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  1. Hsp40 gene therapy exerts therapeutic effects on polyglutamine disease mice via a non-cell autonomous mechanism.

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    H Akiko Popiel

    Full Text Available The polyglutamine (polyQ diseases such as Huntington's disease (HD, are neurodegenerative diseases caused by proteins with an expanded polyQ stretch, which misfold and aggregate, and eventually accumulate as inclusion bodies within neurons. Molecules that inhibit polyQ protein misfolding/aggregation, such as Polyglutamine Binding Peptide 1 (QBP1 and molecular chaperones, have been shown to exert therapeutic effects in vivo by crossing of transgenic animals. Towards developing a therapy using these aggregation inhibitors, we here investigated the effect of viral vector-mediated gene therapy using QBP1 and molecular chaperones on polyQ disease model mice. We found that injection of adeno-associated virus type 5 (AAV5 expressing QBP1 or Hsp40 into the striatum both dramatically suppresses inclusion body formation in the HD mouse R6/2. AAV5-Hsp40 injection also ameliorated the motor impairment and extended the lifespan of R6/2 mice. Unexpectedly, we found even in virus non-infected cells that AAV5-Hsp40 appreciably suppresses inclusion body formation, suggesting a non-cell autonomous therapeutic effect. We further show that Hsp40 inhibits secretion of the polyQ protein from cultured cells, implying that it inhibits the recently suggested cell-cell transmission of the polyQ protein. Our results demonstrate for the first time the therapeutic effect of Hsp40 gene therapy on the neurological phenotypes of polyQ disease mice.

  2. Regulatory T Cell Induced by Poria cocos Bark Exert Therapeutic Effects in Murine Models of Atopic Dermatitis and Food Allergy.

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    Bae, Min-Jung; See, Hye-Jeong; Choi, Gyeyoung; Kang, Chang-Yuil; Shon, Dong-Hwa; Shin, Hee Soon

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of allergic disorders including atopic dermatitis (AD) and food allergy (FA) has increased dramatically in pediatric populations, but there is no effective drug available for their management. Therefore, trials are required for the development of safe therapeutic agents such as herbal medicines. We determined whether orally administered Poria cocos bark (PCB) extract could exert immunosuppressive effects on allergic and inflammatory symptoms of AD and FA. For both AD, which was induced using house dust mite extract, and FA, which was induced by exposure to ovalbumin, model mice were orally treated with PCB extract for 62 days and 18 days, respectively. We also investigated the inductive effect of PCB extract on the generation and maintenance of Foxp3(+)CD4(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs). The symptoms of AD and FA were ameliorated by the administration of PCB extract. Furthermore, PCB extract inhibited the Th2-related cytokines and increased the population of Foxp3(+)CD4(+) Tregs in both AD and FA models. In ex vivo experiments, PCB extract promoted the functional differentiation of Foxp3(+)CD4(+) Tregs, which is dependent on aryl hydrocarbon receptor activation. Thus, PCB extract has potential as an oral immune suppressor for the treatment of AD and FA through the generation of Tregs. PMID:27445434

  3. Regulatory T Cell Induced by Poria cocos Bark Exert Therapeutic Effects in Murine Models of Atopic Dermatitis and Food Allergy

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    Min-Jung Bae

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of allergic disorders including atopic dermatitis (AD and food allergy (FA has increased dramatically in pediatric populations, but there is no effective drug available for their management. Therefore, trials are required for the development of safe therapeutic agents such as herbal medicines. We determined whether orally administered Poria cocos bark (PCB extract could exert immunosuppressive effects on allergic and inflammatory symptoms of AD and FA. For both AD, which was induced using house dust mite extract, and FA, which was induced by exposure to ovalbumin, model mice were orally treated with PCB extract for 62 days and 18 days, respectively. We also investigated the inductive effect of PCB extract on the generation and maintenance of Foxp3+CD4+ regulatory T cells (Tregs. The symptoms of AD and FA were ameliorated by the administration of PCB extract. Furthermore, PCB extract inhibited the Th2-related cytokines and increased the population of Foxp3+CD4+ Tregs in both AD and FA models. In ex vivo experiments, PCB extract promoted the functional differentiation of Foxp3+CD4+ Tregs, which is dependent on aryl hydrocarbon receptor activation. Thus, PCB extract has potential as an oral immune suppressor for the treatment of AD and FA through the generation of Tregs.

  4. Hsp40 Gene Therapy Exerts Therapeutic Effects on Polyglutamine Disease Mice via a Non-Cell Autonomous Mechanism

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    H. Akiko Popiel; Toshihide Takeuchi; Hiromi Fujita; Kazuhiro Yamamoto; Chiyomi Ito; Hiroshi Yamane; Shin-ichi Muramatsu; Tatsushi Toda; Keiji Wada; Yoshitaka Nagai

    2012-01-01

    The polyglutamine (polyQ) diseases such as Huntington's disease (HD), are neurodegenerative diseases caused by proteins with an expanded polyQ stretch, which misfold and aggregate, and eventually accumulate as inclusion bodies within neurons. Molecules that inhibit polyQ protein misfolding/aggregation, such as Polyglutamine Binding Peptide 1 (QBP1) and molecular chaperones, have been shown to exert therapeutic effects in vivo by crossing of transgenic animals. Towards developing a therapy usi...

  5. Intravenous administration of mesenchymal stem cells exerts therapeutic effects on parkinsonian model of rats: Focusing on neuroprotective effects of stromal cell-derived factor-1α

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    Tayra Judith

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs are pluripotent stem cells derived from bone marrow with secretory functions of various neurotrophic factors. Stromal cell-derived factor-1α (SDF-1α is also reported as one of chemokines released from MSCs. In this research, the therapeutic effects of MSCs through SDF-1α were explored. 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA, 20 μg was injected into the right striatum of female SD rats with subsequent administration of GFP-labeled MSCs, fibroblasts, (i.v., 1 × 107 cells, respectively or PBS at 2 hours after 6-OHDA injection. All rats were evaluated behaviorally with cylinder test and amphetamine-induced rotation test for 1 month with consequent euthanasia for immunohistochemical evaluations. Additionally, to explore the underlying mechanisms, neuroprotective effects of SDF-1α were explored using 6-OHDA-exposed PC12 cells by using dopamine (DA assay and TdT-mediated dUTP-biotin nick-end labeling (TUNEL staining. Results Rats receiving MSC transplantation significantly ameliorated behaviorally both in cylinder test and amphetamine-induced rotation test compared with the control groups. Correspondingly, rats with MSCs displayed significant preservation in the density of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH-positive fibers in the striatum and the number of TH-positive neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc compared to that of control rats. In the in vitro study, SDF-1α treatment increased DA release and suppressed cell death induced by 6-OHDA administration compared with the control groups. Conclusions Consequently, MSC transplantation might exert neuroprotection on 6-OHDA-exposed dopaminergic neurons at least partly through anti-apoptotic effects of SDF-1α. The results demonstrate the potentials of intravenous MSC administration for clinical applications, although further explorations are required.

  6. Vitamin K2, a Naturally Occurring Menaquinone, Exerts Therapeutic Effects on Both Hormone-Dependent and Hormone-Independent Prostate Cancer Cells

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    André Kajdacsy-Balla; Bosland, Maarten C.; Aoshuang Chen; Gouxing Zheng; Ramaswamy Kalyanasundaram; Gajalakshmi Dakshinamoorthy; Shetty, Aditya V.; Abhilash Samykutty; Munirathinam Gnanasekar

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, several studies have shown that vitamin k2 (VK2) has anticancer activity in a variety of cancer cells. The antitumor effects of VK2 in prostate cancer are currently not known. In the present study, we sought to characterize the anticancer potential of VK2 in both androgen-dependent and -independent prostate cancer cells. Our investigations show that VK2 is able to suppress viability of androgen-dependent and androgen-independent prostate cancer cells via caspase-3 and -8 depe...

  7. Exosomes and Their Therapeutic Potentials of Stem Cells

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    Chao Han; Xuan Sun; Ling Liu; Haiyang Jiang; Yan Shen; Xiaoyun Xu; Jie Li; Guoxin Zhang; Jinsha Huang; Zhicheng Lin; Nian Xiong; Tao Wang

    2015-01-01

    Exosomes, a group of vesicles originating from the multivesicular bodies (MVBs), are released into the extracellular space when MVBs fuse with the plasma membrane. Numerous studies indicate that exosomes play important roles in cell-to-cell communication, and exosomes from specific cell types and conditions display multiple functions such as exerting positive effects on regeneration in many tissues. It is widely accepted that the therapeutic potential of stem cells may be mediated largely by ...

  8. Exosomes and Their Therapeutic Potentials of Stem Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Han, Chao; Sun, Xuan; Liu, Ling; Jiang, Haiyang; Shen, Yan; Xu, Xiaoyun; Li, Jie; Zhang, Guoxin; Huang, Jinsha; Lin, Zhicheng; Xiong, Nian; Tao WANG

    2016-01-01

    Exosomes, a group of vesicles originating from the multivesicular bodies (MVBs), are released into the extracellular space when MVBs fuse with the plasma membrane. Numerous studies indicate that exosomes play important roles in cell-to-cell communication, and exosomes from specific cell types and conditions display multiple functions such as exerting positive effects on regeneration in many tissues. It is widely accepted that the therapeutic potential of stem cells may be mediated largely by ...

  9. Silybin-mediated inhibition of Notch signaling exerts antitumor activity in human hepatocellular carcinoma cells.

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    Song Zhang

    Full Text Available Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC is a global health burden that is associated with limited treatment options and poor patient prognoses. Silybin (SIL, an antioxidant derived from the milk thistle plant (Silybum marianum, has been reported to exert hepatoprotective and antitumorigenic effects both in vitro and in vivo. While SIL has been shown to have potent antitumor activity against various types of cancer, including HCC, the molecular mechanisms underlying the effects of SIL remain largely unknown. The Notch signaling pathway plays crucial roles in tumorigenesis and immune development. In the present study, we assessed the antitumor activity of SIL in human HCC HepG2 cells in vitro and in vivo and explored the roles of the Notch pathway and of the apoptosis-related signaling pathway on the activity of SIL. SIL treatment resulted in a dose- and time-dependent inhibition of HCC cell viability. Additionally, SIL exhibited strong antitumor activity, as evidenced not only by reductions in tumor cell adhesion, migration, intracellular glutathione (GSH levels and total antioxidant capability (T-AOC but also by increases in the apoptotic index, caspase3 activity, and reactive oxygen species (ROS. Furthermore, SIL treatment decreased the expression of the Notch1 intracellular domain (NICD, RBP-Jκ, and Hes1 proteins, upregulated the apoptosis pathway-related protein Bax, and downregulated Bcl2, survivin, and cyclin D1. Notch1 siRNA (in vitro or DAPT (a known Notch1 inhibitor, in vivo further enhanced the antitumor activity of SIL, and recombinant Jagged1 protein (a known Notch ligand in vitro attenuated the antitumor activity of SIL. Taken together, these data indicate that SIL is a potent inhibitor of HCC cell growth that targets the Notch signaling pathway and suggest that the inhibition of Notch signaling may be a novel therapeutic intervention for HCC.

  10. Alpha-momorcharin (α-MMC) exerts effective anti-human breast tumor activities but has a narrow therapeutic window in vivo.

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    Cao, Dongliang; Sun, Yun; Wang, Ling; He, Qianchuan; Zheng, Juecun; Deng, Fei; Deng, Shanshan; Chang, ShuChing; Yu, XiaoPing; Li, Minhui; Meng, Yao; Jin, Jiagui; Shen, Fubing

    2015-01-01

    Alpha-momorcharin (α-MMC), a ribosome inactivating protein (RIP) extracted from the seeds of Momordica charantia, exerts anti-tumor, antiviral, and anti-fungal activities. However, α-MMC has an obvious toxicity that limits its clinical application. We examined the effect of α-MMC on the inhibition of human breast cancer and assessed its general toxicity to find the therapeutic window in vivo for its potential clinical use. It was purified using column chromatography, and then injected into the xenograft nude mouse model induced by MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7. The anti-tumor efficacy was evaluated with T/C%. Next, the α-MMC was injected at a series of doses to Balb/C mice to assess its general toxicity. The MTT assay, the apoptosis test, and the cell cycle inhibition of α-MMC in human breast cancer cells were performed. In the xenografted tumors induced by MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7, α-MMC exerted an obvious inhibition effects on tumor growth at the dosage of 1.2mg/kg and 0.8 mg/kg. For in vivo toxicity experiments of α-MMC in Balb/C mice, the minimal toxic dose of α-MMC was 1.2mg/kg. Alpha-MMC induced apoptosis by increasing caspase3 activities, and the cell cycle was arrested at the G0/G1 or G2/M phases. The measurements of IC50 were 15.07 μg/mL, 33.66 μg/mL, 42.94 μg/mL for MDA-MB-231, MCF-7 and MDA-MB-453 respectively. Alpha-MMC exhibits anti-tumor effects in human breast cancer in vivo and in vitro. It inhibits breast cancer cells through the inhibition of tumor growth and induction of cell apoptosis. However, due to its obvious toxicity, α-MMC has a relatively narrow therapeutic window in vivo. PMID:25447153

  11. Plumbagin exerts an immunosuppressive effect on human T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia MOLT-4 cells.

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    Bae, Kyoung Jun; Lee, Yura; Kim, Soon Ae; Kim, Jiyeon

    2016-04-22

    Of the hematological disorders typified by poor prognoses and survival rates, T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) is one of the most commonly diagnosed. Despite the development of new therapeutic agents, the treatment options for this cancer remain limited. In this manuscript, we investigated the anti-proliferative effects of plumbagin, mediated by the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways, and inhibition of NF-κB signaling; the human T-ALL MOLT-4 cell line was used as our experimental system. Plumbagin is a natural, plant derived compound, which exerts an anti-proliferative activity against many types of human cancer. Our experiments confirm that plumbagin induces a caspase-dependent apoptosis of MOLT-4 cells, with no significant cytotoxicity seen for normal peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Plumbagin also inhibited LPS-induced phosphorylation of p65, and the transcription of NF-κB target genes. Our results now show that plumbagin is a potent inhibitor of the NF-κB signaling pathway, and suppressor of T-ALL cell proliferation. PMID:27018383

  12. Dual Effects Exerted in Vitro by Micromolar Concentrations of Deoxynivalenol on Undifferentiated Caco-2 Cells

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    Manda, Gina; Mocanu, Mihaela Andreea; Marin, Daniela Eliza; Taranu, Ionelia

    2015-01-01

    Contamination of crops used for food and feed production with Fusarium mycotoxins, such as deoxynivalenol (DON), raise important health and economic issues all along the food chain. Acute exposure to high DON concentrations can alter the intestinal barrier, while chronic exposure to lower doses may exert more subtle effects on signal transduction pathways, leading to disturbances in cellular homeostasis. Using real-time cellular impedance measurements, we studied the effects exerted in vitro by low concentrations of DON (0.37–1.50 μM), relevant for mycotoxin-contaminated food, on the proliferation of undifferentiated Caco-2 cells presenting a tumorigenic phenotype. A 1.5 μM concentration of DON maintained cell adherence of non-proliferating Caco-2 cells, whilst arresting the growth of actively proliferating cells compared with control Caco-2 cells in vitro. At 0.37 μM, DON enhanced Caco-2 cell metabolism, thereby triggering a moderate increase in cell proliferation. The results of the current study suggested that low concentrations of DON commonly detected in food may either limit or sustain the proliferation of colon cancer cells, depending on their proliferation status and on DON concentration. Soluble factors released by Lactobacillus strains can partially counteract the inhibitory action of DON on actively proliferating colon cancer cells. The study also emphasized that real-time cellular impedance measurements were a valuable tool for investigating the dynamics of cellular responses to xenobiotics. PMID:25690693

  13. Therapeutic Implications of Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Liver Injury

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    Maria Ausiliatrice Puglisi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs, represent an attractive tool for the establishment of a successful stem-cell-based therapy of liver diseases. A number of different mechanisms contribute to the therapeutic effects exerted by MSCs, since these cells can differentiate into functional hepatic cells and can also produce a series of growth factors and cytokines able to suppress inflammatory responses, reduce hepatocyte apoptosis, regress liver fibrosis, and enhance hepatocyte functionality. To date, the infusion of MSCs or MSC-conditioned medium has shown encouraging results in the treatment of fulminant hepatic failure and in end-stage liver disease in experimental settings. However, some issues under debate hamper the use of MSCs in clinical trials. This paper summarizes the biological relevance of MSCs and the potential benefits and risks that can result from translating the MSC research to the treatment of liver diseases.

  14. Curcumin exerts antitumor effects in retinoblastoma cells by regulating the JNK and p38 MAPK pathways.

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    Yu, Xiaoming; Zhong, Jingtao; Yan, Li; Li, Jie; Wang, Hui; Wen, Yan; Zhao, Yu

    2016-09-01

    Curcumin, a naturally occurring polyphenolic compound present in turmeric (Curcuma longa), exerts antitumor effects in various types of malignancy. However, the precise mechanisms responsible for the effects of curcumin on retinoblastoma (RB) cells have not been fully explored. In the present study, the molecular mechanisms by which curcumin exerts its anticancer effects in RB Y79 cells were investigated. The results showed that curcumin reduced cell viability in Y79 cells. Curcumin induced G1 phase arrest through downregulating the expression of cyclin D3 and cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK)2/6 and upregulating the expression of CDK inhibitor proteins p21 and p27. Curcumin-induced apoptosis of Y79 cells occurred through the activation of caspases-9/-3. Moreover, flow cytometric analysis showed that curcumin induced mitochondrial membrane potential (∆Ψm) collapse in Y79 cells. We also found that curcumin induced the phosphorylation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK). JNK and p38 MAPK inhibitors significantly suppressed curcumin‑induced activation of caspases-9/-3 and inhibited the apoptosis of Y79 cells. Taken together, our results suggest that curcumin induced the apoptosis of Y79 cells through the activation of JNK and p38 MAPK pathways. These findings provide a novel treatment strategy for human RB. PMID:27432244

  15. Thrombomodulin exerts cytoprotective effect on low-dose UVB-irradiated HaCaT cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thrombomodulin (TM) is an endothelial cell surface anticoagulant glycoprotein that performs antimetastatic, angiogenic, adhesive, and anti-inflammatory functions in various tissues. It is also expressed in epidermal keratinocytes. We found that a physiological dose (10 mJ/cm2) of mid-wavelength ultraviolet irradiation (UVB) significantly induced TM expression via the p38mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)/cyclic AMP response element (CRE) signaling pathway in the epidermal keratinocyte cell line HaCaT; this shows that TM regulates the survival of HaCaT cells. SB203580, a p38MAPK inhibitor, significantly decreased TM expression and the viability of cells exposed to UVB. Furthermore, overexpression of TM markedly increased cell viability, and it was abrogated by TM small interfering RNA (siRNA), suggesting that TM may play an important role in exerting cytoprotective effect on epidermal keratinocytes against low-dose UVB.

  16. Human umbilical cord matrix-derived stem cells exert trophic effects on β-cell survival in diabetic rats and isolated islets

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    Yunting Zhou

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Human umbilical cord matrix-derived stem cells (uMSCs, owing to their cellular and procurement advantages compared with mesenchymal stem cells derived from other tissue sources, are in clinical trials to treat type 1 (T1D and type 2 diabetes (T2D. However, the therapeutic basis remains to be fully understood. The immunomodulatory property of uMSCs could explain the use in treating T1D; however, the mere immune modulation might not be sufficient to support the use in T2D. We thus tested whether uMSCs could exert direct trophic effects on β-cells. Infusion of uMSCs into chemically induced diabetic rats prevented hyperglycemic progression with a parallel preservation of islet size and cellularity, demonstrating the protective effect of uMSCs on β-cells. Mechanistic analyses revealed that uMSCs engrafted long-term in the injured pancreas and the engraftment markedly activated the pancreatic PI3K pathway and its downstream anti-apoptotic machinery. The pro-survival pathway activation was associated with the expression and secretion of β-cell growth factors by uMSCs, among which insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1 was highly abundant. To establish the causal relationship between the uMSC-secreted factors and β-cell survival, isolated rat islets were co-cultured with uMSCs in the transwell system. Co-culturing improved the islet viability and insulin secretion. Furthermore, reduction of uMSC-secreted IGF1 via siRNA knockdown diminished the protective effects on islets in the co-culture. Thus, our data support a model whereby uMSCs exert trophic effects on islets by secreting β-cell growth factors such as IGF1. The study reveals a novel therapeutic role of uMSCs and suggests that multiple mechanisms are employed by uMSCs to treat diabetes.

  17. Interleukin-1 exerts distinct actions on different cell types of the brain in vitro

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    Ying An

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Ying An, Qun Chen, Ning QuanDepartment of Oral Biology, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, USAAbstract: Interleukin-1 (IL-1 is a critical neuroinflammatory mediator in the central nervous system (CNS. In this study, we investigated the effect of IL-1 on inducing inflammation-related gene expression in three astrocyte, two microglial, and one brain endothelial cell line. Interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β is found to be produced by the two microglial cell lines constitutively, but these cells do not respond to IL-1β stimulation. The three astrocyte cell lines responded to IL-1ß stimulation by expressing MCP-1, CXCL-1, and VCAM-1, but different subtypes of astrocytes exhibited different expression profiles after IL-1β stimulation. The brain endothelial cells showed strongest response to IL-1β by producing MCP-1, CXCL-1, VCAM-1, ICAM-1, IL-6, and COX-2 mRNA. The induction of endothelial COX-2 mRNA is shown to be mediated by p38 MAPK pathway, whereas the induction of other genes is mediated by the NF-κB pathway. These results demonstrate that IL-1 exerts distinct cell type-specific action in CNS cells and suggest that IL-1-mediated neuroinflammation is the result of the summation of multiple responses from different cell types in the CNS to IL-1.Keywords: astrocyte, microglia, endothelial cells, signal transduction pathways, gene expression 

  18. Advancing Stem Cell Biology toward Stem Cell Therapeutics

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    Scadden, David; Srivastava, Alok

    2012-01-01

    Here, the International Society for Stem Cell Research (ISSCR) Clinical Translation Committee introduces a series of articles outlining the current status, opportunities, and challenges surrounding the clinical translation of stem cell therapeutics for specific medical conditions.

  19. Therapeutic strategies targeting cancer stem cells.

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    Ning, Xiaoyan; Shu, Jianchang; Du, Yiqi; Ben, Qiwen; Li, Zhaoshen

    2013-04-01

    Increasing studies have demonstrated a small proportion of cancer stem cells (CSCs) exist in the cancer cell population. CSCs have powerful self-renewal capacity and tumor-initiating ability and are resistant to chemotherapy and radiation. Conventional anticancer therapies kill the rapidly proliferating bulk cancer cells but spare the relatively quiescent CSCs, which cause cancer recurrence. So it is necessary to develop therapeutic strategies acting specifically on CSCs. In recent years, studies have shown that therapeutic agents such as metformin, salinomycin, DECA-14, rapamycin, oncostatin M (OSM), some natural compounds, oncolytic viruses, microRNAs, cell signaling pathway inhibitors, TNF-related apoptosis inducing ligand (TRAIL), interferon (IFN), telomerase inhibitors, all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) and monoclonal antibodies can suppress the self-renewal of CSCs in vitro and in vivo. A combination of these agents and conventional chemotherapy drugs can significantly inhibit tumor growth, metastasis and recurrence. These strategies targeting CSCs may bring new hopes to cancer therapy. PMID:23358473

  20. Dimethylsulfoniopropionate Promotes Process Outgrowth in Neural Cells and Exerts Protective Effects against Tropodithietic Acid

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    Heidi Wichmann

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The marine environment harbors a plethora of bioactive substances, including drug candidates of potential value in the field of neuroscience. The present study was undertaken to investigate the effects of dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP, produced by several algae, corals and higher plants, on cells of the mammalian nervous system, i.e., neuronal N2a and OLN-93 cells as model system for nerve cells and glia, respectively. Additionally, the protective capabilities of DMSP were assessed in cells treated with tropodithietic acid (TDA, a marine metabolite produced by several Roseobacter clade bacteria. Both cell lines, N2a and OLN-93, have previously been shown to be a sensitive target for the action of TDA, and cytotoxic effects of TDA have been connected to the induction of oxidative stress. Our data shows that DMSP promotes process outgrowth and microtubule reorganization and bundling, accompanied by an increase in alpha-tubulin acetylation. Furthermore, DMSP was able to prevent the cytotoxic effects exerted by TDA, including the breakdown of the mitochondrial membrane potential, upregulation of heat shock protein Hsp32 and activation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2. Our study points to the conclusion that DMSP provides an antioxidant defense, not only in algae but also in mammalian neural cells.

  1. Dimethylsulfoniopropionate Promotes Process Outgrowth in Neural Cells and Exerts Protective Effects against Tropodithietic Acid

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    Wichmann, Heidi; Brinkhoff, Thorsten; Simon, Meinhard; Richter-Landsberg, Christiane

    2016-01-01

    The marine environment harbors a plethora of bioactive substances, including drug candidates of potential value in the field of neuroscience. The present study was undertaken to investigate the effects of dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP), produced by several algae, corals and higher plants, on cells of the mammalian nervous system, i.e., neuronal N2a and OLN-93 cells as model system for nerve cells and glia, respectively. Additionally, the protective capabilities of DMSP were assessed in cells treated with tropodithietic acid (TDA), a marine metabolite produced by several Roseobacter clade bacteria. Both cell lines, N2a and OLN-93, have previously been shown to be a sensitive target for the action of TDA, and cytotoxic effects of TDA have been connected to the induction of oxidative stress. Our data shows that DMSP promotes process outgrowth and microtubule reorganization and bundling, accompanied by an increase in alpha-tubulin acetylation. Furthermore, DMSP was able to prevent the cytotoxic effects exerted by TDA, including the breakdown of the mitochondrial membrane potential, upregulation of heat shock protein Hsp32 and activation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2). Our study points to the conclusion that DMSP provides an antioxidant defense, not only in algae but also in mammalian neural cells. PMID:27164116

  2. Autologous cell sources in therapeutic vasculogenesis

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    Szöke, Krisztina; Reinisch, Andreas; Østrup, Esben;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND AIMS: Autologous endothelial cells are promising alternative angiogenic cell sources in trials of therapeutic vasculogenesis, in the treatment of vascular diseases and in the field of tissue engineering. A population of endothelial cells (ECs) with long-term proliferative capability...... functional assays, we wanted to evaluate the potential of these EC populations for use in clinical neovascularization. RESULTS: Global gene expression profiling of ECFCs, AT-ECs and the classical EC population, human umbilical vein ECs, showed that the EC populations clustered as unique populations, but very...

  3. Cancer stem cells, metabolism, and therapeutic significance.

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    Yang, Mengqi; Liu, Panpan; Huang, Peng

    2016-05-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) have attracted much attention of the research community in the recent years. Due to their highly tumorigenic and drug-resistant properties, CSCs represent important targets for developing novel anticancer agents and therapeutic strategies. CSCs were first described in hematopoietic malignancies and subsequently identified in various types of solid tumors including brain, breast, lung, colon, melanoma, and ovarian cancer. CSCs possess special biological properties including long-term self-renewal capacity, multi-lineage differentiation, and resistance to conventional chemotherapy and radiotherapy. As such, CSCs are considered as a major source of residual disease after therapy leading to disease occurrence. Thus, it is very important to understand the cellular survival mechanisms specific to CSCs and accordingly develop effective therapeutic approaches to eliminate this subpopulation of cancer cells in order to improve the treatment outcome of cancer patients. Possible therapeutic strategies against CSCs include targeting the self-renewal pathways of CSCs, interrupting the interaction between CSCs and their microenvironment, and exploiting the unique metabolic properties of CSCs. In this review article, we will provide an overview of the biological characteristics of CSCs, with a particular focus on their metabolic properties and potential therapeutic strategies to eliminate CSCs. PMID:26864589

  4. Imperatorin exerts antiallergic effects in Th2-mediated allergic asthma via induction of IL-10-producing regulatory T cells by modulating the function of dendritic cells.

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    Lin, Chu-Lun; Hsiao, George; Wang, Ching-Chiung; Lee, Yueh-Lun

    2016-08-01

    Imperatorin is a furanocoumarin compound which exists in many medicinal herbs and possesses various biological activities. Herein, we investigated the antiallergic effects of imperatorin in asthmatic mice and explored the immunomodulatory actions of imperatorin on immune cells. We used a murine model of ovalbumin (OVA)-induced asthma to evaluate the therapeutic potential of imperatorin. Additionally, bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (DCs; BMDCs) were used to clarify whether imperatorin exerts an antiallergic effect through altering the ability of DCs to regulate T cells. Oral administration of imperatorin to OVA-sensitized and -challenged mice decreased serum OVA-specific immunoglobulin E (IgE) production, attenuated the airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR), and alleviated airway inflammation in a dose-dependent manner. Notably, secretions of Th2 cytokines and chemokines were reduced, and numbers of interleukin (IL)-10-producing regulatory T cells (Tregs) increased in imperatorin-treated mice. Imperatorin inhibited proinflammatory cytokines and IL-12 production but enhanced IL-10 secretion by lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated BMDCs. Compared to fully mature DCs, imperatorin-treated DCs expressed high levels of the inducible costimulatory ligand (ICOSL) and Jagged1 molecules, and had the regulatory capacity to promote the generation of IL-10-producing CD4(+) T cells in vitro. Additionally, imperatorin directly suppressed activated CD4(+) T-cell proliferation and cytokine production. Imperatorin may possess therapeutic potential against Th2-mediated allergic asthma not only via stimulating DC induction of Tregs but also via direct inhibition of Th2 cell activation. These findings provide new insights into how imperatorin affects the Th2 immune response and the development of imperatorin as a Treg-type immunomodulatory agent to treat allergic asthma. PMID:27185659

  5. Teriflunomide, an immunomodulatory drug, exerts anticancer activity in triple negative breast cancer cells.

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    Huang, Ou; Zhang, Weili; Zhi, Qiaoming; Xue, Xiaofeng; Liu, Hongchun; Shen, Daoming; Geng, Meiyu; Xie, Zuoquan; Jiang, Min

    2015-04-01

    Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) is defined as a group of primary breast cancers lacking expression of estrogen, progesterone, and human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER-2) receptors, characterized by higher relapse rate and lower survival compared with other subtypes. Due to lack of identified targets and molecular heterogeneity, conventional chemotherapy is the only available option for treatment of TNBC, but non-discordant positive therapeutic efficacy could not be achieved. Here, we demonstrated that these TNBC cells were sensitive to teriflunomide, which was a well-known immunomodulatory drug for treatment of relapsing multiple sclerosis (MS). Potent anti-cancer effects in TNBC in vitro, including proliferation inhibition, cell cycle delay, cell apoptosis, and suppression of cell motility and invasiveness, could be achieved with this agent. Of note, we showed that multiple signals involved in TNBC proliferation, survival, migratory, and invasive potential were under regulation by teriflunomide. Among them, we identified down-regulation of growth factor receptors to abolish growth maintenance, suppression of c-Myc, and cyclin D1 to contribute to its anti-proliferative effect, modulation of components of cell cycle to induce S-phase arrest, degradation of Bcl-xL, and up-regulation of BAX via activation of MAPK pathway to induce apoptosis, and inhibition of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) process, matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP9) expression, and inactivation of Src/FAK to reduce TNBC migration and invasion. The results identified teriflunomide may be of therapeutic benefit for the more aggressive and difficult-to-treat breast cancer subtype, indicating the use of teriflunomide for clinical trials for treatment of TNBC patients. PMID:25304315

  6. Cell-Specific Aptamers as Emerging Therapeutics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cindy Meyer

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aptamers are short nucleic acids that bind to defined targets with high affinity and specificity. The first aptamers have been selected about two decades ago by an in vitro process named SELEX (systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment. Since then, numerous aptamers with specificities for a variety of targets from small molecules to proteins or even whole cells have been selected. Their applications range from biosensing and diagnostics to therapy and target-oriented drug delivery. More recently, selections using complex targets such as live cells have become feasible. This paper summarizes progress in cell-SELEX techniques and highlights recent developments, particularly in the field of medically relevant aptamers with a focus on therapeutic and drug-delivery applications.

  7. Marked over expression of uncoupling protein-2 in beta cells exerts minor effects on mitochondrial metabolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► The impact of UCP-2 over expression on mitochondrial function is controversial. ► We tested mitochondrial functions at defined levels of overexpression. ► We find minor increases of fatty acid oxidation and uncoupling. ► Effects were seen only at high level (fourfold) of over expression. ► Hence it is doubtful whether these effects are of importance in diabetes. -- Abstract: Evidence is conflicting as to the impact of elevated levels of uncoupling protein-2 (UCP-2) on insulin-producing beta cells. Here we investigated effects of a fourfold induction of UCP-2 protein primarily on mitochondrial parameters and tested for replication of positive findings at a lower level of induction. We transfected INS-1 cells to obtain a tet-on inducible cell line. A 48 h exposure to 1 μg/ml of doxycycline (dox) induced UCP-2 fourfold (424 ± 113%, mean ± SEM) and 0.1 μg/ml twofold (178 ± 29%, n = 3). Fourfold induced cells displayed normal viability (MTT, apoptosis), normal cellular insulin contents and, glucose-induced insulin secretion (+27 ± 11%) as well as D-[U-14C]-glucose oxidation (+5 ± 9% at 11 mM glucose). Oxidation of [1-14C]-oleate was increased from 4088 to 5797 fmol/μg prot/2 h at 3.3 mM glucose, p 14C(U)]-glutamine was unaffected. Induction of UCP-2 did not significantly affect measures of mitochondrial membrane potential (Rhodamine 123) or mitochondrial mass (Mitotracker Green) and did not affect ATP levels. Oligomycin-inhibited oxygen consumption (a measure of mitochondrial uncoupling) was marginally increased, the effect being significant in comparison with dox-only treated cells, p < 0.05. Oxygen radicals, assessed by dichlorofluorescin diacetate, were decreased by 30%, p < 0.025. Testing for the lower level of UCP-2 induction did not reproduce any of the positive findings. A fourfold induction of UCP-2 was required to exert minor metabolic effects. These findings question an impact of moderately elevated UCP-2 levels in beta cells as

  8. Marked over expression of uncoupling protein-2 in beta cells exerts minor effects on mitochondrial metabolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hals, Ingrid K., E-mail: ingrid.hals@ntnu.no [Department of Cancer Research and Molecular Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Trondheim (Norway); Ogata, Hirotaka; Pettersen, Elin [Department of Cancer Research and Molecular Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Trondheim (Norway); Ma, Zuheng; Bjoerklund, Anneli [Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm (Sweden); Skorpen, Frank [Department of Laboratory Medicine, NTNU, Trondheim (Norway); Egeberg, Kjartan Wollo [Department of Cancer Research and Molecular Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Trondheim (Norway); Grill, Valdemar [Department of Cancer Research and Molecular Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Trondheim (Norway); Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2012-06-29

    positive findings. A fourfold induction of UCP-2 was required to exert minor metabolic effects. These findings question an impact of moderately elevated UCP-2 levels in beta cells as seen in diabetes.

  9. Bim and Mcl-1 exert key roles in regulating JAK2V617F cell survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guthy Daniel A

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The JAK2V617F mutation plays a major role in the pathogenesis of myeloproliferative neoplasms and is found in the vast majority of patients suffering from polycythemia vera and in roughly every second patient suffering from essential thrombocythemia or from primary myelofibrosis. The V617F mutation is thought to provide hematopoietic stem cells and myeloid progenitors with a survival and proliferation advantage. It has previously been shown that activated JAK2 promotes cell survival by upregulating the anti-apoptotic STAT5 target gene Bcl-xL. In this study, we have investigated the role of additional apoptotic players, the pro-apoptotic protein Bim as well as the anti-apoptotic protein Mcl-1. Methods Pharmacological inhibition of JAK2/STAT5 signaling in JAK2V617F mutant SET-2 and MB-02 cells was used to study effects on signaling, cell proliferation and apoptosis by Western blot analysis, WST-1 proliferation assays and flow cytometry. Cells were transfected with siRNA oligos to deplete candidate pro- and anti-apoptotic proteins. Co-immunoprecipitation assays were performed to assess the impact of JAK2 inhibition on complexes of pro- and anti-apoptotic proteins. Results Treatment of JAK2V617F mutant cell lines with a JAK2 inhibitor was found to trigger Bim activation. Furthermore, Bim depletion by RNAi suppressed JAK2 inhibitor-induced cell death. Bim activation following JAK2 inhibition led to enhanced sequestration of Mcl-1, besides Bcl-xL. Importantly, Mcl-1 depletion by RNAi was sufficient to compromise JAK2V617F mutant cell viability and sensitized the cells to JAK2 inhibition. Conclusions We conclude that Bim and Mcl-1 have key opposing roles in regulating JAK2V617F cell survival and propose that inactivation of aberrant JAK2 signaling leads to changes in Bim complexes that trigger cell death. Thus, further preclinical evaluation of combinations of JAK2 inhibitors with Bcl-2 family antagonists that also tackle Mcl-1

  10. Bim and Mcl-1 exert key roles in regulating JAK2V617F cell survival

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The JAK2V617F mutation plays a major role in the pathogenesis of myeloproliferative neoplasms and is found in the vast majority of patients suffering from polycythemia vera and in roughly every second patient suffering from essential thrombocythemia or from primary myelofibrosis. The V617F mutation is thought to provide hematopoietic stem cells and myeloid progenitors with a survival and proliferation advantage. It has previously been shown that activated JAK2 promotes cell survival by upregulating the anti-apoptotic STAT5 target gene Bcl-xL. In this study, we have investigated the role of additional apoptotic players, the pro-apoptotic protein Bim as well as the anti-apoptotic protein Mcl-1. Pharmacological inhibition of JAK2/STAT5 signaling in JAK2V617F mutant SET-2 and MB-02 cells was used to study effects on signaling, cell proliferation and apoptosis by Western blot analysis, WST-1 proliferation assays and flow cytometry. Cells were transfected with siRNA oligos to deplete candidate pro- and anti-apoptotic proteins. Co-immunoprecipitation assays were performed to assess the impact of JAK2 inhibition on complexes of pro- and anti-apoptotic proteins. Treatment of JAK2V617F mutant cell lines with a JAK2 inhibitor was found to trigger Bim activation. Furthermore, Bim depletion by RNAi suppressed JAK2 inhibitor-induced cell death. Bim activation following JAK2 inhibition led to enhanced sequestration of Mcl-1, besides Bcl-xL. Importantly, Mcl-1 depletion by RNAi was sufficient to compromise JAK2V617F mutant cell viability and sensitized the cells to JAK2 inhibition. We conclude that Bim and Mcl-1 have key opposing roles in regulating JAK2V617F cell survival and propose that inactivation of aberrant JAK2 signaling leads to changes in Bim complexes that trigger cell death. Thus, further preclinical evaluation of combinations of JAK2 inhibitors with Bcl-2 family antagonists that also tackle Mcl-1, besides Bcl-xL, is warranted to assess the therapeutic potential for

  11. Cell-penetrating peptides transport therapeutics into cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsey, Joshua D; Flynn, Nicholas H

    2015-10-01

    Nearly 30years ago, certain small, relatively nontoxic peptides were discovered to be capable of traversing the cell membrane. These cell-penetrating peptides, as they are now called, have been shown to not only be capable of crossing the cell membrane themselves but can also carry many different therapeutic agents into cells, including small molecules, plasmid DNA, siRNA, therapeutic proteins, viruses, imaging agents, and other various nanoparticles. Many cell-penetrating peptides have been derived from natural proteins, but several other cell-penetrating peptides have been developed that are either chimeric or completely synthetic. How cell-penetrating peptides are internalized into cells has been a topic of debate, with some peptides seemingly entering cells through an endocytic mechanism and others by directly penetrating the cell membrane. Although the entry mechanism is still not entirely understood, it seems to be dependent on the peptide type, the peptide concentration, the cargo the peptide transports, and the cell type tested. With new intracellular disease targets being discovered, cell-penetrating peptides offer an exciting approach for delivering drugs to these intracellular targets. There are hundreds of cell-penetrating peptides being studied for drug delivery, and ongoing studies are demonstrating their success both in vitro and in vivo. PMID:26210404

  12. Combining antiangiogenic therapy with adoptive cell immunotherapy exerts better antitumor effects in non-small cell lung cancer models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shujing Shi

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Cytokine-induced killer cells (CIK cells are a heterogeneous subset of ex-vivo expanded T lymphocytes which are characterized with a MHC-unrestricted tumor-killing activity and a mixed T-NK phenotype. Adoptive CIK cells transfer, one of the adoptive immunotherapy represents a promising nontoxic anticancer therapy. However, in clinical studies, the therapeutic activity of adoptive CIK cells transfer is not as efficient as anticipated. Possible explanations are that abnormal tumor vasculature and hypoxic tumor microenvironment could impede the infiltration and efficacy of lymphocytes. We hypothesized that antiangiogenesis therapy could improve the antitumor activity of CIK cells by normalizing tumor vasculature and modulating hypoxic tumor microenvironment. METHODS: We combined recombinant human endostatin (rh-endostatin and CIK cells in the treatment of lung carcinoma murine models. Intravital microscopy, dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging, immunohistochemistry, and flow cytometry were used to investigate the tumor vasculature and hypoxic microenvironment as well as the infiltration of immune cells. RESULTS: Our results indicated that rh-endostatin synergized with adoptive CIK cells transfer to inhibit the growth of lung carcinoma. We found that rh-endostatin normalized tumor vasculature and reduced hypoxic area in the tumor microenvironment. Hypoxia significantly inhibited the proliferation, cytotoxicity and migration of CIK cells in vitro and impeded the homing of CIK cells into tumor parenchyma ex vivo. Furthermore, we found that treatment with rh-endostatin significantly increased the homing of CIK cells and decreased the accumulation of suppressive immune cells in the tumor tissue. In addition, combination therapy produced higher level of tumor-infiltration lymphocytes compared with other treatments. CONCLUSIONS: Our results demonstrate that rh-endostatin improves the therapeutic effect of adoptive CIK cells

  13. Combining Antiangiogenic Therapy with Adoptive Cell Immunotherapy Exerts Better Antitumor Effects in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Shujing; Wang, Rui; Chen, Yitian; Song, Haizhu; Chen, Longbang; Huang, Guichun

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Cytokine-induced killer cells (CIK cells) are a heterogeneous subset of ex-vivo expanded T lymphocytes which are characterized with a MHC-unrestricted tumor-killing activity and a mixed T-NK phenotype. Adoptive CIK cells transfer, one of the adoptive immunotherapy represents a promising nontoxic anticancer therapy. However, in clinical studies, the therapeutic activity of adoptive CIK cells transfer is not as efficient as anticipated. Possible explanations are that abnormal tumor vasculature and hypoxic tumor microenvironment could impede the infiltration and efficacy of lymphocytes. We hypothesized that antiangiogenesis therapy could improve the antitumor activity of CIK cells by normalizing tumor vasculature and modulating hypoxic tumor microenvironment. Methods We combined recombinant human endostatin (rh-endostatin) and CIK cells in the treatment of lung carcinoma murine models. Intravital microscopy, dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging, immunohistochemistry, and flow cytometry were used to investigate the tumor vasculature and hypoxic microenvironment as well as the infiltration of immune cells. Results Our results indicated that rh-endostatin synergized with adoptive CIK cells transfer to inhibit the growth of lung carcinoma. We found that rh-endostatin normalized tumor vasculature and reduced hypoxic area in the tumor microenvironment. Hypoxia significantly inhibited the proliferation, cytotoxicity and migration of CIK cells in vitro and impeded the homing of CIK cells into tumor parenchyma ex vivo. Furthermore, we found that treatment with rh-endostatin significantly increased the homing of CIK cells and decreased the accumulation of suppressive immune cells in the tumor tissue. In addition, combination therapy produced higher level of tumor-infiltration lymphocytes compared with other treatments. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that rh-endostatin improves the therapeutic effect of adoptive CIK cells therapy against lung

  14. Gecko Proteins Exert Anti-Tumor Effect against Cervical Cancer Cells Via PI3-Kinase/Akt Pathway

    OpenAIRE

    Jeong, Ae-Jin; Chung, Chung-Nam; Kim, Hye-Jin; Bae, Kil Soo; Choi, Song; Jun, Woo Jin; Shim, Sang In; Kang, Tae-Hong; Leem, Sun-Hee; Chung, Jin Woong

    2012-01-01

    Anti-tumor activity of the proteins from Gecko (GP) on cervical cancer cells, and its signaling mechanisms were assessed by viable cell counting, propidium iodide (PI) staining, and Western blot analysis. GP induced the cell death of HeLa cells in a dose-dependent manner while it did not affect the viability of normal cells. Western blot analysis showed that GP decreased the activation of Akt, and co-administration of GP and Akt inhibitors synergistically exerted anti-tumor activities on HeLa...

  15. RhoA exerts a permissive effect on volume-regulated anion channels in vascular endothelial cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carton, Iris; Trouet, Dominique; Hermans, Diane;

    2002-01-01

    Cell swelling triggers in most cell types an outwardly rectifying anion current, I(Cl,swell), via volume-regulated anion channels (VRACs). We have previously demonstrated in calf pulmonary artery endothelial (CPAE) cells that inhibition of the Rho/Rho kinase/myosin light chain phosphorylation......'-O-(3-thiotriphosphate) or C3 exoenzyme had no effect on VRACs in caveolin-1-expressing Caco-2 cells. We conclude that the Rho pathway exerts a permissive effect on VRACs in CPAE cells, i.e., swelling-induced opening of VRACs requires a functional Rho pathway, but not an activation of the Rho pathway....

  16. In vivo therapeutic potential of mesenchymal stromal cells depends on the source and the isolation procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bortolotti, Francesca; Ukovich, Laura; Razban, Vahid; Martinelli, Valentina; Ruozi, Giulia; Pelos, Barbara; Dore, Franca; Giacca, Mauro; Zacchigna, Serena

    2015-03-10

    Over the last several years, mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) have been isolated from different tissues following a variety of different procedures. Here, we comparatively assess the ex vivo and in vivo properties of MSCs isolated from either adipose tissue or bone marrow by different purification protocols. After MSC transplantation into a mouse model of hindlimb ischemia, clinical and histological analysis revealed that bone marrow MSCs purified on adhesive substrates exerted the best therapeutic activity, preserving tissue viability and promoting formation of new arterioles without directly transdifferentiating into vascular cells. In keeping with these observations, these cells abundantly expressed cytokines involved in vessel maturation and cell retention. These findings indicate that the choice of MSC source and purification protocol is critical in determining the therapeutic potential of these cells and warrant the standardization of an optimal MSC isolation procedure in order to select the best conditions to move forward to more effective clinical experimentation. PMID:25660405

  17. Focus on Extracellular Vesicles: Therapeutic Potential of Stem Cell-Derived Extracellular Vesicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Zhang

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The intense research focus on stem and progenitor cells could be attributed to their differentiation potential to generate new cells to replace diseased or lost cells in many highly intractable degenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer disease, multiple sclerosis, and heart diseases. However, experimental and clinical studies have increasingly attributed the therapeutic efficacy of these cells to their secretion. While stem and progenitor cells secreted many therapeutic molecules, none of these molecules singly or in combination could recapitulate the functional effects of stem cell transplantations. Recently, it was reported that extracellular vesicles (EVs could recapitulate the therapeutic effects of stem cell transplantation. Based on the observations reported thus far, the prevailing hypothesis is that stem cell EVs exert their therapeutic effects by transferring biologically active molecules such as proteins, lipids, mRNA, and microRNA from the stem cells to injured or diseased cells. In this respect, stem cell EVs are similar to EVs from other cell types. They are both primarily vehicles for intercellular communication. Therefore, the differentiating factor is likely due to the composition of their cargo. The cargo of EVs from different cell types are known to include a common set of proteins and also proteins that reflect the cell source of the EVs and the physiological or pathological state of the cell source. Hence, elucidation of the stem cell EV cargo would provide an insight into the multiple physiological or biochemical changes necessary to affect the many reported stem cell-based therapeutic outcomes in a variety of experimental models and clinical trials.

  18. Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles exert different cytotoxic effects on cells grown in monolayer cell culture versus as multicellular spheroids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Theumer, Anja; Gräfe, Christine; Bähring, Franziska [Department of Hematology and Oncology, Jena University Hospital, Erlanger Allee 101, 07747 Jena (Germany); Bergemann, Christian [Chemicell GmbH, Eresburgstrasse 22–23, 12103 Berlin (Germany); Hochhaus, Andreas [Department of Hematology and Oncology, Jena University Hospital, Erlanger Allee 101, 07747 Jena (Germany); Clement, Joachim H., E-mail: joachim.clement@med.uni-jena.de [Department of Hematology and Oncology, Jena University Hospital, Erlanger Allee 101, 07747 Jena (Germany)

    2015-04-15

    The aim of this study was to investigate the interaction of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPION) with human blood–brain barrier-forming endothelial cells (HBMEC) in two-dimensional cell monolayers as well as in three-dimensional multicellular spheroids. The precise nanoparticle localisation and the influence of the NP on the cellular viability and the intracellular Akt signalling were studied in detail. Long-term effects of different polymer-coated nanoparticles (neutral fluidMAG-D, anionic fluidMAG-CMX and cationic fluidMAG-PEI) and the corresponding free polymers on cellular viability of HBMEC were investigated by real time cell analysis studies. Nanoparticles exert distinct effects on HBMEC depending on the nanoparticles' surface charge and concentration, duration of incubation and cellular context. The most severe effects were caused by PEI-coated nanoparticles. Concentrations above 25 µg/ml led to increased amounts of dead cells in monolayer culture as well as in multicellular spheroids. On the level of intracellular signalling, context-dependent differences were observed. Monolayer cultures responded on nanoparticle incubation with an increase in Akt phosphorylation whereas spheroids on the whole show a decreased Akt activity. This might be due to the differential penetration and distribution of PEI-coated nanoparticles.

  19. Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles exert different cytotoxic effects on cells grown in monolayer cell culture versus as multicellular spheroids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to investigate the interaction of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPION) with human blood–brain barrier-forming endothelial cells (HBMEC) in two-dimensional cell monolayers as well as in three-dimensional multicellular spheroids. The precise nanoparticle localisation and the influence of the NP on the cellular viability and the intracellular Akt signalling were studied in detail. Long-term effects of different polymer-coated nanoparticles (neutral fluidMAG-D, anionic fluidMAG-CMX and cationic fluidMAG-PEI) and the corresponding free polymers on cellular viability of HBMEC were investigated by real time cell analysis studies. Nanoparticles exert distinct effects on HBMEC depending on the nanoparticles' surface charge and concentration, duration of incubation and cellular context. The most severe effects were caused by PEI-coated nanoparticles. Concentrations above 25 µg/ml led to increased amounts of dead cells in monolayer culture as well as in multicellular spheroids. On the level of intracellular signalling, context-dependent differences were observed. Monolayer cultures responded on nanoparticle incubation with an increase in Akt phosphorylation whereas spheroids on the whole show a decreased Akt activity. This might be due to the differential penetration and distribution of PEI-coated nanoparticles

  20. Ginsenoside Rp1 Exerts Anti-inflammatory Effects via Activation of Dendritic Cells and Regulatory T Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Jingyu; Koo, Jihye; Kim, Soochan; Park, Tae-Yoon; Kim, Mi-Yeon

    2012-10-01

    Ginsenoside Rp1 (G-Rp1) is a saponin derivate that provides anti-metastatic activities through inhibition of the NF-κB pathway. In this study, we examined the effects of G-Rp1 on regulatory T cell (Treg) activation. After treatment of splenocytes with G-Rp1, Tregs exhibited upregulation of IL-10 expression, and along with dendritic cells (DCs), these Tregs showed increased cell number compared to other cell populations. The effect of G-Rp1 on Treg number was augmented in the presence of lipopolysaccharide (LPS), which mimics pathological changes that occur during inflammation. However, depletion of DCs prevented the increase in Treg number in the presence of G-Rp1 and/or LPS. In addition, G-Rp1 promoted the differentiation of the memory types of CD4(+)Foxp3(+)CD62L(low) Tregs rather than the generation of new Tregs. In vivo experiments also demonstrated that Tregs and DCs from mice that were fed G-Rp1 for 7 d and then injected with LPS exhibited increased activation compared with those from mice that were injected with LPS alone. Expression of TGF-β and CTLA4 in Tregs was increased, and upregulation of IL-2 and CD80/ CD86 expression by DCs affected the suppressive function of Tregs through IL-2 receptors and CTLA4. These data demonstrate that G-Rp1 exerts anti-inflammatory effects by activating Tregs in vitro and in vivo. PMID:23717139

  1. Non-CpG Oligonucleotides Exert Adjuvant Effects by Enhancing Cognate B Cell-T Cell Interactions, Leading to B Cell Activation, Differentiation, and Isotype Switching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melinda Herbáth

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Natural and synthetic nucleic acids are known to exert immunomodulatory properties. Notably, nucleic acids are known to modulate immune function via several different pathways and various cell types, necessitating a complex interpretation of their effects. In this study we set out to compare the effects of a CpG motif containing oligodeoxynucleotide (ODN with those of a control and an inhibitory non-CpG ODN during cognate B cell-T cell interactions. We employed an antigen presentation system using splenocytes from TCR transgenic DO11.10 mice and the ovalbumin peptide recognized by the TCR as model antigen. We followed early activation events by measuring CD69 expression, late activation by MHC class II expression, cell division and antibody production of switched, and nonswitched isotypes. We found that both of the tested non-CpG ODN exerted significant immunomodulatory effects on early T cell and on late B cell activation events. Importantly, a synergism between non-CpG effects and T cell help acting on B cells was observed, resulting in enhanced IgG production following cognate T cell-B cell interactions. We propose that non-CpG ODN may perform as better adjuvants when a strong antigen-independent immune activation, elicited by CpG ODNs, is undesirable.

  2. 17β-estradiol exerts anticancer effects in anoikis-resistant hepatocellular carcinoma cell lines by targeting IL-6/STAT3 signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seulki; Lee, Minjong; Kim, Jong Bin; Jo, Ara; Cho, Eun Ju; Yu, Su Jong; Lee, Jeong-Hoon; Yoon, Jung-Hwan; Kim, Yoon Jun

    2016-05-13

    17β-Estradiol (E2) has been proven to exert protective effects against HCC; however, its mechanism on HCC proliferation and suppression of invasion remains to be further explored. Because HCC up-regulates serum Interleukin-6 (IL-6) levels and Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 3 (STAT3), molecular agents that attenuate IL-6/STAT3 signaling can potentially suppress HCC development. In this study, we examined involvement of E2 in anoikis resistance that induces invasion capacities and chemo-resistance. Huh-BAT and HepG2 cells grown under anchorage-independent condition were selected. The anoikis-resistant (AR) cells showed stronger chemo-resistance against sorafenib, doxorubicin, 5-fluorouracil and cisplatin compared to adherent HCC cells. AR HCC cells exhibited decreased expression of E-cadherin and increased expression of the N-cadherin and vimentin compared to adherent HCC cells. We then demonstrated that E2 suppressed cell proliferation in AR HCC cells. IL-6 treatment enhanced invasive characteristics, and E2 reversed it. Regarding mechanism of E2, it decreased in the phosphorylation of STAT3 that overexpressed on AR HCC cells. The inhibitory effect of E2 on cell growth was accompanied with cell cycle arrest at G2/M phase and caspase-3/9/PARP activation through c-Jun N-terminal Kinase (JNK) phosphorylation. Taken together, these findings suggested that E2 inhibited the proliferation of AR HCC cells through down-regulation of IL-6/STAT3 signaling. Thus, E2 can be a potential therapeutic drug for treatment of metastatic or chemo-resistant HCC. PMID:27091428

  3. Cell mediated therapeutics for cancer treatment: Tumor homing cells as therapeutic delivery vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balivada, Sivasai

    Many cell types were known to have migratory properties towards tumors and different research groups have shown reliable results regarding cells as delivery vehicles of therapeutics for targeted cancer treatment. Present report discusses proof of concept for 1. Cell mediated delivery of Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) and targeted Magnetic hyperthermia (MHT) as a cancer treatment by using in vivo mouse cancer models, 2. Cells surface engineering with chimeric proteins for targeted cancer treatment by using in vitro models. 1. Tumor homing cells can carry MNPs specifically to the tumor site and tumor burden will decrease after alternating magnetic field (AMF) exposure. To test this hypothesis, first we loaded Fe/Fe3O4 bi-magnetic NPs into neural progenitor cells (NPCs), which were previously shown to migrate towards melanoma tumors. We observed that NPCs loaded with MNPs travel to subcutaneous melanoma tumors. After alternating magnetic field (AMF) exposure, the targeted delivery of MNPs by the NPCs resulted in a mild decrease in tumor size (Chapter-2). Monocytes/macrophages (Mo/Ma) are known to infiltrate tumor sites, and also have phagocytic activity which can increase their uptake of MNPs. To test Mo/Ma-mediated MHT we transplanted Mo/Ma loaded with MNPs into a mouse model of pancreatic peritoneal carcinomatosis. We observed that MNP-loaded Mo/Ma infiltrated pancreatic tumors and, after AMF treatment, significantly prolonged the lives of mice bearing disseminated intraperitoneal pancreatic tumors (Chapter-3). 2. Targeted cancer treatment could be achieved by engineering tumor homing cell surfaces with tumor proteases cleavable, cancer cell specific recombinant therapeutic proteins. To test this, Urokinase and Calpain (tumor specific proteases) cleavable; prostate cancer cell (CaP) specific (CaP1 targeting peptide); apoptosis inducible (Caspase3 V266ED3)- rCasp3V266ED3 chimeric protein was designed in silico. Hypothesized membrane anchored chimeric protein (rCasp3V

  4. Grape pomace extract exerts antioxidant effects through an increase in GCS levels and GST activity in muscle and endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goutzourelas, Nikolaos; Stagos, Dimitrios; Housmekeridou, Anastasia; Karapouliou, Christina; Kerasioti, Efthalia; Aligiannis, Nektarios; Skaltsounis, Alexios L; Spandidos, Demetrios A; Tsatsakis, Aristidis M; Kouretas, Demetrios

    2015-08-01

    In a previous study, we demonstrated that a grape pomace extract (GPE) exerted antioxidant activity in endothelial (EA.hy926) and muscle (C2C12) cells through an increase in glutathione (GSH) levels. In the present study, in order to elucidate the mechanisms responsible for the antioxidant activity of GPE, its effects on the expression of critical antioxidant enzymes, such as catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD)1, heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) and gamma-glutamylcysteine synthetase (GCS) were assessed in EA.hy926 and C2C12 cells. Moreover, the effects of GPE on CAT, SOD and glutathione S-transferase (GST) enzymatic activity were evaluated. For this purpose, the C2C12 and EA.hy926 cells were treated with GPE at low and non-cytotoxic concentrations (2.5 and 10 µg/ml for the C2C12 cells; 0.068 and 0.250 µg/ml for the EA.hy926 cells) for 3, 6, 12, 18 and 24 h. Following incubation, enzymatic expression and activity were assessed. The results revealed that treatment with GPE significantly increased GCS levels and GST activity in both the C2C12 and EA.hy926 cells. However, GPE significantly decreased CAT levels and activity, but only in the muscle cells, while it had no effect on CAT levels and activity in the endothelial cells. Moreover, treatment with GPE had no effect on HO-1 and SOD expression and activity in both cell lines. Therefore, the present results provide further evidence of the crucial role of GSH systems in the antioxidant effects exerted by GPE. Thus, GPE may prove to be effective for use as a food supplement for the treatment of oxidative stress-induced pathological conditions of the cardiovascular and skeletal muscle systems, particularly those associated with low GSH levels. PMID:26082074

  5. Gecko Proteins Exert Anti-Tumor Effect against Cervical Cancer Cells Via PI3-Kinase/Akt Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Ae-Jin; Chung, Chung-Nam; Kim, Hye-Jin; Bae, Kil Soo; Choi, Song; Jun, Woo Jin; Shim, Sang In; Kang, Tae-Hong; Leem, Sun-Hee; Chung, Jin Woong

    2012-10-01

    Anti-tumor activity of the proteins from Gecko (GP) on cervical cancer cells, and its signaling mechanisms were assessed by viable cell counting, propidium iodide (PI) staining, and Western blot analysis. GP induced the cell death of HeLa cells in a dose-dependent manner while it did not affect the viability of normal cells. Western blot analysis showed that GP decreased the activation of Akt, and co-administration of GP and Akt inhibitors synergistically exerted anti-tumor activities on HeLa cells, suggesting the involvement of PI3-kinase/Akt pathway in GP-induced cell death of the cancer cells. Indeed, the cytotoxic effect of GP against HeLa cells was inhibited by overexpression of constituvely active form of Akt in HeLa cells. The candidates of the functional proteins in GP were analyzed by Mass-spectrum. Taken together, our results suggest that GP elicits anti-tumor activity against HeLa cells by inhibition of PI3-kinase/Akt pathway. PMID:23118562

  6. White kidney bean lectin exerts anti-proliferative and apoptotic effects on cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Yau Sang; Xia, Lixin; Ng, Tzi Bun

    2016-04-01

    A 60-kDa glucosamine binding lectin, white kidney bean lectin (WKBL), was purified from Phaseolus vulgaris cv. white kidney beans, by application of anion exchange chromatography on Q-Sepharose, affinity chromatography on Affi-gel blue gel, and FPLC-size exclusion on Superdex 75. The anti-proliferative activity of WKBL on HONE1 cells and HepG2 cells was stronger than the activity on MCF7 cells and WRL68 cells (IC50 values for a 48-h treatment with WKBL on HONE1 cells: 18.8μM; HepG2 cells: 19.7μM; MCF7 cells: 26.9μM; and WRL68 cells: >80μM). The activity could be reduced by addition of glucosamine, which occupies the binding sites of WKBL, indicating that carbohydrate binding is crucial for the activity. Annexin V-FITC and PI staining, JC-1 staining and Hoechst 33342 staining revealed that apoptosis was induced on WKBL-treated HONE1 cells and HepG2 cells, but not as obviously on MCF7 cells. Cell cycle analysis also showed a slight cell cycle arrest on HONE1 cells after WKBL treatment. Western blotting suggested that WKBL induced apoptosis of HONE1 cells occurred through the extrinsic apoptosis pathway, with detection of increased level of active caspase 3, 8 and 9. PMID:26769089

  7. Maturing From Embryonic to Adult Policy on Stem Cell Therapeutics

    OpenAIRE

    Maguire, Greg

    2014-01-01

    The National Institutes of Health (NIH) closure of the agency’s Center for Regenerative Medicine (CRM), which focused on therapeutic development of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS), was caused by the lack of progress in practical development of the iPSs for use in human therapies. As the NIH evaluates priorities in future stem cell therapeutic development, adult stem cell processes in the human body need to be prioritized for a number of key reasons, including (1) ...

  8. Common Effects on Follicular Thyroid Cancer Cells Exerted by Simulated Microgravity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svejgaard, Benjamin; Grimm, Daniela; Corydon, Thomas Juhl;

    2015-01-01

    This study focuses on gravity-sensitive proteins of two human follicular cancer cell lines (ML-1; RO82-W-1), which were exposed to simulated microgravity (s-μg) on two different machines. Changes in protein cytoskeletal structure, growth patterns and protein expression in response to s-μg were...... investigated. After a three-day (3d) or seven-day (7d) culture grown in s-μg, we found both cell types growing three-dimensionally within multicellular spheroids (MCS) and also cells remaining adherent (AD) to the culture flask, while 1g- control cultures only formed adherent monolayers RO82-W-1 cells released...

  9. Supraphysiological Doses of Performance Enhancing Anabolic-Androgenic Steroids Exert Direct Toxic Effects on Neuron-like Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Robert Basile

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Anabolic-androgenic steroids (AAS are lipophilic hormones often taken in excessive quantities by athletes and bodybuilders to enhance performance and increase muscle mass. AAS exert well known toxic effects on specific cell and tissue types and organ systems. The attention that androgen abuse has received lately should be used as an opportunity to educate both athletes and the general population regarding their adverse effects. Among numerous commercially available steroid hormones, very few have been specifically tested for direct neurotoxicity. We evaluated the effects of supraphysiological doses of methandienone and 17-α-methyltestosterone on sympathetic-like neuron cells. Vitality and apoptotic effects were analyzed, and immunofluorescence staining and western blot performed. In this study, we demonstrate that exposure of supraphysiological doses of methandienone and 17-α-methyltestosterone are toxic to the neuron-like differentiated pheochromocytoma cell line PC12, as confirmed by toxicity on neurite networks responding to nerve growth factor and the modulation of the survival and apoptosis-related proteins ERK, caspase-3, poly (ADP-ribose polymerase and heat-shock protein 90. We observe, in contrast to some previous reports but in accordance with others, expression of the androgen receptor (AR in neuron-like cells, which when inhibited mitigated the toxic effects of AAS tested, suggesting that the AR could be binding these steroid hormones to induce genomic effects. We also note elevated transcription of neuritin in treated cells, a neurotropic factor likely expressed in an attempt to resist neurotoxicity. Taken together, these results demonstrate that supraphysiological exposure to the AAS methandienone and 17-α-methyltestosterone exert neurotoxic effects by an increase in the activity of the intrinsic apoptotic pathway and alterations in neurite networks.

  10. Therapeutic potential of adult stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Serakinci, Nedime; Keith, W. Nicol

    2006-01-01

    lineages are an attractive alternative to human embryonic stem cells (hES) in regenerative medicine. In many countries, present legislation surrounding hES cells makes their use problematic, and indeed the origin of hES cells may represent a controversial issue for many communities. However, adult stem...... cells are not subject to these issues. This review will therefore focus on adult stem cells. Based on their extensive differentiation potential and, in some cases, the relative ease of their isolation, adult stem cells are appropriate for clinical development. Recently, several observations suggest...

  11. Surface active stabilizer Tyloxapol in colloidal dispersions exerts cytostatic effects and apoptotic dismissal of cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solid lipid nanoparticles (SLN) have been praised for their advantageous drug delivery properties such as biocompatibility, controlled release and passive drug targeting. However, the cytotoxicity of SLN and their ingredients, especially over a longer time period, has not been investigated in detail. We examined the critical issues regarding the use of a surface active stabilizer Tyloxapol (Tyl) for the preparation of solid lipid particles (SLP) and their effects on cellular functions and viability. SLP composed of behenate, phospholipids and a stabilizer, Tyloxapol or Lutrol (Lut), were prepared by the lipid melt method, labeled with a fluorescent dye and tested on Jurkat or HEK293 cells. The nano-sized particles were rapidly internalized and exhibited cytoplasmic localization. Incubation of cells with SLP-Tyl resulted in a dose- and time-dependent cytostatic effect, and also caused moderate and delayed cytotoxicity. Tyloxapol solution or SLP-Tyl dispersion caused the detachment of HEK293 cells, a decrease in cell proliferation and alterations in cellular morphology. Cell cycle analysis revealed that, while the unfavourable effects of SLP-Tyl and Tyloxapol solution are similar initially, longer incubation results in partial recovery of cells incubated with the dispersion of SLP-Tyl, whereas the presence of Tyloxapol solution induces apoptotic cell death. These findings indicate that Tyloxapol is an unfavourable stabilizer of SLP used for intracellular delivery and reinforce the role of stabilizers in a design of SLP with minimal cytotoxic properties

  12. Progenitor cells in the kidney: biology and therapeutic perspectives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rookmaaker, M.B.; Verhaar, M.C.; Zonneveld, A.J. van; Rabelink, T.J.

    2004-01-01

    Progenitor cells in the kidney: Biology and therapeutic perspectives. The stem cell may be viewed as an engineer who can read the blue print and become the building. The role of this fascinating cell in physiology and pathophysiology has recently attracted a great deal of interest. The archetype of

  13. Common Effects on Cancer Cells Exerted by a Random Positioning Machine and a 2D Clinostat

    OpenAIRE

    Svejgaard, Benjamin; Wehland, Markus; Ma, Xiao; Kopp, Sascha; Sahana, Jayashree; Warnke, Elisabeth; Aleshcheva, Ganna; Hemmersbach, Ruth; Hauslage, Jens; Grosse, Jirka; Bauer, Johann; Corydon, Thomas Juhl; Islam, Tawhidul; Infanger, Manfred; Grimm, Daniela

    2015-01-01

    In this study we focused on gravity-sensitive proteins of two human thyroid cancer cell lines (ML-1; RO82-W-1), which were exposed to a 2D clinostat (CLINO), a random positioning machine (RPM) and to normal 1g-conditions. After a three (3d)- or seven-day-culture (7d) on the two devices, we found both cell types growing three-dimensionally within multicellular spheroids (MCS) and also cells remaining adherent (AD) to the culture flask, while 1g-control cultures only formed adherent monolayers,...

  14. Common Effects on Cancer Cells Exerted by a Random Positioning Machine and a 2D Clinostat

    OpenAIRE

    Svejgaard, Benjamin; Wehland, Markus; Ma, Xiao; Kopp, Sascha; Sahana, Jayashree; Warnke, Elisabeth; Aleshcheva, Ganna; Hemmersbach, Ruth; Hauslage, Jens; Grosse, Jirka; Bauer, Johann; Corydon, Thomas Juhl; Islam, Tawhidul; Infanger, Manfred; Grimm, Daniela

    2015-01-01

    In this study we focused on gravity-sensitive proteins of two human thyroid cancer cell lines (ML-1; RO82-W-1), which were exposed to a 2D clinostat (CLINO), a random positioning machine (RPM) and to normal 1g-conditions. After a three (3d)- or seven-day-culture (7d) on the two devices, we found both cell types growing three-dimensionally within multicellular spheroids (MCS) and also cells remaining adherent (AD) to the culture flask, while 1gcontrol cultures only formed adherent monolayers, ...

  15. Common Effects on Cancer Cells Exerted by a Random Positioning Machine and a 2D Clinostat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svejgaard, Benjamin; Wehland, Markus; Ma, Xiao; Kopp, Sascha; Sahana, Jayashree; Warnke, Elisabeth; Aleshcheva, Ganna; Hemmersbach, Ruth; Hauslage, Jens; Grosse, Jirka; Bauer, Johann; Corydon, Thomas Juhl; Islam, Tawhidul; Infanger, Manfred; Grimm, Daniela

    2015-01-01

    In this study we focused on gravity-sensitive proteins of two human thyroid cancer cell lines (ML-1; RO82-W-1), which were exposed to a 2D clinostat (CLINO), a random positioning machine (RPM) and to normal 1g-conditions. After a three (3d)- or seven-day-culture (7d) on the two devices, we found both cell types growing three-dimensionally within multicellular spheroids (MCS) and also cells remaining adherent (AD) to the culture flask, while 1g-control cultures only formed adherent monolayers, unless the bottom of the culture dish was covered by agarose. In this case, the cytokines IL-6 and IL-8 facilitated the formation of MCS in both cell lines using the liquid-overlay technique at 1g. ML-1 cells grown on the RPM or the CLINO released amounts of IL-6 and MCP-1 into the supernatant, which were significantly elevated as compared to 1g-controls. Release of IL-4, IL-7, IL-8, IL-17, eotaxin-1 and VEGF increased time-dependently, but was not significantly influenced by the gravity conditions. After 3d on the RPM or the CLINO, an accumulation of F-actin around the cellular membrane was detectable in AD cells of both cell lines. IL-6 and IL-8 stimulation of ML-1 cells for 3d and 7d influenced the protein contents of ß1-integrin, talin-1, Ki-67, and beta-actin dose-dependently in adherent cells. The ß1-integrin content was significantly decreased in AD and MCS samples compared with 1g, while talin-1 was higher expressed in MCS than AD populations. The proliferation marker Ki-67 was elevated in AD samples compared with 1g and MCS samples. The ß-actin content of R082-W-1 cells remained unchanged. ML-1 cells exhibited no change in ß-actin in RPM cultures, but a reduction in CLINO samples. Thus, we concluded that simulated microgravity influences the release of cytokines in follicular thyroid cancer cells, and the production of ß1-integrin and talin-1 and predicts an identical effect under real microgravity conditions. PMID:26274317

  16. Curcumin Sensitizes Silymarin to Exert Synergistic Anticancer Activity in Colon Cancer Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Montgomery, Amanda; Adeyeni, Temitope; San, KayKay; Heuertz, Rita M.; Ezekiel, Uthayashanker R.

    2016-01-01

    We studied combinatorial interactions of two phytochemicals, curcumin and silymarin, in their action against cancer cell proliferation. Curcumin is the major component of the spice turmeric. Silymarin is a bioactive component of milk thistle used as a protective supplement against liver disease. We studied antiproliferative effects of curcumin alone, silymarin alone and combinations of curcumin and silymarin using colon cancer cell lines (DLD-1, HCT116, LoVo). Curcumin inhibited colon cancer ...

  17. Reprogramming therapeutics: iPS cell prospects for neurodegenerative disease

    OpenAIRE

    Abeliovich, Asa; Doege, Claudia A.

    2009-01-01

    The recent description of somatic cell reprogramming to an embryonic stem (ES) cell-like phenotype, termed induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cell technology, presents an exciting potential venue towards cell-based therapeutics and disease models for neurodegenerative disorders Two recent studies from Dimos et al. (Dimos et al., 2008) and Ebert et al. (Ebert et al., 2008) describe the initial characterization of neurodegenerative disease patient-derived iPS cell cultures as proof-of-concept for t...

  18. Glycyrrhizin exerts antioxidative effects in H5N1 influenza A virus-infected cells and inhibits virus replication and pro-inflammatory gene expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Michaelis

    Full Text Available Glycyrrhizin is known to exert antiviral and anti-inflammatory effects. Here, the effects of an approved parenteral glycyrrhizin preparation (Stronger Neo-Minophafen C were investigated on highly pathogenic influenza A H5N1 virus replication, H5N1-induced apoptosis, and H5N1-induced pro-inflammatory responses in lung epithelial (A549 cells. Therapeutic glycyrrhizin concentrations substantially inhibited H5N1-induced expression of the pro-inflammatory molecules CXCL10, interleukin 6, CCL2, and CCL5 (effective glycyrrhizin concentrations 25 to 50 µg/ml but interfered with H5N1 replication and H5N1-induced apoptosis to a lesser extent (effective glycyrrhizin concentrations 100 µg/ml or higher. Glycyrrhizin also diminished monocyte migration towards supernatants of H5N1-infected A549 cells. The mechanism by which glycyrrhizin interferes with H5N1 replication and H5N1-induced pro-inflammatory gene expression includes inhibition of H5N1-induced formation of reactive oxygen species and (in turn reduced activation of NFκB, JNK, and p38, redox-sensitive signalling events known to be relevant for influenza A virus replication. Therefore, glycyrrhizin may complement the arsenal of potential drugs for the treatment of H5N1 disease.

  19. Spatially coordinated changes in intracellular rheology and extracellular force exertion during mesenchymal stem cell differentiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mechanical properties within the cell are regulated by the organization of the actin cytoskeleton, which is linked to the extracellular environment through focal adhesion proteins that transmit force. Chemical and mechanical stimuli alter the organization of cytoskeletal actin, which results in changes in cell shape, adhesion, and differentiation. By combining particle-tracking microrheology and traction force cytometry, we can monitor the mechanical properties of the actin meshwork and determine how changes in the intracellular network contribute to force generation. In this study, we investigated the effects of chemical (differentiation factors) and mechanical (substrate rigidity) stimuli important in mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) differentiation on the intracellular mechanics and traction stress generation. We found the presence of adipogenic factors resulted in stiffening of the actin meshwork regardless of substrate rigidity. In contrast, these factors increased traction stresses on hard substrates, which was associated with increased expression of contractility genes. Furthermore, MSCs cultured on hard substrates expressed both adipogenic and osteogenic markers indicative of mixed differentiation. On hard substrates, heterogeneity in the local elastic modulus-traction stress correlation was also increased in response to adipogenic factors, indicating that these mechanical properties may be reflective of differences in the level of MSC differentiation. These results suggest intracellular rheology and traction stress generation are spatially regulated and contribute insight into how single cell mechanical forces contribute to MSC differentiation. (paper)

  20. Various Acylglycerols from Common Oils Exert Different Antitumor Activities on Colorectal Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos-Bueno, Rebeca P; González-Fernández, María J; Guil-Guerrero, José L

    2016-04-01

    Colorectal cancer is one of the leading causes of death in Western countries; therefore, the implementation of healthy dietary habits in order to prevent its occurrence is a desirable action. We show here that both free fatty acids (FFAs) and some acylglycerols induce antitumoral actions in the colorectal cancer cell line HT-29. We tested several C18 polyunsaturated fatty acid-enriched oils (e.g., sunflower and Echium) as well as other oils, such as arachidonic acid-enriched (Arasco®) and docosahexaenoic acid-enriched (Marinol® and cod liver oil), in addition to coconut and olive oils. The 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide test indicated inhibitory effects on HT-29 cells viability for FFAs, and monoacylglycerol and diacylglycerol (DAG) species, while the lactate dehydrogenase test proved that FFAs were the more effective species to induce membrane injury. Conversely, all species did not exhibit actions on CCD-18 normal human colon cells viability. Furthermore, transmission electron microscopy showed the presence of necrosis and apoptosis, while the monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL) inhibition test demonstrated high activity for 2-monoacylglycerols derived from Arasco and sunflower oils. However, different monoacylglycerols and DAGs have also the potential for MAGL inhibition. Therefore, checking for activity on colon cancer cells of specifically designed acylglycerol-derivative species would be a suitable way to design functional foods destined to avoid colorectal cancer initiation. PMID:27007804

  1. A novel adipocytokine, chemerin exerts anti-inflammatory roles in human vascular endothelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamawaki, Hideyuki, E-mail: yamawaki@vmas.kitasato-u.ac.jp [Laboratory of Veterinary Pharmacology, School of Veterinary Medicine, Kitasato University, Aomori 034-8628 (Japan); Kameshima, Satoshi; Usui, Tatsuya; Okada, Muneyoshi; Hara, Yukio [Laboratory of Veterinary Pharmacology, School of Veterinary Medicine, Kitasato University, Aomori 034-8628 (Japan)

    2012-06-22

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Chemerin is a novel adipocytokine with almost unknown function in vasculature. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Chemerin activates Akt/eNOS/NO pathways in endothelial cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Chemerin inhibits TNF-{alpha}-induced monocyte adhesion to endothelial cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Chemerin inhibits TNF-induced VCAM-1 via suppressing NF-{kappa}B and p38 signal. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Chemerin is anti-inflammatory through producing NO in vascular endothelium. -- Abstract: Chemerin is a recently identified adipocytokine which plays a role on inflammation and adipocytes metabolism. However, its function in vasculature is largely unknown. We examined the effects of chemerin on vascular endothelial inflammatory states. Treatment of human umbilical vein endothelial cells with chemerin (300 ng/ml, 20 min) induced phosphorylation of Akt (Ser473) and endothelial nitric oxide (NO) synthase (eNOS) (Ser1177). Consistently, chemerin increased intracellular cyclic GMP content. Pretreatment with chemerin (1-300 ng/ml, 24 h) significantly inhibited phosphorylation of nuclear factor (NF)-{kappa}B p65 (Ser536) and p38 as well as vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM)-1 expression induced by tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-{alpha} (5 ng/ml, 20 min-6 h). Inhibitor of NF-{kappa}B or p38 significantly inhibited the TNF-{alpha}-induced VCAM-1 expression. Chemerin also inhibited TNF-{alpha}-induced VCAM-1 expression in rat isolated aorta. Moreover, chemerin significantly inhibited monocytes adhesion to TNF-{alpha}-stimulated endothelial cells. The inhibitory effect of chemerin on TNF-{alpha}-induced VCAM-1 was reversed by a NOS inhibitor. Conversely, an NO donor, sodium nitroprusside significantly inhibited TNF-{alpha}-induced VCAM-1. The present results for the first time demonstrate that chemerin plays anti-inflammatory roles by preventing TNF-{alpha}-induced VCAM-1 expression and monocytes adhesion in vascular

  2. A novel adipocytokine, chemerin exerts anti-inflammatory roles in human vascular endothelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Chemerin is a novel adipocytokine with almost unknown function in vasculature. ► Chemerin activates Akt/eNOS/NO pathways in endothelial cells. ► Chemerin inhibits TNF-α-induced monocyte adhesion to endothelial cells. ► Chemerin inhibits TNF-induced VCAM-1 via suppressing NF-κB and p38 signal. ► Chemerin is anti-inflammatory through producing NO in vascular endothelium. -- Abstract: Chemerin is a recently identified adipocytokine which plays a role on inflammation and adipocytes metabolism. However, its function in vasculature is largely unknown. We examined the effects of chemerin on vascular endothelial inflammatory states. Treatment of human umbilical vein endothelial cells with chemerin (300 ng/ml, 20 min) induced phosphorylation of Akt (Ser473) and endothelial nitric oxide (NO) synthase (eNOS) (Ser1177). Consistently, chemerin increased intracellular cyclic GMP content. Pretreatment with chemerin (1–300 ng/ml, 24 h) significantly inhibited phosphorylation of nuclear factor (NF)-κB p65 (Ser536) and p38 as well as vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM)-1 expression induced by tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α (5 ng/ml, 20 min–6 h). Inhibitor of NF-κB or p38 significantly inhibited the TNF-α-induced VCAM-1 expression. Chemerin also inhibited TNF-α-induced VCAM-1 expression in rat isolated aorta. Moreover, chemerin significantly inhibited monocytes adhesion to TNF-α-stimulated endothelial cells. The inhibitory effect of chemerin on TNF-α-induced VCAM-1 was reversed by a NOS inhibitor. Conversely, an NO donor, sodium nitroprusside significantly inhibited TNF-α-induced VCAM-1. The present results for the first time demonstrate that chemerin plays anti-inflammatory roles by preventing TNF-α-induced VCAM-1 expression and monocytes adhesion in vascular endothelial cells. The effect is mediated via inhibiting activation of NF-κB and p38 through stimulation of Akt/eNOS signaling and NO production.

  3. Cancer stem cell markers in common cancers - therapeutic implications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klonisch, Thomas; Wiechec, Emilia; Hombach-Klonisch, Sabine;

    2008-01-01

    Rapid advance in the cancer stem cell field warrants optimism for the development of more reliable cancer therapies within the next 2-3 decades. Below, we characterize and compare the specific markers that are present on stem cells, cancer cells and cancer stem cells (CSC) in selected tissues......, the last part of the review discusses future directions of this intriguing new research field in the context of new diagnostic and therapeutic opportunities....

  4. Pancreatic adenocarcinoma exerts systemic effects on the peripheral blood myeloid and plasmacytoid dendritic cells: an indicator of disease severity?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dendritic cells (DCs) isolated from tumor bearing animals or from individuals with solid tumors display functional abnormalities and the DC impairment has emerged as one mechanism for tumor evasion from the control of the immune system. Ductal pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PDAC), the most common pancreatic cancer, is recognized as a very aggressive cancer type with a mortality that almost matches the rate of incidence. We examined the systemic influence ductal pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PDAC) exerted on levels of peripheral blood DCs and inflammatory mediators in comparison to the effects exerted by other pancreatic tumors, chronic pancreatitis, and age-matched controls. All groups examined, including PDAC, had decreased levels of myeloid DCs (MDC) and plasmacytoid DCs (PDC) and enhanced apoptosis in these cells as compared to controls. We found elevated levels of PGE2 and CXCL8 in subjects with PDAC, and chronic pancreatitis. Levels of these inflammatory factors were in part restored in PDAC after tumor resection, whereas the levels of DCs were impaired in the majority of these patients ~12 weeks after tumor removal. Our results prove that solid pancreatic tumors, including PDAC, systemically affect blood DCs. The impairments do not seem to be tumor-specific, since similar results were obtained in subjects with chronic pancreatitis. Furthermore, we found that PDAC patients with a survival over 2 years had significant higher levels of blood DCs compared to patients with less than one year survival. Our findings points to the involvement of inflammation in the destruction of the blood MDCs and PDCs. Furthermore, the preservation of the blood DCs compartment in PDAC patients seems to benefit their ability to control the disease and survival

  5. Interleukin-12 Gene Modification Exerts Anti-Tumor Effects on Murine Mammary Sarcoma Cell Line in vivo

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dan Li; Hong Yu; Tengfei Xu; Jinghua Li; Yunfang Sun; Wenqing Zhang

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this project was to investigate the anti-tumor effect of an IL-12 gene modified mammary sarcoma murine cell line, EMT6/IL-12, in mouse model. In this study, we transfected the recombinant eukaryotic plasmid encoding IL-12 gene (pcDNA6-p70) into EMT6 and obtained the IL-12 expressing EMT6/IL-12 cell line. Then EMT6/IL-12 cells were s.c. inoculated into mice. The recombinant vector treatment group was set as control. We then evaluated the inhibition of tumor growth and the anti-tumor immunity function in vivo such as cytotoxicity, proliferation of splenocytes and serial IFN-y level. And the percentage of IFN-y producing CD4 or CD8 T cells among splenocytes was also analyzed in tumor bearing mice. Our results showed that the growth of tumors was obviously inhibited in EMT6/IL-12 group. Moreover, the capacities of anti-tumor immunity were all significantly higher in EMT6/IL-12 group compared to the controls. The results of the present investigation support the notion that EMT6/IL-12 could exert gene therapy in tumor model by improving the anti-tumor cellular immunity. Cellular & Molecular Immunology. 2008;5(3):225-230.

  6. Maturing from embryonic to adult policy on stem cell therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maguire, Greg

    2014-12-11

    The National Institutes of Health (NIH) closure of the agency's Center for Regenerative Medicine (CRM), which focused on therapeutic development of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS), was caused by the lack of progress in practical development of the iPSs for use in human therapies. As the NIH evaluates priorities in future stem cell therapeutic development, adult stem cell processes in the human body need to be prioritized for a number of key reasons, including (1) adult stem cells release many types of molecules that provide much of the therapeutic benefit of stem cells and (2) adult stem cells and somatic cells exist in a state of dynamic transition between different potency levels and can be naturally driven by the microenvironment to a state of pluripotency. Thus, the study and development of adult stems for therapeutic use can include naturally induced pluripotent stem cells (NiPSs) that lack the problematic genetic and epigenetic reprogramming errors found in iPSs. PMID:25516780

  7. Therapeutics from Adult Stem Cells and the Hype Curve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maguire, Greg

    2016-05-12

    The Gartner curve for regenerative and stem cell therapeutics is currently climbing out of the "trough of disillusionment" and into the "slope of enlightenment". Understanding that the early years of stem cell therapy relied on the model of embryonic stem cells (ESCs), and then moved into a period of the overhype of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), instead of using the model of 40 years of success, i.e. adult stem cells used in bone marrow transplants, the field of stem cell therapy has languished for years, trying to move beyond the early and poorly understood success of bone marrow transplants. Recent studies in the lab and clinic show that adult stem cells of various types, and the molecules that they release, avoid the issues associated with ESCs and iPSCs and lead to better therapeutic outcomes and into the slope of enlightenment. PMID:27190588

  8. Therapeutic potential of stem cells in veterinary practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nitin E Gade

    Full Text Available Stem cell research acquired great attention during last decade inspite of incredible therapeutic potential of these cells the ethical controversies exists. Stem cells have enormous uses in animal cloning, drug discovery, gene targeting, transgenic production and regenerative therapy. Stem cells are the naïve cells of body which can self-renew and differentiate into other cell types to carry out multiple functions, these properties have been utilized in therapeutic application of stem cells in human and veterinary medicine. The application of stem cells in human medicine is well established and it is commonly used for chronic and accidental injuries. In Veterinary sciences previous studies mostly focused on establishing protocols for isolation and their characterization but with advancement in array of techniques for in vitro studies, stem cells rapidly became a viable tool for regenerative therapy of chronic, debilitating and various unresponsive clinical diseases and disorders. Multipotent adult stem cells have certain advantages over embryonic stem cells like easy isolation and expansion from numerous sources, less immunogenicity and no risk of teratoma formation hence their use is preferred in therapeutics. Adult stem cells have been utilized for treatment of spinal injuries, tendonitis, cartilage defects, osteoarthritis and ligament defects, liver diseases, wounds, cardiac and bone defects in animals. The multi-potential capability of these cells can be better utilized in near future to overcome the challenges faced by the clinicians. This review will emphasize on the therapeutic utilization and success of stem cell therapies in animals. [Vet. World 2012; 5(8.000: 499-507

  9. Organometallic iron(III-salophene exerts cytotoxic properties in neuroblastoma cells via MAPK activation and ROS generation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyu Kwang Kim

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study was to investigate the specific effects of Iron(III-salophene (Fe-SP on viability, morphology, proliferation, cell cycle progression, ROS generation and pro-apoptotic MAPK activation in neuroblastoma (NB cells. A NCI-DTP cancer screen revealed that Fe-SP displayed high toxicity against cell lines of different tumor origin but not tumor type-specificity. In a viability screen Fe-SP exhibited high cytotoxicity against all three NB cell lines tested. The compound caused cell cycle arrest in G1 phase, suppression of cells progressing through S phase, morphological changes, disruption of the mitochondrial membrane depolarization potential, induction of apoptotic markers as well as p38 and JNK MAPK activation, DNA degradation, and elevated generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS in SMS-KCNR NB cells. In contrast to Fe-SP, non-complexed salophene or Cu(II-SP did not raise ROS levels in NB or SKOV-3 ovarian cancer control cells. Cytotoxicity of Fe-SP and activation of caspase-3, -7, PARP, pro-apoptotic p38 and JNK MAPK could be prevented by co-treatment with antioxidants suggesting ROS generation is the primary mechanism of cytotoxic action. We report here that Fe-SP is a potent growth-suppressing and cytotoxic agent for in vitro NB cell lines and, due to its high tolerance in previous animal toxicity studies, a potential therapeutic drug to treat NB tumors in vivo.

  10. Cell-Specific Aptamers as Emerging Therapeutics

    OpenAIRE

    Cindy Meyer; Ulrich Hahn; Andrea Rentmeister

    2011-01-01

    Aptamers are short nucleic acids that bind to defined targets with high affinity and specificity. The first aptamers have been selected about two decades ago by an in vitro process named SELEX (systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment). Since then, numerous aptamers with specificities for a variety of targets from small molecules to proteins or even whole cells have...

  11. In Vivo Therapeutic Potential of Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Depends on the Source and the Isolation Procedure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Bortolotti

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Over the last several years, mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs have been isolated from different tissues following a variety of different procedures. Here, we comparatively assess the ex vivo and in vivo properties of MSCs isolated from either adipose tissue or bone marrow by different purification protocols. After MSC transplantation into a mouse model of hindlimb ischemia, clinical and histological analysis revealed that bone marrow MSCs purified on adhesive substrates exerted the best therapeutic activity, preserving tissue viability and promoting formation of new arterioles without directly transdifferentiating into vascular cells. In keeping with these observations, these cells abundantly expressed cytokines involved in vessel maturation and cell retention. These findings indicate that the choice of MSC source and purification protocol is critical in determining the therapeutic potential of these cells and warrant the standardization of an optimal MSC isolation procedure in order to select the best conditions to move forward to more effective clinical experimentation.

  12. In Vivo Therapeutic Potential of Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Depends on the Source and the Isolation Procedure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bortolotti, Francesca; Ukovich, Laura; Razban, Vahid; Martinelli, Valentina; Ruozi, Giulia; Pelos, Barbara; Dore, Franca; Giacca, Mauro; Zacchigna, Serena

    2015-01-01

    Summary Over the last several years, mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) have been isolated from different tissues following a variety of different procedures. Here, we comparatively assess the ex vivo and in vivo properties of MSCs isolated from either adipose tissue or bone marrow by different purification protocols. After MSC transplantation into a mouse model of hindlimb ischemia, clinical and histological analysis revealed that bone marrow MSCs purified on adhesive substrates exerted the best therapeutic activity, preserving tissue viability and promoting formation of new arterioles without directly transdifferentiating into vascular cells. In keeping with these observations, these cells abundantly expressed cytokines involved in vessel maturation and cell retention. These findings indicate that the choice of MSC source and purification protocol is critical in determining the therapeutic potential of these cells and warrant the standardization of an optimal MSC isolation procedure in order to select the best conditions to move forward to more effective clinical experimentation. PMID:25660405

  13. Mitochondria as therapeutic targets for cancer stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    In Sung Song; Jeong Yu Jeong; Seung Hun Jeong; Hyoung Kyu Kim; Kyung Soo Ko; Byoung Doo Rhee; Nari Kim; Jin Han

    2015-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are maintained by theirsomatic stem cells and are responsible for tumorinitiation, chemoresistance, and metastasis. Evidencefor the CSCs existence has been reported for a numberof human cancers. The CSC mitochondria have beenshown recently to be an important target for cancertreatment, but clinical significance of CSCs and theirmitochondria properties remain unclear. Mitochondriatargetedagents are considerably more effectivecompared to other agents in triggering apoptosis ofCSCs, as well as general cancer cells, via mitochondrialdysfunction. Mitochondrial metabolism is altered incancer cells because of their reliance on glycolyticintermediates, which are normally destined for oxidativephosphorylation. Therefore, inhibiting cancer-specificmodifications in mitochondrial metabolism, increasingreactive oxygen species production, or stimulatingmitochondrial permeabilization transition could bepromising new therapeutic strategies to activate celldeath in CSCs as well, as in general cancer cells. Thisreview analyzed mitochondrial function and its potentialas a therapeutic target to induce cell death in CSCs.Furthermore, combined treatment with mitochondriatargeteddrugs will be a promising strategy for thetreatment of relapsed and refractory cancer.

  14. T cell avidity and tumor recognition: implications and therapeutic strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roszkowski Jeffrey J

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In the last two decades, great advances have been made studying the immune response to human tumors. The identification of protein antigens from cancer cells and better techniques for eliciting antigen specific T cell responses in vitro and in vivo have led to improved understanding of tumor recognition by T cells. Yet, much remains to be learned about the intricate details of T cell – tumor cell interactions. Though the strength of interaction between T cell and target is thought to be a key factor influencing the T cell response, investigations of T cell avidity, T cell receptor (TCR affinity for peptide-MHC complex, and the recognition of peptide on antigen presenting targets or tumor cells reveal complex relationships. Coincident with these investigations, therapeutic strategies have been developed to enhance tumor recognition using antigens with altered peptide structures and T cells modified by the introduction of new antigen binding receptor molecules. The profound effects of these strategies on T cell – tumor interactions and the clinical implications of these effects are of interest to both scientists and clinicians. In recent years, the focus of much of our work has been the avidity and effector characteristics of tumor reactive T cells. Here we review concepts and current results in the field, and the implications of therapeutic strategies using altered antigens and altered effector T cells.

  15. Curcumin Exerts its Anti-hypertensive Effect by Down-regulating the AT1 Receptor in Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Yonggang; Wang, Wei; Li, Meixiang; Ren, Hongmei; Chen, Caiyu; Wang, Jialiang; Wang, Wei Eric; Yang, Jian; Zeng, Chunyu

    2016-01-01

    Curcumin exerts beneficial effects on cardiovascular diseases, including hypertension. However, its mechanisms are unknown. We propose that curcumin prevents the development of hypertension by regulating AT1 receptor (AT1R) expression in arteries. The present study examined how curcumin regulates AT1R expression in vascular smooth muscle cells and investigated the physiological significance of this regulation in angiotensin (Ang) II-induced hypertension. The results showed that curcumin decreased AT1R expression in a concentration- and time-dependent manner in vascular smooth muscle cells. Using luciferase reporters with an entire AT1 or a mutant AT1R in A10 cells, the AT1R promoter activity was inhibited by 10(-6 )M curcumin, and the proximal element (from -61 to +25 bp) of the AT1R promoter was crucial for curcumin-induced AT1R down-regulation. An electrophoretic mobility shift assay showed that curcumin decreased specificity protein 1 (SP1) binding with the AT1R promoter in A10 cells. Curcumin treatment reduced Ang II-induced hypertension in C57Bl/6J mice, which was accompanied by lower AT1R expression in the arteries and decreased Ang II-mediated vasoconstriction in the mesenteric artery. These findings indicate that curcumin down-regulates AT1R expression in A10 cells by affecting SP1/AT1R DNA binding, thus reducing AT1R-mediated vasoconstriction and subsequently prevents the development of hypertension in an Ang II-induced hypertensive model. PMID:27146402

  16. Curcumin Exerts its Anti-hypertensive Effect by Down-regulating the AT1 Receptor in Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Yonggang; Wang, Wei; Li, Meixiang; Ren, Hongmei; Chen, Caiyu; Wang, Jialiang; Wang, Wei Eric; Yang, Jian; Zeng, Chunyu

    2016-01-01

    Curcumin exerts beneficial effects on cardiovascular diseases, including hypertension. However, its mechanisms are unknown. We propose that curcumin prevents the development of hypertension by regulating AT1 receptor (AT1R) expression in arteries. The present study examined how curcumin regulates AT1R expression in vascular smooth muscle cells and investigated the physiological significance of this regulation in angiotensin (Ang) II-induced hypertension. The results showed that curcumin decreased AT1R expression in a concentration- and time-dependent manner in vascular smooth muscle cells. Using luciferase reporters with an entire AT1 or a mutant AT1R in A10 cells, the AT1R promoter activity was inhibited by 10−6 M curcumin, and the proximal element (from −61 to +25 bp) of the AT1R promoter was crucial for curcumin-induced AT1R down-regulation. An electrophoretic mobility shift assay showed that curcumin decreased specificity protein 1 (SP1) binding with the AT1R promoter in A10 cells. Curcumin treatment reduced Ang II-induced hypertension in C57Bl/6J mice, which was accompanied by lower AT1R expression in the arteries and decreased Ang II-mediated vasoconstriction in the mesenteric artery. These findings indicate that curcumin down-regulates AT1R expression in A10 cells by affecting SP1/AT1R DNA binding, thus reducing AT1R-mediated vasoconstriction and subsequently prevents the development of hypertension in an Ang II-induced hypertensive model. PMID:27146402

  17. Metabolic alterations in cancer cells and therapeutic implications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Naima Hammoudi; Kausar Begam Riaz Ahmed; Celia Garcia-Prieto; Peng Huang

    2011-01-01

    Cancer metabolism has emerged as an important area of research in recent years. Elucidation of the metabolic differences between cancer and normal cells and the underlying mechanisms will not only advance our understanding of fundamental cancer cell biology but also provide an important basis for the development of new therapeutic strategies and novel compounds to selectively eliminate cancer cells by targeting their unique metabolism. This article reviews several important metabolic alterations in cancer cells, with an emphasis on increased aerobic glycolysis (the Warburg effect) and glutamine addiction, and discusses the mechanisms that may contribute to such metabolic changes. In addition, metabolic alterations in cancer stem cells, mitochondrial metabolism and its influence on drug sensitivity, and potential therapeutic strategies and agents that target cancer metabolism are also discussed.

  18. Mesenchymal stem cell subpopulations: phenotype, property and therapeutic potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Miaohua; Wang, Shan; Zhou, Ying; Li, Hong; Wu, Yaojiong

    2016-09-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) are capable of differentiating into cells of multiple cell lineages and have potent paracrine effects. Due to their easy preparation and low immunogenicity, MSC have emerged as an extremely promising therapeutic agent in regenerative medicine for diverse diseases. However, MSC are heterogeneous with respect to phenotype and function in current isolation and cultivation regimes, which often lead to incomparable experimental results. In addition, there may be specific stem cell subpopulations with definite differentiation capacity toward certain lineages in addition to stem cells with multi-differentiation potential. Recent studies have identified several subsets of MSC which exhibit distinct features and biological activities, and enhanced therapeutic potentials for certain diseases. In this review, we give an overview of these subsets for their phenotypic, biological and functional properties. PMID:27141940

  19. Pomegranate exerts chemoprevention of experimentally induced mammary tumorigenesis by suppression of cell proliferation and induction of apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishayee, Anupam; Mandal, Animesh; Bhattacharyya, Piyali; Bhatia, Deepak

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is the second leading cause of cancer-related death in women in the United States and discovery and development of safe chemopreventive drugs is urgently needed. The fruit pomegranate (Punica granatum) is gaining importance because of its various health benefits. This study was initiated to investigate chemopreventive potential of a pomegranate emulsion (PE) against 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA) rat mammary carcinogenesis. The animals were orally administered with PE (0.2-5.0 g/kg), starting 2 wk before and 16 wk following DMBA treatment. PE exhibited a striking reduction of DMBA-induced mammary tumor incidence, total tumor burden, and reversed histopathological changes. PE dose-dependently suppressed cell proliferation and induced apoptosis in mammary tumors. Immunohistochemical studies showed that PE increased intratumor Bax, decreased Bcl2 and manifested a proapoptotic shift in Bax/Bcl2 ratio. In addition, our gene expression study showed PE-mediated upregulation of Bad, caspase-3, caspase-7, caspase-9, poly (ADP ribose) polymerase and cytochrome c in mammary tumors. Thus, PE exerts chemoprevention of mammary carcinogenesis by suppressing cell proliferation and inducing apoptosis mediated through upregulation of Bax and downregulation of Bcl2 in concert with caspase cascades. Pomegranate bioactive phytoconstituents could be developed as a chemopreventive drug to reduce the risk of breast cancer. PMID:26699876

  20. Pomegranate exerts chemoprevention of experimentally induced mammary tumorigenesis by suppression of cell proliferation and induction of apoptosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishayee, Anupam; Mandal, Animesh; Bhattacharyya, Piyali; Bhatia, Deepak

    2016-01-01

    abstract Breast cancer is the second leading cause of cancer-related death in women in the United States and discovery and development of safe chemopreventive drugs is urgently needed. The fruit pomegranate (Punica granatum) is gaining importance because of its various health benefits. This study was initiated to investigate chemopreventive potential of a pomegranate emulsion (PE) against 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA) rat mammary carcinogenesis. The animals were orally administered with PE (0.2–5.0 g/kg), starting 2 wk before and 16 wk following DMBA treatment. PE exhibited a striking reduction of DMBA-induced mammary tumor incidence, total tumor burden, and reversed histopathological changes. PE dose-dependently suppressed cell proliferation and induced apoptosis in mammary tumors. Immunohistochemical studies showed that PE increased intratumor Bax, decreased Bcl2 and manifested a proapoptotic shift in Bax/Bcl2 ratio. In addition, our gene expression study showed PE-mediated upregulation of Bad, caspase-3, caspase-7, caspase-9, poly (ADP ribose) polymerase and cytochrome c in mammary tumors. Thus, PE exerts chemoprevention of mammary carcinogenesis by suppressing cell proliferation and inducing apoptosis mediated through upregulation of Bax and downregulation of Bcl2 in concert with caspase cascades. Pomegranate bioactive phytoconstituents could be developed as a chemopreventive drug to reduce the risk of breast cancer. PMID:26699876

  1. Therapeutic efficacy of amniotic membrane stem cells and adipose tissue stem cells in rats with chemically induced ovarian failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fouad, Hanan; Sabry, Dina; Elsetohy, Khaled; Fathy, Naglaa

    2016-03-01

    The present study was conducted to compare between the therapeutic efficacies of human amniotic membrane-derived stem cells (hAM-MSCs) vs. adipose tissue derived stem cells (AD-MSCs) in cyclophosphamide (CTX)-induced ovarian failure in rats. Forty-eight adult female rats were included in the study; 10 rats were used as control group. Thirty-eight rats were injected with CTX to induce ovarian failure and divided into four groups: ovarian failure (IOF) (IOF group), IOF + phosphate buffer saline (PBS group), IOF + hAM-MSCs group and IOF + AD-MSCs group. Serum levels of FSH and estradiol (E2) were assessed. Histopathological examination of the ovarian tissues was performed and quantitative gene expressions of Oct-4, Stra8 and integrin beta-1 genes were conducted by quantitative real time PCR. Results showed that IOF and IOF + PBS rat groups exhibited decreased ovarian follicles, increased interstitial fibrosis with significant decrease of serum E2, significant increase serum FSH level and significant down-regulation of Stra8 and integrin beta-1. In hAM-MSCs and AD-MSCs rat groups, there were increased follicles and corpora with evident the presence of oocytes, significant increase in serum E2, significant decrease in serum FSH levels (in hAM-MSCs treated group only) and significant up-regulation of the three studied genes with higher levels in hAM-MSCs treated rats group when compared to AD-MSCs treated rats group. In Conclusion, administration of either hAM-derived MSCs or AD-MSCs exerts a significant therapeutic efficacy in chemotherapy induced ovarian insult in rats. hAM-MSCs exert higher therapeutic efficacy as compared to AD-MSCs. PMID:26966564

  2. Therapeutic strategies targeting B-cells in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milo, Ron

    2016-07-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic inflammatory and demyelinating disease of the central nervous system (CNS) that traditionally has been considered to be mediated primarily by T-cells. Increasing evidence, however, suggests the fundamental role of B-cells in the pathogenesis of the disease. Recent strategies targeting B-cells in MS have demonstrated impressive and sometimes surprising results: B-cell depletion by monoclonal antibodies targeting the B-cell surface antigen CD20 (e.g. rituximab, ocrelizumab, ofatumumab) was shown to exert profound anti-inflammatory effect in MS with favorable risk-benefit ratio, with ocrelizumab demonstrating efficacy in both relapsing-remitting (RR) and primary-progressive (PP) MS in phase III clinical trials. Depletion of CD52 expressing T- and B-cells and monocytes by alemtuzumab resulted in impressive and durable suppression of disease activity in RRMS patients. On the other hand, strategies targeting B-cell cytokines such as atacicept resulted in increased disease activity. As our understanding of the biology of B-cells in MS is increasing, new compounds that target B-cells continue to be developed which promise to further expand the armamentarium of MS therapies and allow for more individualized therapy for patients with this complex disease. PMID:26970489

  3. Cancer Stem Cells: Biological Functions and Therapeutically Targeting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marius Eugen Ciurea

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Almost all tumors are composed of a heterogeneous cell population, making them difficult to treat. A small cancer stem cell population with a low proliferation rate and a high tumorigenic potential is thought to be responsible for cancer development, metastasis and resistance to therapy. Stem cells were reported to be involved in both normal development and carcinogenesis, some molecular mechanisms being common in both processes. No less controversial, stem cells are considered to be important in treatment of malignant diseases both as targets and drug carriers. The efforts to understand the role of different signalling in cancer stem cells requires in depth knowledge about the mechanisms that control their self-renewal, differentiation and malignant potential. The aim of this paper is to discuss insights into cancer stem cells historical background and to provide a brief review of the new therapeutic strategies for targeting cancer stem cells.

  4. Therapeutic use of stem cells for cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faiella, Whitney; Atoui, Rony

    2016-12-01

    Stem cell treatments are a desirable therapeutic option to regenerate myocardium and improve cardiac function after myocardial infarction. Several different types of cells have been explored, each with their own benefits and limitations. Induced pluripotent stem cells possess an embryonic-like state and therefore have a high proliferative capacity, but they also pose a risk of teratoma formation. Mesenchymal stem cells have been investigated from both bone marrow and adipose tissue. Their immunomodulatory characteristics may permit the use of allogeneic cells as universal donor cells in the future. Lastly, studies have consistently shown that cardiac stem cells are better able to express markers of cardiogenesis compared to other cell types, as well improve cardiac function. The ideal source of stem cells depends on multiple factors such as the ease of extraction/isolation, effectiveness of engraftment, ability to differentiate into cardiac lineages and effect on cardiac function. Although multiple studies highlight the benefits and limitations of each cell type and reinforce the successful potential use of these cells to regenerate damaged myocardium, more studies are needed to directly compare cells from various sources. It is interesting to note that research using stem cell therapies is also expanding to treat other cardiovascular diseases including non-ischemic cardiomyopathies. PMID:27539581

  5. [Stem cells and therapeutic cloning, medical perspectives under discussion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manuel, Catherine; Lafon, Claude; Hairion, Dominique; Antoniotti, Stéphanie

    2004-03-13

    Innovative biotechnical progress over the past few years regards stem cells and therapeutic cloning, which open promising medical horizons for many presently incurable diseases. THE CURRENT DEBATE: The research work in France has been stalled because of the prohibitions listed in the so-called "bioethical" laws of 1994. The ongoing revision of these laws is based on a certain number of ethical questions and launches a disputable parlementary debate. Other than reproductive cloning and research on the embryo, the possibilities provided by stem cells and therapeutic cloning should be emphasized and the different positions advanced specified, showing an evolution in the laws in France. ABUSIVE LEGISLATIVE PROHIBITIONS: The proposed law, which maintains the prohibition for research on the embryo, with a 5-Year dispensation, and which explicitly prohibits therapeutic cloning, is not in keeping with the widening of in this field expected by research teams. Many scientists and physicians, supported by patients' associations, are aware of the importance of therapeutic progress attached to such research. They should not be stalled in their studies by the prohibitions maintained in the new law. PMID:15041874

  6. Therapeutic approaches for treating hemophilia A using embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasuda, Shogo; Tatsumi, Kohei; Sakurai, Yoshihiko; Shima, Midori; Hatake, Katsuhiko

    2016-06-01

    Hemophilia A is an X-linked rescessive bleeding disorder that results from F8 gene aberrations. Previously, we established embryonic stem (ES) cells (tet-226aa/N6-Ainv18) that secrete human factor VIII (hFVIII) by introducing the human F8 gene in mouse Ainv18 ES cells. Here, we explored the potential of cell transplantation therapy for hemophilia A using the ES cells. Transplant tet-226aa/N6-Ainv18 ES cells were injected into the spleens of severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice, carbon tetrachloride (CCl4)-pretreated wild-type mice, and CCl4-pretreated hemophilia A mice. F8 expression was induced by doxycycline in drinking water, and hFVIII-antigen production was assessed in all cell transplantation experiments. Injecting the ES cells into SCID mice resulted in an enhanced expression of the hFVIII antigen; however, teratoma generation was confirmed in the spleen. Transplantation of ES cells into wild-type mice after CCl4-induced liver injury facilitated survival and engraftment of transplanted cells without teratoma formation, resulting in hFVIII production in the plasma. Although CCl4 was lethal to most hemophilia A mice, therapeutic levels of FVIII activity, as well as the hFVIII antigen, were detected in surviving hemophilia A mice after cell transplantation. Immunolocalization results for hFVIII suggested that transplanted ES cells might be engrafted at the periportal area in the liver. Although the development of a safer induction method for liver regeneration is required, our results suggested the potential for developing an effective ES-cell transplantation therapeutic model for treating hemophilia A in the future. PMID:27131224

  7. Green Tea Catechin Metabolites Exert Immunoregulatory Effects on CD4(+) T Cell and Natural Killer Cell Activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yoon Hee; Won, Yeong-Seon; Yang, Xue; Kumazoe, Motofumi; Yamashita, Shuya; Hara, Aya; Takagaki, Akiko; Goto, Keiichi; Nanjo, Fumio; Tachibana, Hirofumi

    2016-05-11

    Tea catechins, such as (-)-epigallocatechin-3-O-gallate (EGCG), have been shown to effectively enhance immune activity and prevent cancer, although the underlying mechanism is unclear. Green tea catechins are instead converted to catechin metabolites in the intestine. Here, we show that these green tea catechin metabolites enhance CD4(+) T cell activity as well as natural killer (NK) cell activity. Our data suggest that the absence of a 4'-hydroxyl on this phenyl group (B ring) is important for the effect on immune activity. In particular, 5-(3',5'-dihydroxyphenyl)-γ-valerolactone (EGC-M5), a major metabolite of EGCG, not only increased the activity of CD4(+) T cells but also enhanced the cytotoxic activity of NK cells in vivo. These data suggest that EGC-M5 might show immunostimulatory activity. PMID:27112424

  8. Inhibition of Hypoxia Inducible Factor Alpha and Astrocyte-Elevated Gene-1 Mediates Cryptotanshinone Exerted Antitumor Activity in Hypoxic PC-3 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyo-Jeong Lee

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Although cryptotanshinone (CT was known to exert antitumor activity in several cancers, its molecular mechanism under hypoxia still remains unclear. Here, the roles of AEG-1 and HIF-1α in CT-induced antitumor activity were investigated in hypoxic PC-3 cells. CT exerted cytotoxicity against prostate cancer cells and suppressed HIF-1α accumulation and AEG-1 expression in hypoxic PC-3 cells. Also, AEG-1 was overexpressed in prostate cancer cells. Interestingly, HIF-1α siRNA transfection enhanced the cleavages of caspase-9,3, and PAPR and decreased expression of Bcl-2 and AEG1 induced by CT in hypoxic PC-3 cells. Of note, DMOG enhanced the stability of AEG-1 and HIF-1α during hypoxia. Additionally, CT significantly reduced cellular level of VEGF in PC-3 cells and disturbed tube formation of HUVECs. Consistently, ChIP assay revealed that CT inhibited the binding of HIF-1α to VEGF promoter. Furthermore, CT at 10 mg/kg suppressed the growth of PC-3 cells in BALB/c athymic nude mice by 46.4% compared to untreated control. Consistently, immunohistochemistry revealed decreased expression of Ki-67, CD34, VEGF, carbonic anhydrase IX, and AEG-1 indices in CT-treated group compared to untreated control. Overall, our findings suggest that CT exerts antitumor activity via inhibition of HIF-1α, AEG1, and VEGF as a potent chemotherapeutic agent.

  9. Neuroimmunotherapies Targeting T Cells: From Pathophysiology to Therapeutic Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bittner, Stefan; Wiendl, Heinz

    2016-01-01

    Therapeutic options for multiple sclerosis (MS) have significantly increased over the last few years. T lymphocytes are considered to play a central role in initiating and perpetuating the pathological immune response. Currently approved therapies for MS target T lymphocytes, either in an unspecific manner or directly by interference with specific T-cell pathways. While the concept of "T-cell-specific therapy" implies specificity and selectivity, currently approved approaches come from a general shaping of the immune system towards anti-inflammatory immune responses by non-T-cell-selective immune suppression or immune modulation (e.g., interferons-immune modulation approach) to a depletion of immune cell populations involving T cells (e.g., anti-CD52, alemtuzumab-immune selective depletion approach), or a selective inhibition of distinct molecular pathways in order to sequester leucocytes (e.g., natalizumab-leukocyte sequestration approach). This review will highlight the rationale and results of different T-cell-directed therapeutic approaches coming from basic animal experiments to clinical trials. We will first discuss the pathophysiological rationale for targeting T lymphocytes in MS leading to currently approved treatments acting on T lymphocytes. Furthermore, we will disuss previous promising concepts that have failed to show efficacy in clinical trials or were halted as a result of unexpected adverse events. Learning from the discrepancies between expectations and failures in practical outcomes helps to optimize future research approaches and clinical study designs. As our current view of MS pathogenesis and patient needs is rapidly evolving, novel therapeutic approaches targeting T lymphocytes will also be discussed, including specific molecular interventions such as cytokine-directed treatments or strategies enhancing immunoregulatory mechanisms. Based on clinical experience and novel pathophysiological approaches, T-cell-based strategies will remain a

  10. Breast cancer stem cells, EMT and therapeutic targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Therapeutic targeting or inhibition of the key molecules of signaling pathways can control growth of breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs). • Development of BCSCs also involves miRNA interactions. • Therapeutic achievement can be done by targeting identified targets in the BCSC pathways. - Abstract: A small heterogeneous population of breast cancer cells acts as seeds to induce new tumor growth. These seeds or breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs) exhibit great phenotypical plasticity which allows them to undergo “epithelial to mesenchymal transition” (EMT) at the site of primary tumor and a future reverse transition. Apart from metastasis they are also responsible for maintaining the tumor and conferring it with drug and radiation resistance and a tendency for post-treatment relapse. Many of the signaling pathways involved in induction of EMT are involved in CSC generation and regulation. Here we are briefly reviewing the mechanism of TGF-β, Wnt, Notch, TNF-α, NF-κB, RTK signalling pathways which are involved in EMT as well as BCSCs maintenance. Therapeutic targeting or inhibition of the key/accessory players of these pathways could control growth of BCSCs and hence malignant cancer. Additionally several miRNAs are dysregulated in cancer stem cells indicating their roles as oncogenes or tumor suppressors. This review also lists the miRNA interactions identified in BCSCs and discusses on some newly identified targets in the BCSC regulatory pathways like SHIP2, nicastrin, Pin 1, IGF-1R, pro-inflammatory cytokines and syndecan which can be targeted for therapeutic achievements

  11. Therapeutic Lymphangiogenesis With Implantation of Adipose‐Derived Regenerative Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Shimizu, Yuuki; Shibata, Rei; Shintani, Satoshi; Ishii, Masakazu; Murohara, Toyoaki

    2012-01-01

    Background Lymphedema is one of the serious clinical problems that can occur after surgical resection of malignant tumors such as breast cancer or intra‐pelvic cancers. However, no effective treatment options exist at present. Here, we report that implantation of adipose‐derived regenerative cells (ADRCs) can induce lymphangiogenesis in a mouse model of reparative lymphedema. Methods and Results ADRCs were isolated from C57BL/6J mice. To examine the therapeutic efficacy of ADRC implantation i...

  12. Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis - Cell Based Therapy and Novel Therapeutic Development

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Changsung; Lee, Hee Chul; Sung, Jung-Joon

    2014-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a neurodegenerative disease, characterized by the predominant loss of motor neurons (MNs) in primary motor cortex, the brainstem, and the spinal cord, causing premature death in most cases. Minimal delay of pathological development by available medicine has prompted the search for novel therapeutic treatments to cure ALS. Cell-based therapy has been proposed as an ultimate source for regeneration of MNs. Recent completion of non-autologous fetal spinal s...

  13. Breast cancer stem cells, EMT and therapeutic targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotiyal, Srishti; Bhattacharya, Susinjan, E-mail: s.bhattacharya@jiit.ac.in

    2014-10-10

    Highlights: • Therapeutic targeting or inhibition of the key molecules of signaling pathways can control growth of breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs). • Development of BCSCs also involves miRNA interactions. • Therapeutic achievement can be done by targeting identified targets in the BCSC pathways. - Abstract: A small heterogeneous population of breast cancer cells acts as seeds to induce new tumor growth. These seeds or breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs) exhibit great phenotypical plasticity which allows them to undergo “epithelial to mesenchymal transition” (EMT) at the site of primary tumor and a future reverse transition. Apart from metastasis they are also responsible for maintaining the tumor and conferring it with drug and radiation resistance and a tendency for post-treatment relapse. Many of the signaling pathways involved in induction of EMT are involved in CSC generation and regulation. Here we are briefly reviewing the mechanism of TGF-β, Wnt, Notch, TNF-α, NF-κB, RTK signalling pathways which are involved in EMT as well as BCSCs maintenance. Therapeutic targeting or inhibition of the key/accessory players of these pathways could control growth of BCSCs and hence malignant cancer. Additionally several miRNAs are dysregulated in cancer stem cells indicating their roles as oncogenes or tumor suppressors. This review also lists the miRNA interactions identified in BCSCs and discusses on some newly identified targets in the BCSC regulatory pathways like SHIP2, nicastrin, Pin 1, IGF-1R, pro-inflammatory cytokines and syndecan which can be targeted for therapeutic achievements.

  14. Lung Regeneration: Endogenous and Exogenous Stem Cell Mediated Therapeutic Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khondoker M. Akram

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The tissue turnover of unperturbed adult lung is remarkably slow. However, after injury or insult, a specialised group of facultative lung progenitors become activated to replenish damaged tissue through a reparative process called regeneration. Disruption in this process results in healing by fibrosis causing aberrant lung remodelling and organ dysfunction. Post-insult failure of regeneration leads to various incurable lung diseases including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. Therefore, identification of true endogenous lung progenitors/stem cells, and their regenerative pathway are crucial for next-generation therapeutic development. Recent studies provide exciting and novel insights into postnatal lung development and post-injury lung regeneration by native lung progenitors. Furthermore, exogenous application of bone marrow stem cells, embryonic stem cells and inducible pluripotent stem cells (iPSC show evidences of their regenerative capacity in the repair of injured and diseased lungs. With the advent of modern tissue engineering techniques, whole lung regeneration in the lab using de-cellularised tissue scaffold and stem cells is now becoming reality. In this review, we will highlight the advancement of our understanding in lung regeneration and development of stem cell mediated therapeutic strategies in combating incurable lung diseases.

  15. Therapeutic potential of stem cells in auditory hair cell repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryuji Hata

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of acquired hearing loss is very high. About 10% of the total population and more than one third of the population over 65 years suffer from debilitating hearing loss. The most common type of hearing loss in adults is idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss (ISSHL. In the majority of cases, ISSHL is permanent and typically associated with loss of sensory hair cells in the organ of Corti. Following the loss of sensory hair cells, the auditory neurons undergo secondary degeneration. Sensory hair cells and auditory neurons do not regenerate throughout life, and loss of these cells is irreversible and cumulative. However, recent advances in stem cell biology have gained hope that stem cell therapy comes closer to regenerating sensory hair cells in humans. A major advance in the prospects for the use of stem cells to restore normal hearing comes with the recent discovery that hair cells can be generated ex vivo from embryonic stem (ES cells, adult inner ear stem cells and neural stem cells. Furthermore, there is increasing evidence that stem cells can promote damaged cell repair in part by secreting diffusible molecules such as growth factors. These results suggest that stem-cell-based treatment regimens can be applicable to the damaged inner ear as future clinical applications.Previously we have established an animal model of cochlear ischemia in gerbils and showed progressive hair cell loss up to 4 days after ischemia. Auditory brain stem response (ABR recordings have demonstrated that this gerbil model displays severe deafness just after cochlear ischemia and gradually recovers thereafter. These pathological findings and clinical manifestations are reminiscent of ISSHL in humans. In this study, we have shown the effectiveness of stem cell therapy by using this animal model of ISSHL.

  16. Novel therapeutic Strategies for Targeting Liver Cancer Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoki Oishi, Xin Wei Wang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The cancer stem cell (CSC hypothesis was first proposed over 40 years ago. Advances in CSC isolation were first achieved in hematological malignancies, with the first CSC demonstrated in acute myeloid leukemia. However, using similar strategies and technologies, and taking advantage of available surface markers, CSCs have been more recently demonstrated in a growing range of epithelial and other solid organ malignancies, suggesting that the majority of malignancies are dependent on such a compartment.Primary liver cancer consists predominantly of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC and intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICC. It is believed that hepatic progenitor cells (HPCs could be the origin of some HCCs and ICCs. Furthermore, stem cell activators such as Wnt/β-catenin, TGF-β, Notch and Hedgehog signaling pathways also expedite tumorigenesis, and these pathways could serve as molecular targets to assist in designing cancer prevention strategies. Recent studies indicate that additional factors such as EpCAM, Lin28 or miR-181 may also contribute to HCC progression by targeting HCC CSCs. Various therapeutic drugs that directly modulate CSCs have been examined in vivo and in vitro. However, CSCs clearly have a complex pathogenesis, with a considerable crosstalk and redundancy in signaling pathways, and hence targeting single molecules or pathways may have a limited benefit for treatment. Many of the key signaling molecules are shared by both CSCs and normal stem cells, which add further challenges for designing molecularly targeted strategies specific to CSCs but sparing normal stem cells to avoid side effects. In addition to the direct control of CSCs, many other factors that are needed for the maintenance of CSCs, such as angiogenesis, vasculogenesis, invasion and migration, hypoxia, immune evasion, multiple drug resistance, and radioresistance, should be taken into consideration when designing therapeutic strategies for HCC.Here we provide a brief

  17. Expanding exertion gaming

    OpenAIRE

    Marshall, Joe; Mueller, Florian ‘Floyd’; Benford, Steve; Pijnappel, Sebastiaan

    2016-01-01

    While exertion games - digital games where the outcome is determined by physical exertion - are of growing interest in HCI, we believe the current health and fitness focus in the research of exertion games limits the opportunities this field has to offer. In order to broaden the agenda on exertion games, we link the existing fields of sports and interactive entertainment (arguing these fields have much to offer) by presenting four of our own designs as case studies. Using our experiences with...

  18. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) as skeletal therapeutics - an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeed, Hamid; Ahsan, Muhammad; Saleem, Zikria; Iqtedar, Mehwish; Islam, Muhammad; Danish, Zeeshan; Khan, Asif Manzoor

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells hold the promise to treat not only several congenital and acquired bone degenerative diseases but also to repair and regenerate morbid bone tissues. Utilizing MSCs, several lines of evidences advocate promising clinical outcomes in skeletal diseases and skeletal tissue repair/regeneration. In this context, both, autologous and allogeneic cell transfer options have been utilized. Studies suggest that MSCs are transplanted either alone by mixing with autogenous plasma/serum or by loading onto repair/induction supportive resorb-able scaffolds. Thus, this review is aimed at highlighting a wide range of pertinent clinical therapeutic options of MSCs in the treatment of skeletal diseases and skeletal tissue regeneration. Additionally, in skeletal disease and regenerative sections, only the early and more recent preclinical evidences are discussed followed by all the pertinent clinical studies. Moreover, germane post transplant therapeutic mechanisms afforded by MSCs have also been conversed. Nonetheless, assertive use of MSCs in the clinic for skeletal disorders and repair is far from a mature therapeutic option, therefore, posed challenges and future directions are also discussed. Importantly, for uniformity at all instances, term MSCs is used throughout the review. PMID:27084089

  19. Therapeutic attack of hypoxic cells of solid tumors: presidential address.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sartorelli, A C

    1988-02-15

    Hypoxic cells of solid tumors are relatively resistant to therapeutic assault. Studies have demonstrated that oxygen-deficient tumor cells exist in an environment conducive to reductive reactions making hypoxic cells particularly sensitive to bioreductive alkylating agents. Mitomycin C, the prototype bioreductive alkylating agent available for clinical use, is capable of preferentially killing oxygen-deficient cells both in vitro and in vivo. This phenomenon is at least in part the result of differences in the uptake and metabolism of mitomycin C by hypoxic and oxygenated tumor cells, with the ultimate critical lesion being the cross-linking of DNA by the mitomycin antibiotic. The combination of mitomycin C with X-irradiation, to attack hypoxic and oxygenated tumor cell populations, respectively, has led to enhanced antitumor effects in mice bearing solid tumor implants and in patients with cancer of the head and neck. More efficacious kill of hypoxic tumor cells may be possible by the use of dicoumarol in combination with mitomycin or by the use of the related antibiotic porfiromycin. The findings support the use of an agent with specificity for hypoxic tumor cells in potentially curative regimens for solid tumors. PMID:3123053

  20. Nanoparticle-labeled stem cells: a novel therapeutic vehicle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abir O El-Sadik

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abir O El-Sadik1, Afaf El-Ansary2, Sherif M Sabry31Stem Cell Unit, Anatomy Department, College of Medicine, Health Science Colleges; 2Biochemistry Department, Science College, King Saud University; 3Anatomy Department, Faculty of Medicine, Cairo University, Cairo, EgyptAbstract: Nanotechnology has been described as a general purpose technology. It has already generated a range of inventions and innovations. Development of nanotechnology will provide clinical medicine with a range of new diagnostic and therapeutic opportunities such as medical imaging, medical diagnosis, drug delivery, and cancer detection and management. Nanoparticles such as manganese, polystyrene, silica, titanium oxide, gold, silver, carbon, quantum dots, and iron oxide have received enormous attention in the creation of new types of analytical tools for biotechnology and life sciences. Labeling of stem cells with nanoparticles overcame the problems in homing and fixing stem cells to their desired site and guiding extension of stem cells to specific directions. Although the biologic effects of some nanoparticles have already been assessed, information on toxicity and possible mechanisms of various particle types remains inadequate. The aim of this review is to give an overview of the mechanisms of internalization and distribution of nanoparticles inside stem cells, as well as the influence of different types of nanoparticles on stem cell viability, proliferation, differentiation, and cytotoxicity, and to assess the role of nanoparticles in tracking the fate of stem cells used in tissue regeneration.Keywords: nanoparticles, stem cells, uptake, differentiation, cytotoxicity, tracking

  1. Harnessing the Therapeutic Potential of Th17 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonas Bystrom

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Th17 cells provide protective immunity to infections by fungi and extracellular bacteria as well as cancer but are also involved in chronic inflammation. The cells were first identified by their ability to produce interleukin 17A (IL-17A and, subsequently, associated with chronic inflammation and autoimmunity. Th17 cells have some gene profile similarity with stem cells and can remain dormant in mucosal tissues for long periods. Indeed, recent studies suggest that functionally distinct subsets of pro- and anti-inflammatory Th17 cells can interchange phenotype and functions. For development, Th17 cells require activation of the transcription factors STAT3 and RORγt while RUNX1, c-Maf, and Aiolos are involved in changes of phenotype/functions. Attempts to harness Th17 cells against pathogens and cancer using vaccination strategies are being explored. The cells gain protective abilities when induced to produce interferon γ (IFNγ. In addition, treatment with antibodies to IL-17 is effective in treating patients with psoriasis, psoriatic arthritis, and refectory rheumatoid arthritis. Moreover, since RORγt is a nuclear receptor, it is likely to be a potential future drug target for modulating Th17 functions. This review explores pathways through which Th17 subsets are induced, the molecular basis of their plasticity, and potential therapeutic strategies for their modulation in diseases.

  2. Private sector development of stem cell technology and therapeutic cloning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lysaght, Michael J; Hazlehurst, Anne L

    2003-06-01

    Based on data collected in June 2002, more than 30 biotechnology startup firms in 11 countries are pursuing commercial development of stem cell technology and therapeutic cloning. These firms employ 950-1000 scientists and support staff and spend just under $200 million on research and development each year. The field has the look and feel of a high-tech cottage industry, with about half the startups employing fewer than 15 FTEs (full time equivalents). Funding is mostly from venture capitalists and private investors. Participants are geographically dispersed, with about 40% of the activity outside the United States. Focus is equally split between embryonic and adult stem cells. Taken as a whole, both the structure and scope of the private sector in stem cell research seem appropriate to the promise and development time frames of this important new technology. PMID:12857423

  3. [Mantle cell lymphoma: Towards a personalized therapeutic strategy?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro Matilla, Belén; García-Marco, José A

    2015-06-22

    Mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) is a clinically heterogeneous non-Hodgkin lymphoma with an aggressive clinical behaviour and short survival in some cases and an indolent course in others. Advances in the biology and pathogenesis of MCL have unveiled several genes involved in deregulation of cell cycle checkpoints and the finding of subclonal populations with specific recurrent mutations (p53, ATM, NOTCH2) with an impact on disease progression and refractoriness to treatment. Prognostic stratification helps to distinguish between indolent and aggressive forms of MCL. Currently, younger fit patients benefit from more intensive front line chemotherapy regimens and consolidation with autologous transplantation, while older or frail patients are treated with less intensive regimens and rituximab maintenance. For relapsing disease, the introduction of bortezomib and lenalidomide containing regimens and B-cell receptor pathway inhibitors such as ibrutinib and idelalisib in combination with immunochemotherapy have emerged as therapeutic agents with promising clinical outcomes. PMID:25023849

  4. Comparative study on the therapeutic potential of neurally differentiated stem cells in a mouse model of multiple sclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalie L Payne

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Transplantation of neural stem cells (NSCs is a promising novel approach to the treatment of neuroinflammatory diseases such as multiple sclerosis (MS. NSCs can be derived from primary central nervous system (CNS tissue or obtained by neural differentiation of embryonic stem (ES cells, the latter having the advantage of readily providing an unlimited number of cells for therapeutic purposes. Using a mouse model of MS, we evaluated the therapeutic potential of NSCs derived from ES cells by two different neural differentiation protocols that utilized adherent culture conditions and compared their effect to primary NSCs derived from the subventricular zone (SVZ. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The proliferation and secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines by antigen-stimulated splenocytes was reduced in the presence of SVZ-NSCs, while ES cell-derived NSCs exerted differential immunosuppressive effects. Surprisingly, intravenously injected NSCs displayed no significant therapeutic impact on clinical and pathological disease outcomes in mice with experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE induced by recombinant myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein, independent of the cell source. Studies tracking the biodistribution of transplanted ES cell-derived NSCs revealed that these cells were unable to traffic to the CNS or peripheral lymphoid tissues, consistent with the lack of cell surface homing molecules. Attenuation of peripheral immune responses could only be achieved through multiple high doses of NSCs administered intraperitoneally, which led to some neuroprotective effects within the CNS. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Systemic transplantation of these NSCs does not have a major influence on the clinical course of rMOG-induced EAE. Improving the efficiency at which NSCs home to inflammatory sites may enhance their therapeutic potential in this model of CNS autoimmunity.

  5. Fetal stem cells and skeletal muscle regeneration: a therapeutic approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina Piccoli

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available More than 40% of the body mass is represented by muscle tissue, which possesses the innate ability to regenerate after damage through the activation of muscle specific stem cell, namely satellite cells. Muscle diseases, in particular chronic degenerative state of skeletal muscle such as dystrophies, lead to a perturbation of the regenerative process, which causes the premature exhaustion of satellite cell reservoir due to continue cycles of degeneration/regeneration. Nowadays, the research is focused on different therapeutic approaches, ranging from gene and cell to pharmacological therapy, but still there is not a definitive cure in particular for genetic muscle disease. Taking this in mind, in this article we will give special consideration to muscle diseases and the use of fetal derived stem cells as new approach for therapy. Cells of fetal origin, from cord blood to placenta and amniotic fluid, can be easily obtained without ethical concern, expanded and differentiated in culture, and possess immunemodulatory properties. The in vivo approach in animal models can be helpful to study the mechanism underneath the operating principle of the stem cell reservoir, namely the niche, which holds great potential to understand the onset of muscle pathologies.

  6. Mast cells: new therapeutic target in helminth immune modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vukman, K V; Lalor, R; Aldridge, A; O'Neill, S M

    2016-01-01

    Helminth infection and their secreted antigens have a protective role in many immune-mediated inflammatory disorders such as inflammatory bowel disease, rheumatoid arthritis and multiple sclerosis. However, studies have focused primarily on identifying immune protective mechanisms of helminth infection and their secreted molecules on dendritic cells and macrophages. Given that mast cells have been shown to be implicated in the pathogenesis and progression of many inflammatory disorders, their role should also be examined and considered as cellular target for helminth-based therapies. As there is a dearth of studies examining the interaction of helminth-derived antigens and mast cells, this review will focus on the role of mast cells during helminth infection and examine our current understanding of the involvement of mast cells in TH 1/TH 17-mediated immune disorders. In this context, potential mechanisms by which helminths could target the TH 1/TH 17 promoting properties of mast cells can be identified to unveil novel therapeutic mast cell driven targets in combating these inflammatory disorders. PMID:26577605

  7. Metformin and prostate cancer stem cells: a novel therapeutic target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, M J; Klotz, L H; Venkateswaran, V

    2015-12-01

    Prostate cancer is the second most frequently diagnosed cancer in the world. Localized disease can be effectively treated with radiation therapy or radical prostatectomy. However, advanced prostate cancer is more difficult to treat and if metastatic, is incurable. There is a need for more effective therapy for advanced prostate cancer. One potential target is the cancer stem cell (CSC). CSCs have been described in several solid tumors, including prostate cancer, and contribute to therapeutic resistance and tumor recurrence. Metformin, a common oral biguanide used to treat type 2 diabetes, has been demonstrated to have anti-neoplastic effects. Specifically, metformin targets CSCs in breast cancer, pancreatic cancer, glioblastoma and colon cancer. Metformin acts directly on the mitochondria to inhibit oxidative phosphorylation and reduce mitochondrial ATP production. This forces tumor cells to compensate by increasing the rate of glycolysis. CSCs rely heavily on mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation for energy production. The glycolytic switch results in an energy crisis in these cells. Metformin could be used to exploit this metabolic weakness in CSCs. This would increase CSC sensitivity to conventional cancer therapies, circumventing treatment resistance and enhancing treatment efficacy. This review will explore the characteristics of prostate CSCs, their role in tumor propagation and therapeutic resistance and the role of metformin as a potential prostate CSC sensitizer to current anticancer therapies. PMID:26215782

  8. Therapeutic Roles of Tendon Stem/Progenitor Cells in Tendinopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xin; Lin, Yu-cheng; Rui, Yun-feng; Xu, Hong-liang; Chen, Hui; Wang, Chen; Teng, Gao-jun

    2016-01-01

    Tendinopathy is a tendon disorder characterized by activity-related pain, local edema, focal tenderness to palpation, and decreased strength in the affected area. Tendinopathy is prevalent in both athletes and the general population, highlighting the need to elucidate the pathogenesis of this disorder. Current treatments of tendinopathy are both conservative and symptomatic. The discovery of tendon stem/progenitor cells (TSPCs) and erroneous differentiation of TSPCs have provided new insights into the pathogenesis of tendinopathy. In this review, we firstly present the histopathological characteristics of tendinopathy and explore the cellular and molecular cues in the pathogenesis of tendinopathy. Current evidence of the depletion of the stem cell pool and altered TSPCs fate in the pathogenesis of tendinopathy has been presented. The potential regulatory factors for either tenogenic or nontenogenic differentiation of TSPCs are also summarized. The regulation of endogenous TSPCs or supplementation with exogenous TSPCs as therapeutic targets for the treatment of tendinopathy is proposed. Therefore, inhibiting the erroneous differentiation of TSPCs and regulating the differentiation of TSPCs into tendon cells might be important areas of future research and could provide new clinical treatments for tendinopathy. The current evidence suggests that TSPCs are promising therapeutic targets for the management of tendinopathy. PMID:27195010

  9. Breast cancer stem cells, EMT and therapeutic targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotiyal, Srishti; Bhattacharya, Susinjan

    2014-10-10

    A small heterogeneous population of breast cancer cells acts as seeds to induce new tumor growth. These seeds or breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs) exhibit great phenotypical plasticity which allows them to undergo "epithelial to mesenchymal transition" (EMT) at the site of primary tumor and a future reverse transition. Apart from metastasis they are also responsible for maintaining the tumor and conferring it with drug and radiation resistance and a tendency for post-treatment relapse. Many of the signaling pathways involved in induction of EMT are involved in CSC generation and regulation. Here we are briefly reviewing the mechanism of TGF-β, Wnt, Notch, TNF-α, NF-κB, RTK signalling pathways which are involved in EMT as well as BCSCs maintenance. Therapeutic targeting or inhibition of the key/accessory players of these pathways could control growth of BCSCs and hence malignant cancer. Additionally several miRNAs are dysregulated in cancer stem cells indicating their roles as oncogenes or tumor suppressors. This review also lists the miRNA interactions identified in BCSCs and discusses on some newly identified targets in the BCSC regulatory pathways like SHIP2, nicastrin, Pin 1, IGF-1R, pro-inflammatory cytokines and syndecan which can be targeted for therapeutic achievements. PMID:25261721

  10. Current therapeutic strategies for anal squamous cell carcinoma in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Western countries, chemoradiotherapy (CRT) is well established as the standard therapy for stages II/III anal squamous cell carcinoma (ASCC). In Japan, the therapeutic modalities for and outcomes of this disease have not been clarified because ASCC is quite rare. The Colorectal Cancer Study Group of the Japan Clinical Oncology Group (JCOG-CCSG) conducted a survey to determine the current therapeutic strategies for ASCC in Japan. In July 2006, a questionnaire was sent to 49 institutions affiliated with the JCOG-CCSG to gather information on numbers of cases, therapeutic modalities, and outcomes. The target subjects were patients with stages II/III ASCC, diagnosed from January 2000 to December 2004, who were 20-80 years of age with normal major organ function and no severe complications. Replies were received from 40 institutions. A total of 59 patients satisfied the subject criteria. Detailed information was obtained for 55 subjects; 25 (45%) had stage II ASCC and 30 (55%) had stage III ASCC. CRT was performed in 25 patients (45%); surgery in 17 (31%); surgery combined with radiotherapy (RT), chemotherapy, or CRT in 8 (15%); and RT in 5 (9%). Complete response rate in CRT was 80% (20/25). The 3-year progression-free survival rates for all subjects and for CRT-only subjects were 67% and 77%, respectively. From 2000 to 2004, only 59 patients with ASCC were identified in the JCOG-CCSG survey and about half of them underwent CRT. (author)

  11. Lactobacillus casei Exerts Anti-Proliferative Effects Accompanied by Apoptotic Cell Death and Up-Regulation of TRAIL in Colon Carcinoma Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santarmaki, Valentina; Aindelis, Georgios; Tompoulidou, Evgenia; Lamprianidou, Eleftheria E.; Saxami, Georgia; Ypsilantis, Petros; Lampri, Evangeli S.; Simopoulos, Constantinos; Kotsianidis, Ioannis; Galanis, Alex; Kourkoutas, Yiannis; Dimitrellou, Dimitra; Chlichlia, Katerina

    2016-01-01

    Probiotic microorganisms such as lactic acid bacteria (LAB) exert a number of strain-specific health-promoting activities attributed to their immunomodulatory, anti-inflammatory and anti-carcinogenic properties. Despite recent attention, our understanding of the biological processes involved in the beneficial effects of LAB strains is still limited. To this end, the present study investigated the growth-inhibitory effects of Lactobacillus casei ATCC 393 against experimental colon cancer. Administration of live Lactobacillus casei (as well as bacterial components thereof) on murine (CT26) and human (HT29) colon carcinoma cell lines raised a significant concentration- and time-dependent anti-proliferative effect, determined by cell viability assays. Specifically, a dramatic decrease in viability of colon cancer cells co-incubated with 109 CFU/mL L. casei for 24 hours was detected (78% for HT29 and 52% for CT26 cells). In addition, live L. casei induced apoptotic cell death in both cell lines as revealed by annexin V and propidium iodide staining. The significance of the in vitro anti-proliferative effects was further confirmed in an experimental tumor model. Oral daily administration of 109 CFU live L. casei for 13 days significantly inhibited in vivo growth of colon carcinoma cells, resulting in approximately 80% reduction in tumor volume of treated mice. Tumor growth inhibition was accompanied by L. casei-driven up-regulation of the TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand TRAIL and down-regulation of Survivin. Taken together, these findings provide evidence for beneficial tumor-inhibitory, anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic effects driven by this probiotic LAB strain. PMID:26849051

  12. Lactobacillus casei Exerts Anti-Proliferative Effects Accompanied by Apoptotic Cell Death and Up-Regulation of TRAIL in Colon Carcinoma Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angeliki Tiptiri-Kourpeti

    Full Text Available Probiotic microorganisms such as lactic acid bacteria (LAB exert a number of strain-specific health-promoting activities attributed to their immunomodulatory, anti-inflammatory and anti-carcinogenic properties. Despite recent attention, our understanding of the biological processes involved in the beneficial effects of LAB strains is still limited. To this end, the present study investigated the growth-inhibitory effects of Lactobacillus casei ATCC 393 against experimental colon cancer. Administration of live Lactobacillus casei (as well as bacterial components thereof on murine (CT26 and human (HT29 colon carcinoma cell lines raised a significant concentration- and time-dependent anti-proliferative effect, determined by cell viability assays. Specifically, a dramatic decrease in viability of colon cancer cells co-incubated with 10(9 CFU/mL L. casei for 24 hours was detected (78% for HT29 and 52% for CT26 cells. In addition, live L. casei induced apoptotic cell death in both cell lines as revealed by annexin V and propidium iodide staining. The significance of the in vitro anti-proliferative effects was further confirmed in an experimental tumor model. Oral daily administration of 10(9 CFU live L. casei for 13 days significantly inhibited in vivo growth of colon carcinoma cells, resulting in approximately 80% reduction in tumor volume of treated mice. Tumor growth inhibition was accompanied by L. casei-driven up-regulation of the TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand TRAIL and down-regulation of Survivin. Taken together, these findings provide evidence for beneficial tumor-inhibitory, anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic effects driven by this probiotic LAB strain.

  13. c-Met in pancreatic cancer stem cells: Therapeutic implications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Marta Herreros-Villanueva; Aizpea Zubia-Olascoaga; Luis Bujanda

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the deadliest solid cancer and currently the fourth most frequent cause of cancer-related deaths.Emerging evidence suggests that cancer stem cells (CSCs) play a crucial role in the development and progression of this disease.The identification of CSC markers could lead to the development of new therapeutic targets.In this study,the authors explore the functional role of c-Met in pancreatic CSCs,by analyzing self-renewal with sphere assays and tumorigenicity capacity in NOD SCID mice.They concluded that c-Met is a novel marker for identifying pancreatic CSCs and c-Methigh in a higher tumorigenic cancer cell population.Inhibition of c-Met with XL184 blocks self-renewal capacity in pancreatic CSCs.In pancreatic tumors established in NOD SCID mice,c-Met inhibition slowed tumor growth and reduced the population of CSCs,along with preventing the development of metastases.

  14. Therapeutic Potential of Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Regenerative Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devang M. Patel

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs are stromal cells that have the ability to self-renew and also exhibit multilineage differentiation into both mesenchymal and nonmesenchymal lineages. The intrinsic properties of these cells make them an attractive candidate for clinical applications. MSCs are of keen interest because they can be isolated from a small aspirate of bone marrow or adipose tissues and can be easily expanded in vitro. Moreover, their ability to modulate immune responses makes them an even more attractive candidate for regenerative medicine as allogeneic transplant of these cells is feasible without a substantial risk of immune rejection. MSCs secrete various immunomodulatory molecules which provide a regenerative microenvironment for a variety of injured tissues or organ to limit the damage and to increase self-regulated tissue regeneration. Autologous/allogeneic MSCs delivered via the bloodstream augment the titers of MSCs that are drawn to sites of tissue injury and can accelerate the tissue repair process. MSCs are currently being tested for their potential use in cell and gene therapy for a number of human debilitating diseases and genetic disorders. This paper summarizes the current clinical and nonclinical data for the use of MSCs in tissue repair and potential therapeutic role in various diseases.

  15. Development of the Fibulin-3 protein therapeutics of non small cell lung cancer stem cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study focuses on developing an efficient bioprocess for large-scale production of fibulin-3 using Chinese Hamster Ovary cell expression system and evaluating its therapeutic potential for the treatment of cancer. The specific aims are as follows: Isolation and establishment of CSCs using FACS based on cell surface markers and high ALDH1 activity. Identification and characterization of lung cancer stem cells that acquire features of CSC upon exposure to ionizing radiation. Evaluation of the fibulin-3 effects on the stem traits and signaling pathways required for the generation and maintenance of CSCs. In vivo validation of fivulin-3 for tumor prognosis and therapeutic efficacy against lung cancer using animal model

  16. Development of the Fibulin-3 protein therapeutics of non small cell lung cancer stem cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, In Gyu; Kim, Kugchan; Jung, Il Lae; Kim, Seo Yeon; Choi, Su Im; Lee, Jae Ha

    2013-09-15

    This study focuses on developing an efficient bioprocess for large-scale production of fibulin-3 using Chinese Hamster Ovary cell expression system and evaluating its therapeutic potential for the treatment of cancer. The specific aims are as follows: Isolation and establishment of CSCs using FACS based on cell surface markers and high ALDH1 activity. Identification and characterization of lung cancer stem cells that acquire features of CSC upon exposure to ionizing radiation. Evaluation of the fibulin-3 effects on the stem traits and signaling pathways required for the generation and maintenance of CSCs. In vivo validation of fivulin-3 for tumor prognosis and therapeutic efficacy against lung cancer using animal model.

  17. Lactobacillus acidophilus (strain LB) from the resident adult human gastrointestinal microflora exerts activity against brush border damage promoted by a diarrhoeagenic Escherichia coli in human enterocyte-like cells

    OpenAIRE

    Liévin-Le Moal, V; Amsellem, R; Servin, A.L.; Coconnier, M-H

    2002-01-01

    Background and aims: The normal gastrointestinal microflora exerts a barrier effect against enteropathogens. The aim of this study was to examine whether lactobacilli, a minor genus of the resident gut microflora, exerts a protective effect against the cellular injuries promoted by the diarrhoeagenic Afa/Dr diffusely adhering Escherichia coli (Afa/Dr DAEC) C1845 strain in human intestinal cells.

  18. Cuban experience with the therapeutic use of adult stem cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The basic and clinical researches carried out during past years on the stem cells and its therapeutic possibilities are at present times, one of the most interesting subjects of the contemporaneous medicine. There are advances in the study and application of adult stem cells showing remarkable advantages on the embryonic ones, since its handling is more simple, economic and they are obtained from the own subject to be treated. For the introduction in Cuba of the regenerative cellular therapy in the Institute of Hematology and Immunology the cellular sources selected were the adult stem cells derived from bone marrow and the mobilized ones to the peripheral blood. To make easy the expansion of treatment to other hospital centers, authors standardized a technique for the mobilization of the hematopoietic stem cells to peripheral blood using a granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (Filgrastim, of national production) developing a simple, economic and more tolerable method for patients. In this way, the cellular therapy has been expanded to 6 Cuban provinces and until April, 2009 562 cases with autologous adult stem cells transplant have been treated, from which the 81.7% to correspond to patients presenting with Angiology diseases with a significant reduction of major amputations. Also, the results have been very promising in the bone lesions and periodontal processes among other diseases treated. The results obtained until now may be considered as a new achievement of revolutionary science and of our national health systems and of science and technique. The method used is an economic and feasible procedure for the institutions with scarce resources

  19. XuefuZhuyu Tang exerts antitumor effects by inhibiting glioma cell metastasis and invasion via regulating tumor microenvironment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jianmin; Zhang, Ji; Huang, Liangwen; Zhu, Xuhong; Chen, Wei; Hu, Peng

    2016-01-01

    Background XuefuZhuyu Tang (XZT) is a traditional Chinese herb used for destagnation and is currently being used for oncotherapy. This study was intended to assess the effects of XZT on glioma along with its anticancer mechanism. Materials and methods U251 cells were divided into five groups: CNC (cells were cultured with normal saline), TSC (cells were treated with TaohongSiwu Tang [TST]), XSC (cells were treated with XZT), THC (cells were treated with homogenate of TST), and XHC (cells were treated with homogenate of XZT). The mRNA and protein expression of VEGF/VEGFR, CXCR4/CXCL12, and TIMP1/MMP9/MMP2 were measured by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Western blotting, respectively. Moreover, MTT assay, transwell assay, wound-healing assay, and flow cytometry were conducted to assess the cell viability, cell migration and invasion, cell motility, and cell apoptosis of U251 cells, respectively. In vivo, three mice models (group CNM, gavaging saline; group TSM, gavaging TST; group XZM, gavaging XZT) were constructed after establishing xenograft mice models. Then, models were examined using hematoxylin and eosin staining, RT-PCR, and Western blotting. Results In vitro, XZT significantly upregulated TIMP1 expression and downregulated the expression of VEGF, VEGFR, CXCR4, CXCL12, MMP9, and MMP2 in U251 cells (all Pherb for curing glioma. PMID:27382298

  20. Cell therapeutics to treat diseases of the retina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natarajan S

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: The adult Bone Marrow Stem Cells (BMSCs have distinct advantages over the other types of stem cells. They are multipotent, can be stored for upto 10 years and considered to be one of the best sources of hematopoietic and mesenchymal stem cells in an adult body. Genetically inherited diseases such as Retinitis Pigmentosa and Degenerative diseases such as Age Related Macular Degeneration remain unsolved as no definitive treatment is available to repair the damages caused to the RPE and Photoreceptors as of now. In this scenario, the technique of Bone Marrow aspiration & isolation of Mono Nucleated Cells (MNCs & intra-vitreal injection of a very small volume of MNCs in human retinal disorders has been standardized and is safe and feasible for human studies (Mohanty et al and autotransplantation of RPEs from periphery to affected area are underpractice(Coffey et al. In this study we report our research work on different approaches to the above diseases using cell therapeuticsStudy 1 Materials & methods: Ciliary Pigment Epithelium was harvested from donor eyes from Aditya Jyot Eye Hospital, Mumbai and was taken to and grown at NCRM lab. The cells were grown in the earlier reported methodology of Brenda et al (Science 2004. Results: The CPE derived Retinal stem cells grew well in the lab. However, the practical difficulties of harvesting the same in patients limited our further steps in this study. Study II:? Materials & methods: Cadaver eye RPE cells were harvested and grown using polymer scaffolds after transporting them over 6 to 12 Hrs. The RPEs were grown on conventional methods and in polymer scaffolds and were subjected to RT-PCR. Results: Human RPEs were able to grow without amniotic membrane and the same was proven by RT-PCR. This would make it possible for the peripheral RPEs taken from patients to be stored and later expanded and used for replacing the diseased cells of the central portion of the retina in future, without having

  1. CAP1 (Cyclase-Associated Protein 1) Exerts Distinct Functions in the Proliferation and Metastatic Potential of Breast Cancer Cells Mediated by ERK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Haitao; Zhou, Guo-Lei

    2016-01-01

    The actin-regulating protein CAP1 is implicated in the invasiveness of human cancers. However, the exact role remains elusive and controversial given lines of conflicting evidence. Moreover, a potential role in the proliferative transformation has largely been overlooked. Further establishing the role and dissecting underlying mechanisms are imperative before targeting CAP1 can become a possibility for cancer treatment. Here we report our findings that CAP1 exerts cell type-dependent functions in the invasiveness of breast cancer cells. Depletion of CAP1 in the metastatic MDA-MB-231 and BT-549 cancer cells stimulated the metastatic potential while it actually inhibited it in the non-metastatic MCF-7 cancer cells or in normal cells. Moreover, we demonstrate functions for CAP1 in cancer cell proliferation and anchorage-independent growth, again in a cell context-dependent manner. Importantly, we identify pivotal roles for the ERK-centered signaling in mediating both CAP1 functions. Phosphor mutants of CAP1 at the S307/S309 regulatory site had compromised rescue effects for both the invasiveness and proliferation in CAP1-knockdown cells, suggesting that CAP1 likely mediates upstream cell signals to control both functions. These novel mechanistic insights may ultimately open up avenues for strategies targeting CAP1 in the treatment of breast cancer, tailored for specific types of the highly diverse disease. PMID:27173014

  2. Glioblastoma: Molecular Pathways, Stem Cells and Therapeutic Targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glioblastoma (GBM), a WHO-defined Grade IV astrocytoma, is the most common and aggressive CNS malignancy. Despite current treatment modalities, the survival time remains dismal. The main cause of mortality in patients with this disease is reoccurrence of the malignancy, which is attributed to treatment-resistant cancer stem cells within and surrounding the primary tumor. Inclusion of novel therapies, such as immuno- and DNA-based therapy, may provide better means of treating GBM. Furthermore, manipulation of recently discovered non-coding microRNAs, some of which regulate tumor growth through the development and maintenance of GBM stem cells, could provide new prospective therapies. Studies conducted by The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) also demonstrate the role of molecular pathways, specifically the activated PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway, in GBM tumorigenesis. Inhibition of the aforementioned pathway may provide a more direct and targeted method to GBM treatment. The combination of these treatment modalities may provide an innovative therapeutic approach for the management of GBM

  3. Glioblastoma: Molecular Pathways, Stem Cells and Therapeutic Targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jhanwar-Uniyal, Meena, E-mail: meena_jhanwar@nymc.edu; Labagnara, Michael; Friedman, Marissa; Kwasnicki, Amanda; Murali, Raj [Department of Neurosurgery, New York Medical College, Valhalla, NY 10595 (United States)

    2015-03-25

    Glioblastoma (GBM), a WHO-defined Grade IV astrocytoma, is the most common and aggressive CNS malignancy. Despite current treatment modalities, the survival time remains dismal. The main cause of mortality in patients with this disease is reoccurrence of the malignancy, which is attributed to treatment-resistant cancer stem cells within and surrounding the primary tumor. Inclusion of novel therapies, such as immuno- and DNA-based therapy, may provide better means of treating GBM. Furthermore, manipulation of recently discovered non-coding microRNAs, some of which regulate tumor growth through the development and maintenance of GBM stem cells, could provide new prospective therapies. Studies conducted by The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) also demonstrate the role of molecular pathways, specifically the activated PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway, in GBM tumorigenesis. Inhibition of the aforementioned pathway may provide a more direct and targeted method to GBM treatment. The combination of these treatment modalities may provide an innovative therapeutic approach for the management of GBM.

  4. White tea (Camellia sinensis Kuntze) exerts neuroprotection against hydrogen peroxide-induced toxicity in PC12 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, Víctor; Calvo, Maria Isabel

    2011-03-01

    Tea is a popular beverage whose consumption is associated with prevention of certain disorders. The objective of the study was to investigate the potential neuroprotective effect of white tea extract (WTE) on hydrogen peroxide induced toxicity in PC12 cells. Cells were treated with various doses of WTE (10-250 μg/ml) before exposition to 250 μM hydrogen peroxide and cell survival was determined through the MTT and LDH assays. Oxidative stress was quantified in the cells after treatments as intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and the antioxidant activity of the extract was assessed in a cell free system in terms of free radical scavenging capacity. Results showed that WTE has a significant protective effect in the PC12 cell line against hydrogen peroxide as cell survival was significantly superior in WTE-treated cells compared to hydrogen peroxide-treated cells. A reduction on intracellular oxidative stress as well as radical scavenging properties were produced by WTE. Results suggest that WTE protects PC12 cells against H(2)O(2)-induced toxicity, and that an antioxidant mechanism through ROS scavenging may be in part responsible for cells neuroprotection. PMID:21271291

  5. Gene-engineered varicella-zoster virus reactive CD4+ cytotoxic T cells exert tumor-specific effector function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landmeier, Silke; Altvater, Bianca; Pscherer, Sibylle; Eing, Bodo R; Kuehn, Joachim; Rooney, Cliona M; Juergens, Heribert; Rossig, Claudia

    2007-09-01

    T cells with grafted specificities for surface antigens provide an avenue for rapidly producing immune effector cells with tumor specificity. However, the function of chimeric receptor (chRec) gene-modified T cells is limited by lack of T-cell expansion and persistence. We propose to use varicella zoster virus (VZV)-reactive T cells as host for the chRec because these cells can be expanded both in vitro and in vivo by stimulation of their native receptor during endogenous reexposure to the virus or by administration of VZV vaccine. We obtained human T cells reactive with VZV from the peripheral blood of seropositive donors by stimulation with VZV lysate and evaluated their characteristics after genetic modification with two tumor-specific model chRecs. Cultures dominated by cytolytic CD4(+) T cells (VZV-CTL) could be expanded and maintained in vitro. Gene-modified VZV-CTL recognized and lysed tumor targets in a MHC-independent manner while maintaining functional, MHC-restricted interaction with VZV antigen through their native receptor. Thus, chRec-transduced VZV-CTL may provide a source of potent tumor-reactive cells for adoptive immunotherapy of cancer. The availability of a safe and effective VZV vaccine provides the option of repeated in vivo stimulation to maintain high T-cell numbers until the tumor is eliminated. PMID:17804749

  6. Therapeutic vaccines in non-small cell lung cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Socola, Francisco; Scherfenberg, Naomi; Raez, Luis E

    2013-01-01

    Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) unfortunately carries a very poor prognosis. Patients usually do not become symptomatic, and therefore do not seek treatment, until the cancer is advanced and it is too late to employ curative treatment options. New therapeutic options are urgently needed for NSCLC, because even current targeted therapies cure very few patients. Active immunotherapy is an option that is gaining more attention. A delicate and complex interplay exists between the tumor and the immune system. Solid tumors utilize a variety of mechanisms to evade immune detection. However, if the immune system can be stimulated to recognize the tumor as foreign, tumor cells can be specifically eliminated with little systemic toxicity. A number of vaccines designed to boost immunity against NSCLC are currently undergoing investigation in phase III clinical trials. Belagenpumatucel-L, an allogeneic cell vaccine that decreases transforming growth factor (TGF-β) in the tumor microenvironment, releases the immune suppression caused by the tumor and it has shown efficacy in a wide array of patients with advanced NSCLC. Melanoma-associated antigen A3 (MAGE-A3), an antigen-based vaccine, has shown promising results in MAGE-A3+ NSCLC patients who have undergone complete surgical resection. L-BLP25 and TG4010 are both antigenic vaccines that target the Mucin-1 protein (MUC-1), a proto-oncogene that is commonly mutated in solid tumors. CIMAVax is a recombinant human epidermal growth factor (EGF) vaccine that induces anti-EGF antibody production and prevents EGF from binding to its receptor. These vaccines may significantly improve survival and quality of life for patients with an otherwise dismal NSCLC prognosis. This review is intended to give an overview of the current data and the most promising studies of active immunotherapy for NSCLC.

  7. CEBPA exerts a specific and biologically important proapoptotic role in pancreatic β cells through its downstream network targets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barbagallo, Davide; Condorelli, Angelo Giuseppe; Piro, Salvatore;

    2014-01-01

    Transcription factor CEBPA has been widely studied for its involvement in hematopoietic cell differentiation and causal role in hematological malignancies. We demonstrate here that it also performs a causal role in cytokine-induced apoptosis of pancreas β cells. Treatment of two mouse pancreatic ...... regulator within the apoptotic network activated in pancreatic β cells during insulitis, and Arl6ip5, Tnfrsf10b, Traf2, and Ubc are key executioners of this program....

  8. Lentinan exerts synergistic apoptotic effects with paclitaxel in A549 cells via activating ROS-TXNIP-NLRP3 inflammasome

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Wei; Gu, Jun; Qi, Jun; Zeng, Xiao-Ning; Ji, Juan; Chen, Zheng-Zhen; Sun, Xiu-Lan

    2015-01-01

    Paclitaxel is generally used to treat cancers in clinic as an inhibitor of cell division. However, the acquired resistance in tumours limits its clinical efficacy. Therefore, the aim of this study was to detect whether co-treatment with lentinan enhanced the anti-cancer effects of paclitaxel in A549 cells. We found that the combination of paclitaxel and lentinan resulted in a significantly stronger inhibition on A549 cell proliferation than paclitaxel treatment alone. Co-treatment with paclit...

  9. Remote control of therapeutic T cells through a small molecule-gated chimeric receptor

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Chia-Yung; Kole T Roybal; Puchner, Elias M.; Onuffer, James; Lim, Wendell A.

    2015-01-01

    There is growing promise in using engineered cells as therapeutic agents. For example, synthetic Chimeric Antigen Receptors (CARs) can redirect T cells to recognize and eliminate tumor cells expressing specific antigens. Despite promising clinical results, excessive activity and poor control over such engineered T cells can cause severe toxicities. We present the design of “ON-switch” CARs that enable small molecule-control over T cell therapeutic functions, while still retaining antigen spec...

  10. Aloe-emodin exerts a potent anticancer and immunomodulatory activity on BRAF-mutated human melanoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabolacci, Claudio; Cordella, Martina; Turcano, Lorenzo; Rossi, Stefania; Lentini, Alessandro; Mariotti, Sabrina; Nisini, Roberto; Sette, Giovanni; Eramo, Adriana; Piredda, Lucia; De Maria, Ruggero; Facchiano, Francesco; Beninati, Simone

    2015-09-01

    Aim of this study was to extend the knowledge on the antineoplastic effect of aloe-emodin (AE), a natural hydroxyanthraquinone compound, both in metastatic human melanoma cell lines and in primary stem-like cells (melanospheres). Treatment with AE caused reduction of cell proliferation and induction of SK-MEL-28 and A375 cells differentiation, characterized by a marked increase of transamidating activity of transglutaminase whose expression remained unmodified. In vitro antimetastatic property of AE was evaluated by adhesion and Boyden chamber invasion assays. The effect of AE on melanoma cytokines/chemokines production was determined by a multiplex assay: interestingly AE showed an immunomodulatory activity through GM-CSF and IFN-γ production. We report also that AE significantly reduced the proliferation, stemness and invasive potential of melanospheres. Moreover, AE treatment significantly enhanced dabrafenib (a BRAF inhibitor) antiproliferative activity in BRAF mutant cell lines. Our results confirm that AE possesses remarkable antineoplastic properties against melanoma cells, indicating this anthraquinone as a promising agent for differentiation therapy of cancer, or as adjuvant in chemotherapy and targeted therapy. Further, its mechanisms of action support a potential efficacy of AE treatment to counteract resistance of BRAF-mutated melanoma cells to target therapy. PMID:26048310

  11. Both cell substratum regulation and hormonal regulation of milk protein gene expression are exerted primarily at the posttranscriptional level.

    OpenAIRE

    Eisenstein, R S; Rosen, J. M.

    1988-01-01

    The mechanism by which individual peptide and steroid hormones and cell-substratum interactions regulate milk protein gene expression has been studied in the COMMA-D mammary epithelial cell line. In the presence of insulin, hydrocortisone, and prolactin, growth of COMMA-D cells on floating collagen gels in comparison with that on a plastic substratum resulted in a 2.5- to 3-fold increase in the relative rate of beta-casein gene transcription but a 37-fold increase in beta-casein mRNA accumula...

  12. HOXA13 exerts a beneficial effect in albumin-induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition via the glucocorticoid receptor signaling pathway in human renal tubular epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Li; He, Qingnan; Li, Xiaoyan; Shuai, Lanjun; Chen, Haixia; Li, Yongzhen; Yi, Zhuwen

    2016-07-01

    Previous studies have suggested that albumin-induced renal tubular epithelial cell injury contributes to renal interstitial fibrosis. Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is known to be a key mechanism in the pathogenesis and progression of renal interstitial fibrosis. Homeobox protein HOX‑A13 (HOXA13) is a nuclear transcriptional factor that has been reported to be involved in renal fibrosis. However, the mechanism underlying the effect of HOXA13 in human serum albumin (HSA)‑induced EMT in HKC renal tubular epithelial cells remains to be elucidated. Thus, the aim of the present study was to investigate the role of HOXA13 in HSA‑induced EMT in HKC cells and the potential mechanism of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) signaling pathway. The protein and mRNA expression levels of HOXA13, cytokeratin, and vimentin were determined by western blot analysis and reverse transcription‑quantitative polymerase chain reaction in HKC cells, which were co‑incubated with HSA at different concentrations or for different time periods. The results demonstrated that HOXA13 mRNA and protein expression decreased in a dose‑ and time‑dependent manner when induced by HSA in HCK cells. The liposomal transfection experiment suggested that overexpression of HOXA13 activated the GR signal, which inhibits HSA-induced EMT. HOXA13 is involved in HSA‑induced EMT in HKC cells and upregulation of HOXA13 exerts a beneficial effect in EMT, which may be associated with the GR signaling pathway. PMID:27176855

  13. Stevia rebaudiana ethanolic extract exerts better antioxidant properties and antiproliferative effects in tumour cells than its diterpene glycoside stevioside.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, Víctor; Pérez, Sergio; Vinuesa, Arturo; Zorzetto, Christian; Abian, Olga

    2016-04-20

    Steviol glycosides are currently being used as natural sweeteners by the food industry and Stevia rebaudiana has long been used as a sweet plant in South America for patients suffering from diabetes. In this study, a Stevia rebaudiana ethanolic extract (SREE) was prepared, analysed and tested for antioxidant activity in terms of free radical scavenging properties and antiproliferative effects in cervix (HeLa), pancreatic (MiaPaCa-2) and colonic (HCT116) cancer cells. The antiproliferative mechanism was confirmed by testing the effects on cyclin D1-CDK4. Bioassays were also performed for the diterpene glycoside stevioside. Our results demonstrate that the extract acts as an antioxidant being able to scavenge free radicals, but this activity was not due to stevioside. The extract also induced cell death in the three cell lines, being more active against cervix cancer cells (HeLa); however, the concentration of stevioside needed to produce antiproliferative effects was higher than the amount of steviol glycosides found in a lower dose of extract inducing cell death. In addition, the extract clearly inhibited CDK4 whereas stevioside did not, concluding that the antiproliferative activity of stevia may be due to inhibition of cyclin-dependent kinases performed by other compounds of the extract. PMID:27071804

  14. Environmental and Genetic Activation of Hypothalamic BDNF Modulates T-cell Immunity to Exert an Anticancer Phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Run; Bergin, Stephen M; Huang, Wei; Slater, Andrew M; Liu, Xianglan; Judd, Ryan T; Lin, En-Ju D; Widstrom, Kyle J; Scoville, Steven D; Yu, Jianhua; Caligiuri, Michael A; Cao, Lei

    2016-06-01

    Macroenvironmental factors, including a patient's physical and social environment, play a role in cancer risk and progression. Our previous studies show that living in an enriched environment (EE) providing complex stimuli confers an anticancer phenotype in mice mediated, in part by a specific neuroendocrine axis, with brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) as the key brain mediator. Here, we investigated how an EE modulated T-cell immunity and its role in the EE-induced anticancer effects. Our data demonstrated that CD8 T cells were required to mediate the anticancer effects of an EE in an orthotropic model of melanoma. In secondary lymphoid tissue (SLT), an EE induced early changes in the phenotype of T-cell populations, characterized by a decrease in the ratio of CD4 T helper to CD8 cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL). Overexpression of hypothalamic BDNF reproduced EE-induced T-cell phenotypes in SLT, whereas knockdown of hypothalamic BDNF inhibited EE-induced immune modulation in SLT. Both propranolol and mifepristone blocked the EE-associated modulation of CTLs in SLT, suggesting that both the sympathetic nervous system and the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis were involved. Our results demonstrated that enhanced anticancer effect of an EE was mediated at least in part through modulation of T-cell immunity and provided support to the emerging concept of manipulating a single gene in the brain to improve cancer immunotherapy. Cancer Immunol Res; 4(6); 488-97. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27045020

  15. Differential Cytotoxicity of MEX: a Component of Neem Oil Whose Action Is Exerted at the Cell Membrane Level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Ricci

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Neem oil is obtained from the seeds of the tree Azadirachta indica. Its chemical composition is very complex, being rich in terpenoids and limonoids, as well as volatile sulphur modified compounds. This work focused on the evaluation of a component of the whole Neem oil obtained by methanolic extraction and defined as MEX. Cytotoxicity was assessed on two different cell populations: a stabilized murine fibroblast line (3T6 and a tumor cell line (HeLa. The data presented here suggest a differential sensitivity of these two populations, the tumor line exhibiting a significantly higher sensitivity to MEX. The data strongly suggest that its toxic target is the cell membrane. In addition the results presented here imply that MEX may contain one or more agents that could find a potential use in anti-proliferative therapy.

  16. Differential Cytotoxicity of MEX: a Component of Neem Oil Whose Action Is Exerted at the Cell Membrane Level

    OpenAIRE

    Francesca Ricci; Valerio Berardi; Gianfranco Risuleo

    2008-01-01

    Neem oil is obtained from the seeds of the tree Azadirachta indica. Its chemical composition is very complex, being rich in terpenoids and limonoids, as well as volatile sulphur modified compounds. This work focused on the evaluation of a component of the whole Neem oil obtained by methanolic extraction and defined as MEX. Cytotoxicity was assessed on two different cell populations: a stabilized murine fibroblast line (3T6) and a tumor cell line (HeLa). The data presented here suggest a diffe...

  17. Stem cells for cell replacement therapy: a therapeutic strategy for HD?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosser, Anne; Svendsen, Clive N

    2014-09-15

    Much interest has been expressed over the last couple of decades in the potential application of stem cells to medicine, both for research and diagnostic tools and as a source of donor cells for therapeutic purposes. Potential therapeutic applications include replacement of cells in many body organs where the capacity for intrinsic repair is limited, including the pancreas, heart, and brain. A key challenge is to generate the relevant donor cell types, and this is particularly challenging in the brain where the number of different neuronal subtypes is so great. Although dopamine neuron replacement in Parkinson's disease has been the focus of most clinical studies, great interest has been shown in this approach for other disorders, including Huntington's disease. Replacing complete neural circuits in the adult brain is clearly challenging, and there are many other complexities with regard to both donor cells and host. This article presents the pros and cons of taking a cell therapy approach in Huntington's disease. It considers the implantation both of cells that are already of the same neural subtype as those lost in the disease process (ie, primary fetal cells derived from the developing striatum) and those derived from stem cells, which require "directing" toward that phenotype. PMID:25216372

  18. Targeting CD47-SIRPα interactions for potentiating therapeutic antibody-mediated tumor cell destruction by phagocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, X.W.

    2014-01-01

    The primary aim of the studies described in this thesis was to investigate the role of CD47-SIRPα interactions in therapeutic antibody-dependent tumor cell destruction by human phagocytes and also explore the killing mechanism(s) by which human phagocytes, and in particular human neutrophils, mediate therapeutic antibody-dependent cytotoxicity towards cancer cells.

  19. Activation of Neuropeptide Y Receptors Modulates Retinal Ganglion Cell Physiology and Exerts Neuroprotective Actions In Vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martins, João; Elvas, Filipe; Brudzewsky, Dan; Martins, Tânia; Kolomiets, Bogdan; Tralhão, Pedro; Gøtzsche, Casper R; Cavadas, Cláudia; Castelo-Branco, Miguel; Woldbye, David P D; Picaud, Serge; Santiago, Ana R; Ambrósio, António F

    2015-01-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is expressed in mammalian retina but the location and potential modulatory effects of NPY receptor activation remain largely unknown. Retinal ganglion cell (RGC) death is a hallmark of several retinal degenerative diseases, particularly glaucoma. Using purified RGCs and ex vivo...

  20. Downregulation of survivin expression exerts antitumoral effects on mouse breast cancer cells in vitro and in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    MA, WEN-HUI; LIU, YONG-CHAO; XUE, MEI-LAN; ZHENG, ZHENG; GE, YIN-LIN

    2016-01-01

    Metastasis constantly occurs in the majority of cases of primary breast cancer at late stage or following surgical treatment. Survivin, a member of the inhibitor of apoptosis protein family, has long been recognized as a promising anticancer target, but its antitumor effects remain largely unexplored. In order to elucidate the role of survivin in breast cancer metastasis, short interfering RNA (siRNA) was used in the present study to specifically downregulate survivin expression in the murine breast cancer cell line 4T1. The results demonstrated that blocking the expression of survivin by siRNA inhibited the proliferation, migration and invasion abilities of murine breast cancer cells in vitro. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-C is a lymphatic endothelial cell-stimulating factor that may lead to the formation of lymphatic vessels in lymph nodes. In the present study, the inhibition of survivin by siRNA was able to reduce the overexpression of VEGF-C in 4T1 cells. Furthermore, intratumoral injections of the survivin-siRNA significantly inhibited the growth of orthotopically transplanted 4T1 tumors in vivo. In addition, the number of pulmonary metastases and the microlymphatic vessel density were significantly reduced in vivo, following transfection with survivin-siRNA. The results of the present study suggested that the Akt/hypoxia-inducible factor-1α signaling pathway participates in the survivin-mediated downregulation of VEGF-C expression observed in breast cancer cells treated with survivin-siRNA. Therefore, the use of siRNA specifically targeting survivin may be a potential anticancer method in the future. PMID:26870183

  1. Arctigenin exerts anti-colitis efficacy through inhibiting the differentiation of Th1 and Th17 cells via an mTORC1-dependent pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xin; Dou, Yannong; Yang, Yan; Bian, Difei; Luo, Jinque; Tong, Bei; Xia, Yufeng; Dai, Yue

    2015-08-15

    Arctigenin, the main effective constituent of Arctium lappa L. fruit, has previously been proven to dramatically attenuate dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis in mice, a frequently used animal model of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). As Th1 and Th17 cells play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of IBD, the present study addressed whether and how arctigenin exerted anti-colitis efficacy by interfering with the differentiation and activation of Th1/Th17 cells. In vitro, arctigenin was shown to markedly inhibit the differentiation of Th17 cells from naïve T cells, and moderately inhibit the differentiation of Th1 cells, which was accompanied by lowered phosphorylation of STAT3 and STAT4, respectively. In contrast, arctigenin was lack of marked effect on the differentiation of either Th2 or regulatory T cells. Furthermore, arctigenin was shown to suppress the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) pathway in T cells as demonstrated by down-regulated phosphorylation of the downstream target genes p70S6K and RPS6, and it functioned independent of two well-known upstream kinases PI3K/AKT and ERK. Arctigenin was also able to inhibit the activity of mTORC1 by dissociating raptor from mTOR. Interestingly, the inhibitory effect of arctigenin on T cell differentiation disappeared under a status of mTORC1 overactivation via knockdown of tuberous sclerosis complex 2 (TSC2, a negative regulator of mTORC1) or pretreatment of leucine (an agonist of mTOR). In DSS-induced mice, the inhibition of Th1/Th17 responses and anti-colitis effect of arctigenin were abrogated by leucine treatment. In conclusion, arctigenin ameliorates colitis through down-regulating the differentiation of Th1 and Th17 cells via mTORC1 pathway. PMID:26074264

  2. Scoparone Exerts Anti-Tumor Activity against DU145 Prostate Cancer Cells via Inhibition of STAT3 Activity

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Jeong-Kook; Kim, Joon-Young; Kim, Han-Jong; Park, Keun-Gyu; Harris, Robert A.; Cho, Won-Jea; Lee, Jae-Tae; Lee, In-Kyu

    2013-01-01

    Scoparone, a natural compound isolated from Artemisia capillaris, has been used in Chinese herbal medicine to treat neonatal jaundice. Signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) contributes to the growth and survival of many human tumors. This study was undertaken to investigate the anti-tumor activity of scoparone against DU145 prostate cancer cells and to determine whether its effects are mediated by inhibition of STAT3 activity. Scoparone inhibited proliferation of DU145 ce...

  3. Noni (Morinda citrifolia L.) Fruit Extracts Improve Colon Microflora and Exert Anti-Inflammatory Activities in Caco-2 Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hsin-Lun; Liu, Cheng-Tzu; Chou, Ming-Chih; Ko, Chien-Hui; Wang, Chin-Kun

    2015-06-01

    Intestinal microflora and inflammation are associated with the risk of inflammatory bowel diseases. Noni (Morinda citrifolia L.) has various bioactivities, but its effect on colon health remains unknown. This study focused on the effects of fermented noni fruit extracts on colon microflora and inflammation of colon epithelial cells. The anti-inflammatory activities of ethanol and ethyl acetate extracts on Caco-2 cells were evaluated including interleukin-8 (IL-8) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). The growth of Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium species was promoted by ethanol extract. Ethyl acetate extract decreased intracellular reactive oxygen species and significantly suppressed COX-2, IL-8, and prostaglandin E2 production and neutrophil chemotaxis by suppressing the translocation of the p65 subunit. Quercetin was the main contributor to the anti-inflammatory activity. The fermented noni fruit promoted probiotic growths and downregulated the intracellular oxidation and inflammation in Caco-2 cells. These results suggest that fermented noni fruit might protect against inflammatory diseases of the colon. PMID:25651187

  4. Resveratrol‑4‑O‑D‑(2'‑galloyl)‑glucopyranoside exerts an anticancer effect on leukemia cells via inducing apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Pu; Wang, Beili; Pan, Baishen; Guo, Wei

    2016-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the anticancer effects of resveratrol‑4‑O‑D-(2'‑galloyl)-glucopyranoside (REG) on leukemia and the mechanism underlying its effects. Three leukemia cell lines (HL‑60, Jurkat and U937) were used in this study. A Cell Counting kit‑8 assay was performed to evaluate the anti‑proliferative activity of REG on leukemia cell lines, and flow cytometric analysis was used to detect REG‑induced apoptosis. In addition, western blot analysis was conducted to detect the levels of apoptosis‑related proteins including, cytochrome c, cleaved (c)‑caspases‑3 and ‑9, B‑cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl‑2) and Bcl‑2‑associated protein x (Bax). Finally, a HL‑60 cell xenograft model in nude mice was used to evaluate the antitumor effect of REG on leukemia in vivo. The present results indicated that REG can significantly inhibit the proliferation of HL‑60, Jurkat and U937 cell lines in a concentration‑ and time‑dependent manner. The half maximal inhibitory concentration values were 38.4, 49.1 and 48.2 µg/ml for HL‑60, Jurkat and U937 cells, respectively. Furthermore, flow cytometric analysis demonstrated that REG can induce the apoptosis of HL‑60 cells, as well as increase the levels of cytochrome c, c‑caspases‑3 and ‑9, and Bax, as well as downregulate the expression of Bcl‑2. In vivo, REG was found to possess a marked anticancer effect on leukemia. In combination, the present results indicated that REG exerts significant anticancer effects on leukemia in vivo and in vitro through the induction of apoptosis. PMID:26781500

  5. Resveratrol and Estradiol Exert Disparate Effects on Cell Migration, Cell Surface Actin Structures, and Focal Adhesion Assembly in MDA-MB-231 Human Breast Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas G. Azios

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Resveratrol, a grape polyphenol, is thought to be a cancer preventive, yet its effects on metastatic breast cancer are relatively unknown. Since cancer cell invasion is dependent on cell migration, the chemotactic response of MDA-MB-231 metastatic human breast cancer cells to resveratrol, estradiol (E2, or epidermal growth factor (EGF was investigated. Resveratrol decreased while E2 and EGF increased directed cell migration. Resveratrol may inhibit cell migration by altering the cytoskeleton. Resveratrol induced a rapid global array of filopodia and decreased focal adhesions and focal adhesion kinase (FAK activity. E2 or EGF treatment did not affect filopodia extension but increased lamellipodia and associated focal adhesions that are integral for cell migration. Combined resveratrol and E2 treatment resulted in a filopodia and focal adhesion response similar to resveratrol alone. Combined resveratrol and EGF resulted in a lamellipodia and focal adhesion response similar to EGF alone. E2 and to a lesser extent resveratrol increased EGFR activity. The cytoskeletal changes and EGFR activity in response to E2 were blocked by EGFR1 inhibitor indicating that E2 may increase cell migration via crosstalk with EGFR signaling. These data suggest a promotional role for E2 in breast cancer cell migration but an antiestrogenic, preventative role for resveratrol.

  6. C-reactive protein exerts angiogenic effects on vascular endothelial cells and modulates associated signalling pathways and gene expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luque Ana

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Formation of haemorrhagic neovessels in the intima of developing atherosclerotic plaques is thought to significantly contribute to plaque instability resulting in thrombosis. C-reactive protein (CRP is an acute phase reactant whose expression in the vascular wall, in particular, in reactive plaque regions, and circulating levels increase in patients at high risk of cardiovascular events. Although CRP is known to induce a pro-inflammatory phenotype in endothelial cells (EC a direct role on modulation of angiogenesis has not been established. Results Here, we show that CRP is a powerful inducer of angiogenesis in bovine aortic EC (BAEC and human coronary artery EC (HCAEC. CRP, at concentrations corresponding to moderate/high risk (1–5 μg/ml, induced a significant increase in proliferation, migration and tube-like structure formation in vitro and stimulated blood vessel formation in the chick chorioallantoic membrane assay (CAM. CRP treated with detoxi-gel columns retained such effects. Western blotting showed that CRP increased activation of early response kinase-1/2 (ERK1/2, a key protein involved in EC mitogenesis. Furthermore, using TaqMan Low-density Arrays we identified key pro-angiogenic genes induced by CRP among them were vascular endothelial cell growth factor receptor-2 (VEGFR2/KDR, platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF-BB, notch family transcription factors (Notch1 and Notch3, cysteine-rich angiogenic inducer 61 (CYR61/CCN1 and inhibitor of DNA binding/differentiation-1 (ID1. Conclusion This data suggests a role for CRP in direct stimulation of angiogenesis and therefore may be a mediator of neovessel formation in the intima of vulnerable plaques.

  7. Points of control exerted along the macrophage-endothelial cell-polymorphonuclear neutrophil axis by PECAM-1 in the innate immune response of acute colonic inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimoto, Naohito; Rui, Tao; Yang, Min; Bharwani, Sulaiman; Handa, Osamu; Yoshida, Norimasa; Yoshikawa, Toshikazu; Kvietys, Peter R

    2008-08-01

    PECAM-1 is expressed on endothelial cells and leukocytes. Its extracellular domain has been implicated in leukocyte diapedesis. In this study, we used PECAM-1(-/-) mice and relevant cells derived from them to assess the role of PECAM-1 in an experimental model of acute colonic inflammation with a predominant innate immune response, i.e., 2,4,6-trinitrobenzine sulfonic acid (TNBS). Using chimeric approaches, we addressed the points of control exerted by PECAM-1 along the macrophage-endothelial cell-polymorphonuclear neutrophil (PMN) axis. In vivo, TNBS-induced colitis was ameliorated in PECAM-1(-/-) mice, an event attributed to PECAM-1 on hematopoietic cells rather than to PECAM-1 on endothelial cells. The in vivo innate immune response was mimicked in vitro by using a construct of the vascular-interstitial interface, i.e., PMN transendothelial migration was induced by colonic lavage fluid (CLF) from TNBS mice or macrophages (MPhi) challenged with CLF. Using the construct, we confirmed that endothelial cell PECAM-1 does not play a role in PMN transendothelial migration. Although MPhi activation (NF-kappaB nuclear binding) and function (keratinocyte-derived chemokine production) induced by CLF was diminished in PECAM-1(-/-) MPhi, this did not affect their ability to promote PMN transendothelial migration. By contrast, PECAM-1(-/-) PMN did not adhere to or migrate across endothelial cell monolayers in response to CLF. Further, as compared with PECAM-1(+/+) PMN, PECAM-1(-/-) PMN were less effective in orientating their CXCR2 receptors (polarization) in the direction of a chemotactic gradient. Collectively, our findings indicate that PECAM-1 modulation of PMN function (at a step before diapedesis) most likely contributes to the inflammation in a colitis model with a strong innate immune component. PMID:18641353

  8. Transplanted Dentate Progenitor Cells Show Increased Survival in an Enriched Environment But Do Not Exert a Neurotrophic Effect on Spatial Memory Within 2 Weeks of Engraftment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamal, Amanda L; Walker, Tara L; Waber Nguyen, Amanda J; Berman, Robert F; Kempermann, Gerd; Waldau, Ben

    2015-01-01

    Cyclin D2 knockout mice show decreased levels of endogenous dentate neurogenesis. We investigated whether transplanted dentate progenitor cells from wild-type mice respond in vivo to an enriched environment and whether they improve deficient dentate neurogenesis through a neurotrophic effect. Adult cyclin D2 knockout mice were transplanted with passaged adult progenitor cells and kept in an enriched environment or under standard housing conditions in isolation. After 1 week, animals living in an enriched environment underwent water maze testing. Progenitor cells grown on a laminin/poly-d-lysine monolayer expressed Sox2 and nestin and could be differentiated in vitro into neurons and astrocytes. After transplantation into the dentate gyrus, cells preferentially survived along the laminin-rich ependymal lining of the basal cistern or basal membrane of capillaries. A subpopulation of transplanted cells migrated into the interstitial space of the hippocampus and was not associated with laminin. Environmental enrichment led to a significant increase in the survival of transplanted progenitor cells on laminin in the dentate gyrus after 2 weeks. However, animals did not show an enhanced performance in the Morris water maze, and transplantation failed to exert a neurotrophic effect on endogenous neurogenesis after 2 weeks. However, a major limitation of the study is the short-term period of investigation, which may have been insufficient to capture functional effects. In conclusion, initial survival of transplanted neural progenitor cells was dependent on the presence of laminin and was significantly enhanced by environmental enrichment. Further studies are needed to address whether an enriched environment continues to promote graft survival over longer periods of time. PMID:25621922

  9. Regulation of cell proliferation and migration in glioblastoma: New therapeutic approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YangjinKim

    2013-03-01

    biophysical properties of cells, dynamics of the core control system, and microenvironment as well as glucose injection methods. We developed a new type of therapeutic approaches: effective injection of chemoattractant for bring invasive cells back to the surgical site after initial surgery, followed by glucose injection at the same location. The model suggests that a good combination of chemoattractant and glucose injection at appropriate time frames may lead to an effective therapeutic strategy of eradicating tumor cells.

  10. FTIR Metabolomic Fingerprint Reveals Different Modes of Action Exerted by Structural Variants of N-Alkyltropinium Bromide Surfactants on Escherichia coli and Listeria innocua Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corte, Laura; Tiecco, Matteo; Roscini, Luca; De Vincenzi, Sergio; Colabella, Claudia; Germani, Raimondo; Tascini, Carlo; Cardinali, Gianluigi

    2015-01-01

    Surfactants are extremely important agents to clean and sanitize various environments. Their biocidal activity is a key factor determined by the interactions between amphiphile structure and the target microbial cells. The object of this study was to analyze the interactions between four structural variants of N-alkyltropinium bromide surfactants with the Gram negative Escherichia coli and the Gram positive Listeria innocua bacteria. Microbiological and conductometric methods with a previously described FTIR bioassay were used to assess the metabolomic damage exerted by these compounds. All surfactants tested showed more biocidal activity in L. innocua than in E. coli. N-tetradecyltropinium bromide was the most effective compound against both species, while all the other variants had a reduced efficacy as biocides, mainly against E. coli cells. In general, the most prominent metabolomic response was observed for the constituents of the cell envelope in the fatty acids (W1) and amides (W2) regions and at the wavenumbers referred to peptidoglycan (W2 and W3 regions). This response was particularly strong and negative in L. innocua, when cells were challenged by N-tetradecyltropinium bromide, and by the variant with a smaller head and a 12C tail (N-dodecylquinuclidinium bromide). Tail length was critical for microbial inhibition especially when acting against E. coli, maybe due the complex nature of Gram negative cell envelope. Statistical analysis allowed us to correlate the induced mortality with the metabolomic cell response, highlighting two different modes of action. In general, gaining insights in the interactions between fine structural properties of surfactants and the microbial diversity can allow tailoring these compounds for the various operative conditions. PMID:25588017

  11. YC-1 exerts inhibitory effects on MDA-MB-468 breast cancer cells by targeting EGFR in vitro and in vivo under normoxic condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huan-Chen Cheng

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available 3-(5'-hydroxymethyl-2'-furyl-1-benzyl indazole (YC-1, the hypoxia-inducible factor-1 alpha (HIF-1α inhibitor, suppresses tumor proliferation and metastasis by down-regulating HIF-1α expression under hypoxic conditions. Our previous studies demonstrated that YC-1 inhibited breast cancer cell proliferation under normoxic conditions. In the current study, we investigated the targets of YC-1 and mechanism of its action in MDA-MB-468 breast cancer cells. In the in vitro experiments, we found that YC-1 significantly inhibited MDA-MB-468 cell proliferation in normoxia and hypoxia. Under normoxic conditions, YC-1 induced apoptosis of MDA-MB-468 cells and blocked cell cycle in the G1 phase, and these effects were possibly related to caspase 8, p21, and p27 expression. RT-PCR and Western blotting results showed that YC-1 primarily inhibited HIF-1α at the mRNA and protein levels under hypoxic conditions, but suppressed the expression of epidermal growth factor receptor(EGFR at the mRNA and protein levels under normoxic conditions. In vivo, YC-1 prolonged survival, increased survival rate, decreased tumor size and metastasis rate, and inhibited tissue EGFR and HIF-1α expression. However, YC-1 exerted no obvious effect on body weight. These results indicate that YC-1 inhibits the proliferation of MDA-MB-468 cells by acting on multiple targets with minimal side effects. Thus, YC-1 is a promising target drug for breast cancer.

  12. Major Components of Energy Drinks (Caffeine, Taurine, and Guarana Exert Cytotoxic Effects on Human Neuronal SH-SY5Y Cells by Decreasing Reactive Oxygen Species Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fares Zeidán-Chuliá

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Scope. To elucidate the morphological and biochemical in vitro effects exerted by caffeine, taurine, and guarana, alone or in combination, since they are major components in energy drinks (EDs. Methods and Results. On human neuronal SH-SY5Y cells, caffeine (0.125–2 mg/mL, taurine (1–16 mg/mL, and guarana (3.125–50 mg/mL showed concentration-dependent nonenzymatic antioxidant potential, decreased the basal levels of free radical generation, and reduced both superoxide dismutase (SOD and catalase (CAT activities, especially when combined together. However, guarana-treated cells developed signs of neurite degeneration in the form of swellings at various segments in a beaded or pearl chain-like appearance and fragmentation of such neurites at concentrations ranging from 12.5 to 50 mg/mL. Swellings, but not neuritic fragmentation, were detected when cells were treated with 0.5 mg/mL (or higher doses of caffeine, concentrations that are present in EDs. Cells treated with guarana also showed qualitative signs of apoptosis, including membrane blebbing, cell shrinkage, and cleaved caspase-3 positivity. Flow cytometric analysis confirmed that cells treated with 12.5–50 mg/mL of guarana and its combinations with caffeine and/or taurine underwent apoptosis. Conclusion. Excessive removal of intracellular reactive oxygen species, to nonphysiological levels (or “antioxidative stress”, could be a cause of in vitro toxicity induced by these drugs.

  13. Curcumin and trans-resveratrol exert cell cycle-dependent radioprotective or radiosensitizing effects as elucidated by the PCC and G2-assay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sebastià, N., E-mail: natividad.sebastia@uv.es [Radiation Protection Service, IIS La Fe, Health Research Institute La Fe, Valencia (Spain); Montoro, A. [Radiation Protection Service, Universitary and Politechnic Hospital La Fe, Valencia (Spain); Grupo de Investigación Biomédica en Imagen GIBI230, IIS La Fe, Health Research Institute La Fe, Valencia (Spain); Unidad Mixta de Investigación en Endocrinología, Nutrición y Dietética Clínica, IIS La Fe, Health Research Institute La Fe, Valencia (Spain); Hervás, D. [Biostatistics Unit, IIS La Fe, Health Research Institute La Fe, Valencia (Spain); Pantelias, G.; Hatzi, V.I. [Institute of Nuclear and Radiological Sciences and Technology, Energy and Safety, National Centre for Scientific Research “Demokritos”, Aghia Paraskevi, Athens (Greece); Soriano, J.M. [Grupo de Investigación Biomédica en Imagen GIBI230, IIS La Fe, Health Research Institute La Fe, Valencia (Spain); Unidad Mixta de Investigación en Endocrinología, Nutrición y Dietética Clínica, IIS La Fe, Health Research Institute La Fe, Valencia (Spain); Department of Preventive Medicine and Public Health, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Valencia, Burjassot, Valencia (Spain); Villaescusa, J.I. [Radiation Protection Service, Universitary and Politechnic Hospital La Fe, Valencia (Spain); and others

    2014-08-15

    Highlights: • Curcumin and trans-resveratrol can exert radioprotective or radiosensitizing effects. • The mechanisms underlying such dual action were elucidated using the PCC and G2-assay. • Radioprotection occurs in non-cycling cells exposed to curcumin and resveratrol. • Radiosensitization occurs in cycling cells exposed to the chemicals. • G2-checkpoint abrogation by the chemicals underlies the radiosensitizing mechanism. - Abstract: Curcumin and trans-resveratrol are well-known antioxidant polyphenols with radiomodulatory properties, radioprotecting non-cancerous cells while radiosensitizing tumor cells. This dual action may be the result of their radical scavenging properties and their effects on cell-cycle checkpoints that are activated in response to radiation-induced chromosomal damage. It could be also caused by their effect on regulatory pathways with impact on detoxification enzymes, the up-regulation of endogenous protective systems, and cell-cycle-dependent processes of DNA damage. This work aims to elucidate the mechanisms underlying the dual action of these polyphenols and investigates under which conditions they exhibit radioprotecting or radiosensitizing properties. The peripheral blood lymphocyte test system was used, applying concentrations ranging from 1.4 to 140 μM curcumin and 2.2 to 220 μM trans-resveratrol. The experimental design focuses first on their radioprotective effects in non-cycling lymphocytes, as uniquely visualized using cell fusion-mediated premature chromosome condensation, excluding, thus, cell-cycle interference to repair processes and activation of checkpoints. Second, the radiosensitizing potential of these chemicals on the induction of chromatid breaks in cultured lymphocytes following G2-phase irradiation was evaluated by a standardized G2-chromosomal radiosensitivity predictive assay. This assay uses caffeine for G2-checkpoint abrogation and it was applied to obtain an internal control for radiosensitivity

  14. Curcumin and trans-resveratrol exert cell cycle-dependent radioprotective or radiosensitizing effects as elucidated by the PCC and G2-assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Curcumin and trans-resveratrol can exert radioprotective or radiosensitizing effects. • The mechanisms underlying such dual action were elucidated using the PCC and G2-assay. • Radioprotection occurs in non-cycling cells exposed to curcumin and resveratrol. • Radiosensitization occurs in cycling cells exposed to the chemicals. • G2-checkpoint abrogation by the chemicals underlies the radiosensitizing mechanism. - Abstract: Curcumin and trans-resveratrol are well-known antioxidant polyphenols with radiomodulatory properties, radioprotecting non-cancerous cells while radiosensitizing tumor cells. This dual action may be the result of their radical scavenging properties and their effects on cell-cycle checkpoints that are activated in response to radiation-induced chromosomal damage. It could be also caused by their effect on regulatory pathways with impact on detoxification enzymes, the up-regulation of endogenous protective systems, and cell-cycle-dependent processes of DNA damage. This work aims to elucidate the mechanisms underlying the dual action of these polyphenols and investigates under which conditions they exhibit radioprotecting or radiosensitizing properties. The peripheral blood lymphocyte test system was used, applying concentrations ranging from 1.4 to 140 μM curcumin and 2.2 to 220 μM trans-resveratrol. The experimental design focuses first on their radioprotective effects in non-cycling lymphocytes, as uniquely visualized using cell fusion-mediated premature chromosome condensation, excluding, thus, cell-cycle interference to repair processes and activation of checkpoints. Second, the radiosensitizing potential of these chemicals on the induction of chromatid breaks in cultured lymphocytes following G2-phase irradiation was evaluated by a standardized G2-chromosomal radiosensitivity predictive assay. This assay uses caffeine for G2-checkpoint abrogation and it was applied to obtain an internal control for radiosensitivity

  15. Fucoxanthin exerts differing effects on 3T3-L1 cells according to differentiation stage and inhibits glucose uptake in mature adipocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → Fucoxanthin enhances 3T3-L1 adipocyte differentiation at an early stage. → Fucoxanthin inhibits 3T3-L1 adipocyte differentiation at intermediate and late stages. → Fucoxanthin attenuates glucose uptake by inhibiting the phosphorylation of IRS in mature 3T3-L1 adipocytes. → Fucoxanthin exerts its anti-obesity effect by inhibiting the differentiation of adipocytes at both intermediate and late stages, as well as glucose uptake in mature adipocytes. -- Abstract: Progression of 3T3-L1 preadipocyte differentiation is divided into early (days 0-2, D0-D2), intermediate (days 2-4, D2-D4), and late stages (day 4 onwards, D4-). In this study, we investigated the effects of fucoxanthin, isolated from the edible brown seaweed Petalonia binghamiae, on adipogenesis during the three differentiation stages of 3T3-L1 preadipocytes. When fucoxanthin was applied during the early stage of differentiation (D0-D2), it promoted 3T3-L1 adipocyte differentiation, as evidenced by increased triglyceride accumulation. At the molecular level, fucoxanthin increased protein expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ), CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein α (C/EBPα), sterol regulatory element-binding protein 1c (SREBP1c), and aP2, and adiponectin mRNA expression, in a dose-dependent manner. However, it reduced the expression of PPARγ, C/EBPα, and SREBP1c during the intermediate (D2-D4) and late stages (D4-D7) of differentiation. It also inhibited the uptake of glucose in mature 3T3-L1 adipocytes by reducing the phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS-1). These results suggest that fucoxanthin exerts differing effects on 3T3-L1 cells of different differentiation stages and inhibits glucose uptake in mature adipocytes.

  16. Fucoxanthin exerts differing effects on 3T3-L1 cells according to differentiation stage and inhibits glucose uptake in mature adipocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Seong-Il [Department of Biology, Jeju National University, Jejusi, Jeju 690-756 (Korea, Republic of); Ko, Hee-Chul [Jeju Sasa Industry Development Agency, Jeju National University, Jejusi, Jeju 690-756 (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Hye-Sun; Kim, Hyo-Min; Hong, Youn-Suk [Department of Biology, Jeju National University, Jejusi, Jeju 690-756 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Nam-Ho [Department of Chemistry, Jeju National University, Jejusi, Jeju 690-756 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Se-Jae, E-mail: sjkim@jejunu.ac.kr [Department of Biology, Jeju National University, Jejusi, Jeju 690-756 (Korea, Republic of); Jeju Sasa Industry Development Agency, Jeju National University, Jejusi, Jeju 690-756 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-06-17

    Highlights: {yields} Fucoxanthin enhances 3T3-L1 adipocyte differentiation at an early stage. {yields} Fucoxanthin inhibits 3T3-L1 adipocyte differentiation at intermediate and late stages. {yields} Fucoxanthin attenuates glucose uptake by inhibiting the phosphorylation of IRS in mature 3T3-L1 adipocytes. {yields} Fucoxanthin exerts its anti-obesity effect by inhibiting the differentiation of adipocytes at both intermediate and late stages, as well as glucose uptake in mature adipocytes. -- Abstract: Progression of 3T3-L1 preadipocyte differentiation is divided into early (days 0-2, D0-D2), intermediate (days 2-4, D2-D4), and late stages (day 4 onwards, D4-). In this study, we investigated the effects of fucoxanthin, isolated from the edible brown seaweed Petalonia binghamiae, on adipogenesis during the three differentiation stages of 3T3-L1 preadipocytes. When fucoxanthin was applied during the early stage of differentiation (D0-D2), it promoted 3T3-L1 adipocyte differentiation, as evidenced by increased triglyceride accumulation. At the molecular level, fucoxanthin increased protein expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {gamma} (PPAR{gamma}), CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein {alpha} (C/EBP{alpha}), sterol regulatory element-binding protein 1c (SREBP1c), and aP2, and adiponectin mRNA expression, in a dose-dependent manner. However, it reduced the expression of PPAR{gamma}, C/EBP{alpha}, and SREBP1c during the intermediate (D2-D4) and late stages (D4-D7) of differentiation. It also inhibited the uptake of glucose in mature 3T3-L1 adipocytes by reducing the phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS-1). These results suggest that fucoxanthin exerts differing effects on 3T3-L1 cells of different differentiation stages and inhibits glucose uptake in mature adipocytes.

  17. Biomanufacturing of Therapeutic Cells: State of the Art, Current Challenges, and Future Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roh, Kyung-Ho; Nerem, Robert M; Roy, Krishnendu

    2016-06-01

    Stem cells and other functionally defined therapeutic cells (e.g., T cells) are promising to bring hope of a permanent cure for diseases and disorders that currently cannot be cured by conventional drugs or biological molecules. This paradigm shift in modern medicine of using cells as novel therapeutics can be realized only if suitable manufacturing technologies for large-scale, cost-effective, reproducible production of high-quality cells can be developed. Here we review the state of the art in therapeutic cell manufacturing, including cell purification and isolation, activation and differentiation, genetic modification, expansion, packaging, and preservation. We identify current challenges and discuss opportunities to overcome them such that cell therapies become highly effective, safe, and predictively reproducible while at the same time becoming affordable and widely available. PMID:27276552

  18. Telmisartan Exerts Anti-Tumor Effects by Activating Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor-γ in Human Lung Adenocarcinoma A549 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Li

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Telmisartan, a member of the angiotensin II type 1 receptor blockers, is usually used for cardiovascular diseases. Recent studies have showed that telmisartan has the property of PPARγ activation. Meanwhile, PPARγ is essential for tumor proliferation, invasion and metastasis. In this work we explore whether telmisartan could exert anti-tumor effects through PPARγ activation in A549 cells. MTT and trypan blue exclusion assays were included to determine the survival rates and cell viabilities. RT-PCR and western blotting were used to analyze the expression of ICAM-1, MMP-9 and PPARγ. DNA binding activity of PPARγ was evaluated by EMSA. Our data showed that the survival rates and cell viabilities of A549 cells were all reduced by telmisartan in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. Meanwhile, our results also demonstrated that telmisartan dose-dependently inhibited the expression of ICAM-1 and MMP-9. Moreover, the cytotoxic and anti-proliferative effects, ICAM-1 and MMP-9 inhibitive properties of telmisartan were totally blunted by the PPARγ antagonist GW9662. Our findings also showed that the expression of PPARγ was up-regulated by telmisartan in a dose dependent manner. And, the EMSA results also figured out that DNA binding activity of PPARγ was dose-dependently increased by telmisartan. Additionally, our data also revealed that telmisartan-induced PPARγ activation was abrogated by GW9662. Taken together, our results indicated that telmisartan inhibited the expression of ICAM-1 and MMP-9 in A549 cells, very likely through the up-regulation of PPARγ synthesis.

  19. Ovatodiolide of Anisomeles indica Exerts the Anticancer Potential on Pancreatic Cancer Cell Lines through STAT3 and NF-κB Regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Ya-Ju; Tseng, Sung-Pin; Kuo, Yu-Hsuan; Cheng, Tain-Lu; Chiang, Chiao-Yu; Tzeng, Yew-Min; Tsai, Wan-Chi

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the eighth leading cause of cancer death worldwide. Patients with pancreatic cancer are normally diagnosed at an advanced stage and present poor survival rate. Ovatodiolide (OV), a bioactive macrocyclic diterpenoid isolated from Anisomeles indica, showed cytotoxicity effects in pancreatic cancer cells by inhibiting cell proliferation and inducing apoptosis. Moreover, not only were cell adhesion and invasion markedly suppressed in a dose-dependent manner, but the mRNA expression of matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) and focal adhesion kinase (FAK) was also significantly decreased. Western blot analysis indicated that OV potently suppressed the phosphorylation of STAT-3 and its upstream kinase including ERK1/2, P38, and AKT Ser473. Meanwhile, OV inactivated the nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) by inhibiting IκB kinase (IKK α/β) activation and the subsequent suppression of inhibitor of kappa B (IκB) phosphorylation. These results demonstrated that OV could potentially inhibit Mia-PaCa2 cancer cells proliferation and induce apoptosis through modulation of NF-κB and STAT3 pathway. Moreover, OV suppressed cell invasiveness and interfered with cell-matrix adhesion in Mia-PaCa2 cancer cells by reducing MMP-9 and FAK transcription through suppressing NF-κB and STAT3 pathway. Taken together, our findings reveal a new therapeutic and antimetastatic potential of ovatodiolide for pancreatic cancer remedy.

  20. Ovatodiolide of Anisomeles indica Exerts the Anticancer Potential on Pancreatic Cancer Cell Lines through STAT3 and NF-κB Regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ya-Ju Hsieh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer is the eighth leading cause of cancer death worldwide. Patients with pancreatic cancer are normally diagnosed at an advanced stage and present poor survival rate. Ovatodiolide (OV, a bioactive macrocyclic diterpenoid isolated from Anisomeles indica, showed cytotoxicity effects in pancreatic cancer cells by inhibiting cell proliferation and inducing apoptosis. Moreover, not only were cell adhesion and invasion markedly suppressed in a dose-dependent manner, but the mRNA expression of matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9 and focal adhesion kinase (FAK was also significantly decreased. Western blot analysis indicated that OV potently suppressed the phosphorylation of STAT-3 and its upstream kinase including ERK1/2, P38, and AKT Ser473. Meanwhile, OV inactivated the nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB by inhibiting IκB kinase (IKK α/β activation and the subsequent suppression of inhibitor of kappa B (IκB phosphorylation. These results demonstrated that OV could potentially inhibit Mia-PaCa2 cancer cells proliferation and induce apoptosis through modulation of NF-κB and STAT3 pathway. Moreover, OV suppressed cell invasiveness and interfered with cell-matrix adhesion in Mia-PaCa2 cancer cells by reducing MMP-9 and FAK transcription through suppressing NF-κB and STAT3 pathway. Taken together, our findings reveal a new therapeutic and antimetastatic potential of ovatodiolide for pancreatic cancer remedy.

  1. Cornering metastases: therapeutic targeting of circulating tumor cells and stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bishoy eFaltas

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The last decade has witnessed an evolution of our understanding of the biology of the metastatic cascade. Recent insights into the metastatic process show that it is complex, dynamic and multi-directional. This process starts at a very early stage in the natural history of solid tumor growth leading to early development of metastases that grow in parallel with the primary tumor. The role of stem cells in perpetuating cancer metastases is increasingly becoming more evident. At the same time, there is a growing recognition of the crucial role circulating tumor cells (CTCs play in the development of metastases. These insights have laid the biological foundations for therapeutic targeting of CTCs, a promising area of research that aims to reduce cancer morbidity and mortality by preventing the development of metastases at a very early stage. The hematogenous transport phase of the metastatic cascade provides critical access to CTCs for therapeutic targeting aiming to interrupt the metastatic process. Recent advances in the fields of nanotechnology and micro-fluidics have led to the development of several devices for in-vivo targeting of CTC during transit in the circulation. Selectin-coated tubes that target cell adhesion molecules, immuno-magnetic separators and in-vivo photoacoustic flow cytometers are currently being developed for this purpose. On the pharmacological front, several pharmacological and immunological agents targeting cancer stem cells are currently being developed. Such agents may ultimately prove to be effective against circulating tumor stem cells (CTSCs. Although still in its infancy, therapeutic targeting of CTCs and CTSCs offers an unprecedented opportunity to prevent the development of metastasis and potentially alter the natural history of cancer. By rendering cancer a local disease, these approaches could lead to major reductions in metastasis-related morbidity and mortality.

  2. Cell to cell spreading of misfolded proteins as a therapeutic target in motor neuron disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasquali, Livia; Lenzi, Paola; Biagioni, Francesca; Siciliano, Gabriele; Fornai, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    Despite a number of genetic mutations and molecular mechanisms are recognized to participate in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), such a devastating neurological disorder still lacks a substantial cure. The present manuscript rather than a general overview of potential therapeutic approaches focuses on novel research findings detailing novel molecular mechanisms which appear to be promising for developing future ALS therapeutics. A special emphasis is given to the abnormal autophagy status and to those autophagy substrates which aggregate in the form of misfolded proteins. In fact, as reviewed in the first part of the manuscript, altered autophagy pathway is present in most genetic mutations responsible for familial ALS. These mutations impair clearance of autophagy substrates, which determines accumulation of giant altered mitochondria and misfolded proteins. Therefore, a considerable piece of the review is dedicated to unconventional processing of misfolded proteins leading to unconventional protein secretions which may underlie a prionoid cellto- cell spreading of ALS neuropathology. The intimate mechanisms regulating these steps are analyzed in order to comprehend which potential therapeutic targets might be considered in future studies. At the same time, negative findings concerning recent trials are explained in light of novel disease mechanisms. In the final part of the review the replacement therapy with focal stem cells implantation is discussed in relationship with toxic mechanisms operating in the intercellular space of the spinal cord and motor-related areas. PMID:24934358

  3. New perspectives in human stem cell therapeutic research

    OpenAIRE

    Trounson Alan

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Human stem cells are in evaluation in clinical stem cell trials, primarily as autologous bone marrow studies, autologous and allogenic mesenchymal stem cell trials, and some allogenic neural stem cell transplantation projects. Safety and efficacy are being addressed for a number of disease state applications. There is considerable data supporting safety of bone marrow and mesenchymal stem cell transplants but the efficacy data are variable and of mixed benefit. Mechanisms of action o...

  4. APPLICATION OF STEM CELL THERAPEUTIC AGENTS TO CONTROL CRITICAL DISEASE

    OpenAIRE

    Sonam Sharma

    2012-01-01

    Stem cell research has been hailed for the potential to revolutionize the future of medicine with the ability to regenerate damaged and diseased organs. On the other hand, stem cell research has been highly controversial due to the ethical issues concerned with the culture and use of stem cells derived from human embryos. This article presents an overview of what stem cells are, what roles they play in normal processes such as development and cancer, and how stem cells could have the potentia...

  5. Cell migration in paediatric glioma; characterisation and potential therapeutic targeting

    OpenAIRE

    Cockle, J V; Picton, S; Levesley, J.; Ilett, E; Carcaboso, A M; Short, S.(Queen Mary University of London, School of Physics and Astronomy, London, United Kingdom); Steel, L P; Melcher, A.; Lawler, S. E.; Brüning-Richardson, A

    2015-01-01

    Background: Paediatric high grade glioma (pHGG) and diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG) are highly aggressive brain tumours. Their invasive phenotype contributes to their limited therapeutic response, and novel treatments that block brain tumour invasion are needed. Methods: Here, we examine the migratory characteristics and treatment effect of small molecule glycogen synthase kinase-3 inhibitors, lithium chloride (LiCl) and the indirubin derivative 6-bromoindirubin-oxime (BIO), previousl...

  6. Cell and molecular biology for diagnostic and therapeutic technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, M. I.

    2016-03-01

    Our body contains 100 trillion cells. However, each cell has certain function and structure. For maintaining their integrity, cells will be collaborating with each other and with extracellular matrix surround them to form a tissue. These interactions effect internally on many networks or pathway such as signalling pathway, metabolic pathway and transport network in the cell. These networks interact with each other to maintain cell survival, cell structure and function and moreover the tissue as well as the organ which the cells built. Therefore, as part of a tissue, genetic and epigenetic abnormality of a cell can also alter these networks, and moreover disturb the function of the tissue itself. Hence, condition of genetic and epigenetic of the cell may affect other conditions in omics level such as transcriptomic, proteomic, metabolomics characteristics which can be differentiated by a particular unique molecular profile from each level, which can be used for diagnostic as well as for targeted therapy.

  7. Therapeutic action of taurine on the postirradiation recovery of the yeast cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It has been shown on X-irradiated Saccharomyces ellipsoides cells that taurine-potassium phosphate applied after the exposure has a therapeutic action, that is, it intensifies the natural process of intracellular dark repair

  8. Therapeutic Use of Stem Cell Transplantation for Cell Replacement or Cytoprotective Effect of Microvesicle Released from Mesenchymal Stem Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Moonhwan; Ban, Taehyun; Rhim, Taiyoun

    2014-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is the most common and severe type of idiopathic interstitial pneumonias (IIP), and which is currently no method was developed to restore normal structure and function. There are several reports on therapeutic effects of adult stem cell transplantations in animal models of pulmonary fibrosis. However, little is known about how mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) can repair the IPF. In this study, we try to provide the evidence to show that transplanted mesenchymal stem cells directly replace fibrosis with normal lung cells using IPF model mice. As results, transplanted MSC successfully integrated and differentiated into type II lung cell which express surfactant protein. In the other hand, we examine the therapeutic effects of microvesicle treatment, which were released from mesenchymal stem cells. Though the therapeutic effects of MV treatment is less than that of MSC treatment, MV treat-ment meaningfully reduced the symptom of IPF, such as collagen deposition and inflammation. These data suggest that stem cell transplantation may be an effective strategy for the treatment of pulmonary fibrosis via replacement and cytoprotective effect of microvesicle released from MSCs. PMID:24598998

  9. Stem cell research: from molecular physiology to therapeutic applications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chengyu Jiang

    2009-01-01

    @@ Stem cell research promises remedies to many devastating diseases that are currently incurable, ranging from diabetes and Parkinson's disease to paralysis. Totipotent embryonic stem cells have great potential for generating a wide range of different human cells that can be used to restore malfunctioning or damaged cells and tissues in patients. Recent studies have shown that pluripotent stem cells derived from adult bone marrow, the umbilical cord and the placenta could also be induced to differentiate into a variety of different tissues. In this issue, we have invited several scientists in China to summarize their pioneering works in the stem cell research field.

  10. Radiation Interaction with Therapeutic Drugs and Cell Membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This transient permeabilized state of the cell membrane, named the 'cell electroporation' (CE) can be used to increase cells uptake of drugs that do not readily pass cell membrane, thus enabling their cytotoxicity. The anticancer drugs, such as bleomycin (BL) and cisplatin, are the most candidates for the combined use with ionizing and non-ionizing radiation fields. The methods and installations for the cell electroporation by electron beam (EB) and microwave (MW) irradiation are presented. The viability tests of the human leukocytes under EB and MW exposure with/without the BL in the cell cultures are discussed

  11. APPLICATION OF STEM CELL THERAPEUTIC AGENTS TO CONTROL CRITICAL DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonam Sharma

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Stem cell research has been hailed for the potential to revolutionize the future of medicine with the ability to regenerate damaged and diseased organs. On the other hand, stem cell research has been highly controversial due to the ethical issues concerned with the culture and use of stem cells derived from human embryos. This article presents an overview of what stem cells are, what roles they play in normal processes such as development and cancer, and how stem cells could have the potential to treat incurable diseases. Ethical issues are not the subject of this review. In addition to offering unprecedented hope in treating many debilitating diseases, stem cells have advanced our understanding of basic biological processes. This review looks at two major aspects of stem cells. Three processes in which stem cells play a central role in an organism, development, repair of damaged tissue, and cancer resulting from stem cell division going awry. II. Research and clinical applications of cultured stem cells: this includes the types of stem cells used, their characteristics, and the uses of stem cells in studying biological processes, drug development and stem cell therapy; heart disease, diabetes and Parkinson's disease are used as examples.

  12. Therapeutic opportunities: Telomere maintenance in inducible pluripotent stem cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gourronc, Francoise A. [Department of Microbiology, University of Iowa (United States); Klingelhutz, Aloysius J., E-mail: al-klingelhutz@uiowa.edu [Department of Microbiology, University of Iowa (United States)

    2012-02-01

    It has been demonstrated that exogenous expression of a combination of transcription factors can reprogram differentiated cells such as fibroblasts and keratinocytes into what have been termed induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells. These iPS cells are capable of differentiating into all the tissue lineages when placed in the right environment and, in the case of mouse cells, can generate chimeric mice and be transmitted through the germline. Safer and more efficient methods of reprogramming are rapidly being developed. Clearly, iPS cells present a number of exciting possibilities, including disease modeling and therapy. A major question is whether the nuclei of iPS cells are truly rejuvenated or whether they might retain some of the marks of aging from the cells from which they were derived. One measure of cellular aging is the telomere. In this regard, recent studies have demonstrated that telomeres in iPS cells may be rejuvenated. They are not only elongated by reactivated telomerase but they are also epigenetically modified to be similar but not identical to embryonic stem cells. Upon differentiation, the derivative cells turn down telomerase, the telomeres begin to shorten again, and the telomeres and the genome are returned to an epigenetic state that is similar to normal differentiated somatic cells. While these preliminary telomere findings are promising, the overall genomic integrity of reprogrammed cells may still be problematic and further studies are needed to examine the safety and feasibility of using iPS cells in regenerative medicine applications.

  13. Therapeutic opportunities: Telomere maintenance in inducible pluripotent stem cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It has been demonstrated that exogenous expression of a combination of transcription factors can reprogram differentiated cells such as fibroblasts and keratinocytes into what have been termed induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells. These iPS cells are capable of differentiating into all the tissue lineages when placed in the right environment and, in the case of mouse cells, can generate chimeric mice and be transmitted through the germline. Safer and more efficient methods of reprogramming are rapidly being developed. Clearly, iPS cells present a number of exciting possibilities, including disease modeling and therapy. A major question is whether the nuclei of iPS cells are truly rejuvenated or whether they might retain some of the marks of aging from the cells from which they were derived. One measure of cellular aging is the telomere. In this regard, recent studies have demonstrated that telomeres in iPS cells may be rejuvenated. They are not only elongated by reactivated telomerase but they are also epigenetically modified to be similar but not identical to embryonic stem cells. Upon differentiation, the derivative cells turn down telomerase, the telomeres begin to shorten again, and the telomeres and the genome are returned to an epigenetic state that is similar to normal differentiated somatic cells. While these preliminary telomere findings are promising, the overall genomic integrity of reprogrammed cells may still be problematic and further studies are needed to examine the safety and feasibility of using iPS cells in regenerative medicine applications.

  14. Stem cell research:from molecular physiology to therapeutic applications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Stem cell research promises remedies to many devastating diseases that are currently incurable, ranging from diabetes and Parkinson’s disease to paralysis. Totipotent embryonic stem cells have great potential for generating a wide

  15. ES cells derived from cloned embryos in monkey - a jump toward human therapeutic cloning

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiangzhong Yang; Sadie L Smith

    2007-01-01

    @@ Therapeutic cloning refers to the derivation of embryonic stem cells (ntESC) from embryos derived from somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) also known as cloning. Cloning involves transplanting a differentiated cell into an oocyte that has had its nucleus (DNA) removed.

  16. Ovarian Cancer Stem Cell Markers: Prognostic and Therapeutic Implications

    OpenAIRE

    Burgos-Ojeda, Daniela; Rueda, Bo R.; Buckanovich, Ronald J.

    2012-01-01

    Cancer stem cells are rare chemotherapy resistant cells within a tumor which can serve to populate the bulk of a tumor with more differentiated daughter cells and potentially contribute to recurrent disease. Ovarian cancer is a disease for which at the time of initial treatment we can obtain complete clinical remission in the majority of patients. Unfortunately, most will relapse and succumb to their disease. This clinical course is in line with the cancer stem cell model. In the past five ye...

  17. Cancer Stem Cells: Biological Functions and Therapeutically Targeting

    OpenAIRE

    Marius Eugen Ciurea; Ada Maria Georgescu; Stefana Oana Purcaru; Stefan-Alexandru Artene; Ghazaleh Hooshyar Emami; Mihai Virgil Boldeanu; Daniela Elise Tache; Anica Dricu

    2014-01-01

    Almost all tumors are composed of a heterogeneous cell population, making them difficult to treat. A small cancer stem cell population with a low proliferation rate and a high tumorigenic potential is thought to be responsible for cancer development, metastasis and resistance to therapy. Stem cells were reported to be involved in both normal development and carcinogenesis, some molecular mechanisms being common in both processes. No less controversial, stem cells are considered to be importan...

  18. Stem Cells Applications in Regenerative Medicine and Disease Therapeutics

    OpenAIRE

    Mahla, Ranjeet Singh

    2016-01-01

    Regenerative medicine, the most recent and emerging branch of medical science, deals with functional restoration of tissues or organs for the patient suffering from severe injuries or chronic disease. The spectacular progress in the field of stem cell research has laid the foundation for cell based therapies of disease which cannot be cured by conventional medicines. The indefinite self-renewal and potential to differentiate into other types of cells represent stem cells as frontiers of regen...

  19. Therapeutic outcomes of transplantation of amniotic fluid-derived stem cells in experimental ischemic stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoki eTajiri

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Accumulating preclinical evidence suggests the use of amnion as a source of stem cells for investigations of basic science concepts related to developmental cell biology, but also for stem cells’ therapeutic applications in treating human disorders. We previously reported isolation of viable rat amniotic fluid-derived stem (AFS cells. Subsequently, we recently reported the therapeutic benefits of intravenous transplantation of AFS cells in a rodent model of ischemic stroke. Parallel lines of investiagtions have provided safety and efficacy of stem cell therapy for treating stroke and other neurological disorders. This review article highlights characterization of AFS cells’ phenotype and their transplant-mediated functional effects, the need for investigations of mechanisms underlying AFS cells’ therapeutic benefits and discusses lab-to-clinic translational gating items in an effort to optimize the clinical application of cell transplantation for stroke.

  20. Therapeutic Use of Stem Cell Transplantation for Cell Replacement or Cytoprotective Effect of Microvesicle Released from Mesenchymal Stem Cell

    OpenAIRE

    Choi, Moonhwan; Ban, Taehyun; Rhim, TaiYoun

    2014-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is the most common and severe type of idiopathic interstitial pneumonias (IIP), and which is currently no method was developed to restore normal structure and function. There are several reports on therapeutic effects of adult stem cell transplantations in animal models of pulmonary fibrosis. However, little is known about how mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) can repair the IPF. In this study, we try to provide the evidence to show that transplanted mesenchymal ...

  1. Therapeutic potential of stem cells expressing suicide genes that selectively target human breast cancer cells: Evidence that they exert tumoricidal effects via tumor tropism

    OpenAIRE

    Yi, Bo-Rim; CHOI, KELVIN J.; Kim, Seung U.; Choi, Kyung-Chul

    2012-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most prevalent cancer in women worldwide and is classified into ductal and lobular carcinoma. Breast cancer as well as lobular carcinoma is associated with various risk factors such as gender, age, female hormone exposure, ethnicity, family history and genetic risk factor-associated genes. Genes associated with a high risk of developing breast cancer include BRCA1, BRCA2, p53, PTEN, CHEK2 and ATM. Surgery, chemotherapy, radiotherapy and hormone therapy are used to treat b...

  2. New perspectives in human stem cell therapeutic research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trounson Alan

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Human stem cells are in evaluation in clinical stem cell trials, primarily as autologous bone marrow studies, autologous and allogenic mesenchymal stem cell trials, and some allogenic neural stem cell transplantation projects. Safety and efficacy are being addressed for a number of disease state applications. There is considerable data supporting safety of bone marrow and mesenchymal stem cell transplants but the efficacy data are variable and of mixed benefit. Mechanisms of action of many of these cells are unknown and this raises the concern of unpredictable results in the future. Nevertheless there is considerable optimism that immune suppression and anti-inflammatory properties of mesenchymal stem cells will be of benefit for many conditions such as graft versus host disease, solid organ transplants and pulmonary fibrosis. Where bone marrow and mesenchymal stem cells are being studied for heart disease, stroke and other neurodegenerative disorders, again progress is mixed and mostly without significant benefit. However, correction of multiple sclerosis, at least in the short term is encouraging. Clinical trials on the use of embryonic stem cell derivatives for spinal injury and macular degeneration are beginning and a raft of other clinical trials can be expected soon, for example, the use of neural stem cells for killing inoperable glioma and embryonic stem cells for regenerating β islet cells for diabetes. The change in attitude to embryonic stem cell research with the incoming Obama administration heralds a new co-operative environment for study and evaluation of stem cell therapies. The Californian stem cell initiative (California Institute for Regenerative Medicine has engendered global collaboration for this new medicine that will now also be supported by the US Federal Government. The active participation of governments, academia, biotechnology, pharmaceutical companies, and private investment is a powerful consortium for

  3. Adult neural stem cells-Functional potential and therapeutic applications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Lin; ZHU Jianhong

    2004-01-01

    The adult brain has been thought traditionally as a structure with a very limited regenerative capacity. It is now evident that neurogenesis in adult mammalian brain is a prevailing phenomenon. Neural stem cells with the ability to self-renew, differentiate into neurons, astrocytes and oligodendrocytes reside in some regions of the adult brain. Adult neurogenesis can be stimulated by many physiological factors including pregnancy. More strikingly, newborn neurons in hippocampus integrally function with local neurons, thus neural stem cells might play important roles in memory and learning function. It seems that neural stem cells could transdifferentiate into other tissues, such as blood cells and muscles. Although there are some impediments in this field, some attempts have been made to employ adult neural stem cells in the cell replacement therapy for traumatic and ischemic brain injuries.

  4. n-3 Polyunsaturated fatty acids exert immunomodulatory effects on lymphocytes by targeting plasma membrane molecular organization

    OpenAIRE

    Shaikh, Saame Raza; Jolly, Christopher A.; Chapkin, Robert S.

    2011-01-01

    Fish oil, enriched in bioactive n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), has therapeutic value for the treatment of inflammation-associated disorders. The effects of n-3 PUFAs are pleiotropic and complex; hence, an understanding of their cellular targets and molecular mechanisms of action remains incomplete. Here we focus on recent data indicating n-3 PUFAs exert immunosuppressive effects on the function of effector and regulatory CD4+ T cells. In addition, we also present emerging evidence th...

  5. Gastric cancer stem cells: A novel therapeutic target

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, Shree Ram

    2013-01-01

    Gastric cancer remains one of the leading causes of global cancer mortality. Multipotent gastric stem cells have been identified in both mouse and human stomachs, and they play an essential role in the self-renewal and homeostasis of gastric mucosa. There are several environmental and genetic factors known to promote gastric cancer. In recent years, numerous in vitro and in vivo studies suggest that gastric cancer may originate from normal stem cells or bone marrow–derived mesenchymal cells, ...

  6. Therapeutic Potential of Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Regenerative Medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Patel, Devang M.; Jainy Shah; Srivastava, Anand S.

    2013-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are stromal cells that have the ability to self-renew and also exhibit multilineage differentiation into both mesenchymal and nonmesenchymal lineages. The intrinsic properties of these cells make them an attractive candidate for clinical applications. MSCs are of keen interest because they can be isolated from a small aspirate of bone marrow or adipose tissues and can be easily expanded in vitro. Moreover, their ability to modulate immune responses makes them an ...

  7. Phytomedicines and Nutraceuticals: Alternative Therapeutics for Sickle Cell Anemia

    OpenAIRE

    Ngozi Awa Imaga

    2013-01-01

    Sickle cell anemia is a genetically inherited disease in which the “SS” individual possesses an abnormal beta globin gene. A single base substitution in the gene encoding the human β -globin subunit results in replacement of β 6 glutamic acid by valine, leading to the devastating clinical manifestations of sickle cell disease. This substitution causes drastic reduction in the solubility of sickle cell hemoglobin (HbS) when deoxygenated. Under these conditions, the HbS molecules polymerize to ...

  8. A novel compound NSC745885 exerts an anti-tumor effect on tongue cancer SAS cells in vitro and in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan-Wu Chen

    Full Text Available Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC is a prevalent cancer, especially in developing countries. Anthracyclines and their anthraquinone derivatives, such as doxorubicin, exhibit a cell growth inhibitory effect and have been used as anti-cancer drugs for many years. However, the cardiotoxicity of anthracycline antibiotics is a major concern in their clinical application. NSC745885 is a novel compound synthesized from 1,2-diaminoanthraquinone, which subsequently reacts with thionyl chloride and triethylamine. The present study aimed to investigate the anti-oral cancer potential and the safety of NSC745885.We investigated the anti-cancer potential of NSC745885 in oral squamous carcinoma cell lines and in an in vivo oral cancer xenograft mouse model. The expression of apoptotic related genes were evaluated by real-time RT-PCR and western bloting, and the in vivo assessment of apoptotic marker were measured by immunohistochemical staining. The anti-tumor efficiency and safety between doxorubicin and NSC745885 were also compared.Our results demonstrated that NSC745885 exhibits anti-oral cancer activity through the induction of apoptosis in cancer cells and in tumor-bearing mice, and this treatment did not induce marked toxicity in experimental mice. This compound also exhibits a comparable anti-tumor efficiency and a higher safety in experimental mice when compared to doxorubicin.The data of this study provide evidence for NSC745885 as a potential novel therapeutic drug for the treatment of human OSCC.

  9. Mesenchymal stem cells as a therapeutic tool to treat sepsis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Eleuterio Lombardo; Tom van der Poll; Olga DelaRosa; Wilfried Dalemans

    2015-01-01

    Sepsis is a clinical syndrome caused by a deregulatedhost response to an infection. Sepsis is the mostfrequent cause of death in hospitalized patients.Although knowledge of the pathogenesis of sepsishas increased substantially during the last decades,attempts to design effective and specific therapiestargeting components of the derailed host responsehave failed. Therefore, there is a dramatic need fornew and mechanistically alternative therapies to treatthis syndrome. Based on their immunomodulatoryproperties, adult mesenchymal stem or stromal cells(MSCs) can be a novel therapeutic tool to treat sepsis.Indeed, MSCs reduce mortality in experimental modelsof sepsis by modulating the deregulated inflammatoryresponse against bacteria through the regulation ofmultiple inflammatory networks, the reprogrammingof macrophages and neutrophils towards a more antiinflammatoryphenotype and the release of antimicrobialpeptides. This report will review the currentknowledge on the effects of MSC treatment in preclinicalexperimental small animal models of sepsis.

  10. Tumor cell heterogeneity: impact on mechanisms of therapeutic drug resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The aim of these studies was to determine whether chemotherapy-resistant tumor cell sublines derived from a single starting cell population with identical treatment protocols, have the same mechanism of resistance. Methods and Materials: Twelve cyclophosphamide-resistant sublines were derived from KHT-iv murine sarcoma cells by repeated exposures to 2, 4, or 8 μg/ml doses of 4-hydroperoxycyclophosphamide (4-OOHCP). To investigate possible mechanisms of resistance, glutathione (GSH) levels, glutathione S-transferase (GST) activity, and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) activity were determined. In addition, studies with the GSH depletor buthionine sulfoximine (BSO) and the ALDH inhibitor diethylamino-benzaldehyde (DEAB) were undertaken. Results: Resistant factors to 4-OOHCP, assessed at 10% clonogenic cell survival, ranged from 1.5-7.0 for the various cell lines. Crossresistance to melphalan and adriamycin also were commonly observed. Increased GSH levels, GST activity and ALDH activity were detected in the sublines but not all exhibited the same pattern of biochemical alterations. The response to GSH and ALDH inhibitors also varied among the sublines; the resistance being reversible in some cell lines but not others. Conclusion: The present results indicate that when resistant sublines are derived simultaneously from the same starting cell population, the observed mechanisms of resistance may not be the same in each of the variants. These findings support the hypothesis that preexisting cellular heterogeneity may affect mechanisms of acquired resistance

  11. Therapeutic journeys: the hopeful travails of stem cell tourists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Alan; Seear, Kate; Munsie, Megan

    2014-06-01

    The recent growth of so-called stem cell tourism reflects the high optimism that currently surrounds stem cell science. Stem cell treatments for various conditions are increasingly advertised over the Internet as being available at hospitals and clinics around the world. However, most are clinically unproven. Despite numerous warnings from scientists about the dangers posed by such treatments, many individuals are evidently prepared to take the risk, sometimes on more than one occasion. This article explores the dynamics of hope that underpin stem cell tourism. Drawing on ideas from the sociology of hope, as applied to biomedicine, the article explores how hope is constructed and shapes actions in relation to stem cell treatments. Making reference to the findings from an Australian study of patients and carers who travelled overseas to receive stem cell treatments, it is argued that hope has an ambiguous significance in the context of deregulated health care. As we explain, this has implications for patients' and carers' treatment decisions and experiences. The findings are discussed in light of current responses to stem cell tourism. PMID:24266861

  12. CELL-SELEX: Novel Perspectives of Aptamer-Based Therapeutics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans P. Wendel

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Aptamers, single stranded DNA or RNA molecules, generated by a method called SELEX (systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment have been widely used in various biomedical applications. The newly developed Cell-SELEX (cell based-SELEX targeting whole living cells has raised great expectations for cancer biology, -therapy and regenerative medicine. Combining nanobiotechnology with aptamers, this technology opens the way to more sophisticated applications in molecular diagnosis. This paper gives a review of recent developments in SELEX technologies and new applications of aptamers.

  13. Stem cell therapy in inflammatory bowel disease: Apromising therapeutic strategy?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ana I Flores; Gonzalo J Gómez-Gómez; ángeles Masedo-González; M Pilar Martínez-Montiel

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases are inflammatory, chronicand progressive diseases of the intestinal tract forwhich no curative treatment is available. Research inother fields with stem cells of different sources and withimmunoregulatory cells (regulatory T-lymphocytes anddendritic T-cells) opens up new expectations for theiruse in these diseases. The goal for stem cell-basedtherapy is to provide a permanent cure. To achieve this,it will be necessary to obtain a cellular product, originalor genetically modified, that has a high migrationcapacity and homes into the intestine, has high survivalafter transplantation, regulates the immune reactionwhile not being visible to the patient's immune system,and repairs the injured tissue.

  14. Future research and therapeutic applications of human stem cells: general, regulatory, and bioethical aspects

    OpenAIRE

    Liras Antonio

    2010-01-01

    Abstract There is much to be investigated about the specific characteristics of stem cells and about the efficacy and safety of the new drugs based on this type of cells, both embryonic as adult stem cells, for several therapeutic indications (cardiovascular and ischemic diseases, diabetes, hematopoietic diseases, liver diseases). Along with recent progress in transference of nuclei from human somatic cells, as well as iPSC technology, has allowed availability of lineages of all three germ la...

  15. Stem Cell-Derived Exosomes: A Potential Alternative Therapeutic Agent in Orthopaedics

    OpenAIRE

    John Burke; Ravindra Kolhe; Monte Hunter; Carlos Isales; Mark Hamrick; Sadanand Fulzele

    2016-01-01

    Within the field of regenerative medicine, many have sought to use stem cells as a promising way to heal human tissue; however, in the past few years, exosomes (packaged vesicles released from cells) have shown more exciting promise. Specifically, stem cell-derived exosomes have demonstrated great ability to provide therapeutical benefits. Exosomal products can include miRNA, other genetic products, proteins, and various factors. They are released from cells in a paracrine fashion in order to...

  16. [Cell-based therapies - an innovative therapeutic option in ophthalmology: Treating corneal diseases with stem cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakker, Ann-Christin; Langer, Barbara

    2015-11-01

    Pathological changes and disorders of the cornea are a major cause of severe visual impairment and blindness. Replacement of a pathologically altered cornea with healthy corneal tissue from the eye of a suitable donor is among the most common and successful transplantation procedures in medicine. In Germany, approximately 5000-6000 corneal transplantations are performed each year, but the total demand per year is estimated to be twice as high. With a success rate of 90%, the outcome of cornea transplantation is very favourable. However, long-term maintenance and regeneration of a healthy new cornea requires tissue-specific corneal stem cells residing at the basal layer of the limbus, which is the annular transition zone between the cornea and sclera. When this important limbal stem cell population is destroyed or dysfunctional, a pathological condition known as limbal stem cell deficiency (LSCD) manifests. Limbal stem cell deficiency describes conditions associated with impaired corneal wound healing and regeneration. In this situation, transplantation of healthy limbal stem cells is the only curative treatment approach for restoration of an intact and functional ocular surface. To date, treatment of LSCD presents a great challenge for ophthalmologists. However, innovative, cell-therapeutic approaches may open new, promising treatment perspectives. In February 2015, the European Commission granted marketing authorization to the first stem cell-based treatment in the European Union. The product named Holoclar® is an advanced therapy medicinal product (ATMP) for the treatment of moderate to severe LSCD due to physical and chemical burns in adults. Further cell-based treatment approaches are in clinical development. PMID:26459569

  17. Deoxycholic Acid and Selenium Metabolite Methylselenol Exert Common and Distinct Effects on Cell Cycle, Apoptosis, and MAP Kinase Pathway in HCT116 Human Colon Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bile acid deoxycholic acid (DCA) is a known tumor promoter in colon tumor development. The cell growth inhibition induced by DCA may cause compensatory hyperproliferation of colonic epithelial cells and provide selection for subpopulations of cells resistant to DCA’s inhibitory effect. These survivi...

  18. Polysaccharide peptides from Coriolus versicolor exert differential immunomodulatory effects on blood lymphocytes and breast cancer cell line MCF-7 in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalczewska, Małgorzata; Piotrowski, Jakub; Jędrzejewski, Tomasz; Kozak, Wiesław

    2016-06-01

    The protein-bound polysaccharides (PBP), isolated from Coriolus versicolor (CV) fungus, are considered as natural compounds with potential therapeutic applications. The immunopotentiating and antitumor activity of polysaccharopeptides has been previously examined, however similar findings could not be achieved. The source of PBP, variations in extraction process as well as environmental factors seems to affect the biological properties of these active CV components. Since further analysis are needed to draw more definite conclusion, the present study aimed to investigate the immunomodulatory properties of the PBP extract, isolated from commercially available capsules of C. versicolor. Our results revealed that the effect mediated by PBP extract depends on the target cells. We reported that the polysaccharopeptides induced a significant decrease in breast cancer MCF-7 cells growth, which was TNF-α-dependent phenomenon. Interestingly, the level of two others cytokines, IL-1β and IL-6 was not affected. On the other hand, in this study we noticed that protein-bound polysaccharides extracted from CV significantly augmented the proliferative response of blood lymphocytes in a time-dependent manner, which was associated with IL-6 and IL-1β mRNA upregulation. Moreover we found that the cells response to PBP stimuli might be inversely related to its concentration. PMID:27091479

  19. Compounds isolated from the aerial part of Crataegus azarolus inhibit growth of B16F10 melanoma cells and exert a potent inhibition of the melanin synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustapha, Nadia; Bzéouich, Imèn Mokdad; Ghedira, Kamel; Hennebelle, Thierry; Chekir-Ghedira, Leila

    2015-02-01

    Poor therapeutic results have been reported for treatment of malignant melanoma; therefore in this study, we have investigated inhibitory capacity of vitexin-2''-O-rhamnoside as well as the extract from which it was isolated, i.e. the ethyl acetate extract obtained from the leaves of Crataegus azarolus, on mouse melanoma (B16F10) proliferation. Cell viability was determined using the 3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay. In addition, amounts of melanin and tyrosinase were measured spectrophotometrically at 475nm. Ethyl acetate extract and vitexin-2''-O-rhamnoside exhibited significant anti-proliferative activity against B16F10 melanoma cells after incubation for 48hours with IC50s of 50μg/mL and 20μM, respectively. Furthermore, these two compounds have the ability to reduce the melanin content by inhibiting the tyrosinase activity of B16F10 cells. Thus, further investigations are merited to ascertain their potential application in treating hyperpigmentation disorders. PMID:25661350

  20. Future research and therapeutic applications of human stem cells: general, regulatory, and bioethical aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liras Antonio

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract There is much to be investigated about the specific characteristics of stem cells and about the efficacy and safety of the new drugs based on this type of cells, both embryonic as adult stem cells, for several therapeutic indications (cardiovascular and ischemic diseases, diabetes, hematopoietic diseases, liver diseases. Along with recent progress in transference of nuclei from human somatic cells, as well as iPSC technology, has allowed availability of lineages of all three germ layers genetically identical to those of the donor patient, which permits safe transplantation of organ-tissue-specific adult stem cells with no immune rejection. The main objective is the need for expansion of stem cell characteristics to maximize stem cell efficacy (i.e. the proper selection of a stem cell and the efficacy (maximum effect and safety of stem cell derived drugs. Other considerations to take into account in cell therapy will be the suitability of infrastructure and technical staff, biomaterials, production costs, biobanks, biosecurity, and the biotechnological industry. The general objectives in the area of stem cell research in the next few years, are related to identification of therapeutic targets and potential therapeutic tests, studies of cell differentiation and physiological mechanisms, culture conditions of pluripotent stem cells and efficacy and safety tests for stem cell-based drugs or procedures to be performed in both animal and human models in the corresponding clinical trials. A regulatory framework will be required to ensure patient accessibility to products and governmental assistance for their regulation and control. Bioethical aspects will be required related to the scientific and therapeutic relevance and cost of cryopreservation over time, but specially with respect to embryos which may ultimately be used for scientific uses of research as source of embryonic stem cells, in which case the bioethical conflict may be further

  1. Phytomedicines and Nutraceuticals: Alternative Therapeutics for Sickle Cell Anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ngozi Awa Imaga

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Sickle cell anemia is a genetically inherited disease in which the “SS” individual possesses an abnormal beta globin gene. A single base substitution in the gene encoding the human β-globin subunit results in replacement of β6 glutamic acid by valine, leading to the devastating clinical manifestations of sickle cell disease. This substitution causes drastic reduction in the solubility of sickle cell hemoglobin (HbS when deoxygenated. Under these conditions, the HbS molecules polymerize to form long crystalline intracellular mass of fibers which are responsible for the deformation of the biconcave disc shaped erythrocyte into a sickle shape. First-line clinical management of sickle cell anemia include, use of hydroxyurea, folic acid, amino acids supplementation, penicillinprophylaxis, and antimalarial prophylaxis to manage the condition and blood transfusions to stabilize the patient's hemoglobin level. These are quite expensive and have attendant risk factors. However, a bright ray of hope involving research into antisickling properties of medicinal plants has been rewarding. This alternative therapy using phytomedicines has proven to not only reduce crisis but also reverse sickling (in vitro. The immense benefits of phytomedicines and nutraceuticals used in the management of sickle cell anemia are discussed in this paper.

  2. Myeloid cell signatures in tumor microenvironment predicts therapeutic response in cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Achyut BR

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Bhagelu R Achyut, Ali S Arbab Tumor Angiogenesis Laboratory, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Cancer Center, Georgia Regents University, Augusta, GA, USA Abstract: Tumor microenvironment (TME consists of several immune and nonimmune cell populations including tumor cells. For many decades, experimental studies have depicted profound contribution of TME toward cancer progression and metastasis development. Several therapeutic strategies have been tested against TME through preclinical studies and clinical trials. Unfortunately, most of them have shown transient effect, and have largely failed due to aggressive tumor growth and without improving survival. Solid tumors are known to have a strong myeloid component (eg, tumor-associated macrophages in tumor development. Recent data suggest that therapeutic responses in tumor are characterized by alterations in immune cell signatures, including tumor-associated myeloid cells. Polarized tumor-associated myeloid cells (M1–M2 are critical in impairing therapeutic effect and promoting tumor growth. The present review is intended to compile all the literatures related to the emerging contribution of different populations of myeloid cells in the development of tumor and therapeutic failures. Finally, we have discussed targeting of myeloid cell populations as a combination therapy with chemo-, targeted-, or radiation therapies. Keywords: tumor microenvironment, tumor-associated macrophage, myeloid-derived suppressor cells, therapies, macrophage polarization, radiation, antiangiogenic therapy

  3. Regulation of endothelial cell tetrahydrobiopterin pathophysiological and therapeutic implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, David G; Chen, Wei; Dikalov, Sergey; Li, Li

    2010-01-01

    Tetrahydrobiopterin (BH(4)) is a critical cofactor for the nitric oxide synthases. In the absence of BH(4), these enzymes become uncoupled, fail to produce nitric oxide, and begin to produce superoxide and other reactive oxygen species (ROS). BH(4) levels are modulated by a complex biosynthetic pathway, salvage enzymes, and by oxidative degradation. The enzyme GTP cyclohydrolase-1 catalyzes the first step in the de novo synthesis of BH(4) and new evidence shows that this enzyme is regulated by phosphorylation, which reduces its interaction with its feedback regulatory protein (GFRP). In the setting of a variety of common diseases, such as atherosclerosis, hypertension, and diabetes, reactive oxygen species promote oxidation of BH(4) and inhibit expression of the salvage enzyme dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR), promoting accumulation of BH(2) and NOS uncoupling. There is substantial interest in therapeutic approaches to increasing tissue levels of BH(4), largely by oral administration of this agent. BH(4) treatment has proved effective in decreasing atherosclerosis, reducing blood pressure, and preventing complications of diabetes in experimental animals. While these basic studies have been very promising, there are only a few studies showing any effect of BH(4) therapy in humans in treatment of these common problems. Whether BH(4) or related agents will be useful in treatment of human diseases needs additional study. PMID:21081217

  4. Esophageal cancer stem cells and implications for future therapeutics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian X

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Xia Qian,* Cheng Tan,* Feng Wang,* Baixia Yang, Yangyang Ge, Zhifeng Guan, Jing CaiDepartment of Radiation Oncology, Nantong Tumor Hospital, Affiliated Tumor Hospital of Nantong University, Nantong, People’s Republic of China*These authors contributed equally to this workAbstract: Esophageal carcinoma (EC is a lethal disease with high morbidity and mortality worldwide, and the incidence has been increasing in recent years. Although the diagnosis and treatment of EC have improved considerably, EC has rapidly progressed in the clinical setting and has a poor prognosis for its metastasis and recurrence. The general idea of cancer stem cells (CSCs is primarily based on clinical and experimental observations, indicating the existence of a subpopulation of cells that can self-renew and differentiate. The EC stem cells, which can be isolated from normal pluripotent stem cells by applying similar biomarkers, may participate in promoting esophageal tumorigenesis through renewal and repair. In this review, major emphasis is given to CSC markers, altered CSC-specific pathways, and molecular targeting agents currently available to target CSCs of esophageal cancer. The roles of numerous markers (CD44, aldehyde dehydrogenase, CD133, and ATP-binding cassette subfamily G member 2 and developmental signaling pathways (Wnt/β-catenin, Notch, hedgehog, and Hippo in isolating esophageal CSCs are discussed in detail. Targeting CSCs can be a logical strategy to treat EC, as these cells are responsible for carcinoma recurrence and chemoradiation resistance. Keywords: esophageal cancer, cancer stem cells, CD44, ALDH, CD133, ABCG2

  5. Optimal Therapeutic Strategy for Non-small Cell Lung Cancer with Mutated Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhong SHI

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Although epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors (EGFR-TKIs have been widely used in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC patients, it is still controversial about how to combine EGFR-TKI with chemotherapy and other targeted drugs. We have made a summary on the current therapeutic models of EGFR-TKI combined with chemotherapy/bevacizumab in this review and aimed to find the optimal therapeutic strategy for NSCLC patients with EGFR mutation.

  6. Therapeutic potential of stem cells in skin repair and regeneration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Cui-ping; FU Xiao-bing

    2008-01-01

    @@ Stem cells are defined by their capacity of self-renewal and multilineage differentiation, which make them uniquely situated to treat a broad spectrum of human diseases. Based on a series of remarkable studies in several fields of regen-erative medicine, their application is not too far from the clinical practice.

  7. Immune cell profiling to guide therapeutic decisions in rheumatic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ermann, Joerg; Rao, Deepak A; Teslovich, Nikola C; Brenner, Michael B; Raychaudhuri, Soumya

    2015-09-01

    Biomarkers are needed to guide treatment decisions for patients with rheumatic diseases. Although the phenotypic and functional analysis of immune cells is an appealing strategy for understanding immune-mediated disease processes, immune cell profiling currently has no role in clinical rheumatology. New technologies, including mass cytometry, gene expression profiling by RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) and multiplexed functional assays, enable the analysis of immune cell function with unprecedented detail and promise not only a deeper understanding of pathogenesis, but also the discovery of novel biomarkers. The large and complex data sets generated by these technologies--big data--require specialized approaches for analysis and visualization of results. Standardization of assays and definition of the range of normal values are additional challenges when translating these novel approaches into clinical practice. In this Review, we discuss technological advances in the high-dimensional analysis of immune cells and consider how these developments might support the discovery of predictive biomarkers to benefit the practice of rheumatology and improve patient care. PMID:26034835

  8. Insulin and insulin-like growth factor I exert different effects on plasminogen activator production or cell growth in the ovine thyroid cell line OVNIS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degryse, B; Maisonobe, F; Hovsépian, S; Fayet, G

    1991-11-01

    Insulin and Insulin-like Growth Factor I (IGF-I) are evaluated for their capacity to affect cell proliferation and plasminogen activator (PA) activity production in an ovine thyroid cell line OVNIS. Insulin at physiological and supraphysiological doses induces cell proliferation and increases PA activity. IGF-I, which is also clearly mitogenic for these cells, surprisingly does not modulate PA activity. The results indicate that the growth promoting effect is mediated through the insulin and IGF-I receptors whereas PA activity is solely regulated via the insulin receptors. PMID:1802921

  9. Heme oxygenase-1 exerts a protective role in ovalbumin-induced neutrophilic airway inflammation by inhibiting Th17 cell-mediated immune response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yanjie; Zhang, Liya; Wu, Jinhong; Di, Caixia; Xia, Zhenwei

    2013-11-29

    Allergic asthma is conventionally considered as a Th2 immune response characterized by eosinophilic inflammation. Recent investigations revealed that Th17 cells play an important role in the pathogenesis of non-eosinophilic asthma (NEA), resulting in steroid-resistant neutrophilic airway inflammation. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) has anti-inflammation, anti-oxidation, and anti-apoptosis functions. However, its role in NEA is still unclear. Here, we explore the role of HO-1 in a mouse model of NEA. HO-1 inducer hemin or HO-1 inhibitor tin protoporphyrin IX was injected intraperitoneally into ovalbumin-challenged DO11.10 mice. Small interfering RNA (siRNA) was delivered into mice to knock down HO-1 expression. The results show that induction of HO-1 by hemin attenuated airway inflammation and decreased neutrophil infiltration in bronchial alveolar lavage fluid and was accompanied by a lower proportion of Th17 cells in mediastinal lymph nodes and spleen. More importantly, induction of HO-1 down-regulated Th17-related transcription factor retinoic acid-related orphan receptor γt (RORγt) expression and decreased IL-17A levels, all of which correlated with a decrease in phosphorylated STAT3 (p-STAT3) level and inhibition of Th17 cell differentiation. Consistently, the above events could be reversed by tin protoporphyrin IX. Also, HO-1 siRNA transfection abolished the effect of hemin induced HO-1 in vivo. Meanwhile, the hemin treatment promoted the level of Foxp3 expression and enhanced the proportion of regulatory T cells (Tregs). Collectively, our findings indicate that HO-1 exhibits anti-inflammatory activity in the mouse model of NEA via inhibition of the p-STAT3-RORγt pathway, regulating kinetics of RORγt and Foxp3 expression, thus providing a possible novel therapeutic target in asthmatic patients. PMID:24097973

  10. Peripheral blood-derived, γ9δ2 t cell-enriched cell lines from glioblastoma multiforme patients exert anti-tumoral effects in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcu-Malina, V; Garelick, D; Peshes-Yeloz, N; Wohl, A; Zach, L; Nagar, M; Amariglio, N; Besser, M J; Cohen, Z R; Bank, I

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this work was to assess the potential of T cells expressing Vγ9Vδ2+ T cell receptors (TCR, γ9δ2T cells) present in peripheral blood (PB) m ononuclear cells (MC, PBMC) of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) patients to act as anti-tumoral agents. We found that γ9δ2T cell levels were decreased in patients' PB relative to a cohort of healthy donors (HD) (respectively 0.52±0.55%, n=16, vs 1.12±0.6%, n=14, p=0.008) but did not significantly correlate with postoperative survival (R=0.6, p=0.063). Importantly, however, the γ9δ2T cells could be expanded in vitro to consist 51±23% of the cultured lymphocytes (98% CD3+). This was achieved after 14 days of culture in medium containing the amino-bisphosphonate (ABP) Zoledronate (Zol) and interleukin (IL)-2, resulting in γ9δ2T cell-enriched lines (gdTCEL) similar to those of HD derived gdTCEL (54±19%). Moreover, gdTCEL from patients and HD mediated cytotoxicity to GBM-derived cell lines (GBMDCL), which was abrogated by immune-magnetic removal of the γ9δ2T cells. Furthermore, low level interferon (IFN) γ secretion was induced by gdTCEL briefly co-cultured with GBMDCL or autologous - tumor-derived cells, which was greatly amplified in the presence of Zol. Importantly, IFNγ secretion was inhibited by mevastatin but enhanced by cross-linking of butyrophilin 3A1 (CD277) on a CD277+ GBMDCL (U251MG) or by pretreatment of GBMDCL with temozolomide (TMZ). Taken together, these data suggest that γ9δ2T cells in PB of GBM patients can give rise to gdTCEL that mediate anti-tumoral activities. PMID:27049073

  11. Therapeutic potential and challenges of Natural killer cells in treatment of solid tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea eGras Navarro

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Natural killer (NK cells are innate lymphoid cells that hold tremendous potential for effective immunotherapy for a broad range of cancers. Due to the mode of NK cell killing requiring one–to-one target engagement and site directed release of cytolytic granules, the therapeutic potential of NK cells has been most extensively explored in hematological malignancies. However, their ability to precisely kill antibody coated cells, cancer stem cells (CSCs and genotoxically altered cells, while maintaining tolerance to healthy cells makes them appealing therapeutic effectors for all cancer forms, including metastases. Due to their release of pro-inflammatory cytokines, NK cells may potently reverse the anti-inflammatory tumor microenvironment (TME and augment adaptive immune responses by promoting differentiation, activation and/ or recruitment of accessory immune cells to sites of malignancy. Nevertheless, integrated and coordinated mechanisms of subversion of NK cell activity against the tumor and its microenvironment exist. Although our understanding of the receptor ligand interactions that regulate NK cell functionality has evolved remarkably, the diversity of ligands and receptors is complex, as is their mechanistic foundations in regulating NK cell function. In this article, we review the literature and highlight how the TME manipulates the NK cell phenotypes, genotypes and tropism to evade tumor recognition and elimination. We discuss counter strategies that may be adopted to augment the efficacy of NK cell anti-tumor surveillance, the clinical trials that have been undertaken so far in solid malignancies, critically weighing the challenges and opportunities with this approach.

  12. Stem Cell-Based Therapeutics to Improve Wound Healing

    OpenAIRE

    Hu, Michael S.; Tripp Leavitt; Samir Malhotra; Dominik Duscher; Pollhammer, Michael S.; Walmsley, Graham G.; Zeshaan N. Maan; Alexander T. M. Cheung; Manfred Schmidt; Georg M. Huemer; Longaker, Michael T.; Peter Lorenz, H.

    2015-01-01

    Issues surrounding wound healing have garnered deep scientific interest as well as booming financial markets invested in novel wound therapies. Much progress has been made in the field, but it is unsurprising to find that recent successes reveal new challenges to be addressed. With regard to wound healing, large tissue deficits, recalcitrant wounds, and pathological scar formation remain but a few of our most pressing challenges. Stem cell-based therapies have been heralded as a promising mea...

  13. Novel HIV-1 Therapeutics through Targeting Altered Host Cell Pathways

    OpenAIRE

    Coley, William; Kehn-Hall, Kylene; Van Duyne, Rachel; KASHANCHI, FATAH

    2009-01-01

    The emergence of drug-resistant human immunodeficiency virus type I (HIV-1) strains presents a challenge for the design of new drugs. Anti-HIV compounds currently in use are the subject of advanced clinical trials using either HIV-1 reverse-transcriptase, viral protease, or integrase inhibitors. Recent studies show an increase in the number of HIV-1 variants resistant to anti-retroviral agents in newly infected individuals. Targeting host cell factors involved in the regulation of HIV-1 repli...

  14. Therapeutic Roles of Tendon Stem/Progenitor Cells in Tendinopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Xin Zhang; Yu-cheng Lin; Yun-feng Rui; Hong-liang Xu; Hui Chen; Chen Wang,; Gao-jun Teng

    2016-01-01

    Tendinopathy is a tendon disorder characterized by activity-related pain, local edema, focal tenderness to palpation, and decreased strength in the affected area. Tendinopathy is prevalent in both athletes and the general population, highlighting the need to elucidate the pathogenesis of this disorder. Current treatments of tendinopathy are both conservative and symptomatic. The discovery of tendon stem/progenitor cells (TSPCs) and erroneous differentiation of TSPCs have provided new insights...

  15. Bone Marrow-Derived Cells as a Therapeutic Approach to Optic Nerve Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louise A. Mesentier-Louro

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Following optic nerve injury associated with acute or progressive diseases, retinal ganglion cells (RGCs of adult mammals degenerate and undergo apoptosis. These diseases have limited therapeutic options, due to the low inherent capacity of RGCs to regenerate and due to the inhibitory milieu of the central nervous system. Among the numerous treatment approaches investigated to stimulate neuronal survival and axonal extension, cell transplantation emerges as a promising option. This review focuses on cell therapies with bone marrow mononuclear cells and bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells, which have shown positive therapeutic effects in animal models of optic neuropathies. Different aspects of available preclinical studies are analyzed, including cell distribution, potential doses, routes of administration, and mechanisms of action. Finally, published and ongoing clinical trials are summarized.

  16. T-Cell Traffic Jam in Hodgkin's Lymphoma: Pathogenetic and Therapeutic Implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Fozza

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In hematologic malignancies, the microenvironment is often characterized by nonneoplastic cells with peculiar phenotypic and functional features. This is particularly true in Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL, in which T lymphocytes surrounding Hodgkin's Reed-Sternberg cells are essentially polarized towards a memory T-helper type 2 phenotype. In this paper we will first evaluate the main processes modulating T-cell recruitment towards the lymph node microenvironment in HL, especially focusing on the role played by cytokines. We will then consider the most relevant mechanisms of immune escape exerted by neoplastic cells in order to evade antitumor immunity. The potential pathogenetic and prognostic impact of regulatory T cells in such a context will be also described. We will finally overview some of the strategies of cellular immunotherapy applied in patients with HL.

  17. DNA damage responses in cancer stem cells: Implications for cancer therapeutic strategies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qi-En; Wang

    2015-01-01

    The identification of cancer stem cells(CSCs) that are responsible for tumor initiation, growth, metastasis, and therapeutic resistance might lead to a new thinking on cancer treatments. Similar to stem cells,CSCs also display high resistance to radiotherapy and chemotherapy with genotoxic agents. Thus, conventional therapy may shrink the tumor volume but cannot eliminate cancer. Eradiation of CSCs represents a novel therapeutic strategy. CSCs possess a highly efficient DNA damage response(DDR) system, which is considered as a contributor to the resistance of these cells from exposures to DNA damaging agents. Targeting of enhanced DDR in CSCs is thus proposed to facilitate the eradication of CSCs by conventional therapeutics. To achieve this aim, a better understanding of the cellular responses to DNA damage in CSCs is needed. In addition to the protein kinases and enzymes that are involved in DDR, other processes that affect the DDR including chromatin remodeling should also be explored.

  18. Cell Survival and Apoptosis Signaling as Therapeutic Target for Cancer: Marine Bioactive Compounds

    OpenAIRE

    Kim Se-Kwon; Senthilkumar Kalimuthu

    2013-01-01

    Inhibition of apoptosis leads to activation of cell survival factors (e.g., AKT) causes continuous cell proliferation in cancer. Apoptosis, the major form of cellular suicide, is central to various physiological processes and the maintenance of homeostasis in multicellular organisms. A number of discoveries have clarified the molecular mechanism of apoptosis, thus clarifying the link between apoptosis and cell survival factors, which has a therapeutic outcome. Induction of apoptosis and inhib...

  19. The cytoskeletal inhibitors latrunculin A and blebbistatin exert antitumorigenic properties in human hepatocellular carcinoma cells by interfering with intracellular HuR trafficking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The impact of the RNA-binding protein HuR for the post-transcriptional deregulation of tumor-relevant genes is well established. Despite of elevations in HuR expression levels, an increase in cytoplasmic HuR abundance in many cases correlates with a high grade of malignancy. Here, we demonstrated that administration of the actin-depolymerizing macrolide latrunculin A, or blebbistatin, an inhibitor of myosin II ATPase activity, caused a dose- and time-dependent reduction in the high cytoplasmic HuR content of HepG2 and Huh7 hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells. Subcellular fractionation revealed that in addition, both inhibitors strongly attenuated cytoskeletal and membrane-bound HuR abundance and conversely increased the HuR amount in nuclear cell fractions. Concomitant with changes in intracellular HuR localization, both cytoskeletal inhibitors markedly decreased the half-lives of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), cyclin A and cyclin D1 encoding mRNAs resulting in a significant reduction in their expression levels in HepG2 cells. Importantly, a similar reduction in the expression of these HuR targets was achieved by a RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated knockdown of either HuR or nonmuscle myoin IIA. Using polysomal fractionation, we further demonstrate that the decrease in cytoplasmic HuR by latrunculin A or blebbistatin is accompanied by a marked change in the allocation of HuR and its mRNA cargo from polysomes to ribonucleoprotein (RNP) particles. Functionally, the basal migration and prostaglandin E2 synthesis are similarly impaired in inhibitor-treated and stable HuR-knockdown HepG2 cells. Our data demonstrate that interfering with the actomyosin-dependent HuR trafficking may comprise a valid therapeutic option for antagonizing pathologic posttranscriptional gene expression by HuR and furthermore emphasize the potential benefit of HuR inhibitory strategies for treatment of HCC. - Highlights: • We tested the effects of latrunculin A and blebbistatin on different Hu

  20. The cytoskeletal inhibitors latrunculin A and blebbistatin exert antitumorigenic properties in human hepatocellular carcinoma cells by interfering with intracellular HuR trafficking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doller, Anke; Badawi, Amel [Pharmazentrum Frankfurt/ZAFES, Klinikum der Goethe-Universität Frankfurt, Frankfurt/Main (Germany); Schmid, Tobias; Brauß, Thilo [Institut für Biochemie I (Pathobiochemie), Klinikum der Goethe-Universität Frankfurt, Frankfurt/Main (Germany); Pleli, Thomas [Medizinische Klinik 1, Schwerpunkt Gastroenterologie und Hepatologie, Klinikum der Goethe-Universität Frankfurt, Frankfurt/Main (Germany); Meyer zu Heringdorf, Dagmar [Pharmazentrum Frankfurt/ZAFES, Klinikum der Goethe-Universität Frankfurt, Frankfurt/Main (Germany); Piiper, Albrecht [Medizinische Klinik 1, Schwerpunkt Gastroenterologie und Hepatologie, Klinikum der Goethe-Universität Frankfurt, Frankfurt/Main (Germany); Pfeilschifter, Josef [Pharmazentrum Frankfurt/ZAFES, Klinikum der Goethe-Universität Frankfurt, Frankfurt/Main (Germany); Eberhardt, Wolfgang, E-mail: w.eberhardt@em.uni-frankfurt.de [Pharmazentrum Frankfurt/ZAFES, Klinikum der Goethe-Universität Frankfurt, Frankfurt/Main (Germany)

    2015-01-01

    The impact of the RNA-binding protein HuR for the post-transcriptional deregulation of tumor-relevant genes is well established. Despite of elevations in HuR expression levels, an increase in cytoplasmic HuR abundance in many cases correlates with a high grade of malignancy. Here, we demonstrated that administration of the actin-depolymerizing macrolide latrunculin A, or blebbistatin, an inhibitor of myosin II ATPase activity, caused a dose- and time-dependent reduction in the high cytoplasmic HuR content of HepG2 and Huh7 hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells. Subcellular fractionation revealed that in addition, both inhibitors strongly attenuated cytoskeletal and membrane-bound HuR abundance and conversely increased the HuR amount in nuclear cell fractions. Concomitant with changes in intracellular HuR localization, both cytoskeletal inhibitors markedly decreased the half-lives of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), cyclin A and cyclin D{sub 1} encoding mRNAs resulting in a significant reduction in their expression levels in HepG2 cells. Importantly, a similar reduction in the expression of these HuR targets was achieved by a RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated knockdown of either HuR or nonmuscle myoin IIA. Using polysomal fractionation, we further demonstrate that the decrease in cytoplasmic HuR by latrunculin A or blebbistatin is accompanied by a marked change in the allocation of HuR and its mRNA cargo from polysomes to ribonucleoprotein (RNP) particles. Functionally, the basal migration and prostaglandin E{sub 2} synthesis are similarly impaired in inhibitor-treated and stable HuR-knockdown HepG2 cells. Our data demonstrate that interfering with the actomyosin-dependent HuR trafficking may comprise a valid therapeutic option for antagonizing pathologic posttranscriptional gene expression by HuR and furthermore emphasize the potential benefit of HuR inhibitory strategies for treatment of HCC. - Highlights: • We tested the effects of latrunculin A and blebbistatin on

  1. The Cotransplantation of Olfactory Ensheathing Cells with Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells Exerts Antiapoptotic Effects in Adult Rats after Spinal Cord Injury

    OpenAIRE

    Shifeng Wu; Guanqun Cui; Hua Shao; Zhongjun Du; Ng, Jack C.; Cheng Peng

    2015-01-01

    The mechanisms behind the repairing effects of the cotransplantation of olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs) with bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells (BMSCs) have not been fully understood. Therefore, we investigated the effects of the cotransplantation of OECs with BMSCs on antiapoptotic effects in adult rats for which the models of SCI are induced. We examined the changes in body weight, histopathological changes, apoptosis, and the expressions of apoptosis-related proteins after 14 days an...

  2. TLR2 and TLR4 triggering exerts contrasting effects with regard to HIV-1 infection of human dendritic cells and subsequent virus transfer to CD4+ T cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fromentin Rémi

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recognition of microbial products through Toll-like receptors (TLRs initiates inflammatory responses orchestrated by innate immune cells such as dendritic cells (DCs. As these cells are patrolling mucosal surfaces, a portal of entry for various pathogens including human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1, we investigated the impact of TLR stimulation on productive HIV-1 infection of DCs and viral spreading to CD4+ T cells. Results We report here that engagement of TLR2 on DCs increases HIV-1 transmission toward CD4+ T cells by primarily affecting de novo virus production by DCs. No noticeable and consistent effect was observed following engagement of TLR5, 7 and 9. Additional studies indicated that both HIV-1 infection of DCs and DC-mediated virus transmission to CD4+ T cells were reduced upon TLR4 triggering due to secretion of type-I interferons. Conclusion It can thus be proposed that exposure of DCs to TLR2-binding bacterial constituents derived, for example, from pathogens causing sexually transmissible infections, might influence the process of DC-mediated viral dissemination, a phenomenon that might contribute to a more rapid disease progression.

  3. Cell Survival and Apoptosis Signaling as Therapeutic Target for Cancer: Marine Bioactive Compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Se-Kwon

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Inhibition of apoptosis leads to activation of cell survival factors (e.g., AKT causes continuous cell proliferation in cancer. Apoptosis, the major form of cellular suicide, is central to various physiological processes and the maintenance of homeostasis in multicellular organisms. A number of discoveries have clarified the molecular mechanism of apoptosis, thus clarifying the link between apoptosis and cell survival factors, which has a therapeutic outcome. Induction of apoptosis and inhibition of cell survival by anticancer agents has been shown to correlate with tumor response. Cellular damage induces growth arrest and tumor suppression by inducing apoptosis, necrosis and senescence; the mechanism of cell death depends on the magnitude of DNA damage following exposure to various anticancer agents. Apoptosis is mainly regulated by cell survival and proliferating signaling molecules. As a new therapeutic strategy, alternative types of cell death might be exploited to control and eradicate cancer cells. This review discusses the signaling of apoptosis and cell survival, as well as the potential contribution of marine bioactive compounds, suggesting that new therapeutic strategies might follow.

  4. Adhesion receptors as therapeutic targets for circulating tumor cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MichaelR.King

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Metastasis contributes to >90% of cancer-associated mortality. Though primary tumors can be removed by surgical resection or chemo/radiotherapy, metastatic disease is a great challenge to treatment due to its systemic nature. As metastatic “seeds”, circulating tumor cells (CTCs are believed to be responsible for dissemination from a primary tumor to anatomically distant organs. Despite the possibility of physical trapping of CTCs in microvessels, recent advances have provided insights into the involvement of a variety of adhesion molecules on CTCs. Such adhesion molecules facilitate direct interaction with the endothelium in specific tissues or indirectly through leukocytes. Importantly, significant progress has been made in understanding how these receptors confer enhanced invasion and survival advantage during hematogenous circulation of CTCs through recruitment of macrophages, neutrophils, platelets, and other cells. This review highlights the identification of novel adhesion molecules and how blocking their function can compromise successful seeding and colonization of CTCs in new microenvironment. Encouraged by existing diagnostic tools to identify and isolate CTCs, strategic targeting of these adhesion molecules to deliver conventional chemotherapeutics or novel apoptotic signals is discussed for the neutralization of CTCs in the circulation.

  5. Optimization of Intracellular Transportation of Gene Therapeutic DNA in Small Cell Lung Cancer (Ph.d.)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cramer, Frederik

    2013-01-01

    system has to be able to repeated systemic delivery of gene therapy to cancer cells in a both safe and efficient way. Non-viral delivery vectors fulfill many of these requirements except the latter. It is currently very difficult to systemically transport sufficient amounts of therapeutic DNA, by a non...... thereby improving the efficacy of the treatment. By implementing what is known as a DNA nuclear targeting sequence (DTS) strategy, we found that we could utilize the SCLC cells own transportation system thereby manipulating the cancer cells to bring our therapeutic plasmids from the cytoplasm and into the......Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) is a highly malignant disease characterized as being very aggressive and metastasizing at a rapid pace. The malevolent pace of SCLC cell migration results in almost three out of four SCLC patients having disseminated SCLC at the time of diagnosis. Unfortunately, there...

  6. Preconditioning Human Cardiac Stem Cells with an HO-1 Inducer Exerts Beneficial Effects After Cell Transplantation in the Infarcted Murine Heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Chuanxi; Guo, Yiru; Teng, Lei; Nong, Yibing; Tan, Min; Book, Michael J; Zhu, Xiaoping; Wang, Xiao-Liang; Du, Junjie; Wu, Wen-Jian; Xie, Wei; Hong, Kyung U; Li, Qianhong; Bolli, Roberto

    2015-12-01

    The regenerative potential of c-kit(+) cardiac stem cells (CSCs) is severely limited by the poor survival of cells after transplantation in the infarcted heart. We have previously demonstrated that preconditioning human CSCs (hCSCs) with the heme oxygenase-1 inducer, cobalt protoporphyrin (CoPP), has significant cytoprotective effects in vitro. Here, we examined whether preconditioning hCSCs with CoPP enhances CSC survival and improves cardiac function after transplantation in a model of myocardial infarction induced by a 45-minute coronary occlusion and 35-day reperfusion in immunodeficient mice. At 30 minutes of reperfusion, CoPP-preconditioned hCSCs(GFP+) , hCSCs(GFP+) , or medium were injected into the border zone. Quantitative analysis with real-time qPCR for the expression of the human-specific gene HLA revealed that the number of survived hCSCs was significantly greater in the preconditioned-hCSC group at 24 hours and 7 and 35 days compared with the hCSC group. Coimmunostaining of tissue sections for both green fluorescent protein (GFP) and human nuclear antigen further confirmed greater hCSC numbers at 35 days in the preconditioned-hCSC group. At 35 days, compared with the hCSC group, the preconditioned-hCSC group exhibited increased positive and negative left ventricular (LV) dP/dt, end-systolic elastance, and anterior wall/apical strain rate (although ejection fraction was similar), reduced LV remodeling, and increased proliferation of transplanted cells and of cells apparently committed to cardiac lineage. In conclusion, CoPP-preconditioning of hCSCs enhances their survival and/or proliferation, promotes greater proliferation of cells expressing cardiac markers, and results in greater improvement in LV remodeling and in indices of cardiac function after infarction. Stem Cells 2015;33:3596-3607. PMID:26299779

  7. Lipid raft-mediated Akt signaling as a therapeutic target in mantle cell lymphoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent evidence shows that lipid raft membrane domains modulate both cell survival and death. Here, we have found that the phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt signaling pathway is present in the lipid rafts of mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) cells, and this location seems to be critical for full activation and MCL cell survival. The antitumor lipids (ATLs) edelfosine and perifosine target rafts, and we found that ATLs exerted in vitro and in vivo antitumor activity against MCL cells by displacing Akt as well as key regulatory kinases p-PDK1 (phosphatidylinositol-dependent protein kinase 1), PI3K and mTOR (mammalian TOR) from lipid rafts. This raft reorganization led to Akt dephosphorylation, while proapoptotic Fas/CD95 death receptor was recruited into rafts. Raft integrity was critical for Ser473 Akt phosphorylation. ATL-induced apoptosis appeared to correlate with the basal Akt phosphorylation status in MCL cell lines and primary cultures, and could be potentiated by the PI3K inhibitor wortmannin, or inhibited by the Akt activator pervanadate. Classical Akt inhibitors induced apoptosis in MCL cells. Microenvironmental stimuli, such as CD40 ligation or stromal cell contact, did not prevent ATL-induced apoptosis in MCL cell lines and patient-derived cells. These results highlight the role of raft-mediated PI3K/Akt signaling in MCL cell survival and chemotherapy, thus becoming a new target for MCL treatment

  8. Bortezomib in mantle cell lymphoma: comparative therapeutic outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vallumsetla N

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Nishanth Vallumsetla, Jonas Paludo, Prashant Kapoor Division of Hematology, Department of Internal Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA Abstract: Mantle cell lymphoma (MCL is an incurable, typically aggressive subtype of non-Hodgkin lymphoma, accounting for 4%–7% of newly diagnosed non-Hodgkin lymphoma cases. Chemoresistance commonly ensues in MCL, and patients with this heterogeneous disease invariably relapse, underscoring the unmet need for better therapies. Over the past few years, several novel agents with promising activity and unique mechanisms of action have been deemed effective in MCL. Bortezomib is a reversible proteasome inhibitor, approved as a single agent for patients with relapsed/refractory MCL who have received at least one prior line of therapy. Addition of bortezomib to chemoimmunotherapies has demonstrated good tolerability and superior efficacy, both in the upfront and salvage settings, and recently one such combination of bortezomib plus rituximab, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, and prednisone was approved as a frontline regimen in untreated patients with MCL. This review examines the role of bortezomib in a multitude of clinical settings and ongoing clinical trials designed to optimize its integration in the current treatment paradigms of MCL. Keywords: non-Hodgkin lymphoma, proteosome inhibitor, treatment

  9. Beta-Naphthoflavone and 3'-methoxy-4'-nitroflavone exert ambiguous effects on Ah receptor-dependent cell proliferation and gene expression in rat liver 'stem-like' cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zatloukalová, Jiřina; Šindlerová, Lenka; Kozubík, Alois; Krčmář, P.; Machala, M.; Vondráček, Jan

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 73, č. 10 (2007), s. 1622-1634. ISSN 0031-7012 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA524/06/0517; GA AV ČR(CZ) KJB6004407 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040702 Keywords : flavony * aryl hydrocarbon receptor * cell proliferation Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 1.195, year: 2007

  10. Preconditioning Human Cardiac Stem Cells with an HO-1 Inducer Exerts Beneficial Effects After Cell Transplantation in the Infarcted Murine Heart

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Chuanxi; Guo, Yiru; Teng, Lei; Nong, Yibing; Tan, Min; Book, Michael J.; Zhu, Xiaoping; Wang, Xiao-Liang; Du, Junjie; Wu, Wen-Jian; Xie, Wei; Hong, Kyung U.; Li, Qianhong; Bolli, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    The regenerative potential of c-kit+ cardiac stem cells (CSCs) is severely limited by the poor survival of cells after transplantation in the infarcted heart. We have previously demonstrated that preconditioning human CSCs (hCSCs) with the heme oxygenase-1 inducer, cobalt protoporphyrin (CoPP), has significant cytoprotective effects in vitro. Here, we examined whether preconditioning hCSCs with CoPP enhances CSC survival and improves cardiac function after transplantation in a model of myocardial infarction induced by a 45-minute coronary occlusion and 35-day reperfusion in immunodeficient mice. At 30 minutes of reperfusion, CoPP-preconditioned hCSCsGFP+, hCSCsGFP+, or medium were injected into the border zone. Quantitative analysis with real-time qPCR for the expression of the human-specific gene HLA revealed that the number of survived hCSCs was significantly greater in the preconditioned-hCSC group at 24 hours and 7 and 35 days compared with the hCSC group. Coimmunostaining of tissue sections for both green fluorescent protein (GFP) and human nuclear antigen further confirmed greater hCSC numbers at 35 days in the preconditioned-hCSC group. At 35 days, compared with the hCSC group, the preconditioned-hCSC group exhibited increased positive and negative left ventricular (LV) dP/dt, end-systolic elastance, and anterior wall/apical strain rate (although ejection fraction was similar), reduced LV remodeling, and increased proliferation of transplanted cells and of cells apparently committed to cardiac lineage. In conclusion, CoPP-preconditioning of hCSCs enhances their survival and/or proliferation, promotes greater proliferation of cells expressing cardiac markers, and results in greater improvement in LV remodeling and in indices of cardiac function after infarction. PMID:26299779

  11. Adipose Tissue-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Exert In Vitro Immunomodulatory and Beta Cell Protective Functions in Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Mice Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Rahavi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Regenerative and immunomodulatory properties of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs might be applied for type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM treatment. Thus, we proposed in vitro assessment of adipose tissue-derived MSCs (AT-MSCs immunomodulation on autoimmune response along with beta cell protection in streptozotocin- (STZ- induced diabetic C57BL/6 mice model. MSCs were extracted from abdominal adipose tissue of normal mice and cultured to proliferate. Diabetic mice were prepared by administration of multiple low-doses of streptozotocin. Pancreatic islets were isolated from normal mice and splenocytes prepared from normal and diabetic mice. Proliferation, cytokine production, and insulin secretion assays were performed in coculture experiments. AT-MSCs inhibited splenocytes proliferative response to specific (islet lysate and nonspecific (PHA triggers in a dose-dependent manner (P<0.05. Decreased production of proinflammatory cytokines, such as IFN-γ, IL-2, and IL-17, and increased secretion of regulatory cytokines such as TGF-β, IL-4, IL-10, and IL-13 by stimulated splenocytes were also shown in response to islet lysate or PHA stimulants (P<0.05. Finally, we demonstrated that AT-MSCs could effectively sustain viability as well as insulin secretion potential of pancreatic islets in the presence of reactive splenocytes (P<0.05. In conclusion, it seems that MSCs may provide a new horizon for T1DM cell therapy and islet transplantation in the future.

  12. Sensitivity of chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells to small targeted therapeutic molecules: An in vitro comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sylvan, Sandra Eketorp; Skribek, Henriette; Norin, Stefan; Muhari, Orsolya; Österborg, Anders; Szekely, Laszlo

    2016-01-01

    New drugs targeting important cellular signaling pathways are currently being developed for chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). It is therefore of interest to analyze their in vitro killing capacity in manufacturer-independent, comparative experiments. We here report on the sensitivity of CLL cells to a panel of emerging targeted therapeutics using high-throughput screening based on an automated fluorescence digital scanning system. Fresh CLL cells from 42 patients with indolent or progressive CLL were cultured for 72 hours on microtiter plates in a unique primary cell culture medium. Antitumor effects of 31 small therapeutic molecules (and, as controls, 29 cytostatic agents) at equimolar concentration were compared in a fluorescence survival assay. In vitro sensitivity to each drug exhibited considerable interpatient variability. The highest mean direct killing was observed for one survivin inhibitor (YM-155), two bcl-2 inhibitors (ABT-199, ABT-737), and one selective CDK inhibitor (dinaciclib). Their killing capacity was, in contrast to most cytostatic agents, similarly high in refractory versus untreated CLL patients and was significantly higher on cells with the 17p deletion/TP53 mutation than on cells with other cytogenetic abnormalities (p = 0.02). Sensitivity of bone marrow and lymph node cells was highly correlated with that of blood cells. Even though direct killing may not be the only therapeutic effector function in vivo, results from this head-to-head comparison may help to identify drugs of particular interest for intensified clinical development. PMID:26325331

  13. Glioblastoma Therapy with Cytotoxic Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Optimized by Bioluminescence Imaging of Tumor and Therapeutic Cell Response

    OpenAIRE

    Maria Alieva; Bagó, Juli R.; Elisabet Aguilar; Carolina Soler-Botija; Vila, Olaia F.; Joan Molet; Gambhir, Sanjiv S.; Nuria Rubio; Jerónimo Blanco

    2012-01-01

    Genetically modified adipose tissue derived mesenchymal stromal cells (hAMSCs) with tumor homing capacity have been proposed for localized therapy of chemo- and radiotherapy resistant glioblastomas. We demonstrate an effective procedure to optimize glioblastoma therapy based on the use of genetically modified hAMSCs and in vivo non invasive monitoring of tumor and therapeutic cells. Glioblastoma U87 cells expressing Photinus pyralis luciferase (Pluc) were implanted in combination with hAMSCs ...

  14. Design and screening of a glial cell-specific, cell penetrating peptide for therapeutic applications in multiple sclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corey Heffernan

    Full Text Available Multiple Sclerosis (MS is an autoimmune, neurodegenerative disease of the central nervous system (CNS characterized by demyelination through glial cell loss. Current and proposed therapeutic strategies to arrest demyelination and/or promote further remyelination include: (i modulation of the host immune system; and/or (ii transplantation of myelinating/stem or progenitor cells to the circulation or sites of injury. However, significant drawbacks are inherent with both approaches. Cell penetrating peptides (CPP are short amino acid sequences with an intrinsic ability to translocate across plasma membranes, and theoretically represent an attractive vector for delivery of therapeutic peptides or nanoparticles to glia to promote cell survival or remyelination. The CPPs described to date are commonly non-selective in the cell types they transduce, limiting their therapeutic application in vivo. Here, we describe a theoretical framework for design of a novel CPP sequence that selectively transduces human glial cells (excluding non-glial cell types, and conduct preliminary screens of purified, recombinant CPPs with immature and matured human oligodendrocytes and astrocytes, and two non-glial cell types. A candidate peptide, termed TD2.2, consistently transduced glial cells, was significantly more effective at transducing immature oligodendrocytes than matured progeny, and was virtually incapable of transducing two non-glial cell types: (i human neural cells and (ii human dermal fibroblasts. Time-lapse confocal microscopy confirms trafficking of TD2.2 (fused to EGFP to mature oligodendrocytes 3-6 hours after protein application in vitro. We propose selectivity of TD2.2 for glial cells represents a new therapeutic strategy for the treatment of glial-related disease, such as MS.

  15. BiovaxID, a personalized therapeutic vaccine against B-cell lymphomas

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Reiniš, Milan

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 10, č. 5 (2008), s. 526-534. ISSN 1464-8431 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : B-cell lymphomas * tumor antigen * therapeutic vaccine Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.913, year: 2008

  16. Cathepsin B as a potential prognostic and therapeutic marker for human lung squamous cell carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Gong, Fengming; PENG, XINGCHEN; Luo, Can; Shen, Guobo; Zhao, Chengjian; ZOU, LIQUN; Li, Longhao; Sang, Yaxiong; Zhao, Yuwei; Zhao, Xia

    2013-01-01

    Background The lung squamous cell carcinoma survival rate is very poor despite multimodal treatment. It is urgent to discover novel candidate biomarkers for prognostic assessment and therapeutic targets to lung squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Results Herein a two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and ESI-Q-TOF MS/MS-based proteomic approach was used to identify differentially expressed proteins between lung SCC and adjacent normal tissues. 31 proteins with significant alteration were identified....

  17. Emerging trends in plasma-free manufacturing of recombinant protein therapeutics expressed in mammalian cells

    OpenAIRE

    Grillberger, Leopold; Kreil, Thomas R.; Nasr, Sonia; Reiter, Manfred

    2009-01-01

    Mammalian cells are the expression system of choice for therapeutic proteins, especially those requiring complex post-translational modifications. Traditionally, these cells are grown in medium supplemented with serum and other animal-or human-derived components to support viability and productivity. Such proteins are also typically added as excipients and stabilizers in the final drug formulation. However, the transmission of hepatitis B in the 1970s and of hepatitis C and HIV in the 1980s t...

  18. Enhanced therapeutic efficacy of vitamin K2 by silencing BCL-2 expression in SMMC-7721 hepatocellular carcinoma cells

    OpenAIRE

    Yao, Yuting; Li, Lu; Zhang, He; Jia, Renbing; Liu, Bo; Zhao, Xiaoping; ZHANG, LEILEI; QIAN, GUANXIANG; Fan, Xianqun; Ge, Shengfang

    2012-01-01

    Vitamin K2 (VK2) exerts cell growth inhibitory effects in various human cancer cells such as SMMC-7721 hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells. BCL-2 is an antiapoptotic protein that is frequently overexpressed in numerous tumors. Modulation of multiple antiapoptotic signaling pathways involving BCL-2, which are related to growth factor-stimulated signal transduction in cell survival, is essential for enhancement of the cytotoxic effect of anticancer drugs. In this study, we tested a new strateg...

  19. Enhancement of therapeutic drug and DNA delivery into cells by electroporation* Enhancement of therapeutic drug and DNA delivery into cells by electroporation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabussay, Dietmar; Dev, Nagendu B.; Fewell, Jason; Smith, Louis C.; Widera, Georg; Zhang, Lei

    2003-02-01

    The effectiveness of potentially powerful therapeutics, including DNA, is often limited by their inability to permeate the cell membrane efficiently. Electroporation (EP) also referred to as `electropermeabilization' of the outer cell membrane renders this barrier temporarily permeable by inducing `pores' across the lipid bilayer. For in vivo EP, the drug or DNA is delivered into the interstitial space of the target tissue by conventional means, followed by local EP. EP pulses of micro- to millisecond duration and field strengths of 100-1500 V cm-1 generally enhance the delivery of certain chemotherapeutic drugs by three to four orders of magnitude and intracellular delivery of DNA several hundred-fold. We have used EP in clinical studies for human cancer therapy and in animals for gene therapy and DNA vaccination. Late stage squamous cell carcinomas of the head and neck were treated with intratumoural injection of bleomycin and subsequent EP. Of the 69 tumours treated, 25% disappeared completely and another 32% were reduced in volume by more than half. Residence time of bleomycin in electroporated tumours was significantly greater than in non-electroporated lesions. Histological findings and gene expression patterns after bleomycin-EP treatment indicated rapid apoptosis of the majority of tumour cells. In animals, we demonstrated the usefulness of EP for enhanced DNA delivery by achieving normalization of blood clotting times in haemophilic dogs, and by substantially increasing transgene expression in smooth muscle cells of arterial walls using a novel porous balloon EP catheter. Finally, we have found in animal experiments that the immune response to DNA vaccines can be dramatically enhanced and accelerated by EP and co-injection of micron-sized particles. We conclude that EP represents an effective, economical and safe approach to enhance the intracellular delivery, and thus potency, of important drugs and genes for therapeutic purposes. The safety and pharmaco

  20. Therapeutic efficacy of Genistein-Cytoreg® combination in breast cancer cells

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson MM; Kumi-Diaka KJ; Zoeller R; Graves BS; Merchant KT; Hörmann VP; Hassanhi M

    2012-01-01

    Background: In spite the heavy investments in therapeutic research breast cancer still impacts the lives of women globally. The projected incidence of new cases of in situ breast cancer in theUSA for 2011 is 57,650, with estimated 39,520 deaths. The phytoestrogen, genistein and the synthetic compound, Cytoreg® have been shown to inhibit growth and proliferation in manycancer cell lines. Purpose of the Study: In this study, we investigated the therapeutic efficacy of Cytoreg®-genistein com...

  1. Engineering Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotube Therapeutic Bionanofluids to Selectively Target Papillary Thyroid Cancer Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Idit Dotan

    Full Text Available The incidence of papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC has risen steadily over the past few decades as well as the recurrence rates. It has been proposed that targeted ablative physical therapy could be a therapeutic modality in thyroid cancer. Targeted bio-affinity functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (BioNanofluid act locally, to efficiently convert external light energy to heat thereby specifically killing cancer cells. This may represent a promising new cancer therapeutic modality, advancing beyond conventional laser ablation and other nanoparticle approaches.Thyroid Stimulating Hormone Receptor (TSHR was selected as a target for PTC cells, due to its wide expression. Either TSHR antibodies or Thyrogen or purified TSH (Thyrotropin were chemically conjugated to our functionalized Bionanofluid. A diode laser system (532 nm was used to illuminate a PTC cell line for set exposure times. Cell death was assessed using Trypan Blue staining.TSHR-targeted BioNanofluids were capable of selectively ablating BCPAP, a TSHR-positive PTC cell line, while not TSHR-null NSC-34 cells. We determined that a 2:1 BCPAP cell:α-TSHR-BioNanofluid conjugate ratio and a 30 second laser exposure killed approximately 60% of the BCPAP cells, while 65% and >70% of cells were ablated using Thyrotropin- and Thyrogen-BioNanofluid conjugates, respectively. Furthermore, minimal non-targeted killing was observed using selective controls.A BioNanofluid platform offering a potential therapeutic path for papillary thyroid cancer has been investigated, with our in vitro results suggesting the development of a potent and rapid method of selective cancer cell killing. Therefore, BioNanofluid treatment emphasizes the need for new technology to treat patients with local recurrence and metastatic disease who are currently undergoing either re-operative neck explorations, repeated administration of radioactive iodine and as a last resort external beam radiation or chemotherapy, with

  2. Engineering Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotube Therapeutic Bionanofluids to Selectively Target Papillary Thyroid Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paliouras, Miltiadis; Mitmaker, Elliot J.; Trifiro, Mark A.

    2016-01-01

    Background The incidence of papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) has risen steadily over the past few decades as well as the recurrence rates. It has been proposed that targeted ablative physical therapy could be a therapeutic modality in thyroid cancer. Targeted bio-affinity functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (BioNanofluid) act locally, to efficiently convert external light energy to heat thereby specifically killing cancer cells. This may represent a promising new cancer therapeutic modality, advancing beyond conventional laser ablation and other nanoparticle approaches. Methods Thyroid Stimulating Hormone Receptor (TSHR) was selected as a target for PTC cells, due to its wide expression. Either TSHR antibodies or Thyrogen or purified TSH (Thyrotropin) were chemically conjugated to our functionalized Bionanofluid. A diode laser system (532 nm) was used to illuminate a PTC cell line for set exposure times. Cell death was assessed using Trypan Blue staining. Results TSHR-targeted BioNanofluids were capable of selectively ablating BCPAP, a TSHR-positive PTC cell line, while not TSHR-null NSC-34 cells. We determined that a 2:1 BCPAP cell:α-TSHR-BioNanofluid conjugate ratio and a 30 second laser exposure killed approximately 60% of the BCPAP cells, while 65% and >70% of cells were ablated using Thyrotropin- and Thyrogen-BioNanofluid conjugates, respectively. Furthermore, minimal non-targeted killing was observed using selective controls. Conclusion A BioNanofluid platform offering a potential therapeutic path for papillary thyroid cancer has been investigated, with our in vitro results suggesting the development of a potent and rapid method of selective cancer cell killing. Therefore, BioNanofluid treatment emphasizes the need for new technology to treat patients with local recurrence and metastatic disease who are currently undergoing either re-operative neck explorations, repeated administration of radioactive iodine and as a last resort external beam

  3. Current status and regulatory perspective of chimeric antigen receptor-modified T cell therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Mi-Gyeong; Kim, Dongyoon; Suh, Soo-Kyung; Park, Zewon; Choi, Min Joung; Oh, Yu-Kyoung

    2016-04-01

    Chimeric antigen receptor-modified T cells (CAR-T) have emerged as a new modality for cancer immunotherapy due to their potent efficacy against terminal cancers. CAR-Ts are reported to exert higher efficacy than monoclonal antibodies and antibody-drug conjugates, and act via mechanisms distinct from T cell receptor-engineered T cells. These cells are constructed by transducing genes encoding fusion proteins of cancer antigen-recognizing single-chain Fv linked to intracellular signaling domains of T cell receptors. CAR-Ts are classified as first-, second- and third-generation, depending on the intracellular signaling domain number of T cell receptors. This review covers the current status of CAR-T research, including basic proof-of-concept investigations at the cell and animal levels. Currently ongoing clinical trials of CAR-T worldwide are additionally discussed. Owing to the lack of existing approved products, several unresolved concerns remain with regard to safety, efficacy and manufacturing of CAR-T, as well as quality control issues. In particular, the cytokine release syndrome is the major side-effect impeding the successful development of CAR-T in clinical trials. Here, we have addressed the challenges and regulatory perspectives of CAR-T therapy. PMID:26895243

  4. Potential therapeutic target for malignant paragangliomas: ATP synthase on the surface of paraganglioma cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fliedner, Stephanie MJ; Yang, Chunzhang; Thompson, Eli; Abu-Asab, Mones; Hsu, Chang-Mei; Lampert, Gary; Eiden, Lee; Tischler, Arthur S; Wesley, Robert; Zhuang, Zhengping; Lehnert, Hendrik; Pacak, Karel

    2015-01-01

    F1FoATP synthase (ATP synthase) is a ubiquitous enzyme complex in eukaryotes. In general it is localized to the mitochondrial inner membrane and serves as the last step in the mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation of ADP to ATP, utilizing a proton gradient across the inner mitochondrial membrane built by the complexes of the electron transfer chain. However some cell types, including tumors, carry ATP synthase on the cell surface. It was suggested that cell surface ATP synthase helps tumor cells thriving on glycolysis to survive their high acid generation. Angiostatin, aurovertin, resveratrol, and antibodies against the α and β subunits of ATP synthase were shown to bind and selectively inhibit cell surface ATP synthase, promoting tumor cell death. Here we show that ATP synthase β (ATP5B) is present on the cell surface of mouse pheochromocytoma cells as well as tumor cells of human SDHB-derived paragangliomas (PGLs), while being virtually absent on chromaffin primary cells from bovine adrenal medulla by confocal microscopy. The cell surface location of ATP5B was verified in the tissue of an SDHB-derived PGL by immunoelectron microscopy. Treatment of mouse pheochromocytoma cells with resveratrol as well as ATP5B antibody led to statistically significant proliferation inhibition. Our data suggest that PGLs carry ATP synthase on their surface that promotes cell survival or proliferation. Thus, cell surface ATP synthase may present a novel therapeutic target in treating metastatic or inoperable PGLs. PMID:26101719

  5. Therapeutic Potential of Umbilical Cord Blood Stem Cells on Brain Damage of a Model of Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Reza Nikravesh

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Human cord blood-derived stem cells are a rich source of stem cells as well as precursors. With regard to the researchers have focused on the therapeutic potential of stem cell in the neurological disease such as stroke, the aim of this study was the investiga-tion of the therapeutic effects of human cord blood-derived stem cells in cerebral ischemia on rat. Methods: This study was carried out on young rats. Firstly, to create a laboratory model of ischemic stroke, carotid artery of animals was occluded for 30 minutes. Then, umbilical cord blood cells were isolated and labeled using bromodeoxyuridine and 2×105 cells were injected into the experimental group via the tail vein. Rats with hypoxic condi-tions were used as a sham group. A group of animals did not receive any injection or sur-geries were used as a control. Results: Obtained results were evaluated based on behavior-al responses and immunohistochemistry, with emphasis on areas of putamen and caudate nucleus in the control, sham and experimental groups. Our results indicated that behavioral recovery was observed in the experimental group compared to the either the sham or the control group. However, histological studies demonstrated a low percent of tissue injury in the experimental group in comparison with the sham group. Conclusion: Stem cell trans-plantation is beneficial for the brain tissue reparation after hypoxic ischemic cell death.

  6. A novel molecule integrating therapeutic and diagnostic activities reveals multiple aspects of stem cell-based therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hingtgen, Shawn D; Kasmieh, Randa; van de Water, Jeroen; Weissleder, Ralph; Shah, Khalid

    2010-04-01

    Stem cells are promising therapeutic delivery vehicles; however pre-clinical and clinical applications of stem cell-based therapy would benefit significantly from the ability to simultaneously determine therapeutic efficacy and pharmacokinetics of therapies delivered by engineered stem cells. In this study, we engineered and screened numerous fusion variants that contained therapeutic (TRAIL) and diagnostic (luciferase) domains designed to allow simultaneous investigation of multiple events in stem cell-based therapy in vivo. When various stem cell lines were engineered with the optimized molecule, SRL(O)L(2)TR, diagnostic imaging showed marked differences in the levels and duration of secretion between stem cell lines, while the therapeutic activity of the molecule showed the different secretion levels translated to significant variability in tumor cell killing. In vivo, simultaneous diagnostic and therapeutic monitoring revealed that stem cell-based delivery significantly improved pharmacokinetics and anti-tumor effectiveness of the therapy compared to intravenous or intratumoral delivery. As treatment for highly malignant brain tumor xenografts, tracking SRL(O)L(2)TR showed stable stem cell-mediated delivery significantly regressed peripheral and intracranial tumors. Together, the integrated diagnostic and therapeutic properties of SRL(O)L(2)TR answer critical questions necessary for successful utilization of stem cells as novel therapeutic vehicles. PMID:20127797

  7. Therapeutic implications of disorders of cell death signalling: membranes, micro-environment, and eicosanoid and docosanoid metabolism

    OpenAIRE

    Davidson, J.; Rotondo, D.; Rizzo, MT; Leaver, HA

    2012-01-01

    Disruptions of cell death signalling occur in pathological processes, such as cancer and degenerative disease. Increased knowledge of cell death signalling has opened new areas of therapeutic research, and identifying key mediators of cell death has become increasingly important. Early triggering events in cell death may provide potential therapeutic targets, whereas agents affecting later signals may be more palliative in nature. A group of primary mediators are derivatives of the highly uns...

  8. Natural killer (NK) cells inhibit systemic metastasis of glioblastoma cells and have therapeutic effects against glioblastomas in the brain

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Se Jeong; Kang, Won Young; Yoon, Yeup; Jin, Ju Youn; Song, Hye Jin; Her, Jung Hyun; Kang, Sang Mi; Hwang, Yu Kyeong; Kang, Kyeong Jin; Joo, Kyeung Min; Nam, Do-Hyun

    2015-01-01

    Background Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is characterized by extensive local invasion, which is in contrast with extremely rare systemic metastasis of GBM. Molecular mechanisms inhibiting systemic metastasis of GBM would be a novel therapeutic candidate for GBM in the brain. Methods Patient-derived GBM cells were primarily cultured from surgical samples of GBM patients and were inoculated into the brains of immune deficient BALB/c-nude or NOD-SCID IL2Rgammanull (NSG) mice. Human NK cells were...

  9. Neural stem cells could serve as a therapeutic material forage-related neurodegenerative diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sarawut Suksuphew; Parinya Noisa

    2015-01-01

    Progressively loss of neural and glial cells is the keyevent that leads to nervous system dysfunctions anddiseases. Several neurodegenerative diseases, forinstance Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, andHuntington's disease, are associated to aging andsuggested to be a consequence of deficiency of neuralstem cell pool in the affected brain regions. Endogenousneural stem cells exist throughout life and are found inspecific niches of human brain. These neural stem cellsare responsible for the regeneration of new neurons torestore, in the normal circumstance, the functions of thebrain. Endogenous neural stem cells can be isolated,propagated, and, notably, differentiated to most celltypes of the brain. On the other hand, other types ofstem cells, such as mesenchymal stem cells, embryonicstem cells, and induced pluripotent stem cells can alsoserve as a source for neural stem cell production, thathold a great promise for regeneration of the brain. Thereplacement of neural stem cells, either endogenousor stem cell-derived neural stem cells, into impairedbrain is highly expected as a possible therapeutic meanfor neurodegenerative diseases. In this review, clinicalfeatures and current routinely treatments of agerelatedneurodegenerative diseases are documented.Noteworthy, we presented the promising evidence ofneural stem cells and their derivatives in curing suchdiseases, together with the remaining challenges toachieve the best outcome for patients.

  10. Invadopodia Are Required for Cancer Cell Extravasation and Are a Therapeutic Target for Metastasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hon S. Leong

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Tumor cell extravasation is a key step during cancer metastasis, yet the precise mechanisms that regulate this dynamic process are unclear. We utilized a high-resolution time-lapse intravital imaging approach to visualize the dynamics of cancer cell extravasation in vivo. During intravascular migration, cancer cells form protrusive structures identified as invadopodia by their enrichment of MT1-MMP, cortactin, Tks4, and importantly Tks5, which localizes exclusively to invadopodia. Cancer cells extend invadopodia through the endothelium into the extravascular stroma prior to their extravasation at endothelial junctions. Genetic or pharmacological inhibition of invadopodia initiation (cortactin, maturation (Tks5, or function (Tks4 resulted in an abrogation of cancer cell extravasation and metastatic colony formation in an experimental mouse lung metastasis model. This provides direct evidence of a functional role for invadopodia during cancer cell extravasation and distant metastasis and reveals an opportunity for therapeutic intervention in this clinically important process.

  11. Impaired clearance of apoptotic cells in chronic inflammatory diseases: therapeutic implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zsuzsa eSzondy

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available In healthy individuals billions of cells die by apoptosis every day. Removal of the dead cells by phagocytosis (a process called efferocytosis must be efficient to prevent secondary necrosis and the consequent release of proinflammatory cell contents that damages the tissue environment and provokes autoimmunity. In addition, detection and removal of apoptotic cells generally induces an anti-inflammatory response. As a consequence improper clearance of apoptotic cells, being the result of either genetic anomalies and /or a persistent disease state, contributes to the establishment and progression of a number of human chronic inflammatory diseases such as autoimmune and neurological disorders, inflammatory lung diseases, obesity, type 2 diabetes or atherosclerosis. During the past decade our knowledge about the mechanism of efferocytosis has significantly increased, providing therapeutic targets through which impaired phagocytosis of apoptotic cells and the consequent inflammation could be influenced in these diseases.

  12. Pathophysiological significance and therapeutic targeting of germinal center kinase in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Julie Marie; Bhatt, Shruti; Patricelli, Matthew P; Nomanbhoy, Tyzoon K; Jiang, Xiaoyu; Natkunam, Yasodha; Gentles, Andrew J; Martinez, Ezequiel; Zhu, Daxing; Chapman, Jennifer Rose; Cortizas, Elena; Shyam, Ragini; Chinichian, Shideh; Advani, Ranjana; Tan, Li; Zhang, Jianming; Choi, Hwan Geun; Tibshirani, Robert; Buhrlage, Sara J; Gratzinger, Dita; Verdun, Ramiro; Gray, Nathanael S; Lossos, Izidore S

    2016-07-14

    Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is the most common subtype of non-Hodgkin lymphoma, yet 40% to 50% of patients will eventually succumb to their disease, demonstrating a pressing need for novel therapeutic options. Gene expression profiling has identified messenger RNAs that lead to transformation, but critical events transforming cells are normally executed by kinases. Therefore, we hypothesized that previously unrecognized kinases may contribute to DLBCL pathogenesis. We performed the first comprehensive analysis of global kinase activity in DLBCL, to identify novel therapeutic targets, and discovered that germinal center kinase (GCK) was extensively activated. GCK RNA interference and small molecule inhibition induced cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis in DLBCL cell lines and primary tumors in vitro and decreased the tumor growth rate in vivo, resulting in a significantly extended lifespan of mice bearing DLBCL xenografts. GCK expression was also linked to adverse clinical outcome in a cohort of 151 primary DLBCL patients. These studies demonstrate, for the first time, that GCK is a molecular therapeutic target in DLBCL tumors and that inhibiting GCK may significantly extend DLBCL patient survival. Because the majority of DLBCL tumors (∼80%) exhibit activation of GCK, this therapy may be applicable to most patients. PMID:27151888

  13. Therapeutic applications of mesenchymal stroma cells in pediatric diseases: current aspects and future perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habib, Hamid S; Halawa, Taher F; Atta, Hazem M

    2011-11-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells or stroma cells (MSCs) were recently proven to play various therapeutic roles when used in clinical trials to control various inflammatory, neoplastic and immunologic diseases in children. Clinical trials show some promising results, particularly in diseases where conventional therapy is still ineffective. However, experimental studies sometimes show conflicting results. This review aims to assess the current therapeutic role of MSCs in the control of several pediatric diseases and elaborate on their future applications by reviewing published studies. A review of published studies on this subject based on Pubmed and Medical Subject Heading databases, with search for all relevant articles focusing on results of clinical trials to evaluate the clinical applications of MSCs. The review includes documentation of positive as well as negative applications of MSCs focused on pediatric diseases. MSCs have important immunosuppressive and antifibrotic effects that need to be employed to help patients with diseases for which no conventional management has proven to be effective. They may be also be used as an adjuvant to conventional therapeutic modalities to consolidate recovery. This review sheds light on the significance of the use of MSCs for the treatment of various pediatric diseases and focuses on promising applications. Most of the reported studies agree about the favorable use of MSCs in various diseases; however, more clinical trials, involving larger numbers of patients, need to be conducted in order to refine the outcome of the therapeutic methods and establish standardized protocols. PMID:22037754

  14. Molecular pathways: novel approaches for improved therapeutic targeting of Hedgehog signaling in cancer stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Justilien, Verline; Fields, Alan P

    2015-02-01

    The Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway is critical for embryonic development. In adult tissues, Hh signaling is relatively quiescent with the exception of roles in tissue maintenance and repair. Aberrant activation of Hh signaling is implicated in multiple aspects of transformation, including the maintenance of the cancer stem cell (CSC) phenotype. Preclinical studies indicate that CSCs from many tumor types are sensitive to Hh pathway inhibition and that Hh-targeted therapeutics block many aspects of transformation attributed to CSCs, including drug resistance, relapse, and metastasis. However, to date, Hh inhibitors, specifically those targeting Smoothened [such as vismodegib, BMS-833923, saridegib (IPI-926), sonidegib/erismodegib (LDE225), PF-04449913, LY2940680, LEQ 506, and TAK-441], have demonstrated good efficacy as monotherapy in patients with basal cell carcinoma and medulloblastoma, but have shown limited activity in other tumor types. This lack of success is likely due to many factors, including a lack of patient stratification in early trials, cross-talk between Hh and other oncogenic signaling pathways that can modulate therapeutic response, and a limited knowledge of Hh pathway activation mechanisms in CSCs from most tumor types. Here, we discuss Hh signaling mechanisms in the context of human cancer, particularly in the maintenance of the CSC phenotype, and consider new therapeutic strategies that hold the potential to expand considerably the scope and therapeutic efficacy of Hh-directed anticancer therapy. PMID:25646180

  15. Analysis of aggregated cell–cell statistical distances within pathways unveils therapeutic-resistance mechanisms in circulating tumor cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schissler, A. Grant; Li, Qike; Chen, James L.; Kenost, Colleen; Achour, Ikbel; Billheimer, D. Dean; Li, Haiquan; Piegorsch, Walter W.; Lussier, Yves A.

    2016-01-01

    Motivation: As ‘omics’ biotechnologies accelerate the capability to contrast a myriad of molecular measurements from a single cell, they also exacerbate current analytical limitations for detecting meaningful single-cell dysregulations. Moreover, mRNA expression alone lacks functional interpretation, limiting opportunities for translation of single-cell transcriptomic insights to precision medicine. Lastly, most single-cell RNA-sequencing analytic approaches are not designed to investigate small populations of cells such as circulating tumor cells shed from solid tumors and isolated from patient blood samples. Results: In response to these characteristics and limitations in current single-cell RNA-sequencing methodology, we introduce an analytic framework that models transcriptome dynamics through the analysis of aggregated cell–cell statistical distances within biomolecular pathways. Cell–cell statistical distances are calculated from pathway mRNA fold changes between two cells. Within an elaborate case study of circulating tumor cells derived from prostate cancer patients, we develop analytic methods of aggregated distances to identify five differentially expressed pathways associated to therapeutic resistance. Our aggregation analyses perform comparably with Gene Set Enrichment Analysis and better than differentially expressed genes followed by gene set enrichment. However, these methods were not designed to inform on differential pathway expression for a single cell. As such, our framework culminates with the novel aggregation method, cell-centric statistics (CCS). CCS quantifies the effect size and significance of differentially expressed pathways for a single cell of interest. Improved rose plots of differentially expressed pathways in each cell highlight the utility of CCS for therapeutic decision-making. Availability and implementation: http://www.lussierlab.org/publications/CCS/ Contact: yves@email.arizona.edu or piegorsch

  16. Cell death induced by ozone and various non-thermal plasmas: therapeutic perspectives and limitations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lunov, Oleg; Zablotskyy, Vitaliy A.; Churpita, Olexandr; Chánová, Eliška; Syková, Eva; Dejneka, Alexandr; Kubinová, Šárka

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 4, NOV (2014), "7129-1"-"7129-11". ISSN 2045-2322 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LO1309 Grant ostatní: AV ČR(CZ) M100101219 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 ; RVO:61389013 ; RVO:68378041 Keywords : cell death * non-thermal plasma * therapeutic perspectives Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics; FH - Neurology (UEM-P); CD - Macromolecular Chemistry (UMCH-V) Impact factor: 5.578, year: 2014

  17. Therapeutic potential of mesenchymal stem cells for pulmonary complications associated with preterm birth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laube, Mandy; Stolzing, Alexandra; Thome, Ulrich H; Fabian, Claire

    2016-05-01

    Preterm infants frequently suffer from pulmonary complications resulting in significant morbidity and mortality. Physiological and structural lung immaturity impairs perinatal lung transition to air breathing resulting in respiratory distress. Mechanical ventilation and oxygen supplementation ensure sufficient oxygen supply but enhance inflammatory processes which might lead to the establishment of a chronic lung disease called bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD). Current therapeutic options to prevent or treat BPD are limited and have salient side effects, highlighting the need for new therapeutic approaches. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have demonstrated therapeutic potential in animal models of BPD. This review focuses on MSC-based therapeutic approaches to treat pulmonary complications and critically compares results obtained in BPD models. Thereby bottlenecks in the translational systems are identified that are preventing progress in combating BPD. Notably, current animal models closely resemble the so-called "old" BPD with profound inflammation and injury, whereas clinical improvements shifted disease pathology towards a "new" BPD in which arrest of lung maturation predominates. Future studies need to evaluate the utility of MSC-based therapies in animal models resembling the "new" BPD though promising in vitro evidence suggests that MSCs do possess the potential to stimulate lung maturation. Furthermore, we address the mode-of-action of MSC-based therapies with regard to lung development and inflammation/fibrosis. Their therapeutic efficacy is mainly attributed to an enhancement of regeneration and immunomodulation due to paracrine effects. In addition, we discuss current improvement strategies by genetic modifications or precondition of MSCs to enhance their therapeutic efficacy which could also prove beneficial for BPD therapies. PMID:26928452

  18. Hepatic leukemia factor promotes resistance to cell death: Implications for therapeutics and chronotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Physiological variation related to circadian rhythms and aberrant gene expression patterns are believed to modulate therapeutic efficacy, but the precise molecular determinants remain unclear. Here we examine the regulation of cell death by hepatic leukemia factor (HLF), which is an output regulator of circadian rhythms and is aberrantly expressed in human cancers, using an ectopic expression strategy in JB6 mouse epidermal cells and human keratinocytes. Ectopic HLF expression inhibited cell death in both JB6 cells and human keratinocytes, as induced by serum-starvation, tumor necrosis factor alpha and ionizing radiation. Microarray analysis indicates that HLF regulates a complex multi-gene transcriptional program encompassing upregulation of anti-apoptotic genes, downregulation of pro-apoptotic genes, and many additional changes that are consistent with an anti-death program. Collectively, our results demonstrate that ectopic expression of HLF, an established transcription factor that cycles with circadian rhythms, can recapitulate many features associated with circadian-dependent physiological variation. - Highlights: ► Circadian-dependent physiological variation impacts therapeutic efficacy. ► Hepatic leukemia factor inhibits cell death and is a candidate circadian factor. ► Hepatic leukemia factor anti-death program is conserved in murine and human cells. ► Transcriptomics indicates the anti-death program results from a systems response

  19. Hepatic leukemia factor promotes resistance to cell death: Implications for therapeutics and chronotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waters, Katrina M. [Computational Biology and Bioinformatics, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99354 (United States); Sontag, Ryan L. [Systems Toxicology Groups, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99354 (United States); Weber, Thomas J., E-mail: Thomas.Weber@pnl.gov [Systems Toxicology Groups, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99354 (United States)

    2013-04-15

    Physiological variation related to circadian rhythms and aberrant gene expression patterns are believed to modulate therapeutic efficacy, but the precise molecular determinants remain unclear. Here we examine the regulation of cell death by hepatic leukemia factor (HLF), which is an output regulator of circadian rhythms and is aberrantly expressed in human cancers, using an ectopic expression strategy in JB6 mouse epidermal cells and human keratinocytes. Ectopic HLF expression inhibited cell death in both JB6 cells and human keratinocytes, as induced by serum-starvation, tumor necrosis factor alpha and ionizing radiation. Microarray analysis indicates that HLF regulates a complex multi-gene transcriptional program encompassing upregulation of anti-apoptotic genes, downregulation of pro-apoptotic genes, and many additional changes that are consistent with an anti-death program. Collectively, our results demonstrate that ectopic expression of HLF, an established transcription factor that cycles with circadian rhythms, can recapitulate many features associated with circadian-dependent physiological variation. - Highlights: ► Circadian-dependent physiological variation impacts therapeutic efficacy. ► Hepatic leukemia factor inhibits cell death and is a candidate circadian factor. ► Hepatic leukemia factor anti-death program is conserved in murine and human cells. ► Transcriptomics indicates the anti-death program results from a systems response.

  20. CD19-targeted CAR T-cell therapeutics for hematologic malignancies: interpreting clinical outcomes to date.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jae H; Geyer, Mark B; Brentjens, Renier J

    2016-06-30

    Adoptive transfer of T cells genetically modified to express chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) targeting CD19 has produced impressive results in treating patients with B-cell malignancies. Although these CAR-modified T cells target the same antigen, the designs of CARs vary as well as several key aspects of the clinical trials in which these CARs have been studied. It is unclear whether these differences have any impact on clinical outcome and treatment-related toxicities. Herein, we review clinical results reflecting the investigational use of CD19-targeted CAR T-cell therapeutics in patients with B-cell hematologic malignancies, in light of differences in CAR design and production, and outline the limitations inherent in comparing outcomes between studies. PMID:27207800

  1. Primary nodal peripheral T-cell lymphomas: diagnosis and therapeutic considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Alberto de Pádua Covas Lage

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Nodal peripheral T-cell lymphomas are a rare group of neoplasms derived from post-thymic and activated T lymphocytes. A review of scientific articles listed in PubMed, Lilacs, and the Cochrane Library databases was performed using the term "peripheral T-cell lymphomas". According to the World Health Organization classification of hematopoietic tissue tumors, this group of neoplasms consists of peripheral T-cell lymphoma not otherwise specified (PTCL-NOS, angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma (AITL, anaplastic large cell lymphoma-anaplastic lymphoma kinase positive (ALCL-ALK+, and a provisional entity called anaplastic large cell lymphoma-anaplastic lymphoma kinase negative (ALCL-ALK-. Because the treatment and prognoses of these neoplasms involve different principles, it is essential to distinguish each one by its clinical, immunophenotypic, genetic, and molecular features. Except for anaplastic large cell lymphoma-anaplastic lymphoma kinase positive, which has no adverse international prognostic index, the prognosis of nodal peripheral T-cell lymphomas is worse than that of aggressive B-cell lymphomas. Chemotherapy based on anthracyclines provides poor outcomes because these neoplasms frequently have multidrug-resistant phenotypes. Based on this, the current tendency is to use intensified cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, prednisolone (CHOP regimens with the addition of new drugs, and autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. This paper describes the clinical features and diagnostic methods, and proposes a therapeutic algorithm for nodal peripheral T-cell lymphoma patients.

  2. Biotechnological and biomedical applications of mesenchymal stem cells as a therapeutic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahimzadeh, Amirbahman; Tabatabaei Mirakabad, Fatemeh Sadat; Movassaghpour, Aliakbar; Shamsasenjan, Karim; Kariminekoo, Saber; Talebi, Mehdi; Shekari, Abolfazl; Zeighamian, Vahideh; Gandomkar Ghalhar, Masoud; Akbarzadeh, Abolfazl

    2016-03-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are non-hematopoietic, multipotent progenitor cells which reside in bone marrow (BM), support homing of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and self-renewal in the BM. These cells have the potential to differentiate into tissues of mesenchymal origin, such as fibroblasts, adipocytes, cardiomyocytes, and stromal cells. MSCs can express surface molecules like CD13, CD29, CD44, CD73, CD90, CD166, CXCL12 and toll-like receptors (TLRs). Different factors, such as TGF-β, IL-10, IDO, PGE-2, sHLA-G5, HO, and Galectin-3, secreted by MSCs, induce interaction in cell to cell immunomodulatory effects on innate and adaptive cells of the immune system. Furthermore, these cells can stimulate and increase the TH2 and regulatory T-cells through inhibitory effects on the immune system. MSCs originate from the BM and other tissues including the brain, adipose tissue, peripheral blood, cornea, thymus, spleen, fallopian tube, placenta, Wharton's jelly and umbilical cord blood. Many studies have focused on two significant features of MSC therapy: (I) MSCs can modulate T-cell-mediated immunological responses, and (II) systemically administered MSCs home in to sites of ischemia or injury. In this review, we describe the known mechanisms of immunomodulation and homing of MSCs. As a result, this review emphasizes the functional role of MSCs in modulating immune responses, their capability in homing to injured tissue, and their clinical therapeutic potential. PMID:25340260

  3. Potential therapeutic application of adult stem cells in acute respiratory distress syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Jian-xin; LI Li

    2009-01-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) remains a poor prognosis in spite of the recent development of new therapeutic strategies. Cell-based therapy with stem cells has been considered as a promising way for the treatment of vital organ damage. Putative endogenous stem cells have been shown to be located within the adult lung in the basal layer of the upper airways, within or near pulmonary neu-roendocrine cell rests, at the bronchoalveolar junction, as well as within the alveolar epithelium. These stem cells are hypothesized to be the source of lung regeneration and repair. But this mechanism seems to be insufficient after lung injury. There is increasing excitement over the last few years with the suggestion that exogenous stem cells may offer new treatment options for ARDS. Exogenous stem cells have the abihty to differentiate and function as both airway and lung parenchymal epithelial cells in both in vitro and in-creasingly in vivo experiments. However, there is great con-troversy concerning the repair effect of adult stem cells in lung injury. This review evaluates the advances in endog-enous respiratory stem cells, and assesses the evidence for the use of stem cells in the repair of lung injury.

  4. Immature myeloid Gr-1+ CD11b+ cells from lipopolysaccharide-immunosuppressed mice acquire inhibitory activity in the bone marrow and migrate to lymph nodes to exert their suppressive function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landoni, Veronica I; Martire-Greco, Daiana; Rodriguez-Rodrigues, Nahuel; Chiarella, Paula; Schierloh, Pablo; Isturiz, Martin A; Fernández, Gabriela C

    2016-02-01

    Secondary infections due to post-sepsis immunosuppression are a major cause of death in patients with sepsis. Repetitive inoculation of increasing doses of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) into mice mimics the immunosuppression associated with sepsis. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs, Gr-1(+) CD11b(+)) are considered a major component of the immunosuppressive network, interfering with T-cell responses in many pathological conditions. We used LPS-immunosuppressed (IS) mice to address whether MDSCs acquired their suppressive ability in the bone marrow (BM) and whether they could migrate to lymph nodes (LNs) to exert their suppressive function. Our results showed that Gr-1(+) CD11b(+) cells of IS mice already had the potential to inhibit T-cell proliferation in the BM. Moreover, soluble factors present in the BM from IS mice were responsible for inducing this inhibitory ability in control BM cells. In addition, migration of Gr-1(+) CD11b(+) to LNs in vivo was maximal when cells obtained from the BM of IS mice were inoculated into an IS context. In this regard, we found chemoattractant activity in cell-free LN extracts (LNEs) from IS mice and an increased expression of the LN-homing chemokine receptor C-C chemokine receptor type 7 (CCR7) in IS BM Gr-1(+) CD11b(+) cells. These results indicate that Gr-1(+) CD11b(+) cells found in BM from IS mice acquire their suppressive activity in the same niche where they are generated, and migrate to LNs to exert their inhibitory role. A better understanding of MDSC generation and/or regulation of factors able to induce their inhibitory function may provide new and more effective tools for the treatment of sepsis-associated immunosuppression. PMID:26582821

  5. Identification of unique expression signatures and therapeutic targets in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Wusheng

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC, the predominant histological subtype of esophageal cancer, is characterized by high mortality. Previous work identified important mRNA expression differences between normal and tumor cells; however, to date there are limited ex vivo studies examining expression changes occurring during normal esophageal squamous cell differentiation versus those associated with tumorigenesis. In this study, we used a unique tissue microdissection strategy and microarrays to measure gene expression profiles associated with cell differentiation versus tumorigenesis in twelve cases of patient-matched normal basal squamous epithelial cells (NB, normal differentiated squamous epithelium (ND, and squamous cell cancer. Class comparison and pathway analysis were used to compare NB versus tumor in a search for unique therapeutic targets. Results As a first step towards this goal, gene expression profiles and pathways were evaluated. Overall, ND expression patterns were markedly different from NB and tumor; whereas, tumor and NB were more closely related. Tumor showed a general decrease in differentially expressed genes relative to NB as opposed to ND that exhibited the opposite trend. FSH and IgG networks were most highly dysregulated in normal differentiation and tumorigenesis, respectively. DNA repair pathways were generally elevated in NB and tumor relative to ND indicating involvement in both normal and pathological growth. PDGF signaling pathway and 12 individual genes unique to the tumor/NB comparison were identified as therapeutic targets, and 10 associated ESCC gene-drug pairs were identified. We further examined the protein expression level and the distribution patterns of four genes: ODC1, POSTN, ASPA and IGF2BP3. Ultimately, three genes (ODC1, POSTN, ASPA were verified to be dysregulated in the same pattern at both the mRNA and protein levels. Conclusions These data reveal insight into genes and

  6. A high-throughput automated platform for the development of manufacturing cell lines for protein therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Shuangping; Condon, Russ G G; Deng, Liang; Saunders, Jason; Hung, Finn; Tsao, Yung-Shyeng; Liu, Zhong

    2011-01-01

    The fast-growing biopharmaceutical industry demands speedy development of highly efficient and reliable production systems to meet the increasing requirement for drug supplies. The generation of production cell lines has traditionally involved manual operations that are labor-intensive, low-throughput and vulnerable to human errors. We report here an integrated high-throughput and automated platform for development of manufacturing cell lines for the production of protein therapeutics. The combination of BD FACS Aria Cell Sorter, CloneSelect Imager and TECAN Freedom EVO liquid handling system has enabled a high-throughput and more efficient cell line development process. In this operation, production host cells are first transfected with an expression vector carrying the gene of interest (1), followed by the treatment with a selection agent. The stably-transfected cells are then stained with fluorescence-labeled anti-human IgG antibody, and are subsequently subject to flow cytometry analysis (2-4). Highly productive cells are selected based on fluorescence intensity and are isolated by single-cell sorting on a BD FACSAria. Colony formation from single-cell stage was detected microscopically and a series of time-laps digital images are taken by CloneSelect Imager for the documentation of cell line history. After single clones have formed, these clones were screened for productivity by ELISA performed on a TECAN Freedom EVO liquid handling system. Approximately 2,000 - 10,000 clones can be screened per operation cycle with the current system setup. This integrated approach has been used to generate high producing Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell lines for the production of therapeutic monoclonal antibody (mAb) as well as their fusion proteins. With the aid of different types of detecting probes, the method can be used for developing other protein therapeutics or be applied to other production host systems. Comparing to the traditional manual procedure, this automated

  7. Heart failure therapy mediated by the trophic activities of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells: a noninvasive therapeutic regimen

    OpenAIRE

    Shabbir, Arsalan; Zisa, David; Suzuki, Gen; Lee, Techung

    2009-01-01

    Heart failure carries a poor prognosis with few treatment options. While myocardial stem cell therapeutic trials have traditionally relied on intracoronary infusion or intramyocardial injection routes, these cell delivery methods are invasive and can introduce harmful scar tissue, arrhythmia, calcification, or microinfarction in the heart. Given that patients with heart failure are at an increased surgical risk, the development of a noninvasive stem cell therapeutic approach is logistically a...

  8. Targeting ferritin receptors for the selective delivery of imaging and therapeutic agents to breast cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geninatti Crich, S.; Cadenazzi, M.; Lanzardo, S.; Conti, L.; Ruiu, R.; Alberti, D.; Cavallo, F.; Cutrin, J. C.; Aime, S.

    2015-04-01

    In this work the selective uptake of native horse spleen ferritin and apoferritin loaded with MRI contrast agents has been assessed in human breast cancer cells (MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231). The higher expression of L-ferritin receptors (SCARA5) led to an enhanced uptake in MCF-7 as shown in T2 and T1 weighted MR images, respectively. The high efficiency of ferritin internalization in MCF-7 has been exploited for the simultaneous delivery of curcumin, a natural therapeutic molecule endowed with antineoplastic and anti-inflammatory action, and the MRI contrast agent Gd-HPDO3A. This theranostic system is able to treat selectively breast cancer cells over-expressing ferritin receptors. By entrapping in apoferritin both Gd-HPDO3A and curcumin, it was possible to deliver a therapeutic dose of 167 μg ml-1 (as calculated by MRI) of this natural drug to MCF-7 cells, thus obtaining a significant reduction of cell proliferation.In this work the selective uptake of native horse spleen ferritin and apoferritin loaded with MRI contrast agents has been assessed in human breast cancer cells (MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231). The higher expression of L-ferritin receptors (SCARA5) led to an enhanced uptake in MCF-7 as shown in T2 and T1 weighted MR images, respectively. The high efficiency of ferritin internalization in MCF-7 has been exploited for the simultaneous delivery of curcumin, a natural therapeutic molecule endowed with antineoplastic and anti-inflammatory action, and the MRI contrast agent Gd-HPDO3A. This theranostic system is able to treat selectively breast cancer cells over-expressing ferritin receptors. By entrapping in apoferritin both Gd-HPDO3A and curcumin, it was possible to deliver a therapeutic dose of 167 μg ml-1 (as calculated by MRI) of this natural drug to MCF-7 cells, thus obtaining a significant reduction of cell proliferation. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Competition studies with free apoferritin, Fig. S1; APO-FITC intracellular distribution by

  9. Uncertainty assessment in measurement of myotube thickness in cells culture treated with and without therapeutic ultrasound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Effectiveness of an ultrasound treatment shall be assessed by experiments. A reliable cell culture protocol is available and spatial discrepancies could arise. To assure if the spatial difference are relevant or not, and how they should be dealt with, an uncertainty model for the treatment result is a metrological reliable solution. The present work reports a metrological approach to assess myotube thickness and to validate a primary cell culture of muscle after a therapeutic ultrasound treatment, comparing it with a control group. The results reinforced the importance of such approach and show an efficacy of treatment on myotube differentiation

  10. Therapeutic potential of umbilical cord blood cells for type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Binbin; Li, Xia; Yu, Haibo; Zhou, Zhiguang

    2015-11-01

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) is a chronic disorder that results from autoimmune-mediated destruction of pancreatic islet β-cells. However, to date, no conventional intervention has successfully treated the disease. The optimal therapeutic method for T1DM should effectively control the autoimmunity, restore immune homeostasis, preserve residual β-cells, reverse β-cell destruction, and protect the regenerated insulin-producing cells against re-attack. Umbilical cord blood is rich in regulatory T (T(reg)) cells and multiple types of stem cells that exhibit immunomodulating potential and hold promise in their ability to restore peripheral tolerance towards pancreatic islet β-cells through remodeling of immune responses and suppression of autoreactive T cells. Recently, reinfusion of autologous umbilical cord blood or immune cells from cord blood has been proposed as a novel therapy for T1DM, with the advantages of no risk to the donors, minimal ethical concerns, a low incidence of graft-versus-host disease and easy accessibility. In this review, we revisit the role of autologous umbilical cord blood or immune cells from cord blood-based applications for the treatment of T1DM. PMID:25799887

  11. Therapeutic efficacy of Genistein-Cytoreg® combination in breast cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnson MM

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: In spite the heavy investments in therapeutic research breast cancer still impacts the lives of women globally. The projected incidence of new cases of in situ breast cancer in theUSA for 2011 is 57,650, with estimated 39,520 deaths. The phytoestrogen, genistein and the synthetic compound, Cytoreg® have been shown to inhibit growth and proliferation in manycancer cell lines. Purpose of the Study: In this study, we investigated the therapeutic efficacy of Cytoreg®-genistein combination on growth inhibition in the MCF-7 human breast cancer cells. Method: MCF-7 cells were treated with genistein and Cytoreg® single and combination treatments for 24-48hrs; and post treatment chemosensitivity assessed, using: Trypan Blue exclusion and MTT assays for cell viability, Ethidium bromide/Acridine orange to assess apoptosis induction, and FAM Poly-Caspase binding assay for mechanism of action. Results: The overall data indicated dose- and time- dependent cell death in the MCF-cells and apoptosis as the major means of treatment-induced growth inhibition with all the treatment regimens. Conclusion: Comparatively, the genistein-Cytoreg® combination treatment was significantly more efficacious in growth inhibition in the MCF cells than either genistein or Cytoreg® alone.Genistein seems to act additively with Cytoreg® in combination treatment-induced apoptosis in Functional Foods in Health and Disease 2012, 2(5:137-150 MCF-7 cells. The normal human breast epithelial cells were not significantly inhibited by either single or the combination treatments.

  12. Molecular and Cellular Effects of Hydrogen Peroxide on Human Lung Cancer Cells: Potential Therapeutic Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer has a very high mortality-to-incidence ratio, representing one of the main causes of cancer mortality worldwide. Therefore, new treatment strategies are urgently needed. Several diseases including lung cancer have been associated with the action of reactive oxygen species (ROS) from which hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is one of the most studied. Despite the fact that H2O2 may have opposite effects on cell proliferation depending on the concentration and cell type, it triggers several antiproliferative responses. H2O2 produces both nuclear and mitochondrial DNA lesions, increases the expression of cell adhesion molecules, and increases p53 activity and other transcription factors orchestrating cancer cell death. In addition, H2O2 facilitates the endocytosis of oligonucleotides, affects membrane proteins, induces calcium release, and decreases cancer cell migration and invasion. Furthermore, the MAPK pathway and the expression of genes related to inflammation including interleukins, TNF-α, and NF-κB are also affected by H2O2. Herein, we will summarize the main effects of hydrogen peroxide on human lung cancer leading to suggesting it as a potential therapeutic tool to fight this disease. Because of the multimechanistic nature of this molecule, novel therapeutic approaches for lung cancer based on the use of H2O2 may help to decrease the mortality from this malignancy. PMID:27375834

  13. New Therapeutic Approaches to Prevent or Delay Beta-Cell Failure in Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ionica Floriana Elvira

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims: The most recent estimates of International Diabetes Federation indicate that 382 million people have diabetes, and the incidence of this disease is increasing. While in type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM beta-cell death is autoimmunemediated, type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM results from an interaction between genetic and environmental factors that impair beta-cell function and insulin action. Many people with T2DM remain unaware of their illness for a long time because symptoms may take years to appear or be recognized, while the body is affected by excess blood glucose. These patients are often diagnosed only when diabetes complications have already developed. The aim of this article was to perform a review based on literature data on therapeutic modalities to prevent/delay beta cell function decline. Material and Methods: We searched MEDLINE from 2000 to the present to identify the therapeutic approaches to prevent or delay beta-cell failure in patients with T2DM. Results and conclusions: Several common polymorphisms in genes linked to monogenic forms of diabetes appear to influence the response to T2DM pharmacotherapy. Recent studies report the role of the G protein coupled receptor 40 (GPR40, also known as Free Fatty Acids Receptor 1 (FFAR1 in the regulation of beta-cell function- CNX-011-67 (a GPR40 agonist has the potential to provide good and durable glycemic control in T2DM patients.

  14. [Cardiac invasion of ATLL cells and therapeutic effects of local along with systemic treatments].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imoto, S; Nakagawa, T; Ito, M

    1989-07-01

    We report a rare case of adult T cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL) in which cardiac invasion was clinically demonstrated and treated effectively. A 45-year-old female was admitted because of exertional dyspnea and cervical tumors. The leukocyte count was 19,100/microliters with 20% of flower cells. HTLV-I antibody was positive. She was diagnosed as ATLL and treated with VEPA. She got remission for a short duration which was followed by relapse. OPEC was started as salvage therapy. In the course, extensive pericardial effusion was found in chest X-P. Pericardial puncture demonstrated ATLL cells and high titer of free IL-2 receptor (57,400U/ml) in the effusion. It was diagnosed as pericardial invasion of ATLL cells. Chemotherapy was started with new combination of drugs (cisplatin, mitoxantrone, ifosfamide, and prednisolone). Concomitantly pericardial drainage was performed and the drugs were administered directly into the pericardial cavity. The clinical improvement was obtained and pericardial effusion did not appear thereafter. She died 4 months after the diagnosis of cardiac invasion. On autopsy myocardial invasion was identified. The pericardium widely adhered and effusion measured 42 ml. PMID:2810792

  15. Bone Marrow Stem Cell Derived Paracrine Factors for Regenerative Medicine: Current Perspectives and Therapeutic Potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tom J. Burdon

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available During the past several years, there has been intense research in the field of bone marrow-derived stem cell (BMSC therapy to facilitate its translation into clinical setting. Although a lot has been accomplished, plenty of challenges lie ahead. Furthermore, there is a growing body of evidence showing that administration of BMSC-derived conditioned media (BMSC-CM can recapitulate the beneficial effects observed after stem cell therapy. BMSCs produce a wide range of cytokines and chemokines that have, until now, shown extensive therapeutic potential. These paracrine mechanisms could be as diverse as stimulating receptor-mediated survival pathways, inducing stem cell homing and differentiation or regulating the anti-inflammatory effects in wounded areas. The current review reflects the rapid shift of interest from BMSC to BMSC-CM to alleviate many logistical and technical issues regarding cell therapy and evaluates its future potential as an effective regenerative therapy.

  16. Hepatic Leukemia Factor Promotes Resistance To Cell Death: Implications For Therapeutics and Chronotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waters, Katrina M.; Sontag, Ryan L.; Weber, Thomas J.

    2013-04-15

    Physiological variation related to circadian rhythms and aberrant gene expression patterns are believed to modulate therapeutic efficacy, but the precise molecular determinants remain unclear. Here we examine the regulation of cell death by hepatic leukemia factor (HLF), which is an output regulator of circadian rhythms and is aberrantly expressed in human cancers, using an ectopic expression strategy in JB6 mouse epidermal cells and human keratinocytes. Ectopic HLF expression inhibited cell death in both JB6 cells and human keratinocytes, as induced by serum-starvation, tumor necrosis factor alpha and ionizing radiation. Microarray analysis indicates that HLF regulates a complex multi-gene transcriptional program encompassing upregulation of anti-apoptotic genes, downregulation of pro-apoptotic genes, and many additional changes that are consistent with an anti-death program. Collectively, our results demonstrate that ectopic expression of HLF, an established transcription factor that cycles with circadian rhythms, can recapitulate many features associated with circadian-dependent physiological variation.

  17. Natural Killer (NK- and T-Cell Engaging Antibody-Derived Therapeutics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Stein

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Unmodified antibodies (abs have been successful in the treatment of hematologic malignancies, but less so for the treatment of solid tumors. They trigger anti-tumor effects through their Fc-domains, and one way to improve their efficacy is to optimize their interaction with the effectors through Fc-engineering. Another way to empower abs is the design of bispecific abs and related fusion proteins allowing a narrower choice of effector cells. Here we review frequently chosen classes of effector cells, as well as common trigger molecules. Natural Killer (NK- and T-cells are the most investigated populations in therapeutical approaches with bispecific agents until now. Catumaxomab, the first bispecific ab to receive drug approval, targets the tumor antigen Epithelial Cell Adhesion Molecule (EpCAM and recruits T-cells via a binding site for the cell surface protein CD3. The next generation of recombinant ab-derivatives replaces the broadly reactive Fc-domain by a binding domain for a single selected trigger. Blinatumomab is the first clinically successful member of this class, targeting cancer cells via CD19 and engaging T-cells by CD3. Other investigators have developed related recombinant fusion proteins to recruit effectors, such as NK-cells and macrophages. The first such agents currently in preclinical and clinical development will be discussed.

  18. Identification of tumorigenic cells and therapeutic targets in pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krampitz, Geoffrey Wayne; George, Benson M; Willingham, Stephen B; Volkmer, Jens-Peter; Weiskopf, Kipp; Jahchan, Nadine; Newman, Aaron M; Sahoo, Debashis; Zemek, Allison J; Yanovsky, Rebecca L; Nguyen, Julia K; Schnorr, Peter J; Mazur, Pawel K; Sage, Julien; Longacre, Teri A; Visser, Brendan C; Poultsides, George A; Norton, Jeffrey A; Weissman, Irving L

    2016-04-19

    Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PanNETs) are a type of pancreatic cancer with limited therapeutic options. Consequently, most patients with advanced disease die from tumor progression. Current evidence indicates that a subset of cancer cells is responsible for tumor development, metastasis, and recurrence, and targeting these tumor-initiating cells is necessary to eradicate tumors. However, tumor-initiating cells and the biological processes that promote pathogenesis remain largely uncharacterized in PanNETs. Here we profile primary and metastatic tumors from an index patient and demonstrate that MET proto-oncogene activation is important for tumor growth in PanNET xenograft models. We identify a highly tumorigenic cell population within several independent surgically acquired PanNETs characterized by increased cell-surface protein CD90 expression and aldehyde dehydrogenase A1 (ALDHA1) activity, and provide in vitro and in vivo evidence for their stem-like properties. We performed proteomic profiling of 332 antigens in two cell lines and four primary tumors, and showed that CD47, a cell-surface protein that acts as a "don't eat me" signal co-opted by cancers to evade innate immune surveillance, is ubiquitously expressed. Moreover, CD47 coexpresses with MET and is enriched in CD90(hi)cells. Furthermore, blocking CD47 signaling promotes engulfment of tumor cells by macrophages in vitro and inhibits xenograft tumor growth, prevents metastases, and prolongs survival in vivo. PMID:27035983

  19. Therapeutic effect of lung mixed culture-derived epithelial cells on lung fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Kensuke; Fujita, Tetsuo; Umezawa, Hiroki; Namiki, Kana; Yoshioka, Kento; Hagihara, Masahiko; Sudo, Tatsuhiko; Kimura, Sadao; Tatsumi, Koichiro; Kasuya, Yoshitoshi

    2014-11-01

    Cell-based therapy is recognized as one of potential therapeutic options for lung fibrosis. However, preparing stem/progenitor cells is complicated and not always efficient. Here, we show easily prepared cell populations having therapeutic capacity for lung inflammatory disease that are named as 'lung mixed culture-derived epithelial cells' (LMDECs). LMDECs expressed surfactant protein (SP)-C and gave rise to type I alveolar epithelial cells (AECs) in vitro and in vivo that partly satisfied type II AEC-like characteristics. An intratracheal delivery of not HEK 293 cells but LMDECs to the lung ameliorated bleomycin (BLM)-induced lung injury. A comprehensive analysis of bronchoalveolar fluid by western blot array revealed that LMDEC engraftment could improve the microenvironment in the BLM-instilled lung in association with stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1)/CXC chemokine receptor 4 signaling axis. SDF-1 enhanced both migration activity and differentiating efficiency of LMDECs. Further classification of LMDECs by flow cytometric study showed that a major population of LMDECs (LMDEC(Maj), 84% of total LMDECs) was simultaneously SP-C(+), CD44(+), CD45(+), and hematopoietic cell lineage(+) and that LMDECs included bronchioalveolar stem cells (BASCs) showing SP-C(+)Clara cell secretory protein(+)stem cell antigen (Sca)1(+) as a small population (1.8% of total LMDECs). CD44(+)-sorted LMDEC(Maj) and Sca1(+)-sorted LMDECs equally ameliorated fibrosis induced by BLM like LMDECs did. However, infiltrated neutrophils were observed in Sca1(+)-sorted LMDEC-treated alveoli that was not typical in LMDEC(Maj)- or LMDEC-treated alveoli. These findings suggest that the protective effect of LMDECs against BLM-induced lung injury depends greatly on that of LMDEC(Maj). Furthermore, the cells expressing both alveolar epithelial and hematopoietic cell lineage markers (SP-C(+)CD45(+)) that have characteristics corresponding to LMDEC(Maj) were observed in the alveoli of lung and

  20. Extracellular vesicles derived from mesenchymal stromal cells: a therapeutic option in respiratory diseases?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abreu, Soraia C; Weiss, Daniel J; Rocco, Patricia R M

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are plasma membrane-bound fragments released from several cell types, including mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs), constitutively or under stimulation. EVs derived from MSCs and other cell types transfer molecules (such as DNA, proteins/peptides, mRNA, microRNA, and lipids) and/or organelles with reparative and anti-inflammatory properties to recipient cells. The paracrine anti-inflammatory effects promoted by MSC-derived EVs have attracted significant interest in the regenerative medicine field, including for potential use in lung injuries. In the present review, we describe the characteristics, biological activities, and mechanisms of action of MSC-derived EVs. We also review the therapeutic potential of EVs as reported in relevant preclinical models of acute and chronic respiratory diseases, such as pneumonia, acute respiratory distress syndrome, asthma, and pulmonary arterial hypertension. Finally, we discuss possible approaches for potentiating the therapeutic effects of MSC-derived EVs so as to enable use of this therapy in clinical practice. PMID:27075363

  1. Stem Cell-Derived Exosomes: A Potential Alternative Therapeutic Agent in Orthopaedics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, John; Kolhe, Ravindra; Hunter, Monte; Isales, Carlos; Hamrick, Mark; Fulzele, Sadanand

    2016-01-01

    Within the field of regenerative medicine, many have sought to use stem cells as a promising way to heal human tissue; however, in the past few years, exosomes (packaged vesicles released from cells) have shown more exciting promise. Specifically, stem cell-derived exosomes have demonstrated great ability to provide therapeutical benefits. Exosomal products can include miRNA, other genetic products, proteins, and various factors. They are released from cells in a paracrine fashion in order to combat local cellular stress. Because of this, there are vast benefits that medicine can obtain from stem cell-derived exosomes. If exosomes could be extracted from stem cells in an efficient manner and packaged with particular regenerative products, then diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis, bone fractures, and other maladies could be treated with cell-free regenerative medicine via exosomes. Many advances must be made to get to this point, and the following review highlights the current advances of stem cell-derived exosomes with particular attention to regenerative medicine in orthopaedics. PMID:26904130

  2. Stem Cell-Derived Exosomes: A Potential Alternative Therapeutic Agent in Orthopaedics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Burke

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Within the field of regenerative medicine, many have sought to use stem cells as a promising way to heal human tissue; however, in the past few years, exosomes (packaged vesicles released from cells have shown more exciting promise. Specifically, stem cell-derived exosomes have demonstrated great ability to provide therapeutical benefits. Exosomal products can include miRNA, other genetic products, proteins, and various factors. They are released from cells in a paracrine fashion in order to combat local cellular stress. Because of this, there are vast benefits that medicine can obtain from stem cell-derived exosomes. If exosomes could be extracted from stem cells in an efficient manner and packaged with particular regenerative products, then diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis, bone fractures, and other maladies could be treated with cell-free regenerative medicine via exosomes. Many advances must be made to get to this point, and the following review highlights the current advances of stem cell-derived exosomes with particular attention to regenerative medicine in orthopaedics.

  3. Evaluation of Therapeutic Oligonucleotides for Familial Amyloid Polyneuropathy in Patient-Derived Hepatocyte-Like Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemietz, Christoph J; Sauer, Vanessa; Stella, Jacqueline; Fleischhauer, Lutz; Chandhok, Gursimran; Guttmann, Sarah; Avsar, Yesim; Guo, Shuling; Ackermann, Elizabeth J; Gollob, Jared; Monia, Brett P; Zibert, Andree; Schmidt, Hartmut H-J

    2016-01-01

    Familial amyloid polyneuropathy (FAP) is caused by mutations of the transthyretin (TTR) gene, predominantly expressed in the liver. Two compounds that knockdown TTR, comprising a small interfering RNA (siRNA; ALN-TTR-02) and an antisense oligonucleotide (ASO; IONIS-TTRRx), are currently being evaluated in clinical trials. Since primary hepatocytes from FAP patients are rarely available for molecular analysis and commercial tissue culture cells or animal models lack the patient-specific genetic background, this study uses primary cells derived from urine of FAP patients. Urine-derived cells were reprogrammed to induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) with high efficiency. Hepatocyte-like cells (HLCs) showing typical hepatic marker expression were obtained from iPSCs of the FAP patients. TTR mRNA expression of FAP HLCs almost reached levels measured in human hepatocytes. To assess TTR knockdown, siTTR1 and TTR-ASO were introduced to HLCs. A significant downregulation (>80%) of TTR mRNA was induced in the HLCs by both oligonucleotides. TTR protein present in the cell culture supernatant of HLCs was similarly downregulated. Gene expression of other hepatic markers was not affected by the therapeutic oligonucleotides. Our data indicate that urine cells (UCs) after reprogramming and hepatic differentiation represent excellent primary human target cells to assess the efficacy and specificity of novel compounds. PMID:27584576

  4. Therapeutic application of stem cells in gastroenterology: An up-date

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Patrizia Burra; Debora Bizzaro; Rachele Ciccocioppo; Fabio Marra; Anna Chiara Piscaglia; Laura Porretti; Antonio Gasbarrini; Francesco Paolo Russo

    2011-01-01

    Adult stem cells represent the self-renewing progenitors of numerous body tissues, and they are currently classified according to their origin and differentiation ability. In recent years, the research on stem cells has expanded enormously and holds therapeutic promises for many patients suffering from currently disabling diseases. This paper focuses on the possible use of stem cells in the two main clinical settings in gastroenterology, i.e., hepatic and intestinal diseases, which have a strong impact on public health worldwide. Despite encouraging results obtained in both regenerative medicine and immune-mediated conditions, further studies are needed to fully understand the biology of stem cells and carefully assess their putative oncogenic properties. Moreover, the research on stem cells arouses fervent ethical, social and political debate. The Italian Society of Gastroenterology sponsored a workshop on stem cells held in Verona during the ⅩⅥ Congress of the Federation of Italian Societies of Digestive Diseases (March 6-9, 2010). Here, we report on the issues discussed, including liver and intestinal diseases that may benefit from stem cell therapy, the biology of hepatic and intestinal tissue repair, and stem cell usage in clinical trials.

  5. Identification of CD90 as Putative Cancer Stem Cell Marker and Therapeutic Target in Insulinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buishand, Floryne O; Arkesteijn, Ger J A; Feenstra, Laurien R; Oorsprong, Claire W D; Mestemaker, Margiet; Starke, Achim; Speel, Ernst-Jan M; Kirpensteijn, Jolle; Mol, Jan A

    2016-06-01

    The long-term prognosis after surgical resection of malignant insulinoma (INS) is poor. Novel adjuvant therapies, specifically targeting cancer stem cells (CSCs), are warranted. Therefore, the goal of this study was to characterize and target putative INS CSCs. Using fluorescence-activated cell sorting, human INS cell line CM and pancreatic carcinoid cell line BON1 were screened for the presence of stem cell-associated markers. CD90, CD166, and GD2 were identified as potential CSC markers. Only CD90(+) INS cells had an increased tumor-initiating potential in athymic nude mice. Anti-CD90 monoclonal antibodies decreased the viability and metastatic potential of injected cells in a zebrafish embryo INS xenograft model. Primary INS stained positive for CD90 by immunohistochemistry, however also intratumoral fibroblasts and vascular endothelium showed positive staining. The results of this study suggest that anti-CD90 monoclonals form a potential novel adjuvant therapeutic modality by targeting either INS cells directly, or by targeting the INS microenvironment. PMID:27049037

  6. Ganodermanontriol (GDNT) exerts its effect on growth and invasiveness of breast cancer cells through the down-regulation of CDC20 and uPA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Ganodermanontriol (GDNT), a Ganoderma mushroom alcohol, inhibits growth of breast cancer cells. ► CDC20 is over-expressed in tumors but not in the tumor surrounding tissue in breast cancer patients. ► GDNT inhibits expression of CDC20 in breast cancer cells. ► GDNT inhibits cell adhesion, cell migration and cell invasion of breast cancer cells. ► GDNT inhibits secretion of uPA and down-regulates expression of uPAR in breast cancer cells. -- Abstract: Ganoderma lucidum is a medicinal mushroom that has been recognized by Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM). Although some of the direct anticancer activities are attributed to the presence of triterpenes—ganoderic and lucidenic acids—the activity of other compounds remains elusive. Here we show that ganodermanontriol (GDNT), a Ganoderma alcohol, specifically suppressed proliferation (anchorage-dependent growth) and colony formation (anchorage-independent growth) of highly invasive human breast cancer cells MDA-MB-231. GDNT suppressed expression of the cell cycle regulatory protein CDC20, which is over-expressed in precancerous and breast cancer cells compared to normal mammary epithelial cells. Moreover, we found that CDC20 is over-expressed in tumors when compared to the tissue surrounding the tumor in specimens from breast cancer patients. GDNT also inhibited invasive behavior (cell adhesion, cell migration, and cell invasion) through the suppression of secretion of urokinase-plasminogen activator (uPA) and inhibited expression of uPA receptor. In conclusion, mushroom GDNT is a natural agent that has potential as a therapy for invasive breast cancers.

  7. Ganodermanontriol (GDNT) exerts its effect on growth and invasiveness of breast cancer cells through the down-regulation of CDC20 and uPA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Jiahua; Jedinak, Andrej [Cancer Research Laboratory, Methodist Research Institute, Indiana University Health, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Sliva, Daniel, E-mail: dsliva@iuhealth.org [Cancer Research Laboratory, Methodist Research Institute, Indiana University Health, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Department of Medicine, School of Medicine, Indiana University, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Indiana University Simon Cancer Center, School of Medicine, Indiana University, Indianapolis, IN (United States)

    2011-11-18

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ganodermanontriol (GDNT), a Ganoderma mushroom alcohol, inhibits growth of breast cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CDC20 is over-expressed in tumors but not in the tumor surrounding tissue in breast cancer patients. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer GDNT inhibits expression of CDC20 in breast cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer GDNT inhibits cell adhesion, cell migration and cell invasion of breast cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer GDNT inhibits secretion of uPA and down-regulates expression of uPAR in breast cancer cells. -- Abstract: Ganoderma lucidum is a medicinal mushroom that has been recognized by Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM). Although some of the direct anticancer activities are attributed to the presence of triterpenes-ganoderic and lucidenic acids-the activity of other compounds remains elusive. Here we show that ganodermanontriol (GDNT), a Ganoderma alcohol, specifically suppressed proliferation (anchorage-dependent growth) and colony formation (anchorage-independent growth) of highly invasive human breast cancer cells MDA-MB-231. GDNT suppressed expression of the cell cycle regulatory protein CDC20, which is over-expressed in precancerous and breast cancer cells compared to normal mammary epithelial cells. Moreover, we found that CDC20 is over-expressed in tumors when compared to the tissue surrounding the tumor in specimens from breast cancer patients. GDNT also inhibited invasive behavior (cell adhesion, cell migration, and cell invasion) through the suppression of secretion of urokinase-plasminogen activator (uPA) and inhibited expression of uPA receptor. In conclusion, mushroom GDNT is a natural agent that has potential as a therapy for invasive breast cancers.

  8. Myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSCs are increased and exert immunosuppressive activity together with polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs in chronic myeloid leukemia patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cesarina Giallongo

    Full Text Available Tumor immune tolerance can derive from the recruitment of suppressor cell population, including myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSCs, able to inhibit T cells activity. We identified a significantly expanded MDSCs population in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML patients at diagnosis that decreased to normal levels after imatinib therapy. In addition, expression of arginase 1 (Arg1 that depletes microenvironment of arginine, an essential aminoacid for T cell function, resulted in an increase in patients at diagnosis. Purified CML CD11b+CD33+CD14-HLADR- cells markedly suppressed normal donor T cell proliferation in vitro. Comparing CML Gr-MDSCs to autologous polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs we observed a higher Arg1 expression and activity in PMNs, together with an inhibitory effect on T cells in vitro. Our data indicate that CML cells create an immuno-tolerant environment associated to MDSCs expansion with immunosuppressive capacity mediated by Arg1. In addition, we demonstrated for the first time also an immunosuppressive activity of CML PMNs, suggesting a strong potential immune escape mechanism created by CML cells, which control the anti-tumor reactive T cells. MDSCs should be monitored in imatinib discontinuation trials to understand their importance in relapsing patients.

  9. Effects of fotemustine or dacarbasine on a melanoma cell line pretreated with therapeutic proton irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Privitera Giuseppe

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Considering that HTB140 melanoma cells have shown a poor response to either protons or alkylating agents, the effects of a combined use of these agents have been analysed. Methods Cells were irradiated in the middle of the therapeutic 62 MeV proton spread out Bragg peak (SOBP. Irradiation doses were 12 or 16 Gy and are those frequently used in proton therapy. Four days after irradiation cells were treated with fotemustine (FM or dacarbazine (DTIC. Drug concentrations were 100 and 250 μM, values close to those that produce 50% of growth inhibition. Cell viability, proliferation, survival and cell cycle distribution were assessed 7 days after irradiation that corresponds to more than six doubling times of HTB140 cells. In this way incubation periods providing the best single effects of drugs (3 days and protons (7 days coincided at the same time. Results Single proton irradiations have reduced the number of cells to ~50%. FM caused stronger cell inactivation due to its high toxicity, while the effectiveness of DTIC, that was important at short term, almost vanished with the incubation of 7 days. Cellular mechanisms triggered by proton irradiation differently influenced the final effects of combined treatments. Combination of protons and FM did not improve cell inactivation level achieved by single treatments. A low efficiency of the single DTIC treatment was overcome when DTIC was introduced following proton irradiation, giving better inhibitory effects with respect to the single treatments. Most of the analysed cells were in G1/S phase, viable, active and able to replicate DNA. Conclusion The obtained results are the consequence of a high resistance of HTB140 melanoma cells to protons and/or drugs. The inactivation level of the HTB140 human melanoma cells after protons, FM or DTIC treatments was not enhanced by their combined application.

  10. Liver-derived human mesenchymal stem cells: a novel therapeutic source for liver diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yini; Yu, Xiaopeng; Chen, Ermei; Li, Lanuan

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) represent an attractive cell type for research and therapy due to their ability to proliferate, differentiate, modulate immune reactions, and secrete trophic factors. MSCs exist in a multitude of tissues, including bone marrow, umbilical cord, and adipose tissues. Moreover, MSCs have recently been isolated from the liver. Compared with other MSC types, liver-derived human MSCs (LHMSCs) possess general morphologies, immune functions, and differentiation capacities. Interestingly, LHMCSs produce higher levels of pro-angiogenic, anti-inflammatory, and anti-apoptotic cytokines than those of bone marrow-derived MSCs. Thus, these cells may be a promising therapeutic source for liver diseases. This paper summarizes the biological characteristics of LHMSCs and their potential benefits and risks for the treatment of liver diseases. PMID:27176654

  11. Therapeutic Potential of Differentiated Mesenchymal Stem Cells for Treatment of Osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Onju Ham

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Osteoarthritis (OA is a chronic, progressive, and irreversible degenerative joint disease. Conventional OA treatments often result in complications such as pain and limited activity. However, transplantation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs has several beneficial effects such as paracrine effects, anti-inflammatory activity, and immunomodulatory capacity. In addition, MSCs can be differentiated into several cell types, including chondrocytes, osteocytes, endothelia, and adipocytes. Thus, transplantation of MSCs is a suggested therapeutic tool for treatment of OA. However, transplanted naïve MSCs can cause problems such as heterogeneous populations including differentiated MSCs and undifferentiated cells. To overcome this problem, new strategies for inducing differentiation of MSCs are needed. One possibility is the application of microRNA (miRNA and small molecules, which regulate multiple molecular pathways and cellular processes such as differentiation. Here, we provide insight into possible strategies for cartilage regeneration by transplantation of differentiated MSCs to treat OA patients.

  12. Interferon-gamma sensitizes colonic epithelial cell lines to physiological and therapeutic inducers of colonocyte apoptosis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Connell, J

    2012-02-03

    Homeostasis in the colonic epithelium is achieved by a continuous cycle of proliferation and apoptosis, in which imbalances are associated with disease. Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and colon cancer are associated with either excessive or insufficient apoptosis of colonic epithelial cells, respectively. By using two colonic epithelial cell lines, HT29 and SW620, we investigated how the epithelial cell\\'s sensitivity to apoptosis was regulated by the proinflammatory cytokine interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma). We found that IFN-gamma sensitized HT29 cells, and to a lesser extent SW620, to diverse inducers of apoptosis of physiologic or therapeutic relevance to the colon. These apoptosis inducers included Fas (CD95\\/APO-1) ligand (FasL), short-chain fatty acids, and chemotherapeutic drugs. The extent of IFN-gamma-mediated apoptosis sensitization in these two cell lines correlated well with the degree of IFN-gamma-mediated upregulation of the proapoptotic protease caspase-1. Although IFN-gamma alone effectively sensitized HT29 cells to apoptosis, inclusion of the protein synthesis inhibitor cyclohexamide (CHX) during apoptotic challenge was necessary for maximal sensitization of SW620. The requirement of CHX to sensitize SW620 cells to apoptosis implies a need to inhibit translation of antiapoptotic proteins absent from HT29. In particular, the antiapoptotic protein Bcl-2 was strongly expressed in SW620 cells but absent from HT29. Our results indicate that IFN-gamma increases the sensitivity of colonic epithelial cells to diverse apoptotic stimuli in concert, via upregulation of caspase-1. Our findings implicate caspase-1 and Bcl-2 as important central points of control determining the general sensitivity of colonic epithelial cells to apoptosis.

  13. Therapeutic limitations in tumor-specific CD8+ memory T cell engraftment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adoptive immunotherapy with cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) represents an alternative approach to treating solid tumors. Ideally, this would confer long-term protection against tumor. We previously demonstrated that in vitro-generated tumor-specific CTL from the ovalbumin (OVA)-specific OT-I T cell receptor transgenic mouse persisted long after adoptive transfer as memory T cells. When recipient mice were challenged with the OVA-expressing E.G7 thymoma, tumor growth was delayed and sometimes prevented. The reasons for therapeutic failures were not clear. OT-I CTL were adoptively transferred to C57BL/6 mice 21 – 28 days prior to tumor challenge. At this time, the donor cells had the phenotypical and functional characteristics of memory CD8+ T cells. Recipients which developed tumor despite adoptive immunotherapy were analyzed to evaluate the reason(s) for therapeutic failure. Dose-response studies demonstrated that the degree of tumor protection was directly proportional to the number of OT-I CTL adoptively transferred. At a low dose of OT-I CTL, therapeutic failure was attributed to insufficient numbers of OT-I T cells that persisted in vivo, rather than mechanisms that actively suppressed or anergized the OT-I T cells. In recipients of high numbers of OT-I CTL, the E.G7 tumor that developed was shown to be resistant to fresh OT-I CTL when examined ex vivo. Furthermore, these same tumor cells no longer secreted a detectable level of OVA. In this case, resistance to immunotherapy was secondary to selection of clones of E.G7 that expressed a lower level of tumor antigen. Memory engraftment with tumor-specific CTL provides long-term protection against tumor. However, there are several limitations to this immunotherapeutic strategy, especially when targeting a single antigen. This study illustrates the importance of administering large numbers of effectors to engraft sufficiently efficacious immunologic memory. It also demonstrates the importance of targeting several

  14. Possible Involvement of the Inhibition of NF-κB Factor in Anti-Inflammatory Actions That Melatonin Exerts on Mast Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maldonado, M D; García-Moreno, H; González-Yanes, C; Calvo, J R

    2016-08-01

    Melatonin is a molecule endogenously produced in a wide variety of immune cells, including mast cells (RBL-2H3). It exhibits immunomodulatory, anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptotic properties. The physiologic mechanisms underlying these activities of melatonin have not been clarified in mast cells. This work is designed to determine the anti-inflammatory effect and mechanism of action of melatonin on activated mast cells. RBL-2H3 were pre-treated with exogenous melatonin (MELx) at physiological (100nM) and pharmacological (1 mM) doses for 30 min, washed and activated with PMACI (phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate plus calcium ionophore A23187) for 2 h and 12 h. The data shows that pre-treatment of MELx in stimulated mast cells, significantly reduced the levels of endogenous melatonin production (MELn), TNF-α and IL-6. These effects are directly related with the MELx concentration used. MELx also inhibited IKK/NF-κB signal transduction pathway in stimulated mast cells. These results indicate a molecular basis for the ability of melatonin to prevent inflammation and for the treatment of allergic inflammatory diseases through the down-regulation of mast cell activation. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 1926-1933, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26756719

  15. Recurrent invasive squamous cell carcinoma of the ocular surface requiring penetrating therapeutic sclerokeratoplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark J. Mannis

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: We review a case of invasive squamous cell carcinoma invading the cornea to discuss optimal management. Methods:  Observational case report with histopathologic analysis. Results: Histopathology demonstrates corneal invasion by the tumor that appears to have been completely excised with a large therapeutic keratoplasty and adjuvant cryotherapy. Conclusions: Successful management of ocular surface squamous neoplasia (OSSN requires removal of identifiably abnormal tissue without disruption of normal protective architecture, careful histopathologic analysis, and the employment of adjuvant therapy at the time of or subsequent to surgical excision.

  16. Stem cells: An insight into the therapeutic aspects from medical and dental perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivakumar, Muniapillai; Dineshshankar, Janardhanam; Sunil, P M; Nirmal, R Madhavan; Sathiyajeeva, J; Saravanan, Balasubramanian; Senthileagappan, A R

    2015-08-01

    The recent advancements in the field of stem cell (SC) biology have increased the hope of achieving the definitive treatments for the diseases which are now considered incurable such as diabetes, Parkinson's disease and other chronic long standing conditions. To achieve this possibility, it is necessary to understand the basic concepts of SC biology to utilize in various advanced techniques of regenerative medicine including tissue engineering and gene therapy. This article highlights the types of SCs available and their therapeutic capacity in regenerative medical and dental fields. PMID:26538878

  17. Antenatal diagnosis of sickle-cell and therapeutical abortion for African immigrant women

    OpenAIRE

    Bonnet, D

    2005-01-01

    French Doctors recommend to pregnant women from Africa, the antenatal detection of sickle-cell, a widely spread genetical disease. When the foetus has a severe type of disease, they are offered a therapeutic abortion. The practice of medical abortion, while it is forbidden in their native countries, and the idea of giving birth to a handicap child, while the perception of this disease is not linked to a handicap, send them back to a new health pattern. In this context, the African woman exper...

  18. The gastric acid secretagogue gastrin-releasing peptide and the inhibitor oxyntomodulin do not exert their effect directly on the parietal cell in the rat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Steen Seier; Holst, J J

    1988-01-01

    Previous studies suggested that gastrin-releasing peptide (a neuropeptide found in rat oxyntic mucosa) and oxyntomodulin (a glucagon-containing peptide of mammalian gut) could directly affect the acid secretion of the parietal cells. We therefore studied their effect on gastric acid production in...... vitro by measuring [14C]-aminopyrine accumulation, a reliable index of H+ generation, in isolated rat parietal cells. However, neither gastrin-releasing peptide nor oxyntomodulin influenced basal acid secretion or histamine-stimulated gastric acid secretion. Electron-microscopic studies of unstimulated...... and histamine-stimulated parietal cells confirmed that the cells retained the normal morphology of intracellular organelles and that the cells responded to physiological stimulation by marked expansion of the intracellular canaliculi....

  19. Therapeutic effect of human amniotic epithelial cell transplantation into the lateral ventricle of hemiparkinsonian rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Xin-xin; XUE Shou-ru; DONG Wan-li; Kong Yan

    2009-01-01

    Background Human amniotic epithelial cells (HAECs) are able to secrete biologically active neurotrophins such as brain-derived neurotrophic factor and neurotrophin-3, both of which exhibit trophic activities on dopamine neurons.Previous study showed that when human amniotic epithelial cells were transplanted into the striatum of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-induced Parkinson disease rats, the cells could survive and exert functional effects. The purpose of this study was to investigate the survival and the differentiation of human amniotic epithelial cells after being transplanted into the lateral ventricle of Parkinson's disease (PD) rats, and to investigate the effects of grafts on healing PD in models.Methods The Parkinson's model was made with stereotactic microinjection of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) into the striatum of a rat. The PD models were divided into two groups: the HAECs group and the normal saline (NS) group.Some untreated rats were taken as the control. The rotational asymmetry induced by apomorphine of the HAECs group and the NS group were measured post cell transplantation. The expression of nestin and vimentin in grafts were determined by immunohistology. Ten weeks after transplantation the density of tyrosine hydroxylase positive cells in the substantia nigra of the HAECs group, NS group and the untreated group was determined. The differentiation of grafts was determined by TH immunohistology. High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) was used to determine monoamine neurotransmitter levels in the striatum.Results The rotational asymmetry induced by apomorphine of the HAECs group was ameliorated significantly compared to the NS group two weeks after transplantation (P <0.01). The grafts expressed nestin and vimentin five weeks after transplantation. TH immunohistochemistry indicated that the TH positive cells in the substantia nigra of the HAECs group increased significantly compared to the NS group (P<0.01). Tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) positive

  20. The molecular signature of therapeutic mesenchymal stem cells exposes the architecture of the hematopoietic stem cell niche synapse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mancardi Gianluigi

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs niche of the bone marrow is comprised of HSCs, osteoblasts, endothelial cells and a stromal component of non-hematopoietic multipotent cells of mesenchymal origin named "mesenchymal stem cells" (MSCs. Results Here we studied the global transcriptional profile of murine MSCs with immuno-therapeutic potential and compared it with that of 486 publicly available microarray datasets from 12 other mouse tissues or cell types. Principal component analysis and hierarchical clustering identified a unique pattern of gene expression capable of distinctively classifying MSCs from other tissues and cells. We then performed an analysis aimed to identify absolute and relative abundance of transcripts in all cell types. We found that the set of transcripts uniquely expressed by MSCs is enriched in transcription factors and components of the Wnt signaling pathway. The analysis of differentially expressed genes also identified a set of genes specifically involved in the HSC niche and is complemented by functional studies that confirm the findings. Interestingly, some of these genes play a role in the maintenance of HSCs in a quiescent state supporting their survival and preventing them from proliferating and differentiating. We also show that MSCs modulate T cell functions in vitro and, upon in vivo administration, ameliorate experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE. Conclusion Altogether, these findings provide novel and important insights on the mechanisms of T cell function regulation by MSCs and help to cement the rationale for their application in the treatment of autoimmune diseases.

  1. Therapeutic Effects of Human Multilineage-Differentiating Stress Enduring (MUSE) Cell Transplantation into Infarct Brain of Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Yamauchi, Tomohiro; Kuroda, Yasumasa; MORITA, Takahiro; Shichinohe, Hideo; Houkin, Kiyohiro; Dezawa, Mari; Kuroda, Satoshi

    2015-01-01

    Objective Bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) are heterogeneous and their therapeutic effect is pleiotropic. Multilineage-differentiating stress enduring (Muse) cells are recently identified to comprise several percentages of BMSCs, being able to differentiate into triploblastic lineages including neuronal cells and act as tissue repair cells. This study was aimed to clarify how Muse and non-Muse cells in BMSCs contribute to functional recovery after ischemic stroke. Methods Human BMSCs were se...

  2. Ganodermanontriol (GDNT) exerts its effect on growth and invasiveness of breast cancer cells through the down-regulation of CDC20 and uPA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jiahua; Jedinak, Andrej; Sliva, Daniel

    2011-11-18

    Ganoderma lucidum is a medicinal mushroom that has been recognized by Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM). Although some of the direct anticancer activities are attributed to the presence of triterpenes-ganoderic and lucidenic acids-the activity of other compounds remains elusive. Here we show that ganodermanontriol (GDNT), a Ganoderma alcohol, specifically suppressed proliferation (anchorage-dependent growth) and colony formation (anchorage-independent growth) of highly invasive human breast cancer cells MDA-MB-231. GDNT suppressed expression of the cell cycle regulatory protein CDC20, which is over-expressed in precancerous and breast cancer cells compared to normal mammary epithelial cells. Moreover, we found that CDC20 is over-expressed in tumors when compared to the tissue surrounding the tumor in specimens from breast cancer patients. GDNT also inhibited invasive behavior (cell adhesion, cell migration, and cell invasion) through the suppression of secretion of urokinase-plasminogen activator (uPA) and inhibited expression of uPA receptor. In conclusion, mushroom GDNT is a natural agent that has potential as a therapy for invasive breast cancers. PMID:22033405

  3. New technology for ultrasensitive detection and isolation of rare cells for clinical diagnostics and therapeutics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leary, James F.; McLaughlin, Scott R.

    1995-04-01

    A high-speed, 11-parameter, 6-color fluorescence, laser flow cytometer/cell sorter with a number of special and unique features has been built for ultrasensitive detection and isolation of rare cells for clinical diagnostics and therapeutics. The software for real-time data acquisition and sort control, written as C++ programming language modules with a WindowsTM graphical user interface, runs on a 66-MHz 80486 computer joined by an extended bus to 23 sophisticated multi-layered boards of special data acquisition and sorting electronics. Special features include: high-speed (> 100,000 cells/sec) real-time data classification module (U.S. Patent 5,204,884 (1993)); real-time principal component cell sorting; multi-queue signal-processing system with multiple hardware and software event buffers to reduce instrument dead time, LUT charge-pulse definition, high-resolution `flexible' sorting for optimal yield/purity sort strategies (U.S. Patent 5,199,576); pre-focusing optical wavelength correction for a second laser beam; and two trains of three fluorescence detectors-- each adjustable for spatial separation to interrogate only one of two laser beams, syringe- driven or pressure-driven fluidics, and time-windowed parameters. The system has been built to be both expandable and versatile through the use of LUT's and a modular hardware and software design. The instrument is especially useful at detection and isolation of rare cell subpopulations for which our laboratory is well-known. Cell subpopulations at frequencies as small as 10-7 have been successfully studied with this system. Current applications in clinical diagnostics and therapeutics include detection and isolation of (1) fetal cells from material blood for prenatal diagnosis of birth defects, (2) hematopoietic stem and precursor cells for autologous bone marrow transplantation, (3) metastatic breast cancer cells for molecular characterization, and (4) HIV-infected maternal cells in newborn blood to study mother

  4. Stat5 Exerts Distinct, Vital Functions in the Cytoplasm and Nucleus of Bcr-Abl+ K562 and Jak2(V617F)+ HEL Leukemia Cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Signal transducers and activators of transcription (Stats) play central roles in the conversion of extracellular signals, e.g., cytokines, hormones and growth factors, into tissue and cell type specific gene expression patterns. In normal cells, their signaling potential is strictly limited in extent and duration. The persistent activation of Stat3 or Stat5 is found in many human tumor cells and contributes to their growth and survival. Stat5 activation plays a pivotal role in nearly all hematological malignancies and occurs downstream of oncogenic kinases, e.g., Bcr-Abl in chronic myeloid leukemias (CML) and Jak2(V617F) in other myeloproliferative diseases (MPD). We defined the mechanisms through which Stat5 affects growth and survival of K562 cells, representative of Bcr-Abl positive CML, and HEL cells, representative for Jak2(V617F) positive acute erythroid leukemia. In our experiments we suppressed the protein expression levels of Stat5a and Stat5b through shRNA mediated downregulation and demonstrated the dependence of cell survival on the presence of Stat5. Alternatively, we interfered with the functional capacities of the Stat5 protein through the interaction with a Stat5 specific peptide ligand. This ligand is a Stat5 specific peptide aptamer construct which comprises a 12mer peptide integrated into a modified thioredoxin scaffold, S5-DBD-PA. The peptide sequence specifically recognizes the DNA binding domain (DBD) of Stat5. Complex formation of S5-DBD-PA with Stat5 causes a strong reduction of P-Stat5 in the nuclear fraction of Bcr-Abl-transformed K562 cells and a suppression of Stat5 target genes. Distinct Stat5 mediated survival mechanisms were detected in K562 and Jak2(V617F)-transformed HEL cells. Stat5 is activated in the nuclear and cytosolic compartments of K562 cells and the S5-DBD-PA inhibitor most likely affects the viability of Bcr-Abl+ K562 cells through the inhibition of canonical Stat5 induced target gene transcription. In HEL cells, Stat5 is

  5. Stat5 Exerts Distinct, Vital Functions in the Cytoplasm and Nucleus of Bcr-Abl+ K562 and Jak2(V617F)+ HEL Leukemia Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Axel; Borghouts, Corina; Brendel, Christian; Moriggl, Richard; Delis, Natalia; Brill, Boris; Vafaizadeh, Vida; Groner, Bernd

    2015-01-01

    Signal transducers and activators of transcription (Stats) play central roles in the conversion of extracellular signals, e.g., cytokines, hormones and growth factors, into tissue and cell type specific gene expression patterns. In normal cells, their signaling potential is strictly limited in extent and duration. The persistent activation of Stat3 or Stat5 is found in many human tumor cells and contributes to their growth and survival. Stat5 activation plays a pivotal role in nearly all hematological malignancies and occurs downstream of oncogenic kinases, e.g., Bcr-Abl in chronic myeloid leukemias (CML) and Jak2(V617F) in other myeloproliferative diseases (MPD). We defined the mechanisms through which Stat5 affects growth and survival of K562 cells, representative of Bcr-Abl positive CML, and HEL cells, representative for Jak2(V617F) positive acute erythroid leukemia. In our experiments we suppressed the protein expression levels of Stat5a and Stat5b through shRNA mediated downregulation and demonstrated the dependence of cell survival on the presence of Stat5. Alternatively, we interfered with the functional capacities of the Stat5 protein through the interaction with a Stat5 specific peptide ligand. This ligand is a Stat5 specific peptide aptamer construct which comprises a 12mer peptide integrated into a modified thioredoxin scaffold, S5-DBD-PA. The peptide sequence specifically recognizes the DNA binding domain (DBD) of Stat5. Complex formation of S5-DBD-PA with Stat5 causes a strong reduction of P-Stat5 in the nuclear fraction of Bcr-Abl-transformed K562 cells and a suppression of Stat5 target genes. Distinct Stat5 mediated survival mechanisms were detected in K562 and Jak2(V617F)-transformed HEL cells. Stat5 is activated in the nuclear and cytosolic compartments of K562 cells and the S5-DBD-PA inhibitor most likely affects the viability of Bcr-Abl+ K562 cells through the inhibition of canonical Stat5 induced target gene transcription. In HEL cells, Stat5 is

  6. Stat5 Exerts Distinct, Vital Functions in the Cytoplasm and Nucleus of Bcr-Abl+ K562 and Jak2(V617F+ HEL Leukemia Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Axel Weber

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Signal transducers and activators of transcription (Stats play central roles in the conversion of extracellular signals, e.g., cytokines, hormones and growth factors, into tissue and cell type specific gene expression patterns. In normal cells, their signaling potential is strictly limited in extent and duration. The persistent activation of Stat3 or Stat5 is found in many human tumor cells and contributes to their growth and survival. Stat5 activation plays a pivotal role in nearly all hematological malignancies and occurs downstream of oncogenic kinases, e.g., Bcr-Abl in chronic myeloid leukemias (CML and Jak2(V617F in other myeloproliferative diseases (MPD. We defined the mechanisms through which Stat5 affects growth and survival of K562 cells, representative of Bcr-Abl positive CML, and HEL cells, representative for Jak2(V617F positive acute erythroid leukemia. In our experiments we suppressed the protein expression levels of Stat5a and Stat5b through shRNA mediated downregulation and demonstrated the dependence of cell survival on the presence of Stat5. Alternatively, we interfered with the functional capacities of the Stat5 protein through the interaction with a Stat5 specific peptide ligand. This ligand is a Stat5 specific peptide aptamer construct which comprises a 12mer peptide integrated into a modified thioredoxin scaffold, S5-DBD-PA. The peptide sequence specifically recognizes the DNA binding domain (DBD of Stat5. Complex formation of S5-DBD-PA with Stat5 causes a strong reduction of P-Stat5 in the nuclear fraction of Bcr-Abl-transformed K562 cells and a suppression of Stat5 target genes. Distinct Stat5 mediated survival mechanisms were detected in K562 and Jak2(V617F-transformed HEL cells. Stat5 is activated in the nuclear and cytosolic compartments of K562 cells and the S5-DBD-PA inhibitor most likely affects the viability of Bcr-Abl+ K562 cells through the inhibition of canonical Stat5 induced target gene transcription. In HEL

  7. A gold nanoparticle pentapeptide: gene fusion to induce therapeutic gene expression in mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muroski, Megan E; Morgan, Thomas J; Levenson, Cathy W; Strouse, Geoffrey F

    2014-10-22

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) have been identified as having great potential as autologous cell therapeutics to treat traumatic brain injury and spinal injury as well as neuronal and cardiac ischemic events. All future clinical applications of MSC cell therapies must allow the MSC to be harvested, transfected, and induced to express a desired protein or selection of proteins to have medical benefit. For the full potential of MSC cell therapy to be realized, it is desirable to systematically alter the protein expression of therapeutically beneficial biomolecules in harvested MSC cells with high fidelity in a single transfection event. We have developed a delivery platform on the basis of the use of a solid gold nanoparticle that has been surface modified to produce a fusion containing a zwitterionic, pentapeptide designed from Bax inhibiting peptide (Ku70) to enhance cellular uptake and a linearized expression vector to induce enhanced expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in rat-derived MSCs. Ku70 is observed to effect >80% transfection following a single treatment of femur bone marrow isolated rat MSCs with efficiencies for the delivery of a 6.6 kbp gene on either a Au nanoparticle (NP) or CdSe/ZnS quantum dot (QD). Gene expression is observed within 4 d by optical measurements, and secretion is observed within 10 d by Western Blot analysis. The combination of being able to selectively engineer the NP, to colocalize biological agents, and to enhance the stability of those agents has provided the strong impetus to utilize this novel class of materials to engineer primary MSCs. PMID:25198921

  8. Enhancement of therapeutic drug and DNA delivery into cells by electroporation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effectiveness of potentially powerful therapeutics, including DNA, is often limited by their inability to permeate the cell membrane efficiently. Electroporation (EP) also referred to as 'electropermeabilization' of the outer cell membrane renders this barrier temporarily permeable by inducing 'pores' across the lipid bilayer. For in vivo EP, the drug or DNA is delivered into the interstitial space of the target tissue by conventional means, followed by local EP. EP pulses of micro- to millisecond duration and field strengths of 100-1500 V cm-1 generally enhance the delivery of certain chemotherapeutic drugs by three to four orders of magnitude and intracellular delivery of DNA several hundred-fold. We have used EP in clinical studies for human cancer therapy and in animals for gene therapy and DNA vaccination. Late stage squamous cell carcinomas of the head and neck were treated with intratumoural injection of bleomycin and subsequent EP. Of the 69 tumours treated, 25% disappeared completely and another 32% were reduced in volume by more than half. Residence time of bleomycin in electroporated tumours was significantly greater than in non-electroporated lesions. Histological findings and gene expression patterns after bleomycin-EP treatment indicated rapid apoptosis of the majority of tumour cells. In animals, we demonstrated the usefulness of EP for enhanced DNA delivery by achieving normalization of blood clotting times in haemophilic dogs, and by substantially increasing transgene expression in smooth muscle cells of arterial walls using a novel porous balloon EP catheter. Finally, we have found in animal experiments that the immune response to DNA vaccines can be dramatically enhanced and accelerated by EP and co-injection of micron-sized particles. We conclude that EP represents an effective, economical and safe approach to enhance the intracellular delivery, and thus potency, of important drugs and genes for therapeutic purposes. The safety and pharmaco

  9. Therapeutic and diagnostic set for irradiation the cell lines in low level laser therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gryko, Lukasz; Zajac, Andrzej; Gilewski, Marian; Szymanska, Justyna; Goralczyk, Krzysztof

    2014-05-01

    In the paper is presented optoelectronic diagnostic set for standardization the biostimulation procedures performed on cell lines. The basic functional components of the therapeutic set are two digitally controlled illuminators. They are composed of the sets of semiconductor emitters - medium power laser diodes and high power LEDs emitting radiation in wide spectral range from 600 nm to 1000 nm. Emitters are coupled with applicator by fibre optic and optical systems that provides uniform irradiation of vessel with cell culture samples. Integrated spectrometer and optical power meter allow to control the energy and spectral parameters of electromagnetic radiation during the Low Level Light Therapy procedure. Dedicated power supplies and digital controlling system allow independent power of each emitter . It was developed active temperature stabilization system to thermal adjust spectral line of emitted radiation to more efficient association with absorption spectra of biological acceptors. Using the set to controlled irradiation and allowing to measure absorption spectrum of biological medium it is possible to carry out objective assessment the impact of the exposure parameters on the state cells subjected to Low Level Light Therapy. That procedure allows comparing the biological response of cell lines after irradiation with radiation of variable spectral and energetic parameters. Researches were carried out on vascular endothelial cell lines. Cells proliferations after irradiation of LEDs: 645 nm, 680 nm, 740 nm, 780 nm, 830 nm, 870 nm, 890 nm, 970 nm and lasers 650 nm and 830 nm were examined.

  10. Regulatory T cell derived Exosomes: possible therapeutic and diagnostic tools in transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akansha eAgarwal

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Exosomes are extracellular vesicles released by many cells of the body. These small vesicles play an important part in intercellular communication both in the local environment and systemically, facilitating in the transfer of proteins, cytokines as well as miRNA between cells. The observation that exosomes isolated from immune cells such as dendritic cells (DCs modulate the immune response has paved the way for these structures to be considered as potential immunotherapeutic reagents. Indeed clinical trials using DC derived exosomes to facilitate immune responses to specific cancer antigens are now underway. Exosomes can also have a negative effect on the immune response and exosomes isolated from regulatory T cells (Tregs and other subsets of T cells have been shown to have immune suppressive capacities. Here we review what is currently known about Treg derived exosomes and their contribution to immune regulation, as well as highlighting their possible therapeutic potential for preventing graft rejection, and their possible use as diagnostic tools to assess transplant outcome.

  11. Androgen-Forming Stem Leydig cells: Identification, Function and Therapeutic Potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunhui Zhang

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Leydig cells are the primary source of testosterone in the male, and differentiation of Leydig cells in the testes is one of the primary events in the development of the male body and fertility. Stem Leydig cells (SLCs exist in the testis throughout postnatal life, but a lack of cell surface markers previously hindered attempts to obtain purified SLC fractions. Once isolated, the properties of SLCs provide interesting clues for the ontogeny of these cells within the embryo. Moreover, the clinical potential of SLCs might be used to reverse age-related declines in testosterone levels in aging men, and stimulate reproductive function in hypogonadal males. This review focuses on the source, identification and outlook for therapeutic applications of SLCs. Separate pools of SLCs may give rise to fetal and adult generations of Leydig cell, which may account for their observed functional differences. These differences should in turn be taken into account when assessing the consequences of environmental pollutants such as the phthalate ester, diethylhexylphthalate (DEHP.

  12. Safety paradigm: genetic evaluation of therapeutic grade human embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephenson, Emma; Ogilvie, Caroline Mackie; Patel, Heema; Cornwell, Glenda; Jacquet, Laureen; Kadeva, Neli; Braude, Peter; Ilic, Dusko

    2010-12-01

    The use of stem cells for regenerative medicine has captured the imagination of the public, with media attention contributing to rising expectations of clinical benefits. Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) are the best model for capital investment in stem cell therapy and there is a clear need for their robust genetic characterization before scaling-up cell expansion for that purpose. We have to be certain that the genome of the starting material is stable and normal, but the limited resolution of conventional karyotyping is unable to give us such assurance. Advanced molecular cytogenetic technologies such as array comparative genomic hybridization for identifying chromosomal imbalances, and single nucleotide polymorphism analysis for identifying ethnic background and loss of heterozygosity should be introduced as obligatory diagnostic tests for each newly derived hESC line before it is deposited in national stem cell banks. If this new quality standard becomes a requirement, as we are proposing here, it would facilitate and accelerate the banking process, since end-users would be able to select the most appropriate line for their particular application, thus improving efficiency and streamlining the route to manufacturing therapeutics. The pharmaceutical industry, which may use hESC-derived cells for drug screening, should not ignore their genomic profile as this may risk misinterpretation of results and significant waste of resources. PMID:20826474

  13. Self-Assembling Peptide Amphiphiles for Therapeutic Delivery of Proteins, Drugs, and Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sungsoo Seth

    Biomaterials are used to help regenerate or replace the structure and function of damaged tissues. In order to elicit desired therapeutic responses in vivo, biomaterials are often functionalized with bioactive agents, such as growth factors, small molecule drugs, or even stem cells. Therefore, the strategies used to incorporate these bioactive agents in the microstructures and nanostructures of biomaterials can strongly influence the their therapeutic efficacy. Using self-assembling peptide amphiphiles (PAs), this work has investigated supramolecular nanostructures with improved interaction with three types of therapeutic agents: bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP-2) which promotes osteogenic differentiation and bone growth, anti-inflammatory drug naproxen which is used to treat osteo- and rheumatoid arthritis, and neural stem cells that could differentiate into neurons to treat neurodegenerative diseases. For BMP-2 delivery, two specific systems were investigated with affinity for BMP-2: 1) heparin-binding nanofibers that display the natural ligand of the osteogenic protein, and 2) nanofibers that display a synthetic peptide ligand discovered in our laboratory through phage display to directly bind BMP-2. Both systems promoted enhanced osteoblast differentiation of pluripotent C2C12 cells and augmented bone regeneration in two in vivo models, a rat critical-size femur defect model and spinal arthrodesis model. The thesis also describes the use of PA nanofibers to improve the delivery of the anti-inflammatory drug naproxen. To promote a controlled release, naproxen was chemically conjugated to the nanofiber surface via an ester bond that would only be cleaved by esterases, which are enzymes found naturally in the body. In the absence of esterases, the naproxen remained conjugated to the nanofibers and was non-bioactive. On the other hand, in the presence of esterases, naproxen was slowly released and inhibited cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) activity, an enzyme responsible

  14. Calcitriol restores antiestrogen responsiveness in estrogen receptor negative breast cancer cells: A potential new therapeutic approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Approximately 30% of breast tumors do not express the estrogen receptor (ER) α, which is necessary for endocrine therapy approaches. Studies are ongoing in order to restore ERα expression in ERα-negative breast cancer. The aim of the present study was to determine if calcitriol induces ERα expression in ER-negative breast cancer cells, thus restoring antiestrogen responses. Cultured cells derived from ERα-negative breast tumors and an ERα-negative breast cancer cell line (SUM-229PE) were treated with calcitriol and ERα expression was assessed by real time PCR and western blots. The ERα functionality was evaluated by prolactin gene expression analysis. In addition, the effects of antiestrogens were assessed by growth assay using the XTT method. Gene expression of cyclin D1 (CCND1), and Ether-à-go-go 1 (EAG1) was also evaluated in cells treated with calcitriol alone or in combination with estradiol or ICI-182,780. Statistical analyses were determined by one-way ANOVA. Calcitriol was able to induce the expression of a functional ERα in ER-negative breast cancer cells. This effect was mediated through the vitamin D receptor (VDR), since it was abrogated by a VDR antagonist. Interestingly, the calcitriol-induced ERα restored the response to antiestrogens by inhibiting cell proliferation. In addition, calcitriol-treated cells in the presence of ICI-182,780 resulted in a significant reduction of two important cell proliferation regulators CCND1 and EAG1. Calcitriol induced the expression of ERα and restored the response to antiestrogens in ERα-negative breast cancer cells. The combined treatment with calcitriol and antiestrogens could represent a new therapeutic strategy in ERα-negative breast cancer patients

  15. Mangiferin exerts antitumor activity in breast cancer cells by regulating matrix metalloproteinases, epithelial to mesenchymal transition, and β-catenin signaling pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Hongzhong; Huang, Jing; Yang, Bing; Xiang, Tingxiu; Yin, Xuedong; Peng, Weiyan; Cheng, Wei [Molecular Oncology and Epigenetics Laboratory, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing (China); Wan, Jingyuan; Luo, Fuling [Department of Pharmacology, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing (China); Li, Hongyuan [Molecular Oncology and Epigenetics Laboratory, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing (China); Ren, Guosheng, E-mail: rgs726@163.com [Molecular Oncology and Epigenetics Laboratory, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing (China)

    2013-10-01

    Although mangiferin which is a naturally occurring glucosylxanthone has exhibited promising anticancer activities, the detailed molecular mechanism of mangiferin on cancers still remains enigmatic. In this study, the anticancer activity of mangiferin was evaluated in breast cancer cell line-based in vitro and in vivo models. We showed that mangiferin treatment resulted in decreased cell viability and suppression of metastatic potential in breast cancer cells. Further mechanistic investigation revealed that mangiferin induced decreased matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-7 and -9, and reversal of epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT). Moreover, it was demonstrated that mangiferin significantly inhibited the activation of β-catenin pathway. Subsequent experiments showed that inhibiting β-catenin pathway might play a central role in mangiferin-induced anticancer activity through modulation of MMP-7 and -9, and EMT. Consistent with these findings in vitro, the antitumor potential was also verified in mangiferin-treated MDA-MB-231 xenograft mice where significantly decreased tumor volume, weight and proliferation, and increased apoptosis were obtained, with lower expression of MMP-7 and -9, vimentin and active β-catenin, and higher expression of E-cadherin. Taken together, our study suggests that mangiferin might be used as an effective chemopreventive agent against breast cancer. - Highlights: • Mangiferin inhibits growth and metastatic potential in breast cancer cells. • Mangiferin down-regulates MMP-7 and -9 in breast cancer cells. • Mangiferin induces the reversal of EMT in metastatic breast cancer cells. • Mangiferin inhibits the activation of β-catenin pathway in breast cancer cells. • Inhibiting β-catenin is responsible for the antitumor activity of mangiferin.

  16. Mangiferin exerts antitumor activity in breast cancer cells by regulating matrix metalloproteinases, epithelial to mesenchymal transition, and β-catenin signaling pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although mangiferin which is a naturally occurring glucosylxanthone has exhibited promising anticancer activities, the detailed molecular mechanism of mangiferin on cancers still remains enigmatic. In this study, the anticancer activity of mangiferin was evaluated in breast cancer cell line-based in vitro and in vivo models. We showed that mangiferin treatment resulted in decreased cell viability and suppression of metastatic potential in breast cancer cells. Further mechanistic investigation revealed that mangiferin induced decreased matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-7 and -9, and reversal of epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT). Moreover, it was demonstrated that mangiferin significantly inhibited the activation of β-catenin pathway. Subsequent experiments showed that inhibiting β-catenin pathway might play a central role in mangiferin-induced anticancer activity through modulation of MMP-7 and -9, and EMT. Consistent with these findings in vitro, the antitumor potential was also verified in mangiferin-treated MDA-MB-231 xenograft mice where significantly decreased tumor volume, weight and proliferation, and increased apoptosis were obtained, with lower expression of MMP-7 and -9, vimentin and active β-catenin, and higher expression of E-cadherin. Taken together, our study suggests that mangiferin might be used as an effective chemopreventive agent against breast cancer. - Highlights: • Mangiferin inhibits growth and metastatic potential in breast cancer cells. • Mangiferin down-regulates MMP-7 and -9 in breast cancer cells. • Mangiferin induces the reversal of EMT in metastatic breast cancer cells. • Mangiferin inhibits the activation of β-catenin pathway in breast cancer cells. • Inhibiting β-catenin is responsible for the antitumor activity of mangiferin

  17. Does mental exertion alter maximal muscle activation?

    OpenAIRE

    Vianney Rozand; Benjamin Pageaux

    2014-01-01

    Mental exertion is known to impair endurance performance, but its effects on neuromuscular function remain unclear. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that mental exertion reduces torque and muscle activation during intermittent maximal voluntary contractions of the knee extensors. Ten subjects performed in a randomized order three separate mental exertion conditions lasting 27 minutes each: i) high mental exertion (incongruent Stroop task), ii) moderate mental exertion (con...

  18. Does mental exertion alter maximal muscle activation?

    OpenAIRE

    Rozand, Vianney; Pageaux, Benjamin; Marcora, Samuele M.; Papaxanthis, Charalambos; Lepers, Romuald

    2014-01-01

    Mental exertion is known to impair endurance performance, but its effects on neuromuscular function remain unclear. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that mental exertion reduces torque and muscle activation during intermittent maximal voluntary contractions of the knee extensors. Ten subjects performed in a randomized order three separate mental exertion conditions lasting 27 min each: (i) high mental exertion (incongruent Stroop task), (ii) moderate mental exertion (congr...

  19. Recruiting endogenous stem cells: a novel therapeutic approach for erectile dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhong-Cheng Xin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Transplanted stem cells (SCs, owing to their regenerative capacity, represent one of the most promising methods to restore erectile dysfunction (ED. However, insufficient source, invasive procedures, ethical and regulatory issues hamper their use in clinical applications. The endogenous SCs/progenitor cells resident in organ and tissues play critical roles for organogenesis during development and for tissue homeostasis in adulthood. Even without any therapeutic intervention, human body has a robust self-healing capability to repair the damaged tissues or organs. Therefore, SCs-for-ED therapy should not be limited to a supply-side approach. The resident endogenous SCs existing in patients could also be a potential target for ED therapy. The aim of this review was to summarize contemporary evidence regarding: (1 SC niche and SC biological features in vitro; (2 localization and mobilization of endogenous SCs; (3 existing evidence of penile endogenous SCs and their possible mode of mobilization. We performed a search on PubMed for articles related to these aspects in a wide range of basic studies. Together, numerous evidences hold the promise that endogenous SCs would be a novel therapeutic approach for the therapy of ED.

  20. Electrochemotherapy as a new therapeutic strategy in advanced Merkel cell carcinoma of head and neck region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merkel Cell Carcinoma (MCC) is a rare and aggressive tumour, arising from a cutaneous mechanoceptor cell located in the basal layer of epidermis, with poor prognosis. The treatment of choice for the initial stage of the disease is surgery and/or radiotherapy. The treatment of recurrent or advanced disease is still controversial. We report a case of 84 years old woman with a recurrent MCC of the chin treated with electrochemotherapy (ECT). During the period of 20 months, four sessions of ECT were employed, which resulted in an objective response of the tumour and good quality of residual life. Our case shows the effectiveness of ECT in the treatment of locally advanced MCC of the head and neck region in a patient not suitable for standard therapeutic options

  1. Sickle cell anemia, the first molecular disease: overview of molecular etiology, pathophysiology, and therapeutic approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinberg, Martin H

    2008-01-01

    The root cause of sickle cell disease is a single beta-globin gene mutation coding for the sickle beta-hemoglobin chain. Sickle hemoglobin tetramers polymerize when deoxygenated, damaging the sickle erythrocyte. A multifaceted pathophysiology, triggered by erythrocyte injury induced by the sickle hemoglobin polymer, and encompassing more general cellular and tissue damage caused by hypoxia, oxidant damage, inflammation, abnormal intracellular interactions, and reduced nitric oxide bioavailability, sets off the events recognized clinically as sickle cell disease. This disease is a group of related disorders where sickle hemoglobin is the principal hemoglobin species. All have varying degrees of chronic hemolytic anemia, vasculopathy, vasoocclusive disease, acute and chronic organ damage, and shortened life span. Its complex pathophysiology, of which we have a reasonable understanding, provides multiple loci for potential therapeutic intervention. PMID:19112541

  2. Mechanisms of Therapeutic Resistance in Cancer (Stem) Cells with Emphasis on Thyroid Cancer Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Hombach-Klonisch, Sabine; Natarajan, Suchitra; Thanasupawat, Thatchawan; Medapati, Manoj; PATHAK, ALOK; Ghavami, Saeid; Klonisch, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    The two main reasons for death of cancer patients, tumor recurrence and metastasis, are multi-stage cellular processes that involve increased cell plasticity and coincide with elevated resistance to anti-cancer treatments. Epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a key contributor to metastasis in many cancer types, including thyroid cancer and is known to confer stem cell-like properties onto cancer cells. This review provides an overview of molecular mechanisms and factors known to con...

  3. Piperlongumine exerts cytotoxic effects against cancer cells with mutant p53 proteins at least in part by restoring the biological functions of the tumor suppressor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basak, Debasish; Punganuru, Surendra R; Srivenugopal, Kalkunte S

    2016-04-01

    Piperlongumine (PL), a small molecule alkaloid present in black pepper (Piper longum), has been reported to kill tumor cells irrespective of their p53 gene status, however, the mechanisms involved are unknown. Since p53 is a redox-sensitive protein, we hypothesized that the redox imbalance induced by PL may affect the structure and/or function of the mutant p53 protein and promote cell death. We used two human colon cancer cell lines, the HT29 and SW620 which harbor the R273H DNA contact abrogatory mutation in p53. PL treatment induced significant ROS production and protein glutathionylation with a concomitant increase in Nrf-2 expression in both cell lines. Surprisingly, immunoprecipitation with wt-p53 specific antibodies (PAb1620) or direct western blotting showed a progressive generation of wild-type-like p53 protein along with a loss of its mutant counterpart in PL-treated HT29 and SW620 cells. Moreover, the EMSA and DNA-affinity blotting revealed a time-dependent restoration of DNA-binding for the mutant p53, which was accompanied by the induction of p53 target genes, MDM2 and Bax. PL, while cytotoxic by itself, also increased the cell killing by many anticancer drugs. In nude mice bearing the HT29 tumors, PL alone (7.5 mg/kg daily) produced a 40% decrease in tumor volume, which was accompanied by diminished intratumoral mutant p53 protein levels. The antitumor efficacy of BCNU or doxorubicin in HT29 xenografts was highly potentiated by PL, followed by expression of apoptotic proteins. These clinically-relevant findings suggest that PL-induced oxidative milieu facilitates a weak functional restoration of mutant p53 through protein glutathionylation and contributes to the increased drug sensitivity. PMID:26848023

  4. Antibacterial activity and immunomodulatory effects on a bovine mammary epithelial cell line exerted by nisin A-producing Lactococcus lactis strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malvisi, M; Stuknytė, M; Magro, G; Minozzi, G; Giardini, A; De Noni, I; Piccinini, R

    2016-03-01

    Twenty-nine strains of mastitis pathogens were used to study the antibacterial activity of the cell-free supernatants (CFS) of 25 strains of Lactococcus lactis ssp. lactis. Out of the tested strains, only the CFS of L. lactis LL11 and SL153 were active, inhibiting and killing most of the pathogens. By means of ultra-performance liquid chromatography/high resolution mass spectrometry, they were shown to produce nisin A, a class I bacteriocin. A variable sensitivity to nisin A-containing CFS was observed among Streptococcus uberis and Enterococcus faecalis strains. Nonetheless, Streptococcus agalactiae, Strep. uberis, and E. faecalis displayed high minimum inhibitory concentration values, reaching 384 arbitrary units/mL. Interestingly, the minimum inhibitory values and the bactericidal concentrations were almost identical among them for each of the 2 stains, LL11 and SL153. Staphylococci were, on average, less sensitive than streptococci, but the 2 CFS inhibited and killed, at different dilutions, strains of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. The immune response to nisin A-containing CFS was tested using the bovine mammary epithelial cell line BME-UV1. Application of CFS did not damage epithelial integrity, as demonstrated by the higher activity of N-acetyl-β-d-glucosaminidase (NAGase) and lysozyme inside the cells, in both treated and control samples. On the other hand, the increase of released NAGase after 15 to 24h of treatment with LL11 or SL153 live cultures demonstrated an inflammatory response of epithelial cells. Similarly, a significantly higher lysozyme activity was detected in the cells treated with LL11 live culture confirming the stimulation of lysosomal activity. The treatment of epithelial cells with SL153 live culture induced a significant tumor necrosis factor-α downregulation in the cells, but did not influence IL-8 expression. The control of tumor necrosis factor-α release could be an interesting approach to reduce the symptoms linked

  5. Respiratory stem cells and progenitors: overview, derivation, differentiation, carcinogenesis, regeneration and therapeutic application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kannan, Shibichakravarthy; Wu, Min

    2006-01-01

    Recently, research of stem cells has garnered great attention and has shown promise by changing the view of traditional therapeutics, with broad impact on gene therapy, carcinogenesis, organ development, tissue injury, regeneration and almost all aspects of the life cycle and all living systems. A century's scientific progress has significantly improved controls for infectious diseases and many other disorders. However, many remaining problems (i.e. cancer, AIDS, diabetes, Parkinson's disease and Marburg infection) appear to be even harder than those that have already been solved. In particular, respiratory stem cell research has been less active and has moved more slowly than that of many other organs. This is probably due to the complexity of the lung and airway system, particularly owing to the many types of cells (>40), unique structures and functions, and technical difficulty in analyzing this system at the genetic, biochemical, molecular and cellular level. Compared with other epithelial cells (i.e., gastrointestinal epithelium), respiratory epithelia have a very low turnover rate and minimal regenerative activity. This review will discuss the current state of pulmonary stem cells, their origin, development, differentiation, and regenerative application, with a particular focus on potential impact on cancer development and lung injury repair. PMID:18220852

  6. Cell Cycle Abnormality in Metabolic Syndrome and Nuclear Receptors as an Emerging Therapeutic Target

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nakatsuka,Atsuko

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, many researchers have emphasized the importance of metabolic syndrome based on its increasing prevalence and its adverse prognosis due to associated chronic vascular complications. Upstream of a cluster of metabolic and vascular disorders is the accumulation of visceral adipose tissue, which plays a central role in the pathophysiology. In the accumulation of adipose tissues, cell cycle regulation is tightly linked to cellular processes such as proliferation, hypertrophy and apoptosis. In addition, various cell cycle abnormalities have also been observed in other tissues, such as kidneys and the cardiovascular system, and they are critically involved in the progression of disease. Here, we discuss cell cycle abnormalities in metabolic syndrome in various tissues. Furthermore, we describe the role of nuclear receptors in cell growth and survival, and glucose and lipid metabolism in the whole body. Therapeutic strategies for modulating various cell cycles in metabolic disorders by targeting nuclear receptors may overcome obesity and its chronic vascular complications in the future.

  7. Therapeutic Effect of Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells on Laser-Induced Retinal Injury in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuanfeng Jiang

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Stem cell therapy has shown encouraging results for neurodegenerative diseases. The retina provides a convenient locus to investigate stem cell functions and distribution in the nervous system. In the current study, we investigated the therapeutic potential of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs by systemic transplantation in a laser-induced retinal injury model. MSCs from C57BL/6 mice labeled with green fluorescent protein (GFP were injected via the tail vein into mice after laser photocoagulation. We found that the average diameters of laser spots and retinal cell apoptosis were decreased in the MSC-treated group. Interestingly, GFP-MSCs did not migrate to the injured retina. Further examination revealed that the mRNA expression levels of glial fibrillary acidic protein and matrix metalloproteinase-2 were lower in the injured eyes after MSC transplantation. Our results suggest that intravenously injected MSCs have the ability to inhibit retinal cell apoptosis, reduce the inflammatory response and limit the spreading of damage in the laser-injured retina of mice. Systemic MSC therapy might play a role in neuroprotection, mainly by regulation of the intraocular microenvironment.

  8. Therapeutic Potential of Dental Pulp Stem Cell Secretome for Alzheimer's Disease Treatment: An In Vitro Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Nermeen El-Moataz Bellah; Murakami, Masashi; Hirose, Yujiro; Nakashima, Misako

    2016-01-01

    The secretome obtained from stem cell cultures contains an array of neurotrophic factors and cytokines that might have the potential to treat neurodegenerative conditions. Alzheimer's disease (AD) is one of the most common human late onset and sporadic neurodegenerative disorders. Here, we investigated the therapeutic potential of secretome derived from dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) to reduce cytotoxicity and apoptosis caused by amyloid beta (Aβ) peptide. We determined whether DPSCs can secrete the Aβ-degrading enzyme, neprilysin (NEP), and evaluated the effects of NEP expression in vitro by quantitating Aβ-degrading activity. The results showed that DPSC secretome contains higher concentrations of VEGF, Fractalkine, RANTES, MCP-1, and GM-CSF compared to those of bone marrow and adipose stem cells. Moreover, treatment with DPSC secretome significantly decreased the cytotoxicity of Aβ peptide by increasing cell viability compared to nontreated cells. In addition, DPSC secretome stimulated the endogenous survival factor Bcl-2 and decreased the apoptotic regulator Bax. Furthermore, neprilysin enzyme was detected in DPSC secretome and succeeded in degrading Aβ1–42 in vitro in 12 hours. In conclusion, our study demonstrates that DPSCs may serve as a promising source for secretome-based treatment of Alzheimer's disease. PMID:27403169

  9. The Therapeutic Effect of Human Adult Stem Cells Derived from Adipose Tissue in Endotoxemic Rat Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soyoung Shin, Yonggoo Kim, Sikyoung Jeong, Sungyoup Hong, Insoo Kim, Woonjeong Lee, Seungphil Choi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Excessive systemic inflammation following sepsis, trauma or burn could lead to multi-organ damage and death. Bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs, commonly referred to as mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs, has been studied in several immune-associated diseases in human and animal by modulating the inflammatory response. Adipose tissue derived mesenchymal stem cells (ATSCs, which can be obtained more easily, compared with BMSCs, has emerged as an attractive alternative MSCs source for cell therapy. We investigated the therapeutic effects of human ATSCs (hATSCs in endotoxemic rat model and their capacity to modulate the inflammatory response. Endotoxemia was induced with Lipopolysaccaride intravenously injection (LPS, 10mg/kg. Animals were divided into the following three groups: (1 saline + saline (n=5, (2 LPS + saline (n=5 and (3 LPS + hATSCs (2x106 (n=5. The administration of LPS caused a consistent systemic inflammatory responses, increased concentrations of the pro-inflammatory cytokines that have an important role in sepsis. Treatment of endotoxemia with hATSCs decreased the level of inflammatory cytokines both in serum and in the lung, reduced inflammatory changes in the lung, prevented apoptosis in the kidney and improved multi-organ injury. In conclusion, our data demonstrates that hATSCs regulate the immue/inflammatory responses and improve multi-organ injury and they could be attractive candidates for cell therapy to treat endotoxemia.

  10. Chemopreventive and therapeutic potentials of thymoquinone in HepG2 cells: mechanistic perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ElKhoely, Abeer; Hafez, Hafez F; Ashmawy, Abeer M; Badary, Osama; Abdelaziz, Ahmed; Mostafa, Adel; Shouman, Samia A

    2015-07-01

    Liver cancer is the fifth commonest malignancy worldwide and the third leading cause of death. Identifying novel curative and preventive therapy may improve its prognosis. In this study, thymoquinone (TQ), the most active biological ingredient of Nigella sativa Linn, was investigated for its antitumor activity. Mechanistic perspectives underlying this antitumor activity were explored by testing its effect on cell cycle, apoptosis, and angiogenesis. In addition, the chemopreventive effect of TQ was carried out by measuring its effect on phase I CYP1A1 and phase II glutathione S-transferase (GST) drug-metabolizing enzymes. The results of the present study revealed the effectiveness of TQ as an antitumor agent against different types of cancer including brain, colon, cervix and liver at both a time- and concentration-dependent manner. In HepG2 cells, it induced G2/M phase cell cycle arrest and a concentration-dependent increase in the percentage of apoptotic cells with an increase in the ratio of Bax/BCL-2. Moreover, the expression of mRNA and protein level of vascular endothelial growth factor decreased as the concentration of TQ increased. Our data showed a significant inhibition of induced phase I CYP1A1 enzyme, and elevation in the content of glutathione and activity of phase II enzyme GST, in HepG2 cells. Our results provide support for the beneficial use of TQ as a therapeutic and chemopreventive agent against liver cancer. PMID:25796541

  11. Mesenchymal stem cell-based gene therapy: A promising therapeutic strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadian, Mozhdeh; Abasi, Elham; Akbarzadeh, Abolfazl

    2016-08-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are multipotent stromal cells that exist in bone marrow, fat, and so many other tissues, and can differentiate into a variety of cell types including osteoblasts, chondrocytes, and adipocytes, as well as myocytes and neurons. Moreover, they have great capacity for self-renewal while maintaining their multipotency. Their capacity for proliferation and differentiation, in addition to their immunomodulatory activity, makes them very promising candidates for cell-based regenerative medicine. Moreover, MSCs have the ability of mobilization to the site of damage; therefore, they can automatically migrate to the site of injury via their chemokine receptors following intravenous transplantation. In this respect, they can be applied for MSC-based gene therapy. In this new therapeutic method, genes of interest are introduced into MSCs via viral and non-viral-based methods that lead to transgene expression in them. Although stem cell-based gene therapy is a relatively new strategy, it lights a new hope for the treatment of a variety of genetic disorders. In the near future, MSCs can be of use in a vast number of clinical applications, because of their uncomplicated isolation, culture, and genetic manipulation. However, full consideration is still crucial before they are utilized for clinical trials, because the number of studies that signify the advantageous effects of MSC-based gene therapy are still limited. PMID:26148175

  12. Therapeutic dendritic cell vaccination of patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma: a clinical phase 1/2 trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berntsen, Annika; Trepiakas, Redas; Wenandy, Lynn;

    2008-01-01

    Therapeutic dendritic cell (DC) vaccination against cancer is a strategy aimed at activating the immune system to recognize and destroy tumor cells. In this nonrandomized phase 1/2 trial, we investigated the safety, feasibility, induction of T-cell response, and clinical response after treatment....../27 patients obtained disease stabilization (SD) for more than 8 weeks. An antigen-specific immune response was demonstrated in 6/6 patients tested. Furthermore, significant alterations in serum YKL-40 and IL-6 were found during treatment. In conclusion, DC vaccination in our setting is feasible and without...... haplotype, and low-dose IL-2 was administered concomitantly. Tumor response, immune response, and serum IL-6 and YKL-40 were measured during treatment. Vaccine generation was successful in all patients and no serious adverse events were observed. None of the patients had an objective response but 13...

  13. Shen-Qi-Jie-Yu-Fang exerts effects on a rat model of postpartum depression by regulating inflammatory cytokines and CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jingya; Zhao, Ruizhen; Li, Xiaoli; Sun, Wenjun; Qu, Miao; Tang, Qisheng; Yang, Xinke; Zhang, Shujing

    2016-01-01

    Background Shen-Qi-Jie-Yu-Fang (SJF) is composed of eight Chinese medicinal herbs. It is widely used in traditional Chinese medicine for treating postpartum depression (PPD). Previous studies have shown that SJF treats PPD through the neuroendocrine mechanism. Aim To further investigate the effect of SJF on the immune system, including the inflammatory response system and CD4+CD25+ regulatory T (Treg) cells. Materials and methods Sprague Dawley rats were used to create an animal model of PPD by inducing hormone-simulated pregnancy followed by hormone withdrawal. After hormone withdrawal, the PPD rats were treated with SJF or fluoxetine for 1, 2, and 4 weeks. Levels of Treg cells in peripheral blood were measured by flow cytometry analysis. Serum interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-6 were evaluated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and gene and protein expressions of IL-1RI, IL-6Rα, and gp130 in the hippocampus were observed by reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction and Western blot. Results Serum IL-1β in PPD rats increased at 2 weeks and declined from then on, while serum IL-6 increased at 1, 2, and 4 weeks. Both IL-1β and IL-6 were downregulated by SJF and fluoxetine. Changes in gene and protein expressions of IL-1RI and gp130 in PPD rats were consistent with changes in serum IL-1β, and were able to be regulated by SJF and fluoxetine. The levels of Treg cells were negatively correlated with serum IL-1β and IL-6, and were decreased in PPD rats. The levels of Treg cells were increased by SJF and fluoxetine. Conclusion Dysfunction of proinflammatory cytokines and Tregs in different stages of PPD was attenuated by SJF and fluoxetine through the modulation of serum concentrations of IL-1β and IL-6, expressions of IL-1RI, and gp130 in the hippocampus, and CD4+CD25+ Treg cells in peripheral blood. PMID:27143890

  14. PolyICLC Exerts Pro- and Anti-HIV Effects on the DC-T Cell Milieu In Vitro and In Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aravantinou, Meropi; Frank, Ines; Hallor, Magnus; Singer, Rachel; Tharinger, Hugo; Kenney, Jessica; Gettie, Agegnehu; Grasperge, Brooke; Blanchard, James; Salazar, Andres; Piatak, Michael; Lifson, Jeffrey D; Robbiani, Melissa; Derby, Nina

    2016-01-01

    Myeloid dendritic cells (mDCs) contribute to both HIV pathogenesis and elicitation of antiviral immunity. Understanding how mDC responses to stimuli shape HIV infection outcomes will inform HIV prevention and treatment strategies. The long double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) viral mimic, polyinosinic polycytidylic acid (polyIC, PIC) potently stimulates DCs to focus Th1 responses, triggers direct antiviral activity in vitro, and boosts anti-HIV responses in vivo. Stabilized polyICLC (PICLC) is being developed for vaccine adjuvant applications in humans, making it critical to understand how mDC sensing of PICLC influences HIV infection. Using the monocyte-derived DC (moDC) model, we sought to describe how PICLC (vs. other dsRNAs) impacts HIV infection within DCs and DC-T cell mixtures. We extended this work to in vivo macaque rectal transmission studies by administering PICLC with or before rectal SIVmac239 (SIVwt) or SIVmac239ΔNef (SIVΔNef) challenge. Like PIC, PICLC activated DCs and T cells, increased expression of α4β7 and CD169, and induced type I IFN responses in vitro. The type of dsRNA and timing of dsRNA exposure differentially impacted in vitro DC-driven HIV infection. Rectal PICLC treatment similarly induced DC and T cell activation and pro- and anti-HIV factors locally and systemically. Importantly, this did not enhance SIV transmission in vivo. Instead, SIV acquisition was marginally reduced after a single high dose challenge. Interestingly, in the PICLC-treated, SIVΔNef-infected animals, SIVΔNef viremia was higher, in line with the importance of DC and T cell activation in SIVΔNef replication. In the right combination anti-HIV strategy, PICLC has the potential to limit HIV infection and boost HIV immunity. PMID:27603520

  15. WJ9708012 exerts anticancer activity through PKC-α related crosstalk of mitochondrial and endoplasmic reticulum stresses in human hormone-refractory prostate cancer cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ting-chun KUO; Wei-jan HUANG; Jih-hwa GUH

    2011-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the anticancer mechanism of a methoxyflavanone derivative,WJ9708012,highlighting its role on a crosstalk between endoplasmic reticulum(ER)and mitochondrial stress.Methods: Cell proliferation was examined using sulforhodamine B assay.Cell-cycle progression,Ca2+mobilization and mitochondrial membrane potential(Δψm)were detected using flow cytometric analysis.Protein expression was detected using Western blot.Results: WJ9708012 displayed an antiproliferative and apoptotic activity in human hormone-refractory prostate cancer cells with IC50values of 6.4 and 5.3 μmol/L in PC-3 and DU-145 cells.WJ9708012 induced a prompt increase of cytosolic Ca2+level and activation of protein kinase C(PKC)-α.The cleavage of p-calpain was also induced by WJ9708012.Furthermore,WJ9708012 induced cell-cycle arrest at G1-phase associated with down-regulation of cyclin D1,cyclin E and cyclin-dependent kinase-4 expressions.It also caused a rapid and time-dependent decrease of phosphorylation level of mTOR(Ser2448),4E-BP1(Thr37/Thr46/Thr70)and p70S6K(Thr389),indicating the inhibition of mTOR-mediated translational pathways.The ER stress was activated by the identification of up-regulated GADD153 and glucose-regulated protein-78 protein levels.The subsequent mitochondrial stress was also identified by the observation of a decreased Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL expressions,an increased truncated Bid and Bad and a loss of Δψm.Conclusion: WJ9708012 induces an increase of cytosolic Ca2+concentration and activation of PKC-α.Subsequently,a crosstalk between ER stress and mitochondrial insult is induced,leading to the inhibition of mTOR pathways and arrest of the cell-cycle at G1phase.The apoptosis is ultimately induced by a severe damage of mitochondrial function.

  16. Enhancement of cell-based therapeutic angiogenesis using a novel type of injectable scaffolds of hydroxyapatite-polymer nanocomposite microspheres.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yohei Mima

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Clinical trials demonstrate the effectiveness of cell-based therapeutic angiogenesis in patients with severe ischemic diseases; however, their success remains limited. Maintaining transplanted cells in place are expected to augment the cell-based therapeutic angiogenesis. We have reported that nano-hydroxyapatite (HAp coating on medical devices shows marked cell adhesiveness. Using this nanotechnology, HAp-coated poly(l-lactic acid (PLLA microspheres, named nano-scaffold (NS, were generated as a non-biological, biodegradable and injectable cell scaffold. We investigate the effectiveness of NS on cell-based therapeutic angiogenesis. METHODS AND RESULTS: Bone marrow mononuclear cells (BMNC and NS or control PLLA microspheres (LA were intramuscularly co-implanted into mice ischemic hindlimbs. When BMNC derived from enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP-transgenic mice were injected into ischemic muscle, the muscle GFP level in NS+BMNC group was approximate fivefold higher than that in BMNC or LA+BMNC groups seven days after operation. Kaplan-Meier analysis demonstrated that NS+BMNC markedly prevented hindlimb necrosis (P<0.05 vs. BMNC or LA+BMNC. NS+BMNC revealed much higher induction of angiogenesis in ischemic tissues and collateral blood flow confirmed by three-dimensional computed tomography angiography than those of BMNC or LA+BMNC groups. NS-enhanced therapeutic angiogenesis and arteriogenesis showed good correlations with increased intramuscular levels of vascular endothelial growth factor and fibroblast growth factor-2. NS co-implantation also prevented apoptotic cell death of transplanted cells, resulting in prolonged cell retention. CONCLUSION: A novel and feasible injectable cell scaffold potentiates cell-based therapeutic angiogenesis, which could be extremely useful for the treatment of severe ischemic disorders.

  17. Exertion injuries in female athletes.

    OpenAIRE

    Orava, S.; Hulkko, A; Jormakka, E.

    1981-01-01

    Because sports injuries in men form most of the available statistics, the reportage of injuries in female athletes is sparse. We describe exertion injuries and disorders in 281 women athletes, all of which hampered athletic training or performances. Sixty per cent of the injuries occurred to girls ages between 12-19 years, and about forty-eight per cent were track and field athletes. The most common sites of injury were the ankle, foot, heel and leg. Osteochondritic disorders were the most ty...

  18. Therapeutic Effects of Myeloid Cell Leukemia-1 siRNA on Human Acute Myeloid Leukemia Cells

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    Hadi Karami

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Up-regulation of Mcl-1, a known anti-apoptotic protein, is associated with the survival and progression of various malignancies including leukemia. The aim of this study was to explore the effect of Mcl-1 small interference RNA (siRNA on the proliferation and apoptosis of HL-60 acute myeloid leukemia (AML cells. Methods: siRNA transfection was performed using Lipofectamine™2000 reagent. Relative mRNA and protein expressions were quantified by quantitative real-time PCR and Western blotting, respectively. Trypan blue assay was performed to assess tumor cell proliferation after siRNA transfection. The cytotoxic effect of Mcl-1 siRNA on leukemic cells was measured using MTT assay. Apoptosis was detected using ELISA cell death assay. Results: Mcl-1 siRNA clearly lowered both Mcl-1 mRNA and protein levels in a time-dependent manner, leading to marked inhibition of cell survival and proliferation. Furthermore, Mcl-1 down-regulation significantly enhanced the extent of HL-60 apoptotic cells. Conclusion: Our results suggest that the down-regulation of Mcl-1 by siRNA can effectively trigger apoptosis and inhibit the proliferation of leukemic cells. Therefore, Mcl-1 siRNA may be a potent adjuvant in AML therapy.

  19. Parathyroid hormone-mitogen-activated protein kinase axis exerts fibrogenic effect of connective tissue growth factor on human renal proximal tubular cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Yun-shan; YUAN Wei-jie; ZHANG Ai-ping; DING Yao-hai; WANG Yan-xia

    2010-01-01

    Background Enhanced and prolonged expression of connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) is associated with kidney fibrosis. Parathyroid hormone (PTH) is involved in the genesis of disturbed calcium/phosphate metabolism and ostitis fibrosa in renal failure. PTH activated mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway is present in renal tubular cells. The aim of this study was to identify the mechanism how the signal is transduced to result in extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK) activation, leading to upregulation of CTGF.Methods The levels of CTGF mRNA and protein in human kidney proximal tubular cells (HK-2) treated with PTH in the presence or absence of the MAPK inhibitor PD98059 were analyzed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and immunoblotting assay. The activation of the CTGF promoter in HK-2 cells was determined by the dual-luciferase assay. The effects of the protein kinase A (PKA) activator 8-Br-cAMP and protein kinase C (PKC) activator phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) on MAPK phosphorylation, and the effects of the PKA inhibitor H89 and PKC inhibitor calphostin C on MAPK phosphorylation and CTGF expression were detected by immunoblotting assay.Results PD98059 inhibited the PTH stimulated expression of CTGF, which strongly suggested that the MAPK signaling pathway plays an important role in the PTH-induced CTGF upregulation in renal tubular cells. A PKA activator as well as PKC activators induced MAPK phosphorylation, and both PKA and PKC inhibitors antagonized PTH-induced MAPK phosphorylation and CTGF expression.Conclusion CTGF expression is upregulated by PTH through a PKC/PKA-ERK-dependent pathway.

  20. Autologous Bone Marrow Mononuclear Cells Exert Broad Effects on Short- and Long-Term Biological and Functional Outcomes in Rodents with Intracerebral Hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suda, Satoshi; Yang, Bing; Schaar, Krystal; Xi, Xiaopei; Pido, Jennifer; Parsha, Kaushik; Aronowski, Jaroslaw; Savitz, Sean I

    2015-12-01

    Autologous bone marrow-derived mononuclear cells (MNCs) are a potential therapy for ischemic stroke. However, the effect of MNCs in intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) has not been fully studied. In this study, we investigated the effects of autologous MNCs in experimental ICH. ICH was induced by infusion of autologous blood into the left striatum in young and aged male Long Evans rats. Twenty-four hours after ICH, rats were randomized to receive an intravenous administration of autologous MNCs (1 × 10(7) cells/kg) or saline. We examined brain water content, various markers related to the integrity of the neurovascular unit and inflammation, neurological deficit, neuroregeneration, and brain atrophy. We found that MNC-treated young rats showed a reduction in the neurotrophil infiltration, the number of inducible nitric oxide synthase-positive cells, and the expression of inflammatory-related signalings such as the high-mobility group protein box-1, S100 calcium binding protein B, matrix metalloproteinase-9, and aquaporin 4. Ultimately, MNCs reduced brain edema in the perihematomal area compared with saline-treated animals at 3 days after ICH. Moreover, MNCs increased vessel density and migration of doublecortin-positive cells, improved motor functional recovery, spatial learning, and memory impairment, and reduced brain atrophy compared with saline-treated animals at 28 days after ICH. We also found that MNCs reduced brain edema and brain atrophy and improved spatial learning and memory in aged rats after ICH. We conclude that autologous MNCs can be safely harvested and intravenously reinfused in rodent ICH and may improve long-term structural and functional recovery after ICH. The results of this study may be applicable when considering future clinical trials testing MNCs for ICH. PMID:26414707

  1. A highly efficient method for generation of therapeutic quality human pluripotent stem cells by using naive induced pluripotent stem cells nucleus for nuclear transfer

    OpenAIRE

    Sanal, Madhusudana Girija

    2014-01-01

    Even after several years since the discovery of human embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC), we are still unable to make any significant therapeutic benefits out of them such as cell therapy or generation of organs for transplantation. Recent success in somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) made it possible to generate diploid embryonic stem cells, which opens up the way to make high-quality pluripotent stem cells. However, the process is highly inefficient and hence e...

  2. Low-molecular-weight fucoidan and high-stability fucoxanthin from brown seaweed exert prebiotics and anti-inflammatory activities in Caco-2 cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pai-An Hwang

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of this study is to investigate the anti-inflammatory effects of low-molecular-weight fucoidan (LMF and high-stability fucoxanthin (HS-Fucox in a lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammatory Caco-2 cell line co-culture with B. lactis. Methods: We used various methods such as transepithelial resistance (TER assay, cytokine secretion assay, and tight junction protein mRNA expression assay to examine LMF and HS-Fucox anti-inflammatory properties. Results: LMF and HS-Fucox activated probiotic growth and reduced the inflammation of the intestinal epithelial cells. Moreover, the combination of LMFHS-Fucox dramatically enhanced the intestinal epithelial barrier and immune function against the lipopolysaccharide effect by inhibiting IL-1β and TNF-α and promoting IL-10 and IFN-γ. Conclusion: These findings suggested that LMF and HS-Fucox, alone or in combination, could be the potential natural compounds to enhance the immune system and have an anti-inflammatory effect on the intestinal cells.

  3. The Ultrasound effects on non tumoral cell line at 1 MHz therapeutic frequency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Giambattista, L.; Grimaldi, P.; Udroiu, I.; Pozzi, D.; Cinque, G.; Frogley, M. D.; Cassarà, A. M.; Bedini, A.; Giliberti, C.; Palomba, R.; Buogo, S.; Giansanti, A.; Congiu Castellano, A.

    2011-02-01

    The aim of this research is to investigate some bioeffects due to Therapeutic Ultrasound (1 MHz and 50drugs or genes delivery in non tumoral cells. Ultrasound (US) has been demonstrated to alter the cell membrane permeability due to a biophysical mechanism, Sonoporation, and exploited as a promising non-invasive gene transfer method. We have used the NIH-3T3 cell line as a model system and exposed it to US medical equipment for 15, 30, 45, 60 minutes at distances of 10 and 15 cm from the source transducer, corresponding to the far field region where cm. We have worked with the maximum power in pulsed system with 75% duty cycle. Characterization of the unfocused, planar and with a circular geometry 1 MHz source transducer, was performed and the acoustics pressure was measured by a calibrated 0.5 mm needle hydrophone; moreover, the pressure field generated by the source transducer was simulated. The US effects on cells were assessed by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) Imaging with focal plane array (FPA) detector. By the IR analysis, the US exposure on non tumoral cells has induced a change of the intensity for CH2 asymmetric stretching (2924 cm-1) band in the lipid region (3000-2800 cm-1) that it could detect an energy-dependent process. It has already shown that cells invest energy to catalyze lipid movement in order to maintain a specific transmembrane phospholipid distribution. Although asymmetry is the rule for control cells, the loss of asymmetry could be associated with the permeability change of plasma membrane inducing temporary pores.

  4. The Ultrasound effects on non tumoral cell line at 1 MHz therapeutic frequency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Di Giambattista, L; Grimaldi, P; Cassara, A M; Giansanti, A; Congiu Castellano, A [Physics Department, Sapienza, University of Rome (Italy); Udroiu, I; Bedini, A; Giliberti, C; Palomba, R [DIPIA, ISPESL, via Urbana 167, Rome (Italy); Pozzi, D [Experimental Medicine and Pathology Department, Sapienza, University of Rome (Italy); Cinque, G; Frogley, M D [Diamond Light Source Ltd, Didcot, Oxfordshire (United Kingdom); Buogo, S, E-mail: l.digiambattista@caspur.it [CNR-Institute of Acoustics O.M. Corbino, Rome (Italy)

    2011-02-01

    The aim of this research is to investigate some bioeffects due to Therapeutic Ultrasound (1 MHz and 50cells. Ultrasound (US) has been demonstrated to alter the cell membrane permeability due to a biophysical mechanism, Sonoporation, and exploited as a promising non-invasive gene transfer method. We have used the NIH-3T3 cell line as a model system and exposed it to US medical equipment for 15, 30, 45, 60 minutes at distances of 10 and 15 cm from the source transducer, corresponding to the far field region where z>{alpha}{sup 2}/4/{lambda}=4.0{+-}0.4 cm. We have worked with the maximum power in pulsed system with 75% duty cycle. Characterization of the unfocused, planar and with a circular geometry 1 MHz source transducer, was performed and the acoustics pressure was measured by a calibrated 0.5 mm needle hydrophone; moreover, the pressure field generated by the source transducer was simulated. The US effects on cells were assessed by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) Imaging with focal plane array (FPA) detector. By the IR analysis, the US exposure on non tumoral cells has induced a change of the intensity for CH{sub 2} asymmetric stretching (2924 cm{sup -1}) band in the lipid region (3000-2800 cm{sup -1}) that it could detect an energy-dependent process. It has already shown that cells invest energy to catalyze lipid movement in order to maintain a specific transmembrane phospholipid distribution. Although asymmetry is the rule for control cells, the loss of asymmetry could be associated with the permeability change of plasma membrane inducing temporary pores.

  5. The Ultrasound effects on non tumoral cell line at 1 MHz therapeutic frequency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this research is to investigate some bioeffects due to Therapeutic Ultrasound (1 MHz and 50PA2) which could allow to enhance drugs or genes delivery in non tumoral cells. Ultrasound (US) has been demonstrated to alter the cell membrane permeability due to a biophysical mechanism, Sonoporation, and exploited as a promising non-invasive gene transfer method. We have used the NIH-3T3 cell line as a model system and exposed it to US medical equipment for 15, 30, 45, 60 minutes at distances of 10 and 15 cm from the source transducer, corresponding to the far field region where z>α2/4/λ=4.0±0.4 cm. We have worked with the maximum power in pulsed system with 75% duty cycle. Characterization of the unfocused, planar and with a circular geometry 1 MHz source transducer, was performed and the acoustics pressure was measured by a calibrated 0.5 mm needle hydrophone; moreover, the pressure field generated by the source transducer was simulated. The US effects on cells were assessed by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) Imaging with focal plane array (FPA) detector. By the IR analysis, the US exposure on non tumoral cells has induced a change of the intensity for CH2 asymmetric stretching (2924 cm-1) band in the lipid region (3000-2800 cm-1) that it could detect an energy-dependent process. It has already shown that cells invest energy to catalyze lipid movement in order to maintain a specific transmembrane phospholipid distribution. Although asymmetry is the rule for control cells, the loss of asymmetry could be associated with the permeability change of plasma membrane inducing temporary pores.

  6. Shen-Qi-Jie-Yu-Fang exerts effects on a rat model of postpartum depression by regulating inflammatory cytokines and CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li JY

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Jingya Li,1,* Ruizhen Zhao,1,* Xiaoli Li,1 Wenjun Sun,1 Miao Qu,1 Qisheng Tang,1 Xinke Yang,1 Shujing Zhang2 1Third Affiliated Hospital, 2School of Basic Medical Sciences, Beijing University of Chinese Medicine, Beijing, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: Shen-Qi-Jie-Yu-Fang (SJF is composed of eight Chinese medicinal herbs. It is widely used in traditional Chinese medicine for treating postpartum depression (PPD. Previous studies have shown that SJF treats PPD through the neuroendocrine mechanism. Aim: To further investigate the effect of SJF on the immune system, including the inflammatory response system and CD4+CD25+ regulatory T (Treg cells. Materials and methods: Sprague Dawley rats were used to create an animal model of PPD by inducing hormone-simulated pregnancy followed by hormone withdrawal. After hormone withdrawal, the PPD rats were treated with SJF or fluoxetine for 1, 2, and 4 weeks. Levels of Treg cells in peripheral blood were measured by flow cytometry analysis. Serum interleukin (IL-1β and IL-6 were evaluated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and gene and protein expressions of IL-1RI, IL-6Rα, and gp130 in the hippocampus were observed by reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction and Western blot. Results: Serum IL-1β in PPD rats increased at 2 weeks and declined from then on, while serum IL-6 increased at 1, 2, and 4 weeks. Both IL-1β and IL-6 were downregulated by SJF and fluoxetine. Changes in gene and protein expressions of IL-1RI and gp130 in PPD rats were consistent with changes in serum IL-1β, and were able to be regulated by SJF and fluoxetine. The levels of Treg cells were negatively correlated with serum IL-1β and IL-6, and were decreased in PPD rats. The levels of Treg cells were increased by SJF and fluoxetine. Conclusion: Dysfunction of proinflammatory cytokines and Tregs in different stages of PPD was attenuated by SJF and fluoxetine through

  7. Th17 Cells Pathways in Multiple Sclerosis and Neuromyelitis Optica Spectrum Disorders: Pathophysiological and Therapeutic Implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passos, Giordani Rodrigues Dos; Sato, Douglas Kazutoshi; Becker, Jefferson; Fujihara, Kazuo

    2016-01-01

    Several animal and human studies have implicated CD4+ T helper 17 (Th17) cells and their downstream pathways in the pathogenesis of central nervous system (CNS) autoimmunity in multiple sclerosis (MS) and neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorders (NMOSD), challenging the traditional Th1-Th2 paradigm. Th17 cells can efficiently cross the blood-brain barrier using alternate ways from Th1 cells, promote its disruption, and induce the activation of other inflammatory cells in the CNS. A number of environmental factors modulate the activity of Th17 pathways, so changes in the diet, exposure to infections, and other environmental factors can potentially change the risk of development of autoimmunity. Currently, new drugs targeting specific points of the Th17 pathways are already being tested in clinical trials and provide basis for the development of biomarkers to monitor disease activity. Herein, we review the key findings supporting the relevance of the Th17 pathways in the pathogenesis of MS and NMOSD, as well as their potential role as therapeutic targets in the treatment of immune-mediated CNS disorders. PMID:26941483

  8. The role of colorectal cancer stem cells in metastatic disease and therapeutic response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Eric C; Hessman, Crystal; Levin, Trevor G; Monroe, Marcus M; Wong, Melissa H

    2011-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is the third-leading cause of cancer related mortality in the United States. The intricate molecular mechanisms involved in the regenerative process of the normal intestine and the identity of putative somatic intestinal stem cells have become clear. In parallel with this, experiment evidence has emerged supporting the century old hypothesis that solid tumor initiation, progression, chemoresistance and recurrence is the result of a small population of cancer cells with self-renewal and pluripotency capabilities. These "cancer stem cells" (CSCs) present a unique opportunity to better understand the biology of solid tumors in general, as well as targets for future therapeutics. In this review, we will summarize the current understanding of intestinal stem cell biology and translate it to colorectal CSCs to provide a basis for understanding chemoresistance, cancer recurrence and metastasis. A more complete understanding of the biology of colorectal CSCs will translate into the development of better chemotherapeutic and biological agents for the treatment of colorectal cancer. PMID:21318087

  9. Epigenetics in non-small cell lung cancer: from basics to therapeutics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari, Junaid; El-Osta, Hazem

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer remains the number one cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide with 221,200 estimated new cases and 158,040 estimated deaths in 2015. Approximately 80% of cases are non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The diagnosis is usually made at an advanced stage where the prognosis is poor and therapeutic options are limited. The evolution of lung cancer is a multistep process involving genetic, epigenetic, and environmental factor interactions that result in the dysregulation of key oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes, culminating in activation of cancer-related signaling pathways. The past decade has witnessed the discovery of multiple molecular aberrations that drive lung cancer growth, among which are epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations and translocations involving the anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene. This has translated into therapeutic agent developments that target these molecular alterations. The absence of targetable mutations in 50% of NSCLC cases and targeted therapy resistance development underscores the importance for developing alternative therapeutic strategies for treating lung cancer. Among these strategies, pharmacologic modulation of the epigenome has been used to treat lung cancer. Epigenetics approaches may circumvent the problem of tumor heterogeneity by affecting the expression of multiple tumor suppression genes (TSGs), halting tumor growth and survival. Moreover, it may be effective for tumors that are not driven by currently recognized druggable mutations. This review summarizes the molecular pathology of lung cancer epigenetic aberrations and discusses current efforts to target the epigenome with different pharmacological approaches. Our main focus will be on hypomethylating agents, histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors, microRNA modulations, and the role of novel epigenetic biomarkers. Last, we will address the challenges that face this old-new strategy in treating lung cancer.

  10. Epigenetics in non-small cell lung cancer: from basics to therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari, Junaid; Shackelford, Rodney E; El-Osta, Hazem

    2016-04-01

    Lung cancer remains the number one cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide with 221,200 estimated new cases and 158,040 estimated deaths in 2015. Approximately 80% of cases are non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The diagnosis is usually made at an advanced stage where the prognosis is poor and therapeutic options are limited. The evolution of lung cancer is a multistep process involving genetic, epigenetic, and environmental factor interactions that result in the dysregulation of key oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes, culminating in activation of cancer-related signaling pathways. The past decade has witnessed the discovery of multiple molecular aberrations that drive lung cancer growth, among which are epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations and translocations involving the anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene. This has translated into therapeutic agent developments that target these molecular alterations. The absence of targetable mutations in 50% of NSCLC cases and targeted therapy resistance development underscores the importance for developing alternative therapeutic strategies for treating lung cancer. Among these strategies, pharmacologic modulation of the epigenome has been used to treat lung cancer. Epigenetics approaches may circumvent the problem of tumor heterogeneity by affecting the expression of multiple tumor suppression genes (TSGs), halting tumor growth and survival. Moreover, it may be effective for tumors that are not driven by currently recognized druggable mutations. This review summarizes the molecular pathology of lung cancer epigenetic aberrations and discusses current efforts to target the epigenome with different pharmacological approaches. Our main focus will be on hypomethylating agents, histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors, microRNA modulations, and the role of novel epigenetic biomarkers. Last, we will address the challenges that face this old-new strategy in treating lung cancer. PMID:27186511

  11. Mesenchymal Stromal Cells as Cell-Based Therapeutics for Wound Healing

    OpenAIRE

    Samir Malhotra; Hu, Michael S.; Marshall, Clement D.; Tripp Leavitt; Alexander T. M. Cheung; Gonzalez, Jennifer G.; Harleen Kaur; Peter Lorenz, H.; Longaker, Michael T.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic wounds are a source of substantial morbidity for patients and are a major financial burden for the healthcare system. There are no current therapies that reliably improve nonhealing wounds or reverse pathological scarring. Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are a promising source of novel cell-based therapies due to the ease of their harvest and their integral role in the native wound repair process. Recent work has addressed the problems of loss of plasticity and off-target delivery th...

  12. Blood Outgrowth Endothelial Cells Increase Tumor Growth Rates and Modify Tumor Physiology: Relevance for Therapeutic Targeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pagan, Jonathan, E-mail: jdpagan@uams.edu; Przybyla, Beata; Jamshidi-Parsian, Azemat [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, 4301 West Markham Street, Little Rock, AR 72205 (United States); Gupta, Kalpna [Vascular Biology Center and Division of Hematology-Oncology Transplantation, Department of Medicine, University of Minnesota Medical School, MN 72223 (United States); Griffin, Robert J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, 4301 West Markham Street, Little Rock, AR 72205 (United States)

    2013-02-18

    Endothelial cell precursors from human peripheral blood have been shown to home to areas of neovascularization and may assist tumor growth by increasing or fortifying blood vessel growth. In the present study, the influence of these cells on tumor growth and physiology was investigated and the role of these cells as a therapeutic target or in determining treatment sensitivity was tested. After isolation from human blood and expansion in vitro, actively growing cells with verified endothelial phenotype (Blood Outgrowth Endothelial Cell, BOEC) were injected i.v. into tumor bearing mice for three consecutive days. The growth rate was significantly enhanced in relatively small RERF human lung tumors (i.e., less than 150 mm{sup 3}) grown in immunocompromised mice by an average of 1.5-fold while it had no effect when injections were given to animals bearing larger tumors. There were no signs of toxicity or unwanted systemic effects. We also observed evidence of increased perfusion, vessel number, response to 15 Gy radiation and oxygenation in RERF tumors of animals injected with BOECs compared to control tumors. In addition, FSaII murine fibrosarcoma tumors were found to grow faster upon injection of BOECs. When FSaII tumors were subjected to a partial thermal ablation treatment using high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) there was consistently elevated detection of fluorescently labeled and i.v. injected endothelial precursors in the tumor when analyzed with optical imaging and/or histological preparations. Importantly, we also observed that BOECs treated with the novel anti-angiogenic peptide anginex in-vitro, show decreased proliferation and increased sensitivity to radiation. In vivo, the normal increase in FSaII tumor growth induced by injected BOECs was blunted by the addition of anginex treatment. It appears that endothelial precursors may significantly contribute to tumor vessel growth, tumor progression and/or repair of tumor damage and may improve the

  13. Blood Outgrowth Endothelial Cells Increase Tumor Growth Rates and Modify Tumor Physiology: Relevance for Therapeutic Targeting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalpna Gupta

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Endothelial cell precursors from human peripheral blood have been shown to home to areas of neovascularization and may assist tumor growth by increasing or fortifying blood vessel growth. In the present study, the influence of these cells on tumor growth and physiology was investigated and the role of these cells as a therapeutic target or in determining treatment sensitivity was tested. After isolation from human blood and expansion in vitro, actively growing cells with verified endothelial phenotype (Blood Outgrowth Endothelial Cell, BOEC were injected i.v. into tumor bearing mice for three consecutive days. The growth rate was significantly enhanced in relatively small RERF human lung tumors (i.e., less than 150 mm3 grown in immunocompromised mice by an average of 1.5-fold while it had no effect when injections were given to animals bearing larger tumors. There were no signs of toxicity or unwanted systemic effects. We also observed evidence of increased perfusion, vessel number, response to 15 Gy radiation and oxygenation in RERF tumors of animals injected with BOECs compared to control tumors. In addition, FSaII murine fibrosarcoma tumors were found to grow faster upon injection of BOECs. When FSaII tumors were subjected to a partial thermal ablation treatment using high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU there was consistently elevated detection of fluorescently labeled and i.v. injected endothelial precursors in the tumor when analyzed with optical imaging and/or histological preparations. Importantly, we also observed that BOECs treated with the novel anti-angiogenic peptide anginex in-vitro, show decreased proliferation and increased sensitivity to radiation. In vivo, the normal increase in FSaII tumor growth induced by injected BOECs was blunted by the addition of anginex treatment. It appears that endothelial precursors may significantly contribute to tumor vessel growth, tumor progression and/or repair of tumor damage and may improve

  14. Blood Outgrowth Endothelial Cells Increase Tumor Growth Rates and Modify Tumor Physiology: Relevance for Therapeutic Targeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endothelial cell precursors from human peripheral blood have been shown to home to areas of neovascularization and may assist tumor growth by increasing or fortifying blood vessel growth. In the present study, the influence of these cells on tumor growth and physiology was investigated and the role of these cells as a therapeutic target or in determining treatment sensitivity was tested. After isolation from human blood and expansion in vitro, actively growing cells with verified endothelial phenotype (Blood Outgrowth Endothelial Cell, BOEC) were injected i.v. into tumor bearing mice for three consecutive days. The growth rate was significantly enhanced in relatively small RERF human lung tumors (i.e., less than 150 mm3) grown in immunocompromised mice by an average of 1.5-fold while it had no effect when injections were given to animals bearing larger tumors. There were no signs of toxicity or unwanted systemic effects. We also observed evidence of increased perfusion, vessel number, response to 15 Gy radiation and oxygenation in RERF tumors of animals injected with BOECs compared to control tumors. In addition, FSaII murine fibrosarcoma tumors were found to grow faster upon injection of BOECs. When FSaII tumors were subjected to a partial thermal ablation treatment using high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) there was consistently elevated detection of fluorescently labeled and i.v. injected endothelial precursors in the tumor when analyzed with optical imaging and/or histological preparations. Importantly, we also observed that BOECs treated with the novel anti-angiogenic peptide anginex in-vitro, show decreased proliferation and increased sensitivity to radiation. In vivo, the normal increase in FSaII tumor growth induced by injected BOECs was blunted by the addition of anginex treatment. It appears that endothelial precursors may significantly contribute to tumor vessel growth, tumor progression and/or repair of tumor damage and may improve the oxygenation

  15. N‑trans‑ρ‑caffeoyl tyramine isolated from Tribulus terrestris exerts anti‑inflammatory effects in lipopolysaccharide‑stimulated RAW 264.7 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Han-Jik; Ahn, Eun-Kyung; Oh, Joa Sub

    2015-10-01

    Inflammation is induced by the expression of cyclooxygenase‑2 (COX‑2), which is an important mediator of chronic inflammatory diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis, asthma and inflammatory bowel disease. Tribulus terrestris (T. terrestris) is known to have a beneficial effect on inflammatory diseases. In this study, we investigated the effects of N‑trans‑ρ‑caffeoyl tyramine (CT) isolated from T. terrestris on the production of nitric oxide (NO), and the expression of pro‑inflammatory cytokines and COX‑2 in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)‑stimulated RAW 264.7 cells. We also aimed to elucidate the molecular mechanisms involved. We found that the ethanolic extract of T. terrestris (EETT) and CT inhibited the production of NO, tumor necrosis factor‑α (TNF‑α), interleukin (IL)‑6 and IL‑10 in the LPS‑stimulated RAW 264.7 cells in a dose‑dependent manner. They were determined by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). In addition, CT markedly suppressed the expression of COX‑2 and the production of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) in response to LPS stimulation. Furthermore, CT markedly decreased p‑c‑Jun N‑terminal kinase (p‑JNK) protein expression in LPS‑stimulated RAW 264.7 cells. COX-2 and p-JNK were measured by western blot analysis. Taken together, these findings indicate that CT isolated from T. terrestris is a novel and potent modulator of inflammatory responses. Thus, it may prove benefiical to further evaluate CT as a possible treatment for chronic inflammatory diseases. PMID:26239676

  16. Progesterone and estradiol exert an inhibitory effect on the production of anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 by activated MZ B cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bommer, I; Muzzio, D O; Zygmunt, M; Jensen, F

    2016-08-01

    The main message of this work is the fact that female sex hormones, progesterone and estradiol, whose levels significantly rise during pregnancy, inhibit the production of anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 with no apparent effect on pro-inflammatory cytokine TNF-α by activated MZ B cells. This is an important piece of information and helps to better understand how the maternal immune system controls the balance between immune tolerance and immune activation during pregnancy leading to the simultaneously acceptance of the semi-allogeneic fetus and the proper defense of the mother against pathogens during this critical period of time. PMID:27317920

  17. Liquid biopsy and therapeutic response: Circulating tumor cell cultures for evaluation of anticancer treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoo, Bee Luan; Grenci, Gianluca; Jing, Tengyang; Lim, Ying Bena; Lee, Soo Chin; Thiery, Jean Paul; Han, Jongyoon; Lim, Chwee Teck

    2016-01-01

    The lack of a robust anticancer drug screening system to monitor patients during treatment delays realization of personalized treatment. We demonstrate an efficient approach to evaluate drug response using patient-derived circulating tumor cell (CTC) cultures obtained from liquid biopsy. Custom microfabricated tapered microwells were integrated with microfluidics to allow robust formation of CTC clusters without pre-enrichment and subsequent drug screening in situ. Rapid feedback after 2 weeks promotes immediate intervention upon detection of drug resistance or tolerance. The procedure was clinically validated with blood samples (n = 73) from 55 patients with early-stage, newly diagnosed, locally advanced, or refractory metastatic breast cancer. Twenty-four of these samples were used for drug evaluation. Cluster formation potential correlated inversely with increased drug concentration and therapeutic treatment. This new and robust liquid biopsy technique can potentially evaluate patient prognosis with CTC clusters during treatment and provide a noninvasive and inexpensive assessment that can guide drug discovery development or therapeutic choices for personalized treatment.

  18. Endostar, a novel recombinant human endostatin, exerts antiangiogenic effect via blocking VEGF-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of KDR/Flk-1 of endothelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endostar, a novel recombinant human endostatin expressed and purified in Escherichia coli with an additional nine-amino acid sequence and forming another his-tag structure, was approved by the SFDA in 2005 for the treatment of non-small-cell lung cancer. But its mechanism of action has not been illustrated before. In this study, we examined the antiangiogenic activities of endostar in vitro and in vivo. The results showed that endostar suppressed the VEGF-stimulated proliferation, migration, and tube formation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) in vitro. Endostar blocked microvessel sprouting from rat aortic rings in vitro. Moreover, it could inhibit the formation of new capillaries from pre-existing vessels in the chicken chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) assay and affect the growth of vessels in tumor. We further found the antiangiogenic effects of endostar were correlated with the VEGF-triggered signaling. Endostar suppressed the VEGF-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of KDR/Flk-1(VEGFR-2) as well as the overall VEGFR-2 expression and the activation of ERK, p38 MAPK, and AKT in HUVECs. Collectively, these data indicated the relationship between endostar and VEGF signal pathways and provided a molecular basis for the antiangiogenic effects of endostar

  19. Onconase responsive genes in human mesothelioma cells: implications for an RNA damaging therapeutic agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onconase represents a new class of RNA-damaging drugs. Mechanistically, Onconase is thought to internalize, where it degrades intracellular RNAs such as tRNA and double-stranded RNA, and thereby suppresses protein synthesis. However, there may be additional or alternative mechanism(s) of action. In this study, microarray analysis was used to compare gene expression profiles in untreated human malignant mesothelioma (MM) cell lines and cells exposed to 5 μg/ml Onconase for 24 h. A total of 155 genes were found to be regulated by Onconase that were common to both epithelial and biphasic MM cell lines. Some of these genes are known to significantly affect apoptosis (IL-24, TNFAIP3), transcription (ATF3, DDIT3, MAFF, HDAC9, SNAPC1) or inflammation and the immune response (IL-6, COX-2). RT-PCR analysis of selected up- or down-regulated genes treated with varying doses and times of Onconase generally confirmed the expression array findings in four MM cell lines. Onconase treatment consistently resulted in up-regulation of IL-24, previously shown to have tumor suppressive activity, as well as ATF3 and IL-6. Induction of ATF3 and the pro-apoptotic factor IL-24 by Onconase was highest in the two most responsive MM cell lines, as defined by DNA fragmentation analysis. In addition to apoptosis, gene ontology analysis indicated that pathways impacted by Onconase include MAPK signaling, cytokine-cytokine-receptor interactions, and Jak-STAT signaling. These results provide a broad picture of gene activity after treatment with a drug that targets small non-coding RNAs and contribute to our overall understanding of MM cell response to Onconase as a therapeutic strategy. The findings provide insights regarding mechanisms that may contribute to the efficacy of this novel drug in clinical trials of MM patients who have failed first line chemotherapy or radiation treatment

  20. Onconase responsive genes in human mesothelioma cells: implications for an RNA damaging therapeutic agent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maizel Jacob V

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Onconase represents a new class of RNA-damaging drugs. Mechanistically, Onconase is thought to internalize, where it degrades intracellular RNAs such as tRNA and double-stranded RNA, and thereby suppresses protein synthesis. However, there may be additional or alternative mechanism(s of action. Methods In this study, microarray analysis was used to compare gene expression profiles in untreated human malignant mesothelioma (MM cell lines and cells exposed to 5 μg/ml Onconase for 24 h. A total of 155 genes were found to be regulated by Onconase that were common to both epithelial and biphasic MM cell lines. Some of these genes are known to significantly affect apoptosis (IL-24, TNFAIP3, transcription (ATF3, DDIT3, MAFF, HDAC9, SNAPC1 or inflammation and the immune response (IL-6, COX-2. RT-PCR analysis of selected up- or down-regulated genes treated with varying doses and times of Onconase generally confirmed the expression array findings in four MM cell lines. Results Onconase treatment consistently resulted in up-regulation of IL-24, previously shown to have tumor suppressive activity, as well as ATF3 and IL-6. Induction of ATF3 and the pro-apoptotic factor IL-24 by Onconase was highest in the two most responsive MM cell lines, as defined by DNA fragmentation analysis. In addition to apoptosis, gene ontology analysis indicated that pathways impacted by Onconase include MAPK signaling, cytokine-cytokine-receptor interactions, and Jak-STAT signaling. Conclusions These results provide a broad picture of gene activity after treatment with a drug that targets small non-coding RNAs and contribute to our overall understanding of MM cell response to Onconase as a therapeutic strategy. The findings provide insights regarding mechanisms that may contribute to the efficacy of this novel drug in clinical trials of MM patients who have failed first line chemotherapy or radiation treatment.

  1. Identification of cell surface targets for HIV-1 therapeutics using genetic screens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drugs designed to interfere with obligatory utilization of certain host cell factors by virus are less likely to encounter development of resistant strains than drugs directed against viral components. Several cellular genes required for productive infection by HIV were identified by the use of genetic suppressor element (GSE) technology as potential targets for anti-HIV drug development. Fragmented cDNA libraries from various pools of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were expressed in vitro in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-susceptible cell lines and subjected to genetic screens to identify GSEs that interfered with viral replication. After three rounds of selection, more than 15 000 GSEs were sequenced, and the cognate genes were identified. The GSEs that inhibited the virus were derived from a diverse set of genes including cell surface receptors, cytokines, signaling proteins, transcription factors, as well as genes with unknown function. Approximately 2.5% of the identified genes were previously shown to play a role in the HIV-1 life cycle; this finding supports the biological relevance of the assay. GSEs were derived from the following 12 cell surface proteins: CXCR4, CCR4, CCR7, CD11C, CD44, CD47, CD68, CD69, CD74, CSF3R, GABBR1, and TNFR2. Requirement of some of these genes for viral infection was also investigated by using RNA interference (RNAi) technology; accordingly, 10 genes were implicated in early events of the viral life cycle, before viral DNA synthesis. Thus, these cell surface proteins represent novel targets for the development of therapeutics against HIV-1 infection and AIDS

  2. Multiple Mechanisms of Anti-Cancer Effects Exerted by Astaxanthin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Zhang

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Astaxanthin (ATX is a xanthophyll carotenoid which has been approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration (USFDA as food colorant in animal and fish feed. It is widely found in algae and aquatic animals and has powerful anti-oxidative activity. Previous studies have revealed that ATX, with its anti-oxidative property, is beneficial as a therapeutic agent for various diseases without any side effects or toxicity. In addition, ATX also shows preclinical anti-tumor efficacy both in vivo and in vitro in various cancer models. Several researches have deciphered that ATX exerts its anti-proliferative, anti-apoptosis and anti-invasion influence via different molecules and pathways including signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3, nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ. Hence, ATX shows great promise as chemotherapeutic agents in cancer. Here, we review the rapidly advancing field of ATX in cancer therapy as well as some molecular targets of ATX.

  3. Dioxin exerts anti-estrogenic actions in a novel dioxin-responsive telomerase-immortalized epithelial cell line of the porcine oviduct (TERT-OPEC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hombach-Klonisch, Sabine; Pocar, Paola; Kauffold, Johannes; Klonisch, Thomas

    2006-04-01

    Oviduct epithelial cells are important for the nourishment and survival of ovulated oocytes and early embryos, and they respond to the steroid hormones estrogen and progesterone. Endocrine-disrupting polyhalogenated aromatic hydrocarbons (PHAH) are environmental toxins that act in part through the ligand-activated transcription factor arylhydrocarbon receptor (AhR; dioxin receptor), and exposure to PHAH has been shown to decrease fertility. To investigate effects of PHAHs on the oviduct epithelium as a potential target tissue of dioxin-type endocrine disruptors, we have established a novel telomerase-immortalized oviduct porcine epithelial cell line (TERT-OPEC). TERT-OPEC exhibited active telomerase and the immunoreactive epithelial marker cytokeratin but lacked the stromal marker vimentin. TERT-OPEC contained functional estrogen receptor (ER)-alpha and AhR, as determined by the detection of ER-alpha- and AhR-specific target molecules. Treatment of TERT-OPEC with the AhR ligand 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) resulted in a significant increase in the production of the cytochrome P-450 microsomal enzyme CYP1A1. Activated AhR caused a downregulation of ER nuclear protein fraction and significantly decreased ER-signaling in TERT-OPEC as determined by ERE-luciferase transient transfection assays. In summary, the TCDD-induced and AhR-mediated anti-estrogenic responses by TERT-OPEC suggest that PHAH affect the predominantly estrogen-dependent differentiation of the oviduct epithelium within the fallopian tube. This action then alters the local endocrine milieu, potentially resulting in a largely unexplored cause of impaired embryonic development and female infertility. PMID:16431846

  4. Modulation of host cell signaling pathways as a therapeutic approach in periodontal disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Antonio Chaves de Souza

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Recently, new treatment approaches have been developed to target the host component of periodontal disease. This review aims at providing updated information on host-modulating therapies, focusing on treatment strategies for inhibiting signal transduction pathways involved in inflammation. Pharmacological inhibitors of MAPK, NFκB and JAK/STAT pathways are being developed to manage rheumatoid arthritis, periodontal disease and other inflammatory diseases. Through these agents, inflammatory mediators can be inhibited at cell signaling level, interfering on transcription factors activation and inflammatory gene expression. Although these drugs offer great potential to modulate host response, their main limitations are lack of specificity and developments of side effects. After overcoming these limitations, adjunctive host modulating drugs will provide new therapeutic strategies for periodontal treatment.

  5. Bladder Cancer Stem-Like Cells: Their Origin and Therapeutic Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomokazu Ohishi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Bladder cancer (BC, the most common cancer arising from the human urinary tract, consists of two major clinicopathological phenotypes: muscle-invasive bladder cancer (MIBC and non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC. MIBC frequently metastasizes and is associated with an unfavorable prognosis. A certain proportion of patients with metastatic BC can achieve a remission with systemic chemotherapy; however, the disease relapses in most cases. Evidence suggests that MIBC comprises a small population of cancer stem cells (CSCs, which may be resistant to these treatments and may be able to form new tumors in the bladder or other organs. Therefore, the unambiguous identification of bladder CSCs and the development of targeted therapies are urgently needed. Nevertheless, it remains unclear where bladder CSCs originate and how they are generated. We review recent studies on bladder CSCs, specifically focusing on their proposed origin and the possible therapeutic options based on the CSC theory.

  6. Circulating endothelial progenitor cells in traumatic brain injury: an emerging therapeutic target?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEI Hui-jie; JIANG Rong-cai; LIU Li; ZHANG Jian-ning

    2010-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major cause ofmortality and morbidity in the world. Recent clinical investigations and basic researches suggest that strategies to improve angiogenesis following TBI may provide promising opportunities to improve clinical outcomes and brain functional recovery. More and more evidences show that circulating endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs), which have been identified in the peripheral blood, may play an important role in the pathologic and physiological angiogenesis in adults. Moreover, impressive data demonstrate that EPCs are mobilized from bone marrow to blood circulation in response to traumatic or inflammatory stimulations.In this review, we discussed the role of EPCs in the repair of brain injury and the possible therapeutic implication for functional recovery of TBl in the future.

  7. The Conceptual Oligometastatic Non-small Cell Lung Cancer and Therapeutic Strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaozheng KANG

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC ranks among the most prevalent malignancies and is the major cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Nearly 20%-50% will accompany by metastatic disease and the most common extrapulmonary sites of distant metastases are the brain, bone, liver and adrenal gland. The oligometastatic state is a biologically mild tumor stage and a intermediate state in which spread may be limited to specific organs and metastases might be present in limited numbers. Oligometastases are thought to arise from micrometastases, which have been dormant for a period of time. Local control may be an crucial component of a curative therapeutic strategy in the following four clinical schemes: to prohibit metastases; to cure occult metastatic disease; to remedy oligometastases; and to deracinate any residual lesion after systemic therapy. This review aims to outline the concept of the oligometastatic NSCLC and its strategies of treatment.

  8. Mer receptor tyrosine kinase is a therapeutic target in pre–B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linger, Rachel M. A.; Lee-Sherick, Alisa B.; DeRyckere, Deborah; Cohen, Rebecca A.; Jacobsen, Kristen M.; McGranahan, Amy; Brandão, Luis N.; Winges, Amanda; Sawczyn, Kelly K.; Liang, Xiayuan; Keating, Amy K.; Tan, Aik Choon; Earp, H. Shelton

    2013-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is currently treated with an intense regimen of chemotherapy yielding cure rates near 85%. However, alterations to treatment strategies using available drugs are unlikely to provide significant improvement in survival or decrease therapy-associated toxicities. Here, we report ectopic expression of the Mer receptor tyrosine kinase in pre–B-cell ALL (B-ALL) cell lines and pediatric patient samples. Inhibition of Mer in B-ALL cell lines decreased activation of AKT and MAPKs and led to transcriptional changes, including decreased expression of antiapoptotic PRKCB gene and increase in proapoptotic BAX and BBC3 genes. Further, Mer inhibition promoted chemosensitization, decreased colony-forming potential in clonogenic assays, and delayed disease onset in a mouse xenograft model of leukemia. Our results identify Mer as a potential therapeutic target in B-ALL and suggest that inhibitors of Mer may potentiate lymphoblast killing when used in combination with chemotherapy. This strategy could reduce minimal residual disease and/or allow for chemotherapy dose reduction, thereby leading to improved event-free survival and reduced therapy-associated toxicity for patients with B-ALL. Additionally, Mer is aberrantly expressed in numerous other malignancies suggesting that this approach may have broad applications. PMID:23861246

  9. Mer receptor tyrosine kinase is a therapeutic target in pre-B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linger, Rachel M A; Lee-Sherick, Alisa B; DeRyckere, Deborah; Cohen, Rebecca A; Jacobsen, Kristen M; McGranahan, Amy; Brandão, Luis N; Winges, Amanda; Sawczyn, Kelly K; Liang, Xiayuan; Keating, Amy K; Tan, Aik Choon; Earp, H Shelton; Graham, Douglas K

    2013-08-29

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is currently treated with an intense regimen of chemotherapy yielding cure rates near 85%. However, alterations to treatment strategies using available drugs are unlikely to provide significant improvement in survival or decrease therapy-associated toxicities. Here, we report ectopic expression of the Mer receptor tyrosine kinase in pre-B-cell ALL (B-ALL) cell lines and pediatric patient samples. Inhibition of Mer in B-ALL cell lines decreased activation of AKT and MAPKs and led to transcriptional changes, including decreased expression of antiapoptotic PRKCB gene and increase in proapoptotic BAX and BBC3 genes. Further, Mer inhibition promoted chemosensitization, decreased colony-forming potential in clonogenic assays, and delayed disease onset in a mouse xenograft model of leukemia. Our results identify Mer as a potential therapeutic target in B-ALL and suggest that inhibitors of Mer may potentiate lymphoblast killing when used in combination with chemotherapy. This strategy could reduce minimal residual disease and/or allow for chemotherapy dose reduction, thereby leading to improved event-free survival and reduced therapy-associated toxicity for patients with B-ALL. Additionally, Mer is aberrantly expressed in numerous other malignancies suggesting that this approach may have broad applications. PMID:23861246

  10. The Role of Colorectal Cancer Stem Cells in Metastatic Disease and Therapeutic Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa H. Wong

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer is the third-leading cause of cancer related mortality in the United States. The intricate molecular mechanisms involved in the regenerative process of the normal intestine and the identity of putative somatic intestinal stem cells have become clear. In parallel with this, experiment evidence has emerged supporting the century old hypothesis that solid tumor initiation, progression, chemoresistance and recurrence is the result of a small population of cancer cells with self-renewal and pluripotency capabilities. These “cancer stem cells” (CSCs present a unique opportunity to better understand the biology of solid tumors in general, as well as targets for future therapeutics. In this review, we will summarize the current understanding of intestinal stem cell biology and translate it to colorectal CSCs to provide a basis for understanding chemoresistance, cancer recurrence and metastasis. A more complete understanding of the biology of colorectal CSCs will translate into the development of better chemotherapeutic and biological agents for the treatment of colorectal cancer.

  11. Vascular dysfunction in diabetes: The endothelial progenitor cells as new therapeutic strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgescu, Adriana

    2011-06-15

    The vascular endothelium is a critical determinant of diabetes-associated vascular complications, and improving endothelial function is an important target for therapy. Diabetes mellitus contributes to endothelial cell injury and dysfunction. Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) play a critical role in maintaining endothelial function and might affect the progression of vascular disease. EPCs are essential to blood vessel formation, can differentiate into mature endothelial cells, and promote the repair of damaged endothelium. In diabetes, the circulating EPC count is low and their functionality is impaired. The mechanisms that underlie this reduced count and impaired functionality are poorly understood. Knowledge of the status of EPCs is critical for assessing the health of the vascular system, and interventions that increase the number of EPCs and restore their angiogenic activity in diabetes may prove to be particularly beneficial. The present review outlines current thinking on EPCs' therapeutic potential in endothelial dysfunction in diabetes, as well as evidence-based perspectives regarding their use for vascular regenerative medicine. PMID:21860692

  12. Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells in the Tumor Microenvironment: Immune Targets for Glioma Therapeutics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marianela Candolfi

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Adenovirus-mediated delivery of the immune-stimulatory cytokine Flt3L and the conditionally cytotoxic thymidine kinase (TK induces tumor regression and long-term survival in preclinical glioma (glioblastoma multiforme [GBM] models. Flt3L induces expansion and recruitment of plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs into the brain. Although pDCs can present antigen and produce powerful inflammatory cytokines, that is, interferon α (IFN-α, their role in tumor immunology remains debated. Thus, we studied the role of pDCs and IFN-α in Ad.TK/GCV+ Ad.Flt3L-mediated anti-GBM therapeutic efficacy. Our data indicate that the combined gene therapy induced recruitment of plasmacytoid DCs (pDCs into the tumor mass; which were capable of in vivo phagocytosis, IFN-α release, and T-cell priming. Thus, we next used either pDCs or an Ad vector encoding IFN-α delivered within the tumor microenvironment. When rats were treated with Ad.TK/GCV in combination with pDCs or Ad-IFN-α, they exhibited 35% and 50% survival, respectively. However, whereas intracranial administration of Ad.TK/GCV + Ad.Flt3L exhibited a high safety profile, Ad-IFN-α led to severe local inflammation, with neurologic and systemic adverse effects. To elucidate whether the efficacy of the immunotherapy was dependent on IFN-α-secreting pDCs, we administered an Ad vector encoding B18R, an IFN-α antagonist, which abrogated the antitumoral effect of Ad.TK/GCV + Ad.Flt3L. Our data suggest that IFN-α release by activated pDCs plays a critical role in the antitumor effect mediated by Ad.TK/GCV + Ad.Flt3L. In summary, taken together, our results demonstrate that pDCs mediate anti-GBM therapeutic efficacy through the production of IFN-α, thus manipulation of pDCs constitutes an attractive new therapeutic target for the treatment of GBM.

  13. Experimental Methodology used by Cell Cultures Laboratory from INRMFB to assess the therapeutic effect of natural factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Munteanu Constantin

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The experimental study design on cell cultures allows the direct biological evaluation at the cellular level, of the therapeutic effect that natural factors can play over the organism.Techniques for obtaining cell cultures requires a complex and laborious task that starts from live tissue sampling, continuous with isolation of cells and their preparation for sowing a culture plate. This preparation involves mechanical and enzymatic action from the researcher on biological material. Derived cell cultures are monitored morphologically by high-performance inverted biological microscope, with video camera for image acquisition. In the final stage, the cells are scraped, and through biochemical and molecular techniques, the therapeutic efficiency hypothesis of the investigated natural factor is verified experimentally. The cell cultures can be crioconservated in special containers with liquid nitrogen.

  14. Ectopic ATP synthase in endothelial cells: a novel cardiovascular therapeutic target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Yi; Zhu, Yi

    2010-01-01

    Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) synthase produces ATP in cells and is found on the inner membrane of mitochondria or the cell plasma membrane (ectopic ATP synthase). Here, we summarize the functions of ectopic ATP synthase in vascular endothelial cells (ECs). Ectopic ATP synthase is involved in adenosine metabolism on the cell surface through its ATP generation or hydrolysis activity. The ATP/ADP generated by the enzyme on the plasma membrane can bind to P2X/P2Y receptors and activate the related signalling pathways to regulate endothelial function. The β-chain of ectopic ATP synthase on the EC surface can recruit inflammatory cells and activate cytotoxic activity to damage ECs and induce vascular inflammation. Angiostatin and other angiogenesis inhibitors can have anti-angiogenic functions by inhibiting ectopic ATP synthase on ECs. Moreover, ectopic ATP synthase on ECs is a receptor for apoA-I, the acceptor of cholesterol efflux, which implies that endothelial ectopic ATP synthase is involved in cholesterol metabolism. Coupling factor 6 (CF6), a part of ectopic ATP synthase, is released from ECs and can inhibit prostacyclin synthesis and promote nitric oxide (NO) degradation to enhance NO bioactivity. Because ATP/ADP generated by ectopic ATP synthase can induce NO production, substances such as CF6 can inhibit NO generation by inhibiting surface ATP/ADP production. Thus, the components of ectopic ATP synthase are associated with regulation of vascular tone. Through these functions, ectopic ATP synthase on ECs is considered a potential and novel therapeutic target for atherosclerosis, hypertension and lipid disorders. PMID:21247400

  15. Fermented Rhus verniciflua Stokes Extract Exerts an Antihepatic Lipogenic Effect in Oleic-Acid-Induced HepG2 Cells via Upregulation of AMP-Activated Protein Kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Myoung-Sun; Kim, Joo-Seok; Cho, Sun-Mi; Lee, Seon Ok; Kim, Sung-Hoon; Lee, Hyo-Jeong

    2015-08-19

    Rhus verniciflua Stokes has been used as a traditional medicine and food supplement in Korea. In the present study, fermented R. verniciflua Stokes extract (FRVE), an allergen-free extract of R. verniciflua Stokes fermented with the yeast Saccharomyces carlsbergensis, was assessed for its lipid-lowering potential in an in vitro non-alcoholic fatty liver disease model. FRVE markedly suppressed lipid accumulation and intracellular triglycerides (TGs) in the presence of oleic acid (OA). Additionally, FRVE decreased both mRNA and protein levels of lipid-synthesis- and cholesterol-metabolism-related factors, such as sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1 (SREBP-1), fatty acid synthase (FAS), glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase (GPAT), and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGCR), in OA-induced HepG2 cells. Moreover, FRVE activated low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR), AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), and fatty acid oxidation-related factors peroxisome proliferator activated receptor α (PPARα) and carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1 (CPT-1). Further, the AMPK inhibitor compound C suppressed the increased expression of AMPK phosphorylation induced by FRVE. Phenolics and cosanols in FRVE increased the phosphorylation of AMPK and decreased that of SREBP-1. Taken together, our findings suggest that FRVE has antilipogenic potential in non-alcoholic fatty livers via AMPK upregulation. PMID:26176317

  16. Exertion injuries in female athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orava, S; Hulkko, A; Jormakka, E

    1981-12-01

    Because sports injuries in men form most of the available statistics, the reportage of injuries in female athletes is sparse. We describe exertion injuries and disorders in 281 women athletes, all of which hampered athletic training or performances. Sixty per cent of the injuries occurred to girls ages between 12-19 years, and about forty-eight per cent were track and field athletes. The most common sites of injury were the ankle, foot, heel and leg. Osteochondritic disorders were the most typical injuries in the series, and the chronic medical tibial syndrome was the injury that needed surgical treatment most frequently. Overuse injuries seem to differ very little from each other in the events included in this survey. PMID:6797496

  17. Finding a new therapeutic approach for no-option Parkinsonisms: mesenchymal stromal cells for progressive supranuclear palsy

    OpenAIRE

    Canesi, Margherita; Giordano, Rosaria; Lazzari, Lorenza; Isalberti, Maurizio; Isaias, Ioannis Ugo; Benti, Riccardo; Rampini, Paolo; Marotta, Giorgio; Colombo, Aurora; Cereda, Emanuele; Dipaola, Mariangela; Montemurro, Tiziana; Viganò, Mariele; Budelli, Silvia; Montelatici, Elisa

    2016-01-01

    Background The trophic, anti-apoptotic and regenerative effects of bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) may reduce neuronal cell loss in neurodegenerative disorders. Methods We used MSC as a novel candidate therapeutic tool in a pilot phase-I study for patients affected by progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP), a rare, severe and no-option form of Parkinsonism. Five patients received the cells by infusion into the cerebral arteries. Effects were assessed using the best available motor f...

  18. The Future of Cell Therapy and Tissue Engineering in Cardiovascular Disease: The New Era of Biological Therapeutics

    OpenAIRE

    Heydarkhan-Hagvall, Sepideh; Nsair, Ali; Beygui, Ramin E.; Shemin, Richard J

    2010-01-01

    The use of living cells as a therapeutic option presents several challenges including identification of a suitable source, development of adequate derivation, maintenance and differentiation methods, and very importantly proof of safety and efficacy. One of the major issues for cardiovascular tissue engineering is determining the ideal cell type for use in regenerative therapies.Many clinical trials have used bone marrow derived mononuclear cells (BM-MNC) (Schächinger V 2006). These clinical ...

  19. Experimental Methodology used by Cell Cultures Laboratory from INRMFB to assess the therapeutic effect of natural factors

    OpenAIRE

    Munteanu Constantin; Munteanu Diana

    2010-01-01

    The experimental study design on cell cultures allows the direct biological evaluation at the cellular level, of the therapeutic effect that natural factors can play over the organism.Techniques for obtaining cell cultures requires a complex and laborious task that starts from live tissue sampling, continuous with isolation of cells and their preparation for sowing a culture plate. This preparation involves mechanical and enzymatic action from the researcher on biological material. Derived ce...

  20. Therapeutic Alliance in Telephone-Administered Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant Survivors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Applebaum, Allison J.; DuHamel, Katherine N.; Winkel, Gary; Rini, Christine; Greene, Paul B.; Mosher, Catherine E.; Redd, William H.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: A strong therapeutic alliance has been found to predict psychotherapeutic treatment success across a variety of therapeutic modalities and patient populations. However, only a few studies have examined therapeutic alliance as a predictor of psychotherapy outcome among cancer survivors, and none have examined this relation in…

  1. Multiple myeloma mesenchymal stromal cells: Contribution to myeloma bone disease and therapeutics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Antonio; Garcia-Gomez; Fermin; Sanchez-Guijo; M; Consuelo; del; Caizo; Jesus; F; San; Miguel; Mercedes; Garayoa

    2014-01-01

    Multiple myeloma is a hematological malignancy inwhich clonal plasma cells proliferate and accumulate within the bone marrow. The presence of osteolytic le-sions due to increased osteoclast(OC) activity and sup-pressed osteoblast(OB) function is characteristic of the disease. The bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells(MSCs) play a critical role in multiple myeloma patho-physiology, greatly promoting the growth, survival, drug resistance and migration of myeloma cells. Here, we specifically discuss on the relative contribution of MSCs to the pathophysiology of osteolytic lesions in light of the current knowledge of the biology of my-eloma bone disease(MBD), together with the reported genomic, functional and gene expression differences between MSCs derived from myeloma patients(pMSCs) and their healthy counterparts(dMSCs). Being MSCs the progenitors of OBs, pMSCs primarily contribute to the pathogenesis of MBD because of their reduced osteogenic potential consequence of multiple OB inhibi-tory factors and direct interactions with myeloma cells in the bone marrow. Importantly, pMSCs also readily contribute to MBD by promoting OC formation and ac-tivity at various levels(i.e., increasing RANKL to OPG expression, augmenting secretion of activin A, uncou-pling ephrinB2-EphB4 signaling, and through augment-ed production of Wnt5a), thus further contributing to OB/OC uncoupling in osteolytic lesions. In this review, we also look over main signaling pathways involved in the osteogenic differentiation of MSCs and/or OB activity, highlighting amenable therapeutic targets; in parallel, the reported activity of bone-anabolic agents(at preclinical or clinical stage) targeting those signaling pathways is commented.

  2. Mesenchymal stem cells and cutaneous wound healing: novel methods to increase cell delivery and therapeutic efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dylan E; Ayoub, Nagi; Agrawal, Devendra K

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) (also known as multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells) possess the capacity for self-renewal and multi-lineage differentiation, and their ability to enhance cutaneous wound healing has been well characterized. Acting via paracrine interactions, MSCs accelerate wound closure, increase angiogenesis, promote resolution of wound inflammation, favorably regulate extracellular matrix remodeling, and encourage regeneration of skin with normal architecture and function. A number of studies have employed novel methods to amplify the delivery and efficacy of MSCs. Non-traditional sources of MSCs, including Wharton's jelly and medical waste material, have shown efficacy comparable to that of traditional sources, such as bone marrow and adipose tissue. The potential of alternative methods to both introduce MSCs into wounds and increase migration of MSCs into wound areas has also been demonstrated. Taking advantage of the associations between MSCs with M2 macrophages and microRNA, methods to enhance the immunomodulatory capacity of MSCs have shown success. New measures to enhance angiogenic capabilities have also exhibited effectiveness, often demonstrated by increased levels of proangiogenic vascular endothelial growth factor. Finally, hypoxia has been shown to have strong wound-healing potential in terms of increasing MSC efficacy. We have critically reviewed the results of the novel studies that show promise for the continued development of MSC-based wound-healing therapies and provide direction for continued research in this field. PMID:26960535

  3. Giant cell tumor of bone: current review of morphological, clinical, radiological, and therapeutic characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgi P. Georgiev

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Giant cell tumor of bone accounts for about 5% of all primary bone tumors in adults and is still one of the most obscure and intensively examined tumors of bone. This largely results from the lack of uniform clinical, radiographic, histological or morphological aspects that allow prediction of recurrence. Classified by the World Health Organization as “an aggressive, potentially malignant lesion”, the giant cell tumor of bone could give lung metastases, could undergo malignant degeneration or could have multicentric localization. It usually develops in long bones but can also occur in unusual locations. The common presenting symptom is increasing pain at the tumor site. Standard treatment ranges from curettage to wide resection, with reports of varying oncological and functional results. The recurrence rate is high during the first 2-3 years after surgery regardless of pre-operative tumor stage. Herein, we discuss the morphological, clinical, radiological, and therapeutic characteristics of this pathologic entity as well as its differential diagnosis. J Clin Exp Invest 2014; 5 (3: 475-485

  4. Regulation of immune responses to protein therapeutics by transplacental induction of T cell tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Nimesh; Culina, Slobodan; Meslier, Yann; Dimitrov, Jordan; Arnoult, Christophe; Delignat, Sandrine; Gangadharan, Bagirath; Lecerf, Maxime; Justesen, Sune; Gouilleux-Gruart, Valérie; Salomon, Benoit L; Scott, David W; Kaveri, Srinivas V; Mallone, Roberto; Lacroix-Desmazes, Sébastien

    2015-02-18

    Central tolerance plays a key role in modulating immune responses to self and exogenous antigens. The absence of self-antigen expression, as in patients with genetic deficiencies, prevents the development of antigen-specific immune tolerance. Hence, a substantial number of patients develop neutralizing antibodies to the corresponding protein therapeutics after replacement treatment. In this context, the administration of missing antigens during fetal development, a key period for self-tolerance establishment, should confer early and long-lasting antigen-specific tolerance. To this end, we exploited the physiological pathway of the neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn) through which maternal immunoglobulins are transplacentally transferred to fetuses. We demonstrate that Fc-fused antigens administered to pregnant mice reach fetal lymphoid organs in an FcRn-dependent manner, accumulate in antigen-presenting cells of myeloid origin, and promote the generation of both thymic and peripheral antigen-specific regulatory T cells. This strategy was successfully pursued in a mouse model of hemophilia A, where maternofetal transfer of the Fc-fused immunodominant domains of coagulation factor VIII conferred antigen-specific tolerance. Transplacental tolerance induction with Fc-fused proteins may thus prove valuable to prevent alloimmunization after replacement protein therapy for congenital deficiencies. PMID:25696000

  5. Can the two mechanisms of tumor cell killing by radiation be exploited for therapeutic gain?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radiation killing of tumor cells by ionizing radiation is best described by the linear-quadratic (LQ) model. Research into the underlying mechanisms of α- and β-inactivation has suggested that different molecular targets (DNA in different forms) and different microdosimetric energy deposits (spurs versus electron track-ends) are involved. Clinical protocols with fractionated doses of about 2.0 Gy/day were defined empirically, and we now know that they produce cancer cures mainly by the α-inactivation mechanism. Radiobiology studies indicate that α and β mechanisms exhibit widely different characteristics that should be addressed upfront as clinical fractionation schemes are altered. As radiation treatments attempt to exploit the advantages of larger dose fractions over shorter treatment times, the LQ model can be used to predict iso-effective tumor cell killing and possibly iso-effective normal tissue complications. Linking best estimates of radiobiology and tumor biology parameters with tumor control probability (TCP) and normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) models will enable us to improve and optimize cancer treatment protocols, delivering no more fractions than are strictly necessary for a high therapeutic ratio. (author)

  6. Dendritic cell-based vaccination in cancer: therapeutic implications emerging from murine models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soledad eMac Keon

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells (DCs play a pivotal role in the orchestration of immune responses, and are thus key targets in cancer vaccine design. Since the 2010 FDA approval of the first cancer DC-based vaccine (Sipuleucel T there has been a surge of interest in exploiting these cells as a therapeutic option for the treatment of tumors of diverse origin. In spite of the encouraging results obtained in the clinic, many elements of DC-based vaccination strategies need to be optimized. In this context, the use of experimental cancer models can help direct efforts towards an effective vaccine design. This paper reviews recent findings in murine models regarding the antitumoral mechanisms of DC-based vaccination, covering issues related to antigen sources, the use of adjuvants and maturing agents, and the role of DC subsets and their interaction in the initiation of antitumoral immune responses. The summary of such diverse aspects will highlight advantages and drawbacks in the use of murine models, and contribute to the design of successful DC-based translational approaches for cancer treatment.

  7. Usefulness of Photodynamic Therapy as a Possible Therapeutic Alternative in the Treatment of Basal Cell Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Savoia

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Basal cell carcinoma (BCC is the most common cancer in individuals with fair skin type (I–II and steadily increasing in incidence (70% of skin malignancy. It is locally invasive but metastasis is usually very rare, with an estimated incidence of 0.0028%–0.55%. Conventional therapy is surgery, especially for the H region of the face and infiltrative lesions; in case of inoperable tumors, radiotherapy is a valid option. Recently, topical photodynamic therapy (PDT has become an effective treatment in the management of superficial and small nodular BCC. PDT is a minimally invasive procedure that involves the administration of a photo-sensibilizing agent followed by irradiation at a pre-defined wavelength; this determines the creation of reactive oxygen species that specifically destroy target cells. The only major side effect is pain, reported by some patients during the irradiation. The high cure rate and excellent cosmetic outcome requires considering this possibility for the management of patients with both sporadic and hereditary BCC. In this article, an extensive review of the recent literature was made, in order to clarify the role of PDT as a possible alternative therapeutic option in the treatment of BCC.

  8. The Design of Networked Exertion Games

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Vetere

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Incorporating physical activity and exertion into pervasive gaming applications can provide health and social benefits. Prior research has resulted in several prototypes of pervasive games that encourage exertion as interaction form; however, no detailed critical account of the various approaches exists. We focus on networked exertion games and detail some of our work while identifying the remaining issues towards providing a coherent framework. We outline common lessons learned and use them as the basis for generalizations for the design of networked exertion games. We propose possible directions of further investigation, hoping to provide guidance for future work to facilitate greater awareness and exposure of exertion games and their benefits.

  9. Industrial Production of Therapeutic Proteins: Cell Lines, Cell Culture, and Purification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Marie M.; Mollet, Michael; Hubert, Rene S.

    The biotechnology and pharmaceutical industries have seen a recent surge in the development of biological drug products manufactured from engineered mammalian cell lines. Since the hugely successful launch of human tissue plasminogen activator in 1987 and erythropoietin in 1988, the biopharmaceutical market has grown immensely. Global sales in 2003 exceeded US 30 billion.1 Currently, a total of 108 biotherapeutics are approved and available to patients (Table 32.1). In addition, 324 medically related, biotechnology-derived medicines for nearly 150 diseases are in clinical trials or under review by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.2 These biopharmaceutical candidates promise to bring more and better treatments to patients. Compared to small molecule drugs, biotherapeutics show exquisite specificity with fewer off-target interactions and improved safety profiles.

  10. Iron labeling and pre-clinical MRI visualization of therapeutic human neural stem cells in a murine glioma model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mya S Thu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Treatment strategies for the highly invasive brain tumor, glioblastoma multiforme, require that cells which have invaded into the surrounding brain be specifically targeted. The inherent tumor-tropism of neural stem cells (NSCs to primary and invasive tumor foci can be exploited to deliver therapeutics to invasive brain tumor cells in humans. Use of the strategy of converting prodrug to drug via therapeutic transgenes delivered by immortalized therapeutic NSC lines have shown efficacy in animal models. Thus therapeutic NSCs are being proposed for use in human brain tumor clinical trials. In the context of NSC-based therapies, MRI can be used both to non-invasively follow dynamic spatio-temporal patterns of the NSC tumor targeting allowing for the optimization of treatment strategies and to assess efficacy of the therapy. Iron-labeling of cells allows their presence to be visualized and tracked by MRI. Thus we aimed to iron-label therapeutic NSCs without affecting their cellular physiology using a method likely to gain United States Federal Drug Administration (FDA approval. METHODOLOGY: For human use, the characteristics of therapeutic Neural Stem Cells must be clearly defined with any pertubation to the cell including iron labeling requiring reanalysis of cellular physiology. Here, we studied the effect of iron-loading of the therapeutic NSCs, with ferumoxide-protamine sulfate complex (FE-Pro on viability, proliferation, migratory properties and transgene expression, when compared to non-labeled cells. FE-Pro labeled NSCs were imaged by MRI at tumor sites, after intracranial administration into the hemisphere contralateral to the tumor, in an orthotopic human glioma xenograft mouse model. CONCLUSION: FE-Pro labeled NSCs retain their proliferative status, tumor tropism, and maintain stem cell character, while allowing in vivo cellular MRI tracking at 7 Tesla, to monitor their real-time migration and distribution at brain tumor sites

  11. Nanomedicine: nanoparticles, molecular biosensors, and targeted gene/drug delivery for combined single-cell diagnostics and therapeutics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prow, Tarl W.; Salazar, Jose H.; Rose, William A.; Smith, Jacob N.; Reece, Lisa; Fontenot, Andrea A.; Wang, Nan A.; Lloyd, R. Stephen; Leary, James F.

    2004-07-01

    Next generation nanomedicine technologies are being developed to provide for continuous and linked molecular diagnostics and therapeutics. Research is being performed to develop "sentinel nanoparticles" which will seek out diseased (e.g. cancerous) cells, enter those living cells, and either perform repairs or induce those cells to die through apoptosis. These nanoparticles are envisioned as multifunctional "smart drug delivery systems". The nanosystems are being developed as multilayered nanoparticles (nanocrystals, nanocapsules) containing cell targeting molecules, intracellular re-targeting molecules, molecular biosensor molecules, and drugs/enzymes/gene therapy. These "nanomedicine systems" are being constructed to be autonomous, much like present-day vaccines, but will have sophisticated targeting, sensing, and feedback control systems-much more sophisticated than conventional antibody-based therapies. The fundamental concept of nanomedicine is to not to just kill all aberrant cells by surgery, radiation therapy, or chemotherapy. Rather it is to fix cells, when appropriate, one cell-at-a-time, to preserve and re-build organ systems. When cells should not be fixed, such as in cases where an improperly repaired cell might give rise to cancer cells, the nanomedical therapy would be to induce apoptosis in those cells to eliminate them without the damagin bystander effects of the inflammatory immune response system reacting to necrotic cells or those which have died from trauma or injury. The ultimate aim of nanomedicine is to combine diagnostics and therapeutics into "real-time medicine", using where possible in-vivo cytometry techniques for diagnostics and therapeutics. A number of individual components of these multi-component nanoparticles are already working in in-vitro and ex-vivo cell and tissue systems. Work has begun on construction of integrated nanomedical systems.

  12. Systemic Administration of Interleukin 2 Enhances the Therapeutic Efficacy of Dendritic Cell-Based Tumor Vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, K.; Fields, R. C.; Giedlin, M.; Mule, J. J.

    1999-03-01

    We have reported previously that murine bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (DC) pulsed with whole tumor lysates can mediate potent antitumor immune responses both in vitro and in vivo. Because successful therapy was dependent on host immune T cells, we have now evaluated whether the systemic administration of the T cell stimulatory/growth promoting cytokine interleukin-2 (IL-2) could enhance tumor lysate-pulsed DC-based immunizations to further promote protective immunity toward, and therapeutic rejection of, syngeneic murine tumors. In three separate approaches using a weakly immunogenic sarcoma (MCA-207), the systemic administration of non-toxic doses of recombinant IL-2 (20,000 and 40,000 IU/dose) was capable of mediating significant increases in the potency of DC-based immunizations. IL-2 could augment the efficacy of tumor lysate-pulsed DC to induce protective immunity to lethal tumor challenge as well as enhance splenic cytotoxic T lymphocyte activity and interferon-γ production in these treated mice. Moreover, treatment with the combination of tumor lysate-pulsed DC and IL-2 could also mediate regressions of established pulmonary 3-day micrometastases and 7-day macrometastases as well as established 14- and 28-day s.c. tumors, leading to either significant cure rates or prolongation in overall survival. Collectively, these findings show that nontoxic doses of recombinant IL-2 can potentiate the antitumor effects of tumor lysate-pulsed DC in vivo and provide preclinical rationale for the use of IL-2 in DC-based vaccine strategies in patients with advanced cancer.

  13. Possible Prognostic and Therapeutic Significance of c-Kit Expression, Mast Cell Count and Microvessel Density in Renal Cell Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilaria Marech

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Renal cell carcinoma (RCC is the most frequent renal tumor and its incidence is increasing worldwide. Tumor angiogenesis is known to play a crucial role in the etiopathogenesis of RCC and over the last few years an even deeper knowledge of its contribution in metastatic RCC development has led to the development of numerous molecular targeting agents (such as sunitinib, sorafenib, pazopanib, axitinib, tivozanib, and dovitinib. The above agents are principally directed against vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR members and also against c-Kit receptor (c-KitR. The role of c-kitR inhibition on clear cell RCC (ccRCC, the main RCC subtype, is less well established. Whether c-kitR activation through its ligand, stem cell factor (SCF contributes significantly to the effects of tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs treatment remains to be established. It is important to underscore that the c-KitR is expressed on mast cells (MCs and cancer cells. After an examination of the c-KitR/SCF pathway, we review here the principal studies that have evaluated c-Kit expression in RCC. Moreover, we summarize some investigations that have observed the distribution of MCs in primary renal cancer and in adjacent normal tissue with appropriate histological immunohistochemical techniques. We also focus on few studies that have evaluated the correlation between RCC proliferation, MC count and microvessel density (MVD, as hallmarks of tumor angiogenesis. Thus, the aim of this review of the literature is to clarify if c-KitR expression, MC count and MVD could have prognostic significance and the possible predictive therapeutic implications in RCC.

  14. Inactivation of encapsulated cells and their therapeutic effects by means of TGL triple-fusion reporter/biosafety gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Edorta; Larzabal, Leyre; Calvo, Alfonso; Orive, Gorka; Pedraz, José Luis; Hernández, Rosa Ma

    2013-01-01

    The immobilization of cells within alginate-poly-l-lysine-alginate (APA) microcapsules has been demonstrated to be an effective technology design for long term delivery of therapeutic products. Despite promising advances, biosafety aspects still remain to be improved. Here, we describe a complete characterization of the strategy based on TGL triple-fusion reporter gene--which codifies for Herpes Simplex virus type 1 thymidine-kinase (HSV1-TK), green fluorescent protein (GFP) and Firefly Luciferase--(SFG(NES)TGL) to inactivate encapsulated cells and their therapeutic effects. Myoblasts genetically engineered to secrete erythropoietin (EPO) were retroviraly transduced with the SFG(NES)TGL plasmid to further characterize their ganciclovir (GCV)-mediated inactivation process. GCV sensitivity of encapsulated cells was 100-fold lower when compared to cells plated onto 2D surfaces. However, the number of cells per capsule and EPO secretion decayed to less than 15% at the same time that proliferation was arrested after 14 days of GCV treatment in vitro. In vivo, ten days of GCV treatment was enough to restore the increased hematocrit levels of mice implanted with encapsulated TGL-expressing and EPO-secreting cells. Altogether, these results show that TGL triple-fusion reporter gene may be a good starting point in the search of a suitable biosafety strategy to inactivate encapsulated cells and control their therapeutic effects. PMID:23174140

  15. Down-regulation of 14-3-3β exerts anti-cancer effects through inducing ER stress in human glioma U87 cells: Involvement of CHOP–Wnt pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, Lei; Lei, Hui; Chang, Ming-Ze; Liu, Zhi-Qin [Department of Neurological Disease, Xi' an Central Hospital, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an, Shaanxi 710000 (China); Bie, Xiao-Hua, E-mail: biexiaohua_xjtu@126.com [Department of Functional Neurosurgery, Xi' an Red Cross Hospital, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an, Shaanxi 710054 (China)

    2015-07-10

    We previously identified 14-3-3β as a tumor-specific isoform of 14-3-3 protein in astrocytoma, but its functional role in glioma cells and underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. In the present study, we investigated the effects of 14-3-3β inhibition in human glioma U87 cells using specific targeted small interfering RNA (siRNA). The results showed that 14-3-3β is highly expressed in U87 cells but not in normal astrocyte SVGp12 cells. Knockdown of 14-3-3β by Si-14-3-3β transfection significantly decreased the cell viability but increased the LDH release in a time-dependent fashion in U87 cells, and these effects were accompanied with G0/G1 cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. In addition, 14-3-3β knockdown induced ER stress in U87 cells, as evidenced by ER calcium release, increased expression of XBP1S mRNA and induction of ER related pro-apoptotic factors. Down-regulation of 14-3-3β significantly decreased the nuclear localization of β-catenin and inhibited Topflash activity, which was shown to be reversely correlated with CHOP. Furthermore, Si-CHOP and sFRP were used to inhibit CHOP and Wnt, respectively. The results showed that the anti-cancer effects of 14-3-3β knockdown in U87 cells were mediated by increased expression of CHOP and followed inhibition of Wnt/β-catenin pathway. In summary, the remarkable efficiency of 14-3-3β knockdown to induce apoptotic cell death in U87 cells may find therapeutic application for the treatment of glioma patients. - Highlights: • Knockdown of 14-3-3β leads to cytotoxicity in human glioma U87 cells. • Knockdown of 14-3-3β induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in U87 cells. • Knockdown of 14-3-3β results in ER stress in U87 cells. • Knockdown of 14-3-3β inhibits Wnt/β-catenin pathway via CHOP activation.

  16. Down-regulation of 14-3-3β exerts anti-cancer effects through inducing ER stress in human glioma U87 cells: Involvement of CHOP–Wnt pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We previously identified 14-3-3β as a tumor-specific isoform of 14-3-3 protein in astrocytoma, but its functional role in glioma cells and underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. In the present study, we investigated the effects of 14-3-3β inhibition in human glioma U87 cells using specific targeted small interfering RNA (siRNA). The results showed that 14-3-3β is highly expressed in U87 cells but not in normal astrocyte SVGp12 cells. Knockdown of 14-3-3β by Si-14-3-3β transfection significantly decreased the cell viability but increased the LDH release in a time-dependent fashion in U87 cells, and these effects were accompanied with G0/G1 cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. In addition, 14-3-3β knockdown induced ER stress in U87 cells, as evidenced by ER calcium release, increased expression of XBP1S mRNA and induction of ER related pro-apoptotic factors. Down-regulation of 14-3-3β significantly decreased the nuclear localization of β-catenin and inhibited Topflash activity, which was shown to be reversely correlated with CHOP. Furthermore, Si-CHOP and sFRP were used to inhibit CHOP and Wnt, respectively. The results showed that the anti-cancer effects of 14-3-3β knockdown in U87 cells were mediated by increased expression of CHOP and followed inhibition of Wnt/β-catenin pathway. In summary, the remarkable efficiency of 14-3-3β knockdown to induce apoptotic cell death in U87 cells may find therapeutic application for the treatment of glioma patients. - Highlights: • Knockdown of 14-3-3β leads to cytotoxicity in human glioma U87 cells. • Knockdown of 14-3-3β induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in U87 cells. • Knockdown of 14-3-3β results in ER stress in U87 cells. • Knockdown of 14-3-3β inhibits Wnt/β-catenin pathway via CHOP activation

  17. Melanoma cell surface-expressed phosphatidylserine as a therapeutic target for cationic anticancer peptide, temporin-1CEa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Che; Chen, Yin-Wang; Zhang, Liang; Gong, Xian-Ge; Zhou, Yang; Shang, De-Jing

    2016-07-01

    We have previously reported that temporin-1CEa, a cationic antimicrobial peptide, exerts preferential cytotoxicity toward cancer cells. However, the exact molecular mechanism for this cancer-selectivity is still largely unknown. Here, we found that the negatively charged phosphatidylserine (PS) expressed on cancer cell surface serves as a target for temporin-1CEa. Our results indicate that human A375 melanoma cells express 50-fold more PS than non-cancerous HaCaT cells. The expression of cell surface PS in various cancer cell lines closely correlated with their ability to be recognized, bound and killed by temporin-1CEa. Additionally, the cytotoxicity of temporin-1CEa against A375 cells can be ameliorated by annexin V, which binds to cell surface PS with high affinity. Moreover, the data of isothermal titration calorimetry assay further confirmed a direct binding of temporin-1CEa to PS, at a ratio of 1:5 (temporin-1CEa:PS). Interestingly, the circular dichroism spectra analysis using artificial biomembrane revealed that PS not only provides electrostatic attractive sites for temporin-1CEa but also confers the membrane-bound temporin-1CEa to form α-helical structure, therefore, enhances the affinity and membrane disrupting ability of temporin-1CEa. In summary, these findings suggested that the melanoma cells expressed PS may serve as a promising target for temporin-1CEa or other cationic anticancer peptides. PMID:26596643

  18. Examination of thromboxane synthase as a prognostic factor and therapeutic target in non-small cell lung cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cathcart, Mary-Clare

    2011-03-01

    Thromboxane synthase (TXS) metabolises prostaglandin H2 into thromboxanes, which are biologically active on cancer cells. TXS over-expression has been reported in a range of cancers, and associated with a poor prognosis. TXS inhibition induces cell death in-vitro, providing a rationale for therapeutic intervention. We aimed to determine the expression profile of TXS in NSCLC and if it is prognostic and\\/or a survival factor in the disease.

  19. Programmed Death-1 Antibody Blocks Therapeutic Effects of T-Regulatory Cells in Cockroach Antigen-Induced Allergic Asthma

    OpenAIRE

    McGee, Halvor S; Yagita, Hideo; Shao, Zhifei; Devendra K Agrawal

    2009-01-01

    We recently reported that the adoptive transfer of T-regulatory cells (Tregs) isolated from lung and spleen tissue of green fluorescent protein–transgenic mice reversed airway hyperresponsiveness and airway inflammation. Because Programmed Death-1 (PD-1) is a pivotal receptor regulating effector T-cell activation by Tregs, we evaluated whether PD-1 is involved in the therapeutic effect of naturally occurring Tregs (NTregs) and inducible Tregs (iTregs) in cockroach (CRA)-sensitized and challen...

  20. Mechanisms and Therapeutic Implications of Cell Death Induction by Indole Compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmad, Aamir; Sakr, Wael A.; Rahman, KM Wahidur, E-mail: kmrahman@med.wayne.edu [Department of Pathology, Karmanos Cancer Institute, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, MI 48201 (United States)

    2011-07-19

    Indole compounds, obtained from cruciferous vegetables, are well-known for their anti-cancer properties. In particular, indole-3-carbinol (I3C) and its dimeric product, 3,3′-diindolylmethane (DIM), have been widely investigated for their effectiveness against a number of human cancers in vitro as well as in vivo. These compounds are effective inducers of apoptosis and the accumulating evidence documenting their ability to modulate multiple cellular signaling pathways is a testimony to their pleiotropic behavior. Here we attempt to update current understanding on the various mechanisms that are responsible for the apoptosis-inducing effects by these compounds. The significance of apoptosis-induction as a desirable attribute of anti-cancer agents such as indole compounds cannot be overstated. However, an equally intriguing property of these compounds is their ability to sensitize cancer cells to standard chemotherapeutic agents. Such chemosensitizing effects of indole compounds can potentially have major clinical implications because these non-toxic compounds can reduce the toxicity and drug-resistance associated with available chemotherapies. Combinational therapy is increasingly being realized to be better than single agent therapy and, through this review article, we aim to provide a rationale behind combination of natural compounds such as indoles with conventional therapeutics.

  1. Mechanisms and Therapeutic Implications of Cell Death Induction by Indole Compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KM Wahidur Rahman

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Indole compounds, obtained from cruciferous vegetables, are well-known for their anti-cancer properties. In particular, indole-3-carbinol (I3C and its dimeric product, 3,3´-diindolylmethane (DIM, have been widely investigated for their effectiveness against a number of human cancers in vitro as well as in vivo. These compounds are effective inducers of apoptosis and the accumulating evidence documenting their ability to modulate multiple cellular signaling pathways is a testimony to their pleiotropic behavior. Here we attempt to update current understanding on the various mechanisms that are responsible for the apoptosis-inducing effects by these compounds. The significance of apoptosis-induction as a desirable attribute of anti-cancer agents such as indole compounds cannot be overstated. However, an equally intriguing property of these compounds is their ability to sensitize cancer cells to standard chemotherapeutic agents. Such chemosensitizing effects of indole compounds can potentially have major clinical implications because these non-toxic compounds can reduce the toxicity and drug-resistance associated with available chemotherapies. Combinational therapy is increasingly being realized to be better than single agent therapy and, through this review article, we aim to provide a rationale behind combination of natural compounds such as indoles with conventional therapeutics.

  2. MRI and proton-NMR relaxation times in diagnosis and therapeutic monitoring of squamous cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The potential application of MRI and proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxation times to predict tumor growth and tumor response to therapy is investigated in 91 patients with various head and neck tumors. Of the 91 patients 38 underwent surgery and 53 underwent combined modality treatment (radiochemotherapy; RCT). The MRI morphology parameters and proton-NMR relaxation times before, during, and after therapy were evaluated. The spin-lattice T1 relaxation time of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) primary tumors is 815 ± 128 ms. Following the first RCT course 21 patients showed a complete tumor remission; 32 patients showed a significant reduction in T1 relaxation time in the primary SCC tumor region (712 ± 117 ms); 19 showed residual tumors and 13 showed reactive inflammation in biopsy. The histological verification shows a spin-lattice T1 relaxation time of 549 ± 181 ms for hyperplastic lymph nodes, 924 ± 116 ms for malignant SCC lymph nodes, and 854 ± 23 ms for inflammation. The sensitivity of the spin-lattice relaxation time is 82%, and the specificity is 93%. The negative predictive value is 85% and the positive predictive value is 93%. The T1 relaxation time of hypothetical malignant lymph nodes changes during combined modality treatment. We conclude that the spin-lattice relaxation time improves lymph node classification, and the T1 relaxation time is useful as a predictive assay indicating favorable therapeutic changes. (orig.)

  3. Entry of hepatitis C virus into the cell: A therapeutic target

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    José Antonio Del Campo; (A)ngela Rojas; Manuel Romero-Gómez

    2012-01-01

    Several receptors have been identified as implicated on viral entry into the hepatocyte; and,this interaction between the virus and potential receptors could modulate infection,spontaneous viral clearance,persistence of the infection and the widespread of the virus as outbreak.Nevertheless,the playing role of each of them remains controversial.The NiemannPick type C1 like 1 gene (NPC1L1) receptor has been recently implicated on hepatitis C virus (HCV) entry into the cell and ezetimibe,an anti-cholesterol drug seems to block that,emerging the idea to control hepatitis C outbreak modulating lipid-related receptors.Hepatitis C infection seems to modulate lipid metabolism according to host genetic background.Indeed,it circulates like a lipoviroparticle.The main aim of this field of vision would be to discuss the role of hepatocyte receptors implicated on virus entry,especially NPC1L1 and the therapeutic options derived from the better knowledge about HCV-lipids-receptors interaction.

  4. Mechanisms and Therapeutic Implications of Cell Death Induction by Indole Compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Indole compounds, obtained from cruciferous vegetables, are well-known for their anti-cancer properties. In particular, indole-3-carbinol (I3C) and its dimeric product, 3,3′-diindolylmethane (DIM), have been widely investigated for their effectiveness against a number of human cancers in vitro as well as in vivo. These compounds are effective inducers of apoptosis and the accumulating evidence documenting their ability to modulate multiple cellular signaling pathways is a testimony to their pleiotropic behavior. Here we attempt to update current understanding on the various mechanisms that are responsible for the apoptosis-inducing effects by these compounds. The significance of apoptosis-induction as a desirable attribute of anti-cancer agents such as indole compounds cannot be overstated. However, an equally intriguing property of these compounds is their ability to sensitize cancer cells to standard chemotherapeutic agents. Such chemosensitizing effects of indole compounds can potentially have major clinical implications because these non-toxic compounds can reduce the toxicity and drug-resistance associated with available chemotherapies. Combinational therapy is increasingly being realized to be better than single agent therapy and, through this review article, we aim to provide a rationale behind combination of natural compounds such as indoles with conventional therapeutics

  5. Therapeutic assessment of mesenchymal stem cells delivered within a PEGylated fibrin gel following an ischemic injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricles, Laura M; Hsieh, Pei-Ling; Dana, Nicholas; Rybalko, Viktoriya; Kraynak, Chelsea; Farrar, Roger P; Suggs, Laura J

    2016-09-01

    The intent of the current study was to investigate the therapeutic contribution of MSCs to vascular regeneration and functional recovery of ischemic tissue. We used a rodent hind limb ischemia model and intramuscularly delivered MSCs within a PEGylated fibrin gel matrix. Within this model, we demonstrated that MSC therapy, when delivered in PEGylated fibrin, results in significantly higher mature blood vessel formation, which allows for greater functional recovery of skeletal muscle tissue as assessed using force production measurements. We observed initial signs of vascular repair at early time points when MSCs were delivered without PEGylated fibrin, but this did not persist or lead to recovery of the tissue in the long-term. Furthermore, animals which were treated with PEGylated fibrin alone exhibited a greater number of mature blood vessels, but they did not arterialize and did not show improvements in force production. These results demonstrate that revascularization of ischemic tissue may be a necessary but not sufficient step to complete functional repair of the injured tissue. This work has implications on stem cell therapies for ischemic diseases and also potentially on how such therapies are evaluated. PMID:27318932

  6. Proteomic analysis of imatinib-resistant CML-T1 cells reveals calcium homeostasis as a potential therapeutic target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toman, O.; Kabickova, T.; Vit, O.; Fiser, R.; Polakova, K. Machova; Zach, J.; Linhartova, J.; Vyoral, D.; Petrak, J.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) therapy has markedly improved patient prognosis after introduction of imatinib mesylate for clinical use. However, a subset of patients develops resistance to imatinib and other tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), mainly due to point mutations in the region encoding the kinase domain of the fused BCR-ABL oncogene. To identify potential therapeutic targets in imatinib-resistant CML cells, we derived imatinib-resistant CML-T1 human cell line clone (CML-T1/IR) by prolonged exposure to imatinib in growth media. Mutational analysis revealed that the Y235H mutation in BCR-ABL is probably the main cause of CML-T1/IR resistance to imatinib. To identify alternative therapeutic targets for selective elimination of imatinib-resistant cells, we compared the proteome profiles of CML-T1 and CML-T1/IR cells using 2-DE-MS. We identified eight differentially expressed proteins, with strongly upregulated Na+/H+ exchanger regulatory factor 1 (NHERF1) in the resistant cells, suggesting that this protein may influence cytosolic pH, Ca2+ concentration or signaling pathways such as Wnt in CML-T1/IR cells. We tested several compounds including drugs in clinical use that interfere with the aforementioned processes and tested their relative toxicity to CML-T1 and CML-T1/IR cells. Calcium channel blockers, calcium signaling antagonists and modulators of calcium homeostasis, namely thapsigargin, ionomycin, verapamil, carboxyamidotriazole and immunosuppressive drugs cyclosporine A and tacrolimus (FK-506) were selectively toxic to CML-T1/IR cells. The putative cellular targets of these compounds in CML-T1/IR cells are postulated in this study. We propose that Ca2+ homeostasis can be a potential therapeutic target in CML cells resistant to TKIs. We demonstrate that a proteomic approach may be used to characterize a TKI-resistant population of CML cells enabling future individualized treatment options for patients. PMID:27430982

  7. The clinical features, therapeutic responses, and prognosis of the patients with mantle cell lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Juan Deng

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Mantle cell lymphoma(MCL, a special type of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, is incurable through conventional treatment. This study aimed to analyze the clinical features, therapeutic responses, and prognosis of patients with MCL. Clinical data of 30 patients with MCL treated in our hospital between April 2006 and July 2011 were analyzed. Eighteen patients were treated with CHOP plus rituximab (R-CHOP regimen, 12 underwent conventional chemotherapy. The median age of the 30 patients was 58 years, 23 were men, all patients had Cyclin D1 overexpression, 29 (96.7% had advanced disease, 11 (36.7% had bone marrow involvement, 9 (30.0% had gastrointestinal involvement, and 15 (50.0% had splenomegaly. The complete response(CR rate and overall response rate(ORR were significantly higher in patients undergoing R-CHOP immunochemotherapy than in those undergoing conventional chemotherapy (38.9% vs. 16.7%, P = 0.187; 72.2% vs. 41.4%, P = 0.098. The difference of 2-year overall survival rate between the two groups was not significant (P = 0.807 due to the short follow-up time. The 2-year progression-free survival (PFS rate was higher in R-CHOP group than in conventional chemotherapy group (53% vs. 25%, P = 0.083, and was higher in patients with a lower mantle cell lymphoma international prognostic index (MIPI (51% for MIPI 0-3, 33% for MIPI 4-5, and 0% for MIPI 6-11, P = 0.059. Most patients with MCL were elderly; in an advanced stage; showed a male predominance; and usually had bone marrow involvement, gastrointestinal involvement, or splenomegaly. R-CHOP regimen could improve the CR rate and ORR of MCL patients. MIPI can be a new prognostic index for predicting the prognosis of advanced MCL.

  8. Therapeutic effect of mesenchymal stem cells transplantation on pulmonary hypertension model rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ke-yan ZHAO

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective  To observe the therapeutic effect of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs transplantation on monocrotaline (MCT-induced pulmonary hypertension in rats. Methods MSCs were isolated from Wistar rats and cultivated by bone marrow adherent culture. The third to fifth passages of MSCs were used for cell transplantation. Forty male Wistar rats were randomly divided into control group, MCT group, MCT/MSCs 5×105 group and MCT/MSCs 1×106 group (10 each. MCT was injected intraperitoneally (60mg/kg, and MSCs were transplanted into rats through external jugular vein. Right ventricular systolic pressure (RVSP of rats was determined, then the animals were sacrificed and the ventricular ratio (i.e. the mass ratio of right to left ventricle plus interventricular septum was calculated. The lung tissue was observed by light microscopy after HE staining, orcein staining and smooth muscle actin immunohistochemical staining. Results Four weeks after MSCs administration, the RVSP and ventricular ratio were 35.6±8.4mmHg and 0.357±0.092 in MCT/MSCs 1×106 group respectively, and significantly lower than those in MCT group (47.2±10.5mmHg and 0.445±0.094, respectively, P0.05. Pathological observation found the intima-media thickness of pulmonary arterioles was 19.2%±3.8% in MCT/MSCs 1×106 group, and significantly thinner than that in MCT group (26.4%±4.9%, P0.05. Conclusion  Intravenous MSCs administration could inhibit the MCT-induced pulmonary hypertension and 1×106 is the optimal number of MSCs for transplantation. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2013.10.010

  9. Cytokines and therapeutic oligonucleotides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, G; Bidlingmaier, M; Eigler, A; Hacker, U; Endres, S

    1997-12-01

    Therapeutic oligonucleotides - short strands of synthetic nucleic acids - encompass antisense and aptamer oligonucleotides. Antisense oligonucleotides are designed to bind to target RNA by complementary base pairing and to inhibit translation of the target protein. Antisense oligonucleotides enable specific inhibition of cytokine synthesis. In contrast, aptamer oligonucleotides are able to bind directly to specific proteins. This binding depends on the sequence of the oligonucleotide. Aptamer oligonucleotides with CpG motifs can exert strong immunostimulatory effects. Both kinds of therapeutic oligonucleotides - antisense and aptamer oligonucleotides - provide promising tools to modulate immunological functions. Recently, therapeutic oligonucleotides have moved towards clinical application. An antisense oligonucleotide directed against the proinflammatory intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) is currently being tested in clinical trials for therapy of inflammatory disease. Immunostimulatory aptamer oligonucleotides are in preclinical development for immunotherapy. In the present review we summarize the application of therapeutic oligonucleotides to modulate immunological functions. We include technological aspects as well as current therapeutic concepts and clinical studies. PMID:9740353

  10. The significance of the host inflammatory response on the therapeutic efficacy of cell therapies utilising human adult stem cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Navarro, Melba, E-mail: mnavarro@ibecbarcelona.eu [UKCTE, The Institute of Ageing and Chronic Disease, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, L69 3GA (United Kingdom); Biomaterials for Regenerative Therapies Group, Institute for Bioengineering of Catalonia (IBEC), Barcelona, 08028 (Spain); Pu, Fanrong; Hunt, John A. [UKCTE, The Institute of Ageing and Chronic Disease, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, L69 3GA (United Kingdom)

    2012-02-15

    Controlling the fate of implanted hMSCs is one of the major drawbacks to be overcome to realize tissue engineering strategies. In particular, the effect of the inflammatory environment on hMSCs behaviour is poorly understood. Studying and mimicking the inflammatory process in vitro is a very complex and challenging task that involves multiple variables. This research addressed the questions using in vitro co-cultures of primary derived hMSCs together with human peripheral blood mononucleated cells (PBMCs); the latter are key agents in the inflammatory process. This work explored the in vitro phenotypic changes of hMSCs in co-culture direct contact with monocytes and lymphocytes isolated from blood using both basal and osteogenic medium. Our findings indicated that hMSCs maintained their undifferentiated phenotype and pluripotency despite the contact with PBMCs. Moreover, hMSCs demonstrated increased proliferation and were able to differentiate specifically down the osteogenic lineage pathway. Providing significant crucial evidence to support the hypothesis that inflammation and host defence mechanisms could be utilised rather than avoided and combated to provide for the successful therapeutic application of stem cell therapies.

  11. The significance of the host inflammatory response on the therapeutic efficacy of cell therapies utilising human adult stem cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Controlling the fate of implanted hMSCs is one of the major drawbacks to be overcome to realize tissue engineering strategies. In particular, the effect of the inflammatory environment on hMSCs behaviour is poorly understood. Studying and mimicking the inflammatory process in vitro is a very complex and challenging task that involves multiple variables. This research addressed the questions using in vitro co-cultures of primary derived hMSCs together with human peripheral blood mononucleated cells (PBMCs); the latter are key agents in the inflammatory process. This work explored the in vitro phenotypic changes of hMSCs in co-culture direct contact with monocytes and lymphocytes isolated from blood using both basal and osteogenic medium. Our findings indicated that hMSCs maintained their undifferentiated phenotype and pluripotency despite the contact with PBMCs. Moreover, hMSCs demonstrated increased proliferation and were able to differentiate specifically down the osteogenic lineage pathway. Providing significant crucial evidence to support the hypothesis that inflammation and host defence mechanisms could be utilised rather than avoided and combated to provide for the successful therapeutic application of stem cell therapies.

  12. Genetic polymorphisms associated with exertional rhabdomyolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deuster, Patricia A; Contreras-Sesvold, Carmen L; O'Connor, Francis G; Campbell, William W; Kenney, Kimbra; Capacchione, John F; Landau, Mark E; Muldoon, Sheila M; Rushing, Elisabeth J; Heled, Yuval

    2013-08-01

    Exertional rhabdomyolysis (ER) occurs in young, otherwise healthy, individuals principally during strenuous exercise, athletic, and military training. Although many risk factors have been offered, it is unclear why some individuals develop ER when participating in comparable levels of physical exertion under identical environmental conditions and others do not. This study investigated possible genetic polymorphisms that might help explain ER. DNA samples derived from a laboratory-based study of persons who had never experienced an episode of ER (controls) and clinical ER cases referred for testing over the past several years were analyzed for single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in candidate genes. These included angiotensin I converting enzyme (ACE), α-actinin-3 (ACTN3), creatine kinase muscle isoform (CKMM), heat shock protein A1B (HSPA1B), interleukin 6 (IL6), myosin light chain kinase (MYLK), adenosine monophosphate deaminase 1 (AMPD1), and sickle cell trait (HbS). Population included 134 controls and 47 ER cases. The majority of ER cases were men (n = 42/47, 89.4 %); the five women with ER were Caucasian. Eighteen African Americans (56.3 %) were ER cases. Three SNPs were associated with ER: CKMM Ncol, ACTN3 R577X, and MYLK C37885A. ER cases were 3.1 times more likely to have the GG genotype of CKMM (odds ratio/OR = 3.1, confidence interval/CI 1.33-7.10), 3.0 times for the XX genotype of ACTN3 SNP (OR = 2.97, CI 1.30-3.37), and 5.7 times for an A allele of MYLK (OR = 21.35, CI 2.60-12.30). All persons with HbS were also ER cases. Three distinct polymorphisms were associated with ER. Further work will be required to replicate these findings and determine the mechanism(s) whereby these variants might confer susceptibility. PMID:23543093

  13. Therapeutic efficacy of topical calcineurin inhibitors in plasma cell balanitis: case series and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyriakou, A; Patsatsi, A; Patsialas, C; Sotiriadis, D

    2014-01-01

    Plasma cell balanitis of Zoon (PCBZ) and plasma cell vulvitis (PCV) are characterized as idiopathic, benign, chronic irritant mucositis. The clinical symptoms and signs usually persist or reappear after treatment withdrawal. Therefore, many therapies have been tried and are available. Recently, several reports of PCBZ and PCV treated with calcineurin inhibitors, tacrolimus and pimecrolimus, have been reported in the literature. We present 9 cases of PCBZ treated with tacrolimus 0.1% ointment (Protopic, Toyama, Japan) that showed good therapeutic results within 4 weeks of treatment, and we review the literature of PCBZ and PCV and their response to these topical immunomodulators. Based on the current literature and on the anecdotal experience, we believe that topical calcineurin inhibitors may serve as a therapeutic option in recalcitrant plasma cell balanitis and vulvitis. PMID:24434685

  14. From hair to cornea: towards the therapeutic use of hair follicle-derived stem cells in the treatment of limbal stem cell deficiency

    OpenAIRE

    Meyer-Blazejewska, Ewa Anna; Call, Mindy K; Yamanaka, Osamu; Liu, Hongshan; Schlötzer-Schrehardt, Ursula; Kruse, Friedrich E; Kao, Winston W.

    2011-01-01

    Limbal stem cell deficiency (LSCD) leads to severe ocular surface abnormalities that can result in the loss of vision. The most successful therapy currently being used is transplantation of limbal epithelial cell sheets cultivated from a limbal biopsy obtained from the patient´s healthy, contralateral eye or cadaveric tissue. In this study, we investigated the therapeutic potential of murine vibrissae hair follicle bulge-derived stem cells (HFSC) as an autologous SC source for ocular surface ...

  15. Control of Granule Cell Dispersion by Natural Materials Such as Eugenol and Naringin: A Potential Therapeutic Strategy Against Temporal Lobe Epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sang Ryong

    2016-08-01

    The hippocampus is an important brain area where abnormal morphological characteristics are often observed in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE), typically showing the loss of the principal neurons in the CA1 and CA3 areas of the hippocampus. TLE is frequently associated with widening of the granule cell layer of the dentate gyrus (DG), termed granule cell dispersion (GCD), in the hippocampus, suggesting that the control of GCD with protection of hippocampal neurons may be useful for preventing and inhibiting epileptic seizures. We previously reported that eugenol (EUG), which is an essential component of medicinal herbs and has anticonvulsant activity, is beneficial for treating epilepsy through its ability to inhibit GCD via suppression of mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) activation in the hippocampal DG in a kainic acid (KA)-treated mouse model of epilepsy in vivo. In addition, we reported that naringin, a bioflavonoid in citrus fruits, could exert beneficial effects, such as antiautophagic stress and antineuroinflammation, in the KA mouse model of epilepsy, even though it was unclear whether naringin might also attenuate the seizure-induced morphological changes of GCD in the DG. Similar to the effects of EUG, we recently observed that naringin treatment significantly reduced KA-induced GCD and mTORC1 activation, which are both involved in epileptic seizures, in the hippocampus of mouse brain. Therefore, these observations suggest that the utilization of natural materials, which have beneficial properties such as inhibition of GCD formation and protection of hippocampal neurons, may be useful in developing a novel therapeutic agent against TLE. PMID:27404051

  16. Safety and function of a new clinical intracerebral microinjection instrument for stem cells and therapeutics examined in the Göttingen minipig

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjarkam, Carsten R; GLUD, AN; Margolin, Lee;

    2010-01-01

    Safety and function of a new clinical intracerebral microinjection instrument for stem cells and therapeutics examined in the Göttingen minipig......Safety and function of a new clinical intracerebral microinjection instrument for stem cells and therapeutics examined in the Göttingen minipig...

  17. Potential therapeutic role of cisplatinum in autologous bone marrow transplantation: in vitro eradication of neuroblastoma cells from bone marrow.

    OpenAIRE

    Bettan-Renaud, L.; De Vathaire, F.; Bénard, J.; Morardet, N.; Pauzie, N.; Bayet, S.; Hartmann, O; Parmentier, C.

    1989-01-01

    Cisplatinum may prove to be a valuable agent for the elimination of diseased cells in the bone marrow of patients with neuroblastoma. In this study, we measured the efficacy of cisplatinum on human neuroblastoma cell lines and on normal human bone marrow progenitors, GM-CFC and CFU-F. Data indicate that the therapeutic index of cisplatinum is high. We set up an experimental model consisting of a mixture of human bone marrow and human neuroblastoma cells in order to confirm these preliminary r...

  18. Generating induced pluripotent stem cell derived endothelial cells and induced endothelial cells for cardiovascular disease modelling and therapeutic angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clayton, Z E; Sadeghipour, S; Patel, S

    2015-10-15

    Standard therapy for atherosclerotic coronary and peripheral arterial disease is insufficient in a significant number of patients because extensive disease often precludes effective revascularization. Stem cell therapy holds promise as a supplementary treatment for these patients, as pre-clinical and clinical research has shown transplanted cells can promote angiogenesis via direct and paracrine mechanisms. Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) are a novel cell type obtained by reprogramming somatic cells using exogenous transcription factor cocktails, which have been introduced to somatic cells via viral or plasmid constructs, modified mRNA or small molecules. IPSCs are now being used in disease modelling and drug testing and are undergoing their first clinical trial, but despite recent advances, the inefficiency of the reprogramming process remains a major limitation, as does the lack of consensus regarding the optimum transcription factor combination and delivery method and the uncertainty surrounding the genetic and epigenetic stability of iPSCs. IPSCs have been successfully differentiated into vascular endothelial cells (iPSC-ECs) and, more recently, induced endothelial cells (iECs) have also been generated by direct differentiation, which bypasses the pluripotent intermediate. IPSC-ECs and iECs demonstrate endothelial functionality in vitro and have been shown to promote neovessel growth and enhance blood flow recovery in animal models of myocardial infarction and peripheral arterial disease. Challenges remain in optimising the efficiency, safety and fidelity of the reprogramming and endothelial differentiation processes and establishing protocols for large-scale production of clinical-grade, patient-derived cells. PMID:26123569

  19. Therapeutic effect of autologous dendritic cell vaccine on patients with chronic hepatitis B: A clinical study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Min Chen; Yong-Guo Li; Da-Zhi Zhang; Zhi-Yi Wang; Wei-Qun Zeng; Xiao-Feng Shi; Yuan Guo; Shu-Hua Guo; Hong Ren

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the therapeutic effect of autologous HBsAg-loaded dendritic cells (DCs) on patients with chronic hepatitis B.METHODS: Monocytes were isolated from fresh peripheral blood of 19 chronic HBV-infected patients by Ficoll-Hypaque density gradient centrifugation and cultured by plastic-adherence methods. DCs were induced and proliferated in the culture medium with recombinant human granulocyte-macrophage-colony- stimulating factor (rhGM-CSF) and human interleukin-4 (rhIL-4). DCs pulsed with HBsAg for twelve hours were injected into patients subcutaneously twice at intervals of two weeks. Two patients received 100 mg oral lamivudine daily for 12 mo at the same time. HBV-DNA and viral markers in sera of patients were tested every two months.RESULTS: By the end of 2003, 11 of 19 (57.9%) patients had a clinical response to DC-treatment. HBeAg of 10(52.6%) patients became negative, and the copies of HBVDNA decreased 101.77±2.39 averagely (t = 3.13, P<0.01).Two cases co-treated with DCs and lamivudine had a complete clinical response. There were no significant differences in the efficient rate between the cases with ALT level lower than 2xULN and those with ALT level higher than 2xULN before treatment (χ2 = 0.0026).CONCLUSION: Autologous DC-vaccine induced in vitro can effectively suppress HBV replication, reduce the virus load in sera, eliminate HBeAg and promote HBeAg/antiHBe transformation. Not only the patients with high serum ALT levels but also those with normal ALT levels can respond to DC vaccine treatment, and the treatment combining DCs with lamivudine can eliminate viruses more effectively.

  20. The clinical features, therapeutic responses, and prognosis of the patients with mantle cell lymphoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi-Tao Ying; Chen Zhang; Jun Zhu; Yu-Qin Song; Wen Zheng; Xiao-Pei Wang; Yan Xie; Mei-Feng Tu; Ning-Jing Lin; Ling-Yan Ping; Wei-Ping Liu; Li-Juan Deng

    2012-01-01

    Mantle cell lymphoma (MCL),a special type of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma,is incurable through conventional treatment.This study aimed to analyze the clinical features,therapeutic responses,and prognosis of patients with MCL.Clinical data of 30 patients with MCL treated in our hospital between April 2006 and July 2011 were analyzed.Eighteen patients were treated with CHOP plus rituximab (R-CHOP)regimen,12 underwent conventional chemotherapy.The median age of the 30 patients was 58 years,23were men,all patients had Cyclin D1 overexpression,29 (96.7%) had advanced disease,11 (36.7%) had bone marrow involvement,9 (30.0%) had gastrointestinal involvement,and 15 (50.0%) had splenomegaly.The complete response (CR) rate and overall response rate (ORR) were significantly higher in patients undergoing R-CHOP immunochemotherapy than in those undergoing conventional chemotherapy (38.9%vs.16.7%,P =0.187; 72.2% vs.41.4%,P =0.098).The difference of 2-year overall survival rate between the two groups was not significant (P =0.807) due to the short follow-up time.The 2-year progression-free survival (PFS) rate was higher in R-CHOP group than in conventional chemotherapy group (53% vs.25%,P =0.083),and was higher in patients with a lower mantle cell lymphoma international prognostic index (MIPI) (51% for MIPI 0-3,33% for MIPI 4-5,and 0% for MIPI 6-11,P =0.059).Most patients with MCL were elderly; in an advanced stage; showed a male predominance; and usually had bone marrow involvement,gastrointestinal involvement,or splenomegaly.R-CHOP regimen could improve the CR rate and ORR of MCL patients.MIPI can be a new prognostic index for predicting the prognosis of advanced MCL.

  1. In vitro study of nucleostemin as a potential therapeutic target in human breast carcinoma SKBR-3 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yu; Liao, Ya-Ping; Zhang, Ding; Xu, Li-Sha; Li, Na; Guan, Wei-Jun; Liu, Chang-Qing

    2014-01-01

    Although nucleolar protein nucleostemin (NS) is essential for cell proliferation and early embryogenesis and expression has been observed in some types of human cancer and stem cells, the molecular mechanisms involved in mediation of cell proliferation and cell cycling remains largely elusive. The aim of the present study was to evaluate NS as a potential target for gene therapy of human breast carcinoma by investigating NS gene expression and its effects on SKBR-3 cell proliferation and apoptosis. NS mRNA and protein were both found to be highly expressed in all detected cancer cell lines. The apoptotic rate of the pcDNA3.1-NS-Silencer group (12.1-15.4 ± 3.8%) was significantly higher than those of pcDNA3.1-NS (7.2-12.0 ± 1.7%) and non-transfection groups (4.1-6.5 ± 1.8%, P0.05). Moreover, RNAi-mediated NS down- regulation induced SKBR-3 cell G1 phase arrest, inhibited cell proliferation, and promoted p53 pathway-mediated cell apoptosis in SKBR-3 cells. NS might thus be an important regulator in the G2/M check point of cell cycle, blocking SKBR-3 cell progression through the G1/S phase. On the whole, these results suggest NS might be a tumor suppressor and important therapeutic target in human cancers. PMID:24716972

  2. Therapeutic effects and associated adverse events of multikinase inhibitors in metastatic renal cell carcinoma: A meta-analysis

    OpenAIRE

    TAN, QINXIANG; WANG, WEIHUA; LONG, YOUHONG; CHEN, GUOZI

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to compare the therapeutic effects and adverse events of the multikinase inhibitors sorafenib, sunitinib, pazopanib and axitinib in advanced renal cell carcinoma (RCC). A meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials was performed to assess the effects of multikinase inhibitors among patients with advanced RCC. The data of median progression-free survival (PFS), median overall survival (OS), progressive disease rate (PDR), objective response rate (ORR) and grade 3/4 adverse e...

  3. βMolecular Pathways: Novel Approaches for Improved Therapeutic Targeting of Hedgehog Signaling in Cancer Stem Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Justilien, Verline; Fields, Alan P.

    2015-01-01

    The Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway is critical for embryonic development. In adult tissues, Hh signaling is relatively quiescent with the exception of roles in tissue maintenance and repair. Aberrant activation of Hh signaling is implicated in multiple aspects of transformation including the maintenance of the cancer stem cell (CSC) phenotype. Pre-clinical studies indicate that CSCs from many tumor types are sensitive to Hh pathway inhibition and that Hh-targeted therapeutics block many aspe...

  4. Ran GTPase-activating protein 1 is a therapeutic target in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kung-Chao Chang

    Full Text Available Lymphoma-specific biomarkers contribute to therapeutic strategies and the study of tumorigenesis. Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL is the most common type of malignant lymphoma. However, only 50% of patients experience long-term survival after current treatment; therefore, developing novel therapeutic strategies is warranted. Comparative proteomic analysis of two DLBCL lines with a B-lymphoblastoid cell line (LCL showed differential expression of Ran GTPase-activating protein 1 (RanGAP1 between them, which was confirmed using immunoblotting. Immunostaining showed that the majority of DLBCLs (92%, 46/50 were RanGAP1(+, while reactive lymphoid hyperplasia (n = 12 was RanGAP1(+ predominantly in germinal centers. RanGAP1 was also highly expressed in other B-cell lymphomas (BCL, n = 180 with brisk mitotic activity (B-lymphoblastic lymphoma/leukemia: 93%, and Burkitt lymphoma: 95% or cell-cycle dysregulation (mantle cell lymphoma: 83%, and Hodgkin's lymphoma 91%. Interestingly, serum RanGAP1 level was higher in patients with high-grade BCL (1.71 ± 2.28 ng/mL, n = 62 than in low-grade BCL (0.75 ± 2.12 ng/mL, n = 52 and healthy controls (0.55 ± 1.58 ng/mL, n = 75 (high-grade BCL vs. low-grade BCL, p = 0.002; high-grade BCL vs. control, p < 0.001, Mann-Whitney U test. In vitro, RNA interference of RanGAP1 showed no effect on LCL but enhanced DLBCL cell death (41% vs. 60%; p = 0.035 and cell-cycle arrest (G0/G1: 39% vs. 49%, G2/M: 19.0% vs. 7.5%; p = 0.030 along with decreased expression of TPX2 and Aurora kinases, the central regulators of mitotic cell division. Furthermore, ON 01910.Na (Estybon, a multikinase inhibitor induced cell death, mitotic cell arrest, and hyperphosphorylation of RanGAP1 in DLBCL cell lines but no effects in normal B and T cells. Therefore, RanGAP1 is a promising marker and therapeutic target for aggressive B-cell lymphoma, especially DLBCL.

  5. Off the shelf cellular therapeutics: Factors to consider during cryopreservation and storage of human cells for clinical use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Erik J; Thirumala, Sreedhar; Badhe-Buchanan, Sandhya S; Clarke, Dominic; Mathew, Aby J

    2016-06-01

    The field of cellular therapeutics has immense potential, affording an exciting array of applications in unmet medical needs. One of several key issues is an emphasis on getting these therapies from bench to bedside without compromising safety and efficacy. The successful commercialization of cellular therapeutics will require many to extend the shelf-life of these therapies beyond shipping "fresh" at ambient or chilled temperatures for "just in time" infusion. Cryopreservation is an attractive option and offers potential advantages, such as storing and retaining patient samples in case of a relapse, banking large quantities of allogeneic cells for broader distribution and use and retaining testing samples for leukocyte antigen typing and matching. However, cryopreservation is only useful if cells can be reanimated to physiological life with negligible loss of viability and functionality. Also critical is the logistics of storing, processing and transporting cells in clinically appropriate packaging systems and storage devices consistent with quality and regulatory standards. Rationalized approaches to develop commercial-scale cell therapies require an efficient cryopreservation system that provides the ability to inventory standardized products with maximized shelf life for later on-demand distribution and use, as well as a method that is scientifically sound and optimized for the cell of interest. The objective of this review is to bridge this gap between the basic science of cryobiology and its application in this context by identifying several key aspects of cryopreservation science in a format that may be easily integrated into mainstream cell therapy manufacture. PMID:27173747

  6. Short-term memory of danger signals or environmental stimuli in mesenchymal stem cells: implications for therapeutic potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Guang-Yang; Liu, Yang; Lu, Ying; Qin, Ya-Ru; Di, Guo-Hu; Lei, Yong-Hong; Liu, Hu-Xian; Li, Yan-Qi; Wu, Chutse; Hu, Xian-Wen; Duan, Hai-Feng

    2016-05-01

    Mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSCs) possess some characteristics of immune cells, including a pro-inflammatory phenotype, an immunosuppressive phenotype, antibacterial properties and the expression of Toll-like receptor proteins. Here we show that, similar to immune cells, MSCs retain information from danger signals or environmental stimuli for a period of time. When treated with the pro-inflammatory factors lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), MSCs display increased expression of IL-6, IL-8 and MCP-1. Following re-plating and several rounds of cell division in the absence of stimulating factors, the expression of IL-6, IL-8 and MCP-1 remained higher than in untreated cells for over 7 days. A spike in cytokine secretion occurred when cells were exposed to a second round of stimulation. We primed MSCs with LPS and LPS-primed MSCs had better therapeutic efficacy at promoting skin flap survival in a diabetic rat model than did unprimed MSCs. Finally, we found that several microRNAs, including miR146a, miR150 and miR155, along with the modification of DNA by 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC), mediate the MSC response to LPS and TNF-α stimulation. Collectively, our data suggest that MSCs have a short-term memory of environmental signals, which may impact their therapeutic potential. PMID:25942600

  7. In Vivo therapeutic potential of mesenchymal stem cell-derived extracellular vesicles with optical imaging reporter in tumor mice model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalimuthu, Senthilkumar; Gangadaran, Prakash; Li, Xiu Juan; Oh, Ji Min; Lee, Ho Won; Jeong, Shin Young; Lee, Sang-Woo; Lee, Jaetae; Ahn, Byeong-Cheol

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) can be used as a therapeutic armor for cancer. Extracellular vesicles (EVs) from MSCs have been evaluated for anticancer effects. In vivo targeting of EVs to the tumor is an essential requirement for successful therapy. Therefore, non-invasive methods of monitoring EVs in animal models are crucial for developing EV-based cancer therapies. The present study to develop bioluminescent EVs using Renilla luciferase (Rluc)-expressing MSCs. The EVs from MSC/Rluc cells (EV-MSC/Rluc) were visualized in a murine lung cancer model. The anticancer effects of EVs on Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) and other cancer cells were assessed. EV-MSC/Rluc were visualized in vivo in the LLC-efffuc tumor model using optical imaging. The induction of apoptosis was confirmed with Annexin-V and propidium iodide staining. EV-MSC/Rluc and EV-MSCs showed a significant cytotoxic effect against LLC-effluc cells and 4T1; however, no significant effect on CT26, B16F10, TC1 cells. Moreover, EV-MSC/Rluc inhibited LLC tumor growth in vivo. EV-MSC/Rluc-mediated LLC tumor inhibitory mechanism revealed the decreased pERK and increased cleaved caspase 3 and cleaved PARP. We successfully developed luminescent EV-MSC/Rluc that have a therapeutic effect on LLC cells in both in vitro and in vivo. This bioluminescent EV system can be used to optimize EV-based therapy. PMID:27452924

  8. Therapeutic effects of human multilineage-differentiating stress enduring (MUSE cell transplantation into infarct brain of mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomohiro Yamauchi

    Full Text Available Bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs are heterogeneous and their therapeutic effect is pleiotropic. Multilineage-differentiating stress enduring (Muse cells are recently identified to comprise several percentages of BMSCs, being able to differentiate into triploblastic lineages including neuronal cells and act as tissue repair cells. This study was aimed to clarify how Muse and non-Muse cells in BMSCs contribute to functional recovery after ischemic stroke.Human BMSCs were separated into stage specific embryonic antigen-3-positive Muse cells and -negative non-Muse cells. Immunodeficient mice were subjected to permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion and received transplantation of vehicle, Muse, non-Muse or BMSCs (2.5×104 cells into the ipsilateral striatum 7 days later.Motor function recovery in BMSC and non-Muse groups became apparent at 21 days after transplantation, but reached the plateau thereafter. In Muse group, functional recovery was not observed for up to 28 days post-transplantation, but became apparent at 35 days post-transplantation. On immunohistochemistry, only Muse cells were integrated into peri-infarct cortex and differentiate into Tuj-1- and NeuN-expressing cells, while negligible number of BMSCs and non-Muse cells remained in the peri-infarct area at 42 days post-transplantation.These findings strongly suggest that Muse cells and non-Muse cells may contribute differently to tissue regeneration and functional recovery. Muse cells may be more responsible for replacement of the lost neurons through their integration into the peri-infarct cortex and spontaneous differentiation into neuronal marker-positive cells. Non-Muse cells do not remain in the host brain and may exhibit trophic effects rather than cell replacement.

  9. Current and future regenerative medicine - principles, concepts, and therapeutic use of stem cell therapy and tissue engineering in equine medicine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koch, Thomas Gadegaard; Berg, Lise Charlotte; Betts, Dean H.

    2009-01-01

    be recorded and reported.Stem cell and tissue engineering research in the horse has exciting comparative and equine specific perspectives that most likely will benefit the health of horses and humans. Controlled, well-designed studies are needed to move this new equine research field forward.......This paper provides a bird's-eye perspective of the general principles of stem-cell therapy and tissue engineering; it relates comparative knowledge in this area to the current and future status of equine regenerative medicine.The understanding of equine stem cell biology, biofactors, and scaffolds......, and their potential therapeutic use in horses are rudimentary at present. Mesenchymal stem cell isolation has been proclaimed from several equine tissues in the past few years. Based on the criteria of the International Society for Cellular Therapy, most of these cells are more correctly referred to as multipotent...

  10. Evaluation by citogenetic methods of the efficiency of irradiating human cells by the therapeutic proton beam of the JINR Phasotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effectiveness of therapeutic proton beam on human cells is evaluated against the criterion of formation of chromosome aberrations in human blood lymphocytes. Both physical characteristics of protons (LET at the place of entry and in the modified Bragg peak region) and the biological factor: differences in the radiosensitivity of non-dividing cells of normal tissues along the beam path and dividing cells of tumors were taken into account. Proton RBE is ∼ 1 at the beam entry into the object and ∼ 1.2 in the Bragg peak region. Allowing for a higher radiosensitivity of dividing cells in the G2 phase of the cell cycle, irradiation effectiveness is found to increase up to ∼1.4

  11. A highly efficient method for generation of therapeutic quality human pluripotent stem cells by using naive induced pluripotent stem cells nucleus for nuclear transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanal, Madhusudana Girija

    2014-01-01

    Even after several years since the discovery of human embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC), we are still unable to make any significant therapeutic benefits out of them such as cell therapy or generation of organs for transplantation. Recent success in somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) made it possible to generate diploid embryonic stem cells, which opens up the way to make high-quality pluripotent stem cells. However, the process is highly inefficient and hence expensive compared to the generation of iPSC. Even with the latest SCNT technology, we are not sure whether one can make therapeutic quality pluripotent stem cell from any patient's somatic cells or by using oocytes from any donor. Combining iPSC technology with SCNT, that is, by using the nucleus of the candidate somatic cell which got reprogrammed to pluripotent state instead that of the unmodified nucleus of the candidate somatic cell, would boost the efficiency of the technique, and we would be able to generate therapeutic quality pluripotent stem cells. Induced pluripotent stem cell nuclear transfer (iPSCNT) combines the efficiency of iPSC generation with the speed and natural reprogramming environment of SCNT. The new technique may be called iPSCNT. This technique could prove to have very revolutionary benefits for humankind. This could be useful in generating organs for transplantation for patients and for reproductive cloning, especially for childless men and women who cannot have children by any other techniques. When combined with advanced gene editing techniques (such as CRISPR-Cas system) this technique might also prove useful to those who want to have healthy children but suffer from inherited diseases. The current code of ethics may be against reproductive cloning. However, this will change with time as it happened with most of the revolutionary scientific breakthroughs. After all, it is the right of every human to have healthy offspring and it is the question of

  12. Proteomic analysis of imatinib-resistant CML-T1 cells reveals calcium homeostasis as a potential therapeutic target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toman, O; Kabickova, T; Vit, O; Fiser, R; Polakova, K Machova; Zach, J; Linhartova, J; Vyoral, D; Petrak, J

    2016-09-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) therapy has markedly improved patient prognosis after introduction of imatinib mesylate for clinical use. However, a subset of patients develops resistance to imatinib and other tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), mainly due to point mutations in the region encoding the kinase domain of the fused BCR-ABL oncogene. To identify potential therapeutic targets in imatinib‑resistant CML cells, we derived imatinib-resistant CML-T1 human cell line clone (CML-T1/IR) by prolonged exposure to imatinib in growth media. Mutational analysis revealed that the Y235H mutation in BCR-ABL is probably the main cause of CML-T1/IR resistance to imatinib. To identify alternative therapeutic targets for selective elimination of imatinib-resistant cells, we compared the proteome profiles of CML-T1 and CML-T1/IR cells using 2-DE-MS. We identified eight differentially expressed proteins, with strongly upregulated Na+/H+ exchanger regulatory factor 1 (NHERF1) in the resistant cells, suggesting that this protein may influence cytosolic pH, Ca2+ concentration or signaling pathways such as Wnt in CML-T1/IR cells. We tested several compounds including drugs in clinical use that interfere with the aforementioned processes and tested their relative toxicity to CML-T1 and CML-T1/IR cells. Calcium channel blockers, calcium signaling antagonists and modulators of calcium homeostasis, namely thapsigargin, ionomycin, verapamil, carboxyamidotriazole and immunosuppressive drugs cyclosporine A and tacrolimus (FK-506) were selectively toxic to CML-T1/IR cells. The putative cellular targets of these compounds in CML-T1/IR cells are postulated in this study. We propose that Ca2+ homeostasis can be a potential therapeutic target in CML cells resistant to TKIs. We demonstrate that a proteomic approach may be used to characterize a TKI-resistant population of CML cells enabling future individualized treatment options for patients. PMID:27430982

  13. ABT-199 mediated inhibition of BCL-2 as a novel therapeutic strategy in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peirs, Sofie; Matthijssens, Filip; Goossens, Steven; Van de Walle, Inge; Ruggero, Katia; de Bock, Charles E; Degryse, Sandrine; Canté-Barrett, Kirsten; Briot, Delphine; Clappier, Emmanuelle; Lammens, Tim; De Moerloose, Barbara; Benoit, Yves; Poppe, Bruce; Meijerink, Jules P; Cools, Jan; Soulier, Jean; Rabbitts, Terence H; Taghon, Tom; Speleman, Frank; Van Vlierberghe, Pieter

    2014-12-11

    T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) is a high-risk subtype of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) with gradually improved survival through introduction of intensified chemotherapy. However, therapy-resistant or refractory T-ALL remains a major clinical challenge. Here, we evaluated B-cell lymphoma (BCL)-2 inhibition by the BH3 mimetic ABT-199 as a new therapeutic strategy in human T-ALL. The T-ALL cell line LOUCY, which shows a transcriptional program related to immature T-ALL, exhibited high in vitro and in vivo sensitivity for ABT-199 in correspondence with high levels of BCL-2. In addition, ABT-199 showed synergistic therapeutic effects with different chemotherapeutic agents including doxorubicin, l-asparaginase, and dexamethasone. Furthermore, in vitro analysis of primary patient samples indicated that some immature, TLX3- or HOXA-positive primary T-ALLs are highly sensitive to BCL-2 inhibition, whereas TAL1 driven tumors mostly showed poor ABT-199 responses. Because BCL-2 shows high expression in early T-cell precursors and gradually decreases during normal T-cell differentiation, differences in ABT-199 sensitivity could partially be mediated by distinct stages of differentiation arrest between different molecular genetic subtypes of human T-ALL. In conclusion, our study highlights BCL-2 as an attractive molecular target in specific subtypes of human T-ALL that could be exploited by ABT-199. PMID:25301704

  14. A Vesicular Stomatitis Virus-Based Therapeutic Vaccine Generates a Functional CD8 T Cell Response to Hepatitis B Virus in Transgenic Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Cobleigh, Melissa A.; Wei, Xin; Robek, Michael D.

    2013-01-01

    Recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) is a promising therapeutic vaccine platform. Using a transgenic mouse model of chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection, we evaluated the therapeutic potential of a VSV vector expressing the HBV middle surface envelope glycoprotein (MS). VSV-MS immunization generated HBV-specific CD8 T cell and antibody responses in transgenic mice that express low HBV antigen levels. These findings support the further development of VSV as a therapeutic vaccine v...

  15. Impact of roscovitine, a selective CDK inhibitor, on cancer cells: bi-functionality increases its therapeutic potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wesierska-Gadek, Józefa; Borza, Andreea; Komina, Oxana; Maurer, Margarita

    2009-01-01

    Increased expression and activity of proteins driving cell cycle progression as well as inactivation of endogenous inhibitors of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) enhance the proliferative potential of cells. Escape of cells during malignant transformation from the proper cell cycle control rendering them independent from growth factors provides rationale for therapeutic targeting of CDKs. Exposure of rapidly growing human MCF-7 breast cancer and HeLa cervix cancer cells to roscovitine (ROSC), a selective inhibitor of CDKs, inhibits their proliferation by induction of cell cycle arrest and/or apoptosis. The outcome strongly depends on the intrinsic traits of the tumor cells, on their cell cycle status prior to the onset of treatment and also on ROSC concentration. At lower dose ROSC primarily inhibits the cell cycle-related CDKs resulting in a strong cell cycle arrest. Interestingly, ROSC arrests asynchronously growing cells at the G(2)/M transition irrespective of the status of their restriction checkpoint. However, the exposure of cancer cells synchronized after serum starvation in the late G(1) phase results in a transient G(1) arrest only in cells displaying the intact G(1)/S checkpoint. At higher dosage ROSC triggers apoptosis. In HeLa cells inhibition of the activity of CDK7 and, in consequence, that of RNA polymerase II is a major event that facilitates the initiation of caspase-dependent apoptosis. In contrast, in the caspase-3-deficient MCF-7 breast cancer cells ROSC induces apoptosis by a p53-dependent pathway. HIPK2-mediated activation of the p53 transcription factor by phosphorylation at Ser46 results in upregulation of p53AIP1 protein. This protein after de novo synthesis and translocation into the mitochondria promotes depolarization of the mitochondrial membrane. PMID:19724778

  16. Intramuscular Transplantation of Pig Amniotic Fluid-Derived Progenitor Cells Has Therapeutic Potential in a Mouse Model of Myocardial Infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Shao-Yu; Chou, Chih-Jen; Cheng, Po-Jen; Tseng, Tse-Yang; Cheng, Winston Teng-Kui; Shaw, S W Steven; Wu, Shinn-Chih

    2015-01-01

    Acute myocardial infarction (MI) is a fatal event that causes a large number of deaths worldwide. MI results in pathological remodeling and decreased cardiac function, which could lead to heart failure and fatal arrhythmia. Cell therapy is a potential strategy to repair the damage through enhanced angiogenesis or by modulation of the inflammatory process via paracrine signaling. Amniotic fluid-derived progenitor cells (AFPCs) have been reported to differentiate into several lineages and can be used without ethical concerns or risk of teratoma formation. Since pigs are anatomically, physiologically, and genetically similar to humans, and pregnant pigs can be an abundant source of AFPCs, we used porcine AFPCs (pAFPCs) as our target cells. Intramyocardial injection of AFPCs has been shown to cure MI in animal models. However, intramuscular transplantation of cells has not been extensively investigated. In this study, we investigated the therapeutic potential of intramuscular injection of pAFPCs on acute MI. MI mice were divided into 1) PBS control, 2) medium cell dose (1 × 10(6) cells per leg; cell-M), and 3) high cell dose (4 × 10(6) cells per leg; cell-H) groups. Cells or PBS were directly injected into the hamstring muscle 20 min after MI surgery. Four weeks after MI surgery, the cell-M and cell-H groups exhibited significantly better ejection fraction, significantly greater wall thickness, smaller infarct scar sizes, and lower LV expansion index compared to the PBS group. Using in vivo imaging, we showed that the hamstring muscles from animals in the cell-M and cell-H groups had RFP-positive signals. In summary, intramuscular injection of porcine AFPCs reduced scar size, reduced pathological remodeling, and preserved heart function after MI. PMID:24667157

  17. Enhanced immune stimulation by a therapeutic lymphoma tumor antigen vaccine produced in insect cells involves mannose receptor targeting to antigen presenting cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betting, David J; Mu, Xi Y; Kafi, Kamran; McDonnel, Desmond; Rosas, Francisco; Gold, Daniel P; Timmerman, John M

    2009-01-01

    Therapeutic vaccination of lymphoma patients with tumor-specific immunoglobulin (idiotype, Id) coupled to the carrier protein keyhole limpet hemocyanin (Id-KLH) is undergoing clinical investigation, and methods to improve the immunogenicity of these and other protein tumor antigen vaccines are being sought. Id proteins can be produced via tumor-myeloma hybridomas or recombinant methods in mammalian, bacteria, or insect cells. We now demonstrate that terminal mannose residues, characteristic of recombinant proteins produced in insect cells, yield Id proteins with significantly enhanced immunostimulatory properties compared to Id proteins derived from mammalian cells. Recombinant baculovirus-infected insect cell-derived Id showed higher binding to and activation of human dendritic cells mediated by mannose receptors. In vivo, insect cell-derived Id elicited higher levels of tumor-specific CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) and improved eradication of pre-established murine lymphoma. Insect cell and mammalian Id generated similar levels of tumor-specific antibodies, showing no impairment in antibody responses to native tumor antigen despite the glycoslylation differences in the immunogen. Combining insect cell production and maleimide-based KLH conjugation offered the highest levels of anti-tumor immunity. Our data comparing sources of recombinant Id protein tumor antigens used in therapeutic cancer vaccines demonstrate that insect cell-derived antigens can offer several immunologic advantages over proteins derived from mammalian sources. PMID:19000731

  18. Clinical-Grade Manufacturing of Therapeutic Human Mesenchymal Stem/Stromal Cells in Microcarrier-Based Culture Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes-Platzgummer, Ana; Carmelo, Joana G; da Silva, Cláudia Lobato; Cabral, Joaquim M S

    2016-01-01

    The therapeutic potential of mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSC) has triggered the need for high cell doses in a vast number of clinical applications. This demand requires the development of good manufacturing practices (GMP)-compliant ex vivo expansion protocols that should be effective to deliver a robust and reproducible supply of clinical-grade cells in a safe and cost-effective manner. Controlled stirred-tank bioreactor systems under xenogeneic (xeno)-free culture conditions offer ideal settings to develop and optimize cell manufacturing to meet the standards and needs of human MSC for cellular therapies. Herein we describe two microcarrier-based stirred culture systems using spinner flasks and controlled stirred-tank bioreactors under xeno-free conditions for the efficient ex vivo expansion of human bone marrow and adipose tissue-derived MSC. PMID:27236684

  19. Therapeutic effect of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells on cold stress induced changes in the hippocampus of rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Saravana Kumar Sampath Kumar; Saraswathi Perumal; Vijayaraghavan Rajagopalan

    2014-01-01

    The present study aims to evaluate the effect of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells on cold stress induced neuronal changes in hippocampal CA1 region of Wistar rats. Bone marrow mes-enchymal stem cells were isolated from a 6-week-old Wistar rat. Bone marrow from adult femora and tibia was collected and mesenchymal stem cells were cultured in minimal essential medium containing 10% heat-inactivated fetal bovine serum and were sub-cultured. Passage 3 cells were analyzed by lfow cytometry for positive expression of CD44 and CD90 and negative expression of CD45. Once CD44 and CD90 positive expression was achieved, the cells were cultured again to 90% conlfuence for later experiments. Twenty-four rats aged 8 weeks old were randomly and evenly divided into normal control, cold water swim stress (cold stress), cold stress + PBS (intra-venous infusion), and cold stress + bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (1 × 106; intravenous infusion) groups. The total period of study was 60 days which included 1 month stress period followed by 1 month treatment. Behavioral functional test was performed during the entire study period. After treatment, rats were sacriifced for histological studies. Treatment with bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells signiifcantly increased the number of neuronal cells in hippocampal CA1 region. Adult bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells injected by intravenous administration show potential therapeutic effects in cognitive decline associated with stress-related lesions.

  20. Hampering the Immune Suppressors: Therapeutic Targeting of Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells (MDSC) in Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Albeituni, Sabrin Husein; Ding, Chuanlin; Yan, Jun

    2013-01-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) are a heterogeneous population of immature myeloid cells with suppressive properties that preferentially expand in cancer. MDSC mainly suppress T cell proliferation and cytotoxicity, inhibit NK cell activation, and induce the differentiation and expansion of regulatory T cells (Tregs). The wide spectrum of MDSC suppressive activity in cancer and its role in tumor progression have rendered these cells a promising target for effective cancer immunotherapy...

  1. NK cell-released exosomes

    OpenAIRE

    Fais, Stefano

    2013-01-01

    We have recently reported that human natural killer (NK) cells release exosomes that express both NK-cell markers and cytotoxic molecules. Similar results were obtained with circulating exosomes from human healthy donors. Both NK-cell derived and circulating exosomes exerted a full functional activity and killed both tumor and activated immune cells. These findings indicate that NK-cell derived exosomes might constitute a new promising therapeutic tool.

  2. Gender and contraction mode on perceived exertion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pincivero, D M; Polen, R R; Byrd, B N

    2010-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine perceived exertion responses during concentric and eccentric elbow flexor contractions between young adult men and women. Thirty healthy young adults participated in two experimental sessions. During the first session, subjects performed five concentric isokinetic maximal voluntary contractions (MVC) of elbow flexion, followed by nine, randomly-ordered sub-maximal contractions (10-90% MVC). The same procedures were repeated during the second session, with the exception that eccentric contractions were performed. Subjects rated their perceived exertion following the sub-maximal contractions with the Borg category-ratio scale. Perceived exertion was significantly (p<0.05) less than equivalent values on the CR-10 scale at intensities greater than, and equal to, 30% MVC. A three-factor interaction between 30-40% MVC indicated that perceived exertion increased more during the eccentric, than concentric, contractions in women, while the opposite pattern was evident for the men. There were no significant contraction mode or gender differences. Power function modeling revealed that perceived exertion increased in a negatively accelerating manner, except for the men performing eccentric exercise. Perceived exertion increases in a similar non-linear manner between men and women during concentric contractions, while men exhibited a statistically linear pattern during eccentric contractions. PMID:20148376

  3. Exosomes secreted by human-induced pluripotent stem cell-derived mesenchymal stem cells attenuate limb ischemia by promoting angiogenesis in mice

    OpenAIRE

    Hu, Guo-wen; Li, Qing; Niu, Xin; Hu, Bin; Liu, Juan; Zhou, Shu-Min; Guo, Shang-chun; Lang, Hai-li; Zhang, Chang-Qing; Wang, Yang; Deng, Zhi-Feng

    2015-01-01

    Introduction ‘Patient-specific’ induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) are attractive because they can generate abundant cells without the risk of immune rejection for cell therapy. Studies have shown that iPSC-derived mesenchymal stem cells (iMSCs) possess powerful proliferation, differentiation, and therapeutic effects. Recently, most studies indicate that stem cells exert their therapeutic effect mainly through a paracrine mechanism other than transdifferentiation, and exosomes have emerge...

  4. Priming with ceramide-1 phosphate promotes the therapeutic effect of mesenchymal stem/stromal cells on pulmonary artery hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Jisun; Kim, YongHwan; Heo, Jinbeom; Kim, Kang-Hyun; Lee, Seungun; Lee, Sei Won; Kim, Kyunggon; Kim, In-Gyu; Shin, Dong-Myung

    2016-04-22

    Some molecules enriched in damaged organs can contribute to tissue repair by stimulating the mobilization of stem cells. These so-called "priming" factors include bioactive lipids, complement components, and cationic peptides. However, their therapeutic significance remains to be determined. Here, we show that priming of mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (MSCs) with ceramide-1 phosphate (C1P), a bioactive lipid, enhances their therapeutic efficacy in pulmonary artery hypertension (PAH). Human bone marrow (BM)-derived MSCs treated with 100 or 200 μM C1P showed improved migration activity in Transwell assays compared with non-primed MSCs and concomitantly activated MAPK(p42/44) and AKT signaling cascades. Although C1P priming had little effect on cell surface marker phenotypes and the multipotency of MSCs, it potentiated their proliferative, colony-forming unit-fibroblast, and anti-inflammatory activities. In a monocrotaline-induced PAH animal model, a single administration of human MSCs primed with C1P significantly attenuated the PAH-related increase in right ventricular systolic pressure, right ventricular hypertrophy, and thickness of α-smooth muscle actin-positive cells around the vessel wall. Thus, this study shows that C1P priming increases the effects of MSC therapy by enhancing the migratory, self-renewal, and anti-inflammatory activity of MSCs and that MSC therapy optimized with priming protocols might be a promising option for the treatment of PAH patients. PMID:26993164

  5. Therapeutic Effects of CUR-Activated Human Umbilical Cord Mesenchymal Stem Cells on 1-Methyl-4-phenylpyridine-Induced Parkinson's Disease Cell Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jinfeng, Li; Yunliang, Wang; Xinshan, Liu; Yutong, Wang; Shanshan, Wang; Peng, Xue; Xiaopeng, Yang; Zhixiu, Xu; Qingshan, Lu; Honglei, Yin; Xia, Cao; Hongwei, Wang; Bingzhen, Cao

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the therapeutic effects of human umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hUC-MSC) activated by curcumin (CUR) on PC12 cells induced by 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium ion (MPP+), a cell model of Parkinson's disease (PD). The supernatant of hUC-MSC and hUC-MSC activated by 5 µmol/L CUR (hUC-MSC-CUR) were collected in accordance with the same concentration. The cell proliferation and differentiation potential to dopaminergic neuronal cells and antioxidation were observed in PC12 cells after being treated with the above two supernatants and 5 µmol/L CUR. The results showed that the hUC-MSC-CUR could more obviously promote the proliferation and the expression of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and microtubule associated protein-2 (MAP2) and significantly decreased the expression of nitric oxide (NO) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in PC12 cells. Furtherly, cytokines detection gave a clue that the expression of IL-6, IL-10, and NGF was significantly higher in the group treated with the hUC-MSC-CUR compared to those of other two groups. Therefore, the hUC-MSC-CUR may be a potential strategy to promote the proliferation and differentiation of PD cell model, therefore providing new insights into a novel therapeutic approach in PD.

  6. Mesenchymal stem cells as a therapeutic tool in tissue and organ regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Bajek

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Tissue engineering is an interdisciplinary field that offers new opportunities for regeneration of diseased and damaged tissue with the use of many different cell types,including adult stem cells. In tissue engineering and regenerative medicine the most popular are mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs isolated from bone marrow. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells are a potential source of progenitor cells for osteoblasts, chondroblasts, adipocytes, skeletal muscles and cardiomyocytes. It has also been shown that these cells can differentiate into ecto- and endodermal cells, e.g. neuronal cells, glial cells, keratinocytes and hepatocytes. The availability of autologous MSCs, their proliferative potential and multilineage differentiation capacity make them an excellent tool for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. The aim of this publication is to present characteristic and biological properties of mesenchymal stem cells isolated from bone marrow.

  7. Therapeutic mechanism of treating SMMC-7721 liver cancer cells with magnetic fluid hyperthermia using Fe2O3 nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.Y. Yan

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to investigate the therapeutic mechanism of treating SMMC-7721 liver cancer cells with magnetic fluid hyperthermia (MFH using Fe2O3 nanoparticles. Hepatocarcinoma SMMC-7721 cells cultured in vitro were treated with ferrofluid containing Fe2O3 nanoparticles and irradiated with an alternating radio frequency magnetic field. The influence of the treatment on the cells was examined by inverted microscopy, MTT and flow cytometry. To study the therapeutic mechanism of the Fe2O3 MFH, Hsp70, Bax, Bcl-2 and p53 were detected by immunocytochemistry and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR. It was shown that Fe2O3 MFH could cause cellular necrosis, induce cellular apoptosis, and significantly inhibit cellular growth, all of which appeared to be dependent on the concentration of the Fe2O3 nanoparticles. Immunocytochemistry results showed that MFH could induce high expression of Hsp70 and Bax, decrease the expression of mutant p53, and had little effect on Bcl-2. RT-PCR indicated that Hsp70 expression was high in the early stage of MFH (<24 h and became low or absent after 24 h of MFH treatment. It can be concluded that Fe2O3 MFH significantly inhibited the proliferation of in vitro cultured liver cancer cells (SMMC-7721, induced cell apoptosis and arrested the cell cycle at the G2/M phase. Fe2O3 MFH can induce high Hsp70 expression at an early stage, enhance the expression of Bax, and decrease the expression of mutant p53, which promotes the apoptosis of tumor cells.

  8. Therapeutic mechanism of treating SMMC-7721 liver cancer cells with magnetic fluid hyperthermia using Fe₂O₃ nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, S Y; Chen, M M; Fan, J G; Wang, Y Q; Du, Y Q; Hu, Y; Xu, L M

    2014-11-01

    This study aimed to investigate the therapeutic mechanism of treating SMMC-7721 liver cancer cells with magnetic fluid hyperthermia (MFH) using Fe₂O₃ nanoparticles. Hepatocarcinoma SMMC-7721 cells cultured in vitro were treated with ferrofluid containing Fe₂O₃ nanoparticles and irradiated with an alternating radio frequency magnetic field. The influence of the treatment on the cells was examined by inverted microscopy, MTT and flow cytometry. To study the therapeutic mechanism of the Fe₂O₃ MFH, Hsp70, Bax, Bcl-2 and p53 were detected by immunocytochemistry and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). It was shown that Fe₂O₃ MFH could cause cellular necrosis, induce cellular apoptosis, and significantly inhibit cellular growth, all of which appeared to be dependent on the concentration of the Fe₂O₃nanoparticles. Immunocytochemistry results showed that MFH could induce high expression of Hsp70 and Bax, decrease the expression of mutant p53, and had little effect on Bcl-2. RT-PCR indicated that Hsp70 expression was high in the early stage of MFH (<24 h) and became low or absent after 24 h of MFH treatment. It can be concluded that Fe₂O₃MFH significantly inhibited the proliferation of in vitro cultured liver cancer cells (SMMC-7721), induced cell apoptosis and arrested the cell cycle at the G₂/M phase. Fe₂O₃ MFH can induce high Hsp70 expression at an early stage, enhance the expression of Bax, and decrease the expression of mutant p53, which promotes the apoptosis of tumor cells. PMID:25296356

  9. Therapeutic mechanism of treating SMMC-7721 liver cancer cells with magnetic fluid hyperthermia using Fe2O3 nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, S Y; Chen, M M; Fan, J G; Wang, Y Q; Du, Y Q; Hu, Y; Xu, L M

    2014-08-29

    This study aimed to investigate the therapeutic mechanism of treating SMMC-7721 liver cancer cells with magnetic fluid hyperthermia (MFH) using Fe2O3 nanoparticles. Hepatocarcinoma SMMC-7721 cells cultured in vitro were treated with ferrofluid containing Fe2O3 nanoparticles and irradiated with an alternating radio frequency magnetic field. The influence of the treatment on the cells was examined by inverted microscopy, MTT and flow cytometry. To study the therapeutic mechanism of the Fe2O3 MFH, Hsp70, Bax, Bcl-2 and p53 were detected by immunocytochemistry and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). It was shown that Fe2O3 MFH could cause cellular necrosis, induce cellular apoptosis, and significantly inhibit cellular growth, all of which appeared to be dependent on the concentration of the Fe2O3 nanoparticles. Immunocytochemistry results showed that MFH could induce high expression of Hsp70 and Bax, decrease the expression of mutant p53, and had little effect on Bcl-2. RT-PCR indicated that Hsp70 expression was high in the early stage of MFH (<24 h) and became low or absent after 24 h of MFH treatment. It can be concluded that Fe2O3 MFH significantly inhibited the proliferation of in vitro cultured liver cancer cells (SMMC-7721), induced cell apoptosis and arrested the cell cycle at the G2/M phase. Fe2O3 MFH can induce high Hsp70 expression at an early stage, enhance the expression of Bax, and decrease the expression of mutant p53, which promotes the apoptosis of tumor cells. PMID:25184378

  10. Quantitative proteomics of the Neisseria gonorrhoeae cell envelope and membrane vesicles for the discovery of potential therapeutic targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zielke, Ryszard A; Wierzbicki, Igor H; Weber, Jacob V; Gafken, Philip R; Sikora, Aleksandra E

    2014-05-01

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae (GC) is a human-specific pathogen, and the agent of a sexually transmitted disease, gonorrhea. There is a critical need for new approaches to study and treat GC infections because of the growing threat of multidrug-resistant isolates and the lack of a vaccine. Despite the implied role of the GC cell envelope and membrane vesicles in colonization and infection of human tissues and cell lines, comprehensive studies have not been undertaken to elucidate their constituents. Accordingly, in pursuit of novel molecular therapeutic targets, we have applied isobaric tagging for absolute quantification coupled with liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry for proteome quantitative analyses. Mining the proteome of cell envelopes and native membrane vesicles revealed 533 and 168 common proteins, respectively, in analyzed GC strains FA1090, F62, MS11, and 1291. A total of 22 differentially abundant proteins were discovered including previously unknown proteins. Among those proteins that displayed similar abundance in four GC strains, 34 were found in both cell envelopes and membrane vesicles fractions. Focusing on one of them, a homolog of an outer membrane protein LptD, we demonstrated that its depletion caused loss of GC viability. In addition, we selected for initial characterization six predicted outer membrane proteins with unknown function, which were identified as ubiquitous in the cell envelopes derived from examined GC isolates. These studies entitled a construction of deletion mutants and analyses of their resistance to different chemical probes. Loss of NGO1985, in particular, resulted in dramatically decreased GC viability upon treatment with detergents, polymyxin B, and chloramphenicol, suggesting that this protein functions in the maintenance of the cell envelope permeability barrier. Together, these findings underscore the concept that the cell envelope and membrane vesicles contain crucial, yet under-explored determinants of GC

  11. Therapeutic mechanism of treating SMMC-7721 liver cancer cells with magnetic fluid hyperthermia using Fe2O3 nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study aimed to investigate the therapeutic mechanism of treating SMMC-7721 liver cancer cells with magnetic fluid hyperthermia (MFH) using Fe2O3 nanoparticles. Hepatocarcinoma SMMC-7721 cells cultured in vitro were treated with ferrofluid containing Fe2O3 nanoparticles and irradiated with an alternating radio frequency magnetic field. The influence of the treatment on the cells was examined by inverted microscopy, MTT and flow cytometry. To study the therapeutic mechanism of the Fe2O3 MFH, Hsp70, Bax, Bcl-2 and p53 were detected by immunocytochemistry and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). It was shown that Fe2O3 MFH could cause cellular necrosis, induce cellular apoptosis, and significantly inhibit cellular growth, all of which appeared to be dependent on the concentration of the Fe2O3 nanoparticles. Immunocytochemistry results showed that MFH could induce high expression of Hsp70 and Bax, decrease the expression of mutant p53, and had little effect on Bcl-2. RT-PCR indicated that Hsp70 expression was high in the early stage of MFH (,24 h) and became low or absent after 24 h of MFH treatment. It can be concluded that Fe2O3 MFH significantly inhibited the proliferation of in vitro cultured liver cancer cells (SMMC-7721), induced cell apoptosis and arrested the cell cycle at the G2/M phase. Fe2O3 MFH can induce high Hsp70 expression at an early stage, enhance the expression of Bax, and decrease the expression of mutant p53, which promotes the apoptosis of tumor cells. (author)

  12. ERRγ Is Required for the Metabolic Maturation of Therapeutically Functional Glucose-Responsive β Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshihara, Eiji; Wei, Zong; Lin, Chun Shi; Fang, Sungsoon; Ahmadian, Maryam; Kida, Yasuyuki; Tseng, Tiffany; Dai, Yang; Yu, Ruth T; Liddle, Christopher; Atkins, Annette R; Downes, Michael; Evans, Ronald M

    2016-04-12

    Pancreatic β cells undergo postnatal maturation to achieve maximal glucose-responsive insulin secretion, an energy intensive process. We identify estrogen-related receptor γ (ERRγ) expression as a hallmark of adult, but not neonatal β cells. Postnatal induction of ERRγ drives a transcriptional network activating mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation, the electron transport chain, and ATP production needed to drive glucose-responsive insulin secretion. Mice deficient in β cell-specific ERRγ expression are glucose intolerant and fail to secrete insulin in response to a glucose challenge. Notably, forced expression of ERRγ in iPSC-derived β-like cells enables glucose-responsive secretion of human insulin in vitro, obviating in vivo maturation to achieve functionality. Moreover, these cells rapidly rescue diabetes when transplanted into β cell-deficient mice. These results identify a key role for ERRγ in β cell metabolic maturation, and offer a reproducible, quantifiable, and scalable approach for in vitro generation of functional human β cell therapeutics. PMID:27076077

  13. CRM1 inhibition induces tumor cell cytotoxicity and impairs osteoclastogenesis in multiple myeloma: molecular mechanisms and therapeutic implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tai, Y-T; Landesman, Y; Acharya, C; Calle, Y; Zhong, MY; Cea, M; Tannenbaum, D; Cagnetta, A; Reagan, M; Munshi, AA; Senapedis, W; Saint-Martin, J-R; Kashyap, T; Shacham, S; Kauffman, M; Gu, Y; Wu, L; Ghobrial, I; Zhan, F; Kung, AL; Schey, SA; Richardson, P; Munshi, NC; Anderson, KC

    2013-01-01

    The key nuclear export protein CRM1/XPO1 may represent a promising novel therapeutic target in human multiple myeloma (MM). Here we showed that chromosome region maintenance 1 (CRM1) is highly expressed in patients with MM, plasma cell leukemia cells and increased in patient cells resistant to bortezomib treatment. CRM1 expression also correlates with increased lytic bone and shorter survival. Importantly, CRM1 knockdown inhibits MM cell viability. Novel, oral, irreversible selective inhibitors of nuclear export (SINEs) targeting CRM1 (KPT-185, KPT-330) induce cytotoxicity against MM cells (ED50<200 nM), alone and cocultured with bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) or osteoclasts (OC). SINEs trigger nuclear accumulation of multiple CRM1 cargo tumor suppressor proteins followed by growth arrest and apoptosis in MM cells. They further block c-myc, Mcl-1, and nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) activity. SINEs induce proteasome-dependent CRM1 protein degradation; concurrently, they upregulate CRM1, p53-targeted, apoptosis-related, anti-inflammatory and stress-related gene transcripts in MM cells. In SCID mice with diffuse human MM bone lesions, SINEs show strong anti-MM activity, inhibit MM-induced bone lysis and prolong survival. Moreover, SINEs directly impair osteoclastogenesis and bone resorption via blockade of RANKL-induced NF-κB and NFATc1, with minimal impact on osteoblasts and BMSCs. These results support clinical development of SINE CRM1 antagonists to improve patient outcome in MM. PMID:23588715

  14. Computational modeling of glucose transport in pancreatic β-cells identifies metabolic thresholds and therapeutic targets in diabetes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camilla Luni

    Full Text Available Pancreatic β-cell dysfunction is a diagnostic criterion of Type 2 diabetes and includes defects in glucose transport and insulin secretion. In healthy individuals, β-cells maintain plasma glucose concentrations within a narrow range in concert with insulin action among multiple tissues. Postprandial elevations in blood glucose facilitate glucose uptake into β-cells by diffusion through glucose transporters residing at the plasma membrane. Glucose transport is essential for glycolysis and glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. In human Type 2 diabetes and in the mouse model of obesity-associated diabetes, a marked deficiency of β-cell glucose transporters and glucose uptake occurs with the loss of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. Recent studies have shown that the preservation of glucose transport in β-cells maintains normal insulin secretion and blocks the development of obesity-associated diabetes. To further elucidate the underlying mechanisms, we have constructed a computational model of human β-cell glucose transport in health and in Type 2 diabetes, and present a systems analysis based on experimental results from human and animal studies. Our findings identify a metabolic threshold or "tipping point" whereby diminished glucose transport across the plasma membrane of β-cells limits intracellular glucose-6-phosphate production by glucokinase. This metabolic threshold is crossed in Type 2 diabetes and results in β-cell dysfunction including the loss of glucose stimulated insulin secretion. Our model further discriminates among molecular control points in this pathway wherein maximal therapeutic intervention is achieved.

  15. mTORC1-Driven Tumor Cells Are Highly Sensitive to Therapeutic Targeting by Antagonists of Oxidative Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing; Shin, Sejeong; Sun, Yang; Yoon, Sang-Oh; Li, Chenggang; Zhang, Erik; Yu, Jane; Zhang, Jianming; Blenis, John

    2016-08-15

    mTORC1 is a central signaling node in controlling cell growth, proliferation, and metabolism that is aberrantly activated in cancers and certain cancer-associated genetic disorders, such as tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) and sporadic lymphangioleiomyomatosis. However, while mTORC1-inhibitory compounds (rapamycin and rapalogs) attracted interest as candidate therapeutics, clinical trials have not replicated the promising findings in preclinical models, perhaps because these compounds tend to limit cell proliferation without inducing cell death. In seeking to address this issue, we performed a high-throughput screen for small molecules that could heighten the cytotoxicity of mTORC1 inhibitors. Here we report the discovery that combining inhibitors of mTORC1 and glutamate cysteine ligase (GCLC) can selectively and efficiently trigger apoptosis in Tsc2-deficient cells but not wild-type cells. Mechanistic investigations revealed that coinhibition of mTORC1 and GCLC decreased the level of the intracellular thiol antioxidant glutathione (GSH), thereby increasing levels of reactive oxygen species, which we determined to mediate cell death in Tsc2-deficient cells. Our findings offer preclinical proof of concept for a strategy to selectively increase the cytotoxicity of mTORC1 inhibitors as a therapy to eradicate tumor cells marked by high mTORC1 signaling, based on cotargeting a GSH-controlled oxidative stress pathway. Cancer Res; 76(16); 4816-27. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27197195

  16. ESCORT APTAMERS: NEW TOOLS FOR THE TARGETEDDELIVERY OF THERAPEUTICS INTO CELLS

    OpenAIRE

    Davydova, A.; Vorobjeva, M.; Venyaminova, A.

    2011-01-01

    Escort aptamers are DNA or RNA sequences with high affinity to certain cell-surface proteins, which can be used for targeted delivery of various agents into cells of a definite type. The peculiarities of the selection of escort aptamers are discussed in this review. The methods used in selection of escort aptamers via the SELEX technique are considered, including selection against isolated cell-surface proteins, cell fragments, living eukaryotic cells, and bacteria. Particular attention is gi...

  17. Recent Progress on Tissue-Resident Adult Stem Cell Biology and Their Therapeutic Implications

    OpenAIRE

    Mimeault, Murielle; Batra, Surinder K.

    2008-01-01

    Recent progress in the field of the stem cell research has given new hopes to treat and even cure diverse degenerative disorders and incurable diseases in human. Particularly, the identification of a rare population of adult stem cells in the most tissues/organs in human has emerged as an attractive source of multipotent stem/progenitor cells for cell replacement-based therapies and tissue engineering in regenerative medicine. The tissue-resident adult stem/progenitor cells offer the possibil...

  18. Therapeutic Potential of Adipose-Derived SSEA-3-Positive Muse Cells for Treating Diabetic Skin Ulcers

    OpenAIRE

    Kinoshita, Kahori; Kuno, Shinichiro; Ishimine, Hisako; Aoi, Noriyuki; Mineda, Kazuhide; Kato, Harunosuke; Doi, Kentaro; Kanayama, Koji; Feng, Jingwei; Mashiko, Takanobu; Kurisaki, Akira; Yoshimura, Kotaro

    2015-01-01

    Refractory skin ulcers were generated in severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice with type 1 diabetes and delayed wound healing compared with nondiabetic SCID mice. Treatment with a multilineage differentiating stress-enduring (Muse)-rich cell population significantly accelerated wound healing compared with the Muse-poor cell population, and these cells be achieved in large amounts with minimal morbidity. Adipose-derived Muse cells could be a practical tool for a variety of stem cell-dep...

  19. Impaired Clearance of Apoptotic Cells in Chronic Inflammatory Diseases: Therapeutic Implications

    OpenAIRE

    Szondy, Zsuzsa; Garabuczi, Éva; Joós, Gergely; Tsay, Gregory J.; Sarang, Zsolt

    2014-01-01

    In healthy individuals, billions of cells die by apoptosis every day. Removal of the dead cells by phagocytosis (a process called efferocytosis) must be efficient to prevent secondary necrosis and the consequent release of pro-inflammatory cell contents that damages the tissue environment and provokes autoimmunity. In addition, detection and removal of apoptotic cells generally induces an anti-inflammatory response. As a consequence improper clearance of apoptotic cells, being the result of e...

  20. NK-92: an 'off-the-shelf therapeutic' for adoptive natural killer cell-based cancer immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suck, Garnet; Odendahl, Marcus; Nowakowska, Paulina; Seidl, Christian; Wels, Winfried S; Klingemann, Hans G; Tonn, Torsten

    2016-04-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are increasingly considered as immunotherapeutic agents in particular in the fight against cancers. NK cell therapies are potentially broadly applicable and, different from their T cell counterparts, do not cause graft-versus-host disease. Efficacy and clinical in vitro or in vivo expansion of primary NK cells will however always remain variable due to individual differences of donors or patients. Long-term storage of clinical NK cell lots to allow repeated clinical applications remains an additional challenge. In contrast, the established and well-characterized cell line NK-92 can be easily and reproducibly expanded from a good manufacturing practice (GMP)-compliant cryopreserved master cell bank. Moreover, no cost-intensive cell purification methods are required. To date, NK-92 has been intensively studied. The cells displayed superior cytotoxicity against a number of tumor types tested, which was confirmed in preclinical mouse studies. Subsequent clinical testing demonstrated safety of NK-92 infusions even at high doses. Despite the phase I nature of the trials conducted so far, some efficacy was noted, particularly against lung tumors. Furthermore, to overcome tumor resistance and for specific targeting, NK-92 has been engineered to express a number of different chimeric antigen receptors (CARs), including targeting, for example, CD19 or CD20 (anti-B cell malignancies), CD38 (anti-myeloma) or human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2; ErbB2; anti-epithelial cancers). The concept of an NK cell line as an allogeneic cell therapeutic produced 'off-the-shelf' on demand holds great promise for the development of effective treatments. PMID:26559813

  1. Radioimmunotherapy of solid tumors targeting a cell-surface protein, FZD10. Therapeutic efficacy largely depends on radiosensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frizzled homolog 10 (FZD10) is expressed at high levels on the cell surface of almost all synovial sarcoma tissues, but is absent in most normal organs. In a previous study, yttrium-90 (90Y)-labeled anti-FZD10 antibody (MAb 92-13) showed considerable therapeutic efficacy in synovial sarcoma cell-bearing mice. The purpose of the present study was to elucidate the factors associated with this therapeutic efficacy of 90Y-MAb 92-13. FZD10 expression levels of SYO-1 (FZD10-overexpressing synovial sarcoma cell line) and DLD-1/FZD10 (FZD10-transfected DLD-1 cell) were determined by the cell binding assay, and their radiosensitivity was evaluated by incubation with 90Y-MAb 92-13 in vitro. Biodistribution study of indium-111 (111In)-MAb 92-13 was performed in SYO-1 and DLD-1/FZD10 tumor-bearing mice. For therapeutic studies, SYO-1 and DLD-1/FZD10 tumor-bearing mice were treated with 90Y-MAb 92-13 (100, 150, and 200 μCi), after which the change in tumor volume was measured. Immunohistochemical staining was performed on the excised tumor. Expression level of FZD10 on DLD-1/FZD10 was much greater than that on SYO-1. The accumulation of 111In-MAb 92-13 was much higher in DLD-1/FZD10 tumor-bearing mice than in SYO-1 tumor-bearing mice (49.0±4.2 and 22.0±4.5% ID/g, respectively, at 48 h after administration). In SYO-1 tumor, substantial tumor size reduction was observed in all mice treated with 90Y-MAb 92-13 (tumor volume decreased to less than 0.1 cm3 at 11 days after treatment) and tumor regrowth was not observed in most of them. In contrast, only slow progression was observed in DLD-1/FZD10 tumor. When incubated with 90Y-MAb 92-13, high radioactivity was needed to damage DLD-1/FZD10. Immunohistochemical study indicated apoptosis of SYO-1 tumor. The therapeutic efficacy of radioimmunotherapy (RIT) seems to largely depend on the tumor radiosensitivity. (author)

  2. Investigations by Cell-Mediated Immunologic Tests and Therapeutic Trials With Thymopentin in Vaginal Mycoses

    OpenAIRE

    Werner Mendling; Ursula Koldovsky

    1996-01-01

    Objective: According to unsatisfactory therapeutic results in patients with chronically recurrent vaginal candidosis, we investigated if immunologic patient factors could be found and treated. Methods: In 42 women with chronically recurrent and 20 women with acute Candida albicans vulvovaginitis, as well as 14 women with C. glabrata vaginitis, the following investigations were carried out: identification of yeast species; quantification of T lymphocytes and their subpopulations in sera; proli...

  3. IL-12 directs further maturation of ex vivo differentiated NK cells with improved therapeutic potential.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorit Lehmann

    Full Text Available The possibility to modulate ex vivo human NK cell differentiation towards specific phenotypes will contribute to a better understanding of NK cell differentiation and facilitate tailored production of NK cells for immunotherapy. In this study, we show that addition of a specific low dose of IL-12 to an ex vivo NK cell differentiation system from cord blood CD34(+ stem cells will result in significantly increased proportions of cells with expression of CD62L as well as KIRs and CD16 which are preferentially expressed on mature CD56(dim peripheral blood NK cells. In addition, the cells displayed decreased expression of receptors such as CCR6 and CXCR3, which are typically expressed to a lower extent by CD56(dim than CD56(bright peripheral blood NK cells. The increased number of CD62L and KIR positive cells prevailed in a population of CD33(+NKG2A(+ NK cells, supporting that maturation occurs via this subtype. Among a series of transcription factors tested we found Gata3 and TOX to be significantly downregulated, whereas ID3 was upregulated in the IL-12-modulated ex vivo NK cells, implicating these factors in the observed changes. Importantly, the cells differentiated in the presence of IL-12 showed enhanced cytokine production and cytolytic activity against MHC class I negative and positive targets. Moreover, in line with the enhanced CD16 expression, these cells exhibited improved antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity for B-cell leukemia target cells in the presence of the clinically applied antibody rituximab. Altogether, these data provide evidence that IL-12 directs human ex vivo NK cell differentiation towards more mature NK cells with improved properties for potential cancer therapies.

  4. FTY720 and two novel butterfly derivatives exert a general anti-inflammatory potential by reducing immune cell adhesion to endothelial cells through activation of S1P(3) and phosphoinositide 3-kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imeri, Faik; Blanchard, Olivier; Jenni, Aurelio; Schwalm, Stephanie; Wünsche, Christin; Zivkovic, Aleksandra; Stark, Holger; Pfeilschifter, Josef; Huwiler, Andrea

    2015-12-01

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) is a key lipid regulator of a variety of cellular responses including cell proliferation and survival, cell migration, and inflammatory reactions. Here, we investigated the effect of S1P receptor activation on immune cell adhesion to endothelial cells under inflammatory conditions. We show that S1P reduces both tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α- and lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated adhesion of Jurkat and U937 cells to an endothelial monolayer. The reducing effect of S1P was reversed by the S1P1+3 antagonist VPC23019 but not by the S1P1 antagonist W146. Additionally, knockdown of S1P3, but not S1P1, by short hairpin RNA (shRNA) abolished the reducing effect of S1P, suggesting the involvement of S1P3. A suppression of immune cell adhesion was also seen with the immunomodulatory drug FTY720 and two novel butterfly derivatives ST-968 and ST-1071. On the molecular level, S1P and all FTY720 derivatives reduced the mRNA expression of LPS- and TNF-α-induced adhesion molecules including ICAM-1, VCAM-1, E-selectin, and CD44 which was reversed by the PI3K inhibitor LY294002, but not by the MEK inhibitor U0126.In summary, our data demonstrate a novel molecular mechanism by which S1P, FTY720, and two novel butterfly derivatives acted anti-inflammatory that is by suppressing gene transcription of various endothelial adhesion molecules and thereby preventing adhesion of immune cells to endothelial cells and subsequent extravasation. PMID:26267293

  5. Examination of thromboxane synthase as a prognostic factor and therapeutic target in non-small cell lung cancer

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cathcart, Mary-Clare

    2011-03-09

    Abstract Background Thromboxane synthase (TXS) metabolises prostaglandin H2 into thromboxanes, which are biologically active on cancer cells. TXS over-expression has been reported in a range of cancers, and associated with a poor prognosis. TXS inhibition induces cell death in-vitro, providing a rationale for therapeutic intervention. We aimed to determine the expression profile of TXS in NSCLC and if it is prognostic and\\/or a survival factor in the disease. Methods TXS expression was examined in human NSCLC and matched controls by western analysis and IHC. TXS metabolite (TXB2) levels were measured by EIA. A 204-patient NSCLC TMA was stained for COX-2 and downstream TXS expression. TXS tissue expression was correlated with clinical parameters, including overall survival. Cell proliferation\\/survival and invasion was examined in NSCLC cells following both selective TXS inhibition and stable TXS over-expression. Results TXS was over-expressed in human NSCLC samples, relative to matched normal controls. TXS and TXB2 levels were increased in protein (p < 0.05) and plasma (p < 0.01) NSCLC samples respectively. TXS tissue expression was higher in adenocarcinoma (p < 0.001) and female patients (p < 0.05). No significant correlation with patient survival was observed. Selective TXS inhibition significantly reduced tumour cell growth and increased apoptosis, while TXS over-expression stimulated cell proliferation and invasiveness, and was protective against apoptosis. Conclusion TXS is over-expressed in NSCLC, particularly in the adenocarcinoma subtype. Inhibition of this enzyme inhibits proliferation and induces apoptosis. Targeting thromboxane synthase alone, or in combination with conventional chemotherapy is a potential therapeutic strategy for NSCLC.

  6. The DREAM complex mediates GIST cell quiescence and is a novel therapeutic target to enhance imatinib-induced apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boichuk, Sergei; Parry, Joshua A; Makielski, Kathleen R; Litovchick, Larisa; Baron, Julianne L; Zewe, James P; Wozniak, Agnieszka; Mehalek, Keith R; Korzeniewski, Nina; Seneviratne, Danushka S; Schöffski, Patrick; Debiec-Rychter, Maria; DeCaprio, James A; Duensing, Anette

    2013-08-15

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) can be successfully treated with imatinib mesylate (Gleevec); however, complete remissions are rare and patients frequently achieve disease stabilization in the presence of residual tumor masses. The clinical observation that discontinuation of treatment can lead to tumor progression suggests that residual tumor cells are, in fact, quiescent and, therefore, able to re-enter the cell-division cycle. In line with this notion, we have previously shown that imatinib induces GIST cell quiescence in vitro through the APC(CDH1)-SKP2-p27(Kip1) signaling axis. Here, we provide evidence that imatinib induces GIST cell quiescence in vivo and that this process also involves the DREAM complex, a multisubunit complex that has recently been identified as an additional key regulator of quiescence. Importantly, inhibition of DREAM complex formation by depletion of the DREAM regulatory kinase DYRK1A or its target LIN52 was found to enhance imatinib-induced cell death. Our results show that imatinib induces apoptosis in a fraction of GIST cells while, at the same time, a subset of cells undergoes quiescence involving the DREAM complex. Inhibition of this process enhances imatinib-induced apoptosis, which opens the opportunity for future therapeutic interventions to target the DREAM complex for more efficient imatinib responses. PMID:23786773

  7. Multiple myeloma cell lines and primary tumors proteoma: protein biosynthesis and immune system as potential therapeutic targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzotti, Diego Robles; Evangelista, Adriane Feijó; Braga, Walter Moisés Tobias; de Lourdes Chauffaille, Maria; Leme, Adriana Franco Paes; Colleoni, Gisele Wally Braga

    2015-01-01

    Despite great advance in multiple myeloma (MM) treatment since 2000s, it is still an incurable disease and novel therapies are welcome. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to explore MM plasma cells' (MM-PC) proteome, in comparison with their normal counterparts (derived from palatine tonsils of normal donors, ND-PC), in order to find potential therapeutic targets expressed on the surface of these cells. We also aimed to evaluate the proteome of MM cell lines with different genetic alterations, to confirm findings obtained with primary tumor cells. Bone marrow (BM) samples from eight new cases of MM and palatine tonsils from seven unmatched controls were submitted to PC separation and, in addition to two MM cell lines (U266, RPMI-8226), were submitted to protein extraction for mass spectrometry analyses. A total of 81 proteins were differentially expressed between MM-PC and ND-PC - 72 upregulated and nine downregulated; U266 vs. RPMI 8226 cell lines presented 61 differentially expressed proteins - 51 upregulated and 10 downregulated. On primary tumors, bioinformatics analyses highlighted upregulation of protein biosynthesis machinery, as well as downregulation of immune response components, such as MHC class I and II, and complement receptors. We also provided comprehensive information about U266 and RPMI-8226 cell lines' proteome and could confirm some patients' findings. PMID:26807199

  8. Prognostic factors of the therapeutic efficacy of mTOR and VEGFR inhibitors in patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Е. А. Voroshilova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Thorough study of the molecular genetic alterations in patients with hereditary and sporadic renal cell carcinoma (RCC enabled to reveal potential therapeutic targets - vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF, platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF, growth factor receptors (VEGFR, PDGFR, EGFR, FGFR, mTOR signaling protein. Advances in targeted therapy treatment in the current therapeutic practice have brought a problem of its rational use and ultimately effective outcomes. The main solution of solving this problem is to establish independent clinical and laboratory prognostic factors and molecular markers which could predict the efficacy of targeted therapy.Objective – optimization of targeted therapy in patients with RCC by using both molecular and genetic prognostic factors as predictors of the treatment efficacy.Materials and methods. We assessed the level of mRNA expression of 13 potential target genes in primary tumor and metastatic site of patients suffering from metastatic RCC (n = 43 and evaluated the influence of the selected genes’ expression on the therapeutic efficacy of mTOR inhibitors and VEGFR inhibitors.Conclusion. VEGFR1 mRNA overexpression in metastatic site as well as mTOR and/or PI3K mRNA overexpression could be assessed as potential biomarkers in predicting the treatment efficacy of VEGFR inhibitors and mTOR inhibitors respectively. The higher expression of RAF1 mRNA and mTOR signaling pathway are not typical molecular alterations in patients with mRCC. RAF1 mRNA overexpression in metastatic site as well as activation of the alternative signaling pathway (RAS-RAF-MAPK in tumor cell are negative prognostic factors of the efficacy of targeted therapy. Activation of the signaling RAS-RAF-MAPK pathway in tumor cells is probably an alternative independent mechanism that “drives” tumor development in certain groups of patients.

  9. Lentiviral-transduced human mesenchymal stem cells persistently express therapeutic levels of enzyme in a xenotransplantation model of human disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyerrose, Todd E; Roberts, Marie; Ohlemiller, Kevin K; Vogler, Carole A; Wirthlin, Louisa; Nolta, Jan A; Sands, Mark S

    2008-07-01

    Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are a promising platform for cell- and gene-based treatment of inherited and acquired disorders. We recently showed that human MSCs distribute widely in a murine xenotransplantation model. In the current study, we have determined the distribution, persistence, and ability of lentivirally transduced human MSCs to express therapeutic levels of enzyme in a xenotransplantation model of human disease (nonobese diabetic severe combined immunodeficient mucopolysaccharidosis type VII [NOD-SCID MPSVII]). Primary human bone marrow-derived MSCs were transduced ex vivo with a lentiviral vector expressing either enhanced green fluorescent protein or the lysosomal enzyme beta-glucuronidase (MSCs-GUSB). Lentiviral transduction did not affect any in vitro parameters of MSC function or potency. One million cells from each population were transplanted intraperitoneally into separate groups of neonatal NOD-SCID MPSVII mice. Transduced MSCs persisted in the animals that underwent transplantation, and comparable numbers of donor MSCs were detected at 2 and 4 months after transplantation in multiple organs. MSCs-GUSB expressed therapeutic levels of protein in the recipients, raising circulating serum levels of GUSB to nearly 40% of normal. This level of circulating enzyme was sufficient to normalize the secondary elevation of other lysosomal enzymes and reduce lysosomal distention in several tissues. In addition, at least one physiologic marker of disease, retinal function, was normalized following transplantation of MSCs-GUSB. These data provide evidence that transduced human MSCs retain their normal trafficking ability in vivo and persist for at least 4 months, delivering therapeutic levels of protein in an authentic xenotransplantation model of human disease. PMID:18436861

  10. A role for plasma cell targeting agents in immune tolerance induction in autoimmune disease and antibody responses to therapeutic proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, A S; Pariser, A R; Diamond, B; Yao, L; Turka, L A; Lacana, E; Kishnani, P S

    2016-04-01

    Antibody responses to life saving therapeutic protein products, such as enzyme replacement therapies (ERT) in the setting of lysosomal storage diseases, have nullified product efficacy and caused clinical deterioration and death despite treatment with immune-suppressive therapies. Moreover, in some autoimmune diseases, pathology is mediated by a robust antibody response to endogenous proteins such as is the case in pulmonary alveolar proteinosis, mediated by antibodies to Granulocyte Macrophage-Colony Stimulating Factor (GM-CSF). In this work, we make the case that in such settings, when the antibody response is high titered, sustained, and refractory to immune suppressive treatments, the antibody response is mediated by long-lived plasma cells which are relatively unperturbed by immune suppressants including rituximab. However, long-lived plasma cells can be targeted by proteasome inhibitors such as bortezomib. Recent reports of successful reversal of antibody responses with bortezomib in the settings of ERT and Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura (TTP) argue that the safety and efficacy of such plasma cell targeting agents should be evaluated in larger scale clinical trials to delineate the risks and benefits of such therapies in the settings of antibody-mediated adverse effects to therapeutic proteins and autoantibody mediated pathology. PMID:26928739

  11. Treatment and prognosis of primary gastric B-cell lymphoma. Special Reference to therapeutic strategy of MALT lymphoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate the influence of therapeutic methods on the prognosis of primary gastric B-cell lymphoma, we analyzed the prognostic factors for 322 patients, comprised of 186 with low-grade mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma, 54 with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBL) plus MALT lymphoma, and 82 with DLBL without MALT lymphoma. Among them, the clinical course of 96 patients who were treated by Helicobacter pylori eradication was also evaluated. Patients who underwent stomach-conserving treatment (H. pylori eradication, chemotherapy or radiation; n=100) showed a better overall survival probability than those treated by surgery (n=222), but the progression-free probability did not differ between the two groups. After H. pylori eradication, complete remission was achieved in 55 patients, of whom histologic relapse was observed in 4 patients (7%). Second line treatment for 34 patients, who failed to respond to eradication therapy, including oral monochemotherapy with cyclophosphamide, radiation, CHOP (CHOP; cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, prednisolone) chemotherapy, and gastrectomy resulted in complete remission in 29 patients (85%). These results suggest stomach- conserving treatment to be an optimal therapeutic modality for primary gastric B-cell lymphoma. (author)

  12. Therapeutic manipulation of natural killer (NK) T cells in autoimmunity: are we close to reality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simoni, Y; Diana, J; Ghazarian, L; Beaudoin, L; Lehuen, A

    2013-01-01

    T cells reactive to lipids and restricted by major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I-like molecules represent more than 15% of all lymphocytes in human blood. This heterogeneous population of innate cells includes the invariant natural killer T cells (iNK T), type II NK T cells, CD1a,b,c-restricted T cells and mucosal-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells. These populations are implicated in cancer, infection and autoimmunity. In this review, we focus on the role of these cells in autoimmunity. We summarize data obtained in humans and preclinical models of autoimmune diseases such as primary biliary cirrhosis, type 1 diabetes, multiple