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Sample records for cells enables cooperation

  1. Autonomic computing enabled cooperative networked design

    CERN Document Server

    Wodczak, Michal

    2014-01-01

    This book introduces the concept of autonomic computing driven cooperative networked system design from an architectural perspective. As such it leverages and capitalises on the relevant advancements in both the realms of autonomic computing and networking by welding them closely together. In particular, a multi-faceted Autonomic Cooperative System Architectural Model is defined which incorporates the notion of Autonomic Cooperative Behaviour being orchestrated by the Autonomic Cooperative Networking Protocol of a cross-layer nature. The overall proposed solution not only advocates for the inc

  2. Cooperative cognitive radio networking system model, enabling techniques, and performance

    CERN Document Server

    Cao, Bin; Mark, Jon W

    2016-01-01

    This SpringerBrief examines the active cooperation between users of Cooperative Cognitive Radio Networking (CCRN), exploring the system model, enabling techniques, and performance. The brief provides a systematic study on active cooperation between primary users and secondary users, i.e., (CCRN), followed by the discussions on research issues and challenges in designing spectrum-energy efficient CCRN. As an effort to shed light on the design of spectrum-energy efficient CCRN, they model the CCRN based on orthogonal modulation and orthogonally dual-polarized antenna (ODPA). The resource allocation issues are detailed with respect to both models, in terms of problem formulation, solution approach, and numerical results. Finally, the optimal communication strategies for both primary and secondary users to achieve spectrum-energy efficient CCRN are analyzed.

  3. A cooperative positioning algorithm for DSRC enabled vehicular networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efatmaneshnik, M.; Kealy, A.; Alam, N.; Dempster, A. G.

    2011-12-01

    Many of the safety related applications that can be facilitated by Dedicated Short Range Communications (DSRC), such as vehicle proximity warnings, automated braking (e.g. at level crossings), speed advisories, pedestrian alerts etc., rely on a robust vehicle positioning capability such as that provided by a Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS). Vehicles in remote areas, entering tunnels, high rise areas or any high multipath/ weak signal environment will challenge the integrity of GNSS position solutions, and ultimately the safety application it underpins. To address this challenge, this paper presents an innovative application of Cooperative Positioning techniques within vehicular networks. CP refers to any method of integrating measurements from different positioning systems and sensors in order to improve the overall quality (accuracy and reliability) of the final position solution. This paper investigates the potential of the DSRC infrastructure itself to provide an inter-vehicular ranging signal that can be used as a measurement within the CP algorithm. In this paper, time-based techniques of ranging are introduced and bandwidth requirements are investigated and presented. The robustness of the CP algorithm to inter-vehicle connection failure as well as GNSS dropouts is also demonstrated using simulation studies. Finally, the performance of the Constrained Kalman Filter used to integrate GNSS measurements with DSRC derived range estimates within a typical VANET is described and evaluated.

  4. Origami-enabled deformable silicon solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Rui; Huang, Hai; Liang, Hanshuang; Liang, Mengbing [School of Electrical, Computer and Energy Engineering, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287 (United States); Tu, Hongen; Xu, Yong [Electrical and Computer Engineering, Wayne State University, 5050 Anthony Wayne Dr., Detroit, Michigan 48202 (United States); Song, Zeming; Jiang, Hanqing, E-mail: hanqing.jiang@asu.edu [School for Engineering of Matter, Transport and Energy, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287 (United States); Yu, Hongyu, E-mail: hongyu.yu@asu.edu [School of Electrical, Computer and Energy Engineering, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287 (United States); School of Earth and Space Exploration, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287 (United States)

    2014-02-24

    Deformable electronics have found various applications and elastomeric materials have been widely used to reach flexibility and stretchability. In this Letter, we report an alternative approach to enable deformability through origami. In this approach, the deformability is achieved through folding and unfolding at the creases while the functional devices do not experience strain. We have demonstrated an example of origami-enabled silicon solar cells and showed that this solar cell can reach up to 644% areal compactness while maintaining reasonable good performance upon cyclic folding/unfolding. This approach opens an alternative direction of producing flexible, stretchable, and deformable electronics.

  5. Dynamical bond cooperativity enables very fast and strong binding between sliding surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Trømborg, Jørgen Kjoshagen

    2015-01-01

    Cooperative binding affects many processes in biology, but it is commonly addressed only in equilibrium. In this work we explore dynamical cooperativity in driven systems, where the cooperation occurs because some of the bonds change the dynamical response of the system to a regime where the other bonds become active. To investigate such cooperativity we study the frictional binding between two flow driven surfaces that interact through a large population of activated bonds. In particular, we study systems where each bond can have two different modes: one mode corresponds to a fast forming yet weak bond, and the other is a strong yet slow forming bond. We find considerable cooperativity between both types of bonds. Under some conditions the system behaves as if there were only one binding mode, corresponding to a strong and fast forming bond. Our results may have important implications on the friction and adhesion between sliding surfaces containing complementary binding motifs, such as in the case of cells b...

  6. Robust Technique for Measuring and Simulating Silicon Wafer Quality Characteristics that Enable the Prediction of Solar Cell Electrical Performance of MEMC Silicon Wafer. Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-11-438

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sopori, Bhushan [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2015-12-01

    NREL and MEMC Electronic Materials are interested in developing a robust technique for monitoring material quality of mc-Si and mono-Si wafers -- a technique that can provide relevant data to accurately predict the performance of solar cells fabricated on them. Previous work, performed under two TSAs between NREL and MEMC, has established that dislocation clusters are the dominant performance-limiting factor in MEMC mc-Si solar cells. The work under this CRADA will go further in verifying these results on a larger data set, evaluate possibilities of faster method(s) for mapping dislocations in wafers/ingots, understanding dislocation generation during ingot casting, and helping MEMC to have an internal capability for basic characterization that will provide feedback needed for more accurate crystallization simulations. NREL has already developed dislocation mapping technique and developed a basic electronic model (called Network Model) that uses spatial distribution of dislocations to predict the cell performance. In this CRADA work, we will use these techniques to: (i) establish dislocation, grain size, and grain orientation distributions of the entire ingots (through appropriate DOE) and compare these with theoretical models developed by MEMC, (ii) determine concentrations of some relevant impurities in selected wafers, (iii) evaluate potential of using photoluminescence for dislocation mapping and identification of recombination centers, (iv) evaluate use of diode array analysis as a detailed characterization tool, and (v) establish dislocation mapping as a wafer-quality monitoring tool for commercial mc-Si production.

  7. Group cell architecture for cooperative communications

    CERN Document Server

    Tao, Xiaofeng; Xu, Xiaodong

    2012-01-01

    Driven by the increasing demand for capacity and Quality of Service in wireless cellular networks and motivated by the distributed antenna system, the authors proposed a cooperative communication architecture - Group Cell architecture, which was initially brought forward in 2001. Years later, Coordinated Multiple-Point Transmission and Reception (CoMP) for LTE-Advanced was put forward in April 2008, as a tool to improve the coverage of cells having high data rates, the cell-edge throughput and/or to increase system throughput. This book mainly focuses on the Group Cell architecture with multi-

  8. Cooperative retraction of bundled type IV pili enables nanonewton force generation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Biais

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available The causative agent of gonorrhea, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, bears retractable filamentous appendages called type IV pili (Tfp. Tfp are used by many pathogenic and nonpathogenic bacteria to carry out a number of vital functions, including DNA uptake, twitching motility (crawling over surfaces, and attachment to host cells. In N. gonorrhoeae, Tfp binding to epithelial cells and the mechanical forces associated with this binding stimulate signaling cascades and gene expression that enhance infection. Retraction of a single Tfp filament generates forces of 50-100 piconewtons, but nothing is known, thus far, on the retraction force ability of multiple Tfp filaments, even though each bacterium expresses multiple Tfp and multiple bacteria interact during infection. We designed a micropillar assay system to measure Tfp retraction forces. This system consists of an array of force sensors made of elastic pillars that allow quantification of retraction forces from adherent N. gonorrhoeae bacteria. Electron microscopy and fluorescence microscopy were used in combination with this novel assay to assess the structures of Tfp. We show that Tfp can form bundles, which contain up to 8-10 Tfp filaments, that act as coordinated retractable units with forces up to 10 times greater than single filament retraction forces. Furthermore, single filament retraction forces are transient, whereas bundled filaments produce retraction forces that can be sustained. Alterations of noncovalent protein-protein interactions between Tfp can inhibit both bundle formation and high-amplitude retraction forces. Retraction forces build over time through the recruitment and bundling of multiple Tfp that pull cooperatively to generate forces in the nanonewton range. We propose that Tfp retraction can be synchronized through bundling, that Tfp bundle retraction can generate forces in the nanonewton range in vivo, and that such high forces could affect infection.

  9. A mixture of "cheats" and "co-operators" can enable maximal group benefit.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Craig MaClean

    Full Text Available Is a group best off if everyone co-operates? Theory often considers this to be so (e.g. the "conspiracy of doves", this understanding underpinning social and economic policy. We observe, however, that after competition between "cheat" and "co-operator" strains of yeast, population fitness is maximized under co-existence. To address whether this might just be a peculiarity of our experimental system or a result with broader applicability, we assemble, benchmark, dissect, and test a systems model. This reveals the conditions necessary to recover the unexpected result. These are 3-fold: (a that resources are used inefficiently when they are abundant, (b that the amount of co-operation needed cannot be accurately assessed, and (c the population is structured, such that co-operators receive more of the resource than the cheats. Relaxing any of the assumptions can lead to population fitness being maximized when cheats are absent, which we experimentally demonstrate. These three conditions will often be relevant, and hence in order to understand the trajectory of social interactions, understanding the dynamics of the efficiency of resource utilization and accuracy of information will be necessary.

  10. Interference Alignment Through User Cooperation for Two-cell MIMO Interfering Broadcast Channels

    CERN Document Server

    Shin, Wonjae; Lim, Jong-Bu; Shin, Changyong; Jang, Kyunghun

    2010-01-01

    This paper focuses on two-cell multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) Gaussian interfering broadcast channels (MIMO-IFBC) with $K$ cooperating users on the cell-boundary of each BS. It corresponds to a downlink scenario for cellular networks with two base stations (BSs), and $K$ users equipped with Wi-Fi interfaces enabling to cooperate among users on a peer-to-peer basis. In this scenario, we propose a novel interference alignment (IA) technique exploiting user cooperation. Our proposed algorithm obtains the achievable degrees of freedom (DoF) of 2K when each BS and user have $M=K+1$ transmit antennas and $N=K$ receive antennas, respectively. Furthermore, the algorithm requires only a small amount of channel feedback information with the aid of the user cooperation channels. The simulations demonstrate that not only are the analytical results valid, but the achievable DoF of our proposed algorithm also outperforms those of conventional techniques.

  11. EGFR cooperates with glucose transporter SGLT1 to enable chromatin remodeling in response to ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: EGFR and the sodium-dependent glucose transporter, SGLT1, are found in complex after radiation treatment. The aim of this study was to elucidate the role of EGFR in glucose uptake and chromatin remodeling. Material and methods: Glucose accumulation was quantified with help of 3H-glucose. Involvement of SGLT was detected by a specific inhibitor. Role of EGFR was proved by EGFR overexpression and siRNA driven knockdown. Functional endpoints were intracellular ATP levels, protein expression, residual DNA-damage and colony formation. Results: EGFR/SGLT1 interactions in response to ionizing radiation were associated with increased glucose uptake. Nevertheless, tumor cells exhibit ATP depletion following irradiation. Recovery from radiation-induced ATP crisis was EGFR/SGLT-dependent and associated with increased cell survival and improved DNA-repair. The blockage of either EGFR or SGLT inhibited ATP level recovery and histone H3 modifications crucial for both chromatin remodeling and DNA repair in response to irradiation. Inhibition of the acetyltransferase TIP60, which is essential for histone H3-K9 acetylation and ATM activation, prevented energy crisis and chromatin remodeling. Conclusions: Radiation-associated interactions between SGLT1 and EGFR resulted in increased glucose uptake, which counteracts the ATP crisis in tumor cells due to chromatin remodeling. The blockage of recovery from ATP crisis led to radio-sensitization in tumor cells

  12. Impact of Base Station Cooperation on Cell Planning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian Dexter Garcia

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Base station cooperation (BSC has been identified as a key radio access technology for next-generation cellular networks such as LTE-Advanced. BSC impacts cell planning, which is the methodical selection of base station (BS sites, and BS equipment configuration for cost-effective cellular networks. In this paper, the impact of BSC on cell plan parameters (coverage, traffic, handover, and cost, as well as additional cell planning steps required for BSC are discussed. Results show that BSC maximizes its gains over noncooperation (NC in a network wherein interference from cooperating BSs is the main limitation. Locations exist where NC may produce higher throughputs, therefore dynamic or semistatic switching between BSC and NC, called fractional BSC, is recommended. Because of interference from noncooperating BSs, the gains of BSC over NC are upper bounded, and diminishes at greater intersite distances because of noise. This encourages smaller cell sizes, higher transmit powers, and dynamic clustering of cooperative BSs.

  13. cRGD-installed polymeric micelles loading platinum anticancer drugs enable cooperative treatment against lymph node metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makino, Jun; Cabral, Horacio; Miura, Yutaka; Matsumoto, Yu; Wang, Ming; Kinoh, Hiroaki; Mochida, Yuki; Nishiyama, Nobuhiro; Kataoka, Kazunori

    2015-12-28

    Lymph node metastasis (LNM) is correlated with decreased survival, indicating high tumor malignancy and being a potential source for subsequent fatal metastases. Targeted therapies inhibiting the formation of LNM, while eliminating established metastatic foci, could provide synergistic effects by reducing the incidence and growth of metastasis. Based on the inhibitory activity of cRGD peptide against the development of metastasis, and the LNM targeting ability of systemically injected drug-loaded polymeric micelles, herein, we studied the capability of cRGD-installed polymeric micelles incorporating the platinum anticancer drug (1,2-diaminocylohexane)platinum(II) (DACHPt) for cooperatively inhibiting the formation and progression of LNM. As cRGD-installed DACHPt-loaded micelles (cRGD-DACHPt/m) presented similar size, drug loading and surface charge to non-conjugated micelles (MeO-DACHPt/m), the differences in the biological performance of the micelles were endorsed to the effect of the ligand. In a syngeneic melanoma model, both MeO-DACHPt/m and cRGD-DACHPt/m showed comparable antitumor activity against the primary tumors and the established metastatic foci in lymph nodes. However, cRGD-DACHPt/m significantly enhanced the efficacy against LNM draining from primary tumors through the effective inhibition of the spreading of cancer cells. This improved inhibition was associated with the ability of cRGD-DACHPt/m to reduce the migration of melanoma cells, which was higher than that of MeO-DACHPt/m, free cRGD and their combination. These results support our strategy of using cRGD-installed micelles for attaining cooperative therapies against LNM exploiting the inhibitory function of the peptide and the cytotoxic effect of the micelles. PMID:26474676

  14. Novel Serial Positive Enrichment Technology Enables Clinical Multiparameter Cell Sorting

    OpenAIRE

    Christian Stemberger; Stefan Dreher; Claudia Tschulik; Christine Piossek; Jeannette Bet; Yamamoto, Tori N.; Matthias Schiemann; Michael Neuenhahn; Klaus Martin; Martin Schlapschy; Arne Skerra; Thomas Schmidt; Matthias Edinger; Riddell, Stanley R.; Lothar Germeroth

    2012-01-01

    A general obstacle for clinical cell preparations is limited purity, which causes variability in the quality and potency of cell products and might be responsible for negative side effects due to unwanted contaminants. Highly pure populations can be obtained best using positive selection techniques. However, in many cases target cell populations need to be segregated from other cells by combinations of multiple markers, which is still difficult to achieve--especially for clinical cell product...

  15. Targeting Cancer Stem Cells with Nanoparticle-Enabled Therapies

    OpenAIRE

    Burke, Andrew R.; Singh, Ravi N.; Carroll, David L.; Torti, Frank M.; Torti, Suzy V.

    2012-01-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that multiple tumor types are sustained by a small population of transformed stem-like cells that have the ability to both self-renew and give rise to non-tumorigenic daughter cells that constitute the bulk of a tumor. These cells, which generally constitute a minority of the overall cancer cell population, are highly resistant to conventional therapies and persist following treatment, leading to disease relapse and the formation of distant metastases. Therapies tha...

  16. Research highlights: microfluidic-enabled single-cell epigenetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhar, Manjima; Khojah, Reem; Tay, Andy; Di Carlo, Dino

    2015-11-01

    Individual cells are the fundamental unit of life with diverse functions from metabolism to motility. In multicellular organisms, a single genome can give rise to tremendous variability across tissues at the single-cell level due to epigenetic differences in the genes that are expressed. Signals from the local environment or a history of signals can drive these variations, and tissues have many cell types that play separate roles. This epigenetic heterogeneity is of biological importance in normal functions such as tissue morphogenesis and can contribute to development or resistance of cancer, or other disease states. Therefore, an improved understanding of variations at the single cell level are fundamental to understanding biology and developing new approaches to combating disease. Traditional approaches to characterize epigenetic modifications of chromatin or the transcriptome of cells have often focused on blended responses of many cells in a tissue; however, such bulk measures lose spatial and temporal differences that occur from cell to cell, and cannot uncover novel or rare populations of cells. Here we highlight a flurry of recent activity to identify the mRNA profiles from thousands of single-cells as well as chromatin accessibility and histone marks on single to few hundreds of cells. Microfluidics and microfabrication have played a central role in the range of new techniques, and will likely continue to impact their further development towards routine single-cell epigenetic analysis. PMID:26405849

  17. Microbuckling in fibrin networks enables long-range cell mechanosensing

    CERN Document Server

    Notbohm, Jacob; Rosakis, Phoebus; Tirrell, David A; Ravichandran, Guruswami

    2014-01-01

    We show that cells in a fibrous matrix induce deformation fields that propagate over a longer range than predicted by linear elasticity. Synthetic, linear elastic hydrogels used in many mechanotrans- duction studies fail to capture this effect. We develop a nonlinear microstructural finite element model for a fiber network to simulate localized deformations induced by cells. The model captures measured cell-induced matrix displacements from experiments and identifies an important mech- anism for long range cell mechanosensing: loss of compression stiffness due to microbuckling of individual fibers. We show evidence that cells sense each other through the formation of localized intercellular bands of tensile deformations caused by this mechanism.

  18. A simple physical mechanism enables homeostasis in primitive cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelhart, Aaron E.; Adamala, Katarzyna P.; Szostak, Jack W.

    2016-05-01

    The emergence of homeostatic mechanisms that enable maintenance of an intracellular steady state during growth was critical to the advent of cellular life. Here, we show that concentration-dependent reversible binding of short oligonucleotides, of both specific and random sequence, can modulate ribozyme activity. In both cases, catalysis is inhibited at high concentrations, and dilution activates the ribozyme via inhibitor dissociation, thus maintaining near-constant ribozyme specific activity throughout protocell growth. To mimic the result of RNA synthesis within non-growing protocells, we co-encapsulated high concentrations of ribozyme and oligonucleotides within fatty acid vesicles, and ribozyme activity was inhibited. Following vesicle growth, the resulting internal dilution produced ribozyme activation. This simple physical system enables a primitive homeostatic behaviour: the maintenance of constant ribozyme activity per unit volume during protocell volume changes. We suggest that such systems, wherein short oligonucleotides reversibly inhibit functional RNAs, could have preceded sophisticated modern RNA regulatory mechanisms, such as those involving miRNAs.

  19. Novel serial positive enrichment technology enables clinical multiparameter cell sorting.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Stemberger

    Full Text Available A general obstacle for clinical cell preparations is limited purity, which causes variability in the quality and potency of cell products and might be responsible for negative side effects due to unwanted contaminants. Highly pure populations can be obtained best using positive selection techniques. However, in many cases target cell populations need to be segregated from other cells by combinations of multiple markers, which is still difficult to achieve--especially for clinical cell products. Therefore, we have generated low-affinity antibody-derived Fab-fragments, which stain like parental antibodies when multimerized via Strep-tag and Strep-Tactin, but can subsequently be removed entirely from the target cell population. Such reagents can be generated for virtually any antigen and can be used for sequential positive enrichment steps via paramagnetic beads. First protocols for multiparameter enrichment of two clinically relevant cell populations, CD4(high/CD25(high/CD45RA(high 'regulatory T cells' and CD8(high/CD62L(high/CD45RA(neg 'central memory T cells', have been established to determine quality and efficacy parameters of this novel technology, which should have broad applicability for clinical cell sorting as well as basic research.

  20. Cell wall staining with Trypan blue enables quantitative analysis of morphological changes in yeast cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liesche, Johannes; Marek, Magdalena; Günther-Pomorski, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    staining with fluorescent dyes is a valuable tool. Furthermore, cell wall staining is used to facilitate sub-cellular localization experiments with fluorescently-labeled proteins and the detection of yeast cells in non-fungal host tissues. Here, we report staining of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cell wall with...... Trypan Blue, which emits strong red fluorescence upon binding to chitin and yeast glucan; thereby, it facilitates cell wall analysis by confocal and super-resolution microscopy. The staining pattern of Trypan Blue was similar to that of the widely used UV-excitable, blue fluorescent cell wall stain...... Calcofluor White. Trypan Blue staining facilitated quantification of cell size and cell wall volume when utilizing the optical sectioning capacity of a confocal microscope. This enabled the quantification of morphological changes during growth under anaerobic conditions and in the presence of chemicals...

  1. Novel Serial Positive Enrichment Technology Enables Clinical Multiparameter Cell Sorting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tschulik, Claudia; Piossek, Christine; Bet, Jeannette; Yamamoto, Tori N.; Schiemann, Matthias; Neuenhahn, Michael; Martin, Klaus; Schlapschy, Martin; Skerra, Arne; Schmidt, Thomas; Edinger, Matthias; Riddell, Stanley R.; Germeroth, Lothar; Busch, Dirk H.

    2012-01-01

    A general obstacle for clinical cell preparations is limited purity, which causes variability in the quality and potency of cell products and might be responsible for negative side effects due to unwanted contaminants. Highly pure populations can be obtained best using positive selection techniques. However, in many cases target cell populations need to be segregated from other cells by combinations of multiple markers, which is still difficult to achieve – especially for clinical cell products. Therefore, we have generated low-affinity antibody-derived Fab-fragments, which stain like parental antibodies when multimerized via Strep-tag and Strep-Tactin, but can subsequently be removed entirely from the target cell population. Such reagents can be generated for virtually any antigen and can be used for sequential positive enrichment steps via paramagnetic beads. First protocols for multiparameter enrichment of two clinically relevant cell populations, CD4high/CD25high/CD45RAhigh ‘regulatory T cells’ and CD8high/CD62Lhigh/CD45RAneg ‘central memory T cells’, have been established to determine quality and efficacy parameters of this novel technology, which should have broad applicability for clinical cell sorting as well as basic research. PMID:22545138

  2. The Voltage Boost Enabled by Luminescence Extraction in Solar Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ganapati, Vidya; Steiner, Myles A.; Yablonovitch, Eli

    2016-07-01

    Over the past few years, the application of the physical principle, i.e., 'luminescence extraction,' has produced record voltages and efficiencies in photovoltaic cells. Luminescence extraction is the use of optical design, such as a back mirror or textured surfaces, to help internal photons escape out of the front surface of a solar cell. The principle of luminescence extraction is exemplified by the mantra 'a good solar cell should also be a good LED.' Basic thermodynamics says that the voltage boost should be related to concentration ratio C of a resource by ..delta..V = (kT/q) ln{C}. In light trapping (i.e., when the solar cell is textured and has a perfect back mirror), the concentration ratio of photons C = {4n2}; therefore, one would expect a voltage boost of ..delta..V = (kT/q) ln{4n2} over a solar cell with no texture and zero back reflectivity, where n is the refractive index. Nevertheless, there has been ambiguity over the voltage benefit to be expected from perfect luminescence extraction. Do we gain an open-circuit voltage boost of ..delta..V = (kT/q) ln{n2}, ..delta..V = (kT/q) ln{2 n2}, or ..delta..V = (kT/q) ln{4 n2}? What is responsible for this voltage ambiguity ..delta..V = (kT/q) ln{4} [equivalent to] 36 mV? We show that different results come about, depending on whether the photovoltaic cell is optically thin or thick to its internal luminescence. In realistic intermediate cases of optical thickness, the voltage boost falls in between: ln{n2} < (q..delta..V/kT) < ln{4n 2}.

  3. T cells cooperate with palmitic acid in induction of beta cell apoptosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miljković Djordje

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Diabetes is characterized by progressive failure of insulin producing beta cells. It is well known that both saturated fatty acids and various products of immune cells can contribute to the reduction of beta cell viability and functionality during diabetes pathogenesis. However, their joint action on beta cells has not been investigated, so far. Therefore, we explored the possibility that leukocytes and saturated fatty acids cooperate in beta cell destruction. Results Rat pancreatic islets or insulinoma cells (RIN were co-cultivated with concanavalin A (ConA-stimulated rat lymph node cells (LNC, or they were treated with cell-free supernatants (Sn obtained from ConA-stimulated spleen cells or from activated CD3+ cells, in the absence or presence of palmitic acid (PA. ConA-stimulated LNC or Sn and PA cooperated in inducing caspase-3-dependent RIN cell apoptosis. The observed effect of PA and Sn on RIN cell viability was mediated by p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK-signaling and was achieved through auto-destructive nitric oxide (NO production. The cooperative effect of Sn was mimicked with the combination of interleukin-1β, interleukin-2, interleukin-6, interleukin-17, interferon-γ and tumor necrosis factor-α. Conclusion These results imply that stimulated T cells produce cytokines that cooperate with saturated free fatty acids in beta cell destruction during diabetes pathogenesis.

  4. Imaging retinal ganglion cells: enabling experimental technology for clinical application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Corey A; Chauhan, Balwantray C

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in clinical ophthalmic imaging have enhanced patient care. However, the ability to differentiate retinal neurons, such as retinal ganglion cells (RGCs), would advance many areas within ophthalmology, including the screening and monitoring of glaucoma and other optic neuropathies. Imaging at the single cell level would take diagnostics to the next level. Experimental methods have provided techniques and insight into imaging RGCs, however no method has yet to be translated to clinical application. This review provides an overview of the importance of non-invasive imaging of RGCs and the clinically relevant capabilities. In addition, we report on experimental data from wild-type mice that received an in vivo intravitreal injection of a neuronal tracer that labelled RGCs, which in turn were monitored for up to 100 days post-injection with confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscopy. We were able to demonstrate efficient and consistent RGC labelling with this delivery method and discuss the issue of cell specificity. This type of experimental work is important in progressing towards clinically applicable methods for monitoring loss of RGCs in glaucoma and other optic neuropathies. We discuss the challenges to translating these findings to clinical application and how this method of tracking RGCs in vivo could provide valuable structural and functional information to clinicians. PMID:25448921

  5. Ultrasonic radiation to enable improvement of direct methanol fuel cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chaoqun; Wu, Jiang; Luo, Hao; Wang, Sanwu; Chen, Tao

    2016-03-01

    To improve DMFC (direct methanol fuel cell) performance, a new method using ultrasonic radiation is proposed and a novel DMFC structure is designed and fabricated in the present paper. Three ultrasonic transducers (piezoelectric transducer, PZT) are integrated in the flow field plate to form the ultrasonic field in the liquid fuel. Ultrasonic frequency, acoustic power, and methanol concentration have been considered as variables in the experiments. With the help of ultrasonic radiation, the maximum output power and limiting current of cell can be independently increased by 30.73% and 40.54%, respectively. The best performance of DMFC is obtained at the condition of ultrasonic radiation (30 kHz and 4 W) fed with 2M methanol solution, because both its limiting current and output power reach their maximum value simultaneously (222 mA and 33.6 mW, respectively) under this condition. These results conclude that ultrasonic can be an alternative choice for improving the cell performance, and can facilitate a guideline for the optimization of DMFC. PMID:26585016

  6. A modular suite of hardware enabling spaceflight cell culture research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoehn, Alexander; Klaus, David M.; Stodieck, Louis S.

    2004-01-01

    BioServe Space Technologies, a NASA Research Partnership Center (RPC), has developed and operated various middeck payloads launched on 23 shuttle missions since 1991 in support of commercial space biotechnology projects. Modular cell culture systems are contained within the Commercial Generic Bioprocessing Apparatus (CGBA) suite of flight-qualified hardware, compatible with Space Shuttle, SPACEHAB, Spacelab and International Space Station (ISS) EXPRESS Rack interfaces. As part of the CGBA family, the Isothermal Containment Module (ICM) incubator provides thermal control, data acquisition and experiment manipulation capabilities, including accelerometer launch detection for automated activation and thermal profiling for culture incubation and sample preservation. The ICM can accommodate up to 8 individually controlled temperature zones. Command and telemetry capabilities allow real-time downlink of data and video permitting remote payload operation and ground control synchronization. Individual cell culture experiments can be accommodated in a variety of devices ranging from 'microgravity test tubes' or standard 100 mm Petri dishes, to complex, fed-batch bioreactors with automated culture feeding, waste removal and multiple sample draws. Up to 3 levels of containment can be achieved for chemical fixative addition, and passive gas exchange can be provided through hydrophobic membranes. Many additional options exist for designing customized hardware depending on specific science requirements.

  7. A surface plasmon enabled liquid-junction photovoltaic cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Woo-ram; Mubeen, Syed; Stucky, Galen D; Moskovits, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Plasmonic nanosystems have recently been shown to be capable of functioning as photovoltaics and of carrying out redox photochemistry, purportedly using the energetic electrons and holes created following plasmonic decay as charge carriers. Although such devices currently have low efficiency, they already manifest a number of favorable characteristics, such as their tunability over the entire solar spectrum and a remarkable resistance to photocorrosion. Here, we report a plasmonic photovoltaic using a 25 μm thick electrolytic liquid junction which supports the iodide/triiodide (I-/I3-) redox couple. The device produces photocurrent densities in excess of 40 μA cm(-2), an open circuit voltage (Voc) of ∼0.24 V and a fill factor of ∼0.5 using AM 1.5 G solar radiation at 100 mW cm(-2). The photocurrent and the power conversion efficiency are primarily limited by the low light absorption in the 2-D gold nanoparticle arrays. The use of a liquid junction greatly reduces dielectric breakdown in the oxide layers utilized, which must be very thin for optimal performance, leading to a great improvement in the long-term stability of the cell's performance. PMID:25740725

  8. Enabling stem cell therapies through synthetic stem cell–niche engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Peerani, Raheem; Zandstra, Peter W.

    2010-01-01

    Enabling stem cell–targeted therapies requires an understanding of how to create local microenvironments (niches) that stimulate endogenous stem cells or serve as a platform to receive and guide the integration of transplanted stem cells and their derivatives. In vivo, the stem cell niche is a complex and dynamic unit. Although components of the in vivo niche continue to be described for many stem cell systems, how these components interact to modulate stem cell fate is only beginning to be u...

  9. Cell cooperation in coelomocyte cytotoxic activity of Paracentrotus lividus coelomocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arizza, Vincenzo; Giaramita, Francesca Tiziana; Parrinello, Daniela; Cammarata, Matteo; Parrinello, Nicolò

    2007-06-01

    The coelomic fluid from the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus contains several coelomocyte types including amoebocytes and uncoloured spherulocytes involved in immune defences. In the present paper, we show a Ca(2+)-dependent cytotoxic activity for the unfractionated coelomocytes assayed in vitro, with rabbit erythrocytes and the K562 tumour cell line. In a plaque-forming assay, whole coelomocyte preparations as well as density gradient separated coelomocyte populations revealed that cell populations enriched in uncoloured spherulocytes, exerted high cytotoxic activity by releasing lysins in the presence of amoebocytes. This cooperative effect could be dependent on soluble factors released by amoebocytes. With regard to this, we show that an enhanced cytotoxic activity was found by adding the supernatant from sonicated amoebocytes or hemocyte culture medium into spherulocyte preparations. PMID:17329136

  10. International cooperation on methanol-based fuel cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An international agreement on co-operation to study the use of cars powered by methanol-based fuel cells was signed in September 2000. This indicates that gas will have to compete on the future fuel market. According to the agreement, measures will be taken to ease the introduction of such cars when they are commercialized. Methanol represents a fuel that can be distributed throughout most of the world within realistic economical bounds by means of the existing infrastructure. A global market analysis based on the assumption that there will be a billion cars in the world by 2020 shows the great potential for the use of fuel cells. In addition, they are environmentally sound. Technological developments of fuel cells during the latest decade may render traditional combustion engines obsolete. Methanol is a liquid at room temperature and can be stored in the fuel tank just like ordinary fuels. Petrol, liquefied petroleum gas, natural gas, ethanol and methanol can all be used in a fuel cell engine, but since the technology is based on chemical energy conversion, the most suitable fuel is one that is hydrogen-rich and easily stored. Many experts favour liquid hydrogen. However, liquid hydrogen has many problems in common with liquefied natural gas or cooled liquid natural gas: about 25% of the energy is used in keeping the fuel in the liquid state

  11. Protein viscosity, mineral fraction and staggered architecture cooperatively enable the fastest stress wave decay in load-bearing biological materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qwamizadeh, Mahan; Zhang, Zuoqi; Zhou, Kun; Zhang, Yong Wei

    2016-07-01

    One of the key functions of load-bearing biological materials, such as bone, dentin and sea shell, is to protect their inside fragile organs by effectively damping dynamic impact. How those materials achieve this remarkable function remains largely unknown. Using systematic finite element analyses, we study the stress wave propagation and attenuation in cortical bone at the nanoscale as a model material to examine the effects of protein viscosity, mineral fraction and staggered architecture on the elastic wave decay. It is found that the staggered arrangement, protein viscosity and mineral fraction work cooperatively to effectively attenuate the stress wave. For a typical mineral volume fraction and protein viscosity, an optimal staggered nanostructure with specific feature sizes and layouts is able to give rise to the fastest stress wave decay, and the optimal aspect ratio and thickness of mineral platelets are in excellent agreement with experimental measurements. In contrary, as the mineral volume fraction or the protein viscosity goes much higher, the structural arrangement is seen having trivial effect on the stress wave decay, suggesting that the damping properties of the composites go into the structure-insensitive regime from the structure-sensitive regime. These findings not only significantly add to our understanding of the structure-function relationship of load-bearing biological materials, and but also provide useful guidelines for the design of bio-inspired materials with superior resistance to impact loading. PMID:26925698

  12. Single-cell PCR of genomic DNA enabled by automated single-cell printing for cell isolation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stumpf, F; Schoendube, J; Gross, A; Rath, C; Niekrawietz, S; Koltay, P; Roth, G

    2015-07-15

    Single-cell analysis has developed into a key topic in cell biology with future applications in personalized medicine, tumor identification as well as tumor discovery (Editorial, 2013). Here we employ inkjet-like printing to isolate individual living single human B cells (Raji cell line) and load them directly into standard PCR tubes. Single cells are optically detected in the nozzle of the microfluidic piezoelectric dispenser chip to ensure printing of droplets with single cells only. The printing process has been characterized by using microbeads (10µm diameter) resulting in a single bead delivery in 27 out of 28 cases and relative positional precision of ±350µm at a printing distance of 6mm between nozzle and tube lid. Process-integrated optical imaging enabled to identify the printing failure as void droplet and to exclude it from downstream processing. PCR of truly single-cell DNA was performed without pre-amplification directly from single Raji cells with 33% success rate (N=197) and Cq values of 36.3±2.5. Additionally single cell whole genome amplification (WGA) was employed to pre-amplify the single-cell DNA by a factor of >1000. This facilitated subsequent PCR for the same gene yielding a success rate of 64% (N=33) which will allow more sophisticated downstream analysis like sequencing, electrophoresis or multiplexing. PMID:25771302

  13. Pyruvate carboxylation enables growth of SDH-deficient cells by supporting aspartate biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardaci, Simone; Zheng, Liang; MacKay, Gillian; van den Broek, Niels J F; MacKenzie, Elaine D; Nixon, Colin; Stevenson, David; Tumanov, Sergey; Bulusu, Vinay; Kamphorst, Jurre J; Vazquez, Alexei; Fleming, Stewart; Schiavi, Francesca; Kalna, Gabriela; Blyth, Karen; Strathdee, Douglas; Gottlieb, Eyal

    2015-10-01

    Succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) is a heterotetrameric nuclear-encoded complex responsible for the oxidation of succinate to fumarate in the tricarboxylic acid cycle. Loss-of-function mutations in any of the SDH genes are associated with cancer formation. However, the impact of SDH loss on cell metabolism and the mechanisms enabling growth of SDH-defective cells are largely unknown. Here, we generated Sdhb-ablated kidney mouse cells and used comparative metabolomics and stable-isotope-labelling approaches to identify nutritional requirements and metabolic adaptations to SDH loss. We found that lack of SDH activity commits cells to consume extracellular pyruvate, which sustains Warburg-like bioenergetic features. We further demonstrated that pyruvate carboxylation diverts glucose-derived carbons into aspartate biosynthesis, thus sustaining cell growth. By identifying pyruvate carboxylase as essential for the proliferation and tumorigenic capacity of SDH-deficient cells, this study revealed a metabolic vulnerability for potential future treatment of SDH-associated malignancies. PMID:26302408

  14. Cooperation between distinct viral variants promotes growth of H3N2 influenza in cell culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Katherine S; Hooper, Kathryn A; Ollodart, Anja R; Dingens, Adam S; Bloom, Jesse D

    2016-01-01

    RNA viruses rapidly diversify into quasispecies of related genotypes. This genetic diversity has long been known to facilitate adaptation, but recent studies have suggested that cooperation between variants might also increase population fitness. Here, we demonstrate strong cooperation between two H3N2 influenza variants that differ by a single mutation at residue 151 in neuraminidase, which normally mediates viral exit from host cells. Residue 151 is often annotated as an ambiguous amino acid in sequenced isolates, indicating mixed viral populations. We show that mixed populations grow better than either variant alone in cell culture. Pure populations of either variant generate the other through mutation and then stably maintain a mix of the two genotypes. We suggest that cooperation arises because mixed populations combine one variant's proficiency at cell entry with the other's proficiency at cell exit. Our work demonstrates a specific cooperative interaction between defined variants in a viral quasispecies. PMID:26978794

  15. Utilizing Cytokines to Function-Enable Human NK Cells for the Immunotherapy of Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rizwan Romee

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Natural killer (NK cells are innate lymphoid cells important for host defense against pathogens and mediate antitumor immunity. Cytokine receptors transduce important signals that regulate proliferation, survival, activation status, and trigger effector functions. Here, we review the roles of major cytokines that regulate human NK cell development, survival, and function, including IL-2, IL-12, IL-15, IL-18, and IL-21, and their translation to the clinic as immunotherapy agents. We highlight a recent development in NK cell biology, the identification of innate NK cell memory, and focus on cytokine-induced memory-like (CIML NK cells that result from a brief, combined activation with IL-12, IL-15, and IL-18. This activation results in long lived NK cells that exhibit enhanced functionality when they encounter a secondary stimulation and provides a new approach to enable NK cells for enhanced responsiveness to infection and cancer. An improved understanding of the cellular and molecular aspects of cytokine-cytokine receptor signals has led to a resurgence of interest in the clinical use of cytokines that sustain and/or activate NK cell antitumor potential. In the future, such strategies will be combined with negative regulatory signal blockade and enhanced recognition to comprehensively enhance NK cells for immunotherapy.

  16. Reversible Immortalization Enables Seamless Transdifferentiation of Primary Fibroblasts into Other Lineage Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Fei; Gong, Kerui; Li, Ke; Zhang, Mingliang; Chang, Judy C; Jiang, Shizhong; Ye, Lin; Wang, Jiaming; Tan, Yuting; Kan, Yuet Wai

    2016-08-15

    Fibroblasts can be transdifferentiated directly into other somatic cells such as cardiomyocytes, hematopoietic cells, and neurons. An advantage of somatic cell differentiation without first generating induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) is that it avoids contamination of the differentiated cells with residual iPSCs, which may cause teratoma. However, since primary fibroblasts from biopsy undergo senescence during repeated culture, it may be difficult to grow transdifferentiated cells in sufficient numbers for future therapeutic purposes. To circumvent this problem, we reversibly immortalized primary fibroblasts by using the piggyBac transposon to deliver the human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) gene hTERT plus SV40 Large T. Both approaches enabled fibroblasts to grow continuously without senescence, and neither caused teratoma formation in immunodeficient mice. However, fibroblasts immortalized with hTERT plus SV40 large T antigen accumulated chromosomal rearrangements, whereas fibroblasts immortalized with hTERT retained the normal karyotype. To transdifferentiate hTERT-immortalized fibroblasts into other somatic lineage cells, we transiently transfected them with episomal OCT4 and cultured them under neural cell growth condition with transposase to remove the transposon. Tripotent neural progenitor cells were seamlessly and efficiently generated. Thus, reversible immortalization of primary fibroblasts with hTERT will allow potential autologous cell-based therapeutics that bypass and simulate iPSC generation. PMID:27328768

  17. Development of Microfluidic Systems Enabling High-Throughput Single-Cell Protein Characterization

    OpenAIRE

    Beiyuan Fan; Xiufeng Li; Deyong Chen; Hongshang Peng; Junbo Wang; Jian Chen

    2016-01-01

    This article reviews recent developments in microfluidic systems enabling high-throughput characterization of single-cell proteins. Four key perspectives of microfluidic platforms are included in this review: (1) microfluidic fluorescent flow cytometry; (2) droplet based microfluidic flow cytometry; (3) large-array micro wells (microengraving); and (4) large-array micro chambers (barcode microchips). We examine the advantages and limitations of each technique and discuss future research oppor...

  18. SEC14L2 enables pan-genotype HCV replication in cell culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeed, Mohsan; Andreo, Ursula; Chung, Hyo-Young; Espiritu, Christine; Branch, Andrea D; Silva, Jose M; Rice, Charles M

    2015-08-27

    Since its discovery in 1989, efforts to grow clinical isolates of the hepatitis C virus (HCV) in cell culture have met with limited success. Only the JFH-1 isolate has the capacity to replicate efficiently in cultured hepatoma cells without cell culture-adaptive mutations. We hypothesized that cultured cells lack one or more factors required for the replication of clinical isolates. To identify the missing factors, we transduced Huh-7.5 human hepatoma cells with a pooled lentivirus-based human complementary DNA (cDNA) library, transfected the cells with HCV subgenomic replicons lacking adaptive mutations, and selected for stable replicon colonies. This led to the identification of a single cDNA, SEC14L2, that enabled RNA replication of diverse HCV genotypes in several hepatoma cell lines. This effect was dose-dependent, and required the continuous presence of SEC14L2. Full-length HCV genomes also replicated and produced low levels of infectious virus. Remarkably, SEC14L2-expressing Huh-7.5 cells also supported HCV replication following inoculation with patient sera. Mechanistic studies suggest that SEC14L2 promotes HCV infection by enhancing vitamin E-mediated protection against lipid peroxidation. This provides a foundation for development of in vitro replication systems for all HCV isolates, creating a useful platform to dissect the mechanisms by which cell culture-adaptive mutations act. PMID:26266980

  19. Cell wall staining with Trypan blue enables quantitative analysis of morphological changes in yeast cells

    OpenAIRE

    Liesche, Johannes; Marek, Magdalena; Günther-Pomorski, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Yeast cells are protected by a cell wall that plays an important role in the exchange of substances with the environment. The cell wall structure is dynamic and can adapt to different physiological states or environmental conditions. For the investigation of morphological changes, selective staining with fluorescent dyes is a valuable tool. Furthermore, cell wall staining is used to facilitate sub-cellular localization experiments with fluorescently-labeled proteins and the detection of yeast...

  20. Adenosinergic Immunosuppression by Human Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Requires Co-Operation with T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerkelä, Erja; Laitinen, Anita; Räbinä, Jarkko; Valkonen, Sami; Takatalo, Maarit; Larjo, Antti; Veijola, Johanna; Lampinen, Milla; Siljander, Pia; Lehenkari, Petri; Alfthan, Kaija; Laitinen, Saara

    2016-03-01

    Mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSCs) have the capacity to counteract excessive inflammatory responses. MSCs possess a range of immunomodulatory mechanisms, which can be deployed in response to signals in a particular environment and in concert with other immune cells. One immunosuppressive mechanism, not so well-known in MSCs, is mediated via adenosinergic pathway by ectonucleotidases CD73 and CD39. In this study, we demonstrate that adenosine is actively produced from adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP) by CD73 on MSCs and MSC-derived extracellular vesicles (EVs). Our results indicate that although MSCs express CD39 at low level and it colocalizes with CD73 in bulge areas of membranes, the most efficient adenosine production from adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) requires co-operation of MSCs and activated T cells. Highly CD39 expressing activated T cells produce AMP from ATP and MSCs produce adenosine from AMP via CD73 activity. Furthermore, adenosinergic signaling plays a role in suppression of T cell proliferation in vitro. In conclusion, this study shows that adenosinergic signaling is an important immunoregulatory mechanism of MSCs, especially in situations where ATP is present in the extracellular environment, like in tissue injury. An efficient production of immunosuppressive adenosine is dependent on the concerted action of CD39-positive immune cells with CD73-positive cells such as MSCs or their EVs. Stem Cells 2016;34:781-790. PMID:26731338

  1. Enabling Flexible Polymer Tandem Solar Cells by 3D Ptychographic Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dam, Henrik Friis; Andersen, Thomas Rieks; Pedersen, Emil Bøje Lind;

    2015-01-01

    one after the other by wet processing leaves plenty of room for error and the process development calls for an analytical technique that enables 3D reconstruction of the layer stack with the possibility to probe thickness, density, and chemistry of the individual layers in the stack. The use of......The realization of a complete tandem polymer solar cell under ambient conditions using only printing and coating methods on a flexible substrate results in a fully scalable process but also requires accurate control during layer formation to succeed. The serial process where the layers are added...

  2. Development of Microfluidic Systems Enabling High-Throughput Single-Cell Protein Characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beiyuan Fan

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available This article reviews recent developments in microfluidic systems enabling high-throughput characterization of single-cell proteins. Four key perspectives of microfluidic platforms are included in this review: (1 microfluidic fluorescent flow cytometry; (2 droplet based microfluidic flow cytometry; (3 large-array micro wells (microengraving; and (4 large-array micro chambers (barcode microchips. We examine the advantages and limitations of each technique and discuss future research opportunities by focusing on three key performance parameters (absolute quantification, sensitivity, and throughput.

  3. Cellular memory of hypoxia elicits neuroblastoma metastasis and enables invasion by non-aggressive neighbouring cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, A; Rice, M; Lévy, R; Pizer, B L; Losty, P D; Moss, D; Sée, V

    2015-01-01

    Therapies targeting cancer metastasis are challenging owing to the complexity of the metastatic process and the high number of effectors involved. Although tumour hypoxia has previously been associated with increased aggressiveness as well as resistance to radio- and chemotherapy, the understanding of a direct link between the level and duration of hypoxia and the individual steps involved in metastasis is still missing. Using live imaging in a chick embryo model, we have demonstrated that the exposure of neuroblastoma cells to 1% oxygen for 3 days was capable of (1) enabling cell migration towards blood vessels, (2) slowing down their velocity within blood vessels to facilitate extravasation and (3) promoting cell proliferation in primary and secondary sites. We have shown that cells do not have to be hypoxic anymore to exhibit these acquired capabilities as a long-term memory of prior hypoxic exposure is kept. Furthermore, non-hypoxic cells can be influenced by neighbouring hypoxic preconditioned cells and be entrained in the metastatic progression. The acquired aggressive phenotype relies on hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-dependent transcription of a number of genes involved in metastasis and can be impaired by HIF inhibition. Altogether, our results demonstrate the need to consider both temporal and spatial tumour heterogeneity because cells can 'remember' an earlier environment and share their acquired phenotype with their close neighbours. As a consequence, it is necessary to monitor the correct hypoxic markers to be able to predict the consequences of the cells' history on their behaviour and their potential response to therapies. PMID:25664931

  4. Cornell Fuel Cell Institute: Materials Discovery to Enable Fuel Cell Technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abruna, H.D.; DiSalvo, Francis J.

    2012-06-29

    The discovery and understanding of new, improved materials to advance fuel cell technology are the objectives of the Cornell Fuel Cell Institute (CFCI) research program. CFCI was initially formed in 2003. This report highlights the accomplishments from 2006-2009. Many of the grand challenges in energy science and technology are based on the need for materials with greatly improved or even revolutionary properties and performance. This is certainly true for fuel cells, which have the promise of being highly efficient in the conversion of chemical energy to electrical energy. Fuel cells offer the possibility of efficiencies perhaps up to 90 % based on the free energy of reaction. Here, the challenges are clearly in the materials used to construct the heart of the fuel cell: the membrane electrode assembly (MEA). The MEA consists of two electrodes separated by an ionically conducting membrane. Each electrode is a nanocomposite of electronically conducting catalyst support, ionic conductor and open porosity, that together form three percolation networks that must connect to each catalyst nanoparticle; otherwise the catalyst is inactive. This report highlights the findings of the three years completing the CFCI funding, and incudes developments in materials for electrocatalyts, catalyst supports, materials with structured and functional porosity for electrodes, and novel electrolyte membranes. The report also discusses developments at understanding electrocatalytic mechanisms, especially on novel catalyst surfaces, plus in situ characterization techniques and contributions from theory. Much of the research of the CFCI continues within the Energy Materials Center at Cornell (emc2), a DOE funded, Office of Science Energy Frontier Research Center (EFRC).

  5. High Performance Ultrathin GaAs Solar Cells Enabled with Heterogeneously Integrated Dielectric Periodic Nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sung-Min; Kwong, Anthony; Jung, Daehwan; Faucher, Joseph; Biswas, Roshni; Shen, Lang; Kang, Dongseok; Lee, Minjoo Larry; Yoon, Jongseung

    2015-10-27

    Due to their favorable materials properties including direct bandgap and high electron mobilities, epitaxially grown III-V compound semiconductors such as gallium arsenide (GaAs) provide unmatched performance over silicon in solar energy harvesting. Nonetheless, their large-scale deployment in terrestrial photovoltaics remains challenging mainly due to the high cost of growing device quality epitaxial materials. In this regard, reducing the thickness of constituent active materials under appropriate light management schemes is a conceptually viable option to lower the cost of GaAs solar cells. Here, we present a type of high efficiency, ultrathin GaAs solar cell that incorporates bifacial photon management enabled by techniques of transfer printing to maximize the absorption and photovoltaic performance without compromising the optimized electronic configuration of planar devices. Nanoimprint lithography and dry etching of titanium dioxide (TiO2) deposited directly on the window layer of GaAs solar cells formed hexagonal arrays of nanoscale posts that serve as lossless photonic nanostructures for antireflection, diffraction, and light trapping in conjunction with a co-integrated rear-surface reflector. Systematic studies on optical and electrical properties and photovoltaic performance in experiments, as well as numerical modeling, quantitatively describe the optimal design rules for ultrathin, nanostructured GaAs solar cells and their integrated modules. PMID:26376087

  6. Cell growth, intracellular calcium concentration and metabolic cooperation measured in cells exposed to 50 Hz electromagnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colony-forming efficiency, DNA/protein and DNA/cell were measured in cells exposed to magnetic fields of 0.2 and 1 mT at a frequency of 50 Hz. Intracellular calcium concentrations were measured in cells exposed to 0.3 and 1 mT at 50 Hz. Metabolic cooperation was measured in cells exposed to 1 mT at 50 Hz. No significant effects of the fields were observed. 20 refs., 10 figs

  7. Rho kinase inhibitor enables cell-based therapy for corneal endothelial dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okumura, Naoki; Sakamoto, Yuji; Fujii, Keita; Kitano, Junji; Nakano, Shinichiro; Tsujimoto, Yuki; Nakamura, Shin-Ichiro; Ueno, Morio; Hagiya, Michio; Hamuro, Junji; Matsuyama, Akifumi; Suzuki, Shingo; Shiina, Takashi; Kinoshita, Shigeru; Koizumi, Noriko

    2016-01-01

    The corneal endothelium maintains corneal transparency; consequently, its dysfunction causes severe vision loss. Tissue engineering-based therapy, as an alternative to conventional donor corneal transplantation, is anticipated to provide a less invasive and more effective therapeutic modality. We conducted a preclinical study for cell-based therapy in a primate model and demonstrated regeneration of the corneal endothelium following injection of cultured monkey corneal endothelial cells (MCECs) or human CECs (HCECs), in combination with a Rho kinase (ROCK) inhibitor, Y-27632, into the anterior chamber. We also evaluated the safety and efficacy of Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP)-grade HCECs, similar to those planned for use as transplant material for human patients in a clinical trial, and we showed that the corneal endothelium was regenerated without adverse effect. We also showed that CEC engraftment is impaired by limited substrate adhesion, which is due to actomyosin contraction induced by dissociation-induced activation of ROCK/MLC signaling. Inclusion of a ROCK inhibitor improves efficiency of engraftment of CECs and enables cell-based therapy for treating corneal endothelial dysfunction as a clinically relevant therapy. PMID:27189516

  8. Cooperative inhibitory effects of antisense oligonucleotide of cell adhesion molecules and cimetidine on cancer cell adhesion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nan-Hong Tang; Yan-Ling Chen; Xiao-Qian Wang; Xiu-Jin Li; Feng-Zhi Yin; Xiao-Zhong Wang

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To explore the cooperative effects of antisense oligonucleotide (ASON) of cell adhesion molecules and cimetidine on the expression of E-selectin and ICAM-1 in endothelial cells and their adhesion to tumor cells.METHODS: After treatment of endothelial cells with ASON and/or cimetidine and induction with TNF-α, the protein and mRNA changes of E-selectin and ICAM-1 in endothelial cells were examined by flow cytometry and RT-PCR,respectively. The adhesion rates of endothelial cells to tumor cells were measured by cell adhesion experiment.RESULTS: In comparison with TNF-α inducing group, lipoASON and lipo-ASON/cimetidine could significantly decrease the protein and mRNA levels of E-selectin and ICAM-1 in endothelial cells, and lipo-ASON/cimetidine had most significant inhibitory effect on E-selectin expression (from 36.37±1.56% to 14.23±1.07%, P<0.001). Meanwhile,cimetidine alone could inhibit the expression of E-selectin (36.37±1.56% vs 27.2±1.31%, P<0.001), but not ICAM-1 (69.34±2.50% vs68.07±2.10%,P>O.05)and the two kinds of mRNA, either. Compared with TNF-αα inducing group, the rate of adhesion was markedly decreased in lipo-E-selectin ASON and lipo-E-selectin ASON/cimetidine treated groups(P<0.05),and Jipo-E-selectin ASON/cimetidine worked better than lipo-E-selectin ASON alone except for HepG2/ECV304 group(P<0.05). However, the decrease of adhesion was not significant in lipo-ICAM-1 ASON and lipo-ICAM-1 ASON/cimetidine treated groups except for HepG2/ECV304 group (P >0.05).CONCLUSION: These data demonstrate that ASON in combination with cimetidine in vitro can significantly reduce the adhesion between endothelial cells and hepatic or colorectal cancer cells, which is stronger than ASON or cimetidine alone. This study provides some useful proofs for gene therapy of antiadhesion.

  9. Circulating Cell-Free DNA Enables Noninvasive Diagnosis of Heart Transplant Rejection

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Vlaminck, Iwijn; Valantine, Hannah A.; Snyder, Thomas M.; Strehl, Calvin; Cohen, Garrett; Luikart, Helen; Neff, Norma F.; Okamoto, Jennifer; Bernstein, Daniel; Weisshaar, Dana; Quake, Stephen R.; Khush, Kiran K.

    2014-01-01

    Monitoring allograft health is an important component of posttransplant therapy. Endomyocardial biopsy is the current gold standard for cardiac allograft monitoring but is an expensive and invasive procedure. Proof of principle of a universal, noninvasive diagnostic method based on high-throughput screening of circulating cell-free donor-derived DNA (cfdDNA) was recently demonstrated in a small retrospective cohort. We present the results of a prospective cohort study (65 patients, 565 samples) that tested the utility of cfdDNA in measuring acute rejection after heart transplantation. Circulating cell-free DNA was purified from plasma and sequenced (mean depth, 1.2 giga–base pairs) to quantify the fraction of cfdDNA. Through a comparison with endomyocardial biopsy results, we demonstrate that cfdDNA enables diagnosis of acute rejection after heart transplantation, with an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.83 and sensitivity and specificity that are comparable to the intrinsic performance of the biopsy itself. This noninvasive genome transplant dynamics approach is a powerful and informative method for routine monitoring of allograft health without incurring the risk, discomfort, and expense of an invasive biopsy. PMID:24944192

  10. Multimodal confocal mosaics enable high sensitivity and specificity in screening of in situ squamous cell carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grados Luyando, Maria del Carmen; Bar, Anna; Snavely, Nicholas; Jacques, Steven; Gareau, Daniel S.

    2014-02-01

    Screening cancer in excision margins with confocal microscopy may potentially save time and cost over the gold standard histopathology (H and E). However, diagnostic accuracy requires sufficient contrast and resolution to reveal pathological traits in a growing set of tumor types. Reflectance mode images structural details due to microscopic refractive index variation. Nuclear contrast with acridine orange fluorescence provides enhanced diagnostic value, but fails for in situ squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), where the cytoplasm is important to visualize. Combination of three modes [eosin (Eo) fluorescence, reflectance (R) and acridine orange (AO) fluorescence] enable imaging of cytoplasm, collagen and nuclei respectively. Toward rapid intra-operative pathological margin assessment to guide staged cancer excisions, multimodal confocal mosaics can image wide surgical margins (~1cm) with sub-cellular resolution and mimic the appearance of conventional H and E. Absorption contrast is achieved by alternating the excitation wavelength: 488nm (AO fluorescence) and 532nm (Eo fluorescence). Superposition and false-coloring of these modes mimics H and E, enabling detection of the carcinoma in situ in the epidermal layer The sum mosaic Eo+R is false-colored pink to mimic eosins' appearance in H and E, while the AO mosaic is false-colored purple to mimic hematoxylins' appearance in H and E. In this study, mosaics of 10 Mohs surgical excisions containing SCC in situ and 5 containing only normal tissue were subdivided for digital presentation equivalent to 4X histology. Of the total 16 SCC in situ multimodal mosaics and 16 normal cases presented, two reviewers made 1 and 2 (respectively) type-2 errors (false positives) but otherwise scored perfectly when using the confocal images to screen for the presence of SCC in situ as compared to the gold standard histopathology. Limitations to precisely mimic H and E included occasional elastin staining by AO. These results suggest that

  11. Cooperation among cancer cells as public goods games on Voronoi networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archetti, Marco

    2016-05-01

    Cancer cells produce growth factors that diffuse and sustain tumour proliferation, a form of cooperation that can be studied using mathematical models of public goods in the framework of evolutionary game theory. Cell populations, however, form heterogeneous networks that cannot be described by regular lattices or scale-free networks, the types of graphs generally used in the study of cooperation. To describe the dynamics of growth factor production in populations of cancer cells, I study public goods games on Voronoi networks, using a range of non-linear benefits that account for the known properties of growth factors, and different types of diffusion gradients. The results are surprisingly similar to those obtained on regular graphs and different from results on scale-free networks, revealing that network heterogeneity per se does not promote cooperation when public goods diffuse beyond one-step neighbours. The exact shape of the diffusion gradient is not crucial, however, whereas the type of non-linear benefit is an essential determinant of the dynamics. Public goods games on Voronoi networks can shed light on intra-tumour heterogeneity, the evolution of resistance to therapies that target growth factors, and new types of cell therapy. PMID:26930167

  12. Industrial systems biology of Saccharomyces cerevisiae enables novel succinic acid cell factory.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Manuel Otero

    Full Text Available Saccharomyces cerevisiae is the most well characterized eukaryote, the preferred microbial cell factory for the largest industrial biotechnology product (bioethanol, and a robust commerically compatible scaffold to be exploitted for diverse chemical production. Succinic acid is a highly sought after added-value chemical for which there is no native pre-disposition for production and accmulation in S. cerevisiae. The genome-scale metabolic network reconstruction of S. cerevisiae enabled in silico gene deletion predictions using an evolutionary programming method to couple biomass and succinate production. Glycine and serine, both essential amino acids required for biomass formation, are formed from both glycolytic and TCA cycle intermediates. Succinate formation results from the isocitrate lyase catalyzed conversion of isocitrate, and from the α-keto-glutarate dehydrogenase catalyzed conversion of α-keto-glutarate. Succinate is subsequently depleted by the succinate dehydrogenase complex. The metabolic engineering strategy identified included deletion of the primary succinate consuming reaction, Sdh3p, and interruption of glycolysis derived serine by deletion of 3-phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase, Ser3p/Ser33p. Pursuing these targets, a multi-gene deletion strain was constructed, and directed evolution with selection used to identify a succinate producing mutant. Physiological characterization coupled with integrated data analysis of transcriptome data in the metabolically engineered strain were used to identify 2(nd-round metabolic engineering targets. The resulting strain represents a 30-fold improvement in succinate titer, and a 43-fold improvement in succinate yield on biomass, with only a 2.8-fold decrease in the specific growth rate compared to the reference strain. Intuitive genetic targets for either over-expression or interruption of succinate producing or consuming pathways, respectively, do not lead to increased succinate. Rather, we

  13. A Cooperative Reinforcement Learning Approach for Inter-Cell Interference Coordination in OFDMA Cellular Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Dirani, Mariana; Altman, Zwi

    2010-01-01

    Interference Management International audience Inter-Cell Interference Coordination (ICIC) is commonly identified as a key radio resource management mechanism to enhance system performance of 4G networks. This paper addresses the problem of ICIC in the downlink of cellular OFDMA (LTE and WiMAX) systems in the context of Self-Organizing Networks (SON). The problem is posed as a cooperative Multi-Agent control problem. Each base station is an agent that dynamically changes power masks on ...

  14. Network governance for dealing with IT-enabled Interorganizational cooperation : When should network IT - such as social media - be used and how to govern it

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Graaf, Frank Jan de; Velthuijsen, Hugo

    2012-01-01

    IT-based networking trends such as the rise of social media, crowd sourcing, open innovation, and cloud computing enable a profoundly different way of working and collaborating that challenges significantly traditional approaches of companies towards governance, i.e. the mechanisms a company empl

  15. Faster than the Speed of Hearing: Nanomechanical Force Probes Enable the Electromechanical Observation of Cochlear Hair Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Doll, Joseph C.; Peng, Anthony W.; Ricci, Anthony J.; Pruitt, Beth L.

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the mechanisms responsible for our sense of hearing requires new tools for unprecedented stimulation and monitoring of sensory cell mechanotransduction at frequencies yet to be explored. We describe nanomechanical force probes designed to evoke mechanotransduction currents at up to 100kHz in living cells. High-speed force and displacement metrology is enabled by integrating piezoresistive sensors and piezoelectric actuators onto nanoscale cantilevers. The design, fabrication pro...

  16. Functional Proteomics Screen Enables Enrichment of Distinct Cell Types from Human Pancreatic Islets

    OpenAIRE

    Revital Sharivkin; Walker, Michael D.; Yoav Soen

    2015-01-01

    The current world-wide epidemic of diabetes has prompted attempts to generate new sources of insulin-producing cells for cell replacement therapy. An inherent challenge in many of these strategies is the lack of cell-surface markers permitting isolation and characterization of specific cell types from differentiating stem cell populations. Here we introduce an iterative proteomics procedure allowing tag-free isolation of cell types based on their function. Our method detects and associates sp...

  17. Functional proteomics screen enables enrichment of distinct cell types from human pancreatic islets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Revital Sharivkin

    Full Text Available The current world-wide epidemic of diabetes has prompted attempts to generate new sources of insulin-producing cells for cell replacement therapy. An inherent challenge in many of these strategies is the lack of cell-surface markers permitting isolation and characterization of specific cell types from differentiating stem cell populations. Here we introduce an iterative proteomics procedure allowing tag-free isolation of cell types based on their function. Our method detects and associates specific cell-surface markers with particular cell functionality by coupling cell capture on antibody arrays with immunofluorescent labeling. Using this approach in an iterative manner, we discovered marker combinations capable of enriching for discrete pancreatic cell subtypes from human islets of Langerhans: insulin-producing beta cells (CD9high/CD56+, glucagon-producing alpha cells (CD9-/CD56+ and trypsin-producing acinar cells (CD9-/CD56-. This strategy may assist future beta cell research and the development of diagnostic tools for diabetes. It can also be applied more generally for function-based purification of desired cell types from other limited and heterogeneous biological samples.

  18. T and B cell cooperation: a dance of life and death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, Alain; Coitot, Sylvie; Brémont, Aurore; Bernard, Ghislaine

    2005-02-15

    In order for the body to develop a good antibody response, B cells need to react intimately with antigen specific T cells. Experimental evidence using hapten-carriers revealed that T and B cells do not recognize the same epitope and this led to the view that the physical contact is mediated by the antigen. Although the modern concept of antigen presentation has changed our perception on how the antigen can bridge both cells, the basic virtues of earlier bridging models remain. Over the past few years, a number of surface ligand-receptor pathways have been described, most of them belonging either to the CD28/B7 Ig or to the TNF/TNFR-like families. These act in concert, whether they are agonist or antagonist, in a timely and spatially organized manner. They form cascades of successive induction and recruitment to ensure that T-B cooperation is closely controlled at all stages of antibody induction. PMID:15699753

  19. Non-linear elasticity of extracellular matrices enables contractile cells to communicate local position and orientation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessamine P Winer

    Full Text Available Most tissue cells grown in sparse cultures on linearly elastic substrates typically display a small, round phenotype on soft substrates and become increasingly spread as the modulus of the substrate increases until their spread area reaches a maximum value. As cell density increases, individual cells retain the same stiffness-dependent differences unless they are very close or in molecular contact. On nonlinear strain-stiffening fibrin gels, the same cell types become maximally spread even when the low strain elastic modulus would predict a round morphology, and cells are influenced by the presence of neighbors hundreds of microns away. Time lapse microscopy reveals that fibroblasts and human mesenchymal stem cells on fibrin deform the substrate by several microns up to five cell lengths away from their plasma membrane through a force limited mechanism. Atomic force microscopy and rheology confirm that these strains locally and globally stiffen the gel, depending on cell density, and this effect leads to long distance cell-cell communication and alignment. Thus cells are acutely responsive to the nonlinear elasticity of their substrates and can manipulate this rheological property to induce patterning.

  20. Confocal Raman data analysis enables identifying apoptosis of MCF-7 cells caused by anticancer drug paclitaxel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salehi, Hamideh; Middendorp, Elodie; Panayotov, Ivan; Dutilleul, Pierre-Yves Collard; Vegh, Attila-Gergely; Ramakrishnan, Sathish; Gergely, Csilla; Cuisinier, Frederic

    2013-05-01

    Confocal Raman microscopy is a noninvasive, label-free imaging technique used to study apoptosis of live MCF-7 cells. The images are based on Raman spectra of cells components, and their apoptosis is monitored through diffusion of cytochrome c in cytoplasm. K-mean clustering is used to identify mitochondria in cells, and correlation analysis provides the cytochrome c distribution inside the cells. Our results demonstrate that incubation of cells for 3 h with 10 μM of paclitaxel does not induce apoptosis in MCF-7 cells. On the contrary, incubation for 30 min at a higher concentration (100 μM) of paclitaxel induces gradual release of the cytochrome c into the cytoplasm, indicating cell apoptosis via a caspase independent pathway.

  1. LPA Induces Colon Cancer Cell Proliferation through a Cooperation between the ROCK and STAT-3 Pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Leve

    Full Text Available Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA plays a critical role in the proliferation and migration of colon cancer cells; however, the downstream signaling events underlying these processes remain poorly characterized. The aim of this study was to investigate the signaling pathways triggered by LPA to regulate the mechanisms involved in the progression of colorectal cancer (CRC. We have used three cell line models of CRC, and initially analyzed the expression profile of LPA receptors (LPAR. Then, we treated the cells with LPA and events related to their tumorigenic potential, such as migration, invasion, anchorage-independent growth, proliferation as well as apoptosis and cell cycle were evaluated. We used the Chip array technique to analyze the global gene expression profiling that occurs after LPA treatment, and we identified cell signaling pathways related to the cell cycle. The inhibition of these pathways verified the conclusions of the transcriptomic analysis. We found that the cell lines expressed LPAR1, -2 and -3 in a differential manner and that 10 μM LPA did not affect cell migration, invasion and anchorage-independent growth, but it did induce proliferation and cell cycle progression in HCT-116 cells. Although LPA in this concentration did not induce transcriptional activity of β-catenin, it promoted the activation of Rho and STAT-3. Moreover, ROCK and STAT-3 inhibitors prevented LPA-induced proliferation, but ROCK inhibition did not prevent STAT-3 activation. Finally, we observed that LPA regulates the expression of genes related to the cell cycle and that the combined inhibition of ROCK and STAT-3 prevented cell cycle progression and increased the LPA-induced expression of cyclins E1, A2 and B1 to a greater degree than either inhibitor alone. Overall, these results demonstrate that LPA increases the proliferative potential of colon adenocarcinoma HCT-116 cells through a mechanism involving cooperation between the Rho-ROCK and STAT3 pathways

  2. Novel Modeling of Cancer Cell Signaling Pathways Enables Systematic Drug Repositioning for Distinct Breast Cancer Metastases

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Hong; Jin, Guangxu; Cui, Kemi; Ren, Ding; Liu, Timothy; Chen, Peikai; Wong, Solomon; Li, Fuhai; Fan, Yubo; Rodriguez, Angel; Chang, Jenny; Wong, Stephen TC.

    2013-01-01

    A new type of signaling network element, called cancer signaling bridges (CSB), has been shown to have the potential for systematic and fast-tracked drug repositioning. On the basis of CSBs, we developed a computational model to derive specific downstream signaling pathways that reveal previously unknown target-disease connections and new mechanisms for specific cancer subtypes. The model enables us to reposition drugs based on available patient gene expression data. We applied this model to ...

  3. A Successful Industrial Academic Cooperation, Development of Closed-cell Metallic Foams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheng-Chung Tzeng

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available This investigation proposes a successful case of industrial-academic cooperation between the Chienkuo Technology University and J. King Aluminum Inc. This study was proposed by the rotating machinery and heat transfer laboratory. They studied the optimal heat transfer and structural strength of closed-cell aluminum porous material. The cooperation involved the exchange of technical skills; the determination of policies and methods for establishing a lasting relationship, to ensure mutual trust between the parties involved and the elucidation of the benefits enjoyed by both sides. This study seeks to provide a good example to local technical industrial institutions of successful industrial-academic cooperation to promote academic professional research and the establishment of empirical formulae from relevant experimental data. The results of the example are useful in designing an electronic package and cooling device will lead to the novel material applications and reduce the cost of research in related industries, improving global production and marketing, also motivates students to combine academic skills and industrial practice as part of a professional education.

  4. Efficiency improvement of silicon solar cells enabled by ZnO nanowhisker array coating

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Xuegong; Wang, Dong; Lei, Dong; Li, Genhu; Yang, Deren

    2012-01-01

    An efficient antireflection coating is critical for the improvement of silicon solar cell performance via increased light coupling. Here, we have grown well-aligned ZnO nanowhisker (NW) arrays on Czochralski silicon solar cells by a seeding-growth two-step process. It is found that the ZnO NWs have a great effect on the macroscopic antireflection effect and, therefore, improves the solar cell performance. The ZnO NW array-coated solar cells display a broadband reflection suppression from 500 ...

  5. Membrane Oxidation Enables the Cytosolic Entry of Polyarginine Cell-penetrating Peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ting-Yi; Sun, Yusha; Muthukrishnan, Nandhini; Erazo-Oliveras, Alfredo; Najjar, Kristina; Pellois, Jean-Philippe

    2016-04-01

    Arginine-rich peptides can penetrate cells and consequently be used as delivery agents in various cellular applications. The activity of these reagents is often context-dependent, and the parameters that impact cell entry are not fully understood, giving rise to variability and limiting progress toward their usage. Herein, we report that the cytosolic penetration of linear polyarginine peptides is dependent on the oxidation state of the cell. In particular, we find that hypoxia and cellular antioxidants inhibit cell penetration. In contrast, oxidants promote cytosolic cell entry with an efficiency proportional to the level of reactive oxygen species generated within membranes. Moreover, an antibody that binds to oxidized lipids inhibits cell penetration, whereas extracellularly administered pure oxidized lipids enhance peptide transport into cells. Overall, these data indicate that oxidized lipids are capable of mediating the transport of polyarginine peptides across membranes. These data may also explain variability in cell-penetrating peptide performance in different experimental conditions. These new findings therefore provide new opportunities for the rational design of future cell-permeable compounds and for the optimization of delivery protocols. PMID:26888085

  6. Fascin Rigidity and L-plastin Flexibility Cooperate in Cancer Cell Invadopodia and Filopodia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Audenhove, Isabel; Denert, Majken; Boucherie, Ciska; Pieters, Leen; Cornelissen, Maria; Gettemans, Jan

    2016-04-22

    Invadopodia and filopodia are dynamic, actin-based protrusions contributing to cancer cell migration, invasion, and metastasis. The force of actin bundles is essential for their protrusive activity. The bundling protein fascin is known to play a role in both invadopodia and filopodia. As it is more and more acknowledged that functionally related proteins cooperate, it is unlikely that only fascin bundles actin in these protrusions. Another interesting candidate is L-plastin, normally expressed in hematopoietic cells, but considered a common marker of many cancer types. We identified L-plastin as a new component of invadopodia, where it contributes to degradation and invasiveness. By means of specific, high-affinity nanobodies inhibiting bundling of fascin or L-plastin, we further unraveled their cooperative mode of action. We show that the bundlers cannot compensate for each other due to strikingly different bundling characteristics: L-plastin bundles are much thinner and less tightly packed. Composite bundles adopt an intermediate phenotype, with fascin delivering the rigidity and strength for protrusive force and structural stability, whereas L-plastin accounts for the flexibility needed for elongation. Consistent with this, elevated L-plastin expression promotes elongation and reduces protrusion density in cells with relatively lower L-plastin than fascin levels. PMID:26945069

  7. Analysis Results for ARRA Projects: Enabling Fuel Cell Market Transformation (Presentation)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurtz, J.; Wipke, K.; Sprik, S.; Ramsden, T.; Ainscough, C.; Saur, G.

    2012-06-01

    This presentation discusses analysis results for American Recovery and Reinvestment Act early market fuel cell deployments and describes the objective of the project and its relevance to the Department of Energy Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program; NREL's analysis approach; technical accomplishments including publication of a fourth set of composite data products; and collaborations and future work.

  8. SPECT-OPT multimodal imaging enables accurate evaluation of radiotracers for β-cell mass assessments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eter, Wael A; Parween, Saba; Joosten, Lieke; Frielink, Cathelijne; Eriksson, Maria; Brom, Maarten; Ahlgren, Ulf; Gotthardt, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) has become a promising experimental approach to monitor changes in β-cell mass (BCM) during diabetes progression. SPECT imaging of pancreatic islets is most commonly cross-validated by stereological analysis of histological pancreatic sections after insulin staining. Typically, stereological methods do not accurately determine the total β-cell volume, which is inconvenient when correlating total pancreatic tracer uptake with BCM. Alternative methods are therefore warranted to cross-validate β-cell imaging using radiotracers. In this study, we introduce multimodal SPECT - optical projection tomography (OPT) imaging as an accurate approach to cross-validate radionuclide-based imaging of β-cells. Uptake of a promising radiotracer for β-cell imaging by SPECT, (111)In-exendin-3, was measured by ex vivo-SPECT and cross evaluated by 3D quantitative OPT imaging as well as with histology within healthy and alloxan-treated Brown Norway rat pancreata. SPECT signal was in excellent linear correlation with OPT data as compared to histology. While histological determination of islet spatial distribution was challenging, SPECT and OPT revealed similar distribution patterns of (111)In-exendin-3 and insulin positive β-cell volumes between different pancreatic lobes, both visually and quantitatively. We propose ex vivo SPECT-OPT multimodal imaging as a highly accurate strategy for validating the performance of β-cell radiotracers. PMID:27080529

  9. Expression of HSF2 decreases in mitosis to enable stress-inducible transcription and cell survival

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsing, Alexandra N.; Aspelin, Camilla; Björk, Johanna K.; Bergman, Heidi A.; Himanen, Samu V.; Kallio, Marko J.; Roos-Mattjus, Pia

    2014-01-01

    Unless mitigated, external and physiological stresses are detrimental for cells, especially in mitosis, resulting in chromosomal missegregation, aneuploidy, or apoptosis. Heat shock proteins (Hsps) maintain protein homeostasis and promote cell survival. Hsps are transcriptionally regulated by heat shock factors (HSFs). Of these, HSF1 is the master regulator and HSF2 modulates Hsp expression by interacting with HSF1. Due to global inhibition of transcription in mitosis, including HSF1-mediated expression of Hsps, mitotic cells are highly vulnerable to stress. Here, we show that cells can counteract transcriptional silencing and protect themselves against proteotoxicity in mitosis. We found that the condensed chromatin of HSF2-deficient cells is accessible for HSF1 and RNA polymerase II, allowing stress-inducible Hsp expression. Consequently, HSF2-deficient cells exposed to acute stress display diminished mitotic errors and have a survival advantage. We also show that HSF2 expression declines during mitosis in several but not all human cell lines, which corresponds to the Hsp70 induction and protection against stress-induced mitotic abnormalities and apoptosis. PMID:25202032

  10. Adaptation to background light enables contrast coding at rod bipolar cell synapses

    OpenAIRE

    Ke, Jiang-Bin; Wang, Yanbin V.; Borghuis, Bart G.; Cembrowski, Mark S.; Riecke, Hermann; Kath, William L.; Demb, Jonathan B; Joshua H Singer

    2013-01-01

    Rod photoreceptors contribute to vision over a ~6 log-unit range of light intensities. The wide dynamic range of rod vision is thought to depend upon light intensity-dependent switching between two parallel pathways linking rods to ganglion cells: a rod→rod bipolar (RB) cell pathway that operates at dim backgrounds and a rod→cone→cone bipolar cell pathway that operates at brighter backgrounds. We evaluated this conventional model of rod vision by recording rod-mediated light responses from ga...

  11. High-definition optical coherence tomography enables visualization of individual cells in healthy skin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boone, Marc; Jemec, Gregor B E; Del Marmol, Véronique

    2012-01-01

    HD-OCT could be confirmed by the phantom analysis. The identification of cells in the epidermis can be made by both techniques. RCM offers the best lateral resolution, and HD-OCT has the best penetration depth, providing images of individual cells deeper within the dermis. Eccrine ducts and hair...... shafts with pilosebaceous units can be observed depending on skin site. HD-OCT provides morphological imaging with sufficient resolution and penetration depth to permit visualization of individual cells at up to 570 μm in depth offering the possibility of additional structural information complementary...

  12. Unraveling the genetic driving forces enabling antibiotic resistance at the single cell level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bos, Julia

    Bacteria are champions at finding ways to quickly respond and adapt to environments like the human gut, known as the epicentre of antibiotic resistance. How do they do it? Combining molecular biology tools to microfluidic and fluorescence microscopy technologies, we monitor the behavior of bacteria at the single cell level in the presence of non-toxic doses of antibiotics. By tracking the chromosome dynamics of Escherichia coli cells upon antibiotic treatment, we examine the changes in the number, localization and content of the chromosome copies within one cell compartment or between adjacent cells. I will discuss how our work pictures the bacterial genomic plasticity as a driving force in evolution and how it provides access to the mechanisms controlling the subtle balance between genetic diversity and stability in the development of antibiotic resistance.

  13. SPECT-OPT multimodal imaging enables accurate evaluation of radiotracers for β-cell mass assessments

    OpenAIRE

    Wael A. Eter; Saba Parween; Lieke Joosten; Cathelijne Frielink; Maria Eriksson; Maarten Brom; Ulf Ahlgren; Martin Gotthardt

    2016-01-01

    Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) has become a promising experimental approach to monitor changes in β-cell mass (BCM) during diabetes progression. SPECT imaging of pancreatic islets is most commonly cross-validated by stereological analysis of histological pancreatic sections after insulin staining. Typically, stereological methods do not accurately determine the total β-cell volume, which is inconvenient when correlating total pancreatic tracer uptake with BCM. Alternative ...

  14. SPECT-OPT multimodal imaging enables accurate evaluation of radiotracers for beta-cell mass assessments

    OpenAIRE

    Wael A. Eter; Parween, Saba; Joosten, Lieke; Frielink, Cathelijne; Eriksson, Maria; Brom, Maarten; Ahlgren, Ulf; Gotthardt, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) has become a promising experimental approach to monitor changes in beta-cell mass (BCM) during diabetes progression. SPECT imaging of pancreatic islets is most commonly cross-validated by stereological analysis of histological pancreatic sections after insulin staining. Typically, stereological methods do not accurately determine the total beta-cell volume, which is inconvenient when correlating total pancreatic tracer uptake with BCM. Altern...

  15. An architecture for mobile computation offloading on cloud-enabled LTE small cells

    OpenAIRE

    Lobillo Vilela, Felicia; Becvar, Zdenek; Puente, Miguel Angel; Mach, Pavel; Lo Presti, Francesco; Gambetti, Fabrizio; Goldhamer, Mariana; Vidal Manzano, José; Widiawan, Anggoro K.; Calvanesse, Emilio

    2014-01-01

    Small cell networks are currently seen as a new way to satisfy the increasing wireless traffic demand. The proximity of base stations to subscribers brings many possibilities for the development of new applications, including new offerings based on cloud computing. Smartphones can directly offload applications to close base stations, provided that these are equipped with additional computational and storage resources. The cloud concept applied in the framework of small cells can also combine ...

  16. Cloud service-oriented dashboard for work cell management in RFID-enabled ubiquitous manufacturing

    OpenAIRE

    Luo, H.; Cheng, M.; Li, Y.; Lan, S.; Huang, GQ; Zhong, RY

    2013-01-01

    This article aims at developing a service-oriented dashboard for operators and supervisors of manufacturing shopfloor work-cells to realize information visibility and traceability effectively with cloud and RFID (radio frequency identification) technologies. The work is based on a case of an illustrative assembly line consisting of a number of work cells. The dashboard is deployed for facilitating assembly operations in ubiquitous manufacturing environment. The utilization of the system leads...

  17. Stem Cell Derived Extracellular Matrix Enables Survival and Multi Lineage Differentiation within Superporous Hydrogels

    OpenAIRE

    Köllmer, Melanie; Keskar, Vandana; Hauk, Thomas G.; Collins, John M.; Russell, Brenda; Gemeinhart, Richard A.

    2012-01-01

    Hydrophilic poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate (PEGDA) hydrogel surfaces resist protein adsorption and are generally thought to be unsuitable for anchorage dependent cells to adhere. Intriguingly, our previous findings revealed that PEGDA superporous hydrogel scaffolds (SPHs) allow anchorage of bone marrow derived human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) and support their long term survival. Therefore, we hypothesized that the physicochemical characteristics of the scaffold impart properties that c...

  18. Cross-presentation of HCMV chimeric protein enables generation and measurement of polyclonal T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Thi H O; Sullivan, Lucy C; Kotsimbos, Tom C; Schwarer, Anthony P; Mifsud, Nicole A

    2010-08-01

    CD8(+) T cell immunity has a critical function in controlling human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infection. In immunocompromized individuals, HCMV reactivation or disease can lead to increased morbidity and mortality, particularly in transplant recipients. In this setting, adoptive transfer of HCMV-specific CD8(+) T cells is a promising vaccine strategy to restore viral immunity, with most clinical approaches focussing on the use of peptides for the generation of single epitope-specific CD8(+) T cells. We show that using an IE1-pp65 chimeric protein as the antigen source promotes effective cross-presentation, by monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MoDCs), to generate polyclonal CD8(+) T cell epitopes. By exploring human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-restricted immunodominance hierarchies both within and across two immunodominant proteins, we show that HLA-B7 epitopes elicit higher CD8(+) T cell responses compared with HLA-A1, -A2 or -B8. This study provides important evidence highlighting both the efficacy of the IE1-pp65 chimeric protein and the importance of immunodominance in designing future therapeutic vaccines. PMID:20195281

  19. Cooperation between Monocyte-Derived Cells and Lymphoid Cells in the Acute Response to a Bacterial Lung Pathogen.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew S Brown

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Legionella pneumophila is the causative agent of Legionnaires' disease, a potentially fatal lung infection. Alveolar macrophages support intracellular replication of L. pneumophila, however the contributions of other immune cell types to bacterial killing during infection are unclear. Here, we used recently described methods to characterise the major inflammatory cells in lung after acute respiratory infection of mice with L. pneumophila. We observed that the numbers of alveolar macrophages rapidly decreased after infection coincident with a rapid infiltration of the lung by monocyte-derived cells (MC, which, together with neutrophils, became the dominant inflammatory cells associated with the bacteria. Using mice in which the ability of MC to infiltrate tissues is impaired it was found that MC were required for bacterial clearance and were the major source of IL12. IL12 was needed to induce IFNγ production by lymphoid cells including NK cells, memory T cells, NKT cells and γδ T cells. Memory T cells that produced IFNγ appeared to be circulating effector/memory T cells that infiltrated the lung after infection. IFNγ production by memory T cells was stimulated in an antigen-independent fashion and could effectively clear bacteria from the lung indicating that memory T cells are an important contributor to innate bacterial defence. We also determined that a major function of IFNγ was to stimulate bactericidal activity of MC. On the other hand, neutrophils did not require IFNγ to kill bacteria and alveolar macrophages remained poorly bactericidal even in the presence of IFNγ. This work has revealed a cooperative innate immune circuit between lymphoid cells and MC that combats acute L. pneumophila infection and defines a specific role for IFNγ in anti-bacterial immunity.

  20. Supramolecular Probes for Assessing Glutamine Uptake Enable Semi-Quantitative Metabolic Models in Single Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Min; Wei, Wei; Su, Yapeng; Johnson, Dazy; Heath, James R

    2016-03-01

    We describe a supramolecular surface competition assay for quantifying glutamine uptake from single cells. Cy3-labeled cyclodextrins were immobilized on a glass surface as a supramolecular host/FRET donor, and adamantane-BHQ2 conjugates were employed as the guest/quencher. An adamantane-labeled glutamine analog was selected through screening a library of compounds and validated by cell uptake experiments. When integrated onto a single cell barcode chip with a multiplex panel of 15 other metabolites, associated metabolic enzymes, and phosphoproteins, the resultant data provided input for a steady-state model that describes energy potential in single cells and correlates that potential with receptor tyrosine kinase signaling. We utilize this integrated assay to interrogate a dose-dependent response of model brain cancer cells to EGFR inhibition. We find that low-dose (1 μM erlotinib) drugging actually increases cellular energy potential even as glucose uptake and phosphoprotein signaling is repressed. We also identify new interactions between phosphoprotein signaling and cellular energy processes that may help explain the facile resistance exhibited by certain cancer patients to EGFR inhibitors. PMID:26916347

  1. Technologies enabling autologous neural stem cell-based therapies for neurodegenerative disease and injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhru, Sasha H.

    The intrinsic abilities of mammalian neural stem cells (NSCs) to self-renew, migrate over large distances, and give rise to all primary neural cell types of the brain offer unprecedented opportunity for cell-based treatment of neurodegenerative diseases and injuries. This thesis discusses development of technologies in support of autologous NSC-based therapies, encompassing harvest of brain tissue biopsies from living human patients; isolation of NSCs from harvested tissue; efficient culture and expansion of NSCs in 3D polymeric microcapsule culture systems; optimization of microcapsules as carriers for efficient in vivo delivery of NSCs; genetic engineering of NSCs for drug-induced, enzymatic release of transplanted NSCs from microcapsules; genetic engineering for drug-induced differentiation of NSCs into specific therapeutic cell types; and synthesis of chitosan/iron-oxide nanoparticles for labeling of NSCs and in vivo tracking by cellular MRI. Sub-millimeter scale tissue samples were harvested endoscopically from subventricular zone regions of living patient brains, secondary to neurosurgical procedures including endoscopic third ventriculostomy and ventriculoperitoneal shunt placement. On average, 12,000 +/- 3,000 NSCs were isolated per mm 3 of subventricular zone tissue, successfully demonstrated in 26 of 28 patients, ranging in age from one month to 68 years. In order to achieve efficient expansion of isolated NSCs to clinically relevant numbers (e.g. hundreds of thousands of cells in Parkinson's disease and tens of millions of cells in multiple sclerosis), an extracellular matrix-inspired, microcapsule-based culture platform was developed. Initial culture experiments with murine NSCs yielded unprecedented expansion folds of 30x in 5 days, from initially minute NSC populations (154 +/- 15 NSCs per 450 mum diameter capsule). Within 7 days, NSCs expanded as almost perfectly homogenous populations, with 94.9% +/- 4.1% of cultured cells staining positive for

  2. siRNA nanoparticle functionalization of nanostructured scaffolds enables controlled multilineage differentiation of stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Morten Ø; Nygaard, Jens V; Burns, Jorge S; Raarup, Merete K; Nyengaard, Jens R; Bünger, Cody; Besenbacher, Flemming; Howard, Kenneth A; Kassem, Moustapha; Kjems, Jørgen

    2010-01-01

    small-interfering RNAs (siRNAs) into nanostructured scaffolds. This allows spatial retention of the RNAs within nanopores until their cellular delivery. The released siRNAs were capable of gene silencing BCL2L2 and TRIB2, in mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), enhancing osteogenic and adipogenic...

  3. Ni foam cathode enables high volumetric H2 production in a microbial electrolysis cell

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jeremiasse, A.W.; Hamelers, H.V.M.; Saakes, M.; Buisman, C.J.N.

    2010-01-01

    Valuable, “green” H2 can be produced with a microbial electrolysis cell (MEC). To achieve a high volumetric production rate of high purity H2, a continuous flow MEC with an anion exchange membrane, a flow through bioanode and a flow through Ni foam cathode was constructed. At an electrical energy in

  4. Transition Metal-Oxide Free Perovskite Solar Cells Enabled by a New Organic Charge Transport Layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Sehoon; Han, Ggoch Ddeul; Weis, Jonathan G; Park, Hyoungwon; Hentz, Olivia; Zhao, Zhibo; Swager, Timothy M; Gradečak, Silvija

    2016-04-01

    Various electron and hole transport layers have been used to develop high-efficiency perovskite solar cells. To achieve low-temperature solution processing of perovskite solar cells, organic n-type materials are employed to replace the metal oxide electron transport layer (ETL). Although PCBM (phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester) has been widely used for this application, its morphological instability in films (i.e., aggregation) is detrimental. Herein, we demonstrate the synthesis of a new fullerene derivative (isobenzofulvene-C60-epoxide, IBF-Ep) that serves as an electron transporting material for methylammonium mixed lead halide-based perovskite (CH3NH3PbI3-xClx) solar cells, both in the normal and inverted device configurations. We demonstrate that IBF-Ep has superior morphological stability compared to the conventional acceptor, PCBM. IBF-Ep provides higher photovoltaic device performance as compared to PCBM (6.9% vs 2.5% in the normal and 9.0% vs 5.3% in the inverted device configuration). Moreover, IBF-Ep devices show superior tolerance to high humidity (90%) in air. By reaching power conversion efficiencies up to 9.0% for the inverted devices with IBF-Ep as the ETL, we demonstrate the potential of this new material as an alternative to metal oxides for perovskite solar cells processed in air. PMID:26947400

  5. Circulating Cell-Free DNA Enables Noninvasive Diagnosis of Heart Transplant Rejection

    OpenAIRE

    De Vlaminck, Iwijn; Valantine, Hannah A.; Snyder, Thomas M.; Strehl, Calvin; Cohen, Garrett; Luikart, Helen; Neff, Norma F.; Okamoto, Jennifer; Bernstein, Daniel; Weisshaar, Dana; Quake, Stephen R.; Khush, Kiran K.

    2014-01-01

    Monitoring allograft health is an important component of posttransplant therapy. Endomyocardial biopsy is the current gold standard for cardiac allograft monitoring but is an expensive and invasive procedure. Proof of principle of a universal, noninvasive diagnostic method based on high-throughput screening of circulating cell-free donor-derived DNA (cfdDNA) was recently demonstrated in a small retrospective cohort. We present the results of a prospective cohort study (65 patients, 565 sample...

  6. Peptide Internalization Enabled by Folding: Triple Helical Cell-Penetrating Peptides

    OpenAIRE

    Shinde, Aparna; Feher, Katie M.; Hu, Chloe; Slowinska, Katarzyna

    2014-01-01

    Cell-Penetrating Peptides (CPPs) are known as efficient transporters of molecular cargo across cellular membranes. Their properties make them ideal candidates for in vivo applications. However, challenges in development of effective CPPs still exist: CPPs are often fast degraded by proteases and large concentration of CPPs required for cargo transporting can cause cytotoxicity. It was previously shown that restricting peptide flexibility can improve peptide stability against enzymatic degrada...

  7. The Cancer Cell Line Encyclopedia enables predictive modeling of anticancer drug sensitivity

    OpenAIRE

    Barretina, Jordi; Caponigro, Giordano; Stransky, Nicolas; Venkatesan, Kavitha; Margolin, Adam A.; Kim, Sungjoon; Wilson, Christopher J.; Lehár, Joseph; Kryukov, Gregory V; Sonkin, Dmitriy; Reddy, Anupama; Liu, Manway; Murray, Lauren; Berger, Michael F; Monahan, John E.

    2012-01-01

    The systematic translation of cancer genomic data into knowledge of tumor biology and therapeutic avenues remains challenging. Such efforts should be greatly aided by robust preclinical model systems that reflect the genomic diversity of human cancers and for which detailed genetic and pharmacologic annotation is available 1 . Here we describe the Cancer Cell Line Encyclopedia (CCLE): a compilation of gene expression, chromosomal copy number, and massively parallel sequencing data from 947 hu...

  8. Inefficient complement system clearance of Trypanosoma cruzi metacyclic trypomastigotes enables resistant strains to invade eukaryotic cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor Cestari

    Full Text Available The complement system is the main arm of the vertebrate innate immune system against pathogen infection. For the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease, subverting the complement system and invading the host cells is crucial to succeed in infection. However, little attention has focused on whether the complement system can effectively control T. cruzi infection. To address this question, we decided to analyse: 1 which complement pathways are activated by T. cruzi using strains isolated from different hosts, 2 the capacity of these strains to resist the complement-mediated killing at nearly physiological conditions, and 3 whether the complement system could limit or control T. cruzi invasion of eukaryotic cells. The complement activating molecules C1q, C3, mannan-binding lectin and ficolins bound to all strains analysed; however, C3b and C4b deposition assays revealed that T. cruzi activates mainly the lectin and alternative complement pathways in non-immune human serum. Strikingly, we detected that metacyclic trypomastigotes of some T. cruzi strains were highly susceptible to complement-mediated killing in non-immune serum, while other strains were resistant. Furthermore, the rate of parasite invasion in eukaryotic cells was decreased by non-immune serum. Altogether, these results establish that the complement system recognizes T. cruzi metacyclic trypomastigotes, resulting in killing of susceptible strains. The complement system, therefore, acts as a physiological barrier which resistant strains have to evade for successful host infection.

  9. Open air biocathode enables effective electricity generation with microbial fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clauwaert, Peter; Van der Ha, David; Boon, Nico; Verbeken, Kim; Verhaege, Marc; Rabaey, Korneel; Verstraete, Willy

    2007-11-01

    The reduction of oxygen at the cathode is one of the major bottlenecks of microbial fuel cells (MFCs). While research so far has mainly focused on chemical catalysis of this oxygen reduction, here we present a continuously wetted cathode with microorganisms that act as biocatalysts for oxygen reduction. We combined the anode of an acetate oxidizing tubular microbial fuel cell with an open air biocathode for electricity production. The maximum power production was 83 +/- 11 W m(-3) MFC (0.183 L MFC) for batch-fed systems (20-40% Coulombic yield) and 65 +/- 5 W m(-3) MFC for a continuous system with an acetate loading rate of 1.5 kg COD m(-3) day(-1) (90 +/- 3% Coulombic yield). Electrochemical precipitation of manganese oxides on the cathodic graphite felt decreased the start-up period with approximately 30% versus a non-treated graphite felt. After the start-up period, the cell performance was similar for the pretreated and non-treated cathodic electrodes. Several reactor designs were tested, and it was found that enlargement of the 0.183 L MFC reactor by a factor 2.9-3.8 reduced the volumetric power output by 60-67%. Biocathodes alleviate the need to use noble or non-noble catalysts for the reduction of oxygen, which increases substantially the viability and sustainability of MFCs. PMID:18044542

  10. Lipid tethering of breast tumor cells enables real-time imaging of free-floating cell dynamics and drug response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakrabarti, Kristi R; Andorko, James I; Whipple, Rebecca A; Zhang, Peipei; Sooklal, Elisabeth L; Martin, Stuart S; Jewell, Christopher M

    2016-03-01

    Free-floating tumor cells located in the blood of cancer patients, known as circulating tumor cells (CTCs), have become key targets for studying metastasis. However, effective strategies to study the free-floating behavior of tumor cells in vitro have been a major barrier limiting the understanding of the functional properties of CTCs. Upon extracellular-matrix (ECM) detachment, breast tumor cells form tubulin-based protrusions known as microtentacles (McTNs) that play a role in the aggregation and re-attachment of tumor cells to increase their metastatic efficiency. In this study, we have designed a strategy to spatially immobilize ECM-detached tumor cells while maintaining their free-floating character. We use polyelectrolyte multilayers deposited on microfluidic substrates to prevent tumor cell adhesion and the addition of lipid moieties to tether tumor cells to these surfaces through interactions with the cell membranes. This coating remains optically clear, allowing capture of high-resolution images and videos of McTNs on viable free-floating cells. In addition, we show that tethering allows for the real-time analysis of McTN dynamics on individual tumor cells and in response to tubulin-targeting drugs. The ability to image detached tumor cells can vastly enhance our understanding of CTCs under conditions that better recapitulate the microenvironments they encounter during metastasis. PMID:26871289

  11. Lipid tethering of breast tumor cells enables real-time imaging of free-floating cell dynamics and drug response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whipple, Rebecca A.; Zhang, Peipei; Sooklal, Elisabeth L.; Martin, Stuart S.; Jewell, Christopher M.

    2016-01-01

    Free-floating tumor cells located in the blood of cancer patients, known as circulating tumor cells (CTCs), have become key targets for studying metastasis. However, effective strategies to study the free-floating behavior of tumor cells in vitro have been a major barrier limiting the understanding of the functional properties of CTCs. Upon extracellular-matrix (ECM) detachment, breast tumor cells form tubulin-based protrusions known as microtentacles (McTNs) that play a role in the aggregation and re-attachment of tumor cells to increase their metastatic efficiency. In this study, we have designed a strategy to spatially immobilize ECM-detached tumor cells while maintaining their free-floating character. We use polyelectrolyte multilayers deposited on microfluidic substrates to prevent tumor cell adhesion and the addition of lipid moieties to tether tumor cells to these surfaces through interactions with the cell membranes. This coating remains optically clear, allowing capture of high-resolution images and videos of McTNs on viable free-floating cells. In addition, we show that tethering allows for the real-time analysis of McTN dynamics on individual tumor cells and in response to tubulin-targeting drugs. The ability to image detached tumor cells can vastly enhance our understanding of CTCs under conditions that better recapitulate the microenvironments they encounter during metastasis. PMID:26871289

  12. Gro/TLE enables embryonic stem cell differentiation by repressing pluripotent gene expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laing, Adam F; Lowell, Sally; Brickman, Joshua M

    2015-01-01

    Gro/TLE proteins (TLE1-4) are a family of transcriptional corepressors acting downstream of multiple signalling pathways. Several TLEs are expressed in a dynamic manner throughout embryonic development and at high levels in embryonic stem cells (ESCs). Here we find that Gro/TLE is not required in...... expression of endoderm (Hhex-Venus) and neural (Sox1-GFP) reporter genes. Taken together, our results suggest that TLE activity is essential for early differentiation where it acts to suppress the pluripotency network, allowing for the initiation of lineage specific gene expression programs....

  13. Glycoengineered mesenchymal stem cells as an enabling platform for two-step targeting of solid tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Layek, Buddhadev; Sadhukha, Tanmoy; Prabha, Swayam

    2016-05-01

    Current tumor targeted drug and diagnostic delivery systems suffer from a lack of selectivity for tumor cells. Here, we propose a two-step tumor targeting strategy based on mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), which actively traffic to tumors. We developed glycoengineering protocols to induce expression of non-natural azide groups on the surface of MSCs without affecting their viability or tumor homing properties. Glycoengineered MSCs demonstrated active tumor homing in subcutaneous and orthotopic lung and ovarian tumor models. Subsequent systemic administration of dibenzyl cyclooctyne (DBCO)-labeled fluorophores or nanoparticles to MSC pretreated mice resulted in enhanced tumor accumulation of these agents through bio-orthogonal copper-free click chemistry. Further, administration of glycoengineered MSCs along with paclitaxel-loaded DBCO-functionalized nanoparticles resulted in significant (p < 0.05) inhibition of tumor growth and improved survival (p < 0.0001) in an orthotopic metastatic ovarian tumor model. These results provide evidence for the potential of MSC-based two-step targeting strategy to improve the tumor specificity of diagnostic agents and drugs, and thus potentially improve the treatment outcomes for patients diagnosed with cancer. PMID:26946263

  14. Improving Energy Efficiency and Enabling Water Recycle in Biorefineries Using Bioelectrochemical Cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Improving biofuel yield and water reuse are two important issues in further development of biorefineries. The total energy content of liquid fuels (including ethanol and hydrocarbon) produced from cellulosic biomass via biochemical or hybrid bio-thermochemical routes can vary from 49% to 70% of the biomass entering the biorefinery, on an energy basis. Use of boiler for combustion of residual organics and lignin results in significant energy and water losses. An alternate process to improve energy recovery from the residual organic streams is via use of bioelectrochemical systems such as microbial fuel cells (MFCs) microbial electrolysis cells (MECs). The potential advantages of this alternative scheme in a biorefinery include minimization of heat loss and generation of a higher value product, hydrogen. The need for 5-15 gallons of water per gallon of ethanol can be reduced significantly via recycle of water after MEC treatment. Removal of inhibitory byproducts such as furans, phenolics and acetate in MFC/MECs to generate energy, thus, has dual advantages including improvements in energy efficiency and ability to recycle water. Conversion of the sugar- and lignin- degradation products to hydrogen is synergistic with biorefinery hydrogen requirements for upgrading F-T liquids and other byproducts to high-octane fuels and/or high value products. Some of these products include sorbitol, succinic acid, furan and levulinate derivatives, glycols, polyols, 1,4-butenadiol, phenolics polymers, etc. Potential process alternatives utilizing MECs in biorefineries capable of improving energy efficiency by up to 30% are discussed.

  15. Cooperative antiproliferative and differentiation-enhancing activity of medicinal plant extracts in acute myeloid leukemia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhamanbayeva, Gulzhan T; Aralbayeva, Araylim N; Murzakhmetova, Maira K; Tuleukhanov, Sultan T; Danilenko, Michael

    2016-08-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is an aggressive hematopoietic malignancy with poor prognosis and limited treatment options. Sea buckthorn (Hippophae rhamnoides) berries, dog rose (Rosa canina) rosehips, and garden sage (Salvia officinalis) and oregano (Origanum vulgare) aerial parts are widely used in traditional medicine and exhibit antitumor effects in preclinical models. However, these plants remain scarcely tested for antileukemic activity. Here, we show that their water-ethanol leaf extracts reduced the growth and viability of AML cells and, at non-cytotoxic doses, potentiated cell differentiation induced by a low concentration of 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3, the hormonal form of vitamin D, in a cell type-dependent manner. The latter effect was accompanied by upregulation of the vitamin D receptor protein components and its transcriptional activity. Furthermore, at minimally effective doses the extracts cooperated with one another to produce marked cytostatic effects associated with a partial S-phase arrest and a modest induction of apoptosis. In contrast, these combinations only slightly affected the growth and viability of proliferating normal human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. In addition, the extracts strongly inhibited microsomal lipid peroxidation and protected normal erythrocytes against hypoosmotic shock. Our results suggest that further exploration of the enhanced antileukemic effects of the combinations tested here may lead to the development of alternative therapeutic and preventive approaches against AML. PMID:27470342

  16. Synthesis of an artificial cell surface receptor that enables oligohistidine affinity tags to function as metal-dependent cell-penetrating peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boonyarattanakalin, Siwarutt; Athavankar, Sonalee; Sun, Qi; Peterson, Blake R

    2006-01-18

    Cell-penetrating peptides and proteins (CPPs) are important tools for the delivery of impermeable molecules into living mammalian cells. To enable these cells to internalize proteins fused to common oligohistidine affinity tags, we synthesized an artificial cell surface receptor comprising an N-alkyl derivative of 3beta-cholesterylamine linked to the metal chelator nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA). This synthetic receptor inserts into cellular plasma membranes, projects NTA headgroups from the cell surface, and rapidly cycles between the plasma membrane and intracellular endosomes. Jurkat lymphocytes treated with the synthetic receptor (10 microM) for 1 h displayed approximately 8,400,000 [corrected]NTA groups on the cell surface. Subsequent addition of the green fluorescent protein AcGFP fused to hexahistidine or decahistidine peptides (3 microM) and Ni(OAc)(2) (100 microM) enhanced the endocytosis of AcGFP by 150-fold (hexahistidine fusion protein) or 600-fold (decahistidine fusion protein) within 4 h at 37 degrees C. No adverse effects on cellular proliferation or morphology were observed under these conditions. By enabling common oligohistidine affinity tags to function as cell-penetrating peptides, this metal-chelating cell surface receptor provides a useful tool for studies of cellular biology [corrected] PMID:16402806

  17. Industrial Systems Biology of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Enables Novel Succinic Acid Cell Factory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Otero, José Manuel; Cimini, Donatella; Patil, Kiran Raosaheb;

    2013-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae is the most well characterized eukaryote, the preferred microbial cell factory for the largest industrial biotechnology product (bioethanol), and a robust commerically compatible scaffold to be exploitted for diverse chemical production. Succinic acid is a highly sought...... production. Glycine and serine, both essential amino acids required for biomass formation, are formed from both glycolytic and TCA cycle intermediates. Succinate formation results from the isocitrate lyase catalyzed conversion of isocitrate, and from the α-keto-glutarate dehydrogenase catalyzed conversion of...... genetic targets for either over-expression or interruption of succinate producing or consuming pathways, respectively, do not lead to increased succinate. Rather, we demonstrate how systems biology tools coupled with directed evolution and selection allows non-intuitive, rapid and substantial re...

  18. Quantitative Analyses of Core Promoters Enable Precise Engineering of Regulated Gene Expression in Mammalian Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ede, Christopher; Chen, Ximin; Lin, Meng-Yin; Chen, Yvonne Y

    2016-05-20

    Inducible transcription systems play a crucial role in a wide array of synthetic biology circuits. However, the majority of inducible promoters are constructed from a limited set of tried-and-true promoter parts, which are susceptible to common shortcomings such as high basal expression levels (i.e., leakiness). To expand the toolbox for regulated mammalian gene expression and facilitate the construction of mammalian genetic circuits with precise functionality, we quantitatively characterized a panel of eight core promoters, including sequences with mammalian, viral, and synthetic origins. We demonstrate that this selection of core promoters can provide a wide range of basal gene expression levels and achieve a gradient of fold-inductions spanning 2 orders of magnitude. Furthermore, commonly used parts such as minimal CMV and minimal SV40 promoters were shown to achieve robust gene expression upon induction, but also suffer from high levels of leakiness. In contrast, a synthetic promoter, YB_TATA, was shown to combine low basal expression with high transcription rate in the induced state to achieve significantly higher fold-induction ratios compared to all other promoters tested. These behaviors remain consistent when the promoters are coupled to different genetic outputs and different response elements, as well as across different host-cell types and DNA copy numbers. We apply this quantitative understanding of core promoter properties to the successful engineering of human T cells that respond to antigen stimulation via chimeric antigen receptor signaling specifically under hypoxic environments. Results presented in this study can facilitate the design and calibration of future mammalian synthetic biology systems capable of precisely programmed functionality. PMID:26883397

  19. Calcium influx rescues adenylate cyclase-hemolysin from rapid cell membrane removal and enables phagocyte permeabilization by toxin pores.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radovan Fiser

    Full Text Available Bordetella adenylate cyclase toxin-hemolysin (CyaA penetrates the cytoplasmic membrane of phagocytes and employs two distinct conformers to exert its multiple activities. One conformer forms cation-selective pores that permeabilize phagocyte membrane for efflux of cytosolic potassium. The other conformer conducts extracellular calcium ions across cytoplasmic membrane of cells, relocates into lipid rafts, translocates the adenylate cyclase enzyme (AC domain into cells and converts cytosolic ATP to cAMP. We show that the calcium-conducting activity of CyaA controls the path and kinetics of endocytic removal of toxin pores from phagocyte membrane. The enzymatically inactive but calcium-conducting CyaA-AC⁻ toxoid was endocytosed via a clathrin-dependent pathway. In contrast, a doubly mutated (E570K+E581P toxoid, unable to conduct Ca²⁺ into cells, was rapidly internalized by membrane macropinocytosis, unless rescued by Ca²⁺ influx promoted in trans by ionomycin or intact toxoid. Moreover, a fully pore-forming CyaA-ΔAC hemolysin failed to permeabilize phagocytes, unless endocytic removal of its pores from cell membrane was decelerated through Ca²⁺ influx promoted by molecules locked in a Ca²⁺-conducting conformation by the 3D1 antibody. Inhibition of endocytosis also enabled the native B. pertussis-produced CyaA to induce lysis of J774A.1 macrophages at concentrations starting from 100 ng/ml. Hence, by mediating calcium influx into cells, the translocating conformer of CyaA controls the removal of bystander toxin pores from phagocyte membrane. This triggers a positive feedback loop of exacerbated cell permeabilization, where the efflux of cellular potassium yields further decreased toxin pore removal from cell membrane and this further enhances cell permeabilization and potassium efflux.

  20. New views of the human NK cell immunological synapse: recent advances enabled by super- and high- resolution imaging techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily M. Mace

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Imaging technology has undergone rapid growth with the development of super resolution microscopy, which enables resolution below the diffraction barrier of light (~200 nm. In addition, new techniques for single molecule imaging are being added to the cell biologist’s arsenal. Immunologists have exploited these techniques to advance understanding of NK biology, particularly that of the immune synapse. The immune synapse’s relatively small size and complex architecture combined with its exquisitely controlled signaling milieu have made it a challenge to visualize. In this review we highlight and discuss new insights into NK cell immune synapse formation and regulation revealed by cutting edge imaging techniques, including super resolution microscopy and high resolution total internal reflection microscopy and Förster resonance energy transfer.

  1. The AMERE project: Enabling real-time detection of radiation effects in individual cells in deep space

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Vos, Winnok H.; Meesen, Geert; Szpirer, Cedric; Scohy, Sophie; Cherukuri, Chaitanya; Evrard, Olivier; Hutsebaut, Xavier; Beghuin, Didier

    2012-12-01

    A major concern for long-term deep space missions is the detrimental impact of cosmic radiation on human health. Especially the presence of high-energy particles of high atomic mass (HZE) represents a serious threat. To contribute to a fundamental understanding of space radiation effects and to help improving risk assessment for humans on the Moon, the ESA Lunar Lander mission model payload includes a package dedicated to cell-based radiobiology experiments in the form of an Autonomous Microscope for Examination of Radiation Effects (AMERE). The purpose of this setup is to enable real-time visualization of DNA damage repair in living cells after traversal of HZE particles on the Moon. To assess the feasibility of this challenging experiment, we have analysed the biological and technological demands. In this article, we discuss the experimental concept, the biological considerations and describe the implications for system design.

  2. Two-way cooperative AF relaying in spectrum-sharing systems: Enhancing cell-edge performance

    KAUST Repository

    Xia, Minghua

    2012-09-01

    In this contribution, two-way cooperative amplify-and-forward (AF) relaying technique is integrated into spectrumsharing wireless systems to improve spectral efficiency of secondary users (SUs). In order to share the available spectrum resources originally dedicated to primary users (PUs), the transmit power of a SU is optimized with respect to the average tolerable interference power at primary receivers. By analyzing outage probability and achievable data rate at the base station and at a cell-edge SU, our results reveal that the uplink performance is dominated by the average tolerable interference power at primary receivers, while the downlink always behaves like conventional one-way AF relaying and its performance is dominated by the average signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). These important findings provide fresh perspectives for system designers to improve spectral efficiency of secondary users in next-generation broadband spectrum-sharing wireless systems. © 2012 IEEE.

  3. Amorphous Silicon Carbide Passivating Layers to Enable Higher Processing Temperature in Crystalline Silicon Heterojunction Solar Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boccard, Mathieu [Arizona State Univ., Mesa, AZ (United States); Holman, Zachary [Arizona State Univ., Mesa, AZ (United States)

    2015-04-06

    "Very efficient crystalline silicon (c-Si) solar cells have been demonstrated when thin layers of intrinsic and doped hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) are used for passivation and carrier selectivity in a heterojunction device. One limitation of this device structure is the (parasitic) absorption in the front passivation/collection a-Si:H layers; another is the degradation of the a-Si:H-based passivation upon temperature, limiting the post-processes to approximately 200°C thus restricting the contacting possibilities and potential tandem device fabrication. To alleviate these two limitations, we explore the potential of amorphous silicon carbide (a-SiC:H), a widely studied material in use in standard a-Si:H thin-film solar cells, which is known for its wider bandgap, increased hydrogen content and stronger hydrogen bonding compared to a-Si:H. We study the surface passivation of solar-grade textured n-type c-Si wafers for symmetrical stacks of 10-nm-thick intrinsic a-SiC:H with various carbon content followed by either p-doped or n-doped a-Si:H (referred to as i/p or i/n stacks). For both doping types, passivation (assessed through carrier lifetime measurements) is degraded by increasing the carbon content in the intrinsic a-SiC:H layer. Yet, this hierarchy is reversed after annealing at 350°C or more due to drastic passivation improvements upon annealing when an a-SiC:H layer is used. After annealing at 350°C, lifetimes of 0.4 ms and 2.0 ms are reported for i/p and i/n stacks, respectively, when using an intrinsic a-SiC:H layer with approximately 10% of carbon (initial lifetimes of 0.3 ms and 0.1 ms, respectively, corresponding to a 30% and 20-fold increase, respectively). For stacks of pure a-Si:H material the lifetimes degrade from 1.2 ms and 2.0 ms for i/p and i/n stacks, respectively, to less than 0.1 ms and 1.1 ms (12-fold and 2-fold decrease, respectively). For complete solar cells using pure a-Si:H i/p and i/n stacks, the open-circuit voltage (Voc

  4. Hierarchical clustering of ryanodine receptors enables emergence of a calcium clock in sinoatrial node cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, Michael D; Maltseva, Larissa A; Juhaszova, Magdalena; Sollott, Steven J; Lakatta, Edward G; Maltsev, Victor A

    2014-05-01

    The sinoatrial node, whose cells (sinoatrial node cells [SANCs]) generate rhythmic action potentials, is the primary pacemaker of the heart. During diastole, calcium released from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) via ryanodine receptors (RyRs) interacts with membrane currents to control the rate of the heartbeat. This "calcium clock" takes the form of stochastic, partially periodic, localized calcium release (LCR) events that propagate, wave-like, for limited distances. The detailed mechanisms controlling the calcium clock are not understood. We constructed a computational model of SANCs, including three-dimensional diffusion and buffering of calcium in the cytosol and SR; explicit, stochastic gating of individual RyRs and L-type calcium channels; and a full complement of voltage- and calcium-dependent membrane currents. We did not include an anatomical submembrane space or inactivation of RyRs, the two heuristic components that have been used in prior models but are not observed experimentally. When RyRs were distributed in discrete clusters separated by >1 µm, only isolated sparks were produced in this model and LCR events did not form. However, immunofluorescent staining of SANCs for RyR revealed the presence of bridging RyR groups between large clusters, forming an irregular network. Incorporation of this architecture into the model led to the generation of propagating LCR events. Partial periodicity emerged from the interaction of LCR events, as observed experimentally. This calcium clock becomes entrained with membrane currents to accelerate the beating rate, which therefore was controlled by the activity of the SERCA pump, RyR sensitivity, and L-type current amplitude, all of which are targets of β-adrenergic-mediated phosphorylation. Unexpectedly, simulations revealed the existence of a pathological mode at high RyR sensitivity to calcium, in which the calcium clock loses synchronization with the membrane, resulting in a paradoxical decrease in beating

  5. Nanoparticle encapsulation in red blood cells enables blood-pool magnetic particle imaging hours after injection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnetic particle imaging (MPI) is a new medical imaging approach that is based on the nonlinear magnetization response of super-paramagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIOs) injected into the blood stream. To date, real-time MPI of the bolus passage of an approved MRI SPIO contrast agent injected into the tail vein of living mice has been demonstrated. However, nanoparticles are rapidly removed from the blood stream by the mononuclear phagocyte system. Therefore, imaging applications for long-term monitoring require the repeated administration of bolus injections, which complicates quantitative comparisons due to the temporal variations in concentration. Encapsulation of SPIOs into red blood cells (RBCs) has been suggested to increase the blood circulation time of nanoparticles. This work presents first evidence that SPIO-loaded RBCs can be imaged in the blood pool of mice several hours after injection using MPI. This finding is supported by magnetic particle spectroscopy performed to quantify the iron concentration in blood samples extracted from the mice 3 and 24 h after injection of SPIO-loaded RBCs. Based on these results, new MPI applications can be envisioned, such as permanent 3D real-time visualization of the vessel tree during interventional procedures, bleeding monitoring after stroke, or long-term monitoring and treatment control of cardiovascular diseases. (paper)

  6. Transcription factor levels enable metabolic diversification of single cells of environmental bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guantes, Raúl; Benedetti, Ilaria; Silva-Rocha, Rafael; de Lorenzo, Víctor

    2016-05-01

    Transcriptional noise is a necessary consequence of the molecular events that drive gene expression in prokaryotes. However, some environmental microorganisms that inhabit polluted sites, for example, the m-xylene degrading soil bacterium Pseudomonas putida mt-2 seem to have co-opted evolutionarily such a noise for deploying a metabolic diversification strategy that allows a cautious exploration of new chemical landscapes. We have examined this phenomenon under the light of deterministic and stochastic models for activation of the main promoter of the master m-xylene responsive promoter of the system (Pu) by its cognate transcriptional factor (XylR). These analyses consider the role of co-factors for Pu activation and determinants of xylR mRNA translation. The model traces the onset and eventual disappearance of the bimodal distribution of Pu activity along time to the growth-phase dependent abundance of XylR itself, that is, very low in exponentially growing cells and high in stationary. This tenet was validated by examining the behaviour of a Pu-GFP fusion in a P. putida strain in which xylR expression was engineered under the control of an IPTG-inducible system. This work shows how a relatively simple regulatory scenario (for example, growth-phase dependent expression of a limiting transcription factor) originates a regime of phenotypic diversity likely to be advantageous in competitive environmental settings. PMID:26636554

  7. Consistency of VDJ Rearrangement and Substitution Parameters Enables Accurate B Cell Receptor Sequence Annotation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duncan K Ralph

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available VDJ rearrangement and somatic hypermutation work together to produce antibody-coding B cell receptor (BCR sequences for a remarkable diversity of antigens. It is now possible to sequence these BCRs in high throughput; analysis of these sequences is bringing new insight into how antibodies develop, in particular for broadly-neutralizing antibodies against HIV and influenza. A fundamental step in such sequence analysis is to annotate each base as coming from a specific one of the V, D, or J genes, or from an N-addition (a.k.a. non-templated insertion. Previous work has used simple parametric distributions to model transitions from state to state in a hidden Markov model (HMM of VDJ recombination, and assumed that mutations occur via the same process across sites. However, codon frame and other effects have been observed to violate these parametric assumptions for such coding sequences, suggesting that a non-parametric approach to modeling the recombination process could be useful. In our paper, we find that indeed large modern data sets suggest a model using parameter-rich per-allele categorical distributions for HMM transition probabilities and per-allele-per-position mutation probabilities, and that using such a model for inference leads to significantly improved results. We present an accurate and efficient BCR sequence annotation software package using a novel HMM "factorization" strategy. This package, called partis (https://github.com/psathyrella/partis/, is built on a new general-purpose HMM compiler that can perform efficient inference given a simple text description of an HMM.

  8. HCN Producing Bacteria Enable Sensing Of Non-Bioavailable Hg Species by the Whole Cell Biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horvat, M.; Rijavec, T.; Koron, N.; Lapanje, A.

    2015-12-01

    Bacteria play an important role in Hg transformation reactions. The production of cyanide (HCN) and other secondary metabolites seems to be key elements involved in these transformations. Current hypotheses link the role of HCN production to growth inhibition of nonHCN producing competitor organisms (role of an antimicrobial agent). Our past investigations showed that HCN production did not correlate with antimicrobial activity and since pK value of HCN is very high (pK = 9,21), it can be expected that most of the produced HCN is removed from the microenvironment. This way, the expected inhibitory concentrations can hardly be reached. Accordingly, we proposed a new concept, where the ability of complexation of transient metals by HCN served as a regulation process for the accessibility of micro-elements. In our study, we focused on the presence of HCN producing bacteria and carried it out in the Hg contaminated environment connected to the Idrija Mercury Mine, Slovenia. We characterised the isolates according to the presence of Hg resistance (HgR), level of HCN production and genetic similarities. In laboratory setups, using our merR whole cell based biosensor, we determined the transformation of low bioavailable Hg0 and HgS forms into bioavailable Hg by these HCN producing bacteria. We observed that HgR strains producing HCN had the highest impact on increased Hg bioavailability. In the proposed ecological strategy HgR HCN producing bacteria increase their competitive edge over non-HgR competitors through the increase of Hg toxicity. Due to their activity, Hg is made available to other organisms as well and thus enters into the ecosystem. Finally, using some of the characteristics of bacteria (e.g. Hg resistance genetic elements), we developed a fully automated sensing approach, combining biosensorics and mechatronics, to measure the bioavailability of Hg in situ.

  9. Mutant p53 - heat shock response oncogenic cooperation: a new mechanism of cancer cell survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evguenia eAlexandrova

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The main tumor suppressor function of p53 as a ‘guardian of the genome’ is to respond to cellular stress by transcriptional activation of apoptosis, growth arrest or senescence in damaged cells. Not surprisingly, mutations in the p53 gene are the most frequent genetic alteration in human cancers. Importantly, mutant p53 (mutp53 proteins not only lose their wild-type tumor suppressor activity, but also can actively promote tumor development. Two main mechanisms accounting for mutp53 proto-oncogenic activity are inhibition of the wild-type p53 in a dominant-negative fashion and gain of additional oncogenic activities known as gain-of-function (GOF. Here we discuss a novel mechanism of mutp53 GOF, which relies on its oncogenic cooperation with the heat shock machinery. This coordinated adaptive mechanism renders cancer cells more resistant to proteotoxic stress and provides both, a strong survival advantage to cancer cells and a promising means for therapeutic intervention.

  10. Functional cooperation between FACT and MCM is coordinated with cell cycle and differential complex formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Chih-Li

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Functional cooperation between FACT and the MCM helicase complex constitutes an integral step during DNA replication initiation. However, mode of regulation that underlies the proper functional interaction of FACT and MCM is poorly understood. Methods & Results Here we present evidence indicating that such interaction is coordinated with cell cycle progression and differential complex formation. We first demonstrate the existence of two distinct FACT-MCM subassemblies, FACT-MCM2/4/6/7 and FACT-MCM2/3/4/5. Both complexes possess DNA unwinding activity and are subject to cell cycle-dependent enzymatic regulation. Interestingly, analysis of functional attributes further suggests that they act at distinct, and possibly sequential, steps during origin establishment and replication initiation. Moreover, we show that the phosphorylation profile of the FACT-associated MCM4 undergoes a cell cycle-dependent change, which is directly correlated with the catalytic activity of the FACT-MCM helicase complexes. Finally, at the quaternary structure level, physical interaction between FACT and MCM complexes is generally dependent on persistent cell cycle and further stabilized upon S phase entry. Cessation of mitotic cycle destabilizes the complex formation and likely leads to compromised coordination and activities. Conclusions Together, our results correlate FACT-MCM functionally and temporally with S phase and DNA replication. They further demonstrate that enzymatic activities intrinsically important for DNA replication are tightly controlled at various levels, thereby ensuring proper progression of, as well as exit from, the cell cycle and ultimately euploid gene balance.

  11. Cooperative transcription activation by Nurr1 and Pitx3 induces embryonic stem cell maturation to the midbrain dopamine neuron phenotype

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinat, Cecile; Bacci, Jean-Jacques; Leete, Thomas;

    2006-01-01

    , Pitx3, Lmx1b, Engrailed-1, and Engrailed-2. However, none of these factors appear sufficient alone to induce the mature midbrain DA neuron phenotype in ES cell cultures in vitro, suggesting a more complex regulatory network. Here we show that Nurr1 and Pitx3 cooperatively promote terminal maturation...

  12. Efficient polymer solar cells enabled by low temperature processed ternary metal oxide as electron transport interlayer with large stoichiometry window.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leong, Wei Lin; Ren, Yi; Seng, Hwee Leng; Huang, Zihao; Chiam, Sing Yang; Dodabalapur, Ananth

    2015-06-01

    Highly efficient organic photovoltaic cells are demonstrated by incorporating low temperature solution processed indium zinc oxide (IZO) as cathode interlayers. The IZOs are synthesized using a combustion synthesis method, which enables low temperature processes (150-250 °C). We investigated the IZO films with different electron mobilities (1.4×10(-3) to 0.23 cm2/(V·s)), hydroxide-oxide content (38% to 47%), and surface roughness (0.19-5.16 nm) by modulating the ternary metal oxide stoichiometry. The photovoltaic performance was found to be relatively insensitive to the composition ratio of In:Zn over the range of 0.8:0.2 to 0.5:0.5 despite the differences in their electrical and surface properties, achieving high power conversion efficiencies of 6.61%-7.04%. Changes in composition ratio of IZO do not lead to obvious differences in energy levels, diode parameters and morphology of the photoactive layer, as revealed by ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS), dark current analysis and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS) measurements, correlating well with the large IZO stoichiometry window that enables efficient photovoltaic devices. Our results demonstrate the robustness of this ETL system and provide a convenient approach to realize a wide range of multicomponent oxides and compatible with processing on flexible plastic substrates. PMID:25978551

  13. Direct hydrogel encapsulation of pluripotent stem cells enables ontomimetic differentiation and growth of engineered human heart tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerscher, Petra; Turnbull, Irene C; Hodge, Alexander J; Kim, Joonyul; Seliktar, Dror; Easley, Christopher J; Costa, Kevin D; Lipke, Elizabeth A

    2016-03-01

    Human engineered heart tissues have potential to revolutionize cardiac development research, drug-testing, and treatment of heart disease; however, implementation is limited by the need to use pre-differentiated cardiomyocytes (CMs). Here we show that by providing a 3D poly(ethylene glycol)-fibrinogen hydrogel microenvironment, we can directly differentiate human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) into contracting heart tissues. Our straight-forward, ontomimetic approach, imitating the process of development, requires only a single cell-handling step, provides reproducible results for a range of tested geometries and size scales, and overcomes inherent limitations in cell maintenance and maturation, while achieving high yields of CMs with developmentally appropriate temporal changes in gene expression. We demonstrate that hPSCs encapsulated within this biomimetic 3D hydrogel microenvironment develop into functional cardiac tissues composed of self-aligned CMs with evidence of ultrastructural maturation, mimicking heart development, and enabling investigation of disease mechanisms and screening of compounds on developing human heart tissue. PMID:26826618

  14. Efficient Designer Nuclease-Based Homologous Recombination Enables Direct PCR Screening for Footprintless Targeted Human Pluripotent Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvia Merkert

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Genetic engineering of human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs via customized designer nucleases has been shown to be significantly more efficient than conventional gene targeting, but still typically depends on the introduction of additional genetic selection elements. In our study, we demonstrate the efficient nonviral and selection-independent gene targeting in human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs. Our high efficiencies of up to 1.6% of gene-targeted hiPSCs, accompanied by a low background of randomly inserted transgenes, eliminated the need for antibiotic or fluorescence-activated cell sorting selection, and allowed the use of short donor oligonucleotides for footprintless gene editing. Gene-targeted hiPSC clones were established simply by direct PCR screening. This optimized approach allows targeted transgene integration into safe harbor sites for more predictable and robust expression and enables the straightforward generation of disease-corrected, patient-derived iPSC lines for research purposes and, ultimately, for future clinical applications.

  15. Studies on the utility and mechanism of the V-79 cell metabolic cooperation assay for tumor promoters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cigarette smoke condensate and its fractions were tested for activity in the V-79 Metabolic Cooperation Assay to determine the usefulness of the assay for analysis of a complex mixture and to compare the results obtained with previously conducted in vivo promoter assays. The whole condensate and several of its fractions were positive in the assay. In general, the Metabolic Cooperation Assay results were comparable to previously published results obtained on mouse skin. The effect of cell density, phorbol 12-myrystate-13-acetate (PMA) exposure time, concentration, pre-exposure and binding activity on the recovery of mutant V-79 Chinese hamster lung fibroblasts in the Metabolic Cooperation Assay was determined. A PMA exposure interval of only 1 minute resulted in maximum recovery of mutant cells. PMA began to inhibit metabolic cooperation at an exposure concentration of 0.1 ng/ml. Pre-exposure of cells to PMA increased the recovery of both post-PMA-treated and non-treated mutant cells in a dose-dependent manner. 3H-PMA was rapidly bound to or taken up by the V-79 cells under assay conditions. The effect of calcium antagonists and representative compounds from several classes of anti-promoters including anti-inflammatory sterols, protease inhibitors, retinoids and cyclic nucleotides on metabolic determined. Each compound was tested for its effect on metabolic cooperation and also for its ability to reverse or modify the inhibitory properties of PMA on inter-cellular communication. Of all the compounds tested only cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) was able to antagonize the inhibitory effect of PMA

  16. Aggregation of gold nanoparticles followed by methotrexate release enables Raman imaging of drug delivery into cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durgadas, C. V.; Sharma, C. P.; Paul, W.; Rekha, M. R. [Sree Chitra Tirunal Institute for Medical Sciences and Technology, Biosurface Technology Division (India); Sreenivasan, K., E-mail: sreeni@sctimst.ac.in [Sree Chitra Tirunal Institute for Medical Sciences and Technology, Laboratory for Polymer Analysis, Biomedical Technology Wing (India)

    2012-09-15

    This study refers an aqueous synthesis of methotrexate (MTX)-conjugated gold nanoparticles (GNPs), their interaction with HepG2 cells, and the use of Raman imaging to observe cellular internalization and drug delivery. GNPs of average size 3.5-5 nm were stabilized using the amine terminated bifunctional biocompatible copolymer and amended by conjugating MTX, an anticancer drug. The nanoparticles were released MTX at a faster rate in acidic pH and subsequently found to form aggregates. The Raman signals of cellular components were found to be enhanced by the aggregated particles enabling the mapping to visualize site-specific drug delivery. The methodology seems to have potential in optimizing the characteristics of nanodrug carriers for emptying the cargo precisely at specified sites.Graphical AbstractDrug release induced particle aggregation enhances Raman signals to aid in imaging.

  17. Aggregation of gold nanoparticles followed by methotrexate release enables Raman imaging of drug delivery into cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study refers an aqueous synthesis of methotrexate (MTX)-conjugated gold nanoparticles (GNPs), their interaction with HepG2 cells, and the use of Raman imaging to observe cellular internalization and drug delivery. GNPs of average size 3.5–5 nm were stabilized using the amine terminated bifunctional biocompatible copolymer and amended by conjugating MTX, an anticancer drug. The nanoparticles were released MTX at a faster rate in acidic pH and subsequently found to form aggregates. The Raman signals of cellular components were found to be enhanced by the aggregated particles enabling the mapping to visualize site-specific drug delivery. The methodology seems to have potential in optimizing the characteristics of nanodrug carriers for emptying the cargo precisely at specified sites.Graphical AbstractDrug release induced particle aggregation enhances Raman signals to aid in imaging.

  18. Ultra-Lightweight Hybrid Thin-Film Solar Cells: A Survey of Enabling Technologies for Space Power Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hepp, Aloysius F.; McNatt, Jeremiah S.; Bailey, Sheila G.; Dickman, John E.; Raffaelle, Ryne P.; Landi, Brian J.; Anctil, Annick; DiLeo, Roberta; Jin, Michael H.-C.; Lee, Chung-Young; Friske, Theresa J.; Sun, Sam-S.; Zhang, Cheng; Choi, S.; Ledbetter, Abram; Seo, Kang; Bonner, Carl E.; Banger, Kulbinder K.; Castro, Stephanie L.; Rauh, David

    2007-01-01

    The development of hybrid inorganic/organic thin-film solar cells on flexible, lightweight, space-qualified, durable substrates provides an attractive solution for fabricating solar arrays with high mass specific power (W/kg). Next generation thin-film technologies may well involve a revolutionary change in materials to organic-based devices. The high-volume, low-cost fabrication potential of organic cells will allow for square miles of solar cell production at one-tenth the cost of conventional inorganic materials. Plastic solar cells take a minimum of storage space and can be inflated or unrolled for deployment. We will explore a cross-section of in-house and sponsored research efforts that aim to provide new hybrid technologies that include both inorganic and polymer materials as active and substrate materials. Research at University of Texas at Arlington focuses on the fabrication and use of poly(isothianaphthene-3,6-diyl) in solar cells. We describe efforts at Norfolk State University to design, synthesize and characterize block copolymers. A collaborative team between EIC Laboratories, Inc. and the University of Florida is investigating multijunction polymer solar cells to more effectively utilize solar radiation. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/Ohio Aerospace Institute (OAI) group has undertaken a thermal analysis of potential metallized substrates as well as production of nanoparticles of CuInS2 and CuInSe2 in good yield at moderate temperatures via decomposition of single-source precursors. Finally, preliminary work at the Rochester Institute of Technology (R.I.T.) to assess the impact on performance of solar cells of temperature and carbon nanotubes is reported. Technologies that must be developed to enable ultra-lightweight solar arrays include: monolithic interconnects, lightweight array structures, and new ultra-light support and deployment mechanisms. For NASA applications, any solar cell or array technology must not only meet

  19. Clones defective in metabolic cooperation selected from a pluripotent feeder-dependent mouse embryonal carcinoma cell line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Starting from embryonal carcinoma (e.c.) cells capable of extensive differentiation in culture, the technique of thioguanine kiss of death has been used to select four independent metabolic cooperation-defective variants. The communication ability of these variant cell lines has been quantified by autoradiographic measurement of the transfer of uridine nucleotides, and also by an assay of the extent of junction-mediated rescue from ouabain toxicity by resistant fibroblasts. The cell lines which are defective in ability to transfer nucleotides, as measured by the uridine nucleotide transfer assay, are also defective in their ability to differentiate into endoderm and to form the cavitated embryoid bodies which are produced by the parental cell line when grown in suspension culture. However, it is not clear whether this is related to the defects in metabolic cooperation, since clones which had been subjected to the same selective conditions but which cooperative normally have also lost some of the capacity to undergo this differentiation. Endoderm differentiation was classified into two categories, one being visceral endoderm and the other, primary plus parietal endoderm, on the basis of morphology, immunocytochemical staining for a-fetoprotein, and basement membrane formation. With the exception of correlations arising from variation between experiments and differences between cell lines, there is no statistical association between these two categories of differentiation. The formation of cavities was observed only in embryoid bodies with endoderm differentiation: the present of either category was sufficient condition for cavitation to occur

  20. Single-cell microarray enables high-throughput evaluation of DNA double-strand breaks and DNA repair inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weingeist, David M; Ge, Jing; Wood, David K; Mutamba, James T; Huang, Qiuying; Rowland, Elizabeth A; Yaffe, Michael B; Floyd, Scott; Engelward, Bevin P

    2013-03-15

    A key modality of non-surgical cancer management is DNA damaging therapy that causes DNA double-strand breaks that are preferentially toxic to rapidly dividing cancer cells. Double-strand break repair capacity is recognized as an important mechanism in drug resistance and is therefore a potential target for adjuvant chemotherapy. Additionally, spontaneous and environmentally induced DSBs are known to promote cancer, making DSB evaluation important as a tool in epidemiology, clinical evaluation and in the development of novel pharmaceuticals. Currently available assays to detect double-strand breaks are limited in throughput and specificity and offer minimal information concerning the kinetics of repair. Here, we present the CometChip, a 96-well platform that enables assessment of double-strand break levels and repair capacity of multiple cell types and conditions in parallel and integrates with standard high-throughput screening and analysis technologies. We demonstrate the ability to detect multiple genetic deficiencies in double-strand break repair and evaluate a set of clinically relevant chemical inhibitors of one of the major double-strand break repair pathways, non-homologous end-joining. While other high-throughput repair assays measure residual damage or indirect markers of damage, the CometChip detects physical double-strand breaks, providing direct measurement of damage induction and repair capacity, which may be useful in developing and implementing treatment strategies with reduced side effects. PMID:23422001

  1. Enabling systematic interrogation of protein-protein interactions in live cells with a versatile ultra-high-throughput biosensor platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Xiu-Lei; Luo, Yin; Ivanov, Andrei A; Su, Rina; Havel, Jonathan J; Li, Zenggang; Khuri, Fadlo R; Du, Yuhong; Fu, Haian

    2016-06-01

    Large-scale genomics studies have generated vast resources for in-depth understanding of vital biological and pathological processes. A rising challenge is to leverage such enormous information to rapidly decipher the intricate protein-protein interactions (PPIs) for functional characterization and therapeutic interventions. While a number of powerful technologies have been employed to detect PPIs, a singular PPI biosensor platform with both high sensitivity and robustness in a mammalian cell environment remains to be established. Here we describe the development and integration of a highly sensitive NanoLuc luciferase-based bioluminescence resonance energy transfer technology, termed BRET(n), which enables ultra-high-throughput (uHTS) PPI detection in live cells with streamlined co-expression of biosensors in a miniaturized format. We further demonstrate the application of BRET(n) in uHTS format in chemical biology research, including the discovery of chemical probes that disrupt PRAS40 dimerization and pathway connectivity profiling among core members of the Hippo signaling pathway. Such hippo pathway profiling not only confirmed previously reported PPIs, but also revealed two novel interactions, suggesting new mechanisms for regulation of Hippo signaling. Our BRET(n) biosensor platform with uHTS capability is expected to accelerate systematic PPI network mapping and PPI modulator-based drug discovery. PMID:26578655

  2. Assessment of beating parameters in human induced pluripotent stem cells enables quantitative in vitro screening for cardiotoxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Human induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC)-derived cardiomyocytes show promise for screening during early drug development. Here, we tested a hypothesis that in vitro assessment of multiple cardiomyocyte physiological parameters enables predictive and mechanistically-interpretable evaluation of cardiotoxicity in a high-throughput format. Human iPSC-derived cardiomyocytes were exposed for 30 min or 24 h to 131 drugs, positive (107) and negative (24) for in vivo cardiotoxicity, in up to 6 concentrations (3 nM to 30 uM) in 384-well plates. Fast kinetic imaging was used to monitor changes in cardiomyocyte function using intracellular Ca2+ flux readouts synchronous with beating, and cell viability. A number of physiological parameters of cardiomyocyte beating, such as beat rate, peak shape (amplitude, width, raise, decay, etc.) and regularity were collected using automated data analysis. Concentration–response profiles were evaluated using logistic modeling to derive a benchmark concentration (BMC) point-of-departure value, based on one standard deviation departure from the estimated baseline in vehicle (0.3% dimethyl sulfoxide)-treated cells. BMC values were used for cardiotoxicity classification and ranking of compounds. Beat rate and several peak shape parameters were found to be good predictors, while cell viability had poor classification accuracy. In addition, we applied the Toxicological Prioritization Index (ToxPi) approach to integrate and display data across many collected parameters, to derive “cardiosafety” ranking of tested compounds. Multi-parameter screening of beating profiles allows for cardiotoxicity risk assessment and identification of specific patterns defining mechanism-specific effects. These data and analysis methods may be used widely for compound screening and early safety evaluation in drug development. - Highlights: • Induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes are promising in vitro models. • We tested if evaluation of

  3. Cooperation of hTERT, SV40 T Antigen and Oncogenic Ras in Tumorigenesis: A Cell Transplantation Model Using Bovine Adrenocortical Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Thomas

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Expression of TERT, the reverse transcriptase component of telomerase, is necessary to convert normal human cells to cancer cells. Despite this, “telomerization” by hTERT does not appear to alter the normal properties of cells. In a cell transplantation model in which bovine adrenocortical cells form vascularized tissue structures beneath the kidney capsule in scid mice, telomerization does not perturb the functional tissue-forming capacity of the cells. This cell transplantation model was used to study the cooperation of hTERT with SV40 T antigen (SV40 TAg and oncogenic Ras in tumorigenesis. Only cells expressing all three genes were tumorigenic; this required large T, but not small t, antigen. These cells produced a continuously expanding tissue mass; they were invasive with respect to adjacent organs and eventually destroyed the kidney. Cells expressing only hTERT or only Ras produced minimally altered tissues. In contrast, SV40 TAg alone produced noninvasive nodules beneath the kidney capsule that had high proliferation rates balanced by high rates of apoptosis. The use of cell transplantation techniques in a cell type that is able to form tissue structures with or without full neoplastic conversion allows the phenotypes produced by individual cooperating oncogenes to be observed.

  4. TLR-4 cooperates with Dectin-1 and mannose receptor to expand Th17 and Tc17 cells induced by Paracoccidioides brasiliensis stimulated dendritic cells

    OpenAIRE

    Loures, Flávio V.; Araújo, Eliseu F.; Feriotti, Claudia; Silvia B. Bazan; Calich, Vera L. G.

    2015-01-01

    The concomitant use of diverse pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) by innate immune cells can result in synergistic or inhibitory activities that profoundly influence anti-microbial immunity. Dectin-1 and the mannose receptor (MR) are C-type lectin receptors (CLRs) previously reported to cooperate with toll-like receptors (TLRs) signaling in the initial inflammatory response and in the induction of adaptive Th17 and Tc17 immunity mediated by CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, respectively. The protectiv...

  5. TLR-4 Cooperates with Dectin-1 and Mannose Receptor to Expand Th17 and Tc17 Cells Induced by Paracoccidioides brasiliensis Stimulated Dendritic Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Vera Lucia Garcia Calich; Flavio Vieira Loures; Eliseu F. Araujo; Claudia eFeriotti; Silvia B. Bazan

    2015-01-01

    The concomitant use of diverse Pattern Recognition Receptors (PRRs) by innate immune cells can result in synergistic or inhibitory activities that profoundly influence anti-microbial immunity. Dectin-1 and the Mannose Receptor (MR) are C-type Lectin Receptors (CLRs) previously reported to cooperate with Toll Like Receptors (TLRs) signaling in the initial inflammatory response and in the induction of adaptive Th17 and Tc17 immunity mediated by CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, respectively. The protectiv...

  6. Population dynamics constrain the cooperative evolution of cross-feeding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James J Bull

    Full Text Available Cross-feeding is the exchange of nutrients among species of microbes. It has two potential evolutionary origins, one as an exchange of metabolic wastes or byproducts among species, the other as a form of cooperation known as reciprocal altruism. This paper explores the conditions favoring the origin of cooperative cross-feeding between two species. There is an extensive literature on the evolution of cooperation, and some of the requirements for the evolution of cooperative cross-feeding follow from this prior work-specifically the requirement that interactions be limited to small groups of individuals, such as colonies in a spatially structured environment. Evolution of cooperative cross-feeding by a species also requires that cross-feeding from the partner species already exists, so that the cooperating mutant will automatically be reciprocated for its actions. Beyond these considerations, some unintuitive dynamical constraints apply. In particular, the benefit of cooperative cross-feeding applies only in the range of intermediate cell densities. At low density, resource concentrations are too low to offset the cost of cooperation. At high density, resources shared by both species become limiting, and the two species become competitors. These considerations suggest that the evolution of cooperative cross-feeding in nature may be more challenging than for other types of cooperation. However, the principles identified here may enable the experimental evolution of cross-feeding, as born out by a recent study.

  7. Thermal and Environmental Stability of Semi-Transparent Perovskite Solar Cells for Tandems Enabled by a Solution-Processed Nanoparticle Buffer Layer and Sputtered ITO Electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bush, Kevin A; Bailie, Colin D; Chen, Ye; Bowring, Andrea R; Wang, Wei; Ma, Wen; Leijtens, Tomas; Moghadam, Farhad; McGehee, Michael D

    2016-05-01

    A sputtered oxide layer enabled by a solution-processed oxide nanoparticle buffer layer to protect underlying layers is used to make semi-transparent perovskite solar cells. Single-junction semi-transparent cells are 12.3% efficient, and mechanically stacked tandems on silicon solar cells are 18.0% efficient. The semi-transparent perovskite solar cell has a T 80 lifetime of 124 h when operated at the maximum power point at 100 °C without additional sealing in ambient atmosphere under visible illumination. PMID:26880196

  8. Coherence-controlled holographic microscopy enabled recognition of necrosis as the mechanism of cancer cells death after exposure to cytopathic turbid emulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collakova, Jana; Krizova, Aneta; Kollarova, Vera; Dostal, Zbynek; Slaba, Michala; Vesely, Pavel; Chmelik, Radim

    2015-11-01

    Coherence-controlled holographic microscopy (CCHM) in low-coherence mode possesses a pronounced coherence gate effect. This offers an option to investigate the details of cellular events leading to cell death caused by cytopathic turbid emulsions. CCHM capacity was first assessed in model situations that showed clear images obtained with low coherence of illumination but not with high coherence of illumination. Then, the form of death of human cancer cells induced by treatment with biologically active phospholipids (BAPs) preparation was investigated. The observed overall retraction of cell colony was apparently caused by the release of cell-to-substratum contacts. This was followed by the accumulation of granules decorating the nuclear membrane. Then, the occurrence of nuclear membrane indentations signaled the start of damage to the integrity of the cell nucleus. In the final stage, cells shrunk and disintegrated. This indicated that BAPs cause cell death by necrosis and not apoptosis. An intriguing option of checking the fate of cancer cells caused by the anticipated cooperative effect after adding another tested substance sodium dichloroacetate to turbid emulsion is discussed on grounds of pilot experiments. Such observations should reveal the impact and mechanism of action of the interacting drugs on cell behavior and fate that would otherwise remain hidden in turbid milieu.

  9. Synthetic Yeast Cooperation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shou, Wenying; Burton, Justin

    2010-03-01

    Cooperation is wide-spread and has been postulated to drive major transitions in evolution. However, Darwinian selection favors ``cheaters'' that consume benefits without paying a fair cost. How did cooperation evolve against the threat of cheaters? To investigate the evolutionary trajectories of cooperation, we created a genetically tractable system that can be observed as it evolves from inception. The system consists of two engineered yeast strains -- a red-fluorescent strain that requires adenine and releases lysine and a yellow-fluorescent strain that requires lysine and releases adenine. Cells that consume but not supply metabolites would be cheaters. From the properties of two cooperating strains, we calculated and experimentally verified the minimal initial cell densities required for the viability of the cooperative system in the absence of exogenously added adenine and lysine. Strikingly, evolved cooperative systems were viable at 100-fold lower initial cell densities than their ancestors. We are investigating the nature and diversity of pro-cooperation changes, the dynamics of cooperator-cheater cocultures, and the effects of spatial environment on cooperation and cheating.

  10. Cooperative effect of adsorbed cations on electron transport and recombination behavior in dye-sensitized solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Disclose the mechanism of cooperative effects of adsorbed cations in DSCs. • Characterize the influence of adsorption of Im+s on photoinduced electron density. • The effect of Li+ is orderly enhanced in DSCs with increasing alkyl chain length. • The DSCs efficiencies are relatively depended on the trade-off between Jsc and FF. -- Abstract: Lithium ion (Li+) and imidazolium cations (Im+s) had been reported to have competitive effects on the photoinduced electrons in TiO2-electrolyte systems. Herein, a further investigation about their cooperative effect in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs) using organic liquid electrolyte is developed by altering alkyl chain length. Imidazolium iodides (Im+I−s) with different alkyl chain length (3, 6, and 12) were synthesized and used as iodide sources. The adsorption amount of Im+s onto TiO2, band edge shifts, trap states distribution, electron recombination/transport processes and ion transport within the electrolyte for DSCs were detected. It is found that the multilayered adsorption of Im+s can induce a lower photoinduced electron density. In-depth characterizations indicate that this negative effect can be reduced as the adsorption amount decreased with increasing alkyl chain length and the effect of Li+ is consequently strengthened in varying degrees. The decisive role of Li+ in cation-controlled interfacial charge injection process finally contributes an ordinal increase of short-circuit photocurrent density Jsc for DSCs with increasing alkyl chain length because of the increasing charge injection efficiency ηinj. Additionally, a large power dissipation in ions transport process is induced by the long alkyl chain of Im+s. Overall, the cell efficiencies are relatively dependent of the trade-off between Jsc and FF, which is essentially related to the cooperative effect of adsorbed cations

  11. Two nuclear oncogenic proteins, P135gag-myb-ets and p61/63myc, cooperate to induce transformation of chicken neuroretina cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Amouyel, P; Laudet, V; P. Martin; Li, R P; Quatannens, B; Stéhelin, D; Saule, S.

    1989-01-01

    Several studies have shown that full transformation of primary rodent fibroblasts can be achieved in vitro through the cooperation of two oncogenes (usually one nuclear and one cytoplasmic) classified on the basis of different complementation groups. We have shown previously that cooperation between v-mil (cytoplasmic, serine-threonine kinase product), and v-myc (nuclear, DNA-binding product) is required to transform 7-day-old chicken neuroretina cells, which in usual culture medium do not ra...

  12. Interlaboratory studies with the Chinese hamster V79 cell metabolic cooperation assay to detect tumor-promoting agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bohrman, J.S.; Burg, J.R.; Elmore, E.; Gulati, D.K.; Barfknecht, T.R.; Niemeier, R.W.; Dames, B.L.; Toraason, M.; Langenbach, R.

    1988-01-01

    Three laboratories participated in an interlaboratory study to evaluate the usefulness of the Chinese hamster V79 cell metabolic cooperation assay to predict the tumor-promoting activity of selected chemical. Twenty-three chemicals of different chemical structures (phorbol esters, barbiturates, phenols, artificial sweeteners, alkanes, and peroxides) were chosen for testing based on in vivo promotion activities, as reported in the literature. Assay protocols and materials were standardized, and the chemicals were coded to facilitate unbiased evaluation. A chemical was tested only once in each laboratory, with one of the three laboratories testing only 15 out of 23 chemicals. Dunnett's test was used for statistical analysis. Chemicals were scored as positive (at least two concentration levels statistically different than control), equivocal (only one concentration statistically different), or negative. For 15 chemicals tested in all three laboratories, there was complete agreement among the laboratories for nine chemicals. For the 23 chemicals tested in only two laboratories, there was agreement on 16 chemicals. With the exception of the peroxides and alkanes, the metabolic cooperation data were in general agreement with in vivo data. However, an overall evaluation of the V79 cell system for predicting in vivo promotion activity was difficult because of the organ specificity of certain chemicals and/or the limited number of adequately tested nonpromoting chemicals.

  13. Mmp1 and Mmp2 cooperatively induce Drosophila fat body cell dissociation with distinct roles

    OpenAIRE

    Jia, Qiangqiang; Liu, Yang; Liu, Hanhan; Li, Sheng

    2014-01-01

    During Drosophila metamorphosis, the single-cell layer of fat body tissues gradually dissociates into individual cells. Via a fat body-specific RNAi screen in this study, we found that two matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), Mmp1 and Mmp2, are both required for fat body cell dissociation. As revealed through a series of cellular, biochemical, molecular, and genetic experiments, Mmp1 preferentially cleaves DE-cadherin-mediated cell-cell junctions, while Mmp2 preferentially degrades basement memb...

  14. Enabled Negatively Regulates Diaphanous-Driven Actin Dynamics In Vitro and In Vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Bilancia, C.G.; Winkelman, J.D.; Tsygankov, D.; Nowotarski, S.H.; Sees, J.A.; Comber, K.; Evans, I.; Lakhani, V.; Wood, W.; Elston, T.C.; Kovar, D.R.; Peifer, M

    2014-01-01

    Summary Actin regulators facilitate cell migration by controlling cell protrusion architecture and dynamics. As the behavior of individual actin regulators becomes clear, we must address why cells require multiple regulators with similar functions and how they cooperate to create diverse protrusions. We characterized Diaphanous (Dia) and Enabled (Ena) as a model, using complementary approaches: cell culture, biophysical analysis, and Drosophila morphogenesis. We found that Dia and Ena have di...

  15. Monovalent cations enable cell wall turnover of the turnover-deficient lyt-15 mutant of Bacillus subtilis.

    OpenAIRE

    Cheung, H. Y.; Freese, E

    1985-01-01

    A lyt-15 mutant reported to be unable to turn over the cell wall exhibited the same rate of wall turnover as the standard strain if the medium contained 0.2 M NaCl, which did not affect growth. Cell wall autolysis was also optimal at 0.2 M NaCl.

  16. Microenvironmental reprogramming by three-dimensional culture enables dermal papilla cells to induce de novo human hair-follicle growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, Claire A; Chen, James C; Cerise, Jane E; Jahoda, Colin A B; Christiano, Angela M

    2013-12-01

    De novo organ regeneration has been observed in several lower organisms, as well as rodents; however, demonstrating these regenerative properties in human cells and tissues has been challenging. In the hair follicle, rodent hair follicle-derived dermal cells can interact with local epithelia and induce de novo hair follicles in a variety of hairless recipient skin sites. However, multiple attempts to recapitulate this process in humans using human dermal papilla cells in human skin have failed, suggesting that human dermal papilla cells lose key inductive properties upon culture. Here, we performed global gene expression analysis of human dermal papilla cells in culture and discovered very rapid and profound molecular signature changes linking their transition from a 3D to a 2D environment with early loss of their hair-inducing capacity. We demonstrate that the intact dermal papilla transcriptional signature can be partially restored by growth of papilla cells in 3D spheroid cultures. This signature change translates to a partial restoration of inductive capability, and we show that human dermal papilla cells, when grown as spheroids, are capable of inducing de novo hair follicles in human skin. PMID:24145441

  17. Palladium nanoparticle array-mediated semiconductor bonding that enables high-efficiency multi-junction solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuno, Hidenori; Makita, Kikuo; Sugaya, Takeyoshi; Oshima, Ryuji; Hozumi, Yasuo; Takato, Hidetaka; Matsubara, Koji

    2016-02-01

    A detailed study on the application of Pd nanoparticle arrays, produced by self-assembled block copolymer templates, in bonding of III-V-based solar cell materials was carried out. The Pd nanoparticle array-mediated bonding (mechanical stacking) of GaAs-based thin-films (cells) was readily performed on the surface of GaAs or InP-based substrates (cells) to form multi-junction device architectures. Using the optimized Pd NP array, a 30.4%-efficiency four-junction two-terminal cell, consisting of an InGaP/GaAs top cell and an InGaAsP/InGaAs bottom cell, was achieved owing to the excellent electrical and optical bonding properties (bonding resistance, 1.81 Ω cm2; optical loss, 2.9%). Together with the verification of the long-term reliability of the Pd nanoparticle array-mediated bonding, our approach would become practically attractive for producing high-efficiency multi-junction solar cells.

  18. Learning to cooperate for cooperative learning

    OpenAIRE

    Yael Sharan

    2014-01-01

    Learning to learn cooperatively requires several changes for teachers and students: in their perception of learning, in their attitudes towards teaching and learning, and in their social and cognitive behaviors in class. This article presents some of the ways that decades of research and practice have developed to enable teachers and students to acquire and adjust to these changes. In the process of change teachers and students are interconnected and interdependent, and together carry out the...

  19. Secretory competence in a gateway endocrine cell conferred by the nuclear receptor βFTZ-F1 enables stage-specific ecdysone responses throughout development in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Kook-Ho; Daubnerová, Ivana; Park, Yoonseong; Zitnan, Dusan; Adams, Michael E

    2014-01-15

    Hormone-induced changes in gene expression initiate periodic molts and metamorphosis during insect development. Successful execution of these developmental steps depends upon successive phases of rising and falling 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E) levels, leading to a cascade of nuclear receptor-driven transcriptional activity that enables stage- and tissue-specific responses to the steroid. Among the cellular processes associated with declining steroids is acquisition of secretory competence in endocrine Inka cells, the source of ecdysis triggering hormones (ETHs). We show here that Inka cell secretory competence is conferred by the orphan nuclear receptor βFTZ-F1. Selective RNA silencing of βftz-f1 in Inka cells prevents ETH release, causing developmental arrest at all stages. Affected larvae display buttoned-up, the ETH-null phenotype characterized by double mouthparts, absence of ecdysis behaviors, and failure to shed the old cuticle. During the mid-prepupal period, individuals fail to translocate the air bubble, execute head eversion and elongate incipient wings and legs. Those that escape to the adult stage are defective in wing expansion and cuticle sclerotization. Failure to release ETH in βftz-f1 silenced animals is indicated by persistent ETH immunoreactivity in Inka cells. Arrested larvae are rescued by precisely-timed ETH injection or Inka cell-targeted βFTZ-F1 expression. Moreover, premature βftz-f1 expression in these cells also results in developmental arrest. The Inka cell therefore functions as a "gateway cell", whose secretion of ETH serves as a key downstream physiological output enabling stage-specific responses to 20E that are required to advance through critical developmental steps. This secretory function depends on transient and precisely timed βFTZ-F1 expression late in the molt as steroids decline. PMID:24247008

  20. Microarray-based MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry enables monitoring of monoclonal antibody production in batch and perfusion cell cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinhoff, Robert F; Karst, Daniel J; Steinebach, Fabian; Kopp, Marie R G; Schmidt, Gregor W; Stettler, Alexander; Krismer, Jasmin; Soos, Miroslav; Pabst, Martin; Hierlemann, Andreas; Morbidelli, Massimo; Zenobi, Renato

    2016-07-15

    Cell culture process monitoring in monoclonal antibody (mAb) production is essential for efficient process development and process optimization. Currently employed online, at line and offline methods for monitoring productivity as well as process reproducibility have their individual strengths and limitations. Here, we describe a matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS)-based on a microarray for mass spectrometry (MAMS) technology to rapidly monitor a broad panel of analytes, including metabolites and proteins directly from the unpurified cell supernatant or from host cell culture lysates. The antibody titer is determined from the intact antibody mass spectra signal intensity relative to an internal protein standard spiked into the supernatant. The method allows a semi-quantitative determination of light and heavy chains. Intracellular mass profiles for metabolites and proteins can be used to track cellular growth and cell productivity. PMID:26707204

  1. iNKT-cell help to B cells: a cooperative job between innate and adaptive immune responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dellabona, Paolo; Abrignani, Sergio; Casorati, Giulia

    2014-08-01

    T-cell help to B lymphocytes is one of the most important events in adaptive immune responses in health and disease. It is generally delivered by cognate CD4(+) T follicular helper (T(FH)) cells via both cell-to-cell contacts and soluble mediators, and it is essential for both the clonal expansion of antibody (Ab)-secreting B cells and memory B-cell formation. CD1d-restricted invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells are a subset of innate-like T lymphocytes that rapidly respond to stimulation with specific lipid antigens (Ags) that are derived from infectious pathogens or stressed host cells. Activated iNKT cells produce a wide range of cytokines and upregulate costimulatory molecules that can promote activation of dendritic cells (DCs), natural killer (NK) cells, and T cells. A decade ago, we discovered that iNKT cells can help B cells to proliferate and to produce IgG Abs in vitro and in vivo. This adjuvant-like function of Ag-activated iNKT cells provides a flexible set of helper mechanisms that expand the current paradigm of T-cell-B-cell interaction and highlights the potential of iNKT-cell targeting vaccine formulations. PMID:24782127

  2. TGF-β and IL-21 cooperatively stimulate activated CD8(+) T cells to differentiate into Tc17 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hsin-Wei; Tsai, Jy-Ping; Yao, Tsung-You; Hsieh, Chia-Ling; Chen, I-Hua; Liu, Shin-Jen

    2016-06-01

    TGF-β together with IL-21 or IL-6 can drive the differentiation of naïve CD8(+) T cells into IL-17-producing CD8(+) T cells. These IL-17-producing CD8(+) T cells are termed Tc17 cells. Tc17 cells preserve plasticity under various conditions in vitro and in vivo. IFN-γ-producing CD8(+) T cells are termed Tc1 cells. However, Tc1 cells are considered relatively stable. In the present study, we show that the combination of TGF-β plus IL-21, but not IL-6, converts Tc1 cells into Tc17 cells; this conversion is associated with elevated RORα, RORγt, and Batf mRNA levels. These results indicate that Tc1 cells are skewed to the Tc17 cell phenotype under TGF-β plus IL-21-polarizing conditions. Furthermore, IL-6R is expressed on naïve, but not activated, CD8(+) T cells. In contrast, IL-21R is expressed on both naïve and activated CD8(+) T cells. Thus, differential expression profiles of IL-6R and IL-21R on naïve and activated CD8(+) T cells may be one mechanism by which TGF-β plus IL-21, but not IL-6, can drive activated CD8(+) T cells to differentiate into IL-17-producing cells. Taken together, these results provide a novel viewpoint for the plasticity of Tc1 cells. PMID:27085379

  3. Planar cell polarity enables posterior localization of nodal cilia and left-right axis determination during mouse and Xenopus embryogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragana Antic

    Full Text Available Left-right asymmetry in vertebrates is initiated in an early embryonic structure called the ventral node in human and mouse, and the gastrocoel roof plate (GRP in the frog. Within these structures, each epithelial cell bears a single motile cilium, and the concerted beating of these cilia produces a leftward fluid flow that is required to initiate left-right asymmetric gene expression. The leftward fluid flow is thought to result from the posterior tilt of the cilia, which protrude from near the posterior portion of each cell's apical surface. The cells, therefore, display a morphological planar polarization. Planar cell polarity (PCP is manifested as the coordinated, polarized orientation of cells within epithelial sheets, or as directional cell migration and intercalation during convergent extension. A set of evolutionarily conserved proteins regulates PCP. Here, we provide evidence that vertebrate PCP proteins regulate planar polarity in the mouse ventral node and in the Xenopus gastrocoel roof plate. Asymmetric anterior localization of VANGL1 and PRICKLE2 (PK2 in mouse ventral node cells indicates that these cells are planar polarized by a conserved molecular mechanism. A weakly penetrant Vangl1 mutant phenotype suggests that compromised Vangl1 function may be associated with left-right laterality defects. Stronger functional evidence comes from the Xenopus GRP, where we show that perturbation of VANGL2 protein function disrupts the posterior localization of motile cilia that is required for leftward fluid flow, and causes aberrant expression of the left side-specific gene Nodal. The observation of anterior-posterior PCP in the mouse and in Xenopus embryonic organizers reflects a strong evolutionary conservation of this mechanism that is important for body plan determination.

  4. Network Utility Aware Traffic Loading Balancing in Backhaul-constrained Cache-enabled Small Cell Networks with Hybrid Power Supplies

    OpenAIRE

    Han, Tao; Ansari, Nirwan

    2014-01-01

    Explosive data traffic growth leads to a continuous surge in capacity demands across mobile networks. In order to provision high network capacity, small cell base stations (SCBSs) are widely deployed. Owing to the close proximity to mobile users, SCBSs can effectively enhance the network capacity and offloading traffic load from macro BSs (MBSs). However, the cost-effective backhaul may not be readily available for SCBSs, thus leading to backhaul constraints in small cell networks (SCNs). Ena...

  5. Cooperative Learning

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    桑莹莹

    2015-01-01

    This paper is about the cooperative learning as a teaching method in a second language learning class. It mainly talks about the background, foundation, features, definitions, components, goals, advantages and disadvantages of cooperative learning. And as the encounter of the disadvantages in cooperative learning, this paper also proposes some strategies.

  6. Final Technical Report: Residential Fuel Cell Demonstration by the Delaware County Electric Cooperative, Inc.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mark Hilson Schneider

    2007-06-06

    This demonstration project contributes to the knowledge base in the area of fuel cells in stationary applications, propane fuel cells, edge-of-grid applications for fuel cells, and energy storage in combination with fuel cells. The project demonstrated that it is technically feasible to meet the whole-house electrical energy needs of a typical upstate New York residence with a 5-kW fuel cell in combination with in-home energy storage without any major modifications to the residence or modifications to the consumption patterns of the residents of the home. The use of a fuel cell at constant output power through a 120-Volt inverter leads to system performance issues including: • relatively poor power quality as quantified by the IEEE-defined short term flicker parameter • relatively low overall system efficiency Each of these issues is discussed in detail in the text of this report. The fuel cell performed well over the 1-year demonstration period in terms of availability and efficiency of conversion from chemical energy (propane) to electrical energy at the fuel cell output terminals. Another strength of fuel cell performance in the demonstration was the low requirements for maintenance and repair on the fuel cell. The project uncovered a new and important installation consideration for propane fuel cells. Alcohol added to new propane storage tanks is preferentially absorbed on the surface of some fuel cell reformer desulfurization filters. The experience on this project indicates that special attention must be paid to the volume and composition of propane tank additives. Size, composition, and replacement schedules for the de-sulfurization filter bed should be adjusted to account for propane tank additives to avoid sulfur poisoning of fuel cell stacks. Despite good overall technical performance of the fuel cell and the whole energy system, the demonstration showed that such a system is not economically feasible as compared to other commercially available

  7. Ultra-sensitive molecular MRI of cerebrovascular cell activation enables early detection of chronic central nervous system disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since endothelial cells can be targeted by large contrast-carrying particles, molecular imaging of cerebrovascular cell activation is highly promising to evaluate the underlying inflammation of the central nervous system (CNS). In this study, we aimed to demonstrate that molecular magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of cerebrovascular cell activation can reveal CNS disorders in the absence of visible lesions and symptoms. To this aim, we optimized contrast carrying particles targeting vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 and MRI protocols through both in vitro and in vivo experiments. Although, pre-contrast MRI images failed to reveal the ongoing pathology, contrast-enhanced MRI revealed hypoperfusion-triggered CNS injury in vascular dementia, unmasked amyloid-induced cerebrovascular activation in Alzheimer's disease and allowed monitoring of disease activity during experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. Moreover, contrast-enhanced MRI revealed the cerebrovascular cell activation associated with known risk factors of CNS disorders such as peripheral inflammation, ethanol consumption, hyperglycemia and aging. By providing a dramatically higher sensitivity than previously reported methods and molecular contrast agents, the technology described in the present study opens new avenues of investigation in the field of neuro-inflammation. (authors)

  8. IL-10 and regulatory T cells cooperate in allergen-specific immunotherapy to ameliorate allergic asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böhm, Livia; Maxeiner, Joachim; Meyer-Martin, Helen; Reuter, Sebastian; Finotto, Susetta; Klein, Matthias; Schild, Hansjörg; Schmitt, Edgar; Bopp, Tobias; Taube, Christian

    2015-02-01

    Human studies demonstrated that allergen-specific immunotherapy (IT) represents an effective treatment for allergic diseases. IT involves repeated administration of the sensitizing allergen, indicating a crucial contribution of T cells to its medicinal benefit. However, the underlying mechanisms of IT, especially in a chronic disease, are far from being definitive. In the current study, we sought to elucidate the suppressive mechanisms of IT in a mouse model of chronic allergic asthma. OVA-sensitized mice were challenged with OVA or PBS for 4 wk. After development of chronic airway inflammation, mice received OVA-specific IT or placebo alternately to airway challenge for 3 wk. To analyze the T cell-mediated mechanisms underlying IT in vivo, we elaborated the role of T-bet-expressing Th1 cells, T cell-derived IL-10, and Ag-specific thymic as well as peripherally induced Foxp3(+) regulatory T (Treg) cells. IT ameliorated airway hyperresponsiveness and airway inflammation in a chronic asthma model. Of note, IT even resulted in a regression of structural changes in the airways following chronic inhaled allergen exposure. Concomitantly, IT induced Th1 cells, Foxp3(+), and IL-10-producing Treg cells. Detailed analyses revealed that thymic Treg cells crucially contribute to the effectiveness of IT by promoting IL-10 production in Foxp3-negative T cells. Together with the peripherally induced Ag-specific Foxp3(+) Treg cells, thymic Foxp3(+) Treg cells orchestrate the curative mechanisms of IT. Taken together, we demonstrate that IT is effective in a chronic allergic disease and dependent on IL-10 and thymic as well as peripherally induced Ag-specific Treg cells. PMID:25527785

  9. Genetically designed biomolecular capping system for mesoporous silica nanoparticles enables receptor-mediated cell uptake and controlled drug release

    CERN Document Server

    Datz, Stefan; Gattner, Michael; Weiss, Veronika; Brunner, Korbinian; Bretzler, Johanna; von Schirnding, Constantin; Spada, Fabio; Engelke, Hanna; Vrabel, Milan; Bräuchle, Christoph; Carell, Thomas; Bein, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Effective and controlled drug delivery systems with on-demand release and targeting abilities have received enormous attention for biomedical applications. Here, we describe a novel enzyme-based cap system for mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) that is directly combined with a targeting ligand via bio-orthogonal click chemistry. The capping system is based on the pH-responsive binding of an aryl-sulfonamide-functionalized MSN and the enzyme carbonic anhydrase (CA). An unnatural amino acid (UAA) containing a norbornene moiety was genetically incorporated into CA. This UAA allowed for the site-specific bio-orthogonal attachment of even very sensitive targeting ligands such as folic acid and anandamide. This leads to specific receptor-mediated cell and stem cell uptake. We demonstrate the successful delivery and release of the chemotherapeutic agent Actinomycin D to KB cells. This novel nanocarrier concept provides a promising platform for the development of precisely controllable and highly modular theranos...

  10. Cell adhesion and growth enabled by biomimetic oligopeptide modification of a polydopamine-poly(ethylene oxide) protein repulsive surface

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Musílková, Jana; Kotelnikov, Ilya; Novotná, Katarína; Pop-Georgievski, Ognen; Rypáček, František; Bačáková, Lucie; Proks, Vladimír

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 26, č. 11 (2015), s. 253. ISSN 0957-4530 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP108/11/1857; GA ČR(CZ) GAP108/12/1168; GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.30.0029; GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 ; RVO:61389013 Keywords : protein repulsive surface * cell adhesion * RGD * endothelial cells Subject RIV: EI - Biotechnology ; Bionics; CD - Macromolecular Chemistry (UMCH-V) Impact factor: 2.587, year: 2014

  11. Time domain simulation of tandem silicon solar cells with optimal textured light trapping enabled by the quadratic complex rational function

    OpenAIRE

    Chung, H.; Jung, K. Y.; Tee, X. T.; Bermel, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Amorphous silicon/crystalline silicon (a-Si/c-Si) micromorph tandem cells, with best confirmed efficiency of 12.3%, have yet to fully approach their theoretical performance limits. In this work, we consider a strategy for improving the light trapping and charge collection of a-Si/c-Si micromorph tandem cells using random texturing with adjustable short-range correlations and long-range periodicity. In order to consider the full-spectrum absorption of a-Si and c-Si, a novel dispersion model kn...

  12. Contorted hexabenzocoronene derivatives enable fullerene-free, semi-transparent solar cells with record-breaking single-junction photovoltage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davy, Nicholas; Sezen, Melda; Loo, Yueh-Lin

    Recent work on tuning the chemical structure of contorted hexabenzocoronene (cHBC) in our group has yielded derivatives with a spectrum of energy levels and absorption profiles, greatly improving the utility of these materials as donor and/or acceptor constituents in organic solar cells. Here, we report planar-heterojunction solar cells comprising an extended heterocyclic cHBC donor and a halogenated cHBC acceptor. By harvesting primarily near-UV light, these devices exhibit a record open-circuit voltage of 1.5 V; this value is higher than any previously reported value for a single-junction organic solar cell. Our active layers are molecularly smooth and pinhole-free; these devices should be scalable to large areas without incurring substantial loss to performance. With a transmittance of 79% across the visible, our devices can be vertically integrated to directly drive the switching of electrochromic windows, where existing prototypes depend on tandem solar cells having near-infrared absorbers.

  13. Time domain simulation of tandem silicon solar cells with optimal textured light trapping enabled by the quadratic complex rational function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, H; Jung, K-Y; Tee, X T; Bermel, P

    2014-05-01

    Amorphous silicon/crystalline silicon (a-Si/c-Si) micromorph tandem cells, with best confirmed efficiency of 12.3%, have yet to fully approach their theoretical performance limits. In this work, we consider a strategy for improving the light trapping and charge collection of a-Si/c-Si micromorph tandem cells using random texturing with adjustable short-range correlations and long-range periodicity. In order to consider the full-spectrum absorption of a-Si and c-Si, a novel dispersion model known as a quadratic complex rational function (QCRF) is applied to photovoltaic materials (e.g., a-Si, c-Si and silver). It has the advantage of accurately modeling experimental semiconductor dielectric values over the entire relevant solar bandwidth from 300-1000 nm in a single simulation. This wide-band dispersion model is then used to model a silicon tandem cell stack (ITO/a-Si:H/c-Si:H/silver), as two parameters are varied: maximum texturing height h and correlation parameter f. Even without any other light trapping methods, our front texturing method demonstrates 12.37% stabilized cell efficiency and 12.79 mA/cm² in a 2 μm-thick active layer. PMID:24922389

  14. Scientific Assessment in support of the Materials Roadmap enabling Low Carbon Energy Technologies: Hydrogen and Fuel Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cerri, I.; Lefebvre-Joud, F.; Holtappels, Peter;

    A group of experts from European research organisations and industry have assessed the state of the art and future needs for materials' R&D for hydrogen and fuel cell technologies. The work was performed as input to the European Commission's roadmapping exercise on materials for the European...

  15. Magneto-electric Nanoparticles to Enable Field-controlled High-Specificity Drug Delivery to Eradicate Ovarian Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guduru, Rakesh; Liang, Ping; Runowicz, Carolyn; Nair, Madhavan; Atluri, Venkata; Khizroev, Sakhrat

    2013-10-01

    The nanotechnology capable of high-specificity targeted delivery of anti-neoplastic drugs would be a significant breakthrough in Cancer in general and Ovarian Cancer in particular. We addressed this challenge through a new physical concept that exploited (i) the difference in the membrane electric properties between the tumor and healthy cells and (ii) the capability of magneto-electric nanoparticles (MENs) to serve as nanosized converters of remote magnetic field energy into the MENs' intrinsic electric field energy. This capability allows to remotely control the membrane electric fields and consequently trigger high-specificity drug uptake through creation of localized nano-electroporation sites. In in-vitro studies on human ovarian carcinoma cell (SKOV-3) and healthy cell (HOMEC) lines, we applied a 30-Oe d.c. field to trigger high-specificity uptake of paclitaxel loaded on 30-nm CoFe2O4@BaTiO3 MENs. The drug penetrated through the membrane and completely eradicated the tumor within 24 hours without affecting the normal cells.

  16. A microfluidic system enabling Raman measurements of the oxygenation cycle in single optically trapped red blood cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramser, Kerstin; Enger, Jonas; Goksör, Mattias; Hanstorp, Dag; Logg, Katarina; Käll, Mikael

    2005-04-01

    Using a lab-on-a-chip approach we demonstrate the possibility of selecting a single cell with certain properties and following its dynamics after an environmental stimulation in real time using Raman spectroscopy. This is accomplished by combining a micro Raman set-up with optical tweezers and a microfluidic system. The latter gives full control over the media surrounding the cell, and it consists of a pattern of channels and reservoirs defined by electron beam lithography that is moulded into rubber silicon (PDMS). Different buffers can be transported through the channels using electro-osmotic flow, while the resonance Raman response of an optically trapped red blood cell (RBC) is simultaneously registered. This makes it possible to monitor the oxygenation cycle of the cell in real time and to investigate effects like photo-induced chemistry caused by the illumination. The experimental set-up has high potential for in vivo monitoring of cellular drug response using a variety of spectroscopic probes. PMID:15791341

  17. Complex molecular mechanisms cooperate to mediate histone deacetylase inhibitors anti-tumour activity in neuroblastoma cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nardou Katya

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi are a new class of promising anti-tumour agent inhibiting cell proliferation and survival in tumour cells with very low toxicity toward normal cells. Neuroblastoma (NB is the second most common solid tumour in children still associated with poor outcome in higher stages and, thus NB strongly requires novel treatment modalities. Results We show here that the HDACi Sodium Butyrate (NaB, suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA and Trichostatin A (TSA strongly reduce NB cells viability. The anti-tumour activity of these HDACi involved the induction of cell cycle arrest in the G2/M phase, followed by the activation of the intrinsic apoptotic pathway, via the activation of the caspases cascade. Moreover, HDACi mediated the activation of the pro-apoptotic proteins Bid and BimEL and the inactivation of the anti-apoptotic proteins XIAP, Bcl-xL, RIP and survivin, that further enhanced the apoptotic signal. Interestingly, the activity of these apoptosis regulators was modulated by several different mechanisms, either by caspases dependent proteolytic cleavage or by degradation via the proteasome pathway. In addition, HDACi strongly impaired the hypoxia-induced secretion of VEGF by NB cells. Conclusion HDACi are therefore interesting new anti-tumour agents for targeting highly malignant tumours such as NB, as these agents display a strong toxicity toward aggressive NB cells and they may possibly reduce angiogenesis by decreasing VEGF production by NB cells.

  18. Genetically designed biomolecular capping system for mesoporous silica nanoparticles enables receptor-mediated cell uptake and controlled drug release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datz, Stefan; Argyo, Christian; Gattner, Michael; Weiss, Veronika; Brunner, Korbinian; Bretzler, Johanna; von Schirnding, Constantin; Torrano, Adriano A.; Spada, Fabio; Vrabel, Milan; Engelke, Hanna; Bräuchle, Christoph; Carell, Thomas; Bein, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Effective and controlled drug delivery systems with on-demand release and targeting abilities have received enormous attention for biomedical applications. Here, we describe a novel enzyme-based cap system for mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) that is directly combined with a targeting ligand via bio-orthogonal click chemistry. The capping system is based on the pH-responsive binding of an aryl-sulfonamide-functionalized MSN and the enzyme carbonic anhydrase (CA). An unnatural amino acid (UAA) containing a norbornene moiety was genetically incorporated into CA. This UAA allowed for the site-specific bio-orthogonal attachment of even very sensitive targeting ligands such as folic acid and anandamide. This leads to specific receptor-mediated cell and stem cell uptake. We demonstrate the successful delivery and release of the chemotherapeutic agent Actinomycin D to KB cells. This novel nanocarrier concept provides a promising platform for the development of precisely controllable and highly modular theranostic systems.Effective and controlled drug delivery systems with on-demand release and targeting abilities have received enormous attention for biomedical applications. Here, we describe a novel enzyme-based cap system for mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) that is directly combined with a targeting ligand via bio-orthogonal click chemistry. The capping system is based on the pH-responsive binding of an aryl-sulfonamide-functionalized MSN and the enzyme carbonic anhydrase (CA). An unnatural amino acid (UAA) containing a norbornene moiety was genetically incorporated into CA. This UAA allowed for the site-specific bio-orthogonal attachment of even very sensitive targeting ligands such as folic acid and anandamide. This leads to specific receptor-mediated cell and stem cell uptake. We demonstrate the successful delivery and release of the chemotherapeutic agent Actinomycin D to KB cells. This novel nanocarrier concept provides a promising platform for the

  19. Biodegradable cationic polymeric nanocapsules for overcoming multidrug resistance and enabling drug-gene co-delivery to cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chih-Kuang; Law, Wing-Cheung; Aalinkeel, Ravikumar; Yu, Yun; Nair, Bindukumar; Wu, Jincheng; Mahajan, Supriya; Reynolds, Jessica L.; Li, Yukun; Lai, Cheng Kee; Tzanakakis, Emmanuel S.; Schwartz, Stanley A.; Prasad, Paras N.; Cheng, Chong

    2014-01-01

    Having unique architectural features, cationic polymeric nanocapsules (NCs) with well-defined covalently stabilized biodegradable structures were generated as potentially universal and safe therapeutic nanocarriers. These NCs were synthesized from allyl-functionalized cationic polylactide (CPLA) by highly efficient UV-induced thiol-ene interfacial cross-linking in transparent miniemulsions. With tunable nanoscopic sizes, negligible cytotoxicity and remarkable degradability, they are able to encapsulate doxorubicin (Dox) with inner cavities and bind interleukin-8 (IL-8) small interfering RNA (siRNA) with cationic shells. The Dox-encapsulated NCs can effectively bypass the P-glycoprotein (Pgp)-mediated multidrug resistance of MCF7/ADR cancer cells, thereby resulting in increased intracellular drug concentration and reduced cell viability. In vitro studies also showed that the NCs loaded with Dox, IL-8 siRNA and both agents can be readily taken up by PC3 prostate cancer cells, resulting in a significant chemotherapeutic effect and/or IL-8 gene silencing.Having unique architectural features, cationic polymeric nanocapsules (NCs) with well-defined covalently stabilized biodegradable structures were generated as potentially universal and safe therapeutic nanocarriers. These NCs were synthesized from allyl-functionalized cationic polylactide (CPLA) by highly efficient UV-induced thiol-ene interfacial cross-linking in transparent miniemulsions. With tunable nanoscopic sizes, negligible cytotoxicity and remarkable degradability, they are able to encapsulate doxorubicin (Dox) with inner cavities and bind interleukin-8 (IL-8) small interfering RNA (siRNA) with cationic shells. The Dox-encapsulated NCs can effectively bypass the P-glycoprotein (Pgp)-mediated multidrug resistance of MCF7/ADR cancer cells, thereby resulting in increased intracellular drug concentration and reduced cell viability. In vitro studies also showed that the NCs loaded with Dox, IL-8 siRNA and both

  20. Brentuximab vedotin enables successful reduced-intensity allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation in patients with relapsed or refractory Hodgkin lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Robert; Palmer, Joycelynne M; Thomas, Sandra H; Tsai, Ni-Chun; Farol, Len; Nademanee, Auayporn; Forman, Stephen J; Gopal, Ajay K

    2012-06-28

    Brentuximab vedotin induces an overall response rate of 75% in patients with relapsed/refractory Hodgkin lymphoma, but its impact on future allogeneic transplantation (allo-HCT) is not known. We retrospectively examined the records of 18 patients with relapsed/refractory Hodgkin lymphoma who were treated on brentuximab vedotin clinical trials to evaluate the efficacy and safety of subsequent reduced-intensity allo-HCT. Seventeen patients had previous autologous transplant; 6 were in complete remission, and 8 were in partial remission before allo-HCT with 12 grafts from unrelated or mismatched donors. The 1-year overall survival was 100%, progression-free survival was 92.3%, and nonrelapse mortality was 0% (median follow-up, 14 months). The incidence of acute GVHD was 27.8% and chronic GVHD was 56.3%. Brentuximab vedotin before reduced-intensity allo-HCT does not appear to adversely affect engraftment, GVHD, or survival and may provide sufficient disease control to enable reduced-intensity allo-HCT. PMID:22611160

  1. MEF2 Cooperates With Forskolin/cAMP and GATA4 to Regulate Star Gene Expression in Mouse MA-10 Leydig Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daems, Caroline; Di-Luoffo, Mickaël; Paradis, Élise; Tremblay, Jacques J

    2015-07-01

    In Leydig cells, steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (STAR) participates in cholesterol shuttling from the outer to the inner mitochondrial membrane, the rate-limiting step in steroidogenesis. Steroid hormone biosynthesis and steroidogenic gene expression are regulated by LH, which activates various signaling pathways and transcription factors, including cAMP/Ca(2+)/CAMK (Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent kinase)-myocyte enhancer factor 2 (MEF2). The 4 MEF2 transcription factors are essential regulators of cell differentiation and organogenesis in numerous tissues. Recently, MEF2 was identified in Sertoli and Leydig cells of the testis. Here, we report that MEF2 regulates steroidogenesis in mouse MA-10 Leydig cells by acting on the Star gene. In MA-10 cells depleted of MEF2 using siRNAs (small interfering RNAs), STAR protein levels, Star mRNA levels, and promoter activity were significantly decreased. On its own, MEF2 did not activate the mouse Star promoter but was found to cooperate with forskolin/cAMP. By chromatin immunoprecipitation and DNA precipitation assays, we confirmed MEF2 binding to a consensus element located at -232 bp of the Star promoter. Mutation or deletion of the MEF2 element reduced but did not abrogate the MEF2/cAMP cooperation, indicating that MEF2 cooperates with other DNA-bound transcription factor(s). We identified GATA4 (GATA binding protein 4) as a partner for MEF2 in Leydig cells, because mutation of the GATA element abrogated the MEF2/cAMP cooperation on a reporter lacking a MEF2 element. MEF2 and GATA4 interact as revealed by coimmunoprecipitation, and MEF2 and GATA4 transcriptionally cooperate on the Star promoter. Altogether, our results define MEF2 as a novel regulator of steroidogenesis and Star transcription in Leydig cells and identify GATA4 as a key partner for MEF2-mediated action. PMID:25860031

  2. From flexibility to cooperativity: multiscale modeling of cadherin-mediated cell adhesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yinghao

    2013-03-01

    Cadherins constitute a large family of Ca2 +-dependent adhesion molecules in the Inter-cellular junctions that play a pivotal role in the assembly of cells into specific three-dimensional tissues. Although the molecular mechanisms underlying cadherin-mediated cell adhesion are still not fully understood, it seems likely that both cis dimers that are formed by binding of extracellular domains of two cadherins on the same cell surface, and trans-dimers formed between cadherins on opposing cell surfaces, are critical to trigger the junction formation. Here we present a new multiscale computational strategy to model the process of junction formation based on the knowledge of cadherin molecular structures and its 3D binding affinities. The cell interfacial region is defined by a simplified system where each of two interacting membrane surfaces is represented as a two-dimensional lattice with each cadherin molecule treated as a randomly diffusing unit. The binding energy for a pair of interacting cadherins in this two-dimensional discrete system is obtained from 3D binding affinities through a renormalization process derived from statistical thermodynamics. The properties of individual cadherins used in the lattice model are based on molecular level simulations. Our results show that within the range of experimentally-measured binding affinities, cadherins condense into junctions driven by the coupling of cis and trans interactions. The key factor appears to be a loss of molecular flexibility during trans dimerization that increases the magnitude of lateral cis interactions. We have also developed stochastic dynamics to study the adhesion of multiple cells. Each cell in the system is described as a mechanical entity and adhesive properties between two cells are derived from the lattice model. The cellular simulations are used to study the specific problems of tissue morphogenesis and tumor metastasis. The consequent question and upcoming challenge is to understand the

  3. A fusion tag enabling optical marking and tracking of proteins and cells by FRET-acceptor photobleaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuppig, S; Nitschke, R

    2006-04-01

    Combined time-lapse imaging with optical marking of fluorescent proteins (FPs) is a widely used method in studies of the dynamic behaviour of proteins, organelles and cell populations. Most of the approaches have specific limitations as they do not permit simultaneous observation of marked and non-marked molecules, require co-expression of two FP-tagged proteins or rely on oligomerizing FPs. Here we provide a strategy to overcome such limitations with a fluorescence resonance energy transfer-competent tandem fusion tag composed of two FPs. We combine optical marking by acceptor photobleaching with spectral imaging to discriminate between marked and non-marked molecules. Such 'bleach-labelling' may be employed in a broad range of studies for robust real-time tracking of proteins, organelles and cells. PMID:16734709

  4. Denosumab Chemotherapy for Recurrent Giant-Cell Tumor of Bone: A Case Report of Neoadjuvant Use Enabling Complete Surgical Resection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Agarwal

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Giant-cell tumor of the bone (GCTB is a rare neoplasm that affects young adults. The tumor is generally benign but sometimes can be locally aggressive. There are no standardized approaches to the treatment of GCTB. Recently, the RANKL inhibitor denosumab has shown activity in this tumor type. We present the case of a young female who presented with locally advanced disease and was successfully managed with the neoadjuvant use of denosumab allowing for surgical resection of the tumor that was previously deemed unresectable. Following surgery, the patient is being managed with continued use of denosumab as ‘maintenance,’ and she continues to be free of disease. Our case highlights a novel approach for the management of locally advanced and aggressive giant cell tumor of the bone.

  5. Enabling Exploration Through Docking Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatfield, Caris A.

    2012-01-01

    Human exploration missions beyond low earth orbit will likely require international cooperation in order to leverage limited resources. International standards can help enable cooperative missions by providing well understood, predefined interfaces allowing compatibility between unique spacecraft and systems. The International Space Station (ISS) partnership has developed a publicly available International Docking System Standard (IDSS) that provides a solution to one of these key interfaces by defining a common docking interface. The docking interface provides a way for even dissimilar spacecraft to dock for exchange of crew and cargo, as well as enabling the assembly of large space systems. This paper provides an overview of the key attributes of the IDSS, an overview of the NASA Docking System (NDS), and the plans for updating the ISS with IDSS compatible interfaces. The NDS provides a state of the art, low impact docking system that will initially be made available to commercial crew and cargo providers. The ISS will be used to demonstrate the operational utility of the IDSS interface as a foundational technology for cooperative exploration.

  6. Single-cell microarray enables high-throughput evaluation of DNA double-strand breaks and DNA repair inhibitors

    OpenAIRE

    Weingeist, David M.; Ge, Jing; Wood, David K.; Mutamba, James T; Huang, Qiuying; Rowland, Elizabeth A.; Yaffe, Michael B.; Floyd, Scott; Engelward, Bevin P.

    2013-01-01

    A key modality of non-surgical cancer management is DNA damaging therapy that causes DNA double-strand breaks that are preferentially toxic to rapidly dividing cancer cells. Double-strand break repair capacity is recognized as an important mechanism in drug resistance and is therefore a potential target for adjuvant chemotherapy. Additionally, spontaneous and environmentally induced DSBs are known to promote cancer, making DSB evaluation important as a tool in epidemiology, clinical evaluatio...

  7. Cooperation between human fibrocytes and endothelial colony-forming cells increases angiogenesis via the CXCR4 pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smadja, David M; Dorfmüller, Peter; Guerin, Coralie L; Bieche, Ivan; Badoual, Cécile; Boscolo, Elisa; Kambouchner, Marianne; Cazes, Aurélie; Mercier, Olaf; Humbert, Marc; Gaussem, Pascale; Bischoff, Joyce; Israël-Biet, Dominique

    2014-11-01

    Fibrotic diseases of the lung are associated with a vascular remodelling process. Fibrocytes (Fy) are a distinct population of blood-borne cells that co-express haematopoietic cell antigens and fibroblast markers, and have been shown to contribute to organ fibrosis. The purpose of this study was to determine whether fibrocytes cooperate with endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFC) to induce angiogenesis. We isolated fibrocytes from blood of patient with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) and characterised them by flow cytometry, quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR (RTQ-PCR), and confocal microscopy. We then investigated the angiogenic interaction between fibrocytes and cord-blood-derived ECFC, both in vitro and in an in vivo Matrigel implant model. Compared to fibroblast culture medium, fibrocyte culture medium increased ECFC proliferation and differentiation via the SDF-1/CXCR4 pathway. IPF-Fy co-implanted with human ECFC in Matrigel plugs in immunodeficient mice formed functional microvascular beds, whereas fibroblasts did not. Evaluation of implants after two weeks revealed an extensive network of erythrocyte-containing blood vessels. CXCR4 blockade significantly inhibited this blood vessel formation. The clinical relevance of these data was confirmed by strong CXCR4 expression in vessels close to fibrotic areas in biopsy specimens from patients with IPF, by comparison with control lungs. In conclusion, circulating fibrocytes might contribute to the intense remodelling of the pulmonary vasculature in patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. PMID:25103869

  8. Oncogenic RAS enables DNA damage- and p53-dependent differentiation of acute myeloid leukemia cells in response to chemotherapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mona Meyer

    Full Text Available Acute myeloid leukemia (AML is a clonal disease originating from myeloid progenitor cells with a heterogeneous genetic background. High-dose cytarabine is used as the standard consolidation chemotherapy. Oncogenic RAS mutations are frequently observed in AML, and are associated with beneficial response to cytarabine. Why AML-patients with oncogenic RAS benefit most from high-dose cytarabine post-remission therapy is not well understood. Here we used bone marrow cells expressing a conditional MLL-ENL-ER oncogene to investigate the interaction of oncogenic RAS and chemotherapeutic agents. We show that oncogenic RAS synergizes with cytotoxic agents such as cytarabine in activation of DNA damage checkpoints, resulting in a p53-dependent genetic program that reduces clonogenicity and increases myeloid differentiation. Our data can explain the beneficial effects observed for AML patients with oncogenic RAS treated with higher dosages of cytarabine and suggest that induction of p53-dependent differentiation, e.g. by interfering with Mdm2-mediated degradation, may be a rational approach to increase cure rate in response to chemotherapy. The data also support the notion that the therapeutic success of cytotoxic drugs may depend on their ability to promote the differentiation of tumor-initiating cells.

  9. Successful Industry/Academia Cooperation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stoustrup, Jakob

    2013-01-01

    The control literature is rich on impressive applications of advanced control, and within almost any industrial sector there are numerous examples of successful advanced control applications. Nevertheless, there is a widespread belief that there is still a wide potential for increased cooperation...... between academia and industry within this area. In this position paper, it is advocated that one of the enablers for successful cooperation between industry and academia within the control area is a proper framework for cooperation projects between companies and universities. Some suggestions...... by less complex but industrially feasible solutions. The proposed approach is illustrated by three case studies of successful industrial/academic cooperation....

  10. 75 FR 9246 - Cooperative Share Loan Insurance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-01

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT Cooperative Share Loan Insurance AGENCY: Office of the Chief Information Officer, HUD... cooperative housing loan insurance will be published to update existing policies, and better enable mortgagees to submit cooperative share loans for FHA insurance. This new publication will provide...

  11. Cdc42 and noncanonical Wnt signal transduction pathways cooperate to promote cell polarity

    OpenAIRE

    Schlessinger, Karni; McManus, Edward J.; Hall, Alan

    2007-01-01

    Scratch-induced disruption of cultured monolayers induces polarity in front row cells that can be visualized by spatially localized polymerization of actin at the front of the cell and reorientation of the centrosome/Golgi to face the leading edge. We previously reported that centrosomal reorientation and microtubule polarization depend on a Cdc42-regulated signal transduction pathway involving activation of the Par6/aPKC complex followed by inhibition of GSK-3β and accumulation of the adenom...

  12. Cooperation of β2- and β3-adrenergic receptors in hematopoietic progenitor cell mobilization

    OpenAIRE

    Méndez-Ferrer, Simón; Battista, Michela; Frenette, Paul S.

    2010-01-01

    CXCL12/SDF-1 dynamically regulates hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) attraction in the bone marrow (BM). Circadian regulation of bone formation and HSC traffic is relayed in bone and BM by β-adrenergic receptors (β-AR) expressed on HSCs, osteoblasts and mesenchymal stem / progenitor cells. Circadian HSC release from the BM follows rhythmic secretion of norepinephrine (NE) from nerve terminals, β3-AR activation and Cxcl12 downregulation, possibly due to reduced Sp1 nuclear content. Here, we show t...

  13. Dock180 and ELMO1 proteins cooperate to promote evolutionarily conserved Rac-dependent cell migration.

    OpenAIRE

    Grimsley, C M; Kinchen, J M; Tosello-Trampont, A C; Brugnera, E.; Haney, L B; Lu, M; Chen, Q.; Klingele, D; Hengartner, M O; K.S.Ravichandran

    2004-01-01

    Cell migration is essential throughout embryonic and adult life. In numerous cell systems, the small GTPase Rac is required for lamellipodia formation at the leading edge and movement ability. However, the molecular mechanisms leading to Rac activation during migration are still unclear. Recently, a mammalian superfamily of proteins related to the prototype member Dock180 has been identified with homologues in Drosophila and Caenorhabditis elegans. Here, we addressed the role of Dock180 and E...

  14. p53 mutations cooperate with oncogenic Kras to promote adenocarcinoma from pancreatic ductal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, J M; Hendley, A M; Lafaro, K J; Pruski, M A; Jones, N C; Alsina, J; Younes, M; Maitra, A; McAllister, F; Iacobuzio-Donahue, C A; Leach, S D

    2016-08-11

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most lethal malignancies, with virtually all patients eventually succumbing to their disease. Mutations in p53 have been documented in >50% of pancreatic cancers. Owing to the high incidence of p53 mutations in PanIN 3 lesions and pancreatic tumors, we interrogated the comparative ability of adult pancreatic acinar and ductal cells to respond to oncogenic Kras and mutant Tp53(R172H) using Hnf1b:CreER(T2) and Mist1:CreER(T2) mice. These studies involved co-activation of a membrane-tethered GFP lineage label, allowing for direct visualization and isolation of cells undergoing Kras and mutant p53 activation. Kras activation in Mist1(+) adult acinar cells resulted in brisk PanIN formation, whereas no evidence of pancreatic neoplasia was observed for up to 6 months following Kras activation in Hnf1beta(+) adult ductal cells. In contrast to the lack of response to oncogenic Kras alone, simultaneous activation of Kras and mutant p53 in adult ductal epithelium generated invasive PDAC in 75% of mice as early as 2.5 months after tamoxifen administration. These data demonstrate that pancreatic ductal cells, whereas exhibiting relative resistance to oncogenic Kras alone, can serve as an effective cell of origin for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma in the setting of gain-of-function mutations in p53. PMID:26592447

  15. Cooperativity of HIV-Specific Cytolytic CD4 T Cells and CD8 T Cells in Control of HIV Viremia

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, Susan; Eller, Michael; Teigler, Jeffrey E.; Maloveste, Sebastien M.; Schultz, Bruce T.; Soghoian, Damien Z.; Lu, Richard; Oster, Alexander F.; Chenine, Agnès-Laurence; Alter, Galit; Dittmer, Ulf; Marovich, Mary; Merlin L Robb; Michael, Nelson L.; Bolton, Diane

    2015-01-01

    CD4+ T cells play a pivotal role in the control of chronic viral infections. Recently, nontraditional CD4+ T cell functions beyond helper effects have been described, and a role for cytolytic CD4+ T cells in the control of HIV infection has been suggested. We define here the transcriptional, phenotypic, and functional profiles of HIV-specific cytolytic CD4+ T cells. Fluidigm BioMark and multiparameter flow cytometric analysis of HIV-specific cytolytic CD4+ T cells revealed a distinct transcri...

  16. Cooperation of B cells and T cells is required for survival of mice infected with vesicular stomatitis virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Allan Randrup; Nansen, A; Andersen, C; Johansen, J; Marker, O; Christensen, Jan Pravsgaard

    1997-01-01

    some antiviral activity, but CD4+ T cells sufficed for survival and were required for optimal resistance. Consistent with this it was found that in nude mice a lethal outcome could be prevented by transfer of CD8-depleted cells from B cell-deficient mice. Thus our results clearly demonstrate that while......To define the role of T cells and B cells in resistance to vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) infection, knockout mice with different specific immune defects on an identical background were infected i.v. and the outcome of infection was compared; in this way a more complete picture of the relative...... importance of various host defence mechanisms could be obtained. Compared to T and B cell-deficient SCID mice which all succumbed from encephalitis within 5-9 days of infection, T cell-deficient nude mice generally lived longer, but within a period of approximately 1 month after challenge all died. In...

  17. ACKR4 on Stromal Cells Scavenges CCL19 To Enable CCR7-Dependent Trafficking of APCs from Inflamed Skin to Lymph Nodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryce, Steven A; Wilson, Ruairi A M; Tiplady, Eleanor M; Asquith, Darren L; Bromley, Shannon K; Luster, Andrew D; Graham, Gerard J; Nibbs, Robert J B

    2016-04-15

    Dermal dendritic cells and epidermal Langerhans cells are APCs that migrate from skin to draining lymph nodes (LN) to drive peripheral tolerance and adaptive immunity. Their migration requires the chemokine receptor CCR7, which directs egress from the skin via dermal lymphatic vessels and extravasation into the LN parenchyma from lymph in the subcapsular sinus. CCR7 is activated by two chemokines: CCL19 and CCL21. CCL21 alone is sufficient for the migration of APCs from skin to LN. CCL19 and CCL21 also bind atypical chemokine receptor (ACKR) 4. ACKR4-mediated CCL21 scavenging by lymphatic endothelial cells lining the subcapsular sinus ceiling stabilizes interfollicular CCL21 gradients that direct lymph-borne CCR7(+)APCs into the parenchyma of mouse LN. In this study, we show that ACKR4 also aids APC egress from mouse skin under steady-state and inflammatory conditions. ACKR4 plays a particularly prominent role during cutaneous inflammation when it facilitates Langerhans cell egress from skin and enables the accumulation of dermal dendritic cells in skin-draining LN. Stromal cells in mouse skin, predominantly keratinocytes and a subset of dermal lymphatic endothelial cells, express ACKR4 and are capable of ACKR4-dependent chemokine scavenging in situ. ACKR4-mediated scavenging of dermal-derived CCL19, rather than CCL21, is critical during inflammation, because the aberrant trafficking of skin-derived APCs inAckr4-deficient mice is completely rescued by genetic deletion ofCcl19 Thus, ACKR4 on stromal cells aids the egress of APCs from mouse skin, and, during inflammation, facilitates CCR7-dependent cell trafficking by scavenging CCL19. PMID:26976955

  18. Nucleolin overexpression in breast cancer cell sub-populations with different stem-like phenotype enables targeted intracellular delivery of synergistic drug combination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, Nuno A; Rodrigues, Ana S; Rodrigues-Santos, Paulo; Alves, Vera; Gregório, Ana C; Valério-Fernandes, Ângela; Gomes-da-Silva, Lígia C; Rosa, Manuel Santos; Moura, Vera; Ramalho-Santos, João; Simões, Sérgio; Moreira, João Nuno

    2015-11-01

    Breast cancer stem cells (CSC) are thought responsible for tumor growth and relapse, metastization and active evasion to standard chemotherapy. The recognition that CSC may originate from non-stem cancer cells (non-SCC) through plastic epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition turned these into relevant cell targets. Of crucial importance for successful therapeutic intervention is the identification of surface receptors overexpressed in both CSC and non-SCC. Cell surface nucleolin has been described as overexpressed in cancer cells as well as a tumor angiogenic marker. Herein we have addressed the questions on whether nucleolin was a common receptor among breast CSC and non-SCC and whether it could be exploited for targeting purposes. Liposomes functionalized with the nucleolin-binding F3 peptide, targeted simultaneously, nucleolin-overexpressing putative breast CSC and non-SCC, which was paralleled by OCT4 and NANOG mRNA levels in cells from triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) origin. In murine embryonic stem cells, both nucleolin mRNA levels and F3 peptide-targeted liposomes cellular association were dependent on the stemness status. An in vivo tumorigenic assay suggested that surface nucleolin overexpression per se, could be associated with the identification of highly tumorigenic TNBC cells. This proposed link between nucleolin expression and the stem-like phenotype in TNBC, enabled 100% cell death mediated by F3 peptide-targeted synergistic drug combination, suggesting the potential to abrogate the plasticity and adaptability associated with CSC and non-SCC. Ultimately, nucleolin-specific therapeutic tools capable of simultaneous debulk multiple cellular compartments of the tumor microenvironment may pave the way towards a specific treatment for TNBC patient care. PMID:26283155

  19. Cooperation of invariant NKT cells and CD46+CD256+ T regulatory cells in prevention of autoimmune diabetes in non-obese diabetic mice treated with α-galactosylceramide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Weipeng Li; Fang Ji; Yong Zhang; Ying Wang; Neng yang; Hailiang Ge; Fuqing Wang

    2008-01-01

    CD1d-restricted natural killer T (NKT) cells and CD4+CD25+regulatory T (Treg) cells are two thymus-derived subsets of regulatory T cells that play an important role in the maintenance of self-tolerance. Yet the functional changes of the two subsets of regulatory T cells in the development of diabetes in non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice remain unclear, and how NKT cells and CD4+CD25+ Treg cells cooperate functionally in the regulation of autoimmune diabetes is also uncertain.We provide evidence that in NOD mice, an animal model of human type 1 diabetes, the functions of both NKT cells and CD4+CD25+ Treg cells decrease in an age-dependent manner.We show that treatment with α-galactosylceramide increases the size of the CD4+CD25+ Treg cell compartment in NOD mice, and augments the expression of forkhead/winged helix transcription factor and the potency of CD4+CD25+ Treg cells to inhibit proliferation of CD4+CD25- T cells. Our data indicate that NKT cells and CD4+CD25+ Treg cells might cooperate in the prevention of autoimmune diabetes in NOD mice treated with α-galactosylceramide. Induced cooperation of NKT cells and CD4+CD25+ Treg cells could serve as a strategy to treat human autoimmune disease, such as type 1 diabetes.

  20. Inhibition of TGF-β signaling enables human corneal endothelial cell expansion in vitro for use in regenerative medicine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoki Okumura

    Full Text Available Corneal endothelial dysfunctions occurring in patients with Fuchs' endothelial corneal dystrophy, pseudoexfoliation syndrome, corneal endotheliitis, and surgically induced corneal endothelial damage cause blindness due to the loss of endothelial function that maintains corneal transparency. Transplantation of cultivated corneal endothelial cells (CECs has been researched to repair endothelial dysfunction in animal models, though the in vitro expansion of human CECs (HCECs is a pivotal practical issue. In this study we established an optimum condition for the cultivation of HCECs. When exposed to culture conditions, both primate and human CECs showed two distinct phenotypes: contact-inhibited polygonal monolayer and fibroblastic phenotypes. The use of SB431542, a selective inhibitor of the transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β receptor, counteracted the fibroblastic phenotypes to the normal contact-inhibited monolayer, and these polygonal cells maintained endothelial physiological functions. Expression of ZO-1 and Na(+/K(+-ATPase maintained their subcellular localization at the plasma membrane. Furthermore, expression of type I collagen and fibronectin was greatly reduced. This present study may prove to be the substantial protocol to provide the efficient in vitro expansion of HCECs with an inhibitor to the TGF-β receptor, and may ultimately provide clinicians with a new therapeutic modality in regenerative medicine for the treatment of corneal endothelial dysfunctions.

  1. Dihydroartemisinin inhibits glucose uptake and cooperates with glycolysis inhibitor to induce apoptosis in non-small cell lung carcinoma cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan-jun Mi

    Full Text Available Despite recent advances in the therapy of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC, the chemotherapy efficacy against NSCLC is still unsatisfactory. Previous studies show the herbal antimalarial drug dihydroartemisinin (DHA displays cytotoxic to multiple human tumors. Here, we showed that DHA decreased cell viability and colony formation, induced apoptosis in A549 and PC-9 cells. Additionally, we first revealed DHA inhibited glucose uptake in NSCLC cells. Moreover, glycolytic metabolism was attenuated by DHA, including inhibition of ATP and lactate production. Consequently, we demonstrated that the phosphorylated forms of both S6 ribosomal protein and mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR, and GLUT1 levels were abrogated by DHA treatment in NSCLC cells. Furthermore, the upregulation of mTOR activation by high expressed Rheb increased the level of glycolytic metabolism and cell viability inhibited by DHA. These results suggested that DHA-suppressed glycolytic metabolism might be associated with mTOR activation and GLUT1 expression. Besides, we showed GLUT1 overexpression significantly attenuated DHA-triggered NSCLC cells apoptosis. Notably, DHA synergized with 2-Deoxy-D-glucose (2DG, a glycolysis inhibitor to reduce cell viability and increase cell apoptosis in A549 and PC-9 cells. However, the combination of the two compounds displayed minimal toxicity to WI-38 cells, a normal lung fibroblast cell line. More importantly, 2DG synergistically potentiated DHA-induced activation of caspase-9, -8 and -3, as well as the levels of both cytochrome c and AIF of cytoplasm. However, 2DG failed to increase the reactive oxygen species (ROS levels elicited by DHA. Overall, the data shown above indicated DHA plus 2DG induced apoptosis was involved in both extrinsic and intrinsic apoptosis pathways in NSCLC cells.

  2. More synergetic cooperation of Yamanaka factors in in-duced pluripotent stem cells than in embryonic stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jinyan Huang; Taotao Chen; Xiaosong Liu; Jing Jiang; Jinsong Li; Dangsheng Li; X Shirley Liu; Wei Li; Jiuhong Kang; Gang Pei

    2009-01-01

    The role of Yamanaka factors as the core regulators in the induction of pluripotency during somatic cell repro-gramming has been discovered recently. Our previous study found that Yamanaka factors regulate a developmental signaling network in maintaining embryonic stem (ES) cell pluripotency. Here, we established completely repro-grammed induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells and analyzed the global promoter occupancy of Yamanaka factors in these cells by ChiP-chip assays. We found that promoters of 565 genes were co-bound by four Yamanaka factors in iPS cells, a 10-fold increase when compared with their binding in ES cells. The promoters occupied by a single Ya-manaka factor distributed equally in activated and repressed genes in iPS cells, while in ES cells Oct4, Sox2, or Klf4 distributed mostly in repressed genes and c-Myc in activated ones. Pathway analysis of the ChIP-chip data revealed that Yamanaka factors regulated 16 developmental signaling pathways in iPS cells, among which 12 were common and 4 were unique compared to pathways regulated in ES cells. We further analyzed another recently published ChiP-chip dataset in iPS cells and observed similar results, showing the power of ChIP-chip plus pathway analysis for revealing the nature of pluripotency maintenance and regeneration. Next, we experimentally tested one of the repressive signaling pathways and found that its inhibition indeed improved efficiency of cell reprogramming. Taken together, we proposed that there is a core developmental signaling network necessary for pluripotency, with TGF-β, Hedgehog, Wnt, p53 as repressive (Yin) regulators and Jak-STAT, cell cycle, focal adhesion, adherens junction as ac-tive (Yang) ones; and Yamanaka factors synergistically regulate them in a Yin-Yang balanced way to induce pluripo-tency.

  3. Status of T- and B-cell cooperation in radiation chimeras: evidence for a suppressor effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Absolute tolerance may not be in operation in the allogeneic bone marrow chimera, but rather a dynamic state involving interaction not only between the donor and host but also among the donor-lymphoid cells themselves may exist. Whether this observation made in one allogeneic chimera, CD2F1→ C3BF1, will be true for other chimeras (different strain combinations, species) remains to be shown. Thus, the tempo, mode, and requirement for the generation of suppressor T cells are factors that may vary for any specific allogeneic bone marrow transplant. Finally, the manner and degree to which the tolerance-inducing mechanism may affect T- and B-cell functions of the chimera with respect to third-party antigens are yet to be determined

  4. Mitochondrial and endoplasmic reticulum stress pathways cooperate in zearalenone-induced apoptosis of human leukemic cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chokchaichamnankit Daranee

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Zearalenone (ZEA is a phytoestrogen from Fusarium species. The aims of the study was to identify mode of human leukemic cell death induced by ZEA and the mechanisms involved. Methods Cell cytotoxicity of ZEA on human leukemic HL-60, U937 and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs was performed by using 3-(4,5-dimethyl-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT assay. Reactive oxygen species production, cell cycle analysis and mitochondrial transmembrane potential reduction was determined by employing 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein diacetate, propidium iodide and 3,3'-dihexyloxacarbocyanine iodide and flow cytometry, respectively. Caspase-3 and -8 activities were detected by using fluorogenic Asp-Glu-Val-Asp-7-amino-4-methylcoumarin (DEVD-AMC and Ile-Glu-Thr-Asp-7-amino-4-methylcoumarin (IETD-AMC substrates, respectively. Protein expression of cytochrome c, Bax, Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL was performed by Western blot. The expression of proteins was assessed by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel-electrophoresis (PAGE coupled with LC-MS2 analysis and real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR approach. Results ZEA was cytotoxic to U937 > HL-60 > PBMCs and caused subdiploid peaks and G1 arrest in both cell lines. Apoptosis of human leukemic HL-60 and U937 cell apoptosis induced by ZEA was via an activation of mitochondrial release of cytochrome c through mitochondrial transmembrane potential reduction, activation of caspase-3 and -8, production of reactive oxygen species and induction of endoplasmic reticulum stress. Bax was up regulated in a time-dependent manner and there was down regulation of Bcl-xL expression. Two-dimensional PAGE coupled with LC-MS2 analysis showed that ZEA treatment of HL-60 cells produced differences in the levels of 22 membrane proteins such as apoptosis inducing factor and the ER stress proteins including endoplasmic reticulum protein 29 (ERp29, 78 kDa glucose-regulated protein, heat shock

  5. Distinct cellular properties of oncogenic KIT receptor tyrosine kinase mutants enable alternative courses of cancer cell inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Xiarong; Sousa, Leiliane P; Mandel-Bausch, Elizabeth M; Tome, Francisco; Reshetnyak, Andrey V; Hadari, Yaron; Schlessinger, Joseph; Lax, Irit

    2016-08-16

    Large genomic sequencing analysis as part of precision medicine efforts revealed numerous activating mutations in receptor tyrosine kinases, including KIT. Unfortunately, a single approach is not effective for inhibiting cancer cells or treating cancers driven by all known oncogenic KIT mutants. Here, we show that each of the six major KIT oncogenic mutants exhibits different enzymatic, cellular, and dynamic properties and responds distinctly to different KIT inhibitors. One class of KIT mutants responded well to anti-KIT antibody treatment alone or in combination with a low dose of tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). A second class of KIT mutants, including a mutant resistant to imatinib treatment, responded well to a combination of TKI with anti-KIT antibodies or to anti-KIT toxin conjugates, respectively. We conclude that the preferred choice of precision medicine treatments for cancers driven by activated KIT and other RTKs may rely on clear understanding of the dynamic properties of oncogenic mutants. PMID:27482095

  6. Engineering Schottky Contacts in Open-Air Fabricated Heterojunction Solar Cells to Enable High Performance and Ohmic Charge Transport

    OpenAIRE

    Hoye, Robert L.Z.; Heffernan, Shane; Ievskaya, Yulia; Sadhanala, Aditya; Flewitt, Andrew; Friend, Richard H.; MacManus-Driscoll, Judith L; Musselman, Kevin P.

    2014-01-01

    The efficiencies of open-air processed Cu2O/Zn1–x Mg x O heterojunction solar cells are doubled by reducing the effect of the Schottky barrier between Zn1–x Mg x O and the indium tin oxide (ITO) top contact. By depositing Zn1–x Mg x O with a long band-tail, charge flows through the Zn1–x Mg x O/ITO Schottky barrier without rectification by hopping between the sub-bandgap states. High current densities are obtained by controlling the Zn1–x Mg x O thickness to ensure that the Schottky barrier i...

  7. BCL-xL/MCL-1 inhibition and RARγ antagonism work cooperatively in human HL60 leukemia cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) subtype of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is characterized by chromosomal translocations that result in fusion proteins, including the promyelocytic leukemia–retinoic acid receptor, alpha fusion protein (PML–RARα). All-trans retinoic acid (atRA) treatment is the standard drug treatment for APL yielding cure rates >80% by activating transcription and proteasomal degradation of retinoic acid receptor, alpha (RARα). Whereas combination therapy with As2O3 has increased survival further, patients that experience relapse and are refractory to atRA and/or As2O3 is a clinically significant problem. BCL-2 family proteins regulate apoptosis and over-expression of anti-apoptotic B-cell leukemia/lymphoma 2 (BCL-2) family proteins has been associated with chemotherapeutic resistance in APL including impairment of the ability of atRA to induce growth arrest and differentiation. Here we investigated the novel BH3 domain mimetic, JY-1-106, which antagonizes the anti-apoptotic BCL-2 family members B-cell lymphoma-extra large (BCL-xL) and myeloid cell leukemia-1 (MCL-1) alone and in combination with retinoids including atRA, AM580 (RARα agonist), and SR11253 (RARγ antagonist). JY-1-106 reduced cell viability in HL-60 cells alone and in combination with retinoids. The combination of JY-1-106 and SR11253 had the greatest impact on cell viability by stimulating apoptosis. These studies indicate that dual BCL-xL/MCL-1 inhibitors and retinoids could work cooperatively in leukemia treatment. - Highlights: • Novel Bcl-xL/Mcl-1 inhibitor JY-1-106 reduces HL60 cell viability. • JY-1-106 is investigated in combination with retinoic acid, AM580, and SR11253. • AM580 is an RARα agonist; SR11253 is an RARγ antagonist. • Combined use of JY-1-106/SR11253 exhibited the greatest cell viability reduction. • JY-1-106 alone or in combination with retinoids induces apoptosis

  8. BCL-x{sub L}/MCL-1 inhibition and RARγ antagonism work cooperatively in human HL60 leukemia cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perri, Mariarita; Yap, Jeremy L.; Yu, Jianshi [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Maryland School of Pharmacy, 20 N Pine Street, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States); Cione, Erika [Department of Pharmacy, Health and Nutritional Sciences, Ed. Polifunzionale, University of Calabria, 87036 Rende, CS (Italy); Fletcher, Steven [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Maryland School of Pharmacy, 20 N Pine Street, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States); Kane, Maureen A., E-mail: mkane@rx.umaryland.edu [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Maryland School of Pharmacy, 20 N Pine Street, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States)

    2014-10-01

    The acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) subtype of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is characterized by chromosomal translocations that result in fusion proteins, including the promyelocytic leukemia–retinoic acid receptor, alpha fusion protein (PML–RARα). All-trans retinoic acid (atRA) treatment is the standard drug treatment for APL yielding cure rates >80% by activating transcription and proteasomal degradation of retinoic acid receptor, alpha (RARα). Whereas combination therapy with As{sub 2}O{sub 3} has increased survival further, patients that experience relapse and are refractory to atRA and/or As{sub 2}O{sub 3} is a clinically significant problem. BCL-2 family proteins regulate apoptosis and over-expression of anti-apoptotic B-cell leukemia/lymphoma 2 (BCL-2) family proteins has been associated with chemotherapeutic resistance in APL including impairment of the ability of atRA to induce growth arrest and differentiation. Here we investigated the novel BH3 domain mimetic, JY-1-106, which antagonizes the anti-apoptotic BCL-2 family members B-cell lymphoma-extra large (BCL-x{sub L}) and myeloid cell leukemia-1 (MCL-1) alone and in combination with retinoids including atRA, AM580 (RARα agonist), and SR11253 (RARγ antagonist). JY-1-106 reduced cell viability in HL-60 cells alone and in combination with retinoids. The combination of JY-1-106 and SR11253 had the greatest impact on cell viability by stimulating apoptosis. These studies indicate that dual BCL-x{sub L}/MCL-1 inhibitors and retinoids could work cooperatively in leukemia treatment. - Highlights: • Novel Bcl-x{sub L}/Mcl-1 inhibitor JY-1-106 reduces HL60 cell viability. • JY-1-106 is investigated in combination with retinoic acid, AM580, and SR11253. • AM580 is an RARα agonist; SR11253 is an RARγ antagonist. • Combined use of JY-1-106/SR11253 exhibited the greatest cell viability reduction. • JY-1-106 alone or in combination with retinoids induces apoptosis.

  9. TRAIL and docosahexaenoic acid cooperate to induce HT-29 colon cancer cell death

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vaculová, Alena; Hofmanová, Jiřina; Anděra, Ladislav; Kozubík, Alois

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 229, č. 1 (2005), s. 43-48. ISSN 0304-3835 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA524/04/0895; GA ČR(CZ) GA524/03/0766 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507 Keywords : TRAIL * DHA * cell death Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 3.049, year: 2005

  10. Expression of Fbxo7 in haematopoietic progenitor cells cooperates with p53 loss to promote lymphomagenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikhail Lomonosov

    Full Text Available Fbxo7 is an unusual F box protein that augments D-type cyclin complex formation with Cdk6, but not Cdk4 or Cdk2, and its over-expression has been demonstrated to transform immortalised fibroblasts in a Cdk6-dependent manner. Here we present new evidence in vitro and in vivo on the oncogenic potential of this regulatory protein in primary haematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs. Increasing Fbxo7 expression in HSPCs suppressed their colony forming ability in vitro, specifically decreasing CD11b (Mac1 expression, and these effects were dependent on an intact p53 pathway. Furthermore, increased Fbxo7 levels enhanced the proliferative capacity of p53 null HSPCs when they were grown in reduced concentrations of stem cell factor. Finally, irradiated mice reconstituted with p53 null, but not wild-type, HSPCs expressing Fbxo7 showed a statistically significant increase in the incidence of T cell lymphoma in vivo. These data argue that Fbxo7 negatively regulates the proliferation and differentiation of HSPCs in a p53-dependent manner, and that in the absence of p53, Fbxo7 expression can promote T cell lymphomagenesis.

  11. FGF, Insulin, and SMAD Signaling Cooperate for Avian Primordial Germ Cell Self-Renewal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jemima Whyte

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Precise self-renewal of the germ cell lineage is fundamental to fertility and reproductive success. The early precursors for the germ lineage, primordial germ cells (PGCs, survive and proliferate in several embryonic locations during their migration to the embryonic gonad. By elucidating the active signaling pathways in migratory PGCs in vivo, we were able to create culture conditions that recapitulate this embryonic germ cell environment. In defined medium conditions without feeder cells, the growth factors FGF2, insulin, and Activin A, signaling through their cognate-signaling pathways, were sufficient for self-renewal of germline-competent PGCs. Forced expression of constitutively active MEK1, AKT, and SMAD3 proteins could replace their respective upstream growth factors. Unexpectedly, we found that BMP4 could replace Activin A in non-clonal growth conditions. These defined medium conditions identify the key molecular pathways required for PGC self-renewal and will facilitate efforts in biobanking of chicken genetic resources and genome editing.

  12. Antitumour action on human glioblastoma A1235 cells through cooperation of bee venom and cisplatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gajski, Goran; Čimbora-Zovko, Tamara; Rak, Sanjica; Osmak, Maja; Garaj-Vrhovac, Vera

    2016-08-01

    Cisplatin (cDDP) is one of the most widely used anticancer-drugs in both therapy and research. However, cDDP-resistance is the greatest obstacle for the successful treatment of cancer patients. In the present study, the possible joint anticancer effect of bee venom (BV), as a natural toxin, and cDDP towards human glioblastoma A1235 cells was evaluated. Treatment with BV alone in concentrations of 2.5-30 μg/ml displayed dose-dependent cytotoxicity towards A1235 cells, as evaluated with different cytotoxicity assays (MTT, Cristal violet and Trypan blue exclusion assay), with an IC50 value of 22.57 μg/ml based on the MTT results. Furthermore, BV treatment induced necrosis, which was confirmed by typical morphological features and fast staining with ethidium-bromide dye. Pre-treatment with BV induced cell sensitization to cDDP, indicating that BV could improve the killing effect of selected cells when combined with cDDP. The isobologram method used to determine the extent of synergism in combining two agents to examine their possible therapeutic effect showed that combined treatment induced an additive and/or synergistic effect towards selected cells depending on the concentration of both. Hence, a greater anticancer effect could be triggered if BV was used in the course of chemotherapy. The obtained results indicate that joint treatment with BV could be useful from the point of minimizing the cDDP concentration during chemotherapy, thus reducing and/or postponing the development of drug resistance. Our data, in accordance with previously reported results, suggests that BV could be used in the development of a new strategy for cancer treatment. PMID:25916941

  13. Titanium dioxide/silicon hole-blocking selective contact to enable double-heterojunction crystalline silicon-based solar cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work, we use an electron-selective titanium dioxide (TiO2) heterojunction contact to silicon to block minority carrier holes in the silicon from recombining at the cathode contact of a silicon-based photovoltaic device. We present four pieces of evidence demonstrating the beneficial effect of adding the TiO2 hole-blocking layer: reduced dark current, increased open circuit voltage (VOC), increased quantum efficiency at longer wavelengths, and increased stored minority carrier charge under forward bias. The importance of a low rate of recombination of minority carriers at the Si/TiO2 interface for effective blocking of minority carriers is quantitatively described. The anode is made of a poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrenesulfonate) heterojunction to silicon which forms a hole selective contact, so that the entire device is made at a maximum temperature of 100 °C, with no doping gradients or junctions in the silicon. A low rate of recombination of minority carriers at the Si/TiO2 interface is crucial for effective blocking of minority carriers. Such a pair of complementary carrier-selective heterojunctions offers a path towards high-efficiency silicon solar cells using relatively simple and near-room temperature fabrication techniques

  14. Direct measurements of IPTG enable analysis of the induction behavior of E. coli in high cell density cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernández-Castané Alfred

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The E. coli lac operon and its components have been studied for decades, and lac-derived systems are widely used for recombinant protein production. However, lac operon dynamics and induction behavior remain the paradigm of gene regulation. Recently, an HPLC-MS-based method to quantify IPTG in the medium and inside the biomass has been established, and this tool may be useful to uncover the lack of knowledge and allow optimization of biotechnological processes. Results The results obtained from the study of IPTG distribution profiles in fed-batch, high cell density cultures allowed discrimination between two different depletion patterns of an inducer from the medium to the biomass in E. coli-expressing rhamnulose-1-phosphate aldolase (RhuA. Moreover, we could demonstrate that active transport mediates the uptake of this gratuitous inducer. Additionally, we could study the induction behaviors of this expression system by taking into account the biomass concentration at the induction time. Conclusions In the bistable range, partial induction occurred, which led to intermediate levels of RhuA activity. There was a direct relationship between the initial inducer concentrations and the initial inducer transport rate together with the specific activity. A majority of the inducer remains in the medium to reach equilibrium with the intracellular level. The intracellular inducer accumulation was a further evidence of bistability of the lac operon.

  15. Core–shell heterostructured metal oxide arrays enable superior light-harvesting and hysteresis-free mesoscopic perovskite solar cells

    KAUST Repository

    Mahmood, Khalid

    2015-01-01

    To achieve highly efficient mesoscopic perovskite solar cells (PSCs), the structure and properties of an electron transport layer (ETL) or material (ETM) have been shown to be of supreme importance. Particularly, the core-shell heterostructured mesoscopic ETM architecture has been recognized as a successful electrode design, because of its large internal surface area, superior light-harvesting efficiency and its ability to achieve fast charge transport. Here we report the successful fabrication of a hysteresis-free, 15.3% efficient PSC using vertically aligned ZnO nanorod/TiO2 shell (ZNR/TS) core-shell heterostructured ETMs for the first time. We have also added a conjugated polyelectrolyte polymer into the growth solution to promote the growth of high aspect ratio (AR) ZNRs and substantially improve the infiltration of the perovskite light absorber into the ETM. The PSCs based on the as-synthesized core-shell ZnO/TiO2 heterostructured ETMs exhibited excellent performance enhancement credited to the superior light harvesting capability, larger surface area, prolonged charge-transport pathways and lower recombination rate. The unique ETM design together with minimal hysteresis introduces core-shell ZnO/TiO2 heterostructures as a promising mesoscopic electrode approach for the fabrication of efficient PSCs. This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  16. An organosilane self-assembled monolayer incorporated into polymer solar cells enabling interfacial coherence to improve charge transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhiqi; Zhang, Xinyuan; Zhang, Zhihui; Li, Shujun; Liu, Chunyu; Shen, Liang; Guo, Wenbin; Ruan, Shengping

    2016-06-21

    The reproducible silylation of titanium oxide (TiO2) with small molecular (dichloromethyl) dimethylchlorosilane (DCS) as the cathode buffer layer was developed to improve electron extraction. Through incorporating the DCS capping layer into polymer solar cells (PSCs), the interfacial coherence of devices could be enhanced, leading to a shift in nanocrystallite size and a smaller internal charge transport resistance. Furthermore, a TiO2/DCS combined interfacial layer could serve as both an exciton dissociation center and a charge transfer channel, which results in a reduction in the energy barrier and electron loss, improving hole-blocking and surface-state passivation in the TiO2 interfacial layer. The Kelvin probe measurements demonstrate that the employment of the DCS nanolayer decreases conduction band energy of TiO2via forming a dipole layer at the interface of TiO2 and the DCS nanolayer, which tunes the work-function of the device and ulteriorly enhances charge carrier transfer between the electrode and the active layer. As a result, the photocurrent and the fill factor of the PSCs are both increased, resulting in an increased power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 6.959%. PMID:27242077

  17. Enabling Lorentz boosted frame particle-in-cell simulations of laser wakefield acceleration in quasi-3D geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Peicheng; Xu, Xinlu; Davidson, Asher; Tableman, Adam; Dalichaouch, Thamine; Li, Fei; Meyers, Michael D.; An, Weiming; Tsung, Frank S.; Decyk, Viktor K.; Fiuza, Frederico; Vieira, Jorge; Fonseca, Ricardo A.; Lu, Wei; Silva, Luis O.; Mori, Warren B.

    2016-07-01

    When modeling laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) using the particle-in-cell (PIC) algorithm in a Lorentz boosted frame, the plasma is drifting relativistically at βb c towards the laser, which can lead to a computational speedup of ∼ γSUB>/bSUB>2 = (1 -space-time distribution of the LWFA data in the lab and boosted frame, we propose to use a moving window to follow the drifting plasma, instead of following the laser driver as is done in the LWFA lab frame simulations, in order to further reduce the computational loads. We describe the details of how the NCI is mitigated for the quasi-3D geometry, the setups for simulations which combine the Lorentz boosted frame, quasi-3D geometry, and the use of a moving window, and compare the results from these simulations against their corresponding lab frame cases. Good agreement is obtained among these sample simulations, particularly when there is no self-trapping, which demonstrates it is possible to combine the Lorentz boosted frame and the quasi-3D algorithms when modeling LWFA. We also discuss the preliminary speedups achieved in these sample simulations.

  18. Engineering Schottky contacts in open-air fabricated heterojunction solar cells to enable high performance and ohmic charge transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoye, Robert L Z; Heffernan, Shane; Ievskaya, Yulia; Sadhanala, Aditya; Flewitt, Andrew; Friend, Richard H; MacManus-Driscoll, Judith L; Musselman, Kevin P

    2014-12-24

    The efficiencies of open-air processed Cu2O/Zn(1-x)Mg(x)O heterojunction solar cells are doubled by reducing the effect of the Schottky barrier between Zn(1-x)Mg(x)O and the indium tin oxide (ITO) top contact. By depositing Zn(1-x)Mg(x)O with a long band-tail, charge flows through the Zn(1-x)Mg(x)O/ITO Schottky barrier without rectification by hopping between the sub-bandgap states. High current densities are obtained by controlling the Zn(1-x)Mg(x)O thickness to ensure that the Schottky barrier is spatially removed from the p-n junction, allowing the full built-in potential to form, in addition to taking advantage of the increased electrical conductivity of the Zn(1-x)Mg(x)O films with increasing thickness. This work therefore shows that the Zn(1-x)Mg(x)O window layer sub-bandgap state density and thickness are critical parameters that can be engineered to minimize the effect of Schottky barriers on device performance. More generally, these findings show how to improve the performance of other photovoltaic system reliant on transparent top contacts, e.g., CZTS and CIGS. PMID:25418326

  19. Cooperative interactions between p53 and NFκB enhance cell plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisio, Alessandra; Zámborszky, Judit; Zaccara, Sara; Lion, Mattia; Tebaldi, Toma; Sharma, Vasundhara; Raimondi, Ivan; Alessandrini, Federica; Ciribilli, Yari; Inga, Alberto

    2014-12-15

    The p53 and NFκB sequence-specific transcription factors play crucial roles in cell proliferation and survival with critical, even if typically opposite, effects on cancer progression. To investigate a possible crosstalk between p53 and NFκB driven by chemotherapy-induced responses in the context of an inflammatory microenvironment, we performed a proof of concept study using MCF7 cells. Transcriptome analyses upon single or combined treatments with doxorubicin (Doxo, 1.5μM) and the NFκB inducer TNF-alpha (TNFα, 5ng/ml) revealed 432 up-regulated (log2 FC> 2), and 390 repressed genes (log2 FC< -2) for the Doxo+TNFα treatment. 239 up-regulated and 161 repressed genes were synergistically regulated by the double treatment. Annotation and pathway analyses of Doxo+TNFα selectively up-regulated genes indicated strong enrichment for cell migration terms. A panel of genes was examined by qPCR coupled to p53 activation by Doxo, 5-Fluoruracil and Nutlin-3a, or to p53 or NFκB inhibition. Transcriptome data were confirmed for 12 of 15 selected genes and seven (PLK3, LAMP3, ETV7, UNC5B, NTN1, DUSP5, SNAI1) were synergistically up-regulated after Doxo+TNFα and dependent both on p53 and NFκB. Migration assays consistently showed an increase in motility for MCF7 cells upon Doxo+TNFα. A signature of 29 Doxo+TNFα highly synergistic genes exhibited prognostic value for luminal breast cancer patients, with adverse outcome correlating with higher relative expression. We propose that the crosstalk between p53 and NFκB can lead to the activation of specific gene expression programs that may impact on cancer phenotypes and potentially modify the efficacy of cancer therapy. PMID:25401416

  20. PLK1 Signaling in Breast Cancer Cells Cooperates with Estrogen Receptor-Dependent Gene Transcription

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Wierer

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1 is a key regulator of cell division and is overexpressed in many types of human cancers. Compared to its well-characterized role in mitosis, little is known about PLK1 functions in interphase. Here, we report that PLK1 mediates estrogen receptor (ER-regulated gene transcription in human breast cancer cells. PLK1 interacts with ER and is recruited to ER cis-elements on chromatin. PLK1-coactivated genes included classical ER target genes such as Ps2, Wisp2, and Serpina3 and were enriched in developmental and tumor-suppressive functions. Performing large-scale phosphoproteomics of estradiol-treated MCF7 cells in the presence or absence of the specific PLK1 inhibitor BI2536, we identified several PLK1 end targets involved in transcription, including the histone H3K4 trimethylase MLL2, the function of which on ER target genes was impaired by PLK1 inhibition. Our results propose a mechanism for the tumor-suppressive role of PLK1 in mammals as an interphase transcriptional regulator.

  1. Super-resolution imaging with Pontamine Fast Scarlet 4BS enables direct visualization of cellulose orientation and cell connection architecture in onion epidermis cells

    OpenAIRE

    Liesche, Johannes; Ziomkiewicz, Iwona; Schulz, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    BackgroundIn plants, a complex cell wall protects cells and defines their shape. Cellulose fibrils form a multilayered network inside the cell-wall matrix that plays a direct role in controlling cell expansion. Resolving the structure of this network will allow us to comprehend the relationship of cellulose fibril orientation and growth.The fluorescent dye Pontamine Fast Scarlet 4BS (PFS) was shown to stain cellulose with high specificity and could be used to visualize cellulose bundles in ce...

  2. Enabling the Distributed Generation Market of High Temperature Fuel Cell and Absorption Chiller Systems to Support Critical and Commercial Loads

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiMola, Ashley M.

    Buildings account for over 18% of the world's anthropogenic Greenhouse Gas (GHG) emissions. As a result, a technology that can offset GHG emissions associated with buildings has the potential to save over 9 Giga-tons of GHG emissions per year. High temperature fuel cell and absorption chiller (HTFC/AC) technology offers a relatively low-carbon option for meeting cooling and electric loads for buildings while producing almost no criteria pollutants. GHG emissions in the state of California would decrease by 7.48 million metric tons per year if every commercial building in the State used HTFC/AC technology to meet its power and cooling requirements. In order to realize the benefits of HTFC/AC technology on a wide scale, the distributed generation market needs to be exposed to the technology and informed of its economic viability and real-world potential. This work characterizes the economics associated with HTFC/AC technology using select scenarios that are representative of realistic applications. The financial impacts of various input factors are evaluated and the HTFC/AC simulations are compared to the economics of traditional building utilities. It is shown that, in addition to the emissions reductions derived from the systems, HTFC/AC technology is financially preferable in all of the scenarios evaluated. This work also presents the design of a showcase environment, centered on a beta-test application, that presents (1) system operating data gathered using a custom data acquisition module, and (2) HTFC/AC technology in a clear and approachable manner in order to serve the target audience of market stakeholders.

  3. Conflictual cooperation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Axel, Erik

    2011-01-01

    This paper explores cooperation as contradictory and therefore with a constant possibility for conflict. Consequently it is called conflictual cooperation. The notion is presented on the basis of a participatory observation in a control room of a district heating system. In the investigation......, cooperation appeared as the continuous reworking of contradictions in the local arrangement of societal con- ditions. Subjects were distributed and distributed themselves according to social privileges, resources, and dilemmas in cooperation. Here, the subjects’ activities and understandings took form from...... regulating who can use what in what way. Contradictions in the observed activity are discussed. It is argued that for the participants the connec- tions of acts appear in such contradictions in cooperation. This conception is dis- cussed in relationship to the notions of practice, as expounded by Bourdieu...

  4. Sulfur X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy of Living Mammalian Cells: An Enabling Tool for Sulfur Metabolomics. in Situ Observation of Uptake of Taurine Into MDCK Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gnida, M.; Sneeden, E.Yu; Whitin, J.C.; Prince, R.C.; Pickering, I.J.; Korbas, M.; George, G.N.

    2009-06-01

    Sulfur is essential for life, with important roles in biological structure and function. However, because of a lack of suitable biophysical techniques, in situ information about sulfur biochemistry is generally difficult to obtain. Here, we present an in situ sulfur X-ray absorption spectroscopy (S-XAS) study of living cell cultures of the mammalian renal epithelial MDCK cell line. A great deal of information is retrieved from a characteristic sulfonate feature in the X-ray absorption spectrum of the cell cultures, which can be related to the amino acid taurine. We followed the time and dose dependence of uptake of taurine into MDCK cell monolayers. The corresponding uptake curves showed a typical saturation behavior with considerable levels of taurine accumulation inside the cells (as much as 40% of total cellular sulfur). We also investigated the polarity of uptake of taurine into MDCK cells, and our results confirmed that uptake in situ is predominantly a function of the basolateral cell surface.

  5. High-contrast three-dimensional imaging of the Arabidopsis leaf enables the analysis of cell dimensions in the epidermis and mesophyll

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Granier Christine

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite the wide spread application of confocal and multiphoton laser scanning microscopy in plant biology, leaf phenotype assessment still relies on two-dimensional imaging with a limited appreciation of the cells' structural context and an inherent inaccuracy of cell measurements. Here, a successful procedure for the three-dimensional imaging and analysis of plant leaves is presented. Results The procedure was developed based on a range of developmental stages, from leaf initiation to senescence, of soil-grown Arabidopsis thaliana (L. Heynh. Rigorous clearing of tissues, made possible by enhanced leaf permeability to clearing agents, allowed the optical sectioning of the entire leaf thickness by both confocal and multiphoton microscopy. The superior image quality, in resolution and contrast, obtained by the latter technique enabled the three-dimensional visualisation of leaf morphology at the individual cell level, cell segmentation and the construction of structural models. Image analysis macros were developed to measure leaf thickness and tissue proportions, as well as to determine for the epidermis and all layers of mesophyll tissue, cell density, volume, length and width. For mesophyll tissue, the proportion of intercellular spaces and the surface areas of cells were also estimated. The performance of the procedure was demonstrated for the expanding 6th leaf of the Arabidopsis rosette. Furthermore, it was proven to be effective for leaves of another dicotyledon, apple (Malus domestica Borkh., which has a very different cellular organisation. Conclusions The pipeline for the three-dimensional imaging and analysis of plant leaves provides the means to include variables on internal tissues in leaf growth studies and the assessment of leaf phenotypes. It also allows the visualisation and quantification of alterations in leaf structure alongside changes in leaf functioning observed under environmental constraints. Data

  6. The B cell antigen receptor and overexpression of MYC can cooperate in the genesis of B cell lymphomas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yosef Refaeli

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available A variety of circumstantial evidence from humans has implicated the B cell antigen receptor (BCR in the genesis of B cell lymphomas. We generated mouse models designed to test this possibility directly, and we found that both the constitutive and antigen-stimulated state of a clonal BCR affected the rate and outcome of lymphomagenesis initiated by the proto-oncogene MYC. The tumors that arose in the presence of constitutive BCR differed from those initiated by MYC alone and resembled chronic B cell lymphocytic leukemia/lymphoma (B-CLL, whereas those that arose in response to antigen stimulation resembled large B-cell lymphomas, particularly Burkitt lymphoma (BL. We linked the genesis of the BL-like tumors to antigen stimulus in three ways. First, in reconstruction experiments, stimulation of B cells by an autoantigen in the presence of overexpressed MYC gave rise to BL-like tumors that were, in turn, dependent on both MYC and the antigen for survival and proliferation. Second, genetic disruption of the pathway that mediates signaling from the BCR promptly killed cells of the BL-like tumors as well as the tumors resembling B-CLL. And third, growth of the murine BL could be inhibited by any of three distinctive immunosuppressants, in accord with the dependence of the tumors on antigen-induced signaling. Together, our results provide direct evidence that antigenic stimulation can participate in lymphomagenesis, point to a potential role for the constitutive BCR as well, and sustain the view that the constitutive BCR gives rise to signals different from those elicited by antigen. The mouse models described here should be useful in exploring further the pathogenesis of lymphomas, and in preclinical testing of new therapeutics.

  7. [Cooperative phenomena in the membrane potential of parathyroid cells induced by divalent cations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirose, T

    1985-01-01

    Membrane potentials of mouse parathyroid cells were measured by means of the intracellular microelectrode method. The membrane potential in external Krebs solution containing 2.5 mM of Ca++ was -23.6 +/- 0.4 mV (mean +/- standard error of mean). The low concentration of Ca++ (1.0 mM) caused hyperpolarization of the membrane potential to -61.7 +/- 0.8 mV. The membrane potential was proportional to the logarithm of the concentration of K ion in the solution of low Ca ion. The concentration of external Na+, C1- and HPO4-- had no effect on the membrane potential. The sigmoidal transition of membrane potentials was induced by the change of Ca ion concentration in the range from 2.5 to 1.0 mM. The change of the membrane potentials in low Ca ion is originated from increase in potassium permeability of the cell membrane. The similar sigmoidal changes of the membrane potentials were observed in the solution containing 4 to 3 mM of Sr ion. The Mg and Ba ion showed smaller effect on the membrane potential. The Goldman equation was extended to divalent ions. Appling the extended membrane potential equation, ratios of the permeability coefficients were obtained as follows: PK/PCa = 0.067 for 2.5 mM Ca++, 0.33 for 1.0 mM Ca++; PK/PSr = 0.08 for 4 mM Sr++ and 0.4 for 3 mM Sr++; PK/PMg = 0.5; PK/PBa = 0.67 for all range of concentration. The Hill constants of Sr ion and Ca ion were 20; the relationship between Sr ion and Ca ion was competitive. The Hill constants of Mg and Ba ion were 1 each. The Hill constant of Ca ion was depend of the temperature; nmax = 20 at 36 degrees C, n = 9 at 27 degrees C, n = 2 at 22 degrees C. The enthalpy of Ca-binding reaction was obtained from the Van't Hoff plot as 0.58 kcal. The activation energies of the K+ permeability increase were obtained from the Arrhenius plots as 3.3 kcal and 4 kcal. The difference, 0.7 kcal, corresponds to the enthalpy change of this reaction, of which value is close to that of the Ca-binding reaction. PMID:4093891

  8. Genetically Encoded Azide Containing Amino Acid in Mammalian Cells Enables Site-Specific Antibody-Drug Conjugates Using Click Cycloaddition Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanBrunt, Michael P; Shanebeck, Kurt; Caldwell, Zachary; Johnson, Jeffrey; Thompson, Pamela; Martin, Thomas; Dong, Huifang; Li, Gary; Xu, Hengyu; D'Hooge, Francois; Masterson, Luke; Bariola, Pauline; Tiberghien, Arnaud; Ezeadi, Ebele; Williams, David G; Hartley, John A; Howard, Philip W; Grabstein, Kenneth H; Bowen, Michael A; Marelli, Marcello

    2015-11-18

    Antibody-drug conjugates (ADC) have emerged as potent antitumor drugs that provide increased efficacy, specificity, and tolerability over chemotherapy for the treatment of cancer. ADCs generated by targeting cysteines and lysines on the antibody have shown efficacy, but these products are heterogeneous, and instability may limit their dosing. Here, a novel technology is described that enables site-specific conjugation of toxins to antibodies using chemistry to produce homogeneous, potent, and highly stable conjugates. We have developed a cell-based mammalian expression system capable of site-specific integration of a non-natural amino acid containing an azide moiety. The azide group enables click cycloaddition chemistry that generates a stable heterocyclic triazole linkage. Antibodies to Her2/neu were expressed to contain N6-((2-azidoethoxy)carbonyl)-l-lysine at four different positions. Each site allowed over 95% conjugation efficacy with the toxins auristatin F or a pyrrolobenzodiazepine (PBD) dimer to generate ADCs with a drug to antibody ratio of >1.9. The ADCs were potent and specific in in vitro cytotoxicity assays. An anti Her2/neu conjugate demonstrated stability in vivo and a PBD containing ADC showed potent efficacy in a mouse tumor xenograph model. This technology was extended to generate fully functional ADCs with four toxins per antibody. The high stability of the azide-alkyne linkage, combined with the site-specific nature of the expression system, provides a means for the generation of ADCs with optimized pharmacokinetic, biological, and biophysical properties. PMID:26332743

  9. Helminth antigens enable CpG-activated dendritic cells to inhibit the symptoms of collagen-induced arthritis through Foxp3+ regulatory T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franco Carranza

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells (DC have the potential to control the outcome of autoimmunity by modulating the immune response. In this study, we tested the ability of Fasciola hepatica total extract (TE to induce tolerogenic properties in CpG-ODN (CpG maturated DC, to then evaluate the therapeutic potential of these cells to diminish the inflammatory response in collagen induced arthritis (CIA. DBA/1J mice were injected with TE plus CpG treated DC (T/C-DC pulsed with bovine collagen II (CII between two immunizations with CII and clinical scores CIA were determined. The levels of CII-specific IgG2 and IgG1 in sera, the histological analyses in the joints, the cytokine profile in the draining lymph node (DLN cells and in the joints, and the number, and functionality of CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ T cells (Treg were evaluated. Vaccination of mice with CII pulsed T/C-DC diminished the severity and incidence of CIA symptoms and the production of the inflammatory cytokine, while induced the production of anti-inflammatory cytokines. The therapeutic effect was mediated by Treg cells, since the adoptive transfer of CD4+CD25+ T cells, inhibited the inflammatory symptoms in CIA. The in vitro blockage of TGF-β in cultures of DLN cells plus CII pulsed T/C-DC inhibited the expansion of Treg cells. Vaccination with CII pulsed T/C-DC seems to be a very efficient approach to diminish exacerbated immune response in CIA, by inducing the development of Treg cells, and it is therefore an interesting candidate for a cell-based therapy for rheumatoid arthritis (RA.

  10. Spatially- and temporally-controlled postnatal p53 knockdown cooperates with embryonic Schwann cell precursor Nf1 gene loss to promote malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirbe, Angela C.; Dahiya, Sonika; Friedmann-Morvinski, Dinorah; Verma, Inder M.; Clapp, D. Wade; Gutmann, David H.

    2016-01-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs) are highly aggressive sarcomas that arise sporadically or in association with the Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) cancer predisposition syndrome. In individuals with NF1, MPNSTs are hypothesized to arise from Nf1-deficient Schwann cell precursor cells following the somatic acquisition of secondary cooperating genetic mutations (e.g., p53 loss). To model this sequential genetic cooperativity, we coupled somatic lentivirus-mediated p53 knockdown in the adult right sciatic nerve with embryonic Schwann cell precursor Nf1 gene inactivation in two different Nf1 conditional knockout mouse strains. Using this approach, ∼60% of mice with Periostin-Cre-mediated Nf1 gene inactivation (Periostin-Cre; Nf1flox/flox mice) developed tumors classified as low-grade MPNSTs following p53 knockdown (mean, 6 months). Similarly, ∼70% of Nf1+/− mice with GFAP-Cre-mediated Nf1 gene inactivation (GFAP-Cre; Nf1flox/null mice) developed low-grade MPNSTs following p53 knockdown (mean, 3 months). In addition, wild-type and Nf1+/− mice with GFAP-Cre-mediated Nf1 loss develop MPNSTs following somatic p53 knockout with different latencies, suggesting potential influences of Nf1+/− stromal cells in MPNST pathogenesis. Collectively, this new MPNST model system permits the analysis of somatically-acquired events as well as tumor microenvironment signals that potentially cooperate with Nf1 loss in the development and progression of this deadly malignancy. PMID:26859681

  11. Optimized microsystems-enabled photovoltaics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz-Campa, Jose Luis; Nielson, Gregory N.; Young, Ralph W.; Resnick, Paul J.; Okandan, Murat; Gupta, Vipin P.

    2015-09-22

    Technologies pertaining to designing microsystems-enabled photovoltaic (MEPV) cells are described herein. A first restriction for a first parameter of an MEPV cell is received. Subsequently, a selection of a second parameter of the MEPV cell is received. Values for a plurality of parameters of the MEPV cell are computed such that the MEPV cell is optimized with respect to the second parameter, wherein the values for the plurality of parameters are computed based at least in part upon the restriction for the first parameter.

  12. Hepatic Stellate Cell Coculture Enables Sorafenib Resistance in Huh7 Cells through HGF/c-Met/Akt and Jak2/Stat3 Pathways

    OpenAIRE

    Weibo Chen; Junhua Wu; Hua Shi; Zhongxia Wang; Guang Zhang; Yin Cao; Chunping Jiang; Yitao Ding

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. Tumor microenvironment confers drug resistance to kinase inhibitors by increasing RKT ligand levels that result in the activation of cell-survival signaling including PI3K and MAPK signals. We assessed whether HSC-LX2 coculture conferred sorafenib resistance in Huh7 and revealed the mechanism underlying the drug resistance. Experimental Design. The effect of LX2 on sorafenib resistance was determined by coculture system with Huh7 cells. The rescue function of LX2 supernatants was ass...

  13. PREFACE: Cooperative dynamics Cooperative dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gov, Nir

    2011-09-01

    The dynamics within living cells are dominated by non-equilibrium processes that consume chemical energy (usually in the form of ATP, adenosine triphosphate) and convert it into mechanical forces and motion. The mechanisms that allow this conversion process are mostly driven by the components of the cytoskeleton: (i) directed (polar) polymerization of filaments (either actin or microtubules) and (ii) molecular motors. The forces and motions produced by these two components of the cytoskeleton give rise to the formation of cellular shapes, and drive the intracellular transport and organization. It is clear that these systems present a multi-scale challenge, from the physics of the molecular processes to the organization of many interacting units. Understanding the physical nature of these systems will have a large impact on many fundamental problems in biology and break new grounds in the field of non-equilibrium physics. This field of research has seen a rapid development over the last ten years. Activities in this area range from theoretical and experimental work on the underlying fundamental (bio)physics at the single-molecule level, to investigations (in vivo and in vitro) of the dynamics and patterns of macroscopic pieces of 'living matter'. In this special issue we have gathered contributions that span the whole spectrum of length- and complexity-scales in this field. Some of the works demonstrate how active forces self-organize within the polymerizing cytoskeleton, on the level of cooperative cargo transport via motors or due to active fluxes at the cell membrane. On a larger scale, it is shown that polar filaments coupled to molecular motors give rise to a huge variety of surprising dynamics and patterns: spontaneously looping rings of gliding microtubules, and emergent phases of self-organized filaments and motors in different geometries. All of these articles share the common feature of being out-of-equilibrium, driven by metabolism. As demonstrated here

  14. Adipose-derived stem cells cooperate with fractional carbon dioxide laser in antagonizing photoaging: a potential role of Wnt and β-catenin signaling

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Xiao; Wang, Hong-yi; Zhang, Yu; Liu, Yang; Li, Yan-qi; Tao, Kai; Wu, Chu-Tse; Jin, Ji-De; Liu, Xiao-Yan

    2014-01-01

    Background It is well established that adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) produce and secrete cytokines/growth factors that antagonize UV-induced photoaging of skin. However, the exact molecular basis underlying the anti-photoaging effects exerted by ADSCs is not well understood, and whether ADSCs cooperate with fractional carbon dioxide (CO2) laser to facilitate photoaging skin healing process has not been explored. Here, we investigated the impacts of ADSCs on photoaging in a photoaging ani...

  15. Cell sorting enables interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization detection of low BCR-ABL1 producing stem cells in chronic myeloid leukaemia patients beyond deep molecular remission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Kooten Niekerk, Peter Buur; Petersen, Charlotte Christie; Nyvold, Charlotte Guldborg;

    2014-01-01

    The exact disease state of chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML) patients in deep molecular remission is unknown, because even the most sensitive quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) methods cannot identify patients prone to relapse after treatment withdrawal. To elucidate......) ), n = 11) using both sensitive qPCR and interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization (iFISH). Despite evaluating fewer cells, iFISH proved superior to mRNA-based qPCR in detecting residual Ph(+) stem cells (P = 0·005), and detected Ph(+) stem- and progenitor cells in 9/10 patients at frequencies of 2......-14%. Moreover, while all qPCR(+) samples also were iFISH(+) , 9/33 samples were qPCR-/iFISH(+) , including all positive samples from MR(4) patients. Our findings show that residual Ph(+) cells are low BCR-ABL1 producers, and that DNA-based methods are required to assess the content of persisting Ph(+) stem...

  16. Super-resolution imaging with Pontamine Fast Scarlet 4BS enables direct visualization of cellulose orientation and cell connection architecture in onion epidermis cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liesche, Johannes; Ziomkiewicz, Iwona; Schulz, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    microscopy of some 200 nm in xy and 550 nm in z for green light, restricts the direct visualization of cellulose to relatively large bundles, whereas the structure of cellulose microfibrils with their diameter below 10 nm remains unresolved. Over the last decade, several so-called super-resolution microscopy...... approaches have been developed; in this paper we explore the potential of such approaches for the direct visualization of cellulose. Results To ensure optimal imaging we determined the spectral properties of PFS-stained tissue. PFS was found not to affect cell viability in the onion bulb scale epidermis. We...... confocal microscopy and the approach could be used to demonstrate differences in fibril orientation in different layers of the cell wall as well as particular cellulose fortifications around plasmodesmata. Conclusions Super-resolution light microscopy of PFS-stained cellulose fibrils is possible...

  17. Cooperative design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Kjeld

    1998-01-01

    if concurrent engineering is to succeed. On the basis of ethnographic studies of cooperative design, the paper attempts to characterize cooperative work in the domain of design and to outline a set of crucial research problems to be addressed if CSCW is to help engineers and de-signers meet the challenges...... they are facing. On one hand, designers need highly flexible ‘coordination mecha-nisms’ that can support horizontal coordination of large-scale distributed design projects, and on the other hand design organizations require versatile and ubiquitous infrastructures to be able to manage their ‘common informa-tion...

  18. Hepatic Stellate Cell Coculture Enables Sorafenib Resistance in Huh7 Cells through HGF/c-Met/Akt and Jak2/Stat3 Pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weibo Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Tumor microenvironment confers drug resistance to kinase inhibitors by increasing RKT ligand levels that result in the activation of cell-survival signaling including PI3K and MAPK signals. We assessed whether HSC-LX2 coculture conferred sorafenib resistance in Huh7 and revealed the mechanism underlying the drug resistance. Experimental Design. The effect of LX2 on sorafenib resistance was determined by coculture system with Huh7 cells. The rescue function of LX2 supernatants was assessed by MTT assay and fluorescence microscopy. The underlying mechanism was tested by administration of pathway inhibitors and manifested by Western blotting. Results. LX2 coculture significantly induced sorafenib resistance in Huh7 by activating p-Akt that led to reactivation of p-ERK. LX2 secreted HGF into the culture medium that triggered drug resistance, and exogenous HGF could also induce sorafenib resistance. The inhibition of p-Akt blocked sorafenib resistance caused by LX2 coculture. Increased phosphorylation of Jak2 and Stat3 was also detected in LX2 cocultured Huh7 cells. The Jak inhibitor tofacitinib reversed sorafenib resistance by blocking Jak2 and Stat3 activation. The combined administration of sorafenib and p-Stat3 inhibitor S3I-201 augmented induced apoptosis even in the presence of sorafenib resistance. Conclusions. HSC-LX2 coculture induced sorafenib resistance in Huh7 through multiple pathways: HGF/c-Met/Akt pathway and Jak2/Stat3 pathway. A combined administration of sorafenib and S3I-201 was able to augment sorafenib-induced apoptosis even in the presence of LX2 coculture.

  19. Cooperation between STAT5 and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase in the IL-3-dependent survival of a bone marrow derived cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa Santos, S C; Dumon, S; Mayeux, P; Gisselbrecht, S; Gouilleux, F

    2000-02-24

    Cytokine-dependent activation of distinct signaling pathways is a common scheme thought to be required for the subsequent programmation into cell proliferation and survival. The PI 3-kinase/Akt, Ras/MAP kinase, Ras/NFIL3 and JAK/STAT pathways have been shown to participate in cytokine mediated suppression of apoptosis in various cell types. However the relative importance of these signaling pathways seems to depend on the cellular context. In several cases, individual inhibition of each pathway is not sufficient to completely abrogate cytokine mediated cell survival suggesting that cooperation between these pathways is required. Here we showed that individual inhibition of STAT5, PI 3-kinase or MEK activities did not or weakly affected the IL-3 dependent survival of the bone marrow derived Ba/F3 cell line. However, the simultaneous inhibition of STAT5 and PI 3-kinase activities but not that of STAT5 and MEK reduced the IL-3 dependent survival of Ba/F3. Analysis of the expression of the Bcl-2 members indicated that phosphorylation of Bad and Bcl-x expression which are respectively regulated by the PI 3-kinase/Akt pathway and STAT5 probably explain this cooperation. Furthermore, we showed by co-immunoprecipitation studies and pull down experiments with fusion proteins encoding the GST-SH2 domains of p85 that STAT5 in its phosphorylated form interacts with the p85 subunit of the PI 3-kinase. These results indicate that the activations of STAT5 and the PI 3-kinase by IL-3 in Ba/F3 cells are tightly connected and cooperate to mediate IL-3-dependent suppression of apoptosis by modulating Bad phosphorylation and Bcl-x expression. PMID:10713704

  20. Metal-ligand cooperation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khusnutdinova, Julia R; Milstein, David

    2015-10-12

    Metal-ligand cooperation (MLC) has become an important concept in catalysis by transition metal complexes both in synthetic and biological systems. MLC implies that both the metal and the ligand are directly involved in bond activation processes, by contrast to "classical" transition metal catalysis where the ligand (e.g. phosphine) acts as a spectator, while all key transformations occur at the metal center. In this Review, we will discuss examples of MLC in which 1) both the metal and the ligand are chemically modified during bond activation and 2) bond activation results in immediate changes in the 1st coordination sphere involving the cooperating ligand, even if the reactive center at the ligand is not directly bound to the metal (e.g. via tautomerization). The role of MLC in enabling effective catalysis as well as in catalyst deactivation reactions will be discussed. PMID:26436516

  1. Comparative Literature in Cooperation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Donat

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Beyond methodological or ideological principles, Comparative Literature depends upon, and flourishes in, cooperation between different systems, fields and disciplines. We introduce two projects developed by Munich’s Comparative Literature Department as examples of the specific challenges and opportunities afforded by this cooperation: in editing Roman Jakobson’s analyses of poetry, experts in 16 different languages and literatures worked together to present translations, interpretations and commentary on this corpus. In ongoing bilateral teaching and research projects with the German Department at Seoul National University, inter-lingual, inter-cultural and inter-disciplinary communication enables and informs studies focusing on Goethe’s concept of active and passive roles in Weltliteratur, as well as censorship and textual control in divided nations.

  2. TLR-4 Cooperates with Dectin-1 and Mannose Receptor to Expand Th17 and Tc17 Cells Induced by Paracoccidioides brasiliensis Stimulated Dendritic Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera Lucia Garcia Calich

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The concomitant use of diverse Pattern Recognition Receptors (PRRs by innate immune cells can result in synergistic or inhibitory activities that profoundly influence anti-microbial immunity. Dectin-1 and the Mannose Receptor (MR are C-type Lectin Receptors (CLRs previously reported to cooperate with Toll Like Receptors (TLRs signaling in the initial inflammatory response and in the induction of adaptive Th17 and Tc17 immunity mediated by CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, respectively. The protective immunity against paracoccidioidomycosis, the most prevalent fungal infection of Latin America, was previously shown to be influenced by these T cell subsets motivating us to study the contribution of TLRs, Dectin-1 and MR to the development of Th17/Tc17 immunity. First, curdlan a specific Dectin-1 agonist was used to characterize the influence of this receptor in the proliferative response and Th17/Tc17 differentiation of naïve lymphocytes induced by Paracoccidioides brasiliensis activated dendritic cells (DCs from C57BL/6 mice. Then, WT, Dectin-1-/-, TLR-2-/- and TLR-4-/- DCs treated or untreated with anti-Dectin-1 and anti-MR antibodies were used to investigate the contribution of these receptors in lymphocyte activation and differentiation. We verified that curdlan induces an enhanced lymphocyte proliferation and development of IL-17 producing CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. In addition, treatment of WT, TLR-2-/- and TLR-4-/- DCs by anti-Dectin-1 antibodies or antigen presentation by Dectin-1-/- DCs led to decreased lymphoproliferation and impaired Th17 and Tc17 expansion. These responses were also inhibited by anti-MR treatment of DCs, but a synergistic action on Th17/Tc17 differentiation was mediated by TLR-4 and MR. Taken together, our results indicate that diverse TLRs and CLRs are involved in the induction of lymphocyte proliferation and Th17/Tc17 differentiation mediated by P. brasiliensis activated DCs, but a synergist action was restricted to Dectin-1, TLR

  3. TLR-4 cooperates with Dectin-1 and mannose receptor to expand Th17 and Tc17 cells induced by Paracoccidioides brasiliensis stimulated dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loures, Flávio V; Araújo, Eliseu F; Feriotti, Claudia; Bazan, Silvia B; Calich, Vera L G

    2015-01-01

    The concomitant use of diverse pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) by innate immune cells can result in synergistic or inhibitory activities that profoundly influence anti-microbial immunity. Dectin-1 and the mannose receptor (MR) are C-type lectin receptors (CLRs) previously reported to cooperate with toll-like receptors (TLRs) signaling in the initial inflammatory response and in the induction of adaptive Th17 and Tc17 immunity mediated by CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells, respectively. The protective immunity against paracoccidioidomycosis, the most prevalent fungal infection of Latin America, was previously shown to be influenced by these T cell subsets motivating us to study the contribution of TLRs, Dectin-1, and MR to the development of Th17/Tc17 immunity. First, curdlan a specific Dectin-1 agonist was used to characterize the influence of this receptor in the proliferative response and Th17/Tc17 differentiation of naïve lymphocytes induced by Paracoccidioides brasiliensis activated dendritic cells (DCs) from C57BL/6 mice. Then, wild type (WT), Dectin-1(-/-), TLR-2(-/-), and TLR-4(-/-) DCs treated or untreated with anti-Dectin-1 and anti-MR antibodies were used to investigate the contribution of these receptors in lymphocyte activation and differentiation. We verified that curdlan induces an enhanced lymphocyte proliferation and development of IL-17 producing CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells. In addition, treatment of WT, TLR-2(-/-), and TLR-4(-/-) DCs by anti-Dectin-1 antibodies or antigen presentation by Dectin-1(-/-) DCs led to decreased lymphoproliferation and impaired Th17 and Tc17 expansion. These responses were also inhibited by anti-MR treatment of DCs, but a synergistic action on Th17/Tc17 differentiation was mediated by TLR-4 and MR. Taken together, our results indicate that diverse TLRs and CLRs are involved in the induction of lymphocyte proliferation and Th17/Tc17 differentiation mediated by P. brasiliensis activated DCs, but a synergist action was

  4. ENHANCING COOPERATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    China and Japan can cooperate on a wide scope of issues, such as the organization of the Beijing Olympic Games next year and aid to Africa,said Ide Keiji, Minister of Public Relations, Press, Culture, Education and Sports and Spokesperson of the Embassy

  5. Hexacyanoferrate-adapted biofilm enables the development of a microbial fuel cell biosensor to detect trace levels of assimilable organic carbon (AOC) in oxygenated seawater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Liang; Quek, Soon Bee; Cord-Ruwisch, Ralf

    2014-12-01

    A marine microbial fuel cell (MFC) type biosensor was developed for the detection of assimilable organic carbon (AOC) in ocean water for the purpose of online water quality monitoring for seawater desalination plants prone to biofouling of reverse osmosis (RO) membranes. The anodophilic biofilm that developed on the graphite tissue anode could detect acetate as the model AOC to concentrations as low as 5 µM (120 µg/L of AOC), which is sufficiently sensitive as an online biofouling risk sensor. Although the sensor was operated at a higher (+200 ± 10 mV) than the usual (-300 mV) anodic potential, the presence of oxygen completely suppressed the electrical signal. In order to overcome this outcompeting effect of oxygen over the anode as electron acceptor by the bacteria, hexacyanoferrate (HCF(III)) was found to enable the development of an adapted biofilm that transferred electrons to HCF(III) rather than oxygen. As the resultant of the reduced HCF(II) could readily transfer electrons to the anode while being re-oxidised to HCF(III), the marine MFC biosensor developed could be demonstrated to work in the presence of oxygen unlike traditional MFC. The possibility of operating the marine MFC in batch or continuous (in-line) mode has been explored by using coulombic or potentiometric interpretation of the signal. PMID:24942462

  6. Motion tracking to enable pre-surgical margin mapping in basal cell carcinoma using optical imaging modalities: initial feasibility study using optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffy, M.; Richardson, T. J.; Craythorne, E.; Mallipeddi, R.; Coleman, A. J.

    2014-02-01

    A system has been developed to assess the feasibility of using motion tracking to enable pre-surgical margin mapping of basal cell carcinoma (BCC) in the clinic using optical coherence tomography (OCT). This system consists of a commercial OCT imaging system (the VivoSight 1500, MDL Ltd., Orpington, UK), which has been adapted to incorporate a webcam and a single-sensor electromagnetic positional tracking module (the Flock of Birds, Ascension Technology Corp, Vermont, USA). A supporting software interface has also been developed which allows positional data to be captured and projected onto a 2D dermoscopic image in real-time. Initial results using a stationary test phantom are encouraging, with maximum errors in the projected map in the order of 1-2mm. Initial clinical results were poor due to motion artefact, despite attempts to stabilise the patient. However, the authors present several suggested modifications that are expected to reduce the effects of motion artefact and improve the overall accuracy and clinical usability of the system.

  7. A cooperative agent-based security framework

    OpenAIRE

    Cunha, Carlos R.; Gomes, João Pedro; Morais, Elisabete Paulo

    2013-01-01

    The actual economic paradigm is based on a strongly cooperative model that tries to support a more competitive and global organizations response. With cooperation comes an intrinsic need - interconnection and interoperability of information systems among business partners. This represents, in many areas, a huge organizational challenge, being the field of information, and communication security one emerging key issue and a natural enabler for cooperative behavior and to the proper establishme...

  8. Connecting the islands - enabling global connectivity through local cooperation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heide, Janus; Pedersen, Morten Videbæk; Fitzek, Frank; Larsen, Torben

    In this work we consider the interconnection of islands formed by neighbouring devices in a highly dynamic topology. To allow for high mobility we take offset in a purely wireless infrastructure where all devices incorporate a global and a local wireless communication interface. We consider...

  9. Transcriptome Sequencing (RNAseq) Enables Utilization of Formalin-Fixed, Paraffin-Embedded Biopsies with Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma for Exploration of Disease Biology and Biomarker Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eikrem, Oystein; Beisland, Christian; Hjelle, Karin; Flatberg, Arnar; Scherer, Andreas; Landolt, Lea; Skogstrand, Trude; Leh, Sabine; Beisvag, Vidar; Marti, Hans-Peter

    2016-01-01

    Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues are an underused resource for molecular analyses. This proof of concept study aimed to compare RNAseq results from FFPE biopsies with the corresponding RNAlater® (Qiagen, Germany) stored samples from clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) patients to investigate feasibility of RNAseq in archival tissue. From each of 16 patients undergoing partial or full nephrectomy, four core biopsies, such as two specimens with ccRCC and two specimens of adjacent normal tissue, were obtained with a 16g needle. One normal and one ccRCC tissue specimen per patient was stored either in FFPE or RNAlater®. RNA sequencing libraries were generated applying the new Illumina TruSeq® Access library preparation protocol. Comparative analysis was done using voom/Limma R-package. The analysis of the FFPE and RNAlater® datasets yielded similar numbers of detected genes, differentially expressed transcripts and affected pathways. The FFPE and RNAlater datasets shared 80% (n = 1106) differentially expressed genes. The average expression and the log2 fold changes of these transcripts correlated with R2 = 0.97, and R2 = 0.96, respectively. Among transcripts with the highest fold changes in both datasets were carbonic anhydrase 9 (CA9), neuronal pentraxin-2 (NPTX2) and uromodulin (UMOD) that were confirmed by immunohistochemistry. IPA revealed the presence of gene signatures of cancer and nephrotoxicity, renal damage and immune response. To simulate the feasibility of clinical biomarker studies with FFPE samples, a classifier model was developed for the FFPE dataset: expression data for CA9 alone had an accuracy, specificity and sensitivity of 94%, respectively, and achieved similar performance in the RNAlater dataset. Transforming growth factor-ß1 (TGFB1)-regulated genes, epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) and NOTCH signaling cascade may support novel therapeutic strategies. In conclusion, in this proof of concept study, RNAseq data

  10. Transcriptome Sequencing (RNAseq) Enables Utilization of Formalin-Fixed, Paraffin-Embedded Biopsies with Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma for Exploration of Disease Biology and Biomarker Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eikrem, Oystein; Beisland, Christian; Hjelle, Karin; Flatberg, Arnar; Scherer, Andreas; Landolt, Lea; Skogstrand, Trude; Leh, Sabine; Beisvag, Vidar; Marti, Hans-Peter

    2016-01-01

    Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues are an underused resource for molecular analyses. This proof of concept study aimed to compare RNAseq results from FFPE biopsies with the corresponding RNAlater® (Qiagen, Germany) stored samples from clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) patients to investigate feasibility of RNAseq in archival tissue. From each of 16 patients undergoing partial or full nephrectomy, four core biopsies, such as two specimens with ccRCC and two specimens of adjacent normal tissue, were obtained with a 16g needle. One normal and one ccRCC tissue specimen per patient was stored either in FFPE or RNAlater®. RNA sequencing libraries were generated applying the new Illumina TruSeq® Access library preparation protocol. Comparative analysis was done using voom/Limma R-package. The analysis of the FFPE and RNAlater® datasets yielded similar numbers of detected genes, differentially expressed transcripts and affected pathways. The FFPE and RNAlater datasets shared 80% (n = 1106) differentially expressed genes. The average expression and the log2 fold changes of these transcripts correlated with R2 = 0.97, and R2 = 0.96, respectively. Among transcripts with the highest fold changes in both datasets were carbonic anhydrase 9 (CA9), neuronal pentraxin-2 (NPTX2) and uromodulin (UMOD) that were confirmed by immunohistochemistry. IPA revealed the presence of gene signatures of cancer and nephrotoxicity, renal damage and immune response. To simulate the feasibility of clinical biomarker studies with FFPE samples, a classifier model was developed for the FFPE dataset: expression data for CA9 alone had an accuracy, specificity and sensitivity of 94%, respectively, and achieved similar performance in the RNAlater dataset. Transforming growth factor-ß1 (TGFB1)-regulated genes, epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) and NOTCH signaling cascade may support novel therapeutic strategies. In conclusion, in this proof of concept study, RNAseq data

  11. Cooperative quasi-Cherenkov radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Anishchenko, S V

    2014-01-01

    We study the features of cooperative parametric (quasi-Cherenkov) radiation arising when initially unmodulated electron (positron) bunches pass through a crystal (natural or artificial) under the conditions of dynamical diffraction of electromagnetic waves in the presence of shot noise. A detailed numerical analysis is given for cooperative THz radiation in artificial crystals. The radiation intensity above 200~MW$/$cm$^2$ is obtained in simulations. In two- and three-wave diffraction cases, the peak intensity of cooperative radiation emitted at small and large angles to particle velocity is investigated as a function of the particle number in an electron bunch. The peak radiation intensity appeared to increase monotonically until saturation is achieved. At saturation, the shot noise causes strong fluctuations in the intensity of cooperative parametric radiation. It is shown that the duration of radiation pulses can be much longer than the particle flight time through the crystal. This enables a thorough expe...

  12. Learning and innovation expand cooperative network topologies

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Shijun; Zhang, Changshui; Csermely, Peter

    2007-01-01

    Cooperation plays a key role in the evolution of complex systems. However, the level of cooperation extensively varies with the topology of agent networks in the widely used models of repeated games. Here we show that cooperation remains rather stable by applying long-term learning + innovative strategy adoption rules on a variety of random, regular, small-word, scale-free and modular networks in repeated, multi-agent games. Furthermore, we found that while long-term learning promotes cooperation, innovation makes the level of cooperation less dependent on the actual network topology. Our results demonstrate that long-term learning and innovation, when acting together, extend the range of network topologies enabling the development of cooperation at a wider range of costs and temptations. Learning and innovation help to preserve cooperation during network re-organization, and may be key mechanisms promoting the evolution of self-organizing, complex systems.

  13. Cooperative Innovation

    OpenAIRE

    Mingzhuan, Huang

    2013-01-01

    The current companies increasingly expect to involve more external sources to achieve more open innovation for value-added. However, the cooperation problem between internal organization and external parties still challenges the top management. This paper aims to find out the solution. The fast spring up Chinese IT market impacts the world market, especially mobile Internet. Therefore, this paper employ the fast growing Chinese Mobile Internet company--- Xiao Mi as the study case. By applying...

  14. Activated tumor cell integrin αvβ3 cooperates with platelets to promote extravasation and metastasis from the blood stream.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Martin R; Zuka, Masahiko; Lorger, Mihaela; Tschan, Mario; Torbett, Bruce E; Zijlstra, Andries; Quigley, James P; Staflin, Karin; Eliceiri, Brian P; Krueger, Joseph S; Marchese, Patrizia; Ruggeri, Zaverio M; Felding, Brunhilde H

    2016-04-01

    Metastasis is the main cause of death in cancer patients, and understanding mechanisms that control tumor cell dissemination may lead to improved therapy. Tumor cell adhesion receptors contribute to cancer spreading. We noted earlier that tumor cells can expressing the adhesion receptor integrin αvβ3 in distinct states of activation, and found that cells which metastasize from the blood stream express it in a constitutively high affinity form. Here, we analyzed steps of the metastatic cascade in vivo and asked, when and how the affinity state of integrin αvβ3 confers a critical advantage to cancer spreading. Following tumor cells by real time PCR, non-invasive bioluminescence imaging, intravital microscopy and histology allowed us to identify tumor cell extravasation from the blood stream as a rate-limiting step supported by high affinity αvβ3. Successful transendothelial migration depended on cooperation between tumor cells and platelets involving the high affinity tumor cell integrin and release of platelet granules. Thus, this study identifies the high affinity conformer of integrin αvβ3 and its interaction with platelets as critical for early steps during hematogenous metastasis and target for prevention of metastatic disease. PMID:27067975

  15. Apoptotic efficacy of etomoxir in human acute myeloid leukemia cells. Cooperation with arsenic trioxide and glycolytic inhibitors, and regulation by oxidative stress and protein kinase activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estañ, María Cristina; Calviño, Eva; Calvo, Susana; Guillén-Guío, Beatriz; Boyano-Adánez, María Del Carmen; de Blas, Elena; Rial, Eduardo; Aller, Patricio

    2014-01-01

    Fatty acid synthesis and oxidation are frequently exacerbated in leukemia cells, and may therefore represent a target for therapeutic intervention. In this work we analyzed the apoptotic and chemo-sensitizing action of the fatty acid oxidation inhibitor etomoxir in human acute myeloid leukemia cells. Etomoxir caused negligible lethality at concentrations up to 100 µM, but efficaciously cooperated to cause apoptosis with the anti-leukemic agent arsenic trioxide (ATO, Trisenox), and with lower efficacy with other anti-tumour drugs (etoposide, cisplatin), in HL60 cells. Etomoxir-ATO cooperation was also observed in NB4 human acute promyelocytic cells, but not in normal (non-tumour) mitogen-stimulated human peripheral blood lymphocytes. Biochemical determinations in HL60 cells indicated that etomoxir (25-200 µM) dose-dependently inhibited mitochondrial respiration while slightly stimulating glycolysis, and only caused marginal alterations in total ATP content and adenine nucleotide pool distribution. In addition, etomoxir caused oxidative stress (increase in intracellular reactive oxygen species accumulation, decrease in reduced glutathione content), as well as pro-apoptotic LKB-1/AMPK pathway activation, all of which may in part explain the chemo-sensitizing capacity of the drug. Etomoxir also cooperated with glycolytic inhibitors (2-deoxy-D-glucose, lonidamine) to induce apoptosis in HL60 cells, but not in NB4 cells. The combined etomoxir plus 2-deoxy-D-glucose treatment did not increase oxidative stress, caused moderate decrease in net ATP content, increased the AMP/ATP ratio with concomitant drop in energy charge, and caused defensive Akt and ERK kinase activation. Apoptosis generation by etomoxir plus 2-deoxy-D-glucose was further increased by co-incubation with ATO, which is apparently explained by the capacity of ATO to attenuate Akt and ERK activation. In summary, co-treatment with etomoxir may represent an interesting strategy to increase the apoptotic

  16. Apoptotic efficacy of etomoxir in human acute myeloid leukemia cells. Cooperation with arsenic trioxide and glycolytic inhibitors, and regulation by oxidative stress and protein kinase activities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Cristina Estañ

    Full Text Available Fatty acid synthesis and oxidation are frequently exacerbated in leukemia cells, and may therefore represent a target for therapeutic intervention. In this work we analyzed the apoptotic and chemo-sensitizing action of the fatty acid oxidation inhibitor etomoxir in human acute myeloid leukemia cells. Etomoxir caused negligible lethality at concentrations up to 100 µM, but efficaciously cooperated to cause apoptosis with the anti-leukemic agent arsenic trioxide (ATO, Trisenox, and with lower efficacy with other anti-tumour drugs (etoposide, cisplatin, in HL60 cells. Etomoxir-ATO cooperation was also observed in NB4 human acute promyelocytic cells, but not in normal (non-tumour mitogen-stimulated human peripheral blood lymphocytes. Biochemical determinations in HL60 cells indicated that etomoxir (25-200 µM dose-dependently inhibited mitochondrial respiration while slightly stimulating glycolysis, and only caused marginal alterations in total ATP content and adenine nucleotide pool distribution. In addition, etomoxir caused oxidative stress (increase in intracellular reactive oxygen species accumulation, decrease in reduced glutathione content, as well as pro-apoptotic LKB-1/AMPK pathway activation, all of which may in part explain the chemo-sensitizing capacity of the drug. Etomoxir also cooperated with glycolytic inhibitors (2-deoxy-D-glucose, lonidamine to induce apoptosis in HL60 cells, but not in NB4 cells. The combined etomoxir plus 2-deoxy-D-glucose treatment did not increase oxidative stress, caused moderate decrease in net ATP content, increased the AMP/ATP ratio with concomitant drop in energy charge, and caused defensive Akt and ERK kinase activation. Apoptosis generation by etomoxir plus 2-deoxy-D-glucose was further increased by co-incubation with ATO, which is apparently explained by the capacity of ATO to attenuate Akt and ERK activation. In summary, co-treatment with etomoxir may represent an interesting strategy to increase the

  17. Cooperative effect of the VP1 amino acids 98E, 145A and 169F in the productive infection of mouse cell lines by enterovirus 71 (BS strain).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Victorio, Carla Bianca Luena; Xu, Yishi; Ng, Qimei; Meng, Tao; Chow, Vincent Tk; Chua, Kaw Bing

    2016-01-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) is a neurotrophic virus that causes hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD) and occasional neurological infection among children. It infects primate cells but not rodent cells, primarily due to the incompatibility between the virus and the expressed form of its receptor, scavenger receptor class B member 2 (SCARB2) protein, on rodent cells (mSCARB2). We previously generated adapted strains (EV71:TLLm and EV71:TLLmv) that were shown to productively infect primate and rodent cell lines and whose genomes exhibited a multitude of non-synonymous mutations compared with the EV71:BS parental virus. In this study, we aimed to identify mutations that are necessary for productive infection of murine cells by EV71:BS. Using reverse genetics and site-directed mutagenesis, we constructed EV71 infectious clones with specific mutations that generated amino acid substitutions in the capsid VP1 and VP2 proteins. We subsequently assessed the infection induced by clone-derived viruses (CDVs) in mouse embryonic fibroblast NIH/3T3 and murine neuroblastoma Neuro-2a cell lines. We found that the CDV:BS-VP1(K98E,E145A,L169F) with three substitutions in the VP1 protein-K98E, E145A and L169F-productively infected both mouse cell lines for at least three passages of the virus in murine cells. Moreover, the virus gained the ability to utilize the mSCARB2 protein to infect murine cell lines. These results demonstrate that the three VP1 residues cooperate to effectively interact with the mSCARB2 protein on murine cells and permit the virus to infect murine cells. Gain-of-function studies similar to the present work provide valuable insight into the mutational trajectory required for EV71 to infect new host cells previously non-susceptible to infection. PMID:27329847

  18. A Gene Regulatory Network Cooperatively Controlled by Pdx1 and Sox9 Governs Lineage Allocation of Foregut Progenitor Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hung Ping Shih

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The generation of pancreas, liver, and intestine from a common pool of progenitors in the foregut endoderm requires the establishment of organ boundaries. How dorsal foregut progenitors activate pancreatic genes and evade the intestinal lineage choice remains unclear. Here, we identify Pdx1 and Sox9 as cooperative inducers of a gene regulatory network that distinguishes the pancreatic from the intestinal lineage. Genetic studies demonstrate dual and cooperative functions for Pdx1 and Sox9 in pancreatic lineage induction and repression of the intestinal lineage choice. Pdx1 and Sox9 bind to regulatory sequences near pancreatic and intestinal differentiation genes and jointly regulate their expression, revealing direct cooperative roles for Pdx1 and Sox9 in gene activation and repression. Our study identifies Pdx1 and Sox9 as important regulators of a transcription factor network that initiates pancreatic fate and sheds light on the gene regulatory circuitry that governs the development of distinct organs from multi-lineage-competent foregut progenitors.

  19. CTBTO international cooperation workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The International Cooperation Workshop took place in Vienna, Austria, on 16 and 17 November 1998, with the participation of 104 policy/decision makers, Research and Development managers and diplomatic representatives from 58 States Signatories to the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test Ban Treaty (CTBT). The Workshop attempted to develop Treaty stipulations to: promote cooperation to facilitate and participate in the fullest possible exchange relating to technologies used in the verification of the Treaty; enable member states to strengthen national implementation of verification measures, and to benefit from the application of such technologies for peaceful purposes. The potential benefits arising from the CTBT monitoring, analysis and data communication systems are multifaceted, and as yet unknown. This Workshop provided the opportunity to examine some of these possibilities. An overview of the CTBT verification regime on the general aspects of the four monitoring technologies (seismic, hydro-acoustic, infrasound and radionuclides), including some of the elements that are the subject of international cooperation, were presented and discussed. Questions were raised on the potential benefits that can be derived by participating in the CTBT regime and broad-based discussions took place. Several concrete proposals on ways and means to facilitate and promote cooperation among States Signatories were suggested. The main points discussed by the participants can be summarized as follows: the purpose of the CTBT Organization is to assist member states to monitor Treaty compliance; the CTBT can be a highly effective technological tool which can generate wide-ranging data, which can be used for peaceful purposes; there are differences in the levels of technology development in the member states that is why peaceful applications should be supported by the Prep Com for the benefit of all member states, whether developed or developing, training being a key element to optimize the CTBT

  20. Learning in Large Cooperative Multi-Robot Domains

    OpenAIRE

    Fernández, Fernando; Parker, Lynne E.

    2001-01-01

    The development of mechanisms that enable robot teams to autonomously generate cooperative behaviours is one of the most interesting issues in dis- tributed and autonomous robotic systems. In this paper, the application of reinforcement learning techniques to robot teams is studied, enabling the robot to learn cooperative behaviours based only on local information.

  1. Cooperative and cognitive satellite systems

    CERN Document Server

    Chatzinotas, Symeon; De Gaudenzi, Riccardo

    2015-01-01

    Cooperative and Cognitive Satellite Systems provides a solid overview of the current research in the field of cooperative and cognitive satellite systems, helping users understand how to incorporate state-of-the-art communication techniques in innovative satellite network architectures to enable the next generation of satellite systems. The book is edited and written by top researchers and practitioners in the field, providing a comprehensive explanation of current research that allows users to discover future technologies and their applications, integrate satellite and terrestrial systems

  2. Gene expression profiling reveals different pathways related to Abl and other genes that cooperate with c-Myc in a model of plasma cell neoplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhan Fenghuang

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To elucidate the genes involved in the neoplastic transformation of B cells, global gene expression profiles were generated using Affymetrix U74Av2 microarrays, containing 12,488 genes, for four different groups of mouse B-cell lymphomas and six subtypes of pristane-induced mouse plasma cell tumors, three of which developed much earlier than the others. Results Unsupervised hierarchical cluster analysis exhibited two main sub-clusters of samples: a B-cell lymphoma cluster and a plasma cell tumor cluster with subclusters reflecting mechanism of induction. This report represents the first step in using global gene expression to investigate molecular signatures related to the role of cooperating oncogenes in a model of Myc-induced carcinogenesis. Within a single subgroup, e.g., ABPCs, plasma cell tumors that contained typical T(12;15 chromosomal translocations did not display gene expression patterns distinct from those with variant T(6;15 translocations, in which the breakpoint was in the Pvt-1 locus, 230 kb 3' of c-Myc, suggesting that c-Myc activation was the initiating factor in both. When integrated with previously published Affymetrix array data from human multiple myelomas, the IL-6-transgenic subset of mouse plasma cell tumors clustered more closely with MM1 subsets of human myelomas, slow-appearing plasma cell tumors clustered together with MM2, while plasma cell tumors accelerated by v-Abl clustered with the more aggressive MM3-MM4 myeloma subsets. Slow-appearing plasma cell tumors expressed Socs1 and Socs2 but v-Abl-accelerated plasma cell tumors expressed 4–5 times as much. Both v-Abl-accelerated and non-v-Abl-associated tumors exhibited phosphorylated STAT 1 and 3, but only v-Abl-accelerated plasma cell tumors lost viability and STAT 1 and 3 phosphorylation when cultured in the presence of the v-Abl kinase inhibitor, STI-571. These data suggest that the Jak/Stat pathway was critical in the transformation

  3. Evolutionary foundations of cooperation and group cohesion

    OpenAIRE

    Frank, Steven A.

    2011-01-01

    In biology, the evolution of increasingly cooperative groups has shaped the history of life. Genes collaborate in the control of cells; cells efficiently divide tasks to produce cohesive multicellular individuals; individual members of insect colonies cooperate in integrated societies. Biological cooperation provides a foundation on which to understand human behavior. Conceptually, the economics of efficient allocation and the game-like processes of strategy are well understood in biology; we...

  4. Organising to Enable Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brink, Tove

    2016-01-01

    . The findings reveal a continous organising process between individual/ team creativity and organisational structures/control to enable innovation at firm level. Organising provides a dynamic approach and contains the integrated reconstruction of creativity, structures and boundaries for enhanced balance......The purpose of this conceptual paper is to reveal how organising can enable innovation across organisational layers and organisational units. This approach calls for a cross-disciplinary literature review. The aim is to provide an integrated understanding of innovation in an organisational approach...... of explorative and exploitative learning in uncertain environments. Shedding light on the cross-disciplinary theories to organise innovation provides a contribution at the firm level to enable innovation....

  5. High-throughput combinatorial screening identifies drugs that cooperate with ibrutinib to kill activated B-cell-like diffuse large B-cell lymphoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathews Griner, Lesley A; Guha, Rajarshi; Shinn, Paul; Young, Ryan M; Keller, Jonathan M; Liu, Dongbo; Goldlust, Ian S; Yasgar, Adam; McKnight, Crystal; Boxer, Matthew B; Duveau, Damien Y; Jiang, Jian-Kang; Michael, Sam; Mierzwa, Tim; Huang, Wenwei; Walsh, Martin J; Mott, Bryan T; Patel, Paresma; Leister, William; Maloney, David J; Leclair, Christopher A; Rai, Ganesha; Jadhav, Ajit; Peyser, Brian D; Austin, Christopher P; Martin, Scott E; Simeonov, Anton; Ferrer, Marc; Staudt, Louis M; Thomas, Craig J

    2014-02-11

    The clinical development of drug combinations is typically achieved through trial-and-error or via insight gained through a detailed molecular understanding of dysregulated signaling pathways in a specific cancer type. Unbiased small-molecule combination (matrix) screening represents a high-throughput means to explore hundreds and even thousands of drug-drug pairs for potential investigation and translation. Here, we describe a high-throughput screening platform capable of testing compounds in pairwise matrix blocks for the rapid and systematic identification of synergistic, additive, and antagonistic drug combinations. We use this platform to define potential therapeutic combinations for the activated B-cell-like subtype (ABC) of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). We identify drugs with synergy, additivity, and antagonism with the Bruton's tyrosine kinase inhibitor ibrutinib, which targets the chronic active B-cell receptor signaling that characterizes ABC DLBCL. Ibrutinib interacted favorably with a wide range of compounds, including inhibitors of the PI3K-AKT-mammalian target of rapamycin signaling cascade, other B-cell receptor pathway inhibitors, Bcl-2 family inhibitors, and several components of chemotherapy that is the standard of care for DLBCL. PMID:24469833

  6. DNA ligase IV and artemis act cooperatively to suppress homologous recombination in human cells: implications for DNA double-strand break repair.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aya Kurosawa

    Full Text Available Nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ and homologous recombination (HR are two major pathways for repairing DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs; however, their respective roles in human somatic cells remain to be elucidated. Here we show using a series of human gene-knockout cell lines that NHEJ repairs nearly all of the topoisomerase II- and low-dose radiation-induced DNA damage, while it negatively affects survival of cells harbouring replication-associated DSBs. Intriguingly, we find that loss of DNA ligase IV, a critical NHEJ ligase, and Artemis, an NHEJ factor with endonuclease activity, independently contribute to increased resistance to replication-associated DSBs. We also show that loss of Artemis alleviates hypersensitivity of DNA ligase IV-null cells to low-dose radiation- and topoisomerase II-induced DSBs. Finally, we demonstrate that Artemis-null human cells display increased gene-targeting efficiencies, particularly in the absence of DNA ligase IV. Collectively, these data suggest that DNA ligase IV and Artemis act cooperatively to promote NHEJ, thereby suppressing HR. Our results point to the possibility that HR can only operate on accidental DSBs when NHEJ is missing or abortive, and Artemis may be involved in pathway switching from incomplete NHEJ to HR.

  7. Real-Time Co-Operative Decision Making & Control Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Vlacic, Ljubo; Thomas, Daniel; Pérez Rastelli, Joshué

    2011-01-01

    International audience Learning and adaptability (and thus the ability of being co-operative) are important features of decision & control systems. This paper investigates decision making and control concepts that enable human beings and artificial beings to interact and co-operate in real time in a dynamic and reliable way. It examines the aspects of being co-operative and substitutable in the context of: (i) co-operative driving by driverless vehicles; and (ii) computer game play scenari...

  8. Flexible Nanosomes (SECosomes) Enable Efficient siRNA Delivery in Cultured Primary Skin Cells and in the Viable Epidermis of Ex Vivo Human Skin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geusens, Barbara; Van Gele, Mireille; Braat, Sien; De Smedt, Stefaan C.; Stuart, Marc C. A.; Prow, Tarl W.; Sanchez, Washington; Roberts, Michael S.; Sanders, Niek N.; Lambert, Jo

    2010-01-01

    The extent to which nanoscale-engineered systems cross intact human skin and can exert pharmacological effects in viable epidermis is controversial. This research seeks to develop a new lipid-based nanosome that enables the effective delivery of siRNA into human skin. The major finding is that an ul

  9. Enabling distributed collaborative science

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hudson, T.; Sonnenwald, Diane H.; Maglaughlin, K.;

    2000-01-01

    To enable collaboration over distance, a collaborative environment that uses a specialized scientific instrument called a nanoManipulator is evaluated. The nanoManipulator incorporates visualization and force feedback technology to allow scientists to see, feel, and modify biological samples being...

  10. The Nordic Housing Enabler

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helle, T.; Nygren, C.; Slaug, B.;

    2014-01-01

    This study addresses development of a content-valid cross-Nordic version of the Housing Enabler and investigation of its inter-rater reliability when used in occupational therapy rating situations, involving occupational therapists, clients, and their home environments. The instrument was...

  11. Pilot project as enabler?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neisig, Margit; Glimø, Helle; Holm, Catrine Granzow;

    This article deals with a systemic perspective on transition. The field of study addressed is a pilot project as enabler of transition in a highly complex polycentric context. From a Luhmannian systemic approach, a framework is created to understand and address barriers of change occurred using...

  12. RNA Sensors Enable Human Mast Cell Anti-Viral Chemokine Production and IFN-Mediated Protection in Response to Antibody-Enhanced Dengue Virus Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, Michael G.; McAlpine, Sarah M.; Huang, Yan Y.; Haidl, Ian D.; Al-Afif, Ayham; Jean S Marshall; Anderson, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Dengue hemorrhagic fever and/or dengue shock syndrome represent the most serious pathophysiological manifestations of human dengue virus infection. Despite intensive research, the mechanisms and important cellular players that contribute to dengue disease are unclear. Mast cells are tissue-resident innate immune cells that play a sentinel cell role in host protection against infectious agents via pathogen-recognition receptors by producing potent mediators that modulate inflammation, cell rec...

  13. Cooperative Software Testing and Analysis:Advances and Challenges

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谢涛; 张路; 肖旭生; 熊英飞; 郝丹

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, to maximize the value of software testing and analysis, we have proposed the methodology of cooperative software testing and analysis (in short as cooperative testing and analysis) to enable testing and analysis tools to cooperate with their users (in the form of tool-human cooperation), and enable one tool to cooperate with another tool (in the form of tool-tool cooperation). Such cooperations are motivated by the observation that a tool is typically not powerful enough to address complications in testing or analysis of complex real-world software, and the tool user or another tool may be able to help out some problems faced by the tool. To enable tool-human or tool-tool cooperation, effective mechanisms need to be developed 1) for a tool to communicate problems faced by the tool to the tool user or another tool, and 2) for the tool user or another tool to assist the tool to address the problems. Such methodology of cooperative testing and analysis forms a new research frontier on synergistic cooperations between humans and tools along with cooperations between tools and tools. This article presents recent example advances and challenges on cooperative testing and analysis.

  14. SME Cooperation on Innovation & Growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brink, Tove; Neville, Mette

    2016-01-01

    The research in this paper reveals how cooperation of SMEs can enable innovation and growth. The research is conducted in a four-year period with 24 SMEs participating from different industry branches. The research is now in the late part of the 3rd. year starting in 2013 and finished January 2017....... Preliminary findings are revealed here and discussed with the SMEs. Shorter-term cooperation and especially longer-term collaboration is important for SMEs to enable innovation and growth. The content of collaboration is based on the cross-disciplinary trinity of organisational- and managerial development......, business model development and financial development. The trinity requires time to get the specific insight on application for each SME. An enhanced contribution is made to the field of SMEs, to academia and to public bodies to understand the needed initiatives to support SMEs for innovation and growth for...

  15. Cellular cooperation during in vivo anti-hapten antibody responses. I. The effect of cell number on the response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cellular interactions in adoptive secondary anti-hapten antibody responses to the hapten 2,4-dinitrophenyl (DNP) have been studied. It was shown that DNP-specific B cells must interact with carrier specific helper T cells to give optimal responses. Independent titration of B cell and helper cell activity in adoptive anti-DNP antibody responses gave the following results: Doubling the number of transferred B cells approximately doubled the subsequent antibody response. Doubling the number of helper cells leads to nearly 4 times as much anti-DNP antibody, measured 7 days after boosting (''premium effect''). This marked effect of helper cell number on the antibody response is thought to be due primarily to the interaction of two populations of carrier-specific cells in the helper effect, or to the interaction of two activities of a single population of helper cells, namely clone activation and clone expansion. Only a very small proportion of the premium effect given by helper cells could be attributed to increases in antibody affinity. (U.S.)

  16. Future international cooperation on space stations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartoe, John-David

    In the course of the next thirty years, extensive international cooperation in space may become the norm rather than the exception. The benefits from the mutual application and exchange of assets and knowledge may enable the development of projects that no nation could afford alone. Cooperation on technical projects may also yield political benefits such as alliance building, although potentially at a cost of making the program hostage to the vagaries of international politics. Successful past cooperative projects include the Apollo-Soyuz Test Project, Spacelab and Soviet Salyut and Mir space stations. The ongoing Space Station Freedom program is offering the first sustained long term opportunity for international cooperation in space. In addition to enabling potential advances in science and technology development, the station may serve as the stepping stone for future international efforts in areas such as planetary exploration. Any significant future increase in international cooperation would likely need to include both the United States and the Soviet Union. Such cooperation could offer many unique possibilities, including interactions between the Freedom and Mir. Indeed the success of future manned exploration missions may well depend on how well space-faring nations learn to cooperate with each other. International involvement in technical programs always creates an additional element of complexity regarding the technical requirements and resource management of a project. However, the experience of international cooperation to date tells us that there can be significant gains, both tangible and symbolic, from international participation.

  17. Poly(I:C induces intense expression of c-IAP2 and cooperates with an IAP inhibitor in induction of apoptosis in cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uzan Catherine

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is increasing evidence that the toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3 is an interesting target for anti-cancer therapy. Unfortunately, most laboratory investigations about the impact of TLR3 stimulation on human malignant cells have been performed with very high concentrations - 5 to 100 μg/ml - of the prototype TLR3 ligand, poly(I:C. In a previous study focused on a specific type of human carcinoma - nasopharyngeal carcinoma - we have shown that concentrations of poly(I:C as low as 100 ng/ml are sufficient to induce apoptosis of malignant cells when combined to a pharmacological antagonist of the IAP family based on Smac mimicry. Methods This observation prompted us to investigate the contribution of the IAP family in cell response to poly(I:C in a variety of human malignant cell types. Results We report a rapid, intense and selective increase in c-IAP2 protein expression observed under stimulation by poly(I:C(500 ng/ml in all types of human malignant cells. In most cell types, this change in protein expression is underlain by an increase in c-IAP2 transcripts and dependent on the TLR3/TRIF pathway. When poly(I:C is combined to the IAP inhibitor RMT 5265, a cooperative effect in apoptosis induction and/or inhibition of clonogenic growth is obtained in a large fraction of carcinoma and melanoma cell lines. Conclusions Currently, IAP inhibitors like RMT 5265 and poly(I:C are the subject of separate therapeutic trials. In light of our observations, combined use of both types of compounds should be considered for treatment of human malignancies including carcinomas and melanomas.

  18. Poly(I:C) induces intense expression of c-IAP2 and cooperates with an IAP inhibitor in induction of apoptosis in cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There is increasing evidence that the toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3) is an interesting target for anti-cancer therapy. Unfortunately, most laboratory investigations about the impact of TLR3 stimulation on human malignant cells have been performed with very high concentrations - 5 to 100 μg/ml - of the prototype TLR3 ligand, poly(I:C). In a previous study focused on a specific type of human carcinoma - nasopharyngeal carcinoma - we have shown that concentrations of poly(I:C) as low as 100 ng/ml are sufficient to induce apoptosis of malignant cells when combined to a pharmacological antagonist of the IAP family based on Smac mimicry. This observation prompted us to investigate the contribution of the IAP family in cell response to poly(I:C) in a variety of human malignant cell types. We report a rapid, intense and selective increase in c-IAP2 protein expression observed under stimulation by poly(I:C)(500 ng/ml) in all types of human malignant cells. In most cell types, this change in protein expression is underlain by an increase in c-IAP2 transcripts and dependent on the TLR3/TRIF pathway. When poly(I:C) is combined to the IAP inhibitor RMT 5265, a cooperative effect in apoptosis induction and/or inhibition of clonogenic growth is obtained in a large fraction of carcinoma and melanoma cell lines. Currently, IAP inhibitors like RMT 5265 and poly(I:C) are the subject of separate therapeutic trials. In light of our observations, combined use of both types of compounds should be considered for treatment of human malignancies including carcinomas and melanomas

  19. Cooperative transcription activation by Nurr1 and Pitx3 induces embryonic stem cell maturation to the midbrain dopamine neuron phenotype

    OpenAIRE

    Martinat, Cecile; Bacci, Jean-Jacques; Leete, Thomas; Kim, Jongpil; Vanti, William B.; Newman, Amy H.; Cha, Joo H.; Gether, Ulrik; Wang, Honggang; Abeliovich, Asa

    2006-01-01

    Midbrain dopamine (DA) neurons play a central role in the regulation of voluntary movement, and their degeneration is associated with Parkinson’s disease. Cell replacement therapies, and in particular embryonic stem (ES) cell-derived DA neurons, offer a potential therapeutic venue for Parkinson’s disease. We sought to identify genes that can potentiate maturation of ES cell cultures to the midbrain DA neuron phenotype. A number of transcription factors have been implicated in the development ...

  20. Flexible CdTe Solar Cells and Modules: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-14-548

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnes, Teresa [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2016-05-01

    Lucintech and NREL will collaborate to develop flexible CdTe solar cells on flexible glass using sputtering and other deposition technologies. This initial work will be conducted under the DOE funded Foundational Program to Advance Cell Efficiency (FPACE) 1 project, and the interaction with Lucintech will focus on scaling up and transferring the high efficiency cell processes to module production on a pilot line.

  1. Nordic Housing Enabler

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helle, Tina; Brandt, Åse

    2009-01-01

    Development and reliability testing of the Nordic Housing Enabler – an instrument for accessibility assessment of the physical housing. Tina Helle & Åse Brandt University of Lund, Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine (SE) and University College Northern Jutland, Occupational Therapy department (DK......, however, the built environment shows serious deficits when it comes to accessibility. This study addresses development of a content valid cross-Nordic version of the Housing Enabler and investigation of inter-rater reliability, when used in occupational therapy practice. The instrument was translated from...... the original Swedish version and adapted according to accessibility norms and guidelines for housing design in Sweden, Denmark, Iceland and Finland. This iterative process involved occupational therapists, architects, building engineers and professional translators, resulting in the Nordic Housing...

  2. Spatially enabled land administration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Enemark, Stig

    2006-01-01

    other words: Good governance and sustainable development is not attainable without sound land administration or - more broadly – sound land management. The paper presents a land management vision that incorporates the benefits of ICT enabled land administration functions. The idea is that spatial......Good governance is a qualitative term or an ideal which may be difficult to achieve. Different people, organisations, and government authorities will define “good governance” according to their own experience and interests. In any case, almost all kind of government includes a spatial component. In...... enabling of land administration systems managing tenure, valuation, planning, and development will allow the information generated by these activities to be much more useful. Also, the services available to private and public sectors and to community organisations should commensurably improve. Knowledge...

  3. International cooperation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Europe is certainly the part of the world where the largest number of international arrangements have been established for dealing with international cooperation in cases of major oil spills at sea. Let me list the most important of these multilateral arrangements: Bonn Agreement: covers the North Sea Contracting Parties: riparian states and the EEC Barcelona Convention: (protocol for emergency situations) covers the Mediterranean Sea Contracting Parties: riparian states and the EEC; Helsinki Convention: covers the Baltic Sea Contracting Parties: riparian states and (soon) the EEC; Lisbon Agreement: covers the NE Atlantic Contracting Parties: France, Spain, Portugal, Morocco and the EEC; Community Action Plan: covers the whole community waters; EEC; Members States participate in this plan. It should be underlined that, in addition to these large multilateral agreements a number of bilateral or trilateral arrangements have been set up, such as the Copenhagen Agreement, Denger Plan, Manche Plan, etc. The Commission involvement in these international frameworks is very important: as an example, it is presently chairing the Bonn Agreement Contracting Parties meeting. In addition, being the only contracting party to all these agreements, it is able to play a unique role of coordination and information to avoid duplications and contradictions. Having given this overview, I would now focus on the Community Action Plan

  4. Enabling Wind Power Nationwide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jose Zayas, Michael Derby, Patrick Gilman and Shreyas Ananthan,

    2015-05-01

    Leveraging this experience, the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Wind and Water Power Technologies Office has evaluated the potential for wind power to generate electricity in all 50 states. This report analyzes and quantifies the geographic expansion that could be enabled by accessing higher above ground heights for wind turbines and considers the means by which this new potential could be responsibly developed.

  5. Precompetitive cooperative research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports that in the current worldwide technology environment, it is essential for the U.S. microelectronics industry, and especially for the integrated circuit portion of that industry, that precompetitive cooperative research alliances be formed and funded at a level that enables them to be effective in rapidly advancing technology. It is important to realize that technology advances with or without our direct participation. If we do not aggressively participate we are quickly left behind. Increasing complexity and miniaturization have been the themes in semiconductor technology. Many are aware that what began in the early 60's with a few masking steps and minimum dimensions measured in mils, has now evolved to a level of sophistication requiring a 100 MIP workstation for IC design and the investment of nearly $400 million dollars in fab cost to produce today's microchips. The leading nations of the world have come to realize that their future well- being is closely tied to their ability to compete in this hi- tech environment. Industry coalitions have been formed to exploit the early ramifications of emerging technologies. Improvements in overseas manufacturing have been made and continue unabated with new products, new processes, and new services being introduced at an increasing rate. Many foreign governments are now actively involved in formulating and conducting industrial and technology policies to aid their hi-tech industry. To meet these challenges, U.S. firms, with U.S. government cooperation, must respond

  6. Unique and shared signaling pathways cooperate to regulate the differentiation of human CD4+ T cells into distinct effector subsets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Cindy S; Wong, Natalie; Rao, Geetha; Nguyen, Akira; Avery, Danielle T; Payne, Kathryn; Torpy, James; O'Young, Patrick; Deenick, Elissa; Bustamante, Jacinta; Puel, Anne; Okada, Satoshi; Kobayashi, Masao; Martinez-Barricarte, Ruben; Elliott, Michael; Sebnem Kilic, Sara; El Baghdadi, Jamila; Minegishi, Yoshiyuki; Bousfiha, Aziz; Robertson, Nic; Hambleton, Sophie; Arkwright, Peter D; French, Martyn; Blincoe, Annaliesse K; Hsu, Peter; Campbell, Dianne E; Stormon, Michael O; Wong, Melanie; Adelstein, Stephen; Fulcher, David A; Cook, Matthew C; Stepensky, Polina; Boztug, Kaan; Beier, Rita; Ikincioğullari, Aydan; Ziegler, John B; Gray, Paul; Picard, Capucine; Boisson-Dupuis, Stéphanie; Phan, Tri Giang; Grimbacher, Bodo; Warnatz, Klaus; Holland, Steven M; Uzel, Gulbu; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Tangye, Stuart G

    2016-07-25

    Naive CD4(+) T cells differentiate into specific effector subsets-Th1, Th2, Th17, and T follicular helper (Tfh)-that provide immunity against pathogen infection. The signaling pathways involved in generating these effector cells are partially known. However, the effects of mutations underlying human primary immunodeficiencies on these processes, and how they compromise specific immune responses, remain unresolved. By studying individuals with mutations in key signaling pathways, we identified nonredundant pathways regulating human CD4(+) T cell differentiation in vitro. IL12Rβ1/TYK2 and IFN-γR/STAT1 function in a feed-forward loop to induce Th1 cells, whereas IL-21/IL-21R/STAT3 signaling is required for Th17, Tfh, and IL-10-secreting cells. IL12Rβ1/TYK2 and NEMO are also required for Th17 induction. Strikingly, gain-of-function STAT1 mutations recapitulated the impact of dominant-negative STAT3 mutations on Tfh and Th17 cells, revealing a putative inhibitory effect of hypermorphic STAT1 over STAT3. These findings provide mechanistic insight into the requirements for human T cell effector function, and explain clinical manifestations of these immunodeficient conditions. Furthermore, they identify molecules that could be targeted to modulate CD4(+) T cell effector function in the settings of infection, vaccination, or immune dysregulation. PMID:27401342

  7. Lactate is a mediator of metabolic cooperation between stromal carcinoma associated fibroblasts and glycolytic tumor cells in the tumor microenvironment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) are bone marrow-derived stromal cells, which play a role in tumor progression. We have shown earlier that breast cancer cells secrete higher levels of interleukin-6 (IL-6) under hypoxia, leading to the recruitment of hMSCs towards hypoxic tumor cells. We found that (i) MDA-MB-231 cells secrete significantly higher levels of lactate (3-fold more) under hypoxia (1% O2) than under 20% O2 and (ii) lactate recruits hMSCs towards tumor cells by activating signaling pathways to enhance migration. The mRNA and protein expression of functional MCT1 in hMSCs is increased in response to lactate exposure. Thus, we hypothesized that hMSCs and stromal carcinoma associated fibroblasts (CAFs) in the tumor microenvironment have the capacity to take up lactate expelled from tumor cells and use it as a source of energy. Our 13C NMR spectroscopic measurements indicate that 13C-lactate is converted to 13C-alpha ketoglutarate in hMSCs and CAFs supporting this hypothesis. To our knowledge this is the first in vitro model system demonstrating that hMSCs and CAFs can utilize lactate produced by tumor cells.

  8. Lactate is a mediator of metabolic cooperation between stromal carcinoma associated fibroblasts and glycolytic tumor cells in the tumor microenvironment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rattigan, Yanique I.; Patel, Brijesh B. [Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, The Cancer Institute of New Jersey, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, 195 Little Albany Street, New Brunswick, NJ 08901 (United States); Department of Pharmacology, The Cancer Institute of New Jersey, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, 195 Little Albany Street, New Brunswick, NJ 08901 (United States); Ackerstaff, Ellen [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, 1275 York Avenue, New York, NY 10065 (United States); Sukenick, George [Molecular Pharmacology and Chemistry Research Program, Sloan-Kettering Institute, 415 E 68th Street, New York, NY 10065 (United States); Koutcher, Jason A. [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, 1275 York Avenue, New York, NY 10065 (United States); Glod, John W. [Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, The Cancer Institute of New Jersey, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, 195 Little Albany Street, New Brunswick, NJ 08901 (United States); Department of Pharmacology, The Cancer Institute of New Jersey, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, 195 Little Albany Street, New Brunswick, NJ 08901 (United States); Department of Pediatric Oncology, The Cancer Institute of New Jersey, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, 195 Little Albany Street, New Brunswick, NJ 08901 (United States); and others

    2012-02-15

    Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) are bone marrow-derived stromal cells, which play a role in tumor progression. We have shown earlier that breast cancer cells secrete higher levels of interleukin-6 (IL-6) under hypoxia, leading to the recruitment of hMSCs towards hypoxic tumor cells. We found that (i) MDA-MB-231 cells secrete significantly higher levels of lactate (3-fold more) under hypoxia (1% O{sub 2}) than under 20% O{sub 2} and (ii) lactate recruits hMSCs towards tumor cells by activating signaling pathways to enhance migration. The mRNA and protein expression of functional MCT1 in hMSCs is increased in response to lactate exposure. Thus, we hypothesized that hMSCs and stromal carcinoma associated fibroblasts (CAFs) in the tumor microenvironment have the capacity to take up lactate expelled from tumor cells and use it as a source of energy. Our {sup 13}C NMR spectroscopic measurements indicate that {sup 13}C-lactate is converted to {sup 13}C-alpha ketoglutarate in hMSCs and CAFs supporting this hypothesis. To our knowledge this is the first in vitro model system demonstrating that hMSCs and CAFs can utilize lactate produced by tumor cells.

  9. RD&D Cooperation for the Development of Fuel Cell, Hybrid and Electric Vehicles within the International Energy Agency: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Telias, G.; Day, K.; Dietrich, P.

    2011-01-01

    Annex XIII on 'Fuel Cell Vehicles' of the Implementing Agreement Hybrid and Electric Vehicles of the International Energy Agency has been operating since 2006, complementing the ongoing activities on battery and hybrid electric vehicles within this group. This paper provides an overview of the Annex XIII final report for 2010, compiling an up-to-date, neutral, and comprehensive assessment of current trends in fuel cell vehicle technology and related policy. The technological description includes trends in system configuration as well as a review of the most relevant components including the fuel cell stack, batteries, and hydrogen storage. Results from fuel cell vehicle demonstration projects around the world and an overview of the successful implementation of fuel cells in specific transport niche markets will also be discussed. The final section of this report provides a detailed description of national research, development, and demonstration (RD&D) efforts worldwide.

  10. MEF2 and NR2F2 cooperate to regulate Akr1c14 gene expression in mouse MA-10 Leydig cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di-Luoffo, M; Brousseau, C; Tremblay, J J

    2016-03-01

    Leydig cells are essential for male reproductive development and health throughout life. Production of androgens [testosterone, dihydrotestosterone (DHT)] as well as intermediate steroids [progesterone, dihydroprogesterone (DHP)] is tightly regulated. In the mouse, the 3α-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase enzyme (3α-HSD, AKR1C14) catalyses the interconversion of DHP and DHT into less potent steroids. Despite its importance, nothing is currently known regarding the regulation of Akr1c14 expression in Leydig cells. Recently, the transcription factors MEF2 and NR2F2 were identified in the mouse testis including in Leydig cells where they were found to regulate expression of genes involved in steroidogenesis. Analyses of transcriptomic data from MEF2- or NR2F2-deficient MA-10 Leydig cells revealed a significant decrease in Akr1c14 mRNA levels. Using qPCR, we confirmed that Akr1c14 mRNA levels were decreased in MEF2- and in NR2F2-deficient conditions. Conversely, overexpression of MEF2A or/and NR2F2 in MA-10 Leydig cells led to an increase in endogenous Akr1c14 mRNA levels. Recruitment of MEF2 and NR2F2 to the Akr1c14 promoter was confirmed by ChIP while DNA precipitation assays revealed direct binding of MEF2 but not NR2F2 to this region. In functional promoter studies, NR2F2 was found to activate the Akr1c14 promoter while MEF2A on its own had no effect. Combination of both NR2F2 and MEF2A led to a cooperative activation of the Akr1c14 promoter and this required intact MEF2 and NR2F2 elements. Finally, co-immunoprecipitation experiments showed that MEF2 and NR2F2 are present in the same protein complex. In conclusion, our results identify a novel cooperation between MEF2 factors and NR2F2 in the expression of the Akr1c14 gene involved in the regulation of DHP/DHT levels. PMID:26748576

  11. Application and Implementation of Network Coding for Cooperative Wireless Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Morten Videbæk

    2012-01-01

    Today the traditional client-server network architecture is the predominant model in our network infrastructure. However, for the increasing amount of \\live" services such as TV and radio being digitalized and the growing amount of user generated content, the centralized model can provide a poor...... utilization of the available network resources. To efficiently support these services we look towards the field of user cooperation. In order to create the incentive for users to join the cooperation we must make the gain larger than the expense. In this PhD I have suggested two central ways of achieving this....... 1) I have suggested the use of network coding as a key-enabler for technology- enabled cooperation. I refer to technology-enabled cooperation when we are able to provide all participating entities in the network a better performance by enabling user cooperation. In order to achieve this goal I apply...

  12. Myelosuppressive conditioning using busulfan enables bone marrow cell accumulation in the spinal cord of a mouse model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coral-Ann B Lewis

    Full Text Available Myeloablative preconditioning using irradiation is the most commonly used technique to generate rodents having chimeric bone marrow, employed for the study of bone marrow-derived cell accumulation in the healthy and diseased central nervous system. However, irradiation has been shown to alter the blood-brain barrier, potentially creating confounding artefacts. To better study the potential of bone marrow-derived cells to function as treatment vehicles for neurodegenerative diseases alternative preconditioning regimens must be developed. We treated transgenic mice that over-express human mutant superoxide dismutase 1, a model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, with busulfan to determine whether this commonly used chemotherapeutic leads to stable chimerism and promotes the entry of bone marrow-derived cells into spinal cord. Intraperitoneal treatment with busulfan at 60 mg/kg or 80 mg/kg followed by intravenous injection of green fluorescent protein-expressing bone marrow resulted in sustained levels of chimerism (~80%. Bone marrow-derived cells accumulated in the lumbar spinal cord of diseased mice at advanced stages of pathology at both doses, with limited numbers of bone marrow derived cells observed in the spinal cords of similarly treated, age-matched controls; the majority of bone marrow-derived cells in spinal cord immunolabelled for macrophage antigens. Comparatively, significantly greater numbers of bone marrow-derived cells were observed in lumbar spinal cord following irradiative myeloablation. These results demonstrate bone marrow-derived cell accumulation in diseased spinal cord is possible without irradiative preconditioning.

  13. Transcriptional program induced by Wnt protein in human fibroblasts suggests mechanisms for cell cooperativity in defining tissue microenvironments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zach Klapholz-Brown

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The Wnt signaling system plays key roles in development, regulation of stem cell self-renewal and differentiation, cell polarity, morphogenesis and cancer. Given the multifaceted roles of Wnt signaling in these processes, its transcriptional effects on the stromal cells that make up the scaffold and infrastructure of epithelial tissues are of great interest. METHODS AND RESULTS: To begin to investigate these effects, we used DNA microarrays to identify transcriptional targets of the Wnt pathway in human lung fibroblasts. Cells were treated with active Wnt3a protein in culture, and RNA was harvested at 4 hours and 24 hours. Nuclear accumulation of ss-Catenin, as shown by immunofluorescence, and induction of AXIN2 demonstrate that fibroblasts are programmed to respond to extracellular Wnt signals. In addition to several known Wnt targets, we found many new Wnt induced genes, including many transcripts encoding regulatory proteins. Transcription factors with important developmental roles, including HOX genes, dominated the early transcriptional response. Furthermore, we found differential expression of several genes that play direct roles in the Wnt signaling pathway, as well as genes involved in other cell signaling pathways including fibroblast growth factor (FGF and bone morphogenetic protein (BMP signaling. The gene most highly induced by Wnt3a was GREMLIN2, which encodes a secreted BMP antagonist. CONCLUSIONS: Elevated expression of GREMLIN2 suggests a new role for Wnt signals in the maintenance of stem cell niches, whereby Wnt signals induce nearby fibroblasts to produce a BMP antagonist, inhibiting differentiation and promoting expansion of stem cells in their microenvironment. We suggest that Wnt-induced changes in the gene expression program of local stromal cells may play an important role in the establishment of specialized niches hospitable to the self-renewal of normal or malignant epithelial stem cells in vivo.

  14. The TCF-1 and LEF-1 transcription factors have cooperative and opposing roles in T-cell development and malignancy

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Shuyang; Zhou, Xinyuan; Steinke, Farrah C.; Liu, Chengyu; Chen, Shann-Ching; Zagorodna, Oksana; Jing, Xuefang; Yokota, Yoshifumi; Meyerholz, David K.; Mullighan, Charles G.; Knudson, C. Michael; Zhao, Dong-Mei; Xue, Hai-Hui

    2012-01-01

    The TCF-1 and LEF-1 transcription factors are known to play critical roles in normal thymocyte development. Unexpectedly, we found that TCF-1-deficient (Tcf7−/−) mice developed aggressive T-cell malignancy, resembling human T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL). Surprisingly, LEF-1 was aberrantly upregulated in pre-malignant Tcf7−/− early thymocytes and lymphoma cells. We further demonstrated that TCF-1 directly repressed LEF-1 expression in early thymocytes and that conditional inactiv...

  15. Glucocorticoids and histone deacetylase inhibitors cooperate to block the invasiveness of basal-like breast cancer cells through novel mechanisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Law, M E; Corsino, P E; Jahn, S C;

    2013-01-01

    Aggressive cancers often express E-cadherin in cytoplasmic vesicles rather than on the plasma membrane and this may contribute to the invasive phenotype of these tumors. Therapeutic strategies are not currently available that restore the anti-invasive function of E-cadherin in cancers. MDA-MB-231...... cells are a frequently used model of invasive triple-negative breast cancer, and these cells express low levels of E-cadherin that is mislocalized to cytoplasmic vesicles. MDA-MB-231 cell lines stably expressing wild-type E-cadherin or E-cadherin fused to glutathione S-transferase or green fluorescent...

  16. Cooperative cytotoxic activity of Zn and Cu in bovine serum albumin-conjugated ZnS/CuS nano-composites in PC12 cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Series of self-assembled and mono-dispersed bovine serum albumin (BSA)-conjugated ZnS/CuS nano-composites with different Zn/Cu ratios had been successfully synthesized by a combination method of the biomimetic synthesis and ion-exchange strategy under the gentle conditions. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy observation, Fourier transform infrared spectra and zeta potential analysis demonstrated that BSA-conjugated ZnS/CuS nano-composites with well dispersity had the hierarchical structure and BSA was a key factor to control the morphology and surface electro-negativity of final products. The real-time monitoring by atomic absorption spectroscopy and powder X-ray diffraction revealed that the Zn/Cu ratio of nano-composites could be controlled by adjusting the ion-exchange time. In addition, the metabolic and morphological assays indicated that the metabolic proliferation and spread of rat pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells could be inhibited by nano-composites, with the high anti-cancer activity at a low concentration (4 ppm). What were more important, Zn and Cu in nano-composites exhibited a positive cooperativity at inhibiting cancer cell functions. The microscope observation and biochemical marker analysis clearly revealed that the nano-composites-included lipid peroxidation and disintegration of membrane led to the death of PC12 cells. Summarily, the present study substantiated the potential of BSA-conjugated ZnS/CuS nano-composites as anti-cancer drug

  17. Nanomaterial-Enabled Neural Stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yongchen; Guo, Liang

    2016-01-01

    Neural stimulation is a critical technique in treating neurological diseases and investigating brain functions. Traditional electrical stimulation uses electrodes to directly create intervening electric fields in the immediate vicinity of neural tissues. Second-generation stimulation techniques directly use light, magnetic fields or ultrasound in a non-contact manner. An emerging generation of non- or minimally invasive neural stimulation techniques is enabled by nanotechnology to achieve a high spatial resolution and cell-type specificity. In these techniques, a nanomaterial converts a remotely transmitted primary stimulus such as a light, magnetic or ultrasonic signal to a localized secondary stimulus such as an electric field or heat to stimulate neurons. The ease of surface modification and bio-conjugation of nanomaterials facilitates cell-type-specific targeting, designated placement and highly localized membrane activation. This review focuses on nanomaterial-enabled neural stimulation techniques primarily involving opto-electric, opto-thermal, magneto-electric, magneto-thermal and acousto-electric transduction mechanisms. Stimulation techniques based on other possible transduction schemes and general consideration for these emerging neurotechnologies are also discussed. PMID:27013938

  18. Nanomaterial-enabled neural stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongchen eWang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Neural stimulation is a critical technique in treating neurological diseases and investigating brain functions. Traditional electrical stimulation uses electrodes to directly create intervening electric fields in the immediate vicinity of neural tissues. Second-generation stimulation techniques directly use light, magnetic fields or ultrasound in a non-contact manner. An emerging generation of non- or minimally invasive neural stimulation techniques is enabled by nanotechnology to achieve a high spatial resolution and cell-type specificity. In these techniques, a nanomaterial converts a remotely transmitted primary stimulus such as a light, magnetic or ultrasonic signal to a localized secondary stimulus such as an electric field or heat to stimulate neurons. The ease of surface modification and bio-conjugation of nanomaterials facilitates cell-type-specific targeting, designated placement and highly localized membrane activation. This review focuses on nanomaterial-enabled neural stimulation techniques primarily involving opto-electric, opto-thermal, magneto-electric, magneto-thermal and acousto-electric transduction mechanisms. Stimulation techniques based on other possible transduction schemes and general consideration for these emerging neurotechnologies are also discussed.

  19. WIRELESS COMMUNICATION IN COOPERATIVE URBAN TRAFFIC MANAGEMENT

    OpenAIRE

    Vujić, Miroslav; Škorput, Pero; Ćelić, Jasmin

    2015-01-01

    The possibility to enable cooperative concept in urban traffic systems is challenging because of large amount of traffic data that must be collected, processed and distributed to end users. The main objective is to establish communication between three main subsystems of traffic system: driver, vehicle and infrastructure so that they can cooperate in real time traffic environment. This paper describes various wireless communication technologies that can be used to achieve real time dana excha...

  20. Cooperative Learning In An Architectural Design Studio

    OpenAIRE

    Yasemin ERBİL; Nilüfer AKINCITÜRK; Çiğdem YÜCEL

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to discover the efficiency of cooperative learning approach in architectural design education. The study was conducted with 23 architecture students from the first and third year students in February-March 2011, in Bursa, Turkey. Researchers adopted a qualitative research strategy since it enables a deeper understanding of the context. The result of this study indicated that cooperative learning method at various levels can be used as an effective learning method ...

  1. Enabling Global Collaboration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brix, Anders; de Gier, Nicolai

    2014-01-01

    Traditional crafts still in existence and daily use in less industrialized countries, but to a great extend either extinct or deprived of meaning in the technologically 'developed' parts of the world, have an important role to play in creating the ’quality economy’ (Fry 2009). This involves...... recognizing the value of incremental refinement of tradition and sustainability obtained through cultivation of the culturally and visually sustainable. As a contribution to this development, we propose: 1) The notion of tectonics as a core concept enabling a mutual, cross-cultural design discourse, a...

  2. CtOS Enabler

    OpenAIRE

    Crespo Cepeda, Rodrigo; El Yamri El Khatibi, Meriem; Carrera García, Juan Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Las Smart Cities son, indudablemente, el futuro próximo de la tecnología al que nos acercamos cada día, lo que se puede observar en la abundancia de dispositivos móviles entre la población, que informatizan la vida cotidiana mediante el uso de la geolocalización y la información. Pretendemos unir estos dos ámbitos con CtOS Enabler para crear un estándar de uso que englobe todos los sistemas de Smart Cities y facilite a los desarrolladores de dicho software la creación de nuevas herramientas. ...

  3. Enabling Digital Literacy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ryberg, Thomas; Georgsen, Marianne

    2010-01-01

    There are some tensions between high-level policy definitions of “digital literacy” and actual teaching practice. We need to find workable definitions of digital literacy; obtain a better understanding of what digital literacy might look like in practice; and identify pedagogical approaches, which...... support teachers in designing digital literacy learning. We suggest that frameworks such as Problem Based Learning (PBL) are approaches that enable digital literacy learning because they provide good settings for engaging with digital literacy. We illustrate this through analysis of a case. Furthermore......, these operate on a meso-level mediating between high-level concepts of digital literacy and classroom practice....

  4. Bovine Mx1 enables resistance against foot-and-mouth disease virus in naturally susceptible cells by inhibiting the replication of viral RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, H-M; Xia, X-Z; Hu, G-X; Yu, L; He, H-B

    2016-03-01

    Innate immunity, especially the anti-viral genes, exerts an important barrier function in preventing viral infections. Myxovirus-resistant (Mx) gene take an anti-viral role, whereas its effects on foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) in naturally susceptible cells are still unclear. The bovine primary fetal tracheal epithelial cell line BPTE-siMx1, in which bovine Mx1 gene was silenced, was established and treated with IFN alpha for 6 hr before FMDV infection. The copy numbers of the negative and positive strand viral RNA were determined by strand-specific real-time fluorescence quantitative RT-PCR. The TCID50 of BPTE-siMx1 cells increased at least 17-fold as compared to control cells BPTE-LacZ at 8 hr post infection, thus silencing of bovine Mx1 could promote the replication of FMDV. The amount of both the negative and positive strand viral RNA in BPTE-siMx1 cells significantly increased as compared to BPTE-LacZ cells, indicating that the replication levels of viral RNA were promoted by silencing bovine Mx1. The bovine Mx1 gene could provide resistance against FMDV in the bovine primary fetal tracheal epithelial cells via suppressing the replication of viral RNA. PMID:26982472

  5. AGE-modified basement membrane cooperates with Endo180 to promote epithelial cell invasiveness and decrease prostate cancer survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodriguez-Teja, Mercedes; Gronau, Julian H; Breit, Claudia;

    2015-01-01

    Biomechanical strain imposed by age-related thickening of the basal lamina and augmented tissue stiffness in the prostate gland coincides with increased cancer risk. Here we hypothesized that the structural alterations in the basal lamina associated with age can induce mechanotransduction pathways...... in prostate epithelial cells (PECs) to promote invasiveness and cancer progression. To demonstrate this, we developed a 3D model of PEC acini in which thickening and stiffening of basal lamina matrix was induced by advanced glycation end-product (AGE)-dependent non-enzymatic crosslinking of its major...... [myosin-light chain-2 (MLC2) phosphorylation], loss of cell polarity, loss of cell-cell junctions, luminal infiltration and basal invasion induced by AGE-modified basal lamina matrix in PEC acini. Our in vitro results were concordant with luminal occlusion of acini in the prostate glands of adult Endo180...

  6. Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cell Culture and Cooperation of L-carnitine in Reducing Stress Induced Cellular Damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose was to show that L-carnitine (LC) is capable of reducing non-oxidative stress in the retinal pigment epithelial cells (RPE) of the human eye. The RPE cells were cultured from donor eyes, obtained immediately after post-mortem. The interaction between bovine serum albumin (BSA) and non-oxidative (sodium hydroxide and methyl methane sulphonate) stress-inducers was observed by recording the change in the absorption profiles of the interacting molecules after incubation in light for 5 hours and after treatment with LC. The isolated and cultured RPE cells from the human eyes were treated with sodium hydroxide or methyl methane sulphonate and/or LC for 5 hours under light, and the qualitative effect on cell morphology after treatment was analyzed by staining cells with Giemsa and visualization by light microscopy. The cell morphology was also qualitatively analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). L-carnitine and stress-inducers interact with BSA and bring about changes in the spectral profile of the interacted molecules. Light microscopy as well as SEM show that the changes in the cellular morphology, induced by 100 uM concentrations of non-oxidative stress-inducers, are considerably reduced in the presence of 100 uM LC. However, L-carnitine alone does not cause any qualitative damage to the cell morphology during incubation under similar conditions. The results give a preliminary indication that LC has ability to reduce the changes brought about by the non-oxidative stress-inducers in the RPF cells in culture. (author)

  7. A defined and xeno-free culture method enabling the establishment of clinical-grade human embryonic, induced pluripotent and adipose stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristiina Rajala

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The growth of stem cells in in vitro conditions requires optimal balance between signals mediating cell survival, proliferation, and self-renewal. For clinical application of stem cells, the use of completely defined conditions and elimination of all animal-derived materials from the establishment, culture, and differentiation processes is desirable. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, we report the development of a fully defined xeno-free medium (RegES, capable of supporting the expansion of human embryonic stem cells (hESC, induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC and adipose stem cells (ASC. We describe the use of the xeno-free medium in the derivation and long-term (>80 passages culture of three pluripotent karyotypically normal hESC lines: Regea 06/015, Regea 07/046, and Regea 08/013. Cardiomyocytes and neural cells differentiated from these cells exhibit features characteristic to these cell types. The same formulation of the xeno-free medium is capable of supporting the undifferentiated growth of iPSCs on human feeder cells. The characteristics of the pluripotent hESC and iPSC lines are comparable to lines derived and cultured in standard undefined culture conditions. In the culture of ASCs, the xeno-free medium provided significantly higher proliferation rates than ASCs cultured in medium containing allogeneic human serum (HS, while maintaining the differentiation potential and characteristic surface marker expression profile of ASCs, although significant differences in the surface marker expression of ASCs cultured in HS and RegES media were revealed. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results demonstrate that human ESCs, iPSCs and ASCs can be maintained in the same defined xeno-free medium formulation for a prolonged period of time while maintaining their characteristics, demonstrating the applicability of the simplified xeno-free medium formulation for the production of clinical-grade stem cells. The basic xeno-free formulation

  8. Enable, mediate, advocate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saan, Hans; Wise, Marilyn

    2011-12-01

    The authors of the Ottawa Charter selected the words enable, mediate and advocate to describe the core activities in what was, in 1986, the new Public Health. This article considers these concepts and the values and ideas upon which they were based. We discuss their relevance in the current context within which health promotion is being conducted, and discuss the implications of changes in the health agenda, media and globalization for practice. We consider developments within health promotion since 1986: its central role in policy rhetoric, the increasing understanding of complexities and the interlinkage with many other societal processes. So the three core activities are reviewed: they still fit well with the main health promotion challenges, but should be refreshed by new ideas and values. As the role of health promotion in the political arena has grown we have become part of the policy establishment and that is a mixed blessing. Making way for community advocates is now our challenge. Enabling requires greater sensitivity to power relations involved and an understanding of the role of health literacy. Mediating keeps its central role as it bridges vital interests of parties. We conclude that these core concepts in the Ottawa Charter need no serious revision. There are, however, lessons from the last 25 years that point to ways to address present and future challenges with greater sensitivity and effectiveness. We invite the next generation to avoid canonizing this text: as is true of every heritage, the heirs must decide on its use. PMID:22080073

  9. Smart Grid Enabled EVSE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2014-10-15

    The combined team of GE Global Research, Federal Express, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, and Consolidated Edison has successfully achieved the established goals contained within the Department of Energy’s Smart Grid Capable Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment funding opportunity. The final program product, shown charging two vehicles in Figure 1, reduces by nearly 50% the total installed system cost of the electric vehicle supply equipment (EVSE) as well as enabling a host of new Smart Grid enabled features. These include bi-directional communications, load control, utility message exchange and transaction management information. Using the new charging system, Utilities or energy service providers will now be able to monitor transportation related electrical loads on their distribution networks, send load control commands or preferences to individual systems, and then see measured responses. Installation owners will be able to authorize usage of the stations, monitor operations, and optimally control their electricity consumption. These features and cost reductions have been developed through a total system design solution.

  10. Enabling technology for human collaboration.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, Tim Andrew (MindTel, LLC, Syracuse, NY); Jones, Wendell Bruce; Warner, David Jay (MindTel, LLC, Syracuse, NY); Doser, Adele Beatrice; Johnson, Curtis Martin; Merkle, Peter Benedict

    2003-11-01

    This report summarizes the results of a five-month LDRD late start project which explored the potential of enabling technology to improve the performance of small groups. The purpose was to investigate and develop new methods to assist groups working in high consequence, high stress, ambiguous and time critical situations, especially those for which it is impractical to adequately train or prepare. A testbed was constructed for exploratory analysis of a small group engaged in tasks with high cognitive and communication performance requirements. The system consisted of five computer stations, four with special devices equipped to collect physiologic, somatic, audio and video data. Test subjects were recruited and engaged in a cooperative video game. Each team member was provided with a sensor array for physiologic and somatic data collection while playing the video game. We explored the potential for real-time signal analysis to provide information that enables emergent and desirable group behavior and improved task performance. The data collected in this study included audio, video, game scores, physiological, somatic, keystroke, and mouse movement data. The use of self-organizing maps (SOMs) was explored to search for emergent trends in the physiological data as it correlated with the video, audio and game scores. This exploration resulted in the development of two approaches for analysis, to be used concurrently, an individual SOM and a group SOM. The individual SOM was trained using the unique data of each person, and was used to monitor the effectiveness and stress level of each member of the group. The group SOM was trained using the data of the entire group, and was used to monitor the group effectiveness and dynamics. Results suggested that both types of SOMs were required to adequately track evolutions and shifts in group effectiveness. Four subjects were used in the data collection and development of these tools. This report documents a proof of concept

  11. Metallic Inks for Solar Cells: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-10-370

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    van Hest, M.

    2013-04-01

    This document describes the statement of work for National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) as a subcontractor for Applied Nanotech, Inc. (ANI) for the Phase II SBIR contract with the Department of Energy to build silicon solar cells using non-contact printed, nanoparticle-based metallic inks. The conductive inks are based upon ANI's proprietary method for nanoparticle dispersion. The primary inks under development are aluminum for silicon solar cell back plane contacts and copper for top interdigitated contacts. The current direction of silicon solar cell technology is to use thinner silicon wafers. The reduction in wafer thickness reduces overall material usage and can increase efficiency. These thin silicon wafers are often very brittle and normal methods used for conductive feed line application, such as screen-printing, are detrimental. The Phase II program will be focused on materials development for metallic inks that can be applied to a silicon solar cell using non-contact methods. Uniform BSF (Back Surface Field) formation will be obtained by optimizing ink formulation and curing conditions to improve cell efficiency.

  12. Sorting and sustaining cooperation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vikander, Nick

    2013-01-01

    This paper looks at cooperation in teams where some people are selfish and others are conditional cooperators, and where lay-offs will occur at a fixed future date. I show that the best way to sustain cooperation prior to the lay-offs is often in a sorting equilibrium, where conditional cooperators...

  13. New Cooperative Development Issues

    OpenAIRE

    Henehan, Brian M.; Hardesty, Shermain D.; Shultz, Madeline; Wells, John

    2011-01-01

    This article briefly reviews the increased interest in new cooperative development, factors for successful cooperative development, and strategies to improve the performance of new and emerging cooperatives. The article highlights issues identified by a panel of cooperative leaders, USDA specialists and academic experts

  14. A DNA-binding mutant of TAL1 cooperates with LMO2 to cause T cell leukemia in mice

    OpenAIRE

    Draheim, KM; Hermance, N.; Yang, Y; Arous, E; Calvo, J; Kelliher, MA

    2010-01-01

    The most common translocation in childhood T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) involves the LMO2 locus, resulting in ectopic expression of the LMO2 gene in human thymocytes. The LMO2 gene was also activated in patients with X-linked Severe Combined Immune Deficiency treated with gene therapy because of retroviral insertion in the LMO2 locus. The LMO2 insertions predisposed these children to T-ALL, yet how LMO2 contributes to T cell transformation remains unclear. The LIM (Lin 11, Isl-...

  15. Enabling graphene nanoelectronics.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pan, Wei; Ohta, Taisuke; Biedermann, Laura Butler; Gutierrez, Carlos; Nolen, C. M.; Howell, Stephen Wayne; Beechem Iii, Thomas Edwin; McCarty, Kevin F.; Ross, Anthony Joseph, III

    2011-09-01

    Recent work has shown that graphene, a 2D electronic material amenable to the planar semiconductor fabrication processing, possesses tunable electronic material properties potentially far superior to metals and other standard semiconductors. Despite its phenomenal electronic properties, focused research is still required to develop techniques for depositing and synthesizing graphene over large areas, thereby enabling the reproducible mass-fabrication of graphene-based devices. To address these issues, we combined an array of growth approaches and characterization resources to investigate several innovative and synergistic approaches for the synthesis of high quality graphene films on technologically relevant substrate (SiC and metals). Our work focused on developing the fundamental scientific understanding necessary to generate large-area graphene films that exhibit highly uniform electronic properties and record carrier mobility, as well as developing techniques to transfer graphene onto other substrates.

  16. mTORC1 and SIRT1 Cooperate to Foster Expansion of Gut Adult Stem Cells during Calorie Restriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igarashi, Masaki; Guarente, Leonard

    2016-07-14

    Longevity-promoting caloric restriction is thought to trigger downregulation of mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) signaling and upregulation of SIRT1 activity with associated health benefits. Here, we show that mTORC1 signaling in intestinal stem cells (ISCs) is instead upregulated during calorie restriction (CR). SIRT1 deacetylates S6K1, thereby enhancing its phosphorylation by mTORC1, which leads to an increase in protein synthesis and an increase in ISC number. Paneth cells in the ISC niche secrete cyclic ADP ribose that triggers SIRT1 activity and mTORC1 signaling in neighboring ISCs. Notably, the mTOR inhibitor rapamycin, previously reported to mimic effects of CR, abolishes this expansion of ISCs. We suggest that Paneth cell signaling overrides any direct nutrient sensing in ISCs to sculpt the observed response to CR. Moreover, drugs that modulate pathways important in CR may exert opposing effects on different cell types. PMID:27345368

  17. Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus Exhibits an Altered Tropism in the Presence of Specific Immunoglobulins, Enabling Productive Infection and Killing of Dendritic Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Robinson, L; Windsor, M.; McLaughlin, K.; Hope, J.; Jackson, T; Charleston, B.

    2011-01-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) causes an acute vesicular disease of farm animals. The development of successful control strategies is limited by an incomplete understanding of the immune response to FMDV. Dendritic cells (DC) mediate the induction of immunity to pathogens, but their role in FMDV infection of cattle is uncharacterized. Bovine monocyte-derived DC (moDC) were exposed to integrin-binding and cell culture-adapted strains of FMDV in vitro. MoDC were not largely susceptible to ...

  18. Supply and Marketing Cooperatives

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    @@ China Supply and Marketing Cooperatives Council of CCPIT was established in March 1996. It is an institution under direct leadership of China Supply and Market-ing Cooperatives and at the same time a branch of China Council for Promotion of International Trade, with its major task to promoting and facilitating export-oriented economic trade and technological cooper-ation of the national supply and marketing cooperative system.

  19. [Phase II study of recombinant human interferon gamma (S-6810) in renal cell carcinoma. Urological Cooperative Study Group of Recombinant Human Interferon Gamma (S-6810)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machida, T; Koiso, K; Takaku, F; Ogawa, M

    1987-02-01

    A phase II study of recombinant human interferon gamma (rHuIFN-gamma) administered intravenously and intramuscularly was carried out in 84 patients with advanced renal cell carcinoma with the cooperation of 18 institutions throughout Japan. The eligibility of the patients and evaluation of the responses were undertaken according to the general criteria proposed by Drs. Koyama and Saito. Out of 84 cases entered in this phase II study, 62 patients were evaluable for antitumor effects. In the case of continuous administration of 8-12 X 10(6) U/m2/day interferon for 4 weeks, 32 patients were evaluable. The response rate was 6.3%. In the case of intermittent therapy of 40 X 10(6) U/m2/day interferon for 8 weeks, six out of 30 patients (20%) were evaluable as responders. Among them, one patient showed a complete response, all patients tolerated this type of interferon well. Major adverse effects were fever (86.8%), anorexia (67.1%), fatigue (53.9%) and leukopenia (42.1%). No life-threatening toxicities were found. The results of this study showed that rHuIFN-gamma had antitumor activity against renal cell carcinoma. PMID:3101607

  20. High-sensitivity HLA class I peptidome analysis enables a precise definition of peptide motifs and the identification of peptides from cell lines and patients' sera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritz, Danilo; Gloger, Andreas; Weide, Benjamin; Garbe, Claus; Neri, Dario; Fugmann, Tim

    2016-05-01

    The characterization of peptides bound to human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I is of fundamental importance for understanding CD8+ T cell-driven immunological processes and for the development of immunomodulatory therapeutic strategies. However, until now, the mass spectrometric analysis of HLA-bound peptides has typically required billions of cells, still resulting in relatively few high-confidence peptide identifications. Capitalizing on the recent developments in mass spectrometry and bioinformatics, we have implemented a methodology for the efficient recovery of acid-eluted HLA peptides after purification with the pan-reactive antibody W6/32 and have identified a total of 27 862 unique peptides with high confidence (1% false discovery rate) from five human cancer cell lines. More than 93% of the identified peptides were eight to 11 amino acids in length and contained signatures that were in excellent agreement with published HLA binding motifs. Furthermore, by purifying soluble HLA class I complexes (sHLA) from sera of melanoma patients, up to 972 high-confidence peptides could be identified, including melanoma-associated antigens already described in the literature. Knowledge of the HLA class I peptidome should facilitate multiplex tetramer technology-based characterization of T cells, and allow the development of patient selection, stratification and immunomodulatory therapeutic strategies. PMID:26992070

  1. A precise, low-cost milk sampler to enable the analysis of fat, protein, lactose and somatic cells in milk from individual cows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Clarke, T.; Hannah, M.C.; Wientjes, H.A.

    2007-01-01

    Less than half of Australian dairy farmers undertake production recording that normally requires the collection of milk samples for the measurements of fat, protein and lactose percentages and somatic cell count. Usually the milk samples are collected from individual animals on a `one-day-per-month¿

  2. Antibody-antigen-adjuvant conjugates enable co-delivery of antigen and adjuvant to dendritic cells in cis but only have partial targeting specificity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kreutz, M.; Giquel, B.; Hu, Q.; Abuknesha, R.; Uematsu, S.; Akira, S.; Nestle, F.O.; Diebold, S.S.

    2012-01-01

    Antibody-antigen conjugates, which promote antigen-presentation by dendritic cells (DC) by means of targeted delivery of antigen to particular DC subsets, represent a powerful vaccination approach. To ensure immunity rather than tolerance induction the co-administration of a suitable adjuvant is par

  3. DNA Vaccines Encoding Antigen Targeted to MHC Class II Induce Influenza-Specific CD8(+) T Cell Responses, Enabling Faster Resolution of Influenza Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Laura; Kinnear, Ekaterina; McDonald, Jacqueline U; Grodeland, Gunnveig; Bogen, Bjarne; Stubsrud, Elisabeth; Lindeberg, Mona M; Fredriksen, Agnete Brunsvik; Tregoning, John S

    2016-01-01

    Current influenza vaccines are effective but imperfect, failing to cover against emerging strains of virus and requiring seasonal administration to protect against new strains. A key step to improving influenza vaccines is to improve our understanding of vaccine-induced protection. While it is clear that antibodies play a protective role, vaccine-induced CD8(+) T cells can improve protection. To further explore the role of CD8(+) T cells, we used a DNA vaccine that encodes antigen dimerized to an immune cell targeting module. Immunizing CB6F1 mice with the DNA vaccine in a heterologous prime-boost regime with the seasonal protein vaccine improved the resolution of influenza disease compared with protein alone. This improved disease resolution was dependent on CD8(+) T cells. However, DNA vaccine regimes that induced CD8(+) T cells alone were not protective and did not boost the protection provided by protein. The MHC-targeting module used was an anti-I-E(d) single chain antibody specific to the BALB/c strain of mice. To test the role of MHC targeting, we compared the response between BALB/c, C57BL/6 mice, and an F1 cross of the two strains (CB6F1). BALB/c mice were protected, C57BL/6 were not, and the F1 had an intermediate phenotype; showing that the targeting of antigen is important in the response. Based on these findings, and in agreement with other studies using different vaccines, we conclude that, in addition to antibody, inducing a protective CD8 response is important in future influenza vaccines. PMID:27602032

  4. Infection Mobilizes Hematopoietic Stem Cells through Cooperative NOD-like Receptor and Toll-like Receptor Signaling

    OpenAIRE

    Burberry, Aaron; Zeng, Melody Y.; Ding, Lei; Wicks, Ian; Inohara, Naohiro; Morrison, Sean J; Núñez, Gabriel

    2014-01-01

    Adult hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are maintained in specialized niches within the bone marrow under steady-state conditions and mobilized for extramedullary hematopoiesis during periods of stress such as bacterial infections. However, the underlying mechanisms are unclear. We show that systemic infection of mice with Escherichia coli, commonly associated with bacteremia in humans, mobilizes functional HSCs to the spleen. Accumulation of splenic HSCs (CD150+CD48-Lin−/lowScal1+cKit+) was di...

  5. Copper and bezafibrate cooperate to rescue cytochrome c oxidase deficiency in cells of patients with sco2 mutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Casarin Alberto

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mutations in SCO2 cause cytochrome c oxidase deficiency (COX and a fatal infantile cardioencephalomyopathy. SCO2 encodes a protein involved in COX copper metabolism; supplementation with copper salts rescues the defect in patients’ cells. Bezafibrate (BZF, an approved hypolipidemic agent, ameliorates the COX deficiency in mice with mutations in COX10, another COX-assembly gene. Methods We have investigated the effect of BZF and copper in cells with SCO2 mutations using spectrophotometric methods to analyse respiratory chain activities and a luciferase assay to measure ATP production.. Results Individual mitochondrial enzymes displayed different responses to BZF. COX activity increased by about 40% above basal levels (both in controls and patients, with SCO2 cells reaching 75-80% COX activity compared to untreated controls. The increase in COX was paralleled by an increase in ATP production. The effect was dose-dependent: it was negligible with 100 μM BZF, and peaked at 400 μM BZF. Higher BZF concentrations were associated with a relative decline of COX activity, indicating that the therapeutic range of this drug is very narrow. Combined treatment with 100 μM CuCl2 and 200 μM BZF (which are only marginally effective when administered individually achieved complete rescue of COX activity in SCO2 cells. Conclusions These data are crucial to design therapeutic trials for this otherwise fatal disorder. The additive effect of copper and BZF will allow to employ lower doses of each drug and to reduce their potential toxic effects. The exact mechanism of action of BZF remains to be determined.

  6. Infection mobilizes hematopoietic stem cells through cooperative NOD-like receptor and Toll-like receptor signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burberry, Aaron; Zeng, Melody Y; Ding, Lei; Wicks, Ian; Inohara, Naohiro; Morrison, Sean J; Núñez, Gabriel

    2014-06-11

    Adult hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are maintained in specialized niches within the bone marrow under steady-state conditions and mobilize for extramedullary hematopoiesis during periods of stress such as bacterial infections. However, the underlying mechanisms are unclear. We show that systemic infection of mice with Escherichia coli, commonly associated with bacteremia in humans, mobilizes functional HSCs to the spleen. Accumulation of splenic HSCs (CD150+CD48-Lin(-/low)Sca1+cKit+) was diminished in TLR4-deficient and RIPK2-deficient mice, implicating TLRs and cytosolic NOD1/NOD2 signaling in the process. Accordingly, dual stimulation of NOD1 and TLR4 in radio-resistant cells alone was sufficient to mobilize HSCs, while TLR4 expression on HSCs was dispensable. Mechanistically, TLR4 and NOD1 synergistically induced granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), which was required for extramedullary HSC accumulation. Mobilized HSCs and progenitor cells gave rise to neutrophils and monocytes and contributed to limiting secondary infection. PMID:24882704

  7. Brief report: Using global positioning system (GPS) enabled cell phones to examine adolescent travel patterns and time in proximity to alcohol outlets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrnes, Hilary F; Miller, Brenda A; Morrison, Christopher N; Wiebe, Douglas J; Remer, Lillian G; Wiehe, Sarah E

    2016-07-01

    As adolescents gain freedom to explore new environments unsupervised, more time in proximity to alcohol outlets may increase risks for alcohol and marijuana use. This pilot study: 1) Describes variations in adolescents' proximity to outlets by time of day and day of the week, 2) Examines variations in outlet proximity by drinking and marijuana use status, and 3) Tests feasibility of obtaining real-time data to study adolescent proximity to outlets. U.S. adolescents (N = 18) aged 16-17 (50% female) carried GPS-enabled smartphones for one week with their locations tracked. The geographic areas where adolescents spend time, activity spaces, were created by connecting GPS points sequentially and adding spatial buffers around routes. Proximity to outlets was greater during after school and evening hours. Drinkers and marijuana users were in proximity to outlets 1½ to 2 times more than non-users. Findings provide information about where adolescents spend time and times of greatest risk, informing prevention efforts. PMID:27214713

  8. Enabling systematic interrogation of protein-protein interactions in live cells with a versatile ultra-high-throughput biosensor platform | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    The vast datasets generated by next generation gene sequencing and expression profiling have transformed biological and translational research. However, technologies to produce large-scale functional genomics datasets, such as high-throughput detection of protein-protein interactions (PPIs), are still in early development. While a number of powerful technologies have been employed to detect PPIs, a singular PPI biosensor platform featured with both high sensitivity and robustness in a mammalian cell environment remains to be established.

  9. Antibody-antigen-adjuvant conjugates enable co-delivery of antigen and adjuvant to dendritic cells in cis but only have partial targeting specificity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Kreutz

    Full Text Available Antibody-antigen conjugates, which promote antigen-presentation by dendritic cells (DC by means of targeted delivery of antigen to particular DC subsets, represent a powerful vaccination approach. To ensure immunity rather than tolerance induction the co-administration of a suitable adjuvant is paramount. However, co-administration of unlinked adjuvant cannot ensure that all cells targeted by the antibody conjugates are appropriately activated. Furthermore, antigen-presenting cells (APC that do not present the desired antigen are equally strongly activated and could prime undesired responses against self-antigens. We, therefore, were interested in exploring targeted co-delivery of antigen and adjuvant in cis in form of antibody-antigen-adjuvant conjugates for the induction of anti-tumour immunity. In this study, we report on the assembly and characterization of conjugates consisting of DEC205-specific antibody, the model antigen ovalbumin (OVA and CpG oligodeoxynucleotides (ODN. We show that such conjugates are more potent at inducing cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL responses than control conjugates mixed with soluble CpG. However, our study also reveals that the nucleic acid moiety of such antibody-antigen-adjuvant conjugates alters their binding and uptake and allows delivery of the antigen and the adjuvant to cells partially independently of DEC205. Nevertheless, antibody-antigen-adjuvant conjugates are superior to antibody-free antigen-adjuvant conjugates in priming CTL responses and efficiently induce anti-tumour immunity in the murine B16 pseudo-metastasis model. A better understanding of the role of the antibody moiety is required to inform future conjugate vaccination strategies for efficient induction of anti-tumour responses.

  10. Enabling distributed petascale science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petascale science is an end-to-end endeavour, involving not only the creation of massive datasets at supercomputers or experimental facilities, but the subsequent analysis of that data by a user community that may be distributed across many laboratories and universities. The new SciDAC Center for Enabling Distributed Petascale Science (CEDPS) is developing tools to support this end-to-end process. These tools include data placement services for the reliable, high-performance, secure, and policy-driven placement of data within a distributed science environment; tools and techniques for the construction, operation, and provisioning of scalable science services; and tools for the detection and diagnosis of failures in end-to-end data placement and distributed application hosting configurations. In each area, we build on a strong base of existing technology and have made useful progress in the first year of the project. For example, we have recently achieved order-of-magnitude improvements in transfer times (for lots of small files) and implemented asynchronous data staging capabilities; demonstrated dynamic deployment of complex application stacks for the STAR experiment; and designed and deployed end-to-end troubleshooting services. We look forward to working with SciDAC application and technology projects to realize the promise of petascale science

  11. Enabling immersive simulation.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCoy, Josh (University of California Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA); Mateas, Michael (University of California Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA); Hart, Derek H.; Whetzel, Jonathan; Basilico, Justin Derrick; Glickman, Matthew R.; Abbott, Robert G.

    2009-02-01

    The object of the 'Enabling Immersive Simulation for Complex Systems Analysis and Training' LDRD has been to research, design, and engineer a capability to develop simulations which (1) provide a rich, immersive interface for participation by real humans (exploiting existing high-performance game-engine technology wherever possible), and (2) can leverage Sandia's substantial investment in high-fidelity physical and cognitive models implemented in the Umbra simulation framework. We report here on these efforts. First, we describe the integration of Sandia's Umbra modular simulation framework with the open-source Delta3D game engine. Next, we report on Umbra's integration with Sandia's Cognitive Foundry, specifically to provide for learning behaviors for 'virtual teammates' directly from observed human behavior. Finally, we describe the integration of Delta3D with the ABL behavior engine, and report on research into establishing the theoretical framework that will be required to make use of tools like ABL to scale up to increasingly rich and realistic virtual characters.

  12. Polymer Solar Cells with Efficiency >10% Enabled via a Facile Solution-Processed Al-Doped ZnO Electron Transporting Layer

    KAUST Repository

    Jagadamma, Lethy Krishnan

    2015-04-22

    A facile and low-temperature (125 °C) solution-processed Al-doped ZnO (AZO) buffer layer functioning very effectively as electron accepting/hole blocking layer for a wide range of polymer:fullerene bulk heterojunction systems, yielding power conversion efficiency in excess of 10% (8%) on glass (plastic) substrates is described. The ammonia-treatment of the aqueous AZO nanoparticle solution produces compact, crystalline, and smooth thin films, which retain the aluminum doping, and eliminates/reduces the native defects by nitrogen incorporation, making them good electron transporters and energetically matched with the fullerene acceptor. It is demonstrated that highly efficient solar cells can be achieved without the need for additional surface chemical modifications of the buffer layer, which is a common requirement for many metal oxide buffer layers to yield efficient solar cells. Also highly efficient solar cells are achieved with thick AZO films (>50 nm), highlighting the suitability of this material for roll-to-roll coating. Preliminary results on the applicability of AZO as electron injection layer in F8BT-based polymer light emitting diode are also presented. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Stimulation of angiogenesis resulting from cooperation between macrophages and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells: proposed molecular mechanism and effect of tetrathiomolybdate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Infiltration by macrophages (Mφ) indicates a poor prognosis in breast cancers, in particular by inducing angiogenesis. Our study aimed 1) to investigate the mechanism by which cooperation between Mφ and aggressive breast cancer cells (MDA-MB-231) induces angiogenesis; 2) to examine the effect of tetrathiomolybdate (TM) on this angiogenic activity. Mφ coincubated with MDA-MB-231 were used as a model to mimic the inflammatory microenvironment. Angiogenesis induced by the culture media was tested in the chick chorioallantoic membrane (CAM). Mφ phenotype was evaluated by 1) expression of the M1 marker CD80, and secretion of interleukin 10 (IL-10), an M2 marker; 2) capacity to secrete Tumour Necrosis Factor α (TNFα) when stimulated by lipopolysaccharide/interferon γ (LPS/IFNγ); 3) ability to induce MDA-MB-231 apoptosis. To explore the molecular mechanisms involved, cytokine profiles of conditioned media from MDA-MB-231, Mφ and the coculture were characterised by an antibody cytokine array. All experiments were carried out both in presence and in absence of TM. Incubation of Mφ with MDA-MB-231 induced a pro-angiogenic effect in the CAM. It emerged that the angiogenic activity of the coculture is due to the capacity of Mφ to switch from M1 Mφ towards M2, probably due to an increase in Macrophage Colony Stimulating Factor. This M1-M2 switch was shown by a decreased expression of CD80 upon LPS/IFNγ stimulation, an increased secretion of IL-10, a decreased secretion of TNFα in response to LPS/IFNγ and an inability to potentiate apoptosis. At the molecular level, the angiogenic activity of the coculture medium can be explained by the secretion of CXC chemokines/ELR+ and CC chemokines. Although TM did not modify either the M2 phenotype in the coculture or the profile of the secreted chemokines, it did decrease the angiogenic activity of the coculture medium, suggesting that TM inhibited angiogenic activity by interfering with the endothelial cell signalling

  14. Telemedical work and cooperation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aas, I H

    2001-01-01

    In telemedicine, cooperation occurs via telecommunication. This represents a new situation for medical cooperation. Whether such cooperation works poorly or well will be important with an increasing volume of telemedicine. When personnel are involved in external cooperation, as in telemedicine, the question of cooperation within one's own organization also arises. To investigate these matters, qualitative interviews were performed with 30 persons working in teledermatology, telepsychiatry, a telepathology frozen-section service and tele-otolaryngology. The results showed that cooperating by telecommunication mainly worked well. The cooperation may be influenced by factors such as personality, knowing each other personally, preparation and experience. Telemedical teamwork may be improved by factors like experience and education. Working with telemedicine did not reduce the personnel's cooperation within their own organizations, but rather improved it, although this effect was slight and most commonly involved improved knowledge of others. In general, the findings concerning cooperation and telemedicine were positive. PMID:11506756

  15. Sleeping Beauty transposon screen identifies signaling modules that cooperate with STAT5 activation to induce B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heltemes-Harris, L M; Larson, J D; Starr, T K; Hubbard, G K; Sarver, A L; Largaespada, D A; Farrar, M A

    2016-06-30

    Signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 (STAT5) activation occurs frequently in human progenitor B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL). To identify gene alterations that cooperate with STAT5 activation to initiate leukemia, we crossed mice expressing a constitutively active form of STAT5 (Stat5b-CA) with mice in which a mutagenic Sleeping Beauty transposon (T2/Onc) was mobilized only in B cells. Stat5b-CA mice typically do not develop B-ALL (<2% penetrance); in contrast, 89% of Stat5b-CA mice in which the T2/Onc transposon had been mobilized died of B-ALL by 3 months of age. High-throughput sequencing approaches were used to identify genes frequently targeted by the T2/Onc transposon; these included Sos1 (74%), Kdm2a (35%), Jak1 (26%), Bmi1 (19%), Prdm14 or Ncoa2 (13%), Cdkn2a (10%), Ikzf1 (8%), Caap1 (6%) and Klf3 (6%). Collectively, these mutations target three major cellular processes: (i) the Janus kinase/STAT5 pathway (ii) progenitor B-cell differentiation and (iii) the CDKN2A tumor-suppressor pathway. Transposon insertions typically resulted in altered expression of these genes, as well as downstream pathways including STAT5, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (Erk) and p38. Importantly, expression of Sos1 and Kdm2a, and activation of p38, correlated with survival, further underscoring the role these genes and associated pathways have in B-ALL. PMID:26500062

  16. Combined modality treatment of regional small cell unidifferentiated carcinoma of the lung: a cooperative study of the RTOG and ECOG

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Between 1975 and 1979, 271 patients with regional small cell undifferentiated (including oat cell) carcinoma of the lung were entered into a study involving treatment by radiation therapy (4500 cGy (rad) in five weeks) to the primary tumor, mediastinum and supraclavicular lymph nodes, and a randomization to receive or not receive prophylactic treatment of the brain (3000 cGy in two weeks) and a randomization to prophylactic or delayed chemotherapy (cyclophosphamide and CCNU). Analysis of the data indicates that the median survival for responders (53 weeks) was significantly longer than that of the non-responders and partial responders (37 and 34 weeks). Median survival by treatment arm was 48 weeks for thoracic irradiation (TI), brain irradiation (BI), and early chemotherapy (CT), 44 weeks for TI alone, 41 weeks for TI and CT, 38 weeks for TI and BI. Regional complete and partial tumor responses were 52 and 25% for prophylactic chemotherapy and 44 and 35% for delayed chemotherapy. The site of first failure was regional in 12%, regional and distant simultaneously in 21%, and distant only in 46%. Elective brain irradiation significantly reduced the incidence of brain metastases from 21 and 5%, but did not improve survival

  17. Rearranged EML4-ALK fusion transcripts sequester in circulating blood platelets and enable blood-based crizotinib response monitoring in non-small-cell lung cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, R. Jonas A.; Karachaliou, Niki; Berenguer, Jordi; Gimenez-Capitan, Ana; Schellen, Pepijn; Teixido, Cristina; Tannous, Jihane; Kuiper, Justine L.; Drees, Esther; Grabowska, Magda; van Keulen, Marte; Heideman, Danielle A.M.; Thunnissen, Erik; Dingemans, Anne-Marie C.; Viteri, Santiago; Tannous, Bakhos A.; Drozdowskyj, Ana; Rosell, Rafael; Smit, Egbert F.; Wurdinger, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Non-small-cell lung cancers harboring EML4-ALK rearrangements are sensitive to crizotinib. However, despite initial response, most patients will eventually relapse, and monitoring EML4-ALK rearrangements over the course of treatment may help identify these patients. However, challenges associated with serial tumor biopsies have highlighted the need for blood-based assays for the monitoring of biomarkers. Platelets can sequester RNA released by tumor cells and are thus an attractive source for the non-invasive assessment of biomarkers. Methods: EML4-ALK rearrangements were analyzed by RT-PCR in platelets and plasma isolated from blood obtained from 77 patients with non-small-cell lung cancer, 38 of whom had EML4-ALK-rearranged tumors. In a subset of 29 patients with EML4-ALK-rearranged tumors who were treated with crizotinib, EML4-ALK rearrangements in platelets were correlated with progression-free and overall survival. Results: RT-PCR demonstrated 65% sensitivity and 100% specificity for the detection of EML4-ALK rearrangements in platelets. In the subset of 29 patients treated with crizotinib, progression-free survival was 3.7 months for patients with EML4-ALK+ platelets and 16 months for those with EML4-ALK− platelets (hazard ratio, 3.5; P = 0.02). Monitoring of EML4-ALK rearrangements in the platelets of one patient over a period of 30 months revealed crizotinib resistance two months prior to radiographic disease progression. Conclusions: Platelets are a valuable source for the non-invasive detection of EML4-ALK rearrangements and may prove useful for predicting and monitoring outcome to crizotinib, thereby improving clinical decisions based on radiographic imaging alone. PMID:26544515

  18. Enabling cleanup technology transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Technology transfer in the environmental restoration, or cleanup, area has been challenging. While there is little doubt that innovative technologies are needed to reduce the times, risks, and costs associated with the cleanup of federal sites, particularly those of the Departments of Energy (DOE) and Defense, the use of such technologies in actual cleanups has been relatively limited. There are, of course, many reasons why technologies do not reach the implementation phase or do not get transferred from developing entities to the user community. For example, many past cleanup contracts provided few incentives for performance that would compel a contractor to seek improvement via technology applications. While performance-based contracts are becoming more common, they alone will not drive increased technology applications. This paper focuses on some applications of cleanup methodologies and technologies that have been successful and are illustrative of a more general principle. The principle is at once obvious and not widely practiced. It is that, with few exceptions, innovative cleanup technologies are rarely implemented successfully alone but rather are implemented in the context of enabling processes and methodologies. And, since cleanup is conducted in a regulatory environment, the stage is better set for technology transfer when the context includes substantive interactions with the relevant stakeholders. Examples of this principle are drawn from Argonne National Laboratory's experiences in Adaptive Sampling and Analysis Programs (ASAPs), Precise Excavation, and the DOE Technology Connection (TechCon) Program. The lessons learned may be applicable to the continuing challenges posed by the cleanup and long-term stewardship of radioactive contaminants and unexploded ordnance (UXO) at federal sites

  19. Cooperative Diversity in Wireless Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Mahmood

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Transmit Diversity is an effective methodology for improving the quality and reliability of a wireless network by reducingthe effects of fading. As majority of the wireless devices (i.e. mobile handsets, etc are limited to only one antenna, especiallydue to hardware constraints, size and cost factors; cooperative communication can be utilized in order to generatetransmit diversity [1]. This enables single antenna wireless devices to share their antennas during transmission in such amanner that creates a virtual MIMO (multiple-input and multiple-output system [2] [3]. In this paper, we will analyze therecent developments and trends in this promising area of wireless Ad hoc networks. The article will also discuss variousmain cooperative signaling methods and will also observe their performance.

  20. Hybrid Forwarding in Cooperative Communications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PENG Cong; ZHAO Ming; YAO Yan

    2008-01-01

    A cooperative communication scheme was developed in which the relay node performs hybrid forwarding, where the relay node will not forward data for a transmission pair unless the corresponding direct transmission fails, and the relay node will not forward data for a transmission pair unless the quality of the channel between the corresponding source and the relay is good. A performance analysis of the outage probability and the diversity-multiplexing tradeoff for the scheme shows that the forwarding mechanism efficiently reduces fading in wireless channels by achieving full diversity order of magnitude improvement. A considerable signal-to-noise ratio gain is provided by this scheme compared with existing cooperation schemes with fixed forwarding. This flexible forwarding mechanism enables the scheme to provide the optimal diversity-multiplexing tradeoff performance.

  1. Guiding Attention by Cooperative Cues

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KangWoo Lee

    2008-01-01

    A common assumption in visual attention is based on the rationale of "limited capacity of information pro-ceasing". From this view point there is little consideration of how different information channels or modules are cooperating because cells in processing stages are forced to compete for the limited resource. To examine the mechanism behind the cooperative behavior of information channels, a computational model of selective attention is implemented based on two hypotheses. Unlike the traditional view of visual attention, the cooperative behavior is assumed to be a dynamic integration process between the bottom-up and top-down information. Furthermore, top-down information is assumed to provide a contextual cue during selection process and to guide the attentional allocation among many bottom-up candidates. The result from a series of simulation with still and video images showed some interesting properties that could not be explained by the competitive aspect of selective attention alone.

  2. Rectification and tunneling effects enabled by Al2O3 atomic layer deposited on back contact of CdTe solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) of Aluminum oxide (Al2O3) is employed to optimize the back contact of thin film CdTe solar cells. Al2O3 layers with a thickness of 0.5 nm to 5 nm are tested, and an improved efficiency, up to 12.1%, is found with the 1 nm Al2O3 deposition, compared with the efficiency of 10.7% without Al2O3 modification. The performance improvement stems from the surface modification that optimizes the rectification and tunneling of back contact. The current-voltage analysis indicates that the back contact with 1 nm Al2O3 maintains large tunneling leakage current and improves the filled factor of CdTe cells through the rectification effect. XPS and capacitance-voltage electrical measurement analysis show that the ALD-Al2O3 modification layer features a desired low-density of interface state of 8 × 1010 cm−2 by estimation

  3. Rectification and tunneling effects enabled by Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} atomic layer deposited on back contact of CdTe solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, Jun; Lin, Qinxian; Li, Hao; Su, Yantao; Yang, Xiaoyang; Wu, Zhongzhen; Zheng, Jiaxin; Wang, Xinwei; Lin, Yuan; Pan, Feng, E-mail: panfeng@pkusz.edu.cn [School of Advanced Materials, Peking University Shenzhen Graduate School, Peking University, Shenzhen 518055 (China)

    2015-07-06

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) of Aluminum oxide (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) is employed to optimize the back contact of thin film CdTe solar cells. Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} layers with a thickness of 0.5 nm to 5 nm are tested, and an improved efficiency, up to 12.1%, is found with the 1 nm Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} deposition, compared with the efficiency of 10.7% without Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} modification. The performance improvement stems from the surface modification that optimizes the rectification and tunneling of back contact. The current-voltage analysis indicates that the back contact with 1 nm Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} maintains large tunneling leakage current and improves the filled factor of CdTe cells through the rectification effect. XPS and capacitance-voltage electrical measurement analysis show that the ALD-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} modification layer features a desired low-density of interface state of 8 × 10{sup 10 }cm{sup −2} by estimation.

  4. Rectification and tunneling effects enabled by Al2O3 atomic layer deposited on back contact of CdTe solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Jun; Lin, Qinxian; Li, Hao; Su, Yantao; Yang, Xiaoyang; Wu, Zhongzhen; Zheng, Jiaxin; Wang, Xinwei; Lin, Yuan; Pan, Feng

    2015-07-01

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) of Aluminum oxide (Al2O3) is employed to optimize the back contact of thin film CdTe solar cells. Al2O3 layers with a thickness of 0.5 nm to 5 nm are tested, and an improved efficiency, up to 12.1%, is found with the 1 nm Al2O3 deposition, compared with the efficiency of 10.7% without Al2O3 modification. The performance improvement stems from the surface modification that optimizes the rectification and tunneling of back contact. The current-voltage analysis indicates that the back contact with 1 nm Al2O3 maintains large tunneling leakage current and improves the filled factor of CdTe cells through the rectification effect. XPS and capacitance-voltage electrical measurement analysis show that the ALD-Al2O3 modification layer features a desired low-density of interface state of 8 × 1010 cm-2 by estimation.

  5. Polymer solar cells with efficiency >10% enabled via a facile solution-processed Al-doped ZnO electron transporting layer

    KAUST Repository

    Jagadamma, Lethy Krishnan

    2015-10-05

    The present work details a facile and low-temperature (125C) solution-processed Al-doped ZnO (AZO) buffer layer functioning very effectively as electron accepting/hole blocking layer for a wide range of polymer:fullerene bulk heterojunction systems, and yielding power conversion efficiency in excess of 10% (8%) on glass (plastic) substrates. We show that ammonia addition to the aqueous AZO nanoparticle solution is a critically important step toward producing compact and smooth thin films which partially retain the aluminum doping and crystalline order of the starting AZO nanocrystals. The ammonia treatment appears to reduce the native defects via nitrogen incorporation, making the AZO film a very good electron transporter and energetically matched with the fullerene acceptor. Importantly, highly efficient solar cells are achieved without the need for additional surface chemical passivation or modification, which has become an increasingly common route to improving the performance of evaporated or solution-processed ZnO ETLs in solar cells.

  6. To cooperate or not to cooperate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wessels, Josepha Ivanka

    To Cooperate or not to Cooperate...? discusses results of a research project to study the rehabilitation of 1500-year old water tunnels, so called "qanats", in Syria. Communities all over the world are using traditional technologies to extract drinkingwater, irrigate their lands and feed their...

  7. Designing for cooperation - cooperating in design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kyng, Morten

    1991-01-01

    This article will discuss how to design computer applications that enhance the quality of work and products, and will relate the discussion to current themes in the field of Computer-Supported Cooperative Work (CSCW). Cooperation is a key element of computer use and work practice, yet here a...

  8. Half-body and local chest irradiation as consolidation following response to standard induction chemotherapy for disseminated small cell lung cancer: an Eastern cooperative oncology group pilot report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A two-institution Phase II Pilot Study for the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) used standard induction chemotherapy (cyclophosphamide and CCNU) followed by consolidation radiation therapy (RT) (600 rad of upper half-body irradiation plus 2000 rad in one week of localized chest irradiation) followed by maintenance chemotherapy in patients with extensive small cell bronchogenic carcinoma (SCBC). Nineteen patients were entered and 9 (47%) had partial responses (PR) after induction chemotherapy. No complete responses (CR) were seen. The 10 patients whose disease progressed were ineligible for consolidation RT and died with a short median survival time (MST) of 15 weeks. Of the 9 patients who were consolidated, 7 (78%) had complete responses in the chest; five (63%) became overall complete responders. The MST of all consolidated responders was 44 weeks. At this writing, two of the 5 patients who achieved CR after RT consolidation were alive without disease for more than one year; another patient was alive with disease for almost one year. A control group consisting of patients with extensive SCBC was used for comparison; these patients were treated by the two participating institutions in an earlier ECOG protocol with the same chemotherapy regimen but without RT consolidation

  9. PKA and Epac cooperate to augment bradykinin-induced interleukin-8 release from human airway smooth muscle cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halayko Andrew J

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Airway smooth muscle contributes to the pathogenesis of pulmonary diseases by secreting inflammatory mediators such as interleukin-8 (IL-8. IL-8 production is in part regulated via activation of Gq-and Gs-coupled receptors. Here we study the role of the cyclic AMP (cAMP effectors protein kinase A (PKA and exchange proteins directly activated by cAMP (Epac1 and Epac2 in the bradykinin-induced IL-8 release from a human airway smooth muscle cell line and the underlying molecular mechanisms of this response. Methods IL-8 release was assessed via ELISA under basal condition and after stimulation with bradykinin alone or in combination with fenoterol, the Epac activators 8-pCPT-2'-O-Me-cAMP and Sp-8-pCPT-2'-O-Me-cAMPS, the PKA activator 6-Bnz-cAMP and the cGMP analog 8-pCPT-2'-O-Me-cGMP. Where indicated, cells were pre-incubated with the pharmacological inhibitors Clostridium difficile toxin B-1470 (GTPases, U0126 (extracellular signal-regulated kinases ERK1/2 and Rp-8-CPT-cAMPS (PKA. The specificity of the cyclic nucleotide analogs was confirmed by measuring phosphorylation of the PKA substrate vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein. GTP-loading of Rap1 and Rap2 was evaluated via pull-down technique. Expression of Rap1, Rap2, Epac1 and Epac2 was assessed via western blot. Downregulation of Epac protein expression was achieved by siRNA. Unpaired or paired two-tailed Student's t test was used. Results The β2-agonist fenoterol augmented release of IL-8 by bradykinin. The PKA activator 6-Bnz-cAMP and the Epac activator 8-pCPT-2'-O-Me-cAMP significantly increased bradykinin-induced IL-8 release. The hydrolysis-resistant Epac activator Sp-8-pCPT-2'-O-Me-cAMPS mimicked the effects of 8-pCPT-2'-O-Me-cAMP, whereas the negative control 8-pCPT-2'-O-Me-cGMP did not. Fenoterol, forskolin and 6-Bnz-cAMP induced VASP phosphorylation, which was diminished by the PKA inhibitor Rp-8-CPT-cAMPS. 6-Bnz-cAMP and 8-pCPT-2'-O-Me-cAMP induced GTP

  10. DMD-enabled confocal microendoscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, Pierre M.; Dlugan, Andrew L. P.; MacAulay, Calum E.

    2001-05-01

    Conventional endoscopy is limited to imaging macroscopic views of tissue. The British Columbia Cancer Research Center, in collaboration with Digital Optical Imaging Corp., is developing a fiber-bundle based microendoscopy system to enable in vivo confocal imaging of cells and tissue structure through the biopsy channel of an endoscope, hypodermic needle, or catheter. The feasibility of imaging individual cells and tissue architecture will be presented using both reflectance and tissue auto-fluorescence modes of imaging. The system consists of a coherent fiber bundle, low-magnification high-NA objective lens, Digital Micromirror DeviceTM(DMD), light source, and CCD camera. The novel approach is the precise control and manipulation of light flow into and out of individual optical fibers. This control is achieved by employing a DMD to illuminate and detect light from selected fibers such that only the core of each fiber is illuminated or detected. The objective of the research is to develop a low-cost, clinically viable microendoscopy system for a range of detection, diagnostic, localization and differentiation uses associated with cancer and pre-cancerous conditions. Currently, multi-wavelength reflectance confocal images with 1 micrometers lateral resolution and 1.6 micrometers axial resolution have been achieved using a 0.95 mm bundle with 30,000 fibers.

  11. Cooperativity of Negative Autoregulation Confers Increased Mutational Robustness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marciano, David C.; Lua, Rhonald C.; Herman, Christophe; Lichtarge, Olivier

    2016-06-01

    Negative autoregulation is universally found across organisms. In the bacterium Escherichia coli, transcription factors often repress their own expression to form a negative feedback network motif that enables robustness to changes in biochemical parameters. Here we present a simple phenomenological model of a negative feedback transcription factor repressing both itself and another target gene. The strength of the negative feedback is characterized by three parameters: the cooperativity in self-repression, the maximal expression rate of the transcription factor, and the apparent dissociation constant of the transcription factor binding to its own promoter. Analysis of the model shows that the target gene levels are robust to mutations in the transcription factor, and that the robustness improves as the degree of cooperativity in self-repression increases. The prediction is tested in the LexA transcriptional network of E. coli by altering cooperativity in self-repression and promoter strength. Indeed, we find robustness is correlated with the former. Considering the proposed importance of gene regulation in speciation, parameters governing a transcription factor's robustness to mutation may have significant influence on a cell or organism's capacity to evolve.

  12. Cooperative Tagging Center (CTC)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Cooperative Tagging Center (CTC) began as the Cooperative Game Fish Tagging Program (GTP) at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute (WHOI) in 1954. The GTP was...

  13. DNA polymerases κ and ζ cooperatively perform mutagenic translesion synthesis of the C8-2'-deoxyguanosine adduct of the dietary mutagen IQ in human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bose, Arindam; Pande, Paritosh; Jasti, Vijay P; Millsap, Amy D; Hawkins, Edward K; Rizzo, Carmelo J; Basu, Ashis K

    2015-09-30

    The roles of translesion synthesis (TLS) DNA polymerases in bypassing the C8-2'-deoxyguanosine adduct (dG-C8-IQ) formed by 2-amino-3-methylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoline (IQ), a highly mutagenic and carcinogenic heterocyclic amine found in cooked meats, were investigated. Three plasmid vectors containing the dG-C8-IQ adduct at the G1-, G2- or G3-positions of the NarI site (5'-G1G2CG3CC-3') were replicated in HEK293T cells. Fifty percent of the progeny from the G3 construct were mutants, largely G→T, compared to 18% and 24% from the G1 and G2 constructs, respectively. Mutation frequency (MF) of dG-C8-IQ was reduced by 38-67% upon siRNA knockdown of pol κ, whereas it was increased by 10-24% in pol η knockdown cells. When pol κ and pol ζ were simultaneously knocked down, MF of the G1 and G3 constructs was reduced from 18% and 50%, respectively, to <3%, whereas it was reduced from 24% to <1% in the G2 construct. In vitro TLS using yeast pol ζ showed that it can extend G3*:A pair more efficiently than G3*:C pair, but it is inefficient at nucleotide incorporation opposite dG-C8-IQ. We conclude that pol κ and pol ζ cooperatively carry out the majority of the error-prone TLS of dG-C8-IQ, whereas pol η is involved primarily in its error-free bypass. PMID:26220181

  14. Cooperative Online Education

    OpenAIRE

    Morten Flate Paulsen

    2008-01-01

    Cooperative learning seeks to develop virtual learning environments that allow students to have optimal individual freedom within online learning communities. The pedagogical and administrative challenges with regard to accommodating both individual freedom and cooperation are explained in the Theory of Cooperative Freedom. This article shows that cooperative learning can be implemented successfully through a set of instruments or means. To illustrate this with current examples, the article p...

  15. FOILFEST :community enabled security.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, Judy Hennessey; Johnson, Curtis Martin; Whitley, John B.; Drayer, Darryl Donald; Cummings, John C., Jr. (.,; .)

    2005-09-01

    The Advanced Concepts Group of Sandia National Laboratories hosted a workshop, ''FOILFest: Community Enabled Security'', on July 18-21, 2005, in Albuquerque, NM. This was a far-reaching look into the future of physical protection consisting of a series of structured brainstorming sessions focused on preventing and foiling attacks on public places and soft targets such as airports, shopping malls, hotels, and public events. These facilities are difficult to protect using traditional security devices since they could easily be pushed out of business through the addition of arduous and expensive security measures. The idea behind this Fest was to explore how the public, which is vital to the function of these institutions, can be leveraged as part of a physical protection system. The workshop considered procedures, space design, and approaches for building community through technology. The workshop explored ways to make the ''good guys'' in public places feel safe and be vigilant while making potential perpetrators of harm feel exposed and convinced that they will not succeed. Participants in the Fest included operators of public places, social scientists, technology experts, representatives of government agencies including DHS and the intelligence community, writers and media experts. Many innovative ideas were explored during the fest with most of the time spent on airports, including consideration of the local airport, the Albuquerque Sunport. Some provocative ideas included: (1) sniffers installed in passage areas like revolving door, escalators, (2) a ''jumbotron'' showing current camera shots in the public space, (3) transparent portal screeners allowing viewing of the screening, (4) a layered open/funnel/open/funnel design where open spaces are used to encourage a sense of ''communitas'' and take advantage of citizen ''sensing'' and funnels are technological

  16. The Cooperative Brain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stallen, M.; Sanfey, A.G.

    2013-01-01

    Cooperation is essential for the functioning of human societies. To better understand how cooperation both succeeds and fails, recent research in cognitive neuroscience has begun to explore novel paradigms to examine how cooperative mechanisms may be encoded in the brain. By combining functional neu

  17. Conditional cooperativity in toxin-antitoxin regulation prevents random toxin activation and promotes fast translational recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cataudella, Ilaria; Trusina, Ala; Sneppen, Kim; Gerdes, Kenn; Mitarai, Namiko

    2012-08-01

    Many toxin-antitoxin (TA) loci are known to strongly repress their own transcription. This auto-inhibition is often called 'conditional cooperativity' as it relies on cooperative binding of TA complexes to operator DNA that occurs only when toxins are in a proper stoichiometric relationship with antitoxins. There has recently been an explosion of interest in TA systems due to their role in bacterial persistence, however the role of conditional cooperativity is still unclear. We reveal the biological function of conditional cooperativity by constructing a mathematical model of the well studied TA system, relBE of Escherichia coli. We show that the model with the in vivo and in vitro established parameters reproduces experimentally observed response to nutritional stress. We further demonstrate that conditional cooperativity stabilizes the level of antitoxin in rapidly growing cells such that random induction of relBE is minimized. At the same time it enables quick removal of free toxin when the starvation is terminated. PMID:22495927

  18. Mobility, fitness collection, and the breakdown of cooperation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelimson, Anatolij; Cremer, Jonas; Frey, Erwin

    2013-04-01

    The spatial arrangement of individuals is thought to overcome the dilemma of cooperation: When cooperators engage in clusters, they might share the benefit of cooperation while being more protected against noncooperating individuals, who benefit from cooperation but save the cost of cooperation. This is paradigmatically shown by the spatial prisoner's dilemma model. Here, we study this model in one and two spatial dimensions, but explicitly take into account that in biological setups, fitness collection and selection are separated processes occurring mostly on vastly different time scales. This separation is particularly important to understand the impact of mobility on the evolution of cooperation. We find that even small diffusive mobility strongly restricts cooperation since it enables noncooperative individuals to invade cooperative clusters. Thus, in most biological scenarios, where the mobility of competing individuals is an irrefutable fact, the spatial prisoner's dilemma alone cannot explain stable cooperation, but additional mechanisms are necessary for spatial structure to promote the evolution of cooperation. The breakdown of cooperation is analyzed in detail. We confirm the existence of a phase transition, here controlled by mobility and costs, which distinguishes between purely cooperative and noncooperative absorbing states. While in one dimension the model is in the class of the voter model, it belongs to the directed percolation universality class in two dimensions. PMID:23679453

  19. Cooperative robots and sensor networks

    CERN Document Server

    Khelil, Abdelmajid

    2014-01-01

    Mobile robots and Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs) have enabled great potentials and a large space for ubiquitous and pervasive applications. Robotics and WSNs have mostly been considered as separate research fields and little work has investigated the marriage between these two technologies. However, these two technologies share several features, enable common cyber-physical applications and provide complementary support to each other.
 The primary objective of book is to provide a reference for cutting-edge studies and research trends pertaining to robotics and sensor networks, and in particular for the coupling between them. The book consists of five chapters. The first chapter presents a cooperation strategy for teams of multiple autonomous vehicles to solve the rendezvous problem. The second chapter is motivated by the need to improve existing solutions that deal with connectivity prediction, and proposed a genetic machine learning approach for link-quality prediction. The third chapter presents an arch...

  20. Optical physics enables advances in multiphoton imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since the initial images were taken using a multiphoton imaging technique the method has rapidly established itself as the preferred method for imaging deeply into biological samples with micron resolution in three dimensions. Multiphoton imaging has thus enabled researchers in the life sciences to undertake studies that had previously been believed to be impossible without significantly perturbing the sample. Many of these experiments have only been realized due to close cooperation between optical physicists, from a range of disciplines, and the biomedical researchers. This paper will provide a general review of the current state of the field demonstrating how the various aspects of the physics development have brought the multiphoton technique to its current position at the forefront of biological microscopy. (topical review)

  1. Genome wide SNP comparative analysis between EGFR and KRAS mutated NSCLC and characterization of two models of oncogenic cooperation in non-small cell lung carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tremblay-Gravel Maxime

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lung cancer with EGFR mutation was shown to be a specific clinical entity. In order to better understand the biology behind this disease we used a genome wide characterization of loss of heterozygosity and amplification by Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP Array analysis to point out chromosome segments linked to EGFR mutations. To do so, we compared genetic profiles between EGFR mutated adenocarcinomas (ADC and KRAS mutated ADC from 24 women with localized lung cancer. Results Patterns of alterations were different between EGFR and KRAS mutated tumors and specific chromosomes alterations were linked to the EGFR mutated group. Indeed chromosome regions 14q21.3 (p = 0.027, 7p21.3-p21.2 (p = 0.032, 7p21.3 (p = 0.042 and 7p21.2-7p15.3 (p = 0.043 were found significantly amplified in EGFR mutated tumors. Within those regions 3 genes are of special interest ITGB8, HDAC9 and TWIST1. Moreover, homozygous deletions at CDKN2A and LOH at RB1 were identified in EGFR mutated tumors. We therefore tested the existence of a link between EGFR mutation, CDKN2A homozygous deletion and cyclin amplification in a larger series of tumors. Indeed, in a series of non-small-cell lung carcinoma (n = 98 we showed that homozygous deletions at CDKN2A were linked to EGFR mutations and absence of smoking whereas cyclin amplifications (CCNE1 and CCND1 were associated to TP53 mutations and smoking habit. Conclusion All together, our results show that genome wide patterns of alteration differ between EGFR and KRAS mutated lung ADC, describe two models of oncogenic cooperation involving either EGFR mutation and CDKN2A deletion or cyclin amplification and TP53 inactivating mutations and identified new chromosome regions at 7p and 14q associated to EGFR mutations in lung cancer.

  2. In vivo cooperation of two nuclear oncogenic proteins, P135gag-myb-ets and p61/63myc, leads to transformation and immortalization of chicken myelomonocytic cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Adelmant, G; Quatannens, B; Lagrou, C; Wernert, N; Torpier, G; Saule, S.; Stehelin, D.; Laudet, V

    1994-01-01

    To investigate a possible in vivo cooperation between the p61/63myc and P135gag-myb-ets proteins, we used a previously constructed retrovirus, named MHE226, which contains the fused v-myb and v-ets oncogenes of the E26 retrovirus and the v-myc oncogene of MH2. For that purpose, chicken neuroretina cells producing MHE226 and pseudotyped with the Rous associated virus-1 (RAV-1) helper virus were injected in 1-day-old chickens. In control experiments, we also injected chicken neuroretina cells p...

  3. The institution as a blunt instrument: Cooperation through imperfect observability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghachem, Montasser

    2016-05-01

    Observing others enables us to indirectly reciprocate their actions. In large societies, however, reliable individual observation is hard to achieve. Societies therefore rely on institutions to aid in observing cooperative behaviour and identifying those who cooperated. Institutions are integral part of modern societies. Here, we propose an evolutionary model in which an institution aims to label cooperators with a tag to verify their trustworthiness, as is the case for financial credit ratings or quality certificates. However, errors in assigning tags inevitably arise: the institution may accidentally leave some cooperators untagged or award tags to some defectors. Taking these two specific types of errors into account, we derive simple analytical conditions under which cooperation becomes stable and is favoured by selection. We find that these two institutional errors are not weighted equally in promoting cooperation: it is more detrimental to cooperation if tags are erroneously awarded to defectors than if they are mistakenly withheld from cooperators. Institutional tagging can lead to non-uniform interaction rates among cooperators and defectors, whereby cooperators benefit disproportionally by playing more games than defectors. This work sheds light on the significant role of institutions in promoting and maintaining societal cooperation. PMID:26907202

  4. Geo-Enabled, Mobile Services

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Christian Søndergaard

    2006-01-01

    We are witnessing the emergence of a global infrastructure that enables the widespread deployment of geo-enabled, mobile services in practice. At the same time, the research community has also paid increasing attention to data management aspects of mobile services. This paper offers me an...

  5. Cooperative Cognitive Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Giupponi, Lorenza; Ibars, Christian

    2009-01-01

    In this chapter, we have described how cooperation can benefit the different phases of the so called cognitive radio cycle. In particular we have focused on physical layer cooperation, showing that benefits can be obtained for both the primary and the secondary system in terms of spatial diversity, increased range and increased availability. In addition, we have modeled the critical interference management problem in a cooperative and cognitive system through a game theoretical approach, as w...

  6. Cooperative Machine Learning Method

    OpenAIRE

    Adnan M. Al-Khatib

    2011-01-01

    Cooperative learning refers to an approach where one or more team of learners work together towards reaching a better knowledge or understanding of a specified task. The purpose of this paper is to use this approach to describe a proposal for designing and building a cooperative machine learning system (Multi-Learning system) that contains two or more machine learners that cooperate together. The objective of the proposal in this paper is to improve the effectiveness of the machine learning...

  7. Cooperative wireless communications

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Yan

    2009-01-01

    Cooperative devices and mechanisms are increasingly important to enhance the performance of wireless communications and networks, with their ability to decrease power consumption and packet loss rate and increase system capacity, computation, and network resilience. Considering the wide range of applications, strategies, and benefits associated with cooperative wireless communications, researchers and product developers need a succinct understanding of relevant theory, fundamentals, and techniques to navigate this challenging field. ""Cooperative Wireless Communications"" provides just that. I

  8. Cooperative Station History Forms

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Various forms, photographs and correspondence documenting the history of Cooperative station instrumentation, location changes, inspections, and...

  9. International co-operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Within the Union Nations (UN) framework, the Slovak Republic participated in following activities on environment protection co-operation: UN European Economic Commission, UN Industrial Development Organization, UN Development Programme, UN Human Habitat Organization, UN Environment Programme, and UN Commission on Sustainable Development. Relevant activities of the Slovak Republic in these co-operations as well as in European Union and OECD activities are reviewed. International conventions and other forms of multilateral co-operation, bilateral co-operation, and international programmes and projects in which the Slovak Republic took participate are presented

  10. Interaction-enabled topological crystalline phases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapa, Matthew F.; Teo, Jeffrey C. Y.; Hughes, Taylor L.

    2016-03-01

    In this article we provide a general mechanism for generating interaction-enabled fermionic topological phases. We illustrate the mechanism with crystalline symmetry-protected topological phases in one, two, and three spatial dimensions. These nontrivial phases require interactions for their existence, and in the cases we consider, the free-fermion classification yields only a trivial phase. For the one- and two-dimensional phases we consider, we provide explicit exactly solvable models which realize the interaction-enabled phases. Similar to the interpretation of the Kitaev Majorana wire as a mean-field p -wave superconductor Hamiltonian arising from an interacting model with quartic interactions, we show that our systems can be interpreted as "mean-field" charge-4 e superconductors arising, e.g., from an interacting model with eight-body interactions or through another physical mechanism. The quartet superconducting nature allows for the teleportation of full Cooper pairs and, in two dimensions, for interesting semiclassical crystalline defects with non-Abelian anyon bound states.

  11. Enabling technologies for oil sands development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A review of oil sands production and expansion possibilities in Alberta were presented. The enabling technologies for oil sands projects include mining (bucketwheels, draglines, trucks, shovels conveyors, slurry hydrotransport); extraction (conditioning tumblers, pipelines, tanks, hot water, caustic, cold water, frothers); froth cleaning (centrifuges, solvent treatment); tailings (tailings ponds, consolidated tailings); and upgrading (coking, hydrotreating for SCO, hydrocracking and multiple products). The enabling technologies for in situ production include cyclic steam stimulation for vertical wells, steam assisted gravity drainage (SAGD) for dual horizontal wells, and cold production with wormholes. This paper described the recovery potentials of each of these processes. It also discussed the role of government and industry in research and cooperative research involving both the private and public sectors. Examples of each of these were described such as SAGD, the OSLO cold water extraction process, The consolidated tailings (CT) project, the low energy extraction process (slurry production, hydrotransport, pipeline conditioning and warm water extraction), and research in fine tailings, to demonstrate that although objectives may differ, government and industry research objectives are complementary

  12. Automated Cooperative Trajectories for a More Efficient and Responsive Air Transportation System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Curt

    2015-01-01

    The NASA Automated Cooperative Trajectories project is developing a prototype avionics system that enables multi-vehicle cooperative control by integrating 1090 MHz ES ADS-B digital communications with onboard autopilot systems. This cooperative control capability will enable meta-aircraft operations for enhanced airspace utilization, as well as improved vehicle efficiency through wake surfing. This briefing describes the objectives and approach to a flight evaluation of this system planned for 2016.

  13. COMPARATIVE STUDY BETWEEN NATIONAL LEGISLATION OF EUROPEAN UNION MEMBER STATES, REGARDING EUROPEAN GROUPING FOR TERRITORIAL COOPERATION

    OpenAIRE

    Petronela STURZ

    2009-01-01

    The legislative package for Structural Funds (2007-2013) introduced Regulation 1082/2006 establishing a new legal instrument for territorial cooperation: the European Grouping of Territorial Cooperation (EGTC). EGTC is a European instrument enabling regional and local authorities from different Member States to set up cooperation structures with a legal personality. EGTCs can facilitate and promote cross-border, trans-national and interregional cooperation, with or without a financial contrib...

  14. Microarray analysis of early adipogenesis in C3H10T1/2 cells: Cooperative inhibitory effects of growth factors and 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    C3H10T1/2 mouse embryo fibroblasts differentiate into adipocytes when stimulated by a standard hormonal mixture (IDMB). 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), via the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), inhibits induction of the key adipogenic gene peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) and subsequent adipogenesis. This TCDD-mediated inhibition requires activation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathway, which can be accomplished by serum, epidermal growth factor (EGF), or fibroblast growth factor (FGF). In the absence of serum or growth factors, IDMB induced adipogenesis without mitosis. Microarray analysis identified 200 genes that exhibited expression changes of at least twofold after 24 h of IDMB treatment. This time precedes most PPARγ stimulation but follows the period of TCDD/ERK cooperation and periods of increased cell contraction and DNA synthesis. Functionally related gene clusters include genes associated with cell structure, triglyceride and cholesterol metabolism, oxidative regulation, and secreted proteins. In the absence of growth factors TCDD inhibited 30% of these IDMB responses without inhibiting the process of differentiation. A combination of EGF and TCDD that blocks differentiation cooperatively blocked a further 44 IDMB-responsive genes, most of which have functional links to differentiation, including PPARγ. Cell cycle regulators that are stimulated by EGF were substantially inhibited by IDMB but these responses were unaffected by TCDD. By contrast, TCDD and EGF cooperatively reversed IDMB-induced changes in cell adhesion complexes immediately prior to increases in PPARγ1 expression. Changes in adhesion-linked signaling may play a key role in TCDD affects on differentiation

  15. BEST: Barcode Enabled Sequencing of Tetrads

    OpenAIRE

    Scott, Adrian C.; Ludlow, Catherine L.; Cromie, Gareth A.; Dudley, Aimée M.

    2014-01-01

    Tetrad analysis is a valuable tool for yeast genetics, but the laborious manual nature of the process has hindered its application on large scales. Barcode Enabled Sequencing of Tetrads (BEST)1 replaces the manual processes of isolating, disrupting and spacing tetrads. BEST isolates tetrads by virtue of a sporulation-specific GFP fusion protein that permits fluorescence-activated cell sorting of tetrads directly onto agar plates, where the ascus is enzymatically digested and the spores are di...

  16. Coordination and Cooperation

    OpenAIRE

    Janssen, Maarten

    2003-01-01

    textabstractThis comment makes four related points. First, explaining coordination is different from explaining cooperation. Second, solving the coordination problem is more important for the theory of games than solving the cooperation problem. Third, a version of the Principle of Coordination can be rationalized on individualistic grounds. Finally, psychological game theory should consider how players perceive their gaming situation. ---------------------------------------------------------...

  17. Making Cooperative Learning Powerful

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slavin, Robert E.

    2014-01-01

    Just about everyone loves the "idea" of cooperative learning, children working productively and excitedly in groups, everyone getting along and enthusiastically helping one another learn. This article presents five strategies that teachers can use to get the greatest benefit possible from cooperative learning and ensure that…

  18. Scandinavian Cooperative Advantage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strand, Robert; Freeman, R. Edward

    2015-01-01

    . We conclude by endorsing the expression “Scandinavian cooperative advantage” in an effort to draw attention to the Scandinavian context and encourage the field of strategic management to shift its focus from achieving a competitive advantage toward achieving a cooperative advantage....

  19. Non-cooperative Games

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Damme, E.E.C.

    2000-01-01

    Non-cooperative games are mathematical models of interactive strategic decision situations.In contrast to cooperative models, they build on the assumption that all possibilities for commitment and contract have been incorporated in the rules of the game.This contribution describes the main models (g

  20. Cooperation or Silent Rivalry?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zank, Wolfgang

    2010-01-01

    on an increasingly institutionalized basis. In terms of military cooperation the US is still the partner for Egypt. But outside the military sphere institutionalized cooperation is comparatively week. In particular the failure of the US to conclude a free-trade agreement has been crucial. But it...

  1. Taxonomy Enabled Discovery (TED) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposal addresses the NASA's need to enable scientific discovery and the topic's requirements for: processing large volumes of data, commonly available on the...

  2. Efficiency in Microfinance Cooperatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HARTARSKA, Valentina

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In recognition of cooperatives’ contribution to the socio-economic well-being of their participants, the United Nations has declared 2012 as the International Year of Cooperatives. Microfinance cooperatives make a large part of the microfinance industry. We study efficiency of microfinance cooperatives and provide estimates of the optimal size of such organizations. We employ the classical efficiency analysis consisting of estimating a system of equations and identify the optimal size of microfinance cooperatives in terms of their number of clients (outreach efficiency, as well as dollar value of lending and deposits (sustainability. We find that microfinance cooperatives have increasing returns to scale which means that the vast majority can lower cost if they become larger. We calculate that the optimal size is around $100 million in lending and half of that in deposits. We find less robust estimates in terms of reaching many clients with a range from 40,000 to 180,000 borrowers.

  3. Integrating vendors into cooperative design practices

    OpenAIRE

    Eskil, Mustafa Taner; Sticklen, Jon

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes a new approach to cooperative design using distributed, off-the-shelf design components. The ultimate goal is to enable assemblers to rapidly design their products and perform simulations using parts that are offered by a global network of suppliers. The obvious way to realise this goal would be to transfer desired component models to the client computer. However, in order to protect proprietary data, manufacturers are reluctant to share their design models without non-di...

  4. Cooperative Regenerating Codes for Distributed Storage Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Shum, Kenneth W.

    2011-01-01

    When there are multiple node failures in a distributed storage system, regenerating the failed storage nodes individually in a one-by-one manner is suboptimal as far as repair-bandwidth minimization is concerned. If data exchange among the newcomers is enabled, we can get a better tradeoff between repair bandwidth and the storage per node. An explicit and optimal construction of cooperative regenerating code is illustrated.

  5. A reference architecture for cooperative driving

    OpenAIRE

    Behere, Sagar; Törngren, Martin; Chen, Dejiu

    2013-01-01

    Cooperative driving systems enable vehicles to adapt their motion to the surrounding traffic situation by utilizing information communicated by other vehicles and infrastructure in the vicinity. How should these systems be designed and integrated into the modern automobile? What are the needed functions, key architectural elements and their relationships? We created a reference architecture that systematically answers these questions and validated it in real world usage scenarios. Key finding...

  6. Cooperative OFDM underwater acoustic communications

    CERN Document Server

    Cheng, Xilin; Cheng, Xiang

    2016-01-01

    Following underwater acoustic channel modeling, this book investigates the relationship between coherence time and transmission distances. It considers the power allocation issues of two typical transmission scenarios, namely short-range transmission and medium-long range transmission. For the former scenario, an adaptive system is developed based on instantaneous channel state information. The primary focus is on cooperative dual-hop orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM). This book includes the decomposed fountain codes designed to enable reliable communications with higher energy efficiency. It covers the Doppler Effect, which improves packet transmission reliability for effective low-complexity mirror-mapping-based intercarrier interference cancellation schemes capable of suppressing the intercarrier interference power level. Designed for professionals and researchers in the field of underwater acoustic communications, this book is also suitable for advanced-level students in electrical enginee...

  7. Insight into Enabling Adaptive Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorne A. Greig

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The U.S. National Commission on Science for Sustainable Forestry recognized a need for effective adaptive management to support management for biological diversity. However, difficulties in implementing adaptive management in the U.S. Northwest Forest Plan led the Commission to wonder if comparisons across multiple adaptive management trials in the forest sector could provide insight into the factors that serve to enable or inhibit adaptive management. This comparison and the resulting discussions among a group of seasoned practitioners, with adaptive management experience at a variety of scales and levels of complexity, led to insights into a hierarchy of ten factors that can serve to either enable or inhibit implementation. Doing high quality adaptive management is about doing good science to enable learning from management experience. Enabling adaptive management though is about working with people to understand their concerns, to develop a common understanding and an environment of trust that allows adaptive management to proceed. Careful attention to enabling factors is critical to fulfilling the promise of adaptive management.

  8. Cooperative Mobile Web Browsing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perrucci, GP; Fitzek, FHP; Zhang, Qi;

    2009-01-01

    This paper advocates a novel approach for mobile web browsing based on cooperation among wireless devices within close proximity operating in a cellular environment. In the actual state of the art, mobile phones can access the web using different cellular technologies. However, the supported data......-range links can then be used for cooperative mobile web browsing. By implementing the cooperative web browsing on commercial mobile phones, it will be shown that better performance is achieved in terms of increased data rate and therefore reduced access times, resulting in a significantly enhanced web...

  9. Cooperative algorithm and group behavior in multirobot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Seong-Woo; Park, Kwang-Soo; Shin, Shang-Woon; Ahn, Doo-Sung

    2001-10-01

    In a multi-agent system, the action selection strategy is important for the cooperation and coordination of multi agents. However the overlap of actions selected individually by each robot makes the acquisition of cooperation behaviors less efficient. In addition to that, a complex and dynamic environment makes cooperation even more difficult. So in this paper, we propose a control algorithm which enables each robot to determine the action for the effective cooperation in multi-robot system. We employ a reinforcement learning in order to choose a proper action for each robot in its action subspace. In this paper, robot soccer system is adopted for the multi-robot environment. To play a soccer game, elementary actions such as shooting and passing must be provided. Q-learning, which is one of the popular methods for reinforcement learning, is used to determine what actions to take. Through simulations, the efficiency of own proposed algorithm is verified for the cooperation in multi robot system.

  10. Loss of cooperativity of secreted CD40L and increased dose-response to IL4 on CLL cell viability correlates with enhanced activation of NF-kB and STAT6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Nupur; Reichenzeller, Michaela; Caudron-Herger, Maiwen; Haebe, Sarah; Brady, Nathan; Diener, Susanne; Nothing, Maria; Döhner, Hartmut; Stilgenbauer, Stephan; Rippe, Karsten; Mertens, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) cells fail to enter apoptosis in vivo as opposed to their non-malignant B-lymphocyte counterparts. The ability of CLL cells to escape apoptosis is highly dependent on their microenvironment. Compared to non-malignant B cells, CLL cells are more responsive to complex stimuli that can be reproduced in vitro by the addition of cytokines. To understand the molecular mechanism of the environment-dependent anti-apoptotic signaling circuitry of CLL cells, we quantified the effect of the SDF-1, BAFF, APRIL, anti-IgM, interleukin-4 (IL4) and secreted CD40L (sCD40L) on the survival of in vitro cultured CLL cells and found IL4 and sCD40L to be most efficient in rescuing CLL cells from apoptosis. In quantitative dose-response experiments using cell survival as readout, the binding affinity of IL4 to its receptor was similar between malignant and non-malignant cells. However, the downstream signaling in terms of the amount of STAT6 and its degree of phosphorylation was highly stimulated in CLL cells. In contrast, the response to sCD40L showed a loss of cooperative binding in CLL cells but displayed a largely increased ligand binding affinity. Although a high-throughput microscopy analysis did not reveal a significant difference in the spatial CD40 receptor organization, the downstream signaling showed an enhanced activation of the NF-kB pathway in the malignant cells. Thus, we propose that the anti-apoptotic phenotype of CLL involves a sensitized response for IL4 dependent STAT6 phosphorylation, and an activation of NF-kB signaling due to an increased affinity of sCD40L to its receptor. PMID:24828787

  11. International cooperation and exchanges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The NNSA continued and enlarged bilateral cooperation with the nuclear energy developing countries and enhanced visiting for high rank leaders of regulatory authorities. Besides, the domestic units for implementing the Convention on Nuclear Safety were settled by coordination

  12. Nuclear cooperation agreements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear cooperation agreements are reviewed in tabular form, especially agreements with developing countries. The reporting countries are the USA, the Federal Republic of Germany, Canada, Australia, Japan, and France. A separate EURATOM list is annexed

  13. International cooperation between electricians

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At the opening of the Montreal Forum 'Electricity: the New Millennium', Francois Ailleret as outgoing president of UNIPEDE (International Union of Producers and Distributors of Electricity) spoke in favour of maintaining and even developing international cooperation between electricians. As the liberalization of electrical systems throughout the world increases, leading to a certain competition between electricians, international cooperation may become difficult. The author recalls the remarkable results of this cooperation in the twentieth century and confirms that it remains an irreplaceable communal resource perfectly compatible with competition between electricity companies. This multifaceted cooperation will lead firstly to a whole variety of spin-off benefiting companies and customers. It will also foster the sustainable development of projects to save the environment and combat poverty in the world, clearly illustrated by the situation of these nearly two billion inhabitants of our planet who still today do not enjoy the irreplaceable services of electricity. (author)

  14. Cooperative processing data bases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasta, Juzar

    1991-01-01

    Cooperative processing for the 1990's using client-server technology is addressed. The main theme is concepts of downsizing from mainframes and minicomputers to workstations on a local area network (LAN). This document is presented in view graph form.

  15. Regional National Cooperative Observer

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NOAA publication dedicated to issues, news and recognition of observers in the National Weather Service Cooperative Observer program. Issues published regionally...

  16. Cooperative Hurricane Network Obs

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Observations from the Cooperative Hurricane Reporting Network (CHURN), a special network of stations that provided observations when tropical cyclones approached...

  17. Solar cooperatives; Genosse Sonne

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, Dierk

    2010-06-15

    Not a boom but a trend: Increasingly, solar power plants and other renewables-based systems are financed by cooperatives. This organizational structure requires long-term strategies and some idealism. (orig.)

  18. Landscape Conservation Cooperatives

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Landscape Conservation Cooperatives (LCCs) are public-private partnerships composed of states, tribes, federal agencies, non-governmental organizations,...

  19. Cooperative Weather Observations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Monthly logs include a daily account of temperature extremes and precipitation, along with snow data at some locations. U.S. Cooperative Observer Program (COOP)...

  20. Research on Sensor Cooperation for Distributed Emergency Response System

    OpenAIRE

    Haoming Guo; Feng Liang; Yunzhen Liu

    2012-01-01

    With advantages of IOT (internet of things) and sensor technique, a new communication mechanism between sensors is enhanced upon which distributed emergency response systems are built. This mechanism enables sensors to cooperate with each other in a decentralized way to improve efficiency in case of emergencies. During the process, the alert messages are exchanged among sensors cooperatively to prepare and implement monitoring activities. The system center won’t be overloaded by floodin...

  1. Non-cooperative Games

    OpenAIRE

    Damme, E.E.C. van

    2000-01-01

    Non-cooperative games are mathematical models of interactive strategic decision situations.In contrast to cooperative models, they build on the assumption that all possibilities for commitment and contract have been incorporated in the rules of the game.This contribution describes the main models (games in normal form, and games in extensive form), as well as the main concepts that have been proposed to solve these games.Solution concepts predict the outcomes that might arise when the game is...

  2. Cooperative quantum Parrondo's games

    OpenAIRE

    Pawela, Łukasz; Sładkowski, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Coordination and cooperation are among the most important issues of game theory. Recently, the attention turned to game theory on graphs and social networks. Encouraged by interesting results obtained in quantum evolutionary game analysis, we study cooperative Parrondo's games in a quantum setup. The game is modeled using multidimensional quantum random walks with biased coins. We use the GHZ and W entangled states as the initial state of the coins. Our analysis shows than an apparent paradox...

  3. Extending Eurasia Security Cooperation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    After 14 years of development, the Shanghai Cooperation Organization (SCO) , has set its sights on goals for the next de-cade at the 15th meeting of the Council of SCO Heads of State that was held in Ufa, the capital of Russia's Bashkortostan Republic, on July 9-10. The SCO, established in Shanghai in 2001, is committed to building fdendly neighbor rela- tions and maintaining security and stability in the Central Asian region through multilateral cooperation.

  4. Modeling Misbehavior in Cooperative Diversity: A Dynamic Game Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sintayehu Dehnie

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Cooperative diversity protocols are designed with the assumption that terminals always help each other in a socially efficient manner. This assumption may not be valid in commercial wireless networks where terminals may misbehave for selfish or malicious intentions. The presence of misbehaving terminals creates a social-dilemma where terminals exhibit uncertainty about the cooperative behavior of other terminals in the network. Cooperation in social-dilemma is characterized by a suboptimal Nash equilibrium where wireless terminals opt out of cooperation. Hence, without establishing a mechanism to detect and mitigate effects of misbehavior, it is difficult to maintain a socially optimal cooperation. In this paper, we first examine effects of misbehavior assuming static game model and show that cooperation under existing cooperative protocols is characterized by a noncooperative Nash equilibrium. Using evolutionary game dynamics we show that a small number of mutants can successfully invade a population of cooperators, which indicates that misbehavior is an evolutionary stable strategy (ESS. Our main goal is to design a mechanism that would enable wireless terminals to select reliable partners in the presence of uncertainty. To this end, we formulate cooperative diversity as a dynamic game with incomplete information. We show that the proposed dynamic game formulation satisfied the conditions for the existence of perfect Bayesian equilibrium.

  5. Future cooperative communication systems driven by social mobile networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blázovics, L.; Varga, C.; Bamford, W.;

    2011-01-01

    In this work we are underlining the importance of social mobile networks for upcoming cooperative communication systems. The assumption of this work is that future mobile communication systems will incorporate user cooperation, i.e. a combination of cellular access in parallel with ongoing short...... cases. By the example of the Gedda-Headz gaming community, possible links between cooperative mobile communication and social mobile networks are shown....... range links to the neighboring devices. It has been shown that user cooperation enables higher data rates, better spectral efficiencies, and reduces the energy consumption of the mobile unit. In this work the social mobile networks are identified to be a fertile ground to facilitate the cooperative use...

  6. Enabler for the agile virtual enterprise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuerst, Karl; Schmidt, Thomas; Wippel, Gerald

    2001-10-01

    In this presentation, a new approach for a flexible low-cost Internet extended enterprise (project FLoCI-EE) will be presented. FLoCI-EE is a project in the fifth framework program of the European commission with 8 partners from 4 countries, which started in January 2001 and will be finished in December 2003. The main objective of FLoCI-EE is the development of a software prototype, which enables flexible enterprise cooperation with the aim to design, manufacture and sell products commonly, independent of enterprise borderlines. The needed IT-support includes functions of product data management (PDM), enterprise resource planning (ERP), supply chain management (SCM) and customer relationship management (CRM). Especially for small and medium sized enterprises, existing solutions are too expensive and inflexible to be of use under current turbulent market conditions. The second part of this paper covers the item Web Services, because in the role-specific support approach of FLoCI-EE, there are user- interface-components, which are tailored for specific roles in an enterprise. These components integrate automatically the services of the so-called basic-components, and the externally offered Web Services like UDDI.

  7. Cooperation, cheating, and collapse in biological populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gore, Jeff

    2014-03-01

    Natural populations can collapse suddenly in response to small changes in environmental conditions, and recovery from such a collapse can be difficult. We have used laboratory microbial ecosystems to directly measure theoretically proposed early warning signals of impending population collapse. Yeast cooperatively break down the sugar sucrose, meaning that below a critical size the population cannot sustain itself. We have demonstrated experimentally that changes in the fluctuations of the population size can serve as an early warning signal that the population is close to collapse. The cooperative nature of yeast growth on sucrose suggests that the population may be susceptible to ``cheater'' cells, which do not contribute to the public good and instead merely take advantage of the cooperative cells. We confirm this possibility experimentally and find that such social parasitism decreases the resilience of the population.

  8. Considering Cooperation: A Guide For New Cooperative Development

    OpenAIRE

    Henehan, Brian M.; Anderson, Bruce L.

    2001-01-01

    This publication reviews the key elements needed for successful formation and development of new cooperative businesses. The motivation for and process of forming cooperatives are discussed. Six phases of cooperative formation are presented including: 1) identifying the opportunity, 2) building consensus on the potential for a cooperative, 3) developing trust among potential members, 4) securing member commitment, 5) involving other stakeholders, and 6) starting up the cooperative enterprise....

  9. Nanomaterial-enabled neural stimulation

    OpenAIRE

    Yongchen eWang; Liang eGuo

    2016-01-01

    Neural stimulation is a critical technique in treating neurological diseases and investigating brain functions. Traditional electrical stimulation uses electrodes to directly create intervening electric fields in the immediate vicinity of neural tissues. Second-generation stimulation techniques directly use light, magnetic fields or ultrasound in a non-contact manner. An emerging generation of non- or minimally invasive neural stimulation techniques is enabled by nanotechnology to achieve a h...

  10. Nanomaterial-Enabled Neural Stimulation

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Yongchen; Guo, Liang

    2016-01-01

    Neural stimulation is a critical technique in treating neurological diseases and investigating brain functions. Traditional electrical stimulation uses electrodes to directly create intervening electric fields in the immediate vicinity of neural tissues. Second-generation stimulation techniques directly use light, magnetic fields or ultrasound in a non-contact manner. An emerging generation of non- or minimally invasive neural stimulation techniques is enabled by nanotechnology to achieve a h...

  11. Decision Making and Cooperation Restrictions.

    OpenAIRE

    2000-01-01

    Decision making by various individuals can result in conflicts or cooperation between these individuals. Game theory deals with both the mathematical modeling of these situations of conflict and cooperation and with the analysis of these models using math atical techniques. This thesis focuses on decision making and cooperation restrictions and can roughly be divided into two parts. The first part provides an analysis of cooperative games with exogenously given cooperation structures. Three t...

  12. Decision making and cooperation restrictions

    OpenAIRE

    Slikker, M.

    2000-01-01

    Decision making by various individuals can result in conflicts or cooperation between these individuals. Game theory deals with both the mathematical modeling of these situations of conflict and cooperation and with the analysis of these models using math atical techniques. This thesis focuses on decision making and cooperation restrictions and can roughly be divided into two parts. The first part provides an analysis of cooperative games with exogenously given cooperation structures. Three t...

  13. 'Ethos' Enabling Organisational Knowledge Creation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsudaira, Yoshito

    This paper examines knowledge creation in relation to improvements on the production line in the manufacturing department of Nissan Motor Company and aims to clarify embodied knowledge observed in the actions of organisational members who enable knowledge creation will be clarified. For that purpose, this study adopts an approach that adds a first, second, and third-person's viewpoint to the theory of knowledge creation. Embodied knowledge, observed in the actions of organisational members who enable knowledge creation, is the continued practice of 'ethos' (in Greek) founded in Nissan Production Way as an ethical basis. Ethos is knowledge (intangible) assets for knowledge creating companies. Substantiated analysis classifies ethos into three categories: the individual, team and organisation. This indicates the precise actions of the organisational members in each category during the knowledge creation process. This research will be successful in its role of showing the indispensability of ethos - the new concept of knowledge assets, which enables knowledge creation -for future knowledge-based management in the knowledge society.

  14. Fundamental Limits of Cooperation

    CERN Document Server

    Lozano, Angel; Andrews, Jeffrey G

    2012-01-01

    Cooperation is viewed as a key ingredient for interference management in wireless systems. This paper shows that cooperation has fundamental limitations. The main result is that even full cooperation between transmitters cannot in general change an interference-limited network to a noise-limited network. The key idea is that there exists a spectral efficiency upper bound that is independent of the transmit power. First, a spectral efficiency upper bound is established for systems that rely on pilot-assisted channel estimation; in this framework, cooperation is shown to be possible only within clusters of limited size, which are subject to out-of-cluster interference whose power scales with that of the in-cluster signals. Second, an upper bound is also shown to exist when cooperation is through noncoherent communication; thus, the spectral efficiency limitation is not a by-product of the reliance on pilot-assisted channel estimation. Consequently, existing literature that routinely assumes the high-power spect...

  15. Performance of MicroLink Cells Developed Under Navy STTR: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-11-426

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emery, K.

    2013-06-01

    Evaluate MicroLink cells as a function of temperature and spectral irradiance following the teams' standard procedures. These measurements will include the standard procedures for evaluating multijunction cells including quantum efficiency measurements and current versus voltage measurements.

  16. Synchrony and cooperation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiltermuth, Scott S; Heath, Chip

    2009-01-01

    Armies, churches, organizations, and communities often engage in activities-for example, marching, singing, and dancing-that lead group members to act in synchrony with each other. Anthropologists and sociologists have speculated that rituals involving synchronous activity may produce positive emotions that weaken the psychological boundaries between the self and the group. This article explores whether synchronous activity may serve as a partial solution to the free-rider problem facing groups that need to motivate their members to contribute toward the collective good. Across three experiments, people acting in synchrony with others cooperated more in subsequent group economic exercises, even in situations requiring personal sacrifice. Our results also showed that positive emotions need not be generated for synchrony to foster cooperation. In total, the results suggest that acting in synchrony with others can increase cooperation by strengthening social attachment among group members. PMID:19152536

  17. Evolution, epigenetics and cooperation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Patrick Bateson

    2014-04-01

    Explanations for biological evolution in terms of changes in gene frequencies refer to outcomes rather than process. Integrating epigenetic studies with older evolutionary theories has drawn attention to the ways in which evolution occurs. Adaptation at the level of the gene is givingway to adaptation at the level of the organism and higher-order assemblages of organisms. These ideas impact on the theories of how cooperation might have evolved. Two of the theories, i.e. that cooperating individuals are genetically related or that they cooperate for self-interested reasons, have been accepted for a long time. The idea that adaptation takes place at the level of groups is much more controversial. However, bringing together studies of development with those of evolution is taking away much of the heat in the debate about the evolution of group behaviour.

  18. International co-operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1996, Nuclear Regulatory Authority of the Slovak Republic (NRA SR) ensured the Slovak Republic (SR) obligations with relation to the international agreements and with the SR membership in the IAEA.International co-operation has been ensured on the basis of the bilateral international agreements. With the Ministry of Foreign Affairs co-operation, the SR fulfilled its financial obligations to this organization in due time and in the full scope. Representing Central and Eastern Europe interest in the Board of Governors, the SR participation in the highest executive in the highest executive authority was finished in 1996.The Board of Governors Vice-chairman position was executed by NRA SR Chairman. 5 national and 6 regional technical co-operation and assistance projects were realized in 1996. 12 organizations participated in these projects and accordingly 104 experts took part in training programmes, scientific visits or as the mission members abroad. Besides, Slovak experts participated at work of technical advisory and consultation groups with the significant assistance. In the framework of IAEA co-operation, the SR was visited by 11 expert missions formed by 28 experts from 19 countries including IAEA. Slovak organizations, namely institutes of the Academy of Sciences, Slovak research centres and universities participated in IAEA scientific and research activities through NRA SR. 15 scientific contracts in total were approved and realized and these contracts are utilized as supplementary financing of the own scientific and research projects. Other international co-operation and regional co-operation activities of the NRA SR in 1996 are reviewed

  19. Cooperate or Free Ride?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Per H.

    2012-01-01

    the establishment of the BIS and free riders in the Austrian crisis, even though there were marked differences in their attitude to international cooperation. These results run counter to the views of those International Political Economy (IPE) theorists who argue that small states should be in favour...... of international cooperation. On the other hand, the evidence seems to confirm Kindleberger's hypothesis that small countries were free riding during the international financial crisis of 1931, and that therefore there is a need for some coordinating mechanism, or a hegemon, in such crises....

  20. Cooperative internal conversion process

    CERN Document Server

    Kálmán, Péter

    2015-01-01

    A new phenomenon, called cooperative internal conversion process, in which the coupling of bound-free electron and neutron transitions due to the dipole term of their Coulomb interaction permits cooperation of two nuclei leading to neutron exchange if it is allowed by energy conservation, is discussed theoretically. General expression of the cross section of the process is reported in one particle nuclear and spherical shell models as well in the case of free atoms (e.g. noble gases). A half-life characteristic of the process is also determined. The case of $Ne$ is investigated numerically. The process may have significance in fields of nuclear waste disposal and nuclear energy production.

  1. Nordic Energy Policy Cooperation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Birte Holst

    2016-01-01

    for Nordic projects of common interests. This created the necessary critical knowledge base in new energy technologies, energy systems and energy markets. Nordic energy policy cooperation followed the ordinary Nordic governance structures, rules and mode of operation with Council of Ministers, supported...... by a committee of senior officials and a secretariat. This was characterised by an incremental development of the cooperation based on consensus, mutual understanding and trust facilitated through exchange of experiences, work groups, seminars, educational activities and mobility schemes for energy policy...

  2. Subradiant split Cooper pairs

    OpenAIRE

    Cottet, Audrey; Kontos, Takis; Yeyati, Alfredo Levy

    2011-01-01

    We suggest a way to characterize the coherence of the split Cooper pairs emitted by a double-quantum-dot based Cooper pair splitter (CPS), by studying the radiative response of such a CPS inside a microwave cavity. The coherence of the split pairs manifests in a strongly nonmonotonic variation of the emitted radiation as a function of the parameters controlling the coupling of the CPS to the cavity. The idea to probe the coherence of the electronic states using the tools of Cavity Quantum Ele...

  3. Cooperative Prototyping Experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bødker, Susanne; Grønbæk, Kaj

    1989-01-01

    tried to achieve a fluent work-like evaluation of prototypes where users envisioned future work with a computer tool, at the same time as we made on-line modifications of prototypes in cooperation with the users when breakdown occur in their work-like evaluation. The experiments showed that it was...... possible to make a number of direct manipulation changes of prototypes in cooperation with the users, in interplay with their fluent work-like evaluation of these. However, breakdown occurred in the prototyping process when we reached the limits of the direct manipulation support for modification. From...

  4. Introduction: cooperative learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José-Manuel Serrano

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The principal objective of this revision is the recognition of cooperative learning as a highly effective strategy for the accomplishment of the general goals in learning. The different investigations assessed validate the potential that a cooperative organization of the classroom could entail for academic achievement, self-esteem, interpersonal attraction or social support. The solidity of the existing research contributes to its external and internal validity and, thus, to conclude that the results are consistent and can be extrapolated to different cultures, ethnic groups or countries.

  5. Toward the Automated Synthesis of Cooperative Mobile Robot Teams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parker, L.E.

    1998-11-01

    A current limitation in the real-world use of cooperating mobiIe robots is the difficulty in determining the proper team composition for a given robotic application. Present technology restricts the design and implementation of cooperative robot teams to the expertise of a robotics researcher, who has to develop robot teams on an application-specific basis. The objective of our research is to reduce the complexity of cooperative robotic systems through the development of a methodology that enables the automated synthesis of cooperative robot teams. We propose an approach to this problem that uses a combination of the theories of sensori-computational systems and information invariants, building on the earlier work of Donald, Rus, et al. We describe the notion of defining equivalence classes that serve as fundamental building blocks of more complex cooperative mobile robot behaviors. We postulate a methodology for framing mission requirements in terms of the goals and constraints of the problem, incorporating issues such as multi-robot interference, communication, control strategy, robot complexity, and so forth, into the mechanism. Our initial work restricts the robot application and design space to three multi-robot application domains we have previously studied and implemented: keeping formation, "mock" hazardous waste cleanup, and cooperative observation. This paper presents the foundational ideas upon which our approach to cooperative team design is based. Keywords: Cooperative behaviors, behavior synthesis, multi-robot learning

  6. Cosmological science enabled by Planck

    OpenAIRE

    White, Martin

    2006-01-01

    Planck will be the first mission to map the entire cosmic microwave background (CMB) sky with mJy sensitivity and resolution better than 10'. The science enabled by such a mission spans many areas of astrophysics and cosmology. In particular it will lead to a revolution in our understanding of primary and secondary CMB anisotropies, the constraints on many key cosmological parameters will be improved by almost an order of magnitude (to sub-percent levels) and the shape and amplitude of the ma...

  7. Amyloid precursor protein cooperates with c-KIT mutation/overexpression to regulate cell apoptosis in AML1-ETO-positive leukemia via the PI3K/AKT signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Guopan; Yin, Changxin; Jiang, Ling; Zheng, Zhongxin; Wang, Zhixiang; Wang, Chunli; Zhou, Hongsheng; Jiang, Xuejie; Liu, Qifa; Meng, Fanyi

    2016-09-01

    It has been reported that amyloid precursor protein (APP) promotes cell proliferation and metastasis in various types of solid cancers. In our previous study, we showed that APP is highly expressed and regulates leukemia cell migration in AML1‑ETO-positive (AE) leukemia. Whether APP is involved in the regulation of AE leukemia cell proliferation or apoptosis is unclear. In the present study we focused on the correlation of APP with c-KIT mutation/overexpression and cell proliferation and apoptosis in AE leukemia. APP and c-KIT expression detected by quantitative real-time (qPCR) method, and c-KIT mutations screened using PCR in bone marrow cells from 65 patients with AE leukemia before their first chemotherapy, were simultaneously assessed. Furthermore, the Kasumi-1 cell line was chosen as the cell model, and the APP gene was knocked down using siRNA technology. The correlation of cell cycle distribution and apoptosis and c-Kit expression with APP expression levels, as well as the regulation of the PI3K/AKT signaling pathway by APP were analyzed in the Kasumi-1 cell line. The results showed that peripheral white blood cell counts (P=0.008) and bone marrow cellularity (P=0.031), but not bone marrow blasts, were correlated with APP expression. Moreover, the patients with APP high expression had a significantly higher incidence of c-KIT mutations (Ptype and negative control cells, cell apoptosis, both early (P0.05). Moreover, the knockdown of APP markedly decreased c-KIT expression at both the transcription (as evidenced by qPCR analysis) and translation (as confirmed by CD117 assay and western blot analysis) levels, as well as p-AKT and its downstream targets including NF-κB, p53 and Bcl-2. In conclusion, APP may cooperate with c-KIT mutation/overexpression in the regulation of cell apoptosis but not proliferation in AE leukemia via the PI3K/AKT signaling pathway. PMID:27460334

  8. Controlling Herds of Cooperative Robots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quadrelli, Marco B.

    2006-01-01

    A document poses, and suggests a program of research for answering, questions of how to achieve autonomous operation of herds of cooperative robots to be used in exploration and/or colonization of remote planets. In a typical scenario, a flock of mobile sensory robots would be deployed in a previously unexplored region, one of the robots would be designated the leader, and the leader would issue commands to move the robots to different locations or aim sensors at different targets to maximize scientific return. It would be necessary to provide for this hierarchical, cooperative behavior even in the face of such unpredictable factors as terrain obstacles. A potential-fields approach is proposed as a theoretical basis for developing methods of autonomous command and guidance of a herd. A survival-of-the-fittest approach is suggested as a theoretical basis for selection, mutation, and adaptation of a description of (1) the body, joints, sensors, actuators, and control computer of each robot, and (2) the connectivity of each robot with the rest of the herd, such that the herd could be regarded as consisting of a set of artificial creatures that evolve to adapt to a previously unknown environment. A distributed simulation environment has been developed to test the proposed approaches in the Titan environment. One blimp guides three surface sondes via a potential field approach. The results of the simulation demonstrate that the method used for control is feasible, even if significant uncertainty exists in the dynamics and environmental models, and that the control architecture provides the autonomy needed to enable surface science data collection.

  9. Negative cooperativity in regulatory enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levitzki, A; Koshland, D E

    1969-04-01

    Negative cooperativity has been observed in CTP synthetase, an allosteric enzyme which contains a regulatory site. Thus, the same enzyme exhibits negative cooperativity for GTP (an effector) and glutamine (a substrate) and positive cooperativity for ATP and UTP (both substrates). In the process of the delineation of these phenomena, diagnostic procedures for negative cooperativity were developed. Application of these procedures to other enzymes indicates that negative cooperativity is a characteristic of many of them. These findings add strong support for the sequential model of subunit interactions which postulates that ligand-induced conformational changes are responsible for regulatory and cooperative phenomena in enzymes. PMID:5256410

  10. Cooperative wireless networks for better green services

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Yang; Zhang Wuxiong; Hu Honglin; Zhang Sihai; Wang Xin; Zhao Haitao; Zhou Wuyang; Wei Jibo

    2011-01-01

    In order to guarantee the overall return on investment ( ROI), improve user experience and quality of service (QoS), save energy, reduce electra magnetic interference (EMI) and radiation pollution, and enable the sustainable deployment of new profitable applications and services in heterogeneous wireless networks coexistence reality, this paper proposes a cross-network cooperation mechanism to effectively share network resources and infrastructures, and then adaptively control and match multi-network energy distribution characteristics according to actual user/service requirements in different geographic areas. Some idle or lightly-loaded base stations ( BS or BSs) will be temporally turned off for saving energy and reducing EMI. Initial simulation results show that the proposed approach can significantly improve the overall energy efficiency and QoS performance across multiple cooperative wireless networks.

  11. Predicting Human Cooperation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nay, John J.; Vorobeychik, Yevgeniy

    2016-01-01

    The Prisoner’s Dilemma has been a subject of extensive research due to its importance in understanding the ever-present tension between individual self-interest and social benefit. A strictly dominant strategy in a Prisoner’s Dilemma (defection), when played by both players, is mutually harmful. Repetition of the Prisoner’s Dilemma can give rise to cooperation as an equilibrium, but defection is as well, and this ambiguity is difficult to resolve. The numerous behavioral experiments investigating the Prisoner’s Dilemma highlight that players often cooperate, but the level of cooperation varies significantly with the specifics of the experimental predicament. We present the first computational model of human behavior in repeated Prisoner’s Dilemma games that unifies the diversity of experimental observations in a systematic and quantitatively reliable manner. Our model relies on data we integrated from many experiments, comprising 168,386 individual decisions. The model is composed of two pieces: the first predicts the first-period action using solely the structural game parameters, while the second predicts dynamic actions using both game parameters and history of play. Our model is successful not merely at fitting the data, but in predicting behavior at multiple scales in experimental designs not used for calibration, using only information about the game structure. We demonstrate the power of our approach through a simulation analysis revealing how to best promote human cooperation. PMID:27171417

  12. Cooperation Or Conflict?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Iran’s recent actions have created confusion and heightened doubt about the future of the nuclear issue Recent events involving Iran have produced high drama. First, the country said it would cooperate with the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) on the

  13. Indian Ocean Rim Cooperation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wippel, Steffen

    Since the mid-1990s, the Indian Ocean has been experiencing increasing economic cooperation among its rim states. Middle Eastern countries, too, participate in the work of the Indian Ocean Rim Association, which received new impetus in the course of the current decade. Notably Oman is a very active...

  14. Cooperative Learning and Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, G. M.; Kimura, H.

    2013-01-01

    In and out of the classroom, life would be unthinkable without interacting with fellow humans. This book urges more cooperative and group activities in the English language classroom for all the advantages: students use the target language more, help each other with comprehension, receive attention from peers as well as the teacher, are motivated…

  15. Supranational Cooperation in Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Deugd, Nienke; Stamm, Katharina; Westerman, Wim

    2013-01-01

    The sovereign debt crisis and the euro crisis have prompted heads of state and government in Europe to intensify supranational cooperation. However, some political leaders and policy makers aim for more. They propose the introduction of a common European economic government that would prevent Europe

  16. Cooperative Mobile Sensing Networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberts, R S; Kent, C A; Jones, E D; Cunningham, C T; Armstrong, G W

    2003-02-10

    A cooperative control architecture is presented that allows a fleet of Unmanned Air Vehicles (UAVs) to collect data in a parallel, coordinated and optimal manner. The architecture is designed to react to a set of unpredictable events thereby allowing data collection to continue in an optimal manner.

  17. Cooperating with the future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauser, Oliver P.; Rand, David G.; Peysakhovich, Alexander; Nowak, Martin A.

    2014-07-01

    Overexploitation of renewable resources today has a high cost on the welfare of future generations. Unlike in other public goods games, however, future generations cannot reciprocate actions made today. What mechanisms can maintain cooperation with the future? To answer this question, we devise a new experimental paradigm, the `Intergenerational Goods Game'. A line-up of successive groups (generations) can each either extract a resource to exhaustion or leave something for the next group. Exhausting the resource maximizes the payoff for the present generation, but leaves all future generations empty-handed. Here we show that the resource is almost always destroyed if extraction decisions are made individually. This failure to cooperate with the future is driven primarily by a minority of individuals who extract far more than what is sustainable. In contrast, when extractions are democratically decided by vote, the resource is consistently sustained. Voting is effective for two reasons. First, it allows a majority of cooperators to restrain defectors. Second, it reassures conditional cooperators that their efforts are not futile. Voting, however, only promotes sustainability if it is binding for all involved. Our results have implications for policy interventions designed to sustain intergenerational public goods.

  18. EFFECTIVENESS OF COOPERATIVE LEARNING STRATEGIES IN DEVELOPMENT OF COOPERATIVE SKILLS

    OpenAIRE

    K. C. Kulkarni

    2015-01-01

    Cooperative Learning Skills :David Johnson and Roger Johnson (2009a) explain five elements that define true cooperative learning groups : (i) Positive interdependence ; (ii) Promotive interaction ; (iii) Individual accountability ; (iv) Collaborative and social skills ; (v) Group processing.

  19. To Cooperate or Not to Cooperate: Why Behavioural Mechanisms Matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, Arthur; André, Jean-Baptiste; Bredeche, Nicolas

    2016-05-01

    Mutualistic cooperation often requires multiple individuals to behave in a coordinated fashion. Hence, while the evolutionary stability of mutualistic cooperation poses no particular theoretical difficulty, its evolutionary emergence faces a chicken and egg problem: an individual cannot benefit from cooperating unless other individuals already do so. Here, we use evolutionary robotic simulations to study the consequences of this problem for the evolution of cooperation. In contrast with standard game-theoretic results, we find that the transition from solitary to cooperative strategies is very unlikely, whether interacting individuals are genetically related (cooperation evolves in 20% of all simulations) or unrelated (only 3% of all simulations). We also observe that successful cooperation between individuals requires the evolution of a specific and rather complex behaviour. This behavioural complexity creates a large fitness valley between solitary and cooperative strategies, making the evolutionary transition difficult. These results reveal the need for research on biological mechanisms which may facilitate this transition. PMID:27148874

  20. Promotion of cooperation by selective group extinction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böttcher, Marvin A.; Nagler, Jan

    2016-06-01

    Multilevel selection is an important organizing principle that crucially underlies evolutionary processes from the emergence of cells to eusociality and the economics of nations. Previous studies on multilevel selection assumed that the effective higher-level selection emerges from lower-level reproduction. This leads to selection among groups, although only individuals reproduce. We introduce selective group extinction, where groups die with a probability inversely proportional to their group fitness. When accounting for this the critical benefit-to-cost ratio is substantially lowered. Because in game theory and evolutionary dynamics the degree of cooperation crucially depends on this ratio above which cooperation emerges, previous studies may have substantially underestimated the establishment and maintenance of cooperation.

  1. DNA Ligase IV and Artemis Act Cooperatively to Suppress Homologous Recombination in Human Cells: Implications for DNA Double-Strand Break Repair

    OpenAIRE

    Aya Kurosawa; Shinta Saito; Sairei So; Mitsumasa Hashimoto; Kuniyoshi Iwabuchi; Haruka Watabe; Noritaka Adachi

    2013-01-01

    Nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) and homologous recombination (HR) are two major pathways for repairing DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs); however, their respective roles in human somatic cells remain to be elucidated. Here we show using a series of human gene-knockout cell lines that NHEJ repairs nearly all of the topoisomerase II- and low-dose radiation-induced DNA damage, while it negatively affects survival of cells harbouring replication-associated DSBs. Intriguingly, we find that loss of ...

  2. [Social cooperatives in Italy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villotti, P; Zaniboni, S; Fraccaroli, F

    2014-06-01

    This paper describes the role of social cooperatives in Italy as a type of economic, non-profit organization and their role in contributing to the economic and social growth of the country. The purpose of this paper is to learn more about the experience of the Italian social cooperatives in promoting the work integration process of disadvantaged workers, especially those suffering from mental disorders, from a theoretical and an empirical point of view. Social enterprise is the most popular and consolidated legal and organizational model for social enterprises in Italy, introduced by Law 381/91. Developed during the early 1980s, and formally recognized by law in the early 1990s, social cooperatives aim at pursuing the general interest of the community to promote the human needs and social inclusion of citizens. They are orientated towards aims that go beyond the interest of the business owners, the primary beneficiary of their activities is the community, or groups of disadvantaged people. In Italy, Law 381/91 distinguishes between two categories of social cooperatives, those producing goods of social utility, such as culture, welfare and educational services (A-type), and those providing economic activities for the integration of disadvantaged people into employment (B-type). The main purpose of B-type social cooperatives is to integrate disadvantaged people into the open labour market. This goal is reached after a period of training and working experience inside the firm, during which the staff works to improve both the social and professional abilities of disadvantaged people. During the years, B-type social co-ops acquired a particular relevance in the care of people with mental disorders by offering them with job opportunities. Having a job is central in the recovery process of people suffering from mental diseases, meaning that B-type social co-ops in Italy play an important rehabilitative and integrative role for this vulnerable population of workers. The

  3. A User Cooperation Stimulating Strategy Based on Cooperative Game Theory in Cooperative Relay Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Zhang

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a user cooperation stimulating strategy among rational users. The strategy is based on cooperative game theory and enacted in the context of cooperative relay networks. Using the pricing-based mechanism, the system is modeled initially with two nodes and a Base Station (BS. Within this framework, each node is treated as a rational decision maker. To this end, each node can decide whether to cooperate and how to cooperate. Cooperative game theory assists in providing an optimal system utility and provides fairness among users. Under different cooperative forwarding modes, certain questions are carefully investigated, including “what is each node's best reaction to maximize its utility?” and “what is the optimal reimbursement to encourage cooperation?” Simulation results show that the nodes benefit from the proposed cooperation stimulating strategy in terms of utility and thus justify the fairness between each user.

  4. Cooperative effects of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 envelope variable loops V1 and V3 in mediating infectivity for T cells.

    OpenAIRE

    A. Carrillo; Ratner, L

    1996-01-01

    Insertion of T-cell line-tropic V3 and V4 loops from the HXB2 strain into the macrophage-tropic YU-2 envelope resulted in a virus with delayed infectivity for HUT78 and Jurkat cells compared with HXB2. Sequence analysis of viral DNA derived from long-term cultures of Jurkat cells revealed a specific mutation that changed a highly conserved Asn residue in the V1 loop of Env to an Asp residue (N-136-->D). Introduction of this mutation into clones containing a T-cell line-tropic V3 loop, either ...

  5. Harvest-Then-Cooperate: Wireless-Powered Cooperative Communications

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, He; Li, Yonghui; Rebelatto, Joao Luiz; Uchoa-Filhoand, Bartolomeu F.; Vucetic, Branka

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we consider a wireless-powered cooperative communication network consisting of one hybrid access-point (AP), one source, and one relay. In contrast to conventional cooperative networks, the source and relay in the considered network have no embedded energy supply. They need to rely on the energy harvested from the signals broadcasted by the AP for their cooperative information transmission. Based on this three-node reference model, we propose a harvest-then-cooperate (HTC) prot...

  6. Cooperative effects of neuronal ensembles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, G; Siebler, M

    1995-01-01

    Electrophysiological properties of neurons as the basic cellular elements of the central nervous system and their synaptic connections are well characterized down to a molecular level. However, the behavior of complex noisy networks formed by these constituents usually cannot simply be derived from the knowledge of its microscopic parameters. As a consequence, cooperative phenomena based on the interaction of neurons were postulated. This is a report on a study of global network spike activity as a function of synaptic interaction. We performed experiments in dissociated cultured hippocampal neurons and, for comparison, simulations of a mathematical model closely related to electrophysiology. Numeric analyses revealed that at a critical level of synaptic connectivity the firing behavior undergoes a phase transition. This cooperative effect depends crucially on the interaction of numerous cells and cannot be attributed to the spike threshold of individual neurons. In the experiment a drastic increase in the firing level was observed upon increase of synaptic efficacy by lowering of the extracellular magnesium concentration, which is compatible with our theoretical predictions. This "on-off" phenomenon demonstrates that even in small neuronal ensembles collective behavior can emerge which is not explained by the characteristics of single neurons. PMID:8542966

  7. Cooperative lignification of xylem tracheary elements

    OpenAIRE

    Serk, Henrik; Gorzsás, András; Tuominen, Hannele; Pesquet, Edouard

    2015-01-01

    The development of xylem tracheary elements (TEs) – the hydro-mineral sap conducting cells - has been an evolutionary breakthrough to enable long distance nutrition and upright growth of vascular land plants. To allow sap conduction, TEs form hollow laterally reinforced cylinders by combining programmed cell death and secondary cell wall formation. To ensure their structural resistance for sap conduction, TE cell walls are reinforced with the phenolic polymer lignin, which is deposited after ...

  8. Context-Enabled Business Intelligence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Troy Hiltbrand

    2012-04-01

    To truly understand context and apply it in business intelligence, it is vital to understand what context is and how it can be applied in addressing organizational needs. Context describes the facets of the environment that impact the way that end users interact with the system. Context includes aspects of location, chronology, access method, demographics, social influence/ relationships, end-user attitude/ emotional state, behavior/ past behavior, and presence. To be successful in making Business Intelligence content enabled, it is important to be able to capture the context of use user. With advances in technology, there are a number of ways in which this user based information can be gathered and exposed to enhance the overall end user experience.

  9. Sharing the sandbox: Evolutionary mechanisms that maintain bacterial cooperation [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Bruger

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Microbes are now known to participate in an extensive repertoire of cooperative behaviors such as biofilm formation, production of extracellular public-goods, group motility, and higher-ordered multicellular structures. A fundamental question is how these cooperative tasks are maintained in the face of non-cooperating defector cells. Recently, a number of molecular mechanisms including facultative participation, spatial sorting, and policing have been discovered to stabilize cooperation. Often these different mechanisms work in concert to reinforce cooperation. In this review, we describe bacterial cooperation and the current understanding of the molecular mechanisms that maintain it.

  10. Musharraf calls for North-South cooperation: Science and technology

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    "President Gen Pervez Musharraf has called for improved North-South cooperation in scinece and technology and said it would enable millions of people in the developing countries to realize the goal of rapid socio-economic progress" (1.5 page)

  11. Cooperating for assisting intelligently operators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We are in the process of an intelligent cooperative system in a nuclear plant application. The system must cooperate with an operator who accomplishes a task of supervision of a real-world process. We point out in the paper that a cooperation between a cooperative system and an operator has two modes: a waking state and a participating state. During the waking state, the system observes the operator's behavior and the consequences on the process. During the participation state, the cooperative system builds jointly with the user a solution to the problem. In our approach, the cooperation depends on the system capabilities to explain, to incrementally acquire knowledge and to make explicit the context of the cooperation. We develop these ideas in the framework of the design of the cooperative system in the nuclear plant. (authors). 22 refs., 1 fig

  12. Merging Cooperatives: Planning, Negotiating, Implementing

    OpenAIRE

    Swanson, Bruce L.

    1985-01-01

    Guidelines for reorganization of cooperatives through merger, acquisition, or consolidation are provided. Planning, negotiating, and implementing phases of reorganization are covered. Items from actual combinations of cooperatives are reported as they relate to phases of the reorganization process.

  13. Conceptual Considerations for Reducing the Computational Complexity in Software Defined Radio using Cooperative Wireless Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Jesper Michael; Fitzek, Frank H. P.; Koch, Peter;

    2005-01-01

    This paper motivates the application of Software defined radio as the enabling technology in the implementation of future wireless terminals for 4G. It outlines the advantages and disadvantages of SDR in terms of Flexibility and reconfigurability versus computational complexity. To mitigate...... the expected increase in complexity leading to a decrease in energy efficiency, cooperative wireless networks are introduced. Cooperative wireless networks enables the concept of resource sharing. Resource sharing is interpreted as collaborative signal processing. This interpretation leads to the concept...

  14. Prospects of ASEAN Legal Cooperation

    OpenAIRE

    Agus Riyanto

    2016-01-01

    Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) is a regional organization in the countries of Southeast Asia established in Bangkok, Thailand, on August 8, 1967 (the Bangkok Declaration) by Indonesia, Malaysia, Philippines, Singapore, and Thailand. One form of cooperation that could further encourage the establishment of ASEAN's goal was legal cooperation. This was because, this cooperation could further strengthen cooperation in politics, economy, social and culture in Southeast Asia. ...

  15. International cooperation for operating safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The international-cooperation organization in nuclear safety domain is discussed. The nuclear energy Direction Committee is helped by the Security Committee for Nuclear Power Plants in the cooperation between security organizations of member countries and in the safety and nuclear activity regulations. The importance of the cooperation between experts in human being and engine problems is underlined. The applied methods, exchange activities and activity analysis, and the cooperation of the Nuclear Energy Agency and international organizations is analysed

  16. Cooperation in regional nuclear training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents an overview of the nuclear training currently being undertaken in the countries of the co-authors, and considers the degree to which training problems are amenable to common solutions such as cooperative regional training programs. Different types of cooperation are discussed including the development of regional and international training centers, cooperative bilateral and multilateral training, and the proposed US International Nuclear Safety Training Academy. The paper provides suggestions of ways for enhancing regional cooperation

  17. Financial Performance of Dairy Cooperatives

    OpenAIRE

    Stafford, Thomas H.

    1985-01-01

    Combined balance sheets and operating statements were used to develop benchmark financial ratios for dairy marketing cooperatives. Data from 291 cooperatives were summarized for five types of dairy cooperatives, then by three types and three size combinations. Both type and size of cooperative made differences in most of the 16 financial ratios calculated as well as in the common size balance sheets and operating statements.

  18. Cooperation of c-raf-1 and c-myc protooncogenes in the neoplastic transformation of simian virus 40 large tumor antigen-immortalized human bronchial epithelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Overexpression of c-raf-1 and the myc family of protooncogenes is primarily associated with small cell carcinoma, which accounts for ∼ 25% of human lung cancer. To determine the functional significance of the c-raf-1 and/or c-myc gene expression in lung carcinogenesis and to delineate the relationship between protooncogene expression and tumor phenotype, the authors introduced both protooncogenes, alone or in combination, into human bronchial epithelial cells. Two retroviral recombinants, pZip-raf and pZip-myc, containing the complete coding sequences of the human c-raf-1 and murine c-myc genes, respectively, were constructed and transfected into simian virus 40 large tumor antigen-immortalized bronchial epithelial cells (BEAS-2B); this was followed by selection for G418 resistance. Cell lines established from tumors (designated RMT) revealed the presence of the cotransfected c-raf-1 and c-myc sequences and expressed morphological, chromosomal, and isoenzyme markers, which identified BEAS-2B cells as the progenitor line of the tumors. The data demonstrate that the concomitant expression of the c-raf and c-myc protooncogenes causes neoplastic transformation of human bronchial epithelial cells resulting in large cell carcinomas with certain neuroendocrine markers. The presented model system should be useful in studies of molecular events involved in multistage lung carcinogenesis

  19. High-Temperature Cooper pairing Between Different Chemical Species

    CERN Document Server

    Mackie, M; Piilo, J; Suominen, K A; Javanainen, J; Mackie, Matt; Dannenberg, Olavi; Piilo, Jyrki; Suominen, Kalle-Antti; Javanainen, Juha

    2003-01-01

    First introduced to explain superconductivity, anomalous quantum correlations between degenerate electrons with equal and opposite momentum, i.e., Cooper pairs, are due physically to an electron-electron attraction mediated by the exchange of lattice-vibration-generated phonons. Cooper-like pairing between different chemical species was immediately suggested to explain the larger excitation energy for nuclei with even-rather-than-odd numbers of nucleons, although unambiguous evidence for proton-neutron pairs never manifested. Here we report the prospect of Cooper pairing between different chemical species in a degenerate Fermi atom-molecule mixture submerged in a Bose condensate of atoms, a state enabled via two-color Raman photoassociation of a Bose-Fermi mixture of degenerate atoms. Condensate density fluctuations replace the vibrating ion lattice of the superconductor, and phonon exchange induces atom-molecule Cooper pairing at about a third of the Fermi temperature.

  20. The evolutionary origin of human hyper-cooperation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkart, J M; Allon, O; Amici, F; Fichtel, C; Finkenwirth, C; Heschl, A; Huber, J; Isler, K; Kosonen, Z K; Martins, E; Meulman, E J; Richiger, R; Rueth, K; Spillmann, B; Wiesendanger, S; van Schaik, C P

    2014-01-01

    Proactive, that is, unsolicited, prosociality is a key component of our hyper-cooperation, which in turn has enabled the emergence of various uniquely human traits, including complex cognition, morality and cumulative culture and technology. However, the evolutionary foundation of the human prosocial sentiment remains poorly understood, largely because primate data from numerous, often incommensurable testing paradigms do not provide an adequate basis for formal tests of the various functional hypotheses. We therefore present the results of standardized prosociality experiments in 24 groups of 15 primate species, including humans. Extensive allomaternal care is by far the best predictor of interspecific variation in proactive prosociality. Proactive prosocial motivations therefore systematically arise whenever selection favours the evolution of cooperative breeding. Because the human data fit this general primate pattern, the adoption of cooperative breeding by our hominin ancestors also provides the most parsimonious explanation for the origin of human hyper-cooperation. PMID:25158760

  1. A Distributed MAC Protocol for Cooperation in Random Access Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Böcherer, Georg

    2008-01-01

    WLAN is one of the most successful applications of wireless communications in daily life because of low cost and ease of deployment. The enabling technique for this success is the use of random access schemes for the wireless channel. Random access requires minimal coordination between the nodes, which considerably reduces the cost of the infrastructure. Recently, cooperative communication in wireless networks has been of increasing interest because it promises higher rates and reliability. An additional MAC overhead is necessary to coordinate the nodes to allow cooperation and this overhead can possibly cancel out the cooperative benefits. In this work, a completely distributed protocol is proposed that allows nodes in the network to cooperate via Two-Hop and Decode-and-Forward for transmitting their data to a common gateway node. It is shown that high throughput gains are obtained in terms of the individual throughput that can be guaranteed to any node in the network. These results are validated by Monte Ca...

  2. Broadband near-infrared quantum-cutting by cooperative energy transfer in Yb3+–Bi3+ co-doped CaTiO3 for solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Broadband NIR QC CaTiO3:Yb3+,Bi3+ phosphor has been firstly developed. • Co-doping with Bi3+, it enhanced the Yb3+ emission intensity by a factor of 10. • This phosphor could efficiently convert 300–480 nm light to ∼1000 nm light. • The ET processes were involved in CET via two photons QC process. - Abstract: An efficient near-infrared (NIR) quantum-cutting (QC) process which converts broadband ultraviolet-blue into NIR via downconversion (DC) has been demonstrated in CaTiO3:Yb3+,Bi3+ phosphors for the first time. These phosphors are valuable for use in crystalline Si (c-Si) solar cells, because they efficiently convert 300–480 nm light that is not fully utilized by existing c-Si solar cells into ∼1000 nm NIR light that can be sufficiently absorbed by solar cells. Co-doping with 15% Bi3+ ions, a significant enhancement in Yb3+ NIR integrated emission intensity by a factor of 10 is realized. The phosphors were characterized with the photoluminescence excitation (PLE) and the photoluminescence (PL) spectra evidence the presence of energy transfer (ET) processes from Bi3+-related charge transfer state to Yb3+ ions. The dependence of Yb3+ luminescent intensity on the excitation power was also measured and it demonstrates that the ET processes involve cooperative energy transfer (CET) via two photons QC processes

  3. Cooperative Learning in Elementary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slavin, Robert E.

    2015-01-01

    Cooperative learning refers to instructional methods in which students work in small groups to help each other learn. Although cooperative learning methods are used for different age groups, they are particularly popular in elementary (primary) schools. This article discusses methods and theoretical perspectives on cooperative learning for the…

  4. COOPERATIVE LEARNING IN LARGE CLASSES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GuoXiangju

    2004-01-01

    Teaching college English in large classes is a new challenge to teachers. To meet this challenge, the strategy of cooperative learning is practicable. This paper introduces cooperative learning and describes the experiment results, which prove the advantages of cooperative learning over competitive learning or individualistic learning.

  5. Enlightening Advantages of Cooperative Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faryadi, Qais

    2007-01-01

    This appraisal discusses the notion that cooperative learning enhances learners' emotional and social performance. It also observes the perception that cooperative learning dramatically improves students' academic accomplishment. This review also examines the definition of cooperative learning and attempts to define it through the lens of renowned…

  6. Gender and Cooperation in Children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cardenas, Juan-Camilo; Dreber, Anna; Essen, Emma von; Ranehill, Eva

    between Colombia and Sweden overall. However, Colombian girls cooperate less than Swedish girls. We also find indications that girls in Colombia are less cooperative than boys. Finally, there is also a tendency for children to be more cooperative with boys than with girls on average....

  7. Nordic cooperation in nuclear safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new four-year safety programme is outlined as a continuation of two previous Nordic programmes, the first of which started in 1977 and the second in 1981. The programme will be carried out as a cooperation between institutions within the Nordic countries. It will be partly financed by the Nordic Council of Ministers. The programme encompasses work within five prinicpal areas: - release of radioactivity, its dispersion and environmental impact - nuclear waste management - risk analysis and safety philosophy - materials research - advanced information technology. The programme is planned with the aim to provide answers on questions that will be relevant towards the end of the present decade in order to maintain the high safety level of nuclear installations in the Nordic countries. The programme will also provide decision makers with background information to enable them to realistically judge the impact of nuclear power and the precautions necessary in order to maintain its safety. This joint effort makes it possible to coordinate resources available in the Nordic countries, which in turn results in an increased efficiency of the research. The results are intended to be applicable also outside the nuclear field. More than thirty project descriptions are included within the five principal working areas. The programme calls for a Nordic financing of 26 million Norwegian Kroner over the four-year period. National contributions are expected to correspond to an amount larger than the Nordic funding. (authors)

  8. Enabling Participation In Exoplanet Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Stuart F.

    2015-08-01

    Determining the distribution of exoplanets has required the contributions of a community of astronomers, who all require the support of colleagues to finish their projects in a manner to enable them to enter new collaborations to continue to contribute to understanding exoplanet science.The contributions of each member of the astronomy community are to be encouraged and must never be intentionally obstructed.We present a member’s long pursuit to be a contributing part of the exoplanet community through doing transit photometry as a means of commissioning the telescopes for a new observatory, followed by pursuit of interpreting the distributions in exoplanet parameter data.We present how the photometry projects have been presented as successful by the others who have claimed to have completed them, but how by requiring its employees to present results while omitting one member has been obstructive against members working together and has prevented the results from being published in what can genuinely be called a peer-reviewed fashion.We present how by tolerating one group to obstruct one member from finishing participation and then falsely denying credit is counterproductive to doing science.We show how expecting one member to attempt to go around an ostracizing group by starting something different is destructive to the entire profession. We repeat previously published appeals to help ostracized members to “go around the observatory” by calling for discussion on how the community must act to reverse cases of shunning, bullying, and other abuses. Without better recourse and support from the community, actions that do not meet standard good collegial behavior end up forcing good members from the community. The most important actions are to enable an ostracized member to have recourse to participating in group papers by either working through other authors or through the journal. All journals and authors must expect that no co-author is keeping out a major

  9. Cooperative Learning i voksenundervisningen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wahlgren, Bjarne

    Nationalt Center for Kompetenceudvikling har evalueret undervisningsmetoden Cooperative Learning i voksenundervisningen og dokumenteret positive effekter på oplevelsen af samarbejde og på lærere og kursisters engagement - men har ikke kunnet påvise systematiske positive effekter af metoden på...... kursisters frafald, fravær og karakterer. Projektet har afprøvet og videreudviklet den pædagogiske metode Cooperative Learning (CL) i en dansk virkelighed og mere specifikt i forhold til VUC'ernes nye kursistgrupper med det overordnede mål at øge gennemførslen markant og målbart ved at anvende og udvikle en...

  10. Cooperation between employers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guidance is given on the application of the Ionising Radiations Regulations 1985 (IRR 85) and the Ionising Radiations (Outside Workers) Regulations 1993 (OWRs) in circumstances where the operations of the employees of one organisation have the potential to expose to ionising radiation the employees of another. One of the Regulations of IRR 85 makes it mandatory for employers to cooperate in such circumstances. OWRs give more detailed requirements for the performance of the duties where one employers' classified employee works in another employer's controlled area. This document explains the separate responsibilities of site operators and contractors in situations where cooperation is required, and gives guidance on how it can be achieved. It also gives guidance to nuclear site licence holders regarding their duties under IRR 85 in such circumstances. (Author)

  11. Strategies of inducing cooperation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of the four experiments described in this paper are very consistent, and they can be summarized as follows: (1) The ''nonpunitive'' strategy was most effective in eliciting cooperative behavior from the subjects and, overall, resulted in the highest joint outcomes as well as the highest outcomes for the accomplice. (2) The effectiveness of the turn-the-other-cheek strategy was very much influenced by the competitiveness of the situation; the more competitive the incentives of the subjects, the more massively they exploited the accomplice who employed this strategy. (3) The punitive deterrent strategy elicited more agressive and self-protective, as well as less cooperative, behavior from the subjects than did the other strategies

  12. International cooperative information systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Developing countries need mechanisms by which the information they generate themselves and development information from the rest of the world can be retrieved. The international cooperative information system is such a mechanism. Delegates to the Seminar on International Cooperative Information Systems were informed about various existing systems (INIS, AGRIS, INFOTERRA, TCDC/INRES, POPIN, DEVSIS, and INPADROC), some specialized information systems and services (CDS/ISIS and the Cassava Information Centre), and computer programs for information processing (INIS/AGRIS, CDS/ISIS, and MINISIS). The participants suggested some changes that should be made on both the national and the international levels to ensure that these systems meet the needs of developing countries more effectively. (LL)

  13. Cooperative Retransmissions Through Collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Qureshi, Jalaluddin; Foh, Chuan Heng

    2011-01-01

    Interference in wireless networks is one of the key capacity-limiting factors. Recently developed interference-embracing techniques show promising performance on turning collisions into useful transmissions. However, the interference-embracing techniques are hard to apply in practical applications due to their strict requirements. In this paper, we consider utilising the interference-embracing techniques in a common scenario of two interfering sender-receiver pairs. By employing opportunistic listening and analog network coding (ANC), we show that compared to traditional ARQ retransmission, a higher retransmission throughput can be achieved by allowing two interfering senders to cooperatively retransmit selected lost packets at the same time. This simultaneous retransmission is facilitated by a simple handshaking procedure without introducing additional overhead. Simulation results demonstrate the superior performance of the proposed cooperative retransmission.

  14. A Secure NEC-enabling Architecture : Disentangling Infrastructure, Information and Security

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boonstra, D.; Hartog, T.; Schotanus, H.A.; Verkoelen, C.A.A.

    2011-01-01

    The NATO Network-Enabled Capability (NNEC) study envisions effective and efficient cooperation among the coalition partners in missions. This requires information sharing and efficient deployment of IT assets. Current military communication infrastructures are mostly deployed as stand-alone networke

  15. LET-418/Mi2 and SPR-5/LSD1 Cooperatively Prevent Somatic Reprogramming of C. elegans Germline Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stéphanie Käser-Pébernard

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Throughout their journey to forming new individuals, germline stem cells must remain totipotent, particularly by maintaining a specific chromatin structure. However, the place epigenetic factors occupy in this process remains elusive. So far, “sensitization” of chromatin by modulation of histone arrangement and/or content was believed to facilitate transcription-factor-induced germ cell reprogramming. Here, we demonstrate that the combined reduction of two epigenetic factors suffices to reprogram C. elegans germ cells. The histone H3K4 demethylase SPR-5/LSD1 and the chromatin remodeler LET-418/Mi2 function together in an early process to maintain germ cell status and act as a barrier to block precocious differentiation. This epigenetic barrier is capable of limiting COMPASS-mediated H3K4 methylation, because elevated H3K4me3 levels correlate with germ cell reprogramming in spr-5; let-418 mutants. Interestingly, germ cells deficient for spr-5 and let-418 mainly reprogram as neurons, suggesting that neuronal fate might be the first to be derepressed in early embryogenesis.

  16. Pioneers in Cooperation (selection)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    @@ Project-oriented cooperation within the framework of the CAS-MPSagreement began in the early 1980s. Its methods differed according to scientific needs and included workshops and seminars, field research, overland expeditions, exchanges of materials and samples, and the training of young scientists and engineers. The German Research Foundation and the National Natural Science Foundation of China provided special funding for many of these projects.

  17. Le banche popolari cooperative

    OpenAIRE

    Schilirò, Daniele

    2011-01-01

    Co-operative banks are an important reality of the credit system and they are spread in Italy and in Europe. These banks are a category different from other banks, as are characterized by a legal form which has some very specific characteristics. These banks may contribute to the development of human capital and the strengthening of social capital, but also to the development of the knowledge economy that thrives on knowledge and tacit knowledge passed down through the local culture. This ess...

  18. Crisis-Driven Cooperation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Not hit as badly as the West, East Asian and Southeast Asian countries grapple with the financial crisis from a long-term perspective Although Thailand postponed at the last minute the annual summits of East Asian and Southeast Asian leaders scheduled on April 11-12, regional cooperation will continue to forge ahead with full vigor, even more so in the context of the global financial crisis, said Chinese international studies experts.

  19. Quantized Cooperative Control

    OpenAIRE

    Guo, Meng

    2011-01-01

    In this thesis project, we consider the cooperative control of multi-agent systems under limited communication between the individual agents. In particular, quantized values of the relatives states between neighboring agents are used as the control parameters for each agent. As an introductory part, the theoretical framework for the distributed consensus problem under perfect communication is reviewed with the focus on the system stability and convergence. We start from the common problem set...

  20. CoopTFD: a repository for predicted yeast cooperative transcription factor pairs

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Wei-Sheng; Lai, Fu-Jou; Tu, Bor-Wen; Chang, Darby Tien-Hao

    2016-01-01

    In eukaryotic cells, transcriptional regulation of gene expression is usually accomplished by cooperative Transcription Factors (TFs). Therefore, knowing cooperative TFs is helpful for uncovering the mechanisms of transcriptional regulation. In yeast, many cooperative TF pairs have been predicted by various algorithms in the literature. However, until now, there is still no database which collects the predicted yeast cooperative TFs from existing algorithms. This prompts us to construct Coope...

  1. Cooperative Mobile Web Browsing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Q

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper advocates a novel approach for mobile web browsing based on cooperation among wireless devices within close proximity operating in a cellular environment. In the actual state of the art, mobile phones can access the web using different cellular technologies. However, the supported data rates are not sufficient to cope with the ever increasing traffic requirements resulting from advanced and rich content services. Extending the state of the art, higher data rates can only be achieved by increasing complexity, cost, and energy consumption of mobile phones. In contrast to the linear extension of current technology, we propose a novel architecture where mobile phones are grouped together in clusters, using a short-range communication such as Bluetooth, sharing, and accumulating their cellular capacity. The accumulated data rate resulting from collaborative interactions over short-range links can then be used for cooperative mobile web browsing. By implementing the cooperative web browsing on commercial mobile phones, it will be shown that better performance is achieved in terms of increased data rate and therefore reduced access times, resulting in a significantly enhanced web browsing user experience on mobile phones.

  2. Cooperatively active sensing system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aiming at development of a strong and flexible sensing system, a study on a sensing technology prepared with cooperativity, activity, and real time workability has been promoted. In the former period, together with preparation of plural moving robot group with real time processing capacity of a lot of sensor informations composing of platform, a parallel object direction language Eus Lisp effectively capable of describing and executing cooperative processing and action therewith was developed. And, it was also shown that capacity to adaptively act even at dynamic environment could be learnt experientially. And, on processing of individual sensor information, application of a photographing system with multiple resolution property similar to human visual sense property was attempted. In the latter period, together with intending of upgrading on adaptability of sensing function, by using moving robot group in center of a moving robot loaded with active visual sense, a cooperative active sensing prototype system was constructed to show effectiveness of this study through evaluation experiment of patrolling inspection at plant simulating environment. (G.K.)

  3. Technical Co-operation between developing countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the plan of activities of the project Int/0/060 Technical Cooperation Between Developing Countries a Workshop on Public Awareness Promotional Literature was included with the purpose of preparing public and professional awareness literature and to develop a strategy which would enable Tissue Banks to present their mission to their public,professional health workers and clinical users.To identify the information to be provided to potential donors about the value of the donation.To prepare instructions to be given to potential users about the various types of grafts available.To develop a strategy wi ch would enable Tissue Banks to present themselves to their public and tissue users

  4. Cooperative robots and sensor networks 2014

    CERN Document Server

    Khelil, Abdelmajid

    2014-01-01

    This book is the second volume on Cooperative Robots and Sensor Networks. The primary objective of this book is to provide an up-to-date reference for cutting-edge studies and research trends related to mobile robots and wireless sensor networks, and in particular for the coupling between them. Indeed, mobile robots and wireless sensor networks have enabled great potentials and a large space for ubiquitous and pervasive applications. Robotics and wireless sensor networks have mostly been considered as separate research fields and little work has investigated the marriage between these two technologies. However, these two technologies share several features, enable common cyber-physical applications and provide complementary support to each other. The book consists of ten chapters, organized into four parts. The first part of the book presents three chapters related to localization of mobile robots using wireless sensor networks. Two chapters presented new solutions based Extended Kalman Filter and Particle Fi...

  5. Telomerase Reverse Transcriptase and Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor γ Co-Activator-1α Cooperate to Protect Cells from DNA Damage and Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Vascular Senescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendelsohn, Andrew R; Larrick, James W

    2015-10-01

    Reduced telomere length with increasing age in dividing cells has been implicated in contributing to the pathologies of human aging, which include cardiovascular and metabolic disorders, through induction of cellular senescence. Telomere shortening results from the absence of telomerase, an enzyme required to maintain telomere length. Telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT), the protein subunit of telomerase, is expressed only transiently in a subset of adult somatic cells, which include stem cells and smooth muscle cells. A recent report from Xiong and colleagues demonstrates a pivotal role for the transcription co-factor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ co-activator-1α (PGC-1α) in maintaining TERT expression and preventing vascular senescence and atherosclerosis in mice. Ablation of PGC-1α reduced TERT expression and increased DNA damage and reactive oxygen species (ROS), resulting in shortened telomeres and vascular senescence. In the ApoE(-/-) mouse model of atherosclerosis, forced expression of PGC-1α increased expression of TERT, extended telomeres, and reversed genomic DNA damage, vascular senescence, and the development of atherosclerotic plaques. Alpha lipoic acid (ALA) stimulated expression of PGC-1α and TERT and reversed DNA damage, vascular senescence, and atherosclerosis, similarly to ectopic expression of PGC-1α. ALA stimulated cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) signaling, which in turn activated the cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB), a co-factor for PGC-1α expression. The possibility that ALA might induce TERT to extend telomeres in human cells suggests that ALA may be useful in treating atherosclerosis and other aging-related diseases. However, further investigation is needed to identify whether ALA induces TERT in human cells, which cell types are susceptible, and whether such changes have clinical significance. PMID:26414604

  6. Coalitions in Cooperative Wireless Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Mathur, Suhas; Mandayam, Narayan B

    2008-01-01

    Cooperation between rational users in wireless networks is studied using coalitional game theory. Using the rate achieved by a user as its utility, it is shown that the stable coalition structure, i.e., set of coalitions from which users have no incentives to defect, depends on the manner in which the rate gains are apportioned among the cooperating users. Specifically, the stability of the grand coalition (GC), i.e., the coalition of all users, is studied. Transmitter and receiver cooperation in an interference channel (IC) are studied as illustrative cooperative models to determine the stable coalitions for both flexible (transferable) and fixed (non-transferable) apportioning schemes. It is shown that the stable sum-rate optimal coalition when only receivers cooperate by jointly decoding (transferable) is the GC. The stability of the GC depends on the detector when receivers cooperate using linear multiuser detectors (non-transferable). Transmitter cooperation is studied assuming that all receivers coopera...

  7. Innovative reactor technologies - Enabling success

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many innovative reactors are being discussed, offering advantages in economics, sustainability, environmental impact, versatility and efficiency. To be successful, however, innovative reactors must meet the requirements for a successful build project. This requires achieving the mixture of innovation and proveness required to meet the first-of-a-kind hurdle. Based on the successful CANDU 6 reactor, a design still being built today, the ACR adds specific innovations in key areas chosen to achieve a balanced design. Capital cost has been significantly reduced by optimising the reactor-core design and simplifying systems. Key changes in this area include a move from a heavy water coolant to a light water coolant, and the adoption of SEU fuel. Construction times have also been reduced by using a modular design that takes advantage of modern construction techniques. Operating performance has been enhanced through improvements in system materials, equipment layout and component specifications. In parallel with these priorities, design adaptations have been applied so as to increase safety margins and defence-in-depth, again adding to the confidence in ACR licensability. The ACR development plan includes early review by regulators to reduce licensing risk, with international regulatory review having commenced. Overall, this places the ACR in a good position to meet the first-of-a-kind challenge, a necessary condition to enabling the success of an innovative reactor. AECL sees a logical evolution from the ACR, via increasing temperature and pressure capability, to the SCWR (Supercritical Water Reactor). AECL's CANDU-X program is already looking at designs for this concept. Inherent features of both ACR and the fuel channel SCWR lend themselves to different fuel cycles for the future. One of the prominent characteristics of the heavy-water moderated fuel channel reactor approach is the high potential for innovation. The evolutionary path allows innovation in practical steps

  8. Identification of Catalysts and Materials for a High-Energy Density Biochemical Fuel Cell: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-09-345

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghirardi, M.; Svedruzic, D.

    2013-07-01

    The proposed research attempted to identify novel biochemical catalysts, catalyst support materials, high-efficiency electron transfer agents between catalyst active sites and electrodes, and solid-phase electrolytes in order to maximize the current density of biochemical fuel cells that utilize various alcohols as substrates.

  9. Exosomes from bulk and stem cells from human prostate cancer have a differential microRNA content that contributes cooperatively over local and pre-metastatic niche

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, Catherine A.; Andahur, Eliana I.; Valenzuela, Rodrigo; Castellón, Enrique A.; Fullá, Juan A.; Ramos, Christian G.; Triviño, Juan C.

    2016-01-01

    The different prostate cancer (PCa) cell populations (bulk and cancer stem cells, CSCs) release exosomes that contain miRNAs that could modify the local or premetastatic niche. The analysis of the differential expression of miRNAs in exosomes allows evaluating the differential biological effect of both populations on the niche, and the identification of potential biomarkers and therapeutic targets. Five PCa primary cell cultures were established to originate bulk and CSCs cultures. From them, exosomes were purified by precipitation for miRNAs extraction to perform a comparative profile of miRNAs by next generation sequencing in an Illumina platform. 1839 miRNAs were identified in the exosomes. Of these 990 were known miRNAs, from which only 19 were significantly differentially expressed: 6 were overexpressed in CSCs and 13 in bulk cells exosomes. miR-100-5p and miR-21-5p were the most abundant miRNAs. Bioinformatics analysis indicated that differentially expressed miRNAs are highly related with PCa carcinogenesis, fibroblast proliferation, differentiation and migration, and angiogenesis. Besides, miRNAs from bulk cells affects osteoblast differentiation. Later, their effect was evaluated in normal prostate fibroblasts (WPMY-1) where transfection with miR-100-5p, miR-21-5p and miR-139-5p increased the expression of metalloproteinases (MMPs) -2, -9 and -13 and RANKL and fibroblast migration. The higher effect was achieved with miR21 transfection. As conclusion, miRNAs have a differential pattern between PCa bulk and CSCs exosomes that act collaboratively in PCa progression and metastasis. The most abundant miRNAs in PCa exosomes are interesting potential biomarkers and therapeutic targets. PMID:26675257

  10. Distributed Cooperative Caching In Social Wireless Network

    OpenAIRE

    Dimple Pandya; Manan Shah

    2014-01-01

    This paper introduces cooperative caching techniques for reducing electronic content provisioning cost in Social Wireless Networks (SWNET).SWNETs are formed by mobile devices, such as modern cell phones etc. sharing common takings in electronic content, and actually meeting together in public places. Electronic object caching in such SWNETs are shown to be able to reduce the content provisioning cost which depends heavily on the service and pricing dependences among various stakeholders inclu...

  11. Enabling Mobility in Heterogeneous Wireless Sensor Networks Cooperating with UAVs for Mission-Critical Management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erman-Tüysüz, A.; Hoesel, van L.F.W.; Wu, Jian; Havinga, P.J.M.

    2008-01-01

    Wireless sensor networks (WSNs) have the promise of revolutionizing the capture, processing, and communication of mission critical data for the use of first operational forces. Their low-cost, low-power, and size make it feasible to embed them into environment-monitoring tags in critical care region

  12. Enabling Mobility in Heterogeneous Wireless Sensor Networks Cooperating with UAVs for Mission-Critical Management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erman-Tüysüz, A.; Hoesel, van L.F.W.; Havinga, P.J.M.; Wu, Jian

    2008-01-01

    Wireless sensor networks have the promise of revolutionizing the capture, processing, and communication of mission-critical data for the use of first operational forces. Their low cost, low power, and size make it feasible to embed them into environment monitoring tags in critical care regions, firs

  13. AFRA: Supporting regional cooperation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The African Regional Cooperative Agreement for Research, Development and Training Related to Nuclear Science and Technology (AFRA) provides a framework for African Member States to intensify their collaboration through programmes and projects focused on the specific shared needs of its members. It is a formal intergovernmental agreement which entered into force in 1990. In the context of AFRA, Regional Designated Centres for training and education in radiation protection (RDCs) are established African institutions able to provide services, such as training of highly qualified specialists or instructors needed at the national level and also to facilitate exchange of experience and information through networks of services operating in the field

  14. Cooperation Between Equals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    2011 MARKS the 55th anniversary of the start of contemporary friendly relations between the People’s Republic of China and African countries. Chinese Vice Premier Hui Liangyu’s recent African trip gave another boost to the burgeoning China-Africa ties,said Chinese Vice Foreign Minister Zhai Jun.Hui visited five African countries - Mauritius, Zambia,the Democratic Republic of the Congo,Cameroon and Senegal -from January 6 to 19.Agriculture and trade were some of the most promising areas of cooperation between China and these countries,said Zhai in a recent interview with ChinAfrica.Excerpts follow:

  15. Cooperative problem solving in a cooperatively breeding primate

    OpenAIRE

    Cronin, K.; Kurian, A; Snowdon, C

    2005-01-01

    We investigated cooperative problem solving in unrelated pairs of the cooperatively breeding cottontop tamarin, Saguinus oedipus, to assess the cognitive basis of cooperative behaviour in this species and to compare abilities with other apes and monkeys. A transparent apparatus was used that required extension of two handles at opposite ends of the apparatus for access to rewards. Resistance was applied to both handles so that two tamarins had to act simultaneously in order to receive rewards...

  16. Cooperative problem solving in a cooperatively breeding primate (Saguinus oedipus)

    OpenAIRE

    Cronin, Katherine A.; KURIAN, AIMEE V.; Snowdon, Charles T.

    2005-01-01

    We investigated cooperative problem solving in unrelated pairs of the cooperatively breeding cottontop tamarin, Saguinus oedipus, to assess the cognitive basis of cooperative behaviour in this species and to compare abilities with other apes and monkeys. A transparent apparatus was used that required extension of two handles at opposite ends of the apparatus for access to rewards. Resistance was applied to both handles so that two tamarins had to act simultaneously in order to receive rewards...

  17. Cooperative Interaction of trp Melastatin Channel TRPM2 with its Splice Variant TRPM2-S is Essential for Endothelial Cell Apoptosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hecquet, Claudie M.; Zhang, Min; Mittal, Manish; Vogel, Stephen M.; Di, Anke; Gao, Xiaopei; Bonini, Marcelo G.; Malik, Asrar B.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale: Oxidants generated by activated endothelial cells are known to induce apoptosis, a pathogenic feature of vascular injury and inflammation from multiple etiologies. The melastatin-family transient receptor potential 2 (TRPM2) channel is an oxidant-sensitive Ca2+ permeable channel implicated in mediating apoptosis; however, the mechanisms of gating of the supra-normal Ca2+ influx required for initiating of apoptosis are not understood. Objective: Here we addressed the role TRPM2 and its interaction with the short splice variant TRPM2-S in mediating the Ca2+ entry burst required for induction of endothelial cell apoptosis. Methods and Results: We observed that TRPM2-S was basally associated with TRPM2 in the endothelial plasmalemma and this interaction functioned to constitutively suppress TRPM2-dependent Ca2+ gating. ROS production in endothelial cells or directly applying ROS induced PKCα activation and phosphorylation of TRPM2 at Ser 39. This in turn stimulated a large entry of Ca2+ and activated the apoptosis pathway. A similar TRPM2-dependent endothelial apoptosis mechanism was seen in intact vessels. The PKCα-activated phospho-switch opened the TRPM2 channel to allow large Ca2+ influx by releasing TRPM2-S inhibition of TRPM2, which in turn activated caspase-3 and cleaved the caspase substrate poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase. Conclusions: Here we describs a fundamental mechanism by which activation of the trp super-family TRPM2 channel induces apoptosis of endothelial cells. The signaling mechanism involves ROS-induced PKCα activation resulting in phosphorylation of TRPM2-S that allows enhanced TRPM2-mediated gating of Ca2+ and activation of the apoptosis program. Strategies aimed at preventing the uncoupling of TRPM2-S from TRPM2 and subsequent Ca2+ gating during oxidative stress may mitigate endothelial apoptosis and its consequences in mediating vascular injury and inflammation. PMID:24337049

  18. Development of batch electrolytic enrichment cells with 100-fold volume reduction, control electronic units and neutralization/distillation unit, to enable better sensitivity to be achieved in low-level tritium measurements when liquid scintillation counting follows the enrichment process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full details of the batch-cell tritium enrichment system design are provided including electronic control circuits specially developed for these cells. The system incorporates a new type of concentric electrode cell (outer cathode of mild steel, anode of stainless steel, inner cathode of mild steel) with volume reduction capability 1 l to ca 9 ml. Electrolysis of 20 cells is performed in 2 steps. Down to sample volume ca 20 ml, the cells are series connected at constant currents up to 14.5 A, in the 2nd step, each cell is connected to its own individual current supply (2A) and control circuit. Automatic shut-off at the desired final volume is achieved by sensing the drop in current through the inner cathode as the electrolyte level falls below a PTFE insulator. The large electrode surface area and careful dimensioning at the foot of the cell allow operation with low starting electrolyte concentration 1.5 g Na2O2.l-1. After electrolysis, quantitative recovery as distilled water of all hydrogen from the enriched residue is achieved by CO2-neutralisation and vacuum distillation at 1000C in a distillation unit which handles 20 cells simultaneously

  19. Two Types of Bureaucracy: Enabling and Coercive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, Paul S.; Borys, Bryan

    1996-01-01

    Proposes a conceptualization of workflow formalization that helps reconcile contrasting assessments of bureaucracy as alienating or enabling to employees. Uses research on equipment technology design to identify enabling and coercive types of formalization. Identifies some forces tending to discourage an enabling orientation and some persistent…

  20. Principles of cooperation across systems: from human sharing to multicellularity and cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aktipis, Athena

    2016-01-01

    From cells to societies, several general principles arise again and again that facilitate cooperation and suppress conflict. In this study, I describe three general principles of cooperation and how they operate across systems including human sharing, cooperation in animal and insect societies and the massively large-scale cooperation that occurs in our multicellular bodies. The first principle is that of Walk Away: that cooperation is enhanced when individuals can leave uncooperative partners. The second principle is that resource sharing is often based on the need of the recipient (i.e., need-based transfers) rather than on strict account-keeping. And the last principle is that effective scaling up of cooperation requires increasingly sophisticated and costly cheater suppression mechanisms. By comparing how these principles operate across systems, we can better understand the constraints on cooperation. This can facilitate the discovery of novel ways to enhance cooperation and suppress cheating in its many forms, from social exploitation to cancer. PMID:27087837

  1. Teleworking through cooperation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dario Minervini

    2006-07-01

    scheme is strictly connected to new technologies and cooperation is an important dimension of teleworking. In our study, cooperation is found performed both in social relations between employers and employees and in institutionalized relations between managers and unions. Although the two forms of cooperation, here called “social trustee cooperation” and “institutional cooperation”, are often thought as prerequisites of “best practices” of new working arrangements, our case studies demonstrate that cooperation has not always arisen that make possible to implement practices of teleworking. By focusing on cooperative relations, the results of different case studies in industry and in the service sector are discussed, thus intending to contribute to the development of sociological debate on telework.

  2. Pre-B cell colony enhancing factor (PBEF/NAMPT/Visfatin) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) cooperate to increase the permeability of the human placental amnion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astern, J.M.; Collier, A.C.; Kendal-Wright, C.E.

    2012-01-01

    Fluid efflux across the region of the amnion overlying the placenta is an essential component of the intramembranous absorption pathway that maintains amniotic fluid volume homeostasis. Dysregulation of this pathway may result in adverse pregnancy outcomes, however the factors controlling amnion permeability are unknown. Here, we report a novel mechanism that increases placental amnion permeability. Pre-B Cell Colony Enhancing Factor (PBEF) is a stress-responsive cytokine expressed by the human amnion, and is known to induce Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) production by other cell types. Interestingly, VEGF is up-regulated in the ovine amnion when intramembranous absorption is augmented. In this study, we show that PBEF induced VEGF secretion by primary human amniotic epithelial cells (AEC) derived from the placental amnion, as well as from the reflected amnion that lines the remainder of the gestational sac. Further, PBEF treatment led to the increased expression of VEGFR2 in placental AEC, but not reflected AEC. To test the hypothesis that PBEF and VEGF increase placental amnion permeability, we monitored the transfer of 2′,7′-dichlorofluorescein (DCF) from the fetal to the maternal side of human amnion explants. A treatment regimen including both PBEF and VEGF increased the rate of DCF transfer across the placental amnion, but not the reflected amnion. In summary, our results suggest that by augmenting VEGFR2 expression in the placental amnion, PBEF primes the tissue for a VEGF-mediated increase in permeability. This mechanism may have important implications in amniotic fluid volume control throughout gestation. PMID:23151382

  3. Broadband near-infrared quantum-cutting by cooperative energy transfer in Yb{sup 3+}–Bi{sup 3+} co-doped CaTiO{sub 3} for solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Li-Tian; Chen, Jun-Qiang; Deng, Chao; Tang, Li; Chen, Dong-Ju; Meng, Jian-Xin, E-mail: tmjx@jnu.edu.cn; Cao, Li-Wei

    2015-08-15

    Highlights: • Broadband NIR QC CaTiO{sub 3}:Yb{sup 3+},Bi{sup 3+} phosphor has been firstly developed. • Co-doping with Bi{sup 3+}, it enhanced the Yb{sup 3+} emission intensity by a factor of 10. • This phosphor could efficiently convert 300–480 nm light to ∼1000 nm light. • The ET processes were involved in CET via two photons QC process. - Abstract: An efficient near-infrared (NIR) quantum-cutting (QC) process which converts broadband ultraviolet-blue into NIR via downconversion (DC) has been demonstrated in CaTiO{sub 3}:Yb{sup 3+},Bi{sup 3+} phosphors for the first time. These phosphors are valuable for use in crystalline Si (c-Si) solar cells, because they efficiently convert 300–480 nm light that is not fully utilized by existing c-Si solar cells into ∼1000 nm NIR light that can be sufficiently absorbed by solar cells. Co-doping with 15% Bi{sup 3+} ions, a significant enhancement in Yb{sup 3+} NIR integrated emission intensity by a factor of 10 is realized. The phosphors were characterized with the photoluminescence excitation (PLE) and the photoluminescence (PL) spectra evidence the presence of energy transfer (ET) processes from Bi{sup 3+}-related charge transfer state to Yb{sup 3+} ions. The dependence of Yb{sup 3+} luminescent intensity on the excitation power was also measured and it demonstrates that the ET processes involve cooperative energy transfer (CET) via two photons QC processes.

  4. The Professionalization of Intelligence Cooperation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Adam David Morgan

    "Providing an in-depth insight into the subject of intelligence cooperation (officially known as liason), this book explores the complexities of this process. Towards facilitating a general understanding of the professionalization of intelligence cooperation, Svendsen's analysis includes risk...... management and encourages the realisation of greater resilience. Svendsen discusses the controversial, mixed and uneven characterisations of the process of the professionalization of intelligence cooperation and argues for a degree of 'fashioning method out of mayhem' through greater operational...

  5. Social learning in cooperative dilemmas

    OpenAIRE

    Lamba, Shakti

    2014-01-01

    Helping is a cornerstone of social organization and commonplace in human societies. A major challenge for the evolutionary sciences is to explain how cooperation is maintained in large populations with high levels of migration, conditions under which cooperators can be exploited by selfish individuals. Cultural group selection models posit that such large-scale cooperation evolves via selection acting on populations among which behavioural variation is maintained by the cultural transmission ...

  6. Cooperation bibliogram of bird flu

    OpenAIRE

    Stegmann, Johannes; Grohmann, Guenter

    2006-01-01

    The published literature on Bird Flu, now a pandemic animal disease with a possible potential of evolving into a devastating human disease, was analysed primarily with respect of national and international cooperations and networks of authors and countries. The output of research-relevant papers is now around 150 per year and was less than 100 papers per year before 2003. The field is highly cooperative; nearly 90% of the articles have two or more authors. National extramural cooperation is ...

  7. ITDB Cooperation With International Organizations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    IAEA illicit trafficking database cooperates with many international organizations. Among these organizations are Interpol, Universal Postal Union,and World Customs Organization. Other organizations are Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe, UN Economic Commission for Europe, UN-Department of Disarmament Affairs and UN office for Drug and Crime. The cooperation with Interpol involves consultations on issues of training and technical assistance and other matters of common interest.

  8. Boosting cooperation by involving extortion in spatial prisoner's dilemma games

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhi-Xi; Rong, Zhihai

    2014-12-01

    We study the evolution of cooperation in spatial prisoner's dilemma games with and without extortion by adopting the aspiration-driven strategy updating rule. We focus explicitly on how the strategy updating manner (whether synchronous or asynchronous) and also the introduction of extortion strategy affect the collective outcome of the games. By means of Monte Carlo simulations as well as dynamical cluster techniques, we find that the involvement of extortioners facilitates the boom of cooperators in the population (and whom can always dominate the population if the temptation to defect is not too large) for both synchronous and asynchronous strategy updating, in stark contrast to the other case, where cooperation is promoted for an intermediate aspiration level with synchronous strategy updating, but is remarkably inhibited if the strategy updating is implemented asynchronously. We explain the results by configurational analysis and find that the presence of extortion leads to the checkerboard-like ordering of cooperators and extortioners, which enable cooperators to prevail in the population with both strategy updating manners. Moreover, extortion itself is evolutionary stable, and therefore acts as the incubator for the evolution of cooperation.

  9. Co-operative intermolecular kinetics of 2-oxoglutarate dependent dioxygenases may be essential for system-level regulation of plant cell physiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siddhartha eKundu

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Chlorosis, a common manifestation of Fe-deficiency in plants occurs in soils with an alkaline pH and/or a high concentration of calcium carbonate (calcareous, and is an important cause of depressed yield. The core premise of this work is the notion that the response to waning ferrous iron in the cytosol of graminaceous root cells is a well orchestrated pathophysiological event, wherein the principal co-ordinator is not restricted to a single protein, but is an assortment of enzymes. The 2OG-dependent sequences comprise members present in all major kingdoms of life, and catalyze the release of carbon dioxide and succinic acid from 2-oxoglutarate, and the hydroxylation of a substrate molecule. This generic reaction is, in most cases accompanied by a specialized conversion of the product. Here, I present a model of iron deficiency sensing and response actuation in the root cells of graminaceous crops. This hypothesis is centered on the rationale that, iron is an essential co-factor for the catalytic process, and therefore, declining cytosolic levels of this micronutrient could trigger compensatory measures. Regression models of empirically available kinetic data for iron and alpha-ketoglutarate were formulated, analysed, and compared. The results, when viewed in the context of the superfamily responding as a unit to this abiotic stressor, suggest that the 2OG-sequences can indeed, work together to mitigate the effects of this noxious stimulus.

  10. Cooperative motion of intrinsic and actuated semiflexible swimmers

    OpenAIRE

    Llopis, I.; Pagonabarraga, I.; Lagomarsino, M.C.; Lowe, C. P.

    2013-01-01

    We examine the phenomenon of hydrodynamic-induced cooperativity for pairs of flagellated micro-organism swimmers, of which spermatozoa cells are an example. We consider semiflexible swimmers, where inextensible filaments are driven by an internal intrinsic force and torque-free mechanism (intrinsic swimmers). The velocity gain for swimming cooperatively, which depends on both the geometry and the driving, develops as a result of the near-field coupling of bending and hydrodynamic stresses. We...

  11. Mechanisms for similarity based cooperation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traulsen, A.

    2008-06-01

    Cooperation based on similarity has been discussed since Richard Dawkins introduced the term “green beard” effect. In these models, individuals cooperate based on an aribtrary signal (or tag) such as the famous green beard. Here, two different models for such tag based cooperation are analysed. As neutral drift is important in both models, a finite population framework is applied. The first model, which we term “cooperative tags” considers a situation in which groups of cooperators are formed by some joint signal. Defectors adopting the signal and exploiting the group can lead to a breakdown of cooperation. In this case, conditions are derived under which the average abundance of the more cooperative strategy exceeds 50%. The second model considers a situation in which individuals start defecting towards others that are not similar to them. This situation is termed “defective tags”. It is shown that in this case, individuals using tags to cooperate exclusively with their own kind dominate over unconditional cooperators.

  12. Spatial structure, cooperation and competition in biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadell, Carey D; Drescher, Knut; Foster, Kevin R

    2016-09-01

    Bacteria often live within matrix-embedded communities, termed biofilms, which are now understood to be a major mode of microbial life. The study of biofilms has revealed their vast complexity both in terms of resident species composition and phenotypic diversity. Despite this complexity, theoretical and experimental work in the past decade has identified common principles for understanding microbial biofilms. In this Review, we discuss how the spatial arrangement of genotypes within a community influences the cooperative and competitive cell-cell interactions that define biofilm form and function. Furthermore, we argue that a perspective rooted in ecology and evolution is fundamental to progress in microbiology. PMID:27452230

  13. Building the Leviathan – Voluntary centralisation of punishment power sustains cooperation in humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Jörg; Méder, Zsombor Z.; Okamoto-Barth, Sanae; Riedl, Arno

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of cooperation among humans is puzzling because cooperators can be exploited by free riders. Peer punishment has been suggested as a solution to this puzzle, but cumulating evidence questions its robustness in sustaining cooperation. Amongst others, punishment fails when it is not powerful enough, or when it elicits counter-punishment. Existing research, however, has ignored that the distribution of punishment power can be the result of social interactions. We introduce a novel experiment in which individuals can transfer punishment power to others. We find that while decentralised peer punishment fails to overcome free riding, the voluntary transfer of punishment power enables groups to sustain cooperation. This is achieved by non-punishing cooperators empowering those who are willing to punish in the interest of the group. Our results show how voluntary power centralisation can efficiently sustain cooperation, which could explain why hierarchical power structures are widespread among animals and humans. PMID:26888519

  14. Cooperation between HMGA1, PDX-1, and MafA is Essential for Glucose-Induced Insulin Transcription in Pancreatic Beta Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arcidiacono, Biagio; Iiritano, Stefania; Chiefari, Eusebio; Brunetti, Francesco S.; Gu, Guoqiang; Foti, Daniela Patrizia; Brunetti, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    The high-mobility group AT-hook 1 (HMGA1) protein is a nuclear architectural factor that can organize chromatin structures. It regulates gene expression by controlling the formation of stereospecific multiprotein complexes called “enhanceosomes” on the AT-rich regions of target gene promoters. Previously, we reported that defects in HMGA1 caused decreased insulin receptor expression and increased susceptibility to type 2 diabetes mellitus in humans and mice. Interestingly, mice with disrupted HMGA1 gene had significantly smaller islets and decreased insulin content in their pancreata, suggesting that HMGA1 may have a direct role in insulin transcription and secretion. Herein, we investigate the regulatory roles of HMGA1 in insulin transcription. We provide evidence that HMGA1 physically interacts with PDX-1 and MafA, two critical transcription factors for insulin gene expression and beta-cell function, both in vitro and in vivo. We then show that the overexpression of HMGA1 significantly improves the transactivating activity of PDX-1 and MafA on human and mouse insulin promoters, while HMGA1 knockdown considerably decreased this transactivating activity. Lastly, we demonstrate that high glucose stimulus significantly increases the binding of HMGA1 to the insulin (INS) gene promoter, suggesting that HMGA1 may act as a glucose-sensitive element controlling the transcription of the INS gene. Together, our findings provide evidence that HMGA1, by regulating PDX-1- and MafA-induced transactivation of the INS gene promoter, plays a critical role in pancreatic beta-cell function and insulin production. PMID:25628604

  15. Cooperation between HMGA1, PDX-1 and MafA is essential for glucose-induced insulin transcription in pancreatic beta cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biagio eArcidiacono

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The high-mobility group AT-hook 1 (HMGA1 protein is a nuclear architectural factor that can organize chromatin structures. It regulates gene expression by controlling the formation of stereospecific multiprotein complexes called enhanceosomes on the AT-rich regions of target gene promoters. Previously, we reported that defects in HMGA1 caused decreased insulin receptor expression and increased susceptibility to type 2 diabetes mellitus in humans and mice. Interestingly, mice with disrupted HMGA1 gene had significantly smaller islets and decreased insulin content in their pancreata, suggesting that HMGA1 may have a direct role in insulin transcription and secretion. Herein, we investigate the regulatory roles of HMGA1 in insulin transcription. We provide evidence that HMGA1 physically interacts with PDX-1 and MafA, two critical transcription factors for insulin gene expression and beta-cell function, both in vitro and in vivo. We then show that the overexpression of HMGA1 significantly improves the transactivating activity of PDX-1 and MafA on human and mouse insulin promoters, while HMGA1 knockdown considerably decreased this transactivating activity. Lastly, we demonstrate that high glucose stimulus significantly increases the binding of HMGA1 to the insulin (INS gene promoter, suggesting that HMGA1 may act as a glucose-sensitive element controlling the transcription of the INS gene. Together, our findings provide evidence that HMGA1, by regulating PDX-1- and MafA-induced transactivation of the INS gene promoter, plays a critical role in pancreatic beta-cell function and insulin production.

  16. Fiscal 1993 international research cooperation project. Feasibility study of finding out the seeds of international joint research (technology for environmental preservation using biotechnology, technology for effective use unused hydrocarbon resource, technology of solid electrolyte fuel cells for high-efficient electric vehicles); 1993 nendo kokusai kenkyu kyoryoku jigyo. Kokusai kyodo kenkyu seeds hakkutsu no tame no FS chosa (biotechnology ni yoru kankyo taisaku gijutsu, miriyo tanka suiso shigen no yuko riyo gijutsu, kokoritsu denki jidosha no kotai denkaishitsu nenryo denchi gijutsu)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-03-01

    This project is aimed at internationally cooperating in the R and D of industrial technology and improving industrial technology of Japan. For it, the following three technologies were investigated: 1) environmental preservation technology using biotechnology, 2) technology for effective use of unused hydrocarbon resource, 3) solid electrolyte fuel cell (SOFC) technology for high-efficient electric vehicles. In 1), bio-remediation is a choice as the result of trially using technologies for remediation of the environment polluted by pollutant, but it is not a technically completed one, but one which will be improved by trial and error. By the application of gene engineering, the use of gene recombination enables wide spread of decomposition genes. In 2), technical subjects were studied such as superheavy distillate, oil shale, coalhead methane and methane hydrate. In 3), designed were cylinder type and planar type SOFC of 850degC operation and 10kW output. Accumulation and weight of a total SOFC system are 81 liters and 100 kg in cylinder type and 136 liters and 200 kg in planar type. The vehicle can be equipped with the SOFC. 171 refs., 72 figs., 54 tabs.

  17. Multi-Agent Cooperative Target Search

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinwen Hu

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses a vision-based cooperative search for multiple mobile ground targets by a group of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs with limited sensing and communication capabilities. The airborne camera on each UAV has a limited field of view and its target discriminability varies as a function of altitude. First, by dividing the whole surveillance region into cells, a probability map can be formed for each UAV indicating the probability of target existence within each cell. Then, we propose a distributed probability map updating model which includes the fusion of measurement information, information sharing among neighboring agents, information decay and transmission due to environmental changes such as the target movement. Furthermore, we formulate the target search problem as a multi-agent cooperative coverage control problem by optimizing the collective coverage area and the detection performance. The proposed map updating model and the cooperative control scheme are distributed, i.e., assuming that each agent only communicates with its neighbors within its communication range. Finally, the effectiveness of the proposed algorithms is illustrated by simulation.

  18. International cooperation and exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For improve the nuclear safety regulatory level of China, it is an important way to absorb international experience widely and use them. In 1998, the NNSA dispatched abroad 34 delegations/90 person-time, and invited to China 9 delegations/73 person-time. The contents of dispatched delegations mainly included the international meetings and personnel training on nuclear safety, and the foreign review consultation and the components' manufacturing inspections related to Chinese nuclear power construction. The contents of invited delegations mainly included the lectures on surveillance technology, and the review consultation about the QSNPP's component purchase from several countries, JLNPP and CEFR. After reformed, the NNSA continues to bear the function on the international cooperation about nuclear safety

  19. A novel p-type and metallic dual-functional Cu-Al2O3 ultra-thin layer as the back electrode enabling high performance of thin film solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Qinxian; Su, Yantao; Zhang, Ming-Jian; Yang, Xiaoyang; Yuan, Sheng; Hu, Jiangtao; Lin, Yuan; Liang, Jun; Pan, Feng

    2016-09-14

    Increasing the open-circuit voltage (Voc) along with the fill factor (FF) is pivotal for the performance improvement of solar cells. In this work, we report the design and construction of a new structure of CdS/CdTe/Al2O3/Cu using the atomic layer deposition (ALD) method, and then we control Cu diffusion through the Al2O3 atomic layer into the CdTe layer. Surprisingly, this generates a novel p-type and metallic dual-functional Cu-Al2O3 atomic layer. Due to this dual-functional character of the Cu-Al2O3 layer, an efficiency improvement of 2% in comparison with the standard cell was observed. This novel dual-functional back contact structure could also be introduced into other thin film solar cells for their efficiency improvement. PMID:27384986

  20. Synergistic defense system by cooperative natural effectors against metastasis of B16 melanoma cells in H-2-associated control: different behavior of H-2+ and H-2- cells in metastatic processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    H-2+ and H-2- cells of B16 melanoma were established by repeated fluorescence-activated cell sorting. The H-2- line formed no metastasis in untreated C57BL/6 mice, whereas the H-2+ cells showed evidence of metastatic development. This difference was ascribed mainly to the increased susceptibility of H-2- cells to attack by natural effector mechanisms, particularly asialo GM1+ NK cells. After treatment with both anti-asialo GM1 serum and whole body irradiation (400 rad), numerous colonies of H-2- cells formed in the lung, whereas the metastasis was only marginally enhanced by irradiation and moderately by treatment with anti-asialo GM1 serum. With the H-2+ cells, treatment with each modality significantly increased the number of metastatic colonies. Therefore collaboration of asialo GM1+ NK cells and radiosensitive natural effectors seems to be the main mechanism involved in the synergistic effects on defense against H-2- cell metastasis, and to a lesser extent against H-2+ cell metastasis. Irradiation (1000 rad) to the right lung to abrogate the organ-associated defense increased the colonies, particularly in the H-2+ cells. On the other hand, treatment with anti-asialo GM1 serum increased colonization in the early phase of metastasis with H-2- cells and may have abolished asialo GM1+ NK cells capable of recognizing the reduced expression of H-2 antigens and eliminating H-2- cells in the blood-born phase. Natural defense mechanisms probably exert suppressive effects on the metastasis of H-2+ cells, mainly in the organ-associated phase after extravasation