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Sample records for cells enables cooperation

  1. Autonomic computing enabled cooperative networked design

    CERN Document Server

    Wodczak, Michal

    2014-01-01

    This book introduces the concept of autonomic computing driven cooperative networked system design from an architectural perspective. As such it leverages and capitalises on the relevant advancements in both the realms of autonomic computing and networking by welding them closely together. In particular, a multi-faceted Autonomic Cooperative System Architectural Model is defined which incorporates the notion of Autonomic Cooperative Behaviour being orchestrated by the Autonomic Cooperative Networking Protocol of a cross-layer nature. The overall proposed solution not only advocates for the inc

  2. Cooperative maneuver enabled UAV relative localization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strader, Jared

    The ability to localize itself in an environment is essential for any autonomous vehicle. In applications involving multiple Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) such as formation flight, surveillance, and mapping, the relative pose of each UAV provides vital information for multiple vehicles to coordinate effectively. The majority of cooperative localization tasks involving multiple UAVs assume the transformation between reference frames, but this information is not always provided in the absence of landmarks or a Global Positioning System (GPS). This thesis presents a method for estimating the relative pose of a pair of UAVs using range-only measurements. In this method, there is no prior information assumed about the relative pose of each UAV. Instead, the trajectories are constrained in order to leverage the circumstances in which the range-only measurements are obtained during flight. To augment this limited information, motion is used to construct a graph of the UAV trajectories using only distance measurements. Using the constructed graph, four potential solutions are derived for the relative pose, and a batch estimate is performed to obtain numerical estimates of each of the four solutions. Using the batch estimate, a cooperative maneuver can be performed in order to obtain a unique solution. The sensitivity to the trajectory and measurement noise are analyzed through a Monte Carlo analysis.

  3. Cooperative cognitive radio networking system model, enabling techniques, and performance

    CERN Document Server

    Cao, Bin; Mark, Jon W

    2016-01-01

    This SpringerBrief examines the active cooperation between users of Cooperative Cognitive Radio Networking (CCRN), exploring the system model, enabling techniques, and performance. The brief provides a systematic study on active cooperation between primary users and secondary users, i.e., (CCRN), followed by the discussions on research issues and challenges in designing spectrum-energy efficient CCRN. As an effort to shed light on the design of spectrum-energy efficient CCRN, they model the CCRN based on orthogonal modulation and orthogonally dual-polarized antenna (ODPA). The resource allocation issues are detailed with respect to both models, in terms of problem formulation, solution approach, and numerical results. Finally, the optimal communication strategies for both primary and secondary users to achieve spectrum-energy efficient CCRN are analyzed.

  4. The key to enabling biosurveillance is cooperative technology development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emanuel, Peter; Jones, Franca; Smith, Michael; Huff, William; Jaffe, Richard; Roos, Jason

    2011-12-01

    The world population will continue to face biological threats, whether they are naturally occurring or intentional events. The speed with which diseases can emerge and spread presents serious challenges, because the impact on public health, the economy, and development can be huge. The U.S. government recognizes that global public health can also have an impact on national security. This global perspective manifests itself in U.S. policy documents that clearly articulate the importance of biosurveillance in providing early warning, detection, and situational awareness of infectious disease threats in order to mount a rapid response and save lives. In this commentary, we suggest that early recognition of infectious disease threats, whether naturally occurring or man-made, requires a globally distributed array of interoperable hardware and software fielded in sufficient numbers to create a network of linked collection nodes. We argue that achievement of this end state will require a degree of cooperation that does not exist at this time-either across the U.S. federal government or among our global partners. Successful fielding of a family of interoperable technologies will require interagency research, development, and purchase ("acquisition") of biosurveillance systems through cooperative ventures that likely will involve our strategic allies and public-private partnerships. To this end, we propose leveraging an existing federal interagency group to integrate the acquisition of technologies to enable global biosurveillance.

  5. Evolution of cooperation among tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axelrod, Robert; Axelrod, David E; Pienta, Kenneth J

    2006-09-01

    The evolution of cooperation has a well established theoretical framework based on game theory. This approach has made valuable contributions to a wide variety of disciplines, including political science, economics, and evolutionary biology. Existing cancer theory suggests that individual clones of cancer cells evolve independently from one another, acquiring all of the genetic traits or hallmarks necessary to form a malignant tumor. It is also now recognized that tumors are heterotypic, with cancer cells interacting with normal stromal cells within the tissue microenvironment, including endothelial, stromal, and nerve cells. This tumor cell-stromal cell interaction in itself is a form of commensalism, because it has been demonstrated that these nonmalignant cells support and even enable tumor growth. Here, we add to this theory by regarding tumor cells as game players whose interactions help to determine their Darwinian fitness. We marshal evidence that tumor cells overcome certain host defenses by means of diffusible products. Our original contribution is to raise the possibility that two nearby cells can protect each other from a set of host defenses that neither could survive alone. Cooperation can evolve as by-product mutualism among genetically diverse tumor cells. Our hypothesis supplements, but does not supplant, the traditional view of carcinogenesis in which one clonal population of cells develops all of the necessary genetic traits independently to form a tumor. Cooperation through the sharing of diffusible products raises new questions about tumorigenesis and has implications for understanding observed phenomena, designing new experiments, and developing new therapeutic approaches.

  6. Connecting the islands - enabling global connectivity through local cooperation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heide, Janus; Pedersen, Morten Videbæk; Fitzek, Frank;

    2009-01-01

    In this work we consider the interconnection of islands formed by neighbouring devices in a highly dynamic topology. To allow for high mobility we take offset in a purely wireless infrastructure where all devices incorporate a global and a local wireless communication interface. We consider cooper...

  7. Enabling Housing Cooperatives: policy lessons from Sweden, India and the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganapati, Sukumar

    2010-01-01

    Housing cooperatives became active in urban areas in Sweden, India and the United States during the interwar period. Yet, after the second world war, while housing cooperatives grew phenomenally nationwide in Sweden and India, they did not do so in the United States. This article makes a comparative institutional analysis of the evolution of housing cooperatives in these three countries. The analysis reveals that housing cooperatives' relationship with the state and the consequent support structures explain the divergent evolution. Although the relationships between cooperatives and the state evolved over time, they can be characterized as embedded autonomy, overembeddedness and disembeddedness in Sweden, India and the United States respectively. Whereas the consequent support structures for housing cooperatives became well developed in Sweden and India, such structures have been weak in the United States. The article highlights the need for embedded autonomy and the need for supportive structures to enable the growth of housing cooperatives.

  8. A cooperative positioning algorithm for DSRC enabled vehicular networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efatmaneshnik, M.; Kealy, A.; Alam, N.; Dempster, A. G.

    2011-12-01

    Many of the safety related applications that can be facilitated by Dedicated Short Range Communications (DSRC), such as vehicle proximity warnings, automated braking (e.g. at level crossings), speed advisories, pedestrian alerts etc., rely on a robust vehicle positioning capability such as that provided by a Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS). Vehicles in remote areas, entering tunnels, high rise areas or any high multipath/ weak signal environment will challenge the integrity of GNSS position solutions, and ultimately the safety application it underpins. To address this challenge, this paper presents an innovative application of Cooperative Positioning techniques within vehicular networks. CP refers to any method of integrating measurements from different positioning systems and sensors in order to improve the overall quality (accuracy and reliability) of the final position solution. This paper investigates the potential of the DSRC infrastructure itself to provide an inter-vehicular ranging signal that can be used as a measurement within the CP algorithm. In this paper, time-based techniques of ranging are introduced and bandwidth requirements are investigated and presented. The robustness of the CP algorithm to inter-vehicle connection failure as well as GNSS dropouts is also demonstrated using simulation studies. Finally, the performance of the Constrained Kalman Filter used to integrate GNSS measurements with DSRC derived range estimates within a typical VANET is described and evaluated.

  9. Origami-enabled deformable silicon solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Rui; Huang, Hai; Liang, Hanshuang; Liang, Mengbing [School of Electrical, Computer and Energy Engineering, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287 (United States); Tu, Hongen; Xu, Yong [Electrical and Computer Engineering, Wayne State University, 5050 Anthony Wayne Dr., Detroit, Michigan 48202 (United States); Song, Zeming; Jiang, Hanqing, E-mail: hanqing.jiang@asu.edu [School for Engineering of Matter, Transport and Energy, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287 (United States); Yu, Hongyu, E-mail: hongyu.yu@asu.edu [School of Electrical, Computer and Energy Engineering, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287 (United States); School of Earth and Space Exploration, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287 (United States)

    2014-02-24

    Deformable electronics have found various applications and elastomeric materials have been widely used to reach flexibility and stretchability. In this Letter, we report an alternative approach to enable deformability through origami. In this approach, the deformability is achieved through folding and unfolding at the creases while the functional devices do not experience strain. We have demonstrated an example of origami-enabled silicon solar cells and showed that this solar cell can reach up to 644% areal compactness while maintaining reasonable good performance upon cyclic folding/unfolding. This approach opens an alternative direction of producing flexible, stretchable, and deformable electronics.

  10. Enabling Project-Centred Learning through Flexible Processes: The Cooper Experience

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ceri, Stefano; Florian, Daniel; Matera, Maristella; Raffio, Alessandro; Spoelstra, Howard

    2007-01-01

    Ceri, S., Daniel, F., Matera, M., Raffio, A., Spoelstra, H. (2007, September). Enabling Project-Centered Learning through Flexible Processes: the COOPER Experience. Presentation given at the 1st International Workshop on Collaborative Open Environments for Project-Centered Learning, Crete, Greece.

  11. Enabling Project-Centred Learning through Flexible Processes: the COOPER Experience

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ceri, Stefano; Daniel, Florian; Matera, Maristella; Raffio, Alessandro; Spoelstra, Howard

    2007-01-01

    Ceri, S., Daniel, F., Matera, M., Raffio, A., Spoelstra, H. (2007, September). Enabling Project-Centered Learning through Flexible Processes: the COOPER Experience. Paper presented at the 1st International Workshop on Collaborative Open Environments for Project-Centered Learning, Crete, Greece.

  12. Nanomaterials Enabled Dye-sensitized Solar Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Pei

    Dye sensitized solar cells (DSCs), as the third generation of solar cells, have attracted tremendous attention for their unique properties. The semi-transparent nature, low-cost, environmental friendliness, and convenient manufacturing conditions of this generation of solar cells are promising aspects of DSCs that make them competitive in their future applications. However, much improvement in many aspects of DSCs' is required for the realization of its full potential. In this thesis, various nanomaterials, such as graphene, multi wall carbon nanotubes, vertically aligned single wall carbon nanotubes, hybrid structures and etc, have been used to improve the performance of DSCs. First, the application of graphene covered metal grids as transparent conductive electrodes in DSCs is explored. It is demonstrated that the mechanical properties of these flexible hybrid transparent electrodes, in both bending and stretching tests, are better than their oxide-based counter parts. Moreover, different kinds of carbon nanotubes, for instance vertically aligned single wall carbon nanotubes, have been used as a replacement for traditional platinum counter electrodes, in both iodine electrolyte, and sulfide-electrolyte. Further, a flexible, seamlessly connected, 3-dimensional vertically-aligned few wall carbon nanotubes graphene hybrid structures on Ni foil as DSCs' counter electrodes improve their efficiency significantly. All these nanomaterials enabled DSCs architectures achieve a comparable or better performance than standard brittle platinum/fluorine doped tin oxide combination. The large surface area of such nanomaterials in addition to the high electrical conductivity and their mechanical robustness provides a platform for significant enhancements in DSCs' performance.

  13. Robo-Enabled Tumor Cell Extrusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Helena E; Portela, Marta

    2016-12-19

    How aberrant cells are removed from a tissue to prevent tumor formation is a key question in cancer biology. Reporting in this issue of Developmental Cell, Vaughen and Igaki (2016) show that a pathway with an important role in neural guidance also directs extrusion of tumor cells from epithelial tissues.

  14. Spatial stochastic dynamics enable robust cell polarization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J Lawson

    Full Text Available Although cell polarity is an essential feature of living cells, it is far from being well-understood. Using a combination of computational modeling and biological experiments we closely examine an important prototype of cell polarity: the pheromone-induced formation of the yeast polarisome. Focusing on the role of noise and spatial heterogeneity, we develop and investigate two mechanistic spatial models of polarisome formation, one deterministic and the other stochastic, and compare the contrasting predictions of these two models against experimental phenotypes of wild-type and mutant cells. We find that the stochastic model can more robustly reproduce two fundamental characteristics observed in wild-type cells: a highly polarized phenotype via a mechanism that we refer to as spatial stochastic amplification, and the ability of the polarisome to track a moving pheromone input. Moreover, we find that only the stochastic model can simultaneously reproduce these characteristics of the wild-type phenotype and the multi-polarisome phenotype of a deletion mutant of the scaffolding protein Spa2. Significantly, our analysis also demonstrates that higher levels of stochastic noise results in increased robustness of polarization to parameter variation. Furthermore, our work suggests a novel role for a polarisome protein in the stabilization of actin cables. These findings elucidate the intricate role of spatial stochastic effects in cell polarity, giving support to a cellular model where noise and spatial heterogeneity combine to achieve robust biological function.

  15. Robust Technique for Measuring and Simulating Silicon Wafer Quality Characteristics that Enable the Prediction of Solar Cell Electrical Performance of MEMC Silicon Wafer. Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-11-438

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sopori, Bhushan [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2015-12-01

    NREL and MEMC Electronic Materials are interested in developing a robust technique for monitoring material quality of mc-Si and mono-Si wafers -- a technique that can provide relevant data to accurately predict the performance of solar cells fabricated on them. Previous work, performed under two TSAs between NREL and MEMC, has established that dislocation clusters are the dominant performance-limiting factor in MEMC mc-Si solar cells. The work under this CRADA will go further in verifying these results on a larger data set, evaluate possibilities of faster method(s) for mapping dislocations in wafers/ingots, understanding dislocation generation during ingot casting, and helping MEMC to have an internal capability for basic characterization that will provide feedback needed for more accurate crystallization simulations. NREL has already developed dislocation mapping technique and developed a basic electronic model (called Network Model) that uses spatial distribution of dislocations to predict the cell performance. In this CRADA work, we will use these techniques to: (i) establish dislocation, grain size, and grain orientation distributions of the entire ingots (through appropriate DOE) and compare these with theoretical models developed by MEMC, (ii) determine concentrations of some relevant impurities in selected wafers, (iii) evaluate potential of using photoluminescence for dislocation mapping and identification of recombination centers, (iv) evaluate use of diode array analysis as a detailed characterization tool, and (v) establish dislocation mapping as a wafer-quality monitoring tool for commercial mc-Si production.

  16. Cooperative retraction of bundled type IV pili enables nanonewton force generation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Biais

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available The causative agent of gonorrhea, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, bears retractable filamentous appendages called type IV pili (Tfp. Tfp are used by many pathogenic and nonpathogenic bacteria to carry out a number of vital functions, including DNA uptake, twitching motility (crawling over surfaces, and attachment to host cells. In N. gonorrhoeae, Tfp binding to epithelial cells and the mechanical forces associated with this binding stimulate signaling cascades and gene expression that enhance infection. Retraction of a single Tfp filament generates forces of 50-100 piconewtons, but nothing is known, thus far, on the retraction force ability of multiple Tfp filaments, even though each bacterium expresses multiple Tfp and multiple bacteria interact during infection. We designed a micropillar assay system to measure Tfp retraction forces. This system consists of an array of force sensors made of elastic pillars that allow quantification of retraction forces from adherent N. gonorrhoeae bacteria. Electron microscopy and fluorescence microscopy were used in combination with this novel assay to assess the structures of Tfp. We show that Tfp can form bundles, which contain up to 8-10 Tfp filaments, that act as coordinated retractable units with forces up to 10 times greater than single filament retraction forces. Furthermore, single filament retraction forces are transient, whereas bundled filaments produce retraction forces that can be sustained. Alterations of noncovalent protein-protein interactions between Tfp can inhibit both bundle formation and high-amplitude retraction forces. Retraction forces build over time through the recruitment and bundling of multiple Tfp that pull cooperatively to generate forces in the nanonewton range. We propose that Tfp retraction can be synchronized through bundling, that Tfp bundle retraction can generate forces in the nanonewton range in vivo, and that such high forces could affect infection.

  17. A mixture of "cheats" and "co-operators" can enable maximal group benefit.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Craig MaClean

    Full Text Available Is a group best off if everyone co-operates? Theory often considers this to be so (e.g. the "conspiracy of doves", this understanding underpinning social and economic policy. We observe, however, that after competition between "cheat" and "co-operator" strains of yeast, population fitness is maximized under co-existence. To address whether this might just be a peculiarity of our experimental system or a result with broader applicability, we assemble, benchmark, dissect, and test a systems model. This reveals the conditions necessary to recover the unexpected result. These are 3-fold: (a that resources are used inefficiently when they are abundant, (b that the amount of co-operation needed cannot be accurately assessed, and (c the population is structured, such that co-operators receive more of the resource than the cheats. Relaxing any of the assumptions can lead to population fitness being maximized when cheats are absent, which we experimentally demonstrate. These three conditions will often be relevant, and hence in order to understand the trajectory of social interactions, understanding the dynamics of the efficiency of resource utilization and accuracy of information will be necessary.

  18. To Enable and Sustain: Pacific Air Forces’ Theater Security Cooperation as a Line of Operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-02-01

    ultimately, national priorities in the rebalance to the Asia -Pacific. What January-february 2015 Air & Space Power Joumall 80 \\J VIEWS •1• follows is... promote Asia -Pacific security? Joint Publication S-0, Joint Operation Planning, reveals two ways of conceptualizing a LOO. One way describes the...to a desired end state-regional stability and prosperity. Why Conduct Air -Centric Theater Security Cooperation, and How Does It Promote Regional

  19. Interference Alignment Through User Cooperation for Two-cell MIMO Interfering Broadcast Channels

    CERN Document Server

    Shin, Wonjae; Lim, Jong-Bu; Shin, Changyong; Jang, Kyunghun

    2010-01-01

    This paper focuses on two-cell multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) Gaussian interfering broadcast channels (MIMO-IFBC) with $K$ cooperating users on the cell-boundary of each BS. It corresponds to a downlink scenario for cellular networks with two base stations (BSs), and $K$ users equipped with Wi-Fi interfaces enabling to cooperate among users on a peer-to-peer basis. In this scenario, we propose a novel interference alignment (IA) technique exploiting user cooperation. Our proposed algorithm obtains the achievable degrees of freedom (DoF) of 2K when each BS and user have $M=K+1$ transmit antennas and $N=K$ receive antennas, respectively. Furthermore, the algorithm requires only a small amount of channel feedback information with the aid of the user cooperation channels. The simulations demonstrate that not only are the analytical results valid, but the achievable DoF of our proposed algorithm also outperforms those of conventional techniques.

  20. Electrospun fiber membranes enable proliferation of genetically modified cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borjigin M

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Mandula Borjigin*, Chris Eskridge*, Rohina Niamat, Bryan Strouse, Pawel Bialk, Eric B KmiecDepartment of Chemistry, Delaware State University, Dover, DE, USA *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Polycaprolactone (PCL and its blended composites (chitosan, gelatin, and lecithin are well-established biomaterials that can enrich cell growth and enable tissue engineering. However, their application in the recovery and proliferation of genetically modified cells has not been studied. In the study reported here, we fabricated PCL-biomaterial blended fiber membranes, characterized them using physicochemical techniques, and used them as templates for the growth of genetically modified HCT116-19 colon cancer cells. Our data show that the blended polymers are highly miscible and form homogenous electrospun fiber membranes of uniform texture. The aligned PCL nanofibers support robust cell growth, yielding a 2.5-fold higher proliferation rate than cells plated on standard plastic plate surfaces. PCL-lecithin fiber membranes yielded a 2.7-fold higher rate of proliferation, while PCL-chitosan supported a more modest growth rate (1.5-fold higher. Surprisingly, PCL-gelatin did not enhance cell proliferation when compared to the rate of cell growth on plastic surfaces. Keywords: nanofibers, PCL-biomaterial blends, miscibility, gene editing, cell proliferation

  1. Magnetizable stent-grafts enable endothelial cell capture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tefft, Brandon J.; Uthamaraj, Susheil; Harburn, J. Jonathan; Hlinomaz, Ota; Lerman, Amir; Dragomir-Daescu, Dan; Sandhu, Gurpreet S.

    2017-04-01

    Emerging nanotechnologies have enabled the use of magnetic forces to guide the movement of magnetically-labeled cells, drugs, and other therapeutic agents. Endothelial cells labeled with superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPION) have previously been captured on the surface of magnetizable 2205 duplex stainless steel stents in a porcine coronary implantation model. Recently, we have coated these stents with electrospun polyurethane nanofibers to fabricate prototype stent-grafts. Facilitated endothelialization may help improve the healing of arteries treated with stent-grafts, reduce the risk of thrombosis and restenosis, and enable small-caliber applications. When placed in a SPION-labeled endothelial cell suspension in the presence of an external magnetic field, magnetized stent-grafts successfully captured cells to the surface regions adjacent to the stent struts. Implantation within the coronary circulation of pigs (n=13) followed immediately by SPION-labeled autologous endothelial cell delivery resulted in widely patent devices with a thin, uniform neointima and no signs of thrombosis or inflammation at 7 days. Furthermore, the magnetized stent-grafts successfully captured and retained SPION-labeled endothelial cells to select regions adjacent to stent struts and between stent struts, whereas the non-magnetized control stent-grafts did not. Early results with these prototype devices are encouraging and further refinements will be necessary in order to achieve more uniform cell capture and complete endothelialization. Once optimized, this approach may lead to more rapid and complete healing of vascular stent-grafts with a concomitant improvement in long-term device performance.

  2. Impact of Base Station Cooperation on Cell Planning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian Dexter Garcia

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Base station cooperation (BSC has been identified as a key radio access technology for next-generation cellular networks such as LTE-Advanced. BSC impacts cell planning, which is the methodical selection of base station (BS sites, and BS equipment configuration for cost-effective cellular networks. In this paper, the impact of BSC on cell plan parameters (coverage, traffic, handover, and cost, as well as additional cell planning steps required for BSC are discussed. Results show that BSC maximizes its gains over noncooperation (NC in a network wherein interference from cooperating BSs is the main limitation. Locations exist where NC may produce higher throughputs, therefore dynamic or semistatic switching between BSC and NC, called fractional BSC, is recommended. Because of interference from noncooperating BSs, the gains of BSC over NC are upper bounded, and diminishes at greater intersite distances because of noise. This encourages smaller cell sizes, higher transmit powers, and dynamic clustering of cooperative BSs.

  3. Exploiting Interference Alignment in Multi-Cell Cooperative OFDMA Resource Allocation

    CERN Document Server

    Da, Bin

    2011-01-01

    This paper studies interference alignment (IA) based multi-cell cooperative resource allocation for the downlink OFDMA with universal frequency reuse. Unlike the traditional scheme that treats subcarriers as separate dimensions for resource allocation, the IA technique is utilized to enable frequency-domain precoding over parallel subcarriers. In this paper, the joint optimization of frequency-domain precoding via IA, subcarrier user selection and power allocation is investigated for a cooperative three-cell OFDMA system to maximize the downlink throughput. Numerical results for a simplified symmetric channel setup reveal that the IA-based scheme achieves notable throughput gains over the traditional scheme only when the inter-cell interference link has a comparable strength as the direct link, and the receiver SNR is sufficiently large. Motivated by this observation, a practical hybrid scheme is proposed for cellular systems with heterogenous channel conditions, where the total spectrum is divided into two s...

  4. Development of Droplet Microfluidics Enabling High-Throughput Single-Cell Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Na Wen

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This article reviews recent developments in droplet microfluidics enabling high-throughput single-cell analysis. Five key aspects in this field are included in this review: (1 prototype demonstration of single-cell encapsulation in microfluidic droplets; (2 technical improvements of single-cell encapsulation in microfluidic droplets; (3 microfluidic droplets enabling single-cell proteomic analysis; (4 microfluidic droplets enabling single-cell genomic analysis; and (5 integrated microfluidic droplet systems enabling single-cell screening. We examine the advantages and limitations of each technique and discuss future research opportunities by focusing on key performances of throughput, multifunctionality, and absolute quantification.

  5. A simple physical mechanism enables homeostasis in primitive cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelhart, Aaron E.; Adamala, Katarzyna P.; Szostak, Jack W.

    2016-05-01

    The emergence of homeostatic mechanisms that enable maintenance of an intracellular steady state during growth was critical to the advent of cellular life. Here, we show that concentration-dependent reversible binding of short oligonucleotides, of both specific and random sequence, can modulate ribozyme activity. In both cases, catalysis is inhibited at high concentrations, and dilution activates the ribozyme via inhibitor dissociation, thus maintaining near-constant ribozyme specific activity throughout protocell growth. To mimic the result of RNA synthesis within non-growing protocells, we co-encapsulated high concentrations of ribozyme and oligonucleotides within fatty acid vesicles, and ribozyme activity was inhibited. Following vesicle growth, the resulting internal dilution produced ribozyme activation. This simple physical system enables a primitive homeostatic behaviour: the maintenance of constant ribozyme activity per unit volume during protocell volume changes. We suggest that such systems, wherein short oligonucleotides reversibly inhibit functional RNAs, could have preceded sophisticated modern RNA regulatory mechanisms, such as those involving miRNAs.

  6. Nylon-3 polymers that enable selective culture of endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Runhui; Chen, Xinyu; Gellman, Samuel H; Masters, Kristyn S

    2013-11-06

    Substrates that selectively encourage the growth of specific cell types are valuable for the engineering of complex tissues. Some cell-selective peptides have been identified from extracellular matrix proteins; these peptides have proven useful for biomaterials-based approaches to tissue repair or regeneration. However, there are very few examples of synthetic materials that display selectivity in supporting cell growth. We describe nylon-3 polymers that support in vitro culture of endothelial cells but do not support the culture of smooth muscle cells or fibroblasts. These materials may be promising for vascular biomaterials applications.

  7. Microbuckling in fibrin networks enables long-range cell mechanosensing

    CERN Document Server

    Notbohm, Jacob; Rosakis, Phoebus; Tirrell, David A; Ravichandran, Guruswami

    2014-01-01

    We show that cells in a fibrous matrix induce deformation fields that propagate over a longer range than predicted by linear elasticity. Synthetic, linear elastic hydrogels used in many mechanotrans- duction studies fail to capture this effect. We develop a nonlinear microstructural finite element model for a fiber network to simulate localized deformations induced by cells. The model captures measured cell-induced matrix displacements from experiments and identifies an important mech- anism for long range cell mechanosensing: loss of compression stiffness due to microbuckling of individual fibers. We show evidence that cells sense each other through the formation of localized intercellular bands of tensile deformations caused by this mechanism.

  8. Cell wall staining with Trypan blue enables quantitative analysis of morphological changes in yeast cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liesche, Johannes; Marek, Magdalena; Günther-Pomorski, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    with Trypan Blue, which emits strong red fluorescence upon binding to chitin and yeast glucan; thereby, it facilitates cell wall analysis by confocal and super-resolution microscopy. The staining pattern of Trypan Blue was similar to that of the widely used UV-excitable, blue fluorescent cell wall stain...... Calcofluor White. Trypan Blue staining facilitated quantification of cell size and cell wall volume when utilizing the optical sectioning capacity of a confocal microscope. This enabled the quantification of morphological changes during growth under anaerobic conditions and in the presence of chemicals...

  9. Novel serial positive enrichment technology enables clinical multiparameter cell sorting.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Stemberger

    Full Text Available A general obstacle for clinical cell preparations is limited purity, which causes variability in the quality and potency of cell products and might be responsible for negative side effects due to unwanted contaminants. Highly pure populations can be obtained best using positive selection techniques. However, in many cases target cell populations need to be segregated from other cells by combinations of multiple markers, which is still difficult to achieve--especially for clinical cell products. Therefore, we have generated low-affinity antibody-derived Fab-fragments, which stain like parental antibodies when multimerized via Strep-tag and Strep-Tactin, but can subsequently be removed entirely from the target cell population. Such reagents can be generated for virtually any antigen and can be used for sequential positive enrichment steps via paramagnetic beads. First protocols for multiparameter enrichment of two clinically relevant cell populations, CD4(high/CD25(high/CD45RA(high 'regulatory T cells' and CD8(high/CD62L(high/CD45RA(neg 'central memory T cells', have been established to determine quality and efficacy parameters of this novel technology, which should have broad applicability for clinical cell sorting as well as basic research.

  10. Emergence of spatial structure in cell groups and the evolution of cooperation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carey D Nadell

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available On its own, a single cell cannot exert more than a microscopic influence on its immediate surroundings. However, via strength in numbers and the expression of cooperative phenotypes, such cells can enormously impact their environments. Simple cooperative phenotypes appear to abound in the microbial world, but explaining their evolution is challenging because they are often subject to exploitation by rapidly growing, non-cooperative cell lines. Population spatial structure may be critical for this problem because it influences the extent of interaction between cooperative and non-cooperative individuals. It is difficult for cooperative cells to succeed in competition if they become mixed with non-cooperative cells, which can exploit the public good without themselves paying a cost. However, if cooperative cells are segregated in space and preferentially interact with each other, they may prevail. Here we use a multi-agent computational model to study the origin of spatial structure within growing cell groups. Our simulations reveal that the spatial distribution of genetic lineages within these groups is linked to a small number of physical and biological parameters, including cell growth rate, nutrient availability, and nutrient diffusivity. Realistic changes in these parameters qualitatively alter the emergent structure of cell groups, and thereby determine whether cells with cooperative phenotypes can locally and globally outcompete exploitative cells. We argue that cooperative and exploitative cell lineages will spontaneously segregate in space under a wide range of conditions and, therefore, that cellular cooperation may evolve more readily than naively expected.

  11. Polycomb enables primitive endoderm lineage priming in embryonic stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Illingworth, Robert S; Hölzenspies, Jurriaan J; Roske, Fabian V

    2016-01-01

    Mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs), like the blastocyst from which they are derived, contain precursors of the epiblast (Epi) and primitive endoderm (PrEn) lineages. While transient in vivo, these precursor populations readily interconvert in vitro. We show that altered transcription is the driver...... polycomb with dynamic changes in transcription and stalled lineage commitment, allowing cells to explore alternative choices prior to a definitive decision....

  12. The Voltage Boost Enabled by Luminescence Extraction in Solar Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ganapati, Vidya; Steiner, Myles A.; Yablonovitch, Eli

    2016-11-21

    A new physical principle has emerged to produce record voltages and efficiencies in photovoltaic cells, 'luminescence extraction.' This is exemplified by the mantra 'a good solar cell should also be a good LED.' Luminescence extraction is the escape of internal photons out of the front surface of a solar cell. Basic thermodynamics says that the voltage boost should be related to concentration ratio, C, of a resource by ..delta..V=(kT/q)ln{C}. In light trapping, (i.e. when the solar cell is textured and has a perfect back mirror) the concentration ratio of photons C={4n2}, so one would expect a voltage boost of ..delta..V=kT ln{4n2} over a solar cell with no texture and zero back reflectivity, where n is the refractive index. Nevertheless, there has been ambiguity over the voltage benefit to be expected from perfect luminescence extraction. Do we gain an open circuit voltage boost of ..delta..V=(kT/q)ln{n2}, ..delta..V=(kT/q)ln{2n2}, or ..delta..V=(kT/q)ln{4n2}? What is responsible for this voltage ambiguity ..delta..V=(kT/q)ln{4}=36mVolts? We show that different results come about, depending on whether the photovoltaic cell is optically thin or thick to its internal luminescence. In realistic intermediate cases of optical thickness the voltage boost falls in between; ln{n2}q..delta..V/kT)<;ln{4n2}.

  13. Cell wall staining with Trypan Blue enables quantitative analysis of morphological changes in yeast cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes eLiesche

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Yeast cells are protected by a cell wall that plays an important role in the exchange of substances with the environment. The cell wall structure is dynamic and can adapt to different physiological states or environmental conditions. For the investigation of morphological changes, selective staining with fluorescent dyes is a valuable tool. Furthermore, cell wall staining is used to facilitate sub-cellular localization experiments with fluorescently-labeled proteins and the detection of yeast cells in non-fungal host tissues. Here, we report staining of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cell wall with Trypan Blue, which emits strong red fluorescence upon binding to chitin and yeast glucan; thereby, it facilitates cell wall analysis by confocal and super-resolution microscopy. The staining pattern of Trypan Blue was similar to that of the widely used UV-excitable, blue fluorescent cell wall stain Calcofluor White. Trypan Blue staining facilitated quantification of cell size and cell wall volume when utilizing the optical sectioning capacity of a confocal microscope. This enabled the quantification of morphological changes during growth under anaerobic conditions and in the presence of chemicals, demonstrating the potential of this approach for morphological investigations or screening assays.

  14. Polycomb enables primitive endoderm lineage priming in embryonic stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illingworth, Robert S; Hölzenspies, Jurriaan J; Roske, Fabian V; Bickmore, Wendy A; Brickman, Joshua M

    2016-01-01

    Mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs), like the blastocyst from which they are derived, contain precursors of the epiblast (Epi) and primitive endoderm (PrEn) lineages. While transient in vivo, these precursor populations readily interconvert in vitro. We show that altered transcription is the driver of these coordinated changes, known as lineage priming, in a process that exploits novel polycomb activities. We find that intragenic levels of the polycomb mark H3K27me3 anti-correlate with changes in transcription, irrespective of the gene’s developmental trajectory or identity as a polycomb target. In contrast, promoter proximal H3K27me3 is markedly higher for PrEn priming genes. Consequently, depletion of this modification stimulates the degree to which ESCs are primed towards PrEn when challenged to differentiate, but has little effect on gene expression in self-renewing ESC culture. These observations link polycomb with dynamic changes in transcription and stalled lineage commitment, allowing cells to explore alternative choices prior to a definitive decision. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.14926.001 PMID:27723457

  15. Cooperative Interference Management in Multi-Cell Downlink Beamforming

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Rui

    2009-01-01

    This paper studies the downlink beamforming for a multi-cell system, where multiple base stations (BSs) each with multiple antennas cooperatively design their respective transmit beamforming vectors. It is assumed that all mobile stations (MSs) are equipped with a single antenna each, and there is one active MS in each cell at one time. Accordingly, the system of interest can be modeled by a multiple-input single-output (MISO) Gaussian interference channel (IC), termed as MISO-IC, with interference treated as additive Gaussian noise. We are interested in designing a multi-cell cooperative downlink beamforming scheme to achieve different rate-tuples for active MSs on the Pareto boundary of the achievable rate region for the MISO-IC, which is in general a non-convex problem due to the coupled signal structure. By exploring the relationship between the MISO-IC and the cognitive radio (CR) MISO channel, we show that each Pareto-boundary rate-tuple of the MISO-IC can be achieved when each of the MSs attains its ow...

  16. Protein viscosity, mineral fraction and staggered architecture cooperatively enable the fastest stress wave decay in load-bearing biological materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qwamizadeh, Mahan; Zhang, Zuoqi; Zhou, Kun; Zhang, Yong Wei

    2016-07-01

    One of the key functions of load-bearing biological materials, such as bone, dentin and sea shell, is to protect their inside fragile organs by effectively damping dynamic impact. How those materials achieve this remarkable function remains largely unknown. Using systematic finite element analyses, we study the stress wave propagation and attenuation in cortical bone at the nanoscale as a model material to examine the effects of protein viscosity, mineral fraction and staggered architecture on the elastic wave decay. It is found that the staggered arrangement, protein viscosity and mineral fraction work cooperatively to effectively attenuate the stress wave. For a typical mineral volume fraction and protein viscosity, an optimal staggered nanostructure with specific feature sizes and layouts is able to give rise to the fastest stress wave decay, and the optimal aspect ratio and thickness of mineral platelets are in excellent agreement with experimental measurements. In contrary, as the mineral volume fraction or the protein viscosity goes much higher, the structural arrangement is seen having trivial effect on the stress wave decay, suggesting that the damping properties of the composites go into the structure-insensitive regime from the structure-sensitive regime. These findings not only significantly add to our understanding of the structure-function relationship of load-bearing biological materials, and but also provide useful guidelines for the design of bio-inspired materials with superior resistance to impact loading.

  17. Rehabilitating mussel beds in Coffee Bay, South Africa: Towards fostering cooperative small-scale fisheries governance and enabling community upliftment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvo-Ugarteburu, Gurutze; Raemaekers, Serge; Halling, Christina

    2017-03-01

    -Scale Fisheries Policy should begin with bottom-up, demonstrative resource management measures such as mussel rehabilitation. This type of initiative can deliver short-term food security benefits and foster social learning towards sustainable and cooperative fisheries governance.

  18. T Cell Receptor and Cytokine Signaling Can Function at Different Stages to Establish and Maintain Transcriptional Memory and Enable T Helper Cell Differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bevington, Sarah L.; Cauchy, Pierre; Withers, David R.; Lane, Peter J. L.; Cockerill, Peter N.

    2017-01-01

    Experienced T cells exhibit immunological memory via a rapid recall response, responding to restimulation much faster than naïve T cells. The formation of immunological memory starts during an initial slow response, when naïve T cells become transformed to proliferating T blast cells, and inducible immune response genes are reprogrammed as active chromatin domains. We demonstrated that these active domains are supported by thousands of priming elements which cooperate with inducible transcriptional enhancers to enable efficient responses to stimuli. At the conclusion of this response, a small proportion of these cells return to the quiescent state as long-term memory T cells. We proposed that priming elements can be established in a hit-and-run process dependent on the inducible factor AP-1, but then maintained by the constitutive factors RUNX1 and ETS-1. This priming mechanism may also function to render genes receptive to additional differentiation-inducing factors such as GATA3 and TBX21 that are encountered under polarizing conditions. The proliferation of recently activated T cells and the maintenance of immunological memory in quiescent memory T cells are also dependent on various cytokine signaling pathways upstream of AP-1. We suggest that immunological memory is established by T cell receptor signaling, but maintained by cytokine signaling.

  19. T Cell Receptor and Cytokine Signaling Can Function at Different Stages to Establish and Maintain Transcriptional Memory and Enable T Helper Cell Differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bevington, Sarah L; Cauchy, Pierre; Withers, David R; Lane, Peter J L; Cockerill, Peter N

    2017-01-01

    Experienced T cells exhibit immunological memory via a rapid recall response, responding to restimulation much faster than naïve T cells. The formation of immunological memory starts during an initial slow response, when naïve T cells become transformed to proliferating T blast cells, and inducible immune response genes are reprogrammed as active chromatin domains. We demonstrated that these active domains are supported by thousands of priming elements which cooperate with inducible transcriptional enhancers to enable efficient responses to stimuli. At the conclusion of this response, a small proportion of these cells return to the quiescent state as long-term memory T cells. We proposed that priming elements can be established in a hit-and-run process dependent on the inducible factor AP-1, but then maintained by the constitutive factors RUNX1 and ETS-1. This priming mechanism may also function to render genes receptive to additional differentiation-inducing factors such as GATA3 and TBX21 that are encountered under polarizing conditions. The proliferation of recently activated T cells and the maintenance of immunological memory in quiescent memory T cells are also dependent on various cytokine signaling pathways upstream of AP-1. We suggest that immunological memory is established by T cell receptor signaling, but maintained by cytokine signaling.

  20. GFP-specific CD8 T cells enable targeted cell depletion and visualization of T-cell interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agudo, Judith; Ruzo, Albert; Park, Eun Sook; Sweeney, Robert; Kana, Veronika; Wu, Meng; Zhao, Yong; Egli, Dieter; Merad, Miriam; Brown, Brian D

    2015-12-01

    There are numerous cell types with scarcely understood functions, whose interactions with the immune system are not well characterized. To facilitate their study, we generated a mouse bearing enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP)-specific CD8(+) T cells. Transfer of the T cells into EGFP reporter animals can be used to kill EGFP-expressing cells, allowing selective depletion of desired cell types, or to interrogate T-cell interactions with specific populations. Using this system, we eliminate a rare EGFP-expressing cell type in the heart and demonstrate its role in cardiac function. We also show that naive T cells are recruited into the mouse brain by antigen-expressing microglia, providing evidence of an immune surveillance pathway in the central nervous system. The just EGFP death-inducing (Jedi) T cells enable visualization of a T-cell antigen. They also make it possible to utilize hundreds of existing EGFP-expressing mice, tumors, pathogens and other tools, to study T-cell interactions with many different cell types, to model disease states and to determine the functions of poorly characterized cell populations.

  1. Enabling linear alkyl carbonate electrolytes for high voltage Li-ion cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Jian; Petibon, Remi; Xiong, Deijun; Ma, Lin; Dahn, J. R.

    2016-10-01

    Some of the problems of current electrolytes for high voltage Li-ion cells originate from ethylene carbonate (EC) which is thought to be an essential electrolyte component for Li-ion cells. Ethylene carbonate-free electrolytes containing 1 M LiPF6 in ethylmethyl carbonate (EMC) with small loadings of vinylene carbonate, fluoroethylene carbonate, or (4R,5S)-4,5-Difluoro-1,3-dioxolan-2-one acting as "enablers" were developed. These electrolytes used in Li(Ni0.4Mn0.4Co0.2)O2/graphite pouch type Li-ion cells tested at 4.2 V and 4.5 V yielded excellent charge-discharge cycling and storage properties. The results for cells containing linear alkyl carbonate electrolytes with no EC were compared to those of cells with EC-containing electrolytes incorporating additives proven to enhance cyclability of cells. The combination of EMC with appropriate amounts of these enablers yields cells with better performance than cells with EC-containing electrolytes incorporating additives tested to 4.5 V. Further optimizing these linear alkyl carbonate electrolytes with appropriate co-additives may represent a viable path to the successful commercial utilization of NMC/graphite Li-ion cells operated to 4.5 V and above.

  2. Magnetic separation and antibiotics selection enable enrichment of cells with ZFN/TALEN-induced mutations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyojin Kim

    Full Text Available The ability to enrich cells with targeted mutations greatly facilitates the process of using engineered nucleases, including zinc-finger nucleases and transcription activator-like effector nucleases, to construct such cells. We previously used surrogate reporters to enrich cells containing nuclease-induced mutations via flow cytometry. This method is, however, limited by the availability of flow cytometers. Furthermore, sorted cells occasionally fail to form colonies after exposure to a strong laser and hydrostatic pressure. Here we describe two different types of novel reporters that enable mutant cell enrichment without the use of flow cytometers. We designed reporters that express H-2K(k, a surface antigen, and the hygromycin resistance protein (Hygro(R, respectively, when insertions or deletions are generated at the target sequences by the activity of engineered nucleases. After cotransfection of these reporters and the engineered nuclease-encoding plasmids, H-2K(k- and Hygro(R-expressing cells were isolated using magnetic separation and hygromycin treatment, respectively. We found that mutant cells were drastically enriched in the isolated cells, suggesting that these two reporters enable efficient enrichment of mutants. We propose that these two reporters will greatly facilitate the use of engineered nucleases in a wider range of biomedical research.

  3. Reference Maps of human ES and iPS cell variation enable high-throughput characterization of pluripotent cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bock, Christoph; Kiskinis, Evangelos; Verstappen, Griet; Gu, Hongcang; Boulting, Gabriella; Smith, Zachary D; Ziller, Michael; Croft, Gist F; Amoroso, Mackenzie W; Oakley, Derek H; Gnirke, Andreas; Eggan, Kevin; Meissner, Alexander

    2011-02-04

    The developmental potential of human pluripotent stem cells suggests that they can produce disease-relevant cell types for biomedical research. However, substantial variation has been reported among pluripotent cell lines, which could affect their utility and clinical safety. Such cell-line-specific differences must be better understood before one can confidently use embryonic stem (ES) or induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells in translational research. Toward this goal we have established genome-wide reference maps of DNA methylation and gene expression for 20 previously derived human ES lines and 12 human iPS cell lines, and we have measured the in vitro differentiation propensity of these cell lines. This resource enabled us to assess the epigenetic and transcriptional similarity of ES and iPS cells and to predict the differentiation efficiency of individual cell lines. The combination of assays yields a scorecard for quick and comprehensive characterization of pluripotent cell lines.

  4. Multi-Cell MIMO Downlink with Cell Cooperation and Fair Scheduling: a Large-System Limit Analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Huh, Hoon; Moon, Sung-Hyun; Kim, Young-Tae; Lee, Inkyu

    2010-01-01

    We consider the downlink of a cellular network with multiple cells and multi-antenna base stations, including a realistic distance-dependent pathloss model, clusters of cooperating cells, and general "fairness" requirements. Beyond Monte Carlo simulation, no efficient computation method to evaluate the ergodic throughput of such systems has been presented so far. We propose an analytic solution based on the combination of large random matrix results and convex optimization. The proposed method is computationally much more efficient than Monte Carlo simulation and provides surprisingly accurate approximations for the actual finite-dimensional systems, even for a small number of users and base station antennas. Numerical examples include 2-cell linear and three-sectored 7-cell planar layouts, with no inter-cell cooperation, sector cooperation, or full inter-cell cooperation.

  5. Interaction effects of cell diffusion, cell density and public goods properties on the evolution of cooperation in digital microbes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobay, A; Bagheri, H C; Messina, A; Kümmerli, R; Rankin, D J

    2014-09-01

    Microbial cooperation typically consists in the sharing of secreted metabolites (referred to as public goods) within the community. Although public goods generally promote population growth, they are also vulnerable to exploitation by cheating mutants, which no longer contribute, but still benefit from the public goods produced by others. Although previous studies have identified a number of key factors that prevent the spreading of cheaters, little is known about how these factors interact and jointly shape the evolution of microbial cooperation. Here, we address this issue by investigating the interaction effects of cell diffusion, cell density, public good diffusion and durability (factors known to individually influence costs and benefits of public goods production) on selection for cooperation. To be able to quantify these effects across a wide parameter space, we developed an individual-based simulation platform, consisting of digital cooperator and cheater bacteria inhabiting a finite two-dimensional continuous toroidal surface. Our simulations, which closely mimic microbial microcolony growth, revealed that: (i) either reduced cell diffusion (which keeps cooperators together) or reduced public good diffusion (which keeps the public goods closer to the producer) is not only essential but also sufficient for cooperation to be promoted; (ii) the sign of selection for or against cooperation can change as a function of cell density and in interaction with diffusion parameters; and (iii) increased public goods durability has opposing effects on the evolution of cooperation depending on the level of cell and public good diffusion. Our work highlights that interactions between key parameters of public goods cooperation give rise to complex fitness landscapes, a finding that calls for multifactorial approaches when studying microbial cooperation in natural systems.

  6. Generic Raman-based calibration models enabling real-time monitoring of cell culture bioreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehdizadeh, Hamidreza; Lauri, David; Karry, Krizia M; Moshgbar, Mojgan; Procopio-Melino, Renee; Drapeau, Denis

    2015-01-01

    Raman-based multivariate calibration models have been developed for real-time in situ monitoring of multiple process parameters within cell culture bioreactors. Developed models are generic, in the sense that they are applicable to various products, media, and cell lines based on Chinese Hamster Ovarian (CHO) host cells, and are scalable to large pilot and manufacturing scales. Several batches using different CHO-based cell lines and corresponding proprietary media and process conditions have been used to generate calibration datasets, and models have been validated using independent datasets from separate batch runs. All models have been validated to be generic and capable of predicting process parameters with acceptable accuracy. The developed models allow monitoring multiple key bioprocess metabolic variables, and hence can be utilized as an important enabling tool for Quality by Design approaches which are strongly supported by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

  7. Interferon-alpha subtype 11 activates NK cells and enables control of retroviral infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathrin Gibbert

    Full Text Available The innate immune response mediated by cells such as natural killer (NK cells is critical for the rapid containment of virus replication and spread during acute infection. Here, we show that subtype 11 of the type I interferon (IFN family greatly potentiates the antiviral activity of NK cells during retroviral infection. Treatment of mice with IFN-α11 during Friend retrovirus infection (FV significantly reduced viral loads and resulted in long-term protection from virus-induced leukemia. The effect of IFN-α11 on NK cells was direct and signaled through the type I IFN receptor. Furthermore, IFN-α11-mediated activation of NK cells enabled cytolytic killing of FV-infected target cells via the exocytosis pathway. Depletion and adoptive transfer experiments illustrated that NK cells played a major role in successful IFN-α11 therapy. Additional experiments with Mouse Cytomegalovirus infections demonstrated that the therapeutic effect of IFN-α11 is not restricted to retroviruses. The type I IFN subtypes 2 and 5, which bind the same receptor as IFN-α11, did not elicit similar antiviral effects. These results demonstrate a unique and subtype-specific activation of NK cells by IFN-α11.

  8. A pseudokinase couples signaling pathways to enable asymmetric cell division in a bacterium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Seth Childers

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Bacteria face complex decisions when initiating developmental events such as sporulation, nodulation, virulence, and asymmetric cell division. These developmental decisions require global changes in genomic readout, and bacteria typically employ intricate (yet poorly understood signaling networks that enable changes in cell function. The bacterium Caulobacter crescentus divides asymmetrically to yield two functionally distinct cells: a motile, chemotactic swarmer cell, and a sessile stalked cell with replication and division capabilities. Work from several Caulobacter labs has revealed that differentiation requires concerted regulation by several two-component system (TCS signaling pathways that are differentially positioned at the poles of the predivisional cell (Figure 1. The strict unidirectional flow from histidine kinase (HK to the response regulator (RR, observed in most studied TCS, is difficult to reconcile with the notion that information can be transmitted between two or more TCS signaling pathways. In this study, we uncovered a mechanism by which daughter cell fate, which is specified by the DivJ-DivK-PleC system and effectively encoded in the phosphorylation state of the single-domain RR DivK, is communicated to the CckA-ChpT-CtrA signaling pathway that regulates more than 100 genes for polar differentiation, replication initiation and cell division. Using structural biology and biochemical findings we proposed a mechanistic basis for TCS pathway coupling in which the DivL pseudokinase is repurposed as a sensor rather than participant in phosphotransduction.

  9. Molecular beacon-enabled purification of living cells by targeting cell type-specific mRNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wile, Brian M; Ban, Kiwon; Yoon, Young-Sup; Bao, Gang

    2014-10-01

    Molecular beacons (MBs) are dual-labeled oligonucleotides that fluoresce only in the presence of complementary mRNA. The use of MBs to target specific mRNAs allows sorting of specific cells from a mixed cell population. In contrast to existing approaches that are limited by available surface markers or selectable metabolic characteristics, the MB-based method enables the isolation of a wide variety of cells. For example, the ability to purify specific cell types derived from pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) is important for basic research and therapeutics. In addition to providing a general protocol for MB design, validation and nucleofection into cells, we describe how to isolate a specific cell population from differentiating PSCs. By using this protocol, we have successfully isolated cardiomyocytes differentiated from mouse or human PSCs (hPSCs) with ∼ 97% purity, as confirmed by electrophysiology and immunocytochemistry. After designing MBs, their ordering and validation requires 2 weeks, and the isolation process requires 3 h.

  10. Cell-Specific Promoters Enable Lipid-Based Nanoparticles to Deliver Genes to Specific Cells of the Retina In Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuhong; Rajala, Ammaji; Cao, Binrui; Ranjo-Bishop, Michelle; Agbaga, Martin-Paul; Mao, Chuanbin; Rajala, Raju V S

    2016-01-01

    Non-viral vectors, such as lipid-based nanoparticles (liposome-protamine-DNA complex [LPD]), could be used to deliver a functional gene to the retina to correct visual function and treat blindness. However, one of the limitations of LPD is the lack of cell specificity, as the retina is composed of seven types of cells. If the same gene is expressed in multiple cell types or is absent from one desired cell type, LPD-mediated gene delivery to every cell may have off-target effects. To circumvent this problem, we have tested LPD-mediated gene delivery using various generalized, modified, and retinal cell-specific promoters. We achieved retinal pigment epithelium cell specificity with vitelliform macular dystrophy (VMD2), rod cell specificity with mouse rhodopsin, cone cell specificity with red/green opsin, and ganglion cell specificity with thymocyte antigen promoters. Here we show for the first time that cell-specific promoters enable lipid-based nanoparticles to deliver genes to specific cells of the retina in vivo. This work will inspire investigators in the field of lipid nanotechnology to couple cell-specific promoters to drive expression in a cell- and tissue-specific manner.

  11. Cellular plasticity enables adaptation to unforeseen cell-cycle rewiring challenges.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yair Katzir

    Full Text Available The fundamental dynamics of the cell cycle, underlying cell growth and reproduction, were previously found to be robust under a wide range of environmental and internal perturbations. This property was commonly attributed to its network structure, which enables the coordinated interactions among hundreds of proteins. Despite significant advances in deciphering the components and autonomous interactions of this network, understanding the interfaces of the cell cycle with other major cellular processes is still lacking. To gain insight into these interfaces, we used the process of genome-rewiring in yeast by placing an essential metabolic gene HIS3 from the histidine biosynthesis pathway, under the exclusive regulation of different cell-cycle promoters. In a medium lacking histidine and under partial inhibition of the HIS3p, the rewired cells encountered an unforeseen multitasking challenge; the cell-cycle regulatory genes were required to regulate the essential histidine-pathway gene in concert with the other metabolic demands, while simultaneously driving the cell cycle through its proper temporal phases. We show here that chemostat cell populations with rewired cell-cycle promoters adapted within a short time to accommodate the inhibition of HIS3p and stabilized a new phenotypic state. Furthermore, a significant fraction of the population was able to adapt and grow into mature colonies on plates under such inhibiting conditions. The adapted state was shown to be stably inherited across generations. These adaptation dynamics were accompanied by a non-specific and irreproducible genome-wide transcriptional response. Adaptation of the cell-cycle attests to its multitasking capabilities and flexible interface with cellular metabolic processes and requirements. Similar adaptation features were found in our previous work when rewiring HIS3 to the GAL system and switching cells from galactose to glucose. Thus, at the basis of cellular plasticity is

  12. Graphene-enabled electron microscopy and correlated super-resolution microscopy of wet cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojcik, Michal; Hauser, Margaret; Li, Wan; Moon, Seonah; Xu, Ke

    2015-06-11

    The application of electron microscopy to hydrated biological samples has been limited by high-vacuum operating conditions. Traditional methods utilize harsh and laborious sample dehydration procedures, often leading to structural artefacts and creating difficulties for correlating results with high-resolution fluorescence microscopy. Here, we utilize graphene, a single-atom-thick carbon meshwork, as the thinnest possible impermeable and conductive membrane to protect animal cells from vacuum, thus enabling high-resolution electron microscopy of wet and untreated whole cells with exceptional ease. Our approach further allows for facile correlative super-resolution and electron microscopy of wet cells directly on the culturing substrate. In particular, individual cytoskeletal actin filaments are resolved in hydrated samples through electron microscopy and well correlated with super-resolution results.

  13. The Maf factor Traffic jam both enables and inhibits collective cell migration in Drosophila oogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunawan, Felix; Arandjelovic, Mimi; Godt, Dorothea

    2013-07-01

    Border cell cluster (BCC) migration in the Drosophila ovary is an excellent system to study the gene regulatory network that enables collective cell migration. Here, we identify the large Maf transcription factor Traffic jam (Tj) as an important regulator of BCC migration. Tj has a multifaceted impact on the known core cascade that enables BCC motility, consisting of the Jak/Stat signaling pathway, the C/EBP factor Slow border cells (Slbo), and the downstream effector DE-cadherin (DEcad). The initiation of BCC migration coincides with a Slbo-dependent decrease in Tj expression. This reduction of Tj is required for normal BCC motility, as high Tj expression strongly impedes migration. At high concentration, Tj has a tripartite negative effect on the core pathway: a decrease in Slbo, an increase in the Jak/Stat inhibitor Socs36E, and a Slbo-independent reduction of DEcad. However, maintenance of a low expression level of Tj in the BCC during migration is equally important, as loss of tj function also results in a significant delay in migration concomitant with a reduction of Slbo and consequently of DEcad. Taken together, we conclude that the regulatory feedback loop between Tj and Slbo is necessary for achieving the correct activity levels of migration-regulating factors to ensure proper BCC motility.

  14. Development of Microfluidic Systems Enabling High-Throughput Single-Cell Protein Characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Beiyuan; Li, Xiufeng; Chen, Deyong; Peng, Hongshang; Wang, Junbo; Chen, Jian

    2016-01-01

    This article reviews recent developments in microfluidic systems enabling high-throughput characterization of single-cell proteins. Four key perspectives of microfluidic platforms are included in this review: (1) microfluidic fluorescent flow cytometry; (2) droplet based microfluidic flow cytometry; (3) large-array micro wells (microengraving); and (4) large-array micro chambers (barcode microchips). We examine the advantages and limitations of each technique and discuss future research opportunities by focusing on three key performance parameters (absolute quantification, sensitivity, and throughput). PMID:26891303

  15. Enabling Flexible Polymer Tandem Solar Cells by 3D Ptychographic Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dam, Henrik Friis; Andersen, Thomas Rieks; Pedersen, Emil Bøje Lind

    2015-01-01

    one after the other by wet processing leaves plenty of room for error and the process development calls for an analytical technique that enables 3D reconstruction of the layer stack with the possibility to probe thickness, density, and chemistry of the individual layers in the stack. The use......The realization of a complete tandem polymer solar cell under ambient conditions using only printing and coating methods on a flexible substrate results in a fully scalable process but also requires accurate control during layer formation to succeed. The serial process where the layers are added...

  16. Development of Microfluidic Systems Enabling High-Throughput Single-Cell Protein Characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beiyuan Fan

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available This article reviews recent developments in microfluidic systems enabling high-throughput characterization of single-cell proteins. Four key perspectives of microfluidic platforms are included in this review: (1 microfluidic fluorescent flow cytometry; (2 droplet based microfluidic flow cytometry; (3 large-array micro wells (microengraving; and (4 large-array micro chambers (barcode microchips. We examine the advantages and limitations of each technique and discuss future research opportunities by focusing on three key performance parameters (absolute quantification, sensitivity, and throughput.

  17. High-k Dielectric Passivation: Novel Considerations Enabling Cell Specific Lysis Induced by Electric Fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wassermann, Klemens J; Barth, Sven; Keplinger, Franz; Noehammer, Christa; Peham, Johannes R

    2016-08-24

    A better understanding of the electrodynamic behavior of cells interacting with electric fields would allow for novel scientific insights and would lead to the next generation of cell manipulation, diagnostics, and treatment. Here, we introduce a promising electrode design by using metal oxide high-k dielectric passivation. The thermally generated dielectric passivation layer enables efficient electric field coupling to the fluid sample comprising cells while simultaneously decoupling the electrode ohmically from the electrolyte, allowing for better control and adjustability of electric field effects due to reduced electrochemical reactions at the electrode surface. This approach demonstrates cell-size specific lysis with electric fields in a microfluidic flow-through design resulting in 99.8% blood cell lysis at 6 s exposure without affecting the viability of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial spike-ins. The advantages of this new approach can support next-generation investigations of electrodynamics in biological systems and their exploitation for cell manipulation in multiple fields of medicine, life science, and industry.

  18. A holder assembly for cooperating with an environmental cell and an electron microscope

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zandbergen, H.W.; Pleun, D.; Van Veen, G.N.A.

    2013-01-01

    The invention relates to a holder assembly for cooperating with an environmental cell ( 101 ) and an electron microscope, the environmental cell showing a fluid inlet (103), the electron microscope showing a vacuum wall (110) for separating an evacuable part of the electron microscope from the outsi

  19. Bacterial viruses enable their host to acquire antibiotic resistance genes from neighbouring cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haaber, Jakob Krause; Leisner, Jørgen; Cohn, Marianne Thorup

    2016-01-01

    Prophages are quiescent viruses located in the chromosomes of bacteria. In the human pathogen, Staphylococcus aureus, prophages are omnipresent and are believed to be responsible for the spread of some antibiotic resistance genes. Here we demonstrate that release of phages from a subpopulation of S....... aureus cells enables the intact, prophage-containing population to acquire beneficial genes from competing, phage-susceptible strains present in the same environment. Phage infection kills competitor cells and bits of their DNA are occasionally captured in viral transducing particles. Return...... of such particles to the prophage-containing population can drive the transfer of genes encoding potentially useful traits such as antibiotic resistance. This process, which can be viewed as ‘auto-transduction’, allows S. aureus to efficiently acquire antibiotic resistance both in vitro and in an in vivo virulence...

  20. Donor polymer design enables efficient non-fullerene organic solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhengke; Jiang, Kui; Yang, Guofang; Lai, Joshua Yuk Lin; Ma, Tingxuan; Zhao, Jingbo; Ma, Wei; Yan, He

    2016-10-01

    To achieve efficient organic solar cells, the design of suitable donor-acceptor couples is crucially important. State-of-the-art donor polymers used in fullerene cells may not perform well when they are combined with non-fullerene acceptors, thus new donor polymers need to be developed. Here we report non-fullerene organic solar cells with efficiencies up to 10.9%, enabled by a novel donor polymer that exhibits strong temperature-dependent aggregation but with intentionally reduced polymer crystallinity due to the introduction of a less symmetric monomer unit. Our comparative study shows that an analogue polymer with a C2 symmetric monomer unit yields highly crystalline polymer films but less efficient non-fullerene cells. Based on a monomer with a mirror symmetry, our best donor polymer exhibits reduced crystallinity, yet such a polymer matches better with small molecular acceptors. This study provides important insights to the design of donor polymers for non-fullerene organic solar cells.

  1. Donor polymer design enables efficient non-fullerene organic solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhengke; Jiang, Kui; Yang, Guofang; Lai, Joshua Yuk Lin; Ma, Tingxuan; Zhao, Jingbo; Ma, Wei; Yan, He

    2016-10-26

    To achieve efficient organic solar cells, the design of suitable donor-acceptor couples is crucially important. State-of-the-art donor polymers used in fullerene cells may not perform well when they are combined with non-fullerene acceptors, thus new donor polymers need to be developed. Here we report non-fullerene organic solar cells with efficiencies up to 10.9%, enabled by a novel donor polymer that exhibits strong temperature-dependent aggregation but with intentionally reduced polymer crystallinity due to the introduction of a less symmetric monomer unit. Our comparative study shows that an analogue polymer with a C2 symmetric monomer unit yields highly crystalline polymer films but less efficient non-fullerene cells. Based on a monomer with a mirror symmetry, our best donor polymer exhibits reduced crystallinity, yet such a polymer matches better with small molecular acceptors. This study provides important insights to the design of donor polymers for non-fullerene organic solar cells.

  2. The Cancer Cell Line Encyclopedia enables predictive modelling of anticancer drug sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barretina, Jordi; Caponigro, Giordano; Stransky, Nicolas; Venkatesan, Kavitha; Margolin, Adam A; Kim, Sungjoon; Wilson, Christopher J; Lehár, Joseph; Kryukov, Gregory V; Sonkin, Dmitriy; Reddy, Anupama; Liu, Manway; Murray, Lauren; Berger, Michael F; Monahan, John E; Morais, Paula; Meltzer, Jodi; Korejwa, Adam; Jané-Valbuena, Judit; Mapa, Felipa A; Thibault, Joseph; Bric-Furlong, Eva; Raman, Pichai; Shipway, Aaron; Engels, Ingo H; Cheng, Jill; Yu, Guoying K; Yu, Jianjun; Aspesi, Peter; de Silva, Melanie; Jagtap, Kalpana; Jones, Michael D; Wang, Li; Hatton, Charles; Palescandolo, Emanuele; Gupta, Supriya; Mahan, Scott; Sougnez, Carrie; Onofrio, Robert C; Liefeld, Ted; MacConaill, Laura; Winckler, Wendy; Reich, Michael; Li, Nanxin; Mesirov, Jill P; Gabriel, Stacey B; Getz, Gad; Ardlie, Kristin; Chan, Vivien; Myer, Vic E; Weber, Barbara L; Porter, Jeff; Warmuth, Markus; Finan, Peter; Harris, Jennifer L; Meyerson, Matthew; Golub, Todd R; Morrissey, Michael P; Sellers, William R; Schlegel, Robert; Garraway, Levi A

    2012-03-28

    The systematic translation of cancer genomic data into knowledge of tumour biology and therapeutic possibilities remains challenging. Such efforts should be greatly aided by robust preclinical model systems that reflect the genomic diversity of human cancers and for which detailed genetic and pharmacological annotation is available. Here we describe the Cancer Cell Line Encyclopedia (CCLE): a compilation of gene expression, chromosomal copy number and massively parallel sequencing data from 947 human cancer cell lines. When coupled with pharmacological profiles for 24 anticancer drugs across 479 of the cell lines, this collection allowed identification of genetic, lineage, and gene-expression-based predictors of drug sensitivity. In addition to known predictors, we found that plasma cell lineage correlated with sensitivity to IGF1 receptor inhibitors; AHR expression was associated with MEK inhibitor efficacy in NRAS-mutant lines; and SLFN11 expression predicted sensitivity to topoisomerase inhibitors. Together, our results indicate that large, annotated cell-line collections may help to enable preclinical stratification schemata for anticancer agents. The generation of genetic predictions of drug response in the preclinical setting and their incorporation into cancer clinical trial design could speed the emergence of 'personalized' therapeutic regimens.

  3. Intrachromosomal recombination between highly diverged DNA sequences is enabled in human cells deficient in Bloom helicase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yibin; Li, Shen; Smith, Krissy; Waldman, Barbara Criscuolo; Waldman, Alan S

    2016-05-01

    Mutation of Bloom helicase (BLM) causes Bloom syndrome (BS), a rare human genetic disorder associated with genome instability, elevation of sister chromatid exchanges, and predisposition to cancer. Deficiency in BLM homologs in Drosophila and yeast brings about significantly increased rates of recombination between imperfectly matched sequences ("homeologous recombination," or HeR). To assess whether BLM deficiency provokes an increase in HeR in human cells, we transfected an HeR substrate into a BLM-null cell line derived from a BS patient. The substrate contained a thymidine kinase (tk)-neo fusion gene disrupted by the recognition site for endonuclease I-SceI, as well as a functional tk gene to serve as a potential recombination partner for the tk-neo gene. The two tk sequences on the substrate displayed 19% divergence. A double-strand break was introduced by expression of I-SceI and repair events were recovered by selection for G418-resistant clones. Among 181 events recovered, 30 were accomplished via HeR with the balance accomplished by nonhomologous end-joining. The frequency of HeR events in the BS cells was elevated significantly compared to that seen in normal human fibroblasts or in BS cells complemented for BLM expression. We conclude that BLM deficiency enables HeR in human cells.

  4. Cell surface characteristics enable encrustation-free survival of neutrophilic iron-oxidizing bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saini, G.; Chan, C. S.

    2011-12-01

    Microbial growth in mineralizing environments depends on the cells' ability to evade surface precipitation. Cell-mineral interactions may be required for metabolism, but if unmoderated, cells could become encrusted, which would limit diffusion of nutrients and waste across cell walls. A combination of cell surface charge and hydrophobicity could enable the survival of microbes in such environments by inhibiting mineral attachment. To investigate this mechanism, we characterized the surfaces of two neutrophilic iron-oxidizing bacteria (FeOB): Mariprofundus ferrooxydans, a Zetaproteobacterium from Fe(II)-rich submarine hydrothermal vents and a Betaproteobacterium Gallionellales strain R-1, recently isolated from a ferrous groundwater seep. Both bacteria produce iron oxyhydroxides, yet successfully escape surface encrustation while inhabiting milieu where iron minerals are also produced by abiotic processes. SEM-EDX and TEM-EELS analyses of cultured bacteria revealed no iron on the cell surfaces. Zeta potential measurements showed that these bacteria have very small negative surface charge (0 to -4 mV) over a pH range of 4-9, indicating near-neutrally charged surfaces. Water contact angle measurements and thermodynamic calculations demonstrate that both bacteria and abiotically-formed Fe oxhydroxides are hydrophilic. Extended-DLVO calculations showed that hydrophilic repulsion between cells and minerals dominates over electrostatic and Lifshitz-van der Waals interactions. This leads to overall repulsion between microbes and minerals, thus preventing surface encrustation. Low surface charge and hydrophilicity (determined by microbial adhesion to hydrocarbon assay) were common features for both live and azide-inhibited cells, which shows that surface characteristics do not depend on active metabolism. It is remarkable that these two phylogenetically-distant bacteria from different environments employ similar adaptations to prevent surface mineralization. Our results

  5. X-ray enabled detection and eradication of circulating tumor cells with nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossain, Mainul; Luo, Yang; Sun, Zhaoyong; Wang, Chaoming; Zhang, Minghui; Fu, Hanyu; Qiao, Yong; Su, Ming

    2012-01-01

    The early detection and eradication of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) play an important role in cancer metastasis management. This paper describes a new nanoparticle-enabled technique for integrated enrichment, detection and killing of CTCs by using magnetic nanoparticles and bismuth nanoparticles, X-ray fluorescence spectrometry, and X-ray radiation. The nanoparticles are modified with tumor targeting agents and conjugated with tumor cells through folate receptors over-expressed on cancer cells. A permanent micro-magnet is used to collect CTCs suspended inside a flowing medium that contains phosphate buffered saline (PBS) or whole blood. The characteristic X-ray emissions from collected bismuth nanoparticles, upon excitation with collimated X-rays, are used to detect CTCs. Results show that the method is capable of selectively detecting CTCs at concentrations ranging from 100-100,000 cells/mL in the buffer solution, with a detection limit of ≈ 100 CTCs/mL. Moreover, the dose of primary X-rays can be enhanced to kill the localized CTCs by radiation induced DNA damage, with minimal invasiveness, thus making in vivo personalized CTC management possible.

  6. The Drosophila actin regulator ENABLED regulates cell shape and orientation during gonad morphogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroko Sano

    Full Text Available Organs develop distinctive morphologies to fulfill their unique functions. We used Drosophila embryonic gonads as a model to study how two different cell lineages, primordial germ cells (PGCs and somatic gonadal precursors (SGPs, combine to form one organ. We developed a membrane GFP marker to image SGP behaviors live. These studies show that a combination of SGP cell shape changes and inward movement of anterior and posterior SGPs leads to the compaction of the spherical gonad. This process is disrupted in mutants of the actin regulator, enabled (ena. We show that Ena coordinates these cell shape changes and the inward movement of the SGPs, and Ena affects the intracellular localization of DE-cadherin (DE-cad. Mathematical simulation based on these observations suggests that changes in DE-cad localization can generate the forces needed to compact an elongated structure into a sphere. We propose that Ena regulates force balance in the SGPs by sequestering DE-cad, leading to the morphogenetic movement required for gonad compaction.

  7. Cornell Fuel Cell Institute: Materials Discovery to Enable Fuel Cell Technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abruna, H.D.; DiSalvo, Francis J.

    2012-06-29

    The discovery and understanding of new, improved materials to advance fuel cell technology are the objectives of the Cornell Fuel Cell Institute (CFCI) research program. CFCI was initially formed in 2003. This report highlights the accomplishments from 2006-2009. Many of the grand challenges in energy science and technology are based on the need for materials with greatly improved or even revolutionary properties and performance. This is certainly true for fuel cells, which have the promise of being highly efficient in the conversion of chemical energy to electrical energy. Fuel cells offer the possibility of efficiencies perhaps up to 90 % based on the free energy of reaction. Here, the challenges are clearly in the materials used to construct the heart of the fuel cell: the membrane electrode assembly (MEA). The MEA consists of two electrodes separated by an ionically conducting membrane. Each electrode is a nanocomposite of electronically conducting catalyst support, ionic conductor and open porosity, that together form three percolation networks that must connect to each catalyst nanoparticle; otherwise the catalyst is inactive. This report highlights the findings of the three years completing the CFCI funding, and incudes developments in materials for electrocatalyts, catalyst supports, materials with structured and functional porosity for electrodes, and novel electrolyte membranes. The report also discusses developments at understanding electrocatalytic mechanisms, especially on novel catalyst surfaces, plus in situ characterization techniques and contributions from theory. Much of the research of the CFCI continues within the Energy Materials Center at Cornell (emc2), a DOE funded, Office of Science Energy Frontier Research Center (EFRC).

  8. Robots, pipelines, polyproteins: enabling multiprotein expression in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayachandran, Lakshmi Sumitra; Viola, Cristina; Garzoni, Frederic; Trowitzsch, Simon; Bieniossek, Christoph; Chaillet, Maxime; Schaffitzel, Christiane; Busso, Didier; Romier, Christophe; Poterszman, Arnaud; Richmond, Timothy J; Berger, Imre

    2011-08-01

    Multiprotein complexes catalyze vital biological functions in the cell. A paramount objective of the SPINE2 project was to address the structural molecular biology of these multiprotein complexes, by enlisting and developing enabling technologies for their study. An emerging key prerequisite for studying complex biological specimens is their recombinant overproduction. Novel reagents and streamlined protocols for rapidly assembling co-expression constructs for this purpose have been designed and validated. The high-throughput pipeline implemented at IGBMC Strasbourg and the ACEMBL platform at the EMBL Grenoble utilize recombinant overexpression systems for heterologous expression of proteins and their complexes. Extension of the ACEMBL platform technology to include eukaryotic hosts such as insect and mammalian cells has been achieved. Efficient production of large multicomponent protein complexes for structural studies using the baculovirus/insect cell system can be hampered by a stoichiometric imbalance of the subunits produced. A polyprotein strategy has been developed to overcome this bottleneck and has been successfully implemented in our MultiBac baculovirus expression system for producing multiprotein complexes.

  9. Kv3 K+ channels enable burst output in rat cerebellar Purkinje cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKay, B E; Turner, R W

    2004-08-01

    The ability of cells to generate an appropriate spike output depends on a balance between membrane depolarizations and the repolarizing actions of K(+) currents. The high-voltage-activated Kv3 class of K(+) channels repolarizes Na(+) spikes to maintain high frequencies of discharge. However, little is known of the ability for these K(+) channels to shape Ca(2+) spike discharge or their ability to regulate Ca(2+) spike-dependent burst output. Here we identify the role of Kv3 K(+) channels in the regulation of Na(+) and Ca(2+) spike discharge, as well as burst output, using somatic and dendritic recordings in rat cerebellar Purkinje cells. Kv3 currents pharmacologically isolated in outside-out somatic membrane patches accounted for approximately 40% of the total K(+) current, were very fast and high voltage activating, and required more than 1 s to fully inactivate. Kv3 currents were differentiated from other tetraethylammonium-sensitive currents to establish their role in Purkinje cells under physiological conditions with current-clamp recordings. Dual somatic-dendritic recordings indicated that Kv3 channels repolarize Na(+) and Ca(2+) spikes, enabling high-frequency discharge for both types of cell output. We further show that during burst output Kv3 channels act together with large-conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channels to ensure an effective coupling between Ca(2+) and Na(+) spike discharge by preventing Na(+) spike inactivation. By contributing significantly to the repolarization of Na(+) and especially Ca(2+) spikes, our data reveal a novel function for Kv3 K(+) channels in the maintenance of high-frequency burst output for cerebellar Purkinje cells.

  10. Cooperative inhibitory effects of antisense oligonucleotide of cell adhesion molecules and cimetidine on cancer cell adhesion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nan-Hong Tang; Yan-Ling Chen; Xiao-Qian Wang; Xiu-Jin Li; Feng-Zhi Yin; Xiao-Zhong Wang

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To explore the cooperative effects of antisense oligonucleotide (ASON) of cell adhesion molecules and cimetidine on the expression of E-selectin and ICAM-1 in endothelial cells and their adhesion to tumor cells.METHODS: After treatment of endothelial cells with ASON and/or cimetidine and induction with TNF-α, the protein and mRNA changes of E-selectin and ICAM-1 in endothelial cells were examined by flow cytometry and RT-PCR,respectively. The adhesion rates of endothelial cells to tumor cells were measured by cell adhesion experiment.RESULTS: In comparison with TNF-α inducing group, lipoASON and lipo-ASON/cimetidine could significantly decrease the protein and mRNA levels of E-selectin and ICAM-1 in endothelial cells, and lipo-ASON/cimetidine had most significant inhibitory effect on E-selectin expression (from 36.37±1.56% to 14.23±1.07%, P<0.001). Meanwhile,cimetidine alone could inhibit the expression of E-selectin (36.37±1.56% vs 27.2±1.31%, P<0.001), but not ICAM-1 (69.34±2.50% vs68.07±2.10%,P>O.05)and the two kinds of mRNA, either. Compared with TNF-αα inducing group, the rate of adhesion was markedly decreased in lipo-E-selectin ASON and lipo-E-selectin ASON/cimetidine treated groups(P<0.05),and Jipo-E-selectin ASON/cimetidine worked better than lipo-E-selectin ASON alone except for HepG2/ECV304 group(P<0.05). However, the decrease of adhesion was not significant in lipo-ICAM-1 ASON and lipo-ICAM-1 ASON/cimetidine treated groups except for HepG2/ECV304 group (P >0.05).CONCLUSION: These data demonstrate that ASON in combination with cimetidine in vitro can significantly reduce the adhesion between endothelial cells and hepatic or colorectal cancer cells, which is stronger than ASON or cimetidine alone. This study provides some useful proofs for gene therapy of antiadhesion.

  11. A Power Allocation Algorithm Based on Cooperative Game Theory in Multi-cell OFDM Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Wang

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available A centralized resource allocation algorithm in multi-cell OFDM systems is studied, which aims at improving the performance of wireless communication systems and enhancing user’s spectral efficiency on the edge of the cell. The proposed resource allocation algorithm can be divided into two steps. The first step is sub-carrier allocation based on matrix searching in single cell and the second one is joint power allocation based on cooperative game theory in multi-cell. By comparing with traditional resource allocation algorithms in multi-cell scenario, we find that the proposed algorithm has lower computational complexity and good fairness performance.

  12. Massive MIMO meets small cell backhaul and cooperation

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Howard H

    2017-01-01

    This brief explores the utilization of large antenna arrays in massive multiple-input-multiple-output (MIMO) for both interference suppression, where it can improve cell-edge user rates, and for wireless backhaul in small cell networks, where macro base stations can forward data to small access points in an energy efficient way. Massive MIMO is deemed as a critical technology for next generation wireless technology. By deploying an antenna array that has active elements in excess of the number of users, massive MIMO not only provides tremendous diversity gain but also powers new aspects for network design to improve performance. This brief investigates a better utilization of the excessive spatial dimensions to improve network performance. It combines random matrix theory and stochastic geometry to develop an analytical framework that accounts for all the key features of a network, including number of antenna array, base station density, inter-cell interference, random base station deployment, and network tra...

  13. Taurolidine cooperates with antineoplastic drugs in neuroblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eschenburg, Georg; Luckert, Christian; Reinshagen, Konrad; Bergholz, Robert

    2014-11-01

    Neuroblastoma is the most common extracranial tumor in childhood. Outcome of stage 4 disease remains poor and the development of novel therapeutic approaches is thus urgently needed. Taurolidine (TRD), originally invented to avoid catheter infections, has shown to exhibit antineoplastic activity in various cancers. The growth of neuroblastoma cell lines is inhibited by TRD as recently demonstrated. Further analysis disclosed a significant negative growth effect of TRD on the four neuroblastoma cell lines SH-EP TET21N, SK-N-AS, SK-N-BE(2)-M17 and SK-N-SH. Detected IC50 (51-274 μM; 48 h) are promising and correspond to clinically-achievable plasma levels. Apoptosis was induced (76-86%; 48 h) in a time-dependent manner mediated by a simultaneous activation of the intrinsic and extrinsic pathways. This was confirmed by cleavage of caspases -3, -8 and -9 and abrogation of apoptosis by pan-caspase inhibition. Application of TRD resulted in a significant enhancement of cytotoxic drugs vincristine/doxorubicin (2/3 of 4 cell lines) making TRD a promising candidate to be included in neuroblastoma therapy regimens in the future.

  14. A Closer Look at Multi-Cell Cooperation via Stochastic Geometry and Large Deviations

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, Kaibin

    2012-01-01

    Multi-cell cooperation (MCC) is an approach for mitigating inter-cell interference in dense cellular networks. Existing studies on MCC performance typically rely on either over-simplified Wyner-type models or complex system-level simulations. The promising theoretical results (typically using Wyner models) seem to not materialize in either complex simulations or particularly in practice. To more accurately investigate the theoretical performance of MCC, this paper models an entire plane of interfering cells as a Poisson random tessellation. The base stations (BSs) are then clustered using a regular lattice, whereby BSs in the same cluster mitigate mutual interference by beamforming with perfect channel state information. Techniques from stochastic geometry and large deviation theory are applied to analyze the outage probability as a function of the mobile locations, scattering environment, and the average number of cooperating BSs per cluster, L. For mobiles near the centers of BS clusters, it is shown that a...

  15. Cooperation among cancer cells as public goods games on Voronoi networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archetti, Marco

    2016-05-07

    Cancer cells produce growth factors that diffuse and sustain tumour proliferation, a form of cooperation that can be studied using mathematical models of public goods in the framework of evolutionary game theory. Cell populations, however, form heterogeneous networks that cannot be described by regular lattices or scale-free networks, the types of graphs generally used in the study of cooperation. To describe the dynamics of growth factor production in populations of cancer cells, I study public goods games on Voronoi networks, using a range of non-linear benefits that account for the known properties of growth factors, and different types of diffusion gradients. The results are surprisingly similar to those obtained on regular graphs and different from results on scale-free networks, revealing that network heterogeneity per se does not promote cooperation when public goods diffuse beyond one-step neighbours. The exact shape of the diffusion gradient is not crucial, however, whereas the type of non-linear benefit is an essential determinant of the dynamics. Public goods games on Voronoi networks can shed light on intra-tumour heterogeneity, the evolution of resistance to therapies that target growth factors, and new types of cell therapy.

  16. Network governance for dealing with IT-enabled Interorganizational cooperation : When should network IT - such as social media - be used and how to govern it

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Graaf, Frank Jan de; Velthuijsen, Hugo

    2012-01-01

    IT-based networking trends such as the rise of social media, crowd sourcing, open innovation, and cloud computing enable a profoundly different way of working and collaborating that challenges significantly traditional approaches of companies towards governance, i.e. the mechanisms a company empl

  17. PU.1 cooperates with IRF4 and IRF8 to suppress pre-B-cell leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, S H M; Minnich, M; Gangatirkar, P; Zheng, Z; Ebert, A; Song, G; Dickins, R A; Corcoran, L M; Mullighan, C G; Busslinger, M; Huntington, N D; Nutt, S L; Carotta, S

    2016-06-01

    The Ets family transcription factor PU.1 and the interferon regulatory factor (IRF)4 and IRF8 regulate gene expression by binding to composite DNA sequences known as Ets/interferon consensus elements. Although all three factors are expressed from the onset of B-cell development, single deficiency of these factors in B-cell progenitors only mildly impacts on bone marrow B lymphopoiesis. Here we tested whether PU.1 cooperates with IRF factors in regulating early B-cell development. Lack of PU.1 and IRF4 resulted in a partial block in development the pre-B-cell stage. The combined deletion of PU.1 and IRF8 reduced recirculating B-cell numbers. Strikingly, all PU.1/IRF4 and ~50% of PU.1/IRF8 double deficient mice developed pre-B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL) associated with reduced expression of the established B-lineage tumor suppressor genes, Ikaros and Spi-B. These genes are directly regulated by PU.1/IRF4/IRF8, and restoration of Ikaros or Spi-B expression inhibited leukemic cell growth. In summary, we demonstrate that PU.1, IRF4 and IRF8 cooperate to regulate early B-cell development and to prevent pre-B-ALL formation.

  18. Industrial systems biology of Saccharomyces cerevisiae enables novel succinic acid cell factory.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Manuel Otero

    Full Text Available Saccharomyces cerevisiae is the most well characterized eukaryote, the preferred microbial cell factory for the largest industrial biotechnology product (bioethanol, and a robust commerically compatible scaffold to be exploitted for diverse chemical production. Succinic acid is a highly sought after added-value chemical for which there is no native pre-disposition for production and accmulation in S. cerevisiae. The genome-scale metabolic network reconstruction of S. cerevisiae enabled in silico gene deletion predictions using an evolutionary programming method to couple biomass and succinate production. Glycine and serine, both essential amino acids required for biomass formation, are formed from both glycolytic and TCA cycle intermediates. Succinate formation results from the isocitrate lyase catalyzed conversion of isocitrate, and from the α-keto-glutarate dehydrogenase catalyzed conversion of α-keto-glutarate. Succinate is subsequently depleted by the succinate dehydrogenase complex. The metabolic engineering strategy identified included deletion of the primary succinate consuming reaction, Sdh3p, and interruption of glycolysis derived serine by deletion of 3-phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase, Ser3p/Ser33p. Pursuing these targets, a multi-gene deletion strain was constructed, and directed evolution with selection used to identify a succinate producing mutant. Physiological characterization coupled with integrated data analysis of transcriptome data in the metabolically engineered strain were used to identify 2(nd-round metabolic engineering targets. The resulting strain represents a 30-fold improvement in succinate titer, and a 43-fold improvement in succinate yield on biomass, with only a 2.8-fold decrease in the specific growth rate compared to the reference strain. Intuitive genetic targets for either over-expression or interruption of succinate producing or consuming pathways, respectively, do not lead to increased succinate. Rather, we

  19. COOPERATIVE DIRECTIONAL INTER-CELL HANDOVER SCHEME IN HIGH ALTITUDE PLATFORM COMMUNICATIONS SYSTEMS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Shufeng; Wang Lijie; David Grace; Ma Dongtang

    2011-01-01

    A novel Cooperative Directional inter-cell Handover Scheme (CDHS) for High Altitude Platform (HAP) communications systems is proposed,in which the handover target cell and the two cells adjacent to this handover target cell work cooperatively to exploit the traffic fluctuation to improve handover performance.Users in the overlap area of the overloaded handover target cell will be forced to handover directionally before their optimal handover boundary in order to free up resources for the handover calls which would otherwise be dropped due to the shortage of resources and queue time out.Simulation results show that the handover call dropping probability is greatly reduced (at least 60%) compared with the general queue handover scheme,with little performancereduction to the call blocking probability,and the Not in the Best Cell (NBC) average time is only increased moderately.Moreover,an optimal cell radius can be achieved for a specific platform speed by minimizing the unified system performance,which is the linear combination of the handover call dropping probability and the NBC average time.

  20. Cellular cooperation: insights from microbes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celiker, Hasan; Gore, Jeff

    2013-01-01

    Cooperation between cells is a widespread phenomenon in nature, found across diverse systems ranging from microbial populations to multicellular organisms. For cooperation to evolve and be maintained within a population of cells, costs due to competition have to be outweighed by the benefits gained through cooperative actions. Because cooperation generally confers a cost to the cooperating cells, defector cells that do not cooperate but reap the benefits of cooperation can thrive and eventually drive the cooperating phenotypes to extinction. Here we summarize recent advances made in understanding how cooperation and multicellularity can evolve in microbial populations in the face of such conflicts and discuss parallels with cell populations within multicellular organisms.

  1. Cooperative effects of matrix stiffness and fluid shear stress on endothelial cell behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohn, Julie C; Zhou, Dennis W; Bordeleau, François; Zhou, Allen L; Mason, Brooke N; Mitchell, Michael J; King, Michael R; Reinhart-King, Cynthia A

    2015-02-03

    Arterial hemodynamic shear stress and blood vessel stiffening both significantly influence the arterial endothelial cell (EC) phenotype and atherosclerosis progression, and both have been shown to signal through cell-matrix adhesions. However, the cooperative effects of fluid shear stress and matrix stiffness on ECs remain unknown. To investigate these cooperative effects, we cultured bovine aortic ECs on hydrogels matching the elasticity of the intima of compliant, young, or stiff, aging arteries. The cells were then exposed to laminar fluid shear stress of 12 dyn/cm(2). Cells grown on more compliant matrices displayed increased elongation and tighter EC-cell junctions. Notably, cells cultured on more compliant substrates also showed decreased RhoA activation under laminar shear stress. Additionally, endothelial nitric oxide synthase and extracellular signal-regulated kinase phosphorylation in response to fluid shear stress occurred more rapidly in ECs cultured on more compliant substrates, and nitric oxide production was enhanced. Together, our results demonstrate that a signaling cross talk between stiffness and fluid shear stress exists within the vascular microenvironment, and, importantly, matrices mimicking young and healthy blood vessels can promote and augment the atheroprotective signals induced by fluid shear stress. These data suggest that targeting intimal stiffening and/or the EC response to intima stiffening clinically may improve vascular health.

  2. Cooperation of B cell lineages in induction of HIV-1-broadly neutralizing antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Feng; Bonsignori, Mattia; Liao, Hua-Xin; Kumar, Amit; Xia, Shi-Mao; Lu, Xiaozhi; Cai, Fangping; Hwang, Kwan-Ki; Song, Hongshuo; Zhou, Tongqing; Lynch, Rebecca M; Alam, S Munir; Moody, M Anthony; Ferrari, Guido; Berrong, Mark; Kelsoe, Garnett; Shaw, George M; Hahn, Beatrice H; Montefiori, David C; Kamanga, Gift; Cohen, Myron S; Hraber, Peter; Kwong, Peter D; Korber, Bette T; Mascola, John R; Kepler, Thomas B; Haynes, Barton F

    2014-07-31

    Development of strategies for induction of HIV-1 broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs) by vaccines is a priority. Determining the steps of bnAb induction in HIV-1-infected individuals who make bnAbs is a key strategy for immunogen design. Here, we study the B cell response in a bnAb-producing individual and report cooperation between two B cell lineages to drive bnAb development. We isolated a virus-neutralizing antibody lineage that targeted an envelope region (loop D) and selected virus escape mutants that resulted in both enhanced bnAb lineage envelope binding and escape mutant neutralization-traits associated with increased B cell antigen drive. Thus, in this individual, two B cell lineages cooperated to induce the development of bnAbs. Design of vaccine immunogens that simultaneously drive both helper and broadly neutralizing B cell lineages may be important for vaccine-induced recapitulation of events that transpire during the maturation of neutralizing antibodies in HIV-1-infected individuals.

  3. Exploiting serum interactions with cationic biomaterials enables label-free circulating tumor cell isolation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellanos, Carlos

    Herein we investigate the role charged biomaterials and fluid dielectric properties have on microfluidic capture and isolation of circulating tumor cells. We determine that heparan sulfate proteoglycans on cancer cell surfaces are responsible for elevated electric charge of cancer cells compared with white blood cells and that these proteoglycans help mediate adhesive interactions between cells and charged surfaces in albumin-containing fluids. Cancer cell firm adhesion to charged surfaces persists when cells are bathed in up to 1% (w/v) human albumin solution, while white blood cell adhesion is nearly abrogated. As many protocols rely on electrical interactions between cells and biomaterials, our study could reveal a new determinant of efficient adhesion and targeting of specific tissue types in the context of a biological fluid environment.

  4. Correlating cell morphology and stochastic gene expression using fluorescence spectroscopy and GPU-enabled image analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepherd, Douglas; Shapiro, Evan; Perillo, Evan; Werner, James

    2014-03-01

    Biological processes at the microscopic level appear stochastic, requiring precise measurement and analytical techniques to determine the nature of the underlying regulatory networks. Single-molecule, single-cell studies of gene expression have provided insights into how cells respond to external stimuli. Recent work has suggested that macroscopic cell properties, such as cell morphology, are correlated with gene expression. Here we present single-cell studies of a signal-activated gene network: Interleukin 4 (IL4) RNA production in rat basophil leukemia (RBL) cells during the allergic response. We fluorescently label individual IL4 RNA transcripts in populations of RBL cells, subject to varying external stimuli. A custom super-resolution microscope is used to measure the number of fluorescent labeled IL4 transcripts in populations of RBL cells on a cell-by-cell basis. To test the hypothesis that cell morphology is connected genotype, we analyze white light images of RBL cells and cross-reference cell morphology with IL4 RNA levels. We find that the activation of RBL cells, determined by white-light imaging, is well correlated with IL4 mRNA expression.

  5. Primed 3D injectable microniches enabling low-dosage cell therapy for critical limb ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yaqian; Liu, Wei; Liu, Fei; Zeng, Yang; Zuo, Simin; Feng, Siyu; Qi, Chunxiao; Wang, Bingjie; Yan, Xiaojun; Khademhosseini, Ali; Bai, Jing; Du, Yanan

    2014-09-16

    The promise of cell therapy for repair and restoration of damaged tissues or organs relies on administration of large dose of cells whose healing benefits are still limited and sometimes irreproducible due to uncontrollable cell loss and death at lesion sites. Using a large amount of therapeutic cells increases the costs for cell processing and the risks of side effects. Optimal cell delivery strategies are therefore in urgent need to enhance the specificity, efficacy, and reproducibility of cell therapy leading to minimized cell dosage and side effects. Here, we addressed this unmet need by developing injectable 3D microscale cellular niches (microniches) based on biodegradable gelatin microcryogels (GMs). The microniches are constituted by in vitro priming human adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) seeded within GMs resulting in tissue-like ensembles with enriched extracellular matrices and enhanced cell-cell interactions. The primed 3D microniches facilitated cell protection from mechanical insults during injection and in vivo cell retention, survival, and ultimate therapeutic functions in treatment of critical limb ischemia (CLI) in mouse models compared with free cell-based therapy. In particular, 3D microniche-based therapy with 10(5) hMSCs realized better ischemic limb salvage than treatment with 10(6) free-injected hMSCs, the minimum dosage with therapeutic effects for treating CLI in literature. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first convincing demonstration of injectable and primed cell delivery strategy realizing superior therapeutic efficacy for treating CLI with the lowest cell dosage in mouse models. This study offers a widely applicable cell delivery platform technology to boost the healing power of cell regenerative therapy.

  6. Cofilin and Vangl2 cooperate in the initiation of planar cell polarity in the mouse embryo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahaffey, James P; Grego-Bessa, Joaquim; Liem, Karel F; Anderson, Kathryn V

    2013-03-01

    The planar cell polarity (PCP; non-canonical Wnt) pathway is required to orient the cells within the plane of an epithelium. Here, we show that cofilin 1 (Cfl1), an actin-severing protein, and Vangl2, a core PCP protein, cooperate to control PCP in the early mouse embryo. Two aspects of planar polarity can be analyzed quantitatively at cellular resolution in the mouse embryo: convergent extension of the axial midline; and posterior positioning of cilia on cells of the node. Analysis of the spatial distribution of brachyury(+) midline cells shows that the Cfl1 mutant midline is normal, whereas Vangl2 mutants have a slightly wider midline. By contrast, midline convergent extension fails completely in Vangl2 Cfl1 double mutants. Planar polarity is required for the posterior positioning of cilia on cells in the mouse node, which is essential for the initiation of left-right asymmetry. Node cilia are correctly positioned in Cfl1 and Vangl2 single mutants, but cilia remain in the center of the cell in Vangl2 Cfl1 double mutants, leading to randomization of left-right asymmetry. In both the midline and node, the defect in planar polarity in the double mutants arises because PCP protein complexes fail to traffic to the apical cell membrane, although other aspects of apical-basal polarity are unaffected. Genetic and pharmacological experiments demonstrate that F-actin remodeling is essential for the initiation, but not maintenance, of PCP. We propose that Vangl2 and cofilin cooperate to target Rab11(+) vesicles containing PCP proteins to the apical membrane during the initiation of planar cell polarity.

  7. Spinal cord injury enables aromatic l-amino acid decarboxylase cells to synthesize monoamines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wienecke, Jacob; Ren, Li-Qun; Hultborn, Hans

    2014-01-01

    a loss of inhibition by descending 5-HT neurons and to be mediated by 5-HT1B receptors expressed by AADC cells. These findings indicate that AADC cells are a potential source of 5-HT at spinal levels below an SCI. The production of 5-HT by AADC cells, together with an upregulation of 5-HT2 receptors...

  8. Photovoltaic surfaces enable clonal myoblastic cell release using visible light as external stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhuyan, Mohammod Kabir; Rodriguez-Devora, Jorge; Tseng, Tzu-Liang Bill; Boland, Thomas

    2016-03-01

    Many new biomedical approaches to treating disease require the supply of cells delivered to an injured or diseased organ either individually, collectively as aggregates or sheets, or encapsulated with a scaffold. The collection of cells is accomplished by using enzymatic digestion witch suffer from the need to remove the enzymes after digestion. In addition, enzymatic methods are not applicable for all cells, cell aggregates, cell sheets or 3D structures. The objective of this study was to investigate the release of cultured cells from silicon based Photovoltaic (PV) surfaces using a light source as external stimulation. C2C12 myoblasts were cultured on the negative surface of a PV device and upon confluence they were exposed to light. The amount of released cells was quantified as a function light exposure. It was found that light exposure at 25,000 lux for one hour caused equivalent cell release from the PV surface than trypsination. The released cells are viable and can be re-cultured if needed. This mechanism may offer an alternative method to release excitable cells without using an enzymatic agent. This may be important for cell therapy if larger cell structures such as sheets need to be collected.

  9. A Novel Cell Type Enables B. subtilis To Escape From Unsuccessful Sporulation In Minimal Medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herve Joel Defeu Soufo

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Sporulation is the most enduring survival strategy developed by several bacterial species. However, spore development of the model organism Bacillus subtilis has mainly been studied by means of media or conditions optimized for the induction of sporogenesis. Here, I show that during prolonged growth during stationary phase in minimal medium, B. subtilis undergoes an asymmetric cell division that produces small and round-shaped, DNA containing cells. In contrast to wild-type cells, mutants harboring spo0A or spoIIIE/sftA double mutations neither sporulate nor produce this special cell type, providing evidence that the small round cells emerge from the abortion of endospore formation. In most cases observed, the small round cells arise in the presence of sigma H but absence of sigma F activity, different from cases of abortive sporulation described for rich media. These data suggest that in minimal media, many cells are able to initiate but fail to complete spore development, and therefore return to normal growth as rods. This work reveals that the continuation of asymmetric cell division, which results in the formation of the small round cells, is a way for cells to delay or escape from - unsuccessful - sporulation. Based on these findings, I suggest to name the here described cell type as dwarf cells to distinguish them from the well-known minicells observed in mutants defective in septum placement or proper chromosome partitioning.

  10. A Successful Industrial Academic Cooperation, Development of Closed-cell Metallic Foams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheng-Chung Tzeng

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available This investigation proposes a successful case of industrial-academic cooperation between the Chienkuo Technology University and J. King Aluminum Inc. This study was proposed by the rotating machinery and heat transfer laboratory. They studied the optimal heat transfer and structural strength of closed-cell aluminum porous material. The cooperation involved the exchange of technical skills; the determination of policies and methods for establishing a lasting relationship, to ensure mutual trust between the parties involved and the elucidation of the benefits enjoyed by both sides. This study seeks to provide a good example to local technical industrial institutions of successful industrial-academic cooperation to promote academic professional research and the establishment of empirical formulae from relevant experimental data. The results of the example are useful in designing an electronic package and cooling device will lead to the novel material applications and reduce the cost of research in related industries, improving global production and marketing, also motivates students to combine academic skills and industrial practice as part of a professional education.

  11. Non-linear elasticity of extracellular matrices enables contractile cells to communicate local position and orientation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessamine P Winer

    Full Text Available Most tissue cells grown in sparse cultures on linearly elastic substrates typically display a small, round phenotype on soft substrates and become increasingly spread as the modulus of the substrate increases until their spread area reaches a maximum value. As cell density increases, individual cells retain the same stiffness-dependent differences unless they are very close or in molecular contact. On nonlinear strain-stiffening fibrin gels, the same cell types become maximally spread even when the low strain elastic modulus would predict a round morphology, and cells are influenced by the presence of neighbors hundreds of microns away. Time lapse microscopy reveals that fibroblasts and human mesenchymal stem cells on fibrin deform the substrate by several microns up to five cell lengths away from their plasma membrane through a force limited mechanism. Atomic force microscopy and rheology confirm that these strains locally and globally stiffen the gel, depending on cell density, and this effect leads to long distance cell-cell communication and alignment. Thus cells are acutely responsive to the nonlinear elasticity of their substrates and can manipulate this rheological property to induce patterning.

  12. Adenoviral Delivery of Tumor Necrosis Factor-α and Interleukin-2 Enables Successful Adoptive Cell Therapy of Immunosuppressive Melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siurala, Mikko; Havunen, Riikka; Saha, Dipongkor; Lumen, Dave; Airaksinen, Anu J; Tähtinen, Siri; Cervera-Carrascon, Víctor; Bramante, Simona; Parviainen, Suvi; Vähä-Koskela, Markus; Kanerva, Anna; Hemminki, Akseli

    2016-08-01

    Adoptive T-cell transfer is a promising treatment approach for metastatic cancer, but efficacy in solid tumors has only been achieved with toxic pre- and postconditioning regimens. Thus, adoptive T-cell therapies would benefit from complementary modalities that enable their full potential without excessive toxicity. We aimed to improve the efficacy and safety of adoptive T-cell transfer by using adenoviral vectors for direct delivery of immunomodulatory murine cytokines into B16.OVA melanoma tumors with concomitant T-cell receptor transgenic OT-I T-cell transfer. Armed adenoviruses expressed high local and low systemic levels of cytokine when injected into B16.OVA tumors, suggesting safety of virus-mediated cytokine delivery. Antitumor efficacy was significantly enhanced with adenoviruses coding for murine interleukin-2 (mIL-2) and tumor necrosis factor-α (mTNFα) when compared with T-cell transfer alone or viruses alone. Further improvement in efficacy was achieved with a triple combination of mIL-2, mTNFα, and OT-I T-cells. Mechanistic studies suggest that mIL-2 has an important role in activating T-cells at the tumor, while mTNFα induces chemokine expression. Furthermore, adenovirus treatments enhanced tumor-infiltration of OT-I T-cells as demonstrated by SPECT/CT imaging of (111)In-labeled cells. Our results suggest the utility of cytokine-coding adenoviruses for improving the efficacy of adoptive T-cell therapies.

  13. LPA Induces Colon Cancer Cell Proliferation through a Cooperation between the ROCK and STAT-3 Pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leve, Fernanda; Peres-Moreira, Rubem J.; Binato, Renata; Abdelhay, Eliana; Morgado-Díaz, José A.

    2015-01-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) plays a critical role in the proliferation and migration of colon cancer cells; however, the downstream signaling events underlying these processes remain poorly characterized. The aim of this study was to investigate the signaling pathways triggered by LPA to regulate the mechanisms involved in the progression of colorectal cancer (CRC). We have used three cell line models of CRC, and initially analyzed the expression profile of LPA receptors (LPAR). Then, we treated the cells with LPA and events related to their tumorigenic potential, such as migration, invasion, anchorage-independent growth, proliferation as well as apoptosis and cell cycle were evaluated. We used the Chip array technique to analyze the global gene expression profiling that occurs after LPA treatment, and we identified cell signaling pathways related to the cell cycle. The inhibition of these pathways verified the conclusions of the transcriptomic analysis. We found that the cell lines expressed LPAR1, -2 and -3 in a differential manner and that 10 μM LPA did not affect cell migration, invasion and anchorage-independent growth, but it did induce proliferation and cell cycle progression in HCT-116 cells. Although LPA in this concentration did not induce transcriptional activity of β-catenin, it promoted the activation of Rho and STAT-3. Moreover, ROCK and STAT-3 inhibitors prevented LPA-induced proliferation, but ROCK inhibition did not prevent STAT-3 activation. Finally, we observed that LPA regulates the expression of genes related to the cell cycle and that the combined inhibition of ROCK and STAT-3 prevented cell cycle progression and increased the LPA-induced expression of cyclins E1, A2 and B1 to a greater degree than either inhibitor alone. Overall, these results demonstrate that LPA increases the proliferative potential of colon adenocarcinoma HCT-116 cells through a mechanism involving cooperation between the Rho-ROCK and STAT3 pathways involved in cell

  14. Advances in 3D cell culture technologies enabling tissue-like structures to be created in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Eleanor; Przyborski, Stefan

    2015-12-01

    Research in mammalian cell biology often relies on developing in vitro models to enable the growth of cells in the laboratory to investigate a specific biological mechanism or process under different test conditions. The quality of such models and how they represent the behavior of cells in real tissues plays a critical role in the value of the data produced and how it is used. It is particularly important to recognize how the structure of a cell influences its function and how co-culture models can be used to more closely represent the structure of real tissue. In recent years, technologies have been developed to enhance the way in which researchers can grow cells and more readily create tissue-like structures. Here we identify the limitations of culturing mammalian cells by conventional methods on two-dimensional (2D) substrates and review the popular approaches currently available that enable the development of three-dimensional (3D) tissue models in vitro. There are now many ways in which the growth environment for cultured cells can be altered to encourage 3D cell growth. Approaches to 3D culture can be broadly categorized into scaffold-free or scaffold-based culture systems, with scaffolds made from either natural or synthetic materials. There is no one particular solution that currently satisfies all requirements and researchers must select the appropriate method in line with their needs. Using such technology in conjunction with other modern resources in cell biology (e.g. human stem cells) will provide new opportunities to create robust human tissue mimetics for use in basic research and drug discovery. Application of such models will contribute to advancing basic research, increasing the predictive accuracy of compounds, and reducing animal usage in biomedical science.

  15. On channel quantization for multi-cell cooperative systems with limited feedback

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HOU XueYing; YANG ChenYang; LAU Buon Kiong

    2013-01-01

    Coherent multi-cell cooperative transmission, also referred to as coordinated multi-point transmission (CoMP), is a promising strategy to provide high spectral efficiency for universal frequency reuse cellular systems. To report the required channel information to the transmitter in frequency division duplexing systems, limited feedback techniques are often applied. Considering that the average channel gains from multiple base stations (BSs) to one mobile station are different and the number of cooperative BSs may be dynamic, it is neither flexible nor compatible to employ a large codebook to directly quantize the CoMP channel. In this paper, we employ per-cell codebooks for quantizing local and cross channels. We first propose a codeword selection criterion, aiming at maximizing an estimated data rate for each user. The proposed criterion can be applied for an arbitrary number of receive antennas at each user and also for an arbitrary number of data streams transmitted to each user. Considering that the resulting optimal per-cell codeword selection for CoMP channel is of high complexity, we propose a serial codeword selection method that has low complexity but yields comparable performance to that of the optimal codeword selection. We evaluate the proposed codeword selection criterion and method using measured CoMP channels from an urban environment as well as simulations. The results demonstrate significant performance gain as compared to an existing low-complexity method.

  16. Waste to Watts and Water: Enabling Self-Contained Facilities Using Microbial Fuel Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-05-01

    Logan et al., "Microbial Fuel Cells: Methodology and Technology," Environmental Science & Technology 40, no. 17 (2006): 5189. 60 M. A. Rodrigo et al...348. 67 Bruce Logan et al., "Graphite Fiber Brush Anodes for Increased Power Production in Air-Cathode Microbial Fuel Cells," Environmental Science & Technology 41...34Diversifying Biological Fuel Cell Designs by Use of Nanoporous Filters," Environmental Science & Technology 41, no. 4 (2007). 76 Eliza M. Tsui and

  17. Microfluidic Impedance Flow Cytometry Enabling High-Throughput Single-Cell Electrical Property Characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Chen

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This article reviews recent developments in microfluidic impedance flow cytometry for high-throughput electrical property characterization of single cells. Four major perspectives of microfluidic impedance flow cytometry for single-cell characterization are included in this review: (1 early developments of microfluidic impedance flow cytometry for single-cell electrical property characterization; (2 microfluidic impedance flow cytometry with enhanced sensitivity; (3 microfluidic impedance and optical flow cytometry for single-cell analysis and (4 integrated point of care system based on microfluidic impedance flow cytometry. We examine the advantages and limitations of each technique and discuss future research opportunities from the perspectives of both technical innovation and clinical applications.

  18. Cell membrane topology analysis by RICM enables marker-free adhesion strength quantification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Katharina; Rommel, Christina E; Hirschfeld-Warneken, Vera C; Spatz, Joachim P

    2013-12-01

    Reflection interference contrast microscopy (RICM) allows the visualization of the cell's adhesion topology on substrates. Here it is applied as a new label-free method to measure adhesion forces between tumor cells and their substrate without any external manipulation, i.e., the application of force or adjustments in the substrate elasticity. Malignant cancer transformation is closely associated with the down-regulation of adhesion proteins and the consequent reduction of adhesion forces. By analyzing the size and distribution of adhesion patches from a benign and a malignant human pancreatic tumor cell line, we established a model for calculating the adhesion strength based on RICM images. Further, we could show that the cell's spread area does not necessarily scale with adhesion strength. Despite the larger projected cell area of the malignant cell line, adhesion strength was clearly reduced. This underscores the importance of adhesion patch analysis. The calculated force values were verified by microfluidic detachment assays. Static and dynamic RICM measurements produce numerous adhesion-related parameters from which characteristic cell signatures can be derived. Such a cellular fingerprint can refine the process of categorizing cell lines according to their grade of differentiation.

  19. Novel hepatitis C virus reporter replicon cell lines enable efficient antiviral screening against genotype 1a.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Margaret; Yang, Huiling; Sun, Siu-Chi; Peng, Betty; Tian, Yang; Pagratis, Nikos; Greenstein, Andrew E; Delaney, William E

    2010-08-01

    The hepatitis C virus (HCV) subgenomic replicon is the primary tool for evaluating the activity of anti-HCV compounds in drug discovery research. Despite the prevalence of HCV genotype 1a (approximately 70% of U.S. HCV patients), few genotype 1a reporter replicon cell lines have been described; this is presumably due to the low replication capacity of such constructs in available Huh-7 cells. In this report, we describe the selection of highly permissive Huh-7 cell lines that support robust replication of genotype 1a subgenomic replicons harboring luciferase reporter genes. These novel cell lines support the replication of multiple genotype 1a replicons (including the H77 and SF9 strains), are significantly more permissive to genotype 1a HCV replication than parental Huh7-Lunet cells, and maintain stable genotype 1a replication levels suitable for antiviral screening. We found that the sensitivity of genotype 1a luciferase replicons to known antivirals was highly consistent between individual genotype 1a clonal cell lines but could vary significantly between genotypes 1a and 1b. Sequencing of the nonstructural region of 12 stable replicon cell clones suggested that the enhanced permissivity is likely due to cellular component(s) in these new cell lines rather than the evolution of novel adaptive mutations in the replicons. These new reagents will enhance drug discovery efforts targeting genotype 1a and facilitate the profiling of compound activity among different HCV genotypes and subtypes.

  20. Analysis Results for ARRA Projects: Enabling Fuel Cell Market Transformation (Presentation)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurtz, J.; Wipke, K.; Sprik, S.; Ramsden, T.; Ainscough, C.; Saur, G.

    2012-06-01

    This presentation discusses analysis results for American Recovery and Reinvestment Act early market fuel cell deployments and describes the objective of the project and its relevance to the Department of Energy Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program; NREL's analysis approach; technical accomplishments including publication of a fourth set of composite data products; and collaborations and future work.

  1. Expression of HSF2 decreases in mitosis to enable stress-inducible transcription and cell survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsing, Alexandra N; Aspelin, Camilla; Björk, Johanna K; Bergman, Heidi A; Himanen, Samu V; Kallio, Marko J; Roos-Mattjus, Pia; Sistonen, Lea

    2014-09-15

    Unless mitigated, external and physiological stresses are detrimental for cells, especially in mitosis, resulting in chromosomal missegregation, aneuploidy, or apoptosis. Heat shock proteins (Hsps) maintain protein homeostasis and promote cell survival. Hsps are transcriptionally regulated by heat shock factors (HSFs). Of these, HSF1 is the master regulator and HSF2 modulates Hsp expression by interacting with HSF1. Due to global inhibition of transcription in mitosis, including HSF1-mediated expression of Hsps, mitotic cells are highly vulnerable to stress. Here, we show that cells can counteract transcriptional silencing and protect themselves against proteotoxicity in mitosis. We found that the condensed chromatin of HSF2-deficient cells is accessible for HSF1 and RNA polymerase II, allowing stress-inducible Hsp expression. Consequently, HSF2-deficient cells exposed to acute stress display diminished mitotic errors and have a survival advantage. We also show that HSF2 expression declines during mitosis in several but not all human cell lines, which corresponds to the Hsp70 induction and protection against stress-induced mitotic abnormalities and apoptosis.

  2. Confocal Fluorescence Imaging Enables Noninvasive Quantitative Assessment of Host Cell Populations In Vivo Following Photodynamic Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soumya Mitra, Oleg Mironov, Thomas H. Foster

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the use of optical imaging strategies to noninvasively examine photosensitizer distribution and physiological and host responses to 2-[1-hexyloxyethyl]-2 devinyl pyropheophorbide-a (HPPH-mediated photodynamic therapy (PDT of EMT6 tumors established in the ears of BALB/c mice. 24 h following intravenous (IV administration of 1 μmol kg-1 HPPH, wide-field fluorescence imaging reveals tumor selectivity with an approximately 2-3-fold differential between tumor and adjacent normal tissue. Confocal microscopy demonstrates a relatively homogeneous intratumor HPPH distribution. Labeling of host cells using fluorophore-conjugated antibodies allowed the visualization of Gr1+/CD11b+ leukocytes and major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC-II+ cells in vivo. Imaging of the treated site at different time-points following irradiation shows significant and rapid increases in Gr1+ cells in response to therapy. The maximum accumulation of Gr1+ cells is found at 24 h post-irradiation, followed by a decrease at the 48 h time-point. Using IV-injected FITC-conjugated dextran as a fluorescent perfusion marker, we imaged tissue perfusion at different times post-irradiation and found that the reduced Gr1+ cell density at 48 h correlated strongly with functional damage to the vasculature as reported via decreased perfusion status. Dual color confocal imaging experiments demonstrates that about 90% of the anti-Gr1 cell population co-localized with anti-CD11b labeling, thus indicating that majority of the Gr1-labeled cells were neutrophils. At 24 h post-PDT, an approximately 2-fold increase in MHC-II+ cells relative to untreated control is also observed. Co-localization analysis reveals an increase in the fraction of Gr1+ cells expressing MHC-II, suggesting that HPPH-PDT is stimulating neutrophils to express an antigen-presenting phenotype.

  3. Technologies enabling autologous neural stem cell-based therapies for neurodegenerative disease and injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhru, Sasha H.

    The intrinsic abilities of mammalian neural stem cells (NSCs) to self-renew, migrate over large distances, and give rise to all primary neural cell types of the brain offer unprecedented opportunity for cell-based treatment of neurodegenerative diseases and injuries. This thesis discusses development of technologies in support of autologous NSC-based therapies, encompassing harvest of brain tissue biopsies from living human patients; isolation of NSCs from harvested tissue; efficient culture and expansion of NSCs in 3D polymeric microcapsule culture systems; optimization of microcapsules as carriers for efficient in vivo delivery of NSCs; genetic engineering of NSCs for drug-induced, enzymatic release of transplanted NSCs from microcapsules; genetic engineering for drug-induced differentiation of NSCs into specific therapeutic cell types; and synthesis of chitosan/iron-oxide nanoparticles for labeling of NSCs and in vivo tracking by cellular MRI. Sub-millimeter scale tissue samples were harvested endoscopically from subventricular zone regions of living patient brains, secondary to neurosurgical procedures including endoscopic third ventriculostomy and ventriculoperitoneal shunt placement. On average, 12,000 +/- 3,000 NSCs were isolated per mm 3 of subventricular zone tissue, successfully demonstrated in 26 of 28 patients, ranging in age from one month to 68 years. In order to achieve efficient expansion of isolated NSCs to clinically relevant numbers (e.g. hundreds of thousands of cells in Parkinson's disease and tens of millions of cells in multiple sclerosis), an extracellular matrix-inspired, microcapsule-based culture platform was developed. Initial culture experiments with murine NSCs yielded unprecedented expansion folds of 30x in 5 days, from initially minute NSC populations (154 +/- 15 NSCs per 450 mum diameter capsule). Within 7 days, NSCs expanded as almost perfectly homogenous populations, with 94.9% +/- 4.1% of cultured cells staining positive for

  4. Microsystems enabled photovoltaics: 14.9% efficient 14 {mu}m thick crystalline silicon solar cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cruz-Campa, Jose L. [Sandia National Laboratories, M.S. 1080, 1515 Eubank Blvd. SE, Albuquerque, NM 87123 (United States); University of Texas at El Paso, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, 500 West University Avenue, El Paso, TX 79968 (United States); Okandan, Murat; Resnick, Paul J.; Clews, Peggy; Pluym, Tammy; Grubbs, Robert K.; Gupta, Vipin P.; Nielson, Gregory N. [Sandia National Laboratories, M.S. 1080, 1515 Eubank Blvd. SE, Albuquerque, NM 87123 (United States); Zubia, David [University of Texas at El Paso, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, 500 West University Avenue, El Paso, TX 79968 (United States)

    2011-02-15

    Crystalline silicon solar cells 10-15 times thinner than traditional commercial c-Si cells with 14.9% efficiency are presented with modeling, fabrication, and testing details. These cells are 14 {mu}m thick, 250 {mu}m wide, and have achieved 14.9% solar conversion efficiency under AM 1.5 spectrum. First, modeling results illustrate the importance of high-quality passivation to achieve high efficiency in thin silicon, back contacted solar cells. Then, the methodology used to fabricate these ultra thin devices by means of established microsystems processing technologies is presented. Finally, the optimization procedure to achieve high efficiency as well as the results of the experiments carried out with alumina and nitride layers as passivation coatings are discussed. (author)

  5. Unraveling the genetic driving forces enabling antibiotic resistance at the single cell level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bos, Julia

    Bacteria are champions at finding ways to quickly respond and adapt to environments like the human gut, known as the epicentre of antibiotic resistance. How do they do it? Combining molecular biology tools to microfluidic and fluorescence microscopy technologies, we monitor the behavior of bacteria at the single cell level in the presence of non-toxic doses of antibiotics. By tracking the chromosome dynamics of Escherichia coli cells upon antibiotic treatment, we examine the changes in the number, localization and content of the chromosome copies within one cell compartment or between adjacent cells. I will discuss how our work pictures the bacterial genomic plasticity as a driving force in evolution and how it provides access to the mechanisms controlling the subtle balance between genetic diversity and stability in the development of antibiotic resistance.

  6. Industrial Systems Biology of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Enables Novel Succinic Acid Cell Factory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Otero, José Manuel; Cimini, Donatella; Patil, Kiran Raosaheb

    2013-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae is the most well characterized eukaryote, the preferred microbial cell factory for the largest industrial biotechnology product (bioethanol), and a robust commerically compatible scaffold to be exploitted for diverse chemical production. Succinic acid is a highly sought......-direction of carbon fluxes in S. cerevisiae, and hence show proof of concept that this is a potentially attractive cell factory for over-producing different platform chemicals....

  7. Fluorescent nanodiamonds enable quantitative tracking of human mesenchymal stem cells in miniature pigs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Long-Jyun; Wu, Meng-Shiue; Hui, Yuen Yung; Chang, Be-Ming; Pan, Lei; Hsu, Pei-Chen; Chen, Yit-Tsong; Ho, Hong-Nerng; Huang, Yen-Hua; Ling, Thai-Yen; Hsu, Hsao-Hsun; Chang, Huan-Cheng

    2017-01-01

    Cell therapy is a promising strategy for the treatment of human diseases. While the first use of cells for therapeutic purposes can be traced to the 19th century, there has been a lack of general and reliable methods to study the biodistribution and associated pharmacokinetics of transplanted cells in various animal models for preclinical evaluation. Here, we present a new platform using albumin-conjugated fluorescent nanodiamonds (FNDs) as biocompatible and photostable labels for quantitative tracking of human placenta choriodecidual membrane-derived mesenchymal stem cells (pcMSCs) in miniature pigs by magnetic modulation. With this background-free detection technique and time-gated fluorescence imaging, we have been able to precisely determine the numbers as well as positions of the transplanted FND-labeled pcMSCs in organs and tissues of the miniature pigs after intravenous administration. The method is applicable to single-cell imaging and quantitative tracking of human stem/progenitor cells in rodents and other animal models as well. PMID:28358111

  8. Induced Quiescence of Lgr5+ Stem Cells in Intestinal Organoids Enables Differentiation of Hormone-Producing Enteroendocrine Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Basak, Onur; Beumer, Joep; Wiebrands, Kay; Seno, Hiroshi; van Oudenaarden, Alexander; Clevers, Hans

    2016-01-01

    Lgr5+ adult intestinal stem cells are highly proliferative throughout life. Single Lgr5+ stem cells can be cultured into three-dimensional organoids containing all intestinal epithelial cell types at near-normal ratios. Conditions to generate the main cell types (enterocyte, goblet cells, Paneth cel

  9. CD8 T cell memory recall is enhanced by novel direct interactions with CD4 T cells enabled by MHC class II transferred from APCs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo A Romagnoli

    Full Text Available Protection against many intracellular pathogens is provided by CD8 T cells, which are thought to need CD4 T cell help to develop into effective memory CD8 T cells. Because murine CD8 T cells do not transcribe MHC class II (MHC-II genes, several models have proposed antigen presenting cells (APCs as intermediaries required for CD4 T cells to deliver their help to CD8 T cells. Here, we demonstrate the presence of MHC-II molecules on activated murine CD8 T cells in vitro as well as in vivo. These MHC-II molecules are acquired via trogocytosis by CD8 T cells from their activating APCs, particularly CD11c positive dendritic cells (DCs. Transferred MHC-II molecules on activated murine CD8 T cells were functionally competent in stimulating specific indicator CD4 T cells. CD8 T cells that were "helped" in vitro and subsequently allowed to rest in vivo showed enhanced recall responses upon challenge compared to "helpless" CD8 T cells; in contrast, no differences were seen upon immediate challenge. These data indicate that direct CD8:CD4 T cell interactions may significantly contribute to help for CD8 T cells. Furthermore, this mechanism may enable CD8 T cells to communicate with different subsets of interacting CD4 T cells that could modulate immune responses.

  10. Sendai virus-based liposomes enable targeted cytosolic delivery of nanoparticles in brain tumor-derived cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dudu Veronica

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Background Nanotechnology-based bioassays that detect the presence and/or absence of a combination of cell markers are increasingly used to identify stem or progenitor cells, assess cell heterogeneity, and evaluate tumor malignancy and/or chemoresistance. Delivery methods that enable nanoparticles to rapidly detect emerging, intracellular markers within cell clusters of biopsies will greatly aid in tumor characterization, analysis of functional state and development of treatment regimens. Results Experiments utilized the Sendai virus to achieve in vitro, cytosolic delivery of Quantum dots in cells cultured from Human brain tumors. Using fluorescence microscopy and Transmission Electron Microscopy, in vitro experiments illustrated that these virus-based liposomes decreased the amount of non-specifically endocytosed nanoparticles by 50% in the Human glioblastoma and medulloblastoma samples studied. Significantly, virus-based liposome delivery also facilitated targeted binding of Quantum dots to cytosolic Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor within cultured cells, focal to the early detection and characterization of malignant brain tumors. Conclusions These findings are the first to utilize the Sendai virus to achieve cytosolic, targeted intracellular binding of Qdots within Human brain tumor cells. The results are significant to the continued applicability of nanoparticles used for the molecular labeling of cancer cells to determine tumor heterogeneity, grade, and chemotherapeutic resistivity.

  11. Aqueous biphasic cancer cell migration assay enables robust, high-throughput screening of anti-cancer compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemmo, Stephanie; Nasrollahi, Samila; Tavana, Hossein

    2014-03-01

    Migration of tumor cells is a fundamental event implicated in metastatic progression of cancer. Therapeutic compounds with the ability to inhibit the motility of cancer cells are critical for preventing cancer metastasis. Achieving this goal requires new technologies that enable high-throughput drug screening against migration of cancer cells and expedite drug discovery. We report an easy-to-implement, robotically operated, cell migration microtechnology with the capability of simultaneous screening of multiple compounds. The technology utilizes a fully biocompatible polymeric aqueous two-phase system to pattern a monolayer of cells containing a cell-excluded gap that serves as the migration niche. We adapted this technology to a standard 96-well plate format and parametrically optimized it to generate highly consistent migration niches. The analysis of migration is done automatically using computerized schemes. We use statistical metrics and show the robustness of this assay for drug screening and its sensitivity to identify effects of different drug compounds on migration of cancer cells. This technology can be employed in core centers, research laboratories, and pharmaceutical industries to evaluate the efficacy of compounds against migration of various types of metastatic cancer cells prior to expensive animal tests and thus, streamline anti-migratory drug screening.

  12. Elimination of metastatic melanoma using gold nanoshell-enabled photothermal therapy and adoptive T cell transfer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adham S Bear

    Full Text Available Ablative treatments such as photothermal therapy (PTT are attractive anticancer strategies because they debulk accessible tumor sites while simultaneously priming antitumor immune responses. However, the immune response following thermal ablation is often insufficient to treat metastatic disease. Here we demonstrate that PTT induces the expression of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines and promotes the maturation of dendritic cells within tumor-draining lymph nodes, thereby priming antitumor T cell responses. Unexpectedly, however, these immunomodulatory effects were not beneficial to overall antitumor immunity. We found that PTT promoted the infiltration of secondary tumor sites by CD11b(+Ly-6G/C(+ myeloid-derived suppressor cells, consequently failing to slow the growth of poorly immunogenic B16-F10 tumors and enhancing the growth of distant lung metastases. To exploit the beneficial effects of PTT activity against local tumors and on antitumor immunity whilst avoiding the adverse consequences, we adoptively transferred gp100-specific pmel T cells following PTT. The combination of local control by PTT and systemic antitumor immune reactivity provided by adoptively transferred T cells prevented primary tumor recurrence post-ablation, inhibited tumor growth at distant sites, and abrogated the outgrowth of lung metastases. Hence, the combination of PTT and systemic immunotherapy prevented the adverse effects of PTT on metastatic tumor growth and optimized overall tumor control.

  13. Elimination of metastatic melanoma using gold nanoshell-enabled photothermal therapy and adoptive T cell transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bear, Adham S; Kennedy, Laura C; Young, Joseph K; Perna, Serena K; Mattos Almeida, Joao Paulo; Lin, Adam Y; Eckels, Phillip C; Drezek, Rebekah A; Foster, Aaron E

    2013-01-01

    Ablative treatments such as photothermal therapy (PTT) are attractive anticancer strategies because they debulk accessible tumor sites while simultaneously priming antitumor immune responses. However, the immune response following thermal ablation is often insufficient to treat metastatic disease. Here we demonstrate that PTT induces the expression of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines and promotes the maturation of dendritic cells within tumor-draining lymph nodes, thereby priming antitumor T cell responses. Unexpectedly, however, these immunomodulatory effects were not beneficial to overall antitumor immunity. We found that PTT promoted the infiltration of secondary tumor sites by CD11b(+)Ly-6G/C(+) myeloid-derived suppressor cells, consequently failing to slow the growth of poorly immunogenic B16-F10 tumors and enhancing the growth of distant lung metastases. To exploit the beneficial effects of PTT activity against local tumors and on antitumor immunity whilst avoiding the adverse consequences, we adoptively transferred gp100-specific pmel T cells following PTT. The combination of local control by PTT and systemic antitumor immune reactivity provided by adoptively transferred T cells prevented primary tumor recurrence post-ablation, inhibited tumor growth at distant sites, and abrogated the outgrowth of lung metastases. Hence, the combination of PTT and systemic immunotherapy prevented the adverse effects of PTT on metastatic tumor growth and optimized overall tumor control.

  14. Optothermally responsive nanocomposite generating mechanical forces for cells enabled by few-walled carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Yuze; Lu, Jennifer Q

    2014-11-25

    We have designed and fabricated a nanocomposite substrate that can deliver spatially and temporally defined mechanical forces onto cells. This nanocomposite substrate comprises a 1.5-mm-thick near-infrared (NIR) mechanoresponsive bottom layer of few-walled carbon nanotubes (FWCNTs) that are uniformly distributed and covalently connected to thermally responsive poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) and an approximately 0.15-mm-thick cell-seeding top layer of collagen-functionalized poly(acrylic acid)-co-poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) that interpenetrates into the bottom layer. Covalent coupling of all the components and uniform distribution of FWCNTs lead to a large local mechanoresponse. As an example, 50% change in strain at the point of irradiation on the order of 0.05 Hz can be produced reversibly under NIR stimulation with 0.02 wt % FWCNTs. We have further demonstrated that the mechanical strain imposed by NIR stimulation can be transmitted onto cells. Human fetal hepatocytes change shape with no sign of detrimental effect on cell viability. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of a nanocomposite platform that can generate fast and controlled mechanical force to actuate cells. Since the amplitude, location, and timing of force can be controlled remotely with NIR, the nanocomposite substrate offers the potential to provide accurately designed force sequences for tissue engineering.

  15. Cooperation between Monocyte-Derived Cells and Lymphoid Cells in the Acute Response to a Bacterial Lung Pathogen.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew S Brown

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Legionella pneumophila is the causative agent of Legionnaires' disease, a potentially fatal lung infection. Alveolar macrophages support intracellular replication of L. pneumophila, however the contributions of other immune cell types to bacterial killing during infection are unclear. Here, we used recently described methods to characterise the major inflammatory cells in lung after acute respiratory infection of mice with L. pneumophila. We observed that the numbers of alveolar macrophages rapidly decreased after infection coincident with a rapid infiltration of the lung by monocyte-derived cells (MC, which, together with neutrophils, became the dominant inflammatory cells associated with the bacteria. Using mice in which the ability of MC to infiltrate tissues is impaired it was found that MC were required for bacterial clearance and were the major source of IL12. IL12 was needed to induce IFNγ production by lymphoid cells including NK cells, memory T cells, NKT cells and γδ T cells. Memory T cells that produced IFNγ appeared to be circulating effector/memory T cells that infiltrated the lung after infection. IFNγ production by memory T cells was stimulated in an antigen-independent fashion and could effectively clear bacteria from the lung indicating that memory T cells are an important contributor to innate bacterial defence. We also determined that a major function of IFNγ was to stimulate bactericidal activity of MC. On the other hand, neutrophils did not require IFNγ to kill bacteria and alveolar macrophages remained poorly bactericidal even in the presence of IFNγ. This work has revealed a cooperative innate immune circuit between lymphoid cells and MC that combats acute L. pneumophila infection and defines a specific role for IFNγ in anti-bacterial immunity.

  16. Cooperation between Monocyte-Derived Cells and Lymphoid Cells in the Acute Response to a Bacterial Lung Pathogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Andrew S; Yang, Chao; Fung, Ka Yee; Bachem, Annabell; Bourges, Dorothée; Bedoui, Sammy; Hartland, Elizabeth L; van Driel, Ian R

    2016-06-01

    Legionella pneumophila is the causative agent of Legionnaires' disease, a potentially fatal lung infection. Alveolar macrophages support intracellular replication of L. pneumophila, however the contributions of other immune cell types to bacterial killing during infection are unclear. Here, we used recently described methods to characterise the major inflammatory cells in lung after acute respiratory infection of mice with L. pneumophila. We observed that the numbers of alveolar macrophages rapidly decreased after infection coincident with a rapid infiltration of the lung by monocyte-derived cells (MC), which, together with neutrophils, became the dominant inflammatory cells associated with the bacteria. Using mice in which the ability of MC to infiltrate tissues is impaired it was found that MC were required for bacterial clearance and were the major source of IL12. IL12 was needed to induce IFNγ production by lymphoid cells including NK cells, memory T cells, NKT cells and γδ T cells. Memory T cells that produced IFNγ appeared to be circulating effector/memory T cells that infiltrated the lung after infection. IFNγ production by memory T cells was stimulated in an antigen-independent fashion and could effectively clear bacteria from the lung indicating that memory T cells are an important contributor to innate bacterial defence. We also determined that a major function of IFNγ was to stimulate bactericidal activity of MC. On the other hand, neutrophils did not require IFNγ to kill bacteria and alveolar macrophages remained poorly bactericidal even in the presence of IFNγ. This work has revealed a cooperative innate immune circuit between lymphoid cells and MC that combats acute L. pneumophila infection and defines a specific role for IFNγ in anti-bacterial immunity.

  17. Ni foam cathode enables high volumetric H2 production in a microbial electrolysis cell

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jeremiasse, A.W.; Hamelers, H.V.M.; Saakes, M.; Buisman, C.J.N.

    2010-01-01

    Valuable, “green” H2 can be produced with a microbial electrolysis cell (MEC). To achieve a high volumetric production rate of high purity H2, a continuous flow MEC with an anion exchange membrane, a flow through bioanode and a flow through Ni foam cathode was constructed. At an electrical energy in

  18. Gro/TLE enables embryonic stem cell differentiation by repressing pluripotent gene expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laing, Adam F; Lowell, Sally; Brickman, Joshua M

    2015-01-01

    Gro/TLE proteins (TLE1-4) are a family of transcriptional corepressors acting downstream of multiple signalling pathways. Several TLEs are expressed in a dynamic manner throughout embryonic development and at high levels in embryonic stem cells (ESCs). Here we find that Gro/TLE is not required...

  19. Phenylalkylamine Passivation of Organolead Halide Perovskites Enabling High-Efficiency and Air-Stable Photovoltaic Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, Feng; Geng, Wei; Zhou, Yang; Fang, Hong-Hua; Tong, Chuan-Jia; Loi, Maria Antonietta; Liu, Li-Min; Zhao, Ni

    2016-01-01

    Benzylamine is introduced as a surface passivation molecule that improves the moisture-resistance of the perovskites while simultaneously enhancing their electronic properties. Solar cells based on benzylamine-modified formamidinium lead iodide perovskite films exhibit a champion efficiency of 19.2%

  20. A pore-forming toxin enables Serratia a nonlytic egress from host cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Venanzio, Gisela; Lazzaro, Martina; Morales, Enrique S; Krapf, Darío; García Véscovi, Eleonora

    2017-02-01

    Several pathogens co-opt host intracellular compartments to survive and replicate, and they thereafter disperse progeny to prosper in a new niche. Little is known about strategies displayed by Serratia marcescens to defeat immune responses and disseminate afterwards. Upon invasion of nonphagocytic cells, Serratia multiplies within autophagosome-like vacuoles. These Serratia-containing vacuoles (SeCV) circumvent progression into acidic/degradative compartments, avoiding elimination. In this work, we show that ShlA pore-forming toxin (PFT) commands Serratia escape from invaded cells. While ShlA-dependent, Ca(2)(+) local increase was shown in SeCVs tight proximity, intracellular Ca(2)(+) sequestration prevented Serratia exit. Accordingly, a Ca(2)(+) surge rescued a ShlA-deficient strain exit capacity, demonstrating that Ca(2)(+) mobilization is essential for egress. As opposed to wild-type-SeCV, the mutant strain-vacuole was wrapped by actin filaments, showing that ShlA expression rearranges host actin. Moreover, alteration of actin polymerization hindered wild-type Serratia escape, while increased intracellular Ca(2)(+) reorganized the mutant strain-SeCV actin distribution, restoring wild-type-SeCV phenotype. Our results demonstrate that, by ShlA expression, Serratia triggers a Ca(2)(+) signal that reshapes cytoskeleton dynamics and ends up pushing the SeCV load out of the cell, in an exocytic-like process. These results disclose that PFTs can be engaged in allowing bacteria to exit without compromising host cell integrity.

  1. Transition Metal-Oxide Free Perovskite Solar Cells Enabled by a New Organic Charge Transport Layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Sehoon; Han, Ggoch Ddeul; Weis, Jonathan G; Park, Hyoungwon; Hentz, Olivia; Zhao, Zhibo; Swager, Timothy M; Gradečak, Silvija

    2016-04-06

    Various electron and hole transport layers have been used to develop high-efficiency perovskite solar cells. To achieve low-temperature solution processing of perovskite solar cells, organic n-type materials are employed to replace the metal oxide electron transport layer (ETL). Although PCBM (phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester) has been widely used for this application, its morphological instability in films (i.e., aggregation) is detrimental. Herein, we demonstrate the synthesis of a new fullerene derivative (isobenzofulvene-C60-epoxide, IBF-Ep) that serves as an electron transporting material for methylammonium mixed lead halide-based perovskite (CH3NH3PbI(3-x)Cl(x)) solar cells, both in the normal and inverted device configurations. We demonstrate that IBF-Ep has superior morphological stability compared to the conventional acceptor, PCBM. IBF-Ep provides higher photovoltaic device performance as compared to PCBM (6.9% vs 2.5% in the normal and 9.0% vs 5.3% in the inverted device configuration). Moreover, IBF-Ep devices show superior tolerance to high humidity (90%) in air. By reaching power conversion efficiencies up to 9.0% for the inverted devices with IBF-Ep as the ETL, we demonstrate the potential of this new material as an alternative to metal oxides for perovskite solar cells processed in air.

  2. Monodisperse Dual-Functional Upconversion Nanoparticles Enabled Near-Infrared Organolead Halide Perovskite Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Ming; Pang, Xinchang; Liu, Xueqin; Jiang, Beibei; He, Yanjie; Snaith, Henry; Lin, Zhiqun

    2016-03-18

    Extending the spectral absorption of organolead halide perovskite solar cells from visible into near-infrared (NIR) range renders the minimization of non-absorption loss of solar photons with improved energy alignment. Herein, we report on, for the first time, a viable strategy of capitalizing on judiciously synthesized monodisperse NaYF4 :Yb/Er upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs) as the mesoporous electrode for CH3 NH3 PbI3 perovskite solar cells and more importantly confer perovskite solar cells to be operative under NIR light. Uniform NaYF4 :Yb/Er UCNPs are first crafted by employing rationally designed double hydrophilic star-like poly(acrylic acid)-block-poly(ethylene oxide) (PAA-b-PEO) diblock copolymer as nanoreactor, imparting the solubility of UCNPs and the tunability of film porosity during the manufacturing process. The subsequent incorporation of NaYF4 :Yb/Er UCNPs as the mesoporous electrode led to a high efficiency of 17.8 %, which was further increased to 18.1 % upon NIR irradiation. The in situ integration of upconversion materials as functional components of perovskite solar cells offers the expanded flexibility for engineering the device architecture and broadening the solar spectral use.

  3. Gredos San Diego Cooperative. Cooperate to undertake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos de la Higuera

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyzes the cooperative experience through Gredos San Diego model, its institutional approaches and its history from the point of view of management, focusing on the variables that enable the success of a collective ownership institution. First, the author makes a brief analysis of the principles that guide the cooperative, its origins and its current situation, including the development of GSD Cooperative Group. It continues exploring the evolution of management, dividing it into four distinct stages, and concludes with a summary with the findings of the previous president of the cooperative.Received: 23.07.2012Accepted: 10.09.2012

  4. Perinuclear Arp2/3-driven actin polymerization enables nuclear deformation to facilitate cell migration through complex environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiam, Hawa-Racine; Vargas, Pablo; Carpi, Nicolas; Crespo, Carolina Lage; Raab, Matthew; Terriac, Emmanuel; King, Megan C; Jacobelli, Jordan; Alberts, Arthur S; Stradal, Theresia; Lennon-Dumenil, Ana-Maria; Piel, Matthieu

    2016-03-15

    Cell migration has two opposite faces: although necessary for physiological processes such as immune responses, it can also have detrimental effects by enabling metastatic cells to invade new organs. In vivo, migration occurs in complex environments and often requires a high cellular deformability, a property limited by the cell nucleus. Here we show that dendritic cells, the sentinels of the immune system, possess a mechanism to pass through micrometric constrictions. This mechanism is based on a rapid Arp2/3-dependent actin nucleation around the nucleus that disrupts the nuclear lamina, the main structure limiting nuclear deformability. The cells' requirement for Arp2/3 to pass through constrictions can be relieved when nuclear stiffness is decreased by suppressing lamin A/C expression. We propose a new role for Arp2/3 in three-dimensional cell migration, allowing fast-moving cells such as leukocytes to rapidly and efficiently migrate through narrow gaps, a process probably important for their function.

  5. Solution-processable MoOx nanocrystals enable highly efficient reflective and semitransparent polymer solar cells

    KAUST Repository

    Jagadamma, Lethy Krishnan

    2016-09-09

    Solution-manufacturing of organic solar cells with best-in-class power conversion efficiency (PCE) will require all layers to be solution-coated without compromising solar cell performance. To date, the hole transporting layer (HTL) deposited on top of the organic bulk heterojunction layer in the inverted architecture is most commonly an ultrathin (<10 nm) metal oxide layer prepared by vacuum-deposition. Here, we show that an alcohol-based nanocrystalline MoOx suspension with carefully controlled nanocrystal (NC) size can yield state of the art reflective and semitransparent solar cells. Using NCs smaller than the target HTL thickness (∼10 nm) can yield compact, pinhole-free films which result in highly efficient polymer:fullerene bulk heterojunction (BHJ) solar cells with PCE=9.5%. The solution processed HTL is shown to achieve performance parity with vacuum-evaporated HTLs for several polymer:fullerene combinations and is even shown to work as hole injection layer in polymer light emitting diodes (PLED). We also demonstrate that larger MoOx NCs (30–50 nm) successfully composite MoOx with Ag nanowires (NW) to form a highly conducting, transparent top anode with exceptional contact properties. This yields state-of-the-art semitransparent polymer: fullerene solar cells with PCE of 6.5% and overall transmission >30%. The remarkable performance of reflective and semitransparent OPVs is due to the uncommonly high fill factors achieved using a carefully designed strategy for implementation of MoOx nanocrystals as HTL materials. © 2016 Elsevier Ltd

  6. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Pore-Forming Exolysin and Type IV Pili Cooperate To Induce Host Cell Lysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basso, Pauline; Ragno, Michel; Elsen, Sylvie; Reboud, Emeline; Golovkine, Guillaume; Bouillot, Stephanie; Huber, Philippe; Lory, Stephen; Faudry, Eric

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT   Clinical strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa lacking the type III secretion system genes employ a toxin, exolysin (ExlA), for host cell membrane disruption. Here, we demonstrated that ExlA export requires a predicted outer membrane protein, ExlB, showing that ExlA and ExlB define a new active two-partner secretion (TPS) system of P. aeruginosa. In addition to the TPS signals, ExlA harbors several distinct domains, which include one hemagglutinin domain, five arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) motifs, and a C-terminal region lacking any identifiable sequence motifs. However, this C-terminal region is important for the toxic activity, since its deletion abolishes host cell lysis. Using lipid vesicles and eukaryotic cells, including red blood cells, we demonstrated that ExlA has a pore-forming activity which precedes cell membrane disruption of nucleated cells. Finally, we developed a high-throughput cell-based live-dead assay and used it to screen a transposon mutant library of an ExlA-producing P. aeruginosa clinical strain for bacterial factors required for ExlA-mediated toxicity. The screen resulted in the identification of proteins involved in the formation of type IV pili as being required for ExlA to exert its cytotoxic activity by promoting close contact between bacteria and the host cell. These findings represent the first example of cooperation between a pore-forming toxin of the TPS family and surface appendages in host cell intoxication. PMID:28119472

  7. siRNA nanoparticle functionalization of nanostructured scaffolds enables controlled multilineage differentiation of stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Morten Ø; Nygaard, Jens V; Burns, Jorge S;

    2010-01-01

    small-interfering RNAs (siRNAs) into nanostructured scaffolds. This allows spatial retention of the RNAs within nanopores until their cellular delivery. The released siRNAs were capable of gene silencing BCL2L2 and TRIB2, in mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), enhancing osteogenic and adipogenic......The creation of complex tissues and organs is the ultimate goal in tissue engineering. Engineered morphogenesis necessitates spatially controlled development of multiple cell types within a scaffold implant. We present a novel method to achieve this by adhering nanoparticles containing different...... differentiation, respectively. This approach for enhancing a single type of differentiation is immediately applicable to all areas of tissue engineering. Different nanoparticles localized to spatially distinct locations within a single implant allowed two different tissue types to develop in controllable areas...

  8. Morphologically controlled fuel cell transport layers enabled via electrospun carbon nonwovens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, Devin; Mérida, Walter

    2015-01-01

    We report on the synthesis and performance of carbon nanofibre substrates for PEM fuel cell transport layer applications. Electrospinning is used for fabrication; by manipulation of spinning properties, morphological control is demonstrated in the product. Our application of the technology and it's manipulability to PEMFC transport layers constitutes a novel approach to the manufacture of such layers. Ex-situ morphology, electrical resistance and water contact angles are reported in additional to in-situ hydrogen/air fuel cell performance. Electrospun transport layers are compared directly to established commercial products in a cathode PTL role. The electrospun transport layers demonstrate approximately 85% of the commercial limiting current density, swifter water transport characteristics, and markedly more stable operating points.

  9. Systems biology of yeast: enabling technology for development of cell factories for production of advanced biofuels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jong, Bouke; Siewers, Verena; Nielsen, Jens

    2012-08-01

    Transportation fuels will gradually shift from oil based fuels towards alternative fuel resources like biofuels. Current bioethanol and biodiesel can, however, not cover the increasing demand for biofuels and there is therefore a need for advanced biofuels with superior fuel properties. Novel cell factories will provide a production platform for advanced biofuels. However, deep cellular understanding is required for improvement of current biofuel cell factories. Fast screening and analysis (-omics) methods and metabolome-wide mathematical models are promising techniques. An integrated systems approach of these techniques drives diversity and quantity of several new biofuel compounds. This review will cover the recent technological developments that support improvement of the advanced biofuels 1-butanol, biodiesels and jetfuels.

  10. High-definition optical coherence tomography enables visualization of individual cells in healthy skin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boone, Marc; Jemec, Gregor B E; Del Marmol, Véronique

    2012-01-01

    of the HD-OCT could be confirmed by the phantom analysis. The identification of cells in the epidermis can be made by both techniques. RCM offers the best lateral resolution, and HD-OCT has the best penetration depth, providing images of individual cells deeper within the dermis. Eccrine ducts and hair......High-definition OCT (HD-OCT) is an innovative technique based on the principle of conventional OCT. Our objective was to test the resolution and image quality of HD-OCT in comparison with reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) of healthy skin. Firstly, images have been made of a ultra......-high-resolution line-pair phantome with both systems. Secondly, we investigated 21 healthy volunteers of different phototypes with HD-OCT and RCM on volar forearm and compared the generated images. HD-OCT displays also differences depending on the skin phototype and anatomical site. The 3-μm lateral resolution...

  11. Semiconductor Nanowires: A Platform for Exploring Limits and Concepts for Nano-Enabled Solar Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Kempa, Thomas Jan; Day, Robert Watson; Kim, Sun-Kyung; Park, Hong-Gyu; Lieber, Charles M.

    2013-01-01

    Over the past decade extensive studies of single semiconductor nanowire and nanowire array photovoltaic devices have explored the potential of these materials as platforms for a new generation of efficient and cost-effective solar cells. This feature review discusses strategies for implementation of semiconductor nanowires in solar energy applications, including advances in complex nanowire synthesis and characterization, fundamental insights from characterization of devices, utilization and ...

  12. Ubiquitylation of the chemokine receptor CCR7 enables efficient receptor recycling and cell migration

    OpenAIRE

    Schäuble, Karin; Hauser, Mark A.; Rippl, Alexandra; Bruderer, Roland; Otero, Carolina; Gröttrup, Marcus; Legler, Daniel F.

    2012-01-01

    The chemokine receptor CCR7 is essential for lymphocyte and dendritic cell homing to secondary lymphoid organs. Owing to the ability to induce directional migration, CCR7 and its ligands CCL19 and CCL21 are pivotal for the regulation of the immune system. Here, we identify a novel function for receptor ubiquitylation in the regulation of the trafficking process of this G-protein-coupled seven transmembrane receptor. We discovered that CCR7 is ubiquitylated in a constitutive, ligand-independen...

  13. Inefficient complement system clearance of Trypanosoma cruzi metacyclic trypomastigotes enables resistant strains to invade eukaryotic cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor Cestari

    Full Text Available The complement system is the main arm of the vertebrate innate immune system against pathogen infection. For the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease, subverting the complement system and invading the host cells is crucial to succeed in infection. However, little attention has focused on whether the complement system can effectively control T. cruzi infection. To address this question, we decided to analyse: 1 which complement pathways are activated by T. cruzi using strains isolated from different hosts, 2 the capacity of these strains to resist the complement-mediated killing at nearly physiological conditions, and 3 whether the complement system could limit or control T. cruzi invasion of eukaryotic cells. The complement activating molecules C1q, C3, mannan-binding lectin and ficolins bound to all strains analysed; however, C3b and C4b deposition assays revealed that T. cruzi activates mainly the lectin and alternative complement pathways in non-immune human serum. Strikingly, we detected that metacyclic trypomastigotes of some T. cruzi strains were highly susceptible to complement-mediated killing in non-immune serum, while other strains were resistant. Furthermore, the rate of parasite invasion in eukaryotic cells was decreased by non-immune serum. Altogether, these results establish that the complement system recognizes T. cruzi metacyclic trypomastigotes, resulting in killing of susceptible strains. The complement system, therefore, acts as a physiological barrier which resistant strains have to evade for successful host infection.

  14. Parabens enable suspension growth of MCF-10A immortalized, non-transformed human breast epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanna, Sugandha; Darbre, Philippa D

    2013-05-01

    Parabens (alkyl esters of p-hydroxybenzoic acid) are used extensively as preservatives in consumer products, and intact esters have been measured in several human tissues. Concerns of a potential link between parabens and breast cancer have been raised, but mechanistic studies have centred on their oestrogenic activity and little attention has been paid to any carcinogenic properties. In the present study, we report that parabens can induce anchorage-independent growth of MCF-10A immortalized but non-transformed human breast epithelial cells, a property closely related to transformation and a predictor of tumour growth in vivo. In semi-solid methocel suspension culture, MCF-10A cells produced very few colonies and only of a small size but the addition of 5 × 10(-4) M methylparaben, 10(-5) M n-propylparaben or 10(-5) M n-butylparaben resulted in a greater number of colonies per dish (P paraben concentrations in human breast tissue samples from 40 mastectomies (Barr et al., 2012) showed that 22/40 of the patients had at least one of the parabens at the site of the primary tumour at or above these concentrations. To our knowledge, this is the first study to report that parabens can induce a transformed phenotype in human breast epithelial cells in vitro, and further investigation is now justified into a potential link between parabens and breast carcinogenesis.

  15. Open air biocathode enables effective electricity generation with microbial fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clauwaert, Peter; Van der Ha, David; Boon, Nico; Verbeken, Kim; Verhaege, Marc; Rabaey, Korneel; Verstraete, Willy

    2007-11-01

    The reduction of oxygen at the cathode is one of the major bottlenecks of microbial fuel cells (MFCs). While research so far has mainly focused on chemical catalysis of this oxygen reduction, here we present a continuously wetted cathode with microorganisms that act as biocatalysts for oxygen reduction. We combined the anode of an acetate oxidizing tubular microbial fuel cell with an open air biocathode for electricity production. The maximum power production was 83 +/- 11 W m(-3) MFC (0.183 L MFC) for batch-fed systems (20-40% Coulombic yield) and 65 +/- 5 W m(-3) MFC for a continuous system with an acetate loading rate of 1.5 kg COD m(-3) day(-1) (90 +/- 3% Coulombic yield). Electrochemical precipitation of manganese oxides on the cathodic graphite felt decreased the start-up period with approximately 30% versus a non-treated graphite felt. After the start-up period, the cell performance was similar for the pretreated and non-treated cathodic electrodes. Several reactor designs were tested, and it was found that enlargement of the 0.183 L MFC reactor by a factor 2.9-3.8 reduced the volumetric power output by 60-67%. Biocathodes alleviate the need to use noble or non-noble catalysts for the reduction of oxygen, which increases substantially the viability and sustainability of MFCs.

  16. Small molecule ice recrystallization inhibitors enable freezing of human red blood cells with reduced glycerol concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capicciotti, Chantelle J; Kurach, Jayme D R; Turner, Tracey R; Mancini, Ross S; Acker, Jason P; Ben, Robert N

    2015-04-08

    In North America, red blood cells (RBCs) are cryopreserved in a clinical setting using high glycerol concentrations (40% w/v) with slow cooling rates (~1°C/min) prior to storage at -80°C, while European protocols use reduced glycerol concentrations with rapid freezing rates. After thawing and prior to transfusion, glycerol must be removed to avoid intravascular hemolysis. This is a time consuming process requiring specialized equipment. Small molecule ice recrystallization inhibitors (IRIs) such as β-PMP-Glc and β-pBrPh-Glc have the ability to prevent ice recrystallization, a process that contributes to cellular injury and decreased cell viability after cryopreservation. Herein, we report that addition of 110 mM β-PMP-Glc or 30 mM β-pBrPh-Glc to a 15% glycerol solution increases post-thaw RBC integrity by 30-50% using slow cooling rates and emphasize the potential of small molecule IRIs for the preservation of cells.

  17. Near-Infrared Light Activation of Proteins Inside Living Cells Enabled by Carbon Nanotube-Mediated Intracellular Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, He; Fan, Xinqi; Chen, Xing

    2016-02-01

    Light-responsive proteins have been delivered into the cells for controlling intracellular events with high spatial and temporal resolution. However, the choice of wavelength is limited to the UV and visible range; activation of proteins inside the cells using near-infrared (NIR) light, which has better tissue penetration and biocompatibility, remains elusive. Here, we report the development of a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT)-based bifunctional system that enables protein intracellular delivery, followed by NIR activation of the delivered proteins inside the cells. Proteins of interest are conjugated onto SWCNTs via a streptavidin-desthiobiotin (SA-DTB) linkage, where the protein activity is blocked. SWCNTs serve as both a nanocarrier for carrying proteins into the cells and subsequently a NIR sensitizer to photothermally cleave the linkage and release the proteins. The released proteins become active and exert their functions inside the cells. We demonstrated this strategy by intracellular delivery and NIR-triggered nuclear translocation of enhanced green fluorescent protein, and by intracellular delivery and NIR-activation of a therapeutic protein, saporin, in living cells. Furthermore, we showed that proteins conjugated onto SWCNTs via the SA-DTB linkage could be delivered to the tumors, and optically released and activated by using NIR light in living mice.

  18. Cooperation enabled systems for collaborative networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Osorio, A. L.; Camarihna-Matos, L.M.; Afsarmanesh, H.

    2011-01-01

    A fast evolution to collaborative business models requires novel strategies for the development of collaboration-based information technology (IT) solutions. The complexity of building such solutions based on heterogeneous sub-systems requires a multidisciplinary approach, involving the perspectives

  19. Improving Energy Efficiency and Enabling Water Recycle in Biorefineries Using Bioelectrochemical Cells.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borole, Abhijeet P [ORNL

    2010-01-01

    Improving biofuel yield and water reuse are two important issues in further development of biorefineries. The total energy content of liquid fuels (including ethanol and hydrocarbon) produced from cellulosic biomass via biochemical or hybrid bio-thermochemical routes can vary from 49% to 70% of the biomass entering the biorefinery, on an energy basis. Use of boiler for combustion of residual organics and lignin results in significant energy and water losses. An alternate process to improve energy recovery from the residual organic streams is via use of bioelectrochemical systems such as microbial fuel cells (MFCs) microbial electrolysis cells (MECs). The potential advantages of this alternative scheme in a biorefinery include minimization of heat loss and generation of a higher value product, hydrogen. The need for 5-15 gallons of water per gallon of ethanol can be reduced significantly via recycle of water after MEC treatment. Removal of inhibitory byproducts such as furans, phenolics and acetate in MFC/MECs to generate energy, thus, has dual advantages including improvements in energy efficiency and ability to recycle water. Conversion of the sugar- and lignin- degradation products to hydrogen is synergistic with biorefinery hydrogen requirements for upgrading F-T liquids and other byproducts to high-octane fuels and/or high value products. Some of these products include sorbitol, succinic acid, furan and levulinate derivatives, glycols, polyols, 1,4-butenadiol, phenolics polymers, etc. Potential process alternatives utilizing MECs in biorefineries capable of improving energy efficiency by up to 30% are discussed.

  20. Optogenetics-enabled assessment of viral gene and cell therapy for restoration of cardiac excitability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrosi, Christina M; Boyle, Patrick M; Chen, Kay; Trayanova, Natalia A; Entcheva, Emilia

    2015-12-01

    Multiple cardiac pathologies are accompanied by loss of tissue excitability, which leads to a range of heart rhythm disorders (arrhythmias). In addition to electronic device therapy (i.e. implantable pacemakers and cardioverter/defibrillators), biological approaches have recently been explored to restore pacemaking ability and to correct conduction slowing in the heart by delivering excitatory ion channels or ion channel agonists. Using optogenetics as a tool to selectively interrogate only cells transduced to produce an exogenous excitatory ion current, we experimentally and computationally quantify the efficiency of such biological approaches in rescuing cardiac excitability as a function of the mode of application (viral gene delivery or cell delivery) and the geometry of the transduced region (focal or spatially-distributed). We demonstrate that for each configuration (delivery mode and spatial pattern), the optical energy needed to excite can be used to predict therapeutic efficiency of excitability restoration. Taken directly, these results can help guide optogenetic interventions for light-based control of cardiac excitation. More generally, our findings can help optimize gene therapy for restoration of cardiac excitability.

  1. Cooperative Tin Oxide Fullerene Electron Selective Layers for High-Performance Planar Perovskite Solar Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ke, Weijun; Zhao, Dewei; Xiao, Chuanxiao; Wang, Changlei; Cimaroli, Alexander J.; Grice, Corey R.; Yang, Mengjin; Li, Zhen; Jiang, Chun-Sheng; Al-Jassim, Mowafak; Zhu, Kai; Kanatzidis, Mercouri G.; Fang, Guojia; Yan, Yanfa

    2016-10-07

    Both tin oxide (SnO2) and fullerenes have been reported as electron selective layers (ESLs) for producing efficient lead halide perovskite solar cells. Here, we report that SnO2 and fullerenes can work cooperatively to further boost the performance of perovskite solar cells. We find that fullerenes can be redissolved during perovskite deposition, allowing ultra-thin fullerenes to be retained at the interface and some dissolved fullerenes infiltrate into perovskite grain boundaries. The SnO2 layer blocks holes effectively; whereas, the fullerenes promote electron transfer and passivate both the SnO2/perovskite interface and perovskite grain boundaries. With careful device optimization, the best-performing planar perovskite solar cell using a fullerene passivated SnO2 ESL has achieved a steady-state efficiency of 17.75% and a power conversion efficiency of 19.12% with an open circuit voltage of 1.12 V, a short-circuit current density of 22.61 mA cm-2, and a fill factor of 75.8% when measured under reverse voltage scanning. We find that the partial dissolving of fullerenes during perovskite deposition is the key for fabricating high-performance perovskite solar cells based on metal oxide/fullerene ESLs.

  2. Quantitative Analyses of Core Promoters Enable Precise Engineering of Regulated Gene Expression in Mammalian Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ede, Christopher; Chen, Ximin; Lin, Meng-Yin; Chen, Yvonne Y

    2016-05-20

    Inducible transcription systems play a crucial role in a wide array of synthetic biology circuits. However, the majority of inducible promoters are constructed from a limited set of tried-and-true promoter parts, which are susceptible to common shortcomings such as high basal expression levels (i.e., leakiness). To expand the toolbox for regulated mammalian gene expression and facilitate the construction of mammalian genetic circuits with precise functionality, we quantitatively characterized a panel of eight core promoters, including sequences with mammalian, viral, and synthetic origins. We demonstrate that this selection of core promoters can provide a wide range of basal gene expression levels and achieve a gradient of fold-inductions spanning 2 orders of magnitude. Furthermore, commonly used parts such as minimal CMV and minimal SV40 promoters were shown to achieve robust gene expression upon induction, but also suffer from high levels of leakiness. In contrast, a synthetic promoter, YB_TATA, was shown to combine low basal expression with high transcription rate in the induced state to achieve significantly higher fold-induction ratios compared to all other promoters tested. These behaviors remain consistent when the promoters are coupled to different genetic outputs and different response elements, as well as across different host-cell types and DNA copy numbers. We apply this quantitative understanding of core promoter properties to the successful engineering of human T cells that respond to antigen stimulation via chimeric antigen receptor signaling specifically under hypoxic environments. Results presented in this study can facilitate the design and calibration of future mammalian synthetic biology systems capable of precisely programmed functionality.

  3. Two-way cooperative AF relaying in spectrum-sharing systems: Enhancing cell-edge performance

    KAUST Repository

    Xia, Minghua

    2012-09-01

    In this contribution, two-way cooperative amplify-and-forward (AF) relaying technique is integrated into spectrumsharing wireless systems to improve spectral efficiency of secondary users (SUs). In order to share the available spectrum resources originally dedicated to primary users (PUs), the transmit power of a SU is optimized with respect to the average tolerable interference power at primary receivers. By analyzing outage probability and achievable data rate at the base station and at a cell-edge SU, our results reveal that the uplink performance is dominated by the average tolerable interference power at primary receivers, while the downlink always behaves like conventional one-way AF relaying and its performance is dominated by the average signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). These important findings provide fresh perspectives for system designers to improve spectral efficiency of secondary users in next-generation broadband spectrum-sharing wireless systems. © 2012 IEEE.

  4. New views of the human NK cell immunological synapse: recent advances enabled by super- and high- resolution imaging techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily M. Mace

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Imaging technology has undergone rapid growth with the development of super resolution microscopy, which enables resolution below the diffraction barrier of light (~200 nm. In addition, new techniques for single molecule imaging are being added to the cell biologist’s arsenal. Immunologists have exploited these techniques to advance understanding of NK biology, particularly that of the immune synapse. The immune synapse’s relatively small size and complex architecture combined with its exquisitely controlled signaling milieu have made it a challenge to visualize. In this review we highlight and discuss new insights into NK cell immune synapse formation and regulation revealed by cutting edge imaging techniques, including super resolution microscopy and high resolution total internal reflection microscopy and Förster resonance energy transfer.

  5. Calcium influx rescues adenylate cyclase-hemolysin from rapid cell membrane removal and enables phagocyte permeabilization by toxin pores.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radovan Fiser

    Full Text Available Bordetella adenylate cyclase toxin-hemolysin (CyaA penetrates the cytoplasmic membrane of phagocytes and employs two distinct conformers to exert its multiple activities. One conformer forms cation-selective pores that permeabilize phagocyte membrane for efflux of cytosolic potassium. The other conformer conducts extracellular calcium ions across cytoplasmic membrane of cells, relocates into lipid rafts, translocates the adenylate cyclase enzyme (AC domain into cells and converts cytosolic ATP to cAMP. We show that the calcium-conducting activity of CyaA controls the path and kinetics of endocytic removal of toxin pores from phagocyte membrane. The enzymatically inactive but calcium-conducting CyaA-AC⁻ toxoid was endocytosed via a clathrin-dependent pathway. In contrast, a doubly mutated (E570K+E581P toxoid, unable to conduct Ca²⁺ into cells, was rapidly internalized by membrane macropinocytosis, unless rescued by Ca²⁺ influx promoted in trans by ionomycin or intact toxoid. Moreover, a fully pore-forming CyaA-ΔAC hemolysin failed to permeabilize phagocytes, unless endocytic removal of its pores from cell membrane was decelerated through Ca²⁺ influx promoted by molecules locked in a Ca²⁺-conducting conformation by the 3D1 antibody. Inhibition of endocytosis also enabled the native B. pertussis-produced CyaA to induce lysis of J774A.1 macrophages at concentrations starting from 100 ng/ml. Hence, by mediating calcium influx into cells, the translocating conformer of CyaA controls the removal of bystander toxin pores from phagocyte membrane. This triggers a positive feedback loop of exacerbated cell permeabilization, where the efflux of cellular potassium yields further decreased toxin pore removal from cell membrane and this further enhances cell permeabilization and potassium efflux.

  6. Low-molecular-weight inhibitors of cell differentiation enable efficient growth of mouse iPS cells under feeder-free conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donai, Kenichiro; Inagaki, Akane; So, Kyoung-Ha; Kuroda, Kengo; Sone, Hideko; Kobayashi, Masayuki; Nishimori, Katsuhiko; Fukuda, Tomokazu

    2015-03-01

    Embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells are usually maintained on feeder cells derived from mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs). In recent years, the cell culture of iPS cells under serum- and feeder-free conditions is gaining attention in overcoming the biosafety issues for clinical applications. In this study, we report on the use of multiple small-molecular inhibitors (i.e., CHIR99021, PD0325901, and Thiazovivin) to efficiently cultivate mouse iPS cells without feeder cells in a chemically-defined and serum-free condition. In this condition, we showed that mouse iPS cells are expressing the Nanog, Oct3/4, and SSEA-1 pluripotent markers, indicating that the culture condition is optimized to maintain the pluripotent status of iPS cells. Without these small-molecular inhibitors, mouse iPS cells required the adaptation period to start the stable cell proliferation. The application of these inhibitors enabled us the shortcut culture method for the cellular adaptation. This study will be useful to efficiently establish mouse iPS cell lines without MEF-derived feeder cells.

  7. Electrostatic nucleic acid nanoassembly enables hybridization chain reaction in living cells for ultrasensitive mRNA imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhan; Liu, Gao-Qin; Yang, Xiao-Li; Jiang, Jian-Hui

    2015-06-03

    Efficient approaches for intracellular delivery of nucleic acid reagents to achieve sensitive detection and regulation of gene and protein expressions are essential for chemistry and biology. We develop a novel electrostatic DNA nanoassembly that, for the first time, realizes hybridization chain reaction (HCR), a target-initiated alternating hybridization reaction between two hairpin probes, for signal amplification in living cells. The DNA nanoassembly has a designed structure with a core gold nanoparticle, a cationic peptide interlayer, and an electrostatically assembled outer layer of fluorophore-labeled hairpin DNA probes. It is shown to have high efficiency for cellular delivery of DNA probes via a unique endocytosis-independent mechanism that confers a significant advantage of overcoming endosomal entrapment. Moreover, electrostatic assembly of DNA probes enables target-initialized release of the probes from the nanoassembly via HCR. This intracellular HCR offers efficient signal amplification and enables ultrasensitive fluorescence activation imaging of mRNA expression with a picomolar detection limit. The results imply that the developed nanoassembly may provide an invaluable platform in low-abundance biomarker discovery and regulation for cell biology and theranostics.

  8. Amorphous Silicon Carbide Passivating Layers to Enable Higher Processing Temperature in Crystalline Silicon Heterojunction Solar Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boccard, Mathieu [Arizona State Univ., Mesa, AZ (United States); Holman, Zachary [Arizona State Univ., Mesa, AZ (United States)

    2015-04-06

    "Very efficient crystalline silicon (c-Si) solar cells have been demonstrated when thin layers of intrinsic and doped hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) are used for passivation and carrier selectivity in a heterojunction device. One limitation of this device structure is the (parasitic) absorption in the front passivation/collection a-Si:H layers; another is the degradation of the a-Si:H-based passivation upon temperature, limiting the post-processes to approximately 200°C thus restricting the contacting possibilities and potential tandem device fabrication. To alleviate these two limitations, we explore the potential of amorphous silicon carbide (a-SiC:H), a widely studied material in use in standard a-Si:H thin-film solar cells, which is known for its wider bandgap, increased hydrogen content and stronger hydrogen bonding compared to a-Si:H. We study the surface passivation of solar-grade textured n-type c-Si wafers for symmetrical stacks of 10-nm-thick intrinsic a-SiC:H with various carbon content followed by either p-doped or n-doped a-Si:H (referred to as i/p or i/n stacks). For both doping types, passivation (assessed through carrier lifetime measurements) is degraded by increasing the carbon content in the intrinsic a-SiC:H layer. Yet, this hierarchy is reversed after annealing at 350°C or more due to drastic passivation improvements upon annealing when an a-SiC:H layer is used. After annealing at 350°C, lifetimes of 0.4 ms and 2.0 ms are reported for i/p and i/n stacks, respectively, when using an intrinsic a-SiC:H layer with approximately 10% of carbon (initial lifetimes of 0.3 ms and 0.1 ms, respectively, corresponding to a 30% and 20-fold increase, respectively). For stacks of pure a-Si:H material the lifetimes degrade from 1.2 ms and 2.0 ms for i/p and i/n stacks, respectively, to less than 0.1 ms and 1.1 ms (12-fold and 2-fold decrease, respectively). For complete solar cells using pure a-Si:H i/p and i/n stacks, the open-circuit voltage (Voc

  9. Hierarchical clustering of ryanodine receptors enables emergence of a calcium clock in sinoatrial node cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, Michael D; Maltseva, Larissa A; Juhaszova, Magdalena; Sollott, Steven J; Lakatta, Edward G; Maltsev, Victor A

    2014-05-01

    The sinoatrial node, whose cells (sinoatrial node cells [SANCs]) generate rhythmic action potentials, is the primary pacemaker of the heart. During diastole, calcium released from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) via ryanodine receptors (RyRs) interacts with membrane currents to control the rate of the heartbeat. This "calcium clock" takes the form of stochastic, partially periodic, localized calcium release (LCR) events that propagate, wave-like, for limited distances. The detailed mechanisms controlling the calcium clock are not understood. We constructed a computational model of SANCs, including three-dimensional diffusion and buffering of calcium in the cytosol and SR; explicit, stochastic gating of individual RyRs and L-type calcium channels; and a full complement of voltage- and calcium-dependent membrane currents. We did not include an anatomical submembrane space or inactivation of RyRs, the two heuristic components that have been used in prior models but are not observed experimentally. When RyRs were distributed in discrete clusters separated by >1 µm, only isolated sparks were produced in this model and LCR events did not form. However, immunofluorescent staining of SANCs for RyR revealed the presence of bridging RyR groups between large clusters, forming an irregular network. Incorporation of this architecture into the model led to the generation of propagating LCR events. Partial periodicity emerged from the interaction of LCR events, as observed experimentally. This calcium clock becomes entrained with membrane currents to accelerate the beating rate, which therefore was controlled by the activity of the SERCA pump, RyR sensitivity, and L-type current amplitude, all of which are targets of β-adrenergic-mediated phosphorylation. Unexpectedly, simulations revealed the existence of a pathological mode at high RyR sensitivity to calcium, in which the calcium clock loses synchronization with the membrane, resulting in a paradoxical decrease in beating

  10. Multiple conductances cooperatively regulate spontaneous bursting in mouse olfactory bulb external tufted cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shaolin; Shipley, Michael T

    2008-02-13

    External tufted (ET) cells are juxtaglomerular neurons that spontaneously generate bursts of action potentials, which persist when fast synaptic transmission is blocked. The intrinsic mechanism of this autonomous bursting is unknown. We identified a set of voltage-dependent conductances that cooperatively regulate spontaneous bursting: hyperpolarization-activated inward current (I(h)), persistent Na+ current (I(NaP)), low-voltage-activated calcium current (I(L/T)) mediated by T- and/or L-type Ca2+ channels, and large-conductance Ca2+-dependent K+ current (I(BK)). I(h) is important in setting membrane potential and depolarizes the cell toward the threshold of I(NaP) and I(T/L), which are essential to generate the depolarizing envelope that is crowned by a burst of action potentials. Action potentials depolarize the membrane and induce Ca2+ influx via high-voltage-activated Ca2+ channels (I(HVA)). The combined depolarization and increased intracellular Ca2+ activates I(BK), which terminates the burst by hyperpolarizing the membrane. Hyperpolarization activates I(h) and the cycle is regenerated. A novel finding is the role of L-type Ca2+ channels in autonomous ET cells bursting. A second novel feature is the role of BK channels, which regulate burst duration. I(L) and I(BK) may go hand-in-hand, the slow inactivation of I(L) requiring I(BK)-dependent hyperpolarization to deactivate inward conductances and terminate the burst. ET cells receive monosynaptic olfactory nerve input and drive the major inhibitory interneurons of the glomerular circuit. Modulation of the conductances identified here can regulate burst frequency, duration, and spikes per burst in ET cells and thus significantly shape the impact of glomerular circuits on mitral and tufted cells, the output channels of the olfactory bulb.

  11. HCN Producing Bacteria Enable Sensing Of Non-Bioavailable Hg Species by the Whole Cell Biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horvat, M.; Rijavec, T.; Koron, N.; Lapanje, A.

    2015-12-01

    Bacteria play an important role in Hg transformation reactions. The production of cyanide (HCN) and other secondary metabolites seems to be key elements involved in these transformations. Current hypotheses link the role of HCN production to growth inhibition of nonHCN producing competitor organisms (role of an antimicrobial agent). Our past investigations showed that HCN production did not correlate with antimicrobial activity and since pK value of HCN is very high (pK = 9,21), it can be expected that most of the produced HCN is removed from the microenvironment. This way, the expected inhibitory concentrations can hardly be reached. Accordingly, we proposed a new concept, where the ability of complexation of transient metals by HCN served as a regulation process for the accessibility of micro-elements. In our study, we focused on the presence of HCN producing bacteria and carried it out in the Hg contaminated environment connected to the Idrija Mercury Mine, Slovenia. We characterised the isolates according to the presence of Hg resistance (HgR), level of HCN production and genetic similarities. In laboratory setups, using our merR whole cell based biosensor, we determined the transformation of low bioavailable Hg0 and HgS forms into bioavailable Hg by these HCN producing bacteria. We observed that HgR strains producing HCN had the highest impact on increased Hg bioavailability. In the proposed ecological strategy HgR HCN producing bacteria increase their competitive edge over non-HgR competitors through the increase of Hg toxicity. Due to their activity, Hg is made available to other organisms as well and thus enters into the ecosystem. Finally, using some of the characteristics of bacteria (e.g. Hg resistance genetic elements), we developed a fully automated sensing approach, combining biosensorics and mechatronics, to measure the bioavailability of Hg in situ.

  12. Consistency of VDJ Rearrangement and Substitution Parameters Enables Accurate B Cell Receptor Sequence Annotation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duncan K Ralph

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available VDJ rearrangement and somatic hypermutation work together to produce antibody-coding B cell receptor (BCR sequences for a remarkable diversity of antigens. It is now possible to sequence these BCRs in high throughput; analysis of these sequences is bringing new insight into how antibodies develop, in particular for broadly-neutralizing antibodies against HIV and influenza. A fundamental step in such sequence analysis is to annotate each base as coming from a specific one of the V, D, or J genes, or from an N-addition (a.k.a. non-templated insertion. Previous work has used simple parametric distributions to model transitions from state to state in a hidden Markov model (HMM of VDJ recombination, and assumed that mutations occur via the same process across sites. However, codon frame and other effects have been observed to violate these parametric assumptions for such coding sequences, suggesting that a non-parametric approach to modeling the recombination process could be useful. In our paper, we find that indeed large modern data sets suggest a model using parameter-rich per-allele categorical distributions for HMM transition probabilities and per-allele-per-position mutation probabilities, and that using such a model for inference leads to significantly improved results. We present an accurate and efficient BCR sequence annotation software package using a novel HMM "factorization" strategy. This package, called partis (https://github.com/psathyrella/partis/, is built on a new general-purpose HMM compiler that can perform efficient inference given a simple text description of an HMM.

  13. Optogenetics enables functional analysis of human embryonic stem cell-derived grafts in a Parkinson's disease model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinbeck, Julius A; Choi, Se Joon; Mrejeru, Ana; Ganat, Yosif; Deisseroth, Karl; Sulzer, David; Mosharov, Eugene V; Studer, Lorenz

    2015-02-01

    Recent studies have shown evidence of behavioral recovery after transplantation of human pluripotent stem cell (PSC)-derived neural cells in animal models of neurological disease. However, little is known about the mechanisms underlying graft function. Here we use optogenetics to modulate in real time electrophysiological and neurochemical properties of mesencephalic dopaminergic (mesDA) neurons derived from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs). In mice that had recovered from lesion-induced Parkinsonian motor deficits, light-induced selective silencing of graft activity rapidly and reversibly re-introduced the motor deficits. The re-introduction of motor deficits was prevented by the dopamine agonist apomorphine. These results suggest that functionality depends on graft neuronal activity and dopamine release. Combining optogenetics, slice electrophysiology and pharmacological approaches, we further show that mesDA-rich grafts modulate host glutamatergic synaptic transmission onto striatal medium spiny neurons in a manner reminiscent of endogenous mesDA neurons. Thus, application of optogenetics in cell therapy can link transplantation, animal behavior and postmortem analysis to enable the identification of mechanisms that drive recovery.

  14. Cooperation between CD4 and CD8 T cells for anti-tumor activity is enhanced by OX40 signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Aihua; Song, Jianxun; Tang, Xiaohong; Croft, Michael

    2007-05-01

    The relative contribution of OX40 (CD134) to priming of CD8 T cells in complex systems where CD4 and CD8 cells respond and cooperate together is not clear. We previously found that OX40 expressed on tumor-reactive CD8 T cells controls their initial persistence when adoptively transferred in vivo and is required for delayed tumor growth. We now show that exogenous stimulation of OX40 with agonist antibody augments its ability to suppress the growth of new as well as established tumors, correlating with marked expansion of adoptively transferred CD8 T cells. Concomitantly, anti-OX40 strongly enhanced the number of tumor antigen-reactive CD4 T cells. Moreover, the augmented accumulation of CD8 T cells was prevented in animals lacking MHC class II or depleted of CD4 cells and did not occur in OX40-deficient animals receiving wild-type CD8 cells, demonstrating that non-CD8 cells are the major target of OX40 signals. These results suggest that while OX40 signaling to a CD8 T cell can control its expansion, OX40 expressed on non-CD8 cells strongly influences CD8 priming and in vivo activity. OX40 therefore represents an important signal for allowing effective cooperation between CD4 and CD8 cells and for promoting cell interplay and tumor rejection where CD8 activity is limiting.

  15. Functional cooperation between FACT and MCM is coordinated with cell cycle and differential complex formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Chih-Li

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Functional cooperation between FACT and the MCM helicase complex constitutes an integral step during DNA replication initiation. However, mode of regulation that underlies the proper functional interaction of FACT and MCM is poorly understood. Methods & Results Here we present evidence indicating that such interaction is coordinated with cell cycle progression and differential complex formation. We first demonstrate the existence of two distinct FACT-MCM subassemblies, FACT-MCM2/4/6/7 and FACT-MCM2/3/4/5. Both complexes possess DNA unwinding activity and are subject to cell cycle-dependent enzymatic regulation. Interestingly, analysis of functional attributes further suggests that they act at distinct, and possibly sequential, steps during origin establishment and replication initiation. Moreover, we show that the phosphorylation profile of the FACT-associated MCM4 undergoes a cell cycle-dependent change, which is directly correlated with the catalytic activity of the FACT-MCM helicase complexes. Finally, at the quaternary structure level, physical interaction between FACT and MCM complexes is generally dependent on persistent cell cycle and further stabilized upon S phase entry. Cessation of mitotic cycle destabilizes the complex formation and likely leads to compromised coordination and activities. Conclusions Together, our results correlate FACT-MCM functionally and temporally with S phase and DNA replication. They further demonstrate that enzymatic activities intrinsically important for DNA replication are tightly controlled at various levels, thereby ensuring proper progression of, as well as exit from, the cell cycle and ultimately euploid gene balance.

  16. Dopamine and angiotensin type 2 receptors cooperatively inhibit sodium transport in human renal proximal tubule cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gildea, John J; Wang, Xiaoli; Shah, Neema; Tran, Hanh; Spinosa, Michael; Van Sciver, Robert; Sasaki, Midori; Yatabe, Junichi; Carey, Robert M; Jose, Pedro A; Felder, Robin A

    2012-08-01

    Little is known regarding how the kidney shifts from a sodium and water reclaiming state (antinatriuresis) to a state where sodium and water are eliminated (natriuresis). In human renal proximal tubule cells, sodium reabsorption is decreased by the dopamine D(1)-like receptors (D(1)R/D(5)R) and the angiotensin type 2 receptor (AT(2)R), whereas the angiotensin type 1 receptor increases sodium reabsorption. Aberrant control of these opposing systems is thought to lead to sodium retention and, subsequently, hypertension. We show that D(1)R/D(5)R stimulation increased plasma membrane AT(2)R 4-fold via a D(1)R-mediated, cAMP-coupled, and protein phosphatase 2A-dependent specific signaling pathway. D(1)R/D(5)R stimulation also reduced the ability of angiotensin II to stimulate phospho-extracellular signal-regulated kinase, an effect that was partially reversed by an AT(2)R antagonist. Fenoldopam did not increase AT(2)R recruitment in renal proximal tubule cells with D(1)Rs uncoupled from adenylyl cyclase, suggesting a role of cAMP in mediating these events. D(1)Rs and AT(2)Rs heterodimerized and cooperatively increased cAMP and cGMP production, protein phosphatase 2A activation, sodium-potassium-ATPase internalization, and sodium transport inhibition. These studies shed new light on the regulation of renal sodium transport by the dopaminergic and angiotensin systems and potential new therapeutic targets for selectively treating hypertension.

  17. Efficient CRISPR/Cas9-assisted gene targeting enables rapid and precise genetic manipulation of mammalian neural stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bressan, Raul Bardini; Dewari, Pooran Singh; Kalantzaki, Maria; Gangoso, Ester; Matjusaitis, Mantas; Garcia-Diaz, Claudia; Blin, Carla; Grant, Vivien; Bulstrode, Harry; Gogolok, Sabine; Skarnes, William C.

    2017-01-01

    Mammalian neural stem cell (NSC) lines provide a tractable model for discovery across stem cell and developmental biology, regenerative medicine and neuroscience. They can be derived from foetal or adult germinal tissues and continuously propagated in vitro as adherent monolayers. NSCs are clonally expandable, genetically stable, and easily transfectable – experimental attributes compatible with targeted genetic manipulations. However, gene targeting, which is crucial for functional studies of embryonic stem cells, has not been exploited to date in NSC lines. Here, we deploy CRISPR/Cas9 technology to demonstrate a variety of sophisticated genetic modifications via gene targeting in both mouse and human NSC lines, including: (1) efficient targeted transgene insertion at safe harbour loci (Rosa26 and AAVS1); (2) biallelic knockout of neurodevelopmental transcription factor genes; (3) simple knock-in of epitope tags and fluorescent reporters (e.g. Sox2-V5 and Sox2-mCherry); and (4) engineering of glioma mutations (TP53 deletion; H3F3A point mutations). These resources and optimised methods enable facile and scalable genome editing in mammalian NSCs, providing significant new opportunities for functional genetic analysis. PMID:28096221

  18. Efficient Designer Nuclease-Based Homologous Recombination Enables Direct PCR Screening for Footprintless Targeted Human Pluripotent Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvia Merkert

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Genetic engineering of human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs via customized designer nucleases has been shown to be significantly more efficient than conventional gene targeting, but still typically depends on the introduction of additional genetic selection elements. In our study, we demonstrate the efficient nonviral and selection-independent gene targeting in human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs. Our high efficiencies of up to 1.6% of gene-targeted hiPSCs, accompanied by a low background of randomly inserted transgenes, eliminated the need for antibiotic or fluorescence-activated cell sorting selection, and allowed the use of short donor oligonucleotides for footprintless gene editing. Gene-targeted hiPSC clones were established simply by direct PCR screening. This optimized approach allows targeted transgene integration into safe harbor sites for more predictable and robust expression and enables the straightforward generation of disease-corrected, patient-derived iPSC lines for research purposes and, ultimately, for future clinical applications.

  19. Direct hydrogel encapsulation of pluripotent stem cells enables ontomimetic differentiation and growth of engineered human heart tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerscher, Petra; Turnbull, Irene C; Hodge, Alexander J; Kim, Joonyul; Seliktar, Dror; Easley, Christopher J; Costa, Kevin D; Lipke, Elizabeth A

    2016-03-01

    Human engineered heart tissues have potential to revolutionize cardiac development research, drug-testing, and treatment of heart disease; however, implementation is limited by the need to use pre-differentiated cardiomyocytes (CMs). Here we show that by providing a 3D poly(ethylene glycol)-fibrinogen hydrogel microenvironment, we can directly differentiate human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) into contracting heart tissues. Our straight-forward, ontomimetic approach, imitating the process of development, requires only a single cell-handling step, provides reproducible results for a range of tested geometries and size scales, and overcomes inherent limitations in cell maintenance and maturation, while achieving high yields of CMs with developmentally appropriate temporal changes in gene expression. We demonstrate that hPSCs encapsulated within this biomimetic 3D hydrogel microenvironment develop into functional cardiac tissues composed of self-aligned CMs with evidence of ultrastructural maturation, mimicking heart development, and enabling investigation of disease mechanisms and screening of compounds on developing human heart tissue.

  20. Aggregation of gold nanoparticles followed by methotrexate release enables Raman imaging of drug delivery into cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durgadas, C. V.; Sharma, C. P.; Paul, W.; Rekha, M. R. [Sree Chitra Tirunal Institute for Medical Sciences and Technology, Biosurface Technology Division (India); Sreenivasan, K., E-mail: sreeni@sctimst.ac.in [Sree Chitra Tirunal Institute for Medical Sciences and Technology, Laboratory for Polymer Analysis, Biomedical Technology Wing (India)

    2012-09-15

    This study refers an aqueous synthesis of methotrexate (MTX)-conjugated gold nanoparticles (GNPs), their interaction with HepG2 cells, and the use of Raman imaging to observe cellular internalization and drug delivery. GNPs of average size 3.5-5 nm were stabilized using the amine terminated bifunctional biocompatible copolymer and amended by conjugating MTX, an anticancer drug. The nanoparticles were released MTX at a faster rate in acidic pH and subsequently found to form aggregates. The Raman signals of cellular components were found to be enhanced by the aggregated particles enabling the mapping to visualize site-specific drug delivery. The methodology seems to have potential in optimizing the characteristics of nanodrug carriers for emptying the cargo precisely at specified sites.Graphical AbstractDrug release induced particle aggregation enhances Raman signals to aid in imaging.

  1. Splenic B cells from Hymenolepis diminuta-infected mice ameliorate colitis independent of T cells and via cooperation with macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, José L; Wang, Arthur; Fernando, Maria R; Graepel, Rabea; Leung, Gabriella; van Rooijen, Nico; Sigvardsson, Mikael; McKay, Derek M

    2015-01-01

    Helminth parasites provoke multicellular immune responses in their hosts that can suppress concomitant disease. The gut lumen-dwelling tapeworm Hymenolepis diminuta, unlike other parasites assessed as helminth therapy, causes no host tissue damage while potently suppressing murine colitis. With the goal of harnessing the immunomodulatory capacity of infection with H. diminuta, we assessed the putative generation of anti-colitic regulatory B cells following H. diminuta infection. Splenic CD19(+) B cells isolated from mice infected 7 [HdBc(7(d))] and 14 d (but not 3 d) previously with H. diminuta and transferred to naive mice significantly reduced the severity of dinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (DNBS)-, oxazolone-, and dextran-sodium sulfate-induced colitis. Mechanistic studies with the DNBS model, revealed the anti-colitic HdBc(7(d)) was within the follicular B cell population and its phenotype was not dependent on IL-4 or IL-10. The HdBc(7(d)) were not characterized by increased expression of CD1d, CD5, CD23, or IL-10 production, but did spontaneously, and upon LPS plus anti-CD40 stimulation, produce more TGF-β than CD19(+) B cells from controls. DNBS-induced colitis in RAG1(-/-) mice was inhibited by administration of HdBc(7(d)), indicating a lack of a requirement for T and B cells in the recipient; however, depletion of macrophages in recipient mice abrogated the anti-colitic effect of HdBc(7(d)). Thus, in response to H. diminuta, a putatively unique splenic CD19(+) B cell with a functional immunoregulatory program is generated that promotes the suppression of colitis dominated by TH1, TH2, or TH1-plus-TH2 events, and may do so via the synthesis of TGF-β and the generation of, or cooperation with, a regulatory macrophage.

  2. De novo designed proteins from a library of artificial sequences function in Escherichia coli and enable cell growth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael A Fisher

    Full Text Available A central challenge of synthetic biology is to enable the growth of living systems using parts that are not derived from nature, but designed and synthesized in the laboratory. As an initial step toward achieving this goal, we probed the ability of a collection of >10(6 de novo designed proteins to provide biological functions necessary to sustain cell growth. Our collection of proteins was drawn from a combinatorial library of 102-residue sequences, designed by binary patterning of polar and nonpolar residues to fold into stable 4-helix bundles. We probed the capacity of proteins from this library to function in vivo by testing their abilities to rescue 27 different knockout strains of Escherichia coli, each deleted for a conditionally essential gene. Four different strains--ΔserB, ΔgltA, ΔilvA, and Δfes--were rescued by specific sequences from our library. Further experiments demonstrated that a strain simultaneously deleted for all four genes was rescued by co-expression of four novel sequences. Thus, cells deleted for ∼0.1% of the E. coli genome (and ∼1% of the genes required for growth under nutrient-poor conditions can be sustained by sequences designed de novo.

  3. Integrated, Flexible, High-efficiency Solar Cells: Epitaxial Lift-Off GaAs Solar Cells and Enabling Substrate Reuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-01

    welded to Kapton®. •  Lift off performed with HF . –  Etch selectivity is ~107...223503  (2009)—UM.   Epitaxial  Li>-­‐Off  (ELO) Epitaxial  ProtecLon  Layers Cold   Welding MulLple  Growths  on  Single...Cells Growth MetallizaLon Cold   Welding Epitaxial  Li>  0ff Surface  Cleaning GSMBE Thin-­‐Film  FabricaLon 5   GaAs, 0.1

  4. Analysis of long-range interactions in primary human cells identifies cooperative CFTR regulatory elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moisan, Stéphanie; Berlivet, Soizik; Ka, Chandran; Le Gac, Gérald; Dostie, Josée; Férec, Claude

    2016-04-07

    A mechanism by which control DNA elements regulate transcription over large linear genomic distances is by achieving close physical proximity with genes, and looping of the intervening chromatin paths. Alterations of such regulatory 'chromatin looping' systems are likely to play a critical role in human genetic disease at large. Here, we studied the spatial organization of a ≈790 kb locus encompassing the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene. Dysregulation of CFTR is responsible for cystic fibrosis, which is the most common lethal genetic disorder in Caucasian populations. CFTR is a relatively large gene of 189 kb with a rather complex tissue-specific and temporal expression profile. We used chromatin conformation at the CFTR locus to identify new DNA sequences that regulate its transcription. By comparing 5C chromatin interaction maps of the CFTR locus in expressing and non-expressing human primary cells, we identified several new contact points between the CFTR promoter and its surroundings, in addition to regions featuring previously described regulatory elements. We demonstrate that two of these novel interacting regions cooperatively increase CFTR expression, and suggest that the new enhancer elements located on either side of the gene are brought together through chromatin looping via CTCF.

  5. Fair Allocation of Backhaul Resources in Multi-Cell MIMO Co-operative Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Soliman, Hazem M; Khairy, Mohamed M

    2011-01-01

    In this paper the problem of allocating the limited backhaul bandwidth among users in Multi-cell MIMO cooperative networks is considered. We approach the problem from both the sum-rate and fairness perspectives. First, we show that there are many allocations that can provide near maximum sumrate while varying significantly in fairness, which is assessed through the mean versus variance criteria. Second, Two novel schemes that achieve near maximum sum-rate while offering fair allocation of the backhaul bandwidth among users are proposed: the Equal Signal-to-Interference ratio (SIR) and the Equal Interference schemes. Simulation results show that, for the same mean rate among users, the proposed schemes can achieve more fairness when compared to the conventional scheme, which gives all users the same share of bandwidth. Moreover, we show that the Equal SIR scheme can achieve zero variance among users in a wide range of backhaul bandwidths while keeping very close to maximum sum rate. This is the most fair solut...

  6. Super-resolution imaging with Pontamine Fast Scarlet 4BS enables direct visualization of cellulose orientation and cell connection architecture in onion epidermis cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liesche, Johannes; Ziomkiewicz, Iwona; Schulz, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    of cellulose fibril orientation and growth. The fluorescent dye Pontamine Fast Scarlet 4BS (PFS) was shown to stain cellulose with high specificity and could be used to visualize cellulose bundles in cell walls of Arabidopsis root epidermal cells with confocal microscopy. The resolution limit of confocal...... as alternatives 3D-structured illumination microscopy (3D-SIM) and confocal microscopy, combined with image deconvolution. Both methods offer lower resolution than STORM, but enable 3D imaging. While 3D-SIM produced strong artifacts, deconvolution gave good results. The resolution was improved over conventional...... confocal microscopy and the approach could be used to demonstrate differences in fibril orientation in different layers of the cell wall as well as particular cellulose fortifications around plasmodesmata. Conclusions Super-resolution light microscopy of PFS-stained cellulose fibrils is possible...

  7. Glucocorticoids and histone deacetylase inhibitors cooperate to block the invasiveness of basal-like breast cancer cells through novel mechanisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Law, M E; Corsino, P E; Jahn, S C

    2013-01-01

    cells are a frequently used model of invasive triple-negative breast cancer, and these cells express low levels of E-cadherin that is mislocalized to cytoplasmic vesicles. MDA-MB-231 cell lines stably expressing wild-type E-cadherin or E-cadherin fused to glutathione S-transferase or green fluorescent...... of the corresponding orthotopic xenograft tumors. Further studies indicated that the glucocorticoid dexamethasone and the highly potent class I histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor largazole cooperated to induce E-cadherin localization to the plasma membrane in triple-negative breast cancers, and to suppress cellular...

  8. Self-Adaptive Power Control Mechanism in D2D Enabled Hybrid Cellular Network with mmWave Small Cells:An Optimization Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Raza, Syed Ahsan; Hassan, Syed Ali; Pervaiz, Haris Bin; Ni, Qiang; Musavian, Leila

    2016-01-01

    Millimeter wave (mmWave) and Device-to-Device (D2D) communications have been considered as the key enablers of the next generation networks. We consider a D2D-enabled hybrid cellular network compromising of μW macro-cells coexisting with mmWave small cells. We investigate the dynamic resource sharing in downlink transmission to maximize the energy efficiency (EE) of the priority, or cellular users (CUs), that are opportunistically served by either macrocells or mmWave small cells, while satis...

  9. An All-Solution Processed Recombination Layer with Mild Post-Treatment Enabling Efficient Homo-Tandem Non-fullerene Organic Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shangshang; Zhang, Guangye; Liu, Jing; Yao, Huatong; Zhang, Jianquan; Ma, Tingxuan; Li, Zhengke; Yan, He

    2017-02-01

    The first homo-tandem non-fullerene organic solar cell enabled by a novel recombination layer which only requires a very mild thermal annealing treatment is reported. The best efficiency achieved is 10.8% with a Voc over 2.1 V, which is the highest Voc for double-junction organic solar cells reported to date.

  10. Cell sorting enables interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization detection of low BCR-ABL1 producing stem cells in chronic myeloid leukaemia patients beyond deep molecular remission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Kooten Niekerk, Peter B; Petersen, Charlotte C; Nyvold, Charlotte G; Ommen, Hans B; Roug, Anne S; Nederby, Line; Hokland, Peter; Kjeldsen, Eigil

    2014-01-01

    The exact disease state of chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML) patients in deep molecular remission is unknown, because even the most sensitive quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) methods cannot identify patients prone to relapse after treatment withdrawal. To elucidate this, CD34(+) stem cell and progenitor cell subpopulations were isolated by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS), and their content of residual Philadelphia positive (Ph(+) ) cells was evaluated in 17 CML patients (major molecular response, n = 6; 4-log reduction in BCR-ABL1 expression (MR(4) ), n = 11) using both sensitive qPCR and interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization (iFISH). Despite evaluating fewer cells, iFISH proved superior to mRNA-based qPCR in detecting residual Ph(+) stem cells (P = 0·005), and detected Ph(+) stem- and progenitor cells in 9/10 patients at frequencies of 2-14%. Moreover, while all qPCR(+) samples also were iFISH(+) , 9/33 samples were qPCR-/iFISH(+) , including all positive samples from MR(4) patients. Our findings show that residual Ph(+) cells are low BCR-ABL1 producers, and that DNA-based methods are required to assess the content of persisting Ph(+) stem cells in these patients. This approach demonstrates a clinically applicable manner of assessing residual disease at the stem cell level in CML patients in MR(4) , and may enable early and safe identification of candidates for tyrosine kinase inhibitor withdrawal.

  11. Fluorescence molecular tomography enables in vivo visualization and quantification of nonunion fracture repair induced by genetically engineered mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zilberman, Yoram; Kallai, Ilan; Gafni, Yossi; Pelled, Gadi; Kossodo, Sylvie; Yared, Wael; Gazit, Dan

    2008-04-01

    Fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT) is a novel tomographic near-infrared (NIR) imaging modality that enables 3D quantitative determination of fluorochrome distribution in tissues of live small animals at any depth. This study demonstrates a noninvasive, quantitative method of monitoring engineered bone remodeling via FMT. Murine mesenchymal stem cells overexpressing the osteogenic gene BMP2 (mMSCs-BMP2) were implanted into the thigh muscle and into a radial nonunion bone defect model in C3H/HeN mice. Real-time imaging of bone formation was performed following systemic administration of the fluorescent bisphosphonate imaging agent OsteoSense, an hydroxyapatite-directed bone-imaging probe. The mice underwent imaging on days 7, 14, and 21 postimplantation. New bone formation at the implantation sites was quantified using micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) imaging. A higher fluorescent signal occurred at the site of the mMSC-BMP2 implants than that found in controls. Micro-CT imaging revealed a mass of mature bone formed in the implantation sites on day 21, a finding also confirmed by histology. These findings highlight the effectiveness of FMT as a functional platform for molecular imaging in the field of bone regeneration and tissue engineering.

  12. Combined cell surface carbonic anhydrase 9 and CD147 antigens enable high-efficiency capture of circulating tumor cells in clear cell renal cell carcinoma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shijie; Tian, Zuhong; Zhang, Lei; Hou, Shuang; Hu, Sijun; Wu, Junshen; Jing, Yuming; Sun, Huimin; Yu, Fei; Zhao, Libo; Wang, Ruoxiang; Tseng, Hsian-Rong; Zhau, Haiyen E; Chung, Leland W K; Wu, Kaichun; Wang, Hao; Wu, Jason Boyang; Nie, Yongzhan; Shao, Chen

    2016-09-13

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) have emerged as promising tools for noninvasive cancer detection and prognosis. Most conventional approaches for capturing CTCs use an EpCAM-based enrichment strategy, which does not work well in cancers that show low or no expression of EpCAM, such as renal cell carcinoma (RCC). In this study, we developed a new set of cell surface markers including CA9 and CD147 as alternative CTC-capture antigens specifically designed for RCC patients. We showed that the expression of both CA9 and CD147 was prevalent in a RCC patient cohort (n=70) by immunohistochemical analysis, with both molecules in combination covering 97.1% of cases. The NanoVelcro platform combined with CA9-/CD147-capture antibodies demonstrated significantly higher efficiency for capturing both CTC-mimicking renal cancer cells and RCC CTCs in peripheral blood, compared to the conventional EpCAM-based method. Using immunofluorescence cytological validation at the single-cell level, we were able to identify bona fide CTCs in RCC patient blood following the well-accepted criteria in our CTC-capture system. We further demonstrated a significant association of CTC numbers as well as the CTC expression status of Vimentin, a mesenchymal marker, with disease progression, including pathologic features and clinical staging. These results provide new insights into developing novel, effective targets/approaches for capturing CTCs, making CTCs a valuable tool for improved cancer detection, prognosis and treatment in RCC.

  13. Light-sheet Bayesian microscopy enables deep-cell super-resolution imaging of heterochromatin in live human embryonic stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Ying S; Zhu, Quan; Elkins, Keri; Tse, Kevin; Li, Yu; Fitzpatrick, James A J; Verma, Inder M; Cang, Hu

    2016-01-01

    Background Heterochromatin in the nucleus of human embryonic cells plays an important role in the epigenetic regulation of gene expression. The architecture of heterochromatin and its dynamic organization remain elusive because of the lack of fast and high-resolution deep-cell imaging tools. We enable this task by advancing instrumental and algorithmic implementation of the localization-based super-resolution technique. Results We present light-sheet Bayesian super-resolution microscopy (LSBM). We adapt light-sheet illumination for super-resolution imaging by using a novel prism-coupled condenser design to illuminate a thin slice of the nucleus with high signal-to-noise ratio. Coupled with a Bayesian algorithm that resolves overlapping fluorophores from high-density areas, we show, for the first time, nanoscopic features of the heterochromatin structure in both fixed and live human embryonic stem cells. The enhanced temporal resolution allows capturing the dynamic change of heterochromatin with a lateral resolution of 50–60 nm on a time scale of 2.3 s. Conclusion Light-sheet Bayesian microscopy opens up broad new possibilities of probing nanometer-scale nuclear structures and real-time sub-cellular processes and other previously difficult-to-access intracellular regions of living cells at the single-molecule, and single cell level.

  14. 4-Phenylbutyric Acid (4-PBA) and Lithium Cooperatively Attenuate Cell Death during Oxygen-Glucose Deprivation (OGD) and Reoxygenation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tung, Wai-Fai; Chen, Wei-Jen; Hung, Hui-Chih; Liu, Guang-Yaw; Tung, Jai-Nien; Huang, Chien-Chih; Lin, Chih-Li

    2015-08-01

    Hypoxia is an important cause of brain injury in ischemic stroke. It is known that endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is an important determinant of cell survival or death during hypoxia. However, the signaling pathways and molecular mechanisms involved remain to be studied in more detail. To investigate whether inhibition of ER stress promotes neuroprotection pathways, we applied an in vitro oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) followed by reoxygenation model of human SK-N-MC neuronal cell cultures in this study. Our results showed that neuronal cell death was induced in this model during the OGD reoxygenation by the sustained ER stress, but not during OGD phase. However, treatment of the cultures with lithium with the OGD reoxygenation insult did not result in neuroprotection, whereas concomitant treatment of chemical chaperon 4-phenylbutyric acid (4-PBA) provides protective effects in ER stress-exposed cells. Moreover, 4-PBA rescued ER stress-suppressed Akt protein biosynthesis, which works cooperatively with lithium in the activation of Akt downstream signaling by inhibition of autophagy-induced cell death. Taken together, our finding provides a possible mechanism by which 4-PBA and lithium contribute to mediate neuroprotection cooperatively. This result may potentially be a useful therapeutic strategy for ischemic stroke.

  15. Biomaterial-enabled delivery of SDF-1α at the ventral side of breast cancer cells reveals a crosstalk between cell receptors to promote the invasive phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xi Qiu; Fourel, Laure; Dalonneau, Fabien; Sadir, Rabia; Leal, Salome; Lortat-Jacob, Hugues; Weidenhaupt, Marianne; Albiges-Rizo, Corinne; Picart, Catherine

    2017-05-01

    The SDF-1α chemokine (CXCL12) is a potent bioactive chemoattractant known to be involved in hematopoietic stem cell homing and cancer progression. The associated SDF-1α/CXCR4 receptor signaling is a hallmark of aggressive tumors, which can metastasize to distant sites such as lymph nodes, lung and bone. Here, we engineered a biomimetic tumoral niche made of a thin and soft polyelectrolyte film that can retain SDF-1α to present it, in a spatially-controlled manner, at the ventral side of the breast cancer cells. Matrix-bound SDF-1α but not soluble SDF-1α induced a striking increase in cell spreading and migration in a serum-containing medium, which was associated with the formation of lamellipodia and filopodia in MDA-MB231 cells and specifically mediated by CXCR4. Other Knockdown and inhibition experiments revealed that CD44, the major hyaluronan receptor, acted in concert, via a spatial coincidence, to drive a specific matrix-bound SDFα-induced cell response associated with ERK signaling. In contrast, the β1 integrin adhesion receptor played only a minor role on cell polarity. The CXCR4/CD44 mediated cellular response to matrix-bound SDF-1α involved the Rac1 RhoGTPase and was sustained solely in the presence of matrix-bound SDFα, in contrast with the transient signaling observed in response to soluble SDF-1α. Our results highlight that a biomimetic tumoral niche enables to reveal potent cellular effects and so far hidden molecular mechanisms underlying the breast cancer response to chemokines. These results open new insights for the design of future innovative therapies in metastatic cancers, by inhibiting CXCR4-mediated signaling in the tumoral niche via dual targeting of receptors (CXCR4 and CD44) or of associated signaling molecules (CXCR4 and Rac1).

  16. Cooperative transcription activation by Nurr1 and Pitx3 induces embryonic stem cell maturation to the midbrain dopamine neuron phenotype

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinat, Cecile; Bacci, Jean-Jacques; Leete, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    , Pitx3, Lmx1b, Engrailed-1, and Engrailed-2. However, none of these factors appear sufficient alone to induce the mature midbrain DA neuron phenotype in ES cell cultures in vitro, suggesting a more complex regulatory network. Here we show that Nurr1 and Pitx3 cooperatively promote terminal maturation......Midbrain dopamine (DA) neurons play a central role in the regulation of voluntary movement, and their degeneration is associated with Parkinson's disease. Cell replacement therapies, and in particular embryonic stem (ES) cell-derived DA neurons, offer a potential therapeutic venue for Parkinson......'s disease. We sought to identify genes that can potentiate maturation of ES cell cultures to the midbrain DA neuron phenotype. A number of transcription factors have been implicated in the development of midbrain DA neurons by expression analyses and loss-of-function knockout mouse studies, including Nurr1...

  17. Modeling the cooperative energy transfer dynamics of quantum cutting for solar cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rabouw, Freddy T.; Meijerink, Andries

    2015-01-01

    Cooperative energy transfer (ET) is a quantum cutting (or downconversion) process where a luminescent center splits its excited state energy in two by simultaneous transfer to two nearby acceptor centers, thus yielding two low-energy photons for each high-energy photon absorbed. It has the potential

  18. Magnetic Particle Spectroscopy Reveals Dynamic Changes in the Magnetic Behavior of Very Small Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles During Cellular Uptake and Enables Determination of Cell-Labeling Efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poller, Wolfram C; Löwa, Norbert; Wiekhorst, Frank; Taupitz, Matthias; Wagner, Susanne; Möller, Konstantin; Baumann, Gert; Stangl, Verena; Trahms, Lutz; Ludwig, Antje

    2016-02-01

    In vivo tracking of nanoparticle-labeled cells by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) crucially depends on accurate determination of cell-labeling efficacy prior to transplantation. Here, we analyzed the feasibility and accuracy of magnetic particle spectroscopy (MPS) for estimation of cell-labeling efficacy in living THP-1 cells incubated with very small superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (VSOP). Cell viability and proliferation capacity were not affected by the MPS measurement procedure. In VSOP samples without cell contact, MPS enabled highly accurate quantification. In contrast, MPS constantly overestimated the amount of cell associated and internalized VSOP. Analyses of the MPS spectrum shape expressed as harmonic ratio A₅/A₃ revealed distinct changes in the magnetic behavior of VSOP in response to cellular uptake. These changes were proportional to the deviation between MPS and actual iron amount, therefore allowing for adjusted iron quantification. Transmission electron microscopy provided visual evidence that changes in the magnetic properties correlated with cell surface interaction of VSOP as well as with alterations of particle structure and arrangement during the phagocytic process. Altogether, A₅/A₃-adjusted MPS enables highly accurate, cell-preserving VSOP quantification and furthermore provides information on the magnetic characteristics of internalized VSOP.

  19. Coherence-controlled holographic microscopy enabled recognition of necrosis as the mechanism of cancer cells death after exposure to cytopathic turbid emulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collakova, Jana; Krizova, Aneta; Kollarova, Vera; Dostal, Zbynek; Slaba, Michala; Vesely, Pavel; Chmelik, Radim

    2015-11-01

    Coherence-controlled holographic microscopy (CCHM) in low-coherence mode possesses a pronounced coherence gate effect. This offers an option to investigate the details of cellular events leading to cell death caused by cytopathic turbid emulsions. CCHM capacity was first assessed in model situations that showed clear images obtained with low coherence of illumination but not with high coherence of illumination. Then, the form of death of human cancer cells induced by treatment with biologically active phospholipids (BAPs) preparation was investigated. The observed overall retraction of cell colony was apparently caused by the release of cell-to-substratum contacts. This was followed by the accumulation of granules decorating the nuclear membrane. Then, the occurrence of nuclear membrane indentations signaled the start of damage to the integrity of the cell nucleus. In the final stage, cells shrunk and disintegrated. This indicated that BAPs cause cell death by necrosis and not apoptosis. An intriguing option of checking the fate of cancer cells caused by the anticipated cooperative effect after adding another tested substance sodium dichloroacetate to turbid emulsion is discussed on grounds of pilot experiments. Such observations should reveal the impact and mechanism of action of the interacting drugs on cell behavior and fate that would otherwise remain hidden in turbid milieu.

  20. Parabens can enable hallmarks and characteristics of cancer in human breast epithelial cells: a review of the literature with reference to new exposure data and regulatory status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darbre, Philippa D; Harvey, Philip W

    2014-09-01

    A framework for understanding the complexity of cancer development was established by Hanahan and Weinberg in their definition of the hallmarks of cancer. In this review, we consider the evidence that parabens can enable development in human breast epithelial cells of four of six of the basic hallmarks, one of two of the emerging hallmarks and one of two of the enabling characteristics. In Hallmark 1, parabens have been measured as present in 99% of human breast tissue samples, possess oestrogenic activity and can stimulate sustained proliferation of human breast cancer cells at concentrations measurable in the breast. In Hallmark 2, parabens can inhibit the suppression of breast cancer cell growth by hydroxytamoxifen, and through binding to the oestrogen-related receptor gamma may prevent its deactivation by growth inhibitors. In Hallmark 3, in the 10 nm-1 μm range, parabens give a dose-dependent evasion of apoptosis in high-risk donor breast epithelial cells. In Hallmark 4, long-term exposure (>20 weeks) to parabens leads to increased migratory and invasive activity in human breast cancer cells, properties that are linked to the metastatic process. As an emerging hallmark methylparaben has been shown in human breast epithelial cells to increase mTOR, a key regulator of energy metabolism. As an enabling characteristic parabens can cause DNA damage at high concentrations in the short term but more work is needed to investigate long-term, low-dose mixtures. The ability of parabens to enable multiple cancer hallmarks in human breast epithelial cells provides grounds for regulatory review of the implications of the presence of parabens in human breast tissue.

  1. The 6-chromanol derivate SUL-109 enables prolonged hypothermic storage of adipose tissue-derived stem cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hajmousa, Ghazaleh; Vogelaar, Pieter; Brouwer, Linda A; van der Graaf, Adrianus C; Henning, Robert H; Krenning, Guido

    2017-01-01

    Encouraging advances in cell therapy research with adipose derived stem cells (ASC) require an effective short-term preservation method that provides time for quality control and transport of cells from their manufacturing facility to their clinical destination. Hypothermic storage of cells in their

  2. Cost-benefit analysis of the mechanisms that enable migrating cells to sustain motility upon changes in matrix environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tozluoglu, Melda; Mao, Yanlan; Bates, Paul A; Sahai, Erik

    2015-05-06

    Cells can move through extracellular environments with varying geometries and adhesive properties. Adaptation to these differences is achieved by switching between different modes of motility, including lamellipod-driven and blebbing motility. Further, cells can modulate their level of adhesion to the extracellular matrix (ECM) depending on both the level of force applied to the adhesions and cell intrinsic biochemical properties. We have constructed a computational model of cell motility to investigate how motile cells transition between extracellular environments with varying surface continuity, confinement and adhesion. Changes in migration strategy are an emergent property of cells as the ECM geometry and adhesion changes. The transition into confined environments with discontinuous ECM fibres is sufficient to induce shifts from lamellipod-based to blebbing motility, while changes in confinement alone within a continuous geometry are not. The geometry of the ECM facilitates plasticity, by inducing shifts where the cell has high marginal gain from a mode change, and conserving persistency where the cell can continue movement regardless of the motility mode. This regulation of cell motility is independent of global changes in cytoskeletal properties, but requires locally higher linkage between the actin network and the plasma membrane at the cell rear, and changes in internal cell pressure. In addition to matrix geometry, we consider how cells might transition between ECM of different adhesiveness. We find that this requires positive feedback between the forces cells apply on the adhesion points, and the strength of the cell-ECM adhesions on those sites. This positive feedback leads to the emergence of a small number of highly adhesive cores, similar to focal adhesions. While the range of ECM adhesion levels the cell can invade is expanded with this feedback mechanism; the velocities are lowered for conditions where the positive feedback is not vital. Thus

  3. Interlaboratory studies with the Chinese hamster V79 cell metabolic cooperation assay to detect tumor-promoting agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bohrman, J.S.; Burg, J.R.; Elmore, E.; Gulati, D.K.; Barfknecht, T.R.; Niemeier, R.W.; Dames, B.L.; Toraason, M.; Langenbach, R.

    1988-01-01

    Three laboratories participated in an interlaboratory study to evaluate the usefulness of the Chinese hamster V79 cell metabolic cooperation assay to predict the tumor-promoting activity of selected chemical. Twenty-three chemicals of different chemical structures (phorbol esters, barbiturates, phenols, artificial sweeteners, alkanes, and peroxides) were chosen for testing based on in vivo promotion activities, as reported in the literature. Assay protocols and materials were standardized, and the chemicals were coded to facilitate unbiased evaluation. A chemical was tested only once in each laboratory, with one of the three laboratories testing only 15 out of 23 chemicals. Dunnett's test was used for statistical analysis. Chemicals were scored as positive (at least two concentration levels statistically different than control), equivocal (only one concentration statistically different), or negative. For 15 chemicals tested in all three laboratories, there was complete agreement among the laboratories for nine chemicals. For the 23 chemicals tested in only two laboratories, there was agreement on 16 chemicals. With the exception of the peroxides and alkanes, the metabolic cooperation data were in general agreement with in vivo data. However, an overall evaluation of the V79 cell system for predicting in vivo promotion activity was difficult because of the organ specificity of certain chemicals and/or the limited number of adequately tested nonpromoting chemicals.

  4. Cost–benefit analysis of the mechanisms that enable migrating cells to sustain motility upon changes in matrix environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tozluoglu, Melda; Mao, Yanlan; Bates, Paul A.; Sahai, Erik

    2015-01-01

    Cells can move through extracellular environments with varying geometries and adhesive properties. Adaptation to these differences is achieved by switching between different modes of motility, including lamellipod-driven and blebbing motility. Further, cells can modulate their level of adhesion to the extracellular matrix (ECM) depending on both the level of force applied to the adhesions and cell intrinsic biochemical properties. We have constructed a computational model of cell motility to investigate how motile cells transition between extracellular environments with varying surface continuity, confinement and adhesion. Changes in migration strategy are an emergent property of cells as the ECM geometry and adhesion changes. The transition into confined environments with discontinuous ECM fibres is sufficient to induce shifts from lamellipod-based to blebbing motility, while changes in confinement alone within a continuous geometry are not. The geometry of the ECM facilitates plasticity, by inducing shifts where the cell has high marginal gain from a mode change, and conserving persistency where the cell can continue movement regardless of the motility mode. This regulation of cell motility is independent of global changes in cytoskeletal properties, but requires locally higher linkage between the actin network and the plasma membrane at the cell rear, and changes in internal cell pressure. In addition to matrix geometry, we consider how cells might transition between ECM of different adhesiveness. We find that this requires positive feedback between the forces cells apply on the adhesion points, and the strength of the cell–ECM adhesions on those sites. This positive feedback leads to the emergence of a small number of highly adhesive cores, similar to focal adhesions. While the range of ECM adhesion levels the cell can invade is expanded with this feedback mechanism; the velocities are lowered for conditions where the positive feedback is not vital. Thus

  5. Conflictual cooperation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Axel, Erik

    2011-01-01

    , cooperation appeared as the continuous reworking of contradictions in the local arrangement of societal con- ditions. Subjects were distributed and distributed themselves according to social privileges, resources, and dilemmas in cooperation. Here, the subjects’ activities and understandings took form from...

  6. Cooperative Learning

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    桑莹莹

    2015-01-01

    This paper is about the cooperative learning as a teaching method in a second language learning class. It mainly talks about the background, foundation, features, definitions, components, goals, advantages and disadvantages of cooperative learning. And as the encounter of the disadvantages in cooperative learning, this paper also proposes some strategies.

  7. PDADMAC flocculation of Chinese hamster ovary cells: enabling a centrifuge-less harvest process for monoclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNerney, Thomas; Thomas, Anne; Senczuk, Anna; Petty, Krista; Zhao, Xiaoyang; Piper, Rob; Carvalho, Juliane; Hammond, Matthew; Sawant, Satin; Bussiere, Jeanine

    2015-01-01

    High titer (>10 g/L) monoclonal antibody (mAb) cell culture processes are typically achieved by maintaining high viable cell densities over longer culture durations. A corresponding increase in the solids and sub-micron cellular debris particle levels are also observed. This higher burden of solids (≥15%) and sub-micron particles typically exceeds the capabilities of a continuous centrifuge to effectively remove the solids without a substantial loss of product and/or the capacity of the harvest filtration train (depth filter followed by membrane filter) used to clarify the centrate. We discuss here the use of a novel and simple two-polymer flocculation method used to harvest mAb from high cell mass cell culture processes. The addition of the polycationic polymer, poly diallyldimethylammonium chloride (PDADMAC) to the cell culture broth flocculates negatively-charged cells and cellular debris via an ionic interaction mechanism. Incorporation of a non-ionic polymer such as polyethylene glycol (PEG) into the PDADMAC flocculation results in larger flocculated particles with faster settling rate compared to PDADMAC-only flocculation. PDADMAC also flocculates the negatively-charged sub-micron particles to produce a feed stream with a significantly higher harvest filter train throughput compared to a typical centrifuged harvest feed stream. Cell culture process variability such as lactate production, cellular debris and cellular densities were investigated to determine the effect on flocculation. Since PDADMAC is cytotoxic, purification process clearance and toxicity assessment were performed.

  8. Planar cell polarity enables posterior localization of nodal cilia and left-right axis determination during mouse and Xenopus embryogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragana Antic

    Full Text Available Left-right asymmetry in vertebrates is initiated in an early embryonic structure called the ventral node in human and mouse, and the gastrocoel roof plate (GRP in the frog. Within these structures, each epithelial cell bears a single motile cilium, and the concerted beating of these cilia produces a leftward fluid flow that is required to initiate left-right asymmetric gene expression. The leftward fluid flow is thought to result from the posterior tilt of the cilia, which protrude from near the posterior portion of each cell's apical surface. The cells, therefore, display a morphological planar polarization. Planar cell polarity (PCP is manifested as the coordinated, polarized orientation of cells within epithelial sheets, or as directional cell migration and intercalation during convergent extension. A set of evolutionarily conserved proteins regulates PCP. Here, we provide evidence that vertebrate PCP proteins regulate planar polarity in the mouse ventral node and in the Xenopus gastrocoel roof plate. Asymmetric anterior localization of VANGL1 and PRICKLE2 (PK2 in mouse ventral node cells indicates that these cells are planar polarized by a conserved molecular mechanism. A weakly penetrant Vangl1 mutant phenotype suggests that compromised Vangl1 function may be associated with left-right laterality defects. Stronger functional evidence comes from the Xenopus GRP, where we show that perturbation of VANGL2 protein function disrupts the posterior localization of motile cilia that is required for leftward fluid flow, and causes aberrant expression of the left side-specific gene Nodal. The observation of anterior-posterior PCP in the mouse and in Xenopus embryonic organizers reflects a strong evolutionary conservation of this mechanism that is important for body plan determination.

  9. Tracking Adolescents with GPS-enabled Cell Phones to Study Contextual Exposures and Alcohol and Marijuana Use: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrnes, Hilary F.; Miller, Brenda A.; Wiebe, Douglas J.; Morrison, Christopher N.; Remer, Lillian G.; Wiehe, Sarah E.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Measuring activity spaces, places adolescents spend time, provides information about relations between contextual exposures and risk behaviors. We studied whether contextual exposures in adolescents’ activity spaces differ from contextual risks present in residential contexts and examined relationships between contextual exposures in activity spaces and alcohol/marijuana use. Methods Adolescents (N=18) aged 16–17 carried GPS-enabled smartphones for one week, with locations tracked. Activity spaces were created by connecting GPS points sequentially and adding buffers. Contextual exposure data (e.g., alcohol outlets) were connected to routes. Adolescents completed texts regarding behaviors. Results Adolescent activity spaces intersected 24.3 census tracts and contained 9 times more alcohol outlets than residential census tracts. Outlet exposure in activity spaces was related to drinking. Low SES exposure was related to marijuana use. Conclusions Findings suggest substantial differences between activity spaces and residential contexts, and suggest that activity spaces are relevant for adolescent risk behaviors. PMID:26206448

  10. Final Technical Report: Residential Fuel Cell Demonstration by the Delaware County Electric Cooperative, Inc.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mark Hilson Schneider

    2007-06-06

    This demonstration project contributes to the knowledge base in the area of fuel cells in stationary applications, propane fuel cells, edge-of-grid applications for fuel cells, and energy storage in combination with fuel cells. The project demonstrated that it is technically feasible to meet the whole-house electrical energy needs of a typical upstate New York residence with a 5-kW fuel cell in combination with in-home energy storage without any major modifications to the residence or modifications to the consumption patterns of the residents of the home. The use of a fuel cell at constant output power through a 120-Volt inverter leads to system performance issues including: • relatively poor power quality as quantified by the IEEE-defined short term flicker parameter • relatively low overall system efficiency Each of these issues is discussed in detail in the text of this report. The fuel cell performed well over the 1-year demonstration period in terms of availability and efficiency of conversion from chemical energy (propane) to electrical energy at the fuel cell output terminals. Another strength of fuel cell performance in the demonstration was the low requirements for maintenance and repair on the fuel cell. The project uncovered a new and important installation consideration for propane fuel cells. Alcohol added to new propane storage tanks is preferentially absorbed on the surface of some fuel cell reformer desulfurization filters. The experience on this project indicates that special attention must be paid to the volume and composition of propane tank additives. Size, composition, and replacement schedules for the de-sulfurization filter bed should be adjusted to account for propane tank additives to avoid sulfur poisoning of fuel cell stacks. Despite good overall technical performance of the fuel cell and the whole energy system, the demonstration showed that such a system is not economically feasible as compared to other commercially available

  11. Stirred tank bioreactor culture combined with serum-/xenogeneic-free culture medium enables an efficient expansion of umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stem/stromal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizukami, Amanda; Fernandes-Platzgummer, Ana; Carmelo, Joana G; Swiech, Kamilla; Covas, Dimas T; Cabral, Joaquim M S; da Silva, Cláudia L

    2016-08-01

    Mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSC) are being widely explored as promising candidates for cell-based therapies. Among the different human MSC origins exploited, umbilical cord represents an attractive and readily available source of MSC that involves a non-invasive collection procedure. In order to achieve relevant cell numbers of human MSC for clinical applications, it is crucial to develop scalable culture systems that allow bioprocess control and monitoring, combined with the use of serum/xenogeneic (xeno)-free culture media. In the present study, we firstly established a spinner flask culture system combining gelatin-based Cultispher(®) S microcarriers and xeno-free culture medium for the expansion of umbilical cord matrix (UCM)-derived MSC. This system enabled the production of 2.4 (±1.1) x10(5) cells/mL (n = 4) after 5 days of culture, corresponding to a 5.3 (±1.6)-fold increase in cell number. The established protocol was then implemented in a stirred-tank bioreactor (800 mL working volume) (n = 3) yielding 115 million cells after 4 days. Upon expansion under stirred conditions, cells retained their differentiation ability and immunomodulatory potential. The development of a scalable microcarrier-based stirred culture system, using xeno-free culture medium that suits the intrinsic features of UCM-derived MSC represents an important step towards a GMP compliant large-scale production platform for these promising cell therapy candidates.

  12. Bid and calpains cooperate to trigger oxaliplatin-induced apoptosis of cervical carcinoma HeLa cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anguissola, Sergio; Köhler, Barbara; O'Byrne, Robert; Düssmann, Heiko; Cannon, Mary D; Murray, Frank E; Concannon, Caoimhin G; Rehm, Markus; Kögel, Donat; Prehn, Jochen H M

    2009-11-01

    The Bcl-2 homology 3-only protein Bid is an important mediator of death receptor-induced apoptosis. Recent reports and this study suggest that Bid may also mediate genotoxic drug-induced apoptosis of various human cancer cells. Here, we characterized the role of Bid and the mechanism of Bid activation during oxaliplatin-induced apoptosis of HeLa cervical cancer cells. Small hairpin RNA-mediated silencing of Bid protected HeLa cells against both death receptor- and oxaliplatin-induced apoptosis. Expression of a Bid mutant in which caspase-8 cleavage site was mutated (D59A) reactivated oxaliplatin-induced apoptosis in Bid-deficient cells but failed to reactivate death receptor-induced apoptosis, suggesting that caspase-8-mediated Bid cleavage did not contribute to oxaliplatin-induced apoptosis. Overexpression of bcl-2 or treatment with the pan-caspase inhibitor N-benzyloxycarbonyl-Val-Ala-dl-Asp-fluoromethylketone abolished caspase-2, -8, -9, and -3 activation as well as Bid cleavage in response to oxaliplatin, suggesting that Bid cleavage occurred downstream of mitochondrial permeabilization and was predominantly mediated by caspases. We also detected an early activation of calpains in response to oxaliplatin. Calpain inhibition reduced Bid cleavage, mitochondrial depolarization, and activation of caspase-9, -3, -2, and -8 in response to oxaliplatin. Further experiments, however, suggested that Bid cleavage by calpains was not a prerequisite for oxaliplatin-induced apoptosis: single-cell imaging experiments using a yellow fluorescent protein-Bid-cyan fluorescent protein probe demonstrated translocation of full-length Bid to mitochondria that was insensitive to calpain or caspase inhibition. Moreover, calpain inhibition showed a potent protective effect in Bid-silenced cells. In conclusion, our data suggest that calpains and Bid act in a cooperative, but mutually independent, manner to mediate oxaliplatin-induced apoptosis of HeLa cells.

  13. Ultra-sensitive molecular MRI of cerebrovascular cell activation enables early detection of chronic central nervous system disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montagne, Axel; Gauberti, Maxime; Macrez, Richard; Jullienne, Amandine; Briens, Aurélien; Raynaud, Jean-Sébastien; Louin, Gaelle; Buisson, Alain; Haelewyn, Benoit; Docagne, Fabian; Defer, Gilles; Vivien, Denis; Maubert, Eric

    2012-11-01

    Since endothelial cells can be targeted by large contrast-carrying particles, molecular imaging of cerebrovascular cell activation is highly promising to evaluate the underlying inflammation of the central nervous system (CNS). In this study, we aimed to demonstrate that molecular magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of cerebrovascular cell activation can reveal CNS disorders in the absence of visible lesions and symptoms. To this aim, we optimized contrast carrying particles targeting vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 and MRI protocols through both in vitro and in vivo experiments. Although, pre-contrast MRI images failed to reveal the ongoing pathology, contrast-enhanced MRI revealed hypoperfusion-triggered CNS injury in vascular dementia, unmasked amyloid-induced cerebrovascular activation in Alzheimer's disease and allowed monitoring of disease activity during experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. Moreover, contrast-enhanced MRI revealed the cerebrovascular cell activation associated with known risk factors of CNS disorders such as peripheral inflammation, ethanol consumption, hyperglycemia and aging. By providing a dramatically higher sensitivity than previously reported methods and molecular contrast agents, the technology described in the present study opens new avenues of investigation in the field of neuroinflammation.

  14. Genetically designed biomolecular capping system for mesoporous silica nanoparticles enables receptor-mediated cell uptake and controlled drug release

    CERN Document Server

    Datz, Stefan; Gattner, Michael; Weiss, Veronika; Brunner, Korbinian; Bretzler, Johanna; von Schirnding, Constantin; Spada, Fabio; Engelke, Hanna; Vrabel, Milan; Bräuchle, Christoph; Carell, Thomas; Bein, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Effective and controlled drug delivery systems with on-demand release and targeting abilities have received enormous attention for biomedical applications. Here, we describe a novel enzyme-based cap system for mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) that is directly combined with a targeting ligand via bio-orthogonal click chemistry. The capping system is based on the pH-responsive binding of an aryl-sulfonamide-functionalized MSN and the enzyme carbonic anhydrase (CA). An unnatural amino acid (UAA) containing a norbornene moiety was genetically incorporated into CA. This UAA allowed for the site-specific bio-orthogonal attachment of even very sensitive targeting ligands such as folic acid and anandamide. This leads to specific receptor-mediated cell and stem cell uptake. We demonstrate the successful delivery and release of the chemotherapeutic agent Actinomycin D to KB cells. This novel nanocarrier concept provides a promising platform for the development of precisely controllable and highly modular theranos...

  15. RGD peptide-modified dendrimer-entrapped gold nanoparticles enable highly efficient and specific gene delivery to stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Lingdan; Alves, Carla S; Hou, Wenxiu; Qiu, Jieru; Möhwald, Helmuth; Tomás, Helena; Shi, Xiangyang

    2015-03-04

    We report the use of arginine-glycine-aspartic (Arg-Gly-Asp, RGD) peptide-modified dendrimer-entrapped gold nanoparticles (Au DENPs) for highly efficient and specific gene delivery to stem cells. In this study, generation 5 poly(amidoamine) dendrimers modified with RGD via a poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) spacer and with PEG monomethyl ether were used as templates to entrap gold nanoparticles (AuNPs). The native and the RGD-modified PEGylated dendrimers and the respective well characterized Au DENPs were used as vectors to transfect human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) with plasmid DNA (pDNA) carrying both the enhanced green fluorescent protein and the luciferase (pEGFPLuc) reporter genes, as well as pDNA encoding the human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (hBMP-2) gene. We show that all vectors are capable of transfecting the hMSCs with both pDNAs. Gene transfection using pEGFPLuc was demonstrated by quantitative Luc activity assay and qualitative evaluation by fluorescence microscopy. For the transfection with hBMP-2, the gene delivery efficiency was evaluated by monitoring the hBMP-2 concentration and the level of osteogenic differentiation of the hMSCs via alkaline phosphatase activity, osteocalcin secretion, calcium deposition, and von Kossa staining assays. Our results reveal that the stem cell gene delivery efficiency is largely dependent on the composition and the surface functionality of the dendrimer-based vectors. The coexistence of RGD and AuNPs rendered the designed dendrimeric vector with specific stem cell binding ability likely via binding of integrin receptor on the cell surface and improved three-dimensional conformation of dendrimers, which is beneficial for highly efficient and specific stem cell gene delivery applications.

  16. Upregulation of CC Chemokine Receptor 7 (CCR7) Enables Migration of Xenogeneic Human Adipose-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells to Rat Secondary Lymphoid Organs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Tian; Luan, Shao-Liang; Huang, Hong; Sun, Xing-Kun; Yang, Yan-Mei; Zhang, Hui; Han, Wei-Dong; Li, Hong; Han, Yan

    2016-12-30

    BACKGROUND CC chemokine receptor 7 (CCR7) expression is vital for cell migration to secondary lymphoid organs (SLOs). Our previous work showed that inducing CCR7 expression enabled syngeneic mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) to migrate into SLOs, resulting in enhanced immunosuppressive performance in mice. Given that human adipose-derived stem cells (hASCs) are widely used in clinical therapy, we further investigated whether upregulation of CCR7 enables xenogeneic hASCs to migrate to rat SLOs. MATERIAL AND METHODS hASCs rarely express CCR7; therefore, hASCs were transfected with lentivirus encoding rat CCR7 (rCCR7) plus green fluorescence protein (GFP) or GFP alone. CCR7 mRNA and cell surface expression of rCCR7-hASCs and GFP-hASCs were examined by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and flow cytometry (FCM), respectively. The phenotype, differentiation, and proliferation capacity of each cell type was also determined. To examine migration, rCCR7-hASCs and GFP-hASCs were injected intravenously into Lewis rats, and the proportion of GFP-positive cells in the spleen and lymph nodes was determined with FCM. RESULTS mRNA and cell surface protein expression of CCR7 was essentially undetectable in hASCs and GFP-ASCs; however, CCR7 was highly expressed in rCCR7-ASCs. rCCR7-hASCs, GFP-hASCs, and hASCs shared a similar immunophenotype, and maintained the ability of multilineage differentiation and proliferation. In addition, the average proportion of GFP-positive cells was significantly higher following transplantation of rCCR7-hASCs compared with GFP-hASCs (p<0.01). CONCLUSIONS These results suggest that upregulation of rat CCR7 expression does not change the phenotype, differentiation, or proliferation capacity of hASCs, but does enable efficient migration of hASCs to rat SLOs.

  17. Scientific Assessment in support of the Materials Roadmap enabling Low Carbon Energy Technologies: Hydrogen and Fuel Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cerri, I.; Lefebvre-Joud, F.; Holtappels, Peter

    A group of experts from European research organisations and industry have assessed the state of the art and future needs for materials' R&D for hydrogen and fuel cell technologies. The work was performed as input to the European Commission's roadmapping exercise on materials for the European...

  18. Combined microsatellite and FGFR3 mutation analysis enables a highly sensitive detection of urothelial cell carcinoma in voided urine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B.W. van Rhijn (Bas); I. Lurkin (Irene); D.K. Chopin; W.J. Kirkels (Wim); J.P. Thiery (Joachim); Th.H. van der Kwast (Theo); F. Radvanyi (Franois); E.C. Zwarthoff (Ellen)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractPURPOSE: Fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3) mutations were reported recently at a high frequency in low-grade urothelial cell carcinoma (UCC). We investigated the feasibility of combining microsatellite analysis (MA) and the FGFR3 status for the detection of UC

  19. A microfluidic system enabling Raman measurements of the oxygenation cycle in single optically trapped red blood cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramser, Kerstin; Enger, Jonas; Goksör, Mattias; Hanstorp, Dag; Logg, Katarina; Käll, Mikael

    2005-04-01

    Using a lab-on-a-chip approach we demonstrate the possibility of selecting a single cell with certain properties and following its dynamics after an environmental stimulation in real time using Raman spectroscopy. This is accomplished by combining a micro Raman set-up with optical tweezers and a microfluidic system. The latter gives full control over the media surrounding the cell, and it consists of a pattern of channels and reservoirs defined by electron beam lithography that is moulded into rubber silicon (PDMS). Different buffers can be transported through the channels using electro-osmotic flow, while the resonance Raman response of an optically trapped red blood cell (RBC) is simultaneously registered. This makes it possible to monitor the oxygenation cycle of the cell in real time and to investigate effects like photo-induced chemistry caused by the illumination. The experimental set-up has high potential for in vivo monitoring of cellular drug response using a variety of spectroscopic probes.

  20. Transient fusion ensures granule replenishment to enable repeated release after IgE-mediated mast cell degranulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balseiro-Gomez, Santiago; Flores, Juan A; Acosta, Jorge; Ramirez-Ponce, M Pilar; Ales, Eva

    2016-11-01

    To ensure normal immune function, mast cells employ different pathways to release mediators. Here, we report a thus far unknown capacity of mast cells to recycle and reuse secretory granules after an antigen-evoked degranulation process under physiological conditions; this phenomenon involves the existence of a recycling secretory granule pool that is available for release in a short time scale. Rapid endocytic modes contributed to the recycling of ∼60% of the total secretory granule population, which involved kiss-and-run and cavicapture mechanisms, causing retention of the intragranular matrix. We found the presence of normal-size granules and giant actomyosin- and dynamin-dependent granules, which were characterized by large quantal content. These large structures allowed the recovered mast cells to release a large amount of 5-HT, compensating for the decrease in the number of exocytosed secretory granules. This work uncovers a new physiological role of the exo-endocytosis cycle in the immunological plasticity of mast cells and reveals a new property of their biological secretion.

  1. Genetically designed biomolecular capping system for mesoporous silica nanoparticles enables receptor-mediated cell uptake and controlled drug release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datz, Stefan; Argyo, Christian; Gattner, Michael; Weiss, Veronika; Brunner, Korbinian; Bretzler, Johanna; von Schirnding, Constantin; Torrano, Adriano A.; Spada, Fabio; Vrabel, Milan; Engelke, Hanna; Bräuchle, Christoph; Carell, Thomas; Bein, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Effective and controlled drug delivery systems with on-demand release and targeting abilities have received enormous attention for biomedical applications. Here, we describe a novel enzyme-based cap system for mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) that is directly combined with a targeting ligand via bio-orthogonal click chemistry. The capping system is based on the pH-responsive binding of an aryl-sulfonamide-functionalized MSN and the enzyme carbonic anhydrase (CA). An unnatural amino acid (UAA) containing a norbornene moiety was genetically incorporated into CA. This UAA allowed for the site-specific bio-orthogonal attachment of even very sensitive targeting ligands such as folic acid and anandamide. This leads to specific receptor-mediated cell and stem cell uptake. We demonstrate the successful delivery and release of the chemotherapeutic agent Actinomycin D to KB cells. This novel nanocarrier concept provides a promising platform for the development of precisely controllable and highly modular theranostic systems.Effective and controlled drug delivery systems with on-demand release and targeting abilities have received enormous attention for biomedical applications. Here, we describe a novel enzyme-based cap system for mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) that is directly combined with a targeting ligand via bio-orthogonal click chemistry. The capping system is based on the pH-responsive binding of an aryl-sulfonamide-functionalized MSN and the enzyme carbonic anhydrase (CA). An unnatural amino acid (UAA) containing a norbornene moiety was genetically incorporated into CA. This UAA allowed for the site-specific bio-orthogonal attachment of even very sensitive targeting ligands such as folic acid and anandamide. This leads to specific receptor-mediated cell and stem cell uptake. We demonstrate the successful delivery and release of the chemotherapeutic agent Actinomycin D to KB cells. This novel nanocarrier concept provides a promising platform for the

  2. BCL-xL/MCL-1 inhibition and RARγ antagonism work cooperatively in human HL60 leukemia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perri, Mariarita; Yap, Jeremy L; Yu, Jianshi; Cione, Erika; Fletcher, Steven; Kane, Maureen A

    2014-10-01

    The acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) subtype of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is characterized by chromosomal translocations that result in fusion proteins, including the promyelocytic leukemia-retinoic acid receptor, alpha fusion protein (PML-RARα). All-trans retinoic acid (atRA) treatment is the standard drug treatment for APL yielding cure rates > 80% by activating transcription and proteasomal degradation of retinoic acid receptor, alpha (RARα). Whereas combination therapy with As2O3 has increased survival further, patients that experience relapse and are refractory to atRA and/or As2O3 is a clinically significant problem. BCL-2 family proteins regulate apoptosis and over-expression of anti-apoptotic B-cell leukemia/lymphoma 2 (BCL-2) family proteins has been associated with chemotherapeutic resistance in APL including impairment of the ability of atRA to induce growth arrest and differentiation. Here we investigated the novel BH3 domain mimetic, JY-1-106, which antagonizes the anti-apoptotic BCL-2 family members B-cell lymphoma-extra large (BCL-xL) and myeloid cell leukemia-1 (MCL-1) alone and in combination with retinoids including atRA, AM580 (RARα agonist), and SR11253 (RARγ antagonist). JY-1-106 reduced cell viability in HL-60 cells alone and in combination with retinoids. The combination of JY-1-106 and SR11253 had the greatest impact on cell viability by stimulating apoptosis. These studies indicate that dual BCL-xL/MCL-1 inhibitors and retinoids could work cooperatively in leukemia treatment.

  3. Functional receptor molecules CD300lf and CD300ld within the CD300 family enable murine noroviruses to infect cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haga, Kei; Fujimoto, Akira; Takai-Todaka, Reiko; Miki, Motohiro; Doan, Yen Hai; Murakami, Kosuke; Yokoyama, Masaru; Murata, Kazuyoshi; Nakanishi, Akira; Katayama, Kazuhiko

    2016-01-01

    Norovirus is the leading cause of acute gastroenteritis worldwide. Since the discovery of human norovirus (HuNoV), an efficient and reproducible norovirus replication system has not been established in cultured cells. Although limited amounts of virus particles can be produced when the HuNoV genome is directly transfected into cells, the HuNoV cycle of infection has not been successfully reproduced in any currently available cell-culture system. Those results imply that the identification of a functional cell-surface receptor for norovirus might be the key to establishing a norovirus culture system. Using a genome-wide CRISPR/Cas9 guide RNA library, we identified murine CD300lf and CD300ld as functional receptors for murine norovirus (MNV). The treatment of susceptible cells with polyclonal antibody against CD300lf significantly reduced the production of viral progeny. Additionally, ectopic CD300lf expression in nonsusceptible cell lines derived from other animal species enabled MNV infection and progeny production, suggesting that CD300lf has potential for dictating MNV host tropism. Furthermore, CD300ld, which has an amino acid sequence in the N-terminal region of its extracellular domain that is highly homologous to that of CD300lf, also functions as a receptor for MNV. Our results indicate that direct interaction of MNV with two cell-surface molecules, CD300lf and CD300ld, dictates permissive noroviral infection. PMID:27681626

  4. Complex molecular mechanisms cooperate to mediate histone deacetylase inhibitors anti-tumour activity in neuroblastoma cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nardou Katya

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi are a new class of promising anti-tumour agent inhibiting cell proliferation and survival in tumour cells with very low toxicity toward normal cells. Neuroblastoma (NB is the second most common solid tumour in children still associated with poor outcome in higher stages and, thus NB strongly requires novel treatment modalities. Results We show here that the HDACi Sodium Butyrate (NaB, suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA and Trichostatin A (TSA strongly reduce NB cells viability. The anti-tumour activity of these HDACi involved the induction of cell cycle arrest in the G2/M phase, followed by the activation of the intrinsic apoptotic pathway, via the activation of the caspases cascade. Moreover, HDACi mediated the activation of the pro-apoptotic proteins Bid and BimEL and the inactivation of the anti-apoptotic proteins XIAP, Bcl-xL, RIP and survivin, that further enhanced the apoptotic signal. Interestingly, the activity of these apoptosis regulators was modulated by several different mechanisms, either by caspases dependent proteolytic cleavage or by degradation via the proteasome pathway. In addition, HDACi strongly impaired the hypoxia-induced secretion of VEGF by NB cells. Conclusion HDACi are therefore interesting new anti-tumour agents for targeting highly malignant tumours such as NB, as these agents display a strong toxicity toward aggressive NB cells and they may possibly reduce angiogenesis by decreasing VEGF production by NB cells.

  5. A Cytotoxic, Co-operative Interaction Between Energy Deprivation and Glutamate Release From System xc− Mediates Aglycemic Neuronal Cell Death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trista L. Thorn

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The astrocyte cystine/glutamate antiporter (system xc− contributes substantially to the excitotoxic neuronal cell death facilitated by glucose deprivation. The purpose of this study was to determine the mechanism by which this occurred. Using pure astrocyte cultures, as well as, mixed cortical cell cultures containing both neurons and astrocytes, we found that neither an enhancement in system xc− expression nor activity underlies the excitotoxic effects of aglycemia. In addition, using three separate bioassays, we demonstrate no change in the ability of glucose-deprived astrocytes—either cultured alone or with neurons—to remove glutamate from the extracellular space. Instead, we demonstrate that glucose-deprived cultures are 2 to 3 times more sensitive to the killing effects of glutamate or N-methyl-D-aspartate when compared with their glucose-containing controls. Hence, our results are consistent with the weak excitotoxic hypothesis such that a bioenergetic deficiency, which is measureable in our mixed but not astrocyte cultures, allows normally innocuous concentrations of glutamate to become excitotoxic. Adding to the burgeoning literature detailing the contribution of astrocytes to neuronal injury, we conclude that under our experimental paradigm, a cytotoxic, co-operative interaction between energy deprivation and glutamate release from astrocyte system xc− mediates aglycemic neuronal cell death.

  6. The immune receptor Trem1 cooperates with diminished DNA damage response to induce preleukemic stem cell expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, W; Amarachintha, S; Wilson, A; Pang, Q

    2017-02-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is an inherited bone marrow failure syndrome with extremely high risk of leukemic transformation. Here we investigate the relationship between DNA damage response (DDR) and leukemogenesis using the Fanca knockout mouse model. We found that chronic exposure of the Fanca(-/-) hematopoietic stem cells to DNA crosslinking agent mitomycin C in vivo leads to diminished DDR, and the emergence/expansion of pre-leukemia stem cells (pre-LSCs). Surprisingly, although genetic correction of Fanca deficiency in the pre-LSCs restores DDR and reduces genomic instability, but fails to prevent pre-LSC expansion or delay leukemia development in irradiated recipients. Furthermore, we identified transcription program underlying dysregulated DDR and cell migration, myeloid proliferation, and immune response in the Fanca(-/-) pre-LSCs. Forced expression of the downregulated DNA repair genes, Rad51c or Trp53i13, in the Fanca(-/-) pre-LSCs partially rescues DDR but has no effect on leukemia, whereas shRNA knockdown of the upregulated immune receptor genes Trem1 or Pilrb improves leukemia-related survival, but not DDR or genomic instability. Furthermore, Trem1 cooperates with diminished DDR in vivo to promote Fanca(-/-) pre-LSC expansion and leukemia development. Our study implicates diminishing DDR as a root cause of FA leukemogenesis, which subsequently collaborates with other signaling pathways for leukemogenic transformation.

  7. Sleeping Beauty transposon screen identifies signaling modules that cooperate with STAT5 activation to induce B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heltemes-Harris, Lynn M.; Larson, Jon D.; Starr, Timothy K.; Hubbard, Gregory K.; Sarver, Aaron L.; Largaespada, David A.; Farrar, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    STAT5 activation occurs frequently in human progenitor B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL). To identify gene alterations that cooperate with STAT5 activation to initiate leukemia we crossed mice expressing a constitutively active form of STAT5 (Stat5b-CA) to mice in which a mutagenic Sleeping Beauty transposon (T2/Onc) was mobilized only in B cells. Stat5b-CA mice typically do not develop B-ALL (<2% penetrance); in contrast, 89% of Stat5b–CA mice in which the T2/Onc transposon had been mobilized died of B-ALL by 3 months of age. High-throughput sequencing approaches were used to identify genes frequently targeted by the T2/Onc transposon; these included Sos1 (74%), Kdm2a (35%), Jak1 (26%), Bmi1 (19%), Prdm14 or Ncoa2 (13%), Cdkn2a (10%), Ikzf1 (8%), Caap1 (6%) and Klf3 (6%). Collectively, these mutations target three major cellular processes: (i) the JAK/STAT5 pathway (ii) progenitor B cell differentiation and (iii) the CDKN2A tumor suppressor pathway. Transposon insertions typically resulted in altered expression of these genes, as well as downstream pathways including STAT5, ERK and p38. Importantly, expression of Sos1 and Kdm2a, and activation of p38, correlated with survival, further underscoring the role these genes and associated pathways play in B-ALL. PMID:26500062

  8. A Cytotoxic, Co-operative Interaction Between Energy Deprivation and Glutamate Release From System xc- Mediates Aglycemic Neuronal Cell Death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorn, Trista L; He, Yan; Jackman, Nicole A; Lobner, Doug; Hewett, James A; Hewett, Sandra J

    2015-01-01

    The astrocyte cystine/glutamate antiporter (system xc(-)) contributes substantially to the excitotoxic neuronal cell death facilitated by glucose deprivation. The purpose of this study was to determine the mechanism by which this occurred. Using pure astrocyte cultures, as well as, mixed cortical cell cultures containing both neurons and astrocytes, we found that neither an enhancement in system xc(-) expression nor activity underlies the excitotoxic effects of aglycemia. In addition, using three separate bioassays, we demonstrate no change in the ability of glucose-deprived astrocytes--either cultured alone or with neurons--to remove glutamate from the extracellular space. Instead, we demonstrate that glucose-deprived cultures are 2 to 3 times more sensitive to the killing effects of glutamate or N-methyl-D-aspartate when compared with their glucose-containing controls. Hence, our results are consistent with the weak excitotoxic hypothesis such that a bioenergetic deficiency, which is measureable in our mixed but not astrocyte cultures, allows normally innocuous concentrations of glutamate to become excitotoxic. Adding to the burgeoning literature detailing the contribution of astrocytes to neuronal injury, we conclude that under our experimental paradigm, a cytotoxic, co-operative interaction between energy deprivation and glutamate release from astrocyte system xc(-) mediates aglycemic neuronal cell death.

  9. Cooperativity between CD8+ T cells, non-neutralizing antibodies, and alveolar macrophages is important for heterosubtypic influenza virus immunity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian J Laidlaw

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Seasonal epidemics of influenza virus result in ∼36,000 deaths annually in the United States. Current vaccines against influenza virus elicit an antibody response specific for the envelope glycoproteins. However, high mutation rates result in the emergence of new viral serotypes, which elude neutralization by preexisting antibodies. T lymphocytes have been reported to be capable of mediating heterosubtypic protection through recognition of internal, more conserved, influenza virus proteins. Here, we demonstrate using a recombinant influenza virus expressing the LCMV GP33-41 epitope that influenza virus-specific CD8+ T cells and virus-specific non-neutralizing antibodies each are relatively ineffective at conferring heterosubtypic protective immunity alone. However, when combined virus-specific CD8 T cells and non-neutralizing antibodies cooperatively elicit robust protective immunity. This synergistic improvement in protective immunity is dependent, at least in part, on alveolar macrophages and/or other lung phagocytes. Overall, our studies suggest that an influenza vaccine capable of eliciting both CD8+ T cells and antibodies specific for highly conserved influenza proteins may be able to provide heterosubtypic protection in humans, and act as the basis for a potential "universal" vaccine.

  10. High-Efficiency Nonfullerene Polymer Solar Cell Enabling by Integration of Film-Morphology Optimization, Donor Selection, and Interfacial Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xin; Li, Weiping; Yao, Jiannian; Zhan, Chuanlang

    2016-06-22

    Carrier mobility is a vital factor determining the electrical performance of organic solar cells. In this paper we report that a high-efficiency nonfullerene organic solar cell (NF-OSC) with a power conversion efficiency of 6.94 ± 0.27% was obtained by optimizing the hole and electron transportations via following judicious selection of polymer donor and engineering of film-morphology and cathode interlayers: (1) a combination of solvent annealing and solvent vapor annealing optimizes the film morphology and hence both hole and electron mobilities, leading to a trade-off of fill factor and short-circuit current density (Jsc); (2) the judicious selection of polymer donor affords a higher hole and electron mobility, giving a higher Jsc; and (3) engineering the cathode interlayer affords a higher electron mobility, which leads to a significant increase in electrical current generation and ultimately the power conversion efficiency (PCE).

  11. A tetraphenylethylene core-based 3D structure small molecular acceptor enabling efficient non-fullerene organic solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yuhang; Mu, Cheng; Jiang, Kui; Zhao, Jingbo; Li, Yunke; Zhang, Lu; Li, Zhengke; Lai, Joshua Yuk Lin; Hu, Huawei; Ma, Tingxuan; Hu, Rongrong; Yu, Demei; Huang, Xuhui; Tang, Ben Zhong; Yan, He

    2015-02-01

    A tetraphenylethylene core-based small molecular acceptor with a unique 3D molecular structure is developed. Bulk-heterojunction blend films with a small feature size (≈20 nm) are obtained, which lead to non-fullerene organic solar cells (OSCs) with 5.5% power conversion efficiency. The work provides a new molecular design approach to efficient non-fullerene OSCs based on 3D-structured small-molecule acceptors.

  12. Direct methane solid oxide fuel cells based on catalytic partial oxidation enabling complete coking tolerance of Ni-based anodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Daehee; Myung, Jaeha; Tan, Jeiwan; Hyun, Sang-Hoon; Irvine, John T. S.; Kim, Joosun; Moon, Jooho

    2017-03-01

    Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) can oxidize diverse fuels by harnessing oxygen ions. Benefited by this feature, direct utilization of hydrocarbon fuels without external reformers allows for cost-effective realization of SOFC systems. Superior hydrocarbon reforming catalysts such as nickel are required for this application. However, carbon coking on nickel-based anodes and the low efficiency associated with hydrocarbon fueling relegate these systems to immature technologies. Herein, we present methane-fueled SOFCs operated under conditions of catalytic partial oxidation (CPOX). Utilizing CPOX eliminates carbon coking on Ni and facilitates the oxidation of methane. Ni-gadolinium-doped ceria (GDC) anode-based cells exhibit exceptional power densities of 1.35 W cm-2 at 650 °C and 0.74 W cm-2 at 550 °C, with stable operation over 500 h, while the similarly prepared Ni-yttria stabilized zirconia anode-based cells exhibit a power density of 0.27 W cm-2 at 650 °C, showing gradual degradation. Chemical analyses suggest that combining GDC with the Ni anode prevents the oxidation of Ni due to the oxygen exchange ability of GDC. In addition, CPOX operation allows the usage of stainless steel current collectors. Our results demonstrate that high-performance SOFCs utilizing methane CPOX can be realized without deterioration of Ni-based anodes using cost-effective current collectors.

  13. Cooperative role for tetraspanins in adhesin-mediated attachment of bacterial species to human epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Luke R; Monk, Peter N; Partridge, Lynda J; Morris, Paul; Gorringe, Andrew R; Read, Robert C

    2011-06-01

    The tetraspanins are a superfamily of transmembrane proteins with diverse functions and can form extended microdomains within the plasma membrane in conjunction with partner proteins, which probably includes receptors for bacterial adhesins. Neisseria meningitidis, the causative agent of meningococcal disease, attaches to host nasopharyngeal epithelial cells via type IV pili and opacity (Opa) proteins. We examined the role of tetraspanin function in Neisseria meningitidis adherence to epithelial cells. Tetraspanins CD9, CD63, and CD151 were expressed by HEC-1-B and DETROIT 562 cells. Coincubation of cells with antibodies against all three tetraspanin molecules used individually or in combination, with recombinant tetraspanin extracellular domains (EC2), or with small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) significantly reduced adherence of Neisseria meningitidis. In contrast, recombinant CD81, a different tetraspanin, had no effect on meningococcal adherence. Antitetraspanin antibodies reduced the adherence to epithelial cells of Neisseria meningitidis strain derivatives expressing Opa and pili significantly more than isogenic strains lacking these determinants. Adherence to epithelial cells of strains of Staphylococcus aureus, Neisseria lactamica, Escherichia coli, and Streptococcus pneumoniae was also reduced by pretreatment of cells with tetraspanin antibodies and recombinant proteins. These data suggest that tetraspanins are required for optimal function of epithelial adhesion platforms containing specific receptors for Neisseria meningitidis and potentially for multiple species of bacteria.

  14. Fabrication and characterization of microsieve electrode array (µSEA) enabling cell positioning on 3D electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schurink, B.; Tiggelaar, R. M.; Gardeniers, J. G. E.; Luttge, R.

    2017-01-01

    Here the fabrication and characterization of a novel microelectrode array for electrophysiology applications is described, termed a micro sieve electrode array (µSEA). This silicon based µSEA device allows for hydrodynamic parallel positioning of single cells on 3D electrodes realized on the walls of inverted pyramidal shaped pores. To realize the µSEA, a previously realized silicon sieving structure is provided with a patterned boron doped poly-silicon, connecting the contact electrodes with the 3D sensing electrodes in the pores. A LPCVD silicon-rich silicon nitride layer was used as insulation. The selective opening of this insulation layer at the ends of the wiring lines allows to generate well-defined contact and sensing electrodes according to the layout used in commercial microelectrode array readers. The main challenge lays in the simultaneously selective etching of material at both the planar surface (contact electrode) as well as in the sieving structure containing the (3D) pores (sensing electrodes). For the generation of 3D electrodes in the pores a self-aligning technique was developed using the pore geometry to our advantage. This technique, based on sacrificial layer etching, allows for the fine tuning of the sensing electrode surface area and thus supports the positioning and coupling of single cells on the electrode surface in relation to the cell size. Furthermore, a self-aligning silicide is formed on the sensing electrodes to favour the electrical properties. Experiments were performed to demonstrate the working principle of the µSEA using different types of neuronal cells. Capture efficiency in the pores was  >70% with a 70% survival rate of the cell maintained for up to 14 DIV. The TiSi2-boron-doped-poly-silicon sensing electrodes of the µSEA were characterized, which indicated noise levels of  <15 µV and impedance values of 360 kΩ. These findings potentially allow for future electrophysiological measurements using the µSEA.

  15. Albumin nanoshell encapsulation of near-infrared-excitable rare-Earth nanoparticles enhances biocompatibility and enables targeted cell imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naczynski, Dominik J; Andelman, Tamar; Pal, David; Chen, Suzie; Riman, Richard E; Roth, Charles M; Moghe, Prabhas V

    2010-08-02

    The use of traditional fluorophores for in vivo imaging applications is limited by poor quantum yield, poor tissue penetration of the excitation light, and excessive tissue autofluorescence, while the use of inorganic fluorescent particles that offer a high quantum yield is frequently limited due to particle toxicity. Rare-earth-doped nanoparticles that utilize near-infrared upconversion overcome the optical limitations of traditional fluorophores, but are not typically suitable for biological application due to their insolubility in aqueous solution, lack of functional surface groups for conjugation of biomolecules, and potential cytotoxicity. A new approach to establish highly biocompatible and biologically targetable nanoshell complexes of luminescent rare-earth-doped NaYF(4) nanoparticles (REs) excitable with 920-980 nm near-infrared light for biomedical imaging applications is reported. The approach involves the encapsulation of NaYF(4) nanoparticles doped with Yb and Er within human serum albumin nanoshells to create water-dispersible, biologically functionalizable composite particles. These particles exhibit narrow size distributions around 200 nm and are stable in aqueous solution for over 4 weeks. The albumin shell confers cytoprotection and significantly enhances the biocompatibility of REs even at concentrations above 200 microg REs mL(-1). Composite particles conjugated with cyclic arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (cRGD) specifically target both human glioblastoma cell lines and melanoma cells expressing alpha(v)beta(3) integrin receptors. These findings highlight the promise of albumin-encapsulated rare-earth nanoparticles for imaging cancer cells in vitro and the potential for targeted imaging of disease sites in vivo.

  16. A Multiplexed Single-Cell CRISPR Screening Platform Enables Systematic Dissection of the Unfolded Protein Response. | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Functional genomics efforts face tradeoffs between number of perturbations examined and complexity of phenotypes measured. We bridge this gap with Perturb-seq, which combines droplet-based single-cell RNA-seq with a strategy for barcoding CRISPR-mediated perturbations, allowing many perturbations to be profiled in pooled format. We applied Perturb-seq to dissect the mammalian unfolded protein response (UPR) using single and combinatorial CRISPR perturbations. Two genome-scale CRISPR interference (CRISPRi) screens identified genes whose repression perturbs ER homeostasis.

  17. TACI-BLyS signaling via B-cell–dendritic cell cooperation is required for naive CD8+ T-cell priming in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz-de-Durana, Yaiza; Mantchev, George T.; Bram, Richard J.; Franco, Alessandra

    2006-01-01

    We demonstrated that B-cell–dendritic cell (DC) interactions via transmembrane activator and calcium modulator and cyclophilin ligand (CAML) interactor (TACI) and B-lymphocyte stimulator (BLyS) provide an early signal critical to generate adequate numbers of mature antigen presenting cells (APCs) to prime naive CD8+ T cells (CTLs) in vivo. Evidence that B cells are required for efficient CTL generation in mice and that reconstitution with wild-type but not TACI-knockout B cells restored normal CTL responses support our conclusion. Moreover, low doses of a TACI fusion protein (TACI-Fc) that express the extracellular domain of TACI (amino acid [aa] 1-126) restored CTL priming in B-cell–deficient mice in vivo and induced DC maturation in vitro. In fact, following interactions with B cells, splenic DCs rapidly express the CD86 costimulatory molecule, to an extent comparable to the exposure to antigenic stimuli. BLyShigh peptide-pulsed bone marrow–derived DCs, used as vaccines in vivo, cannot generate CTLs in B-cell–deficient and TACI-deficient mice, strongly supporting a need for B-cell–DC cooperation through TACI-BLyS during CTL first encounter with antigens in vivo. PMID:16195331

  18. Nucleolin overexpression in breast cancer cell sub-populations with different stem-like phenotype enables targeted intracellular delivery of synergistic drug combination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, Nuno A; Rodrigues, Ana S; Rodrigues-Santos, Paulo; Alves, Vera; Gregório, Ana C; Valério-Fernandes, Ângela; Gomes-da-Silva, Lígia C; Rosa, Manuel Santos; Moura, Vera; Ramalho-Santos, João; Simões, Sérgio; Moreira, João Nuno

    2015-11-01

    Breast cancer stem cells (CSC) are thought responsible for tumor growth and relapse, metastization and active evasion to standard chemotherapy. The recognition that CSC may originate from non-stem cancer cells (non-SCC) through plastic epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition turned these into relevant cell targets. Of crucial importance for successful therapeutic intervention is the identification of surface receptors overexpressed in both CSC and non-SCC. Cell surface nucleolin has been described as overexpressed in cancer cells as well as a tumor angiogenic marker. Herein we have addressed the questions on whether nucleolin was a common receptor among breast CSC and non-SCC and whether it could be exploited for targeting purposes. Liposomes functionalized with the nucleolin-binding F3 peptide, targeted simultaneously, nucleolin-overexpressing putative breast CSC and non-SCC, which was paralleled by OCT4 and NANOG mRNA levels in cells from triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) origin. In murine embryonic stem cells, both nucleolin mRNA levels and F3 peptide-targeted liposomes cellular association were dependent on the stemness status. An in vivo tumorigenic assay suggested that surface nucleolin overexpression per se, could be associated with the identification of highly tumorigenic TNBC cells. This proposed link between nucleolin expression and the stem-like phenotype in TNBC, enabled 100% cell death mediated by F3 peptide-targeted synergistic drug combination, suggesting the potential to abrogate the plasticity and adaptability associated with CSC and non-SCC. Ultimately, nucleolin-specific therapeutic tools capable of simultaneous debulk multiple cellular compartments of the tumor microenvironment may pave the way towards a specific treatment for TNBC patient care.

  19. ACKR4 on Stromal Cells Scavenges CCL19 To Enable CCR7-Dependent Trafficking of APCs from Inflamed Skin to Lymph Nodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryce, Steven A; Wilson, Ruairi A M; Tiplady, Eleanor M; Asquith, Darren L; Bromley, Shannon K; Luster, Andrew D; Graham, Gerard J; Nibbs, Robert J B

    2016-04-15

    Dermal dendritic cells and epidermal Langerhans cells are APCs that migrate from skin to draining lymph nodes (LN) to drive peripheral tolerance and adaptive immunity. Their migration requires the chemokine receptor CCR7, which directs egress from the skin via dermal lymphatic vessels and extravasation into the LN parenchyma from lymph in the subcapsular sinus. CCR7 is activated by two chemokines: CCL19 and CCL21. CCL21 alone is sufficient for the migration of APCs from skin to LN. CCL19 and CCL21 also bind atypical chemokine receptor (ACKR) 4. ACKR4-mediated CCL21 scavenging by lymphatic endothelial cells lining the subcapsular sinus ceiling stabilizes interfollicular CCL21 gradients that direct lymph-borne CCR7(+)APCs into the parenchyma of mouse LN. In this study, we show that ACKR4 also aids APC egress from mouse skin under steady-state and inflammatory conditions. ACKR4 plays a particularly prominent role during cutaneous inflammation when it facilitates Langerhans cell egress from skin and enables the accumulation of dermal dendritic cells in skin-draining LN. Stromal cells in mouse skin, predominantly keratinocytes and a subset of dermal lymphatic endothelial cells, express ACKR4 and are capable of ACKR4-dependent chemokine scavenging in situ. ACKR4-mediated scavenging of dermal-derived CCL19, rather than CCL21, is critical during inflammation, because the aberrant trafficking of skin-derived APCs inAckr4-deficient mice is completely rescued by genetic deletion ofCcl19 Thus, ACKR4 on stromal cells aids the egress of APCs from mouse skin, and, during inflammation, facilitates CCR7-dependent cell trafficking by scavenging CCL19.

  20. Segregated Cell Populations Enable Distinct Parallel Encoding within the Radial Axis of the CA1 Pyramidal Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geiller, Tristan; Royer, Sebastien

    2017-01-01

    Numerous studies have implicated the hippocampus in the encoding and storage of declarative and spatial memories. Several models have considered the hippocampus and its distinct subfields to contain homogeneous pyramidal cell populations. Yet, recent studies have led to a consensus that the dorso-ventral and proximo-distal axes have different connectivities and physiologies. The remaining deep-superficial axis of the pyramidal layer, however, remains relatively unexplored due to a lack of techniques that can record from neurons simultaneously at different depths. Recent advances in transgenic mice, two-photon imaging and dense multisite recording have revealed extensive disparities between the pyramidal cells located in the deep and the superficial layers. Here, we summarize differences between the two populations in terms of gene expression and connectivity with other intra-hippocampal subregions and local interneurons that underlie distinct learning processes and spatial representations. A unified picture will emerge to describe how such local segregations can increase the capacity of the hippocampus to compute and process numerous tasks in parallel. PMID:28243162

  1. Inhibition of TGF-β signaling enables human corneal endothelial cell expansion in vitro for use in regenerative medicine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoki Okumura

    Full Text Available Corneal endothelial dysfunctions occurring in patients with Fuchs' endothelial corneal dystrophy, pseudoexfoliation syndrome, corneal endotheliitis, and surgically induced corneal endothelial damage cause blindness due to the loss of endothelial function that maintains corneal transparency. Transplantation of cultivated corneal endothelial cells (CECs has been researched to repair endothelial dysfunction in animal models, though the in vitro expansion of human CECs (HCECs is a pivotal practical issue. In this study we established an optimum condition for the cultivation of HCECs. When exposed to culture conditions, both primate and human CECs showed two distinct phenotypes: contact-inhibited polygonal monolayer and fibroblastic phenotypes. The use of SB431542, a selective inhibitor of the transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β receptor, counteracted the fibroblastic phenotypes to the normal contact-inhibited monolayer, and these polygonal cells maintained endothelial physiological functions. Expression of ZO-1 and Na(+/K(+-ATPase maintained their subcellular localization at the plasma membrane. Furthermore, expression of type I collagen and fibronectin was greatly reduced. This present study may prove to be the substantial protocol to provide the efficient in vitro expansion of HCECs with an inhibitor to the TGF-β receptor, and may ultimately provide clinicians with a new therapeutic modality in regenerative medicine for the treatment of corneal endothelial dysfunctions.

  2. Cooperation of invariant NKT cells and CD46+CD256+ T regulatory cells in prevention of autoimmune diabetes in non-obese diabetic mice treated with α-galactosylceramide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Weipeng Li; Fang Ji; Yong Zhang; Ying Wang; Neng yang; Hailiang Ge; Fuqing Wang

    2008-01-01

    CD1d-restricted natural killer T (NKT) cells and CD4+CD25+regulatory T (Treg) cells are two thymus-derived subsets of regulatory T cells that play an important role in the maintenance of self-tolerance. Yet the functional changes of the two subsets of regulatory T cells in the development of diabetes in non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice remain unclear, and how NKT cells and CD4+CD25+ Treg cells cooperate functionally in the regulation of autoimmune diabetes is also uncertain.We provide evidence that in NOD mice, an animal model of human type 1 diabetes, the functions of both NKT cells and CD4+CD25+ Treg cells decrease in an age-dependent manner.We show that treatment with α-galactosylceramide increases the size of the CD4+CD25+ Treg cell compartment in NOD mice, and augments the expression of forkhead/winged helix transcription factor and the potency of CD4+CD25+ Treg cells to inhibit proliferation of CD4+CD25- T cells. Our data indicate that NKT cells and CD4+CD25+ Treg cells might cooperate in the prevention of autoimmune diabetes in NOD mice treated with α-galactosylceramide. Induced cooperation of NKT cells and CD4+CD25+ Treg cells could serve as a strategy to treat human autoimmune disease, such as type 1 diabetes.

  3. Excess Lymphangiogenesis Cooperatively Induced by Macrophages and CD4(+) T Cells Drives the Pathogenesis of Lymphedema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogata, Fusa; Fujiu, Katsuhito; Matsumoto, Sahohime; Nakayama, Yukiteru; Shibata, Munehiko; Oike, Yuichi; Koshima, Isao; Watabe, Tetsuro; Nagai, Ryozo; Manabe, Ichiro

    2016-03-01

    Lymphedema is a debilitating progressive condition that severely restricts quality of life and is frequently observed after cancer surgery. The mechanism underlying lymphedema development remains poorly understood, and no effective pharmacological means to prevent or alleviate the ailment is currently available. Using a mouse model of lymphedema, we show here that excessive generation of immature lymphatic vessels is essential for initial edema development and that this early process is also important for later development of lymphedema pathology. We found that CD4(+) T cells interact with macrophages to promote lymphangiogenesis, and that both lymphangiogenesis and edema were greatly reduced in macrophage-depleted mice, lymphocyte-deficient Rag2(?/?) mice or CD4(+) T-cell-deficient mice. Mechanistically, T helper type 1 and T helper type 17 cells activate lesional macrophages to produce vascular endothelial growth factor-C, which promotes lymphangiogenesis, and inhibition of this mechanism suppressed not only early lymphangiogenesis, but also later development of lymphedema. Finally, we show that atorvastatin suppresses excessive lymphangiogenesis and lymphedema by inhibiting T helper type 1 and T helper type 17 cell activation. These results demonstrate that the interaction between CD4(+) T cells and macrophages is a potential therapeutic target for prevention of lymphedema after surgery.

  4. Multifunctional Pt(II) Reagents: Covalent Modifications of Pt Complexes Enable Diverse Structural Variation and In-Cell Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Jonathan D; Haley, Michael M; DeRose, Victoria J

    2016-01-19

    To enhance the functionality of Pt-based reagents, several strategies have been developed that utilize Pt compounds modified with small, reactive handles. This Account encapsulates work done by us and other groups regarding the use of Pt(II) compounds with reactive handles for subsequent elaboration with fluorophores or other functional moieties. Described strategies include the incorporation of substituents for well-known condensation or nucleophilic displacement-type reactions and their use, for example, to tether spectroscopic handles to Pt reagents for in vivo investigation. Other chief uses of displacement-type reactions have included tethering various small molecules exhibiting pharmacological activity directly to Pt, thus adding synergistic effects. Click chemistry-based ligation techniques have also been applied, primarily with azide- and alkyne-appended Pt complexes. Orthogonally reactive click chemistry reactions have proven invaluable when more traditional nucleophilic displacement reactions induce side-reactivity with the Pt center or when systematic functionalization of a larger number of Pt complexes is desired. Additionally, a diverse assortment of Pt-fluorophore conjugates have been tethered via click chemistry conjugation. In addition to providing a convenient synthetic path for diversifying Pt compounds, the use of click-capable Pt complexes has proved a powerful strategy for postbinding covalent modification and detection with fluorescent probes. This strategy bypasses undesirable influences of the fluorophore camouflaged as reactivity due to Pt that may be present when detecting preattached Pt-fluorophore conjugates. Using postbinding strategies, Pt reagent distributions in HeLa and lung carcinoma (NCI-H460) cell cultures were observed with two different azide-modified Pt compounds, a monofunctional Pt(II)-acridine type and a difunctional Pt(II)-neutral complex. In addition, cellular distribution was observed with an alkyne-appended difunctional

  5. Fluorination-enabled optimal morphology leads to over 11% efficiency for inverted small-molecule organic solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Dan; Zhang, Yajie; Zhang, Jianqi; Wang, Zaiyu; Zhu, Lingyun; Fang, Jin; Xia, Benzheng; Wang, Zhen; Lu, Kun; Ma, Wei; Wei, Zhixiang

    2016-12-01

    Solution-processable small molecules for organic solar cells have attracted intense attention for their advantages of definite molecular structures compared with their polymer counterparts. However, the device efficiencies based on small molecules are still lower than those of polymers, especially for inverted devices, the highest efficiency of which is <9%. Here we report three novel solution-processable small molecules, which contain π-bridges with gradient-decreased electron density and end acceptors substituted with various fluorine atoms (0F, 1F and 2F, respectively). Fluorination leads to an optimal active layer morphology, including an enhanced domain purity, the formation of hierarchical domain size and a directional vertical phase gradation. The optimal morphology balances charge separation and transfer, and facilitates charge collection. As a consequence, fluorinated molecules exhibit excellent inverted device performance, and an average power conversion efficiency of 11.08% is achieved for a two-fluorine atom substituted molecule.

  6. BCL-x{sub L}/MCL-1 inhibition and RARγ antagonism work cooperatively in human HL60 leukemia cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perri, Mariarita; Yap, Jeremy L.; Yu, Jianshi [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Maryland School of Pharmacy, 20 N Pine Street, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States); Cione, Erika [Department of Pharmacy, Health and Nutritional Sciences, Ed. Polifunzionale, University of Calabria, 87036 Rende, CS (Italy); Fletcher, Steven [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Maryland School of Pharmacy, 20 N Pine Street, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States); Kane, Maureen A., E-mail: mkane@rx.umaryland.edu [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Maryland School of Pharmacy, 20 N Pine Street, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States)

    2014-10-01

    The acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) subtype of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is characterized by chromosomal translocations that result in fusion proteins, including the promyelocytic leukemia–retinoic acid receptor, alpha fusion protein (PML–RARα). All-trans retinoic acid (atRA) treatment is the standard drug treatment for APL yielding cure rates >80% by activating transcription and proteasomal degradation of retinoic acid receptor, alpha (RARα). Whereas combination therapy with As{sub 2}O{sub 3} has increased survival further, patients that experience relapse and are refractory to atRA and/or As{sub 2}O{sub 3} is a clinically significant problem. BCL-2 family proteins regulate apoptosis and over-expression of anti-apoptotic B-cell leukemia/lymphoma 2 (BCL-2) family proteins has been associated with chemotherapeutic resistance in APL including impairment of the ability of atRA to induce growth arrest and differentiation. Here we investigated the novel BH3 domain mimetic, JY-1-106, which antagonizes the anti-apoptotic BCL-2 family members B-cell lymphoma-extra large (BCL-x{sub L}) and myeloid cell leukemia-1 (MCL-1) alone and in combination with retinoids including atRA, AM580 (RARα agonist), and SR11253 (RARγ antagonist). JY-1-106 reduced cell viability in HL-60 cells alone and in combination with retinoids. The combination of JY-1-106 and SR11253 had the greatest impact on cell viability by stimulating apoptosis. These studies indicate that dual BCL-x{sub L}/MCL-1 inhibitors and retinoids could work cooperatively in leukemia treatment. - Highlights: • Novel Bcl-x{sub L}/Mcl-1 inhibitor JY-1-106 reduces HL60 cell viability. • JY-1-106 is investigated in combination with retinoic acid, AM580, and SR11253. • AM580 is an RARα agonist; SR11253 is an RARγ antagonist. • Combined use of JY-1-106/SR11253 exhibited the greatest cell viability reduction. • JY-1-106 alone or in combination with retinoids induces apoptosis.

  7. More synergetic cooperation of Yamanaka factors in in-duced pluripotent stem cells than in embryonic stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jinyan Huang; Taotao Chen; Xiaosong Liu; Jing Jiang; Jinsong Li; Dangsheng Li; X Shirley Liu; Wei Li; Jiuhong Kang; Gang Pei

    2009-01-01

    The role of Yamanaka factors as the core regulators in the induction of pluripotency during somatic cell repro-gramming has been discovered recently. Our previous study found that Yamanaka factors regulate a developmental signaling network in maintaining embryonic stem (ES) cell pluripotency. Here, we established completely repro-grammed induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells and analyzed the global promoter occupancy of Yamanaka factors in these cells by ChiP-chip assays. We found that promoters of 565 genes were co-bound by four Yamanaka factors in iPS cells, a 10-fold increase when compared with their binding in ES cells. The promoters occupied by a single Ya-manaka factor distributed equally in activated and repressed genes in iPS cells, while in ES cells Oct4, Sox2, or Klf4 distributed mostly in repressed genes and c-Myc in activated ones. Pathway analysis of the ChIP-chip data revealed that Yamanaka factors regulated 16 developmental signaling pathways in iPS cells, among which 12 were common and 4 were unique compared to pathways regulated in ES cells. We further analyzed another recently published ChiP-chip dataset in iPS cells and observed similar results, showing the power of ChIP-chip plus pathway analysis for revealing the nature of pluripotency maintenance and regeneration. Next, we experimentally tested one of the repressive signaling pathways and found that its inhibition indeed improved efficiency of cell reprogramming. Taken together, we proposed that there is a core developmental signaling network necessary for pluripotency, with TGF-β, Hedgehog, Wnt, p53 as repressive (Yin) regulators and Jak-STAT, cell cycle, focal adhesion, adherens junction as ac-tive (Yang) ones; and Yamanaka factors synergistically regulate them in a Yin-Yang balanced way to induce pluripo-tency.

  8. Cooperation between lateral ligand mobility and accessibility for receptor recognition in selectin-induced cell rolling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakowsky, U; Schumacher, G; Gege, C; Schmidt, RR; Rothe, U; Bendas, G

    2002-01-01

    Selectin-induced leukocyte rolling along the endothelial surface is an essential step in the immune response. Several in vitro studies showed that this cell rolling is a highly regulated adhesion phenomenon, controlled by the kinetics and forces of selectin-ligand interactions. In the flow chamber s

  9. Tobacco Smoke Activates Human Papillomavirus 16 p97 Promoter and Cooperates with High-Risk E6/E7 for Oxidative DNA Damage in Lung Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, Juan P.; Chnaiderman, Jonás; Urzúa, Ulises; León, Oscar; Tornesello, Maria L.; Corvalán, Alejandro H.; Soto-Rifo, Ricardo; Aguayo, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    We have previously shown a functional interaction between human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV-16) E6 and E7 oncoproteins and cigarette smoke condensate (CSC) in lung cells suggesting cooperation during carcinogenesis. The molecular mechanisms of such interaction, however, remain to be elucidated. Here we first present evidence showing that cigarette smoke condensate (CSC) has the ability to activate the HPV-16 p97 promoter by acting on the long control region (LCR) in lung epithelial cells. Interestingly, we observed that CSC-induced p97 promoter activation occurs in a dose-dependent manner in both tumor A-549 (lung adenocarcinoma), H-2170 (bronchial carcinoma), SiHa or Hela (cervical carcinoma) cells but not in non-tumor BEAS-2B (bronchial) or NL-20 (alveolar) lung cells unless they ectopically expressed the HPV-16 E6 and E7 oncogenes. In addition, we also observed a significant increase of primary DNA damage in tumor and non-tumor CSC-treated lung cells expressing HPV-16 E6 and E7 oncogenes suggesting a cooperative effect in this process, even though the contribution of E7 was significantly higher. Taken together, our results strongly suggest that tobacco smoke is able to induce the activation of the HPV-16 p97 promoter in cooperation with HPV-16 E6 and E7 oncogenes that, in turn, sensitize lung cells to tobacco smoke-induced DNA damage. PMID:25830243

  10. Phenylalanine ammonia-lyase and cell wall peroxidase are cooperatively involved in the extensive formation of ferulate network in cell walls of developing rice shoots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakabayashi, Kazuyuki; Soga, Kouichi; Hoson, Takayuki

    2012-02-15

    The relationship between the formation of cell wall-bound ferulic acid (FA) and diferulic acid (DFA) and the change in activities of phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL) and cell wall-bound peroxidase (CW-PRX) was studied in rice shoots. The length and the fresh mass of shoots increased during the growth period from day 4 to 6, while coleoptiles ceased elongation growth on day 5. The amounts of FA and DFA isomers as well as cell wall polysaccharides continued to increase during the whole period. The activities of PAL and CW-PRX greatly increased in the same manner during the period. There were close correlations between the PAL activity and ferulate content or between the CW-PRX activity and DFA content. The expression levels of investigated genes for PAL and putative CW-PRX showed good accordance with the activities of these enzymes. These results suggest that increases in PAL and CW-PRX activities are cooperatively involved in the formation of ferulate network in cell walls of rice shoots and that investigated genes may be, at least in part, associated with the enzyme activities. The substantial increase in such network probably causes the maturation of cell walls and thus the cessation of elongation growth of coleoptiles.

  11. FOXO3-mTOR metabolic cooperation in the regulation of erythroid cell maturation and homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xin; Campreciós, Genís; Rimmelé, Pauline; Liang, Raymond; Yalcin, Safak; Mungamuri, Sathish Kumar; Barminko, Jeffrey; D'Escamard, Valentina; Baron, Margaret H; Brugnara, Carlo; Papatsenko, Dmitri; Rivella, Stefano; Ghaffari, Saghi

    2014-10-01

    Ineffective erythropoiesis is observed in many erythroid disorders including β-thalassemia and anemia of chronic disease in which increased production of erythroblasts that fail to mature exacerbate the underlying anemias. As loss of the transcription factor FOXO3 results in erythroblast abnormalities similar to the ones observed in ineffective erythropoiesis, we investigated the underlying mechanisms of the defective Foxo3(-/-) erythroblast cell cycle and maturation. Here we show that loss of Foxo3 results in overactivation of the JAK2/AKT/mTOR signaling pathway in primary bone marrow erythroblasts partly mediated by redox modulation. We further show that hyperactivation of mTOR signaling interferes with cell cycle progression in Foxo3 mutant erythroblasts. Importantly, inhibition of mTOR signaling, in vivo or in vitro enhances significantly Foxo3 mutant erythroid cell maturation. Similarly, in vivo inhibition of mTOR remarkably improves erythroid cell maturation and anemia in a model of β-thalassemia. Finally we show that FOXO3 and mTOR are likely part of a larger metabolic network in erythroblasts as together they control the expression of an array of metabolic genes some of which are implicated in erythroid disorders. These combined findings indicate that a metabolism-mediated regulatory network centered by FOXO3 and mTOR control the balanced production and maturation of erythroid cells. They also highlight physiological interactions between these proteins in regulating erythroblast energy. Our results indicate that alteration in the function of this network might be implicated in the pathogenesis of ineffective erythropoiesis.

  12. Core–shell heterostructured metal oxide arrays enable superior light-harvesting and hysteresis-free mesoscopic perovskite solar cells

    KAUST Repository

    Mahmood, Khalid

    2015-01-01

    To achieve highly efficient mesoscopic perovskite solar cells (PSCs), the structure and properties of an electron transport layer (ETL) or material (ETM) have been shown to be of supreme importance. Particularly, the core-shell heterostructured mesoscopic ETM architecture has been recognized as a successful electrode design, because of its large internal surface area, superior light-harvesting efficiency and its ability to achieve fast charge transport. Here we report the successful fabrication of a hysteresis-free, 15.3% efficient PSC using vertically aligned ZnO nanorod/TiO2 shell (ZNR/TS) core-shell heterostructured ETMs for the first time. We have also added a conjugated polyelectrolyte polymer into the growth solution to promote the growth of high aspect ratio (AR) ZNRs and substantially improve the infiltration of the perovskite light absorber into the ETM. The PSCs based on the as-synthesized core-shell ZnO/TiO2 heterostructured ETMs exhibited excellent performance enhancement credited to the superior light harvesting capability, larger surface area, prolonged charge-transport pathways and lower recombination rate. The unique ETM design together with minimal hysteresis introduces core-shell ZnO/TiO2 heterostructures as a promising mesoscopic electrode approach for the fabrication of efficient PSCs. This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  13. Direct measurements of IPTG enable analysis of the induction behavior of E. coli in high cell density cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernández-Castané Alfred

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The E. coli lac operon and its components have been studied for decades, and lac-derived systems are widely used for recombinant protein production. However, lac operon dynamics and induction behavior remain the paradigm of gene regulation. Recently, an HPLC-MS-based method to quantify IPTG in the medium and inside the biomass has been established, and this tool may be useful to uncover the lack of knowledge and allow optimization of biotechnological processes. Results The results obtained from the study of IPTG distribution profiles in fed-batch, high cell density cultures allowed discrimination between two different depletion patterns of an inducer from the medium to the biomass in E. coli-expressing rhamnulose-1-phosphate aldolase (RhuA. Moreover, we could demonstrate that active transport mediates the uptake of this gratuitous inducer. Additionally, we could study the induction behaviors of this expression system by taking into account the biomass concentration at the induction time. Conclusions In the bistable range, partial induction occurred, which led to intermediate levels of RhuA activity. There was a direct relationship between the initial inducer concentrations and the initial inducer transport rate together with the specific activity. A majority of the inducer remains in the medium to reach equilibrium with the intracellular level. The intracellular inducer accumulation was a further evidence of bistability of the lac operon.

  14. Efficient particle-in-cell simulation of auroral plasma phenomena using a CUDA enabled graphics processing unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sewell, Stephen

    This thesis introduces a software framework that effectively utilizes low-cost commercially available Graphic Processing Units (GPUs) to simulate complex scientific plasma phenomena that are modeled using the Particle-In-Cell (PIC) paradigm. The software framework that was developed conforms to the Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA), a standard for general purpose graphic processing that was introduced by NVIDIA Corporation. This framework has been verified for correctness and applied to advance the state of understanding of the electromagnetic aspects of the development of the Aurora Borealis and Aurora Australis. For each phase of the PIC methodology, this research has identified one or more methods to exploit the problem's natural parallelism and effectively map it for execution on the graphic processing unit and its host processor. The sources of overhead that can reduce the effectiveness of parallelization for each of these methods have also been identified. One of the novel aspects of this research was the utilization of particle sorting during the grid interpolation phase. The final representation resulted in simulations that executed about 38 times faster than simulations that were run on a single-core general-purpose processing system. The scalability of this framework to larger problem sizes and future generation systems has also been investigated.

  15. Tailoring the Mesoscopic TiO2 Layer: Concomitant Parameters for Enabling High-Performance Perovskite Solar Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Taehyun; Lee, Sangheon; Kim, Jinhyun; Kim, Jaewon; Kim, Chunjoong; Shin, Byungha; Park, Byungwoo

    2017-01-01

    Architectural control over the mesoporous TiO2 film, a common electron-transport layer for organic-inorganic hybrid perovskite solar cells, is conducted by employing sub-micron sized polystyrene beads as sacrificial template. Such tailored TiO2 layer is shown to induce asymmetric enhancement of light absorption notably in the long-wavelength region with red-shifted absorption onset of perovskite, leading to 20% increase of photocurrent and 10% increase of power conversion efficiency. This enhancement is likely to be originated from the enlarged CH3NH3PbI3(Cl) grains residing in the sub-micron pores rather than from the effect of reduced perovskite-TiO2 interfacial area, which is supported from optical bandgap change, haze transmission of incident light, and one-diode model parameters correlated with the internal surface area of microporous TiO2 layers. With the templating strategy suggested, the necessity of proper hole-blocking method is discussed to prevent any direct contact of the large perovskite grains infiltrated into the intended pores of TiO2 scaffold, further mitigating the interfacial recombination and leading to 20% improvement in power conversion efficiency compared with the control device using conventional solution-processed hole blocking TiO2. Thereby, the imperatives that originate from the structural engineering of the electron-transport layer are discussed to understand the governing elements for the improved device performance.

  16. Cooperation of B cells and T cells is required for survival of mice infected with vesicular stomatitis virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Allan Randrup; Nansen, A; Andersen, C

    1997-01-01

    To define the role of T cells and B cells in resistance to vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) infection, knockout mice with different specific immune defects on an identical background were infected i.v. and the outcome of infection was compared; in this way a more complete picture of the relative...

  17. [Cells of immune system of mother and trophoblast cells: constructive cooperation for the sake of achievement of the joint purpose].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aĭlamazian, E K; Stepanova, O I; Sel'kov, S A; Sokolov, D I

    2013-01-01

    In the present review modern data about change of morfo-functional properties of a trophoblast during pregnancy, and also about influence of the cytokines produced by cells of a microenvironment, including leucocytes of mother, on a functional state of trophoblast is cited. Features of interaction between trophoblast and immune cells of mother are described within physiological pregnancy and within pregnancy complicated by preeclampsia.

  18. Enabling the Distributed Generation Market of High Temperature Fuel Cell and Absorption Chiller Systems to Support Critical and Commercial Loads

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiMola, Ashley M.

    Buildings account for over 18% of the world's anthropogenic Greenhouse Gas (GHG) emissions. As a result, a technology that can offset GHG emissions associated with buildings has the potential to save over 9 Giga-tons of GHG emissions per year. High temperature fuel cell and absorption chiller (HTFC/AC) technology offers a relatively low-carbon option for meeting cooling and electric loads for buildings while producing almost no criteria pollutants. GHG emissions in the state of California would decrease by 7.48 million metric tons per year if every commercial building in the State used HTFC/AC technology to meet its power and cooling requirements. In order to realize the benefits of HTFC/AC technology on a wide scale, the distributed generation market needs to be exposed to the technology and informed of its economic viability and real-world potential. This work characterizes the economics associated with HTFC/AC technology using select scenarios that are representative of realistic applications. The financial impacts of various input factors are evaluated and the HTFC/AC simulations are compared to the economics of traditional building utilities. It is shown that, in addition to the emissions reductions derived from the systems, HTFC/AC technology is financially preferable in all of the scenarios evaluated. This work also presents the design of a showcase environment, centered on a beta-test application, that presents (1) system operating data gathered using a custom data acquisition module, and (2) HTFC/AC technology in a clear and approachable manner in order to serve the target audience of market stakeholders.

  19. Mediatorless glucose biosensor and direct electron transfer type glucose/air biofuel cell enabled with carbon nanodots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Mei; Gao, Yue; Sun, Junyong; Gao, Feng

    2015-03-03

    Utilization of carbon nanodots (CNDs), newcomers to the world of carbonaceous nanomaterials, in the electrochemistry realm has rarely been reported so far. In this study, CNDs were used as immobilization supports and electron carriers to promote direct electron transfer (DET) reactions of glucose oxidase (GOx) and bilirubin oxidase (BOD). At the CNDs electrode entrapped with GOx, a high rate constant (k(s)) of 6.28 ± 0.05 s(-1) for fast DET and an apparent Michaelis-Menten constant (K(M)(app)) as low as 0.85 ± 0.03 mM for affinity to glucose were found. By taking advantage of its excellent direct bioelectrocatalytic performances to glucose oxidation, a DET-based biosensor for glucose detection ranging from 0 to 0.64 mM with a high sensitivity of 6.1 μA mM(-1) and a limit of detection (LOD) of 1.07 ± 0.03 μM (S/N = 3) was proposed. Additionally, the promoted DET of BOD immobilized on CNDs was also observed and effectively catalyzed the reduction of oxygen to water at the onset potential of +0.51 V (vs Ag/AgCl). On the basis of the facilitated DET of these two enzymes at CNDs electrodes, a mediator-free DET-type glucose/air enzymatic biofuel cell (BFC), in which CNDs electrodes entrapped with GOx and BOD were employed for oxidizing glucose at the bioanode and reducing oxygen at the biocathode, respectively, was successfully fabricated. The constructed BFC displayed an open-circuit voltage (OCV) as high as 0.93 V and a maximum power density of 40.8 μW cm(-2) at 0.41 V. These important features of CNDs have implied to be promising materials for immobilizing enzymes and efficient platforms for elaborating bioelectrochemical devices such as biosensors and BFCs.

  20. Enabling Lorentz boosted frame particle-in-cell simulations of laser wakefield acceleration in quasi-3D geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Peicheng; Xu, Xinlu; Davidson, Asher; Tableman, Adam; Dalichaouch, Thamine; Li, Fei; Meyers, Michael D.; An, Weiming; Tsung, Frank S.; Decyk, Viktor K.; Fiuza, Frederico; Vieira, Jorge; Fonseca, Ricardo A.; Lu, Wei; Silva, Luis O.; Mori, Warren B.

    2016-07-01

    When modeling laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) using the particle-in-cell (PIC) algorithm in a Lorentz boosted frame, the plasma is drifting relativistically at βb c towards the laser, which can lead to a computational speedup of ∼ γb2 = (1 - βb2)-1. Meanwhile, when LWFA is modeled in the quasi-3D geometry in which the electromagnetic fields and current are decomposed into a limited number of azimuthal harmonics, speedups are achieved by modeling three dimensional (3D) problems with the computational loads on the order of two dimensional r - z simulations. Here, we describe a method to combine the speedups from the Lorentz boosted frame and quasi-3D algorithms. The key to the combination is the use of a hybrid Yee-FFT solver in the quasi-3D geometry that significantly mitigates the Numerical Cerenkov Instability (NCI) which inevitably arises in a Lorentz boosted frame due to the unphysical coupling of Langmuir modes and EM modes of the relativistically drifting plasma in these simulations. In addition, based on the space-time distribution of the LWFA data in the lab and boosted frame, we propose to use a moving window to follow the drifting plasma, instead of following the laser driver as is done in the LWFA lab frame simulations, in order to further reduce the computational loads. We describe the details of how the NCI is mitigated for the quasi-3D geometry, the setups for simulations which combine the Lorentz boosted frame, quasi-3D geometry, and the use of a moving window, and compare the results from these simulations against their corresponding lab frame cases. Good agreement is obtained among these sample simulations, particularly when there is no self-trapping, which demonstrates it is possible to combine the Lorentz boosted frame and the quasi-3D algorithms when modeling LWFA. We also discuss the preliminary speedups achieved in these sample simulations.

  1. PLK1 Signaling in Breast Cancer Cells Cooperates with Estrogen Receptor-Dependent Gene Transcription

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Wierer

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1 is a key regulator of cell division and is overexpressed in many types of human cancers. Compared to its well-characterized role in mitosis, little is known about PLK1 functions in interphase. Here, we report that PLK1 mediates estrogen receptor (ER-regulated gene transcription in human breast cancer cells. PLK1 interacts with ER and is recruited to ER cis-elements on chromatin. PLK1-coactivated genes included classical ER target genes such as Ps2, Wisp2, and Serpina3 and were enriched in developmental and tumor-suppressive functions. Performing large-scale phosphoproteomics of estradiol-treated MCF7 cells in the presence or absence of the specific PLK1 inhibitor BI2536, we identified several PLK1 end targets involved in transcription, including the histone H3K4 trimethylase MLL2, the function of which on ER target genes was impaired by PLK1 inhibition. Our results propose a mechanism for the tumor-suppressive role of PLK1 in mammals as an interphase transcriptional regulator.

  2. Cooperative antiproliferative signaling by aspirin and indole-3-carbinol targets microphthalmia-associated transcription factor gene expression and promoter activity in human melanoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poindexter, Kevin M; Matthew, Susanne; Aronchik, Ida; Firestone, Gary L

    2016-04-01

    Antiproliferative signaling of combinations of the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin) and indole-3-carbinol (I3C), a natural indolecarbinol compound derived from cruciferous vegetables, was investigated in human melanoma cells. Melanoma cell lines with distinct mutational profiles were sensitive to different extents to the antiproliferative response of aspirin, with oncogenic BRAF-expressing G361 cells and wild-type BRAF-expressing SK-MEL-30 cells being the most responsive. I3C triggered a strong proliferative arrest of G361 melanoma cells and caused only a modest decrease in the proliferation of SK-MEL-30 cells. In both cell lines, combinations of aspirin and I3C cooperatively arrested cell proliferation and induced a G1 cell cycle arrest, and nearly ablated protein and transcript levels of the melanocyte master regulator microphthalmia-associated transcription factor isoform M (MITF-M). In melanoma cells transfected with a -333/+120-bp MITF-M promoter-luciferase reporter plasmid, treatment with aspirin and I3C cooperatively disrupted MITF-M promoter activity, which accounted for the loss of MITF-M gene products. Mutational analysis revealed that the aspirin required the LEF1 binding site, whereas I3C required the BRN2 binding site to mediate their combined and individual effects on MITF-M promoter activity. Consistent with LEF1 being a downstream effector of Wnt signaling, aspirin, but not I3C, downregulated protein levels of the Wnt co-receptor LDL receptor-related protein-6 and β-catenin and upregulated the β-catenin destruction complex component Axin. Taken together, our results demonstrate that aspirin-regulated Wnt signaling and I3C-targeted signaling pathways converge at distinct DNA elements in the MITF-M promoter to cooperatively disrupt MITF-M expression and melanoma cell proliferation.

  3. Enabling user-guided segmentation and tracking of surface-labeled cells in time-lapse image sets of living tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mashburn, David N; Lynch, Holley E; Ma, Xiaoyan; Hutson, M Shane

    2012-05-01

    To study the process of morphogenesis, one often needs to collect and segment time-lapse images of living tissues to accurately track changing cellular morphology. This task typically involves segmenting and tracking tens to hundreds of individual cells over hundreds of image frames, a scale that would certainly benefit from automated routines; however, any automated routine would need to reliably handle a large number of sporadic, and yet typical problems (e.g., illumination inconsistency, photobleaching, rapid cell motions, and drift of focus or of cells moving through the imaging plane). Here, we present a segmentation and cell tracking approach based on the premise that users know their data best-interpreting and using image features that are not accounted for in any a priori algorithm design. We have developed a program, SeedWater Segmenter, that combines a parameter-less and fast automated watershed algorithm with a suite of manual intervention tools that enables users with little to no specialized knowledge of image processing to efficiently segment images with near-perfect accuracy based on simple user interactions.

  4. High-contrast three-dimensional imaging of the Arabidopsis leaf enables the analysis of cell dimensions in the epidermis and mesophyll

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Granier Christine

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite the wide spread application of confocal and multiphoton laser scanning microscopy in plant biology, leaf phenotype assessment still relies on two-dimensional imaging with a limited appreciation of the cells' structural context and an inherent inaccuracy of cell measurements. Here, a successful procedure for the three-dimensional imaging and analysis of plant leaves is presented. Results The procedure was developed based on a range of developmental stages, from leaf initiation to senescence, of soil-grown Arabidopsis thaliana (L. Heynh. Rigorous clearing of tissues, made possible by enhanced leaf permeability to clearing agents, allowed the optical sectioning of the entire leaf thickness by both confocal and multiphoton microscopy. The superior image quality, in resolution and contrast, obtained by the latter technique enabled the three-dimensional visualisation of leaf morphology at the individual cell level, cell segmentation and the construction of structural models. Image analysis macros were developed to measure leaf thickness and tissue proportions, as well as to determine for the epidermis and all layers of mesophyll tissue, cell density, volume, length and width. For mesophyll tissue, the proportion of intercellular spaces and the surface areas of cells were also estimated. The performance of the procedure was demonstrated for the expanding 6th leaf of the Arabidopsis rosette. Furthermore, it was proven to be effective for leaves of another dicotyledon, apple (Malus domestica Borkh., which has a very different cellular organisation. Conclusions The pipeline for the three-dimensional imaging and analysis of plant leaves provides the means to include variables on internal tissues in leaf growth studies and the assessment of leaf phenotypes. It also allows the visualisation and quantification of alterations in leaf structure alongside changes in leaf functioning observed under environmental constraints. Data

  5. PREFACE: Cooperative dynamics Cooperative dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gov, Nir

    2011-09-01

    The dynamics within living cells are dominated by non-equilibrium processes that consume chemical energy (usually in the form of ATP, adenosine triphosphate) and convert it into mechanical forces and motion. The mechanisms that allow this conversion process are mostly driven by the components of the cytoskeleton: (i) directed (polar) polymerization of filaments (either actin or microtubules) and (ii) molecular motors. The forces and motions produced by these two components of the cytoskeleton give rise to the formation of cellular shapes, and drive the intracellular transport and organization. It is clear that these systems present a multi-scale challenge, from the physics of the molecular processes to the organization of many interacting units. Understanding the physical nature of these systems will have a large impact on many fundamental problems in biology and break new grounds in the field of non-equilibrium physics. This field of research has seen a rapid development over the last ten years. Activities in this area range from theoretical and experimental work on the underlying fundamental (bio)physics at the single-molecule level, to investigations (in vivo and in vitro) of the dynamics and patterns of macroscopic pieces of 'living matter'. In this special issue we have gathered contributions that span the whole spectrum of length- and complexity-scales in this field. Some of the works demonstrate how active forces self-organize within the polymerizing cytoskeleton, on the level of cooperative cargo transport via motors or due to active fluxes at the cell membrane. On a larger scale, it is shown that polar filaments coupled to molecular motors give rise to a huge variety of surprising dynamics and patterns: spontaneously looping rings of gliding microtubules, and emergent phases of self-organized filaments and motors in different geometries. All of these articles share the common feature of being out-of-equilibrium, driven by metabolism. As demonstrated here

  6. SME Cooperation on Innovation & Growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brink, Tove; Neville, Mette

    2016-01-01

    The research in this paper reveals how cooperation of SMEs can enable innovation and growth. The research is conducted in a four-year period with 24 SMEs participating from different industry branches. The research is now in the late part of the 3rd. year starting in 2013 and finished January 2017....... Preliminary findings are revealed here and discussed with the SMEs. Shorter-term cooperation and especially longer-term collaboration is important for SMEs to enable innovation and growth. The content of collaboration is based on the cross-disciplinary trinity of organisational- and managerial development...... for the benefit of all....

  7. The B cell antigen receptor and overexpression of MYC can cooperate in the genesis of B cell lymphomas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yosef Refaeli

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available A variety of circumstantial evidence from humans has implicated the B cell antigen receptor (BCR in the genesis of B cell lymphomas. We generated mouse models designed to test this possibility directly, and we found that both the constitutive and antigen-stimulated state of a clonal BCR affected the rate and outcome of lymphomagenesis initiated by the proto-oncogene MYC. The tumors that arose in the presence of constitutive BCR differed from those initiated by MYC alone and resembled chronic B cell lymphocytic leukemia/lymphoma (B-CLL, whereas those that arose in response to antigen stimulation resembled large B-cell lymphomas, particularly Burkitt lymphoma (BL. We linked the genesis of the BL-like tumors to antigen stimulus in three ways. First, in reconstruction experiments, stimulation of B cells by an autoantigen in the presence of overexpressed MYC gave rise to BL-like tumors that were, in turn, dependent on both MYC and the antigen for survival and proliferation. Second, genetic disruption of the pathway that mediates signaling from the BCR promptly killed cells of the BL-like tumors as well as the tumors resembling B-CLL. And third, growth of the murine BL could be inhibited by any of three distinctive immunosuppressants, in accord with the dependence of the tumors on antigen-induced signaling. Together, our results provide direct evidence that antigenic stimulation can participate in lymphomagenesis, point to a potential role for the constitutive BCR as well, and sustain the view that the constitutive BCR gives rise to signals different from those elicited by antigen. The mouse models described here should be useful in exploring further the pathogenesis of lymphomas, and in preclinical testing of new therapeutics.

  8. Spatially- and temporally-controlled postnatal p53 knockdown cooperates with embryonic Schwann cell precursor Nf1 gene loss to promote malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirbe, Angela C; Dahiya, Sonika; Friedmann-Morvinski, Dinorah; Verma, Inder M; Clapp, D Wade; Gutmann, David H

    2016-02-16

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs) are highly aggressive sarcomas that arise sporadically or in association with the Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) cancer predisposition syndrome. In individuals with NF1, MPNSTs are hypothesized to arise from Nf1-deficient Schwann cell precursor cells following the somatic acquisition of secondary cooperating genetic mutations (e.g., p53 loss). To model this sequential genetic cooperativity, we coupled somatic lentivirus-mediated p53 knockdown in the adult right sciatic nerve with embryonic Schwann cell precursor Nf1 gene inactivation in two different Nf1 conditional knockout mouse strains. Using this approach, ~60% of mice with Periostin-Cre-mediated Nf1 gene inactivation (Periostin-Cre; Nf1(flox/flox) mice) developed tumors classified as low-grade MPNSTs following p53 knockdown (mean, 6 months). Similarly, ~70% of Nf1+/- mice with GFAP-Cre-mediated Nf1 gene inactivation (GFAP-Cre; Nf1(flox/null) mice) developed low-grade MPNSTs following p53 knockdown (mean, 3 months). In addition, wild-type and Nf1+/- mice with GFAP-Cre-mediated Nf1 loss develop MPNSTs following somatic p53 knockout with different latencies, suggesting potential influences of Nf1+/- stromal cells in MPNST pathogenesis. Collectively, this new MPNST model system permits the analysis of somatically-acquired events as well as tumor microenvironment signals that potentially cooperate with Nf1 loss in the development and progression of this deadly malignancy.

  9. Digital Sorting of Pure Cell Populations Enables Unambiguous Genetic Analysis of Heterogeneous Formalin-Fixed Paraffin-Embedded Tumors by Next Generation Sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolognesi, Chiara; Forcato, Claudio; Buson, Genny; Fontana, Francesca; Mangano, Chiara; Doffini, Anna; Sero, Valeria; Lanzellotto, Rossana; Signorini, Giulio; Calanca, Alex; Sergio, Maximilian; Romano, Rita; Gianni, Stefano; Medoro, Gianni; Giorgini, Giuseppe; Morreau, Hans; Barberis, Massimo; Corver, Willem E.; Manaresi, Nicolò

    2016-01-01

    Precision medicine in oncology requires an accurate characterization of a tumor molecular profile for patient stratification. Though targeted deep sequencing is an effective tool to detect the presence of somatic sequence variants, a significant number of patient specimens do not meet the requirements needed for routine clinical application. Analysis is hindered by contamination of normal cells and inherent tumor heterogeneity, compounded with challenges of dealing with minute amounts of tissue and DNA damages common in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) specimens. Here we present an innovative workflow using DEPArray™ system, a microchip-based digital sorter to achieve 100%-pure, homogenous subpopulations of cells from FFPE samples. Cells are distinguished by fluorescently labeled antibodies and DNA content. The ability to address tumor heterogeneity enables unambiguous determination of true-positive sequence variants, loss-of-heterozygosity as well as copy number variants. The proposed strategy overcomes the inherent trade-offs made between sensitivity and specificity in detecting genetic variants from a mixed population, thus rescuing for analysis even the smaller clinical samples with low tumor cellularity. PMID:26864208

  10. A mix of S and ΔS variants of STAT3 enable survival of activated B-cell-like diffuse large B-cell lymphoma cells in culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, M; Turton, K B; Zhu, F; Li, Y; Grindle, K M; Annis, D S; Lu, L; Drennan, A C; Tweardy, D J; Bharadwaj, U; Mosher, D F; Rui, L

    2016-01-01

    Activated B-cell-like diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (ABC DLBCL) is characterized by increased expression and activator of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3). ABC DLBCL cells require STAT3 for growth in culture. In ABC DLBCL cells, eosinophils and perhaps all cells, four variant STAT3 mRNAs (Sα, ΔSα, Sβ and ΔSβ) are present as a result of two alternative splicing events, one that results in the inclusion of a 55-residue C-terminal transactivation domain (α) or a truncated C-terminal domain with 7 unique residues (β) and a second that includes (S) or excludes (ΔS) the codon for Ser-701 in the linker between the SH2 and C-terminal domains. A substantial literature indicates that both α and β variants are required for optimal STAT3 function, but nothing is known about functions of ΔS variants. We used a knockdown/re-expression strategy to explore whether survival of ABC DLBCL cells requires that the four variants be in an appropriate ratio. No single variant rescued survival as well as STAT3Sα-C, Sα with activating mutations (A661C and N663C) in the SH2 domain. Better rescue was achieved when all four variants were re-expressed or Sα and ΔSα or Sβ and ΔSβ were re-expressed in pairs. Rescue correlated with expression of STAT3-sensitive genes NFKBIA and NFKBIZ. We consider a variety of explanations why a mix of S and ΔS variants of STAT3 should enable survival of ABC DLBCL cells. PMID:26727576

  11. Optimized microsystems-enabled photovoltaics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cruz-Campa, Jose Luis; Nielson, Gregory N.; Young, Ralph W.; Resnick, Paul J.; Okandan, Murat; Gupta, Vipin P.

    2015-09-22

    Technologies pertaining to designing microsystems-enabled photovoltaic (MEPV) cells are described herein. A first restriction for a first parameter of an MEPV cell is received. Subsequently, a selection of a second parameter of the MEPV cell is received. Values for a plurality of parameters of the MEPV cell are computed such that the MEPV cell is optimized with respect to the second parameter, wherein the values for the plurality of parameters are computed based at least in part upon the restriction for the first parameter.

  12. RAD21 cooperates with pluripotency transcription factors in the maintenance of embryonic stem cell identity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anja Nitzsche

    Full Text Available For self-renewal, embryonic stem cells (ESCs require the expression of specific transcription factors accompanied by a particular chromosome organization to maintain a balance between pluripotency and the capacity for rapid differentiation. However, how transcriptional regulation is linked to chromosome organization in ESCs is not well understood. Here we show that the cohesin component RAD21 exhibits a functional role in maintaining ESC identity through association with the pluripotency transcriptional network. ChIP-seq analyses of RAD21 reveal an ESC specific cohesin binding pattern that is characterized by CTCF independent co-localization of cohesin with pluripotency related transcription factors Oct4, Nanog, Sox2, Esrrb and Klf4. Upon ESC differentiation, most of these binding sites disappear and instead new CTCF independent RAD21 binding sites emerge, which are enriched for binding sites of transcription factors implicated in early differentiation. Furthermore, knock-down of RAD21 causes expression changes that are similar to expression changes after Nanog depletion, demonstrating the functional relevance of the RAD21--pluripotency transcriptional network association. Finally, we show that Nanog physically interacts with the cohesin or cohesin interacting proteins STAG1 and WAPL further substantiating this association. Based on these findings we propose that a dynamic placement of cohesin by pluripotency transcription factors contributes to a chromosome organization supporting the ESC expression program.

  13. The direction of evolution: the rise of cooperative organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, John E

    2014-09-01

    Two great trends are evident in the evolution of life on Earth: towards increasing diversification and towards increasing integration. Diversification has spread living processes across the planet, progressively increasing the range of environments and free energy sources exploited by life. Integration has proceeded through a stepwise process in which living entities at one level are integrated into cooperative groups that become larger-scale entities at the next level, and so on, producing cooperative organizations of increasing scale (for example, cooperative groups of simple cells gave rise to the more complex eukaryote cells, groups of these gave rise to multi-cellular organisms, and cooperative groups of these organisms produced animal societies). The trend towards increasing integration has continued during human evolution with the progressive increase in the scale of human groups and societies. The trends towards increasing diversification and integration are both driven by selection. An understanding of the trajectory and causal drivers of the trends suggests that they are likely to culminate in the emergence of a global entity. This entity would emerge from the integration of the living processes, matter, energy and technology of the planet into a global cooperative organization. Such an integration of the results of previous diversifications would enable the global entity to exploit the widest possible range of resources across the varied circumstances of the planet. This paper demonstrates that it's case for directionality meets the tests and criticisms that have proven fatal to previous claims for directionality in evolution.

  14. Cooperation by Fibroblasts and Bone Marrow-Mesenchymal Stem Cells to Improve Pancreatic Rat-to-Mouse Islet Xenotransplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meana, Alvaro; Otero, Jesus; Esteban, Manuel M.

    2013-01-01

    xenotransplantation, whereas only BM-MSCs exerted an immunomodulatory effect, which was improved by the presence of fibroblasts. These results suggest that cooperation of different cell types with islets will be required to achieve a long-term functional graft. PMID:24009755

  15. Cooperation by fibroblasts and bone marrow-mesenchymal stem cells to improve pancreatic rat-to-mouse islet xenotransplantation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Perez-Basterrechea

    islet xenotransplantation, whereas only BM-MSCs exerted an immunomodulatory effect, which was improved by the presence of fibroblasts. These results suggest that cooperation of different cell types with islets will be required to achieve a long-term functional graft.

  16. Helminth antigens enable CpG-activated dendritic cells to inhibit the symptoms of collagen-induced arthritis through Foxp3+ regulatory T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franco Carranza

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells (DC have the potential to control the outcome of autoimmunity by modulating the immune response. In this study, we tested the ability of Fasciola hepatica total extract (TE to induce tolerogenic properties in CpG-ODN (CpG maturated DC, to then evaluate the therapeutic potential of these cells to diminish the inflammatory response in collagen induced arthritis (CIA. DBA/1J mice were injected with TE plus CpG treated DC (T/C-DC pulsed with bovine collagen II (CII between two immunizations with CII and clinical scores CIA were determined. The levels of CII-specific IgG2 and IgG1 in sera, the histological analyses in the joints, the cytokine profile in the draining lymph node (DLN cells and in the joints, and the number, and functionality of CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ T cells (Treg were evaluated. Vaccination of mice with CII pulsed T/C-DC diminished the severity and incidence of CIA symptoms and the production of the inflammatory cytokine, while induced the production of anti-inflammatory cytokines. The therapeutic effect was mediated by Treg cells, since the adoptive transfer of CD4+CD25+ T cells, inhibited the inflammatory symptoms in CIA. The in vitro blockage of TGF-β in cultures of DLN cells plus CII pulsed T/C-DC inhibited the expansion of Treg cells. Vaccination with CII pulsed T/C-DC seems to be a very efficient approach to diminish exacerbated immune response in CIA, by inducing the development of Treg cells, and it is therefore an interesting candidate for a cell-based therapy for rheumatoid arthritis (RA.

  17. Transient replication of Hepatitis C Virus sub-genomic RNA in murine cell lines is enabled by miR-122 and varies with cell passage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia A Thibault

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C Virus (HCV is a serious global health problem, infecting almost 3% of the world's population. The lack of model systems for studying this virus limit research options in vaccine and therapeutic development, as well as for studying the pathogenesis of chronic HCV infection. Herein we make use of the liver-specific microRNA miR-122 to render mouse cell lines permissive to HCV replication in an attempt to develop additional model systems for the identification of new features of the virus and its life cycle. We have determined that some wild-type and knockout mouse cell lines--NCoA6 and PKR knockout embryonic fibroblasts--can be rendered permissive to transient HCV sub-genomic RNA replication upon addition of miR-122, but we did not observe replication of full-length HCV RNA in these cells. However, other wild-type and knockout cell lines cannot be rendered permissive to HCV replication by addition of miR-122, and in fact, different NCoA6 and PKR knockout cell line passages and isolates from the same mice demonstrated varying permissiveness phenotypes and eventually complete loss of permissiveness. When we tested knockdown of NCoA6 and PKR in Huh7.5 cells, we saw no substantial impact in sub-genomic HCV replication, which we would expect if these genes were inhibitory to the virus' life cycle. This leads us to conclude that along with the influence of specific gene knockouts there are additional factors within the cell lines that affect their permissiveness for HCV replication; we suggest that these may be epigenetically regulated, or modulated by cell line immortalization and transformation.

  18. Super-resolution imaging with Pontamine Fast Scarlet 4BS enables direct visualization of cellulose orientation and cell connection architecture in onion epidermis cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liesche, Johannes; Ziomkiewicz, Iwona; Schulz, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    present the first super-resolution images of cellulose bundles in the plant cell wall produced by direct stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (dSTORM) in combination with total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy. Since TIRF limits observation to the cell surface, we tested...... microscopy of some 200 nm in xy and 550 nm in z for green light, restricts the direct visualization of cellulose to relatively large bundles, whereas the structure of cellulose microfibrils with their diameter below 10 nm remains unresolved. Over the last decade, several so-called super-resolution microscopy...... confocal microscopy and the approach could be used to demonstrate differences in fibril orientation in different layers of the cell wall as well as particular cellulose fortifications around plasmodesmata. Conclusions Super-resolution light microscopy of PFS-stained cellulose fibrils is possible...

  19. About Cooperative Engineering: Theory and Emblematic Examples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, Grace; Sensevy, Gérard; Forest, Dominique

    2017-01-01

    In this article we focus on "cooperative engineering", in which teachers and researchers co-design didactic sequences. In the first part of the article, we present cooperative engineering by describing some of the main principles on which it is grounded. The second part is dedicated to a case study, which enables us to illustrate some…

  20. ENHANCING COOPERATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    China and Japan can cooperate on a wide scope of issues, such as the organization of the Beijing Olympic Games next year and aid to Africa,said Ide Keiji, Minister of Public Relations, Press, Culture, Education and Sports and Spokesperson of the Embassy

  1. Five Rules for the Evolution of Cooperation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak, Martin A.

    2006-12-01

    Cooperation is needed for evolution to construct new levels of organization. Genomes, cells, multicellular organisms, social insects, and human society are all based on cooperation. Cooperation means that selfish replicators forgo some of their reproductive potential to help one another. But natural selection implies competition and therefore opposes cooperation unless a specific mechanism is at work. Here I discuss five mechanisms for the evolution of cooperation: kin selection, direct reciprocity, indirect reciprocity, network reciprocity, and group selection. For each mechanism, a simple rule is derived that specifies whether natural selection can lead to cooperation.

  2. Incentive and Architecture of Multi-Band Enabled Small Cell and UE for Up-/Down-Link and Control-/User-Plane Splitting for 5G Mobile Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Rony Kumer; Aswakul, Chaodit

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, a multi-band enabled femtocell base station (FCBS) and user equipment (UE) architecture is proposed in a multi-tier network that consists of small cells, including femtocells and picocells deployed over the coverage of a macrocell for splitting uplink and downlink (UL/DL) as well as control-plane and user-plane (C-/U-plane) for 5G mobile networks. Since splitting is performed at the same FCBS, we define this architecture as the same base station based split architecture (SBSA). For multiple bands, we consider co-channel (CC) microwave and different frequency (DF) 60 GHz millimeter wave (mmWave) bands for FCBSs and UEs with respect to the microwave band used by their over-laid macrocell base station. All femtocells are assumed to be deployed in a 3-dimensional multi-storage building. For CC microwave band, cross-tier CC interference of femtocells with macrocell is avoided using almost blank subframe based enhanced inter-cell interference coordination techniques. The co-existence of CC microwave and DF mmWave bands for SBSA on the same FCBS and UE is first studied to show their performance disparities in terms of system capacity and spectral efficiency in order to provide incentives for employing multiple bands at the same FCBS and UE and identify a suitable band for routing decoupled UL/DL or C-/U-plane traffic. We then present a number of disruptive architectural design alternatives of multi-band enabled SBSA for 5G mobile networks for UL/DL and C-/U-plane splitting, including a disruptive and complete splitting of UL/DL and C-/U-plane as well as a combined UL/DL and C-/U-plane splitting, by exploiting dual connectivity on CC microwave and DF mmWave bands. The outperformances of SBSA in terms of system level capacity, average spectral efficiency, energy efficiency, and control-plane overhead traffic capacity in comparison with different base stations based split architecture (DBSA) are shown. Finally, a number of technical and business perspectives

  3. The Quantitative Criteria Based on the Fractal Dimensions, Entropy and Lacunarity for the Spatial Distribution of Cancer Cell Nuclei Enable Identification of Low or High Aggressive Prostate Carcinomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Przemyslaw eWaliszewski

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Tumor grading, PSA concentration, and stage determine a risk of prostate cancer patients with accuracy of about 70%. An approach based on the fractal geometrical model was proposed to eliminate subjectivity from the evaluation of tumor aggressiveness and to improve the prediction. This study was undertaken to validate classes of equivalence for the spatial distribution of cancer cell nuclei in a larger, independent set of prostate carcinomas.Methods: The global fractal capacity D0, information D1 and correlation D2 dimension, the local fractal dimension (LFD and the local connected fractal dimension (LCFD, Shannon entropy H and lacunarity were measured using computer algorithms in digitalized images of both the reference set (n = 60 and the test set (n = 208 of prostate carcinomas.Results: Prostate carcinomas were re-stratified into seven classes of equivalence. The cut-off D0 values 1.5450, 1.5820, 1.6270, 1.6490, 1.6980, 1.7640 defined the classes from C1 to C7, respectively. The other measures but the D1 failed to define the same classes of equivalence. The pairs (D0, LFD, (D0, H, (D0, , (D1, LFD, (D1, H, (D1,  characterized the spatial distribution of cancer cell nuclei in each class. The co-application of those measures enabled the subordination of prostate carcinomas to one out of three clusters associated with different tumor aggressiveness. For D0 0.8, the class C1 or C2 contains low complexity low aggressive carcinomas exclusively. For D0 > 1.6980, LFD > 1.7644, LCFD > 1.7051, H > 0.9, and < 0.7, the class C6 or C7 contains high complexity high aggressive carcinomas. Conclusions: The cut-off D0 values defining the classes of equivalence were validated in this study. The cluster analysis suggested that the number of the subjective Gleason grades and the number of the objective classes of equivalence could be decreased from seven to three without a loss of clinically relevant information. Two novel quantitative

  4. Cooperative Compute-and-Forward

    CERN Document Server

    Nokleby, Matthew

    2012-01-01

    We examine the benefits of user cooperation under compute-and-forward. Much like in network coding, receivers in a compute-and-forward network recover finite-field linear combinations of transmitters' messages. Recovery is enabled by linear codes: transmitters map messages to a linear codebook, and receivers attempt to decode the incoming superposition of signals to an integer combination of codewords. However, the achievable computation rates are low if channel gains do not correspond to a suitable linear combination. In response to this challenge, we propose a cooperative approach to compute-and-forward. We devise a lattice-coding approach to block Markov encoding with which we construct a decode-and-forward style computation strategy. Transmitters broadcast lattice codewords, decode each other's messages, and then cooperatively transmit resolution information to aid receivers in decoding the integer combinations. Using our strategy, we show that cooperation offers a significant improvement both in the achi...

  5. FBH1 co-operates with MUS81 in inducing DNA double-strand breaks and cell death following replication stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fugger, Kasper; Chu, Wai Kit; Haahr, Peter;

    2013-01-01

    The molecular events occurring following the disruption of DNA replication forks are poorly characterized, despite extensive use of replication inhibitors such as hydroxyurea in the treatment of malignancies. Here, we identify a key role for the FBH1 helicase in mediating DNA double-strand break...... formation following replication inhibition. We show that FBH1-deficient cells are resistant to killing by hydroxyurea, and exhibit impaired activation of the pro-apoptotic factor p53, consistent with decreased DNA double-strand break formation. Similar findings were obtained in murine ES cells carrying...... disrupted alleles of Fbh1. We also show that FBH1 through its helicase activity co-operates with the MUS81 nuclease in promoting the endonucleolytic DNA cleavage following prolonged replication stress. Accordingly, MUS81 and EME1-depleted cells show increased resistance to the cytotoxic effects...

  6. Co-operative suppression of inflammatory responses in human dendritic cells by plant proanthocyanidins and products from the parasitic nematode Trichuris suis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Williams, Andrew R; Klaver, Elsenoor J; Laan, Lisa C;

    2017-01-01

    Interactions between dendritic cells (DCs) and environmental, dietary and pathogen antigens play a key role in immune homeostasis and regulation of inflammation. Dietary polyphenols such as proanthocyanidins (PAC) may reduce inflammation, and we therefore hypothesized that PAC may suppress...... lipopolysaccharide (LPS) -induced responses in human DCs and subsequent T helper type 1 (Th1) -type responses in naive T cells. Moreover, we proposed that, because DCs are likely to be exposed to multiple stimuli, the activity of PAC may synergise with other bioactive molecules that have anti-inflammatory activity...... that selectively down-regulates Th1 response in naive T cells, and that they also act cooperatively with TsSP. Our results indicate a novel interaction between dietary compounds and parasite products to influence immune function, and may suggest that combinations of PAC and TsSP can have therapeutic potential...

  7. Cooperative and cognitive satellite systems

    CERN Document Server

    Chatzinotas, Symeon; De Gaudenzi, Riccardo

    2015-01-01

    Cooperative and Cognitive Satellite Systems provides a solid overview of the current research in the field of cooperative and cognitive satellite systems, helping users understand how to incorporate state-of-the-art communication techniques in innovative satellite network architectures to enable the next generation of satellite systems. The book is edited and written by top researchers and practitioners in the field, providing a comprehensive explanation of current research that allows users to discover future technologies and their applications, integrate satellite and terrestrial systems

  8. The apoptotic members CD95, BclxL, and Bcl-2 cooperate to promote cell migration by inducing Ca2+ flux from the endoplasmic reticulum to mitochondria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fouqué, A; Lepvrier, E; Debure, L; Gouriou, Y; Malleter, M; Delcroix, V; Ovize, M; Ducret, T; Li, C; Hammadi, M; Vacher, P; Legembre, P

    2016-01-01

    Metalloprotease-processed CD95L (cl-CD95L) is a soluble cytokine that implements a PI3K/Ca2+ signaling pathway in triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) cells. Accordingly, high levels of cl-CD95L in TNBC women correlate with poor prognosis, and administration of this ligand in an orthotopic xenograft mouse model accelerates the metastatic dissemination of TNBC cells. The molecular mechanism underlying CD95-mediated cell migration remains unknown. Here, we present genetic and pharmacologic evidence that the anti-apoptotic molecules BclxL and Bcl-2 and the pro-apoptotic factors BAD and BID cooperate to promote migration of TNBC cells stimulated with cl-CD95L. BclxL was distributed in both endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and mitochondrion membranes. The mitochondrion-localized isoform promoted cell migration by interacting with voltage-dependent anion channel 1 to orchestrate Ca2+ transfer from the ER to mitochondria in a BH3-dependent manner. Mitochondrial Ca2+ uniporter contributed to this flux, which favored ATP production and cell migration. In conclusion, this study reveals a novel molecular mechanism controlled by BclxL to promote cancer cell migration and supports the use of BH3 mimetics as therapeutic options not only to kill tumor cells but also to prevent metastatic dissemination in TNBCs. PMID:27367565

  9. Puma and p21 represent cooperating checkpoints limiting self-renewal and chromosomal instability of somatic stem cells in response to telomere dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sperka, Tobias; Song, Zhangfa; Morita, Yohei; Nalapareddy, Kodandaramireddy; Guachalla, Luis Miguel; Lechel, André; Begus-Nahrmann, Yvonne; Burkhalter, Martin D; Mach, Monika; Schlaudraff, Falk; Liss, Birgit; Ju, Zhenyu; Speicher, Michael R; Rudolph, K Lenhard

    2011-12-04

    The tumour suppressor p53 activates Puma-dependent apoptosis and p21-dependent cell-cycle arrest in response to DNA damage. Deletion of p21 improved stem-cell function and organ maintenance in progeroid mice with dysfunctional telomeres, but the function of Puma has not been investigated in this context. Here we show that deletion of Puma improves stem- and progenitor-cell function, organ maintenance and lifespan of telomere-dysfunctional mice. Puma deletion impairs the clearance of stem and progenitor cells that have accumulated DNA damage as a consequence of critically short telomeres. However, further accumulation of DNA damage in these rescued progenitor cells leads to increasing activation of p21. RNA interference experiments show that upregulation of p21 limits proliferation and evolution of chromosomal imbalances of Puma-deficient stem and progenitor cells with dysfunctional telomeres. These results provide experimental evidence that p53-dependent apoptosis and cell-cycle arrest act in cooperating checkpoints limiting tissue maintenance and evolution of chromosomal instability at stem- and progenitor-cell levels in response to telomere dysfunction. Selective inhibition of Puma-dependent apoptosis can result in temporary improvements in maintenance of telomere-dysfunctional organs.

  10. Organising to Enable Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brink, Tove

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this conceptual paper is to reveal how organising can enable innovation across organisational layers and organisational units. This approach calls for a cross-disciplinary literature review. The aim is to provide an integrated understanding of innovation in an organisational approa...... of explorative and exploitative learning in uncertain environments. Shedding light on the cross-disciplinary theories to organise innovation provides a contribution at the firm level to enable innovation.......The purpose of this conceptual paper is to reveal how organising can enable innovation across organisational layers and organisational units. This approach calls for a cross-disciplinary literature review. The aim is to provide an integrated understanding of innovation in an organisational approach....... The findings reveal a continous organising process between individual/ team creativity and organisational structures/control to enable innovation at firm level. Organising provides a dynamic approach and contains the integrated reconstruction of creativity, structures and boundaries for enhanced balance...

  11. Apoptotic Efficacy of Etomoxir in Human Acute Myeloid Leukemia Cells. Cooperation with Arsenic Trioxide and Glycolytic Inhibitors, and Regulation by Oxidative Stress and Protein Kinase Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estañ, María Cristina; Calviño, Eva; Calvo, Susana; Guillén-Guío, Beatriz; Boyano-Adánez, María del Carmen; de Blas, Elena; Rial, Eduardo; Aller, Patricio

    2014-01-01

    Fatty acid synthesis and oxidation are frequently exacerbated in leukemia cells, and may therefore represent a target for therapeutic intervention. In this work we analyzed the apoptotic and chemo-sensitizing action of the fatty acid oxidation inhibitor etomoxir in human acute myeloid leukemia cells. Etomoxir caused negligible lethality at concentrations up to 100 µM, but efficaciously cooperated to cause apoptosis with the anti-leukemic agent arsenic trioxide (ATO, Trisenox), and with lower efficacy with other anti-tumour drugs (etoposide, cisplatin), in HL60 cells. Etomoxir-ATO cooperation was also observed in NB4 human acute promyelocytic cells, but not in normal (non-tumour) mitogen-stimulated human peripheral blood lymphocytes. Biochemical determinations in HL60 cells indicated that etomoxir (25–200 µM) dose-dependently inhibited mitochondrial respiration while slightly stimulating glycolysis, and only caused marginal alterations in total ATP content and adenine nucleotide pool distribution. In addition, etomoxir caused oxidative stress (increase in intracellular reactive oxygen species accumulation, decrease in reduced glutathione content), as well as pro-apoptotic LKB-1/AMPK pathway activation, all of which may in part explain the chemo-sensitizing capacity of the drug. Etomoxir also cooperated with glycolytic inhibitors (2-deoxy-D-glucose, lonidamine) to induce apoptosis in HL60 cells, but not in NB4 cells. The combined etomoxir plus 2-deoxy-D-glucose treatment did not increase oxidative stress, caused moderate decrease in net ATP content, increased the AMP/ATP ratio with concomitant drop in energy charge, and caused defensive Akt and ERK kinase activation. Apoptosis generation by etomoxir plus 2-deoxy-D-glucose was further increased by co-incubation with ATO, which is apparently explained by the capacity of ATO to attenuate Akt and ERK activation. In summary, co-treatment with etomoxir may represent an interesting strategy to increase the apoptotic

  12. Gossip and ostracism promote cooperation in groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feinberg, Matthew; Willer, Robb; Schultz, Michael

    2014-03-01

    The widespread existence of cooperation is difficult to explain because individuals face strong incentives to exploit the cooperative tendencies of others. In the research reported here, we examined how the spread of reputational information through gossip promotes cooperation in mixed-motive settings. Results showed that individuals readily communicated reputational information about others, and recipients used this information to selectively interact with cooperative individuals and ostracize those who had behaved selfishly, which enabled group members to contribute to the public good with reduced threat of exploitation. Additionally, ostracized individuals responded to exclusion by subsequently cooperating at levels comparable to those who were not ostracized. These results suggest that the spread of reputational information through gossip can mitigate egoistic behavior by facilitating partner selection, thereby helping to solve the problem of cooperation even in noniterated interactions.

  13. Cooperative effect of the VP1 amino acids 98E, 145A and 169F in the productive infection of mouse cell lines by enterovirus 71 (BS strain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Victorio, Carla Bianca Luena; Xu, Yishi; Ng, Qimei; Meng, Tao; Chow, Vincent TK; Chua, Kaw Bing

    2016-01-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) is a neurotrophic virus that causes hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD) and occasional neurological infection among children. It infects primate cells but not rodent cells, primarily due to the incompatibility between the virus and the expressed form of its receptor, scavenger receptor class B member 2 (SCARB2) protein, on rodent cells (mSCARB2). We previously generated adapted strains (EV71:TLLm and EV71:TLLmv) that were shown to productively infect primate and rodent cell lines and whose genomes exhibited a multitude of non-synonymous mutations compared with the EV71:BS parental virus. In this study, we aimed to identify mutations that are necessary for productive infection of murine cells by EV71:BS. Using reverse genetics and site-directed mutagenesis, we constructed EV71 infectious clones with specific mutations that generated amino acid substitutions in the capsid VP1 and VP2 proteins. We subsequently assessed the infection induced by clone-derived viruses (CDVs) in mouse embryonic fibroblast NIH/3T3 and murine neuroblastoma Neuro-2a cell lines. We found that the CDV:BS-VP1K98E,E145A,L169F with three substitutions in the VP1 protein—K98E, E145A and L169F—productively infected both mouse cell lines for at least three passages of the virus in murine cells. Moreover, the virus gained the ability to utilize the mSCARB2 protein to infect murine cell lines. These results demonstrate that the three VP1 residues cooperate to effectively interact with the mSCARB2 protein on murine cells and permit the virus to infect murine cells. Gain-of-function studies similar to the present work provide valuable insight into the mutational trajectory required for EV71 to infect new host cells previously non-susceptible to infection. PMID:27329847

  14. A general model for binary cell fate decision gene circuits with degeneracy: indeterminacy and switch behavior in the absence of cooperativity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mircea Andrecut

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The gene regulatory circuit motif in which two opposing fate-determining transcription factors inhibit each other but activate themselves has been used in mathematical models of binary cell fate decisions in multipotent stem or progenitor cells. This simple circuit can generate multistability and explains the symmetric "poised" precursor state in which both factors are present in the cell at equal amounts as well as the resolution of this indeterminate state as the cell commits to either cell fate characterized by an asymmetric expression pattern of the two factors. This establishes the two alternative stable attractors that represent the two fate options. It has been debated whether cooperativity of molecular interactions is necessary to produce such multistability. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we take a general modeling approach and argue that this question is not relevant. We show that non-linearity can arise in two distinct models in which no explicit interaction between the two factors is assumed and that distinct chemical reaction kinetic formalisms can lead to the same (generic dynamical system form. Moreover, we describe a novel type of bifurcation that produces a degenerate steady state that can explain the metastable state of indeterminacy prior to cell fate decision-making and is consistent with biological observations. CONCLUSION: The general model presented here thus offers a novel principle for linking regulatory circuits with the state of indeterminacy characteristic of multipotent (stem cells.

  15. A General Model for Binary Cell Fate Decision Gene Circuits with Degeneracy: Indeterminacy and Switch Behavior in the Absence of Cooperativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrecut, Mircea; Halley, Julianne D.; Winkler, David A.; Huang, Sui

    2011-01-01

    Background The gene regulatory circuit motif in which two opposing fate-determining transcription factors inhibit each other but activate themselves has been used in mathematical models of binary cell fate decisions in multipotent stem or progenitor cells. This simple circuit can generate multistability and explains the symmetric “poised” precursor state in which both factors are present in the cell at equal amounts as well as the resolution of this indeterminate state as the cell commits to either cell fate characterized by an asymmetric expression pattern of the two factors. This establishes the two alternative stable attractors that represent the two fate options. It has been debated whether cooperativity of molecular interactions is necessary to produce such multistability. Principal Findings Here we take a general modeling approach and argue that this question is not relevant. We show that non-linearity can arise in two distinct models in which no explicit interaction between the two factors is assumed and that distinct chemical reaction kinetic formalisms can lead to the same (generic) dynamical system form. Moreover, we describe a novel type of bifurcation that produces a degenerate steady state that can explain the metastable state of indeterminacy prior to cell fate decision-making and is consistent with biological observations. Conclusion The general model presented here thus offers a novel principle for linking regulatory circuits with the state of indeterminacy characteristic of multipotent (stem) cells. PMID:21625586

  16. PI3K/AKT/mTOR and sonic hedgehog pathways cooperate together to inhibit human pancreatic cancer stem cell characteristics and tumor growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Narinder; Nanta, Rajesh; Sharma, Jay; Gunewardena, Sumedha; Singh, Karan P; Shankar, Sharmila; Srivastava, Rakesh K

    2015-10-13

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) play major roles in cancer initiation, progression, and metastasis. It is evident from growing reports that PI3K/Akt/mTOR and Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) signaling pathways are aberrantly reactivated in pancreatic CSCs. Here, we examined the efficacy of combining NVP-LDE-225 (PI3K/mTOR inhibitor) and NVP-BEZ-235 (Smoothened inhibitor) on pancreatic CSCs characteristics, microRNA regulatory network, and tumor growth. NVP-LDE-225 co-operated with NVP-BEZ-235 in inhibiting pancreatic CSC's characteristics and tumor growth in mice by acting at the level of Gli. Combination of NVP-LDE-225 and NVP-BEZ-235 inhibited self-renewal capacity of CSCs by suppressing the expression of pluripotency maintaining factors Nanog, Oct-4, Sox-2 and c-Myc, and transcription of Gli. NVP-LDE-225 co-operated with NVP-BEZ-235 to inhibit Lin28/Let7a/Kras axis in pancreatic CSCs. Furthermore, a superior interaction of these drugs was observed on spheroid formation by pancreatic CSCs isolated from Pankras/p53 mice. The combination of these drugs also showed superior effects on the expression of proteins involved in cell proliferation, survival and apoptosis. In addition, NVP-LDE-225 co-operated with NVP-BEZ-235 in inhibiting EMT through modulation of cadherin, vimentin and transcription factors Snail, Slug and Zeb1. In conclusion, these data suggest that the combined inhibition of PI3K/Akt/mTOR and Shh pathways may be beneficial for the treatment of pancreatic cancer.

  17. Cooperative Software Testing and Analysis:Advances and Challenges

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谢涛; 张路; 肖旭生; 熊英飞; 郝丹

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, to maximize the value of software testing and analysis, we have proposed the methodology of cooperative software testing and analysis (in short as cooperative testing and analysis) to enable testing and analysis tools to cooperate with their users (in the form of tool-human cooperation), and enable one tool to cooperate with another tool (in the form of tool-tool cooperation). Such cooperations are motivated by the observation that a tool is typically not powerful enough to address complications in testing or analysis of complex real-world software, and the tool user or another tool may be able to help out some problems faced by the tool. To enable tool-human or tool-tool cooperation, effective mechanisms need to be developed 1) for a tool to communicate problems faced by the tool to the tool user or another tool, and 2) for the tool user or another tool to assist the tool to address the problems. Such methodology of cooperative testing and analysis forms a new research frontier on synergistic cooperations between humans and tools along with cooperations between tools and tools. This article presents recent example advances and challenges on cooperative testing and analysis.

  18. The Nordic Housing Enabler

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helle, Tina; Slaug, Bjørn; Brandt, Åse

    2010-01-01

    This study addresses development of a content valid cross-Nordic version of the Housing Enabler and investigation of its inter-rater reliability when used in occupational therapy rating situations, involving occupational therapists, clients and their home environments. The instrument was translated...... from the original Swedish version of the Housing Enabler, and adapted according to accessibility norms and guidelines for housing design in Sweden, Denmark, Finland and Iceland. This iterative process involved occupational therapists, architects, building engineers and professional translators......, resulting in the Nordic Housing Enabler. For reliability testing, the sampling strategy and data collection procedures used were the same in all countries. Twenty voluntary occupational therapists, pair-wise but independently from each other, collected data from 106 cases by means of the Nordic Housing...

  19. Organising to Enable Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brink, Tove

    2016-01-01

    . The findings reveal a continous organising process between individual/ team creativity and organisational structures/control to enable innovation at firm level. Organising provides a dynamic approach and contains the integrated reconstruction of creativity, structures and boundaries for enhanced balance......The purpose of this conceptual paper is to reveal how organising can enable innovation across organisational layers and organisational units. This approach calls for a cross-disciplinary literature review. The aim is to provide an integrated understanding of innovation in an organisational approach...... of explorative and exploitative learning in uncertain environments. Shedding light on the cross-disciplinary theories to organise innovation provides a contribution at the firm level to enable innovation....

  20. The Cooperative Effect of Genistein and Protein Hydrolysates on the Proliferation and Survival of Osteoblastic Cells (hFOB 1.19

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuo Wang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Chum salmon skin gelatin, de-isoflavoned soy protein, and casein were hydrolyzed at two degrees of hydrolysis. Genistein, the prepared hydrolysates, and genistein-hydrolysate combinations were assessed for their proliferative and anti-apoptotic effects on human osteoblasts (hFOB 1.19 to clarify potential cooperative effects between genistein and these hydrolysates in these two activities. Genistein at 2.5 μg/L demonstrated the highest proliferative activity, while the higher dose of genistein inhibited cell growth. All hydrolysates promoted osteoblast proliferation by increasing cell viability to 102.9%–131.1%. Regarding etoposide- or NaF-induced osteoblast apoptosis, these hydrolysates at 0.05 g/L showed both preventive and therapeutic effects against apoptosis. In the mode of apoptotic prevention, the hydrolysates decreased apoptotic cells from 32.9% to 15.2%–23.7% (etoposide treatment or from 23.6% to 14.3%–19.6% (NaF treatment. In the mode of apoptotic rescue, the hydrolysates lessened the extent of apoptotic cells from 15.9% to 13.0%–15.3% (etoposide treatment or from 13.3% to 10.9%–12.7% (NaF treatment. Gelatin hydrolysates showed the highest activities among all hydrolysates in all cases. All investigated combinations (especially the genistein-gelatin hydrolysate combination had stronger proliferation, apoptotic prevention, and rescue than genistein itself or their counterpart hydrolysates alone, suggesting that genistein cooperated with these hydrolysates, rendering greater activities in osteoblast proliferation and anti-apoptosis.

  1. The Nordic Housing Enabler

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helle, T.; Nygren, C.; Slaug, B.

    2014-01-01

    This study addresses development of a content-valid cross-Nordic version of the Housing Enabler and investigation of its inter-rater reliability when used in occupational therapy rating situations, involving occupational therapists, clients, and their home environments. The instrument was transla......This study addresses development of a content-valid cross-Nordic version of the Housing Enabler and investigation of its inter-rater reliability when used in occupational therapy rating situations, involving occupational therapists, clients, and their home environments. The instrument...... was translated from the original Swedish version of the Housing Enabler, and adapted according to accessibility norms and guidelines for housing design in Sweden, Denmark, Finland, and Iceland. This iterative process involved occupational therapists, architects, building engineers, and professional translators......, resulting in the Nordic Housing Enabler. For reliability testing, the sampling strategy and data collection procedures used were the same in all countries. Twenty voluntary occupational therapists, pair-wise but independently of each other, collected data from 106 cases by means of the Nordic Housing...

  2. Pilot project as enabler?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neisig, Margit; Glimø, Helle; Holm, Catrine Granzow;

    This article deals with a systemic perspective on transition. The field of study addressed is a pilot project as enabler of transition in a highly complex polycentric context. From a Luhmannian systemic approach, a framework is created to understand and address barriers of change occurred using p...

  3. Enabling distributed collaborative science

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hudson, T.; Sonnenwald, Diane H.; Maglaughlin, K.

    2000-01-01

    To enable collaboration over distance, a collaborative environment that uses a specialized scientific instrument called a nanoManipulator is evaluated. The nanoManipulator incorporates visualization and force feedback technology to allow scientists to see, feel, and modify biological samples bein...

  4. Cooperative Effect of Erythropoietin and TGF-β Inhibition on Erythroid Development in Human Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Yinliang; Bai, Hao; Liu, Yanfeng; Hoyle, Dixie L; Cheng, Tao; Wang, Zack Z

    2015-12-01

    Patient-specific human induced-pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) represent important cell sources to treat patients with acquired blood disorders. To realize the therapeutic potential of hiPSCs, it is crucial to understand signals that direct hiPSC differentiation to a hematopoietic lineage fate. Our previous study demonstrated that CD34(+)CD31(+) cells derived from human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) contain hemato-endothelial progenitors (HEPs) that give rise to hematopoietic cells and endothelial cells. Here, we established a serum-free and feeder-free system to induce the differentiation of hPSC-derived CD34(+)CD31(+) progenitor cells to erythroid cells. We show that extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins promote the differentiation of CD34(+)CD31(+) progenitor cells into CD235a(+) erythroid cells through CD41(+)CD235a(+) megakaryocyte-erythroid progenitors (MEP). Erythropoietin (EPO) is a predominant factor for CD34(+)CD31(+) progenitor differentiation to erythroid cells, whereas transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) inhibits the development of CD34(+)CD31(+) progenitor cells. Apoptosis of progenitor cells is induced by TGF-β in early erythroid differentiation. Suppression of TGF-β signaling by SB431542 at early stage of CD34(+)CD31(+) progenitor differentiation induces the erythroid cell generation. Together, these findings suggest that TGF-β suppression and EPO stimulation promote erythropoiesis of CD34(+)CD31(+) progenitor cells derived from hPSCs.

  5. Cooperative antiproliferative effect of coordinated ectopic expression of DLC1 tumor suppressor protein and silencing of MYC oncogene expression in liver cancer cells: Therapeutic implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xuyu; Zhou, Xiaoling; Tone, Paul; Durkin, Marian E.; Popescu, Nicholas C.

    2016-01-01

    Human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most common types of cancer and has a very poor prognosis; thus, the development of effective therapies for the treatment of advanced HCC is of high clinical priority. In the present study, the anti-oncogenic effect of combined knockdown of c-Myc expression and ectopic restoration of deleted in liver cancer 1 (DLC1) expression was investigated in human liver cancer cells. Expression of c-Myc in human HCC cells was knocked down by stable transfection with a Myc-specific short hairpin (sh) RNA vector. DLC1 expression in Huh7 cells was restored by adenovirus transduction, and the effects of DLC1 expression and c-Myc knockdown on Ras homolog gene family, member A (RhoA) levels, cell proliferation, soft agar colony formation and cell invasion were measured. Downregulation of c-Myc or re-expression of DLC1 led to a marked reduction in RhoA levels, which was associated with decreases in cell proliferation, soft agar colony formation and invasiveness; this inhibitory effect was augmented with a combination of DLC1 transduction and c-Myc suppression. To determine whether liver cell-specific delivery of DLC1 was able to enhance the inhibitory effect of c-Myc knockdown on tumor growth in vivo, DLC1 vector DNA complexed with galactosylated polyethylene glycol-linear polyethyleneimine was administered by tail vein injection to mice bearing subcutaneous xenografts of Huh7 cells transfected with shMyc or control shRNA. A cooperative inhibitory effect of DLC1 expression and c-Myc knockdown on the growth of Huh7-derived tumors was observed, suggesting that targeted liver cell delivery of DLC1 and c-Myc shRNA may serve as a possible gene therapy modality for the treatment of human HCC. PMID:27446476

  6. Smashing patriarchy with cell phones? : Critique of dominant technofeminist perspectives on mobile phone-enabled women’s empowerment programmes in Bangladesh

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I. Segers (Iris); P.A. Arora (Payal)

    2016-01-01

    markdownabstractThis study problematizes the relationship between ICTs, gender and development, informed by the gap between high ambitions, and disappointing outcomes of ICT-enabled development programmes aiming for women’s empowerment. Using a critical discourse analysis approach, this study scrut

  7. DNA ligase IV and artemis act cooperatively to suppress homologous recombination in human cells: implications for DNA double-strand break repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurosawa, Aya; Saito, Shinta; So, Sairei; Hashimoto, Mitsumasa; Iwabuchi, Kuniyoshi; Watabe, Haruka; Adachi, Noritaka

    2013-01-01

    Nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) and homologous recombination (HR) are two major pathways for repairing DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs); however, their respective roles in human somatic cells remain to be elucidated. Here we show using a series of human gene-knockout cell lines that NHEJ repairs nearly all of the topoisomerase II- and low-dose radiation-induced DNA damage, while it negatively affects survival of cells harbouring replication-associated DSBs. Intriguingly, we find that loss of DNA ligase IV, a critical NHEJ ligase, and Artemis, an NHEJ factor with endonuclease activity, independently contribute to increased resistance to replication-associated DSBs. We also show that loss of Artemis alleviates hypersensitivity of DNA ligase IV-null cells to low-dose radiation- and topoisomerase II-induced DSBs. Finally, we demonstrate that Artemis-null human cells display increased gene-targeting efficiencies, particularly in the absence of DNA ligase IV. Collectively, these data suggest that DNA ligase IV and Artemis act cooperatively to promote NHEJ, thereby suppressing HR. Our results point to the possibility that HR can only operate on accidental DSBs when NHEJ is missing or abortive, and Artemis may be involved in pathway switching from incomplete NHEJ to HR.

  8. DNA ligase IV and artemis act cooperatively to suppress homologous recombination in human cells: implications for DNA double-strand break repair.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aya Kurosawa

    Full Text Available Nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ and homologous recombination (HR are two major pathways for repairing DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs; however, their respective roles in human somatic cells remain to be elucidated. Here we show using a series of human gene-knockout cell lines that NHEJ repairs nearly all of the topoisomerase II- and low-dose radiation-induced DNA damage, while it negatively affects survival of cells harbouring replication-associated DSBs. Intriguingly, we find that loss of DNA ligase IV, a critical NHEJ ligase, and Artemis, an NHEJ factor with endonuclease activity, independently contribute to increased resistance to replication-associated DSBs. We also show that loss of Artemis alleviates hypersensitivity of DNA ligase IV-null cells to low-dose radiation- and topoisomerase II-induced DSBs. Finally, we demonstrate that Artemis-null human cells display increased gene-targeting efficiencies, particularly in the absence of DNA ligase IV. Collectively, these data suggest that DNA ligase IV and Artemis act cooperatively to promote NHEJ, thereby suppressing HR. Our results point to the possibility that HR can only operate on accidental DSBs when NHEJ is missing or abortive, and Artemis may be involved in pathway switching from incomplete NHEJ to HR.

  9. Nordic Housing Enabler

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helle, Tina; Brandt, Åse

    2009-01-01

    Development and reliability testing of the Nordic Housing Enabler – an instrument for accessibility assessment of the physical housing. Tina Helle & Åse Brandt University of Lund, Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine (SE) and University College Northern Jutland, Occupational Therapy department (DK......). Danish Centre for Assistive Technology. Abstract. For decades, accessibility to the physical housing environment for people with functional limitations has been of interest politically, professionally and for the users. Guidelines and norms on accessible housing design have gradually been developed......, however, the built environment shows serious deficits when it comes to accessibility. This study addresses development of a content valid cross-Nordic version of the Housing Enabler and investigation of inter-rater reliability, when used in occupational therapy practice. The instrument was translated from...

  10. Spatially enabled land administration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Enemark, Stig

    2006-01-01

    . In other words: Good governance and sustainable development is not attainable without sound land administration or - more broadly – sound land management. The paper presents a land management vision that incorporates the benefits of ICT enabled land administration functions. The idea is that spatial...... enabling of land administration systems managing tenure, valuation, planning, and development will allow the information generated by these activities to be much more useful. Also, the services available to private and public sectors and to community organisations should commensurably improve. Knowledge...... the communication between administrative systems and also establish more reliable data due to the use the original data instead of copies. In Denmark, such governmental guidelines for a service-oriented ITarchitecture in support of e-government are recently adopted. Finally, the paper presents the role of FIG...

  11. 基于协作元的产品协同设计研究%PRODUCT COOPERATIVE DESIGN BASED ON COLLABORATION CELL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    储备; 蔡青; 武俊峰; 杨海波

    2001-01-01

    The organization,optimization and dynamical control of design assignments are key issues of product cooperative design. Existing methods for product cooperative design focus on the disposing of business process. They do not take into account the optimum way of distributing subtasks in design. An idea of "collaboration cell"is presented which is made up of designer, personnel cooperative agent(PCAgent)and design tools. A model of invitation and bid is put forward to reasonably deploy subtasks in product design based on PCAgent and task bulletin board, with the decision-making bid in PCAgent and the definition of Ability operator, Famine operator and Importance operator. The"key path"method is also presented to control and optimize the period of design, which can inspect whether the task is reasonably distributed into subtasks or not. The experiment in engineering indicates the rationality and validity of all methods which provide the dearly theoretical foundation for the organization,optimization,deployment and control of all design assignments, and obviously improve the product cooperative design.%设计任务的组织、优化及动态控制都是产品协同设计的关键问题。引入了以设计人、个人协同代理、设计工 具为内容的"协作元"概念。以个人协同代理和任务公告模板为基础,通过招投标模型实现产品设计任务的合理配 置,并提出关键路径法控制产品设计周期。工程实例表明,所提方法合理有效,设计任务的组织、分解、配置、控制 有了明显的理论依据,对产品协同设计水平有明显的提高作用。

  12. Enabling Global Collaboration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brix, Anders; de Gier, Nicolai

    2014-01-01

    recognizing the value of incremental refinement of tradition and sustainability obtained through cultivation of the culturally and visually sustainable. As a contribution to this development, we propose: 1) The notion of tectonics as a core concept enabling a mutual, cross-cultural design discourse...... of the studio informed by the theory of tectonics together provides cross-cultural students with a mutual language to discuss intrinsic matters of form....

  13. Enabling Wind Power Nationwide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jose Zayas, Michael Derby, Patrick Gilman and Shreyas Ananthan,

    2015-05-01

    Leveraging this experience, the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Wind and Water Power Technologies Office has evaluated the potential for wind power to generate electricity in all 50 states. This report analyzes and quantifies the geographic expansion that could be enabled by accessing higher above ground heights for wind turbines and considers the means by which this new potential could be responsibly developed.

  14. Arabidopsis PEROXIN11c-e, FISSION1b, and DYNAMIN-RELATED PROTEIN3A Cooperate in Cell Cycle–Associated Replication of Peroxisomes[W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lingard, Matthew J.; Gidda, Satinder K.; Bingham, Scott; Rothstein, Steven J.; Mullen, Robert T.; Trelease, Richard N.

    2008-01-01

    Although participation of PEROXIN11 (PEX11), FISSION1 (FISl), and DYNAMIN-RELATED PROTEIN (DRP) has been well established during induced peroxisome proliferation in response to external stimuli, their roles in cell cycle–associated constitutive replication/duplication have not been fully explored. Herein, bimolecular fluorescence complementation experiments with Arabidopsis thaliana suspension cells revealed homooligomerization of all five PEX11 isoforms (PEX11a-e) and heterooligomerizations of all five PEX11 isoforms with FIS1b, but not FIS1a nor DRP3A. Intracellular protein targeting experiments demonstrated that FIS1b, but not FIS1a nor DRP3A, targeted to peroxisomes only when coexpressed with PEX11d or PEX11e. Simultaneous silencing of PEX11c-e or individual silencing of DRP3A, but not FIS1a nor FIS1b, resulted in ∼40% reductions in peroxisome number. During G2 in synchronized cell cultures, peroxisomes sequentially enlarged, elongated, and then doubled in number, which correlated with peaks in PEX11, FIS1, and DRP3A expression. Overall, these data support a model for the replication of preexisting peroxisomes wherein PEX11c, PEX11d, and PEX11e act cooperatively during G2 to promote peroxisome elongation and recruitment of FIS1b to the peroxisome membrane, where DRP3A stimulates fission of elongated peroxisomes into daughter peroxisomes, which are then distributed between daughter cells. PMID:18539750

  15. Arabidopsis PEROXIN11c-e, FISSION1b, and DYNAMIN-RELATED PROTEIN3A cooperate in cell cycle-associated replication of peroxisomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lingard, Matthew J; Gidda, Satinder K; Bingham, Scott; Rothstein, Steven J; Mullen, Robert T; Trelease, Richard N

    2008-06-01

    Although participation of PEROXIN11 (PEX11), FISSION1 (FISl), and DYNAMIN-RELATED PROTEIN (DRP) has been well established during induced peroxisome proliferation in response to external stimuli, their roles in cell cycle-associated constitutive replication/duplication have not been fully explored. Herein, bimolecular fluorescence complementation experiments with Arabidopsis thaliana suspension cells revealed homooligomerization of all five PEX11 isoforms (PEX11a-e) and heterooligomerizations of all five PEX11 isoforms with FIS1b, but not FIS1a nor DRP3A. Intracellular protein targeting experiments demonstrated that FIS1b, but not FIS1a nor DRP3A, targeted to peroxisomes only when coexpressed with PEX11d or PEX11e. Simultaneous silencing of PEX11c-e or individual silencing of DRP3A, but not FIS1a nor FIS1b, resulted in approximately 40% reductions in peroxisome number. During G2 in synchronized cell cultures, peroxisomes sequentially enlarged, elongated, and then doubled in number, which correlated with peaks in PEX11, FIS1, and DRP3A expression. Overall, these data support a model for the replication of preexisting peroxisomes wherein PEX11c, PEX11d, and PEX11e act cooperatively during G2 to promote peroxisome elongation and recruitment of FIS1b to the peroxisome membrane, where DRP3A stimulates fission of elongated peroxisomes into daughter peroxisomes, which are then distributed between daughter cells.

  16. Poly(I:C induces intense expression of c-IAP2 and cooperates with an IAP inhibitor in induction of apoptosis in cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uzan Catherine

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is increasing evidence that the toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3 is an interesting target for anti-cancer therapy. Unfortunately, most laboratory investigations about the impact of TLR3 stimulation on human malignant cells have been performed with very high concentrations - 5 to 100 μg/ml - of the prototype TLR3 ligand, poly(I:C. In a previous study focused on a specific type of human carcinoma - nasopharyngeal carcinoma - we have shown that concentrations of poly(I:C as low as 100 ng/ml are sufficient to induce apoptosis of malignant cells when combined to a pharmacological antagonist of the IAP family based on Smac mimicry. Methods This observation prompted us to investigate the contribution of the IAP family in cell response to poly(I:C in a variety of human malignant cell types. Results We report a rapid, intense and selective increase in c-IAP2 protein expression observed under stimulation by poly(I:C(500 ng/ml in all types of human malignant cells. In most cell types, this change in protein expression is underlain by an increase in c-IAP2 transcripts and dependent on the TLR3/TRIF pathway. When poly(I:C is combined to the IAP inhibitor RMT 5265, a cooperative effect in apoptosis induction and/or inhibition of clonogenic growth is obtained in a large fraction of carcinoma and melanoma cell lines. Conclusions Currently, IAP inhibitors like RMT 5265 and poly(I:C are the subject of separate therapeutic trials. In light of our observations, combined use of both types of compounds should be considered for treatment of human malignancies including carcinomas and melanomas.

  17. Genome Wide Mapping of NR4A Binding Reveals Cooperativity with ETS Factors to Promote Epigenetic Activation of Distal Enhancers in Acute Myeloid Leukemia Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan P Duren

    Full Text Available Members of the NR4A subfamily of orphan nuclear receptors regulate cell fate decisions via both genomic and non-genomic mechanisms in a cell and tissue selective manner. NR4As play a key role in maintenance of hematopoietic stem cell homeostasis and are critical tumor suppressors of acute myeloid leukemia (AML. Expression of NR4As is broadly silenced in leukemia initiating cell enriched populations from human patients relative to normal hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells. Rescue of NR4A expression in human AML cells inhibits proliferation and reprograms AML gene signatures via transcriptional mechanisms that remain to be elucidated. By intersecting an acutely regulated NR4A1 dependent transcriptional profile with genome wide NR4A binding distribution, we now identify an NR4A targetome of 685 genes that are directly regulated by NR4A1. We show that NR4As regulate gene transcription primarily through interaction with distal enhancers that are co-enriched for NR4A1 and ETS transcription factor motifs. Using a subset of NR4A activated genes, we demonstrate that the ETS factors ERG and FLI-1 are required for activation of NR4A bound enhancers and NR4A target gene induction. NR4A1 dependent recruitment of ERG and FLI-1 promotes binding of p300 histone acetyltransferase to epigenetically activate NR4A bound enhancers via acetylation at histone H3K27. These findings disclose novel epigenetic mechanisms by which NR4As and ETS factors cooperate to drive NR4A dependent gene transcription in human AML cells.

  18. Genome Wide Mapping of NR4A Binding Reveals Cooperativity with ETS Factors to Promote Epigenetic Activation of Distal Enhancers in Acute Myeloid Leukemia Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duren, Ryan P; Boudreaux, Seth P; Conneely, Orla M

    2016-01-01

    Members of the NR4A subfamily of orphan nuclear receptors regulate cell fate decisions via both genomic and non-genomic mechanisms in a cell and tissue selective manner. NR4As play a key role in maintenance of hematopoietic stem cell homeostasis and are critical tumor suppressors of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Expression of NR4As is broadly silenced in leukemia initiating cell enriched populations from human patients relative to normal hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells. Rescue of NR4A expression in human AML cells inhibits proliferation and reprograms AML gene signatures via transcriptional mechanisms that remain to be elucidated. By intersecting an acutely regulated NR4A1 dependent transcriptional profile with genome wide NR4A binding distribution, we now identify an NR4A targetome of 685 genes that are directly regulated by NR4A1. We show that NR4As regulate gene transcription primarily through interaction with distal enhancers that are co-enriched for NR4A1 and ETS transcription factor motifs. Using a subset of NR4A activated genes, we demonstrate that the ETS factors ERG and FLI-1 are required for activation of NR4A bound enhancers and NR4A target gene induction. NR4A1 dependent recruitment of ERG and FLI-1 promotes binding of p300 histone acetyltransferase to epigenetically activate NR4A bound enhancers via acetylation at histone H3K27. These findings disclose novel epigenetic mechanisms by which NR4As and ETS factors cooperate to drive NR4A dependent gene transcription in human AML cells.

  19. RNA sensors enable human mast cell anti-viral chemokine production and IFN-mediated protection in response to antibody-enhanced dengue virus infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael G Brown

    Full Text Available Dengue hemorrhagic fever and/or dengue shock syndrome represent the most serious pathophysiological manifestations of human dengue virus infection. Despite intensive research, the mechanisms and important cellular players that contribute to dengue disease are unclear. Mast cells are tissue-resident innate immune cells that play a sentinel cell role in host protection against infectious agents via pathogen-recognition receptors by producing potent mediators that modulate inflammation, cell recruitment and normal vascular homeostasis. Most importantly, mast cells are susceptible to antibody-enhanced dengue virus infection and respond with selective cytokine and chemokine responses. In order to obtain a global view of dengue virus-induced gene regulation in mast cells, primary human cord blood-derived mast cells (CBMCs and the KU812 and HMC-1 mast cell lines were infected with dengue virus in the presence of dengue-immune sera and their responses were evaluated at the mRNA and protein levels. Mast cells responded to antibody-enhanced dengue virus infection or polyinosiniċpolycytidylic acid treatment with the production of type I interferons and the rapid and potent production of chemokines including CCL4, CCL5 and CXCL10. Multiple interferon-stimulated genes were also upregulated as well as mRNA and protein for the RNA sensors PKR, RIG-I and MDA5. Dengue virus-induced chemokine production by KU812 cells was significantly modulated by siRNA knockdown of RIG-I and PKR, in a negative and positive manner, respectively. Pretreatment of fresh KU812 cells with supernatants from dengue virus-infected mast cells provided protection from subsequent infection with dengue virus in a type I interferon-dependent manner. These findings support a role for tissue-resident mast cells in the early detection of antibody-enhanced dengue virus infection via RNA sensors, the protection of neighbouring cells through interferon production and the potential recruitment of

  20. miR-128b is a potent glucocorticoid sensitizer in MLL-AF4 acute lymphocytic leukemia cells and exerts cooperative effects with miR-221.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotani, Ai; Ha, Daon; Hsieh, James; Rao, Prakash K; Schotte, Diana; den Boer, Monique L; Armstrong, Scott A; Lodish, Harvey F

    2009-11-05

    MLL-AF4 acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) has a poor prognosis. MicroRNAs (miRNA) are small noncoding RNAs that posttranscriptionally regulate expression of target mRNAs. Our analysis of previously published data showed that expression of miR-128b and miR-221 is down-regulated in MLL-rearranged ALL relative to other types of ALL. Reexpression of these miRNAs cooperatively sensitizes 2 cultured lines of MLL-AF4 ALL cells to glucocorticoids. Target genes down-regulated by miR-128b include MLL, AF4, and both MLL-AF4 and AF4-MLL fusion genes; miR-221 down-regulates CDKN1B. These results demonstrate that down-regulation of miR-128b and miR-221 is implicated in glucocorticoid resistance and that restoration of their levels is a potentially promising therapeutic in MLL-AF4 ALL.

  1. Flexible CdTe Solar Cells and Modules: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-14-548

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnes, Teresa [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2016-05-01

    Lucintech and NREL will collaborate to develop flexible CdTe solar cells on flexible glass using sputtering and other deposition technologies. This initial work will be conducted under the DOE funded Foundational Program to Advance Cell Efficiency (FPACE) 1 project, and the interaction with Lucintech will focus on scaling up and transferring the high efficiency cell processes to module production on a pilot line.

  2. Enabling Digital Literacy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ryberg, Thomas; Georgsen, Marianne

    2010-01-01

    There are some tensions between high-level policy definitions of “digital literacy” and actual teaching practice. We need to find workable definitions of digital literacy; obtain a better understanding of what digital literacy might look like in practice; and identify pedagogical approaches, which...... support teachers in designing digital literacy learning. We suggest that frameworks such as Problem Based Learning (PBL) are approaches that enable digital literacy learning because they provide good settings for engaging with digital literacy. We illustrate this through analysis of a case. Furthermore......, these operate on a meso-level mediating between high-level concepts of digital literacy and classroom practice....

  3. Nanomaterial-enabled neural stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongchen eWang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Neural stimulation is a critical technique in treating neurological diseases and investigating brain functions. Traditional electrical stimulation uses electrodes to directly create intervening electric fields in the immediate vicinity of neural tissues. Second-generation stimulation techniques directly use light, magnetic fields or ultrasound in a non-contact manner. An emerging generation of non- or minimally invasive neural stimulation techniques is enabled by nanotechnology to achieve a high spatial resolution and cell-type specificity. In these techniques, a nanomaterial converts a remotely transmitted primary stimulus such as a light, magnetic or ultrasonic signal to a localized secondary stimulus such as an electric field or heat to stimulate neurons. The ease of surface modification and bio-conjugation of nanomaterials facilitates cell-type-specific targeting, designated placement and highly localized membrane activation. This review focuses on nanomaterial-enabled neural stimulation techniques primarily involving opto-electric, opto-thermal, magneto-electric, magneto-thermal and acousto-electric transduction mechanisms. Stimulation techniques based on other possible transduction schemes and general consideration for these emerging neurotechnologies are also discussed.

  4. Nanomaterial-Enabled Neural Stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yongchen; Guo, Liang

    2016-01-01

    Neural stimulation is a critical technique in treating neurological diseases and investigating brain functions. Traditional electrical stimulation uses electrodes to directly create intervening electric fields in the immediate vicinity of neural tissues. Second-generation stimulation techniques directly use light, magnetic fields or ultrasound in a non-contact manner. An emerging generation of non- or minimally invasive neural stimulation techniques is enabled by nanotechnology to achieve a high spatial resolution and cell-type specificity. In these techniques, a nanomaterial converts a remotely transmitted primary stimulus such as a light, magnetic or ultrasonic signal to a localized secondary stimulus such as an electric field or heat to stimulate neurons. The ease of surface modification and bio-conjugation of nanomaterials facilitates cell-type-specific targeting, designated placement and highly localized membrane activation. This review focuses on nanomaterial-enabled neural stimulation techniques primarily involving opto-electric, opto-thermal, magneto-electric, magneto-thermal and acousto-electric transduction mechanisms. Stimulation techniques based on other possible transduction schemes and general consideration for these emerging neurotechnologies are also discussed.

  5. Loss of the Drosophila cell polarity regulator Scribbled promotes epithelial tissue overgrowth and cooperation with oncogenic Ras-Raf through impaired Hippo pathway signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grusche Felix A

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Epithelial neoplasias are associated with alterations in cell polarity and excessive cell proliferation, yet how these neoplastic properties are related to one another is still poorly understood. The study of Drosophila genes that function as neoplastic tumor suppressors by regulating both of these properties has significant potential to clarify this relationship. Results Here we show in Drosophila that loss of Scribbled (Scrib, a cell polarity regulator and neoplastic tumor suppressor, results in impaired Hippo pathway signaling in the epithelial tissues of both the eye and wing imaginal disc. scrib mutant tissue overgrowth, but not the loss of cell polarity, is dependent upon defective Hippo signaling and can be rescued by knockdown of either the TEAD/TEF family transcription factor Scalloped or the transcriptional coactivator Yorkie in the eye disc, or reducing levels of Yorkie in the wing disc. Furthermore, loss of Scrib sensitizes tissue to transformation by oncogenic Ras-Raf signaling, and Yorkie-Scalloped activity is required to promote this cooperative tumor overgrowth. The inhibition of Hippo signaling in scrib mutant eye disc clones is not dependent upon JNK activity, but can be significantly rescued by reducing aPKC kinase activity, and ectopic aPKC activity is sufficient to impair Hippo signaling in the eye disc, even when JNK signaling is blocked. In contrast, warts mutant overgrowth does not require aPKC activity. Moreover, reducing endogenous levels of aPKC or increasing Scrib or Lethal giant larvae levels does not promote increased Hippo signaling, suggesting that aPKC activity is not normally rate limiting for Hippo pathway activity. Epistasis experiments suggest that Hippo pathway inhibition in scrib mutants occurs, at least in part, downstream or in parallel to both the Expanded and Fat arms of Hippo pathway regulation. Conclusions Loss of Scrib promotes Yorkie/Scalloped-dependent epithelial tissue

  6. Enabling technology for human collaboration.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, Tim Andrew (MindTel, LLC, Syracuse, NY); Jones, Wendell Bruce; Warner, David Jay (MindTel, LLC, Syracuse, NY); Doser, Adele Beatrice; Johnson, Curtis Martin; Merkle, Peter Benedict

    2003-11-01

    This report summarizes the results of a five-month LDRD late start project which explored the potential of enabling technology to improve the performance of small groups. The purpose was to investigate and develop new methods to assist groups working in high consequence, high stress, ambiguous and time critical situations, especially those for which it is impractical to adequately train or prepare. A testbed was constructed for exploratory analysis of a small group engaged in tasks with high cognitive and communication performance requirements. The system consisted of five computer stations, four with special devices equipped to collect physiologic, somatic, audio and video data. Test subjects were recruited and engaged in a cooperative video game. Each team member was provided with a sensor array for physiologic and somatic data collection while playing the video game. We explored the potential for real-time signal analysis to provide information that enables emergent and desirable group behavior and improved task performance. The data collected in this study included audio, video, game scores, physiological, somatic, keystroke, and mouse movement data. The use of self-organizing maps (SOMs) was explored to search for emergent trends in the physiological data as it correlated with the video, audio and game scores. This exploration resulted in the development of two approaches for analysis, to be used concurrently, an individual SOM and a group SOM. The individual SOM was trained using the unique data of each person, and was used to monitor the effectiveness and stress level of each member of the group. The group SOM was trained using the data of the entire group, and was used to monitor the group effectiveness and dynamics. Results suggested that both types of SOMs were required to adequately track evolutions and shifts in group effectiveness. Four subjects were used in the data collection and development of these tools. This report documents a proof of concept

  7. Role of aspiration-induced migration in cooperation

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Han-Xin; Wang, Bing-Hong

    2011-01-01

    Both cooperation and migration are ubiquitous in human society and animal world. In this Rapid Communication, we propose an aspiration-induced migration in which individuals will migrate to new sites provided that their payoffs are below some aspiration level. It is found that moderate aspiration level can best favor cooperative behavior. In particular, moderate aspiration level enables cooperator clusters to maintain and expand whereas induces defector clusters to disintegrate, thus promoting the diffusion of cooperation among population. Our results provide insights into understanding the role played by migration in the emergence of cooperative behavior.

  8. Smart Grid Enabled EVSE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2015-01-12

    The combined team of GE Global Research, Federal Express, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, and Consolidated Edison has successfully achieved the established goals contained within the Department of Energy’s Smart Grid Capable Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment funding opportunity. The final program product, shown charging two vehicles in Figure 1, reduces by nearly 50% the total installed system cost of the electric vehicle supply equipment (EVSE) as well as enabling a host of new Smart Grid enabled features. These include bi-directional communications, load control, utility message exchange and transaction management information. Using the new charging system, Utilities or energy service providers will now be able to monitor transportation related electrical loads on their distribution networks, send load control commands or preferences to individual systems, and then see measured responses. Installation owners will be able to authorize usage of the stations, monitor operations, and optimally control their electricity consumption. These features and cost reductions have been developed through a total system design solution.

  9. Smart Grid Enabled EVSE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2014-10-15

    The combined team of GE Global Research, Federal Express, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, and Consolidated Edison has successfully achieved the established goals contained within the Department of Energy’s Smart Grid Capable Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment funding opportunity. The final program product, shown charging two vehicles in Figure 1, reduces by nearly 50% the total installed system cost of the electric vehicle supply equipment (EVSE) as well as enabling a host of new Smart Grid enabled features. These include bi-directional communications, load control, utility message exchange and transaction management information. Using the new charging system, Utilities or energy service providers will now be able to monitor transportation related electrical loads on their distribution networks, send load control commands or preferences to individual systems, and then see measured responses. Installation owners will be able to authorize usage of the stations, monitor operations, and optimally control their electricity consumption. These features and cost reductions have been developed through a total system design solution.

  10. Cooperative cytotoxic activity of Zn and Cu in bovine serum albumin-conjugated ZnS/CuS nano-composites in PC12 cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Hua-Jie, E-mail: wanghuajie972001@163.com; Yu, Xue-Hong; Wang, Cai-Feng; Cao, Ying, E-mail: caoying1130@sina.com [Henan Normal University, Key Laboratory of Green Chemical Media and Reactions, Ministry of Education, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering (China)

    2013-11-15

    Series of self-assembled and mono-dispersed bovine serum albumin (BSA)-conjugated ZnS/CuS nano-composites with different Zn/Cu ratios had been successfully synthesized by a combination method of the biomimetic synthesis and ion-exchange strategy under the gentle conditions. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy observation, Fourier transform infrared spectra and zeta potential analysis demonstrated that BSA-conjugated ZnS/CuS nano-composites with well dispersity had the hierarchical structure and BSA was a key factor to control the morphology and surface electro-negativity of final products. The real-time monitoring by atomic absorption spectroscopy and powder X-ray diffraction revealed that the Zn/Cu ratio of nano-composites could be controlled by adjusting the ion-exchange time. In addition, the metabolic and morphological assays indicated that the metabolic proliferation and spread of rat pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells could be inhibited by nano-composites, with the high anti-cancer activity at a low concentration (4 ppm). What were more important, Zn and Cu in nano-composites exhibited a positive cooperativity at inhibiting cancer cell functions. The microscope observation and biochemical marker analysis clearly revealed that the nano-composites-included lipid peroxidation and disintegration of membrane led to the death of PC12 cells. Summarily, the present study substantiated the potential of BSA-conjugated ZnS/CuS nano-composites as anti-cancer drug.

  11. Research of pre-coding with multi-cell cooperation%基于信干噪比反馈的多基站协作预编码

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张宏群; 史小平

    2011-01-01

    针对蜂窝小区的干扰,给出了基于信干噪比(SINR)反馈的基站协作策略,采用SINR门限锁定系统边缘用户,避免了传统穷搜索算法的复杂性,在多小区规模上索引协作基站。基于SWF功率分配,采用SVD预编码设计。仿真表明,该方案既弱化了小区边缘用户受到的干扰,提高了系统信息吞吐量,又减少了高反馈量带来的复杂度,是一个很好的折中方案。%In this paper, for inter-cell interference, we propose a cooperation strategy based on the SINR feedback. According to the SINR decision threshold, we lock edge users to avoid the complexity of the traditional poor search algorithm and index the collaboration BS within multi-cell scale, Based on the SWF power allocation algorithm, we use SVD to do the pre-coding design. Simulation resuhs show that the program, which not only weakens the cell edge users disruption and improves the information throughput, and reduces the complexity brought by the feedback amount, is a quite good compromise.

  12. Supply and Marketing Cooperatives

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    @@ China Supply and Marketing Cooperatives Council of CCPIT was established in March 1996. It is an institution under direct leadership of China Supply and Market-ing Cooperatives and at the same time a branch of China Council for Promotion of International Trade, with its major task to promoting and facilitating export-oriented economic trade and technological cooper-ation of the national supply and marketing cooperative system.

  13. Cooperative Role for Tetraspanins in Adhesin-Mediated Attachment of Bacterial Species to Human Epithelial Cells ▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Luke R.; Monk, Peter N.; Partridge, Lynda J.; Morris, Paul; Gorringe, Andrew R.; Read, Robert C.

    2011-01-01

    The tetraspanins are a superfamily of transmembrane proteins with diverse functions and can form extended microdomains within the plasma membrane in conjunction with partner proteins, which probably includes receptors for bacterial adhesins. Neisseria meningitidis, the causative agent of meningococcal disease, attaches to host nasopharyngeal epithelial cells via type IV pili and opacity (Opa) proteins. We examined the role of tetraspanin function in Neisseria meningitidis adherence to epithelial cells. Tetraspanins CD9, CD63, and CD151 were expressed by HEC-1-B and DETROIT 562 cells. Coincubation of cells with antibodies against all three tetraspanin molecules used individually or in combination, with recombinant tetraspanin extracellular domains (EC2), or with small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) significantly reduced adherence of Neisseria meningitidis. In contrast, recombinant CD81, a different tetraspanin, had no effect on meningococcal adherence. Antitetraspanin antibodies reduced the adherence to epithelial cells of Neisseria meningitidis strain derivatives expressing Opa and pili significantly more than isogenic strains lacking these determinants. Adherence to epithelial cells of strains of Staphylococcus aureus, Neisseria lactamica, Escherichia coli, and Streptococcus pneumoniae was also reduced by pretreatment of cells with tetraspanin antibodies and recombinant proteins. These data suggest that tetraspanins are required for optimal function of epithelial adhesion platforms containing specific receptors for Neisseria meningitidis and potentially for multiple species of bacteria. PMID:21464080

  14. Bovine Mx1 enables resistance against foot-and-mouth disease virus in naturally susceptible cells by inhibiting the replication of viral RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, H-M; Xia, X-Z; Hu, G-X; Yu, L; He, H-B

    2016-03-01

    Innate immunity, especially the anti-viral genes, exerts an important barrier function in preventing viral infections. Myxovirus-resistant (Mx) gene take an anti-viral role, whereas its effects on foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) in naturally susceptible cells are still unclear. The bovine primary fetal tracheal epithelial cell line BPTE-siMx1, in which bovine Mx1 gene was silenced, was established and treated with IFN alpha for 6 hr before FMDV infection. The copy numbers of the negative and positive strand viral RNA were determined by strand-specific real-time fluorescence quantitative RT-PCR. The TCID50 of BPTE-siMx1 cells increased at least 17-fold as compared to control cells BPTE-LacZ at 8 hr post infection, thus silencing of bovine Mx1 could promote the replication of FMDV. The amount of both the negative and positive strand viral RNA in BPTE-siMx1 cells significantly increased as compared to BPTE-LacZ cells, indicating that the replication levels of viral RNA were promoted by silencing bovine Mx1. The bovine Mx1 gene could provide resistance against FMDV in the bovine primary fetal tracheal epithelial cells via suppressing the replication of viral RNA.

  15. Sugar-decorated mesoporous silica nanoparticles as delivery vehicles for the poorly soluble drug celastrol enables targeted induction of apoptosis in cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemelä, Erik; Desai, Diti; Nkizinkiko, Yves; Eriksson, John E; Rosenholm, Jessica M

    2015-10-01

    Cancerous cells have a rapid metabolism by which they take up sugars, such as glucose, at significantly higher rates than normal cells. Celastrol is a traditional herbal medicine known for its anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer activities. The poor aqueous solubility and lack of target selectivity of celastrol result in low therapeutic concentration of the drug reaching subcellular compartments of the target tissue, making it an interesting candidate for nanoparticulate delivery. The goal of this study was to utilize glucose as an affinity ligand decorated on mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs), with the aim of delivering these celastrol-loaded MSNs with high specificity to cancer cells and inducing minimal off-target effects in healthy cells. MSNs were thus functionalized with sugar moieties by two different routes, either by conjugation directly to the MSN surface or mediated by a hyperbranched poly(ethylene imine), PEI layer; the latter to increase the cellular uptake by providing an overall positive surface charge as well as to increase the reaction sites for sugar conjugation. The effect of surface functionalization on the target-specific efficacy of the particles was assessed by analyzing the uptake in HeLa and A549 cells as cancer cell models, as compared to mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEF) as a representative for normal cells. To this end a comprehensive analysis strategy was employed, including flow cytometry, confocal microscopy, and spectrophotometry. When the apoptotic effect of celastrol was evaluated, the anti-cancer activity of celastrol was shown to be significantly enhanced when it was loaded into the specifically designed MSNs. The particles themselves did not induce any toxicity, and normal cells displayed minimal off-target effects. In summary, we show that glucose-functionalized MSNs can be used as efficient carriers for targeted celastrol delivery to achieve specific induction of apoptosis in cancer cells.

  16. Enabling graphene nanoelectronics.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pan, Wei; Ohta, Taisuke; Biedermann, Laura Butler; Gutierrez, Carlos; Nolen, C. M.; Howell, Stephen Wayne; Beechem Iii, Thomas Edwin; McCarty, Kevin F.; Ross, Anthony Joseph, III

    2011-09-01

    Recent work has shown that graphene, a 2D electronic material amenable to the planar semiconductor fabrication processing, possesses tunable electronic material properties potentially far superior to metals and other standard semiconductors. Despite its phenomenal electronic properties, focused research is still required to develop techniques for depositing and synthesizing graphene over large areas, thereby enabling the reproducible mass-fabrication of graphene-based devices. To address these issues, we combined an array of growth approaches and characterization resources to investigate several innovative and synergistic approaches for the synthesis of high quality graphene films on technologically relevant substrate (SiC and metals). Our work focused on developing the fundamental scientific understanding necessary to generate large-area graphene films that exhibit highly uniform electronic properties and record carrier mobility, as well as developing techniques to transfer graphene onto other substrates.

  17. EphA4 Regulates the Balance between Self-Renewal and Differentiation of Radial Glial Cells and Intermediate Neuronal Precursors in Cooperation with FGF Signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qingfa Chen

    Full Text Available In mouse cerebral corticogenesis, neurons are generated from radial glial cells (RGCs or from their immediate progeny, intermediate neuronal precursors (INPs. The balance between self-renewal of these neuronal precursors and specification of cell fate is critical for proper cortical development, but the signaling mechanisms that regulate this progression are poorly understood. EphA4, a member of the receptor tyrosine kinase superfamily, is expressed in RGCs during embryogenesis. To illuminate the function of EphA4 in RGC cell fate determination during early corticogenesis, we deleted Epha4 in cortical cells at E11.5 or E13.5. Loss of EphA4 at both stages led to precocious in vivo RGC differentiation toward neurogenesis. Cortical cells isolated at E14.5 and E15.5 from both deletion mutants showed reduced capacity for neurosphere formation with greater differentiation toward neurons. They also exhibited lower phosphorylation of ERK and FRS2α in the presence of FGF. The size of the cerebral cortex at P0 was smaller than that of controls when Epha4 was deleted at E11.5 but not when it was deleted at E13.5, although the cortical layers were formed normally in both mutants. The number of PAX6-positive RGCs decreased at later developmental stages only in the E11.5 Epha4 deletion mutant. These results suggest that EphA4, in cooperation with an FGF signal, contributes to the maintenance of RGC self-renewal and repression of RGC differentiation through the neuronal lineage. This function of EphA4 is especially critical and uncompensated in early stages of corticogenesis, and thus deletion at E11.5 reduces the size of the neonatal cortex.

  18. A defined and xeno-free culture method enabling the establishment of clinical-grade human embryonic, induced pluripotent and adipose stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristiina Rajala

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The growth of stem cells in in vitro conditions requires optimal balance between signals mediating cell survival, proliferation, and self-renewal. For clinical application of stem cells, the use of completely defined conditions and elimination of all animal-derived materials from the establishment, culture, and differentiation processes is desirable. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, we report the development of a fully defined xeno-free medium (RegES, capable of supporting the expansion of human embryonic stem cells (hESC, induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC and adipose stem cells (ASC. We describe the use of the xeno-free medium in the derivation and long-term (>80 passages culture of three pluripotent karyotypically normal hESC lines: Regea 06/015, Regea 07/046, and Regea 08/013. Cardiomyocytes and neural cells differentiated from these cells exhibit features characteristic to these cell types. The same formulation of the xeno-free medium is capable of supporting the undifferentiated growth of iPSCs on human feeder cells. The characteristics of the pluripotent hESC and iPSC lines are comparable to lines derived and cultured in standard undefined culture conditions. In the culture of ASCs, the xeno-free medium provided significantly higher proliferation rates than ASCs cultured in medium containing allogeneic human serum (HS, while maintaining the differentiation potential and characteristic surface marker expression profile of ASCs, although significant differences in the surface marker expression of ASCs cultured in HS and RegES media were revealed. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results demonstrate that human ESCs, iPSCs and ASCs can be maintained in the same defined xeno-free medium formulation for a prolonged period of time while maintaining their characteristics, demonstrating the applicability of the simplified xeno-free medium formulation for the production of clinical-grade stem cells. The basic xeno-free formulation

  19. The membrane fusion step of vaccinia virus entry is cooperatively mediated by multiple viral proteins and host cell components.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason P Laliberte

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available For many viruses, one or two proteins allow cell attachment and entry, which occurs through the plasma membrane or following endocytosis at low pH. In contrast, vaccinia virus (VACV enters cells by both neutral and low pH routes; four proteins mediate cell attachment and twelve that are associated in a membrane complex and conserved in all poxviruses are dedicated to entry. The aim of the present study was to determine the roles of cellular and viral proteins in initial stages of entry, specifically fusion of the membranes of the mature virion and cell. For analysis of the role of cellular components, we used well characterized inhibitors and measured binding of a recombinant VACV virion containing Gaussia luciferase fused to a core protein; viral and cellular membrane lipid mixing with a self-quenching fluorescent probe in the virion membrane; and core entry with a recombinant VACV expressing firefly luciferase and electron microscopy. We determined that inhibitors of tyrosine protein kinases, dynamin GTPase and actin dynamics had little effect on binding of virions to cells but impaired membrane fusion, whereas partial cholesterol depletion and inhibitors of endosomal acidification and membrane blebbing had a severe effect at the later stage of core entry. To determine the role of viral proteins, virions lacking individual membrane components were purified from cells infected with members of a panel of ten conditional-lethal inducible mutants. Each of the entry protein-deficient virions had severely reduced infectivity and except for A28, L1 and L5 greatly impaired membrane fusion. In addition, a potent neutralizing L1 monoclonal antibody blocked entry at a post-membrane lipid-mixing step. Taken together, these results suggested a 2-step entry model and implicated an unprecedented number of viral proteins and cellular components involved in signaling and actin rearrangement for initiation of virus-cell membrane fusion during poxvirus entry.

  20. Metallic Inks for Solar Cells: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-10-370

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    van Hest, M.

    2013-04-01

    This document describes the statement of work for National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) as a subcontractor for Applied Nanotech, Inc. (ANI) for the Phase II SBIR contract with the Department of Energy to build silicon solar cells using non-contact printed, nanoparticle-based metallic inks. The conductive inks are based upon ANI's proprietary method for nanoparticle dispersion. The primary inks under development are aluminum for silicon solar cell back plane contacts and copper for top interdigitated contacts. The current direction of silicon solar cell technology is to use thinner silicon wafers. The reduction in wafer thickness reduces overall material usage and can increase efficiency. These thin silicon wafers are often very brittle and normal methods used for conductive feed line application, such as screen-printing, are detrimental. The Phase II program will be focused on materials development for metallic inks that can be applied to a silicon solar cell using non-contact methods. Uniform BSF (Back Surface Field) formation will be obtained by optimizing ink formulation and curing conditions to improve cell efficiency.

  1. Cooperative Strategies for Enhancing Performance of Photothermal Therapy (PTT) Agent: Optimizing Its Photothermal Conversion and Cell Internalization Ability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Baoji; Ma, Chongbo; Ding, Guanyu; Han, Xu; Li, Dan; Wang, Erkang; Wang, Jin

    2017-01-23

    Photothermal conversion ability (PCA) and cell internalization ability (CIA) are two key factors for determining the performance of photothermal agents. The previous studies mostly focus on improving the PCA by exploring new photothermal nanomaterials. Herein, the authors take the hybrids of graphene and gold nanostar (GGN) as an example to investigate the gradually enhanced phototherapy effect by changing the PCA and CIA of photothermal therapy (PTT) agent simultaneously. Based on the GGN, the GGN and the reduced GGN protected by bovine serum albumin (BSA) or BSA-FA (folic acid) are prepared, which are named as GGNB, rGGNB, and rGGNB-FA, respectively. The rGGNB showed an enhanced PCA compared to GGNB, leading to strong cell ablation. On the other hand, the 1,2-dioleoyl-3-trimethylammoniumpropan (DOTAP) can activate the endocytosis and promote the CIA of rGGNB, further help rGGNB to be more internalized into the cells. Finally, rGGNB-FA with the target ability can make itself further internalized into the cells with the aid of DOTAP, which can significantly destroy the cancer cells even at the low laser density of 0.3 W cm(-2) . Therefore, a new angle of view is brought out for researching the PTT agents of high performance.

  2. CD147, CD44, and the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling pathway cooperate to regulate breast epithelial cell invasiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grass, G Daniel; Tolliver, Lauren B; Bratoeva, Momka; Toole, Bryan P

    2013-09-06

    The immunoglobulin superfamily glycoprotein CD147 (emmprin; basigin) is associated with an invasive phenotype in various types of cancers, including malignant breast cancer. We showed recently that up-regulation of CD147 in non-transformed, non-invasive breast epithelial cells is sufficient to induce an invasive phenotype characterized by membrane type-1 matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP)-dependent invadopodia activity (Grass, G. D., Bratoeva, M., and Toole, B. P. (2012) Regulation of invadopodia formation and activity by CD147. J. Cell Sci. 125, 777-788). Here we found that CD147 induces breast epithelial cell invasiveness by promoting epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-Ras-ERK signaling in a manner dependent on hyaluronan-CD44 interaction. Furthermore, CD147 promotes assembly of signaling complexes containing CD147, CD44, and EGFR in lipid raftlike domains. We also found that oncogenic Ras regulates CD147 expression, hyaluronan synthesis, and formation of CD147-CD44-EGFR complexes, thus forming a positive feedback loop that may amplify invasiveness. Last, we showed that malignant breast cancer cells are heterogeneous in their expression of surface-associated CD147 and that high levels of membrane CD147 correlate with cell surface EGFR and CD44 levels, activated EGFR and ERK1, and activated invadopodia. Future studies should evaluate CD147 as a potential therapeutic target and disease stratification marker in breast cancer.

  3. Chemically enabled nanostructure fabrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huo, Fengwei

    The first part of the dissertation explored ways of chemically synthesizing new nanoparticles and biologically guided assembly of nanoparticle building blocks. Chapter two focuses on synthesizing three-layer composite magnetic nanoparticles with a gold shell which can be easily functionalized with other biomolecules. The three-layer magnetic nanoparticles, when functionalized with oligonucleotides, exhibit the surface chemistry, optical properties, and cooperative DNA binding properties of gold nanoparticle probes, while maintaining the magnetic properties of the Fe3O4 inner shell. Chapter three describes a new method for synthesizing nanoparticles asymmetrically functionalized with oligonucleotides and the use of these novel building blocks to create satellite structures. This synthetic capability allows one to introduce valency into such structures and then use that valency to direct particle assembly events. The second part of the thesis explored approaches of nanostructure fabrication on substrates. Chapter four focuses on the development of a new scanning probe contact printing method, polymer pen lithography (PPL), which combines the advantages of muCp and DPN to achieve high-throughput, flexible molecular printing. PPL uses a soft elastomeric tip array, rather than tips mounted on individual cantilevers, to deliver inks to a surface in a "direct write" manner. Arrays with as many as ˜11 million pyramid-shaped pens can be brought into contact with substrates and readily leveled optically in order to insure uniform pattern development. Chapter five describes gel pen lithography, which uses a gel to fabricate pen array. Gel pen lithography is a low-cost, high-throughput nanolithography method especially useful for biomaterials patterning and aqueous solution patterning which makes it a supplement to DPN and PPL. Chapter 6 shows a novel form of optical nanolithography, Beam Pen Lithography (BPL), which uses an array of NSOM pens to do nanoscale optical

  4. Cooperation of NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 and UDP-glucuronosyltransferases reduces menadione cytotoxicity in HEK293 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiyama, Takahito; Izawa, Tadashi; Usami, Mami; Ohnuma, Tomokazu; Ogura, Kenichiro; Hiratsuka, Akira

    2010-04-01

    Previous studies have shown that NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1) plays an important role in the detoxification of menadione (2-methyl-1,4-naphthoquinone, also known as vitamin K3). However, menadiol (2-methyl-1,4-naphthalenediol) formed from menadione by NQO1-mediated reduction continues to be an unstable substance, which undergoes the reformation of menadione with concomitant formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Hence, we focused on the roles of phase II enzymes, with particular attention to UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs), in the detoxification process of menadione. In this study, we established an HEK293 cell line stably expressing NQO1 (HEK293/NQO1) and HEK293/NQO1 cell lines with doxycycline (DOX)-regulated expression of UGT1A6 (HEK293/NQO1/UGT1A6) and UGT1A10 (HEK293/NQO1/UGT1A10), and evaluated the role of NQO1 and UGTs against menadione-induced cytotoxicity. Our results differed from those of previous studies. HEK293/NQO1 was the most sensitive cell line to menadione cytotoxicity among cell lines established in this study. These phenomena were also observed in HEK293/NQO1/UGT1A6 and HEK293/NQO1/UGT1A10 cells in which the expression of UGT was suppressed by DOX treatment. On the contrary, HEK293/NQO1/UGT1A6 and HEK293/NQO1/UGT1A10 cells without DOX treatment were resistant to menadione-induced cytotoxicity. These results demonstrated that NQO1 is not a detoxification enzyme for menadione and that UGT-mediated glucuronidation of menadiol is the most important detoxification process.

  5. Multifrequency permittivity measurements enable on-line monitoring of changes in intracellular conductivity due to nutrient limitations during batch cultivations of CHO cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansorge, Sven; Esteban, Geoffrey; Schmid, Georg

    2010-01-01

    Lab and pilot scale batch cultivations of a CHO K1/dhfr(-) host cell line were conducted to evaluate on-line multifrequency permittivity measurements as a process monitoring tool. The beta-dispersion parameters such as the characteristic frequency (f(C)) and the permittivity increment (Deltaepsilon(max)) were calculated on-line from the permittivity spectra. The dual-frequency permittivity signal correlated well with the off-line measured biovolume and the viable cell density. A significant drop in permittivity was monitored at the transition from exponential growth to a phase with reduced growth rate. Although not reflected in off-line biovolume measurements, this decrease coincided with a drop in OUR and was probably caused by the depletion of glutamine and a metabolic shift occurring at the same time. Sudden changes in cell density, cell size, viability, capacitance per membrane area (C(M)), and effects caused by medium conductivity (sigma(m)) could be excluded as reasons for the decrease in permittivity. After analysis of the process data, a drop in f(C) as a result of a fall in intracellular conductivity (sigma(i)) was identified as responsible for the observed changes in the dual-frequency permittivity signal. It is hypothesized that the beta-dispersion parameter f(C) is indicative of changes in nutrient availability that have an impact on intracellular conductivity sigma(i). On-line permittivity measurements consequently not only reflect the biovolume but also the physiological state of mammalian cell cultures. These findings should pave the way for a better understanding of the intracellular state of cells and render permittivity measurements an important tool in process development and control.

  6. Enabling immersive simulation.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCoy, Josh (University of California Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA); Mateas, Michael (University of California Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA); Hart, Derek H.; Whetzel, Jonathan; Basilico, Justin Derrick; Glickman, Matthew R.; Abbott, Robert G.

    2009-02-01

    The object of the 'Enabling Immersive Simulation for Complex Systems Analysis and Training' LDRD has been to research, design, and engineer a capability to develop simulations which (1) provide a rich, immersive interface for participation by real humans (exploiting existing high-performance game-engine technology wherever possible), and (2) can leverage Sandia's substantial investment in high-fidelity physical and cognitive models implemented in the Umbra simulation framework. We report here on these efforts. First, we describe the integration of Sandia's Umbra modular simulation framework with the open-source Delta3D game engine. Next, we report on Umbra's integration with Sandia's Cognitive Foundry, specifically to provide for learning behaviors for 'virtual teammates' directly from observed human behavior. Finally, we describe the integration of Delta3D with the ABL behavior engine, and report on research into establishing the theoretical framework that will be required to make use of tools like ABL to scale up to increasingly rich and realistic virtual characters.

  7. Liquid metal enabled microfluidics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoshmanesh, Khashayar; Tang, Shi-Yang; Zhu, Jiu Yang; Schaefer, Samira; Mitchell, Arnan; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kourosh; Dickey, Michael D

    2017-03-14

    Several gallium-based liquid metal alloys are liquid at room temperature. As 'liquid', such alloys have a low viscosity and a high surface tension while as 'metal', they have high thermal and electrical conductivities, similar to mercury. However, unlike mercury, these liquid metal alloys have low toxicity and a negligible vapor pressure, rendering them much safer. In comparison to mercury, the distinguishing feature of these alloys is the rapid formation of a self-limiting atomically thin layer of gallium oxide over their surface when exposed to oxygen. This oxide layer changes many physical and chemical properties of gallium alloys, including their interfacial and rheological properties, which can be employed and modulated for various applications in microfluidics. Injecting liquid metal into microfluidic structures has been extensively used to pattern and encapsulate highly deformable and reconfigurable electronic devices including electrodes, sensors, antennas, and interconnects. Likewise, the unique features of liquid metals have been employed for fabricating miniaturized microfluidic components including pumps, valves, heaters, and electrodes. In this review, we discuss liquid metal enabled microfluidic components, and highlight their desirable attributes including simple fabrication, facile integration, stretchability, reconfigurability, and low power consumption, with promising applications for highly integrated microfluidic systems.

  8. Cooperative Online Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morten Flate Paulsen

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Cooperative learning seeks to develop virtual learning environments that allow students to have optimal individual freedom within online learning communities. The pedagogical and administrative challenges with regard to accommodating both individual freedom and cooperation are explained in the Theory of Cooperative Freedom. This article shows that cooperative learning can be implemented successfully through a set of instruments or means. To illustrate this with current examples, the article presents NKI Distance Education’s surveys and experiences with cooperative learning. The article also discusses how issues such as web 2.0, transparency, learning partners and individual progression plans relate to cooperative online education.

  9. TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand cooperates with NSAIDs via activated Wnt signalling in (pre)malignant colon cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijink, Dianne M.; Jalving, Mathilde; Oosterhuis, Dorenda; Sloots, Ineke A.; Koster, Roelof; Hollema, Harry; Kleibeuker, Jan H.; Koornstra, Jan J.; de Vries, Elisabeth G. E.; de Jong, Steven

    2011-01-01

    TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) receptor agonistic agents and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are interesting agents for the chemoprevention and treatment of colorectal cancer. We investigated whether NSAIDs sensitize colon cancer and adenoma cell lines and ex vivo cultu

  10. Two oncogenes, v-fos and v-ras, cooperate to convert normal keratinocytes to squamous cell carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenhalgh, D.A.; Welty, D.J.; Player, A.; Yuspa, S.H. (National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD (USA))

    1990-01-01

    Previous studies have been implicated the ras{sup Ha} oncogene in the initiation of skin carcinogenesis and the fos oncogene in malignant progression of premalignant skin cell lines. To determine if these two oncogenes are sufficient to convert normal keratinocytes to cancer cells, freshly isolated mouse keratinocytes were coinfected with replication-defective ({psi}-2) v-ras{sup Ha} and v-fos viruses in culture. When tested in nude mice within several days of infection, v-fos/v-ras{sup Ha}-coinfected keratinocytes produced squamous cell carcinomas. Introduction of v-fos alone resulted in normal or hyperplastic skin, whereas v-ras{sup Ha} alone produced squamous papillomas. These results indicate that two oncogenes are sufficient to produce the malignant phenotype in epidermal cells. Furthermore, they clearly link the fos oncogene with malignant conversion. Since fos acts as a transcriptional regulator of other genes, malignant conversion may be an indirect consequence of the overexpression of the fos-encoded protein leading to a change in the expression of fos-controlled cellular genes.

  11. Solar Glitter -- Microsystems Enabled Photovoltaics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielson, Gregory N.

    2012-02-01

    Many products have significantly benefitted from, or been enabled by, the ability to manufacture structures at an ever decreasing length scale. Obvious examples of this include integrated circuits, flat panel displays, micro-scale sensors, and LED lighting. These industries have benefited from length scale effects in terms of improved performance, reduced cost, or new functionality (or a combination of these). In a similar manner, we are working to take advantage of length scale effects that exist within solar photovoltaic (PV) systems. While this is a significant step away from traditional approaches to solar power systems, the benefits in terms of new functionality, improved performance, and reduced cost for solar power are compelling. We are exploring scale effects that result from the size of the solar cells within the system. We have developed unique cells of both crystalline silicon and III-V materials that are very thin (5-20 microns thick) and have very small lateral dimensions (on the order of hundreds of microns across). These cells minimize the amount of expensive semiconductor material required for the system, allow improved cell performance, and provide an expanded design space for both module and system concepts allowing optimized power output and reduced module and balance of system costs. Furthermore, the small size of the cells allows for unique high-efficiency, high-flexibility PV panels and new building-integrated PV options that are currently unavailable. These benefits provide a pathway for PV power to become cost competitive with grid power and allow unique power solutions independent of grid power.

  12. Defining the required infrastructure supporting co-operative systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Malone, K.; Kievit, M.; Maas, S.

    2012-01-01

    Cooperative Systems will play a critical role in enabling safe, smart and clean transport, as well as meeting the European Commission's 2020 policy goals. There is today a general understanding of the benefits of cooperative systems but there is still a need for further validation of the estimated b

  13. Prophylactic G-CSF and antibiotics enable a significant dose-escalation of triplet-chemotherapy in non-small cell lung cancer.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmer-Bonte, J.N.H.; Punt, C.J.A.; Heijden, H.F.M. van der; Die, C.E. van; Bussink, J.; Beijnen, J.H.; Huitema, A.D.; Tjan-Heijnen, V.C.

    2008-01-01

    In advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) the clinical benefit of a platinum-based doublet is only modest, therefore, attenuated dosed three-drug combinations are investigated. We hypothesized that with adequate support a full dosed chemotherapy triplet is feasible. The study was designed as a

  14. Antibody-antigen-adjuvant conjugates enable co-delivery of antigen and adjuvant to dendritic cells in cis but only have partial targeting specificity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kreutz, M.; Giquel, B.; Hu, Q.; Abuknesha, R.; Uematsu, S.; Akira, S.; Nestle, F.O.; Diebold, S.S.

    2012-01-01

    Antibody-antigen conjugates, which promote antigen-presentation by dendritic cells (DC) by means of targeted delivery of antigen to particular DC subsets, represent a powerful vaccination approach. To ensure immunity rather than tolerance induction the co-administration of a suitable adjuvant is par

  15. Guiding Attention by Cooperative Cues

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KangWoo Lee

    2008-01-01

    A common assumption in visual attention is based on the rationale of "limited capacity of information pro-ceasing". From this view point there is little consideration of how different information channels or modules are cooperating because cells in processing stages are forced to compete for the limited resource. To examine the mechanism behind the cooperative behavior of information channels, a computational model of selective attention is implemented based on two hypotheses. Unlike the traditional view of visual attention, the cooperative behavior is assumed to be a dynamic integration process between the bottom-up and top-down information. Furthermore, top-down information is assumed to provide a contextual cue during selection process and to guide the attentional allocation among many bottom-up candidates. The result from a series of simulation with still and video images showed some interesting properties that could not be explained by the competitive aspect of selective attention alone.

  16. Cooperative regulation of non-small cell lung carcinoma by nicotinic and beta-adrenergic receptors: a novel target for intervention.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hussein A N Al-Wadei

    Full Text Available Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death; 80-85% of lung cancer cases are non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. Smoking is a documented risk factor for the development of this cancer. Although nicotine does not have the ability to initiate carcinogenic events, recent studies have implicated nicotine in growth stimulation of NSCLC. Using three NSCLC cell lines (NCI-H322, NCI-H441 and NCI-H1299, we identified the cooperation of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs and β-adrenergic receptors (β-ARs as principal regulators of these effects. Proliferation was measured by thymidine incorporation and MTT assays, and Western blots were used to monitor the upregulation of the nAChRs and activation of signaling molecules. Noradrenaline and GABA were measured by immunoassays. Nicotine-treated NSCLC cells showed significant induction of the α7nAChR and α4nAChR, along with significant inductions of p-CREB and p-ERK1/2 accompanied by increases in the stress neurotransmitter noradrenaline, which in turn led to the observed increase in DNA synthesis and cell proliferation. Effects on cell proliferation and signaling proteins were reversed by the α7nAChR antagonist α-BTX or the β-blocker propranolol. Nicotine treatment also down-regulated expression of the GABA synthesizing enzyme GAD 65 and the level of endogenous GABA, while treatment of NSCLC cells with GABA inhibited cell proliferation. Interestingly, GABA acts by reducing β-adrenergic activated cAMP signaling. Our findings suggest that nicotine-induced activation of this autocrine noradrenaline-initiated signaling cascade and concomitant deficiency in inhibitory GABA, similar to modulation of these neurotransmitters in the nicotine-addicted brain, may contribute to the development of NSCLC in smokers. Our data suggest that exposure to nicotine either by tobacco smoke or nicotine supplements facilitates growth and progression of NSCLC and that pharmacological intervention by β blocker may

  17. Nanoproteomics enabling personalized nanomedicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolini, Claudio; Bragazzi, Nicola; Pechkova, Eugenia

    2012-10-01

    Nucleic Acid Programmable Protein Arrays utilize a complex mammalian cell free expression system to produce proteins in situ. In alternative to fluorescent-labeled approaches a new label free method, emerging from the combined utilization of three independent and complementary nanotechnological approaches, appears capable to analyze protein function and protein-protein interaction in studies promising for personalized medicine. Quartz Micro Circuit nanogravimetry, based on frequency and dissipation factor, mass spectrometry and anodic porous alumina overcomes indeed the limits of correlated fluorescence detection plagued by the background still present after extensive washes. This could be further optimized by a homogeneous and well defined bacterial cell free expression system capable to realize the ambitious objective to quantify the regulatory protein networks in humans. Implications for personalized medicine of the above label free protein array using different test genes proteins are reported.

  18. Antigen S1, encoded by the MIC1 gene, is characterized as an epitope of human CD59, enabling measurement of mutagen-induced intragenic deletions in the AL cell system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, A. B.; Seilly, D.; Willers, C.; Vannais, D. B.; McGraw, M.; Waldren, C. A.; Hei, T. K.; Davies, A.; Chatterjee, A. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    S1 cell membrane antigen is encoded by the MIC1 gene on human chromosome 11. This antigen has been widely used as a marker for studies in gene mapping or in analysis of mutagen-induced gene deletions/mutations, which utilized the human-hamster hybrid cell-line, AL-J1, carrying human chromosome 11. Evidence is presented here which identifies S1 as an epitope of CD59, a cell membrane complement inhibiting protein. E7.1 monoclonal antibody, specific for the S1 determinant, was found to react strongly with membrane CD59 in Western blotting, and to bind to purified, urinary form of CD59 in ELISAs. Cell membrane expression of S1 on various cell lines always correlated with that of CD59 when examined by immunofluorescent staining. In addition, E7.1 antibody inhibited the complement regulatory function of CD59. Identification of S1 protein as CD59 has increased the scope of the AL cell system by enabling analysis of intragenic mutations, and multiplex PCR analysis of mutated cells is described, showing variable loss of CD59 exons.

  19. Brief report: Using global positioning system (GPS) enabled cell phones to examine adolescent travel patterns and time in proximity to alcohol outlets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrnes, Hilary F; Miller, Brenda A; Morrison, Christopher N; Wiebe, Douglas J; Remer, Lillian G; Wiehe, Sarah E

    2016-07-01

    As adolescents gain freedom to explore new environments unsupervised, more time in proximity to alcohol outlets may increase risks for alcohol and marijuana use. This pilot study: 1) Describes variations in adolescents' proximity to outlets by time of day and day of the week, 2) Examines variations in outlet proximity by drinking and marijuana use status, and 3) Tests feasibility of obtaining real-time data to study adolescent proximity to outlets. U.S. adolescents (N = 18) aged 16-17 (50% female) carried GPS-enabled smartphones for one week with their locations tracked. The geographic areas where adolescents spend time, activity spaces, were created by connecting GPS points sequentially and adding spatial buffers around routes. Proximity to outlets was greater during after school and evening hours. Drinkers and marijuana users were in proximity to outlets 1½ to 2 times more than non-users. Findings provide information about where adolescents spend time and times of greatest risk, informing prevention efforts.

  20. Sharing the sandbox: Evolutionary mechanisms that maintain bacterial cooperation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruger, Eric; Waters, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    Microbes are now known to participate in an extensive repertoire of cooperative behaviors such as biofilm formation, production of extracellular public-goods, group motility, and higher-ordered multicellular structures. A fundamental question is how these cooperative tasks are maintained in the face of non-cooperating defector cells. Recently, a number of molecular mechanisms including facultative participation, spatial sorting, and policing have been discovered to stabilize cooperation. Often these different mechanisms work in concert to reinforce cooperation. In this review, we describe bacterial cooperation and the current understanding of the molecular mechanisms that maintain it.

  1. Copper and bezafibrate cooperate to rescue cytochrome c oxidase deficiency in cells of patients with sco2 mutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Casarin Alberto

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mutations in SCO2 cause cytochrome c oxidase deficiency (COX and a fatal infantile cardioencephalomyopathy. SCO2 encodes a protein involved in COX copper metabolism; supplementation with copper salts rescues the defect in patients’ cells. Bezafibrate (BZF, an approved hypolipidemic agent, ameliorates the COX deficiency in mice with mutations in COX10, another COX-assembly gene. Methods We have investigated the effect of BZF and copper in cells with SCO2 mutations using spectrophotometric methods to analyse respiratory chain activities and a luciferase assay to measure ATP production.. Results Individual mitochondrial enzymes displayed different responses to BZF. COX activity increased by about 40% above basal levels (both in controls and patients, with SCO2 cells reaching 75-80% COX activity compared to untreated controls. The increase in COX was paralleled by an increase in ATP production. The effect was dose-dependent: it was negligible with 100 μM BZF, and peaked at 400 μM BZF. Higher BZF concentrations were associated with a relative decline of COX activity, indicating that the therapeutic range of this drug is very narrow. Combined treatment with 100 μM CuCl2 and 200 μM BZF (which are only marginally effective when administered individually achieved complete rescue of COX activity in SCO2 cells. Conclusions These data are crucial to design therapeutic trials for this otherwise fatal disorder. The additive effect of copper and BZF will allow to employ lower doses of each drug and to reduce their potential toxic effects. The exact mechanism of action of BZF remains to be determined.

  2. Challenges and Opportunities for International Cooperative Studies in Pediatric Hematopoeitic Cell Transplantation: Priorities of the Westhafen Intercontinental Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Rudolph Kirk R.; Baker, Kevin Scott; Boelens, Jaap J.; Bollard, Catherine M.; Egeler, R. Maarten; Cowan, Mort; Ladenstein, Ruth; Lankester, Arjan; Locatelli, Franco; Lawitschka, Anita; Levine, John E.; Loh, Mignon; Nemecek, Eneida; Niemeyer, Charlotte; Prasad, Vinod K.; Rocha, Vanderson; Shenoy, Shalini; Strahm, Brigitte; Veys, Paul; Wall, Donna; Bader, Peter; Grupp, Stephan A.; Pulsipher, Michael A.; Peters, Christina

    2014-01-01

    More than 20% of allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantations (HCTs) are performed in children and adolescents at a large number of relatively small centers. Unlike adults, at least one-third of HCTs in children are performed for rare, nonmalignant indications. Clinical trials to improve HCT outcomes in children have been limited by small numbers and these pediatric-specific features. The need for a larger number of pediatric HCT centers to participate in trials has led to the involvement of international collaborative groups. Representatives of the Pediatric Blood and Marrow Transplant Consortium, European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation’s Pediatric Working Group, International Berlin-Frankfurt-Munster (iBFm) Stem Cell Transplantation Committee, and Children’s Oncology Group’s Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation Discipline Committee met on October 3, 2012, in Frankfurt, Germany to develop a consensus on the highest priorities in pediatric HCT. In addition, it explored the creation of an international consortium to develop studies focused on HCT in children and adolescents. This meeting led to the creation of an international HCT network, dubbed the Westhafen Intercontinental Group, to develop worldwide priorities and strategies to address pediatric HCT issues. This review outlines the priorities of need as identified by this consensus group. PMID:23883618

  3. Cooperation of bisphenol A and leptin in inhibition of caspase-3 expression and activity in OVCAR-3 ovarian cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ptak, Anna; Rak-Mardyła, Agnieszka; Gregoraszczuk, Ewa L

    2013-09-01

    This study was designed to investigate the effect of bisphenol A and leptin on caspase-3 expression and activity in OVCAR-3 ovarian cancer cells. Caspase-3 and survivin expression was measured at the transcript level by real-time PCR and at the protein level by Western blotting. In addition, caspase-3 activity was measured, using a fluorometric assay, upon exposure to bisphenol A (40 nM) alone, leptin (2.5 nM) alone, and the combination of both agents. 17β-estradiol (40 nM) was used as a positive control for estrogenic properties of bisphenol A. Results showed that the interaction between bisphenol A and leptin, which was similar to that observed between 17β-estradiol and leptin, led to the inhibition of caspase-3 expression and activity in OVCAR-3 cells. Surprisingly, survivin was found to not be involved in the anti-apoptotic activity of either agent. Also, results showed that leptin inhibits caspase-3 activity by acting on the signal transducers and activators of transcription 3 (STAT3) pathway, but bisphenol A and 17β-estradiol by the extracellular-signal-regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2) pathway. In conclusion, the study reveals that bisphenol A and leptin interact to inhibit caspase-3 expression and activity by modulating STAT3 and ERK1/2 signaling pathways in OVCAR-3 cells.

  4. Cellulose binding protein from the parasitic nematode Heterodera schachtii interacts with Arabidopsis pectin methylesterase: cooperative cell wall modification during parasitism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewezi, Tarek; Howe, Peter; Maier, Tom R; Hussey, Richard S; Mitchum, Melissa Goellner; Davis, Eric L; Baum, Thomas J

    2008-11-01

    Plant-parasitic cyst nematodes secrete a complex of cell wall-digesting enzymes, which aid in root penetration and migration. The soybean cyst nematode Heterodera glycines also produces a cellulose binding protein (Hg CBP) secretory protein. To determine the function of CBP, an orthologous cDNA clone (Hs CBP) was isolated from the sugar beet cyst nematode Heterodera schachtii, which is able to infect Arabidopsis thaliana. CBP is expressed only in the early phases of feeding cell formation and not during the migratory phase. Transgenic Arabidopsis expressing Hs CBP developed longer roots and exhibited enhanced susceptibility to H. schachtii. A yeast two-hybrid screen identified Arabidopsis pectin methylesterase protein 3 (PME3) as strongly and specifically interacting with Hs CBP. Transgenic plants overexpressing PME3 also produced longer roots and exhibited increased susceptibility to H. schachtii, while a pme3 knockout mutant showed opposite phenotypes. Moreover, CBP overexpression increases PME3 activity in planta. Localization studies support the mode of action of PME3 as a cell wall-modifying enzyme. Expression of CBP in the pme3 knockout mutant revealed that PME3 is required but not the sole mechanism for CBP overexpression phenotype. These data indicate that CBP directly interacts with PME3 thereby activating and potentially targeting this enzyme to aid cyst nematode parasitism.

  5. The Plasma Membrane Ca2+ ATPase and the Plasma Membrane Sodium Calcium Exchanger Cooperate in the Regulation of Cell Calcium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brini, Marisa; Carafoli, Ernesto

    2011-01-01

    Calcium is an ambivalent signal: it is essential for the correct functioning of cell life, but may also become dangerous to it. The plasma membrane Ca2+ ATPase (PMCA) and the plasma membrane Na+/Ca2+ exchanger (NCX) are the two mechanisms responsible for Ca2+ extrusion. The NCX has low Ca2+ affinity but high capacity for Ca2+ transport, whereas the PMCA has a high Ca2+ affinity but low transport capacity for it. Thus, traditionally, the PMCA pump has been attributed a housekeeping role in maintaining cytosolic Ca2+, and the NCX the dynamic role of counteracting large cytosolic Ca2+ variations (especially in excitable cells). This view of the roles of the two Ca2+ extrusion systems has been recently revised, as the specific functional properties of the numerous PMCA isoforms and splicing variants suggests that they may have evolved to cover both the basal Ca2+ regulation (in the 100 nM range) and the Ca2+ transients generated by cell stimulation (in the μM range). PMID:21421919

  6. Cooperativity of Negative Autoregulation Confers Increased Mutational Robustness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marciano, David C.; Lua, Rhonald C.; Herman, Christophe; Lichtarge, Olivier

    2016-06-01

    Negative autoregulation is universally found across organisms. In the bacterium Escherichia coli, transcription factors often repress their own expression to form a negative feedback network motif that enables robustness to changes in biochemical parameters. Here we present a simple phenomenological model of a negative feedback transcription factor repressing both itself and another target gene. The strength of the negative feedback is characterized by three parameters: the cooperativity in self-repression, the maximal expression rate of the transcription factor, and the apparent dissociation constant of the transcription factor binding to its own promoter. Analysis of the model shows that the target gene levels are robust to mutations in the transcription factor, and that the robustness improves as the degree of cooperativity in self-repression increases. The prediction is tested in the LexA transcriptional network of E. coli by altering cooperativity in self-repression and promoter strength. Indeed, we find robustness is correlated with the former. Considering the proposed importance of gene regulation in speciation, parameters governing a transcription factor's robustness to mutation may have significant influence on a cell or organism's capacity to evolve.

  7. Cooperativity of Negative Autoregulation Confers Increased Mutational Robustness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marciano, David C.; Lua, Rhonald C.; Herman, Christophe; Lichtarge, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    Negative autoregulation is universally found across organisms. In the bacterium Escherichia coli, transcription factors often repress their own expression to form a negative feedback network motif that enables robustness to changes in biochemical parameters. Here we present a simple phenomenological model of a negative feedback transcription factor repressing both itself and another target gene. The strength of the negative feedback is characterized by three parameters: the cooperativity in self-repression, the maximal expression rate of the transcription factor, and the apparent dissociation constant of the transcription factor binding to its own promoter. Analysis of the model shows that the target gene levels are robust to mutations in the transcription factor, and that the robustness improves as the degree of cooperativity in self-repression increases. The prediction is tested in the LexA transcriptional network of E. coli by altering cooperativity in self-repression and promoter strength. Indeed, we find robustness is correlated with the former. Considering the proposed importance of gene regulation in speciation, parameters governing a transcription factor’s robustness to mutation may have significant influence on a cell or organism’s capacity to evolve. PMID:27391757

  8. Noggin and Wnt3a enable BMP4-dependent differentiation of telencephalic stem cells into GluR-agonist responsive neurons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Therese; Duckworth, Joshua K; Fritz, Nicolas;

    2011-01-01

    of multipotent telencephalic neural stem cells (NSCs) with BMP4 induces differentiation primarily into astrocytic and mesenchymal cells. However, BMP4-mediated mesenchymal differentiation is inhibited at certain culture conditions of NSCs, corresponding to in vivo developmental contexts. These inhibitory......Early telencephalic development is dependent on the spatially and temporally coordinated regulation by essential signaling factors. For example, members of the Bone Morphogenetic Protein (BMP) family, such as BMP4, are crucial for proper development of dorsal telencephalic structures. Stimulation...... to be essential for the development of neurons derived from the dorsal telencephalon, and co-stimulation of NSCs with BMP4+Wnt3a resulted in a synergistic effect yielding significantly increased number of mature neurons compared to stimulation with each factor alone. Thus whereas only a subset of BMP4-induced...

  9. Enabling systematic interrogation of protein-protein interactions in live cells with a versatile ultra-high-throughput biosensor platform | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    The vast datasets generated by next generation gene sequencing and expression profiling have transformed biological and translational research. However, technologies to produce large-scale functional genomics datasets, such as high-throughput detection of protein-protein interactions (PPIs), are still in early development. While a number of powerful technologies have been employed to detect PPIs, a singular PPI biosensor platform featured with both high sensitivity and robustness in a mammalian cell environment remains to be established.

  10. Antibody-antigen-adjuvant conjugates enable co-delivery of antigen and adjuvant to dendritic cells in cis but only have partial targeting specificity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Kreutz

    Full Text Available Antibody-antigen conjugates, which promote antigen-presentation by dendritic cells (DC by means of targeted delivery of antigen to particular DC subsets, represent a powerful vaccination approach. To ensure immunity rather than tolerance induction the co-administration of a suitable adjuvant is paramount. However, co-administration of unlinked adjuvant cannot ensure that all cells targeted by the antibody conjugates are appropriately activated. Furthermore, antigen-presenting cells (APC that do not present the desired antigen are equally strongly activated and could prime undesired responses against self-antigens. We, therefore, were interested in exploring targeted co-delivery of antigen and adjuvant in cis in form of antibody-antigen-adjuvant conjugates for the induction of anti-tumour immunity. In this study, we report on the assembly and characterization of conjugates consisting of DEC205-specific antibody, the model antigen ovalbumin (OVA and CpG oligodeoxynucleotides (ODN. We show that such conjugates are more potent at inducing cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL responses than control conjugates mixed with soluble CpG. However, our study also reveals that the nucleic acid moiety of such antibody-antigen-adjuvant conjugates alters their binding and uptake and allows delivery of the antigen and the adjuvant to cells partially independently of DEC205. Nevertheless, antibody-antigen-adjuvant conjugates are superior to antibody-free antigen-adjuvant conjugates in priming CTL responses and efficiently induce anti-tumour immunity in the murine B16 pseudo-metastasis model. A better understanding of the role of the antibody moiety is required to inform future conjugate vaccination strategies for efficient induction of anti-tumour responses.

  11. Catechol Groups Enable Reactive Oxygen Species Scavenging-Mediated Suppression of PKD-NFkappaB-IL-8 Signaling Pathway by Chlorogenic and Caffeic Acids in Human Intestinal Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Hee Soon; Satsu, Hideo; Bae, Min-Jung; Totsuka, Mamoru; Shimizu, Makoto

    2017-02-20

    Chlorogenic acid (CHA) and caffeic acid (CA) are phenolic compounds found in coffee, which inhibit oxidative stress-induced interleukin (IL)-8 production in intestinal epithelial cells, thereby suppressing serious cellular injury and inflammatory intestinal diseases. Therefore, we investigated the anti-inflammatory mechanism of CHA and CA, both of which inhibited hydrogen peroxide (H₂O₂)-induced IL-8 transcriptional activity. They also significantly suppressed nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB) transcriptional activity, nuclear translocation of the p65 subunit, and phosphorylation of IκB kinase (IKK). Additionally, upstream of IKK, protein kinase D (PKD) was also suppressed. Finally, we found that they scavenged H₂O₂-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the functional moiety responsible for the anti-inflammatory effects of CHA and CA was the catechol group. Therefore, we conclude that the presence of catechol groups in CHA and CA allows scavenging of intracellular ROS, thereby inhibiting H₂O₂-induced IL-8 production via suppression of PKD-NF-κB signaling in human intestinal epithelial cells.

  12. Catechol Groups Enable Reactive Oxygen Species Scavenging-Mediated Suppression of PKD-NFkappaB-IL-8 Signaling Pathway by Chlorogenic and Caffeic Acids in Human Intestinal Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hee Soon Shin

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Chlorogenic acid (CHA and caffeic acid (CA are phenolic compounds found in coffee, which inhibit oxidative stress-induced interleukin (IL-8 production in intestinal epithelial cells, thereby suppressing serious cellular injury and inflammatory intestinal diseases. Therefore, we investigated the anti-inflammatory mechanism of CHA and CA, both of which inhibited hydrogen peroxide (H2O2-induced IL-8 transcriptional activity. They also significantly suppressed nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB transcriptional activity, nuclear translocation of the p65 subunit, and phosphorylation of IκB kinase (IKK. Additionally, upstream of IKK, protein kinase D (PKD was also suppressed. Finally, we found that they scavenged H2O2-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS and the functional moiety responsible for the anti-inflammatory effects of CHA and CA was the catechol group. Therefore, we conclude that the presence of catechol groups in CHA and CA allows scavenging of intracellular ROS, thereby inhibiting H2O2-induced IL-8 production via suppression of PKD-NF-κB signaling in human intestinal epithelial cells.

  13. Polymer Solar Cells with Efficiency >10% Enabled via a Facile Solution-Processed Al-Doped ZnO Electron Transporting Layer

    KAUST Repository

    Jagadamma, Lethy Krishnan

    2015-04-22

    A facile and low-temperature (125 °C) solution-processed Al-doped ZnO (AZO) buffer layer functioning very effectively as electron accepting/hole blocking layer for a wide range of polymer:fullerene bulk heterojunction systems, yielding power conversion efficiency in excess of 10% (8%) on glass (plastic) substrates is described. The ammonia-treatment of the aqueous AZO nanoparticle solution produces compact, crystalline, and smooth thin films, which retain the aluminum doping, and eliminates/reduces the native defects by nitrogen incorporation, making them good electron transporters and energetically matched with the fullerene acceptor. It is demonstrated that highly efficient solar cells can be achieved without the need for additional surface chemical modifications of the buffer layer, which is a common requirement for many metal oxide buffer layers to yield efficient solar cells. Also highly efficient solar cells are achieved with thick AZO films (>50 nm), highlighting the suitability of this material for roll-to-roll coating. Preliminary results on the applicability of AZO as electron injection layer in F8BT-based polymer light emitting diode are also presented. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Catechol Groups Enable Reactive Oxygen Species Scavenging-Mediated Suppression of PKD-NFkappaB-IL-8 Signaling Pathway by Chlorogenic and Caffeic Acids in Human Intestinal Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Hee Soon; Satsu, Hideo; Bae, Min-Jung; Totsuka, Mamoru; Shimizu, Makoto

    2017-01-01

    Chlorogenic acid (CHA) and caffeic acid (CA) are phenolic compounds found in coffee, which inhibit oxidative stress-induced interleukin (IL)-8 production in intestinal epithelial cells, thereby suppressing serious cellular injury and inflammatory intestinal diseases. Therefore, we investigated the anti-inflammatory mechanism of CHA and CA, both of which inhibited hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced IL-8 transcriptional activity. They also significantly suppressed nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB) transcriptional activity, nuclear translocation of the p65 subunit, and phosphorylation of IκB kinase (IKK). Additionally, upstream of IKK, protein kinase D (PKD) was also suppressed. Finally, we found that they scavenged H2O2-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the functional moiety responsible for the anti-inflammatory effects of CHA and CA was the catechol group. Therefore, we conclude that the presence of catechol groups in CHA and CA allows scavenging of intracellular ROS, thereby inhibiting H2O2-induced IL-8 production via suppression of PKD-NF-κB signaling in human intestinal epithelial cells. PMID:28230729

  15. Simultaneous multi-parametric analysis of Leishmania and of its hosting mammal cells: A high content imaging-based method enabling sound drug discovery process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forestier, Claire-Lise; Späth, Gerald Frank; Prina, Eric; Dasari, Sreekanth

    2015-11-01

    Leishmaniasis is a vector-borne disease for which only limited therapeutic options are available. The disease is ranked among the six most important tropical infectious diseases and represents the second-largest parasitic killer in the world. The development of new therapies has been hampered by the lack of technologies and methodologies that can be integrated into the complex physiological environment of a cell or organism and adapted to suitable in vitro and in vivo Leishmania models. Recent advances in microscopy imaging offer the possibility to assess the efficacy of potential drug candidates against Leishmania within host cells. This technology allows the simultaneous visualization of relevant phenotypes in parasite and host cells and the quantification of a variety of cellular events. In this review, we present the powerful cellular imaging methodologies that have been developed for drug screening in a biologically relevant context, addressing both high-content and high-throughput needs. Furthermore, we discuss the potential of intra-vital microscopy imaging in the context of the anti-leishmanial drug discovery process.

  16. Cooperative credit systems: defence of the model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roxana Sánchez Boza

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This study analyses the role carried out by saving and credit cooperatives in Central America where they have gained momentum, mainly in the past ten years. Cooperatives of this type are called financial intermediation cooperatives due to the influence of various legislative regulations that have placed them in the context of international control, the type of economic activity they perform and the fact that they make profits from both public and private international entities which enable their growth.Many of these organisations can be commended. They are highly competitive on financial markets and strive to extend their profits to increasingly larger parts of the population while also searching for new products to benefit the sector of the population that has chosen the cooperative model as a means to progress in a sphere of equity and respect for the rights of their fellow men.Received: 31.05.2015Accepted: 17.07.2015

  17. Cooperative Tagging Center (CTC)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Cooperative Tagging Center (CTC) began as the Cooperative Game Fish Tagging Program (GTP) at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute (WHOI) in 1954. The GTP was...

  18. Sleeping Beauty transposon screen identifies signaling modules that cooperate with STAT5 activation to induce B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heltemes-Harris, L M; Larson, J D; Starr, T K; Hubbard, G K; Sarver, A L; Largaespada, D A; Farrar, M A

    2016-06-30

    Signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 (STAT5) activation occurs frequently in human progenitor B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL). To identify gene alterations that cooperate with STAT5 activation to initiate leukemia, we crossed mice expressing a constitutively active form of STAT5 (Stat5b-CA) with mice in which a mutagenic Sleeping Beauty transposon (T2/Onc) was mobilized only in B cells. Stat5b-CA mice typically do not develop B-ALL (<2% penetrance); in contrast, 89% of Stat5b-CA mice in which the T2/Onc transposon had been mobilized died of B-ALL by 3 months of age. High-throughput sequencing approaches were used to identify genes frequently targeted by the T2/Onc transposon; these included Sos1 (74%), Kdm2a (35%), Jak1 (26%), Bmi1 (19%), Prdm14 or Ncoa2 (13%), Cdkn2a (10%), Ikzf1 (8%), Caap1 (6%) and Klf3 (6%). Collectively, these mutations target three major cellular processes: (i) the Janus kinase/STAT5 pathway (ii) progenitor B-cell differentiation and (iii) the CDKN2A tumor-suppressor pathway. Transposon insertions typically resulted in altered expression of these genes, as well as downstream pathways including STAT5, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (Erk) and p38. Importantly, expression of Sos1 and Kdm2a, and activation of p38, correlated with survival, further underscoring the role these genes and associated pathways have in B-ALL.

  19. Cooperation between CD4+ T Cells and Humoral Immunity Is Critical for Protection against Dengue Using a DNA Vaccine Based on the NS1 Antigen.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antônio J S Gonçalves

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Dengue virus (DENV is spread through most tropical and subtropical areas of the world and represents a serious public health problem. At present, the control of dengue disease is mainly hampered by the absence of antivirals or a vaccine, which results in an estimated half worldwide population at risk of infection. The immune response against DENV is not yet fully understood and a better knowledge of it is now recognized as one of the main challenge for vaccine development. In previous studies, we reported that a DNA vaccine containing the signal peptide sequence from the human tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA fused to the DENV2 NS1 gene (pcTPANS1 induced protection against dengue in mice. In the present work, we aimed to elucidate the contribution of cellular and humoral responses elicited by this vaccine candidate for protective immunity. We observed that pcTPANS1 exerts a robust protection against dengue, inducing considerable levels of anti-NS1 antibodies and T cell responses. Passive immunization with anti-NS1 antibodies conferred partial protection in mice infected with low virus load (4 LD50, which was abrogated with the increase of viral dose (40 LD50. The pcTPANS1 also induced activation of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. We detected production of IFN-γ and a cytotoxic activity by CD8+ T lymphocytes induced by this vaccine, although its contribution in the protection was not so evident when compared to CD4+ cells. Depletion of CD4+ cells in immunized mice completely abolished protection. Furthermore, transfer experiments revealed that animals receiving CD4+ T cells combined with anti-NS1 antiserum, both obtained from vaccinated mice, survived virus infection with survival rates not significantly different from pcTPANS1-immunized animals. Taken together, results showed that the protective immune response induced by the expression of NS1 antigen mediated by the pcTPANS1 requires a cooperation between CD4+ T cells and the humoral immunity.

  20. Cooperation between CD4+ T Cells and Humoral Immunity Is Critical for Protection against Dengue Using a DNA Vaccine Based on the NS1 Antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Antônio J S; Oliveira, Edson R A; Costa, Simone M; Paes, Marciano V; Silva, Juliana F A; Azevedo, Adriana S; Mantuano-Barradas, Marcio; Nogueira, Ana Cristina M A; Almeida, Cecília J; Alves, Ada M B

    2015-12-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) is spread through most tropical and subtropical areas of the world and represents a serious public health problem. At present, the control of dengue disease is mainly hampered by the absence of antivirals or a vaccine, which results in an estimated half worldwide population at risk of infection. The immune response against DENV is not yet fully understood and a better knowledge of it is now recognized as one of the main challenge for vaccine development. In previous studies, we reported that a DNA vaccine containing the signal peptide sequence from the human tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA) fused to the DENV2 NS1 gene (pcTPANS1) induced protection against dengue in mice. In the present work, we aimed to elucidate the contribution of cellular and humoral responses elicited by this vaccine candidate for protective immunity. We observed that pcTPANS1 exerts a robust protection against dengue, inducing considerable levels of anti-NS1 antibodies and T cell responses. Passive immunization with anti-NS1 antibodies conferred partial protection in mice infected with low virus load (4 LD50), which was abrogated with the increase of viral dose (40 LD50). The pcTPANS1 also induced activation of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. We detected production of IFN-γ and a cytotoxic activity by CD8+ T lymphocytes induced by this vaccine, although its contribution in the protection was not so evident when compared to CD4+ cells. Depletion of CD4+ cells in immunized mice completely abolished protection. Furthermore, transfer experiments revealed that animals receiving CD4+ T cells combined with anti-NS1 antiserum, both obtained from vaccinated mice, survived virus infection with survival rates not significantly different from pcTPANS1-immunized animals. Taken together, results showed that the protective immune response induced by the expression of NS1 antigen mediated by the pcTPANS1 requires a cooperation between CD4+ T cells and the humoral immunity.

  1. In situ processed gold nanoparticle-embedded TiO2 nanofibers enabling plasmonic perovskite solar cells to exceed 14% conversion efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mali, Sawanta S.; Shim, Chang Su; Kim, Hyungjin; Patil, Pramod S.; Hong, Chang Kook

    2016-01-01

    We have demonstrated organometallic perovskite solar cells (PSCs) based on Au decorated TiO2 nanofibers and methylammonium lead iodide (MAPbI3). A power conversion efficiency of 14.92% was achieved, which is significantly higher than that of conventional mesoporous (mp) TiO2, as well as TiO2 nanofiber-based devices. The present synthetic process provides new opportunities for the development of efficient plasmonic PSCs based on metal oxide nanofibers. Solar cells based on these architectures exhibit a short-circuit current density JSC of 21.63 +/- 0.36 mA cm-2, VOC of 0.986 +/- 0.01 V and fill factor of 70% +/- 3%, which provide a power conversion efficiency of 14.92% +/- 0.33% under standard AM 1.5 conditions. The results of time-resolved photoluminescence (TRPL) spectroscopy and solid-state impedance spectroscopy (ssIS) revealed that PSCs based on Au-decorated TiO2 nanofibers exhibit a low recombination rate. The present results are much higher than those for reported PSCs based on a Au@TiO2 electron-transporting layer (ETL).We have demonstrated organometallic perovskite solar cells (PSCs) based on Au decorated TiO2 nanofibers and methylammonium lead iodide (MAPbI3). A power conversion efficiency of 14.92% was achieved, which is significantly higher than that of conventional mesoporous (mp) TiO2, as well as TiO2 nanofiber-based devices. The present synthetic process provides new opportunities for the development of efficient plasmonic PSCs based on metal oxide nanofibers. Solar cells based on these architectures exhibit a short-circuit current density JSC of 21.63 +/- 0.36 mA cm-2, VOC of 0.986 +/- 0.01 V and fill factor of 70% +/- 3%, which provide a power conversion efficiency of 14.92% +/- 0.33% under standard AM 1.5 conditions. The results of time-resolved photoluminescence (TRPL) spectroscopy and solid-state impedance spectroscopy (ssIS) revealed that PSCs based on Au-decorated TiO2 nanofibers exhibit a low recombination rate. The present results are much

  2. Love or fear: can punishment promote cooperation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroupa, Sebestian

    2014-01-01

    Cooperation is a paradox: Why should one perform a costly behavior only to increase the fitness of another? Human societies, in which individuals cooperate with genetically unrelated individuals on a considerably larger scale than most mammals do, are especially puzzling in this regard. Recently, the threat of punishment has been given substantial attention as one of the mechanisms that could help sustain human cooperation in such situations. Nevertheless, using punishment to explain cooperation only leads to further questions: Why spend precious resources to penalize free-riders, especially if others can avoid this investment and cheaters can punish you back? Here, it is argued that current evidence supports punishment as an efficient means for the maintenance of cooperation, and that the gravity of proposed limitations of punishment for maintaining cooperation may have been overestimated in previous studies due to the features of experimental design. Most notably, the importance of factors as characteristic of human societies as reputation and language has been greatly neglected. Ironically, it was largely the combination of the two that enabled humans to shape costly punishment into numerous low-cost and less detrimental strategies that clearly can promote human cooperation.

  3. Extensive Dialogues and Cooperation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    @@ Chinese Taipei On March 23,Chairman Wan Jifei of the China Council for the Promotion of International Trade (CCPIT) and Board Chairman Wang Zhigang of the Taipei World Trade Center (TWTC) signed a cooperation agreement at the Taipei World Trade Tower,marking the new page of the development of cooperation and relations between the two organizations and the establishment of their cooperation mechanism.

  4. Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor-induced mice liver defatting: A novel strategy to enable transplantation of steatotic livers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taba Taba Vakili, Sahar; Kailar, Roshni; Rahman, Khalidur; Nezami, Behtash Ghazi; Mwangi, Simon Musyoka; Anania, Frank A; Srinivasan, Shanthi

    2016-04-01

    Moderate macrovesicular steatosis (>30%), which is present in almost 50% of livers considered for transplantation, increases the risk of primary graft dysfunction. Our previously published data showed that glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) is protective against high-fat diet (HFD)-induced hepatic steatosis in mice. Hence, we hypothesized that perfusion of steatotic livers with GDNF may reduce liver fat content before transplantation. Livers from 8 weeks of regular diet (RD) and of HFD-fed mice were perfused ex vivo for 4 hours with either vehicle, GDNF, or a previously described defatting cocktail. The liver's residual fat was quantified colorimetrically using a triglyceride (TG) assay kit and by Oil Red O (ORO) and Nile red/Hoechst staining. Liver tissue injury was assessed by using a lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity assay. In vitro induction of lipolysis in HepG2 cells was assessed by measuring glycerol and free fatty acid release. ORO staining showed significantly more steatosis in livers from HFD-fed mice compared with RD-fed mice (P defatting compared to the defatting cocktail; however, GDNF induces less liver damage than the defatting cocktail. These observations were consistent with data obtained from assessment of liver TG content. Assessment of liver injury revealed significant hepatocyte injury in livers perfused with the control defatting cocktail but no evidence of injury in livers perfused with either GDNF or vehicle. In vitro, GDNF reduced TG accumulation in HepG2 cells and stimulated increased TG lipolysis. In conclusion, GDNF can decrease mice liver fat content to an acceptable range and could be a potential defatting agent before liver transplantation.

  5. Adaptive-optics SLO imaging combined with widefield OCT and SLO enables precise 3D localization of fluorescent cells in the mouse retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zawadzki, Robert J; Zhang, Pengfei; Zam, Azhar; Miller, Eric B; Goswami, Mayank; Wang, Xinlei; Jonnal, Ravi S; Lee, Sang-Hyuck; Kim, Dae Yu; Flannery, John G; Werner, John S; Burns, Marie E; Pugh, Edward N

    2015-06-01

    Adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (AO-SLO) has recently been used to achieve exquisite subcellular resolution imaging of the mouse retina. Wavefront sensing-based AO typically restricts the field of view to a few degrees of visual angle. As a consequence the relationship between AO-SLO data and larger scale retinal structures and cellular patterns can be difficult to assess. The retinal vasculature affords a large-scale 3D map on which cells and structures can be located during in vivo imaging. Phase-variance OCT (pv-OCT) can efficiently image the vasculature with near-infrared light in a label-free manner, allowing 3D vascular reconstruction with high precision. We combined widefield pv-OCT and SLO imaging with AO-SLO reflection and fluorescence imaging to localize two types of fluorescent cells within the retinal layers: GFP-expressing microglia, the resident macrophages of the retina, and GFP-expressing cone photoreceptor cells. We describe in detail a reflective afocal AO-SLO retinal imaging system designed for high resolution retinal imaging in mice. The optical performance of this instrument is compared to other state-of-the-art AO-based mouse retinal imaging systems. The spatial and temporal resolution of the new AO instrumentation was characterized with angiography of retinal capillaries, including blood-flow velocity analysis. Depth-resolved AO-SLO fluorescent images of microglia and cone photoreceptors are visualized in parallel with 469 nm and 663 nm reflectance images of the microvasculature and other structures. Additional applications of the new instrumentation are discussed.

  6. Transport Studies Enabling Efficiency Optimization of Cost-Competitive Fuel Cell Stacks (aka AURORA: Areal Use and Reactant Optimization at Rated Amperage)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conti, Amedeo [Nuvera Fuel Cells, Inc., Billerica, MA (United States); Dross, Robert [Nuvera Fuel Cells, Inc., Billerica, MA (United States)

    2013-12-06

    Hydrogen fuel cells are recognized as one of the most viable solutions for mobility in the 21st century; however, there are technical challenges that must be addressed before the technology can become available for mass production. One of the most demanding aspects is the costs of present-day fuel cells which are prohibitively high for the majority of envisioned markets. The fuel cell community recognizes two major drivers to an effective cost reduction: (1) decreasing the noble metals content, and (2) increasing the power density in order to reduce the number of cells needed to achieve a specified power level. To date, the majority of development work aimed at increasing the value metric (i.e. W/mg-Pt) has focused on the reduction of precious metal loadings, and this important work continues. Efforts to increase power density have been limited by two main factors: (1) performance limitations associated with mass transport barriers, and (2) the historical prioritization of efficiency over cost. This program is driven by commercialization imperatives, and challenges both of these factors. The premise of this Program, supported by proprietary cost modeling by Nuvera, is that DOE 2015 cost targets can be met by simultaneously exceeding DOE 2015 targets for Platinum loadings (using materials with less than 0.2 mg-Pt/cm2) and MEA power density (operating at higher than 1.0 Watt/cm2). The approach of this program is to combine Nuvera’s stack technology, which has demonstrated the ability to operate stably at high current densities (> 1.5 A/cm2), with low Platinum loading MEAs developed by Johnson Matthey in order to maximize Pt specific power density and reduce stack cost. A predictive performance model developed by PSU/UTK is central to the program allowing the team to study the physics and optimize materials/conditions specific to low Pt loading electrodes and ultra-high current density and operation.

  7. Polymer solar cells with efficiency >10% enabled via a facile solution-processed Al-doped ZnO electron transporting layer

    KAUST Repository

    Jagadamma, Lethy Krishnan

    2015-10-05

    The present work details a facile and low-temperature (125C) solution-processed Al-doped ZnO (AZO) buffer layer functioning very effectively as electron accepting/hole blocking layer for a wide range of polymer:fullerene bulk heterojunction systems, and yielding power conversion efficiency in excess of 10% (8%) on glass (plastic) substrates. We show that ammonia addition to the aqueous AZO nanoparticle solution is a critically important step toward producing compact and smooth thin films which partially retain the aluminum doping and crystalline order of the starting AZO nanocrystals. The ammonia treatment appears to reduce the native defects via nitrogen incorporation, making the AZO film a very good electron transporter and energetically matched with the fullerene acceptor. Importantly, highly efficient solar cells are achieved without the need for additional surface chemical passivation or modification, which has become an increasingly common route to improving the performance of evaporated or solution-processed ZnO ETLs in solar cells.

  8. Lysosomal pH Decrease in Inflammatory Cells Used To Enable Activatable Imaging of Inflammation with a Sialic Acid Conjugated Profluorophore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Mingzhu; Wu, Xuanjun; Lin, Bijuan; Han, Jiahuai; Yang, Liu; Han, Shoufa

    2015-07-07

    Inflammation causes significant morbidity and mortality, necessitating effective in vivo imaging of inflammation. Prior approaches often rely on combination of optical agents with entities specific for proteinaceous biomarkers overexpressed in inflammatory tissues. We herein report a fundamentally new approach to image inflammation by targeting lysosomes undergoing acidification in inflammatory cells with a sialic acid (Sia) conjugated near-infrared profluorophore (pNIR). Sia-pNIR contains a sialic acid domain for in vivo targeting of inflamed tissues and a pNIR domain which isomerizes into fluorescent and optoacoustic species in acidic lysosomes. Sia-pNIR displays high inflammation-to-healthy tissue signal contrasts in mice treated with Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, or lipopolysaccharide. In addition, inflammation-associated fluorescence is switched off upon antibiotics treatment in mice. This report shows the potentials of Sia-pNIR for activatable dual-modality inflammation imaging, and particularly the use of lysosomes of inflamed cells as a previously unappreciated biomarker for inflammation imaging.

  9. Rectification and tunneling effects enabled by Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} atomic layer deposited on back contact of CdTe solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, Jun; Lin, Qinxian; Li, Hao; Su, Yantao; Yang, Xiaoyang; Wu, Zhongzhen; Zheng, Jiaxin; Wang, Xinwei; Lin, Yuan; Pan, Feng, E-mail: panfeng@pkusz.edu.cn [School of Advanced Materials, Peking University Shenzhen Graduate School, Peking University, Shenzhen 518055 (China)

    2015-07-06

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) of Aluminum oxide (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) is employed to optimize the back contact of thin film CdTe solar cells. Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} layers with a thickness of 0.5 nm to 5 nm are tested, and an improved efficiency, up to 12.1%, is found with the 1 nm Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} deposition, compared with the efficiency of 10.7% without Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} modification. The performance improvement stems from the surface modification that optimizes the rectification and tunneling of back contact. The current-voltage analysis indicates that the back contact with 1 nm Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} maintains large tunneling leakage current and improves the filled factor of CdTe cells through the rectification effect. XPS and capacitance-voltage electrical measurement analysis show that the ALD-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} modification layer features a desired low-density of interface state of 8 × 10{sup 10 }cm{sup −2} by estimation.

  10. Promising Cell Configuration for Next-Generation Energy Storage: Li2S/Graphite Battery Enabled by a Solvate Ionic Liquid Electrolyte.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhe; Zhang, Shiguo; Terada, Shoshi; Ma, Xiaofeng; Ikeda, Kohei; Kamei, Yutaro; Zhang, Ce; Dokko, Kaoru; Watanabe, Masayoshi

    2016-06-29

    Lithium-ion sulfur batteries with a [graphite|solvate ionic liquid electrolyte|lithium sulfide (Li2S)] structure are developed to realize high performance batteries without the issue of lithium anode. Li2S has recently emerged as a promising cathode material, due to its high theoretical specific capacity of 1166 mAh/g and its great potential in the development of lithium-ion sulfur batteries with a lithium-free anode such as graphite. Unfortunately, the electrochemical Li(+) intercalation/deintercalation in graphite is highly electrolyte-selective: whereas the process works well in the carbonate electrolytes inherited from Li-ion batteries, it cannot take place in the ether electrolytes commonly used for Li-S batteries, because the cointercalation of the solvent destroys the crystalline structure of graphite. Thus, only very few studies have focused on graphite-based Li-S full cells. In this work, simple graphite-based Li-S full cells were fabricated employing electrolytes beyond the conventional carbonates, in combination with highly loaded Li2S/graphene composite cathodes (Li2S loading: 2.2 mg/cm(2)). In particular, solvate ionic liquids can act as a single-phase electrolyte simultaneously compatible with both the Li2S cathode and the graphite anode and can further improve the battery performance by suppressing the shuttle effect. Consequently, these lithium-ion sulfur batteries show a stable and reversible charge-discharge behavior, along with a very high Coulombic efficiency.

  11. FOILFEST :community enabled security.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, Judy Hennessey; Johnson, Curtis Martin; Whitley, John B.; Drayer, Darryl Donald; Cummings, John C., Jr. (.,; .)

    2005-09-01

    The Advanced Concepts Group of Sandia National Laboratories hosted a workshop, ''FOILFest: Community Enabled Security'', on July 18-21, 2005, in Albuquerque, NM. This was a far-reaching look into the future of physical protection consisting of a series of structured brainstorming sessions focused on preventing and foiling attacks on public places and soft targets such as airports, shopping malls, hotels, and public events. These facilities are difficult to protect using traditional security devices since they could easily be pushed out of business through the addition of arduous and expensive security measures. The idea behind this Fest was to explore how the public, which is vital to the function of these institutions, can be leveraged as part of a physical protection system. The workshop considered procedures, space design, and approaches for building community through technology. The workshop explored ways to make the ''good guys'' in public places feel safe and be vigilant while making potential perpetrators of harm feel exposed and convinced that they will not succeed. Participants in the Fest included operators of public places, social scientists, technology experts, representatives of government agencies including DHS and the intelligence community, writers and media experts. Many innovative ideas were explored during the fest with most of the time spent on airports, including consideration of the local airport, the Albuquerque Sunport. Some provocative ideas included: (1) sniffers installed in passage areas like revolving door, escalators, (2) a ''jumbotron'' showing current camera shots in the public space, (3) transparent portal screeners allowing viewing of the screening, (4) a layered open/funnel/open/funnel design where open spaces are used to encourage a sense of ''communitas'' and take advantage of citizen ''sensing'' and funnels are technological

  12. Cooperative effects of solvent and polymer acceptor co-additives in P3HT:PDI solar cells: simultaneous optimization in lateral and vertical phase separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mingguang; Wang, Lei; Liu, Jiangang; Zhou, Ke; Yu, Xinhong; Xing, Rubo; Geng, Yanhou; Han, Yanchun

    2014-03-14

    In this work, solvent chloronaphthalene (CN) and polymer acceptor an alternating copolymer of perylene diimide and carbazole (PCPDI) were utilized as co-additives to optimize the nanoscale phase-separated morphology and photovoltaic properties of bulk-heterojunction (BHJ) polymer solar cells based on the poly(3-hexyl thiophene) (P3HT)/N,N'-bis(1-ethylpropyl)-perylene-3,4,9,10-tetracarboxylic diimide (EP-PDI) system. The domain size of EP-PDI molecules together with that of P3HT distinctly decreased by adding a 0.75 vol% CN additive. The optimized lateral phase separation increased the donor-acceptor interfacial area and facilitated the exciton dissociation process, leading to 5-fold enhancement of short-circuit current (JSC). Furthermore, when PCPDI was employed as a co-additive, acceptor materials (including PCPDI and EP-PDI) were prone to aggregation towards the top surface of blend films, improving vertical phase separation of active layers. PCPDI incorporation, which improved the percolation pathways for electron carriers, suppressed the crystallinity of P3HT distinctly. Thus, much more balanced charge transport was achieved by PCPDI addition, which resulted in almost 1-fold enhancement of open-circuit voltage (VOC) by reducing nongeminate recombination. As a consequence, cooperative effects of CN and PCPDI additives improved the nanoscale phase-separated morphology in lateral and vertical directions simultaneously, achieving the enhancement in both VOC and JSC.

  13. Toll-like Receptors 4 and 5 Cooperatively Initiate the Innate Immune Responses to Uropathogenic Escherichia coli Infection in Mouse Epididymal Epithelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Lijing; Chen, Qiaoyuan; Zhu, Weiwei; Wu, Han; Wang, Qing; Shi, Lili; Zhao, Xiang; Han, Daishu

    2016-03-01

    Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) may cause epididymitis and impair male fertility. The mechanisms underlying the innate immune responses to UPEC infection in the epididymis are not fully understood. This study showed that UPEC induced innate immune responses in mouse epididymal epithelial cells (EECs) through the activation of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and TLR5. Infection with UPEC significantly induced the expression of proinflammatory cytokines, including tumor necrosis factor alpha, interleukin 6, and monocyte chemoattractant protein 1, in EECs through the activation of nuclear factor kappa B. Moreover, UPEC induced the production of type 1 interferons by EECs through the activation of interferon regulatory factor 3. The UPEC-induced innate immune responses were significantly reduced in the EECs of Tlr4 or Tlr5 knockout mice. The innate immune responses were further reduced in Tlr4 and Tlr5 double-knockout EECs. Furthermore, we demonstrated that TLR4 and TLR5 cooperatively initiated the epididymal innate immune responses to UPEC infection in vivo. The results provide novel insights into the mechanisms underlying the epididymal innate immune responses to UPEC infection.

  14. Cooperative cell-growth inhibition by combination treatment with ZD1839 (Iressa) and trastuzumab (Herceptin) in non-small-cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Hisashi; Takamori, Shinzo; Fujii, Teruhiko; Ono, Mayumi; Yamana, Hideaki; Kuwano, Michihiko; Shirouzu, Kazuo

    2005-12-08

    An important recent advance in anticancer therapy was the development of molecular-targeting drugs, such as the epidermal growth-factor receptor (EGFR)-targeting drug ZD1839 (Iressa) and the HER2-trageting anti-HER2 monoclonal antibody trastuzumab (Herceptin). ZD1839 and trastuzumab are reported to improve the therapeutic efficacy of treatment for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and breast cancer, respectively, although the effectiveness of either drug alone is not satisfactory. NSCLC cells often express both EGFR and HER2. We therefore investigated whether a combination of ZD1839 and trastuzumab had an additive or synergistic antitumor effect. In culture ZD1839 inhibited the growth of four NSCLC cell lines (A549, NCI-H23, NCI-H727, and NCI-H661) that expressed various levels of EGFR, HER2, HER3, and HER4. A significant cytotoxic effect was observed when ZD1839 was combined with trastuzumab in A549 cells. However, this combination had no apparent effect in NCI-H23 cells. Significant G(1)-phase arrest, increased p27 expression and decreased cyclin E or D1 levels were detected in A549 cells treated with ZD1839 and trastuzumab. No significant effects were detected in NCI-H23 cells examined. The combination treatment significantly inhibited the phosphorylation of EGFR, HER2, retinoblastoma, extracellular signal-regulated kinase-1/2, and protein kinase B/Akt in A549 cells, but not in NCI-H23 cells. Our results indicated that increased levels of constitutive EGFR/HER2 heterodimers were formed in A549 cells in the presence of ZD1839, whereas no heterodimer formation was detected in NCI-H23 cells. We therefore suggest that combination treatment with ZD1839 and trastuzumab might have improved therapeutic efficacy against NSCLC cells expressing both EGFR and HER2.

  15. AGE-modified basement membrane cooperates with Endo180 to promote epithelial cell invasiveness and decrease prostate cancer survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodriguez-Teja, Mercedes; Gronau, Julian H; Breit, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    Biomechanical strain imposed by age-related thickening of the basal lamina and augmented tissue stiffness in the prostate gland coincides with increased cancer risk. Here we hypothesized that the structural alterations in the basal lamina associated with age can induce mechanotransduction pathways...... in prostate epithelial cells (PECs) to promote invasiveness and cancer progression. To demonstrate this, we developed a 3D model of PEC acini in which thickening and stiffening of basal lamina matrix was induced by advanced glycation end-product (AGE)-dependent non-enzymatic crosslinking of its major......(Δ) (Ex2-6/) (Δ) (Ex2-6) mice, with constitutively exposed CTLD2 and decreased survival of men with early (non-invasive) prostate cancer with high epithelial Endo180 expression and levels of AGE. These findings indicate that AGE-dependent modification of the basal lamina induces invasive behaviour...

  16. Cooperative robots and sensor networks

    CERN Document Server

    Khelil, Abdelmajid

    2014-01-01

    Mobile robots and Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs) have enabled great potentials and a large space for ubiquitous and pervasive applications. Robotics and WSNs have mostly been considered as separate research fields and little work has investigated the marriage between these two technologies. However, these two technologies share several features, enable common cyber-physical applications and provide complementary support to each other.
 The primary objective of book is to provide a reference for cutting-edge studies and research trends pertaining to robotics and sensor networks, and in particular for the coupling between them. The book consists of five chapters. The first chapter presents a cooperation strategy for teams of multiple autonomous vehicles to solve the rendezvous problem. The second chapter is motivated by the need to improve existing solutions that deal with connectivity prediction, and proposed a genetic machine learning approach for link-quality prediction. The third chapter presents an arch...

  17. Designing for cooperation - cooperating in design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kyng, Morten

    1991-01-01

    This article will discuss how to design computer applications that enhance the quality of work and products, and will relate the discussion to current themes in the field of Computer-Supported Cooperative Work (CSCW). Cooperation is a key element of computer use and work practice, yet here...... a specific "CSCW approach is not taken." Instead the focus is cooperation as an important aspect of work that should be integrated into most computer support efforts in order to develop successful computer support, however, other aspects such as power, conflict and control must also be considered....

  18. PKA and Epac cooperate to augment bradykinin-induced interleukin-8 release from human airway smooth muscle cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halayko Andrew J

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Airway smooth muscle contributes to the pathogenesis of pulmonary diseases by secreting inflammatory mediators such as interleukin-8 (IL-8. IL-8 production is in part regulated via activation of Gq-and Gs-coupled receptors. Here we study the role of the cyclic AMP (cAMP effectors protein kinase A (PKA and exchange proteins directly activated by cAMP (Epac1 and Epac2 in the bradykinin-induced IL-8 release from a human airway smooth muscle cell line and the underlying molecular mechanisms of this response. Methods IL-8 release was assessed via ELISA under basal condition and after stimulation with bradykinin alone or in combination with fenoterol, the Epac activators 8-pCPT-2'-O-Me-cAMP and Sp-8-pCPT-2'-O-Me-cAMPS, the PKA activator 6-Bnz-cAMP and the cGMP analog 8-pCPT-2'-O-Me-cGMP. Where indicated, cells were pre-incubated with the pharmacological inhibitors Clostridium difficile toxin B-1470 (GTPases, U0126 (extracellular signal-regulated kinases ERK1/2 and Rp-8-CPT-cAMPS (PKA. The specificity of the cyclic nucleotide analogs was confirmed by measuring phosphorylation of the PKA substrate vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein. GTP-loading of Rap1 and Rap2 was evaluated via pull-down technique. Expression of Rap1, Rap2, Epac1 and Epac2 was assessed via western blot. Downregulation of Epac protein expression was achieved by siRNA. Unpaired or paired two-tailed Student's t test was used. Results The β2-agonist fenoterol augmented release of IL-8 by bradykinin. The PKA activator 6-Bnz-cAMP and the Epac activator 8-pCPT-2'-O-Me-cAMP significantly increased bradykinin-induced IL-8 release. The hydrolysis-resistant Epac activator Sp-8-pCPT-2'-O-Me-cAMPS mimicked the effects of 8-pCPT-2'-O-Me-cAMP, whereas the negative control 8-pCPT-2'-O-Me-cGMP did not. Fenoterol, forskolin and 6-Bnz-cAMP induced VASP phosphorylation, which was diminished by the PKA inhibitor Rp-8-CPT-cAMPS. 6-Bnz-cAMP and 8-pCPT-2'-O-Me-cAMP induced GTP

  19. DNA polymerases κ and ζ cooperatively perform mutagenic translesion synthesis of the C8-2'-deoxyguanosine adduct of the dietary mutagen IQ in human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bose, Arindam; Pande, Paritosh; Jasti, Vijay P; Millsap, Amy D; Hawkins, Edward K; Rizzo, Carmelo J; Basu, Ashis K

    2015-09-30

    The roles of translesion synthesis (TLS) DNA polymerases in bypassing the C8-2'-deoxyguanosine adduct (dG-C8-IQ) formed by 2-amino-3-methylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoline (IQ), a highly mutagenic and carcinogenic heterocyclic amine found in cooked meats, were investigated. Three plasmid vectors containing the dG-C8-IQ adduct at the G1-, G2- or G3-positions of the NarI site (5'-G1G2CG3CC-3') were replicated in HEK293T cells. Fifty percent of the progeny from the G3 construct were mutants, largely G→T, compared to 18% and 24% from the G1 and G2 constructs, respectively. Mutation frequency (MF) of dG-C8-IQ was reduced by 38-67% upon siRNA knockdown of pol κ, whereas it was increased by 10-24% in pol η knockdown cells. When pol κ and pol ζ were simultaneously knocked down, MF of the G1 and G3 constructs was reduced from 18% and 50%, respectively, to <3%, whereas it was reduced from 24% to <1% in the G2 construct. In vitro TLS using yeast pol ζ showed that it can extend G3*:A pair more efficiently than G3*:C pair, but it is inefficient at nucleotide incorporation opposite dG-C8-IQ. We conclude that pol κ and pol ζ cooperatively carry out the majority of the error-prone TLS of dG-C8-IQ, whereas pol η is involved primarily in its error-free bypass.

  20. Dilemmas of partial cooperation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, Hans-Ulrich

    2010-08-01

    Related to the often applied cooperation models of social dilemmas, we deal with scenarios in which defection dominates cooperation, but an intermediate fraction of cooperators, that is, "partial cooperation," would maximize the overall performance of a group of individuals. Of course, such a solution comes at the expense of cooperators that do not profit from the overall maximum. However, because there are mechanisms accounting for mutual benefits after repeated interactions or through evolutionary mechanisms, such situations can constitute "dilemmas" of partial cooperation. Among the 12 ordinally distinct, symmetrical 2 x 2 games, three (barely considered) variants are correspondents of such dilemmas. Whereas some previous studies investigated particular instances of such games, we here provide the unifying framework and concisely relate it to the broad literature on cooperation in social dilemmas. Complementing our argumentation, we study the evolution of partial cooperation by deriving the respective conditions under which coexistence of cooperators and defectors, that is, partial cooperation, can be a stable outcome of evolutionary dynamics in these scenarios. Finally, we discuss the relevance of such models for research on the large biodiversity and variation in cooperative efforts both in biological and social systems.

  1. Exposure to human immunodeficiency virus/hepatitis C virus in hepatic and stellate cell lines reveals cooperative profibrotic transcriptional activation between viruses and cell types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salloum, Shadi; Holmes, Jacinta A; Jindal, Rohit; Bale, Shyam S; Brisac, Cynthia; Alatrakchi, Nadia; Lidofsky, Anna; Kruger, Annie J; Fusco, Dahlene N; Luther, Jay; Schaefer, Esperance A; Lin, Wenyu; Yarmush, Martin L; Chung, Raymond T

    2016-12-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/hepatitis C virus (HCV) coinfection accelerates progressive liver fibrosis; however, the mechanisms remain poorly understood. HCV and HIV independently induce profibrogenic markers transforming growth factor beta-1 (TGFβ1) (mediated by reactive oxygen species [ROS]) and nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NFκB) in hepatocytes and hepatic stellate cells in monoculture; however, they do not account for cellular crosstalk that naturally occurs. We created an in vitro coculture model and investigated the contributions of HIV and HCV to hepatic fibrogenesis. Green fluorescent protein reporter cell lines driven by functional ROS (antioxidant response elements), NFκB, and mothers against decapentaplegic homolog 3 (SMAD3) promoters were created in Huh7.5.1 and LX2 cells, using a transwell to generate cocultures. Reporter cell lines were exposed to HIV, HCV, or HIV/HCV. Activation of the 3 pathways was measured and compared according to infection status. Extracellular matrix products (collagen type 1 alpha 1 (CoL1A1) and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 1 (TIMP1)) were also measured. Both HCV and HIV independently activated TGFβ1 signaling through ROS (antioxidant response elements), NFκB, and SMAD3 in both cell lines in coculture. Activation of these profibrotic pathways was additive following HIV/HCV coexposure. This was confirmed when examining CoL1A1 and TIMP1, where messenger RNA and protein levels were significantly higher in LX2 cells in coculture following HIV/HCV coexposure compared with either virus alone. In addition, expression of these profibrotic genes was significantly higher in the coculture model compared to either cell type in monoculture, suggesting an interaction and feedback mechanism between Huh7.5.1 and LX2 cells.

  2. To cooperate or not to cooperate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wessels, Josepha Ivanka

    To Cooperate or not to Cooperate...? discusses results of a research project to study the rehabilitation of 1500-year old water tunnels, so called "qanats", in Syria. Communities all over the world are using traditional technologies to extract drinkingwater, irrigate their lands and feed their li......To Cooperate or not to Cooperate...? discusses results of a research project to study the rehabilitation of 1500-year old water tunnels, so called "qanats", in Syria. Communities all over the world are using traditional technologies to extract drinkingwater, irrigate their lands and feed...... their livestock. But these often sustainable and ancient ways to make use of groundwater are in rapid decline worldwide. A research project started in 1999 to study the rehabilitation of 1500-year old water tunnels called "qanats"in Syria. To Cooperate or not to Cooperate...? discusses results and outcomes...... of this research project. The main objective of this research is to better understand the proces of collective maintenance of these ancient water tunnels. The study evaluates the social, cultural, political and environmental factors that have driven abandonment and decay of qanats in Syria. It tries to reconcile...

  3. Integrative miRNA-Gene Expression Analysis Enables Refinement of Associated Biology and Prediction of Response to Cetuximab in Head and Neck Squamous Cell Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loris De Cecco

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper documents the process by which we, through gene and miRNA expression profiling of the same samples of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC and an integrative miRNA-mRNA expression analysis, were able to identify candidate biomarkers of progression-free survival (PFS in patients treated with cetuximab-based approaches. Through sparse partial least square–discriminant analysis (sPLS-DA and supervised analysis, 36 miRNAs were identified in two components that clearly separated long- and short-PFS patients. Gene set enrichment analysis identified a significant correlation between the miRNA first-component and EGFR signaling, keratinocyte differentiation, and p53. Another significant correlation was identified between the second component and RAS, NOTCH, immune/inflammatory response, epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT, and angiogenesis pathways. Regularized canonical correlation analysis of sPLS-DA miRNA and gene data combined with the MAGIA2 web-tool highlighted 16 miRNAs and 84 genes that were interconnected in a total of 245 interactions. After feature selection by a smoothed t-statistic support vector machine, we identified three miRNAs and five genes in the miRNA-gene network whose expression result was the most relevant in predicting PFS (Area Under the Curve, AUC = 0.992. Overall, using a well-defined clinical setting and up-to-date bioinformatics tools, we are able to give the proof of principle that an integrative miRNA-mRNA expression could greatly contribute to the refinement of the biology behind a predictive model.

  4. Selective expression of the chemokine receptor XCR1 on cross-presenting dendritic cells determines cooperation with CD8+ T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorner, Brigitte G; Dorner, Martin B; Zhou, Xuefei; Opitz, Corinna; Mora, Ahmed; Güttler, Steffen; Hutloff, Andreas; Mages, Hans W; Ranke, Katja; Schaefer, Michael; Jack, Robert S; Henn, Volker; Kroczek, Richard A

    2009-11-20

    The expression of the chemokine receptor XCR1 and the function of its ligand XCL1 (otherwise referred to as ATAC, lymphotactin, or SCM-1) remained elusive to date. In the present report we demonstrated that XCR1 is exclusively expressed on murine CD8(+) dendritic cells (DCs) and showed that XCL1 is a potent and highly specific chemoattractant for this DC subset. CD8(+) T cells abundantly secreted XCL1 8-36 hr after antigen recognition on CD8(+) DCs in vivo, in a period in which stable T cell-DC interactions are known to occur. Functionally, XCL1 increased the pool of antigen-specific CD8(+) T cells and their capacity to secrete IFN-gamma. Absence of XCL1 impaired the development of cytotoxicity to antigens cross-presented by CD8(+) DCs. The XCL1-XCR1 axis thus emerges as an integral component in the development of efficient cytotoxic immunity in vivo.

  5. Constitutive plasmacytoid dendritic cell migration to the splenic white pulp is cooperatively regulated by CCR7- and CXCR4-mediated signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umemoto, Eiji; Otani, Kazuhiro; Ikeno, Takashi; Verjan Garcia, Noel; Hayasaka, Haruko; Bai, Zhongbin; Jang, Myoung Ho; Tanaka, Toshiyuki; Nagasawa, Takashi; Ueda, Koichi; Miyasaka, Masayuki

    2012-07-01

    Although the spleen plays an important role in host defense against infection, the mechanism underlying the migration of the innate immune cells, plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs), into the spleen remains ill defined. In this article, we report that pDCs constitutively migrate into the splenic white pulp (WP) in a manner dependent on the chemokine receptors CCR7 and CXCR4. In CCR7-deficient mice and CCR7 ligand-deficient mice, compared with wild-type (WT) mice, substantially fewer pDCs were found in the periarteriolar lymphoid sheath of the splenic WP under steady-state conditions. In addition, the migration of adoptively transferred CCR7-deficient pDCs into the WP was significantly worse than that of WT pDCs, supporting the idea that pDC trafficking to the splenic WP requires CCR7 signaling. WT pDCs responded to a CCR7 ligand with modest chemotaxis and ICAM-1 binding in vitro, and priming with the CCR7 ligand enabled the pDCs to migrate efficiently toward low concentrations of CXCL12 in a CXCR4-dependent manner, raising the possibility that CCR7 signaling enhances CXCR4-mediated pDC migration. In agreement with this hypothesis, CCL21 and CXCL12 were colocalized on fibroblastic reticular cells in the T cell zone and in the marginal zone bridging channels, through which pDCs appeared to enter the WP. Furthermore, functional blockage of CCR7 and CXCR4 abrogated pDC trafficking into the WP. Collectively, these results strongly suggest that pDCs employ both CCR7 and CXCR4 as critical chemokine receptors to migrate into the WP under steady-state conditions.

  6. Automated Cooperative Trajectories for a More Efficient and Responsive Air Transportation System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Curt

    2015-01-01

    The NASA Automated Cooperative Trajectories project is developing a prototype avionics system that enables multi-vehicle cooperative control by integrating 1090 MHz ES ADS-B digital communications with onboard autopilot systems. This cooperative control capability will enable meta-aircraft operations for enhanced airspace utilization, as well as improved vehicle efficiency through wake surfing. This briefing describes the objectives and approach to a flight evaluation of this system planned for 2016.

  7. Combination treatment with Grb7 peptide and Doxorubicin or Trastuzumab (Herceptin) results in cooperative cell growth inhibition in breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pero, S C; Shukla, G S; Cookson, M M; Flemer, S; Krag, D N

    2007-05-21

    Grb7 has potential importance in the progression of cancer. We have previously identified a novel peptide that binds to the SH2 domain of Grb7 and inhibits its association with several different receptor tyrosine kinases. We have synthesised the Grb7 peptide, G7-18NATE, with two different cell penetrating peptides, Penetratin and Tat. In this study, we have shown that both Penetratin- and Tat-conjugated G7-18NATE peptides are able to inhibit the proliferation of SK-BR-3, ZR-75-30, MDA-MB-361 and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. There was no significant effects on breast cancer MCF-7cells, non-malignant MCF 10A or 3T3 cells. In addition, there was no significant inhibition of proliferation by Penetratin or Tat alone or by their conjugates with arbitrary peptide sequence in any of the cell lines tested. We determined the EC50 of G7-18NATE-P peptide for SK-BR-3 cell proliferation to be 7.663 x 10(-6) M. Co-treatment of G7-18NATE-P peptide plus Doxorubicin in SK-BR-3 breast cancer cells resulted in an additional inhibition of proliferation, resulting in 56 and 84% decreases in the Doxorubicin EC50 value in the presence of 5 x 10(-6) and 1.0 x 10(-5) M G7-18NATE-P peptide, respectively. Importantly, the co-treatment with Doxorubicin and the delivery peptide did not change the Doxorubicin EC50. Since Grb7 associates with ErbB2, we assessed whether the peptide inhibitor would have a combined effect with a molecule that targets ErbB2, Herceptin. Co-treatment of Herceptin plus 1.0 x 10(-5) M G7-18NATE-P peptide in SK-BR-3 cells resulted in a 46% decrease in the Herceptin EC50 value and no decrease following the co-treatment with Herceptin and penetratin alone. This Grb7 peptide has potential to be developed as a therapeutic agent alone, in combination with traditional chemotherapy, or in combination with other targeting molecules.

  8. Cooperative wireless communications

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Yan

    2009-01-01

    Cooperative devices and mechanisms are increasingly important to enhance the performance of wireless communications and networks, with their ability to decrease power consumption and packet loss rate and increase system capacity, computation, and network resilience. Considering the wide range of applications, strategies, and benefits associated with cooperative wireless communications, researchers and product developers need a succinct understanding of relevant theory, fundamentals, and techniques to navigate this challenging field. ""Cooperative Wireless Communications"" provides just that. I

  9. Futures for energy cooperatives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1981-01-01

    A listing of Federal agencies and programs with potential funding for community-scale cooperatives using conservation measures and solar technologies is presented in Section 1. Section 2 presents profiles of existing community energy cooperatives describing their location, history, membership, services, sources of finance and technical assistance. A condensed summary from a recent conference on Energy Cooperatives featuring notes on co-op members' experiences, problems, and opportunities is presented in Section 3. Section 4 lists contacts for additional information. A National Consumer Cooperative Bank Load Application is shown in the appendix.

  10. Cooperative Station History Forms

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Various forms, photographs and correspondence documenting the history of Cooperative station instrumentation, location changes, inspections, and...

  11. Cooperation or Silent Rivalry?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zank, Wolfgang

    2010-01-01

    a gravitational pull which goes beyond economic problems. Furthermore, the EU has gradually built up a coherent policy on many fields. The EU has become the “reform anchor” and most important cooperation partner for Egypt. The progress towards increasing Egypt’s “Stake in the Internal Market” places cooperation...... on an increasingly institutionalized basis. In terms of military cooperation the US is still the partner for Egypt. But outside the military sphere institutionalized cooperation is comparatively week. In particular the failure of the US to conclude a free-trade agreement has been crucial. But it would be wrong...

  12. Geo-Enabled, Mobile Services

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Christian Søndergaard

    2006-01-01

    We are witnessing the emergence of a global infrastructure that enables the widespread deployment of geo-enabled, mobile services in practice. At the same time, the research community has also paid increasing attention to data management aspects of mobile services. This paper offers me...

  13. Enabling Knowledge : Is Liberty a Daughter of Knowledge?

    OpenAIRE

    Stehr, Nico

    2007-01-01

    The theme I would like to explore in this presentation concern the multiple linkages between knowledge, civil society, governance, and democracy. I will place this general set of questions into the context of whether or not the these linkages are co-determined by a an enabling knowledgeability of modern actors -- stressing growing chances of reflexive cooperation in civil society organizations, social movements and perhaps a growing influence of larger segments of society on democratic regime...

  14. Toward genome-enabled mycology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hibbett, David S; Stajich, Jason E; Spatafora, Joseph W

    2013-01-01

    Genome-enabled mycology is a rapidly expanding field that is characterized by the pervasive use of genome-scale data and associated computational tools in all aspects of fungal biology. Genome-enabled mycology is integrative and often requires teams of researchers with diverse skills in organismal mycology, bioinformatics and molecular biology. This issue of Mycologia presents the first complete fungal genomes in the history of the journal, reflecting the ongoing transformation of mycology into a genome-enabled science. Here, we consider the prospects for genome-enabled mycology and the technical and social challenges that will need to be overcome to grow the database of complete fungal genomes and enable all fungal biologists to make use of the new data.

  15. The evolution of cooperation by negotiation in a noisy world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, K; McNamara, J M; Yamauchi, A; Higginson, A D

    2017-03-01

    Cooperative interactions among individuals are ubiquitous despite the possibility of exploitation by selfish free riders. One mechanism that may promote cooperation is 'negotiation': individuals altering their behaviour in response to the behaviour of others. Negotiating individuals decide their actions through a recursive process of reciprocal observation, thereby reducing the possibility of free riding. Evolutionary games with response rules have shown that infinitely many forms of the rule can be evolutionarily stable simultaneously, unless there is variation in individual quality. This potentially restricts the conditions under which negotiation could maintain cooperation. Organisms interact with one another in a noisy world in which cooperative effort and the assessment of effort may be subject to error. Here, we show that such noise can make the number of evolutionarily stable rules finite, even without quality variation, and so noise could help maintain cooperative behaviour. We show that the curvature of the benefit function is the key factor determining whether individuals invest more or less as their partner's investment increases, investing less when the benefit to investment has diminishing returns. If the benefits of low investment are very small then behavioural flexibility tends to promote cooperation, because negotiation enables cooperators to reach large benefits. Under some conditions, this leads to a repeating cycle in which cooperative behaviour rises and falls over time, which may explain between-population differences in cooperative behaviour. In other conditions, negotiation leads to extremely high levels of cooperative behaviour, suggesting that behavioural flexibility could facilitate the evolution of eusociality in the absence of high relatedness.

  16. Cooperative Wideband OFDM Communication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lu, H.

    2013-01-01

    In this thesis, major attention is paid to cooperative diversity as an alternative way to achieve spatial diversity when the multiple antenna structure is not an option. By adopting the cooperative relay nodes to forward information, we can mitigate the fading effects, increase the capacity, lower t

  17. Cooperation, compensation and transition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ju, Y.

    2004-01-01

    Cooperation and compensation are two important and well-linked issues in economics. The central question in cooperation is how to share the joint gains among participating players. Compensation is a specific aspect of surplus sharing problems providing incentives for agents to sacrifice their own di

  18. Coordination and Cooperation

    OpenAIRE

    Janssen, Maarten

    2003-01-01

    textabstractThis comment makes four related points. First, explaining coordination is different from explaining cooperation. Second, solving the coordination problem is more important for the theory of games than solving the cooperation problem. Third, a version of the Principle of Coordination can be rationalized on individualistic grounds. Finally, psychological game theory should consider how players perceive their gaming situation. ---------------------------------------------------------...

  19. Cooperative Science Lesson Plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooperative Learning, 1991

    1991-01-01

    Offers several elementary level cooperative science lesson plans. The article includes a recipe for cooperative class learning, instructions for making a compost pile, directions for finding evidence of energy, experiments in math and science using oranges to test density, and discussions of buoyancy using eggs. (SM)

  20. Readings in Cooperative Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leventhal, Jerome I.

    Twenty-three journal articles on cooperative education were selected in a review of the literature by two Temple University graduate classes in the fall of 1975 and the spring of 1976 for those interested in the role of coordinating cooperative education programs. The journal readings consist of articles on theory/planning (6), implementation…

  1. Coordination and Cooperation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.C.W. Janssen (Maarten)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractThis comment makes four related points. First, explaining coordination is different from explaining cooperation. Second, solving the coordination problem is more important for the theory of games than solving the cooperation problem. Third, a version of the Principle of Coordination can

  2. International Cooperation Advances Internationalization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ge Mingyi

    2004-01-01

    @@ Intemational scientific cooperation continues to successfully promote the development of research and the quality of researchers in China, and also the internationalization of China's research system and research organizations. An outstanding example of this is the 30 years of fruitful cooperation between the Chinese Academy of Sciences and the Max Planck Society.

  3. Culture and cooperation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gächter, Simon; Herrmann, Benedikt; Thöni, Christian

    2010-09-12

    Does the cultural background influence the success with which genetically unrelated individuals cooperate in social dilemma situations? In this paper, we provide an answer by analysing the data of Herrmann et al. (2008a), who studied cooperation and punishment in 16 subject pools from six different world cultures (as classified by Inglehart & Baker (2000)). We use analysis of variance to disentangle the importance of cultural background relative to individual heterogeneity and group-level differences in cooperation. We find that culture has a substantial influence on the extent of cooperation, in addition to individual heterogeneity and group-level differences identified by previous research. The significance of this result is that cultural background has a substantial influence on cooperation in otherwise identical environments. This is particularly true in the presence of punishment opportunities.

  4. Efficiency in Microfinance Cooperatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HARTARSKA, Valentina

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In recognition of cooperatives’ contribution to the socio-economic well-being of their participants, the United Nations has declared 2012 as the International Year of Cooperatives. Microfinance cooperatives make a large part of the microfinance industry. We study efficiency of microfinance cooperatives and provide estimates of the optimal size of such organizations. We employ the classical efficiency analysis consisting of estimating a system of equations and identify the optimal size of microfinance cooperatives in terms of their number of clients (outreach efficiency, as well as dollar value of lending and deposits (sustainability. We find that microfinance cooperatives have increasing returns to scale which means that the vast majority can lower cost if they become larger. We calculate that the optimal size is around $100 million in lending and half of that in deposits. We find less robust estimates in terms of reaching many clients with a range from 40,000 to 180,000 borrowers.

  5. Computer Security Systems Enable Access.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riggen, Gary

    1989-01-01

    A good security system enables access and protects information from damage or tampering, but the most important aspects of a security system aren't technical. A security procedures manual addresses the human element of computer security. (MLW)

  6. Taxonomy Enabled Discovery (TED) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposal addresses the NASA's need to enable scientific discovery and the topic's requirements for: processing large volumes of data, commonly available on the...

  7. Development of cooperative system bridges

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Zhe; WAN Qi-bai; SHI Lei

    2008-01-01

    Cooperative system bridges comprise several basic structures that act jointly to improve structural characteristics. We delved into the historical development of cooperative system bridges. Cooperative systems are classified as different-load cooperative systems and same-load cooperative systems by distinguishing the modes of load distribution. For different-load cooperation, individual basic structures are at different positions in the direction along bridge axis and carry the loads separately. While for same-load cooperation, all basic structures overlap in geometrical locations and support the entire loads conjointly. The choosing of span ratios between basic structures, the design of connections of different-load cooperative systems were discussed as well as optimizations of relative rigidity for same-load cooperative systems which greatly influence structural characteristics. The general situation and several structural measurements of several cooperative bridges were demonstrated. This information can assist engineers in developing their concepts in cooperative systems and can lead to more efficient and economical cooperative bridges.

  8. Collective chasing behavior between cooperators and defectors in the spatial prisoner's dilemma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Genki Ichinose

    Full Text Available Cooperation is one of the essential factors for all biological organisms in major evolutionary transitions. Recent studies have investigated the effect of migration for the evolution of cooperation. However, little is known about whether and how an individuals' cooperativeness coevolves with mobility. One possibility is that mobility enhances cooperation by enabling cooperators to escape from defectors and form clusters; the other possibility is that mobility inhibits cooperation by helping the defectors to catch and exploit the groups of cooperators. In this study we investigate the coevolutionary dynamics by using the prisoner's dilemma game model on a lattice structure. The computer simulations demonstrate that natural selection maintains cooperation in the form of evolutionary chasing between the cooperators and defectors. First, cooperative groups grow and collectively move in the same direction. Then, mutant defectors emerge and invade the cooperative groups, after which the defectors exploit the cooperators. Then other cooperative groups emerge due to mutation and the cycle is repeated. Here, it is worth noting that, as a result of natural selection, the mobility evolves towards directional migration, but not to random or completely fixed migration. Furthermore, with directional migration, the rate of global population extinction is lower when compared with other cases without the evolution of mobility (i.e., when mobility is preset to random or fixed. These findings illustrate the coevolutionary dynamics of cooperation and mobility through the directional chasing between cooperators and defectors.

  9. Collective chasing behavior between cooperators and defectors in the spatial prisoner's dilemma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichinose, Genki; Saito, Masaya; Suzuki, Shinsuke

    2013-01-01

    Cooperation is one of the essential factors for all biological organisms in major evolutionary transitions. Recent studies have investigated the effect of migration for the evolution of cooperation. However, little is known about whether and how an individuals' cooperativeness coevolves with mobility. One possibility is that mobility enhances cooperation by enabling cooperators to escape from defectors and form clusters; the other possibility is that mobility inhibits cooperation by helping the defectors to catch and exploit the groups of cooperators. In this study we investigate the coevolutionary dynamics by using the prisoner's dilemma game model on a lattice structure. The computer simulations demonstrate that natural selection maintains cooperation in the form of evolutionary chasing between the cooperators and defectors. First, cooperative groups grow and collectively move in the same direction. Then, mutant defectors emerge and invade the cooperative groups, after which the defectors exploit the cooperators. Then other cooperative groups emerge due to mutation and the cycle is repeated. Here, it is worth noting that, as a result of natural selection, the mobility evolves towards directional migration, but not to random or completely fixed migration. Furthermore, with directional migration, the rate of global population extinction is lower when compared with other cases without the evolution of mobility (i.e., when mobility is preset to random or fixed). These findings illustrate the coevolutionary dynamics of cooperation and mobility through the directional chasing between cooperators and defectors.

  10. Enabling plant synthetic biology through genome engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baltes, Nicholas J; Voytas, Daniel F

    2015-02-01

    Synthetic biology seeks to create new biological systems, including user-designed plants and plant cells. These systems can be employed for a variety of purposes, ranging from producing compounds of industrial or therapeutic value, to reducing crop losses by altering cellular responses to pathogens or climate change. To realize the full potential of plant synthetic biology, techniques are required that provide control over the genetic code - enabling targeted modifications to DNA sequences within living plant cells. Such control is now within reach owing to recent advances in the use of sequence-specific nucleases to precisely engineer genomes. We discuss here the enormous potential provided by genome engineering for plant synthetic biology.

  11. Cooperative Handover Management in Dense Cellular Networks

    KAUST Repository

    Arshad, Rabe

    2017-02-07

    Network densification has always been an important factor to cope with the ever increasing capacity demand. Deploying more base stations (BSs) improves the spatial frequency utilization, which increases the network capacity. However, such improvement comes at the expense of shrinking the BSs\\' footprints, which increases the handover (HO) rate and may diminish the foreseen capacity gains. In this paper, we propose a cooperative HO management scheme to mitigate the HO effect on throughput gains achieved via cellular network densification. The proposed HO scheme relies on skipping HO to the nearest BS at some instances along the user\\'s trajectory while enabling cooperative BS service during HO execution at other instances. To this end, we develop a mathematical model, via stochastic geometry, to quantify the performance of the proposed HO scheme in terms of coverage probability and user throughput. The results show that the proposed cooperative HO scheme outperforms the always best connected based association at high mobility. Also, the value of BS cooperation along with handover skipping is quantified with respect to the HO skipping only that has recently appeared in the literature. Particularly, the proposed cooperative HO scheme shows throughput gains of 12% to 27% and 17% on average, when compared to the always best connected and HO skipping only schemes at user velocity ranging from 80 km/h to 160 Km/h, respectively.

  12. Cooperative OFDM underwater acoustic communications

    CERN Document Server

    Cheng, Xilin; Cheng, Xiang

    2016-01-01

    Following underwater acoustic channel modeling, this book investigates the relationship between coherence time and transmission distances. It considers the power allocation issues of two typical transmission scenarios, namely short-range transmission and medium-long range transmission. For the former scenario, an adaptive system is developed based on instantaneous channel state information. The primary focus is on cooperative dual-hop orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM). This book includes the decomposed fountain codes designed to enable reliable communications with higher energy efficiency. It covers the Doppler Effect, which improves packet transmission reliability for effective low-complexity mirror-mapping-based intercarrier interference cancellation schemes capable of suppressing the intercarrier interference power level. Designed for professionals and researchers in the field of underwater acoustic communications, this book is also suitable for advanced-level students in electrical enginee...

  13. Globalization and human cooperation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchan, Nancy R; Grimalda, Gianluca; Wilson, Rick; Brewer, Marilynn; Fatas, Enrique; Foddy, Margaret

    2009-03-17

    Globalization magnifies the problems that affect all people and that require large-scale human cooperation, for example, the overharvesting of natural resources and human-induced global warming. However, what does globalization imply for the cooperation needed to address such global social dilemmas? Two competing hypotheses are offered. One hypothesis is that globalization prompts reactionary movements that reinforce parochial distinctions among people. Large-scale cooperation then focuses on favoring one's own ethnic, racial, or language group. The alternative hypothesis suggests that globalization strengthens cosmopolitan attitudes by weakening the relevance of ethnicity, locality, or nationhood as sources of identification. In essence, globalization, the increasing interconnectedness of people worldwide, broadens the group boundaries within which individuals perceive they belong. We test these hypotheses by measuring globalization at both the country and individual levels and analyzing the relationship between globalization and individual cooperation with distal others in multilevel sequential cooperation experiments in which players can contribute to individual, local, and/or global accounts. Our samples were drawn from the general populations of the United States, Italy, Russia, Argentina, South Africa, and Iran. We find that as country and individual levels of globalization increase, so too does individual cooperation at the global level vis-à-vis the local level. In essence, "globalized" individuals draw broader group boundaries than others, eschewing parochial motivations in favor of cosmopolitan ones. Globalization may thus be fundamental in shaping contemporary large-scale cooperation and may be a positive force toward the provision of global public goods.

  14. Network modularity promotes cooperation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcoux, Marianne; Lusseau, David

    2013-05-01

    Cooperation in animals and humans is widely observed even if evolutionary biology theories predict the evolution of selfish individuals. Previous game theory models have shown that cooperation can evolve when the game takes place in a structured population such as a social network because it limits interactions between individuals. Modularity, the natural division of a network into groups, is a key characteristic of all social networks but the influence of this crucial social feature on the evolution of cooperation has never been investigated. Here, we provide novel pieces of evidence that network modularity promotes the evolution of cooperation in 2-person prisoner's dilemma games. By simulating games on social networks of different structures, we show that modularity shapes interactions between individuals favouring the evolution of cooperation. Modularity provides a simple mechanism for the evolution of cooperation without having to invoke complicated mechanisms such as reputation or punishment, or requiring genetic similarity among individuals. Thus, cooperation can evolve over wider social contexts than previously reported.

  15. Fibroblast Growth Factors and Epidermal Growth Factor Cooperate with Oocyte-Derived Members of the TGFbeta Superfamily to Regulate Spry2 mRNA Levels in Mouse Cumulus Cells1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiura, Koji; Su, You-Qiang; Li, Qinglei; Wigglesworth, Karen; Matzuk, Martin M.; Eppig, John J.

    2009-01-01

    Mouse oocytes produce members of the transforming growth factor beta (TGFbeta) superfamily, including bone morphogenetic protein 15 (BMP15) and growth differentiation factor 9 (GDF9), as well as fibroblast growth factors (FGFs). These growth factors cooperate to regulate cumulus cell function. To identify potential mechanisms involved in these interactions, the ability of fully grown oocytes to regulate expression of BMP or FGF antagonists in cumulus cells was examined. Oocytes promoted cumulus cell expression of transcripts encoding antagonists to TGFbeta superfamily members, including Grem2, Htra1, Htra3, and Nog mRNAs. In contrast, oocytes suppressed cumulus cell expression of Spry2 mRNA, which encodes a regulator of receptor tyrosine kinase signals, such as FGF and epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor signals. The regulation of Spry2 mRNA levels in cumulus cells was studied further as a model for analysis of potential mechanisms for cooperativity of FGF/EGF signaling with oocyte-derived members of the TGFbeta superfamily. Oocytes suppressed basal and FGF-stimulated Spry2 mRNA levels in cumulus cells but promoted EGF-stimulated levels. Furthermore, recombinant TGFbeta superfamily proteins, including BMP15 and GDF9, mimicked these effects of oocytes. Elevated expression of Spry2 mRNA in cumulus and mural granulosa cells correlated with human chorionic gonadotropin-induced expression of mRNAs encoding EGF-like peptides. Therefore, oocyte-derived members of the TGFbeta superfamily suppress FGF-stimulated Spry2 mRNA levels before the luteinizing hormone surge but promote Spry2 mRNA levels stimulated by EGF receptor-mediated signals after the surge. PMID:19553596

  16. Modeling Misbehavior in Cooperative Diversity: A Dynamic Game Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sintayehu Dehnie

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Cooperative diversity protocols are designed with the assumption that terminals always help each other in a socially efficient manner. This assumption may not be valid in commercial wireless networks where terminals may misbehave for selfish or malicious intentions. The presence of misbehaving terminals creates a social-dilemma where terminals exhibit uncertainty about the cooperative behavior of other terminals in the network. Cooperation in social-dilemma is characterized by a suboptimal Nash equilibrium where wireless terminals opt out of cooperation. Hence, without establishing a mechanism to detect and mitigate effects of misbehavior, it is difficult to maintain a socially optimal cooperation. In this paper, we first examine effects of misbehavior assuming static game model and show that cooperation under existing cooperative protocols is characterized by a noncooperative Nash equilibrium. Using evolutionary game dynamics we show that a small number of mutants can successfully invade a population of cooperators, which indicates that misbehavior is an evolutionary stable strategy (ESS. Our main goal is to design a mechanism that would enable wireless terminals to select reliable partners in the presence of uncertainty. To this end, we formulate cooperative diversity as a dynamic game with incomplete information. We show that the proposed dynamic game formulation satisfied the conditions for the existence of perfect Bayesian equilibrium.

  17. On the Performance of Cooperative Spectrum Sensing under Quantization

    CERN Document Server

    Han, Weijia; Li, Zan; Zhang, Yan; Liu, Qin

    2011-01-01

    In cognitive radio, the cooperative spectrum sensing (CSS) plays a key role in determining the performance of secondary networks. However, there have not been feasible approaches that can analytically calculate the performance of CSS with regard to the multi-level quantization. In this paper, we not only show the cooperative false alarm probability and cooperative detection probability impacted by quantization, but also formulate them by two closed form expressions. These two expressions enable the calculation of cooperative false alarm probability and cooperative detection probability tractable efficiently, and provide a feasible approach for optimization of sensing performance. Additionally, to facilitate this calculation, we derive Normal approximation for evaluating the sensing performance conveniently. Furthermore, two optimization methods are proposed to achieve the high sensing performance under quantization.

  18. Transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN-mediated CLYBL targeting enables enhanced transgene expression and one-step generation of dual reporter human induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC and neural stem cell (NSC lines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trevor Cerbini

    Full Text Available Targeted genome engineering to robustly express transgenes is an essential methodology for stem cell-based research and therapy. Although designer nucleases have been used to drastically enhance gene editing efficiency, targeted addition and stable expression of transgenes to date is limited at single gene/locus and mostly PPP1R12C/AAVS1 in human stem cells. Here we constructed transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs targeting the safe-harbor like gene CLYBL to mediate reporter gene integration at 38%-58% efficiency, and used both AAVS1-TALENs and CLYBL-TALENs to simultaneously knock-in multiple reporter genes at dual safe-harbor loci in human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs and neural stem cells (NSCs. The CLYBL-TALEN engineered cell lines maintained robust reporter expression during self-renewal and differentiation, and revealed that CLYBL targeting resulted in stronger transgene expression and less perturbation on local gene expression than PPP1R12C/AAVS1. TALEN-mediated CLYBL engineering provides improved transgene expression and options for multiple genetic modification in human stem cells.

  19. Transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN)-mediated CLYBL targeting enables enhanced transgene expression and one-step generation of dual reporter human induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) and neural stem cell (NSC) lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerbini, Trevor; Funahashi, Ray; Luo, Yongquan; Liu, Chengyu; Park, Kyeyoon; Rao, Mahendra; Malik, Nasir; Zou, Jizhong

    2015-01-01

    Targeted genome engineering to robustly express transgenes is an essential methodology for stem cell-based research and therapy. Although designer nucleases have been used to drastically enhance gene editing efficiency, targeted addition and stable expression of transgenes to date is limited at single gene/locus and mostly PPP1R12C/AAVS1 in human stem cells. Here we constructed transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) targeting the safe-harbor like gene CLYBL to mediate reporter gene integration at 38%-58% efficiency, and used both AAVS1-TALENs and CLYBL-TALENs to simultaneously knock-in multiple reporter genes at dual safe-harbor loci in human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) and neural stem cells (NSCs). The CLYBL-TALEN engineered cell lines maintained robust reporter expression during self-renewal and differentiation, and revealed that CLYBL targeting resulted in stronger transgene expression and less perturbation on local gene expression than PPP1R12C/AAVS1. TALEN-mediated CLYBL engineering provides improved transgene expression and options for multiple genetic modification in human stem cells.

  20. Globalization and economic cooperation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Divar

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Economic globalization is nothing, really, that the universality of capitalism. Not globalized culture, and economic participation, and human rights, ... has only globalized market. We must react by substituting those materialistic values with cooperative economy.

  1. Cooperative Bacterial Foraging Optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanning Chen

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial Foraging Optimization (BFO is a novel optimization algorithm based on the social foraging behavior of E. coli bacteria. This paper presents a variation on the original BFO algorithm, namely, the Cooperative Bacterial Foraging Optimization (CBFO, which significantly improve the original BFO in solving complex optimization problems. This significant improvement is achieved by applying two cooperative approaches to the original BFO, namely, the serial heterogeneous cooperation on the implicit space decomposition level and the serial heterogeneous cooperation on the hybrid space decomposition level. The experiments compare the performance of two CBFO variants with the original BFO, the standard PSO and a real-coded GA on four widely used benchmark functions. The new method shows a marked improvement in performance over the original BFO and appears to be comparable with the PSO and GA.

  2. Cooperative Purchasing Reduces Costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kula, Edwin J.

    1981-01-01

    Several suburban Chicago (Illinois) school districts are members of the South Suburban School Purchasing Cooperative, which serves as a conduit for volume purchases of educational supplies. (Author/MLF)

  3. Landscape Conservation Cooperatives

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Landscape Conservation Cooperatives (LCCs) are public-private partnerships composed of states, tribes, federal agencies, non-governmental organizations,...

  4. Cooperating and Prospering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO MINGWEN

    2010-01-01

    @@ Since its establish-ment in 2001, the Shanghai Cooperation Organization (SCO)-a re-gional organization grouping China, Russia, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan and Uzbekistan-has grown at a notable pace.

  5. Regional National Cooperative Observer

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NOAA publication dedicated to issues, news and recognition of observers in the National Weather Service Cooperative Observer program. Issues published regionally...

  6. Solar cooperatives; Genosse Sonne

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, Dierk

    2010-06-15

    Not a boom but a trend: Increasingly, solar power plants and other renewables-based systems are financed by cooperatives. This organizational structure requires long-term strategies and some idealism. (orig.)

  7. Cooperative Weather Observations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Monthly logs include a daily account of temperature extremes and precipitation, along with snow data at some locations. U.S. Cooperative Observer Program (COOP)...

  8. Cooperative processing data bases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasta, Juzar

    1991-01-01

    Cooperative processing for the 1990's using client-server technology is addressed. The main theme is concepts of downsizing from mainframes and minicomputers to workstations on a local area network (LAN). This document is presented in view graph form.

  9. Cooperative Transport Planning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zutt, J.; De Weerdt, M.M.

    2000-01-01

    To test and compare different forms of cooperative planning algorithms developed in the CABS project we use a generic simulator called MARS. Examples in the transportation sector are implemented in this simulator.

  10. Cooperation Beats Conflict

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    China and the Philippines agree to strengthen economic and trade cooperation while minimizing disputes Philippine President Benigno Aquino III recently completed a five-day visit to China, his first state visit to China since he took office last year.

  11. Global Reserve Cooperation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-24

    St ra te gy R es ea rc h Pr oj ec t GLOBAL RESERVE COOPERATION BY LIEUTENANT COLONEL PAMELA L. MCGAHA United States Army National Guard...DATES COVERED (From - To) 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Global Reserve Cooperation 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM...decade, the United States, its allies, and partner nations have greatly increased their reliance on Reserve Component forces. This global

  12. Cooperation Without Intervention

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    In January, China announced its desire to increase cooperation with African countries by issuing China's African Policy, a paper intended to guide relations with the continent by continuing a non-interventionist and non-ideological strategy. Christopher Mutsvangwa, Zimbabwean Ambassador to China, shared his views of the policy with Beijing Review reporter Ni Yanshuo and answered criticisms of the China-Africa relationship by Western countries that tie cooperation to democracy and human rights.

  13. Extending Eurasia Security Cooperation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    After 14 years of development, the Shanghai Cooperation Organization (SCO) , has set its sights on goals for the next de-cade at the 15th meeting of the Council of SCO Heads of State that was held in Ufa, the capital of Russia's Bashkortostan Republic, on July 9-10. The SCO, established in Shanghai in 2001, is committed to building fdendly neighbor rela- tions and maintaining security and stability in the Central Asian region through multilateral cooperation.

  14. Cooperating mobile robots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrington, John J.; Eskridge, Steven E.; Hurtado, John E.; Byrne, Raymond H.

    2004-02-03

    A miniature mobile robot provides a relatively inexpensive mobile robot. A mobile robot for searching an area provides a way for multiple mobile robots in cooperating teams. A robotic system with a team of mobile robots communicating information among each other provides a way to locate a source in cooperation. A mobile robot with a sensor, a communication system, and a processor, provides a way to execute a strategy for searching an area.

  15. Enabler for the agile virtual enterprise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuerst, Karl; Schmidt, Thomas; Wippel, Gerald

    2001-10-01

    In this presentation, a new approach for a flexible low-cost Internet extended enterprise (project FLoCI-EE) will be presented. FLoCI-EE is a project in the fifth framework program of the European commission with 8 partners from 4 countries, which started in January 2001 and will be finished in December 2003. The main objective of FLoCI-EE is the development of a software prototype, which enables flexible enterprise cooperation with the aim to design, manufacture and sell products commonly, independent of enterprise borderlines. The needed IT-support includes functions of product data management (PDM), enterprise resource planning (ERP), supply chain management (SCM) and customer relationship management (CRM). Especially for small and medium sized enterprises, existing solutions are too expensive and inflexible to be of use under current turbulent market conditions. The second part of this paper covers the item Web Services, because in the role-specific support approach of FLoCI-EE, there are user- interface-components, which are tailored for specific roles in an enterprise. These components integrate automatically the services of the so-called basic-components, and the externally offered Web Services like UDDI.

  16. Smart Grid enabled heat pumps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carmo, Carolina; Detlefsen, Nina; Nielsen, Mads Pagh

    2014-01-01

    The transition towards a 100 % fossil-free energy system, while achieving extreme penetration levels of intermittent wind and solar power in electricity generation, requires demand-side technologies that are smart (intermittency-friendly) and efficient. The integration of Smart Grid enabling...

  17. Secure Enclaves-Enabled Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-25

    solution. Recommendations There is the potential to exploit extremely lucrative opportunities utilizing our first- mover advantage in this...emerging market segment. However, there is still significant work to be completed. The SE Enabled browser extension application is still in the early

  18. Retroreflecting polarization spectroscopy enabling miniaturization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groswasser, D; Waxman, A; Givon, M; Aviv, G; Japha, Y; Keil, M; Folman, R

    2009-09-01

    We describe and characterize alternative configurations for Doppler-free polarization spectroscopy. The suggested apparatus enables complete pump/probe beam overlap and allows substantial miniaturization. Its utility and performance for narrow linewidth, high-stability frequency locking is discussed for the /5S(1/2)F=2>-->/5P(3/2)F(')>D(2) transition in (87)Rb.

  19. Micro-concentrators for a microsystems-enabled photovoltaic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jared, Bradley H; Saavedra, Michael P; Anderson, Ben J; Goeke, Ron S; Sweatt, William C; Nielson, Gregory N; Okandan, Murat; Elisberg, Brenton; Snively, Dave; Duncan, John; Gu, Tian; Agrawal, Gautam; Haney, Michael W

    2014-03-10

    A 100X magnification, ± 2.5° field of view micro-concentrating optical system has been developed for a microsystems-enabled photovoltaic (MEPV) prototype module using 250 µm diameter multi-junction "stacked" PV cells.

  20. Cooperative transport by small teams of molecular motors

    OpenAIRE

    Klumpp, Stefan; Muller, Melanie J. I.; Lipowsky, Reinhard

    2006-01-01

    Molecular motors power directed transport of cargoes within cells. Even if a single motor is sufficient to transport a cargo, motors often cooperate in small teams. We discuss the cooperative cargo transport by several motors theoretically and explore some of its properties. In particular we emphasize how motor teams can drag cargoes through a viscous environment.

  1. Computational implications of cooperative plasticity induction at nearby dendritic sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morita, Kenji

    2009-01-06

    Recent studies have revealed that plasticity is not regulated independently at individual synapses but rather that there is cooperativity or associativity between nearby synapses in the dendritic tree of individual cortical pyramidal cells. Here, I summarize experimental results regarding such cooperative plasticity and its underlying mechanisms and consider their computational implications.

  2. Enablers and constrainers to participation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Desjardins, Richard; Milana, Marcella

    2007-01-01

    This paper briefly reviews some of evidence on participation patterns in Nordic countries and some of the defining parameters that may explain the observations. This is done in a comparative perspective by contrasting results from the 2003 Eurobarometer data between Nordic countries and a handful...... of non-Nordic countries. An emphasis is placed on the constraining and enabling elements to participation and how these may explain why certain groups participate more or less than others. A central question of interest to this paper is to what extent does (can) government intervention interact...... with constraining and enabling elements so as to raise participation among otherwise disadvantaged groups. To begin addressing this question, consideration is given to different types of constraints and different types of policies. These are brought together within a broad demand and supply framework, so...

  3. Fundamental Limits of Cooperation

    CERN Document Server

    Lozano, Angel; Andrews, Jeffrey G

    2012-01-01

    Cooperation is viewed as a key ingredient for interference management in wireless systems. This paper shows that cooperation has fundamental limitations. The main result is that even full cooperation between transmitters cannot in general change an interference-limited network to a noise-limited network. The key idea is that there exists a spectral efficiency upper bound that is independent of the transmit power. First, a spectral efficiency upper bound is established for systems that rely on pilot-assisted channel estimation; in this framework, cooperation is shown to be possible only within clusters of limited size, which are subject to out-of-cluster interference whose power scales with that of the in-cluster signals. Second, an upper bound is also shown to exist when cooperation is through noncoherent communication; thus, the spectral efficiency limitation is not a by-product of the reliance on pilot-assisted channel estimation. Consequently, existing literature that routinely assumes the high-power spect...

  4. MEMS: Enabled Drug Delivery Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobo, Angelica; Sheybani, Roya; Meng, Ellis

    2015-05-01

    Drug delivery systems play a crucial role in the treatment and management of medical conditions. Microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) technologies have allowed the development of advanced miniaturized devices for medical and biological applications. This Review presents the use of MEMS technologies to produce drug delivery devices detailing the delivery mechanisms, device formats employed, and various biomedical applications. The integration of dosing control systems, examples of commercially available microtechnology-enabled drug delivery devices, remaining challenges, and future outlook are also discussed.

  5. Echo-Enabled Harmonic Generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stupakov, Gennady; /SLAC

    2012-06-28

    A recently proposed concept of the Echo-Enabled Harmonic Generation (EEHG) FEL uses two laser modulators in combination with two dispersion sections to generate a high-harmonic density modulation in a relativistic beam. This seeding technique holds promise of a one-stage soft x-ray FEL that radiates not only transversely but also longitudinally coherent pulses. Currently, an experimental verification of the concept is being conducted at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory aimed at the demonstration of the EEHG.

  6. Toward the Automated Synthesis of Cooperative Mobile Robot Teams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parker, L.E.

    1998-11-01

    A current limitation in the real-world use of cooperating mobiIe robots is the difficulty in determining the proper team composition for a given robotic application. Present technology restricts the design and implementation of cooperative robot teams to the expertise of a robotics researcher, who has to develop robot teams on an application-specific basis. The objective of our research is to reduce the complexity of cooperative robotic systems through the development of a methodology that enables the automated synthesis of cooperative robot teams. We propose an approach to this problem that uses a combination of the theories of sensori-computational systems and information invariants, building on the earlier work of Donald, Rus, et al. We describe the notion of defining equivalence classes that serve as fundamental building blocks of more complex cooperative mobile robot behaviors. We postulate a methodology for framing mission requirements in terms of the goals and constraints of the problem, incorporating issues such as multi-robot interference, communication, control strategy, robot complexity, and so forth, into the mechanism. Our initial work restricts the robot application and design space to three multi-robot application domains we have previously studied and implemented: keeping formation, "mock" hazardous waste cleanup, and cooperative observation. This paper presents the foundational ideas upon which our approach to cooperative team design is based. Keywords: Cooperative behaviors, behavior synthesis, multi-robot learning

  7. Quantifying the energetics of cooperativity in a ternary protein complex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Peter S; Schuck, Peter; Sundberg, Eric J

    2002-01-01

    binary reactions that make up the overall complex. This is due, in large part, to cooperative interactions between separate protein domains. Thus, a full understanding of multiprotein complexes requires the quantitative analysis of cooperativity. We have used surface plasmon resonance techniques...... and mathematical modeling to describe the energetics of cooperativity in a trimolecular protein complex. As a model system for quantifying cooperativity, we studied the ternary complex formed by the simultaneous interaction of a superantigen with major histocompatibility complex and T cell receptor, for which...... a structural model is available. This system exhibits positive and negative cooperativity, as well as augmentation of the temperature dependence of binding kinetics upon the cooperative interaction of individual protein components in the complex. Our experimental and theoretical analysis may be applicable...

  8. Cooperative Prototyping Experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bødker, Susanne; Grønbæk, Kaj

    1989-01-01

    tried to achieve a fluent work-like evaluation of prototypes where users envisioned future work with a computer tool, at the same time as we made on-line modifications of prototypes in cooperation with the users when breakdown occur in their work-like evaluation. The experiments showed...... these experiences we discuss problems in the process, requirements for design tools, and issues involved in getting going with cooperative prototyping with active user involvement.......This paper describes experiments with a design technique that we denote cooperative prototyping. The experiments consider design of a patient case record system for municipal dental clinics in which we used HyperCard, an off the shelf programming environment for the Macintosh. In the ecperiments we...

  9. Evolution, epigenetics and cooperation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Patrick Bateson

    2014-04-01

    Explanations for biological evolution in terms of changes in gene frequencies refer to outcomes rather than process. Integrating epigenetic studies with older evolutionary theories has drawn attention to the ways in which evolution occurs. Adaptation at the level of the gene is givingway to adaptation at the level of the organism and higher-order assemblages of organisms. These ideas impact on the theories of how cooperation might have evolved. Two of the theories, i.e. that cooperating individuals are genetically related or that they cooperate for self-interested reasons, have been accepted for a long time. The idea that adaptation takes place at the level of groups is much more controversial. However, bringing together studies of development with those of evolution is taking away much of the heat in the debate about the evolution of group behaviour.

  10. Cooperatives between truth and validity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilherme Krueger

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The current declaration of the International Cooperative Alliance on cooperative identity since its 1995 Centennial Conference (which was held in Manchester makes no distinction between cooperation and cooperative. The lack of distinction between cooperation and cooperative has caused the Decennial Cooperative Action Plan to define cooperatives as a form, while their materiality is regarded as managerial: a business (activity under a cooperative form. An identity that is close to us cannot be reduced to form, without this being a problem. Therefore, the value underlying this identity —cooperation— must have a substantial basis, even if it is idealised, if it is to affect us.Received: 27.03.2014Accepted: 12.05.2014

  11. Nordic Energy Policy Cooperation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Birte Holst

    2016-01-01

    the borders long before the politicians supported and pushed for further cooperation. Energy efficiency was addressed by a portfolio of activities ranging from knowledge-sharing, public campaigns, labelling and standardisation of products. The need to address environmental degradation was inspired by the UN...... officials. With the consolidation of Nordic Energy Research in 1999, the cooperation benefitted from having an institution that exclusively could focus on Nordic energy policy issues and deliver research-based decision support to decision makers in the Nordic energy sector....

  12. Excited cooper pairs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez-Arrietea, M. G.; Solis, M. A.; De Llano, M. [Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Mexico, D.F (Mexico)

    2001-02-01

    Excited cooper pairs formed in a many-fermion system are those with nonzero total center-of mass momentum (CMM). They are normally neglected in the standard Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer (BCS) theory of superconductivity for being too few compared with zero CMM pairs. However, a Bose-Einstein condensation picture requires both zero and nonzero CMM pairs. Assuming a BCS model interaction between fermions we determine the populations for all CMM values of Cooper pairs by actually calculating the number of nonzero-CMM pairs relative to that of zero-CMM ones in both 2D and 3D. Although this ratio decreases rapidly with CMM, the number of Cooper pairs for any specific CMM less than the maximum (or breakup of the pair) momentum turns out to be typically larger than about 95% of those with zero-CMM at zero temperature T. Even at T {approx}100 K this fraction en 2D is still as large as about 70% for typical quasi-2D cuprate superconductor parameters. [Spanish] Los pares de cooper excitados formados en un sistema de muchos electrones, son aquellos con momentos de centro de masa (CMM) diferente de cero. Normalmente estos no son tomados en cuenta en la teoria estandar de la superconductividad de Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer (BCS) al suponer que su numero es muy pequeno comparados con los pares de centro de masa igual a cero. Sin embargo, un esquema de condensacion Bose-Einstein requiere de ambos pares, con CMM cero y diferente de cero. Asumiendo una interaccion modelo BCS entre los fermiones, determinamos la poblacion de pares cooper con cada uno de todos los posibles valores del CMM calculando el numero de pares con momentos de centro de masa diferente de cero relativo a los pares de CMM igual a cero, en 2D y 3D. Aunque esta razon decrece rapidamente con el CMM, el numero de pares de cooper para cualquier CMM especifico menor que el momento maximo (o rompimiento de par) es tipicamente mas grande que el 95% de aquellos con CMM cero. Aun a T {approx}100 K esta fraccion en 2D es

  13. Introduction: cooperative learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José-Manuel Serrano

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The principal objective of this revision is the recognition of cooperative learning as a highly effective strategy for the accomplishment of the general goals in learning. The different investigations assessed validate the potential that a cooperative organization of the classroom could entail for academic achievement, self-esteem, interpersonal attraction or social support. The solidity of the existing research contributes to its external and internal validity and, thus, to conclude that the results are consistent and can be extrapolated to different cultures, ethnic groups or countries.

  14. Cooperative strategies in innovation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ratner Svetlana Valerevna

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In the knowledge economy one of the conventional ways to obtain economic agents access to new knowledge and technology is the creation and implementation of specific cooperative strategies, such as the formation of alliances with other economic agents. Combining competencies partners in joint research and development has a positive impact on innovation, but it is a partial convergence of competences partners that in the long term can lead to the unification of competences agents economic system and reduce their innovative activity. In this paper, we propose an effective method of information management in the implementation of a cooperative strategy of innovation.

  15. Cooperative internal conversion process

    CERN Document Server

    Kálmán, Péter

    2015-01-01

    A new phenomenon, called cooperative internal conversion process, in which the coupling of bound-free electron and neutron transitions due to the dipole term of their Coulomb interaction permits cooperation of two nuclei leading to neutron exchange if it is allowed by energy conservation, is discussed theoretically. General expression of the cross section of the process is reported in one particle nuclear and spherical shell models as well in the case of free atoms (e.g. noble gases). A half-life characteristic of the process is also determined. The case of $Ne$ is investigated numerically. The process may have significance in fields of nuclear waste disposal and nuclear energy production.

  16. Proto-cooperation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herbert-Read, James E; Romanczuk, Pawel; Krause, Stefan;

    2016-01-01

    beneficial if the cost of attacking is high, and only then when waiting times are short. Our findings provide evidence that cooperative benefits can be realized through the facilitative effects of individuals' hunting actions without spatial coordination of attacks. Such 'proto-cooperation' may be the pre...... in an increase of injured fish in the school with the number of attacks. How quickly prey are captured is positively correlated with the level of injury of the school, suggesting that hunters can benefit from other conspecifics' attacks on the prey. To explore this, we built a mathematical model capturing...

  17. Social penalty promotes cooperation in a cooperative society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Hiromu; Yoshimura, Jin

    2015-08-04

    Why cooperation is well developed in human society is an unsolved question in biological and human sciences. Vast studies in game theory have revealed that in non-cooperative games selfish behavior generally dominates over cooperation and cooperation can be evolved only under very limited conditions. These studies ask the origin of cooperation; whether cooperation can evolve in a group of selfish individuals. In this paper, instead of asking the origin of cooperation, we consider the enhancement of cooperation in a small already cooperative society. We ask whether cooperative behavior is further promoted in a small cooperative society in which social penalty is devised. We analyze hawk-dove game and prisoner's dilemma introducing social penalty. We then expand it for non-cooperative games in general. The results indicate that cooperation is universally favored if penalty is further imposed. We discuss the current result in terms of the moral, laws, rules and regulations in a society, e.g., criminology and traffic violation.

  18. Ena/VASP proteins cooperate with the WAVE complex to regulate the actin cytoskeleton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xing Judy; Squarr, Anna Julia; Stephan, Raiko; Chen, Baoyu; Higgins, Theresa E; Barry, David J; Martin, Morag C; Rosen, Michael K; Bogdan, Sven; Way, Michael

    2014-09-01

    Ena/VASP proteins and the WAVE regulatory complex (WRC) regulate cell motility by virtue of their ability to independently promote actin polymerization. We demonstrate that Ena/VASP and the WRC control actin polymerization in a cooperative manner through the interaction of the Ena/VASP EVH1 domain with an extended proline rich motif in Abi. This interaction increases cell migration and enables VASP to cooperatively enhance WRC stimulation of Arp2/3 complex-mediated actin assembly in vitro in the presence of Rac. Loss of this interaction in Drosophila macrophages results in defects in lamellipodia formation, cell spreading, and redistribution of Ena to the tips of filopodia-like extensions. Rescue experiments of abi mutants also reveals a physiological requirement for the Abi:Ena interaction in photoreceptor axon targeting and oogenesis. Our data demonstrate that the activities of Ena/VASP and the WRC are intimately linked to ensure optimal control of actin polymerization during cell migration and development.

  19. Shariah Governance Framework For Islamic Co-Operatives As An Integral Social Insitution In Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Muhammad Issyam Itam; Rusni bt Hasan; Syed Musa Alhabshi

    2017-01-01

    In Malaysia, Islamic cooperatives are recognized as providers of some form of Islamic financial service similar to Islamic Banks and Takaful Operators. An Islamic Co-operative refers to a co-operative conducting activities and businesses based on Shariah principles. Being a non-banking financial institution, its main objective is to enhance social economic welfare of its members. As a form of captive social institution, it enables the less economically privileged members of society to pool re...

  20. A User Cooperation Stimulating Strategy Based on Cooperative Game Theory in Cooperative Relay Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Zhang

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a user cooperation stimulating strategy among rational users. The strategy is based on cooperative game theory and enacted in the context of cooperative relay networks. Using the pricing-based mechanism, the system is modeled initially with two nodes and a Base Station (BS. Within this framework, each node is treated as a rational decision maker. To this end, each node can decide whether to cooperate and how to cooperate. Cooperative game theory assists in providing an optimal system utility and provides fairness among users. Under different cooperative forwarding modes, certain questions are carefully investigated, including “what is each node's best reaction to maximize its utility?” and “what is the optimal reimbursement to encourage cooperation?” Simulation results show that the nodes benefit from the proposed cooperation stimulating strategy in terms of utility and thus justify the fairness between each user.

  1. Duty ratio of cooperative molecular motors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dharan, Nadiv; Farago, Oded

    2012-02-01

    Molecular motors are found throughout the cells of the human body and have many different and important roles. These micromachines move along filament tracks and have the ability to convert chemical energy into mechanical work that powers cellular motility. Different types of motors are characterized by different duty ratios, which is the fraction of time that a motor is attached to its filament. In the case of myosin II (a nonprocessive molecular machine with a low duty ratio), cooperativity between several motors is essential to induce motion along its actin filament track. In this work we use statistical mechanical tools to calculate the duty ratio of cooperative molecular motors. The model suggests that the effective duty ratio of nonprocessive motors that work in cooperation is lower than the duty ratio of the individual motors. The origin of this effect is the elastic tension that develops in the filament which is relieved when motors detach from the track.

  2. Promotion of cooperation by selective group extinction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böttcher, Marvin A.; Nagler, Jan

    2016-06-01

    Multilevel selection is an important organizing principle that crucially underlies evolutionary processes from the emergence of cells to eusociality and the economics of nations. Previous studies on multilevel selection assumed that the effective higher-level selection emerges from lower-level reproduction. This leads to selection among groups, although only individuals reproduce. We introduce selective group extinction, where groups die with a probability inversely proportional to their group fitness. When accounting for this the critical benefit-to-cost ratio is substantially lowered. Because in game theory and evolutionary dynamics the degree of cooperation crucially depends on this ratio above which cooperation emerges, previous studies may have substantially underestimated the establishment and maintenance of cooperation.

  3. Scandinavian Cooperative Advantage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strand, Robert; Freeman, R. Edward

    2015-01-01

    of relationships to these historical contributions. Thus, we propose that Scandinavia offers a particularly promising context from which to draw inspiration regarding effective company-stakeholder cooperation and where ample of examples of what is more recently referred to as “creating shared value” can be found...

  4. Cooperative social capital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar Acera Manero

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Social capital consists of the contributions of members and associates, both mandatory and voluntary. From an accounting point of view, it is a liability figure that expresses the value of a portion of the equity of the cooperative. Its inclusion in the liability is not the fact that it is a debt but by its nature unenforceable.

  5. Cooperation Across the Pacific

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    China and Mexico, two significant developing countries in the world, have been strengthening cooperation in all fields in recent years. And the two countries are confident about improving their ties in the future. Mexican Foreign Minister Luis Ernesto Derbez Bautista shares his views on bilateral relations in a written response to questions from Beijing Review reporter Ding Ying.

  6. Cooper pairs and bipolarons

    OpenAIRE

    Lakhno, Victor D.

    2016-01-01

    It is shown that Cooper pairs are a solution of the bipolaron problem for model Fr\\"{o}hlich Hamiltonian. The total energy of a pair for the initial Fr\\"{o}hlich Hamiltonian is found. Differences between the solutions for the model and initial two-particle problems are discussed.

  7. Communication, Coordination, Cooperation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Nancy Oft; Wiper, Kathie Tippens

    Speech communication teachers at both secondary and postsecondary school levels must cooperate to improve oral communication education. Despite the importance of oral communication skills, speech courses are rarely required in high school. Teachers must tell school boards, higher education boards, and faculties of the importance of speaking and…

  8. Family Sequencing and Cooperation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grundel, S.; Ciftci, B.B.; Borm, P.E.M.; Hamers, H.J.M.

    2012-01-01

    To analyze the allocation problem of the maximal cost savings of the whole group of jobs, we define and analyze a so-called corresponding cooperative family sequencing game which explicitly takes into account the maximal cost savings for any coalition of jobs. Using nonstandard techniques we prove t

  9. Cooperation Or Conflict?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Iran’s recent actions have created confusion and heightened doubt about the future of the nuclear issue Recent events involving Iran have produced high drama. First, the country said it would cooperate with the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) on the

  10. Predicting Human Cooperation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John J Nay

    Full Text Available The Prisoner's Dilemma has been a subject of extensive research due to its importance in understanding the ever-present tension between individual self-interest and social benefit. A strictly dominant strategy in a Prisoner's Dilemma (defection, when played by both players, is mutually harmful. Repetition of the Prisoner's Dilemma can give rise to cooperation as an equilibrium, but defection is as well, and this ambiguity is difficult to resolve. The numerous behavioral experiments investigating the Prisoner's Dilemma highlight that players often cooperate, but the level of cooperation varies significantly with the specifics of the experimental predicament. We present the first computational model of human behavior in repeated Prisoner's Dilemma games that unifies the diversity of experimental observations in a systematic and quantitatively reliable manner. Our model relies on data we integrated from many experiments, comprising 168,386 individual decisions. The model is composed of two pieces: the first predicts the first-period action using solely the structural game parameters, while the second predicts dynamic actions using both game parameters and history of play. Our model is successful not merely at fitting the data, but in predicting behavior at multiple scales in experimental designs not used for calibration, using only information about the game structure. We demonstrate the power of our approach through a simulation analysis revealing how to best promote human cooperation.

  11. Indian Ocean Rim Cooperation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wippel, Steffen

    Since the mid-1990s, the Indian Ocean has been experiencing increasing economic cooperation among its rim states. Middle Eastern countries, too, participate in the work of the Indian Ocean Rim Association, which received new impetus in the course of the current decade. Notably Oman is a very active...

  12. Cooperation Beats Conflict

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DING YING

    2011-01-01

    Philippine President Benigno Aquino Ⅲ recently completed a five-day visit to China,his first state visit to China since he took office last year.The two countries reached consensus on promoting all-round cooperation,especially in trade and the economy,and downplayed disputes in the South China Sea.

  13. Cooper pairs and bipolarons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakhno, Victor

    2016-11-01

    It is shown that Cooper pairs are a solution of the bipolaron problem for model Fröhlich Hamiltonian. The total energy of a pair for the initial Fröhlich Hamiltonian is found. Differences between the solutions for the model and initial two-particle problems are discussed.

  14. Cooperative Mobile Sensing Networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberts, R S; Kent, C A; Jones, E D; Cunningham, C T; Armstrong, G W

    2003-02-10

    A cooperative control architecture is presented that allows a fleet of Unmanned Air Vehicles (UAVs) to collect data in a parallel, coordinated and optimal manner. The architecture is designed to react to a set of unpredictable events thereby allowing data collection to continue in an optimal manner.

  15. Cooperation of tyrosine kinase receptor TrkB and epidermal growth factor receptor signaling enhances migration and dispersal of lung tumor cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rudolf Götz

    Full Text Available TrkB mediates the effects of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF in neuronal and nonnneuronal cells. Based on recent reports that TrkB can also be transactivated through epidermal growth-factor receptor (EGFR signaling and thus regulates migration of early neurons, we investigated the role of TrkB in migration of lung tumor cells. Early metastasis remains a major challenge in the clinical management of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. TrkB receptor signaling is associated with metastasis and poor patient prognosis in NSCLC. Expression of this receptor in A549 cells and in another adenocarcinoma cell line, NCI-H441, promoted enhanced migratory capacity in wound healing assays in the presence of the TrkB ligand BDNF. Furthermore, TrkB expression in A549 cells potentiated the stimulatory effect of EGF in wound healing and in Boyden chamber migration experiments. Consistent with a potential loss of cell polarity upon TrkB expression, cell dispersal and de-clustering was induced in A549 cells independently of exogeneous BDNF. Morphological transformation involved extensive cytoskeletal changes, reduced E-cadherin expression and suppression of E-cadherin expression on the cell surface in TrkB expressing tumor cells. This function depended on MEK and Akt kinase activity but was independent of Src. These data indicate that TrkB expression in lung adenoma cells is an early step in tumor cell dissemination, and thus could represent a target for therapy development.

  16. Conceptual Considerations for Reducing the Computational Complexity in Software Defined Radio using Cooperative Wireless Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Jesper Michael; Fitzek, Frank H. P.; Koch, Peter

    2005-01-01

    This paper motivates the application of Software defined radio as the enabling technology in the implementation of future wireless terminals for 4G. It outlines the advantages and disadvantages of SDR in terms of Flexibility and reconfigurability versus computational complexity. To mitigate...... the expected increase in complexity leading to a decrease in energy efficiency, cooperative wireless networks are introduced. Cooperative wireless networks enables the concept of resource sharing. Resource sharing is interpreted as collaborative signal processing. This interpretation leads to the concept...

  17. Sharing the sandbox: Evolutionary mechanisms that maintain bacterial cooperation [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Bruger

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Microbes are now known to participate in an extensive repertoire of cooperative behaviors such as biofilm formation, production of extracellular public-goods, group motility, and higher-ordered multicellular structures. A fundamental question is how these cooperative tasks are maintained in the face of non-cooperating defector cells. Recently, a number of molecular mechanisms including facultative participation, spatial sorting, and policing have been discovered to stabilize cooperation. Often these different mechanisms work in concert to reinforce cooperation. In this review, we describe bacterial cooperation and the current understanding of the molecular mechanisms that maintain it.

  18. On Optimal Policies for Network-Coded Cooperation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khamfroush, Hana; Roetter, Daniel Enrique Lucani; Pahlevani, Peyman

    2015-01-01

    's Raspberry Pi testbed and compared with random linear network coding (RLNC) broadcast in terms of completion time, total number of required transmissions, and percentage of delivered generations. Our measurements show that enabling cooperation only among pairs of devices can decrease the completion time...

  19. Cooperative adaptive cruise control: An artificial potential field approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Semsar-Kazerooni, E.; Verhaegh, J.; Ploeg, J.; Alirezaei, M.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, in addition to the main functionality of vehicle following, cooperative adaptive cruise control (CACC) is enabled with additional features of gap closing and collision avoidance. Due to its nonlinear nature, a control objective such as collision avoidance, cannot be addressed using a

  20. Musharraf calls for North-South cooperation: Science and technology

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    "President Gen Pervez Musharraf has called for improved North-South cooperation in scinece and technology and said it would enable millions of people in the developing countries to realize the goal of rapid socio-economic progress" (1.5 page)

  1. [Social cooperatives in Italy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villotti, P; Zaniboni, S; Fraccaroli, F

    2014-06-01

    This paper describes the role of social cooperatives in Italy as a type of economic, non-profit organization and their role in contributing to the economic and social growth of the country. The purpose of this paper is to learn more about the experience of the Italian social cooperatives in promoting the work integration process of disadvantaged workers, especially those suffering from mental disorders, from a theoretical and an empirical point of view. Social enterprise is the most popular and consolidated legal and organizational model for social enterprises in Italy, introduced by Law 381/91. Developed during the early 1980s, and formally recognized by law in the early 1990s, social cooperatives aim at pursuing the general interest of the community to promote the human needs and social inclusion of citizens. They are orientated towards aims that go beyond the interest of the business owners, the primary beneficiary of their activities is the community, or groups of disadvantaged people. In Italy, Law 381/91 distinguishes between two categories of social cooperatives, those producing goods of social utility, such as culture, welfare and educational services (A-type), and those providing economic activities for the integration of disadvantaged people into employment (B-type). The main purpose of B-type social cooperatives is to integrate disadvantaged people into the open labour market. This goal is reached after a period of training and working experience inside the firm, during which the staff works to improve both the social and professional abilities of disadvantaged people. During the years, B-type social co-ops acquired a particular relevance in the care of people with mental disorders by offering them with job opportunities. Having a job is central in the recovery process of people suffering from mental diseases, meaning that B-type social co-ops in Italy play an important rehabilitative and integrative role for this vulnerable population of workers. The

  2. Cooperative expression of atomic chirality in inorganic nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Peng-Peng; Yu, Shang-Jie; Govorov, Alexander O.; Ouyang, Min

    2017-02-01

    Cooperative chirality phenomena extensively exist in biomolecular and organic systems via intra- and inter-molecular interactions, but study of inorganic materials has been lacking. Here we report, experimentally and theoretically, cooperative chirality in colloidal cinnabar mercury sulfide nanocrystals that originates from chirality interplay between the crystallographic lattice and geometric morphology at different length scales. A two-step synthetic scheme is developed to allow control of critical parameters of these two types of handedness, resulting in different chiral interplays expressed as observables through materials engineering. Furthermore, we adopt an electromagnetic model with the finite element method to elucidate cooperative chirality in inorganic systems, showing excellent agreement with experimental results. Our study enables an emerging class of nanostructures with tailored cooperative chirality that is vital for fundamental understanding of nanoscale chirality as well as technology applications based on new chiroptical building blocks.

  3. Competition between species can stabilize public-goods cooperation within a species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celiker, Hasan; Gore, Jeff

    2012-01-01

    Competition between species is a major ecological force that can drive evolution. Here, we test the effect of this force on the evolution of cooperation within a species. We use sucrose metabolism of budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, as a model cooperative system that is subject to social parasitism by cheater strategies. We find that when cocultured with a bacterial competitor, Escherichia coli, the frequency of cooperator phenotypes in yeast populations increases dramatically as compared with isolated yeast populations. Bacterial competition stabilizes cooperation within yeast by limiting the yeast population density and also by depleting the public goods produced by cooperating yeast cells. Both of these changes induced by bacterial competition increase the cooperator frequency because cooperator yeast cells have a small preferential access to the public goods they produce; this preferential access becomes more important when the public good is scarce. Our results indicate that a thorough understanding of species interactions is crucial for explaining the maintenance and evolution of cooperation in nature.

  4. Prospects of ASEAN Legal Cooperation

    OpenAIRE

    Agus Riyanto

    2016-01-01

    Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) is a regional organization in the countries of Southeast Asia established in Bangkok, Thailand, on August 8, 1967 (the Bangkok Declaration) by Indonesia, Malaysia, Philippines, Singapore, and Thailand. One form of cooperation that could further encourage the establishment of ASEAN's goal was legal cooperation. This was because, this cooperation could further strengthen cooperation in politics, economy, social and culture in Southeast Asia. ...

  5. Noise-Enabled Optical Ratchets

    CERN Document Server

    León-Montiel, Roberto de J

    2016-01-01

    In this work we demonstrate single microparticle transport enabled by noise in a one dimensional optical lattice with periodic symmetric potentials and a small constant external force. The one dimensional lattice is implemented by six focused beams with holographic optical tweezers, where a microparticle is trapped in three dimensions. Transport initiates when dynamical disorder is added to the diffracted laser power at each trap ($\\pm 30\\%$) at a fixed frequency (0 to 35 Hz), while the direction of motion is set by the constant external force. We find that transport is only achieved within a narrow noise frequency range, which is consistent with simulations, and the predicted behavior and observations of noise-induced energy transport in quantum and classical systems. To our knowledge this is the first direct observation of noise-assisted transport in a colloidal system.

  6. Organizational Enablers for Project Governance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller, Ralf; Shao, Jingting; Pemsel, Sofia

    for the studies was collected through interviews with six companies in Sweden and China and a global web-based questionnaire that garnered 208 responses. Using this data the authors conducted four studies, employing various research methodologies, to investigate the different systems of governance...... and their relationships to organizational success. Based on these results, the authors discovered that organizational enablers (including key factors such as leadership, governance, and influence of project managers) have a critical impact on how organizations operate, adapt to market fluctuations and forces, and make...... essential changes over time. This must-read book is a practical guide for executives and project managers alike. The insights and industry examples provided can be applied to any project-based organization....

  7. Context-Enabled Business Intelligence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Troy Hiltbrand

    2012-04-01

    To truly understand context and apply it in business intelligence, it is vital to understand what context is and how it can be applied in addressing organizational needs. Context describes the facets of the environment that impact the way that end users interact with the system. Context includes aspects of location, chronology, access method, demographics, social influence/ relationships, end-user attitude/ emotional state, behavior/ past behavior, and presence. To be successful in making Business Intelligence content enabled, it is important to be able to capture the context of use user. With advances in technology, there are a number of ways in which this user based information can be gathered and exposed to enhance the overall end user experience.

  8. Simulation Enabled Safeguards Assessment Methodology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert Bean; Trond Bjornard; Thomas Larson

    2007-09-01

    It is expected that nuclear energy will be a significant component of future supplies. New facilities, operating under a strengthened international nonproliferation regime will be needed. There is good reason to believe virtual engineering applied to the facility design, as well as to the safeguards system design will reduce total project cost and improve efficiency in the design cycle. Simulation Enabled Safeguards Assessment MEthodology (SESAME) has been developed as a software package to provide this capability for nuclear reprocessing facilities. The software architecture is specifically designed for distributed computing, collaborative design efforts, and modular construction to allow step improvements in functionality. Drag and drop wireframe construction allows the user to select the desired components from a component warehouse, render the system for 3D visualization, and, linked to a set of physics libraries and/or computational codes, conduct process evaluations of the system they have designed.

  9. Cooperation-mediated plasticity in dispersal and colonization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Staffan; Wehi, Priscilla; Clobert, Jean; Legrand, Delphine; Schtickzelle, Nicolas; Huet, Michele; Chaine, Alexis

    2016-10-01

    Kin selection theory predicts that costly cooperative behaviors evolve most readily when directed toward kin. Dispersal plays a controversial role in the evolution of cooperation: dispersal decreases local population relatedness and thus opposes the evolution of cooperation, but limited dispersal increases kin competition and can negate the benefits of cooperation. Theoretical work has suggested that plasticity of dispersal, where individuals can adjust their dispersal decisions according to the social context, might help resolve this paradox and promote the evolution of cooperation. Here, we experimentally tested the hypothesis that conditional dispersal decisions are mediated by a cooperative strategy: we quantified the density-dependent dispersal decisions and subsequent colonization efficiency from single cells or groups of cells among six genetic strains of the unicellular Tetrahymena thermophila that differ in their aggregation level (high, medium, and low), a behavior associated with cooperation strategy. We found that the plastic reaction norms of dispersal rate relative to density differed according to aggregation level: highly aggregative genotypes showed negative density-dependent dispersal, whereas low-aggregation genotypes showed maximum dispersal rates at intermediate density, and medium-aggregation genotypes showed density-independent dispersal with intermediate dispersal rate. Dispersers from highly aggregative genotypes had specialized long-distance dispersal phenotypes, contrary to low-aggregation genotypes; medium-aggregation genotypes showing intermediate dispersal phenotype. Moreover, highly aggregation genotypes showed evidence for beneficial kin-cooperation during dispersal. Our experimental results should help to resolve the evolutionary conflict between cooperation and dispersal: cooperative individuals are expected to avoid kin-competition by dispersing long distances, but maintain the benefits of cooperation by dispersing in small groups.

  10. Partner Choice Drives the Evolution of Cooperation via Indirect Reciprocity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilbert Roberts

    Full Text Available Indirect reciprocity potentially provides an important means for generating cooperation based on helping those who help others. However, the use of 'image scores' to summarize individuals' past behaviour presents a dilemma: individuals withholding help from those of low image score harm their own reputation, yet giving to defectors erodes cooperation. Explaining how indirect reciprocity could evolve has therefore remained problematic. In all previous treatments of indirect reciprocity, individuals are assigned potential recipients and decide whether to cooperate or defect based on their reputation. A second way of achieving discrimination is through partner choice, which should enable individuals to avoid defectors. Here, I develop a model in which individuals choose to donate to anyone within their group, or to none. Whereas image scoring with random pairing produces cycles of cooperation and defection, with partner choice there is almost maximal cooperation. In contrast to image scoring with random pairing, partner choice results in almost perfect contingency, producing the correlation between giving and receiving required for cooperation. In this way, partner choice facilitates much higher and more stable levels of cooperation through image scoring than previously reported and provides a simple mechanism through which systems of helping those who help others can work.

  11. A Secure NEC-enabling Architecture : Disentangling Infrastructure, Information and Security

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boonstra, D.; Hartog, T.; Schotanus, H.A.; Verkoelen, C.A.A.

    2011-01-01

    The NATO Network-Enabled Capability (NNEC) study envisions effective and efficient cooperation among the coalition partners in missions. This requires information sharing and efficient deployment of IT assets. Current military communication infrastructures are mostly deployed as stand-alone networke

  12. The governance of cooperative societies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaiza Juanes Sobradillo

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available The present work aims to expose the appropriate legislation for cooperative societies to which Article 129 of the Spanish Constitution refers, deepen the analysis of the organs of management and control based on the Spanish and Basque Laws on Cooperatives and the Statute for the European Cooperative Societies.

  13. Cooperative Learning in Elementary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slavin, Robert E.

    2015-01-01

    Cooperative learning refers to instructional methods in which students work in small groups to help each other learn. Although cooperative learning methods are used for different age groups, they are particularly popular in elementary (primary) schools. This article discusses methods and theoretical perspectives on cooperative learning for the…

  14. Cooperative Learning: Developments in Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillies, Robyn M.

    2014-01-01

    Cooperative learning is widely recognized as a pedagogical practice that promotes socialization and learning among students from kindergarten through to college level and across different subject areas. Cooperative learning involves students working together to achieve common goals or complete group tasks. Interest in cooperative learning has…

  15. Seeking Cooperation in Green Economy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wan Jifei

    2010-01-01

    @@ On May28,the 2 n d China-South Korea Green Economic Cooperation Forum,sponsored by CCPIT and KCCI,was held in Seoul,South Korea. The subjects tallked about at the forum were "New Recycle Energy Cooperation Plan and Strategy"and Cooperation Plan and Strategy in Green Industries"etc

  16. Cooperation in Networks and Scheduling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Velzen, S.

    2005-01-01

    This thesis deals with various models of cooperation in networks and scheduling. The main focus is how the benefits of this cooperation should be divided among the participating individuals. A major part of this analysis is concerned with stability of the cooperation. In addition, allocation rules a

  17. Gender and Cooperation in Children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cardenas, Juan-Camilo; Dreber, Anna; Essen, Emma von;

    2014-01-01

    between Colombia and Sweden overall. However, Colombian girls cooperate less than Swedish girls. We also find indications that girls in Colombia are less cooperative than boys. Finally, there is also a tendency for children to be more cooperative with boys than with girls on average....

  18. COOPERATIVE LEARNING IN LARGE CLASSES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GuoXiangju

    2004-01-01

    Teaching college English in large classes is a new challenge to teachers. To meet this challenge, the strategy of cooperative learning is practicable. This paper introduces cooperative learning and describes the experiment results, which prove the advantages of cooperative learning over competitive learning or individualistic learning.

  19. Ubiquitin ligase MARCH 8 cooperates with CD83 to control surface MHC II expression in thymic epithelium and CD4 T cell selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Haiyin; Jain, Reema; Guan, Jing; Vuong, Vivian; Ishido, Satoshi; La Gruta, Nicole L; Gray, Daniel H; Villadangos, Jose A; Mintern, Justine D

    2016-08-22

    Major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC II) expression is tightly regulated, being subjected to cell type-specific mechanisms that closely control its levels at the cell surface. Ubiquitination by the E3 ubiquitin ligase MARCH 1 regulates MHC II expression in dendritic cells and B cells. In this study, we demonstrate that the related ligase MARCH 8 is responsible for regulating surface MHC II in thymic epithelial cells (TECs). March8(-/-) mice have elevated MHC II at the surface of cortical TECs and autoimmune regulator (AIRE)(-) medullary TECs (mTECs), but not AIRE(+) mTECs. Despite this, thymic and splenic CD4(+) T cell numbers and repertoires remained unaltered in March8(-/-) mice. Notably, the ubiquitination of MHC II by MARCH 8 is controlled by CD83. Mice expressing a mutated form of CD83 (Cd83(anu/anu) mice) have impaired CD4(+) T cell selection, but deleting March8 in Cd83(anu/anu) mice restored CD4(+) T cell selection to normal levels. Therefore, orchestrated regulation of MHC II surface expression in TECs by MARCH 8 and CD83 plays a major role in CD4(+) T cell selection. Our results also highlight the specialized use of ubiquitinating machinery in distinct antigen-presenting cell types, with important functional consequences and implications for therapeutic manipulation.

  20. The birth of cooperation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aanen, D.K.; Bisseling, T.

    2014-01-01

    Mutually beneficial associations between individuals of different species, called mutualistic symbioses, have enabled major ecological innovations and underlie some of the major transitions in evolution (1). For example, the ancestor of plants domesticated endosymbiotic photosynthetic bacteria, toda