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Sample records for cells bind centrosome

  1. Nuclei of non-muscle cells bind centrosome proteins upon fusion with differentiating myoblasts.

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    Xavier Fant

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In differentiating myoblasts, the microtubule network is reorganized from a centrosome-bound, radial array into parallel fibres, aligned along the long axis of the cell. Concomitantly, proteins of the centrosome relocalize from the pericentriolar material to the outer surface of the nucleus. The mechanisms that govern this relocalization are largely unknown. METHODOLOGY: In this study, we perform experiments in vitro and in cell culture indicating that microtubule nucleation at the centrosome is reduced during myoblast differentiation, while nucleation at the nuclear surface increases. We show in heterologous cell fusion experiments, between cultures of differentiating mouse myoblasts and human cells of non-muscular origin, that nuclei from non-muscle cells recruit centrosome proteins once fused with the differentiating myoblasts. This recruitment still occurs in the presence of cycloheximide and thus appears to be independent of new protein biosynthesis. CONCLUSIONS: Altogether, our data suggest that nuclei of undifferentiated cells have the dormant potential to bind centrosome proteins, and that this potential becomes activated during myoblast differentiation.

  2. Direct Microtubule-Binding by Myosin-10 Orients Centrosomes toward Retraction Fibers and Subcortical Actin Clouds.

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    Kwon, Mijung; Bagonis, Maria; Danuser, Gaudenz; Pellman, David

    2015-08-10

    Positioning of centrosomes is vital for cell division and development. In metazoan cells, spindle positioning is controlled by a dynamic pool of subcortical actin that organizes in response to the position of retraction fibers. These actin "clouds" are proposed to generate pulling forces on centrosomes and mediate spindle orientation. However, the motors that pull astral microtubules toward these actin structures are not known. Here, we report that the unconventional myosin, Myo10, couples actin-dependent forces from retraction fibers and subcortical actin clouds to centrosomes. Myo10-mediated centrosome positioning requires its direct microtubule binding. Computational image analysis of large microtubule populations reveals a direct effect of Myo10 on microtubule dynamics and microtubule-cortex interactions. Myo10's role in centrosome positioning is distinct from, but overlaps with, that of dynein. Thus, Myo10 plays a key role in integrating the actin and microtubule cytoskeletons to position centrosomes and mitotic spindles. PMID:26235048

  3. Actin and Arp2/3 localize at the centrosome of interphase cells

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    Hubert, Thomas; Vandekerckhove, Joel; Gettemans, Jan, E-mail: jan.gettemans@vib-ugent.be

    2011-01-07

    Research highlights: {yields} Actin was detected at the centrosome with the anti-actin antibody 1C7 that recognizes antiparallel ('lower dimer') actin dimers. {yields} Centrosomal actin was found in interphase but not mitotic MDA-MB-231 cells. {yields} Neither the anti-actin antibody C4 that binds to globular, monomer actin, nor the anti-actin antibody 2G2 that recognizes the nuclear conformation of actin detect actin at the centrosome. {yields} The Arp2/3 complex transiently localizes at the pericentriolar matrix but not at the centrioles of interphase HEK 293T cells. -- Abstract: Although many actin binding proteins such as cortactin and the Arp2/3 activator WASH localize at the centrosome, the presence and conformation of actin at the centrosome has remained elusive. Here, we report the localization of actin at the centrosome in interphase but not in mitotic MDA-MB-231 cells. Centrosomal actin was detected with the anti-actin antibody 1C7 that recognizes antiparallel ('lower dimer') actin dimers. In addition, we report the transient presence of the Arp2/3 complex at the pericentriolar matrix but not at the centrioles of interphase HEK 293T cells. Overexpression of an Arp2/3 component resulted in expansion of the pericentriolar matrix and selective accumulation of the Arp2/3 component in the pericentriolar matrix. Altogether, we hypothesize that the centrosome transiently recruits Arp2/3 to perform processes such as centrosome separation prior to mitotic entry, whereas the observed constitutive centrosomal actin staining in interphase cells reinforces the current model of actin-based centrosome reorientation toward the leading edge in migrating cells.

  4. Centrosome polarization in T cells: a task for formins

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    Laura eAndrés-Delgado

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available T-cell antigen receptor (TCR engagement triggers the rapid reorientation of the centrosome, which is associated with the secretory machinery, towards the immunological synapse (IS for polarized protein trafficking. Recent evidence indicates that upon TCR triggering the INF2 formin, together with the formins DIA1 and FMNL1, promotes the formation of a specialized array of stable detyrosinated MTs that breaks the symmetrical organization of the T-cell microtubule (MT cytoskeleton. The detyrosinated MT array and TCR-induced tyrosine phosphorylation should coincide for centrosome polarization. We propose that the pushing forces produced by the detyrosinated MT array, which modify the position of the centrosome, in concert with Src kinase dependent TCR signaling, which provide the reference frame with respect to which the centrosome reorients, result in the repositioning of the centrosome to the IS.

  5. Effect of heavy ion beams to centrosome amplification in mammalian cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Centrosome is an organelle that regulates proper cell division. Centrosome aberration such as centrosome amplification causes chromosome instability. Ionizing radiation is a inducer of effective centrosome amplification. In the previous report, we showed that γ-ray induced centrosome amplification in a dose dependent manner. In this study, we investigated that whether High linear energy transfer (LET) irradiation induce more effective centrosome amplification than low LET irradiation. As expected, high LET irradiation effectively induced centrosome amplification in human U2OS and mouse NIH3T3 cells. (author)

  6. β-catenin: A multi-functional protein’s role at the centrosome and implications for a broader role in cell division

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    Mbom, Bertrade C.; Nelson, W. James; Barth, Angela

    2013-01-01

    Beta-catenin is a multifunctional protein with critical roles in cell-cell adhesion, Wnt-signaling and the centrosome cycle. Whereas the roles of β-catenin in cell-cell adhesion and Wnt-signaling have been studied extensively, the mechanism(s) involving β-catenin in centrosome functions are poorly understood. β-Catenin localizes to centrosomes and promotes mitotic progression. NIMA-related protein kinase 2 (Nek2), which stimulates centrosome separation, binds to and phosphorylates β-catenin. ...

  7. Effect if heavy ion beams to centrosome amplification in mammalian cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Centrosome is an organelle, which function as microtubules organizing center. Centrosome aberration such as centrosome amplification causes chromosome instability. In previous reports, we showed that irradiated cells increased centrosomes number. In this study, we investigated that whether high linear energy transfer (LET) irradiation induce more effective molecular change of γ-tubulin, which is centrosome protein than low LET irradiation. γ-tubulin are monoubiquitylated by BRCA1. We found that monoubiquitilation level of γ-tubulin was reduced after irradiation. Moreover, monoubiquitilation level of γ-tubulin was effectively reduced after High LET irradiation. (author)

  8. Increased centrosome amplification in aged stem cells of the Drosophila midgut

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    Park, Joung-Sun; Pyo, Jung-Hoon; Na, Hyun-Jin; Jeon, Ho-Jun; Kim, Young-Shin [Department of Molecular Biology, Pusan National University, Busan 609-735 (Korea, Republic of); Arking, Robert, E-mail: aa2210@wayne.edu [Department of Biological Sciences, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI 48202 (United States); Yoo, Mi-Ae, E-mail: mayoo@pusan.ac.kr [Department of Molecular Biology, Pusan National University, Busan 609-735 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-07-25

    Highlights: • Increased centrosome amplification in ISCs of aged Drosophila midguts. • Increased centrosome amplification in ISCs of oxidative stressed Drosophila midguts. • Increased centrosome amplification in ISCs by overexpression of PVR, EGFR, and AKT. • Supernumerary centrosomes can be responsible for abnormal ISC polyploid cells. • Supernumerary centrosomes can be a useful marker for aging stem cells. - Abstract: Age-related changes in long-lived tissue-resident stem cells may be tightly linked to aging and age-related diseases such as cancer. Centrosomes play key roles in cell proliferation, differentiation and migration. Supernumerary centrosomes are known to be an early event in tumorigenesis and senescence. However, the age-related changes of centrosome duplication in tissue-resident stem cells in vivo remain unknown. Here, using anti-γ-tubulin and anti-PH3, we analyzed mitotic intestinal stem cells with supernumerary centrosomes in the adult Drosophila midgut, which may be a versatile model system for stem cell biology. The results showed increased centrosome amplification in intestinal stem cells of aged and oxidatively stressed Drosophila midguts. Increased centrosome amplification was detected by overexpression of PVR, EGFR, and AKT in intestinal stem cells/enteroblasts, known to mimic age-related changes including hyperproliferation of intestinal stem cells and hyperplasia in the midgut. Our data show the first direct evidence for the age-related increase of centrosome amplification in intestinal stem cells and suggest that the Drosophila midgut is an excellent model for studying molecular mechanisms underlying centrosome amplification in aging adult stem cells in vivo.

  9. Increased centrosome amplification in aged stem cells of the Drosophila midgut

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Increased centrosome amplification in ISCs of aged Drosophila midguts. • Increased centrosome amplification in ISCs of oxidative stressed Drosophila midguts. • Increased centrosome amplification in ISCs by overexpression of PVR, EGFR, and AKT. • Supernumerary centrosomes can be responsible for abnormal ISC polyploid cells. • Supernumerary centrosomes can be a useful marker for aging stem cells. - Abstract: Age-related changes in long-lived tissue-resident stem cells may be tightly linked to aging and age-related diseases such as cancer. Centrosomes play key roles in cell proliferation, differentiation and migration. Supernumerary centrosomes are known to be an early event in tumorigenesis and senescence. However, the age-related changes of centrosome duplication in tissue-resident stem cells in vivo remain unknown. Here, using anti-γ-tubulin and anti-PH3, we analyzed mitotic intestinal stem cells with supernumerary centrosomes in the adult Drosophila midgut, which may be a versatile model system for stem cell biology. The results showed increased centrosome amplification in intestinal stem cells of aged and oxidatively stressed Drosophila midguts. Increased centrosome amplification was detected by overexpression of PVR, EGFR, and AKT in intestinal stem cells/enteroblasts, known to mimic age-related changes including hyperproliferation of intestinal stem cells and hyperplasia in the midgut. Our data show the first direct evidence for the age-related increase of centrosome amplification in intestinal stem cells and suggest that the Drosophila midgut is an excellent model for studying molecular mechanisms underlying centrosome amplification in aging adult stem cells in vivo

  10. Cilium, centrosome and cell cycle regulation in polycystic kidney disease.

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    Lee, Kyung; Battini, Lorenzo; Gusella, G Luca

    2011-10-01

    Polycystic kidney disease is the defining condition of a group of common life-threatening genetic disorders characterized by the bilateral formation and progressive expansion of renal cysts that lead to end stage kidney disease. Although a large body of information has been acquired in the past years about the cellular functions that characterize the cystic cells, the mechanisms triggering the cystogenic conversion are just starting to emerge. Recent findings link defects in ciliary functions, planar cell polarity pathway, and centrosome integrity in early cystic development. Many of the signals dysregulated during cystogenesis may converge on the centrosome for its central function as a structural support for cilia formation and a coordinator of protein trafficking, polarity, and cell division. Here, we will discuss the contribution of proliferation, cilium and planar cell polarity to the cystic signal and will analyze in particular the possible role that the basal bodies/centrosome may play in the cystogenetic mechanisms. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Polycystic Kidney Disease. PMID:21376807

  11. HSPB1 facilitates the formation of non-centrosomal microtubules.

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    Leonardo Almeida-Souza

    Full Text Available The remodeling capacity of microtubules (MT is essential for their proper function. In mammals, MTs are predominantly formed at the centrosome, but can also originate from non-centrosomal sites, a process that is still poorly understood. We here show that the small heat shock protein HSPB1 plays a role in the control of non-centrosomal MT formation. The HSPB1 expression level regulates the balance between centrosomal and non-centrosomal MTs. The HSPB1 protein can be detected specifically at sites of de novo forming non-centrosomal MTs, while it is absent from the centrosomes. In addition, we show that HSPB1 binds preferentially to the lattice of newly formed MTs in vitro, suggesting that its function occurs by stabilizing MT seeds. Our findings open new avenues for the understanding of the role of HSPB1 in the development, maintenance and protection of cells with specialized non-centrosomal MT arrays.

  12. Synthesis and Structure-Activity Relationship of Griseofulvin Analogues as Inhibitors of Centrosomal Clustering in Cancer Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rønnest, Mads Holger; Rebacz, Blanka; Markworth, Lene;

    2009-01-01

    Griseofulvin was identified as an inhibitor of centrosomal clustering in a recently developed assay. Centrosomal clustering is an important cellular event that enables bipolar mitosis for cancer cell lines harboring supernumerary centrosomes. We report herein the synthesis and SAR of 34 griseoful......Griseofulvin was identified as an inhibitor of centrosomal clustering in a recently developed assay. Centrosomal clustering is an important cellular event that enables bipolar mitosis for cancer cell lines harboring supernumerary centrosomes. We report herein the synthesis and SAR of 34...

  13. Hsp70 protects mitotic cells against heat-induced centrosome damage and division abnormalities

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    Hut, HMJ; Kampinga, HH; Sibon, OCM

    2005-01-01

    The effect of heat shock on centrosomes has been mainly studied in interphase cells. Centrosomes play a key role in proper segregation of DNA during mitosis. However, the direct effect and consequences of heat shock on mitotic cells and a possible cellular defense system against proteotoxic stress d

  14. Human Embryonic Stem Cells Suffer from Centrosomal Amplification

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Holubcová, Z.; Matula, P.; Sedláčková, M.; Vinarský, Vladimír; Doležalová, Dáša; Bárta, Tomáš; Dvořák, Petr; Hampl, Aleš

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 29, č. 1 (2011), s. 46-56. ISSN 1066-5099 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA204/09/2044 Grant ostatní: GA MŠk(CZ) 1M0538; GA MŠk(CZ) 2B06052; GA MŠk(CZ) MSM0021622430; EU FP6 project ESTOOLS(XE) LSHG-CT-2006-018739 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390703 Keywords : human embryonic stem cells * centrosome * chromosome Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 7.781, year: 2011

  15. Abnormal centrosomal structure and duplication in Cep135-deficient vertebrate cells

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    Inanç, Burcu; Pütz, Monika; Lalor, Pierce; Dockery, Peter; Kuriyama, Ryoko; Gergely, Fanni; Morrison, Ciaran G.

    2013-01-01

    Centrosomes are key microtubule-organizing centers that contain a pair of centrioles, conserved cylindrical, microtubule-based structures. Centrosome duplication occurs once per cell cycle and relies on templated centriole assembly. In many animal cells this process starts with the formation of a radially symmetrical cartwheel structure. The centrosomal protein Cep135 localizes to this cartwheel, but its role in vertebrates is not well understood. Here we examine the involvement of Cep135 in centriole function by disrupting the Cep135 gene in the DT40 chicken B-cell line. DT40 cells that lack Cep135 are viable and show no major defects in centrosome composition or function, although we note a small decrease in centriole numbers and a concomitant increase in the frequency of monopolar spindles. Furthermore, electron microscopy reveals an atypical structure in the lumen of Cep135-deficient centrioles. Centrosome amplification after hydroxyurea treatment increases significantly in Cep135-deficient cells, suggesting an inhibitory role for the protein in centrosome reduplication during S-phase delay. We propose that Cep135 is required for the structural integrity of centrioles in proliferating vertebrate cells, a role that also limits centrosome amplification in S-phase–arrested cells. PMID:23864714

  16. Cdc6 localizes to S- and G2-phase centrosomes in a cell cycle-dependent manner

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    Kim, Gwang Su; Kang, Jeeheon; Bang, Sung Woong; Hwang, Deog Su, E-mail: dshwang@snu.ac.kr

    2015-01-16

    Highlights: • Cdc6 protein is a component of the pre-replicative complex required for chromosomal replication initiation. • Cdc6 localized to centrosomes of S and G2 phases in a cell cycle-dependent manner. • The centrosomal localization was governed by centrosomal localization signal sequences of Cdc6. • Deletions or substitution mutations on the centrosomal localization signal interfered with centrosomal localization of the Cdc6 proteins. - Abstract: The Cdc6 protein has been primarily investigated as a component of the pre-replicative complex for the initiation of chromosome replication, which contributes to maintenance of chromosomal integrity. Here, we show that Cdc6 localized to the centrosomes during S and G2 phases of the cell cycle. The centrosomal localization was mediated by Cdc6 amino acid residues 311–366, which are conserved within other Cdc6 homologues and contains a putative nuclear export signal. Deletions or substitutions of the amino acid residues did not allow the proteins to localize to centrosomes. In contrast, DsRed tag fused to the amino acid residues localized to centrosomes. These results indicated that a centrosome localization signal is contained within amino acid residues 311–366. The cell cycle-dependent centrosomal localization of Cdc6 in S and G2 phases suggest a novel function of Cdc6 in centrosomes.

  17. TrkAIII Promotes Microtubule Nucleation and Assembly at the Centrosome in SH-SY5Y Neuroblastoma Cells, Contributing to an Undifferentiated Anaplastic Phenotype

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    Antonietta R. Farina

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The alternative TrkAIII splice variant is expressed by advanced stage human neuroblastomas (NBs and exhibits oncogenic activity in NB models. In the present study, employing stable transfected cell lines and assays of indirect immunofluorescence, immunoprecipitation, Western blotting, microtubule regrowth, tubulin kinase, and tubulin polymerisation, we report that TrkAIII binds α-tubulin and promotes MT nucleation and assembly at the centrosome. This effect depends upon spontaneous TrkAIII activity, TrkAIII localisation to the centrosome and pericentrosomal area, and the capacity of TrkAIII to bind, phosphorylate, and polymerise tubulin. We propose that this novel role for TrkAIII contributes to MT involvement in the promotion and maintenance of an undifferentiated anaplastic NB cell morphology by restricting and augmenting MT nucleation and assembly at the centrosomal MTOC.

  18. Characterization of BRCA1 Protein Targeting, Dynamics, and Function at the Centrosome

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    Brodie, Kirsty M.; Henderson, Beric R.

    2012-01-01

    BRCA1 is a DNA damage response protein and functions in the nucleus to stimulate DNA repair and at the centrosome to inhibit centrosome overduplication in response to DNA damage. The loss or mutation of BRCA1 causes centrosome amplification and abnormal mitotic spindle assembly in breast cancer cells. The BRCA1-BARD1 heterodimer binds and ubiquitinates γ-tubulin to inhibit centrosome amplification and promote microtubule nucleation; however regulation of BRCA1 targeting and function at the centrosome is poorly understood. Here we show that both N and C termini of BRCA1 are required for its centrosomal localization and that BRCA1 moves to the centrosome independently of BARD1 and γ-tubulin. Mutations in the C-terminal phosphoprotein-binding BRCT domain of BRCA1 prevented localization to centrosomes. Photobleaching experiments identified dynamic (60%) and immobilized (40%) pools of ectopic BRCA1 at the centrosome, and these are regulated by the nuclear export receptor CRM1 (chromosome region maintenance 1) and BARD1. CRM1 mediates nuclear export of BRCA1, and mutation of the export sequence blocked BRCA1 regulation of centrosome amplification in irradiated cells. CRM1 binds to undimerized BRCA1 and is displaced by BARD1. Photobleaching assays implicate CRM1 in driving undimerized BRCA1 to the centrosome and revealed that when BRCA1 subsequently binds to BARD1, it is less well retained at centrosomes, suggesting a mechanism to accelerate BRCA1 release after formation of the active heterodimer. Moreover, Aurora A binding and phosphorylation of BRCA1 enhanced its centrosomal retention and regulation of centrosome amplification. Thus, CRM1, BARD1 and Aurora A promote the targeting and function of BRCA1 at centrosomes. PMID:22262852

  19. Protein synthesis and the cell cycle: centrosome reproduction in sea urchin eggs is not under translational control

    OpenAIRE

    1990-01-01

    The reproduction, or duplication, of the centrosome is an important event in a cell's preparation for mitosis. We sought to determine if centrosome reproduction is regulated by the synthesis and accumulation of cyclin proteins and/or the synthesis of centrosome-specific proteins at each cell cycle. We continuously treat sea urchin eggs, starting before fertilization, with a combination of emetine and anisomycin, drugs that have separate targets in the protein synthetic pathway. These drugs in...

  20. Centrosomal pre-integration latency of HIV-1 in quiescent cells

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    Emiliani Stéphane

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 efficiently replicates in dividing and non-dividing cells. However, HIV-1 infection is blocked at an early post-entry step in quiescent CD4+ T cells in vitro. The molecular basis of this restriction is still poorly understood. Here, we show that in quiescent cells, incoming HIV-1 sub-viral complexes concentrate and stably reside at the centrosome for several weeks. Upon cell activation, viral replication resumes leading to viral gene expression. Thus, HIV-1 can persist in quiescent cells as a stable, centrosome-associated, pre-integration intermediate.

  1. The Coordination of Centrosome Reproduction with Nuclear Events of the Cell Cycle in the Sea Urchin Zygote

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    Hinchcliffe, Edward H.; Cassels, Grizzel O.; Rieder, Conly L.; Sluder, Greenfield

    1998-01-01

    Centrosomes repeatedly reproduce in sea urchin zygotes arrested in S phase, whether cyclin-dependent kinase 1–cyclin B (Cdk1-B) activity remains at prefertilization levels or rises to mitotic values. In contrast, when zygotes are arrested in mitosis using cyclin B Δ-90, anaphase occurs at the normal time, yet centrosomes do not reproduce. Together, these results reveal the cell cycle stage specificity for centrosome reproduction and demonstrate that neither the level nor the cycling of Cdk1-B...

  2. The centrosome protein NEDD1 as a potential pharmacological target to induce cell cycle arrest

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    Etievant Chantal

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background NEDD1 is a protein that binds to the gamma-tubulin ring complex, a multiprotein complex at the centrosome and at the mitotic spindle that mediates the nucleation of microtubules. Results We show that NEDD1 is expressed at comparable levels in a variety of tumor-derived cell lines and untransformed cells. We demonstrate that silencing of NEDD1 expression by treatment with siRNA has differential effects on cells, depending on their status of p53 expression: p53-positive cells arrest in G1, whereas p53-negative cells arrest in mitosis with predominantly aberrant monopolar spindles. However, both p53-positive and -negative cells arrest in mitosis if treated with low doses of siRNA against NEDD1 combined with low doses of the inhibitor BI2536 against the mitotic kinase Plk1. Simultaneous reduction of NEDD1 levels and inhibition of Plk1 act in a synergistic manner, by potentiating the anti-mitotic activity of each treatment. Conclusion We propose that NEDD1 may be a promising target for controlling cell proliferation, in particular if targeted in combination with Plk1 inhibitors.

  3. The Seckel syndrome and centrosomal protein Ninein localizes asymmetrically to stem cell centrosomes but is not required for normal development, behavior, or DNA damage response in Drosophila.

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    Zheng, Yiming; Mennella, Vito; Marks, Steven; Wildonger, Jill; Elnagdi, Esraa; Agard, David; Megraw, Timothy L

    2016-06-01

    Ninein (Nin) is a centrosomal protein whose gene is mutated in Seckel syndrome (SCKL, MIM 210600), an inherited recessive disease that results in primordial dwarfism, cognitive deficiencies, and increased sensitivity to genotoxic stress. Nin regulates neural stem cell self-renewal, interkinetic nuclear migration, and microtubule assembly in mammals. Nin is evolutionarily conserved, yet its role in cell division and development has not been investigated in a model organism. Here we characterize the single Nin orthologue in Drosophila Drosophila Nin localizes to the periphery of the centrosome but not at centriolar structures as in mammals. However, Nin shares the property of its mammalian orthologue of promoting microtubule assembly. In neural and germline stem cells, Nin localizes asymmetrically to the younger (daughter) centrosome, yet it is not required for the asymmetric division of stem cells. In wing epithelia and muscle, Nin localizes to noncentrosomal microtubule-organizing centers. Surprisingly, loss of nin expression from a nin mutant does not significantly affect embryonic and brain development, fertility, or locomotor performance of mutant flies or their survival upon exposure to DNA-damaging agents. Although it is not essential, our data suggest that Nin plays a supportive role in centrosomal and extracentrosomal microtubule organization and asymmetric stem cell division. PMID:27053665

  4. Beclin 1 and UVRAG confer protection from radiation-induced DNA damage and maintain centrosome stability in colorectal cancer cells.

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    Jae Myung Park

    Full Text Available Beclin 1 interacts with UV-irradiation-resistance-associated gene (UVRAG to form core complexes that induce autophagy. While cells with defective autophagy are prone to genomic instability that contributes to tumorigenesis, it is unknown whether Beclin1 or UVRAG can regulate the DNA damage/repair response to cancer treatment in established tumor cells. We found that siRNA knockdown of Beclin 1 or UVRAG can increase radiation-induced DNA double strand breaks (DSBs, shown by pATM and γH2Ax, and promote colorectal cancer cell death. Furthermore, knockdown of Beclin 1, UVRAG or ATG5 increased the percentage of irradiated cells with nuclear foci expressing 53BP1, a marker of nonhomologous end joining but not RAD51 (homologous recombination, compared to control siRNA. Beclin 1 siRNA was shown to attenuate UVRAG expression. Cells with a UVRAG deletion mutant defective in Beclin 1 binding showed increased radiation-induced DSBs and cell death compared to cells with ectopic wild-type UVRAG. Knockdown of Beclin 1 or UVRAG, but not ATG5, resulted in a significant increase in centrosome number (γ-tubulin staining in irradiated cells compared to control siRNA. Taken together, these data indicate that Beclin 1 and UVRAG confer protection against radiation-induced DNA DSBs and may maintain centrosome stability in established tumor cells.

  5. Asymmetric Inheritance of Mother Versus Daughter Centrosome in Stem Cell Division

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    Yamashita, Yukiko M.; Anthony P Mahowald; Perlin, Julie R.; Fuller, Margaret T.

    2007-01-01

    Adult stem cells often divide asymmetrically to produce one self-renewed stem cell and one differentiating cell, thus maintaining both populations. The asymmetric outcome of stem cell divisions can be specified by an oriented spindle and local self-renewal signals from the stem cell niche. Here we show that developmentally programmed asymmetric behavior and inheritance of mother and daughter centrosomes underlies the stereotyped spindle orientation and asymmetric outcome of stem cell division...

  6. Inactivation of nucleolin leads to nucleolar disruption, cell cycle arrest and defects in centrosome duplication

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    Thiry Marc

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nucleolin is a major component of the nucleolus, but is also found in other cell compartments. This protein is involved in various aspects of ribosome biogenesis from transcription regulation to the assembly of pre-ribosomal particles; however, many reports suggest that it could also play an important role in non nucleolar functions. To explore nucleolin function in cell proliferation and cell cycle regulation we used siRNA to down regulate the expression of nucleolin. Results We found that, in addition to the expected effects on pre-ribosomal RNA accumulation and nucleolar structure, the absence of nucleolin results in a cell growth arrest, accumulation in G2, and an increase of apoptosis. Numerous nuclear alterations, including the presence of micronuclei, multiple nuclei or large nuclei are also observed. In addition, a large number of mitotic cells showed a defect in the control of centrosome duplication, as indicated by the presence of more than 2 centrosomes per cell associated with a multipolar spindle structure in the absence of nucleolin. This phenotype is very similar to that obtained with the inactivation of another nucleolar protein, B23. Conclusion Our findings uncovered a new role for nucleolin in cell division, and highlight the importance of nucleolar proteins for centrosome duplication.

  7. Physical association between a novel plasma-membrane structure and centrosome orients cell division

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    Negishi, Takefumi; Miyazaki, Naoyuki; Murata, Kazuyoshi; Yasuo, Hitoyoshi; Ueno, Naoto

    2016-01-01

    In the last mitotic division of the epidermal lineage in the ascidian embryo, the cells divide stereotypically along the anterior-posterior axis. During interphase, we found that a unique membrane structure invaginates from the posterior to the centre of the cell, in a microtubule-dependent manner. The invagination projects toward centrioles on the apical side of the nucleus and associates with one of them. Further, a cilium forms on the posterior side of the cell and its basal body remains associated with the invagination. A laser ablation experiment suggests that the invagination is under tensile force and promotes the posterior positioning of the centrosome. Finally, we showed that the orientation of the invaginations is coupled with the polarized dynamics of centrosome movements and the orientation of cell division. Based on these findings, we propose a model whereby this novel membrane structure orchestrates centrosome positioning and thus the orientation of cell division axis. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.16550.001 PMID:27502556

  8. The presence of centrioles and centrosomes in ovarian mature cystic teratoma cells suggests human parthenotes developed in vitro can differentiate into mature cells without a sperm centriole

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    Lee, Bo Yon, E-mail: boyonlee@gmail.com [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Kyung Hee University Hospital, Kyung Hee University, School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Shim, Sang Woo; Kim, Young Sun; Kim, Seung Bo [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Kyung Hee University Hospital, Kyung Hee University, School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-11-18

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The sperm centriole is the progenitor of centrosomes in all somatic cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Centrioles and centrosomes exist in parthenogenetic ovarian teratoma cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Without a sperm centriole, parthenogenetic oocytes produce centrioles and centrosomes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Parthenogenetic human oocytes can develop and differentiate into mature cells. -- Abstract: In most animals, somatic cell centrosomes are inherited from the centriole of the fertilizing spermatozoa. The oocyte centriole degenerates during oogenesis, and completely disappears in metaphase II. Therefore, the embryos generated by in vitro parthenogenesis are supposed to develop without any centrioles. Exceptional acentriolar and/or acentrosomal developments are possible in mice and in some experimental cells; however, in most animals, the full developmental potential of parthenogenetic cells in vitro and the fate of their centrioles/centrosomes are not clearly understood. To predict the future of in vitro human parthenogenesis, we explored the centrioles/centrosomes in ovarian mature cystic teratoma cells by immunofluorescent staining and transmission electron microscopy. We confirmed the presence of centrioles and centrosomes in these well-known parthenogenetic ovarian tumor cells. Our findings clearly demonstrate that, even without a sperm centriole, parthenotes that develop from activated oocytes can produce their own centrioles/centrosomes, and can even develop into the well-differentiated mature tissue.

  9. GF-15, a Novel Inhibitor of Centrosomal Clustering, Suppresses Tumor Cell Growth In Vitro and In Vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raab, Marc S.; Breitkreutz, Iris; Anderhub, Simon;

    2012-01-01

    In contrast to normal cells, malignant cells are frequently aneuploid and contain multiple centrosomes. To allow for bipolar mitotic division, supernumerary centrosomes are clustered into two functional spindle poles in many cancer cells. Recently, we have shown that griseofulvin forces tumor cells...... concentrations (IC50) for proliferation and survival were in the range of 1 to 5 μmol/L and were associated with apoptotic cell death. Importantly, treatment of mouse xenograft models of human colon cancer and multiple myeloma resulted in tumor growth inhibition and significantly prolonged survival. These...

  10. Proteomic analysis of mammalian sperm cells identifies new components of the centrosome

    OpenAIRE

    Fırat, Elif Nur Karalar; Sante, Joshua; Elliott, Sarah; Stearns, Tim

    2014-01-01

    1 Proteomic analysis of mammalian sperm cells identifies new components of the centrosome Elif N. Firat-Karalar1,3, Joshua Sante1,4, Sarah Elliott1, and Tim Stearns1,2 1Department of Biology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305-5020, USA 2Department of Genetics, Stanford School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305-5120, USA 3Current address: Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics, Koç University, Istanbul, 34450, Turkey 4Current address: Division of Pulmonary and ...

  11. Interphase centrosome organization by the PLP-Cnn scaffold is required for centrosome function

    OpenAIRE

    Lerit, Dorothy A.; Jordan, Holly A.; Poulton, John S; Fagerstrom, Carey J.; Brian J Galletta; Peifer, Mark; Rusan, Nasser M.

    2015-01-01

    Cnn and PLP directly interact at two defined sites to coordinate the cell cycle–dependent rearrangement and scaffolding activity of the centrosome to permit normal centrosome organization, cell division, and embryonic viability.

  12. Conductin/axin2 and Wnt signalling regulates centrosome cohesion

    OpenAIRE

    Hadjihannas, Michel V; Brückner, Martina; Behrens, Jürgen

    2010-01-01

    Wnt signalling regulates centrosome cohesion. Work by the Behrens group shows that conductin/axin2, a negative regulator of β-catenin, localizes to centrosomes by binding to the centriole-associated component C-Nap1. Conductin/axin2 promotes centrosome cohesion by phosphorylating β-catenin at centrosomes and the authors propose a model for the regulation of centrosome separation by conductin and Wnt signalling.

  13. A nano-reference-system based on two orthogonal (molecular micro-goniometers: the centrosome of animal cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regolini Marco

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The centrosome, because of 9-fold-symmetry of its orthogonalcentrioles and their circumferential polarity (nonequivalence of the nine centriolarblades,each one molecularly distinguishable, constitutes a biological discrete interface, composed of two orthogonal macromolecular protractors, capable of recognizing and decoding morphogenetic instructions, translating them and delivering targeted molecular complexes into their expected 3D real location in the cell: like an interface or a wiring device, the centrosome recognizes each targeting sequence, matches it with the corresponding receptor, soconnectingit with the correctly-oriented microtubule, directed and targeted towards the desired definite cortical compartment.Morphogenetic geometric instructions (DNA coded are translated by the centrosome into actual locations in cells, and, as a consequence, macromolecules, labeled by DNA geometric signals, can be correctly delivered into their programmed cell locations. In addition, the centrosome (the most chiral and enantiomorphous cell structure plays a geometric key role in left-right patterning: axial centriole circumferential polarity, if reversely oriented, constitutes a likely molecular base for bilateral symmetry.

  14. Identification of new centrosome proteins by autoimmune patient sera

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIA Liang; LI Yan; YANG Dong; WANG LiMin; HE Fang; ZHOU ChunYuan; LI YongZhe; ZENG ChangQing; He DaCheng

    2007-01-01

    Compared to other subcellular organelles, centrosome proteome can hardly be studied, due to the difficulties in separation and purification of centrosome. Auto-antisera from 6 autoimmune patients, which recognized centrosome specifically in immunofluorescence, were used to identify the corresponding centrosomal proteins. The sera were first tested by Western blot on whole cell lysate, and all bound antibodies were then eluted from each single band in Western blot membrane to assure which antibody was responsible for the centrosome specific immunofluorescence staining. The corresponding proteins were obtained by immunoprecipitation and identified by mass spectrometry. Six centrosomal proteins, including 2 known centrosomal proteins and 4 proteins with unknown localization or reportedly non-centrosomal localization, were identified. These proteins apparently involve in cell cycle regulation, signal transduction pathways, molecular chaperons, and metabolism enzymes, which may reflect the expected functional diversity of centrosome.

  15. Cep192 controls the balance of centrosome and non-centrosomal microtubules during interphase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian P O'Rourke

    Full Text Available Cep192 is a centrosomal protein that contributes to the formation and function of the mitotic spindle in mammalian cells. Cep192's mitotic activities stem largely from its role in the recruitment to the centrosome of numerous additional proteins such as gamma-tubulin and Pericentrin. Here, we examine Cep192's function in interphase cells. Our data indicate that, as in mitosis, Cep192 stimulates the nucleation of centrosomal microtubules thereby regulating the morphology of interphase microtubule arrays. Interestingly, however, cells lacking Cep192 remain capable of generating normal levels of MTs as the loss of centrosomal microtubules is augmented by MT nucleation from other sites, most notably the Golgi apparatus. The depletion of Cep192 results in a significant decrease in the level of centrosome-associated gamma-tubulin, likely explaining its impact on centrosome microtubule nucleation. However, in stark contrast to mitosis, Cep192 appears to maintain an antagonistic relationship with Pericentrin at interphase centrosomes. Interphase cells depleted of Cep192 display significantly higher levels of centrosome-associated Pericentrin while overexpression of Cep192 reduces the levels of centrosomal Pericentrin. Conversely, depletion of Pericentrin results in elevated levels of centrosomal Cep192 and enhances microtubule nucleation at centrosomes, at least during interphase. Finally, we show that depletion of Cep192 negatively impacts cell motility and alters normal cell polarization. Our current working hypothesis is that the microtubule nucleating capacity of the interphase centrosome is determined by an antagonistic balance of Cep192, which promotes nucleation, and Pericentrin, which inhibits nucleation. This in turn determines the relative abundance of centrosomal and non-centrosomal microtubules that tune cell movement and shape.

  16. Elevated endogenous expression of the dominant negative basic helix-loop-helix protein ID1 correlates with significant centrosome abnormalities in human tumor cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gutmann Anja

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background ID proteins are dominant negative inhibitors of basic helix-loop-helix transcription factors that have multiple functions during development and cellular differentiation. Ectopic (over-expression of ID1 extends the lifespan of primary human epithelial cells. High expression levels of ID1 have been detected in multiple human malignancies, and in some have been correlated with unfavorable clinical prognosis. ID1 protein is localized at the centrosomes and forced (over-expression of ID1 results in errors during centrosome duplication. Results Here we analyzed the steady state expression levels of the four ID-proteins in 18 tumor cell lines and assessed the number of centrosome abnormalities. While expression of ID1, ID2, and ID3 was detected, we failed to detect protein expression of ID4. Expression of ID1 correlated with increased supernumerary centrosomes in most cell lines analyzed. Conclusions This is the first report that shows that not only ectopic expression in tissue culture but endogenous levels of ID1 modulate centrosome numbers. Thus, our findings support the hypothesis that ID1 interferes with centrosome homeostasis, most likely contributing to genomic instability and associated tumor aggressiveness.

  17. Dimerization of CPAP Orchestrates Centrosome Cohesion Plasticity*

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Lingli; Jin, Changjiang; Chu, Youjun; Varghese, Chris; Hua, Shasha; Yan, Feng; Miao, Yong; Liu, Jing; Mann, David; Ding, Xia; Zhang, Jiancun; Wang, Zhiyong; Dou, Zhen; Yao, XueBiao

    2009-01-01

    Centrosome cohesion and segregation are accurately regulated to prevent an aberrant separation of duplicated centrosomes and to ensure the correct formation of bipolar spindles by a tight coupling with cell cycle machinery. CPAP is a centrosome protein with five coiled-coil domains and plays an important role in the control of brain size in autosomal recessive primary microcephaly. Previous studies showed that CPAP interacts with tubulin and controls centriole length. Here, we reported that C...

  18. Cyclin G2 is a centrosome-associated nucleocytoplasmic shuttling protein that influences microtubule stability and induces a p53-dependent cell cycle arrest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cyclin G2 is an atypical cyclin that associates with active protein phosphatase 2A. Cyclin G2 gene expression correlates with cell cycle inhibition; it is significantly upregulated in response to DNA damage and diverse growth inhibitory stimuli, but repressed by mitogenic signals. Ectopic expression of cyclin G2 promotes cell cycle arrest, cyclin dependent kinase 2 inhibition and the formation of aberrant nuclei [Bennin, D. A., Don, A. S., Brake, T., McKenzie, J. L., Rosenbaum, H., Ortiz, L., DePaoli-Roach, A. A., and Horne, M. C. (2002). Cyclin G2 associates with protein phosphatase 2A catalytic and regulatory B' subunits in active complexes and induces nuclear aberrations and a G1/S-phase cell cycle arrest. J Biol Chem 277, 27449-67]. Here we report that endogenous cyclin G2 copurifies with centrosomes and microtubules (MT) and that ectopic G2 expression alters microtubule stability. We find exogenous and endogenous cyclin G2 present at microtubule organizing centers (MTOCs) where it colocalizes with centrosomal markers in a variety of cell lines. We previously reported that cyclin G2 forms complexes with active protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) and colocalizes with PP2A in a detergent-resistant compartment. We now show that cyclin G2 and PP2A colocalize at MTOCs in transfected cells and that the endogenous proteins copurify with isolated centrosomes. Displacement of the endogenous centrosomal scaffolding protein AKAP450 that anchors PP2A at the centrosome resulted in the depletion of centrosomal cyclin G2. We find that ectopic expression of cyclin G2 induces microtubule bundling and resistance to depolymerization, inhibition of polymer regrowth from MTOCs and a p53-dependent cell cycle arrest. Furthermore, we determined that a 100 amino acid carboxy-terminal region of cyclin G2 is sufficient to both direct GFP localization to centrosomes and induce cell cycle inhibition. Colocalization of endogenous cyclin G2 with only one of two GFP-centrin-tagged centrioles, the

  19. A centrosome-autonomous signal that involves centriole disengagement permits centrosome duplication in G2 phase after DNA damage.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    2010-11-15

    DNA damage can induce centrosome overduplication in a manner that requires G2-to-M checkpoint function, suggesting that genotoxic stress can decouple the centrosome and chromosome cycles. How this happens is unclear. Using live-cell imaging of cells that express fluorescently tagged NEDD1\\/GCP-WD and proliferating cell nuclear antigen, we found that ionizing radiation (IR)-induced centrosome amplification can occur outside S phase. Analysis of synchronized populations showed that significantly more centrosome amplification occurred after irradiation of G2-enriched populations compared with G1-enriched or asynchronous cells, consistent with G2 phase centrosome amplification. Irradiated and control populations of G2 cells were then fused to test whether centrosome overduplication is allowed through a diffusible stimulatory signal, or the loss of a duplication-inhibiting signal. Irradiated G2\\/irradiated G2 cell fusions showed significantly higher centrosome amplification levels than irradiated G2\\/unirradiated G2 fusions. Chicken-human cell fusions demonstrated that centrosome amplification was limited to the irradiated partner. Our finding that only the irradiated centrosome can duplicate supports a model where a centrosome-autonomous inhibitory signal is lost upon irradiation of G2 cells. We observed centriole disengagement after irradiation. Although overexpression of dominant-negative securin did not affect IR-induced centrosome amplification, Plk1 inhibition reduced radiation-induced amplification. Together, our data support centriole disengagement as a licensing signal for DNA damage-induced centrosome amplification.

  20. CENP-32 is required to maintain centrosomal dominance in bipolar spindle assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohta, Shinya; Wood, Laura; Toramoto, Iyo; Yagyu, Ken-Ichi; Fukagawa, Tatsuo; Earnshaw, William C

    2015-04-01

    Centrosomes nucleate spindle formation, direct spindle pole positioning, and are important for proper chromosome segregation during mitosis in most animal cells. We previously reported that centromere protein 32 (CENP-32) is required for centrosome association with spindle poles during metaphase. In this study, we show that CENP-32 depletion seems to release centrosomes from bipolar spindles whose assembly they had previously initiated. Remarkably, the resulting anastral spindles function normally, aligning the chromosomes to a metaphase plate and entering anaphase without detectable interference from the free centrosomes, which appear to behave as free asters in these cells. The free asters, which contain reduced but significant levels of CDK5RAP2, show weak interactions with spindle microtubules but do not seem to make productive attachments to kinetochores. Thus CENP-32 appears to be required for centrosomes to integrate into a fully functional spindle that not only nucleates astral microtubules, but also is able to nucleate and bind to kinetochore and central spindle microtubules. Additional data suggest that NuMA tethers microtubules at the anastral spindle poles and that augmin is required for centrosome detachment after CENP-32 depletion, possibly due to an imbalance of forces within the spindle. PMID:25657325

  1. The Centrosome-Specific Phosphorylation of Cnn by Polo/Plk1 Drives Cnn Scaffold Assembly and Centrosome Maturation

    OpenAIRE

    Conduit, PT; Feng, Z; Richens, JH; Baumbach, J.; Wainman, A; Bakshi, SD; Dobbelaere, J; Johnson, S; Lea, SM; Raff, JW

    2014-01-01

    Summary Centrosomes are important cell organizers. They consist of a pair of centrioles surrounded by pericentriolar material (PCM) that expands dramatically during mitosis—a process termed centrosome maturation. How centrosomes mature remains mysterious. Here, we identify a domain in Drosophila Cnn that appears to be phosphorylated by Polo/Plk1 specifically at centrosomes during mitosis. The phosphorylation promotes the assembly of a Cnn scaffold around the centrioles that is in constant flu...

  2. Actin nucleation at the centrosome controls lymphocyte polarity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obino, Dorian; Farina, Francesca; Malbec, Odile; Sáez, Pablo J; Maurin, Mathieu; Gaillard, Jérémie; Dingli, Florent; Loew, Damarys; Gautreau, Alexis; Yuseff, Maria-Isabel; Blanchoin, Laurent; Théry, Manuel; Lennon-Duménil, Ana-Maria

    2016-01-01

    Cell polarity is required for the functional specialization of many cell types including lymphocytes. A hallmark of cell polarity is the reorientation of the centrosome that allows repositioning of organelles and vesicles in an asymmetric fashion. The mechanisms underlying centrosome polarization are not fully understood. Here we found that in resting lymphocytes, centrosome-associated Arp2/3 locally nucleates F-actin, which is needed for centrosome tethering to the nucleus via the LINC complex. Upon lymphocyte activation, Arp2/3 is partially depleted from the centrosome as a result of its recruitment to the immune synapse. This leads to a reduction in F-actin nucleation at the centrosome and thereby allows its detachment from the nucleus and polarization to the synapse. Therefore, F-actin nucleation at the centrosome-regulated by the availability of the Arp2/3 complex-determines its capacity to polarize in response to external stimuli. PMID:26987298

  3. Clathrin regulates centrosome positioning by promoting acto-myosin cortical tension in C. elegans embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiró, Zoltán; Thyagarajan, Kalyani; De Simone, Alessandro; Träger, Sylvain; Afshar, Katayoun; Gönczy, Pierre

    2014-07-01

    Regulation of centrosome and spindle positioning is crucial for spatial cell division control. The one-cell Caenorhabditis elegans embryo has proven attractive for dissecting the mechanisms underlying centrosome and spindle positioning in a metazoan organism. Previous work revealed that these processes rely on an evolutionarily conserved force generator complex located at the cell cortex. This complex anchors the motor protein dynein, thus allowing cortical pulling forces to be exerted on astral microtubules emanating from microtubule organizing centers (MTOCs). Here, we report that the clathrin heavy chain CHC-1 negatively regulates pulling forces acting on centrosomes during interphase and on spindle poles during mitosis in one-cell C. elegans embryos. We establish a similar role for the cytokinesis/apoptosis/RNA-binding protein CAR-1 and uncover that CAR-1 is needed to maintain proper levels of CHC-1. We demonstrate that CHC-1 is necessary for normal organization of the cortical acto-myosin network and for full cortical tension. Furthermore, we establish that the centrosome positioning phenotype of embryos depleted of CHC-1 is alleviated by stabilizing the acto-myosin network. Conversely, we demonstrate that slight perturbations of the acto-myosin network in otherwise wild-type embryos results in excess centrosome movements resembling those in chc-1(RNAi) embryos. We developed a 2D computational model to simulate cortical rigidity-dependent pulling forces, which recapitulates the experimental data and further demonstrates that excess centrosome movements are produced at medium cortical rigidity values. Overall, our findings lead us to propose that clathrin plays a critical role in centrosome positioning by promoting acto-myosin cortical tension. PMID:24961801

  4. Interphase centrosome organization by the PLP-Cnn scaffold is required for centrosome function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerit, Dorothy A; Jordan, Holly A; Poulton, John S; Fagerstrom, Carey J; Galletta, Brian J; Peifer, Mark; Rusan, Nasser M

    2015-07-01

    Pericentriolar material (PCM) mediates the microtubule (MT) nucleation and anchoring activity of centrosomes. A scaffold organized by Centrosomin (Cnn) serves to ensure proper PCM architecture and functional changes in centrosome activity with each cell cycle. Here, we investigate the mechanisms that spatially restrict and temporally coordinate centrosome scaffold formation. Focusing on the mitotic-to-interphase transition in Drosophila melanogaster embryos, we show that the elaboration of the interphase Cnn scaffold defines a major structural rearrangement of the centrosome. We identify an unprecedented role for Pericentrin-like protein (PLP), which localizes to the tips of extended Cnn flares, to maintain robust interphase centrosome activity and promote the formation of interphase MT asters required for normal nuclear spacing, centrosome segregation, and compartmentalization of the syncytial embryo. Our data reveal that Cnn and PLP directly interact at two defined sites to coordinate the cell cycle-dependent rearrangement and scaffolding activity of the centrosome to permit normal centrosome organization, cell division, and embryonic viability. PMID:26150390

  5. Drosophila neuroblasts retain the daughter centrosome

    OpenAIRE

    Januschke, Jens; Llamazares, Salud; Reina, Jose; Gonzalez, Cayetano

    2011-01-01

    During asymmetric mitosis, both in male Drosophila germline stem cells and in mouse embryo neural progenitors, the mother centrosome is retained by the self-renewed cell; hence suggesting that mother centrosome inheritance might contribute to stemness. We test this hypothesis in Drosophila neuroblasts (NBs) tracing photo converted centrioles and a daughter-centriole-specific marker generated by cloning the Drosophila homologue of human Centrobin. Here we show that upon asymmetric mitosis, the...

  6. The disassembly and reassembly of functional centrosomes in vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Schnackenberg, Bradley J.; Khodjakov, Alexey; Rieder, Conly L.; Palazzo, Robert E.

    1998-01-01

    Animal cells contain a single centrosome that nucleates and organizes a polarized array of microtubules which functions in many cellular processes. In most cells the centrosome is composed of two centrioles surrounded by an ill-defined “cloud” of pericentriolar material. Recently, γ-tubulin-containing 25-nm diameter ring structures have been identified as likely microtubule nucleation sites within the pericentriolar material of isolated centrosomes. Here we demonstrate that when Spisula centr...

  7. A fraction of Crm1 locates at centrosomes by its CRIME domain and regulates the centrosomal localization of pericentrin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crm1 plays a role in exporting proteins containing nuclear export signals (NESs) from the nucleus to the cytoplasm. Some proteins that are capable of interacting with Ran/Crm1 were reported to be localized at centrosomes and to function as centrosome checkpoints. But it remains unclear how Crm1 locates at centrosomes. In this study, we found that a fraction of Crm1 is located at centrosomes through its N-terminal CRM1, importin β etc. (CRIME) domain, which is responsible for interacting with RanGTP, suggesting that Crm1 might target to centrosomes through binding centrosomal RanGTP. Moreover, overexpression of the CRIME domain, which is free of NES binding domain, resulted in the dissociation of pericentrin and γ-tubulin complex from centrosomes and the disruption of microtubule nucleation. Deficiency of Crm1 provoked by RNAi also decreased the spindle poles localization of pericentrin and γ-tubulin complex, coupled with mitotic defects. Since pericentrin was sensitive to Crm1 specific inhibitor leptomycin B, we propose that the centrosomal Crm1 might interact with pericentrin and regulate the localization and function of pericentrin at centrosomes.

  8. APC functions at the centrosome to stimulate microtubule growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lui, Christina; Ashton, Cahora; Sharma, Manisha; Brocardo, Mariana G; Henderson, Beric R

    2016-01-01

    The adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) tumor suppressor is multi-functional. APC is known to localize at the centrosome, and in mitotic cells contributes to formation of the mitotic spindle. To test whether APC contributes to nascent microtubule (MT) growth at interphase centrosomes, we employed MT regrowth assays in U2OS cells to measure MT assembly before and after nocodazole treatment and release. We showed that siRNA knockdown of full-length APC delayed both initial MT aster formation and MT elongation/regrowth. In contrast, APC-mutant SW480 cancer cells displayed a defect in MT regrowth that was unaffected by APC knockdown, but which was rescued by reconstitution of full-length APC. Our findings identify APC as a positive regulator of centrosome MT initial assembly and suggest that this process is disrupted by cancer mutations. We confirmed that full-length APC associates with the MT-nucleation factor γ-tubulin, and found that the APC cancer-truncated form (1-1309) also bound to γ-tubulin through APC amino acids 1-453. While binding to γ-tubulin may help target APC to the site of MT nucleation complexes, additional C-terminal sequences of APC are required to stimulate and stabilize MT growth. PMID:26556314

  9. Identification of a novel resi-dent centrosomal protein

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    One human autoimmune serum was identified to react withcentrosomes by immunofluorescence. We applied the affinity purification of membrane-bound antibody technique and demonstrated that the antibodies present in this antiserum reacted with a 31/29 ku centrosomal antigen. Immunofluorescence showed that this antigen is located at centrosome in a cell-cycle independent manner, and thereby it belongs to the family of centrosomal residents. We then uti- lized this autoimmune serum and antibodies against centrin and gamma-tubulin to investigate changes of centrosome cycle kinetics during premature chromosome condensation (PCC) artificially induced in V79-8 cells. We show here that centrosomal proteins continue to express when cells are syn-chronized at G1/S boundary and S phase by Hydroxyurea (HU). During this time, the addition of caffeine causes cells with unreplicated genome to go into mitosis, and induces the separation of the replicated centrosomes. These results sug-gest that the coordination of DNA synthesis and centrosome replication in the normal cell cycle can be uncoupled. Cells ensure that centrosome duplicates once, and only once dur-ing each DNA synthesis cycle through the tight and subtle coordination of cell cycle engine molecules, and thereby the assembly of bipolar spindle and the accurate transmission of genetic information.

  10. Centrosomal clustering contributes to chromosomal instability and cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milunović-Jevtić, A; Mooney, P; Sulerud, T; Bisht, J; Gatlin, J C

    2016-08-01

    Cells assemble mitotic spindles during each round of division to insure accurate segregation of their duplicated genome. In animal cells, stereotypical spindles have two poles, each containing one centrosome, from which microtubules are nucleated. By contrast, many cancer cells often contain more than two centrosomes and form transient multipolar spindle structures with more than two poles. In order to divide and produce viable progeny, the multipolar spindle intermediate must be reshaped into a pseudo-bipolar structure via a process called centrosomal clustering. Pseudo-bipolar spindles appear to function normally during mitosis, but they occasionally give rise to aneuploid and transformed daughter cells. Agents that inhibit centrosomal clustering might therefore work as a potential cancer therapy, specifically targeting mitosis in supernumerary centrosome-containing cells. PMID:27046071

  11. Molecular basis of the STIL coiled coil oligomerization explains its requirement for de-novo formation of centrosomes in mammalian cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Ahuvit; Amartely, Hadar; Rabinowicz, Noa; Shamir, Mai; Friedler, Assaf; Izraeli, Shai

    2016-01-01

    The STIL protein is essential for centriole replication and for the non-templated, de novo centriole biogenesis that is required for mammalian embryogenesis. Here we performed quantitative biophysical and structural analysis of the central short coiled coil domain (CCD) of STIL that is critical for its function. Using biophysical, biochemical and cell biology approaches, we identified the specific residues in the CCD that mediate the oligomerization, centrosomal localization and protein interactions of STIL. We characterized the structural properties of the coiled coil peptide using circular dichroism spectroscopy and size exclusion chromatography. We identified two regions in this domain, containing eight hydrophobic residues, which mediate the coiled coil oligomerization. Mutations in these residues destabilized the coiled coil thermodynamically but in most cases did not affect its secondary structure. Reconstituting mouse embryonic fibroblasts lacking endogenous Stil, we show that STIL oligomerization mediated by these residues is not only important for the centrosomal functions of STIL during the canonical duplication process but also for de-novo formation of centrosomes. PMID:27075531

  12. Regulated assembly of a supramolecular centrosome scaffold in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Woodruff, J. B.; Wueseke, O.; Viscardi, V.;

    2015-01-01

    The centrosome organizes microtubule arrays within animal cells and comprises two centrioles surrounded by an amorphous protein mass called the pericentriolar material (PCM). Despite the importance of centrosomes as microtubule-organizing centers, the mechanism and regulation of PCM assembly are ...

  13. Downregulation of Protein 4.1R impairs centrosome function,bipolar spindle organization and anaphase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spence, Jeffrey R.; Go, Minjoung M.; Bahmanyar, S.; Barth,A.I.M.; Krauss, Sharon Wald

    2006-03-17

    Centrosomes nucleate and organize interphase MTs and areinstrumental in the assembly of the mitotic bipolar spindle. Here wereport that two members of the multifunctional protein 4.1 family havedistinct distributions at centrosomes. Protein 4.1R localizes to maturecentrioles whereas 4.1G is a component of the pericentriolar matrixsurrounding centrioles. To selectively probe 4.1R function, we used RNAinterference-mediated depletion of 4.1R without decreasing 4.1Gexpression. 4.1R downregulation reduces MT anchoring and organization atinterphase and impairs centrosome separation during prometaphase.Metaphase chromosomes fail to properly condense/align and spindleorganization is aberrant. Notably 4.1R depletion causes mislocalizationof its binding partner NuMA (Nuclear Mitotic Apparatus Protein),essential for spindle pole focusing, and disrupts ninein. Duringanaphase/telophase, 4.1R-depleted cells have lagging chromosomes andaberrant MT bridges. Our data provide functional evidence that 4.1R makescrucial contributions to centrosome integrity and to mitotic spindlestructure enabling mitosis and anaphase to proceed with the coordinatedprecision required to avoid pathological events.

  14. HSET overexpression fuels tumor progression via centrosome clustering-independent mechanisms in breast cancer patients

    OpenAIRE

    Pannu, Vaishali; Rida, Padmashree C. G.; Ogden, Angela; Turaga, Ravi Chakra; Donthamsetty, Shashikiran; Bowen, Nathan J.; Rudd, Katie; Gupta, Meenakshi V.; Reid, Michelle D.; Cantuaria, Guilherme; Walczak, Claire E.; Aneja, Ritu

    2015-01-01

    Human breast tumors harbor supernumerary centrosomes in almost 80% of tumor cells. Although amplified centrosomes compromise cell viability via multipolar spindles resulting in death-inducing aneuploidy, cancer cells tend to cluster extra centrosomes during mitosis. As a result cancer cells display bipolar spindle phenotypes to maintain a tolerable level of aneuploidy, an edge to their survival. HSET/KifC1, a kinesin-like minus-end directed microtubule motor has recently found fame as a cruci...

  15. Fodrin in centrosomes: implication of a role of fodrin in the transport of gamma-tubulin complex in brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sasidharan Shashikala

    Full Text Available Gamma-tubulin is the major protein involved in the nucleation of microtubules from centrosomes in eukaryotic cells. It is present in both cytoplasm and centrosome. However, before centrosome maturation prior to mitosis, gamma-tubulin concentration increases dramatically in the centrosome, the mechanism of which is not known. Earlier it was reported that cytoplasmic gamma-tubulin complex isolated from goat brain contains non-erythroid spectrin/fodrin. The major role of erythroid spectrin is to help in the membrane organisation and integrity. However, fodrin or non-erythroid spectrin has a distinct pattern of localisation in brain cells and evidently some special functions over its erythroid counterpart. In this study, we show that fodrin and γ-tubulin are present together in both the cytoplasm and centrosomes in all brain cells except differentiated neurons and astrocytes. Immunoprecipitation studies in purified centrosomes from brain tissue and brain cell lines confirm that fodrin and γ-tubulin interact with each other in centrosomes. Fodrin dissociates from centrosome just after the onset of mitosis, when the concentration of γ-tubulin attains a maximum at centrosomes. Further it is observed that the interaction between fodrin and γ-tubulin in the centrosome is dependent on actin as depolymerisation of microfilaments stops fodrin localization. Image analysis revealed that γ-tubulin concentration also decreased drastically in the centrosome under this condition. This indicates towards a role of fodrin as a regulatory transporter of γ-tubulin to the centrosomes for normal progression of mitosis.

  16. Mitochondrial genome regulates mitotic fidelity by maintaining centrosomal homeostasis

    OpenAIRE

    Donthamsetty, Shashikiran; Brahmbhatt, Meera; Pannu, Vaishali; Rida, Padmashree CG; Ramarathinam, Sujatha; Ogden, Angela; Cheng, Alice; Singh, Keshav K.; Aneja, Ritu

    2014-01-01

    Centrosomes direct spindle morphogenesis to assemble a bipolar mitotic apparatus to enable error-free chromosome segregation and preclude chromosomal instability (CIN). Amplified centrosomes, a hallmark of cancer cells, set the stage for CIN, which underlies malignant transformation and evolution of aggressive phenotypes. Several studies report CIN and a tumorigenic and/or aggressive transformation in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA)-depleted cells. Although several nuclear-encoded proteins are impl...

  17. Centrosome isolation and analysis by mass spectrometry-based proteomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Lis; Schrøder, Jacob Morville; Larsen, Katja M;

    2013-01-01

    Centrioles are microtubule-based scaffolds that are essential for the formation of centrosomes, cilia, and flagella with important functions throughout the cell cycle, in physiology and during development. The ability to purify centriole-containing organelles on a large scale, combined with advan...... isolate centrosomes from human cells and strategies to selectively identify and study the properties of the associated proteins using quantitative mass spectrometry-based proteomics.......Centrioles are microtubule-based scaffolds that are essential for the formation of centrosomes, cilia, and flagella with important functions throughout the cell cycle, in physiology and during development. The ability to purify centriole-containing organelles on a large scale, combined with...... advances in protein identification using mass spectrometry-based proteomics, have revealed multiple centriole-associated proteins that are conserved during evolution in eukaryotes. Despite these advances, the molecular basis for the plethora of processes coordinated by cilia and centrosomes is not fully...

  18. Centrosomal Protein of 55 Regulates Glucose Metabolism, Proliferation and Apoptosis of Glioma Cells via the Akt/mTOR Signaling Pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guangzhi; Liu, Mingna; Wang, Hongjun; Yu, Shan; Jiang, Zhenfeng; Sun, Jiahang; Han, Ke; Shen, Jia; Zhu, Minwei; Lin, Zhiguo; Jiang, Chuanlu; Guo, Mian

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Glioma is one of the most common and most aggressive brain tumors in humans. The molecular and cellular mechanisms responsible for the onset and the progression of glioma are elusive and controversial. Centrosomal protein of 55 (CEP55) was initially described as a highly coiled-coil protein that plays critical roles in cell division, but was recently identified as being overexpressed in many human cancers. The function of CEP55 has not previously been characterized in glioma. We aim to discover the effect and mechanism of CEP55 in glioma development. Method: qRT-PCR and immunohistochemistry were used to analyze CEP55 expression. Glucose uptake, western blot, MTS, CCK-8, Caspase-3 activity and TUNEL staining assays were performed to investigate the role and mechanism of CEP55 on glioma cell process. Results: We found that the levels of CEP55 expression were upregulated in glioma. In addition, CEP55 appeared to regulate glucose metabolism of glioma cells. Furthermore, knockdown of CEP55 inhibited cell proliferation and induced cell apoptosis in glioma. Finally, we provided preliminary evidence that knockdown of CEP55 inhibited glioma development via suppressing the activity of Akt/mTOR signaling. Conclusions: Our results demonstrated that CEP55 regulates glucose metabolism, proliferation and apoptosis of glioma cells via the Akt/mTOR signaling pathway, and its promotive effect on glioma tumorigenesis can be a potential target for glioma therapy in the future. PMID:27471559

  19. Centrosomes split in the presence of impaired DNA integrity during mitosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hut, HMJ; Lemstra, W; Blaauw, EH; van Cappellen, GWA; Kampinga, HH; Sibon, OCM

    2003-01-01

    A well-established function of centrosomes is their role in accomplishing a successful mitosis that gives rise to a pair of identical daughter cells. We recently showed that DNA replication defects and DNA damage in Drosophila embryos trigger centrosomal changes, but it remained unclear whether comp

  20. Proteomic characterization of the human centrosome by protein correlation profiling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jens S; Wilkinson, Christopher J; Mayor, Thibault; Mortensen, Peter; Nigg, Erich A; Mann, Matthias

    2003-01-01

    The centrosome is the major microtubule-organizing centre of animal cells and through its influence on the cytoskeleton is involved in cell shape, polarity and motility. It also has a crucial function in cell division because it determines the poles of the mitotic spindle that segregates duplicat...

  1. Activity and regulation of the centrosome-associated proteasome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabunmi, R P; Wigley, W C; Thomas, P J; DeMartino, G N

    2000-01-01

    Regulated proteolysis is important for maintaining appropriate cellular levels of many proteins. The bulk of intracellular protein degradation is catalyzed by the proteasome. Recently, the centrosome was identified as a novel site for concentration of the proteasome and associated regulatory proteins (Wigley, W. C., Fabunmi, R. P., Lee, M. G., Marino, C. R., Muallem, S., DeMartino, G. N., and Thomas, P. J. (1999) J. Cell Biol. 145, 481-490). Here we provide evidence that centrosomes contain the active 26 S proteasome that degrades ubiquitinated-protein and proteasome-specific peptide substrates. Moreover, the centrosomes contain an ubiquitin isopeptidase activity. The proteolytic activity is ATP-dependent and is inhibited by proteasome inhibitors. Notably, treatment of cells with inhibitors of proteasome activity promotes redistribution of the proteasome and associated regulatory proteins to the centrosome independent of an intact microtubule system. These data provide biochemical evidence for active proteasomal complexes at the centrosome, highlighting a novel function for this organizing structure. PMID:10617632

  2. Dynamic association of proteasomal machinery with the centrosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wigley, W C; Fabunmi, R P; Lee, M G; Marino, C R; Muallem, S; DeMartino, G N; Thomas, P J

    1999-05-01

    Although the number of pathologies known to arise from the inappropriate folding of proteins continues to grow, mechanisms underlying the recognition and ultimate disposition of misfolded polypeptides remain obscure. For example, how and where such substrates are identified and processed is unknown. We report here the identification of a specific subcellular structure in which, under basal conditions, the 20S proteasome, the PA700 and PA28 (700- and 180-kD proteasome activator complexes, respectively), ubiquitin, Hsp70 and Hsp90 (70- and 90-kD heat shock protein, respectively) concentrate in HEK 293 and HeLa cells. The structure is perinuclear, surrounded by endoplasmic reticulum, adjacent to the Golgi, and colocalizes with gamma-tubulin, an established centrosomal marker. Density gradient fractions containing purified centrosomes are enriched in proteasomal components and cell stress chaperones. The centrosome-associated structure enlarges in response to inhibition of proteasome activity and the level of misfolded proteins. For example, folding mutants of CFTR form large inclusions which arise from the centrosome upon inhibition of proteasome activity. At high levels of misfolded protein, the structure not only expands but also extensively recruits the cytosolic pools of ubiquitin, Hsp70, PA700, PA28, and the 20S proteasome. Thus, the centrosome may act as a scaffold, which concentrates and recruits the systems which act as censors and modulators of the balance between folding, aggregation, and degradation. PMID:10225950

  3. Centrosome amplification, chromosomal instability and cancer: mechanistic, clinical and therapeutic issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosenza, Marco Raffaele; Krämer, Alwin

    2016-01-01

    Centrosomes, the main microtubule-organizing centers in most animal cells, are of crucial importance for the assembly of a bipolar mitotic spindle and subsequent faithful segregation of chromosomes into two daughter cells. Centrosome abnormalities can be found in virtually all cancer types and have been linked to chromosomal instability (CIN) and tumorigenesis. Although our knowledge on centrosome structure, replication, and amplification has greatly increased within recent years, still only very little is known on nature, causes, and consequences of centrosome aberrations in primary tumor tissues. In this review, we summarize our current insights into the mechanistic link between centrosome aberrations, aneuploidy, CIN and tumorigenesis. Mechanisms of induction and cellular consequences of aneuploidy, tetraploidization and CIN, as well as origin and effects of supernumerary centrosomes will be discussed. In addition, animal models for both CIN and centrosome amplification will be outlined. Finally, we describe approaches to exploit centrosome amplification, aneuploidy and CIN for novel and specific anticancer treatment strategies based on the modulation of chromosome missegregation rates. PMID:26645976

  4. Centrosomes: CNN's Broadcast Reaches the Cleavage Furrow

    OpenAIRE

    Sullivan, William

    2009-01-01

    Centrosomin (CNN), a core Drosophila centrosome protein, interacts with the newly identified protein Centrocortin to promote cleavage furrow formation in the early embryo. Significantly, this activity is distinct from CNN's well-established role in centrosome-based microtubule organization.

  5. LIN-41 inactivation leads to delayed centrosome elimination and abnormal chromosome behavior during female meiosis in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuura, Rieko; Ashikawa, Tomoko; Nozaki, Yuka; Kitagawa, Daiju

    2016-03-01

    During oogenesis, two successive meiotic cell divisions occur without functional centrosomes because of the inactivation and subsequent elimination of maternal centrosomes during the diplotene stage of meiosis I. Despite being a conserved phenomenon in most metazoans, the means by which this centrosome behavior is controlled during female meiosis remain elusive. Here, we conducted a targeted RNAi screening in the Caenorhabditis elegans gonad to identify novel regulators of centrosome behavior during oogenesis. We screened 513 genes known to be essential for embryo production and directly visualized GFP-γ-tubulin to monitor centrosome behavior at all stages of oogenesis. In the screening, we found that RNAi-mediated inactivation of 33 genes delayed the elimination of GFP-γ-tubulin at centrosomes during oogenesis, whereas inactivation of nine genes accelerated the process. Depletion of the TRIM-NHL protein LIN-41 led to a significant delay in centrosome elimination and to the separation and reactivation of centrosomes during oogenesis. Upon LIN-41 depletion, meiotic chromosomes were abnormally condensed and pulled toward one of the two spindle poles around late pachytene even though the spindle microtubules emanated from both centrosomes. Overall, our work provides new insights into the regulation of centrosome behavior to ensure critical meiotic events and the generation of intact oocytes. PMID:26764090

  6. The centrosome is a dynamic structure that ejects PCM flares.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Megraw, Timothy L; Kilaru, Sandhya; Turner, F Rudolf; Kaufman, Thomas C

    2002-12-01

    The Drosophila Centrosomin (Cnn) protein is an essential core component of centrosomes in the early embryo. We have expressed a Cnn-GFP fusion construct in cleavage stage embryos, which rescues the maternal effect lethality of cnn mutant animals. The localization patterns seen with GFP-Cnn are identical to the patterns we see by immunofluorescent staining with anti-Cnn antibodies. Live imaging of centrosomes with Cnn-GFP reveals surprisingly dynamic features of the centrosome. Extracentrosomal particles of Cnn move radially from the centrosome and frequently change their direction. D-TACC colocalized with Cnn at these particles. We have named these extrusions 'flares'. Flares are dependent on microtubules, since disruption of the microtubule array severs the movement of these particles. Movement of flare particles is cleavage-cycle-dependent and appears to be attributed mostly to their association with dynamic astral microtubules. Flare activity decreases at metaphase, then increases at telophase and remains at this higher level of activity until the next metaphase. Flares appear to be similar to vertebrate PCM-1-containing 'centriolar satellites' in their behavior. By injecting rhodamine-actin, we observed that flares extend no farther than the actin cage. Additionally, disruption of the microfilament array increased the extent of flare movement. These observations indicate that centrosomes eject particles of Cnn-containing pericentriolar material that move on dynamic astral microtubules at a rate that varies with the cell cycle. We propose that flare particles play a role in organizing the actin cytoskeleton during syncytial cleavage. PMID:12415014

  7. Generation and Characterization of a Tissue-Specific Centrosome Indicator Mouse Line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirai, Maretoshi; Chen, Ju; Evans, Sylvia M

    2016-05-01

    Centrosomes are major microtubule organizing centers (MTOCs) that play an important role in chromosome segregation during cell division. Centrosomes provide a stable anchor for microtubules, constituting the centers of the spindle poles in mitotic cells, and determining the orientation of cell division. However, visualization of centrosomes is challenging because of their small size. Especially in mouse tissues, it has been extremely challenging to observe centrosomes belonging to a specific cell type of interest among multiple comingled cell types. To overcome this obstacle, we generated a tissue-specific centrosome indicator. In this mouse line, a construct containing a floxed neomyocin resistance gene with a triplicate polyA sequence followed by an EGFP-Centrin1 fusion cassette was knocked into the Rosa locus. Upon Cre-mediated excision, EGFP-Centrin1 was expressed under the control of the Rosa locus. Experiments utilizing mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEFs) demonstrated the feasibility of real-time imaging, and showed that EGFP-Centrin1 expression mirrored the endogenous centrosome cycle, undergoing precisely one round of duplication through the cell cycle. Moreover, experiments using embryo and adult mouse tissues demonstrated that EGFP-Centrin1 specifically mirrors the localization of endogenous centrosomes. genesis 54:286-296, 2016. © 2016 The Authors. Genesis Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26990996

  8. Disjunction of conjoined twins: Cdk1, Cdh1 and separation of centrosomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surana Uttam

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Accurate transmission of chromosomes from parent to progeny cell requires assembly of a bipolar spindle. Centrosomes (spindle pole body in yeast are critical for the biogenesis of this complex mitotic apparatus since they confer bipolarity on the spindle and serve as the site of microtubule polymerization. In each division cycle, the centrosome is duplicated and the sister-centrosomes move away from each other, forming the two poles of the spindle. While the structure and the duplication of centrosomes have been investigated extensively, the understanding of the control of their segregation remains scant. Recent findings are beginning to yield insights into the regulation of centrosome segregation in yeast and its link to the mitotic kinase.

  9. A phthalimide derivative that inhibits centrosomal clustering is effective on multiple myeloma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirokazu Shiheido

    Full Text Available Despite the introduction of newly developed drugs such as lenalidomide and bortezomib, patients with multiple myeloma are still difficult to treat and have a poor prognosis. In order to find novel drugs that are effective for multiple myeloma, we tested the antitumor activity of 29 phthalimide derivatives against several multiple myeloma cell lines. Among these derivatives, 2-(2,6-diisopropylphenyl-5-amino-1H-isoindole-1,3- dione (TC11 was found to be a potent inhibitor of tumor cell proliferation and an inducer of apoptosis via activation of caspase-3, 8 and 9. This compound also showed in vivo activity against multiple myeloma cell line KMS34 tumor xenografts in ICR/SCID mice. By means of mRNA display selection on a microfluidic chip, the target protein of TC11 was identified as nucleophosmin 1 (NPM. Binding of TC11 and NPM monomer was confirmed by surface plasmon resonance. Immunofluorescence and NPM knockdown studies in HeLa cells suggested that TC11 inhibits centrosomal clustering by inhibiting the centrosomal-regulatory function of NPM, thereby inducing multipolar mitotic cells, which undergo apoptosis. NPM may become a novel target for development of antitumor drugs active against multiple myeloma.

  10. Conserved molecular interactions in centriole-to-centrosome conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Jingyan; Lipinszki, Zoltan; Rangone, Hélène; Min, Mingwei; Mykura, Charlotte; Chao-Chu, Jennifer; Schneider, Sandra; Dzhindzhev, Nikola S; Gottardo, Marco; Riparbelli, Maria Giovanna; Callaini, Giuliano; Glover, David M

    2016-01-01

    Centrioles are required to assemble centrosomes for cell division and cilia for motility and signalling. New centrioles assemble perpendicularly to pre-existing ones in G1-S and elongate throughout S and G2. Fully elongated daughter centrioles are converted into centrosomes during mitosis to be able to duplicate and organize pericentriolar material in the next cell cycle. Here we show that centriole-to-centrosome conversion requires sequential loading of Cep135, Ana1 (Cep295) and Asterless (Cep152) onto daughter centrioles during mitotic progression in both Drosophila melanogaster and human. This generates a molecular network spanning from the inner- to outermost parts of the centriole. Ana1 forms a molecular strut within the network, and its essential role can be substituted by an engineered fragment providing an alternative linkage between Asterless and Cep135. This conserved architectural framework is essential for loading Asterless or Cep152, the partner of the master regulator of centriole duplication, Plk4. Our study thus uncovers the molecular basis for centriole-to-centrosome conversion that renders daughter centrioles competent for motherhood. PMID:26595382

  11. Novel asymmetrically localizing components of human centrosomes identified by complementary proteomics methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Lis; Vanselow, Katja; Skogs, Marie;

    2011-01-01

    constituents of human centrosomes. From a background of non-specific proteins, we distinguished 126 known and 40 candidate centrosomal proteins, of which 22 were confirmed as novel components. An antibody screen covering 4000 genes revealed an additional 113 candidates. We illustrate the power of our methods...... by identifying a novel set of five proteins preferentially associated with mother or daughter centrioles, comprising genes implicated in cell polarity. Pulsed labelling demonstrates a remarkable variation in the stability of centrosomal protein complexes. These spatiotemporal proteomics data provide...

  12. A genome-wide RNAi screen to dissect centriole duplication and centrosome maturation in Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeroen Dobbelaere

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Centrosomes comprise a pair of centrioles surrounded by an amorphous pericentriolar material (PCM. Here, we have performed a microscopy-based genome-wide RNA interference (RNAi screen in Drosophila cells to identify proteins required for centriole duplication and mitotic PCM recruitment. We analysed 92% of the Drosophila genome (13,059 genes and identified 32 genes involved in centrosome function. An extensive series of secondary screens classified these genes into four categories: (1 nine are required for centriole duplication, (2 11 are required for centrosome maturation, (3 nine are required for both functions, and (4 three genes regulate centrosome separation. These 32 hits include several new centrosomal components, some of which have human homologs. In addition, we find that the individual depletion of only two proteins, Polo and Centrosomin (Cnn can completely block centrosome maturation. Cnn is phosphorylated during mitosis in a Polo-dependent manner, suggesting that the Polo-dependent phosphorylation of Cnn initiates centrosome maturation in flies.

  13. HSET overexpression fuels tumor progression via centrosome clustering-independent mechanisms in breast cancer patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pannu, Vaishali; Rida, Padmashree C.G.; Ogden, Angela; Turaga, Ravi Chakra; Donthamsetty, Shashikiran; Bowen, Nathan J.; Rudd, Katie; Gupta, Meenakshi V.; Reid, Michelle D.; Cantuaria, Guilherme; Walczak, Claire E.; Aneja, Ritu

    2015-01-01

    Human breast tumors harbor supernumerary centrosomes in almost 80% of tumor cells. Although amplified centrosomes compromise cell viability via multipolar spindles resulting in death-inducing aneuploidy, cancer cells tend to cluster extra centrosomes during mitosis. As a result cancer cells display bipolar spindle phenotypes to maintain a tolerable level of aneuploidy, an edge to their survival. HSET/KifC1, a kinesin-like minus-end directed microtubule motor has recently found fame as a crucial centrosome clustering molecule. Here we show that HSET promotes tumor progression via mechanisms independent of centrosome clustering. We found that HSET is overexpressed in breast carcinomas wherein nuclear HSET accumulation correlated with histological grade and predicted poor progression-free and overall survival. In addition, deregulated HSET protein expression was associated with gene amplification and/or translocation. Our data provide compelling evidence that HSET overexpression is pro-proliferative, promotes clonogenic-survival and enhances cell-cycle kinetics through G2 and M-phases. Importantly, HSET co-immunoprecipitates with survivin, and its overexpression protects survivin from proteasome-mediated degradation, resulting in its increased steady-state levels. We provide the first evidence of centrosome clustering-independent activities of HSET that fuel tumor progression and firmly establish that HSET can serve both as a potential prognostic biomarker and as a valuable cancer-selective therapeutic target. PMID:25788277

  14. HSET overexpression fuels tumor progression via centrosome clustering-independent mechanisms in breast cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pannu, Vaishali; Rida, Padmashree C G; Ogden, Angela; Turaga, Ravi Chakra; Donthamsetty, Shashikiran; Bowen, Nathan J; Rudd, Katie; Gupta, Meenakshi V; Reid, Michelle D; Cantuaria, Guilherme; Walczak, Claire E; Aneja, Ritu

    2015-03-20

    Human breast tumors harbor supernumerary centrosomes in almost 80% of tumor cells. Although amplified centrosomes compromise cell viability via multipolar spindles resulting in death-inducing aneuploidy, cancer cells tend to cluster extra centrosomes during mitosis. As a result cancer cells display bipolar spindle phenotypes to maintain a tolerable level of aneuploidy, an edge to their survival. HSET/KifC1, a kinesin-like minus-end directed microtubule motor has recently found fame as a crucial centrosome clustering molecule. Here we show that HSET promotes tumor progression via mechanisms independent of centrosome clustering. We found that HSET is overexpressed in breast carcinomas wherein nuclear HSET accumulation correlated with histological grade and predicted poor progression-free and overall survival. In addition, deregulated HSET protein expression was associated with gene amplification and/or translocation. Our data provide compelling evidence that HSET overexpression is pro-proliferative, promotes clonogenic-survival and enhances cell-cycle kinetics through G2 and M-phases. Importantly, HSET co-immunoprecipitates with survivin, and its overexpression protects survivin from proteasome-mediated degradation, resulting in its increased steady-state levels. We provide the first evidence of centrosome clustering-independent activities of HSET that fuel tumor progression and firmly establish that HSET can serve both as a potential prognostic biomarker and as a valuable cancer-selective therapeutic target. PMID:25788277

  15. Downregulation of Histone H3 Lysine 9 Methyltransferase G9a Induces Centrosome Disruption and Chromosome Instability in Cancer Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Kondo, Yutaka; Shen, Lanlan; Ahmed, Saira; Boumber, Yanis; Sekido, Yoshitaka; Haddad, Bassem R; Issa, Jean-Pierre J.

    2008-01-01

    Background Modifications of the histone amino-terminal tails affect access of regulatory factors and complexes to chromatin and thereby influence biological processes. Cancer cells are characterized by prominent epigenetic dysregulation, including histone modifications. However, the functional roles of the histone methyltransferases (HMT) in cancer remain unclear. Methodology/Principal Findings We studied RNAi-based inhibition (knockdown, KD) of 2 different H3K9 HMTs, SUV39H1 and G9a. Knockdo...

  16. Nudel Contributes to Microtubule Anchoring at the Mother Centriole and Is Involved in Both Dynein-dependent and -independent Centrosomal Protein Assembly

    OpenAIRE

    Guo, Jing; Yang, Zhenye; Song, Wei; Chen, Qi; Wang, Fubin; Zhang, Qiangge; Zhu, Xueliang

    2006-01-01

    The centrosome is the major microtubule-organizing center in animal cells. Although the cytoplasmic dynein regulator Nudel interacts with centrosomes, its role herein remains unclear. Here, we show that in Cos7 cells Nudel is a mother centriole protein with rapid turnover independent of dynein activity. During centriole duplication, Nudel targets to the new mother centriole later than ninein but earlier than dynactin. Its centrosome localization requires a C-terminal region that is essential ...

  17. Specific insulin binding in bovine chromaffin cells; demonstration of preferential binding to adrenalin-storing cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serck-Hanssen, G.; Soevik, O.

    1987-12-28

    Insulin binding was studied in subpopulations of bovine chromaffin cells enriched in adrenalin-producing cells (A-cells) or noradrenalin-producing cells (NA-cells). Binding of /sup 125/I-insulin was carried out at 15/sup 0/C for 3 hrs in the absence or presence of excess unlabeled hormone. Four fractions of cells were obtained by centrifugation on a stepwise bovine serum albumin gradient. The four fractions were all shown to bind insulin in a specific manner and the highest binding was measured in the cell layers of higher densities, containing mainly A-cells. The difference in binding of insulin to the four subpopulations of chromaffin cells seemed to be related to differences in numbers of receptors as opposed to receptor affinities. The authors conclude that bovine chromaffin cells possess high affinity binding sites for insulin and that these binding sites are mainly confined to A-cells. 24 references, 2 figures, 1 table.

  18. Mechanisms of metal-induced centrosome amplification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Amie L; Wise, John Pierce

    2010-12-01

    Exposure to toxic and carcinogenic metals is widespread; however, their mechanisms of action remain largely unknown. One potential mechanism for metal-induced carcinogenicity and toxicity is centrosome amplification. Here we review the mechanisms for metal-induced centrosome amplification, including arsenic, chromium, mercury and nano-titanium dioxide. PMID:21118148

  19. Mechanisms of Metal-Induced Centrosome Amplification

    OpenAIRE

    Holmes, Amie L.; Wise, John Pierce

    2010-01-01

    Exposure to toxic and carcinogenic metals is widespread; however, their mechanisms of action remain largely unknown. One potential mechanism for metal-induced carcinogenicity and toxicity is centrosome amplification. Here, we review the mechanisms for metal-induced centrosome amplification, including arsenic, chromium, mercury and nano-titanium dioxide.

  20. A role for RIC-8 (Synembryn) and GOA-1 (G(o)alpha) in regulating a subset of centrosome movements during early embryogenesis in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    OpenAIRE

    Miller, K.G.; Rand, J. B.

    2000-01-01

    RIC-8 (synembryn) and GOA-1 (G(o)alpha) are key components of a signaling network that regulates neurotransmitter secretion in Caenorhabditis elegans. Here we show that ric-8 and goa-1 reduction of function mutants exhibit partial embryonic lethality. Through Nomarski analysis we show that goa-1 and ric-8 mutant embryos exhibit defects in multiple events that involve centrosomes, including one-cell posterior centrosome rocking, P(1) centrosome flattening, mitotic spindle alignment, and nuclea...

  1. Calcium-binding capacity of centrin2 is required for linear POC5 assembly but not for nucleotide excision repair.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiago J Dantas

    Full Text Available Centrosomes, the principal microtubule-organising centres in animal cells, contain centrins, small, conserved calcium-binding proteins unique to eukaryotes. Centrin2 binds to xeroderma pigmentosum group C protein (XPC, stabilising it, and its presence slightly increases nucleotide excision repair (NER activity in vitro. In previous work, we deleted all three centrin isoforms present in chicken DT40 cells and observed delayed repair of UV-induced DNA lesions, but no centrosome abnormalities. Here, we explore how centrin2 controls NER. In the centrin null cells, we expressed centrin2 mutants that cannot bind calcium or that lack sites for phosphorylation by regulatory kinases. Expression of any of these mutants restored the UV sensitivity of centrin null cells to normal as effectively as expression of wild-type centrin. However, calcium-binding-deficient and T118A mutants showed greatly compromised localisation to centrosomes. XPC recruitment to laser-induced UV-like lesions was only slightly slower in centrin-deficient cells than in controls, and levels of XPC and its partner HRAD23B were unaffected by centrin deficiency. Interestingly, we found that overexpression of the centrin interactor POC5 leads to the assembly of linear, centrin-dependent structures that recruit other centrosomal proteins such as PCM-1 and NEDD1. Together, these observations suggest that assembly of centrins into complex structures requires calcium binding capacity, but that such assembly is not required for centrin activity in NER.

  2. Calcium-Binding Capacity of Centrin2 Is Required for Linear POC5 Assembly but Not for Nucleotide Excision Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dantas, Tiago J.; Daly, Owen M.; Conroy, Pauline C.; Tomas, Martin; Wang, Yifan; Lalor, Pierce; Dockery, Peter; Ferrando-May, Elisa; Morrison, Ciaran G.

    2013-01-01

    Centrosomes, the principal microtubule-organising centres in animal cells, contain centrins, small, conserved calcium-binding proteins unique to eukaryotes. Centrin2 binds to xeroderma pigmentosum group C protein (XPC), stabilising it, and its presence slightly increases nucleotide excision repair (NER) activity in vitro. In previous work, we deleted all three centrin isoforms present in chicken DT40 cells and observed delayed repair of UV-induced DNA lesions, but no centrosome abnormalities. Here, we explore how centrin2 controls NER. In the centrin null cells, we expressed centrin2 mutants that cannot bind calcium or that lack sites for phosphorylation by regulatory kinases. Expression of any of these mutants restored the UV sensitivity of centrin null cells to normal as effectively as expression of wild-type centrin. However, calcium-binding-deficient and T118A mutants showed greatly compromised localisation to centrosomes. XPC recruitment to laser-induced UV-like lesions was only slightly slower in centrin-deficient cells than in controls, and levels of XPC and its partner HRAD23B were unaffected by centrin deficiency. Interestingly, we found that overexpression of the centrin interactor POC5 leads to the assembly of linear, centrin-dependent structures that recruit other centrosomal proteins such as PCM-1 and NEDD1. Together, these observations suggest that assembly of centrins into complex structures requires calcium binding capacity, but that such assembly is not required for centrin activity in NER. PMID:23844208

  3. DDA3 targets Cep290 into the centrosome to regulate spindle positioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Haiyu; Park, Ji Eun; Jang, Chang-Young

    The centrosome is an important cellular organelle which nucleates microtubules (MTs) to form the cytoskeleton during interphase and the mitotic spindle during mitosis. The Cep290 is one of the centrosomal proteins and functions in cilia formation. Even-though it is in the centrosome, the function of Cep290 in mitosis had not yet been evaluated. In this study, we report a novel function of Cep290 that is involved in spindle positioning. Cep290 was identified as an interacting partner of DDA3, and we confirmed that Cep290 specifically localizes in the mitotic centrosome. Depletion of Cep290 caused a reduction of the astral spindle, leading to misorientation of the mitotic spindle. MT polymerization also decreased in Cep290-depleted cells, suggesting that Cep290 is involved in spindle nucleation. Furthermore, DDA3 stabilizes and transports Cep290 to the centrosome. Therefore, we concluded that DDA3 controls astral spindle formation and spindle positioning by targeting Cep290 to the centrosome. PMID:25998387

  4. High LET Radiation Amplifies Centrosome Overduplication Through a Pathway of γ-Tubulin Monoubiquitination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimada, Mikio [Department of Genome Repair Dynamics, Radiation Biology Center, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Hirayama, Ryoichi [Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Komatsu, Kenshi, E-mail: komatsu@house.rbc.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Genome Repair Dynamics, Radiation Biology Center, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan)

    2013-06-01

    Purpose: Radiation induces centrosome overduplication, leading to mitotic catastrophe and tumorigenesis. Because mitotic catastrophe is one of the major tumor cell killing factors in high linear energy transfer (LET) radiation therapy and long-term survivors from such treatment have a potential risk of secondary tumors, we investigated LET dependence of radiation-induced centrosome overduplication and the underlying mechanism. Methods and Materials: Carbon and iron ion beams (13-200 keV/μm) and γ-rays (0.5 keV/μm) were used as radiation sources. To count centrosomes after IR exposure, human U2OS and mouse NIH3T3 cells were immunostained with antibodies of γ-tubulin and centrin 2. Similarly, Nbs1-, Brca1-, Ku70-, and DNA-PKcs-deficient mouse cells and their counterpart wild-type cells were used for measurement of centrosome overduplication. Results: The number of excess centrosome-containing cells at interphase and the resulting multipolar spindle at mitosis were amplified with increased LET, reaching a maximum level of 100 keV/μm, followed by sharp decrease in frequency. Interestingly, Ku70 and DNA-PKcs deficiencies marginally affected the induction of centrosome overduplication, whereas the cell killings were significantly enhanced. This was in contrast to observation that high LET radiation significantly enhanced frequencies of centrosome overduplication in Nbs1- and Brca1-deficient cells. Because NBS1/BRCA1 is implicated in monoubiquitination of γ-tubulin, we subsequently tested whether it is affected by high LET radiation. As a result, monoubiquitination of γ-tubulin was abolished in 48 to 72 hours after exposure to high LET radiation, although γ-ray exposure slightly decreased it 48 hours postirradiation and was restored to a normal level at 72 hours. Conclusions: High LET radiation significantly reduces NBS1/BRCA1-mediated monoubiquitination of γ-tubulin and amplifies centrosome overduplication with a peak at 100 keV/μm. In contrast, Ku70 and DNA

  5. Intensity-based signal separation algorithm for accuratequantification of clustered centrosomes in tissue sections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fleisch, Markus C.; Maxell, Christopher A.; Kuper, Claudia K.; Brown, Erika T.; Parvin, Bahram; Barcellos-Hoff, Mary-Helen; Costes,Sylvain V.

    2006-03-08

    Centrosomes are small organelles that organize the mitoticspindle during cell division and are also involved in cell shape andpolarity. Within epithelial tumors, such as breast cancer, and somehematological tumors, centrosome abnormalities (CA) are common, occurearly in disease etiology, and correlate with chromosomal instability anddisease stage. In situ quantification of CA by optical microscopy ishampered by overlap and clustering of these organelles, which appear asfocal structures. CA has been frequently associated with Tp53 status inpremalignant lesions and tumors. Here we describe an approach toaccurately quantify centrosomes in tissue sections and tumors.Considering proliferation and baseline amplification rate the resultingpopulation based ratio of centrosomes per nucleus allow the approximationof the proportion of cells with CA. Using this technique we show that20-30 percent of cells have amplified centrosomes in Tp53 null mammarytumors. Combining fluorescence detection, deconvolution microscopy and amathematical algorithm applied to a maximum intensity projection we showthat this approach is superior to traditional investigator based visualanalysis or threshold-based techniques.

  6. Autologous antibodies that bind neuroblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yujing; Sholler, Giselle S; Shukla, Girja S; Pero, Stephanie C; Carman, Chelsea L; Zhao, Ping; Krag, David N

    2015-11-01

    Antibody therapy of neuroblastoma is promising and our goal is to derive antibodies from patients with neuroblastoma for developing new therapeutic antibodies. The feasibility of using residual bone marrow obtained for clinical indications as a source of tumor cells and a source of antibodies was assessed. From marrow samples, neuroblastoma cells were recovered, grown in cell culture and also implanted into mice to create xenografts. Mononuclear cells from the marrow were used as a source to generate phage display antibody libraries and also hybridomas. Growth of neuroblastoma patient cells was possible both in vitro and as xenografts. Antibodies from the phage libraries and from the monoclonal hybridomas bound autologous neuroblastoma cells with some selectivity. It appears feasible to recover neuroblastoma cells from residual marrow specimens and to generate human antibodies that bind autologous neuroblastoma cells. Expansion of this approach is underway to collect more specimens, optimize methods to generate antibodies, and to evaluate the bioactivity of neuroblastoma-binding antibodies. PMID:26210205

  7. Characterization of Adenomatous Polyposis Coli Protein Dynamics and Localization at the Centrosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lui, Christina; Mok, Myth T S; Henderson, Beric R

    2016-01-01

    The adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) tumor suppressor is a multifunctional regulator of Wnt signaling and acts as a mobile scaffold at different cellular sites. APC was recently found to stimulate microtubule (MT) growth at the interphase centrosome; however, little is known about its dynamics and localization at this site. To address this, we analysed APC dynamics in fixed and live cells by fluorescence microscopy. In detergent-extracted cells, we discovered that APC was only weakly retained at the centrosome during interphase suggesting a rapid rate of exchange. This was confirmed in living cells by fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP), which identified two pools of green fluorescent protein (GFP)-APC: a major rapidly exchanging pool (~86%) and minor retained pool (~14%). The dynamic exchange rate of APC was unaffected by C-terminal truncations implicating a targeting role for the N-terminus. Indeed, we mapped centrosome localization to N-terminal armadillo repeat (ARM) domain amino acids 334-625. Interestingly, the rate of APC movement to the centrosome was stimulated by intact MTs, and APC dynamics slowed when MTs were disrupted by nocodazole treatment or knockdown of γ-tubulin. Thus, the rate of APC recycling at the centrosome is enhanced by MT growth, suggesting a positive feedback to stimulate its role in MT growth. PMID:27144584

  8. Characterization of Adenomatous Polyposis Coli Protein Dynamics and Localization at the Centrosome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Lui

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The adenomatous polyposis coli (APC tumor suppressor is a multifunctional regulator of Wnt signaling and acts as a mobile scaffold at different cellular sites. APC was recently found to stimulate microtubule (MT growth at the interphase centrosome; however, little is known about its dynamics and localization at this site. To address this, we analysed APC dynamics in fixed and live cells by fluorescence microscopy. In detergent-extracted cells, we discovered that APC was only weakly retained at the centrosome during interphase suggesting a rapid rate of exchange. This was confirmed in living cells by fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP, which identified two pools of green fluorescent protein (GFP-APC: a major rapidly exchanging pool (~86% and minor retained pool (~14%. The dynamic exchange rate of APC was unaffected by C-terminal truncations implicating a targeting role for the N-terminus. Indeed, we mapped centrosome localization to N-terminal armadillo repeat (ARM domain amino acids 334–625. Interestingly, the rate of APC movement to the centrosome was stimulated by intact MTs, and APC dynamics slowed when MTs were disrupted by nocodazole treatment or knockdown of γ-tubulin. Thus, the rate of APC recycling at the centrosome is enhanced by MT growth, suggesting a positive feedback to stimulate its role in MT growth.

  9. Structural centrosome aberrations favor proliferation by abrogating microtubule-dependent tissue integrity of breast epithelial mammospheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnerch, D; Nigg, E A

    2016-05-01

    Structural centrosome aberrations are frequently observed in early stage carcinomas, but their role in malignant transformation is poorly understood. Here, we examined the impact of overexpression of Ninein-like protein (Nlp) on the architecture of polarized epithelia in three-dimensional mammospheres. When Nlp was overexpressed to levels resembling those seen in human tumors, it formed striking centrosome-related bodies (CRBs), which sequestered Ninein and affected the kinetics of microtubule (MT) nucleation and release. In turn, the profound reorganization of the MT cytoskeleton resulted in mislocalization of several adhesion and junction proteins as well as the tumor suppressor Scribble, resulting in the disruption of epithelial polarity, cell-cell interactions and mammosphere architecture. Remarkably, cells harboring Nlp-CRBs displayed an enhanced proliferative response to epidermal growth factor. These results demonstrate that structural centrosome aberrations cause not only the disruption of epithelial polarity but also favor overproliferation, two phenotypes typically associated with human carcinomas. PMID:26364601

  10. New insights into centrosome imaging in Drosophila and mouse neuroepithelial tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rujano, Maria A; Basto, Renata; Marthiens, Véronique

    2015-01-01

    The centrosome is the main microtubule-organizing center in animal cells. It participates in the assembly of a bipolar spindle that ensures accurate segregation of chromosomes during mitosis. Recently, mutations in centrosome genes have been identified in patients affected by neurodevelopmental disorders. In fact, the etiology of several neurodevelopmental pathologies seems to be linked to defects in the assembly of the mitotic spindle in the neural stem cell compartment during neurogenesis. Therefore, getting better insights into the structure and function/dysfunction of the mitotic spindle apparatus in an intact tissue environment is of utmost importance. However, imaging nanometer-scale structures like centrosomes and microtubule bundles within the depth of a tissue is still challenging. Here we describe two procedures to acquire high-resolution images on fixed tissues and to perform live imaging of microtubule-based structures in the neuroepithelia of the Drosophila brain and of the mouse neocortex. We take advantage of the accumulation of centrosomes and mitotic figures at the apical surface of these polarized tissues to improve the quality of staining and imaging. Both Drosophila and mouse models with centrosome dysfunction showed abnormalities in the neuroepithelium reminiscent of the ones described in brains of human patients. These observations have highlighted their value as model organisms to study the etiology of human neurodevelopmental pathologies. PMID:26175441

  11. Loss of KLF14 triggers centrosome amplification and tumorigenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Fan, Guangjian; Sun, Lianhui; Shan, Peipei; Zhang, Xianying; Huan, Jinliang; Li, Dali; Wang, Tingting; Wei, Tingting; Zhang, Xiaohong; Gu, Xiaoyang; Yao, Liangfang; Xuan, Yang; Hou, Zhaoyuan; Cui, Yongping; Cao, Liu

    2015-01-01

    Centrosome amplification is frequent in cancer, but the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Here we report that disruption of the Kruppel-like factor 14 (KLF14) gene in mice causes centrosome amplification, aneuploidy and spontaneous tumorigenesis. Molecularly, KLF14 functions as a transcriptional repressor of Plk4, a polo-like kinase whose overexpression induces centrosome overduplication. Transient knockdown of KLF14 is sufficient to induce Plk4-directed centrosome amplification. Clinical...

  12. Centrosome-associated regulators of the G2/M checkpoint as targets for cancer therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Broaddus Russell R

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In eukaryotic cells, control mechanisms have developed that restrain cell-cycle transitions in response to stress. These regulatory pathways are termed cell-cycle checkpoints. The G2/M checkpoint prevents cells from entering mitosis when DNA is damaged in order to afford these cells an opportunity to repair the damaged DNA before propagating genetic defects to the daughter cells. If the damage is irreparable, checkpoint signaling might activate pathways that lead to apoptosis. Since alteration of cell-cycle control is a hallmark of tumorigenesis, cell-cycle regulators represent potential targets for therapy. The centrosome has recently come into focus as a critical cellular organelle that integrates G2/M checkpoint control and repairs signals in response to DNA damage. A growing number of G2/M checkpoint regulators have been found in the centrosome, suggesting that centrosome has an important role in G2/M checkpoint function. In this review, we discuss centrosome-associated regulators of the G2/M checkpoint, the dysregulation of this checkpoint in cancer, and potential candidate targets for cancer therapy.

  13. 14-3-3 theta binding to cell cycle regulatory factors is enhanced by HIV-1 Vpr

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sakai Keiko

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite continuing advances in our understanding of AIDS pathogenesis, the mechanism of CD4+ T cell depletion in HIV-1-infected individuals remains unclear. The HIV-1 Vpr accessory protein causes cell death, likely through a mechanism related to its ability to arrest cells in the G2,M phase. Recent evidence implicated the scaffold protein, 14-3-3, in Vpr cell cycle blockade. Results We found that in human T cells, 14-3-3 plays an active role in mediating Vpr-induced cell cycle arrest and reveal a dramatic increase in the amount of Cdk1, Cdc25C, and CyclinB1 bound to 14-3-3 θ during Vprv-induced G2,M arrest. By contrast, a cell-cycle-arrest-dead Vpr mutant failed to augment 14-3-3 θ association with Cdk1 and CyclinB1. Moreover, G2,M arrest caused by HIV-1 infection strongly correlated with a disruption in 14-3-3 θ binding to centrosomal proteins, Plk1 and centrin. Finally, Vpr caused elevated levels of CyclinB1, Plk1, and Cdk1 in a complex with the nuclear transport and spindle assembly protein, importin β. Conclusion Thus, our data reveal a new facet of Vpr-induced cell cycle arrest involving previously unrecognized abnormal rearrangements of multiprotein assemblies containing key cell cycle regulatory proteins. Reviewers This article was reviewed by David Kaplan, Nathaniel R. Landau and Yan Zhou.

  14. A Novel Role of Human Holliday Junction Resolvase GEN1 in the Maintenance of Centrosome Integrity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gao, M.; Danielsen, Jannie Michaela Rendtlew; Wei, L.-Z.;

    2012-01-01

    The maintenance of genomic stability requires accurate genome replication, repair of DNA damage, and the precise segregation of chromosomes in mitosis. GEN1 possesses Holliday junction resolvase activity in vitro and presumably functions in homology driven repair of DNA double strand breaks......, which is required and sufficient for centrosome localization. We report that GEN1 depletion results in aberrant centrosome numbers associated with the formation of multiple spindle poles in mitosis, an increased number of cells with multi-nuclei, increased apoptosis and an elevated level of spontaneous...

  15. Spectrum of centrosome autoantibodies in childhood varicella and post-varicella acute cerebellar ataxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stinton Laura M

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sera from children with post-varicella infections have autoantibodies that react with centrosomes in brain and tissue culture cells. We investigated the sera of children with infections and post-varicella ataxia and related conditions for reactivity to five recombinant centrosome proteins: γγ-enolase, pericentrin, ninein, PCM-1, and Mob1. Methods Sera from 12 patients with acute post-varicella ataxia, 1 with post-Epstein Barr virus (EBV ataxia, 5 with uncomplicated varicella infections, and other conditions were tested for reactivity to cryopreserved cerebellum tissue and recombinant centrosome proteins. The distribution of pericentrin in the cerebellum was studied by indirect immunofluorescence (IIF using rabbit antibodies to the recombinant protein. Antibodies to phospholipids (APL were detected by ELISA. Results Eleven of 12 children with post-varicella ataxia, 4/5 children with uncomplicated varicella infections, 1/1 with post-EBV ataxia, 2/2 with ADEM, 1/2 with neuroblastoma and ataxia, and 2/2 with cerebellitis had antibodies directed against 1 or more recombinant centrosome antigens. Antibodies to pericentrin were seen in 5/12 children with post-varicella ataxia but not in any of the other sera tested. IIF demonstrated that pericentrin is located in axons and centrosomes of cerebellar cells. APL were detected in 75% of the sera from children with post-varicella ataxia and 50% of children with varicella without ataxia and in none of the controls. Conclusion This is the first study to show the antigen specificity of anti-centrosome antibodies in children with varicella. Our data suggest that children with post-varicella ataxia have unique autoantibody reactivity to pericentrin.

  16. Differential role of repair proteins, BRCA1/NBS1 and Ku70/DNA-PKcs, in radiation-induced centrosome overduplication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Centrosomes are important cytoplasmic organelles involved in chromosome segregation, defects in which can result in aneuploidy, and contribute to tumorigenesis. It is known that DNA damage causes the supernumerary centrosomes by a mechanism in which centrosomes continue to duplicate during cell cycle arrest at checkpoints. We show here that ionizing radiation induces the overduplication of centrosomes in a dose-dependent manner, and that the level of overduplication is pronounced in BRCA1- and NBS1-deficient cells, even though their checkpoint control is abrogated. Conversely, marginal increases in overduplication were observed in Ku70- and DNA-PKcs-deficient cells, which are intact in checkpoint control. The frequency of radiation-induced overduplication of centrosomes might be associated with DNA repair, as it was decreased with reduced cell killing after protracted exposures to radiation. As a result, when the frequency of radiation-induced centrosome overduplication was plotted against radiation-induced cell killing, similar curves were seen for both protracted and acute exposures in wild-type cells, Ku70-deficient, and DNA-PKcs-deficient cells, indicating a common mechanism for centrosome overduplication. However, the absence of either BRCA1 or NBS1 enhanced radiation-induced overduplication frequencies by 2-4-fold on the basis of the same cell killing. These results suggest that radiation-induced centrosome overduplication is regulated by at least two mechanisms: a checkpoint-dependent pathway involved in wild-type cells, Ku70-deficient and DNA-PKcs-deficient cells; and a checkpoint-independent pathway as observed in BRCA1-deficient and NBS1-deficient cells. (author)

  17. DISC1, PDE4B, and NDE1 at the centrosome and synapse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Disrupted-In-Schizophrenia 1 (DISC1) is a risk factor for schizophrenia and other major mental illnesses. Its protein binding partners include the Nuclear Distribution Factor E Homologs (NDE1 and NDEL1), LIS1, and phosphodiesterases 4B and 4D (PDE4B and PDE4D). We demonstrate that NDE1, NDEL1 and LIS1, together with their binding partner dynein, associate with DISC1, PDE4B and PDE4D within the cell, and provide evidence that this complex is present at the centrosome. LIS1 and NDEL1 have been previously suggested to be synaptic, and we now demonstrate localisation of DISC1, NDE1, and PDE4B at synapses in cultured neurons. NDE1 is phosphorylated by cAMP-dependant Protein Kinase A (PKA), whose activity is, in turn, regulated by the cAMP hydrolysis activity of phosphodiesterases, including PDE4. We propose that DISC1 acts as an assembly scaffold for all of these proteins and that the NDE1/NDEL1/LIS1/dynein complex is modulated by cAMP levels via PKA and PDE4.

  18. The Microcephaly-Associated Protein Wdr62/CG7337 Is Required to Maintain Centrosome Asymmetry in Drosophila Neuroblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anjana Ramdas Nair

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Centrosome asymmetry has been implicated in stem cell fate maintenance in both flies and vertebrates, but the underlying molecular mechanisms are incompletely understood. Here, we report that loss of CG7337, the fly ortholog of WDR62, compromises interphase centrosome asymmetry in fly neural stem cells (neuroblasts. Wdr62 maintains an active interphase microtubule-organizing center (MTOC by stabilizing microtubules (MTs, which are necessary for sustained recruitment of Polo/Plk1 to the pericentriolar matrix (PCM and downregulation of Pericentrin-like protein (Plp. The loss of an active MTOC in wdr62 mutants compromises centrosome positioning, spindle orientation, and biased centrosome segregation. wdr62 mutant flies also have an ∼40% reduction in brain size as a result of cell-cycle delays. We propose that CG7337/Wdr62, a microtubule-associated protein, is required for the maintenance of interphase microtubules, thereby regulating centrosomal Polo and Plp levels. Independent of this function, Wdr62 is also required for the timely mitotic entry of neural stem cells.

  19. Ninein is essential for the maintenance of the cortical progenitor character by anchoring the centrosome to microtubules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Shinohara

    2013-06-01

    The mammalian cerebral cortex develops from proliferative apical progenitor cells (APs that exhibit cell cycle-dependent nuclear movement (interkinetic nuclear migration; INM, which may be important for efficient and continuous production of neurons. The Pax6 transcription factor plays a major role in INM by regulating various downstream molecules. We have previously observed abnormal INM and unstable localization of the centrosome in APs of the Pax6 homozygous mutant rat embryo. To understand the mechanisms of INM, we focused on the centrosomes of APs. One of the centrosomal proteins, ninein, is specifically localized in the centrosome of APs. We observed a dramatic downregulation of ninein in APs of the Pax6 mutant. Moreover, knockdown of ninein by RNAi induced ectopic distribution of reduced numbers of BrdU-positive (S-phase and PH3-positive (M-phase cells. Furthermore, time-lapsed imaging demonstrated that knockdown of ninein in vivo induced abnormal INM. Finally, we observed impaired microtubule regrowth in neural progenitors taken from Pax6 homozygous mutant rat embryos, which was recovered by via ninein overexpression. We also found that ninein knockdown enlarged the surface size area of apical endfeet of the APs. Our results suggest that ninein plays a role in the molecular machinery essential for INM by connecting microtubules to the centrosome.

  20. A novel role of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR in centrosome amplification - implications for chemoprevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chatterjee Payel

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Centrosome aberrations can cause genomic instability and correlate with malignant progression in common human malignancies such as breast and prostate cancer. Deregulation of cyclin/cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (CDK2 activity has previously been shown to be critically involved in centrosome overduplication. We therefore test here whether small molecule CDK inhibitors derived from the bis-indole indirubin can be used to suppress centrosome aberrations as a novel approach to chemoprevention of malignant progression. Results As expected, we found that the CDK inhibitor indirubin-3'-oxime (IO suppresses centrosome amplification in breast cancer cells. However, we made the unexpected discovery that indirubin-derived compounds that have been chemically modified to be inactive as kinase inhibitors such as 1-methyl-indirubin-3'-oxime (MeIO still significantly reduced centrosome amplification. All indirubins used in the present study are potent agonists of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR, which is known for its important role in the cellular metabolism of xenobiotics. To corroborate our results, we first show that the coincidence of nuclear AhR overexpression, reflecting a constitutive activation, and numerical centrosome aberrations correlates significantly with malignancy in mammary tissue specimens. Remarkably, a considerable proportion (72.7% of benign mammary tissue samples scored also positive for nuclear AhR overexpression. We furthermore provide evidence that continued expression of endogenous AhR is critical to promote centriole overduplication induced by cyclin E and that AhR and cyclin E may function in the same pathway. Overexpression of the AhR in the absence of exogenous ligands was found to rapidly disrupt centriole duplication control. Nonetheless, the AhR agonists IO and MeIO were still found to significantly reduce centriole overduplication stimulated by ectopic AhR expression. Conclusions Our results indicate that

  1. Binding cells of 125I-iodoamphetamine in rat liver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We recently reported that transrectal or intestinal portal scintigraphy with 123I-iodoamphetamine (IMP) could be a useful method for the non-invasive and quantitative evaluation of the portosystemic shunt in portal hypertension, but what cells in the liver trap IMP has not been clarified. This study was aimed at elucidating whether IMP was extracted by parenchymal cells, sinusoidal endothelial cells, Kupffer cells or fat storing cells. Each type of liver cell was isolated from rats and cultured. The cells were incubated with 125I-IMP and the radioactivity of the lysate was determined. Nonspecific binding was assessed in the presence of an excess of unlabeled IMP, and specific binding was determined by subtracting the nonspecific from total binding. Specific binding observed in parenchymal cells, endothelial cells and Kupffer cells was 70.2±0.4, 4.2±1.4 and 2.3±0.8 pmol/well, respectively, but no specific binding was observed in fat storing cells. The binding in parenchymal cells was much higher than that in endothelial cells or Kupffer cells (p<0.005). In addition, the binding to parenchymal cells reached equilibrium within 20 min and was not saturable over the concentration range tested (0.5-10 μM). These findings indicate that IMP is mostly extracted by parenchymal cells in the liver. (author)

  2. Characterization of Adenomatous Polyposis Coli Protein Dynamics and Localization at the Centrosome

    OpenAIRE

    Christina Lui; Myth T. S. Mok; Henderson, Beric R.

    2016-01-01

    The adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) tumor suppressor is a multifunctional regulator of Wnt signaling and acts as a mobile scaffold at different cellular sites. APC was recently found to stimulate microtubule (MT) growth at the interphase centrosome; however, little is known about its dynamics and localization at this site. To address this, we analysed APC dynamics in fixed and live cells by fluorescence microscopy. In detergent-extracted cells, we discovered that APC was only weakly retained...

  3. Tankyrase 1 regulates centrosome function by controlling CPAP stability

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Mi Kyung; Dudognon, Charles; Smith, Susan

    2012-01-01

    Centrosomal P4.1-associated protein (CPAP) degradation and function is shown to be controlled by the poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase tankyrase 1. CPAP PARsylation precisely precedes its degradation in G1, limiting centriole elongation and ensuring proper centrosome function.

  4. Kinetics of binding and geometry of cells on molecular biochips

    OpenAIRE

    Chechetkin, V.R.

    2011-01-01

    We examine how the shape of cells and the geometry of experiment affect the reaction-diffusion kinetics at the binding between target and probe molecules on molecular biochips. In particular, we compare the binding kinetics for the probes immobilized on surface of the semispherical and flat circular cells, the limit of thin slab of analyte solution over probe cell as well as hemispherical gel pads and cells printed in gel slab over a substrate. It is shown that hemispherical geometry provides...

  5. Nuclear Export and Centrosome Targeting of the Protein Phosphatase 2A Subunit B56α

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flegg, Cameron P.; Sharma, Manisha; Medina-Palazon, Cahora; Jamieson, Cara; Galea, Melanie; Brocardo, Mariana G.; Mills, Kate; Henderson, Beric R.

    2010-01-01

    Protein phosphatase (PP) 2A is a heterotrimeric enzyme regulated by specific subunits. The B56 (or B′/PR61/PPP2R5) class of B-subunits direct PP2A or its substrates to different cellular locations, and the B56α, -β, and -ϵ isoforms are known to localize primarily in the cytoplasm. Here we studied the pathways that regulate B56α subcellular localization. We detected B56α in the cytoplasm and nucleus, and at the nuclear envelope and centrosomes, and show that cytoplasmic localization is dependent on CRM1-mediated nuclear export. The inactivation of CRM1 by leptomycin B or by siRNA knockdown caused nuclear accumulation of ectopic and endogenous B56α. Conversely, CRM1 overexpression shifted B56α to the cytoplasm. We identified a functional nuclear export signal at the C terminus (NES; amino acids 451–469), and site-directed mutagenesis of the NES (L461A) caused nuclear retention of full-length B56α. Active NESs were identified at similar positions in the cytoplasmic B56-β and ϵ isoforms, but not in the nuclear-localized B56-δ or γ isoforms. The transient expression of B56α induced nuclear export of the PP2A catalytic (C) subunit, and this was blocked by the L461A NES mutation. In addition, B56α co-located with the PP2A active (A) subunit at centrosomes, and its centrosome targeting involved sequences that bind to the A-subunit. Fluorescence Recovery after Photobleaching (FRAP) assays revealed dynamic and immobile pools of B56α-GFP, which was rapidly exported from the nucleus and subject to retention at centrosomes. We propose that B56α can act as a PP2A C-subunit chaperone and regulates PP2A activity at diverse subcellular locations. PMID:20378546

  6. Porphyromonas gingivalis Fimbriae Bind to Cytokeratin of Epithelial Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Sojar, Hakimuddin T.; Sharma, Ashu; Genco, Robert J.

    2002-01-01

    The adherence of Porphyromonas gingivalis to host cells is likely a prerequisite step in the pathogenesis of P. gingivalis-induced periodontal disease. P. gingivalis binds to and invades epithelial cells, and fimbriae are shown to be involved in this process. Little is known regarding epithelial receptor(s) involved in binding of P. gingivalis fimbriae. Using an overlay assay with purified P. gingivalis fimbriae as a probe, two major epithelial cell proteins with masses of 50 and 40 kDa were ...

  7. RPL41, a Small Ribosomal Peptide Deregulated in Tumors, Is Essential for Mitosis and Centrosome Integrity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shan Wang

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Ribosomal large subunit protein RPL41 is a basic (positively charged peptide consisting of only 25 amino acids. An antisense-based functional screening revealed that the down-regulation of RPL41 led to an anchorage-independent growth of NIH3T3 cells in soft agar plates. RPL41 depletion with gene-specific small interfering RNA also resulted in malignant transformation of NIH3T3 cells including increased tumor growth in mice. RPL41 deletion was detected in 59% of tumor cell lines by fluorescence in situ hybridization analyses and RPL41 down-regulation in 75% of primary breast cancers by real-time quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. These studies suggest a tumor suppression role for RPL41. By mass spectrometry, RPL41 was associated with several cytoskeleton components including tubulin β, γ, and myosin IIA, which was confirmed by Western blot analysis on both cellular lysis and individually in vitro-expressed proteins. RPL41 also bound directly to polymerized tubulins. Cells overexpressing a GFP-RPL41 were resistant to nocodazole-induced microtubule depolymerization. A synthetic RPL41 induced cellular α-tubulin acetylation and G2/M cell cycle arrest. These results indicate a stabilizing role of RPL41 on microtubule. Microtubule spindles are essential for chromosome segregation during mitosis. Cells with RPL41 knock-down showed abnormal spindles, frequent failure of cytokinesis, and formation of polynuclear cells. In interphase cells, RPL41-depleted cells had premature splitting of centrosome. Our results provide evidence that RPL41 is a microtubule-associated protein essential for functional spindles and for the integrity of centrosome and that the abnormal mitosis and disrupted centrosome associated with the RPL41 down-regulation may be related to malignant transformation.

  8. Crystal Structure of the Botulinum Neurotoxin Type G Binding Domain: Insight into Cell Surface Binding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stenmark, Pål; Dong, Min; Dupuy, Jérôme; Chapman, Edwin R.; Stevens, Raymond C. (Scripps); (UW)

    2011-11-02

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) typically bind the neuronal cell surface via dual interactions with both protein receptors and gangliosides. We present here the 1.9-{angstrom} X-ray structure of the BoNT serotype G (BoNT/G) receptor binding domain (residues 868-1297) and a detailed view of protein receptor and ganglioside binding regions. The ganglioside binding motif (SxWY) has a conserved structure compared to the corresponding regions in BoNT serotype A and BoNT serotype B (BoNT/B), but several features of interactions with the hydrophilic face of the ganglioside are absent at the opposite side of the motif in the BoNT/G ganglioside binding cleft. This may significantly reduce the affinity between BoNT/G and gangliosides. BoNT/G and BoNT/B share the protein receptor synaptotagmin (Syt) I/II. The Syt binding site has a conserved hydrophobic plateau located centrally in the proposed protein receptor binding interface (Tyr1189, Phe1202, Ala1204, Pro1205, and Phe1212). Interestingly, only 5 of 14 residues that are important for binding between Syt-II and BoNT/B are conserved in BoNT/G, suggesting that the means by which BoNT/G and BoNT/B bind Syt diverges more than previously appreciated. Indeed, substitution of Syt-II Phe47 and Phe55 with alanine residues had little effect on the binding of BoNT/G, but strongly reduced the binding of BoNT/B. Furthermore, an extended solvent-exposed hydrophobic loop, located between the Syt binding site and the ganglioside binding cleft, may serve as a third membrane association and binding element to contribute to high-affinity binding to the neuronal membrane. While BoNT/G and BoNT/B are homologous to each other and both utilize Syt-I/Syt-II as their protein receptor, the precise means by which these two toxin serotypes bind to Syt appears surprisingly divergent.

  9. Penicillin-binding site on the Escherichia coli cell envelope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The binding of 35S-labeled penicillin to distinct penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs) of the cell envelope obtained from the sonication of Escherichia coli was studied at different pHs ranging from 4 to 11. Experiments distinguishing the effect of pH on penicillin binding by PBP 5/6 from its effect on beta-lactamase activity indicated that although substantial binding occurred at the lowest pH, the amount of binding increased with pH, reaching a maximum at pH 10. Based on earlier studies, it is proposed that the binding at high pH involves the formation of a covalent bond between the C-7 of penicillin and free epsilon amino groups of the PBPs. At pHs ranging from 4 to 8, position 1 of penicillin, occupied by sulfur, is considered to be the site that establishes a covalent bond with the sulfhydryl groups of PBP 5. The use of specific blockers of free epsilon amino groups or sulfhydryl groups indicated that wherever the presence of each had little or no effect on the binding of penicillin by PBP 5, the presence of both completely prevented binding. The specific blocker of the hydroxyl group of serine did not affect the binding of penicillin

  10. 14C-glucose binding assay of the glucose transporter binding sites in muscular cell membrane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method of determining the binding sites of glucose transporter in rat muscular cell membrane was introduced. The crude products of cell membrane form the skeletal muscle of control and insulin treated rats were prepared, and then fractionated in sucrose gradient. Both plasma membrane and microsome membrane were incubated with D-[U-14C] glucose respectively for the measurement of radioactivity and Scatchard plot analysis. It was found that the binding sites of glucose transporter in plasma membrane and intracellular membrane were 5.6 nmol 14C-glucose/mg protein and 8.7 nmol 14C-glucose-mg protein respectively at basic state. Insulin treatment in experimental groups caused approximately 146% increase in plasma membrane fraction and 88% decrease in intracellular membrane fraction. Moreover, the kinetic data of Scatchard plot curve were similar to those of the [3H]-cytochalasin B binding assay. D-[U-14C] glucose binding assay of glucose transporter binding sites in muscular cell membrane is simple, easy and practicable. The D-[U-14C] glucose is commercially available

  11. The PUF binding landscape in metazoan germ cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Aman; Porter, Douglas F.; Kroll-Conner, Peggy L.; Mohanty, Ipsita; Ryan, Anne R.; Crittenden, Sarah L.; Wickens, Marvin; Kimble, Judith

    2016-01-01

    PUF (Pumilio/FBF) proteins are RNA-binding proteins and conserved stem cell regulators. The Caenorhabditis elegans PUF proteins FBF-1 and FBF-2 (collectively FBF) regulate mRNAs in germ cells. Without FBF, adult germlines lose all stem cells. A major gap in our understanding of PUF proteins, including FBF, is a global view of their binding sites in their native context (i.e., their “binding landscape”). To understand the interactions underlying FBF function, we used iCLIP (individual-nucleotide resolution UV crosslinking and immunoprecipitation) to determine binding landscapes of C. elegans FBF-1 and FBF-2 in the germline tissue of intact animals. Multiple iCLIP peak-calling methods were compared to maximize identification of both established FBF binding sites and positive control target mRNAs in our iCLIP data. We discovered that FBF-1 and FBF-2 bind to RNAs through canonical as well as alternate motifs. We also analyzed crosslinking-induced mutations to map binding sites precisely and to identify key nucleotides that may be critical for FBF–RNA interactions. FBF-1 and FBF-2 can bind sites in the 5′UTR, coding region, or 3′UTR, but have a strong bias for the 3′ end of transcripts. FBF-1 and FBF-2 have strongly overlapping target profiles, including mRNAs and noncoding RNAs. From a statistically robust list of 1404 common FBF targets, 847 were previously unknown, 154 were related to cell cycle regulation, three were lincRNAs, and 335 were shared with the human PUF protein PUM2. PMID:27165521

  12. Loss of KLF14 triggers centrosome amplification and tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Guangjian; Sun, Lianhui; Shan, Peipei; Zhang, Xianying; Huan, Jinliang; Zhang, Xiaohong; Li, Dali; Wang, Tingting; Wei, Tingting; Zhang, Xiaohong; Gu, Xiaoyang; Yao, Liangfang; Xuan, Yang; Hou, Zhaoyuan; Cui, Yongping; Cao, Liu; Li, Xiaotao; Zhang, Shengping; Wang, Chuangui

    2015-01-01

    Centrosome amplification is frequent in cancer, but the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Here we report that disruption of the Kruppel-like factor 14 (KLF14) gene in mice causes centrosome amplification, aneuploidy and spontaneous tumorigenesis. Molecularly, KLF14 functions as a transcriptional repressor of Plk4, a polo-like kinase whose overexpression induces centrosome overduplication. Transient knockdown of KLF14 is sufficient to induce Plk4-directed centrosome amplification. Clinically, KLF14 transcription is significantly downregulated, whereas Plk4 transcription is upregulated in multiple types of cancers, and there exists an inverse correlation between KLF14 and Plk4 protein expression in human breast and colon cancers. Moreover, KLF14 depletion promotes AOM/DSS-induced colon tumorigenesis. Our findings reveal that KLF14 reduction serves as a mechanism leading to centrosome amplification and tumorigenesis. On the other hand, forced expression of KLF14 leads to mitotic catastrophe. Collectively, our findings identify KLF14 as a tumour suppressor and highlight its potential as biomarker and therapeutic target for cancer. PMID:26439168

  13. Finding the Cell Center by a Balance of Dynein and Myosin Pulling and Microtubule Pushing: A Computational Study

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, Jie; Burakov, Anton; Rodionov, Vladimir; Mogilner, Alex

    2010-01-01

    The centrosome position in many types of interphase cells is actively maintained in the cell center. Our previous work indicated that the centrosome is kept at the center by pulling force generated by dynein and actin flow produced by myosin contraction and that an unidentified factor that depends on microtubule dynamics destabilizes position of the centrosome. Here, we use modeling to simulate the centrosome positioning based on the idea that the balance of three forces—dyneins pulling along...

  14. Correlative light and electron microscopy analysis of the centrosome: A step-by-step protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Dong; Loncarek, Jadranka

    2015-01-01

    Correlative light and electron microscopy harnesses the best from each of the two modalities of microscopy it utilizes; while light microscopy provides information about the dynamic properties of the cellular structure or fluorescently labeled protein, electron microscopy provides ultrastructural information in an unsurpassed resolution. However, tracing a particular cell and its rare and small structures such as centrosomes throughout numerous steps of the experiment is not a trivial task. In this chapter, we present the experimental workflow for combining live-cell fluorescence microscopy analysis with classical transmission electron microscopy, adapted for the studies of the centrosomes and basal bodies. We describe, in a step-by-step manner, an approach that can be affordably and successfully employed in any typical cell biology laboratory. The article details all key phases of the analysis starting from cell culture, live-cell microscopy, and sample fixation, through the steps of sample preparation for electron microscopy, to the identification of the target cell on the electron microscope. PMID:26175430

  15. Cobalt uptake and binding in human red blood cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Lars Ole; Brown, Anthony M; Harbak, Henrik;

    2011-01-01

    The basal uptake and cytoplasmic binding of cobalt was studied in human red cells using (57)Co as tracer. The basal uptake is linear with time, at a rate of about 10 µmol (l cells)(-1) h(-1) at 100 µM [Co(2+)](o), and is almost irreversible, as there is hardly any efflux into excess EDTA. Ionophore...... reversibly bound, being releasable by excess extracellular EGTA in the presence of A23187, and partly tightly bound, remaining in the cells even at high ionophore concentrations. The tightly bound fraction builds up over time, and is larger and develops earlier in fed cells compared to ATP-depleted cells...

  16. Regional differences in lectin binding patterns of vestibular hair cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baird, Richard A.; Schuff, N. R.; Bancroft, J.

    1994-01-01

    Surface glycoconjugates of hair cells and supporting cells in the vestibular endorgans of the bullfrog were identified using biotinylated lectins with different carbohydrate specificities. Lectin binding in hair cells was consistent with the presence of glucose and mannose (CON A), galactose (RCA-I), N-acetylgalactosamine (VVA), but not fucose (UEA-I) residues. Hair cells in the bullfrog sacculus, unlike those in the utriculus and semicircular canals, did not stain for N-acetylglucosamine (WGA) or N-acetylgalactosamine (VVA). By contrast, WGA and, to a lesser extent, VVA, differentially stained utricular and semicircular canal hair cells, labeling hair cells located in peripheral, but not central, regions. In mammals, WGA uniformly labeled Type 1 hair cells while labeling, as in the bullfrog, Type 2 hair cells only in peripheral regions. These regional variations were retained after enzymatic digestion. We conclude that vestibular hair cells differ in their surface glycoconjugates and that differences in lectin binding patterns can be used to identify hair cell types and to infer the epithelial origin of isolated vestibular hair cells.

  17. Angiotensin II Inhibits Insulin Binding to Endothelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su-Jin Oh

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundInsulin-mediated glucose uptake in insulin target tissues is correlated with interstitial insulin concentration, rather than plasma insulin concentration. Therefore, insulin delivery to the interstitium of target tissues is very important, and the endothelium may also play an important role in the development of insulin resistance.MethodsAfter treating bovine aortic endothelial cells with angiotensin II (ATII, we observed the changes in insulin binding capacity and the amounts of insulin receptor (IR on the cell membranes and in the cytosol.ResultsAfter treatment of 10-7M ATII, insulin binding was decreased progressively, up to 60% at 60 minutes (P<0.05. ATII receptor blocker (eprosartan dose dependently improved the insulin binding capacity which was reduced by ATII (P<0.05. At 200 µM, eprosartan fully restored insulin binding capacity, althogh it resulted in only a 20% to 30% restoration at the therapeutic concentration. ATII did not affect the total amount of IR, but it did reduce the amount of IR on the plasma membrane and increased that in the cytosol.ConclusionATII decreased the insulin binding capacity of the tested cells. ATII did not affect the total amount of IR but did decrease the amount of IR on the plasma membrane. Our data indicate that ATII decreases insulin binding by translocating IR from the plasma membrane to the cytosol. The binding of insulin to IR is important for insulin-induced vasodilation and transendothelial insulin transport. Therefore, ATII may cause insulin resistance through this endothelium-based mechanism.

  18. Opioid binding site in EL-4 thymoma cell line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using EL-4 thymoma cell-line we found a binding site similar to the k opioid receptor of the nervous system. The Scatchard analysis of the binding of [3H] bremazocine indicated a single site with a K/sub D/ = 60 +/- 17 nM and Bmax = 2.7 +/- 0.8 pmols/106 cells. To characterize this binding site, competition studies were performed using selective compounds for the various opioid receptors. The k agonist U-50,488H was the most potent displacer of [3H] bremazocine with an IC50 value = 0.57μM. The two steroisomers levorphanol and dextrorphan showed the same affinity for this site. While morphine, [D-Pen2, D-Pen5] enkephalin and β-endorphin failed to displace, except at very high concentrations, codeine demonstrated a IC50 = 60μM, that was similar to naloxone. 32 references, 3 figures, 2 tables

  19. 3D-structured illumination microscopy provides novel insight into architecture of human centrosomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katharina F. Sonnen

    2012-08-01

    Centrioles are essential for the formation of cilia and flagella. They also form the core of the centrosome, which organizes microtubule arrays important for cell shape, polarity, motility and division. Here, we have used super-resolution 3D-structured illumination microscopy to analyse the spatial relationship of 18 centriole and pericentriolar matrix (PCM components of human centrosomes at different cell cycle stages. During mitosis, PCM proteins formed extended networks with interspersed γ-Tubulin. During interphase, most proteins were arranged at specific distances from the walls of centrioles, resulting in ring staining, often with discernible density masses. Through use of site-specific antibodies, we found the C-terminus of Cep152 to be closer to centrioles than the N-terminus, illustrating the power of 3D-SIM to study protein disposition. Appendage proteins showed rings with multiple density masses, and the number of these masses was strongly reduced during mitosis. At the proximal end of centrioles, Sas-6 formed a dot at the site of daughter centriole assembly, consistent with its role in cartwheel formation. Plk4 and STIL co-localized with Sas-6, but Cep135 was associated mostly with mother centrioles. Remarkably, Plk4 formed a dot on the surface of the mother centriole before Sas-6 staining became detectable, indicating that Plk4 constitutes an early marker for the site of nascent centriole formation. Our study provides novel insights into the architecture of human centrosomes and illustrates the power of super-resolution microscopy in revealing the relative localization of centriole and PCM proteins in unprecedented detail.

  20. Hierarchy of ADAM12 binding to integrins in tumor cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thodeti, Charles Kumar; Fröhlich, Camilla; Nielsen, Christian Kamp;

    2005-01-01

    12. However, when alpha9beta1 integrin is not expressed--as in many carcinoma cells--other members of the beta1 integrin family can replace its ligand binding activity. In attachment assays, the recombinant disintegrin domain of ADAM12 only supported alpha9 integrin-dependent tumor cell attachment...... with a rounded morphology; attachment of cells with a spread morphology required further activation of the alpha9beta1 integrin. We demonstrated that phosphoinositide-3-kinase appears to be central in regulating alpha9beta1 integrin cell spreading activity in response to ADAM12....

  1. Microtubule dynamics of the centrosome-like polar organizers from the basal land plant Marchantia polymorpha.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buschmann, Henrik; Holtmannspötter, Michael; Borchers, Agnes; O'Donoghue, Martin-Timothy; Zachgo, Sabine

    2016-02-01

    The liverwort Marchantia employs both modern and ancestral devices during cell division: it forms preprophase bands and in addition it shows centrosome-like polar organizers. We investigated whether polar organizers and preprophase bands cooperate to set up the division plane. To this end, two novel green fluorescent protein-based microtubule markers for dividing cells of Marchantia were developed. Cells of the apical notch formed polar organizers first and subsequently assembled preprophase bands. Polar organizers were formed de novo from multiple mobile microtubule foci localizing to the nuclear envelope. The foci then became concentrated by bipolar aggregation. We determined the comet production rate of polar organizers and show that microtubule plus ends of astral microtubules polymerize faster than those found on cortical microtubules. Importantly, it was observed that conditions increasing polar organizer numbers interfere with preprophase band formation. The data show that polar organizers have much in common with centrosomes, but that they also have specialized features. The results suggest that polar organizers contribute to preprophase band formation and in this way are involved in controlling the division plane. Our analyses of the basal land plant Marchantia shed new light on the evolution of plant cell division. PMID:26467050

  2. An Amino-Terminal Polo Kinase Interaction Motif Acts in the Regulation of Centrosome Formation and Reveals a Novel Function for centrosomin (cnn) in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisman, Robert C; Phelps, Melissa A S; Kaufman, Thomas

    2015-10-01

    The formation of the pericentriolar matrix (PCM) and a fully functional centrosome in syncytial Drosophila melanogaster embryos requires the rapid transport of Cnn during initiation of the centrosome replication cycle. We show a Cnn and Polo kinase interaction is apparently required during embryogenesis and involves the exon 1A-initiating coding exon, suggesting a subset of Cnn splice variants is regulated by Polo kinase. During PCM formation exon 1A Cnn-Long Form proteins likely bind Polo kinase before phosphorylation by Polo for Cnn transport to the centrosome. Loss of either of these interactions in a portion of the total Cnn protein pool is sufficient to remove native Cnn from the pool, thereby altering the normal localization dynamics of Cnn to the PCM. Additionally, Cnn-Short Form proteins are required for polar body formation, a process known to require Polo kinase after the completion of meiosis. Exon 1A Cnn-LF and Cnn-SF proteins, in conjunction with Polo kinase, are required at the completion of meiosis and for the formation of functional centrosomes during early embryogenesis. PMID:26447129

  3. Rat embryo fibroblasts require both the cell-binding and the heparin-binding domains of fibronectin for survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeong, J; Han, I; Lim, Y;

    2001-01-01

    of the cell-binding domain of FN with integrin is sufficient to rescue rat embryo fibroblasts (REFs) from detachment-induced apoptosis. REFs attached and spread normally after plating on substrates coated with either intact FN or a FN fragment, FN120, that contains the cell-binding domain but lacks the C-terminal...

  4. Porphyromonas gingivalis Fimbriae Bind to Cytokeratin of Epithelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sojar, Hakimuddin T.; Sharma, Ashu; Genco, Robert J.

    2002-01-01

    The adherence of Porphyromonas gingivalis to host cells is likely a prerequisite step in the pathogenesis of P. gingivalis-induced periodontal disease. P. gingivalis binds to and invades epithelial cells, and fimbriae are shown to be involved in this process. Little is known regarding epithelial receptor(s) involved in binding of P. gingivalis fimbriae. Using an overlay assay with purified P. gingivalis fimbriae as a probe, two major epithelial cell proteins with masses of 50 and 40 kDa were identified by immunoblotting with fimbria-specific antibodies. Iodinated purified fimbriae also bound to the same two epithelial cell proteins. An affinity chromatography technique was utilized to isolate and purify the epithelial components to which P. gingivalis fimbriae bind. Purified fimbriae were coupled to CNBr-activated Sepharose-4B, and the solubilized epithelial cell extract proteins bound to the immobilized fimbriae were isolated from the column. A major 50-kDa component and a minor 40-kDa component were purified and could be digested with trypsin, suggesting that they were proteins. These affinity-eluted 50- and 40-kDa proteins were then subjected to amino-terminal sequencing, and no sequence could be determined, suggesting that these proteins have blocked amino-terminal residues. CNBr digestion of the 50-kDa component resulted in an internal sequence homologous to that of Keratin I molecules. Further evidence that P. gingivalis fimbriae bind to cytokeratin molecule(s) comes from studies showing that multicytokeratin rabbit polyclonal antibodies cross-react with the affinity-purified 50-kDa epithelial cell surface component. Also, binding of purified P. gingivalis fimbriae to epithelial components can be inhibited in an overlay assay by multicytokeratin rabbit polyclonal antibodies. Furthermore, we showed that biotinylated purified fimbriae bind to purified human epidermal keratin in an overlay assay. These studies suggest that the surface-accessible epithelial

  5. Relationships between cell surface insulin binding and endocytosis in adipocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chymotrypsin substrate analogues, such as N-acetyl-Tyr ethyl ester, have recently been demonstrated to inhibit the endocytic uptake of insulin in isolated rat adipocytes. In this study, the effect of N-acetyl-Tyr ethyl ester on cell surface insulin binding and dissociation were examined. Surface-bound 125I-insulin was distinguished from intracellular 125I-insulin by the sensitivity of the former to rapid dissociation with an acidic buffer. Plateau levels of surface-bound insulin at 37 degree C were increased 70% by inhibiting the internalization pathway. This increase was temperature and insulin concentration dependent. Thus differences in surface binding were small at 12 degree C and also at high insulin concentrations. Inhibition of internalization with N-acetyl-Tyr ethyl ester markedly slowed the loss of surface-bound insulin observed during dissociation the loss of surface-bound insulin observed during dissociation studies. After 20-30 min of dissociation, the remaining levels of surface-bound insulin were three- to fourfold higher in treated adipocytes compared with control adipocytes. Added unlabeled insulin retained its ability to accelerate the dissociation of insulin in N-acetyl-Tyr ethyl ester-treated cells. These observations indicate that the internalization pathway is a quantitatively important factor in determining levels of surface binding at 37 degree C and in determining the rat of deactivation of insulin binding

  6. Regulation of spindle pole body assembly and cytokinesis by the centrin-binding protein Sfi1 in fission yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, I-Ju; Wang, Ning; Hu, Wen; Schott, Kersey; Bähler, Jürg; Giddings, Thomas H; Pringle, John R; Du, Li-Lin; Wu, Jian-Qiu

    2014-09-15

    Centrosomes play critical roles in the cell division cycle and ciliogenesis. Sfi1 is a centrin-binding protein conserved from yeast to humans. Budding yeast Sfi1 is essential for the initiation of spindle pole body (SPB; yeast centrosome) duplication. However, the recruitment and partitioning of Sfi1 to centrosomal structures have never been fully investigated in any organism, and the presumed importance of the conserved tryptophans in the internal repeats of Sfi1 remains untested. Here we report that in fission yeast, instead of doubling abruptly at the initiation of SPB duplication and remaining at a constant level thereafter, Sfi1 is gradually recruited to SPBs throughout the cell cycle. Like an sfi1Δ mutant, a Trp-to-Arg mutant (sfi1-M46) forms monopolar spindles and exhibits mitosis and cytokinesis defects. Sfi1-M46 protein associates preferentially with one of the two daughter SPBs during mitosis, resulting in a failure of new SPB assembly in the SPB receiving insufficient Sfi1. Although all five conserved tryptophans tested are involved in Sfi1 partitioning, the importance of the individual repeats in Sfi1 differs. In summary, our results reveal a link between the conserved tryptophans and Sfi1 partitioning and suggest a revision of the model for SPB assembly. PMID:25031431

  7. Albumin binding ligands and albumin conjugate uptake by cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frei Eva

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The scope of this short review is to summarise the knowledge gleaned from the fate of drugs transported by albumin upon contact with the target cancer cell or cells in inflamed tissues. The authors expertise covers covalently bound drugs and their cellular uptake and release from albumin. This review therefore aims to deduce what will happen to drugs such as insulin detemir which is considered to bind non-covalently to albumin and may have a fate similar to fatty acids transported by albumin.

  8. Albumin binding ligands and albumin conjugate uptake by cancer cells

    OpenAIRE

    Frei Eva

    2011-01-01

    Abstract The scope of this short review is to summarise the knowledge gleaned from the fate of drugs transported by albumin upon contact with the target cancer cell or cells in inflamed tissues. The authors expertise covers covalently bound drugs and their cellular uptake and release from albumin. This review therefore aims to deduce what will happen to drugs such as insulin detemir which is considered to bind non-covalently to albumin and may have a fate similar to fatty acids transported by...

  9. A centrosomal theory of the short term evolutionary maintenance of sexual reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grafen, A

    1988-03-21

    A new mode of inheritance is postulated in which a sexual offspring receives a contribution from each parent and selects the better to pass on to its own offspring. This could provide a simple advantage to sex over a sex whose magnitude is shown to be of the order of a doubling of fitness in each generation, large enough to cancel the twofold cost of sex. This possible advantage to sex can be realized only if a cell component is in fact inherited in this selectively ambiguous way. No such component is known of, but the eukaryotic centrosome is a possible candidate. The possibility is discussed that the centrosome contains an obligatorily non-digital replicator which has an essential function in the initiation of microtubules. If this theory is true, it has the capacity to apply as widely as sex is found, and it would rescue theories of the long-term maintenance of sex from the necessity to provide a twofold advantage in each generation. If false, the theory will soon be disproved. PMID:3404998

  10. The Centrosome Undergoes Plk1-Independent Interphase Maturation during Inflammation and Mediates Cytokine Release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vertii, Anastassiia; Ivshina, Maria; Zimmerman, Wendy; Hehnly, Heidi; Kant, Shashi; Doxsey, Stephen

    2016-05-23

    Cytokine production is a necessary event in the immune response during inflammation and is associated with mortality during sepsis, autoimmune disorders, cancer, and diabetes. Stress-activated MAP kinase signaling cascades that mediate cytokine synthesis are well established. However, the downstream fate of cytokines before they are secreted remains elusive. We report that pro-inflammatory stimuli lead to recruitment of pericentriolar material, specifically pericentrin and γ-tubulin, to the centrosome. This is accompanied by enhanced microtubule nucleation and enrichment of the recycling endosome component FIP3, all of which are hallmarks of centrosome maturation during mitosis. Intriguingly, centrosome maturation occurs during interphase in an MLK-dependent manner, independent of the classic mitotic kinase, Plk1. Centrosome disruption by chemical prevention of centriole assembly or genetic ablation of pericentrin attenuated interleukin-6, interleukin-10, and MCP1 secretion, suggesting that the centrosome is critical for cytokine production. Our results reveal a function of the centrosome in innate immunity. PMID:27219065

  11. Exposure to Bisphenol A Correlates with Early-Onset Prostate Cancer and Promotes Centrosome Amplification and Anchorage-Independent Growth In Vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarapore, Pheruza; Burke, Barbara; Bracken, Bruce; Ho, Shuk-Mei

    2014-01-01

    Human exposure to bisphenol A (BPA) is ubiquitous. Animal studies found that BPA contributes to development of prostate cancer, but human data are scarce. Our study examined the association between urinary BPA levels and Prostate cancer and assessed the effects of BPA on induction of centrosome abnormalities as an underlying mechanism promoting prostate carcinogenesis. The study, involving 60 urology patients, found higher levels of urinary BPA (creatinine-adjusted) in Prostate cancer patients (5.74 µg/g [95% CI; 2.63, 12.51]) than in non-Prostate cancer patients (1.43 µg/g [95% CI; 0.70, 2.88]) (p = 0.012). The difference was even more significant in patients <65 years old. A trend toward a negative association between urinary BPA and serum PSA was observed in Prostate cancer patients but not in non-Prostate cancer patients. In vitro studies examined centrosomal abnormalities, microtubule nucleation, and anchorage-independent growth in four Prostate cancer cell lines (LNCaP, C4-2, 22Rv1, PC-3) and two immortalized normal prostate epithelial cell lines (NPrEC and RWPE-1). Exposure to low doses (0.01–100 nM) of BPA increased the percentage of cells with centrosome amplification two- to eight-fold. Dose responses either peaked or reached the plateaus with 0.1 nM BPA exposure. This low dose also promoted microtubule nucleation and regrowth at centrosomes in RWPE-1 and enhanced anchorage-independent growth in C4-2. These findings suggest that urinary BPA level is an independent prognostic marker in Prostate cancer and that BPA exposure may lower serum PSA levels in Prostate cancer patients. Moreover, disruption of the centrosome duplication cycle by low-dose BPA may contribute to neoplastic transformation of the prostate. PMID:24594937

  12. Exposure to bisphenol A correlates with early-onset prostate cancer and promotes centrosome amplification and anchorage-independent growth in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pheruza Tarapore

    Full Text Available Human exposure to bisphenol A (BPA is ubiquitous. Animal studies found that BPA contributes to development of prostate cancer, but human data are scarce. Our study examined the association between urinary BPA levels and Prostate cancer and assessed the effects of BPA on induction of centrosome abnormalities as an underlying mechanism promoting prostate carcinogenesis. The study, involving 60 urology patients, found higher levels of urinary BPA (creatinine-adjusted in Prostate cancer patients (5.74 µg/g [95% CI; 2.63, 12.51] than in non-Prostate cancer patients (1.43 µg/g [95% CI; 0.70, 2.88] (p = 0.012. The difference was even more significant in patients <65 years old. A trend toward a negative association between urinary BPA and serum PSA was observed in Prostate cancer patients but not in non-Prostate cancer patients. In vitro studies examined centrosomal abnormalities, microtubule nucleation, and anchorage-independent growth in four Prostate cancer cell lines (LNCaP, C4-2, 22Rv1, PC-3 and two immortalized normal prostate epithelial cell lines (NPrEC and RWPE-1. Exposure to low doses (0.01-100 nM of BPA increased the percentage of cells with centrosome amplification two- to eight-fold. Dose responses either peaked or reached the plateaus with 0.1 nM BPA exposure. This low dose also promoted microtubule nucleation and regrowth at centrosomes in RWPE-1 and enhanced anchorage-independent growth in C4-2. These findings suggest that urinary BPA level is an independent prognostic marker in Prostate cancer and that BPA exposure may lower serum PSA levels in Prostate cancer patients. Moreover, disruption of the centrosome duplication cycle by low-dose BPA may contribute to neoplastic transformation of the prostate.

  13. Opioid binding site in EL-4 thymoma cell line

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fiorica, E.; Spector, S.

    1988-01-01

    Using EL-4 thymoma cell-line we found a binding site similar to the k opioid receptor of the nervous system. The Scatchard analysis of the binding of (/sup 3/H) bremazocine indicated a single site with a K/sub D/ = 60 +/- 17 nM and Bmax = 2.7 +/- 0.8 pmols/10/sup 6/ cells. To characterize this binding site, competition studies were performed using selective compounds for the various opioid receptors. The k agonist U-50,488H was the most potent displacer of (/sup 3/H) bremazocine with an IC/sub 50/ value = 0.57..mu..M. The two steroisomers levorphanol and dextrorphan showed the same affinity for this site. While morphine, (D-Pen/sup 2/, D-Pen/sup 5/) enkephalin and ..beta..-endorphin failed to displace, except at very high concentrations, codeine demonstrated a IC/sub 50/ = 60..mu..M, that was similar to naloxone. 32 references, 3 figures, 2 tables.

  14. Importance of the CEP215-Pericentrin Interaction for Centrosome Maturation during Mitosis

    OpenAIRE

    Seongjae Kim; Kunsoo Rhee

    2014-01-01

    At the onset of mitosis, the centrosome undergoes maturation, which is characterized by a drastic expansion of the pericentriolar material (PCM) and a robust increase in microtubule-organizing activity. CEP215 is one of the major PCM components which accumulates at the centrosome during mitosis. The depletion phenotypes indicate that CEP215 is essential for centrosome maturation and bipolar spindle formation. Here, we performed a series of knockdown-rescue experiments to link the protein-prot...

  15. RNA-binding IMPs promote cell adhesion and invadopodia formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vikesaa, Jonas; Hansen, Thomas V O; Jønson, Lars; Borup, Rehannah; Wewer, Ulla M; Christiansen, Jan; Nielsen, Finn C

    2006-01-01

    Oncofetal RNA-binding IMPs have been implicated in mRNA localization, nuclear export, turnover and translational control. To depict the cellular actions of IMPs, we performed a loss-of-function analysis, which showed that IMPs are necessary for proper cell adhesion, cytoplasmic spreading and...... invadopodia formation. Loss of IMPs was associated with a coordinate downregulation of mRNAs encoding extracellular matrix and adhesion proteins. The transcripts were present in IMP RNP granules, implying that IMPs were directly involved in the post-transcriptional control of the transcripts. In particular......-mediated invadopodia formation. Taken together, our results indicate that RNA-binding proteins exert profound effects on cellular adhesion and invasion during development and cancer formation....

  16. The human enhancer-binding protein Gata3 binds to several T-cell receptor regulatory elements.

    OpenAIRE

    Marine, J; Winoto, A

    1991-01-01

    The tissue-specific developmental regulation of the alpha, beta, gamma and delta T-cell antigen receptor (TCR) genes is controlled by the corresponding distinct enhancers and their enhancer-binding proteins. To find a common TCR regulatory element, we have studied the ability of the newly described enhancer-binding protein Gata3 to bind to the sequence motif (A/T)GATA(G/A) shared between enhancer elements of all four TCR genes. Gata3 was shown in the chicken to be an enhancer-binding protein ...

  17. Polyglutamylated Tubulin Binding Protein C1orf96/CSAP Is Involved in Microtubule Stabilization in Mitotic Spindles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohta, Shinya; Hamada, Mayako; Sato, Nobuko; Toramoto, Iyo

    2015-01-01

    The centrosome-associated C1orf96/Centriole, Cilia and Spindle-Associated Protein (CSAP) targets polyglutamylated tubulin in mitotic microtubules (MTs). Loss of CSAP causes critical defects in brain development; however, it is unclear how CSAP association with MTs affects mitosis progression. In this study, we explored the molecular mechanisms of the interaction of CSAP with mitotic spindles. Loss of CSAP caused MT instability in mitotic spindles and resulted in mislocalization of Nuclear protein that associates with the Mitotic Apparatus (NuMA), with defective MT dynamics. Thus, CSAP overload in the spindles caused extensive MT stabilization and recruitment of NuMA. Moreover, MT stabilization by CSAP led to high levels of polyglutamylation on MTs. MT depolymerization by cold or nocodazole treatment was inhibited by CSAP binding. Live-cell imaging analysis suggested that CSAP-dependent MT-stabilization led to centrosome-free MT aster formation immediately upon nuclear envelope breakdown without γ-tubulin. We therefore propose that CSAP associates with MTs around centrosomes to stabilize MTs during mitosis, ensuring proper bipolar spindle formation and maintenance. PMID:26562023

  18. Binding and Clustering of Glycosaminoglycans: A Common Property of Mono- and Multivalent Cell-Penetrating Compounds

    OpenAIRE

    Ziegler, André; Seelig, Joachim

    2007-01-01

    Recent observations in cell culture provide evidence that negatively charged glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) at the surface of biological cells bind cationic cell-penetrating compounds (CPCs) and cluster during CPC binding, thereby contributing to their endocytotic uptake. The GAG binding and clustering occur in the low-micromolar concentration range and suggest a tight interaction between GAGs and CPCs, although the relation between binding affinity and specificity of this interaction remains to b...

  19. Antibody-Conjugated Paramagnetic Nanobeads: Kinetics of Bead-Cell Binding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahid Waseem

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Specific labelling of target cell surfaces using antibody-conjugated paramagnetic nanobeads is essential for efficient magnetic cell separation. However, studies examining parameters determining the kinetics of bead-cell binding are scarce. The present study determines the binding rates for specific and unspecific binding of 150 nm paramagnetic nanobeads to highly purified target and non-target cells. Beads bound to cells were enumerated spectrophotometrically. Results show that the initial bead-cell binding rate and saturation levels depend on initial bead concentration and fit curves of the form A(1 − exp(−kt. Unspecific binding within conventional experimental time-spans (up to 60 min was not detectable photometrically. For CD3-positive cells, the probability of specific binding was found to be around 80 times larger than that of unspecific binding.

  20. Aptamers Binding to c-Met Inhibiting Tumor Cell Migration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birgit Piater

    Full Text Available The human receptor tyrosine kinase c-Met plays an important role in the control of critical cellular processes. Since c-Met is frequently over expressed or deregulated in human malignancies, blocking its activation is of special interest for therapy. In normal conditions, the c-Met receptor is activated by its bivalent ligand hepatocyte growth factor (HGF. Also bivalent antibodies can activate the receptor by cross linking, limiting therapeutic applications. We report the generation of the RNA aptamer CLN64 containing 2'-fluoro pyrimidine modifications by systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX. CLN64 and a previously described single-stranded DNA (ssDNA aptamer CLN3 exhibited high specificities and affinities to recombinant and cellular expressed c-Met. Both aptamers effectively inhibited HGF-dependent c-Met activation, signaling and cell migration. We showed that these aptamers did not induce c-Met activation, revealing an advantage over bivalent therapeutic molecules. Both aptamers were shown to bind overlapping epitopes but only CLN3 competed with HGF binding to cMet. In addition to their therapeutic and diagnostic potential, CLN3 and CLN64 aptamers exhibit valuable tools to further understand the structural and functional basis for c-Met activation or inhibition by synthetic ligands and their interplay with HGF binding.

  1. Par6γ is at the mother centriole and controls centrosomal protein composition through a Par6α-dependent pathway

    OpenAIRE

    Dormoy, Valérian; Tormanen, Kati; Sütterlin, Christine

    2013-01-01

    The centrosome contains two centrioles that differ in age, protein composition and function. This non-membrane bound organelle is known to regulate microtubule organization in dividing cells and ciliogenesis in quiescent cells. These specific roles depend on protein appendages at the older, or mother, centriole. In this study, we identified the polarity protein partitioning defective 6 homolog gamma (Par6γ) as a novel component of the mother centriole. This specific localization required the ...

  2. Initial interaction of herpes simplex virus with cells is binding to heparan sulfate.

    OpenAIRE

    WuDunn, D; Spear, P G

    1989-01-01

    We have shown that cell surface heparan sulfate serves as the initial receptor for both serotypes of herpes simplex virus (HSV). We found that virions could bind to heparin, a related glycosaminoglycan, and that heparin blocked virus adsorption. Agents known to bind to cell surface heparan sulfate blocked viral adsorption and infection. Enzymatic digestion of cell surface heparan sulfate but not of dermatan sulfate or chondroitin sulfate concomitantly reduced the binding of virus to the cells...

  3. Angiostatin binds ATP synthase on the surface of human endothelial cells

    OpenAIRE

    Moser, Tammy L.; Stack, M. Sharon; Asplin, Iain; Enghild, Jan J; Højrup, Peter; Everitt, Lorraine; Hubchak, Susan; Schnaper, H. William; Pizzo, Salvatore V.

    1999-01-01

    Angiostatin, a proteolytic fragment of plasminogen, is a potent antagonist of angiogenesis and an inhibitor of endothelial cell migration and proliferation. To determine whether the mechanism by which angiostatin inhibits endothelial cell migration and/or proliferation involves binding to cell surface plasminogen receptors, we isolated the binding proteins for plasminogen and angiostatin from human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Binding studies demonstrated that plasminogen and angiostatin...

  4. A comparison of the rest complex binding patterns in embryonic stem cells and epiblast stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahide Seki

    Full Text Available We detected and characterized the binding sites of the representative Rest complex components Rest, Sin3A, and Lsd1. We compared their binding patterns in mouse embryonic stem (ES cells and epiblast stem (EpiS cells. We found few Rest sites unique to the EpiS cells. The ES-unique site features were distinct from those of the common sites, namely, the signal intensities were weaker, and the characteristic gene function categories differed. Our analyses showed that the Rest binding sites do not always overlap with the Sin3A and Lsd1 binding sites. The Sin3A binding pattern differed remarkably between the ES and EpiS cells and was accompanied by significant changes in acetylated-histone patterns in the surrounding regions. A series of transcriptome analyses in the same cell types unexpectedly showed that the putative target gene transcript levels were not dramatically different despite dynamic changes in the Rest complex binding patterns and chromatin statuses, which suggests that Rest is not the sole determinant of repression at its targets. Nevertheless, we identified putative Rest targets with explicitly enhanced transcription upon Rest knock-down in 143 and 60 common and ES-unique Rest target genes, respectively. Among such sites, several genes are involved in ES cell proliferation. In addition, we also found that long, intergenic non-coding RNAs were apparent Rest targets and shared similar features with the protein-coding target genes. Interestingly, such non-coding target genes showed less conservation through evolution than protein-coding targets. As a result of differences in the components and targets of the Rest complex, its functional roles may differ in ES and EpiS cells.

  5. Human TREX2 components PCID2 and centrin 2, but not ENY2, have distinct functions in protein export and co-localize to the centrosome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    TREX-2 is a five protein complex, conserved from yeast to humans, involved in linking mRNA transcription and export. The centrin 2 subunit of TREX-2 is also a component of the centrosome and is additionally involved in a distinctly different process of nuclear protein export. While centrin 2 is a known multifunctional protein, the roles of other human TREX-2 complex proteins other than mRNA export are not known. In this study, we found that human TREX-2 member PCID2 but not ENY2 is involved in some of the same cellular processes as those of centrin 2 apart from the classical TREX-2 function. PCID2 is present at the centrosome in a subset of HeLa cells and this localization is centrin 2 dependent. Furthermore, the presence of PCID2 at the centrosome is prevalent throughout the cell cycle as determined by co-staining with cyclins E, A and B. PCID2 but not ENY2 is also involved in protein export. Surprisingly, siRNA knockdown of PCID2 delayed the rate of nuclear protein export, a mechanism distinct from the effects of centrin 2, which when knocked down inhibits export. Finally we showed that co-depletion of centrin 2 and PCID2 leads to blocking rather than delaying nuclear protein export, indicating the dominance of the centrin 2 phenotype. Together these results represent the first discovery of specific novel functions for PCID2 other than mRNA export and suggest that components of the TREX-2 complex serve alternative shared roles in the regulation of nuclear transport and cell cycle progression. - Highlights: • TREX2 complex member PCID2 but not ENY2 localizes to the centrosome in HeLa cells. • Centrin 2 is required for the localization of PCID2 at the centrosome. • PCID2 is found at the centrosome in G1/S at a slightly higher rate than that in G2/M. • PCID2 but not ENY2 delays the rate of nuclear protein export. • Co-depletion of centrin 2 and PCID2 leads to blocking rather than delaying nuclear protein export

  6. Binding of transcobalamin II by human mammary epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adkins, Y; Lönnerdal, B

    2001-01-01

    The presence of nutrient binders in milk may have an important role during milk production and may influence the nutrient's bioavailability to the infant. Human milk and plasma contain at least two types of vitamin B12 binders: transcobalamin II (TCII) and haptocorrin (Hc). Vitamin B12 in milk is exclusively bound to Hc (Hc-B12). In plasma, the major vitamin B12 binding protein that is responsible for delivering absorbed vitamin B12 to most tissues and cells is TCII (TCII-B12). Currently, little is known about the route of secretion of vitamin B12 into human milk. It is possible that a receptor-mediated pathway is involved, since maternal vitamin B12 supplementation increases the amount of the vitamin secreted into human milk if the mother's vitamin B12 consumption is low, but remains unchanged if her intake is adequate. In this study, we investigated the process by which the mammary gland acquires vitamin B12 from maternal circulation, whether as a free vitamin or as a Hc-B12 or TCII-B12 complex. TCII was purified from plasma incubated with [57Co]vit B12 (B12*), while Hc was purified from whey incubated with B12*. Both proteins were separated by fast protein liquid chromatography using gel filtration and anion-exchange columns. Purity of the separated proteins was assessed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Binding studies were carried out on a monolayer of normal human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) at 4 degrees C using free B12* and TCII-B12* and Hc-B12* complexes. Minimal binding of free B12* and Hc-B12* to HMEC was observed; however, HMEC exhibited a high affinity for the TCII-B12* complex. This study suggests that a specific cell surface receptor for the TCII-B12 complex exists in the mammary gland. It is possible that once vitamin B12 is in the mammary gland it is transferred to Hc (which may be synthesized by the mammary gland) and then secreted into milk as a Hc-B12 complex. PMID:11787717

  7. Staphylococcal enterotoxin induced mitogenesis: toxin binding and cell-cell interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buxser, E S; Bonventre, P F; Archer, D L

    1983-07-01

    The binding characteristics of 125I-labelled staphylococcal enterotoxin A (125I-SEA), a T-cell mitogen, to murine lymphoid cell subpopulations were analyzed. Both T- and B-lymphocytes from murine spleens possess specific binding sites for SEA, as do T-lymphocytes from thymus. B-lymphocytes appear to have a greater capacity for binding of 125-SEA than do T-lymphocytes from either thymus or spleen. Enterotoxin did not specifically bind to thioglycollate-induced peritoneal exudate cells (PECs), used as a source of macrophages. Adherent PECs however, incorporated 125-ISEA by fluid phase endocytosis. When exposed to SEA and thoroughly washed, macrophages stimulate lymphocyte mitogenesis in spleen or thymus cell cultures not directly exposed to toxin. Maximum mitogenic stimulation took place only when both PECs and lymphocytes were exposed to SEA. The presence of splenic B-lymphocytes enhanced the mitogenic response of thymus derived T-cells to SEA. Thus, B-lymphocytes appear to contribute to SEA mitogenesis. These data suggest that mitogenic stimulation and possibly other immunological phenomena associated with SEA occur as a result of complex interactions between cellular components of the immune system. PMID:6605472

  8. 1918 Influenza receptor binding domain variants bind and replicate in primary human airway cells regardless of receptor specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, A Sally; Chertow, Daniel S; Kindrachuk, Jason; Qi, Li; Schwartzman, Louis M; Suzich, Jon; Alsaaty, Sara; Logun, Carolea; Shelhamer, James H; Taubenberger, Jeffery K

    2016-06-01

    The 1918 influenza pandemic caused ~50 million deaths. Many questions remain regarding the origin, pathogenicity, and mechanisms of human adaptation of this virus. Avian-adapted influenza A viruses preferentially bind α2,3-linked sialic acids (Sia) while human-adapted viruses preferentially bind α2,6-linked Sia. A change in Sia preference from α2,3 to α2,6 is thought to be a requirement for human adaptation of avian influenza viruses. Autopsy data from 1918 cases, however, suggest that factors other than Sia preference played a role in viral binding and entry to human airway cells. Here, we evaluated binding and entry of five 1918 influenza receptor binding domain variants in a primary human airway cell model along with control avian and human influenza viruses. We observed that all five variants bound and entered cells efficiently and that Sia preference did not predict entry of influenza A virus to primary human airway cells evaluated in this model. PMID:27062579

  9. Centrosome clustering and cyclin D1 gene amplification in double minutes are common events in chromosomal unstable bladder tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aneuploidy, centrosome abnormalities and gene amplification are hallmarks of chromosome instability (CIN) in cancer. Yet there are no studies of the in vivo behavior of these phenomena within the same bladder tumor. Twenty-one paraffin-embedded bladder tumors were analyzed by conventional comparative genome hybridization and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with a cyclin D1 gene (CCND1)/centromere 11 dual-color probe. Immunofluorescent staining of α, β and γ tubulin was also performed. Based on the CIN index, defined as the percentage of cells not displaying the modal number for chromosome 11, tumors were classified as CIN-negative and CIN-positive. Fourteen out of 21 tumors were considered CIN-positive. All T1G3 tumors were included in the CIN-positive group whereas the majority of Ta samples were classified as CIN-negative tumors. Centrosome clustering was observed in six out of 12 CIN-positive tumors analyzed. CCND1 amplification in homogeneously staining regions was present in six out of 14 CIN-positive tumors; three of them also showed amplification of this gene in double minutes. Complex in vivo behavior of CCND1 amplicon in bladder tumor cells has been demonstrated by accurate FISH analysis on paraffin-embedded tumors. Positive correlation between high heterogeneity, centrosome abnormalities and CCND1 amplification was found in T1G3 bladder carcinomas. This is the first study to provide insights into the coexistence of CCND1 amplification in homogeneously staining regions and double minutes in primary bladder tumors. It is noteworthy that those patients whose tumors showed double minutes had a significantly shorter overall survival rate (p < 0.001)

  10. Human growth hormone binding and stimulation of insulin biosynthesis in cloned rat insulinoma cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Billestrup, Nils

    1985-01-01

    Binding of 125I labelled human growth hormone to cloned insulin producing RIN-5AH cells is described. Binding was specific for somatotropic hormones since both human and rat growth hormone could compete for binding sites, whereas much higher concentrations of lactogenic hormones were needed to in...

  11. Biointerface: protein enhanced stem cells binding to implant surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chrzanowski, W; Kondyurin, A; Lee, Jae Ho; Lord, Megan S; Bilek, M M M; Kim, Hae-Won

    2012-09-01

    The number of metallic implantable devices placed every year is estimated at 3.7 million. This number has been steadily increasing over last decades at a rate of around 8 %. In spite of the many successes of the devices the implantation of biomaterial into tissues almost universally leads to the development of an avascular sac, which consists of fibrous tissue around the device and walls off the implant from the body. This reaction can be detrimental to the function of implant, reduces its lifetime, and necessitates repeated surgery. Clearly, to reduce the number of revision surgeries and improve long-term implant function it is necessary to enhance device integration by modulating cell adhesion and function. In this paper we have demonstrated that it is possible to enhance stem cell attachment using engineered biointerfaces. To create this functional interface, samples were coated with polymer (as a precursor) and then ion implanted to create a reactive interface that aids the binding of biomolecules--fibronectin. Both AFM and XPS analyses confirmed the presence of protein layers on the samples. The amount of protein was significant greater for the ion implanted surfaces and was not disrupted upon washing with detergent, hence the formation of strong bonds with the interface was confirmed. While, for non ion implanted surfaces, a decrease of protein was observed after washing with detergent. Finally, the number of stem cells attached to the surface was enhanced for ion implanted surfaces. The studies presented confirm that the developed bionterface with immobilised fibronectin is an effective means to modulate stem cell attachment. PMID:22714559

  12. Binding of progesterone to cell surfaces of human granulosa-lutein cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Younglai, Edward V; Wu, Yanjing; Foster, Warren G; Lobb, Derek K; Price, Thomas M

    2006-09-01

    Progesterone is produced by granulosa cells under the influence of luteinizing hormone. Nuclear progesterone receptors have been found in rat granulosa cells. Human granulosa-lutein cells rapidly respond to progesterone with an increase in intracellular calcium suggesting the existence of a nongenomic mechanism. This study was conducted to determine whether binding of progesterone to granulosa cells could occur at the membrane. Granulosa cells were obtained from an in vitro fertilization program and examined immunohistochemically with an antiserum to membrane progesterone receptors. Approximately 14-70% of freshly harvested or cultured granulosa cells of six patients showed a positive reaction to the antiserum, limited to the cell membrane. Western blot analysis of homogenates of granulosa cells and a granulosa cell tumour confirmed the presence of progesterone receptors A, B and C and low amounts of a putative membrane receptor. These results demonstrate that the plasma membranes of human granulosa cells possess binding components for progesterone which may be involved in its nongenomic mechanism of action. PMID:16905308

  13. The topology of plasminogen binding and activation on the surface of human breast cancer cells

    OpenAIRE

    Andronicos, N M; Ranson, M.

    2001-01-01

    The urokinase-dependent activation of plasminogen by breast cancer cells plays an important role in metastasis. We have previously shown that the metastatic breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231 over-expresses urokinase and binds and efficiently activates plasminogen at the cell surface compared to non-metastatic cells. The aim of this study was to further characterise plasminogen binding and determine the topology of cell surface-bound plasminogen in terms of its potential for activation. The l...

  14. FancJ regulates interstrand crosslinker induced centrosome amplification through the activation of polo-like kinase 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianqiu Zou

    2013-08-01

    DNA damage response (DDR and the centrosome cycle are two of the most critical processes for maintaining a stable genome in animals. Sporadic evidence suggests a connection between these two processes. Here, we report our findings that six Fanconi Anemia (FA proteins, including FancI and FancJ, localize to the centrosome. Intriguingly, we found that the localization of FancJ to the mother centrosome is stimulated by a DNA interstrand crosslinker, Mitomycin C (MMC. We further show that, in addition to its role in interstrand crosslinking (ICL repair, FancJ also regulates the normal centrosome cycle as well as ICL induced centrosome amplification by activating the polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1. We have uncovered a novel function of FancJ in centrosome biogenesis and established centrosome amplification as an integral part of the ICL response.

  15. Comparison of chemical binding to recombinant fathead minnow and human estrogen receptors alpha in whole cell and cell-free binding assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rider, Cynthia V; Hartig, Phillip C; Cardon, Mary C; Wilson, Vickie S

    2009-10-01

    Mammalian receptors and assay systems are generally used for in vitro screening of endocrine-disrupting chemicals with the assumption that minor differences in amino acid sequences among species do not translate into significant differences in receptor function. Objectives of the present study were to evaluate the performance of two different in vitro assay systems (a whole cell and a cell-free competitive binding assay) in assessing whether binding of chemicals differs significantly between full-length recombinant estrogen receptors from fathead minnows (fhERalpha) and those from humans (hERalpha). It was confirmed that 17beta-estradiol displays a reduction in binding to fhERalpha at an elevated temperature (37 degrees C), as has been reported with other piscine estrogen receptors. Several of the chemicals (17beta-estradiol, ethinylestradiol, alpha-zearalanol, fulvestrant, dibutyl phthalate, benzyl butyl phthalate, and cadmium chloride) displayed higher affinity for fhERalpha than for hERalpha in the whole cell assay, while only dibutyl phthalate had a higher affinity for fhERalpha than for hERalpha in the cell-free assay. Both assays were effective in identifying strong binders, weak binders, and nonbinders to the two receptors. However, the cell-free assay provided a less complicated and more efficient binding platform and is, therefore, recommended over the whole cell binding assay. In conclusion, no strong evidence showed species-specific binding among the chemicals tested. PMID:19453209

  16. A 125I-protein A-binding assay detecting antibodies to cell surface antigens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 125I-protein A-binding assay detecting antibodies to cell surface antigens on human blood cells was developed and evaluated using sera from multitransfused nonleukemic patients sensitized against HLA antigens. The binding assay was found to be reproducible and more sensitive than conventional HLA testing. Seven patients with acute myelogenous leukemia and two patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia successfully treated by chemotherapy were than investigated. Sera from seven of the patients studied in partial or complete remission demonstrated significant binding to autochthonous leukemic cells obtained from bone marrow or peripheral blood. In two cases sera taken during the leukemic stage demonstrated the most pronounced binding to the patients' own leukemic cells. Sera from four patients with demonstrable significant binding to autochthonous leukemic cells failed to bind to autochthonous remission cells when both types of target cells were tested in parallel. Differences in serum concentrations of IgG, IgA, and IgM were not the cause of the demonstrated increased binding of leukemic sera to autochthonous target cells. We propose that the 125I-protein A-binding assay presented in this paper detects antibodies reacting selectively with acute leukemia cells. (orig.)

  17. The RNA binding protein Larp1 regulates cell division, apoptosis and cell migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrows, Carla; Abd Latip, Normala; Lam, Sarah-Jane; Carpenter, Lee; Sawicka, Kirsty; Tzolovsky, George; Gabra, Hani; Bushell, Martin; Glover, David M; Willis, Anne E; Blagden, Sarah P

    2010-09-01

    The RNA binding protein Larp1 was originally shown to be involved in spermatogenesis, embryogenesis and cell-cycle progression in Drosophila. Our data show that mammalian Larp1 is found in a complex with poly A binding protein and eukaryote initiation factor 4E and is associated with 60S and 80S ribosomal subunits. A reduction in Larp1 expression by siRNA inhibits global protein synthesis rates and results in mitotic arrest and delayed cell migration. Consistent with these data we show that Larp1 protein is present at the leading edge of migrating cells and interacts directly with cytoskeletal components. Taken together, these data suggest a role for Larp1 in facilitating the synthesis of proteins required for cellular remodelling and migration. PMID:20430826

  18. Changes in binding of staphylococcal leukocidin to HL-60 cells during differentiation induced by dimethyl sulfoxide.

    OpenAIRE

    Morinaga, N; Nagamori, M; Kato, I.

    1988-01-01

    The susceptibility of HL-60 cells to the cytotoxic activity of leukocidin increased depending on the degree of differentiation induced by dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO). To compare binding characteristics of two components (S and F) of leukocidin to HL-60 and DMSO-treated HL-60 cells, the S and F components were labeled with 125I. Scatchard analysis of the binding curve of the 125I-labeled S component to HL-60 cells showed two classes of binding sites. The binding sites with higher affinity had a ...

  19. Research Progress on Centrosome Cycle Related Protein Phosphorylation /Dephosphorylation and the Involved Functions%中心体周期相关蛋白磷酸化/去磷酸化及其功能的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谭锬; 梁前进

    2012-01-01

    中心体(centrosome)是动物细胞和低等植物细胞中存在的一种重要的无膜细胞器.正常情况下,它参与细胞的有丝分裂,形成基于微管结构的纺锤体,牵引着复制后的染色体移向细胞的两极.这一过程保证了遗传物质DNA能够精确、有序和完整地遗传到子代的细胞中.与细胞有丝分裂及增殖过程中发挥作用的其他重要细胞器一样,它的行为和调控同样是由一系列与功能相关的蛋白质来完成的.在这些蛋白质中,一部分与中心体的复制、分裂相关,保证中心体增殖周期的实现;另一部分则在细胞周期中与中心体有着一定的联系,但同时在细胞生命活动中发挥着其他重要功能.无论是在正常细胞中,还是在异常细胞(如肿瘤细胞)中,蛋白质修饰的调节方式都占据了优势,其中尤以磷酸化修饰方式引人注目.中心体是细胞内重要的细胞器之一,大量与中心体周期相关的蛋白质同样也通过磷酸化修饰方式进行调节.主要对中心体周期相关蛋白的磷酸化修饰及功能进行综述,为中心体周期及其调节的深入研究提供参考.%Centrosome is a significant organelle without membrane in animal cells and some lower plant cells. Normally, centrosomes participate cell division ( mitosis) , form spindle which is based on microtubules and then pull the duplicated chromosomes to the opposite poles of the cell. This process ensures that genetic materials (DNA) can pass from one generation to the next accurately, orderly and perfectly. Like other essential organelles related with cell division and proliferation, the behavior and regulation of centrosome also depends on many function-related proteins. In these proteins, one part connects with centrosome duplication and separation, ensuring centrosome cycle achieved; the other part, not only associates with cell cycle and centrosome, but also plays vital roles in other aspects. Regardless of normal cells

  20. Expression of Cyclins A, E and Topoisomerase II α correlates with centrosome amplification and genomic instability and influences the reliability of cytometric S-phase determination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laytragoon-Lewin Nongnit

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The progression of normal cells through the cell cycle is meticulously regulated by checkpoints guaranteeing the exact replication of the genome during S-phase and its equal division at mitosis. A prerequisite for this achievement is synchronized DNA-replication and centrosome duplication. In this context the expression of cyclins A and E has been shown to play a principal role. Results Our results demonstrated a correlation between centrosome amplification, cell cycle fidelity and the level of mRNA and protein expression of cyclins A and E during the part of the cell cycle defined as G1-phase by means of DNA content based histogram analysis. It is shown that the normal diploid breast cell line HTB-125, the genomically relatively stable aneuploid breast cancer cell line MCF-7, and the genomically unstable aneuploid breast cancer cell line MDA-231 differ remarkably concerning both mRNA and protein expression of the two cyclins during G1-phase. In MDA-231 cells the expression of e.g. cyclin A mRNA was found to be ten times higher than in MCF-7 cells and about 500 times higher than in HTB-125 cells. Topoisomerase II α showed high mRNA expression in MDA compared to MCF-7 cells, but the difference in protein expression was small. Furthermore, we measured centrosome aberrations in 8.4% of the MDA-231 cells, and in only 1.3% of the more stable aneuploid cell line MCF-7. MDA cells showed 27% more incorporation of BrdU than reflected by S-phase determination with flow cytometric DNA content analysis, whereas these values were found to be of the same size in both HTB-125 and MCF-7 cells. Conclusions Our data indicate that the breast cancer cell lines MCF-7 and MDA-231, although both DNA-aneuploid, differ significantly regarding the degree of cell cycle disturbance and centrosome aberrations, which partly could explain the different genomic stability of the two cell lines. The results also question the reliability of cytometric DNA

  1. Factor XII binding to endothelial cells depends on caveolae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schousboe, Inger; Thomsen, Peter; van Deurs, Bo

    2004-01-01

    It is now generally accepted that factor XII (FXII) binds to cellular surfaces in the vascular system. One of the suggested receptors of this binding is the glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored urokinase-like plasminogen activator (u-PAR) harbored in caveolae/lipid rafts. However, binding of FXII...... FXII binding to caveolae were performed by sucrose density-gradient centrifugations. This showed that the majority of FXII, chemically cross-linked to HUVEC, could be identified in the same fractions of the gradient as caveolin-1, a marker of caveolae, while the majority of u-PAR was identified in...

  2. Specific binding of phorbol esters to Friend erythroleukemia cells--general properties, down regulation and relationship to cell differentiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Specific and saturable binding sites for [20-3H]phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate ([3H]PDBu) were demonstrated in tact Friend erythroleukemia cells (FELC), in which inducible erythroid differentiation is reversibly inhibited by phorbol esters. The binding of [3H]PDBu to intact cells was maximal within only 15 min of incubation at 37 degrees C, after which there was a gradual decrease; binding at 4 degrees C however, was alow process, requiring greater than 180 min for maximal binding. A Scatchard analysis showed that the dissociation constant for binding of [3H]PDBu is 8.3 nM; at saturation, approximately 1.75 x 10(5) molecules of [3H]PDBu are bound per cell. When FELC were induced to differentiate with 4mM hexameethylene bisacetamide (approximately 80% of cells were benzidine-positive), a slight decrease (10-20%) in the number of binding sites at saturation was seen, but the dissociation constant was not changed. When the cells were precultured with non-radioactive phorbol esters, a significant decrease in [3H]PDBu binding was observed, suggesting a homologous down regulation of phorbol ester receptors. Scatchard analysis indicated that the decrease in [3H]PDBu binding was due to a decrease in the number of binding sites and not to a change in affinity. Such specific phorbol ester binding sites might mediate a number of biochemical and biological effects of phorbol esters on FELC

  3. Binding of fluorescent and radiolabelled alprenolol to intact cultured brain cells and liposomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maderspach, K.; Nemecz, Gy.; Mesude Yigiter (Magyar Tudomanyos Akademia Biologiai Kutato Koezpontja, Szeged)

    1981-01-01

    Beta-adrenergic antagonist L-alprenolol was labelled for radioactivity and UV fluorescence, and the binding to intact cultured chicken brain cells under equilibrium conditions, as the model of the experiments in vivo, was probed. The application of fluorescent label did not explore any cell type or cell particle with enhanced binding. The analysis of the radiolabelled alprenolol-binding revealed a non-specific accumulation on the surface of these cells, which was inhibited by unlabelled alprenolol excess, however, this is the peculiarity of the specific binding. The authors' results emphasize that for the characterization of membrane receptors of intact cells, the accurate separation of specific and non-specific binding is required. The application of a ligand concentration as low as possible and a very effective washing procedure for the removal of the unbound (and the bulk of the nonspecifically bound) label are recommended.

  4. Characterization of Plasminogen Binding to NB4 Promyelocytic Cells Using Monoclonal Antibodies against Receptor-Induced Binding Sites in Cell-Bound Plasminogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mercè Jardí

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The NB4 promyelocytic cell line exhibits many of the characteristics of acute promyelocytic leukemia blast cells, including the translocation (15 : 17 that fuses the PML gene on chromosome 15 to the RARα gene on chromosome 17. These cells have a very high fibrinolytic capacity. In addition to a high secretion of urokinase, NB4 cells exhibit a 10-fold higher plasminogen binding capacity compared with other leukemic cell lines. When tissue-type plasminogen activator was added to acid-treated cells, plasmin generation was 20–26-fold higher than that generated by U937 cells or peripheral blood neutrophils, respectively. We found that plasminogen bound to these cells can be detected by fluorescence-activated cell sorting using an antiplasminogen monoclonal antibody that specifically reacts with this antigen when it is bound to cell surfaces. All-trans retinoid acid treatment of NB4 cells markedly decreased the binding of this monoclonal antibody. This cell line constitutes a unique model to explore plasminogen binding and activation on cell surfaces that can be modulated by all-trans retinoid acid treatment.

  5. Pigment epithelium-derived factor binds to cell-surface F(1)-ATP synthase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Notari, Luigi; Arakaki, Naokatu; Mueller, David; Meier, Scott; Amaral, Juan; Becerra, S P

    2010-05-01

    Pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF), a potent blocker of angiogenesis in vivo, and of endothelial cell migration and tubule formation, binds with high affinity to an as yet unknown protein on the surfaces of endothelial cells. Given that protein fingerprinting suggested a match of a approximately 60 kDa PEDF-binding protein in bovine retina with Bos taurus F(1)-ATP synthase beta-subunit, and that F(1)F(o)-ATP synthase components have been identified recently as cell-surface receptors, we examined the direct binding of PEDF to F(1). Size-exclusion ultrafiltration assays showed that recombinant human PEDF formed a complex with recombinant yeast F(1). Real-time binding as determined by surface plasmon resonance demonstrated that yeast F(1) interacted specifically and reversibly with human PEDF. Kinetic evaluations revealed high binding affinity for PEDF, in agreement with PEDF affinities for endothelial cell surfaces. PEDF blocked interactions between F(1) and angiostatin, another antiangiogenic factor, suggesting overlapping PEDF-binding and angiostatin-binding sites on F(1). Surfaces of endothelial cells exhibited affinity for PEDF-binding proteins of approximately 60 kDa. Antibodies to F(1)beta-subunit specifically captured PEDF-binding components in endothelial plasma membranes. The extracellular ATP synthesis activity of endothelial cells was examined in the presence of PEDF. PEDF significantly reduced the amount of extracellular ATP produced by endothelial cells, in agreement with direct interactions between cell-surface ATP synthase and PEDF. In addition to demonstrating that PEDF binds to cell-surface F(1), these results show that PEDF is a ligand for endothelial cell-surface F(1)F(o)-ATP synthase. They suggest that PEDF-mediated inhibition of ATP synthase may form part of the biochemical mechanisms by which PEDF exerts its antiangiogenic activity. PMID:20412062

  6. Cytoskeletal binding proteins distinguish cultured dental follicle cells and periodontal ligament cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jie; Li, Hui; Tian, Ye; Yang, Yaling; Chen, Guoqing; Guo, Weihua; Tian, Weidong

    2016-07-01

    Human dental follicle cells (DFCs) and periodontal ligament cells (PDLCs) derived from the ectomesenchymal tissue, have been shown to exhibit stem/progenitor cell properties and the ability to induce tissue regeneration. Stem cells in dental follicle differentiate into cementoblasts, periodontal ligament fibroblasts and osteoblasts, these cells form cementum, periodontal ligament and alveolar bone, respectively. While stem cells in dental follicle are a precursor to periodontal ligament fibroblasts, the molecular changes that distinguish cultured DFCs from PDLCs are still unknown. In this study, we have compared the immunophenotypic features and cell cycle status of the two cell lines. The results suggest that DFCs and PDLCs displayed similar features related to immunophenotype and cell cycle. Then we employed an isobaric tag for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ) proteomics strategy to reveal the molecular differences between the two cell types. A total of 2138 proteins were identified and 39 of these proteins were consistently differentially expressed between DFCs and PDLCs. Gene ontology analyses revealed that the protein subsets expressed higher in PDLCs were related to actin binding, cytoskeletal protein binding, and structural constituent of muscle. Upon validation by real-time PCR, western blotting, and immunofluorescence staining. Tropomyosin 1 (TPM1) and caldesmon 1 (CALD1) were expressed higher in PDLCs than in DFCs. Our results suggested that PDLCs display enhanced actin cytoskeletal dynamics relative to DFCs while DFCs may exhibit a more robust antioxidant defense ability relative to PDLCs. This study expands our knowledge of the cultured DFCs and PDLCs proteome and provides new insights into possible mechanisms responsible for the different biological features observed in each cell type. PMID:26708290

  7. Interleukin 1α and interleukin 1β bind to the same receptor on T cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pure, E. coli-derived recombinant murine interleukin 1α (IL 1α) was labeled with 125I and used for receptor binding studies. The 125I-IL 1 binds to murine EL-4 thymoma cells in a specific and saturable manner. Scatchard plot analysis for binding studies carried out at 40C reveals a single type of high affinity binding site with an apparent dissociation constant of approximately 2.6 X 10-10 M and the presence of approximately 1200 binding sites per cell. Unlabeled recombinant murine IL 1 competes for 125I-IL 1 binding in a dose-dependent manner, whereas interferon-αA, interleukin 2 (IL 2), epidermal growth factor, and nerve growth factor have no effect. The 125I-IL 1 binding site is sensitive to trypsin, suggesting that it is localized on the cell surface. The authors have also examined the ability of purified recombinant human IL 1α and IL 1β to compete for binding of the radiolabeled murine IL 1 to its receptor and to stimulate IL 2 production by EL-4 cells. They report here that both human IL 1 proteins are able to recognize the same binding site on mouse IL 1. In addition, murine as well as both human IL 1 proteins stimulate IL 2 production by EL-4 cells

  8. Binding ability of LHRH-PE40 to LHRH receptors on cancer cell line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To evaluate the binding ability of LHRH-PE40, a fusion protein, to the LHRH receptors on cancer cell line. Methods: The radioligand binding assay of receptors was used to calculate the Kd and Bmax. Results: Hela cell line: Kd=(0.36 +- 0.12) nmol, Bmax=(0.23+-0.15) μmol·g-1; Hep2 cell line: Kd=(0.33 +- 0.11) nmol, Bmax=(0.46 +- 0.12)μmol·g-1. Conclusion: LHRH-PE40 has a high binding affinity to the LHRH receptors on cancer cell line, which is the same as the natural LHRH

  9. Binding kinetics of magnetic nanoparticles on latex beads and yeast cells studied by magnetorelaxometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ion exchange mediated binding of magnetic nanoparticles (MNP) to modified latex spheres and yeast cells was quantified using magnetorelaxometry. By fitting subsequently recorded relaxation curves, the kinetics of the binding reactions was extracted. The signal of MNP with weak ion exchanger groups bound to latex and yeast cells scales linearly with the concentration of latex beads or yeast cells whereas that of MNP with strong ion exchanger groups is proportional to the square root of concentration. The binding of the latter leads to a much stronger aggregation of yeast cells than the former MNP

  10. Chronic morphine treatment up-regulates mu opioid receptor binding in cells lacking Filamin A

    OpenAIRE

    Onoprishvili, Irma; Simon, Eric J.

    2007-01-01

    We investigated the effects of morphine and other agonists on the human mu opioid receptor (MOP) expressed in M2 melanoma cells, lacking the actin cytoskeleton protein filamin A and in A7, a sub clone of the M2 melanoma cells, stably transfected with filamin A cDNA. The results of binding experiments showed, that after chronic morphine treatment (24 hr) of A7 cells, MOP binding sites were down-regulated to 63% of control, whereas, unexpectedly, in M2 cells, MOP binding was up-regulated to 188...

  11. Overexpressed Ly-6A.2 mediates cell-cell adhesion by binding a ligand expressed on lymphoid cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Bamezai, A; Rock, K L

    1995-01-01

    The Ly-6 locus encodes several cell surface proteins whose functions are unknown. Although it is hypothesized that these proteins may be receptors, there is no direct evidence that they bind a ligand. Herein we present evidence that Ly-6A.2, a Ly-6 protein expressed on T lymphocytes, binds a ligand expressed on normal thymocytes and splenic B and T cells. We find that transgenic thymocytes that overexpress Ly-6A.2 spontaneously aggregate in culture. This homotypic adhesion requires the overex...

  12. Detection of calmodulin binding protein at 170 KDA in BALB, AKR, DON and chicken granulosa cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calmodulin (CAM) has been shown to bind to the epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor (170 kDa) and is phosphorylated in a EGF dependent manner in the A431 human epidermoid carcinoma cells. In the present study, they report 125I-CAM binding to a 170 kDa protein detected in cell membrane vesicles of Balb/3T3, AKR, DON and chicken granulosa cells. Purified plasma membranes from these cells were resolved via electrophoresis (without heat denaturation) and electroblotted onto nictrocellulose paper. Upon hybridizing against 125I-CAM, a distinct autoradiographic band occurred at 170 kDa for all the cells lines under study. The binding of CAM is specific and can be displaced with the addition of excess unlabeled CAM. The result suggest that 125I-CAM may bind to the 170 kDa EGF receptor in BALB, AKR, DON and chicken granulosa cells

  13. Heparin Binds Endothelial Cell Growth Factor, the Principal Endothelial Cell Mitogen in Bovine Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maciag, Thomas; Mehlman, Tevie; Friesel, Robert; Schreiber, Alain B.

    1984-08-01

    Endothelial cell growth factor (ECGF), an anionic polypeptide mitogen, binds to immobilized heparin. The interaction between the acidic polypeptide and the anionic carbohydrate suggests a mechanism that is independent of ion exchange. Monoclonal antibodies to purified bovine ECGF inhibited the biological activity of ECGF in crude preparations of bovine brain. These data indicate that ECGF is the principal mitogen for endothelial cells from bovine brain, that heparin affinity chromatography may be used to purify and concentrate ECGF, and that the affinity of ECGF for heparin may have structural and perhaps biological significance.

  14. Sequence and chromatin determinants of cell-type-specific transcription factor binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arvey, Aaron; Agius, Phaedra; Noble, William Stafford; Leslie, Christina

    2012-09-01

    Gene regulatory programs in distinct cell types are maintained in large part through the cell-type-specific binding of transcription factors (TFs). The determinants of TF binding include direct DNA sequence preferences, DNA sequence preferences of cofactors, and the local cell-dependent chromatin context. To explore the contribution of DNA sequence signal, histone modifications, and DNase accessibility to cell-type-specific binding, we analyzed 286 ChIP-seq experiments performed by the ENCODE Consortium. This analysis included experiments for 67 transcriptional regulators, 15 of which were profiled in both the GM12878 (lymphoblastoid) and K562 (erythroleukemic) human hematopoietic cell lines. To model TF-bound regions, we trained support vector machines (SVMs) that use flexible k-mer patterns to capture DNA sequence signals more accurately than traditional motif approaches. In addition, we trained SVM spatial chromatin signatures to model local histone modifications and DNase accessibility, obtaining significantly more accurate TF occupancy predictions than simpler approaches. Consistent with previous studies, we find that DNase accessibility can explain cell-line-specific binding for many factors. However, we also find that of the 10 factors with prominent cell-type-specific binding patterns, four display distinct cell-type-specific DNA sequence preferences according to our models. Moreover, for two factors we identify cell-specific binding sites that are accessible in both cell types but bound only in one. For these sites, cell-type-specific sequence models, rather than DNase accessibility, are better able to explain differential binding. Our results suggest that using a single motif for each TF and filtering for chromatin accessible loci is not always sufficient to accurately account for cell-type-specific binding profiles. PMID:22955984

  15. Identification of albumin-binding proteins in capillary endothelial cells

    OpenAIRE

    1988-01-01

    Isolated fat tissue microvessels and lung, whose capillary endothelia express in situ specific binding sites for albumin, were homogenized and subjected to SDS-gel electrophoresis and electroblotting. The nitrocellulose strips were incubated with either albumin-gold (Alb-Au) and directly visualized, or with [125I]albumin (monomeric or polymeric) and autoradiographed. The extracts of both microvascular endothelium and the lung express albumin-binding proteins (ABPs) represented by two pairs of...

  16. Strain Variation in Glycosaminoglycan Recognition Influences Cell-Type-Specific Binding by Lyme Disease Spirochetes

    OpenAIRE

    Parveen, Nikhat; Robbins, Douglas; Leong, John M.

    1999-01-01

    Lyme disease, a chronic multisystemic disorder that can affect the skin, heart, joints, and nervous system is caused by Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato. Lyme disease spirochetes were previously shown to bind glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). In the current study, the GAG-binding properties of eight Lyme disease strains were determined. Binding by two high-passage HB19 derivatives to Vero cells could not be inhibited by enzymatic removal of GAGs or by the addition of exogenous GAG. The other six stra...

  17. Pigment Epithelium-derived Factor (PEDF) Binds to Cell-surface F1-ATP Synthase

    OpenAIRE

    NOTARI, LUIGI; Arakaki, Naokatu; Mueller, David; Meier, Scott; Amaral, Juan; Becerra, S. Patricia

    2010-01-01

    Pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF), a potent blocker of angiogenesis in vivo, and of endothelial cell migration and tubule formation, binds with high affinity to a yet unknown protein on the surface of endothelial cells. Given that protein fingerprinting suggested a match of a ~60-kDa PEDF-binding protein in bovine retina to Bos taurus F1-ATP synthase β-subunit, and that F1F0-ATP synthase components have been identified recently as cell-surface receptors, we examined the direct binding ...

  18. Cell surface syndecan-1 contributes to binding and function of macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) on epithelial tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasqualon, Tobias; Lue, Hongqi; Groening, Sabine; Pruessmeyer, Jessica; Jahr, Holger; Denecke, Bernd; Bernhagen, Jürgen; Ludwig, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    Surface expressed proteoglycans mediate the binding of cytokines and chemokines to the cell surface and promote migration of various tumor cell types including epithelial tumor cells. We here demonstrate that binding of the chemokine-like inflammatory cytokine macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) to epithelial lung and breast tumor cell lines A549 and MDA-MB231 is sensitive to enzymatic digestion of heparan sulphate chains and competitive inhibition with heparin. Moreover, MIF interaction with heparin was confirmed by chromatography and a structural comparison indicated a possible heparin binding site. These results suggested that proteoglycans carrying heparan sulphate chains are involved in MIF binding. Using shRNA-mediated gene silencing, we identified syndecan-1 as the predominant proteoglycan required for the interaction with MIF. MIF binding was decreased by induction of proteolytic shedding of syndecan-1, which could be prevented by inhibition of the metalloproteinases involved in this process. Finally, MIF induced the chemotactic migration of A549 cells, wound closure and invasion into matrigel without affecting cell proliferation. These MIF-induced responses were abrogated by heparin or by silencing of syndecan-1. Thus, our study indicates that syndecan-1 on epithelial tumor cells promotes MIF binding and MIF-mediated cell migration. This may represent a relevant mechanism through which MIF enhances tumor cell motility and metastasis. PMID:26852939

  19. RNA-binding proteins in mouse male germline stem cells: a mammalian perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Huayu

    2016-01-01

    Adult stem cells that reside in particular types of tissues are responsible for tissue homeostasis and regeneration. Cellular functions of adult stem cells are intricately related to the gene expression programs in those cells. Past research has demonstrated that regulation of gene expression at the transcriptional level can decisively alter cell fate of stem cells. However, cellular contents of mRNAs are sometimes not equivalent to proteins, the functional units of cells. It is increasingly realized that post-transcriptional and translational regulation of gene expression are also fundamental for stem cell functions. Compared to differentiated somatic cells, effects on cellular status manifested by varied expression of RNA-binding proteins and global protein synthesis have been demonstrated in several stem cell systems. Through the cooperation of both cis-elements of mRNAs and trans-acting RNA-binding proteins that are intimately associated with them, regulation of localization, stability, and translational status of mRNAs directly influences the self-renewal and differentiation of stem cells. Previous studies have uncovered some of the molecular mechanisms that underlie the functions of RNA-binding proteins in stem cells in invertebrate species. However, their roles in adult stem cells in mammals are just beginning to be unveiled. This review highlights some of the RNA-binding proteins that play important functions during the maintenance and differentiation of mouse male germline stem cells, the adult stem cells in the male reproductive organ. PMID:26839690

  20. Centrosomin: A Complex Mix of Long and Short Isoforms Is Required for Centrosome Function During Early Development in Drosophila melanogaster

    OpenAIRE

    Eisman, Robert C.; Phelps, Melissa A. S.; Kaufman, Thomas C.

    2009-01-01

    Centrosomin (Cnn) is a required core component in mitotic centrosomes during syncytial development and the presence of Cnn at centrosomes has become synonymous with fully functional centrosomes in Drosophila melanogaster. Previous studies of Cnn have attributed this embryonic function to a single isoform or splice variant. In this study, we present new evidence that significantly increases the complexity of cnn. Rather than a single isoform, Cnn function can be attributed to two unique classe...

  1. Preliminary screening and identification of the hepatocarcinoma cell-binding peptide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To explore the feasibility of screening and isolating homing peptides that bind specifically, or preferentially, to hepatocarcinoma cells using phage display random peptide library and to develop a new peptide which may be potentially used as targeting delivery carrier in the biological targeted diagnosis or therapy for liver cancer. Methods: A 12-mer peptide phage display library was used to screen and isolate peptides that bind to human hepatocarcinoma cells, and four rounds of subtractive panning were carried out with the human hepatocarcinoma cell line HepG2 as the target. The affinities of selected phage clones for human hepatocarcinoma cells were determined with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and compared with that to human liver cell and other tumor cells of different tissue origins, respectively. In addition, the binding site in the tumor cells was observed with immunofluorescence analysis under confocal light microscopy. The amino acid sequences of phages that bind HepG2 specifically were deduced through DNA sequencing. Based on the results of DNA sequence, a 16-mer peptide (WH16) was designed and synthesized. Binding ability of the new peptide, WH16, was determined with competitive inhibition test. Results: After four rounds of panning, the phages that were bound to and internalized in human hepatocarcinoma cells were isolated. ELISA and immunofluorescence analysis confirmed the affinity of these phages for hepatocarcinoma cells. 56.67%(17/30) of the isolated phages displayed repeated sequence FLLEPHLMDTSM, and FLEP was defined as conservative motif . Binding of the selected phage to HepG2 cells was inhibited by synthesized peptide WH16, that strongly support that cellular binding of the phage is mediated through its displayed peptide, and WH16 can also bind to HepG2. Conclusions: It is feasible to screen and isolate homing peptides that bind specifically, or preferentially, to hepatocarcinoma cells using phage display random peptide

  2. Preliminary screening and identification of the peptide binding to hepatocarcinoma cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: The present study was performed to screen and isolate homing peptides that bind specifically, or preferentially, to hepatocarcinoma cells using phage display of random peptide library with the purpose of developing a new peptide which may be potentially used as target delivery carrier in the biological target diagnosis or therapy for liver cancer. Methods: A peptide 12-mer phage display library was used to screen and isolate peptide that bind to human hepatocarcinoma cell, and four rounds subtractive panning were carried out with the human hepatocarcinoma cell line HepG2 as the target. The affinities of selected phage clones to human hepatocarcinoma cell were determined with ELISA and compared with human liver cell and other tumor cells of different tissue origins respectively. In addition, the binding site in the tumor cells was observed with immunofluorescence analysis under confocal light microscopy. The amino acid sequences of phages that bind HepG2 specifically were deduced though DNA sequencing. Based on the results of DNA sequence, a 16-mer peptide (WH16) was designed and synthesized. Binding ability of the new peptide WH16 was determined with competitive inhibition test. Results: After four rounds panning, the phages that bound to and internalized in human hepatocarcinoma cell were isolated. ELISA and immunofluorescence analysis confirmed the affinity of these phages to hepatpcarcinoma cells 56.57%(17/30) of the isolated phages displayed repeated sequence FLLEPHLMDTSM, and FLEP was defined as conservative motif. Binding of the selected phage to HepG2 cells was inhibited by synthesized peptide WH16, which strongly support that cellular binding of phage is mediated though its displayed peptide and WH16 can also bind to HepG2. Conclusion: It is feasible to screen and isolate homing peptides that bind specifically, or preferentially, to hepatocarcinoma cells using phage display of random peptide libraries. The sequence of peptide that can bind to

  3. Synthetic Peptide Ligands of the Antigen Binding Receptor Induce Programmed Cell Death in a Human B-Cell Lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renschler, Markus F.; Bhatt, Ramesh R.; Dower, William J.; Levy, Ronald

    1994-04-01

    Peptide ligands for the antigen binding site of the surface immunoglobulin receptor of a human B-cell lymphoma cell line were identified with the use of filamentous phage libraries displaying random 8- and 12-amino acid peptides. Corresponding synthetic peptides bound specifically to the antigen binding site of this immunoglobulin receptor and blocked the binding of an anti-idiotype antibody. The ligands, when conjugated to form dimers or tetramers, induced cell death by apoptosis in vitro with an IC50 between 40 and 200 nM. This effect was associated with specific stimulation of intracellular protein tyrosine phosphorylation.

  4. STD NMR spectroscopy: a case study of fosfomycin binding interactions in living bacterial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milagre, Cintia D.F.; Cabeca, Luis Fernando; Martins, Lucas G.; Marsaioli, Anita J., E-mail: anita@iq [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (IQ/UNICAMP), SP (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica

    2011-07-01

    A saturation transfer difference (STD) NMR experiment was successfully employed to observe the binding interactions of fosfomycin resistant and non-resistant bacterial strains using living cell suspensions, without the need for isotopic labelling of the ligand or receptor. (author)

  5. Mesangial cell-binding activity of serum immunoglobulin G in patients with lupus nephritis

    OpenAIRE

    Yap, Desmond Y.H.; Yung, Susan; Zhang, Qing; Tang, Colin; Chan, Tak Mao

    2014-01-01

    In vitro data showed that immunoglobulin G (IgG) from patients with lupus nephritis (LN) could bind to cultured human mesangial cells (HMC). The clinical relevance of such binding was unknown. Binding of IgG and subclasses was measured in 189 serial serum samples from 23 patients with Class III/IV+/-V LN (48 during renal flares, 141 during low level disease activity (LLDA)). 64 patients with non-lupus glomerular diseases (NLGD) and 23 healthy individuals were used as controls. HMC-binding was...

  6. Oligonucleotide delivery with cell surface binding and cell penetrating Peptide amphiphile nanospheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mumcuoglu, Didem; Sardan, Melis; Tekinay, Turgay; Guler, Mustafa O; Tekinay, Ayse B

    2015-05-01

    A drug delivery system designed specifically for oligonucleotide therapeutics can ameliorate the problems associated with the in vivo delivery of these molecules. The internalization of free oligonucleotides is challenging, and cytotoxicity is the main obstacle for current transfection vehicles. To develop nontoxic delivery vehicles for efficient transfection of oligonucleotides, we designed a self-assembling peptide amphiphile (PA) nanosphere delivery system decorated with cell penetrating peptides (CPPs) containing multiple arginine residues (R4 and R8), and a cell surface binding peptide (KRSR), and report the efficiency of this system in delivering G-3129, a Bcl-2 antisense oligonucleotide (AON). PA/AON (peptide amphiphile/antisense oligonucleotide) complexes were characterized with regards to their size and secondary structure, and their cellular internalization efficiencies were evaluated. The effect of the number of arginine residues on the cellular internalization was investigated by both flow cytometry and confocal imaging, and the results revealed that uptake efficiency improved as the number of arginines in the sequence increased. The combined effect of cell penetration and surface binding property on the cellular internalization and its uptake mechanism was also evaluated by mixing R8-PA and KRSR-PA. R8 and R8/KRSR decorated PAs were found to drastically increase the internalization of AONs compared to nonbioactive PA control. Overall, the KRSR-decorated self-assembled PA nanospheres were demonstrated to be noncytotoxic delivery vectors with high transfection rates and may serve as a promising delivery system for AONs. PMID:25828697

  7. Heterologously expressed Staphylococcus aureus fibronectin-binding proteins are sufficient for invasion of host cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sinha, B; Francois, P; Que, Y A; Hussain, M; Heilmann, C; Moreillon, P; Lew, D; Krause, K H; Peters, G; Herrmann, M

    2000-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus invasion of mammalian cells, including epithelial, endothelial, and fibroblastic cells, critically depends on fibronectin bridging between S. aureus fibronectin-binding proteins (FnBPs) and the host fibronectin receptor integrin alpha(5)beta(1) (B. Sinha et al., Cell. Microbiol

  8. Internal binding sites for MSH: Analyses in wild-type and variant Cloudman melanoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cloudman S91 mouse melanoma cells express both external (plasma membrane) and internal binding sites for MSH. Using 125I-beta melanotropin (beta-MSH) as a probe, we report here an extensive series of studies on the biological relevance of these internal sites. Cells were swollen in a hypotonic buffer and lysed, and a particulate fraction was prepared by high-speed centrifugation. This fraction was incubated with 125I-beta-MSH with or without excess nonradioactive beta-MSH in the cold for 2 hours. The material was then layered onto a step-wise sucrose gradient and centrifuged; fractions were collected and counted in a gamma counter or assayed for various enzymatic activities. The following points were established: (1) Specific binding sites for MSH were observed sedimenting at an average density of 50% sucrose in amelanotic cells and at higher densities in melanotic cells. (2) These sites were similar in density to those observed when intact cells were labeled externally with 125I-beta-MSH and then warmed to promote internalization of the hormone. (3) Most of the internal binding sites were not as dense as fully melanized melanosomes. (4) In control experiments, the MSH binding sites were not found in cultured hepatoma cells. (5) Variant melanoma cells, which differed from the wild-type in their responses to MSH, had reduced expression of internal binding sites even though their ability to bind MSH to the outer cell surface appeared normal. (MSH-induced responses included changes in tyrosinase, dopa oxidase, and dopachrome conversion factor activities, melanization, proliferation, and morphology.) (6) Isobutylmethylxanthine, which enhanced cellular responsiveness to MSH, also enhanced expression of internal binding sites. The results indicate that expression of internal binding sites for MSH is an important criterion for cellular responsiveness to the hormone

  9. Binding of Candida albicans yeast cells to mouse popliteal lymph node tissue is mediated by macrophages.

    OpenAIRE

    Han, Y.; Van Rooijen, N.; Cutler, J E

    1993-01-01

    We previously reported that Candida albicans yeast cells adhere to the macrophage-rich medullary and subcapsular sinus areas of mouse lymph node tissue. To determine whether the yeast cell-lymph node interaction is mediated by macrophages, the effect of specific elimination of macrophages on yeast cell binding was studied, and yeast cell adherence was correlated with the ingestion of India ink by lymph node cells. Macrophage elimination was done by use of liposome-containing dichloromethylene...

  10. Removal of glycosaminoglycans from bovine granulosa cells contributes to increased binding of hydrogen-3 heparin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ax, R.L.; Stodd, C.M.; Boehm, S.K.; Bellin, M.E.

    1986-02-01

    Granulosa cells from small or large bovine follicles were pretreated with enzymes that hydrolyze various glycosaminoglycans, and binding of (/sup 3/H)-heparin to the granulosa was measured. Binding of (/sup 3/H) heparin increased significantly after enzymatic pretreatments with chondroitinase ABC and fungal hyaluronidase, and similar results were obtained with granulosa from small and large follicles. No changes in binding of (/sup 3/H) heparin were detected after hydrolyses with chondroitinase AC and heparinase in either follicle size. Heparitinase, which hydrolyzes heparan sulfate, led to a significant 50% increase in binding of (/sup 3/H) heparin to granulosa from large follicles but was without effect in small follicles. These results suggest that the lower binding of (/sup 3/H) heparin, which has been reported with follicular enlargement, may be due to heparan sulfate occupying or obstructing binding sites for heparin on granulosa from large follicles.

  11. The centrosomin protein is required for centrosome assembly and function during cleavage in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Megraw, T L; Li, K; Kao, L R; Kaufman, T C

    1999-07-01

    Centrosomin is a 150 kDa centrosomal protein of Drosophila melanogaster. To study the function of Centrosomin in the centrosome, we have recovered mutations that are viable but male and female sterile (cnnmfs). We have shown that these alleles (1, 2, 3, 7, 8 and hk21) induce a maternal effect on early embryogenesis and result in the accumulation of low or undetectable levels of Centrosomin in the centrosomes of cleavage stage embryos. Hemizygous cnn females produce embryos that show dramatic defects in chromosome segregation and spindle organization during the syncytial cleavage divisions. In these embryos the syncytial divisions proceed as far as the twelfth cycle, and embryos fail to cellularize. Aberrant divisions and nuclear fusions occur in the early cycles of the nuclear divisions, and become more prominent at later stages. Giant nuclei are seen in late stage embryos. The spindles that form in mutant embryos exhibit multiple anomalies. There is a high occurrence of apparently linked spindles that share poles, indicating that Centrosomin is required for the proper spacing and separation of mitotic spindles within the syncytium. Spindle poles in the mutants contain little or no detectable amounts of the centrosomal proteins CP60, CP190 and (gamma)-tubulin and late stage embryos often do not have astral microtubules at their spindle poles. Spindle morphology and centrosomal composition suggest that the primary cause of these division defects in mutant embryos is centrosomal malfunction. These results suggest that Centrosomin is required for the assembly and function of centrosomes during the syncytial cleavage divisions. PMID:10357928

  12. Expression of Hyaluronan and the Hyaluronan-Binding Proteoglycans Neurocan, Aggrecan and Versican by Neural Stem Cells and Neural Cells Derived from Embryonic Stem Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Abaskharoun, Mary; Bellemare, Marie; Lau, Elizabeth; Margolis, Richard U

    2010-01-01

    We have examined the expression and localization patterns of hyaluronan and hyaluronan-binding chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans in neural stem cells and differentiated neural cells derived from mouse embryonic stem cells. Expression of proteoglycans and hyaluronan was weak in the SSEA1-positive embryonic stem cells but increased noticeably after retinoic acid induction to nestin-positive neural stem cells. After subsequent plating, the hyaluronan-binding chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans agg...

  13. Lectin binding profiles of SSEA-4 enriched, pluripotent human embryonic stem cell surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shin Soojung

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pluripotent human embryonic stem cells (hESCs have the potential to form every cell type in the body. These cells must be appropriately characterized prior to differentiation studies or when defining characteristics of the pluripotent state. Some developmentally regulated cell surface antigens identified by monoclonal antibodies in a variety of species and stem cell types have proven to be side chains of membrane glycolipids and glycoproteins. Therefore, to examine hESC surfaces for other potential pluripotent markers, we used a panel of 14 lectins, which were chosen based on their specificity for a variety of carbohydrates and carbohydrate linkages, along with stage specific embryonic antigen-4 (SSEA-4, to determine binding quantitation by flow cytometry and binding localization in adherent colonies by immunocytochemistry. Results Enriching cells for SSEA-4 expression increased the percentage of SSEA-4 positive cells to 98–99%. Using enriched high SSEA-4-expressing hESCs, we then analyzed the binding percentages of selected lectins and found a large variation in binding percentages ranging from 4% to 99% binding. Lycopersicon (tomatoesculetum lectin (TL, Ricinus communis agglutinin (RCA, and Concanavalin A (Con A bound to SSEA-4 positive regions of hESCs and with similar binding percentages as SSEA-4. In contrast, we found Dolichos biflorus agglutinin (DBA and Lotus tetragonolobus lectin (LTL did not bind to hESCs while Phaseolus vulgaris leuco-agglutinin (PHA-L, Vicia villosa agglutinin (VVA, Ulex europaeus agglutinin (UEA, Phaseolus vulgaris erythro-agglutinin (PHA-E, and Maackia amurensis agglutinin (MAA bound partially to hESCs. These binding percentages correlated well with immunocytochemistry results. Conclusion Our results provide information about types of carbohydrates and carbohydrate linkages found on pluripotent hESC surfaces. We propose that TL, RCA and Con A may be used as markers that are associated with the

  14. Neuron-glia cell adhesion molecule interacts with neurons and astroglia via different binding mechanisms

    OpenAIRE

    1988-01-01

    The neuron-glia cell adhesion molecule (Ng-CAM) is present in the central nervous system on postmitotic neurons and in the periphery on neurons and Schwann cells. It has been implicated in binding between neurons and between neurons and glia. To understand the molecular mechanisms of Ng-CAM binding, we analyzed the aggregation of chick Ng- CAM either immobilized on 0.5-micron beads (Covaspheres) or reconstituted into liposomes. The results were correlated with the binding of these particles t...

  15. Addition of lysophospholipids with large head groups to cells inhibits Shiga toxin binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ailte, Ieva; Lingelem, Anne Berit Dyve; Kavaliauskiene, Simona; Bergan, Jonas; Kvalvaag, Audun Sverre; Myrann, Anne-Grethe; Skotland, Tore; Sandvig, Kirsten

    2016-01-01

    Shiga toxin (Stx), an AB5 toxin, binds specifically to the neutral glycosphingolipid Gb3 at the cell surface before being transported into cells. We here demonstrate that addition of conical lysophospholipids (LPLs) with large head groups inhibit Stx binding to cells whereas LPLs with small head groups do not. Lysophosphatidylinositol (LPI 18:0), the most efficient LPL with the largest head group, was selected for in-depth investigations to study how the binding of Stx is regulated. We show that the inhibition of Stx binding by LPI is reversible and possibly regulated by cholesterol since addition of methyl-β-cyclodextrin (mβCD) reversed the ability of LPI to inhibit binding. LPI-induced inhibition of Stx binding is independent of signalling and membrane turnover as it occurs in fixed cells as well as after depletion of cellular ATP. Furthermore, data obtained with fluorescent membrane dyes suggest that LPI treatment has a direct effect on plasma membrane lipid packing with shift towards a liquid disordered phase in the outer leaflet, while lysophosphoethanolamine (LPE), which has a small head group, does not. In conclusion, our data show that cellular treatment with conical LPLs with large head groups changes intrinsic properties of the plasma membrane and modulates Stx binding to Gb3. PMID:27458147

  16. Binding of iodinated erythropoietin to rat bone marrow cells under normal and anemic conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akahane, K.; Tojo, A.; Fukamachi, H.; Kitamura, T.; Saito, T.; Urabe, A.; Takaku, F.

    1989-02-01

    Specific binding sites for erythropoietin (Epo) were shown in normal and anemic rat bone marrow cells using (125I)labeled human recombinant Epo. When rats were treated once or several times with phenylhydrazine or malotilate, or by phlebotomy, the serum Epo level determined by RIA began to increase rapidly. Thereafter, both the number of erythroid colony-forming unit (CFU-E)-derived colonies and the Epo binding capacity of bone marrow cells increased almost simultaneously in response to induced anemic states, suggesting that the amount of Epo binding in bone marrow cells may reflect in vivo erythropoiesis. Scatchard analysis of the binding data from normal rats revealed the presence of a single class of binding sites (Kd = 0.18 +/- 0.04 nM, 38 +/- 5 sites/cell). In anemic states, the apparent average receptor number per cell increased (52-62 sites/cell) without changing in binding affinity toward Epo. Furthermore, (125I)Epo was cross-linked to the cell surface molecule of approximately 165 kd in nonreducing conditions and 75 kd in reducing conditions. Autoradiographic analysis indicated that Epo receptors were distributed on immature erythroid cells. Proerythroblasts were the most heavily labeled, whereas orthochromatic erythroblasts and cells of myeloid and lymphoid lineages were not labeled. Calculations based on Scatchard and autoradiographic analysis showed that proerythroblasts have 390 receptor sites per cell, twice as many as basophilic or polychromatophilic erythroblasts have. These results are consistent with the stage-specific action of Epo in physiological differentiation of erythroid cells.

  17. A poxvirus protein that binds to and inactivates IL-18, and inhibits NK cell response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Born, T L; Morrison, L A; Esteban, D J; VandenBos, T; Thebeau, L G; Chen, N; Spriggs, M K; Sims, J E; Buller, R M

    2000-03-15

    IL-18 induces IFN-gamma and NK cell cytotoxicity, making it a logical target for viral antagonism of host defense. We demonstrate that the ectromelia poxvirus p13 protein, bearing homology to the mammalian IL-18 binding protein, binds IL-18, and inhibits its activity in vitro. Binding of IL-18 to the viral p13 protein was compared with binding to the cellular IL-18R. The dissociation constant of p13 for murine IL-18 is 5 nM, compared with 0.2 nM for the cellular receptor heterodimer. Mice infected with a p13 deletion mutant of ectromelia virus had elevated cytotoxicity for YAC-1 tumor cell targets compared with control animals. Additionally, the p13 deletion mutant virus exhibited decreased levels of infectivity. Our data suggest that inactivation of IL-18, and subsequent impairment of NK cell cytotoxicity, may be one mechanism by which ectromelia evades the host immune response. PMID:10706717

  18. RNA-binding proteins to assess gene expression states of co-cultivated cells in response to tumor cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Penalva Luiz OF

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tumors and complex tissues consist of mixtures of communicating cells that differ significantly in their gene expression status. In order to understand how different cell types influence one another's gene expression, it will be necessary to monitor the mRNA profiles of each cell type independently and to dissect the mechanisms that regulate their gene expression outcomes. Results In order to approach these questions, we have used RNA-binding proteins such as ELAV/Hu, poly (A binding protein (PABP and cap-binding protein (eIF-4E as reporters of gene expression. Here we demonstrate that the epitope-tagged RNA binding protein, PABP, expressed separately in tumor cells and endothelial cells can be used to discriminate their respective mRNA targets from mixtures of these cells without significant mRNA reassortment or exchange. Moreover, using this approach we identify a set of endothelial genes that respond to the presence of co-cultured breast tumor cells. Conclusion RNA-binding proteins can be used as reporters to elucidate components of operational mRNA networks and operons involved in regulating cell-type specific gene expression in tissues and tumors.

  19. Binding of erythropoietin to CFU-E derived from fetal mouse liver cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukamachi, H.; Saito, T.; Tojo, A.; Kitamura, T.; Urabe, A.; Takaku, F.

    1987-09-01

    The binding of recombinant erythropoietin (EPO) to fetal mouse liver cells (FMLC) was investigated using a radioiodinated derivative which retained full biological activity. FMLC were fractionated using a preformed Percoll density gradient. Using the fractionated FMLC, the ability to form CFU-E colonies in a semisolid culture was examined, and the binding of (/sup 125/I)EPO was measured. The highest specific binding of (/sup 125/I)EPO was observed in a fraction with a density between 1.062 and 1.076 g/ml. The same fraction showed the highest ability to form CFU-E-derived colonies. After suspension culture of FMLC with EPO for 2 days, differentiated erythroid cells with higher density markedly increased. The specific binding of (/sup 125/I)EPO to these cells almost disappeared with differentiation. Scatchard analysis with cells of the CFU-E-enriched fraction showed a nonlinear curve, suggesting the existence of two classes of binding sites. One binding site was high-affinity (Kd1 = 0.41 nM), and the other low-affinity (Kd2 = 3.13 nM). These results suggest that the expression of EPO receptors on the erythroid cells is highest in CFU-E.

  20. The cloning and expression characterization of the centrosome protein genes family (centrin genes) in rat testis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN; Xiaodong(孙晓冬); GE; Yehua(葛晔华); MA; Jing(马静); YU; Zuoren(俞作仁); LI; Sai(李赛); WANG; Yongchao(王永潮); XUE; Shepu(薛社普); HAN; Daishu(韩代书)

    2002-01-01

    Centrins are members of the centrosome protein family, which is highly conserved during revolution. The homologous genes of centrin in many organisms had been cloned, but the sequences of the rat centrin genes were not reported yet in GenBank. We cloned the cDNA fragments of centrin-1, -2 and -3 from the rat testis by RT-PCR, and analyzed the homology of the deduced amino acid sequences. The expression characterization of centrin genes in rat spermatogenesis was carried out by semi-quantitative RT-PCR. The results show that the homology of the corresponding centrin proteins in human, mouse and rat is high. The expression of centrin-1 is testis-specific, spermatogenic cell-specific and developmental stage-related. Centrin-1 begins to be transcribed when the meiosis occurs, and its mRNA level reaches the peak in round spermatids. Centrin-2 and centrin-3 are highly expressed in spermatogonia and their mRNA level decreases markedly when meiosis occurs. These results suggest that centrin-1 may play roles in meiosis and spermiogenesis, and centrin-2 and centrin-3 may be related to mitosis.

  1. Differential utilization of binding loop flexibility in T cell receptor ligand selection and cross-reactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayres, Cory M; Scott, Daniel R; Corcelli, Steven A; Baker, Brian M

    2016-01-01

    Complementarity determining region (CDR) loop flexibility has been suggested to play an important role in the selection and binding of ligands by T cell receptors (TCRs) of the cellular immune system. However, questions remain regarding the role of loop motion in TCR binding, and crystallographic structures have raised questions about the extent to which generalizations can be made. Here we studied the flexibility of two structurally well characterized αβ TCRs, A6 and DMF5. We found that the two receptors utilize loop motion very differently in ligand binding and cross-reactivity. While the loops of A6 move rapidly in an uncorrelated fashion, those of DMF5 are substantially less mobile. Accordingly, the mechanisms of binding and cross-reactivity are very different between the two TCRs: whereas A6 relies on conformational selection to select and bind different ligands, DMF5 uses a more rigid, permissive architecture with greater reliance on slower motions or induced-fit. In addition to binding site flexibility, we also explored whether ligand-binding resulted in common dynamical changes in A6 and DMF5 that could contribute to TCR triggering. Although binding-linked motional changes propagated throughout both receptors, no common features were observed, suggesting that changes in nanosecond-level TCR structural dynamics do not contribute to T cell signaling. PMID:27118724

  2. 25 Years of Tension over Actin Binding to the Cadherin Cell Adhesion Complex: The Devil is in the Details.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, W James; Weis, William I

    2016-07-01

    Over the past 25 years, there has been a conceptual (re)evolution in understanding how the cadherin cell adhesion complex, which contains F-actin-binding proteins, binds to the actin cytoskeleton. There is now good synergy between structural, biochemical, and cell biological results that the cadherin-catenin complex binds to F-actin under force. PMID:27166091

  3. Binding of tissue plasminogen activator to human umbilical vein endothelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The binding of purified, recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) to human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) was studied in vitro using immunofluorescence as well as radiolabeled tPA. Immunofluorescence was performed on HUVEC grown on round glass coverslips using rabbit anti-human tPA and fluorescein-conjugated anti-rabbit immunoglobulin. Positive fluorescence was observed only after incubation of HUVEC with tPA. HUVEC were grown to confluence in 24-well tissue culture plates, washed, and incubated with a constant amount of 125I-tPA and various concentrations of unlabeled tPA. The binding of tPA to HUVEC was found to be specific, saturable, and reversible. Scatchard analysis yielded as equilibrium constant (K/sub eq/) of 4.2 x 106 M-1 and 1.2 x 107 binding sites per cell. Binding was inhibited by positively charged amino acids and by D-phenylalanyl-L-prolyl-L-arginine chloromethyl ketone but not by carbohydrates including mannose, galactose, N-acetyl glucosamine and N-acetyl galactosamine. Neat human plasma abrogates but does not totally inhibit binding of tPA to HUVEC. Binding was neither enhanced nor inhibited by fibronectin. Although the affinity of binding of tPA to HUVEC is low, the endothelial cell may be involved in regulating plasma levels of tPA in vivo which may have therapeutic significance

  4. Multiple opioid receptor binding in dissociated intact guinea pig brain cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tam, S.W.; James, D.W.

    1986-03-05

    Dissociated intact guinea pig brain cells were prepared by the method of Rogers and El-Fakahany. Over 95% of these cells are viable as demonstrated by their exclusion of the dye trypan blue. Opioid receptor binding assays were performed in a modified Kreb-Ringers physiological buffer. The following radiolabeled ligands and conditions were used to selectively labeled multiple opioid receptors: mu binding, 1 nM (/sup 3/H)naloxone + 20 nM DADLE + 300 nM U50,488H; kappa binding, 4 nM (-)-(/sup 3/H)-EKC + 100 nM DAGO + 500 nM DADLE; delta binding, 2 nM (/sup 3/H)-DADLE + 100 nM DAGO + 300 nM U50,488H; sigma binding, 4 nM (+)-(/sup 3/H)SKF 10,047. The intact brain cells in physiological buffer demonstrated specific binding for mu, kappa, delta, and sigma receptors. The relative binding potency of naloxone for each of the receptor types is arbitrarily set at 1.

  5. Multiple opioid receptor binding in dissociated intact guinea pig brain cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dissociated intact guinea pig brain cells were prepared by the method of Rogers and El-Fakahany. Over 95% of these cells are viable as demonstrated by their exclusion of the dye trypan blue. Opioid receptor binding assays were performed in a modified Kreb-Ringers physiological buffer. The following radiolabeled ligands and conditions were used to selectively labeled multiple opioid receptors: mu binding, 1 nM [3H]naloxone + 20 nM DADLE + 300 nM U50,488H; kappa binding, 4 nM (-)-[3H]-EKC + 100 nM DAGO + 500 nM DADLE; delta binding, 2 nM [3H]-DADLE + 100 nM DAGO + 300 nM U50,488H; sigma binding, 4 nM (+)-[3H]SKF 10,047. The intact brain cells in physiological buffer demonstrated specific binding for mu, kappa, delta, and sigma receptors. The relative binding potency of naloxone for each of the receptor types is arbitrarily set at 1

  6. The Dynamic Pollen Tube Cytoskeleton: Live Cell Studies Using Actin-Binding and Microtubule-Binding Reporter Proteins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Alice Y. Cheung; Qiao-hong Duan; Silvia Santos Costa; Barend H.J.de Graaf; Veronica S.Di Stilio; Jose Feijo; Hen-Ming Wu

    2008-01-01

    Pollen tubes elongate within the pistil to transport sperm cells to the embryo sac for fertilization.Growth occurs exclusively at the tube apex,rendering pollen tube elongation a most dramatic polar cell growth process.A hall-mark pollen tube feature is its cytoskeleton,which comprises elaborately organized and dynamic actin microfilaments and microtubules.Pollen tube growth is dependent on the actin cytoskeleton;its organization and regulation have been exalined extensively by various approaches.including fluorescent protein labeled actin-binding proteins in live cell studies.Using the previously described GFP-NtADF1 and GFP-LIADF1, and a new actin reporter protein NtPLIM2b-GFP,we re-affirm that the predominant actin structures in elongating tobacco and lily pollen tubes are long,streaming actin cables along the pollen tube shank,and a subapical structure comprising shorter actin cables.The subapical collection of actin microfilaments undergoes dynamic changes,giving rise to the appearance of structures that range from basket-or funnel-shaped,mesh-like to a subtle ring.NtPLIM2b-GFP is used in combination with a guanine nucleotide exchange factor for the Rho GTPases,AtROP-GEF1,to illustrate the use of these actin reporter proteins to explore the linkage between the polar cell growth process and its actin cytoskeleton.Contrary to the actin cytoskeleton,microtubules appear not to play a direct role in supporting the polar cell growth process in angiosperm pollen tubes.Using a microtubule reporter protein based on the microtubule end-binding protein from Arabidopsis AtEB1,GFP-AtEB1,we show that the extensive microtubule network in elongating pollen tubes displays varying degrees of dynamics.These reporter proteins provide versatile tools to explore the functional connection between major structural and signaling components of the polar pollen tube growth process.

  7. Binding and uptake of diphtheria toxin by toxin-resistant Chinese hamster ovary and mouse cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Didsbury, J R; Moehring, J M; Moehring, T. J.

    1983-01-01

    We investigated two phenotypically distinct types of diphtheria toxin-resistant mutants of Chinese hamster cells and compared their resistance with that of naturally resistant mouse cells. All are resistant due to a defect in the process of internalization and delivery of toxin to its target in the cytosol, elongation factor 2. By cell hybridization studies, analysis of cross-resistance, and determination of specific binding sites for 125I-labeled diphtheria toxin, we showed that these cell s...

  8. Microassay for measurement of binding of radiolabelled ligands to cell surface molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An improved technique for measuring the binding of radiolabelled ligands to cell surface molecules has been developed by modification of a procedure using centrifugation through a water-immiscible oil to separate free and cell-bound ligand. It maximises the percentage of ligand bound since cell-bound and free ligand can be separated easily and reproducibly even when very small reaction volumes are used. This permits low levels of ligand radiolabelling and relatively low numbers of cells to be used

  9. AFBI assay - Aptamer Fluorescence Binding and Internalization assay for cultured adherent cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiel, William H; Giangrande, Paloma H

    2016-07-01

    The SELEX (Systematic Evolution of Ligands by Exponential Enrichment) process allows for the enrichment of DNA or RNA aptamers from a complex nucleic acid library that are specific for a target molecule. The SELEX process has been adapted from identifying aptamers in vitro using recombinant target protein to cell-based methodologies (Cell-SELEX), where the targets are expressed on the surface of cells. One major advantage of Cell-SELEX is that the target molecules are maintained in a native confirmation. Additionally, Cell-SELEX may be used to discover novel therapeutic biomarkers by performing selections on diseased versus healthy cells. However, a caveat to Cell-SELEX is that testing of single aptamers identified in the selection is laborious, time-consuming, and expensive. The most frequently used methods to screen for aptamer binding and internalization on cells are flow cytometry and quantitative PCR (qPCR). While flow cytometry can directly assess binding of a fluorescently-labeled aptamer to a target, it requires significant starting material and is not easily scalable. qPCR-based approaches are highly sensitive but have non-negligible experiment-to-experiment variability due to the number of sample processing steps. Herein we describe a cell-based aptamer fluorescence binding and internalization (AFBI) assay. This assay requires minimal reagents and has few experimental steps/manipulations, thereby allowing for rapid screening of many aptamers and conditions simultaneously and direct quantitation of aptamer binding and internalization. PMID:26972784

  10. Anti-galactose antibodies do not bind to normal human red cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors investigated the possibility that senescent cell IgG might have an anti-galactose (anti-gal) specificity as suggested by others. Anti-gal was isolated from normal human serum with α melibiose-agarose. The assays used were hemagglutination, rosetting, phagocytosis, and 125I protein A binding assay, immunoblotting, and glycine/HCL, pH 2.3, versus sugar elutions. Results revealed binding of anti-gal to rabbit but not human RBC. Immunoblotting of anti-gal revealed labeling of approx.29 bands in rabbit red cell membranes and no labeling of autologous human red cell membranes. The authors attempted to inhibit binding of anti-gal with various sugars. Melibiose caused enhancement rather than inhibition of agglutination when used at concentrations reported by previous investigators to cause inhibition. Neither α melibiose or galactose caused inhibition of phagocytosis of senescent cells. Senescent cell IgG was not displaced from freshly isolated old red cells by incubation with melibiose or galactose as determined by an 125I protein A binding assay. The authors were also unable to elute IgG from stored red cells with galactose. The authors conclude that senescent cell IgG does not have an anti-galactose specificity. The authors were unable to demonstrate an anti-gal antibody to normal human red cells

  11. Ca2(+)-sensitive binding of thrombospondin to U937 cells is due to the formation of calcium precipitate in the binding medium.

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, X.; Mosher, D F

    1991-01-01

    Thrombospondin (TSP) binds to U937 monocytic cells in a Ca2(+)-enhancible and EDTA-inhibitable manner (Silverstein, R. L., and R. L. Nachman. 1987. J. Clin. Invest. 79:867-874; Silverstein, R. L., A. S. Asch, and R. L. Nachman. 1989. J. Clin. Invest. 84:546-552). We reproduced the results when RPMI cell culture medium, but not when HBSS was used as binding medium. Addition of 1 mM Ca2+ to RPMI medium increased the binding of TSP to suspended U937 cells more than eightfold; the increase was bl...

  12. Biologically active monoiodinated alpha-MSH derivatives for receptor binding studies using human melanoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three different monoiodinated radioligands of alpha-MSH (alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone) were compared in a binding assay with human D10 melanoma cells: [Tyr(125I)2]-alpha-MSH, [Tyr(125I)2,NIe4]-alpha-MSH, and [Tyr(125I)2,NIe4,D-Phe7]-alpha-MSH. They were prepared either by the classical chloramine T method or by the Enzymobead method. A simple and rapid purification scheme was developed consisting of a primary separation on reversed-phase C18 silica cartridges immediately after the iodination, followed by HPLC purification before each binding experiment. Biological testing of the three radioligands showed that they all retained high melanotropic activity in the B16 melanin assay and the Anolis melanophore assay. However, in human D10 melanoma cells, [Tyr(125I)2,NIe4]-alpha-MSH led to a high degree of non-specific binding to the cells which could not be displaced by excess alpha-MSH and only partially by [NIe4]-alpha-MSH. The [Tyr(125I)2,NIe4,D-Phe7]-alpha-MSH tracer gave similar results but with a much lower proportion of non-specific binding. On the other hand, [Tyr(125I)2]-alpha-MSH proved to be an excellent radioligand whose non-specific binding to the D10 cells was not higher than 20% of the total binding

  13. Localization of Cellular Retinol-Binding Protein and Retinol-Binding Protein in Cells Comprising the Blood-Brain Barrier of Rat and Human

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, Paul N.; Bok, Dean; Ong, David E.

    1990-06-01

    Brain is not generally recognized as an organ that requiries vitamin A, perhaps because no obvious histologic lesions have been observed in severely vitamin A-deficient animals. However, brain tissue does contain cellular vitamin A-binding proteins and a nuclear receptor protein for retinoic acid. In the present study, immunohistochemical techniques were used to determine the cell-specific location of cellular retinol-binding protein in human and rat brain tissue. Cellular retinol-binding protein was localized specifically within the endothelial cells of the brain microvasculature and within the cuboidal epithelial cells of the choroid plexus, two primary sites of the mammalian blood-brain barrier. In addition, autoradiographic procedures demonstrated binding sites for serum retinol-binding protein in the choroidal epithelium. These observations suggest that a significant movement of retinol across the blood-brain barrier may occur.

  14. Protein C inhibitor (PCI binds to phosphatidylserine exposing cells with implications in the phagocytosis of apoptotic cells and activated platelets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Rieger

    Full Text Available Protein C Inhibitor (PCI is a secreted serine protease inhibitor, belonging to the family of serpins. In addition to activated protein C PCI inactivates several other proteases of the coagulation and fibrinolytic systems, suggesting a regulatory role in hemostasis. Glycosaminoglycans and certain negatively charged phospholipids, like phosphatidylserine, bind to PCI and modulate its activity. Phosphatidylerine (PS is exposed on the surface of apoptotic cells and known as a phagocytosis marker. We hypothesized that PCI might bind to PS exposed on apoptotic cells and thereby influence their removal by phagocytosis. Using Jurkat T-lymphocytes and U937 myeloid cells, we show here that PCI binds to apoptotic cells to a similar extent at the same sites as Annexin V, but in a different manner as compared to live cells (defined spots on ∼10-30% of cells. PCI dose dependently decreased phagocytosis of apoptotic Jurkat cells by U937 macrophages. Moreover, the phagocytosis of PS exposing, activated platelets by human blood derived monocytes declined in the presence of PCI. In U937 cells the expression of PCI as well as the surface binding of PCI increased with time of phorbol ester treatment/macrophage differentiation. The results of this study suggest a role of PCI not only for the function and/or maturation of macrophages, but also as a negative regulator of apoptotic cell and activated platelets removal.

  15. Characterization of cell surface adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate-binding proteins in Y-1 mouse adrenal tumor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adrenal cortical cells are known to export cAMP and have binding proteins and cAMP-dependent protein kinase activity associated with their plasma membranes. Because these properties suggest a function for extracellular cAMP, we have undertaken a search for specific cell surface receptors for this cyclic nucleotide. Y-1 mouse adrenal tumor cells actively export cAMP by an energy-dependent process. Analysis of Scatchard plots of the equilibrium binding of [3H]cAMP to these cells indicate the existence of two classes of cAMP binders: one with high affinity (K/sub a/ . 2.9 X 10(9) M-1) and another with low affinity (K/sub a/ . 7.0 X 10(7) M-1). The cell surface localization of these binders was established by the sensitivity of both the [3H]cAMP-binding proteins and the [32P]8-N3-cAMP photoaffinity labeled proteins of intact cells to mild trypsin digestion and by the surface distribution of a BSA-O2-monosuccinyl cAMP-gold complex revealed by electron microscopy. Analysis of radioautograms of cell surface cAMP-binding proteins from confluent monolayer tumor cells, photoaffinity labeled with [32P]8-N3-cAMP and subjected to sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis revealed two major 32P-labeled protein bands which were indistinguishable from the 49,000 and 55,000 mol wt regulatory subunits of the cytosolic protein kinase isoenzymes of this cell. These observations along with the demonstration of cell surface, cAMP-dependent protein kinase activity in the mouse adrenal tumor cell strongly suggest that these cAMP-binding proteins function as regulatory proteins for cell surface protein kinases

  16. A single-molecule approach to explore binding, uptake and transport of cancer cell targeting nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the past decade carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been widely studied as a potential drug-delivery system, especially with functionality for cellular targeting. Yet, little is known about the actual process of docking to cell receptors and transport dynamics after internalization. Here we performed single-particle studies of folic acid (FA) mediated CNT binding to human carcinoma cells and their transport inside the cytosol. In particular, we employed molecular recognition force spectroscopy, an atomic force microscopy based method, to visualize and quantify docking of FA functionalized CNTs to FA binding receptors in terms of binding probability and binding force. We then traced individual fluorescently labeled, FA functionalized CNTs after specific uptake, and created a dynamic ‘roadmap’ that clearly showed trajectories of directed diffusion and areas of nanotube confinement in the cytosol. Our results demonstrate the potential of a single-molecule approach for investigation of drug-delivery vehicles and their targeting capacity. (paper)

  17. A single-molecule approach to explore binding, uptake and transport of cancer cell targeting nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamprecht, C.; Plochberger, B.; Ruprecht, V.; Wieser, S.; Rankl, C.; Heister, E.; Unterauer, B.; Brameshuber, M.; Danzberger, J.; Lukanov, P.; Flahaut, E.; Schütz, G.; Hinterdorfer, P.; Ebner, A.

    2014-03-01

    In the past decade carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been widely studied as a potential drug-delivery system, especially with functionality for cellular targeting. Yet, little is known about the actual process of docking to cell receptors and transport dynamics after internalization. Here we performed single-particle studies of folic acid (FA) mediated CNT binding to human carcinoma cells and their transport inside the cytosol. In particular, we employed molecular recognition force spectroscopy, an atomic force microscopy based method, to visualize and quantify docking of FA functionalized CNTs to FA binding receptors in terms of binding probability and binding force. We then traced individual fluorescently labeled, FA functionalized CNTs after specific uptake, and created a dynamic ‘roadmap’ that clearly showed trajectories of directed diffusion and areas of nanotube confinement in the cytosol. Our results demonstrate the potential of a single-molecule approach for investigation of drug-delivery vehicles and their targeting capacity.

  18. Ligand-receptor binding kinetics in surface plasmon resonance cells: A Monte Carlo analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Carroll, Jacob; Forsten-Williams, Kimberly; Täuber, Uwe C

    2016-01-01

    Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) chips are widely used to measure association and dissociation rates for the binding kinetics between two species of chemicals, e.g., cell receptors and ligands. It is commonly assumed that ligands are spatially well mixed in the SPR region, and hence a mean-field rate equation description is appropriate. This approximation however ignores the spatial fluctuations as well as temporal correlations induced by multiple local rebinding events, which become prominent for slow diffusion rates and high binding affinities. We report detailed Monte Carlo simulations of ligand binding kinetics in an SPR cell subject to laminar flow. We extract the binding and dissociation rates by means of the techniques frequently employed in experimental analysis that are motivated by the mean-field approximation. We find major discrepancies in a wide parameter regime between the thus extracted rates and the known input simulation values. These results underscore the crucial quantitative importance of s...

  19. Binding and internalization of recombinant human erythropoietin in murine erythroid precursor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erythropoietin (EPO) biosynthetically labelled with [35S]cysteine was produced from Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells containing amplified copies of human EPO cDNA. The glycosylated recombinant [35S]EPO, purified to virtual radiochemical homogeneity, was biologically active. We studied the interaction of this labeled recombinant EPO with erythroid precursor cells from mice made anemic with phenylhydrazine. The [35S]-labeled molecule bound to erythroid precursors in a time- and temperature-dependent manner. The binding was specific for EPO, and neither insulin, transferrin, epidermal growth factor, nor multiplication stimulating activity could compete for EPO binding sites. In the presence of 0.2% sodium azide, which blocks 80% to 90% of internalization, the recombinant molecule bound with an apparent Kd of 750 pmol/L and 100 to 200 binding sites per cell at 37 degrees C. Asialo-EPO was a more effective competitor than sialated EPO for the available binding sites. Thus, the enhanced biological specific activity of asialo-EPO could result from its enhanced binding affinity. We also studied recombinant human EPO labeled with 125I and found that it also bound to the erythroid cells in a saturable and specific manner. After 90 minutes of incubation at 37 degrees C, most of the bound [35S]EPO was internalized, whereas most of the [125I]EPO remained on the cell surface. The reduced internalization of the iodinated molecule could account for the previously reported functional deficit associated with iodination

  20. General cell-binding activity of intramolecular G-quadruplexes with parallel structure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tianjun Chang

    Full Text Available G-quadruplexes (G4s are four-stranded nucleic acid structures adopted by some repetitive guanine-rich sequences. Putative G-quadruplex-forming sequences (PQSs are highly prevalent in human genome. Recently some G4s have been reported to have cancer-selective antiproliferative activity. A G4 DNA, AS1411, is currently in phase II clinical trials as an anticancer agent, which is reported to bind tumor cells by targeting surface nucleolin. AS1411 also has been extensively investigated as a target-recognition element for cancer cell specific drug delivery or cancer cell imaging. Here we show that, in addition to AS1411, intramolecular G4s with parallel structure (including PQSs in genes have general binding activity to many cell lines with different affinity. The binding of these G4s compete with each other, and their targets are certain cellular surface proteins. The tested G4s exhibit enhanced cellular uptake than non-G4 sequences. This uptake may be through the endosome/lysosome pathway, but it is independent of cellular binding of the G4s. The tested G4s also show selective antiproliferative activity that is independent of their cellular binding. Our findings provide new insight into the molecular recognition of G4s by cells; offer new clues for understanding the functions of G4s in vivo, and may extend the potential applications of G4s.

  1. Analysis of Hereditary Elliptocytosis with Decreased Binding of Eosin-5-maleimide to Red Blood Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shin-ichiro Suemori

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Flow cytometric test for analyzing the eosin-5-maleimide (EMA binding to red blood cells has been believed to be a specific method for diagnosing hereditary spherocytosis (HS. However, it has been reported that diseases other than HS, such as hereditary pyropoikilocytosis (HPP and Southeast Asian ovalocytosis (SAO, which are forms in the category of hereditary elliptocytosis (HE, show decreased EMA binding to red blood cells. We analyzed EMA binding to red blood cells in 101 healthy control subjects and 42 HS patients and obtained a mean channel fluorescence (MCF cut-off value of 36.4 (sensitivity 0.97, specificity 0.95. Using this method, we also analyzed 12 HE patients. Among them, four HE patients showed the MCF at or below the cut-off value. It indicates that some HE patients have decreased EMA binding to red blood cells. Two of these four HE patients were classified as common HE, and two were spherocytic HE with reduced spectrin. This study demonstrates that, in addition to patients with HPP or SAO, some HE patients have decreased EMA binding to red blood cells.

  2. Alterations in transcription factor binding in radioresistant human melanoma cells after ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We analyzed alterations in transcription factor binding to specific, known promoter DNA consensus sequences between irradiated and unirradiated radioresistant human melanoma (U1-Mel) cells. The goal of this study was to begin to investigate which transcription factors and DNA-binding sites are responsible for the induction of specific transcripts and proteins after ionizing radiation. Transcription factor binding was observed using DNA band-shift assays and oligonucleotide competition analyses. Confluence-arrested U1-Mel cells were irradiated (4.5 Gy) and harvested at 4 h. Double-stranded oligonucleotides containing known DNA-binding consensus sites for specific transcription factors were used. Increased DNA binding activity after ionizing radiation was noted with oligonucleotides containing the CREB, NF-kB and Sp1 consensus sites. No changes in protein binding to AP-1, AP-2, AP-3, or CTF/NF1, GRE or Oct-1 consensus sequences were noted. X-ray activation of select transcription factors, which bind certain consensus sites in promoters, may cause specific induction or repression of gene transcription. 22 refs., 2 figs

  3. The Membrane Receptor for Plasma Retinol Binding Protein, a New Type of Cell-Surface Receptor

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Hui; KAWAGUCHI, RIKI

    2011-01-01

    Vitamin A is essential for diverse aspects of life ranging from embryogenesis to the proper functioning of most adult organs. Its derivatives (retinoid) have potent biological activities such as regulating cell growth and differentiation. Plasma retinol binding protein (RBP) is the specific vitamin A carrier protein in the blood that binds to vitamin A with high affinity and delivers it to target organs. A large amount of evidence has accumulated over the past decades supporting the existence...

  4. Receptor-mediated binding of C1 q on pulmonary endothelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Normal undamaged pulmonary endothelial cells (EC) do not express receptors for C3b or the Fc portion of IgG, but both receptors become unmasked after viral infection or exposure to white cell lysates. Here, highly purified human C1q was labeled with 125I, and the globular subunits were separated from the collagenous portion by collagenase digestion and chromatography. Bovine pulmonary artery EC were cultured without exposure to proteolytic enzymes. Binding assays were carried out at 00C, pH 7.4, μ = 0.15. Results showed that 125I-C1q binds to EC, the binding is dose-dependent, and the receptor is saturable. Saturation was approached at a C1q concentration of ca 0.1 ug. By Scatchard analysis, maximum binding was 0.219 pmoles in a volume of 250 μl for 7 x 105 cells, and the average number of binding sites per cell was 1.88 x 105. Isolated 125I-C1q heads do not bind, and when native 125I-C1q was bound to EC radioactivity was eliminated after collagenase treatment for 4 h at 370C. Thus, C1q binds to EC via the collagenous portion. That Fc receptors (globular heads) are exposed was shown by rosette formation with EA and EC bound C1q. Using similar conditions, native C1(C1w x 2C1r x 2C1s) did not bind to EC. These results suggest a mechanism for localizing immune complexes on undamaged pulmonary vessels which may be important for initiation of the inflammatory response

  5. Procaine binding, its influence on the cell volume and the rate of packing of human erytrocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morariu, V.V.; Mocanu, A.; Simplaceanu, T.; Chifu, A.; Balc, C.; Frangopol, P.T.; Morariu, V.V. (eds.)

    1984-02-01

    It has been shown that procaine and Gerovital H/sub 3/-(procaine) have similar binding curves to normal human erythrocytes. The binding constant and the number of the binding sites were evaluated from the Scatchard plot. Gerovitaal H/sub 3/ is more effective than procaine in increasing the cell volume at relatively higher concentrations. Gerovital H/sub 3/ and procaine increase the packing rate of erythrocytes in different ways, the complex drug being more effective. It is suggested tht the main effect is on the rouleaux formation. 9 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Identification of a cell membrane protein that binds alveolar surfactant.

    OpenAIRE

    Strayer, D. S.

    1991-01-01

    Alveolar surfactants are complex mixtures of proteins and phospholipids produced by type II alveolar cells and responsible for lowering pulmonary surface tension. The process by which surfactant is produced and exported and by which its production by pulmonary cells is regulated are not well understood. This study was designed to identify a cellular receptor for surfactant constituents. To do so, monoclonal anti-idiotypic antibodies directed against antibodies to porcine and rabbit surfactant...

  7. Rapid preparation of plasma membranes from avian lymphoid cells and fibroblasts for virus binding studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieper, H; Müller, H

    1998-06-01

    A simple and rapid protocol for the preparation of plasma membranes from chicken embryo fibroblasts and chicken lymphoid cells was developed. Characterization of the preparations by morphological, biochemical and serological methods indicated the specific enrichment of the plasma membranes as well as cell surface proteins. Binding of infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) particles was demonstrated after immobilization of the plasma membranes, and cell type-specific differences were observed. Although the results of these studies reflect the interaction between IBDV and isolated cells only partially, the advantages of these plasma membrane preparations, the specific enrichment of cell surface proteins, their constant quality and the possibility to store aliquots over several months, make them a useful tool for virus binding studies with avian cells. PMID:9694323

  8. Centrifugal Filter Device for Detection of Rare Cells With Immuno-Binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chih-Chung; Chen, Yu-An; Yao, Da-Jeng

    2015-12-01

    Many investigations have shown circulating tumor cells (CTCs) to serve as a significant biomarker of cancer progression and for cancer treatment. Multiple blood samples detection of CTCs during a course of treatment might facilitate a choice by a medical doctor of an effective drug and a treatment for particular patients. A simple and cost-effective method to identify the trend of decreasing CTCs during a treatment with various therapies is in great demand. A novel multilayer, concentric filter device combined with an immune-binding method enables the enrichment and detection of rare cells in a mass cell population with a separation based on size. Such separation implemented with a filter is among the most efficient, simple and inexpensive methods to isolate cells, but its main disadvantages are clogging, deformation of cells, and a requirement of a significant difference of size between targeted rare cells and normal cells. We designed a concentric filter device and an immune-binding method to create a significant size difference of target cells, and increased the efficiency of separation to identify rare cells with a simple miniature centrifuge in the laboratory. The enrichment of target rare cells from a mass cell population and the detection were demonstrated on mixing targeted MCF-7 blast cancer cells and Jurkat blood cells in ratio 1:1 000 000. The device is prospectively applicable for the detection of circulating tumor cells in a clinical application. PMID:26452287

  9. Discovery and Characterization of a Cell-Permeable, Small-Molecule c-Abl Kinase Activator that Binds to the Myristoyl Binding Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Jingsong; Campobasso, Nino; Biju, Mangatt P.; Fisher, Kelly; Pan, Xiao-Qing; Cottom, Josh; Galbraith, Sarah; Ho, Thau; Zhang, Hong; Hong, Xuan; Ward, Paris; Hofmann, Glenn; Siegfried, Brett; Zappacosta, Francesca; Washio, Yoshiaki; Cao, Ping; Qu, Junya; Bertrand, Sophie; Wang, Da-Yuan; Head, Martha S.; Li, Hu; Moores, Sheri; Lai, Zhihong; Johanson, Kyung; Burton, George; Erickson-Miller, Connie; Simpson, Graham; Tummino, Peter; Copeland, Robert A.; Oliff, Allen (GSKPA)

    2014-10-02

    c-Abl kinase activity is regulated by a unique mechanism involving the formation of an autoinhibited conformation in which the N-terminal myristoyl group binds intramolecularly to the myristoyl binding site on the kinase domain and induces the bending of the {alpha}I helix that creates a docking surface for the SH2 domain. Here, we report a small-molecule c-Abl activator, DPH, that displays potent enzymatic and cellular activity in stimulating c-Abl activation. Structural analyses indicate that DPH binds to the myristoyl binding site and prevents the formation of the bent conformation of the {alpha}I helix through steric hindrance, a mode of action distinct from the previously identified allosteric c-Abl inhibitor, GNF-2, that also binds to the myristoyl binding site. DPH represents the first cell-permeable, small-molecule tool compound for c-Abl activation.

  10. Localization of cellular retinol-binding protein and retinol-binding protein in cells comprising the blood-brain barrier of rat and human

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacDonald, P.N.; Ong, D.E. (Vanderbilt Univ., Nashville, TN (USA)); Bok, D. (Univ. of California, Los Angeles (USA))

    1990-06-01

    Brain is not generally recognized as an organ that requires vitamin A, perhaps because no obvious histologic lesions have been observed in severely vitamin A-deficient animals. However, brain tissue does contain cellular vitamin A-binding proteins and a nuclear receptor protein for retinoic acid. In the present study, immunohistochemical techniques were used to determine the cell-specific location of cellular retinol-binding protein in human and rat brain tissue. Cellular retinol-binding protein was localized specifically within the cuboidal epithelial cells of the choroid plexus, two primary sites of the mammalian blood-brain barrier. In addition, autoradiographic procedures demonstrated binding sites for serum retinol-binding protein in the choroidal epithelium. These observations suggest that a significant movement of retinol across the blood-brain barrier may occur.

  11. Intact brain cells: a novel model system for studying opioid receptor binding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogers, N.F.; El-Fakahany, E.E.

    1985-07-29

    The use of a novel tissue preparation to study opioid receptor binding in viable, intact cells derived from whole brains of adult rats is presented. Mechanically dissociated and sieved cells, which were not homogenized at any stage of the experimental protocol, and iso-osmotic physiological buffer were used in these experiments. This system was adapted in order to avoid mechanical and chemical disruption of cell membranes, cytoskeletal ultrastructure or receptor topography by homogenization or by the use of nonphysiological buffers, and to mimic in vivo binding conditions as much as possible. Using (/sup 3/H)naloxone as the radioligand, the studies showed saturable and stereospecific high-affinity binding of this opioid antagonist in intact cells, which in turn showed consistently high viability. (/sup 3/H)Naloxone binding was also linear over a wide range of tissue concentrations. This technique provides a very promising model for future studies of the binding of opioids and of many other classes of drugs to brain tissue receptors in a more physiologically relevant system than those commonly used to date.

  12. Intact brain cells: a novel model system for studying opioid receptor binding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of a novel tissue preparation to study opioid receptor binding in viable, intact cells derived from whole brains of adult rats is presented. Mechanically dissociated and sieved cells, which were not homogenized at any stage of the experimental protocol, and iso-osmotic physiological buffer were used in these experiments. This system was adapted in order to avoid mechanical and chemical disruption of cell membranes, cytoskeletal ultrastructure or receptor topography by homogenization or by the use of nonphysiological buffers, and to mimic in vivo binding conditions as much as possible. Using [3H]naloxone as the radioligand, the studies showed saturable and stereospecific high-affinity binding of this opioid antagonist in intact cells, which in turn showed consistently high viability. [3H]Naloxone binding was also linear over a wide range of tissue concentrations. This technique provides a very promising model for future studies of the binding of opioids and of many other classes of drugs to brain tissue receptors in a more physiologically relevant system than those commonly used to date

  13. Immunospecific red cell binding of iodine 125-labeled immunoglobulin G erythrocyte autoantibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The primary interaction of autoantibodies with red cells has been studied by using labeled autoantibodies. Immunoglobulin G red cell autoantibodies obtained from IgG antiglobulin-positive normal blood donors were labeled with radioactive iodine and compared with alloanti-D with respect to their properties and binding behavior. Iodine 125-labeled IgG autoantibody migrated as a single homogeneous peak with the same relative mobility as human IgG on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The isoelectric focusing pattern of labeled autoantibodies varied from donor to donor but was similar to that of alloanti-D, consisting of multiple IgG populations with isoelectric points in the neutral to alkaline range. 125I-autoantibody bound to all human red cells of common Rh phenotypes. Evidence for immunospecific antibody binding of the labeled autoantibody was based on variation in equilibrium binding to nonhuman and human red cells of common and rare phenotypes, enhanced binding after red cell protease modification, antiglobulin reactivity of cell-bound IgG comparable to that of cell-bound anti-D, and saturation binding in autoantibody excess. Scatchard analysis of two 125I-autoantibody preparations yielded site numbers of 41,500 and 53,300 with equilibrium constants of 3.7 and 2.1 X 10(8) L X mol-1. Dog, rabbit, rhesus monkey, and baboon red cells were antigen(s) negative by quantitative adsorption studies adsorbing less than 3% of the labeled autoantibody. Reduced ability of rare human D--red blood cells to adsorb the autoantibody and identification of donor autoantibodies that bind to Rh null red blood cells indicated that eluates contained multiple antibody populations of complex specificities in contrast to anti-D, which consists of a monospecific antibody population. Another difference is that less than 70% of the autoantibody IgG was adsorbed by maximum binding red blood cells as compared with greater than 85% for alloanti-D

  14. Immunospecific red cell binding of iodine /sup 125/-labeled immunoglobulin G erythrocyte autoantibodies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masouredis, S.P.; Branks, M.J.; Garratty, G.; Victoria, E.J.

    1987-09-01

    The primary interaction of autoantibodies with red cells has been studied by using labeled autoantibodies. Immunoglobulin G red cell autoantibodies obtained from IgG antiglobulin-positive normal blood donors were labeled with radioactive iodine and compared with alloanti-D with respect to their properties and binding behavior. Iodine /sup 125/-labeled IgG autoantibody migrated as a single homogeneous peak with the same relative mobility as human IgG on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The isoelectric focusing pattern of labeled autoantibodies varied from donor to donor but was similar to that of alloanti-D, consisting of multiple IgG populations with isoelectric points in the neutral to alkaline range. /sup 125/I-autoantibody bound to all human red cells of common Rh phenotypes. Evidence for immunospecific antibody binding of the labeled autoantibody was based on variation in equilibrium binding to nonhuman and human red cells of common and rare phenotypes, enhanced binding after red cell protease modification, antiglobulin reactivity of cell-bound IgG comparable to that of cell-bound anti-D, and saturation binding in autoantibody excess. Scatchard analysis of two /sup 125/I-autoantibody preparations yielded site numbers of 41,500 and 53,300 with equilibrium constants of 3.7 and 2.1 X 10(8) L X mol-1. Dog, rabbit, rhesus monkey, and baboon red cells were antigen(s) negative by quantitative adsorption studies adsorbing less than 3% of the labeled autoantibody. Reduced ability of rare human D--red blood cells to adsorb the autoantibody and identification of donor autoantibodies that bind to Rh null red blood cells indicated that eluates contained multiple antibody populations of complex specificities in contrast to anti-D, which consists of a monospecific antibody population. Another difference is that less than 70% of the autoantibody IgG was adsorbed by maximum binding red blood cells as compared with greater than 85% for alloanti-D.

  15. A new histochemical method using human placenta alkaline phosphatase for demonstrating concanavalin A binding sites on cell surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanzaki,Yoshito

    1975-12-01

    Full Text Available Human placenta alkaline phosphatase (HP-ALP, a glycoprotein, was stained histochemically for the purpose of examining the concanavalin A (Con A binding sites on the cell surface. HP-ALP was bound to the cell surface by Con A. This simple method successfully detected Con A binding sites on the cell surface.

  16. Improved methods for binding acma-type protein anchor fusions yo cell-wall material of micro-organisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leenhouts, Cornelis; Ramasamy, R.; Steen, Anton; Kok, Jan; Buist, Girbe; Kuipers, Oscar

    2002-01-01

    The invention provides a method for improving binding of a proteinaceous substance to cell-wall material of a Gram-positive bacterium, said substance comprising an AcmA cell wall binding domain or homolog or functional derivative thereof, said method comprising treating said cell-wall material with

  17. The role of EBNA binding proteins in cell transformation

    OpenAIRE

    Darekar, Suhas

    2013-01-01

    Epstein - Barr virus (EBV) infects m ajority of the human population and maintains sub - cl inical infection . However , under certain conditions it is associated with several B - cell malignancies , such as Burkitt lymphoma, Hodgkin’s lymphoma etc. Moreover , EBV also plays a causative role in a cquired immunodeficiency syndrome ( AIDS ) associated lymph omas and post - transplant l...

  18. Combinatorial binding in human and mouse embryonic stem cells identifies conserved enhancers active in early embryonic development.

    OpenAIRE

    Jonathan Göke; Marc Jung; Sarah Behrens; Lukas Chavez; Sean O'Keeffe; Bernd Timmermann; Hans Lehrach; James Adjaye; Martin Vingron

    2011-01-01

    Transcription factors are proteins that regulate gene expression by binding to cis-regulatory sequences such as promoters and enhancers. In embryonic stem (ES) cells, binding of the transcription factors OCT4, SOX2 and NANOG is essential to maintain the capacity of the cells to differentiate into any cell type of the developing embryo. It is known that transcription factors interact to regulate gene expression. In this study we show that combinatorial binding is strongly associated with co-lo...

  19. IGF binding protein 2 is a cell-autonomous factor supporting survival and migration of acute leukemia cells

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Xiaoli; Zheng, Junke; Zou, Yizhou; Song, Chun; Hu, Xuemei; Zhang, Cheng Cheng

    2013-01-01

    Background The role of IGF binding protein 2 (IGFBP2) in cancer development is intriguing. Previously we identified IGFBP2 as an extrinsic factor that supports the activity of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). Methods and results Here we investigated the role of IGFBP2 in in human leukemia cells and in the retroviral AML1-ETO9a transplantation acute myeloid leukemia (AML) mouse model. Results IGFBP2 is highly expressed in certain human AML and acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) cells. Inhibiti...

  20. A high affinity binding site for cytokinin to a particulate fraction in carrot suspension cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carrot suspension cells contain one class of high affinity binding sites for cytokinin in an 80,000 X g particulate fraction. Binding of [8-14C] - benzylaminopurine (BA) to this fraction assayed by a sedimentation method was found to be optimal at ph 6.0 and thermolabile. Specific binding was proved in competition experiments in which labelled BA was displaced by increasing concentrations of unlabelled BA. Scatchard plots of these results displayed a dissociation constant (Ksub(d)) of 33+- 6 n.M. The number of binding sites found was 1,100+-120 fmol g-1 fresh weight which is equivalent to a frequency of 23,000 binding sites per cell. The specificity of the binding sites to cytokinins and their analogues followed the sequence BA with highest affinity, kinetin, zeatin, iP and adenine. The cytokinin ribosides generally had a lower affinity than their cytokinin bases, and the affinity decreased in the order [9 R] BA, [9 R] iP, [i R]Z, [9 R] A. (author)

  1. Penicillin binding proteins as danger signals: meningococcal penicillin binding protein 2 activates dendritic cells through Toll-like receptor 4.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Hill

    Full Text Available Neisseria meningitidis is a human pathogen responsible for life-threatening inflammatory diseases. Meningococcal penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs and particularly PBP2 are involved in bacterial resistance to β-lactams. Here we describe a novel function for PBP2 that activates human and mouse dendritic cells (DC in a time and dose-dependent manner. PBP2 induces MHC II (LOGEC50 = 4.7 µg/ml ± 0.1, CD80 (LOGEC50 = 4.88 µg/ml ± 0.15 and CD86 (LOGEC50 = 5.36 µg/ml ± 0.1. This effect was abolished when DCs were co-treated with anti-PBP2 antibodies. PBP2-treated DCs displayed enhanced immunogenic properties in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, proteins co-purified with PBP2 showed no effect on DC maturation. We show through different in vivo and in vitro approaches that this effect is not due to endotoxin contamination. At the mechanistic level, PBP2 induces nuclear localization of p65 NF-kB of 70.7 ± 5.1% cells versus 12 ± 2.6% in untreated DCs and needs TLR4 expression to mature DCs. Immunoprecipitation and blocking experiments showed thatPBP2 binds TLR4. In conclusion, we describe a novel function of meningococcal PBP2 as a pathogen associated molecular pattern (PAMP at the host-pathogen interface that could be recognized by the immune system as a danger signal, promoting the development of immune responses.

  2. Identification of Arsenic Direct-Binding Proteins in Acute Promyelocytic Leukaemia Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Zhang

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The identification of arsenic direct-binding proteins is essential for determining the mechanism by which arsenic trioxide achieves its chemotherapeutic effects. At least two cysteines close together in the amino acid sequence are crucial to the binding of arsenic and essential to the identification of arsenic-binding proteins. In the present study, arsenic binding proteins were pulled down with streptavidin and identified using a liquid chromatograph-mass spectrometer (LC-MS/MS. More than 40 arsenic-binding proteins were separated, and redox-related proteins, glutathione S-transferase P1 (GSTP1, heat shock 70 kDa protein 9 (HSPA9 and pyruvate kinase M2 (PKM2, were further studied using binding assays in vitro. Notably, PKM2 has a high affinity for arsenic. In contrast to PKM2, GSTP1and HSPA9 did not combine with arsenic directly in vitro. These observations suggest that arsenic-mediated acute promyelocytic leukaemia (APL suppressive effects involve PKM2. In summary, we identified several arsenic binding proteins in APL cells and investigated the therapeutic mechanisms of arsenic trioxide for APL. Further investigation into specific signal pathways by which PKM2 mediates APL developments may lead to a better understanding of arsenic effects on APL.

  3. In vitro cytokinin binding to a particulate fraction of tobacco cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sussman, M.R.; Kende, H.

    1978-01-01

    At least two types of cytokinin-binding sites are present in a particulate fraction of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) cells that sediments at 80,000 x g. The major binding component has a low affinity towards cytokinins, is resistant to heating at 100/sup 0/C, and is not specific for biologically active cytokinin analogues. The second site occurs in much lower frequency, is heat labile, shows high affinity towards cytokinins, and is specific for biologically active analogs of the hormone. The testing for binding specificity was mainly performed with a series of halogenated benzyladenine derivatives having a wide range of biological activities. The low-affinity binding site shows some of the same features as talcum powder, a non-biological material which binds cytokinins in a non-specific fashion. The properties of the high-affinity binding site are consistent with the expected characteristics of a cytokinin receptor. However, the role of the observed high-affinity binding site with regard to the biological action of cytokinins is not yet known.

  4. Ganglioside inhibition of 125I-plasmin binding to colorectal carcinoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The pre-incubation of human colorectal carcinoma cells SW 1116 with 25 to 100 uM purified gangliosides resulted in 35-60% inhibition of specific 125I-plasmin binding to the cell surface. After 5 to 6 days in culture, tumor cells were pre-incubated at 4 degrees for 1 to 4 h followed by post-incubation with 125I-plasmin by techniques previously described. At 25 uM the capacity for inhibition of plasmin binding was GT1b greater than GQ1b greater than or equal to GD1a greater than GM1 less than or equal to GgOse 4Cer. Thus a terminal sialyl moiety appears to be necessary (p less than 0.05) although exogenous N-acetyl neuraminic acid was ineffective (p greater than 0.05), indicating a role for the lipid portion of the ganglioside. Other (glyco)lipids such as sphingosine, fucolipid H-1 and sulfatide were without significant effect. The inhibition could not be reversed by the presence of 10 mM Ca+2, EDTA, pre-treatment of the cell with carboxypeptidase or pretreatment of plasmin with neuraminidases. The inhibition was however reversed by post-incubation in control medium without exogenous ganglioside. Cell counts determined prior to, and after ganglioside incubation showed that the effect was not due to cell death or detachment from the culture surface. The dissociation constant for 125I-plasmin binding was 5.6 x 10(-8) M (700,000 sites/cell), but in the presence of trisialoganglioside (GT1b), Scatchard plots suggested diversification of binding sites with 280,000 sites/cell at Kd 2.6 x 10(-8) M and 820,000 sites/cell at Kd 2.1 x 10(-7) M. Another interpretation of the Scatchard plot in the presence of ganglioside was that the glycolipid imposed negative cooperativity on plasmin binding to the cell surface. These results suggest that certain gangliosides can affect tumor cell invasiveness by altering protease binding to the cell surface

  5. Multiple growth hormone-binding proteins are expressed on insulin-producing cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møldrup, A; Billestrup, N; Thorn, N A;

    1989-01-01

    disulfide-linked multimers of Mr 270-350K (300K). In addition, a minor Mr 180K GH-binding protein is identified which does not appear to be associated with other proteins by disulfide bridges. A plasma membrane-enriched fraction accounts for 86% of the RIN-cell GH-binding activity while cytosol and...... intracellular organelles are low in GH-binding activity. The plasma membrane-bound activity is soluble in Triton X-100 with intact hormone binding characteristics. The apparent KD in detergent solution is estimated to 18 ng/ml (8 x 10(-10) M). 125I-hGH-affinity cross-linking to intact and detergent...

  6. Effects of sodium on cell surface and intracellular TH-naloxone binding sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pollack, A.E.; Wooten, G.F.

    1987-07-27

    The binding of the opiate antagonist TH-naloxone was examined in rat whole brain homogenates and in crude subcellular fractions of these homogenates (nuclear, synaptosomal, and mitochondrial fractions) using buffers that approximated intra- (low sodium concentration) and extracellular (high sodium concentration) fluids. Saturation studies showed a two-fold decrease in the dissociation constant (Kd) in all subcellular fractions examined in extracellular buffer compared to intracellular buffer. In contrast, there was no significant effect of the buffers on the Bmax. Thus, TH-naloxone did not distinguish between binding sites present on cell surface and intracellular tissues in these two buffers. These results show that the sodium effect of opiate antagonist binding is probably not a function of altered selection of intra- and extracellular binding sites. 17 references, 2 tables.

  7. Effects of sodium on cell surface and intracellular 3H-naloxone binding sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The binding of the opiate antagonist 3H-naloxone was examined in rat whole brain homogenates and in crude subcellular fractions of these homogenates (nuclear, synaptosomal, and mitochondrial fractions) using buffers that approximated intra- (low sodium concentration) and extracellular (high sodium concentration) fluids. Saturation studies showed a two-fold decrease in the dissociation constant (Kd) in all subcellular fractions examined in extracellular buffer compared to intracellular buffer. In contrast, there was no significant effect of the buffers on the Bmax. Thus, 3H-naloxone did not distinguish between binding sites present on cell surface and intracellular tissues in these two buffers. These results show that the sodium effect of opiate antagonist binding is probably not a function of altered selection of intra- and extracellular binding sites. 17 references, 2 tables

  8. Two cell surface proteins bind the sponge Microciona prolifera aggregation factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varner, J A; Burger, M M; Kaufman, J F

    1988-06-15

    Two extracellular matrix cell surface proteins which bind the proteoglycan-like aggregation factor from the marine sponge Microciona prolifera (MAF) and which may function as physiological receptors for MAF were identified and characterized for the first time. By probing nitrocellulose blots of nonreducing sodium dodecyl sulfate gels containing whole sponge cell protein with iodinated MAF, a 210- and a 68-kDa protein, which have native molecular masses of approximately 200-400 and 70 kDa, were identified. MAF binding to blots is species-specific. It is also sensitive to reduction and is completely abolished by pretreatment of live cells with proteases, as was cellular aggregation, indicating that the 210- and 68-kDa proteins may be located on the cell surface. The additional observations that the 68 kDa is an endoglycosidase F-sensitive glycoprotein and that antisera against whole sponge cells or membranes can immunoprecipitate the 210 kDa when prebound to intact cells are consistent with a cell surface location. Both proteins can be isolated from sponge cell membranes and from the sponge skeleton (insoluble extracellular matrix), but the 210-kDa MAF-binding protein can also be found in the soluble extracellular matrix (buffer washes of cells and skeleton) as well. A third MAF-binding protein of molecular mass 95 kDa was also found in the sponge extracellular matrix but rarely on cells. Both of the cell-associated 210- and 68-kDa proteins are nonintegral membrane proteins, based on Triton X-114 phase separation, flotation of liposomes containing sponge membrane lysates, and their extraction from membranes by buffer washes. Both proteins bind MAF affinity resins, indicating that they each exhibit a moderate affinity for MAF under native conditions. They can also be separated from each other and from the bulk of the protein in an octylpolyoxyethylene extract of membranes by fast protein liquid chromatography Mono Q anion exchange chromatography, as assessed by native

  9. Heparan sulfate proteoglycans mediate factor XIIa binding to the cell surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wujak, Lukasz; Didiasova, Miroslava; Zakrzewicz, Dariusz; Frey, Helena; Schaefer, Liliana; Wygrecka, Malgorzata

    2015-03-13

    Hageman factor (FXIIa) initiates the intrinsic coagulation pathway and triggers the kallikrein-kinin and the complement systems. In addition, it functions as a growth factor by expressing promitogenic activities toward several cell types. FXIIa binds to the cell surface via a number of structurally unrelated surface receptors; however, the underlying mechanisms are not yet fully understood. Here, we demonstrate that FXIIa utilizes cell membrane-bound glycosaminoglycans to interact with the cell surface of human lung fibroblasts (HLF). The combination of enzymatic, inhibitory, and overexpression approaches identified a heparan sulfate (HS) component of proteoglycans as an important determinant of the FXIIa binding capacity of HLF. Moreover, cell-free assays and competition experiments revealed preferential binding of FXIIa to HS and heparin over dextran sulfate, dermatan sulfate, and chondroitin sulfate A and C. Finally, we demonstrate that fibroblasts isolated from the lungs of the patients suffering from idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) exhibit enhanced FXIIa binding capacity. Increased sulfation of HS resulting from elevated HS 6-O-sulfotransferase-1 expression in IPF HLF accounted, in part, for this phenomenon. Application of RNA interference technology and inhibitors of intracellular sulfation revealed the cooperative action of cell surface-associated HS and urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor in the accumulation of FXIIa on the cell surface of IPF HLF. Moreover, FXIIa stimulated IPF HLF migration, which was abrogated by pretreatment of cells with heparinase I. Collectively, our study uncovers a novel role of HS-type glycosaminoglycans in a local accumulation of FXIIa on the cell membrane. The enhanced association of FXIIa with IPF HLF suggests its contribution to fibrogenesis. PMID:25589788

  10. Binding and Fusion of Extracellular Vesicles to the Plasma Membrane of Their Cell Targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prada, Ilaria; Meldolesi, Jacopo

    2016-01-01

    Exosomes and ectosomes, extracellular vesicles of two types generated by all cells at multivesicular bodies and the plasma membrane, respectively, play critical roles in physiology and pathology. A key mechanism of their function, analogous for both types of vesicles, is the fusion of their membrane to the plasma membrane of specific target cells, followed by discharge to the cytoplasm of their luminal cargo containing proteins, RNAs, and DNA. Here we summarize the present knowledge about the interactions, binding and fusions of vesicles with the cell plasma membrane. The sequence initiates with dynamic interactions, during which vesicles roll over the plasma membrane, followed by the binding of specific membrane proteins to their cell receptors. Membrane binding is then converted rapidly into fusion by mechanisms analogous to those of retroviruses. Specifically, proteins of the extracellular vesicle membranes are structurally rearranged, and their hydrophobic sequences insert into the target cell plasma membrane which undergoes lipid reorganization, protein restructuring and membrane dimpling. Single fusions are not the only process of vesicle/cell interactions. Upon intracellular reassembly of their luminal cargoes, vesicles can be regenerated, released and fused horizontally to other target cells. Fusions of extracellular vesicles are relevant also for specific therapy processes, now intensely investigated. PMID:27517914

  11. Label-free measuring and mapping of binding kinetics of membrane proteins in single living cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Yang, Yunze; Wang, Shaopeng; Nagaraj, Vinay J.; Liu, Qiang; Wu, Jie; Tao, Nongjian

    2012-10-01

    Membrane proteins mediate a variety of cellular responses to extracellular signals. Although membrane proteins are studied intensively for their values as disease biomarkers and therapeutic targets, in situ investigation of the binding kinetics of membrane proteins with their ligands has been a challenge. Traditional approaches isolate membrane proteins and then study them ex situ, which does not reflect accurately their native structures and functions. We present a label-free plasmonic microscopy method to map the local binding kinetics of membrane proteins in their native environment. This analytical method can perform simultaneous plasmonic and fluorescence imaging, and thus make it possible to combine the strengths of both label-based and label-free techniques in one system. Using this method, we determined the distribution of membrane proteins on the surface of single cells and the local binding kinetic constants of different membrane proteins. Furthermore, we studied the polarization of the membrane proteins on the cell surface during chemotaxis.

  12. Sensitive and rapid detection of staphylococcus aureus in milk via cell binding domain of lysin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Junping; Zhang, Yun; Zhang, Yun; Li, Heng; Yang, Hang; Wei, Hongping

    2016-03-15

    Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) is an important food-borne pathogen in dairy products contaminated through raw ingredients or improper food handling. Rapid detection of S. aureus with high sensitivity is of significance for food quality and safety. In this study, a new method was developed for detecting S. aureus in milk by coupling immunomagnetic separation with enzyme linked cell wall binding domain (CBD) of lysin plyV12, which can bind to S. aureus with high affinity. There are millions of binding sites present on the cell surface of S. aureus for the CBD attachment, which greatly improves the detection sensitivity. The method has the overall testing time of only 1.5h with the detection limit of 4 × 10(3)CFU/mL in spiked milk. Because it is simple, rapid and sensitive, this method could be used for the detection of S. aureus in various food samples. PMID:26433070

  13. Binding studies of the antitumoral radiopharmaceutical 125I-Crotoxin to Ehrlich ascites tumor cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silveira, Marina B.; Santos, Raquel G. dos [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Dias, Consuelo L. Fortes [Fundacao Ezequiel Dias (FUNED), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)], e-mail: consuelo@pq.cnpq.br; Cassali, Geovanni D. [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Lab. de Patologia Comparada], e-mail: cassalig@icb.ufmg.br

    2009-07-01

    The development of tools for functional diagnostic imaging is mainly based on radiopharmaceuticals that specifically target membrane receptors. Crotoxin (Crtx), a polypeptide isolated from Crotalus durissus terrificus venom, has been shown to have an antitumoral activity and is a promising bioactive tracer for tumor detection. More specific radiopharmaceuticals are being studied to complement the techniques applied in the conventional medicine against breast cancer, the most frequent cause of death from malignant disease in women. Crtx's effect has been shown to be related with the overexpression of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), present in high levels in 30 to 60% of breast tumor cells. Our objective was to evaluate Crtx as a tracer for cancer diagnosis, investigating its properties as an EGFR-targeting agent. Ehrlich ascites tumor cells (EAT cells) were used due to its origin and similar characteristics to breast tumor cells, specially the presence of EGFR. Crtx was labeled with 125I and binding experiments were performed. To evaluate the specific binding in vitro of Crtx, competition binding assay was carried out in the presence of increasing concentrations of non-labelled crotoxin and epidermal growth factor (EGF). Specific binding of 125I-Crtx to EAT cells was determined and the binding was considered saturable, with approximately 70% of specificity, high affinity (Kd = 19.7 nM) and IC50 = 1.6 x 10-11 M. Our results indicate that Crtx's interaction with EAT cells is partially related with EGFR and increases the biotechnological potential of Crtx as a template for radiopharmaceutical design for cancer diagnosis. (author)

  14. Binding studies of the antitumoral radiopharmaceutical 125I-Crotoxin to Ehrlich ascites tumor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development of tools for functional diagnostic imaging is mainly based on radiopharmaceuticals that specifically target membrane receptors. Crotoxin (Crtx), a polypeptide isolated from Crotalus durissus terrificus venom, has been shown to have an antitumoral activity and is a promising bioactive tracer for tumor detection. More specific radiopharmaceuticals are being studied to complement the techniques applied in the conventional medicine against breast cancer, the most frequent cause of death from malignant disease in women. Crtx's effect has been shown to be related with the overexpression of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), present in high levels in 30 to 60% of breast tumor cells. Our objective was to evaluate Crtx as a tracer for cancer diagnosis, investigating its properties as an EGFR-targeting agent. Ehrlich ascites tumor cells (EAT cells) were used due to its origin and similar characteristics to breast tumor cells, specially the presence of EGFR. Crtx was labeled with 125I and binding experiments were performed. To evaluate the specific binding in vitro of Crtx, competition binding assay was carried out in the presence of increasing concentrations of non-labelled crotoxin and epidermal growth factor (EGF). Specific binding of 125I-Crtx to EAT cells was determined and the binding was considered saturable, with approximately 70% of specificity, high affinity (Kd = 19.7 nM) and IC50 = 1.6 x 10-11 M. Our results indicate that Crtx's interaction with EAT cells is partially related with EGFR and increases the biotechnological potential of Crtx as a template for radiopharmaceutical design for cancer diagnosis. (author)

  15. Microassay for measurement of binding of radiolabelled ligands to cell surface molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woof, J M; Burton, D R

    1988-07-22

    An improved technique for measuring the binding of radiolabelled ligands to cell surface molecules has been developed by modification of a procedure using centrifugation through a water-immiscible oil to separate free and cell-bound ligand. It maximises the percentage of ligand bound since cell-bound and free ligand can be separated easily and reproducibly even when very small reaction volumes are used. This permits low levels of ligand radiolabelling and relatively low numbers of cells to be used. PMID:2840465

  16. The neural cell adhesion molecule binds to fibroblast growth factor receptor 2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Claus; Lauridsen, Jes B; Berezin, Vladimir; Bock, Elisabeth; Kiselyov, Vladislav V

    2006-01-01

    The neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) can bind to and activate fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1). However, there are four major FGFR isoforms (FGFR1-FGFR4), and it is not known whether NCAM also interacts directly with the other three FGFR isoforms. In this study, we show by surface...

  17. Genome-wide analysis of CDX2 binding in intestinal epithelial cells (Caco-2)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boyd, Mette; Hansen, Morten; Jensen, Tine G K;

    2010-01-01

    resulting in a high throughput experimental method of identifying direct targets of specific transcription factors. The method was applied to CDX2, leading to the identification of the direct binding of CDX2 to several known and novel target genes in the intestinal cell. Examination of the transcript levels...

  18. Insulin-induced glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI binding to red cell membrane proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NENAD TOMASEVIC

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available In this work GPI binding to membrane proteins from erythrocytes of insulinoma patients for whom prolonged hyperinsulinism and hypoglycemia were characteristic, as well as from normal erythrocytes incubated with supraphysiological concentrations of insulin were analyzed. In the RBCs from insulinoma patients, covalent GPI binding to red cell membrane proteins in the spectrin/ankyrin region, band 4.1 and two proteins of molecular mass of 115 and 110 kD was demonstrated. In erythrocytes incubated with insulin label was associated with band 4.1 and two proteins of molecular mass of 115 and 110 kD. Extraction studies showed that the 100-kD proteins are unrelated to band 3 since they were found in Triton-prepared cytoskeleton. To our knowledge this is the first demonstration of such a modification of red cell skeletal proteins, and the first demonstration of post-translation GPI binding to red cell skeletal proteins in response to insulin. A mechanism proposed for GPI binding to red cell skeletal proteins as well as the relevance of these results for physiological disorders that are characterized by hyperinsulinism are briefly discussed.

  19. Conditional expression of CD44 isoforms in lymphoma cells: influence on hyaluronate binding and tumor growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CD44 describes a family of surface proteins consisting of many isoforms due to alternative splice of ten 'variant' exons. Members of this family are involved in various processes including hematopoiesis, lymphocyte activation and homing, limb development, wound healing and tumor progression. Clinically, CD44 has been shown to be a prognostic factor for several human cancers. To answer the question which isoform might be relevant for tumor progression and to gain an insight into the mechanism of its function, I established transfectants of the LB lymphoma cell line in which the expression of four CD44 isoforms, namely CD44v3-10, CD44v4-10, CD44v8-10 and CD44s, was controlled by the Tet-off promoter. In the presence of Doxycycline, the expression was repressed. Removal of Doxycycline switched on expression and the maximal CD44 amount was obtained within two days. The transfectants were characterized regarding their ability to bind to the extracellular matrix component hyaluronate (HA). Overexpression of all four CD44 isoforms conferred the ability to bind HA on LB cells. Other glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) were bound in an isotype-specific fashion. CD44v3-10, CD44v4-10 and CD44v8-10 showed high binding affinity to chondroitin A, B and C, and low affinity to heparin, heparan sulfate and keratan sulfate. CD44s could not bind to these GAGs. Among these three variants, the binding ability of CD44v3-10 was the strongest. CD44 clustering seemed to play a crucial role for HA binding. Both CD44s and CD44v8-10 formed reduction-sensitive complexes in LB cells. The complexes are homooligomers or heterooligomers composed of different isoforms. Cys286 in CD44 transmember domain was not responsible for the formation of reduction-sensitive oligomer or for the enhanced HA binding in LB cell line. Using a conditional dimerization system the requirement of CD44 oligomerization for HA binding was directly demonstrated. The induction of oligomerization increased HA binding. Finally, I

  20. Identification of biomolecule mass transport and binding rate parameters in living cells by inverse modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirmohammadi Adel

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Quantification of in-vivo biomolecule mass transport and reaction rate parameters from experimental data obtained by Fluorescence Recovery after Photobleaching (FRAP is becoming more important. Methods and results The Osborne-Moré extended version of the Levenberg-Marquardt optimization algorithm was coupled with the experimental data obtained by the Fluorescence Recovery after Photobleaching (FRAP protocol, and the numerical solution of a set of two partial differential equations governing macromolecule mass transport and reaction in living cells, to inversely estimate optimized values of the molecular diffusion coefficient and binding rate parameters of GFP-tagged glucocorticoid receptor. The results indicate that the FRAP protocol provides enough information to estimate one parameter uniquely using a nonlinear optimization technique. Coupling FRAP experimental data with the inverse modeling strategy, one can also uniquely estimate the individual values of the binding rate coefficients if the molecular diffusion coefficient is known. One can also simultaneously estimate the dissociation rate parameter and molecular diffusion coefficient given the pseudo-association rate parameter is known. However, the protocol provides insufficient information for unique simultaneous estimation of three parameters (diffusion coefficient and binding rate parameters owing to the high intercorrelation between the molecular diffusion coefficient and pseudo-association rate parameter. Attempts to estimate macromolecule mass transport and binding rate parameters simultaneously from FRAP data result in misleading conclusions regarding concentrations of free macromolecule and bound complex inside the cell, average binding time per vacant site, average time for diffusion of macromolecules from one site to the next, and slow or rapid mobility of biomolecules in cells. Conclusion To obtain unique values for molecular diffusion coefficient and

  1. Conditional expression of CD44 isoforms in lymphoma cells: influence on hyaluronate binding and tumor growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu, J.

    2002-03-01

    CD44 describes a family of surface proteins consisting of many isoforms due to alternative splice of ten 'variant' exons. Members of this family are involved in various processes including hematopoiesis, lymphocyte activation and homing, limb development, wound healing and tumor progression. Clinically, CD44 has been shown to be a prognostic factor for several human cancers. To answer the question which isoform might be relevant for tumor progression and to gain an insight into the mechanism of its function, I established transfectants of the LB lymphoma cell line in which the expression of four CD44 isoforms, namely CD44v3-10, CD44v4-10, CD44v8-10 and CD44s, was controlled by the Tet-off promoter. In the presence of Doxycycline, the expression was repressed. Removal of Doxycycline switched on expression and the maximal CD44 amount was obtained within two days. The transfectants were characterized regarding their ability to bind to the extracellular matrix component hyaluronate (HA). Overexpression of all four CD44 isoforms conferred the ability to bind HA on LB cells. Other glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) were bound in an isotype-specific fashion. CD44v3-10, CD44v4-10 and CD44v8-10 showed high binding affinity to chondroitin A, B and C, and low affinity to heparin, heparan sulfate and keratan sulfate. CD44s could not bind to these GAGs. Among these three variants, the binding ability of CD44v3-10 was the strongest. CD44 clustering seemed to play a crucial role for HA binding. Both CD44s and CD44v8-10 formed reduction-sensitive complexes in LB cells. The complexes are homooligomers or heterooligomers composed of different isoforms. Cys286 in CD44 transmember domain was not responsible for the formation of reduction-sensitive oligomer or for the enhanced HA binding in LB cell line. Using a conditional dimerization system the requirement of CD44 oligomerization for HA binding was directly demonstrated. The induction of oligomerization increased HA binding

  2. Glycosaminoglycans that bind cold-insoluble globulin in cell-substratum adhesion sites of murine fibroblasts.

    OpenAIRE

    Laterra, J; Ansbacher, R; Culp, L A

    1980-01-01

    Glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) and glycoprotein-derived glycopeptide from mouse BALB/c3T3 and simian virus 40-transformed 3T3 whole cells or their adhesion sites, which are left bound to the serum-coated tissue culture substratum after detachment of cells mediated by [ethylenebis-(oxyethylenenitrilo]tetraacetic acid (EGTA), were analyzed for specific binding to Sepharose columns derivatized with cold-insoluble globulin (CIg). CIg is the serum-contained form of fibronectin and is required for the a...

  3. Critical Role of Heparin Binding Domains of Ameloblastin for Dental Epithelium Cell Adhesion and Ameloblastoma Proliferation*

    OpenAIRE

    Sonoda, Akira; Iwamoto, Tsutomu; Nakamura, Takashi; Fukumoto, Emiko; Yoshizaki, Keigo; Yamada, Aya; Arakaki, Makiko; Harada, Hidemitsu; Nonaka, Kazuaki; Nakamura, Seiji; Yamada, Yoshihiko; Fukumoto, Satoshi

    2009-01-01

    AMBN (ameloblastin) is an enamel matrix protein that regulates cell adhesion, proliferation, and differentiation of ameloblasts. In AMBN-deficient mice, ameloblasts are detached from the enamel matrix, continue to proliferate, and form a multiple cell layer; often, odontogenic tumors develop in the maxilla with age. However, the mechanism of AMBN functions in these biological processes remains unclear. By using recombinant AMBN proteins, we found that AMBN had heparin binding domains at the C...

  4. ATP binding cassette transporter gene expression in rat liver progenitor cells

    OpenAIRE

    2003-01-01

    Background and aim: Liver regeneration after severe liver damage depends in part on proliferation and differentiation of hepatic progenitor cells (HPCs). Under these conditions they must be able to withstand the toxic milieu of the damaged liver. ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporters are cytoprotective efflux pumps that may contribute to the preservation of these cells. The aim of this study was to determine the ABC transporter phenotype of HPCs.

  5. Binding of VEGF-A to canine cancer cells with preferential expression of VEGFR1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonella Borgatti,

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Despite encouraging results in syngeneic and xenografts cancer models with various inhibitors of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF or its receptors (VEGFRs, beneficial effects have not been consistently translated to the clinic, underscoring the need to develop strategies that go beyond the inhibition of these targets. The purpose of this study was to generate data to support the hypothesis that VEGF may be used as “bait” to selectively deliver therapeutics to VEGFR-expressing cancer cells. Materials and Methods: VEGFR1 and VEGFR2 expression was characterized using real time quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR in canine hemangiosarcoma (Grace-HSA, Emma-HSA, melanoma (TLM-1, and thyroid adenocarcinoma (CTAC cell lines. TLM-1 and Grace-HSA were identified as representative cell lines that selectively expressed high levels of VEGFR1. Flow cytometry was performed to examine binding of a single VEGF molecule (biotinylated VEGFA and avidin conjugated to fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC by these chemoresistant cell lines. Results: RT-qPCR showed that canine tumor cells can preferentially express VEGFR1 over VEGFR2. Both TLM-1 and Grace-HSA cell lines, which represent VEGFR1-expressing tumors, showed specific binding to VEGF-A and this binding was competitively inhibited by anti-VEGF antibody. Conclusions: Cells preferentially expressing VEGFR1 can be targeted with a single VEGF molecule and these ligand-receptor pairs are well suited for targeting cytotoxic molecules in various canine tumor cells. Further studies are needed to develop strategies to selectively deliver therapeutics through VEGF-VEGFRs binding into VEGFR-expressing tumors.

  6. The Novel Fibrinogen-Binding Protein FbsB Promotes Streptococcus agalactiae Invasion into Epithelial Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Gutekunst, Heike; Eikmanns, Bernhard J.; Reinscheid, Dieter J.

    2004-01-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae is a major cause of bacterial sepsis and meningitis in human newborns. The interaction of S. agalactiae with host proteins and the entry into host cells thereby represent important virulence traits of these bacteria. The present report describes the identification of the fbsB gene, encoding a novel fibrinogen-binding protein that plays a crucial role in the invasion of S. agalactiae into human cells. In Western blots and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) exper...

  7. Intravascularly Administered RGD-Displaying Measles Viruses Bind to and Infect Neovessel Endothelial Cells In Vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Ong, Hooi Tin; Trejo, Theodore R; Pham, Linh D.; Oberg, Ann L.; Russell, Stephen J.; Peng, Kah-Whye

    2009-01-01

    Systemically administered vectors must cross the endothelial lining of tumor blood vessels to access cancer cells. Vectors that interact with markers on the lumenal surface of these endothelial cells might have enhanced tumor localization. Here, we generated oncolytic measles viruses (MVs) displaying αvβ3 integrin-binding peptides, cyclic arginine-glycine-aspartate (RGD) or echistatin, on the measles hemagglutinin protein. Both viruses had expanded tropisms, and efficiently entered target cel...

  8. Characterization of [125I]omega-conotoxin binding to brain N calcium channels and (-)[3H] desmethoxyverapamil binding to novel calcium channels in osteoblast-like osteosarcoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This dissertation provides molecular evidence for a diversity of Ca2+ channels in neuronal and non-neuronal tissues. First, I demonstrated specific, reversible, saturable binding sites for omega [125I]conotoxin GVIA (omega[125I]CTX) in rat brain and rabbit sympathetic ganglion. Omega [125I]CTX binding has a unique pharmacology, ion selectivity, and anatomical distribution in rat brain. Omega [125I]CTX binding was solubilized, retaining an appropriate pharmacology and ion selectivity. Omega[125I]CTX binding may be associated with a Ca2+ channel because the K/sub D/ of omega [125I]CTX is similar to the IC50 of inhibition of depolarization-induced 45Ca2+ flux into rat brain synaptosomes. Specific (-)[3H]desmethoxyverapamil ((-)[3H]DMV) binding sites were demonstrated on osteoblast-like osteosarcoma cell membranes

  9. A mutation in the ligand binding domain of the androgen receptor of human LNCaP cells affects steroid binding characteristics and response to anti-androgens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Veldscholte (Jos); C. Ris-Stalpers (Carolyn); G.G.J.M. Kuiper (George); G.W. Jenster (Guido); C.A. Berrevoets (Cor); H.J.H.M. Claassen (Eric); H.C.J. van Rooij (Henri); J. Trapman (Jan); A.O. Brinkmann (Albert); E. Mulder (Eppo)

    1990-01-01

    markdownabstractAbstract INCaP prostate tumor cells contain an abnormal androgen receptor system. Progestagens, estradiol and anti-androgens can compete with androgens for binding to the androgen receptor and can stimulate both cell growth and excretion of prostate specific acid phosphatase. We ha

  10. p31comet-Induced Cell Death Is Mediated by Binding and Inactivation of Mad2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyun-Jin Shin

    Full Text Available Mad2, a key component of the spindle checkpoint, is closely associated with chromosomal instability and poor prognosis in cancer. p31comet is a Mad2-interacting protein that serves as a spindle checkpoint silencer at mitosis. In this study, we showed that p31comet-induced apoptosis and senescence occur via counteraction of Mad2 activity. Upon retroviral transduction of p31comet, the majority of human cancer cell lines tested lost the ability to form colonies in a low-density seeding assay. Cancer cells with p31comet overexpression underwent distinct apoptosis and/or senescence, irrespective of p53 status, confirming the cytotoxicity of p31comet. Interestingly, both cytotoxic and Mad2 binding activities were eliminated upon deletion of the C-terminal 30 amino acids of p31comet. Point mutation or deletion of the region affecting Mad2 binding additionally abolished cytotoxic activity. Consistently, wild-type Mad2 interacting with p31comet, but not its non-binding mutant, inhibited cell death, indicating that the mechanism of p31comet-induced cell death involves Mad2 inactivation. Our results clearly suggest that the regions of p31comet affecting interactions with Mad2, including the C-terminus, are essential for induction of cell death. The finding that p31comet-induced cell death is mediated by interactions with Mad2 that lead to its inactivation is potentially applicable in anticancer therapy.

  11. Membrane-associated insulin-like growth factor (IGF binding structures in placental cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ROMANA MASNIKOSA

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available The biological activities of IGF-I and –II are mediated mainly by the type 1 IGF receptor (IGF 1R and controlled by their interaction with soluble proteins, the IGF binding proteins (IGFBPs. Although there is a growing body of evidence that some IGFBPs may be cell surface-bound, published data concerning cell association of IGFBP-1 are scarce and none of them concern placental cells. The cell membranes used in this study were isolated from term human placentae. Detergent-solubilized membranes were shown to contain two types of IGF binding structures that were separated by gel filtration on a Sephadex G-100 column. Proteins in the first peak were eluted at V0 (Mr > 100 kD and they bound IGF-I with greater specificity and affinity than IGF-II and insulin. Most likely, they represented the IGF 1R. Small proteins (Mr ~ 45 kD were eluted with the membrane proteins in the second maximum. They were able to bind IGF-I and IGF-II, but not insulin. The identity of these proteins was shown to be IGFBP-1 on the basis of their reaction with specific anti-IGFBP-1 antibodies. To the best of our knowledge, the existence of IGFBP-1 associated with human placental cell membranes has not been reported in the literature before. Colocalisation of IGFBP-1 with IGF 1R in cell membranes could provide efficient modulation of IGF 1R receptor-ligand interactions.

  12. Identification of novel viral receptors with cell line expressing viral receptor-binding protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Mei; Ye, Jianqiang; Qin, Aijian; Wang, Lin; Hu, Xuming; Qian, Kun; Shao, Hongxia

    2015-01-01

    The viral cell receptors and infection can be blocked by the expression of the viral receptor-binding protein. Thus, the viral cell receptor is an attractive target for anti-viral strategies, and the identification of viral cell receptor is critical for better understanding and controlling viral disease. As a model system for viral entry and anti-retroviral approaches, avian sarcoma/leukosis virus (ASLV, including the A-J ten subgroups) has been studied intensively and many milestone discoveries have been achieved based on work with ASLV. Here, we used a DF1 cell line expressed viral receptor-binding protein to efficiently identify chicken Annexin A2 (chANXA2) as a novel receptor for retrovirus ALV-J (avian leukosis virus subgroup J). Our data demonstrate that antibodies or siRNA to chANXA2 significantly inhibited ALV-J infection and replication, and over-expression of chANXA2 permitted the entry of ALV-J into its non-permissible cells. Our findings have not only identified chANXA2 as a novel biomarker for anti-ALV-J, but also demonstrated that cell lines with the expression of viral receptor-binding protein could be as efficient tools for isolating functional receptors to identify novel anti-viral targets. PMID:25604889

  13. Kit receptor dimerization is driven by bivalent binding of stem cell factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemmon, M A; Pinchasi, D; Zhou, M; Lax, I; Schlessinger, J

    1997-03-01

    Most growth factors and cytokines activate their receptors by inducing dimerization upon binding. We have studied binding of the dimeric cytokine stem cell factor (SCF) to the extracellular domain of its receptor Kit, which is a receptor tyrosine kinase similar to the receptors for platelet-derived growth factor and colony-stimulating factor-1. Calorimetric studies show that one SCF dimer binds simultaneously to two molecules of the Kit extracellular domain. Gel filtration and other methods show that this results in Kit dimerization. It has been proposed that SCF-induced Kit dimerization proceeds via a conformational change that exposes a key receptor dimerization site in the fourth of the five immunoglobulin (Ig)-like domains in Kit. We show that a form of Kit containing just the first three Ig domains (Kit-123) binds to SCF with precisely the same thermodynamic parameters as does Kit-12345. Analytical ultracentrifugation, light scattering, and gel filtration show that Kit-123 dimerizes upon SCF binding in a manner indistinguishable from that seen with Kit-12345. These data argue that the fourth Ig-like domain of Kit is not required for SCF-induced receptor dimerization and provide additional support for a model in which bivalent binding of the SCF dimer provides the driving force for Kit dimerization. PMID:9045650

  14. DNA-binding protein from HeLa cells that binds preferentially to supercoiled DNA damaged by ultraviolet light or N-acetoxy-N-acetyl-2-aminofluorene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A DNA-binding protein was partially purified from extracts of HeLa cells by high-speed centrifugation and chromatography on DEAE-cellulose, phosphocellulose and ultraviolet light-irradiated DNA-cellulose columns. It eluted from the phosphocellulose column with 0.375 M potassium phosphate and from the ultraviolet light-irradiated DNA-cellulose column between 0.5 M and 1 M NaCl. The protein binds preferentially to supercoiled PM2 DNA treated with ultraviolet light or N-acetoxy-N-acetyl-2-aminofluorene, as compared to native supercoiled PM2 DNA. The binding is non-cooperative. Nicked or linear forms of PM2 DNA (damaged or untreated) are not efficient substrates, indicating a requirement of DNA supercoiling for DNA binding. The sedimentation coefficient of the protein estimated by glycerol gradient centrifugation is 2.0-2.5 S, corresponding to a molecular weight of about 20000-25000 if the protein is spherical. The binding to DNA irradiated with ultraviolet light or treated with acetoxyacetylaminofluorene is optimal at around 100-200 mM NaCl and is relatively independent of temperature and pH. MgCl2 and MnCl2 at concentrations between 1 and 5 mM do not markedly affect the binding, but it is inhibited by sucrose, ATP and caffeine. The biological significance of the DNA-binding protein remains to be determined. It does not possess significant glycosylase, endonuclease or exonuclease activities. The dissociation equilibrium constant for the binding reaction of the protein to the ultraviolet light or acetoxyacetylaminofluorene-induced binding sites on DNA is estimated to be 4x10-11 M. There are at least 1x105 DNA-binding protein molecules/HeLa cell. (Auth.)

  15. Effect of corticosteroid binding proteins on the steroidogenic activity of bovine adrenocortical cell suspensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basset, M; Rostaing-Metz, B; Chambaz, E M

    1982-07-01

    The possible role of steroid binding proteins in the hormonal secretion process of a steroidogenic tissue was examined using bovine adrenocortical cell suspensions, either under basal conditions or in the presence of half-maximally active concentration (1 x 10(-9) M) of synthetic adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH). Three types of plasma cortisol binding proteins were used, namely bovine serum albumine (BSA), purified transcortin (CBG) and purified anticortisol immunoglobulins (IgG). When added to the incubation medium, CBG (at 1 x 10(-10) to 2 x 10(-9) M cortisol binding sites) and anticortisol IgG (at 4.8 x 10(-10) to 3 x 10(-9) M cortisol binding sites) did not influence either the basal nor the ACTH-stimulated net cortisol production of the cell preparations. Whereas crystallized and delipidated BSA showed also no effect, crude commercial BSA preparation (Cohn fraction V) exhibited an ACTH-like cofactor effect which resulted in a marked increase in the net cortisol production by stimulated cells. These observations might be explained by the presence in crude BSA of lipoprotein-cholesterol complexes, possibly acting as an extracellular source of cholesterol available for corticosteroidogenesis. It may be concluded that specific high affinity cortisol binding systems present outside adrenocortical steroidogenic cells do not influence their secretory activity under short term in vitro condition. In addition, it can be stressed that use of ill defined protein preparations (e.g. crude BSA) may lead to artifactual observations in the study of the differentiated functions of isolated steroidogenic cells. PMID:6287106

  16. Binding and internalization of recombinant human erythropoietin in murine erythroid precursor cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mufson, R.A.; Gesner, T.G.

    1987-05-01

    Erythropoietin (EPO) biosynthetically labelled with (/sup 35/S)cysteine was produced from Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells containing amplified copies of human EPO cDNA. The glycosylated recombinant (/sup 35/S)EPO, purified to virtual radiochemical homogeneity, was biologically active. We studied the interaction of this labeled recombinant EPO with erythroid precursor cells from mice made anemic with phenylhydrazine. The (/sup 35/S)-labeled molecule bound to erythroid precursors in a time- and temperature-dependent manner. The binding was specific for EPO, and neither insulin, transferrin, epidermal growth factor, nor multiplication stimulating activity could compete for EPO binding sites. In the presence of 0.2% sodium azide, which blocks 80% to 90% of internalization, the recombinant molecule bound with an apparent Kd of 750 pmol/L and 100 to 200 binding sites per cell at 37 degrees C. Asialo-EPO was a more effective competitor than sialated EPO for the available binding sites. Thus, the enhanced biological specific activity of asialo-EPO could result from its enhanced binding affinity. We also studied recombinant human EPO labeled with /sup 125/I and found that it also bound to the erythroid cells in a saturable and specific manner. After 90 minutes of incubation at 37 degrees C, most of the bound (/sup 35/S)EPO was internalized, whereas most of the (/sup 125/I)EPO remained on the cell surface. The reduced internalization of the iodinated molecule could account for the previously reported functional deficit associated with iodination.

  17. DNA damaging, cell cytotoxicity and serum albumin binding efficacy of the rutin-Cu(ii) complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Atanu Singha; Tripathy, Debi Ranjan; Samanta, Sintu; Ghosh, Sudip K; Dasgupta, Swagata

    2016-04-26

    Flavonoids are widely used as anti-oxidants, anti-cancer agents and possess metal ion chelation properties. In this report we have investigated the DNA binding (and damaging), cell cytotoxicity and serum albumin (SA) binding efficacy of the rutin-Cu(ii) complex using differential spectroscopic methods. The rutin-Cu(ii) complex was able to intercalate into calf thymus DNA (ct-DNA) at lower concentrations and its DNA damaging properties were also confirmed from the agarose gel based assay, fluorescence and UV-vis studies. The copper complex was found to be effective against the growth of HeLa cells in vivo. The binding constants (Kb) of the rutin-Cu(ii) complex towards HSA and BSA were found to be (0.98 ± 0.03) and (1.05 ± 0.02) × 10(5) M(-1), respectively, at 299 K and observed to increase with the increase in temperature. Site selectivity studies revealed that the rutin-Cu(ii) complex binds near site 1 (subdomain IIA) of SAs. Thermodynamic parameters indicated that the mode of interaction of rutin and its copper complex with SAs are different from each other. Both ΔH° and ΔS° were observed to be positive for the interaction of the rutin-Cu(ii) complex with SAs, indicating the presence of hydrophobic association in binding. The values of ΔH° were estimated to be negative (-42.07 ± 2.92 and -23.29 ± 2.33 kJ mol(-1) for HSA and BSA respectively) in the binding of rutin with SAs. It implies that after chelation with Cu(ii) ion, rutin alters its binding mode which could have varying applications to its other physicochemical activities. PMID:27035097

  18. Involvement of cell surface heparin sulfate in the binding of lipoprotein lipase to cultured bovine endothelial cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Shimada, K.; Gill, P J; Silbert, J E; Douglas, W H; Fanburg, B L

    1981-01-01

    It has been postulated that lipoprotein lipase, an enzyme important in the uptake of fatty acids into tissues, is bound to the vascular endothelial cell surface and that this binding occurs through attachment to heparinlike glycosaminoglycans. Furthermore, it is thought that heparin releases the enzyme from its attachment to the endothelium into the circulation. These hypotheses have never been tested directly in cell systems in vitro. In the present study we have directly evaluated the inter...

  19. Antiproliferative activity of bicyclic benzimidazole nucleosides: synthesis, DNA-binding and cell cycle analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sontakke, Vyankat A; Lawande, Pravin P; Kate, Anup N; Khan, Ayesha; Joshi, Rakesh; Kumbhar, Anupa A; Shinde, Vaishali S

    2016-04-26

    An efficient route was developed for synthesis of bicyclic benzimidazole nucleosides from readily available d-glucose. The key reactions were Vörbruggen glycosylation and ring closing metathesis (RCM). Primarily, to understand the mode of DNA binding, we performed a molecular docking study and the binding was found to be in the minor groove region. Based on the proposed binding model, UV-visible and fluorescence spectroscopic techniques using calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA) demonstrated a non-intercalative mode of binding. Antiproliferative activity of nucleosides was tested against MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell lines and found to be active at low micromolar concentrations. Compounds and displayed significant antiproliferative activity as compared to and with the reference anticancer drug, doxorubicin. Cell cycle analysis showed that nucleoside induced cell cycle arrest at the S-phase. Confocal microscopy has been performed to validate the induction of cellular apoptosis. Based on these findings, such modified bicyclic benzimidazole nucleosides will make a significant contribution to the development of anticancer drugs. PMID:27074628

  20. Overexpression of Csk-binding protein contributes to renal cell carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, X; Lu, X; Man, X; Zhou, W; Jiang, L Q; Knyazev, P; Lei, L; Huang, Q; Ullrich, A; Zhang, Z; Chen, Z

    2009-09-17

    C-terminal Src kinase (Csk)-binding protein (Cbp) is a transmembrane adaptor protein that localizes exclusively in lipid rafts, where it regulates Src family kinase (SFK) activities through recruitment of Csk. Although SFKs are well known for their involvement in cancer, the function of Cbp in carcinogenesis remains largely unknown. In this study, we reported overexpression of Cbp in more than 70% of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) specimens and in the majority of tested RCC cell lines. Depletion of Cbp in RCC cells by RNA interference led to remarkable inhibition of cell proliferation, migration, anchorage-independent growth as well as tumorigenicity in nude mice. Strikingly, silencing of Cbp negatively affected the sustaining of Erk1/2 activation but not c-Src activation induced by serum. Besides, the RhoA activity in RCC cells was remarkably impaired when Cbp was knocked down. Overexpression of wild-type Cbp, but not its mutant Cbp/DeltaCP lacking C-terminal PDZ-binding motif, significantly enhanced RhoA activation and cell migration of RCC cells. These results provided new insights into the function of Cbp in modulating RhoA activation, by which Cbp might contribute to renal cell carcinogenesis. PMID:19581936

  1. Identification of fluorescent compounds with non-specific binding property via high throughput live cell microscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangeeta Nath

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Compounds exhibiting low non-specific intracellular binding or non-stickiness are concomitant with rapid clearing and in high demand for live-cell imaging assays because they allow for intracellular receptor localization with a high signal/noise ratio. The non-stickiness property is particularly important for imaging intracellular receptors due to the equilibria involved. METHOD: Three mammalian cell lines with diverse genetic backgrounds were used to screen a combinatorial fluorescence library via high throughput live cell microscopy for potential ligands with high in- and out-flux properties. The binding properties of ligands identified from the first screen were subsequently validated on plant root hair. A correlative analysis was then performed between each ligand and its corresponding physiochemical and structural properties. RESULTS: The non-stickiness property of each ligand was quantified as a function of the temporal uptake and retention on a cell-by-cell basis. Our data shows that (i mammalian systems can serve as a pre-screening tool for complex plant species that are not amenable to high-throughput imaging; (ii retention and spatial localization of chemical compounds vary within and between each cell line; and (iii the structural similarities of compounds can infer their non-specific binding properties. CONCLUSION: We have validated a protocol for identifying chemical compounds with non-specific binding properties that is testable across diverse species. Further analysis reveals an overlap between the non-stickiness property and the structural similarity of compounds. The net result is a more robust screening assay for identifying desirable ligands that can be used to monitor intracellular localization. Several new applications of the screening protocol and results are also presented.

  2. Cdk1 Phosphorylates Drosophila Sas-4 to Recruit Polo to Daughter Centrioles and Convert Them to Centrosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novak, Zsofia A; Wainman, Alan; Gartenmann, Lisa; Raff, Jordan W

    2016-06-20

    Centrosomes and cilia are organized by a centriole pair comprising an older mother and a younger daughter. Centriole numbers are tightly regulated, and daughter centrioles (which assemble in S phase) cannot themselves duplicate or organize centrosomes until they have passed through mitosis. It is unclear how this mitotic "centriole conversion" is regulated, but it requires Plk1/Polo kinase. Here we show that in flies, Cdk1 phosphorylates the conserved centriole protein Sas-4 during mitosis. This creates a Polo-docking site that helps recruit Polo to daughter centrioles and is required for the subsequent recruitment of Asterless (Asl), a protein essential for centriole duplication and mitotic centrosome assembly. Point mutations in Sas-4 that prevent Cdk1 phosphorylation or Polo docking do not block centriole disengagement during mitosis, but block efficient centriole conversion and lead to embryonic lethality. These observations can explain why daughter centrioles have to pass through mitosis before they can duplicate and organize a centrosome. PMID:27326932

  3. IGF binding protein 2 supports the survival and cycling of hematopoietic stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    Huynh, HoangDinh; Zheng, Junke; Umikawa, Masato; Zhang, Chaozheng; Silvany, Robert; Iizuka, Satoru; Holzenberger, Martin; Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Cheng Cheng

    2011-01-01

    The role of IGF binding protein 2 (IGFBP2) in cell growth is intriguing and largely undefined. Previously we identified IGFBP2 as an extrinsic factor that supports ex vivo expansion of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). Here we showed that IGFBP2-null mice have fewer HSCs than wild-type mice. While IGFBP2 has little cell-autonomous effect on HSC function, we found decreased in vivo repopulation of HSCs in primary and secondary transplanted IGFBP2-null recipients. Importantly, bone marrow stroma...

  4. Photoaffinity labeling demonstrates binding between Ia molecules and nominal antigen on antigen-presenting cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Phillips, M L; Yip, C C; Shevach, E M; Delovitch, T L

    1986-01-01

    We have used radioiodinated photoreactive bovine insulin as antigen to examine the molecular nature of immunogenic complexes that form on antigen-presenting cells. The probe was allowed to bind to either insulin-presenting B-hybridoma cells, lipopolysaccharide-stimulated blasts, or bovine insulin-specific helper-T-hybridoma cells in the dark. Samples were then exposed to light to induce crosslinkage, solubilized, and analyzed by gel electrophoresis. Two protein bands at about 36 kDa and 27 kD...

  5. Insulin-like growth factor binding protein-5 influences pancreatic cancer cell growth

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sarah K Johnson; Randy S Haun

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the functional significance of insulin-like growth factor binding protein-5 (IGFBP-5) overexpression in pancreatic cancer (PaC).METHODS: The effects of IGFBP-5 on cell growth were assessed by stable transfection of BxPC-3 and PANC-1 cell lines and measuring cell number and DNA synthesis. Alterations in the cell cycle were assessed by flow cytometry and immunoblot analyses.Changes in cell survival and signal transduction were evaluated after mitogen activated protein kinase and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor treatment.RESULTS: After serum depr ivat ion, IGFBP-5 expression increased both cell number and DNA synthesis in BxPC-3 cells, but reduced cell number in PANC-1 cells. Consistent with this observation, cell cycle analysis of IGFBP-5-expressing cells revealed accelerated cell cycle progression in BxPC-3 and G2/M arrest of PANC-1 cells. Signal transduction analysis revealed that Akt activation was increased in BxPC-3, but reduced in PANC-1 cells that express IGFBP-5. Inhibition of PI3K with LY294002 suppressed extracellular signal-regulated kinase-1 and -2 (ERK1/2) activation in BxPC-3, but enhanced ERK1/2 activation in PANC-1 cells that express IGFBP-5. When MEK1/2 was blocked, Akt activation remained elevated in IGFBP-5 expressing PaC cells; however, inhibition of PI3K or MEK1/2 abrogated IGFBP-5-mediated cell survival.CONCLUSION: These results indicate that IGFBP-5 expression affects the cell cycle and survival signal pathways and thus it may be an important mediator of PaC cell growth.

  6. Binding capacity of in vitro deglycosylated IgA1 to human mesangial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jun-jun; Xu, Li-xia; Zhang, Ying; Zhao, Ming-hui

    2006-04-01

    IgA nephropathy (IgAN) is the most common glomerular disease and it is characterized by deposition of IgA1 molecules in mesangium. Recent studies had demonstrated that serum and mesangial IgA1 in IgAN were deglycosylated and IgA1 could bind to human mesangial cells (HMC) through a novel receptor. The aim of the current study is to investigate and compare the binding capacities of different in vitro deglycosylated IgA1 on human mesangial cells. Serum IgA1 was purified by jacalin affinity chromatography and then was desialylated (DesIgA1) and/or degalactosylated (Des/DeGalIgA1) with neuraminidase and/or beta-galactosidase. The efficacy of deglycosylations was assessed by Peanut agglutinin (PNA) and Vicia villosa (VV) lectin. The sizes of normal IgA1 and deglycosylated IgA1 were determined by Sephacryl S-300 chromatography and binding capacities to primary HMC were evaluated by radioligand binding assays. Normal IgA1 and deglycosylated IgA1 could bind to HMC in a dose-dependent, saturable manner. The maximal binding capacities and binding sites/cell of DesIgA1 and Des/DeGalIgA were significantly higher than that of normal IgA1. However, more aggregated IgA1 was found in DesIgA1 and Des/DeGalIgA1. Scatchard analysis revealed a similar Kd of normal IgA1 and deglycosylated IgA1. The current study suggested that the binding capacities of DesIgA1 and Des/DeGalIgA1 to HMC were significantly higher than that of normal IgA1, which at least in part was due to more macromolecular IgA1 in deglycoslated IgA1. However, there were no significant differences in the affinities of normal IgA1, DesIgA1 and Des/DeGalIgA1 with HMC. Deglycosylated IgA1 might play an important role in pathogenesis of IgAN. PMID:16442846

  7. Targeting of nucleotide-binding proteins by HAMLET--a conserved tumor cell death mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, J C S; Nadeem, A; Rydström, A; Puthia, M; Svanborg, C

    2016-02-18

    HAMLET (Human Alpha-lactalbumin Made LEthal to Tumor cells) kills tumor cells broadly suggesting that conserved survival pathways are perturbed. We now identify nucleotide-binding proteins as HAMLET binding partners, accounting for about 35% of all HAMLET targets in a protein microarray comprising 8000 human proteins. Target kinases were present in all branches of the Kinome tree, including 26 tyrosine kinases, 10 tyrosine kinase-like kinases, 13 homologs of yeast sterile kinases, 4 casein kinase 1 kinases, 15 containing PKA, PKG, PKC family kinases, 15 calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinases and 13 kinases from CDK, MAPK, GSK3, CLK families. HAMLET acted as a broad kinase inhibitor in vitro, as defined in a screen of 347 wild-type, 93 mutant, 19 atypical and 17 lipid kinases. Inhibition of phosphorylation was also detected in extracts from HAMLET-treated lung carcinoma cells. In addition, HAMLET recognized 24 Ras family proteins and bound to Ras, RasL11B and Rap1B on the cytoplasmic face of the plasma membrane. Direct cellular interactions between HAMLET and activated Ras family members including Braf were confirmed by co-immunoprecipitation. As a consequence, oncogenic Ras and Braf activity was inhibited and HAMLET and Braf inhibitors synergistically increased tumor cell death in response to HAMLET. Unlike most small molecule kinase inhibitors, HAMLET showed selectivity for tumor cells in vitro and in vivo. The results identify nucleotide-binding proteins as HAMLET targets and suggest that dysregulation of the ATPase/kinase/GTPase machinery contributes to cell death, following the initial, selective recognition of HAMLET by tumor cells. The findings thus provide a molecular basis for the conserved tumoricidal effect of HAMLET, through dysregulation of kinases and oncogenic GTPases, to which tumor cells are addicted. PMID:26028028

  8. Dengue virus specific dual HLA binding T cell epitopes induce CD8+ T cell responses in seropositive individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comber, Joseph D; Karabudak, Aykan; Huang, Xiaofang; Piazza, Paolo A; Marques, Ernesto T A; Philip, Ramila

    2014-01-01

    Dengue virus infects an estimated 300 million people each year and even more are at risk of becoming infected as the virus continues to spread into new areas. Despite the increase in viral prevalence, no anti-viral medications or vaccines are approved for treating or preventing infection. CD8+ T cell responses play a major role in viral clearance. Therefore, effective vaccines that induce a broad, multi-functional T cell response with substantial cross-reactivity between all virus serotypes can have major impacts on reducing infection rates and infection related complications. Here, we took an immunoproteomic approach to identify novel MHC class I restricted T cell epitopes presented by dengue virus infected cells, representing the natural and authentic targets of the T cell response. Using this approach we identified 4 novel MHC-I restricted epitopes: 2 with the binding motif for HLA-A24 molecules and 2 with both HLA-A2 and HLA-A24 binding motifs. These peptides were able to activate CD8+ T cell responses in both healthy, seronegative individuals and in seropositive individuals who have previously been infected with dengue virus. Importantly, the dual binding epitopes activated pre-existing T cell precursors in PBMCs obtained from both HLA-A2+ and HLA-A24+ seropositive individuals. Together, the data indicate that these epitopes are immunologically relevant T cell activating peptides presented on infected cells during a natural infection and therefore may serve as candidate antigens for the development of effective multi-serotype specific dengue virus vaccines. PMID:25668665

  9. Hyaluronic acid binding, endocytosis and degradation by sinusoidal liver endothelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The binding, endocytosis, and degradation of 125I-hyaluronic acid (125I-HA) by liver endothelial cells (LEC) was studied under several conditions. The dissociation of receptor-bound 125I-HA was rapid, with a half time of ∼31 min and a Koff of 6.3 x 10-4/sec. A large reversible increase in 125I-HA binding to LEC at pH 5.0 was due to an increase in the observed affinity of the binding interaction. Pronase digestion suggested the protein nature of the receptor and the intracellular location of the digitonin exposed binding activity. Binding and endocytosis occur in the presence of 10 mM EGTA indicating that divalent cations are not required for receptor function. To study the degradation of 125I-HA by LEC, a cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC) precipitation assay was characterized. The minimum HA length required for precipitation was elucidated. The fate of the LEC HA receptor after endocytosis was examined

  10. Hyaluronic acid binding, endocytosis and degradation by sinusoidal liver endothelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGary, C.T.

    1988-01-01

    The binding, endocytosis, and degradation of {sup 125}I-hyaluronic acid ({sup 125}I-HA) by liver endothelial cells (LEC) was studied under several conditions. The dissociation of receptor-bound {sup 125}I-HA was rapid, with a half time of {approx}31 min and a K{sub off} of 6.3 {times} 10{sup {minus}4}/sec. A large reversible increase in {sup 125}I-HA binding to LEC at pH 5.0 was due to an increase in the observed affinity of the binding interaction. Pronase digestion suggested the protein nature of the receptor and the intracellular location of the digitonin exposed binding activity. Binding and endocytosis occur in the presence of 10 mM EGTA indicating that divalent cations are not required for receptor function. To study the degradation of {sup 125}I-HA by LEC, a cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC) precipitation assay was characterized. The minimum HA length required for precipitation was elucidated. The fate of the LEC HA receptor after endocytosis was examined.

  11. Dietary flavonoid fisetin binds to β-tubulin and disrupts microtubule dynamics in prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhtar, Eiman; Adhami, Vaqar Mustafa; Sechi, Mario; Mukhtar, Hasan

    2015-10-28

    Microtubule targeting based therapies have revolutionized cancer treatment; however, resistance and side effects remain a major limitation. Therefore, novel strategies that can overcome these limitations are urgently needed. We made a novel discovery that fisetin, a hydroxyflavone, is a microtubule stabilizing agent. Fisetin binds to tubulin and stabilizes microtubules with binding characteristics far superior than paclitaxel. Surface plasmon resonance and computational docking studies suggested that fisetin binds to β-tubulin with superior affinity compared to paclitaxel. Fisetin treatment of human prostate cancer cells resulted in robust up-regulation of microtubule associated proteins (MAP)-2 and -4. In addition, fisetin treated cells were enriched in α-tubulin acetylation, an indication of stabilization of microtubules. Fisetin significantly inhibited PCa cell proliferation, migration, and invasion. Nudc, a protein associated with microtubule motor dynein/dynactin complex that regulates microtubule dynamics, was inhibited with fisetin treatment. Further, fisetin treatment of a P-glycoprotein overexpressing multidrug-resistant cancer cell line NCI/ADR-RES inhibited the viability and colony formation. Our results offer in vitro proof-of-concept for fisetin as a microtubule targeting agent. We suggest that fisetin could be developed as an adjuvant for treatment of prostate and other cancer types. PMID:26235140

  12. Genetic induction of the gastrin releasing peptide receptor on tumor cells for radiolabeled peptide binding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose/Objective: To improve upon existing radioimmunotherapy (RAIT) approaches, we have devised a strategy to genetically induce high levels of new membrane-associated receptors on human cancer cells targetable by radiolabeled peptides. In this context, we report successful adenoviral-mediated transduction of tumor cells to express the murine gastrin releasing peptide receptor (mGRPr) as demonstrated by125 I-labeled bombesin binding. Materials and Methods: To demonstrate the feasibility of our strategy and to provide rapid proof of principle, we constructed a plasmid encoding the mGRPr gene. We cloned the mGRPr gene into the adenoviral shuttle vector pACMVpLpARS+ (F. Graham). We then utilized the methodology of adenovirus-polylysine-mediated transfection (AdpLmGRPr) to accomplish transient gene expression of mGRPr in two human cancer cell lines including A427 non-small cell lung cancer cells and HeLa cervical cancer cells. Murine GRPr expression was then measured by a live-cell binding assay using 125I-labeled bombesin. In order to develop this strategy further, it was necessary to construct a vector that would be more efficient for in vivo transduction. In this regard, we constructed a recombinant adenoviral vector (AdCMVGRPr) encoding the mGRPr under the control of the CMV promoter based on in vivo homologous recombination methods. The recombinant shuttle vector containing mGRPr was co-transfected with the adenoviral rescue plasmid pJM17 into the E1A trans complementing cell line 293 allowing for derivation of replication-incompetent, recombinant adenoviral vector. Individual plaques were isolated and subjected to two further rounds of plaque purification. The identity of the virus was confirmed at each step by PCR employing primers for mGRPr. The absence of wild-type adenovirus was confirmed by PCR using primers to the adenoviral E1A gene. SKOV3.ip1 human ovarian cancer cells and MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cells were transduced in vitro with AdCMVGRPr at

  13. Isolated receptor binding domains of HTLV-1 and HTLV-2 envelopes bind Glut-1 on activated CD4+ and CD8+ T cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Montel-Hagen Amélie

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We previously identified the glucose transporter Glut-1, a member of the multimembrane-spanning facilitative nutrient transporter family, as a receptor for both HTLV-1 and HTLV-2. However, a recent report concluded that Glut-1 cannot serve as a receptor for HTLV-1 on CD4 T cells: This was based mainly on their inability to detect Glut-1 on this lymphocyte subset using the commercial antibody mAb1418. It was therefore of significant interest to thoroughly assess Glut-1 expression on CD4 and CD8 T cells, and its association with HTLV-1 and -2 envelope binding. Results As previously reported, ectopic expression of Glut-1 but not Glut-3 resulted in significantly augmented binding of tagged proteins harboring the receptor binding domains of either HTLV-1 or HTLV-2 envelope glycoproteins (H1RBD or H2RBD. Using antibodies raised against the carboxy-terminal peptide of Glut-1, we found that Glut-1 expression was significantly increased in both CD4 and CD8 cells following TCR stimulation. Corresponding increases in the binding of H1RBD as well as H2RBD, not detected on quiescent T cells, were observed following TCR engagement. Furthermore, increased Glut-1 expression was accompanied by a massive augmentation in glucose uptake in TCR-stimulated CD4 and CD8 lymphocytes. Finally, we determined that the apparent contradictory results obtained by Takenouchi et al were due to their monitoring of Glut-1 with a mAb that does not bind cells expressing endogenous Glut-1, including human erythrocytes that harbor 300,000 copies per cell. Conclusion Transfection of Glut-1 directly correlates with the capacities of HTLV-1 and HTLV-2 envelope-derived ligands to bind cells. Moreover, Glut-1 is induced by TCR engagement, resulting in massive increases in glucose uptake and binding of HTLV-1 and -2 envelopes to both CD4 and CD8 T lymphocytes. Therefore, Glut-1 is a primary binding receptor for HTLV-1 and HTLV-2 envelopes on activated CD4 as well as CD8

  14. Characterization of human platelet binding of recombinant T cell receptor ligand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meza-Romero Roberto

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recombinant T cell receptor ligands (RTLs are bio-engineered molecules that may serve as novel therapeutic agents for the treatment of neuroinflammatory conditions such as multiple sclerosis (MS. RTLs contain membrane distal α1 plus β1 domains of class II major histocompatibility complex linked covalently to specific peptides that can be used to regulate T cell responses and inhibit experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE. The mechanisms by which RTLs impede local recruitment and retention of inflammatory cells in the CNS, however, are not completely understood. Methods We have recently shown that RTLs bind strongly to B cells, macrophages, and dendritic cells, but not to T cells, in an antigenic-independent manner, raising the question whether peripheral blood cells express a distinct RTL-receptor. Our study was designed to characterize the molecular mechanisms by which RTLs bind human blood platelets, and the ability of RTL to modulate platelet function. Results Our data demonstrate that human blood platelets support binding of RTL. Immobilized RTL initiated platelet intracellular calcium mobilization and lamellipodia formation through a pathway dependent upon Src and PI3 kinases signaling. The presence of RTL in solution reduced platelet aggregation by collagen, while treatment of whole blood with RTL prolonged occlusive thrombus formation on collagen. Conclusions Platelets, well-known regulators of hemostasis and thrombosis, have been implicated in playing a major role in inflammation and immunity. This study provides the first evidence that blood platelets express a functional RTL-receptor with a putative role in modulating pathways of neuroinflammation.

  15. CELL-SURFACE BINDING OF DEOXYNIVALENOL TO Lactobacillus paracasei subsp. tolerans ISOLATED FROM SOURDOUGH STARTER CULTURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yousef I. Hassan

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Deoxynivalenol (DON and fumonisin B1 (FB1 are two contaminant-mycotoxins frequently found in food commodities produced under poor conditions. Several methods have been suggested for the detoxification of such mycotoxins. Among the proposed methods, biological detoxification seems to be the most promising and cost-efficient. This study explores the capability of one strain of lactic acid bacteria, identified as Lactobacillus paracasei subsp. tolerans, to bind both DON and FB1 in liquid cultures. Here we report the ability of heat-inactivated cells to significantly reduce concentrations of DON in liquid cultures. Further mechanistic investigation showed that the detoxification process is a result of the physical binding of such mycotoxins to the cell wall of this bacterium.

  16. A human BRCA2 complex containing a structural DNA binding component influences cell cycle progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marmorstein, L Y; Kinev, A V; Chan, G K; Bochar, D A; Beniya, H; Epstein, J A; Yen, T J; Shiekhattar, R

    2001-01-26

    Germline mutations of the human BRCA2 gene confer susceptibility to breast cancer. Although the function of the BRCA2 protein remains to be determined, murine cells homozygous for BRCA2 inactivation display chromosomal aberrations. We have isolated a 2 MDa BRCA2-containing complex and identified a structural DNA binding component, designated as BRCA2-Associated Factor 35 (BRAF35). BRAF35 contains a nonspecific DNA binding HMG domain and a kinesin-like coiled coil domain. Similar to BRCA2, BRAF35 mRNA expression levels in mouse embryos are highest in proliferating tissues with high mitotic index. Strikingly, nuclear staining revealed a close association of BRAF35/BRCA2 complex with condensed chromatin coincident with histone H3 phosphorylation. Importantly, antibody microinjection experiments suggest a role for BRCA2/BRAF35 complex in modulation of cell cycle progression. PMID:11207365

  17. Protein-binding, cytotoxicity in vitro and cell cycle arrest of ruthenium(II) polypyridyl complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Si-Hong; Zhu, Jian-Wei; Xu, Hui-Hua; Wang, Yan; Liu, Ya-Min; Liang, Jun-Bo; Zhang, Gui-Qiang; Cao, Di-Hua; Lin, Yang-Yang; Wu, Yong; Guo, Qi-Feng

    2016-05-01

    The cytotoxic activity of two Ru(II) complexes against A549, BEL-7402, HeLa, PC-12, SGC-7901 and SiHa cell lines was investigated by MTT method. Complexes 1 and 2 show moderate cytotoxicity toward BEL-7402 cells with an IC50 value of 53.9 ± 3.4 and 39.3 ± 2.1 μM. The effects of the complexes inducing apoptosis, cellular uptake, reactive oxygen species and mitochondrial membrane potential in BEL-7402 cells have been studied by fluorescence microscopy. The percentages of apoptotic and necrotic cells and cell cycle arrest were studied by flow cytometry. The BSA-binding behaviors were investigated by UV/visible and fluorescent spectra.

  18. Insulin-like Growth Factor Binding Protein 7 Mediates Glioma Cell Growth and Migration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Jiang

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Insulin-like growth factor binding protein 7 (IGFBP-7 is the only member of the IGFBP superfamily that binds strongly to insulin, suggesting that IGFBP-7 may have different functions from other IGFBPs. Unlike other IGFBPs, the expression and functions of IGFBP-7 in glioma tumors have not been reported. Using cDNA microarray analysis, we found that expression of IGFBP-7 correlated with the grade of glioma tumors and the overall patient survival. This finding was further validated by real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and Western blot analysis. We used RNAi to examine the role of IGFBP-7 in glioma cells, inhibiting IGFBP-7 expression by short interfering RNA transfection. Cell proliferation was suppressed after IGFBP-7 expression was inhibited for 5 days, and glioma cell growth was stimulated consistently by the addition of recombinant IGFBP-7 protein. Moreover, glioma cell migration was attenuated by IGFBP-7 depletion but enhanced by IGFBP-7 overexpression and addition. Overexpression of AKT1 in IGFBP-7-overxpressed cells attenuated the IGFBP-7-promoted migration and further enhanced inhibition of IGFBP-7 depletion on the migration. Phosphorylation of AKT and Erk1/2 was also inversely regulated by IGFBP-7 expression. These two factors together suggest that IGFBP-7 can regulate glioma cell migration through the AKT-ERK pathway, thereby playing an important role in glioma growth and migration.

  19. Ligand-affinity cloning and structure of a cell surface heparan sulfate proteoglycan that binds basic fibroblast growth factor.

    OpenAIRE

    Kiefer, M C; Stephans, J C; Crawford, K; Okino, K.; Barr, P.J.

    1990-01-01

    Expression cloning of cDNAs encoding a basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF) binding protein confirms previous hypotheses that this molecule is a cell-surface heparan sulfate proteoglycan. A cDNA library constructed from a hamster kidney cell line rich in FGF receptor activity was transfected into a human lymphoblastoid cell line. Clones expressing functional basic FGF binding proteins at their surfaces were enriched by panning on plastic dishes coated with human basic FGF. The amino acid sequ...

  20. Effective Binding of a Phosphatidylserine-Targeting Antibody to Ebola Virus Infected Cells and Purified Virions

    OpenAIRE

    Dowall, S. D.; Graham, V A; Corbin-Lickfett, K; C. Empig; Schlunegger, K.; Bruce, C B; Easterbrook, L.; Hewson, R.

    2015-01-01

    Ebola virus is responsible for causing severe hemorrhagic fevers, with case fatality rates of up to 90%. Currently, no antiviral or vaccine is licensed against Ebola virus. A phosphatidylserine-targeting antibody (PGN401, bavituximab) has previously been shown to have broad-spectrum antiviral activity. Here, we demonstrate that PGN401 specifically binds to Ebola virus and recognizes infected cells. Our study provides the first evidence of phosphatidylserine-targeting antibody reactivity again...

  1. Cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART) peptide specific binding in pheochromocytoma cells PC12

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Maletínská, Lenka; Maixnerová, Jana; Matyšková, Resha; Haugvicová, Renata; Šloncová, Eva; Elbert, Tomáš; Slaninová, Jiřina; Železná, Blanka

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 559, 2/3 (2007), s. 109-114. ISSN 0014-2999 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA303/05/0614 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506; CEZ:AV0Z50520514; CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : radioligand binding * CART * PC12 cells * food intake Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 2.376, year: 2007

  2. Insulin-like growth factor binding protein 2 promotes ovarian cancer cell invasion

    OpenAIRE

    Liu Jinsong; Wang Huamin; Shmulevich Ilya; Mircean Cristian; Lee Eun-Ju; Niemistö Antti; Kavanagh John J; Lee Je-Ho; Zhang Wei

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Background Insulin-like growth factor binding protein 2 (IGFBP2) is overexpressed in ovarian malignant tissues and in the serum and cystic fluid of ovarian cancer patients, suggesting an important role of IGFBP2 in the biology of ovarian cancer. The purpose of this study was to assess the role of increased IGFBP2 in ovarian cancer cells. Results Using western blotting and tissue microarray analyses, we showed that IGFBP2 was frequently overexpressed in ovarian carcinomas compared wit...

  3. The Microtubule-Associated Protein END BINDING1 Modulates Membrane Trafficking Pathways in Plant Root Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Shahidi, Saeid

    2013-01-01

    EB1 protein preferentially binds to the fast growing ends of microtubules where it regulates microtubule dynamics. In addition to microtubules, EB1 interacts with several additional proteins, and through these interactions modulates various cellular processes. Arabidopsis thaliana eb1 mutants have roots that exhibit aberrant responses to touch/gravity cues. Columella cells in the centre of the root cap are polarized and play key roles in these responses by functioning as sensors.I examined th...

  4. Recombinant fusion protein of albumin-retinol binding protein inactivates stellate cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► We designed novel recombinant albumin-RBP fusion proteins. ► Expression of fusion proteins inactivates pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs). ► Fusion proteins are successfully internalized into and inactivate PSCs. ► RBP moiety mediates cell specific uptake of fusion protein. -- Abstract: Quiescent pancreatic- (PSCs) and hepatic- (HSCs) stellate cells store vitamin A (retinol) in lipid droplets via retinol binding protein (RBP) receptor and, when activated by profibrogenic stimuli, they transform into myofibroblast-like cells which play a key role in the fibrogenesis. Despite extensive investigations, there is, however, currently no appropriate therapy available for tissue fibrosis. We previously showed that the expression of albumin, composed of three homologous domains (I–III), inhibits stellate cell activation, which requires its high-affinity fatty acid-binding sites asymmetrically distributed in domain I and III. To attain stellate cell-specific uptake, albumin (domain I/III) was coupled to RBP; RBP-albumindomainIII (R-III) and albumindomainI-RBP-albuminIII (I-R-III). To assess the biological activity of fusion proteins, cultured PSCs were used. Like wild type albumin, expression of R-III or I-R-III in PSCs after passage 2 (activated PSCs) induced phenotypic reversal from activated to fat-storing cells. On the other hand, R-III and I-R-III, but not albumin, secreted from transfected 293 cells were successfully internalized into and inactivated PSCs. FPLC-purified R-III was found to be internalized into PSCs via caveolae-mediated endocytosis, and its efficient cellular uptake was also observed in HSCs and podocytes among several cell lines tested. Moreover, tissue distribution of intravenously injected R-III was closely similar to that of RBP. Therefore, our data suggest that albumin-RBP fusion protein comprises of stellate cell inactivation-inducing moiety and targeting moiety, which may lead to the development of effective anti

  5. Quantification of Non-Specific Binding of Magnetic Micro and Nano particles using Cell Tracking Velocimetry: Implication for magnetic cell separation and detection

    OpenAIRE

    Chalmers, J. J.; Xiong, Y; X. Jin; Shao, M.; Tong, X; Farag, S.; Zborowski, M.

    2010-01-01

    The maturation of magnetic cell separation technology places increasing demands on magnetic cell separation performance. While a number of factors can cause suboptimal performance, one of the major challenges can be non-specific binding of magnetic nano or micro particles to non-targeted cells. Depending on the type of separation, this non-specific binding can have a negative effect on the final purity, the recovery of the targeted cells, or both. In this work, we quantitatively demonstrate t...

  6. TRAF4 is a novel phosphoinositide-binding protein modulating tight junctions and favoring cell migration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrien Rousseau

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Tumor necrosis factor (TNF receptor-associated factor 4 (TRAF4 is frequently overexpressed in carcinomas, suggesting a specific role in cancer. Although TRAF4 protein is predominantly found at tight junctions (TJs in normal mammary epithelial cells (MECs, it accumulates in the cytoplasm of malignant MECs. How TRAF4 is recruited and functions at TJs is unclear. Here we show that TRAF4 possesses a novel phosphoinositide (PIP-binding domain crucial for its recruitment to TJs. Of interest, this property is shared by the other members of the TRAF protein family. Indeed, the TRAF domain of all TRAF proteins (TRAF1 to TRAF6 is a bona fide PIP-binding domain. Molecular and structural analyses revealed that the TRAF domain of TRAF4 exists as a trimer that binds up to three lipids using basic residues exposed at its surface. Cellular studies indicated that TRAF4 acts as a negative regulator of TJ and increases cell migration. These functions are dependent from its ability to interact with PIPs. Our results suggest that TRAF4 overexpression might contribute to breast cancer progression by destabilizing TJs and favoring cell migration.

  7. Complexities in human herpesvirus-6A and -6B binding to host cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Simon Metz; Höllsberg, Per

    2006-01-01

    Human herpesvirus-6A and -6B uses the cellular receptor CD46 for fusion and infection of the host cell. The viral glycoprotein complex gH-gL from HHV-6A binds to the short consensus repeat 2 and 3 in CD46. Although all the major isoforms of CD46 bind the virus, certain isoforms may have higher...... affinity than others for the virus. Within recent years, elucidation of the viral complex has identified additional HHV-6A and -6B specific glycoproteins. Thus, gH-gL associates with a gQ1-gQ2 dimer to form a heterotetrameric complex. In addition, a novel complex consisting of gH-gL-gO has been described...... that does not bind CD46. Accumulating evidence suggests that an additional HHV-6A and -6B receptor exists. The previous simple picture of HHV-6A/B-host cell contact therefore includes more layers of complexities on both the viral and the host cell side of the interaction....

  8. Binding of [125I]iodipine to parathyroid cell membranes: Evidence of a dihydropyridine-sensitive calcium channel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The parathyroid cell is unusual, in that an increase in extracellular calcium concentrations inhibits PTH release. Calcium channels are glycoproteins that span cell membranes and allow entry of extracellular calcium into cells. We have demonstrated that the calcium channel agonist (+)202-791, which opens calcium channels, inhibits PTH release and that the antagonist (-)202-791, which closes calcium channels, stimulates PTH release. To identify the calcium channels responsible for these effects, we used a radioligand that specifically binds to calcium channels. Bovine parathyroid cell membranes were prepared and incubated under reduced lighting with [125I] iodipine (SA, 2000 Ci/mmol), which recognizes 1,4-dihydropyridine-sensitive calcium channels. Bound ligand was separated from free ligand by rapid filtration through Whatman GF/B filters. Nonspecific binding was measured by the inclusion of nifedipine at 10 microM. Specific binding represented approximately 40% of the total binding. The optimal temperature for [125I] iodipine binding was 4 C, and binding reached equilibrium by 30 min. The equilibrium dissociation constant (Kd) was approximately 550 pM, and the maximum number of binding sites was 780 fmol/mg protein. Both the calcium channel agonist (+)202-791 and antagonist (-)202-791 competitively inhibited [125I] iodipine binding, with 50% inhibition concentrations of 20 and 300 nM, respectively. These data indicate the presence of dihydropyridine-sensitive calcium channels on parathyroid cell membranes

  9. Glycosylation Helps Cellulase Enzymes Bind to Plant Cell Walls (Fact Sheet)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2012-06-01

    Computer simulations suggest a new strategy to design enhanced enzymes for biofuels production. Large-scale computer simulations predict that the addition of glycosylation on carbohydrate-binding modules can dramatically improve the binding affinity of these protein domains over amino acid mutations alone. These simulations suggest that glycosylation can be used as a protein engineering tool to enhance the activity of cellulase enzymes, which are a key component in the conversion of cellulose to soluble sugars in the production of biofuels. Glycosylation is the covalent attachment of carbohydrate molecules to protein side chains, and is present in many proteins across all kingdoms of life. Moreover, glycosylation is known to serve a wide variety of functions in biological recognition, cell signaling, and metabolism. Cellulase enzymes, which are responsible for deconstructing cellulose found in plant cell walls to glucose, contain glycosylation that when modified can affect enzymatic activity-often in an unpredictable manner. To gain insight into the role of glycosylation on cellulase activity, scientists at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) used computer simulation to predict that adding glycosylation on the carbohydrate-binding module of a cellulase enzyme dramatically boosts the binding affinity to cellulose-more than standard protein engineering approaches in which amino acids are mutated. Because it is known that higher binding affinity in cellulases leads to higher activity, this work suggests a new route to designing enhanced enzymes for biofuels production. More generally, this work suggests that tuning glycosylation in cellulase enzymes is a key factor to consider when engineering biochemical conversion processes, and that more work is needed to understand how glycosylation affects cellulase activity at the molecular level.

  10. Prion and doppel proteins bind to granule cells of the cerebellum

    OpenAIRE

    Legname, Giuseppe; Nelken, Peter; Guan, Zhengyu; Kanyo, Zoltan F.; DeArmond, Stephen J.; Prusiner, Stanley B.

    2002-01-01

    We reported that expression of the cellular prion protein (PrPC) rescues doppel (Dpl)-induced cerebellar degeneration in mice. To search for protein(s) that mediate this process, we fused the C-termini of mouse (Mo) PrP and Dpl to the Fc portion of an IgG. Although both MoPrP-Fc and MoDpl-Fc bound to many regions of the brain, we observed restricted binding to granule cells in the cerebellum, suggesting a scenario in which granule cells express a protein that mediates Dpl-induced neurodegener...

  11. Genome-wide binding of the CRISPR endonuclease Cas9 in mammalian cells

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Xuebing; Scott, David A.; Kriz, Andrea J.; Chiu, Anthony C; Hsu, Patrick D.; Dadon, Daniel B.; Cheng, Albert W.; Trevino, Alexandro E.; Konermann, Silvana; Chen, Sidi; Jaenisch, Rudolf; Zhang, Feng; Sharp, Phillip A.

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial type II CRISPR-Cas9 systems have been widely adapted for RNA-guided genome editing and transcription regulation in eukaryotic cells, yet their in vivo target specificity is poorly understood. Here we mapped genome-wide binding sites of a catalytically inactive Cas9 (dCas9) from Streptococcus pyogenes loaded with single guide RNAs (sgRNAs) in mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs). Each of the four sgRNAs we tested targets dCas9 to between tens and thousands of genomic sites, frequently ...

  12. Escherichia coli cell division protein FtsZ is a guanine nucleotide binding protein.

    OpenAIRE

    Mukherjee, A; Dai, K; Lutkenhaus, J

    1993-01-01

    FtsZ is an essential cell division protein in Escherichia coli that forms a ring structure at the division site under cell cycle control. The dynamic nature of the FtsZ ring suggests possible similarities to eukaryotic filament forming proteins such as tubulin. In this study we have determined that FtsZ is a GTP/GDP binding protein with GTPase activity. A short segment of FtsZ is homologous to a segment in tubulin believed to be involved in the interaction between tubulin and guanine nucleoti...

  13. Galectin-3 Binding Protein Secreted by Breast Cancer Cells Inhibits Monocyte-Derived Fibrocyte Differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Michael J V; Roife, David; Gomer, Richard H

    2015-08-15

    To metastasize, tumor cells often need to migrate through a layer of collagen-containing scar tissue which encapsulates the tumor. A key component of scar tissue and fibrosing diseases is the monocyte-derived fibrocyte, a collagen-secreting profibrotic cell. To test the hypothesis that invasive tumor cells may block the formation of the fibrous sheath, we determined whether tumor cells secrete factors that inhibit monocyte-derived fibrocyte differentiation. We found that the human metastatic breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231 secretes activity that inhibits human monocyte-derived fibrocyte differentiation, whereas less aggressive breast cancer cell lines secrete less of this activity. Purification indicated that Galectin-3 binding protein (LGALS3BP) is the active factor. Recombinant LGALS3BP inhibits monocyte-derived fibrocyte differentiation, and immunodepletion of LGALS3BP from MDA-MB 231 conditioned media removes the monocyte-derived fibrocyte differentiation-inhibiting activity. LGALS3BP inhibits the differentiation of monocyte-derived fibrocytes from wild-type mouse spleen cells, but not from SIGN-R1(-/-) mouse spleen cells, suggesting that CD209/SIGN-R1 is required for the LGALS3BP effect. Galectin-3 and galectin-1, binding partners of LGALS3BP, potentiate monocyte-derived fibrocyte differentiation. In breast cancer biopsies, increased levels of tumor cell-associated LGALS3BP were observed in regions of the tumor that were invading the surrounding stroma. These findings suggest LGALS3BP and galectin-3 as new targets to treat metastatic cancer and fibrosing diseases. PMID:26136428

  14. Protein C Inhibitor (PCI) Binds to Phosphatidylserine Exposing Cells with Implications in the Phagocytosis of Apoptotic Cells and Activated Platelets

    OpenAIRE

    Daniela Rieger; Alice Assinger; Katrin Einfinger; Barbora Sokolikova; Margarethe Geiger

    2014-01-01

    Protein C Inhibitor (PCI) is a secreted serine protease inhibitor, belonging to the family of serpins. In addition to activated protein C PCI inactivates several other proteases of the coagulation and fibrinolytic systems, suggesting a regulatory role in hemostasis. Glycosaminoglycans and certain negatively charged phospholipids, like phosphatidylserine, bind to PCI and modulate its activity. Phosphatidylerine (PS) is exposed on the surface of apoptotic cells and known as a phagocytosis marke...

  15. Fluctuation Analysis of Centrosomes Reveals a Cortical Function of Kinesin-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkler, Franziska; Gummalla, Maheshwar; Künneke, Lutz; Lv, Zhiyi; Zippelius, Annette; Aspelmeier, Timo; Grosshans, Jörg

    2015-09-01

    The actin and microtubule networks form the dynamic cytoskeleton. Network dynamics is driven by molecular motors applying force onto the networks and the interactions between the networks. Here we assay the dynamics of centrosomes in the scale of seconds as a proxy for the movement of microtubule asters. With this assay we want to detect the role of specific motors and of network interaction. During interphase of syncytial embryos of Drosophila, cortical actin and the microtubule network depend on each other. Centrosomes induce cortical actin to form caps, whereas F-actin anchors microtubules to the cortex. In addition, lateral interactions between microtubule asters are assumed to be important for regular spatial organization of the syncytial embryo. The functional interaction between the microtubule asters and cortical actin has been largely analyzed in a static manner, so far. We recorded the movement of centrosomes at 1 Hz and analyzed their fluctuations for two processes—pair separation and individual movement. We found that F-actin is required for directional movements during initial centrosome pair separation, because separation proceeds in a diffusive manner in latrunculin-injected embryos. For assaying individual movement, we established a fluctuation parameter as the deviation from temporally and spatially slowly varying drift movements. By analysis of mutant and drug-injected embryos, we found that the fluctuations were suppressed by both cortical actin and microtubules. Surprisingly, the microtubule motor Kinesin-1 also suppressed fluctuations to a similar degree as F-actin. Kinesin-1 may mediate linkage of the microtubule (+)-ends to the actin cortex. Consistent with this model is our finding that Kinesin-1-GFP accumulates at the cortical actin caps. PMID:26331244

  16. Involvement of Fatty Acid Binding Protein 5 and PPARβ/δ in Prostate Cancer Cell Growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elwin Morgan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Fatty acid binding protein 5 (FABP5 delivers ligands from the cytosol directly to the nuclear receptor PPARβ/δ and thus facilitates the ligation and enhances the transcriptional activity of the receptor. We show here that expression levels of both FABP5 and PPARβ/δ are correlated with the tumorigenic potential of prostate cancer cell lines. We show further that FABP5 comprises a direct target gene for PPARβ/δ and thus the binding protein and its cognate receptor are engaged in a positive feedback loop. The observations demonstrate that, similarly to effects observed in mammary carcinomas, activation of the FABP5/PPARβ/δ pathway induces PPARβ/δ target genes involved in cell survival and growth and enhances cell proliferation and anchorage-independent growth in prostate cancer cells. Furthermore, the data show that downregulation of either FABP5 or PPARβ/δ inhibits the growth of the highly malignant prostate cancer PC3M cells. These studies suggest that the FABP5/PPARβ/δ pathway may play a general role in facilitating tumor progression and that inhibition of the pathway may comprise a novel strategy in treatment of cancer.

  17. Regulation of B cell differentiation by the ubiquitin-binding protein TAX1BP1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsushita, Nobuko; Suzuki, Midori; Ikebe, Emi; Nagashima, Shun; Inatome, Ryoko; Asano, Kenichi; Tanaka, Masato; Matsushita, Masayuki; Kondo, Eisaku; Iha, Hidekatsu; Yanagi, Shigeru

    2016-01-01

    Tax1-binding protein 1 (TAX1BP1) is a ubiquitin-binding protein that restricts nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) activation and facilitates the termination of aberrant inflammation. However, its roles in B-cell activation and differentiation are poorly understood. To evaluate the function of TAX1BP1 in B cells, we established TAX1BP1-deficient DT40 B cells that are hyper-responsive to CD40-induced extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) activation signaling, exhibit prolonged and exaggerated ERK phosphorylation and show enhanced B lymphocyte-induced maturation protein 1 (Blimp-1; a transcription factor inducing plasma cell differentiation) expression that is ERK-dependent. Furthermore, TAX1BP1-deficient cells exhibit significantly decreased surface IgM expression and increased IgM secretion. Moreover, TAX1BP1-deficient mice display reduced germinal center formation and antigen-specific antibody production. These findings show that TAX1BP1 restricts ERK activation and Blimp-1 expression and regulates germinal center formation. PMID:27515252

  18. Cell Surface Binding and Internalization of Aβ Modulated by Degree of Aggregation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David A. Bateman

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The amyloid peptides, Aβ40 and Aβ42, are generated through endoproteolytic cleavage of the amyloid precursor protein. Here we have developed a model to investigate the interaction of living cells with various forms of aggregated Aβ40/42. After incubation at endosomal pH 6, we observed a variety of Aβ conformations after 3 (Aβ3, 24 (Aβ24, and 90 hours (Aβ90. Both Aβ4224 and Aβ4024 were observed to rapidly bind and internalize into differentiated PC12 cells, leading to accumulation in the lysosome. In contrast, Aβ40/4290 were both found to only weakly associate with cells, but were observed as the most aggregated using dynamic light scattering and thioflavin-T. Internalization of Aβ40/4224 was inhibited with treatment of monodansylcadaverine, an endocytosis inhibitor. These studies indicate that the ability of Aβ40/42 to bind and internalize into living cells increases with degree of aggregation until it reaches a maximum beyond which its ability to interact with cells diminishes drastically.

  19. Cu(II) complexes of glyco-imino-aromatic conjugates in DNA binding, plasmid cleavage and cell cytotoxicity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Amit Kumar; Atanu Mitra; Amrendra Kumar Ajay; Manoj Kumar Bhat; Chebrolu P Rao

    2012-11-01

    Binding of metal complexes of C2-glucosyl conjugates with DNA has been established by absorption and fluorescence studies. Conformational changes occurred in DNA upon binding have been studied by circular dichroism. All these studies are suggestive that the metal complexes bind to DNA through intercalation. Binding of di-nuclear copper complex 5 was found to be stronger when compared to the other complexes studied. Copper complexes were found to cleave the plasmid DNA in the absence of oxidizing or reducing agent, whereas, zinc complexes do not cleave. Metal complexes have shown toxicity to the HeLa and MCF-7 cell lines.Morphological studies, western blot and FACS analysis are suggestive of apoptotic cell death induced by the metal complexes. Di-nuclear copper complexes were found to be better as compared to the mononuclear ones in binding, plasmid cleavage and also in causing more cell death.

  20. Interactions of opsonized immune complexes with whole blood cells: binding to erythrocytes restricts complex uptake by leucocyte populations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, C H; Svehag, S E; Marquart, H V; Leslie, R G

    1994-01-01

    respect to IC binding, the main contributors being B cells. E initially inhibited and then later enhanced the IC binding to lymphocytes, suggesting that E promote B cell uptake of C3d,g-covered IC via CR2. Our findings, that E can restrict the IC uptake by circulating leucocytes, and that an IC......The binding of opsonized, fluorescein-labelled bovine serum albumin (BSA)/rabbit anti-BSA complexes (IC) to washed human whole blood cells and isolated leucocytes in the presence of autologous serum was investigated by flow cytometry. In the presence of erythrocytes (E), the IC-binding to...... granulocytes (PMN), monocytes and lymphocytes was inhibited by up to 46%, 61% and 48%, respectively, depending on the incubation time and the IC-concentration tested. The E-mediated inhibition of the binding to PMN was found to correlate with the average numbers of CR1 per E during the initial 15 min of...

  1. Interactions of opsonized immune complexes with whole blood cells: binding to erythrocytes restricts complex uptake by leucocyte populations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, C H; Svehag, S E; Marquart, H V;

    1994-01-01

    The binding of opsonized, fluorescein-labelled bovine serum albumin (BSA)/rabbit anti-BSA complexes (IC) to washed human whole blood cells and isolated leucocytes in the presence of autologous serum was investigated by flow cytometry. In the presence of erythrocytes (E), the IC-binding to...... granulocytes (PMN), monocytes and lymphocytes was inhibited by up to 46%, 61% and 48%, respectively, depending on the incubation time and the IC-concentration tested. The E-mediated inhibition of the binding to PMN was found to correlate with the average numbers of CR1 per E during the initial 15 min of...... respect to IC binding, the main contributors being B cells. E initially inhibited and then later enhanced the IC binding to lymphocytes, suggesting that E promote B cell uptake of C3d,g-covered IC via CR2. Our findings, that E can restrict the IC uptake by circulating leucocytes, and that an IC...

  2. Characteristics of retinol accumulation from serum retinol-binding protein by cultured sertoli cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The uptake of retinol was examined in cultured Sertoli cells when retinol was provided as a complex with the transport protein retinol-binding protein (RBP). Sertoil cells accumulated [3H]retinol in a time- and temperature-dependent manner. The change in rate of retinol accumulation occurred when the cells had accumulated approximately 0.53 pmol of retinol/μg of cellular DNA. Extraction and HPLC analysis of the cell-associated radioactivity yielded retinol and retinyl esters, indicating that a significant proportion of the accumulated retinol was esterified. Excess unlabeled retinol-RBP competed with [3H]retinol-RBP for [3H]retinol delivery to the cells, indicating that RBP delivery of retinol was a saturable and competable process. However, free [3H]retinol associated with Sertoli cells in a noncompetable manner. The transport constant for specific retinol accumulation from RBP was 3.0 μM. Neither iodinated nor reductively methylated RBP was accumulated by or tightly bound to Sertoli cells. Competition studies indicated, however, that protein recognition is important in the retinol uptake process. RBP, CRBP, and CRBP(II) competed with [3H]retinol-RBP for [3H]retinol accumulation, but free retinol, retinol-bovine serum albumin, and retinol-β-lactoglobulin did not. These studies indicated that Sertoli cell uptake of retinol involved recognition of the retinol-RBP complex at the cell surface with subsequent internalization of retinol, but not RBP

  3. Early Events in Chikungunya Virus Infection-From Virus Cell Binding to Membrane Fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Duijl-Richter, Mareike K S; Hoornweg, Tabitha E; Rodenhuis-Zybert, Izabela A; Smit, Jolanda M

    2015-07-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is a rapidly emerging mosquito-borne alphavirus causing millions of infections in the tropical and subtropical regions of the world. CHIKV infection often leads to an acute self-limited febrile illness with debilitating myalgia and arthralgia. A potential long-term complication of CHIKV infection is severe joint pain, which can last for months to years. There are no vaccines or specific therapeutics available to prevent or treat infection. This review describes the critical steps in CHIKV cell entry. We summarize the latest studies on the virus-cell tropism, virus-receptor binding, internalization, membrane fusion and review the molecules and compounds that have been described to interfere with virus cell entry. The aim of the review is to give the reader a state-of-the-art overview on CHIKV cell entry and to provide an outlook on potential new avenues in CHIKV research. PMID:26198242

  4. Early Events in Chikungunya Virus Infection—From Virus CellBinding to Membrane Fusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mareike K. S. van Duijl-Richter

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Chikungunya virus (CHIKV is a rapidly emerging mosquito-borne alphavirus causing millions of infections in the tropical and subtropical regions of the world. CHIKV infection often leads to an acute self-limited febrile illness with debilitating myalgia and arthralgia. A potential long-term complication of CHIKV infection is severe joint pain, which can last for months to years. There are no vaccines or specific therapeutics available to prevent or treat infection. This review describes the critical steps in CHIKV cell entry. We summarize the latest studies on the virus-cell tropism, virus-receptor binding, internalization, membrane fusion and review the molecules and compounds that have been described to interfere with virus cell entry. The aim of the review is to give the reader a state-of-the-art overview on CHIKV cell entry and to provide an outlook on potential new avenues in CHIKV research.

  5. Analysis of unconventional approaches for the rapid detection of surface lectin binding ligands on human cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welty, Lily Anne Y; Heinrich, Eileen L; Garcia, Karina; Banner, Lisa R; Summers, Michael L; Baresi, Larry; Metzenberg, Stan; Coyle-Thompson, Cathy; Oppenheimer, Steven B

    2006-01-01

    For over a decade our laboratory has developed and used a novel histochemical assay using derivatized agarose beads to examine the surface properties of various cell types. Most recently, we have used this assay to examine lectin binding ligands on two human cell types, CCL-220, a colon cancer cell line, and CRL-1459, a non-cancer colon cell line. We found that CCL-220 cells bound specific lectins better than CRL-1459, and this information was used to test for possible differential toxicity of these lectins in culture, as a possible approach in the design of more specific anti-cancer drugs. Although we have examined the validity of the bead-binding assay in sea urchin cell systems, we have not previously validated this technique for mammalian cells. Here the binding results of the bead assay are compared with conventional fluorescence assays, using lectins from three species (Triticum vulgaris, Phaseolus vulgaris, and Lens culinaris) on the two colon cell lines. These lectins were chosen because they seemed to interact with the two cell lines differently. Binding results obtained using both assays were compared for frozen, thawed and fixed; cultured and fixed; and live cells. Both qualitative and quantitative fluorescence results generally correlated with those using the bead assay. Similar results were also obtained with all of the three different cell preparation protocols. The fluorescence assay was able to detect lower lectin binding ligand levels than the bead assay, while the bead assay, because it can so rapidly detect cells with large numbers of lectin binding ligands, is ideal for initial screening studies that seek to identify cells that are rich in surface binders for specific molecules. The direct use of frozen, thawed and fixed cells allows rapid mass screening for surface molecules, without the requirement for costly and time consuming cell culture. PMID:16414103

  6. Insulin-like growth factor (IGF) binding protein from human decidua inhibits the binding and biological action of IGF-I in cultured choriocarcinoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The placenta expresses genes for insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) and possesses IGF-receptors, suggesting that placental growth is regulated by IGFs in an autocrine manner. We have previously shown that human decidua, but not placenta, synthesizes and secretes a 34 K IGF-binding protein (34 K IGF-BP) called placental protein 12. We now used human choriocarcinoma JEG-3 cell monolayer cultures and recombinant (Thr59)IGF-I as a model to study whether the decidual 34 K IGF-BP is able to modulate the receptor binding and biological activity of IGFs in trophoblasts. JEG-3 cells, which possess type I IGF receptors, were unable to produce IGF-BPs. Purified 34 K IGF-BP specifically bound [125I]iodo-(Thr59)IGF-I. Multiplication-stimulating activity had 2.5% the potency of (Thr59)IGF-I, and insulin had no effect on the binding of [125I] iodo-(Thr59)IGF-I. 34 K IGF-BP inhibited the binding of [125I] iodo-(Thr59)IGF-I to JEG-3 monolayers in a concentration-dependent manner by forming with the tracer a soluble complex that could not bind to the cell surface as demonstrated by competitive binding and cross-linking experiments. After incubating the cell monolayers with [125I]iodo-(Thr59)IGF-I in the presence of purified binding protein, followed by cross-linking, no affinity labeled bands were seen on autoradiography. In contrast, an intensely labeled band at 40 K was detected when the incubation medium was analyzed, suggesting that (Thr59)IGF-I and 34 K IGF-BP formed a complex in a 1:1 molar ratio. Also, 34 K IGF-BP inhibited both basal and IGF-I-stimulated uptake of alpha-[3H]aminoisobutyric acid in JEG-3 cells. RNA analysis revealed that IGF-II is expressed in JEG-3 cells

  7. Insulin-like growth factor (IGF) binding protein from human decidua inhibits the binding and biological action of IGF-I in cultured choriocarcinoma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ritvos, O.; Ranta, T.; Jalkanen, J.; Suikkari, A.M.; Voutilainen, R.; Bohn, H.; Rutanen, E.M.

    1988-05-01

    The placenta expresses genes for insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) and possesses IGF-receptors, suggesting that placental growth is regulated by IGFs in an autocrine manner. We have previously shown that human decidua, but not placenta, synthesizes and secretes a 34 K IGF-binding protein (34 K IGF-BP) called placental protein 12. We now used human choriocarcinoma JEG-3 cell monolayer cultures and recombinant (Thr59)IGF-I as a model to study whether the decidual 34 K IGF-BP is able to modulate the receptor binding and biological activity of IGFs in trophoblasts. JEG-3 cells, which possess type I IGF receptors, were unable to produce IGF-BPs. Purified 34 K IGF-BP specifically bound (125I)iodo-(Thr59)IGF-I. Multiplication-stimulating activity had 2.5% the potency of (Thr59)IGF-I, and insulin had no effect on the binding of (125I) iodo-(Thr59)IGF-I. 34 K IGF-BP inhibited the binding of (125I) iodo-(Thr59)IGF-I to JEG-3 monolayers in a concentration-dependent manner by forming with the tracer a soluble complex that could not bind to the cell surface as demonstrated by competitive binding and cross-linking experiments. After incubating the cell monolayers with (125I)iodo-(Thr59)IGF-I in the presence of purified binding protein, followed by cross-linking, no affinity labeled bands were seen on autoradiography. In contrast, an intensely labeled band at 40 K was detected when the incubation medium was analyzed, suggesting that (Thr59)IGF-I and 34 K IGF-BP formed a complex in a 1:1 molar ratio. Also, 34 K IGF-BP inhibited both basal and IGF-I-stimulated uptake of alpha-(3H)aminoisobutyric acid in JEG-3 cells. RNA analysis revealed that IGF-II is expressed in JEG-3 cells.

  8. Combinatorial binding in human and mouse embryonic stem cells identifies conserved enhancers active in early embryonic development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Göke

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Transcription factors are proteins that regulate gene expression by binding to cis-regulatory sequences such as promoters and enhancers. In embryonic stem (ES cells, binding of the transcription factors OCT4, SOX2 and NANOG is essential to maintain the capacity of the cells to differentiate into any cell type of the developing embryo. It is known that transcription factors interact to regulate gene expression. In this study we show that combinatorial binding is strongly associated with co-localization of the transcriptional co-activator Mediator, H3K27ac and increased expression of nearby genes in embryonic stem cells. We observe that the same loci bound by Oct4, Nanog and Sox2 in ES cells frequently drive expression in early embryonic development. Comparison of mouse and human ES cells shows that less than 5% of individual binding events for OCT4, SOX2 and NANOG are shared between species. In contrast, about 15% of combinatorial binding events and even between 53% and 63% of combinatorial binding events at enhancers active in early development are conserved. Our analysis suggests that the combination of OCT4, SOX2 and NANOG binding is critical for transcription in ES cells and likely plays an important role for embryogenesis by binding at conserved early developmental enhancers. Our data suggests that the fast evolutionary rewiring of regulatory networks mainly affects individual binding events, whereas "gene regulatory hotspots" which are bound by multiple factors and active in multiple tissues throughout early development are under stronger evolutionary constraints.

  9. Chemotaxis and Binding of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to Scratch-Wounded Human Cystic Fibrosis Airway Epithelial Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Schwarzer

    Full Text Available Confocal imaging was used to characterize interactions of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA, expressing GFP or labeled with Syto 11 with CF airway epithelial cells (CFBE41o-, grown as confluent monolayers with unknown polarity on coverglasses in control conditions and following scratch wounding. Epithelia and PAO1-GFP or PAK-GFP (2 MOI were incubated with Ringer containing typical extracellular salts, pH and glucose and propidium iodide (PI, to identify dead cells. PAO1 and PAK swam randomly over and did not bind to nonwounded CFBE41o- cells. PA migrated rapidly (began within 20 sec, maximum by 5 mins and massively (10-80 fold increase, termed "swarming", but transiently (random swimming after 15 mins, to wounds, particularly near cells that took up PI. Some PA remained immobilized on cells near the wound. PA swam randomly over intact CFBE41o- monolayers and wounded monolayers that had been incubated with medium for 1 hr. Expression of CFTR and altered pH of the media did not affect PA interactions with CFBE41o- wounds. In contrast, PAO1 swarming and immobilization along wounds was abolished in PAO1 (PAO1ΔcheYZABW, no expression of chemotaxis regulatory components cheY, cheZ, cheA, cheB and cheW and greatly reduced in PAO1 that did not express amino acid receptors pctA, B and C (PAO1ΔpctABC and in PAO1 incubated in Ringer containing a high concentration of mixed amino acids. Non-piliated PAKΔpilA swarmed normally towards wounded areas but bound infrequently to CFBE41o- cells. In contrast, both swarming and binding of PA to CFBE41o- cells near wounds were prevented in non-flagellated PAKΔfliC. Data are consistent with the idea that (i PA use amino acid sensor-driven chemotaxis and flagella-driven swimming to swarm to CF airway epithelial cells near wounds and (ii PA use pili to bind to epithelial cells near wounds.

  10. Energetics of ligand-receptor binding affinity on endothelial cells: An in vitro model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fotticchia, Iolanda; Guarnieri, Daniela; Fotticchia, Teresa; Falanga, Andrea Patrizia; Vecchione, Raffaele; Giancola, Concetta; Netti, Paolo Antonio

    2016-08-01

    Targeted therapies represent a challenge in modern medicine. In this contest, we propose a rapid and reliable methodology based on Isothermal Titration Calorimetry (ITC) coupled with confluent cell layers cultured around biocompatible templating microparticles to quantify the number of overexpressing receptors on cell membrane and study the energetics of receptor-ligand binding in near-physiological conditions. In the in vitro model here proposed we used the bEnd3 cell line as brain endothelial cells to mimic the blood brain barrier (BBB) cultured on dextran microbeads ranging from 67μm to 80μm in size (Cytodex) and the primary human umbilical vein cells (HUVEC) for comparison. The revealed affinity between transferrin (Tf) and transferrin receptor (TfR) in both systems is very high, Kd values are in the order of nM. Conversely, the value of TfRs/cell reveals a 100-fold increase in the number of TfRs per bEnd3 cells compared to HUVEC cells. The presented methodology can represent a novel and helpful strategy to identify targets, to address drug design and selectively deliver therapeutics that can cross biological barriers such as the blood brain barrier. PMID:27100851

  11. Study of the influence of actin-binding proteins using linear analyses of cell deformability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plaza, Gustavo R; Uyeda, Taro Q P; Mirzaei, Zahra; Simmons, Craig A

    2015-07-21

    The actin cytoskeleton plays a key role in the deformability of the cell and in mechanosensing. Here we analyze the contributions of three major actin cross-linking proteins, myosin II, α-actinin and filamin, to cell deformability, by using micropipette aspiration of Dictyostelium cells. We examine the applicability of three simple mechanical models: for small deformation, linear viscoelasticity and drop of liquid with a tense cortex; and for large deformation, a Newtonian viscous fluid. For these models, we have derived linearized equations and we provide a novel, straightforward methodology to analyze the experiments. This methodology allowed us to differentiate the effects of the cross-linking proteins in the different regimes of deformation. Our results confirm some previous observations and suggest important relations between the molecular characteristics of the actin-binding proteins and the cell behavior: the effect of myosin is explained in terms of the relation between the lifetime of the bond to actin and the resistive force; the presence of α-actinin obstructs the deformation of the cytoskeleton, presumably mainly due to the higher molecular stiffness and to the lower dissociation rate constants; and filamin contributes critically to the global connectivity of the network, possibly by rapidly turning over cross-links during the remodeling of the cytoskeletal network, thanks to the higher rate constants, flexibility and larger size. The results suggest a sophisticated relationship between the expression levels of actin-binding proteins, deformability and mechanosensing. PMID:26059185

  12. Cargo binding promotes KDEL receptor clustering at the mammalian cell surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Björn; Shaebani, M. Reza; Rammo, Domenik; Bubel, Tobias; Santen, Ludger; Schmitt, Manfred J.

    2016-01-01

    Transmembrane receptor clustering is a ubiquitous phenomenon in pro- and eukaryotic cells to physically sense receptor/ligand interactions and subsequently translate an exogenous signal into a cellular response. Despite that receptor cluster formation has been described for a wide variety of receptors, ranging from chemotactic receptors in bacteria to growth factor and neurotransmitter receptors in mammalian cells, a mechanistic understanding of the underlying molecular processes is still puzzling. In an attempt to fill this gap we followed a combined experimental and theoretical approach by dissecting and modulating cargo binding, internalization and cellular response mediated by KDEL receptors (KDELRs) at the mammalian cell surface after interaction with a model cargo/ligand. Using a fluorescent variant of ricin toxin A chain as KDELR-ligand (eGFP-RTAH/KDEL), we demonstrate that cargo binding induces dose-dependent receptor cluster formation at and subsequent internalization from the membrane which is associated and counteracted by anterograde and microtubule-assisted receptor transport to preferred docking sites at the plasma membrane. By means of analytical arguments and extensive numerical simulations we show that cargo-synchronized receptor transport from and to the membrane is causative for KDELR/cargo cluster formation at the mammalian cell surface. PMID:27353000

  13. Protecting Cell Walls from Binding Aluminum by Organic Acids Contributes to Aluminum Resistance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ya-Ying Li; Yue-Jiao Zhang; Yuan Zhou; Jian-Li Yang; Shao-Jian Zheng

    2009-01-01

    Aluminum-induced secretion of organic acids from the root apex has been demonstrated to be one major AI resistance mechanism in plants. However, whether the organic acid concentration is high enough to detoxify AI in the growth medium is frequently questioned. The genotypes of Al-resistant wheat, Cassia tora L. and buckwheat secrete malate, citrate and oxalate, respectively. In the present study we found that at a 35% inhibition of root elongation, the AI activities in the solution were 10, 20, and 50 μM with the corresponding malate, citrate, and oxalate exudation at the rates of 15, 20 and 21 nmol/cm2 per 12 h, respectively, for the above three plant species. When exogenous organic acids were added to ameliorate Al toxicity, twofold and eightfold higher oxalate and malate concentrations were required to produce the equal effect by citrate. After the root apical cell walls were isolated and preincubated in 1 mM malate, oxalate or citrate solution overnight, the total amount of AI adsorbed to the cell walls all decreased significantly to a similar level, implying that these organic acids own an equal ability to protect the cell walls from binding AI. These findings suggest that protection of cell walls from binding Al by organic acids may contribute significantly to AI resistance.

  14. Characteristics of pancreatic cholesterol esterase binding to and uptake by rat intestinal cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the intestinal lumen cholesterol esterase derived from pancreatic juice catalyzes the hydrolysis of cholesteryl esters (CE). The characteristics of Ce'ase binding to and uptake by rat intestinal cells were determined. CE'ase purified from rat pancreas with a specific activity 2 fold higher and a yield 5 fold greater than that previously attainable was judged as homogeneous on the basis of SDS-PAGE and sedimentation equilibrium centrifugation. Intestinal cell types and membranes were isolated and judged as pure on the basis of marker enzyme analyses. The enzyme was radiolabeled with [125-I] to a specific radioactivity of 55 Ci/mmole with retention of biological activity, gross molecular size, secondary structure, and immunological properties. [125-I] CE'ase bound preferentially to mature absorptive cells from proximal intestine and their brush border membranes. A specific, low affinity binding phenomenon was demonstrated with the following characteristics: linearity with increasing ligand concentration (non-saturability) or cell concentration, time and temperature dependency, and irreversibility. Native CE'ase, at a 500 fold molar excess did not displace bound [125-I] CE'ase

  15. Binding of human factors X and Xa to HepG2 and J82 human tumor cell lines. Evidence that factor Xa binds to tumor cells independent of factor Va

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Previous studies demonstrated that several cultured human tumor cell lines potentiate the conversion of prothrombin to thrombin by factor Xa and calcium in the absence of exogenous factor Va. In the present study, the specific binding of radioiodinated preparations of human factor X and factor Xa to a human hepatocellular carcinoma cell line (HepG2) that constitutively synthesizes a factor V/Va molecule, and a human bladder carcinoma cell line (J82) that does not synthesize factor V/Va, was examined. Radioiodinated factor Xa bound specifically to J82 and HepG2 cells, whereas no significant specific binding of 125I-factor X to either cell was observed. The binding isotherm of 125I-factor Xa to each tumor cell line exhibited a hyperbolic profile, and Scatchard analysis demonstrated a single class of binding site for factor Xa on each cell surface with Kd values of 1.66 +/- 0.39 and 1.64 +/- 0.52 nM and 566,000 +/- 71,000 and 28,000 +/- 6,000 binding sites/cell for HepG2 and J82 cells, respectively. Thrombin formation by cell-bound factor Xa was hyperbolic and saturable at 5 nM factor Xa on each cell line. Hanes-Woolf plots of the prothrombin activation data indicated that half-maximal rates of thrombin formation occurred at factor Xa concentrations of 1.50 +/- 0.43 nM and 1.42 +/- 0.48 nM on HepG2 and J82 cells, respectively. Pretreatment of J82 cells with polyclonal anti-human factor V IgG had no measurable effect on either the binding of 125I-factor Xa or prothrombin activation. However, pretreatment of HepG2 cells with anti-human factor V IgG inhibited prothrombin activation in a dose-dependent manner, but did not inhibit the binding of factor Xa to this cell. When both cell lines were preincubated with exogenous human factor Va, the binding of factor Xa to either HepG2 or J82 cells was marginally affected

  16. Cell-Type-Specific Profiling of Gene Expression and Chromatin Binding without Cell Isolation: Assaying RNA Pol II Occupancy in Neural Stem Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Southall, Tony D.; Gold, Katrina S.; Egger, Boris; Davidson, Catherine M.; Caygill, Elizabeth E.; Marshall, Owen J.; Brand, Andrea H.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Cell-type-specific transcriptional profiling often requires the isolation of specific cell types from complex tissues. We have developed “TaDa,” a technique that enables cell-specific profiling without cell isolation. TaDa permits genome-wide profiling of DNA- or chromatin-binding proteins without cell sorting, fixation, or affinity purification. The method is simple, sensitive, highly reproducible, and transferable to any model system. We show that TaDa can be used to identify transc...

  17. Novel Mutation in Syntaxin-Binding Protein 2 (STXBP2) Prevents IL-2-induced Natural Killer Cell Cytotoxicity

    OpenAIRE

    Saltzman, Rushani W.; Monaco-Shawver, Linda; Zhang, Kejian; Sullivan, Kathleen E.; Filipovich, Alexandra H.; Orange, Jordan S.

    2012-01-01

    We have identified dizygotic twins with a novel syntaxin-binding protein 2 (STXBP2) mutation, where cytotoxicity cannot be restored with IL-2. This defines STXBP2 as an absolute requirement for NK cell cytotoxic function.

  18. The localization of key Bacillus subtilis penicillin binding proteins during cell growth is determined by substrate availability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lages, Marta Carolina Afonso; Beilharz, Katrin; Angeles, Danae Morales; Veening, Jan-Willem; Scheffers, Dirk-Jan

    2013-01-01

    The shape of bacteria is maintained by the cell wall. The main component of the cell wall is peptidoglycan (PG) that is synthesized by penicillin binding proteins (PBPs). The correct positioning of PBPs is essential for the maintenance of cell shape. In the literature, two different models for local

  19. Transcription factor CCAAT/enhancer binding protein alpha up-regulates microRNA let-7a-1 in lung cancer cells by direct binding

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Yani; Zhao, Jian; Hu, Xiaoyan; Wang, Lina; Liang, Liming; Chen, Weiwen

    2016-01-01

    Aims The transcription factor CCAAT/enhancer binding protein α (C/EBPα) and microRNA (miRNA) let-7a-1 act as tumor suppressors in many types of cancers including lung cancer. In the present study, we aim to investigate whether let-7a-1 is a novel important target of C/EBPα in lung cancer cells. Methods The DNA sequence of the 2.1 kb let-7a-1 promoter was analyzed with MatInspector 4.1 (http://www.genomatix.de). Human lung cancer cell lines A549 and H1299, and human cervical cancer cell line H...

  20. Characterization of Four Outer Membrane Proteins Involved in Binding Starch to the Cell Surface of Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron

    OpenAIRE

    Shipman, Joseph A.; Berleman, James E.; Salyers, Abigail A.

    2000-01-01

    Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron, a gram-negative obligate anaerobe, utilizes polysaccharides by binding them to its cell surface and allowing cell-associated enzymes to hydrolyze them into digestible fragments. We use the starch utilization system as a model to analyze the initial steps involved in polysaccharide binding and breakdown. In a recent paper, we reported that one of the outer membrane proteins involved, SusG, had starch-degrading activity but was not sufficient for growth on starch. ...

  1. The Non-Specific Binding of Fluorescent-Labeled MiRNAs on Cell Surface by Hydrophobic Interaction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting Lu

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs are small noncoding RNAs about 22 nt long that play key roles in almost all biological processes and diseases. The fluorescent labeling and lipofection are two common methods for changing the levels and locating the position of cellular miRNAs. Despite many studies about the mechanism of DNA/RNA lipofection, little is known about the characteristics, mechanisms and specificity of lipofection of fluorescent-labeled miRNAs.Therefore, miRNAs labeled with different fluorescent dyes were transfected into adherent and suspension cells using lipofection reagent. Then, the non-specific binding and its mechanism were investigated by flow cytometer and laser confocal microscopy. The results showed that miRNAs labeled with Cy5 (cyanine fluorescent dye could firmly bind to the surface of adherent cells (Hela and suspended cells (K562 even without lipofection reagent. The binding of miRNAs labeled with FAM (carboxyl fluorescein to K562 cells was obvious, but it was not significant in Hela cells. After lipofectamine reagent was added, most of the fluorescently labeled miRNAs binding to the surface of Hela cells were transfected into intra-cell because of the high transfection efficiency, however, most of them were still binding to the surface of K562 cells. Moreover, the high-salt buffer which could destroy the electrostatic interactions did not affect the above-mentioned non-specific binding, but the organic solvent which could destroy the hydrophobic interactions eliminated it.These results implied that the fluorescent-labeled miRNAs could non-specifically bind to the cell surface by hydrophobic interaction. It would lead to significant errors in the estimation of transfection efficiency only according to the cellular fluorescence intensity. Therefore, other methods to evaluate the transfection efficiency and more appropriate fluorescent dyes should be used according to the cell types for the accuracy of results.

  2. Bee venom phospholipase A2 as a membrane-binding vector for cell surface display or internalization of soluble proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babon, Aurélie; Wurceldorf, Thibault; Almunia, Christine; Pichard, Sylvain; Chenal, Alexandre; Buhot, Cécile; Beaumelle, Bruno; Gillet, Daniel

    2016-06-15

    We showed that bee venom phospholipase A2 can be used as a membrane-binding vector to anchor to the surface of cells a soluble protein fused to its C-terminus. ZZ, a two-domain derivative of staphylococcal protein A capable of binding constant regions of antibodies was fused to the C-terminus of the phospholipase or to a mutant devoid of enzymatic activity. The fusion proteins bound to the surface of cells and could themselves bind IgGs. Their fate depended on the cell type to which they bound. On the A431 carcinoma cell line the proteins remained exposed on the cell surface. In contrast, on human dendritic cells the proteins were internalized into early endosomes. PMID:26253725

  3. Sulfated polymannuroguluronate inhibits Tat-induced SLK cell adhesion via a novel binding site, a KKR spatial triad

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan-lin WU; Jing AI; Jing-ming ZHAO; Bing XIONG; Xiao-jie XIN; Mei-yu GENG; Xian-liang XIN; Han-dong JIANG

    2011-01-01

    Aim: Sulfated polymannuroguluronate (SPMG), a candidate anti-AIDS drug, inhibited HIV replication and interfered with HIV entry into host T lymphocytes. SPMG has high binding affinity for the transactivating factor of the HIV-1 virus (Tat) via its basic domain. However, deletion or substitution of the basic domain affected, but did not completely eliminated Tat-SPMG interactions. Here, we sought to identify other SPMG binding sites in addition to the basic domain.Methods: The potential SPMG binding sites were determined using molecular simulation and a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) based competitive inhibition assay. The effect of SPMG on Tat induced adhesion was evaluated using a cell adhesion assay. Results: The KKR domain, a novel high-affinity heparin binding site, was identified, which consisted of a triad of Lys12, Lys41, and Arg78. The KKR domain, spatially enclosed SPMG binding site on Tat, functions as another binding domain for SPMG. Further func- tional evaluation demonstrated that SPMG inhibits Tat-mediated SLK cell adhesion by directly binding to the KKR region.Conclusion: The KKR domain is a novel high-affinity binding domain for SPMG. Our findings provide important new insights into the molecular mechanisms of SPMG and a potential therapeutic intervention for Tat-induced cell adhesion.

  4. Pluripotency factor binding and Tsix expression act synergistically to repress Xist in undifferentiated embryonic stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nesterova Tatyana B

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Expression of Xist, the master regulator of X chromosome inactivation, is extinguished in pluripotent cells, a process that has been linked to programmed X chromosome reactivation. The key pluripotency transcription factors Nanog, Oct4 and Sox2 are implicated in Xist gene extinction, at least in part through binding to an element located in Xist intron 1. Other pathways, notably repression by the antisense RNA Tsix, may also be involved. Results Here we employ a transgene strategy to test the role of the intron 1 element and Tsix in repressing Xist in ES cells. We find that deletion of the intron 1 element causes a small increase in Xist expression and that simultaneous deletion of the antisense regulator Tsix enhances this effect. Conclusion We conclude that Tsix and pluripotency factors act synergistically to repress Xist in undifferentiated embryonic stem cells. Double mutants do not exhibit maximal levels of Xist expression, indicating that other pathways also play a role.

  5. Lipopolysaccharide-binding protein: localization in secretory granules of Paneth cells in the mouse small intestine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Gert H; Rasmussen, Karina; Niels-Christiansen, Lise-Lotte;

    2009-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-binding protein (LBP) is an acute-phase protein involved in the host's response to endotoxin and mainly synthesized and secreted to the blood by the liver. But in addition, LBP is also made by extrahepatic cells, including the enterocyte-like cell line Caco-2. To study in...... closer detail the synthesis and storage of LBP in the intestinal mucosal epithelium, we performed an immunolocalization of LBP in mouse small intestine. By immunofluorescence microscopy, an antibody recognizing the 58-60 kDa protein of LBP distinctly labeled a small population of cells located deep into...... LBP together with other proteins acting in the innate immune response of the gut, such as lysozyme, defensins and intelectin....

  6. Calreticulin Binds to Fas Ligand and Inhibits Neuronal Cell Apoptosis Induced by Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beilei Chen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Calreticulin (CRT can bind to Fas ligand (FasL and inhibit Fas/FasL-mediated apoptosis of Jurkat T cells. However, its effect on neuronal cell apoptosis has not been investigated. Purpose. We aimed to evaluate the neuroprotective effect of CRT following ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI. Methods. Mice underwent middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO and SH-SY5Y cells subjected to oxygen glucose deprivation (OGD were used as models for IRI. The CRT protein level was detected by Western blotting, and mRNA expression of CRT, caspase-3, and caspase-8 was measured by real-time PCR. Immunofluorescence was used to assess the localization of CRT and FasL. The interaction of CRT with FasL was verified by coimmunoprecipitation. SH-SY5Y cell viability was determined by MTT assay, and cell apoptosis was assessed by flow cytometry. The measurement of caspase-8 and caspase-3 activity was carried out using caspase activity assay kits. Results. After IRI, CRT was upregulated on the neuron surface and bound to FasL, leading to increased viability of OGD-exposed SH-SY5Y cells and decreased activity of caspase-8 and caspase-3. Conclusions. This study for the first time revealed that increased CRT inhibited Fas/FasL-mediated neuronal cell apoptosis during the early stage of ischemic stroke, suggesting it to be a potential protector activated soon after IRI.

  7. Colorimetric growth assay for epidermal cell cultures by their crystal violet binding capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnekoh, B; Wevers, A; Jugert, F; Merk, H; Mahrle, G

    1989-01-01

    The application of a simple, rapid, and inexpensive colorimetric growth assay was tested for human epidermal cells subcultured in uncoated plastic dishes. Cell layers were incubated with a crystal violet (CV) solution (0.2% with ethanol 2% in 0.5 M Tris-Cl buffer, pH 7.8) for 10 min at room temperature. After rinsing with 0.5 M Tris-Cl (pH 7.8) the cell layer was dried and decolorized with a sodium-dodecylsulfate solution (0.5% with ethanol 50% in 0.5 M Tris-Cl, pH 7.8) for 60 min at 37 degrees C. The extinction of the supernatant was read at the absorption maximum of 586 nm. The protein content of attached cells as classical parameter for quantifying cell growth was strongly related to CV extinction with a correlation coefficient of r = 0.98. Furthermore, the subcellular protein binding qualities of CV were analyzed. The water-soluble protein fraction of cultured epidermal cells was separated by sodium-dodecylsulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and stained with CV. We found a staining pattern which was qualitatively very similar to that of Coomassie blue, however less intense. Keratin electrophoresis revealed an affinity of CV to the 48, 50, and 56 kD cytokeratins. In conclusion, this CV assay is a reliable and simple method for the monitoring of epidermal cell growth in cultures. PMID:2482013

  8. Vitamin D-binding protein controls T cell responses to vitamin D

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kongsbak, Martin; von Essen, Marina Rode; Levring, Trine Bøegh;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In vitro studies have shown that the active form of vitamin D3, 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25(OH)2D3), can regulate differentiation of CD4+ T cells by inhibiting Th1 and Th17 cell differentiation and promoting Th2 and Treg cell differentiation. However, the serum concentration of 1...... activated T cells express the 25(OH)D-1α-hydroxylase CYP27B1 that converts 25(OH)D3 to 1,25(OH)2D3, it is still controversial whether activated T cells have the capacity to produce sufficient amounts of 1,25(OH)2D3 to affect vitamin D-responsive genes. Furthermore, it is not known how the vitamin D......-binding protein (DBP) found in high concentrations in serum affects T cell responses to 25(OH)D3. RESULTS: We found that activated T cells express CYP27B1 and have the capacity to produce sufficient 1,25(OH)2D3 to affect vitamin D-responsive genes when cultured with physiological concentrations of 25(OH)D3 in...

  9. MAR binding protein SMAR1 favors IL-10 mediated regulatory T cell function in acute colitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Treg cells are not only crucial for controlling immune responses to autoantigens but also prevent those directed towards commensal pathogens. Control of effector immune responses by Treg cells depend on their capacity to accumulate at inflammatory site and accordingly accommodate to inflammatory environment. Till date, the factors associated with maintaining these aspects of Treg phenotype is not understood properly. Here we have shown that a known nuclear matrix binding protein SMAR1 is selectively expressed more in colonic Treg cells and is required for their ability to accumulate at inflammatory site and to sustain high levels of Foxp3 and IL-10 expression during acute colitis. Elimination of anti-inflammatory subsets revealed a protective role for IL-10 producing Treg cells in SMAR1−/− mice. Moreover, a combined action of Foxp3 and SMAR1 restricts effector cytokine production and enhance the production of IL-10 by colonic Treg cells that controls acute colitis. This data highlights a critical role of SMAR1 in maintaining Treg physiology during inflammatory disorders. - Highlights: • SMAR1 is essential to sustain high level of Foxp3 and IL-10 in Treg cells. • SMAR1−/− Treg cells produce pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-17 leads to inflammation. • IL-10 administration can control the inflammation in SMAR1−/− mice. • Both Foxp3 and SMAR1 maintain Treg phenotype that controls colitis

  10. The CHR promoter element controls cell cycle-dependent gene transcription and binds the DREAM and MMB complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Gerd A; Quaas, Marianne; Schümann, Michael; Krause, Eberhard; Padi, Megha; Fischer, Martin; Litovchick, Larisa; DeCaprio, James A; Engeland, Kurt

    2012-02-01

    Cell cycle-dependent gene expression is often controlled on the transcriptional level. Genes like cyclin B, CDC2 and CDC25C are regulated by cell cycle-dependent element (CDE) and cell cycle genes homology region (CHR) promoter elements mainly through repression in G(0)/G(1). It had been suggested that E2F4 binding to CDE sites is central to transcriptional regulation. However, some promoters are only controlled by a CHR. We identify the DREAM complex binding to the CHR of mouse and human cyclin B2 promoters in G(0). Association of DREAM and cell cycle-dependent regulation is abrogated when the CHR is mutated. Although E2f4 is part of the complex, a CDE is not essential but can enhance binding of DREAM. We show that the CHR element is not only necessary for repression of gene transcription in G(0)/G(1), but also for activation in S, G(2) and M phases. In proliferating cells, the B-myb-containing MMB complex binds the CHR of both promoters independently of the CDE. Bioinformatic analyses identify many genes which contain conserved CHR elements in promoters binding the DREAM complex. With Ube2c as an example from that screen, we show that inverse CHR sites are functional promoter elements that can bind DREAM and MMB. Our findings indicate that the CHR is central to DREAM/MMB-dependent transcriptional control during the cell cycle. PMID:22064854

  11. The CHR promoter element controls cell cycle-dependent gene transcription and binds the DREAM and MMB complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Gerd A.; Quaas, Marianne; Schümann, Michael; Krause, Eberhard; Padi, Megha; Fischer, Martin; Litovchick, Larisa; DeCaprio, James A.; Engeland, Kurt

    2012-01-01

    Cell cycle-dependent gene expression is often controlled on the transcriptional level. Genes like cyclin B, CDC2 and CDC25C are regulated by cell cycle-dependent element (CDE) and cell cycle genes homology region (CHR) promoter elements mainly through repression in G0/G1. It had been suggested that E2F4 binding to CDE sites is central to transcriptional regulation. However, some promoters are only controlled by a CHR. We identify the DREAM complex binding to the CHR of mouse and human cyclin B2 promoters in G0. Association of DREAM and cell cycle-dependent regulation is abrogated when the CHR is mutated. Although E2f4 is part of the complex, a CDE is not essential but can enhance binding of DREAM. We show that the CHR element is not only necessary for repression of gene transcription in G0/G1, but also for activation in S, G2 and M phases. In proliferating cells, the B-myb-containing MMB complex binds the CHR of both promoters independently of the CDE. Bioinformatic analyses identify many genes which contain conserved CHR elements in promoters binding the DREAM complex. With Ube2c as an example from that screen, we show that inverse CHR sites are functional promoter elements that can bind DREAM and MMB. Our findings indicate that the CHR is central to DREAM/MMB-dependent transcriptional control during the cell cycle. PMID:22064854

  12. Autoradiographic quantitation of. beta. -adrenergic receptors on neural cells in primary cultures. 1. Pharmacological studies of (/sup 125/I)pindolol binding of individual astroglial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burgess, S.K.; McCarthy, K.D. (North Carolina Univ., Chapel Hill (USA). School of Medicine)

    1985-05-27

    The current investigation was undertaken to determine whether the binding of (/sup 125/I)pindolol (*IPIN) to immunocytochemically stained cultured cells, as measured by quantitative autoradiography, would fulfill the usual pharmacological criteria for specific ..beta..-adrenergic receptor binding. *IPIN binding experiments were carried out on individual astroglia obtained from neonatal rat cerebral cortex and grown as primary cultures on polylysine-coated glass slides. Autoradiographic silver grains on cells which stained for the intracellular astroglial marker, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), were quantified by a microcomputer-based video digitizing system. This study is a demonstration of receptor binding parameters derived from single cells in a known population, and represents a novel approach to the problem of assessing cell-type specific receptors on neural cells in mixed primary cultures.

  13. Ability of luteinizing hormone releasing hormone-Pseudomonas aeruginosa exotoxin 40 binding to LHRH receptor on human liver cancer cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shou-Liang Gong; Gang Zhao; Hong-Guang Zhao; Wen-Tian Lü; Guang-Wei Liu; Ping Zhu

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To explore the ability of recombinant toxin luteinizing hormone releasing hormone-Pseudomonas aeruginosa exotoxin 40 (LHRH-PE40) anH binding to LHRH receptor(LHRHR) on the membrane surfa ogf hman liver cancer HEPG cells.METHODS: LHRH was beled by using 125I with enzymatic reaction. The affinity and receptor volume of LHRH-PE40and LHRH binding to LHRHR on the membrane surface of human liver cancer cells were measured with radioligand receptor assay.RESULTS:The specific activity of LHRH labeled with 125I was 2.7×104 kBq/μL, and its radiochemical purity reached to 99.2-99.7%. The binding of 125I to LHRH was maximal for 240 min in the warm cultivation, and this binding was stabilized. The inhibiting rates of 125I-LHRH and LHRH on the proliferation of human liver cancer HEPG cells were not significantly different. On the basis of the saturation curve of 125I-LHRH binding to the membrane LHRHR of HEPG cells, 125I-LHRH of 1×105 cpm was selected for radioligand receptor assay. The affinity constants (Kd) of LHRH-PE40and LHRH bively,and their receptor volumes were 0.37±0.15 μmol/g and0.42±0.13 μmol/g, respectively. The binding of LHRH-PE40to the membrane proteinof normal liver cells was not observed.CONCLUSION: The recombinant toxin LHRH-PE40 binding to the membrane surface of LHRHR of human liver cancer HEPG cells was very strong, while the specific binding of it to normal liver cells was not observed. The results provide an important experimental basis for the clinical application of LHRH-PE.

  14. Specific binding sites for growth hormone in cultured mouse thymic epithelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ban, E.; Haour, F. (Institut Pasteur, Paris (France)); Gagnerault, M.; Dardenne, M.; Postel-Vinay, M. (Hopital Necker, Paris (France)); Jammes, H. (Endocrinologie Molecuaire, INRA, Jouy-en-Josas (France))

    1991-01-01

    Growth hormones bound specifically to murine thymic epithelial cells, which represent the major component of thymic micro-environment and can be modulated by pituitary hormones. The Kds found with human growth hormone and bovine growth hormone were 0.14 and 0.27 nM with a Bmax 0.56 and 0.35 fmol/10{sup 6} cells respectively. Competition experiment analysis showed ED{sub 50} of 0.24 nM for hGH, 0.46 nM for rGH, 0.71 nM for bGH, 11.8 nM for hPRL and 11.2 nM for oPRL. No specific binding of ({sup 125}I)-oPRL was observed under the same conditions. Both hPRL and bGH showed a negative regulatory effect on the number of the hGH binding sites when incubated with the culture for three days. The presence of GH receptors on thymic epithelial cells provides biochemical evidence for the effect of GH on thymic function.

  15. Insulin-like growth factor binding protein production and regulation in fetal rat lung cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, W A; Moats-Staats, B M; D'Ercole, A J; Stiles, A D

    1993-04-01

    Insulin-like growth factor binding proteins (IGFBPs) are expressed in lung from early in gestation and may modulate IGF-stimulated fetal lung cell proliferation and/or differentiation. To begin to define IGFBP production and regulation in lung cells during development, we prepared primary cultures of 19 day gestation fetal rat lung fibroblasts and epithelial cells and identified IGFBPs secreted into medium. Ligand blot analysis of conditioned media (CM) from both cell types demonstrated IGFBP bands of approximately 39,000-45,000, 32,000, 24,000, and 22,000 M(r). These migration characteristics allowed the identification of the 39,000-45,000 M(r) bands as IGFBP-3 and the 24,000 M(r) band as IGFBP-4, while Western immunoblot analyses localized IGFBP-2 to the 32,000 M(r) band and IGFBP-5 to the 22,000 M(r) band. Polymerase chain reaction amplification of cDNAs generated by reverse transcription of fibroblast and epithelial cell RNA using specific oligodeoxynucleotide primers for IGFBPs 1 through 6, demonstrated the presence of amplified products for IGFBP-2, -3, -4, -5, and -6. In both cell types, IGFBP-2 and -3 production was sustained during 48 h of incubation in serum-free medium, whereas IGFBP-4 abundance increased only during the first 6 to 12 h of incubation. CM from fibroblasts and epithelial cells plated at low densities contained a high abundance of IGFBP-2 per microgram cellular DNA compared with cells at higher densities. In contrast, IGFBP-3 and -4 abundance normalized to cell DNA did not change with differing cell densities.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7682822

  16. Damaged DNA binding protein 2 plays a role in breast cancer cell growth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zilal Kattan

    Full Text Available The Damaged DNA binding protein 2 (DDB2, is involved in nucleotide excision repair as well as in other biological processes in normal cells, including transcription and cell cycle regulation. Loss of DDB2 function may be related to tumor susceptibility. However, hypothesis of this study was that DDB2 could play a role in breast cancer cell growth, resulting in its well known interaction with the proliferative marker E2F1 in breast neoplasia. DDB2 gene was overexpressed in estrogen receptor (ER-positive (MCF-7 and T47D, but not in ER-negative breast cancer (MDA-MB231 and SKBR3 or normal mammary epithelial cell lines. In addition, DDB2 expression was significantly (3.0-fold higher in ER-positive than in ER-negative tumor samples (P = 0.0208 from 16 patients with breast carcinoma. Knockdown of DDB2 by small interfering RNA in MCF-7 cells caused a decrease in cancer cell growth and colony formation. Inversely, introduction of the DDB2 gene into MDA-MB231 cells stimulated growth and colony formation. Cell cycle distribution and 5 Bromodeoxyuridine incorporation by flow cytometry analysis showed that the growth-inhibiting effect of DDB2 knockdown was the consequence of a delayed G1/S transition and a slowed progression through the S phase of MCF-7 cells. These results were supported by a strong decrease in the expression of S phase markers (Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen, cyclin E and dihydrofolate reductase. These findings demonstrate for the first time that DDB2 can play a role as oncogene and may become a promising candidate as a predictive marker in breast cancer.

  17. Real-Time Protein and Cell Binding Measurements on Hydroxyapatite Coatings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilardell, A M; Cinca, N; Jokinen, A; Garcia-Giralt, N; Dosta, S; Cano, I G; Guilemany, J M

    2016-01-01

    Although a lot of in vitro and in vivo assays have been performed during the last few decades years for hydroxyapatite bioactive coatings, there is a lack of exploitation of real-time in vitro interaction measurements. In the present work, real-time interactions for a plasma sprayed hydroxyapatite coating were measured by a Multi-Parametric Surface Plasmon Resonance (MP-SPR), and the results were compared with standard traditional cell viability in vitro assays. MP-SPR is proven to be suitable not only for measurement of molecule-molecule interactions but also molecule-material interaction measurements and cell interaction. Although SPR is extensively utilized in interaction studies, recent research of protein or cell adsorption on hydroxyapatite coatings for prostheses applications was not found. The as-sprayed hydroxyapatite coating resulted in 62.4% of crystalline phase and an average thickness of 24 ± 6 μm. The MP-SPR was used to measure lysozyme protein and human mesenchymal stem cells interaction to the hydroxyapatite coating. A comparison between the standard gold sensor and Hydroxyapatite (HA)-plasma coated sensor denoted a clearly favourable cell attachment on HA coated sensor as a significantly higher signal of cell binding was detected. Moreover, traditional cell viability and proliferation tests showed increased activity with culture time indicating that cells were proliferating on HA coating. Cells show homogeneous distribution and proliferation along the HA surface between one and seven days with no significant mortality. Cells were flattened and spread on rough surfaces from the first day, with increasing cytoplasmatic extensions during the culture time. PMID:27618911

  18. Weak glycolipid binding of a microdomain-tracer peptide correlates with aggregation and slow diffusion on cell membranes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim Lauterbach

    Full Text Available Organized assembly or aggregation of sphingolipid-binding ligands, such as certain toxins and pathogens, has been suggested to increase binding affinity of the ligand to the cell membrane and cause membrane reorganization or distortion. Here we show that the diffusion behavior of the fluorescently tagged sphingolipid-interacting peptide probe SBD (Sphingolipid Binding Domain is altered by modifications in the construction of the peptide sequence that both result in a reduction in binding to ganglioside-containing supported lipid membranes, and at the same time increase aggregation on the cell plasma membrane, but that do not change relative amounts of secondary structural features. We tested the effects of modifying the overall charge and construction of the SBD probe on its binding and diffusion behavior, by Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR; Biacore analysis on lipid surfaces, and by Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy (FCS on live cells, respectively. SBD binds preferentially to membranes containing the highly sialylated gangliosides GT1b and GD1a. However, simple charge interactions of the peptide with the negative ganglioside do not appear to be a critical determinant of binding. Rather, an aggregation-suppressing amino acid composition and linker between the fluorophore and the peptide are required for optimum binding of the SBD to ganglioside-containing supported lipid bilayer surfaces, as well as for interaction with the membrane. Interestingly, the strength of interactions with ganglioside-containing artificial membranes is mirrored in the diffusion behavior by FCS on cell membranes, with stronger binders displaying similar characteristic diffusion profiles. Our findings indicate that for aggregation-prone peptides, aggregation occurs upon contact with the cell membrane, and rather than giving a stronger interaction with the membrane, aggregation is accompanied by weaker binding and complex diffusion profiles indicative of heterogeneous

  19. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Rv2536 protein implicated in specific binding to human cell lines

    OpenAIRE

    García, Javier; Puentes, Alvaro; Rodríguez, Luis; Ocampo, Marisol; Curtidor, Hernando; Vera, Ricardo; Lopez, Ramses; Valbuena, John; Cortes, Jimena; Vanegas, Magnolia; Barrero, Carlos; Patarroyo, Manuel A; Urquiza, Mauricio; Patarroyo, Manuel E.

    2005-01-01

    The gene encoding the Mycobacterium tuberculosis Rv2536 protein is present in the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (as assayed by PCR) and transcribed (as determined by RT-PCR) in M. tuberculosis H37Rv, M. tuberculosis H37Ra, M. bovis BCG, and M. africanum strains. Rabbits immunized with synthetic polymer peptides from this protein produced antibodies specifically recognizing a 25-kDa band in mycobacterial sonicate. U937 and A549 cells were used in binding assays involving 20-amino-acid-lon...

  20. A triplex DNA-binding protein from human cells: purification and characterization.

    OpenAIRE

    Kiyama, R; Camerini-Otero, R.D.

    1991-01-01

    A protein that binds to an oligonucleotide triplex, (dT)34.(dA)34.(dT)34 (TAT triplex), was purified from HeLa cells by a combination of conventional column chromatography and triplex DNA affinity chromatography. The protein has an apparent molecular mass of 55 kDa on sodium dodecyl sulfate/polyacrylamide gels. Although the protein has an affinity for AT duplex and TAT triplex, a higher affinity for TAT triplex was demonstrated by comparing the elution profiles from an AT duplex and a TAT tri...

  1. Ligand binding to G protein-coupled receptors in tethered cell membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinez, Karen L.; Meyer, Bruno H.; Hovius, Ruud; Lundstrom, Kenneth; Vogel, Horst

    2003-01-01

    of receptor function and in turn for the design and development of novel therapeutic compound. Here we show how ligand-receptor interaction can be investigated in situ with high sensitivity on sensor surfaces by total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) measurements. A generally applicable method...... streptavidin. TIRF measurements showed that a fluorescent agonist binds to the receptor on the sensor surface with similar affinity as to the receptor in live cells. This approach offers the possibility to investigate minute amounts of membrane protein in an active form and in its native environment without...

  2. Heparin-binding growth factor 1 stimulates tyrosine phosphorylation in NIH 3T3 cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Friesel, R; Burgess, W H; Maciag, T

    1989-01-01

    Tyrosine phosphorylation of cellular proteins induced by heparin-binding growth factor 1 (HBGF-1) was studied by using the murine fibroblast cell line NIH 3T3 (clone 2.2). HBGF-1 specifically induced the rapid tyrosine phosphorylation of polypeptides of Mr 150,000, 130,000, and 90,000 that were detected with polyclonal and monoclonal antiphosphotyrosine (anti-P-Tyr) antibodies. The concentration of HBGF-1 required for half-maximal induction of tyrosine phosphorylation of the Mr-150,000 Mr-130...

  3. Inhibitor of DNA binding 1 regulates cell cycle progression of endothelial progenitor cells through induction of Wnt2 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Xi; Yu, Yang; Zhang, Li; Ma, Yang; Wang, Hong

    2016-09-01

    Endothelial injury is a risk factor for atherosclerosis. Endothelial progenitor cell (EPC) proliferation contributes to vascular injury repair. Overexpression of inhibitor of DNA binding 1 (Id1) significantly promotes EPC proliferation; however, the underlying molecular mechanism remains to be fully elucidated. The present study investigated the role of Id1 in cell cycle regulation of EPCs, which is closely associated with proliferation. Overexpression of Id1 increased the proportion of EPCs in the S/G2M phase and significantly increased cyclin D1 expression levels, while knockdown of Id1 arrested the cell cycle progression of EPCs in the G1 phase and inhibited cyclin D1 expression levels. In addition, it was demonstrated that Id1 upregulated wingless‑type mouse mammary tumor virus integration site family member 2 (Wnt2) expression levels and promoted β‑catenin accumulation and nuclear translocation. Furthermore, Wnt2 knockdown counteracted the effects of Id1 on cell cycle progression of EPCs. In conclusion, the results of the present study indicate that Id1 promoted Wnt2 expression, which accelerated cell cycle progression from G1 to S phase. This suggests that Id1 may promote cell cycle progression of EPCs, and that Wnt2 may be important in Id1 regulation of the cell cycle of EPCs. PMID:27432753

  4. Nuclear thyroid hormone receptor binding in human mononuclear blood cells after goitre resection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kvetny, J; Matzen, L E; Blichert-Toft, M; Watt-Boolsen, S; Date, J

    1989-01-01

    . u. to 94 a. u. and SHBG from 80 nmol/l to 69 nmol/l (P less than 0.05) followed after 6 weeks by a rise in serum TSH from 1.2 mU/l to 11.0 mU/l (P less than 0.05) suggesting an initial slight hypothyroidism. Nuclear receptor-binding of T4 and T3 increased within one week and eventually decreased to...... preresectional values. We conclude that the expected alteration of the metabolic state caused by resection of the gland is opposed by increased nuclear binding of T4 and T3.......Nuclear thyroxine and triiodothyronine receptor-binding in human mononuclear blood cells were examined in 14 euthyroid persons prior to and 1, 6, 24 and 53 weeks after goitre resection. One week after resection decreased serum T3 from 1.47 nmol/l to 1.14 nmol/l (P less than 0.05), FT4I from 103 a...

  5. Hybrid Markov-mass action law for cell activation by rare binding events

    CERN Document Server

    Holcman, C Guerrier D

    2016-01-01

    The binding of molecules, ions or proteins to specific target sites is a generic step for cell activation. However, this step relies on rare events where stochastic particles located in a large bulk are searching for small and often hidden targets and thus remains difficult to study. We present here a hybrid discrete-continuum model where the large ensemble of particles is described by mass-action laws. The rare discrete binding events are modeled by a Markov chain for the encounter of a finite number of small targets by few Brownian particles, for which the arrival time is Poissonian. This model is applied for predicting the time distribution of vesicular release at neuronal synapses that remains elusive. This release is triggered by the binding of few calcium ions that can originate either from the synaptic bulk or from the transient entry through calcium channels. We report that the distribution of release time is bimodal although triggered by a single fast action potential: while the first peak follows a ...

  6. Nuclear matrix binding protein SMAR1 regulates T-cell differentiation and allergic airway disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chemmannur, S V; Badhwar, A J; Mirlekar, B; Malonia, S K; Gupta, M; Wadhwa, N; Bopanna, R; Mabalirajan, U; Majumdar, S; Ghosh, B; Chattopadhyay, S

    2015-11-01

    Asthma is a complex airway allergic disease involving the interplay of various cell types, cytokines, and transcriptional factors. Though many factors contribute to disease etiology, the molecular control of disease phenotype and responsiveness is not well understood. Here we report an essential role of the matrix attachment region (MAR)-binding protein SMAR1 in regulating immune response during allergic airway disease. Conditional knockout of SMAR1 in T cells rendered the mice resistant to eosinophilic airway inflammation against ovalbumin (OVA) allergen with low immunoglobulin E (IgE) and interleukin-5 (IL-5) levels. Moreover, a lower IgE/IgG2a ratio and higher interferon-γ (IFN-γ) response suggested aberrant skewing of T-cell differentiation toward type 1 helper T cell (Th1) response. We show that SMAR1 functions as a negative regulator of Th1 and Th17 differentiation by interacting with two potential and similar MAR regions present on the promoters of T-bet and IL-17. Thus, we present SMAR1 as a regulator of T-cell differentiation that favors the establishment of Th2 cells by modulating Th1 and Th17 responses. PMID:25736456

  7. Engineering and exploitation of a fluorescent HIV-1 gp120 for live cell CD4 binding assays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costantini, Lindsey M. [Department of Anatomy and Structural Biology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, 1300 Morris Park Avenue, Bronx, NY 10461 (United States); Irvin, Susan C. [Department of Pediatrics, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, 1300 Morris Park Avenue, Bronx, NY 10461 (United States); Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, 1300 Morris Park Avenue, Bronx, NY 10461 (United States); Kennedy, Steven C. [Department of Pediatrics, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, 1300 Morris Park Avenue, Bronx, NY 10461 (United States); Guo, Feng [Department of Anatomy and Structural Biology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, 1300 Morris Park Avenue, Bronx, NY 10461 (United States); Goldstein, Harris; Herold, Betsy C. [Department of Pediatrics, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, 1300 Morris Park Avenue, Bronx, NY 10461 (United States); Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, 1300 Morris Park Avenue, Bronx, NY 10461 (United States); Snapp, Erik L., E-mail: erik-lee.snapp@einstein.yu.edu [Department of Anatomy and Structural Biology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, 1300 Morris Park Avenue, Bronx, NY 10461 (United States)

    2015-02-15

    The HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein, gp120, binds the host cell receptor, CD4, in the initial step of HIV viral entry and infection. This process is an appealing target for the development of inhibitory drugs and neutralizing antibodies. To study gp120 binding and intracellular trafficking, we engineered a fluorescent fusion of the humanized gp120 JRFL HIV-1 variant and GFP. Gp120-sfGFP is glycosylated with human sugars, robustly expressed, and secreted from cultured human cells. Protein dynamics, quality control, and trafficking can be visualized in live cells. The fusion protein can be readily modified with different gp120 variants or fluorescent proteins. Finally, secreted gp120-sfGFP enables a sensitive and easy binding assay that can quantitatively screen potential inhibitors of gp120-CD4 binding on live cells via fluorescence imaging or laser scanning cytometry. This adaptable research tool should aid in studies of gp120 cell biology and the development of novel anti-HIV drugs. - Highlights: • Development of fluorescent protein labeled HIV-1 envelope gp120. • Imaging of gp120 dynamics and trafficking in live cells. • Quantitative visual assay of antibody-mediated inhibition of gp120 binding to CD4 on live cells.

  8. Engineering and exploitation of a fluorescent HIV-1 gp120 for live cell CD4 binding assays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein, gp120, binds the host cell receptor, CD4, in the initial step of HIV viral entry and infection. This process is an appealing target for the development of inhibitory drugs and neutralizing antibodies. To study gp120 binding and intracellular trafficking, we engineered a fluorescent fusion of the humanized gp120 JRFL HIV-1 variant and GFP. Gp120-sfGFP is glycosylated with human sugars, robustly expressed, and secreted from cultured human cells. Protein dynamics, quality control, and trafficking can be visualized in live cells. The fusion protein can be readily modified with different gp120 variants or fluorescent proteins. Finally, secreted gp120-sfGFP enables a sensitive and easy binding assay that can quantitatively screen potential inhibitors of gp120-CD4 binding on live cells via fluorescence imaging or laser scanning cytometry. This adaptable research tool should aid in studies of gp120 cell biology and the development of novel anti-HIV drugs. - Highlights: • Development of fluorescent protein labeled HIV-1 envelope gp120. • Imaging of gp120 dynamics and trafficking in live cells. • Quantitative visual assay of antibody-mediated inhibition of gp120 binding to CD4 on live cells

  9. Identification of an additional class of C3-binding membrane proteins of human peripheral blood leukocytes and cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, J L; Housley, G A; Dykman, T R; MacDermott, R P; Atkinson, J P

    1985-02-01

    Proteins binding the third component of complement (C3) were isolated by affinity chromatography from surface-labeled solubilized membranes of human peripheral blood cells and cell lines. The isolated molecules were subjected to NaDodSO4/PAGE, and autoradiographs of these gels indicated that C3-binding proteins could be divided into three groups based on Mr: (i) gp200, an approximately 200,000 Mr molecule previously identified as the C3b/C4b receptor or CR1; (ii) gp140, an approximately 140,000 Mr molecule previously identified as the C3d receptor or CR2; and (iii) gp45-70, a heretofore unrecognized group of 45,000-70,000 Mr C3-binding molecules. The cell distribution, Mr, antigenic cross-reactivity, and specificity of gp45-70 were examined. Erythrocytes have no detectable gp45-70, but all leukocyte populations examined possess this group of molecules. On neutrophils and mononuclear phagocytes, CR1 is the predominant C3-binding glycoprotein, but gp45-70 is present on both cell populations and on macrophage and neutrophil cell lines. B plus null cells, chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells, and an Epstein-Barr virus-transformed B-cell line possess CR1, CR2, and gp45-70. On T cells and T-cell lines gp45-70 is the predominant or, in some cases, the only C3-binding protein isolated. gp45-70 is structurally characterized as a broad band or doublet with a mean Mr that is slightly different for each cell population. gp45-70 binds iC3, C3b, and C4b, but not C3d, indicating that the binding region is probably within the C3c portion of C3b. A polyclonal antibody to CR1 and monoclonal antibodies to CR1 and CR2 do not immunoprecipitate gp45-70. While gp45-70 has not been previously characterized on human cells, a C3b-binding glycoprotein of similar Mr is present on rabbit alveolar macrophages. We conclude that gp45-70 is an additional group of membrane proteins present on human leukocytes that possess ligand-binding activity for C3b. PMID:3871945

  10. Growth hormone binding to specific receptors stimulates growth and function of cloned insulin-producing rat insulinoma RIN-5AH cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Billestrup, Nils; Martin, J M

    1985-01-01

    Binding of 125I-labeled human GH (hGH) to a cloned rat insulin-producing cell line RIN-5AH in monolayer culture was studied along with some physiological effects of the hormone on these cells. Binding was time and temperature dependent, and steady state binding was observed in 60 min at 37 C with...

  11. Fatty acid binding protein 4 is a target of VEGF and a regulator of cell proliferation in endothelial cells

    OpenAIRE

    Elmasri, Harun; Karaaslan, Cagatay; Teper, Yaroslav; Ghelfi, Elisa; Weng, Meiqian; Ince, Tan A.; Kozakewich, Harry; Bischoff, Joyce; Cataltepe, Sule

    2009-01-01

    Fatty acid binding protein 4 (FABP4) plays an important role in maintaining glucose and lipid homeostasis. FABP4 has been primarily regarded as an adipocyte- and macrophage-specific protein, but recent studies suggest that it may be more widely expressed. We found strong FABP4 expression in the endothelial cells (ECs) of capillaries and small veins in several mouse and human tissues, including the heart and kidney. FABP4 was also detected in the ECs of mature human placental vessels and infan...

  12. Alpha-bungarotoxin binding to target cell in a developing visual system by carboxylated nanodiamond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Kuang-Kai; Chen, Mei-Fang; Chen, Po-Yi; Lee, Tony J. F.; Cheng, Chia-Liang; Chang, Chia-Ching; Ho, Yen-Peng; Chao, Jui-I.

    2008-05-01

    Biological molecules conjugating with nanoparticles are valuable for applications including bio-imaging, bio-detection, and bio-sensing. Nanometer-sized diamond particles have excellent electronic and chemical properties for bio-conjugation. In this study, we manipulated the carboxyl group produced on the surface of nanodiamond (carboxylated nanodiamond, cND) for conjugating with alpha-bungarotoxin (α-BTX), a neurotoxin derived from Bungarus multicinctus with specific blockade of alpha7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7-nAChR). The electrostatic binding of cND-α-BTX was mediated by the negative charge of the cND and the positive charge of the α-BTX in physiological pH conditions. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel analysis and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI/TOF-MS) spectra displayed that α-BTX proteins were conjugated with cND particles via non-covalent bindings. The green fluorescence of the cND particles combining with the red fluorescence of tetramethylrhodamine-labeled α-BTX presented a yellow color at the same location, which indicated that α-BTX proteins were conjugated with cND particles. Xenopus laevis's oocytes expressed the human α7-nAChR proteins by microinjection with α7-nAChR mRNA. The cND-α-BTX complexes were bound to α7-nAChR locating on the cell membrane of oocytes and human lung A549 cancer cells analyzed by laser scanning confocal microscopy. The choline-evoked α7-nAChR-mediated inward currents of the oocytes were blocked by cND-α-BTX complexes in a concentration-dependent manner using two-electrode voltage-clamp recording. Furthermore, the fluorescence intensity of cND-α-BTX binding on A549 cells could be quantified by flow cytometry. These results indicate that cND-conjugated α-BTX still preserves its biological activity in blocking the function of α7-nAChR, and provide a visual system showing the binding of α-BTX to α7-nAChR.

  13. Alpha-bungarotoxin binding to target cell in a developing visual system by carboxylated nanodiamond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biological molecules conjugating with nanoparticles are valuable for applications including bio-imaging, bio-detection, and bio-sensing. Nanometer-sized diamond particles have excellent electronic and chemical properties for bio-conjugation. In this study, we manipulated the carboxyl group produced on the surface of nanodiamond (carboxylated nanodiamond, cND) for conjugating with alpha-bungarotoxin (α-BTX), a neurotoxin derived from Bungarus multicinctus with specific blockade of alpha7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7-nAChR). The electrostatic binding of cND-α-BTX was mediated by the negative charge of the cND and the positive charge of the α-BTX in physiological pH conditions. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel analysis and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI/TOF-MS) spectra displayed that α-BTX proteins were conjugated with cND particles via non-covalent bindings. The green fluorescence of the cND particles combining with the red fluorescence of tetramethylrhodamine-labeled α-BTX presented a yellow color at the same location, which indicated that α-BTX proteins were conjugated with cND particles. Xenopus laevis's oocytes expressed the human α7-nAChR proteins by microinjection with α7-nAChR mRNA. The cND-α-BTX complexes were bound to α7-nAChR locating on the cell membrane of oocytes and human lung A549 cancer cells analyzed by laser scanning confocal microscopy. The choline-evoked α7-nAChR-mediated inward currents of the oocytes were blocked by cND-α-BTX complexes in a concentration-dependent manner using two-electrode voltage-clamp recording. Furthermore, the fluorescence intensity of cND-α-BTX binding on A549 cells could be quantified by flow cytometry. These results indicate that cND-conjugated α-BTX still preserves its biological activity in blocking the function of α7-nAChR, and provide a visual system showing the binding of α-BTX to α7-nAChR

  14. Membrane binding mode of intrinsically disordered cytoplasmic domains of T cell receptor signaling subunits depends on lipid composition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Intrinsically disordered cytoplasmic domains of T cell receptor (TCR) signaling subunits including ζcyt and CD3εcyt all contain one or more copies of an immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM), tyrosine residues of which are phosphorylated upon receptor triggering. Membrane binding-induced helical folding of ζcyt and CD3εcyt ITAMs is thought to control TCR activation. However, the question whether or not lipid binding of ζcyt and CD3εcyt is necessarily accompanied by a folding transition of ITAMs remains open. In this study, we investigate whether the membrane binding mechanisms of ζcyt and CD3εcyt depend on the membrane model used. Circular dichroic and fluorescence data indicate that binding of ζcyt and CD3εcyt to detergent micelles and unstable vesicles is accompanied by a disorder-to-order transition, whereas upon binding to stable vesicles these proteins remain unfolded. Using electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering, we show that upon protein binding, unstable vesicles fuse and rupture. In contrast, stable vesicles remain intact under these conditions. This suggests different membrane binding modes for ζcyt and CD3εcyt depending on the bilayer stability: (1) coupled binding and folding, and (2) binding without folding. These findings explain the long-standing puzzle in the literature and highlight the importance of the choice of an appropriate membrane model for protein-lipid interactions studies.

  15. Characterization of Palytoxin Binding to HaCaT Cells Using a Monoclonal Anti-Palytoxin Antibody

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiara Florio

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Palytoxin (PLTX is the reference compound for a group of potent marine biotoxins, for which the molecular target is Na+/K+-ATPase. Indeed, ouabain (OUA, a potent blocker of the pump, is used to inhibit some PLTX effects in vitro. However, in an effort to explain incomplete inhibition of PLTX cytotoxicity, some studies suggest the possibility of two different binding sites on Na+/K+-ATPase. Hence, this study was performed to characterize PLTX binding to intact HaCaT keratinocytes and to investigate the ability of OUA to compete for this binding. PLTX binding to HaCaT cells was demonstrated by immunocytochemical analysis after 10 min exposure. An anti-PLTX monoclonal antibody-based ELISA showed that the binding was saturable and reversible, with a Kd of 3 × 10−10 M. However, kinetic experiments revealed that PLTX binding dissociation was incomplete, suggesting an additional, OUA-insensitive, PLTX binding site. Competitive experiments suggested that OUA acts as a negative allosteric modulator against high PLTX concentrations (0.3–1.0 × 10−7 M and possibly as a non-competitive antagonist against low PLTX concentrations (0.1–3.0 × 10−9 M. Antagonism was supported by PLTX cytotoxicity inhibition at OUA concentrations that displaced PLTX binding (1 × 10−5 M. However, this inhibition was incomplete, supporting the existence of both OUA-sensitive and -insensitive PLTX binding sites.

  16. Functionalization of single-walled carbon nanotubes and their binding to cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madani SY

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Seyed Yazdan Madani1, Aaron Tan1, Miriam Dwek2, Alexander M Seifalian1,31UCL Centre for Nanotechnology and Regenerative Medicine, University College London, London, UK; 2Department of Molecular and Applied Biosciences, School of Life Sciences, University of Westminster, London, UK; 3Royal Free Hampstead NHS Trust Hospital, London, UKBackground: Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs have novel properties including their nanoscale size and ease of cellular uptake. This makes them useful for drug delivery, and their photo-thermal effects make them potentially useful in a wide range of applications, particularly the treatment of solid tumors. The poor solubility of SWCNTs has, however, been an issue that may potentially limit the utility of SWCNTs for cancer treatment. Functionalization of the surface of the tubes may be an approach to overcome this problem.Methods: SWCNTs were refluxed in HNO3/H2SO4 (1:3 at 120°C for 120 minutes. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR, contact angle measurements, and near infrared (NIR light exposure were used to assess the functionalization process. The attachment of a carbohydrate-binding protein (lectin labeled with fluorescein isothiocyanate to the functionalized SWCNTs enabled evaluation of the functionalization step via confocal microscopy. The lectin from Helix pomatia, (Helix pomatia agglutinin [HPA], can detect changes in protein glycosylation associated with aggressive metastatic cancer. The interaction between the lectin HPA alone and HPA conjugated to the functionalized SWCNTs with human breast cancer cells (MCF-7 was measured using a quartz crystal microbalance biosensor.Results: Following the functionalization process, TEM images showed a layer had formed on the surface of the SWCNTs. In the FTIR experiment, results illustrated the presence of the –COOH group on the functionalized SWCNTs. Contact angle measurements showed that upon functionalization

  17. Ectopic expression of the calcium-binding protein parvalbumin in mouse liver endothelial cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Castillo, M B; Berchtold, M W; Rülicke, T; Schwaller, B; Gotzos, V; Pinzani, M; Reichen, J; Celio, M R

    1997-01-01

    normal mice but virtually not affected in the transgenic animals. This suggests that ectopically expressed parvalbumin is involved in the regulation of Ca2+ signals in the sinusoidal endothelial cells. This animal model could be of interest to those working on the physiology of liver circulation.......To elucidate the physiological role of the Ca2+ binding protein parvalbumin, we have generated transgenic mice carrying the full-length complementary DNA (cDNA) of rat parvalbumin under the control of the heavy-metal inducible metallothionein IIA promoter. Immunohistochemical and biochemical...... methods have been used to detect the presence of ectopic parvalbumin expression in different tissues. Here we show the expression of parvalbumin in endothelial cells lining the liver sinusoids in situ and after isolation in vitro. The hemodynamic effects of endothelin 1, a peptide hormone mediating potent...

  18. Asymmetric centrosome inheritance maintains neural progenitors in neocortex

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Xiaoqun; Tsai, Jin-Wu; Imai, Janice H.; Lian, Wei-Nan; Vallee, Richard B.; Shi, Song-Hai

    2009-01-01

    Asymmetric divisions of radial glial progenitors produce self-renewing radial glia and differentiating cells simultaneously in the ventricular zone (VZ) of the developing neocortex. While differentiating cells leave the VZ to constitute the future neocortex, renewing radial glial progenitors stay in the VZ for subsequent divisions. The differential behaviour of progenitors and their differentiating progeny is essential for neocortical development; however, the mechanisms that ensure these beh...

  19. Biological activity and binding of estradiol to SK-Mel 23 human melanoma cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarti M.S.M.V.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients expressing estradiol receptors in melanoma cells have been reported to have a better prognosis. We therefore decided to investigate the in vitro effects of ß-estradiol and tamoxifen on the growth and tyrosinase activity of SK-Mel 23 human melanoma cells. Twenty-four-hour treatment with 0.4 nM ß-estradiol inhibited cell proliferation in 30% (0.70 ± 0.03 x 10(5 cells and increased tyrosinase activity in 50% (7130.5 ± 376.5 cpm/10(5 cells, as compared to untreated cells (1.0 ± 0.05 x 10(5 cells and 4769 ± 25.5 cpm/10(5 cells, respectively. Both responses were completely (100% blocked by 1 µM tamoxifen. Higher concentrations (up to 1.6 nM or longer treatments (up to 72 h did not result in a larger effect of the hormone on proliferation or tyrosinase activity. Competition binding assays demonstrated the presence of binding sites to [2,4,6,7-³H]-ß-estradiol, and that the tritiated analogue was displaced by the unlabeled hormone (1 nM to 100 µM, Kd = 0.14 µM, maximal displacement of 93% or by 10 µM tamoxifen (displacement of 60%. ß-estradiol also increased the phosphorylated state of two proteins of 16 and 46 kDa, after 4-h treatment, as determined by Western blot. The absorbance of each band was 1.9- and 4-fold the controls, respectively, as determined with Image-Pro Plus software. Shorter incubation periods with ß-estradiol did not enhance phosporylation; after 6-h treatment with the hormone, the two proteins returned to the control phosphorylation levels. The growth inhibition promoted by estradiol may explain the better prognosis of melanoma-bearing women as compared to men, and open new perspectives for drug therapy.

  20. Distribution of a 69-kD laminin-binding protein in aortic and microvascular endothelial cells: modulation during cell attachment, spreading, and migration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yannariello-Brown, J; Wewer, U; Liotta, L;

    1988-01-01

    cultured subconfluent cells actively synthesizing matrix. Endothelial cells express a 69-kD laminin-binding protein that is membrane associated and appears to colocalize with actin microfilaments. The topological distribution of 69 kD and its cytoskeletal associations can be modulated by the cell during...

  1. Immunocytochemical localization of the [3H]estradiol-binding protein in rat pancreatic acinar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Significant amounts of an estradiol-binding protein (EBP) are present in pancreatic acinar cells. This protein differs from the one found in female reproductive tissues and secondary sex organs (which is commonly referred to as estrogen receptor). EBP has now been purified from rat pancreas and was used as an antigen to induce polyclonal antibodies in rabbits. The antiserum obtained was purified initially by ammonium sulfate fractionation and then still further by interaction with a protein fraction from pancreas that was devoid of estradiol-binding activity. The latter procedure was used to precipitate nonspecific immunoglobulin Gs. Western blot analysis demonstrated that the anti-EBP antibody reacted specifically with a doublet of protein bands having mol wt of 64K and 66K. When this purified antibody was used as an immunocytochemical probe in conjunction with protein-A-gold, acinar cells were labeled on the surface of the endoplasmic reticulum, on the plasma membrane, and in mitochondria. This specific labeling pattern was not observed when preimmune serum was used. No labeling was observed over the nucleus, Golgi apparatus, or zymogen granules with purified anti-EBP antibodies. The unexpected distribution of EBP in both the endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria is discussed

  2. The RNA recognition motif domains of RBM5 are required for RNA binding and cancer cell proliferation inhibition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • RNA recognition motif domains of RBM5 are essential for cell proliferation inhibition. • RNA recognition motif domains of RBM5 are essential for apoptosis induction. • RNA recognition motif domains of RBM5 are essential for RNA binding. • RNA recognition motif domains of RBM5 are essential for caspase-2 alternative splicing. - Abstract: RBM5 is a known putative tumor suppressor gene that has been shown to function in cell growth inhibition by modulating apoptosis. RBM5 also plays a critical role in alternative splicing as an RNA binding protein. However, it is still unclear which domains of RBM5 are required for RNA binding and related functional activities. We hypothesized the two putative RNA recognition motif (RRM) domains of RBM5 spanning from amino acids 98–178 and 231–315 are essential for RBM5-mediated cell growth inhibition, apoptosis regulation, and RNA binding. To investigate this hypothesis, we evaluated the activities of the wide-type and mutant RBM5 gene transfer in low-RBM5 expressing A549 cells. We found that, unlike wild-type RBM5 (RBM5-wt), a RBM5 mutant lacking the two RRM domains (RBM5-ΔRRM), is unable to bind RNA, has compromised caspase-2 alternative splicing activity, lacks cell proliferation inhibition and apoptosis induction function in A549 cells. These data provide direct evidence that the two RRM domains of RBM5 are required for RNA binding and the RNA binding activity of RBM5 contributes to its function on apoptosis induction and cell growth inhibition

  3. The RNA recognition motif domains of RBM5 are required for RNA binding and cancer cell proliferation inhibition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Lei [Key Laboratory of Bioresources and Ecoenvironment (Ministry of Education), College of Life Sciences, Sichuan University, Chengdu (China); Zhang, Qing [Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Biological Cancer Therapy, Xuzhou Medical College, Xuzhou 221002 (China); Yang, Yu [Key Laboratory of Bioresources and Ecoenvironment (Ministry of Education), College of Life Sciences, Sichuan University, Chengdu (China); Wu, Chuanfang, E-mail: wuchuanfangsichuan@gmail.com [Key Laboratory of Bioresources and Ecoenvironment (Ministry of Education), College of Life Sciences, Sichuan University, Chengdu (China)

    2014-02-14

    Highlights: • RNA recognition motif domains of RBM5 are essential for cell proliferation inhibition. • RNA recognition motif domains of RBM5 are essential for apoptosis induction. • RNA recognition motif domains of RBM5 are essential for RNA binding. • RNA recognition motif domains of RBM5 are essential for caspase-2 alternative splicing. - Abstract: RBM5 is a known putative tumor suppressor gene that has been shown to function in cell growth inhibition by modulating apoptosis. RBM5 also plays a critical role in alternative splicing as an RNA binding protein. However, it is still unclear which domains of RBM5 are required for RNA binding and related functional activities. We hypothesized the two putative RNA recognition motif (RRM) domains of RBM5 spanning from amino acids 98–178 and 231–315 are essential for RBM5-mediated cell growth inhibition, apoptosis regulation, and RNA binding. To investigate this hypothesis, we evaluated the activities of the wide-type and mutant RBM5 gene transfer in low-RBM5 expressing A549 cells. We found that, unlike wild-type RBM5 (RBM5-wt), a RBM5 mutant lacking the two RRM domains (RBM5-ΔRRM), is unable to bind RNA, has compromised caspase-2 alternative splicing activity, lacks cell proliferation inhibition and apoptosis induction function in A549 cells. These data provide direct evidence that the two RRM domains of RBM5 are required for RNA binding and the RNA binding activity of RBM5 contributes to its function on apoptosis induction and cell growth inhibition.

  4. Englerin A Inhibits EWS-FLI1 DNA Binding in Ewing Sarcoma Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caropreso, Vittorio; Darvishi, Emad; Turbyville, Thomas J; Ratnayake, Ranjala; Grohar, Patrick J; McMahon, James B; Woldemichael, Girma M

    2016-05-01

    High-throughput screening of extracts from plants, marine, and micro-organisms led to the identification of the extract from the plant Phyllanthus engleri as the most potent inhibitor of EWS-FLI1 induced luciferase reporter expression. Testing of compounds isolated from this extract in turn led to the identification of Englerin A (EA) as the active constituent of the extract. EA induced both necrosis and apoptosis in Ewing cells subsequent to a G2M accumulation of cells in the cell cycle. It also impacted clonogenic survival and anchorage-independent proliferation while also decreasing the proportion of chemotherapy-resistant cells identified by high ALDH activity. EA also caused a sustained increase in cytosolic calcium levels. EA appears to exert its effect on Ewing cells through a decrease in phosphorylation of EWS-FLI1 and its ability to bind DNA. This effect is mediated, at least in part, through a decrease in the levels of the calcium-dependent protein kinase PKC-βI after a transient up-regulation. PMID:26961871

  5. Estramustine-binding protein (EMBP) in renal cell carcinoma immunohistochemistry, immunoscintigraphy and in vitro estramustine effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present report shows that the human renal cell carcinoma (RCC) cell lines, A498 and CAKI-2, express the estramustine-binding protein (EMBP). The RCC cell lines investigated were highly sensitive for estramustine, with cell arrest in atypical metaphase. In vitro experiments using a fluorimetric cytotoxicity assay (FMCA) showed a pronounced cytotoxic effect mediate by estramustine. Immunohistochemical analysis of tumoru specimens from patients with RCC showed positive staining for EMBP in 12/16 cases. Immunoscintigraphy was performed in an experimental system in nude mice, heterotransplanted with the CAKI-2 cell line. A radiolabelled monoclonal anti-EMBP antibody was used. The results show a specific uptake of the antibody in the RCC tumour, expressed as a percentage of the injected dose per gram tissue, which ranged from 4.03 to 6.9. The results obtained from the basis for clinical studies on the feasibility of utilizing estramustine in the management of RCC. Immunoscintigraphy using the monoclonal anti-EMBP antibody is of potential use for in vivo characterization of the malignancy and in the selection patients suitable for treatment with estramustine. (orig.)

  6. A specific assay measuring binding of 125I-Gp 120 from HIV to T4+/CD4+ cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The HIV (HTLV-III) envelope glycoprotein, Gp120, was isolated from virus-infected tissue culture cells using affinity chromatography. A radioimmunoassay was developed to determine the degree of iodinated Gp120 to target CD4+ (T4+) cells. 125I-Gp120 could be shown to selectively bind to CD4+ cells only. The Gp120 remained bound to these cells after repeated washes. Monoclonal anti-CD4 antibodies block the binding of Gp120 to CD4+ cells. Monoclonal antibodies to other cell surface components do not interfere with 125I-Gp120 binding. All IgG antibodies from HIV seropositive donors tested block 125I-GP120 binding, though with variable titers. The authors believe that this assay provides further proof for the use of CD4 (T4) as a component of the receptor for HIV. It represents a safe, objective and sensitive method for the analysis of Gp120-CD4 interactions, as well as the potential of antibodies to interfere with this binding. (Auth.)

  7. Cdc42 and noncanonical Wnt signal transduction pathways cooperate to promote cell polarity

    OpenAIRE

    Schlessinger, Karni; McManus, Edward J.; Hall, Alan

    2007-01-01

    Scratch-induced disruption of cultured monolayers induces polarity in front row cells that can be visualized by spatially localized polymerization of actin at the front of the cell and reorientation of the centrosome/Golgi to face the leading edge. We previously reported that centrosomal reorientation and microtubule polarization depend on a Cdc42-regulated signal transduction pathway involving activation of the Par6/aPKC complex followed by inhibition of GSK-3β and accumulation of the adenom...

  8. The CHR Promoter Element Controls Cell Cycle-Dependent Gene Transcription and Binds the DREAM and MMB Complexes

    OpenAIRE

    Müller, Gerd A.; Quaas, Marianne; Schümann, Michael; Krause, Eberhard; Fischer, Martin; Engeland, Kurt; Padi, Megha; Litovchick, Larisa; DeCaprio, James A.

    2011-01-01

    Cell cycle-dependent gene expression is often controlled on the transcriptional level. Genes like \\(cyclin B, CDC2\\) and \\(CDC25C\\) are regulated by cell cycle-dependent element (CDE) and cell cycle genes homology region (CHR) promoter elements mainly through repression in \\(G_0/G_1\\). It had been suggested that E2F4 binding to CDE sites is central to transcriptional regulation. However, some promoters are only controlled by a CHR. We identify the DREAM complex binding to the CHR of mouse and...

  9. A monoclonal antibody (8H3) that binds to rat T lineage cells and augments in vitro proliferative responses

    OpenAIRE

    1990-01-01

    A murine monoclonal antibody, designated 8H3, recognizes a cell surface antigen expressed exclusively on rat T lineage cells. 8H3 antibody immunoprecipitated 180-, 120-, and 90-kD components from rat thymocytes as well as splenic T cells under nonreducing conditions. 8H3 antibody specifically inhibited the binding of thymocytes to fibronectin. Furthermore, binding of rat thymocytes to immobilized synthetic peptide Gly-Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser-Pro-Cys-BSA was inhibited by 8H3 antibody as was Gly-Arg-Gl...

  10. Identification of amino acids important for binding of Clostridium perfringens epsilon toxin to host cells and to HAVCR1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivie, Susan E; McClain, Mark S

    2012-09-25

    Clostridium perfringens epsilon toxin belongs to the aerolysin-like family of pore-forming toxins and is one of the most potent bacterial toxins known. The epsilon toxin causes fatal enterotoxemia in sheep, goats, and possibly humans. Evidence indicates that the toxin binds to protein receptors including hepatitis A virus cellular receptor 1 (HAVCR1), but the region of the toxin responsible for cell binding has not been identified. In the present study, we identify amino acids within the epsilon toxin important for this cell interaction. Site-specific mutagenesis was used to investigate the role of a surface-accessible cluster of aromatic amino acids, and purified mutant proteins were tested in a series of cell-culture assays to assess cytotoxic activity and cell binding. When added to cells, four mutant proteins (Etx-Y29E, Etx-Y30E, Etx-Y36E and Etx-Y196E) were severely impaired in their ability to not only kill host cells, but also in their ability to permeabilize the plasma membrane. Circular dichroism spectroscopy and thermal stability studies revealed that the wild-type and mutant proteins were similarly folded. Additional experiments revealed that these mutant proteins were defective in binding to host cells and to HAVCR1. These data indicate that an amino acid motif including Y29, Y30, Y36, and Y196 is important for the ability of epsilon toxin to interact with cells and HAVCR1. PMID:22938730

  11. ROLE OF ATP BINDING CASSETTE SUB-FAMILY MEMBER 2 (ABCG2) IN MOUSE EMBRYONIC STEM CELL DEVELOPMENT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ATP binding cassette sub-family member 2 (ABCG2), is a member of the ABC transporter superfamily and a principal xenobiotic transporter. ABCG2 is also highly expressed in certain stem cell populations where it is thought to be related to stem cell plasticity, although the role o...

  12. UL16-binding proteins, novel MHC class I-related proteins, bind to NKG2D and activate multiple signaling pathways in primary NK cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherland, Claire L; Chalupny, N Jan; Schooley, Kenneth; VandenBos, Tim; Kubin, Marek; Cosman, David

    2002-01-15

    The UL16-binding proteins (ULBPs) are a novel family of MHC class I-related molecules that were identified as targets of the human CMV glycoprotein, UL16. We have previously shown that ULBP expression renders a relatively resistant target cell sensitive to NK cytotoxicity, presumably by engaging NKG2D, an activating receptor expressed by NK and other immune effector cells. In this study we show that NKG2D is the ULBP counterstructure on primary NK cells and that its expression is up-regulated by IL-15 stimulation. Soluble forms of ULBPs induce marked protein tyrosine phosphorylation, and activation of the Janus kinase 2, STAT5, extracellular signal-regulated kinase, mitogen-activated protein kinase, and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI 3-kinase)/Akt signal transduction pathways. ULBP-induced activation of Akt and extracellular signal-regulated kinase and ULBP-induced IFN-gamma production are blocked by inhibitors of PI 3-kinase, consistent with the known binding of PI 3-kinase to DAP10, the membrane-bound signal-transducing subunit of the NKG2D receptor. While all three ULBPs activate the same signaling pathways, ULBP3 was found to bind weakly and to induce the weakest signal. In summary, we have shown that NKG2D is the ULBP counterstructure on primary NK cells and for the first time have identified signaling pathways that are activated by NKG2D ligands. These results increase our understanding of the mechanisms by which NKG2D activates immune effector cells and may have implications for immune surveillance against pathogens and tumors. PMID:11777960

  13. Designing a binding interface for control of cancer cell adhesion via 3D topography and metabolic oligosaccharide engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Jian; Che, Pao-Lin; Wang, Zhi-Yun; Aich, Udayanath; Yarema, Kevin J

    2011-08-01

    This study combines metabolic oligosaccharide engineering (MOE), a technology where the glycocalyx of living cells is endowed with chemical features not normally found in sugars, with custom-designed three-dimensional biomaterial substrates to enhance the adhesion of cancer cells and control their morphology and gene expression. Specifically, Ac(5)ManNTGc, a thiol-bearing analog of N-acetyl-d-mannosamine (ManNAc) was used to introduce thiolated sialic acids into the glycocalyx of human Jurkat T-lymphoma derived cells. In parallel 2D films and 3D electrospun nanofibrous scaffolds were prepared from polyethersulfone (PES) and (as controls) left unmodified or aminated. Alternately, the materials were malemided or gold-coated to provide bio-orthogonal binding partners for the thiol groups newly expressed on the cell surface. Cell attachment was modulated by both the topography of the substrate surface and by the chemical compatibility of the binding interface between the cell and the substrate; a substantial increase in binding for normally non-adhesive Jurkat line for 3D scaffold compared to 2D surfaces with an added degree of adhesion resulting from chemoselective binding to malemidede-derivatived or gold-coated surfaces. In addition, the morphology of the cells attached to the 3D scaffolds via MOE-mediated adhesion was dramatically altered and the expression of genes involved in cell adhesion changed in a time-dependent manner. This study showed that cell adhesion could be enhanced, gene expression modulated, and cell fate controlled by introducing the 3D topograhical cues into the growth substrate and by creating a glycoengineered binding interface where the chemistry of both the cell surface and biomaterials scaffold was controlled to facilitate a new mode of carbohydrate-mediated adhesion. PMID:21549424

  14. A ~35 kDa polypeptide from insect cells binds to yeast ACS like elements in the presence of ATP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soni Rajesh K

    2002-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The S. cerevisiae origin recognition complex binds to the ARS consensus sequence in an ATP dependent fashion. Recently, the yeast Cdc6 has been reported to have DNA binding activity. Conservation of replication proteins among different species strongly supports their functional similarity. Here we report the results of an investigation into the DNA binding activity of human Cdc6 protein. Cdc6 was expressed and purified from baculovirus infected Sf9 (Spodoptera frugiperda insect cells as GST fusion protein (GST-Cdc6 and its DNA binding activity was tested. Results Partially purified fractions containing GSTCdc6 or GST showed an ACS binding activity in an ATP dependent manner. However, further purification revealed the presence of a putative 35 kDa insect cell protein (p35 which was found responsible for the DNA binding activity. A close match to the 9/11 bases of the ARS consensus sequence was sufficient for p35 binding activity. A DNA fragment from the human c-myc origin region containing yeast ACS like elements also showed p35 binding activity. Conclusions We have identified a Spodoptera frugiperda protein with ATP dependent DNA binding activity to ACS like elements. ACS like elements have been reported to be essential for ORC binding and replication initiation in yeast but their role in higher eukaryotes still remains elusive. Like the ARS consensus sequence elements of yeast, ACS like elements found in c-myc and lamin beta 2 origin regions may play similar roles in replication and indicate a conserved role for this DNA motif among eukaryotes.

  15. MAR binding protein SMAR1 favors IL-10 mediated regulatory T cell function in acute colitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mirlekar, Bhalchandra; Patil, Sachin [Chromatin and Disease Biology Laboratory, National Centre for Cell Science, Ganeshkhind, Pune 411007 (India); Bopanna, Ramanamurthy [Experimental Animal Facility, National Centre for Cell Science, Ganeshkhind, Pune 411007 (India); Chattopadhyay, Samit, E-mail: samit@nccs.res.in [Chromatin and Disease Biology Laboratory, National Centre for Cell Science, Ganeshkhind, Pune 411007 (India)

    2015-08-21

    T{sub reg} cells are not only crucial for controlling immune responses to autoantigens but also prevent those directed towards commensal pathogens. Control of effector immune responses by T{sub reg} cells depend on their capacity to accumulate at inflammatory site and accordingly accommodate to inflammatory environment. Till date, the factors associated with maintaining these aspects of T{sub reg} phenotype is not understood properly. Here we have shown that a known nuclear matrix binding protein SMAR1 is selectively expressed more in colonic T{sub reg} cells and is required for their ability to accumulate at inflammatory site and to sustain high levels of Foxp3 and IL-10 expression during acute colitis. Elimination of anti-inflammatory subsets revealed a protective role for IL-10 producing T{sub reg} cells in SMAR1{sup −/−} mice. Moreover, a combined action of Foxp3 and SMAR1 restricts effector cytokine production and enhance the production of IL-10 by colonic T{sub reg} cells that controls acute colitis. This data highlights a critical role of SMAR1 in maintaining T{sub reg} physiology during inflammatory disorders. - Highlights: • SMAR1 is essential to sustain high level of Foxp3 and IL-10 in T{sub reg} cells. • SMAR1{sup −/−} T{sub reg} cells produce pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-17 leads to inflammation. • IL-10 administration can control the inflammation in SMAR1{sup −/−} mice. • Both Foxp3 and SMAR1 maintain T{sub reg} phenotype that controls colitis.

  16. Iron-Binding Capacity of Defatted Rice Bran Hydrolysate and Bioavailability of Iron in Caco-2 Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foong, Lian-Chee; Imam, Mustapha Umar; Ismail, Maznah

    2015-10-21

    The present study was aimed at utilizing defatted rice bran (DRB) protein as an iron-binding peptide to enhance iron uptake in humans. DRB samples were treated with Alcalase and Flavourzyme, and the total extractable peptides were determined. Furthermore, the iron-binding capacities of the DRB protein hydrolysates were determined, whereas iron bioavailability studies were conducted using an in vitro digestion and absorption model (Caco-2 cells). The results showed that the DRB protein hydrolysates produced by combined Alcalase and Flavourzyme hydrolysis had the best iron-binding capacity (83%) after 90 min of hydrolysis. The optimal hydrolysis time to produce the best iron-uptake in Caco-2 cells was found to be 180 min. The results suggested that DRB protein hydrolysates have potent iron-binding capacities and may enhance the bioavailability of iron, hence their suitability for use as iron-fortified supplements. PMID:26435326

  17. ATP-binding cassette transporters as pitfalls in selection of transgenic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theile, Dirk; Staffen, Bianca; Weiss, Johanna

    2010-04-15

    Puromycin, hygromycin, and geneticin (G418) are antibiotics frequently used to select genetically engineered eukaryotic cells after transfection or transduction. Because intrinsic or acquired high expression of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters, such as P-glycoprotein (Pgp/ABCB1) and multidrug resistance-associated proteins (MRP/ABCC1), can hamper efficient selection, it is important to know whether these antibiotics are substrates and/or inducers of efflux transporters. Therefore, we investigated the influence of these antibiotics on drug transporter expression by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction in the induction model cell line LS180. Moreover, we assessed whether ABC transporters influence the growth inhibitory effects of these antibiotics by proliferation assays using Madin-Darby canine kidney II (MDCKII) cells overexpressing the particular transporter. The results obtained indicate that puromycin and G418 are substrates of several ABC transporters, mainly Pgp/ABCB1. In contrast, hygromycin seems to be no good substrate for any of the ABC transporters investigated. Puromycin induced ABCC1/MRP1, whereas G418 suppressed ABCB1/Pgp, at the messenger RNA (mRNA) level. In contrast, hygromycin had no effect on ABC transporter mRNA expressions. In conclusion, this study emphasizes the significance of ABC transporters for the efficacy of selection processes. Consciousness of the results is supposed to guide the molecular biologist to the right choice of adequate experimental conditions for successful selection of genetically engineered eukaryotic cells. PMID:20018165

  18. Photoaffinity labeling demonstrates binding between Ia and antigen on antigen-presenting cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antigen-presenting cells (APCs) bind and present antigens to immunocompetent T lymphocytes in the context of Ia molecules: however, the molecular nature of the immunogenic complexes on the surface of these cells is unknown. They have used radioiodinated photoreactive Beef insulin (BI) derivatized in the B29 position with (n-[4-(4'-azido-3'-[125]iodophenylazo)benzoyl]-3-aminopropyl-n-oxy-succinimide) (B29-AZAP) as antigen to examine the nature of these molecular complexes. The probe was reacted with either of two B hybridoma APCs, TA3 (Ia/sup k/d/) and LB(Ia/sup d/b/) which present insulin on I-A/sup d/ and I-A/sub b/ respectively, to appropriately restricted, BI specific T helper lymphocytes (T/sub H/). Samples were photolyzed, solubilized and then analyzed by SDS-PAGE. Two protein bands of 36-kDa and 27-kDa were specifically labeled on TA3 and LB cells. Treatment of these bands with dithiothreitol or endo-N-β-glycosidase F demonstrates that each is composed of a single glycoprotein. These bands are immunoprecipitable with haplotype specific but not control anti-Ia antibodies. This identifies the labeled bands as the α- and β- subunits of class II MHC antigens. They conclude that a molecular complex may form between Ia and antigen on APCs and that formation of this complex does not require the presence of an antigen specific T/sub H/ cell receptor

  19. Anti-angiogenic action of plasma hyaluronan binding protein in human umbilical vein endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Ji Won; Song, Hyun Seok; Moon, Eun-Joung; Park, Shi-Young; Son, Myung Jin; Jung, Seung Youn; Kim, Ji Tae; Nam, Do-Hyun; Choi-Miura, Nam-Ho; Kim, Kyu-Won; Kim, Yung-Jin

    2006-07-01

    The kringle domain is a triple loop structure present in angiostatin and endostatin. The disulfide bond-linked kringle architectures have been known to be essential for anti-angiogenic activity. Plasma hyaluronan binding protein (PHBP) is a novel serine protease which consists of three epidermal growth factor (EGF) domains, a kringle domain, and a serine protease domain. PHBP can be cleaved autocatalytically to generate activity and is highly expressed in the human blood and liver. To determine the anti-angiogenic activities of PHBP, we purified recombinant mouse PHBP from stable cell line overexpressing PHBP and used protein in vivo and in vitro angiogenesis assays. We found that recombinant PHBP inhibits not only angiogenesis in vivo in chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) assay but also the basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF)-induced proliferation, invasion and tube formation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) in a dose-dependant manner. Moreover, we found that the kringle domain of PHBP was essential for the anti-angiogenic action of PHBP by the deletion mutants. These findings unravel a new function of PHBP as an inhibitor of the proangiogenic phenotype of vascular endothelial cells and demonstrate that the kringle domain of PHBP might be a potent novel inhibitor of activated endothelial cells in vitro and in vivo. PMID:16773202

  20. The characterization and purification of DNA binding proteins present within herpes simplex virus infected cells using monoclonal antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hybridomas secreting monoclonal antibodies against herpes simplex virus (HSV) DNA binding proteins (DBP) have been produced. Five HSV DBP have been characterized according to molecular weight, affinity for DNA, kinetic class and localization within the infected cell. By preparing an immunoadsorbent column from antibody TI8, its specific DBP was purified to apparent homogeneity. The purified DBP retained the ability to bind to DNA. (Author)

  1. Identification of amino acids important for binding of Clostridium perfringens epsilon toxin to host cells and to HAVCR1

    OpenAIRE

    Ivie, Susan E.; McClain, Mark S.

    2012-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens epsilon toxin belongs to the aerolysin-like family of pore-forming toxins and is one of the most potent bacterial toxins known. The epsilon toxin causes fatal enterotoxemia in sheep, goats, and possibly humans. Evidence indicates that the toxin binds to protein receptors including hepatitis A virus cellular receptor 1 (HAVCR1), but the region of the toxin responsible for cell binding has not been identified. In the present study, we identify amino acids within the epsi...

  2. Non-enzymatic glycation of type I collagen diminishes collagen-proteoglycan binding and weakens cell adhesion

    OpenAIRE

    Reigle, Kristin L.; Di Lullo, Gloria; Turner, Kevin R.; Last, Jerold A; Chervoneva, Inna; Birk, David E.; Funderburgh, James L.; Elrod, Elizabeth; Markus W. Germann; Surber, Charles; Sanderson, Ralph D.; San Antonio, James D.

    2008-01-01

    Non-enzymatic glycation of type I collagen occurs in aging and diabetes, and may affect collagen solubility, charge, polymerization, and intermolecular interactions. Proteoglycans1(PGs) bind type I collagen and are proposed to regulate fibril assembly, function, and cell-collagen interactions. Moreover, on the collagen fibril a keratan sulfate (KS) PG binding region overlaps with preferred collagen glycation sites. Thus, we examined the effect of collagen modified by simple glycation on PG-co...

  3. JAB1 regulates unphosphorylated STAT3 DNA-binding activity through protein–protein interaction in human colon cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: •JAB1 interacted with unphosphorylated STAT3 in the nucleus. •JAB1 knockdown tended to increase nuclear STAT3 expression. •JAB1 knockdown significantly decreased unphosphorylated STAT3 DNA-binding activity. •JAB1 knockdown significantly decreased MDR1, NANOG, and VEGF expressions. •Nuclear JAB1, but not nuclear STAT3, correlated with STAT3 DNA-binding activity. -- Abstract: Recent studies have revealed that unphosphorylated STAT3 forms a dimer, translocates to the nucleus, binds to the STAT3 binding site, and activates the transcription of STAT3 target genes, thereby playing an important role in oncogenesis in addition to phosphorylated STAT3. Among signaling steps of unphosphorylated STAT3, nuclear translocation and target DNA-binding are the critical steps for its activation. Therefore, elucidating the regulatory mechanism of these signaling steps of unphosphorylated STAT3 is a potential step in the discovery of a novel cancer drug. However, the mechanism of unphosphorylated STAT3 binding to the promoter of target genes remains unclear. In this study, we focused on Jun activation domain-binding protein 1 (JAB1) as a candidate protein that regulates unphosphorylated STAT3 DNA-binding activity. Initially, we observed that both unphosphorylated STAT3 and JAB1 existed in the nucleus of human colon cancer cell line COLO205 at the basal state (no cytokine stimulation). On the other hand, phosphorylated STAT3 did not exist in the nucleus of COLO205 cells at the basal state. Immunoprecipitation using nuclear extract of COLO205 cells revealed that JAB1 interacted with unphosphorylated STAT3. To investigate the effect of JAB1 on unphosphorylated STAT3 activity, RNAi studies were performed. Although JAB1 knockdown tended to increase nuclear STAT3 expression, it significantly decreased unphosphorylated STAT3 DNA-binding activity. Subsequently, JAB1 knockdown significantly decreased the expression levels of MDR1, NANOG, and VEGF, which are STAT3 target

  4. Activity of neutral endopeptidase and aminopeptidase N in mouse thymic stromal cells which bind double-positive thymocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Small, M; Kaiser, M; Tse, W; Heimfeld, S; Blumberg, S

    1996-04-01

    The activity of two peptidases was determined in immortalized lines of thymic stromal cells. A line of total stromal cells (T-TG-St) was grown from transgenic mouse expressing temperature-sensitive SV40 T antigen under the control of the regulatory elements of the mouse major histocompatibility complex class I gene. From these cells we isolated a subset (DP-TG-St) that binds thymocytes which are mainly CD4+8+. We also assayed a clone of fetal thymic epithelial cells (BA/10) that binds CD4+8+ thymocytes. Both lines of double -positive cell-binding stroma exhibited strong activity of two peptidases, neutral endopeptidase (NEP; EC 3.4.24.11) and aminopeptidase N (APN; EC 3.4.11.2). In contrast, the activity of both enzymes was very low in the total thymic stromal line. Use of the specific inhibitors confirmed that these two enzymes were responsible for the activity observed but also suggested the presence of additional unidentified aminopeptidase(s) in the same stromal cells. The high activity of the two peptidases on stromal cells that bind thymocytes at the double-positive stage raises the possibility that they might contribute to the microenvironment of the developing thymocytes. PMID:8625997

  5. Bacterial cell-cell communication in the host via RRNPP peptide-binding regulators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David ePerez-Pascual

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Human microbiomes are composed of complex and dense bacterial consortia. In these environments, bacteria are able to react quickly to change by coordinating their gene expression at the population level via small signaling molecules. In Gram-positive bacteria, cell-cell communication is mostly mediated by peptides that are released into the extracellular environment. Cell-cell communication based on these peptides is especially widespread in the group Firmicutes, in which they regulate a wide array of biological processes, including functions related to host-microbe interactions. Among the different agents of communication, the RRNPP family of cytoplasmic transcriptional regulators, together with their cognate re-internalized signaling peptides, represents a group of emerging importance. RRNPP members that have been studied so far are found mainly in species of bacilli, streptococci, and enterococci. These bacteria are characterized as both human commensal and pathogenic, and share different niches in the human body with other microorganisms. The goal of this mini-review is to present the current state of research on the biological relevance of RRNPP mechanisms in the context of the host, highlighting their specific roles in commensalism or virulence.

  6. Fluorescently labeled collagen binding proteins allow specific visualization of collagen in tissues and live cell culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krahn, Katy Nash; Bouten, Carlijn V C; van Tuijl, Sjoerd; van Zandvoort, Marc A M J; Merkx, Maarten

    2006-03-15

    Visualization of the formation and orientation of collagen fibers in tissue engineering experiments is crucial for understanding the factors that determine the mechanical properties of tissues. In this study, collagen-specific fluorescent probes were developed using a new approach that takes advantage of the inherent specificity of collagen binding protein domains present in bacterial adhesion proteins (CNA35) and integrins (GST-alpha1I). Both collagen binding domains were obtained as fusion proteins from an Escherichia coli expression system and fluorescently labeled using either amine-reactive succinimide (CNA35) or cysteine-reactive maleimide (GST-alpha1I) dyes. Solid-phase binding assays showed that both protein-based probes are much more specific than dichlorotriazinyl aminofluorescein (DTAF), a fluorescent dye that is currently used to track collagen formation in tissue engineering experiments. The CNA35 probe showed a higher affinity for human collagen type I than did the GST-alpha1I probe (apparent K(d) values of 0.5 and 50 microM, respectively) and showed very little cross-reactivity with noncollagenous extracellular matrix proteins. The CNA35 probe was also superior to both GST-alpha1I and DTAF in visualizing the formation of collagen fibers around live human venous saphena cells. Immunohistological experiments on rat tissue showed colocalization of the CNA35 probe with collagen type I and type III antibodies. The fluorescent probes described here have important advantages over existing methods for visualization of collagen, in particular for monitoring the formation of collagen in live tissue cultures over prolonged time periods. PMID:16476406

  7. Variations in insulin responsiveness in rat fat cells are due to metabolic differences rather than insulin binding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Finn Mølgård; Nilsson, Poul; Sonne, Ole;

    1983-01-01

    Insulin resistance was studied by comparing insulin response and insulin binding in four groups of rats. Glucose metabolism in isolated fat cells from male Wistar rats weighing 340 g was less responsive to a supramaximal dose of insulin than glucose metabolism in fat cells from rats weighing 200 g...... to fat cells. Insulin binding was not correlated to the plasma insulin level which however was reflected in the lipoprotein lipase activity in the adipose tissue. In conclusion, these results indicate that variations in insulin responsiveness in fat cells are due to alterations in cellular metabolism....... Induction of streptozotocin-diabetes in rats weighing 200 g resulted in a marked decrease in the insulin responsiveness of fat cells. Ventromedial hypothalamic lesions of 340 g rats had the opposite effect and restored the insulin responsiveness of fat cells. The responsiveness in the four groups was...

  8. Efficient cell-free production of olfactory receptors: detergent optimization, structure, and ligand binding analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, Liselotte; Graveland-Bikker, Johanna; Steuerwald, Dirk; Vanberghem, Mélanie; Herlihy, Kara; Zhang, Shuguang

    2008-10-14

    High-level production of membrane proteins, particularly of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) in heterologous cell systems encounters a number of difficulties from their inherent hydrophobicity in their transmembrane domains, which frequently cause protein aggregation and cytotoxicity and thus reduce the protein yield. Recent advances in cell-free protein synthesis circumvent those problems to produce membrane proteins with a yield sometimes exceeding the cell-based approach. Here, we report cell-free production of a human olfactory receptor 17-4 (hOR17-4) using the wheat germ extract. Using the simple method, we also successful produced two additional olfactory receptors. To obtain soluble olfactory receptors and to increase yield, we directly added different detergents in varying concentrations to the cell-free reaction. To identify a purification buffer system that maintained the receptor in a nonaggregated form, we developed a method that uses small-volume size-exclusion column chromatography combined with rapid and sensitive dot-blot detection. Different buffer components including salt concentration, various detergents and detergent concentration, and reducing agent and its concentrations were evaluated for their ability to maintain the cell-free produced protein stable and nonaggregated. The purified olfactory receptor displays a typical a alpha-helical CD spectrum. Surface plasmon resonance measurements were used to show binding of a known ligand undecanal to hOR17-4. Our approach to produce a high yield of purified olfactory receptor is a milestone toward obtaining a large quantity of olfactory receptors for designing bionic sensors. Furthermore, this simple approach may be broadly useful not only for other classes of GPCRs but also for other membrane proteins. PMID:18840687

  9. SAOS-2 osteosarcoma cells bind fibroblasts via ICAM-1 and this is increased by tumour necrosis factor-α.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manu S David

    Full Text Available We recently reported exchange of membrane and cytoplasmic markers between SAOS-2 osteosarcoma cells and human gingival fibroblasts (h-GF without comparable exchange of nuclear markers, while similar h-GF exchange was seen for melanoma and ovarian carcinoma cells. This process of "cellular sipping" changes phenotype such that cells sharing markers of both SAOS-2 and h-GF have morphology intermediate to that of either cell population cultured alone, evidencing increased tumour cell diversity without genetic change. TNF-α increases cellular sipping between h-GF and SAOS-2, and we here study binding of SAOS-2 to TNF-α treated h-GF to determine if increased cellular sipping can be accounted for by cytokine stimulated SAOS-2 binding. More SAOS-2 bound h-GF pe-seeded wells than culture plastic alone (p<0.001, and this was increased by h-GF pre-treatment with TNF-α (p<0.001. TNF-α stimulated binding was dose dependent and maximal at 1.16 nM (p<0.05 with no activity below 0.006 nM. SAOS-2 binding to h-GF was independent of serum, while the lipopolysaccharide antagonist Polymyxin B did not affect results, and TNF-α activity was lost on boiling. h-GF binding of SAOS-2 started to increase after 30min TNF-α stimulation and was maximal by 1.5 hr pre-treatment (p<0.001. h-GF retained maximal binding up to 6 hrs after TNF-α stimulation, but this was lost by 18 hrs (p<0.001. FACS analysis demonstrated increased ICAM-1 consistent with the time course of SAOS-2 binding, while antibody against ICAM-1 inhibited SAOS-2 adhesion (p<0.04. Pre-treating SAOS-2 with TNF-α reduced h-GF binding to background levels (p<0.003, and this opposite effect to h-GF cytokine stimulation suggests that the history of cytokine exposure of malignant cells migrating across different microenvironments can influence subsequent interactions with fibroblasts. Since cytokine stimulated binding was comparable in magnitude to earlier reported TNF-α stimulated cellular sipping, we

  10. Analysis of the regulation of fatty acid binding protein 7 expression in human renal carcinoma cell lines

    OpenAIRE

    Sugiyama Takayuki; Teratani Takumi; Takayama Tatsuya; Takaoka Naohisa; Mugiya Soichi; Ozono Seiichiro

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Improving the treatment of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) will depend on the development of better biomarkers for predicting disease progression and aiding the design of appropriate therapies. One such marker may be fatty acid binding protein 7 (FABP7), also known as B-FABP and BLBP, which is expressed normally in radial glial cells of the developing central nervous system and cells of the mammary gland. Melanomas, glioblastomas, and several types of carcinomas, including RCC,...

  11. Controlled surface modification of tissue culture polystyrene for selective cell binding using resilin-inspired polypeptides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Modified tissue culture polystyrene (TCP) surfaces have been fabricated by attachment of recombinant polypeptides based on Drosophila melanogaster resilin and the Anopheles gambiae resilin-like protein. The D. melanogaster polypeptide (Rec-1) was from the first exon of resilin and consisted of 17 very similar repeats of a 15 residue sequence. The A. gambiae polypeptide consisted of 16 repeats of an 11 residue consensus sequence (An16). Polypeptides were attached to the TCP surface through tyrosine-based photo-crosslinking using blue light in combination with (RuII(bpy)3)Cl2 and sodium persulfate. TCP that has been manufactured by mild oxidation has surface phenolic groups that are believed to participate in this crosslinking process. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and contact angle analyses were used to demonstrate polypeptide binding. At higher coating concentrations of Rec-1 and An16, the surface was passivated and fibroblasts no longer attached and spread. At coating concentrations of 1 mg ml−1 for Rec-1 and 0.1 mg ml−1 for An16, where the surface was fully passivated against fibroblast attachment, addition of a cell attachment peptide, cyclo(Arg-Gly-Asp-D-Tyr-Lys) during coating and photo-crosslinking at >0.1 mg ml−1, led to the restoration of fibroblast binding that was dependent on the integrin αV chain. (paper)

  12. Igs Expressed by Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia B Cells Show Limited Binding-Site Structure Variability

    KAUST Repository

    Marcatili, P.

    2013-05-01

    Ag selection has been suggested to play a role in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) pathogenesis, but no large-scale analysis has been performed so far on the structure of the Ag-binding sites (ABSs) of leukemic cell Igs. We sequenced both H and L chain V(D)J rearrangements from 366 CLL patients and modeled their three-dimensional structures. The resulting ABS structures were clustered into a small number of discrete sets, each containing ABSs with similar shapes and physicochemical properties. This structural classification correlates well with other known prognostic factors such as Ig mutation status and recurrent (stereotyped) receptors, but it shows a better prognostic value, at least in the case of one structural cluster for which clinical data were available. These findings suggest, for the first time, to our knowledge, on the basis of a structural analysis of the Ab-binding sites, that selection by a finite quota of antigenic structures operates on most CLL cases, whether mutated or unmutated. Copyright © 2013 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  13. Construction and Characterization of Insect Cell-Derived Influenza VLP: Cell Binding, Fusion, and EGFP Incorporation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Shin Pan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We have constructed virus-like particles (VLPs harboring hemagglutinin (HA, neuraminidase (NA, matrix protein 1 (M1 ,and proton channel protein (M2 using baculovirus as a vector in the SF9 insect cell. The size of the expressed VLP was estimated to be ~100 nm by light scattering experiment and transmission electron microscopy. Recognition of HA on the VLP surface by the HA2-specific monoclonal antibody IIF4 at acidic pH, as probed by surface plasmon resonance, indicated the pH-induced structural rearrangement of HA. Uptake of the particle by A549 mediated by HA-sialylose receptor interaction was visualized by the fluorescent-labeled VLP. The HA-promoted cell-virus fusion activity was illustrated by fluorescence imaging on the Jurkat cells incubated with rhodamine-loaded VLP performed at fusogenic pH. Furthermore, the green fluorescence protein (GFP was fused to NA to produce VLP with a pH-sensitive probe, expanding the use of VLP as an antigen carrier and a tool for viral tracking.

  14. Interactions between ultraviolet light and interleukin-1 on MSH binding in both mouse melanoma and human squamous carcinoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Interactions between beta-melanotropin (MSH), interleukin 1-a (IL-1), and ultraviolet light (UV) were examined in Cloudman S91 mouse melanoma and RHEK human squamous carcinoma cell lines. The following points were established: (1) both cell lines produced IL-1 and their production was stimulated by exposure of the cells to UV; (2) both cell lines possessed high affinity binding sites for MSH, and their ability to bind MSH was modulated by IL-1; (3) IL-1 exhibited both stimulatory and inhibitory effects on MSH binding to Cloudman cells; and (4) the stimulatory effect of IL-1 on MSH binding to melanoma cells was reflected in enhanced cellular responsiveness to MSH regarding tyrosinase activity (E.C. 1.14.18.1) and melanin content. The findings raise the possibility that interactions between keratinocytes and melanocytes may be regulated by IL-1 and MSH, and suggest a possible mechanism for stimulation of cutaneous melanogenesis by solar radiation: enhancement of MSH receptor activity by induction of IL-1

  15. DNA binding, anti-tumour activity and reactivity toward cell thiols of acridin-9-ylalkenoic derivatives

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    O Salem; M Vilkova; J Plsikova; A Grolmusova; M Burikova; M Prokaiova; H Paulikova; J Imrich; M Kozurkova

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, we describe the synthesis, biochemical properties and biological activity of a series of new 9-substituted acridine derivatives with a reactive alkene moiety: 9-[(E)-2-phenylethenyl] acridine (1) and methyl (2E)-3-(acridin-9-yl)-prop-2-enoate (2). The interaction of derivatives 1 and 2 with calf thymus DNA was investigated using UV-Vis, fluorescence and circular dichroism spectroscopy. The binding constants K were estimated as being in the range of 1.9 to 7.1 × 105 M−1, and the percentage of hypochromism was found to be 40–57% (from spectral titration). UV-Vis, fluorescence, and CD measurements indicate that the compounds were effective DNA-intercalating agents. Electrophoretic separation proved that ligands 1 and 2 relaxed topoisomerase I at a concentration of 5 M. Ester 2 was shown to have a stronger cytostatic effect on leukemia cell line L1210 than alkene 1. The incubation of ligands 1 and 2 with the ovarian carcinoma cell line A2780 confirmed their extensive cytotoxic effects, an effect which was particularly pronounced in the case of ligand 2. Cytotoxicity tests against A2780 cells demonstrate that a conjugate of compound 2 with -cysteine (3) is less cytotoxic than compound 2, especially at concentrations greater than 10 M.

  16. Nanog RNA-binding proteins YBX1 and ILF3 affect pluripotency of embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Chuanliang; Xue, Yan; Yang, Guanheng; Yin, Shang; Shi, Wansheng; Cheng, Yan; Yan, Xiaoshuang; Fan, Shuyue; Zhang, Huijun; Zeng, Fanyi

    2016-08-01

    Nanog is a well-known transcription factor that plays a fundamental role in stem cell self-renewal and the maintenance of their pluripotent cell identity. There remains a large data gap with respect to the spectrum of the key pluripotency transcription factors' interaction partners. Limited information is available concerning Nanog-associated RNA-binding proteins (RBPs), and the intrinsic protein-RNA interactions characteristic of the regulatory activities of Nanog. Herein, we used an improved affinity protocol to purify Nanog-interacting RBPs from mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs), and 49 RBPs of Nanog were identified. Among them, the interaction of YBX1 and ILF3 with Nanog mRNA was further confirmed by in vitro assays, such as Western blot, RNA immunoprecipitation (RIP), and ex vivo methods, such as immunofluorescence staining and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH), MS2 in vivo biotin-tagged RNA affinity purification (MS2-BioTRAP). Interestingly, RNAi studies revealed that YBX1 and ILF3 positively affected the expression of Nanog and other pluripotency-related genes. Particularly, downregulation of YBX1 or ILF3 resulted in high expression of mesoderm markers. Thus, a reduction in the expression of YBX1 and ILF3 controls the expression of pluripotency-related genes in ESCs, suggesting their roles in further regulation of the pluripotent state of ESCs. PMID:26289635

  17. Identification of a 48 kDa tubulin or tubulin-like C6/36 mosquito cells protein that binds dengue virus 2 using mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Binding of dengue virus 2 (DENV-2) to C6/36 mosquito cells protein was investigated. A 48 kDa DENV-2-binding C6/36 cells protein (D2BP) was detected in a virus overlay protein-binding assay. The binding occurred only to the C6/36 cells cytosolic protein fraction and it was inhibited by free D2BP. D2BP was shown to bind to DENV-2 E in the far-Western-binding studies and using mass spectrometry (MS) and MS/MS, peptide masses of the D2BP that matched to β-tubulin and α-tubulin chains were identified. These findings suggest that DENV-2 through DENV-2 E binds directly to a 48 kDa tubulin or tubulin-like protein of C6/36 mosquito cells

  18. Spermidine/spermine N-1-acetyltransferase specifically binds to the integrin alpha 9 subunit cytoplasmic domain and enhances cell migration

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, C.; Young, B A; Coleman, C S; Pegg, A E; Sheppard, D

    2004-01-01

    T he integrin alpha9beta1 is expressed on migrating cells, such as leukocytes, and binds to multiple ligands that are present at sites of tissue injury and inflammation. alpha9beta1, like the structurally related integrin alpha4beta1, mediates accelerated cell migration, an effect that depends on the beta cytoplasmic domain. alpha4beta1 enhances migration through reversible binding to the adapter protein, paxillin, but alpha9beta1-dependent migration is paxillin independent. Using yeast two-h...

  19. Identification of an additional class of C3-binding membrane proteins of human peripheral blood leukocytes and cell lines.

    OpenAIRE

    Cole, J L; Housley, G A; Dykman, T R; MacDermott, R P; Atkinson, J P

    1985-01-01

    Proteins binding the third component of complement (C3) were isolated by affinity chromatography from surface-labeled solubilized membranes of human peripheral blood cells and cell lines. The isolated molecules were subjected to NaDodSO4/PAGE, and autoradiographs of these gels indicated that C3-binding proteins could be divided into three groups based on Mr: (i) gp200, an approximately 200,000 Mr molecule previously identified as the C3b/C4b receptor or CR1; (ii) gp140, an approximately 140,0...

  20. Iron Uptake Mediated by Binding of H-Ferritin to the TIM-2 Receptor in Mouse Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Han, Jian; William E. Seaman; Di, Xiumin; Wang, Wei; Willingham, Mark; Torti, Frank M.; Torti, Suzy V.

    2011-01-01

    Ferritin binds specifically and saturably to a variety of cell types, and recently several ferritin receptors have been cloned. TIM-2 is a specific receptor for H ferritin (HFt) in the mouse. TIM-2 is a member of the T cell immunoglobulin and mucin domain containing (TIM) protein family and plays an important role in immunity. The expression of TIM-2 outside of the immune system indicates that this receptor may have broader roles. We tested whether ferritin binding to TIM-2 can serve as an ir...

  1. Analysis of Unconventional Approaches for the Rapid Detection of Surface Lectin Binding Ligands on Human Cell Lines

    OpenAIRE

    Welty, Lily Anne Y.; Heinrich, Eileen L.; Garcia, Karina; Banner, Lisa R.; Summers, Michael L.; Baresi, Larry; Metzenberg, Stan; Coyle-Thompson, Cathy; Oppenheimer, Steven B.

    2006-01-01

    This laboratory has developed and used a novel histochemical assay using derivatized agarose beads for over a decade to examine the surface properties of various cell types. Most recently we have used this assay to examine lectin binding ligands on two human cell types, CCL-220, a colon cancer cell line, and CRL-1459, a non-cancer colon cell line. We found that CCL-220 cells bound specific lectins better than CRL-1459, and this information was used to test for possible differential toxicity o...

  2. Single molecule narrowfield microscopy of protein-DNA binding dynamics in glucose signal transduction of live yeast cells

    CERN Document Server

    Wollman, Adam J M

    2016-01-01

    Single-molecule narrowfield microscopy is a versatile tool to investigate a diverse range of protein dynamics in live cells and has been extensively used in bacteria. Here, we describe how these methods can be extended to larger eukaryotic, yeast cells, which contain sub-cellular compartments. We describe how to obtain single-molecule microscopy data but also how to analyse these data to track and obtain the stoichiometry of molecular complexes diffusing in the cell. We chose glucose mediated signal transduction of live yeast cells as the system to demonstrate these single-molecule techniques as transcriptional regulation is fundamentally a single molecule problem - a single repressor protein binding a single binding site in the genome can dramatically alter behaviour at the whole cell and population level.

  3. Inhibition of 125I-labeled ristocetin binding to Micrococcus luteus cells by the peptides related to bacterial cell wall mucopeptide precursors: quantitative structure-activity relationships

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSAR) of N-Ac amino acids, N-Ac dipeptides, and N-Ac tripeptides in inhibition of 125I-labeled ristocetin binding to Micrococcus luteus cell wall have been developed to probe the details of the binding between ristocetin and N-acetylated peptides. The correlation equations indicate that (1) the binding is stronger for peptides in which the side chain of the C-terminal amino acid has a large molar refractivity (MR) value, (2) the binding is weaker for peptides with polar than for those with nonpolar C-terminal side chains, (3) the N-terminal amino acid in N-Ac dipeptides contributes 12 times that of the C-terminal amino acid to binding affinity, and (4) the interactions between ristocetin and the N-terminal amino acid of N-acetyl tripeptides appear to be much weaker than those with the first two amino acids

  4. Susceptibility of chicken lymphoid cells to infectious bursal disease virus does not correlate with the presence of specific binding sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieper, H; Müller, H

    1996-06-01

    Pathogenic serotype 1 strains of infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) replicate efficiently in lymphoid cells of the bursa of Fabricius of chicken. Lymphoid cells in other organs are not susceptible. Apathogenic serotype 2 strains do not replicate in lymphoid bursa cells or in other lymphoid cells. Chicken embryo fibroblasts (CEF), however, efficiently replicate strains of either serotype. Binding studies showed that strains of both IBDV serotypes bind to lymphoid cells isolated from the bursa, thymus or spleen, indicating that restriction of IBDV replication to lymphoid B cells is not determined by the presence of specific receptor sites. The specificity of binding was demonstrated by saturation and competition experiments. These revealed the presence of different receptors: CEF had receptors common to both serotypes and specific ones for each serotype. Receptor sites common to both serotypes were also present on lymphoid cells; however, additional serotype-specific sites were only demonstrated for the apathogenic serotype 2 strain. Strains of both serotypes specifically bound to proteins with molecular masses of 40 kDa and 46 kDa, exposed on the surface of CEF and lymphoid cells. Competition experiments indicated that these proteins might represent the common receptor sites of IBDV. PMID:8683211

  5. Iron uptake mediated by binding of H-ferritin to the TIM-2 receptor in mouse cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jian; Seaman, William E; Di, Xiumin; Wang, Wei; Willingham, Mark; Torti, Frank M; Torti, Suzy V

    2011-01-01

    Ferritin binds specifically and saturably to a variety of cell types, and recently several ferritin receptors have been cloned. TIM-2 is a specific receptor for H ferritin (HFt) in the mouse. TIM-2 is a member of the T cell immunoglobulin and mucin domain containing (TIM) protein family and plays an important role in immunity. The expression of TIM-2 outside of the immune system indicates that this receptor may have broader roles. We tested whether ferritin binding to TIM-2 can serve as an iron delivery mechanism. TIM-2 was transfected into normal (TCMK-1) mouse kidney cells, where it was appropriately expressed on the cell surface. HFt was labeled with (55)Fe and (55)Fe-HFt was incubated with TIM-2 positive cells or controls. (55)Fe-HFt uptake was observed only in TIM-2 positive cells. HFt uptake was also seen in A20 B cells, which express endogenous TIM-2. TIM-2 levels were not increased by iron chelation. Uptake of (55)Fe-HFt was specific and temperature-dependent. HFt taken up by TIM-2 positive cells transited through the endosome and eventually entered a lysosomal compartment, distinguishing the HFt pathway from that of transferrin, the classical vehicle for cellular iron delivery. Iron delivered following binding of HFt to TIM-2 entered the cytosol and became metabolically available, resulting in increased levels of endogenous intracellular ferritin. We conclude that TIM-2 can function as an iron uptake pathway. PMID:21886823

  6. Relationship between Fc receptors, antigen-binding sites on T and B cells, and H-2 complex-associated determinants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basten, A; Miller, J F; Abraham, R

    1975-03-01

    The relationship between H-2 complex-associated determinants, Fc receptors, and specific antigen-recognition sites on T and B cells was examined by binding and functional assays. The Fc receptor was detected by radiolabeled immune complexes or aggregated human IgG. Both these reagents selectively bound to B cells, not to T cells. When spleen cells, from mice primed to several antigens, were exposed to highly substituted radioactive aggregates, their capacity to transfer both a direct and indirect plaque-forming cell response to these antigens was abrogated. Addition of B cells, but not of T cells, restored responsiveness. Complexed Ig binding to Fc receptors was prevented by pretreatment of mixed lymphoid cell populations with antisera directed against membrane components on the same cell (e.g., H-2) and on other cells (e.g., theta). The lack of specificity of inhibition was thought to be due to the formation on cell surfaces of antigen-antibody complexes which would then attach to the Fc receptor during the incubation precedure. Specific blockade of the Fc receptor during the incubation procedure. Specific blockade of the Fc receptor however occurred when B cells were pretreated with the Fab fragments of anti-H-2 antibody. This was demonstrated autoradiographically and by inhibition of aggregate-induced suicide. The blocking activity of ante-H-2 Fab was removed by absorption with spleen cells from thymectomized irradiated mice but not with thymus cells of appropriate specificity. This suggested that the antibodies involved had specificity for determinants on the B-cell membrane distinct from those coded by the K or D end of the H-2 complex, and either absent from, or poorly represented on, thymus cells. Specific antigen-induced suicide of B cells was achieved simply by incubating the cells with radioactive antigen in the cold. T-cell suicide on the other hand required that the 125I-labeled antigen be presented to the T cells at 37 degrees-C on the surface of

  7. Antibody binding to membrane of cultured melanoma cells by sera of melanoma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canevari, S; Fossati, G; Vezzoni, P; Biguzzi, S; Garcia-Puche, J; Della Porta, G

    1979-02-28

    One hundred and nine sera from 75 patients with malignant melanoma and 69 sera from as many healthy donors were assayed by isotopic antiglobulin technique (IAT) on 2 melanoma cell lines. The same picture of reactivity was observed with patients' and healthy donors' sera, and in both groups 35% of the cases were high responders on 1 line and 21% on the other one. The specificity of the reactions was analyzed by absorption experiments using 12 melanoma sera selected for their high binding activity. Pools of human erythrocytes or leukocytes did not remove, except in 1 case respectively, the activity of the sera, suggesting that it was not directed against alloantigens. Quantitative absorption experiments were done with the 2 melanoma lines and with 1 colon carcinoma line. The results, evaluated on the basis of absorption capacity per cell, indicate that the 2 melanoma lines had a similar amount of shared antigens, whereas the colon line was also effective in absorbing out the serum activity, but less frequently and less efficiently. Further experiments performed to analyze the influence of culturing the target cells in presence of fetal bovine serum (FBS), showed that the activity of sera was removed, at various degrees for different sera, by absorption with free FBS, with FBS coupled to Sepharose 4B, and with normal leukocytes cultured overnight with 10% FBS. The same positive melanoma sera became negative when assayed on the same melanoma line cultured in gamma-globulin-depleted human AB serum. In conclusion, in our experimental conditions, the activity of melanoma sera seems mostly directed against components of FBS absorbed on cell membrane during culturing. PMID:87047

  8. Determination of Mother Centriole Maturation in CPAP-Depleted Cells Using the Ninein Antibody

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Miseon; Rhee, Kunsoo

    2015-01-01

    Background Mutations in centrosomal protein genes have been identified in a number of genetic diseases in brain development, including microcephaly. Centrosomal P4.1-associated protein (CPAP) is one of the causal genes implicated in primary microcephaly. We previously proposed that CPAP is essential for mother centriole maturation during mitosis. Methods We immunostained CPAP-depleted cells using the ninein antibody, which selectively detects subdistal appendages in mature mother centrioles. ...

  9. Cell surface binding and uptake of arginine- and lysine-rich penetratin peptides in absence and presence of proteoglycans

    KAUST Repository

    Åmand, Helene L.

    2012-11-01

    Cell surface proteoglycans (PGs) appear to promote uptake of arginine-rich cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs), but their exact functions are unclear. To address if there is specificity in the interactions of arginines and PGs leading to improved internalization, we used flow cytometry to examine uptake in relation to cell surface binding for penetratin and two arginine/lysine substituted variants (PenArg and PenLys) in wildtype CHO-K1 and PG-deficient A745 cells. All peptides were more efficiently internalized into CHO-K1 than into A745, but their cell surface binding was independent of cell type. Thus, PGs promote internalization of cationic peptides, irrespective of the chemical nature of their positive charges. Uptake of each peptide was linearly dependent on its cell surface binding, and affinity is thus important for efficiency. However, the gradients of these linear dependencies varied significantly. Thus each peptide\\'s ability to stimulate uptake once bound to the cell surface is reliant on formation of specific uptake-promoting interactions. Heparin affinity chromatography and clustering experiments showed that penetratin and PenArg binding to sulfated sugars is stabilized by hydrophobic interactions and result in clustering, whereas PenLys only interacts through electrostatic attraction. This may have implications for the molecular mechanisms behind arginine-specific uptake stimulation as penetratin and PenArg are more efficiently internalized than PenLys upon interaction with PGs. However, PenArg is also least affected by removal of PGs. This indicates that an increased arginine content not only improve PG-dependent uptake but also that PenArg is more adaptable as it can use several portals of entry into the cell. © 2012 Elsevier B.V.

  10. Deciphering the roles of acyl-CoA-binding proteins in plant cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lung, Shiu-Cheung; Chye, Mee-Len

    2016-09-01

    Lipid trafficking is vital for metabolite exchange and signal communications between organelles and endomembranes. Acyl-CoA-binding proteins (ACBPs) are involved in the intracellular transport, protection, and pool formation of acyl-CoA esters, which are important intermediates and regulators in lipid metabolism and cellular signaling. In this review, we highlight recent advances in our understanding of plant ACBP families from a cellular and developmental perspective. Plant ACBPs have been extensively studied in Arabidopsis thaliana (a dicot) and to a lesser extent in Oryza sativa (a monocot). Thus far, they have been detected in the plasma membrane, vesicles, endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi apparatus, apoplast, cytosol, nuclear periphery, and peroxisomes. In combination with biochemical and molecular genetic tools, the widespread subcellular distribution of respective ACBP members has been explicitly linked to their functions in lipid metabolism during development and in response to stresses. At the cellular level, strong expression of specific ACBP homologs in specialized cells, such as embryos, stem epidermis, guard cells, male gametophytes, and phloem sap, is of relevance to their corresponding distinct roles in organ development and stress responses. Other interesting patterns in their subcellular localization and spatial expression that prompt new directions in future investigations are discussed. PMID:26340904

  11. Binding of cetuximab to the EGFRvIII deletion mutant and its biological consequences in malignant glioma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: Despite the clinical use of cetuximab, a chimeric antibody against EGFR, little is known regarding its interaction with EGFRvIII, a frequently expressed deletion mutant of EGFR. Therefore, we investigated the interaction and the functional consequences of cetuximab treatment on glioma cells stably expressing EGFRvIII. Materials and methods: The human glioma cell line U373 genetically modified to express EGFRvIII was used to measure the binding of cetuximab and its internalization using flow cytometry and confocal microscopy. Proliferation and cell survival were analyzed by cell growth and clonogenic survival assays. Results: Cetuximab is able to bind to EGFRvIII and causes an internalization of the receptor and decreases its expression levels. Furthermore, in contrast to EGF, cetuximab was able to activate EGFRvIII which was evidenced by multiple phosphorylation sites and its downstream signaling targets. Despite this activation, the growth rate and the radiosensitivity of the EGFRvIII-expressing glioma cells were not modulated. Conclusions: Cetuximab binds to EGFRvIII and leads to the initial activation, internalization and subsequent downregulation of EGFRvIII, but it does not seem to modulate the proliferation or radiosensitivity of EGFRvIII-expressing glioma cells. Thus, approaches to treat EGFRvIII-expressing glioma cells should be evaluated more carefully.

  12. Idas, a novel phylogenetically conserved geminin-related protein, binds to geminin and is required for cell cycle progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pefani, Dafni-Eleutheria; Dimaki, Maria; Spella, Magda; Karantzelis, Nickolas; Mitsiki, Eirini; Kyrousi, Christina; Symeonidou, Ioanna-Eleni; Perrakis, Anastassis; Taraviras, Stavros; Lygerou, Zoi

    2011-07-01

    Development and homeostasis of multicellular organisms relies on an intricate balance between cell proliferation and differentiation. Geminin regulates the cell cycle by directly binding and inhibiting the DNA replication licensing factor Cdt1. Geminin also interacts with transcriptional regulators of differentiation and chromatin remodelling factors, and its balanced interactions are implicated in proliferation-differentiation decisions during development. Here, we describe Idas (Idas being a cousin of the Gemini in Ancient Greek Mythology), a previously uncharacterised coiled-coil protein related to Geminin. We show that human Idas localizes to the nucleus, forms a complex with Geminin both in cells and in vitro through coiled-coil mediated interactions, and can change Geminin subcellular localization. Idas does not associate with Cdt1 and prevents Geminin from binding to Cdt1 in vitro. Idas depletion from cells affects cell cycle progression; cells accumulate in S phase and are unable to efficiently progress to mitosis. Idas protein levels decrease in anaphase, whereas its overexpression causes mitotic defects. During development, we show that Idas exhibits high level expression in the choroid plexus and the cortical hem of the mouse telencephalon. Our data highlight Idas as a novel Geminin binding partner, implicated in cell cycle progression, and a putative regulator of proliferation-differentiation decisions during development. PMID:21543332

  13. Microphysiometry Studies of Rapid Binding of Insulin-Like Growth Factor I by Parental and Transfected Mammary Epithelial Cell Lines

    OpenAIRE

    Robinson, Rose Marie

    1998-01-01

    Breast cancer is a leading cause of cancer death of women in the U.S. today. Members of the family of insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) are proposed to play a major role in the development and subsequent uncontrolled proliferation of breast cancer cells. Insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) is known to be a potent mitogen for mammary epithelial cells. IGF-I acts by binding to cell surface receptors, thereby stimulating a cascade of events leading to cell division. In the interest of inte...

  14. RAINBOW TROUT ANDROGEN RECEPTOR ALPHA AND THE HUMAN ANDROGEN RECEPTOR: COMPARISONS IN THE COS WHOLE CELL BINDING ASSAY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rainbow Trout Androgen Receptor Alpha And Human Androgen Receptor: Comparisons in the COS Whole Cell Binding Assay Mary C. Cardon, L. Earl Gray, Jr. and Vickie S. WilsonU.S. Environmental Protection Agency, ORD, NHEERL, Reproductive Toxicology Division, Research Triangle...

  15. BINDING OF STEROIDS AND ENVIRONMENTAL CHEMICALS TO THE RAINBOW TROUT ANDROGEN RECEPTOR ALPHA EXPRESSED IN COS CELLS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binding of Steroids and Environmental Chemicals to the Rainbow Trout Androgen Receptor Alpha Expressed in COS Cells. Mary C. Cardon, L. Earl Gray. Jr., Phillip C. Hartig and Vickie S. Wilson U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, ORD, NHEERL, Reproductive Toxicology...

  16. Analysis of Swine Leukocyte Antigen Peptide Binding Profiles and the Identification of T cell Epitopes by Tetramer Staining

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Lasse Eggers

    of the specific CTL response elicited as a result of immunization against foot-and-mouth-disease virus (FMDV) and swine influenza A virus. These studies resulted in the identification of T cell epitopes from both viruses. As SLA:peptide binding data accumulates in these and similar studies, it becomes possible...

  17. Lamellipodial tension, not integrin/ligand binding, is the crucial factor to realise integrin activation and cell migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulte, Carsten; Ferraris, Gian Maria Sarra; Oldani, Amanda; Galluzzi, Massimiliano; Podestà, Alessandro; Puricelli, Luca; de Lorenzi, Valentina; Lenardi, Cristina; Milani, Paolo; Sidenius, Nicolai

    2016-01-01

    The molecular clutch (MC) model proposes that actomyosin-driven force transmission permits integrin-dependent cell migration. To investigate the MC, we introduced diverse talin (TLN) and integrin variants into Flp-In™ T-Rex™ HEK293 cells stably expressing uPAR. Vitronectin variants served as substrate providing uPAR-mediated cell adhesion and optionally integrin binding. This particular system allowed us to selectively analyse key MC proteins and interactions, effectively from the extracellular matrix substrate to intracellular f-actin, and to therewith study mechanobiological aspects of MC engagement also uncoupled from integrin/ligand binding. With this experimental approach, we found that for the initial PIP2-dependent membrane/TLN/f-actin linkage and persistent lamellipodia formation the C-terminal TLN actin binding site (ABS) is dispensable. The establishment of an adequate MC-mediated lamellipodial tension instead depends predominantly on the coupling of this C-terminal TLN ABS to the actomyosin-driven retrograde actin flow force. This lamellipodial tension is crucial for full integrin activation eventually determining integrin-dependent cell migration. In the integrin/ligand-independent condition the frictional membrane resistance participates to these processes. Integrin/ligand binding can also contribute but is not necessarily required. PMID:26616200

  18. Mannose-binding lectin variant alleles and HLA-DR4 alleles are associated with giant cell arteritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Soren; Baslund, Bo; Madsen, Hans Ole;

    2002-01-01

    To determine whether variant alleles of the mannose-binding lectin (MBL) gene causing low serum concentrations of MBL and/or polymorphisms of HLA-DRB1 are associated with increased susceptibility to polymyalgia rheumatica (PMR) and giant cell arteritis (GCA) or particular clinical phenotypes of PMR/GCA....

  19. A novel cell binding site in the coiled‐coil domain of laminin involved in capillary morphogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sanz, Laura; García-Bermejo, Laura; Blanco, Francisco J;

    2003-01-01

    Recently, we reported the isolation and characterization of an anti‐laminin antibody that modulates the extracellular matrix‐dependent morphogenesis of endothelial cells. Here we use this antibody to precisely map the binding site responsible for mediating this biologically important interaction....

  20. Targeting the Cryptococcus neoformans var. grubii Cell Wall Using Lectins: Study of the Carbohydrate-Binding Domain

    OpenAIRE

    Pamella de Brito Ximenes; Eduardo Isidoro Carneiro Beltrão; Danielle Patrícia Cerqueira Macêdo; Maria Daniela Silva Buonafina; Reginaldo Gonçalves de Lima-Neto; Rejane Pereira Neves

    2015-01-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans var. grubii is considered to be the major cause of cryptococcosis in immunosuppressed patients. Understanding cell wall glycoproteins using lectins is of medical interest and can contribute to specific therapy. The aim of this study was to evaluate the carbohydrates on the cell wall of Cryptococcus neoformans var. grubii clinical isolates, using a fluorescein isothiocyanate-lectin binding protocol. Thirty yeast strains stocked in the culture collection were cultivated ...

  1. Effects of Vitamin D-binding Protein-derived Macrophage-activating Factor on Human Breast Cancer Cells

    OpenAIRE

    S. Pacini; T.Punzi; G.Morucci; Gulisano, M; Ruggiero, M

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Searching for additional therapeutic tools to fight breast cancer, we investigated the effects of vitamin D-binding protein-derived macrophage activating factor (DBP-MAF, also known as GcMAF) on a human breast cancer cell line (MCF-7). MATERIALS AND METHODS: The effects of DBP-MAF on proliferation, morphology, vimentin expression and angiogenesis were studied by cell proliferation assay, phase-contrast microscopy, immunohistochemistry and western blotting, and chorioallantoic m...

  2. The SH3 regulatory domain of the hematopoietic cell kinase Hck binds ELMO via its polyproline motif

    OpenAIRE

    Awad, Rida; Marion, Sévajol; Isabel, Ayala; Anne, Chouquet; Philippe, Frachet; Pierre, Gans; Jean-Baptiste, Reiser; Jean-Philippe, Kleman

    2015-01-01

    Eukaryotic EnguLfment and cell MOtility (ELMO) proteins form an evolutionary conserved family of regulators involved in small GTPase dependent actin remodeling processes that regulates the guanine exchange factor activity of some of the Downstream Of CrK (DOCK) family members. Gathered data strongly suggest that DOCK activation by ELMO and the subsequent signaling result from a subtle balance in the binding of partners to ELMO. Among its putative upward modulators, the Hematopoietic cell kina...

  3. Interaction of Insulin-like Growth Factor-binding Protein-3 and BAX in Mitochondria Promotes Male Germ Cell Apoptosis

    OpenAIRE

    Jia, Yue; Lee, Kuk-Wha; Swerdloff, Ronald; Hwang, David; Cobb, Laura J.; Sinha Hikim, Amiya; Lue, Yan He; Cohen, Pinchas; Wang, Christina

    2009-01-01

    Germ cell apoptosis is crucial for spermatogenesis and can be triggered by various stimuli, including intratesticular hormone deprivation. This study proposes a role for insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3) in male germ cell apoptosis. Groups of adult Sprague-Dawley male rats received one of the following treatments for 5 days: (i) daily intratesticular (IT) injections with saline (control); (ii) a single subcutaneous injection of the gonadotropin-releasing hormone antagonis...

  4. The membrane-induced proton motive force influences the metal binding ability of Bacillus subtilis cell walls.

    OpenAIRE

    Urrutia Mera, M; Kemper, M; Doyle, R.; Beveridge, T. J.

    1992-01-01

    Bacillus subtilis 168 is a gram-positive bacterium whose cell wall contains the highly electronegative polymers peptidoglycan (chemotype A1 gamma) and glycerol-based teichoic acid to produce a surface with a net negative charge with high metal binding capacity. During metabolism, a membrane-induced proton motive force continuously pumps protons into the wall fabric. As a result, a competition between protons and metal ions for anionic wall sites occurs, and less metal is bound in living cells...

  5. MicroRNA-137 Targets Carboxyl-terminal Binding Protein 1 in Melanoma Cell Lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Deng, Hui Deng, Feng Bi, Jing Liu, Lynn T. Bemis, David Norris, Xiao-Jing Wang, Qinghong Zhang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Carboxyl-terminal binding protein 1 (CtBP1 is a transcriptional co-repressor that represses expression of various tumor suppressor genes. In the present study, we identified miR-137 as a potential regulator of CtBP1 expression in melanoma cells. Expression of miR-137 in melanoma cell lines was found to inversely correlate with CtBP1 levels. Target Scan predicted a putative site for miR-137 within the CtBP1 3′ untranslated region (3′UTR at nt 710-716, which is highly conserved across species. To explore the mechanism of miR-137 targeting CtBP1, we performed an Argonaute 2 (Ago2-pull down assay, and miR-137 was identified in complex with CtBP1 mRNA. miR-137 suppressed CtBP1 3' UTR luciferase-reporter activity, and this effect was lost with deletion of the putative 3' UTR target-site. Consistent with the results of the reporter assay, ectopic expression of miR-137 reduced expression levels of CtBP1. Furthermore, expression of miR-137 increased the immediate downstream effectors of CtBP1, such as E-cadherin and Bax. The human miR-137 gene is located at chromosome 1p22, which has previously been determined to be a susceptive region for melanoma. This study suggests miR-137 may act as a tumor suppressor by directly targeting CtBP1 to inhibit epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT and inducing apoptosis of melanoma cells, thus illustrating a functional link between miR-137 and CtBP1 in melanoma development.

  6. IMPACT OF MANNOSE-BINDING PROTEIN GENE POLYMORPHISMS IN OMANI SICKLE CELL DISEASE PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathew Zachariah

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Our objective was to study mannose binding protein (MBP polymorphisms in exonic and promoter region and correlate associated infections and vasoocculsive (VOC episodes, since MBP plays an important role in innate immunity by activating the complement system. Methods: We studied the genetic polymorphisms in the Exon 1 (alleles A/O and promoter region (alleles Y/X; H/L, P/Q of the MBL2 gene, in sickle cell disease (SCD patients as increased incidence of infections is seen in these patients. A PCR-based, targeted genomic DNA sequencing of MBL2 was used to study 68 SCD Omani patients and 44 controls (voluntary blood donors. Results: The observed frequencies of MBL2 promoter polymorphism (-221, Y/X were 44.4% and 20.5% for the heterozygous genotype Y/X and 3.2% and 2.2% for the homozygous (X/X respectively between SCD patients and controls. MBL2 Exon1 gene mutations were 29.4% and 50% for the heterozygous genotype A/O and 5.9% and 6.8% respectively for the homozygous (O/O genotype between SCD patients and controls. The distribution of variant MBL2 polymorphisms did not show any correlation in SCD patients with or without vasoocculsive crisis (VOC attacks (p=0.162; OR-0.486; CI=0.177 -1.33, however, it was correlated with infections (p=0.0162; OR-3.55; CI 1.25-10.04. Conclusions: Although the frequency of the genotypes and haplotypes of MBL2 in SCD patients did not differ from controls, overall in the SCD patient cohort the increased representation of variant alleles was significantly correlated with infections (p<0.05. However, these variant MBL2 polymorphisms did not seem to play a significant role in the VOC episodes in this SCD cohort. Keywords: Mannose-binding lectin, polymorphism, promoter, Sickle cell disease, MBL2, MBP

  7. Decreasing methylation of pectin caused by nitric oxide leads to higher aluminium binding in cell walls and greater aluminium sensitivity of wheat roots

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Chengliang; Lu, Lingli; Yu, Yan; Liu, Lijuan; Hu, Yan; Ye, Yiquan; Jin, Chongwei; Lin, Xianyong

    2015-01-01

    Highlight Aluminium-induced nitric oxide production enhances the aluminium sensitivity of wheat by decreasing pectin methylation of root cell-wall pectin, resulting in greater aluminium binding in root cell walls.

  8. Second Intron of Mouse Nestin Gene Directs its Expression in Pluripotent Embryonic Carcinoma Cells through POU Factor Binding Site

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi-Gang JIN; Li LIU; Hua ZHONG; Ke-Jing ZHANG; Yong-Feng CHEN; Wei BIAN; Le-Ping CHENG; Nai-He JING

    2006-01-01

    Nestin, an intermediate filament protein, is expressed in the neural stem cells of the developing central nervous system. This tissue-specific expression is driven by the neural stem cell-specific enhancer in the second intron of the nestin gene. In this study, we showed that the mouse nestin gene was expressed in pluripotent embryonic carcinoma (EC) P19 and F9 cells, not in the differentiated cell types. This cell typespecific expression was conferred by the enhancer in the second intron. Mutation of the conserved POU factor-binding site in the enhancer abolished the reporter gene expression in EC cells. Oct4, a Class V POU factor, was found to be coexpressed with nestin in EC cells. Electrophoretic mobility-shift assays and supershift assays showed that a unique protein-DNA complex was formed specifically with nuclear extracts of EC cells, and Oct4 protein was included. Together, these results suggest the functional relevance between the conserved POU factor-binding site and the expression of the nestin gene in pluripotent EC cells.

  9. Steroid hormone modulation of 3H-prostaglanding E1 binding to bovine corpus leteum cell membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, C V

    1975-04-01

    The specific binding of 3H-prostaglandin E1 (3H-PGE1) to bovine corpus luteum cell membranes was not affected by cholesterol or various progestins at concentrations of up to 9.0x10-minus-6M. At concentrations above 2.5 x 10-minus-6M; estrone, 17beta-estradiol (but not 17alpha-estradiol or 17beta-estradiol glucuronide), estroil, equilin, D-equilenin, 17-ethynyl estradiol, diethylstilbestrol, cortisol, corticosterone, deoxycorticosterone and aldosterone inhibited specific binding of 3H-PGE1. On the other hand, testosterone and dihydrotestosterone (DHT) (but not androstenedione) significantly enhanced 3H-PGE1 binding. These findings permitted the following correlations between steroid structure and modulation of 3H-PGE1 binding: steroids with a free phenolic ring and a 17beta-hydroxyl or 17-keto group or C-21 steroids with a C-20 ketone and a C-21 hydroxy group decrease, whereas C-19 steroids with a C-17 hydroxy group enhance specific binding of 3H-PGE1. PGE receptors are heterogeneous with respect to affinity for 3H-PGE1. The steroids that decreased 3H-PGE1 binding caused a lowering to a complete loss of low affinity PGE receptors. Steroids that increased 3H-PGE1 binding caused appearance of new low affinity PGE receptors. Association rate constants for 3H-PGE1 binding were decreased by 17beta-estradiol (61%) and increased by DHT (59%). PMID:168618

  10. Specific binding of 125I-rErythropoietin to Friend polycythemia virus-transformed erythroleukemia cells purified by centrifugal elutriation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have used countercurrent centrifugal elutriation (CCE) to determine the distribution of cells with respect to cell volume and buoyant density for an erythroleukemia cell line (JG6) transformed by the polycythemia strain of Friend virus (FV-P), and to determine the effect of inducing the cells to differentiate with dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) on this distribution. CCE made it possible to obtain suspensions of modal JG6 populations virtually free of dead cells and uniform with respect to volume and buoyant density. These modal populations were assayed for specific binding of erythropoietin (Epo). Between 500 and 550 Epo receptors per cell were detected. These belonged to a single class having a dissociation constant of 0.36 nM. DMSO induction of differentiation of the JG6 cells had no effect on the number of Epo receptors expressed

  11. Mitotic protein kinase CDK1 phosphorylation of mRNA translation regulator 4E-BP1 Ser83 may contribute to cell transformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Velasquez, Celestino; Cheng, Erdong; Shuda, Masahiro; Lee-Oesterreich, Paula J.; Pogge von Strandmann, Lisa; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Jacobs, Jon M.; Moore, Patrick S.; Chang, Yuan

    2016-07-26

    mTOR-directed 4E-BP1 phosphorylation promotes cap-dependent translation and tumorigen-esis. During mitosis, CDK1 substitutes for mTOR and fully phosphorylates 4E-BP1 at canoni-cal as well a non-canonical S83 site resulting in a mitosis-specific hyperphosphorylated δ isoform. Colocalization studies with a phospho-S83 specific antibody indicate that 4E-BP1 S83 phosphorylation accumulates at centrosomes during prophase, peaks at metaphase, and decreases through telophase. While S83 phosphorylation of 4E-BP1 does not affect in vitro cap-dependent translation, nor eIF4G/4E-BP1 cap-binding, expression of an alanine substitution mutant 4E-BP1.S83A partially reverses rodent cell transformation induced by Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCV) small T (sT) antigen viral oncoprotein. In contrast to inhibitory mTOR 4E-BP1 phosphorylation, these findings suggest that mitotic CDK1-directed phosphorylation of δ-4E-BP1 may yield a gain-of-function, distinct from translation regulation, that may be important in tumorigenesis and mitotic centrosome function.

  12. Mitotic protein kinase CDK1 phosphorylation of mRNA translation regulator 4E-BP1 Ser83 may contribute to cell transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velásquez, Celestino; Cheng, Erdong; Shuda, Masahiro; Lee-Oesterreich, Paula J; Pogge von Strandmann, Lisa; Gritsenko, Marina A; Jacobs, Jon M; Moore, Patrick S; Chang, Yuan

    2016-07-26

    Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR)-directed eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E-binding protein 1 (4E-BP1) phosphorylation promotes cap-dependent translation and tumorigenesis. During mitosis, cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (CDK1) substitutes for mTOR and fully phosphorylates 4E-BP1 at canonical sites (T37, T46, S65, and T70) and the noncanonical S83 site, resulting in a mitosis-specific hyperphosphorylated δ isoform. Colocalization studies with a phospho-S83 specific antibody indicate that 4E-BP1 S83 phosphorylation accumulates at centrosomes during prophase, peaks at metaphase, and decreases through telophase. Although S83 phosphorylation of 4E-BP1 does not affect general cap-dependent translation, expression of an alanine substitution mutant 4E-BP1.S83A partially reverses rodent cell transformation induced by Merkel cell polyomavirus small T antigen viral oncoprotein. In contrast to inhibitory mTOR 4E-BP1 phosphorylation, these findings suggest that mitotic CDK1-directed phosphorylation of δ-4E-BP1 may yield a gain of function, distinct from translation regulation, that may be important in tumorigenesis and mitotic centrosome function. PMID:27402756

  13. Identification of conserved, centrosome-targeting ASH domains in TRAPPII complex subunits and TRAPPC8

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, Kenneth Bødtker; Morthorst, Stine Kjær; Christensen, Søren Tvorup;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Assembly of primary cilia relies on vesicular trafficking towards the cilium base and intraflagellar transport (IFT) between the base and distal tip of the cilium. Recent studies have identified several key regulators of these processes, including Rab GTPases such as Rab8 and Rab11, the...... exact molecular mechanisms by which these proteins interact and target to the basal body to promote ciliogenesis are not fully understood. RESULTS: We surveyed the human proteome for novel ASPM, SPD-2, Hydin (ASH) domain-containing proteins. We identified the TRAPP complex subunits TRAPPC8, -9, -10, -11...... domains confer targeting to the centrosome and cilia, and that TRAPPC8 has cilia-related functions. Further, we propose that the yeast TRAPPII complex and its mammalian counterpart are evolutionarily related to the bacterial periplasmic trafficking chaperone PapD of the usher pili assembly machinery....

  14. Clearance and binding of radiolabeled glycoproteins by cells of the murine mononuclear phagocyte system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The clearance and binding of radiolabeled lactoferrin and fast α2-macroglobulin were studied. Both glycoproteins cleared rapidly following intravenous injection in mice, and both bound specifically to discrete receptors on murine peritoneal macrophages. The simultaneous presence of excess, unlabeled ligands specific for receptors recognizing terminal fucose, mannose, N-acetylglucosamine or galactose residues did not inhibit the clearance or binding of either lactoferrin or fast-α2M. The clearance and binding of enzymatically defucosylated lactoferrin was indistinguishable from native lactoferrin, indicating that terminal α(1-3)-linked fucose on lactoferrin is not necessary for receptor recognition. The clearance and binding of two fast -α2M forms, α2M-trypsin and α2M-MeNH2 cross compete with each other. Saturation binding studies indicated that the total binding of mannosyl -BSA, fusocyl-BSA, and N-acetylglucosaminyl-BSA to macrophages activated by BCG was approximately 15% of the levels observed with inflammatory macrophages elicited by thioglycollate broth. Cross-competition binding studies demonstrated a common surface receptor mediated binding of all three neoglycoprotein ligands and was identical to the receptor on mononuclear phagocytes that binds mannosyl- and N-acetylglucosaminyl-terminated glycoproteins. These results suggest that difference between discrete states of macrophage function may be correlated with selective changes in levels of the surface receptor for mannose-containing glycoproteins

  15. Some characteristics of 3H-dihydroalprenolol binding to intact normal granulocytes, lymphocytes and membrane preparations of these cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    3H-Dihydroalprenolol (3H-DHA) is a well-known ligand which is used to characterize β-adrenergic receptors on different cell types. In asthma research, circulating blood cells, i.e. granulocytes or lymphocytes, are often used as in-vitro models to study βreceptor function. Most of the studies to date have used rather crude membrane preparations. We therefore compared some 3H-DHA binding characteristics of normal intact granulocytes and lymphocytes and of crude and partly purified membrane preparations of these cells. In a separate series of experiments, we investigated whether 3H-DHA binding to subcellular fragments besides plasma membranes could occur. (author)

  16. Cytotoxic Effects of Native and Recombinant Frutalin, a Plant Galactose-Binding Lectin, on HeLa Cervical Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla Oliveira

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Frutalin is the α-D-galactose-binding lectin isolated from breadfruit seeds. Frutalin was obtained from two different sources: native frutalin was purified from its natural origin, and recombinant frutalin was produced and purified from Pichia pastoris. This work aimed to study and compare the effect of native and recombinant frutalin on HeLa cervical cancer cells proliferation and apoptosis. Furthermore, the interaction between frutalin and the HeLa cells was investigated by confocal microscopy. Despite having different carbohydrate-binding affinities, native and recombinant frutalin showed an identical magnitude of cytotoxicity on HeLa cells growth (IC50~100 μg/mL and equally induced cell apoptosis. The interaction studies showed that both lectins were rapidly internalised and targeted to HeLa cell's nucleus. Altogether, these results indicate that frutalin action is not dependent on its sugar-binding properties. This study provides important information about the bioactivity of frutalin and contributes to the understanding of the plant lectins cytotoxic activity.

  17. 177Lu-DTPA-BIS-BIOTIN Binding of Octreotide-dextran-avidinated PANC-1 Cell Lines in Vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tyr3-octreotide, dextran-40 and avidin were used to prepare octreotide-dextran-avidin (TOC-Dx40-Av). DTPA-BIS-BIOTIN was labelled with 177Lu. The in vitro somatostatin receptor binding study was carried out by pretargeted method using TOC-Dx40-Av and 177Lu-DTPA-BIS-BIOTIN. The 24 well cell culture plates were prepared with PANC-1 cell monolayer and then incubated with TOC-Dx40-Av. After two washed with PBS, the cells were incubated with different concentration of 177Lu-DTPA-BIS-BIOTIN (48.8 ∼ 391 pmol). Cells uptake was evaluated with γ counter. The results showed that the chemical purity of TOC-Dx40-Av was over 99%. The results also showed that TOC-Dx40-Av remained high receptor binding affinity to somatostatin receptor which indicated that TOC- Dx40-Av could bind to 177Lu-DTPA-BIS-BIOTIN with the molar ratio of 1 : 1 on the cell surface. (authors)

  18. Hemagglutinin of influenza A virus binds specifically to cell surface nucleolin and plays a role in virus internalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Che-Man; Chu, Hin; Zhang, Anna Jinxia; Leung, Lai-Han; Sze, Kong-Hung; Kao, Richard Yi-Tsun; Chik, Kenn Ka-Heng; To, Kelvin Kai-Wang; Chan, Jasper Fuk-Woo; Chen, Honglin; Jin, Dong-Yan; Liu, Liang; Yuen, Kwok-Yung

    2016-07-01

    The hemagglutinin (HA) protein of influenza A virus initiates cell entry by binding to sialic acids on target cells. In the current study, we demonstrated that in addition to sialic acids, influenza A/Puerto Rico/8/34 H1N1 (PR8) virus HA specifically binds to cell surface nucleolin (NCL). The interaction between HA and NCL was initially revealed with virus overlay protein binding assay (VOPBA) and subsequently verified with co-immunoprecipitation. Importantly, inhibiting cell surface NCL with NCL antibody, blocking PR8 viruses with purified NCL protein, or depleting endogenous NCL with siRNA all substantially reduced influenza virus internalization. We further demonstrated that NCL was a conserved cellular factor required for the entry of multiple influenza A viruses, including H1N1, H3N2, H5N1, and H7N9. Overall, our findings identified a novel role of NCL in influenza virus life cycle and established NCL as one of the host cell surface proteins for the entry of influenza A virus. PMID:27085069

  19. Rotavirus NSP4 is secreted from infected cells as an oligomeric lipoprotein and binds to glycosaminoglycans on the surface of non-infected cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Didsbury Alicia

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nonstructural glycoprotein 4 (NSP4 encoded by rotavirus is the only viral protein currently believed to function as an enterotoxin. NSP4 is synthesized as an intracellular transmembrane glycoprotein and as such is essential for virus assembly. Infection of polarized Caco-2 cells with rotavirus also results in the secretion of glycosylated NSP4 apparently in a soluble form despite retention of its transmembrane domain. We have examined the structure, solubility and cell-binding properties of this secreted form of NSP4 to further understand the biochemical basis for its enterotoxic function. We show here that NSP4 is secreted as discrete detergent-sensitive oligomers in a complex with phospholipids and demonstrate that this secreted form of NSP4 can bind to glycosaminoglycans present on the surface of a range of different cell types. Methods NSP4 was purified from the medium of infected cells after ultracentrifugation and ultrafiltration by successive lectin-affinity and ion exchange chromatography. Oligomerisation of NSP4 was examined by density gradient centrifugation and chemical crosslinking and the lipid content was assessed by analytical thin layer chromatography and flame ionization detection. Binding of NSP4 to various cell lines was measured using a flow cytometric-based assay. Results Secreted NSP4 formed oligomers that contained phospholipid but dissociated to a dimeric species in the presence of non-ionic detergent. The purified glycoprotein binds to the surface of various non-infected cells of distinct lineage. Binding of NSP4 to HT-29, a cell line of intestinal origin, is saturable and independent of divalent cations. Complementary biochemical approaches reveal that NSP4 binds to sulfated glycosaminoglycans on the plasma membrane. Conclusion Our study is the first to analyze an authentic (i.e. non-recombinant form of NSP4 that is secreted from virus-infected cells. Despite retention of the transmembrane domain

  20. ATP Binding Cassette Transporter Mediates Both Heme and Pesticide Detoxification in Tick Midgut Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flavio Alves Lara

    Full Text Available In ticks, the digestion of blood occurs intracellularly and proteolytic digestion of hemoglobin takes place in a dedicated type of lysosome, the digest vesicle, followed by transfer of the heme moiety of hemoglobin to a specialized organelle that accumulates large heme aggregates, called hemosomes. In the present work, we studied the uptake of fluorescent metalloporphyrins, used as heme analogs, and amitraz, one of the most regularly used acaricides to control cattle tick infestations, by Rhipicephalus (Boophilus microplus midgut cells. Both compounds were taken up by midgut cells in vitro and accumulated inside the hemosomes. Transport of both molecules was sensitive to cyclosporine A (CsA, a well-known inhibitor of ATP binding cassette (ABC transporters. Rhodamine 123, a fluorescent probe that is also a recognized ABC substrate, was similarly directed to the hemosome in a CsA-sensitive manner. Using an antibody against conserved domain of PgP-1-type ABC transporter, we were able to immunolocalize PgP-1 in the digest vesicle membranes. Comparison between two R. microplus strains that were resistant and susceptible to amitraz revealed that the resistant strain detoxified both amitraz and Sn-Pp IX more efficiently than the susceptible strain, a process that was also sensitive to CsA. A transcript containing an ABC transporter signature exhibited 2.5-fold increased expression in the amitraz-resistant strain when compared with the susceptible strain. RNAi-induced down-regulation of this ABC transporter led to the accumulation of metalloporphyrin in the digestive vacuole, interrupting heme traffic to the hemosome. This evidence further confirms that this transcript codes for a heme transporter. This is the first report of heme transport in a blood-feeding organism. While the primary physiological function of the hemosome is to detoxify heme and attenuate its toxicity, we suggest that the use of this acaricide detoxification pathway by ticks may

  1. Heart-type fatty-acid-binding protein (FABP3) is a lysophosphatidic acid-binding protein in human coronary artery endothelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukahara, Ryoko; Haniu, Hisao; Matsuda, Yoshikazu; Tsukahara, Tamotsu

    2014-01-01

    Fatty-acid-binding protein 3, muscle and heart (FABP3), also known as heart-type FABP, is a member of the family of intracellular lipid-binding proteins. It is a small cytoplasmic protein with a molecular mass of about 15 kDa. FABPs are known to be carrier proteins for transporting fatty acids and other lipophilic substances from the cytoplasm to the nucleus, where these lipids are released to a group of nuclear receptors such as peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs). In this study, using lysophosphatidic acid (LPA)-coated agarose beads, we have identified FABP3 as an LPA carrier protein in human coronary artery endothelial cells (HCAECs). Administration of LPA to HCAECs resulted in a dose-dependent increase in PPARγ activation. Furthermore, the LPA-induced PPARγ activation was abolished when the FABP3 expression was reduced using small interfering RNA (siRNA). We further show that the nuclear fraction of control HCAECs contained a significant amount of exogenously added LPA, whereas FABP3 siRNA-transfected HCAECs had a decreased level of LPA in the nucleus. Taken together, these results suggest that FABP3 governs the transcriptional activities of LPA by targeting them to cognate PPARγ in the nucleus. PMID:25426414

  2. Heart-type fatty-acid-binding protein (FABP3 is a lysophosphatidic acid-binding protein in human coronary artery endothelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryoko Tsukahara

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Fatty-acid-binding protein 3, muscle and heart (FABP3, also known as heart-type FABP, is a member of the family of intracellular lipid-binding proteins. It is a small cytoplasmic protein with a molecular mass of about 15 kDa. FABPs are known to be carrier proteins for transporting fatty acids and other lipophilic substances from the cytoplasm to the nucleus, where these lipids are released to a group of nuclear receptors such as peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs. In this study, using lysophosphatidic acid (LPA-coated agarose beads, we have identified FABP3 as an LPA carrier protein in human coronary artery endothelial cells (HCAECs. Administration of LPA to HCAECs resulted in a dose-dependent increase in PPARγ activation. Furthermore, the LPA-induced PPARγ activation was abolished when the FABP3 expression was reduced using small interfering RNA (siRNA. We further show that the nuclear fraction of control HCAECs contained a significant amount of exogenously added LPA, whereas FABP3 siRNA-transfected HCAECs had a decreased level of LPA in the nucleus. Taken together, these results suggest that FABP3 governs the transcriptional activities of LPA by targeting them to cognate PPARγ in the nucleus.

  3. The use of fibronectin-coated polyvinyl chloride microtest plates to detect monoclonal antibody-binding to adherent tumor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes the use of fibronectin-coated polyvinyl chloride (PVC) plates as a time-saving modification in an assay measuring antibody-binding to live adherent tumor cells. Three cell lines (A-431, Colo 16 and UCLA-SO-P3) derived from human squamous cell carcinomas (SCC) and forming monolayers in cultures were plated onto flexible PVC microtest plates rather than the commonly-used rigid polystyrene plates. In PVC plates, two of the three cell lines (A-431 and Colo 16) grew as foci of clumped cells instead of monolayers. Coating of the plates with plasma fibronectin restored the monolayer morphology. [125I]Staphylococcal protein A radioimmunoassays measuring the binding of a monoclonal anti-β2 microglobulin antibody to the cells were slightly, but consistently, more sensitive in coated PVC plates than in polystyrene plates. In contrast, the sensitivity of the radioimmunoassay was remarkably constant when the assay was performed on the third cell line (UCLA-SO-P3), which formed monolayers in any of the conditions tested. Preliminary experiments suggested that the inability to form monolayers on uncoated PVC plates correlates with the amount of fibronectin associated with the cell surface. (Auth.)

  4. Binding of nuclear caveolin-1 to promoter elements of growth-associated genes in ovarian carcinoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caveolin-1 (cav-1), a member of a protein family associated mainly with cell membrane microdomains in many cell types, acts as a tumor suppressor in ovarian carcinoma cells. Biochemical analyses demonstrated that cav-1 was also localized in the nuclei of ovarian carcinoma cells, endogenously (SKOV3) or ectopically (IGtC3) expressing cav-1. By confocal analyses, the same cell lines as well as IGROV1 and SKOV3 cells transiently transfected with green fluorescent protein-cav-1 fusion protein showed nuclear punctate speckled pattern. Subnuclear distribution analysis revealed cav-1 mainly associated with the nuclear matrix, but also slightly with chromatin. Cav-1 was found in nuclear high-molecular weight complexes and by confocal analysis was found to co-localized with the inner nuclear membrane protein emerin. Cyclin D1 and folate receptor promoters were modulated by cav-1 in SKOV3 cells as demonstrated by transient transfection with or silencing of cav-1. Chromatin immunoprecipitation and supershift assays indicated that nuclear cav-1 can bind in vitro and in vivo to promoter sequences of both cyclin D1 and folate receptor genes. These data suggest that in ovarian carcinoma cells cav-1, localized in transcriptionally inactive chromatin, exerts a functional activity mediated, at least in part, by directly binding to sequences of genes involved in proliferation

  5. The Zn(II) nanocomplex: Sonochemical synthesis, characterization, DNA- and BSA-binding, cell imaging, and cytotoxicity against the human carcinoma cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anjomshoa, Marzieh; Torkzadeh-Mahani, Masoud; Shakeri, Marjan; Adeli-Sardou, Mahboubeh

    2016-05-01

    The focus of this article is preparation of a new kind of nanomaterial, the Zn(II) nanocomplex, to decrease growth of human carcinoma cell lines. The Zn(II) nanocomplex coordinated by phendione, [Zn(phendione)3](PF6)2 (where phendione is 1,10-phenanthroline-5,6-dione), has been synthesized by sonochemical method and characterized by FT-IR, dynamic light scattering (DLS), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The interaction of the complex and nanocomplex with fish sperm DNA (FS-DNA) has been investigated under physiological conditions by a series of experimental methods (fluorescence titration, viscosity, cyclic voltammetry (CV), competitive DNA-binding studies with ethidium bromide, and SEM). Results have indicated that the complex binds to FS-DNA by two biding modes, viz., electrostatic and partial insertion phendione between the base stacks of double-stranded DNA. The quenching constants (Ksv), binding constants (Kbin), and number of binding sites (n) at different temperatures, as well as thermodynamic parameters (ΔH(o), ΔS(o) and ΔG(o)) have been calculated for the BSA-complex system. Protein binding studies show that the complex and nanocomplex could bind with BSA. Results of synchronous fluorescence of BSA show that addition of the complex affect the microenvironment of both tyrosine and tryptophan residues during the binding process. The in vitro cytotoxicity of the complex and nanocomplex against the human carcinoma cell lines (MCF-7 and A-549) was evaluated by MTT assay. Results indicate that the complex and nanocomplex have greater cytotoxicity activity against MCF-7 with IC50 values of 0.2 and 0.9 mg/L, respectively. Results of the microscopic analyses of the cancer cells confirm results of cytotoxicity. PMID:26987745

  6. Glucocorticoid receptors on leukemic cells as evidenced by dexamethasone-induced cytolysis and 3H-dexamethasone binding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The presence of glucocorticoid receptors on the leukemic cells of 33 patients affected with acute lymphatic leukemia (ALL) and 6 patients affected with acute myeloic leukemia (AML) was investigated by dexamethasone-induced cytolysis and [3H]-dexamethasone binding. The tests undertaken proved that after 20 hours of incubation 9 of 26 non-T-non-B-ALL (c-ALL and unclassified ALL) and 2 of AML were lysed with dexamethasone; blood lymphocytes and bone marrow leukocytes of healthy donors, however, were not affected. Non-T-non-B-ALL and AML were able to bind essentially more [3H]-dexamethasone than T-ALL. There existed no correlation between dexamethasone binding and dexamethasone-induced cytolysis. (author)

  7. [3H]Ouabain binding and Na+, K+-ATPase in resealed human red cell ghosts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The interaction of the cardiac glycoside [3H]ouabain with the Na+, K+ pump of resealed human erythrocyte ghosts was investigated. Binding of [3H]ouabain to high intracellular Na+ ghosts was studied in high extracellular Na+ media, a condition determined to produce maximal ouabain binding rates. Simultaneous examination of both the number of ouabain molecules bound per ghost and the corresponding inhibition of the Na+, K+-ATPase revealed that one molecule of [3H]ouabain inhibited one Na+, K+-ATPase complex. Intracellular magnesium or magnesium plus inorganic phosphate produced the lowest ouabain binding rate. Support of ouabain binding by adenosine diphosphate (ADP) was negligible, provided synthesis of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) through the residual adenylate kinase activity was prevented by the adenylate kinase inhibitor Ap5A. Uridine 5'-triphosphate (UTP) alone did not support ouabain binding after inhibition of the endogenous nucleoside diphosphokinase by trypan blue and depletion of residual ATP by the incorporation of hexokinase and glucose. ATP acting solely at the high-affinity binding site of the Na+, K+ pump (Km approximately 1 microM) promoted maximal [3H]ouabain binding rates. Failure of 5'-adenylyl-beta-gamma-imidophosphate (AMP-PNP) to stimulate significantly the rate of ouabain binding suggests that phosphorylation of the pump was required to expose the ouabain receptor

  8. EGCG decreases binding of calcium oxalate monohydrate crystals onto renal tubular cells via decreased surface expression of alpha-enolase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanlaya, Rattiyaporn; Singhto, Nilubon; Thongboonkerd, Visith

    2016-06-01

    Crystal retention on tubular cell surface inside renal tubules is considered as the earliest and crucial step for kidney stone formation. Therapeutics targeting this step would cease the development of kidney stone. This study thus aimed to investigate the potential role of epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), a major antioxidant found in green tea leaves, in the reduction of calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) crystal binding onto renal tubular cells. Pretreatment of the cells with EGCG for up to 6 h significantly diminished crystal-binding capability in a dose-dependent manner. Indirect immunofluorescence assay without and with cell permeabilization followed by laser-scanning confocal microscopy revealed that EGCG significantly reduced surface expression of alpha-enolase, whereas its intracellular level was increased. Western blot analysis confirmed such contradictory changes in membrane and cytosolic fractions of EGCG-treated cells, whereas the total level in whole cell lysate remained unchanged. Moreover, overexpression of surface alpha-enolase and enhancement of cell-crystal adhesion induced by 10 mM sodium oxalate were completely abolished by EGCG. Taken together, these data indicate that EGCG decreases binding of COM crystals onto renal tubular cells by decreasing the surface expression of alpha-enolase via re-localization or inhibition of alpha-enolase shuttling from the cytoplasm to the plasma membrane. These findings may also explain the effects of EGCG in reducing COM crystal deposition in previous animal models of kidney stone disease. Thus, EGCG may be useful for the prevention of new or recurrent stone formation. PMID:26898643

  9. Two Arginine Residues of Streptococcus gordonii Sialic Acid-Binding Adhesin Hsa Are Essential for Interaction to Host Cell Receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urano-Tashiro, Yumiko; Takahashi, Yukihiro; Oguchi, Riyo; Konishi, Kiyoshi

    2016-01-01

    Hsa is a large, serine-rich protein of Streptococcus gordonii DL1 that mediates binding to α2-3-linked sialic acid termini of glycoproteins, including platelet glycoprotein Ibα, and erythrocyte membrane protein glycophorin A, and band 3. The binding of Hsa to platelet glycoprotein Ibα contributes to the pathogenesis of infective endocarditis. This interaction appears to be mediated by a second non-repetitive region (NR2) of Hsa. However, the molecular details of the interaction between the Hsa NR2 region and these glycoproteins are not well understood. In the present study, we identified the amino acid residues of the Hsa NR2 region that are involved in sialic acid recognition. To identify the sialic acid-binding site of Hsa NR2 region, we prepared various mutants of Hsa NR2 fused with glutathione transferase. Fusion proteins harboring Arg340 to Asn (R340N) or Arg365 to Asn (R365N) substitutions in the NR2 domain exhibited significantly reduced binding to human erythrocytes and platelets. A sugar-binding assay showed that these mutant proteins abolished binding to α2-3-linked sialic acid. Furthermore, we established S. gordonii DL1 derivatives that encoded the corresponding Hsa mutant protein. In whole-cell assays, these mutant strains showed significant reductions in hemagglutination, in platelet aggregation, and in adhesion to human leukocytes. These results indicate that the Arg340 and Arg365 residues of Hsa play an important role in the binding of Hsa to α2-3-linked sialic acid-containing glycoproteins. PMID:27101147

  10. High-throughput screening of monoclonal antibodies against plant cell wall glycans by hierarchical clustering of their carbohydrate microarray binding profiles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moller, Isabel; Marcus, Susan E.; Haeger, Ash;

    2007-01-01

    Antibody-producing hybridoma cell lines were created following immunisation with a crude extract of cell wall polymers from the plant Arabidopsis thaliana. In order to rapidly screen the specificities of individual monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), their binding to microarrays containing 50 cell wall...... investigated using subsequent immunochemical and biochemical analyses and two novel mAbs are described in detail. mAb LM13 binds to an arabinanase-sensitive pectic epitope and mAb LM14, binds to an epitope occurring on arabinogalactan-proteins. Both mAbs display novel patterns of recognition of cell walls in...... plant materials....

  11. Release of IgD-binding factor by T cells under the influence of interleukin 2, interleukin 4, or cross-linked IgD.

    OpenAIRE

    Amin, A R; Coico, R F; Finkelman, F; Siskind, G W; Thorbecke, G. J.

    1988-01-01

    Helper T cells with receptors specific for IgD have immunoaugmenting properties. We have now detected soluble IgD-binding factor in cell supernatants immobilized on nitrocellulose paper by their ability to bind 125I-labeled IgD. IgD-binding factor is released by normal splenic T cells stimulated with recombinant interleukin 2, recombinant interleukin 4, or crosslinked IgD in amounts paralleling the induction of IgD receptors on the cells. IgD receptors are constitutively produced by antigen-s...

  12. The biosynthesis and wall-binding of hemicelluloses in cellulose-deficient maize cells:An example of metabolic plasticity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mara de Castro; Janice G Miller; Jose Luis Acebes; Antonio Encina; Penelope Garca-Angulo; Stephen C Fry

    2015-01-01

    Cell-suspension cultures (Zea mays L., Black Mexican sweet corn) habituated to 2,6-dichlorobenzonitrile (DCB) survive with reduced cellulose owing to hemicellulose network modification. We aimed to define the hemicellulose metabolism modifications in DCB-habituated maize cells showing a mild reduction in cellulose at different stages in the culture cycle. Using pulse-chase radiolabeling, we fed habituated and non-habituated cultures with [3H]arabinose, and traced the distribution of 3H-pentose residues between xylans, xyloglucans and other polymers in several cellular compartments for 5 h. Habituated cells were slower taking up exogenous [3H]arabinose. Tritium was incorporated into polysaccharide-bound arabinose and xylose residues, but habituated cells diverted a higher proportion of their new [3H] xylose residues into (hetero) xylans at the expense of xyloglucan synthesis. During logarithmic growth, habituated cells showed slower vesicular trafficking of polymers, especially xylans. Moreover, habituated cells showed a decrease in the strong wall-binding of all pentose-containing polysaccharides studied; correspondingly, especially in log-phase cultures, habituation increased the proportion of 3H-hemicelluloses ([3H]xylans and [3H]xyloglucan) sloughed into the medium. These findings could be related to the cell walls’ cellulose-deficiency, and consequent reduction in binding sites for hemicelluloses; the data could also reflect the habituated cells’ reduced capacity to integrate arabinox-ylans by extra-protoplasmic phenolic cross-linking, as well as xyloglucans, during wall assembly.

  13. Spatiotemporal Expression of Poly(rC)-Binding Protein PCBP2 Modulates Schwann Cell Proliferation After Sciatic Nerve Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhigang; Zhang, Weidong; Ni, Li; Wang, Genlin; Cao, Yi; Wu, Weijie; Sun, Chi; Yuan, Damin; Ni, Haidan; Wang, Youhua; Yang, Huilin

    2016-07-01

    Poly(C)-binding proteins (PCBPs), also known as RNA-binding proteins, interact in a sequence-specific fashion with single-stranded poly(C). It was reported that PCBP2 contributed to gastric cancer proliferation and survival through miR-34a, and knockdown of PCBP2 inhibited glioma proliferation through inhibition of cell cycle progression. In addition, PCBP2 might play a critical role in the regulation of cortical neurons apoptosis induced by hypoxia or ischemia. Because of the essential role of PCBP2 in nervous system and cell growth, we investigated the spatiotemporal expression of PCBP2 in a rat sciatic nerve crush (SNC) model. We detected the upregulated expression of PCBP2 in Schwann cell after SNC. Besides, the peak expression of PCBP2 was in parallel with proliferation cell nuclear antigen. In vitro, we observed increased expression of PCBP2 during the process of TNF-α-induced Schwann cell proliferation. Specially, PCBP2-specific siRNA-transfected Schwann cell showed significantly decreased ability for proliferation. Together, all these data indicated that the change of PCBP2 protein expression was associated with Schwann cell proliferation after the trauma of the peripheral nervous system. PMID:26250704

  14. The ligand binding domain of GCNF is not required for repression of pluripotency genes in mouse fetal ovarian germ cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leah M Okumura

    Full Text Available In mice, successful development and reproduction require that all cells, including germ cells, transition from a pluripotent to a differentiated state. This transition is associated with silencing of the pluripotency genes Oct4 and Nanog. Interestingly, these genes are repressed at different developmental timepoints in germ and somatic cells. Ovarian germ cells maintain their expression until about embryonic day (E 14.5, whereas somatic cells silence them much earlier, at about E8.0. In both somatic cells and embryonic stem cells, silencing of Oct4 and Nanog requires the nuclear receptor GCNF. However, expression of the Gcnf gene has not been investigated in fetal ovarian germ cells, and whether it is required for silencing Oct4 and Nanog in that context is not known. Here we demonstrate that Gcnf is expressed in fetal ovarian germ cells, peaking at E14.5, when Oct4 and Nanog are silenced. However, conditional ablation of the ligand-binding domain of Gcnf using a ubiquitous, tamoxifen-inducible Cre indicates that Gcnf is not required for the down-regulation of pluripotency genes in fetal ovarian germ cells, nor is it required for initiation of meiosis and oogenesis. These results suggest that the silencing of Oct4 and Nanog in germ cells occurs via a different mechanism from that operating in somatic cells during gastrulation.

  15. In vivo autoradiographic demonstration of β-adrenergic binding sites in adult rat type II alveolar epithelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adult male rats were injected intravenously with the muscarinic binding probe 3H-Quinuclidinyl benzilate (QNB) or the β-adrenergic probe 3H-dihydroalprenolol (DHA). Other rats were pre-treated with an intraperitoneal injection of a 500-fold excess of L-isoproterenol prior to the DHA. Light microscopic autoradiography of 0.5 μm sections of lung from the QNB group demonstrated very little labelling even after 6 months of exposure. In constrast, trachealis smooth muscle from these animals contained substantial labelling. Autoradiographs of lung from rats injected with DHA demonstrated labelling which was well localized over alveolar septa and concentrated over the cytoplasm of type II cells. Quantitative analysis of labelling in the DHA groups indicated a significant reduction of labelling in animals treated with L-isoproterenol prior to DHA, in both the alveolar parenchyma in general and over type II cells. The results of this study provide morphologic evidence for the uptake and specific binding of β-adrenergic antagonists by the adult lung in vivo, while failing to demonstrate similar binding of a muscarinic probe. In addition, the results demonstrate specific β-adrenergic receptors on type II cells in vivo and substantiate the view of a direct effect of β-adrenergic agonists on alveolar type II cells

  16. Breast cancer cells compete with hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells for intercellular adhesion molecule 1-mediated binding to the bone marrow microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhawan, Abhishek; Friedrichs, Jens; Bonin, Malte von; Bejestani, Elham Peshali; Werner, Carsten; Wobus, Manja; Chavakis, Triantafyllos; Bornhäuser, Martin

    2016-08-01

    Adhesion-based cellular interactions involved in breast cancer metastasis to the bone marrow remain elusive. We identified that breast cancer cells directly compete with hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) for retention in the bone marrow microenvironment. To this end, we established two models of competitive cell adhesion-simultaneous and sequential-to study a potential competition for homing to the niche and displacement of the endogenous HSPCs upon invasion by tumor cells. In both models, breast cancer cells but not non-tumorigenic cells competitively reduced adhesion of HSPCs to bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) in a tumor cell number-dependent manner. Higher adhesive force between breast cancer cells and MSCs, as compared with HSPCs, assessed by quantitative atomic force microscopy-based single-cell force spectroscopy could partially account for tumor cell mediated reduction in HSPC adhesion to MSCs. Genetic inactivation and blockade studies revealed that homophilic interactions between intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) expressed on tumor cells and MSCs, respectively, regulate the competition between tumor cells and HSPCs for binding to MSCs. Moreover, tumor cell-secreted soluble ICAM-1(sICAM-1) also impaired HSPC adhesion via blocking CD18-ICAM-1 binding between HSPCs and MSCs. Xenotransplantation studies in NOD.Cg-Prkdc(scid) Il2rg(tm1Wjl)/SzJ mice revealed reduction of human HSPCs in the bone marrow via metastatic breast cancer cells. These findings point to a direct competitive interaction between disseminated breast cancer cells and HSPCs within the bone marrow micro environment. This interaction might also have implications on niche-based tumor support. Therefore, targeting this cross talk may represent a novel therapeutic strategy. PMID:27207667

  17. Use of Cre/loxP recombination to swap cell binding motifs on the adenoviral capsid protein IX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We used Cre/loxP recombination to swap targeting ligands present on the adenoviral capsid protein IX (pIX). A loxP-flanked sequence encoding poly-lysine (pK-binds heparan sulfate proteoglycans) was engineered onto the 3'-terminus of pIX, and the resulting fusion protein allowed for routine virus propagation. Growth of this virus on Cre-expressing cells removed the pK coding sequence, generating virus that could only infect through alternative ligands, such as a tyrosine kinase receptor A (TrkA)-binding motif engineered into the capsid fibre protein for enhanced infection of neuronal cells. We used a similar approach to swap the pK motif on pIX for a sequence encoding a single-domain antibody directed towards CD66c for targeted infection of cancer cells; Cre-mediated removal of the pK-coding sequence simultaneously placed the single-domain antibody coding sequence in frame with pIX. Thus, we have developed a simple method to propagate virus lacking native viral tropism but containing cell-specific binding ligands. - Highlights: → We describe a method to grow virus lacking native tropism but containing novel cell-binding ligands. → Cre/loxP recombination was used to modify the adenovirus genome. → A targeting ligand present on capsid protein IX was removed or replaced using recombination. → Cre-loxP was also used to 'swap' the identity of the targeting ligand present on pIX.

  18. High-affinity insulin binding to an atypical insulin-like growth factor-I receptor in human breast cancer cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Milazzo, G.; Yip, C. C.; Maddux, B A; Vigneri, R; Goldfine, I D

    1992-01-01

    We studied the nature of insulin receptor binding in MCF-7 breast cancer cells. In both intact cells and solubilized receptor preparations, high-affinity insulin binding was seen. However, unlabeled insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) was five-fold more potent in inhibiting 125I-insulin binding than insulin itself. With monoclonal antibodies to the insulin receptor, 30% of 125I-insulin binding was inhibited. In contrast when alpha-IR3, a monoclonal antibody that recognizes typical IGF-I rece...

  19. Effects of retinoids on differentiation, lipid metabolism, epidermal growth factor, and low-density lipoprotein binding in squamous carcinoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The relationship among keratinocyte differentiation capacity, lipid synthesis, low-density lipoprotein (LDL) metabolism, plasma membrane composition, and epidermal growth factor (EGF) binding has been studied in SCC-12F2 cells. The differentiation capacity of the cells, i.e., ionophore-induced cornified envelope formation, was inhibited by various retinoids and stimulated by hydrocortisone. Retinoids that caused a significant reduction of cornified envelope formation, i.e., retinoic acid and 13-cis-retinoic acid, caused only minor changes in lipid synthesis and plasma membrane composition. Arotinoid ethylsulfone, having a minor effect on cornified envelope formation, caused a drastic inhibition of cholesterol synthesis resulting in changes in the plasma membrane composition. Hydrocortisone stimulated cornified envelope formation but had only minor effects on lipid synthesis and plasma membrane composition. Of all retinoids tested, only arotinoid ethylsulfone caused a drastic increase in EGF binding, while hydrocortisone had no effect. These results clearly demonstrate that the plasma membrane composition is not related to keratinocyte differentiation capacity, but most likely does determine EGF binding. Furthermore, EGF binding does not determine keratinocyte differentiation capacity

  20. Interaction between Endothelial Protein C Receptor and Intercellular Adhesion Molecule 1 to Mediate Binding of Plasmodium falciparum-Infected Erythrocytes to Endothelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avril, Marion; Bernabeu, Maria; Benjamin, Maxwell; Brazier, Andrew Jay

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) and the endothelial protein C receptor (EPCR) are candidate receptors for the deadly complication cerebral malaria. However, it remains unclear if Plasmodium falciparum parasites with dual binding specificity are involved in cytoadhesion or different parasite subpopulations bind in brain microvessels. Here, we investigated this issue by studying different subtypes of ICAM-1-binding parasite lines. We show that two parasite lines expressing domain cassette 13 (DC13) of the P. falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1) family have dual binding specificity for EPCR and ICAM-1 and further mapped ICAM-1 binding to the first DBLβ domain following the PfEMP1 head structure in both proteins. As PfEMP1 head structures have diverged between group A (EPCR binders) and groups B and C (CD36 binders), we also investigated how ICAM-1-binding parasites with different coreceptor binding traits influence P. falciparum-infected erythrocyte binding to endothelial cells. Whereas levels of binding to tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α)-stimulated endothelial cells from the lung and brain by all ICAM-1-binding parasite lines increased, group A (EPCR and ICAM-1) was less dependent than group B (CD36 and ICAM-1) on ICAM-1 upregulation. Furthermore, both group A DC13 parasite lines had higher binding levels to brain endothelial cells (a microvascular niche with limited CD36 expression). This study shows that ICAM-1 is a coreceptor for a subset of EPCR-binding parasites and provides the first evidence of how EPCR and ICAM-1 interact to mediate parasite binding to both resting and TNF-α-activated primary brain and lung endothelial cells. PMID:27406562

  1. Skin mucus of Cyprinus carpio inhibits cyprinid herpesvirus 3 binding to epidermal cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raj Victor

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cyprinid herpesvirus 3 (CyHV-3 is the aetiological agent of a mortal and highly contagious disease in common and koi carp. The skin is the major portal of entry of CyHV-3 in carp after immersion in water containing the virus. In the present study, we used in vivo bioluminescence imaging to investigate the effect of skin mucus removal and skin epidermis lesion on CyHV-3 entry. Physical treatments inducing removal of the mucus up to complete erosion of the epidermis were applied on a defined area of carp skin just before inoculation by immersion in infectious water. CyHV-3 entry in carp was drastically enhanced on the area of the skin where the mucus was removed with or without associated epidermal lesion. To investigate whether skin mucus inhibits CyHV-3 binding to epidermal cells, tail fins with an intact mucus layer or without mucus were inoculated ex vivo. While electron microscopy examination revealed numerous viral particles bound on the fins inoculated after mucus removal, no particle could be detected after infection of mucus-covered fins. Finally, anti-CyHV-3 neutralising activity of mucus extract was tested in vitro. Incubation of CyHV-3 with mucus extract reduced its infectivity in a dose dependent manner. The present study demonstrates that skin mucus removal and epidermal lesions enhance CyHV-3 entry in carp. It highlights the role of fish skin mucus as an innate immune protection against viral epidermal entry.

  2. Mutational analysis of the RNA-binding domain of the Prunus necrotic ringspot virus (PNRSV) movement protein reveals its requirement for cell-to-cell movement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The movement protein (MP) of Prunus necrotic ringspot virus (PNRSV) is required for cell-to-cell movement. MP subcellular localization studies using a GFP fusion protein revealed highly punctate structures between neighboring cells, believed to represent plasmodesmata. Deletion of the RNA-binding domain (RBD) of PNRSV MP abolishes the cell-to-cell movement. A mutational analysis on this RBD was performed in order to identify in vivo the features that govern viral transport. Loss of positive charges prevented the cell-to-cell movement even though all mutants showed a similar accumulation level in protoplasts to those observed with the wild-type (wt) MP. Synthetic peptides representing the mutants and wild-type RBDs were used to study RNA-binding affinities by EMSA assays being approximately 20-fold lower in the mutants. Circular dichroism analyses revealed that the secondary structure of the peptides was not significantly affected by mutations. The involvement of the affinity changes between the viral RNA and the MP in the viral cell-to-cell movement is discussed

  3. Fluorescence Quenching Property of C-Phycocyanin from Spirulina platensis and its Binding Efficacy with Viable Cell Components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paswan, Meenakshi B; Chudasama, Meghna M; Mitra, Madhusree; Bhayani, Khushbu; George, Basil; Chatterjee, Shruti; Mishra, Sandhya

    2016-03-01

    Phycocyanin is a natural brilliant blue colored, fluorescent protein, which is commonly present in cyanobacteria. In this study, C-phycocyanin was extracted and purified from Spirulina platensis, which are multicellular and filamentous cyanobacteria of greater importance because of its various biological and pharmacological potential. It was analyzed for its binding affinity towards blood cells, algal cells, genomic DNA of microalgae, and bacteria at different temperature and incubation time. It showed good binding affinity with these components even at low concentration of 2.5 μM. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the applicability of C-phycocyanin as a green fluorescent dye substituting carcinogenic chemical dyes. PMID:26678758

  4. Direct binding of autoimmune disease related T cell epitopes to purified Lewis rat MHC class II molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joosten, I; Wauben, M H; Holewijn, M C;

    1994-01-01

    New strategies applied in the treatment of experimental autoimmune disease models involve blocking or modulation of MHC-peptide-TCR interactions either at the level of peptide-MHC interaction or, alternatively, at the level of T cell recognition. In order to identify useful competitor peptides one...... must be able to assess peptide-MHC interactions. Several well described autoimmune disease models exist in the Lewis rat and thus this particular rat strain provides a good model system to study the effect of competitor peptides. So far no information has been available on the peptide binding...... chemiluminescence. The assay is sensitive and specific. We have used this assay to determine the binding characteristics of several disease associated T cell determinants and their sequence analogues in the Lewis rat. Notably, most of the autoimmune disease associated peptide sequences tested were found to be...

  5. THAP5 is a DNA-binding transcriptional repressor that is regulated in melanoma cells during DNA damage-induced cell death

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balakrishnan, Meenakshi P.; Cilenti, Lucia; Ambivero, Camilla [Biomolecular Science Center, Burnett School of Biomedical Sciences, College of Medicine, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL (United States); Goto, Yamafumi [Department of Dermatology, Shinshu University School of Medicine, Matsumoto (Japan); Takata, Minoru [Department of Dermatology, Okayama University Graduate School of Medical Dentistry and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Okayama (Japan); Turkson, James; Li, Xiaoman Shawn [Biomolecular Science Center, Burnett School of Biomedical Sciences, College of Medicine, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL (United States); Zervos, Antonis S., E-mail: azervos@mail.ucf.edu [Biomolecular Science Center, Burnett School of Biomedical Sciences, College of Medicine, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL (United States)

    2011-01-07

    Research highlights: {yields} THAP5 is a DNA-binding protein and a transcriptional repressor. {yields} THAP5 is induced in melanoma cells upon exposure to UV or treatment with cisplatin. {yields} THAP5 induction correlates with the degree of apoptosis in melanoma cell population. {yields} THAP5 is a pro-apoptotic protein involved in melanoma cell death. -- Abstract: THAP5 was originally isolated as a specific interactor and substrate of the mitochondrial pro-apoptotic Omi/HtrA2 protease. It is a human zinc finger protein characterized by a restricted pattern of expression and the lack of orthologs in mouse and rat. The biological function of THAP5 is unknown but our previous studies suggest it could regulate G2/M transition in kidney cells and could be involved in human cardiomyocyte cell death associated with coronary artery disease (CAD). In this report, we expanded our studies on the properties and function of THAP5 in human melanoma cells. THAP5 was expressed in primary human melanocytes as well as in all melanoma cell lines that were tested. THAP5 protein level was significantly induced by UV irradiation or cisplatin treatment, conditions known to cause DNA damage. The induction of THAP5 correlated with a significant increase in apoptotic cell death. In addition, we show that THAP5 is a nuclear protein that could recognize and bind a specific DNA motif. THAP5 could also repress the transcription of a reporter gene in a heterologous system. Our work suggests that THAP5 is a DNA-binding protein and a transcriptional repressor. Furthermore, THAP5 has a pro-apoptotic function and it was induced in melanoma cells under conditions that promoted cell death.

  6. THAP5 is a DNA-binding transcriptional repressor that is regulated in melanoma cells during DNA damage-induced cell death

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research highlights: → THAP5 is a DNA-binding protein and a transcriptional repressor. → THAP5 is induced in melanoma cells upon exposure to UV or treatment with cisplatin. → THAP5 induction correlates with the degree of apoptosis in melanoma cell population. → THAP5 is a pro-apoptotic protein involved in melanoma cell death. -- Abstract: THAP5 was originally isolated as a specific interactor and substrate of the mitochondrial pro-apoptotic Omi/HtrA2 protease. It is a human zinc finger protein characterized by a restricted pattern of expression and the lack of orthologs in mouse and rat. The biological function of THAP5 is unknown but our previous studies suggest it could regulate G2/M transition in kidney cells and could be involved in human cardiomyocyte cell death associated with coronary artery disease (CAD). In this report, we expanded our studies on the properties and function of THAP5 in human melanoma cells. THAP5 was expressed in primary human melanocytes as well as in all melanoma cell lines that were tested. THAP5 protein level was significantly induced by UV irradiation or cisplatin treatment, conditions known to cause DNA damage. The induction of THAP5 correlated with a significant increase in apoptotic cell death. In addition, we show that THAP5 is a nuclear protein that could recognize and bind a specific DNA motif. THAP5 could also repress the transcription of a reporter gene in a heterologous system. Our work suggests that THAP5 is a DNA-binding protein and a transcriptional repressor. Furthermore, THAP5 has a pro-apoptotic function and it was induced in melanoma cells under conditions that promoted cell death.

  7. ParA encoded on chromosome II of Deinococcus radiodurans binds to nucleoid and inhibits cell division in Escherichia coli

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Vijaya Kumar Charaka; Kruti P Mehta; H S Misra

    2013-09-01

    Bacterial genome segregation and cell division has been studied mostly in bacteria harbouring single circular chromosome and low-copy plasmids. Deinococcus radiodurans, a radiation-resistant bacterium, harbours multipartite genome system. Chromosome I encodes majority of the functions required for normal growth while other replicons encode mostly the proteins involved in secondary functions. Here, we report the characterization of putative P-loop ATPase (ParA2) encoded on chromosome II of D. radiodurans. Recombinant ParA2 was found to be a DNA-binding ATPase. E. coli cells expressing ParA2 showed cell division inhibition and mislocalization of FtsZ-YFP and those expressing ParA2-CFP showed multiple CFP foci formation on the nucleoid. Although, in trans expression of ParA2 failed to complement SlmA loss per se, it could induce unequal cell division in slmAminCDE double mutant. These results suggested that ParA2 is a nucleoid-binding protein, which could inhibits cell division in E. coli by affecting the correct localization of FtsZ and thereby cytokinesis. Helping slmAminCDE mutant to produce minicells, a phenotype associated with mutations in the `Min’ proteins, further indicated the possibility of ParA2 regulating cell division by bringing nucleoid compaction at the vicinity of septum growth.

  8. Inhibition activity of wild berry juice fractions against Streptococcus pneumoniae binding to human bronchial cells

    OpenAIRE

    Huttunen, Sanna; Toivanen, Marko; Arkko, Satu; Ruponen, Marika; Tikkanen-Kaukanen, Carina

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Bacterial adhesion to the cell surface is a crucial step before infection can take place. Inhibition of bacterial binding offers a novel preventive approach against infections. Cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon Ait.) juice has been found to have anti-adhesive activity against different bacteria. Streptococcus pneumoniae is an important pathogen and the most common cause for pneumonia, meningitis, and otitis media. In this study the inhibitory activity of cranberry (Vacciniu...

  9. Telomere-Binding Protein TPP1 Modulates Telomere Homeostasis and Confers Radioresistance to Human Colorectal Cancer Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Lei Yang; Wenbo Wang; Liu Hu; Xiaoxi Yang; Juan Zhong; Zheng Li; Hui Yang; Han Lei; Haijun Yu; ZhengKai Liao; Fuxiang Zhou; Conghua Xie; Yunfeng Zhou

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Radiotherapy is one of the major therapeutic strategies in cancer treatment. The telomere-binding protein TPP1 is an important component of the shelterin complex at mammalian telomeres. Our previous reports showed that TPP1 expression was elevated in radioresistant cells, but the exact effects and mechanisms of TPP1 on radiosensitivity is unclear. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, we found that elevated TPP1 expression significantly correlated with radioresistance and longer telo...

  10. Telomere-Binding Protein TPP1 Modulates Telomere Homeostasis and Confers Radioresistance to Human Colorectal Cancer Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Lei; Wang, Wenbo; Hu, Liu; Yang, Xiaoxi; Zhong, Juan; Li, Zheng; Yang, Hui; Lei, Han; Yu, Haijun; Liao, Zhengkai; Zhou, Fuxiang; Xie, Conghua; Zhou, Yunfeng

    2013-01-01

    Background Radiotherapy is one of the major therapeutic strategies in cancer treatment. The telomere-binding protein TPP1 is an important component of the shelterin complex at mammalian telomeres. Our previous reports showed that TPP1 expression was elevated in radioresistant cells, but the exact effects and mechanisms of TPP1 on radiosensitivity is unclear. Principal Findings In this study, we found that elevated TPP1 expression significantly correlated with radioresistance and longer telome...

  11. Structure-function analysis of Leishmania lipophosphoglycan. Distinct domains that mediate binding and inhibition of endothelial cell function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, J L; Kim, H K; Sass, P M; He, S; Geng, J; Xu, H; Zhu, B; Turco, S J; Lo, S K

    1996-10-01

    We have shown that Leishmania lipophosphoglycan (LPG) inhibits IL-1 beta gene expression in human monocytes. Here, we show that LPG can bind in a time-dependent manner and suppress endothelial cell activation, possibly via specific LPG domains. Endotoxin (10 ng/ml, 4 h) consistently caused endothelium to increase monocyte adhesion (approximately 20-fold). LPG pretreatment (2 microM, 2 h) completely blocked endotoxin-mediated monocyte adhesion. LPG did not grossly suppress endothelial functions because TNF-alpha- and IL-1 beta-mediated adhesion toward monocytes were not affected. Using four highly purified LPG fragments (namely, repeating phosphodisaccharide (PGM), phosphoglycan, phosphosaccharide core-lyso-alkyl-phosphatidylinositol (core-PI), and lyso-alkyl-phosphatidylinositol (lyso-PI)), we examined whether these fragments can independently inhibit endothelial adhesion. In contrast to that of intact LPG, neither the four LPG fragments (2 microM, 2 h) independently nor the co-addition of phosphoglycan and core-P1 fragments blocked the endotoxin-mediated adhesion to monocytes. To determine whether the fragments can reverse the effect of intact LPG, endothelial cells were first pretreated with the LPG fragments (10 microM, 15 min), followed by the addition of LPG (2 microM). All four LPG fragments fully reversed the effect of LPG. Simultaneous addition of LPG fragments and intact LPG caused only partial suppression (approximately 45%), while the addition of LPG fragments 14 min later had no reversal effect. Flow cytometry revealed that only core-P1 and lyso-P1 competitively inhibited (approximately 30%) LPG binding. Conversely, LPG competed with the binding of [3H]lyso-P1 (approximately 30%). Furthermore, mAb against the PGM reversed (approximately 70%) the effect of LPG. Thus, the lyso-P1 domain on LPG mediates binding to endothelial cells, whereas the PGM domain mediates the cell inhibitory effect. PMID:8816410

  12. Liver Fatty acid binding protein (L-Fabp) modulates murine stellate cell activation and diet induced nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Anping; Tang, Youcai; Davis, Victoria; Hsu, Fong-Fu; Kennedy, Susan M; Song, Haowei; Turk, John; Brunt, Elizabeth M.; Newberry, Elizabeth P.; Davidson, Nicholas O.

    2013-01-01

    Activation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) is crucial to the development of fibrosis in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. Quiescent HSCs contain lipid droplets (LDs), whose depletion upon activation induces a fibrogenic gene program. Here we show that liver fatty acid-binding protein (L-Fabp), an abundant cytosolic protein that modulates fatty acid (FA) metabolism in enterocytes and hepatocytes also modulates HSC FA utilization and in turn regulates the fibrogenic program. L-Fabp expression ...

  13. Andrographolide interferes with binding of nuclear factor-κB to DNA in HL-60-derived neutrophilic cells

    OpenAIRE

    María A. Hidalgo; Romero, Alex; Figueroa, Jaime; Cortés, Patricia; Concha, Ilona I; Hancke, Juan L.; Burgos, Rafael A

    2005-01-01

    Andrographolide, the major active component from Andrographis paniculata, has shown to possess anti-inflammatory activity. Andrographolide inhibits the expression of several proinflammatory proteins that exhibit a nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) binding site in their gene.In the present study, we analyzed the effect of andrographolide on the activation of NF-κB induced by platelet-activating factor (PAF) and N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP) in HL-60 cells differentiated to neutro...

  14. Non-cysteine linked MUC1 cytoplasmic dimers are required for Src recruitment and ICAM-1 binding induced cell invasion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gunasekara Nirosha

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The mucin MUC1, a type I transmembrane glycoprotein, is overexpressed in breast cancer and has been correlated with increased metastasis. We were the first to report binding between MUC1 and Intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1, which is expressed on stromal and endothelial cells throughout the migratory tract of a metastasizing breast cancer cell. Subsequently, we found that MUC1/ICAM-1 binding results in pro-migratory calcium oscillations, cytoskeletal reorganization, and simulated transendothelial migration. These events were found to involve Src kinase, a non-receptor tyrosine kinase also implicated in breast cancer initiation and progression. Here, we further investigated the mechanism of MUC1/ICAM-1 signalling, focusing on the role of MUC1 dimerization in Src recruitment and pro-metastatic signalling. Methods To assay MUC1 dimerization, we used a chemical crosslinker which allowed for the detection of dimers on SDS-PAGE. We then generated MUC1 constructs containing an engineered domain which allowed for manipulation of dimerization status through the addition of ligands to the engineered domain. Following manipulation of dimerization, we immunoprecipitated MUC1 to investigate recruitment of Src, or assayed for our previously observed ICAM-1 binding induced events. To investigate the nature of MUC1 dimers, we used both non-reducing SDS-PAGE and generated a mutant construct lacking cysteine residues. Results We first demonstrate that the previously observed MUC1/ICAM-1signalling events are dependent on the activity of Src kinase. We then report that MUC1 forms constitutive cytoplasmic domain dimers which are necessary for Src recruitment, ICAM-1 induced calcium oscillations and simulated transendothelial migration. The dimers are not covalently linked constitutively or following ICAM-1 binding. In contrast to previously published reports, we found that membrane proximal cysteine residues were not involved in

  15. Structure of the active core of human stem cell factor and analysis of binding to its receptor Kit

    OpenAIRE

    Jiang, Xuliang; Gurel, Ogan; Mendiaz, Elizabeth A.; Stearns, George W.; Clogston, Christi L.; Lu, Hsieng S; Osslund, Timothy D.; Syed, Rashid S.; Langley, Keith E.; Hendrickson, Wayne A

    2000-01-01

    Stem cell factor (SCF) is an early-acting hematopoietic cytokine that elicits multiple biological effects. SCF is dimeric and occurs in soluble and membrane-bound forms. It transduces signals by ligand- mediated dimerization of its receptor, Kit, which is a receptor tyrosine kinase related to the receptors for platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), macrophage colony-stimulating factor, Flt-3 ligand and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). All of these have extracellular ligand-binding p...

  16. Pinin interacts with C-terminal binding proteins for RNA alternative splicing and epithelial cell identity of human ovarian cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yanli; Kwok, Jamie Sui-Lam; Choi, Pui-Wah; Liu, Minghua; Yang, Junzheng; Singh, Margit; Ng, Shu-Kay; Welch, William R.; Muto, Michael G.; Tsui, Stephen KW; Sugrue, Stephen P.; Berkowitz, Ross S.; Ng, Shu-Wing

    2016-01-01

    Unlike many other human solid tumors, ovarian tumors express many epithelial markers at a high level for cell growth and local invasion. The phosphoprotein Pinin plays a key role in epithelial cell identity. We showed that clinical ovarian tumors and ovarian cancer cell lines express a high level of Pinin when compared with normal ovarian tissues and immortalized normal ovarian surface epithelial cell lines. Pinin co-localized and physically interacted with transcriptional corepressor C-terminal binding proteins, CtBP1 and CtBP2, in the nuclei of cancer cells. Knockdown of Pinin in ovarian cancer cells resulted in specific reduction of CtBP1 protein expression, cell adhesion, anchorage-independent growth, and increased drug sensitivity. Whole transcriptomic comparison of next-generation RNA sequencing data between control ovarian cancer cell lines and cancer cell lines with respective knockdown of Pinin, CtBP1, and CtBP2 expression also showed reduced expression of CtBP1 mRNA in the Pinin knockdown cell lines. The Pinin knockdown cell lines shared significant overlap of differentially expressed genes and RNA splicing aberrations with CtBP1 knockdown and in a lesser degree with CtBP2 knockdown cancer cells. Hence, Pinin and CtBP are oncotargets that closely interact with each other to regulate transcription and pre-mRNA alternative splicing and promote cell adhesion and other epithelial characteristics of ovarian cancer cells. PMID:26871283

  17. Target molecular weights for red cell band 3 stilbene and mercurial binding sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation inactivation was used to measure the target sizes for binding of disulfonic stilbene anion transport inhibitor 4,4'-dibenzamido-2,2'-disulfonic stilbene (DBDS) and mercurial water transport inhibitor p-chloromercuribenzene sulfonate (pCMBS) to human erythrocytes. The measured target size for erythrocyte ghost acetylcholinesterase was 78 +/- 3 kDa. DBDS binding to ghost membranes was measured by a fluorescence enhancement technique. Radiation (0-26 Mrad) had no effect on total membrane protein and DBDS binding affinity, whereas DBDS binding stoichiometry decreased exponentially with radiation dose, giving a target size of 59 +/- 4 kDa. H2-4,4'-diisothiocyano-2,2'-disulfonic stilbene (H2-DIDS, 5 microM) blocked greater than 95% of DBDS binding at all radiation doses. pCMBS binding was measured from the time course of tryptophan fluorescence quenching in ghosts treated with the sulfhydryl reagent N-ethylmaleimide (NEM). Radiation did not affect the kinetics of tryptophan quenching, whereas the total amplitude of the fluorescence signal inactivated with radiation with a target size of 31 +/- 6 kDa. These results support the notion that DBDS and pCMBS bind to the transmembrane domain of erythrocyte band 3 in NEM-treated ghosts and demonstrate that radiation inactivation may probe a target significantly smaller than a covalently linked protein subunit. The small target size for the band 3 stilbene binding site may correspond to the intramembrane domain of the band 3 monomer (52 kDa), which is physically distinct from the cytoplasmic domain (42 kDa)

  18. Lectin interactions with the Jurkat leukemic T-cell line: quantitative binding studies and interleukin-2 production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dupuis, G.; Bastin, B.

    1988-03-01

    Phytohemagglutinin (PHA), concanavalin A (Con A), pea lectin, and wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) have been used to investigate their binding properties to Jurkat 77 6.8 leukemic human T cells and their ability to induce these cells to produce interleukin-2 (IL-2). Binding studies showed that the Jurkat cells fixed 0.82 +/- 0.11 microgram pea lectin, 2.02 +/- 0.17 micrograms Con A, 1.85 +/- 0.07 micrograms PHA and 8.88 +/- 0.61 micrograms WGA. Scatchard plots were linear, indicating that the binding process was homogeneous with respect to the binding constant. PHA and Con A bound with the highest affinity (Kass (apparent) approximately equal to 9 x 10(9) M-1), followed by pea lectin and WGA (Kass (apparent) approximately equal to 3 x 10(9) M-1). The number of lectin binding sites was in agreement with the results of saturation experiments. We also evaluated the effect of the presence of 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) on the binding process. Results show that there were no gross alterations in the value of (apparent) Kass in the case of PHA and WGA. In contrast, the presence of TPA decreased the affinity of Con A and modified the Scatchard profile for pea lectin, which was curvilinear with a concavity turned upward. In this case, data were (apparent) K1 = 17.7 x 10(9) M-1 (high-affinity sites) and (apparent) K2 = 2.6 x 10(9) M-1 (low-affinity sites). The four lectins shared the ability to stimulate Jurkat 77 6.8 cells to secrete IL-2. Optimal lectin concentrations were 20 micrograms/ml (PHA) and 50 micrograms/ml (WGA and Con A). Pea lectin failed to display a dose-response relationship, and IL-2 production increased proportionally with lectin concentration. Con A was the most efficient stimulator (250 U/ml), followed by WGA (160 U/ml) and PHA (108 U/ml).

  19. Suppression of Poly(rC)-Binding Protein 4 (PCBP4) reduced cisplatin resistance in human maxillary cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Yumi; Narita, Norihiko; Nomi, Nozomi; Sugimoto, Chizuru; Takabayashi, Tetsuji; Yamada, Takechiyo; Karaya, Kazuhiro; Matsumoto, Hideki; Fujieda, Shigeharu

    2015-01-01

    Cisplatin plays an important role in the therapy for human head and neck cancers. However, cancer cells develop cisplatin resistance, leading to difficulty in treatment and poor prognosis. To analyze cisplatin-resistant mechanisms, a cisplatin-resistant cell line, IMC-3CR, was established from the IMC-3 human maxillary cancer cell line. Flow cytometry revealed that, compared with IMC-3 cells, cisplatin more dominantly induced cell cycle G2/M arrest rather than apoptosis in IMC-3CR cells. That fact suggests that IMC-3CR cells avoid cisplatin-induced apoptosis through induction of G2/M arrest, which allows cancer cells to repair damaged DNA and survive. In the present study, we specifically examined Poly(rC)-Binding Protein 4 (PCBP4), which reportedly induces G2/M arrest. Results showed that suppression of PCBP4 by RNAi reduced cisplatin-induced G2/M arrest and enhanced apoptosis in IMC-3CR cells, resulting in the reduction of cisplatin resistance. In contrast, overexpression of PCBP4 in IMC-3 cells induced G2/M arrest after cisplatin treatment and enhanced cisplatin resistance. We revealed that PCBP4 combined with Cdc25A and suppressed the expression of Cdc25A, resulting in G2/M arrest. PCBP4 plays important roles in the induction of cisplatin resistance in human maxillary cancers. PCBP4 is a novel molecular target for the therapy of head and neck cancers, especially cisplatin-resistant cancers. PMID:26196957

  20. Pathogenesis of Shigella diarrhea: rabbit intestinal cell microvillus membrane binding site for Shigella toxin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study examined the binding of purified 125I-labeled shigella toxin to rabbit jejunal microvillus membranes (MVMs). Toxin binding was concentration dependent, saturable, reversible, and specifically inhibited by unlabeled toxin. The calculated number of toxin molecules bound at 40C was 7.9 X 10(10) (3 X 10(10) to 2 X 10(11))/micrograms of MVM protein or 1.2 X 10(6) per enterocyte. Scatchard analysis showed the binding site to be of a single class with an equilibrium association constant, K, of 4.7 X 10(9) M-1 at 40C. Binding was inversely related to the temperature of incubation. A total of 80% of the labeled toxin binding at 40C dissociated from MVM when the temperature was raised to 370C, but reassociated when the temperature was again brought to 40C. There was no structural or functional change of MVM due to toxin as monitored by electron microscopy or assay of MVM sucrase activity. These studies demonstrate a specific binding site for shigella toxin on rabbit MVMs. The physiological relevance of this receptor remains to be determined