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Sample records for cell-type specific regulation

  1. Epigenetic regulation of normal human mammary cell type-specific miRNAs

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    Vrba, Lukas [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States). Arizona Cancer Center; Inst. of Plant Molecular Biology, Ceske Budejovice (Czech Republic). Biology Centre ASCR; Garbe, James C. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Life Sciences Center; Stampfer, Martha R. [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States). Arizona Cancer Center; Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Life Sciences Center; Futscher, Bernard W. [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States). Arizona Cancer Center and Dept. of Pharmacology & Toxicology

    2011-08-26

    Epigenetic mechanisms are important regulators of cell type–specific genes, including miRNAs. In order to identify cell type-specific miRNAs regulated by epigenetic mechanisms, we undertook a global analysis of miRNA expression and epigenetic states in three isogenic pairs of human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) and human mammary fibroblasts (HMF), which represent two differentiated cell types typically present within a given organ, each with a distinct phenotype and a distinct epigenotype. While miRNA expression and epigenetic states showed strong interindividual concordance within a given cell type, almost 10% of the expressed miRNA showed a cell type–specific pattern of expression that was linked to the epigenetic state of their promoter. The tissue-specific miRNA genes were epigenetically repressed in nonexpressing cells by DNA methylation (38%) and H3K27me3 (58%), with only a small set of miRNAs (21%) showing a dual epigenetic repression where both DNA methylation and H3K27me3 were present at their promoters, such as MIR10A and MIR10B. Individual miRNA clusters of closely related miRNA gene families can each display cell type–specific repression by the same or complementary epigenetic mechanisms, such as the MIR200 family, and MIR205, where fibroblasts repress MIR200C/141 by DNA methylation, MIR200A/200B/429 by H3K27me3, and MIR205 by both DNA methylation and H3K27me3. Since deregulation of many of the epigenetically regulated miRNAs that we identified have been linked to disease processes such as cancer, it is predicted that compromise of the epigenetic control mechanisms is important for this process. Overall, these results highlight the importance of epigenetic regulation in the control of normal cell type–specific miRNA expression.

  2. Cell-type specific light-mediated transcript regulation in the multicellular alga Volvox carteri

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    Kianianmomeni, Arash

    2014-01-01

    Background The multicellular green alga Volvox carteri makes use of none less than 13 photoreceptors, which are mostly expressed in a cell-type specific manner. This gives reason to believe that trasncriptome pattern of each cell type could change differentially in response to environmental light. Here, the cell-type specific changes of various transcripts from different pathways in response to blue, red and far-red light were analyzed. Results In response to different light qualities, distin...

  3. Cell-type specific regulation of cortical excitability through the allatostatin receptor system

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    Tomoko Velasquez

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent technical advances enable the regulation of neuronal circuit activity with high spatial and temporal resolution through genetic delivery of molecular activation or inactivation systems. Among them, the allatostatin receptor (AlstR/ligand system has been developed for selective and quickly reversible silencing of mammalian neurons. However, targeted AlstR-mediated inactivation of specific neuronal types, particularly diverse types of inhibitory interneurons, remains to be established. In the present study, we achieved Cre-directed expression of AlstRs to excitatory and inhibitory cell types in the cortex, and found that the AlstR-mediated inactivation was specific and robust at single cell and neuronal population levels. Bath application of the allatostatin peptide markedly reduced spiking activity of AlstR-expressing excitatory and inhibitory neurons in response to intrasomatic current injections and laser photostimulation via glutamate uncaging, but control neurons without AlstR expression were not affected. As for the cortical network activity, the peptide application constrained photostimulation-evoked excitatory activity propagation detected by fast voltage-sensitive dye (VSD imaging of the slices expressing AlstRs selectively in excitatory neurons, while it augmented excitatory activity in those slices with inhibitory neurons expressing AlstRs. In addition, AlstR-mediated inactivation effectively suppressed pharmacologically-induced seizure activity in the slices targeting AlstRs to excitatory neurons. Taken together, our work demonstrated that the genetic delivery of AlstRs can be used for regulation of cortical excitability in a cell-type specific manner, and suggested that the AlstR system can be potentially used for fast seizure control.

  4. A machine learning approach for identifying novel cell type-specific transcriptional regulators of myogenesis.

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    Busser, Brian W; Taher, Leila; Kim, Yongsok; Tansey, Terese; Bloom, Molly J; Ovcharenko, Ivan; Michelson, Alan M

    2012-01-01

    Transcriptional enhancers integrate the contributions of multiple classes of transcription factors (TFs) to orchestrate the myriad spatio-temporal gene expression programs that occur during development. A molecular understanding of enhancers with similar activities requires the identification of both their unique and their shared sequence features. To address this problem, we combined phylogenetic profiling with a DNA-based enhancer sequence classifier that analyzes the TF binding sites (TFBSs) governing the transcription of a co-expressed gene set. We first assembled a small number of enhancers that are active in Drosophila melanogaster muscle founder cells (FCs) and other mesodermal cell types. Using phylogenetic profiling, we increased the number of enhancers by incorporating orthologous but divergent sequences from other Drosophila species. Functional assays revealed that the diverged enhancer orthologs were active in largely similar patterns as their D. melanogaster counterparts, although there was extensive evolutionary shuffling of known TFBSs. We then built and trained a classifier using this enhancer set and identified additional related enhancers based on the presence or absence of known and putative TFBSs. Predicted FC enhancers were over-represented in proximity to known FC genes; and many of the TFBSs learned by the classifier were found to be critical for enhancer activity, including POU homeodomain, Myb, Ets, Forkhead, and T-box motifs. Empirical testing also revealed that the T-box TF encoded by org-1 is a previously uncharacterized regulator of muscle cell identity. Finally, we found extensive diversity in the composition of TFBSs within known FC enhancers, suggesting that motif combinatorics plays an essential role in the cellular specificity exhibited by such enhancers. In summary, machine learning combined with evolutionary sequence analysis is useful for recognizing novel TFBSs and for facilitating the identification of cognate TFs that

  5. Combinatorial topography and cell-type specific regulation of the ERK pathway by dopaminergic agonists in the mouse striatum.

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    Gangarossa, Giuseppe; Perroy, Julie; Valjent, Emmanuel

    2013-03-01

    Therapeutic agents and drugs of abuse regulate the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) cascade signaling in the medium-sized spiny neurons (MSNs) of the striatum. However, whether this regulation is associated with specific cortical and thalamic inputs has never been studied. We used Drd2-EGFP BAC-transgenic mice to undertake a topographical and cell-type specific analysis of ERK phosphorylation and two of its downstream targets histone H3 and ribosomal protein S6 (rS6) in the dorsal striatum following injection of SKF81297 (D1R-like agonist), quinpirole (D2R-like agonist) or apomorphine (non selective DA receptor agonist). In striatal areas receiving inputs from the cingulate/prelimbic, visual and auditory cortex, SKF81297 treatment increased phosphorylation of ERK, histone H3 and rS6 selectively in EGFP-negative MSNs of Drd2-EGFP mice. In contrast, no regulation was found in striatal region predominantly targeted by the sensorimotor and motor cortex. Apomorphine slightly enhanced ERK and rS6, but not histone H3 phosphorylation. This regulation occurred exclusively in EGFP-negative neurons mostly in striatal sectors receiving connections from the insular, visual and auditory cortex. Quinpirole administration inhibited basal ERK activation but did not change histone H3 and rS6 phosphorylation throughout the rostrocaudal axis of the dorsal striatum. This anatomo-functional study indicates that D1R and D2R agonists produce a unique topography and cell-type specific regulation of the ERK cascade signaling in the mouse striatum, and that those patterns are closely associated with particular cortical and thalamic inputs. This work evidences the need of a precise identification of the striatal areas under study to further understand striatal plasticity. PMID:22453353

  6. oca2 Regulation of chromatophore differentiation and number is cell type specific in zebrafish.

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    Beirl, Alisha J; Linbo, Tor H; Cobb, Marea J; Cooper, Cynthia D

    2014-03-01

    We characterized a zebrafish mutant that displays defects in melanin synthesis and in the differentiation of melanophores and iridophores of the skin and retinal pigment epithelium. Positional cloning and candidate gene sequencing link this mutation to a 410-kb region on chromosome 6, containing the oculocutaneous albinism 2 (oca2) gene. Quantification of oca2 mutant melanophores shows a reduction in the number of differentiated melanophores compared with wildtype siblings. Consistent with the analysis of mouse Oca2-deficient melanocytes, zebrafish mutant melanophores have immature melanosomes which are partially rescued following treatment with vacuolar-type ATPase inhibitor/cytoplasmic pH modifier, bafilomycin A1. Melanophore-specific gene expression is detected at the correct time and in anticipated locations. While oca2 zebrafish display unpigmented gaps on the head region of mutants 3 days post-fertilization, melanoblast quantification indicates that oca2 mutants have the correct number of melanoblasts, suggesting a differentiation defect explains the reduced melanophore number. Unlike melanophores, which are reduced in number in oca2 mutants, differentiated iridophores are present at significantly higher numbers. These data suggest distinct mechanisms for oca2 in establishing differentiated chromatophore number in developing zebrafish. PMID:24330346

  7. Drug and cell type-specific regulation of genes with different classes of estrogen receptor beta-selective agonists.

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    Sreenivasan Paruthiyil

    Full Text Available Estrogens produce biological effects by interacting with two estrogen receptors, ERalpha and ERbeta. Drugs that selectively target ERalpha or ERbeta might be safer for conditions that have been traditionally treated with non-selective estrogens. Several synthetic and natural ERbeta-selective compounds have been identified. One class of ERbeta-selective agonists is represented by ERB-041 (WAY-202041 which binds to ERbeta much greater than ERalpha. A second class of ERbeta-selective agonists derived from plants include MF101, nyasol and liquiritigenin that bind similarly to both ERs, but only activate transcription with ERbeta. Diarylpropionitrile represents a third class of ERbeta-selective compounds because its selectivity is due to a combination of greater binding to ERbeta and transcriptional activity. However, it is unclear if these three classes of ERbeta-selective compounds produce similar biological activities. The goals of these studies were to determine the relative ERbeta selectivity and pattern of gene expression of these three classes of ERbeta-selective compounds compared to estradiol (E(2, which is a non-selective ER agonist. U2OS cells stably transfected with ERalpha or ERbeta were treated with E(2 or the ERbeta-selective compounds for 6 h. Microarray data demonstrated that ERB-041, MF101 and liquiritigenin were the most ERbeta-selective agonists compared to estradiol, followed by nyasol and then diarylpropionitrile. FRET analysis showed that all compounds induced a similar conformation of ERbeta, which is consistent with the finding that most genes regulated by the ERbeta-selective compounds were similar to each other and E(2. However, there were some classes of genes differentially regulated by the ERbeta agonists and E(2. Two ERbeta-selective compounds, MF101 and liquiritigenin had cell type-specific effects as they regulated different genes in HeLa, Caco-2 and Ishikawa cell lines expressing ERbeta. Our gene profiling studies

  8. Cell type-specific transcriptome profiling in mammalian brains.

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    LoVerso, Peter R; Cui, Feng

    2016-01-01

    A mammalian brain contains numerous types of cells. Advances in neuroscience in the past decade allow us to identify and isolate neural cells of interest from mammalian brains. Recent developments in high-throughput technologies, such as microarrays and next-generation sequencing (NGS), provide detailed information on gene expression in pooled cells on a genomic scale. As a result, many novel genes have been found critical in cell type-specific transcriptional regulation. These differentially expressed genes can be used as molecular signatures, unique to a particular class of neural cells. Use of this gene expression-based approach can further differentiate neural cell types into subtypes, potentially linking some of them with neurological diseases. In this article, experimental techniques used to purify neural cells are described, followed by a review on recent microarray- or NGS-based transcriptomic studies of common neural cell types. The future prospects of cell type-specific research are also discussed. PMID:27100485

  9. Nr2e3-directed transcriptional regulation of genes involved in photoreceptor development and cell-type specific phototransduction.

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    Haider, Neena B; Mollema, Nissa; Gaule, Meghan; Yuan, Yang; Sachs, Andrew J; Nystuen, Arne M; Naggert, Jürgen K; Nishina, Patsy M

    2009-09-01

    The retinal transcription factor Nr2e3 plays a key role in photoreceptor development and function. In this study we examine gene expression in the retina of Nr2e3(rd7/rd7) mutants with respect to wild-type control mice, to identify genes that are misregulated and hence potentially function in the Nr2e3 transcriptional network. Quantitative candidate gene real time PCR and subtractive hybridization approaches were used to identify transcripts that were misregulated in Nr2e3(rd7/rd7) mice. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays were then used to determine which of the misregulated transcripts were direct targets of NR2E3. We identified 24 potential targets of NR2E3. In the developing retina, NR2E3 targets transcription factors such as Ror1, Rorg, and the nuclear hormone receptors Nr1d1 and Nr2c1. In the mature retina NR2E3 targets several genes including the rod specific gene Gnb1 and cone specific genes blue opsin, and two of the cone transducin subunits, Gnat2 and Gnb3. In addition, we identified 5 novel transcripts that are targeted by NR2E3. While mislocalization of proteins between rods and cones was not observed, we did observe diminished concentration of GNB1 protein in adult Nr2e3(rd7/rd7) retinas. These studies identified novel transcriptional pathways that are potentially targeted by Nr2e3 in the retina and specifically demonstrate a novel role for NR2E3 in regulating genes involved in phototransduction. PMID:19379737

  10. Characterization of the Dictyostelium homolog of chromatin binding protein DET1 suggests a conserved pathway regulating cell type specification and developmental plasticity.

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    Dubin, Manu J; Kasten, Sonja; Nellen, Wolfgang

    2011-03-01

    DET1 (De-etiolated 1) is a chromatin binding protein involved in developmental regulation in both plants and animals. DET1 is largely restricted to multicellular eukaryotes, and here we report the characterization of a DET1 homolog from the social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum. As in other species, Dictyostelium DET1 is nuclear localized. In contrast to other species, where it is an essential protein, loss of DET1 is nonlethal in Dictyostelium, although viability is significantly reduced. The phenotype of the det1(-) mutant is highly pleiotropic and results in a large degree of heterogeneity in developmental parameters. Loss of DET1 results in delayed and abnormal development with enlarged aggregation territories. Mutant slugs displayed cell type patterning with a bias toward the prestalk pathway. A number of DET1-interacting proteins are conserved in Dictyostelium, and the apparently conserved role of DET1 in regulatory pathways involving the bZIP transcription factors DimB, c-Jun, and HY5 suggests a highly conserved mechanism regulating development in multicellular eukaryotes. While the mechanism by which DET1 functions is unclear, it appears that it has a key role in regulation of developmental plasticity and integration of information on environmental conditions into the developmental program of an organism. PMID:21193547

  11. Cell type-specific conditional regulation of the c-myc proto-oncogene by combining Cre/loxP recombination and tamoxifen-mediated activation.

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    Jäger, Richard; Maurer, Jochen; Jacob, Andrea; Schorle, Hubert

    2004-03-01

    Development of inducible genetic switches for in vivo use with transgenic mice has revolutionized many areas in modern molecular biology. Combining two techniques, Cre/loxP-based genetic recombination and ligand-dependent activation of a chimeric protein, we generated transgenic mice which allow for the spatiotemporal control of expression and of activity of the proto-oncogene c-myc. To these ends, the gene encoding the tamoxifen-inducible c-mycER(T) fusion protein (mycER(T)) was inserted in the ubiquitously active ROSA 26 gene locus by gene targeting. In the resulting ROSAMER allele, generalized transcription of the mycER(T) gene is prevented by a preceding transcriptional stop sequence which is flanked by loxP sites. Crosses of ROSAMER transgenic mice with Mox2 cre transgenic mice revealed tight control of mycER(T) transcription in various tissues unless the transcriptional stop sequence was removed by cre-mediated excision. Furthermore, we were able to demonstrate tamoxifen-dependent activation of the MycER(T) protein in embryonic fibroblasts derived from such mice. As a proof of principle, we demonstrate that primary neural crest cultures established from ROSAMER mice maintain their proliferative capacity in a 4-OHT-dependent manner. Furthermore, we demonstrate that such neural crest cells retain their differentiation potential as shown by expression of NF 160, a marker of neuronal differentiation upon 4-OHT withdrawal. The transgenic mice produced may thus be valuable tools for studying the cell type-specific effects of c-myc activity in development and disease. PMID:15048812

  12. Triiodothyronine regulates angiogenic growth factor and cytokine secretion by isolated human decidual cells in a cell-type specific and gestational age-dependent manner

    OpenAIRE

    Vasilopoulou, E.; Loubière, L.S.; Lash, G.E.; Ohizua, O.; McCabe, C.J.; Franklyn, J A; Kilby, M. D.; Chan, S Y

    2014-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION Does triiodothyronine (T3) regulate the secretion of angiogenic growth factors and cytokines by human decidual cells isolated from early pregnancy? SUMMARY ANSWER T3 modulates the secretion of specific angiogenic growth factors and cytokines, with different regulatory patterns observed amongst various isolated subpopulations of human decidual cells and with a distinct change between the first and second trimesters of pregnancy. WHAT IS KNOWN ALREADY Maternal thyroid dysfunction...

  13. Investigating Striatal Function through Cell-Type-Specific Manipulations

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    Kreitzer, Anatol C.; Berke, Joshua D.

    2011-01-01

    The striatum integrates convergent input from the cortex, thalamus, and midbrain, and has a powerful influence over motivated behavior via outputs to downstream basal ganglia nuclei. Although the anatomy and physiology of distinct classes of striatal neurons has been intensively studied, the specific functions of these cell subpopulations have been more difficult to address. Recently, application of new methodologies for perturbing activity and signaling in different cell types in vivo has be...

  14. Sequence and chromatin determinants of cell-type-specific transcription factor binding.

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    Arvey, Aaron; Agius, Phaedra; Noble, William Stafford; Leslie, Christina

    2012-09-01

    Gene regulatory programs in distinct cell types are maintained in large part through the cell-type-specific binding of transcription factors (TFs). The determinants of TF binding include direct DNA sequence preferences, DNA sequence preferences of cofactors, and the local cell-dependent chromatin context. To explore the contribution of DNA sequence signal, histone modifications, and DNase accessibility to cell-type-specific binding, we analyzed 286 ChIP-seq experiments performed by the ENCODE Consortium. This analysis included experiments for 67 transcriptional regulators, 15 of which were profiled in both the GM12878 (lymphoblastoid) and K562 (erythroleukemic) human hematopoietic cell lines. To model TF-bound regions, we trained support vector machines (SVMs) that use flexible k-mer patterns to capture DNA sequence signals more accurately than traditional motif approaches. In addition, we trained SVM spatial chromatin signatures to model local histone modifications and DNase accessibility, obtaining significantly more accurate TF occupancy predictions than simpler approaches. Consistent with previous studies, we find that DNase accessibility can explain cell-line-specific binding for many factors. However, we also find that of the 10 factors with prominent cell-type-specific binding patterns, four display distinct cell-type-specific DNA sequence preferences according to our models. Moreover, for two factors we identify cell-specific binding sites that are accessible in both cell types but bound only in one. For these sites, cell-type-specific sequence models, rather than DNase accessibility, are better able to explain differential binding. Our results suggest that using a single motif for each TF and filtering for chromatin accessible loci is not always sufficient to accurately account for cell-type-specific binding profiles. PMID:22955984

  15. Quantitative analysis of cell-type specific gene expression in the green alga Volvox carteri

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    Hallmann Armin

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The multicellular alga Volvox carteri possesses only two cell types: mortal, motile somatic cells and potentially immortal, immotile reproductive cells. It is therefore an attractive model system for studying how cell-autonomous cytodifferentiation is programmed within a genome. Moreover, there are ongoing genome projects both in Volvox carteri and in the closely related unicellular alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. However, gene sequencing is only the beginning. To identify cell-type specific expression and to determine relative expression rates, we evaluate the potential of real-time RT-PCR for quantifying gene transcript levels. Results Here we analyze a diversified pool of 39 target genes by real-time RT-PCR for each cell type. This gene pool contains previously known genes with unknown localization of cellular expression, 28 novel genes which are described in this study for the first time, and a few known, cell-type specific genes as a control. The respective gene products are, for instance, part of photosynthesis, cellular regulation, stress response, or transport processes. We provide expression data for all these genes. Conclusion The results show that quantitative real-time RT-PCR is a favorable approach to analyze cell-type specific gene expression in Volvox, which can be extended to a much larger number of genes or to developmental or metabolic mutants. Our expression data also provide a basis for a detailed analysis of individual, previously unknown, cell-type specifically expressed genes.

  16. Transcription factor co-localization patterns affect human cell type-specific gene expression

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    Wang Dennis

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cellular development requires the precise control of gene expression states. Transcription factors are involved in this regulatory process through their combinatorial binding with DNA. Information about transcription factor binding sites can help determine which combinations of factors work together to regulate a gene, but it is unclear how far the binding data from one cell type can inform about regulation in other cell types. Results By integrating data on co-localized transcription factor binding sites in the K562 cell line with expression data across 38 distinct hematopoietic cell types, we developed regression models to describe the relationship between the expression of target genes and the transcription factors that co-localize nearby. With K562 binding sites identifying the predictors, the proportion of expression explained by the models is statistically significant only for monocytic cells (p-valueFOS, TAF1 and YY1 to a sparsely studied gene LRIG2. We also find that the activity of a transcription factor may be different depending on the cell type and the identity of other co-localized factors. Conclusion Our approach shows that gene expression can be explained by a modest number of co-localized transcription factors, however, information on cell-type specific binding is crucial for understanding combinatorial gene regulation.

  17. Cell-Type Specific Inactivation of Hippocampal CA1 Disrupts Location-Dependent Object Recognition in the Mouse

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    Haettig, Jakob; Sun, Yanjun; Wood, Marcelo A.; Xu, Xiangmin

    2013-01-01

    The allatostatin receptor (AlstR)/ligand inactivation system enables potent regulation of neuronal circuit activity. To examine how different cell types participate in memory formation, we have used this system through Cre-directed, cell-type specific expression in mouse hippocampal CA1 in vivo and examined functional effects of inactivation of…

  18. CAST-ChIP Maps Cell-Type-Specific Chromatin States in the Drosophila Central Nervous System

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    Tamás Schauer

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Chromatin organization and gene activity are responsive to developmental and environmental cues. Although many genes are transcribed throughout development and across cell types, much of gene regulation is highly cell-type specific. To readily track chromatin features at the resolution of cell types within complex tissues, we developed and validated chromatin affinity purification from specific cell types by chromatin immunoprecipitation (CAST-ChIP, a broadly applicable biochemical procedure. RNA polymerase II (Pol II CAST-ChIP identifies ∼1,500 neuronal and glia-specific genes in differentiated cells within the adult Drosophila brain. In contrast, the histone H2A.Z is distributed similarly across cell types and throughout development, marking cell-type-invariant Pol II-bound regions. Our study identifies H2A.Z as an active chromatin signature that is refractory to changes across cell fates. Thus, CAST-ChIP powerfully identifies cell-type-specific as well as cell-type-invariant chromatin states, enabling the systematic dissection of chromatin structure and gene regulation within complex tissues such as the brain.

  19. Cell-type specific four-component hydrogel.

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    Timo Aberle

    Full Text Available In the field of regenerative medicine we aim to develop implant matrices for specific tissue needs. By combining two per se, cell-permissive gel systems with enzymatic crosslinkers (gelatin/transglutaminase and fibrinogen/thrombin to generate a blend (technical term: quattroGel, an unexpected cell-selectivity evolved. QuattroGels were porous and formed cavities in the cell diameter range, possessed gelation kinetics in the minute range, viscoelastic properties and a mechanical strength appropriate for general cell adhesion, and restricted diffusion. Cell proliferation of endothelial cells, chondrocytes and fibroblasts was essentially unaffected. In contrast, on quattroGels neither endothelial cells formed vascular tubes nor did primary neurons extend neurites in significant amounts. Only chondrocytes differentiated properly as judged by collagen isoform expression. The biophysical quattroGel characteristics appeared to leave distinct cell processes such as mitosis unaffected and favored differentiation of sessile cells, but hampered differentiation of migratory cells. This cell-type selectivity is of interest e.g. during articular cartilage or invertebral disc repair, where pathological innervation and angiogenesis represent adverse events in tissue engineering.

  20. Cell-type specific four-component hydrogel.

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    Aberle, Timo; Franke, Katrin; Rist, Elke; Benz, Karin; Schlosshauer, Burkhard

    2014-01-01

    In the field of regenerative medicine we aim to develop implant matrices for specific tissue needs. By combining two per se, cell-permissive gel systems with enzymatic crosslinkers (gelatin/transglutaminase and fibrinogen/thrombin) to generate a blend (technical term: quattroGel), an unexpected cell-selectivity evolved. QuattroGels were porous and formed cavities in the cell diameter range, possessed gelation kinetics in the minute range, viscoelastic properties and a mechanical strength appropriate for general cell adhesion, and restricted diffusion. Cell proliferation of endothelial cells, chondrocytes and fibroblasts was essentially unaffected. In contrast, on quattroGels neither endothelial cells formed vascular tubes nor did primary neurons extend neurites in significant amounts. Only chondrocytes differentiated properly as judged by collagen isoform expression. The biophysical quattroGel characteristics appeared to leave distinct cell processes such as mitosis unaffected and favored differentiation of sessile cells, but hampered differentiation of migratory cells. This cell-type selectivity is of interest e.g. during articular cartilage or invertebral disc repair, where pathological innervation and angiogenesis represent adverse events in tissue engineering. PMID:24475174

  1. Common and cell type-specific responses of human cells to mitochondrial dysfunction

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    In yeast, mitochondrial dysfunction activates a specific pathway, termed retrograde regulation, which alters the expression of specific nuclear genes and results in increased replicative life span. In mammalian cells, the specific nuclear genes induced in response to loss of mitochondrial function are less well defined. This study characterizes responses in nuclear gene expression to loss of mitochondrial DNA sequences in three different human cell types: T143B, an osteosarcoma-derived cell line; ARPE19, a retinal pigment epithelium cell line; and GMO6225, a fibroblast cell population from an individual with Kearns-Sayre syndrome (KSS). Quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was used to measure gene expression of a selection of glycolysis, TCA cycle, mitochondrial, peroxisomal, extracellular matrix, stress response, and regulatory genes. Gene expression changes that were common to all three cell types included up-regulation of GCK (glucokinase), CS (citrate synthase), HOX1 (heme oxygenase 1), CKMT2 (mitochondrial creatine kinase 2), MYC (v-myc myelocytomatosis viral oncogene homolog), and WRN (Werner syndrome helicase), and down-regulation of FBP1 (fructose-1, 6-bisphosphatase 1) and COL4A1 (collagen, type IV, alpha 1). RNA interference experiments show that induction of MYC is important in ρ0 cells for the up-regulation of glycolysis. In addition, a variety of cell type-specific gene changes was detected and most likely depended upon the differentiated functions of the individual cell types. These expression changes may help explain the response of different tissues to the loss of mitochondrial function due to aging or disease

  2. C/EBPβ Induces Chromatin Opening at a Cell-Type-Specific Enhancer▿

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    Plachetka, Annette; Chayka, Olesya; Wilczek, Carola; Melnik, Svitlana; Bonifer, Constanze; Klempnauer, Karl-Heinz

    2008-01-01

    We have used the chicken mim-1 gene as a model to study the mechanisms by which transcription factors gain initial access to their target sites in compacted chromatin. The expression of mim-1 is restricted to the myelomonocytic lineage of the hematopoietic system where it is regulated synergistically by the Myb and CCAAT/enhancer binding protein (C/EBP) factors. Myb and C/EBPβ cooperate at two distinct cis elements of mim-1, the promoter and a cell-type-specific enhancer, both of which are as...

  3. Cell type-specific neuroprotective activity of untranslocated prion protein.

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    Elena Restelli

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A key pathogenic role in prion diseases was proposed for a cytosolic form of the prion protein (PrP. However, it is not clear how cytosolic PrP localization influences neuronal viability, with either cytotoxic or anti-apoptotic effects reported in different studies. The cellular mechanism by which PrP is delivered to the cytosol of neurons is also debated, and either retrograde transport from the endoplasmic reticulum or inefficient translocation during biosynthesis has been proposed. We investigated cytosolic PrP biogenesis and effect on cell viability in primary neuronal cultures from different mouse brain regions. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Mild proteasome inhibition induced accumulation of an untranslocated form of cytosolic PrP in cortical and hippocampal cells, but not in cerebellar granules. A cyclopeptolide that interferes with the correct insertion of the PrP signal sequence into the translocon increased the amount of untranslocated PrP in cortical and hippocampal cells, and induced its synthesis in cerebellar neurons. Untranslocated PrP boosted the resistance of cortical and hippocampal neurons to apoptotic insults but had no effect on cerebellar cells. SIGNIFICANCE: These results indicate cell type-dependent differences in the efficiency of PrP translocation, and argue that cytosolic PrP targeting might serve a physiological neuroprotective function.

  4. The evolutionary emergence of cell type-specific genes inferred from the gene expression analysis of Hydra

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    Hwang, Jung Shan; Ohyanagi, Hajime; Hayakawa, Shiho; Osato, Naoki; Nishimiya-Fujisawa, Chiemi; Ikeo, Kazuho; David, Charles N.; Fujisawa, Toshitaka; Gojobori, Takashi

    2007-01-01

    Cell lineages of cnidarians including Hydra represent the fundamental cell types of metazoans and provides us a unique opportunity to study the evolutionary diversification of cell type in the animal kingdom. Hydra contains epithelial cells as well as a multipotent interstitial cell (I-cell) that gives rise to nematocytes, nerve cells, gland cells, and germ-line cells. We used cDNA microarrays to identify cell type-specific genes by comparing gene expression in normal Hydra with animals lacking the I-cell lineage, so-called epithelial Hydra. We then performed in situ hybridization to localize expression to specific cell types. Eighty-six genes were shown to be expressed in specific cell types of the I-cell lineage. An additional 29 genes were expressed in epithelial cells and were down-regulated in epithelial animals lacking I-cells. Based on the above information, we constructed a database (http://hydra.lab.nig.ac.jp/hydra/), which describes the expression patterns of cell type-specific genes in Hydra. Most genes expressed specifically in either I-cells or epithelial cells have homologues in higher metazoans. By comparison, most nematocyte-specific genes and approximately half of the gland cell- and nerve cell-specific genes are unique to the cnidarian lineage. Because nematocytes, gland cells, and nerve cells appeared along with the emergence of cnidarians, this suggests that lineage-specific genes arose in cnidarians in conjunction with the evolution of new cell types required by the cnidarians. PMID:17766437

  5. General and cell-type specific mechanisms target TRPP2/PKD-2 to cilia.

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    Bae, Young-Kyung; Qin, Hongmin; Knobel, Karla M; Hu, Jinghua; Rosenbaum, Joel L; Barr, Maureen M

    2006-10-01

    Ciliary localization of the transient receptor potential polycystin 2 channel (TRPP2/PKD-2) is evolutionarily conserved, but how TRPP2 is targeted to cilia is not known. In this study, we characterize the motility and localization of PKD-2, a TRPP2 homolog, in C. elegans sensory neurons. We demonstrate that GFP-tagged PKD-2 moves bidirectionally in the dendritic compartment. Furthermore, we show a requirement for different molecules in regulating the ciliary localization of PKD-2. PKD-2 is directed to moving dendritic particles by the UNC-101/adaptor protein 1 (AP-1) complex. When expressed in non-native neurons, PKD-2 remains in cell bodies and is not observed in dendrites or cilia, indicating that cell-type specific factors are required for directing PKD-2 to the dendrite. PKD-2 stabilization in cilia and cell bodies requires LOV-1, a functional partner and a TRPP1 homolog. In lov-1 mutants, PKD-2 is greatly reduced in cilia and forms abnormal aggregates in neuronal cell bodies. Intraflagellar transport (IFT) is not essential for PKD-2 dendritic motility or access to the cilium, but may regulate PKD-2 ciliary abundance. We propose that both general and cell-type-specific factors govern TRPP2/PKD-2 subcellular distribution by forming at least two steps involving somatodendritic and ciliary sorting decisions. PMID:16943275

  6. Cell-Type Specific Four-Component Hydrogel

    OpenAIRE

    Timo Aberle; Katrin Franke; Elke Rist; Karin Benz; Burkhard Schlosshauer

    2014-01-01

    In the field of regenerative medicine we aim to develop implant matrices for specific tissue needs. By combining two per se, cell-permissive gel systems with enzymatic crosslinkers (gelatin/transglutaminase and fibrinogen/thrombin) to generate a blend (technical term: quattroGel), an unexpected cell-selectivity evolved. QuattroGels were porous and formed cavities in the cell diameter range, possessed gelation kinetics in the minute range, viscoelastic properties and a mechanical strength appr...

  7. Molecular Characterization of Arabidopsis GAL4/UAS Enhancer Trap Lines Identifies Novel Cell-Type-Specific Promoters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radoeva, Tatyana; Ten Hove, Colette A; Saiga, Shunsuke; Weijers, Dolf

    2016-06-01

    Cell-type-specific gene expression is essential to distinguish between the numerous cell types of multicellular organism. Therefore, cell-type-specific gene expression is tightly regulated and for most genes RNA transcription is the central point of control. Thus, transcriptional reporters are broadly used markers for cell identity. In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), a recognized standard for cell identities is a collection of GAL4/UAS enhancer trap lines. Yet, while greatly used, very few of them have been molecularly characterized. Here, we have selected a set of 21 frequently used GAL4/UAS enhancer trap lines for detailed characterization of expression pattern and genomic insertion position. We studied their embryonic and postembryonic expression domains and grouped them into three groups (early embryo development, late embryo development, and embryonic root apical meristem lines) based on their dominant expression. We show that some of the analyzed lines are expressed in a domain often broader than the one that is reported. Additionally, we present an overview of the location of the T-DNA inserts of all lines, with one exception. Finally, we demonstrate how the obtained information can be used for generating novel cell-type-specific marker lines and for genotyping enhancer trap lines. The knowledge could therefore support the extensive use of these valuable lines. PMID:27208300

  8. Glutamine synthetase is a genetic determinant of cell type-specific glutamine independence in breast epithelia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsiu-Ni Kung

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Although significant variations in the metabolic profiles exist among different cells, little is understood in terms of genetic regulations of such cell type-specific metabolic phenotypes and nutrient requirements. While many cancer cells depend on exogenous glutamine for survival to justify the therapeutic targeting of glutamine metabolism, the mechanisms of glutamine dependence and likely response and resistance of such glutamine-targeting strategies among cancers are largely unknown. In this study, we have found a systematic variation in the glutamine dependence among breast tumor subtypes associated with mammary differentiation: basal- but not luminal-type breast cells are more glutamine-dependent and may be susceptible to glutamine-targeting therapeutics. Glutamine independence of luminal-type cells is associated mechanistically with lineage-specific expression of glutamine synthetase (GS. Luminal cells can also rescue basal cells in co-culture without glutamine, indicating a potential for glutamine symbiosis within breast ducts. The luminal-specific expression of GS is directly induced by GATA3 and represses glutaminase expression. Such distinct glutamine dependency and metabolic symbiosis is coupled with the acquisition of the GS and glutamine independence during the mammary differentiation program. Understanding the genetic circuitry governing distinct metabolic patterns is relevant to many symbiotic relationships among different cells and organisms. In addition, the ability of GS to predict patterns of glutamine metabolism and dependency among tumors is also crucial in the rational design and application of glutamine and other metabolic pathway targeted therapies.

  9. Towards identifying host cell-type specific response patterns to bacterial endosymbiosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gavrilovic, Srdjan

    view, available techniques have relied heavily on whole organ analyses that disregard specificities of individual cell types. To address this issue we aimed to develop a technology for comparative global analysis of mature mRNA and small RNA populations at the cell type specific level in the model...... plant Lotus japonicus. A powerful approach referred to here as Defined Expression and RNA Affinity co-Purification (DERAP) was developed to study gene expression and small RNA populations in the host roots during early phases of signal exchange at the cell-type level. As a basis for DERAP analysis of......, namely epidermis with elongating root hairs, inner cortex, endodermis, phloem and xylem, were characterized in L. japonicus. In combination with tagged forms of a Ribosomal surface Protein (RP) and the viral small RNA binding protein P19, these promoters were introduced into L. japonicus ecotype Gifu...

  10. Cell type-specific interactions of transcription factors with a housekeeping promoter in vivo.

    OpenAIRE

    Stapleton, G; Somma, M P; Lavia, P

    1993-01-01

    Mammalian housekeeping promoters represent a class of regulatory elements different from those of tissues-specific genes, lacking a TATA box and associated with CG-rich DNA. We have compared the organization of the housekeeping Htf9 promoter in different cell types by genomic footprinting. The sites of in vivo occupancy clearly reflected local combinations of tissue-specific and ubiquitous binding factors. The flexibility of the Htf9 promoter in acting as the target of cell-specific combinati...

  11. Analysis of cell-type-specific gene expression during mouse spermatogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Almstrup, Kristian; Nielsen, John E; Hansen, Martin Asser;

    2004-01-01

    In rodents, changes in gene expression during spermatogenesis can be monitored by sampling testis from each day during postnatal development. However, changes in gene expression at the tissue level can reflect changes in the concentration of an mRNA in a specific cell type, changes in volume of s...

  12. A quantitative comparison of cell-type-specific microarray gene expression profiling methods in the mouse brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin W Okaty

    Full Text Available Expression profiling of restricted neural populations using microarrays can facilitate neuronal classification and provide insight into the molecular bases of cellular phenotypes. Due to the formidable heterogeneity of intermixed cell types that make up the brain, isolating cell types prior to microarray processing poses steep technical challenges that have been met in various ways. These methodological differences have the potential to distort cell-type-specific gene expression profiles insofar as they may insufficiently filter out contaminating mRNAs or induce aberrant cellular responses not normally present in vivo. Thus we have compared the repeatability, susceptibility to contamination from off-target cell-types, and evidence for stress-responsive gene expression of five different purification methods--Laser Capture Microdissection (LCM, Translating Ribosome Affinity Purification (TRAP, Immunopanning (PAN, Fluorescence Activated Cell Sorting (FACS, and manual sorting of fluorescently labeled cells (Manual. We found that all methods obtained comparably high levels of repeatability, however, data from LCM and TRAP showed significantly higher levels of contamination than the other methods. While PAN samples showed higher activation of apoptosis-related, stress-related and immediate early genes, samples from FACS and Manual studies, which also require dissociated cells, did not. Given that TRAP targets actively translated mRNAs, whereas other methods target all transcribed mRNAs, observed differences may also reflect translational regulation.

  13. Targeting the hemangioblast with a novel cell type-specific enhancer

    OpenAIRE

    Teixeira Vera; Arede Natacha; Gardner Rui; Rodríguez-León Joaquín; Tavares Ana T

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Hemangioblasts are known as the common precursors for primitive hematopoietic and endothelial lineages. Their existence has been supported mainly by the observation that both cell types develop in close proximity and by in vitro differentiation and genetic studies. However, more compelling evidence will arise from tracking their cell fates using a lineage-specific marker. Results We report the identification of a hemangioblast-specific enhancer (Hb) located in the cis-regu...

  14. Protein conservation and variation suggest mechanisms of cell type-specific modulation of signaling pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin H Schaefer

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Many proteins and signaling pathways are present in most cell types and tissues and yet perform specialized functions. To elucidate mechanisms by which these ubiquitous pathways are modulated, we overlaid information about cross-cell line protein abundance and variability, and evolutionary conservation onto functional pathway components and topological layers in the pathway hierarchy. We found that the input (receptors and the output (transcription factors layers evolve more rapidly than proteins in the intermediary transmission layer. In contrast, protein expression variability decreases from the input to the output layer. We observed that the differences in protein variability between the input and transmission layer can be attributed to both the network position and the tendency of variable proteins to physically interact with constitutively expressed proteins. Differences in protein expression variability and conservation are also accompanied by the tendency of conserved and constitutively expressed proteins to acquire somatic mutations, while germline mutations tend to occur in cell type-specific proteins. Thus, conserved core proteins in the transmission layer could perform a fundamental role in most cell types and are therefore less tolerant to germline mutations. In summary, we propose that the core signal transmission machinery is largely modulated by a variable input layer through physical protein interactions. We hypothesize that the bow-tie organization of cellular signaling on the level of protein abundance variability contributes to the specificity of the signal response in different cell types.

  15. Protein conservation and variation suggest mechanisms of cell type-specific modulation of signaling pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, Martin H; Yang, Jae-Seong; Serrano, Luis; Kiel, Christina

    2014-06-01

    Many proteins and signaling pathways are present in most cell types and tissues and yet perform specialized functions. To elucidate mechanisms by which these ubiquitous pathways are modulated, we overlaid information about cross-cell line protein abundance and variability, and evolutionary conservation onto functional pathway components and topological layers in the pathway hierarchy. We found that the input (receptors) and the output (transcription factors) layers evolve more rapidly than proteins in the intermediary transmission layer. In contrast, protein expression variability decreases from the input to the output layer. We observed that the differences in protein variability between the input and transmission layer can be attributed to both the network position and the tendency of variable proteins to physically interact with constitutively expressed proteins. Differences in protein expression variability and conservation are also accompanied by the tendency of conserved and constitutively expressed proteins to acquire somatic mutations, while germline mutations tend to occur in cell type-specific proteins. Thus, conserved core proteins in the transmission layer could perform a fundamental role in most cell types and are therefore less tolerant to germline mutations. In summary, we propose that the core signal transmission machinery is largely modulated by a variable input layer through physical protein interactions. We hypothesize that the bow-tie organization of cellular signaling on the level of protein abundance variability contributes to the specificity of the signal response in different cell types. PMID:24922536

  16. Cell-type specific roles for PTEN in establishing a functional retinal architecture.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Cantrup

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The retina has a unique three-dimensional architecture, the precise organization of which allows for complete sampling of the visual field. Along the radial or apicobasal axis, retinal neurons and their dendritic and axonal arbors are segregated into layers, while perpendicular to this axis, in the tangential plane, four of the six neuronal types form patterned cellular arrays, or mosaics. Currently, the molecular cues that control retinal cell positioning are not well-understood, especially those that operate in the tangential plane. Here we investigated the role of the PTEN phosphatase in establishing a functional retinal architecture. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In the developing retina, PTEN was localized preferentially to ganglion, amacrine and horizontal cells, whose somata are distributed in mosaic patterns in the tangential plane. Generation of a retina-specific Pten knock-out resulted in retinal ganglion, amacrine and horizontal cell hypertrophy, and expansion of the inner plexiform layer. The spacing of Pten mutant mosaic populations was also aberrant, as were the arborization and fasciculation patterns of their processes, displaying cell type-specific defects in the radial and tangential dimensions. Irregular oscillatory potentials were also observed in Pten mutant electroretinograms, indicative of asynchronous amacrine cell firing. Furthermore, while Pten mutant RGC axons targeted appropriate brain regions, optokinetic spatial acuity was reduced in Pten mutant animals. Finally, while some features of the Pten mutant retina appeared similar to those reported in Dscam-mutant mice, PTEN expression and activity were normal in the absence of Dscam. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We conclude that Pten regulates somal positioning and neurite arborization patterns of a subset of retinal cells that form mosaics, likely functioning independently of Dscam, at least during the embryonic period. Our findings thus reveal an unexpected

  17. The roadmap for estimation of cell-type-specific neuronal activity from non-invasive measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhlirova, Hana; Kılıç, Kıvılcım; Tian, Peifang; Sakadžić, Sava; Gagnon, Louis; Thunemann, Martin; Desjardins, Michèle; Saisan, Payam A; Nizar, Krystal; Yaseen, Mohammad A; Hagler, Donald J; Vandenberghe, Matthieu; Djurovic, Srdjan; Andreassen, Ole A; Silva, Gabriel A; Masliah, Eliezer; Kleinfeld, David; Vinogradov, Sergei; Buxton, Richard B; Einevoll, Gaute T; Boas, David A; Dale, Anders M; Devor, Anna

    2016-10-01

    The computational properties of the human brain arise from an intricate interplay between billions of neurons connected in complex networks. However, our ability to study these networks in healthy human brain is limited by the necessity to use non-invasive technologies. This is in contrast to animal models where a rich, detailed view of cellular-level brain function with cell-type-specific molecular identity has become available due to recent advances in microscopic optical imaging and genetics. Thus, a central challenge facing neuroscience today is leveraging these mechanistic insights from animal studies to accurately draw physiological inferences from non-invasive signals in humans. On the essential path towards this goal is the development of a detailed 'bottom-up' forward model bridging neuronal activity at the level of cell-type-specific populations to non-invasive imaging signals. The general idea is that specific neuronal cell types have identifiable signatures in the way they drive changes in cerebral blood flow, cerebral metabolic rate of O2 (measurable with quantitative functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging), and electrical currents/potentials (measurable with magneto/electroencephalography). This forward model would then provide the 'ground truth' for the development of new tools for tackling the inverse problem-estimation of neuronal activity from multimodal non-invasive imaging data.This article is part of the themed issue 'Interpreting BOLD: a dialogue between cognitive and cellular neuroscience'. PMID:27574309

  18. Gene Expression Programs in Response to Hypoxia: Cell Type Specificity and Prognostic Significance in Human Cancers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Inadequate oxygen (hypoxia triggers a multifaceted cellular response that has important roles in normal physiology and in many human diseases. A transcription factor, hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF, plays a central role in the hypoxia response; its activity is regulated by the oxygen-dependent degradation of the HIF-1alpha protein. Despite the ubiquity and importance of hypoxia responses, little is known about the variation in the global transcriptional response to hypoxia among different cell types or how this variation might relate to tissue- and cell-specific diseases. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We analyzed the temporal changes in global transcript levels in response to hypoxia in primary renal proximal tubule epithelial cells, breast epithelial cells, smooth muscle cells, and endothelial cells with DNA microarrays. The extent of the transcriptional response to hypoxia was greatest in the renal tubule cells. This heightened response was associated with a uniquely high level of HIF-1alpha RNA in renal cells, and it could be diminished by reducing HIF-1alpha expression via RNA interference. A gene-expression signature of the hypoxia response, derived from our studies of cultured mammary and renal tubular epithelial cells, showed coordinated variation in several human cancers, and was a strong predictor of clinical outcomes in breast and ovarian cancers. In an analysis of a large, published gene-expression dataset from breast cancers, we found that the prognostic information in the hypoxia signature was virtually independent of that provided by the previously reported wound signature and more predictive of outcomes than any of the clinical parameters in current use. CONCLUSIONS: The transcriptional response to hypoxia varies among human cells. Some of this variation is traceable to variation in expression of the HIF1A gene. A gene-expression signature of the cellular response to hypoxia is associated with a significantly poorer prognosis

  19. Cell-type specific oxytocin gene expression from AAV delivered promoter deletion constructs into the rat supraoptic nucleus in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raymond L Fields

    Full Text Available The magnocellular neurons (MCNs in the hypothalamus selectively express either oxytocin (OXT or vasopressin (AVP neuropeptide genes, a property that defines their phenotypes. Here we examine the molecular basis of this selectivity in the OXT MCNs by stereotaxic microinjections of adeno-associated virus (AAV vectors that contain various OXT gene promoter deletion constructs using EGFP as the reporter into the rat supraoptic nucleus (SON. Two weeks following injection of the AAVs, immunohistochemical assays of EGFP expression from these constructs were done to determine whether the EGFP reporter co-localizes with either the OXT- or AVP-immunoreactivity in the MCNs. The results show that the key elements in the OT gene promoter that regulate the cell-type specific expression the SON are located -216 to -100 bp upstream of the transcription start site. We hypothesize that within this 116 bp domain a repressor exists that inhibits expression specifically in AVP MCNs, thereby leading to the cell-type specific expression of the OXT gene only in the OXT MCNs.

  20. Gene expression profiles of hepatic cell-type specific marker genes in progression of liver fibrosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yoshiyuki Takahara; Mitsuo Takahashi; Hiroki Wagatsuma; Fumihiko Yokoya; Qing-Wei Zhang; Mutsuyo Yamaguchi; Hiroyuki Aburatani; Norifumi Kawada

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To determine the gene expression profile data for the whole liver during development of dimethylnitrosamine (DMN)-induced hepatic fibrosis.METHODS: Marker genes were identified for different types of hepatic cells, including hepatic stellate cells (HSCs), Kupffer cells (including other inflammatory cells),and hepatocytes, using independent temporal DNA microarray data obtained from isolated hepatic cells.RESULTS: The cell-type analysis of gene expression gave several key results and led to formation of three hypotheses: (1) changes in the expression of HSCspecific marker genes during fibrosis were similar to gene expression data in in vitro cultured HSCs, suggesting a major role of the self-activating characteristics of HSCs in formation of fibrosis; (2) expression of mast cell-specific marker genes reached a peak during liver fibrosis,suggesting a possible role of mast cells in formation of fibrosis; and (3) abnormal expression of hepatocytespecific marker genes was found across several metabolic pathways during fibrosis, including sulfur-containing amino acid metabolism, fatty acid metabolism, and drug metabolism, suggesting a mechanistic relationship between these abnormalities and symptoms of liver fibrosis.CONCLUSION: Analysis of marker genes for specific hepatic cell types can identify the key aspects of fibrogenesis. Sequential activation of inflammatory cells and the self-supporting properties of HSCs play an important role in development of fibrosis.

  1. Cell type specificity and structural determinants of IRES activity from the 5' leaders of different HIV-1 transcripts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plank, Terra-Dawn M; Whitehurst, James T; Kieft, Jeffrey S

    2013-07-01

    Internal ribosome entry site (IRES) RNAs are important regulators of gene expression, but their diverse molecular mechanisms remain partially understood. The HIV-1 gag transcript leader contains an IRES that may be a good model for understanding the function of many other IRESs. We investigated the possibility that this IRES' function is linked to both the structure of the RNA and its cellular environment. We find that in the context of a bicistronic reporter construct, HIV-1 gag IRES' activity is cell type-specific, with higher activity in T-cell culture systems that model the natural target cells for HIV-1 infection. This finding underscores how an IRES may be fine tuned to function in certain cells, perhaps owing to cell type-specific protein factors. Using RNA probing and mutagenesis, we demonstrate that the HIV-1 gag IRES does not use pre-folded RNA structure to drive function, a finding that gives insight into how conformationally dynamic IRESs operate. Furthermore, we find that a common exon drives IRES activity in a diverse set of alternatively spliced transcripts. We propose a mechanism in which a structurally plastic RNA element confers the ability to initiate translation internally, and activity from this common element is modulated by 3' nucleotides added by alternative splicing. PMID:23661682

  2. Cell type specificity and structural determinants of IRES activity from the 5′ leaders of different HIV-1 transcripts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plank, Terra-Dawn M.; Whitehurst, James T.; Kieft, Jeffrey S.

    2013-01-01

    Internal ribosome entry site (IRES) RNAs are important regulators of gene expression, but their diverse molecular mechanisms remain partially understood. The HIV-1 gag transcript leader contains an IRES that may be a good model for understanding the function of many other IRESs. We investigated the possibility that this IRES’ function is linked to both the structure of the RNA and its cellular environment. We find that in the context of a bicistronic reporter construct, HIV-1 gag IRES’ activity is cell type-specific, with higher activity in T-cell culture systems that model the natural target cells for HIV-1 infection. This finding underscores how an IRES may be fine tuned to function in certain cells, perhaps owing to cell type-specific protein factors. Using RNA probing and mutagenesis, we demonstrate that the HIV-1 gag IRES does not use pre-folded RNA structure to drive function, a finding that gives insight into how conformationally dynamic IRESs operate. Furthermore, we find that a common exon drives IRES activity in a diverse set of alternatively spliced transcripts. We propose a mechanism in which a structurally plastic RNA element confers the ability to initiate translation internally, and activity from this common element is modulated by 3′ nucleotides added by alternative splicing. PMID:23661682

  3. Partitioning Heritability of Regulatory and Cell-Type-Specific Variants across 11 Common Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gusev, Alexander; Lee, S. Hong; Trynka, Gosia; Finucane, Hilary; Vilhjálmsson, Bjarni J.; Xu, Han; Zang, Chongzhi; Ripke, Stephan; Bulik-Sullivan, Brendan; Stahl, Eli; Ripke, Stephan; Neale, Benjamin M.; Corvin, Aiden; Walters, James T.R.; Farh, Kai-How; Holmans, Peter A.; Lee, Phil; Bulik-Sullivan, Brendan; Collier, David A.; Huang, Hailiang; Pers, Tune H.; Agartz, Ingrid; Agerbo, Esben; Albus, Margot; Alexander, Madeline; Amin, Farooq; Bacanu, Silviu A.; Begemann, Martin; Belliveau, Richard A.; Bene, Judit; Bergen, Sarah E.; Bevilacqua, Elizabeth; Bigdeli, Tim B.; Black, Donald W.; Børglum, Anders D.; Bruggeman, Richard; Buccola, Nancy G.; Buckner, Randy L.; Byerley, William; Cahn, Wiepke; Cai, Guiqing; Campion, Dominique; Cantor, Rita M.; Carr, Vaughan J.; Carrera, Noa; Catts, Stanley V.; Chambert, Kimberly D.; Chan, Raymond C.K.; Chen, Ronald Y.L.; Chen, Eric Y.H.; Cheng, Wei; Cheung, Eric F.C.; Chong, Siow Ann; Cloninger, C. Robert; Cohen, David; Cohen, Nadine; Cormican, Paul; Craddock, Nick; Crowley, James J.; Curtis, David; Davidson, Michael; Davis, Kenneth L.; Degenhardt, Franziska; Del Favero, Jurgen; DeLisi, Lynn E.; Demontis, Ditte; Dikeos, Dimitris; Dinan, Timothy; Djurovic, Srdjan; Donohoe, Gary; Drapeau, Elodie; Duan, Jubao; Dudbridge, Frank; Durmishi, Naser; Eichhammer, Peter; Eriksson, Johan; Escott-Price, Valentina; Essioux, Laurent; Fanous, Ayman H.; Farrell, Martilias S.; Frank, Josef; Franke, Lude; Freedman, Robert; Freimer, Nelson B.; Friedl, Marion; Friedman, Joseph I.; Fromer, Menachem; Genovese, Giulio; Georgieva, Lyudmila; Gershon, Elliot S.; Giegling, Ina; Giusti-Rodrguez, Paola; Godard, Stephanie; Goldstein, Jacqueline I.; Golimbet, Vera; Gopal, Srihari; Gratten, Jacob; Grove, Jakob; de Haan, Lieuwe; Hammer, Christian; Hamshere, Marian L.; Hansen, Mark; Hansen, Thomas; Haroutunian, Vahram; Hartmann, Annette M.; Henskens, Frans A.; Herms, Stefan; Hirschhorn, Joel N.; Hoffmann, Per; Hofman, Andrea; Hollegaard, Mads V.; Hougaard, David M.; Ikeda, Masashi; Joa, Inge; Julià, Antonio; Kahn, René S.; Kalaydjieva, Luba; Karachanak-Yankova, Sena; Karjalainen, Juha; Kavanagh, David; Keller, Matthew C.; Kelly, Brian J.; Kennedy, James L.; Khrunin, Andrey; Kim, Yunjung; Klovins, Janis; Knowles, James A.; Konte, Bettina; Kucinskas, Vaidutis; Kucinskiene, Zita Ausrele; Kuzelova-Ptackova, Hana; Kähler, Anna K.; Laurent, Claudine; Keong, Jimmy Lee Chee; Lee, S. Hong; Legge, Sophie E.; Lerer, Bernard; Li, Miaoxin; Li, Tao; Liang, Kung-Yee; Lieberman, Jeffrey; Limborska, Svetlana; Loughland, Carmel M.; Lubinski, Jan; Lnnqvist, Jouko; Macek, Milan; Magnusson, Patrik K.E.; Maher, Brion S.; Maier, Wolfgang; Mallet, Jacques; Marsal, Sara; Mattheisen, Manuel; Mattingsdal, Morten; McCarley, Robert W.; McDonald, Colm; McIntosh, Andrew M.; Meier, Sandra; Meijer, Carin J.; Melegh, Bela; Melle, Ingrid; Mesholam-Gately, Raquelle I.; Metspalu, Andres; Michie, Patricia T.; Milani, Lili; Milanova, Vihra; Mokrab, Younes; Morris, Derek W.; Mors, Ole; Mortensen, Preben B.; Murphy, Kieran C.; Murray, Robin M.; Myin-Germeys, Inez; Mller-Myhsok, Bertram; Nelis, Mari; Nenadic, Igor; Nertney, Deborah A.; Nestadt, Gerald; Nicodemus, Kristin K.; Nikitina-Zake, Liene; Nisenbaum, Laura; Nordin, Annelie; O’Callaghan, Eadbhard; O’Dushlaine, Colm; O’Neill, F. Anthony; Oh, Sang-Yun; Olincy, Ann; Olsen, Line; Van Os, Jim; Pantelis, Christos; Papadimitriou, George N.; Papiol, Sergi; Parkhomenko, Elena; Pato, Michele T.; Paunio, Tiina; Pejovic-Milovancevic, Milica; Perkins, Diana O.; Pietilinen, Olli; Pimm, Jonathan; Pocklington, Andrew J.; Powell, John; Price, Alkes; Pulver, Ann E.; Purcell, Shaun M.; Quested, Digby; Rasmussen, Henrik B.; Reichenberg, Abraham; Reimers, Mark A.; Richards, Alexander L.; Roffman, Joshua L.; Roussos, Panos; Ruderfer, Douglas M.; Salomaa, Veikko; Sanders, Alan R.; Schall, Ulrich; Schubert, Christian R.; Schulze, Thomas G.; Schwab, Sibylle G.; Scolnick, Edward M.; Scott, Rodney J.; Seidman, Larry J.; Shi, Jianxin; Sigurdsson, Engilbert; Silagadze, Teimuraz; Silverman, Jeremy M.; Sim, Kang; Slominsky, Petr; Smoller, Jordan W.; So, Hon-Cheong; Spencer, Chris C.A.; Stahl, Eli A.; Stefansson, Hreinn; Steinberg, Stacy; Stogmann, Elisabeth; Straub, Richard E.; Strengman, Eric; Strohmaier, Jana; Stroup, T. Scott; Subramaniam, Mythily; Suvisaari, Jaana; Svrakic, Dragan M.; Szatkiewicz, Jin P.; Sderman, Erik; Thirumalai, Srinivas; Toncheva, Draga; Tooney, Paul A.; Tosato, Sarah; Veijola, Juha; Waddington, John; Walsh, Dermot; Wang, Dai; Wang, Qiang; Webb, Bradley T.; Weiser, Mark; Wildenauer, Dieter B.; Williams, Nigel M.; Williams, Stephanie; Witt, Stephanie H.; Wolen, Aaron R.; Wong, Emily H.M.; Wormley, Brandon K.; Wu, Jing Qin; Xi, Hualin Simon; Zai, Clement C.; Zheng, Xuebin; Zimprich, Fritz; Wray, Naomi R.; Stefansson, Kari; Visscher, Peter M.; Adolfsson, Rolf; Andreassen, Ole A.; Blackwood, Douglas H.R.; Bramon, Elvira; Buxbaum, Joseph D.; Brglum, Anders D.; Cichon, Sven; Darvasi, Ariel; Domenici, Enrico; Ehrenreich, Hannelore; Esko, Tõnu; Gejman, Pablo V.; Gill, Michael; Gurling, Hugh; Hultman, Christina M.; Iwata, Nakao; Jablensky, Assen V.; Jönsson, Erik G.; Kendler, Kenneth S.; Kirov, George; Knight, Jo; Lencz, Todd; Levinson, Douglas F.; Li, Qingqin S.; Liu, Jianjun; Malhotra, Anil K.; McCarroll, Steven A.; McQuillin, Andrew; Moran, Jennifer L.; Mortensen, Preben B.; Mowry, Bryan J.; Nthen, Markus M.; Ophoff, Roel A.; Owen, Michael J.; Palotie, Aarno; Pato, Carlos N.; Petryshen, Tracey L.; Posthuma, Danielle; Rietschel, Marcella; Riley, Brien P.; Rujescu, Dan; Sham, Pak C.; Sklar, Pamela; St. Clair, David; Weinberger, Daniel R.; Wendland, Jens R.; Werge, Thomas; Daly, Mark J.; Sullivan, Patrick F.; O’Donovan, Michael C.; Ripke, Stephan; O’Dushlaine, Colm; Chambert, Kimberly; Moran, Jennifer L.; Kähler, Anna K.; Akterin, Susanne; Bergen, Sarah; Magnusson, Patrik K.E.; Neale, Benjamin M.; Ruderfer, Douglas; Scolnick, Edward; Purcell, Shaun; McCarroll, Steve; Sklar, Pamela; Hultman, Christina M.; Sullivan, Patrick F.; Kähler, Anna K.; Hultman, Christina M.; Purcell, Shaun M.; McCarroll, Steven A.; Daly, Mark; Pasaniuc, Bogdan; Sullivan, Patrick F.; Neale, Benjamin M.; Wray, Naomi R.; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Price, Alkes L.

    2014-01-01

    Regulatory and coding variants are known to be enriched with associations identified by genome-wide association studies (GWASs) of complex disease, but their contributions to trait heritability are currently unknown. We applied variance-component methods to imputed genotype data for 11 common diseases to partition the heritability explained by genotyped SNPs (hg2) across functional categories (while accounting for shared variance due to linkage disequilibrium). Extensive simulations showed that in contrast to current estimates from GWAS summary statistics, the variance-component approach partitions heritability accurately under a wide range of complex-disease architectures. Across the 11 diseases DNaseI hypersensitivity sites (DHSs) from 217 cell types spanned 16% of imputed SNPs (and 24% of genotyped SNPs) but explained an average of 79% (SE = 8%) of hg2 from imputed SNPs (5.1× enrichment; p = 3.7 × 10−17) and 38% (SE = 4%) of hg2 from genotyped SNPs (1.6× enrichment, p = 1.0 × 10−4). Further enrichment was observed at enhancer DHSs and cell-type-specific DHSs. In contrast, coding variants, which span 1% of the genome, explained <10% of hg2 despite having the highest enrichment. We replicated these findings but found no significant contribution from rare coding variants in independent schizophrenia cohorts genotyped on GWAS and exome chips. Our results highlight the value of analyzing components of heritability to unravel the functional architecture of common disease. PMID:25439723

  4. Cell Type-Specific Expression and Function of Toll-Like Receptors 2 and 4 in Human Placenta: Implications in Fetal Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Ma, Yuehong; Krikun, Graciela; Abrahams, Vikki M.; Mor, Gil; Guller, Seth

    2007-01-01

    Placental infection is associated with adverse fetal outcomes. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are critical regulators of the innate immune response based on their ability to recognize and respond to pathogen-associated molecular patterns expressed by microbes. To date, cell-type specific expression and regulation of TLR function in human term placenta remains largely unelucidated. The goal of the current study was to examine the in vivo and in vitro patterns of TLR expression and function in majo...

  5. Lim homeobox genes in the Ctenophore Mnemiopsis leidyi: the evolution of neural cell type specification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simmons David K

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nervous systems are thought to be important to the evolutionary success and diversification of metazoans, yet little is known about the origin of simple nervous systems at the base of the animal tree. Recent data suggest that ctenophores, a group of macroscopic pelagic marine invertebrates, are the most ancient group of animals that possess a definitive nervous system consisting of a distributed nerve net and an apical statocyst. This study reports on details of the evolution of the neural cell type specifying transcription factor family of LIM homeobox containing genes (Lhx, which have highly conserved functions in neural specification in bilaterian animals. Results Using next generation sequencing, the first draft of the genome of the ctenophore Mnemiopsis leidyi has been generated. The Lhx genes in all animals are represented by seven subfamilies (Lhx1/5, Lhx3/4, Lmx, Islet, Lhx2/9, Lhx6/8, and LMO of which four were found to be represented in the ctenophore lineage (Lhx1/5, Lhx3/4, Lmx, and Islet. Interestingly, the ctenophore Lhx gene complement is more similar to the sponge complement (sponges do not possess neurons than to either the cnidarian-bilaterian or placozoan Lhx complements. Using whole mount in situ hybridization, the Lhx gene expression patterns were examined and found to be expressed around the blastopore and in cells that give rise to the apical organ and putative neural sensory cells. Conclusion This research gives us a first look at neural cell type specification in the ctenophore M. leidyi. Within M. leidyi, Lhx genes are expressed in overlapping domains within proposed neural cellular and sensory cell territories. These data suggest that Lhx genes likely played a conserved role in the patterning of sensory cells in the ancestor of sponges and ctenophores, and may provide a link to the expression of Lhx orthologs in sponge larval photoreceptive cells. Lhx genes were later co-opted into patterning more

  6. Cell-Type Specific Determinants of NRAMP1 Expression in Professional Phagocytes

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    Mathieu F. M. Cellier

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The Natural resistance-associated macrophage protein 1 (Nramp1 or Solute carrier 11 member 1, Slc11a1 transports divalent metals across the membrane of late endosomes and lysosomes in professional phagocytes. Nramp1 represents an ancient eukaryotic cell-autonomous defense whereas the gene duplication that yielded Nramp1 and Nramp2 predated the origin of Sarcopterygians (lobe-finned fishes and tetrapods. SLC11A1 genetic polymorphisms associated with human resistance to tuberculosis consist of potential regulatory variants. Herein, current knowledge of the regulation of SLC11A1 gene expression is reviewed and comprehensive analysis of ENCODE data available for hematopoietic cell-types suggests a hypothesis for the regulation of SLC11A1 expression during myeloid development and phagocyte functional polarization. SLC11A1 is part of a 34.6 kb CTCF-insulated locus scattered with predicted regulatory elements: a 3' enhancer, a large 5' enhancer domain and four elements spread around the transcription start site (TSS, including several C/EBP and PU.1 sites. SLC11A1 locus ends appear mobilized by ETS-related factors early during myelopoiesis; activation of both 5' and 3' enhancers in myelo-monocytic cells correlate with transcription factor binding at the TSS. Characterizing the corresponding cis/trans determinants functionally will establish the mechanisms involved and possibly reveal genetic variation that impacts susceptibility to infectious or immune diseases.

  7. Optimizing Staining Protocols for Laser Microdissection of Specific Cell Types from the Testis Including Carcinoma In Situ

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sonne, Si Brask; Dalgaard, Marlene D; Nielsen, John Erik;

    2009-01-01

    Microarray and RT-PCR based methods are important tools for analysis of gene expression; however, in tissues containing many different cells types, such as the testis, characterization of gene expression in specific cell types can be severely hampered by noise from other cells. The laser microdis......Microarray and RT-PCR based methods are important tools for analysis of gene expression; however, in tissues containing many different cells types, such as the testis, characterization of gene expression in specific cell types can be severely hampered by noise from other cells. The laser......-containing cells, which is useful for isolation of the androgen-producing Leydig cells. Both protocols retain a morphology that is compatible with laser microdissection and yield RNA of a quality suitable for PCR and microarray analysis....

  8. Cell type specificity of female lung cancer associated with sulfur dioxide from air pollutants in Taiwan: An ecological study

    OpenAIRE

    Tseng Ching-Yu; Huang Yi-Chia; Su Shih-Yung; Huang Jing-Yang; Lai Cheng-Hsiu; Lung Chia-Chi; Ho Chien-Chang; Liaw Yung-Po

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Many studies have examined the association between air pollutants (including sulfur dioxide [SO2], carbon monoxide [CO], nitrogen dioxide [NO2], nitric oxide [NO], ozone [O3], and particulate matter < 10 μm [PM10]) and lung cancer. However, data from previous studies on pathological cell types were limited, especially for SO2 exposure. We aimed to explore the association between SO2 exposure from outdoor air pollutants and female lung cancer incidence by cell type specific...

  9. Targeting the hemangioblast with a novel cell type-specific enhancer

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    Teixeira Vera

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hemangioblasts are known as the common precursors for primitive hematopoietic and endothelial lineages. Their existence has been supported mainly by the observation that both cell types develop in close proximity and by in vitro differentiation and genetic studies. However, more compelling evidence will arise from tracking their cell fates using a lineage-specific marker. Results We report the identification of a hemangioblast-specific enhancer (Hb located in the cis-regulatory region of chick Cerberus gene (cCer that is able to direct the expression of enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP to the precursors of yolk sac blood and endothelial cells in electroporated chick embryos. Moreover, we present the Hb-eGFP reporter as a powerful live imaging tool for visualizing hemangioblast cell fate and blood island morphogenesis. Conclusions We hereby introduce the Hb enhancer as a valuable resource for genetically targeting the hemangioblast population as well as for studying the dynamics of vascular and blood cell development.

  10. Genetically-directed, cell type-specific sparse labeling for the analysis of neuronal morphology.

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    Thomas Rotolo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In mammals, genetically-directed cell labeling technologies have not yet been applied to the morphologic analysis of neurons with very large and complex arbors, an application that requires extremely sparse labeling and that is only rendered practical by limiting the labeled population to one or a few predetermined neuronal subtypes. METHODS AND FINDINGS: In the present study we have addressed this application by using CreER technology to non-invasively label very small numbers of neurons so that their morphologies can be fully visualized. Four lines of IRES-CreER knock-in mice were constructed to permit labeling selectively in cholinergic or catecholaminergic neurons [choline acetyltransferase (ChAT-IRES-CreER or tyrosine hydroxylase (TH-IRES-CreER], predominantly in projection neurons [neurofilament light chain (NFL-IRES-CreER], or broadly in neurons and some glia [vesicle-associated membrane protein2 (VAMP2-IRES-CreER]. When crossed to the Z/AP reporter and exposed to 4-hydroxytamoxifen in the early postnatal period, the number of neurons expressing the human placental alkaline phosphatase reporter can be reproducibly lowered to fewer than 50 per brain. Sparse Cre-mediated recombination in ChAT-IRES-CreER;Z/AP mice shows the full axonal and dendritic arbors of individual forebrain cholinergic neurons, the first time that the complete morphologies of these very large neurons have been revealed in any species. CONCLUSIONS: Sparse genetically-directed, cell type-specific neuronal labeling with IRES-creER lines should prove useful for studying a wide variety of questions in neuronal development and disease.

  11. Balancing intestinal and systemic inflammation through cell type-specific expression of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor repressor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandstätter, Olga; Schanz, Oliver; Vorac, Julia; König, Jessica; Mori, Tetsushi; Maruyama, Toru; Korkowski, Markus; Haarmann-Stemmann, Thomas; von Smolinski, Dorthe; Schultze, Joachim L; Abel, Josef; Esser, Charlotte; Takeyama, Haruko; Weighardt, Heike; Förster, Irmgard

    2016-01-01

    As a sensor of polyaromatic chemicals the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) exerts an important role in immune regulation besides its requirement for xenobiotic metabolism. Transcriptional activation of AhR target genes is counterregulated by the AhR repressor (AhRR) but the exact function of the AhRR in vivo is currently unknown. We here show that the AhRR is predominantly expressed in immune cells of the skin and intestine, different from other AhR target genes. Whereas AhRR antagonizes the anti-inflammatory function of the AhR in the context of systemic endotoxin shock, AhR and AhRR act in concert to dampen intestinal inflammation. Specifically, AhRR contributes to the maintenance of colonic intraepithelial lymphocytes and prevents excessive IL-1β production and Th17/Tc17 differentiation. In contrast, the AhRR enhances IFN-γ-production by effector T cells in the inflamed gut. Our findings highlight the physiologic importance of cell-type specific balancing of AhR/AhRR expression in response to microbial, nutritional and other environmental stimuli. PMID:27184933

  12. LaeA control of velvet family regulatory proteins for light-dependent development and fungal cell-type specificity.

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    Ozlem Sarikaya Bayram

    Full Text Available VeA is the founding member of the velvet superfamily of fungal regulatory proteins. This protein is involved in light response and coordinates sexual reproduction and secondary metabolism in Aspergillus nidulans. In the dark, VeA bridges VelB and LaeA to form the VelB-VeA-LaeA (velvet complex. The VeA-like protein VelB is another developmental regulator, and LaeA has been known as global regulator of secondary metabolism. In this study, we show that VelB forms a second light-regulated developmental complex together with VosA, another member of the velvet family, which represses asexual development. LaeA plays a key role, not only in secondary metabolism, but also in directing formation of the VelB-VosA and VelB-VeA-LaeA complexes. LaeA controls VeA modification and protein levels and possesses additional developmental functions. The laeA null mutant results in constitutive sexual differentiation, indicating that LaeA plays a pivotal role in inhibiting sexual development in response to light. Moreover, the absence of LaeA results in the formation of significantly smaller fruiting bodies. This is due to the lack of a specific globose cell type (Hülle cells, which nurse the young fruiting body during development. This suggests that LaeA controls Hülle cells. In summary, LaeA plays a dynamic role in fungal morphological and chemical development, and it controls expression, interactions, and modification of the velvet regulators.

  13. Quantitative Proteomic Analysis of the Response to Zinc, Magnesium, and Calcium Deficiency in Specific Cell Types of Arabidopsis Roots

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    Yoichiro Fukao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The proteome profiles of specific cell types have recently been investigated using techniques such as fluorescence activated cell sorting and laser capture microdissection. However, quantitative proteomic analysis of specific cell types has not yet been performed. In this study, to investigate the response of the proteome to zinc, magnesium, and calcium deficiency in specific cell types of Arabidopsis thaliana roots, we performed isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomics using GFP-expressing protoplasts collected by fluorescence-activated cell sorting. Protoplasts were collected from the pGL2-GFPer and pMGP-GFPer marker lines for epidermis or inner cell lines (pericycle, endodermis, and cortex, respectively. To increase the number of proteins identified, iTRAQ-labeled peptides were separated into 24 fractions by OFFGFEL electrophoresis prior to high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry analysis. Overall, 1039 and 737 proteins were identified and quantified in the epidermal and inner cell lines, respectively. Interestingly, the expression of many proteins was decreased in the epidermis by mineral deficiency, although a weaker effect was observed in inner cell lines such as the pericycle, endodermis, and cortex. Here, we report for the first time the quantitative proteomics of specific cell types in Arabidopsis roots.

  14. Posttranscriptional Control Mediates Cell Type-Specific Localization of Catalase A during Aspergillus nidulans Development

    OpenAIRE

    Navarro, Rosa E.; Aguirre, Jesús

    1998-01-01

    Two differentially regulated catalase genes have been identified in the fungus Aspergillus nidulans. The catA gene belongs to a class whose transcripts are specifically induced during asexual sporulation (conidiation) and encodes a catalase accumulated in conidia. Using a developmental mutant affected in the brlA gene, which is unable to form conidia but capable of producing sexual spores (ascospores), we demonstrated that the catA mRNA accumulated during induction of conidiation but did not ...

  15. Cell-type-specific Jumonji histone demethylase gene expression in the healthy rat CNS: detection by a novel flow cytometry method

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    Stephanie M.C. Smith

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Our understanding of how histone demethylation contributes to the regulation of basal gene expression in the brain is largely unknown in any injury model, and especially in the healthy adult brain. Although Jumonji genes are often regulated transcriptionally, cell-specific gene expression of Jumonji histone demethylases in the brain remains poorly understood. Thus, in the present study we profiled the mRNA levels of 26 Jumonji genes in microglia (CD11b+, neurons (NeuN+ and astrocytes (GFAP+ from the healthy adult rat brain. We optimized a method combining a mZBF (modified zinc-based fixative and FCM (flow cytometry to simultaneously sort cells from non-transgenic animals. We evaluated cell-surface, intracellular and nuclear proteins, including histones, as well as messenger- and micro-RNAs in different cell types simultaneously from a single-sorted sample. We found that 12 Jumonji genes were differentially expressed between adult microglia, neurons and astrocytes. While JMJD2D was neuron-restricted, PHF8 and JMJD1C were expressed in all three cell types although the expression was highest in neurons. JMJD3 and JMJD5 were expressed in all cell types, but were highly enriched in microglia; astrocytes had the lowest expression of UTX and JHDM1D. Levels of global H3K27 (H3 lysine 27 methylation varied among cell types and appeared to be lowest in microglia, indicating that differences in basal gene expression of specific Jumonji histone demethylases may contribute to cell-specific gene expression in the CNS (central nervous system. This multiparametric technique will be valuable for simultaneously assaying chromatin modifications and gene regulation in the adult CNS.

  16. Dual-specificity anti-sigma factor reinforces control of cell-type specific gene expression in Bacillus subtilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano, Mónica; Gao, JinXin; Bota, João; Bate, Ashley R; Meisner, Jeffrey; Eichenberger, Patrick; Moran, Charles P; Henriques, Adriano O

    2015-04-01

    Gene expression during spore development in Bacillus subtilis is controlled by cell type-specific RNA polymerase sigma factors. σFand σE control early stages of development in the forespore and the mother cell, respectively. When, at an intermediate stage in development, the mother cell engulfs the forespore, σF is replaced by σG and σE is replaced by σK. The anti-sigma factor CsfB is produced under the control of σF and binds to and inhibits the auto-regulatory σG, but not σF. A position in region 2.1, occupied by an asparagine in σG and by a glutamate in οF, is sufficient for CsfB discrimination of the two sigmas, and allows it to delay the early to late switch in forespore gene expression. We now show that following engulfment completion, csfB is switched on in the mother cell under the control of σK and that CsfB binds to and inhibits σE but not σK, possibly to facilitate the switch from early to late gene expression. We show that a position in region 2.3 occupied by a conserved asparagine in σE and by a conserved glutamate in σK suffices for discrimination by CsfB. We also show that CsfB prevents activation of σG in the mother cell and the premature σG-dependent activation of σK. Thus, CsfB establishes negative feedback loops that curtail the activity of σE and prevent the ectopic activation of σG in the mother cell. The capacity of CsfB to directly block σE activity may also explain how CsfB plays a role as one of the several mechanisms that prevent σE activation in the forespore. Thus the capacity of CsfB to differentiate between the highly similar σF/σG and σE/σK pairs allows it to rinforce the cell-type specificity of these sigma factors and the transition from early to late development in B. subtilis, and possibly in all sporeformers that encode a CsfB orthologue. PMID:25835496

  17. Cell-type-specific tuning of Cav1.3 Ca2+-channels by a C-terminal automodulatory domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharinger, Anja; Eckrich, Stephanie; Vandael, David H.; Schönig, Kai; Koschak, Alexandra; Hecker, Dietmar; Kaur, Gurjot; Lee, Amy; Sah, Anupam; Bartsch, Dusan; Benedetti, Bruno; Lieb, Andreas; Schick, Bernhard; Singewald, Nicolas; Sinnegger-Brauns, Martina J.; Carbone, Emilio; Engel, Jutta; Striessnig, Jörg

    2015-01-01

    Cav1.3 L-type Ca2+-channel function is regulated by a C-terminal automodulatory domain (CTM). It affects channel binding of calmodulin and thereby tunes channel activity by interfering with Ca2+- and voltage-dependent gating. Alternative splicing generates short C-terminal channel variants lacking the CTM resulting in enhanced Ca2+-dependent inactivation and stronger voltage-sensitivity upon heterologous expression. However, the role of this modulatory domain for channel function in its native environment is unkown. To determine its functional significance in vivo, we interrupted the CTM with a hemagglutinin tag in mutant mice (Cav1.3DCRDHA/HA). Using these mice we provide biochemical evidence for the existence of long (CTM-containing) and short (CTM-deficient) Cav1.3 α1-subunits in brain. The long (HA-labeled) Cav1.3 isoform was present in all ribbon synapses of cochlear inner hair cells. CTM-elimination impaired Ca2+-dependent inactivation of Ca2+-currents in hair cells but increased it in chromaffin cells, resulting in hyperpolarized resting potentials and reduced pacemaking. CTM disruption did not affect hearing thresholds. We show that the modulatory function of the CTM is affected by its native environment in different cells and thus occurs in a cell-type specific manner in vivo. It stabilizes gating properties of Cav1.3 channels required for normal electrical excitability. PMID:26379493

  18. Cell-type-specific tuning of Cav1.3 Ca2+-channels by a C-terminal automodulatory domain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anja eScharinger

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Cav1.3 L-type Ca2+-channel function is regulated by a C-terminal automodulatory domain (CTM. It affects channel binding of calmodulin and thereby tunes channel activity by interfering with Ca2+- and voltage-dependent gating. Alternative splicing generates short C-terminal channel variants lacking the CTM resulting in enhanced Ca2+-dependent inactivation and stronger voltage-sensitivity upon heterologous expression. However, the role of this modulatory domain for channel function in its native environment is unkown. To determine its functional significance in vivo, we interrupted the CTM with a hemagglutinin tag in mutant mice (Cav1.3DCRDHA/HA. Using these mice we provide biochemical evidence for the existence of long (CTM-containing and short (CTM-deficient Cav1.3 α1-subunits in brain. The long (HA-labeled Cav1.3 isoform was present in all ribbon synapses of cochlear inner hair cells. CTM-elimination impaired Ca2+-dependent inactivation of Ca2+-currents in hair cells but increased it in chromaffin cells, resulting in hyperpolarized resting potentials and reduced pacemaking. CTM disruption did not affect hearing thresholds. We show that the modulatory function of the CTM is affected by its native environment in different cells and thus occurs in a cell-type specific manner in vivo. It is required to stabilize gating properties of Cav1.3 channels required for normal electrical excitability.

  19. Improved salinity tolerance of rice through cell type-specific expression of AtHKT1;1

    OpenAIRE

    Darren Plett; Gehan Safwat; Matthew Gilliham; Inge Skrumsager Møller; Stuart Roy; Neil Shirley; Andrew Jacobs; Alexander Johnson; Mark Tester

    2010-01-01

    Previously, cell type-specific expression of AtHKT1;1, a sodium transporter, improved sodium (Na(+)) exclusion and salinity tolerance in Arabidopsis. In the current work, AtHKT1;1, was expressed specifically in the root cortical and epidermal cells of an Arabidopsis GAL4-GFP enhancer trap line. These transgenic plants were found to have significantly improved Na(+) exclusion under conditions of salinity stress. The feasibility of a similar biotechnological approach in crop plants was explored...

  20. Cell-type-specific neuroanatomy of cliques of autism-related genes in the mouse brain

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    Pascal eGrange

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Two cliques of genes identified computationally for their high co-expression in the mouse brain according to the Allen Brain Atlas, and for their enrichment in genes related to autism spectrum disorder, have recently been shown to be highly co-expressed in the cerebellar cortex, compared to what could be expected by chance. Moreover, the expression of these cliques of genes is not homogeneous across the cerebellar cortex, and it has been noted that their expression pattern seems to highlight the granular layer. However, this observation was only made by eye, and recent advances in computational neuroanatomy allow to rank cell types in the mouse brain (characterized by their transcriptome profiles according to the similarity between their spatial density profiles and the expression profiles of the cliques. We establish by Monte Carlo simulation that with probability at least 99%, the expression profiles of the two cliques are more similar to the density profile of granule cells than 99% of the expression of cliques containing the same number of genes (Purkinje cells also score above 99% in one of the cliques. Thresholding the expression profiles shows that the signal is more intense in the granular layer. Finally, we work out pairs of cell types whose combined expression profiles are more similar to the expression profiles of the cliquesthan any single cell type. These pairs predominantly consist of one cortical pyramidal cell and one cerebellar cell (whichcan be either a granule cell or a Purkinje cell.

  1. Cell-type-specific neuroanatomy of cliques of autism-related genes in the mouse brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grange, Pascal; Menashe, Idan; Hawrylycz, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Two cliques of genes identified computationally for their high co-expression in the mouse brain according to the Allen Brain Atlas, and for their enrichment in genes related to autism spectrum disorder (ASD), have recently been shown to be highly co-expressed in the cerebellar cortex, compared to what could be expected by chance. Moreover, the expression of these cliques of genes is not homogeneous across the cerebellar cortex, and it has been noted that their expression pattern seems to highlight the granular layer. However, this observation was only made by eye, and recent advances in computational neuroanatomy allow to rank cell types in the mouse brain (characterized by their transcriptome profiles) according to the similarity between their spatial density profiles and the spatial expression profiles of the cliques. We establish by Monte Carlo simulation that with probability at least 99%, the expression profiles of the two cliques are more similar to the density profile of granule cells than 99% of the expression of cliques containing the same number of genes (Purkinje cells also score above 99% in one of the cliques). Thresholding the expression profiles shows that the signal is more intense in the granular layer. Finally, we work out pairs of cell types whose combined expression profiles are more similar to the expression profiles of the cliques than any single cell type. These pairs predominantly consist of one cortical pyramidal cell and one cerebellar cell (which can be either a granule cell or a Purkinje cell). PMID:26074809

  2. Optimizing Staining Protocols for Laser Microdissection of Specific Cell Types from the Testis Including Carcinoma In Situ

    OpenAIRE

    Si Brask Sonne; Dalgaard, Marlene D; John Erik Nielsen; Hoei-Hansen, Christina E.; Ewa Rajpert-De Meyts; Lise Mette Gjerdrum; Henrik Leffers

    2009-01-01

    Udgivelsesdato: May 2009 Microarray and RT-PCR based methods are important tools for analysis of gene expression; however, in tissues containing many different cells types, such as the testis, characterization of gene expression in specific cell types can be severely hampered by noise from other cells. The laser microdissection technology allows for enrichment of specific cell types. However, when the cells are not morphologically distinguishable, it is necessary to use a specific staining...

  3. Coordinated cell type-specific epigenetic remodeling in prefrontal cortex begins before birth and continues into early adulthood.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hennady P Shulha

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Development of prefrontal and other higher-order association cortices is associated with widespread changes in the cortical transcriptome, particularly during the transitions from prenatal to postnatal development, and from early infancy to later stages of childhood and early adulthood. However, the timing and longitudinal trajectories of neuronal gene expression programs during these periods remain unclear in part because of confounding effects of concomitantly occurring shifts in neuron-to-glia ratios. Here, we used cell type-specific chromatin sorting techniques for genome-wide profiling of a histone mark associated with transcriptional regulation--H3 with trimethylated lysine 4 (H3K4me3--in neuronal chromatin from 31 subjects from the late gestational period to 80 years of age. H3K4me3 landscapes of prefrontal neurons were developmentally regulated at 1,157 loci, including 768 loci that were proximal to transcription start sites. Multiple algorithms consistently revealed that the overwhelming majority and perhaps all of developmentally regulated H3K4me3 peaks were on a unidirectional trajectory defined by either rapid gain or loss of histone methylation during the late prenatal period and the first year after birth, followed by similar changes but with progressively slower kinetics during early and later childhood and only minimal changes later in life. Developmentally downregulated H3K4me3 peaks in prefrontal neurons were enriched for Paired box (Pax and multiple Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription (STAT motifs, which are known to promote glial differentiation. In contrast, H3K4me3 peaks subject to a progressive increase in maturing prefrontal neurons were enriched for activating protein-1 (AP-1 recognition elements that are commonly associated with activity-dependent regulation of neuronal gene expression. We uncovered a developmental program governing the remodeling of neuronal histone methylation landscapes in the prefrontal

  4. Identification of Cell Type-Specific Differences in Erythropoietin Receptor Signaling in Primary Erythroid and Lung Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salopiata, Florian; Depner, Sofia; Wäsch, Marvin; Böhm, Martin E.; Mücke, Oliver; Plass, Christoph; Lehmann, Wolf D.; Kreutz, Clemens; Timmer, Jens; Klingmüller, Ursula

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer, with its most prevalent form non-small-cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC), is one of the leading causes of cancer-related deaths worldwide, and is commonly treated with chemotherapeutic drugs such as cisplatin. Lung cancer patients frequently suffer from chemotherapy-induced anemia, which can be treated with erythropoietin (EPO). However, studies have indicated that EPO not only promotes erythropoiesis in hematopoietic cells, but may also enhance survival of NSCLC cells. Here, we verified that the NSCLC cell line H838 expresses functional erythropoietin receptors (EPOR) and that treatment with EPO reduces cisplatin-induced apoptosis. To pinpoint differences in EPO-induced survival signaling in erythroid progenitor cells (CFU-E, colony forming unit-erythroid) and H838 cells, we combined mathematical modeling with a method for feature selection, the L1 regularization. Utilizing an example model and simulated data, we demonstrated that this approach enables the accurate identification and quantification of cell type-specific parameters. We applied our strategy to quantitative time-resolved data of EPO-induced JAK/STAT signaling generated by quantitative immunoblotting, mass spectrometry and quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) in CFU-E and H838 cells as well as H838 cells overexpressing human EPOR (H838-HA-hEPOR). The established parsimonious mathematical model was able to simultaneously describe the data sets of CFU-E, H838 and H838-HA-hEPOR cells. Seven cell type-specific parameters were identified that included for example parameters for nuclear translocation of STAT5 and target gene induction. Cell type-specific differences in target gene induction were experimentally validated by qRT-PCR experiments. The systematic identification of pathway differences and sensitivities of EPOR signaling in CFU-E and H838 cells revealed potential targets for intervention to selectively inhibit EPO-induced signaling in the tumor cells but leave the responses in erythroid

  5. Identification of Cell Type-Specific Differences in Erythropoietin Receptor Signaling in Primary Erythroid and Lung Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merkle, Ruth; Steiert, Bernhard; Salopiata, Florian; Depner, Sofia; Raue, Andreas; Iwamoto, Nao; Schelker, Max; Hass, Helge; Wäsch, Marvin; Böhm, Martin E; Mücke, Oliver; Lipka, Daniel B; Plass, Christoph; Lehmann, Wolf D; Kreutz, Clemens; Timmer, Jens; Schilling, Marcel; Klingmüller, Ursula

    2016-08-01

    Lung cancer, with its most prevalent form non-small-cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC), is one of the leading causes of cancer-related deaths worldwide, and is commonly treated with chemotherapeutic drugs such as cisplatin. Lung cancer patients frequently suffer from chemotherapy-induced anemia, which can be treated with erythropoietin (EPO). However, studies have indicated that EPO not only promotes erythropoiesis in hematopoietic cells, but may also enhance survival of NSCLC cells. Here, we verified that the NSCLC cell line H838 expresses functional erythropoietin receptors (EPOR) and that treatment with EPO reduces cisplatin-induced apoptosis. To pinpoint differences in EPO-induced survival signaling in erythroid progenitor cells (CFU-E, colony forming unit-erythroid) and H838 cells, we combined mathematical modeling with a method for feature selection, the L1 regularization. Utilizing an example model and simulated data, we demonstrated that this approach enables the accurate identification and quantification of cell type-specific parameters. We applied our strategy to quantitative time-resolved data of EPO-induced JAK/STAT signaling generated by quantitative immunoblotting, mass spectrometry and quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) in CFU-E and H838 cells as well as H838 cells overexpressing human EPOR (H838-HA-hEPOR). The established parsimonious mathematical model was able to simultaneously describe the data sets of CFU-E, H838 and H838-HA-hEPOR cells. Seven cell type-specific parameters were identified that included for example parameters for nuclear translocation of STAT5 and target gene induction. Cell type-specific differences in target gene induction were experimentally validated by qRT-PCR experiments. The systematic identification of pathway differences and sensitivities of EPOR signaling in CFU-E and H838 cells revealed potential targets for intervention to selectively inhibit EPO-induced signaling in the tumor cells but leave the responses in erythroid

  6. Tissue-specific regulatory network extractor (TS-REX): a database and software resource for the tissue and cell type-specific investigation of transcription factor-gene networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colecchia, Federico; Kottwitz, Denise; Wagner, Mandy; Pfenninger, Cosima V; Thiel, Gerald; Tamm, Ingo; Peterson, Carsten; Nuber, Ulrike A

    2009-06-01

    The prediction of transcription factor binding sites in genomic sequences is in principle very useful to identify upstream regulatory factors. However, when applying this concept to genomes of multicellular organisms such as mammals, one has to deal with a large number of false positive predictions since many transcription factor genes are only expressed in specific tissues or cell types. We developed TS-REX, a database/software system that supports the analysis of tissue and cell type-specific transcription factor-gene networks based on expressed sequence tag abundance of transcription factor-encoding genes in UniGene EST libraries. The use of expression levels of transcription factor-encoding genes according to hierarchical anatomical classifications covering different tissues and cell types makes it possible to filter out irrelevant binding site predictions and to identify candidates of potential functional importance for further experimental testing. TS-REX covers ESTs from H. sapiens and M. musculus, and allows the characterization of both presence and specificity of transcription factors in user-specified tissues or cell types. The software allows users to interactively visualize transcription factor-gene networks, as well as to export data for further processing. TS-REX was applied to predict regulators of Polycomb group genes in six human tumor tissues and in human embryonic stem cells. PMID:19443447

  7. Assessment of Membrane Fluidity Fluctuations during Cellular Development Reveals Time and Cell Type Specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noutsi, Pakiza; Gratton, Enrico; Chaieb, Sahraoui

    2016-01-01

    Cell membrane is made up of a complex structure of lipids and proteins that diffuse laterally giving rise to what we call membrane fluidity. During cellular development, such as differentiation cell membranes undergo dramatic fluidity changes induced by proteins such as ARC and Cofilin among others. In this study we used the generalized polarization (GP) property of fluorescent probe Laurdan using two-photon microscopy to determine membrane fluidity as a function of time and for various cell lines. A low GP value corresponds to a higher fluidity and a higher GP value is associated with a more rigid membrane. Four different cell lines were monitored such as hN2, NIH3T3, HEK293 and L6 cells. Membrane fluidity was measured at 12h, 72h and 92 h. Our results show significant changes in membrane fluidity among all cell types at different time points. GP values tend to increase significantly within 92 h in hN2 cells and 72 h in NIH3T3 cells and only at 92 h in HEK293 cells. L6 showed a marked decrease in membrane fluidity at 72 h and starts to increase at 92 h. As expected, NIH3T3 cells have more rigid membrane at earlier time points. On the other hand, neurons tend to have the highest membrane fluidity at early time points emphasizing its correlation with plasticity and the need for this malleability during differentiation. This study sheds light on the involvement of membrane fluidity during neuronal differentiation and development of other cell lines. PMID:27362860

  8. Effect of Diffusion on the Autoradiographic Measurement of Macromolecular Synthesis in Specific Cell Types In Vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Organ slices cultured in vitro lack a capillary circulation. Cells within the slice are supplied with nutrients and oxygen by diffusion from the culture medium into the slice. The rate of synthesis of macromolecules, e.g. ribonucleic acid, deoxyribonucleic acid, protein or mucopolysaccharide can be determined in these circumstances by adding labelled precursors to the culture medium. Comparisons of the rate of synthesis between different types of cell within a single organ slice or between different slices can be quantitated by autoradiography and grain counting only if the concentration of labelled precursor in tissue water is uniform throughout all the slices. To achieve this aim the precursor should rapidly saturate the tissue water at the beginning of the incubation period, and subsequently diffusion into the slice should keep pace with consumption of the precursor by the cells. Experimental methods to measure the relevant parameters of any organ slice and precursor combination will be described. These parameters are the diffusion coefficient of the precursor in the organ slice, the rate of consumption of the precursor by each cell type, and the frequency and distribution of tissue within the slice. The relation between precursor concentration and position within the slice can be calculated under differing culture conditions, using the appropriate mathematical model. It is then possible to choose those conditions which give a uniform concentration of precursor throughout the organ slice. The methods are illustrated by consideration of ribonucleic acid synthesis from 3H-uridine in full thickness slices of human skin, an organ which contains several tissues including epidermis, hair follicle, eccrine sweat gland and sebaceous gland. (author)

  9. Assessment of Membrane Fluidity Fluctuations during Cellular Development Reveals Time and Cell Type Specificity

    KAUST Repository

    Noutsi, Pakiza

    2016-06-30

    Cell membrane is made up of a complex structure of lipids and proteins that diffuse laterally giving rise to what we call membrane fluidity. During cellular development, such as differentiation cell membranes undergo dramatic fluidity changes induced by proteins such as ARC and Cofilin among others. In this study we used the generalized polarization (GP) property of fluorescent probe Laurdan using two-photon microscopy to determine membrane fluidity as a function of time and for various cell lines. A low GP value corresponds to a higher fluidity and a higher GP value is associated with a more rigid membrane. Four different cell lines were monitored such as hN2, NIH3T3, HEK293 and L6 cells. Membrane fluidity was measured at 12h, 72h and 92 h. Our results show significant changes in membrane fluidity among all cell types at different time points. GP values tend to increase significantly within 92 h in hN2 cells and 72 h in NIH3T3 cells and only at 92 h in HEK293 cells. L6 showed a marked decrease in membrane fluidity at 72 h and starts to increase at 92 h. As expected, NIH3T3 cells have more rigid membrane at earlier time points. On the other hand, neurons tend to have the highest membrane fluidity at early time points emphasizing its correlation with plasticity and the need for this malleability during differentiation. This study sheds light on the involvement of membrane fluidity during neuronal differentiation and development of other cell lines.

  10. Defining cell-type specificity at the transcriptional level in human disease

    OpenAIRE

    Ju, Wenjun; Greene, Casey S; Eichinger, Felix; Nair, Viji; Hodgin, Jeffrey B.; Bitzer, Markus; Lee, Young-Suk; Zhu, Qian; Kehata, Masami; Li, Min; Jiang, Song; Rastaldi, Maria Pia; Cohen, Clemens D; Troyanskaya, Olga G.; Kretzler, Matthias

    2013-01-01

    Cell-lineage–specific transcripts are essential for differentiated tissue function, implicated in hereditary organ failure, and mediate acquired chronic diseases. However, experimental identification of cell-lineage–specific genes in a genome-scale manner is infeasible for most solid human tissues. We developed the first genome-scale method to identify genes with cell-lineage–specific expression, even in lineages not separable by experimental microdissection. Our machine-learning–based approa...

  11. Beyond Columnar Organization: Cell Type- and Target Layer-Specific Principles of Horizontal Axon Projection Patterns in Rat Vibrissal Cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, Rajeevan T; Egger, Robert; Johnson, Andrew S; Mansvelder, Huibert D; Sakmann, Bert; de Kock, Christiaan P J; Oberlaender, Marcel

    2015-11-01

    Vertical thalamocortical afferents give rise to the elementary functional units of sensory cortex, cortical columns. Principles that underlie communication between columns remain however unknown. Here we unravel these by reconstructing in vivo-labeled neurons from all excitatory cell types in the vibrissal part of rat primary somatosensory cortex (vS1). Integrating the morphologies into an exact 3D model of vS1 revealed that the majority of intracortical (IC) axons project far beyond the borders of the principal column. We defined the corresponding innervation volume as the IC-unit. Deconstructing this structural cortical unit into its cell type-specific components, we found asymmetric projections that innervate columns of either the same whisker row or arc, and which subdivide vS1 into 2 orthogonal [supra-]granular and infragranular strata. We show that such organization could be most effective for encoding multi whisker inputs. Communication between columns is thus organized by multiple highly specific horizontal projection patterns, rendering IC-units as the primary structural entities for processing complex sensory stimuli. PMID:25838038

  12. The multifunctional FUS, EWS and TAF15 proto-oncoproteins show cell type-specific expression patterns and involvement in cell spreading and stress response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stenman Göran

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background FUS, EWS and TAF15 are structurally similar multifunctional proteins that were first discovered upon characterization of fusion oncogenes in human sarcomas and leukemias. The proteins belong to the FET (previously TET family of RNA-binding proteins and are implicated in central cellular processes such as regulation of gene expression, maintenance of genomic integrity and mRNA/microRNA processing. In the present study, we investigated the expression and cellular localization of FET proteins in multiple human tissues and cell types. Results FUS, EWS and TAF15 were expressed in both distinct and overlapping patterns in human tissues. The three proteins showed almost ubiquitous nuclear expression and FUS and TAF15 were in addition present in the cytoplasm of most cell types. Cytoplasmic EWS was more rarely detected and seen mainly in secretory cell types. Furthermore, FET expression was downregulated in differentiating human embryonic stem cells, during induced differentiation of neuroblastoma cells and absent in terminally differentiated melanocytes and cardiac muscle cells. The FET proteins were targeted to stress granules induced by heat shock and oxidative stress and FUS required its RNA-binding domain for this translocation. Furthermore, FUS and TAF15 were detected in spreading initiation centers of adhering cells. Conclusion Our results point to cell-specific expression patterns and functions of the FET proteins rather than the housekeeping roles inferred from earlier studies. The localization of FET proteins to stress granules suggests activities in translational regulation during stress conditions. Roles in central processes such as stress response, translational control and adhesion may explain the FET proteins frequent involvement in human cancer.

  13. Global mapping of cell type-specific open chromatin by FAIRE-seq reveals the regulatory role of the NFI family in adipocyte differentiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hironori Waki

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Identification of regulatory elements within the genome is crucial for understanding the mechanisms that govern cell type-specific gene expression. We generated genome-wide maps of open chromatin sites in 3T3-L1 adipocytes (on day 0 and day 8 of differentiation and NIH-3T3 fibroblasts using formaldehyde-assisted isolation of regulatory elements coupled with high-throughput sequencing (FAIRE-seq. FAIRE peaks at the promoter were associated with active transcription and histone modifications of H3K4me3 and H3K27ac. Non-promoter FAIRE peaks were characterized by H3K4me1+/me3-, the signature of enhancers, and were largely located in distal regions. The non-promoter FAIRE peaks showed dynamic change during differentiation, while the promoter FAIRE peaks were relatively constant. Functionally, the adipocyte- and preadipocyte-specific non-promoter FAIRE peaks were, respectively, associated with genes up-regulated and down-regulated by differentiation. Genes highly up-regulated during differentiation were associated with multiple clustered adipocyte-specific FAIRE peaks. Among the adipocyte-specific FAIRE peaks, 45.3% and 11.7% overlapped binding sites for, respectively, PPARγ and C/EBPα, the master regulators of adipocyte differentiation. Computational motif analyses of the adipocyte-specific FAIRE peaks revealed enrichment of a binding motif for nuclear family I (NFI transcription factors. Indeed, ChIP assay showed that NFI occupy the adipocyte-specific FAIRE peaks and/or the PPARγ binding sites near PPARγ, C/EBPα, and aP2 genes. Overexpression of NFIA in 3T3-L1 cells resulted in robust induction of these genes and lipid droplet formation without differentiation stimulus. Overexpression of dominant-negative NFIA or siRNA-mediated knockdown of NFIA or NFIB significantly suppressed both induction of genes and lipid accumulation during differentiation, suggesting a physiological function of these factors in the adipogenic program. Together, our

  14. Cell-type-specific control elements of the lymphotropic papovavirus enhancer.

    OpenAIRE

    Erselius, J R; Jostes, B; Hatzopoulos, A K; Mosthaf, L; Gruss, P

    1990-01-01

    Lymphotropic papovavirus (LPV) exhibits a highly restricted host range, in which only cells of primate B-lymphocyte origin are permissive for infection. Its enhancer element contributes to this tropism, since transcriptional potentiation is confined to cells of the hematopoietic lineage. Nuclear extracts from B and T cells, but not from HeLa cells, contain protein factors that interact specifically with the LPV 63-base-pair enhancer repeat, as demonstrated by DNase I footprinting and gel reta...

  15. Cell Type-Specific Manipulation with GFP-Dependent Cre Recombinase

    OpenAIRE

    Tang, Jonathan C. Y.; Rudolph, Stephanie; Dhande, Onkar S.; Abraira, Victoria E.; Choi, Seungwon; Lapan, Sylvain; Drew, Iain R.; Drokhlyansky, Eugene; Huberman, Andrew D.; Regehr, Wade G.; Cepko, Constance L.

    2015-01-01

    Summary There are many transgenic GFP reporter lines that allow visualization of specific populations of cells. Using such lines for functional studies requires a method that transforms GFP into a molecule that enables genetic manipulation. Here we report the creation of a method that exploits GFP for gene manipulation, Cre Recombinase Dependent on GFP (CRE-DOG), a split component system that uses GFP and its derivatives to directly induce Cre/loxP recombination. Using plasmid electroporation...

  16. Comparison of the pathogen species-specific immune response in udder derived cell types and their models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Günther, Juliane; Koy, Mirja; Berthold, Anne; Schuberth, Hans-Joachim; Seyfert, Hans-Martin

    2016-01-01

    The outcome of an udder infection (mastitis) largely depends on the species of the invading pathogen. Gram-negative pathogens, such as Escherichia coli often elicit acute clinical mastitis while Gram-positive pathogens, such as Staphylococcus aureus tend to cause milder subclinical inflammations. It is unclear which type of the immune competent cells residing in the udder governs the pathogen species-specific physiology of mastitis and which established cell lines might provide suitable models. We therefore profiled the pathogen species-specific immune response of different cell types derived from udder and blood. Primary cultures of bovine mammary epithelial cells (pbMEC), mammary derived fibroblasts (pbMFC), and bovine monocyte-derived macrophages (boMdM) were challenged with heat-killed E. coli, S. aureus and S. uberis mastitis pathogens and their immune response was scaled against the response of established models for MEC (bovine MAC-T) and macrophages (murine RAW 264.7). Only E. coli provoked a full scale immune reaction in pbMEC, fibroblasts and MAC-T cells, as indicated by induced cytokine and chemokine expression and NF-κB activation. Weak reactions were induced by S. aureus and none by S. uberis challenges. In contrast, both models for macrophages (boMdM and RAW 264.7) reacted strongly against all the three pathogens accompanied by strong activation of NF-κB factors. Hence, the established cell models MAC-T and RAW 264.7 properly reflected key aspects of the pathogen species-specific immune response of the respective parental cell type. Our data imply that the pathogen species-specific physiology of mastitis likely relates to the respective response of MEC rather to that of professional immune cells. PMID:26830914

  17. Gamma-Retrovirus Integration Marks Cell Type-Specific Cancer Genes: A Novel Profiling Tool in Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilroy, Kathryn L.; Terry, Anne; Naseer, Asif; de Ridder, Jeroen; Wang, Weiwei; Carpenter, Eric; Mason, Andrew; Wong, Gane K-S.; Kilbey, Anna; Neil, James C.

    2016-01-01

    Retroviruses have been foundational in cancer research since early studies identified proto-oncogenes as targets for insertional mutagenesis. Integration of murine gamma-retroviruses into the host genome favours promoters and enhancers and entails interaction of viral integrase with host BET/bromodomain factors. We report that this integration pattern is conserved in feline leukaemia virus (FeLV), a gamma-retrovirus that infects many human cell types. Analysis of FeLV insertion sites in the MCF-7 mammary carcinoma cell line revealed strong bias towards active chromatin marks with no evidence of significant post-integration growth selection. The most prominent FeLV integration targets had little overlap with the most abundantly expressed transcripts, but were strongly enriched for annotated cancer genes. A meta-analysis based on several gamma-retrovirus integration profiling (GRIP) studies in human cells (CD34+, K562, HepG2) revealed a similar cancer gene bias but also remarkable cell-type specificity, with prominent exceptions including a universal integration hotspot at the long non-coding RNA MALAT1. Comparison of GRIP targets with databases of super-enhancers from the same cell lines showed that these have only limited overlap and that GRIP provides unique insights into the upstream drivers of cell growth. These observations elucidate the oncogenic potency of the gamma-retroviruses and support the wider application of GRIP to identify the genes and growth regulatory circuits that drive distinct cancer types. PMID:27097319

  18. Gamma-Retrovirus Integration Marks Cell Type-Specific Cancer Genes: A Novel Profiling Tool in Cancer Genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilroy, Kathryn L; Terry, Anne; Naseer, Asif; de Ridder, Jeroen; Allahyar, Amin; Wang, Weiwei; Carpenter, Eric; Mason, Andrew; Wong, Gane K-S; Cameron, Ewan R; Kilbey, Anna; Neil, James C

    2016-01-01

    Retroviruses have been foundational in cancer research since early studies identified proto-oncogenes as targets for insertional mutagenesis. Integration of murine gamma-retroviruses into the host genome favours promoters and enhancers and entails interaction of viral integrase with host BET/bromodomain factors. We report that this integration pattern is conserved in feline leukaemia virus (FeLV), a gamma-retrovirus that infects many human cell types. Analysis of FeLV insertion sites in the MCF-7 mammary carcinoma cell line revealed strong bias towards active chromatin marks with no evidence of significant post-integration growth selection. The most prominent FeLV integration targets had little overlap with the most abundantly expressed transcripts, but were strongly enriched for annotated cancer genes. A meta-analysis based on several gamma-retrovirus integration profiling (GRIP) studies in human cells (CD34+, K562, HepG2) revealed a similar cancer gene bias but also remarkable cell-type specificity, with prominent exceptions including a universal integration hotspot at the long non-coding RNA MALAT1. Comparison of GRIP targets with databases of super-enhancers from the same cell lines showed that these have only limited overlap and that GRIP provides unique insights into the upstream drivers of cell growth. These observations elucidate the oncogenic potency of the gamma-retroviruses and support the wider application of GRIP to identify the genes and growth regulatory circuits that drive distinct cancer types. PMID:27097319

  19. Cell-Type-Specific Circuit Connectivity of Hippocampal CA1 Revealed through Cre-Dependent Rabies Tracing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanjun Sun

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available We developed and applied a Cre-dependent, genetically modified rabies-based tracing system to map direct synaptic connections to specific CA1 neuron types in the mouse hippocampus. We found common inputs to excitatory and inhibitory CA1 neurons from CA3, CA2, the entorhinal cortex (EC, the medial septum (MS, and, unexpectedly, the subiculum. Excitatory CA1 neurons receive inputs from both cholinergic and GABAergic MS neurons, whereas inhibitory neurons receive a great majority of inputs from GABAergic MS neurons. Both cell types also receive weaker input from glutamatergic MS neurons. Comparisons of inputs to CA1 PV+ interneurons versus SOM+ interneurons showed similar strengths of input from the subiculum, but PV+ interneurons received much stronger input than SOM+ neurons from CA3, the EC, and the MS. Thus, rabies tracing identifies hippocampal circuit connections and maps how the different input sources to CA1 are distributed with different strengths on each of its constituent cell types.

  20. Measuring cell-type specific differential methylation in human brain tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montaño, Carolina M; Irizarry, Rafael A; Kaufmann, Walter E; Talbot, Konrad; Gur, Raquel E; Feinberg, Andrew P; Taub, Margaret A

    2013-01-01

    The behavior of epigenetic mechanisms in the brain is obscured by tissue heterogeneity and disease-related histological changes. Not accounting for these confounders leads to biased results. We develop a statistical methodology that estimates and adjusts for celltype composition by decomposing neuronal and non-neuronal differential signal. This method provides a conceptual framework for deconvolving heterogeneous epigenetic data from postmortem brain studies. We apply it to find cell-specific differentially methylated regions between prefrontal cortex and hippocampus. We demonstrate the utility of the method on both Infinium 450k and CHARM data. PMID:24000956

  1. Key metalloproteinases are expressed by specific cell types in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toft-Hansen, Henrik; Nuttall, Robert K; Edwards, Dylan R;

    2004-01-01

    Metalloproteinases (MPs) include matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and metalloproteinase-disintegrins (ADAMs). Their physiological inhibitors are tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases (TIMPs). MPs are thought to be mediators of cellular infiltration in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis and its...... animal model, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). We used real-time RT-PCR to profile the expression of all 22 known mouse MMPs, seven ADAMs, and all four known TIMPs in spinal cord from SJL/J mice and mice with adoptively transferred myelin basic protein (MBP)-specific EAE. A significant...

  2. Cell-type specific mechanisms of D-serine uptake and release in the brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magalie eMartineau

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Accumulating evidence during the last decade established that D-serine is a key signaling molecule utilized by neurons and astroglia in the mammalian central nervous system. D-serine is increasingly appreciated as the main physiological endogenous coagonist for synaptic NMDA receptors at central excitatory synapses; it is mandatory for long-term changes in synaptic strength, memory, learning, and social interactions. Alterations in the extracellular levels of D-serine leading to disrupted cell-cell signaling are a trademark of many chronic or acute neurological (i.e. Alzheimer disease, epilepsy, stroke and psychiatric (i.e. schizophrenia disorders, and are associated with addictive behavior (i.e. cocaine addiction. Indeed, fine tuning of the extracellular levels of D-serine, achieved by various molecular machineries and signaling pathways, is necessary for maintenance of accurate NMDA receptor functions. Here, we review the experimental data supporting the notion that astroglia and neurons use different pathways to regulate levels of extracellular D-serine.

  3. CCR2 and CXCR3 agonistic chemokines are differently expressed and regulated in human alveolar epithelial cells type II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasse Antje

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The attraction of leukocytes from circulation to inflamed lungs depends on the activation of both the leukocytes and the resident cells within the lung. In this study we determined gene expression and secretion patterns for monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1/CCL2 and T-cell specific CXCR3 agonistic chemokines (Mig/CXCL9, IP-10/CXCL10, and I-TAC/CXCL11 in TNF-α-, IFN-γ-, and IL-1β-stimulated human alveolar epithelial cells type II (AEC-II. AEC-II constitutively expressed high level of CCL2 mRNA in vitro and in situ , and released CCL2 protein in vitro . Treatment of AEC-II with proinflammatory cytokines up-regulated both CCL2 mRNA expression and release of immunoreactive CCL2, whereas IFN-γ had no effect on CCL2 release. In contrast, CXCR3 agonistic chemokines were not detected in freshly isolated AEC-II or in non-stimulated epithelial like cell line A549. IFN-γ, alone or in combination with IL-1β and TNF-α resulted in an increase in CXCL10, CXCL11, and CXCL9 mRNA expression and generation of CXCL10 protein by AEC-II or A549 cells. CXCL10 gene expression and secretion were induced in dose-dependent manner after cytokine-stimulation of AEC-II with an order of potency IFN-γ>>IL-1β ≥ TNF-α. Additionally, we localized the CCL2 and CXCL10 mRNAs in human lung tissue explants by in situ hybridization, and demonstrated the selective effects of cytokines and dexamethasone on CCL2 and CXCL10 expression. These data suggest that the regulation of the CCL2 and CXCL10 expression exhibit significant differences in their mechanisms, and also demonstrate that the alveolar epithelium contributes to the cytokine milieu of the lung, with the ability to respond to locally generated cytokines and to produce potent mediators of the local inflammatory response.

  4. Cell type-specific delivery of short interfering RNAs by dye-functionalised theranostic nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Press, Adrian T.; Traeger, Anja; Pietsch, Christian; Mosig, Alexander; Wagner, Michael; Clemens, Mark G.; Jbeily, Nayla; Koch, Nicole; Gottschaldt, Michael; Bézière, Nicolas; Ermolayev, Volodymyr; Ntziachristos, Vasilis; Popp, Jürgen; Kessels, Michael M.; Qualmann, Britta; Schubert, Ulrich S.; Bauer, Michael

    2014-12-01

    Efficient delivery of short interfering RNAs reflects a prerequisite for the development of RNA interference therapeutics. Here, we describe highly specific nanoparticles, based on near infrared fluorescent polymethine dye-derived targeting moieties coupled to biodegradable polymers. The fluorescent dye, even when coupled to a nanoparticle, mimics a ligand for hepatic parenchymal uptake transporters resulting in hepatobiliary clearance of approximately 95% of the dye within 45 min. Body distribution, hepatocyte uptake and excretion into bile of the dye itself, or dye-coupled nanoparticles can be tracked by intravital microscopy or even non-invasively by multispectral optoacoustic tomography. Efficacy of delivery is demonstrated in vivo using 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-CoA reductase siRNA as an active payload resulting in a reduction of plasma cholesterol levels if siRNA was formulated into dye-functionalised nanoparticles. This suggests that organ-selective uptake of a near infrared dye can be efficiently transferred to theranostic nanoparticles allowing novel possibilities for personalised silencing of disease-associated genes.

  5. Cell-type specific photoreceptors and light signaling pathways in the multicellular green alga volvox carteri and their potential role in cellular differentiation

    OpenAIRE

    Kianianmomeni, Arash

    2015-01-01

    The formation of multicellular organisms requires genetically predefined signaling pathways in various cell types. Besides differences in size, energy balance and life time, cell types should be enable to modulate appropriate developmental and adaptive responses in ever-changing surrounding environment. One of the most important environmental cues is light which regulates a variety of physiological and cellular processes. During evolution, diverse light-sensitive proteins, so-called photorece...

  6. Specific residues of the GDP/GTP exchange factor Bud5p are involved in establishment of the cell type-specific budding pattern in yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Pil Jung; Lee, Bongyong; Park, Hay-Oak

    2004-07-01

    Cells of the budding yeast undergo oriented cell division by choosing a specific site for growth depending on their cell type. Haploid a and alpha cells bud in an axial pattern whereas diploid a/alpha cells bud in a bipolar pattern. The Ras-like GTPase Rsr1p/Bud1p, its GDP-GTP exchange factor Bud5p, and its GTPase-activating protein Bud2p are essential for selecting the proper site for polarized growth in all cell types. Here we showed that specific residues at the N terminus and the C terminus of Bud5p were important for bipolar budding, while some residues were involved in both axial and bipolar budding. These bipolar-specific mutations of BUD5 disrupted proper localization of Bud5p in diploid a/alpha cells without affecting Bud5p localization in haploid alpha cells. In contrast, Bud5p expressed in the bud5 mutants defective in both budding patterns failed to localize in all cell types. Thus, these results identify specific residues of Bud5p that are likely to be involved in direct interaction with spatial landmarks, which recruit Bud5p to the proper bud site. Finally, we found a new start codon of BUD5, which extends the open reading frame to 210 bp upstream of the previously estimated start site, thus encoding a polypeptide of 608 amino acid residues. Bud5p with these additional N-terminal residues interacted with Bud8p, a potential bipolar landmark, suggesting that the N-terminal region is necessary for recognition of the spatial cues. PMID:15136576

  7. Cell Type Dependent Regulation of Multidrug Resistance-1 Gene Expression by AML1-ETO

    OpenAIRE

    Hines, Robert; Boyapati, Anita; Zhang, Dong-Er

    2007-01-01

    The AML1-ETO fusion protein is generated from the 8;21 chromosome translocation that is commonly identified in acute myeloid leukemia. AML1-ETO is a DNA binding transcription factor and has been demonstrated to play a critical role in promoting leukemogenesis. Therefore, it is important to define the molecular mechanism of AML1-ETO in the regulation of gene expression. Here, we report that the effect of AML1-ETO on the promoter of multidrug resistance-1 (MDR1) gene, a known AML1-ETO target, i...

  8. Cell-Type-Specific Profiling of Gene Expression and Chromatin Binding without Cell Isolation: Assaying RNA Pol II Occupancy in Neural Stem Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Southall, Tony D.; Gold, Katrina S.; Egger, Boris; Davidson, Catherine M.; Caygill, Elizabeth E.; Marshall, Owen J.; Brand, Andrea H.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Cell-type-specific transcriptional profiling often requires the isolation of specific cell types from complex tissues. We have developed “TaDa,” a technique that enables cell-specific profiling without cell isolation. TaDa permits genome-wide profiling of DNA- or chromatin-binding proteins without cell sorting, fixation, or affinity purification. The method is simple, sensitive, highly reproducible, and transferable to any model system. We show that TaDa can be used to identify transc...

  9. Distinct and atypical intrinsic and extrinsic cell death pathways between photoreceptor cell types upon specific ablation of Ranbp2 in cone photoreceptors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyoung-In Cho

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Non-autonomous cell-death is a cardinal feature of the disintegration of neural networks in neurodegenerative diseases, but the molecular bases of this process are poorly understood. The neural retina comprises a mosaic of rod and cone photoreceptors. Cone and rod photoreceptors degenerate upon rod-specific expression of heterogeneous mutations in functionally distinct genes, whereas cone-specific mutations are thought to cause only cone demise. Here we show that conditional ablation in cone photoreceptors of Ran-binding protein-2 (Ranbp2, a cell context-dependent pleiotropic protein linked to neuroprotection, familial necrotic encephalopathies, acute transverse myelitis and tumor-suppression, promotes early electrophysiological deficits, subcellular erosive destruction and non-apoptotic death of cones, whereas rod photoreceptors undergo cone-dependent non-autonomous apoptosis. Cone-specific Ranbp2 ablation causes the temporal activation of a cone-intrinsic molecular cascade highlighted by the early activation of metalloproteinase 11/stromelysin-3 and up-regulation of Crx and CoREST, followed by the down-modulation of cone-specific phototransduction genes, transient up-regulation of regulatory/survival genes and activation of caspase-7 without apoptosis. Conversely, PARP1+ -apoptotic rods develop upon sequential activation of caspase-9 and caspase-3 and loss of membrane permeability. Rod photoreceptor demise ceases upon cone degeneration. These findings reveal novel roles of Ranbp2 in the modulation of intrinsic and extrinsic cell death mechanisms and pathways. They also unveil a novel spatiotemporal paradigm of progression of neurodegeneration upon cell-specific genetic damage whereby a cone to rod non-autonomous death pathway with intrinsically distinct cell-type death manifestations is triggered by cell-specific loss of Ranbp2. Finally, this study casts new light onto cell-death mechanisms that may be shared by human dystrophies with distinct

  10. DETECTION OF E6, E7 AND CELL-TYPE SPECIFIC ENHANCER OF HUMAN PAPILLOMAVIRUS TYPE 16 IN BREAST CARCINOMA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Qian; CHU Yong-lie; JIA Xiao-li; ZHANG Shu-qun; LIU Wen-kang

    2008-01-01

    Objective To detect HPV16 E6, E7 genes and cell-type specific enhancer (CTSE) of long control region (LCR) in breast carcinoma (BC).Methods HPV16 E6,E7 genes and CTSE were detected in 40 BCs and 20 normal breast tissue (NBT) using polymerase chain reaction (PCR).Results The positive rates of HPV16 E6, E7genes and CTSE were 60% (24/40),55% (22/40) and 67.5%(27/40)respectively in BCs, whereas only 5% (1/20), 5%(1/20) and 15% (3/20) in NBTs (P<0.05). There exited significant correlation between E6 gene and CTSE in BCs (P<0.05), as well as E7 gene and CTSE. The infection of HPV16 E6, E7 and CTSE had no statistic relationship with pathological features.Conclusion There were HPV16 E6, E7 genes and CTSE together in BCs and CTSE may play an important role in pathogenesis of BC.

  11. Reversal of morphine-induced cell-type-specific synaptic plasticity in the nucleus accumbens shell blocks reinstatement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hearing, Matthew C; Jedynak, Jakub; Ebner, Stephanie R; Ingebretson, Anna; Asp, Anders J; Fischer, Rachel A; Schmidt, Clare; Larson, Erin B; Thomas, Mark John

    2016-01-19

    Drug-evoked plasticity at excitatory synapses on medium spiny neurons (MSNs) of the nucleus accumbens (NAc) drives behavioral adaptations in addiction. MSNs expressing dopamine D1 (D1R-MSN) vs. D2 receptors (D2R-MSN) can exert antagonistic effects in drug-related behaviors, and display distinct alterations in glutamate signaling following repeated exposure to psychostimulants; however, little is known of cell-type-specific plasticity induced by opiates. Here, we find that repeated morphine potentiates excitatory transmission and increases GluA2-lacking AMPA receptor expression in D1R-MSNs, while reducing signaling in D2-MSNs following 10-14 d of forced abstinence. In vivo reversal of this pathophysiology with optogenetic stimulation of infralimbic cortex-accumbens shell (ILC-NAc shell) inputs or treatment with the antibiotic, ceftriaxone, blocked reinstatement of morphine-evoked conditioned place preference. These findings confirm the presence of overlapping and distinct plasticity produced by classes of abused drugs within subpopulations of MSNs that may provide targetable molecular mechanisms for future pharmacotherapies. PMID:26739562

  12. Cell type specificity of female lung cancer associated with sulfur dioxide from air pollutants in Taiwan: An ecological study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tseng Ching-Yu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many studies have examined the association between air pollutants (including sulfur dioxide [SO2], carbon monoxide [CO], nitrogen dioxide [NO2], nitric oxide [NO], ozone [O3], and particulate matter 10] and lung cancer. However, data from previous studies on pathological cell types were limited, especially for SO2 exposure. We aimed to explore the association between SO2 exposure from outdoor air pollutants and female lung cancer incidence by cell type specificity. Methods We conducted an ecological study and calculated annual average concentration of 6 air pollutants (SO2, CO, NO2, NO, O3, and PM10 using data from Taiwan Environmental Protection Administration air quality monitoring stations. The Poisson regression models were used to evaluate the association between SO2 and age-standardized incidence rate of female lung cancer by two major pathological types (adenocarcinoma [AC] and squamous cell carcinoma [SCC]. In order to understand whether there is a dose-response relationship between SO2 and two major pathological types, we analyzed 4 levels of exposure based on quartiles of concentration of SO2. Results The Poisson regression results showed that with the first quartile of SO2 concentration as the baseline, the relative risks for AC/SCC type cancer among females were 1.20 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.04-1.37/1.39 (95% CI, 0.96-2.01 for the second, 1.22 (95% CI, 1.04-1.43/1.58 (95% CI, 1.06-2.37 for the third, and 1.27 (95% CI, 1.06-1.52/1.80 (95% CI, 1.15-2.84 for the fourth quartile of SO2 concentration. The tests for trend were statistically significant for both AC and SCC at P = 0.0272 and 0.0145, respectively. Conclusion The current study suggests that SO2 exposure as an air pollutant may increase female lung cancer incidence and the associations with female lung cancer is much stronger for SCC than for AC. The findings of this study warrant further investigation on the role of SO2 in the etiology of SCC.

  13. Layer- and cell-type-specific subthreshold and suprathreshold effects of long-term monocular deprivation in rat visual cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medini, Paolo

    2011-11-23

    Connectivity and dendritic properties are determinants of plasticity that are layer and cell-type specific in the neocortex. However, the impact of experience-dependent plasticity at the level of synaptic inputs and spike outputs remains unclear along vertical cortical microcircuits. Here I compared subthreshold and suprathreshold sensitivity to prolonged monocular deprivation (MD) in rat binocular visual cortex in layer 4 and layer 2/3 pyramids (4Ps and 2/3Ps) and in thick-tufted and nontufted layer 5 pyramids (5TPs and 5NPs), which innervate different extracortical targets. In normal rats, 5TPs and 2/3Ps are the most binocular in terms of synaptic inputs, and 5NPs are the least. Spike responses of all 5TPs were highly binocular, whereas those of 2/3Ps were dominated by either the contralateral or ipsilateral eye. MD dramatically shifted the ocular preference of 2/3Ps and 4Ps, mostly by depressing deprived-eye inputs. Plasticity was profoundly different in layer 5. The subthreshold ocular preference shift was sevenfold smaller in 5TPs because of smaller depression of deprived inputs combined with a generalized loss of responsiveness, and was undetectable in 5NPs. Despite their modest ocular dominance change, spike responses of 5TPs consistently lost their typically high binocularity during MD. The comparison of MD effects on 2/3Ps and 5TPs, the main affected output cells of vertical microcircuits, indicated that subthreshold plasticity is not uniquely determined by the initial degree of input binocularity. The data raise the question of whether 5TPs are driven solely by 2/3Ps during MD. The different suprathreshold plasticity of the two cell populations could underlie distinct functional deficits in amblyopia. PMID:22114282

  14. Induction of long-term potentiation and long-term depression is cell-type specific in the spinal cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hee Young; Jun, Jaebeom; Wang, Jigong; Bittar, Alice; Chung, Kyungsoon; Chung, Jin Mo

    2015-04-01

    The underlying mechanism of chronic pain is believed to be changes in excitability in spinal dorsal horn (DH) neurons that respond abnormally to peripheral input. Increased excitability in pain transmission neurons, and depression of inhibitory neurons, are widely recognized in the spinal cord of animal models of chronic pain. The possible occurrence of 2 parallel but opposing forms of synaptic plasticity, long-term potentiation (LTP) and long-term depression (LTD) was tested in 2 types of identified DH neurons using whole-cell patch-clamp recordings in mouse spinal cord slices. The test stimulus was applied to the sensory fibers to evoke excitatory postsynaptic currents in identified spinothalamic tract neurons (STTn) and GABAergic neurons (GABAn). Afferent conditioning stimulation (ACS) applied to primary afferent fibers with various stimulation parameters induced LTP in STTn but LTD in GABAn, regardless of stimulation parameters. These opposite responses were further confirmed by simultaneous dual patch-clamp recordings of STTn and GABAn from a single spinal cord slice. Both the LTP in STTn and the LTD in GABAn were blocked by an NMDA receptor antagonist, AP5, or an intracellular Ca chelator, BAPTA. Both the pattern and magnitude of intracellular Ca after ACS were almost identical between STTn and GABAn based on live-cell calcium imaging. The results suggest that the intense sensory input induces an NMDA receptor-dependent intracellular Ca increase in both STTn and GABAn, but produces opposing synaptic plasticity. This study shows that there is cell type-specific synaptic plasticity in the spinal DH. PMID:25785524

  15. Cell-Type-Specific Transcriptome Analysis in the Drosophila Mushroom Body Reveals Memory-Related Changes in Gene Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crocker, Amanda; Guan, Xiao-Juan; Murphy, Coleen T; Murthy, Mala

    2016-05-17

    Learning and memory formation in Drosophila rely on a network of neurons in the mushroom bodies (MBs). Whereas numerous studies have delineated roles for individual cell types within this network in aspects of learning or memory, whether or not these cells can also be distinguished by the genes they express remains unresolved. In addition, the changes in gene expression that accompany long-term memory formation within the MBs have not yet been studied by neuron type. Here, we address both issues by performing RNA sequencing on single cell types (harvested via patch pipets) within the MB. We discover that the expression of genes that encode cell surface receptors is sufficient to identify cell types and that a subset of these genes, required for sensory transduction in peripheral sensory neurons, is not only expressed within individual neurons of the MB in the central brain, but is also critical for memory formation. PMID:27160913

  16. Cell-type-specific and hypoxia-inducible expression of the human erythropoietin gene in transgenic mice.

    OpenAIRE

    Semenza, G L; Koury, S. T.; Nejfelt, M K; Gearhart, J D; Antonarakis, S E

    1991-01-01

    Synthesis of erythropoietin, the primary humoral regulator of erythropoiesis, in liver and kidney is inducible by anemia or hypoxia. Analysis of human erythropoietin gene expression in transgenic mice revealed that sequences located 6-14 kilobases 5' to the gene direct expression to the kidney, whereas sequences within the immediate 3'-flanking region control hepatocyte-specific expression. Human erythropoietin transcription initiation sites were differentially utilized in liver and kidney. I...

  17. Cell type-specific control of protein synthesis and proliferation by FGF-dependent signaling to the translation repressor 4E-BP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruoff, Rachel; Katsara, Olga; Kolupaeva, Victoria

    2016-07-01

    Regulation of protein synthesis plays a vital role in posttranscriptional modulation of gene expression. Translational control most commonly targets the initiation of protein synthesis: loading 40S ribosome complexes onto mRNA and AUG start codon recognition. This step is initiated by eukaryotic initiation factor 4E (eIF4E) (the m7GTP cap-binding protein), whose binding to eIF4G (a scaffolding subunit) and eIF4A (an ATP-dependent RNA helicase) leads to assembly of active eIF4F complex. The ability of eIF4E to recognize the cap is prevented by its binding to eIF4E binding protein (4E-BP), which thereby inhibits cap-dependent translation by sequestering eIF4E. The 4E-BP activity is, in turn, inhibited by mTORC1 [mTOR (the mechanistic target of rapamycin) complex 1] mediated phosphorylation. Here, we define a previously unidentified mechanism of mTOR-independent 4E-BP1 regulation that is used by chondrocytes upon FGF signaling. Chondrocytes are responsible for the formation of the skeleton long bones. Unlike the majority of cell types where FGF signaling triggers proliferation, chondrocytes respond to FGF with inhibition. We establish that FGF specifically suppresses protein synthesis in chondrocytes, but not in any other cells of mesenchymal origin. Furthermore, 4E-BP1 repressor activity is necessary not only for suppression of protein synthesis, but also for FGF-induced cell-cycle arrest. Importantly, FGF-induced changes in the 4E-BP1 activity observed in cell culture are likewise detected in vivo and reflect the action of FGF signaling on downstream targets during bone development. Thus, our findings demonstrate that FGF signaling differentially impacts protein synthesis through either stimulation or repression, in a cell-type-dependent manner, with 4E-BP1 being a key player. PMID:27313212

  18. Three Human Cell Types Respond to Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes and Titanium Dioxide Nanobelts with Cell-Specific Transcriptomic and Proteomic Expression Patterns.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tilton, Susan C.; Karin, Norman J.; Tolic, Ana; Xie, Yumei; Lai, Xianyin; Hamilton, Raymond F.; Waters, Katrina M.; Holian, Andrij; Witzmann, Frank A.; Orr, Galya

    2014-08-01

    The growing use of engineered nanoparticles (NPs) in commercial and medical applications raises the urgent need for tools that can predict NP toxicity. Global transcriptome and proteome analyses were conducted on three human cell types, exposed to two high aspect ratio NP types, to identify patterns of expression that might indicate high versus low NP toxicity. Three cell types representing the most common routes of human exposure to NPs, including macrophage-like (THP-1), small airway epithelial and intestinal (Caco-2/HT29-MTX) cells, were exposed to TiO2 nanobelts (TiO2-NB; high toxicity) and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT; low toxicity) at low (10 µg/mL) and high (100 µg/mL) concentrations for 1 and 24 h. Unique patterns of gene and protein expressions were identified for each cell type, with no differentially expressed (p < 0.05, 1.5-fold change) genes or proteins overlapping across all three cell types. While unique to each cell type, the early response was primarily independent of NP type, showing similar expression patterns in response to both TiO2-NB and MWCNT. The early response might, therefore, indicate a general response to insult. In contrast, the 24 h response was unique to each NP type. The most significantly (p < 0.05) enriched biological processes in THP-1 cells indicated TiO2-NB regulation of pathways associated with inflammation, apoptosis, cell cycle arrest, DNA replication stress and genomic instability, while MWCNT-regulated pathways indicated increased cell proliferation, DNA repair and anti-apoptosis. These two distinct sets of biological pathways might, therefore, underlie cellular responses to high and low NP toxicity, respectively.

  19. In Vivo Zonal Variation and Liver Cell-Type Specific NF-κB Localization after Chronic Adaptation to Ethanol and following Partial Hepatectomy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harshavardhan Nilakantan

    insights as to how ethanol treatment may affect cell-type specific processes regulated by NF-κB activation in liver cells.

  20. Gamma-retrovirus integration marks cell type-specific cancer genes: a novel profiling tool in cancer genomics

    OpenAIRE

    Gilroy, Kathryn L.; Terry, Anne; Naseer, Asif; De Ridder, Jeroen; Allahyar, Amin; Wang, Weiwei; Carpenter, Eric; Mason, Andrew; Wong, Gane K-S; Cameron, Ewan R; Kilbey, Anna; Neil, James C.

    2016-01-01

    Retroviruses have been foundational in cancer research since early studies identified proto-oncogenes as targets for insertional mutagenesis. Integration of murine gamma-retroviruses into the host genome favours promoters and enhancers and entails interaction of viral integrase with host BET/bromodomain factors. We report that this integration pattern is conserved in feline leukaemia virus (FeLV), a gamma-retrovirus that infects many human cell types. Analysis of FeLV insertion sites in the M...

  1. A 350 bp region of the proximal promoter of Rds drives cell-type specific gene expression

    OpenAIRE

    Cai, Xue; Conley, Shannon M.; Cheng, Tong; Al-Ubaidi, Muayyad R.; Naash, Muna I.

    2010-01-01

    RDS (retinal degeneration slow) is a photoreceptor-specific tetraspanin protein required for the biogenesis and maintenance of rod and cone outer segments. Mutations in the Rds gene are associated with multiple forms of rod- and cone-dominant retinal degeneration. To gain more insight into the mechanisms underlying the regulation of this gene the identification of regulatory sequences within the promoter of Rds was undertaken. A 3.5kb fragment of the 5′ flanking region of the mouse Rds gene w...

  2. Genome-wide analyses of transcription factor GATA3-mediated gene regulation in distinct T cell types

    OpenAIRE

    Wei, Gang; Abraham, Brian J.; Yagi, Ryoji; Jothi, Raja; Cui, Kairong; Sharma, Suveena; Narlikar, Leelavati; Northrup, Daniel L.; Tang, Qingsong; Paul, William E.; Zhu, Jinfang; Zhao, Keji

    2011-01-01

    The transcription factor GATA3 plays an essential role during T cell development and T helper 2 (Th2) cell differentiation. To understand GATA3-mediated gene regulation, we identified genome-wide GATA3 binding sites in ten well-defined developmental and effector T lymphocyte lineages. In the thymus, GATA3 directly regulated many critical factors, including Th-POK, Notch1 and T cell receptor subunits. In the periphery, GATA3 induced a large number of Th2 cell-specific as well as Th2 cell non-s...

  3. HaploReg v4: systematic mining of putative causal variants, cell types, regulators and target genes for human complex traits and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Lucas D; Kellis, Manolis

    2016-01-01

    More than 90% of common variants associated with complex traits do not affect proteins directly, but instead the circuits that control gene expression. This has increased the urgency of understanding the regulatory genome as a key component for translating genetic results into mechanistic insights and ultimately therapeutics. To address this challenge, we developed HaploReg (http://compbio.mit.edu/HaploReg) to aid the functional dissection of genome-wide association study (GWAS) results, the prediction of putative causal variants in haplotype blocks, the prediction of likely cell types of action, and the prediction of candidate target genes by systematic mining of comparative, epigenomic and regulatory annotations. Since first launching the website in 2011, we have greatly expanded HaploReg, increasing the number of chromatin state maps to 127 reference epigenomes from ENCODE 2012 and Roadmap Epigenomics, incorporating regulator binding data, expanding regulatory motif disruption annotations, and integrating expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL) variants and their tissue-specific target genes from GTEx, Geuvadis, and other recent studies. We present these updates as HaploReg v4, and illustrate a use case of HaploReg for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD)-associated SNPs with putative brain regulatory mechanisms. PMID:26657631

  4. Microarray Gene Expression Analysis to Evaluate Cell Type Specific Expression of Targets Relevant for Immunotherapy of Hematological Malignancies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M J Pont

    Full Text Available Cellular immunotherapy has proven to be effective in the treatment of hematological cancers by donor lymphocyte infusion after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and more recently by targeted therapy with chimeric antigen or T-cell receptor-engineered T cells. However, dependent on the tissue distribution of the antigens that are targeted, anti-tumor responses can be accompanied by undesired side effects. Therefore, detailed tissue distribution analysis is essential to estimate potential efficacy and toxicity of candidate targets for immunotherapy of hematological malignancies. We performed microarray gene expression analysis of hematological malignancies of different origins, healthy hematopoietic cells and various non-hematopoietic cell types from organs that are often targeted in detrimental immune responses after allogeneic stem cell transplantation leading to graft-versus-host disease. Non-hematopoietic cells were also cultured in the presence of IFN-γ to analyze gene expression under inflammatory circumstances. Gene expression was investigated by Illumina HT12.0 microarrays and quality control analysis was performed to confirm the cell-type origin and exclude contamination of non-hematopoietic cell samples with peripheral blood cells. Microarray data were validated by quantitative RT-PCR showing strong correlations between both platforms. Detailed gene expression profiles were generated for various minor histocompatibility antigens and B-cell surface antigens to illustrate the value of the microarray dataset to estimate efficacy and toxicity of candidate targets for immunotherapy. In conclusion, our microarray database provides a relevant platform to analyze and select candidate antigens with hematopoietic (lineage-restricted expression as potential targets for immunotherapy of hematological cancers.

  5. Single-cell RNA-seq reveals cell type-specific transcriptional signatures at the maternal–foetal interface during pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Andrew C.; Mould, Arne W.; Bikoff, Elizabeth K.; Robertson, Elizabeth J.

    2016-01-01

    Growth and survival of the mammalian embryo within the uterine environment depends on the placenta, a highly complex vascularized organ comprised of both maternal and foetal tissues. Recent experiments demonstrate that the zinc finger transcriptional repressor Prdm1/Blimp1 is essential for specification of spiral artery trophoblast giant cells (SpA-TGCs) that invade and remodel maternal blood vessels. To learn more about functional contributions made by Blimp1+ cell lineages here we perform the first single-cell RNA-seq analysis of the placenta. Cell types of both foetal and maternal origin are profiled. Comparisons with microarray datasets from mutant placenta and in vitro differentiated trophoblast stem cells allow us to identify Blimp1-dependent transcripts enriched in SpA-TGCs. Our experiments provide new insights into the functionally distinct cell types present at the maternal–foetal interface and advance our knowledge of dynamic gene expression patterns controlling placental morphogenesis and vascular mimicry. PMID:27108815

  6. Differential cell type-specific transcriptional regulation of the CYP1A1 gene

    OpenAIRE

    Adamska, Magdalena

    2005-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 1A1 (CYP1A1) monooxygenase plays an important role in the metabolism of environmental pollutants such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and halogenated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (HAHs). Oxidation of these compounds converts them to the metabolites that subsequently can be conjugated to hydrophilic endogenous entities e.g. glutathione. Derivates generated in this way are water soluble and can be excreted in bile or urine, which is a defense mechanism. Besides de...

  7. Epigenetic regulation of normal human mammary cell type-specific miRNAs

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vrba, Lukáš; Garbe, J.; Stampfer, M.R.; Futscher, B. W.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 21, č. 12 (2011), s. 2026-2037. ISSN 1088-9051 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50510513 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : DNA metylation * gene expression * transcription Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 13.608, year: 2011

  8. Correlation of mRNA and protein levels: Cell type-specific gene expression of cluster designation antigens in the prostate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deutsch Eric W

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: Expression levels of mRNA and protein by cell types exhibit a range of correlations for different genes. In this study, we compared levels of mRNA abundance for several cluster designation (CD genes determined by gene arrays using magnetic sorted and laser-capture microdissected human prostate cells with levels of expression of the respective CD proteins determined by immunohistochemical staining in the major cell types of the prostate – basal epithelial, luminal epithelial, stromal fibromuscular, and endothelial – and for prostate precursor/stem cells and prostate carcinoma cells. Immunohistochemical stains of prostate tissues from more than 50 patients were scored for informative CD antigen expression and compared with cell-type specific transcriptomes. Results: Concordance between gene and protein expression findings based on 'present' vs. 'absent' calls ranged from 46 to 68%. Correlation of expression levels was poor to moderate (Pearson correlations ranged from 0 to 0.63. Divergence between the two data types was most frequently seen for genes whose array signals exceeded background (> 50 but lacked immunoreactivity by immunostaining. This could be due to multiple factors, e.g. low levels of protein expression, technological sensitivities, sample processing, probe set definition or anatomical origin of tissue and actual biological differences between transcript and protein abundance. Conclusion: Agreement between these two very different methodologies has great implications for their respective use in both molecular studies and clinical trials employing molecular biomarkers.

  9. Classically and alternatively activated bone marrow derived macrophages differ in cytoskeletal functions and migration towards specific CNS cell types

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dijkstra Christine D

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Macrophages play an important role in neuroinflammatory diseases such as multiple sclerosis (MS and spinal cord injury (SCI, being involved in both damage and repair. The divergent effects of macrophages might be explained by their different activation status: classically activated (CA/M1, pro-inflammatory, macrophages and alternatively activated (AA/M2, growth promoting, macrophages. Little is known about the effect of macrophages with these phenotypes in the central nervous system (CNS and how they influence pathogenesis. The aim of this study was therefore to determine the characteristics of these phenotypically different macrophages in the context of the CNS in an in vitro setting. Results Here we show that bone marrow derived CA and AA macrophages have a distinct migratory capacity towards medium conditioned by various cell types of the CNS. AA macrophages were preferentially attracted by the low weight ( Conclusion In conclusion, since AA macrophages are more motile and are attracted by NCM, they are prone to migrate towards neurons in the CNS. CA macrophages have a lower motility and a stronger adhesion to ECM. In neuroinflammatory diseases the restricted migration and motility of CA macrophages might limit lesion size due to bystander damage.

  10. Cell-type-specific profiling of protein-DNA interactions without cell isolation using targeted DamID with next-generation sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Owen J; Southall, Tony D; Cheetham, Seth W; Brand, Andrea H

    2016-09-01

    This protocol is an extension to: Nat. Protoc. 2, 1467-1478 (2007); doi:10.1038/nprot.2007.148; published online 7 June 2007The ability to profile transcription and chromatin binding in a cell-type-specific manner is a powerful aid to understanding cell-fate specification and cellular function in multicellular organisms. We recently developed targeted DamID (TaDa) to enable genome-wide, cell-type-specific profiling of DNA- and chromatin-binding proteins in vivo without cell isolation. As a protocol extension, this article describes substantial modifications to an existing protocol, and it offers additional applications. TaDa builds upon DamID, a technique for detecting genome-wide DNA-binding profiles of proteins, by coupling it with the GAL4 system in Drosophila to enable both temporal and spatial resolution. TaDa ensures that Dam-fusion proteins are expressed at very low levels, thus avoiding toxicity and potential artifacts from overexpression. The modifications to the core DamID technique presented here also increase the speed of sample processing and throughput, and adapt the method to next-generation sequencing technology. TaDa is robust, reproducible and highly sensitive. Compared with other methods for cell-type-specific profiling, the technique requires no cell-sorting, cross-linking or antisera, and binding profiles can be generated from as few as 10,000 total induced cells. By profiling the genome-wide binding of RNA polymerase II (Pol II), TaDa can also identify transcribed genes in a cell-type-specific manner. Here we describe a detailed protocol for carrying out TaDa experiments and preparing the material for next-generation sequencing. Although we developed TaDa in Drosophila, it should be easily adapted to other organisms with an inducible expression system. Once transgenic animals are obtained, the entire experimental procedure-from collecting tissue samples to generating sequencing libraries-can be accomplished within 5 d. PMID:27490632

  11. Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol accumulation, metabolism and cell-type-specific adverse effects in aggregating brain cell cultures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Despite the widespread use of Cannabis as recreational drug or as medicine, little is known about its toxicity. The accumulation, metabolism and toxicity of THC were analyzed 10 days after a single treatment, and after repeated exposures during 10 days. Mixed-cell aggregate cultures of fetal rat telencephalon were used as in vitro model, as well as aggregates enriched either in neurons or in glial cells. It was found that THC accumulated preferentially in neurons, and that glia-neuron interactions decreased THC accumulation. The quantification of 11-OH-THC and of THC-COOH showed that brain aggregates were capable of THC metabolism. No cell-type difference was found for the metabolite 11-OH-THC, whereas the THC-COOH content was higher in mixed-cell cultures. No cell death was found at THC concentrations of 2 μM in single treatment and of 1 μM and 2 μM in repeated treatments. Neurons, and particularly GABAergic neurons, were most sensitive to THC. Only the GABAergic marker was affected after the single treatment, whereas the GABAergic, cholinergic and astrocytic markers were decreased after the repeated treatments. JWH 015, a CB2 receptor agonist, showed effects similar to THC, whereas ACEA, a CB1 receptor agonist, had no effect. The expression of the cytokine IL-6 was upregulated 48 h after the single treatment with 5 μM of THC or JWH 015, whereas the expression of TNF-α remained unchanged. These results suggest that the adverse effects of THC were related either to THC accumulation or to cannabinoid receptor activation and associated with IL-6 upregulation

  12. The properties of genome conformation and spatial gene interaction and regulation networks of normal and malignant human cell types.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng Wang

    Full Text Available The spatial conformation of a genome plays an important role in the long-range regulation of genome-wide gene expression and methylation, but has not been extensively studied due to lack of genome conformation data. The recently developed chromosome conformation capturing techniques such as the Hi-C method empowered by next generation sequencing can generate unbiased, large-scale, high-resolution chromosomal interaction (contact data, providing an unprecedented opportunity to investigate the spatial structure of a genome and its applications in gene regulation, genomics, epigenetics, and cell biology. In this work, we conducted a comprehensive, large-scale computational analysis of this new stream of genome conformation data generated for three different human leukemia cells or cell lines by the Hi-C technique. We developed and applied a set of bioinformatics methods to reliably generate spatial chromosomal contacts from high-throughput sequencing data and to effectively use them to study the properties of the genome structures in one-dimension (1D and two-dimension (2D. Our analysis demonstrates that Hi-C data can be effectively applied to study tissue-specific genome conformation, chromosome-chromosome interaction, chromosomal translocations, and spatial gene-gene interaction and regulation in a three-dimensional genome of primary tumor cells. Particularly, for the first time, we constructed genome-scale spatial gene-gene interaction network, transcription factor binding site (TFBS - TFBS interaction network, and TFBS-gene interaction network from chromosomal contact information. Remarkably, all these networks possess the properties of scale-free modular networks.

  13. Intrinsic properties of Tcf1 and Tcf4 splice variants determine cell-type-specific Wnt/β-catenin target gene expression

    OpenAIRE

    Wallmen, Britta; Schrempp, Monika; Hecht, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    T-cell factor (Tcf)/lymphoid-enhancer factor (Lef) proteins are a structurally diverse family of deoxyribonucleic acid-binding proteins that have essential nuclear functions in Wnt/β-catenin signalling. Expression of Wnt/β-catenin target genes is highly dependent on context, but the precise role of Tcf/Lef family members in the generation and maintenance of cell-type-specific Wnt/β-catenin responses is unknown. Herein, we show that induction of a subset of Wnt/β-catenin targets in embryonic s...

  14. Balancing intestinal and systemic inflammation through cell type-specific expression of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor repressor

    OpenAIRE

    Olga Brandstätter; Oliver Schanz; Julia Vorac; Jessica König; Tetsushi Mori; Toru Maruyama; Markus Korkowski; Thomas Haarmann-Stemmann; Dorthe von Smolinski; Schultze, Joachim L.; Josef Abel; Charlotte Esser; Haruko Takeyama; Heike Weighardt; Irmgard Förster

    2016-01-01

    As a sensor of polyaromatic chemicals the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) exerts an important role in immune regulation besides its requirement for xenobiotic metabolism. Transcriptional activation of AhR target genes is counterregulated by the AhR repressor (AhRR) but the exact function of the AhRR in vivo is currently unknown. We here show that the AhRR is predominantly expressed in immune cells of the skin and intestine, different from other AhR target genes. Whereas AhRR antagonizes the a...

  15. The differential loading of two barley CENH3 variants into distinct centromeric substructures is cell type- and development-specific.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Takayoshi; Karimi-Ashtiyani, Raheleh; Banaei-Moghaddam, Ali Mohammad; Schubert, Veit; Fuchs, Jörg; Houben, Andreas

    2015-06-01

    The organization of centromeric chromatin of diploid barley (Hordeum vulgare) encoding two (α and β) CENH3 variants was analysed by super-resolution microscopy. Antibody staining revealed that both CENH3 variants are organized in distinct but intermingled subdomains in interphase, mitotic and meiotic centromeres. Artificially extended chromatin fibres illustrate that these subdomains are formed by polynucleosome clusters. Thus, a CENH3 variant-specific loading followed by the arrangement into specific intermingling subdomains forming the centromere region appears. The CENH3 composition and transcription vary among different tissues. In young embryos, most interphase centromeres are composed of both CENH3 variants, while in meristematic root cells, a high number of nuclei contain βCENH3 mainly dispersed within the nucleoplasm. A similar distribution and no preferential arrangement of the two CENH3 variants in relationship to the spindle poles suggest that both homologs meet the same function in metaphase cells. PMID:25688006

  16. Antibody-based screening of cell wall matrix glycans in ferns reveals taxon, tissue and cell-type specific distribution patterns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leroux, Olivier; Sørensen, Iben; Marcus, Susan E.;

    2015-01-01

    Background: While it is kno3wn that complex tissues with specialized functions emerged during land plant evolution, it is not clear how cell wall polymers and their structural variants are associated with specific tissues or cell types. Moreover, due to the economic importance of many flowering...... plants, ferns have been largely neglected in cell wall comparative studies. Results: To explore fern cell wall diversity sets of monoclonal antibodies directed to matrix glycans of angiosperm cell walls have been used in glycan microarray and in situ analyses with 76 fern species and four species of...... across the ferns and specifically associated with phloem cell walls and similarly the LM11 xylan epitope was associated with xylem cell walls. The LM5 galactan and LM6 arabinan epitopes, linked to pectic supramolecules in angiosperms, were associated with vascular structures with only limited detection...

  17. RNF2/Ring1b negatively regulates p53 expression in selective cancer cell types to promote tumor development

    OpenAIRE

    Su, Wen-Jing; Fang, Jun-shun; Cheng, Feng; Liu, Chao; Zhou, Fang; Zhang, Jian

    2013-01-01

    Large numbers of studies have focused on the posttranslational regulation of p53 activity. One of the best-known negative regulators for p53 is MDM2, an E3 ubiquitin ligase that promotes p53 degradation through proteasome degradation pathways. Additional E3 ligases have also been reported to negatively regulate p53. However, whether these E3 ligases have distinct/overlapping roles in the regulation of p53 is largely unknown. In this study, we identify RNF2 (ring finger protein 2) as an E3 lig...

  18. Cell-type-specific repression by methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 is biased toward long genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugino, Ken; Hempel, Chris M; Okaty, Benjamin W; Arnson, Hannah A; Kato, Saori; Dani, Vardhan S; Nelson, Sacha B

    2014-09-17

    Mutations in methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MeCP2) cause Rett syndrome and related autism spectrum disorders (Amir et al., 1999). MeCP2 is believed to be required for proper regulation of brain gene expression, but prior microarray studies in Mecp2 knock-out mice using brain tissue homogenates have revealed only subtle changes in gene expression (Tudor et al., 2002; Nuber et al., 2005; Jordan et al., 2007; Chahrour et al., 2008). Here, by profiling discrete subtypes of neurons we uncovered more dramatic effects of MeCP2 on gene expression, overcoming the "dilution problem" associated with assaying homogenates of complex tissues. The results reveal misregulation of genes involved in neuronal connectivity and communication. Importantly, genes upregulated following loss of MeCP2 are biased toward longer genes but this is not true for downregulated genes, suggesting MeCP2 may selectively repress long genes. Because genes involved in neuronal connectivity and communication, such as cell adhesion and cell-cell signaling genes, are enriched among longer genes, their misregulation following loss of MeCP2 suggests a possible etiology for altered circuit function in Rett syndrome. PMID:25232122

  19. Characterisation of CD4 T cells in healthy and diseased koalas (Phascolarctos cinereus) using cell-type-specific monoclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangar, Chandan; Armitage, Charles W; Timms, Peter; Corcoran, Lynn M; Beagley, Kenneth W

    2016-07-01

    The koala (Phascolarctos cinereus) is an arboreal herbivorous marsupial that is an Australian icon. Koalas in many parts of Australia are under multiple threats including habitat destruction, dog attacks, vehicular accidents, and infectious diseases such as Chlamydia spp. and the koala retrovirus (KoRV), which may contribute to the incidence of lymphoma and leukaemia in this species. Due to a lack of koala-specific immune reagents and assays there is currently no way to adequately analyse the immune response in healthy, diseased or vaccinated animals. This paper reports the production and characterisation of the first anti-koala CD4 monoclonal antibody (mAb). The koala CD4 gene was identified and used to develop recombinant proteins for mAb production. Fluorochrome-conjugated anti-CD4 mAb was used to measure the levels of CD4(+) lymphocytes collected from koala spleens (41.1%, range 20-45.1%) lymph nodes (36.3%, range 19-55.9%) and peripheral blood (23.8%, range 17.3-35%) by flow cytometry. Biotin-conjugated anti-CD4 mAb was used for western blot to determine an approximate size of 52 kDa for the koala CD4 molecule and used in immunohistochemistry to identify CD4(+) cells in the paracortical region and germinal centres of spleen and lymph nodes. Using the anti-CD4 mab we showed that CD4 cells from vaccinated, but not control, koalas proliferated following in vitro stimulation with UV-inactivated Chlamydia pecorum and recombinant chlamydial antigens. Since CD4(+) T cells have been shown to play a pivotal role in clearing chlamydial infection in both human and mouse infections, using this novel antibody will help determine the role CD4(+) T cells play in protection against chlamydial infection in koalas and also enhance our knowledge of how KoRV affects the koala immune system. PMID:26905635

  20. BRAF Mutation Is Associated With a Specific Cell Type With Features Suggestive of Senescence in Ovarian Serous Borderline (Atypical Proliferative) Tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zeppernick, Felix; Ardighieri, Laura; Hannibal, Charlotte G;

    2014-01-01

    Serous borderline tumor also known as atypical proliferative serous tumor (APST) is the precursor of ovarian low-grade serous carcinoma (LGSC). In this study, we correlated the morphologic and immunohistochemical phenotypes of 71 APSTs and 18 LGSCs with the mutational status of KRAS and BRAF, the...... LGSCs, EC cells were found in only 2, and both contained BRAF mutations. The EC cells were present admixed with cuboidal and columnar cells lining the papillae and appeared to be budding from the surface, resulting in individual cells and clusters of detached cells "floating" above the papillae...... of ovarian tumors by showing that BRAF mutation is associated with cellular senescence and the presence of a specific cell type characterized by abundant EC. This "oncogene-induced senescence" phenotype may represent a mechanism that impedes progression of APSTs to LGSC....

  1. Differential microRNA expression signatures and cell type-specific association with Taxol resistance in ovarian cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim YW

    2014-02-01

    downregulation of the two miRNAs was associated with better survival, perhaps increasing the sensitivity of cancer cells to Taxol. In the chemo-sensitive patient group, only miR-647 could be a prognosis marker. These miRNAs inhibit several interacting genes of p53 networks, especially in TUOS-3 and TUOS-4, and showed cell line-specific inhibition effects. Taken together, the data indicate that the three miRNAs are closely associated with Taxol resistance and potentially better prognosis factors. Our results suggest that these miRNAs were successfully and reliably identified and would be used in the development of miRNA therapies in treating ovarian cancer. Keywords: microRNA, ovarian cancer, Taxol resistance, Kaplan–Meier survival analysis

  2. Using laser micro-dissection and qRT-PCR to analyze cell type-specific gene expression in Norway spruce phloem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina E. Nagy

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The tangentially oriented polyphenolic parenchyma (PP and radially organized ray parenchyma in the phloem are central in the defense of conifer stems against insects and pathogens. Laser micro-dissection enables examination of cell-specific defense responses. To examine induced defense responses in Norway spruce stems inoculated with the necrotrophic blue-stain fungus Ceratocystis polonica, RNA extracted from laser micro-dissected phloem parenchyma and vascular cambium was analyzed using real-time RT-PCR (qRT-PCR to profile transcript levels of selected resistance marker genes. The monitored transcripts included three pathogenesis-related proteins (class IV chitinase (CHI4, defensin (SPI1, peroxidase (PX3, two terpene synthesis related proteins (DXPS and LAS, one ethylene biosynthesis related protein (ACS, and a phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL. Three days following inoculation, four genes (CHI4, PAL, PX3, SPI1 were differentially induced in individual cell and tissue types, both close to the inoculation site (5 mm above and, to a lesser degree, further away (10 mm above. These resistance marker genes were all highly induced in ray parenchyma, supporting the important role of the rays in spruce defense propagation. CHI4 and PAL were also induced in PP cells and in conducting secondary phloem tissues. Our data suggests that different cell types in the secondary phloem of Norway spruce have overlapping but not fully redundant roles in active host defense. Furthermore, the study demonstrates the usefulness of laser micro-dissection coupled with qRT-PCR to characterize gene expression in different cell types of conifer bark.

  3. Regional and cell-type-specific effects of DAMGO on striatal D1 and D2 dopamine receptor-expressing medium-sized spiny neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher J Evans

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The striatum can be divided into the DLS (dorsolateral striatum and the VMS (ventromedial striatum, which includes NAcC (nucleus accumbens core and NAcS (nucleus accumbens shell. Here, we examined differences in electrophysiological properties of MSSNs (medium-sized spiny neurons based on their location, expression of DA (dopamine D1/D2 receptors and responses to the μ-opioid receptor agonist, DAMGO {[D-Ala2-MePhe4-Gly(ol5]enkephalin}. The main differences in morphological and biophysical membrane properties occurred among striatal sub-regions. MSSNs in the DLS were larger, had higher membrane capacitances and lower Rin (input resistances compared with cells in the VMS. RMPs (resting membrane potentials were similar among regions except for D2 cells in the NAcC, which displayed a significantly more depolarized RMP. In contrast, differences in frequency of spontaneous excitatory synaptic inputs were more prominent between cell types, with D2 cells receiving significantly more excitatory inputs than D1 cells, particularly in the VMS. Inhibitory inputs were not different between D1 and D2 cells. However, MSSNs in the VMS received more inhibitory inputs than those in the DLS. Acute application of DAMGO reduced the frequency of spontaneous excitatory and inhibitory postsynaptic currents, but the effect was greater in the VMS, in particular in the NAcS, where excitatory currents from D2 cells and inhibitory currents from D1 cells were inhibited by the largest amount. DAMGO also increased cellular excitability in the VMS, as shown by reduced threshold for evoking APs (action potentials. Together the present findings help elucidate the regional and cell-type-specific substrate of opioid actions in the striatum and point to the VMS as a critical mediator of DAMGO effects.

  4. First Evidence for the Disease-Stage, Cell-Type, and Virus Specificity of microRNAs during Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type-1 Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren Fowler

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The potential involvement of host microRNAs (miRNAs in HIV infection is well documented, and evidence suggests that HIV modulates and also dysregulates host miRNAs involved in maintaining the host innate immune system. Moreover, the dysregulation of host miRNAs by HIV also effectively interferes directly with the host gene expression. In this study, we have simultaneously evaluated the expression of host miRNAs in both CD4+ and CD8+ T-cells derived from HIV-positive (HIV+ individuals (viremic and aviremic individuals while receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART, therapy-naïve long-term non-progressors (LTNP, and HIV-negative (HIV– healthy controls. miRNAs were run on Affymetrix V2 chips, and the differential expression between HIV+ and HIV− samples, along with intergroup comparisons, was derived using PARTEK software, using an FDR of 5% and an adjusted p-value < 0.05. The miR-199a-5p was found to be HIV-specific and expressed in all HIV+ groups as opposed to HIV– controls. Moreover, these are the first studies to reveal clearly the highly discriminatory miRNAs at the level of the disease state, cell type, and HIV-specific miRNAs.

  5. Fucose-specific DC-SIGN signalling directs T helper cell type-2 responses via IKKε- and CYLD-dependent Bcl3 activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gringhuis, Sonja I; Kaptein, Tanja M; Wevers, Brigitte A; Mesman, Annelies W; Geijtenbeek, Teunis B H

    2014-01-01

    Carbohydrate-specific signalling through DC-SIGN provides dendritic cells with plasticity to tailor immunity to the nature of invading microbes. Here we demonstrate that recognition of fucose-expressing extracellular pathogens like Schistosoma mansoni and Helicobacter pylori by DC-SIGN favors T helper cell type-2 (TH2) responses via activation of atypical NF-κB family member Bcl3. Crosstalk between TLR and DC-SIGN signalling results in TLR-induced MK2-mediated phosphorylation of LSP1, associated with DC-SIGN, upon fucose binding. Subsequently, IKKε and CYLD are recruited to phosphorylated LSP1. IKKε activation is pivotal for suppression of CYLD deubiquitinase activity and subsequent nuclear translocation of ubiquitinated Bcl3. Bcl3 activation represses TLR-induced proinflammatory cytokine expression, while enhancing interleukin-10 (IL-10) and TH2-attracting chemokine expression, shifting TH differentiation from TH1 to TH2 polarization. Thus, DC-SIGN directs adaptive TH2 immunity to fucose-expressing pathogens via an IKKε-CYLD-dependent signalling pathway leading to Bcl3 activation, which might be targeted in vaccination strategies or to prevent aberrant inflammation and allergy. PMID:24867235

  6. Peroxisomes in Different Skeletal Cell Types during Intramembranous and Endochondral Ossification and Their Regulation during Osteoblast Differentiation by Distinct Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guofeng Qian

    Full Text Available Ossification defects leading to craniofacial dysmorphism or rhizomelia are typical phenotypes in patients and corresponding knockout mouse models with distinct peroxisomal disorders. Despite these obvious skeletal pathologies, to date no careful analysis exists on the distribution and function of peroxisomes in skeletal tissues and their alterations during ossification. Therefore, we analyzed the peroxisomal compartment in different cell types of mouse cartilage and bone as well as in primary cultures of calvarial osteoblasts. The peroxisome number and metabolism strongly increased in chondrocytes during endochondral ossification from the reserve to the hypertrophic zone, whereas in bone, metabolically active osteoblasts contained a higher numerical abundance of this organelle than osteocytes. The high abundance of peroxisomes in these skeletal cell types is reflected by high levels of Pex11β gene expression. During culture, calvarial pre-osteoblasts differentiated into secretory osteoblasts accompanied by peroxisome proliferation and increased levels of peroxisomal genes and proteins. Since many peroxisomal genes contain a PPAR-responsive element, we analyzed the gene expression of PPARɑ/ß/ɣ in calvarial osteoblasts and MC3T3-E1 cells, revealing higher levels for PPARß than for PPARɑ and PPARɣ. Treatment with different PPAR agonists and antagonists not only changed the peroxisomal compartment and associated gene expression, but also induced complex alterations of the gene expression patterns of the other PPAR family members. Studies in M3CT3-E1 cells showed that the PPARß agonist GW0742 activated the PPRE-mediated luciferase expression and up-regulated peroxisomal gene transcription (Pex11, Pex13, Pex14, Acox1 and Cat, whereas the PPARß antagonist GSK0660 led to repression of the PPRE and a decrease of the corresponding mRNA levels. In the same way, treatment of calvarial osteoblasts with GW0742 increased in peroxisome number and

  7. Specific affect regulation impairments in major depression

    OpenAIRE

    Brockmeyer, Timo

    2012-01-01

    Impairments in affect regulation as well as cognitive reactivity have been considered to play important roles in the development, maintenance, and recurrence of major depressive disorder (MDD). However, there is a lack of studies investigating, (a) whether certain difficulties in emotion regulation are specific for MDD, (b) whether certain meta-mood beliefs are associated with an increased risk for MDD, and (c) whether reduced abilities to engage in mood-incongruent information processing and...

  8. The Homeodomain Protein CDP Regulates Mammary-Specific Gene Transcription and Tumorigenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, Quan; Maitra, Urmila; Johnston, Dennis; Lozano, Mary; Dudley, Jaquelin P.

    2004-01-01

    The CCAAT-displacement protein (CDP) has been implicated in developmental and cell-type-specific regulation of many cellular and viral genes. We previously have shown that CDP represses mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) transcription in tissue culture cells. Since CDP-binding activity for the MMTV long terminal repeat declines during mammary development, we tested whether binding mutations could alter viral expression. Infection of mice with MMTV proviruses containing CDP binding site mutation...

  9. Lola regulates Drosophila olfactory projection neuron identity and targeting specificity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giniger Edward

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Precise connections of neural circuits can be specified by genetic programming. In the Drosophila olfactory system, projection neurons (PNs send dendrites to single glomeruli in the antenna lobe (AL based upon lineage and birth order and send axons with stereotyped terminations to higher olfactory centers. These decisions are likely specified by a PN-intrinsic transcriptional code that regulates the expression of cell-surface molecules to instruct wiring specificity. Results We find that the loss of longitudinals lacking (lola, which encodes a BTB-Zn-finger transcription factor with 20 predicted splice isoforms, results in wiring defects in both axons and dendrites of all lineages of PNs. RNA in situ hybridization and quantitative RT-PCR suggest that most if not all lola isoforms are expressed in all PNs, but different isoforms are expressed at widely varying levels. Overexpression of individual lola isoforms fails to rescue the lola null phenotypes and causes additional phenotypes. Loss of lola also results in ectopic expression of Gal4 drivers in multiple cell types and in the loss of transcription factor gene lim1 expression in ventral PNs. Conclusion Our results indicate that lola is required for wiring of axons and dendrites of most PN classes, and suggest a need for its molecular diversity. Expression pattern changes of Gal4 drivers in lola-/- clones imply that lola normally represses the expression of these regulatory elements in a subset of the cells surrounding the AL. We propose that Lola functions as a general transcription factor that regulates the expression of multiple genes ultimately controlling PN identity and wiring specificity.

  10. Genetic Isolation of Hypothalamic Neurons that Regulate Context-Specific Male Social Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soden, Marta E; Miller, Samara M; Burgeno, Lauren M; Phillips, Paul E M; Hnasko, Thomas S; Zweifel, Larry S

    2016-07-12

    Nearly all animals engage in a complex assortment of social behaviors that are essential for the survival of the species. In mammals, these behaviors are regulated by sub-nuclei within the hypothalamus, but the specific cell types within these nuclei responsible for coordinating behavior in distinct contexts are only beginning to be resolved. Here, we identify a population of neurons in the ventral premammillary nucleus of the hypothalamus (PMV) that are strongly activated in male intruder mice in response to a larger resident male but that are not responsive to females. Using a combination of molecular and genetic approaches, we demonstrate that these PMV neurons regulate intruder-specific male social behavior and social novelty recognition in a manner dependent on synaptic release of the excitatory neurotransmitter glutamate. These data provide direct evidence for a unique population of neurons that regulate social behaviors in specific contexts. PMID:27346361

  11. Gene expression relationship between prostate cancer cells of Gleason 3, 4 and normal epithelial cells as revealed by cell type-specific transcriptomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prostate cancer cells in primary tumors have been typed CD10-/CD13-/CD24hi/CD26+/CD38lo/CD44-/CD104-. This CD phenotype suggests a lineage relationship between cancer cells and luminal cells. The Gleason grade of tumors is a descriptive of tumor glandular differentiation. Higher Gleason scores are associated with treatment failure. CD26+ cancer cells were isolated from Gleason 3+3 (G3) and Gleason 4+4 (G4) tumors by cell sorting, and their gene expression or transcriptome was determined by Affymetrix DNA array analysis. Dataset analysis was used to determine gene expression similarities and differences between G3 and G4 as well as to prostate cancer cell lines and histologically normal prostate luminal cells. The G3 and G4 transcriptomes were compared to those of prostatic cell types of non-cancer, which included luminal, basal, stromal fibromuscular, and endothelial. A principal components analysis of the various transcriptome datasets indicated a closer relationship between luminal and G3 than luminal and G4. Dataset comparison also showed that the cancer transcriptomes differed substantially from those of prostate cancer cell lines. Genes differentially expressed in cancer are potential biomarkers for cancer detection, and those differentially expressed between G3 and G4 are potential biomarkers for disease stratification given that G4 cancer is associated with poor outcomes. Differentially expressed genes likely contribute to the prostate cancer phenotype and constitute the signatures of these particular cancer cell types

  12. Gene expression relationship between prostate cancer cells of Gleason 3, 4 and normal epithelial cells as revealed by cell type-specific transcriptomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Page Laura S

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prostate cancer cells in primary tumors have been typed CD10-/CD13-/CD24hi/CD26+/CD38lo/CD44-/CD104-. This CD phenotype suggests a lineage relationship between cancer cells and luminal cells. The Gleason grade of tumors is a descriptive of tumor glandular differentiation. Higher Gleason scores are associated with treatment failure. Methods CD26+ cancer cells were isolated from Gleason 3+3 (G3 and Gleason 4+4 (G4 tumors by cell sorting, and their gene expression or transcriptome was determined by Affymetrix DNA array analysis. Dataset analysis was used to determine gene expression similarities and differences between G3 and G4 as well as to prostate cancer cell lines and histologically normal prostate luminal cells. Results The G3 and G4 transcriptomes were compared to those of prostatic cell types of non-cancer, which included luminal, basal, stromal fibromuscular, and endothelial. A principal components analysis of the various transcriptome datasets indicated a closer relationship between luminal and G3 than luminal and G4. Dataset comparison also showed that the cancer transcriptomes differed substantially from those of prostate cancer cell lines. Conclusions Genes differentially expressed in cancer are potential biomarkers for cancer detection, and those differentially expressed between G3 and G4 are potential biomarkers for disease stratification given that G4 cancer is associated with poor outcomes. Differentially expressed genes likely contribute to the prostate cancer phenotype and constitute the signatures of these particular cancer cell types.

  13. A multi-omics approach identifies key hubs associated with cell type-specific responses of airway epithelial cells to staphylococcal alpha-toxin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik Richter

    Full Text Available Responsiveness of cells to alpha-toxin (Hla from Staphylococcus aureus appears to occur in a cell-type dependent manner. Here, we compare two human bronchial epithelial cell lines, i.e. Hla-susceptible 16HBE14o- and Hla-resistant S9 cells, by a quantitative multi-omics strategy for a better understanding of Hla-induced cellular programs. Phosphoproteomics revealed a substantial impact on phosphorylation-dependent signaling in both cell models and highlights alterations in signaling pathways associated with cell-cell and cell-matrix contacts as well as the actin cytoskeleton as key features of early rHla-induced effects. Along comparable changes in down-stream activity of major protein kinases significant differences between both models were found upon rHla-treatment including activation of the epidermal growth factor receptor EGFR and mitogen-activated protein kinases MAPK1/3 signaling in S9 and repression in 16HBE14o- cells. System-wide transcript and protein expression profiling indicate induction of an immediate early response in either model. In addition, EGFR and MAPK1/3-mediated changes in gene expression suggest cellular recovery and survival in S9 cells but cell death in 16HBE14o- cells. Strikingly, inhibition of the EGFR sensitized S9 cells to Hla indicating that the cellular capacity of activation of the EGFR is a major protective determinant against Hla-mediated cytotoxic effects.

  14. Identification of Vulnerable Cell Types in Major Brain Disorders Using Single Cell Transcriptomes and Expression Weighted Cell Type Enrichment

    OpenAIRE

    Skene, Nathan G.; Grant, Seth G.N.

    2016-01-01

    The cell types that trigger the primary pathology in many brain diseases remain largely unknown. One route to understanding the primary pathological cell type for a particular disease is to identify the cells expressing susceptibility genes. Although this is straightforward for monogenic conditions where the causative mutation may alter expression of a cell type specific marker, methods are required for the common polygenic disorders. We developed the Expression Weighted Cell Type Enrichment ...

  15. Identification of vulnerable cell types in major brain disorders using single cell transcriptomes and expression weighted cell type enrichment

    OpenAIRE

    Skene, Nathan G.; Grant, Seth G.N.

    2016-01-01

    The cell types that trigger the primary pathology in many brain diseases remain largely unknown. One route to understanding the primary pathological cell type for a particular disease is to identify the cells expressing susceptibility genes. Although this is straightforward for monogenic conditions where the causative mutation may alter expression of a cell type specific marker, methods are required for the common polygenic disorders. We developed the Expression Weighted Cell Type Enrichment ...

  16. 50 CFR 216.105 - Specific regulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... MAMMALS General Regulations Governing Small Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities... activity. (b) For allowed activities that may result in incidental takings of small numbers of...

  17. Vectorial secretion of CTGF as a cell-type specific response to LPA and TGF-β in human tubular epithelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuehlke Jonathan

    2012-09-01

    vectorial secretion of the pro-fibrotic protein CTGF depends on the cell type, the stimulus and the signaling pathway activated. In all conditions, CTGF was secreted mainly to the apical side upon TGF-β and LPA treatment and therefore, likely contributes to increased urinary CTGF levels in vivo. Moreover, CTGF secreted basolaterally may be active as paracrine pro-fibrotic mediator.

  18. Enhanced detection with spectral imaging fluorescence microscopy reveals tissue- and cell-type-specific compartmentalization of surface-modified polystyrene nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    Kenesei, Kata; Murali, Kumarasamy; Czéh, Árpád; Piella, Jordi; Puntes, Victor; Madarász, Emília

    2016-01-01

    Background Precisely targeted nanoparticle delivery is critically important for therapeutic applications. However, our knowledge on how the distinct physical and chemical properties of nanoparticles determine tissue penetration through physiological barriers, accumulation in specific cells and tissues, and clearance from selected organs has remained rather limited. In the recent study, spectral imaging fluorescence microscopy was exploited for precise and rapid monitoring of tissue- and cell-...

  19. Daughter-specific transcription factors regulate cell size control in budding yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Di Talia

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available In budding yeast, asymmetric cell division yields a larger mother and a smaller daughter cell, which transcribe different genes due to the daughter-specific transcription factors Ace2 and Ash1. Cell size control at the Start checkpoint has long been considered to be a main regulator of the length of the G1 phase of the cell cycle, resulting in longer G1 in the smaller daughter cells. Our recent data confirmed this concept using quantitative time-lapse microscopy. However, it has been proposed that daughter-specific, Ace2-dependent repression of expression of the G1 cyclin CLN3 had a dominant role in delaying daughters in G1. We wanted to reconcile these two divergent perspectives on the origin of long daughter G1 times. We quantified size control using single-cell time-lapse imaging of fluorescently labeled budding yeast, in the presence or absence of the daughter-specific transcriptional regulators Ace2 and Ash1. Ace2 and Ash1 are not required for efficient size control, but they shift the domain of efficient size control to larger cell size, thus increasing cell size requirement for Start in daughters. Microarray and chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments show that Ace2 and Ash1 are direct transcriptional regulators of the G1 cyclin gene CLN3. Quantification of cell size control in cells expressing titrated levels of Cln3 from ectopic promoters, and from cells with mutated Ace2 and Ash1 sites in the CLN3 promoter, showed that regulation of CLN3 expression by Ace2 and Ash1 can account for the differential regulation of Start in response to cell size in mothers and daughters. We show how daughter-specific transcriptional programs can interact with intrinsic cell size control to differentially regulate Start in mother and daughter cells. This work demonstrates mechanistically how asymmetric localization of cell fate determinants results in cell-type-specific regulation of the cell cycle.

  20. Two Golgi integral membrane proteins (GIMPS) exhibit region- and cell type-specific distribution in the epididymis of the adult rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suarez-Quian, C A; Jelesoff, N

    1994-12-15

    The epididymis participates in the post-testicular maturation and storage of spermatozoa by secreting proteins into the tubule lumen in a region-specific fashion. The underlying molecular mechanisms leading to biogenesis of these region-specific differences, however, are not known, although components of the Golgi complex membrane container must undoubtedly be intimately involved. Two monoclonal antibodies raised against Golgi integral membrane proteins, recognizing either the cis (GIMPc) or trans Golgi (GIMPt) cisternae, were used as molecular probes of these regions to begin the characterization of the Golgi complex of in vivo and in vitro epididymal cells. Immunolocalization of GIMPs was performed on frozen sections and in cultured cells using biotin-streptavidin-peroxidase immunocytochemistry. In tissue sections, immunostaining of GIMPt was extremely robust in the supranuclear cytoplasm throughout the epididymis. In contrast, no GIMPc immunostaining was detected in the initial segment or in clear cells of the distal caput, corpus, and cauda. Immunodetection of GIMPc and GIMPt in epididymal cells in vitro revealed a reticular, perinuclear pattern, and NH4Cl treatment preferentially disrupted the GIMPt immunolocalization. These results characterizing the molecular components of the Golgi complex will form the basis of additional studies to gain further insight into mechanisms leading to generation of regional differences in epididymal function. PMID:7873795

  1. RAG-mediated DNA double-strand breaks activate a cell type-specific checkpoint to inhibit pre-B cell receptor signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bednarski, Jeffrey J; Pandey, Ruchi; Schulte, Emily; White, Lynn S; Chen, Bo-Ruei; Sandoval, Gabriel J; Kohyama, Masako; Haldar, Malay; Nickless, Andrew; Trott, Amanda; Cheng, Genhong; Murphy, Kenneth M; Bassing, Craig H; Payton, Jacqueline E; Sleckman, Barry P

    2016-02-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) activate a canonical DNA damage response, including highly conserved cell cycle checkpoint pathways that prevent cells with DSBs from progressing through the cell cycle. In developing B cells, pre-B cell receptor (pre-BCR) signals initiate immunoglobulin light (Igl) chain gene assembly, leading to RAG-mediated DNA DSBs. The pre-BCR also promotes cell cycle entry, which could cause aberrant DSB repair and genome instability in pre-B cells. Here, we show that RAG DSBs inhibit pre-BCR signals through the ATM- and NF-κB2-dependent induction of SPIC, a hematopoietic-specific transcriptional repressor. SPIC inhibits expression of the SYK tyrosine kinase and BLNK adaptor, resulting in suppression of pre-BCR signaling. This regulatory circuit prevents the pre-BCR from inducing additional Igl chain gene rearrangements and driving pre-B cells with RAG DSBs into cycle. We propose that pre-B cells toggle between pre-BCR signals and a RAG DSB-dependent checkpoint to maintain genome stability while iteratively assembling Igl chain genes. PMID:26834154

  2. Cell-Type Specific Insertion of GluA2-Lacking AMPARs with Cocaine Exposure Leading to Sensitization, Cue-Induced Seeking, and Incubation of Craving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrier, Jean; Lüscher, Christian; Pascoli, Vincent

    2016-06-01

    Addiction is a behavioral disease, of which core components can be modeled in rodents. Much evidence implicates drug-evoked synaptic plasticity in cocaine-evoked locomotor sensitization, cue-induced cocaine seeking, and incubation of cocaine craving. However, the type of plasticity evoked by different modalities of cocaine administration (eg contingent vs non-contingent) and its role in reshaping circuit function remains largely elusive. Here we exposed mice to various regimens of cocaine and recorded excitatory transmission onto identified medium-sized spiny neurons (MSN, expressing fluorescent proteins under the control of either D1R or D2R dopamine receptor promotor) in the nucleus accumbens at time points when behavioral adaptations are observed. In D1-MSN, we found the presence of GluA2-lacking α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptors (AMPARs) after single or chronic non-contingent exposure to cocaine as well as after cocaine self-administration (SA). We also report an increase in the AMPA/NMDA ratio (A/N) in D1-MSN, which was observed only after repeated passive injections associated with locomotor sensitization as well as in a condition of SA leading to seeking behavior. Remarkably, insertion of GluA2-lacking AMPARs was also detected in D2-MSN after SA of a high dose of cocaine but not regular dose (1.5 vs 0.75 mg/kg), which was the only condition where incubation of cocaine craving was observed in this study. Moreover, synapses containing GluA2-lacking AMPARs belonged to amygdala inputs in D2-MSN and to medial prefrontal cortex inputs in D1-MSN. Taken together this study allows for a refinement of a circuit model of addiction based on specific synaptic changes induced by cocaine. PMID:26585289

  3. Enteroendocrine cell types revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engelstoft, Maja S; Egerod, Kristoffer Lihme; Lund, Mari L;

    2013-01-01

    The GI-tract is profoundly involved in the control of metabolism through peptide hormones secreted from enteroendocrine cells scattered throughout the gut mucosa. A large number of recently generated transgenic reporter mice have allowed for direct characterization of biochemical and cell...... biological properties of these previously highly elusive enteroendocrine cells. In particular the surprisingly broad co-expression of six functionally related hormones in the intestinal enteroendocrine cells indicates that it should be possible to control not only the hormone secretion but also the type and...... number of enteroendocrine cells. However, this will require a more deep understanding of the factors controlling differentiation, gene expression and specification of the enteroendocrine cells during their weekly renewal from progenitor cells in the crypts of the mucosa....

  4. Human Specific Regulation of the Telomerase Reverse Transcriptase Gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fan Zhang

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Telomerase, regulated primarily by the transcription of its catalytic subunit telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT, is critical for controlling cell proliferation and tissue homeostasis by maintaining telomere length. Although there is a high conservation between human and mouse TERT genes, the regulation of their transcription is significantly different in these two species. Whereas mTERT expression is widely detected in adult mice, hTERT is expressed at extremely low levels in most adult human tissues and cells. As a result, mice do not exhibit telomere-mediated replicative aging, but telomere shortening is a critical factor of human aging and its stabilization is essential for cancer development in humans. The chromatin environment and epigenetic modifications of the hTERT locus, the binding of transcriptional factors to its promoter, and recruitment of nucleosome modifying complexes all play essential roles in restricting its transcription in different cell types. In this review, we will discuss recent progress in understanding the molecular mechanisms of TERT regulation in human and mouse tissues and cells, and during cancer development.

  5. Tissue-specific effects of genetic and epigenetic variation on gene regulation and splicing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Gutierrez-Arcelus

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Understanding how genetic variation affects distinct cellular phenotypes, such as gene expression levels, alternative splicing and DNA methylation levels, is essential for better understanding of complex diseases and traits. Furthermore, how inter-individual variation of DNA methylation is associated to gene expression is just starting to be studied. In this study, we use the GenCord cohort of 204 newborn Europeans' lymphoblastoid cell lines, T-cells and fibroblasts derived from umbilical cords. The samples were previously genotyped for 2.5 million SNPs, mRNA-sequenced, and assayed for methylation levels in 482,421 CpG sites. We observe that methylation sites associated to expression levels are enriched in enhancers, gene bodies and CpG island shores. We show that while the correlation between DNA methylation and gene expression can be positive or negative, it is very consistent across cell-types. However, this epigenetic association to gene expression appears more tissue-specific than the genetic effects on gene expression or DNA methylation (observed in both sharing estimations based on P-values and effect size correlations between cell-types. This predominance of genetic effects can also be reflected by the observation that allele specific expression differences between individuals dominate over tissue-specific effects. Additionally, we discover genetic effects on alternative splicing and interestingly, a large amount of DNA methylation correlating to alternative splicing, both in a tissue-specific manner. The locations of the SNPs and methylation sites involved in these associations highlight the participation of promoter proximal and distant regulatory regions on alternative splicing. Overall, our results provide high-resolution analyses showing how genome sequence variation has a broad effect on cellular phenotypes across cell-types, whereas epigenetic factors provide a secondary layer of variation that is more tissue-specific. Furthermore

  6. Turning One Cell Type into Another.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slack, Jonathan M W

    2016-01-01

    The nature of cells in early embryos may be respecified simply by exposure to inducing factors. In later stage embryos, determined cell populations do not respond to inducing factors but may be respecified by other stimuli, especially the introduction of specific transcription factors. Fully differentiated cell types are hard to respecify by any method, but some degree of success can be achieved using selected combinations of transcription factors, and this may have clinical significance in the future. PMID:26969988

  7. Identification of Vulnerable Cell Types in Major Brain Disorders Using Single Cell Transcriptomes and Expression Weighted Cell Type Enrichment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skene, Nathan G; Grant, Seth G N

    2016-01-01

    The cell types that trigger the primary pathology in many brain diseases remain largely unknown. One route to understanding the primary pathological cell type for a particular disease is to identify the cells expressing susceptibility genes. Although this is straightforward for monogenic conditions where the causative mutation may alter expression of a cell type specific marker, methods are required for the common polygenic disorders. We developed the Expression Weighted Cell Type Enrichment (EWCE) method that uses single cell transcriptomes to generate the probability distribution associated with a gene list having an average level of expression within a cell type. Following validation, we applied EWCE to human genetic data from cases of epilepsy, Schizophrenia, Autism, Intellectual Disability, Alzheimer's disease, Multiple Sclerosis and anxiety disorders. Genetic susceptibility primarily affected microglia in Alzheimer's and Multiple Sclerosis; was shared between interneurons and pyramidal neurons in Autism and Schizophrenia; while intellectual disabilities and epilepsy were attributable to a range of cell-types, with the strongest enrichment in interneurons. We hypothesized that the primary cell type pathology could trigger secondary changes in other cell types and these could be detected by applying EWCE to transcriptome data from diseased tissue. In Autism, Schizophrenia and Alzheimer's disease we find evidence of pathological changes in all of the major brain cell types. These findings give novel insight into the cellular origins and progression in common brain disorders. The methods can be applied to any tissue and disorder and have applications in validating mouse models. PMID:26858593

  8. To edit or not to edit: regulation of ADAR editing specificity and efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deffit, Sarah N; Hundley, Heather A

    2016-01-01

    Hundreds to millions of adenosine (A)-to-inosine (I) modifications are present in eukaryotic transcriptomes and play an essential role in the creation of proteomic and phenotypic diversity. As adenosine and inosine have different base-pairing properties, the functional consequences of these modifications or 'edits' include altering coding potential, splicing, and miRNA-mediated gene silencing of transcripts. However, rather than serving as a static control of gene expression, A-to-I editing provides a means to dynamically rewire the genetic code during development and in a cell-type specific manner. Interestingly, during normal development, in specific cells, and in both neuropathological diseases and cancers, the extent of RNA editing does not directly correlate with levels of the substrate mRNA or the adenosine deaminase that act on RNA (ADAR) editing enzymes, implying that cellular factors are required for spatiotemporal regulation of A-to-I editing. The factors that affect the specificity and extent of ADAR activity have been thoroughly dissected in vitro. Yet, we still lack a complete understanding of how specific ADAR family members can selectively deaminate certain adenosines while others cannot. Additionally, in the cellular environment, ADAR specificity and editing efficiency is likely to be influenced by cellular factors, which is currently an area of intense investigation. Data from many groups have suggested two main mechanisms for controlling A-to-I editing in the cell: (1) regulating ADAR accessibility to target RNAs and (2) protein-protein interactions that directly alter ADAR enzymatic activity. Recent studies suggest cis- and trans-acting RNA elements, heterodimerization and RNA-binding proteins play important roles in regulating RNA editing levels in vivo. WIREs RNA 2016, 7:113-127. doi: 10.1002/wrna.1319. PMID:26612708

  9. Inferring cell type innovations by phylogenetic methods-concepts, methods, and limitations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kin, Koryu

    2015-12-01

    Multicellular organisms are composed of distinct cell types that have specific roles in the body. Each cell type is a product of two kinds of historical processes-development and evolution. Although the concept of a cell type is difficult to define, the cell type concept based on the idea of the core regulatory network (CRN), a gene regulatory network that determines the identity of a cell type, illustrates the essential aspects of the cell type concept. The first step toward elucidating cell type evolution is to reconstruct the evolutionary relationships of cell types, or the cell type tree. The sister cell type model assumes that a new cell type evolves through divergence from a multifunctional ancestral cell type, creating tree-like evolutionary relationships between cell types. The process of generating a cell type tree can also be understood as the sequential addition of a new branching point on an ancestral cell differentiation hierarchy in evolution. A cell type tree thus represents an intertwined history of cell type evolution and development. Cell type trees can be reconstructed from high-throughput sequencing data, and the reconstruction of a cell type tree leads to the discovery of genes that are functionally important for a cell type. Although many issues including the lack of cross-species comparisons and the lack of a proper model for cell type evolution remain, the study of the origin of a new cell type using phylogenetic methods offers a promising new research avenue in developmental evolution. J. Exp. Zool. (Mol. Dev. Evol.) 324B: 653-661, 2015. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26462996

  10. Astrocyte-specific regulation of hMeCP2 expression in Drosophila

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David L. Hess-Homeier

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Alterations in the expression of Methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MeCP2 either by mutations or gene duplication leads to a wide spectrum of neurodevelopmental disorders including Rett Syndrome and MeCP2 duplication disorder. Common features of Rett Syndrome (RTT, MeCP2 duplication disorder, and neuropsychiatric disorders indicate that even moderate changes in MeCP2 protein levels result in functional and structural cell abnormalities. In this study, we investigated two areas of MeCP2 pathophysiology using Drosophila as a model system: the effects of MeCP2 glial gain-of-function activity on circuits controlling sleep behavior, and the cell-type specific regulation of MeCP2 expression. In this study, we first examined the effects of elevated MeCP2 levels on microcircuits by expressing human MeCP2 (hMeCP2 in astrocytes and distinct subsets of amine neurons including dopamine and octopamine (OA neurons. Depending on the cell-type, hMeCP2 expression reduced sleep levels, altered daytime/nighttime sleep patterns, and generated sleep maintenance deficits. Second, we identified a 498 base pair region of the MeCP2e2 isoform that is targeted for regulation in distinct subsets of astrocytes. Levels of the full-length hMeCP2e2 and mutant RTT R106W protein decreased in astrocytes in a temporally and spatially regulated manner. In contrast, expression of the deletion Δ166 hMeCP2 protein was not altered in the entire astrocyte population. qPCR experiments revealed a reduction in full-length hMeCP2e2 transcript levels suggesting transgenic hMeCP2 expression is regulated at the transcriptional level. Given the phenotypic complexities that are caused by alterations in MeCP2 levels, our results provide insight into distinct cellular mechanisms that control MeCP2 expression and link microcircuit abnormalities with defined behavioral deficits.

  11. IL-4 regulates specific Arg-1(+) macrophage sFlt-1-mediated inhibition of angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wei-Kang; Georgiadis, Anastasios; Copland, David A; Liyanage, Sidath; Luhmann, Ulrich F O; Robbie, Scott J; Liu, Jian; Wu, Jiahui; Bainbridge, James W; Bates, David O; Ali, Robin R; Nicholson, Lindsay B; Dick, Andrew D

    2015-08-01

    One of the main drivers for neovascularization in age-related macular degeneration is activation of innate immunity in the presence of macrophages. Here, we demonstrate that T helper cell type 2 cytokines and, in particular, IL-4 condition human and murine monocyte phenotype toward Arg-1(+), and their subsequent behavior limits angiogenesis by increasing soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase 1 (sFlt-1) gene expression. We document that T helper cell type 2 cytokine-conditioned murine macrophages neutralize vascular endothelial growth factor-mediated endothelial cell proliferation (human umbilical vein endothelial cell and choroidal vasculature) in a sFlt-1-dependent manner. We demonstrate that in vivo intravitreal administration of IL-4 attenuates laser-induced choroidal neovascularization (L-CNV) due to specific IL-4 conditioning of macrophages. IL-4 induces the expression of sFlt-1 by resident CD11b(+) retinal microglia and infiltrating myeloid cells but not from retinal pigment epithelium. IL-4-induced suppression of L-CNV is not prevented when sFlt-1 expression is attenuated in retinal pigment epithelium. IL-4-mediated suppression of L-CNV was abrogated in IL-4R-deficient mice and in bone marrow chimeras reconstituted with myeloid cells that had undergone lentiviral-mediated shRNA silencing of sFlt-1, demonstrating the critical role of this cell population. Together, these data establish how lL-4 directly drives macrophage sFlt-1 production expressing an Arg-1(+) phenotype and support the therapeutic potential of targeted IL-4 conditioning within the tissue to regulate disease conditions such as neovascular age-related macular degeneration. PMID:26079814

  12. Identifying Specific Learning Disabilities: Legislation, Regulation, and Court Decisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zumeta, Rebecca O.; Zirkel, Perry A.; Danielson, Louis

    2014-01-01

    Specific learning disability (SLD) identification and eligibility practices are evolving and sometimes contentious. This article describes the historical context and current status of the SLD definition, legislation, regulation, and case law related to the identification of students eligible for special education services. The first part traces…

  13. TTP specifically regulates the internalization of the transferrin receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tosoni, Daniela; Puri, Claudia; Confalonieri, Stefano;

    2005-01-01

    Different plasma membrane receptors are internalized through saturable/noncompetitive pathways, suggesting cargo-specific regulation. Here, we report that TTP (SH3BP4), a SH3-containing protein, specifically regulates the internalization of the transferrin receptor (TfR). TTP interacts with...... endocytic proteins, including clathrin, dynamin, and the TfR, and localizes selectively to TfR-containing coated-pits (CCP) and -vesicles (CCV). Overexpression of TTP specifically inhibits TfR internalization, and causes the formation of morphologically aberrant CCP, which are probably fission impaired....... This effect is mediated by the SH3 of TTP, which can bind to dynamin, and it is rescued by overexpression of dynamin. Functional ablation of TTP causes a reduction in TfR internalization, and reduced cargo loading and size of TfR-CCV. Tyrosine phosphorylation of either TTP or dynamin prevents their...

  14. Regulation and Cellular Roles of Ubiquitin-specific Deubiquitinating Enzymes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turcu, Francisca E. Reyes; Ventii, Karen H.; Wilkinson, Keith D.

    2009-01-01

    Deubiquitinating enzymes (DUBs) are proteases that process ubiquitin or ubiquitin-like gene products, reverse the modification of proteins by a single ubiquitin (or ubiquitin-like protein), and remodel polyubiquitin (or ubiquitin-like) chains on target proteins. The human genome encodes nearly 100 DUBs with specificity for ubiquitin in five families: the UCH, USP, OTU, Josephin, and JAMM families. Four families are cysteine proteases, while the later is a family of metalloproteases. Most DUB activity is cryptic and active site rearrangements often occur during the binding of ubiquitin and/or scaffold proteins. DUBs with specificity for ubiquitin contain multiple domains with insertions and extensions modulating DUB substrate specificity, protein-protein interactions, and cellular localization. Binding partners and multi-protein complexes with which DUBs associate modulate DUB activity and substrate specificity. Quantitative studies of activity and protein-protein interactions, together with genetic studies and the advent of RNAi, have lead to new insights into the function of yeast and human DUBs. This review will discuss ubiquitin-specific DUBs, some of the generalizations emerging from recent studies of the regulation of DUB activity, and their roles in various cellular processes. Specific examples are drawn from studies of protein degradation, DNA repair, chromatin remodeling, cell cycle regulation, endocytosis, and modulation of signaling kinases. PMID:19489724

  15. Predicting cell types and genetic variations contributing to disease by combining GWAS and epigenetic data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Gerasimova

    Full Text Available Genome-wide association studies (GWASs identify single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs that are enriched in individuals suffering from a given disease. Most disease-associated SNPs fall into non-coding regions, so that it is not straightforward to infer phenotype or function; moreover, many SNPs are in tight genetic linkage, so that a SNP identified as associated with a particular disease may not itself be causal, but rather signify the presence of a linked SNP that is functionally relevant to disease pathogenesis. Here, we present an analysis method that takes advantage of the recent rapid accumulation of epigenomics data to address these problems for some SNPs. Using asthma as a prototypic example; we show that non-coding disease-associated SNPs are enriched in genomic regions that function as regulators of transcription, such as enhancers and promoters. Identifying enhancers based on the presence of the histone modification marks such as H3K4me1 in different cell types, we show that the location of enhancers is highly cell-type specific. We use these findings to predict which SNPs are likely to be directly contributing to disease based on their presence in regulatory regions, and in which cell types their effect is expected to be detectable. Moreover, we can also predict which cell types contribute to a disease based on overlap of the disease-associated SNPs with the locations of enhancers present in a given cell type. Finally, we suggest that it will be possible to re-analyze GWAS studies with much higher power by limiting the SNPs considered to those in coding or regulatory regions of cell types relevant to a given disease.

  16. Isoform-specific phosphorylation-dependent regulation of connexin hemichannels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alstrøm, Jette Skov; Hansen, Daniel Bloch; Nielsen, Morten Schak;

    2015-01-01

    Connexins form gap junction channels made up of two connexons (hemichannels) from adjacent cells. Unopposed hemichannels may open toward the extracellular space upon stimulation by, e.g., removal of divalent cations from the extracellular solution and allow isoform-specific transmembrane flux of...... fluorescent dyes and physiologically relevant molecules, such as ATP and ions. Connexin (Cx)43 and Cx30 are the major astrocytic connexins. Protein kinase C (PKC) regulates Cx43 in its cell-cell gap junction configuration and may also act to keep Cx43 hemichannels closed. In contrast, the regulation of Cx30...... hemichannels by PKC is unexplored. To determine phosphorylation-dependent regulation of Cx30 and Cx43 hemichannels, these were heterologously expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes and opened with divalent cation-free solution. Inhibition of PKC activity did not affect hemichannel opening of either connexin. PKC...

  17. Gene expression profiles and phosphorylation patterns of AMP-activated protein kinase subunits in various mesenchymal cell types

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Yugang; Fan Qiming; Ma Rui; Lin Wentao; Tang Tingting

    2014-01-01

    Background Recent studies on bone have shown an endocrine role of the skeleton,which could be impaired in various human diseases,including osteoporosis,obesity,and diabetes-associated bone diseases.As a sensor and regulator of energy metabolism,AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) may also play an important role in the regulation of bone metabolism.The current study aimed to establish the expression profiles and phosphorylation patterns of AMPK subunits in several mesenchymal cell types.Methods Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for relative quantification,real-time PCR for absolute quantification,and Western blotting were used to investigate the gene expression profiles and phosphorylation patterns of AMPK subunits in several mesenchymal cell types,including primary human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) and hFOB,Saos-2,C3H/10T1/2,MC3T3-E1,3T3-L1,and C2C12 cells.Results AMPKα1 and AMPKβ1 mRNAs were abundantly expressed in all cell types.AMPKY1 mRNA was abundantly expressed in C3H/10T1/2,MC3T3-E1,3T3-L1,and C2C12 but not detected in human-derived cell types.AMPKY2 mRNA was mildly expressed in all cell types.AMPKα1 protein was highly expressed in all cell types and AMPKα2 protein was highly expressed only in hFOB and Saos-2 cells.AMPKβ1 protein was abundantly expressed in all cell types except for Saos-2,in which AMPKβ2 protein overwhelmed AMPKβ1 expression.AMPKy1 and AMPKY2 proteins were expressed in C3H/10T1/2,MC3T3-E1,3T3-L1,and C2C12 cells and only AMPKY2 protein was expressed in hMSCs,hFOB and Saos2 cells.AMPKα was phosphorylated at Thr172 and Ser485 and AMPKβ1 was phosphorylated at Ser108 and Ser182 in all cell types with a specific pattern in each cell type.Conclusion The combination of AMPK α,β,and Y subunits and phosphorylation of AMPKα (Thr172 and Ser485) and AMPKβ1 (Ser108 and Ser182) showed a specific pattern in each cell type.

  18. Laser-assisted Microdissection (LAM) as a Tool for Transcriptional Profiling of Individual Cell Types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florez Rueda, Ana Marcela; Grossniklaus, Ueli; Schmidt, Anja

    2016-01-01

    The understanding of developmental processes at the molecular level requires insights into transcriptional regulation, and thus the transcriptome, at the level of individual cell types. While the methods described here are generally applicable to a wide range of species and cell types, our research focuses on plant reproduction. Plant cultivation and seed production is of crucial importance for human and animal nutrition. A detailed understanding of the regulatory networks that govern the formation of the reproductive lineage (germline) and ultimately of seeds is a precondition for the targeted manipulation of plant reproduction. In particular, the engineering of apomixis (asexual reproduction through seeds) into crop plants promises great improvements, as it leads to the formation of clonal seeds that are genetically identical to the mother plant. Consequently, the cell types of the female germline are of major importance for the understanding and engineering of apomixis. However, as the corresponding cells are deeply embedded within the floral tissues, they are very difficult to access for experimental analyses, including cell-type specific transcriptomics. To overcome this limitation, sections of individual cells can be isolated by laser-assisted microdissection (LAM). While LAM in combination with transcriptional profiling allows the identification of genes and pathways active in any cell type with high specificity, establishing a suitable protocol can be challenging. Specifically, the quality of RNA obtained after LAM can be compromised, especially when small, single cells are targeted. To circumvent this problem, we have established a workflow for LAM that reproducibly results in high RNA quality that is well suitable for transcriptomics, as exemplified here by the isolation of cells of the female germline in apomictic Boechera. In this protocol, procedures are described for tissue preparation and LAM, also with regard to RNA extraction and quality control

  19. Antigen-Specific Antibody Glycosylation Is Regulated via Vaccination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alison E Mahan

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Antibody effector functions, such as antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity, complement deposition, and antibody-dependent phagocytosis, play a critical role in immunity against multiple pathogens, particularly in the absence of neutralizing activity. Two modifications to the IgG constant domain (Fc domain regulate antibody functionality: changes in antibody subclass and changes in a single N-linked glycan located in the CH2 domain of the IgG Fc. Together, these modifications provide a specific set of instructions to the innate immune system to direct the elimination of antibody-bound antigens. While it is clear that subclass selection is actively regulated during the course of natural infection, it is unclear whether antibody glycosylation can be tuned, in a signal-specific or pathogen-specific manner. Here, we show that antibody glycosylation is determined in an antigen- and pathogen-specific manner during HIV infection. Moreover, while dramatic differences exist in bulk IgG glycosylation among individuals in distinct geographical locations, immunization is able to overcome these differences and elicit antigen-specific antibodies with similar antibody glycosylation patterns. Additionally, distinct vaccine regimens induced different antigen-specific IgG glycosylation profiles, suggesting that antibody glycosylation is not only programmable but can be manipulated via the delivery of distinct inflammatory signals during B cell priming. These data strongly suggest that the immune system naturally drives antibody glycosylation in an antigen-specific manner and highlights a promising means by which next-generation therapeutics and vaccines can harness the antiviral activity of the innate immune system via directed alterations in antibody glycosylation in vivo.  .

  20. Antigen-Specific Antibody Glycosylation Is Regulated via Vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahan, Alison E; Jennewein, Madeleine F; Suscovich, Todd; Dionne, Kendall; Tedesco, Jacquelynne; Chung, Amy W; Streeck, Hendrik; Pau, Maria; Schuitemaker, Hanneke; Francis, Don; Fast, Patricia; Laufer, Dagna; Walker, Bruce D; Baden, Lindsey; Barouch, Dan H; Alter, Galit

    2016-03-01

    Antibody effector functions, such as antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity, complement deposition, and antibody-dependent phagocytosis, play a critical role in immunity against multiple pathogens, particularly in the absence of neutralizing activity. Two modifications to the IgG constant domain (Fc domain) regulate antibody functionality: changes in antibody subclass and changes in a single N-linked glycan located in the CH2 domain of the IgG Fc. Together, these modifications provide a specific set of instructions to the innate immune system to direct the elimination of antibody-bound antigens. While it is clear that subclass selection is actively regulated during the course of natural infection, it is unclear whether antibody glycosylation can be tuned, in a signal-specific or pathogen-specific manner. Here, we show that antibody glycosylation is determined in an antigen- and pathogen-specific manner during HIV infection. Moreover, while dramatic differences exist in bulk IgG glycosylation among individuals in distinct geographical locations, immunization is able to overcome these differences and elicit antigen-specific antibodies with similar antibody glycosylation patterns. Additionally, distinct vaccine regimens induced different antigen-specific IgG glycosylation profiles, suggesting that antibody glycosylation is not only programmable but can be manipulated via the delivery of distinct inflammatory signals during B cell priming. These data strongly suggest that the immune system naturally drives antibody glycosylation in an antigen-specific manner and highlights a promising means by which next-generation therapeutics and vaccines can harness the antiviral activity of the innate immune system via directed alterations in antibody glycosylation in vivo.  . PMID:26982805

  1. Antiestrogenic activity of flavnoid phytochemicals mediated via c-Jun N-terminal protein kinase pathway. Cell-type specific regulation of estrogen receptor alpha

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flavonoid phytochemicals act as both agonists and antagonists of the human estrogen receptors (ERs). While a number of these compounds act by directly binding to the ER, certain phytochemicals, such as the flavonoid compounds chalcone and flavone, elicit antagonistic effects on estrogen signaling in...

  2. Expression of the Ly-6 family proteins Lynx1 and Ly6H in the rat brain is compartmentalized, cell-type specific, and developmentally regulated

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Morten Skøtt; Cinar, Betül; Jensen, Majbrit Myrup;

    2014-01-01

    The Ly-6 superfamily of proteins, which affects diverse processes in the immune system, has attracted renewed attention due to the ability of some Ly-6 proteins to bind to and modulate the function of neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). However, there is a scarcity of knowledge r...

  3. The chromatin remodeler SPLAYED regulates specific stress signaling pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin W Walley

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Organisms are continuously exposed to a myriad of environmental stresses. Central to an organism's survival is the ability to mount a robust transcriptional response to the imposed stress. An emerging mechanism of transcriptional control involves dynamic changes in chromatin structure. Alterations in chromatin structure are brought about by a number of different mechanisms, including chromatin modifications, which covalently modify histone proteins; incorporation of histone variants; and chromatin remodeling, which utilizes ATP hydrolysis to alter histone-DNA contacts. While considerable insight into the mechanisms of chromatin remodeling has been gained, the biological role of chromatin remodeling complexes beyond their function as regulators of cellular differentiation and development has remained poorly understood. Here, we provide genetic, biochemical, and biological evidence for the critical role of chromatin remodeling in mediating plant defense against specific biotic stresses. We found that the Arabidopsis SWI/SNF class chromatin remodeling ATPase SPLAYED (SYD is required for the expression of selected genes downstream of the jasmonate (JA and ethylene (ET signaling pathways. SYD is also directly recruited to the promoters of several of these genes. Furthermore, we show that SYD is required for resistance against the necrotrophic pathogen Botrytis cinerea but not the biotrophic pathogen Pseudomonas syringae. These findings demonstrate not only that chromatin remodeling is required for selective pathogen resistance, but also that chromatin remodelers such as SYD can regulate specific pathways within biotic stress signaling networks.

  4. Nidogen-1 regulates laminin-1-dependent mammary-specific gene expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pujuguet, Philippe; Simian, Marina; Liaw, Jane; Timpl, Rupert; Werb, Zena; Bissell, Mina J..

    2000-02-01

    Nidogen-1 (entactin) acts as a bridge between the extracellular matrix molecules laminin-1 and type IV collagen, and thus participates in the assembly of basement membranes. To investigate the role of nidogen-1 in regulating cell-type-specific gene expression in mammary epithelium, we designed a culture microecosystem in which each component, including epithelial cells, mesenchymal cells, lactogenic hormones and extracellular matrix, could be controlled. We found that primary and established mesenchymal and myoepithelial cells synthesized and secreted nidogen-1, whereas expression was absent in primary and established epithelial cells. In an epithelial cell line containing mesenchymal cells, nidogen-1 was produced by the mesenchymal cells but deposited between the epithelial cells. In this mixed culture, mammary epithelial cells express b-casein in the presence of lactogenic hormones. Addition of either laminin-1 plus nidogen-1, or laminin-1 alone to mammary epithelial cells induced b- casein production. We asked whether recombinant nidogen-1 alone could signal directly for b-casein. Nidogen-1 did not induce b-casein synthesis in epithelial cells, but it augmented the inductive capacity of laminin-1. These data suggest that nidogen-1 can cooperate with laminin-1 to regulate b-casein expression. Addition of full length nidogen-1 to the mixed cultures had no effect on b-casein gene expression; however, a nidogen-1 fragment containing the laminin-1 binding domain, but lacking the type IV collagen-binding domain, had a dominant negative effect on b-casein expression. These data point to a physiological role for nidogen-1 in the basement membrane-induced gene expression by epithelial cells.

  5. Recent Progress in Understanding Subtype Specific Regulation of NMDA Receptors by G Protein Coupled Receptors (GPCRs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Yang

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available G Protein Coupled Receptors (GPCRs are the largest family of receptors whose ligands constitute nearly a third of prescription drugs in the market. They are widely involved in diverse physiological functions including learning and memory. NMDA receptors (NMDARs, which belong to the ionotropic glutamate receptor family, are likewise ubiquitously expressed in the central nervous system (CNS and play a pivotal role in learning and memory. Despite its critical contribution to physiological and pathophysiological processes, few pharmacological interventions aimed directly at regulating NMDAR function have been developed to date. However, it is well established that NMDAR function is precisely regulated by cellular signalling cascades recruited downstream of G protein coupled receptor (GPCR stimulation. Accordingly, the downstream regulation of NMDARs likely represents an important determinant of outcome following treatment with neuropsychiatric agents that target selected GPCRs. Importantly, the functional consequence of such regulation on NMDAR function varies, based not only on the identity of the GPCR, but also on the cell type in which relevant receptors are expressed. Indeed, the mechanisms responsible for regulating NMDARs by GPCRs involve numerous intracellular signalling molecules and regulatory proteins that vary from one cell type to another. In the present article, we highlight recent findings from studies that have uncovered novel mechanisms by which selected GPCRs regulate NMDAR function and consequently NMDAR-dependent plasticity.

  6. Fat-specific protein 27 regulates storage of triacylglycerol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keller, P.; Petrie, J.T.; Rose, P. De;

    2008-01-01

    study, we investigated the function of another member of this family, FSP27 (Cidec), in apoptosis and adipocyte metabolism. Although overexpression of FSP27 is sufficient to increase apoptosis of 293T and 3T3-L1 cells, more physiological levels of expression stimulate spontaneous lipid accumulation in...... several cell types without induction of adipocyte genes. Increased triacylglycerol is likely due to decreased beta-oxidation of nonesterified fatty acids. Altered flux of fatty acids into triacylglycerol may be a direct effect of FSP27 function, which is localized to lipid droplets in 293T cells and 3T3-L...

  7. CONSEQUENCES OF THE NEW SPECIFICATIONS OF THE JUDO REGULATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chirazi Marin

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The evolution of the sport undergoes, globally, more and more prominently, the requests of the media means. We notice every year new modifications of the regulations of carrying out the competitions in different sport branches. This fact is a necessity both to maintain and develop it, and also to stop some technical-tactics directions against the practice principles. This work wants to underline the way it was influenced the competition side, the technical practice and tactics by methodical observation, as well as other aspects, such as: motive qualities required, priority muscle groups, number of accidents, etc., by analysing the documents of planning the sportsmen training in judo. The most significant influences have been noticed at the level of expressing the level of techniques of the sportsmen, caused directly by the limitation of the number of technical procedures, as well as the decrease of the number of errors of arbitration (according to the statements of the coaches interviewed, by the specification of the new regulation.

  8. Tissue specific regulation of lipogenesis by thyroid hormone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blennemann, B.; Freake, H. (Univ. of Connecticut, Storrs (United States))

    1990-02-26

    Thyroid hormone stimulates long chain fatty acid synthesis in rat liver by increasing the amounts of key lipogenic enzymes. Sparse and conflicting data exist concerning its action on this pathway in other tissues. The authors recently showed that, in contrast to liver, hypothyroidism stimulates lipogenesis in brown adipose tissue and have now systematically examined the effects of thyroid state on fatty acid synthesis in other rat tissues. Lipogenesis was assessed by tritiated water incorporation. Euthyroid hepatic fatty acid synthesis (16.6um H/g/h) was reduced to 30% in hypothyroid rats and increased 3 fold in hyperthyroidism. Lipogenesis was detected in euthyroid kidney and heart and these levels were also stimulated by thyroid hormone treatment. Brown adipose tissue was unique in showing increased lipogenesis in the hypothyroid state. Hyperthyroid levels were not different from euthyroid. Effects in white adipose tissue were small and inconsistent. Brain, skin and lung were all lipogenically active, but did not respond to changes in thyroid state. Low but detectable levels of fatty acid synthesis were measured in muscle, which also were non-responsive. A wide spectrum of responses to thyroid hormone are seen in different rat tissues and thus the pathway of long chain fatty acid synthesis would appear to be an excellent model for examining the tissue specific regulation of gene expression by thyroid hormone.

  9. Specificity of cognitive emotion regulation strategies: a transdiagnostic examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldao, Amelia; Nolen-Hoeksema, Susan

    2010-10-01

    Despite growing interest in the role of regulatory processes in clinical disorders, it is not clear whether certain cognitive emotion regulation strategies play a more central role in psychopathology than others. Similarly, little is known about whether these strategies have effects transdiagnostically. We examined the relationship between four cognitive emotion regulation strategies (rumination, thought suppression, reappraisal, and problem-solving) and symptoms of three psychopathologies (depression, anxiety, and eating disorders) in an undergraduate sample (N=252). Maladaptive strategies (rumination, suppression), compared to adaptive strategies (reappraisal, problem-solving), were more strongly associated with psychopathology and loaded more highly on a latent factor of cognitive emotion regulation. In addition, this latent factor of cognitive emotion regulation was significantly associated with symptoms of all three disorders. Overall, these results suggest that the use of maladaptive strategies might play a more central role in psychopathology than the non-use of adaptive strategies and provide support of a transdiagnostic view of cognitive emotion regulation. PMID:20591413

  10. Ctip2-, Satb2-, Prox1-, and GAD65-Expressing Neurons in Rat Cultures: Preponderance of Single- and Double-Positive Cells, and Cell Type-Specific Expression of Neuron-Specific Gene Family Members, Nsg-1 (NEEP21 and Nsg-2 (P19.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Digilio

    Full Text Available The brain consists of many distinct neuronal cell types, but which cell types are present in widely used primary cultures of embryonic rodent brain is often not known. We characterized how abundantly four cell type markers (Ctip2, Satb2, Prox1, GAD65 were represented in cultured rat neurons, how easily neurons expressing different markers can be transfected with commonly used plasmids, and whether neuronal-enriched endosomal proteins Nsg-1 (NEEP21 and Nsg-2 (P19 are ubiquitously expressed in all types of cultured neurons. We found that cultured neurons stably maintain cell type identities that are reflective of cell types in vivo. This includes neurons maintaining simultaneous expression of two transcription factors, such as Ctip2+/Satb2+ or Prox1+/Ctip2+ double-positive cells, which have also been described in vivo. Secondly, we established the superior efficiency of CAG promoters for both Lipofectamine-mediated transfection as well as for electroporation. Thirdly, we discovered that Nsg-1 and Nsg-2 were not expressed equally in all neurons: whereas high levels of both Nsg-1 and Nsg-2 were found in Satb2-, Ctip2-, and GAD65-positive neurons, Prox1-positive neurons in hippocampal cultures expressed low levels of both. Our findings thus highlight the importance of identifying neuronal cell types for doing cell biology in cultured neurons: Keeping track of neuronal cell type might uncover effects in assays that might otherwise be masked by the mixture of responsive and non-responsive neurons in the dish.

  11. Regulation of Motor Neuron Specification by GSK3-Mediated Phosphorylation of Neurogenin 2

    OpenAIRE

    Ma, Yong-Chao; Song, Mi-Ryoung; Park, Jin P.; Ho, Hsin-Yi Henry; Hu, Linda; Kurtev, Martin V.; Zieg, Janine; Ma, Qiufu; Pfaff, Samuel L.; Greenberg, Michael E.

    2008-01-01

    The mechanisms by which proneural basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) factors control neurogenesis have been characterized, but it is not known how they specify neuronal cell-type identity. Here we provide evidence that two conserved serine residues on the bHLH factor neurogenin 2 (Ngn2), S231 and S234, are phosphorylated during motor neuron differentiation. In knock-in mice in which S231 and S234 of Ngn2 were mutated to alanines, neurogenesis occurs normally but motor neuron specification is impai...

  12. Autoradiographic localization of epidermal growth factor receptors to all major uterine cell types

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have recently studied the structure and function of the uterine epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor, its hormonal regulation, and its possible role in estrogen-induced uterine DNA synthesis. Since the uterus is composed of multiple cell types, we sought, in the work reported here, to localize EGF binding in this organ by autoradiography. Prior to the actual autoradiography, we performed a companion series of experiments to insure that EGF binding to uterine tissue in situ represented a true receptor interaction. Uteri from immature female rats were incubated in vitro with 125I-EGF at 25 degrees C. Tissue binding was maximal within 120 min and remained constant for at least an additional 120 min. This binding of labeled EGF was largely abolished by excess unlabeled EGF but not by other growth factors, indicating that binding was to specific receptors. The binding of 125I-EGF was saturable and reached a plateau at 4-8 nM; specific binding was half-maximal at 1-2 nM EGF. In situ cross-linking studies revealed that 125I-EGF was bound predominantly to a 170,000 MW EGF receptor similar to that seen in isolated uterine membranes. Incubation of uteri with 125I-EGF followed by autoradiography revealed binding to epithelial cells, stroma, and myometrium. These results provide evidence for the presence of specific EGF receptors in all major uterine cell types of the immature rat

  13. Expression weighted cell type enrichments reveal genetic and cellular nature of major brain disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan Gerald Skene

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The cell types that trigger the primary pathology in many brain diseases remain largely unknown. One route to understanding the primary pathological cell type for a particular disease is to identify the cells expressing susceptibility genes. Although this is straightforward for monogenic conditions where the causative mutation may alter expression of a cell type specific marker, methods are required for the common polygenic disorders. We developed the Expression Weighted Cell Type Enrichment (EWCE method that uses single cell transcriptomes to generate the probability distribution associated with a gene list having an average level of expression within a cell type. Following validation, we applied EWCE to human genetic data from cases of epilepsy, Schizophrenia, Autism, Intellectual Disability, Alzheimer’s disease, Multiple Sclerosis and anxiety disorders. Genetic susceptibility primarily affected microglia in Alzheimer’s and Multiple Sclerosis; was shared between interneurons and pyramidal neurons in Autism and Schizophrenia; while intellectual disabilities and epilepsy were attributable to a range of cell-types, with the strongest enrichment in interneurons. We hypothesised that the primary cell type pathology could trigger secondary changes in other cell types and these could be detected by applying EWCE to transcriptome data from diseased tissue. In Autism, Schizophrenia and Alzheimer’s disease we find evidence of pathological changes in all of the major brain cell types. These findings give novel insight into the cellular origins and progression in common brain disorders. The methods can be applied to any tissue and disorder and have applications in validating mouse models.

  14. Planar cell polarity effector gene Intu regulates cell fate-specific differentiation of keratinocytes through the primary cilia

    OpenAIRE

    Dai, D.; Li, L.; Huebner, A; H. Zeng; Guevara, E; Claypool, D J; Liu, A.; Chen, J.

    2012-01-01

    Genes involved in the planar cell polarity (PCP) signaling pathway are essential for a number of developmental processes in mammals, such as convergent extension and ciliogenesis. Tissue-specific PCP effector genes of the PCP signaling pathway are believed to mediate PCP signals in a tissue- and cell type-specific manner. However, how PCP signaling controls the morphogenesis of mammalian tissues remains unclear. In this study, we investigated the role of inturned (Intu), a tissue-specific PCP...

  15. REC46 gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae controls mitotic chromosomal stability, recombination and sporulation: cell-type and life cycle stage specific expression of the rec46-1 mutation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studies of chromosomal recombination during mitosis and meiosis of Saccharomyces cerevisiae have demonstrated that recombination at these two distinct stages of the yeast life cycle proceeds by mechanisms that appear similar but involve discrete mitosis-specific and meiosis-specific properties. UV radiation induced REC mutants are being employed as a genetic tool to identify the partial reactions comprising recombination and the involvement of individual REC gene products in mitotic and meiotic recombination. The sequence of molecular events that results in genetic recombination in eukaryotes is presently ill-defined. Genetic characterization of REC gene mutants and biochemical analyses of them for discrete defects in DNA metabolic proteins and enzymes (in collaboration with the laboratory of Junko Hosoda) are beginning to remedy this gap in the authors knowledge. This report summarizes the genetic properties of the rec46-1 mutation

  16. Murine Pregnancy-Specific Glycoprotein 23 Induces the Proangiogenic Factors Transforming-Growth Factor Beta 1 and Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor A in Cell Types Involved in Vascular Remodeling in Pregnancy1

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Julie A.; Johnson, Briana L.; Chen, Yongqing; Ha, Cam T.; Dveksler, Gabriela S.

    2008-01-01

    Haemochorial placentation is a unique physiological process in which the fetal trophoblast cells remodel the maternal decidual spiral arteries to establish the fetoplacental blood supply. Pregnancy-specific glycoproteins (PSGs) are members of the carcinoembryonic antigen family. PSGs are produced by the placenta of rodents and primates and are secreted into the bloodstream. PSG23 is one of 17 members of the murine PSG family (designated PSG16 to PSG32). Previous studies determined that PSGs h...

  17. Antigen-Specific Antibody Glycosylation Is Regulated via Vaccination

    OpenAIRE

    Mahan, Alison E.; Jennewein, Madeleine F.; Suscovich, Todd; Dionne, Kendall; Tedesco, Jacquelynne; Chung, Amy W.; Streeck, Hendrik; Pau, Maria; Schuitemaker, Hanneke; Francis, Don; Fast, Patricia; Laufer, Dagna; Walker, Bruce D.; Baden, Lindsey; Barouch, Dan H.

    2016-01-01

    Antibody effector functions, such as antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity, complement deposition, and antibody-dependent phagocytosis, play a critical role in immunity against multiple pathogens, particularly in the absence of neutralizing activity. Two modifications to the IgG constant domain (Fc domain) regulate antibody functionality: changes in antibody subclass and changes in a single N-linked glycan located in the CH2 domain of the IgG Fc. Together, these modifications provide a spe...

  18. Gene program-specific regulation of PGC-1{alpha} activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Søren F; Mandrup, Susanne

    2011-01-01

    . 1232-1244) demonstrated that phosphorylation of PGC-1α by the p70 ribosomal protein S6 kinase 1 (S6K1) specifically interfered with the interaction between PGC-1α and HNF4α in liver and blocked the coactivation of the gluconeogenic target genes. This demonstrates how independent fine-tuning of gene...

  19. Regulating VEGF signaling in platelet concentrates via specific VEGF sequestering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belair, David G; Le, Ngoc Nhi; Murphy, William L

    2016-05-26

    Platelets contain an abundance of growth factors that mimic the composition of the wound healing milieu, and platelet-derived VEGF in particular can negatively influence wound healing if unregulated. Here, we sought to capture and regulate the activity of VEGF factor from human platelets using poly(ethylene glycol) microspheres. In this communication, we demonstrate that platelet freeze/thaw produced significantly higher levels of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) than either calcium chloride treatment, protease activated receptor 1 activating peptide (PAR1AP) treatment, or thrombin treatment. PEG microspheres containing a VEGF-binding peptide (VBP), derived from VEGFR2, sequestered VEGF from platelet concentrate, prepared via freeze/thaw, and reduced the bioactivity of platelet concentrate in HUVEC culture, which suggests that VBP microspheres sequestered and reduced the activity of VEGF from patient-derived platelets. Here, we demonstrate the ability of VEGF sequestering microspheres to regulate the activity of VEGF derived from a growth factor-rich autologous human blood product. PMID:27010034

  20. The Sarcoglycan complex is expressed in the cerebrovascular system and is specifically regulated by astroglial Cx30 channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne-Cécile eBoulay

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Astrocytes, the most prominent glial cell type in the brain, send specialized processes called endfeet, around blood vessels and express a large molecular repertoire regulating the cerebrovascular system physiology. One of the most striking properties of astrocyte endfeet is their enrichment in gap junction protein Connexin 43 and 30 (Cx43 and Cx30 allowing in particular for direct intercellular trafficking of ions and small signaling molecules through perivascular astroglial networks. In this study, we addressed the specific role of Cx30 at the gliovascular interface. Using an inactivation mouse model for Cx30 (Cx30Δ/Δ, we showed that absence of Cx30 does not affect blood-brain barrier (BBB organization and permeability. However, it results in the cerebrovascular fraction, in a strong upregulation of Sgcg encoding γ-Sarcoglycan (SG, a member of the Dystrophin-associated protein complex (DAPC connecting cytoskeleton and the extracellular matrix. The same molecular event occurs in Cx30T5M/T5M mutated mice, where Cx30 channels are closed, demonstrating that Sgcg regulation relied on Cx30 channel functions. We further characterized the expression of other Sarcoglycan complex (SGC molecules in the cerebrovascular system and showed the presence of α-, β-, δ-, γ-, ε- and ζ- SG, as well as Sarcospan. Their expression was however not modified in Cx30Δ/Δ. These results suggest that a full SGC might be present in the cerebrovascular system, and that expression of one of its member, γ-Sarcoglycan, depends on Cx30 channels. As described in skeletal muscles, the SGC may contribute to membrane stabilization and signal transduction in the cerebrovascular system, which may therefore be regulated by Cx30 channel-mediated functions.

  1. Cell-specific regulation of apoptosis by designed enediynes.

    OpenAIRE

    Nicolaou, K. C.; Stabila, P; Esmaeli-Azad, B; Wrasidlo, W; Hiatt, A

    1993-01-01

    The naturally occurring enediyne antibiotics are a unique class of antitumor drugs that combine reactive enediynes with additional structural features conferring affinity for DNA. Dynemicin A, in which an enediyne core is attached to an anthraquinone group capable of DNA intercalation, readily cleaves double-stranded DNA. This activity is thought to be the basis of its potent antitumor cytotoxicity. To investigate cell-specific mechanisms of cytotoxicity in the absence of DNA affinity, we hav...

  2. Drosophila melanogaster lipins are tissue-regulated and developmentally regulated and present specific subcellular distributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valente, Valeria; Maia, Rafaela Martins; Vianna, Murilo Carlos Bizam; Paçó-Larson, Maria Luisa

    2010-11-01

    Lipins constitute a novel family of Mg(2+)-dependent phosphatidate phosphatases that catalyze the dephosphorylation of phosphatidic acid to yield diacylglycerol, an important intermediate in lipid metabolism and cell signaling. Whereas a single lipin is detected in less complex organisms, in mammals there are distinct lipin isoforms and paralogs that are differentially expressed among tissues. Compatible with organism tissue complexity, we show that the single Drosophila Lpin1 ortholog (CG8709, here named DmLpin) expresses at least three isoforms (DmLpinA, DmLpinK and DmLpinJ) in a temporal and spatially regulated manner. The highest levels of lipin in the fat body, where DmLpinA and DmLpinK are expressed, correlate with the highest levels of triacylglycerol (TAG) measured in this tissue. DmLpinK is the most abundant isoform in the central nervous system, where TAG levels are significantly lower than in the fat body. In the testis, where TAG levels are even lower, DmLpinJ is the predominant isoform. Together, these data suggest that DmLpinA might be the isoform that is mainly involved in TAG production, and that DmLpinK and DmLpinJ could perform other cellular functions. In addition, we demonstrate by immunofluorescence that lipins are most strongly labeled in the perinuclear region of the fat body and ventral ganglion cells. In visceral muscles of the larval midgut and adult testis, lipins present a sarcomeric distribution. In the ovary chamber, the lipin signal is concentrated in the internal rim of the ring canal. These specific subcellular localizations of the Drosophila lipins provide the basis for future investigations on putative novel cellular functions of this protein family. PMID:20977671

  3. Plug-and-Play Genetic Access to Drosophila Cell Types Using Exchangeable Exon Cassettes

    OpenAIRE

    Fengqiu Diao; Holly Ironfield; Haojiang Luan; Feici Diao; William C. Shropshire; John Ewer; Elizabeth Marr; Christopher J. Potter; Matthias Landgraf; Benjamin H. White

    2015-01-01

    Genetically encoded effectors are important tools for probing cellular function in living animals, but improved methods for directing their expression to specific cell types are required. Here, we introduce a simple, versatile method for achieving cell-type-specific expression of transgenes that leverages the untapped potential of “coding introns” (i.e., introns between coding exons). Our method couples the expression of a transgene to that of a native gene expressed in the cells of interest ...

  4. Tissue- and isoform-specific phytochrome regulation of light-dependent anthocyanin accumulation in Arabidopsis thaliana

    OpenAIRE

    Warnasooriya, Sankalpi N.; Porter, Katie J.; Montgomery, Beronda L

    2011-01-01

    Phytochromes regulate light- and sucrose-dependent anthocyanin synthesis and accumulation in many plants. Mesophyll-specific phyA alone has been linked to the regulation of anthocyanin accumulation in response to far-red light in Arabidopsis thaliana. However, multiple mesophyll-localized phytochromes were implicated in the photoregulation of anthocyanin accumulation in red-light conditions. Here, we report a role for mesophyll-specific phyA in blue-light-dependent regulation of anthocyanin l...

  5. Nanomaterial cytotoxicity is composition, size, and cell type dependent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sohaebuddin Syed K

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite intensive research efforts, reports of cellular responses to nanomaterials are often inconsistent and even contradictory. Additionally, relationships between the responding cell type and nanomaterial properties are not well understood. Using three model cell lines representing different physiological compartments and nanomaterials of different compositions and sizes, we have systematically investigated the influence of nanomaterial properties on the degrees and pathways of cytotoxicity. In this study, we selected nanomaterials of different compositions (TiO2 and SiO2 nanoparticles, and multi-wall carbon nanotubes [MWCNTs] with differing size (MWCNTs of different diameters 50 nm; but same length 0.5-2 μm to analyze the effects of composition and size on toxicity to 3T3 fibroblasts, RAW 264.7 macrophages, and telomerase-immortalized (hT bronchiolar epithelial cells. Results Following characterization of nanomaterial properties in PBS and serum containing solutions, cells were exposed to nanomaterials of differing compositions and sizes, with cytotoxicity monitored through reduction in mitochondrial activity. In addition to cytotoxicity, the cellular response to nanomaterials was characterized by quantifying generation of reactive oxygen species, lysosomal membrane destabilization and mitochondrial permeability. The effect of these responses on cellular fate - apoptosis or necrosis - was then analyzed. Nanomaterial toxicity was variable based on exposed cell type and dependent on nanomaterial composition and size. In addition, nanomaterial exposure led to cell type dependent intracellular responses resulting in unique breakdown of cellular functions for each nanomaterial: cell combination. Conclusions Nanomaterials induce cell specific responses resulting in variable toxicity and subsequent cell fate based on the type of exposed cell. Our results indicate that the composition and size of nanomaterials as well as the

  6. Specific expression of bioluminescence reporter gene in cardiomyocyte regulated by tissue specific promoter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As the human heart is not capable of regenerating the great numbers of cardiac cells that are lost after myocardial infarction, impaired cardiac function is the inevitable result of ischemic disease. Recently, human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) have gained popularity as a potentially ideal cell candidate for tissue regeneration. In particular, hESCs are capable of cardiac lineage-specific differentiation and confer improvement of cardiac function following transplantation into animal models. Although such data are encouraging, the specific strategy for in vivo and non-invasive detection of differentiated cardiac lineage is still limited. Therefore, in the present study, we established the gene construction in which the optical reporter gene Firefly luciferase was controlled by Myosin Heavy Chain promoter for specific expressing in heart cells. The vector consisting of - MHC promoter and a firefly luciferase coding sequence flanked by full-length bovine growth hormone (BGH) 3'-polyadenylation sequence based on pcDNA3.1- vector backbone. To test the specific transcription of this promoter in g of MHC-Fluc or CMV-Flue (for control) plasmid DNA in myocardial tissue, 20 phosphate-buffered saline was directly injected into mouse myocardium through a midline sternotomy and liver. After 1 week of injection, MHC-Fluc expression was detected from heart region which was observed under cooled CCD camera of in vivo imaging system but not from liver. In control group injected with CMV-Flue, the bioluminescence was detected from all these organs. The expression of Flue under control of Myosin Heavy Chain promoter may become a suitable optical reporter gene for stem cell-derived cardiac lineage differentiation study

  7. Specific expression of bioluminescence reporter gene in cardiomyocyte regulated by tissue specific promoter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Vu Hong; Tae, Seong Ho; Le, Nguyen Uyen Chi; Min, Jung Joon [Chonnam National University Medical School, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-07-01

    As the human heart is not capable of regenerating the great numbers of cardiac cells that are lost after myocardial infarction, impaired cardiac function is the inevitable result of ischemic disease. Recently, human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) have gained popularity as a potentially ideal cell candidate for tissue regeneration. In particular, hESCs are capable of cardiac lineage-specific differentiation and confer improvement of cardiac function following transplantation into animal models. Although such data are encouraging, the specific strategy for in vivo and non-invasive detection of differentiated cardiac lineage is still limited. Therefore, in the present study, we established the gene construction in which the optical reporter gene Firefly luciferase was controlled by Myosin Heavy Chain promoter for specific expressing in heart cells. The vector consisting of - MHC promoter and a firefly luciferase coding sequence flanked by full-length bovine growth hormone (BGH) 3'-polyadenylation sequence based on pcDNA3.1- vector backbone. To test the specific transcription of this promoter in g of MHC-Fluc or CMV-Flue (for control) plasmid DNA in myocardial tissue, 20 phosphate-buffered saline was directly injected into mouse myocardium through a midline sternotomy and liver. After 1 week of injection, MHC-Fluc expression was detected from heart region which was observed under cooled CCD camera of in vivo imaging system but not from liver. In control group injected with CMV-Flue, the bioluminescence was detected from all these organs. The expression of Flue under control of Myosin Heavy Chain promoter may become a suitable optical reporter gene for stem cell-derived cardiac lineage differentiation study.

  8. A hierarchy of ECM-mediated signalling tissue-specific gene expression regulates tissue-specific gene expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roskelley, Calvin D; Srebrow, Anabella; Bissell, Mina J

    1995-10-07

    A dynamic and reciprocal flow of information between cells and the extracellular matrix contributes significantly to the regulation of form and function in developing systems. Signals generated by the extracellular matrix do not act in isolation. Instead, they are processed within the context of global signalling hierarchies whose constituent inputs and outputs are constantly modulated by all the factors present in the cell's surrounding microenvironment. This is particularly evident in the mammary gland, where the construction and subsequent destruction of such a hierarchy regulates changes in tissue-specific gene expression, morphogenesis and apoptosis during each developmental cycle of pregnancy, lactation and involution.

  9. Functional Proteomics Screen Enables Enrichment of Distinct Cell Types from Human Pancreatic Islets

    OpenAIRE

    Revital Sharivkin; Walker, Michael D.; Yoav Soen

    2015-01-01

    The current world-wide epidemic of diabetes has prompted attempts to generate new sources of insulin-producing cells for cell replacement therapy. An inherent challenge in many of these strategies is the lack of cell-surface markers permitting isolation and characterization of specific cell types from differentiating stem cell populations. Here we introduce an iterative proteomics procedure allowing tag-free isolation of cell types based on their function. Our method detects and associates sp...

  10. Bigenomic transcriptional regulation of all thirteen cytochrome c oxidase subunit genes by specificity protein 1

    OpenAIRE

    Dhar, Shilpa S.; Johar, Kaid; Wong-Riley, Margaret T. T.

    2013-01-01

    Cytochrome c oxidase (COX) is one of only four known bigenomic proteins, with three mitochondria-encoded subunits and 10 nucleus-encoded ones derived from nine different chromosomes. The mechanism of regulating this multi-subunit, bigenomic enzyme is not fully understood. We hypothesize that specificity protein 1 (Sp1) functionally regulates the 10 nucleus-encoded COX subunit genes directly and the three mitochondrial COX subunit genes indirectly by regulating mitochondrial transcription fact...

  11. Linking specification to differentiation: From proneural genes to the regulation of ciliogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    zur Lage, Petra I; Simpson, T Ian; Jarman, Andrew P

    2011-01-01

    Much of developmental biology is concerned with the processes by which cells become committed to particular fates in a regulated fashion, whereas cell biology addresses, among other things, the variety of differentiated forms and functions that cells can acquire. One open question is how the regulators of the former process lead to attainment of the latter. “High-level” regulators of cell fate specification include the proneural factors, which drive cells to commit as precursors in the sensor...

  12. 77 FR 58050 - Refuge-Specific Hunting and Sport Fishing Regulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-19

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Fish and Wildlife Service 50 CFR Part 32 Refuge-Specific Hunting and Sport Fishing Regulations CFR Correction Sec. 32.29 0 In Title 50 of the Code of Federal Regulations, parts 18 to 199, revised as...

  13. 77 FR 58051 - Refuge-Specific Hunting and Sport Fishing Regulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-19

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Fish and Wildlife Service 50 CFR Part 32 Refuge-Specific Hunting and Sport Fishing Regulations CFR Correction 0 In Title 50 of the Code of Federal Regulations, Parts 18 to 199, revised as of October 1,...

  14. Lineage relationship of prostate cancer cell types based on gene expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ware Carol B

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prostate tumor heterogeneity is a major factor in disease management. Heterogeneity could be due to multiple cancer cell types with distinct gene expression. Of clinical importance is the so-called cancer stem cell type. Cell type-specific transcriptomes are used to examine lineage relationship among cancer cell types and their expression similarity to normal cell types including stem/progenitor cells. Methods Transcriptomes were determined by Affymetrix DNA array analysis for the following cell types. Putative prostate progenitor cell populations were characterized and isolated by expression of the membrane transporter ABCG2. Stem cells were represented by embryonic stem and embryonal carcinoma cells. The cancer cell types were Gleason pattern 3 (glandular histomorphology and pattern 4 (aglandular sorted from primary tumors, cultured prostate cancer cell lines originally established from metastatic lesions, xenografts LuCaP 35 (adenocarcinoma phenotype and LuCaP 49 (neuroendocrine/small cell carcinoma grown in mice. No detectable gene expression differences were detected among serial passages of the LuCaP xenografts. Results Based on transcriptomes, the different cancer cell types could be clustered into a luminal-like grouping and a non-luminal-like (also not basal-like grouping. The non-luminal-like types showed expression more similar to that of stem/progenitor cells than the luminal-like types. However, none showed expression of stem cell genes known to maintain stemness. Conclusions Non-luminal-like types are all representatives of aggressive disease, and this could be attributed to the similarity in overall gene expression to stem and progenitor cell types.

  15. Identification and characterization of the minimal androgen-regulated kidney-specific kidney androgen-regulated protein gene promoter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The kidney androgen-regulated protein (Kap) gene is tissue specific and regulated by androgen in mouse kidney proximal tubule cells (PTCs). In the present study, we aimed to identify the minimal PTC-specific androgen-regulated Kap promoter and analyze its androgen response elements (AREs).Adeletion series of the Kap1542 promoter/luciferase constructs were assayed in opossum kidney (OK) PTCs in the presence or absence of 15 nM dihydrotestosterone (DHT). Kap 1542 and Kap637 had low activity and no androgen induction; Kap224 had a basal activity that was 4- to 5-fold higher than that of Kap 1542, but was only sfightly induced by DHT. Kap 147 had a basal activity that was 2- to 3-fold higher than that of Kap 1542 and was induced by DHT 4- to 6-fold. Kap77 abol-ished basal promoter activity but was still induced by DHT. Results showed that, in vitro, Kap147 was a minimal androgen-regulated promoter. Transient transfection in different cells demonstrated that Kap147 specifically initi-ated reporter gene expression in PTCs. Sequence analysis revealed two potential AREs located at positions -124 and -39 of Kap147. Mutational assays showed that only the ARE at -124 was involved in androgen response in OK cells. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay also verified -124 ARE bound specifically to androgen receptor. In conclusion, we defined the minimal Kap 147 promoter that may be a good model for the study of kidney PTC-specific expression and molecular mechanisms that lead to an androgen-specific responsiveness in vivo.

  16. 77 FR 41001 - 2012-2013 Refuge-Specific Hunting and Sport Fishing Regulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-11

    ... Refuge-Specific Hunting and Sport Fishing Regulations; Proposed Rule #0;#0;Federal Register / Vol. 77... Wildlife Service 50 CFR Part 32 RIN 1018-AY37 2012-2013 Refuge-Specific Hunting and Sport Fishing... Service proposes to add one refuge to the list of areas open for hunting and/or sport fishing, close...

  17. Cell elasticity with altered cytoskeletal architectures across multiple cell types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grady, Martha E; Composto, Russell J; Eckmann, David M

    2016-08-01

    The cytoskeleton is primarily responsible for providing structural support, localization and transport of organelles, and intracellular trafficking. The structural support is supplied by actin filaments, microtubules, and intermediate filaments, which contribute to overall cell elasticity to varying degrees. We evaluate cell elasticity in five different cell types with drug-induced cytoskeletal derangements to probe how actin filaments and microtubules contribute to cell elasticity and whether it is conserved across cell type. Specifically, we measure elastic stiffness in primary chondrocytes, fibroblasts, endothelial cells (HUVEC), hepatocellular carcinoma cells (HUH-7), and fibrosarcoma cells (HT 1080) subjected to two cytoskeletal destabilizers: cytochalasin D and nocodazole, which disrupt actin and microtubule polymerization, respectively. Elastic stiffness is measured by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and the disruption of the cytoskeleton is confirmed using fluorescence microscopy. The two cancer cell lines showed significantly reduced elastic moduli values (~0.5kPa) when compared to the three healthy cell lines (~2kPa). Non-cancer cells whose actin filaments were disrupted using cytochalasin D showed a decrease of 60-80% in moduli values compared to untreated cells of the same origin, whereas the nocodazole-treated cells showed no change in elasticity. Overall, we demonstrate actin filaments contribute more to elastic stiffness than microtubules but this result is cell type dependent. Cancer cells behaved differently, exhibiting increased stiffness as well as stiffness variability when subjected to nocodazole. We show that disruption of microtubule dynamics affects cancer cell elasticity, suggesting therapeutic drugs targeting microtubules be monitored for significant elastic changes. PMID:26874250

  18. A novel mammal-specific three partite enhancer element regulates node and notochord-specific Noto expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonie Alten

    Full Text Available The vertebrate organizer and notochord have conserved, essential functions for embryonic development and patterning. The restricted expression of developmental regulators in these tissues is directed by specific cis-regulatory modules (CRMs whose sequence conservation varies considerably. Some CRMs have been conserved throughout vertebrates and likely represent ancestral regulatory networks, while others have diverged beyond recognition but still function over a wide evolutionary range. Here we identify and characterize a mammalian-specific CRM required for node and notochord specific (NNC expression of NOTO, a transcription factor essential for node morphogenesis, nodal cilia movement and establishment of laterality in mouse. A 523 bp enhancer region (NOCE upstream the Noto promoter was necessary and sufficient for NNC expression from the endogenous Noto locus. Three subregions in NOCE together mediated full activity in vivo. Binding sites for known transcription factors in NOCE were functional in vitro but dispensable for NOCE activity in vivo. A FOXA2 site in combination with a novel motif was necessary for NOCE activity in vivo. Strikingly, syntenic regions in non-mammalian vertebrates showed no recognizable sequence similarities. In contrast to its activity in mouse NOCE did not drive NNC expression in transgenic fish. NOCE represents a novel, mammal-specific CRM required for the highly restricted Noto expression in the node and nascent notochord and thus regulates normal node development and function.

  19. Discover Gene Specific Local Co-Regulations from Time-Course Gene Expression Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Zhang

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Discovering gene co-regulatory relationships is one of most important research in DNA microarray data analysis. The problem of gene specific co-regulation discovery is to, for a particular gene of interest (called target gene, identify the condition subsets where strong gene co-regulations of the target gene are observed and its co-regulated genes in these condition subsets. The co-regulations are local in the sense that they occur in some subsets of full experimental conditions. The study on this problem can contribute to better understanding and characterizing the target gene during the biological activity involved. In this paper, we propose an innovative method for finding gene specific co-regulations using genetic algorithm (GA. A sliding window is used to delimit the allowed length of conditions in which gene co-regulations occur and an ad hoc GA, called the progressive GA, is performed in each window position to find those condition subsets having high fitness. It is called progressive because the initial population for the GA in a window position inherits the top-ranked individuals obtained in its preceding window position, enabling the GA to achieve a better accuracy than the non-progressive algorithm. kNN Lookup Table is utilized to substantially speed up fitness evaluation in the GA. Experimental results with a real-life gene expression data demonstrate the efficiency and effectiveness of our technique in discovering gene specific co-regulations.

  20. Turtle functions downstream of Cut in differentially regulating class specific dendrite morphogenesis in Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikolaj J Sulkowski

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Dendritic morphology largely determines patterns of synaptic connectivity and electrochemical properties of a neuron. Neurons display a myriad diversity of dendritic geometries which serve as a basis for functional classification. Several types of molecules have recently been identified which regulate dendrite morphology by acting at the levels of transcriptional regulation, direct interactions with the cytoskeleton and organelles, and cell surface interactions. Although there has been substantial progress in understanding the molecular mechanisms of dendrite morphogenesis, the specification of class-specific dendritic arbors remains largely unexplained. Furthermore, the presence of numerous regulators suggests that they must work in concert. However, presently, few genetic pathways regulating dendrite development have been defined. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The Drosophila gene turtle belongs to an evolutionarily conserved class of immunoglobulin superfamily members found in the nervous systems of diverse organisms. We demonstrate that Turtle is differentially expressed in Drosophila da neurons. Moreover, MARCM analyses reveal Turtle acts cell autonomously to exert class specific effects on dendritic growth and/or branching in da neuron subclasses. Using transgenic overexpression of different Turtle isoforms, we find context-dependent, isoform-specific effects on mediating dendritic branching in class II, III and IV da neurons. Finally, we demonstrate via chromatin immunoprecipitation, qPCR, and immunohistochemistry analyses that Turtle expression is positively regulated by the Cut homeodomain transcription factor and via genetic interaction studies that Turtle is downstream effector of Cut-mediated regulation of da neuron dendrite morphology. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our findings reveal that Turtle proteins differentially regulate the acquisition of class-specific dendrite morphologies. In addition, we have established a

  1. 50 CFR 32.6 - What are the procedures for publication of refuge-specific sport fishing regulations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... refuge-specific sport fishing regulations? 32.6 Section 32.6 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH... sport fishing regulations? (a) Refuge-specific fishing regulations are issued only at the time of or after the opening of a wildlife refuge area to sport fishing. (b) Refuge-specific fishing...

  2. Self-regulation of general upper secondary school students with specific learning disabilities

    OpenAIRE

    Švajger Savič, Karmen

    2015-01-01

    Self-regulated learning, as an active approach to learning at which students set the goals themselves, insist on them, monitor and evaluate their results and in view of that change their behaviour, has become increasingly important in education in the last decades. Numerous studies of adolescents with specific learning disabilities reveal the particulars of their self-regulation of learning. They need more support in their family and educational environment due to their peculiarities and beca...

  3. Phosphorylation regulates the Star-PAP-PIPKIα interaction and directs specificity toward mRNA targets

    OpenAIRE

    Mohan, Nimmy; AP, Sudheesh; Francis, Nimmy; Anderson, Richard; Laishram, Rakesh S.

    2015-01-01

    Star-PAP is a nuclear non-canonical poly(A) polymerase (PAP) that shows specificity toward mRNA targets. Star-PAP activity is stimulated by lipid messenger phosphatidyl inositol 4,5 bisphoshate (PI4,5P2) and is regulated by the associated Type I phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate 5-kinase that synthesizes PI4,5P2 as well as protein kinases. These associated kinases act as coactivators of Star-PAP that regulates its activity and specificity toward mRNAs, yet the mechanism of control of these int...

  4. Cadherin-9 Regulates Synapse-Specific Differentiation in the Developing Hippocampus

    OpenAIRE

    Williams, Megan E.; Wilke, Scott A.; Daggett, Anthony; Davis, Elizabeth; Otto, Stefanie; Ravi, Deepak; Ripley, Beth; Bushong, Eric A.; Ellisman, Mark H.; Klein, Gerd; Ghosh, Anirvan

    2011-01-01

    Our understanding of mechanisms that regulate the differentiation of specific classes of synapses is limited. Here, we investigate the formation of synapses between hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG) neurons and their target CA3 neurons and find that DG neurons preferentially form synapses with CA3 rather than DG or CA1 neurons in culture, suggesting that specific interactions between DG and CA3 neurons drive synapse formation. Cadherin-9 is expressed selectively in DG and CA3 neurons, and downre...

  5. Nkx factors specifically regulate expression of Hedgehog receptor isoforms in early embryonic development

    Science.gov (United States)

    BACKGROUND: NK homeobox family members are tissue-specific transcription factors that regulate developmental genes. Homozygous disruption of Nkx3.2 produces severe developmental defects of the axial skeleton, skull, spleen, and stomach. Murine mutation of Nkx2.5 results in death at E9 with defects i...

  6. Internet-Specific Epistemic Beliefs and Self-Regulated Learning in Online Academic Information Searching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Yen-Lin; Liang, Jyh-Chong; Tsai, Chin-Chung

    2013-01-01

    Epistemic beliefs have been considered as important components of the self-regulatory model; however, their relationships with self-regulated learning processes in the Internet context need further research. The main purpose of this study was to examine the relationships between Internet-specific epistemic belief dimensions and self-regulated…

  7. Specificity protein 4 (Sp4) transcriptionally regulates inhibitory GABAergic receptors in neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Bindu; Johar, Kaid; Priya, Anusha; Wong-Riley, Margaret T T

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies in our laboratory have shown that the neuron-specific specificity protein 4 (Sp4) transcriptionally regulates many excitatory neurotransmitter receptor subunit genes, such as those for GluN1, GluN2A, and GluN2B of N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors and Gria2 of α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptors. It also regulates Atp1a1 and Atp1b1 subunit genes of Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase, a major energy-consuming enzyme, as well as all 13 subunits of cytochrome c oxidase (COX), an important energy-generating enzyme. Thus, there is a tight coupling between energy consumption, energy production, and excitatory neuronal activity at the transcriptional level in neurons. The question is whether inhibitory neurotransmitter receptors are also regulated by Sp4. In the present study, we tested our hypothesis that Sp4 regulates receptor subunit genes of a major inhibitory neurotransmitter, GABA, specifically GABAA receptors. By means of multiple approaches, including in silico analysis, electrophoretic mobility shift and supershift assays, real-time quantitative PCR, chromatin immunoprecipitation, promoter mutational analysis, over-expression and shRNA of Sp4, functional assays, and western blots, we found that Sp4 functionally regulates the transcription of Gabra1 (GABAA α1) and Gabra2 (GABAA α2), but not Gabra3 (GABAA α3) subunit genes. The binding sites of Sp4 are conserved among rats, humans, and mice. Thus, our results substantiate our hypothesis that Sp4 plays a key role in regulating the transcription of GABAA receptor subunit genes. They also indicate that Sp4 is in a position to transcriptionally regulate the balance between excitatory and inhibitory neurochemical expressions in neurons. PMID:26469128

  8. CTen: a web-based platform for identifying enriched cell types from heterogeneous microarray data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shoemaker Jason E

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Interpreting in vivo sampled microarray data is often complicated by changes in the cell population demographics. To put gene expression into its proper biological context, it is necessary to distinguish differential gene transcription from artificial gene expression induced by changes in the cellular demographics. Results CTen (cell type enrichment is a web-based analytical tool which uses our highly expressed, cell specific (HECS gene database to identify enriched cell types in heterogeneous microarray data. The web interface is designed for differential expression and gene clustering studies, and the enrichment results are presented as heatmaps or downloadable text files. Conclusions In this work, we use an independent, cell-specific gene expression data set to assess CTen's performance in accurately identifying the appropriate cell type and provide insight into the suggested level of enrichment to optimally minimize the number of false discoveries. We show that CTen, when applied to microarray data developed from infected lung tissue, can correctly identify the cell signatures of key lymphocytes in a highly heterogeneous environment and compare its performance to another popular bioinformatics tool. Furthermore, we discuss the strong implications cell type enrichment has in the design of effective microarray workflow strategies and show that, by combining CTen with gene expression clustering, we may be able to determine the relative changes in the number of key cell types. CTen is available at http://www.influenza-x.org/~jshoemaker/cten/

  9. Specification of Drosophila corpora cardiaca neuroendocrine cells from mesoderm is regulated by Notch signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangbin Park

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Drosophila neuroendocrine cells comprising the corpora cardiaca (CC are essential for systemic glucose regulation and represent functional orthologues of vertebrate pancreatic α-cells. Although Drosophila CC cells have been regarded as developmental orthologues of pituitary gland, the genetic regulation of CC development is poorly understood. From a genetic screen, we identified multiple novel regulators of CC development, including Notch signaling factors. Our studies demonstrate that the disruption of Notch signaling can lead to the expansion of CC cells. Live imaging demonstrates localized emergence of extra precursor cells as the basis of CC expansion in Notch mutants. Contrary to a recent report, we unexpectedly found that CC cells originate from head mesoderm. We show that Tinman expression in head mesoderm is regulated by Notch signaling and that the combination of Daughterless and Tinman is sufficient for ectopic CC specification in mesoderm. Understanding the cellular, genetic, signaling, and transcriptional basis of CC cell specification and expansion should accelerate discovery of molecular mechanisms regulating ontogeny of organs that control metabolism.

  10. MEF2C and EBF1 Co-regulate B Cell-Specific Transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Nikki R; Davis, Matthew; Chai, Li; Winoto, Astar; Tjian, Robert

    2016-02-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells are capable of self-renewal or differentiation along three main lineages: myeloid, erythroid, and lymphoid. One of the earliest lineage decisions for blood progenitor cells is whether to adopt the lymphoid or myeloid fate. Previous work had shown that myocyte enhancer factor 2C (MEF2C) is indispensable for the lymphoid fate decision, yet the specific mechanism of action remained unclear. Here, we have identified early B cell factor-1 (EBF1) as a co-regulator of gene expression with MEF2C. A genome-wide survey of MEF2C and EBF1 binding sites identified a subset of B cell-specific genes that they target. We also determined that the p38 MAPK pathway activates MEF2C to drive B cell differentiation. Mef2c knockout mice showed reduced B lymphoid-specific gene expression as well as increased myeloid gene expression, consistent with MEF2C's role as a lineage fate regulator. This is further supported by interaction between MEF2C and the histone deacetylase, HDAC7, revealing a likely mechanism to repress the myeloid transcription program. This study thus elucidates both activation and repression mechanisms, identifies regulatory partners, and downstream targets by which MEF2C regulates lymphoid-specific differentiation. PMID:26900922

  11. Activation of individual L1 retrotransposon instances is restricted to cell-type dependent permissive loci

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philippe, Claude; Vargas-Landin, Dulce B; Doucet, Aurélien J; van Essen, Dominic; Vera-Otarola, Jorge; Kuciak, Monika; Corbin, Antoine; Nigumann, Pilvi; Cristofari, Gaël

    2016-01-01

    LINE-1 (L1) retrotransposons represent approximately one sixth of the human genome, but only the human-specific L1HS-Ta subfamily acts as an endogenous mutagen in modern humans, reshaping both somatic and germline genomes. Due to their high levels of sequence identity and the existence of many polymorphic insertions absent from the reference genome, the transcriptional activation of individual genomic L1HS-Ta copies remains poorly understood. Here we comprehensively mapped fixed and polymorphic L1HS-Ta copies in 12 commonly-used somatic cell lines, and identified transcriptional and epigenetic signatures allowing the unambiguous identification of active L1HS-Ta copies in their genomic context. Strikingly, only a very restricted subset of L1HS-Ta loci - some being polymorphic among individuals - significantly contributes to the bulk of L1 expression, and these loci are differentially regulated among distinct cell lines. Thus, our data support a local model of L1 transcriptional activation in somatic cells, governed by individual-, locus-, and cell-type-specific determinants. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13926.001 PMID:27016617

  12. A Web-Server of Cell Type Discrimination System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anyou Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Discriminating cell types is a daily request for stem cell biologists. However, there is not a user-friendly system available to date for public users to discriminate the common cell types, embryonic stem cells (ESCs, induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs, and somatic cells (SCs. Here, we develop WCTDS, a web-server of cell type discrimination system, to discriminate the three cell types and their subtypes like fetal versus adult SCs. WCTDS is developed as a top layer application of our recent publication regarding cell type discriminations, which employs DNA-methylation as biomarkers and machine learning models to discriminate cell types. Implemented by Django, Python, R, and Linux shell programming, run under Linux-Apache web server, and communicated through MySQL, WCTDS provides a friendly framework to efficiently receive the user input and to run mathematical models for analyzing data and then to present results to users. This framework is flexible and easy to be expended for other applications. Therefore, WCTDS works as a user-friendly framework to discriminate cell types and subtypes and it can also be expended to detect other cell types like cancer cells.

  13. A web-server of cell type discrimination system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Anyou; Zhong, Yan; Wang, Yanhua; He, Qianchuan

    2014-01-01

    Discriminating cell types is a daily request for stem cell biologists. However, there is not a user-friendly system available to date for public users to discriminate the common cell types, embryonic stem cells (ESCs), induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), and somatic cells (SCs). Here, we develop WCTDS, a web-server of cell type discrimination system, to discriminate the three cell types and their subtypes like fetal versus adult SCs. WCTDS is developed as a top layer application of our recent publication regarding cell type discriminations, which employs DNA-methylation as biomarkers and machine learning models to discriminate cell types. Implemented by Django, Python, R, and Linux shell programming, run under Linux-Apache web server, and communicated through MySQL, WCTDS provides a friendly framework to efficiently receive the user input and to run mathematical models for analyzing data and then to present results to users. This framework is flexible and easy to be expended for other applications. Therefore, WCTDS works as a user-friendly framework to discriminate cell types and subtypes and it can also be expended to detect other cell types like cancer cells. PMID:24578634

  14. An atlas of active enhancers across human cell types and tissues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Robin; Gebhard, Claudia; Miguel-Escalada, Irene;

    2014-01-01

    strongly related to enhancer activity. The atlas is used to compare regulatory programs between different cells at unprecedented depth, to identify disease-associated regulatory single nucleotide polymorphisms, and to classify cell-type-specific and ubiquitous enhancers. We further explore the utility of...

  15. LARP6 Meets Collagen mRNA: Specific Regulation of Type I Collagen Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yujie Zhang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Type I collagen is the most abundant structural protein in all vertebrates, but its constitutive rate of synthesis is low due to long half-life of the protein (60–70 days. However, several hundred fold increased production of type I collagen is often seen in reparative or reactive fibrosis. The mechanism which is responsible for this dramatic upregulation is complex, including multiple levels of regulation. However, posttranscriptional regulation evidently plays a predominant role. Posttranscriptional regulation comprises processing, transport, stabilization and translation of mRNAs and is executed by RNA binding proteins. There are about 800 RNA binding proteins, but only one, La ribonucleoprotein domain family member 6 (LARP6, is specifically involved in type I collagen regulation. In the 5′untranslated region (5’UTR of mRNAs encoding for type I and type III collagens there is an evolutionally conserved stem-loop (SL structure; this structure is not found in any other mRNA, including any other collagen mRNA. LARP6 binds to the 5′SL in sequence specific manner to regulate stability of collagen mRNAs and their translatability. Here, we will review current understanding of how is LARP6 involved in posttranscriptional regulation of collagen mRNAs. We will also discuss how other proteins recruited by LARP6, including nonmuscle myosin, vimentin, serine threonine kinase receptor associated protein (STRAP, 25 kD FK506 binding protein (FKBP25 and RNA helicase A (RHA, contribute to this process.

  16. Opposing Fgf and Bmp activities regulate the specification of olfactory sensory and respiratory epithelial cell fates

    OpenAIRE

    Maier, Esther; von Hofsten, Jonas; Nord, Hanna; Fernandes, Marie; Paek, Hunki; Hébert, Jean M.; Gunhaga, Lena

    2010-01-01

    The olfactory sensory epithelium and the respiratory epithelium are derived from the olfactory placode. However, the molecular mechanisms regulating the differential specification of the sensory and the respiratory epithelium have remained undefined. To address this issue, we first identified Msx1/2 and Id3 as markers for respiratory epithelial cells by performing quail chick transplantation studies. Next, we established chick explant and intact chick embryo assays of sensory/respiratory epit...

  17. TCR Down-Regulation Controls Virus-Specific CD8+ T Cell Responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonefeld, Charlotte Menné; Haks, Mariëlle; Nielsen, Bodil;

    2008-01-01

    The CD3gamma di-leucine-based motif plays a central role in TCR down-regulation. However, little is understood about the role of the CD3gamma di-leucine-based motif in physiological T cell responses. In this study, we show that the expansion in numbers of virus-specific CD8(+) T cells is impaired...... in mice with a mutated CD3gamma di-leucine-based motif. The CD3gamma mutation did not impair early TCR signaling, nor did it compromise recruitment or proliferation of virus-specific T cells, but it increased the apoptosis rate of the activated T cells by increasing down-regulation of the...... antiapoptotic molecule Bcl-2. This resulted in a 2-fold reduction in the clonal expansion of virus-specific CD8(+) T cells during the acute phase of vesicular stomatitis virus and lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus infections. These results identify an important role of CD3gamma-mediated TCR down-regulation in...

  18. TCR down-regulation controls virus-specific CD8+ T cell responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonefeld, Charlotte Menné; Haks, Mariëlle; Nielsen, Bodil;

    2008-01-01

    The CD3gamma di-leucine-based motif plays a central role in TCR down-regulation. However, little is understood about the role of the CD3gamma di-leucine-based motif in physiological T cell responses. In this study, we show that the expansion in numbers of virus-specific CD8(+) T cells is impaired...... in mice with a mutated CD3gamma di-leucine-based motif. The CD3gamma mutation did not impair early TCR signaling, nor did it compromise recruitment or proliferation of virus-specific T cells, but it increased the apoptosis rate of the activated T cells by increasing down-regulation of the...... antiapoptotic molecule Bcl-2. This resulted in a 2-fold reduction in the clonal expansion of virus-specific CD8(+) T cells during the acute phase of vesicular stomatitis virus and lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus infections. These results identify an important role of CD3gamma-mediated TCR down-regulation in...

  19. Overview of OVATE FAMILY PROTEINS, A Novel Class of Plant-Specific Growth Regulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shucai; Chang, Ying; Ellis, Brian

    2016-01-01

    OVATE FAMILY PROTEINS (OFPs) are a class of proteins with a conserved OVATE domain. OVATE protein was first identified in tomato as a key regulator of fruit shape. OFPs are plant-specific proteins that are widely distributed in the plant kingdom including mosses and lycophytes. Transcriptional activity analysis of Arabidopsis OFPs (AtOFPs) in protoplasts suggests that they act as transcription repressors. Functional characterization of OFPs from different plant species including Arabidopsis, rice, tomato, pepper, and banana suggests that OFPs regulate multiple aspects of plant growth and development, which is likely achieved by interacting with different types of transcription factors including the KNOX and BELL classes, and/or directly regulating the expression of target genes such as Gibberellin 20 oxidase (GA20ox). Here, we examine how OVATE was originally identified, summarize recent progress in elucidation of the roles of OFPs in regulating plant growth and development, and describe possible mechanisms underpinning this regulation. Finally, we review potential new research directions that could shed additional light on the functional biology of OFPs in plants. PMID:27065353

  20. Regulating expression of cell and tissue-specific genes by modifying transcription

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beachy, Roger N; Dai, Shunhong

    2010-06-14

    Transcriptional regulation is the primary step to control gene expression, therefore function. Such regulation is achieved primarily via a combination of the activities of the promoter cis regulatory DNA elements and trans regulatory proteins that function through binding to these DNA elements. Rice bZIP transcription factors RF2a, RF2b and RLP1 play key roles in regulating the activity of a vascular tissue specific promoter isolated from Rice Tungro Bacilliform Virus (RTBV), through their interactions with the Box II essential cis element located in the promoter (Dai et al., 2006., Dai et al., 2004., Yin et al., 1997). RF2a, RF2b and RLP1 possess multiple regulatory domains. Functional characterization reveals that those domains can activate or repress the activity of the RTBV promoter. It is equally as important to recognize that these proteins control plant development by regulating differentiation and/or function of the vascular tissues. Studies of transcriptional regulation of the RTBV promoter by this group of bZIP proteins will not only provide insights about gene expression in the vascular tissue, but also insights about general mechanisms of transcription activation and repression. The knowledge gained from this research will also enable us to develop a well-described set of tools that can be used to control expression of multiple genes in transgenic plants. We have proposed characterize the function domains of RF2a, RF2b and RLP1 and explore the biological function of the transcription repressor RLP1.

  1. Different promoter affinities account for specificity in MYC-dependent gene regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzin, Francesca; Benary, Uwe; Baluapuri, Apoorva; Walz, Susanne; Jung, Lisa Anna; von Eyss, Björn; Kisker, Caroline; Wolf, Jana; Eilers, Martin; Wolf, Elmar

    2016-01-01

    Enhanced expression of the MYC transcription factor is observed in the majority of tumors. Two seemingly conflicting models have been proposed for its function: one proposes that MYC enhances expression of all genes, while the other model suggests gene-specific regulation. Here, we have explored the hypothesis that specific gene expression profiles arise since promoters differ in affinity for MYC and high-affinity promoters are fully occupied by physiological levels of MYC. We determined cellular MYC levels and used RNA- and ChIP-sequencing to correlate promoter occupancy with gene expression at different concentrations of MYC. Mathematical modeling showed that binding affinities for interactions of MYC with DNA and with core promoter-bound factors, such as WDR5, are sufficient to explain promoter occupancies observed in vivo. Importantly, promoter affinity stratifies different biological processes that are regulated by MYC, explaining why tumor-specific MYC levels induce specific gene expression programs and alter defined biological properties of cells. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.15161.001 PMID:27460974

  2. The Candida albicans-specific gene EED1 encodes a key regulator of hyphal extension.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Martin, Ronny

    2011-04-01

    The extension of germ tubes into elongated hyphae by Candida albicans is essential for damage of host cells. The C. albicans-specific gene EED1 plays a crucial role in this extension and maintenance of filamentous growth. eed1Δ cells failed to extend germ tubes into long filaments and switched back to yeast growth after 3 h of incubation during growth on plastic surfaces. Expression of EED1 is regulated by the transcription factor Efg1 and ectopic overexpression of EED1 restored filamentation in efg1Δ. Transcriptional profiling of eed1Δ during infection of oral tissue revealed down-regulation of hyphal associated genes including UME6, encoding another key transcriptional factor. Ectopic overexpression of EED1 or UME6 rescued filamentation and damage potential in eed1Δ. Transcriptional profiling during overexpression of UME6 identified subsets of genes regulated by Eed1 or Ume6. These data suggest that Eed1 and Ume6 act in a pathway regulating maintenance of hyphal growth thereby repressing hyphal-to-yeast transition and permitting dissemination of C. albicans within epithelial tissues.

  3. Regulating expressin of cell and tissue-specific genes by modifying transcription

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beachy, R N; Dai, Shunhong

    2009-12-15

    Transcriptional regulation is the primary step to control gene expression, therefore function. Such regulation is achieved primarily via a combination of the activities of the promoter cis regulatory DNA elements and trans regulatory proteins that function through binding to these DNA elements. Our research supported by this program has led to the identification of rice bZIP transcription factors RF2a, RF2b and RLP1 that play key roles in regulating the activity of a vascular tissue specific promoter isolated from Rice Tungro Bacilliform Virus (RTBV) through their interactions with the Box II essential cis element located in the promoter. RF2a, RF2b and RLP1 possess multiple regulatory domains. Functional characterization reveals that those domains can activate or repress the activity of the RTBV promoter. Studies of transcriptional regulation of the RTBV promoter by this group of bZIP proteins not only provide insights about gene expression in the vascular tissue, but also insights about general mechanisms of transcription activation and repression. The knowledge gained from this research will also enable us to develop a well-described set of tools that can be used to control expression of multiple genes in transgenic plants and to improve biofuel feedstock.

  4. Specific roles of Akt iso forms in apoptosis and axon growth regulation in neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hector Diez

    Full Text Available Akt is a member of the AGC kinase family and consists of three isoforms. As one of the major regulators of the class I PI3 kinase pathway, it has a key role in the control of cell metabolism, growth, and survival. Although it has been extensively studied in the nervous system, we have only a faint knowledge of the specific role of each isoform in differentiated neurons. Here, we have used both cortical and hippocampal neuronal cultures to analyse their function. We characterized the expression and function of Akt isoforms, and some of their substrates along different stages of neuronal development using a specific shRNA approach to elucidate the involvement of each isoform in neuron viability, axon development, and cell signalling. Our results suggest that three Akt isoforms show substantial compensation in many processes. However, the disruption of Akt2 and Akt3 significantly reduced neuron viability and axon length. These changes correlated with a tendency to increase in active caspase 3 and a decrease in the phosphorylation of some elements of the mTORC1 pathway. Indeed, the decrease of Akt2 and more evident the inhibition of Akt3 reduced the expression and phosphorylation of S6. All these data indicate that Akt2 and Akt3 specifically regulate some aspects of apoptosis and cell growth in cultured neurons and may contribute to the understanding of mechanisms of neuron death and pathologies that show deregulated growth.

  5. The Role of Distress Tolerance in the Use of Specific Emotion Regulation Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffries, Emily R; McLeish, Alison C; Kraemer, Kristen M; Avallone, Kimberly M; Fleming, John B

    2016-05-01

    The present study evaluated the role of distress tolerance (DT), defined as the ability to tolerate negative emotional states, in the use of four specific emotion regulation strategies (suppression, avoidance, rumination, and reappraisal). Undergraduate psychology students (N = 431, 71.7% female; Mage = 19.80 years, SD= 3.71) completed self-report measures online for course credit. It was hypothesized that, after controlling for the effects of anxiety sensitivity and negative affectivity, DT would be negatively associated with suppression, avoidance, and rumination, and positively associated with reappraisal. Consistent with prediction, low DT significantly predicted greater use of suppression, avoidance, and rumination. However, contrary to prediction, DT did not significantly predict reappraisal. These results suggest that individuals who are unable to withstand negative emotions are more likely to use maladaptive regulation strategies. PMID:26659192

  6. Lysine-specific demethylase 1 regulates differentiation onset and migration of trophoblast stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongmei; Hölz, Stefanie; Metzger, Eric; Pavlovic, Mihael; Jandausch, Anett; Jilg, Cordula; Galgoczy, Petra; Herz, Corinna; Moser, Markus; Metzger, Daniel; Günther, Thomas; Arnold, Sebastian J.; Schüle, Roland

    2014-01-01

    Propagation and differentiation of stem cell populations are tightly regulated to provide sufficient cell numbers for tissue formation while maintaining the stem cell pool. Embryonic parts of the mammalian placenta are generated from differentiating trophoblast stem cells (TSCs) invading the maternal decidua. Here we demonstrate that lysine-specific demethylase 1 (Lsd1) regulates differentiation onset of TSCs. Deletion of Lsd1 in mice results in the reduction of TSC number, diminished formation of trophectoderm tissues and early embryonic lethality. Lsd1-deficient TSCs display features of differentiation initiation, including alterations of cell morphology, and increased migration and invasion. We show that increased TSC motility is mediated by the premature expression of the transcription factor Ovol2 that is directly repressed by Lsd1 in undifferentiated cells. In summary, our data demonstrate that the epigenetic modifier Lsd1 functions as a gatekeeper for the differentiation onset of TSCs, whereby differentiation-associated cell migration is controlled by the transcription factor Ovol2.

  7. Regulating specific organic substances and heavy metals in industrial wastewater discharged to municipal wastewater treatment plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grüttner, Henrik; Munk, L.; Pedersen, F.;

    1994-01-01

    for sludge intended for use in agriculture, and the quality criteria for the aquatic environment. Proposals for general guidelines have been calculated using a simple mass balance model combined with water quality criteria and the Danish limit values for use of sludge in agriculture.......Due to the extension of wastewater treatment plants to nutrient removal and the development towards reuse of sludge m agriculture, new guidelines for regulating industrial discharges m Denmark were needed. The paper describes how a concept for regulating the discharge of specific organic substances...... degradability, defined by the OECD-test, bio-sorption and bio-accumulation, defined by the octanol/water distribution coefficient and toxic effects on water organisms. Several potential effects of seven heavy metals have been evaluated, and the most critical effects were found to be the quality criteria...

  8. Tetracycline-inducible system for regulation of skeletal muscle-specific gene expression in transgenic mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grill, Mischala A.; Bales, Mark A.; Fought, Amber N.; Rosburg, Kristopher C.; Munger, Stephanie J.; Antin, Parker B.

    2003-01-01

    Tightly regulated control of over-expression is often necessary to study one aspect or time point of gene function and, in transgenesis, may help to avoid lethal effects and complications caused by ubiquitous over-expression. We have utilized the benefits of an optimized tet-on system and a modified muscle creatine kinase (MCK) promoter to generate a skeletal muscle-specific, doxycycline (Dox) controlled over-expression system in transgenic mice. A DNA construct was generated in which the codon optimized reverse tetracycline transactivator (rtTA) was placed under control of a skeletal muscle-specific version of the mouse MCK promoter. Transgenic mice containing this construct expressed rtTA almost exclusively in skeletal muscles. These mice were crossed to a second transgenic line containing a bi-directional promoter centered on a tet responder element driving both a luciferase reporter gene and a tagged gene of interest; in this case the calpain inhibitor calpastatin. Compound hemizygous mice showed high level, Dox dependent muscle-specific luciferase activity often exceeding 10,000-fold over non-muscle tissues of the same mouse. Western and immunocytochemical analysis demonstrated similar Dox dependent muscle-specific induction of the tagged calpastatin protein. These findings demonstrate the effectiveness and flexibility of the tet-on system to provide a tightly regulated over-expression system in adult skeletal muscle. The MCKrtTA transgenic lines can be combined with other transgenic responder lines for skeletal muscle-specific over-expression of any target gene of interest.

  9. Tissue-specific regulation of porcine prolactin receptor expression by estrogen, progesterone, and prolactin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trott, Josephine F; Horigan, Katherine C; Gloviczki, Julia M; Costa, Kristen M; Freking, Bradley A; Farmer, Chantal; Hayashi, Kanako; Spencer, Thomas; Morabito, Joseph E; Hovey, Russell C

    2009-07-01

    Prolactin (PRL) acts through its receptor (PRLR) via both endocrine and local paracrine/autocrine pathways to regulate biological processes including reproduction and lactation. We analyzed the tissue- and stage of gestation-specific regulation of PRL and PRLR expression in various tissues of pigs. Abundance of pPRLR-long form (LF) mRNA increased in the mammary gland and endometrium during gestation while in other tissues it remained constant. There was a parallel increase in the abundance of the pPRLR-LF protein in the mammary gland and endometrium during gestation. We determined the hormonal regulation of pPRLR-LF mRNA expression in various tissues from ovariectomized, hypoprolactinemic gilts given combinations of the replacement hormones estrogen (E(2)), progestin (P), and/or haloperidol-induced PRL. Abundance of pPRLR-LF mRNA in kidney and liver was unaffected by hormone treatments. Expression of uterine pPRLR-LF mRNA was induced by E(2) whereas the effect of E(2) was abolished by co-administering P. The expression of pPRLR-LF mRNA in the mammary gland stroma was induced by PRL, whereas E(2) induced its expression in the epithelium. In contrast to these changes in pPRLR expression, pPRL expression was relatively constant and low during gestation in all tissues except the pituitary. Taken together, these data reveal that specific combinations of E(2), P, and PRL differentially regulate pPRLR-LF expression in the endometrium and mammary glands, and that the action of PRL on its target tissues is dependent upon pPRLR-LF abundance more so than the local PRL expression. PMID:19401343

  10. Cell type-selective disease-association of genes under high regulatory load

    OpenAIRE

    Galhardo, Mafalda Sofia; Berninger, Philipp; Nguyen, Thanh Phuong; Sauter, Thomas; Sinkkonen, Lasse

    2015-01-01

    We previously showed that disease-linked metabolic genes are often under combinatorial regulation. Using the genome-wide ChIP-Seq binding profiles for 93 transcription factors in nine different cell lines, we show that genes under high regulatory load are significantly enriched for disease-association across cell types. We find that transcription factor load correlates with the enhancer load of the genes and thereby allows the identification of genes under high regulatory load by epigenomic m...

  11. Brain-specific interleukin-1 receptor accessory protein in sleep regulation

    OpenAIRE

    Taishi, Ping; Davis, Christopher J.; Bayomy, Omar; Zielinski, Mark R.; Liao, Fan; Clinton, James M.; Smith, Dirk E.; Krueger, James M.

    2011-01-01

    Interleukin (IL)-1β is involved in several brain functions, including sleep regulation. It promotes non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep via the IL-1 type I receptor. IL-1β/IL-1 receptor complex signaling requires adaptor proteins, e.g., the IL-1 receptor brain-specific accessory protein (AcPb). We have cloned and characterized rat AcPb, which shares substantial homologies with mouse AcPb and, compared with AcP, is preferentially expressed in the brain. Furthermore, rat somatosensory cortex Ac...

  12. Shade-induced stem elongation in rice seedlings: Implication of tissue-specific phytohormone regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Huihui; Yang, Chuanwei; Li, Lin

    2016-07-01

    A better understanding of shade avoidance syndrome (SAS) is an urgent need because of its effect on energy reallocation. Leverage-related mechanism in crops is of potential economic interest for agricultural applications. Here we report the SAS phenotype at tissue level rice seedlings. Tissue-specific RNA-sequencing indicates auxin plays different roles between coleoptile and the first leaf. Phenotypes of wild type treated by gibberellin and brassinosteroid biosynthesis inhibitors and of related mutants suggest these two hormones positively regulate SAS. Our work reveals the diversity of hormone responses in different organs and different species in shade conditions. PMID:26888633

  13. Algal dual-specificity tyrosine phosphorylation-regulated kinase, triacylglycerol accumulation regulator1, regulates accumulation of triacylglycerol in nitrogen or sulfur deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kajikawa, Masataka; Sawaragi, Yuri; Shinkawa, Haruka; Yamano, Takashi; Ando, Akira; Kato, Misako; Hirono, Masafumi; Sato, Naoki; Fukuzawa, Hideya

    2015-06-01

    Although microalgae accumulate triacylglycerol (TAG) and starch in response to nutrient-deficient conditions, the regulatory mechanisms are poorly understood. We report here the identification and characterization of a kinase, triacylglycerol accumulation regulator1 (TAR1), that is a member of the yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) Yet another kinase1 (Yak1) subfamily in the dual-specificity tyrosine phosphorylation-regulated kinase family in a green alga (Chlamydomonas reinhardtii). The kinase domain of TAR1 showed auto- and transphosphorylation activities. A TAR1-defective mutant, tar1-1, accumulated TAG to levels 0.5- and 0.1-fold of those of a wild-type strain in sulfur (S)- and nitrogen (N)-deficient conditions, respectively. In N-deficient conditions, tar1-1 showed more pronounced arrest of cell division than the wild type, had increased cell size and cell dry weight, and maintained chlorophyll and photosynthetic activity, which were not observed in S-deficient conditions. In N-deficient conditions, global changes in expression levels of N deficiency-responsive genes in N assimilation and tetrapyrrole metabolism were noted between tar1-1 and wild-type cells. These results indicated that TAR1 is a regulator of TAG accumulation in S- and N-deficient conditions, and it functions in cell growth and repression of photosynthesis in conditions of N deficiency. PMID:25922058

  14. Regulation and specificity of antifungal metapleural gland secretion in leaf-cutting ants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yek, Sze Huei; Nash, David Richard; Jensen, Annette Bruun;

    2012-01-01

    Ants have paired metapleural glands (MGs) to produce secretions for prophylactic hygiene. These exocrine glands are particularly well developed in leaf-cutting ants, but whether the ants can actively regulate MG secretion is unknown. In a set of controlled experiments using conidia of five fungi...... significantly larger for ants challenged with virulent and mild pathogens/weeds than for controls and Escovopsis-challenged ants. We conclude that the MG defence system of leaf-cutting ants has characteristics reminiscent of an additional cuticular immune system, with specific and non-specific components, of......, we show that the ants adjust the amount of MG secretion to the virulence of the fungus with which they are infected. We further applied fixed volumes of MG secretion of ants challenged with constant conidia doses to agar mats of the same fungal species. This showed that inhibition halos were...

  15. Crystal structure of human insulin-regulated aminopeptidase with specificity for cyclic peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermans, Stefan J; Ascher, David B; Hancock, Nancy C; Holien, Jessica K; Michell, Belinda J; Chai, Siew Yeen; Morton, Craig J; Parker, Michael W

    2015-02-01

    Insulin-regulated aminopeptidase (IRAP or oxytocinase) is a membrane-bound zinc-metallopeptidase that cleaves neuroactive peptides in the brain and produces memory enhancing effects when inhibited. We have determined the crystal structure of human IRAP revealing a closed, four domain arrangement with a large, mostly buried cavity abutting the active site. The structure reveals that the GAMEN exopeptidase loop adopts a very different conformation from other aminopeptidases, thus explaining IRAP's unique specificity for cyclic peptides such as oxytocin and vasopressin. Computational docking of a series of IRAP-specific cognitive enhancers into the crystal structure provides a molecular basis for their structure-activity relationships and demonstrates that the structure will be a powerful tool in the development of new classes of cognitive enhancers for treating a variety of memory disorders such as Alzheimer's disease. PMID:25408552

  16. The world merger and acquisition market: economic dimensions and specifics of regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oxana Davydovych

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents a comprehensive analysis of the world mergers and acquisitions (M&A market, describing its stages of evolution and examining the trends and specific features of development at different stages. The author identifies the motives of mergers and acquisitions, determines their impact on the economy, makes an attempt at revealing the main reasons for failed M&A deals, analyzes the specifics of regulating mergers in the European Union countries, and describes their main requirements. The article also evaluates the development of the M&A processes in Central and Eastern Europe, in particular Ukraine. In conclusion, the author offers recommendations for the successful operation of companies after their merger or acquisition and considers the factors of the M&A market’s positive dynamics at the current stage.

  17. Regulation of nucleosome landscape and transcription factor targeting at tissue-specific enhancers by BRG1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Gangqing; Schones, Dustin E.; Cui, Kairong; Ybarra, River; Northrup, Daniel; Tang, Qingsong; Gattinoni, Luca; Restifo, Nicholas P.; Huang, Suming; Zhao, Keji

    2011-01-01

    Enhancers of transcription activate transcription via binding of sequence-specific transcription factors to their target sites in chromatin. In this report, we identify GATA1-bound distal sites genome-wide and find a global reorganization of the nucleosomes at these potential enhancers during differentiation of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) to erythrocytes. We show that the catalytic subunit BRG1 of BAF complexes localizes to these distal sites during differentiation and generates a longer nucleosome linker region surrounding the GATA1 sites by shifting the flanking nucleosomes away. Intriguingly, we find that the nucleosome shifting specifically facilitates binding of TAL1 but not GATA1 and is linked to subsequent transcriptional regulation of target genes. PMID:21795385

  18. Distinct and histone-specific modifications mediate positive versus negative transcriptional regulation of TSHalpha promoter.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongqing Wang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Hormonally-regulated histone modifications that govern positive versus negative transcription of target genes are poorly characterized despite their importance for normal and pathological endocrine function. There have been only a few studies examining chromatin modifications on target gene promoters by nuclear hormone receptors. Moreover, these studies have focused on positively-regulated target genes. TSHalpha, a heterodimer partner for thyrotropin (TSH, is secreted by the pituitary gland. T(3 negatively regulates TSHalpha gene expression via thyroid hormone receptors (TRs which belong to the nuclear hormone receptor superfamily, whereas thyrotropin releasing hormone (TRH positively regulates via the TRH receptor, a G protein-coupled receptor. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We studied regulation of the TSHalpha gene by cAMP and T(3 using chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP assays in stably-transfected rat pituitary cells containing the human TSHalpha promoter. Interestingly, cAMP selectively increased histone H4 acetylation whereas, as previously reported, T(3 induced histone H3 acetylation. In particular, cAMP increased H4K5 and H4K8 acetylation and decreased H4K20 trimethylation, modifications associated with transcriptional activation. T(3 increased H3K9 and H3K18 acetylation and H3K4 trimethylation; however, it also decreased H3K27 acetylation and increased H3K27 trimethylation which are associated with transcriptional repression. Of note, cAMP recruited pCREB, CBP/p300, and PCAF to the promoter whereas T(3 caused dissociation of NCoR/SMRT and HDAC3. Overexpression of a dominant negative mutant thyroid hormone receptor (TR from a patient with resistance to thyroid hormone (RTH led to less T(3-dependent negative regulation and partially blocked histone H3 modifications of the TSHalpha promoter. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our findings show that non-overlapping and specific histone modifications determine positive versus negative

  19. Planar cell polarity effector gene Intu regulates cell fate-specific differentiation of keratinocytes through the primary cilia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, D; Li, L; Huebner, A; Zeng, H; Guevara, E; Claypool, D J; Liu, A; Chen, J

    2013-01-01

    Genes involved in the planar cell polarity (PCP) signaling pathway are essential for a number of developmental processes in mammals, such as convergent extension and ciliogenesis. Tissue-specific PCP effector genes of the PCP signaling pathway are believed to mediate PCP signals in a tissue- and cell type-specific manner. However, how PCP signaling controls the morphogenesis of mammalian tissues remains unclear. In this study, we investigated the role of inturned (Intu), a tissue-specific PCP effector gene, during hair follicle formation in mice. Tissue-specific disruption of Intu in embryonic epidermis resulted in hair follicle morphogenesis arrest because of the failure of follicular keratinocyte to differentiate. Targeting Intu in the epidermis resulted in almost complete loss of primary cilia in epidermal and follicular keratinocytes, and a suppressed hedgehog signaling pathway. Surprisingly, the epidermal stratification and differentiation programs and barrier function were not affected. These results demonstrate that tissue-specific PCP effector genes of the PCP signaling pathway control the differentiation of keratinocytes through the primary cilia in a cell fate- and context-dependent manner, which may be critical in orchestrating the propagation and interpretation of polarity signals established by the core PCP components. PMID:22935613

  20. Specific microRNAs regulate heat stress responses in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nehammer, Camilla; Podolska, Agnieszka; Mackowiak, Sebastian D; Kagias, Konstantinos; Pocock, Roger

    2015-01-01

    The ability of animals to sense and respond to elevated temperature is essential for survival. Transcriptional control of the heat stress response has been much studied, whereas its posttranscriptional regulation by microRNAs (miRNAs) is not well understood. Here we analyzed the miRNA response to heat stress in Caenorhabditis elegans and show that a discrete subset of miRNAs is thermoregulated. Using in-depth phenotypic analyses of miRNA deletion mutant strains we reveal multiple developmental and post-developmental survival and behavioral functions for specific miRNAs during heat stress. We have identified additional functions for already known players (mir-71 and mir-239) as well as identifying mir-80 and the mir-229 mir-64-66 cluster as important regulators of the heat stress response in C. elegans. These findings uncover an additional layer of complexity to the regulation of stress signaling that enables animals to robustly respond to the changing environment. PMID:25746291

  1. A Hypoxia-Regulated Adeno-Associated Virus Vector for Cancer-Specific Gene Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hangjun Ruan

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The presence of hypoxic cells in human brain tumors is an important factor leading to resistance to radiation therapy. However, this physiological difference between normal tissues and tumors also provides the potential for designing cancer-specific gene therapy. We compared the increase of gene expression under anoxia (<0.01% oxygen produced by 3, 6, and 9 copies of hypoxia-responsive elements (HRE from the erythropoietin gene (Epo, which are activated through the transcriptional complex hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1. Under anoxic conditions, nine copies of HIRE (9XHRE yielded 27- to 37-fold of increased gene expression in U-251 MG and U-87 MG human brain tumor cell lines. Under the less hypoxic conditions of 0.3% and 1% oxygen, gene activation by 9XHRE increased expression 11- to 18-fold in these cell lines. To generate a recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV in which the transgene can be regulated by hypoxia, we inserted the DNA fragment containing 9XHRE and the LacZ reporter gene into an AAV vector. Under anoxic conditions, this vector produced 79- to 110-fold increase in gene expression. We believe this hypoxia-regulated rAAV vector will provide a useful delivery vehicle for cancer-specific gene therapy.

  2. Light-specific transcriptional regulation of the accumulation of carotenoids and phenolic compounds in rice leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohanty, Bijayalaxmi; Lakshmanan, Meiyappan; Lim, Sun-Hyung; Kim, Jae Kwang; Ha, Sun-Hwa; Lee, Dong-Yup

    2016-06-01

    Carotenoids and phenolic compounds are important subgroups of secondary metabolites having an array of functional roles in the growth and development of plants. They are also major sources for health and pharmaceutical benefits, and industrially relevant biochemicals. The control of the biosynthesis of these compounds depends mainly on the quality and quantity of different light sources. Thus, to unravel their light-specific transcriptional regulation in rice leaves, we performed promoter analysis of genes upregulated in response to blue and red lights. The analysis results suggested a crosstalk between different phytohormones and the involvement of key transcription factors such as bHLH, bZIP, MYB, WRKY, ZnF and ERF [jasmonic acid inducible], in the regulation of higher accumulation of carotenoids and phenolic compounds upon blue light. Overall, the current analysis could improve our understanding of the light-specific regulatory mechanism involved in the biosynthesis of secondary metabolites via possible critical links between different TFs in rice leaves. PMID:27172458

  3. PPP1, a plant-specific regulator of transcription controls Arabidopsis development and PIN expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benjamins, René; Barbez, Elke; Ortbauer, Martina; Terpstra, Inez; Lucyshyn, Doris; Moulinier-Anzola, Jeanette; Khan, Muhammad Asaf; Leitner, Johannes; Malenica, Nenad; Butt, Haroon; Korbei, Barbara; Scheres, Ben; Kleine-Vehn, Jürgen; Luschnig, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Directional transport of auxin is essential for plant development, with PIN auxin transport proteins representing an integral part of the machinery that controls hormone distribution. However, unlike the rapidly emerging framework of molecular determinants regulating PIN protein abundance and subcellular localization, insights into mechanisms controlling PIN transcription are still limited. Here we describe PIN2 PROMOTER BINDING PROTEIN 1 (PPP1), an evolutionary conserved plant-specific DNA binding protein that acts on transcription of PIN genes. Consistent with PPP1 DNA-binding activity, PPP1 reporter proteins are nuclear localized and analysis of PPP1 null alleles and knockdown lines indicated a function as a positive regulator of PIN expression. Furthermore, we show that ppp1 pleiotropic mutant phenotypes are partially reverted by PIN overexpression, and results are presented that underline a role of PPP1-PIN promoter interaction in PIN expression control. Collectively, our findings identify an elementary, thus far unknown, plant-specific DNA-binding protein required for post-embryonic plant development, in general, and correct expression of PIN genes, in particular. PMID:27553690

  4. A Hypoxia-Regulated Adeno-Associated Virus Vector for Cancer-Specific Gene Therapy1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruan, Hangjun; Su, Hua; Hu, Lily; Lamborn, Kathleen R; Kan, YW; Deen, Dennis F

    2001-01-01

    Abstract The presence of hypoxic cells in human brain tumors is an important factor leading to resistance to radiation therapy. However, this physiological difference between normal tissues and tumors also provides the potential for designing cancer-specific gene therapy. We compared the increase of gene expression under anoxia (<0.01% oxygen) produced by 3, 6, and 9 copies of hypoxia-responsive elements (HRE) from the erythropoietin gene (Epo), which are activated through the transcriptional complex hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1). Under anoxic conditions, nine copies of HRE (9XHRE) yielded 27- to 37-fold of increased gene expression in U-251 MG and U-87 MG human brain tumor cell lines. Under the less hypoxic conditions of 0.3% and 1% oxygen, gene activation by 9XHRE increased expression 11- to 18-fold in these cell lines. To generate a recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) in which the transgene can be regulated by hypoxia, we inserted the DNA fragment containing 9XHRE and the LacZ reporter gene into an AAV vector. Under anoxic conditions, this vector produced 79- to 110-fold increase in gene expression. We believe this hypoxia-regulated rAAV vector will provide a useful delivery vehicle for cancer-specific gene therapy. PMID:11494119

  5. Regulation of platelet activating factor receptor coupled phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morrison, W.J.

    1988-01-01

    The major objectives of this study were two-fold. The first was to establish whether binding of platelet activating factor (PAF) to its receptor was integral to the stimulation of polyphosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C (PLC) in rabbit platelets. The second was to determine regulatory features of this receptor-coupled mechanism. ({sup 3}H)PAF binding demonstrated two binding sites, a high affinity site with a inhibitory constant (Ki) of 2.65 nM and a low affinity site with a Ki of 0.80 {mu}M. PAF receptor coupled activation of phosphoinositide-specific PLC was studied in platelets which were made refractory, by short term pretreatments, to either PAF or thrombin. Saponin-permeabilized rabbit platelets continue to regulate the mechanism(s) coupling PAF receptors to PLC stimulation. However, TRP{gamma}S and GDP{beta}S, which affect guanine nucleotide regulatory protein functions, were unable to modulate the PLC activity to any appreciable extent as compared to PAF. The possible involvement of protein kinase C (PKC) activation in regulating PAF-stimulated PLC activity was studied in rabbit platelets pretreated with staurosporine followed by pretreatments with PAF or phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA).

  6. Discovery of a Family of Genomic Sequences Which Interact Specifically with the c-MYC Promoter to Regulate c-MYC Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Shelia D.; Rouchka, Eric C.; Miller, Donald M.

    2016-01-01

    G-quadruplex forming sequences are particularly enriched in the promoter regions of eukaryotic genes, especially of oncogenes. One of the most well studied G-quadruplex forming sequences is located in the nuclease hypersensitive element (NHE) III1 of the c-MYC promoter region. The oncoprotein c-MYC regulates a large array of genes which play important roles in growth regulation and metabolism. It is dysregulated in >70% of human cancers. The silencer NHEIII1 located upstream of the P1 promoter regulates up-to 80% of c-MYC transcription and includes a G-quadruplex structure (Pu27) that is required for promoter inhibition. We have identified, for the first time, a family of seventeen G-quadruplex-forming motifs with >90% identity with Pu27, located on different chromosomes throughout the human genome, some found near or within genes involved in stem cell maintenance or neural cell development. Notably, all members of the Pu27 family interact specifically with NHEIII1 sequence, in vitro. Crosslinking studies demonstrate that Pu27 oligonucleotide binds specifically to the C-rich strand of the NHEIII1 resulting in the G-quadruplex structure stabilization. Pu27 homologous sequences (Pu27-HS) significantly inhibit leukemic cell lines proliferation in culture. Exposure of U937 cells to the Pu27-HS induces cell growth inhibition associated with cell cycle arrest that is most likely due to downregulation of c-MYC expression at the RNA and/or protein levels. Expression of SOX2, another gene containing a Pu27-HS, was affected by Pu27-HS treatment as well. Our data suggest that the oligonucleotides encoding the Pu27 family target complementary DNA sequences in the genome, including those of the c-MYC and SOX2 promoters. This effect is most likely cell type and cell growth condition dependent. The presence of genomic G-quadruplex-forming sequences homologous to Pu27 of c-MYC silencer and the fact that they interact specifically with the parent sequence suggest a common

  7. Arabidopsis ETO1 specifically interacts with and negatively regulates type 2 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate synthases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saito Koji

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Arabidopsis, ETO1 (ETHYLENE-OVERPRODUCER1 is a negative regulator of ethylene evolution by interacting with AtACS5, an isoform of the rate-limiting enzyme, 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate synthases (ACC synthase or ACS, in ethylene biosynthetic pathway. ETO1 directly inhibits the enzymatic activity of AtACS5. In addition, a specific interaction between ETO1 and AtCUL3, a constituent of a new type of E3 ubiquitin ligase complex, suggests the molecular mechanism in promoting AtACS5 degradation by the proteasome-dependent pathway. Because orthologous sequences to ETO1 are found in many plant species including tomato, we transformed tomato with Arabidopsis ETO1 to evaluate its ability to suppress ethylene production in tomato fruits. Results Transgenic tomato lines that overexpress Arabidopsis ETO1 (ETO1-OE did not show a significant delay of fruit ripening. So, we performed yeast two-hybrid assays to investigate potential heterologous interaction between ETO1 and three isozymes of ACC synthases from tomato. In the yeast two-hybrid system, ETO1 interacts with LE-ACS3 as well as AtACS5 but not with LE-ACS2 or LE-ACS4, two major isozymes whose gene expression is induced markedly in ripening fruits. According to the classification of ACC synthases, which is based on the C-terminal amino acid sequences, both LE-ACS3 and AtACS5 are categorized as type 2 isozymes and possess a consensus C-terminal sequence. In contrast, LE-ACS2 and LE-ACS4 are type 1 and type 3 isozymes, respectively, both of which do not possess this specific C-terminal sequence. Yeast two-hybrid analysis using chimeric constructs between LE-ACS2 and LE-ACS3 revealed that the type-2-ACS-specific C-terminal tail is required for interaction with ETO1. When treated with auxin to induce LE-ACS3, seedlings of ETO1-OE produced less ethylene than the wild type, despite comparable expression of the LE-ACS3 gene in the wild type. Conclusion These results suggest that ETO1

  8. AMPK regulates circadian rhythms in a tissue- and isoform-specific manner.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jee-Hyun Um

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: AMP protein kinase (AMPK plays an important role in food intake and energy metabolism, which are synchronized to the light-dark cycle. In vitro, AMPK affects the circadian rhythm by regulating at least two clock components, CKIα and CRY1, via direct phosphorylation. However, it is not known whether the catalytic activity of AMPK actually regulates circadian rhythm in vivo. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDING: THE CATALYTIC SUBUNIT OF AMPK HAS TWO ISOFORMS: α1 and α2. We investigate the circadian rhythm of behavior, physiology and gene expression in AMPKα1-/- and AMPKα2-/- mice. We found that both α1-/- and α2-/- mice are able to maintain a circadian rhythm of activity in dark-dark (DD cycle, but α1-/- mice have a shorter circadian period whereas α2-/- mice showed a tendency toward a slightly longer circadian period. Furthermore, the circadian rhythm of body temperature was dampened in α1-/- mice, but not in α2-/- mice. The circadian pattern of core clock gene expression was severely disrupted in fat in α1-/- mice, but it was severely disrupted in the heart and skeletal muscle of α2-/- mice. Interestingly, other genes that showed circadian pattern of expression were dysreguated in both α1-/- and α2-/- mice. The circadian rhythm of nicotinamide phosphoryl-transferase (NAMPT activity, which converts nicotinamide (NAM to NAD+, is an important regulator of the circadian clock. We found that the NAMPT rhythm was absent in AMPK-deficient tissues and cells. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: This study demonstrates that the catalytic activity of AMPK regulates circadian rhythm of behavior, energy metabolism and gene expression in isoform- and tissue-specific manners.

  9. The Effects of Goal Specificity and Scaffolding on Programming Performance and Self-Regulation in Game Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Chia-Yen; Chen, Ming-Puu

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of goal specificity and scaffolding on the programming performance and self-regulation of elementary students engaged in learning game design. This study recruited 232 students for the experimental activities. Two levels of goal specificity were employed: specific and nonspecific.…

  10. Gene expression changes in the tyrosine metabolic pathway regulate caste-specific cuticular pigmentation of termites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuoka, Yudai; Maekawa, Kiyoto

    2016-07-01

    In social insects, all castes have characteristic phenotypes suitable for their own tasks and to engage in social behavior. The acquisition of caste-specific phenotypes was a key event in the course of social insect evolution. However, understanding of the genetic basis and the developmental mechanisms that produce these phenotypes is still very limited. In particular, termites normally possess more than two castes with specific phenotypes (i.e. workers, soldiers, and reproductives), but proximate developmental mechanisms are far from being fully understood. In this study, we focused on the pigmentation of the cuticle as a model trait for caste-specific phenotypes, during the molts of each caste; workers, soldiers, presoldiers (intermediate stage of soldiers), and alates (primary reproductives) in Zootermopsis nevadensis. Expression patterns of cuticular tanning genes (members of the tyrosine metabolic pathway) were different among each molt, and high expression levels of several "key genes" were observed during each caste differentiation. For the differentiation of castes with well-tanned cuticles (i.e. soldiers and alates), all focal genes except DDC in the former were highly expressed. On the other hand, high expression levels of yellow and aaNAT were observed during worker and presoldier molts, respectively, but most other genes in the pathway were expressed at low levels. RNA interference (RNAi) of these key genes affected caste-specific cuticular pigmentation, leading to soldiers with yellowish-white heads and pigmented mandibular tips, presoldiers with partly pigmented head cuticles, and alates with the yellow head capsules. These results suggest that the pigmentation of caste-specific cuticles is achieved by the regulation of gene expression in the tyrosine metabolic pathway. PMID:27125584

  11. Genotype-specific regulation of oral innate immunity by T2R38 taste receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil, Sucheol; Coldwell, Susan; Drury, Jeanie L; Arroyo, Fabiola; Phi, Tran; Saadat, Sanaz; Kwong, Danny; Chung, Whasun Oh

    2015-12-01

    The bitter taste receptor T2R38 has been shown to regulate mucosal innate immune responses in the upper airway epithelium. Furthermore, SNPs in T2R38 influence the sensitivity to 6-n-propylthiouracil (PROP) and are associated with caries risk/protection. However, no study has been reported on the role of T2R38 in the innate immune responses to oral bacteria. We hypothesize that T2R38 regulates oral innate immunity and that this regulation is genotype-specific. Primary gingival epithelial cells carrying three common genotypes, PAV/PAV (PROP super-taster), AVI/PAV (intermediate) and AVI/AVI (non-taster) were stimulated with cariogenic bacteria Streptococcus mutans, periodontal pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis or non-pathogen Fusobacterium nucleatum. QRT-PCR analyzed T2R38 mRNA, and T2R38-specific siRNA and ELISA were utilized to evaluate induction of hBD-2 (antimicrobial peptide), IL-1α and IL-8 in various donor-lines. Experiments were set up in duplicate and repeated three times. T2R38 mRNA induction in response to S. mutans was highest in PAV/PAV (4.3-fold above the unstimulated controls; p<0.05), while lowest in AVI/AVI (1.2-fold). In PAV/PAV, hBD-2 secretion in response to S. mutans was decreased by 77% when T2R38 was silenced. IL-1α secretion was higher in PAV/PAV compared to AVI/PAV or AVI/AVI with S. mutans stimulation, but it was reduced by half when T2R38 was silenced (p<0.05). In response to P. gingivalis, AVI/AVI showed 4.4-fold increase (p<0.05) in T2R38 expression, whereas the levels in PAV/PAV and AVI/PAV remained close to that of the controls. Secretion levels of IL-1α and IL-8 decreased in AVI/AVI in response to P. gingivalis when T2R38 was silenced (p<0.05), while the changes were not significant in PAV/PAV. Our data suggest that the regulation of gingival innate immunity by T2R38 is genotype-dependent and that the ability to induce a high level of hBD-2 by PAV/PAV carriers may be a reason for protection against caries in this group. PMID

  12. Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator intracellular processing, trafficking, and opportunities for mutation-specific treatment.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Rogan, Mark P

    2012-02-01

    Recent advances in basic science have greatly expanded our understanding of the cystic fibrosis (CF) transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), the chloride and bicarbonate channel that is encoded by the gene, which is mutated in patients with CF. We review the structure, function, biosynthetic processing, and intracellular trafficking of CFTR and discuss the five classes of mutations and their impact on the CF phenotype. The therapeutic discussion is focused on the significant progress toward CFTR mutation-specific therapies. We review the results of encouraging clinical trials examining orally administered therapeutics, including agents that promote read-through of class I mutations (premature termination codons); correctors, which overcome the CFTR misfolding that characterizes the common class II mutation F508del; and potentiators, which enhance the function of class III or IV mutated CFTR at the plasma membrane. Long-term outcomes from successful mutation-specific treatments could finally answer the question that has been lingering since and even before the CFTR gene discovery: Will therapies that specifically restore CFTR-mediated chloride secretion slow or arrest the deleterious cascade of events leading to chronic infection, bronchiectasis, and end-stage lung disease?

  13. METHOD FOR AUTOMATIC ANALYSIS OF WHEAT STRAW PULP CELL TYPES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikko Karjalainen,

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Agricultural residues are receiving increasing interest when studying renewable raw materials for industrial use. Residues, generally referred to as nonwood materials, are usually complex materials. Wheat straw is one of the most abundant agricultural residues around the world and is therefore available for extensive industrial use. However, more information of its cell types is needed to utilize wheat straw efficiently in pulp and papermaking. The pulp cell types and particle dimensions of wheat straw were studied, using an optical microscope and an automatic optical fibre analyzer. The role of various cell types in wheat straw pulp and papermaking is discussed. Wheat straw pulp components were categorized according to particle morphology and categorization with an automatic optical analyzer was used to determine wheat straw pulp cell types. The results from automatic optical analysis were compared to those with microscopic analysis and a good correlation was found. Automatic optical analysis was found to be a promising tool for the in-depth analysis of wheat straw pulp cell types.

  14. SPECIFIC REGULATIONS REGARDING THE SOLVING OF LABOR DISPUTES IN ROMANIAN LEGAL SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Onica -Chipea Lavinia

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper aims to briefly review specific provisions of labor legislation for the solving of labor disputes. Those rules are found in matters of discrimination in the payment settlements, the public sector staff as well as some personnel status or disciplinary (work stops at Status of Teachers and established a derogationfrom the common law (Labor Code Law nr.62/2011 of Social Dialogue in resolving individual labor conflicts(former conflicts of rights. The role and importance of these regulations is that they give the parties the employment relationship, particularly employees, way, way more for rights enshrined in law. Appeals, complaints or expressions of individual grievances be settled outside the judicial system organ (the courts,authorizing officers, judicial administrative organs, which aim at restoring order violated.

  15. Regulatory Networks that Direct the Development of Specialized Cell Types in the Drosophila Heart

    OpenAIRE

    Lovato, TyAnna L.; Cripps, Richard M.

    2016-01-01

    The Drosophila cardiac tube was once thought to be a simple linear structure, however research over the past 15 years has revealed significant cellular and molecular complexity to this organ. Prior reviews have focused upon the gene regulatory networks responsible for the specification of the cardiac field and the activation of cardiac muscle structural genes. Here we focus upon highlighting the existence, function, and development of unique cell types within the dorsal vessel, and discuss th...

  16. Laser Microdissection of Grapevine Leaves Reveals Site-Specific Regulation of Transcriptional Response to Plasmopara viticola.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenzi, Luisa; Caruso, Carla; Bianchedi, Pier Luigi; Pertot, Ilaria; Perazzolli, Michele

    2016-01-01

    Grapevine is one of the most important fruit crops in the world, and it is highly susceptible to downy mildew caused by the biotrophic oomycete Plasmopara viticola. Gene expression profiling has been used extensively to investigate the regulation processes of grapevine-P. viticola interaction, but all studies to date have involved the use of whole leaves. However, only a small fraction of host cells is in contact with the pathogen, so highly localized transcriptional changes of infected cells may be masked by the large portion of non-infected cells when analyzing the whole leaf. In order to understand the transcriptional regulation of the plant reaction at the sites of pathogen infection, we optimized a laser microdissection protocol and analyzed the transcriptional changes in stomata cells and surrounding areas of grapevine leaves at early stages of P. viticola infection. The results indicate that the expression levels of seven P. viticola-responsive genes were greater in microdissected cells than in whole leaves, highlighting the site-specific transcriptional regulation of the host response. The gene modulation was restricted to the stomata cells and to the surrounding areas of infected tissues, indicating that the host response is mainly located at the infection sites and that short-distance signals are implicated. In addition, due to the high sensitivity of the laser microdissection technique, significant modulations of three genes that were completely masked in the whole tissue analysis were detected. The protocol validated in this study could greatly increase the sensitivity of further transcriptomic studies of the grapevine-P. viticola interaction. PMID:26546320

  17. Nuclear factor 1 regulates adipose tissue-specific expression in the mouse GLUT4 gene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Previous studies demonstrated that an adipose tissue-specific element(s) (ASE) of the murine GLUT4 gene is located between -551 and -506 in the 5'-flanking sequence and that a high-fat responsive element(s) for down-regulation of the GLUT4 gene is located between bases -701 and -552. A binding site for nuclear factor 1 (NF1), that mediates insulin and cAMP-induced repression of GLUT4 in 3T3-L1 adipocytes is located between bases -700 and -688. To examine the role of NF1 in the regulation of GLUT4 gene expression in white adipose tissues (WAT) in vivo, we created two types of transgenic mice harboring mutated either 5' or 3' half-site of NF1-binding sites in GLUT4 minigene constructs. In both cases, the GLUT4 minigene was not expressed in WAT, while expression was maintained in brown adipose tissue, skeletal muscle, and heart. This was an unexpected finding, since a -551 GLUT4 minigene that did not have the NF1-binding site was expressed in WAT. We propose a model that explains the requirement for both the ASE and the NF1-binding site for expression of GLUT4 in WAT

  18. Dealing with feeling: Specific emotion regulation skills predict responses to stress in psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lincoln, Tania M; Hartmann, Maike; Köther, Ulf; Moritz, Steffen

    2015-08-15

    Elevated negative affect is an established link between minor stressors and psychotic symptoms. Less clear is why people with psychosis fail to regulate distressing emotions effectively. This study tests whether subjective, psychophysiological and symptomatic responses to stress can be predicted by specific emotion regulation (ER) difficulties. Participants with psychotic disorders (n=35) and healthy controls (n=28) were assessed for ER-skills at baseline. They were then exposed to a noise versus no stressor on different days, during which self-reported stress responses, state paranoia and skin conductance levels (SCL) were assessed. Participants with psychosis showed a stronger increase in self-reported stress and SCL in response to the stressor than healthy controls. Stronger increases in self-reported stress were predicted by a reduced ability to be aware of and tolerate distressing emotions, whereas increases in SCL were predicted by a reduced ability to be aware of, tolerate, accept and modify them. Although paranoid symptoms were not significantly affected by the stressors, individual variation in paranoid responses was also predicted by a reduced ability to be aware of and tolerate emotions. Differences in stress responses in the samples were no longer significant after controlling for ER skills. Thus, interventions that improve ER-skills could reduce stress-sensitivity in psychosis. PMID:26001960

  19. Disruption of mouse Slx4, a regulator of structure-specific nucleases, phenocopies Fanconi anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crossan, Gerry P; van der Weyden, Louise; Rosado, Ivan V; Langevin, Frederic; Gaillard, Pierre-Henri L; McIntyre, Rebecca E; Gallagher, Ferdia; Kettunen, Mikko I; Lewis, David Y; Brindle, Kevin; Arends, Mark J; Adams, David J; Patel, Ketan J

    2011-02-01

    The evolutionarily conserved SLX4 protein, a key regulator of nucleases, is critical for DNA damage response. SLX4 nuclease complexes mediate repair during replication and can also resolve Holliday junctions formed during homologous recombination. Here we describe the phenotype of the Btbd12 knockout mouse, the mouse ortholog of SLX4, which recapitulates many key features of the human genetic illness Fanconi anemia. Btbd12-deficient animals are born at sub-Mendelian ratios, have greatly reduced fertility, are developmentally compromised and are prone to blood cytopenias. Btbd12(-/-) cells prematurely senesce, spontaneously accumulate damaged chromosomes and are particularly sensitive to DNA crosslinking agents. Genetic complementation reveals a crucial requirement for Btbd12 (also known as Slx4) to interact with the structure-specific endonuclease Xpf-Ercc1 to promote crosslink repair. The Btbd12 knockout mouse therefore establishes a disease model for Fanconi anemia and genetically links a regulator of nuclease incision complexes to the Fanconi anemia DNA crosslink repair pathway. PMID:21240276

  20. Mechanisms regulating nutrition-dependent developmental plasticity through organ-specific effects in insects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ChristenKerryMirth

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Nutrition, via the insulin/insulin-like growth factor (IIS/Target of Rapamycin (TOR signaling pathway, can provide a strong molding force for determining animal size and shape. For instance, nutrition induces a disproportionate increase in the size of male horns in dung and rhinoceros beetles, or mandibles in staghorn or horned flour beetles, relative to body size. In these species, well-fed male larvae produce adults with greatly enlarged horns or mandibles, whereas males that are starved or poorly fed as larvae bear much more modest appendages. Changes in IIS/TOR signaling plays a key role in appendage development by regulating growth in the horn and mandible primordia. In contrast, changes the IIS/TOR pathway produces minimal effects on the size of other adult structures, such as the male genitalia in fruit flies and dung beetles. The horn, mandible and genitalia illustrate that although all tissues are exposed to the same hormonal environment within the larval body, the extent to which insulin can induce growth is organ specific. In addition, the IIS/TOR pathway affects body size and shape by controlling production of metamorphic hormones important for regulating developmental timing, like the steroid molting hormone ecdysone and sesquiterpenoid hormone juvenile hormone. In this review, we discuss recent results from Drosophila and other insects that highlight mechanisms allowing tissues to differ in their sensitivity to IIS/TOR and the potential consequences of these differences on body size and shape.

  1. Novel Kidins220/ARMS Splice Isoforms: Potential Specific Regulators of Neuronal and Cardiovascular Development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathalie Schmieg

    Full Text Available Kidins220/ARMS is a transmembrane protein playing a crucial role in neuronal and cardiovascular development. Kidins220/ARMS is a downstream target of neurotrophin receptors and interacts with several signalling and trafficking factors. Through computational modelling, we found two potential sites for alternative splicing of Kidins220/ARMS. The first is located between exon 24 and exon 29, while the second site replaces exon 32 by a short alternative terminal exon 33. Here we describe the conserved occurrence of several Kidins220/ARMS splice isoforms at RNA and protein levels. Kidins220/ARMS splice isoforms display spatio-temporal regulation during development with distinct patterns in different neuronal populations. Neurotrophin receptor stimulation in cortical and hippocampal neurons and neuroendocrine cells induces specific Kidins220/ARMS splice isoforms and alters the appearance kinetics of the full-length transcript. Remarkably, alternative terminal exon splicing generates Kidins220/ARMS variants with distinct cellular localisation: Kidins220/ARMS containing exon 32 is targeted to the plasma membrane and neurite tips, whereas Kidins220/ARMS without exon 33 mainly clusters the full-length protein in a perinuclear intracellular compartment in PC12 cells and primary neurons, leading to a change in neurotrophin receptor expression. Overall, this study demonstrates the existence of novel Kidins220/ARMS splice isoforms with unique properties, revealing additional complexity in the functional regulation of neurotrophin receptors, and potentially other signalling pathways involved in neuronal and cardiovascular development.

  2. Ligand-specific sequential regulation of transcription factors for differentiation of MCF-7 cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toyoda Tetsuro

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sharing a common ErbB/HER receptor signaling pathway, heregulin (HRG induces differentiation of MCF-7 human breast cancer cells while epidermal growth factor (EGF elicits proliferation. Although cell fates resulting from action of the aforementioned ligands completely different, the respective gene expression profiles in early transcription are qualitatively similar, suggesting that gene expression during late transcription, but not early transcription, may reflect ligand specificity. In this study, based on both the data from time-course quantitative real-time PCR on over 2,000 human transcription factors and microarray of all human genes, we identified a series of transcription factors which may control HRG-specific late transcription in MCF-7 cells. Results We predicted that four transcription factors including EGR4, FRA-1, FHL2, and DIPA should have responsibility of regulation in MCF-7 cell differentiation. Validation analysis suggested that one member of the activator protein 1 (AP-1 family, FOSL-1 (FRA-1 gene, appeared immediately following c-FOS expression, might be responsible for expression of transcription factor FHL2 through activation of the AP-1 complex. Furthermore, RNAi gene silencing of FOSL-1 and FHL2 resulted in increase of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK phosphorylation of which duration was sustained by HRG stimulation. Conclusion Our analysis indicated that a time-dependent transcriptional regulatory network including c-FOS, FRA-1, and FHL2 is vital in controlling the ERK signaling pathway through a negative feedback loop for MCF-7 cell differentiation.

  3. Computational neuroanatomy: mapping cell-type densities in the mouse brain, simulations from the Allen Brain Atlas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grange, Pascal

    2015-09-01

    The Allen Brain Atlas of the adult mouse (ABA) consists of digitized expression profiles of thousands of genes in the mouse brain, co-registered to a common three-dimensional template (the Allen Reference Atlas).This brain-wide, genome-wide data set has triggered a renaissance in neuroanatomy. Its voxelized version (with cubic voxels of side 200 microns) is available for desktop computation in MATLAB. On the other hand, brain cells exhibit a great phenotypic diversity (in terms of size, shape and electrophysiological activity), which has inspired the names of some well-studied cell types, such as granule cells and medium spiny neurons. However, no exhaustive taxonomy of brain cell is available. A genetic classification of brain cells is being undertaken, and some cell types have been chraracterized by their transcriptome profiles. However, given a cell type characterized by its transcriptome, it is not clear where else in the brain similar cells can be found. The ABA can been used to solve this region-specificity problem in a data-driven way: rewriting the brain-wide expression profiles of all genes in the atlas as a sum of cell-type-specific transcriptome profiles is equivalent to solving a quadratic optimization problem at each voxel in the brain. However, the estimated brain-wide densities of 64 cell types published recently were based on one series of co-registered coronal in situ hybridization (ISH) images per gene, whereas the online ABA contains several image series per gene, including sagittal ones. In the presented work, we simulate the variability of cell-type densities in a Monte Carlo way by repeatedly drawing a random image series for each gene and solving the optimization problem. This yields error bars on the region-specificity of cell types.

  4. Skeletal muscle gene expression in response to resistance exercise: sex specific regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burant Charles F

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The molecular mechanisms underlying the sex differences in human muscle morphology and function remain to be elucidated. The sex differences in the skeletal muscle transcriptome in both the resting state and following anabolic stimuli, such as resistance exercise (RE, might provide insight to the contributors of sexual dimorphism of muscle phenotypes. We used microarrays to profile the transcriptome of the biceps brachii of young men and women who underwent an acute unilateral RE session following 12 weeks of progressive training. Bilateral muscle biopsies were obtained either at an early (4 h post-exercise or late recovery (24 h post-exercise time point. Muscle transcription profiles were compared in the resting state between men (n = 6 and women (n = 8, and in response to acute RE in trained exercised vs. untrained non-exercised control muscle for each sex and time point separately (4 h post-exercise, n = 3 males, n = 4 females; 24 h post-exercise, n = 3 males, n = 4 females. A logistic regression-based method (LRpath, following Bayesian moderated t-statistic (IMBT, was used to test gene functional groups and biological pathways enriched with differentially expressed genes. Results This investigation identified extensive sex differences present in the muscle transcriptome at baseline and following acute RE. In the resting state, female muscle had a greater transcript abundance of genes involved in fatty acid oxidation and gene transcription/translation processes. After strenuous RE at the same relative intensity, the time course of the transcriptional modulation was sex-dependent. Males experienced prolonged changes while females exhibited a rapid restoration. Most of the biological processes involved in the RE-induced transcriptional regulation were observed in both males and females, but sex specificity was suggested for several signaling pathways including activation of notch signaling and TGF-beta signaling in females

  5. Regulation of endothelial-specific transgene expression by the LacI repressor protein in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan K Morton

    Full Text Available Genetically modified mice have played an important part in elucidating gene function in vivo. However, conclusions from transgenic studies may be compromised by complications arising from the site of transgene integration into the genome and, in inducible systems, the non-innocuous nature of inducer molecules. The aim of the present study was to use the vascular system to validate a technique based on the bacterial lac operon system, in which transgene expression can be repressed and de-repressed by an innocuous lactose analogue, IPTG. We have modified an endothelium specific promoter (TIE2 with synthetic LacO sequences and made transgenic mouse lines with this modified promoter driving expression of mutant forms of connexin40 and an independently translated reporter, EGFP. We show that tissue specificity of this modified promoter is retained in the vasculature of transgenic mice in spite of the presence of LacO sequences, and that transgene expression is uniform throughout the endothelium of a range of adult systemic and cerebral arteries and arterioles. Moreover, transgene expression can be consistently down-regulated by crossing the transgenic mice with mice expressing an inhibitor protein LacI(R, and in one transgenic line, transgene expression could be de-repressed rapidly by the innocuous inducer, IPTG. We conclude that the modified bacterial lac operon system can be used successfully to validate transgenic phenotypes through a simple breeding schedule with mice homozygous for the LacI(R protein.

  6. Expression of PIN Genes in Rice (Oryza sativa L.):Tissue Specificity and Regulation by Hormones

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ji-Rong Wang; Han Hu; Gao-Hang Wang; Jing Li; Jie-Yu Chen; Ping Wu

    2009-01-01

    Twelve genes of the PIN family in rice were analyzed for gene and protein structures and an evolutionary relationship with reported AtPINs in Arabidopsis.Four members of PIN1 (designated as OsPIN1a-d),one gene paired with AtPIN2 (OsPIN2),three members of PIN5 (OsPIN5a-c),one gene paired with AtPIN8 (OsPIN8),and three monocot-specific PiNs (OsPINg,OsPIN10a,and b) were identified from the phylogenetic analysis.Tissue-specific expression patterns of nine PIN genes among them were investigated using RT-PCR and GUS reporter.The wide variations in the expression domain in different tissues of the PIN genes were observed.In general,PIN genes are up-regulated by exogenous auxin,while different responses of different PIN genes to other hormones were found.

  7. Coordination between Drosophila Arc1 and a specific population of brain neurons regulates organismal fat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosher, Jeremy; Zhang, Wei; Blumhagen, Rachel Z; D'Alessandro, Angelo; Nemkov, Travis; Hansen, Kirk C; Hesselberth, Jay R; Reis, Tânia

    2015-09-15

    The brain plays a critical yet incompletely understood role in regulating organismal fat. We performed a neuronal silencing screen in Drosophila larvae to identify brain regions required to maintain proper levels of organismal fat. When used to modulate synaptic activity in specific brain regions, the enhancer-trap driver line E347 elevated fat upon neuronal silencing, and decreased fat upon neuronal activation. Unbiased sequencing revealed that Arc1 mRNA levels increase upon E347 activation. We had previously identified Arc1 mutations in a high-fat screen. Here we reveal metabolic changes in Arc1 mutants consistent with a high-fat phenotype and an overall shift toward energy storage. We find that Arc1-expressing cells neighbor E347 neurons, and manipulating E347 synaptic activity alters Arc1 expression patterns. Elevating Arc1 expression in these cells decreased fat, a phenocopy of E347 activation. Finally, loss of Arc1 prevented the lean phenotype caused by E347 activation, suggesting that Arc1 activity is required for E347 control of body fat. Importantly, neither E347 nor Arc1 manipulation altered energy-related behaviors. Our results support a model wherein E347 neurons induce Arc1 in specific neighboring cells to prevent excess fat accumulation. PMID:26209258

  8. Structural Evidence for Regulation and Specificity of Flaviviral Proteases and Evolution of the Flaviviridae Fold

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aleshin,A.; Shiryaev, S.; Strongin, A.; Liddington, R.

    2007-01-01

    Pathogenic members of the flavivirus family, including West Nile Virus (WNV) and Dengue Virus (DV), are growing global threats for which there are no specific treatments. The two-component flaviviral enzyme NS2B-NS3 cleaves the viral polyprotein precursor within the host cell, a process that is required for viral replication. Here, we report the crystal structure of WNV NS2B-NS3pro both in a substrate-free form and in complex with the trypsin inhibitor aprotinin/BPTI. We show that aprotinin binds in a substrate-mimetic fashion in which the productive conformation of the protease is fully formed, providing evidence for an 'induced fit' mechanism of catalysis and allowing us to rationalize the distinct substrate specificities of WNV and DV proteases. We also show that the NS2B cofactor of WNV can adopt two very distinct conformations and that this is likely to be a general feature of flaviviral proteases, providing further opportunities for regulation. Finally, by comparing the flaviviral proteases with the more distantly related Hepatitis C virus, we provide insights into the evolution of the Flaviviridae fold. Our work should expedite the design of protease inhibitors to treat a range of flaviviral infections.

  9. A specific, transmembrane interface regulates fibroblast activation protein (FAP) homodimerization, trafficking and exopeptidase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wonganu, Benjamaporn; Berger, Bryan W

    2016-08-01

    Fibroblast activation protein (FAP) is a cell-surface serine protease which promotes invasiveness of certain epithelial cancers and is therefore a potential target for cancer drug development and delivery. Unlike dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPPIV), FAP exhibits prolyl endopeptidase activity and is active as a homodimer with specificity for type I collagen. The mechanism that regulates FAP homodimerization and its relation to prolyl endopeptidase activity is not completely understood. Here, we investigate key residues in the FAP TM domain that may be significant for FAP homodimerization. Mutations to predicted TM interfacial residues (G10L, S14L, and A18L) comprising a small-X3-small motif reduced FAP TM-CYTO dimerization relative to wild type as measured using the AraTM assay, whereas predicted off-interface residues showed no significant change from wild type. The results implied that the predicted small-X3-small dimer interface affect stabilization of FAP TM-CYTO homodimerization. Compared with FAPwild-type, the interfacial TM residue G10L significantly decreased FAP endopeptidase activity more than 25%, and also reduced cell-surface versus intracellular expression relative to other interfacial residues S14L and A18L. Thus, our results suggest FAP dimerization is important for both trafficking and protease activity, and is dependent on a specific TM interface. PMID:27155568

  10. Specifications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As part of the Danish RERTR Program, three fuel elements with LEU U3O8-Al fuel and three fuel elements with LEU U3Si2-Al fuel were manufactured by NUKEM for irradiation testing in the DR-3 reactor at the Risoe National Laboratory in Denmark. The specifications for the elements with U3O8-Al fuel are presented here as an illustration only. Specifications for the elements with U3Si2-Al fuel were very similar. In this example, materials, material numbers, documents numbers, and drawing numbers specific to a single fabricator have been deleted. (author)

  11. The lysine specific demethylase-1 (LSD1/KDM1A) regulates VEGF-A expression in prostate cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Kashyap, Vasundhra; Ahmad, Shafqat; Nilsson, Emeli M.; Helczynski, Leszek; Kenna, Sinéad; Persson, Jenny Liao; Gudas, Lorraine J.; Nigel P. Mongan

    2013-01-01

    Recurrent prostate cancer remains a major clinical challenge. The lysine specific demethylase-1 (LSD1/KDM1A), together with the JmjC domain-containing JMJD2A and JMJD2C proteins, have emerged as critical regulators of histone lysine methylation. The LSD1-JMJD2 complex functions as a transcriptional co-regulator of hormone activated androgen and estrogen receptors at specific gene promoters. LSD1 also regulates DNA methylation and p53 function. LSD1 is overexpressed in numerous cancers includi...

  12. The determination of mother cell-specific mating type of switching in yeast by a specific regulator of HO transcription

    OpenAIRE

    Nasmyth, Kim

    1987-01-01

    In haploid homothallic budding yeast, cell division gives rise to a mother cell which proceeds to switch its mating type and a daughter cell (the bud) which does not. Switching is initiated by a specific double strand cleavage of mating type DNA by an endonuclease encoded by the HO gene. Previous data suggest that the pattern of HO transcription is responsible for the mother cell specificity of switching. HO is transcribed transiently, at START, during the cell cycle of mother cells but not a...

  13. Differential roles of epigenetic changes and Foxp3 expression in regulatory T cell-specific transcriptional regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morikawa, Hiromasa; Ohkura, Naganari; Vandenbon, Alexis; Itoh, Masayoshi; Nagao-Sato, Sayaka; Kawaji, Hideya; Lassmann, Timo; Carninci, Piero; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide; Forrest, Alistair R. R.; Standley, Daron M.; Date, Hiroshi; Sakaguchi, Shimon; Forrest, Alistair R.R.; Kawaji, Hideya; Rehli, Michael; Baillie, J. Kenneth; de Hoon, Michiel J.L.; Haberle, Vanja; Lassmann, Timo; Kulakovskiy, Ivan V.; Lizio, Marina; Itoh, Masayoshi; Andersson, Robin; Mungall, Christopher J.; Meehan, Terrence F.; Schmeier, Sebastian; Bertin, Nicolas; Jørgensen, Mette; Dimont, Emmanuel; Arner, Erik; Schmidl, Christian; Schaefer, Ulf; Medvedeva, Yulia A.; Plessy, Charles; Vitezic, Morana; Severin, Jessica; Semple, Colin A.; Ishizu, Yuri; Francescatto, Margherita; Alam, Intikhab; Albanese, Davide; Altschuler, Gabriel M.; Archer, John A.C.; Arner, Peter; Babina, Magda; Baker, Sarah; Balwierz, Piotr J.; Beckhouse, Anthony G.; Pradhan-Bhatt, Swati; Blake, Judith A.; Blumenthal, Antje; Bodega, Beatrice; Bonetti, Alessandro; Briggs, James; Brombacher, Frank; Burroughs, A. Maxwell; Califano, Andrea; Cannistraci, Carlo V.; Carbajo, Daniel; Chen, Yun; Chierici, Marco; Ciani, Yari; Clevers, Hans C.; Dalla, Emiliano; Davis, Carrie A.; Deplancke, Bart; Detmar, Michael; Diehl, Alexander D.; Dohi, Taeko; Drabløs, Finn; Edge, Albert S.B.; Edinger, Matthias; Ekwall, Karl; Endoh, Mitsuhiro; Enomoto, Hideki; Fagiolini, Michela; Fairbairn, Lynsey; Fang, Hai; Farach-Carson, Mary C.; Faulkner, Geoffrey J.; Favorov, Alexander V.; Fisher, Malcolm E.; Frith, Martin C.; Fujita, Rie; Fukuda, Shiro; Furlanello, Cesare; Furuno, Masaaki; Furusawa, Jun-ichi; Geijtenbeek, Teunis B.; Gibson, Andrew; Gingeras, Thomas; Goldowitz, Daniel; Gough, Julian; Guhl, Sven; Guler, Reto; Gustincich, Stefano; Ha, Thomas J.; Hamaguchi, Masahide; Hara, Mitsuko; Harbers, Matthias; Harshbarger, Jayson; Hasegawa, Akira; Hasegawa, Yuki; Hashimoto, Takehiro; Herlyn, Meenhard; Hitchens, Kelly J.; Sui, Shannan J. Ho; Hofmann, Oliver M.; Hoof, Ilka; Hori, Fumi; Huminiecki, Lukasz; Iida, Kei; Ikawa, Tomokatsu; Jankovic, Boris R.; Jia, Hui; Joshi, Anagha; Jurman, Giuseppe; Kaczkowski, Bogumil; Kai, Chieko; Kaida, Kaoru; Kaiho, Ai; Kajiyama, Kazuhiro; Kanamori-Katayama, Mutsumi; Kasianov, Artem S.; Kasukawa, Takeya; Katayama, Shintaro; Kato, Sachi; Kawaguchi, Shuji; Kawamoto, Hiroshi; Kawamura, Yuki I.; Kawashima, Tsugumi; Kempfle, Judith S.; Kenna, Tony J.; Kere, Juha; Khachigian, Levon M.; Kitamura, Toshio; Klinken, S. Peter; Knox, Alan J.; Kojima, Miki; Kojima, Soichi; Kondo, Naoto; Koseki, Haruhiko; Koyasu, Shigeo; Krampitz, Sarah; Kubosaki, Atsutaka; Kwon, Andrew T.; Laros, Jeroen F.J.; Lee, Weonju; Lennartsson, Andreas; Li, Kang; Lilje, Berit; Lipovich, Leonard; Mackay-sim, Alan; Manabe, Ri-ichiroh; Mar, Jessica C.; Marchand, Benoit; Mathelier, Anthony; Mejhert, Niklas; Meynert, Alison; Mizuno, Yosuke; Morais, David A. de Lima; Morikawa, Hiromasa; Morimoto, Mitsuru; Moro, Kazuyo; Motakis, Efthymios; Motohashi, Hozumi; Mummery, Christine L.; Murata, Mitsuyoshi; Nagao-Sato, Sayaka; Nakachi, Yutaka; Nakahara, Fumio; Nakamura, Toshiyuki; Nakamura, Yukio; Nakazato, Kenichi; van Nimwegen, Erik; Ninomiya, Noriko; Nishiyori, Hiromi; Noma, Shohei; Nozaki, Tadasuke; Ogishima, Soichi; Ohkura, Naganari; Ohmiya, Hiroko; Ohno, Hiroshi; Ohshima, Mitsuhiro; Okada-Hatakeyama, Mariko; Okazaki, Yasushi; Orlando, Valerio; Ovchinnikov, Dmitry A.; Pain, Arnab; Passier, Robert; Patrikakis, Margaret; Persson, Helena; Piazza, Silvano; Prendergast, James G.D.; Rackham, Owen J.L.; Ramilowski, Jordan A.; Rashid, Mamoon; Ravasi, Timothy; Rizzu, Patrizia; Roncador, Marco; Roy, Sugata; Rye, Morten B.; Saijyo, Eri; Sajantila, Antti; Saka, Akiko; Sakaguchi, Shimon; Sakai, Mizuho; Sato, Hiroki; Satoh, Hironori; Savvi, Suzana; Saxena, Alka; Schneider, Claudio; Schultes, Erik A.; Schulze-Tanzil, Gundula G.; Schwegmann, Anita; Sengstag, Thierry; Sheng, Guojun; Shimoji, Hisashi; Shimoni, Yishai; Shin, Jay W.; Simon, Christophe; Sugiyama, Daisuke; Sugiyama, Takaaki; Suzuki, Masanori; Swoboda, Rolf K.; 't Hoen, Peter A.C.; Tagami, Michihira; Takahashi, Naoko; Takai, Jun; Tanaka, Hiroshi; Tatsukawa, Hideki; Tatum, Zuotian; Thompson, Mark; Toyoda, Hiroo; Toyoda, Tetsuro; Valen, Eivind; van de Wetering, Marc; van den Berg, Linda M.; Verardo, Roberto; Vijayan, Dipti; Vorontsov, Ilya E.; Wasserman, Wyeth W.; Watanabe, Shoko; Wells, Christine A.; Winteringham, Louise N.; Wolvetang, Ernst; Wood, Emily J.; Yamaguchi, Yoko; Yamamoto, Masayuki; Yoneda, Misako; Yonekura, Yohei; Yoshida, Shigehiro; Zabierowski, Suzan E.; Zhang, Peter G.; Zhao, Xiaobei; Zucchelli, Silvia; Summers, Kim M.; Suzuki, Harukazu; Daub, Carsten O.; Kawai, Jun; Heutink, Peter; Hide, Winston; Freeman, Tom C.; Lenhard, Boris; Bajic, Vladimir B.; Taylor, Martin S.; Makeev, Vsevolod J.; Sandelin, Albin; Hume, David A.; Carninci, Piero; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide

    2014-01-01

    Naturally occurring regulatory T (Treg) cells, which specifically express the transcription factor forkhead box P3 (Foxp3), are engaged in the maintenance of immunological self-tolerance and homeostasis. By transcriptional start site cluster analysis, we assessed here how genome-wide patterns of DNA methylation or Foxp3 binding sites were associated with Treg-specific gene expression. We found that Treg-specific DNA hypomethylated regions were closely associated with Treg up-regulated transcriptional start site clusters, whereas Foxp3 binding regions had no significant correlation with either up- or down-regulated clusters in nonactivated Treg cells. However, in activated Treg cells, Foxp3 binding regions showed a strong correlation with down-regulated clusters. In accordance with these findings, the above two features of activation-dependent gene regulation in Treg cells tend to occur at different locations in the genome. The results collectively indicate that Treg-specific DNA hypomethylation is instrumental in gene up-regulation in steady state Treg cells, whereas Foxp3 down-regulates the expression of its target genes in activated Treg cells. Thus, the two events seem to play distinct but complementary roles in Treg-specific gene expression. PMID:24706905

  14. 50 CFR 32.3 - What are the procedures for publication of refuge-specific hunting regulations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... refuge-specific hunting regulations? 32.3 Section 32.3 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR (CONTINUED) THE NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE SYSTEM HUNTING AND FISHING General Provisions § 32.3 What are the procedures for publication of refuge-specific...

  15. Chimeric Sex-Determining Chromosomal Regions and Dysregulation of Cell-Type Identity in a Sterile Zygosaccharomyces Allodiploid Yeast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bizzarri, Melissa; Giudici, Paolo; Cassanelli, Stefano; Solieri, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    Allodiploidization is a fundamental yet evolutionarily poorly characterized event, which impacts genome evolution and heredity, controlling organismal development and polyploid cell-types. In this study, we investigated the sex determination system in the allodiploid and sterile ATCC 42981 yeast, a member of the Zygosaccharomyces rouxii species complex, and used it to study how a chimeric mating-type gene repertoire contributes to hybrid reproductive isolation. We found that ATCC 42981 has 7 MAT-like (MTL) loci, 3 of which encode α-idiomorph and 4 encode a-idiomorph. Two phylogenetically divergent MAT expression loci were identified on different chromosomes, accounting for a hybrid a/α genotype. Furthermore, extra a-idimorph-encoding loci (termed MTLa copies 1 to 3) were recognized, which shared the same MATa1 ORFs but diverged for MATa2 genes. Each MAT expression locus was linked to a HML silent cassette, while the corresponding HMR loci were located on another chromosome. Two putative parental sex chromosome pairs contributed to this unusual genomic architecture: one came from an as-yet-undescribed taxon, which has the NCYC 3042 strain as a unique representative, while the other did not match any MAT-HML and HMR organizations previously described in Z. rouxii species. This chimeric rearrangement produces two copies of the HO gene, which encode for putatively functional endonucleases essential for mating-type switching. Although both a and α coding sequences, which are required to obtain a functional cell-type a1-α2 regulator, were present in the allodiploid ATCC 42981 genome, the transcriptional circuit, which regulates entry into meiosis in response to meiosis-inducing salt stress, appeared to be turned off. Furthermore, haploid and α-specific genes, such as MATα1 and HO, were observed to be actively transcribed and up-regulated under hypersaline stress. Overall, these evidences demonstrate that ATCC 42981 is unable to repress haploid α-specific genes and

  16. Comparative Characterization of Cardiac Development Specific microRNAs: Fetal Regulators for Future.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yashika Rustagi

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs are small, conserved RNAs known to regulate several biological processes by influencing gene expression in eukaryotes. The implication of miRNAs as another player of regulatory layers during heart development and diseases has recently been explored. However, there is no study which elucidates the profiling of miRNAs during development of heart till date. Very limited miRNAs have been reported to date in cardiac context. In addition, integration of large scale experimental data with computational and comparative approaches remains an unsolved challenge.The present study was designed to identify the microRNAs implicated in heart development using next generation sequencing, bioinformatics and experimental approaches. We sequenced six small RNA libraries prepared from different developmental stages of the heart using chicken as a model system to produce millions of short sequence reads. We detected 353 known and 703 novel miRNAs involved in heart development. Out of total 1056 microRNAs identified, 32.7% of total dataset of known microRNAs displayed differential expression whereas seven well studied microRNAs namely let-7, miR-140, miR-181, miR-30, miR-205, miR-103 and miR-22 were found to be conserved throughout the heart development. The 3'UTR sequences of genes were screened from Gallus gallus genome for potential microRNA targets. The target mRNAs were appeared to be enriched with genes related to cell cycle, apoptosis, signaling pathways, extracellular remodeling, metabolism, chromatin remodeling and transcriptional regulators. Our study presents the first comprehensive overview of microRNA profiling during heart development and prediction of possible cardiac specific targets and has a big potential in future to develop microRNA based therapeutics against cardiac pathologies where fetal gene re-expression is witnessed in adult heart.

  17. Prostate specific membrane antigen (PSMA regulates angiogenesis independently of VEGF during ocular neovascularization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina L Grant

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Aberrant growth of blood vessels in the eye forms the basis of many incapacitating diseases and currently the majority of patients respond to anti-angiogenic therapies based on blocking the principal angiogenic growth factor, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF. While highly successful, new therapeutic targets are critical for the increasing number of individuals susceptible to retina-related pathologies in our increasingly aging population. Prostate specific membrane antigen (PSMA is a cell surface peptidase that is absent on normal tissue vasculature but is highly expressed on the neovasculature of most solid tumors, where we have previously shown to regulate angiogenic endothelial cell invasion. Because pathologic angiogenic responses are often triggered by distinct signals, we sought to determine if PSMA also contributes to the pathologic angiogenesis provoked by hypoxia of the retina, which underlies many debilitating retinopathies. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using a mouse model of oxygen-induced retinopathy, we found that while developmental angiogenesis is normal in PSMA null mice, hypoxic challenge resulted in decreased retinal vascular pathology when compared to wild type mice as assessed by avascular area and numbers of vascular tufts/glomeruli. The vessels formed in the PSMA null mice were more organized and highly perfused, suggesting a more 'normal' phenotype. Importantly, the decrease in angiogenesis was not due to an impaired hypoxic response as levels of pro-angiogenic factors are comparable; indicating that PSMA regulation of angiogenesis is independent of VEGF. Furthermore, both systemic and intravitreal administration of a PSMA inhibitor in wild type mice undergoing OIR mimicked the PSMA null phenotype resulting in improved retinal vasculature. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our data indicate that PSMA plays a VEGF-independent role in retinal angiogenesis and that the lack of or inhibition of PSMA may

  18. Neuron-specific regulation of associative learning and memory by MAGI-1 in C. elegans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Attila Stetak

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Identifying the molecular mechanisms and neural circuits that control learning and memory are major challenges in neuroscience. Mammalian MAGI/S-SCAM is a multi-PDZ domain synaptic scaffolding protein that interacts with a number of postsynaptic signaling proteins and is thereby thought to regulate synaptic plasticity [1], [2], [3]. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: While investigating the behavioral defects of C. elegans nematodes carrying a mutation in the single MAGI ortholog magi-1, we have identified specific neurons that require MAGI-1 function for different aspects of associative learning and memory. Various sensory stimuli and a food deprivation signal are associated in RIA interneurons during learning, while additional expression of MAGI-1 in glutamatergic AVA, AVD and possibly AVE interneurons is required for efficient memory consolidation, i.e. the ability to retain the conditioned changes in behavior over time. During associative learning, MAGI-1 in RIA neurons controls in a cell non-autonomous fashion the dynamic remodeling of AVA, AVD and AVE synapses containing the ionotropic glutamate receptor (iGluR GLR-1 [4]. During memory consolidation, however, MAGI-1 controls GLR-1 clustering in AVA and AVD interneurons cell-autonomously and depends on the ability to interact with the beta-catenin HMP-2. SIGNIFICANCE: Together, these results indicate that different aspects of associative learning and memory in C. elegans are likely carried out by distinct subsets of interneurons. The synaptic scaffolding protein MAGI-1 plays a critical role in these processes in part by regulating the clustering of iGluRs at synapses.

  19. Differential Regulation of Strand-Specific Transcripts from Arabidopsis Centromeric Satellite Repeats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Centromeres interact with the spindle apparatus to enable chromosome disjunction and typically contain thousands of tandemly arranged satellite repeats interspersed with retrotransposons. While their role has been obscure, centromeric repeats are epigenetically modified and centromere specification has a strong epigenetic component. In the yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, long heterochromatic repeats are transcribed and contribute to centromere function via RNA interference (RNAi. In the higher plant Arabidopsis thaliana, as in mammalian cells, centromeric satellite repeats are short (180 base pairs, are found in thousands of tandem copies, and are methylated. We have found transcripts from both strands of canonical, bulk Arabidopsis repeats. At least one subfamily of 180-base pair repeats is transcribed from only one strand and regulated by RNAi and histone modification. A second subfamily of repeats is also silenced, but silencing is lost on both strands in mutants in the CpG DNA methyltransferase MET1, the histone deacetylase HDA6/SIL1, or the chromatin remodeling ATPase DDM1. This regulation is due to transcription from Athila2 retrotransposons, which integrate in both orientations relative to the repeats, and differs between strains of Arabidopsis. Silencing lost in met1 or hda6 is reestablished in backcrosses to wild-type, but silencing lost in RNAi mutants and ddm1 is not. Twenty-four-nucleotide small interfering RNAs from centromeric repeats are retained in met1 and hda6, but not in ddm1, and may have a role in this epigenetic inheritance. Histone H3 lysine-9 dimethylation is associated with both classes of repeats. We propose roles for transcribed repeats in the epigenetic inheritance and evolution of centromeres.

  20. Transcriptome Analysis of the Planarian Eye Identifies ovo as a Specific Regulator of Eye Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvain W. Lapan

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Among the millions of invertebrate species with visual systems, the genetic basis of eye development and function is well understood only in Drosophila melanogaster. We describe an eye transcriptome for the planarian Schmidtea mediterranea. Planarian photoreceptors expressed orthologs of genes required for phototransduction and microvillus structure in Drosophila and vertebrates, and optic pigment cells expressed solute transporters and melanin synthesis enzymes similar to those active in the vertebrate retinal pigment epithelium. Orthologs of several planarian eye genes, such as bestrophin-1 and Usher syndrome genes, cause eye defects in mammals when perturbed and were not previously described to have roles in invertebrate eyes. Five previously undescribed planarian eye transcription factors were required for normal eye formation during head regeneration. In particular, a conserved, transcription-factor-encoding ovo gene was expressed from the earliest stages of eye regeneration and was required for regeneration of all cell types of the eye.

  1. Functional proteomics screen enables enrichment of distinct cell types from human pancreatic islets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Revital Sharivkin

    Full Text Available The current world-wide epidemic of diabetes has prompted attempts to generate new sources of insulin-producing cells for cell replacement therapy. An inherent challenge in many of these strategies is the lack of cell-surface markers permitting isolation and characterization of specific cell types from differentiating stem cell populations. Here we introduce an iterative proteomics procedure allowing tag-free isolation of cell types based on their function. Our method detects and associates specific cell-surface markers with particular cell functionality by coupling cell capture on antibody arrays with immunofluorescent labeling. Using this approach in an iterative manner, we discovered marker combinations capable of enriching for discrete pancreatic cell subtypes from human islets of Langerhans: insulin-producing beta cells (CD9high/CD56+, glucagon-producing alpha cells (CD9-/CD56+ and trypsin-producing acinar cells (CD9-/CD56-. This strategy may assist future beta cell research and the development of diagnostic tools for diabetes. It can also be applied more generally for function-based purification of desired cell types from other limited and heterogeneous biological samples.

  2. Disproportionate Contributions of Select Genomic Compartments and Cell Types to Genetic Risk for Coronary Artery Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-Hee Won

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Large genome-wide association studies (GWAS have identified many genetic loci associated with risk for myocardial infarction (MI and coronary artery disease (CAD. Concurrently, efforts such as the National Institutes of Health (NIH Roadmap Epigenomics Project and the Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE Consortium have provided unprecedented data on functional elements of the human genome. In the present study, we systematically investigate the biological link between genetic variants associated with this complex disease and their impacts on gene function. First, we examined the heritability of MI/CAD according to genomic compartments. We observed that single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs residing within nearby regulatory regions show significant polygenicity and contribute between 59-71% of the heritability for MI/CAD. Second, we showed that the polygenicity and heritability explained by these SNPs are enriched in histone modification marks in specific cell types. Third, we found that a statistically higher number of 45 MI/CAD-associated SNPs that have been identified from large-scale GWAS studies reside within certain functional elements of the genome, particularly in active enhancer and promoter regions. Finally, we observed significant heterogeneity of this signal across cell types, with strong signals observed within adipose nuclei, as well as brain and spleen cell types. These results suggest that the genetic etiology of MI/CAD is largely explained by tissue-specific regulatory perturbation within the human genome.

  3. Differential roles of epigenetic changes and Foxp3 expression in regulatory T cell-specific transcriptional regulation

    OpenAIRE

    Vandenbon, Alexis; Standley, Daron M; Date, Hiroshi; Forrest, Alistair R.R.; Kawaji, Hideya; Rehli, Michael; Baillie, J. Kenneth; de Hoon, Michiel J.L.; Haberle, Vanja; Lassmann, Timo; Kulakovskiy, Ivan V; Lizio, Marina; Itoh, Masayoshi; Andersson, Robin; Mungall, Christopher J

    2014-01-01

    Naturally occurring regulatory T (Treg) cells, which specifically express the transcription factor forkhead box P3 (Foxp3), are engaged in the maintenance of immunological self-tolerance and homeostasis. By transcriptional start site cluster analysis, we assessed here how genome-wide patterns of DNA methylation or Foxp3 binding sites were associated with Treg-specific gene expression. We found that Treg-specific DNA hypomethylated regions were closely associated with Treg up-regulated transcr...

  4. Interactions of the algicidal bacterium Kordia algicida with diatoms: regulated protease excretion for specific algal lysis.

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    Carsten Paul

    Full Text Available Interactions of planktonic bacteria with primary producers such as diatoms have great impact on plankton population dynamics. Several studies described the detrimental effect of certain bacteria on diatoms but the biochemical nature and the regulation mechanism involved in the production of the active compounds remained often elusive. Here, we investigated the interactions of the algicidal bacterium Kordia algicida with the marine diatoms Skeletonema costatum, Thalassiosira weissflogii, Phaeodactylum tricornutum, and Chaetoceros didymus. Algicidal activity was only observed towards the first three of the tested diatom species while C. didymus proved to be not susceptible. The cell free filtrate and the >30 kDa fraction of stationary K. algicida cultures is fully active, suggesting a secreted algicidal principle. The active supernatant from bacterial cultures exhibited high protease activity and inhibition experiments proved that these enzymes are involved in the observed algicidal action of the bacteria. Protease mediated interactions are not controlled by the presence of the alga but dependent on the cell density of the K. algicida culture. We show that protease release is triggered by cell free bacterial filtrates suggesting a quorum sensing dependent excretion mechanism of the algicidal protein. The K. algicida / algae interactions in the plankton are thus host specific and under the control of previously unidentified factors.

  5. Interactions of the algicidal bacterium Kordia algicida with diatoms: regulated protease excretion for specific algal lysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Carsten; Pohnert, Georg

    2011-01-01

    Interactions of planktonic bacteria with primary producers such as diatoms have great impact on plankton population dynamics. Several studies described the detrimental effect of certain bacteria on diatoms but the biochemical nature and the regulation mechanism involved in the production of the active compounds remained often elusive. Here, we investigated the interactions of the algicidal bacterium Kordia algicida with the marine diatoms Skeletonema costatum, Thalassiosira weissflogii, Phaeodactylum tricornutum, and Chaetoceros didymus. Algicidal activity was only observed towards the first three of the tested diatom species while C. didymus proved to be not susceptible. The cell free filtrate and the >30 kDa fraction of stationary K. algicida cultures is fully active, suggesting a secreted algicidal principle. The active supernatant from bacterial cultures exhibited high protease activity and inhibition experiments proved that these enzymes are involved in the observed algicidal action of the bacteria. Protease mediated interactions are not controlled by the presence of the alga but dependent on the cell density of the K. algicida culture. We show that protease release is triggered by cell free bacterial filtrates suggesting a quorum sensing dependent excretion mechanism of the algicidal protein. The K. algicida / algae interactions in the plankton are thus host specific and under the control of previously unidentified factors. PMID:21695044

  6. The brain-specific carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1c regulates energy homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfgang, Michael J.; Kurama, Takeshi; Dai, Yun; Suwa, Akira; Asaumi, Makoto; Matsumoto, Shun-ichiro; Cha, Seung Hun; Shimokawa, Teruhiko; Lane, M. Daniel

    2006-01-01

    Fatty acid synthesis in the central nervous system is implicated in the control of food intake and energy expenditure. An intermediate in this pathway, malonyl-CoA, mediates these effects. Malonyl-CoA is an established inhibitor of carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1 (CPT1), an outer mitochondrial membrane enzyme that controls entry of fatty acids into mitochondria and, thereby, fatty acid oxidation. CPT1c, a brain-specific enzyme with high sequence similarity to CPT1a (liver) and CPT1b (muscle) was recently discovered. All three CPTs bind malonyl-CoA, and CPT1a and CPT1b catalyze acyl transfer from various fatty acyl-CoAs to carnitine, whereas CPT1c does not. These findings suggest that CPT1c has a unique function or activation mechanism. We produced a targeted mouse knockout (KO) of CPT1c to investigate its role in energy homeostasis. CPT1c KO mice have lower body weight and food intake, which is consistent with a role as an energy-sensing malonyl-CoA target. Paradoxically, CPT1c KO mice fed a high-fat diet are more susceptible to obesity, suggesting that CPT1c is protective against the effects of fat feeding. CPT1c KO mice also exhibit decreased rates of fatty acid oxidation, which may contribute to their increased susceptibility to diet-induced obesity. These findings indicate that CPT1c is necessary for the regulation of energy homeostasis. PMID:16651524

  7. Lipopolysaccharide Clearance, Bacterial Clearance, and Systemic Inflammatory Responses Are Regulated by Cell Type–Specific Functions of TLR4 during Sepsis

    OpenAIRE

    Deng, Meihong; Scott, Melanie J.; Loughran, Patricia; Gibson, Gregory; Sodhi, Chhinder; Watkins, Simon; Hackam, David; Billiar, Timothy R

    2013-01-01

    The morbidity associated with bacterial sepsis is the result of host immune responses to pathogens, which are dependent on pathogen recognition by pattern recognition receptors, such as TLR4. TLR4 is expressed on a range of cell types, yet the mechanisms by which cell-specific functions of TLR4 lead to an integrated sepsis response are poorly understood. To address this, we generated mice in which TLR4 was specifically deleted from myeloid cells (LysMTLR4KO) or hepatocytes (HCTLR4KO) and then...

  8. Macoilin, a conserved nervous system-specific ER membrane protein that regulates neuronal excitability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fausto Arellano-Carbajal

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Genome sequence comparisons have highlighted many novel gene families that are conserved across animal phyla but whose biological function is unknown. Here, we functionally characterize a member of one such family, the macoilins. Macoilins are characterized by several highly conserved predicted transmembrane domains towards the N-terminus and by coiled-coil regions C-terminally. They are found throughout Eumetazoa but not in other organisms. Mutants for the single Caenorhabditis elegans macoilin, maco-1, exhibit a constellation of behavioral phenotypes, including defects in aggregation, O₂ responses, and swimming. MACO-1 protein is expressed broadly and specifically in the nervous system and localizes to the rough endoplasmic reticulum; it is excluded from dendrites and axons. Apart from subtle synapse defects, nervous system development appears wild-type in maco-1 mutants. However, maco-1 animals are resistant to the cholinesterase inhibitor aldicarb and sensitive to levamisole, suggesting pre-synaptic defects. Using in vivo imaging, we show that macoilin is required to evoke Ca²(+ transients, at least in some neurons: in maco-1 mutants the O₂-sensing neuron PQR is unable to generate a Ca²(+ response to a rise in O₂. By genetically disrupting neurotransmission, we show that pre-synaptic input is not necessary for PQR to respond to O₂, indicating that the response is mediated by cell-intrinsic sensory transduction and amplification. Disrupting the sodium leak channels NCA-1/NCA-2, or the N-,P/Q,R-type voltage-gated Ca²(+ channels, also fails to disrupt Ca²(+ responses in the PQR cell body to O₂ stimuli. By contrast, mutations in egl-19, which encodes the only Caenorhabditis elegans L-type voltage-gated Ca²(+ channel α1 subunit, recapitulate the Ca²(+ response defect we see in maco-1 mutants, although we do not see defects in localization of EGL-19. Together, our data suggest that macoilin acts in the ER to regulate assembly or

  9. Breast tumor specific mutation in GATA3 affects physiological mechanisms regulating transcription factor turnover

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The transcription factor GATA3 is a favorable prognostic indicator in estrogen receptor-α (ERα)-positive breast tumors in which it participates with ERα and FOXA1 in a complex transcriptional regulatory program driving tumor growth. GATA3 mutations are frequent in breast cancer and have been classified as driver mutations. To elucidate the contribution(s) of GATA3 alterations to cancer, we studied two breast cancer cell lines, MCF7, which carries a heterozygous frameshift mutation in the second zinc finger of GATA3, and T47D, wild-type at this locus. Immunofluorescence staining and subcellular fractionation were employed to verify cellular localization of GATA3 in T47D and MCF7 cells. To test protein stability, cells were treated with translation inhibitor, cycloheximide or proteasome inhibitor, MG132, and GATA3 abundance was measured over time using immunoblot. GATA3 turn-over in response to hormone was determined by treating the cells with estradiol or ERα agonist, ICI 182,780. DNA binding ability of recombinant GATA3 was evaluated using electrophoretic mobility shift assay and heparin chromatography. Genomic location of GATA3 in MCF7 and T47D cells was assessed by chromatin immunoprecipitation coupled with next-generation sequencing (ChIP-seq). GATA3 localized in the nucleus in T47D and MCF7 cells, regardless of the mutation status. The truncated protein in MCF7 had impaired interaction with chromatin and was easily released from the nucleus. Recombinant mutant GATA3 was able to bind DNA to a lesser degree than the wild-type protein. Heterozygosity for the truncating mutation conferred protection from regulated turnover of GATA3, ERα and FOXA1 following estrogen stimulation in MCF7 cells. Thus, mutant GATA3 uncoupled protein-level regulation of master regulatory transcription factors from hormone action. Consistent with increased protein stability, ChIP-seq profiling identified greater genome-wide accumulation of GATA3 in MCF7 cells bearing the mutation

  10. Gender-Specific Expression and Mechanism of Regulation of Estrogen Sulfotransferase in Adipose Tissues of the Mouse

    OpenAIRE

    Khor, Victor K.; Tong, Ming Han; Qian, Yueming; Song, Wen-Chao

    2008-01-01

    Although primarily regarded as a sex steroid, estrogen plays an important role in many other physiological processes including adipose development and disposition. Estrogen sulfotransferase (EST) regulates estrogen activity by catalyzing the sulfoconjugation and inactivation of estrogens. In the present study, we report the gender-specific expression of EST in adipose tissues of the mouse and describe contrasting mechanisms of EST regulation in the fat and liver. EST is expressed in the white...

  11. Atlas of prostate cancer heritability in European and African-American men pinpoints tissue-specific regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gusev, Alexander; Shi, Huwenbo; Kichaev, Gleb; Pomerantz, Mark; Li, Fugen; Long, Henry W.; Ingles, Sue A.; Kittles, Rick A.; Strom, Sara S.; Rybicki, Benjamin A.; Nemesure, Barbara; Isaacs, William B.; Zheng, Wei; Pettaway, Curtis A.; Yeboah, Edward D.; Tettey, Yao; Biritwum, Richard B.; Adjei, Andrew A.; Tay, Evelyn; Truelove, Ann; Niwa, Shelley; Chokkalingam, Anand P.; John, Esther M.; Murphy, Adam B.; Signorello, Lisa B.; Carpten, John; Leske, M. Cristina; Wu, Suh-Yuh; Hennis, Anslem J. M.; Neslund-Dudas, Christine; Hsing, Ann W.; Chu, Lisa; Goodman, Phyllis J.; Klein, Eric A.; Witte, John S.; Casey, Graham; Kaggwa, Sam; Cook, Michael B.; Stram, Daniel O.; Blot, William J.; Eeles, Rosalind A.; Easton, Douglas; Kote-Jarai, ZSofia; Al Olama, Ali Amin; Benlloch, Sara; Muir, Kenneth; Giles, Graham G.; Southey, Melissa C.; Fitzgerald, Liesel M.; Gronberg, Henrik; Wiklund, Fredrik; Aly, Markus; Henderson, Brian E.; Schleutker, Johanna; Wahlfors, Tiina; Tammela, Teuvo L. J.; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Key, Tim J.; Travis, Ruth C.; Neal, David E.; Donovan, Jenny L.; Hamdy, Freddie C.; Pharoah, Paul; Pashayan, Nora; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Stanford, Janet L.; Thibodeau, Stephen N.; McDonnell, Shannon K.; Schaid, Daniel J.; Maier, Christiane; Vogel, Walther; Luedeke, Manuel; Herkommer, Kathleen; Kibel, Adam S.; Cybulski, Cezary; Wokolorczyk, Dominika; Kluzniak, Wojciech; Cannon-Albright, Lisa; Teerlink, Craig; Brenner, Hermann; Dieffenbach, Aida K.; Arndt, Volker; Park, Jong Y.; Sellers, Thomas A.; Lin, Hui-Yi; Slavov, Chavdar; Kaneva, Radka; Mitev, Vanio; Batra, Jyotsna; Spurdle, Amanda; Clements, Judith A.; Teixeira, Manuel R.; Pandha, Hardev; Michael, Agnieszka; Paulo, Paula; Maia, Sofia; Kierzek, Andrzej; Cook, Margaret; Guy, Michelle; Govindasami, Koveela; Leongamornlert, Daniel; Sawyer, Emma J.; Wilkinson, Rosemary; Saunders, Edward J.; Tymrakiewicz, Malgorzata; Dadaev, Tokhir; Morgan, Angela; Fisher, Cyril; Hazel, Steve; Livni, Naomi; Lophatananon, Artitaya; Pedersen, John; Hopper, John L.; Adolfson, Jan; Stattin, Paer; Johansson, Jan-Erik; Cavalli-Bjoerkman, Carin; Karlsson, Ami; Broms, Michael; Auvinen, Anssi; Kujala, Paula; Maeaettaenen, Liisa; Murtola, Teemu; Taari, Kimmo; Weischer, Maren; Nielsen, Sune F.; Klarskov, Peter; Roder, Andreas; Iversen, Peter; Wallinder, Hans; Gustafsson, Sven; Cox, Angela; Brown, Paul; George, Anne; Marsden, Gemma; Lane, Athene; Davis, Michael; Zheng, Wei; Signorello, Lisa B.; Blot, William J.; Tillmans, Lori; Riska, Shaun; Wang, Liang; Rinckleb, Antje; Lubiski, Jan; Stegmaier, Christa; Pow-Sang, Julio; Park, Hyun; Radlein, Selina; Rincon, Maria; Haley, James; Zachariah, Babu; Kachakova, Darina; Popov, Elenko; Mitkova, Atanaska; Vlahova, Aleksandrina; Dikov, Tihomir; Christova, Svetlana; Heathcote, Peter; Wood, Glenn; Malone, Greg; Saunders, Pamela; Eckert, Allison; Yeadon, Trina; Kerr, Kris; Collins, Angus; Turner, Megan; Srinivasan, Srilakshmi; Kedda, Mary-Anne; Alexander, Kimberly; Omara, Tracy; Wu, Huihai; Henrique, Rui; Pinto, Pedro; Santos, Joana; Barros-Silva, Joao; Conti, David V.; Albanes, Demetrius; Berg, Christine; Berndt, Sonja I.; Campa, Daniele; Crawford, E. David; Diver, W. Ryan; Gapstur, Susan M.; Gaziano, J. Michael; Giovannucci, Edward; Hoover, Robert; Hunter, David J.; Johansson, Mattias; Kraft, Peter; Le Marchand, Loic; Lindström, Sara; Navarro, Carmen; Overvad, Kim; Riboli, Elio; Siddiq, Afshan; Stevens, Victoria L.; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Vineis, Paolo; Yeager, Meredith; Trynka, Gosia; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Schumacher, Frederick R.; Price, Alkes L.; Freedman, Matthew L.; Haiman, Christopher A.; Pasaniuc, Bogdan

    2016-01-01

    Although genome-wide association studies have identified over 100 risk loci that explain ∼33% of familial risk for prostate cancer (PrCa), their functional effects on risk remain largely unknown. Here we use genotype data from 59,089 men of European and African American ancestries combined with cell-type-specific epigenetic data to build a genomic atlas of single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) heritability in PrCa. We find significant differences in heritability between variants in prostate-relevant epigenetic marks defined in normal versus tumour tissue as well as between tissue and cell lines. The majority of SNP heritability lies in regions marked by H3k27 acetylation in prostate adenoc7arcinoma cell line (LNCaP) or by DNaseI hypersensitive sites in cancer cell lines. We find a high degree of similarity between European and African American ancestries suggesting a similar genetic architecture from common variation underlying PrCa risk. Our findings showcase the power of integrating functional annotation with genetic data to understand the genetic basis of PrCa. PMID:27052111

  12. Practice specific model regulations: Radiation safety of non-medical irradiation facilities. Interim report for comment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    the infrastructure aimed at achieving its maximum efficiency, and extensively covers performance regulations. The BSS cover the application of ionizing radiation for all practices and interventions and are, therefore, basic and general in nature. Users must apply these basic requirements to their own particular practices. In this context, the preamble of the BSS states that: 'The Regulatory Authority may need to provide guidance on how certain regulatory requirements are to be fulfilled for various practices, for example in regulatory guideline documents.' There are certain requirements that, when applied to specific practices, can be fulfilled through virtually only one practical solution. In these cases, the regulatory authority would use a 'shall' statement for this solution. To meet other requirements, there may be more than one option. In these cases the regulatory authority would usually indicate the recommended option with a 'should' statement, which implies that licensees may choose another alternative provided that the level of safety is equivalent. This distinction has been maintained in this 'model regulations' for irradiation facilities in order to facilitate the decision of regulatory authorities on the degree of obligation

  13. Tissue-specific down-regulation of RIPK 2 in Mycobacterium leprae-infected nu/nu mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gue-Tae Chae

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available RIPK 2 is adapter molecule in the signal pathway involved in Toll-like receptors. However, there has been no reported association between receptor-interacting serine/threonine kinase 2 (RIPK 2 expression and the infectious diseases involving mycobacterial infection. This study found that its expression was down-regulated in the footpads and skin but was up-regulated in the liver of Mycobacterium leprae-infected nu/nu mice compared with those of the M. leprae non-infected nu/nu mice. It was observed that the interlukin-12p40 and interferon-γ genes involved in the susceptibility of M. leprae were down-regulated in the skin but were up-regulated in the liver. Overall, this suggests that regulation of RIPK 2 expression is tissue-specifically associated with M. leprae infection.

  14. Specific micro RNA-regulated TetR-KRAB transcriptional control of transgene expression in viral vector-transduced cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virginie Pichard

    Full Text Available Precise control of transgene expression in a tissue-specific and temporally regulated manner is desirable for many basic and applied investigations gene therapy applications. This is important to regulate dose of transgene products and minimize unwanted effects. Previously described methods have employed tissue specific promoters, miRNA-based transgene silencing or tetR-KRAB-mediated suppression of transgene promoters. To improve on versatility of transgene expression control, we have developed expression systems that use combinations of a tetR-KRAB artificial transgene-repressor, endogenous miRNA silencing machinery and tissue specific promoters. Precise control of transgene expression was demonstrated in liver-, macrophage- and muscle-derived cells. Efficiency was also demonstrated in vivo in murine muscle. This multicomponent and modular regulatory system provides a robust and easily adaptable method for achieving regulated transgene expression in different tissue types. The improved precision of regulation will be useful for many gene therapy applications requiring specific spatiotemporal transgene regulation.

  15. BDNF deficiency and young-adult methamphetamine induce sex-specific effects on prepulse inhibition regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth E Manning

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF has been implicated in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia, yet its role in the development of specific symptoms is unclear. Methamphetamine (METH users have an increased risk of psychosis and schizophrenia, and METH-treated animals have been used extensively as a model to study the positive symptoms of schizophrenia. We investigated whether METH treatment in BDNF heterozygous mutant mice (HET has cumulative effects on sensorimotor gating, including the disruptive effects of psychotropic drugs. BDNF HETs and WT littermates were treated during young-adulthood with METH and, following a two-week break, prepulse inhibition (PPI was examined. At baseline, BDNF HETs showed reduced PPI compared to WT mice irrespective of METH pre-treatment. An acute challenge with amphetamine (AMPH disrupted PPI but male BDNF HETs were more sensitive to this effect, irrespective of METH pre-treatment. In contrast, female mice treated with METH were less sensitive to the disruptive effects of AMPH, and there were no effects of BDNF genotype. Similar changes were not observed in the response to an acute apomorphine or MK-801 challenge. These results show that genetically-induced reduction of BDNF caused changes in a behavioural endophenotype relevant to the positive symptoms of schizophrenia. However, major sex differences were observed in the effects of a psychotropic drug challenge on this behaviour. These findings suggest sex differences in the effects of BDNF depletion and METH treatment on the monoamine signaling pathways that regulate PPI. Given that these same pathways are thought to contribute to the expression of positive symptoms in schizophrenia, this work suggests that there may be significant sex differences in the pathophysiology underlying these symptoms. Elucidating these sex differences may be important for our understanding of the neurobiology of schizophrenia and developing better treatments strategies for the

  16. Birthdating studies reshape models for pituitary gland cell specification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Shannon W; Mortensen, Amanda H; Camper, Sally A

    2011-04-15

    The intermediate and anterior lobes of the pituitary gland are derived from an invagination of oral ectoderm that forms Rathke's pouch. During gestation proliferating cells are enriched around the pouch lumen, and they appear to delaminate as they exit the cell cycle and differentiate. During late mouse gestation and the postnatal period, anterior lobe progenitors re-enter the cell cycle and expand the populations of specialized, hormone-producing cells. At birth, all cell types are present, and their localization appears stratified based on cell type. We conducted a birth dating study of Rathke's pouch derivatives to determine whether the location of specialized cells at birth is correlated with the timing of cell cycle exit. We find that all of the anterior lobe cell types initiate differentiation concurrently with a peak between e11.5 and e13.5. Differentiation of intermediate lobe melanotropes is delayed relative to anterior lobe cell types. We discovered that specialized cell types are not grouped together based on birth date and are dispersed throughout the anterior lobe. Thus, the apparent stratification of specialized cells at birth is not correlated with cell cycle exit. Thus, the currently popular model of cell specification, dependent upon timing of extrinsic, directional gradients of signaling molecules, needs revision. We propose that signals intrinsic to Rathke's pouch are necessary for cell specification between e11.5 and e13.5 and that cell-cell communication likely plays an important role in regulating this process. PMID:21262217

  17. Critical role of △DNMT3B4/2 in regulating RASSF1A promoter specific DNA methylation in non-small cell lung cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Shu-hang; LIU Nin-hong; WANG Jie; BAI Hua; MAO Li

    2008-01-01

    hours,but no effect resulted from the p16INK4a promoter in the NSCLC cell lines.Conclusions These results demonstrate an important role of △DNMT3B4/2 in the maintenance of promoter-specific DNA methylation in a cell type specific manner and provide a novel cell model for the study of the regulation of replication-independent DNA methylation.

  18. Regulation of mga Transcription in the Group A Streptococcus: Specific Binding of Mga within Its Own Promoter and Evidence for a Negative Regulator

    OpenAIRE

    McIver, Kevin S.; Thurman, Alec S.; Scott, June R.

    1999-01-01

    Transcription of mga, encoding the multiple virulence gene regulator of the group A streptococcus, is positively autoregulated. This regulation requires a DNA region (Pmga) that contains both a promoter proximal to mga (P2) and a promoter located further upstream (P1). To determine if Mga has a direct role in this process, its ability to bind to specific sequences within Pmga was tested. A purified fusion of Mga to the C-terminal end of maltose-binding protein (MBP-Mga), encoded by malE-mga, ...

  19. Cyst formation and activation of the extracellular regulated kinase pathway after kidney specific inactivation of Pkd1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibazaki, Sekiya; Yu, Zhiheng; Nishio, Saori; Tian, Xin; Thomson, R. Brent; Mitobe, Michihiro; Louvi, Angeliki; Velazquez, Heino; Ishibe, Shuta; Cantley, Lloyd G.; Igarashi, Peter; Somlo, Stefan

    2008-01-01

    Polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) results from failure of the kidney to properly maintain three-dimensional structure after loss of either polycystin-1 or -2. Mice with kidney selective inactivation of Pkd1 during embryogenesis develop profound renal cystic disease and die from renal failure within 3 weeks of birth. In this model, cysts form exclusively from cells in which Cre recombinase is active, but the apparent pace of cyst expansion varies by segment and cell type. Intercalated cells do not participate in cyst expansion despite the presence of cilia up to at least postnatal day 21. Cystic segments show a persistent increase in proliferation as determined by bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation; however, the absolute proliferative index is dependent on the underlying proliferative potential of kidney tubule cells. Components of the extracellular regulated kinase (MAPK/ERK) pathway from Ras through MEK1/2 and ERK1/2 to the effector P90RSK are activated in both perinatal Pkd1 and adult Pkd2 ortholgous gene disease models. The pattern of MAPK/ERK activation is focal and does not correlate with the pattern of active proliferation identified by BrdU uptake. The possibility of a causal relationship between ERK1/2 activation and cyst cell proliferation was assessed in vivo in the acute perinatal Pkd1 model of ADPKD using MEK1/2 inhibitor U0126. U0126 treatment had no effect on progression of cyst formation in this model at doses sufficient to reduce phospho-ERK1/2 in cystic kidneys. Cysts in ADPKD exhibit both increased proliferation and activation of MAPK/ERK, but cyst growth is not prevented by inhibition of ERK1/2 activation. PMID:18263604

  20. MicroRNA-regulated non-viral vectors with improved tumor specificity in an orthotopic rat model of hepatocellular carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ronald, J A; Katzenberg, R; Nielsen, Carsten Haagen;

    2013-01-01

    In hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), tumor specificity of gene therapy is of utmost importance to preserve liver function. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are powerful negative regulators of gene expression and many are downregulated in human HCC. We identified seven miRNAs that are also downregulated in tumors...

  1. The Ubiquitin-Specific Protease 14 (USP14) Is a Critical Regulator of Long-Term Memory Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarome, Timothy J.; Kwapis, Janine L.; Hallengren, Jada J.; Wilson, Scott M.; Helmstetter, Fred J.

    2014-01-01

    Numerous studies have suggested a role for ubiquitin-proteasome-mediated protein degradation in learning-dependent synaptic plasticity; however, very little is known about how protein degradation is regulated at the level of the proteasome during memory formation. The ubiquitin-specific protease 14 (USP14) is a proteasomal deubiquitinating enzyme…

  2. Environmental Stewardship: How Semiconductor Suppliers Help toMeet Energy-Efficiency Regulations and Voluntary Specifications inChina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aizhen, Li; Fanara, Andrew; Fridley, David; Merriman, Louise; Ju,Jeff

    2007-01-15

    Recognizing the role that semiconductor suppliers can playin meeting energy-efficiency regulations and voluntary specifications,this paper provides an overview of Chinese policies and implementingbodies; a discussion of current programs, their goals, and effectiveness;and possible steps that can be taken tomeet these energy-efficiencyrequirements while also meeting products' high performance and costgoals.

  3. Sprouty genes prevent excessive FGF signalling in multiple cell types throughout development of the cerebellum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Tian; Yaguchi, Yuichiro; Echevarria, Diego; Martinez, Salvador; Basson, M. Albert

    2011-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factors (FGFs) and regulators of the FGF signalling pathway are expressed in several cell types within the cerebellum throughout its development. Although much is known about the function of this pathway during the establishment of the cerebellar territory during early embryogenesis, the role of this pathway during later developmental stages is still poorly understood. Here, we investigated the function of sprouty genes (Spry1, Spry2 and Spry4), which encode feedback antagonists of FGF signalling, during cerebellar development in the mouse. Simultaneous deletion of more than one of these genes resulted in a number of defects, including mediolateral expansion of the cerebellar vermis, reduced thickness of the granule cell layer and abnormal foliation. Analysis of cerebellar development revealed that the anterior cerebellar neuroepithelium in the early embryonic cerebellum was expanded and that granule cell proliferation during late embryogenesis and early postnatal development was reduced. We show that the granule cell proliferation deficit correlated with reduced sonic hedgehog (SHH) expression and signalling. A reduction in Fgfr1 dosage during development rescued these defects, confirming that the abnormalities are due to excess FGF signalling. Our data indicate that sprouty acts both cell autonomously in granule cell precursors and non-cell autonomously to regulate granule cell number. Taken together, our data demonstrate that FGF signalling levels have to be tightly controlled throughout cerebellar development in order to maintain the normal development of multiple cell types. PMID:21693512

  4. Requirements for efficient cell-type proportioning: regulatory timescales, stochasticity and lateral inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeuty, B; Kaneko, K

    2016-01-01

    The proper functioning of multicellular organisms requires the robust establishment of precise proportions between distinct cell types. This developmental differentiation process typically involves intracellular regulatory and stochastic mechanisms to generate cell-fate diversity as well as intercellular signaling mechanisms to coordinate cell-fate decisions at tissue level. We thus surmise that key insights about the developmental regulation of cell-type proportion can be captured by the modeling study of clustering dynamics in population of inhibitory-coupled noisy bistable systems. This general class of dynamical system is shown to exhibit a very stable two-cluster state, but also metastability, collective oscillations or noise-induced state hopping, which can prevent from timely and reliably reaching a robust and well-proportioned clustered state. To circumvent these obstacles or to avoid fine-tuning, we highlight a general strategy based on dual-time positive feedback loops, such as mediated through transcriptional versus epigenetic mechanisms, which improves proportion regulation by coordinating early and flexible lineage priming with late and firm commitment. This result sheds new light on the respective and cooperative roles of multiple regulatory feedback, stochasticity and lateral inhibition in developmental dynamics. PMID:27172110

  5. CYP18A1 regulates tissue-specific steroid hormone inactivation in Bombyx mori

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Zhiqian; Ge, Xie; Ling, Lin; Zeng, Baosheng; Xu, Jun; Aslam, Abu F.M.; You, Lang; Palli, Subba Reddy; Huang, Yongping; Tan, Anjiang

    2014-01-01

    Insect development and metamorphosis are regulated by two major hormones, juvenile hormone and ecdysteroids. Despite being the key regulator of insect developmental transitions, the metabolic pathway of the primary steroid hormone, 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E), especially its inactivation pathway, is still not completely elucidated. A cytochrome P450 enzyme, CYP18A1, has been shown to play key roles in insect steroid hormone inactivation through 26-hydroxylation. Here, we identified two CYP18 (Bm...

  6. The Isl1/Ldb1 complex orchestrates heart-specific chromatin organization and transcriptional regulation

    OpenAIRE

    Caputo, Luca

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac progenitor cells hold great potential for regenerative therapies in heart disorders. However, the molecular mechanisms regulating cardiac progenitor cell expansion and differentiation remain poorly defined. Here we show that the multi- adaptor protein Ldb1, which mediates interactions between different classes of LIM domain transcription factors, is a multifunctional regulator of cardiac progenitor cell differentiation. Ldb1-deficient embryonic stem cells (ESCs) show a markedly decrea...

  7. Turtle Functions Downstream of Cut in Differentially Regulating Class Specific Dendrite Morphogenesis in Drosophila

    OpenAIRE

    Sulkowski, Mikolaj J.; Iyer, Srividya Chandramouli; Kurosawa, Mathieu S.; Iyer, Eswar Prasad R.; Cox, Daniel N.

    2011-01-01

    Background Dendritic morphology largely determines patterns of synaptic connectivity and electrochemical properties of a neuron. Neurons display a myriad diversity of dendritic geometries which serve as a basis for functional classification. Several types of molecules have recently been identified which regulate dendrite morphology by acting at the levels of transcriptional regulation, direct interactions with the cytoskeleton and organelles, and cell surface interactions. Although there has ...

  8. GATA3: A master of many trades in immune regulation

    OpenAIRE

    Wan, Yisong Y.

    2014-01-01

    GATA3 has conventionally been regarded as a transcription factor that drives the differentiation of T helper (Th) 2 cells. Increasing evidence points to function for GATA3 beyond controlling Th2 differentiation. GATA3 regulates T cell development, proliferation and maintenance. Furthermore, recent studies have demonstrated important roles for GATA3 in innate lymphoid cells. Thus GATA3 emerges as a factor with diverse functions in immune regulation, which are in some cases cell-type specific a...

  9. Characterization of upstream sequences of the LIM2 gene that bind developmentally regulated and lens-specific proteins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HSU Heng; Robert L. CHURCH

    2004-01-01

    During lens development, lens epithelial cells differentiate into fiber cells. To date, four major lens fiber cell intrinsic membrane proteins (MIP) ranging in size from 70 kD to 19 kD have been characterized. The second most abundant lens fiber cell intrinsic membrane protein is MP19. This protein probably is involved with lens cell communication and relates with cataractogenesis. The aim of this research is to characterize upstream sequences of the MP19 (also called LIM2) gene that bind developmentally regulated and lens-specific proteins. We have used the gel mobility assays and corresponding competition experiments to identify and characterize cis elements within approximately 500 bases of LIM2 upstream sequences. Our studies locate the positions of some cis elements, including a "CA" repeat, a methylation Hha I island, an FnuD II site, an Ap1 and an Ap2 consensus sequences, and identify some specific cis elements which relate to lens-specific transcription of LIM2. Our experiments also preliminarily identify trans factors which bind to specific cis elements of the LIM2 promoter and/or regulate transcription of LIM2. We conclude that developmental regulation and coordination of the MP 19 gene in ocular lens fiber cells is controlled by the presence of specific cis elements that bind regulatory trans factors that affect LIM2 gene expression. DNA methylation is one mechanism of controlling LIM2 gene expression during lens development.

  10. Endothelial-Specific EphA4 Negatively Regulates Native Pial Collateral Formation and Re-Perfusion following Hindlimb Ischemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okyere, Benjamin; Giridhar, Kaavya; Hazy, Amanda; Chen, Miao; Keimig, David; Bielitz, Robert C.; Xie, Hehuang; He, Jia-Qiang; Huckle, William R.; Theus, Michelle H.

    2016-01-01

    Leptomeningeal anastomoses play a critical role in regulating vascular re-perfusion following obstruction, however, the mechanisms regulating their development remains under investingation. Our current findings indicate that EphA4 receptor is a novel negative regulator of collaterogenesis. We demonstrate that EphA4 is highly expressed on pial arteriole collaterals at post-natal day (P) 1 and 7, then significantly reduced by P21. Endothelial cell (EC)-specific loss of EphA4, EphA4f/f/Tie2::Cre (KO), resulted in an increase in the density but not diameter of pial collaterals compared to WT mice. ECs isolated from KO mice displayed a 3-fold increase in proliferation, enhanced migration, tube formation and elevated levels of phospho(p)-Akt compared to WT ECs. Attenuating p-Akt, using LY294002, reduced the proliferative and migration effects in the KO ECs. RNAseq analysis also revealed altered expression patterns for genes that regulate cell proliferation, vascular development, extracellular matrix and immune-mediate responses, namely MCP-1, MMP2 and angiopoietin-1. Lastly, we show that induction of hindlimb ischemia resulted in accelerated re-perfusion, collateral remodeling and reduced tissue necrosis in the absence of EC-specific EphA4 compared to WT mice. These findings demonstrate a novel role for EphA4 in the early development of the pial collateral network and suggests a role in regulating vascular remodeling after obstruction. PMID:27467069

  11. Prohibitin 2 regulates the proliferation and lineage-specific differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells in mitochondria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megumi Kowno

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The pluripotent state of embryonic stem (ES cells is controlled by a network of specific transcription factors. Recent studies also suggested the significant contribution of mitochondria on the regulation of pluripotent stem cells. However, the molecules involved in these regulations are still unknown. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, we found that prohibitin 2 (PHB2, a pleiotrophic factor mainly localized in mitochondria, is a crucial regulatory factor for the homeostasis and differentiation of ES cells. PHB2 was highly expressed in undifferentiated mouse ES cells, and the expression was decreased during the differentiation of ES cells. Knockdown of PHB2 induced significant apoptosis in pluripotent ES cells, whereas enhanced expression of PHB2 contributed to the proliferation of ES cells. However, enhanced expression of PHB2 strongly inhibited ES cell differentiation into neuronal and endodermal cells. Interestingly, only PHB2 with intact mitochondrial targeting signal showed these specific effects on ES cells. Moreover, overexpression of PHB2 enhanced the processing of a dynamin-like GTPase (OPA1 that regulates mitochondrial fusion and cristae remodeling, which could induce partial dysfunction of mitochondria. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results suggest that PHB2 is a crucial mitochondrial regulator for homeostasis and lineage-specific differentiation of ES cells.

  12. Circuit-wide Transcriptional Profiling Reveals Brain Region-Specific Gene Networks Regulating Depression Susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagot, Rosemary C; Cates, Hannah M; Purushothaman, Immanuel; Lorsch, Zachary S; Walker, Deena M; Wang, Junshi; Huang, Xiaojie; Schlüter, Oliver M; Maze, Ian; Peña, Catherine J; Heller, Elizabeth A; Issler, Orna; Wang, Minghui; Song, Won-Min; Stein, Jason L; Liu, Xiaochuan; Doyle, Marie A; Scobie, Kimberly N; Sun, Hao Sheng; Neve, Rachael L; Geschwind, Daniel; Dong, Yan; Shen, Li; Zhang, Bin; Nestler, Eric J

    2016-06-01

    Depression is a complex, heterogeneous disorder and a leading contributor to the global burden of disease. Most previous research has focused on individual brain regions and genes contributing to depression. However, emerging evidence in humans and animal models suggests that dysregulated circuit function and gene expression across multiple brain regions drive depressive phenotypes. Here, we performed RNA sequencing on four brain regions from control animals and those susceptible or resilient to chronic social defeat stress at multiple time points. We employed an integrative network biology approach to identify transcriptional networks and key driver genes that regulate susceptibility to depressive-like symptoms. Further, we validated in vivo several key drivers and their associated transcriptional networks that regulate depression susceptibility and confirmed their functional significance at the levels of gene transcription, synaptic regulation, and behavior. Our study reveals novel transcriptional networks that control stress susceptibility and offers fundamentally new leads for antidepressant drug discovery. PMID:27181059

  13. SAS4 and SAS5 are locus-specific regulators of silencing in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, E Y; S. Kim; Rivier, D H

    1999-01-01

    Sir2p, Sir3p, Sir4p, and the core histones form a repressive chromatin structure that silences transcription in the regions near telomeres and at the HML and HMR cryptic mating-type loci in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Null alleles of SAS4 and SAS5 suppress silencing defects at HMR; therefore, SAS4 and SAS5 are negative regulators of silencing at HMR. This study revealed that SAS4 and SAS5 contribute to silencing at HML and the telomeres, indicating that SAS4 and SAS5 are positive regulators of ...

  14. Schedules of Provisions of the IAEA Regulations for the Safe Transport of Radioactive Material (2012 Edition). Specific Safety Guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Safety Guide aims to aid users of radioactive material and regulators by providing a listing of relevant requirements of the regulations (IAEA Safety Standards Series No. SSR 6) as applicable to the type of radioactive material, package or shipment. Once a consignor has properly classified the radioactive material to be shipped (following the recommendations provided in Section 2 and Fig. 1 of this Safety Guide), the appropriate UN number can be assigned and the paragraph numbers of specific requirements for shipment can be found in the corresponding schedule

  15. C/EBP beta regulation of the tumor necrosis factor alpha gene.

    OpenAIRE

    Pope, R. M.; Leutz, A; Ness, S A

    1994-01-01

    Activated macrophages contribute to chronic inflammation by the secretion of cytokines and proteinases. Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF alpha) is particularly important in this process because of its ability to regulate other inflammatory mediators in an autocrine and paracrine fashion. The mechanism(s) responsible for the cell type-specific regulation of TNF alpha is not known. We present data to show that the expression of TNF alpha is regulated by the transcription factor C/EBP beta (NF-I...

  16. Distinct and stage specific nuclear factors regulate the expression of falcipains, Plasmodium falciparum cysteine proteases

    OpenAIRE

    Malhotra Pawan; Chauhan Virander S; Sunil Sujatha

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Plasmodium falciparum cysteine proteases (falcipains) play indispensable roles in parasite infection and development, especially in the process of host erythrocyte rupture/invasion and hemoglobin degradation. No detailed molecular analysis of transcriptional regulation of parasite proteases especially cysteine proteases has yet been reported. In this study, using a combination of transient transfection assays and electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSA), we demonstrate...

  17. Cell cycle-specific UNG2 phosphorylations regulate protein turnover, activity and association with RPA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hagen, Lars; Kavli, Bodil; Sousa, Mirta M L; Torseth, Kathrin; Liabakk, Nina B; Sundheim, Ottar; Pena Diaz, Javier; Otterlei, Marit; Hørning, Ole; Jensen, Ole N; Krokan, Hans E; Slupphaug, Geir

    2008-01-01

    Human UNG2 is a multifunctional glycosylase that removes uracil near replication forks and in non-replicating DNA, and is important for affinity maturation of antibodies in B cells. How these diverse functions are regulated remains obscure. Here, we report three new phosphoforms of the non-cataly...

  18. GATA-2 and GATA-3 regulate trophoblast-specific gene expression in vivo.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.T. Ma (Grace); M.E. Roth (Matthew); J.C. Groskopf (John); F.G. Grosveld (Frank); J.D. Engel (Douglas); D.I.H. Linzer (Daniel); F.Y. Tsai (Fong-Ying); S.H. Orkin (Stuart)

    1997-01-01

    textabstractWe previously demonstrated that the zinc finger transcription factors GATA-2 and GATA-3 are expressed in trophoblast giant cells and that they regulate transcription from the mouse placental lactogen I gene promoter in a transfected trophoblast cell line. We present evidence here that bo

  19. Rapid male-specific regulatory divergence and down regulation of spermatogenesis genes in Drosophila species hybrids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Ferguson

    Full Text Available In most crosses between closely related species of Drosophila, the male hybrids are sterile and show postmeiotic abnormalities. A series of gene expression studies using genomic approaches have found significant down regulation of postmeiotic spermatogenesis genes in sterile male hybrids. These results have led some to suggest a direct relationship between down regulation in gene expression and hybrid sterility. An alternative explanation to a cause-and-effect relationship between misregulation of gene expression and male sterility is rapid divergence of male sex regulatory elements leading to incompatible interactions in an interspecies hybrid genome. To test the effect of regulatory divergence in spermatogenesis gene expression, we isolated 35 fertile D. simulans strains with D. mauritiana introgressions in either the X, second or third chromosome. We analyzed gene expression in these fertile hybrid strains for a subset of spermatogenesis genes previously reported as significantly under expressed in sterile hybrids relative to D. simulans. We found that fertile autosomal introgressions can cause levels of gene down regulation similar to that of sterile hybrids. We also found that X chromosome heterospecific introgressions cause significantly less gene down regulation than autosomal introgressions. Our results provide evidence that rapid male sex gene regulatory divergence can explain misexpression of spermatogenesis genes in hybrids.

  20. Specific microRNAs Regulate Heat Stress Responses in Caenorhabditis elegans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nehammer, Camilla; Podolska, Agnieszka; Mackowiak, Sebastian D;

    2015-01-01

    The ability of animals to sense and respond to elevated temperature is essential for survival. Transcriptional control of the heat stress response has been much studied, whereas its posttranscriptional regulation by microRNAs (miRNAs) is not well understood. Here we analyzed the miRNA response to...

  1. Cell-specific precursor processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rehfeld, Jens F; Bundgaard, Jens R

    2010-01-01

    The singular gene for a peptide hormone is expressed not only in a specific endocrine cell type but also in other endocrine cells as well as in entirely different cells such as neurons, adipocytes, myocytes, immune cells, and cells of the sex-glands. The cellular expression pattern for each gene...... varies with development, time and species. Endocrine regulation is, however, based on the release of a given hormone from an endocrine cell to the general circulation from whose cappilaries the hormone reaches the specific target cell elsewhere in the body. The widespread expression of hormone genes in...... different cells and tissues therefore requires control of biogenesis and secretion in order to avoid interference with the function of a specific hormonal peptide from a particular endocrine cell. Several mechanisms are involved in such control, one of them being cell-specific processing of prohormones. The...

  2. MEK kinase 1 is a negative regulator of virus-specific CD8(+) T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Labuda, Tord; Christensen, Jan Pravsgaard; Rasmussen, Susanne; Bonnesen, Barbara; Karin, Michael; Thomsen, Allan Randrup; Ødum, Niels

    2006-01-01

    in the generation of a virus-specific immune response. Mekk1(DeltaKD) mice challenged with vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) showed a fourfold increase in splenic CD8(+) T cell numbers. In contrast, the number of splenic T cells in infected WT mice was only marginally increased. The CD8(+) T cell...... result of increased proliferation, since a significantly higher percentage of virus-specific Mekk1(DeltaKD) CD8(+) T cells incorporated BrdU as compared to virus-specific WT CD8(+) T cells. In contrast, similar levels of apoptosis were detected in Mekk1(DeltaKD) and WT T cells following VSV infection....... These results strongly suggest that MEKK1 plays a negative regulatory role in the expansion of virus-specific CD8(+) T cells in vivo....

  3. Specific growth rate regulation in a simulated fed-batch E. coli fermentation

    OpenAIRE

    Rocha, I.; Ferreira, E. C.

    2006-01-01

    The specific growth rate is one of the most important process variables characterizing the state of microorganisms during fermentations mainly because the biosynthesis of many products of interest is often related with the values assumed by this parameter. In the particular case of the fed-batch operation of Escherichia coli for the production of recombinant proteins, it is often argued that both pre- and the post-induction specific growth rates should be closely controlled in ...

  4. Isomer-specific regulation of metabolism and PPARγ signaling by CLA in human preadipocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, J. Mark; Boysen, Maria Sandberg; Jensen, Søren Skov; Morrison, Ron F.; Storkson, Jayne; Lea-Currie, Renee; Pariza, Michael; Mandrup, Susanne; McIntosh, Michael K.

    2003-01-01

    Trans-10,cis-12 conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) has previously been shown to be the CLA isomer responsible for CLA-induced reductions in body fat in animal models, and we have shown that this isomer, but not the cis-9,trans-11 CLA isomer, specifically decreased triglyceride (TG) accumulation in primary human adiopcytes in vitro. Here we investigated the mechanism behind the isomer-specific, CLA-mediated reduction in TG accumulation in differentiating human preadipocytes. Trans-10,cis-12 CLA de...

  5. Human muscle fibre type-specific regulation of AMPK and downstream targets by exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Dorte Enggaard; Albers, Peter Hjorth; Prats, Clara;

    2015-01-01

    ) ). Exercise-induced glycogen degradation in type I vs. II fibres was similar (CON) or lower (INT). In conclusion, a differentiated response to exercise of metabolic signalling/effector proteins in human type I and II fibres was evident during interval exercise. This could be important for exercise......-type specific adaptations, i.e. insulin sensitivity and mitochondrial density, and highlights the potential for new discoveries when investigating fibre type-specific signalling. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved....

  6. Plug-and-Play Genetic Access to Drosophila Cell Types using Exchangeable Exon Cassettes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fengqiu Diao

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Genetically encoded effectors are important tools for probing cellular function in living animals, but improved methods for directing their expression to specific cell types are required. Here, we introduce a simple, versatile method for achieving cell-type-specific expression of transgenes that leverages the untapped potential of “coding introns” (i.e., introns between coding exons. Our method couples the expression of a transgene to that of a native gene expressed in the cells of interest using intronically inserted “plug-and-play” cassettes (called “Trojan exons” that carry a splice acceptor site followed by the coding sequences of T2A peptide and an effector transgene. We demonstrate the efficacy of this approach in Drosophila using lines containing suitable MiMIC (Minos-mediated integration cassette transposons and a palette of Trojan exons capable of expressing a range of commonly used transcription factors. We also introduce an exchangeable, MiMIC-like Trojan exon construct that can be targeted to coding introns using the Crispr/Cas system.

  7. Plug-and-Play Genetic Access to Drosophila Cell Types Using Exchangeable Exon Cassettes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diao, Fengqiu; Ironfield, Holly; Luan, Haojiang; Diao, Feici; Shropshire, William C.; Ewer, John; Marr, Elizabeth; Potter, Christopher J.; Landgraf, Matthias; White, Benjamin H.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Genetically encoded effectors are important tools for probing cellular function in living animals, but improved methods for directing their expression to specific cell types are required. Here we introduce a simple, versatile method for achieving cell type-specific expression of transgenes that leverages the untapped potential of “coding introns” (i.e. introns between coding exons). Our method couples the expression of a transgene to that of a native gene expressed in the cells of interest using intronically inserted “plug-and-play” cassettes (called “Trojan exons”) that carry a splice acceptor site followed by the coding sequences of T2A peptide and an effector transgene. We demonstrate the efficacy of this approach in Drosophila using lines containing suitable MiMIC transposons and a palette of Trojan exons capable of expressing a range of commonly used transcription factors. We also introduce an exchangeable, MiMIC-like Trojan exon construct that can be targeted to coding introns using the Crispr/Cas system. PMID:25732830

  8. PTPRT regulates the interaction of Syntaxin-binding protein 1 with Syntaxin 1 through dephosphorylation of specific tyrosine residue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: •PTPRT is a brain-specific, expressed, protein tyrosine phosphatase. •PTPRT regulated the interaction of Syntaxin-binding protein 1 with Syntaxin 1. •PTPRT dephosphorylated the specific tyrosine residue of Syntaxin-binding protein 1. •Dephosphorylation of Syntaxin-binding protein 1 enhanced the interaction with Syntaxin 1. •PTPRT appears to regulate the fusion of synaptic vesicle through dephosphorylation. -- Abstract: PTPRT (protein tyrosine phosphatase receptor T), a brain-specific tyrosine phosphatase, has been found to regulate synaptic formation and development of hippocampal neurons, but its regulation mechanism is not yet fully understood. Here, Syntaxin-binding protein 1, a key component of synaptic vesicle fusion machinery, was identified as a possible interaction partner and an endogenous substrate of PTPRT. PTPRT interacted with Syntaxin-binding protein 1 in rat synaptosome, and co-localized with Syntaxin-binding protein 1 in cultured hippocampal neurons. PTPRT dephosphorylated tyrosine 145 located around the linker between domain 1 and 2 of Syntaxin-binding protein 1. Syntaxin-binding protein 1 directly binds to Syntaxin 1, a t-SNARE (soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor) protein, and plays a role as catalysts of SNARE complex formation. Syntaxin-binding protein 1 mutant mimicking non-phosphorylation (Y145F) enhanced the interaction with Syntaxin 1 compared to wild type, and therefore, dephosphorylation of Syntaxin-binding protein 1 appeared to be important for SNARE-complex formation. In conclusion, PTPRT could regulate the interaction of Syntaxin-binding protein 1 with Syntaxin 1, and as a result, the synaptic vesicle fusion appeared to be controlled through dephosphorylation of Syntaxin-binding protein 1

  9. Specific regulation of male rat liver cytosolic estrogen receptor by the modulator of the glucocorticoid receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celiker, M Y; Haas, A; Saunders, D; Litwack, G

    1993-08-31

    Modulator is a novel low-molecular-weight organic compound that regulates activities of glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid receptors as well as protein kinase C. In this study we show that male rat liver cytosolic estrogen receptor activation is inhibited by modulator in a dose-dependent manner. Fifty percent inhibition is obtained with 1 unit/ml modulator purified from bovine liver which is within the physiological concentration for modulator. However, sheep uterine cytosolic estrogen and androgen receptors are insensitive to regulation by modulator. Exogenous sodium molybdate treatment inhibits activation of all of these receptors of liver or uterus origin in an identical manner, further differentiating the effects of modulator and the molybdate anion. PMID:8363596

  10. Organ-specific regulation of growth-defense tradeoffs by plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smakowska, Elwira; Kong, Jixiang; Busch, Wolfgang; Belkhadir, Youssef

    2016-02-01

    Plants grow while also defending themselves against phylogenetically unrelated pathogens. Because defense and growth are both costly programs, a plant's success in colonizing resource-scarce environments requires tradeoffs between the two. Here, we summarize efforts aimed at understanding how plants use iterative tradeoffs to modulate differential organ growth when defenses are elicited. First, we focus on shoots to illustrate how light, in conjunction with the growth hormone gibberellin (GA) and the defense hormone jasmonic acid (JA), act to finely regulate defense and growth programs in this organ. Second, we expand on the regulation of growth-defense trade-offs in the root, a less well-studied topic despite the critical role of this organ in acquiring resources in an environment deeply entrenched with disparate populations of microbes. PMID:26802804

  11. Comparative Characterization of Cardiac Development Specific microRNAs: Fetal Regulators for Future

    OpenAIRE

    Rustagi, Yashika; Jaiswal, Hitesh K.; Rawal, Kamal; Kundu, Gopal C.; Rani, Vibha

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small, conserved RNAs known to regulate several biological processes by influencing gene expression in eukaryotes. The implication of miRNAs as another player of regulatory layers during heart development and diseases has recently been explored. However, there is no study which elucidates the profiling of miRNAs during development of heart till date. Very limited miRNAs have been reported to date in cardiac context. In addition, integration of large scale experimental d...

  12. The activity-dependent transcription factor NPAS4 regulates domain-specific inhibition

    OpenAIRE

    Bloodgood, Brenda L.; Sharma, Nikhil; Browne, Heidi Adlman; Trepman, Alissa Z.; Greenberg, Michael E.

    2013-01-01

    A heterogeneous population of inhibitory neurons controls the flow of information through a neural circuit1–3. Inhibitory synapses that form on pyramidal neuron dendrites modulate the summation of excitatory synaptic potentials4–6 and prevent the generation of dendritic calcium spikes7,8. Precisely timed somatic inhibition limits both the number of action potentials and the time window during which firing can occur8,9. The activity-dependent transcription factor NPAS4 regulates inhibitory syn...

  13. Emotion Regulation and Emotion Coherence: Evidence for Strategy-Specific Effects

    OpenAIRE

    Dan-Glauser, Elise S.; Gross, James J.

    2013-01-01

    One of the central tenets of emotion theory is that emotions involve coordinated changes across experiential, behavioral, and physiological response domains. Surprisingly little is known, however, on how the strength of this emotion coherence is altered when people try to regulate their emotions. To address this issue, we recorded experiential, behavioral, and physiological responses while participants watched negative and positive pictures. Cross-correlations were used to quantify emotion co...

  14. Regulation of mRNA Levels by Decay-Promoting Introns that Recruit the Exosome Specificity Factor Mmi1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornelia Kilchert

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In eukaryotic cells, inefficient splicing is surprisingly common and leads to the degradation of transcripts with retained introns. How pre-mRNAs are committed to nuclear decay is unknown. Here, we uncover a mechanism by which specific intron-containing transcripts are targeted for nuclear degradation in fission yeast. Sequence elements within these “decay-promoting” introns co-transcriptionally recruit the exosome specificity factor Mmi1, which induces degradation of the unspliced precursor and leads to a reduction in the levels of the spliced mRNA. This mechanism negatively regulates levels of the RNA helicase DDX5/Dbp2 to promote cell survival in response to stress. In contrast, fast removal of decay-promoting introns by co-transcriptional splicing precludes Mmi1 recruitment and relieves negative expression regulation. We propose that decay-promoting introns facilitate the regulation of gene expression. Based on the identification of multiple additional Mmi1 targets, including mRNAs, long non-coding RNAs, and sn/snoRNAs, we suggest a general role in RNA regulation for Mmi1 through transcript degradation.

  15. Cold-inducible RNA binding protein (CIRP, a novel XTcf-3 specific target gene regulates neural development in Xenopus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wedlich Doris

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As nuclear mediators of wnt/β-catenin signaling, Lef/Tcf transcription factors play important roles in development and disease. Although it is well established, that the four vertebrate Lef/Tcfs have unique functional properties, most studies unite Lef-1, Tcf-1, Tcf-3 and Tcf-4 and reduce their function to uniformly transduce wnt/β-catenin signaling for activating wnt target genes. In order to discriminate target genes regulated by XTcf-3 from those regulated by XTcf-4 or Lef/Tcfs in general, we performed a subtractive screen, using neuralized Xenopus animal cap explants. Results We identified cold-inducible RNA binding protein (CIRP as novel XTcf-3 specific target gene. Furthermore, we show that knockdown of XTcf-3 by injection of an antisense morpholino oligonucleotide results in a general broadening of the anterior neural tissue. Depletion of XCIRP by antisense morpholino oligonucleotide injection leads to a reduced stability of mRNA and an enlargement of the anterior neural plate similar to the depletion of XTcf-3. Conclusion Distinct steps in neural development are differentially regulated by individual Lef/Tcfs. For proper development of the anterior brain XTcf-3 and the Tcf-subtype specific target XCIRP appear indispensable. Thus, regulation of anterior neural development, at least in part, depends on mRNA stabilization by the novel XTcf-3 target gene XCIRP.

  16. Rbfox proteins regulate microRNA biogenesis by sequence-specific binding to their precursors and target downstream Dicer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu; Zubovic, Lorena; Yang, Fan; Godin, Katherine; Pavelitz, Tom; Castellanos, Javier; Macchi, Paolo; Varani, Gabriele

    2016-01-01

    Rbfox proteins regulate tissue-specific splicing by targeting a conserved GCAUG sequence within pre-mRNAs. We report here that sequence-specific binding of the conserved Rbfox RRM to miRNA precursors containing the same sequence motif in their terminal loops, including miR-20b and miR-107, suppresses their nuclear processing. The structure of the complex between precursor miR-20b and Rbfox RRM shows the molecular basis for recognition, and reveals changes in the stem-loop upon protein binding. In mammalian cells, Rbfox2 downregulates mature miR-20b and miR-107 levels and increases the expression of their downstream targets PTEN and Dicer, respectively, suggesting that Rbfox2 indirectly regulates many more cellular miRNAs. Thus, some of the widespread cellular functions of Rbfox2 protein are attributable to regulation of miRNA biogenesis, and might include the mis-regulation of miR-20b and miR-107 in cancer and neurodegeneration. PMID:27001519

  17. Rbfox proteins regulate microRNA biogenesis by sequence-specific binding to their precursors and target downstream Dicer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu; Zubovic, Lorena; Yang, Fan; Godin, Katherine; Pavelitz, Tom; Castellanos, Javier; Macchi, Paolo; Varani, Gabriele

    2016-05-19

    Rbfox proteins regulate tissue-specific splicing by targeting a conserved GCAUG sequence within pre-mRNAs. We report here that sequence-specific binding of the conserved Rbfox RRM to miRNA precursors containing the same sequence motif in their terminal loops, including miR-20b and miR-107, suppresses their nuclear processing. The structure of the complex between precursor miR-20b and Rbfox RRM shows the molecular basis for recognition, and reveals changes in the stem-loop upon protein binding. In mammalian cells, Rbfox2 downregulates mature miR-20b and miR-107 levels and increases the expression of their downstream targets PTEN and Dicer, respectively, suggesting that Rbfox2 indirectly regulates many more cellular miRNAs. Thus, some of the widespread cellular functions of Rbfox2 protein are attributable to regulation of miRNA biogenesis, and might include the mis-regulation of miR-20b and miR-107 in cancer and neurodegeneration. PMID:27001519

  18. Regulation of fat specific protein 27 by isoproterenol and TNF-α to control lipolysis in murine adipocytes[S

    OpenAIRE

    Ranjit, Srijana; Boutet, Emilie; Gandhi, Pallavi; Prot, Matthieu; Tamori, Yoshikazu; Chawla, Anil; Greenberg, Andrew S.; Puri, Vishwajeet; Czech, Michael P.

    2011-01-01

    The lipid droplet-associated fat specific protein 27 (FSP27) suppresses lipolysis and thereby enhances triglyceride accumulation in adipocytes. We and others have recently found FSP27 to be a remarkably short-lived protein (half-life, 15 min) due to its rapid ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation. Thus, we tested the hypothesis that lipolytic agents such as tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and isoproterenol modulate FSP27 levels to regulate FFA release. Consistent with this concept, we sh...

  19. Region-specific variation in the properties of skeletal adipocytes reveals regulated and constitutive marrow adipose tissues

    OpenAIRE

    Erica L. Scheller; Doucette, Casey R.; Learman, Brian S.; Cawthorn, William P; Khandaker, Shaima; Schell, Benjamin; Wu, Brent; Ding, Shi-Ying; Bredella, Miriam A.; Fazeli, Pouneh K.; Khoury, Basma; Jepsen, Karl J.; Pilch, Paul F.; Klibanski, Anne; ROSEN, CLIFFORD J

    2015-01-01

    Marrow adipose tissue (MAT) accumulates in diverse clinical conditions but remains poorly understood. Here we show region-specific variation in MAT adipocyte development, regulation, size, lipid composition, gene expression, and genetic determinants. Early MAT formation in mice is conserved, while later development is strain dependent. Proximal, but not distal, MAT is lost with 21-day cold exposure. Rat MAT adipocytes from distal sites have an increased proportion of monounsaturated fatty aci...

  20. Proteomic analysis of astrocytic secretion that regulates neurogenesis using quantitative amine-specific isobaric tagging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Astrocytes are essential components of neurogenic niches that affect neurogenesis through membrane association and/or the release of soluble factors. To identify factors released from astrocytes that could regulate neural stem cell differentiation and proliferation, we used mild oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) to inhibit the secretory capacity of astrocytes. Using the Transwell co-culture system, we found that OGD-treated astrocytes could not promote neural stem cell differentiation and proliferation. Next, isobaric tagging for the relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ) proteomics techniques was performed to identify the proteins in the supernatants of astrocytes (with or without OGD). Through a multi-step analysis and gene ontology classification, 130 extracellular proteins were identified, most of which were involved in neuronal development, the inflammatory response, extracellular matrix composition and supportive functions. Of these proteins, 44 had never been reported to be produced by astrocytes. Using ProteinPilot software analysis, we found that 60 extracellular proteins were significantly altered (27 upregulated and 33 downregulated) in the supernatant of OGD-treated astrocytes. Among these proteins, 7 have been reported to be able to regulate neurogenesis, while others may have the potential to regulate neurogenesis. This study profiles the major proteins released by astrocytes, which play important roles in the modulation of neurogenesis.

  1. Proteomic analysis of astrocytic secretion that regulates neurogenesis using quantitative amine-specific isobaric tagging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Hu; Zhou, Wenhao [Children' s Hospital of Fudan University, 399 Wanyuan Road, Shanghai 201102 (China); Wei, Liming; Zhong, Fan [Institutes of Biomedical Sciences, Fudan University, 138 Yixueyuan Roda, Shanghai 200032 (China); Yang, Yi, E-mail: yyang@shmu.edu.cn [Children' s Hospital of Fudan University, 399 Wanyuan Road, Shanghai 201102 (China)

    2010-01-08

    Astrocytes are essential components of neurogenic niches that affect neurogenesis through membrane association and/or the release of soluble factors. To identify factors released from astrocytes that could regulate neural stem cell differentiation and proliferation, we used mild oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) to inhibit the secretory capacity of astrocytes. Using the Transwell co-culture system, we found that OGD-treated astrocytes could not promote neural stem cell differentiation and proliferation. Next, isobaric tagging for the relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ) proteomics techniques was performed to identify the proteins in the supernatants of astrocytes (with or without OGD). Through a multi-step analysis and gene ontology classification, 130 extracellular proteins were identified, most of which were involved in neuronal development, the inflammatory response, extracellular matrix composition and supportive functions. Of these proteins, 44 had never been reported to be produced by astrocytes. Using ProteinPilot software analysis, we found that 60 extracellular proteins were significantly altered (27 upregulated and 33 downregulated) in the supernatant of OGD-treated astrocytes. Among these proteins, 7 have been reported to be able to regulate neurogenesis, while others may have the potential to regulate neurogenesis. This study profiles the major proteins released by astrocytes, which play important roles in the modulation of neurogenesis.

  2. The statistical geometry of transcriptome divergence in cell-type evolution and cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liang, Cong; Forrest, Alistair R R; Wagner, Günter P; Clevers, J.C.

    2015-01-01

    In evolution, body plan complexity increases due to an increase in the number of individualized cell types. Yet, there is very little understanding of the mechanisms that produce this form of organismal complexity. One model for the origin of novel cell types is the sister cell-type model. According

  3. Development of functionalized nanodiamond fluorescence detection platform: Analysis the specific promoter regulated by p53

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Diansyue; Chu, Hsueh-Liang; Chuang, Hung; Lu, Yu-Ning; Ho, Li-Ping; Li, Hsing-Yuan; Hsu, Ming-Hua; Chang, Chia-Ching

    2014-03-01

    Nanodiamond (ND) is one of the biocompatible nanomaterials with large tunable surface for chemical modification. It possesses unique mechanical, spectroscopy, and thermal properties. It is an excellent molecular vehicle to deliver specific molecules in biological system. The green fluorescent protein (GFP) is a protein that emits strong green fluorescence when it is excited by ultra-violet to blue light. It makes GFP a good indicator. By combining ND-GFP, a visible biocompatible delivery system will be developed. p53 is a tumor suppressor protein encoded by the TP53 gene. P53 plays an important role in apoptosis, genomic stability, and inhibition of angiogenesis by interacting with specific DNA sequence of promoter of related genes. In this study, a p53 functionalized ND-GFP will be developed. This complex can recognize the specific DNA sequence of promoter and the intermolecular interactions can be monitored directly by fluorescence and Raman spectroscopy both in vivo and in vitro.

  4. Base J glucosyltransferase does not regulate the sequence specificity of J synthesis in trypanosomatid telomeric DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullard, Whitney; Cliffe, Laura; Wang, Pengcheng; Wang, Yinsheng; Sabatini, Robert

    2015-12-01

    Telomeric DNA of trypanosomatids possesses a modified thymine base, called base J, that is synthesized in a two-step process; the base is hydroxylated by a thymidine hydroxylase forming hydroxymethyluracil (hmU) and a glucose moiety is then attached by the J-associated glucosyltransferase (JGT). To examine the importance of JGT in modifiying specific thymine in DNA, we used a Leishmania episome system to demonstrate that the telomeric repeat (GGGTTA) stimulates J synthesis in vivo while mutant telomeric sequences (GGGTTT, GGGATT, and GGGAAA) do not. Utilizing an in vitro GT assay we find that JGT can glycosylate hmU within any sequence with no significant change in Km or kcat, even mutant telomeric sequences that are unable to be J-modified in vivo. The data suggests that JGT possesses no DNA sequence specificity in vitro, lending support to the hypothesis that the specificity of base J synthesis is not at the level of the JGT reaction. PMID:26815240

  5. Effective learning among elite football players: the development of a football-specific self-regulated learning questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toering, Tynke; Jordet, Geir; Ripegutu, Anders

    2013-01-01

    The present study aimed to develop a football-specific self-report instrument measuring self-regulated learning in the context of daily practice, which can be used to monitor the extent to which players take responsibility for their own learning. Development of the instrument involved six steps: 1. Literature review based on Zimmerman's (2006) theory of self-regulated learning, 2. Item generation, 3. Item validation, 4. Pilot studies, 5. Exploratory factor analysis (EFA), and 6. Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA). The instrument was tested for reliability and validity among 204 elite youth football players aged 13-16 years (Mage = 14.6; s = 0.60; 123 boys, 81 girls). The EFA indicated that a five-factor model fitted the observed data best (reflection, evaluation, planning, speaking up, and coaching). However, the CFA showed that a three-factor structure including 22 items produced a satisfactory model fit (reflection, evaluation, and planning; non-normed fit index [NNFI] = 0.96, comparative fit index [CFI] = 0.95, root mean square error of approximation [RMSEA] = 0.067). While the self-regulation processes of reflection, evaluation, and planning are strongly related and fit well into one model, other self-regulated learning processes seem to be more individually determined. In conclusion, the questionnaire developed in this study is considered a reliable and valid instrument to measure self-regulated learning among elite football players. PMID:23731271

  6. NAC genes: Time-specific regulators of hormonal signaling in Arabidopsis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Michael Krogh; Kjærsgaard, Trine; Petersen, Klaus;

    2010-01-01

    Environmental stresses on both animals and plants impose massive transcriptional perturbations. Successful adaptations to such stresses are being orchestrated by both activating and repressing effects of transcription factors on specific target genes. We have recently published a systematic chara...... genes upon stimuli with seven phytohormones. Our analysis could be a first indication of NAC-centered transcriptional networks, which coordinate timely hormonal signaling in plants.......Environmental stresses on both animals and plants impose massive transcriptional perturbations. Successful adaptations to such stresses are being orchestrated by both activating and repressing effects of transcription factors on specific target genes. We have recently published a systematic...

  7. Cryopreservation and in vitro culture of primary cell types from lung tissue of a stranded pygmy sperm whale (Kogia breviceps).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annalaura Mancia; Spyropoulos, Demetri D; McFee, Wayne E; Newton, Danforth A; Baatz, John E

    2012-01-01

    Current models for in vitro studies of tissue function and physiology, including responses to hypoxia or environmental toxins, are limited and rely heavily on standard 2-dimensional (2-D) cultures with immortalized murine or human cell lines. To develop a new more powerful model system, we have pursued methods to establish and expand cultures of primary lung cell types and reconstituted tissues from marine mammals. What little is known about the physiology of the deep-sea diving pygmy sperm whale (PSW), Kogia breviceps, comes primarily from stranding events that occur along the coast of the southeastern United States. Thus, development of a method for preserving live tissues and retrieving live cells from deceased stranded individuals was initiated. This report documents successful cryopreservation of PSW lung tissue. We established in vitro cultures of primary lung cell types from tissue fragments that had been cryopreserved several months earlier at the stranding event. Dissociation of cryopreserved lung tissues readily provides a variety of primary cell types that, to varying degrees, can be expanded and further studied/manipulated in cell culture. In addition, PSW-specific molecular markers have been developed that permitted the monitoring of fibroblast, alveolar type II, and vascular endothelial cell types. Reconstitution of 3-D cultures of lung tissues with these cell types is now underway. This novel system may facilitate the development of rare or disease-specific lung tissue models (e.g., to test causes of PSW stranding events and lead to improved treatments for pulmonary hypertension or reperfusion injury in humans). Also, the establishment of a "living" tissue bank biorepository for rare/endangered species could serve multiple purposes as surrogates for freshly isolated samples. PMID:21501697

  8. Identification and characterization of seed-specific transcription factors regulating anthocyanin biosynthesis in black rice

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, C.-K; Cho, M.-A.; Choi, Y.-H.; Kim, J.-A.; Kim, Y.-H.; Kim, Y.-K.; Park, S.-H

    2011-01-01

    Black rice is rich in anthocyanin and is expected to have more healthful dietary potential than white rice. We assessed expression of anthocyanin in black rice cultivars using a newly designed 135 K Oryza sativa microarray. A total of 12,673 genes exhibited greater than 2.0-fold up- or down-regulation in comparisons between three rice cultivars and three seed developmental stages. The 137 transcription factor genes found to be associated with production of anthocyanin pigment were classified ...

  9. Cyclic GMP-specific Phosphodiesterase-5 Regulates Motility of Sea Urchin Spermatozoa

    OpenAIRE

    Su, Yi-Hsien; Vacquier, Victor D.

    2006-01-01

    Motility, chemotaxis, and the acrosome reaction of animal sperm are all regulated by cyclic nucleotides and protein phosphorylation. One of the cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) substrates in sea urchin sperm is a member of the phosphodiesterase (PDE) family. The molecular identity and in vivo function of this PDE remained unknown. Here we cloned and characterized this sea urchin sperm PDE (suPDE5), which is an ortholog of human PDE5. The recombinant catalytic domain of suPDE5 hydroly...

  10. Specific microRNAs regulate heat stress responses in Caenorhabditis elegans

    OpenAIRE

    Nehammer, C.; Podolska, A; Mackowiak, S.D.; Kagias, K.; Pocock, R

    2015-01-01

    The ability of animals to sense and respond to elevated temperature is essential for survival. Transcriptional control of the heat stress response has been much studied, whereas its posttranscriptional regulation by microRNAs (miRNAs) is not well understood. Here we analyzed the miRNA response to heat stress in Caenorhabditis elegans and show that a discrete subset of miRNAs is thermoregulated. Using in-depth phenotypic analyses of miRNA deletion mutant strains we reveal multiple developmenta...

  11. 76 FR 59304 - 2011-2012 Refuge-Specific Hunting and Sport Fishing Regulations; Correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-26

    ... Register on September 9, 2011 (76 FR 56054), to finalize our yearly updates to the Code of Federal... paragraph should have been removed. PART 32-- Accordingly, in FR Doc. 2011-22752 appearing on page 56064 in... Fish and Wildlife Service 50 CFR Part 32 RIN 1018-AX54 2011-2012 Refuge-Specific Hunting and...

  12. 75 FR 18413 - 2009-2010 Refuge-Specific Hunting and Sport Fishing Regulations-Additions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-12

    .... According to the July 9, 2007, final rule published in the Federal Register (72 FR 37346), we went from 487... Fish and Wildlife Service 50 CFR Part 32 RIN 1018-AW49 2009-2010 Refuge-Specific Hunting and Sport...: The Fish and Wildlife Service adds two refuges to the list of areas open for hunting and/or...

  13. The Involvement of Neuron-Specific Factors in Dendritic Spinogenesis: Molecular Regulation and Association with Neurological Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsiao-Tang Hu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic spines are the location of excitatory synapses in the mammalian nervous system and are neuron-specific subcellular structures essential for neural circuitry and function. Dendritic spine morphology is determined by the F-actin cytoskeleton. F-actin remodeling must coordinate with different stages of dendritic spinogenesis, starting from dendritic filopodia formation to the filopodia-spines transition and dendritic spine maturation and maintenance. Hundreds of genes, including F-actin cytoskeleton regulators, membrane proteins, adaptor proteins, and signaling molecules, are known to be involved in regulating synapse formation. Many of these genes are not neuron-specific, but how they specifically control dendritic spine formation in neurons is an intriguing question. Here, we summarize how ubiquitously expressed genes, including syndecan-2, NF1 (encoding neurofibromin protein, VCP, and CASK, and the neuron-specific gene CTTNBP2 coordinate with neurotransmission, transsynaptic signaling, and cytoskeleton rearrangement to control dendritic filopodia formation, filopodia-spines transition, and dendritic spine maturation and maintenance. The aforementioned genes have been associated with neurological disorders, such as autism spectrum disorders (ASDs, mental retardation, learning difficulty, and frontotemporal dementia. We also summarize the corresponding disorders in this report.

  14. The Involvement of Neuron-Specific Factors in Dendritic Spinogenesis: Molecular Regulation and Association with Neurological Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Hsiao-Tang; Shih, Pu-Yun; Shih, Yu-Tzu; Hsueh, Yi-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic spines are the location of excitatory synapses in the mammalian nervous system and are neuron-specific subcellular structures essential for neural circuitry and function. Dendritic spine morphology is determined by the F-actin cytoskeleton. F-actin remodeling must coordinate with different stages of dendritic spinogenesis, starting from dendritic filopodia formation to the filopodia-spines transition and dendritic spine maturation and maintenance. Hundreds of genes, including F-actin cytoskeleton regulators, membrane proteins, adaptor proteins, and signaling molecules, are known to be involved in regulating synapse formation. Many of these genes are not neuron-specific, but how they specifically control dendritic spine formation in neurons is an intriguing question. Here, we summarize how ubiquitously expressed genes, including syndecan-2, NF1 (encoding neurofibromin protein), VCP, and CASK, and the neuron-specific gene CTTNBP2 coordinate with neurotransmission, transsynaptic signaling, and cytoskeleton rearrangement to control dendritic filopodia formation, filopodia-spines transition, and dendritic spine maturation and maintenance. The aforementioned genes have been associated with neurological disorders, such as autism spectrum disorders (ASDs), mental retardation, learning difficulty, and frontotemporal dementia. We also summarize the corresponding disorders in this report. PMID:26819769

  15. Tissue-specific regulation of expression and activity of P-glycoprotein in adjuvant arthritis rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achira, Meguru; Totsuka, Ryuichi; Fujimura, Hisako; Kume, Toshiyuki

    2002-07-01

    Cyclosporine A and steroids are effective against rheumatoid arthritis and also known as substrates of P-glycoprotein (P-gp). We investigated the effect of arthritis on the hepatic and intestinal P-gp activity in rats, and substantiated the expression level of the hepatic P-gp. Doxorubicin was used as a P-gp substrate. Cumulative biliary excretion and intestinal exsorption of doxorubicin following intravenous administration were compared between adjuvant arthritis (AA) and normal rats. Intestinal P-gp activity was also investigated by intestinal everted sac method, and hepatic P-gp was detected by FITC-labeled antibody and visualized using a confocal laser microscope system. Biliary clearance of doxorubicin in AA rats was significantly decreased from that in normal rats. The expression level of the hepatic P-gp in AA rats was very low compared to normal rats, indicating down-regulation. Intestinal exsorption clearance was not different between AA and normal rats. Permeability of doxorubicin across intestinal everted sac was comparable between AA and normal rats, corresponding to in vivo study. In AA rats, hepatic P-gp activity was decreased due to the reduction of expression level, but intestinal P-gp activity was not changed. Different regulation systems may be involved in liver and intestine. PMID:12113888

  16. The specification and testing of radioactive sources designated as ''special form'' under the IAEA transport regulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The object of this study is to remove some of the uncertainties associated with the application of the IAEA Regulations insofar as they apply to Special Form materials. The first part of this project involved a comparison of the ISO and IAEA Regulations. An analysis of the physical tests has been carried out. The second and most important part of the project involved an assessment of the leakage tests used to evaluate the capsules after each of the physical tests. The work has defined and confirmed by experiment the relationship between the IAEA and ISO impact and percussion tests. The practical application of the tests particularly with regard to specimen orientation will be aided by the data now available. The work has established the sensitivities of the primary volumetric leak test methods and practical procedures are outlined. Volumetric leak test methods, with sentivities approximately 10-5 mbar l/s, are considered to be more reliable in detecting leakage paths in capsules than methods using solid leachable or non-leachable radioactive contents. The work reported should assist in the updating and clarification and harmonisation of IAEA Safety Series Nos 6 and 37 and ISO 4919 and ISO TR 4826

  17. Self-regulation of circumscribed brain activity modulates spatially selective and frequency specific connectivity of distributed resting state networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vukelić, Mathias; Gharabaghi, Alireza

    2015-01-01

    The mechanisms of learning involved in brain self-regulation have still to be unveiled to exploit the full potential of this methodology for therapeutic interventions. This skill of volitionally changing brain activity presumably resembles motor skill learning which in turn is accompanied by plastic changes modulating resting state networks. Along these lines, we hypothesized that brain regulation and neurofeedback would similarly modify intrinsic networks at rest while presenting a distinct spatio-temporal pattern. High-resolution electroencephalography preceded and followed a single neurofeedback training intervention of modulating circumscribed sensorimotor low β-activity by kinesthetic motor imagery in eleven healthy participants. The participants were kept in the deliberative phase of skill acquisition with high demands for learning self-regulation through stepwise increases of task difficulty. By applying the corrected imaginary part of the coherency function, we observed increased functional connectivity of both the primary motor and the primary somatosensory cortex with their respective contralateral homologous cortices in the low β-frequency band which was self-regulated during feedback. At the same time, the primary motor cortex-but none of the surrounding cortical areas-showed connectivity to contralateral supplementary motor and dorsal premotor areas in the high β-band. Simultaneously, the neurofeedback target displayed a specific increase of functional connectivity with an ipsilateral fronto-parietal network in the α-band while presenting a de-coupling with contralateral primary and secondary sensorimotor areas in the very same frequency band. Brain self-regulation modifies resting state connections spatially selective to the neurofeedback target of the dominant hemisphere. These are anatomically distinct with regard to the cortico-cortical connectivity pattern and are functionally specific with regard to the time domain of coherent activity

  18. An FGF3-BMP Signaling Axis Regulates Caudal Neural Tube Closure, Neural Crest Specification and Anterior-Posterior Axis Extension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Matthew J.; Schimmang, Thomas; Lewandoski, Mark

    2016-01-01

    During vertebrate axis extension, adjacent tissue layers undergo profound morphological changes: within the neuroepithelium, neural tube closure and neural crest formation are occurring, while within the paraxial mesoderm somites are segmenting from the presomitic mesoderm (PSM). Little is known about the signals between these tissues that regulate their coordinated morphogenesis. Here, we analyze the posterior axis truncation of mouse Fgf3 null homozygotes and demonstrate that the earliest role of PSM-derived FGF3 is to regulate BMP signals in the adjacent neuroepithelium. FGF3 loss causes elevated BMP signals leading to increased neuroepithelium proliferation, delay in neural tube closure and premature neural crest specification. We demonstrate that elevated BMP4 depletes PSM progenitors in vitro, phenocopying the Fgf3 mutant, suggesting that excessive BMP signals cause the Fgf3 axis defect. To test this in vivo we increased BMP signaling in Fgf3 mutants by removing one copy of Noggin, which encodes a BMP antagonist. In such mutants, all parameters of the Fgf3 phenotype were exacerbated: neural tube closure delay, premature neural crest specification, and premature axis termination. Conversely, genetically decreasing BMP signaling in Fgf3 mutants, via loss of BMP receptor activity, alleviates morphological defects. Aberrant apoptosis is observed in the Fgf3 mutant tailbud. However, we demonstrate that cell death does not cause the Fgf3 phenotype: blocking apoptosis via deletion of pro-apoptotic genes surprisingly increases all Fgf3 defects including causing spina bifida. We demonstrate that this counterintuitive consequence of blocking apoptosis is caused by the increased survival of BMP-producing cells in the neuroepithelium. Thus, we show that FGF3 in the caudal vertebrate embryo regulates BMP signaling in the neuroepithelium, which in turn regulates neural tube closure, neural crest specification and axis termination. Uncovering this FGF3-BMP signaling axis is

  19. An FGF3-BMP Signaling Axis Regulates Caudal Neural Tube Closure, Neural Crest Specification and Anterior-Posterior Axis Extension.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew J Anderson

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available During vertebrate axis extension, adjacent tissue layers undergo profound morphological changes: within the neuroepithelium, neural tube closure and neural crest formation are occurring, while within the paraxial mesoderm somites are segmenting from the presomitic mesoderm (PSM. Little is known about the signals between these tissues that regulate their coordinated morphogenesis. Here, we analyze the posterior axis truncation of mouse Fgf3 null homozygotes and demonstrate that the earliest role of PSM-derived FGF3 is to regulate BMP signals in the adjacent neuroepithelium. FGF3 loss causes elevated BMP signals leading to increased neuroepithelium proliferation, delay in neural tube closure and premature neural crest specification. We demonstrate that elevated BMP4 depletes PSM progenitors in vitro, phenocopying the Fgf3 mutant, suggesting that excessive BMP signals cause the Fgf3 axis defect. To test this in vivo we increased BMP signaling in Fgf3 mutants by removing one copy of Noggin, which encodes a BMP antagonist. In such mutants, all parameters of the Fgf3 phenotype were exacerbated: neural tube closure delay, premature neural crest specification, and premature axis termination. Conversely, genetically decreasing BMP signaling in Fgf3 mutants, via loss of BMP receptor activity, alleviates morphological defects. Aberrant apoptosis is observed in the Fgf3 mutant tailbud. However, we demonstrate that cell death does not cause the Fgf3 phenotype: blocking apoptosis via deletion of pro-apoptotic genes surprisingly increases all Fgf3 defects including causing spina bifida. We demonstrate that this counterintuitive consequence of blocking apoptosis is caused by the increased survival of BMP-producing cells in the neuroepithelium. Thus, we show that FGF3 in the caudal vertebrate embryo regulates BMP signaling in the neuroepithelium, which in turn regulates neural tube closure, neural crest specification and axis termination. Uncovering this FGF3

  20. DNA methylation of specific CpG sites in the promoter region regulates the transcription of the mouse oxytocin receptor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shimrat Mamrut

    Full Text Available Oxytocin is a peptide hormone, well known for its role in labor and suckling, and most recently for its involvement in mammalian social behavior. All central and peripheral actions of oxytocin are mediated through the oxytocin receptor, which is the product of a single gene. Transcription of the oxytocin receptor is subject to regulation by gonadal steroid hormones, and is profoundly elevated in the uterus and mammary glands during parturition. DNA methylation is a major epigenetic mechanism that regulates gene transcription, and has been linked to reduced expression of the oxytocin receptor in individuals with autism. Here, we hypothesized that transcription of the mouse oxytocin receptor is regulated by DNA methylation of specific sites in its promoter, in a tissue-specific manner. Hypothalamus-derived GT1-7, and mammary-derived 4T1 murine cell lines displayed negative correlations between oxytocin receptor transcription and methylation of the gene promoter, and demethylation caused a significant enhancement of oxytocin receptor transcription in 4T1 cells. Using a reporter gene assay, we showed that methylation of specific sites in the gene promoter, including an estrogen response element, significantly inhibits transcription. Furthermore, methylation of the oxytocin receptor promoter was found to be differentially correlated with oxytocin receptor expression in mammary glands and the uterus of virgin and post-partum mice, suggesting that it plays a distinct role in oxytocin receptor transcription among tissues and under different physiological conditions. Together, these results support the hypothesis that the expression of the mouse oxytocin receptor gene is epigenetically regulated by DNA methylation of its promoter.

  1. Tissue-specific and neural activity-regulated expression of human BDNF gene in BAC transgenic mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palm Kaia

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF is a small secreted protein that has important roles in the developing and adult nervous system. Altered expression or changes in the regulation of the BDNF gene have been implicated in a variety of human nervous system disorders. Although regulation of the rodent BDNF gene has been extensively investigated, in vivo studies regarding the human BDNF gene are largely limited to postmortem analysis. Bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC transgenic mice harboring the human BDNF gene and its regulatory flanking sequences constitute a useful tool for studying human BDNF gene regulation and for identification of therapeutic compounds modulating BDNF expression. Results In this study we have generated and analyzed BAC transgenic mice carrying 168 kb of the human BDNF locus modified such that BDNF coding sequence was replaced with the sequence of a fusion protein consisting of N-terminal BDNF and the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP. The human BDNF-BAC construct containing all BDNF 5' exons preceded by different promoters recapitulated the expression of endogenous BDNF mRNA in the brain and several non-neural tissues of transgenic mice. All different 5' exon-specific BDNF-EGFP alternative transcripts were expressed from the transgenic human BDNF-BAC construct, resembling the expression of endogenous BDNF. Furthermore, BDNF-EGFP mRNA was induced upon treatment with kainic acid in a promotor-specific manner, similarly to that of the endogenous mouse BDNF mRNA. Conclusion Genomic region covering 67 kb of human BDNF gene, 84 kb of upstream and 17 kb of downstream sequences is sufficient to drive tissue-specific and kainic acid-induced expression of the reporter gene in transgenic mice. The pattern of expression of the transgene is highly similar to BDNF gene expression in mouse and human. This is the first study to show that human BDNF gene is regulated by neural activity.

  2. Chlorine-Induced In Situ Regulation to Synthesize Graphene Frameworks with Large Specific Area for Excellent Supercapacitor Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yanyan; Cui, Huijuan; Meng, Xin; Zheng, Jianfeng; Yang, Pengju; Li, Li; Wang, Zhijian; Jia, Suping; Zhu, Zhenping

    2016-03-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) graphene frameworks are usually limited by a complicated preparation process and a low specific surface area. This paper presents a facile suitable approach to effectively synthesize 3D graphene frameworks (GFs) with large specific surface area (up to 1018 m(2) g(-1)) through quick thermal decomposition from sodium chloroacetate, which are considerably larger than those of sodium acetate reported in our recent study. The chlorine element in sodium chloroacetate may possess a strong capability to induce in situ activation and regulate graphene formation during pyrolysis in one step. These GFs can be applied as excellent electrode materials for supercapacitors and can achieve an enhanced supercapacitor performance with a specific capacitance of 266 F g(-1) at a current density of 0.5 A g(-1). PMID:26902453

  3. Increased fat deposition in injured skeletal muscle is regulated by sex-specific hormones

    OpenAIRE

    McHale, Matthew J.; Sarwar, Zaheer U.; Cardenas, Damon P.; Porter, Laurel; Salinas, Anna S.; Michalek, Joel E.; McManus, Linda M.; Shireman, Paula K

    2011-01-01

    Sex differences in skeletal muscle regeneration are controversial; comparisons of regenerative events between sexes have not been rigorously defined in severe injury models. We comprehensively quantified inflammation and muscle regeneration between sexes and manipulated sex-specific hormones to determine effects on regeneration. Cardiotoxin injury was induced in intact, castrated and ovariectomized female and male mice; ovariectomized mice were replaced with low- or high-dose 17-β estradiol (...

  4. Mesoderm-specific transcript (MEST) is a negative regulator of human adipocyte differentiation

    OpenAIRE

    Karbiener, M; Glantschnig, C; Pisani, D. F.; Laurencikiene, J.; Dahlman, I; Herzig, S; Amri, E-Z; Scheideler, M

    2015-01-01

    Background: A growing body of evidence suggests that many downstream pathologies of obesity are amplified or even initiated by molecular changes within the white adipose tissue (WAT). Such changes are the result of an excessive expansion of individual white adipocytes and could potentially be ameliorated via an increase in de novo adipocyte recruitment (adipogenesis). Mesoderm-specific transcript (MEST) is a protein with a putative yet unidentified enzymatic function and has previously been s...

  5. Cysteinyl leukotriene receptor antagonist regulates allergic airway inflammation in an organ- and cytokine-specific manner

    OpenAIRE

    Kawano, Tetsuya; Matsuse, Hiroto; Tsuchida, Tomoko; Fukahori, Susumu; Fukushima, Chizu; Nishino, Tomoya; Kohno, Shigeru

    2014-01-01

    Background Cysteinyl leukotrienes (cys-LTs) are very important factors in the pathophysiology of bronchial asthma. Cys-LT receptor antagonists (LTRAs) decrease allergic airway inflammation. The aim of the present study was to determine the differential effects of LTRAs and corticosteroids on allergic airway inflammation and allergen-specific cytokine production from lymphoid tissues using a murine model of asthma. Material/Methods Four groups of female BALB/c mice [control (Cont); Dermatophag...

  6. Cdc7-Dbf4 Is a Gene-Specific Regulator of Meiotic Transcription in Yeast

    OpenAIRE

    Lo, Hsiao-Chi; Kunz, Ryan C.; Chen, Xiangyu; Marullo, Allison; Steven P Gygi; Hollingsworth, Nancy M.

    2012-01-01

    Meiosis divides the chromosome number of the cell in half by having two rounds of chromosome segregation follow a single round of chromosome duplication. The first meiotic division is unique in that homologous pairs of sister chromatids segregate to opposite poles. Recent work in budding and fission yeast has shown that the cell cycle kinase, Cdc7-Dbf4, is required for many meiosis-specific chromosomal functions necessary for proper disjunction at meiosis I. This work reveals another role for...

  7. Lys-63-specific Deubiquitination of SDS3 by USP17 Regulates HDAC Activity*

    OpenAIRE

    Ramakrishna, Suresh; Suresh, Bharathi; Lee, Eung-Ji; Lee, Hey-Jin; Ahn, Woong-Shick; BAEK, KWANG-HYUN

    2011-01-01

    SDS3 is a key component of the histone deacetylase (HDAC)-dependent Sin3A co-repressor complex, serving to maintain its HDAC activity. Here, we report both exogenous and endogenous functional interaction between deubiquitinating enzyme USP17 and human SDS3 by MALDI-TOF-MS, co-immunoprecipitation assay, and GST pull-down assay. In this study, we demonstrated that SDS3 readily undergoes endogenous polyubiquitination, which is associated specifically with Lys-63-branched polyubiquitin chains and...

  8. Nitric oxide regulates input specificity of long-term depression and context dependence of cerebellar learning.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideaki Ogasawara

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies have shown that multiple internal models are acquired in the cerebellum and that these can be switched under a given context of behavior. It has been proposed that long-term depression (LTD of parallel fiber (PF-Purkinje cell (PC synapses forms the cellular basis of cerebellar learning, and that the presynaptically synthesized messenger nitric oxide (NO is a crucial "gatekeeper" for LTD. Because NO diffuses freely to neighboring synapses, this volume learning is not input-specific and brings into question the biological significance of LTD as the basic mechanism for efficient supervised learning. To better characterize the role of NO in cerebellar learning, we simulated the sequence of electrophysiological and biochemical events in PF-PC LTD by combining established simulation models of the electrophysiology, calcium dynamics, and signaling pathways of the PC. The results demonstrate that the local NO concentration is critical for induction of LTD and for its input specificity. Pre- and postsynaptic coincident firing is not sufficient for a PF-PC synapse to undergo LTD, and LTD is induced only when a sufficient amount of NO is provided by activation of the surrounding PFs. On the other hand, above-adequate levels of activity in nearby PFs cause accumulation of NO, which also allows LTD in neighboring synapses that were not directly stimulated, ruining input specificity. These findings lead us to propose the hypothesis that NO represents the relevance of a given context and enables context-dependent selection of internal models to be updated. We also predict sparse PF activity in vivo because, otherwise, input specificity would be lost.

  9. Intestinal Specific Gene Regulation by Transcription Factors Gata4 and Hnfla in Vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Bosse, Tjalling

    2006-01-01

    textabstractThe mammalian small intestine is responsible for the terminal digestion and absorption of nutrients, water homeostasis, and the elimination of waste products, which in turn, are essential processes for life. These processes however, are easily disrupted by infection, inflammatory processes such as Crohn’s disease, cancer, and resection. The small intestine is equipped with specific proteins, such as enzymes to digest nutrients (digestion) and ‘transporters’ to carry the nutrients ...

  10. Consistent Quantitative Operational Risk Measurement and Regulation; Challenges of Model Specification, Data Collection and Loss Reporting

    OpenAIRE

    Andreas Jobst

    2007-01-01

    Amid increased size and complexity of the banking industry, operational risk has a greater potential to transpire in more harmful ways than many other sources of risk. This paper provides a succinct overview of the current regulatory framework of operational risk under the New Basel Capital Accord with a view to inform a critical debate about the influence of varying loss profiles and different methods of data collection, loss reporting, and model specification on the reliability of operation...

  11. HDAC4 Regulates Muscle Fiber Type-Specific Gene Expression Programs

    OpenAIRE

    Cohen, Todd J.; Choi, Moon-Chang; Kapur, Meghan; Lira, Vitor A.; Yan, Zhen; Yao, Tso-Pang

    2015-01-01

    Fiber type-specific programs controlled by the transcription factor MEF2 dictate muscle functionality. Here, we show that HDAC4, a potent MEF2 inhibitor, is predominantly localized to the nuclei in fast/glycolytic fibers in contrast to the sarcoplasm in slow/oxidative fibers. The cytoplasmic localization is associated with HDAC4 hyper-phosphorylation in slow/oxidative-fibers. Genetic reprogramming of fast/glycolytic fibers to oxidative fibers by active CaMKII or calcineurin leads to increased...

  12. Regulation of nucleosome landscape and transcription factor targeting at tissue-specific enhancers by BRG1

    OpenAIRE

    Hu, Gangqing; Dustin E Schones; Cui, Kairong; Ybarra, River; Northrup, Daniel; Tang, Qingsong; Gattinoni, Luca; Restifo, Nicholas P; Huang, Suming; Zhao, Keji

    2011-01-01

    Enhancers of transcription activate transcription via binding of sequence-specific transcription factors to their target sites in chromatin. In this report, we identify GATA1-bound distal sites genome-wide and find a global reorganization of the nucleosomes at these potential enhancers during differentiation of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) to erythrocytes. We show that the catalytic subunit BRG1 of BAF complexes localizes to these distal sites during differentiation and generates a longer ...

  13. Site-specific phosphorylation regulates the transcriptive activity of vesicular stomatitis virus NS protein.

    OpenAIRE

    C. H. Hsu; Morgan, E M; Kingsbury, D. W.

    1982-01-01

    In vitro transcription by vesicular stomatitis virus nucleocapsids is inhibited by enzymatic dephosphorylation of the NS protein. We provide evidence that specific, partial dephosphorylation of NS molecules is the only detectable change in nucleocapsids treated with bacterial alkaline phosphatase under conditions that prevent the action of adventitious protease. Dephosphorylation appeared to affect only the rate of transcription; there were no changes in sedimentation rates of transcripts. To...

  14. Increased fat deposition in injured skeletal muscle is regulated by sex-specific hormones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McHale, Matthew J; Sarwar, Zaheer U; Cardenas, Damon P; Porter, Laurel; Salinas, Anna S; Michalek, Joel E; McManus, Linda M; Shireman, Paula K

    2012-02-01

    Sex differences in skeletal muscle regeneration are controversial; comparisons of regenerative events between sexes have not been rigorously defined in severe injury models. We comprehensively quantified inflammation and muscle regeneration between sexes and manipulated sex-specific hormones to determine effects on regeneration. Cardiotoxin injury was induced in intact, castrated and ovariectomized female and male mice; ovariectomized mice were replaced with low- or high-dose 17-β estradiol (E(2)) or progesterone (P4). Extent of injury was comparable between intact mice, but females were more efficient in removal of necrotic debris, despite similar tissue levels of inflammatory cells and chemokines. Myofiber size during regeneration was equivalent between intact mice and after castration or ovariectomy (OVX) but was decreased (P < 0.001) in ovariectomized mice with high-dose E(2) replacement. Intermuscular adipocytes were absent in uninjured muscle, whereas adipocyte area was increased among regenerated myofibers in all groups. Interestingly, intermuscular fat was greater (P = 0.03) in intact females at day 14 compared with intact males. Furthermore, castration increased (P = 0.01) and OVX decreased adipocyte accumulation. After OVX, E(2), but not P4, replacement decreased (P ≤ 0.03) fat accumulation. In conclusion, sex-dependent differences in regeneration consisted of more efficient removal of necrosis and increased fat deposition in females with similar injury, inflammation, and regenerated myofiber size; high-dose E(2) decreased myofiber size and fat deposition. Adipocyte accumulation in regenerating muscle was influenced by sex-specific hormones. Recovery following muscle injury was different between males and females, and sex-specific hormones contributed to these differences, suggesting that sex-specific treatments could be beneficial after injury. PMID:22116509

  15. The expression and regulation of pregnancy-specific glycoproteins in the mouse

    OpenAIRE

    Williams, John Michael

    2013-01-01

    Pregnancy-Specific Glycoproteins (PSG) are the most abundant fetally expressed proteins in the maternal bloodstream at term. This multigene family are immunoglobulin superfamily members and are predominantly expressed in the syncytiotrophoblast of human placenta and in giant cells and spongiotrophoblast of rodent placenta. PSGs are encoded by seventeen genes in the mouse and ten genes in the human. Little is known about the function of this gene family, although they have been implicated in i...

  16. Area-specific development of distinct projection neuron subclasses is regulated by postnatal epigenetic modifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harb, Kawssar; Magrinelli, Elia; Nicolas, Céline S; Lukianets, Nikita; Frangeul, Laura; Pietri, Mariel; Sun, Tao; Sandoz, Guillaume; Grammont, Franck; Jabaudon, Denis; Studer, Michele; Alfano, Christian

    2016-01-01

    During cortical development, the identity of major classes of long-distance projection neurons is established by the expression of molecular determinants, which become gradually restricted and mutually exclusive. However, the mechanisms by which projection neurons acquire their final properties during postnatal stages are still poorly understood. In this study, we show that the number of neurons co-expressing Ctip2 and Satb2, respectively involved in the early specification of subcerebral and callosal projection neurons, progressively increases after birth in the somatosensory cortex. Ctip2/Satb2 postnatal co-localization defines two distinct neuronal subclasses projecting either to the contralateral cortex or to the brainstem suggesting that Ctip2/Satb2 co-expression may refine their properties rather than determine their identity. Gain- and loss-of-function approaches reveal that the transcriptional adaptor Lmo4 drives this maturation program through modulation of epigenetic mechanisms in a time- and area-specific manner, thereby indicating that a previously unknown genetic program postnatally promotes the acquisition of final subtype-specific features. PMID:26814051

  17. Regulation of angiogenesis in human skeletal muscle with specific focus on pro- angiogenic and angiostatic factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høier, Birgitte

    important. Furthermore, it appears that the pro-angiogeinc factors, eNOS, MMP9, Ang2, and Tie-2 and the angiostatic factors, TIMP-1 and TSP-1 play an important part in modulation the angiogenic response to acute exercise and training in human skeletal muscle thus determining if capillary growth occurs or...... VEGF vesicles being a mechanism for regulating VEGF secretion in response to exercise. Furthermore, the exercise-induced increase in VEGF secretion was shown to be mediated in part through adenosine which is released during contraction, and its receptor A2B which activates the MAPK pathway and in part...... was studied in peripheral arterial disease. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is the most important factor in exercise-induced angiogenesis and is located primarily in muscle cells but also in endothelial cells, pericytes, and in the extracellular matrix. VEGF protein secretion to the...

  18. Patterns of hybrid loss of imprinting reveal tissue- and cluster-specific regulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher D Wiley

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Crosses between natural populations of two species of deer mice, Peromyscus maniculatus (BW, and P. polionotus (PO, produce parent-of-origin effects on growth and development. BW females mated to PO males (bwxpo produce growth-retarded but otherwise healthy offspring. In contrast, PO females mated to BW males (POxBW produce overgrown and severely defective offspring. The hybrid phenotypes are pronounced in the placenta and include POxBW conceptuses which lack embryonic structures. Evidence to date links variation in control of genomic imprinting with the hybrid defects, particularly in the POxBW offspring. Establishment of genomic imprinting is typically mediated by gametic DNA methylation at sites known as gDMRs. However, imprinted gene clusters vary in their regulation by gDMR sequences. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we further assess imprinted gene expression and DNA methylation at different cluster types in order to discern patterns. These data reveal POxBW misexpression at the Kcnq1ot1 and Peg3 clusters, both of which lose ICR methylation in placental tissues. In contrast, some embryonic transcripts (Peg10, Kcnq1ot1 reactivated the silenced allele with little or no loss of DNA methylation. Hybrid brains also display different patterns of imprinting perturbations. Several cluster pairs thought to use analogous regulatory mechanisms are differentially affected in the hybrids. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These data reinforce the hypothesis that placental and somatic gene regulation differs significantly, as does that between imprinted gene clusters and between species. That such epigenetic regulatory variation exists in recently diverged species suggests a role in reproductive isolation, and that this variation is likely to be adaptive.

  19. Tissue-specific expression of ferritin H regulates cellular iron homoeostasis in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, John; Di, Xiumin; Schönig, Kai; Buss, Joan L; Kock, Nancy D; Cline, J Mark; Saunders, Thomas L; Bujard, Hermann; Torti, Suzy V; Torti, Frank M

    2006-05-01

    Ferritin is a ubiquitously distributed iron-binding protein. Cell culture studies have demonstrated that ferritin plays a role in maintenance of iron homoeostasis and in the protection against cytokine- and oxidant-induced stress. To test whether FerH (ferritin H) can regulate tissue iron homoeostasis in vivo, we prepared transgenic mice that conditionally express FerH and EGFP (enhanced green fluorescent protein) from a bicistronic tetracycline-inducible promoter. Two transgenic models were explored. In the first, the FerH and EGFP transgenes were controlled by the tTA(CMV) (Tet-OFF) (where tTA and CMV are tet transactivator protein and cytomegalovirus respectively). In skeletal muscle of mice bearing the FerH/EGFP and tTA(CMV) transgenes, FerH expression was increased 6.0+/-1.1-fold (mean+/-S.D.) compared with controls. In the second model, the FerH/EGFP transgenes were controlled by an optimized Tet-ON transactivator, rtTA2(S)-S2(LAP) (where rtTA is reverse tTA and LAP is liver activator protein), resulting in expression predominantly in the kidney and liver. In mice expressing these transgenes, doxycycline induced FerH in the kidney by 14.2+/-4.8-fold (mean+/-S.D.). Notably, increases in ferritin in overexpressers versus control littermates were accompanied by an elevation of IRP (iron regulatory protein) activity of 2.3+/-0.9-fold (mean+/-S.D.), concurrent with a 4.5+/-2.1-fold (mean+/-S.D.) increase in transferrin receptor, indicating that overexpression of FerH is sufficient to elicit a phenotype of iron depletion. These results demonstrate that FerH not only responds to changes in tissue iron (its classic role), but can actively regulate overall tissue iron balance. PMID:16448386

  20. A missing PD-L1/PD-1 coinhibition regulates diabetes induction by preproinsulin-specific CD8 T-cells in an epitope-specific manner.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornelia Schuster

    Full Text Available Coinhibitory PD-1/PD-L1 (B7-H1 interactions provide critical signals for the regulation of autoreactive T-cell responses. We established mouse models, expressing the costimulator molecule B7.1 (CD80 on pancreatic beta cells (RIP-B7.1 tg mice or are deficient in coinhibitory PD-L1 or PD-1 molecules (PD-L1(-/- and PD-1(-/- mice, to study induction of preproinsulin (ppins-specific CD8 T-cell responses and experimental autoimmune diabetes (EAD by DNA-based immunization. RIP-B7.1 tg mice allowed us to identify two CD8 T-cell specificities: pCI/ppins DNA exclusively induced K(b/A(12-21-specific CD8 T-cells and EAD, whereas pCI/ppinsΔA(12-21 DNA (encoding ppins without the COOH-terminal A(12-21 epitope elicited K(b/B(22-29-specific CD8 T-cells and EAD. Specific expression/processing of mutant ppinsΔA(12-21 (but not ppins in non-beta cells, targeted by intramuscular DNA-injection, thus facilitated induction of K(b/B(22-29-specific CD8 T-cells. The A(12-21 epitope binds K(b molecules with a very low avidity as compared with B(22-29. Interestingly, immunization of coinhibition-deficient PD-L1(-/- or PD-1(-/- mice with pCI/ppins induced K(b/A(12-21-monospecific CD8 T-cells and EAD but injections with pCI/ppinsΔA(12-21 did neither recruit K(b/B(22-29-specific CD8 T-cells into the pancreatic target tissue nor induce EAD. PpinsΔA(12-21/(K(b/B(22-29-mediated EAD was efficiently restored in RIP-B7.1(+/PD-L1(-/- mice, differing from PD-L1(-/- mice only in the tg B7.1 expression in beta cells. Alternatively, an ongoing beta cell destruction and tissue inflammation, initiated by ppins/(K(b/A(12-21-specific CD8 T-cells in pCI/ppins+pCI/ppinsΔA(12-21 co-immunized PD-L1(-/- mice, facilitated the expansion of ppinsΔA(12-21/(K(b/B(22-29-specific CD8 T-cells. CD8 T-cells specific for the high-affinity K(b/B(22-29- (but not the low-affinity K(b/A(12-21-epitope thus require stimulatory help from beta cells or inflamed islets to expand in PD-L1-deficient mice. The

  1. LATS-YAP/TAZ controls lineage specification by regulating TGFβ signaling and Hnf4α expression during liver development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Da-Hye; Park, Jae Oh; Kim, Tae-Shin; Kim, Sang-Kyum; Kim, Tack-hoon; Kim, Min-chul; Park, Gun Soo; Kim, Jeong-Hwan; Kuninaka, Shinji; Olson, Eric N.; Saya, Hideyuki; Kim, Seon-Young; Lee, Ho; Lim, Dae-Sik

    2016-01-01

    The Hippo pathway regulates the self-renewal and differentiation of various adult stem cells, but its role in cell fate determination and differentiation during liver development remains unclear. Here we report that the Hippo pathway controls liver cell lineage specification and proliferation separately from Notch signalling, using mice and primary hepatoblasts with liver-specific knockout of Lats1 and Lats2 kinase, the direct upstream regulators of YAP and TAZ. During and after liver development, the activation of YAP/TAZ induced by loss of Lats1/2 forces hepatoblasts or hepatocytes to commit to the biliary epithelial cell (BEC) lineage. It increases BEC and fibroblast proliferation by up-regulating TGFβ signalling, but suppresses hepatoblast to hepatocyte differentiation by repressing Hnf4α expression. Notably, oncogenic YAP/TAZ activation in hepatocytes induces massive p53-dependent cell senescence/death. Together, our results reveal that YAP/TAZ activity levels govern liver cell differentiation and proliferation in a context-dependent manner. PMID:27358050

  2. Identification of soybean proteins from a single cell type: The root hair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brechenmacher, Laurent; Nguyen, Tran H.; Hixson, Kim K.; Libault, Marc; Aldrich, Joshua T.; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Stacey, Gary

    2012-11-01

    Root hairs are a terminally differentiated single cell type, mainly involved in water and nutrient uptake from the soil. The soybean root hair cell represents an excellent model for the study of single cell systems biology. In this study, we identified 5702 proteins, with at least two peptides, from soybean root hairs using an accurate mass and time tag approach, establishing the most comprehensive proteome reference map of this single cell type. We also showed that trypsin is the most appropriate enzyme for soybean proteomic studies by performing an in silico digestion of the soybean proteome database using different proteases. Although the majority of proteins identified in this study are involved in basal metabolism, the function of others are more related to root hair formation/function and include proteins involved in nutrient uptake (transporters) or vesicular trafficking (cytoskeleton and RAB proteins). Interestingly, some of these proteins appear to be specifically expressed in root hairs and constitute very good candidates for further studies to elucidate unique features of this single cell model.

  3. Interleukin-1 exerts distinct actions on different cell types of the brain in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying An

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Ying An, Qun Chen, Ning QuanDepartment of Oral Biology, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, USAAbstract: Interleukin-1 (IL-1 is a critical neuroinflammatory mediator in the central nervous system (CNS. In this study, we investigated the effect of IL-1 on inducing inflammation-related gene expression in three astrocyte, two microglial, and one brain endothelial cell line. Interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β is found to be produced by the two microglial cell lines constitutively, but these cells do not respond to IL-1β stimulation. The three astrocyte cell lines responded to IL-1ß stimulation by expressing MCP-1, CXCL-1, and VCAM-1, but different subtypes of astrocytes exhibited different expression profiles after IL-1β stimulation. The brain endothelial cells showed strongest response to IL-1β by producing MCP-1, CXCL-1, VCAM-1, ICAM-1, IL-6, and COX-2 mRNA. The induction of endothelial COX-2 mRNA is shown to be mediated by p38 MAPK pathway, whereas the induction of other genes is mediated by the NF-κB pathway. These results demonstrate that IL-1 exerts distinct cell type-specific action in CNS cells and suggest that IL-1-mediated neuroinflammation is the result of the summation of multiple responses from different cell types in the CNS to IL-1.Keywords: astrocyte, microglia, endothelial cells, signal transduction pathways, gene expression 

  4. The Role of Internet-Specific Epistemic Beliefs and Self-Regulation in High School Students' Online Academic Help Seeking: A Structural Equation Modeling Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Kun-Hung; Liang, Jyh-Chong; Tsai, Chin-Chung

    2013-01-01

    Three instruments (i.e., Internet-specific epistemic beliefs, self-regulation, and online academic help seeking questionnaires) were administered to 319 high school students with the aim of understanding the role of Internet specific epistemic beliefs and self-regulation in their online academic help seeking. Through a structure equation modeling…

  5. Specific CLK inhibitors from a novel chemotype for regulation of alternative splicing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fedorov, Oleg; Huber, Kilian; Eisenreich, Andreas;

    2011-01-01

    , a potent and highly specific inhibitor of the CDC2-like kinase isoforms 1 and 4 (CLK1/CLK4). Cocrystal structures of KH-CB19 with CLK1 and CLK3 revealed a non-ATP mimetic binding mode, conformational changes in helix aC and the phosphate binding loop and halogen bonding to the kinase hinge region. KH-CB19......There is a growing recognition of the importance of protein kinases in the control of alternative splicing. To define the underlying regulatory mechanisms, highly selective inhibitors are needed. Here, we report the discovery and characterization of the dichloroindolyl enaminonitrile KH-CB19...

  6. The brain-specific carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1c regulates energy homeostasis

    OpenAIRE

    Wolfgang, Michael J.; Kurama, Takeshi; Dai, Yun; Suwa, Akira; Asaumi, Makoto; Matsumoto, Shun-ichiro; Cha, Seung Hun; Shimokawa, Teruhiko; Lane, M. Daniel

    2006-01-01

    Fatty acid synthesis in the central nervous system is implicated in the control of food intake and energy expenditure. An intermediate in this pathway, malonyl-CoA, mediates these effects. Malonyl-CoA is an established inhibitor of carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1 (CPT1), an outer mitochondrial membrane enzyme that controls entry of fatty acids into mitochondria and, thereby, fatty acid oxidation. CPT1c, a brain-specific enzyme with high sequence similarity to CPT1a (liver) and CPT1b (muscle)...

  7. Isomer-specific regulation of metabolism and PPARgamma signaling by CLA in human preadipocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brown, J Mark; Boysen, Maria Sandberg; Jensen, Søren Skov;

    2003-01-01

    primary human adipocytes in vitro. Here we investigated the mechanism behind the isomer-specific, CLA-mediated reduction in TG accumulation in differentiating human preadipocytes. Trans-10,cis-12 CLA decreased insulin-stimulated glucose uptake and oxidation, and reduced insulin-dependent glucose...... transporter 4 gene expression. Furthermore, trans-10,cis-12 CLA reduced oleic acid uptake and oxidation when compared with all other treatments. In parallel to CLA's effects on metabolism, trans-10,cis-12 CLA decreased, whereas cis-9,trans-11 CLA increased, the expression of peroxisome proliferator...

  8. Regulation of non-specific lipid transfer proteins in abiotically stressed Physcomitrella patens

    OpenAIRE

    Jansson, Sandra

    2011-01-01

    Non-specific lipid transfer proteins is a large and diverse protein family found in plants, with roles in biological systems ranging from long distance signaling to plant pathogen defense. Little is known about the roles of nsLTPs, but recent studies have cast some light on the issue, among other things proposing that they may be involved in the cutice formation on land-living liverworts, mosses and non-seedbearing plants. Increased cuticle formation is thought to be a part of a plants defens...

  9. Transcript-Specific Decapping and Regulated Stability by the Human Dcp2 Decapping Protein▿ †

    OpenAIRE

    Li,You; Song, Man-Gen; Kiledjian, Megerditch

    2007-01-01

    mRNA decapping is a critical step in the control of mRNA stability and gene expression and is carried out by the Dcp2 decapping enzyme. Dcp2 is an RNA binding protein that must bind RNA in order to recognize the cap for hydrolysis. We demonstrate that human Dcp2 (hDcp2) preferentially binds to a subset of mRNAs and identify sequences at the 5′ terminus of the mRNA encoding Rrp41, a core subunit component of the RNA exosome, as a specific hDcp2 substrate. A 60-nucleotide element at the 5′ end ...

  10. EST analysis in Ginkgo biloba: an assessment of conserved developmental regulators and gymnosperm specific genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Runko Suzan J

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ginkgo biloba L. is the only surviving member of one of the oldest living seed plant groups with medicinal, spiritual and horticultural importance worldwide. As an evolutionary relic, it displays many characters found in the early, extinct seed plants and extant cycads. To establish a molecular base to understand the evolution of seeds and pollen, we created a cDNA library and EST dataset from the reproductive structures of male (microsporangiate, female (megasporangiate, and vegetative organs (leaves of Ginkgo biloba. Results RNA from newly emerged male and female reproductive organs and immature leaves was used to create three distinct cDNA libraries from which 6,434 ESTs were generated. These 6,434 ESTs from Ginkgo biloba were clustered into 3,830 unigenes. A comparison of our Ginkgo unigene set against the fully annotated genomes of rice and Arabidopsis, and all available ESTs in Genbank revealed that 256 Ginkgo unigenes match only genes among the gymnosperms and non-seed plants – many with multiple matches to genes in non-angiosperm plants. Conversely, another group of unigenes in Gingko had highly significant homology to transcription factors in angiosperms involved in development, including MADS box genes as well as post-transcriptional regulators. Several of the conserved developmental genes found in Ginkgo had top BLAST homology to cycad genes. We also note here the presence of ESTs in G. biloba similar to genes that to date have only been found in gymnosperms and an additional 22 Ginkgo genes common only to genes from cycads. Conclusion Our analysis of an EST dataset from G. biloba revealed genes potentially unique to gymnosperms. Many of these genes showed homology to fully sequenced clones from our cycad EST dataset found in common only with gymnosperms. Other Ginkgo ESTs are similar to developmental regulators in higher plants. This work sets the stage for future studies on Ginkgo to better understand seed and

  11. Ubiquitin-specific protease 24 negatively regulates abscisic acid signalling in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jinfeng; Zhou, Huapeng; Zhang, Ming; Gao, Yanan; Li, Long; Gao, Ying; Li, Ming; Yang, Yuhong; Guo, Yan; Li, Xueyong

    2016-02-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) is an important plant hormone integrating environmental stress and plant growth. Protein ubiquitination and deubiquitination are reversible processes catalysed by E3 ubiquitin ligase and deubiquitinating enzyme, respectively. Lots of E3 ubiquitin ligase and transcriptional factors modified by ubiquitination were reported to modulate ABA signalling. However, no deubiquitinating enzyme has been identified that functions in ABA signalling until now. Here, we isolated an ABA overly sensitive mutant, ubp24, in which the gene encoding ubiquitin-specific protease 24 (UBP24, At4g30890) was disrupted by a T-DNA insertion. The ubp24 mutant was hypersensitive to ABA and salt stress in both post-germinative growth and seedling growth. However, stomata closure in the ubp24 mutant was less sensitive to ABA, and the ubp24 mutant showed drought sensitivity. UBP24 possessed deubiquitinating enzyme activity, and the activity was essential for UBP24 function. Additionally, UBP24 formed homodimer in vivo. UBP24 was genetically upstream of ABI2, and the phosphatase activity of protein phosphatase 2C was decreased in the ubp24 mutant compared with the wild type in the presence of ABA. These results uncover an important regulatory role for the ubiquitin-specific protease in response to ABA and salt stress in plant. PMID:26290265

  12. Sex chromosome-specific regulation in the Drosophila male germline but little evidence for chromosomal dosage compensation or meiotic inactivation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colin D Meiklejohn

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The evolution of heteromorphic sex chromosomes (e.g., XY in males or ZW in females has repeatedly elicited the evolution of two kinds of chromosome-specific regulation: dosage compensation--the equalization of X chromosome gene expression in males and females--and meiotic sex chromosome inactivation (MSCI--the transcriptional silencing and heterochromatinization of the X during meiosis in the male (or Z in the female germline. How the X chromosome is regulated in the Drosophila melanogaster male germline is unclear. Here we report three new findings concerning gene expression from the X in Drosophila testes. First, X chromosome-wide dosage compensation appears to be absent from most of the Drosophila male germline. Second, microarray analysis provides no evidence for X chromosome-specific inactivation during meiosis. Third, we confirm the previous discovery that the expression of transgene reporters driven by autosomal spermatogenesis-specific promoters is strongly reduced when inserted on the X chromosome versus the autosomes; but we show that this chromosomal difference in expression is established in premeiotic cells and persists in meiotic cells. The magnitude of the X-autosome difference in transgene expression cannot be explained by the absence of dosage compensation, suggesting that a previously unrecognized mechanism limits expression from the X during spermatogenesis in Drosophila. These findings help to resolve several previously conflicting reports and have implications for patterns of genome evolution and speciation in Drosophila.

  13. AN EVIDENCE-BASED ANALYSIS OF SELF-REGULATED STRATEGY DEVELOPMENT WRITING INTERVENTIONS FOR STUDENTS WITH SPECIFIC LEARNING DISABILITIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Areej ALHARBI

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Approximately 5% of school-aged children in the United States receive special education services under the specific learning disabilities category. Additionally, 20% of all students experience difficulty with writing, spelling, and handwriting. Goal: This literature review provides a synthesis of single case studies evaluating the use of self-regulated strategy development (SRSD for students with specific learning disabilities. Methods: Percentage of non-overlapping data (PND and Percentage of Data Exceeding the Median (PEM were used as a common metric to evaluate studies meeting inclusion criteria. Results: Fifteen articles evaluating seven SRSD writing intervention strategies met study inclusion criteria. Both mean PND (89.69%, Range = 38% – 100% and mean PEM (0.98, Range = 0.91 – 1.00 suggest that SRSD writing interventions are effective to highly effective. Conclusion: Althoudh additional research is needed, the results suggest that self-regulated writing strategies are an effective intervention to support students with specific learning disabilities experiencing difficulty with writing.

  14. Characterization of DYRK2 ( dual-specificity tyrosine-phosphorylation-regulated kinase 2) from Zebrafish ( Dario rerio)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wei; Tan, Xungang; Zhang, Peijun; Zhang, Yuqing; Xu, Yongli

    2010-07-01

    Proteins of the DYRK (dual-specificity tyrosine-phosphorylation-regulated kinase) family are characterized by the presence of a conserved kinase domain and N-terminal DH box. DYRK2 is involved in regulating key developmental and cellular processes, such as neurogenesis, cell proliferation, cytokinesis, and cellular differentiation. Herein, we report that the ortholog of DYRK2 found in zebrafish shares about 70% identity with that of human, mouse, and chick. RT-PCR showed that DYRK2 is expressed maternally and zygotically. In-situ hybridization results show that DYRK2 is expressed in somite cells that will develop into muscles. Our results provide preliminary evidence for investigating the in-vivo function of DYRK2 in zebrafish muscle development.

  15. Changing scenario in plant UV-B research:UV-B from a generic stressor to a specific regulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parihar, Parul; Singh, Samiksha; Singh, Rachana; Singh, Vijay Pratap; Prasad, Sheo Mohan

    2015-12-01

    Although UV-B accounts for sunlight energy reaching the earth's surface, however, it has multifaceted impact on plants as well as animals. High energy UV-B radiation is reported to have damaging impact on plant growth and productivity. After discovery of UV RESISTANCE LOCUS8 (UVR8), perceptions of biological impact of UV-B radiation on plants, have changed dramatically in last few years. This review focuses on the changing concept about the role of UV-B from a generic stressor to a specific regulator in plant science and has tried compiling the historical aspects of UVR8 starting with discovery, localisation and regulatory role played by UVR8 and also its interaction with other regulators. PMID:26513385

  16. Restricted leucine zipper dimerization and specificity of DNA recognition of the melanocyte master regulator MITF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pogenberg, Vivian; Ogmundsdóttir, Margrét H; Bergsteinsdóttir, Kristín; Schepsky, Alexander; Phung, Bengt; Deineko, Viktor; Milewski, Morlin; Steingrímsson, Eiríkur; Wilmanns, Matthias

    2012-12-01

    Microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF) is a master regulator of melanocyte development and an important oncogene in melanoma. MITF heterodimeric assembly with related basic helix-loop-helix leucine zipper transcription factors is highly restricted, and its binding profile to cognate DNA sequences is distinct. Here, we determined the crystal structure of MITF in its apo conformation and in the presence of two related DNA response elements, the E-box and M-box. In addition, we investigated mouse and human Mitf mutations to dissect the functional significance of structural features. Owing to an unusual three-residue shift in the leucine zipper register, the MITF homodimer shows a marked kink in one of the two zipper helices to allow an out-of-register assembly. Removal of this insertion relieves restricted heterodimerization by MITF and permits assembly with the transcription factor MAX. Binding of MITF to the M-box motif is mediated by an unusual nonpolar interaction by Ile212, a residue that is mutated in mice and humans with Waardenburg syndrome. As several related transcription factors have low affinity for the M-box sequence, our analysis unravels how these proteins discriminate between similar target sequences. Our data provide a rational basis for targeting MITF in the treatment of important hereditary diseases and cancer. PMID:23207919

  17. Tissue specific diurnal rhythms of metabolites and their regulation during herbivore attack in a native tobacco, Nicotiana attenuata.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang-Gyu Kim

    Full Text Available Ecological performance is all about timing and the endogenous clock that allows the entrainment of rhythms and anticipation of fitness-determining events is being rapidly characterized. How plants anticipate daily abiotic stresses, such as cold in early mornings and drought at noon, as well as biotic stresses, such as the timing of pathogen infections, is being explored, but little is known about the clock's role in regulating responses to insect herbivores and mutualists, whose behaviors are known to be strongly diurnally regulated and whose attack is known to reconfigure plant metabolomes. We developed a liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry procedure and analyzed its output with model-based peak picking algorithms to identify metabolites with diurnal accumulation patterns in sink/source leaves and roots in an unbiased manner. The response of metabolites with strong diurnal patterns to simulated attack from the specialist herbivore, Manduca sexta larvae was analyzed and annotated with in-house and public databases. Roots and leaves had largely different rhythms and only 10 ions of 182 oscillating ions in leaves and 179 oscillating ions in roots were rhythmic in both tissues: root metabolites mainly peaked at dusk or night, while leaf metabolites peaked during the day. Many oscillating metabolites showed tissue-specific regulation by simulated herbivory of which systemic responses in unattacked tissues were particularly pronounced. Diurnal and herbivory-elicited accumulation patterns of disaccharide, phenylalanine, tyrosine, lyciumoside I, coumaroyl tyramine, 12-oxophytodienoic acid and jasmonic acid and those of their related biosynthetic transcripts were examined in detail. We conclude that oscillating metabolites of N. attenuata accumulate in a highly tissue-specific manner and the patterns reveal pronounced diurnal rhythms in the generalized and specialized metabolism that mediates the plant's responses to herbivores and mutualists. We

  18. Whole-animal genome-wide RNAi screen identifies networks regulating male germline stem cells in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ying; Ge, Qinglan; Chan, Brian; Liu, Hanhan; Singh, Shree Ram; Manley, Jacob; Lee, Jae; Weideman, Ann Marie; Hou, Gerald; Hou, Steven X

    2016-01-01

    Stem cells are regulated both intrinsically and externally, including by signals from the local environment and distant organs. To identify genes and pathways that regulate stem-cell fates in the whole organism, we perform a genome-wide transgenic RNAi screen through ubiquitous gene knockdowns, focusing on regulators of adult Drosophila testis germline stem cells (GSCs). Here we identify 530 genes that regulate GSC maintenance and differentiation. Of these, we further knock down 113 selected genes using cell-type-specific Gal4s and find that more than half were external regulators, that is, from the local microenvironment or more distal sources. Some genes, for example, versatile (vers), encoding a heterochromatin protein, regulates GSC fates differentially in different cell types and through multiple pathways. We also find that mitosis/cytokinesis proteins are especially important for male GSC maintenance. Our findings provide valuable insights and resources for studying stem cell regulation at the organismal level. PMID:27484291

  19. Polycomb-Mediated Repression and Sonic Hedgehog Signaling Interact to Regulate Merkel Cell Specification during Skin Development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina N Perdigoto

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available An increasing amount of evidence indicates that developmental programs are tightly regulated by the complex interplay between signaling pathways, as well as transcriptional and epigenetic processes. Here, we have uncovered coordination between transcriptional and morphogen cues to specify Merkel cells, poorly understood skin cells that mediate light touch sensations. In murine dorsal skin, Merkel cells are part of touch domes, which are skin structures consisting of specialized keratinocytes, Merkel cells, and afferent neurons, and are located exclusively around primary hair follicles. We show that the developing primary hair follicle functions as a niche required for Merkel cell specification. We find that intraepidermal Sonic hedgehog (Shh signaling, initiated by the production of Shh ligand in the developing hair follicles, is required for Merkel cell specification. The importance of Shh for Merkel cell formation is further reinforced by the fact that Shh overexpression in embryonic epidermal progenitors leads to ectopic Merkel cells. Interestingly, Shh signaling is common to primary, secondary, and tertiary hair follicles, raising the possibility that there are restrictive mechanisms that regulate Merkel cell specification exclusively around primary hair follicles. Indeed, we find that loss of Polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2 in the epidermis results in the formation of ectopic Merkel cells that are associated with all hair types. We show that PRC2 loss expands the field of epidermal cells competent to differentiate into Merkel cells through the upregulation of key Merkel-differentiation genes, which are known PRC2 targets. Importantly, PRC2-mediated repression of the Merkel cell differentiation program requires inductive Shh signaling to form mature Merkel cells. Our study exemplifies how the interplay between epigenetic and morphogen cues regulates the complex patterning and formation of the mammalian skin structures.

  20. Polycomb-Mediated Repression and Sonic Hedgehog Signaling Interact to Regulate Merkel Cell Specification during Skin Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bar, Carmit; Tsai, Pai-Chi; Valdes, Victor J.; Cohen, Idan; Santoriello, Francis J.; Zhao, Dejian; Hsu, Ya-Chieh; Ezhkova, Elena

    2016-01-01

    An increasing amount of evidence indicates that developmental programs are tightly regulated by the complex interplay between signaling pathways, as well as transcriptional and epigenetic processes. Here, we have uncovered coordination between transcriptional and morphogen cues to specify Merkel cells, poorly understood skin cells that mediate light touch sensations. In murine dorsal skin, Merkel cells are part of touch domes, which are skin structures consisting of specialized keratinocytes, Merkel cells, and afferent neurons, and are located exclusively around primary hair follicles. We show that the developing primary hair follicle functions as a niche required for Merkel cell specification. We find that intraepidermal Sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling, initiated by the production of Shh ligand in the developing hair follicles, is required for Merkel cell specification. The importance of Shh for Merkel cell formation is further reinforced by the fact that Shh overexpression in embryonic epidermal progenitors leads to ectopic Merkel cells. Interestingly, Shh signaling is common to primary, secondary, and tertiary hair follicles, raising the possibility that there are restrictive mechanisms that regulate Merkel cell specification exclusively around primary hair follicles. Indeed, we find that loss of Polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2) in the epidermis results in the formation of ectopic Merkel cells that are associated with all hair types. We show that PRC2 loss expands the field of epidermal cells competent to differentiate into Merkel cells through the upregulation of key Merkel-differentiation genes, which are known PRC2 targets. Importantly, PRC2-mediated repression of the Merkel cell differentiation program requires inductive Shh signaling to form mature Merkel cells. Our study exemplifies how the interplay between epigenetic and morphogen cues regulates the complex patterning and formation of the mammalian skin structures. PMID:27414999

  1. In vivo regulation of NADP-specific glutamate dehydrogenase by L-amides in Stemphylium botryosum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The activity of NADP-specific glutamate dehydrogenase (NADP-GDH; EC 1.4.1.4) increased at a linear rate of 2.1 x 103 units h-1(g fresh wt)-1 following the transfer of Stemphylium botryosum mycelium growth in L-asparagine medium to nitrate medium. The maximum enzyme activity was reached after 5 h. De nova synthesis was demonstrated by density labelling of the enzyme with deuterium and inhibition of NADP-GDH synthesis by cycloheximide, p-fluorophenylalanine or 6-methylpurine. L-Asparagine or L-glutamine could serve as a corepressor of NADP-GDH synthesis whereas the D-isomers were ineffective. Of the various amide derivatives tested, only L-asparagine tert-butyl ester could mimic the effect of L-asparagine. Enzyme repression was not correlated with the internal pool of L-amides. After NADP-GDH had been induced to the maximum level, the addition of L-asparagine and cycloheximide resulted in a decrease of activity with half-lives of 4.5 h and 8 h respectively. The mean half-life, as measured by following the decay in specific radioactivity of the enzyme in nitrate medium after administration of 35SO42-, was 7 h. Mycelium starved of carbon and nitrogen sources showed a slow decrease (half-life of 17 h) in NADP-GDH activity. Depletion of energy by carbon starvation or the presence of sodium azide did not prevent the decrease in enzyme activity caused by L-asparagine. The decrease in NADP-GDH activity mediated by L-asparagine was inhibited by cycloheximide or α-iodoacetamide. Sodium azide inhibited the decrease in enzyme activity caused by cylcoheximide. (author)

  2. Specifications and Quality of Technetium99m Produced diopharmaceuticals According to Good Manufacturing Practice Regulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Technological revolution has occurred in the last two decades of this century in field of Cold Kits preparations processed by Lyophilization technique (A drying process while frozen) which are labeled afterwards with Technetium-99m radionuclide. Such materials are intended to be used as Radiopharmaceutical probes in nuclear medicine for the diagnosis of dynamic and static conditions of organs, and therefore; uncovering of diseases and syndromes targeting humans. Preferability and the advantages of such kits labeled with Technetium-99m radionuclide over other types of radiopharmaceuticals is attributed to the unique physical properties of the radionuclide including its short half life of 6.02 hours, low photon energy of 140 keV, lacking of alpha and beta particles which are usually exposing patients to have additional exposed doses. Moreover, simplicity in obtaining such radionuclide in form portable generators containing the mother radionuclide Molybdenum - 99 (i.e. solvent extraction generators or adsorption column chromatographic generators) for-on-the- spot-labeling, and the ability of formulating the cold kits as chemical complexes located at different organs of human body. Those lyophilized kits intended for radiopharmaceutical preparations labeled with Technetium - 99m radionuclide must stand for quality assurance standards and assessments for the sake of safety, efficiency, apyrogenecity, radiochemical purity, in- vivo stability and suitability for the endeavor planed for. Therefore, in order to control and optimize those considerations, implementations of the so-called GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE composed of regulations and constitutional laws related to the process of preparation and final produced preparation must take place.(author)

  3. The pseudokinase domain of JAK2 is a dual-specificity protein kinase that negatively regulates cytokine signaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ungureanu, Daniela; Wu, Jinhua; Pekkala, Tuija; Niranjan, Yashavanthi; Young, Clifford; Jensen, Ole N; Xu, Chong-Feng; Neubert, Thomas A; Skoda, Radek C; Hubbard, Stevan R; Silvennoinen, Olli

    2011-01-01

    Human JAK2 tyrosine kinase mediates signaling through numerous cytokine receptors. The JAK2 JH2 domain functions as a negative regulator and is presumed to be a catalytically inactive pseudokinase, but the mechanism(s) for its inhibition of JAK2 remains unknown. Mutations in JH2 lead to increased...... JAK2 activity, contributing to myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs). Here we show that JH2 is a dual-specificity protein kinase that phosphorylates two negative regulatory sites in JAK2: Ser523 and Tyr570. Inactivation of JH2 catalytic activity increased JAK2 basal activity and downstream signaling...... mechanism to control basal activity and signaling of JAK2....

  4. The immune checkpoint regulator PD-L1 is a specific target for naturally occurring CD4+ T cells

    OpenAIRE

    Munir, Shamaila; Andersen, Gitte Holmen; Svane, Inge Marie; Andersen, Mads Hald

    2013-01-01

    Programmed cell death 1 ligand 1 (PD-L1) is an important regulator of T-cell responses and may consequently limit anticancer immunity. We have recently identified PD-L1-specific, cytotoxic CD8+ T cells. In the present study, we develop these findings and report that CD4+ helper T cells spontaneously recognize PD-L1. We examined the locality of a previously identified HLA-A*0201-restricted PD-L1-epitope for the presence of possible CD4+ T-cell epitopes. Thus, we identified naturally occurring ...

  5. Receptors for B cell stimulatory factor 2. Quantitation, specificity, distribution, and regulation of their expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taga, T.; Kawanishi, Y.; Hardy, R.R.; Hirano, T.; Kishimoto, T.

    1987-10-01

    B cell stimulatory factor 2 receptors (BSF-2-R) were studied using radioiodinated recombinant BSF-2 with a specific activity of 6.16 X 10(13) cpm/g. Kinetic studies showed that binding of /sup 125/I-BSF-2 to CESS cells reached maximum level within 150 min at 0 degrees C. There was a single class of receptors with high affinity (Kd 3.4 X 10(-10) M) on CESS, and the number of receptors was 2700 per cell. Binding of /sup 125/I-BSF-2 to CESS was competitively inhibited by unlabeled BSF-2 but not by IL-1, IL-2, IFN-beta, IFN-gamma, and G-CSF, indicating the presence of the receptors specific for BSF-2. EBV-transformed B lymphoblastoid cell lines (CESS, SKW6-CL4, LCL13, and LCL14) expressed BSF-2-R, whereas Burkitt's lines did not. EBV or EBNA2 did not induce the expression of the receptors on Burkitt's cells. The plasma cell lines (ARH-77 and U266) expressed BSF-2-R, fitting the function of BSF-2 as plasma cell growth factor. Several other cell lines, the histiocytic line U937, the promyelocytic line HL60, the astrocytoma line U373 and the glioblastoma line SK-MG-4, in which BSF-2 was inducible with IL-1 or TPA, displayed BSF-2-R with Kd in the range of 1.3-6.4 X 10(-10) M, suggesting the autocrine mechanism in BSF-2 function. The four T cell lines (CEM, HSB, Jurkat, and OM 1) did not express a detectable number of receptors, but normal resting T cells expressed 100-1000 receptors per cell. BSF-2-R were not present on normal resting B cells but expressed on activated B cells with a Kd of 3.6-5.0 X 10(-10) M, fitting the function of BSF-2, which acts on B cells at the final maturation stage to induce immunoglobulin production.

  6. IGF-1 Regulates Vertebral Bone Aging Through Sex-Specific and Time-Dependent Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashpole, Nicole M; Herron, Jacquelyn C; Mitschelen, Matthew C; Farley, Julie A; Logan, Sreemathi; Yan, Han; Ungvari, Zoltan; Hodges, Erik L; Csiszar, Anna; Ikeno, Yuji; Humphrey, Mary Beth; Sonntag, William E

    2016-02-01

    Advanced aging is associated with increased risk of bone fracture, especially within the vertebrae, which exhibit significant reductions in trabecular bone structure. Aging is also associated with a reduction in circulating levels of insulin-like growth factor (IGF-1). Studies have suggested that the reduction in IGF-1 compromises healthspan, whereas others report that loss of IGF-1 is beneficial because it increases healthspan and lifespan. To date, the effect of decreases in circulating IGF-1 on vertebral bone aging has not been thoroughly investigated. Here, we delineate the consequences of a loss of circulating IGF-1 on vertebral bone aging in male and female Igf(f/f) mice. IGF-1 was reduced at multiple specific time points during the mouse lifespan: early in postnatal development (crossing albumin-cyclic recombinase [Cre] mice with Igf(f/f) mice); and in early adulthood and in late adulthood using hepatic-specific viral vectors (AAV8-TBG-Cre). Vertebrae bone structure was analyzed at 27 months of age using micro-computed tomography (μCT) and quantitative bone histomorphometry. Consistent with previous studies, both male and female mice exhibited age-related reductions in vertebral bone structure. In male mice, reduction of circulating IGF-1 induced at any age did not diminish vertebral bone loss. Interestingly, early-life loss of IGF-1 in females resulted in a 67% increase in vertebral bone volume fraction, as well as increased connectivity density and increased trabecular number. The maintenance of bone structure in the early-life IGF-1-deficient females was associated with increased osteoblast surface and an increased ratio of osteoprotegerin/receptor-activator of NF-κB-ligand (RANKL) levels in circulation. Within 3 months of a loss of IGF-1, there was a 2.2-fold increase in insulin receptor expression within the vertebral bones of our female mice, suggesting that local signaling may compensate for the loss of circulating IGF-1. Together, these data

  7. Clone-specific expression, transcriptional regulation, and action of interleukin-6 in human colon carcinoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many cancer cells produce interleukin-6 (IL-6), a cytokine that plays a role in growth stimulation, metastasis, and angiogenesis of secondary tumours in a variety of malignancies, including colorectal cancer. Effectiveness of IL-6 in this respect may depend on the quantity of basal and inducible IL-6 expressed as the tumour progresses through stages of malignancy. We therefore have evaluated the effect of IL-6 modulators, i.e. IL-1β, prostaglandin E2, 17β-estradiol, and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3, on expression and synthesis of the cytokine at different stages of tumour progression. We utilized cultures of the human colon carcinoma cell clones Caco-2/AQ, COGA-1A and COGA-13, all of which expressed differentiation and proliferation markers typical of distinct stages of tumour progression. IL-6 mRNA and protein levels were assayed by RT-PCR and ELISA, respectively. DNA sequencing was utilized to detect polymorphisms in the IL-6 gene promoter. IL-6 mRNA and protein concentrations were low in well and moderately differentiated Caco-2/AQ and COGA-1A cells, but were high in poorly differentiated COGA-13 cells. Addition of IL-1β (5 ng/ml) to a COGA-13 culture raised IL-6 production approximately thousandfold via a prostaglandin-independent mechanism. Addition of 17β-estradiol (10-7 M) reduced basal IL-6 production by one-third, but IL-1β-inducible IL-6 was unaffected. Search for polymorphisms in the IL-6 promoter revealed the presence of a single haplotype, i.e., -597A/-572G/-174C, in COGA-13 cells, which is associated with a high degree of transcriptional activity of the IL-6 gene. IL-6 blocked differentiation only in Caco-2/AQ cells and stimulated mitosis through up-regulation of c-myc proto-oncogene expression. These effects were inhibited by 10-8 M 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3. In human colon carcinoma cells derived from well and moderately differentiated tumours, IL-6 expression is low and only marginally affected, if at all, by PGE2, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3, and 17

  8. Ligand-specific regulation of the extracellular surface of a G-protein-coupled receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bokoch, Michael P.; Zou, Yaozhong; Rasmussen, Søren G.F.; Liu, Corey W.; Nygaard, Rie; Rosenbaum, Daniel M.; Fung, Juan José; Choi, Hee-Jung; Thian, Foon Sun; Kobilka, Tong Sun; Puglisi, Joseph D.; Weis, William I.; Pardo, Leonardo; Prosser, R. Scott; Mueller, Luciano; Kobilka, Brian K. (Stanford-MED); (Toronto); (BMS); (UAB, Spain)

    2010-01-14

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are seven-transmembrane proteins that mediate most cellular responses to hormones and neurotransmitters. They are the largest group of therapeutic targets for a broad spectrum of diseases. Recent crystal structures of GPCRs have revealed structural conservation extending from the orthosteric ligand-binding site in the transmembrane core to the cytoplasmic G-protein-coupling domains. In contrast, the extracellular surface (ECS) of GPCRs is remarkably diverse and is therefore an ideal target for the discovery of subtype-selective drugs. However, little is known about the functional role of the ECS in receptor activation, or about conformational coupling of this surface to the native ligand-binding pocket. Here we use NMR spectroscopy to investigate ligand-specific conformational changes around a central structural feature in the ECS of the {beta}{sub 2} adrenergic receptor: a salt bridge linking extracellular loops 2 and 3. Small-molecule drugs that bind within the transmembrane core and exhibit different efficacies towards G-protein activation (agonist, neutral antagonist and inverse agonist) also stabilize distinct conformations of the ECS. We thereby demonstrate conformational coupling between the ECS and the orthosteric binding site, showing that drugs targeting this diverse surface could function as allosteric modulators with high subtype selectivity. Moreover, these studies provide a new insight into the dynamic behaviour of GPCRs not addressable by static, inactive-state crystal structures.

  9. Hemokinin is a hematopoietic-specific tachykinin that regulates B lymphopoiesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Y; Lu, L; Furlonger, C; Wu, G E; Paige, C J

    2000-11-01

    We report here the molecular cloning of a newly identified preprotachykinin gene, Pptc, which specifies the sequence for a new preprotachykinin protein and bioactive peptide designated hemokinin 1 (HK-1). PPT-C mRNA was detected primarily in hematopoietic cells in contrast to the previously described Ppta and Pptb genes, which are predominantly expressed in neuronal tissues. HK-1 has several biological activities that are similar to the most studied tachykinin, substance P, such as induction of plasma extravasation and mast cell degranulation. However, HK-1 also has properties that are indicative of a critical role in mouse B cell development. HK-1 stimulated the proliferation of interleukin 7-expanded B cell precursors, whereas substance P had no effect. HK-1, but not substance P, promoted the survival of freshly isolated bone marrow B lineage cells or cultured, lipopolysaccharide-stimulated pre-B cells. N-acetyl-L-trytophan-3,5-bistrifluromethyl benzyl ester, a tachykinin receptor antagonist, increased apoptosis of these cells and in vivo administration of this antagonist led to specific reductions of the B220lowCD43 population (the pre-B cell compartment) in the bone marrow and the IgMhighIgDlow population (the newly generated B cells) in the spleen. Thus, HK-1 may be an autocrine factor that is important for the survival of B cell precursors at a critical phase of development. PMID:11062498

  10. Gender-specific regulation of response to thyroid hormone in aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzuki Satoru

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Similar to other systems, the endocrine system is affected by aging. Thyroid hormone, the action of which is affected by many factors, has been shown to be associated with longevity. The most useful marker for the assessment of thyroid hormone action is TSH level. Although age and gender are believed to modify the pituitary set point or response to free thyroid hormone concentration, the precise age- and gender-dependent responses to thyroid hormone have yet to be reported. Methods We analyzed the results of 3564 thyroid function tests obtained from patients who received medication at both out- and inpatient clinics of Shinshu University Hospital. Subjects were from among those with thyroid function test results in the normal or mildly abnormal range. Based on a log-linear relationship between the concentrations of FHs and TSH, we established the putative resistance index to assess the relation between serum FH and TSH levels. Results Free thyroid hormone and TSH concentration showed an inverse log-linear relation. In males, there was a negative relationship between the free T3 resistance index and age. In females, although there were no relationships between age and FHs, the indices were positively related to age. Conclusions These findings indicated that there is a gender-specific response to thyroid hormone with aging. Although the TSH level is a useful marker for the assessment of peripheral thyroid hormone action, the values should be interpreted carefully, especially with regard to age- and gender-related differences.

  11. Segment-specific terminal sequences of Bunyamwera bunyavirus regulate genome replication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bunyamwera virus (BUNV) is the prototype of both the Orthobunyavirus genus and the Bunyaviridae family of segmented negative sense RNA viruses. The tripartite BUNV genome consists of small (S), medium (M), and large (L) segments that are transcribed to give a single mRNA and replicated to generate an antigenome that is the template for synthesis of further genomic RNA strands. We modified an existing cDNA-derived RNA synthesis system to allow identification of BUNV RNA replication and transcription products by direct metabolic labeling. Direct RNA analysis allowed us to distinguish between template activities that affected either RNA replication or mRNA transcription, an ability that was not possible using previous reporter gene expression assays. We generated genome analogs containing the entire nontranslated terminal sequences of the S, M, and L BUNV segments surrounding a common sequence. Analysis of RNAs synthesized from these templates revealed that the relative abilities of BUNV segments to perform RNA replication was M > L > S. Exchange of segment-specific terminal nucleotides identified a 12-nt region located within both the 3' and 5' termini of the M segment that correlated with its high replication ability

  12. Gene-specific regulation of hepatic selenoprotein expression by interleukin-6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martitz, J; Becker, N-P; Renko, K; Stoedter, M; Hybsier, S; Schomburg, L

    2015-11-01

    Sepsis is a severe inflammatory disease resulting in excessive production of pro-inflammatory cytokines including interleukin-6 (IL-6), causing oxidative stress, tissue damage and organ dysfunction. Health benefits have been observed upon selenium (Se) supplementation in severe sepsis. Selenium is incorporated into selenoproteins implicated in anti-oxidative defence, thyroid hormone metabolism and immunoregulation. Selenium metabolism is controlled by hepatocytes synthesizing and secreting the Se transporter selenoprotein P (SePP). The circulating SePP declines in sepsis causing low serum Se levels. Dysregulation of the hepatic selenoenzyme deiodinase type 1 (DIO1) potentially contributes to the low T3 (thyroid hormone) syndrome observed in severe diseases. We hypothesized that IL-6 affects hepatic selenoprotein biosynthesis directly. Testing human hepatocytes in culture, IL-6 reduced the concentrations of SePP mRNA and secreted SePP in a dose-dependent manner. In parallel, expression of DIO1 declined at the mRNA, protein and enzyme activity level. The effects of IL-6 on glutathione peroxidase (GPX) expression were isozyme-specific; GPX1 remained unaffected, while transcript concentrations of GPX2 increased and those of GPX4 decreased. This pattern of IL-6-dependent effects was mirrored in reporter gene experiments with SePP, DIO1, GPX1, and GPX2 promoter constructs pointing to direct transcriptional effects of IL-6. The redirection of hepatic selenoprotein biosynthesis by IL-6 may represent a central regulatory circuit responsible for the decline of serum Se and low T3 concentrations in sepsis. Accordingly, therapeutic IL-6 targeting may be effective for improving the Se and thyroid hormone status, adjuvant Se supplementation success and survival in sepsis. PMID:26399395

  13. Death-specific protein in a marine diatom regulates photosynthetic responses to iron and light availability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thamatrakoln, Kimberlee; Bailleul, Benjamin; Brown, Christopher M; Gorbunov, Maxim Y; Kustka, Adam B; Frada, Miguel; Joliot, Pierre A; Falkowski, Paul G; Bidle, Kay D

    2013-12-10

    Diatoms, unicellular phytoplankton that account for ∼40% of marine primary productivity, often dominate coastal and open-ocean upwelling zones. Limitation of growth and productivity by iron at low light is attributed to an elevated cellular Fe requirement for the synthesis of Fe-rich photosynthetic proteins. In the dynamic coastal environment, Fe concentrations and daily surface irradiance levels can vary by two to three orders of magnitude on short spatial and temporal scales. Although genome-wide studies are beginning to provide insight into the molecular mechanisms used by diatoms to rapidly respond to such fluxes, their functional role in mediating the Fe stress response remains uncharacterized. Here, we show, using reverse genetics, that a death-specific protein (DSP; previously named for its apparent association with cell death) in the coastal diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana (TpDSP1) localizes to the plastid and enhances growth during acute Fe limitation at subsaturating light by increasing the photosynthetic efficiency of carbon fixation. Clone lines overexpressing TpDSP1 had a lower quantum requirement for growth, increased levels of photosynthetic and carbon fixation proteins, and increased cyclic electron flow around photosystem I. Cyclic electron flow is an ATP-producing pathway essential in higher plants and chlorophytes with a heretofore unappreciated role in diatoms. However, cells under replete conditions were characterized as having markedly reduced growth and photosynthetic rates at saturating light, thereby constraining the benefits afforded by overexpression. Widespread distribution of DSP-like sequences in environmental metagenomic and metatranscriptomic datasets highlights the presence and relevance of this protein in natural phytoplankton populations in diverse oceanic regimes. PMID:24277817

  14. Noncommutative Biology: Sequential Regulation of Complex Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Letsou, William; Cai, Long

    2016-01-01

    Single-cell variability in gene expression is important for generating distinct cell types, but it is unclear how cells use the same set of regulatory molecules to specifically control similarly regulated genes. While combinatorial binding of transcription factors at promoters has been proposed as a solution for cell-type specific gene expression, we found that such models resulted in substantial information bottlenecks. We sought to understand the consequences of adopting sequential logic wherein the time-ordering of factors informs the final outcome. We showed that with noncommutative control, it is possible to independently control targets that would otherwise be activated simultaneously using combinatorial logic. Consequently, sequential logic overcomes the information bottleneck inherent in complex networks. We derived scaling laws for two noncommutative models of regulation, motivated by phosphorylation/neural networks and chromosome folding, respectively, and showed that they scale super-exponentially in the number of regulators. We also showed that specificity in control is robust to the loss of a regulator. Lastly, we connected these theoretical results to real biological networks that demonstrate specificity in the context of promiscuity. These results show that achieving a desired outcome often necessitates roundabout steps. PMID:27560383

  15. The immune checkpoint regulator PD-L1 is a specific target for naturally occurring CD4(+) T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munir, Shamaila; Andersen, Gitte Holmen; Svane, Inge Marie; Andersen, Mads Hald

    2013-01-01

    Programmed cell death 1 ligand 1 (PD-L1) is an important regulator of T-cell responses and may consequently limit anticancer immunity. We have recently identified PD-L1-specific, cytotoxic CD8(+) T cells. In the present study, we develop these findings and report that CD4(+) helper T cells...... spontaneously recognize PD-L1. We examined the locality of a previously identified HLA-A*0201-restricted PD-L1-epitope for the presence of possible CD4(+) T-cell epitopes. Thus, we identified naturally occurring PD-L1-specific CD4(+) T cells among the peripheral blood lymphocytes of cancer patients and - to...... lesser extents - healthy donors, by means of ELISPOT assays. PD-L1-specific CD4(+) T cells appeared to be TH17 cells exhibiting an effector T-cell cytokine profile. Hence, PD-L1-specific CD4(+) T cells released interferon γ (IFNγ), tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) and interleukin-17 (IL-17) in response to...

  16. Lysine-Specific Demethylase 1 Has Dual Functions as a Major Regulator of Androgen Receptor Transcriptional Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changmeng Cai

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Lysine-Specific Demethylase 1 (LSD1, KDM1A functions as a transcriptional corepressor through demethylation of histone 3 lysine 4 (H3K4 but has a coactivator function on some genes through mechanisms that are unclear. We show that LSD1, interacting with CoREST, associates with and coactivates androgen receptor (AR on a large fraction of androgen-stimulated genes. A subset of these AR/LSD1-associated enhancer sites have histone 3 threonine 6 phosphorylation (H3T6ph, and these sites are further enriched for androgen-stimulated genes. Significantly, despite its coactivator activity, LSD1 still mediates H3K4me2 demethylation at these androgen-stimulated enhancers. FOXA1 is also associated with LSD1 at AR-regulated enhancer sites, and a FOXA1 interaction with LSD1 enhances binding of both proteins at these sites. These findings show that LSD1 functions broadly as a regulator of AR function, that it maintains a transcriptional repression function at AR-regulated enhancers through H3K4 demethylation, and that it has a distinct AR-linked coactivator function mediated by demethylation of other substrates.

  17. The herpesvirus associated ubiquitin specific protease, USP7, is a negative regulator of PML proteins and PML nuclear bodies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feroz Sarkari

    Full Text Available The PML tumor suppressor is the founding component of the multiprotein nuclear structures known as PML nuclear bodies (PML-NBs, which control several cellular functions including apoptosis and antiviral effects. The ubiquitin specific protease USP7 (also called HAUSP is known to associate with PML-NBs and to be a tight binding partner of two herpesvirus proteins that disrupt PML NBs. Here we investigated whether USP7 itself regulates PML-NBs. Silencing of USP7 was found to increase the number of PML-NBs, to increase the levels of PML protein and to inhibit PML polyubiquitylation in nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells. This effect of USP7 was independent of p53 as PML loss was observed in p53-null cells. PML-NBs disruption was induced by USP7 overexpression independently of its catalytic activity and was induced by either of the protein interaction domains of USP7, each of which localized to PML-NBs. USP7 also disrupted NBs formed from some single PML isoforms, most notably isoforms I and IV. CK2α and RNF4, which are known regulators of PML, were dispensable for USP7-associated PML-NB disruption. The results are consistent with a novel model of PML regulation where a deubiquitylase disrupts PML-NBs through recruitment of another cellular protein(s to PML NBs, independently of its catalytic activity.

  18. The herpesvirus associated ubiquitin specific protease, USP7, is a negative regulator of PML proteins and PML nuclear bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkari, Feroz; Wang, Xueqi; Nguyen, Tin; Frappier, Lori

    2011-01-01

    The PML tumor suppressor is the founding component of the multiprotein nuclear structures known as PML nuclear bodies (PML-NBs), which control several cellular functions including apoptosis and antiviral effects. The ubiquitin specific protease USP7 (also called HAUSP) is known to associate with PML-NBs and to be a tight binding partner of two herpesvirus proteins that disrupt PML NBs. Here we investigated whether USP7 itself regulates PML-NBs. Silencing of USP7 was found to increase the number of PML-NBs, to increase the levels of PML protein and to inhibit PML polyubiquitylation in nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells. This effect of USP7 was independent of p53 as PML loss was observed in p53-null cells. PML-NBs disruption was induced by USP7 overexpression independently of its catalytic activity and was induced by either of the protein interaction domains of USP7, each of which localized to PML-NBs. USP7 also disrupted NBs formed from some single PML isoforms, most notably isoforms I and IV. CK2α and RNF4, which are known regulators of PML, were dispensable for USP7-associated PML-NB disruption. The results are consistent with a novel model of PML regulation where a deubiquitylase disrupts PML-NBs through recruitment of another cellular protein(s) to PML NBs, independently of its catalytic activity. PMID:21305000

  19. Genetic Variability Overrides the Impact of Parental Cell Type and Determines iPSC Differentiation Potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aija Kyttälä

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Reports on the retention of somatic cell memory in induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs have complicated the selection of the optimal cell type for the generation of iPSC biobanks. To address this issue we compared transcriptomic, epigenetic, and differentiation propensities of genetically matched human iPSCs derived from fibroblasts and blood, two tissues of the most practical relevance for biobanking. Our results show that iPSC lines derived from the same donor are highly similar to each other. However, genetic variation imparts a donor-specific expression and methylation profile in reprogrammed cells that leads to variable functional capacities of iPSC lines. Our results suggest that integration-free, bona fide iPSC lines from fibroblasts and blood can be combined in repositories to form biobanks. Due to the impact of genetic variation on iPSC differentiation, biobanks should contain cells from large numbers of donors.

  20. Lysine-specific demethylase-1 contributes to malignant behavior by regulation of invasive activity and metabolic shift in esophageal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosumi, Keisuke; Baba, Yoshifumi; Sakamoto, Akihisa; Ishimoto, Takatsugu; Harada, Kazuto; Nakamura, Kenichi; Kurashige, Junji; Hiyoshi, Yukiharu; Iwatsuki, Masaaki; Iwagami, Shiro; Sakamoto, Yasuo; Miyamoto, Yuji; Yoshida, Naoya; Oki, Eiji; Watanabe, Masayuki; Hino, Shinjiro; Nakao, Mitsuyoshi; Baba, Hideo

    2016-01-15

    Lysine-specific demethylase-1 (LSD1) removes the methyl groups from mono- and di-methylated lysine 4 of histone H3. Previous studies have linked LSD1 to malignancy in several human tumors, and LSD1 is considered to epigenetically regulate the energy metabolism genes in adipocytes and hepatocellular carcinoma. This study investigates the function of LSD1 in the invasive activity and the metabolism of esophageal cancer cells. We investigated whether LSD1 immunohistochemical expression levels are related to clinical and pathological features, including the maximum standard uptake value in fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography assay. The influence of LSD1 on cell proliferation, invasion and glucose uptake was evaluated in vitro by using specific small interfering RNA for LSD1, and an LSD1 inhibitor. We also evaluated two major energy pathways (glycolytic pathway and mitochondrial respiration) by measuring the extracellular acidification rate (ECAR) and the oxygen consumption rate (OCR) with an extracellular flux analyzer. High LSD1 immunohistochemical expression was significantly associated with high tumor stage, lymphovascular invasion, poor prognosis, and high maximum standard uptake value in esophageal cancer patients. In the in vitro analysis, LSD1 knockdown significantly suppressed the invasive activity and glucose uptake of cancerous cells, reduced their ECAR and increased their OCR and OCR/ECAR. LSD1 may contribute to malignant behavior by regulating the invasive activity and metabolism, activating the glycolytic pathway and inhibiting the mitochondrial respiration of esophageal cancer cells. The results support LSD1 as a potential therapeutic target. PMID:26240060

  1. Myeloid-specific Fos-related antigen-1 regulates cigarette smoke-induced lung inflammation, not emphysema, in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaz, Michelle; Rajasekaran, Subbiah; Potteti, Haranatha R; Reddy, Sekhar P

    2015-07-01

    Heightened lung inflammation is a cardinal feature of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Cigarette smoke (CS)-induced macrophage recruitment and activation, accompanied by abnormal secretion of a number of inflammatory cytokines and matrix metalloproteinases, play a major role in the pathophysiology of COPD. The Fos-related antigen-1 (Fra-1) transcription factor differentially regulates several cellular processes that are implicated in COPD, such as inflammation and immune responses, cell proliferation and death, and extracellular remodeling. Although CS stimulates Fra-1 expression in the lung, the precise role of this transcription factor in the regulation of CS-induced lung inflammation in vivo is poorly understood. Here, we report that myeloid-specific Fra-1 signaling is important for CS-induced lung macrophagic inflammatory response. In response to chronic CS exposure, mice with Fra-1 specifically deleted in myeloid cells showed reduced levels of CS-induced lung macrophagic inflammation, accompanied by decreased expression levels of proinflammatory cytokines compared with their wild-type counterparts. Consistent with this result, bone marrow-derived Fra-1-null macrophages treated with CS showed decreased levels of proinflammatory mediators and matrix metalloproteinases. Interestingly, deletion of Fra-1 in myeloid cells did not affect the severity of emphysema. We propose that Fra-1 plays a key role in promoting chronic CS-induced lung macrophagic inflammation in vivo, and that targeting this transcription factor may be useful in dampening persistent lung inflammation in patients with COPD. PMID:25489966

  2. Shoot-Specific Down-Regulation of Protein Farnesyltransferase (α-Subunit) for Yield Protection against Drought in Canola

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Wang; Michelle Beaith; Maryse Chalifoux; Jifeng Ying; Tina Uchacz; Carlene Sarvas; Rebecca Griffiths; Monika Kuzma; Jiangxin Wan; Yafan Huang

    2009-01-01

    Canola (Brassica napus L.) is one of the most important oilseed crops in the world and its seed yield and quality are significantly affected by drought stress. As an innate and adaptive response to water deficit, land plants avoid potential damage by rapid biosynthesis of the phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA), which triggers stomatal closure to reduce transpirational water loss. The ABA-mediated stomatal response is a dosage-dependent process; thus, one genetic engineering approach for achieving drought avoidance could be to sensitize the guard cell's responsiveness to this hormone.Recent genetic studies have pinpointed protein farnesyltransferase as a key negative regulator controlling ABA sensitivity in the guard cells. We have previously shown that down-regulation of the gene encoding Arabidopsis β-subunit of farnesyltransferase (ERA1) enhances the plant's sensitivity to ABA and drought tolerance. Although the α-subunit of famesyltransferase (AtFTA) is also implicated in ABA sensing, the effectiveness of using such a gene target for improving drought tolerance in a crop plant has not been validated. Here, we report the identification and characterization of the promoter of Arabidopsis hydroxypyruvate reductase (AtHPR1), which expresses specifically in the shoot and not in non-photosynthetic tissues such as root. The promoter region of AtHPR1 contains the core motif of the well characterized dehydration-responsive cis-acting element and we have confirmed that AtHPR1 expression is inducible by drought stress. Conditional and specific down-regulation of FTA in canola using the AtHPR1 promoter driving an RNAi construct resulted in yield protection against drought stress in the field. Using this molecular strategy, we have made significant progress in engineering drought tolerance in this important crop species.

  3. Genotoxic damage in polychaetes: a study of species and cell-type sensitivities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Ceri; Galloway, Tamara

    2008-06-30

    The marine environment is becoming increasingly contaminated by environmental pollutants with the potential to damage DNA, with marine sediments acting as a sink for many of these contaminants. Understanding genotoxic responses in sediment-dwelling marine organisms, such as polychaetes, is therefore of increasing importance. This study is an exploration of species-specific and cell-specific differences in cell sensitivities to DNA-damaging agents in polychaete worms, aimed at increasing fundamental knowledge of their responses to genotoxic damage. The sensitivities of coelomocytes from three polychaetes species of high ecological relevance, i.e. the lugworm Arenicola marina, the harbour ragworm Nereis diversicolor and the king ragworm Nereis virens to genotoxic damage are compared, and differences in sensitivities of their different coelomic cell types determined by use of the comet assay. A. marina was found to be the most sensitive to genotoxic damage induced by the direct-acting mutagen methyl methanesulfonate (MMS), and showed dose-dependent responses to MMS and the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon benzo(a)pyrene. Significant differences in sensitivity were also measured for the different types of coelomocyte. Eleocytes were more sensitive to induction of DNA damage than amoebocytes in both N. virens and N. diversicolor. Spermatozoa from A. marina showed significant DNA damage following in vitro exposure to MMS, but were less sensitive to DNA damage than coelomocytes. This investigation has clearly demonstrated that different cell types within the same species and different species within the polychaetes show significantly different responses to genotoxic insult. These findings are discussed in terms of the relationship between cell function and sensitivity and their implications for the use of polychaetes in environmental genotoxicity studies. PMID:18579434

  4. Cell Type-Specific Control of Spike Timing by Gamma-Band Oscillatory Inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasenstaub, Andrea; Otte, Stephani; Callaway, Edward

    2016-02-01

    Many lines of theoretical and experimental investigation have suggested that gamma oscillations provide a temporal framework for cortical information processing, acting to either synchronize neuronal firing, restrict neuron's relative spike times, and/or provide a global reference signal to which neurons encode input strength. Each theory has been disputed and some believe that gamma is an epiphenomenon. We investigated the biophysical plausibility of these theories by performing in vitro whole-cell recordings from 6 cortical neuron subtypes and examining how gamma-band and slow fluctuations in injected input affect precision and phase of spike timing. We find that gamma is at least partially able to restrict the spike timing in all subtypes tested, but to varying degrees. Gamma exerts more precise control of spike timing in pyramidal neurons involved in cortico-cortical versus cortico-subcortical communication and in inhibitory neurons that target somatic versus dendritic compartments. We also find that relatively few subtypes are capable of phase-based information coding. Using simple neuron models and dynamic clamp, we determine which intrinsic differences lead to these variations in responsiveness and discuss both the flexibility and confounds of gamma-based spike-timing systems. PMID:25778344

  5. Strain Variation in Glycosaminoglycan Recognition Influences Cell-Type-Specific Binding by Lyme Disease Spirochetes

    OpenAIRE

    Parveen, Nikhat; Robbins, Douglas; Leong, John M.

    1999-01-01

    Lyme disease, a chronic multisystemic disorder that can affect the skin, heart, joints, and nervous system is caused by Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato. Lyme disease spirochetes were previously shown to bind glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). In the current study, the GAG-binding properties of eight Lyme disease strains were determined. Binding by two high-passage HB19 derivatives to Vero cells could not be inhibited by enzymatic removal of GAGs or by the addition of exogenous GAG. The other six stra...

  6. State-dependent and cell type-specific temporal processing in auditory thalamocortical circuit

    OpenAIRE

    Shuzo Sakata

    2016-01-01

    Ongoing spontaneous activity in cortical circuits defines cortical states, but it still remains unclear how cortical states shape sensory processing across cortical laminae and what type of response properties emerge in the cortex. Recording neural activity from the auditory cortex (AC) and medial geniculate body (MGB) simultaneously with electrical stimulations of the basal forebrain (BF) in urethane-anesthetized rats, we investigated state-dependent spontaneous and auditory-evoked activitie...

  7. Cell type-specific termination of transcription by transposable element sequences

    OpenAIRE

    Conley Andrew B; Jordan I

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Transposable elements (TEs) encode sequences necessary for their own transposition, including signals required for the termination of transcription. TE sequences within the introns of human genes show an antisense orientation bias, which has been proposed to reflect selection against TE sequences in the sense orientation owing to their ability to terminate the transcription of host gene transcripts. While there is evidence in support of this model for some elements, the ex...

  8. Cell-type specific adhesive interactions of skeletal myoblasts with thrombospondin-1.

    OpenAIRE

    Adams, J. C.; Lawler, J

    1994-01-01

    Thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1) is an extracellular matrix glycoprotein that may play important roles in the morphogenesis and repair of skeletal muscle. To begin to explore the role of thrombospondin-1 in this tissue, we have examined the interactions of three rodent skeletal muscle cell lines, C2C12, G8, and H9c2, with platelet TSP-1. The cells secrete thrombospondin and incorporate it into the cell layer in a distribution distinct from that of fibronectin. Myoblasts attach and spread on fibronect...

  9. Innate immune response to pulmonary contusion: Identification of cell-type specific inflammatory responses

    OpenAIRE

    Hoth, J. Jason; Wells, Jonathan D.; Yoza, Barbara K.; McCall, Charles E.

    2012-01-01

    Lung injury from pulmonary contusion is a common traumatic injury, predominantly seen after blunt chest trauma such as in vehicular accidents. The local and systemic inflammatory response to injury includes activation of innate immune receptors, elaboration of a variety inflammatory mediators, and recruitment of inflammatory cells to the injured lung. Using a mouse model of pulmonary contusion, we had previously shown that innate immune Toll like receptors 2 and 4 (TLR2 and TLR4) mediate the ...

  10. The cell type-specific effect of TAp73 isoforms on the cell cycle and apoptosis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Holčáková, J.; Češková, P.; Hrstka, R.; Muller, P.; Dubská, L.; Coates, P.J.; Paleček, Emil; Vojtěšek, B.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 13, č. 3 (2008), s. 404-420. ISSN 1425-8153 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA301/05/0416; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA500040513 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507; CEZ:AV0Z50040702 Keywords : p53 * TAp73 * DNA binding Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 1.454, year: 2008

  11. Ligation-free ribosome profiling of cell type-specific translation in the brain

    OpenAIRE

    Hornstein, Nicholas; Torres, Daniela; Das Sharma, Sohani; Tang, Guomei; Canoll, Peter; Sims, Peter A

    2016-01-01

    Ribosome profiling has emerged as a powerful tool for genome-wide measurements of translation, but library construction requires multiple ligation steps and remains cumbersome relative to more conventional deep-sequencing experiments. We report a new, ligation-free approach to ribosome profiling that does not require ligation. Library construction for ligation-free ribosome profiling can be completed in one day with as little as 1 ng of purified RNA footprints. We apply ligation-free ribosome...

  12. Unique cell type-specific junctional complexes in vascular endothelium of human and rat liver sinusoids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cyrill Géraud

    Full Text Available Liver sinusoidal endothelium is strategically positioned to control access of fluids, macromolecules and cells to the liver parenchyma and to serve clearance functions upstream of the hepatocytes. While clearance of macromolecular debris from the peripheral blood is performed by liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSECs using a delicate endocytic receptor system featuring stabilin-1 and -2, the mannose receptor and CD32b, vascular permeability and cell trafficking are controlled by transcellular pores, i.e. the fenestrae, and by intercellular junctional complexes. In contrast to blood vascular and lymphatic endothelial cells in other organs, the junctional complexes of LSECs have not yet been consistently characterized in molecular terms. In a comprehensive analysis, we here show that LSECs express the typical proteins found in endothelial adherens junctions (AJ, i.e. VE-cadherin as well as α-, β-, p120-catenin and plakoglobin. Tight junction (TJ transmembrane proteins typical of endothelial cells, i.e. claudin-5 and occludin, were not expressed by rat LSECs while heterogenous immunreactivity for claudin-5 was detected in human LSECs. In contrast, junctional molecules preferentially associating with TJ such as JAM-A, B and C and zonula occludens proteins ZO-1 and ZO-2 were readily detected in LSECs. Remarkably, among the JAMs JAM-C was considerably over-expressed in LSECs as compared to lung microvascular endothelial cells. In conclusion, we show here that LSECs form a special kind of mixed-type intercellular junctions characterized by co-occurrence of endothelial AJ proteins, and of ZO-1 and -2, and JAMs. The distinct molecular architecture of the intercellular junctional complexes of LSECs corroborates previous ultrastructural findings and provides the molecular basis for further analyses of the endothelial barrier function of liver sinusoids under pathologic conditions ranging from hepatic inflammation to formation of liver metastasis.

  13. Cell-Type-Specific Cytokinin Distribution within the Arabidopsis Primary Root Apex

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Antoniadi, I.; Plačková, Lenka; Simonovik, B.; Doležal, Karel; Turnbull, C.; Ljung, K.; Novák, Ondřej

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 27, č. 7 (2015), s. 1955-1967. ISSN 1040-4651 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA14-34792S; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1204; GA MŠk LK21306 Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : SOLID-PHASE EXTRACTION * ENDOPLASMIC-RETICULUM * MERISTEM ACTIVITY Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 9.338, year: 2014

  14. Cell-type Specific Development of NMDA Receptors in the Interneurons of Rat Prefrontal Cortex

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Huai-Xing; Gao, Wen-Jun

    2009-01-01

    In the prefrontal cortex, N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptors are critical not only for normal prefrontal functions but also for the pathological processes of schizophrenia. Little is known, however, about the developmental properties of NMDA receptors in the functionally diverse subpopulations of interneurons. We investigated the developmental changes of NMDA receptors in rat prefrontal interneurons using patch clamp recording in cortical slices. We found that fast-spiking (FS) interne...

  15. Dopamine D1 receptor expression is bipolar cell type-specific in the mouse retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farshi, Pershang; Fyk-Kolodziej, Bozena; Krolewski, David M; Walker, Paul D; Ichinose, Tomomi

    2016-07-01

    In the retina, dopamine is a key molecule for daytime vision. Dopamine is released by retinal dopaminergic amacrine cells and transmits signaling either by conventional synaptic or by volume transmission. By means of volume transmission, dopamine modulates all layers of retinal neurons; however, it is not well understood how dopamine modulates visual signaling pathways in bipolar cells. Here we analyzed Drd1a-tdTomato BAC transgenic mice and found that the dopamine D1 receptor (D1R) is expressed in retinal bipolar cells in a type-dependent manner. Strong tdTomato fluorescence was detected in the inner nuclear layer and localized to type 1, 3b, and 4 OFF bipolar cells and type 5-2, XBC, 6, and 7 ON bipolar cells. In contrast, type 2, 3a, 5-1, 9, and rod bipolar cells did not express Drd1a-tdTomato. Other interneurons were also found to express tdTomato including horizontal cells and a subset (25%) of AII amacrine cells. Diverse visual processing pathways, such as color or motion-coded pathways, are thought to be initiated in retinal bipolar cells. Our results indicate that dopamine sculpts bipolar cell performance in a type-dependent manner to facilitate daytime vision. J. Comp. Neurol. 524:2059-2079, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26587737

  16. Partitioning Heritability of Regulatory and Cell-Type-Specific Variants across 11 Common Diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gusev, Alexander; Lee, S Hong; Trynka, Gosia;

    2014-01-01

    diseases to partition the heritability explained by genotyped SNPs (hg(2)) across functional categories (while accounting for shared variance due to linkage disequilibrium). Extensive simulations showed that in contrast to current estimates from GWAS summary statistics, the variance-component approach...

  17. Cell-Type Specific DNA Methylation Patterns Define Human Breast Cellular Identity

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Novák, Petr; Stampfer, M.R.; Munoz-Rodriguez, J.L.; Garbe, J.C.; Ehrich, M.; Futscher, B. W.; Jensen, T.J.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 12 (2012), e52299. E-ISSN 1932-6203 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50510513 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : MAMMARY EPITHELIAL-CELLS * PLURIPOTENT STEM-CELLS * CPG ISLAND SHORES Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.730, year: 2012

  18. Drosophila Syncrip binds the gurken mRNA localisation signal and regulates localised transcripts during axis specification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzanne M. McDermott

    2012-04-01

    In the Drosophila oocyte, mRNA transport and localised translation play a fundamental role in axis determination and germline formation of the future embryo. gurken mRNA encodes a secreted TGF-α signal that specifies dorsal structures, and is localised to the dorso-anterior corner of the oocyte via a cis-acting 64 nucleotide gurken localisation signal. Using GRNA chromatography, we characterised the biochemical composition of the ribonucleoprotein complexes that form around the gurken mRNA localisation signal in the oocyte. We identified a number of the factors already known to be involved in gurken localisation and translational regulation, such as Squid and Imp, in addition to a number of factors with known links to mRNA localisation, such as Me31B and Exu. We also identified previously uncharacterised Drosophila proteins, including the fly homologue of mammalian SYNCRIP/hnRNPQ, a component of RNA transport granules in the dendrites of mammalian hippocampal neurons. We show that Drosophila Syncrip binds specifically to gurken and oskar, but not bicoid transcripts. The loss-of-function and overexpression phenotypes of syncrip in Drosophila egg chambers show that the protein is required for correct grk and osk mRNA localisation and translational regulation. We conclude that Drosophila Syncrip is a new factor required for localisation and translational regulation of oskar and gurken mRNA in the oocyte. We propose that Syncrip/SYNCRIP is part of a conserved complex associated with localised transcripts and required for their correct translational regulation in flies and mammals.

  19. Gene expression profile of renal cell carcinoma clear cell type

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos F. Dall’Oglio

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: The determination of prognosis in patients with renal cell carcinoma (RCC is based, classically, on stage and histopathological aspects. The metastatic disease develops in one third of patients after surgery, even in localized tumors. There are few options for treating those patients, and even the new target designed drugs have shown low rates of success in controlling disease progression. Few studies used high throughput genomic analysis in renal cell carcinoma for determination of prognosis. This study is focused on the identification of gene expression signatures in tissues of low-risk, high-risk and metastatic RCC clear cell type (RCC-CCT. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We analyzed the expression of approximately 55,000 distinct transcripts using the Whole Genome microarray platform hybridized with RNA extracted from 19 patients submitted to surgery to treat RCC-CCT with different clinical outcomes. They were divided into three groups (1 low risk, characterized by pT1, Fuhrman grade 1 or 2, no microvascular invasion RCC; (2 high risk, pT2-3, Fuhrman grade 3 or 4 with, necrosis and microvascular invasion present and (3 metastatic RCC-CCT. Normal renal tissue was used as control. RESULTS: After comparison of differentially expressed genes among low-risk, high-risk and metastatic groups, we identified a group of common genes characterizing metastatic disease. Among them Interleukin-8 and Heat shock protein 70 were over-expressed in metastasis and validated by real-time polymerase chain reaction. CONCLUSION: These findings can be used as a starting point to generate molecular markers of RCC-CCT as well as a target for the development of innovative therapies.

  20. Allele-Specific Transcriptome and Methylome Analysis Reveals Stable Inheritance and Cis-Regulation of DNA Methylation in Nasonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xu; Werren, John H; Clark, Andrew G

    2016-07-01

    Gene expression divergence between closely related species could be attributed to both cis- and trans- DNA sequence changes during evolution, but it is unclear how the evolutionary dynamics of epigenetic marks are regulated. In eutherian mammals, biparental DNA methylation marks are erased and reset during gametogenesis, resulting in paternal or maternal imprints, which lead to genomic imprinting. Whether DNA methylation reprogramming exists in insects is not known. Wasps of the genus Nasonia are non-social parasitoids that are emerging as a model for studies of epigenetic processes in insects. In this study, we quantified allele-specific expression and methylation genome-wide in Nasonia vitripennis and Nasonia giraulti and their reciprocal F1 hybrids. No parent-of-origin effect in allelic expression was found for >8,000 covered genes, suggesting a lack of genomic imprinting in adult Nasonia. As we expected, both significant cis- and trans- effects are responsible for the expression divergence between N. vitripennis and N. giraulti. Surprisingly, all 178 differentially methylated genes are also differentially methylated between the two alleles in F1 hybrid offspring, recapitulating the parental methylation status with nearly 100% fidelity, indicating the presence of strong cis-elements driving the target of gene body methylation. In addition, we discovered that total and allele-specific expression are positively correlated with allele-specific methylation in a subset of the differentially methylated genes. The 100% cis-regulation in F1 hybrids suggests the methylation machinery is conserved and DNA methylation is targeted by cis features in Nasonia. The lack of genomic imprinting and parent-of-origin differentially methylated regions in Nasonia, together with the stable inheritance of methylation status between generations, suggests either a cis-regulatory motif for methylation at the DNA level or highly stable inheritance of an epigenetic signal in Nasonia. PMID

  1. A specific phospholipase C activity regulates phosphatidylinositol levels in lung surfactant of patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spyridakis, Spyros; Leondaritis, George; Nakos, George; Lekka, Marilena E; Galanopoulou, Dia

    2010-03-01

    Lung surfactant (LS) is a lipid-rich material lining the inside of the lungs. It reduces surface tension at the liquid/air interface and thus, it confers protection of the alveoli from collapsing. The surface-active component of LS is dipalmitoyl-phosphatidylcholine, while anionic phospholipids such as phosphatidylinositol (PtdIns) and primarily phosphatidylglycerol are involved in the stabilization of the LS monolayer. The exact role of PtdIns in this system is not well-understood; however, PtdIns levels change dramatically during the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) evolution. In this report we present evidence of a phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC) activity in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid, which may regulate PtdIns levels. Characterization of this extracellular activity showed specificity for PtdIns and phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate, sharing the typical substrate concentration-, pH-, and calcium-dependencies with mammalian PI-PLCs. Fractionation of BAL fluid showed that PI-PLC did not co-fractionate with large surfactant aggregates, but it was found mainly in the soluble fraction. Importantly, analysis of BAL samples from control subjects and from patients with ARDS showed that the PI-PLC specific activity was decreased by 4-fold in ARDS samples concurrently with the increase in BAL PtdIns levels. Thus, we have identified for the first time an extracellular PI-PLC enzyme activity that may be acutely involved in the regulation of PtdIns levels in LS. PMID:19491339

  2. Identification of major cell types in paraffin sections of bovine tissues

    OpenAIRE

    Pessa-Morikawa Tiina; Ekman Anna; Niku Mikael; Iivanainen Antti

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Background Identification of cell types in bovine tissue sections is complicated by the limited availability of anti-bovine antibodies, and by antigen retrieval treatments required for formalin-fixed tissue samples. We have evaluated an antibody and lectin panel for identifying major cell types in paraffin-embedded bovine tissue sections, and report optimized pretreatments for these markers. Results We selected 31 useful antibodies and lectins which can be used to identify cell types...

  3. Non-coding RNAs as regulators of embryogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Pauli, Andrea; Rinn, John L; Schier, Alexander F.

    2011-01-01

    Non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) are emerging as key regulators of embryogenesis. They control embryonic gene expression by several means, ranging from microRNA-induced degradation of mRNAs to long ncRNA-mediated modification of chromatin. Many aspects of embryogenesis seem to be controlled by ncRNAs, including the maternal–zygotic transition, the maintenance of pluripotency, the patterning of the body axes, the specification and differentiation of cell types and the morphogenesis of organs. Drawing ...

  4. Epigenetic Regulation of HIV-1 Latency in Astrocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Narasipura, Srinivas D.; Kim, Stephanie; Al-Harthi, Lena

    2014-01-01

    HIV infiltrates the brain at early times postinfection and remains latent within astrocytes and macrophages. Because astrocytes are the most abundant cell type in the brain, we evaluated epigenetic regulation of HIV latency in astrocytes. We have shown that class I histone deacetylases (HDACs) and a lysine-specific histone methyltransferase, SU(VAR)3-9, play a significant role in silencing of HIV transcription in astrocytes. Our studies add to a growing body of evidence demonstrating that ast...

  5. Interplay between pathway-specific and global regulation of the fumonisin gene cluster in the rice pathogen Fusarium fujikuroi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rösler, Sarah M; Sieber, Christian M K; Humpf, Hans-Ulrich; Tudzynski, Bettina

    2016-07-01

    The rice pathogenic fungus Fusarium fujikuroi is known to produce a large variety of secondary metabolites. Besides the gibberellins, causing the bakanae effect in infected rice seedlings, the fungus produces several mycotoxins and pigments. Among the 47 putative secondary metabolite gene clusters identified in the genome of F. fujikuroi, the fumonisin gene cluster (FUM) shows very high homology to the FUM cluster of the main fumonisin producer Fusarium verticillioides, a pathogen of maize. Despite the high level of cluster gene conservation, total fumonisin FB1 and FB2 levels (FBx) produced by F. fujikuroi were only 1-10 % compared to F. verticillioides under inducing conditions. Nitrogen repression was found to be relevant for wild-type strains of both species. However, addition of germinated maize kernels activated the FBx production only in F. verticillioides, reflecting the different host specificity of both wild-type strains. Over-expression of the pathway-specific transcription factor Fum21 in F. fujikuroi strongly activated the FUM cluster genes leading to 1000-fold elevated FBx levels. To gain further insights into the nitrogen metabolite repression of FBx biosynthesis, we studied the impact of the global nitrogen regulators AreA and AreB and demonstrated that both GATA-type transcription factors are essential for full activation of the FUM gene cluster. Loss of one of them obstructs the pathway-specific transcription factor Fum21 to fully activate expression of FUM cluster genes. PMID:26966024

  6. [3H]GABA uptake as a marker for cell type in primary cultures of cerebellum and olfactory bulb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uptake of [3H]GABA into cell cultures of rat cerebellum and olfactory bulb was studied by autoradiography, using β-alanine and aminocyclohexane carboxylic acid to distinguish neuronal-specific and glial-specific uptake. Neurons and astrocytes were also labelled by tetanus toxin and anti-GFAP respectively. This combination of markers allowed identification and quantification of several cell types. Cerebellar cultures were found to contain 77% granule neurons, 7.5% inhibitory neurons (probably stellate and basket cells) and 15% astrocytes. Olfactory bulb cultures were over 50% in small neurons which accumulated GABA, the olfactory bulb granule neuron being GABAergic in vivo. (Auth.)

  7. Single cell transcriptional analysis reveals novel innate immune cell types

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda E. Kippner

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Single-cell analysis has the potential to provide us with a host of new knowledge about biological systems, but it comes with the challenge of correctly interpreting the biological information. While emerging techniques have made it possible to measure inter-cellular variability at the transcriptome level, no consensus yet exists on the most appropriate method of data analysis of such single cell data. Methods for analysis of transcriptional data at the population level are well established but are not well suited to single cell analysis due to their dependence on population averages. In order to address this question, we have systematically tested combinations of methods for primary data analysis on single cell transcription data generated from two types of primary immune cells, neutrophils and T lymphocytes. Cells were obtained from healthy individuals, and single cell transcript expression data was obtained by a combination of single cell sorting and nanoscale quantitative real time PCR (qRT-PCR for markers of cell type, intracellular signaling, and immune functionality. Gene expression analysis was focused on hierarchical clustering to determine the existence of cellular subgroups within the populations. Nine combinations of criteria for data exclusion and normalization were tested and evaluated. Bimodality in gene expression indicated the presence of cellular subgroups which were also revealed by data clustering. We observed evidence for two clearly defined cellular subtypes in the neutrophil populations and at least two in the T lymphocyte populations. When normalizing the data by different methods, we observed varying outcomes with corresponding interpretations of the biological characteristics of the cell populations. Normalization of the data by linear standardization taking into account technical effects such as plate effects, resulted in interpretations that most closely matched biological expectations. Single cell transcription

  8. Triptolide inhibits the proliferation of prostate cancer cells and down-regulates SUMO-specific protease 1 expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiwei Huang

    Full Text Available Recently, traditional Chinese medicine and medicinal herbs have attracted more attentions worldwide for its anti-tumor efficacy. Celastrol and Triptolide, two active components extracted from the Chinese herb Tripterygium wilfordii Hook F (known as Lei Gong Teng or Thunder of God Vine, have shown anti-tumor effects. Celastrol was identified as a natural 26 s proteasome inhibitor which promotes cell apoptosis and inhibits tumor growth. The effect and mechanism of Triptolide on prostate cancer (PCa is not well studied. Here we demonstrated that Triptolide, more potent than Celastrol, inhibited cell growth and induced cell death in LNCaP and PC-3 cell lines. Triptolide also significantly inhibited the xenografted PC-3 tumor growth in nude mice. Moreover, Triptolide induced PCa cell apoptosis through caspases activation and PARP cleavage. Unbalance between SUMOylation and deSUMOylation was reported to play an important role in PCa progression. SUMO-specific protease 1 (SENP1 was thought to be a potential marker and therapeutical target of PCa. Importantly, we observed that Triptolide down-regulated SENP1 expression in both mRNA and protein levels in dose-dependent and time-dependent manners, resulting in an enhanced cellular SUMOylation in PCa cells. Meanwhile, Triptolide decreased AR and c-Jun expression at similar manners, and suppressed AR and c-Jun transcription activity. Furthermore, knockdown or ectopic SENP1, c-Jun and AR expression in PCa cells inhibited the Triptolide anti-PCa effects. Taken together, our data suggest that Triptolide is a natural compound with potential therapeutic value for PCa. Its anti-tumor activity may be attributed to mechanisms involving down-regulation of SENP1 that restores SUMOylation and deSUMOyaltion balance and negative regulation of AR and c-Jun expression that inhibits the AR and c-Jun mediated transcription in PCa.

  9. Biosynthetic Enzyme GMP Synthetase Cooperates with Ubiquitin-Specific Protease 7 in Transcriptional Regulation of Ecdysteroid Target Genes▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Knaap, Jan A.; Kozhevnikova, Elena; Langenberg, Karin; Moshkin, Yuri M.; Verrijzer, C. Peter

    2010-01-01

    Drosophila GMP synthetase binds ubiquitin-specific protease 7 (USP7) and is required for its ability to deubiquitylate histone H2B. Previously, we showed that the GMPS/USP7 complex cooperates with the Polycomb silencing system through removal of the active ubiquitin mark from histone H2B (H2Bub). Here, we explored the interplay between GMPS and USP7 further and assessed their role in hormone-regulated gene expression. Genetic analysis established a strong cooperation between GMPS and USP7, which is counteracted by the histone H2B ubiquitin ligase BRE1. Loss of either GMPS or USP7 led to increased levels of histone H2Bub in mutant animals. These in vivo analyses complement our earlier biochemical results, establishing that GMPS/USP7 mediates histone H2B deubiquitylation. We found that GMPS/USP7 binds ecdysone-regulated loci and that mutants display severe misregulation of ecdysone target genes. Ecdysone receptor (EcR) interacts biochemically and genetically with GMPS/USP7. Genetic and gene expression analyses suggested that GMPS/USP7 acts as a transcriptional corepressor. These results revealed the cooperation between a biosynthetic enzyme and a ubiquitin protease in developmental gene control by hormone receptors. PMID:19995917

  10. PABP interacting protein 2A (PAIP2A) regulates specific key proteins during spermiogenesis in the mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delbes, Geraldine; Yanagiya, Akiko; Sonenberg, Nahum; Robaire, Bernard

    2012-03-01

    During spermiogenesis, expression of the specific proteins needed for proper differentiation of male germ cells is under translational control. We have shown that PAIP2A is a major translational regulator involved in the maturation of male germ cells and male fertility. To identify the proteins controlled by PAIP2A during spermiogenesis, we characterized the proteomic profiles of elongated spermatids from wild-type (WT) mice and mice that were Paip2a/Paip2b double-null mutants (DKO). Elongated spermatid populations were obtained and proteins were extracted and separated on gradient polyacrylamide gels. The gels were digested with trypsin and peptides were identified by mass spectrometry. We identified 632 proteins with at least two unique peptides and a confidence level of 95%. Only 209 proteins were consistently detected in WT or DKO replicates with more than five spectra. Twenty-nine proteins were differentially expressed with at least a 1.5-fold change; 10 and 19 proteins were down- and up-regulated, respectively, in DKO compared to WT mice. We confirmed the significantly different expression levels of three proteins, EIF4G1, AKAP4, and HK1, by Western blot analysis. We have characterized novel proteins that have their expression controlled by PAIP2A; of these, 50% are involved in flagellar structure and sperm motility. Although several proteins affected by abrogation of Paip2a have established roles in reproduction, the roles of many others remain to be determined. PMID:22190698

  11. dlk acts as a negative regulator of Notch1 activation through interactions with specific EGF-like repeats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The protein dlk, encoded by the Dlk1 gene, belongs to the Notch epidermal growth factor (EGF)-like family of receptors and ligands, which participate in cell fate decisions during development. The molecular mechanisms by which dlk regulates cell differentiation remain unknown. By using the yeast two-hybrid system, we found that dlk interacts with Notch1 in a specific manner. Moreover, by using luciferase as a reporter gene under the control of a CSL/RBP-Jk/CBF-1-dependent promoter in the dlk-negative, Notch1-positive Balb/c 14 cell line, we found that addition of synthetic dlk EGF-like peptides to the culture medium or forced expression of dlk decreases endogenous Notch activity. Furthermore, the expression of the gene Hes-1, a target for Notch1 activation, diminishes in confluent Balb/c14 cells transfected with an expression construct encoding for the extracellular EGF-like region of dlk. The expression of Dlk1 and Notch1 increases in 3T3-L1 cells maintained in a confluent state for several days, which is associated with a concomitant decrease in Hes-1 expression. On the other hand, the decrease of Dlk1 expression in 3T3-L1 cells by antisense cDNA transfection is associated with an increase in Hes-1 expression. These results suggest that dlk functionally interacts in vivo with Notch1, which may lead to the regulation of differentiation processes modulated by Notch1 activation and signaling, including adipogenesis

  12. Region-specific up-regulation of oxytocin receptor binding in the brain of mice following chronic nicotine administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanos, Panos; Georgiou, Polymnia; Metaxas, Athanasios; Kitchen, Ian; Winsky-Sommerer, Raphaelle; Bailey, Alexis

    2015-07-23

    Nicotine addiction is considered to be the main preventable cause of death worldwide. While growing evidence indicates that the neurohypophysial peptide oxytocin can modulate the addictive properties of several abused drugs, the regulation of the oxytocinergic system following nicotine administration has so far received little attention. Here, we examined the effects of long-term nicotine or saline administration on the central oxytocinergic system using [(125)I]OVTA autoradiographic binding in mouse brain. Male, 7-week old C57BL6J mice were treated with either nicotine (7.8 mg/kg daily; rate of 0.5 μl per hour) or saline for a period of 14-days via osmotic minipumps. Chronic nicotine administration induced a marked region-specific upregulation of the oxytocin receptor binding in the amygdala, a brain region involved in stress and emotional regulation. These results provide direct evidence for nicotine-induced neuroadaptations in the oxytocinergic system, which may be involved in the modulation of nicotine-seeking as well as emotional consequence of chronic drug use. PMID:26037668

  13. Toward epigenetic and gene regulation models of specific language impairment: looking for links among growth, genes, and impairments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rice Mabel L

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Children with specific language impairment (SLI are thought to have an inherited form of language impairment that spares other developmental domains. SLI shows strong heritability and recent linkage and association studies have replicated results for candidate genes. Regulatory regions of the genes may be involved. Behavioral growth models of language development of children with SLI reveal that the onset of language is delayed, and the growth trajectories of children with SLI parallel those of younger children without SLI. The rate of language acquisition decelerates in the pre-adolescent period, resulting in immature language levels for the children with SLI that persist into adolescence and beyond. Recent genetic and epigenetic discoveries and models relevant to language impairment are reviewed. T cell regulation of onset, acceleration, and deceleration signaling are described as potential conceptual parallels to the growth timing elements of language acquisition and impairment. A growth signaling disruption (GSD hypothesis is proposed for SLI, which posits that faulty timing mechanisms at the cellular level, intrinsic to neurocortical functioning essential for language onset and growth regulation, are at the core of the growth outcomes of SLI. The GSD highlights the need to document and account for growth patterns over childhood and suggests needed directions for future investigation.

  14. Enhancement of cell-specific transgene expression from a Tet-Off regulatory system using a transcriptional amplification strategy in the rat brain

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Beihui; Wang, Shu; Brenner, Michael; Paton, Julian FR; Kasparov, Sergey

    2008-01-01

    Background The Tet-Off system uses a tetracycline-controlled transactivator protein (tTA) and a tetracycline-responsive promoter element (TRE) to regulate expression of a target gene. This system can be used to achieve regulatable transgene expression in specific cell types by employing a cell-specific promoter to drive tTA expression. Wide applications of this attractive approach are, however, hindered by relatively weak transcriptional activity of most cell-specific promoters. We report her...

  15. GTP depletion synergizes the anti-proliferative activity of chemotherapeutic agents in a cell type-dependent manner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Tao; Meng, Lingjun [Center for Cancer and Stem Cell Biology, Institute of Biosciences and Technology, Texas A and M Health Science Center, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Tsai, Robert Y.L., E-mail: rtsai@ibt.tamhsc.edu [Center for Cancer and Stem Cell Biology, Institute of Biosciences and Technology, Texas A and M Health Science Center, Houston, TX 77030 (United States)

    2011-10-22

    Highlights: {yields} Strong synergy between mycophenolic acid (MPA) and 5-FU in MDA-MB-231 cells. {yields} Cell type-dependent synergy between MPA and anti-proliferative agents. {yields} The synergy of MPA on 5-FU is recapitulated by RNA polymerase-I inhibition. {yields} The synergy of MPA on 5-FU requires the expression of nucleostemin. -- Abstract: Mycophenolic acid (MPA) depletes intracellular GTP by blocking de novo guanine nucleotide synthesis. GTP is used ubiquitously for DNA/RNA synthesis and as a signaling molecule. Here, we made a surprising discovery that the anti-proliferative activity of MPA acts synergistically with specific chemotherapeutic agents in a cell type-dependent manner. In MDA-MB-231 cells, MPA shows an extremely potent synergy with 5-FU but not with doxorubicin or etoposide. The synergy between 5-FU and MPA works most effectively against the highly tumorigenic mammary tumor cells compared to the less tumorigenic ones, and does not work in the non-breast cancer cell types that we tested, with the exception of PC3 cells. On the contrary, MPA shows the highest synergy with paclitaxel but not with 5-FU in SCC-25 cells, derived from oral squamous cell carcinomas. Mechanistically, the synergistic effect of MPA on 5-FU in MDA-MB-231 cells can be recapitulated by inhibiting the RNA polymerase-I activity and requires the expression of nucleostemin. This work reveals that the synergy between MPA and anti-proliferative agents is determined by cell type-dependent factors.

  16. Specific binding of phorbol esters to Friend erythroleukemia cells--general properties, down regulation and relationship to cell differentiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Specific and saturable binding sites for [20-3H]phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate ([3H]PDBu) were demonstrated in tact Friend erythroleukemia cells (FELC), in which inducible erythroid differentiation is reversibly inhibited by phorbol esters. The binding of [3H]PDBu to intact cells was maximal within only 15 min of incubation at 37 degrees C, after which there was a gradual decrease; binding at 4 degrees C however, was alow process, requiring greater than 180 min for maximal binding. A Scatchard analysis showed that the dissociation constant for binding of [3H]PDBu is 8.3 nM; at saturation, approximately 1.75 x 10(5) molecules of [3H]PDBu are bound per cell. When FELC were induced to differentiate with 4mM hexameethylene bisacetamide (approximately 80% of cells were benzidine-positive), a slight decrease (10-20%) in the number of binding sites at saturation was seen, but the dissociation constant was not changed. When the cells were precultured with non-radioactive phorbol esters, a significant decrease in [3H]PDBu binding was observed, suggesting a homologous down regulation of phorbol ester receptors. Scatchard analysis indicated that the decrease in [3H]PDBu binding was due to a decrease in the number of binding sites and not to a change in affinity. Such specific phorbol ester binding sites might mediate a number of biochemical and biological effects of phorbol esters on FELC

  17. Elucidation of Xylem-Specific Transcription Factors and Absolute Quantification of Enzymes Regulating Cellulose Biosynthesis in Populus trichocarpa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loziuk, Philip L; Parker, Jennifer; Li, Wei; Lin, Chien-Yuan; Wang, Jack P; Li, Quanzi; Sederoff, Ronald R; Chiang, Vincent L; Muddiman, David C

    2015-10-01

    Cellulose, the main chemical polymer of wood, is the most abundant polysaccharide in nature.1 The ability to perturb the abundance and structure of cellulose microfibrils is of critical importance to the pulp and paper industry as well as for the textile, wood products, and liquid biofuels industries. Although much has been learned at the transcript level about the biosynthesis of cellulose, a quantitative understanding at the proteome level has yet to be established. The study described herein sought to identify the proteins directly involved in cellulose biosynthesis during wood formation in Populus trichocarpa along with known xylem-specific transcription factors involved in regulating these key proteins. Development of an effective discovery proteomic strategy through a combination of subcellular fractionation of stem differentiating xylem tissue (SDX) with recently optimized FASP digestion protocols, StageTip fractionation, as well as optimized instrument parameters for global proteomic analysis using the quadrupole-orbitrap mass spectrometer resulted in the deepest proteomic coverage of SDX protein from P. trichocarpa with 9,146 protein groups being identified (1% FDR). Of these, 20 cellulosic/hemicellulosic enzymes and 43 xylem-specific transcription factor groups were identified. Finally, selection of surrogate peptides led to an assay for absolute quantification of 14 cellulosic proteins in SDX of P. trichocarpa. PMID:26325666

  18. Sexually dimorphic body color is regulated by sex-specific expression of yellow gene in ponerine ant, Diacamma sp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Miyazaki

    Full Text Available Most hymenopteran species exhibit conspicuous sexual dimorphism due to ecological differences between the sexes. As hymenopteran genomes, under the haplodiploid genetic system, exhibit quantitative differences between sexes while remaining qualitatively identical, sexual phenotypes are assumed to be expressed through sex-specific gene usage. In the present study, the molecular basis for expression of sexual dimorphism in a queenless ant, Diacamma sp., which exhibits a distinct color dimorphism, was examined. Worker females of the species appear bluish-black, while winged males exhibit a yellowish-brown body color. Initially, observations of the pigmentation processes during pupal development revealed that black pigmentation was present in female pupae but not in males, suggesting that sex-specific melanin synthesis was responsible for the observed color dimorphism. Therefore, five orthologs of the genes involved in the insect melanin synthesis (yellow, ebony, tan, pale and dopa decarboxylase were subcloned and their spatiotemporal expression patterns were examined using real-time quantitative RT-PCR. Of the genes examined, yellow, which plays a role in black melanin synthesis in insects, was expressed at higher levels in females than in males throughout the entire body during the pupal stage. RNA interference of yellow was then carried out in order to determine the gene function, and produced females with a more yellowish, brighter body color similar to that of males. It was concluded that transcriptional regulation of yellow was responsible for the sexual color dimorphism observed in this species.

  19. Ubiquitination and degradation of the hominoid-specific oncoprotein TBC1D3 is regulated by protein palmitoylation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kong, Chen; Lange, Jeffrey J.; Samovski, Dmitri [Department of Cell Biology and Physiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63110 (United States); Su, Xiong [Department of Internal Medicine, Center for Human Nutrition Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63110 (United States); Liu, Jialiu [Department of Cell Biology and Physiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63110 (United States); Sundaresan, Sinju [Department of Internal Medicine, Center for Human Nutrition Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63110 (United States); Stahl, Philip D., E-mail: pstahl@wustl.edu [Department of Cell Biology and Physiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63110 (United States)

    2013-05-03

    Highlights: •Hominoid-specific oncogene TBC1D3 is targeted to plasma membrane by palmitoylation. •TBC1D3 is palmitoylated on two cysteine residues: 318 and 325. •TBC1D3 palmitoylation governs growth factors-induced TBC1D3 degradation. •Post-translational modifications may regulate oncogenic properties of TBC1D3. -- Abstract: Expression of the hominoid-specific oncoprotein TBC1D3 promotes enhanced cell growth and proliferation by increased activation of signal transduction through several growth factors. Recently we documented the role of CUL7 E3 ligase in growth factors-induced ubiquitination and degradation of TBC1D3. Here we expanded our study to discover additional molecular mechanisms that control TBC1D3 protein turnover. We report that TBC1D3 is palmitoylated on two cysteine residues: 318 and 325. The expression of double palmitoylation mutant TBC1D3:C318/325S resulted in protein mislocalization and enhanced growth factors-induced TBC1D3 degradation. Moreover, ubiquitination of TBC1D3 via CUL7 E3 ligase complex was increased by mutating the palmitoylation sites, suggesting that depalmitoylation of TBC1D3 makes the protein more available for ubiquitination and degradation. The results reported here provide novel insights into the molecular mechanisms that govern TBC1D3 protein degradation. Dysregulation of these mechanisms in vivo could potentially result in aberrant TBC1D3 expression and promote oncogenesis.

  20. Chaperonin containing T-complex polypeptide subunit eta (CCT-eta is a specific regulator of fibroblast motility and contractility.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Latha Satish

    beta-actin but markedly decreased alpha-SMA; in contrast, reduction of CCT-beta had minimal effect on either actin isoform. Direct inhibition of alpha-SMA with siRNA reduced both basal and growth factor-induced fibroblast motility. These results indicate that CCT-eta is a specific regulator of fibroblast motility and contractility and may be a key determinant of the scarless wound healing phenotype by means of its specific regulation of alpha-SMA expression.

  1. Exogenous plant MIR168a specifically targets mammalian LDLRAP1: evidence of cross-kingdom regulation by microRNA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lin Zhang; Xing Cai; Yuan Yin; Cheng Wang; Tianfu Zhang; Dihan Zhu; Dianmu Zhang; Jie Xu; Qun Chen; Yi Ba; Jing Liu; Dongxia Hou; Qiang Wang; Jianqun Chen; Jin Wang; Meng Wang; Qipeng Zhang; Junfeng Zhang; Ke Zen; Chen-Yu Zhang; Xi Chen; Donghai Li; Lingyun Zhu; Yujing Zhang; Jing Li; Zhen Bian; Xiangying Liang

    2012-01-01

    In the initial published version of this article,an error was made during the assembly of Figure 5B.Figure 5B is a representative image of western blots,which shows that rice-derived MIR 168a can down-regulate LDLRAP 1 expression in mouse liver and that the injection of antiMIR168a rescued the expression of LDLRAP1.After the initial publishing of this article,it has been brought to our attention that the image of the internal control in previous Figure 5B showing the western blot results of α-tubulin,actually duplicated the images in other parts of the paper (specifically,the left two lanes of the αt-tubulin western data in previous Figure 5B duplicated the α-tubulin image of Figure 3C,while the right two lanes duplicated the α-tubulin image of Figure S3D).This error in previous Figure 5B was inadvertently introduced during the assembly of figure panels for this paper.Moreover,after a careful re-examination of the figure legend,we also found that the figure legend of previous Figure 5 was not precise.The corrected figure and its legend are provided below.The detailed results of all the western blot experiments analyzing liver samples of individual mice from different groups (chow diet,rice,rice +anti-ncRNA,rice + anti-MIR168a) are also available for interested readers at our website:http://mcube.nju.edu.cn/mir 168a_regulates_ldlrap1.

  2. Proteomic Analysis Reveals Branch-specific Regulation of the Unfolded Protein Response by Nonsense-mediated mRNA Decay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sieber, Jana; Hauer, Christian; Bhuvanagiri, Madhuri; Leicht, Stefan; Krijgsveld, Jeroen; Neu-Yilik, Gabriele; Hentze, Matthias W; Kulozik, Andreas E

    2016-05-01

    Nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) has originally been described as a surveillance mechanism to inhibit the expression of mRNAs with truncated open reading frames (ORFs) and to contribute to the fidelity of gene expression. It is now recognized that NMD also controls the expression of physiological genes with "intact" mRNA. Stress can decrease NMD efficiency and thus increase the mRNA levels of physiological NMD targets. As stress can also inhibit translation, the net outcome for shaping the proteome is difficult to predict. We have thus analyzed de novo protein synthesis in response to NMD inhibition or the induction of mild endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress by treatment of cells with the reducing agent dithiotreitol (DTT). For this purpose, we combined pulsed azidohomoalanine (AHA) and stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC). Labeled proteins were purified by click chemistry-based covalent coupling to agarose beads, trypsinized, fractionated, and analyzed by mass spectrometry (MS). We find that mild ER stress up-regulates the de novo synthesis of components of all three branches of the unfolded protein response (PERK, IRE1 and ATF6) without increasing eIF2α phosphorylation or impairing of protein translation. In contrast, inhibition of NMD induces de novo protein synthesis of downstream targets of the PERK and IRE1 pathways, whereas we could not detect regulation of ATF6-responsive genes. These data thus support a model that implicates a positive feedback loop of ER stress inhibiting NMD efficiency which further promotes the ER stress response in a branch-specific manner. PMID:26896796

  3. Distinct Roles for Intestinal Epithelial Cell-Specific Hdac1 and Hdac2 in the Regulation of Murine Intestinal Homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonneaud, Alexis; Turgeon, Naomie; Boudreau, François; Perreault, Nathalie; Rivard, Nathalie; Asselin, Claude

    2016-02-01

    The intestinal epithelium responds to and transmits signals from the microbiota and the mucosal immune system to insure intestinal homeostasis. These interactions are in part conveyed by epigenetic modifications, which respond to environmental changes. Protein acetylation is an epigenetic signal regulated by histone deacetylases, including Hdac1 and Hdac2. We have previously shown that villin-Cre-inducible intestinal epithelial cell (IEC)-specific Hdac1 and Hdac2 deletions disturb intestinal homeostasis. To determine the role of Hdac1 and Hdac2 in the regulation of IEC function and the establishment of the dual knockout phenotype, we have generated villin-Cre murine models expressing one Hdac1 allele without Hdac2, or one Hdac2 allele without Hdac1. We have also investigated the effect of short-term deletion of both genes in naphtoflavone-inducible Ah-Cre and tamoxifen-inducible villin-Cre(ER) mice. Mice with one Hdac1 allele displayed normal tissue architecture, but increased sensitivity to DSS-induced colitis. In contrast, mice with one Hdac2 allele displayed intestinal architecture defects, increased proliferation, decreased goblet cell numbers as opposed to Paneth cells, increased immune cell infiltration associated with fibrosis, and increased sensitivity to DSS-induced colitis. In comparison to dual knockout mice, intermediary activation of Notch, mTOR, and Stat3 signaling pathways was observed. While villin-Cre(ER) Hdac1 and Hdac2 deletions led to an impaired epithelium and differentiation defects, Ah-Cre-mediated deletion resulted in blunted proliferation associated with the induction of a DNA damage response. Our results suggest that IEC determination and intestinal homeostasis are highly dependent on Hdac1 and Hdac2 activity levels, and that changes in the IEC acetylome may alter the mucosal environment. PMID:26174178

  4. Matrix compliance and the regulation of cytokinesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Savitha Sambandamoorthy

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Integrin-mediated cell adhesion to the ECM regulates many physiological processes in part by controlling cell proliferation. It is well established that many normal cells require integrin-mediated adhesion to enter S phase of the cell cycle. Recent evidence indicates that integrins also regulate cytokinesis. Mechanical properties of the ECM can dictate entry into S phase; however, it is not known whether they also can affect the successful completion of cell division. To address this issue, we modulated substrate compliance using fibronectin-coated acrylamide-based hydrogels. Soft and hard substrates were generated with approximate elastic moduli of 1600 and 34,000 Pascals (Pa respectively. Our results indicate that dermal fibroblasts successfully complete cytokinesis on hard substrates, whereas on soft substrates, a significant number fail and become binucleated. Cytokinesis failure occurs at a step following the formation of the intercellular bridge connecting presumptive daughter cells, suggesting a defect in abscission. Like dermal fibroblasts, mesenchymal stem cells require cell-matrix adhesion for successful cytokinesis. However, in contrast to dermal fibroblasts, they are able to complete cytokinesis on both hard and soft substrates. These results indicate that matrix stiffness regulates the successful completion of cytokinesis, and does so in a cell-type specific manner. To our knowledge, our study is the first to demonstrate that matrix stiffness can affect cytokinesis. Understanding the cell-type specific contribution of matrix compliance to the regulation of cytokinesis will provide new insights important for development, as well as tissue homeostasis and regeneration.

  5. Glutamine Synthetase Is a Genetic Determinant of Cell Type–Specific Glutamine Independence in Breast Epithelia

    OpenAIRE

    Hsiu-Ni Kung; Marks, Jeffrey R.; Jen-Tsan Chi

    2011-01-01

    Although significant variations in the metabolic profiles exist among different cells, little is understood in terms of genetic regulations of such cell type-specific metabolic phenotypes and nutrient requirements. While many cancer cells depend on exogenous glutamine for survival to justify the therapeutic targeting of glutamine metabolism, the mechanisms of glutamine dependence and likely response and resistance of such glutamine-targeting strategies among cancers are largely unknown. In th...

  6. Genetic associations at 53 loci highlight cell types and biological pathways relevant for kidney function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattaro, Cristian; Teumer, Alexander; Gorski, Mathias; Chu, Audrey Y; Li, Man; Mijatovic, Vladan; Garnaas, Maija; Tin, Adrienne; Sorice, Rossella; Li, Yong; Taliun, Daniel; Olden, Matthias; Foster, Meredith; Yang, Qiong; Chen, Ming-Huei; Pers, Tune H; Johnson, Andrew D; Ko, Yi-An; Fuchsberger, Christian; Tayo, Bamidele; Nalls, Michael; Feitosa, Mary F; Isaacs, Aaron; Dehghan, Abbas; d'Adamo, Pio; Adeyemo, Adebowale; Dieffenbach, Aida Karina; Zonderman, Alan B; Nolte, Ilja M; van der Most, Peter J; Wright, Alan F; Shuldiner, Alan R; Morrison, Alanna C; Hofman, Albert; Smith, Albert V; Dreisbach, Albert W; Franke, Andre; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Metspalu, Andres; Tonjes, Anke; Lupo, Antonio; Robino, Antonietta; Johansson, Åsa; Demirkan, Ayse; Kollerits, Barbara; Freedman, Barry I; Ponte, Belen; Oostra, Ben A; Paulweber, Bernhard; Krämer, Bernhard K; Mitchell, Braxton D; Buckley, Brendan M; Peralta, Carmen A; Hayward, Caroline; Helmer, Catherine; Rotimi, Charles N; Shaffer, Christian M; Müller, Christian; Sala, Cinzia; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Saint-Pierre, Aude; Ackermann, Daniel; Shriner, Daniel; Ruggiero, Daniela; Toniolo, Daniela; Lu, Yingchang; Cusi, Daniele; Czamara, Darina; Ellinghaus, David; Siscovick, David S; Ruderfer, Douglas; Gieger, Christian; Grallert, Harald; Rochtchina, Elena; Atkinson, Elizabeth J; Holliday, Elizabeth G; Boerwinkle, Eric; Salvi, Erika; Bottinger, Erwin P; Murgia, Federico; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Ernst, Florian; Kronenberg, Florian; Hu, Frank B; Navis, Gerjan J; Curhan, Gary C; Ehret, George B; Homuth, Georg; Coassin, Stefan; Thun, Gian-Andri; Pistis, Giorgio; Gambaro, Giovanni; Malerba, Giovanni; Montgomery, Grant W; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Jacobs, Gunnar; Li, Guo; Wichmann, H-Erich; Campbell, Harry; Schmidt, Helena; Wallaschofski, Henri; Völzke, Henry; Brenner, Hermann; Kroemer, Heyo K; Kramer, Holly; Lin, Honghuang; Leach, I Mateo; Ford, Ian; Guessous, Idris; Rudan, Igor; Prokopenko, Inga; Borecki, Ingrid; Heid, Iris M; Kolcic, Ivana; Persico, Ivana; Jukema, J Wouter; Wilson, James F; Felix, Janine F; Divers, Jasmin; Lambert, Jean-Charles; Stafford, Jeanette M; Gaspoz, Jean-Michel; Smith, Jennifer A; Faul, Jessica D; Wang, Jie Jin; Ding, Jingzhong; Hirschhorn, Joel N; Attia, John; Whitfield, John B; Chalmers, John; Viikari, Jorma; Coresh, Josef; Denny, Joshua C; Karjalainen, Juha; Fernandes, Jyotika K; Endlich, Karlhans; Butterbach, Katja; Keene, Keith L; Lohman, Kurt; Portas, Laura; Launer, Lenore J; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Yengo, Loic; Franke, Lude; Ferrucci, Luigi; Rose, Lynda M; Kedenko, Lyudmyla; Rao, Madhumathi; Struchalin, Maksim; Kleber, Marcus E; Cavalieri, Margherita; Haun, Margot; Cornelis, Marilyn C; Ciullo, Marina; Pirastu, Mario; de Andrade, Mariza; McEvoy, Mark A; Woodward, Mark; Adam, Martin; Cocca, Massimiliano; Nauck, Matthias; Imboden, Medea; Waldenberger, Melanie; Pruijm, Menno; Metzger, Marie; Stumvoll, Michael; Evans, Michele K; Sale, Michele M; Kähönen, Mika; Boban, Mladen; Bochud, Murielle; Rheinberger, Myriam; Verweij, Niek; Bouatia-Naji, Nabila; Martin, Nicholas G; Hastie, Nick; Probst-Hensch, Nicole; Soranzo, Nicole; Devuyst, Olivier; Raitakari, Olli; Gottesman, Omri; Franco, Oscar H; Polasek, Ozren; Gasparini, Paolo; Munroe, Patricia B; Ridker, Paul M; Mitchell, Paul; Muntner, Paul; Meisinger, Christa; Smit, Johannes H; Kovacs, Peter; Wild, Philipp S; Froguel, Philippe; Rettig, Rainer; Mägi, Reedik; Biffar, Reiner; Schmidt, Reinhold; Middelberg, Rita P S; Carroll, Robert J; Penninx, Brenda W; Scott, Rodney J; Katz, Ronit; Sedaghat, Sanaz; Wild, Sarah H; Kardia, Sharon L R; Ulivi, Sheila; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Enroth, Stefan; Kloiber, Stefan; Trompet, Stella; Stengel, Benedicte; Hancock, Stephen J; Turner, Stephen T; Rosas, Sylvia E; Stracke, Sylvia; Harris, Tamara B; Zeller, Tanja; Zemunik, Tatijana; Lehtimäki, Terho; Illig, Thomas; Aspelund, Thor; Nikopensius, Tiit; Esko, Tonu; Tanaka, Toshiko; Gyllensten, Ulf; Völker, Uwe; Emilsson, Valur; Vitart, Veronique; Aalto, Ville; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Chouraki, Vincent; Chen, Wei-Min; Igl, Wilmar; März, Winfried; Koenig, Wolfgang; Lieb, Wolfgang; Loos, Ruth J F; Liu, Yongmei; Snieder, Harold; Pramstaller, Peter P; Parsa, Afshin; O'Connell, Jeffrey R; Susztak, Katalin; Hamet, Pavel; Tremblay, Johanne; de Boer, Ian H; Böger, Carsten A; Goessling, Wolfram; Chasman, Daniel I; Köttgen, Anna; Kao, W H Linda; Fox, Caroline S

    2016-01-01

    Reduced glomerular filtration rate defines chronic kidney disease and is associated with cardiovascular and all-cause mortality. We conducted a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies for estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), combining data across 133,413 individuals with replication in up to 42,166 individuals. We identify 24 new and confirm 29 previously identified loci. Of these 53 loci, 19 associate with eGFR among individuals with diabetes. Using bioinformatics, we show that identified genes at eGFR loci are enriched for expression in kidney tissues and in pathways relevant for kidney development and transmembrane transporter activity, kidney structure, and regulation of glucose metabolism. Chromatin state mapping and DNase I hypersensitivity analyses across adult tissues demonstrate preferential mapping of associated variants to regulatory regions in kidney but not extra-renal tissues. These findings suggest that genetic determinants of eGFR are mediated largely through direct effects within the kidney and highlight important cell types and biological pathways. PMID:26831199

  7. Tracking of plus-ends reveals microtubule functional diversity in different cell types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaebani, M. Reza; Pasula, Aravind; Ott, Albrecht; Santen, Ludger

    2016-07-01

    Many cellular processes are tightly connected to the dynamics of microtubules (MTs). While in neuronal axons MTs mainly regulate intracellular trafficking, they participate in cytoskeleton reorganization in many other eukaryotic cells, enabling the cell to efficiently adapt to changes in the environment. We show that the functional differences of MTs in different cell types and regions is reflected in the dynamic properties of MT tips. Using plus-end tracking proteins EB1 to monitor growing MT plus-ends, we show that MT dynamics and life cycle in axons of human neurons significantly differ from that of fibroblast cells. The density of plus-ends, as well as the rescue and catastrophe frequencies increase while the growth rate decreases toward the fibroblast cell margin. This results in a rather stable filamentous network structure and maintains the connection between nucleus and membrane. In contrast, plus-ends are uniformly distributed along the axons and exhibit diverse polymerization run times and spatially homogeneous rescue and catastrophe frequencies, leading to MT segments of various lengths. The probability distributions of the excursion length of polymerization and the MT length both follow nearly exponential tails, in agreement with the analytical predictions of a two-state model of MT dynamics.

  8. Tracking of plus-ends reveals microtubule functional diversity in different cell types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaebani, M Reza; Pasula, Aravind; Ott, Albrecht; Santen, Ludger

    2016-01-01

    Many cellular processes are tightly connected to the dynamics of microtubules (MTs). While in neuronal axons MTs mainly regulate intracellular trafficking, they participate in cytoskeleton reorganization in many other eukaryotic cells, enabling the cell to efficiently adapt to changes in the environment. We show that the functional differences of MTs in different cell types and regions is reflected in the dynamic properties of MT tips. Using plus-end tracking proteins EB1 to monitor growing MT plus-ends, we show that MT dynamics and life cycle in axons of human neurons significantly differ from that of fibroblast cells. The density of plus-ends, as well as the rescue and catastrophe frequencies increase while the growth rate decreases toward the fibroblast cell margin. This results in a rather stable filamentous network structure and maintains the connection between nucleus and membrane. In contrast, plus-ends are uniformly distributed along the axons and exhibit diverse polymerization run times and spatially homogeneous rescue and catastrophe frequencies, leading to MT segments of various lengths. The probability distributions of the excursion length of polymerization and the MT length both follow nearly exponential tails, in agreement with the analytical predictions of a two-state model of MT dynamics. PMID:27461361

  9. Genetic associations at 53 loci highlight cell types and biological pathways relevant for kidney function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattaro, Cristian; Teumer, Alexander; Gorski, Mathias; Chu, Audrey Y.; Li, Man; Mijatovic, Vladan; Garnaas, Maija; Tin, Adrienne; Sorice, Rossella; Li, Yong; Taliun, Daniel; Olden, Matthias; Foster, Meredith; Yang, Qiong; Chen, Ming-Huei; Pers, Tune H.; Johnson, Andrew D.; Ko, Yi-An; Fuchsberger, Christian; Tayo, Bamidele; Nalls, Michael; Feitosa, Mary F.; Isaacs, Aaron; Dehghan, Abbas; d'Adamo, Pio; Adeyemo, Adebowale; Dieffenbach, Aida Karina; Zonderman, Alan B.; Nolte, Ilja M.; van der Most, Peter J.; Wright, Alan F.; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Morrison, Alanna C.; Hofman, Albert; Smith, Albert V.; Dreisbach, Albert W.; Franke, Andre; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Metspalu, Andres; Tonjes, Anke; Lupo, Antonio; Robino, Antonietta; Johansson, Åsa; Demirkan, Ayse; Kollerits, Barbara; Freedman, Barry I.; Ponte, Belen; Oostra, Ben A.; Paulweber, Bernhard; Krämer, Bernhard K.; Mitchell, Braxton D.; Buckley, Brendan M.; Peralta, Carmen A.; Hayward, Caroline; Helmer, Catherine; Rotimi, Charles N.; Shaffer, Christian M.; Müller, Christian; Sala, Cinzia; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Saint-Pierre, Aude; Ackermann, Daniel; Shriner, Daniel; Ruggiero, Daniela; Toniolo, Daniela; Lu, Yingchang; Cusi, Daniele; Czamara, Darina; Ellinghaus, David; Siscovick, David S.; Ruderfer, Douglas; Gieger, Christian; Grallert, Harald; Rochtchina, Elena; Atkinson, Elizabeth J.; Holliday, Elizabeth G.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Salvi, Erika; Bottinger, Erwin P.; Murgia, Federico; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Ernst, Florian; Kronenberg, Florian; Hu, Frank B.; Navis, Gerjan J.; Curhan, Gary C.; Ehret, George B.; Homuth, Georg; Coassin, Stefan; Thun, Gian-Andri; Pistis, Giorgio; Gambaro, Giovanni; Malerba, Giovanni; Montgomery, Grant W.; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Jacobs, Gunnar; Li, Guo; Wichmann, H-Erich; Campbell, Harry; Schmidt, Helena; Wallaschofski, Henri; Völzke, Henry; Brenner, Hermann; Kroemer, Heyo K.; Kramer, Holly; Lin, Honghuang; Leach, I. Mateo; Ford, Ian; Guessous, Idris; Rudan, Igor; Prokopenko, Inga; Borecki, Ingrid; Heid, Iris M.; Kolcic, Ivana; Persico, Ivana; Jukema, J. Wouter; Wilson, James F.; Felix, Janine F.; Divers, Jasmin; Lambert, Jean-Charles; Stafford, Jeanette M.; Gaspoz, Jean-Michel; Smith, Jennifer A.; Faul, Jessica D.; Wang, Jie Jin; Ding, Jingzhong; Hirschhorn, Joel N.; Attia, John; Whitfield, John B.; Chalmers, John; Viikari, Jorma; Coresh, Josef; Denny, Joshua C.; Karjalainen, Juha; Fernandes, Jyotika K.; Endlich, Karlhans; Butterbach, Katja; Keene, Keith L.; Lohman, Kurt; Portas, Laura; Launer, Lenore J.; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Yengo, Loic; Franke, Lude; Ferrucci, Luigi; Rose, Lynda M.; Kedenko, Lyudmyla; Rao, Madhumathi; Struchalin, Maksim; Kleber, Marcus E.; Cavalieri, Margherita; Haun, Margot; Cornelis, Marilyn C.; Ciullo, Marina; Pirastu, Mario; de Andrade, Mariza; McEvoy, Mark A.; Woodward, Mark; Adam, Martin; Cocca, Massimiliano; Nauck, Matthias; Imboden, Medea; Waldenberger, Melanie; Pruijm, Menno; Metzger, Marie; Stumvoll, Michael; Evans, Michele K.; Sale, Michele M.; Kähönen, Mika; Boban, Mladen; Bochud, Murielle; Rheinberger, Myriam; Verweij, Niek; Bouatia-Naji, Nabila; Martin, Nicholas G.; Hastie, Nick; Probst-Hensch, Nicole; Soranzo, Nicole; Devuyst, Olivier; Raitakari, Olli; Gottesman, Omri; Franco, Oscar H.; Polasek, Ozren; Gasparini, Paolo; Munroe, Patricia B.; Ridker, Paul M.; Mitchell, Paul; Muntner, Paul; Meisinger, Christa; Smit, Johannes H.; Abecasis, Goncalo R.; Adair, Linda S.; Alexander, Myriam; Altshuler, David; Amin, Najaf; Arking, Dan E.; Arora, Pankaj; Aulchenko, Yurii; Bakker, Stephan J. L.; Bandinelli, Stefania; Barroso, Ines; Beckmann, Jacques S.; Beilby, John P.; Bergman, Richard N.; Bergmann, Sven; Bis, Joshua C.; Boehnke, Michael; Bonnycastle, Lori L.; Bornstein, Stefan R.; Bots, Michiel L.; Bragg-Gresham, Jennifer L.; Brand, Stefan-Martin; Brand, Eva; Braund, Peter S.; Brown, Morris J.; Burton, Paul R.; Casas, Juan P.; Caulfield, Mark J.; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Chambers, John C.; Chandak, Giriraj R.; Chang, Yen-Pei C.; Charchar, Fadi J.; Chaturvedi, Nish; Shin Cho, Yoon; Clarke, Robert; Collins, Francis S.; Collins, Rory; Connell, John M.; Cooper, Jackie A.; Cooper, Matthew N.; Cooper, Richard S.; Corsi, Anna Maria; Dörr, Marcus; Dahgam, Santosh; Danesh, John; Smith, George Davey; Day, Ian N. M.; Deloukas, Panos; Denniff, Matthew; Dominiczak, Anna F.; Dong, Yanbin; Doumatey, Ayo; Elliott, Paul; Elosua, Roberto; Erdmann, Jeanette; Eyheramendy, Susana; Farrall, Martin; Fava, Cristiano; Forrester, Terrence; Fowkes, F. Gerald R.; Fox, Ervin R.; Frayling, Timothy M.; Galan, Pilar; Ganesh, Santhi K.; Garcia, Melissa; Gaunt, Tom R.; Glazer, Nicole L.; Go, Min Jin; Goel, Anuj; Grässler, Jürgen; Grobbee, Diederick E.; Groop, Leif; Guarrera, Simonetta; Guo, Xiuqing; Hadley, David; Hamsten, Anders; Han, Bok-Ghee; Hardy, Rebecca; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Heath, Simon; Heckbert, Susan R.; Hedblad, Bo; Hercberg, Serge; Hernandez, Dena; Hicks, Andrew A.; Hilton, Gina; Hingorani, Aroon D.; Bolton, Judith A Hoffman; Hopewell, Jemma C.; Howard, Philip; Humphries, Steve E.; Hunt, Steven C.; Hveem, Kristian; Ikram, M. Arfan; Islam, Muhammad; Iwai, Naoharu; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Jackson, Anne U.; Jafar, Tazeen H.; Janipalli, Charles S.; Johnson, Toby; Kathiresan, Sekar; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Kim, Hyung-Lae; Kinra, Sanjay; Kita, Yoshikuni; Kivimaki, Mika; Kooner, Jaspal S.; Kumar, M. J. Kranthi; Kuh, Diana; Kulkarni, Smita R.; Kumari, Meena; Kuusisto, Johanna; Kuznetsova, Tatiana; Laakso, Markku; Laan, Maris; Laitinen, Jaana; Lakatta, Edward G.; Langefeld, Carl D.; Larson, Martin G.; Lathrop, Mark; Lawlor, Debbie A.; Lawrence, Robert W.; Lee, Jong-Young; Lee, Nanette R.; Levy, Daniel; Li, Yali; Longstreth, Will T.; Luan, Jian'an; Lucas, Gavin; Ludwig, Barbara; Mangino, Massimo; Mani, K. Radha; Marmot, Michael G.; Mattace-Raso, Francesco U. S.; Matullo, Giuseppe; McArdle, Wendy L.; McKenzie, Colin A.; Meitinger, Thomas; Melander, Olle; Meneton, Pierre; Meschia, James F.; Miki, Tetsuro; Milaneschi, Yuri; Mohlke, Karen L.; Mooser, Vincent; Morken, Mario A.; Morris, Richard W.; Mosley, Thomas H.; Najjar, Samer; Narisu, Narisu; Newton-Cheh, Christopher; Nguyen, Khanh-Dung Hoang; Nilsson, Peter; Nyberg, Fredrik; O'Donnell, Christopher J.; Ogihara, Toshio; Ohkubo, Takayoshi; Okamura, Tomonori; Ong, RickTwee-Hee; Ongen, Halit; Onland-Moret, N. Charlotte; O'Reilly, Paul F.; Org, Elin; Orru, Marco; Palmas, Walter; Palmen, Jutta; Palmer, Lyle J.; Palmer, Nicholette D.; Parker, Alex N.; Peden, John F.; Peltonen, Leena; Perola, Markus; Pihur, Vasyl; Platou, Carl G. P.; Plump, Andrew; Prabhakaran, Dorairajan; Psaty, Bruce M.; Raffel, Leslie J.; Rao, Dabeeru C.; Rasheed, Asif; Ricceri, Fulvio; Rice, Kenneth M.; Rosengren, Annika; Rotter, Jerome I.; Rudock, Megan E.; Sõber, Siim; Salako, Tunde; Saleheen, Danish; Salomaa, Veikko; Samani, Nilesh J.; Schwartz, Steven M.; Schwarz, Peter E. H.; Scott, Laura J.; Scott, James; Scuteri, Angelo; Sehmi, Joban S.; Seielstad, Mark; Seshadri, Sudha; Sharma, Pankaj; Shaw-Hawkins, Sue; Shi, Gang; Shrine, Nick R. G.; Sijbrands, Eric J. G.; Sim, Xueling; Singleton, Andrew; Sjögren, Marketa; Smith, Nicholas L.; Artigas, Maria Soler; Spector, Tim D.; Staessen, Jan A.; Stancakova, Alena; Steinle, Nanette I.; Strachan, David P.; Stringham, Heather M.; Sun, Yan V.; Swift, Amy J.; Tabara, Yasuharu; Tai, E-Shyong; Talmud, Philippa J.; Taylor, Andrew; Terzic, Janos; Thelle, Dag S.; Tobin, Martin D.; Tomaszewski, Maciej; Tripathy, Vikal; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Tzoulaki, Ioanna; Uda, Manuela; Ueshima, Hirotsugu; Uiterwaal, Cuno S. P. M.; Umemura, Satoshi; van der Harst, Pim; van der Schouw, Yvonne T.; van Gilst, Wiek H.; Vartiainen, Erkki; Vasan, Ramachandran S.; Veldre, Gudrun; Verwoert, Germaine C.; Viigimaa, Margus; Vinay, D. G.; Vineis, Paolo; Voight, Benjamin F.; Vollenweider, Peter; Wagenknecht, Lynne E.; Wain, Louise V.; Wang, Xiaoling; Wang, Thomas J.; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Watkins, Hugh; Weder, Alan B.; Whincup, Peter H.; Wiggins, Kerri L.; Witteman, Jacqueline C. M.; Wong, Andrew; Wu, Ying; Yajnik, Chittaranjan S.; Yao, Jie; Young, J. H.; Zelenika, Diana; Zhai, Guangju; Zhang, Weihua; Zhang, Feng; Zhao, Jing Hua; Zhu, Haidong; Zhu, Xiaofeng; Zitting, Paavo; Zukowska-Szczechowska, Ewa; Okada, Yukinori; Wu, Jer-Yuarn; Gu, Dongfeng; Takeuchi, Fumihiko; Takahashi, Atsushi; Maeda, Shiro; Tsunoda, Tatsuhiko; Chen, Peng; Lim, Su-Chi; Wong, Tien-Yin; Liu, Jianjun; Young, Terri L.; Aung, Tin; Teo, Yik-Ying; Kim, Young Jin; Kang, Daehee; Chen, Chien-Hsiun; Tsai, Fuu-Jen; Chang, Li-Ching; Fann, S. -J. Cathy; Mei, Hao; Hixson, James E.; Chen, Shufeng; Katsuya, Tomohiro; Isono, Masato; Albrecht, Eva; Yamamoto, Kazuhiko; Kubo, Michiaki; Nakamura, Yusuke; Kamatani, Naoyuki; Kato, Norihiro; He, Jiang; Chen, Yuan-Tsong; Tanaka, Toshihiro; Reilly, Muredach P; Schunkert, Heribert; Assimes, Themistocles L.; Hall, Alistair; Hengstenberg, Christian; König, Inke R.; Laaksonen, Reijo; McPherson, Ruth; Thompson, John R.; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Ziegler, Andreas; Absher, Devin; Chen, Li; Cupples13, L. Adrienne; Halperin, Eran; Li, Mingyao; Musunuru, Kiran; Preuss, Michael; Schillert, Arne; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Wells, George A.; Holm, Hilma; Roberts, Robert; Stewart, Alexandre F. R.; Fortmann, Stephen; Go, Alan; Hlatky, Mark; Iribarren, Carlos; Knowles, Joshua; Myers, Richard; Quertermous, Thomas; Sidney, Steven; Risch, Neil; Tang, Hua; Blankenberg, Stefan; Schnabel, Renate; Sinning, Christoph; Lackner, Karl J.; Tiret, Laurence; Nicaud, Viviane; Cambien, Francois; Bickel, Christoph; Rupprecht, Hans J.; Perret, Claire; Proust, Carole; Münzel, Thomas F.; Barbalic, Maja; Chen, Ida Yii-Der; Demissie-Banjaw, Serkalem; Folsom, Aaron; Lumley, Thomas; Marciante, Kristin; Taylor, Kent D.; Volcik, Kelly; Gretarsdottir, Solveig; Gulcher, Jeffrey R.; Kong, Augustine; Stefansson, Kari; Thorgeirsson, Gudmundur; Andersen, Karl; Fischer, Marcus; Grosshennig, Anika; Linsel-Nitschke, Patrick; Stark, Klaus; Schreiber, Stefan; Aherrahrou, Zouhair; Bruse, Petra; Doering, Angela; Klopp, Norman; Diemert, Patrick; Loley, Christina; Medack, Anja; Nahrstedt, Janja; Peters, Annette; Wagner, Arnika K.; Willenborg, Christina; Böhm, Bernhard O.; Dobnig, Harald; Grammer, Tanja B.; Hoffmann, Michael M.; Meinitzer, Andreas; Winkelmann, Bernhard R.; Pilz, Stefan; Renner, Wilfried; Scharnagl, Hubert; Stojakovic, Tatjana; Tomaschitz, Andreas; Winkler, Karl; Guiducci, Candace; Burtt, Noel; Gabriel, Stacey B.; Dandona, Sonny; Jarinova, Olga; Qu, Liming; Wilensky, Robert; Matthai, William; Hakonarson, Hakon H.; Devaney, Joe; Burnett, Mary Susan; Pichard, Augusto D.; Kent, Kenneth M.; Satler, Lowell; Lindsay, Joseph M.; Waksman, Ron; Knouff, Christopher W.; Waterworth, Dawn M.; Walker, Max C.; Epstein, Stephen E.; Rader, Daniel J.; Nelson, Christopher P.; Wright, Benjamin J.; Balmforth, Anthony J.; Ball, Stephen G.; Loehr, Laura R.; Rosamond, Wayne D.; Benjamin, Emelia; Haritunians, Talin; Couper, David; Murabito, Joanne; Wang, Ying A.; Stricker, Bruno H.; Chang, Patricia P.; Willerson, James T.; Felix, Stephan B.; Watzinger, Norbert; Aragam, Jayashri; Zweiker, Robert; Lind, Lars; Rodeheffer, Richard J.; Greiser, Karin Halina; Deckers, Jaap W.; Stritzke, Jan; Ingelsson, Erik; Kullo, Iftikhar; Haerting, Johannes; Reffelmann, Thorsten; Redfield, Margaret M.; Werdan, Karl; Mitchell, Gary F.; Arnett, Donna K.; Gottdiener, John S.; Blettner, Maria; Friedrich, Nele; Kovacs, Peter; Wild, Philipp S.; Froguel, Philippe; Rettig, Rainer; Mägi, Reedik; Biffar, Reiner; Schmidt, Reinhold; Middelberg, Rita P. S.; Carroll, Robert J.; Penninx, Brenda W.; Scott, Rodney J.; Katz, Ronit; Sedaghat, Sanaz; Wild, Sarah H.; Kardia, Sharon L. R.; Ulivi, Sheila; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Enroth, Stefan; Kloiber, Stefan; Trompet, Stella; Stengel, Benedicte; Hancock, Stephen J.; Turner, Stephen T.; Rosas, Sylvia E.; Stracke, Sylvia; Harris, Tamara B.; Zeller, Tanja; Zemunik, Tatijana; Lehtimäki, Terho; Illig, Thomas; Aspelund, Thor; Nikopensius, Tiit; Esko, Tonu; Tanaka, Toshiko; Gyllensten, Ulf; Völker, Uwe; Emilsson, Valur; Vitart, Veronique; Aalto, Ville; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Chouraki, Vincent; Chen, Wei-Min; Igl, Wilmar; März, Winfried; Koenig, Wolfgang; Lieb, Wolfgang; Loos, Ruth J. F.; Liu, Yongmei; Snieder, Harold; Pramstaller, Peter P.; Parsa, Afshin; O'Connell, Jeffrey R.; Susztak, Katalin; Hamet, Pavel; Tremblay, Johanne; de Boer, Ian H.; Böger, Carsten A.; Goessling, Wolfram; Chasman, Daniel I.; Köttgen, Anna; Kao, W. H. Linda; Fox, Caroline S.

    2016-01-01

    Reduced glomerular filtration rate defines chronic kidney disease and is associated with cardiovascular and all-cause mortality. We conducted a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies for estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), combining data across 133,413 individuals with replication in up to 42,166 individuals. We identify 24 new and confirm 29 previously identified loci. Of these 53 loci, 19 associate with eGFR among individuals with diabetes. Using bioinformatics, we show that identified genes at eGFR loci are enriched for expression in kidney tissues and in pathways relevant for kidney development and transmembrane transporter activity, kidney structure, and regulation of glucose metabolism. Chromatin state mapping and DNase I hypersensitivity analyses across adult tissues demonstrate preferential mapping of associated variants to regulatory regions in kidney but not extra-renal tissues. These findings suggest that genetic determinants of eGFR are mediated largely through direct effects within the kidney and highlight important cell types and biological pathways. PMID:26831199

  10. Injury-Dependent and Disability-Specific Lumbar Spinal Gene Regulation following Sciatic Nerve Injury in the Rat.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul J Austin

    Full Text Available Allodynia, hyperalgesia and spontaneous pain are cardinal sensory signs of neuropathic pain. Clinically, many neuropathic pain patients experience affective-motivational state changes, including reduced familial and social interactions, decreased motivation, anhedonia and depression which are severely debilitating. In earlier studies we have shown that sciatic nerve chronic constriction injury (CCI disrupts social interactions, sleep-wake-cycle and endocrine function in one third of rats, a subgroup reliably identified six days after injury. CCI consistently produces allodynia and hyperalgesia, the intensity of which was unrelated either to the altered social interactions, sleep-wake-cycle or endocrine changes. This decoupling of the sensory consequences of nerve injury from the affective-motivational changes is reported in both animal experiments and human clinical data. The sensory changes triggered by CCI are mediated primarily by functional changes in the lumbar dorsal horn, however, whether lumbar spinal changes may drive different affective-motivational states has never been considered. In these studies, we used microarrays to identify the unique transcriptomes of rats with altered social behaviours following sciatic CCI to determine whether specific patterns of lumbar spinal adaptations characterised this subgroup. Rats underwent CCI and on the basis of reductions in dominance behaviour in resident-intruder social interactions were categorised as having Pain & Disability, Pain & Transient Disability or Pain alone. We examined the lumbar spinal transcriptomes two and six days after CCI. Fifty-four 'disability-specific' genes were identified. Sixty-five percent were unique to Pain & Disability rats, two-thirds of which were associated with neurotransmission, inflammation and/or cellular stress. In contrast, 40% of genes differentially regulated in rats without disabilities were involved with more general homeostatic processes (cellular

  11. Injury-Dependent and Disability-Specific Lumbar Spinal Gene Regulation following Sciatic Nerve Injury in the Rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, Paul J; Bembrick, Alison L; Denyer, Gareth S; Keay, Kevin A

    2015-01-01

    Allodynia, hyperalgesia and spontaneous pain are cardinal sensory signs of neuropathic pain. Clinically, many neuropathic pain patients experience affective-motivational state changes, including reduced familial and social interactions, decreased motivation, anhedonia and depression which are severely debilitating. In earlier studies we have shown that sciatic nerve chronic constriction injury (CCI) disrupts social interactions, sleep-wake-cycle and endocrine function in one third of rats, a subgroup reliably identified six days after injury. CCI consistently produces allodynia and hyperalgesia, the intensity of which was unrelated either to the altered social interactions, sleep-wake-cycle or endocrine changes. This decoupling of the sensory consequences of nerve injury from the affective-motivational changes is reported in both animal experiments and human clinical data. The sensory changes triggered by CCI are mediated primarily by functional changes in the lumbar dorsal horn, however, whether lumbar spinal changes may drive different affective-motivational states has never been considered. In these studies, we used microarrays to identify the unique transcriptomes of rats with altered social behaviours following sciatic CCI to determine whether specific patterns of lumbar spinal adaptations characterised this subgroup. Rats underwent CCI and on the basis of reductions in dominance behaviour in resident-intruder social interactions were categorised as having Pain & Disability, Pain & Transient Disability or Pain alone. We examined the lumbar spinal transcriptomes two and six days after CCI. Fifty-four 'disability-specific' genes were identified. Sixty-five percent were unique to Pain & Disability rats, two-thirds of which were associated with neurotransmission, inflammation and/or cellular stress. In contrast, 40% of genes differentially regulated in rats without disabilities were involved with more general homeostatic processes (cellular structure

  12. Target-specific regulation of presynaptic release properties at auditory nerve terminals in the avian cochlear nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, J; MacLeod, K M

    2016-03-01

    Short-term synaptic plasticity (STP) acts as a time- and firing rate-dependent filter that mediates the transmission of information across synapses. In the auditory brain stem, the divergent pathways that encode acoustic timing and intensity information express differential STP. To investigate what factors determine the plasticity expressed at different terminals, we tested whether presynaptic release probability differed in the auditory nerve projections to the two divisions of the avian cochlear nucleus, nucleus angularis (NA) and nucleus magnocellularis (NM). Estimates of release probability were made with an open-channel blocker ofN-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors. Activity-dependent blockade of NMDA receptor-mediated excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) with application of 20 μM (+)-MK801 maleate was more rapid in NM than in NA, indicating that release probability was significantly higher at terminals in NM. Paired-pulse ratio (PPR) was tightly correlated with the blockade rate at terminals in NA, suggesting that PPR was a reasonable proxy for relative release probability at these synapses. To test whether release probability was similar across convergent inputs onto NA neurons, PPRs of different nerve inputs onto the same postsynaptic NA target neuron were measured. The PPRs, as well as the plasticity during short trains, were tightly correlated across multiple inputs, further suggesting that release probability is coordinated at auditory nerve terminals in a target-specific manner. This highly specific regulation of STP in the auditory brain stem provides evidence that the synaptic dynamics are tuned to differentially transmit the auditory information in nerve activity into parallel ascending pathways. PMID:26719087

  13. The Ca2+ channel TRPML3 specifically interacts with the mammalian ATG8 homologue GATE16 to regulate autophagy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: •Split-ubiquitin MY2H screen identified GATE16 as an interacting protein of TRPML3. •TRPML3 specifically binds to a mammalian ATG8 homologue GATE16, not to LC3B. •The interaction of TRPML3 with GATE16 facilitates autophagosome formation. •GATE16 is expressed in both autophagosome and extra-autophagosomal compartments. -- Abstract: TRPML3 is a Ca2+ permeable cation channel expressed in multiple intracellular compartments. Although TRPML3 is implicated in autophagy, how TRPML3 can regulate autophagy is not understood. To search interacting proteins with TRPML3 in autophagy, we performed split-ubiquitin membrane yeast two-hybrid (MY2H) screening with TRPML3-loop as a bait and identified GATE16, a mammalian ATG8 homologue. GST pull-down assay revealed that TRPML3 and TRPML3-loop specifically bind to GATE16, not to LC3B. Co-immunoprecipitation (co-IP) experiments showed that TRPML3 and TRPML3-loop pull down only the lipidated form of GATE16, indicating that the interaction occurs exclusively at the organellar membrane. The interaction of TRPML3 with GATE16 and GATE16-positive vesicle formation were increased in starvation induced autophagy, suggesting that the interaction facilitates the function of GATE16 in autophagosome formation. However, GATE16 was not required for TRPML3 trafficking to autophagosomes. Experiments using dominant-negative (DN) TRPML3(D458K) showed that GATE16 is localized not only in autophagosomes but also in extra-autophagosomal compartments, by contrast with LC3B. Since GATE16 acts at a later stage of the autophagosome biogenesis, our results suggest that TRPML3 plays a role in autophagosome maturation through the interaction with GATE16, by providing Ca2+ in the fusion process

  14. PD-L1 expression in renal cell carcinoma clear cell type is related to unfavorable prognosis

    OpenAIRE

    Katia R. M. Leite; Reis, Sabrina T.; Junior, José Pontes; Zerati, Marcelo; Gomes, Daniel de Oliveira; Luiz H. Camara-Lopes; Srougi, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    Background PD-L1 is a glycoprotein from the family of T-cell co-stimulatory molecules that are constitutively expressed by macrophages. Aberrant expression of PD-L1 is observed in human cancers associated with inhibition of the tumor-directed T-cell immune response. There are few reports in the literature evaluating PD-L1 expression in association to prognosis specifically in renal cell cancer clear cell type (RCC-CC). Methods Immunohistochemistry using a PD-L1 polyclonal antibody was perform...

  15. Isolation and characterization of a novel cis-acting sequences regulating root-specific gene from Daucus carota L.

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Yan; GUO Chang-an; REN Haibo; CHEN Fan

    2004-01-01

    Aquaporins are ubiquitous channel proteins that facilitate the transport of water across cell membranes. Most of aquaporins are represent in more than one tissues, but some of them performed highest in roots. They are belived to participate in water transport. DcRB7, a member of the aquaporin family, was isolated from somatic embryos of carrot and identified as a homologous gene of TobRB7. Further studies showed that the expression of DcRB7 was particular in carrot root. To investigate the transcription regulation of DcRB7, a 650-bp upstream sequence of DcRB7 was isolated by inverse PCR, and was fused to the β-glucuronidase (GUS) report gene. After the recombined vectors were transformed into tobacco, the expression pattern was performed by histochemical staining and the quantitative analysis of GUS activity. The results indicated that the cis-acting element of DcRB7 gene directs GUS expression not only as root-specific but also as drought inducible.

  16. Sall1 regulates cortical neurogenesis and laminar fate specification in mice: implications for neural abnormalities in Townes-Brocks syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan J. Harrison

    2012-05-01

    Progenitor cells in the cerebral cortex undergo dynamic cellular and molecular changes during development. Sall1 is a putative transcription factor that is highly expressed in progenitor cells during development. In humans, the autosomal dominant developmental disorder Townes-Brocks syndrome (TBS is associated with mutations of the SALL1 gene. TBS is characterized by renal, anal, limb and auditory abnormalities. Although neural deficits have not been recognized as a diagnostic characteristic of the disease, ∼10% of patients exhibit neural or behavioral abnormalities. We demonstrate that, in addition to being expressed in peripheral organs, Sall1 is robustly expressed in progenitor cells of the central nervous system in mice. Both classical- and conditional-knockout mouse studies indicate that the cerebral cortex is particularly sensitive to loss of Sall1. In the absence of Sall1, both the surface area and depth of the cerebral cortex were decreased at embryonic day 18.5 (E18.5. These deficiencies are associated with changes in progenitor cell properties during development. In early cortical progenitor cells, Sall1 promotes proliferative over neurogenic division, whereas, at later developmental stages, Sall1 regulates the production and differentiation of intermediate progenitor cells. Furthermore, Sall1 influences the temporal specification of cortical laminae. These findings present novel insights into the function of Sall1 in the developing mouse cortex and provide avenues for future research into potential neural deficits in individuals with TBS.

  17. Specific changes in the expression of imprinted genes in prostate cancer-implications for cancer progression and epigenetic regulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Teodora Ribarska; Klaus-Marius Bastian; Annemarie Koch; Wolfgang A Schulz

    2012-01-01

    Epigenetic dysregulation comprising DNA hypermethylation and hypomethylation,enhancer of zeste homologue 2 (EZH2)overexpression and altered patterns of histone modifications is associated with the progression of prostate cancer.DNA methylation,EZH2 and histone modifications also ensure the parental-specific monoallelic expression of at least 62 imprinted genes.Although it is therefore tempting to speculate that epigenetic dysregulation may extend to imprinted genes,expression changes in cancerous prostates are only well documented for insulin-like growth factor 2 (IGF2).A literature and database survey on imprinted genes in prostate cancer suggests that the expression of most imprinted genes remains unchanged despite global disturbances in epigenetic mechanisms.Instead,selective genetic and epigenetic changes appear to lead to the inactivation of a sub-network of imprinted genes,which might function in the prostate to limit cell growth induced viathe PI3K/Akt pathway,modulate androgen responses and regulate differentiation.Whereas dysregulation of IG F2 may constitute an early change in prostate carcinogenesis,inactivation of this imprinted gene network is rather associated with cancer progression.

  18. POLITICS OF LANGUAGE IN THE ACT REGULATING MATTERS PERTAINING TO SPECIFIC AUTONOMY FOR PAPUA : Critical Discourse Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugo Warami

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available This article aims to illustrate that the politics of language marked power relations framed by a form of power between the dominating and the dominated in the Act Regulating Matters Pertaining to Specific Autonomy for Papua (hereinafter called UU Otsus Papua. The politics of language involves a high degree of knowledge and power that is marked by the symbolic interactions in the ethnic diversity of the archipelago UU Otsus Papua is a form of political discourse and the medium of language diplomacy containing an authority and political competence of the central government over the people of Papua; including a number of authorities and policies, as well as to explore the power of language in the language politics networks through the system of government of the Republic of Indonesia. Politics of language in this article will be disclosed through the paradigm of Critical Discourse Analysis (CDA. This article will focus on the efforts of uncovering: “Language Politics in UU Otsus Papua”, by projecting the problems including: (i the form of the politics of language, and (ii the political function of language in the UU Otsus Papua.  

  19. The G1/S Specific Cyclin D2 Is a Regulator of HIV-1 Restriction in Non-proliferating Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badia, Roger; Pujantell, Maria; Riveira-Muñoz, Eva; Puig, Teresa; Torres-Torronteras, Javier; Martí, Ramón; Clotet, Bonaventura; Ampudia, Rosa M; Vives-Pi, Marta; Esté, José A; Ballana, Ester

    2016-08-01

    Macrophages are a heterogeneous cell population strongly influenced by differentiation stimuli that become susceptible to HIV-1 infection after inactivation of the restriction factor SAMHD1 by cyclin-dependent kinases (CDK). Here, we have used primary human monocyte-derived macrophages differentiated through different stimuli to evaluate macrophage heterogeneity on cell activation and proliferation and susceptibility to HIV-1 infection. Stimulation of monocytes with GM-CSF induces a non-proliferating macrophage population highly restrictive to HIV-1 infection, characterized by the upregulation of the G1/S-specific cyclin D2, known to control early steps of cell cycle progression. Knockdown of cyclin D2, enhances HIV-1 replication in GM-CSF macrophages through inactivation of SAMHD1 restriction factor by phosphorylation. Co-immunoprecipitation experiments show that cyclin D2 forms a complex with CDK4 and p21, a factor known to restrict HIV-1 replication by affecting the function of the downstream cascade that leads to SAMHD1 deactivation. Thus, we demonstrate that cyclin D2 acts as regulator of cell cycle proteins affecting SAMHD1-mediated HIV-1 restriction in non-proliferating macrophages. PMID:27541004

  20. Neuron-specific regulation of class I PI3K catalytic subunits and their dysfunction in brain disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina eGross

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The PI3K complex plays important roles in virtually all cells of the body. The enzymatic activity of PI3K to phosphorylate phosphoinositides in the membrane is mediated by a group of catalytic and regulatory subunits. Among those, the class I catalytic subunits, p110α, p110β, p110γ and p110δ, have recently drawn attention in the neuroscience field due to their specific dysregulation in diverse brain disorders. While in non-neuronal cells these catalytic subunits may have partially redundant functions, there is increasing evidence that in neurons their roles are more specialized, and confined to distinct receptor-dependent pathways. This review will summarize the emerging role of class I PI3K catalytic subunits in neurotransmitter-regulated neuronal signaling, and their dysfunction in a variety of neurological diseases, including fragile X syndrome, schizophrenia and epilepsy. We will discuss recent literature describing the use of PI3K subunit-selective inhibitors to rescue brain disease-associated phenotypes in in vitro and animal models. These studies give rise to the exciting prospect that these drugs, originally designed for cancer treatment, may be repurposed as therapeutic drugs for brain disorders in the future.

  1. Ubiquitin-specific Protease 19 (USP19) Regulates Hypoxia-inducible Factor 1α (HIF-1α) during Hypoxia*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altun, Mikael; Zhao, Bin; Velasco, Kelly; Liu, Haiyin; Hassink, Gerco; Paschke, Julia; Pereira, Teresa; Lindsten, Kristina

    2012-01-01

    A proper cellular adaptation to low oxygen levels is essential for processes such as development, growth, metabolism, and angiogenesis. The response to decrease in oxygen supply, referred to as hypoxia, is also involved in numerous human diseases including cancer, inflammatory conditions, and vascular disease. The hypoxia-inducible factor 1-α (HIF-1α), a key player in the hypoxic response, is kept under stringent regulation. At normoxia, the levels are kept low as a consequence of the efficient degradation by the ubiquitin-proteasome system, and in response to hypoxia, the degradation is blocked and the accumulating HIF-1α promotes a transcriptional response essential for proper adaptation and survival. Here we show that the ubiquitin-specific protease-19 (USP19) interacts with components of the hypoxia pathway including HIF-1α and rescues it from degradation independent of its catalytic activity. In the absence of USP19, cells fail to mount an appropriate response to hypoxia, indicating an important role for this enzyme in normal or pathological conditions. PMID:22128162

  2. Neutrophil-specific deletion of the CARD9 gene expression regulator suppresses autoantibody-induced inflammation in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Németh, Tamás; Futosi, Krisztina; Sitaru, Cassian; Ruland, Jürgen; Mócsai, Attila

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophils are terminally differentiated cells with limited transcriptional activity. The biological function of their gene expression changes is poorly understood. CARD9 regulates transcription during antifungal immunity but its role in sterile inflammation is unclear. Here we show that neutrophil CARD9 mediates pro-inflammatory chemokine/cytokine but not lipid mediator release during non-infectious inflammation. Genetic deficiency of CARD9 suppresses autoantibody-induced arthritis and dermatitis in mice. Neutrophil-specific deletion of CARD9 is sufficient to induce that phenotype. Card9(-/-) neutrophils show defective immune complex-induced gene expression changes and pro-inflammatory chemokine/cytokine release but normal LTB4 production and other short-term responses. In vivo deletion of CARD9 reduces tissue levels of pro-inflammatory chemokines and cytokines but not LTB4. The CARD9-mediated signalling pathway involves Src-family kinases, Syk, PLCγ2, Bcl10/Malt1 and NFκB. Collectively, CARD9-mediated gene expression changes within neutrophils play important roles during non-infectious inflammation in vivo and CARD9 acts as a divergence point between chemokine/cytokine and lipid mediator release. PMID:27032818

  3. Structural and Functional Characterization of Two Alternative Splicing Variants of Mouse Endothelial Cell-Specific Chemotaxis Regulator (ECSCR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongchang Chang

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Endothelial cells (ECs that line the lumen of blood vessels are important players in blood vessel formation, and EC migration is a key component of the angiogenic process. Thus, identification of genes that are specifically or preferentially expressed in vascular ECs and in-depth understanding of their biological functions may lead to discovery of new therapeutic targets. We have previously reported molecular characterization of human endothelial cell-specific molecule 2 (ECSM2/endothelial cell-specific chemotaxis regulator (ECSCR. In the present study, we cloned two mouse full-length cDNAs by RT-PCR, which encode two putative ECSCR isoform precursors with considerable homology to the human ECSCR. Nucleotide sequence and exon-intron junction analyses suggested that they are alternative splicing variants (ECSCR isoform-1 and -2, differing from each other in the first and second exons. Quantitative RT-PCR results revealed that isoform-2 is the predominant form, which was most abundant in heart, lung, and muscles, and moderately abundant in uterus and testis. In contrast, the expression of isoform-1 seemed to be more enriched in testis. To further explore their potential cellular functions, we expressed GFP- and FLAG-tagged ECSCR isoforms, respectively, in an ECSCR deficient cell line (HEK293. Interestingly, the actual sizes of either ECSCR-GFP or -FLAG fusion proteins detected by immunoblotting are much larger than their predicted sizes, suggesting that both isoforms are glycoproteins. Fluorescence microscopy revealed that both ECSCR isoforms are localized at the cell surface, which is consistent with the structural prediction. Finally, we performed cell migration assays using mouse endothelial MS1 cells overexpressing GFP alone, isoform-1-GFP, and isoform-2-GFP, respectively. Our results showed that both isoforms significantly inhibited vascular epidermal growth factor (VEGF-induced cell migration. Taken together, we have provided several lines

  4. Diversity of Epithelial Stem Cell Types in Adult Lung

    OpenAIRE

    Feng Li; Jinxi He; Jun Wei; Cho, William C.; Xiaoming Liu

    2015-01-01

    Lung is a complex organ lined with epithelial cells. In order to maintain its homeostasis and normal functions following injuries caused by varied extraneous and intraneous insults, such as inhaled environmental pollutants and overwhelming inflammatory responses, the respiratory epithelium normally undergoes regenerations by the proliferation and differentiation of region-specific epithelial stem/progenitor cells that resided in distinct niches along the airway tree. The importance of local e...

  5. Adenovirus vectors targeting distinct cell types in the retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweigard, J Harry; Cashman, Siobhan M; Kumar-Singh, Rajendra

    2010-04-01

    Purpose. Gene therapy for a number of retinal diseases necessitates efficient transduction of photoreceptor cells. Whereas adenovirus (Ad) serotype 5 (Ad5) does not transduce photoreceptors efficiently, previous studies have demonstrated improved photoreceptor transduction by Ad5 pseudotyped with Ad35 (Ad5/F35) or Ad37 (Ad5/F37) fiber or by the deletion of the RGD domain in the Ad5 penton base (Ad5DeltaRGD). However, each of these constructs contained a different transgene cassette, preventing the evaluation of the relative performance of these vectors, an important consideration before the use of these vectors in the clinic. The aim of this study was to evaluate these vectors in the retina and to attempt photoreceptor-specific transgene expression. Methods. Three Ad5-based vectors containing the same expression cassette were generated and injected into the subretinal space of adult mice. Eyes were analyzed for green fluorescence protein expression in flat-mounts, cross-sections, quantitative RT-PCR, and a modified stereological technique. A 257-bp fragment derived from the mouse opsin promoter was analyzed in the context of photoreceptor-specific transgene expression. Results. Each virus tested efficiently transduced the retinal pigment epithelium. The authors found no evidence that Ad5/F35 or Ad5/F37 transduced photoreceptors. Instead, they found that Ad5/F37 transduced Müller cells. Robust photoreceptor transduction by Ad5DeltaRGD was detected. Photoreceptor-specific transgene expression from the 257-bp mouse opsin promoter in the context of Ad5DeltaRGD vectors was found. Conclusions. Adenovirus vectors may be designed with tropism to distinct cell populations. Robust photoreceptor-specific transgene expression can be achieved in the context of Ad5DeltaRGD vectors. PMID:19892875

  6. Diversity of epithelial stem cell types in adult lung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Feng; He, Jinxi; Wei, Jun; Cho, William C; Liu, Xiaoming

    2015-01-01

    Lung is a complex organ lined with epithelial cells. In order to maintain its homeostasis and normal functions following injuries caused by varied extraneous and intraneous insults, such as inhaled environmental pollutants and overwhelming inflammatory responses, the respiratory epithelium normally undergoes regenerations by the proliferation and differentiation of region-specific epithelial stem/progenitor cells that resided in distinct niches along the airway tree. The importance of local epithelial stem cell niches in the specification of lung stem/progenitor cells has been recently identified. Studies using cell differentiating and lineage tracing assays, in vitro and/or ex vivo models, and genetically engineered mice have suggested that these local epithelial stem/progenitor cells within spatially distinct regions along the pulmonary tree contribute to the injury repair of epithelium adjacent to their respective niches. This paper reviews recent findings in the identification and isolation of region-specific epithelial stem/progenitor cells and local niches along the airway tree and the potential link of epithelial stem cells for the development of lung cancer. PMID:25810726

  7. Diversity of Epithelial Stem Cell Types in Adult Lung

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Lung is a complex organ lined with epithelial cells. In order to maintain its homeostasis and normal functions following injuries caused by varied extraneous and intraneous insults, such as inhaled environmental pollutants and overwhelming inflammatory responses, the respiratory epithelium normally undergoes regenerations by the proliferation and differentiation of region-specific epithelial stem/progenitor cells that resided in distinct niches along the airway tree. The importance of local epithelial stem cell niches in the specification of lung stem/progenitor cells has been recently identified. Studies using cell differentiating and lineage tracing assays, in vitro and/or ex vivo models, and genetically engineered mice have suggested that these local epithelial stem/progenitor cells within spatially distinct regions along the pulmonary tree contribute to the injury repair of epithelium adjacent to their respective niches. This paper reviews recent findings in the identification and isolation of region-specific epithelial stem/progenitor cells and local niches along the airway tree and the potential link of epithelial stem cells for the development of lung cancer.

  8. Sparse PCA corrects for cell type heterogeneity in epigenome-wide association studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmani, Elior; Zaitlen, Noah; Baran, Yael; Eng, Celeste; Hu, Donglei; Galanter, Joshua; Oh, Sam; Burchard, Esteban G; Eskin, Eleazar; Zou, James; Halperin, Eran

    2016-05-01

    In epigenome-wide association studies (EWAS), different methylation profiles of distinct cell types may lead to false discoveries. We introduce ReFACTor, a method based on principal component analysis (PCA) and designed for the correction of cell type heterogeneity in EWAS. ReFACTor does not require knowledge of cell counts, and it provides improved estimates of cell type composition, resulting in improved power and control for false positives in EWAS. Corresponding software is available at http://www.cs.tau.ac.il/~heran/cozygene/software/refactor.html. PMID:27018579

  9. Down-regulation of miR-302b, an ESC-specific microRNA, in Gastric Adenocarcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Javad Mowla

    2012-01-01

    -tumorgastric tissue samples. The data further revealed a down-regulation of miR-302b in gastrictumor samples (p=0.001, particularly in high-grade adenocarcinoma (p=0.009. However,ROC analysis data demonstrated a low sensitivity and specificity of miR-302b expressionto discriminate between the tumor and non-tumor state of the samples (AUC=0.63.Conclusion: Despite the upregulation of some hESC-specific genes in tumors, our datarevealed a down-regulation of miR-302b in high-grade tumors. This data suggested a potentialtumor-suppressor role for miR-302b in tumorigenesis of gastric tissue.

  10. Rotavirus NSP4: Cell type-dependent transport kinetics to the exofacial plasma membrane and release from intact infected cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parr Rebecca D

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rotavirus NSP4 localizes to multiple intracellular sites and is multifunctional, contributing to RV morphogenesis, replication and pathogenesis. One function of NSP4 is the induction of early secretory diarrhea by binding surface receptors to initiate signaling events. The aims of this study were to determine the transport kinetics of NSP4 to the exofacial plasma membrane (PM, the subsequent release from intact infected cells, and rebinding to naïve and/or neighboring cells in two cell types. Methods Transport kinetics was evaluated using surface-specific biotinylation/streptavidin pull-downs and exofacial exposure of NSP4 was confirmed by antibody binding to intact cells, and fluorescent resonant energy transfer. Transfected cells similarly were monitored to discern NSP4 movement in the absence of infection or other viral proteins. Endoglycosidase H digestions, preparation of CY3- or CY5- labeled F(ab2 fragments, confocal imaging, and determination of preferential polarized transport employed standard laboratory techniques. Mock-infected, mock-biotinylated and non-specific antibodies served as controls. Results Only full-length (FL, endoglycosidase-sensitive NSP4 was detected on the exofacial surface of two cell types, whereas the corresponding cell lysates showed multiple glycosylated forms. The C-terminus of FL NSP4 was detected on exofacial-membrane surfaces at different times in different cell types prior to its release into culture media. Transport to the PM was rapid and distinct yet FL NSP4 was secreted from both cell types at a time similar to the release of virus. NSP4-containing, clarified media from both cells bound surface molecules of naïve cells, and imaging showed secreted NSP4 from one or more infected cells bound neighboring cell membranes in culture. Preferential sorting to apical or basolateral membranes also was distinct in different polarized cells. Conclusions The intracellular transport of NSP4 to

  11. Cervix carcinoma is associated with an up-regulation and nuclear localization of the dual-specificity protein phosphatase VHR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 21-kDa Vaccinia virus VH1-related (VHR) dual-specific protein phosphatase (encoded by the DUSP3 gene) plays a critical role in cell cycle progression and is itself regulated during the cell cycle. We have previously demonstrated using RNA interference that cells lacking VHR arrest in the G1 and G2 phases of the cell cycle and show signs of beginning of cell senescence. In this report, we evaluated successfully the expression levels of VHR protein in 62 hysterectomy or conization specimens showing the various (pre) neoplastic cervical epithelial lesions and 35 additional cases of hysterectomy performed for non-cervical pathologies, from patients under 50 years of age. We used a tissue microarray and IHC technique to evaluate the expression of the VHR phosphatase. Immunofluorescence staining under confocal microscopy, Western blotting and RT-PCR methods were used to investigate the localization and expression levels of VHR. We report that VHR is upregulated in (pre) neoplastic lesions (squamous intraepithelial lesions; SILs) of the uterine cervix mainly in high grade SIL (H-SIL) compared to normal exocervix. In the invasive cancer, VHR is also highly expressed with nuclear localization in the majority of cells compared to normal tissue where VHR is always in the cytoplasm. We also report that this phosphatase is highly expressed in several cervix cancer cell lines such as HeLa, SiHa, CaSki, C33 and HT3 compared to primary keratinocytes. The immunofluorescence technique under confocal microscopy shows that VHR has a cytoplasmic localization in primary keratinocytes, while it localizes in both cytoplasm and nucleus of the cancer cell lines investigated. We report that the up-regulation of this phosphatase is mainly due to its post-translational stabilization in the cancer cell lines compared to primary keratinocytes rather than increases in the transcription of DUSP3 locus. These results together suggest that VHR can be considered as a new marker for cancer

  12. The epithelial splicing factors ESRP1 and ESRP2 positively and negatively regulate diverse types of alternative splicing events

    OpenAIRE

    Warzecha, Claude C.; Shen, Shihao; Xing, Yi; Carstens, Russ P.

    2009-01-01

    Cell-type and tissue-specific alternative splicing events are regulated by combinatorial control involving both abundant RNA binding proteins as well as those with more discrete expression and specialized functions. Epithelial Splicing Regulatory Proteins 1 and 2 (ESRP1 and ESRP2) are recently discovered epithelial-specific RNA binding proteins that promote splicing of the epithelial variant of the FGFR2, ENAH, CD44 and CTNND1 transcripts. To catalogue a larger set of splicing events under th...

  13. The gene for erythropoietin receptor is expressed in multipotential hematopoietic and embryonal stem cells: evidence for differentiation stage-specific regulation.

    OpenAIRE

    Heberlein, C; Fischer, K D; Stoffel, M; Nowock, J; Ford, A.; Tessmer, U.; Stocking, C

    1992-01-01

    The principal regulator of erythropoiesis is the glycoprotein erythropoietin, which interacts with a specific cell surface receptor (EpoR). A study aimed at analyzing EpoR gene regulation has shown that both pluripotent embryonal stem cells and early multipotent hematopoietic cells express EpoR transcripts. Commitment to nonerythroid lineages (e.g., macrophage or lymphocytic) results in the shutdown of EpoR gene expression, whereas commitment to the erythroid lineage is concurrent with or fol...

  14. PapR6, a Putative Atypical Response Regulator, Functions as a Pathway-Specific Activator of Pristinamycin II Biosynthesis in Streptomyces pristinaespiralis

    OpenAIRE

    Dun, Junling; Zhao, Yawei; Zheng, Guosong; Zhu, Hong; Ruan, Lijun; Wang, Wenfang; Ge, Mei; Jiang, Weihong; Lu, Yinhua

    2014-01-01

    There are up to seven regulatory genes in the pristinamycin biosynthetic gene cluster of Streptomyces pristinaespiralis, which infers a complicated regulation mechanism for pristinamycin production. In this study, we revealed that PapR6, a putative atypical response regulator, acts as a pathway-specific activator of pristinamycin II (PII) biosynthesis. Deletion of the papR6 gene resulted in significantly reduced PII production, and its overexpression led to increased PII formation, compared t...

  15. [The alchemy--epigenetic regulation of pluripotency].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bem, Joanna; Grabowska, Iwona

    2013-01-01

    Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) self renew their population, also they are pluripotent which means they can differentiate into any given cell type. In specific culture conditions they remain undifferentiated. On the cellular level pluripotency is determined by many transcription factors, e.g. Sox2, Nanog, Klf4, Oct4. Epigenetic regulation is also crucial for both self renewal and pluripotency. This review focuses on epigenetic mechanisms, among them DNA methylation, posttranslational histone modifications, ATP dependent chromatin remodeling and miRNAs interactions. These mechanisms affect embryonic stem cells functions keeping them poised for differentiation. PMID:24044279

  16. Implications of epigenetic variability within a cell population for cell type classification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inna eTabansky

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Here we propose a new approach to defining nerve ‘cell types’ in reaction to recent advances in single cell analysis. Among cells previously thought to be equivalent, considerable differences in global gene expression and biased tendencies among differing developmental fates have been demonstrated within multiple lineages. The model of classifying cells into distinct types thus has to be revised to account for this intrinsic variability. A ‘cell type’ could be a group of cells that possess similar, but not necessarily identical properties, variable within a spectrum of epigenetic adjustments that permit its developmental path toward a specific function to be achieved. Thus, the definition of a cell type is becoming more similar to the definition of a species: sharing essential properties with other members of its group, but permitting a certain amount of deviation in aspects that do not seriously impact function. This approach accommodates, even embraces the spectrum of natural variation found in various cell populations and consequently avoids the fallacy of false equivalence. For example, developing neurons will react to their microenvironments with epigenetic changes resulting in slight changes in gene expression and morphology. Addressing the new questions implied here will have significant implications for developmental neurobiology.

  17. Multimodal imaging of a tescalcin (TESC)-regulating polymorphism (rs7294919)-specific effects on hippocampal gray matter structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dannlowski, U; Grabe, H J; Wittfeld, K; Klaus, J; Konrad, C; Grotegerd, D; Redlich, R; Suslow, T; Opel, N; Ohrmann, P; Bauer, J; Zwanzger, P; Laeger, I; Hohoff, C; Arolt, V; Heindel, W; Deppe, M; Domschke, K; Hegenscheid, K; Völzke, H; Stacey, D; Meyer Zu Schwabedissen, H; Kugel, H; Baune, B T

    2015-03-01

    In two large genome-wide association studies, an intergenic single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP; rs7294919) involved in TESC gene regulation has been associated with hippocampus volume. Further characterization of neurobiological effects of the TESC gene is warranted using multimodal brain-wide structural and functional imaging. Voxel-based morphometry (VBM8) was used in two large, well-characterized samples of healthy individuals of West-European ancestry (Münster sample, N=503; SHIP-TREND, N=721) to analyze associations between rs7294919 and local gray matter volume. In subsamples, white matter fiber structure was investigated using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and limbic responsiveness was measured by means of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) during facial emotion processing (N=220 and N=264, respectively). Furthermore, gene x environment (G × E) interaction and gene x gene interaction with SNPs from genes previously found to be associated with hippocampal size (FKBP5, Reelin, IL-6, TNF-α, BDNF and 5-HTTLPR/rs25531) were explored. We demonstrated highly significant effects of rs7294919 on hippocampal gray matter volumes in both samples. In whole-brain analyses, no other brain areas except the hippocampal formation and adjacent temporal structures were associated with rs7294919. There were no genotype effects on DTI and fMRI results, including functional connectivity measures. No G × E interaction with childhood maltreatment was found in both samples. However, an interaction between rs7294919 and rs2299403 in the Reelin gene was found that withstood correction for multiple comparisons. We conclude that rs7294919 exerts highly robust and regionally specific effects on hippocampal gray matter structures, but not on other neuropsychiatrically relevant imaging markers. The biological interaction between TESC and RELN pointing to a neurodevelopmental origin of the observed findings warrants further mechanistic investigations. PMID:24776739

  18. Novel HSAN1 mutation in serine palmitoyltransferase resides at a putative phosphorylation site that is involved in regulating substrate specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, Daniela; Murphy, Sinéad M; Sathiyanadan, Karthik; Wei, Yu; Othman, Alaa; Laurá, Matilde; Liu, Yo-Tsen; Penno, Anke; Blake, Julian; Donaghy, Michael; Houlden, Henry; Reilly, Mary M; Hornemann, Thorsten

    2015-03-01

    1-Deoxysphingolipids (1-deoxySL) are atypical sphingolipids that are formed by the enzyme serine palmitoyltransferase (SPT) due to a promiscuous use of L-alanine over its canonical substrate L-serine. Several mutations in SPT are associated with the hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type I (HSAN1). The current hypothesis is that these mutations induce a permanent shift in the affinity from L-serine toward L-alanine which results in a pathologically increased 1-deoxySL formation in HSAN1 patients. Also, wild-type SPT forms 1-deoxySL under certain conditions, and elevated levels were found in individuals with the metabolic syndrome and diabetes. However, the molecular mechanisms which control the substrate shift of the wild-type enzyme are not understood. Here, we report a novel SPTLC2-S384F variant in two unrelated HSAN1 families. Affected patients showed elevated plasma 1-deoxySL levels and expression of the S384F mutant in HEK293 cells increased 1-deoxySL formation. Previously, S384 has been reported as one of the two (S384 and Y387) putative phosphorylation sites in SPTLC2. The phosphorylation of wild-type SPTLC2 was confirmed by isoelectric focusing. The impact of an S384 phosphorylation on SPT activity was tested by creating mutants mimicking either a constitutively phosphorylated (S384D, S384E) or non-phosphorylated (S384A, Y387F, Y387F+S384A) protein. The S384D but not the S384E variant was associated with increased 1-deoxySL formation. The other mutations had no influence on activity and substrate affinity. In summary, our data show that S384F is a novel mutation in HSAN1 and that the substrate specificity of wild-type SPT might by dynamically regulated by a phosphorylation at this position. PMID:25567748