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Sample records for cell-to-cell signal molecules

  1. Strategy for signaling molecule detection by using an integrated microfluidic device coupled with mass spectrometry to study cell-to-cell communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Sifeng; Zhang, Jie; Li, Haifang; Lin, Jin-Ming

    2013-01-15

    Cell-to-cell communication is a very important physiological behavior in life entity, and most of human behaviors are related to it. Although cell-to-cell communications are attracting much attention and financial support, rare methods have been successfully developed for in vitro cell-to-cell communication study. In this work, we developed a novel method for cell-to-cell communication study on an integrated microdevice, and signaling molecule and metabolites were online-detected by an electrospray ionization-quadrupole-time-of-flight-mass spectrometer (ESI-Q-TOF-MS) after on-chip solid-phase extraction. Moreover, we presented a "Surface Tension Plug" on a microchip to control cell-to-cell communication. The microdevice consists of three functional sections: cell coculture channel, targets pretreatment, and targets detection sections. To verify the feasibility of cell-to-cell communications on the integrated microdevice, we studied the communication between the 293 and the L-02 cells. Epinephrine and glucose were successfully detected using an ESI-Q-TOF-MS with short analysis time (communication study.

  2. Cell to cell signalling during vertebrate limb bud development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Panman, Lia

    2004-01-01

    Communication between cells is essential during embryonic development. The vertebrate limb bud provides us a model to study signalling interactions between cells during patterning of embryonic tissues and organogenesis. In chapter 1 I give an introduction about limb bud development that is focussed

  3. Determinants of cell-to-cell variability in protein kinase signaling.

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    Matthias Jeschke

    Full Text Available Cells reliably sense environmental changes despite internal and external fluctuations, but the mechanisms underlying robustness remain unclear. We analyzed how fluctuations in signaling protein concentrations give rise to cell-to-cell variability in protein kinase signaling using analytical theory and numerical simulations. We characterized the dose-response behavior of signaling cascades by calculating the stimulus level at which a pathway responds ('pathway sensitivity' and the maximal activation level upon strong stimulation. Minimal kinase cascades with gradual dose-response behavior show strong variability, because the pathway sensitivity and the maximal activation level cannot be simultaneously invariant. Negative feedback regulation resolves this trade-off and coordinately reduces fluctuations in the pathway sensitivity and maximal activation. Feedbacks acting at different levels in the cascade control different aspects of the dose-response curve, thereby synergistically reducing the variability. We also investigated more complex, ultrasensitive signaling cascades capable of switch-like decision making, and found that these can be inherently robust to protein concentration fluctuations. We describe how the cell-to-cell variability of ultrasensitive signaling systems can be actively regulated, e.g., by altering the expression of phosphatase(s or by feedback/feedforward loops. Our calculations reveal that slow transcriptional negative feedback loops allow for variability suppression while maintaining switch-like decision making. Taken together, we describe design principles of signaling cascades that promote robustness. Our results may explain why certain signaling cascades like the yeast pheromone pathway show switch-like decision making with little cell-to-cell variability.

  4. Cell-to-Cell stochastic fluctuations in apoptotic signaling can decide between life and death

    CERN Document Server

    Raychaudhuri, S; Nguyen, T; Khan, E M; Goldkorn, T

    2007-01-01

    Apoptosis, or genetically programmed cell death, is a crucial cellular process that maintains the balance between life and death in cells. The precise molecular mechanism of apoptosis signaling and how these two pathways are differentially activated under distinct apoptotic stimuli is poorly understood. We developed a Monte Carlo-based stochastic simulation model that can characterize distinct signaling behaviors in the two major pathways of apoptotic signaling using a novel probability distribution-based approach. Specifically, we show that for a weak death signal, such as low levels of death ligand Fas (CD95) binding or under stress conditions, the type 2 mitochondrial pathway dominates apoptotic signaling. Our results also show signaling in the type 2 pathway is stochastic, where the population average over many cells does not capture the cell-to-cell fluctuations in the time course (~1 - 10 hours) of downstream caspase-3 activation. On the contrary, the probability distribution of caspase-3 activation for...

  5. Robustness of MEK-ERK Dynamics and Origins of Cell-to-Cell Variability in MAPK Signaling

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    Sarah Filippi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Cellular signaling processes can exhibit pronounced cell-to-cell variability in genetically identical cells. This affects how individual cells respond differentially to the same environmental stimulus. However, the origins of cell-to-cell variability in cellular signaling systems remain poorly understood. Here, we measure the dynamics of phosphorylated MEK and ERK across cell populations and quantify the levels of population heterogeneity over time using high-throughput image cytometry. We use a statistical modeling framework to show that extrinsic noise, particularly that from upstream MEK, is the dominant factor causing cell-to-cell variability in ERK phosphorylation, rather than stochasticity in the phosphorylation/dephosphorylation of ERK. We furthermore show that without extrinsic noise in the core module, variable (including noisy signals would be faithfully reproduced downstream, but the within-module extrinsic variability distorts these signals and leads to a drastic reduction in the mutual information between incoming signal and ERK activity.

  6. Cell-to-cell communication in intact taste buds through ATP signalling from pannexin 1 gap junction hemichannels.

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    Dando, Robin; Roper, Stephen D

    2009-12-15

    Isolated taste cells, taste buds and strips of lingual tissue from taste papillae secrete ATP upon taste stimulation. Taste bud receptor (Type II) cells have been identified as the source of ATP secretion. Based on studies on isolated taste buds and single taste cells, we have postulated that ATP secreted from receptor cells via pannexin 1 hemichannels acts within the taste bud to excite neighbouring presynaptic (Type III) cells. This hypothesis, however, remains to be tested in intact tissues. In this report we used confocal Ca(2+) imaging and lingual slices containing intact taste buds to test the hypothesis of purinergic signalling between taste cells in a more integral preparation. Incubating lingual slices with apyrase reversibly blocked cell-to-cell communication between receptor cells and presynaptic cells, consistent with ATP being the transmitter. Inhibiting pannexin 1 gap junction hemichannels with CO(2)-saturated buffer or probenecid significantly reduced cell-cell signalling between receptor cells and presynaptic cells. In contrast, anandamide, a blocker of connexin gap junction channels, had no effect of cell-to-cell communication in taste buds. These findings are consistent with the model for peripheral signal processing via ATP and pannexin 1 hemichannels in mammalian taste buds.

  7. Pseudomonas aeruginosa forms Biofilms in Acute InfectionIndependent of Cell-to-Cell Signaling

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    Schaber, J. Andy; Triffo, W.J.; Suh, Sang J.; Oliver, Jeffrey W.; Hastert, Mary C.; Griswold, John A.; Auer, Manfred; Hamood, Abdul N.; Rumbaugh, Kendra P.

    2006-09-20

    Biofilms are bacterial communities residing within a polysaccharide matrix that are associated with persistence and antibiotic resistance in chronic infections. We show that the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa forms biofilms within 8 hours of infection in thermally-injured mice, demonstrating that biofilms contribute to bacterial colonization in acute infections. P. aeruginosa biofilms were visualized within burned tissue surrounding blood vessels and adipose cells. Although quorum sensing (QS), a bacterial signaling mechanism, coordinates differentiation of biofilms in vitro, wild type and QS-deficient P. aeruginosa formed similar biofilms in vivo. Our findings demonstrate that P. aeruginosa forms biofilms on specific host tissues independent of QS.

  8. [Action of antibiotics as signalling molecules].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulgakova, V G; Vinogradova, K A; Orlova, T I; Kozhevin, P A; Polin, A N

    2014-01-01

    It was thought that antibiotics should be produced by soil microorganisms to inhibit the growth of competitors in natural habitats. Yet it has been shown that antibiotics at subinhibitory concentrations may have a role as signalling molecules providing cell-to-cell communication in bacteria in the environment. Antibiotics modulate gene transcription and regulate gene expression in microbial populations. Subinhibitory concentrations of antibiotics may cause a number of phenotypic and genotypic changes in microorganisms. These transcription changes are dependent on the interaction of antibiotics with macromolecular receptors such as ribosome or RNA-polymerase. Antibiotic signalling and quorum-sensing system are important regulatory mechanisms in bacteria. It was demonstrated that antibiotics interfered with quorum-sensing system.

  9. Cell-to-cell signaling influences the fate of prostate cancer stem cells and their potential to generate more aggressive tumors.

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    Luisa Salvatori

    Full Text Available An increasing number of malignancies has been shown to be initiated and propelled by small subpopulations of cancer stem cells (CSC. However, whether tumor aggressiveness is driven by CSC and by what extent this property may be relevant within the tumor mass is still unsettled. To address this issue, we isolated a rare tumor cell population on the basis of its CD44(+CD24(- phenotype from the human androgen-independent prostate carcinoma cell line DU145 and established its CSC properties. The behavior of selected CSC was investigated with respect to the bulk DU145 cells. The injection of CSC in nude mice generated highly vascularized tumors infiltrating the adjacent tissues, showing high density of neuroendocrine cells and expressing low levels of E-cadherin and β-catenin as well as high levels of vimentin. On the contrary, when a comparable number of unsorted DU145 cells were injected the resulting tumors were less aggressive. To investigate the different features of tumors in vivo, the influence of differentiated tumor cells on CSC was examined in vitro by growing CSC in the absence or presence of conditioned medium from DU145 cells. CSC grown in permissive conditions differentiated into cell populations with features similar to those of cells held in aggressive tumors generated from CSC injection. Differently, conditioned medium induced CSC to differentiate into a cell phenotype comparable to cells of scarcely aggressive tumors originated from bulk DU145 cell injection. These findings show for the first time that CSC are able to generate differentiated cells expressing either highly or scarcely aggressive phenotype, thus influencing prostate cancer progression. The fate of CSC was determined by signals released from tumor environment. Moreover, using microarray analysis we selected some molecules which could be involved in this cell-to-cell signaling, hypothesizing their potential value for prognostic or therapeutic applications.

  10. Rho-ROCK and Rac-PAK signaling pathways have opposing effects on the cell-to-cell spread of Marek's Disease Virus.

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    Nicolas Richerioux

    Full Text Available Marek's Disease Virus (MDV is an avian alpha-herpesvirus that only spreads from cell-to-cell in cell culture. While its cell-to-cell spread has been shown to be dependent on actin filament dynamics, the mechanisms regulating this spread remain largely unknown. Using a recombinant BAC20 virus expressing an EGFPVP22 tegument protein, we found that the actin cytoskeleton arrangements and cell-cell contacts differ in the center and periphery of MDV infection plaques, with cells in the latter areas showing stress fibers and rare cellular projections. Using specific inhibitors and activators, we determined that Rho-ROCK pathway, known to regulate stress fiber formation, and Rac-PAK, known to promote lamellipodia formation and destabilize stress fibers, had strong contrasting effects on MDV cell-to-cell spread in primary chicken embryo skin cells (CESCs. Inhibition of Rho and its ROCKs effectors led to reduced plaque sizes whereas inhibition of Rac or its group I-PAKs effectors had the adverse effect. Importantly, we observed that the shape of MDV plaques is related to the semi-ordered arrangement of the elongated cells, at the monolayer level in the vicinity of the plaques. Inhibition of Rho-ROCK signaling also resulted in a perturbation of the cell arrangement and a rounding of plaques. These opposing effects of Rho and Rac pathways in MDV cell-to-cell spread were validated for two parental MDV recombinant viruses with different ex vivo spread efficiencies. Finally, we demonstrated that Rho/Rac pathways have opposing effects on the accumulation of N-cadherin at cell-cell contact regions between CESCs, and defined these contacts as adherens junctions. Considering the importance of adherens junctions in HSV-1 cell-to-cell spread in some cell types, this result makes of adherens junctions maintenance one potential and attractive hypothesis to explain the Rho/Rac effects on MDV cell-to-cell spread. Our study provides the first evidence that MDV cell-to-cell

  11. Mutation of a chloroplast-targeting signal in Alternanthera mosaic virus TGB3 impairs cell-to-cell movement and eliminates long-distance virus movement.

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    Lim, Hyoun-Sub; Vaira, Anna Maria; Bae, Hanhong; Bragg, Jennifer N; Ruzin, Steven E; Bauchan, Gary R; Dienelt, Margaret M; Owens, Robert A; Hammond, John

    2010-08-01

    Cell-to-cell movement of potexviruses requires coordinated action of the coat protein and triple gene block (TGB) proteins. The structural properties of Alternanthera mosaic virus (AltMV) TGB3 were examined by methods differentiating between signal peptides and transmembrane domains, and its subcellular localization was studied by Agrobacterium-mediated transient expression and confocal microscopy. Unlike potato virus X (PVX) TGB3, AltMV TGB3 was not associated with the endoplasmic reticulum, and accumulated preferentially in mesophyll cells. Deletion and site-specific mutagenesis revealed an internal signal VL(17,18) of TGB3 essential for chloroplast localization, and either deletion of the TGB3 start codon or alteration of the chloroplast-localization signal limited cell-to-cell movement to the epidermis, yielding a virus that was unable to move into the mesophyll layer. Overexpression of AltMV TGB3 from either AltMV or PVX infectious clones resulted in veinal necrosis and vesiculation at the chloroplast membrane, a cytopathology not observed in wild-type infections. The distinctive mesophyll and chloroplast localization of AltMV TGB3 highlights the critical role played by mesophyll targeting in virus long-distance movement within plants.

  12. Nonbioluminescent strains of Photobacterium phosphoreum produce the cell-to-cell communication signal N-(3-Hydroxyoctanoyl)homoserine lactone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flodgaard, Lars; Dalgaard, Paw; Andersen, Jens Bo

    2005-01-01

    Bioluminescence is a common phenotype in marine bacteria, such As Vibrio and Photobacterium species, and can be quorum regulated by N-acylated homoserine lactones (AHLs). We extracted a molecule that induced a bacterial AHL monitor (Agrobacterium tumefaciens NT1 [pZLR4]) from packed cod fillets......, which spoil due to growth of Photobacterium phosphoreum. Interestingly, AHLs were produced by 13 nonbioluminescent strains of P. phosphoreum isolated from the product. Of 177 strains of P. phosphoreum (including 18 isolates from this study), none of 74 bioluminescent strains elicited a reaction......) and shape to N-(3-hydroxyoctanoyl)homoserine lactone, and the presence of this molecule in culture supernatants from a nonbioluminescent strain of P. phosphoreum was confirmed by high-performance liquid chromatography-positive electrospray high-resolution mass spectrometry. Bioluminescence (in a non...

  13. Repression of tropolone production and induction of a Burkholderia plantarii pseudo-biofilm by carot-4-en-9,10-diol, a cell-to-cell signaling disrupter produced by Trichoderma virens.

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    Mengcen Wang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The tropolone-tolerant Trichoderma virens PS1-7 is a biocontrol agent against Burkholderia plantarii, causative of rice seedling blight. When exposed to catechol, this fungus dose-dependently produced carot-4-en-9,10-diol, a sesquiterpene-type autoregulatory signal molecule that promotes self-conidiation of T. virens PS1-7 mycelia. It was, however, uncertain why T. virens PS1-7 attenuates the symptom development of the rice seedlings infested with B. plantarii. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To reveal the antagonism by T. virens PS1-7 against B. plantarii leading to repression of tropolone production in a coculture system, bioassay-guided screening for active compounds from a 3-d culture of T. virens PS1-7 was conducted. As a result, carot-4-en-9,10-diol was identified and found to repress tropolone production of B. plantarii from 10 to 200 µM in a dose-dependent manner as well as attenuate virulence of B. plantarii on rice seedlings. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis revealed that transcriptional suppression of N-acyl-L-homoserine lactone synthase plaI in B. plantarii was the main mode of action by which carot-4-en-9,10-diol mediated the quorum quenching responsible for repression of tropolone production. In addition, the unique response of B. plantarii to carot-4-en-9,10-diol in the biofilm formed in the static culture system was also found. Although the initial stage of B. plantarii biofilm formation was induced by both tropolone and carot-4-en-9,10-diol, it was induced in different states. Moreover, the B. plantarii biofilm that was induced by carot-4-en-9,10-diol at the late stage showed defects not only in matrix structure but also cell viability. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our findings demonstrate that carot-4-en-9,10-diol released by T. virens PS1-7 acts as an interkingdom cell-to-cell signaling molecule against B. plantarii to repress tropolone production and induces pseudo-biofilm to the cells. This observation also led to

  14. Notch signaling-mediated cell-to-cell interaction is dependent on E-cadherin adhesion in adult rat anterior pituitary.

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    Batchuluun, Khongorzul; Azuma, Morio; Yashiro, Takashi; Kikuchi, Motoshi

    2016-12-10

    The rat anterior pituitary is composed of hormone-producing cells, non-hormone-producing cells (referred to as folliculostellate cells) and marginal layer cells. In the adult rat, progenitor cells of hormone-producing cells have recently been reported to be maintained within this non-hormone-producing cell population. In tissue, non-hormone-producing cells construct homophilic cell aggregates by the differential expression of the cell adhesion molecule E-cadherin. We have previously shown that Notch signaling, a known regulator of progenitor cells in a number of organs, is activated in the cell aggregates. We now investigate the relationship between Notch signaling and E-cadherin-mediated cell adhesion in the pituitary gland. Immunohistochemically, Notch signaling receptor Notch2 and the ligand Jagged1 were localized within E-cadherin-positive cells in the marginal cell layer and in the main part of the anterior lobe, whereas Notch1 was localized in E-cadherin-positive and -negative cells. Activation of Notch signaling within E-cadherin-positive cells was confirmed by immunostaining of the Notch target HES1. Notch2 and Jagged1 were always co-localized within the same cells suggesting that homologous cells have reciprocal effects in activating Notch signaling. When the E-cadherin function was inhibited by exposure to a monoclonal antibody (DECMA-1) in primary monolayer cell culture, the percentage of HES1-positive cells among Notch2-positive cells was less than half that of the control. The present results suggest that E-cadherin-mediated cell attachment is necessary for the activation of Notch signaling in the anterior pituitary gland but not for the expression of the Notch2 molecule.

  15. Polypetide signaling molecules in plant development

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    Intercellular communication mediated by small signaling molecules is a key mechanism for coordinating plant growth and development. In the past few years, polypeptide signals have been shown to play prominent roles in processes as diverse as shoot and root meristem maintenance, vascular differentiat...

  16. Events at the host-microbial interface of the gastrointestinal tract III. Cell-to-cell signaling among microbial flora, host, and pathogens: there is a whole lot of talking going on.

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    Clarke, Marcie B; Sperandio, Vanessa

    2005-06-01

    Humans have an important association with their intestinal microbial flora. The microbial flora helps to shape the mammalian innate immune system, absorbs nutrients, and plays an intricate role on intestinal development. Microbes and mammals communicate with each other through an array of hormone and hormonelike chemical compounds. These "signals," however, are hijacked by bacterial pathogens, such as enterohemorrhagic Eschrichia coli (EHEC), to activate its virulence genes, colonize the host, and start the disease process. This review explores the cell-to-cell signaling events in the gastrointestinal tract that lead EHEC to regulate its virulence genes in a coordinate manner.

  17. Phospholipase C-β1 and β4 contribute to non-genetic cell-to-cell variability in histamine-induced calcium signals in HeLa cells.

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    Sachiko Ishida

    Full Text Available A uniform extracellular stimulus triggers cell-specific patterns of Ca(2+ signals, even in genetically identical cell populations. However, the underlying mechanism that generates the cell-to-cell variability remains unknown. We monitored cytosolic inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3 concentration changes using a fluorescent IP3 sensor in single HeLa cells showing different patterns of histamine-induced Ca(2+ oscillations in terms of the time constant of Ca(2+ spike amplitude decay and the Ca(2+ oscillation frequency. HeLa cells stimulated with histamine exhibited a considerable variation in the temporal pattern of Ca(2+ signals and we found that there were cell-specific IP3 dynamics depending on the patterns of Ca(2+ signals. RT-PCR and western blot analyses showed that phospholipase C (PLC-β1, -β3, -β4, -γ1, -δ3 and -ε were expressed at relatively high levels in HeLa cells. Small interfering RNA-mediated silencing of PLC isozymes revealed that PLC-β1 and PLC-β4 were specifically involved in the histamine-induced IP3 increases in HeLa cells. Modulation of IP3 dynamics by knockdown or overexpression of the isozymes PLC-β1 and PLC-β4 resulted in specific changes in the characteristics of Ca(2+ oscillations, such as the time constant of the temporal changes in the Ca(2+ spike amplitude and the Ca(2+ oscillation frequency, within the range of the cell-to-cell variability found in wild-type cell populations. These findings indicate that the heterogeneity in the process of IP3 production, rather than IP3-induced Ca(2+ release, can cause cell-to-cell variability in the patterns of Ca(2+ signals and that PLC-β1 and PLC-β4 contribute to generate cell-specific Ca(2+ signals evoked by G protein-coupled receptor stimulation.

  18. Evolution of stalk/spore ratio in a social amoeba: cell-to-cell interaction via a signaling chemical shaped by cheating risk.

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    Uchinomiya, Kouki; Iwasa, Yoh

    2013-11-07

    The social amoeba (or cellular slime mold) is a model system for cell cooperation. When food is depleted in the environment, cells aggregate together. Some of these cells become stalks, raising spores to aid in their dispersal. Differentiation-inducing factor-1 (DIF-1) is a signaling chemical produced by prespore cells and decomposed by prestalk cells. It affects the rate of switching between prestalk and prespore cells, thereby achieving a stable stalk/spore ratio. In this study we analyzed the evolution of the stalk/spore ratio. Strains may differ in the production and decomposition rates of the signaling chemical, and in the sensitivity of cells to switch in response to the signaling chemical exposure. When two strains with the same stalk/spore ratio within their own fruiting body are combined into a single fruiting body, one strain may develop into prespores to a greater degree than the other. Direct evolutionary simulations and quantitative genetic dynamics demonstrate that if a fruiting body is always formed by a single strain, the cells evolve to produce less signaling chemical and become more sensitive to the signaling chemical due to the cost of producing the chemical. In contrast, if a fruiting body is formed by multiple strains, the cells evolve to become less sensitive to the signaling chemical and produce more signaling chemical in order to reduce the risk of being exploited. In contrast, the stalk-spore ratio is less likely to be affected by small cheating risk.

  19. Carotenoids as signaling molecules in cardiovascular biology

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    Abolfazl Barzegari

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress and inflammation play important roles in the etiology of cardiovascular disease (CVD. Thus, natural antioxidant carotenoids existing in fruits and vegetables could have a significant role in the prevention of CVD. Nevertheless,clinical data are conflicting about the positive effect of some antioxidant carotenoids in reducing cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Many biological actions of carotenoids have been attributed to their antioxidant effect; however, the precise mechanism by which carotenoids produce their beneficial effects is still under discussion. They might modulate molecular pathways involved in cell proliferation, acting at Akt, tyrosine kinases, mitogen activated protein kinase (MAP kinase and growth factor signaling cascades. Screening for a promising cardiovascular protective carotenoids therefore might be performed in vitro and in vivo with caution in cross-interaction with other molecules involved in signaling pathways especially those affecting microRNAs, performing a role in molecular modulation of cardiovascular cells.

  20. Proteoglycans: from structural compounds to signaling molecules.

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    Schaefer, Liliana; Schaefer, Roland M

    2010-01-01

    Our knowledge of proteoglycan biology has significantly expanded over the past decade with the discovery of a host of new members of this multifunctional family leading to their present classification into three major categories: (1) small leucine-rich proteoglycans, 2) modular proteoglycans, and 3) cell-surface proteoglycans. In addition to being structural proteins, proteoglycans play a major role in signal transduction with regulatory functions in various cellular processes. Being mostly extracellular, they are upstream of many signaling cascades and are capable of affecting intracellular phosphorylation events and modulating distinct pathways, including those driven by bone morphogenetic protein/transforming growth factor superfamily members, receptor tyrosine kinases, the insulin-like growth factor-I receptor, and Toll-like receptors. Mechanistic insights into the molecular and cellular functions of proteoglycans have revealed both the sophistication of these regulatory proteins and the challenges that remain in uncovering the entirety of their biological functions. This review aims to summarize the multiple functions of proteoglycans with special emphasis on their intricate composition and the newly described signaling events in which these molecules play a key role.

  1. Signal molecule-mediated hepatic cell communication during liver regeneration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhen-Yu Zheng; Shun-Yan Weng; Yan Yu

    2009-01-01

    Liver regeneration is a complex and well-orchestrated process, during which hepatic cells are activated to produce large signal molecules in response to liver injury or mass reduction. These signal molecules, in turn, set up the connections and cross-talk among liver cells to promote hepatic recovery. In this review, we endeavor to summarize the network of signal molecules that mediates hepatic cell communication in the regulation of liver regeneration.

  2. Small RNA Control of Cell-to-Cell Communication in Vibrio Harveyi and Vibrio Cholerae

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    Svenningsen, Sine Lo

    Quorum sensing is a process of cell-to-cell communication, by which bacteria coordinate gene expression and behavior on a population-wide scale. Quorum sensing is accomplished through production, secretion, and subsequent detection of chemical signaling molecules termed autoinducers. The human pathogen Vibrio cholerae and the marine bioluminescent bacterium Vibrio harveyi incorporate information from multiple autoinducers, and also environmental signals and metabolic cues into their quorum-sensing pathways. At the core of these pathways lie several homologous small regulatory RNA molecules, the Quorum Regulatory RNAs. Small noncoding RNAs have emerged throughout the bacterial and eukaryotic kingdoms as key regulators of behavioral and developmental processes. Here, I review our present understanding of the role of the Qrr small RNAs in integrating quorum-sensing signals and in regulating the individual cells response to this information.

  3. Clinical review: Oxygen as a signaling molecule

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Molecular oxygen is obviously essential for conserving energy in a form useable for aerobic life; however, its utilization comes at a cost - the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). ROS can be highly damaging to a range of biological macromolecules, and in the past the overproduction of these short-lived molecules in a variety of disease states was thought to be exclusively toxic to cells and tissues such as the lung. Recent basic research, however, has indicated that ROS production -...

  4. Oxidized fatty acids as inter-kingdom signaling molecules.

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    Pohl, Carolina H; Kock, Johan L F

    2014-01-20

    Oxylipins or oxidized fatty acids are a group of molecules found to play a role in signaling in many different cell types. These fatty acid derivatives have ancient evolutionary origins as signaling molecules and are ideal candidates for inter-kingdom communication. This review discusses examples of the ability of organisms from different kingdoms to "listen" and respond to oxylipin signals during interactions. The interactions that will be looked at are signaling between animals and plants; between animals and fungi; between animals and bacteria and between plants and fungi. This will aid in understanding these interactions, which often have implications in ecology, agriculture as well as human and animal health.

  5. Signal transduction by the major histocompatibility complex class I molecule

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Anders Elm; Skov, S; Bregenholt, S;

    1999-01-01

    Ligation of cell surface major histocompatibility class I (MHC-I) proteins by antibodies, or by their native counter receptor, the CD8 molecule, mediates transduction of signals into the cells. MHC-I-mediated signaling can lead to both increased and decreased activity of the MHC-I-expressing cell...

  6. Oxidized Fatty Acids as Inter-Kingdom Signaling Molecules

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    Carolina H. Pohl

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxylipins or oxidized fatty acids are a group of molecules found to play a role in signaling in many different cell types. These fatty acid derivatives have ancient evolutionary origins as signaling molecules and are ideal candidates for inter-kingdom communication. This review discusses examples of the ability of organisms from different kingdoms to “listen” and respond to oxylipin signals during interactions. The interactions that will be looked at are signaling between animals and plants; between animals and fungi; between animals and bacteria and between plants and fungi. This will aid in understanding these interactions, which often have implications in ecology, agriculture as well as human and animal health.

  7. Chasing the structures of small molecules in arbuscular mycorrhizal signaling.

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    Bucher, Marcel; Wegmüller, Sarah; Drissner, David

    2009-08-01

    The arbuscular mycorrhiza (AM) is a symbiosis between most terrestrial plants and fungi of the ancient phylum Glomeromycota. AM improves the uptake of water and mineral nutrients, such as phosphorus (P) and nitrogen (N), of the host plant in exchange for photosynthetically fixed carbon. Successful colonization and a functional interaction between host plant and mycobiont are based upon exchange of signaling molecules at different stages of symbiosis development. Strigolactones, a novel class of plant hormones, are secreted by plant roots stimulating presymbiotic growth of AM fungi. Fungi release soluble signaling molecules, the enigmatic 'Myc factors', that activate early symbiotic root responses. Lysophosphatidylcholine is a lipophilic intraradical mycorrhizal signal triggering plant phosphate transporter gene expression late in AM development through a P-controlled transcriptional mechanism. This enables uptake of orthophosphate released from the AM fungus.

  8. Role of chrysin on expression of insulin signaling molecules

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    Kottireddy Satyanarayana

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Currently available drugs are unsuccessful for the treatment of tye-2 diabetes due to their adverseside-effects. Hence, a search for novel drugs, especially ofplant origin, continues. Chrysin (5,7-dihydroxyflavone is a flavonoid, natural component of traditional medicinal herbs, present in honey, propolis and many plant extracts that hasbeen used in traditional medicine around the world to treat numerous ailments. Objective: The present study was aimed to identify the protective role of chrysin on the expression of insulin-signaling molecules in the skeletal muscle of high fat and sucrose-induced type-2 diabetic adult male rats. Materials and Methods: The oral effective dose of chrysin (100 mg/kg body weight was given once a day until the end of the study (30 days post-induction of diabetes to high fat diet-induced diabetic rats.At the end of the experimental period, fasting blood glucose, oral glucose tolerance, serum lipid profile, lipid peroxidation (LPO and free radical generation, as well as the levels of insulin signaling molecules and tissue glycogen in the gastrocnemius muscle were assessed. Results: Diabetic rats showed impaired glucose tolerance and impairment in insulin signaling molecules (IR, IRS-1, p-IRS-1Tyr 632 , p- Akt Thr308 , glucose transporter subtype 4 [GLUT4] proteins and glycogen concentration. Serum insulin, lipid profile, LPO and free radical generation were found to be increased in diabetic control rats.The treatment with chrysin normalized the altered levels of blood glucose, serum insulin, lipid profile, LPO and insulin signaling molecules as well as GLUT4 proteins. Conclusion: Our present findings indicate that chrysin improves glycemic control through activation of insulin signal transduction in the gastrocnemius muscle of high fat and sucrose-induced type-2 diabetic male rats.

  9. Silicon technology compatible photonic molecules for compact optical signal processing

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    Barea, Luis A. M., E-mail: barea@ifi.unicamp.br; Vallini, Felipe; Jarschel, Paulo F.; Frateschi, Newton C. [Device Research Laboratory, Applied Physics Department, “GlebWataghin” Physics Institute, University of Campinas–UNICAMP, 13083-859 Campinas, SP (Brazil)

    2013-11-11

    Photonic molecules (PMs) based on multiple inner coupled microring resonators allow to surpass the fundamental constraint between the total quality factor (Q{sub T}), free spectral range (FSR), and resonator size. In this work, we use a PM that presents doublets and triplets resonance splitting, all with high Q{sub T}. We demonstrate the use of the doublet splitting for 34.2 GHz signal extraction by filtering the sidebands of a modulated optical signal. We also demonstrate that very compact optical modulators operating 2.75 times beyond its resonator linewidth limit may be obtained using the PM triplet splitting, with separation of ∼55 GHz.

  10. Immune-Signaling Molecules and Obesity-Induced Inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Rina

    2015-01-01

    Obesity-induced inflammation is closely associated with the development of metabolic complications such as insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. Several immune-signaling receptors and their counterpart ligands are known to be crucial for crosstalk between the adaptive and innate immune system, and they are implicated in various inflammatory pathologies. In this mini-review, I will discuss the involvement of the immune costimulatory molecule 4-1BB and its ligand in obesity-induced inflammation and metabolic complications.

  11. Regulation of cell-to-cell variability in divergent gene expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Chao; Wu, Shuyang; Pocetti, Christopher; Bai, Lu

    2016-03-01

    Cell-to-cell variability (noise) is an important feature of gene expression that impacts cell fitness and development. The regulatory mechanism of this variability is not fully understood. Here we investigate the effect on gene expression noise in divergent gene pairs (DGPs). We generated reporters driven by divergent promoters, rearranged their gene order, and probed their expressions using time-lapse fluorescence microscopy and single-molecule fluorescence in situ hybridization (smFISH). We show that two genes in a co-regulated DGP have higher expression covariance compared with the separate, tandem and convergent configurations, and this higher covariance is caused by more synchronized firing of the divergent transcriptions. For differentially regulated DGPs, the regulatory signal of one gene can stochastically `leak' to the other, causing increased gene expression noise. We propose that the DGPs' function in limiting or promoting gene expression noise may enhance or compromise cell fitness, providing an explanation for the conservation pattern of DGPs.

  12. Signaling molecules involved in immune responses in mussels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Koutsogiannaki

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Immune system of molluscs is constituted by hemocytes and humoral factors that cooperate for the protection of the organism, triggering a wide range of immune responses. In molluscs, immune responses include phagocytosis, encapsulation, respiratory burst leading to reactive oxygen species (ROS production and nitric oxide (NO synthesis, release of antimicrobial molecules and the activation of phenoloxidase system. These responses are mediated firstly by a variety of hemocyte receptors binding to ligands that results to a cascade of signaling events. The processes of hemocytes adhesion to and migration through extracellular matrix (ECM proteins play a crucial role in cell immunity. Results suggest that cadmium and oxidants induce adhesion to and migration through ECM proteins in Mytilus gallorovincialis hemocytes with the involvement of Na+/H+ exchanger (NHE, phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI-3K, protein kinase C (PKC, NADPH oxidase, ROS and NO as well as with α2 integrin subunit. Furthermore, the data so far suggests the involvement of additional signaling molecules such as mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs, signal transducers and activators of transcription (STATs, c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK, cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP, responsive element binding protein (CREB and nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kB in molluscs immunity. Further research in mollusc immune system may lead to a more sufficient protection and to a better control of these economically important organisms.

  13. Cloning of a novel signaling molecule, AMSH-2, that potentiates transforming growth factor β signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pandey Akhilesh

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transforming growth factor-βs (TGF-βs, bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs and activins are important regulators of developmental cell growth and differentiation. Signaling by these factors is mediated chiefly by the Smad family of latent transcription factors. Results There are a large number of uncharacterized cDNA clones that code for novel proteins with homology to known signaling molecules. We have identified a novel molecule from the HUGE database that is related to a previously known molecule, AMSH (associated molecule with the SH3 domain of STAM, an adapter shown to be involved in BMP signaling. Both of these molecules contain a coiled-coil domain located within the amino-terminus region and a JAB (Domain in Jun kinase activation domain binding protein and proteasomal subunits domain at the carboxy-terminus. We show that this novel molecule, which we have designated AMSH-2, is widely expressed and its overexpression potentiates activation of TGF-β-dependent promoters. Coimmunoprecipitation studies indicated that Smad7 and Smad2, but not Smad3 or 4, interact with AMSH-2. We show that overexpression of AMSH-2 decreases the inhibitory effect of Smad7 on TGF-β signaling. Finally, we demonstrate that knocking down AMSH-2 expression by RNA interference decreases the activation of 3TP-lux reporter in response to TGF-β. Conclusions This report implicates AMSH and AMSH-2 as a novel family of molecules that positively regulate the TGF-β signaling pathway. Our results suggest that this effect could be partially explained by AMSH-2 mediated decrease of the action of Smad7 on TGF-β signaling pathway.

  14. Conserved nematode signalling molecules elicit plant defenses and pathogen resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manosalva, Patricia; Manohar, Murli; von Reuss, Stephan H; Chen, Shiyan; Koch, Aline; Kaplan, Fatma; Choe, Andrea; Micikas, Robert J; Wang, Xiaohong; Kogel, Karl-Heinz; Sternberg, Paul W; Williamson, Valerie M; Schroeder, Frank C; Klessig, Daniel F

    2015-07-23

    Plant-defense responses are triggered by perception of conserved microbe-associated molecular patterns (MAMPs), for example, flagellin or peptidoglycan. However, it remained unknown whether plants can detect conserved molecular patterns derived from plant-parasitic animals, including nematodes. Here we show that several genera of plant-parasitic nematodes produce small molecules called ascarosides, an evolutionarily conserved family of nematode pheromones. Picomolar to micromolar concentrations of ascr#18, the major ascaroside in plant-parasitic nematodes, induce hallmark defense responses including the expression of genes associated with MAMP-triggered immunity, activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases, as well as salicylic acid- and jasmonic acid-mediated defense signalling pathways. Ascr#18 perception increases resistance in Arabidopsis, tomato, potato and barley to viral, bacterial, oomycete, fungal and nematode infections. These results indicate that plants recognize ascarosides as a conserved molecular signature of nematodes. Using small-molecule signals such as ascarosides to activate plant immune responses has potential utility to improve economic and environmental sustainability of agriculture.

  15. Signal transduction molecule patterns indicating potential glioblastoma therapy approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cruceru ML

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Maria Linda Cruceru,1 Ana-Maria Enciu,1,2,7 Adrian Claudiu Popa,1,3 Radu Albulescu,2,4,7 Monica Neagu,2,7 Cristiana Pistol Tanase,2,7 Stefan N Constantinescu5–7 1Carol Davila University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Department of Cellular and Molecular Medicine, Bucharest, Romania; 2Victor Babes National Institute of Pathology, Bucharest, Romania; 3Army Centre for Medical Research, Bucharest, Romania; 4National Institute for Chemical Pharmaceutical R&D, Bucharest, Romania; 5de Duve Institute, Université Catholique de Louvain, Brussels, Belgium; 6Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research, Brussels, Belgium; 7Operational Sectorial Programme for Competitive Economic Growth Canbioprot at Victor Babes National Institute of Pathology, Bucharest, Romania Purpose: The expression of an array of signaling molecules, along with the assessment of real-time cell proliferation, has been performed in U87 glioma cell line and in patients’ glioblastoma established cell cultures in order to provide a better understanding of cellular and molecular events involved in glioblastoma pathogenesis. Experimental therapy was performed using a phosphatydylinositol-3´-kinase (PI3K inhibitor. Patients and methods: xMAP technology was employed to assess expression levels of several signal transduction molecules and real-time xCELLigence platform for cell behavior. Results: PI3K inhibition induced the most significant effects on global signaling pathways in patient-derived cell cultures, especially on members of the mitogen-activated protein-kinase family, P70S6 serine-threonine kinase, and cAMP response element-binding protein expression and further prevented tumor cell proliferation. Conclusion: The PI3K pathway might be a prime target for glioblastoma treatment. Keywords: personalized medicine, PI3K inhibitor, targeted therapy, xCELLigence, xMAP analysis

  16. A new class of small molecule inhibitor of BMP signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline E Sanvitale

    Full Text Available Growth factor signaling pathways are tightly regulated by phosphorylation and include many important kinase targets of interest for drug discovery. Small molecule inhibitors of the bone morphogenetic protein (BMP receptor kinase ALK2 (ACVR1 are needed urgently to treat the progressively debilitating musculoskeletal disease fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva (FOP. Dorsomorphin analogues, first identified in zebrafish, remain the only BMP inhibitor chemotype reported to date. By screening an assay panel of 250 recombinant human kinases we identified a highly selective 2-aminopyridine-based inhibitor K02288 with in vitro activity against ALK2 at low nanomolar concentrations similar to the current lead compound LDN-193189. K02288 specifically inhibited the BMP-induced Smad pathway without affecting TGF-β signaling and induced dorsalization of zebrafish embryos. Comparison of the crystal structures of ALK2 with K02288 and LDN-193189 revealed additional contacts in the K02288 complex affording improved shape complementarity and identified the exposed phenol group for further optimization of pharmacokinetics. The discovery of a new chemical series provides an independent pharmacological tool to investigate BMP signaling and offers multiple opportunities for pre-clinical development.

  17. Identification and quantitation of signal molecule-dependent protein phosphorylation

    KAUST Repository

    Groen, Arnoud J.

    2013-09-03

    Phosphoproteomics is a fast-growing field that aims at characterizing phosphorylated proteins in a cell or a tissue at a given time. Phosphorylation of proteins is an important regulatory mechanism in many cellular processes. Gel-free phosphoproteome technique involving enrichment of phosphopeptide coupled with mass spectrometry has proven to be invaluable to detect and characterize phosphorylated proteins. In this chapter, a gel-free quantitative approach involving 15N metabolic labelling in combination with phosphopeptide enrichment by titanium dioxide (TiO2) and their identification by MS is described. This workflow can be used to gain insights into the role of signalling molecules such as cyclic nucleotides on regulatory networks through the identification and quantification of responsive phospho(proteins). © Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013.

  18. DMPD: Regulation of cytokine signaling by SOCS family molecules. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 14644140 Regulation of cytokine signaling by SOCS family molecules. Fujimoto M, Nak...a T. Trends Immunol. 2003 Dec;24(12):659-66. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Regulation of cytokine signaling by SOCS family... molecules. PubmedID 14644140 Title Regulation of cytokine signaling by SOCS family molec

  19. Novel Small Molecule Inhibitors of Cancer Stem Cell Signaling Pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abetov, Danysh; Mustapova, Zhanar; Saliev, Timur; Bulanin, Denis; Batyrbekov, Kanat; Gilman, Charles P

    2015-12-01

    The main aim of oncologists worldwide is to understand and then intervene in the primary tumor initiation and propagation mechanisms. This is essential to allow targeted elimination of cancer cells without altering normal mitotic cells. Currently, there are two main rival theories describing the process of tumorigenesis. According to the Stochastic Model, potentially any cell, once defunct, is capable of initiating carcinogenesis. Alternatively the Cancer Stem Cell (CSC) Model posits that only a small fraction of undifferentiated tumor cells are capable of triggering carcinogenesis. Like healthy stem cells, CSCs are also characterized by a capacity for self-renewal and the ability to generate differentiated progeny, possibly mediating treatment resistance, thus leading to tumor recurrence and metastasis. Moreover, molecular signaling profiles are similar between CSCs and normal stem cells, including Wnt, Notch and Hedgehog pathways. Therefore, development of novel chemotherapeutic agents and proteins (e.g., enzymes and antibodies) specifically targeting CSCs are attractive pharmaceutical candidates. This article describes small molecule inhibitors of stem cell pathways Wnt, Notch and Hedgehog, and their recent chemotherapy clinical trials.

  20. Comparative gel-based phosphoproteomics in response to signaling molecules

    KAUST Repository

    Marondedze, Claudius

    2013-09-03

    The gel-based proteomics approach is a valuable technique for studying the characteristics of proteins. This technique has diverse applications ranging from analysis of a single protein to the study of the total cellular proteins. Further, protein quality and to some extent distribution can be first assessed by means of one-dimensional gel electrophoresis and then more informatively, for comparative analysis, using the two-dimensional gel electrophoresis technique. Here, we describe how to take advantage of the availability of fluorescent dyes to stain for a selective class of proteins on the same gel for the detection of both phospho- and total proteomes. This enables the co-detection of phosphoproteins as well as total proteins from the same gel and is accomplished by utilizing two different fluorescent stains, the ProQ-Diamond, which stains only phosphorylated proteins, and Sypro Ruby, which stains the entire subset of proteins. This workflow can be applied to gain insights into the regulatory mechanisms induced by signaling molecules such as cyclic nucleotides through the quantification and subsequent identification of responsive phospho- and total proteins. © Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013.

  1. Signaling lymphocyte activating molecule (SLAM) expression in subacute sclerosing panencephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piskin, A Kevser; Akpinar, Pinar; Muftuoglu, Sevda; Anlar, Banu

    2007-08-01

    Signaling lymphocyte activating molecule (SLAM) is a receptor for measles virus which also has immunomodulatory activity. We analyzed SLAM expression in mononuclear cells (MNC) of patients with SSPE (n=7) and control subjects (n=7) from the same population. Native 10% PAGE analysis in cell and brain tissue extracts followed by Western blotting using monoclonal anti-human SLAM showed four types of bands. Differences in the type and amount of SLAM expression were observed between SSPE and control cases. Lymphocytes of SSPE patients showed two types of SLAM bands in comparison to only one in control lymphocytes. Stimulation of cells with lipopolysaccharide (80 u/ml) and concanavalin A (1 microg/ml) in vitro led to the appearance of a second isoform in both groups. Brain homogenates of SSPE patients (n=2) displayed all four types of SLAM isoforms at significantly higher levels than those of control brains (n=2). Our results show native PAGE enables the detection of all SLAM isotypes. The expression of SLAM is increased in lymphocytes, monocytes, and brain tissues of SSPE patients.

  2. Study in Mice Links Key Signaling Molecule to Underlying Cause of Osteogenesis Imperfecta

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... on Research 2014 August 2014 (historical) Study in Mice Links Key Signaling Molecule to Underlying Cause of ... genetic disease characterized by fragile bones. Working in mice, the researchers found that TGF-β, a molecule ...

  3. The evolution of cell-to-cell communication in a sporulating bacterium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Gestel, Jordi; Nowak, Martin A; Tarnita, Corina E

    2012-01-01

    Traditionally microorganisms were considered to be autonomous organisms that could be studied in isolation. However, over the last decades cell-to-cell communication has been found to be ubiquitous. By secreting molecular signals in the extracellular environment microorganisms can indirectly assess the cell density and respond in accordance. In one of the best-studied microorganisms, Bacillus subtilis, the differentiation processes into a number of distinct cell types have been shown to depend on cell-to-cell communication. One of these cell types is the spore. Spores are metabolically inactive cells that are highly resistant against environmental stress. The onset of sporulation is dependent on cell-to-cell communication, as well as on a number of other environmental cues. By using individual-based simulations we examine when cell-to-cell communication that is involved in the onset of sporulation can evolve. We show that it evolves when three basic premises are satisfied. First, the population of cells has to affect the nutrient conditions. Second, there should be a time-lag between the moment that a cell decides to sporulate and the moment that it turns into a mature spore. Third, there has to be environmental variation. Cell-to-cell communication is a strategy to cope with environmental variation, by allowing cells to predict future environmental conditions. As a consequence, cells can anticipate environmental stress by initiating sporulation. Furthermore, signal production could be considered a cooperative trait and therefore evolves when it is not too costly to produce signal and when there are recurrent colony bottlenecks, which facilitate assortment. Finally, we also show that cell-to-cell communication can drive ecological diversification. Different ecotypes can evolve and be maintained due to frequency-dependent selection.

  4. The evolution of cell-to-cell communication in a sporulating bacterium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordi van Gestel

    Full Text Available Traditionally microorganisms were considered to be autonomous organisms that could be studied in isolation. However, over the last decades cell-to-cell communication has been found to be ubiquitous. By secreting molecular signals in the extracellular environment microorganisms can indirectly assess the cell density and respond in accordance. In one of the best-studied microorganisms, Bacillus subtilis, the differentiation processes into a number of distinct cell types have been shown to depend on cell-to-cell communication. One of these cell types is the spore. Spores are metabolically inactive cells that are highly resistant against environmental stress. The onset of sporulation is dependent on cell-to-cell communication, as well as on a number of other environmental cues. By using individual-based simulations we examine when cell-to-cell communication that is involved in the onset of sporulation can evolve. We show that it evolves when three basic premises are satisfied. First, the population of cells has to affect the nutrient conditions. Second, there should be a time-lag between the moment that a cell decides to sporulate and the moment that it turns into a mature spore. Third, there has to be environmental variation. Cell-to-cell communication is a strategy to cope with environmental variation, by allowing cells to predict future environmental conditions. As a consequence, cells can anticipate environmental stress by initiating sporulation. Furthermore, signal production could be considered a cooperative trait and therefore evolves when it is not too costly to produce signal and when there are recurrent colony bottlenecks, which facilitate assortment. Finally, we also show that cell-to-cell communication can drive ecological diversification. Different ecotypes can evolve and be maintained due to frequency-dependent selection.

  5. The Evolution of Cell-to-Cell Communication in a Sporulating Bacterium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Gestel, Jordi; Nowak, Martin A.; Tarnita, Corina E.

    2012-01-01

    Traditionally microorganisms were considered to be autonomous organisms that could be studied in isolation. However, over the last decades cell-to-cell communication has been found to be ubiquitous. By secreting molecular signals in the extracellular environment microorganisms can indirectly assess

  6. Diagram of Cell to Cell Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    Diagram depicts the importance of cell-cell communication as central to the understanding of cancer growth and progression, the focus of the NASA bioreactor demonstration system (BDS-05) investigation. Microgravity studies will allow us to unravel the signaling and communication between these cells with the host and potential development of therapies for the treatment of cancer metastasis. The NASA Bioreactor provides a low turbulence culture environment which promotes the formation of large, three-dimensional cell clusters. Due to their high level of cellular organization and specialization, samples constructed in the bioreactor more closely resemble the original tumor or tissue found in the body. The Bioreactor is rotated to provide gentle mixing of fresh and spent nutrient without inducing shear forces that would damage the cells. The work is sponsored by NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research. The bioreactor is managed by the Biotechnology Cell Science Program at NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC). NASA-sponsored bioreactor research has been instrumental in helping scientists to better understand normal and cancerous tissue development. In cooperation with the medical community, the bioreactor design is being used to prepare better models of human colon, prostate, breast and ovarian tumors. Cartilage, bone marrow, heart muscle, skeletal muscle, pancreatic islet cells, liver and kidney are just a few of the normal tissues being cultured in rotating bioreactors by investigators. Credit: Emory University.

  7. Expression of SMAD signal transduction molecules in the pancreas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brorson, Michael; Hougaard, D.; Nielsen, Jens Høiriis;

    2001-01-01

    Members of the TGF-beta superfamily of cytokines have been implicated in pancreatic cancer, pancreatitis and in regulation and differentiation of pancreatic endocrine and exocrine cells. Different TGF-beta members signal through phosphorylation of different signal transduction proteins, which eve...

  8. Agrobacterium tumefaciens responses to plant-derived signaling molecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sujatha eSubramoni

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available As a special phytopathogen, Agrobacterium tumefaciens infects a wide range of plant hosts and causes plant tumors also known as crown galls. The complexity of Agrobacterium-plant interaction has been studied for several decades. Agrobacterium pathogenicity is largely attributed to its evolved capabilities of precise recognition and response to plant-derived chemical signals. Agrobacterium perceives plant-derived signals to activate its virulence genes, which are responsible for transferring and integrating its T-DNA (Transferred DNA from its Tumour-inducing (Ti plasmid into the plant nucleus. The expression of T-DNA in plant hosts leads to the production of a large amount of indole-3-acetic acid (IAA, cytokinin (CK and opines. IAA and CK stimulate plant growth, resulting in tumor formation. Agrobacterium utilizes opines as nutrient sources as well as signals in order to activate its quorum sensing (QS to further promote virulence and opine metabolism. Intriguingly, Agrobacterium also recognizes plant-derived signals including -amino butyric acid (GABA and salicylic acid (SA to activate quorum quenching that reduces the level of QS signals, thereby avoiding the elicitation of plant defense and preserving energy. In addition, Agrobacterium hijacks plant-derived signals including SA, IAA, and ethylene (ET to down-regulate its virulence genes located on the Ti plasmid. Moreover, certain metabolites from corn (Zea mays also inhibit the expression of Agrobacterium virulence genes. Here we outline the responses of Agrobacterium to major plant-derived signals that impact Agrobacterium-plant interactions.

  9. Conserved nematode signaling molecules elicit plant defenses and pathogen resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nematodes, which are ubiquitous in soil and are estimated to cause $100 B of agricultural damage annually, produce novel, highly conserved small sugar-based molecules call ascarosides. Ascarosides play critical roles in nematode development and behavior. We report here that plants recognize these un...

  10. Gap junction modulation by extracellular signaling molecules: the thymus model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alves L.A.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Gap junctions are intercellular channels which connect adjacent cells and allow direct exchange of molecules of low molecular weight between them. Such a communication has been described as fundamental in many systems due to its importance in coordination, proliferation and differentiation. Recently, it has been shown that gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC can be modulated by several extracellular soluble factors such as classical hormones, neurotransmitters, interleukins, growth factors and some paracrine substances. Herein, we discuss some aspects of the general modulation of GJIC by extracellular messenger molecules and more particularly the regulation of such communication in the thymus gland. Additionally, we discuss recent data concerning the study of different neuropeptides and hormones in the modulation of GJIC in thymic epithelial cells. We also suggest that the thymus may be viewed as a model to study the modulation of gap junction communication by different extracellular messengers involved in non-classical circuits, since this organ is under bidirectional neuroimmunoendocrine control.

  11. Conserved nematode signalling molecules elicit plant defenses and pathogen resistance

    OpenAIRE

    Manosalva, P; Manohar, M; von Reuss, S.; Chen, S.; Koch, A; Kaplan, F; Choe, A.; Micikas, R.; X. Wang; Kogel, K.; Sternberg, P.; Williamson, V; Schroeder, D; Klessig, F.

    2015-01-01

    Plant-defense responses are triggered by perception of conserved microbe-associated molecular patterns (MAMPs), for example, flagellin or peptidoglycan. However, it remained unknown whether plants can detect conserved molecular patterns derived from plant-parasitic animals, including nematodes. Here we show that several genera of plant-parasitic nematodes produce small molecules called ascarosides, an evolutionarily conserved family of nematode pheromones. Picomolar to micromolar concentratio...

  12. ATP as a signaling molecule: the exocrine focus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Novak, Ivana

    2003-01-01

    Why and how do cells release ATP? It is not spilled energy. ATP becomes an extracellular regulator. Various cellular responses are initiated by purinergic receptors and signaling processes and are terminated by breakdown of ATP by ectonucleotidases. In epithelia, ATP regulates salt and water tran...... transport; other effects may be longer lasting....

  13. γ-Butyrolactones : Streptomyces signalling molecules regulating antibiotic production and differentiation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Takano, Eriko

    2006-01-01

    Small signalling molecules called γ-butyrolactones are mainly produced by Streptomyces species in which they regulate antibiotic production and morphological differentiation. Their molecular mechanism of action has recently been unravelled in several streptomycetes, revealing a diverse and complex s

  14. Activation of MyD88 Signaling upon Staphylococcal Enterotoxin Binding to MHC Class II Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-20

    Activation of MyD88 Signaling upon Staphylococcal Enterotoxin Binding to MHC Class II Molecules Teri L. Kissner, Gordon Ruthel, Shahabuddin Alam...mediated signaling, which activates pro-inflammatory cytokine responses. Recently we reported that staphylococcal enterotoxins (SEA or SEB), which...upon Staphylococcal Enterotoxin Binding to MHC Class II Molecules. PLoS ONE 6(1): e15985. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0015985 Editor: Jacques Zimmer

  15. Where are signal molecules likely to be located in anaerobic granular sludge?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Huajun; Ding, Yangcheng; Wang, Meizhen; Zhou, Guanglan; Zheng, Xin; He, Hongzhen; Zhang, Xueqin; Shen, Dongsheng; Shentu, Jiali

    2014-03-01

    Quorum sensing is a concentration-sensing mechanism that plays a vital role in sludge granulation. In this study, the regularities of distribution of different signal molecules, including intra- and interspecific signal molecules (diffusible signal factor, DSF), interspecific signal molecules (autoinducter-2, AI-2) and intraspecific signal molecules (acyl-homoserine lactones, AHLs), from three types of anaerobic granular sludge were investigated. The results showed that 70-90% of DSF was distributed in sludge, while AI-2 in the Water phase accounted for over 80% of the total content. Interestingly, there was a positive correlation between DSF and AI-2, which played opposite roles in granulation. Moreover, more than 55% of short and medium acyl chain AHLs tended to spread in aqueous water, while the long acyl chain AHLs were closer to granular sludge than the short and medium acyl chain AHLs. With the exception of one type of sludge, the percentage of long acyl chain AHLs in the sludge phase was greater than 70%. The different distributions of signal molecules were primarily determined based on their physicochemical properties, including molecular weight and solubility in water or organic solutions. In addition, the basic properties of sludge, such as the granular level or the production of EPS, were closely related to the diversity, distribution and concentration of signal molecules. As a medium in granulation, extracellular polymeric substances production was regulated by different signal molecules from different parts of anaerobic granular sludge. This study provides a foundation for investigation of quorum sensing in the system of anaerobic granular sludge.

  16. All-optical signal processing at 10 GHz using a photonic crystal molecule

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Combrié, Sylvain; Lehoucq, Gaëlle; Junay, Alexandra; De Rossi, Alfredo, E-mail: alfredo.derossi@thalesgroup.com [Thales Research and Technology, 1 Avenue A. Fresnel, 91767 Palaiseau (France); Malaguti, Stefania; Bellanca, Gaetano; Trillo, Stefano [Department of Engineering, Università di Ferrara, v. Saragat 1, 44122 Ferrara (Italy); Ménager, Loic [Thales Systèmes Aeroportés, 2 Av. Gay Lussac, 78851 Elancourt (France); Peter Reithmaier, Johann [Institute of Nanostructure Technologies and Analytics, CINSaT, University of Kassel, Heinrich-Plett-Str. 40, 34132 Kassel (Germany)

    2013-11-04

    We report on 10 GHz operation of an all-optical gate based on an Indium Phosphide Photonic Crystal Molecule. Wavelength conversion and all-optical mixing of microwave signals are demonstrated using the 2 mW output of a mode locked diode laser. The spectral separation of the optical pump and signal is crucial in suppressing optical cross-talk.

  17. [From endoplasmic reticulum to Golgi apparatus: a secretory pathway controlled by signal molecules].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jiasheng; Luo, Jianhong; Zhang, Xiaomin

    2013-07-01

    Protein transport from endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to Golgi apparatus has long been known to be a central process for protein quality control and sorting. Recent studies have revealed that a large number of signal molecules are involved in regulation of membrane trafficking through ER, ER-Golgi intermediate compartment and Golgi apparatus. These molecules can significantly change the transport rate of proteins by regulating vesicle budding and fusion. Protein transport from ER to Golgi apparatus is not only controlled by signal pathways triggered from outside the cell, it is also regulated by feedback signals from the transport pathway.

  18. Amplification of single molecule translocation signal using β-strand peptide functionalized nanopores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebes-Peer, Yael; Rapaport, Hanna; Ashkenasy, Nurit

    2014-07-22

    Changes in ionic current flowing through nanopores due to binding or translocation of single biopolymer molecules enable their detection and characterization. It is, however, much more challenging to detect small molecules due to their rapid and small signal signature. Here we demonstrate the use of de novo designed peptides for functionalization of nanopores that enable the detection of a small analytes at the single molecule level. The detection relies on cooperative peptide conformational change that is induced by the binding of the small molecule to a receptor domain on the peptide. This change results in alteration of the nanopore effective diameter and hence induces current perturbation signal. On the basis of this approach, we demonstrate here the detection of diethyl 4-nitrophenyl phosphate (paraoxon), a poisonous organophosphate molecule. Paraoxon binding is induced by the incorporation of the catalytic triad of acetylcholine esterase in the hydrophilic domain of a short amphiphilic peptide and promotes β-sheet assembly of the peptide both in solution and for peptide molecules immobilized on solid surfaces. Nanopores coated with this peptide allowed the detection of paraoxon at the single molecule level revealing two binding arrangements. This unique approach, hence, provides the ability to study interactions of small molecules with the corresponding engineered receptors at the single molecule level. Furthermore, the suggested versatile platform may be used for the development of highly sensitive small analytes sensors.

  19. Role of cell adhesion signal molecules in hepatocellular carcinoma cell apoptosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian-Min Su; Li-Ying Wang; Yu-Long Liang; Xi-Liang Zha

    2005-01-01

    AIM: Cell adhesion molecules and their signal molecules play a very important role in carcinogenesis. The aim of this study is to elucidate the role of these molecules and the signal molecules of integrins and E-cadherins, such as (focal adhesion kinase) FAK, (integrin linked kinase)ILK, and β-catenin in hepatocellular carcinoma cell apoptosis.METHODS: We first synthesized the small molecular compound, S-(1,2-dichlorovinyl)-L-cysteine (DCVC), and identified it, by element analysis and 1H NMR. To establish the apoptosis model of the SMMC-7721 hepatocellular carcinoma cell, we treated cells with DCVC in EBSS for different concentrations or for various length times in the presence of 20 μmol/L N,N-diphenyl-p-phenylenediamine,which blocks necrotic cell death and identified this model by flow cytometry and DNA ladder. Then we studied the changes of FAK, ILK, β-catenin, and PKB in this apoptotic model by Western blot.RESULTS: We found that the loss or decrease of cell adhesion signal molecules is an important reason in apoptosis of SMMC-7721 hepatocellular carcinoma cell and the apoptosis of SMMC-7721 cell was preceded by the loss or decrease of FAK, ILK, PKB, and β-catenin or the damage of cell-matrix and cell-cell adhesion.CONCLUSION: Our results suggested that the decrease of adhesion signal molecules, FAK, ILK, PKB, and β-catenin,could induce hepatocellular carcinoma cell apoptosis.

  20. Synthetic Small Molecule Inhibitors of Hh Signaling As Anti-Cancer Chemotherapeutics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maschinot, C.A.; Pace, J.R.; Hadden, M.K.

    2016-01-01

    The hedgehog (Hh) pathway is a developmental signaling pathway that is essential to the proper embryonic development of many vertebrate systems. Dysregulation of Hh signaling has been implicated as a causative factor in the development and progression of several forms of human cancer. As such, the development of small molecule inhibitors of Hh signaling as potential anti-cancer chemotherapeutics has been a major area of research interest in both academics and industry over the past ten years. Through these efforts, synthetic small molecules that target multiple components of the Hh pathway have been identified and advanced to preclinical or clinical development. The goal of this review is to provide an update on the current status of several synthetic small molecule Hh pathway inhibitors and explore the potential of several recently disclosed inhibitory scaffolds. PMID:26310919

  1. Tetherin restricts productive HIV-1 cell-to-cell transmission.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicoletta Casartelli

    Full Text Available The IFN-inducible antiviral protein tetherin (or BST-2/CD317/HM1.24 impairs release of mature HIV-1 particles from infected cells. HIV-1 Vpu antagonizes the effect of tetherin. The fate of virions trapped at the cell surface remains poorly understood. Here, we asked whether tetherin impairs HIV cell-to-cell transmission, a major means of viral spread. Tetherin-positive or -negative cells, infected with wild-type or DeltaVpu HIV, were used as donor cells and cocultivated with target lymphocytes. We show that tetherin inhibits productive cell-to-cell transmission of DeltaVpu to targets and impairs that of WT HIV. Tetherin accumulates with Gag at the contact zone between infected and target cells, but does not prevent the formation of virological synapses. In the presence of tetherin, viruses are then mostly transferred to targets as abnormally large patches. These viral aggregates do not efficiently promote infection after transfer, because they accumulate at the surface of target cells and are impaired in their fusion capacities. Tetherin, by imprinting virions in donor cells, is the first example of a surface restriction factor limiting viral cell-to-cell spread.

  2. Super-resolution Analysis of TCR-Dependent Signaling: Single-Molecule Localization Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, Valarie A; Yi, Jason; Samelson, Lawrence E

    2017-01-01

    Single-molecule localization microscopy (SMLM) comprises methods that produce super-resolution images from molecular locations of single molecules. These techniques mathematically determine the center of a diffraction-limited spot produced by a fluorescent molecule, which represents the most likely location of the molecule. Only a small cohort of well-separated molecules is visualized in a single image, and then many images are obtained from a single sample. The localizations from all the images are combined to produce a super-resolution picture of the sample. Here we describe the application of two methods, photoactivation localization microscopy (PALM) and direct stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (dSTORM), to the study of signaling microclusters in T cells.

  3. Bacterial LuxR solos have evolved to respond to different molecules including signals from plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hitendra K. Patel

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available A future challenge will be understanding the extensive communication that most likely takes place in bacterial interspecies and interkingdom signaling between plants and bacteria. A major bacterial inter-cellular signaling system in Gram-negative bacteria is LuxI/R quorum sensing (QS based on the production (via the LuxI-family proteins and detection (via the LuxR-family proteins of N-acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs signaling molecules. LuxR proteins which have the same modular structure of QS LuxRs but are devoid of a cognate LuxI AHL synthase are called solos. LuxR solos have been shown to be responsible to respond to exogenous AHLs produced by neighboring cells as well endogenously produced AHLs. It is now also evident that some LuxR proteins have evolved from the ability to binding AHLs and respond to other molecules/signals. For example, recent research has shown that a sub-family of LuxR solos responds to small molecules produced by plants. This indicates the presence of a uni-directional interkingdom signaling system occurring from plants to bacteria. In addition LuxR solos have now been also implicated to respond to endogenously produced signals which are not AHLs. In this Mini Review article we will discuss current trends and implications of the role of LuxR solos in bacterial responses to other signals using proteins related to AHL quorum sensing systems.

  4. Association of glypican-3 expression with growth signaling molecules in hepatocellular carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Noriyuki; Akutsu; Hiroyuki; Yamamoto; Shigeru; Sasaki; Hiroaki; Taniguchi; Yoshiaki; Arimura; Kohzoh; Imai; Yasuhisa; Shinomura

    2010-01-01

    AIM:To clarify the association of glypican-3(GPC3)expression with Wnt and other growth signaling molecules in hepatocellular carcinoma(HCC). METHODS:Expression of GPC3,Wnt,matrix metalloproteinases(MMPs),sulfatase(SULF)1,SULF2,and other growth signaling molecules was analyzed in HCC cell lines and tissue samples by real-time reverse transcriptionpolymerase chain reaction,immunoblotting,and/or immunostaining.Expression of various genes in GPC3 siRNA-transfected HCC cells was analyzed. RESULTS:GPC3 was overex...

  5. SigMol: repertoire of quorum sensing signaling molecules in prokaryotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajput, Akanksha; Kaur, Karambir; Kumar, Manoj

    2016-01-04

    Quorum sensing is a widespread phenomenon in prokaryotes that helps them to communicate among themselves and with eukaryotes. It is driven through quorum sensing signaling molecules (QSSMs) in a density dependent manner that assists in numerous biological functions like biofilm formation, virulence factors secretion, swarming motility, bioluminescence, etc. Despite immense implications, dedicated resources of QSSMs are lacking. Therefore, we have developed SigMol (http://bioinfo.imtech.res.in/manojk/sigmol), a specialized repository of these molecules in prokaryotes. SigMol harbors information on QSSMs pertaining to different quorum sensing signaling systems namely acylated homoserine lactones (AHLs), diketopiperazines (DKPs), 4-hydroxy-2-alkylquinolines (HAQs), diffusible signal factors (DSFs), autoinducer-2 (AI-2) and others. Database contains 1382: entries of 182: unique signaling molecules from 215: organisms. It encompasses biological as well as chemical aspects of signaling molecules. Biological information includes genes, preliminary bioassays, identification assays and applications, while chemical detail comprises of IUPAC name, SMILES and structure. We have provided user-friendly browsing and searching facilities for easy data retrieval and comparison. We have gleaned information of diverse QSSMs reported in literature at a single platform 'SigMol'. This comprehensive resource will assist the scientific community in understanding intraspecies, interspecies or interkingdom networking and further help to unfold different facets of quorum sensing and related therapeutics.

  6. SigMol: repertoire of quorum sensing signaling molecules in prokaryotes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajput, Akanksha; Kaur, Karambir; Kumar, Manoj

    2016-01-01

    Quorum sensing is a widespread phenomenon in prokaryotes that helps them to communicate among themselves and with eukaryotes. It is driven through quorum sensing signaling molecules (QSSMs) in a density dependent manner that assists in numerous biological functions like biofilm formation, virulence factors secretion, swarming motility, bioluminescence, etc. Despite immense implications, dedicated resources of QSSMs are lacking. Therefore, we have developed SigMol (http://bioinfo.imtech.res.in/manojk/sigmol), a specialized repository of these molecules in prokaryotes. SigMol harbors information on QSSMs pertaining to different quorum sensing signaling systems namely acylated homoserine lactones (AHLs), diketopiperazines (DKPs), 4-hydroxy-2-alkylquinolines (HAQs), diffusible signal factors (DSFs), autoinducer-2 (AI-2) and others. Database contains 1382 entries of 182 unique signaling molecules from 215 organisms. It encompasses biological as well as chemical aspects of signaling molecules. Biological information includes genes, preliminary bioassays, identification assays and applications, while chemical detail comprises of IUPAC name, SMILES and structure. We have provided user-friendly browsing and searching facilities for easy data retrieval and comparison. We have gleaned information of diverse QSSMs reported in literature at a single platform ‘SigMol’. This comprehensive resource will assist the scientific community in understanding intraspecies, interspecies or interkingdom networking and further help to unfold different facets of quorum sensing and related therapeutics. PMID:26490957

  7. Small molecule inhibition of protein depalmitoylation as a new approach towards downregulation of oncogenic Ras signalling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dekker, Frank J.; Hedberg, Christian

    2011-01-01

    The H- and N-Ras GTPases are prominent examples of proteins, whose localizations and signalling capacities are regulated by reversible palmitoylations and depalmitoylations. Recently, the novel small molecule inhibitor palmostatin B has been described to inhibit Ras depalmitoylation and to revert th

  8. A density-dependent switch drives stochastic clustering and polarization of signaling molecules.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Jilkine

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Positive feedback plays a key role in the ability of signaling molecules to form highly localized clusters in the membrane or cytosol of cells. Such clustering can occur in the absence of localizing mechanisms such as pre-existing spatial cues, diffusional barriers, or molecular cross-linking. What prevents positive feedback from amplifying inevitable biological noise when an un-clustered "off" state is desired? And, what limits the spread of clusters when an "on" state is desired? Here, we show that a minimal positive feedback circuit provides the general principle for both suppressing and amplifying noise: below a critical density of signaling molecules, clustering switches off; above this threshold, highly localized clusters are recurrently generated. Clustering occurs only in the stochastic regime, suggesting that finite sizes of molecular populations cannot be ignored in signal transduction networks. The emergence of a dominant cluster for finite numbers of molecules is partly a phenomenon of random sampling, analogous to the fixation or loss of neutral mutations in finite populations. We refer to our model as the "neutral drift polarity model." Regulating the density of signaling molecules provides a simple mechanism for a positive feedback circuit to robustly switch between clustered and un-clustered states. The intrinsic ability of positive feedback both to create and suppress clustering is a general mechanism that could operate within diverse biological networks to create dynamic spatial organization.

  9. Legume receptors perceive the rhizobial lipochitin oligosaccharide signal molecules by direct binding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broghammer, Angelique; Krusell, Lene; Blaise, Mickaël

    2012-01-01

    Lipochitin oligosaccharides called Nod factors function as primary rhizobial signal molecules triggering legumes to develop new plant organs: root nodules that host the bacteria as nitrogen-fixing bacteroids. Here, we show that the Lotus japonicus Nod factor receptor 5 (NFR5) and Nod factor recep...

  10. Acupuncture Alters Expression of Insulin Signaling Related Molecules and Improves Insulin Resistance in OLETF Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin-Yu Huang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available To determine effect of acupuncture on insulin resistance in Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima Fatty (OLETF rats and to evaluate expression of insulin signaling components. Rats were divided into three groups: Sprague-Dawley (SD rats, OLETF rats, and acupuncture+OLETF rats. Acupuncture was subcutaneously applied to Neiguan (PC6, Zusanli (ST36, and Sanyinjiao (SP6; in contrast, acupuncture to Shenshu (BL23 was administered perpendicularly. For Neiguan (PC6 and Zusanli (ST36, needles were connected to an electroacupuncture (EA apparatus. Fasting blood glucose (FPG was measured by glucose oxidase method. Plasma fasting insulin (FINS and serum C peptide (C-P were determined by ELISA. Protein and mRNA expressions of insulin signaling molecules were determined by Western blot and real-time RT-PCR, respectively. OLETF rats exhibit increased levels of FPG, FINS, C-P, and homeostasis model assessment-estimated insulin resistance (HOMA-IR, which were effectively decreased by acupuncture treatment. mRNA expressions of several insulin signaling related molecules IRS1, IRS2, Akt2, aPKCζ, and GLUT4 were decreased in OLETF rats compared to SD controls. Expression of these molecules was restored back to normal levels upon acupuncture administration. PI3K-p85α was increased in OLETF rats; this increase was also reversed by acupuncture treatment. Acupuncture improves insulin resistance in OLETF rats, possibly via regulating expression of key insulin signaling related molecules.

  11. Role of signaling lymphocytic activation molecule in T helper cell responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan E. de Vries

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Signaling lymphocytic activation molecule (SLAM; CDw150 is a 70 kDa glycoprotein. Signaling lymphocytic activation molecule is constitutively expressed on memory T cells, CD56+ T cells, a subset of T cell receptor γδ+ cells, immature thymocytes and, at low levels, on a proportion of peripheral blood B cells. Signaling lymphocytic activation molecule is rapidly upregulated on all T and B cells after activation. Engagement of SLAM by F(ab’2 fragments of an anti-SLAM monoclonal antibody (mAb A12 enhances antigen-specific T cell proliferation. In addition, mAb A12 was directly mitogenic for T cell clones and activated T cells. T cell proliferation induced by mAb A12 is independent of interleukin (IL-2, IL-4, IL-12 and IL-15, but is cyclosporin A sensitive. Ligation of SLAM during antigen-specific T cell proliferation resulted in upregulation of interferon (IFN-γ production, even by allergen-specific T helper cell (Th 2 clones, whereas the levels of IL-4 and IL-5 production were only marginally affected. The mAb A12 was unable to induce IL-4 and IL-5 production by Th1 clones. Co-stimulation of skin-derived Der P1-specific Th2 cells from patients with atopic dermatitis via SLAM resulted in the generation of a population of IFN-γ-producing cells, thereby reverting their phenotype to a Th0 pattern. Signaling lymphocytic activation molecule is a high-affinity self ligand mediating homophilic cell interaction. In addition, soluble SLAM enhances both T and B cell proliferation. Collectively, these data indicate that SLAM molecules act both as receptors and ligands that are not only involved in T cell expansion but also drive the expanding T cells during immune responses into the Th0/Th1 pathway. This suggests that signaling through SLAM plays a role in directing Th0/Th1 development.

  12. The universality and biological significance of signal molecules with intracellular-extracellular compatible functions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Generally,cell signal molecules are classified into the extracellular signal molecules (the first messengers) and the intracellular signal ones (the second messengers).Cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP),calcium ions and calmodulin (CaM) are the traditional intracellular messengers,but they are also present in extracellular matrix (ECM).Some of them have been discovered to act as the first messengers through cell surface receptors.Other second messengers,such as cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP),cyclic adenosine diphosphate ribose (cADPR) and annexin,are also found existing outside animal and plant cells.The existence of these messengers with intracellular-extracellular compatible functions in cells may be a regular biological phenomenon.These compatible messengers might be the communication factors between intracellular and extracellular regions or among the cell populations,and are also important in regulating cell development procedure.

  13. Small-molecule modulators of Hedgehog signaling: identification and characterization of Smoothened agonists and antagonists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shulok Janine

    2002-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Hedgehog (Hh signaling pathway is vital to animal development as it mediates the differentiation of multiple cell types during embryogenesis. In adults, Hh signaling can be activated to facilitate tissue maintenance and repair. Moreover, stimulation of the Hh pathway has shown therapeutic efficacy in models of neuropathy. The underlying mechanisms of Hh signal transduction remain obscure, however: little is known about the communication between the pathway suppressor Patched (Ptc, a multipass transmembrane protein that directly binds Hh, and the pathway activator Smoothened (Smo, a protein that is related to G-protein-coupled receptors and is capable of constitutive activation in the absence of Ptc. Results We have identified and characterized a synthetic non-peptidyl small molecule, Hh-Ag, that acts as an agonist of the Hh pathway. This Hh agonist promotes cell-type-specific proliferation and concentration-dependent differentiation in vitro, while in utero it rescues aspects of the Hh-signaling defect in Sonic hedgehog-null, but not Smo-null, mouse embryos. Biochemical studies with Hh-Ag, the Hh-signaling antagonist cyclopamine, and a novel Hh-signaling inhibitor Cur61414, reveal that the action of all these compounds is independent of Hh-protein ligand and of the Hh receptor Ptc, as each binds directly to Smo. Conclusions Smo can have its activity modulated directly by synthetic small molecules. These studies raise the possibility that Hh signaling may be regulated by endogenous small molecules in vivo and provide potent compounds with which to test the therapeutic value of activating the Hh-signaling pathway in the treatment of traumatic and chronic degenerative conditions.

  14. Molecular Mechanisms of HTLV-1 Cell-to-Cell Transmission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Gross

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The tumorvirus human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1, a member of the delta-retrovirus family, is transmitted via cell-containing body fluids such as blood products, semen, and breast milk. In vivo, HTLV-1 preferentially infects CD4+ T-cells, and to a lesser extent, CD8+ T-cells, dendritic cells, and monocytes. Efficient infection of CD4+ T-cells requires cell-cell contacts while cell-free virus transmission is inefficient. Two types of cell-cell contacts have been described to be critical for HTLV-1 transmission, tight junctions and cellular conduits. Further, two non-exclusive mechanisms of virus transmission at cell-cell contacts have been proposed: (1 polarized budding of HTLV-1 into synaptic clefts; and (2 cell surface transfer of viral biofilms at virological synapses. In contrast to CD4+ T-cells, dendritic cells can be infected cell-free and, to a greater extent, via viral biofilms in vitro. Cell-to-cell transmission of HTLV-1 requires a coordinated action of steps in the virus infectious cycle with events in the cell-cell adhesion process; therefore, virus propagation from cell-to-cell depends on specific interactions between cellular and viral proteins. Here, we review the molecular mechanisms of HTLV-1 transmission with a focus on the HTLV-1-encoded proteins Tax and p8, their impact on host cell factors mediating cell-cell contacts, cytoskeletal remodeling, and thus, virus propagation.

  15. Signal-amplification detection of small molecules by use of Mg2+-dependent DNAzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Zhijun; Wang, Jiahai; Wang, Erkang

    2013-05-01

    Because small molecules can be beneficial or toxic in biology and the environment, specific and sensitive detection of small molecules is one of the most important objectives of the scientific community. In this study, new signal amplification assays for detection of small molecules based on Mg(2+)-dependent DNAzyme were developed. A cleavable DNA substrate containing a ribonucleotide, the ends of which were labeled with black hole quencher (BHQ) and 6-carboxyfluorescein (FAM), was used for fluorescence detection. When the small molecule of interest is added to the assay solution, the Mg(2+)-dependent DNAzyme is activated, facilitating hybridization between the Mg(2+)-dependent DNAzyme and the DNA substrate. Binding of the substrate to the DNAzyme structure results in hydrolytic cleavage of the substrate in the presence of Mg(2+) ions. The fluorescence signal was amplified by continuous cleavage of the enzyme substrate. Ochratoxin A (OTA) and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) were used as model analytes in these experiments. This method can detect OTA specifically with a detection limit as low as 140 pmol L(-1) and detect ATP specifically with a detection limit as low as 13 nmol L(-1). Moreover, this method is potentially extendable to detection of other small molecules which are able to dissociate the aptamer from the DNAzyme, leading to activation of the DNAzyme.

  16. Potato signal molecules that activate pectate lyase synthesis in Pectobacterium atrosepticum SCRI1043.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarasova, Nadezhda; Gorshkov, Vladimir; Petrova, Olga; Gogolev, Yuri

    2013-07-01

    A new type of plant-derived signal molecules that activate extracellular pectate lyase activity in phytopathogenic bacterium Pectobacterium atrosepticum SCRI1043 was revealed. These compounds were characterized and partially purified by means of several approaches including RT-PCR analysis, luminescence bioassay and HPLC fractionation. They were smaller than 1 kDa, thermoresistant, nonproteinaceous, hydrophilic, and slightly negatively charged molecules. Using gene expression analysis and bacterial biosensor assay the mode of activity of revealed compounds was studied. The possibility of their action through quorum sensing- and KdgR-mediated pathways was analyzed.

  17. Programmed Cell-to-Cell Variability in Ras Activity Triggers Emergent Behaviors during Mammary Epithelial Morphogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer S. Liu

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Variability in signaling pathway activation between neighboring epithelial cells can arise from local differences in the microenvironment, noisy gene expression, or acquired genetic changes. To investigate the consequences of this cell-to-cell variability in signaling pathway activation on coordinated multicellular processes such as morphogenesis, we use DNA-programmed assembly to construct three-dimensional MCF10A microtissues that are mosaic for low-level expression of activated H-Ras. We find two emergent behaviors in mosaic microtissues: cells with activated H-Ras are basally extruded or lead motile multicellular protrusions that direct the collective motility of their wild-type neighbors. Remarkably, these behaviors are not observed in homogeneous microtissues in which all cells express the activated Ras protein, indicating that heterogeneity in Ras activity, rather than the total amount of Ras activity, is critical for these processes. Our results directly demonstrate that cell-to-cell variability in pathway activation within local populations of epithelial cells can drive emergent behaviors during epithelial morphogenesis.

  18. Caffeine and REM sleep deprivation: Effect on basal levels of signaling molecules in area CA1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkadhi, Karim A; Alhaider, Ibrahim A

    2016-03-01

    We have investigated the neuroprotective effect of chronic caffeine treatment on basal levels of memory-related signaling molecules in area CA1 of sleep-deprived rats. Animals in the caffeine groups were treated with caffeine in drinking water (0.3g/l) for four weeks before they were REM sleep-deprived for 24h in the Modified Multiple Platforms paradigm. Western blot analysis of basal protein levels of plasticity- and memory-related signaling molecules in hippocampal area CA1 showed significant down regulation of the basal levels of phosphorylated- and total-CaMKII, phosphorylated- and total-CREB as well as those of BDNF and CaMKIV in sleep deprived rats. All these changes were completely prevented in rats that chronically consumed caffeine. The present findings suggest an important neuroprotective property of caffeine in sleep deprivation.

  19. Ion channels, guidance molecules, intracellular signaling and transcription factors regulating nervous and vascular system development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akita, Tenpei; Kumada, Tatsuro; Yoshihara, Sei-ichi; Egea, Joaquim; Yamagishi, Satoru

    2016-03-01

    Our sophisticated thoughts and behaviors are based on the miraculous development of our complex nervous network system, in which many different types of proteins and signaling cascades are regulated in a temporally and spatially ordered manner. Here we review our recent attempts to grasp the principles of nervous system development in terms of general cellular phenomena and molecules, such as volume-regulated anion channels, intracellular Ca(2+) and cyclic nucleotide signaling, the Npas4 transcription factor and the FLRT family of axon guidance molecules. We also present an example illustrating that the same FLRT family may regulate the development of vascular networks as well. The aim of this review is to open up new vistas for understanding the intricacy of nervous and vascular system development.

  20. From single-cell to cell-pool transcriptomes: stochasticity in gene expression and RNA splicing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinov, Georgi K; Williams, Brian A; McCue, Ken; Schroth, Gary P; Gertz, Jason; Myers, Richard M; Wold, Barbara J

    2014-03-01

    Single-cell RNA-seq mammalian transcriptome studies are at an early stage in uncovering cell-to-cell variation in gene expression, transcript processing and editing, and regulatory module activity. Despite great progress recently, substantial challenges remain, including discriminating biological variation from technical noise. Here we apply the SMART-seq single-cell RNA-seq protocol to study the reference lymphoblastoid cell line GM12878. By using spike-in quantification standards, we estimate the absolute number of RNA molecules per cell for each gene and find significant variation in total mRNA content: between 50,000 and 300,000 transcripts per cell. We directly measure technical stochasticity by a pool/split design and find that there are significant differences in expression between individual cells, over and above technical variation. Specific gene coexpression modules were preferentially expressed in subsets of individual cells, including one enriched for mRNA processing and splicing factors. We assess cell-to-cell variation in alternative splicing and allelic bias and report evidence of significant differences in splice site usage that exceed splice variation in the pool/split comparison. Finally, we show that transcriptomes from small pools of 30-100 cells approach the information content and reproducibility of contemporary RNA-seq from large amounts of input material. Together, our results define an experimental and computational path forward for analyzing gene expression in rare cell types and cell states.

  1. Signaling mechanisms of neurite outgrowth induced by the cell adhesion molecules NCAM and N-cadherin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, S M; Berezin, V; Bock, E

    2008-01-01

    Formation of appropriate neural circuits depends on a complex interplay between extracellular guiding cues and intracellular signaling events that result in alterations of cytoskeletal dynamics and a neurite growth response. Surface-expressed cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) interact with the surro...... interaction between NCAM and N-cadherin with a number of intracellular partners, as well as on their interaction with the fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR)....

  2. Reciprocal upregulation of Notch signaling molecules in hematopoietic progenitor and mesenchymal stromal cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kikuchi Y

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Although mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs play pivotal supportive roles in hematopoiesis, how they interact with hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs is not well understood. We investigated the interaction between HSCs and surrogate MSCs (C3H10T1/2 stromal cells, focusing on the molecular events induced by cell contact of these bipartite populations. C3H10T1/2 is a mesenchymal stromal cell line that can be induced to differentiate into preadipocytes (A54 and myoblasts (M1601. The stromal cell derivatives were cocultured with murine HSCs (Lineage-Sca1+, and gene expression profiles in stromal cells and HSCs were compared before and after the coculture. HSCs gave rise to cobblestone areas only on A54 cells, with ninefold more progenitors than on M1601 or undifferentiated C3H10T1/2 cells. Microarray-based screening and a quantitative reverse transcriptase directed-polymerase chain reaction showed that the levels of Notch ligands (Jagged1 and Delta-like 3 were increased in A54 cells upon interaction with HSCs. On the other hand, the expression of Notch1 and Hes1 was upregulated in the HSCs cocultured with A54 cells. A transwell assay revealed that the reciprocal upregulation was dependent on cell-to-cell contact. The result suggested that in the hematopoietic niche, HSCs help MSCs to produce Notch ligands, and in turn, MSCs help HSCs to express Notch receptor. Such a reciprocal upregulation would reinforce the downstream signaling to determine the fate of hematopoietic cell lineage. Clarification of the initiating events on cell contact should lead to the identification of specific molecular targets to facilitate HSC engraftment in transplantation therapy.

  3. Gasotransmitters are emerging as new guard cell signaling molecules and regulators of leaf gas exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Mata, Carlos; Lamattina, Lorenzo

    2013-03-01

    Specialized guard cells modulate plant gas exchange through the regulation of stomatal aperture. The size of the stomatal pore is a direct function of the volume of the guard cells. The transport of solutes across channels in plasma membrane is a crucial process in the maintenance of guard cell water status. The fine tuned regulation of that transport requires an integrated convergence of multiple endogenous and exogenous signals perceived at both the cellular and the whole plant level. Gasotransmitters are novel signaling molecules with key functions in guard cell physiology. Three gasotransmitters, nitric oxide (NO), carbon monoxide (CO), and hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S) are involved in guard cell regulatory processes. These molecules are endogenously produced by plant cells and are part of the guard cells responses to drought stress conditions through ABA-dependent pathways. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge of gasotransmitters as versatile molecules interacting with different components of guard cell signaling network and propose them as players in new paradigms to study ABA-independent guard cell responses to water deficit.

  4. Novel protein kinase signaling systems regulating lifespan identified by small molecule library screening using Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen R Spindler

    Full Text Available Protein kinase signaling cascades control most aspects of cellular function. The ATP binding domains of signaling protein kinases are the targets of most available inhibitors. These domains are highly conserved from mammals to flies. Herein we describe screening of a library of small molecule inhibitors of protein kinases for their ability to increase Drosophila lifespan. We developed an assay system which allowed screening using the small amounts of materials normally present in commercial chemical libraries. The studies identified 17 inhibitors, the majority of which targeted tyrosine kinases associated with the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR, platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF/vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF receptors, G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR, Janus kinase (JAK/signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT, the insulin and insulin-like growth factor (IGFI receptors. Comparison of the protein kinase signaling effects of the inhibitors in vitro defined a consensus intracellular signaling profile which included decreased signaling by p38MAPK (p38, c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK and protein kinase C (PKC. If confirmed, many of these kinases will be novel additions to the signaling cascades known to regulate metazoan longevity.

  5. Novel protein kinase signaling systems regulating lifespan identified by small molecule library screening using Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spindler, Stephen R; Li, Rui; Dhahbi, Joseph M; Yamakawa, Amy; Sauer, Frank

    2012-01-01

    Protein kinase signaling cascades control most aspects of cellular function. The ATP binding domains of signaling protein kinases are the targets of most available inhibitors. These domains are highly conserved from mammals to flies. Herein we describe screening of a library of small molecule inhibitors of protein kinases for their ability to increase Drosophila lifespan. We developed an assay system which allowed screening using the small amounts of materials normally present in commercial chemical libraries. The studies identified 17 inhibitors, the majority of which targeted tyrosine kinases associated with the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)/vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptors, G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR), Janus kinase (JAK)/signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT), the insulin and insulin-like growth factor (IGFI) receptors. Comparison of the protein kinase signaling effects of the inhibitors in vitro defined a consensus intracellular signaling profile which included decreased signaling by p38MAPK (p38), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and protein kinase C (PKC). If confirmed, many of these kinases will be novel additions to the signaling cascades known to regulate metazoan longevity.

  6. Discovery of novel small molecule activators of β-catenin signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Folkert Verkaar

    Full Text Available Wnt/β-catenin signaling plays a major role in embryonic development and adult stem cell maintenance. Reduced activation of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway underlies neurodegenerative disorders and aberrations in bone formation. Screening of a small molecule compound library with a β-galactosidase fragment complementation assay measuring β-catenin nuclear entry revealed bona fide activators of β-catenin signaling. The compounds stabilized cytoplasmic β-catenin and activated β-catenin-dependent reporter gene activity. Although the mechanism through which the compounds activate β-catenin signaling has yet to be determined, several key regulators of Wnt/β-catenin signaling, including glycogen synthase kinase 3 and Frizzled receptors, were excluded as the molecular target. The compounds displayed remarkable selectivity, as they only induced β-catenin signaling in a human osteosarcoma U2OS cell line and not in a variety of other cell lines examined. Our data indicate that differences in cellular Wnt/β-catenin signaling machinery can be exploited to identify cell type-specific activators of Wnt/β-catenin signaling.

  7. Identification of quorum sensing signal molecules and oligolignols associated with watermark disease in willow (Salix sp.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huvenne, Hanneke; Goeminne, Geert; Maes, Martine; Messens, Eric

    2008-09-01

    The bacterium Brenneria salicis is the causal agent of watermark disease in willow. This work shows the importance of in situ studies and high-resolution separation of biological samples with ultrahigh performance liquid chromatography combined with ion trap mass spectrometry to unambiguously identify molecular compounds associated with this disease. Approximately 40 oligolignols accumulated in wood sap of watermark diseased willow, and are indicative for degradation of the xylem cell wall, of which 15 were structurally assigned based on an earlier study. Many bacteria are known to produce and release quorum sensing signal molecules that switch on the expression of specific, sometimes pathogenic functions. Two quorum sensing signal molecules, N-(3-oxohexanoyl)-l-homoserine lactone and N-(hexanoyl)-l-homoserine lactone, were present in 4/1 ratios in diseased wood and in high-density in vitro cultures of B. salicis at 0.13-1.2 microM concentrations, and absent in healthy wood and in low-density in vitro cultures of B. salicis. Although it is not a proof, it can be an indication for involvement of quorum sensing in B. salicis pathogenesis. Cyclic dipeptides were present at high concentrations in high-density in vitro cultures of B. salicis, but not in situ, and were found not to be involved in quorum sensing signaling, therefore, the attribution of quorum signal properties to cyclic dipeptides isolated from in vitro cultures of pathogenic bacteria should be reconsidered.

  8. NADPH oxidase and reactive oxygen species as signaling molecules in carcinogenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gang WANG

    2009-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are small molecule metabolites of oxygen that are prone to participate in redox reactions via their high reactivity. Intracellular ROS could be generated in reduced nicotina-mide-adenine dinucleotidephosphate (NADPH) oxidase-dependent and/or NADPH oxidase-independent manners. Physiologically, ROS are involved in many signaling cascades that contribute to normal processes. One classical example is that ROS derived from the NADPH oxidase and released in neurotrophils are able to digest invading bacteria. Excessive ROS, however, contribute to patho-genesis of various human diseases including cancer, aging, dimentia and hypertension. As signaling messengers, ROS are able to oxidize many targets such as DNA, proteins and lipids, which may be linked with tumor growth, invasion or metastasis. The present review summarizes recent advances in our comprehensive understanding of ROS-linked signaling pathways in regulation of tumor growth, invasion and metastasis, and focuses on the role of the NADPH oxidase-derived ROS in cancer pathogenesis.

  9. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy in the presence of strong resonant signal from background molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Bitter, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Optical spectroscopy with broadband femtosecond laser pulses often involves simultaneous excitation of multiple molecular species with close resonance frequencies. Interpreting the collective optical response from molecular mixtures typically requires Fourier analysis of the detected time-resolved signal. We propose an alternative method of separating coherent optical responses from two molecular species with neighboring excitation resonances (here, vibrational modes of oxygen and carbon dioxide). We utilize ro-vibrational coupling as a mechanism of suppressing the strong vibrational response from the dominating molecular species (O$_{2}$). Coherent ro-vibrational dynamics lead to long "silence windows" of zero signal from oxygen molecules. In these silence windows, the detected signal stems solely from the minority species (CO$_{2}$) enabling background-free detection and characterization of the O$_2$/CO$_2$ mixing ratio. In comparison to a Fourier analysis, our technique does not require femtosecond time re...

  10. Signalling via MHC class II molecules modifies the composition of GEMs in APC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setterblad, N; Becart, S; Charron, D; Mooney, N

    2001-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecules are responsible for peptide presentation to helper T lymphocytes and as such play an essential role in the immune response. These molecules transmit intracellular signals leading to diverse consequences in B lymphocytes including proliferation and apoptosis. Recent studies have revealed that glycolipid enriched membrane microdomains (GEMs) behave as signalling platforms for a variety of lymphocyte receptors. We have quantified human leucocyte antigen (HLA)-DR molecules localized in GEMs in human B lymphocytes. Use of a model imitating the interaction of HLA-DR with a T-cell receptor (TCR) modified the constituents of the HLA-DR-enriched GEMs. Confocal microscopy demonstrated a recruitment of HLA-DR and the ganglioside GM1 at the site of HLA-DR interaction with the stimulating ligand. Moreover, cholesterol depletion efficiently impaired this recruitment. Co-localizing proteins detected in HLA-DR-enriched GEMs include protein kinase C (PKC)-delta and actin. These data reveal that MHC class II antigens are localized in GEMs in mature human B lymphocytes and indicates that the formation of the immunological synapse regulates the composition of HLA-DR enriched GEMs in the antigen presenting cell (APC).

  11. Cell to substratum and cell to cell interactions of microalgae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozkan, Altan; Berberoglu, Halil

    2013-12-01

    This paper reports the cell to substratum and cell to cell interactions of a diverse group of microalgae based on the Extended Derjaguin, Landau, Verwey, Overbeek (XDLVO) approach using the previously reported physico-chemical surface properties. The microalgae included 10 different species of green algae and diatoms from both freshwater and saltwater environments while the substrata included glass, indium-tin oxide (ITO), stainless steel, polycarbonate, polyethylene, and polystryrene. The results indicated that acid-base interactions were the dominating mechanism of interaction for microalgae. For green algae, if at least one of the interacting surfaces was hydrophobic, adhesion at primary minimum was predicted without any energy barrier. However, most diatom systems featured energy barriers for adhesion due to repulsive van der Waals interactions. The results reported in this study are expected to provide useful data and insight into the interaction mechanisms of microalgae cells with each other and with substrata for a number of practical applications including prevention of biofouling of photobioreactors and other man-made surfaces, promotion of biofilm formation in algal biofilm photobioreactors, and developing bioflocculation strategies for energy efficient harvesting of algal biomass. Particularly, Botryococcus braunii and Cerithiopsis fusiformis were identified as promising species for biofloccuation and biofilm formation in freshwater and saltwater aquatic systems, respectively. Finally, based on the observed trends in this study, use of hydrophilic algae and hydrophilic coatings over surfaces are recommended for minimizing biofouling in aquatic systems.

  12. Cloning of a novel phosphotyrosine binding domain containing molecule, Odin, involved in signaling by receptor tyrosine kinases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pandey, A.; Blagoev, B.; Kratchmarova, I.;

    2002-01-01

    We have used a proteomic approach using mass spectrometry to identify signaling molecules involved in receptor tyrosine kinase signaling pathways. Using affinity purification by anti-phosphotyrosine antibodies to enrich for tyrosine phosphorylated proteins, we have identified a novel signaling mo...

  13. Pseudomonas aeruginosa quorum-sensing signal molecules interfere with dendritic cell-induced T-cell proliferation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skindersø, Mette Elena; Zeuthen, Louise; Pedersen, Susanne Brix;

    2009-01-01

    -oxododecanoyl)-l-homoserine lactone (OdDHL) exhibits both quorum-sensing signalling and immune-modulating properties. Recently, yet another quorum-sensing signal molecule, the Pseudomonas quinolone signal (PQS), has been shown to affect cytokine release by mitogen-stimulated human T cells. In the present...

  14. Detection, Characterization, and Biological Effect of Quorum-Sensing Signaling Molecules in Peanut-Nodulating Bradyrhizobia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter Giordano

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Bacteria of the genus Bradyrhizobium are able to establish a symbiotic relationship with peanut (Arachis hypogaea root cells and to fix atmospheric nitrogen by converting it to nitrogenous compounds. Quorum sensing (QS is a cell-cell communication mechanism employed by a variety of bacterial species to coordinate behavior at a community level through regulation of gene expression. The QS process depends on bacterial production of various signaling molecules, among which the N-acylhomoserine lactones (AHLs are most commonly used by Gram-negative bacteria. Some previous reports have shown the production of QS signaling molecules by various rhizobia, but little is known regarding mechanisms of communication among peanut-nodulating strains. The aims of this study were to identify and characterize QS signals produced by peanut-nodulating bradyrhizobial strains and to evaluate their effects on processes related to cell interaction. Detection of AHLs in 53 rhizobial strains was performed using the biosensor strains Agrobacterium tumefaciens NTL4 (pZLR4 and Chromobacterium violaceum CV026 for AHLs with long and short acyl chains, respectively. None of the strains screened were found to produce AHLs with short acyl chains, but 14 strains produced AHLs with long acyl chains. These 14 AHL-producing strains were further studied by quantification of β-galactosidase activity levels (AHL-like inducer activity in NTL4 (pZLR4. Strains displaying moderate to high levels of AHL-like inducer activity were subjected to chemical identification of signaling molecules by high-performance liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS. For each AHL-producing strain, we found at least four different AHLs, corresponding to N-hexanoyl-DL-homoserine lactone (C6, N-(3-oxodecanoyl-L-homoserine lactone (3OC10, N-(3-oxododecanoyl-L-homoserine lactone (3OC12, and N-(3-oxotetradecanoyl-L-homoserine lactone (3OC14. Biological roles of 3OC10, 3OC12, and 3OC14 AHLs

  15. Control of Biofilms with the Fatty Acid Signaling Molecule cis-2-Decenoic Acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cláudia N. H. Marques

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Biofilms are complex communities of microorganisms in organized structures attached to surfaces. Importantly, biofilms are a major cause of bacterial infections in humans, and remain one of the most significant challenges to modern medical practice. Unfortunately, conventional therapies have shown to be inadequate in the treatment of most chronic biofilm infections based on the extraordinary innate tolerance of biofilms to antibiotics. Antagonists of quorum sensing signaling molecules have been used as means to control biofilms. QS and other cell-cell communication molecules are able to revert biofilm tolerance, prevent biofilm formation and disrupt fully developed biofilms, albeit with restricted effectiveness. Recently however, it has been demonstrated that Pseudomonas aeruginosa produces a small messenger molecule cis-2-decenoic acid (cis-DA that shows significant promise as an effective adjunctive to antimicrobial treatment of biofilms. This molecule is responsible for induction of the native biofilm dispersion response in a range of Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria and in yeast, and has been shown to reverse persistence, increase microbial metabolic activity and significantly enhance the cidal effects of conventional antimicrobial agents. In this manuscript, the use of cis-2-decenoic acid as a novel agent for biofilm control is discussed. Stimulating the biofilm dispersion response as a novel antimicrobial strategy holds significant promise for enhanced treatment of infections and in the prevention of biofilm formation.

  16. Small Molecule Modulator of p53 Signaling Pathway: Application for Radiosensitizing or Radioprotection Agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Sang Taek; Cho, Mun Ju; Gwak, Jung Sug; Ryu, Min Jung [PharmacoGenomics Research Center, Inje University, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Song, Jie Young; Yun, Yeon Sook [Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-05-15

    The tumor suppressor p53 is key molecule to protect the cell against genotoxic stress and..the most frequently mutated..protein..in cancer cells. Lack of functional p53..is accompanied by high rate of genomic instability, rapid tumor progression, resistance to anticancer therapy, and increased angiogenesis. In response to DNA damage, p53 protein rapidly accumulated through attenuated proteolysis and is also activated as transcription factor. Activated p53 up-regulates target genes involved in cell cycle arrest and/or apoptosis and then lead to suppression of malignant transformation and the maintenance of genomic integrity. Chemical genetics is a new technology to uncover the signaling networks that regulated biological phenotype using exogenous reagents such as small molecules. Analogous to classical forward genetic screens in model organism, this approach makes use of high throughput, phenotypic assay to identify small molecules that disrupt gene product function in a way that alters a phenotype of interest. Recently, interesting small molecules were identified from cell based high throughput screening and its target protein or mechanism of action were identified by various methods including affinity chromatography, protein array profiling, mRNA or phage display, transcription profiling, and RNA interference.

  17. Interference of bacterial cell-to-cell communication: A new concept of antimicrobial chemotherapy breaks antibiotic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hidetada eHirakawa

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Bacteria use a cell-to-cell communication activity termed Quorum sensing to coordinate group behaviors in a cell-density dependent manner. Quorum sensing influences the expression profile of diverse genes, including antibiotic tolerance and virulence determinants, via specific chemical compounds called Auto-inducers. During quorum sensing, Gram-negative bacteria typically use an acylated homoserine lactone (AHL called auto-inducer 1 (AI-1. Since the first discovery of quorum sensing in a marine bacterium, it has been recognized that more than 100 species possess this mechanism of cell-to-cell communication. In addition to being of interest from a biological standpoint, quorum sensing is a potential target for antimicrobial chemotherapy. This unique concept of antimicrobial control relies on reducing the burden of virulence rather than killing the bacteria. It is believed that this approach will not only suppress the development of antibiotic resistance, but will also improve the treatment of refractory infections triggered by multi-drug resistant (MDR pathogens. In this paper, we review and track recent progress in studies on AHL inhibitors/modulators from a biological standpoint. It has been discovered that both natural and synthetic compounds can disrupt quorum sensing by a variety of means, such as jamming signal transduction, inhibition of signal production and break-down and trapping of signal compounds. We also focus on the regulatory elements that attenuate quorum sensing activities and discuss their unique properties. Understanding the biological roles of regulatory elements might be useful in developing inhibitor applications and understanding how quorum sensing is controlled.

  18. Old concepts, new molecules and current approaches applied to the bacterial nucleotide signalling field

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Signalling nucleotides are key molecules that help bacteria to rapidly coordinate cellular pathways and adapt to changes in their environment. During the past 10 years, the nucleotide signalling field has seen much excitement, as several new signalling nucleotides have been discovered in both eukaryotic and bacterial cells. The fields have since advanced quickly, aided by the development of important tools such as the synthesis of modified nucleotides, which, combined with sensitive mass spectrometry methods, allowed for the rapid identification of specific receptor proteins along with other novel genome-wide screening methods. In this review, we describe the principle concepts of nucleotide signalling networks and summarize the recent work that led to the discovery of the novel signalling nucleotides. We also highlight current approaches applied to the research in the field as well as resources and methodological advances aiding in a rapid identification of nucleotide-specific receptor proteins. This article is part of the themed issue ‘The new bacteriology’. PMID:27672152

  19. Relative Roles of Gap Junction Channels and Cytoplasm in Cell-to-Cell Diffusion of Fluorescent Tracers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safranyos, Richard G. A.; Caveney, Stanley; Miller, James G.; Petersen, Nils O.

    1987-04-01

    Intercellular (tissue) diffusion of molecules requires cytoplasmic diffusion and diffusion through gap junctional (or cell-to-cell) channels. The rates of tissue and cytoplasmic diffusion of fluorescent tracers, expressed as an effective diffusion coefficient, De, and a cytoplasmic diffusion coefficient, Dcyt, have been measured among the developing epidermal cells of a larval beetle, Tenebrio molitor L., to determine the contribution of the junctional channels to intercellular diffusion. Tracer diffusion was measured by injecting fluorescent tracers into cells and quantitating the rate of subsequent spread into adjacent cells. Cytoplasmic diffusion was determined by fluorescence photobleaching. These experiments show that gap junctional channels constitute approximately 70-80% of the total cell-to-cell resistance to the diffusion of organic tracers at high concentrations in this tissue. At low concentrations, however, the binding of tracer to cytoplasm slows down the cytoplasmic diffusion, which may limit intercellular diffusion.

  20. A shortcut to identifying small molecule signals that regulate behavior and development in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pungaliya, Chirag; Srinivasan, Jagan; Fox, Bennett W; Malik, Rabia U; Ludewig, Andreas H; Sternberg, Paul W; Schroeder, Frank C

    2009-05-12

    Small molecule metabolites play important roles in Caenorhabditis elegans biology, but effective approaches for identifying their chemical structures are lacking. Recent studies revealed that a family of glycosides, the ascarosides, differentially regulate C. elegans development and behavior. Low concentrations of ascarosides attract males and thus appear to be part of the C. elegans sex pheromone, whereas higher concentrations induce developmental arrest at the dauer stage, an alternative, nonaging larval stage. The ascarosides act synergistically, which presented challenges for their identification via traditional activity-guided fractionation. As a result the chemical characterization of the dauer and male attracting pheromones remained incomplete. Here, we describe the identification of several additional pheromone components by using a recently developed NMR-spectroscopic approach, differential analysis by 2D NMR spectroscopy (DANS), which simplifies linking small molecule metabolites with their biological function. DANS-based comparison of wild-type C. elegans and a signaling-deficient mutant, daf-22, enabled identification of 3 known and 4 previously undescribed ascarosides, including a compound that features a p-aminobenzoic acid subunit. Biological testing of synthetic samples of these compounds revealed additional evidence for synergy and provided insights into structure-activity relationships. Using a combination of the three most active ascarosides allowed full reconstitution of the male-attracting activity of wild-type pheromone extract. Our results highlight the efficacy of DANS as a method for identifying small-molecule metabolites and placing them within a specific genetic context. This study further supports the hypothesis that ascarosides represent a structurally diverse set of nematode signaling molecules regulating major life history traits.

  1. Neural cell adhesion molecule induces intracellular signaling via multiple mechanisms of Ca2+ homeostasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiryushko, Darya; Korshunova, Irina; Berezin, Vladimir;

    2006-01-01

    The neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) plays a pivotal role in the development of the nervous system, promoting neuronal differentiation via homophilic (NCAM-NCAM) as well as heterophilic (NCAM-fibroblast growth factor receptor [FGFR]) interactions. NCAM-induced intracellular signaling has been....... The first pathway was associated with activation of FGFR, phospholipase Cgamma, and production of diacylglycerol, and the second pathway involved Src-family kinases. Moreover, NCAM-mediated Ca2+ entry required activation of nonselective cation and T-type voltage-gated Ca2+ channels. These channels, together...

  2. Overexpression of Hedgehog signaling molecules and its involvement in triple-negative breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Tao, Yajun; Mao, Jun; Zhang, Qingqing; Li, Lianhong

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the activation of Hedgehog (Hh) signaling molecules and its involvement in triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC). A total of 123 cases of paraffin blocks, including 83 cases of primary breast carcinoma, 30 cases of mammary hyperplasia and 10 cases of normal breast tissue, were immunohistochemically analyzed for Sonic Hedgehog (SHH), Patched-1 (PTCH1), Smoothened (SMO) and glioma-associated oncogene homoglog 1 (GLI1) expression. The expression of SMO...

  3. A modular library of small molecule signals regulates social behaviors in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, Jagan; von Reuss, Stephan H; Bose, Neelanjan; Zaslaver, Alon; Mahanti, Parag; Ho, Margaret C; O'Doherty, Oran G; Edison, Arthur S; Sternberg, Paul W; Schroeder, Frank C

    2012-01-01

    The nematode C. elegans is an important model for the study of social behaviors. Recent investigations have shown that a family of small molecule signals, the ascarosides, controls population density sensing and mating behavior. However, despite extensive studies of C. elegans aggregation behaviors, no intraspecific signals promoting attraction or aggregation of wild-type hermaphrodites have been identified. Using comparative metabolomics, we show that the known ascarosides are accompanied by a series of derivatives featuring a tryptophan-derived indole moiety. Behavioral assays demonstrate that these indole ascarosides serve as potent intraspecific attraction and aggregation signals for hermaphrodites, in contrast to ascarosides lacking the indole group, which are repulsive. Hermaphrodite attraction to indole ascarosides depends on the ASK amphid sensory neurons. Downstream of the ASK sensory neuron, the interneuron AIA is required for mediating attraction to indole ascarosides instead of the RMG interneurons, which previous studies have shown to integrate attraction and aggregation signals from ASK and other sensory neurons. The role of the RMG interneuron in mediating aggregation and attraction is thought to depend on the neuropeptide Y-like receptor NPR-1, because solitary and social C. elegans strains are distinguished by different npr-1 variants. We show that indole ascarosides promote attraction and aggregation in both solitary and social C. elegans strains. The identification of indole ascarosides as aggregation signals reveals unexpected complexity of social signaling in C. elegans, which appears to be based on a modular library of ascarosides integrating building blocks derived from lipid β-oxidation and amino-acid metabolism. Variation of modules results in strongly altered signaling content, as addition of a tryptophan-derived indole unit to repellent ascarosides produces strongly attractive indole ascarosides. Our findings show that the library of

  4. A modular library of small molecule signals regulates social behaviors in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jagan Srinivasan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The nematode C. elegans is an important model for the study of social behaviors. Recent investigations have shown that a family of small molecule signals, the ascarosides, controls population density sensing and mating behavior. However, despite extensive studies of C. elegans aggregation behaviors, no intraspecific signals promoting attraction or aggregation of wild-type hermaphrodites have been identified. Using comparative metabolomics, we show that the known ascarosides are accompanied by a series of derivatives featuring a tryptophan-derived indole moiety. Behavioral assays demonstrate that these indole ascarosides serve as potent intraspecific attraction and aggregation signals for hermaphrodites, in contrast to ascarosides lacking the indole group, which are repulsive. Hermaphrodite attraction to indole ascarosides depends on the ASK amphid sensory neurons. Downstream of the ASK sensory neuron, the interneuron AIA is required for mediating attraction to indole ascarosides instead of the RMG interneurons, which previous studies have shown to integrate attraction and aggregation signals from ASK and other sensory neurons. The role of the RMG interneuron in mediating aggregation and attraction is thought to depend on the neuropeptide Y-like receptor NPR-1, because solitary and social C. elegans strains are distinguished by different npr-1 variants. We show that indole ascarosides promote attraction and aggregation in both solitary and social C. elegans strains. The identification of indole ascarosides as aggregation signals reveals unexpected complexity of social signaling in C. elegans, which appears to be based on a modular library of ascarosides integrating building blocks derived from lipid β-oxidation and amino-acid metabolism. Variation of modules results in strongly altered signaling content, as addition of a tryptophan-derived indole unit to repellent ascarosides produces strongly attractive indole ascarosides. Our findings show

  5. Role of ATP as a Key Signaling Molecule Mediating Radiation-Induced Biological Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohshima, Yasuhiro; Nakatsukasa, Hiroko; Tsukimoto, Mitsutoshi

    2017-01-01

    Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) serves as a signaling molecule for adaptive responses to a variety of cytotoxic agents and plays an important role in mediating the radiation stress-induced responses that serve to mitigate or repair the injurious effects of γ radiation on the body. Indeed, low doses of radiation may have a net beneficial effect by activating a variety of protective mechanisms, including antitumor immune responses. On the other hand, ATP signaling may be involved in the radiation resistance of cancer cells. Here, focusing on our previous work, we review the evidence that low-dose γ irradiation (0.25-0.5 Gy) induces release of extracellular ATP, and that the released ATP mediates multiple radiation-induced responses, including increased intracellular antioxidant synthesis, cell-mediated immune responses, induction of DNA damage repair systems, and differentiation of regulatory T cells.

  6. Role of ATP as a Key Signaling Molecule Mediating Radiation-Induced Biological Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojima, Shuji; Ohshima, Yasuhiro; Nakatsukasa, Hiroko; Tsukimoto, Mitsutoshi

    2017-01-01

    Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) serves as a signaling molecule for adaptive responses to a variety of cytotoxic agents and plays an important role in mediating the radiation stress-induced responses that serve to mitigate or repair the injurious effects of γ radiation on the body. Indeed, low doses of radiation may have a net beneficial effect by activating a variety of protective mechanisms, including antitumor immune responses. On the other hand, ATP signaling may be involved in the radiation resistance of cancer cells. Here, focusing on our previous work, we review the evidence that low-dose γ irradiation (0.25-0.5 Gy) induces release of extracellular ATP, and that the released ATP mediates multiple radiation-induced responses, including increased intracellular antioxidant synthesis, cell-mediated immune responses, induction of DNA damage repair systems, and differentiation of regulatory T cells.

  7. Methylglyoxal: An Emerging Signaling Molecule in Plant Abiotic Stress Responses and Tolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoque, Tahsina S.; Hossain, Mohammad A.; Mostofa, Mohammad G.; Burritt, David J.; Fujita, Masayuki; Tran, Lam-Son P.

    2016-01-01

    The oxygenated short aldehyde methylglyoxal (MG) is produced in plants as a by-product of a number of metabolic reactions, including elimination of phosphate groups from glycolysis intermediates dihydroxyacetone phosphate and glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate. MG is mostly detoxified by the combined actions of the enzymes glyoxalase I and glyoxalase II that together with glutathione make up the glyoxalase system. Under normal growth conditions, basal levels of MG remain low in plants; however, when plants are exposed to abiotic stress, MG can accumulate to much higher levels. Stress-induced MG functions as a toxic molecule, inhibiting different developmental processes, including seed germination, photosynthesis and root growth, whereas MG, at low levels, acts as an important signaling molecule, involved in regulating diverse events, such as cell proliferation and survival, control of the redox status of cells, and many other aspects of general metabolism and cellular homeostases. MG can modulate plant stress responses by regulating stomatal opening and closure, the production of reactive oxygen species, cytosolic calcium ion concentrations, the activation of inward rectifying potassium channels and the expression of many stress-responsive genes. MG appears to play important roles in signal transduction by transmitting and amplifying cellular signals and functions that promote adaptation of plants growing under adverse environmental conditions. Thus, MG is now considered as a potential biochemical marker for plant abiotic stress tolerance, and is receiving considerable attention by the scientific community. In this review, we will summarize recent findings regarding MG metabolism in plants under abiotic stress, and evaluate the concept of MG signaling. In addition, we will demonstrate the importance of giving consideration to MG metabolism and the glyoxalase system, when investigating plant adaptation and responses to various environmental stresses. PMID:27679640

  8. Small Molecule Inhibition of Ligand-Stimulated RAGE-DIAPH1 Signal Transduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manigrasso, Michaele B.; Pan, Jinhong; Rai, Vivek; Zhang, Jinghua; Reverdatto, Sergey; Quadri, Nosirudeen; DeVita, Robert J.; Ramasamy, Ravichandran; Shekhtman, Alexander; Schmidt, Ann Marie

    2016-01-01

    The receptor for advanced glycation endproducts (RAGE) binds diverse ligands linked to chronic inflammation and disease. NMR spectroscopy and x-ray crystallization studies of the extracellular domains of RAGE indicate that RAGE ligands bind by distinct charge- and hydrophobicity-dependent mechanisms. The cytoplasmic tail (ct) of RAGE is essential for RAGE ligand-mediated signal transduction and consequent modulation of gene expression and cellular properties. RAGE signaling requires interaction of ctRAGE with the intracellular effector, mammalian diaphanous 1 or DIAPH1. We screened a library of 58,000 small molecules and identified 13 small molecule competitive inhibitors of ctRAGE interaction with DIAPH1. These compounds, which exhibit in vitro and in vivo inhibition of RAGE-dependent molecular processes, present attractive molecular scaffolds for the development of therapeutics against RAGE-mediated diseases, such as those linked to diabetic complications, Alzheimer’s disease, and chronic inflammation, and provide support for the feasibility of inhibition of protein-protein interaction (PPI). PMID:26936329

  9. Small Molecule Inhibition of Ligand-Stimulated RAGE-DIAPH1 Signal Transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manigrasso, Michaele B; Pan, Jinhong; Rai, Vivek; Zhang, Jinghua; Reverdatto, Sergey; Quadri, Nosirudeen; DeVita, Robert J; Ramasamy, Ravichandran; Shekhtman, Alexander; Schmidt, Ann Marie

    2016-03-03

    The receptor for advanced glycation endproducts (RAGE) binds diverse ligands linked to chronic inflammation and disease. NMR spectroscopy and x-ray crystallization studies of the extracellular domains of RAGE indicate that RAGE ligands bind by distinct charge- and hydrophobicity-dependent mechanisms. The cytoplasmic tail (ct) of RAGE is essential for RAGE ligand-mediated signal transduction and consequent modulation of gene expression and cellular properties. RAGE signaling requires interaction of ctRAGE with the intracellular effector, mammalian diaphanous 1 or DIAPH1. We screened a library of 58,000 small molecules and identified 13 small molecule competitive inhibitors of ctRAGE interaction with DIAPH1. These compounds, which exhibit in vitro and in vivo inhibition of RAGE-dependent molecular processes, present attractive molecular scaffolds for the development of therapeutics against RAGE-mediated diseases, such as those linked to diabetic complications, Alzheimer's disease, and chronic inflammation, and provide support for the feasibility of inhibition of protein-protein interaction (PPI).

  10. Detection of Quorum Sensing Signal Molecules in Edwardsiella ictaluri Ei-151.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Qian; Han, Yin; Tinh, Nguyen Thi Ngoc; Hien, Nguyen Thi; Bossier, Peter

    2012-12-01

    Edwardsiella ictaluri is a Gram-negative pathogenic bacterium in the family Enterobacteriaceae that causes enteric septicemia of catfish, which has become a significant problem in the aquaculture of striped catfish (Pangasianodon hypophthalmus) in Vietnam. In this study, a bacterium designated as Ei-151 was isolated from diseased striped catfish and proved to be virulent. Based on 16S rDNA sequencing and phenotypic tests, the pathogenic bacterium was identified as Edw. ictaluri. The presence of quorum sensing signal molecules in Edw. ictaluri Ei-151 was detected with different biosensor strains. The results showed that Ei-151 produced at least three kinds of acylated homoserine lactone (AHL) signal molecules as detected with the biosensor Agrobacterium tumefaciens KYC55, and the AHLs fingerprint was similar to that of Edw. tarda. During its entire growth, the levels of AHLs and autoinducer-2 produced by Ei-151 peaked at the stationary phase (OD600 1.8), which suggested that both of them may function at the stationary phase. No Cholerae autoinducer-1-like activity (including Edw. ictaluri LMG7860(T)) was detected.

  11. Cross talk between H2O2 and interacting signal molecules under plant stress response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ina eSaxena

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available It is well established that oxidative stress is an important cause of cellular damage. During stress condition plants have evolved regulatory mechanism to adapt to various environmental stresses. One of the consequences of stress is an increase in the cellular concentration of ROS, which is subsequently converted to H2O2. H2O2 is continuously produced as the by-product of oxidative plant aerobic metabolism. Organelles with a high oxidizing metabolic activity or with an intense rate of electron flow, such as chloroplasts, mitochondria, or peroxisomes are major sources of H2O2 production. H2O2 acts as a versatile molecule because of its dual role in cells. Under normal conditions, H2O2 acts as a key regulator of many biological processes because H2O2 has been identified as an important second messenger in signal transduction networks. In this review we discuss potential roles of H2O2 and other signaling molecule during various stress responses.

  12. Detection and quantification of quinolone signalling molecule: a third quorum sensing molecule of Pseudomonas aeruginosa by high performance-thin layer chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bala, Anju; Gupta, Ravi Kumar; Chhibber, Sanjay; Harjai, Kusum

    2013-07-01

    Sophisticated network of quorum sensing involves the production of chemical signals which regulate the combined expression of virulence genes and biofilm formation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Two well-characterized acyl homoserine lactone based las and rhl systems together with alkyl quinolone based Pseudomonas quinolone signalling (PQS) are fundamental components of this network. Third signalling molecule, 2-heptyl-3-hydroxy-4-quinolone (PQS) is of paramount importance because of its interconnecting role in quorum sensing hierarchy in P. aeruginosa. Accurate detection of PQS molecule is very important to understand the involvement of this system in infection process of P. aeruginosa. In this study, high performance-thin layer chromatography (HP-TLC) method was developed for detection as well as quantification of PQS signal molecules in P. aeruginosa, which combines conventional method like TLC with sophisticated instrumentation. This method was validated using parameters like linearity, accuracy, precision, reproducibility and sensitivity. Intra- and inter-day accuracy and precision values were determined which were found to be within acceptable level and hence showed reproducibility. Measurement of PQS in the range of 0.01nmol indicated excellent sensitivity of this approach for quantifying PQS molecule. Automated sampling, rapid and simultaneous analysis of large number of samples and minimal errors make this method more suitable for analysis of PQS signalling molecules. Production of PQS was found to be strain dependent since variation in amount of PQS was observed among different P. aeruginosa isolates. Further, PQS production was also dependent on growth phase of P. aeruginosa with maximum production in late stationary phase.

  13. Concepts of neuroendocrine cardiology and neuroendocrine immunology, chemistry and biology of signal molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galoyan, Armen

    2010-12-01

    Discovery of neurosecretion of cardioactive neurohormones produced by hypothalamic nuclei (NSO and NPV), as well as the biosynthesis of several immunomodulators (signal molecules of the neuroendocrine immune system of brain), deciphering of their chemical structure and study of their biological properties led to the foundation of two important trends of neurobiology: neuroendocrine immunology and cardiology. Hormone formation by atrium ganglionary nerve cells and auriculum establishment of neurohumoral interactions between hypothalamic and atrium neurosecretion indicated the existence of the system neuroendocrine hypothalamus--endocrine heart. Study of their biological properties promoted creation of powerful neurohormonal preparations for the treatment of immune, cardio-vascular, neurodegenerative, infectious and tumor diseases. Concepts suggested by us on neuroendocrine cardiology and immunology, create large perspectives for development of the theory and its implementation in medicine.

  14. Chemical 'Jekyll and Hyde's: small-molecule inhibitors of developmental signaling pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakata, Tomoyo; Chen, James K

    2011-08-01

    Small molecules that perturb developmental signaling pathways can have devastating effects on embryonic patterning, as evidenced by the chemically induced onset of cyclopic lambs and children with severely shortened limbs during the 1950s. Recent studies, however, have revealed critical roles for these pathways in human disorders and diseases, spurring the re-examination of these compounds as new targeted therapies. In this tutorial review, we describe four case studies of teratogenic compounds, including inhibitors of the Hedgehog (Hh), Wnt, and bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) pathways. We discuss how these teratogens were discovered, their mechanisms of action, their utility as molecular probes, and their potential as therapeutic agents. We also consider current challenges in the field and possible directions for future research.

  15. The model of defense gene expression induced by signaling molecule β-ocimene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Chunlin; RUAN Ying; GUAN Chunyun

    2004-01-01

    @@ β-ocimene, a kind of monoterpene, was found recently as a plant communication signal molecule[1]. It has two isomeric forms in nature: cis-β-ocimene and trans-β- ocimene. According to recent reports, all investigated plants, such as corn, cotton, lima bean, potato, tobacco, arabidopsis, and Mediterranean pine, could release the chemical component β-ocimene after fed by arthropod herbivores[2-5], suggesting thatβ-ocimene is an important functioal component in the herbivore-induced volatile. Nowadays, we know that β-ocimene can induce the expression of defense genes relative to salicylic acid in detatched leaves. But many problems of β-ocimene, for example, whether β-ocimene can induce the defense gene expression in intact plants, what role it can play in the expression model of defense genes, are elusive[1,6].

  16. Nitrogen modulation of legume root architecture signaling pathways involves phytohormones and small regulatory molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohd-Radzman, Nadiatul A; Djordjevic, Michael A; Imin, Nijat

    2013-10-01

    Nitrogen, particularly nitrate is an important yield determinant for crops. However, current agricultural practice with excessive fertilizer usage has detrimental effects on the environment. Therefore, legumes have been suggested as a sustainable alternative for replenishing soil nitrogen. Legumes can uniquely form nitrogen-fixing nodules through symbiotic interaction with specialized soil bacteria. Legumes possess a highly plastic root system which modulates its architecture according to the nitrogen availability in the soil. Understanding how legumes regulate root development in response to nitrogen availability is an important step to improving root architecture. The nitrogen-mediated root development pathway starts with sensing soil nitrogen level followed by subsequent signal transduction pathways involving phytohormones, microRNAs and regulatory peptides that collectively modulate the growth and shape of the root system. This review focuses on the current understanding of nitrogen-mediated legume root architecture including local and systemic regulations by different N-sources and the modulations by phytohormones and small regulatory molecules.

  17. Small molecule activators of SIRT1 replicate signaling pathways triggered by calorie restriction in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lavu Siva

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Calorie restriction (CR produces a number of health benefits and ameliorates diseases of aging such as type 2 diabetes. The components of the pathways downstream of CR may provide intervention points for developing therapeutics for treating diseases of aging. The NAD+-dependent protein deacetylase SIRT1 has been implicated as one of the key downstream regulators of CR in yeast, rodents, and humans. Small molecule activators of SIRT1 have been identified that exhibit efficacy in animal models of diseases typically associated with aging including type 2 diabetes. To identify molecular processes induced in the liver of mice treated with two structurally distinct SIRT1 activators, SIRT501 (formulated resveratrol and SRT1720, for three days, we utilized a systems biology approach and applied Causal Network Modeling (CNM on gene expression data to elucidate downstream effects of SIRT1 activation. Results Here we demonstrate that SIRT1 activators recapitulate many of the molecular events downstream of CR in vivo, such as enhancing mitochondrial biogenesis, improving metabolic signaling pathways, and blunting pro-inflammatory pathways in mice fed a high fat, high calorie diet. Conclusion CNM of gene expression data from mice treated with SRT501 or SRT1720 in combination with supporting in vitro and in vivo data demonstrates that SRT501 and SRT1720 produce a signaling profile that mirrors CR, improves glucose and insulin homeostasis, and acts via SIRT1 activation in vivo. Taken together these results are encouraging regarding the use of small molecule activators of SIRT1 for therapeutic intervention into type 2 diabetes, a strategy which is currently being investigated in multiple clinical trials.

  18. Synemin acts as a regulator of signalling molecules during skeletal muscle hypertrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhenlin; Parlakian, Ara; Coletti, Dario; Alonso-Martin, Sonia; Hourdé, Christophe; Joanne, Pierre; Gao-Li, Jacqueline; Blanc, Jocelyne; Ferry, Arnaud; Paulin, Denise; Xue, Zhigang; Agbulut, Onnik

    2014-11-01

    Synemin, a type IV intermediate filament (IF) protein, forms a bridge between IFs and cellular membranes. As an A-kinase-anchoring protein, it also provides temporal and spatial targeting of protein kinase A (PKA). However, little is known about its functional roles in either process. To better understand its functions in muscle tissue, we generated synemin-deficient (Synm(-) (/-)) mice. Synm(-) (/-) mice displayed normal development and fertility but showed a mild degeneration and regeneration phenotype in myofibres and defects in sarcolemma membranes. Following mechanical overload, Synm(-) (/-) mice muscles showed a higher hypertrophic capacity with increased maximal force and fatigue resistance compared with control mice. At the molecular level, increased remodelling capacity was accompanied by decreased myostatin (also known as GDF8) and atrogin (also known as FBXO32) expression, and increased follistatin expression. Furthermore, the activity of muscle-mass control molecules (the PKA RIIα subunit, p70S6K and CREB1) was increased in mutant mice. Finally, analysis of muscle satellite cell behaviour suggested that the absence of synemin could affect the balance between self-renewal and differentiation of these cells. Taken together, our results show that synemin is necessary to maintain membrane integrity and regulates signalling molecules during muscle hypertrophy.

  19. Over-expression of putative transcriptional coactivator KELP interferes with Tomato mosaic virus cell-to-cell movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Nobumitsu; Ogata, Takuya; Deguchi, Masakazu; Nagai, Shoko; Tamai, Atsushi; Meshi, Tetsuo; Kawakami, Shigeki; Watanabe, Yuichiro; Matsushita, Yasuhiko; Nyunoya, Hiroshi

    2009-03-01

    Tomato mosaic virus (ToMV) encodes a movement protein (MP) that is necessary for virus cell-to-cell movement. We have demonstrated previously that KELP, a putative transcriptional coactivator of Arabidopsis thaliana, and its orthologue from Brassica campestris can bind to ToMV MP in vitro. In this study, we examined the effects of the transient over-expression of KELP on ToMV infection and the intracellular localization of MP in Nicotiana benthamiana, an experimental host of the virus. In co-bombardment experiments, the over-expression of KELP inhibited virus cell-to-cell movement. The N-terminal half of KELP (KELPdC), which had been shown to bind to MP, was sufficient for inhibition. Furthermore, the over-expression of KELP and KELPdC, both of which were co-localized with ToMV MP, led to a reduction in the plasmodesmal association of MP. In the absence of MP expression, KELP was localized in the nucleus and the cytoplasm by the localization signal in its N-terminal half. It was also shown that ToMV amplified normally in protoplasts prepared from leaf tissue that expressed KELP transiently. These results indicate that over-expressed KELP interacts with MP in vivo and exerts an inhibitory effect on MP function for virus cell-to-cell movement, but not on virus amplification in individual cells.

  20. HIV-1 Nef control of cell signalling molecules: multiple strategies to promote virus replication

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Alison L Greenway; Gavan Holloway; Dale A McPhee; Phoebe Ellis; Alyssa Cornall; Michael Lidman

    2003-04-01

    HIV-1 has at its disposal numerous proteins encoded by its genome which provide the required arsenal to establish and maintain infection in its host for a considerable number of years. One of the most important and enigmatic of these proteins is Nef. The Nef protein of HIV-1 plays a fundamental role in the virus life cycle. This small protein of approximately 27 kDa is required for maximal virus replication and disease progression. The mechanisms by which it is able to act as a positive factor during virus replication is an area of intense research and although some controversy surrounds Nef much has been gauged as to how it functions. Its ability to modulate the expression of key cellular receptors important for cell activation and control signal transduction elements and events by interacting with numerous cellular kinases and signalling molecules, including members of the Src family kinases, leading to an effect on host cell function is likely to explain at least in part its role during infection and represents a finely tuned mechanism where this protein assists HIV-1 to control its host.

  1. Study of Sonic hedgehog signaling pathway related molecules in gastric carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Li Ma; Hai-Ji Sun; Yun-Shan Wang; Shu-Hong Huang; Jing-Wu Xie; Hong-Wei Zhang

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To study the expression of Sonic hedgehog pathway-related molecules, Sonic hedgehog (Shh) and Gli1 in gastric carcinoma.METHODS: Expression of Shh in 56 gastric specimens including non-cancerous gastric tissues, gastric adenocarcinoma, gastric squamous cell carcinoma was detected by RT-PCR, in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry. Expression of Gli1 was observed by in situ hybridization.RESULTS: The positive rate of Shh and Gli1 expression was 0.0%, 0.0% in non-cancerous gastric tissues while it was 66.7%, 57.8% respectively in gastric adenocarcinoma, and 100%, 100% respectively in gastric squamous cell carcinoma. There was a significant difference between the non-cancerous gastric tissues and gastric carcinoma (P < 0.05). Elevated expression of Shh and Gli1 in gastric tubular adenocarcinoma was associated with poorly differentiated tumors while the expression was absent in gastric mucinous adenocarcinoma.CONCLUSION: The elevated expression of Shh and Gli1 in gastric adenocarcinoma and gastric squamous cell carcinoma shows the involvement of activated Shh signaling in the cellular proliferation of gastric carcinogenesis. It suggests Shh signaling gene may be a new and good target gene for gastric tumor diagnosis and therapy.

  2. Simulated microgravity allows to demonstrate cell-to-cell communication in bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastroleo, Felice; van Houdt, Rob; Mergeay, Max; Hendrickx, Larissa; Wattiez, Ruddy; Leys, Natalie

    Through the MELiSSA project, the European Space Agency aims to develop a closed life support system for oxygen, water and food production to support human life in space in forth-coming long term space exploration missions. This production is based on the recycling of the missions organic waste, including CO2 and minerals. The photosynthetic bacterium Rhodospir-illum rubrum S1H is used in MELiSSA to degrade organics with light energy and is the first MELiSSA organism that has been studied in space related environmental conditions (Mastroleo et al., 2009). It was tested in actual space flight to the International Space Station (ISS) as well as in ground simulations of ISS-like ionizing radiation and microgravity. In the present study, R. rubrum S1H was cultured in liquid medium in 2 devices simulating microgravity conditions, i.e. the Rotating Wall Vessel (RWV) and the Random Positioning Machine (RPM). The re-sponse of the bacterium was evaluated at both the transcriptomic and proteomic levels using respectively a dedicated whole-genome microarray and high-throughput gel-free quantitative proteomics. Both at transcriptomic and proteomic level, the bacterium showed a significant response to cultivation in simulated microgravity. The response to low fluid shear modeled microgravity in RWV was different than to randomized microgravity in RPM. Nevertheless, both tests pointed out a change in and a likely interrelation between cell-to-cell communica-tion (i.e. quorum sensing) and cell pigmentation (i.e. photosynthesis) for R. rubrum S1H in microgravity conditions. A new type of cell-to-cell communication molecule in R. rubrum S1H was discovered and characterized. It is hypothised that the lack of convection currents and the fluid quiescence in (simulated) microgravity limits communications molecules to be spread throughout the medium. Cultivation in this new artificial environment of simulated micro-gravity has showed new properties of this well know bacterium

  3. Interaction of plant cell signaling molecules, salicylic acid and jasmonic acid, with the mitochondria of Helicoverpa armigera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbar, S M D; Sharma, H C; Jayalakshmi, S K; Sreeramulu, K

    2012-02-01

    The cotton bollworm, Helicoverpa armigera is a polyphagous pest in Asia, Africa, and the Mediterranean Europe. Salicylic acid (SA) and jasmonic acid (JA) are the cell signaling molecules produced in response to insect attack in plants. The effect of these signaling molecules was investigated on the oxidative phosphorylation and oxidative stress of H. armigera. SA significantly inhibited the state III and state IV respiration, respiratory control index (RCI), respiratory complexes I and II, induced mitochondrial swelling, and cytochrome c release in vitro. Under in vivo conditions, SA induced state IV respiration as well as oxidative stress in time- and dose-dependent manner, and also inhibited the larval growth. In contrast, JA did not affect the mitochondrial respiration and oxidative stress. SA affected the growth and development of H. armigera, in addition to its function as signaling molecules involved in both local defense reactions at feeding sites and the induction of systemic acquired resistance in plants.

  4. Plasmodesmal-mediated cell-to-cell transport in wheat roots is modulated by anaerobic stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleland, R. E.; Fujiwara, T.; Lucas, W. J.

    1994-01-01

    Cell-to-cell transport of small molecules and ions occurs in plants through plasmodesmata. Plant roots are frequently subjected to localized anaerobic stress, with a resultant decrease in ATP. In order to determine the effect of this stress on plasmodesmal transport, fluorescent dyes of increasing molecular weight (0.46 to 1OkDa) were injected into epidermal and cortical cells of 3-day-old wheat roots, and their movement into neighboring cells was determined by fluorescence microscopy. Anaerobiosis was generated by N2 gas or simulated by the presence of sodium azide, both of which reduced the ATP levels in the tissue by over 80%. In the absence of such stress, the upper limit for movement, or size exclusion limit (SEL), of cortical plasmodesmata was roots, indicating that plasmodesmata may be conduits for nucleotide (ATP and ADP) exchange between cells. Upon imposition of stress, the SEL rose to between 5 and 10 kDa. This response of plasmodesmata to a decrease in the level of ATP suggests that they are constricted by an ATP-dependent process so as to maintain a restricted SEL. When roots are subjected to anaerobic stress, an increase in SEL may permit enhanced delivery of sugars to the affected cells of the root where anaerobic respiration could regenerate the needed ATP.

  5. Adenosine as a signaling molecule in the retina: biochemical and developmental aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ROBERTO PAES-DE-CARVALHO

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available The nucleoside adenosine plays an important role as a neurotransmitter or neuromodulator in the central nervous system, including the retina. In the present paper we review compelling evidence showing that adenosine is a signaling molecule in the developing retina. In the chick retina, adenosine transporters are present since early stages of development before the appearance of adenosine A1 receptors modulating dopamine-dependent adenylate cyclase activity or A2 receptors that directly activate the enzyme. Experiments using retinal cell cultures revealed that adenosine is taken up by specific cell populations that when stimulated by depolarization or neurotransmitters such as dopamine or glutamate, release the nucleoside through calcium-dependent transporter-mediated mechanisms. The presence of adenosine in the extracellular medium and the long-term activation of adenosine receptors is able to regulate the survival of retinal neurons and blocks glutamate excitoxicity. Thus, adenosine besides working as a neurotransmitter or neuromodulator in the mature retina, is considered as an important signaling molecule during retinal development having important functions such as regulation of neuronal survival and differentiation.O nucleosídeo adenosina apresenta um importante papel como neurotransmissor ou neuromodulador no sistema nervoso central, inclusive na retina. Neste artigo apresentamos uma revisão das evidências que mostram que a adenosina é uma molécula sinalizadora na retina em desenvolvimento. Na retina de pinto, transportadores de adenosina estão presentes desde estágios precoces do desenvolvimento, antes do aparecimento dos receptores A1 que modulam a atividade adenilato ciclase dependente de dopamina ou dos receptores A2 que ativam diretamente a enzima. Experimentos usando culturas de células de retina revelaram que a adenosina é captada por populações celulares específicas que, quando estimuladas por despolarização ou por

  6. mRNA expression of Rho GTPase-related signaling molecules during rat hippocampal development

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guoqing Guo; Jifeng Zhang; Li Xin; Jing Chen; Weizai Shen; Lin Yuan; Shizhen Zhong

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND:Rho GTPase family members have been shown to participate in neurite growth by regulating the neuronal cytoskeleton.However,there are very few reports of developmental roles of signaling molecules related to Rho GTPases.OBJECTIVE:To investigate messenger ribonucleic acid mRNA expression of signaling molecules associated with Rho GTPases,including Rho-A,Rac-1,collapsin response mediator protein 1(CRMP-1),and tubulin β3 (Tub β3) during rat hippocampus development.DESIGN,TIME AND SETTING:A non-randomized,controlled,animal experiment,based on different developmental stages of the rat hippocampus,was performed at the Guangdong Key Laboratory of Tissue Construction and Detection,Institute of Clinical Anatomy,Southern Medical University between December 2005 and July 2007.MATERIALS:Trizol reagent was purchased from Invitrogen,USA.RNA PCR kit (AMV) Ver 3.0 and 150 bp DNA Ladder Marker were purchased from TaKaRa,Japan.Unless otherwise specified,all other reagents were purchased from Sigma-Aldrich,USA.METHODS:Twenty-five Sprague Dawley rats were assigned to five groups (n=5) according to developmental stages:embryonic (embryonic 15 days),neonatal (postnatal 5 days),juvenile (postnatal 1 month),adult (postnatal 3 months),and senile (postnatal 18 months).MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:Detection of mRNA expression of Rho-A,Rac-1,CRMP-1,and Tub β3 during various hippocampal developmental stages by reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction.RESULTS:Hippocampal mRNA expression of Rho-A,as well as Rac-1,reached peak levels at embryonic,juvenile,and senile stages,and was relatively less during neonatal and adult stages.mRNA expression of Rac-1 was greater than Rho-A during each hippocampal developmental stage.CRMP-1 mRNA expression levels were as follows:embryonic>neonatal>juvenile>adult<senile,while Tub β3 mRNA expression was embryonic>neonatal>juvenile>adult=senile.CONCLUSION:Rho-A and Rac-1 shared similar expression profiles,which demonstrated similar

  7. Hydrogen sulfide in plants: from dissipation of excess sulfur to signaling molecule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderwood, Alexander; Kopriva, Stanislav

    2014-09-15

    Sulfur is essential in all organisms for the synthesis of amino acids cysteine and methionine and as an active component of numerous co-factors and prosthetic groups. However, only plants, algae, fungi, and some prokaryotes are capable of using the abundant inorganic source of sulfur, sulfate. Plants take sulfate up, reduce it, and assimilate into organic compounds with cysteine being the first product of the pathway and a donor of reduced sulfur for synthesis of other S-containing compounds. Cysteine is formed in a reaction between sulfide, derived from reduction of sulfite and an activated amino acid acceptor, O-acetylserine. Sulfide is thus an important intermediate in sulfur metabolism, but numerous other functions in plants has been revealed. Hydrogen sulfide can serve as an alternative source of sulfur for plants, which may be significant in anaerobic conditions of waterlogged soils. On the other hand, emissions of hydrogen sulfide have been detected from many plant species. Since the amount of H2S discharged correlated with sulfate supply to the plants, the emissions were considered a mechanism for dissipation of excess sulfur. Significant hydrogen sulfide emissions were also observed in plants infected with pathogens, particularly with fungi. H2S thus seems to be part of the widely discussed sulfur-induced-resistance/sulfur-enhanced-defense. Recently, however, more evidence has emerged for a role for H2S in regulation and signaling. Sulfide stabilizes the cysteine synthase complex, increasing so the synthesis of its acceptor O-acetylserine. H2S has been implicating in regulation of plant stress response, particularly draught stress. There are more and more examples of processes regulated by H2S in plants being discovered, and hydrogen sulfide is emerging as an important signaling molecule, similar to its role in the animal and human world. How similar the functions, and homeostasis of H2S are in these diverse organisms, however, remains to be elucidated.

  8. Identification of small molecule compounds that inhibit the HIF-1 signaling pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun Yi

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1 is the major hypoxia-regulated transcription factor that regulates cellular responses to low oxygen environments. HIF-1 is composed of two subunits: hypoxia-inducible HIF-1α and constitutively-expressed HIF-1β. During hypoxic conditions, HIF-1α heterodimerizes with HIF-1β and translocates to the nucleus where the HIF-1 complex binds to the hypoxia-response element (HRE and activates expression of target genes implicated in cell growth and survival. HIF-1α protein expression is elevated in many solid tumors, including those of the cervix and brain, where cells that are the greatest distance from blood vessels, and therefore the most hypoxic, express the highest levels of HIF-1α. Therapeutic blockade of the HIF-1 signaling pathway in cancer cells therefore provides an attractive strategy for development of anticancer drugs. To identify small molecule inhibitors of the HIF-1 pathway, we have developed a cell-based reporter gene assay and screened a large compound library by using a quantitative high-throughput screening (qHTS approach. Results The assay is based upon a β-lactamase reporter under the control of a HRE. We have screened approximate 73,000 compounds by qHTS, with each compound tested over a range of seven to fifteen concentrations. After qHTS we have rapidly identified three novel structural series of HIF-1 pathway Inhibitors. Selected compounds in these series were also confirmed as inhibitors in a HRE β-lactamase reporter gene assay induced by low oxygen and in a VEGF secretion assay. Three of the four selected compounds tested showed significant inhibition of hypoxia-induced HIF-1α accumulation by western blot analysis. Conclusion The use of β-lactamase reporter gene assays, in combination with qHTS, enabled the rapid identification and prioritization of inhibitors specific to the hypoxia induced signaling pathway.

  9. Surface composition gradients of immobilized cell signaling molecules. Epidermal growth factor on gold

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Qian [Department of Chemistry and Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 600 S. Mathews Ave., Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Bohn, Paul W. [Department of Chemistry and Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 600 S. Mathews Ave., Urbana, IL 61801 (United States)]. E-mail: bohn@scs.uiuc.edu

    2006-08-14

    Surface composition gradients of the signaling molecule, epidermal growth factor (EGF), have been prepared by an adaptation of the electrochemical gradient technique. EGF is covalently bound to the reactive component, 11-amino-l-undecanethiol (AUT), in a counterpropagating two-component gradient composed of AUT and poly(ethylene glycol) thiol (PEG) using carbodiimide coupling chemistry. Areas of the surface presenting -NH{sub 2} termination react with succinimidyl esters of solvent-accessible acidic amino acids in EGF, while non-specific protein adsorption is resisted in the PEG regions. The maximum surface coverage of EGF prepared in this manner was determined by surface plasmon resonance reflectometry (SPR) on spatially uniform films to be 20% < {gamma} {sub EGF} < 70% depending on the concentration of the EGF derivatization solution. EGF retains its biological activity with this immobilization process, as verified by culturing human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) on an EGF-terminated surface for 24 h. PEG shows good resistance to EGF physical adsorption as demonstrated by both SPR and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The N / C ratio of EGF gradients, which is characteristic of EGF adsorption, because only the protein contains N, while both protein and PEG contain C, was spatially mapped with XPS. The gradient composition distributions are sigmoidal with lateral distance, with the position of the gradient transition region being readily controlled by adjusting the applied potential window. EGF gradients with variable quantitative surface coverage profiles were generated by varying EGF and AUT concentrations.

  10. Morphofunctional and signaling molecules overlap of the pineal gland and thymus: role and significance in aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paltsev, Michael A; Polyakova, Victoria O; Kvetnoy, Igor M; Anderson, George; Kvetnaia, Tatiana V; Linkova, Natalia S; Paltseva, Ekaterina M; Rubino, Rosa; De Cosmo, Salvatore; De Cata, Angelo; Mazzoccoli, Gianluigi

    2016-03-15

    Deficits in neuroendocrine-immune system functioning, including alterations in pineal and thymic glands, contribute to aging-associated diseases. This study looks at ageing-associated alterations in pineal and thymic gland functioning evaluating common signaling molecules present in both human and animal pinealocytes and thymocytes: endocrine cell markers (melatonin, serotonin, pCREB, AANAT, CGRP, VIP, chromogranin А); cell renovation markers (p53, AIF, Ki67), matrix metalloproteinases (MMP2, MMP9) and lymphocytes markers (CD4, CD5, CD8, CD20). Pineal melatonin is decreased, as is one of the melatonin pathway synthesis enzymes in the thymic gland. A further similarity is the increased MMPs levels evident over age in both glands. Significant differences are evident in cell renovation processes, which deteriorate more quickly in the aged thymus versus the pineal gland. Decreases in the number of pineal B-cells and thymic T-cells were also observed over aging. Collected data indicate that cellular involution of the pineal gland and thymus show many commonalities, but also significant changes in aging-associated proteins. It is proposed that such ageing-associated alterations in these two glands provide novel pharmaceutical targets for the wide array of medical conditions that are more likely to emerge over the course of ageing.

  11. Cell Death-Associated Molecular-Pattern Molecules: Inflammatory Signaling and Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz Sangiuliano

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Apoptosis, necroptosis, and pyroptosis are different cellular death programs characterized in organs and tissues as consequence of microbes infection, cell stress, injury, and chemotherapeutics exposure. Dying and death cells release a variety of self-proteins and bioactive chemicals originated from cytosol, nucleus, endoplasmic reticulum, and mitochondria. These endogenous factors are named cell death-associated molecular-pattern (CDAMP, damage-associated molecular-pattern (DAMP molecules, and alarmins. Some of them cooperate or act as important initial or delayed inflammatory mediators upon binding to diverse membrane and cytosolic receptors coupled to signaling pathways for the activation of the inflammasome platforms and NF-κB multiprotein complexes. Current studies show that the nonprotein thiols and thiol-regulating enzymes as well as highly diffusible prooxidant reactive oxygen and nitrogen species released together in extracellular inflammatory milieu play essential role in controlling pro- and anti-inflammatory activities of CDAMP/DAMP and alarmins. Here, we provide an overview of these emerging concepts and mechanisms of triggering and maintenance of tissue inflammation under massive death of cells.

  12. Oxalic acid: a signal molecule for fungus-feeding bacteria of the genus Collimonas?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudnick, M B; van Veen, J A; de Boer, W

    2015-10-01

    Mycophagous (=fungus feeding) soil bacteria of the genus Collimonas have been shown to colonize and grow on hyphae of different fungal hosts as the only source of energy and carbon. The ability to exploit fungal nutrient resources might require a strategy for collimonads to sense fungi in the soil matrix. Oxalic acid is ubiquitously secreted by soil fungi, serving different purposes. In this study, we investigated the possibility that collimonads might use oxalic acid secretion to localize a fungal host and move towards it. We first confirmed earlier indications that collimonads have a very limited ability to use oxalic acid as growth substrate. In a second step, with using different assays, we show that oxalic acid triggers bacterial movement in such a way that accumulation of cells can be expected at micro-sites with high free oxalic acid concentrations. Based on these observations we propose that oxalic acid functions as a signal molecule to guide collimonads to hyphal tips, the mycelial zones that are most sensitive for mycophagous bacterial attack.

  13. HLA-DR molecules enhance signal transduction through the CD3/Ti complex in activated T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Odum, Niels; Martin, P J; Schieven, G L;

    1991-01-01

    Crosslinking HLA-DR molecules by monoclonal antibodies (mAb) induces protein tyrosine phosphorylation and results in a secondary elevation of free cytoplasmic Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) in activated human T cells. Here we have studied the effect of DR on CD3-induced signal transduction...

  14. Single molecule narrowfield microscopy of protein-DNA binding dynamics in glucose signal transduction of live yeast cells

    CERN Document Server

    Wollman, Adam J M

    2016-01-01

    Single-molecule narrowfield microscopy is a versatile tool to investigate a diverse range of protein dynamics in live cells and has been extensively used in bacteria. Here, we describe how these methods can be extended to larger eukaryotic, yeast cells, which contain sub-cellular compartments. We describe how to obtain single-molecule microscopy data but also how to analyse these data to track and obtain the stoichiometry of molecular complexes diffusing in the cell. We chose glucose mediated signal transduction of live yeast cells as the system to demonstrate these single-molecule techniques as transcriptional regulation is fundamentally a single molecule problem - a single repressor protein binding a single binding site in the genome can dramatically alter behaviour at the whole cell and population level.

  15. Chromosomal Rainbows detect Oncogenic Rearrangements of Signaling Molecules in Thyroid Tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Brien, Benjamin; Jossart, Gregg H.; Ito, Yuko; Greulich-Bode, Karin M.; Weier, Jingly F.; Munne, Santiago; Clark, Orlo H.; Weier, Heinz-Ulrich G.

    2010-08-19

    Altered signal transduction can be considered a hallmark of many solid tumors. In thyroid cancers the receptor tyrosine kinase (rtk) genes NTRK1 (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man = OMIM *191315, also known as 'TRKA'), RET ('Rearranged during Transfection protooncogene', OMIM *164761) and MET (OMIM *164860) have been reported as activated, rearranged or overexpressed. In many cases, a combination of cytogenetic and molecular techniques allows elucidation of cellular changes that initiate tumor development and progression. While the mechanisms leading to overexpression of the rtk MET gene remain largely unknown, a variety of chromosomal rearrangements of the RET or NTKR1 gene could be demonstrated in thyroid cancer. Abnormal expressions in these tumors seem to follow a similar pattern: the rearrangement translocates the 3'-end of the rtk gene including the entire catalytic domain to an expressed gene leading to a chimeric RNA and protein with kinase activity. Our research was prompted by an increasing number of reports describing translocations involving ret and previously unknown translocation partners. We developed a high resolution technique based on fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) to allow rapid screening for cytogenetic rearrangements which complements conventional chromosome banding analysis. Our technique applies simultaneous hybridization of numerous probes labeled with different reporter molecules which are distributed along the target chromosome allowing the detection of cytogenetic changes at near megabase-pair (Mbp) resolution. Here, we report our results using a probe set specific for human chromosome 10, which is altered in a significant portion of human thyroid cancers (TC's). While rendering accurate information about the cytogenetic location of rearranged elements, our multi-locus, multi-color analysis was developed primarily to overcome limitations of whole chromosome painting (WCP) and chromosome banding

  16. Testosterone induces molecular changes in dopamine signaling pathway molecules in the adolescent male rat nigrostriatal pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tertia D Purves-Tyson

    receptor-driven events as estradiol had minimal effect. We conclude that nigrostriatal responsivity to dopamine may be modulated by testosterone acting via androgen receptors to alter gene expression of molecules involved in dopamine signaling during adolescence.

  17. Signaling through intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) in a B cell lymphoma line

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holland, J; Owens, T

    1997-01-01

    Intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) (CD54) is an adhesion molecule of the immunoglobulin superfamily. The interaction between ICAM-1 on B lymphocytes and leukocyte function-associated antigen 1 on T cells plays a major role in several aspects of the immune response, including T-dependent B...

  18. Deletion of the signalling molecule synthase ScbA has pleiotropic effects on secondary metabolite biosynthesis, morphological differentiation and primary metabolism in Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2)

    OpenAIRE

    D'Alia, Davide; Eggle, Daniela; Nieselt, Kay; Hu, Wei‐Shou; Breitling, Rainer; Takano, Eriko

    2011-01-01

    Summary Streptomycetes have high biotechnological relevance as producers of diverse metabolites widely used in medical and agricultural applications. The biosynthesis of these metabolites is controlled by signalling molecules, γ‐butyrolactones, that act as bacterial hormones. In Streptomyces coelicolor, a group of signalling molecules called SCBs (S. coelicolorbutanolides) regulates production of the pigmented antibiotics coelicolor polyketide (CPK), actinorhodin and undecylprodigiosin. The γ...

  19. Oseltamivir expands quasispecies of influenza virus through cell-to-cell transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Kotaro; Murano, Kensaku; Ohniwa, Ryosuke L; Kawaguchi, Atsushi; Nagata, Kyosuke

    2015-03-16

    The population of influenza virus consists of a huge variety of variants, called quasispecies, due to error-prone replication. Previously, we reported that progeny virions of influenza virus become infected to adjacent cells via cell-to-cell transmission pathway in the presence of oseltamivir. During cell-to-cell transmission, viruses become infected to adjacent cells at high multiplicity since progeny virions are enriched on plasma membrane between infected cells and their adjacent cells. Co-infection with viral variants may rescue recessive mutations with each other. Thus, it is assumed that the cell-to-cell transmission causes expansion of virus quasispecies. Here, we have demonstrated that temperature-sensitive mutations remain in progeny viruses even at non-permissive temperature by co-infection in the presence of oseltamivir. This is possibly due to a multiplex infection through the cell-to-cell transmission by the addition of oseltamivir. Further, by the addition of oseltamivir, the number of missense mutation introduced by error-prone replication in segment 8 encoding NS1 was increased in a passage-dependent manner. The number of missense mutation in segment 5 encoding NP was not changed significantly, whereas silent mutation was increased. Taken together, we propose that oseltamivir expands influenza virus quasispecies via cell-to-cell transmission, and may facilitate the viral evolution and adaptation.

  20. Comparative metabolomics reveals biogenesis of ascarosides, a modular library of small-molecule signals in C. elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Reuss, Stephan H; Bose, Neelanjan; Srinivasan, Jagan; Yim, Joshua J; Judkins, Joshua C; Sternberg, Paul W; Schroeder, Frank C

    2012-01-25

    In the model organism Caenorhabditis elegans, a family of endogenous small molecules, the ascarosides function as key regulators of developmental timing and behavior that act upstream of conserved signaling pathways. The ascarosides are based on the dideoxysugar ascarylose, which is linked to fatty-acid-like side chains of varying lengths derived from peroxisomal β-oxidation. Despite the importance of ascarosides for many aspects of C. elegans biology, knowledge of their structures, biosynthesis, and homeostasis remains incomplete. We used an MS/MS-based screen to profile ascarosides in C. elegans wild-type and mutant metabolomes, which revealed a much greater structural diversity of ascaroside derivatives than previously reported. Comparison of the metabolomes from wild-type and a series of peroxisomal β-oxidation mutants showed that the enoyl CoA-hydratase MAOC-1 serves an important role in ascaroside biosynthesis and clarified the functions of two other enzymes, ACOX-1 and DHS-28. We show that, following peroxisomal β-oxidation, the ascarosides are selectively derivatized with moieties of varied biogenetic origin and that such modifications can dramatically affect biological activity, producing signaling molecules active at low femtomolar concentrations. Based on these results, the ascarosides appear as a modular library of small-molecule signals, integrating building blocks from three major metabolic pathways: carbohydrate metabolism, peroxisomal β-oxidation of fatty acids, and amino acid catabolism. Our screen further demonstrates that ascaroside biosynthesis is directly affected by nutritional status and that excretion of the final products is highly selective.

  1. From signal to form: Nod factor as a morhogenetic signal molecule to induce symbiotic responses in legume root hairs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Esseling, J.J.

    2004-01-01

    In this thesis, research is presented which contributes to a better understanding of nod factor (NF) induced signalling in Iegume root hairs, leading to a successful symbiosis. We mainly use root hairs of the model Iegume Medicago truncatula ('barrel medic') as an experimental system. In the differe

  2. Electroporation loading of membrane-impermeable molecules to investigate intra- and intercellular Ca2+ signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decrock, Elke; De Bock, Marijke; Wang, Nan; Bol, Mélissa; Gadicherla, Ashish K; Leybaert, Luc

    2015-03-02

    Electroporation is a technique that temporarily induces pores in the plasma membranes of cells, thereby allowing plasma membrane-impermeable substances to enter the cells. This loading method requires an electrical drive circuit providing an electroporation signal, an electrode to apply the signal to a localized zone in a cell monolayer, and a special solution that has a low electrical conductivity. To avoid impairment of cell function and cell death from the electroporation procedure itself, the applied electrical signal should ideally be a high-frequency oscillating signal (50 kHz) without any direct current (DC) component. Here, we describe the detailed procedure of electroporation loading.

  3. Quorum sensing signaling molecules produced by reference and emerging soft-rot bacteria (Dickeya and Pectobacterium spp..

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Crépin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Several small diffusible molecules are involved in bacterial quorum sensing and virulence. The production of autoinducers-1 and -2, quinolone, indole and γ-amino butyrate signaling molecules was investigated in a set of soft-rot bacteria belonging to six Dickeya or Pectobacterium species including recent or emerging potato isolates. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using bacterial biosensors, immunoassay, and chromatographic analysis, we showed that soft-rot bacteria have the common ability to produce transiently during their exponential phase of growth the N-3-oxo-hexanoyl- or the N-3-oxo-octanoyl-l-homoserine lactones and a molecule of the autoinducer-2 family. Dickeya spp. produced in addition the indole-3-acetic acid in tryptophan-rich conditions. All these signaling molecules have been identified for the first time in the novel Dickeya solani species. In contrast, quinolone and γ-amino butyrate signals were not identified and the corresponding synthases are not present in the available genomes of soft-rot bacteria. To determine if the variations of signal production according to growth phase could result from expression modifications of the corresponding synthase gene, the respective mRNA levels were estimated by reverse transcriptase-PCR. While the N-acyl-homoserine lactone production is systematically correlated to the synthase expression, that of the autoinducer-2 follows the expression of an enzyme upstream in the activated methyl cycle and providing its precursor, rather than the expression of its own synthase. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Despite sharing the S-adenosylmethionine precursor, no strong link was detected between the production kinetics or metabolic pathways of autoinducers-1 and -2. In contrast, the signaling pathway of autoinducer-2 seems to be switched off by the indole-3-acetic acid pathway under tryptophan control. It therefore appears that the two genera of soft-rot bacteria have similarities but also

  4. Quorum Sensing Signaling Molecules Produced by Reference and Emerging Soft-Rot Bacteria (Dickeya and Pectobacterium spp.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crépin, Alexandre; Barbey, Corinne; Beury-Cirou, Amélie; Hélias, Valérie; Taupin, Laure; Reverchon, Sylvie; Nasser, William; Faure, Denis; Dufour, Alain; Orange, Nicole; Feuilloley, Marc; Heurlier, Karin; Burini, Jean-François; Latour, Xavier

    2012-01-01

    Background Several small diffusible molecules are involved in bacterial quorum sensing and virulence. The production of autoinducers-1 and -2, quinolone, indole and γ-amino butyrate signaling molecules was investigated in a set of soft-rot bacteria belonging to six Dickeya or Pectobacterium species including recent or emerging potato isolates. Methodology/Principal Findings Using bacterial biosensors, immunoassay, and chromatographic analysis, we showed that soft-rot bacteria have the common ability to produce transiently during their exponential phase of growth the N-3-oxo-hexanoyl- or the N-3-oxo-octanoyl-l-homoserine lactones and a molecule of the autoinducer-2 family. Dickeya spp. produced in addition the indole-3-acetic acid in tryptophan-rich conditions. All these signaling molecules have been identified for the first time in the novel Dickeya solani species. In contrast, quinolone and γ-amino butyrate signals were not identified and the corresponding synthases are not present in the available genomes of soft-rot bacteria. To determine if the variations of signal production according to growth phase could result from expression modifications of the corresponding synthase gene, the respective mRNA levels were estimated by reverse transcriptase-PCR. While the N-acyl-homoserine lactone production is systematically correlated to the synthase expression, that of the autoinducer-2 follows the expression of an enzyme upstream in the activated methyl cycle and providing its precursor, rather than the expression of its own synthase. Conclusions/Significance Despite sharing the S-adenosylmethionine precursor, no strong link was detected between the production kinetics or metabolic pathways of autoinducers-1 and -2. In contrast, the signaling pathway of autoinducer-2 seems to be switched off by the indole-3-acetic acid pathway under tryptophan control. It therefore appears that the two genera of soft-rot bacteria have similarities but also differences in the

  5. Dissecting Repulsive Guidance Molecule/Neogenin function and signaling during neural development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Heuvel, D.M.A.

    2013-01-01

    During neural development a series of precisely ordered cellular processes acts to establish a functional brain comprising millions of neurons and many more neuronal connections. Neogenin and its repulsive guidance molecule (RGM) ligands contribute to neuronal network formation by inducing axon repu

  6. Small-molecule inhibition of APT1 affects Ras localization and signaling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dekker, Frank J.; Rocks, Oliver; Vartak, Nachiket; Menninger, Sascha; Hedberg, Christian; Balamurugan, Rengarajan; Wetzel, Stefan; Renner, Steffen; Gerauer, Marc; Schoelermann, Beate; Rusch, Marion; Kramer, John W.; Rauh, Daniel; Coates, Geoffrey W.; Brunsveld, Luc; Bastiaens, Philippe I. H.; Waldmann, Herbert

    2010-01-01

    Cycles of depalmitoylation and repalmitoylation critically control the steady-state localization and function of various peripheral membrane proteins, such as Ras proto-oncogene products. Interference with acylation using small molecules is a strategy to modulate cellular localization-and thereby un

  7. Development of Small Molecules Targeting the Wnt Signaling Pathway in Cancer Stem Cells for the Treatment of Colorectal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Lele; Li, Yuemin; He, Baoming; Gong, Yuan

    2015-09-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) was ranked third in morbidity and mortality in the United States in 2013. Although substantial progress has been made in surgical techniques and postoperative chemotherapy in recent years, the prognosis for colon cancer is still not satisfactory, mainly because of cancer recurrence and metastasis. The latest studies have shown that cancer stem cells (CSCs) play important roles in cancer recurrence and metastasis. Drugs that target CSCs might therefore have great therapeutic potential in prevention of cancer recurrence and metastasis. The wingless-int (Wnt) signaling pathway in CSCs has been suggested to play crucial roles in colorectal carcinogenesis, and has become a popular target for anti-CRC therapy. Dysregulation of the Wnt signaling pathway, mostly by inactivating mutations of the adenomatous polyposis coli tumor suppressor or oncogenic mutations of β-catenin, has been implicated as a key factor in colorectal tumorigenesis. Abnormal increases of β-catenin levels represents a common pathway in Wnt signaling activation and is also observed in other human malignancies. These findings highlight the importance of developing small-molecule drugs that target the Wnt pathway. Herein we provide an overview on the current development of small molecules that target the Wnt pathway in colorectal CSCs and discuss future research directions.

  8. The inflammasome and danger molecule signaling: at the crossroads of inflammation and pathogen persistence in the oral cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Özlem; Lee, Kyu Lim

    2015-10-01

    Inflammasomes are an oligomeric assembly of multiprotein complexes that activate the caspase-1-dependent maturation and the subsequent secretion of inflammatory interleukin-1beta and interleukin-18 cytokines in response to a 'danger signal' in vertebrates. The assessment of their significance continues to grow rapidly as the complex biology of various chronic inflammatory conditions is better dissected. Increasing evidence strongly links inflammasomes and host-derived small 'danger molecule ATP' signaling with the modulation of the host immune response by microbial colonizers as well as with potential altering of the microbiome structure and intermicrobial interactions in the host. All of these factors eventually lead to the destructive chronic inflammatory disease state. In the oral cavity, a highly dynamic and multifaceted interplay takes place between the signaling of endogenous danger molecules and colonizing microbes on the mucosal surfaces. This interaction may redirect the local microenvironment to favor the conversion of the resident microbiome toward pathogenicity. This review outlines the major components of the known inflammasome complexes/mechanisms and highlights their regulation, in particular, by oral microorganisms, in relation to periodontal disease pathology. Better characterization of the cellular and molecular biology of the inflammasome will probably identify important potential therapeutic targets for the treatment and prevention of periodontal disease, as well as for other debilitating chronic diseases.

  9. The Arabidopsis synaptotagmin SYTA regulates the cell-to-cell movement of diverse plant viruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asako eUchiyama

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Synaptotagmins are a large gene family in animals that have been extensively characterized due to their role as calcium sensors to regulate synaptic vesicle exocytosis and endocytosis in neurons, and dense core vesicle exocytosis for hormone secretion from neuroendocrine cells. Thought to be exclusive to animals, synaptotagmins have recently been characterized in Arabidopsis thaliana, in which they comprise a five gene family. Using infectivity and leaf-based functional assays, we have shown that Arabidopsis SYTA regulates endocytosis and marks an endosomal vesicle recycling pathway to regulate movement protein-mediated trafficking of the Begomovirus Cabbage leaf curl virus (CaLCuV and the Tobamovirus Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV through plasmodesmata (Lewis and Lazarowitz, 2010. To determine whether SYTA has a central role in regulating the cell-to-cell trafficking of a wider range of diverse plant viruses, we extended our studies here to examine the role of SYTA in the cell-to-cell movement of additional plant viruses that employ different modes of movement, namely the Potyvirus Turnip mosaic virus (TuMV, the Caulimovirus Cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV and the Tobamovirus Turnip vein clearing virus (TVCV, which in contrast to TMV does efficiently infect Arabidopsis. We found that both TuMV and TVCV systemic infection, and the cell-to-cell trafficking of the their movement proteins, were delayed in the Arabidopsis Col-0 syta-1 knockdown mutant. In contrast, CaMV systemic infection was not inhibited in syta-1. Our studies show that SYTA is a key regulator of plant virus intercellular movement, being necessary for the ability of diverse cell-to-cell movement proteins encoded by Begomoviruses (CaLCuV MP, Tobamoviruses (TVCV and TMV 30K protein and Potyviruses (TuMV P3N-PIPO to alter PD and thereby mediate virus cell-to-cell spread.

  10. Relationship of MAPK signaling molecule expression in uterine smooth muscle with postpartum hemorrhage as well as BKCa and PGs expression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guo-Su Shi

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To study the relationship of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling molecule expression in uterine smooth muscle with postpartum hemorrhage as well as large-conductance calcium-activated potassium channels (BKCa) and prostaglandins (PGs) expression.Methods:Puerperae who received cesarean delivery in our hospital between May 2012 and December 2015 were selected, 34 cases with postpartum hemorrhage caused by uterine inertia and 58 cases with normal uterine contractions and without postpartum hemorrhage were screened and included in hemorrhage group and non-hemorrhage group of the study respectively. During the cesarean delivery, proper amount of uterine muscle tissue was collected to determine uterine muscle contraction function as well as the content of MAPK signaling molecules, BKCa and PGs.Results:The spontaneous in vitro uterine muscle contraction frequency, contraction amplitude and contraction activity as well as contraction frequency, contraction amplitude and contraction activity after oxytocin intervention of hemorrhage group were significantly lower than those of non-hemorrhage group; p-EKR1, p-ERK2, p-JNK1, p-JNK2, p-P38, PGE2, PGF2α and TXB2 content in uterine muscle of hemorrhage group were significantly lower than those of non-hemorrhage group while BKCaαsubunit andβsubunit mRNA content and protein content as well as 6-keto-PGF1αcontent were significantly higher than those of non-hemorrhage group. p-EKR1, p-ERK2, p-JNK1, p-JNK2 and p-P38 content were positively correlated with PGE2, PGF2α and TXB2, and negatively correlated with BKCaα subunit andβsubunit as well as 6-keto-PGF1α. Conclusions:Lower expression of MAPK signal molecules in uterine smooth muscle will influence the expression of BKCa and PGs to lead to the occurrence of postpartum hemorrhage caused by uterine inertia.

  11. Small-Molecule Inhibitors of Cytokine-Mediated STAT1 Signal Transduction In ß-Cells With Improved Aqueous Solubility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scully, Stephen Shane; Tang, Alicia J; Lundh, Morten;

    2013-01-01

    We previously reported the discovery of BRD0476 (1), a small molecule generated by diversity-oriented synthesis that suppresses cytokine-induced ß-cell apoptosis. Herein, we report the synthesis and biological evaluation of 1 and analogs with improved aqueous solubility. By replacing naphthyl wit...... with quinoline moieties, we prepared active analogs with up to a 1400-fold increase in solubility from 1. In addition, we demonstrated that compound 1 and analogs inhibit STAT1 signal transduction induced by IFN-¿....

  12. Signalling by the global regulatory molecule ppGpp in bacteria and chloroplasts of land plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tozawa, Y; Nomura, Y

    2011-09-01

    The hyperphosphorylated guanine ribonucleotide ppGpp mediates the stringent response in bacteria. Biochemical and genetic studies of this response in Escherichia coli have shown that the biosynthesis of ppGpp is catalysed by two homologous enzymes, RelA and SpoT. RelA is activated in response to amino acid starvation, and SpoT responds to abiotic physical stress beside nutritional stress. All free-living bacteria, including Gram-positive firmicutes, contain RelA-SpoT homologues (RSH). Further, novel ppGpp biosynthetic enzymes, designated small alarmone synthetases (SASs), were recently identified in a subset of bacteria, including the Gram-positive organism Bacillus subtilis, and were shown to consist only of a ppGpp synthetase domain. Studies suggest that these SAS proteins contribute to ppGpp signalling in response to stressful conditions in a manner distinct from that of RelA-SpoT enzymes. SAS proteins currently appear to always occur in addition to RSH enzymes in various combinations but never alone. RSHs have also been identified in chloroplasts, organelles of photosynthetic eukaryotes that originated from endosymbiotic photosynthetic bacteria. These chloroplast RSHs are exclusively encoded in nuclear DNA and targeted into chloroplasts. The findings suggest that ppGpp may regulate chloroplast functions similar to those regulated in bacteria, including transcription and translation. In addition, a novel ppGpp synthetase that is regulated by Ca²⁺ as a result of the presence of two EF-hand motifs at its COOH terminus was recently identified in chloroplasts of land plants. This finding indicates the existence of a direct connection between eukaryotic Ca²⁺ signalling and prokaryotic ppGpp signalling in chloroplasts. The new observations with regard to ppGpp signalling in land plants suggest that such signalling contributes to the regulation of a wider range of cellular functions than previously anticipated.

  13. Functional characterization of an AQP0 missense mutation, R33C, that causes dominant congenital lens cataract, reveals impaired cell-to-cell adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumari, Sindhu S; Gandhi, Jason; Mustehsan, Mohammed H; Eren, Semih; Varadaraj, Kulandaiappan

    2013-11-01

    Aquaporin 0 (AQP0) performs dual functions in the lens fiber cells, as a water pore and as a cell-to-cell adhesion molecule. Mutations in AQP0 cause severe lens cataract in both humans and mice. An arginine to cysteine missense mutation at amino acid 33 (R33C) produced congenital autosomal dominant cataract in a Chinese family for five generations. We re-created this mutation in wild type human AQP0 (WT-AQP0) cDNA by site-directed mutagenesis, and cloned and expressed the mutant AQP0 (AQP0-R33C) in heterologous expression systems. Mutant AQP0-R33C showed proper trafficking and membrane localization like WT-AQP0. Functional studies conducted in Xenopus oocytes showed no significant difference (P > 0.05) in water permeability between AQP0-R33C and WT-AQP0. However, the cell-to-cell adhesion property of AQP0-R33C was significantly reduced (P cataract suggest that the conserved positive charge of Extracellular Loop A may play an important role in bringing fiber cells closer. The proposed schematic models illustrate that cell-to-cell adhesion elicited by AQP0 is vital for lens transparency and homeostasis.

  14. A ligation-triggered DNAzyme cascade for amplified fluorescence detection of biological small molecules with zero-background signal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Li-Min; Zhang, Xiao-Bing; Kong, Rong-Mei; Yang, Bin; Tan, Weihong

    2011-08-03

    Many types of fluorescent sensing systems have been reported for biological small molecules. Particularly, several methods have been developed for the recognition of ATP or NAD(+), but they only show moderate sensitivity, and they cannot discriminate either ATP or NAD(+) from their respective analogues. We have addressed these limitations and report here a dual strategy which combines split DNAzyme-based background reduction with catalytic and molecular beacon (CAMB)-based amplified detection to develop a ligation-triggered DNAzyme cascade, resulting in ultrahigh sensitivity. First, the 8-17 DNAzyme is split into two separate oligonucleotide fragments as the building blocks for the DNA ligation reaction, thereby providing a zero-background signal to improve overall sensitivity. Next, a CAMB strategy is further employed for amplified signal detection achieved through cycling and regenerating the DNAzyme to realize the true enzymatic multiple turnover (one enzyme catalyzes the cleavage of several substrates) of catalytic beacons. This combination of zero-background signal and signal amplification significantly improves the sensitivity of the sensing systems, resulting in detection limits of 100 and 50 pM for ATP and NAD(+), respectively, much lower than those of previously reported biosensors. Moreover, by taking advantage of the highly specific biomolecule-dependence of the DNA ligation reaction, the developed DNAzyme cascades show significantly high selectivity toward the target cofactor (ATP or NAD(+)), and the target biological small molecule can be distinguished from its analogues. Therefore, as a new and universal platform for the design of DNA ligation reaction-based sensing systems, this novel ligation-triggered DNAzyme cascade method may find a broad spectrum of applications in both environmental and biomedical fields.

  15. High throughput screening for small molecule enhancers of the interferon signaling pathway to drive next-generation antiviral drug discovery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhara A Patel

    Full Text Available Most of current strategies for antiviral therapeutics target the virus specifically and directly, but an alternative approach to drug discovery might be to enhance the immune response to a broad range of viruses. Based on clinical observation in humans and successful genetic strategies in experimental models, we reasoned that an improved interferon (IFN signaling system might better protect against viral infection. Here we aimed to identify small molecular weight compounds that might mimic this beneficial effect and improve antiviral defense. Accordingly, we developed a cell-based high-throughput screening (HTS assay to identify small molecules that enhance the IFN signaling pathway components. The assay is based on a phenotypic screen for increased IFN-stimulated response element (ISRE activity in a fully automated and robust format (Z'>0.7. Application of this assay system to a library of 2240 compounds (including 2160 already approved or approvable drugs led to the identification of 64 compounds with significant ISRE activity. From these, we chose the anthracycline antibiotic, idarubicin, for further validation and mechanism based on activity in the sub-µM range. We found that idarubicin action to increase ISRE activity was manifest by other members of this drug class and was independent of cytotoxic or topoisomerase inhibitory effects as well as endogenous IFN signaling or production. We also observed that this compound conferred a consequent increase in IFN-stimulated gene (ISG expression and a significant antiviral effect using a similar dose-range in a cell-culture system inoculated with encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV. The antiviral effect was also found at compound concentrations below the ones observed for cytotoxicity. Taken together, our results provide proof of concept for using activators of components of the IFN signaling pathway to improve IFN efficacy and antiviral immune defense as well as a validated HTS approach to identify

  16. Deletion of the signalling molecule synthase ScbA has pleiotropic effects on secondary metabolite biosynthesis, morphological differentiation and primary metabolism in Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D'Alia, Davide; Eggle, D.; Nieselt, K.; Hu, W.-S.; Breitling, R.; Takano, E.

    2011-01-01

    Streptomycetes have high biotechnological relevance as producers of diverse metabolites widely used in medical and agricultural applications. The biosynthesis of these metabolites is controlled by signalling molecules, gamma-butyrolactones, that act as bacterial hormones. In Streptomyces coelicolor,

  17. Small Molecule APY606 Displays Extensive Antitumor Activity in Pancreatic Cancer via Impairing Ras-MAPK Signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Na; Liu, Zuojia; Zhao, Wenjing; Wang, Erkang; Wang, Jin

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer has been found with abnormal expression or mutation in Ras proteins. Oncogenic Ras activation exploits their extensive signaling reach to affect multiple cellular processes, in which the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling exerts important roles in tumorigenesis. Therapies targeted Ras are thus of major benefit for pancreatic cancer. Although small molecule APY606 has been successfully picked out by virtual drug screening based on Ras target receptor, its in-depth mechanism remains to be elucidated. We herein assessed the antitumor activity of APY606 against human pancreatic cancer Capan-1 and SW1990 cell lines and explored the effect of Ras-MAPK and apoptosis-related signaling pathway on the activity of APY606. APY606 treatment resulted in a dose- and time-dependent inhibition of cancer cell viability. Additionally, APY606 exhibited strong antitumor activity, as evidenced not only by reduction in tumor cell invasion, migration and mitochondrial membrane potential but also by alteration in several apoptotic indexes. Furthermore, APY606 treatment directly inhibited Ras-GTP and the downstream activation of MAPK, which resulted in the down-regulation of anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2, leading to the up-regulation of mitochondrial apoptosis pathway-related proteins (Bax, cytosolic Cytochrome c and Caspase 3) and of cyclin-dependent kinase 2 and Cyclin A, E. These data suggest that impairing Ras-MAPK signaling is a novel mechanism of action for APY606 during therapeutic intervention in pancreatic cancer. PMID:27223122

  18. Control of Adult Neurogenesis by Short-Range Morphogenic-Signaling Molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choe, Youngshik; Pleasure, Samuel J; Mira, Helena

    2015-12-04

    Adult neurogenesis is dynamically regulated by a tangled web of local signals emanating from the neural stem cell (NSC) microenvironment. Both soluble and membrane-bound niche factors have been identified as determinants of adult neurogenesis, including morphogens. Here, we review our current understanding of the role and mechanisms of short-range morphogen ligands from the Wnt, Notch, Sonic hedgehog, and bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) families in the regulation of adult neurogenesis. These morphogens are ideally suited to fine-tune stem-cell behavior, progenitor expansion, and differentiation, thereby influencing all stages of the neurogenesis process. We discuss cross talk between their signaling pathways and highlight findings of embryonic development that provide a relevant context for understanding neurogenesis in the adult brain. We also review emerging examples showing that the web of morphogens is in fact tightly linked to the regulation of neurogenesis by diverse physiologic processes.

  19. NFAT targets signaling molecules to gene promoters in pancreatic β-cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Michael C; Borenstein-Auerbach, Nofit; McGlynn, Kathleen; Kunnathodi, Faisal; Shahbazov, Rauf; Syed, Ilham; Kanak, Mazhar; Takita, Morihito; Levy, Marlon F; Naziruddin, Bashoo

    2015-02-01

    Nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) is activated by calcineurin in response to calcium signals derived by metabolic and inflammatory stress to regulate genes in pancreatic islets. Here, we show that NFAT targets MAPKs, histone acetyltransferase p300, and histone deacetylases (HDACs) to gene promoters to differentially regulate insulin and TNF-α genes. NFAT and ERK associated with the insulin gene promoter in response to glucagon-like peptide 1, whereas NFAT formed complexes with p38 MAPK (p38) and Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) upon promoters of the TNF-α gene in response to IL-1β. Translocation of NFAT and MAPKs to gene promoters was calcineurin/NFAT dependent, and complex stability required MAPK activity. Knocking down NFATc2 expression, eliminating NFAT DNA binding sites, or interfering with NFAT nuclear import prevented association of MAPKs with gene promoters. Inhibiting p38 and JNK activity increased NFAT-ERK association with promoters, which repressed TNF-α and enhanced insulin gene expression. Moreover, inhibiting p38 and JNK induced a switch from NFAT-p38/JNK-histone acetyltransferase p300 to NFAT-ERK-HDAC3 complex formation upon the TNF-α promoter, which resulted in gene repression. Histone acetyltransferase/HDAC exchange was reversed on the insulin gene by p38/JNK inhibition in the presence of glucagon-like peptide 1, which enhanced gene expression. Overall, these data indicate that NFAT directs signaling enzymes to gene promoters in islets, which contribute to protein-DNA complex stability and promoter regulation. Furthermore, the data suggest that TNF-α can be repressed and insulin production can be enhanced by selectively targeting signaling components of NFAT-MAPK transcriptional/signaling complex formation in pancreatic β-cells. These findings have therapeutic potential for suppressing islet inflammation while preserving islet function in diabetes and islet transplantation.

  20. Sequence analysis of morbillivirus CD150 receptor-Signaling Lymphocyte Activation Molecule (SLAM) of different animal species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, J; Balamurugan, V; Sen, A; Saravanan, P; Sahay, B; Rajak, K K; Rasool, T J; Bhanuprakash, V; Singh, R K

    2009-12-01

    Signaling Lymphocyte Activation Molecule-SLAM (CD150) molecule has been reported as a putative receptor for most morbilliviruses for their respective host species. In this study, we determined the complete nucleotide sequence of the gene coding for the morbillivirus receptor-SLAM from the four species, namely, goat (Capra hircus), sheep (Ovis aries), Indian cattle (Bos indicus), and buffalo (Bubalus bubalis). The nucleotide (nt) open reading frame sequence of SLAM gene in all the four species studied was 1017 nucleotides in length encoding a polypeptide of 339 amino acids (aa), similar to Bos taurus, but different from canine, human, marmoset, and mouse SLAM, which were 1029, 1008, 1011, and 1032 nts, respectively, in length, and coding for 343, 336, 337, and 344 aa, respectively. Sequence analysis revealed 96.3-98.5% and 92.9-96.8% identities among the four species at the nt and aa level, respectively. Sequence diversity at aa level between various species revealed that the critical functional region of SLAM protein among different species is relatively conserved, thereby facilitating this molecule to act as a receptor for morbillivirus. Phylogenetic relationship based on the aa sequences of SLAM protein revealed that caprine, ovine, cattle, and buffalo fall under a defined cluster but caprine SLAM is more closely related to ovine, followed by bovine.

  1. The translocation of signaling molecules in dark adapting mammalian rod photoreceptor cells is dependent on the cytoskeleton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reidel, Boris; Goldmann, Tobias; Giessl, Andreas; Wolfrum, Uwe

    2008-10-01

    In vertebrate rod photoreceptor cells, arrestin and the visual G-protein transducin move between the inner segment and outer segment in response to changes in light. This stimulus dependent translocation of signalling molecules is assumed to participate in long term light adaptation of photoreceptors. So far the cellular basis for the transport mechanisms underlying these intracellular movements remains largely elusive. Here we investigated the dependency of these movements on actin filaments and the microtubule cytoskeleton of photoreceptor cells. Co-cultures of mouse retina and retinal pigment epithelium were incubated with drugs stabilizing and destabilizing the cytoskeleton. The actin and microtubule cytoskeleton and the light dependent distribution of signaling molecules were subsequently analyzed by light and electron microscopy. The application of cytoskeletal drugs differentially affected the cytoskeleton in photoreceptor compartments. During dark adaptation the depolymerization of microtubules as well as actin filaments disrupted the translocation of arrestin and transducin in rod photoreceptor cells. During light adaptation only the delivery of arrestin within the outer segment was impaired after destabilization of microtubules. Movements of transducin and arrestin required intact cytoskeletal elements in dark adapting cells. However, diffusion might be sufficient for the fast molecular movements observed as cells adapt to light. These findings indicate that different molecular translocation mechanisms are responsible for the dark and light associated translocations of arrestin and transducin in rod photoreceptor cells.

  2. Isolation and molecular characterization of biofouling bacteria and profiling of quorum sensing signal molecules from membrane bioreactor activated sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lade, Harshad; Paul, Diby; Kweon, Ji Hyang

    2014-02-04

    The formation of biofilm in a membrane bioreactor depends on the production of various signaling molecules like N-acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs). In the present study, a total of 200 bacterial strains were isolated from membrane bioreactor activated sludge and screened for AHLs production using two biosensor systems, Chromobacterium violaceum CV026 and Agrobacterium tumefaciens A136. A correlation between AHLs production and biofilm formation has been made among screened AHLs producing strains. The 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis revealed the dominance of Aeromonas and Enterobacter sp. in AHLs production; however few a species of Serratia, Leclercia, Pseudomonas, Klebsiella, Raoultella and Citrobacter were also identified. The chromatographic characterization of sludge extract showed the presence of a broad range of quorum sensing signal molecules. Further identification of sludge AHLs by thin layer chromatography bioassay and high performance liquid chromatography confirms the presence of C4-HSL, C6-HSL, C8-HSL, 3-oxo-C8-HSL, C10-HSL, C12-HSL, 3-oxo-C12-HSL and C14-HSL. The occurrence of AHLs in sludge extract and dominance of Aeromonas and Enterobacter sp. in activated sludge suggests the key role of these bacterial strains in AHLs production and thereby membrane fouling.

  3. Isolation and Molecular Characterization of Biofouling Bacteria and Profiling of Quorum Sensing Signal Molecules from Membrane Bioreactor Activated Sludge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harshad Lade

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The formation of biofilm in a membrane bioreactor depends on the production of various signaling molecules like N-acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs. In the present study, a total of 200 bacterial strains were isolated from membrane bioreactor activated sludge and screened for AHLs production using two biosensor systems, Chromobacterium violaceum CV026 and Agrobacterium tumefaciens A136. A correlation between AHLs production and biofilm formation has been made among screened AHLs producing strains. The 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis revealed the dominance of Aeromonas and Enterobacter sp. in AHLs production; however few a species of Serratia, Leclercia, Pseudomonas, Klebsiella, Raoultella and Citrobacter were also identified. The chromatographic characterization of sludge extract showed the presence of a broad range of quorum sensing signal molecules. Further identification of sludge AHLs by thin layer chromatography bioassay and high performance liquid chromatography confirms the presence of C4-HSL, C6-HSL, C8-HSL, 3-oxo-C8-HSL, C10-HSL, C12-HSL, 3-oxo-C12-HSL and C14-HSL. The occurrence of AHLs in sludge extract and dominance of Aeromonas and Enterobacter sp. in activated sludge suggests the key role of these bacterial strains in AHLs production and thereby membrane fouling.

  4. Eph/ephrin-B-mediated cell-to-cell interactions govern MTS20(+) thymic epithelial cell development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montero-Herradón, Sara; García-Ceca, Javier; Sánchez Del Collado, Beatriz; Alfaro, David; Zapata, Agustín G

    2016-08-01

    Thymus development is a complex process in which cell-to-cell interactions between thymocytes and thymic epithelial cells (TECs) are essential to allow a proper maturation of both thymic cell components. Although signals that control thymocyte development are well known, mechanisms governing TEC maturation are poorly understood, especially those that regulate the maturation of immature TEC populations during early fetal thymus development. In this study, we show that EphB2-deficient, EphB2LacZ and EphB3-deficient fetal thymuses present a lower number of cells and delayed maturation of DN cell subsets compared to WT values. Moreover, deficits in the production of chemokines, known to be involved in the lymphoid seeding into the thymus, contribute in decreased proportions of intrathymic T cell progenitors (PIRA/B(+)) in the mutant thymuses from early stages of development. These features correlate with increased proportions of MTS20(+) cells but fewer MTS20(-) cells from E13.5 onward in the deficient thymuses, suggesting a delayed development of the first epithelial cells. In addition, in vitro the lack of thymocytes or the blockade of Eph/ephrin-B-mediated cell-to-cell interactions between either thymocytes-TECs or TECs-TECs in E13.5 fetal thymic lobes coursed with increased proportions of MTS20(+) TECs. This confirms, for the first time, that the presence of CD45(+) cells, corresponding at these stages to DN1 and DN2 cells, and Eph/ephrin-B-mediated heterotypic or homotypic cell interactions between thymocytes and TECs, or between TECs and themselves, contribute to the early maturation of MTS20(+) TECs.

  5. Myosin-Va-dependent cell-to-cell transfer of RNA from Schwann cells to axons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotelo, José R; Canclini, Lucía; Kun, Alejandra; Sotelo-Silveira, José R; Xu, Lei; Wallrabe, Horst; Calliari, Aldo; Rosso, Gonzalo; Cal, Karina; Mercer, John A

    2013-01-01

    To better understand the role of protein synthesis in axons, we have identified the source of a portion of axonal RNA. We show that proximal segments of transected sciatic nerves accumulate newly-synthesized RNA in axons. This RNA is synthesized in Schwann cells because the RNA was labeled in the complete absence of neuronal cell bodies both in vitro and in vivo. We also demonstrate that the transfer is prevented by disruption of actin and that it fails to occur in the absence of myosin-Va. Our results demonstrate cell-to-cell transfer of RNA and identify part of the mechanism required for transfer. The induction of cell-to-cell RNA transfer by injury suggests that interventions following injury or degeneration, particularly gene therapy, may be accomplished by applying them to nearby glial cells (or implanted stem cells) at the site of injury to promote regeneration.

  6. Lactate as a Signaling Molecule That Regulates Exercise-Induced Adaptations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minas Nalbandian

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Lactate (or its protonated form: lactic acid has been studied by many exercise scientists. The lactate paradigm has been in constant change since lactate was first discovered in 1780. For many years, it was unfairly seen as primarily responsible for muscular fatigue during exercise and a waste product of glycolysis. The status of lactate has slowly changed to an energy source, and in the last two decades new evidence suggests that lactate may play a much bigger role than was previously believed: many adaptations to exercise may be mediated in some way by lactate. The mechanisms behind these adaptations are yet to be understood. The aim of this review is to present the state of lactate science, focusing on how this molecule may mediate exercise-induced adaptations.

  7. Messenger molecules of the phospholipase signaling system have dual effects on vascular smooth muscle contraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidulescu, Cristina; Mironneau, J.; Mironneau, Chantal; Popescu, L. M.

    2000-01-01

    Background and methods. In order to investigate the role of phospholipases and their immediately derived messengers in agonist-induced contraction of portal vein smooth muscle, we used the addition in the organ bath of exogenous molecules such as: phospholipases C, A(2), and D, diacylglycerol, arachidonic acid, phosphatidic acid, choline. We also used substances modulating activity of downstream molecules like protein kinase C, phosphatidic acid phosphohydrolase, or cyclooxygenase. Results. a) Exogenous phospholipases C or A(2), respectively, induced small agonist-like contractions, while exogenous phospholipase D did not. Moreover, phospholipase D inhibited spontaneous contractions. However, when added during noradrenaline-induced plateau, phospholipase D shortly potentiated it. b) The protein kinase C activator, phorbol dibutyrate potentiated both the exogenous phospholipase C-induced contraction and the noradrenaline-induced plateau, while the protein kinase C inhibitor 1-(-5-isoquinolinesulfonyl)-2-methyl-piperazine relaxed the plateau. c) When added before noradrenaline, indomethacin inhibited both phasic and tonic contractions, but when added during the tonic contraction shortly potentiated it. Arachidonic acid strongly potentiated both spontaneous and noradrenaline-induced contractions, irrespective of the moment of its addition. d) In contrast, phosphatidic acid inhibited spontaneous contractile activity, nevertheless it was occasionally capable of inducing small contractions, and when repetitively added during the agonist-induced tonic contraction, produced short potentiations of the plateau. Pretreatment with propranolol inhibited noradrenaline-induced contractions and further addition of phosphatidic acid augmented this inhibition. Choline augmented the duration and amplitude of noradrenaline-induced tonic contraction and final contractile oscillations. Conclusions. These data suggest that messengers produced by phospholipase C and phospholipase A(2

  8. Cell-to-cell spread and massive vacuole formation after Cryptococcus neoformans infection of murine macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Casadevall Arturo

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The interaction between macrophages and Cryptococcus neoformans (Cn is critical for containing dissemination of this pathogenic yeast. However, Cn can either lyse macrophages or escape from within them through a process known as phagosomal extrusion. Both events result in live extracellular yeasts capable of reproducing and disseminating in the extracellular milieu. Another method of exiting the intracellular confines of cells is through host cell-to-cell transfer of the pathogen, and this commonly occurs with the human immuno-deficiency virus (HIV and CD4+ T cells and macrophages. In this report we have used time-lapse imaging to determine if this occurs with Cn. Results Live imaging of Cryptococcus neoformans interactions with murine macrophages revealed cell-to-cell spread of yeast cells from infected donor cells to uninfected cells. Although this phenomenon was relatively rare its occurrence documents a new capacity for this pathogen to infect adjacent cells without exiting the intracellular space. Cell-to-cell spread appeared to be an actin-dependent process. In addition, we noted that cryptococcal phagosomal extrusion was followed by the formation of massive vacuoles suggesting that intracellular residence is accompanied by long lasting damage to host cells. Conclusion C. neoformans can escape the intracellular confines of macrophages in an actin dependent manner by cell-to-cell transfer of the yeast leading to infection of adjacent cells. In addition, complete extrusion of internalized Cn cells can lead to the formation of a massive vacuole which may be a sign of damage to the host macrophage. These observations document new outcomes for the interaction of C. neoformans with host cells that provide precedents for cell biological effects that may contribute to the pathogenesis of cryptococcal infections.

  9. Cell-to-cell spread and massive vacuole formation after Cryptococcus neoformans infection of murine macrophages

    OpenAIRE

    Casadevall Arturo; Alvarez Mauricio

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background The interaction between macrophages and Cryptococcus neoformans (Cn) is critical for containing dissemination of this pathogenic yeast. However, Cn can either lyse macrophages or escape from within them through a process known as phagosomal extrusion. Both events result in live extracellular yeasts capable of reproducing and disseminating in the extracellular milieu. Another method of exiting the intracellular confines of cells is through host cell-to-cell transfer of the ...

  10. Metabolic Adaptations of Azospirillum brasilense to Oxygen Stress by Cell-to-Cell Clumping and Flocculation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bible, Amber N.; Khalsa-Moyers, Gurusahai K.; Mukherjee, Tanmoy; Green, Calvin S.; Mishra, Priyanka; Purcell, Alicia; Aksenova, Anastasia; Hurst, Gregory B.

    2015-01-01

    The ability of bacteria to monitor their metabolism and adjust their behavior accordingly is critical to maintain competitiveness in the environment. The motile microaerophilic bacterium Azospirillum brasilense navigates oxygen gradients by aerotaxis in order to locate low oxygen concentrations that can support metabolism. When cells are exposed to elevated levels of oxygen in their surroundings, motile A. brasilense cells implement an alternative response to aerotaxis and form transient clumps by cell-to-cell interactions. Clumping was suggested to represent a behavior protecting motile cells from transiently elevated levels of aeration. Using the proteomics of wild-type and mutant strains affected in the extent of their clumping abilities, we show that cell-to-cell clumping represents a metabolic scavenging strategy that likely prepares the cells for further metabolic stresses. Analysis of mutants affected in carbon or nitrogen metabolism confirmed this assumption. The metabolic changes experienced as clumping progresses prime cells for flocculation, a morphological and metabolic shift of cells triggered under elevated-aeration conditions and nitrogen limitation. The analysis of various mutants during clumping and flocculation characterized an ordered set of changes in cell envelope properties accompanying the metabolic changes. These data also identify clumping and early flocculation to be behaviors compatible with the expression of nitrogen fixation genes, despite the elevated-aeration conditions. Cell-to-cell clumping may thus license diazotrophy to microaerophilic A. brasilense cells under elevated oxygen conditions and prime them for long-term survival via flocculation if metabolic stress persists. PMID:26407887

  11. Metabolic adaptations of Azospirillum brasilense to oxygen stress by cell-to-cell clumping and flocculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bible, Amber N; Khalsa-Moyers, Gurusahai K; Mukherjee, Tanmoy; Green, Calvin S; Mishra, Priyanka; Purcell, Alicia; Aksenova, Anastasia; Hurst, Gregory B; Alexandre, Gladys

    2015-12-01

    The ability of bacteria to monitor their metabolism and adjust their behavior accordingly is critical to maintain competitiveness in the environment. The motile microaerophilic bacterium Azospirillum brasilense navigates oxygen gradients by aerotaxis in order to locate low oxygen concentrations that can support metabolism. When cells are exposed to elevated levels of oxygen in their surroundings, motile A. brasilense cells implement an alternative response to aerotaxis and form transient clumps by cell-to-cell interactions. Clumping was suggested to represent a behavior protecting motile cells from transiently elevated levels of aeration. Using the proteomics of wild-type and mutant strains affected in the extent of their clumping abilities, we show that cell-to-cell clumping represents a metabolic scavenging strategy that likely prepares the cells for further metabolic stresses. Analysis of mutants affected in carbon or nitrogen metabolism confirmed this assumption. The metabolic changes experienced as clumping progresses prime cells for flocculation, a morphological and metabolic shift of cells triggered under elevated-aeration conditions and nitrogen limitation. The analysis of various mutants during clumping and flocculation characterized an ordered set of changes in cell envelope properties accompanying the metabolic changes. These data also identify clumping and early flocculation to be behaviors compatible with the expression of nitrogen fixation genes, despite the elevated-aeration conditions. Cell-to-cell clumping may thus license diazotrophy to microaerophilic A. brasilense cells under elevated oxygen conditions and prime them for long-term survival via flocculation if metabolic stress persists.

  12. Human Cytomegalovirus US28 Facilitates Cell-to-Cell Viral Dissemination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa M. Noriega

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV encodes a number of viral proteins with homology to cellular G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs. These viral GPCRs, including US27, US28, UL33, and UL78, have been ascribed numerous functions during infection, including activating diverse cellular pathways, binding to immunomodulatory chemokines, and impacting virus dissemination. To investigate the role of US28 during virus infection, two variants of the clinical isolate TB40/E were generated: TB40/E-US28YFP expressing a C-terminal yellow fluorescent protein tag, and TB40/E-FLAGYFP in which a FLAG-YFP cassette replaces the US28 coding region. The TB40/E-US28YFP protein localized as large perinuclear fluorescent structures at late times post-infection in fibroblasts, endothelial, and epithelial cells. Interestingly, US28YFP is a non-glycosylated membrane protein throughout the course of infection. US28 appears to impact cell-to-cell spread of virus, as the DUS28 virus (TB40/E-FLAGYFP generated a log-greater yield of extracellular progeny whose spread could be significantly neutralized in fibroblasts. Most strikingly, in epithelial cells, where dissemination of virus occurs exclusively by the cell-to-cell route, TB40/E-FLAGYFP (DUS28 displayed a significant growth defect. The data demonstrates that HCMV US28 may contribute at a late stage of the viral life cycle to cell-to-cell dissemination of virus.

  13. The adhesion molecule NCAM promotes ovarian cancer progression via FGFR signalling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zecchini, Silvia; Bombardelli, Lorenzo; Decio, Alessandra;

    2011-01-01

    stimulates EOC cell migration and invasion in vitro and promotes metastatic dissemination in mice. This pro-malignant function of NCAM is mediated by its interaction with fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR). Indeed, not only FGFR signalling is required for NCAM-induced EOC cell motility, but targeting...... the NCAM/FGFR interplay with a monoclonal antibody abolishes the metastatic dissemination of EOC in mice. Our results point to NCAM-mediated stimulation of FGFR as a novel mechanism underlying EOC malignancy and indicate that this interplay may represent a valuable therapeutic target....

  14. Biased signaling of lipids and allosteric actions of synthetic molecules for GPR119

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hassing, Helle A; Fares, Suzan; Larsen, Olav;

    2016-01-01

    for 2h with the 2-MAG-lipase inhibitor JZL84 doubled the constitutive activity, indicating that endogenous lipids contribute to the apparent constitutive activity. Finally, besides being an agonist, AR231453 acted as a positive allosteric modulator of OEA and increased its potency by 54-fold at 100nM AR......231453. Our studies uncovering broad and biased signaling, masked constitutive activity by endogenous MAGs, and ago-allosteric properties of synthetic ligands may explain why many GPR119 drug-discovery programs have failed so far....

  15. Enhancement of single-molecule fluorescence signals by colloidal silver nanoparticles in studies of protein translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharill, Shashank; Chen, Chunlai; Stevens, Benjamin; Kaur, Jaskiran; Smilansky, Zeev; Mandecki, Wlodek; Gryczynski, Ignacy; Gryczynski, Zygmunt; Cooperman, Barry S; Goldman, Yale E

    2011-01-25

    Metal-enhanced fluorescence (MEF) increased total photon emission of Cy3- and Cy5-labeled ribosomal initiation complexes near 50 nm silver particles 4- and 5.5-fold, respectively. Fluorescence intensity fluctuations above shot noise, at 0.1-5 Hz, were greater on silver particles. Overall signal-to-noise ratio was similar or slightly improved near the particles. Proximity to silver particles did not compromise ribosome function, as measured by codon-dependent binding of fluorescent tRNA, dynamics of fluorescence resonance energy transfer between adjacent tRNAs in the ribosome, and tRNA translocation induced by elongation factor G.

  16. Interaction of structure-specific and promiscuous G-protein-coupled receptors mediates small-molecule signaling in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Donha; O'Doherty, Inish; Somvanshi, Rishi K; Bethke, Axel; Schroeder, Frank C; Kumar, Ujendra; Riddle, Donald L

    2012-06-19

    A chemically diverse family of small-molecule signals, the ascarosides, control developmental diapause (dauer), olfactory learning, and social behaviors of the nematode model organism, Caenorhabditis elegans. The ascarosides act upstream of conserved signaling pathways, including the insulin, TGF-β, serotonin, and guanylyl cyclase pathways; however, the sensory processes underlying ascaroside function are poorly understood. Because ascarosides often are multifunctional and show strongly synergistic effects, characterization of their receptors will be essential for understanding ascaroside biology and may provide insight into molecular mechanisms that produce synergistic outcomes in small-molecule sensing. Based on DAF-8 immunoprecipitation, we here identify two G-protein-coupled receptors, DAF-37 and DAF-38, which cooperatively mediate ascaroside perception. daf-37 mutants are defective in all responses to ascr#2, one of the most potent dauer-inducing ascarosides, although this mutant responds normally to other ascarosides. In contrast, daf-38 mutants are partially defective in responses to several different ascarosides. Through cell-specific overexpression, we show that DAF-37 regulates dauer when expressed in ASI neurons and adult behavior when expressed in ASK neurons. Using a photoaffinity-labeled ascr#2 probe and amplified luminescence assays (AlphaScreen), we demonstrate that ascr#2 binds to DAF-37. Photobleaching fluorescent energy transfer assays revealed that DAF-37 and DAF-38 form heterodimers, and we show that heterodimerization strongly increases cAMP inhibition in response to ascr#2. These results suggest that that the ascarosides' intricate signaling properties result in part from the interaction of highly structure-specific G-protein-coupled receptors such as DAF-37 with more promiscuous G-protein-coupled receptors such as DAF-38.

  17. Interaction of structure-specific and promiscuous G-protein–coupled receptors mediates small-molecule signaling in Caenorhabditis elegans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Donha; O'Doherty, Inish; Somvanshi, Rishi K.; Bethke, Axel; Schroeder, Frank C.; Kumar, Ujendra; Riddle, Donald L.

    2012-01-01

    A chemically diverse family of small-molecule signals, the ascarosides, control developmental diapause (dauer), olfactory learning, and social behaviors of the nematode model organism, Caenorhabditis elegans. The ascarosides act upstream of conserved signaling pathways, including the insulin, TGF-β, serotonin, and guanylyl cyclase pathways; however, the sensory processes underlying ascaroside function are poorly understood. Because ascarosides often are multifunctional and show strongly synergistic effects, characterization of their receptors will be essential for understanding ascaroside biology and may provide insight into molecular mechanisms that produce synergistic outcomes in small-molecule sensing. Based on DAF-8 immunoprecipitation, we here identify two G-protein–coupled receptors, DAF-37 and DAF-38, which cooperatively mediate ascaroside perception. daf-37 mutants are defective in all responses to ascr#2, one of the most potent dauer-inducing ascarosides, although this mutant responds normally to other ascarosides. In contrast, daf-38 mutants are partially defective in responses to several different ascarosides. Through cell-specific overexpression, we show that DAF-37 regulates dauer when expressed in ASI neurons and adult behavior when expressed in ASK neurons. Using a photoaffinity-labeled ascr#2 probe and amplified luminescence assays (AlphaScreen), we demonstrate that ascr#2 binds to DAF-37. Photobleaching fluorescent energy transfer assays revealed that DAF-37 and DAF-38 form heterodimers, and we show that heterodimerization strongly increases cAMP inhibition in response to ascr#2. These results suggest that that the ascarosides' intricate signaling properties result in part from the interaction of highly structure-specific G-protein–coupled receptors such as DAF-37 with more promiscuous G-protein–coupled receptors such as DAF-38. PMID:22665789

  18. Inhibition of GSK3 by lithium, from single molecules to signaling networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laure eFreland

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available For more than 60 years, the mood stabilizer lithium has been used alone or in combination for the treatment of bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, depression and other mental illnesses. Despite this long history, the molecular mechanisms trough which lithium regulates behavior are still poorly understood. Among several targets, lithium has been shown to directly inhibit glycogen synthase kinase 3 alpha and beta (GSK3α and GSK3β. However in vivo, lithium also inhibits GSK3 by regulating the activity of other mechanisms like the formation of a signaling complex comprised of beta-arrestin 2 and Akt. Here, we provide an overview of in vivo evidence supporting a role for inhibition of GSK3 in some behavioral effects of lithium. We also explore how regulation of GSK3 by lithium within a signaling network involving several molecular targets and cell surface receptors (e.g. G protein coupled receptors and receptor tyrosine kinases may provide cues to its relative pharmacological selectivity and its effects on disease mechanisms. A better understanding of these intricate actions of lithium at a systems level may allow the rational development of better mood stabilizer drugs with enhanced selectivity, efficacy and lesser side effects.

  19. Cyclic ADP-ribose as a universal calcium signal molecule in the nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higashida, Haruhiro; Salmina, Alla B; Olovyannikova, Raissa Ya; Hashii, Minako; Yokoyama, Shigeru; Koizumi, Keita; Jin, Duo; Liu, Hong-Xiang; Lopatina, Olga; Amina, Sarwat; Islam, Mohammad Saharul; Huang, Jian-Jun; Noda, Mami

    2007-01-01

    beta-NAD(+) is as abundant as ATP in neuronal cells. beta-NAD(+) functions not only as a coenzyme but also as a substrate. beta-NAD(+)-utilizing enzymes are involved in signal transduction. We focus on ADP-ribosyl cyclase/CD38 which synthesizes cyclic ADP-ribose (cADPR), a universal Ca(2+) mobilizer from intracellular stores, from beta-NAD(+). cADPR acts through activation/modulation of ryanodine receptor Ca(2+) releasing Ca(2+) channels. cADPR synthesis in neuronal cells is stimulated or modulated via different pathways and various factors. Subtype-specific coupling of various neurotransmitter receptors with ADP-ribosyl cyclase confirms the involvement of the enzyme in signal transduction in neurons and glial cells. Moreover, cADPR/CD38 is critical in oxytocin release from the hypothalamic cell dendrites and nerve terminals in the posterior pituitary. Therefore, it is possible that pharmacological manipulation of intracellular cADPR levels through ADP-ribosyl cyclase activity or synthetic cADPR analogues may provide new therapeutic opportunities for treatment of neurodevelopmental disorders.

  20. Antioxidant Role of Glutathione S-Transferases: 4-Hydroxynonenal, a Key Molecule in Stress-Mediated Signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singhal, Sharad S; Singh, Sharda P.; Singhal, Preeti; Horne, David; Singhal, Jyotsana; Awasthi, Sanjay

    2015-01-01

    4-Hydroxy-2-trans-nonenal (4HNE), one of the major end products of lipid peroxidation (LPO), has been shown to induce apoptosis in a variety of cell lines. It appears to modulate signaling processes in more than one way because it has been suggested to have a role in signaling for differentiation and proliferation. It has been known that glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) can reduce lipid hydroperoxides through their Se-independent glutathione-peroxidase activity and that these enzymes can also detoxify LPO end-products such as 4HNE. Available evidence from earlier studies together with results of recent studies in our laboratories strongly suggests that LPO products, particularly hydroperoxides and 4HNE, are involved in the mechanisms of stress-mediated signaling and that it can be modulated by the alpha-class GSTs through the regulation of the intracellular concentrations of 4HNE. We demonstrate 4HNE induced apoptosis in various cell lines is accompanied with c-Jun-N-terminal kinase (JNK) and caspase-3 activation. Cells exposed to mild, transient heat or oxidative stress acquire the capacity to exclude intracellular 4HNE at a faster rate by inducing GSTA4-4 which conjugate 4HNE to glutathione (GSH), and RLIP76 which mediates the ATP-dependent transport of the GSH-conjugate of 4HNE (GS-HNE). The balance between formation and exclusion promotes different cellular processes – higher concentrations of 4HNE promote apoptosis; whereas, lower concentrations promote proliferation. In this article, we provide a brief summary of the cellular effects of 4HNE, followed by a review of its GST-catalyzed detoxification, with an emphasis on the structural attributes that play an important role in the interactions with alpha-class GSTA4-4. Taken together, 4HNE is a key signaling molecule and that GSTs being determinants of its intracellular concentrations, can regulate stress-mediated signaling, are reviewed in this article. PMID:26476300

  1. Antioxidant role of glutathione S-transferases: 4-Hydroxynonenal, a key molecule in stress-mediated signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singhal, Sharad S; Singh, Sharda P; Singhal, Preeti; Horne, David; Singhal, Jyotsana; Awasthi, Sanjay

    2015-12-15

    4-Hydroxy-2-trans-nonenal (4HNE), one of the major end products of lipid peroxidation (LPO), has been shown to induce apoptosis in a variety of cell lines. It appears to modulate signaling processes in more than one way because it has been suggested to have a role in signaling for differentiation and proliferation. It has been known that glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) can reduce lipid hydroperoxides through their Se-independent glutathione-peroxidase activity and that these enzymes can also detoxify LPO end-products such as 4HNE. Available evidence from earlier studies together with results of recent studies in our laboratories strongly suggests that LPO products, particularly hydroperoxides and 4HNE, are involved in the mechanisms of stress-mediated signaling and that it can be modulated by the alpha-class GSTs through the regulation of the intracellular concentrations of 4HNE. We demonstrate that 4HNE induced apoptosis in various cell lines is accompanied with c-Jun-N-terminal kinase (JNK) and caspase-3 activation. Cells exposed to mild, transient heat or oxidative stress acquire the capacity to exclude intracellular 4HNE at a faster rate by inducing GSTA4-4 which conjugates 4HNE to glutathione (GSH), and RLIP76 which mediates the ATP-dependent transport of the GSH-conjugate of 4HNE (GS-HNE). The balance between formation and exclusion promotes different cellular processes - higher concentrations of 4HNE promote apoptosis; whereas, lower concentrations promote proliferation. In this article, we provide a brief summary of the cellular effects of 4HNE, followed by a review of its GST-catalyzed detoxification, with an emphasis on the structural attributes that play an important role in the interactions with alpha-class GSTA4-4. Taken together, 4HNE is a key signaling molecule and that GSTs being determinants of its intracellular concentrations, can regulate stress-mediated signaling, are reviewed in this article.

  2. Signaling molecules regulating phenotypic conversions of astrocytes and glial scar formation in damaged nerve tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyama, Yutaka

    2014-12-01

    Phenotypic conversion of astrocytes from resting to reactive (i.e., astrocytic activation) occurs in numerous brain disorders. Astrocytic activation in severely damaged brain regions often leads to glial scar formation. Because astrocytic activation and glial scar largely affect the vulnerability and tissue repair of damaged brain, numerous studies have been made to clarify mechanisms regulating the astrocytic phenotype. The phenotypic conversion is accompanied by the increased expression of intermediate filament proteins and the induction of hypertrophy in reactive astrocytes. Severe brain damage results in proliferation and migration of reactive astrocytes, which lead to glial scar formations at the injured areas. Gliogenesis from neural progenitors in the adult brain is also involved in astrocytic activation and glial scar formation. Recent studies have shown that increased expression of connexin 43, aquaporin 4, matrix metalloproteinase 9, and integrins alter the function of astrocytes. The transcription factors: STAT3, OLIG2, SMAD, NF-κB, and Sp1 have been suggested to play regulatory roles in astrocytic activation and glial scar formation. In this review, I discuss the roles of these key molecules regulating the pathophysiological functions of reactive astrocytes.

  3. Small molecule inhibitors of the Candida albicans budded-to-hyphal transition act through multiple signaling pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Midkiff

    Full Text Available The ability of the pathogenic yeast Candida albicans to interconvert between budded and hyphal growth states, herein termed the budded-to-hyphal transition (BHT, is important for C. albicans development and virulence. The BHT is under the control of multiple cell signaling pathways that respond to external stimuli, including nutrient availability, high temperature, and pH. Previous studies identified 21 small molecules that could inhibit the C. albicans BHT in response to carbon limitation in Spider media. However, the studies herein show that the BHT inhibitors had varying efficacies in other hyphal-inducing media, reflecting their varying abilities to block signaling pathways associated with the different media. Chemical epistasis analyses suggest that most, but not all, of the BHT inhibitors were acting through either the Efg1 or Cph1 signaling pathways. Notably, the BHT inhibitor clozapine, a FDA-approved drug used to treat atypical schizophrenia by inhibiting G-protein-coupled dopamine receptors in the brain, and several of its functional analogs were shown to act at the level of the Gpr1 G-protein-coupled receptor. These studies are the first step in determining the target and mechanism of action of these BHT inhibitors, which may have therapeutic anti-fungal utility in the future.

  4. Cytokinins and auxin communicate nitrogen availability as long-distance signal molecules in pineapple (Ananas comosus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamaki, Vívian; Mercier, Helenice

    2007-11-01

    This work aimed at identifying a possible role of phytohormones in long-distance (root-shoot) signaling under nitrogen deficiency. Three-months old pineapple plants were transferred from Murashige and Skoog (MS) medium to nitrogen-free MS (-N). During the first 24h on -N, 20 plants were harvested every 4h. After 30 days in -N, the remaining plants were transferred back to regular MS (+N) and 20 plants harvested every 4h for the first 24h. Following the harvests, endogenous levels of nitrate (NO(3)(-)), indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), isopentenyladenine (iP), isopentenyladenine riboside (iPR), zeatin (Z) and zeatin riboside (ZR) were analyzed in roots and leaves. In N-starved plants, the NO(3)(-) level dropped by 20% in roots between the first (4h) and the second harvest (8h). In leaves a reduction of 20% was found 4h later. Accumulation of IAA peaked in leaves at 16h. In roots, the accumulation of IAA only started at 16h while the leaf content was already in decline, which suggests that the hormone might have traveled from the leaves to the roots, communicating N-shortage. The contents of the four cytokinins were generally low in both, shoot and roots, and remained almost unchanged during the 24h of analysis. After N re-supply, roots showed a NO(3)(-) peak at 8h whereas the foliar concentration increased 4h later. Hormone levels in roots climaxed at 8h, this coinciding with the highest NO(3)(-) concentration. In leaf tissue, a dramatic accumulation was only observed for Z and ZR, and the peak was seen 4h later than in roots, suggesting that Z-type cytokinins might have traveled from the roots to the leaves. These findings provide evidence that there is a signaling pathway for N availability in pineapple plants, communicated upwards through cytokinins (N-supplemented plants) and downwards through auxin (N-starved plants).

  5. Pseudomonas aeruginosa quorum-sensing signaling molecule N-3-oxododecanoyl homoserine lactone induces matrix metalloproteinase 9 expression via the AP1 pathway in rat fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagami, Gojiro; Minematsu, Takeo; Morohoshi, Tomohiro; Yamane, Takumi; Kanazawa, Toshiki; Huang, Lijuan; Asada, Mayumi; Nagase, Takashi; Ikeda, Shin-ichi; Ikeda, Tsukasa; Sanada, Hiromi

    2015-01-01

    Quorum sensing is a cell-to-cell communication mechanism, which is responsible for regulating a number of bacterial virulence factors and biofilm maturation and therefore plays an important role for establishing wound infection. Quorum-sensing signals may induce inflammation and predispose wounds to infection by Pseudomonas aeruginosa; however, the interaction has not been well investigated. We examined the effects of the P. aeruginosa las quorum-sensing signal, N-3-oxo-dodecanoyl homoserine lactone (3OC12-HSL), on matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) 9 expression in Rat-1 fibroblasts. 3OC12-HSL upregulated the expression of the MMP9 gene bearing an activator protein-1 (AP-1) binding site in the promoter region. We further investigated the mechanism underlying this effect. c-Fos gene expression increased rapidly after exposure to 3OC12-HSL, and nuclear translocation of c-Fos protein was observed; both effects were reduced by pretreatment with an AP-1 inhibitor. These results suggest that 3OC12-HSL can alter MMP9 gene expression in fibroblasts via the AP-1 signaling pathway.

  6. Tumor suppressor microRNAs: Targeted molecules and signaling pathways in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asghari, F; Haghnavaz, N; Baradaran, B; Hemmatzadeh, M; Kazemi, T

    2016-07-01

    Breast cancer is the most common type of cancer in women whose prevalence is increasing every year. Common strategies for diagnosis, prognosis and specific treatment of breast cancer need improvements to increase patients' survival. For this reason, there is growing number of efforts world-wide with molecular approaches. With the advent of microRNAs (miRNAs), they have been interested for almost all aspects of tumorgenesis and correlation of breast cancer and microRNAs was discovered for the first time in 2005. MiRNAs form a group of small noncoding RNAs which participate in regulation of gene expression and subsequently several biological processes and pathogenesis of various diseases. As other cancers, miRNAs involved in breast cancer are classified in two groups: the first group is tumor inducing miRNAs (also called oncomirs) that can induce tumor initiation and progression, and their expression is increased in cancerous cells. The second group is tumor suppressor miRNAs. In normal situation, tumor suppressor miRNAs prevent beginning and progression of breast cancer through suppressing the expression of various oncogenes. In this review we will give a general overview about miRNAs and breast cancer, and in the following, more discussion about tumor suppressor miRNAs, with focus on the best known of them and their targeted oncogenes and signaling pathways. Finally, we will point to application of this group of miRNAs in diagnosis, prognosis and treatment of patients.

  7. Caenorhabditis elegans recognizes a bacterial quorum-sensing signal molecule through the AWCON neuron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Kristen M; Perez, Lark J; Ghosh, Rajarshi; Semmelhack, Martin F; Bassler, Bonnie L

    2014-09-19

    In a process known as quorum sensing, bacteria use chemicals called autoinducers for cell-cell communication. Population-wide detection of autoinducers enables bacteria to orchestrate collective behaviors. In the animal kingdom detection of chemicals is vital for success in locating food, finding hosts, and avoiding predators. This behavior, termed chemotaxis, is especially well studied in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. Here we demonstrate that the Vibrio cholerae autoinducer (S)-3-hydroxytridecan-4-one, termed CAI-1, influences chemotaxis in C. elegans. C. elegans prefers V. cholerae that produces CAI-1 over a V. cholerae mutant defective for CAI-1 production. The position of the CAI-1 ketone moiety is the key feature driving CAI-1-directed nematode behavior. CAI-1 is detected by the C. elegans amphid sensory neuron AWC(ON). Laser ablation of the AWC(ON) cell, but not other amphid sensory neurons, abolished chemoattraction to CAI-1. These analyses define the structural features of a bacterial-produced signal and the nematode chemosensory neuron that permit cross-kingdom interaction.

  8. Amniotic fluid may act as a transporting pathway for signaling molecules and stem cells during the embryonic development of amniotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Xinglong

    2013-11-01

    Amniotic fluid (AF) is formed at the very early stages of pregnancy, and is present throughout embryonic development of amniotes. It is well-known that AF provides a protective sac around the fetus that allows fetal movement and growth, and prevents mechanical and thermal shock. However, a growing body of evidence has shown that AF contains a number of proteins and peptides, including growth factors and cytokines, which potently affect cellular growth and proliferation. In addition, pluripotent stem cells have recently been identified in AF. Herein, this article reviews the biological properties of AF during embryonic development and speculates that AF may act as a transporting pathway for signaling molecules and stem cells during amniote embryonic development. Defining this novel function of AF is potentially significant for further understanding embryonic development and regenerative medicine, preventing genetic diseases, and developing therapeutic options for human malignancies.

  9. A natural-like synthetic small molecule impairs bcr-abl signaling cascades and induces megakaryocyte differentiation in erythroleukemia cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Turroni

    Full Text Available Over the past years, we synthesized a series of new molecules that are hybrids of spirocyclic ketones as complexity-bearing cores with bi- and ter-phenyls as privileged fragments. Some of these newly-shaped small molecules showed antiproliferative, pro-apoptotic and differentiating activity in leukemia cell lines. In the present study, to investigate more in depth the mechanisms of action of these molecules, the protein expression profiles of K562 cells treated with or without the compounds IND_S1, MEL_T1, IND_S7 and MEL_S3 were analyzed using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis coupled with mass spectrometry. Proteome comparisons revealed several differentially expressed proteins, mainly related to cellular metabolism, chaperone activity, cytoskeletal organization and RNA biogenesis. The major results were validated by Western blot and qPCR. To attempt integrating findings into a cellular signaling context, proteomic data were explored using MetaCore. Network analysis highlighted relevant relationships between the identified proteins and additional potential effectors. Notably, qPCR validation of central hubs showed that the compound MEL_S3 induced high mRNA levels of the transcriptional factors EGR1 and HNF4-alpha; the latter to our knowledge is reported here for the first time to be present in K562 cells. Consistently with the known EGR1 involvement in the regulation of differentiation along megakaryocyte lineage, MEL_S3-treated leukemia cells showed a marked expression of glycoprotein IIb/IIIa (CD41 and glycoprotein Ib (CD42, two important cell markers in megakaryocytic differentiation, together with morphological aspects of megakaryoblasts and megakaryocytes.

  10. Molecule-binding dependent assembly of split aptamer and γ-cyclodextrin: A sensitive excimer signaling approach for aptamer biosensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Fen [State Key Laboratory of Chemo/Biosensing and Chemometrics, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Hubei Key Laboratory of Mine Environmental Pollution Control and Remediation, Environmental Science and Engineering College, Hubei Polytechnic University, Huangshi 435003 (China); Lian, Yan; Li, Jishan; Zheng, Jing; Hu, Yaping; Liu, Jinhua; Huang, Jin [State Key Laboratory of Chemo/Biosensing and Chemometrics, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Yang, Ronghua, E-mail: Yangrh@pku.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Chemo/Biosensing and Chemometrics, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China)

    2013-10-17

    Graphical abstract: Adenosine-binding aptamer was splitted into two fragments P2 and P3 which labeled pyrene molecules, mainly produce monomer signal. γ-CD cavity brings P2 and P3 in close proximity, allowing for weak excimer emission. In the presence of target, P2 and P3 are expected to bind ATP and form an aptamer/target complex, leads to large increase of the pyrene excimer fluorescence. -- Highlights: •We assembled split aptamer and γ-cyclodextrin fluorescence biosensors for ATP detection. •The biosensor increased quantum yield and emission lifetime of the excimer. •Time-resolved fluorescence is effective for ATP assay in complicated environment. -- Abstract: A highly sensitive and selective fluorescence aptamer biosensors for the determination of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) was developed. Binding of a target with splitting aptamers labeled with pyrene molecules form stable pyrene dimer in the γ-cyclodextrin (γ-CD) cavity, yielding a strong excimer emission. We have found that inclusion of pyrene dimer in γ-cyclodextrin cavity not only exhibits additive increases in quantum yield and emission lifetime of the excimer, but also facilitates target-induced fusion of the splitting aptamers to form the aptamer/target complex. As proof-of-principle, the approach was applied to fluorescence detection of adenosine triphosphate. With an anti-ATP aptamer, the approach exhibits excimer fluorescence response toward ATP with a maximum signal-to-background ratio of 32.1 and remarkably low detection limit of 80 nM ATP in buffer solution. Moreover, due to the additive fluorescence lifetime of excimer induced by γ-cyclodextrin, time-resolved measurements could be conveniently used to detect as low as 0.5 μM ATP in blood serum quantitatively.

  11. NBBA, a synthetic small molecule, inhibits TNF-{alpha}-induced angiogenesis by suppressing the NF-{kappa}B signaling pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Nam Hee; Jung, Hye Jin [Chemical Genomics Laboratory, Department of Biotechnology, Translational Research Center for Protein Function Control, College of Life Science and Biotechnology, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Shibasaki, Futoshi [Translation Research Project, Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Medical Science, Tokyo 156-8506 (Japan); Kwon, Ho Jeong, E-mail: kwonhj@yonsei.ac.kr [Chemical Genomics Laboratory, Department of Biotechnology, Translational Research Center for Protein Function Control, College of Life Science and Biotechnology, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-01-15

    Nuclear factor-{kappa}B (NF-{kappa}B) is a crucial transcription factor that contributes to cancer development by regulating a number of genes involved in angiogenesis and tumorigenesis. Here, we describe (Z)-N-(3-(7-nitro-3-oxobenzo[d][1,2]selenazol-2(3H)-yl)benzylidene) propan-2-amine oxide (NBBA) as a new anti-angiogenic small molecule that targets NF-{kappa}B activity. NBBA showed stronger growth inhibition on human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) than on the cancer cell lines we tested. Moreover, NBBA inhibited tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-{alpha})-induced tube formation and invasion of HUVECs. In addition, NBBA suppressed the neovascularization of chorioallantonic membrane from growing chick embryos in vivo. To address the mode of action of the compound, the effect of NBBA on TNF-{alpha}-induced NF-{kappa}B transcription activity was investigated. NBBA suppressed TNF-{alpha}-induced c-Jun N-terminal kinase phosphorylation, which resulted in suppression of transcription of NF-{kappa}B and its target genes, including interleukin-8, interleukin-1{alpha}, and epidermal growth factor. Collectively, these results demonstrated that NBBA is a new anti-angiogenic small molecule that targets the NF-{kappa}B signaling pathway.

  12. Extracellular Membrane Vesicles as Vehicles for Brain Cell-to-Cell Interactions in Physiological as well as Pathological Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriella Schiera

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular vesicles are involved in a great variety of physiological events occurring in the nervous system, such as cross talk among neurons and glial cells in synapse development and function, integrated neuronal plasticity, neuronal-glial metabolic exchanges, and synthesis and dynamic renewal of myelin. Many of these EV-mediated processes depend on the exchange of proteins, mRNAs, and noncoding RNAs, including miRNAs, which occurs among glial and neuronal cells. In addition, production and exchange of EVs can be modified under pathological conditions, such as brain cancer and neurodegeneration. Like other cancer cells, brain tumours can use EVs to secrete factors, which allow escaping from immune surveillance, and to transfer molecules into the surrounding cells, thus transforming their phenotype. Moreover, EVs can function as a way to discard material dangerous to cancer cells, such as differentiation-inducing proteins, and even drugs. Intriguingly, EVs seem to be also involved in spreading through the brain of aggregated proteins, such as prions and aggregated tau protein. Finally, EVs can carry useful biomarkers for the early diagnosis of diseases. Herein we summarize possible roles of EVs in brain physiological functions and discuss their involvement in the horizontal spreading, from cell to cell, of both cancer and neurodegenerative pathologies.

  13. Global Dynamics of a Virus Dynamical Model with Cell-to-Cell Transmission and Cure Rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tongqian Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The cure effect of a virus model with both cell-to-cell transmission and cell-to-virus transmission is studied. By the method of next generation matrix, the basic reproduction number is obtained. The locally asymptotic stability of the virus-free equilibrium and the endemic equilibrium is considered by investigating the characteristic equation of the model. The globally asymptotic stability of the virus-free equilibrium is proved by constructing suitable Lyapunov function, and the sufficient condition for the globally asymptotic stability of the endemic equilibrium is obtained by constructing suitable Lyapunov function and using LaSalle invariance principal.

  14. Asymptotic behaviors of a cell-to-cell HIV-1 infection model perturbed by white noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qun

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, we analyze a mathematical model of cell-to-cell HIV-1 infection to CD4+ T cells perturbed by stochastic perturbations. First of all, we investigate that there exists a unique global positive solution of the system for any positive initial value. Then by using Lyapunov analysis methods, we study the asymptotic property of this solution. Moreover, we discuss whether there is a stationary distribution for this system and if it owns the ergodic property. Numerical simulations are presented to illustrate the theoretical results.

  15. Computing the threshold of the influence of intercellular nanotubes on cell-to-cell communication integrity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihailović, Dragutin T.; Kostić, Vladimir R.; Balaž, Igor; Kapor, Darko

    2016-10-01

    We examine the threshold of the influence of the tunneling nanotubes (TNTs) on the cell-to-cell communication integrity. A deterministic model is introduced with the Michaelis-Menten dynamics and the intercellular exchange of substance. The influence of TNTs are considered as a functional perturbation of the main communication and treated as the matrix nearness problems. We analyze communication integrity in terms of the \\emph{pseudospectra} of the exchange, to find the \\emph{distance to instability}. The threshold of TNTs influence is computed for Newman-Gastner and Erd\\H{o}s-R\\'enyi gap junction (GJ) networks.

  16. Expression analysis of taste signal transduction molecules in the fungiform and circumvallate papillae of the rhesus macaque, Macaca mulatta.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshiro Ishimaru

    Full Text Available The molecular mechanisms of the mammalian gustatory system have been examined in many studies using rodents as model organisms. In this study, we examined the mRNA expression of molecules involved in taste signal transduction in the fungiform papillae (FuP and circumvallate papillae (CvP of the rhesus macaque, Macaca mulatta, using in situ hybridization. TAS1R1, TAS1R2, TAS2Rs, and PKD1L3 were exclusively expressed in different subsets of taste receptor cells (TRCs in the FuP and CvP. This finding suggests that TRCs sensing different basic taste modalities are mutually segregated in macaque taste buds. Individual TAS2Rs exhibited a variety of expression patterns in terms of the apparent level of expression and the number of TRCs expressing these genes, as in the case of human TAS2Rs. GNAT3, but not GNA14, was expressed in TRCs of FuP, whereas GNA14 was expressed in a small population of TRCs of CvP, which were distinct from GNAT3- or TAS1R2-positive TRCs. These results demonstrate similarities and differences between primates and rodents in the expression profiles of genes involved in taste signal transduction.

  17. Stable isotope labelling reveals that NaCl stress decreases the production of Ensifer (Sinorhizobium) arboris lipochitooligosaccharide signalling molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penttinen, Petri; Räsänen, Leena A; Lortet, Gilles; Lindström, Kristina

    2013-12-01

    Ensifer (Sinorhizobium) arboris is a symbiont of salt-tolerant leguminous trees in the genera Acacia and Prosopis that are utilized in the prevention of soil erosion and desertification and in phytoremediation of salinized soil. Signalling between the plant and the rhizobia is essential for the formation of effective symbiosis that increases the success of reclaiming saline sites. We assessed the effect of salt stress on the growth and the production of lipochitooligosaccharide signalling molecules (LCOs) of S. arboris HAMBI 2361, an LCO-overproducing derivative of the S. arboris type strain HAMBI 1552. The strain tolerated NaCl up to 750 mM. To obtain both qualitative and quantitative information on the LCO production under salt stress, we devised a method where LCOs were differentially labelled by stable isotopes of nitrogen, (14)N and (15)N, and analysed by mass spectrometry. Under control conditions, the strain produced altogether 27 structural LCO variants. In 380 mM NaCl, 13 LCO variants were produced in detectable amounts, and six of these were reliably quantified, ranging from one-tenth to one-third of the non-stressed one.

  18. A stromal interaction molecule 1 variant up-regulates matrix metalloproteinase-2 expression by strengthening nucleoplasmic Ca2+ signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Fengrong; Zhu, Liping; Cai, Lei; Zhang, Jiwei; Zeng, Xianqin; Li, Jiansha; Su, Yuan; Hu, Qinghua

    2016-04-01

    Very recent studies hold promise to reveal the role of stromal interaction molecule 1 (STIM1) in non-store-operated Ca2+ entry. Here we showed that in contrast to cytoplasmic membrane redistribution as previously noted, human umbilical vein endothelial STIM1 with a T-to-C nucleotide transition resulting in an amino acid substitution of leucine by proline in the signal peptide sequence translocated to perinuclear membrane upon intracellular Ca2+ depletion, amplified nucleoplasmic Ca2+ signaling through ryanodine receptor-dependent pathway, and enhanced the subsequent cAMP responsive element binding protein activity, matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) gene expression, and endothelial tube forming. The abundance of mutated STIM1 and the MMP-2 expression were higher in native human umbilical vein endothelial cells of patients with gestational hypertension than controls and were significantly correlated with blood pressure. These findings broaden our understanding about structure-function bias of STIM1 and offer unique insights into its application in nucleoplasmic Ca2+, MMP-2 expression, endothelial dysfunction, and pathophysiological mechanism(s) of gestational hypertension.

  19. Pseudomonas fragi strains isolated from meat do not produce N-acyl homoserine lactones as signal molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrocino, Ilario; Ercolini, Danilo; Villani, Francesco; Moorhead, Sandra M; Griffiths, Mansel W

    2009-12-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) is a signalling mechanism through which bacteria cellular functions are modified to promote access to nutrients and more favorable environmental niches. The frequent occurrence of Pseudomonas spp. in fresh and spoiled meat may involve enhanced gene expression regulated by QS. Several Pseudomonas spp. produce different N-acyl homoserine lactone (AHL) signal molecules. Meat spoilage during aerobic, refrigerated storage is often associated with the presence of Pseudomonas fragi. As with other Pseudomonas species in natural habitats, the dominance and activities of P. fragi in meat may be regulated by QS. In this study, five biosensor strains were used to detect AHL production on three different media by 72 different P. fragi strains isolated from fresh and spoiled meat. Positive and negative AHL-producing strains were used to verify the assays. None of the strains produced detectable quantities of AHLs, even when concentrated cell-free culture supernatants were assayed, nor did exogenous lactones increase biofilm formation in P. fragi strains. However, all isolates produced furanosyl borate diesters (type II autoinducers; AI-2) when tested using the bioluminescent biosensor strain of Vibrio harveyi (BB170). The production of AI-2 was presumed to be of metabolic origin even though Pseudomonas spp. have not been shown to harbor the luxS gene. Thus, the efficient development of P. fragi in fresh meat is not regulated by an AHL-mediated QS system. The mechanism of AI-2 production and its possible role in spoilage dynamics needs further study.

  20. Regulation of ITAM adaptor molecules and their receptors by inhibition of calcineurin-NFAT signalling during late stage osteoclast differentiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zawawi, M.S.F. [Universiti Sains Malaysia (USM) (Malaysia); Discipline of Anatomy and Pathology, School of Medical Sciences, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, SA 5005 (Australia); Dharmapatni, A.A.S.S.K.; Cantley, M.D. [Discipline of Anatomy and Pathology, School of Medical Sciences, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, SA 5005 (Australia); McHugh, K.P. [University of Florida, College of Dentistry, Fl (United States); Haynes, D.R. [Discipline of Anatomy and Pathology, School of Medical Sciences, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, SA 5005 (Australia); Crotti, T.N., E-mail: tania.crotti@adelaide.edu.au [Discipline of Anatomy and Pathology, School of Medical Sciences, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, SA 5005 (Australia)

    2012-10-19

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Calcineurin/NFAT inhibitors FK506 and VIVIT treated human PBMC derived osteoclasts in vitro. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Differential regulation of ITAM receptors and adaptor molecules by calcineurin/NFAT inhibitors. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer FK506 and VIVIT suppress ITAM factors during late phase osteoclast differentiation. -- Abstract: Osteoclasts are specialised bone resorptive cells responsible for both physiological and pathological bone loss. Osteoclast differentiation and activity is dependent upon receptor activator NF-kappa-B ligand (RANKL) interacting with its receptor RANK to induce the transcription factor, nuclear factor of activated T-cells, cytoplasmic, calcineurin-dependent 1 (NFATc1). The immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM)-dependent pathway has been identified as a co-stimulatory pathway in osteoclasts. Osteoclast-associated receptor (OSCAR) and triggering receptor expressed in myeloid cells (TREM2) are essential receptors that pair with adaptor molecules Fc receptor common gamma chain (FcR{gamma}) and DNAX-activating protein 12 kDa (DAP12) respectively to induce calcium signalling. Treatment with calcineurin-NFAT inhibitors, Tacrolimus (FK506) and the 11R-VIVIT (VIVIT) peptide, reduces NFATc1 expression consistent with a reduction in osteoclast differentiation and activity. This study aimed to investigate the effects of inhibiting calcineurin-NFAT signalling on the expression of ITAM factors and late stage osteoclast genes including cathepsin K (CathK), Beta 3 integrin ({beta}3) and Annexin VIII (AnnVIII). Human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were differentiated with RANKL and macrophage-colony stimulating factor (M-CSF) over 10 days in the presence or absence of FK506 or VIVIT. Osteoclast formation (as assessed by tartrate resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP)) and activity (assessed by dentine pit resorption) were significantly reduced with treatment. Quantitative real

  1. Cytorhabdovirus P3 genes encode 30K-like cell-to-cell movement proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Krin S; Bejerman, Nicolas; Johnson, Karyn N; Dietzgen, Ralf G

    2016-02-01

    Plant viruses encode movement proteins (MP) to facilitate cell-to-cell transport through plasmodesmata. In this study, using trans-complementation of a movement-defective turnip vein-clearing tobamovirus (TVCV) replicon, we show for the first time for cytorhabdoviruses (lettuce necrotic yellows virus (LNYV) and alfalfa dwarf virus (ADV)) that their P3 proteins function as MP similar to the TVCV P30 protein. All three MP localized to plasmodesmata when ectopically expressed. In addition, we show that these MP belong to the 30K superfamily since movement was inhibited by mutation of an aspartic acid residue in the critical 30K-specific LxD/N50-70G motif. We also report that Nicotiana benthamiana microtubule-associated VOZ1-like transcriptional activator interacts with LNYV P3 and TVCV P30 but not with ADV P3 or any of the MP point mutants. This host protein, which is known to interact with P3 of sonchus yellow net nucleorhabdovirus, may be involved in aiding the cell-to-cell movement of LNYV and TVCV.

  2. Effect of promoter architecture on the cell-to-cell variability in gene expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alvaro Sanchez

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available According to recent experimental evidence, promoter architecture, defined by the number, strength and regulatory role of the operators that control transcription, plays a major role in determining the level of cell-to-cell variability in gene expression. These quantitative experiments call for a corresponding modeling effort that addresses the question of how changes in promoter architecture affect variability in gene expression in a systematic rather than case-by-case fashion. In this article we make such a systematic investigation, based on a microscopic model of gene regulation that incorporates stochastic effects. In particular, we show how operator strength and operator multiplicity affect this variability. We examine different modes of transcription factor binding to complex promoters (cooperative, independent, simultaneous and how each of these affects the level of variability in transcriptional output from cell-to-cell. We propose that direct comparison between in vivo single-cell experiments and theoretical predictions for the moments of the probability distribution of mRNA number per cell can be used to test kinetic models of gene regulation. The emphasis of the discussion is on prokaryotic gene regulation, but our analysis can be extended to eukaryotic cells as well.

  3. Natural sequence variants of yeast environmental sensors confer cell-to-cell expression variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fehrmann, Steffen; Bottin-Duplus, Hélène; Leonidou, Andri; Mollereau, Esther; Barthelaix, Audrey; Wei, Wu; Steinmetz, Lars M; Yvert, Gaël

    2013-10-08

    Living systems may have evolved probabilistic bet hedging strategies that generate cell-to-cell phenotypic diversity in anticipation of environmental catastrophes, as opposed to adaptation via a deterministic response to environmental changes. Evolution of bet hedging assumes that genotypes segregating in natural populations modulate the level of intraclonal diversity, which so far has largely remained hypothetical. Using a fluorescent P(met17)-GFP reporter, we mapped four genetic loci conferring to a wild yeast strain an elevated cell-to-cell variability in the expression of MET17, a gene regulated by the methionine pathway. A frameshift mutation in the Erc1p transmembrane transporter, probably resulting from a release of laboratory strains from negative selection, reduced P(met17)-GFP expression variability. At a second locus, cis-regulatory polymorphisms increased mean expression of the Mup1p methionine permease, causing increased expression variability in trans. These results demonstrate that an expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL) can simultaneously have a deterministic effect in cis and a probabilistic effect in trans. Our observations indicate that the evolution of transmembrane transporter genes can tune intraclonal variation and may therefore be implicated in both reactive and anticipatory strategies of adaptation.

  4. Surface molecules that drive T cell development in vitro in the absence of thymic epithelium and in the absence of lineage-specific signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cibotti, R; Punt, J A; Dash, K S; Sharrow, S O; Singer, A

    1997-03-01

    Differentiation of immature double positive (DP) CD4+ CD8+ thymocytes into single positive (SP) CD4+ and CD8+ T cells is referred to as positive selection and requires physical contact with thymic cortical epithelium. We now have identified "coinducer" molecules on DP thymocytes that, together with TCR, signal DP thymocytes to differentiate into SP T cells in vitro in the absence of thymic epithelium. A remarkable number of different molecules on DP thymocytes possessed "coinducing" activity, including CD2, CD5, CD24, CD28, CD49d, CD81, and TSA-1. Interestingly, in vitro differentiation occurred in the absence of lineage-specific signals, yet resulted in the selective generation of CD4+CD8- T cells. Thus, the present study has identified surface molecules that can signal DP thymocytes to differentiate into SP T cells in the absence of thymic epithelium and has characterized a default pathway for CD4+ T cell differentiation.

  5. Ligation of MHC class I and class II molecules can lead to heterologous desensitization of signal transduction pathways that regulate homotypic adhesion in human lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, N; Engel, P; Vega, M; Tedder, T F

    1994-06-01

    Engagement of lymphocyte MHC class I and class II Ags activates an array of intracellular signal transduction pathways that up-regulates the activity of cell-surface adhesion receptors, resulting in homotypic cell-cell aggregation. In this study, engagement of MHC class I and class II molecules with specific mAbs was shown to also inhibit lymphocyte homotypic adhesion. Two mAbs reactive with class II Ag, homotypic adhesion blocking mAb (HAB)-2, and HAB-3, and one mAb reactive with class I Ag, HAB-4, were generated that inhibited homotypic adhesion of activated lymphocytes and B and T cell lines at concentrations as low as 0.1 microgram/ml. Binding of these mAbs resulted in heterologous desensitization of other surface signal transduction molecules as homotypic adhesion induced through class I, class II, CD19, CD20, CD39, CD40, Leu-13, and PMA was also inhibited. The spontaneous adhesion exhibited by some cell lines was also abrogated by binding of these mAbs. Abs that either induced, blocked, or had no effect on adhesion bound to distinct epitopes on class I, whereas the anti-class II mAbs recognized either distinct or overlapping epitopes. Thus, engagement of distinct epitopes on MHC molecules can result in homologous or heterologous desensitization of cell-surface signaling molecules. The induction or inhibition of homotypic adhesion through class I molecules did not require the presence of the cytoplasmic domain, as deletion of this portion of the class I molecule had no effect. In contrast, the transmembrane region was essential for signal transduction as the mAbs binding to a chimeric molecule in which the transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains of class I were exchanged with those of the HB15 molecule did not induce or inhibit homotypic adhesion. Although this report is the first demonstration that homotypic adhesion can be influenced in a negative manner through MHC molecules, these findings demonstrate a considerable level of cross-talk between MHC molecules

  6. Clinical development of galunisertib (LY2157299 monohydrate, a small molecule inhibitor of transforming growth factor-beta signaling pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herbertz S

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Stephan Herbertz,1 J Scott Sawyer,2 Anja J Stauber,2 Ivelina Gueorguieva,3 Kyla E Driscoll,4 Shawn T Estrem,2 Ann L Cleverly,3 Durisala Desaiah,2 Susan C Guba,2 Karim A Benhadji,2 Christopher A Slapak,2 Michael M Lahn21Lilly Deutschland GmbH, Bad Homburg, Germany; 2Lilly Research Laboratories, Eli Lilly and Company, Indianapolis, IN, USA; 3Lilly Research Laboratories, Eli Lilly and Company, Windlesham, Surrey, UK; 4Lilly Research Laboratories, Eli Lilly and Company, New York, NY, USA Abstract: Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β signaling regulates a wide range of biological processes. TGF-β plays an important role in tumorigenesis and contributes to the hallmarks of cancer, including tumor proliferation, invasion and metastasis, inflammation, angiogenesis, and escape of immune surveillance. There are several pharmacological approaches to block TGF-β signaling, such as monoclonal antibodies, vaccines, antisense oligonucleotides, and small molecule inhibitors. Galunisertib (LY2157299 monohydrate is an oral small molecule inhibitor of the TGF-β receptor I kinase that specifically downregulates the phosphorylation of SMAD2, abrogating activation of the canonical pathway. Furthermore, galunisertib has antitumor activity in tumor-bearing animal models such as breast, colon, lung cancers, and hepatocellular carcinoma. Continuous long-term exposure to galunisertib caused cardiac toxicities in animals requiring adoption of a pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic-based dosing strategy to allow further development. The use of such a pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic model defined a therapeutic window with an appropriate safety profile that enabled the clinical investigation of galunisertib. These efforts resulted in an intermittent dosing regimen (14 days on/14 days off, on a 28-day cycle of galunisertib for all ongoing trials. Galunisertib is being investigated either as monotherapy or in combination with standard antitumor regimens (including nivolumab

  7. New connections: Cell to cell HIV-1 transmission, resistance to broadly neutralizing antibodies, and an envelope sorting motif.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, S Abigail; Derdeyn, Cynthia A

    2017-03-01

    HIV-1 infection from cell to cell may provide an efficient mode of viral spread in vivo and could therefore present a significant challenge for preventative or therapeutic strategies based on broadly neutralizing antibodies. Indeed, Li et al show that the potency and magnitude of multiple HIV-1 broadly neutralizing antibody classes are decreased during cell to cell infection in a context dependent manner. A functional motif in gp41 appears to contribute to this differential susceptibility by modulating exposure of neutralization epitopes.

  8. Investigating a possible role for the bacterial signal molecules N-acylhomoserine lactones in Balanus improvisus cyprid settlement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tait, Karen; Havenhand, Jon

    2013-05-01

    Increased settlement on bacterial biofilms has been demonstrated for a number of marine invertebrate larvae, but the nature of the cue(s) responsible is not well understood. We tested the hypothesis that the bay barnacle Balanus improvisus utilizes the bacterial signal molecules N-acylhomoserine lactones (AHLs) as a cue for the selection of sites for permanent attachment. Single species biofilms of the AHL-producing bacteria Vibrio anguillarum, Aeromonas hydrophila and Sulfitobacter sp. BR1 were attractive to settling cypris larvae of B. improvisus. However, when AHL production was inactivated, either by mutation of the AHL synthetic genes or by expression of an AHL-degrading gene (aiiA), the ability of the bacteria to attract cyprids was abolished. In addition, cyprids actively explored biofilms of E. coli expressing the recombinant AHL synthase genes luxI from Vibrio fischeri (3-oxo-C6-HSL), rhlI from Pseudomonas aeruginosa (C4-HSL/C6-HSL), vanI from V. anguillarum (3-oxo-C10-HSL) and sulI from Sulfitobacter sp. BR1 (C4-HSL, 3-hydroxy-C6-HSL, C8-HSL and 3-hydroxy-C10-HSL), but not E. coli that did not produce AHLs. Finally, synthetic AHLs (C8-HSL, 3-oxo-C10-HSL and C12-HSL) at concentrations similar to those found within natural biofilms (5 μm) resulted in increased cyprid settlement. Thus, B. improvisus cypris exploration of and settlement on biofilms appears to be mediated by AHL-signalling bacteria in the laboratory. This adds to our understanding of how quorum sensing inhibition may be used as for biofouling control. Nonetheless, the significance of our results for larvae settling naturally in the field, and the mechanisms that underlay the observed responses to AHLs, is as yet unknown.

  9. Dose-dependent effect of Bisphenol-A on insulin signaling molecules in cardiac muscle of adult male rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivashanmugam, Preethi; Mullainadhan, Vigneswari; Karundevi, Balasubramanian

    2017-03-25

    Environmental contaminant, Bisphenol-A (BPA) is a xenoestrogen, an essential component used for the production of two classes of polymers such as polycarbonate and epoxy resin which disrupts the normal endocrine function. BPA has intense effects on mice endocrine pancreas, an essential tissue involved in glucose metabolism. It disrupts pancreatic β-cell insulin content, induces hyperinsulinemia and insulin resistance in male rats. Cardiac muscle is an insulin responsive organ and insulin has direct effects on glucose transport. The present study was designed to assess the effect of BPA on insulin signaling molecules in the cardiac muscle of adult male Wistar rat. Adult male Wistar rats (200-250 g) were selected and divided into following groups: Group 1: Control (vehicle treated), Group 2: Rats treated with 10 mg BPA/kg b.wt./day for 30 days orally, Group 3: Rats treated with 100 mg BPA/kg b.wt./day for 30 days orally, Group 4: Rats treated with 400 mg BPA/kg b.wt./day for 30 days orally. IR (insulin receptor) and pIR(Tyr1162) proteins were significantly decreased in the high dose group (400 mg). There was no change in IRS1 (insulin receptor substrate-1) and Akt proteins. Whereas, a decrease in pIRS1(Tyr632) (100 mg and 400 mg), pAkt (Ser473) (400 mg) and GLUT4 (glucose transporter 4) (cytosolic and plasma membrane) proteins was observed which may affect the cardiovascular function. It is concluded that BPA exposure has adverse effect on cardiac insulin signal transduction which may affect its function.

  10. Meat and Livestock Association Plenary Lecture 2005. Oocyte signalling molecules and their effects on reproduction in ruminants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNatty, Kenneth P; Lawrence, Stephen; Groome, Nigel P; Meerasahib, Mohammed F; Hudson, Norma L; Whiting, Lynda; Heath, Derek A; Juengel, Jennifer L

    2006-01-01

    Sheep (Ovis aries) are a highly diverse species, with more than 900 different breeds that vary significantly in their physiological characteristics, including ovulation rate and fecundity. From examination of inherited patterns of ovulation rate, several breeds have been identified with point mutations in two growth factor genes that are expressed in oocytes. Currently, five different point mutations have been identified in the BMP15 (GDF9b) gene and one in GDF9. Animals heterozygous for the GDF9 and/or the BMP15 mutations have higher ovulation rates than their wild-type counterparts. In contrast, those homozygous for any of the aforementioned BMP15 or GDF9 mutations are sterile owing to arrested follicular development. In bovine and ovine ovaries, GDF9 was expressed exclusively in oocytes throughout follicular growth from the primordial stage of development, whereas in sheep BMP15 was expressed exclusively in oocytes from the primary stage: no data for the ontogeny of BMP15 expression are currently available for cattle. In vitro, ovine growth differentiation factor 9 (oGDF9) has no effect on (3)H-thymidine incorporation by either bovine or ovine granulosa cells, whereas ovine bone morphogenetic protein 15 (oBMP15) has modest (1.2- to 1.6-fold; P reproduction in mammals, including rodents, humans and ruminants. Moreover, in vivo manipulation of these oocyte signalling molecules provides new opportunities for the management of the fertility of ruminants.

  11. Sulforaphane inhibits TNF-α-induced adhesion molecule expression through the Rho A/ROCK/NF-κB signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Chi-Nan; Huang, Hui-Pei; Wang, Chau-Jong; Liu, Kai-Li; Lii, Chong-Kuei

    2014-10-01

    Endothelial dysfunction is an early indicator of cardiovascular diseases. Increased stimulation of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) triggers the inflammatory mediator secretion of endothelial cells, leading to atherosclerotic risk. In this study, we investigated whether sulforaphane (SFN) affected the expression of intracellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) in TNF-α-induced ECV 304 endothelial cells. Our data showed that SFN attenuated TNF-α-induced expression of ICAM-1 in ECV 304 cells. Pretreatment of ECV 304 cells with SFN inhibited dose-dependently the secretion of proinflammatory cytokines, such as interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, and IL-8. SFN inhibited TNF-α-induced nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) DNA binding activity. Furthermore, SFN decreased TNF-α-mediated phosphorylation of IκB kinase (IKK) and IκBα, Rho A, ROCK, ERK1/2, and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) levels. Collectively, SFN inhibited the NF-κB DNA binding activity and downregulated the TNF-α-mediated induction of ICAM-1 in endothelial cells by inhibiting the Rho A/ROCK/NF-κB signaling pathway, suggesting the beneficial effects of SFN on suppression of inflammation within the atherosclerotic lesion.

  12. Structure and thermodynamics of effector molecule binding to the nitrogen signal transduction PII protein GlnZ from Azospirillum brasilense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truan, Daphné; Bjelić, Saša; Li, Xiao-Dan; Winkler, Fritz K

    2014-07-29

    The trimeric PII signal transduction proteins regulate the function of a variety of target proteins predominantly involved in nitrogen metabolism. ATP, ADP and 2-oxoglutarate (2-OG) are key effector molecules influencing PII binding to targets. Studies of PII proteins have established that the 20-residue T-loop plays a central role in effector sensing and target binding. However, the specific effects of effector binding on T-loop conformation have remained poorly documented. We present eight crystal structures of the Azospirillum brasilense PII protein GlnZ, six of which are cocrystallized and liganded with ADP or ATP. We find that interaction with the diphosphate moiety of bound ADP constrains the N-terminal part of the T-loop in a characteristic way that is maintained in ADP-promoted complexes with target proteins. In contrast, the interactions with the triphosphate moiety in ATP complexes are much more variable and no single predominant interaction mode is apparent except for the ternary MgATP/2-OG complex. These conclusions can be extended to most investigated PII proteins of the GlnB/GlnK subfamily. Unlike reported for other PII proteins, microcalorimetry reveals no cooperativity between the three binding sites of GlnZ trimers for any of the three effectors under carefully controlled experimental conditions.

  13. Cell-to-cell communication in plants, animals, and fungi: a comparative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloemendal, Sandra; Kück, Ulrich

    2013-01-01

    Cell-to-cell communication is a prerequisite for differentiation and development in multicellular organisms. This communication has to be tightly regulated to ensure that cellular components such as organelles, macromolecules, hormones, or viruses leave the cell in a precisely organized way. During evolution, plants, animals, and fungi have developed similar ways of responding to this biological challenge. For example, in higher plants, plasmodesmata connect adjacent cells and allow communication to regulate differentiation and development. In animals, two main general structures that enable short- and long-range intercellular communication are known, namely gap junctions and tunneling nanotubes, respectively. Finally, filamentous fungi have also developed specialized structures called septal pores that allow intercellular communication via cytoplasmic flow. This review summarizes the underlying mechanisms for intercellular communication in these three eukaryotic groups and discusses its consequences for the regulation of differentiation and developmental processes.

  14. Cell-to-cell communication in plants, animals, and fungi: a comparative review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloemendal, Sandra; Kück, Ulrich

    2013-01-01

    Cell-to-cell communication is a prerequisite for differentiation and development in multicellular organisms. This communication has to be tightly regulated to ensure that cellular components such as organelles, macromolecules, hormones, or viruses leave the cell in a precisely organized way. During evolution, plants, animals, and fungi have developed similar ways of responding to this biological challenge. For example, in higher plants, plasmodesmata connect adjacent cells and allow communication to regulate differentiation and development. In animals, two main general structures that enable short- and long-range intercellular communication are known, namely gap junctions and tunneling nanotubes, respectively. Finally, filamentous fungi have also developed specialized structures called septal pores that allow intercellular communication via cytoplasmic flow. This review summarizes the underlying mechanisms for intercellular communication in these three eukaryotic groups and discusses its consequences for the regulation of differentiation and developmental processes.

  15. Alpha-synuclein cell-to-cell transfer and seeding in grafted dopaminergic neurons in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elodie Angot

    Full Text Available Several people with Parkinson's disease have been treated with intrastriatal grafts of fetal dopaminergic neurons. Following autopsy, 10-22 years after surgery, some of the grafted neurons contained Lewy bodies similar to those observed in the host brain. Numerous studies have attempted to explain these findings in cell and animal models. In cell culture, α-synuclein has been found to transfer from one cell to another, via mechanisms that include exosomal transport and endocytosis, and in certain cases seed aggregation in the recipient cell. In animal models, transfer of α-synuclein from host brain cells to grafted neurons has been shown, but the reported frequency of the event has been relatively low and little is known about the underlying mechanisms as well as the fate of the transferred α-synuclein. We now demonstrate frequent transfer of α-synuclein from a rat brain engineered to overexpress human α-synuclein to grafted dopaminergic neurons. Further, we show that this model can be used to explore mechanisms underlying cell-to-cell transfer of α-synuclein. Thus, we present evidence both for the involvement of endocytosis in α-synuclein uptake in vivo, and for seeding of aggregation of endogenous α-synuclein in the recipient neuron by the transferred α-synuclein. Finally, we show that, at least in a subset of the studied cells, the transmitted α-synuclein is sensitive to proteinase K. Our new model system could be used to test compounds that inhibit cell-to-cell transfer of α-synuclein and therefore might retard progression of Parkinson neuropathology.

  16. Detection of the quorum sensing signal molecule N-Dodecanoyl-DL-homoserine lactone below 1 nanomolarconcentrations using surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Claussen, Anetta; Abdali, Salim; Berg, Rolf W.;

    2013-01-01

    To the best of our knowledge we here for the first time demonstrate surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) to detect a quorum sensing (QS) signal molecule below 1 nM concentration in both ultrapure water and under physiological conditions. Based on our results, SERS shows promise as a highly...

  17. Advanced Ring-Shaped Microelectrode Assay Combined with Small Rectangular Electrode for Quasi-In vivo Measurement of Cell-to-Cell Conductance in Cardiomyocyte Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Fumimasa; Kaneko, Tomoyuki; Hamada, Tomoyo; Hattori, Akihiro; Yasuda, Kenji

    2013-06-01

    To predict the risk of fatal arrhythmia induced by cardiotoxicity in the highly complex human heart system, we have developed a novel quasi-in vivo electrophysiological measurement assay, which combines a ring-shaped human cardiomyocyte network and a set of two electrodes that form a large single ring-shaped electrode for the direct measurement of irregular cell-to-cell conductance occurrence in a cardiomyocyte network, and a small rectangular microelectrode for forced pacing of cardiomyocyte beating and for acquiring the field potential waveforms of cardiomyocytes. The advantages of this assay are as follows. The electrophysiological signals of cardiomyocytes in the ring-shaped network are superimposed directly on a single loop-shaped electrode, in which the information of asynchronous behavior of cell-to-cell conductance are included, without requiring a set of huge numbers of microelectrode arrays, a set of fast data conversion circuits, or a complex analysis in a computer. Another advantage is that the small rectangular electrode can control the position and timing of forced beating in a ring-shaped human induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPS)-derived cardiomyocyte network and can also acquire the field potentials of cardiomyocytes. First, we constructed the human iPS-derived cardiomyocyte ring-shaped network on the set of two electrodes, and acquired the field potential signals of particular cardiomyocytes in the ring-shaped cardiomyocyte network during simultaneous acquisition of the superimposed signals of whole-cardiomyocyte networks representing cell-to-cell conduction. Using the small rectangular electrode, we have also evaluated the response of the cell network to electrical stimulation. The mean and SD of the minimum stimulation voltage required for pacing (VMin) at the small rectangular electrode was 166+/-74 mV, which is the same as the magnitude of amplitude for the pacing using the ring-shaped electrode (179+/-33 mV). The results showed that the

  18. Effect of troxerutin on insulin signaling molecules in the gastrocnemius muscle of high fat and sucrose-induced type-2 diabetic adult male rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampath, Sathish; Karundevi, Balasubramanian

    2014-10-01

    Troxerutin is a trihydroxyethylated derivative of the flavonoid, rutin. It has been reported to possess the hepatoprotective, nephroprotective, antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and antihyperlipidemic activities. Troxerutin treatment reduced the blood glucose and glycosylated hemoglobin levels in high-cholesterol-induced insulin-resistant mice and in type-2 diabetic patients. However, the mechanism by which it exhibits antidiabetic property was unknown. Therefore, the present study was designed to evaluate the effect of troxerutin on insulin signaling molecules in gastrocnemius muscle of high fat and sucrose-induced type-2 diabetic rats. Wistar male albino rats were selected and divided into five groups. Group I: Control. Group II: High fat and sucrose-induced type-2 diabetic rats. Group III: Type-2 diabetic rats treated with troxerutin (150 mg/kg body weight/day orally). Group IV: Type-2 diabetic rats treated with metformin (50 mg/kg body weight/day orally). Group V: Normal rats treated with troxerutin (150 mg/kg body weight/day orally). After 30 days of treatment, fasting blood glucose, oral glucose tolerance, serum lipid profile, and the levels of insulin signaling molecules, glycogen, glucose uptake, and oxidation in gastrocnemius muscle were assessed. Diabetic rats showed impairment in insulin signaling molecules (IR, p-IRS-1(Tyr632), p-Akt(Ser473), β-arrestin-2, c-Src, p-AS160(Thr642), and GLUT4 proteins), glycogen concentration, glucose uptake, and oxidation. Oral administration of troxerutin showed near normal levels of blood glucose, serum insulin, lipid profile, and insulin signaling molecules as well as GLUT4 proteins in type-2 diabetic rats. It is concluded from the present study that troxerutin may play a significant role in the management of type-2 diabetes mellitus, by improving the insulin signaling molecules and glucose utilization in the skeletal muscle.

  19. Small molecule ErbB inhibitors decrease proliferative signaling and promote apoptosis in philadelphia chromosome-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary E Irwin

    Full Text Available The presence of the Philadelphia chromosome in patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (Ph(+ALL is a negative prognostic indicator. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI that target BCR/ABL, such as imatinib, have improved treatment of Ph(+ALL and are generally incorporated into induction regimens. This approach has improved clinical responses, but molecular remissions are seen in less than 50% of patients leaving few treatment options in the event of relapse. Thus, identification of additional targets for therapeutic intervention has potential to improve outcomes for Ph+ALL. The human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (ErbB2 is expressed in ~30% of B-ALLs, and numerous small molecule inhibitors are available to prevent its activation. We analyzed a cohort of 129 ALL patient samples using reverse phase protein array (RPPA with ErbB2 and phospho-ErbB2 antibodies and found that activity of ErbB2 was elevated in 56% of Ph(+ALL as compared to just 4.8% of Ph(-ALL. In two human Ph+ALL cell lines, inhibition of ErbB kinase activity with canertinib resulted in a dose-dependent decrease in the phosphorylation of an ErbB kinase signaling target p70S6-kinase T389 (by 60% in Z119 and 39% in Z181 cells at 3 µM. Downstream, phosphorylation of S6-kinase was also diminished in both cell lines in a dose-dependent manner (by 91% in both cell lines at 3 µM. Canertinib treatment increased expression of the pro-apoptotic protein Bim by as much as 144% in Z119 cells and 49% in Z181 cells, and further produced caspase-3 activation and consequent apoptotic cell death. Both canertinib and the FDA-approved ErbB1/2-directed TKI lapatinib abrogated proliferation and increased sensitivity to BCR/ABL-directed TKIs at clinically relevant doses. Our results suggest that ErbB signaling is an additional molecular target in Ph(+ALL and encourage the development of clinical strategies combining ErbB and BCR/ABL kinase inhibitors for this subset of ALL patients.

  20. The Adaptor Protein Myd88 Is a Key Signaling Molecule in the Pathogenesis of Irinotecan-Induced Intestinal Mucositis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deysi V T Wong

    Full Text Available Intestinal mucositis is a common side effect of irinotecan-based anticancer regimens. Mucositis causes cell damage, bacterial/endotoxin translocation and production of cytokines including IL-1 and IL-18. These molecules and toll-like receptors (TLRs activate a common signaling pathway that involves the Myeloid Differentiation adaptor protein, MyD88, whose role in intestinal mucositis is unknown. Then, we evaluated the involvement of TLRs and MyD88 in the pathogenesis of irinotecan-induced intestinal mucositis. MyD88-, TLR2- or TLR9-knockout mice and C57BL/6 (WT mice were given either saline or irinotecan (75 mg/kg, i.p. for 4 days. On day 7, animal survival, diarrhea and bacteremia were assessed, and following euthanasia, samples of the ileum were obtained for morphometric analysis, myeloperoxidase (MPO assay and measurement of pro-inflammatory markers. Irinotecan reduced the animal survival (50% and induced a pronounced diarrhea, increased bacteremia, neutrophil accumulation in the intestinal tissue, intestinal damage and more than twofold increased expression of MyD88 (200%, TLR9 (400%, TRAF6 (236%, IL-1β (405%, IL-18 (365%, COX-2 (2,777% and NF-κB (245% in the WT animals when compared with saline-injected group (P<0.05. Genetic deletion of MyD88, TLR2 or TLR9 effectively controlled the signs of intestinal injury when compared with irinotecan-administered WT controls (P<0.05. In contrast to the MyD88-/- and TLR2-/- mice, the irinotecan-injected TLR9-/- mice showed a reduced survival, a marked diarrhea and an enhanced expression of IL-18 versus irinotecan-injected WT controls. Additionally, the expression of MyD88 was reduced in the TLR2-/- or TLR9-/- mice. This study shows a critical role of the MyD88-mediated TLR2 and TLR9 signaling in the pathogenesis of irinotecan-induced intestinal mucositis.

  1. Recent host range expansion of canine distemper virus and variation in its receptor, the signaling lymphocyte activation molecule, in carnivores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohishi, Kazue; Suzuki, Rintaro; Maeda, Taro; Tsuda, Miwako; Abe, Erika; Yoshida, Takao; Endo, Yasuyuki; Okamura, Maki; Nagamine, Takashi; Yamamoto, Hanae; Ueda, Miya; Maruyama, Tadashi

    2014-07-01

    The signaling lymphocyte activation molecule (SLAM) is a receptor for morbilliviruses. To understand the recent host range expansion of canine distemper virus (CDV) in carnivores, we determined the nucleotide sequences of SLAMs of various carnivores and generated three-dimensional homology SLAM models. Thirty-four amino acid residues were found for the candidates binding to CDV on the interface of the carnivore SLAMs. SLAM of the domestic dog (Canis lupus familiaris) were similar to those of other members of the suborder Caniformia, indicating that the animals in this group have similar sensitivity to dog CDV. However, they were different at nine positions from those of felids. Among the nine residues, four of domestic cat (Felis catus) SLAM (72, 76, 82, and 129) and three of lion (Panthera leo persica) SLAM (72, 82, and 129) were associated with charge alterations, suggesting that the felid interfaces have lower affinities to dog CDV. Only the residue at 76 was different between domestic cat and lion SLAM interfaces. The domestic cat SLAM had threonine at 76, whereas the lion SLAM had arginine, a positively charged residue like that of the dog SLAM. The cat SLAM with threonine is likely to have lower affinity to CDV-H and to confer higher resistance against dog CDV. Thus, the four residues (72, 76, 82, and 129) on carnivore SLAMs are important for the determination of affinity and sensitivity with CDV. Additionally, the CDV-H protein of felid strains had a substitution of histidine for tyrosine at 549 of dog CDV-H and may have higher affinity to lion SLAM. Three-dimensional model construction is a new risk assessment method of morbillivirus infectivity. Because the method is applicable to animals that have no information about virus infection, it is especially useful for morbillivirus risk assessment and wildlife conservation.

  2. Can Cell to Cell Thermal Runaway Propagation be Prevented in a Li-ion Battery Module?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeevarajan, Judith; Lopez, Carlos; Orieukwu, Josephat

    2014-01-01

    Increasing cell spacing decreased adjacent cell damage center dotElectrically connected adjacent cells drained more than physically adjacent cells center dotRadiant barrier prevents propagation when fully installed between BP cells center dotBP cells vent rapidly and expel contents at 100% SOC -Slower vent with flame/smoke at 50% -Thermal runaway event typically occurs at 160 degC center dotLG cells vent but do not expel contents -Thermal runaway event typically occurs at 200 degC center dotSKC LFP modules did not propagate; fuses on negative terminal of cell may provide a benefit in reducing cell to cell damage propagation. New requirement in NASA-Battery Safety Requirements document: JSC 20793 Rev C 5.1.5.1 Requirements - Thermal Runaway Propagation a. For battery designs greater than a 80-Wh energy employing high specific energy cells (greater than 80 watt-hours/kg, for example, lithium-ion chemistries) with catastrophic failure modes, the battery shall be evaluated to ascertain the severity of a worst-case single-cell thermal runaway event and the propensity of the design to demonstrate cell-to-cell propagation in the intended application and environment. NASA has traditionally addressed the threat of thermal runaway incidents in its battery deployments through comprehensive prevention protocols. This prevention-centered approach has included extensive screening for manufacturing defects, as well as robust battery management controls that prevent abuse-induced runaway even in the face of multiple system failures. This focused strategy has made the likelihood of occurrence of such an event highly improbable. b. The evaluation shall include all necessary analysis and test to quantify the severity (consequence) of the event in the intended application and environment as well as to identify design modifications to the battery or the system that could appreciably reduce that severity. In addition to prevention protocols, programs developing battery designs with

  3. The Azospirillum brasilense Che1 chemotaxis pathway controls swimming velocity, which affects transient cell-to-cell clumping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bible, Amber; Russell, Matthew H; Alexandre, Gladys

    2012-07-01

    The Che1 chemotaxis-like pathway of Azospirillum brasilense contributes to chemotaxis and aerotaxis, and it has also been found to contribute to regulating changes in cell surface adhesive properties that affect the propensity of cells to clump and to flocculate. The exact contribution of Che1 to the control of chemotaxis and flocculation in A. brasilense remains poorly understood. Here, we show that Che1 affects reversible cell-to-cell clumping, a cellular behavior in which motile cells transiently interact by adhering to one another at their nonflagellated poles before swimming apart. Clumping precedes and is required for flocculation, and both processes appear to be independently regulated. The phenotypes of a ΔaerC receptor mutant and of mutant strains lacking cheA1, cheY1, cheB1, or cheR1 (alone or in combination) or with che1 deleted show that Che1 directly mediates changes in the flagellar swimming velocity and that this behavior directly modulates the transient nature of clumping. Our results also suggest that an additional receptor(s) and signaling pathway(s) are implicated in mediating other Che1-independent changes in clumping identified in the present study. Transient clumping precedes the transition to stable clump formation, which involves the production of specific extracellular polysaccharides (EPS); however, production of these clumping-specific EPS is not directly controlled by Che1 activity. Che1-dependent clumping may antagonize motility and prevent chemotaxis, thereby maintaining cells in a metabolically favorable niche.

  4. Rate dependence of cell-to-cell variations of lithium-ion cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Fuqiang; Chen, Lufan; Huang, Jun; Zhang, Jianbo; Li, Ping

    2016-10-01

    Lithium-ion cells are commonly used in a multicell configuration in power devices and electric vehicles, making the cell-to-cell variation (CtCV) a key factor to consider in system design and management. Previous studies on CtCV have two major limitations: the number of cells is usually less than one hundred, and the cells are usually commercial cells already subjected to cell-screenings. In this article, we first make a statistical analysis on the CtCV of 5473 fresh cells from an automotive battery manufacturer before the cell-screening process. Secondly, 198 cells are randomly selected from these 5473 cells and the rate dependence of the CtCV is examined, focusing on the correlations of capacity versus weight and capacity versus resistance, corresponding to thermodynamic and kinetic factors, respectively. The rate dependence of these two correlations is explained from a phenomenological model. Finally, eight cells from the 198 cells are further characterized with electrochemical impedance spectroscopy method to elucidate the kinetic origins of the CtCV.

  5. Histochemical approaches to assess cell-to-cell transmission of misfolded proteins in neurodegenerative diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Natale

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Formation, aggregation and transmission of abnormal proteins are common features in neurodegenerative disorders including Parkinson’s disease, Alzheimer’s disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and Huntington’s disease. The mechanisms underlying protein alterations in neurodegenerative diseases remain controversial. Novel findings highlighted altered protein clearing systems as common biochemical pathways which generate protein misfolding, which in turn causes protein aggregation and protein spreading. In fact, proteinaceous aggregates are prone to cell-to-cell propagation. This is reminiscent of what happens in prion disorders, where the prion protein misfolds thus forming aggregates which spread to neighbouring cells. For this reason, the term prionoids is currently used to emphasize how several misfolded proteins are transmitted in neurodegenerative diseases following this prion-like pattern. Histochemical techniques including the use of specific antibodies covering both light and electron microscopy offer a powerful tool to describe these phenomena and investigate specific molecular steps. These include: prion like protein alterations; glycation of prion-like altered proteins to form advanced glycation end-products (AGEs; mechanisms of extracellular secretion; interaction of AGEs with specific receptors placed on neighbouring cells (RAGEs. The present manuscript comments on these phenomena aimed to provide a consistent scenario of the available histochemical approaches to dissect each specific step.

  6. Malaria parasites form filamentous cell-to-cell connections during reproduction in the mosquito midgut

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ingrid Rupp; Gabriele Pradel; Ludmilla Sologub; Kim C Williamson; Matthias Scheuermayer; Luc Reininger; Christian Doerig; Saliha Eksi; Davy U Kombilaa; Matthias Frank

    2011-01-01

    Physical contact is important for the interaction between animal cells, but it can represent a major challenge for protists like malaria parasites. Recently, novel filamentous cell-cell contacts have been identified in different types of eukaryotic cells and termed nanotubes due to their morphological appearance. Nanotubes represent small dynamic membranous extensions that consist of F-actin and are considered an ancient feature evolved by eukaryotic cells to establish contact for communication. We here describe similar tubular structures in the malaria pathogen Plasmodium falciparum, which emerge from the surfaces of the forming gametes upon gametocyte activation in the mosquito midgut. The filaments can exhibit a length of>100 μm and contain the F-actin isoform actin 2. They actively form within a few minutes after gametocyte activation and persist until the zygote transforms into the ookinete. The filaments originate from the parasite plasma membrane, are close ended and express adhesion proteins on their surfaces that are typically found in gametes, like Pfs230, Pfs48/45 or Pfs25, but not the zygote surface protein Pfs28. We show that these tubular structures represent long-distance cell-to-cell connections between sexual stage parasites and demonstrate that they meet the characteristics of nanotubes. We propose that malaria parasites utilize these adhesive "nanotubes" in order to facilitate intercellular contact between gametes during reproduction in the mosquito midgut.

  7. Effect of Interaction between Chromatin Loops on Cell-to-Cell Variability in Gene Expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuoqi Liu

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available According to recent experimental evidence, the interaction between chromatin loops, which can be characterized by three factors-connection pattern, distance between regulatory elements, and communication form, play an important role in determining the level of cell-to-cell variability in gene expression. These quantitative experiments call for a corresponding modeling effect that addresses the question of how changes in these factors affect variability at the expression level in a systematic rather than case-by-case fashion. Here we make such an effort, based on a mechanic model that maps three fundamental patterns for two interacting DNA loops into a 4-state model of stochastic transcription. We first show that in contrast to side-by-side loops, nested loops enhance mRNA expression and reduce expression noise whereas alternating loops have just opposite effects. Then, we compare effects of facilitated tracking and direct looping on gene expression. We find that the former performs better than the latter in controlling mean expression and in tuning expression noise, but this control or tuning is distance-dependent, remarkable for moderate loop lengths, and there is a limit loop length such that the difference in effect between two communication forms almost disappears. Our analysis and results justify the facilitated chromatin-looping hypothesis.

  8. Protective effect of bioflavonoid myricetin enhances carbohydrate metabolic enzymes and insulin signaling molecules in streptozotocin–cadmium induced diabetic nephrotoxic rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kandasamy, Neelamegam; Ashokkumar, Natarajan, E-mail: npashokkumar1@gmail.com

    2014-09-01

    Diabetic nephropathy is the kidney disease that occurs as a result of diabetes. The present study was aimed to evaluate the therapeutic potential of myricetin by assaying the activities of key enzymes of carbohydrate metabolism, insulin signaling molecules and renal function markers in streptozotocin (STZ)–cadmium (Cd) induced diabetic nephrotoxic rats. After myricetin treatment schedule, blood and tissue samples were collected to determine plasma glucose, insulin, hemoglobin, glycosylated hemoglobin and renal function markers, carbohydrate metabolic enzymes in the liver and insulin signaling molecules in the pancreas and skeletal muscle. A significant increase of plasma glucose, glycosylated hemoglobin, urea, uric acid, creatinine, blood urea nitrogen (BUN), urinary albumin, glycogen phosphorylase, glucose-6-phosphatase, and fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase and a significant decrease of plasma insulin, hemoglobin, hexokinase, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, glycogen and glycogen synthase with insulin signaling molecule expression were found in the STZ–Cd induced diabetic nephrotoxic rats. The administration of myricetin significantly normalizes the carbohydrate metabolic products like glucose, glycated hemoglobin, glycogen phosphorylase and gluconeogenic enzymes and renal function markers with increase insulin, glycogen, glycogen synthase and insulin signaling molecule expression like glucose transporter-2 (GLUT-2), glucose transporter-4 (GLUT-4), insulin receptor-1 (IRS-1), insulin receptor-2 (IRS-2) and protein kinase B (PKB). Based on the data, the protective effect of myricetin was confirmed by its histological annotation of the pancreas, liver and kidney tissues. These findings suggest that myricetin improved carbohydrate metabolism which subsequently enhances glucose utilization and renal function in STZ–Cd induced diabetic nephrotoxic rats. - Highlights: • Diabetic rats are more susceptible to cadmium nephrotoxicity. • Cadmium plays as a cumulative

  9. Rice dwarf phytoreovirus segment S6-encoded nonstructural protein has a cell-to-cell movement function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yi; Bao, Yi M; Wei, Chun H; Kang, Zhen S; Zhong, Yong W; Mao, Peng; Wu, Gang; Chen, Zhang L; Schiemann, Joachim; Nelson, Richard S

    2004-05-01

    Rice dwarf virus (RDV) is a member of the genus Phytoreovirus, which is composed of viruses with segmented double-stranded RNA genomes. Proteins that support the intercellular movement of these viruses in the host have not been identified. Microprojectile bombardment was used to determine which open reading frames (ORFs) support intercellular movement of a heterologous virus. A plasmid containing an infectious clone of Potato virus X (PVX) defective in cell-to-cell movement and expressing either beta-glucuronidase or green fluorescent protein (GFP) was used for cobombardment with plasmids containing ORFs from RDV gene segments S1 through S12 onto leaves of Nicotiana benthamiana. Cell-to-cell movement of the movement-defective PVX was restored by cobombardment with a plasmid containing S6. In the absence of S6, no other gene segment supported movement. Identical results were obtained with Nicotiana tabacum, a host that allows fewer viruses to infect and spread within its tissue. S6 supported the cell-to-cell movement of the movement-defective PVX in sink and source leaves of N. benthamiana. A mutant S6 lacking the translation start codon did not complement the cell-to-cell movement of the movement-defective PVX. An S6 protein product (Pns6)-enhanced GFP fusion was observed near or within cell walls of epidermal cells from N. tabacum. By immunocytochemistry, unfused Pns6 was localized to plasmodesmata in rice leaves infected with RDV. S6 thus encodes a protein with characteristics identical to those of other viral proteins required for the cell-to-cell movement of their genome and therefore is likely required for the cell-to-cell movement of RDV.

  10. Pseudomonas aeruginosa quorum-sensing molecule homoserine lactone modulates inflammatory signaling through PERK and eI-F2α.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabiner, Mark A; Fu, Zhu; Wu, Tara; Barry, Kevin C; Schwarzer, Christian; Machen, Terry E

    2014-08-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa secrete N-(3-oxododecanoyl)-homoserine lactone (HSL-C12) as a quorum-sensing molecule to regulate bacterial gene expression. Because HSL-C12 is membrane permeant, multiple cell types in P. aeruginosa-infected airways may be exposed to HSL-C12, especially adjacent to biofilms where local (HSL-C12) may be high. Previous reports showed that HSL-C12 causes both pro- and anti-inflammatory effects. To characterize HSL-C12's pro- and anti-inflammatory effects in host cells, we measured protein synthesis, NF-κB activation, and KC (mouse IL-8) and IL-6 mRNA and protein secretion in wild-type mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEF). To test the role of the endoplasmic reticulum stress inducer, PERK we compared these responses in PERK(-/-) and PERK-corrected PERK(-/-) MEF. During 4-h treatments of wild-type MEF, HSL-C12 potentially activated NF-κB p65 by preventing the resynthesis of IκB and increased transcription of KC and IL-6 genes (quantitative PCR). HSL-C12 also inhibited secretion of KC and/or IL-6 into the media (ELISA) both in control conditions and also during stimulation by TNF-α. HSL-C12 also activated PERK (as shown by increased phosphorylation of eI-F2α) and inhibited protein synthesis (as measured by incorporation of [(35)S]methionine by MEF). Comparisons of PERK(-/-) and PERK-corrected MEF showed that HSL-C12's effects were explained in part by activation of PERK→phosphorylation of eI-F2α→inhibition of protein synthesis→reduced IκBα production→activation of NF-κB→increased transcription of the KC gene but reduced translation and secretion of KC. HSL-C12 may be an important modulator of early (up to 4 h) inflammatory signaling in P. aeruginosa infections.

  11. Melatonin as a Signaling Molecule for Metabolism Regulation in Response to Hypoxia in the Crab Neohelice granulata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fábio Everton Maciel

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Melatonin has been identified in a variety of crustacean species, but its function is not as well understood as in vertebrates. The present study investigates whether melatonin has an effect on crustacean hyperglycemic hormone (CHH gene expression, oxygen consumption (VO2 and circulating glucose and lactate levels, in response to different dissolved-oxygen concentrations, in the crab Neohelice granulata, as well as whether these possible effects are eyestalk- or receptor-dependent. Melatonin decreased CHH expression in crabs exposed for 45 min to 6 (2, 200 or 20,000 pmol·crab−1 or 2 mgO2·L−1 (200 pmol·crab−1. Since luzindole (200 nmol·crab−1 did not significantly (p > 0.05 alter the melatonin effect, its action does not seem to be mediated by vertebrate-typical MT1 and MT2 receptors. Melatonin (200 pmol·crab−1 increased the levels of glucose and lactate in crabs exposed to 6 mgO2·L−1, and luzindole (200 nmol·crab−1 decreased this effect, indicating that melatonin receptors are involved in hyperglycemia and lactemia. Melatonin showed no effect on VO2. Interestingly, in vitro incubation of eyestalk ganglia for 45 min at 0.7 mgO2·L−1 significantly (p < 0.05 increased melatonin production in this organ. In addition, injections of melatonin significantly increased the levels of circulating melatonin in crabs exposed for 45 min to 6 (200 or 20,000 pmol·crab−1, 2 (200 and 20,000 pmol·crab−1 and 0.7 (200 or 20,000 pmol·crab−1 mgO2·L−1. Therefore, melatonin seems to have an effect on the metabolism of N. granulata. This molecule inhibited the gene expression of CHH and caused an eyestalk- and receptor-dependent hyperglycemia, which suggests that melatonin may have a signaling role in metabolic regulation in this crab.

  12. Sweet Taste Receptor Signaling Network: Possible Implication for Cognitive Functioning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Menizibeya O. Welcome

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Sweet taste receptors are transmembrane protein network specialized in the transmission of information from special “sweet” molecules into the intracellular domain. These receptors can sense the taste of a range of molecules and transmit the information downstream to several acceptors, modulate cell specific functions and metabolism, and mediate cell-to-cell coupling through paracrine mechanism. Recent reports indicate that sweet taste receptors are widely distributed in the body and serves specific function relative to their localization. Due to their pleiotropic signaling properties and multisubstrate ligand affinity, sweet taste receptors are able to cooperatively bind multiple substances and mediate signaling by other receptors. Based on increasing evidence about the role of these receptors in the initiation and control of absorption and metabolism, and the pivotal role of metabolic (glucose regulation in the central nervous system functioning, we propose a possible implication of sweet taste receptor signaling in modulating cognitive functioning.

  13. Chronic Stress Decreases Basal Levels of Memory-Related Signaling Molecules in Area CA1 of At-Risk (Subclinical) Model of Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkadhi, Karim A; Tran, Trinh T

    2015-08-01

    An important factor that may affect the severity and time of onset of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is chronic stress. Epidemiological studies report that chronically stressed individuals are at an increased risk for developing AD. The purpose of this study was to reveal whether chronic psychosocial stress could hasten the appearance of AD symptoms including changes in basal levels of cognition-related signaling molecules in subjects who are at risk for the disease. We investigated the effect of chronic psychosocial stress on basal levels of memory-related signaling molecules in area CA1 of subclinical rat model of AD. The subclinical symptomless rat model of AD was induced by osmotic pump continuous intracerebroventricular (ICV) infusion of 160 pmol/day Aβ1-42 for 14 days. Rats were chronically stressed using the psychosocial stress intruder model. Western blot analysis of basal protein levels of important signaling molecules in hippocampal area CA1 showed no significant difference between the subclinical AD rat model and control rat. Following six weeks of psychosocial stress, molecular analysis showed that subclinical animals subjected to stress have significantly reduced basal levels of p-CaMKII and decreased p-CaMKII/t-CaMKII ratio as well as decreased basal levels of p-CREB, total CREB, and BDNF. The present results suggest that these changes in basal levels of signaling molecules may be responsible for impaired learning, memory, and LTP in this rat model, which support the proposition that chronic stress may accelerate the emergence of AD in susceptible individuals.

  14. Protective effect of bioflavonoid myricetin enhances carbohydrate metabolic enzymes and insulin signaling molecules in streptozotocin-cadmium induced diabetic nephrotoxic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandasamy, Neelamegam; Ashokkumar, Natarajan

    2014-09-01

    Diabetic nephropathy is the kidney disease that occurs as a result of diabetes. The present study was aimed to evaluate the therapeutic potential of myricetin by assaying the activities of key enzymes of carbohydrate metabolism, insulin signaling molecules and renal function markers in streptozotocin (STZ)-cadmium (Cd) induced diabetic nephrotoxic rats. After myricetin treatment schedule, blood and tissue samples were collected to determine plasma glucose, insulin, hemoglobin, glycosylated hemoglobin and renal function markers, carbohydrate metabolic enzymes in the liver and insulin signaling molecules in the pancreas and skeletal muscle. A significant increase of plasma glucose, glycosylated hemoglobin, urea, uric acid, creatinine, blood urea nitrogen (BUN), urinary albumin, glycogen phosphorylase, glucose-6-phosphatase, and fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase and a significant decrease of plasma insulin, hemoglobin, hexokinase, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, glycogen and glycogen synthase with insulin signaling molecule expression were found in the STZ-Cd induced diabetic nephrotoxic rats. The administration of myricetin significantly normalizes the carbohydrate metabolic products like glucose, glycated hemoglobin, glycogen phosphorylase and gluconeogenic enzymes and renal function markers with increase insulin, glycogen, glycogen synthase and insulin signaling molecule expression like glucose transporter-2 (GLUT-2), glucose transporter-4 (GLUT-4), insulin receptor-1 (IRS-1), insulin receptor-2 (IRS-2) and protein kinase B (PKB). Based on the data, the protective effect of myricetin was confirmed by its histological annotation of the pancreas, liver and kidney tissues. These findings suggest that myricetin improved carbohydrate metabolism which subsequently enhances glucose utilization and renal function in STZ-Cd induced diabetic nephrotoxic rats.

  15. Modelling the Impact of Cell-To-Cell Transmission in Hepatitis B Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Cell-free virus is a well-recognized and efficient mechanism for the spread of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection in the liver. Cell-to-cell transmission (CCT) can be a more efficient means of virus propagation. Despite experimental evidence implying CCT occurs in HBV, its relative impact is uncertain. We develop a 3-D agent-based model where each hepatocyte changes its viral state according to a dynamical process driven by cell-free virus infection, CCT and intracellular replication. We determine the relative importance of CCT in the development and resolution of acute HBV infection in the presence of cytolytic (CTL) and non-CTL mechanisms. T cell clearance number is defined as the minimum number of infected cells needed to be killed by each T cell at peak infection that results in infection clearance within 12 weeks with hepatocyte turnover (HT, number of equivalent livers) ≤3. We find that CCT has very little impact on the establishment of infection as the mean cccDNA copies/cell remains between 15 to 20 at the peak of the infection regardless of CCT strength. In contrast, CCT inhibit immune-mediated clearance of acute HBV infection as higher CCT strength requires higher T cell clearance number and increases the probability of T cell exhaustion. An effective non-CTL inhibition can counter these negative effects of higher strengths of CCT by supporting rapid, efficient viral clearance and with little liver destruction. This is evident as the T cell clearance number drops by approximately 50% when non-CTL inhibition is increased from 10% to 80%. Higher CCT strength also increases the probability of the incidence of fulminant hepatitis with this phenomenon being unlikely to arise for no CCT. In conclusion, we report the possibility of CCT impacting HBV clearance and its contribution to fulminant hepatitis. PMID:27560827

  16. Features under dermoscopy as well as the expression of pro-inflammatory factors, TGF-β signaling pathway and apoptosis molecules of psoriasis vulgaris

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fan Yang; Shi-Chao Lv

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To study the features under dermoscopy as well as the expression of pro-inflammatory factors, TGF-β signaling pathway and apoptosis molecules of psoriasis vulgaris. Methods:A total of 134 cases of skin lesion tissues diagnosed with psoriasis vulgaris in our hospital between May 2012 and December 2015 were collected as the pathological group, fresh normal limb skin tissues trimmed in the orthopaedic surgery during the same period were selected as control group, dermoscopy was used to observe the features of pathological group, and the expression levels of pro-inflammatory factors, TGF-β signal molecules and apoptosis-related molecules in pathological group and control group were determined.Results: The typical features of patients with psoriasis vulgaris under dermoscopy were pink background, dotted vascular morphology and regular vascular arrangement pattern; IFN-γ, IL-12, IL-17, IL-18, c-myc, Bcl-2 and Survivin content in pathological group were significantly higher than those in control group while IL-4, IL-10, TGF-β1, TGF-β1R-I, TGF-β1R-II, Smad2, Smad3, PTEN and CEACAM1 content were significantly lower than those in control group.Conclusions:The feature of psoriasis vulgaris under dermoscopy is regular dotted angiogenesis, and the Th1/Th2 and Th17/Treg disorder as well as abnormal apoptotic signals in skin lesion tissue are associated with the occurrence of psoriasis.

  17. Model of the initiation of signal transduction by ligands in a cell culture: Simulation of molecules near a plane membrane comprising receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plante, Ianik; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2011-11-01

    Cell communication is a key mechanism in tissue responses to radiation. Several molecules are implicated in radiation-induced signaling between cells, but their contributions to radiation risk are poorly understood. Meanwhile, Green's functions for diffusion-influenced reactions have appeared in the literature, which are applied to describe the diffusion of molecules near a plane membrane comprising bound receptors with the possibility of reversible binding of a ligand and activation of signal transduction proteins by the ligand-receptor complex. We have developed Brownian dynamics algorithms to simulate particle histories in this system which can accurately reproduce the theoretical distribution of distances of a ligand from the membrane, the number of reversibly bound particles, and the number of receptor complexes activating signaling proteins as a function of time, regardless of the number of time steps used for the simulation. These simulations will be of great importance to model interactions at low doses where stochastic effects induced by a small number of molecules or interactions come into play.

  18. Stimulus dependence of the action of small-molecule inhibitors in the CD3/CD28 signalling network.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kohler, K.; Ganser, A.; Andre, T.; Roth, G.; Grosse-Hovest, L.; Jung, G.; Brock, R.E.

    2008-01-01

    Cells in the body are exposed simultaneously to a multitude of various signals. Inside a cell, molecular signalling networks integrate this information into a physiologically meaningful response. Interestingly, in the cellular testing of drug candidates, this complexity is largely ignored. Compounds

  19. Integration of the beta-catenin-dependent Wnt pathway with integrin signaling through the adaptor molecule Grb2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steve P Crampton

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: THE COMPLEXITY OF WNT SIGNALING LIKELY STEMS FROM TWO SOURCES: multiple pathways emanating from frizzled receptors in response to wnt binding, and modulation of those pathways and target gene responsiveness by context-dependent signals downstream of growth factor and matrix receptors. Both rac1 and c-jun have recently been implicated in wnt signaling, however their upstream activators have not been identified. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we identify the adapter protein Grb2, which is itself an integrator of multiple signaling pathways, as a modifier of beta-catenin-dependent wnt signaling. Grb2 synergizes with wnt3A, constitutively active (CA LRP6, Dvl2 or CA-beta-catenin to drive a LEF/TCF-responsive reporter, and dominant negative (DN Grb2 or siRNA to Grb2 block wnt3A-mediated reporter activity. MMP9 is a target of beta-catenin-dependent wnt signaling, and an MMP9 promoter reporter is also responsive to signals downstream of Grb2. Both a jnk inhibitor and DN-c-jun block transcriptional activation downstream of Dvl2 and Grb2, as does DN-rac1. Integrin ligation by collagen also synergizes with wnt signaling as does overexpression of Focal Adhesion Kinase (FAK, and this is blocked by DN-Grb2. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These data suggest that integrin ligation and FAK activation synergize with wnt signaling through a Grb2-rac-jnk-c-jun pathway, providing a context-dependent mechanism for modulation of wnt signaling.

  20. p70S6 kinase signals cell survival as well as growth, inactivating the pro-apoptotic molecule BAD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harada, H; Andersen, Jens S.; Mann, M;

    2001-01-01

    -specific phosphorylation of BAD, which inactivates this proapoptotic molecule. Rapamycin inhibited mitochondrial-based p70S6K, which prevented phosphorylation of Ser-136 on BAD and blocked cell survival induced by insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1). Moreover, IGF-1-induced phosphorylation of BAD Ser-136 was abolished...

  1. MHC class II molecules deliver costimulatory signals in human T cells through a functional linkage with IL-2-receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Odum, Niels; Kanner, S B; Ledbetter, J A;

    1993-01-01

    tyrosine phosphorylation of specific substrates including PLC-gamma 1. Combined stimulation of IL-2R and class II molecules had an additive effect on tyrosine phosphorylation. Pretreatment of T cells with a protein tyrosine kinase inhibitor, herbimycin A, inhibited IL-2 and class II-induced proliferation...

  2. The yeast three-hybrid system as an experimental platform to identify proteins interacting with small signaling molecules in plant cells: Potential and limitations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stéphanie eCottier

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Chemical genetics is a powerful scientific strategy that utilizes small bioactive molecules as experimental tools to unravel biological processes. Bioactive compounds occurring in nature represent an enormous diversity of structures that can be used to dissect functions of biological systems. Once the bioactivity of a natural or synthetic compound has been critically evaluated the challenge remains to identify its molecular target and mode of action, which usually is a time consuming and labor-intensive process. To facilitate this task, we decided to implement the yeast three-hybrid (Y3H technology as a general experimental platform to scan the whole Arabidopsis proteome for targets of small signaling molecules. The Y3H technology is based on the yeast two-hybrid system and allows direct cloning of proteins that interact in vivo with a synthetic hybrid ligand, which comprises the biologically active molecule of interest covalently linked to methotrexate (Mtx. In yeast nucleus the hybrid ligand connects two fusion proteins: the Mtx part binding to dihydrofolate reductase fused to a DNA binding domain (encoded in the yeast strain, and the bioactive molecule part binding to its potential protein target fused to a DNA activating domain (encoded on a cDNA expression vector. During cDNA library screening, the formation of this ternary, transcriptional activator complex leads to reporter gene activation in yeast cells, and thereby allows selection of the putative targets of small bioactive molecules of interest. Here we present the strategy and experimental details for construction and application of a Y3H platform, including chemical synthesis of different hybrid ligands, construction of suitable cDNA libraries, the choice of yeast strains, and appropriate screening conditions. Based on the results obtained and the current literature we discussed the perspectives and limitations of the Y3H approach for identifying targets of small bioactive molecules.

  3. Establishment of a High-throughput Setup for Screening Small Molecules That Modulate c-di-GMP Signaling in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rugjee, Kushal N; An, Shi-Qi; Ryan, Robert P

    2016-06-30

    Bacterial resistance to traditional antibiotics has driven research attempts to identify new drug targets in recently discovered regulatory pathways. Regulatory systems that utilize intracellular cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP) as a second messenger are one such class of target. c-di-GMP is a signaling molecule found in almost all bacteria that acts to regulate an extensive range of processes including antibiotic resistance, biofilm formation and virulence. The understanding of how c-di-GMP signaling controls aspects of antibiotic resistant biofilm development has suggested approaches whereby alteration of the cellular concentrations of the nucleotide or disruption of these signaling pathways may lead to reduced biofilm formation or increased susceptibility of the biofilms to antibiotics. We describe a simple high-throughput bioreporter protocol, based on green fluorescent protein (GFP), whose expression is under the control of the c-di-GMP responsive promoter cdrA, to rapidly screen for small molecules with the potential to modulate c-di-GMP cellular levels in Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa). This simple protocol can screen upwards of 3,500 compounds within 48 hours and has the ability to be adapted to multiple microorganisms.

  4. Magnetic molecularly imprinted polymer nanoparticles based electrochemical sensor for the measurement of Gram-negative bacterial quorum signaling molecules (N-acyl-homoserine-lactones).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Hui; Jiang, Donglei; Shao, Jingdong; Sun, Xiulan

    2016-01-15

    We have developed a novel and economical electrochemical sensor to measure Gram-negative bacterial quorum signaling molecules (AHLs) using magnetic nanoparticles and molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) technology. Magnetic molecularly imprinted polymers (MMIPs) capable of selectively absorbing AHLs were successfully synthesized by surface polymerization. The particles were deposited onto a magnetic carbon paste electrode (MGCE) surface, and characterized by electrochemical measurements. Differential Pulse Voltammetry (DPV) was utilized to record the oxidative current signal that is characteristic of AHL. The detection limit of this assay was determined to be 8×10(-10)molL(-1) with a linear detection range of 2.5×10(-9)molL(-1) to 1.0×10(-7)molL(-1). This Fe3O4@SiO2-MIP-based electrochemical sensor is a valuable new tool that allows quantitative measurement of Gram-negative bacterial quorum signaling molecules. It has potential applications in the fields of clinical diagnosis or food analysis with real-time detection capability, high specificity, excellent reproducibility, and good stability.

  5. Deletion of the signalling molecule synthase ScbA has pleiotropic effects on secondary metabolite biosynthesis, morphological differentiation and primary metabolism in Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Alia, Davide; Eggle, Daniela; Nieselt, Kay; Hu, Wei-Shou; Breitling, Rainer; Takano, Eriko

    2011-03-01

    Streptomycetes have high biotechnological relevance as producers of diverse metabolites widely used in medical and agricultural applications. The biosynthesis of these metabolites is controlled by signalling molecules, γ-butyrolactones, that act as bacterial hormones. In Streptomyces coelicolor, a group of signalling molecules called SCBs (S. coelicolorbutanolides) regulates production of the pigmented antibiotics coelicolor polyketide (CPK), actinorhodin and undecylprodigiosin. The γ-butyrolactone synthase ScbA is responsible for the biosynthesis of SCBs. Here we show the results of a genome-wide transcriptome analysis of a scbA deletion mutant prior to and during the transition to antibiotic production. We report a strong perturbation in the expression of three pigmented antibiotic clusters in the mutant throughout the growth curve, thus providing a molecular explanation for the antibiotic phenotype observed previously. Our study also revealed, for the first time, that the secondary metabolite cluster responsible for synthesis of the siderophore desferrioxamine is under the control of SCB signalling. Moreover, expression of the genes encoding enzymes for primary metabolism pathways, which supply antibiotic precursors and genes for morphological differentiation, was found shifted earlier in time in the mutant. In conclusion, our time series analysis demonstrates new details of the regulatory effects of the γ-butyrolactone system in Streptomyces.

  6. Prostaglandin E2 reduces the release and infectivity of new cell-free virions and cell-to-cell HIV-1 transfer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Isabel Clemente

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The course of human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1 infection is influenced by a complex interplay between viral and host factors. HIV infection stimulates several proinflammatory genes, such as cyclooxigense-2 (COX-2, which leads to an increase in prostaglandin (PG levels in the plasma of HIV-1-infected patients. These genes play an indeterminate role in HIV replication and pathogenesis. The effect of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 on HIV infection is quite controversial and even contradictory, so we sought to determine the role of PGE2 and the signal transduction pathways involved in HIV infection to elucidate possible new targets for antiretrovirals. RESULTS: Our results suggest that PGE2 post-infection treatment acts in the late stages of the viral cycle to reduce HIV replication. Interestingly, viral protein synthesis was not affected, but a loss of progeny virus production was observed. No modulation of CD4 CXCR4 and CCR5 receptor expression, cell proliferation, or activation after PGE2 treatment was detected. Moreover, PGE2 induced an increase in intracellular cAMP (cyclic AMP levels through the EP2/EP4 receptors. PGE2 effects were mimicked by dbcAMP and by a specific Epac (exchange protein directly activated by cyclic AMP agonist, 8-Cpt-cAMP. Treatment with PGE2 increased Rap1 activity, decreased RhoA activity and subsequently reduced the polymerization of actin by approximately 30% compared with untreated cells. In connection with this finding, polarized viral assembly platforms enriched in Gag were disrupted, altering HIV cell-to-cell transfer and the infectivity of new virions. CONCLUSIONS: Our results demonstrate that PGE2, through Epac and Rap activation, alters the transport of newly synthesized HIV-1 components to the assembly site, reducing the release and infectivity of new cell-free virions and cell-to-cell HIV-1 transfer.

  7. Multi-scale characean experimental system: from electrophysiology of membrane transporters to cell-to-cell connectivity, cytoplasmic streaming and auxin metabolism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Jane Beilby

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The morphology of characean algae could be mistaken for a higher plant: stem-like axes with leaf-like branchlets anchored in the soil by root-like rhizoids. However, all of these structures are made up of giant multinucleate cells separated by multicellular nodal complexes. The excised internodal cells survive long enough for the nodes to give rise to new thallus. The size of the internodes and their thick cytoplasmic layer minimize impalement injury and allow specific micro-electrode placement. The cell structure can be manipulated by centrifugation, perfusion of cell contents or creation of cytoplasmic droplets, allowing access to both vacuolar and cytoplasmic compartments and both sides of the cell membranes. Thousands of electrical measurements on intact or altered cells and cytoplasmic droplets laid down basis to modern plant electrophysiology. Furthermore, the giant internodal cells and whole thalli facilitate research into many other plant properties. As nutrients have to be transported from rhizoids to growing parts of the thallus and hormonal signals need to pass from cell to cell, Characeae possess very fast cytoplasmic streaming. The mechanism was resolved in the characean model. Plasmodesmata between the internodal cells and nodal complexes facilitate transport of ions, nutrients and photosynthates across the nodes. The internal structure was found to be similar to those of higher plants. Recent experiments suggest a strong circadian influence on metabolic pathways producing indole-3-acetic acid (IAA and serotonin/melatonin. The review will discuss the impact of the characean models arising from fragments of cells, single cells, cell-to-cell transport or whole thalli on understanding of plant evolution and physiology.

  8. Multi-Scale Characean Experimental System: From Electrophysiology of Membrane Transporters to Cell-to-Cell Connectivity, Cytoplasmic Streaming and Auxin Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beilby, Mary J

    2016-01-01

    The morphology of characean algae could be mistaken for a higher plant: stem-like axes with leaf-like branchlets anchored in the soil by root-like rhizoids. However, all of these structures are made up of giant multinucleate cells separated by multicellular nodal complexes. The excised internodal cells survive long enough for the nodes to give rise to new thallus. The size of the internodes and their thick cytoplasmic layer minimize impalement injury and allow specific micro-electrode placement. The cell structure can be manipulated by centrifugation, perfusion of cell contents or creation of cytoplasmic droplets, allowing access to both vacuolar and cytoplasmic compartments and both sides of the cell membranes. Thousands of electrical measurements on intact or altered cells and cytoplasmic droplets laid down basis to modern plant electrophysiology. Furthermore, the giant internodal cells and whole thalli facilitate research into many other plant properties. As nutrients have to be transported from rhizoids to growing parts of the thallus and hormonal signals need to pass from cell to cell, Characeae possess very fast cytoplasmic streaming. The mechanism was resolved in the characean model. Plasmodesmata between the internodal cells and nodal complexes facilitate transport of ions, nutrients and photosynthates across the nodes. The internal structure was found to be similar to those of higher plants. Recent experiments suggest a strong circadian influence on metabolic pathways producing indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) and serotonin/melatonin. The review will discuss the impact of the characean models arising from fragments of cells, single cells, cell-to-cell transport or whole thalli on understanding of plant evolution and physiology.

  9. An unusual dependence of human herpesvirus-8 glycoproteins-induced cell-to-cell fusion on heparan sulfate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiwari, Vaibhav [Department of Ophthalmology, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60612 (United States); Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60612 (United States); Department of Basic Medical Sciences, College of Osteopathic Medicine of the Pacific and College of Optometry, Western University of Health Sciences, Pomona, CA 91766 (United States); Darmani, Nissar A.; Thrush, Gerald R. [Department of Basic Medical Sciences, College of Osteopathic Medicine of the Pacific and College of Optometry, Western University of Health Sciences, Pomona, CA 91766 (United States); Shukla, Deepak, E-mail: dshukla@uic.edu [Department of Ophthalmology, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60612 (United States); Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60612 (United States)

    2009-12-18

    Human herpesvirus-8 (HHV-8) is known to interact with cell surface heparan sulfate (HS) for entry into a target cell. Here we investigated the role of HS during HHV-8 glycoproteins-induced cell fusion. Interestingly, the observed fusion demonstrated an unusual dependence on HS as evident from following lines of evidence: (1) a significant reduction in cell-to-cell fusion occurred when target cells were treated with heparinase; (2) in a competition assay, when the effector cells expressing HHV-8 glycoproteins were challenged with soluble HS, cell-to-cell fusion was reduced; and, (3) co-expression of HHV-8 glycoproteins gH-gL on target cells resulted in inhibition of cell surface HS expression. Taken together, our results indicate that cell surface HS can play an additional role during HHV-8 pathogenesis.

  10. Neural Cell Adhesion Molecule-Associated Polysialic Acid Regulates Synaptic Plasticity and Learning by Restraining the Signaling through GluN2B-Containing NMDA Receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochlamazashvili, Gaga; Senkov, Oleg; Grebenyuk, Sergei; Robinson, Catrina; Xiao, Mei-Fang; Stummeyer, Katharina; Gerardy-Schahn, Rita; Engel, Andreas K.; Feig, Larry; Semyanov, Alexey; Suppiramaniam, Vishnu; Schachner, Melitta; Dityatev, Alexander

    2017-01-01

    The neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) is the predominant carrier of α2,8 polysialic acid (PSA) in the mammalian brain. Abnormalities in PSA and NCAM expression are associated with schizophrenia in humans and cause deficits in hippocampal synaptic plasticity and contextual fear conditioning in mice. Here, we show that PSA inhibits opening of recombinant NMDA receptors composed of GluN1/2B (NR1/NR2B) or GluN1/2A/2B (NR1/NR2A/NR2B) but not of GluN1/2A (NR1/NR2A) subunits. Deficits in NCAM/PSA increase GluN2B-mediated transmission and Ca2+ transients in the CA1 region of the hippocampus. In line with elevation of GluN2B-mediated transmission, defects in long-term potentiation in the CA1 region and contextual fear memory in NCAM/PSA-deficient mice are abrogated by application of a GluN2B-selective antagonist. Furthermore, treatment with the glutamate scavenger glutamic-pyruvic transaminase, ablation of Ras-GRF1 (a mediator of GluN2B signaling to p38 MAPK), or direct inhibition of hyperactive p38 MAPK can restore impaired synaptic plasticity in brain slices lacking PSA/NCAM. Thus, PSA carried by NCAM regulates plasticity and learning by inhibition of the GluN2B-Ras-GRF1-p38 MAPK signaling pathway. These findings implicate carbohydrates carried by adhesion molecules in modulating NMDA receptor signaling in the brain and demonstrate reversibility of cognitive deficits associated with ablation of a schizophrenia-related adhesion molecule. PMID:20237287

  11. Quantitative Structure-property Relationship Studies on Amino Acid Conjugates of Jasmonic Acid as Defense Signaling Molecules

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zu-Guang Li; Ke-Xian Chen; Hai-Ying Xie; Jian-Rong Gao

    2009-01-01

    Jasmonates and related compounds, including amino acid conjugates of jasmonic acid, have regulatory functions in the signaling pathway for plant developmental processes and responses to the complex equilibrium of biotic and abiotic stress.But the molecular details of the signaling mechanism are still poorly understood. Statistically significant quantitative structure-property relationship models (r2 > 0.990) constructed by genetic function approximation and molecular field analysis were generated for the purpose of deriving structural requirements for lipophilicity of amino acid conjugates of jasmonic acid. The best models derived in the present study provide some valuable academic information in terms of the 213D-descriptors influencing the lipophilicity, which may contribute to further understanding the mechanism of exogenous application of jasmonates in their signaling pathway and designing novel analogs ofjasmonic acid as ecological pesticides.

  12. Involvement of ERK1/2 signalling and growth-related molecules' expression in response to heat stress-induced damage in rat jejunum and IEC-6 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jin; Yin, Peng; Yin, Jingdong; Liu, Fenghua; Zhu, Xiaoyu; Cheng, Guiling; Guo, Kaijun; Yin, Yulong; Xu, Jianqin

    2010-01-01

    Our previous studies found small intestine epithelial tissues from several different animals (including rats, pigs and chickens) became significantly damaged following exposure to extreme heat. However, damaged tissue was rapidly repaired or regenerated in the following few days. Growth-related molecules are critical for cellular survival and promote endothelial cell proliferation and migration. The ERK1/2 signalling pathway is reported to regulate the growth and adaptation of endothelial cells to both physiological and pathological stimuli. However, little information is available concerning both growth-related molecules and ERK1/2 in response to heat stress. Herein, we employed both live rats and rat IEC-6 cells to investigate growth-related molecule expression and ERK1/2 activation in heat stress. Heat stress caused significant morphological damage to rat intestinal tissue and IEC-6 cells, reduced cell growth and proliferation, induced apoptosis, altered growth-related molecule mRNA expression and increased ERK1/2 phosphorylation. Addition of U0126 (a selective inhibitor of MEK kinase responsible for ERK phosphorylation) combined with heat stress exacerbated the morphological damage and apoptosis. With the addition of U0126, further up- or down-regulation of Egfr, Ctgf, Tgif, Vegfa, Okl38 and Gdf15 in response to heat stress was observed. In conclusion, extreme heat stress caused obvious damage to rat jejunum and IEC-6 cells. Both growth-related molecule expression and ERK1/2 phosphorylation were involved in response to heat stress. ERK1/2 inhibition exacerbated apoptosis and affected growth factor mRNA expression in heat stress.

  13. Analysis of tyrosine phosphorylation sites in signaling molecules by a phosphotyrosine-specific immonium ion scanning method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steen, Hanno; Pandey, Akhilesh; Andersen, Jens S;

    2002-01-01

    Signal transduction pathways involve cascades of events, such as formation of second messengers and protein complexes that alter the activities of proteins. This can ultimately lead to changes in gene expression in response to the stimuli. Reversible phosphorylation of proteins is an important me...

  14. The PI3K/Akt Signaling Pathway Mediates the High Glucose-Induced Expression of Extracellular Matrix Molecules in Human Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Qin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Prolonged hyperglycemia is an important risk factor of the pathogenesis of diabetic retinopathy (DR. Extracellular matrix molecules, such as fibronectin, collagen IV, and laminin, are associated with fibrotic membranes. In this study, we investigated the expression of fibronectin, collagen IV, and laminin in RPE cells under high glucose conditions. Furthermore, we also detected the phosphorylation of protein kinase B (Akt under high glucose conditions in RPE cells. Our results showed that high glucose upregulated fibronectin, collagen IV, and laminin expression, and activated Akt in RPE cells. We also found that pretreatment with LY294002 (an inhibitor of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase abolished high glucose-induced expression of fibronectin, collagen IV, and laminin in RPE cells. Thus, high glucose induced the expression of fibronectin, collagen IV, and laminin through PI3K/Akt signaling pathway in RPE cells, and the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway may contribute to the formation of fibrotic membrane during the development of DR.

  15. A phenotypic screen in zebrafish identifies a novel small-molecule inducer of ectopic tail formation suggestive of alterations in non-canonical Wnt/PCP signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evelien Gebruers

    Full Text Available Zebrafish have recently emerged as an attractive model for the in vivo bioassay-guided isolation and characterization of pharmacologically active small molecules of natural origin. We carried out a zebrafish-based phenotypic screen of over 3000 plant-derived secondary metabolite extracts with the goal of identifying novel small-molecule modulators of the BMP and Wnt signaling pathways. One of the bioactive plant extracts identified in this screen - Jasminum gilgianum, an Oleaceae species native to Papua New Guinea - induced ectopic tails during zebrafish embryonic development. As ectopic tail formation occurs when BMP or non-canonical Wnt signaling is inhibited during the tail protrusion process, we suspected a constituent of this extract to act as a modulator of these pathways. A bioassay-guided isolation was carried out on the basis of this zebrafish phenotype, identifying para-coumaric acid methyl ester (pCAME as the active compound. We then performed an in-depth phenotypic analysis of pCAME-treated zebrafish embryos, including a tissue-specific marker analysis of the secondary tails. We found pCAME to synergize with the BMP-inhibitors dorsomorphin and LDN-193189 in inducing ectopic tails, and causing convergence-extension defects in compound-treated embryos. These results indicate that pCAME may interfere with non-canonical Wnt signaling. Inhibition of Jnk, a downstream target of Wnt/PCP signaling (via morpholino antisense knockdown and pharmacological inhibition with the kinase inhibitor SP600125 phenocopied pCAME-treated embryos. However, immunoblotting experiments revealed pCAME to not directly inhibit Jnk-mediated phosphorylation of c-Jun, suggesting additional targets of SP600125, and/or other pathways, as possibly being involved in the ectopic tail formation activity of pCAME. Further investigation of pCAME's mechanism of action will help determine this compound's pharmacological utility.

  16. Direct Targeting of β-Catenin by a Small Molecule Stimulates Proteasomal Degradation and Suppresses Oncogenic Wnt/β-Catenin Signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    So-Young Hwang

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway plays a major role in tissue homeostasis, and its dysregulation can lead to various human diseases. Aberrant activation of β-catenin is oncogenic and is a critical driver in the development and progression of human cancers. Despite the significant potential of targeting the oncogenic β-catenin pathway for cancer therapy, the development of specific inhibitors remains insufficient. Using a T cell factor (TCF-dependent luciferase-reporter system, we screened for small-molecule compounds that act against Wnt/β-catenin signaling and identified MSAB (methyl 3-{[(4-methylphenylsulfonyl]amino}benzoate as a selective inhibitor of Wnt/β-catenin signaling. MSAB shows potent anti-tumor effects selectively on Wnt-dependent cancer cells in vitro and in mouse cancer models. MSAB binds to β-catenin, promoting its degradation, and specifically downregulates Wnt/β-catenin target genes. Our findings might represent an effective therapeutic strategy for cancers addicted to the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway.

  17. NADPH OXIDASE AND LIPID RAFT-ASSOCIATED REDOX SIGNALING ARE REQUIRED FOR PCB153-INDUCED UPREGULATION OF CELL ADHESION MOLECULES IN HUMAN BRAIN ENDOTHELIAL CELLS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eum, Sung Yong; Andras, Ibolya; Hennig, Bernhard; Toborek, Michal

    2009-01-01

    Exposure to persistent organic pollutants, such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), can lead to chronic inflammation and the development of vascular diseases. Because cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) of the cerebrovascular endothelium regulate infiltration of inflammatory cells into the brain, we have explored the molecular mechanisms by which ortho-substituted polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), such as PCB153, can upregulate CAMs in brain endothelial cells. Exposure to PCB153 increased expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), as well as elevated adhesion of leukocytes to brain endothelial cells. These effects were impeded by inhibitors of EGFR, JAKs, or Src activity. In addition, pharmacological inhibition of NADPH oxidase or disruption of lipid rafts by cholesterol depleting agents blocked PCB153-induced phosphorylation of JAK and Src kinases and upregulation of CAMs. In contrast, silencing of caveolin-1 by siRNA interference did not affect upregulation of ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 in brain endothelial cells stimulated by PCB153. Results of the present study indicate that lipid raft-dependent NADPH oxidase/JAK/EGFR signaling mechanisms regulate the expression of CAMs in brain endothelial cells and adhesion of leukocytes to endothelial monolayers. Due to its role in leukocyte infiltration, induction of CAMs may contribute to PCB-induced cerebrovascular disorders and neurotoxic effects in the CNS. PMID:19632255

  18. Design and construction of novel molecular conjugates for signal amplification (I): conjugation of multiple horseradish peroxidase molecules to immunoglobulin via primary amines on lysine peptide chains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhawan, Subhash

    2002-12-01

    Immunoconjugates are widely used for indirect detection of analytes (such as antibodies or antigens) in a variety of immunoassays. However, the availability of functional groups such as primary amines or free sulfhydryls in an immunoglobulin molecule is the limiting factor for optimal conjugation and, therefore, determines the sensitivity of an assay. In the present study, an N-terminal bromoacetylated 20 amino acid peptide containing 20 lysine residues was conjugated to N-succinimidyl-S-acetylthioacetate (SATA)-modified IgG or free sulfhydryl groups on 2-mercaptoethylamine (2-MEA)-reduced IgG molecules via a thioether (S[bond]CH(2)CONH) linkage to introduce multiple reactive primary amines per IgG. These primary amines were then covalently coupled with maleimide-activated horseradish peroxidase (HRP). The poly-HRP-antibody conjugates thus generated demonstrated greater than 15-fold signal amplification upon reaction with orthophenyldiamine substrate. The poly-HRP-antibody conjugates efficiently detected human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 antibodies in plasma specimens with significantly higher sensitivity than conventionally prepared HRP-antibody conjugates in an HIV-1 solid-phase enzyme immunoassay and Western blot analysis. The signal amplification techniques reported here could have the potential for development of highly sensitive immunodiagnostic assay systems.

  19. Improvement of the closed cranial window model in rats by intracarotid infusion of signalling molecules implicated in migraine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gupta, S; Bhatt, D K; Boni, L J;

    2010-01-01

    Intravital microscopy on a closed cranial window allows one to measure change in the diameter of cranial blood vessels after intravenous (i.v.) administration of pharmacodynamic substances. Putative targets being pursued in migraine are large vasodilating peptide molecules such as calcitonin gene...... required, respectively, compared with i.v. infusion to induce the same dilation in dural artery. Dilating intracarotid (i.c.) doses caused no or a minimal fall in BP, whereas equi-responsive i.v. doses caused a marked BP reduction. The CGRP blocking potential of olcegepant was amplified by > 20 times on i.......c. infusion. Pial artery responses to CGRP did not change with i.c. infusion, demonstrating that dilations after i.v. CGRP are mediated by autoregulation rather than through specific receptors. We applied CGRP topically, which induced concentration-dependent dural vasodilation, but no effect on pial artery...

  20. The Pseudomonas aeruginosa quorum sensing signal molecule N-(3-oxododecanoyl) homoserine lactone enhances keratinocyte migration and induces Mmp13 gene expression in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paes, Camila, E-mail: camilaquinetti@gmail.com [University of Tokyo, Department of Gerontological Nursing/Wound Care Management, Graduate School of Medicine, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Nakagami, Gojiro, E-mail: gojiron-tky@umin.ac.jp [University of Tokyo, Department of Gerontological Nursing/Wound Care Management, Graduate School of Medicine, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Minematsu, Takeo, E-mail: tminematsu-tky@umin.ac.jp [University of Tokyo, Department of Gerontological Nursing/Wound Care Management, Graduate School of Medicine, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Nagase, Takashi, E-mail: tnagase@fb3.so-net.ne.jp [University of Tokyo, Department of Gerontological Nursing/Wound Care Management, Graduate School of Medicine, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Huang, Lijuan, E-mail: koureikenhlj@gmail.com [University of Tokyo, Department of Gerontological Nursing/Wound Care Management, Graduate School of Medicine, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Sari, Yunita, E-mail: yunita-tky@umin.ac.jp [University of Tokyo, Department of Gerontological Nursing/Wound Care Management, Graduate School of Medicine, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Sanada, Hiromi, E-mail: hsanada-tky@umin.ac.jp [University of Tokyo, Department of Gerontological Nursing/Wound Care Management, Graduate School of Medicine, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan)

    2012-10-19

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An evidence of the positive effect of AHL on epithelialization process is provided. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer AHL enhances keratinocyte's ability to migrate in an in vitro scratch wound model. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer AHL induces the expression of Mmp13. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Topical application of AHL represents a possible strategy to treat chronic wounds. -- Abstract: Re-epithelialization is an essential step of wound healing involving three overlapping keratinocyte functions: migration, proliferation and differentiation. While quorum sensing (QS) is a cell density-dependent signaling system that enables bacteria to regulate the expression of certain genes, the QS molecule N-(3-oxododecanoyl) homoserine lactone (AHL) exerts effects also on mammalian cells in a process called inter-kingdom signaling. Recent studies have shown that AHL improves epithelialization in in vivo wound healing models but detailed understanding of the molecular and cellular mechanisms are needed. The present study focused on the AHL as a candidate reagent to improve wound healing through direct modulation of keratinocyte's activity in the re-epithelialization process. Results indicated that AHL enhances the keratinocyte's ability to migrate in an in vitro scratch wound healing model probably due to the high Mmp13 gene expression analysis after AHL treatment that was revealed by real-time RT-PCR. Inhibition of activator protein 1 (AP-1) signaling pathway completely prevented the migration of keratinocytes, and also resulted in a diminished Mmp13 gene expression, suggesting that AP-1 might be essential in the AHL-induced migration. Taken together, these results imply that AHL is a promising candidate molecule to improve re-epithelialization through the induction of migration of keratinocytes. Further investigation is needed to clarify the mechanism of action and molecular pathway of AHL on the keratinocyte migration

  1. Modulation of opiate-related signaling molecules in morphine-dependent conditioned behavior: conditioned place preference to morphine induces CREB phosphorylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morón, José A; Gullapalli, Srinivas; Taylor, Chirisse; Gupta, Achla; Gomes, Ivone; Devi, Lakshmi A

    2010-03-01

    Opiate addiction is a chronic, relapsing behavioral disorder where learned associations that develop between the abused opiate and the environment in which it is consumed are brought about through Pavlovian (classical) conditioning processes. However, the signaling mechanisms/pathways regulating the mechanisms that underlie the responses to opiate-associated cues or the development of sensitization as a consequence of repeated context-independent administration of opiates are unknown. In this study we examined the phosphorylation levels of various classic signaling molecules in brain regions implicated in addictive behaviors after acute and repeated morphine administration. An unbiased place conditioning protocol was used to examine changes in phosphorylation that are associated with (1) the expression of the rewarding effects of morphine and (2) the sensitization that develops to this effect. We also examined the effects of a delta-receptor antagonist on morphine-induced conditioned behavior and on the phosphorylation of classic signaling molecules in view of data showing that blockade of delta-opioid receptor (deltaOR) prevents the development of sensitization to the rewarding effects of morphine. We find that CREB phosphorylation is specifically induced upon the expression of a sensitized response to morphine-induced conditioned behavior in brain areas related to memory consolidation, such as the hippocampus and cortex. A similar effect is also observed, albeit to a lesser extent, in the case of the GluR1 subunit of AMPA glutamate receptor. These increases in the phosphorylation levels of CREB and pGluR1 are significantly blocked by pretreatment with a deltaOR antagonist. These results indicate a critical role for phospho-CREB, AMPA, and deltaOR activities in mediating the expression of a sensitized response to morphine-dependent conditioned behavior.

  2. Dendritic targeting in the leg neuropil of Drosophila: the role of midline signalling molecules in generating a myotopic map.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David J Brierley

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Neural maps are emergent, highly ordered structures that are essential for organizing and presenting synaptic information. Within the embryonic nervous system of Drosophila motoneuron dendrites are organized topographically as a myotopic map that reflects their pattern of innervation in the muscle field. Here we reveal that this fundamental organizational principle exists in adult Drosophila, where the dendrites of leg motoneurons also generate a myotopic map. A single postembryonic neuroblast sequentially generates different leg motoneuron subtypes, starting with those innervating proximal targets and medial neuropil regions and producing progeny that innervate distal muscle targets and lateral neuropil later in the lineage. Thus the cellular distinctions in peripheral targets and central dendritic domains, which make up the myotopic map, are linked to the birth-order of these motoneurons. Our developmental analysis of dendrite growth reveals that this myotopic map is generated by targeting. We demonstrate that the medio-lateral positioning of motoneuron dendrites in the leg neuropil is controlled by the midline signalling systems Slit-Robo and Netrin-Fra. These results reveal that dendritic targeting plays a major role in the formation of myotopic maps and suggests that the coordinate spatial control of both pre- and postsynaptic elements by global neuropilar signals may be an important mechanism for establishing the specificity of synaptic connections.

  3. Mechanistic insight into the conserved allosteric regulation of periplasmic proteolysis by the signaling molecule cyclic-di-GMP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Debashree; Cooley, Richard B; Boyd, Chelsea D; Mehl, Ryan A; O'Toole, George A; Sondermann, Holger

    2014-01-01

    Stable surface adhesion of cells is one of the early pivotal steps in bacterial biofilm formation, a prevalent adaptation strategy in response to changing environments. In Pseudomonas fluorescens, this process is regulated by the Lap system and the second messenger cyclic-di-GMP. High cytoplasmic levels of cyclic-di-GMP activate the transmembrane receptor LapD that in turn recruits the periplasmic protease LapG, preventing it from cleaving a cell surface-bound adhesin, thereby promoting cell adhesion. In this study, we elucidate the molecular basis of LapG regulation by LapD and reveal a remarkably sensitive switching mechanism that is controlled by LapD's HAMP domain. LapD appears to act as a coincidence detector, whereby a weak interaction of LapG with LapD transmits a transient outside-in signal that is reinforced only when cyclic-di-GMP levels increase. Given the conservation of key elements of this receptor system in many bacterial species, the results are broadly relevant for cyclic-di-GMP- and HAMP domain-regulated transmembrane signaling.

  4. Dual small-molecule targeting of SMAD signaling stimulates human induced pluripotent stem cells toward neural lineages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Methichit Wattanapanitch

    Full Text Available Incurable neurological disorders such as Parkinson's disease (PD, Huntington's disease (HD, and Alzheimer's disease (AD are very common and can be life-threatening because of their progressive disease symptoms with limited treatment options. To provide an alternative renewable cell source for cell-based transplantation and as study models for neurological diseases, we generated induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs from human dermal fibroblasts (HDFs and then differentiated them into neural progenitor cells (NPCs and mature neurons by dual SMAD signaling inhibitors. Reprogramming efficiency was improved by supplementing the histone deacethylase inhibitor, valproic acid (VPA, and inhibitor of p160-Rho associated coiled-coil kinase (ROCK, Y-27632, after retroviral transduction. We obtained a number of iPS colonies that shared similar characteristics with human embryonic stem cells in terms of their morphology, cell surface antigens, pluripotency-associated gene and protein expressions as well as their in vitro and in vivo differentiation potentials. After treatment with Noggin and SB431542, inhibitors of the SMAD signaling pathway, HDF-iPSCs demonstrated rapid and efficient differentiation into neural lineages. Six days after neural induction, neuroepithelial cells (NEPCs were observed in the adherent monolayer culture, which had the ability to differentiate further into NPCs and neurons, as characterized by their morphology and the expression of neuron-specific transcripts and proteins. We propose that our study may be applied to generate neurological disease patient-specific iPSCs allowing better understanding of disease pathogenesis and drug sensitivity assays.

  5. Natural variation in small molecule-induced TIR-NB-LRR signaling induces root growth arrest via EDS1- and PAD4-complexed R protein VICTR in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tae-Houn; Kunz, Hans-Henning; Bhattacharjee, Saikat; Hauser, Felix; Park, Jiyoung; Engineer, Cawas; Liu, Amy; Ha, Tracy; Parker, Jane E; Gassmann, Walter; Schroeder, Julian I

    2012-12-01

    In a chemical genetics screen we identified the small-molecule [5-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)furan-2-yl]-piperidine-1-ylmethanethione (DFPM) that triggers rapid inhibition of early abscisic acid signal transduction via PHYTOALEXIN DEFICIENT4 (PAD4)- and ENHANCED DISEASE SUSCEPTIBILITY1 (EDS1)-dependent immune signaling mechanisms. However, mechanisms upstream of EDS1 and PAD4 in DFPM-mediated signaling remain unknown. Here, we report that DFPM generates an Arabidopsis thaliana accession-specific root growth arrest in Columbia-0 (Col-0) plants. The genetic locus responsible for this natural variant, VICTR (VARIATION IN COMPOUND TRIGGERED ROOT growth response), encodes a TIR-NB-LRR (for Toll-Interleukin1 Receptor-nucleotide binding-Leucine-rich repeat) protein. Analyses of T-DNA insertion victr alleles showed that VICTR is necessary for DFPM-induced root growth arrest and inhibition of abscisic acid-induced stomatal closing. Transgenic expression of the Col-0 VICTR allele in DFPM-insensitive Arabidopsis accessions recapitulated the DFPM-induced root growth arrest. EDS1 and PAD4, both central regulators of basal resistance and effector-triggered immunity, as well as HSP90 chaperones and their cochaperones RAR1 and SGT1B, are required for the DFPM-induced root growth arrest. Salicylic acid and jasmonic acid signaling pathway components are dispensable. We further demonstrate that VICTR associates with EDS1 and PAD4 in a nuclear protein complex. These findings show a previously unexplored association between a TIR-NB-LRR protein and PAD4 and identify functions of plant immune signaling components in the regulation of root meristematic zone-targeted growth arrest.

  6. Analysis of global gene expression profile of rice in response to methylglyoxal indicates its possible role as a stress signal molecule

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charanpreet eKaur

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Methylglyoxal (MG is a toxic metabolite produced primarily as a byproduct of glycolysis. Being a potent glycating agent, it can readily bind macromolecules like DNA, RNA or proteins, modulating their expression and activity. In plants, despite the known inhibitory effects of MG on growth and development, still limited information is available about the molecular mechanisms and response pathways elicited upon elevation in MG levels. To gain insight into the molecular basis of MG response, we have investigated changes in global gene expression profiles in rice upon exposure to exogenous MG using GeneChip microarrays. Initially, growth of rice seedlings was monitored in response to increasing MG concentrations which could retard plant growth in a dose-dependent manner. Upon exposure to 10 mM concentration of MG, a total of 1685 probe sets were up- or down-regulated by more than 1.5-fold in shoot tissues within 16 h. These were classified into ten functional categories. The genes involved in signal transduction such as, protein kinases and transcription factors, were significantly over-represented in the perturbed transcriptome, of which several are known to be involved in abiotic and biotic stress response indicating a cross-talk between MG-responsive and stress-responsive signal transduction pathways. Through in silico studies, we could predict 7-8 bp long conserved motif as a possible MG-responsive element (MGRE in the 1 kb upstream region of genes that were more than ten-fold up- or down-regulated in the analysis. Since several perturbations were found in signaling cascades in response to MG, we hereby suggest that it plays an important role in signal transduction probably acting as a stress signal molecule.

  7. A Nonlinear Mixed Effects Approach for Modeling the Cell-To-Cell Variability of Mig1 Dynamics in Yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almquist, Joachim; Bendrioua, Loubna; Adiels, Caroline Beck; Goksör, Mattias; Hohmann, Stefan; Jirstrand, Mats

    2015-01-01

    The last decade has seen a rapid development of experimental techniques that allow data collection from individual cells. These techniques have enabled the discovery and characterization of variability within a population of genetically identical cells. Nonlinear mixed effects (NLME) modeling is an established framework for studying variability between individuals in a population, frequently used in pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics, but its potential for studies of cell-to-cell variability in molecular cell biology is yet to be exploited. Here we take advantage of this novel application of NLME modeling to study cell-to-cell variability in the dynamic behavior of the yeast transcription repressor Mig1. In particular, we investigate a recently discovered phenomenon where Mig1 during a short and transient period exits the nucleus when cells experience a shift from high to intermediate levels of extracellular glucose. A phenomenological model based on ordinary differential equations describing the transient dynamics of nuclear Mig1 is introduced, and according to the NLME methodology the parameters of this model are in turn modeled by a multivariate probability distribution. Using time-lapse microscopy data from nearly 200 cells, we estimate this parameter distribution according to the approach of maximizing the population likelihood. Based on the estimated distribution, parameter values for individual cells are furthermore characterized and the resulting Mig1 dynamics are compared to the single cell times-series data. The proposed NLME framework is also compared to the intuitive but limited standard two-stage (STS) approach. We demonstrate that the latter may overestimate variabilities by up to almost five fold. Finally, Monte Carlo simulations of the inferred population model are used to predict the distribution of key characteristics of the Mig1 transient response. We find that with decreasing levels of post-shift glucose, the transient response of Mig1 tend

  8. A Nonlinear Mixed Effects Approach for Modeling the Cell-To-Cell Variability of Mig1 Dynamics in Yeast.

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    Joachim Almquist

    Full Text Available The last decade has seen a rapid development of experimental techniques that allow data collection from individual cells. These techniques have enabled the discovery and characterization of variability within a population of genetically identical cells. Nonlinear mixed effects (NLME modeling is an established framework for studying variability between individuals in a population, frequently used in pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics, but its potential for studies of cell-to-cell variability in molecular cell biology is yet to be exploited. Here we take advantage of this novel application of NLME modeling to study cell-to-cell variability in the dynamic behavior of the yeast transcription repressor Mig1. In particular, we investigate a recently discovered phenomenon where Mig1 during a short and transient period exits the nucleus when cells experience a shift from high to intermediate levels of extracellular glucose. A phenomenological model based on ordinary differential equations describing the transient dynamics of nuclear Mig1 is introduced, and according to the NLME methodology the parameters of this model are in turn modeled by a multivariate probability distribution. Using time-lapse microscopy data from nearly 200 cells, we estimate this parameter distribution according to the approach of maximizing the population likelihood. Based on the estimated distribution, parameter values for individual cells are furthermore characterized and the resulting Mig1 dynamics are compared to the single cell times-series data. The proposed NLME framework is also compared to the intuitive but limited standard two-stage (STS approach. We demonstrate that the latter may overestimate variabilities by up to almost five fold. Finally, Monte Carlo simulations of the inferred population model are used to predict the distribution of key characteristics of the Mig1 transient response. We find that with decreasing levels of post-shift glucose, the transient

  9. Caffeine prevents sleep loss-induced deficits in long-term potentiation and related signaling molecules in the dentate gyrus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhaider, Ibrahim A; Aleisa, Abdulaziz M; Tran, Trinh T; Alkadhi, Karim A

    2010-04-01

    We have previously reported that caffeine prevented sleep deprivation-induced impairment of long-term potentiation (LTP) of area CA1 as well as hippocampus-dependent learning and memory performance in the radial arm water maze. In this report we examined the impact of long-term (4-week) caffeine consumption (0.3 g/L in drinking water) on synaptic plasticity (Alhaider et al., 2010) deficit in the dentate gyrus (DG) area of acutely sleep-deprived rats. The sleep deprivation and caffeine/sleep deprivation groups were sleep-deprived for 24 h by using the columns-in-water technique. We tested the effect of caffeine and/or sleep deprivation on LTP and measured the basal levels as well as stimulated levels of LTP-related molecules in the DG. The results showed that chronic caffeine administration prevented the impairment of early-phase LTP (E-LTP) in the DG of sleep-deprived rats. Additionally, chronic caffeine treatment prevented the sleep deprivation-associated decreases in the basal levels of the phosphorylated calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (P-CaMKII) and brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) as well as in the stimulated levels of P-CaMKII in the DG area. The results suggest that chronic use of caffeine prevented anomalous changes in the basal levels of P-CaMKII and BDNF associated with sleep deprivation and as a result contributes to the revival of LTP in the DG region.

  10. Adenosine Triphosphate (ATP Is a Candidate Signaling Molecule in the Mitochondria-to-Nucleus Retrograde Response Pathway

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    Zhengchang Liu

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Intracellular communication from the mitochondria to the nucleus is achieved via the retrograde response. In budding yeast, the retrograde response, also known as the RTG pathway, is regulated positively by Rtg1, Rtg2, Rtg3 and Grr1 and negatively by Mks1, Lst8 and two 14-3-3 proteins, Bmh1/2. Activation of retrograde signaling leads to activation of Rtg1/3, two basic helix-loop-helix leucine zipper transcription factors. Rtg1/3 activation requires Rtg2, a cytoplasmic protein with an N-terminal adenosine triphosphate (ATP binding domain belonging to the actin/Hsp70/sugar kinase superfamily. The critical regulatory step of the retrograde response is the interaction between Rtg2 and Mks1. Rtg2 binds to and inactivates Mks1, allowing for activation of Rtg1/3 and the RTG pathway. When the pathway is inactive, Mks1 has dissociated from Rtg2 and bound to Bmh1/2, preventing activation of Rtg1/3. What signals association or disassociation of Mks1 and Rtg2 is unknown. Here, we show that ATP at physiological concentrations dissociates Mks1 from Rtg2 in a highly cooperative fashion. We report that ATP-mediated dissociation of Mks1 from Rtg2 is conserved in two other fungal species, K. lactis and K. waltii. Activation of Rtg1/3 upregulates expression of genes encoding enzymes catalyzing the first three reactions of the Krebs cycle, which is coupled to ATP synthesis through oxidative phosphorylation. Therefore, we propose that the retrograde response is an ATP homeostasis pathway coupling ATP production with ATP-mediated repression of the retrograde response by releasing Mks1 from Rtg2.

  11. Research progress of bacterial quorum sensing—signal molecule%密度感应系统——细菌信号分子研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周雯; 刘岚

    2012-01-01

    The process, termed quorum sensing system, regulates bacterial communication by the production of diffusible intercellular signal molecules. The molecules are produced during bacteria basal levels and accumulated during the growth process. Once the concentration level reached, the molecules can activate or repress the expressing of target genes, then these genes regulate the production of virulence factor, biofilm formation and so on. As the antibiotic resistance and multidrug resistance increase seriously, researchers hope to make the mechanism of quorum sensing much clearer, find some medicine which can inhibit quorum sensing system, and get a new choice for antibacterial treatment. But quorum sensing is much more complex than expected. Quorum sensing system of different bacteria or even different types of the same bacteria may be different. One bacterium may include more than one quorum sensing system. So this review summarizes several different common bacteria and gives focus on quorum sensing and the signal molecules.%细菌利用散在的细胞间信号分子产物介导细胞间通讯的这个整个过程被叫做密度感应系统.这些信号分子在细菌基础水平时产生,生长过程积累.当细菌密度达到阈值时信号分子则激活或抑制相关系列基因表达,从而影响毒力因子、生物膜等的产生.在抗生素耐药及多重耐药不断增加的背景下,研究者们希望明确此系统作用机制,了解可否寻找抑制它的物质并将其应用于临床协同抗生素治疗.但密度感应系统远比预想的复杂,不同细菌甚至是同种细菌不同分型可能有差异,同一细菌也可能有不同密度感应系统.故本文综述了目前研究较多的多种细菌的密度感应系统及其信号分子作用机制.

  12. Cell-to-cell communication in bilateral macronodular adrenal hyperplasia causing hypercortisolism

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    Herve eLefebvre

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available It has been well established that, in the human adrenal gland, cortisol secretion is not only controlled by circulating corticotropin but is also influenced by a wide variety of bioactive signals, including conventional neurotransmitters and neuropeptides, released within the cortex by various cell types such as chromaffin cells, neurons, cells of the immune system, adipocytes and endothelial cells. These different types of cells are present in bilateral macronodular adrenal hyperplasia, a rare etiology of primary adrenal Cushing’s syndrome, where they appear intermingled with adrenocortical cells in the hyperplastic cortex. In addition, the genetic events which cause the disease favor abnormal adrenal differenciation that results in illicit expression of paracrine regulatory factors and their receptors in adrenocortical cells. All these defects constitute the molecular basis for aberrant autocrine/paracrine regulatory mechanisms which are likely to play a role in the pathophysiology of bilateral macronodular adrenal hyperplasia-associated hypercortisolism. The present review summarizes the current knowledge on this topic as well as the therapeutic perspectives offered by this new pathophysiological concept.

  13. Effects of urea on the molecules involved in the olfactory signal transduction: a preliminary study on Danio rerio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrando, Sara; Gallus, Lorenzo; Gambardella, Chiara; Marchesotti, Emiliano; Ravera, Silvia; Franceschini, Valeria; Masini, Maria Angela

    2014-12-01

    Among vertebrates, the physiologically uremic Chondrichthyes are the only class which are not presenting the ciliated olfactory receptor neurons in the olfactory neuroepithelium. The only sequenced genome for this class revealed only three olfactory receptor genes and the immunohistochemical detection of G protein alpha subunit typically coupled to the olfactory receptors (Gα(olf)) failed in different species. Chronic renal disease can represent a cause of olfactory impairment in human. In this context, our present study focused on investigating potential effects of high urea concentration on the olfactory epithelium of vertebrates. Larvae of the teleost fish Danio rerio were exposed to urea in order to assess the effects on the olfactory signal transduction; in particular on both the olfactory receptors and the Gα(olf). The endocytosis of neutral red dye in the olfactory mucosa was detected in control and urea-exposed larvae. The amount of neutral red dye uptake was used as a marker of binding and internalization of the Gα(olf). The neutral red dye endocytosis was not affected by urea exposure, hence suggesting that the presence of the Gα(olf) and their binding to the odorants are not affected by urea treatment, either. The presence and distribution of Gα(olf) were investigated in the olfactory epithelium of control and urea-exposed larvae, using a commercial antibody. The immunoreactivity was increased after urea treatment, suggesting an effect of urea on the expression or degradation of this G protein alpha subunit.

  14. Directed pancreatic acinar differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells via embryonic signalling molecules and exocrine transcription factors.

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    Fabien Delaspre

    Full Text Available Pluripotent embryonic stem cells (ESC are a promising cellular system for generating an unlimited source of tissue for the treatment of chronic diseases and valuable in vitro differentiation models for drug testing. Our aim was to direct differentiation of mouse ESC into pancreatic acinar cells, which play key roles in pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer. To that end, ESC were first differentiated as embryoid bodies and sequentially incubated with activin A, inhibitors of Sonic hedgehog (Shh and bone morphogenetic protein (BMP pathways, fibroblast growth factors (FGF and retinoic acid (RA in order to achieve a stepwise increase in the expression of mRNA transcripts encoding for endodermal and pancreatic progenitor markers. Subsequent plating in Matrigel® and concomitant modulation of FGF, glucocorticoid, and folllistatin signalling pathways involved in exocrine differentiation resulted in a significant increase of mRNAs encoding secretory enzymes and in the number of cells co-expressing their protein products. Also, pancreatic endocrine marker expression was down-regulated and accompanied by a significant reduction in the number of hormone-expressing cells with a limited presence of hepatic marker expressing-cells. These findings suggest a selective activation of the acinar differentiation program. The newly differentiated cells were able to release α-amylase and this feature was greatly improved by lentiviral-mediated expression of Rbpjl and Ptf1a, two transcription factors involved in the maximal production of digestive enzymes. This study provides a novel method to produce functional pancreatic exocrine cells from ESC.

  15. Hematopoietic lineage cell specific protein 1 (HS1) is a functionally important signaling molecule in platelet activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahner, Bryan N; Dorsam, Robert T; Mada, Sripal R; Kim, Soochong; Stalker, Timothy J; Brass, Lawrence F; Daniel, James L; Kitamura, Daisuke; Kunapuli, Satya P

    2007-10-01

    Collagen activates platelets through an intracellular signaling cascade downstream of glycoprotein VI (GPVI). We have investigated the contribution of hematopoietic lineage cell-specific protein 1 (HS1) downstream of GPVI in platelet activation. Stimulation of GPVI leads to tyrosine phosphorylation of HS1, which is blocked by Src-family kinase inhibitors. Coimmunoprecipitation experiments revealed that HS1 associates with Syk and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinases. HS1-null mice displayed increased bleeding times and increased time to occlusion in the FeCl(3) in vivo thrombosis model compared with their wild-type littermates. In addition, aggregation and secretion responses were diminished in HS1-null mouse platelets after stimulation of GPVI and protease-activated receptor 4 (PAR-4) agonists compared with wild-type littermate mouse platelets. Finally, Akt phosphorylation was diminished after GPVI or PAR-4 stimulation in platelets from HS1-null mice compared with their wild-type littermates. These results demonstrate that phosphorylation of the HS1 protein occurs downstream of GPVI stimulation and that HS1 plays a significant functional role in platelet activation downstream of GPVI and PARs.

  16. VEGF receptor-2 Y951 signaling and a role for the adapter molecule TSAd in tumor angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Taro; Bohman, Svante; Dixelius, Johan; Berge, Tone; Dimberg, Anna; Magnusson, Peetra; Wang, Ling; Wikner, Charlotte; Qi, Jian Hua; Wernstedt, Christer; Wu, Jiong; Bruheim, Skjalg; Mugishima, Hideo; Mukhopadhyay, Debrabata; Spurkland, Anne; Claesson-Welsh, Lena

    2005-07-06

    Vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 (VEGFR-2) activation by VEGF-A is essential in vasculogenesis and angiogenesis. We have generated a pan-phosphorylation site map of VEGFR-2 and identified one major tyrosine phosphorylation site in the kinase insert (Y951), in addition to two major sites in the C-terminal tail (Y1175 and Y1214). In developing vessels, phosphorylation of Y1175 and Y1214 was detected in all VEGFR-2-expressing endothelial cells, whereas phosphorylation of Y951 was identified in a subset of vessels. Phosphorylated Y951 bound the T-cell-specific adapter (TSAd), which was expressed in tumor vessels. Mutation of Y951 to F and introduction of phosphorylated Y951 peptide or TSAd siRNA into endothelial cells blocked VEGF-A-induced actin stress fibers and migration, but not mitogenesis. Tumor vascularization and growth was reduced in TSAd-deficient mice, indicating a critical role of Y951-TSAd signaling in pathological angiogenesis.

  17. Inter-kingdom Signaling by the Legionella Quorum Sensing Molecule LAI-1 Modulates Cell Migration through an IQGAP1-Cdc42-ARHGEF9-Dependent Pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Sylvia; Schell, Ursula; Heuer, Natalie; Hager, Dominik; Albers, Michael F.; Matthias, Jan; Fahrnbauer, Felix; Trauner, Dirk; Eichinger, Ludwig; Hedberg, Christian; Hilbi, Hubert

    2015-01-01

    Small molecule signaling promotes the communication between bacteria as well as between bacteria and eukaryotes. The opportunistic pathogenic bacterium Legionella pneumophila employs LAI-1 (3-hydroxypentadecane-4-one) for bacterial cell-cell communication. LAI-1 is produced and detected by the Lqs (Legionella quorum sensing) system, which regulates a variety of processes including natural competence for DNA uptake and pathogen-host cell interactions. In this study, we analyze the role of LAI-1 in inter-kingdom signaling. L. pneumophila lacking the autoinducer synthase LqsA no longer impeded the migration of infected cells, and the defect was complemented by plasmid-borne lqsA. Synthetic LAI-1 dose-dependently inhibited cell migration, without affecting bacterial uptake or cytotoxicity. The forward migration index but not the velocity of LAI-1-treated cells was reduced, and the cell cytoskeleton appeared destabilized. LAI-1-dependent inhibition of cell migration involved the scaffold protein IQGAP1, the small GTPase Cdc42 as well as the Cdc42-specific guanine nucleotide exchange factor ARHGEF9, but not other modulators of Cdc42, or RhoA, Rac1 or Ran GTPase. Upon treatment with LAI-1, Cdc42 was inactivated and IQGAP1 redistributed to the cell cortex regardless of whether Cdc42 was present or not. Furthermore, LAI-1 reversed the inhibition of cell migration by L. pneumophila, suggesting that the compound and the bacteria antagonistically target host signaling pathway(s). Collectively, the results indicate that the L. pneumophila quorum sensing compound LAI-1 modulates migration of eukaryotic cells through a signaling pathway involving IQGAP1, Cdc42 and ARHGEF9. PMID:26633832

  18. Inter-kingdom Signaling by the Legionella Quorum Sensing Molecule LAI-1 Modulates Cell Migration through an IQGAP1-Cdc42-ARHGEF9-Dependent Pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvia Simon

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Small molecule signaling promotes the communication between bacteria as well as between bacteria and eukaryotes. The opportunistic pathogenic bacterium Legionella pneumophila employs LAI-1 (3-hydroxypentadecane-4-one for bacterial cell-cell communication. LAI-1 is produced and detected by the Lqs (Legionella quorum sensing system, which regulates a variety of processes including natural competence for DNA uptake and pathogen-host cell interactions. In this study, we analyze the role of LAI-1 in inter-kingdom signaling. L. pneumophila lacking the autoinducer synthase LqsA no longer impeded the migration of infected cells, and the defect was complemented by plasmid-borne lqsA. Synthetic LAI-1 dose-dependently inhibited cell migration, without affecting bacterial uptake or cytotoxicity. The forward migration index but not the velocity of LAI-1-treated cells was reduced, and the cell cytoskeleton appeared destabilized. LAI-1-dependent inhibition of cell migration involved the scaffold protein IQGAP1, the small GTPase Cdc42 as well as the Cdc42-specific guanine nucleotide exchange factor ARHGEF9, but not other modulators of Cdc42, or RhoA, Rac1 or Ran GTPase. Upon treatment with LAI-1, Cdc42 was inactivated and IQGAP1 redistributed to the cell cortex regardless of whether Cdc42 was present or not. Furthermore, LAI-1 reversed the inhibition of cell migration by L. pneumophila, suggesting that the compound and the bacteria antagonistically target host signaling pathway(s. Collectively, the results indicate that the L. pneumophila quorum sensing compound LAI-1 modulates migration of eukaryotic cells through a signaling pathway involving IQGAP1, Cdc42 and ARHGEF9.

  19. Identification of the SLAM Adapter Molecule EAT-2 as a Lupus-Susceptibility Gene That Acts through Impaired Negative Regulation of Dendritic Cell Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talaei, Nafiseh; Yu, Tao; Manion, Kieran; Bremner, Rod; Wither, Joan E

    2015-11-15

    We showed previously that C57BL/6 congenic mice with an introgressed homozygous 70 cM (125.6 Mb) to 100 cM (179.8 Mb) interval on c1 from the lupus-prone New Zealand Black (NZB) mouse develop high titers of antinuclear Abs and severe glomerulonephritis. Using subcongenic mice, we found that a genetic locus in the 88-96 cM region was associated with altered dendritic cell (DC) function and synergized with T cell functional defects to promote expansion of pathogenic proinflammatory T cell subsets. In this article, we show that the promoter region of the NZB gene encoding the SLAM signaling pathway adapter molecule EWS-activated transcript 2 (EAT-2) is polymorphic, which results in an ∼ 70% reduction in EAT-2 in DC. Silencing of the EAT-2 gene in DC that lacked this polymorphism led to increased production of IL-12 and enhanced differentiation of T cells to a Th1 phenotype in T cell-DC cocultures, reproducing the phenotype observed for DC from congenic mice with the NZB c1 70-100 cM interval. SLAM signaling was shown to inhibit production of IL-12 by CD40L-activated DCs. Consistent with a role for EAT-2 in this inhibition, knockdown of EAT-2 resulted in increased production of IL-12 by CD40-stimulated DC. Assessment of downstream signaling following CD40 cross-linking in the presence or absence of SLAM cross-linking revealed that SLAM coengagement blocked activation of p38 MAPK and JNK signaling pathways in DC, which was reversed in DC with the NZB EAT-2 allele. We conclude that EAT-2 negatively regulates cytokine production in DC downstream of SLAM engagement and that a genetic polymorphism that disturbs this process promotes the development of lupus.

  20. Small-Molecule NSC59984 Restores p53 Pathway Signaling and Antitumor Effects against Colorectal Cancer via p73 Activation and Degradation of Mutant p53.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shengliang; Zhou, Lanlan; Hong, Bo; van den Heuvel, A Pieter J; Prabhu, Varun V; Warfel, Noel A; Kline, Christina Leah B; Dicker, David T; Kopelovich, Levy; El-Deiry, Wafik S

    2015-09-15

    The tumor-suppressor p53 prevents cancer development via initiating cell-cycle arrest, cell death, repair, or antiangiogenesis processes. Over 50% of human cancers harbor cancer-causing mutant p53. p53 mutations not only abrogate its tumor-suppressor function, but also endow mutant p53 with a gain of function (GOF), creating a proto-oncogene that contributes to tumorigenesis, tumor progression, and chemo- or radiotherapy resistance. Thus, targeting mutant p53 to restore a wild-type p53 signaling pathway provides an attractive strategy for cancer therapy. We demonstrate that small-molecule NSC59984 not only restores wild-type p53 signaling, but also depletes mutant p53 GOF. NSC59984 induces mutant p53 protein degradation via MDM2 and the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. NSC59984 restores wild-type p53 signaling via p73 activation, specifically in mutant p53-expressing colorectal cancer cells. At therapeutic doses, NSC59984 induces p73-dependent cell death in cancer cells with minimal genotoxicity and without evident toxicity toward normal cells. NSC59984 synergizes with CPT11 to induce cell death in mutant p53-expressing colorectal cancer cells and inhibits mutant p53-associated colon tumor xenograft growth in a p73-dependent manner in vivo. We hypothesize that specific targeting of mutant p53 may be essential for anticancer strategies that involve the stimulation of p73 in order to efficiently restore tumor suppression. Taken together, our data identify NSC59984 as a promising lead compound for anticancer therapy that acts by targeting GOF-mutant p53 and stimulates p73 to restore the p53 pathway signaling.

  1. Small-molecule synthetic compound norcantharidin reverses multi-drug resistance by regulating Sonic hedgehog signaling in human breast cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Jen Chen

    Full Text Available Multi-drug resistance (MDR, an unfavorable factor compromising treatment efficacy of anticancer drugs, involves upregulated ATP binding cassette (ABC transporters and activated Sonic hedgehog (Shh signaling. By preparing human breast cancer MCF-7 cells resistant to doxorubicin (DOX, we examined the effect and mechanism of norcantharidin (NCTD, a small-molecule synthetic compound, on reversing multidrug resistance. The DOX-prepared MCF-7R cells also possessed resistance to vinorelbine, characteristic of MDR. At suboptimal concentration, NCTD significantly inhibited the viability of DOX-sensitive (MCF-7S and DOX-resistant (MCF-7R cells and reversed the resistance to DOX and vinorelbine. NCTD increased the intracellular accumulation of DOX in MCF-7R cells and suppressed the upregulated the mdr-1 mRNA, P-gp and BCRP protein expression, but not the MRP-1. The role of P-gp was strengthened by partial reversal of the DOX and vinorelbine resistance by cyclosporine A. NCTD treatment suppressed the upregulation of Shh expression and nuclear translocation of Gli-1, a hallmark of Shh signaling activation in the resistant clone. Furthermore, the Shh ligand upregulated the expression of P-gp and attenuated the growth inhibitory effect of NCTD. The knockdown of mdr-1 mRNA had not altered the expression of Shh and Smoothened in both MCF-7S and MCF-7R cells. This indicates that the role of Shh signaling in MDR might be upstream to mdr-1/P-gp, and similar effect was shown in breast cancer MDA-MB-231 and BT-474 cells. This study demonstrated that NCTD may overcome multidrug resistance through inhibiting Shh signaling and expression of its downstream mdr-1/P-gp expression in human breast cancer cells.

  2. Identification of amino acid residues involved in the interaction between measles virus Haemagglutin (MVH) and its human cell receptor (signaling lymphocyte activation molecule, SLAM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Qin; Zhang, Peng; Hu, Chunling; Liu, Xin; Qi, Yipeng; Liu, Yingle

    2006-07-31

    Signaling lymphocyte activation molecule (SLAM; also known as CD150) is a newly identified cellular receptor for measles virus (MV). The interaction between MV Haemagglutin (MVH) and SLAM is an initial step for MV entry. We have identified several novel SLAM binding sites at residues S429, T436 and H437 of MVH protein and MVH mutants in these residues dramatically decrease the ability to interaction with the cell surface SLAM and fail to coprecipitation with SLAM in vivo as well as malfunction in syncytium formation. At the same time, K58, S59 and H61 of SLAM was also identified to be critical for MVH and SLAM binding. Further, these residues may be useful targets for the development of measles therapy.

  3. HIV-1 infection ex vivo accelerates measles virus infection by upregulating signaling lymphocytic activation molecule (SLAM) in CD4+ T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsuki, Yu-ya; Terahara, Kazutaka; Shibusawa, Kentaro; Yamamoto, Takuya; Tsuchiya, Takatsugu; Mizukoshi, Fuminori; Ishige, Masayuki; Okada, Seiji; Kobayashi, Kazuo; Morikawa, Yuko; Nakayama, Tetsuo; Takeda, Makoto; Yanagi, Yusuke; Tsunetsugu-Yokota, Yasuko

    2012-07-01

    Measles virus (MV) infection in children harboring human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is often fatal, even in the presence of neutralizing antibodies; however, the underlying mechanisms are unclear. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to examine the interaction between HIV-1 and wild-type MV (MVwt) or an MV vaccine strain (MVvac) during dual infection. The results showed that the frequencies of MVwt- and MVvac-infected CD4(+) T cells within the resting peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were increased 3- to 4-fold after HIV-1 infection, and this was associated with a marked upregulation of signaling lymphocytic activation molecule (SLAM) expression on CD4(+) T cells but not on CD8(+) T cells. SLAM upregulation was induced by infection with a replication-competent HIV-1 isolate comprising both the X4 and R5 types and to a lesser extent by a pseudotyped HIV-1 infection. Notably, SLAM upregulation was observed in HIV-infected as well as -uninfected CD4(+) T cells and was abrogated by the removal of HLA-DR(+) cells from the PBMC culture. Furthermore, SLAM upregulation did not occur in uninfected PBMCs cultured together with HIV-infected PBMCs in compartments separated by a permeable membrane, indicating that no soluble factors were involved. Rather, CD4(+) T cell activation mediated through direct contact with dendritic cells via leukocyte function-associated molecule 1 (LFA-1)/intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) and LFA-3/CD2 was critical. Thus, HIV-1 infection induces a high level of SLAM expression on CD4(+) T cells, which may enhance their susceptibility to MV and exacerbate measles in coinfected individuals.

  4. Role of an expansin-like molecule in Dictyostelium morphogenesis and regulation of its gene expression by the signal transducer and activator of transcription protein Dd-STATa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogasawara, Shun; Shimada, Nao; Kawata, Takefumi

    2009-02-01

    Expansins are proteins involved in plant morphogenesis, exerting their effects on cellulose to extend cell walls. Dictyostelium is an organism that possesses expansin-like molecules, but their functions are not known. In this study, we analyzed the expL7 (expansin-like 7) gene, which has been identified as a putative target of Dd-STATa, a Dictyostelium homolog of the metazoan signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) proteins. Promoter fragments of the expL7 were fused to a lacZ reporter and the expression patterns determined. As expected from the behavior of the endogenous expL7 gene, the expL7/lacZ fusion gene was downregulated in Dd-STATa null slugs. In the parental strain, the expL7 promoter was activated in the anterior tip region. Mutational analysis of the promoter identified a sequence that was necessary for expression in tip cells. In addition, an activator sequence for pstAB cells was identified. These sequences act in combination with the repressor region to prevent ectopic expL7 expression in the prespore and prestalk regions of the slug and culminant. Although the expL7 null mutant showed no phenotypic change, the expL7 overexpressor showed aberrant stalk formation. These results indicate that the expansin-like molecule is important for morphogenesis in Dictyostelium.

  5. Small Molecule Inhibition of miR-544 Biogenesis Disrupts Adaptive Responses to Hypoxia by Modulating ATM-mTOR Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haga, Christopher L; Velagapudi, Sai Pradeep; Strivelli, Jacqueline R; Yang, Wang-Yong; Disney, Matthew D; Phinney, Donald G

    2015-10-16

    Hypoxia induces a complex circuit of gene expression that drives tumor progression and increases drug resistance. Defining these changes allows for an understanding of how hypoxia alters tumor biology and informs design of lead therapeutics. We probed the role of microRNA-544 (miR-544), which silences mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), in a hypoxic breast cancer model by using a small molecule (1) that selectively impedes the microRNA's biogenesis. Application of 1 to hypoxic tumor cells selectively inhibited production of the mature microRNA, sensitized cells to 5-fluorouracil, and derepressed mRNAs affected by miR-544 in cellulo and in vivo, including boosting mTOR expression. Thus, small molecule inhibition of miR-544 reverses a tumor cell's physiological response to hypoxia. Importantly, 1 sensitized tumor cells to hypoxia-associated apoptosis at a 25-fold lower concentration than a 2'-O-methyl RNA antagomir and was as selective. Further, the apoptotic effect of 1 was suppressed by treatment of cell with rapamycin, a well-known inhibitor of the mTOR signaling pathway, illustrating the selectivity of the compound. Thus, RNA-directed chemical probes, which could also serve as lead therapeutics, enable interrogation of complex cellular networks in cells and animals.

  6. A new anti-angiogenic small molecule, G0811, inhibits angiogenesis via targeting hypoxia inducible factor (HIF)-1α signal transduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ki Hyun; Jung, Hye Jin; Kwon, Ho Jeong, E-mail: kwonhj@yonsei.ac.kr

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: •G0811 suppresses HIF-1α expression without cell toxicity. •G0811 exhibits anti-angiogenic activity both in vitro and in vivo. •G0811 provides a new molecular scaffold for the development of therapeutics targeting angiogenesis. -- Abstract: Regulation of hypoxia inducible factor (HIF)-1α stabilization, which in turn contributes to adaptation of tumor cells to hypoxia has been highlighted as a promising therapeutic target in angiogenesis-related diseases. We have identified a new small molecule, G0811, as a potent angiogenesis inhibitor that targets HIF-1α signal transduction. G0811 suppressed HIF-1α stability in cancer cells and inhibited in vitro and in vivo angiogenesis, as validated by tube formation, chemoinvasion, and chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) assays. In addition, G0811 effectively decreased the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), which is one of target genes of HIF-1α. However, G0811 did not exhibit anti-proliferative activities or toxicity in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) at effective doses. These results demonstrate that G0811 could be a new angiogenesis inhibitor that acts by targeting HIF-1α signal transduction pathway.

  7. Effect of the signaling lymphocytic activation molecule (SLAM in the modulation of T cells in immune response to Leishmania braziliensis in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zirlane Castelo Branco Coêlho

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Signaling lymphocyte activation molecule (SLAM is a self-ligand receptor on the surface of activated T- and B-lymphocytes, macrophages, and DC. Studies have shown PBMC from healthy individuals exposed to Leishmania differ in IFN-γ production. Objective: We investigated the role of SLAM signaling pathway in PMBC from high (HP and low (LP IFN-γ producers exposed to L. braziliensis in vitro. Methods: PBMC from 43 healthy individuals were cultured with or without antigen, α-SLAM, rIL-12 and rIFN-γ. The cytokines production was evaluated by ELISA, and SLAM expression by flow cytometry. Results: L. braziliensis associated with rIFN-γ or rIL-12 reduced early SLAM but did not modify this response later in HP. α-SLAM did not alter CD3+SLAM+ expression, and not affected IFN-γ and IL-13 production, in both groups, but increased significantly IL-10 in HP. Leishmania associated with α-SLAM and rIL-12 increased IFN-γ in LP, as well as IL-13 in HP. LP group presented low IFN-γ and IL-13 production, and low SLAM expression. Conclusion: Collectively, these findings suggest that when PBMC from healthy individuals are sensitized with L. braziliensis in vitro, SLAM acts in modulating Th1 response in HP individuals and induces a condition of immunosuppression in LP individuals.

  8. Transmembrane TNF-alpha reverse signaling leading to TGF-beta production is selectively activated by TNF targeting molecules: Therapeutic implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szondy, Zsuzsa; Pallai, Anna

    2017-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α is a potent pro-inflammatory cytokine exerting pleiotropic effects on various cell types. It is synthesized in a precursor form called transmembrane TNF-α (mTNF-α) which, after being processed by metalloproteinases, is released in a soluble form to mediate its biological activities through Type 1 and 2 TNF receptors in TNF receptor expressing cells. In addition to acting in soluble form, TNF-α also acts in the transmembrane form both as a ligand by activating TNF receptors, as well as a receptor that transmits outside-to-inside (reverse) signals back into mTNF-α bearing cells. Since the discovery that TNF-α plays a determining role in the pathogenesis of several chronic inflammatory diseases, anti-TNF agents are increasingly being used in the treatment of a rapidly expanding number of rheumatic and systemic autoimmune diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis, Crohn's disease, psoriasis, psoriatic arthritis, ankyloting spondylitis, Wegener granulomatosis and sarcoidosis. There are 5 TNF antagonists currently available: etanercept, a soluble TNF receptor construct; infliximab, a chimeric monoclonal antibody; adalimumab and golimumab, fully human antibodies; and certolizumab pegol, an Fab' fragment of a humanized anti-TNF-α antibody. Though each compound can efficiently neutralize TNF-α, increasing evidence suggests that they show different efficacy in the treatment of these diseases. These observations indicate that in addition to neutralizing TNF-α, other biological effects induced by TNF-α targeting molecules dictate the success of the therapy. Recently, we found that mTNF-α reverse signaling leads to transforming growth factor (TGF)-β production in macrophages and anti-TNF agents selectively trigger this pathway. In this review we will focus on the potential contribution of the activation of the mTNF-α signaling pathway to the success of the anti-TNF therapy.

  9. Effect of 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 on rotavirus replication and gene expressions of RIG-I signalling molecule in porcine rotavirus-infected IPEC-J2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ye; Yu, Bing; Mao, Xiangbing; He, Jun; Huang, Zhiqing; Zheng, Ping; Yu, Jie; Han, Guoquan; Liang, Xiaofang; Chen, Daiwen

    2015-01-01

    The study evaluated whether a 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 (25D3) supplementation decreases the replication of rotavirus by the retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I) signalling pathway in a porcine small intestinal epithelial cell line (IPEC-J2). The results show that IPEC-J2 cells express high baseline levels of 1α-hydroxylase (CYP27B1), which converts inactive 25D3 to the active 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25D3). Porcine rotavirus (PRV) infection alone resulted in a significant increase in CYP27B1 mRNA, which augmented the production of active vitamin D. Physiological concentrations of 25D3 were found to decrease PRV replication in IPEC-J2 cells. RIG-I plays an important role in the recognition of double-stranded RNA virus by host cells. Upon recognition, RIG-I triggers a series of signalling molecules such as interferon-β (IFN-β) promoter stimulator 1 (IPS-1) leading to the expression of type I interferons (IFN-β). Active 25D3 that was generated by PRV-infected IPEC-J2 cells led to an increased expression of toll-like receptors 3 (TLR3), RIG-I, IPS-1, IFN-β and IFN-stimulated genes 15 (ISG15) with important innate immune functions. Inhibiting CYP27B1 also failed to increase RIG-I, IPS-1, IFN-β and ISG15 mRNA expression. These observations suggest that 25D3 can directly inhibit PRV in IPEC-J2 cells, which requires this active form of vitamin D. The anti-rotavirus effect of 25D3 is mediated at least in part by RIG-I signalling pathways in IPEC-J2 cells.

  10. Oxidative stress parameters induced by exposure to either cadmium or 17β-estradiol on Mytilus galloprovincialis hemocytes. The role of signaling molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koutsogiannaki, Sophia [Laboratory of Animal Physiology, Zoology Department, School of Biology, Faculty of Science, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, 54124 Thessaloniki (Greece); Franzellitti, Silvia [University of Bologna, Interdepartment Centre for Environmental Science Research, via S. Alberto 163, 48123 Ravenna (Italy); Fabbri, Elena [University of Bologna, Interdepartment Centre for Environmental Science Research, via S. Alberto 163, 48123 Ravenna (Italy); University of Bologna, Department of Biological, Geological, and Environmental Sciences, via Selmi 3, 40100 Bologna (Italy); Kaloyianni, Martha, E-mail: kaloyian@bio.auth.gr [Laboratory of Animal Physiology, Zoology Department, School of Biology, Faculty of Science, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, 54124 Thessaloniki (Greece)

    2014-01-15

    Highlights: •Oxidative parameters in Mytilus galloprovincialis hemocytes were measured. •Comparison between cadmium and 17β-estradiol cytotoxicity is discussed. •NHE, PKC, PI3-K, NADPH oxidase, NO synthase, JNK involvement was observed. •Protective role of cAMP is suggested. •Signaling molecules studied could constitute novel biomarkers. -- Abstract: The aim of the present study was to determine and compare the possible effects of exposure to an estrogen, 17β-estradiol and to a metal, cadmium on oxidative parameters of Mytilus galloprovincialis hemocytes and to elucidate the signaling pathways that probably mediate the studied effects exerted by these two chemicals. In addition, it was of interest to investigate if the studied parameters could constitute biomarkers for aquatic pollution monitoring. Our results suggest that micromolar concentrations of either cadmium or 17β-estradiol affected the redox status of mussels by modulating oxidative parameters and antioxidant enzymes gene expression in mussel M. galloprovincialis hemocytes. In particular, our results showed that treatment of hemocytes with either 5 μM of cadmium chloride or with 25 nM of 17β-estradiol for 30 min caused significant increased ROS production; this led to oxidative damage exemplified by significant increased DNA damage, protein carbonylation and lipid peroxidation, as well as increased mRNA levels of the antioxidant enzymes catalase (CAT), superoxide dismoutase (SOD) and glutathione S-transferase (GST). Furthermore, our results suggest that either cadmium or 17β-estradiol signal is mediated either through one of the already known pathways initiated by photatidyl-inositol 3-kinase (PI3 K) and reaching Na{sup +}/H{sup +} exchanger (NHE) probably through protein kinase C (PKC) or a kinase-mediated signaling pathway that involves in most of the cases NHE, PKC, Ca{sup 2+}-dependent PKC isoforms, PI3-K, NADPH oxidase, nitric oxide (NO) synthase, c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and

  11. Diethyl hexyl phthalate-induced changes in insulin signaling molecules and the protective role of antioxidant vitamins in gastrocnemius muscle of adult male rat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srinivasan, Chinnapaiyan; Khan, Adam Ismail; Balaji, Venkataraman; Selvaraj, Jayaraman; Balasubramanian, Karundevi, E-mail: kbala82@rediffmail.com

    2011-12-15

    -Right-Pointing-Pointer Vitamins C and E alter ROS, glucose uptake, oxidation and insulin signaling molecules.

  12. Chikungunya virus neutralization antigens and direct cell-to-cell transmission are revealed by human antibody-escape mutants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia Yin Lee

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Chikungunya virus (CHIKV is an alphavirus responsible for numerous epidemics throughout Africa and Asia, causing infectious arthritis and reportedly linked with fatal infections in newborns and elderly. Previous studies in animal models indicate that humoral immunity can protect against CHIKV infection, but despite the potential efficacy of B-cell-driven intervention strategies, there are no virus-specific vaccines or therapies currently available. In addition, CHIKV has been reported to elicit long-lasting virus-specific IgM in humans, and to establish long-term persistence in non-human primates, suggesting that the virus might evade immune defenses to establish chronic infections in man. However, the mechanisms of immune evasion potentially employed by CHIKV remain uncharacterized. We previously described two human monoclonal antibodies that potently neutralize CHIKV infection. In the current report, we have characterized CHIKV mutants that escape antibody-dependent neutralization to identify the CHIKV E2 domain B and fusion loop "groove" as the primary determinants of CHIKV interaction with these antibodies. Furthermore, for the first time, we have also demonstrated direct CHIKV cell-to-cell transmission, as a mechanism that involves the E2 domain A and that is associated with viral resistance to antibody-dependent neutralization. Identification of CHIKV sub-domains that are associated with human protective immunity, will pave the way for the development of CHIKV-specific sub-domain vaccination strategies. Moreover, the clear demonstration of CHIKV cell-to-cell transmission and its possible role in the establishment of CHIKV persistence, will also inform the development of future anti-viral interventions. These data shed new light on CHIKV-host interactions that will help to combat human CHIKV infection and inform future studies of CHIKV pathogenesis.

  13. Exploring the contextual sensitivity of factors that determine cell-to-cell variability in receptor-mediated apoptosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzanne Gaudet

    Full Text Available Stochastic fluctuations in gene expression give rise to cell-to-cell variability in protein levels which can potentially cause variability in cellular phenotype. For TRAIL (TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand variability manifests itself as dramatic differences in the time between ligand exposure and the sudden activation of the effector caspases that kill cells. However, the contribution of individual proteins to phenotypic variability has not been explored in detail. In this paper we use feature-based sensitivity analysis as a means to estimate the impact of variation in key apoptosis regulators on variability in the dynamics of cell death. We use Monte Carlo sampling from measured protein concentration distributions in combination with a previously validated ordinary differential equation model of apoptosis to simulate the dynamics of receptor-mediated apoptosis. We find that variation in the concentrations of some proteins matters much more than variation in others and that precisely which proteins matter depends both on the concentrations of other proteins and on whether correlations in protein levels are taken into account. A prediction from simulation that we confirm experimentally is that variability in fate is sensitive to even small increases in the levels of Bcl-2. We also show that sensitivity to Bcl-2 levels is itself sensitive to the levels of interacting proteins. The contextual dependency is implicit in the mathematical formulation of sensitivity, but our data show that it is also important for biologically relevant parameter values. Our work provides a conceptual and practical means to study and understand the impact of cell-to-cell variability in protein expression levels on cell fate using deterministic models and sampling from parameter distributions.

  14. The adaptor molecule signaling lymphocytic activation molecule (SLAM)-associated protein (SAP) is essential in mechanisms involving the Fyn tyrosine kinase for induction and progression of collagen-induced arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Ming-Chao; Veillette, André

    2013-11-01

    Signaling lymphocytic activation molecule-associated protein (SAP) is an Src homology 2 domain-only adaptor involved in multiple immune cell functions. It has also been linked to immunodeficiencies and autoimmune diseases, such as systemic lupus erythematosus. Here, we examined the role and mechanism of action of SAP in autoimmunity using a mouse model of autoimmune arthritis, collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). We found that SAP was essential for development of CIA in response to collagen immunization. It was also required for production of collagen-specific antibodies, which play a key role in disease pathogenesis. These effects required SAP expression in T cells, not in B cells. In mice immunized with a high dose of collagen, the activity of SAP was nearly independent of its ability to bind the protein tyrosine kinase Fyn and correlated with the capacity of SAP to promote full differentiation of follicular T helper (TFH) cells. However, with a lower dose of collagen, the role of SAP was more dependent on Fyn binding, suggesting that additional mechanisms other than TFH cell differentiation were involved. Further studies suggested that this might be due to a role of the SAP-Fyn interaction in natural killer T cell development through the ability of SAP-Fyn to promote Vav-1 activation. We also found that removal of SAP expression during progression of CIA attenuated disease severity. However, it had no effect on disease when CIA was clinically established. Together, these results indicate that SAP plays an essential role in CIA because of Fyn-independent and Fyn-dependent effects on TFH cells and, possibly, other T cell types.

  15. Small-Molecule Fusion Inhibitors Bind the pH-Sensing Stable Signal Peptide-GP2 Subunit Interface of the Lassa Virus Envelope Glycoprotein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shankar, Sundaresh; Whitby, Landon R.; Casquilho-Gray, Hedi E.; York, Joanne; Boger, Dale L.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Arenavirus species are responsible for severe life-threatening hemorrhagic fevers in western Africa and South America. Without effective antiviral therapies or vaccines, these viruses pose serious public health and biodefense concerns. Chemically distinct small-molecule inhibitors of arenavirus entry have recently been identified and shown to act on the arenavirus envelope glycoprotein (GPC) to prevent membrane fusion. In the tripartite GPC complex, pH-dependent membrane fusion is triggered through a poorly understood interaction between the stable signal peptide (SSP) and the transmembrane fusion subunit GP2, and our genetic studies have suggested that these small-molecule inhibitors act at this interface to antagonize fusion activation. Here, we have designed and synthesized photoaffinity derivatives of the 4-acyl-1,6-dialkylpiperazin-2-one class of fusion inhibitors and demonstrate specific labeling of both the SSP and GP2 subunits in a native-like Lassa virus (LASV) GPC trimer expressed in insect cells. Photoaddition is competed by the parental inhibitor and other chemically distinct compounds active against LASV, but not those specific to New World arenaviruses. These studies provide direct physical evidence that these inhibitors bind at the SSP-GP2 interface. We also find that GPC containing the uncleaved GP1-GP2 precursor is not susceptible to photo-cross-linking, suggesting that proteolytic maturation is accompanied by conformational changes at this site. Detailed mapping of residues modified by the photoaffinity adducts may provide insight to guide the further development of these promising lead compounds as potential therapeutic agents to treat Lassa hemorrhagic fever. IMPORTANCE Hemorrhagic fever arenaviruses cause lethal infections in humans and, in the absence of licensed vaccines or specific antiviral therapies, are recognized to pose significant threats to public health and biodefense. Lead small-molecule inhibitors that target the

  16. Inhibitory Effect of Curcumol on Jak2-STAT Signal Pathway Molecules of Fibroblast-Like Synoviocytes in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heng Wang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Hyperplasia of synovial membrane in rheumatoid arthritis (RA is a critical pathological foundation for inducing articular injury. The janus kinase and signal transducer and activator of transcription (Jak-STAT pathway plays a critical role in synovial membrane proliferation induced by platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF. To explore the anti-cell proliferation mechanism of curcumol, a pure monomer extracted from Chinese medical plant zedoary rhizome, the changes of Jak2-STAT1/3 signal pathway-related molecules in synoviocytes were observed in vitro. In this study, the fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS in patients with RA were collected and cultured. The following parameters were measured: cell proliferation (WST-1 assay, cell cycles (fluorescence-activated cell sorting, FACS, STAT1 and STAT3 activities (electrophoretic mobility shift assay, EMSA, and the protein expressions of phosphorylated Jak2, STAT1, and STAT3 (Western blot. It was shown that curcumol could inhibit the RA-FLS proliferation and DNA synthesis induced by PDGF-BB in a dose-dependent manner in vitro. The transcription factors activities of STAT1 and STAT3 were obviously elevated after PDGF-BB stimulation (P<0.05. Super-shift experiments identified the STAT1 or STAT3 proteins in the complex. Furthermore, the different concentration curcumol could downregulate the DNA binding activities of STAT1 and STAT3 (P<0.05 and inhibit the phosphorylation of Jak2 while it had no effect on the protein expressions of STAT1 and STAT3. Positive correlations were found between changes of cell proliferation and DNA-binding activities of STAT1 and STAT3, respectively (P<0.01. In conclusion, curcumol might suppress the FLS proliferation and DNA synthesis induced by PDGF-BB through attenuating Jak2 phosphorylation, downregulating STAT1 and STAT3 DNA-binding activities, which could provide theoretical foundation for clinical treatment of RA.

  17. Small Molecule DFPM Derivative-Activated Plant Resistance Protein Signaling in Roots Is Unaffected by EDS1 Subcellular Targeting Signal and Chemical Genetic Isolation of victr R-Protein Mutants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans-Henning Kunz

    Full Text Available The small molecule DFPM ([5-(3,4-dichlorophenylfuran-2-yl]-piperidine-1-ylmethanethione was recently shown to trigger signal transduction via early effector-triggered immunity signaling genes including EDS1 and PAD4 in Arabidopsis thaliana accession Col-0. Chemical genetic analyses of A. thaliana natural variants identified the plant Resistance protein-like Toll/Interleukin1 Receptor (TIR-Nucleotide Binding (NB-Leucine-Rich Repeat (LRR protein VICTR as required for DFPM-mediated root growth arrest. Here a chemical genetic screen for mutants which disrupt DFPM-mediated root growth arrest in the Col-0 accession identified new mutant alleles of the TIR-NB-LRR gene VICTR. One allele, victr-6, carries a Gly216-to-Asp mutation in the Walker A domain supporting an important function of the VICTR nucleotide binding domain in DFPM responses consistent with VICTR acting as a canonical Resistance protein. The essential nucleo-cytoplasmic regulator of TIR-NB-LRR-mediated effector-triggered immunity, EDS1, was reported to have both nuclear and cytoplasmic actions in pathogen resistance. DFPM was used to investigate the requirements for subcellular EDS1 localization in DFPM-mediated root growth arrest. EDS1-YFP fusions engineered to localize mainly in the cytoplasm or the nucleus by tagging with a nuclear export signal (NES or a nuclear localization signal (NLS, respectively, were tested. We found that wild-type EDS1-YFP and both the NES and NLS-tagged EDS1 variants were induced by DFPM treatments and fully complemented eds1 mutant plants in root responses to DFPM, suggesting that enrichment of EDS1 in either compartment could confer DFPM-mediated root growth arrest. We further found that a light and O2-dependent modification of DFPM is necessary to mediate DFPM signaling in roots. Chemical analyses including Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry and High-Resolution Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry identified a DFPM modification

  18. Small Molecule DFPM Derivative-Activated Plant Resistance Protein Signaling in Roots Is Unaffected by EDS1 Subcellular Targeting Signal and Chemical Genetic Isolation of victr R-Protein Mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunz, Hans-Henning; Park, Jiyoung; Mevers, Emily; García, Ana V; Highhouse, Samantha; Gerwick, William H; Parker, Jane E; Schroeder, Julian I

    2016-01-01

    The small molecule DFPM ([5-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)furan-2-yl]-piperidine-1-ylmethanethione) was recently shown to trigger signal transduction via early effector-triggered immunity signaling genes including EDS1 and PAD4 in Arabidopsis thaliana accession Col-0. Chemical genetic analyses of A. thaliana natural variants identified the plant Resistance protein-like Toll/Interleukin1 Receptor (TIR)-Nucleotide Binding (NB)-Leucine-Rich Repeat (LRR) protein VICTR as required for DFPM-mediated root growth arrest. Here a chemical genetic screen for mutants which disrupt DFPM-mediated root growth arrest in the Col-0 accession identified new mutant alleles of the TIR-NB-LRR gene VICTR. One allele, victr-6, carries a Gly216-to-Asp mutation in the Walker A domain supporting an important function of the VICTR nucleotide binding domain in DFPM responses consistent with VICTR acting as a canonical Resistance protein. The essential nucleo-cytoplasmic regulator of TIR-NB-LRR-mediated effector-triggered immunity, EDS1, was reported to have both nuclear and cytoplasmic actions in pathogen resistance. DFPM was used to investigate the requirements for subcellular EDS1 localization in DFPM-mediated root growth arrest. EDS1-YFP fusions engineered to localize mainly in the cytoplasm or the nucleus by tagging with a nuclear export signal (NES) or a nuclear localization signal (NLS), respectively, were tested. We found that wild-type EDS1-YFP and both the NES and NLS-tagged EDS1 variants were induced by DFPM treatments and fully complemented eds1 mutant plants in root responses to DFPM, suggesting that enrichment of EDS1 in either compartment could confer DFPM-mediated root growth arrest. We further found that a light and O2-dependent modification of DFPM is necessary to mediate DFPM signaling in roots. Chemical analyses including Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry and High-Resolution Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry identified a DFPM modification product that is

  19. Extracellular Protein Interactions Mediated by the Neural Cell Adhesion Molecule, NCAM: Heterophilic Interactions Between NCAM and Cell Adhesion Molecules, Extracellular Matrix Proteins, and Viruses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Janne; Kulahin, Nikolaj; Walmod, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) mediate cell-to-cell interactions and interactions between cells and the extracellular matrix (ECM). The neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM), a prototypic member of the immunoglobulin (Ig) superfamily of CAMs, mediates adhesion through homophilic and heterophilic i...

  20. Deuterium-labelled N-acyl-l-homoserine lactones (AHLs) - inter-kingdom signalling molecules - synthesis, structural studies, and interactions with model lipid membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jakubczyk, Dorota [Institute of Organic Chemistry, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Karlsruhe (Germany); Institute of Functional Interfaces, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Barth, Christoph; Anastassacos, Frances; Koelsch, Patrick; Schepers, Ute [Institute of Toxicology and Genetics, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Kubas, Adam; Fink, Karin [Institute of Nanotechnology, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Brenner-Weiss, Gerald [Institute of Functional Interfaces, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Braese, Stefan [Institute of Organic Chemistry, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2012-04-15

    N-Acyl-l-homoserine lactones (AHLs) are synthesized by Gram-negative bacteria. These quorum-sensing molecules play an important role in the context of bacterial infection and biofilm formation. They also allow communication between microorganisms and eukaryotic cells (inter-kingdom signalling). However, very little is known about the entire mechanism of those interactions. Precise structural studies are required to analyse the different AHL isomers as only one form is biologically most active. Theoretical studies combined with experimental infrared and Raman spectroscopic data are therefore undertaken to characterise the obtained compounds. To mimic interactions between AHL and cell membranes, we studied the insertion of AHL in supported lipid bilayers, using vibrational sum-frequency-generation spectroscopy. Deuterium-labelled AHLs were thus synthesized. Starting from readily available deuterated fatty acids, a two-step procedure towards deuterated N-acyl-l-homoserine lactones with varying chain lengths is described. This included the acylation of Meldrum's acid followed by amidation. Additionally, the detailed analytical evaluation of the products is presented herein. (orig.)

  1. CD54/intercellular adhesion molecule 1 and major histocompatibility complex II signaling induces B cells to express interleukin 2 receptors and complements help provided through CD40 ligation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poudrier, J; Owens, T

    1994-01-01

    ) dependent to demonstrate the relative roles of CD54, MHC II, and CD40 signaling in the events leading to the induction of B cell proliferation and responsiveness to IL-2. Paraformaldehyde-fixed activated Th1-induced expression of IL-2R alpha, IL-2R beta, and B7, and upregulated MHC II and CD54 on B cells....... Anti-CD54 and MHC II mAbs as well as a CD8 alpha-CD40 ligand (L) soluble construct inhibited both the T-dependent induction of Ig secretion, and B cell phenotypic changes. We then compared the effects of activated Th1 cells with that of cross-linking these molecules. Cross-linking of CD54 and MHC II...... resulted in the upregulated expression of MHC II and of CD54 and B7, respectively, analogous to the effect of fixed activated Th1 cells. B7 expression was further enhanced by co-cross-linking CD54 and MHC II. Cross-linking of CD40 achieved comparable effects. Strikingly, cross-linking ligation of CD54...

  2. Molecular Signature of Pseudomonas aeruginosa with Simultaneous Nanomolar Detection of Quorum Sensing Signaling Molecules at a Boron-Doped Diamond Electrode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzid, Alyah; Shang, Fengjun; Reen, F. Jerry; Muimhneacháin, Eoin Ó.; Clarke, Sarah L.; Zhou, Lin; Luong, John H. T.; O’Gara, Fergal; McGlacken, Gerard P.; Glennon, Jeremy D.

    2016-07-01

    Electroanalysis was performed using a boron-doped diamond (BDD) electrode for the simultaneous detection of 2-heptyl-3-hydroxy-4-quinolone (PQS), 2-heptyl-4-hydroxyquinoline (HHQ) and pyocyanin (PYO). PQS and its precursor HHQ are two important signal molecules produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, while PYO is a redox active toxin involved in virulence and pathogenesis. This Gram-negative and opportunistic human pathogen is associated with a hospital-acquired infection particularly in patients with compromised immunity and is the primary cause of morbidity and mortality in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. Early detection is crucial in the clinical management of this pathogen, with established infections entering a biofilm lifestyle that is refractory to conventional antibiotic therapies. Herein, a detection procedure was optimized and proven for the simultaneous detection of PYO, HHQ and PQS in standard mixtures, biological samples, and P. aeruginosa spiked CF sputum samples with remarkable sensitivity, down to nanomolar levels. Differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) scans were also applicable for monitoring the production of PYO, HHQ and PQS in P. aeruginosa PA14 over 8 h of cultivation. The simultaneous detection of these three compounds represents a molecular signature specific to this pathogen.

  3. Measles virus selectively blind to signaling lymphocytic activation molecule (SLAM; CD150) is attenuated and induces strong adaptive immune responses in rhesus monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, Vincent H J; Hodge, Gregory; Reyes-Del Valle, Jorge; McChesney, Michael B; Cattaneo, Roberto

    2010-04-01

    The signaling lymphocytic activation molecule (SLAM; CD150) is the immune cell receptor for measles virus (MV). To assess the importance of the SLAM-MV interactions for virus spread and pathogenesis, we generated a wild-type IC-B MV selectively unable to recognize human SLAM (SLAM-blind). This virus differs from the fully virulent wild-type IC-B strain by a single arginine-to-alanine substitution at amino acid 533 of the attachment protein hemagglutinin and infects cells through SLAM about 40 times less efficiently than the isogenic wild-type strain. Ex vivo, this virus infects primary lymphocytes at low levels regardless of SLAM expression. When a group of six rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) was inoculated intranasally with the SLAM-blind virus, no clinical symptoms were documented. Only one monkey had low-level viremia early after infection, whereas all the hosts in the control group had high viremia levels. Despite minimal, if any, viremia, all six hosts generated neutralizing antibody titers close to those of the control monkeys while MV-directed cellular immunity reached levels at least as high as in wild-type-infected monkeys. These findings prove formally that efficient SLAM recognition is necessary for MV virulence and pathogenesis. They also suggest that the selectively SLAM-blind wild-type MV can be developed into a vaccine vector.

  4. Molecular Signature of Pseudomonas aeruginosa with Simultaneous Nanomolar Detection of Quorum Sensing Signaling Molecules at a Boron-Doped Diamond Electrode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzid, Alyah; Shang, Fengjun; Reen, F. Jerry; Muimhneacháin, Eoin Ó; Clarke, Sarah L.; Zhou, Lin; Luong, John H. T.; O’Gara, Fergal; McGlacken, Gerard P.; Glennon, Jeremy D.

    2016-01-01

    Electroanalysis was performed using a boron-doped diamond (BDD) electrode for the simultaneous detection of 2-heptyl-3-hydroxy-4-quinolone (PQS), 2-heptyl-4-hydroxyquinoline (HHQ) and pyocyanin (PYO). PQS and its precursor HHQ are two important signal molecules produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, while PYO is a redox active toxin involved in virulence and pathogenesis. This Gram-negative and opportunistic human pathogen is associated with a hospital-acquired infection particularly in patients with compromised immunity and is the primary cause of morbidity and mortality in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. Early detection is crucial in the clinical management of this pathogen, with established infections entering a biofilm lifestyle that is refractory to conventional antibiotic therapies. Herein, a detection procedure was optimized and proven for the simultaneous detection of PYO, HHQ and PQS in standard mixtures, biological samples, and P. aeruginosa spiked CF sputum samples with remarkable sensitivity, down to nanomolar levels. Differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) scans were also applicable for monitoring the production of PYO, HHQ and PQS in P. aeruginosa PA14 over 8 h of cultivation. The simultaneous detection of these three compounds represents a molecular signature specific to this pathogen. PMID:27427496

  5. A novel small molecule, HK-156, inhibits lipopoly-saccharide-induced activation of NF-κB signaling and improves survival in mouse models of sepsis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian-ping FANG; Yang LIU; Jie LI; Wen-feng LIAO; You-hong HU; Kan DING

    2012-01-01

    Aim:To characterize a small molecule compound HK-156 as a novel inhibitor of the nuclear factor KB (NF-KB) signaling pathway.Methods:THP-1 monocytes and HEK293/hTLR4A-MD2-CD14 cells were tested.HK-156 and compound 809,an HK-156 analogue,were synthesized.A luciferase assay was used to evaluate the transcriptional activity of NF-κB.The levels of cytokines were measured with cytokine arrays,ELISA and quantitative PCR.An electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA),immunofluor.escence,Western blot and mass spectrometry were used to investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying the actions of the agent.BALB/c mice chal lenged with lipopolysaccharide (LPS,15 mg/kg,ip) were used as a mouse experimental endotoxemia model.Results:In HEK293hTLR4/NF-κB-luc cells treated with LPS (1000 ng/mL),HK-156 inhibited the transcriptional activity of NF-κB in a concentration-dependent manner(IC50=6.54±0.37 μmol/L).Pretreatment of THP-1 monocytes with HK-156 (5,10 and 20 μmol/L)significantly inhibited LPS-induced release and production of TNF-α and IL-1β,attenuated LPS-induced translocation of NF-κB into the nucleus and its binding to DNA,and suppressed LPS-induced phosphorylation and degradation of IκBα,and phosphorylation of IKKβ and TGFβ-activated kinase (TAK1).Meanwhile,HK-156 (5,10 and 20 μmol/L) slightly suppressed LPS-induced activation of p38.The effect of HK-156 on LPS-induced activation of NF-κB signaling was dependent on thiol groups of cysteines in upstream proteins.In mouse models of sepsis,pre-injection of HK-156 (50 mg/kg,iv) significantly inhibited TNFα production and reduced the mortality caused by the lethal dose of LPS.Conclusion:HK-156 inhibits LPS-induced activation of NF-κB signaling by suppressing the phosphorylation of TAK1 in vitro,and exerts beneficial effects in a mouse sepsis model.HK 156 may therefore be a useful therapeutic agent for treating sepsis.

  6. A versatile complementation assay for cell-to-cell and long distance movements by cucumber mosaic virus based agro-infiltration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yan; Zhao, Xiaohui; Yao, Min; Li, Chun; Miriam, Karwitha; Zhang, Xue; Tao, Xiaorong

    2014-09-22

    Microinjection, bombardment or tobamovirus and potexvirus based assay has been developed to identify the putative movement protein (MP) or to characterize plasmodesma-mediated macromolecular transport. In this study, we developed a versatile complementation assay for the cell-to-cell and long distance movements of macromolecules by agro-infiltration based on the infectious clones of cucumber mosaic virus (CMV). The movement-deficient CMV reporter was constructed by replacing the MP on RNA 3 with ER targeted GFP. The ectopic expression of CMV MP was able to efficiently move the RNA3-MP::erGFP reporter from the original cell to neighboring cells, whereas CMV MP-M5 mutant was unable to initiate the movement. Importantly, the presence of CMV RNA1 and RNA2 can dramatically amplify the movement signals once the RNA3-MP::erGFP reporter moves out of the original cell. The appropriate observation time for this movement complementation assay was at 48-72 hours post infiltration (hpi), whereas the optimal incubation temperature was between 25 and 28 °C. The ectopic co-expression of MPs from other virus genera, NSm from tomato spotted wilt tospovirus (TSWV) or NSvc4 from rice stripe tenuivirus (RSV), could also facilitate the movement of the RNA3::erGFP reporter from the original cell into other cells. The chimeric mutant virus created by substituting the MP of CMV RNA3 with NSm from TSWV or NSvc4 from RSV move systemically in Nicotiana benthamiana plants by agro-infiltration. This agro-infiltration complementation assay is simple, efficient and reliable. Our approach provides an alternative and powerful tool with great potentials in identifying putative movement protein and characterizing macromolecular trafficking.

  7. Nitric oxide and other gas signaling molecules and periodontal disease%一氧化氮等气体信号分子与牙周疾病

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王艳芝; 李纾

    2014-01-01

    In periodontal diseases, nitric oxide can kill Porphytomonas gingivalis, the mechanism of which may involve combination of nitric oxide with key enzymes of microorganisms and inactivating them. High volume fraction of nitric oxide can cause blood vessels to dilate and lower platelet aggregation, causing gum bleeding. Carbon monoxide can inhibit the expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1, reduce the activity of nuclear factor(NF)-κB predominately induced by intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and vascular cell adhesion molecule, as well as lower immune active cells to vascular endothelial cells and gingival fibroblast adhesion, thus controlling periodontitis pathological inflammation. Hydrogen sulfide promotes the occurrence of periodontal disease by increasing the expression of interleukin(IL)-8 in gingival epithelium. Overexpression of IL-8 promotes accumulation of neutrophils, which causes periodontal tissue damage. Hydrogen sulfide can cause alveolar bone absorption because hydrogen sulfide can upregulate the expression of the receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand(RANKL), which promotes the differentiation of the osteoclast. Hydrogen sulfide increases the permeability of the mucosa, causing inflammation. The reason for this phenomenon is that hydrogen sulfide destroys the integrity of the periodontal tissue barrier, which increases mucous membrane permeability. Hydrogen sulfide inhibits synthesis of collagen and promotes its degradation. Hydrogen can relieve inflammation of periodontal tissue. The mechanism may reduce hydrogen and the volume fraction of reactive oxygen species, reduce the infiltration of neutrophils in organization and osteoclast differentiation, or reduce the activity of inflammatory signal transduction pathways, such as the mitogen-activated protein kinase signal transduction pathway. Hydrogen inhibits the combination of RANKL and NF-κB receptor activation factor by eliminating active

  8. Pseudomonas cremoricolorata Strain ND07 Produces N-acyl Homoserine Lactones as Quorum Sensing Molecules

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    Nina Yusrina Muhamad Yunos

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Quorum sensing (QS is a bacterial cell-to-cell communication system controlling QS-mediated genes which is synchronized with the population density. The regulation of specific gene activity is dependent on the signaling molecules produced, namely N-acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs. We report here the identification and characterization of AHLs produced by bacterial strain ND07 isolated from a Malaysian fresh water sample. Molecular identification showed that strain ND07 is clustered closely to Pseudomonas cremoricolorata. Spent culture supernatant extract of P. cremoricolorata strain ND07 activated the AHL biosensor Chromobacterium violaceum CV026. Using high resolution triple quadrupole liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, it was confirmed that P. cremoricolorata strain ND07 produced N-octanoyl-l-homoserine lactone (C8-HSL and N-decanoyl-l-homoserine lactone (C10-HSL. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first documentation on the production of C10-HSL in P. cremoricolorata strain ND07.

  9. Development towards cell-to-cell monolithic integration of a thin-film solar cell and lithium-ion accumulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agbo, Solomon N.; Merdzhanova, Tsvetelina; Yu, Shicheng; Tempel, Hermann; Kungl, Hans; Eichel, Rüdiger-A.; Rau, Uwe; Astakhov, Oleksandr

    2016-09-01

    This work focuses on the potentials of monolithic integrated thin-film silicon solar cell and lithium ion cell in a simple cell-to-cell integration without any control electronics as a compact power solution for portable electronic devices. To demonstrate this we used triple-junction thin-film silicon solar cell connected directly to a lithium ion battery cell to charge the battery and in turn discharge the battery through the solar cell. Our results show that with appropriate voltage matching the solar cell provides efficient charging for lab-scale lithium ion storage cell. Despite the absence of any control electronics the discharge rate of the Li-ion cell through the non-illuminated solar cell can be much lower than the charging rate when the current voltage (IV) characteristics of the solar cell is matched properly to the charge-discharge characteristics of the battery. This indicates good sustainability of the ultimately simple integrated device. At the maximum power point, solar energy-to-battery charging efficiency of 8.5% which is nearly the conversion efficiency of the solar cell was obtained indicating potential for loss-free operation of the photovoltaic (PV)-battery integration. For the rest of the charging points, an average of 8.0% charging efficiency was obtained.

  10. Cell-to-cell contact of human monocytes with infected arterial smooth-muscle cells enhances growth of Chlamydia pneumoniae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puolakkainen, Mirja; Campbell, Lee Ann; Lin, Tsun-Mei; Richards, Theresa; Patton, Dorothy L; Kuo, Cho-Chou

    2003-02-01

    Chlamydia pneumoniae can infect arterial cells. It has been shown that coculture of human monocytes (U937) and endothelial cells promotes infection of C. pneumoniae in endothelial cells and that the enhancement was mediated by a soluble factor (insulin-like growth factor 2) secreted by monocytes. In this study, it is shown that coculture of monocytes with C. pneumoniae enhances infection of C. pneumoniae in arterial smooth-muscle cells 5.3-fold at a monocyte-to-smooth-muscle cell ratio of 5. However, unlike endothelial cells, no enhancement was observed if monocytes were placed in cell culture inserts or if conditioned medium from monocyte cultures was used, which suggests that cell-to-cell contact is critical. The addition of mannose 6-phosphate or octyl glucoside, a nonionic detergent containing a sugar group, to cocultures inhibited the enhancement. These findings suggest that the monocyte-smooth-muscle cell interaction may be mediated by mannose 6-phosphate receptors present on monocytes.

  11. Cell-to-Cell Transmission of Dipeptide Repeat Proteins Linked to C9orf72-ALS/FTD

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    Thomas Westergard

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Aberrant hexanucleotide repeat expansions in C9orf72 are the most common genetic change underlying amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS and frontotemporal dementia (FTD. RNA transcripts containing these expansions undergo repeat-associated non-ATG translation (RAN-T to form five dipeptide repeat proteins (DPRs. DPRs are found as aggregates throughout the CNS of C9orf72-ALS/FTD patients, and some cause degeneration when expressed in vitro in neuronal cultures and in vivo in animal models. The spread of characteristic disease-related proteins drives the progression of pathology in many neurodegenerative diseases. While DPR toxic mechanisms continue to be investigated, the potential for DPRs to spread has yet to be determined. Using different experimental cell culture platforms, including spinal motor neurons derived from induced pluripotent stem cells from C9orf72-ALS patients, we found evidence for cell-to-cell spreading of DPRs via exosome-dependent and exosome-independent pathways, which may be relevant to disease.

  12. Role of Rice stripe virus NSvc4 in cell-to-cell movement and symptom development in Nicotiana benthamiana

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    Yi eXu

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Our previous work has demonstrated that the NSvc4 protein of Rice stripe virus (RSV functions as a cell-to-cell movement protein. However, the mechanisms whereby RSV traffics through plasmodesmata (PD are unknown. Here we provide evidence that the NSvc4 moves on the actin filament and endoplasmic reticulum (ER network, but not microtubules, to reach cell wall PD. Disruption of cytoskeleton using different inhibitors altered NSvc4 localization to PD, thus impeding RSV infection of Nicotiana benthamiana. Sequence analyses and deletion mutagenesis experiment revealed that the N-terminal 125 amino acids (AAs of the NSvc4 determine PD targeting and that a transmembrane domain spanning AAs 106 to 125 is critical for PD localization. We also found that the NSvc4 protein can localize to chloroplasts in infected cells. Analyses using deletion mutants revealed that the N-terminal 73 AAs are essential for chloroplast localization. Furthermore, expression of NSvc4 from a Potato virus X (PVX vector resulted in more severe disease symptoms than PVX alone in systemically infected N. benthamiana leaves. Expression of NSvc4 in Spodoptera frugiperda 9 (Sf-9 cells did not elicit tubule formation, but instead resulted in punctate foci at the plasma membrane. These findings shed new light on our understanding of the movement mechanisms whereby RSV infects host plants.

  13. Role of cell-to-cell variability in activating a positive feedback antiviral response in human dendritic cells.

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    Jianzhong Hu

    Full Text Available In the first few hours following Newcastle disease viral infection of human monocyte-derived dendritic cells, the induction of IFNB1 is extremely low and the secreted type I interferon response is below the limits of ELISA assay. However, many interferon-induced genes are activated at this time, for example DDX58 (RIGI, which in response to viral RNA induces IFNB1. We investigated whether the early induction of IFNBI in only a small percentage of infected cells leads to low level IFN secretion that then induces IFN-responsive genes in all cells. We developed an agent-based mathematical model to explore the IFNBI and DDX58 temporal dynamics. Simulations showed that a small number of early responder cells provide a mechanism for efficient and controlled activation of the DDX58-IFNBI positive feedback loop. The model predicted distributions of single cell responses that were confirmed by single cell mRNA measurements. The results suggest that large cell-to-cell variation plays an important role in the early innate immune response, and that the variability is essential for the efficient activation of the IFNB1 based feedback loop.

  14. Physical and chemical analysis of lithium-ion battery cell-to-cell failure events inside custom fire chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinner, Neil S.; Field, Christopher R.; Hammond, Mark H.; Williams, Bradley A.; Myers, Kristina M.; Lubrano, Adam L.; Rose-Pehrsson, Susan L.; Tuttle, Steven G.

    2015-04-01

    A 5-cubic meter decompression chamber was re-purposed as a fire test chamber to conduct failure and abuse experiments on lithium-ion batteries. Various modifications were performed to enable remote control and monitoring of chamber functions, along with collection of data from instrumentation during tests including high speed and infrared cameras, a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer, real-time gas analyzers, and compact reconfigurable input and output devices. Single- and multi-cell packages of LiCoO2 chemistry 18650 lithium-ion batteries were constructed and data was obtained and analyzed for abuse and failure tests. Surrogate 18650 cells were designed and fabricated for multi-cell packages that mimicked the thermal behavior of real cells without using any active components, enabling internal temperature monitoring of cells adjacent to the active cell undergoing failure. Heat propagation and video recordings before, during, and after energetic failure events revealed a high degree of heterogeneity; some batteries exhibited short burst of sparks while others experienced a longer, sustained flame during failure. Carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, methane, dimethyl carbonate, and ethylene carbonate were detected via gas analysis, and the presence of these species was consistent throughout all failure events. These results highlight the inherent danger in large format lithium-ion battery packs with regards to cell-to-cell failure, and illustrate the need for effective safety features.

  15. The cell adhesion molecules Echinoid and Friend of Echinoid coordinate cell adhesion and cell signaling to regulate the fidelity of ommatidial rotation in the Drosophila eye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fetting, Jennifer L; Spencer, Susan A; Wolff, Tanya

    2009-10-01

    Directed cellular movements are a universal feature of morphogenesis in multicellular organisms. Differential adhesion between the stationary and motile cells promotes these cellular movements to effect spatial patterning of cells. A prominent feature of Drosophila eye development is the 90 degrees rotational movement of the multicellular ommatidial precursors within a matrix of stationary cells. We demonstrate that the cell adhesion molecules Echinoid (Ed) and Friend of Echinoid (Fred) act throughout ommatidial rotation to modulate the degree of ommatidial precursor movement. We propose that differential levels of Ed and Fred between stationary and rotating cells at the initiation of rotation create a permissive environment for cell movement, and that uniform levels in these two populations later contribute to stopping the movement. Based on genetic data, we propose that ed and fred impart a second, independent, ;brake-like' contribution to this process via Egfr signaling. Ed and Fred are localized in largely distinct and dynamic patterns throughout rotation. However, ed and fred are required in only a subset of cells - photoreceptors R1, R7 and R6 - for normal rotation, cells that have only recently been linked to a role in planar cell polarity (PCP). This work also provides the first demonstration of a requirement for cone cells in the ommatidial rotation aspect of PCP. ed and fred also genetically interact with the PCP genes, but affect only the degree-of-rotation aspect of the PCP phenotype. Significantly, we demonstrate that at least one PCP protein, Stbm, is required in R7 to control the degree of ommatidial rotation.

  16. Hydrogen sulfide acts as a downstream signal molecule in salicylic acid-induced heat tolerance in maize (Zea mays L.) seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhong-Guang; Xie, Lin-Run; Li, Xiao-Juan

    2015-04-01

    Salicylic acid (SA), 2-hydroxy benzoic acid, is a small phenolic compound with multifunction that is involved in plant growth, development, and the acquisition of stress tolerance. In recent years, hydrogen sulfide (H2S) has been found to have similar functions, but cross talk between SA and H2S in the acquisition of heat tolerance is not clear. In this study, pretreatment of maize seedlings with SA improved the survival percentage of seedlings under heat stress, indicating that SA pretreatment could improve the heat tolerance of maize seedlings. In addition, treatment with SA enhanced the activity of L-cysteine desulfhydrase (L-DES), a key enzyme in H2S biosynthesis, which in turn induced accumulation of endogenous H2S. Interestingly, SA-induced heat tolerance was enhanced by addition of NaHS, a H2S donor, but weakened by specific inhibitors of H2S biosynthesis DL-propargylglycine (PAG) and its scavenger hydroxylamine (HT). Furthermore, pretreatment with paclobutrazol (PAC) and 2-aminoindan-2-phosphonic acid (AIP), inhibitors of SA biosynthesis, had no significant effect on NaHS-induced heat tolerance of maize seedlings. Similarly, significant change in the activities of phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL) and benzoic-acid-2-hydroxylase (BA2H), the key enzymes in SA biosynthesis, and the content of endogenous SA, was not observed in maize seedlings by NaHS treatment. All of the above-mentioned results suggest that SA pretreatment could improve the heat tolerance of maize seedlings, and H2S might be a novel downstream signal molecule in SA-induced heat tolerance.

  17. Vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein restricts cell-to-cell spread of Shigella flexneri at the cell periphery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Soo Young; Gertler, Frank B; Goldberg, Marcia B

    2015-11-01

    Shigella spp. are intracellular bacterial pathogens that cause diarrhoeal disease in humans. Shigella utilize the host actin cytoskeleton to enter cells, move through the cytoplasm of cells and pass into adjacent cells. Ena/VASP family proteins are highly conserved proteins that participate in actin-dependent dynamic cellular processes. We tested whether Ena/VASP family members VASP (vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein), Mena (mammalian-enabled) or EVL (Ena-VASP-like) contribute to Shigella flexneri spread through cell monolayers. VASP and EVL restricted cell-to-cell spread without significantly altering actin-based motility, whereas Mena had no effect on these processes. Phosphorylation of VASP on Ser153, Ser235 and Thr274 regulated its subcellular distribution and function. VASP derivatives that lack the Ena/VASP homology 1 (EVH1) domain or contain a phosphoablative mutation of Ser153 were defective in restricting S. flexneri spread, indicating that the EVH1 domain and phosphorylation on Ser153 are required for this process. The EVH1 domain and Ser153 of VASP were required for VASP localization to focal adhesions, and localization of VASP to focal adhesions and/or the leading edge was required for restriction of spread. The contribution of the EVH1 domain was from both the donor and the recipient cell, whereas the contribution of Ser153 phosphorylation was only from the donor cell. Thus, unlike host proteins characterized in Shigella pathogenesis that promote bacterial spread, VASP and EVL function to limit it. The ability of VASP and EVL to limit spread highlights the critical role of focal adhesion complexes and/or the leading edge in bacterial passage between cells.

  18. Myotube formation is affected by adipogenic lineage cells in a cell-to-cell contact-independent manner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takegahara, Yuki; Yamanouchi, Keitaro, E-mail: akeita@mail.ecc.u-tokyo.ac.jp; Nakamura, Katsuyuki; Nakano, Shin-ichi; Nishihara, Masugi

    2014-05-15

    Intramuscular adipose tissue (IMAT) formation is observed in some pathological conditions such as Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) and sarcopenia. Several studies have suggested that IMAT formation is not only negatively correlated with skeletal muscle mass but also causes decreased muscle contraction in sarcopenia. In the present study, we examined w hether adipocytes affect myogenesis. For this purpose, skeletal muscle progenitor cells were transfected with siRNA of PPARγ (siPPARγ) in an attempt to inhibit adipogenesis. Myosin heavy chain (MHC)-positive myotube formation was promoted in cells transfected with siPPARγ compared to that of cells transfected with control siRNA. To determine whether direct cell-to-cell contact between adipocytes and myoblasts is a prerequisite for adipocytes to affect myogenesis, skeletal muscle progenitor cells were cocultured with pre- or mature adipocytes in a Transwell coculture system. MHC-positive myotube formation was inhibited when skeletal muscle progenitor cells were cocultured with mature adipocytes, but was promoted when they were cocultured with preadipocytes. Similar effects were observed when pre- or mature adipocyte-conditioned medium was used. These results indicate that preadipocytes play an important role in maintaining skeletal muscle mass by promoting myogenesis; once differentiated, the resulting mature adipocytes negatively affect myogenesis, leading to the muscle deterioration observed in skeletal muscle pathologies. - Highlights: • We examined the effects of pre- and mature adipocytes on myogenesis in vitro. • Preadipocytes and mature adipocytes affect myoblast fusion. • Preadipocytes play an important role in maintaining skeletal muscle mass. • Mature adipocytes lead to muscle deterioration observed in skeletal muscle pathologies.

  19. Quantifying the integration of quorum-sensing signals with single-cell resolution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Long

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Cell-to-cell communication in bacteria is a process known as quorum sensing that relies on the production, detection, and response to the extracellular accumulation of signaling molecules called autoinducers. Often, bacteria use multiple autoinducers to obtain information about the vicinal cell density. However, how cells integrate and interpret the information contained within multiple autoinducers remains a mystery. Using single-cell fluorescence microscopy, we quantified the signaling responses to and analyzed the integration of multiple autoinducers by the model quorum-sensing bacterium Vibrio harveyi. Our results revealed that signals from two distinct autoinducers, AI-1 and AI-2, are combined strictly additively in a shared phosphorelay pathway, with each autoinducer contributing nearly equally to the total response. We found a coherent response across the population with little cell-to-cell variation, indicating that the entire population of cells can reliably distinguish several distinct conditions of external autoinducer concentration. We speculate that the use of multiple autoinducers allows a growing population of cells to synchronize gene expression during a series of distinct developmental stages.

  20. Signaling Pathways in Exosomes Biogenesis, Secretion and Fate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla Emiliani

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Exosomes are small extracellular vesicles (30–100 nm derived from the endosomal system, which have raised considerable interest in the last decade. Several studies have shown that they mediate cell-to-cell communication in a variety of biological processes. Thus, in addition to cell-to-cell direct interaction or secretion of active molecules, they are now considered another class of signal mediators. Exosomes can be secreted by several cell types and retrieved in many body fluids, such as blood, urine, saliva and cerebrospinal fluid. In addition to proteins and lipids, they also contain nucleic acids, namely mRNA and miRNA. These features have prompted extensive research to exploit them as a source of biomarkers for several pathologies, such as cancer and neurodegenerative disorders. In this context, exosomes also appear attractive as gene delivery vehicles. Furthermore, exosome immunomodulatory and regenerative properties are also encouraging their application for further therapeutic purposes. Nevertheless, several issues remain to be addressed: exosome biogenesis and secretion mechanisms have not been clearly understood, and physiological functions, as well as pathological roles, are far from being satisfactorily elucidated.

  1. Molecule nanoweaver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerald, II; Rex E.; Klingler, Robert J.; Rathke, Jerome W.; Diaz, Rocio; Vukovic, Lela

    2009-03-10

    A method, apparatus, and system for constructing uniform macroscopic films with tailored geometric assemblies of molecules on the nanometer scale. The method, apparatus, and system include providing starting molecules of selected character, applying one or more force fields to the molecules to cause them to order and condense with NMR spectra and images being used to monitor progress in creating the desired geometrical assembly and functionality of molecules that comprise the films.

  2. The fitness burden imposed by synthesising quorum sensing signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruparell, A; Dubern, J F; Ortori, C A; Harrison, F; Halliday, N M; Emtage, A; Ashawesh, M M; Laughton, C A; Diggle, S P; Williams, P; Barrett, D A; Hardie, K R

    2016-09-12

    It is now well established that bacterial populations utilize cell-to-cell signaling (quorum-sensing, QS) to control the production of public goods and other co-operative behaviours. Evolutionary theory predicts that both the cost of signal production and the response to signals should incur fitness costs for producing cells. Although costs imposed by the downstream consequences of QS have been shown, the cost of QS signal molecule (QSSM) production and its impact on fitness has not been examined. We measured the fitness cost to cells of synthesising QSSMs by quantifying metabolite levels in the presence of QSSM synthases. We found that: (i) bacteria making certain QSSMs have a growth defect that exerts an evolutionary cost, (ii) production of QSSMs negatively correlates with intracellular concentrations of QSSM precursors, (iii) the production of heterologous QSSMs negatively impacts the production of a native QSSM that shares common substrates, and (iv) supplementation with exogenously added metabolites partially rescued growth defects imposed by QSSM synthesis. These data identify the sources of the fitness costs incurred by QSSM producer cells, and indicate that there may be metabolic trade-offs associated with QS signaling that could exert selection on how signaling evolves.

  3. Differential effects of exposure to maternal obesity or maternal weight loss during the periconceptional period in the sheep on insulin signalling molecules in skeletal muscle of the offspring at 4 months of age.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa M Nicholas

    Full Text Available Exposure to maternal obesity before and/or throughout pregnancy may increase the risk of obesity and insulin resistance in the offspring in childhood and adult life, therefore, resulting in its transmission into subsequent generations. We have previously shown that exposure to maternal obesity around the time of conception alone resulted in increased adiposity in female lambs. Changes in the abundance of insulin signalling molecules in skeletal muscle and adipose tissue precede the development of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. It is not clear, however, whether exposure to maternal obesity results in insulin resistance in her offspring as a consequence of the impact of increased adiposity on skeletal muscle or as a consequence of the programming of specific changes in the abundance of insulin signalling molecules in this tissue. We have used an embryo transfer model in the sheep to investigate the effects of exposure to either maternal obesity or to weight loss in normal and obese mothers preceding and for one week after conception on the expression and abundance of insulin signalling molecules in muscle in the offspring. We found that exposure to maternal obesity resulted in lower muscle GLUT-4 and Ser 9 phospho-GSK3α and higher muscle GSK3α abundance in lambs when compared to lambs conceived in normally nourished ewes. Exposure to maternal weight loss in normal or obese mothers, however, resulted in lower muscle IRS1, PI3K, p110β, aPKCζ, Thr 642 phospho-AS160 and GLUT-4 abundance in the offspring. In conclusion, maternal obesity or weight loss around conception have each programmed specific changes on subsets of molecules in the insulin signalling, glucose transport and glycogen synthesis pathways in offspring. There is a need for a stronger evidence base to ensure that weight loss regimes in obese women seeking to become pregnant minimize the metabolic costs for the next generation.

  4. Reliable Signal Transduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wollman, Roy

    Stochasticity inherent to biochemical reactions (intrinsic noise) and variability in cellular states (extrinsic noise) degrade information transmitted through signaling networks. We analyzed the ability of temporal signal modulation - that is dynamics - to reduce noise-induced information loss. In the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), calcium (Ca(2 +)) , and nuclear factor kappa-B (NF- κB) pathways, response dynamics resulted in significantly greater information transmission capacities compared to nondynamic responses. Theoretical analysis demonstrated that signaling dynamics has a key role in overcoming extrinsic noise. Experimental measurements of information transmission in the ERK network under varying signal-to-noise levels confirmed our predictions and showed that signaling dynamics mitigate, and can potentially eliminate, extrinsic noise-induced information loss. By curbing the information-degrading effects of cell-to-cell variability, dynamic responses substantially increase the accuracy of biochemical signaling networks.

  5. Effect of the infectious laryngotracheitis virus (ILTV) glycoprotein G on virus attachment, penetration, growth curve and direct cell-to-cell spread

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Zhaogang; ZHANG Manfu

    2005-01-01

    The secreted alphaherpesvirus glycoprotein G (gG) works differently from other proteins. Analysis of the role of ILTV gG in virus attachment, penetration, direct cell-to-cell spread (CTCS) and the growth curve showed that gG or its antibody had no effect on ILTV attachment and penetration and that the gG antibody reduced the virus plaque size and the one-step growth curve on chicken embryo liver (CEL) cells, but gG did not affect the virus plaque size or the one-step growth curve on CEL cells. Laser scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM) detection showed that ILTV gG is located in the perinuclear region and the membrane of the CEL cells. These results suggested that ILTV gG might contribute to direct cell-to-cell transmission.

  6. Durability and Reliability of Electric Vehicle Batteries under Electric Utility Grid Operations. Part 1: Cell-to-Cell Variations and Preliminary Testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnaud Devie

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Vehicle-to-grid (V2G and grid-to-vehicle (G2V strategies are considered to help stabilize the electric grid but their true impact on battery degradation is still unknown. The intention of this study is to test the impact of such strategies on the degradation of commercial Li-ion batteries. This first part looks into the preliminary testing performed prior to the start of degradation studies to ensure that the selected cells are compatible. Both the thermodynamic and kinetic cell-to-cell variation within the selected batch and the diagnostic-ability of the cells were investigated. The cells were found to have low cell-to-cell variations and are thus consistent. Moreover, the emulation of the full cell from the half-cell data prepared from harvested electrodes was successful and the degradation forecast showed that the main degradation modes can be differentiated.

  7. Mesenchymal stem cells rescue cardiomyoblasts from cell death in an in vitro ischemia model via direct cell-to-cell connections

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    Kiss Levente

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs are promising candidates for cell based therapies in myocardial infarction. However, the exact underlying cellular mechanisms are still not fully understood. Our aim was to explore the possible role of direct cell-to-cell interaction between ischemic H9c2 cardiomyoblasts and normal MSCs. Using an in vitro ischemia model of 150 minutes of oxygen glucose deprivation we investigated cell viability and cell interactions with confocal microscopy and flow cytometry. Results Our model revealed that adding normal MSCs to the ischemic cell population significantly decreased the ratio of dead H9c2 cells (H9c2 only: 0.85 ± 0.086 vs. H9c2+MSCs: 0.16 ± 0.035. This effect was dependent on direct cell-to-cell contact since co-cultivation with MSCs cultured in cell inserts did not exert the same beneficial effect (ratio of dead H9c2 cells: 0.90 ± 0.055. Confocal microscopy revealed that cardiomyoblasts and MSCs frequently formed 200-500 nm wide intercellular connections and cell fusion rarely occurred between these cells. Conclusion Based on these results we hypothesize that mesenchymal stem cells may reduce the number of dead cardiomyoblasts after ischemic damage via direct cell-to-cell interactions and intercellular tubular connections may play an important role in these processes.

  8. Two basic (hydrophilic) regions in the movement protein of Parietaria mottle virus have RNA binding activity and are required for cell-to-cell transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, Carolina; Coll-Bonfill, Nuria; Aramburu, Jose; Pallás, Vicente; Aparicio, Frederic; Galipienso, Luis

    2014-05-12

    The movement protein (MP) of parietaria mottle virus (PMoV) is required for virus cell-to-cell movement. Bioinformatics analysis identified two hydrophilic non-contiguous regions (R1 and R2) rich in the basic amino acids lysine and arginine and with the predicted secondary structure of an α-helix. Different approaches were used to determine the implication of the R1 and R2 regions in RNA binding, plasmodesmata (PD) targeting and cell-to-cell movement. EMSA (Electrophoretic Mobility Shift Assay) showed that both regions have RNA-binding activity whereas that mutational analysis reported that either deletion of any of these regions, or loss of the basic amino acids, interfered with the viral intercellular movement. Subcellular localization studies showed that PMoV MP locates at PD. Mutants designed to impeded cell-to-cell movement failed to accumulate at PD indicating that basic residues in both R1 and R2 are critical for binding the MP at PD.

  9. An important role for syndecan-1 in herpes simplex virus type-1 induced cell-to-cell fusion and virus spread.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghadah A Karasneh

    Full Text Available Herpes simplex virus type-1 (HSV-1 is a common human pathogen that relies heavily on cell-to-cell spread for establishing a lifelong latent infection. Molecular aspects of HSV-1 entry into host cells have been well studied; however, the molecular details of the spread of the virus from cell-to-cell remain poorly understood. In the past, the role of heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPG during HSV-1 infection has focused solely on the role of HS chains as an attachment receptor for the virus, while the core protein has been assumed to perform a passive role of only carrying the HS chains. Likewise, very little is known about the involvement of any specific HSPGs in HSV-1 lifecycle. Here we demonstrate that a HSPG, syndecan-1, plays an important role in HSV-1 induced membrane fusion and cell-to-cell spread. Interestingly, the functions of syndecan-1 in fusion and spread are independent of the presence of HS on the core protein. Using a mutant CHO-K1 cell line that lacks all glycosaminoglycans (GAGs on its surface (CHO-745 we demonstrate that the core protein of syndecan-1 possesses the ability to modulate membrane fusion and viral spread. Altogether, we identify a new role for syndecan-1 in HSV-1 pathogenesis and demonstrate HS-independent functions of its core protein in viral spread.

  10. Disruption of Cell-to-Cell Signaling Does Not Abolish the Antagonism of Phaeobacter gallaeciensis toward the Fish Pathogen Vibrio anguillarum in Algal Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prol García, María Jesús; D'Alvise, Paul; Gram, Lone

    2013-01-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) regulates Phaeobacter gallaeciensis antagonism in broth systems; however, we demonstrate here that QS is not important for antagonism in algal cultures. QS mutants reduced Vibrio anguillarum to the same extent as the wild type. Consequently, a combination of probiotic Phaeobac......Quorum sensing (QS) regulates Phaeobacter gallaeciensis antagonism in broth systems; however, we demonstrate here that QS is not important for antagonism in algal cultures. QS mutants reduced Vibrio anguillarum to the same extent as the wild type. Consequently, a combination of probiotic...

  11. Statistical Analysis of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilm Development: Impact of Mutations in Genes Involved in Twitching Motility, Cell-to-Cell Signaling, and Stationary-Phase Sigma Factor Expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heydorn, Arne; Ersbøll, Bjarne Kjær; Kato, Junichi

    2002-01-01

    developments of the biofilms were quantified by the computer program COMSTAT (A. Heydorn, A. T. Nielsen, M. Hentzer, C. Sternberg, M. Givskov, B. K. Ersboll, and S. Molin, Microbiology 146:2395-2407, 2000). Two structural key variables, average thickness and roughness, formed the basis for an analysis......Four strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (wild type, DeltapilHIJK mutant, lasI mutant, and rpoS mutant) were genetically tagged with the green fluorescent protein, and the development of flow chamber-grown biofilms by each of them was investigated by confocal laser scanning microscopy. The structural...... of variance model comprising the four P. aeruginosa strains, five time points (55, 98, 146, 242, and 314 h), and three independent rounds of biofllm experiments. The results showed that the wild type, the DeltapilHIJK mutant, and the rpoS mutant display conspicuously different types of temporal biofilm...

  12. Glossogyne tenuifolia Extract Inhibits TNF-α-Induced Expression of Adhesion Molecules in Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells via Blocking the NF-kB Signaling Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsuan, Chin-Feng; Hsu, Hsia-Fen; Tseng, Wei-Kung; Lee, Thung-Lip; Wei, Yu-Feng; Hsu, Kwan-Lih; Wu, Chau-Chung; Houng, Jer-Yiing

    2015-09-17

    Chronic inflammation plays a pivotal role in the development of atherosclerosis, where the pro-inflammatory cytokine-induced expression of endothelial adhesion molecules and the recruitment of monocytes are the crucial events leading to its pathogenesis. Glossogyne tenuifolia ethanol extract (GTE) is shown to have potent anti-inflammatory and antioxidant activities. We evaluated the effects of GTE and its major components, luteolin (lut), luteolin-7-glucoside (lut-7-g), and oleanolic acid (OA) on TNF-α-induced expression of adhesion molecules in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). The results demonstrated that GTE, lut, and lut-7-g attenuated the expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) in TNF-α-activated HUVECs, and inhibited the adhesion of monocytes to TNF-α-activated HUVECs. The TNF-α-induced mRNA expression of ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 was also suppressed, revealing their inhibitory effects at the transcriptional level. Furthermore, GTE, lut, and lut-7-g blocked the TNF-α-induced degradation of nuclear factor-kB inhibitor (IkB), an indicator of the activation of nuclear factor-kB (NF-kB). In summary, GTE and its bioactive components were effective in preventing the adhesion of monocytes to cytokine-activated endothelium by the inhibition of expression of adhesion molecules, which in turn is mediated through blocking the activation and nuclear translocation of NF-kB. The current results reveal the therapeutic potential of GTE in atherosclerosis.

  13. The role of microbial signals in plant growth and development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortíz-Castro, Randy; Contreras-Cornejo, Hexon Angel; Macías-Rodríguez, Lourdes; López-Bucio, José

    2009-08-01

    Plant growth and development involves a tight coordination of the spatial and temporal organization of cell division, cell expansion and cell differentiation. Orchestration of these events requires the exchange of signaling molecules between the root and shoot, which can be affected by both biotic and abiotic factors. The interactions that occur between plants and their associated microorganisms have long been of interest, as knowledge of these processes could lead to the development of novel agricultural applications. Plants produce a wide range of organic compounds including sugars, organic acids and vitamins, which can be used as nutrients or signals by microbial populations. On the other hand, microorganisms release phytohormones, small molecules or volatile compounds, which may act directly or indirectly to activate plant immunity or regulate plant growth and morphogenesis. In this review, we focus on recent developments in the identification of signals from free-living bacteria and fungi that interact with plants in a beneficial way. Evidence has accumulated indicating that classic plant signals such as auxins and cytokinins can be produced by microorganisms to efficiently colonize the root and modulate root system architecture. Other classes of signals, including N-acyl-L-homoserine lactones, which are used by bacteria for cell-to-cell communication, can be perceived by plants to modulate gene expression, metabolism and growth. Finally, we discuss the role played by volatile organic compounds released by certain plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria in plant immunity and developmental processes. The picture that emerges is one in which plants and microbes communicate themselves through transkingdom signaling systems involving classic and novel signals.

  14. Comparative integromics on non-canonical WNT or planar cell polarity signaling molecules: transcriptional mechanism of PTK7 in colorectal cancer and that of SEMA6A in undifferentiated ES cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katoh, Masuko; Katoh, Masaru

    2007-09-01

    Non-canonical WNT and planar cell polarity (PCP) are overlapping but distinct signaling pathways, which control convergent extension, neural tube closure, orientation of cilia and sensory hair cells, axon guidance, and cell motility. Non-canonical WNT signals, regulated by the interaction of WNT, WNT antagonist, Frizzled and ROR2, are transduced to JNK, ROCK, PKC, MAP3K7, and NFAT signaling cascades. PCP signals, regulated by the interaction of VANGL-PRICKLE complex, CELSR and Frizzled-DVL complex, are transduced to JNK, ROCK, and other uncharacterized signaling cascades. PTK7 signaling, regulated by SEMA6 and Plexin-A family members, affects PCP pathway through VANGL. Here, integrative genomic analyses on WNT5A, WNT5B, WNT11, FZD3, FZD6, ROR1, ROR2, RYK, CELSR1, CELSR2, CELSR3, VANGL1, VANGL2, PRICKLE1, PRICKLE2, PTK7, SEMA6A, SEMA6B, SEMA6C and SEMA6D were carried out. PTK7 and SEMA6A were expressed in undifferentiated embryonic stem (ES) cells, SEMA6A in endodermal progenitors, CELSR1, VANGL1 and PTK7 in gastrointestinal tumors. CELSR2, PRICKLE2 and SEMA6C were expressed in fetal brain, CELSR2, PRICKLE1 and SEMA6A in adult brain, WNT5A and CELSR3 in adult brain tumors. These facts indicate class switches of non-canonical WNT or PCP signaling molecules during embryogenesis and carcinogenesis. TCF/LEF-, SP1-, and 5 bHLH-binding sites within human PTK7 promoter were conserved in chimpanzee, rhesus monkey, mouse, and rat PTK7 orthologs, which explained the mechanism of PTK7 upregulation in colorectal cancer. NANOG-, SOX2-, and POU5F1 (OCT3/OCT4)-binding sites within intron 1 of the human SEMA6A gene were conserved in chimpanzee, rhesus monkey, mouse, and rat SEMA6A orthologs, which explained the mechanism of SEMA6A upregulation in undifferentiated ES cells. Most of non-canonical WNT or PCP signaling molecules, except PTK7 and SEMA6A, were not frequently expressed in undifferentiated human ES cells. Non-canonical WNT or PCP signaling pathway, activated to orchestrate

  15. The inhibition of inflammatory molecule expression on 3T3-L1 adipocytes by berberine is not mediated by leptin signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Bong-Hyuk; Kim, Yu-Hee; Ahn, In-Sook; Ha, Jung-Heun; Byun, Jae-Min; Do, Myoung-Sool

    2009-01-01

    In our previous study, we have shown that berberine has both anti-adipogenic and anti-inflammatory effects on 3T3-L1 adipocytes, and the anti-adipogenic effect is due to the down-regulation of adipogenic enzymes and transcription factors. Here we focused more on anti-inflammatory effect of berberine using real time RT-PCR and found it changes expressions of adipokines. We hypothesized that anti-adipogenicity of berberine mediates anti-inflammtory effect and explored leptin as a candidate mediator of this signaling. We studied this hypothesis by western blot analysis, but our results showed that berberine has no effect on the phosphorylations of STAT-3 and ERK which have important roles on leptin signaling. These results led us to conclude that the anti-inflammatory effect of berberine is not mediated by the inhibition of leptin signal transduction. Moreover, we have found that berberine down-regulates NF-kappaB signaling, one of the inflammation-related signaling pathway, through western blot analysis. Taken together, the anti-inflammatory effect of berberine is not mediated by leptin, and berberine induces anti-inflammatory effect independent of leptin signaling.

  16. TW-37, a Small-Molecule Inhibitor of Bcl-2, Inhibits Cell Growth and Induces Apoptosis in Pancreatic Cancer: Involvement of Notch-1 Signaling Pathway

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Overexpression of Bcl-2 family proteins has been found in a variety of aggressive human carcinomas, including pancreatic cancer, suggesting that specific agents targeting Bcl-2 family proteins would be valuable for pancreatic cancer therapy. We have previously reported that TW-37, a small-molecule inhibitor of Bcl-2 family proteins, inhibited cell growth and induced apoptosis in pancreatic cancer. However, the precise role and the molecular mechanism of action of TW-37 have not been fully elu...

  17. Regulation of T cell receptor expression in immature CD4+CD8+ thymocytes by p56lck tyrosine kinase: basis for differential signaling by CD4 and CD8 in immature thymocytes expressing both coreceptor molecules

    OpenAIRE

    1993-01-01

    Signals transduced through the T cell antigen receptor (TCR) are modulated by the src family tyrosine kinase p56lck (lck), which associates in mature T cells with the coreceptor molecules CD4 and CD8. Here we describe a novel function of lck in immature CD4+CD8+ thymocytes, that of regulating TCR expression. Activation of lck in immature CD4+CD8+ thymocytes by intrathymic engagement of CD4 maintains low TCR expression by causing most TCR components to be retained and degraded within the endop...

  18. Enumerating molecules.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Visco, Donald Patrick, Jr. (, . Tennessee Technological University, Cookeville, TN); Faulon, Jean-Loup Michel; Roe, Diana C.

    2004-04-01

    This report is a comprehensive review of the field of molecular enumeration from early isomer counting theories to evolutionary algorithms that design molecules in silico. The core of the review is a detail account on how molecules are counted, enumerated, and sampled. The practical applications of molecular enumeration are also reviewed for chemical information, structure elucidation, molecular design, and combinatorial library design purposes. This review is to appear as a chapter in Reviews in Computational Chemistry volume 21 edited by Kenny B. Lipkowitz.

  19. Cell-to-cell diversity in protein levels of a gene driven by a tetracycline inducible promoter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yli-Harja Olli

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene expression in Escherichia coli is regulated by several mechanisms. We measured in single cells the expression level of a single copy gene coding for green fluorescent protein (GFP, integrated into the genome and driven by a tetracycline inducible promoter, for varying induction strengths. Also, we measured the transcriptional activity of a tetracycline inducible promoter controlling the transcription of a RNA with 96 binding sites for MS2-GFP. Results The distribution of GFP levels in single cells is found to change significantly as induction reaches high levels, causing the Fano factor of the cells' protein levels to increase with mean level, beyond what would be expected from a Poisson-like process of RNA transcription. In agreement, the Fano factor of the cells' number of RNA molecules target for MS2-GFP follows a similar trend. The results provide evidence that the dynamics of the promoter complex formation, namely, the variability in its duration from one transcription event to the next, explains the change in the distribution of expression levels in the cell population with induction strength. Conclusions The results suggest that the open complex formation of the tetracycline inducible promoter, in the regime of strong induction, affects significantly the dynamics of RNA production due to the variability of its duration from one event to the next.

  20. Low-density subculture: a technical note on the importance of avoiding cell-to-cell contact during mesenchymal stromal cell expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balint, Richard; Richardson, Stephen M; Cartmell, Sarah H

    2015-10-01

    Numerous scientific studies and clinical trials are carried out each year exploring the use of mesenchymal stromal cells in regenerative medicine and tissue engineering. However, the effective and reliable expansion of this very important cell type remains a challenge. In this study the importance of cell-to-cell contact during expansion has been explored on the proliferation and differentiation potential of the produced cells. Cells were cultured up to passage 5 under conditions where cell-to-cell contact was either probable (40-70% confluence; see supporting information, Protocol A) or where it was unlikely (10-50% confluence; see supporting information, Protocol B). The effect of the two different conditions on expansion efficiency; proliferation rate and tri-lineage differentiation potential was assessed. Differences in immunophenotype, cell size and senescence were also investigated. Protocol B cultures expanded twice as fast as those cultured with Protocol A. In passage 5 experiments low confluence expanded cells displayed a 10% higher overall proliferation rate, and produced 23% more cells in growth, 12% more in osteogenic, 77% more in adipogenic, but 27% less in chondrogenic medium. Differentiation potential wasn't decisively affected at the mRNA level. However, Protocol B favoured bone and cartilage differentiation at the secretional level. Protocol A populations showed reduced purity, expressing CD105 in only 76% compared to the 96.7% in Protocol B cultures. Protocol A populations also contained significantly more (+4.2%) senescent cells, however, no difference was found in cell size between the two protocols. The findings of this study suggest that cell-to-cell contact, and therefore high confluence levels, is detrimental to MSC quality.

  1. Cell-to-cell transformation in Escherichia coli: a novel type of natural transformation involving cell-derived DNA and a putative promoting pheromone.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rika Etchuuya

    Full Text Available Escherichia coli is not assumed to be naturally transformable. However, several recent reports have shown that E. coli can express modest genetic competence in certain conditions that may arise in its environment. We have shown previously that spontaneous lateral transfer of non-conjugative plasmids occurs in a colony biofilm of mixed E. coli strains (a set of a donor strain harbouring a plasmid and a plasmid-free recipient strain. In this study, with high-frequency combinations of strains and a plasmid, we constructed the same lateral plasmid transfer system in liquid culture. Using this system, we demonstrated that this lateral plasmid transfer was DNase-sensitive, indicating that it is a kind of transformation in which DNase-accessible extracellular naked DNA is essential. However, this transformation did not occur with purified plasmid DNA and required a direct supply of plasmid from co-existing donor cells. Based on this feature, we have termed this transformation type as 'cell-to-cell transformation'. Analyses using medium conditioned with the high-frequency strain revealed that this strain released a certain factor(s that promoted cell-to-cell transformation and arrested growth of the other strains. This factor is heat-labile and protease-sensitive, and its roughly estimated molecular mass was between ∼9 kDa and ∼30 kDa, indicating that it is a polypeptide factor. Interestingly, this factor was effective even when the conditioned medium was diluted 10(-5-10(-6, suggesting that it acts like a pheromone with high bioactivity. Based on these results, we propose that cell-to-cell transformation is a novel natural transformation mechanism in E. coli that requires cell-derived DNA and is promoted by a peptide pheromone. This is the first evidence that suggests the existence of a peptide pheromone-regulated transformation mechanism in E. coli and in Gram-negative bacteria.

  2. A protein G fragment from the salmonid viral hemorrhagic septicemia rhabdovirus induces cell-to-cell fusion and membrane phosphatidylserine translocation at low pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estepa, A M; Rocha, A I; Mas, V; Pérez, L; Encinar, J A; Nuñez, E; Fernandez, A; Gonzalez Ros, J M; Gavilanes, F; Coll, J M

    2001-12-07

    The fusion-related properties of segments p9, p3, p4, and p9 + p2 surrounding the p2 phospholipid-binding domain of the protein G (pG) of the salmonid rhabdovirus of viral hemorrhagic septicemia (VHS) (Nuñez, E., Fernandez, A. M., Estepa, A., Gonzalez-Ros, J. M., Gavilanes, F., and Coll, J. M. (1998) Virology 243, 322-330; Estepa, A., and Coll, J. M. (1996) Virology 216, 60-70), have been studied at neutral and fusion (low) pH values by using its derived peptides. Cell-to-cell fusion, translocation of phosphatidylserine, and inhibition of fusion of pG-transfected cells defined the p9 + p2 (fragment 11, sequence 56-110) as a fragment with higher specific activity for anionic phospholipid aggregation than the previously reported p2. While fragment 11, p2, and p3 showed interactions with anionic phospholipids, p9 and p4 showed no interactions with any phospholipids. When added to a cell monolayer model at low pH, fragment 11 induced pH-dependent cell-to-cell fusion and translocated phosphatidylserine from the inner to the outer leaflet of the membrane. At low pH and in the presence of anionic phospholipids, fragment 11 showed more than 80% beta-sheet conformation (IR and CD spectroscopies). Finally, anti-fragment 11 antibodies inhibited low pH-dependent pG-transfected cell-to-cell fusion. All of the data support the conclusion that fragment 11 is a primary determinant of some of the viral cell fusion events in VHSV.

  3. Hibiscus chlorotic ringspot virus coat protein is essential for cell-to-cell and long-distance movement but not for viral RNA replication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shengniao Niu

    Full Text Available Hibiscus chlorotic ringspot virus (HCRSV is a member of the genus Carmovirus in the family Tombusviridae. In order to study its coat protein (CP functions on virus replication and movement in kenaf (Hibiscus cannabinus L., two HCRSV mutants, designated as p2590 (A to G in which the first start codon ATG was replaced with GTG and p2776 (C to G in which proline 63 was replaced with alanine, were constructed. In vitro transcripts of p2590 (A to G were able to replicate to a similar level as wild type without CP expression in kenaf protoplasts. However, its cell-to-cell movement was not detected in the inoculated kenaf cotyledons. Structurally the proline 63 in subunit C acts as a kink for β-annulus formation during virion assembly. Progeny of transcripts derived from p2776 (C to G was able to move from cell-to-cell in inoculated cotyledons but its long-distance movement was not detected. Virions were not observed in partially purified mutant virus samples isolated from 2776 (C to G inoculated cotyledons. Removal of the N-terminal 77 amino acids of HCRSV CP by trypsin digestion of purified wild type HCRSV virions resulted in only T = 1 empty virus-like particles. Taken together, HCRSV CP is dispensable for viral RNA replication but essential for cell-to-cell movement, and virion is required for the virus systemic movement. The proline 63 is crucial for HCRSV virion assembly in kenaf plants and the N-terminal 77 amino acids including the β-annulus domain is required in T = 3 assembly in vitro.

  4. Selenium acts as an insulin-like molecule for the down-regulation of diabetic symptoms via endoplasmic reticulum stress and insulin signalling proteins in diabetes-induced non-obese diabetic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Daeyoun; Seo, Sujin; Kim, Yongkyu; Kim, Chuelkyu; Shim, Sunbo; Jee, Seungwan; Lee, Suhae; Jang, Mikyong; Kim, Minsun; Yim, Suyoun; Lee, Sang-Koo; Kang, Byeongcheol; Jang, Insurk; Cho, Jungsik

    2007-06-01

    To investigate whether selenium (Sel) treatment would impact on the onset of diabetes,we examined serum biochemical components including glucose and insulin,endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and insulin signalling proteins, hepatic C/EBP-homologous protein (CHOP) expression and DNA fragmentation in diabetic and non- diabetic conditions of non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice. We conclude that (i) Sel treatment induced insulin-like effects in lowering serum glucose level in Sel-treated NOD mice, (ii) Sel-treated mice had significantly decreased serum biochemical components associated with liver damage and lipid metabolism, (iii) Sel treatment led to the activation of the ER stress signal through the phosphorylation of JNK and eIF2 protein and insulin signal mechanisms through the phosphorylation of Akt and PI3 kinase, and (iv) Sel-treated mice were significantly relieved apoptosis of liver tissues indicated by DNA fragmentation assay in the diabetic NOD group. These results suggest that Sel compounds not only serve as insulin-like molecules for the downregulation of glucose level and the incidence of liver damage, but may also have the potential for the development of new drugs for the relief of diabetes by activating the ER stress and insulin signalling pathways.

  5. Treating small fiber neuropathy by topical application of a small molecule modulator of ligand-induced GFRα/RET receptor signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedstrom, Kristian L; Murtie, Joshua C; Albers, Kathryn; Calcutt, Nigel A; Corfas, Gabriel

    2014-02-11

    Small-fiber neuropathy (SFN) is a disorder of peripheral nerves commonly found in patients with diabetes mellitus, HIV infection, and those receiving chemotherapy. The complexity of disease etiology has led to a scarcity of effective treatments. Using two models of progressive SFN, we show that overexpression of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) in skin keratinocytes or topical application of XIB4035, a reported nonpeptidyl agonist of GDNF receptor α1 (GFRα1), are effective treatments for SFN. We also demonstrate that XIB4035 is not a GFRα1 agonist, but rather it enhances GFRα family receptor signaling in conjunction with ligand stimulation. Taken together, our results indicate that topical application of GFRα/RET receptor signaling modulators may be a unique therapy for SFN, and we have identified XIB4035 as a candidate therapeutic agent.

  6. The classification and detection of Quorum-sensing signaling molecules%细菌群体感应系统信号分子的分类及检测

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张彩凤

    2011-01-01

    Quorum-sensing is a regulatory mechanism,with which the bacteria will release a number of specific signaling molecules,which regulate the group behavior of the specie or other species in the same environment.When the signaling molecules density reaches a critical threshold,bacteria can alter the gene expression to suit the change of environment.This review focuses on the classification of Quorum-sensing,and describes the forecast of application.%细菌的群体感应系统(Quorum-sensing,QS)作为一种细胞的信号转导机制,是细菌通过特定的信号分子浓度来监测周围环境中本身或其它细菌的数量变化,当信号分子达到浓度阈值时,能够启动菌体中相关的基因表达来适应环境变化的一种调控机制。笔者综述了细菌群体感应系统的分类,并对其应用前景进行了展望。

  7. A Pro-Drug Approach for Selective Modulation of AI-2-Mediated Bacterial Cell-to-Cell Communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herman O. Sintim

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The universal quorum sensing autoinducer, AI-2, is utilized by several bacteria. Analogs of AI-2 have the potential to modulate bacterial behavior. Selectively quenching the communication of a few bacteria, in the presence of several others in an ecosystem, using analogs of AI-2 is non-trivial due to the ubiquity of AI-2 processing receptors in many bacteria that co-exist. Herein, we demonstrate that when an AI-2 analog, isobutyl DPD (which has been previously shown to be a quorum sensing, QS, quencher in both Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium is modified with ester groups, which get hydrolyzed once inside the bacterial cells, only QS in E. coli, but not in S. typhimurium, is inhibited. The origin of this differential QS inhibition could be due to differences in analog permeation of the bacterial membranes or ester hydrolysis rates. Such differences could be utilized to selectively target QS in specific bacteria amongst a consortium of other species that also use AI-2 signaling.

  8. NCAM-mimetic, FGL peptide, restores disrupted fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) phosphorylation and FGFR mediated signaling in neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM)-deficient mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aonurm-Helm, Anu; Berezin, Vladimir; Bock, Elisabeth;

    2010-01-01

    Neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) is a membrane-bound glycoprotein expressed on the surface of neuronal and glial cells. Previous in vitro studies have demonstrated that NCAM promotes neuronal functions largely via three main interaction partners: the fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR...... compared the levels of phosphorylation of FGFR1, Src kinase Fyn, Raf1 kinase, MAP kinases, Akt kinase and calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinases II and IV (CaMKII and CaMKIV) in the hippocampus of NCAM knockout mice to their wild-type littermates. The data of our study show that mice constitutively deficient...... in all isoforms of NCAM have decreased basal phosphorylation levels of FGFR1 and CaMKII and CaMKIV. Furthermore, NCAM-mimetic, FGL peptide, is found to be able to restore FGFR1, CaMKII and CaMKIV phosphorylation levels and thereby mimic the interactions of NCAM at this receptor in NCAM deficient mice...

  9. Enhancing the efficiency of direct reprogramming of human mesenchymal stem cells into mature neuronal-like cells with the combination of small molecule modulators of chromatin modifying enzymes, SMAD signaling and cyclic adenosine monophosphate levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexanian, Arshak R; Liu, Qing-song; Zhang, Zhiying

    2013-08-01

    Advances in cell reprogramming technologies to generate patient-specific cells of a desired type will revolutionize the field of regenerative medicine. While several cell reprogramming methods have been developed over the last decades, the majority of these technologies require the exposure of cell nuclei to reprogramming large molecules via transfection, transduction, cell fusion or nuclear transfer. This raises several technical, safety and ethical issues. Chemical genetics is an alternative approach for cell reprogramming that uses small, cell membrane penetrable substances to regulate multiple cellular processes including cell plasticity. Recently, using the combination of small molecules that are involved in the regulation chromatin structure and function and agents that favor neural differentiation we have been able to generate neural-like cells from human mesenchymal stem cells. In this study, to improve the efficiency of neuronal differentiation and maturation, two specific inhibitors of SMAD signaling (SMAD1/3 and SMAD3/5/8) that play an important role in neuronal differentiation of embryonic stem cells, were added to our previous neural induction recipe. Results demonstrated that human mesenchymal stem cells grown in this culture conditions exhibited higher expression of several mature neuronal genes, formed synapse-like structures and exerted electrophysiological properties of differentiating neural stem cells. Thus, an efficient method for production of mature neuronal-like cells from human adult bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells has been developed. We concluded that specific combinations of small molecules that target specific cell signaling pathways and chromatin modifying enzymes could be a promising approach for manipulation of adult stem cell plasticity.

  10. Cell-to-cell contact and antimicrobial peptides play a combined role in the death of Lachanchea thermotolerans during mixed-culture alcoholic fermentation with Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemsawasd, Varongsiri; Branco, Patrícia; Almeida, Maria Gabriela; Caldeira, Jorge; Albergaria, Helena; Arneborg, Nils

    2015-07-01

    The roles of cell-to-cell contact and antimicrobial peptides in the early death of Lachanchea thermotolerans CBS2803 during anaerobic, mixed-culture fermentations with Saccharomyces cerevisiae S101 were investigated using a commercially available, double-compartment fermentation system separated by cellulose membranes with different pore sizes, i.e. 1000 kDa for mixed- and single-culture fermentations, and 1000 and 3.5-5 kDa for compartmentalized-culture fermentations. SDS-PAGE and gel filtration chromatography were used to determine an antimicrobial peptidic fraction in the fermentations. Our results showed comparable amounts of the antimicrobial peptidic fraction in the inner compartments of the mixed-culture and 1000 kDa compartmentalized-culture fermentations containing L. thermotolerans after 4 days of fermentation, but a lower death rate of L. thermotolerans in the 1000 kDa compartmentalized-culture fermentation than in the mixed-culture fermentation. Furthermore, L. thermotolerans died off even more slowly in the 3.5-5 kDa than in the 1000 kDa compartmentalized-culture fermentation, which coincided with the presence of less of the antimicrobial peptidic fraction in the inner compartment of that fermentation than of the 1000 kDa compartmentalized-culture fermentation. Taken together, these results indicate that the death of L. thermotolerans in mixed cultures with S. cerevisiae is caused by a combination of cell-to-cell contact and antimicrobial peptides.

  11. The V domain of dog PVRL4 (nectin-4) mediates canine distemper virus entry and virus cell-to-cell spread

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delpeut, Sebastien; Noyce, Ryan S. [The Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada B3H 1X5 (Canada); IWK Health Centre, Canadian Center for Vaccinology, Goldbloom Pavilion, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada B3H 1X5 (Canada); Richardson, Christopher D., E-mail: chris.richardson@dal.ca [The Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada B3H 1X5 (Canada); IWK Health Centre, Canadian Center for Vaccinology, Goldbloom Pavilion, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada B3H 1X5 (Canada); The Department of Pediatrics, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia (Canada)

    2014-04-15

    The entry of canine distemper virus (CDV) is a multistep process that involves the attachment of CDV hemagglutinin (H) to its cellular receptor, followed by fusion between virus and cell membranes. Our laboratory recently identified PVRL4 (nectin-4) to be the epithelial receptor for measles and canine distemper viruses. In this study, we demonstrate that the V domain of PVRL4 is critical for CDV entry and virus cell-to-cell spread. Furthermore, four key amino acid residues within the V domain of dog PVRL4 and two within the CDV hemagglutinin were shown to be essential for receptor-mediated virus entry. - Highlights: • PVRL4 (nectin-4) is the epithelial cell receptor for measles and canine distemper viruses. • V domain of PVRL4 is critical for CDV entry, cell-to-cell spread, and syncytia formation. • Chimeric PVRL1 backbone substituted with the V domain of PVRL4 can function as a receptor. • Amino acids (F132/P133/A134/G135) within the V domain are essential for PVRL4 receptor activity. • Amino acids (P493/Y539) within CDV H protein are essential for PVRL4 receptor interaction.

  12. The potato virus X TGBp2 protein association with the endoplasmic reticulum plays a role in but is not sufficient for viral cell-to-cell movement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, Ruchira; Krishnamurthy, Konduru; Blancaflor, Elison; Payton, Mark; Nelson, Richard S.; Verchot-Lubicz, Jeanmarie

    2003-01-01

    Potato virus X (PVX) TGBp1, TGBp2, TGBp3, and coat protein are required for virus cell-to-cell movement. Plasmids expressing GFP fused to TGBp2 were bombarded to leaf epidermal cells and GFP:TGBp2 moved cell to cell in Nicotiana benthamiana leaves but not in Nicotiana tabacum leaves. GFP:TGBp2 movement was observed in TGBp1-transgenic N. tabacum, indicating that TGBp2 requires TGBp1 to promote its movement in N. tabacum. In this study, GFP:TGBp2 was detected in a polygonal pattern that resembles the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) network. Amino acid sequence analysis revealed TGBp2 has two putative transmembrane domains. Two mutations separately introduced into the coding sequences encompassing the putative transmembrane domains within the GFP:TGBp2 plasmids and PVX genome, disrupted membrane binding of GFP:TGBp2, inhibited GFP:TGBp2 movement in N. benthamiana and TGBp1-expressing N. tabacum, and inhibited PVX movement. A third mutation, lying outside the transmembrane domains, had no effect on GFP:TGBp2 ER association or movement in N. benthamiana but inhibited GFP:TGBp2 movement in TGBp1-expressing N. tabacum and PVX movement in either Nicotiana species. Thus, ER association of TGBp2 may be required but not be sufficient for virus movement. TGBp2 likely provides an activity for PVX movement beyond ER association.

  13. The glycoprotein and the matrix protein of rabies virus affect pathogenicity by regulating viral replication and facilitating cell-to-cell spread.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulmanausahakul, Rojjanaporn; Li, Jianwei; Schnell, Matthias J; Dietzschold, Bernhard

    2008-03-01

    While the glycoprotein (G) of rabies virus (RV) is known to play a predominant role in the pathogenesis of rabies, the function of the RV matrix protein (M) in RV pathogenicity is not completely clear. To further investigate the roles of these proteins in viral pathogenicity, we constructed chimeric recombinant viruses by exchanging the G and M genes of the attenuated SN strain with those of the highly pathogenic SB strain. Infection of mice with these chimeric viruses revealed a significant increase in the pathogenicity of the SN strain bearing the RV G from the pathogenic SB strain. Moreover, the pathogenicity was further increased when both G and M from SB were introduced into SN. Interestingly, the replacement of the G or M gene or both in SN by the corresponding genes of SB was associated with a significant decrease in the rate of viral replication and viral RNA synthesis. In addition, a chimeric SN virus bearing both the M and G genes from SB exhibited more efficient cell-to-cell spread than a chimeric SN virus in which only the G gene was replaced. Together, these data indicate that both G and M play an important role in RV pathogenesis by regulating virus replication and facilitating cell-to-cell spread.

  14. Carbon monoxide:a new member of the gaseous signalling molecule in plants%一氧化碳:植物气体信号分子的新成员

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    崔为体; 刘锐涛; 林玉婷; 谢彦杰; 沈文飚

    2012-01-01

    Carbon monoxide ( CO ) , a novel gaseous signalling molecule in plants, is generated by the heme oxygenase ( HO ). Recent results showed that HO/CO was induced by different phytohormones and various environmental stimuli, thus acting as an important bio-regulator responsible for adventitious and lateral rooting process and root hair development in plants. Furthermore, it was also involved in the regulation of plant responses against abiotic stresses, such as salinity and osmotic stress, heavy metals exposure, UV radiation and nutritional deficiency,etc. Here, we provide a brief summary of new insights into CO synthesis and its conjugates,its signalling and physiological functions,as well as the possible cross-talk among CO and phytohormones,and other signalling molecules in plants.%一氧化碳(carbon monoxide,CO)是植物中新发现的气体信号分子,在植物体内主要由血红素加氧酶(heme oxygenase,HO)催化产生,并应答多种激素处理和环境胁迫因子对植物的刺激.最近的研究表明,CO参与植物不定根、侧根及根毛的发育,并在植物耐受盐害、渗透、重金属、紫外辐射和营养元素缺乏等非生物胁迫中起重要的调节作用.本文综述了植物中CO的产生及其结合物、生理功能及信号作用的研究新进展,并介绍了CO与激素及其他信号分子之间的互作关系.

  15. Salinity-induced inhibition of growth in the aquatic pteridophyte Azolla microphylla primarily involves inhibition of photosynthetic components and signaling molecules as revealed by proteome analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thagela, Preeti; Yadav, Ravindra Kumar; Mishra, Vagish; Dahuja, Anil; Ahmad, Altaf; Singh, Pawan Kumar; Tiwari, Budhi Sagar; Abraham, Gerard

    2017-01-01

    Salinity stress causes adverse physiological and biochemical changes in the growth and productivity of a plant. Azolla, a symbiotic pteridophyte and potent candidate for biofertilizer due to its nitrogen fixation ability, shows reduced growth and nitrogen fixation during saline stress. To better understand regulatory components involved in salinity-induced physiological changes, in the present study, Azolla microphylla plants were exposed to NaCl (6.74 and 8.61 ds/m) and growth, photochemical reactions of photosynthesis, ion accumulation, and changes in cellular proteome were studied. Maximum dry weight was accumulated in control and untreated plant while a substantial decrease in dry weight was observed in the plants exposed to salinity. Exposure of the organism to different concentrations of salt in hydroponic conditions resulted in differential level of Na(+) and K(+) ion accumulation. Comparative analysis of salinity-induced proteome changes in A. microphylla revealed 58 salt responsive proteins which were differentially expressed during the salt exposure. Moreover, 42 % spots among differentially expressed proteins were involved in different signaling events. The identified proteins are involved in photosynthesis, energy metabolism, amino acid biosynthesis, protein synthesis, and defense. Downregulation of these key metabolic proteins appears to inhibit the growth of A. microphylla in response to salinity. Altogether, the study revealed that in Azolla, increased salinity primarily affected signaling and photosynthesis that in turn leads to reduced biomass.

  16. Nanosecond pulsed electric field inhibits cancer growth followed by alteration in expressions of NF-κB and Wnt/β-catenin signaling molecules.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhigang Ren

    Full Text Available Cancer remains a leading cause of death worldwide and total number of cases globally is increasing. Novel treatment strategies are therefore desperately required for radical treatment of cancers and long survival of patients. A new technology using high pulsed electric field has emerged from military application into biology and medicine by applying nsPEF as a means to inhibit cancer. However, molecular mechanisms of nsPEF on tumors or cancers are still unclear. In this paper, we found that nsPEF had extensive biological effects in cancers, and clarified its possible molecular mechanisms in vitro and in vivo. It could not only induce cell apoptosis via dependent-mitochondria intrinsic apoptosis pathway that was triggered by imbalance of anti- or pro-apoptosis Bcl-2 family proteins, but also inhibit cell proliferation through repressing NF-κB signaling pathway to reduce expressions of cyclin proteins. Moreover, nsPEF could also inactivate metastasis and invasion in cancer cells by suppressing Wnt/β-Catenin signaling pathway to down-regulating expressions of VEGF and MMPs family proteins. More importantly, nsPEF could function safely and effectively as an anti-cancer therapy through inducing tumor cell apoptosis, destroying tumor microenvironment, and depressing angiogenesis in tumor tissue in vivo. These findings may provide a creative and effective therapeutic strategy for cancers.

  17. Nanosecond pulsed electric field inhibits cancer growth followed by alteration in expressions of NF-κB and Wnt/β-catenin signaling molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Zhigang; Chen, Xinhua; Cui, Guangying; Yin, Shengyong; Chen, Luyan; Jiang, Jianwen; Hu, Zhenhua; Xie, Haiyang; Zheng, Shusen; Zhou, Lin

    2013-01-01

    Cancer remains a leading cause of death worldwide and total number of cases globally is increasing. Novel treatment strategies are therefore desperately required for radical treatment of cancers and long survival of patients. A new technology using high pulsed electric field has emerged from military application into biology and medicine by applying nsPEF as a means to inhibit cancer. However, molecular mechanisms of nsPEF on tumors or cancers are still unclear. In this paper, we found that nsPEF had extensive biological effects in cancers, and clarified its possible molecular mechanisms in vitro and in vivo. It could not only induce cell apoptosis via dependent-mitochondria intrinsic apoptosis pathway that was triggered by imbalance of anti- or pro-apoptosis Bcl-2 family proteins, but also inhibit cell proliferation through repressing NF-κB signaling pathway to reduce expressions of cyclin proteins. Moreover, nsPEF could also inactivate metastasis and invasion in cancer cells by suppressing Wnt/β-Catenin signaling pathway to down-regulating expressions of VEGF and MMPs family proteins. More importantly, nsPEF could function safely and effectively as an anti-cancer therapy through inducing tumor cell apoptosis, destroying tumor microenvironment, and depressing angiogenesis in tumor tissue in vivo. These findings may provide a creative and effective therapeutic strategy for cancers.

  18. Expression of hedgehog signal molecules in pancreatic cancer and their correlation with clinical and pathologic characteristics%Hedgehog信号蛋白在胰腺癌中的表达及临床意义

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    田孝东; 杨尹默; 汤坚强; 万远廉; 黄莛庭

    2008-01-01

    目的 研究Hedgehog相关信号蛋白Ihh、Ptc和Smo在胰腺癌中的表达情况及其临床意义.方法 采用免疫组织化学方法 检测54例原发性胰腺癌及5例正常胰腺石蜡标本中Hedgehog信号蛋白(Ihh、Ptc、Smo)的表达情况,并统计分析其阳性率与临床病理特征的相关性;采用Westernblot比较21例新鲜胰腺癌及癌旁胰腺组织标本Hedgehog信号蛋白表达量的差异.结果 54例胰腺癌标本中,Ihh、Ptc及Smo阳性率分别为70.4%、64.8%和88.9%,5例正常胰腺组织中均无阳性表达;Ptc阳性率与肿瘤大小、分化程度、淋巴结转移情况及肿瘤TNM分期显著相关,Smo表达率则与肿瘤分化程度显著相关(P<0.05);21例新鲜胰腺癌标本中Ihh、Ptc、Smo平均表达量均显著高于癌旁胰腺组织(P<0.05).结论 胰腺癌组织中Hedgehog信号蛋白表达量显著增加;Hedgehog信号蛋白与胰腺癌临床病理特征相关.%Objective To investigate the expression of hedgehog signal molecules (Ihh,Ptc and Stop) in human pancreatic cancer and their correlation with clinical and pathologic characteristics.Methods Fifty-four pancreatic cancer samples and 5 normal pancreatic tissues were examined by im-munohistochemistry for the expression and localization of hedgehog signal molecules (Ihh, Ptc andStop). Meanwhile,correlation of hedgehog signal molecules to clinical and pathologic characteristics ofpancreatic cancer was analyzed. Western blot was carried out to analyze the expression of Ihh,Ptc and Smo in 21 freshly removed pancreatic cancer tissues and paraneoplastic pancreatic tissues. Results Of the 54 pancreatic cancer samples, immunoreactivity of Ihh, Ptc and Smo was observed in 70. 4%,64.8% and 88.9 % of the cancer tissues, respectively. No immunoreaetivity was observed in the ductal cells of all the 5 normal pancreas tissues. Expression of Ptc was strongly correlated with tumor size,differentiation grade of tumor cells,lymph node metastasis and TNM stage of tumor

  19. 小分子IL-6/STAT3信号通路抑制剂%Small Molecule Inhibitors of IL-6/STAT3 Signaling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    叶霁青; 岳晓虹; 孙丽萍

    2016-01-01

    IL-6 is a widespread cytokine which participates in many biological responses.All members of the IL-6 cytokine family are able to activate STAT3,and STAT3 is also recognized as the main mediator of IL-6 functions.IL-6 binding to cell surface receptors results in the activation of the Janus kinases(JAKs) which cause STAT3 phosphorylated.Then activated STAT3 dimerizes translocates to the nucleus and combines with target genes with specific sites,then activats DNA transcriptional activity.Studies show that the abnormally activated STAT3 in cells plays an important role in tumorigenesis and malignant transformation.Meanwhile,STAT3 is a valid target for novel anticancer drug design.So far,many methods,such as structure-based virtual screening,high throughput screening,fragment-based drug design,have been used to screen and design novel STAT3 inhibitors,and thus several classes of small molecule compounds have been identified as STAT3 inhibitors.In this review,we mainly focus on the small molecule IL-6/STAT3 inhibitors especially target STAT3 protein which have been optimized and identified since 2013.%IL-6是细胞内广泛存在的一种细胞因子,参与细胞内大量的生物应答.研究表明所有IL-6家族的细胞因子均能激活STAT3蛋白,同时,STAT3被认为是介导IL-6功能的主要因子.IL-6与其受体结合,激活JAKs,从而使STAT3磷酸化激活,活化的STAT3二聚化,向细胞核内转移并与其靶基因特定位点结合从而调节基因的转录活性.大量的证据表明细胞中异常活化的STAT3在肿瘤生成与恶性转化中具有重要作用.研究显示STAT3蛋白也是抗肿瘤药物设计的有效靶点.到目前为止,多种药物设计方法,如基于结构的虚拟筛选、高通量筛选、基于片段的药物设计等被用于STAT3抑制剂的筛选以及设计;文献也已经报道了许多具有抗肿瘤活性的STAT3抑制剂.本文主要介绍了近年来小分子IL-6/STAT3信号通路

  20. A Natural Variant of the T Cell Receptor-Signaling Molecule Vav1 Reduces Both Effector T Cell Functions and Susceptibility to Neuroinflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassem, Sahar; Bernard, Isabelle; Dejean, Anne S.; Liblau, Roland; Fournié, Gilbert J.; Colacios, Céline

    2016-01-01

    The guanine nucleotide exchange factor Vav1 is essential for transducing T cell antigen receptor signals and therefore plays an important role in T cell development and activation. Our previous genetic studies identified a locus on rat chromosome 9 that controls the susceptibility to neuroinflammation and contains a non-synonymous polymorphism in the major candidate gene Vav1. To formally demonstrate the causal implication of this polymorphism, we generated a knock-in mouse bearing this polymorphism (Vav1R63W). Using this model, we show that Vav1R63W mice display reduced susceptibility to experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) induced by MOG35-55 peptide immunization. This is associated with a lower production of effector cytokines (IFN-γ, IL-17 and GM-CSF) by autoreactive CD4 T cells. Despite increased proportion of Foxp3+ regulatory T cells in Vav1R63W mice, we show that this lowered cytokine production is intrinsic to effector CD4 T cells and that Treg depletion has no impact on EAE development. Finally, we provide a mechanism for the above phenotype by showing that the Vav1R63W variant has normal enzymatic activity but reduced adaptor functions. Together, these data highlight the importance of Vav1 adaptor functions in the production of inflammatory cytokines by effector T cells and in the susceptibility to neuroinflammation. PMID:27438086

  1. Modulation of Pb-induced stress in Prosopis shoots through an interconnected network of signaling molecules, phenolic compounds and amino acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zafari, Somaieh; Sharifi, Mohsen; Ahmadian Chashmi, Najmeh; Mur, Luis A J

    2016-02-01

    Lead (Pb) is a hazardous heavy metal present in the environment which elicits oxidative stress in plants. To characterize the physiological and biochemical basis of Pb tolerance, Prosopis farcta seedlings were exposed to Hoagland's solutions at six different Pb concentrations (0, 80, 160, 320, 400 and 480 μM) for different periods of time. As expected, application of Pb significantly increased hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) content. In response, P. farcta deployed the antioxidative defence mechanisms with significantly higher activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), enzymes related to H2O2 removal, and also the increases in proline as a solute marker of stress. Increases were observed in nitric oxide (NO) production which could also act in triggering defense functions to detoxify Pb. Enhanced phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL) activity at early days of exposure to Pb was correlated with increases in phenolic compounds. Significant increases in phenolic acids and flavonoids; daidzein, vitexin, ferulic acid and salicylic acid were observed with Pb treatment. Furthermore, the stress effects were followed by changes in free amino acid content and composition. Aspartic acid and glycine content was increased but glutamic acid significantly decreased. It is likely that stress signal transduction by NO and H2O2 mediated defence responses to Pb by coordination of antioxidative system and metabolic pathways of phenylpropanoid and amino acids.

  2. Liquid-Diet with Alcohol Alters Maternal, Fetal and Placental Weights and the Expression of Molecules Involved in Integrin Signaling in the Fetal Cerebral Cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ujjwal K. Rout

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Maternal alcohol consumption during pregnancy causes wide range of behavioral and structural deficits in children, commonly known as Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS. Children with FAS may suffer behavioral deficits in the absence of obvious malformations. In rodents, the exposure to alcohol during gestation changes brain structures and weights of offspring. The mechanism of FAS is not completely understood. In the present study, an established rat (Long-Evans model of FAS was used. The litter size and the weights of mothers, fetuses and placentas were examined on gestation days 18 or 20. On gestation day 18, the effects of chronic alcohol on the expression levels of integrin receptor subunits, phospholipase-Cγ and N-cadherin were examined in the fetal cerebral cortices. Presence of alcohol in the liquid-diet reduced the consumption and decreased weights of mothers and fetuses but increased the placental weights. Expression levels of β1 and α3 integrin subunits and phospholipase-Cγ2 were significantly altered in the fetal cerebral cortices of mothers on alcohol containing diet. Results show that alcohol consumption during pregnancy even with protein, mineral and vitamin enriched diet may affect maternal and fetal health, and alter integrin receptor signaling pathways in the fetal cerebral cortex disturbing the development of fetal brains.

  3. Cell-to-Cell Transmission of HIV-1 Is Required to Trigger Pyroptotic Death of Lymphoid-Tissue-Derived CD4 T Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galloway, Nicole L K; Doitsh, Gilad; Monroe, Kathryn M; Yang, Zhiyuan; Muñoz-Arias, Isa; Levy, David N; Greene, Warner C

    2015-09-01

    The progressive depletion of CD4 T cells underlies clinical progression to AIDS in untreated HIV-infected subjects. Most dying CD4 T cells correspond to resting nonpermissive cells residing in lymphoid tissues. Death is due to an innate immune response against the incomplete cytosolic viral DNA intermediates accumulating in these cells. The viral DNA is detected by the IFI16 sensor, leading to inflammasome assembly, caspase-1 activation, and the induction of pyroptosis, a highly inflammatory form of programmed cell death. We now show that cell-to-cell transmission of HIV is obligatorily required for activation of this death pathway. Cell-free HIV-1 virions, even when added in large quantities, fail to activate pyroptosis. These findings underscore the infected CD4 T cells as the major killing units promoting progression to AIDS and highlight a previously unappreciated role for the virological synapse in HIV pathogenesis.

  4. Cellular uptake and cell-to-cell transfer of polyelectrolyte microcapsules within a triple co-culture system representing parts of the respiratory tract

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhn, Dagmar A.; Hartmann, Raimo; Fytianos, Kleanthis; Petri-Fink, Alke; Rothen-Rutishauser, Barbara; Parak, Wolfgang J.

    2015-06-01

    Polyelectrolyte multilayer microcapsules around 3.4 micrometers in diameter were added to epithelial cells, monocyte-derived macrophages, and dendritic cells in vitro and their uptake kinetics were quantified. All three cell types were combined in a triple co-culture model, mimicking the human epithelial alveolar barrier. Hereby, macrophages were separated in a three-dimensional model from dendritic cells by a monolayer of epithelial cells. While passing of small nanoparticles has been demonstrated from macrophages to dendritic cells across the epithelial barrier in previous studies, for the micrometer-sized capsules, this process could not be observed in a significant amount. Thus, this barrier is a limiting factor for cell-to-cell transfer of micrometer-sized particles.

  5. A Cell-to-Cell Battery Equalizer With Zero-Current Switching and Zero-Voltage Gap Based on Quasi-Resonant LC Converter and Boost Converter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shang, Yunlong; Zhang, Chenghui; Cui, Naxin

    2015-01-01

    voltage gap for large balancing current and ZVG between cells. Instead of a dedicated equalizer for each cell, only one balancing converter is employed and shared by all cells, reducing the size and implementation cost. Moreover, the equalization current can be regulated as needed by controlling the duty...... cycle of the BDDC, which not only prevents efficiently over-equalization but also abridges the balancing time. Simulation and experimental results show the proposed scheme exhibits outstanding balancing performance, and the energy conversion efficiency is higher than 98%. The validity of the proposed...... these difficulties, an innovative direct cell-to-cell battery equalizer based on quasi-resonant LC converter (QRLCC) and boost DC-DC converter (BDDC) is proposed. The QRLCC is employed to gain zero-current switching (ZCS), leading to a reduction of power losses. The BDDC is employed to enhance the equalization...

  6. Differential Inhibition of the TGF-β Signaling Pathway in HCC Cells Using the Small Molecule Inhibitor LY2157299 and the D10 Monoclonal Antibody against TGF-β Receptor Type II.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Dituri

    Full Text Available We investigated blocking the TGF-β signaling pathway in HCC using two small molecule inhibitors (LY2157299, LY2109761 and a neutralizing humanized antibody (D10 against TGF-βRII. LY2157299 and LY2109761 inhibited HCC cell migration on Laminin-5, Fibronectin, Vitronectin, Fibrinogen and Collagen-I and de novo phosphorylation of pSMAD2. LY2157299 inhibited HCC migration and cell growth independently of the expression levels of TGF-βRII. In contrast to LY2157299, D10 showed a reduction in pSMAD2 only after a short exposure. This study supports the use of LY2157299 in clinical trials, and presents new insights into TGF-β receptor cycling in cancer cells.

  7. A millifluidic study of cell-to-cell heterogeneity in growth-rate and cell-division capability in populations of isogenic cells of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shima P Damodaran

    Full Text Available To address possible cell-to-cell heterogeneity in growth dynamics of isogenic cell populations of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, we developed a millifluidic drop-based device that not only allows the analysis of populations grown from single cells over periods of a week, but is also able to sort and collect drops of interest, containing viable and healthy cells, which can be used for further experimentation. In this study, we used isogenic algal cells that were first synchronized in mixotrophic growth conditions. We show that these synchronized cells, when placed in droplets and kept in mixotrophic growth conditions, exhibit mostly homogeneous growth statistics, but with two distinct subpopulations: a major population with a short doubling-time (fast-growers and a significant subpopulation of slowly dividing cells (slow-growers. These observations suggest that algal cells from an isogenic population may be present in either of two states, a state of restricted division and a state of active division. When isogenic cells were allowed to propagate for about 1000 generations on solid agar plates, they displayed an increased heterogeneity in their growth dynamics. Although we could still identify the original populations of slow- and fast-growers, drops inoculated with a single progenitor cell now displayed a wider diversity of doubling-times. Moreover, populations dividing with the same growth-rate often reached different cell numbers in stationary phase, suggesting that the progenitor cells differed in the number of cell divisions they could undertake. We discuss possible explanations for these cell-to-cell heterogeneities in growth dynamics, such as mutations, differential aging or stochastic variations in metabolites and macromolecules yielding molecular switches, in the light of single-cell heterogeneities that have been reported among isogenic populations of other eu- and prokaryotes.

  8. A millifluidic study of cell-to-cell heterogeneity in growth-rate and cell-division capability in populations of isogenic cells of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damodaran, Shima P; Eberhard, Stephan; Boitard, Laurent; Rodriguez, Jairo Garnica; Wang, Yuxing; Bremond, Nicolas; Baudry, Jean; Bibette, Jérôme; Wollman, Francis-André

    2015-01-01

    To address possible cell-to-cell heterogeneity in growth dynamics of isogenic cell populations of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, we developed a millifluidic drop-based device that not only allows the analysis of populations grown from single cells over periods of a week, but is also able to sort and collect drops of interest, containing viable and healthy cells, which can be used for further experimentation. In this study, we used isogenic algal cells that were first synchronized in mixotrophic growth conditions. We show that these synchronized cells, when placed in droplets and kept in mixotrophic growth conditions, exhibit mostly homogeneous growth statistics, but with two distinct subpopulations: a major population with a short doubling-time (fast-growers) and a significant subpopulation of slowly dividing cells (slow-growers). These observations suggest that algal cells from an isogenic population may be present in either of two states, a state of restricted division and a state of active division. When isogenic cells were allowed to propagate for about 1000 generations on solid agar plates, they displayed an increased heterogeneity in their growth dynamics. Although we could still identify the original populations of slow- and fast-growers, drops inoculated with a single progenitor cell now displayed a wider diversity of doubling-times. Moreover, populations dividing with the same growth-rate often reached different cell numbers in stationary phase, suggesting that the progenitor cells differed in the number of cell divisions they could undertake. We discuss possible explanations for these cell-to-cell heterogeneities in growth dynamics, such as mutations, differential aging or stochastic variations in metabolites and macromolecules yielding molecular switches, in the light of single-cell heterogeneities that have been reported among isogenic populations of other eu- and prokaryotes.

  9. The Envelope Cytoplasmic Tail of HIV-1 Subtype C Contributes to Poor Replication Capacity through Low Viral Infectivity and Cell-to-Cell Transmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemaire, Morgane; Masquelier, Cécile; Beraud, Cyprien; Rybicki, Arkadiusz; Servais, Jean-Yves; Iserentant, Gilles; Schmit, Jean-Claude; Seguin-Devaux, Carole; Perez Bercoff, Danielle

    2016-01-01

    The cytoplasmic tail (gp41CT) of the HIV-1 envelope (Env) mediates Env incorporation into virions and regulates Env intracellular trafficking. Little is known about the functional impact of variability in this domain. To address this issue, we compared the replication of recombinant virus pairs carrying the full Env (Env viruses) or the Env ectodomain fused to the gp41CT of NL4.3 (EnvEC viruses) (12 subtype C and 10 subtype B pairs) in primary CD4+ T-cells and monocyte-derived-macrophages (MDMs). In CD4+ T-cells, replication was as follows: B-EnvEC = B-Env>C-EnvEC>C-Env, indicating that the gp41CT of subtype C contributes to the low replicative capacity of this subtype. In MDMs, in contrast, replication capacity was comparable for all viruses regardless of subtype and of gp41CT. In CD4+ T-cells, viral entry, viral release and viral gene expression were similar. However, infectivity of free virions and cell-to-cell transmission of C-Env viruses released by CD4+ T-cells was lower, suggestive of lower Env incorporation into virions. Subtype C matrix only minimally rescued viral replication and failed to restore infectivity of free viruses and cell-to-cell transmission. Taken together, these results show that polymorphisms in the gp41CT contribute to viral replication capacity and suggest that the number of Env spikes per virion may vary across subtypes. These findings should be taken into consideration in the design of vaccines. PMID:27598717

  10. Regulation of IL-6 and IL-8 production by reciprocal cell-to-cell interactions between tumor cells and stromal fibroblasts through IL-1α in ameloblastoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuchigami, Takao [Department of Biochemistry and Genetics, Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, 8-35-1 Sakuragaoka, Kagoshima 890-8544 (Japan); Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, 8-35-1 Sakuragaoka, Kagoshima 890-8544 (Japan); Kibe, Toshiro [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, 8-35-1 Sakuragaoka, Kagoshima 890-8544 (Japan); Koyama, Hirofumi; Kishida, Shosei; Iijima, Mikio [Department of Biochemistry and Genetics, Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, 8-35-1 Sakuragaoka, Kagoshima 890-8544 (Japan); Nishizawa, Yoshiaki [Kagoshima University Faculty of Medicine, 8-35-1 Sakuragaoka, Kagoshima 890-8544 (Japan); Hijioka, Hiroshi; Fujii, Tomomi [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, 8-35-1 Sakuragaoka, Kagoshima 890-8544 (Japan); Ueda, Masahiro [Natural Science Centre for Research and Education, Kagoshima University, 1-21-24 Koorimoto, Kagoshima 890-8580 (Japan); Nakamura, Norifumi [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, 8-35-1 Sakuragaoka, Kagoshima 890-8544 (Japan); Kiyono, Tohru [Department of Virology, National Cancer Center Research Institute, 5-1-1 Tsukiji, Chuouku, Tokyo 104-0045 (Japan); Kishida, Michiko, E-mail: kmichiko@m2.kufm.kagoshima-u.ac.jp [Department of Biochemistry and Genetics, Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, 8-35-1 Sakuragaoka, Kagoshima 890-8544 (Japan)

    2014-09-05

    Highlights: • We studied the interaction between tumor cells and fibroblasts in ameloblastoma. • AM-3 ameloblastoma cells secreted significantly high IL-1α levels. • IL-1α derived from AM-3 cells promoted IL-6 and IL-8 secretion of fibroblasts. • IL-6 and IL-8 activated the cellular motility and proliferation of AM-3 cells. - Abstract: Ameloblastoma is an odontogenic benign tumor that occurs in the jawbone, which invades bone and reoccurs locally. This tumor is treated by wide surgical excision and causes various problems, including changes in facial countenance and mastication disorders. Ameloblastomas have abundant tumor stroma, including fibroblasts and immune cells. Although cell-to-cell interactions are considered to be involved in the pathogenesis of many diseases, intercellular communications in ameloblastoma have not been fully investigated. In this study, we examined interactions between tumor cells and stromal fibroblasts via soluble factors in ameloblastoma. We used a human ameloblastoma cell line (AM-3 ameloblastoma cells), human fibroblasts (HFF-2 fibroblasts), and primary-cultured fibroblasts from human ameloblastoma tissues, and analyzed the effect of ameloblastoma-associated cell-to-cell communications on gene expression, cytokine secretion, cellular motility and proliferation. AM-3 ameloblastoma cells secreted higher levels of interleukin (IL)-1α than HFF-2 fibroblasts. Treatment with conditioned medium from AM-3 ameloblastoma cells upregulated gene expression and secretion of IL-6 and IL-8 of HFF-2 fibroblasts and primary-cultured fibroblast cells from ameloblastoma tissues. The AM3-stimulated production of IL-6 and IL-8 in fibroblasts was neutralized by pretreatment of AM-3 cells with anti-IL-1α antibody and IL-1 receptor antagonist. Reciprocally, cellular motility of AM-3 ameloblastoma cells was stimulated by HFF-2 fibroblasts in IL-6 and IL-8 dependent manner. In conclusion, ameloblastoma cells and stromal fibroblasts behave

  11. Circulating preproinsulin signal peptide-specific CD8 T cells restricted by the susceptibility molecule HLA-A24 are expanded at onset of type 1 diabetes and kill β-cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kronenberg, Deborah; Knight, Robin R; Estorninho, Megan; Ellis, Richard J; Kester, Michel G; de Ru, Arnoud; Eichmann, Martin; Huang, Guo C; Powrie, Jake; Dayan, Colin M; Skowera, Ania; van Veelen, Peter A; Peakman, Mark

    2012-07-01

    Type 1 diabetes results from T cell-mediated β-cell destruction. The HLA-A*24 class I gene confers significant risk of disease and early onset. We tested the hypothesis that HLA-A24 molecules on islet cells present preproinsulin (PPI) peptide epitopes to CD8 cytotoxic T cells (CTLs). Surrogate β-cell lines secreting proinsulin and expressing HLA-A24 were generated and their peptide ligandome examined by mass spectrometry to discover naturally processed and HLA-A24-presented PPI epitopes. A novel PPI epitope was identified and used to generate HLA-A24 tetramers and examine the frequency of PPI-specific T cells in new-onset HLA-A*24(+) patients and control subjects. We identified a novel naturally processed and HLA-A24-presented PPI signal peptide epitope (PPI(3-11); LWMRLLPLL). HLA-A24 tetramer analysis reveals a significant expansion of PPI(3-11)-specific CD8 T cells in the blood of HLA-A*24(+) recent-onset patients compared with HLA-matched control subjects. Moreover, a patient-derived PPI(3-11)-specific CD8 T-cell clone shows a proinflammatory phenotype and kills surrogate β-cells and human HLA-A*24(+) islet cells in vitro. These results indicate that the type 1 diabetes susceptibility molecule HLA-A24 presents a naturally processed PPI signal peptide epitope. PPI-specific, HLA-A24-restricted CD8 T cells are expanded in patients with recent-onset disease. Human islet cells process and present PPI(3-11), rendering themselves targets for CTL-mediated killing.

  12. Hadron Molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Gutsche, Thomas; Faessler, Amand; Lee, Ian Woo; Lyubovitskij, Valery E

    2010-01-01

    We discuss a possible interpretation of the open charm mesons $D_{s0}^*(2317)$, $D_{s1}(2460)$ and the hidden charm mesons X(3872), Y(3940) and Y(4140) as hadron molecules. Using a phenomenological Lagrangian approach we review the strong and radiative decays of the $D_{s0}^* (2317)$ and $D_{s1}(2460)$ states. The X(3872) is assumed to consist dominantly of molecular hadronic components with an additional small admixture of a charmonium configuration. Determing the radiative ($\\gamma J/\\psi$ and $\\gamma \\psi(2s)$) and strong ($J/\\psi 2\\pi $ and $ J/\\psi 3\\pi$) decay modes we show that present experimental observation is consistent with the molecular structure assumption of the X(3872). Finally we give evidence for molecular interpretations of the Y(3940) and Y(4140) related to the observed strong decay modes $J/\\psi + \\omega$ or $J/\\psi + \\phi$, respectively.

  13. Phaeobacter sp. strain Y4I utilizes two separate cell-to-cell communication systems to regulate production of the antimicrobial indigoidine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cude, W Nathan; Prevatte, Carson W; Hadden, Mary K; May, Amanda L; Smith, Russell T; Swain, Caleb L; Campagna, Shawn R; Buchan, Alison

    2015-02-01

    The marine roseobacter Phaeobacter sp. strain Y4I synthesizes the blue antimicrobial secondary metabolite indigoidine when grown in a biofilm or on agar plates. Prior studies suggested that indigoidine production may be, in part, regulated by cell-to-cell communication systems. Phaeobacter sp. strain Y4I possesses two luxR and luxI homologous N-acyl-L-homoserine lactone (AHL)-mediated cell-to-cell communication systems, designated pgaRI and phaRI. We show here that Y4I produces two dominantAHLs, the novel monounsaturated N-(3-hydroxydodecenoyl)-L-homoserine lactone (3OHC(12:1)-HSL) and the relatively common N-octanoyl-L-homoserine lactone (C8-HSL), and provide evidence that they are synthesized by PhaI and PgaI, respectively.A Tn5 insertional mutation in either genetic locus results in the abolishment (pgaR::Tn5) or reduction (phaR::Tn5) of pigment production. Motility defects and denser biofilms were also observed in these mutant backgrounds, suggesting an overlap in the functional roles of these systems. Production of the AHLs occurs at distinct points during growth on an agar surface and was determined by isotope dilution high-performance liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry (ID-HPLC-MS/MS) analysis.Within 2 h of surface inoculation, only 3OHC(12:1)-HSL was detected in agar extracts. As surface-attached cells became established (at approximately 10 h), the concentration of 3OHC(12:1)-HSL decreased, and the concentration of C8-HSL increased rapidly over 14 h.After longer (>24-h) establishment periods, the concentrations of the two AHLs increased to and stabilized at approximately 15 nM and approximately 600 nM for 3OHC12:1-HSL and C8-HSL, respectively. In contrast, the total amount of indigoidine increased steadily from undetectable to 642 Mby 48 h. Gene expression profiles of the AHL and indigoidine synthases (pgaI, phaI, and igiD) were consistent with their metabolite profiles. These data provide evidence that pgaRI and phaRI play overlapping roles

  14. Notch信号分子在人淋巴瘤细胞中的表达及意义%Expression of Notch Signal Molecules in Human Lymphoma Cells and Its Significance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王艳芳; 李艳莹; 王晶; 克晓燕

    2012-01-01

    本研究探讨Notch信号分子在人淋巴瘤细胞中的表达及其意义.选择人B淋巴瘤细胞系(Raji、Maver、Z138)和T淋巴瘤细胞系Jurkat细胞,利用RT-PCR技术检测Notch信号分子在这些细胞中的表达情况;利用流式细胞术检测γ-分泌酶抑制剂DAPT阻断Notch信号后对淋巴瘤细胞凋亡以及细胞周期的影响;利用CCK-8法检测DAPT对淋巴瘤细胞增殖的影响.结果表明:Notch分子在不同淋巴瘤细胞中的表达有所不同,Notch1和Notch2在4种细胞中均有表达,Notch3主要表达于Jurkat细胞,而Notch4仅在Raji细胞中弱表达;另外,Notch下游靶基因Hes1仅表达于Raji和Jurkat细胞.DAPT对Jurkat和Raji细胞的增殖抑制以及凋亡诱导作用比较明显,并将细胞周期阻滞在G1期,但是对Maver和Z138细胞的作用较弱.DAPT可以通过抑制Notch下游靶基因Hes1的表达而发挥作用.结论:Notch信号的异常表达与活化对淋巴瘤细胞的增殖起着重要作用,Notch信号有望成为淋巴瘤治疗的一个新靶点.%The study was aimed to investigate the expression of Notch signal molecules in human lymphoma cells and its significance. Raji, Maver, Z138 and Jurkat cell lines were used in the study. RT-PCR was used to determine the expression of Notch signaling molecules in these lymphoma cells. How cytometry was used to detect the apoptosis and cell-cycle of the lymphoma cells induced by different concentrations of gamma secretase inhibitor DAPT. CCK-8 was used to detect the proliferation of the lymphoma cells treated by DAPT. The results showed that the expression of Notch molecules in the four cell lines was different. Notchl and Notch2 were found to be expressed in the four lymphoma cell lines, Notch3 predominantly expressed in Jurkat cells, Notch4 only expressed in Raji cells weakly and Hesl only expressed in Raji and Jurkat cells. Treatment with DAPT could increase the apoptosis ratio of Raji and Jurkat cells. Besides, DAPT could significantly

  15. Research Progress of Bacterial Signaling Molecule of Antibiotics Re-sistance Mechanism%细菌信号小分子耐药机制的相关研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    易胜杰; 谢靖; 邱少富; 宋宏彬

    2015-01-01

    细菌耐药性问题已逐渐成为社会广泛关注的问题。然而,可运用于临床的新型抗生素却十分匮乏。这主要是因为细菌的耐药机制极其复杂,我们对细菌耐药机制的理解不够全面和深入。近几年,多种生物小分子被发现能够使细菌获得广谱的耐药性,并被证明是广泛存在于细菌中的一种耐药机制,这是对目前细菌耐药理论和模型的一个非常重要的补充,更有助于在抗生素的研发过程中寻找新的作用靶标。我们通过总结分析一氧化氮、硫化氢及吲哚这3种信号小分子与细菌耐药的相关研究进展,探讨信号小分子使细菌获得耐药性的相关机制。%The problem of bacterial resistance has become the social widespread concern. However, the new anti⁃biotics in the clinical application are very scarce. Our understanding of the mechanisms of bacterial resistance is not comprehensive and in-depth enough mainly because they are very complicated. But in recent years, a variety of small signaling molecule are found to make bacteria drug resistance against broad spectrum antibiotics which is shown to be widely existed in bacteria as a mechanism of resistance. It is a very important supplement to bacteri⁃al resistance theory and model at present, and more conducive to choose appropriate targets in the development process of new antibiotics. In this review, we summarized and analyzed the correlation and mechanism of bacterial resistance and small signaling molecule including nitric oxide, hydrogen sulfide and indole.

  16. Both asymmetric mitotic segregation and cell-to-cell invasion are required for stable germline transmission of Wolbachia in filarial nematodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frédéric Landmann

    2012-04-01

    Parasitic filarial nematodes that belong to the Onchocercidae family live in mutualism with Wolbachia endosymbionts. We developed whole-mount techniques to follow the segregation patterns of Wolbachia through the somatic and germline lineages of four filarial species. These studies reveal multiple evolutionarily conserved mechanisms that are required for Wolbachia localization to the germline. During the initial embryonic divisions, Wolbachia segregate asymmetrically such that they concentrate in the posteriorly localized P2 blastomere, a precursor to the adult germline and hypodermal lineages. Surprisingly, in the next division they are excluded from the germline precursor lineage. Rather, they preferentially segregate to the C blastomere, a source of posterior hypodermal cells. Localization to the germline is accomplished by a distinct mechanism in which Wolbachia invade first the somatic gonadal cells close to the ovarian distal tip cell, the nematode stem cell niche, from the hypodermis. This tropism is associated with a cortical F-actin disruption, suggesting an active engulfment. Significantly, germline invasion occurs only in females, explaining the lack of Wolbachia in the male germline. Once in the syncytial environment of the ovaries, Wolbachia rely on the rachis to multiply and disperse into the germ cells. The utilization of cell-to-cell invasion for germline colonization may indicate an ancestral mode of horizontal transfer that preceded the acquisition of the mutualism.

  17. A Cell-to-Cell Equalizer Based on Three-Resonant-State Switched-Capacitor Converters for Series-Connected Battery Strings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunlong Shang

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Due to the low cost, small size, and ease of control, the switched-capacitor (SC battery equalizers are promising among active balancing methods. However, it is difficult to achieve the full cell equalization for the SC equalizers due to the inevitable voltage drops across Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor Field Effect Transistor (MOSFET switches. Moreover, when the voltage gap among cells is larger, the balancing efficiency is lower, while the balancing speed becomes slower as the voltage gap gets smaller. In order to soften these downsides, this paper proposes a cell-to-cell battery equalization topology with zero-current switching (ZCS and zero-voltage gap (ZVG among cells based on three-resonant-state SC converters. Based on the conventional inductor-capacitor (LC converter, an additional resonant path is built to release the charge of the capacitor into the inductor in each switching cycle, which lays the foundations for obtaining ZVG among cells, improves the balancing efficiency at a large voltage gap, and increases the balancing speed at a small voltage gap. A four-lithium-ion-cell prototype is applied to validate the theoretical analysis. Experiment results demonstrate that the proposed topology has good equalization performances with fast equalization, ZCS, and ZVG among cells.

  18. Downregulation of the NbNACa1 gene encoding a movement-protein-interacting protein reduces cell-to-cell movement of Brome mosaic virus in Nicotiana benthamiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaido, Masanori; Inoue, Yosuke; Takeda, Yoshika; Sugiyama, Kazuhiko; Takeda, Atsushi; Mori, Masashi; Tamai, Atsushi; Meshi, Tetsuo; Okuno, Tetsuro; Mise, Kazuyuki

    2007-06-01

    The 3a movement protein (MP) plays a central role in the movement of the RNA plant virus, Brome mosaic virus (BMV). To identify host factor genes involved in viral movement, a cDNA library of Nicotiana benthamiana, a systemic host for BMV, was screened with far-Western blotting using a recombinant BMV MP as probe. One positive clone encoded a protein with sequence similarity to the alpha chain of nascent-polypeptide-associated complex from various organisms, which is proposed to contribute to the fidelity of translocation of newly synthesized proteins. The orthologous gene from N. benthamiana was designated NbNACa1. The binding of NbNACa1 to BMV MP was confirmed in vivo with an agroinfiltration-immunoprecipitation assay. To investigate the involvement of NbNACa1 in BMV multiplication, NbNACa1-silenced (GSNAC) transgenic N. benthamiana plants were produced. Downregulation of NbNACa1 expression reduced virus accumulation in inoculated leaves but not in protoplasts. A microprojectile bombardment assay to monitor BMV-MP-assisted viral movement demonstrated reduced virus spread in GSNAC plants. The localization to the cell wall of BMV MP fused to green fluorescent protein was delayed in GSNAC plants. From these results, we propose that NbNACa1 is involved in BMV cell-to-cell movement through the regulation of BMV MP localization to the plasmodesmata.

  19. Ser/Thr kinase-like protein of Nicotiana benthamiana is involved in the cell-to-cell movement of Bamboo mosaic virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shun-Fang Cheng

    Full Text Available To investigate the plant genes affected by Bamboo mosaic virus (BaMV infection, we applied a cDNA-amplified fragment length polymorphism technique to screen genes with differential expression. A serine/threonine kinase-like (NbSTKL gene of Nicotiana benthamiana is upregulated after BaMV infection. NbSTKL contains the homologous domain of Ser/Thr kinase. Knocking down the expression of NbSTKL by virus-induced gene silencing reduced the accumulation of BaMV in the inoculated leaves but not in the protoplasts. The spread of GFP-expressing BaMV in the inoculated leaves is also impeded by a reduced expression of NbSTKL. These data imply that NbSTKL facilitates the cell-to-cell movement of BaMV. The subcellular localization of NbSTKL is mainly on the cell membrane, which has been confirmed by mutagenesis and fractionation experiments. Combined with the results showing that active site mutation of NbSTKL does not change its subcellular localization but significantly affects BaMV accumulation, we conclude that NbSTKL may regulate BaMV movement on the cell membrane by its kinase-like activity. Moreover, the transient expression of NbSTKL does not significantly affect the accumulation of Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV and Potato virus X (PVX; thus, NbSTKL might be a specific protein facilitating BaMV movement.

  20. Alanine scanning of cucumber mosaic virus (CMV 2b protein identifies different positions for cell-to-cell movement and gene silencing suppressor activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katalin Nemes

    Full Text Available The multifunctional 2b protein of CMV has a role in the long distance and local movement of the virus, in symptom formation, in evasion of defense mediated by salicylic acid as well as in suppression of RNA silencing. The role of conserved amino acid sequence domains were analyzed previously in the protein function, but comprehensive analysis of this protein was not carried out until recently. We have analyzed all over the 2b protein by alanine scanning mutagenesis changing three consecutive amino acids (aa to alanine. We have identified eight aa triplets as key determinants of the 2b protein function in virus infection. Four of them (KKQ/22-24/AAA, QNR/31-33/AAA, RER/34-36/AAA, SPS/40-42/AAA overlap with previously determined regions indispensable in gene silencing suppressor function. We have identified two additional triplets necessary for the suppressor function of the 2b protein (LPF/55-57/AAA, NVE/10-12/AAA, and two other positions were required for cell-to-cell movement of the virus (MEL/1-3/AAA, RHV/70-72/AAA, which are not essential for suppressor activity.

  1. The regulated secretory pathway in CD4(+ T cells contributes to human immunodeficiency virus type-1 cell-to-cell spread at the virological synapse.

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    Clare Jolly

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Direct cell-cell spread of Human Immunodeficiency Virus type-1 (HIV-1 at the virological synapse (VS is an efficient mode of dissemination between CD4(+ T cells but the mechanisms by which HIV-1 proteins are directed towards intercellular contacts is unclear. We have used confocal microscopy and electron tomography coupled with functional virology and cell biology of primary CD4(+ T cells from normal individuals and patients with Chediak-Higashi Syndrome and report that the HIV-1 VS displays a regulated secretion phenotype that shares features with polarized secretion at the T cell immunological synapse (IS. Cell-cell contact at the VS re-orientates the microtubule organizing center (MTOC and organelles within the HIV-1-infected T cell towards the engaged target T cell, concomitant with polarization of viral proteins. Directed secretion of proteins at the T cell IS requires specialized organelles termed secretory lysosomes (SL and we show that the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env localizes with CTLA-4 and FasL in SL-related compartments and at the VS. Finally, CD4(+ T cells that are disabled for regulated secretion are less able to support productive cell-to-cell HIV-1 spread. We propose that HIV-1 hijacks the regulated secretory pathway of CD4(+ T cells to enhance its dissemination.

  2. GAPDH--a recruits a plant virus movement protein to cortical virus replication complexes to facilitate viral cell-to-cell movement.

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    Masanori Kaido

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The formation of virus movement protein (MP-containing punctate structures on the cortical endoplasmic reticulum is required for efficient intercellular movement of Red clover necrotic mosaic virus (RCNMV, a bipartite positive-strand RNA plant virus. We found that these cortical punctate structures constitute a viral replication complex (VRC in addition to the previously reported aggregate structures that formed adjacent to the nucleus. We identified host proteins that interacted with RCNMV MP in virus-infected Nicotiana benthamiana leaves using a tandem affinity purification method followed by mass spectrometry. One of these host proteins was glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase-A (NbGAPDH-A, which is a component of the Calvin-Benson cycle in chloroplasts. Virus-induced gene silencing of NbGAPDH-A reduced RCNMV multiplication in the inoculated leaves, but not in the single cells, thereby suggesting that GAPDH-A plays a positive role in cell-to-cell movement of RCNMV. The fusion protein of NbGAPDH-A and green fluorescent protein localized exclusively to the chloroplasts. In the presence of RCNMV RNA1, however, the protein localized to the cortical VRC as well as the chloroplasts. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation assay and GST pulldown assay confirmed in vivo and in vitro interactions, respectively, between the MP and NbGAPDH-A. Furthermore, gene silencing of NbGAPDH-A inhibited MP localization to the cortical VRC. We discuss the possible roles of NbGAPDH-A in the RCNMV movement process.

  3. The sixth sense: hematopoietic stem cells detect danger through purinergic signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Lara; Salvestrini, Valentina; Ferrari, Davide; Di Virgilio, Francesco; Lemoli, Roberto M

    2012-09-20

    Over the past decade, extracellular nucleotides (such as ATP and UTP) have emerged as key immunomodulators. This family of molecules, already known for its key metabolic functions, has been the focus of intense investigation that has unambiguously shown its crucial role as mediators of cell-to-cell communication. More recently, in addition to its involvement in inflammation and immunity, purinergic signaling has also been shown to modulate BM-derived stem cells. Extracellular nucleotides promote proliferation, CXCL12-driven migration, and BM engraftment of hematopoietic progenitor and stem cells. In addition, purinergic signaling acts indirectly on hematopoietic progenitor and stem cells by regulating differentiation and release of proinflammatory cytokines in BM-derived human mesenchymal stromal cells, which are part of the hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) niche. HSC research has recently blended into the field of immunology, as new findings highlighted the role played by immunologic signals (such as IFN-α, IFN-γ, or TNF-α) in the regulation of the HSC compartment. In this review, we summarize recent reports unveiling a previously unsuspected ability of HSCs to integrate inflammatory signals released by immune and stromal cells, with particular emphasis on the dual role of extracellular nucleotides as mediators of both immunologic responses and BM stem cell functions.

  4. Sprinter: a novel transmembrane protein required for Wg secretion and signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Robyn M; Thombre, Shreya; Firtina, Zeynep; Gray, Dione; Betts, Daniella; Roebuck, Jamie; Spana, Eric P; Selva, Erica M

    2006-12-01

    Wingless (Wg) is a secreted ligand that differentially activates gene expression in target tissues. It belongs to the Wnt family of secreted signaling molecules that regulate cell-to-cell interactions during development. Activation of Wg targets is dependent on the ligand concentration in the extracellular milieu; cellular mechanisms that govern the synthesis, delivery and receipt of Wg are elaborate and complex. We have identified sprinter (srt), which encodes a novel, evolutionarily conserved transmembrane protein required for the transmission of the Wg signal. Mutations in srt cause the accumulation of Wg in cells that express it, and retention of the ligand prevents activation of its target genes in signal-receiving cells. In the absence of Srt activity, levels of Wg targets (including Engrailed in embryos lacking maternal and zygotic srt, and Senseless and Achaete in wing discs) are reduced. Activation of Wg targets in the receiving cells does not require srt. Hence, the function of Srt is restricted to events occurring within the Wg-producing cells. We show that srt is not required for any aspect of Hedgehog (Hh) signal transduction, suggesting specificity of srt for the Wg pathway. We propose that srt encodes a protein required for Wg secretion that regulates maturation, membrane targeting or delivery of Wg. Loss of srt function in turn diminishes Wg-pathway activation in receiving cells.

  5. Exosomes as Intercellular Signaling Organelles Involved in Health and Disease: Basic Science and Clinical Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Ciccia

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Cell to cell communication is essential for the coordination and proper organization of different cell types in multicellular systems. Cells exchange information through a multitude of mechanisms such as secreted growth factors and chemokines, small molecules (peptides, ions, bioactive lipids and nucleotides, cell-cell contact and the secretion of extracellular matrix components. Over the last few years, however, a considerable amount of experimental evidence has demonstrated the occurrence of a sophisticated method of cell communication based on the release of specialized membranous nano-sized vesicles termed exosomes. Exosome biogenesis involves the endosomal compartment, the multivesicular bodies (MVB, which contain internal vesicles packed with an extraordinary set of molecules including enzymes, cytokines, nucleic acids and different bioactive compounds. In response to stimuli, MVB fuse with the plasma membrane and vesicles are released in the extracellular space where they can interact with neighboring cells and directly induce a signaling pathway or affect the cellular phenotype through the transfer of new receptors or even genetic material. This review will focus on exosomes as intercellular signaling organelles involved in a number of physiological as well as pathological processes and their potential use in clinical diagnostics and therapeutics.

  6. Effect of small chain N acyl homoserine lactone quorum sensing signals on biofilms of food-borne pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    A, Jamuna Bai; V, Ravishankar Rai

    2016-09-01

    Quorum sensing or cell to cell communication which includes inter- and intra-cellular communication has been implicated in the production of virulence factor and formation of biofilm in food-borne pathogens. In the present study, the effect of quorum sensing signals on the biofilms of food-borne pathogens has been elucidated. N-butryl homoserine lactone and N-hexanoyl homoserine lactone belonging to acyl homoserine lactone (AHL) family of signaling molecules were investigated for their effect on the biofilm formation (attachment and exopolymeric substance production) in the food-borne pathogens Escherichia coli, Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium and Vibrio parahemolyticus. The signaling molecules at a concentration of 1 µM were capable of increasing biofilm formation in all the tested pathogens. There was an increase in the attachment of the bacterial cells and biomass as observed by microtiter plate assay and exopolymeric substances production in the biofilms in presence of the AHLs. Further, it needs to be elucidated if the effect of AHLS on the biofilms of E. coli and S. enterica serovar Typhimurium is SdiA dependent.

  7. Colonic miRNA expression/secretion, regulated by intestinal epithelial PepT1, plays an important role in cell-to-cell communication during colitis.

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    Saravanan Ayyadurai

    Full Text Available PepT1 is a member of the proton-oligopeptide cotransporter family SLC15, which mediates the transport of di/tripeptides from intestinal lumen into epithelial cells. MicroRNAs (miRNAs, a small noncoding RNAs (21-23 nucleotides, post-transcriptionally regulate gene expression by binding to the 3'-untranslated regions (UTRs of their target mRNAs. Although the role of most miRNAs remains elusive, they have been implicated in vital cellular functions such as intestinal epithelial cells differentiation, proliferation, and apoptosis. In the present study, we investigated the effect of intestinal epithelial PepT1 expression on microRNA (miRNA expression/secretion in the colons of control mice and in mice with experimentally induced colonic inflammation (colitis. The colonic miRNA expression was deregulated in both colitis and control mice but the deregulation of miRNA expression/secretion was specific to colonic tissue and did not affect other tissues such as spleen and liver. Intestinal epithelial PepT1-dependent deregulation of colonic miRNA expression not only affects epithelial cells but also other cell types, such as intestinal macrophages. Importantly, we found the miRNA 23b which was known to be involved in inflammatory bowel disease was secreted and transported between cells to impose a gene-silencing effect on recipient intestinal macrophages. Based on our data, we may conclude that the expression of a specific protein, PepT1, in the intestine affects local miRNA expression/secretion in the colon on a tissue specific manner and may play an important role during the induction and progression of colitis. Colonic miRNA expression/secretion, regulated by intestinal epithelial PepT1, could play a crucial role in cell-to-cell communication during colitis.

  8. Inductive expression of toll-like receptor 5 (TLR5) and associated downstream signaling molecules following ligand exposure and bacterial infection in the Indian major carp, mrigal (Cirrhinus mrigala).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, M; Swain, B; Maiti, N K; Routray, P; Samanta, M

    2012-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are one of the key components of innate immunity. Among various types of TLRs, TLR5 is involved in recognizing bacterial flagellin and after binding, it triggers myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88 (MyD88)-dependent signaling pathway to induce pro-inflammatory cytokines. In this report, we analyzed the expression profile of TLR5 and its associated downstream signaling molecules like MyD88 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor-associated factor (TRAF) 6 in the Indian major carp (IMC), mrigal (Cirrhinus mrigala) which is highly commercially important fish species in the Indian subcontinent. Ontogeny analysis of TLR5, MyD88 and TRAF6 revealed constitutive expression of these genes in all embryonic developmental stages, and highlighted the importance of embryonic innate immune defense system in fish. Tissue specific expression analysis of these genes by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) revealed their wide distribution in various organs and tissues; highest expression of TLR5 and MyD88 was in liver and TRAF6 was in kidney. Modulation of TLR5, MyD88 and TRAF6 gene expression, and the induction of interleukin (IL)-8 and TNF-α were analyzed in various organs by qRT-PCR following flagellin stimulation, and Aeromonas hydrophila and Edwardsiella tarda infection. In the treated fish, majority of the tested tissues exhibited significant induction of these genes, although with varied intensity among the tissues and with the types of treatments. Among the examined tissues, a significant relationship of TLR5 induction, MyD88 and TRAF6 up-regulation, and enhanced expression of IL-8 and TNF-α gene transcripts was observed in the blood and intestine of both flagellin stimulated and bacteria infected fish. These findings may indicate the involvement of TLR5 in inducing IL-8 and TNF-α, and suggest the important role of TLR5 in augmenting innate immunity in fish in response to pathogenic invasion. This study will enrich the information

  9. Development of an Immunoperoxidase Monolayer Assay for the Detection of Antibodies against Peste des Petits Ruminants Virus Based on BHK-21 Cell Line Stably Expressing the Goat Signaling Lymphocyte Activation Molecule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Weiye; Li, Cuicui; Xie, Meimei; Bu, Zhigao

    2016-01-01

    From 2013 to 2015, peste des petits ruminants (PPR) broke out in more than half of the provinces of China; thus, the application and development of diagnostic methods are very important for the control of PPR. Here, an immunoperoxidase monolayer assay (IPMA) was developed to detect antibodies against PPR. However, during IPMA development, we found that Vero cells were not the appropriate choice because staining results were not easily observed. Therefore, we first established a baby hamster kidney-goat signaling lymphocyte activation molecule (BHK-SLAM) cell line that could stably express goat SLAM for at least 20 generations. Compared with Vero cells, the PPR-mediated cytopathic effect occurred earlier in BHK-SLAM cells, and large syncytia appeared after virus infection. Based on this cell line and recombinant PPR virus expressing the green fluorescent protein (GFP) (rPPRV-GFP), an IPMA for PPR diagnosis was developed. One hundred and ninety-eight PPR serum samples from goats or sheep were tested by the IPMA and virus neutralization test (VNT). Compared with the VNT, the sensitivity and specificity of the IPMA were 91% and 100%, respectively, and the coincidence rate of the two methods was 95.5%. The IPMA assay could be completed in 4 h, compared with more than 6 d for the VNT using rPPRV-GFP, and it is easily performed, as the staining results can be observed under a microscope. Additionally, unlike the VNT, the IPMA does not require antigen purification, which will reduce its cost. In conclusion, the established IPMA will be an alternative method that replaces the VNT for detecting antibodies against PPRV in the field. PMID:27768770

  10. Danger signals in stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelderblom, Mathias; Sobey, Christopher G; Kleinschnitz, Christoph; Magnus, Tim

    2015-11-01

    Danger molecules are the first signals released from dying tissue after stroke. These danger signals bind to receptors on immune cells that will result in their activation and the release of inflammatory and neurotoxic mediators, resulting in amplification of the immune response and subsequent enlargement of the damaged brain volume. The release of danger signals is a central event that leads to a multitude of signals and cascades in the affected and neighbouring tissue, therefore providing a potential target for therapy.

  11. 硫化氢——具有临床应用潜力的气体信号分子%Hydrogen sulphide-a kind of gas signal molecule for potential clinical application

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    程翅; 喻田

    2011-01-01

    Background Hydrogen sulphide (H2S) is the third endogenous gas signal transduction molecule at present,which involved in the development and progression of many diseases. Fairly satisfactory achievement of H2S-related drugs for treatment of certain diseases can be found.Objective To summary the role and related mechanism of hydrogen sulphide in the central nervous system,cardiovascular system et al.Content The review will focus on the latest research on H2S in the central nervous system,cardiovascular system,respiratory system,digestive system,inflammation and other aspect. H2S may be found in a new direction to explore the origin of a disease,and contribute to the possibility of studying new drugs.Trend With the deepening understanding of hydrogen sulfide,H2S-related drugs is expected to be used for clinical application.%背景 硫化氢(hydrogen sulphide,H2S)是人们发现的第3个内源性气体信号转导分子,参与了许多疾病的发生发展过程,并且发现H2S相关药物对于某些疾病治疗取得了较为满意的结果.目的 总结H2S在中枢神经系统、心血管系统等的作用以及相关机制.内容 从中枢神经系统、心血管系统、呼吸系统、消化系统、炎症反应以及其他作用等方面综述近几年来对H2S研究的最新进展,发现H2S可能成为探求病因的一个新方向以及研发相关药物的可能性.趋向 随着对H2S认识的加深,H2S相关药物有望成为一种临床用药.

  12. Copper-induced tight junction mRNA expression changes, apoptosis and antioxidant responses via NF-κB, TOR and Nrf2 signaling molecules in the gills of fish: Preventive role of arginine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Biao [Animal Nutrition Institute, Sichuan Agricultural University, Chengdu 611130, Sichuan (China); Feng, Lin; Jiang, Wei-Dan [Animal Nutrition Institute, Sichuan Agricultural University, Chengdu 611130, Sichuan (China); Fish Nutrition and Safety Production University Key Laboratory of Sichuan Province, Sichuan Agricultural University, Chengdu 611130, Sichuan (China); Key Laboratory for Animal Disease-Resistance Nutrition of China Ministry of Education, Sichuan Agricultural University, Chengdu 611130, Sichuan (China); Wu, Pei [Animal Nutrition Institute, Sichuan Agricultural University, Chengdu 611130, Sichuan (China); Kuang, Sheng-Yao [Animal Nutrition Institute, Sichuan Academy of Animal Science, Chengdu, 610066, Sichuan (China); Jiang, Jun [Animal Nutrition Institute, Sichuan Agricultural University, Chengdu 611130, Sichuan (China); Fish Nutrition and Safety Production University Key Laboratory of Sichuan Province, Sichuan Agricultural University, Chengdu 611130, Sichuan (China); Key Laboratory for Animal Disease-Resistance Nutrition of China Ministry of Education, Sichuan Agricultural University, Chengdu 611130, Sichuan (China); Tang, Ling; Tang, Wu-Neng [Animal Nutrition Institute, Sichuan Academy of Animal Science, Chengdu, 610066, Sichuan (China); Zhang, Yong-An [Institute of Hydrobiology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan 430072 (China); Liu, Yang, E-mail: kyckgk@hotmail.com [Animal Nutrition Institute, Sichuan Agricultural University, Chengdu 611130, Sichuan (China); Fish Nutrition and Safety Production University Key Laboratory of Sichuan Province, Sichuan Agricultural University, Chengdu 611130, Sichuan (China); Key Laboratory for Animal Disease-Resistance Nutrition of China Ministry of Education, Sichuan Agricultural University, Chengdu 611130, Sichuan (China); and others

    2015-01-15

    Highlights: • Cu exposure induced oxidative stress via disruption of antioxidant system. • Cu exposure disrupted TJ mRNA expression through regulation of cytokines in fish. • Cu induced gill apoptosis partly via intrinsic pathway but not extrinsic pathway. • Cu exposure can regulate Nrf2, NF-κB and TOR signaling molecules in fish. • Arginine can effectively prevent Cu-induced fish gill damage. - Abstract: This study explored the possible preventive effects of dietary arginine on copper (Cu)-induced tight junction mRNA expression changes, apoptosis and antioxidant responses in the gills of young grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella). The results indicated that exposure to 0.7 mg/L (11.01 μmol/L) Cu for 96 h induced the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), thereby increasing protein oxidation, lipid peroxidation and DNA damage in the gills of fish. However, these oxidative effects were prevented by arginine supplementation. Arginine also prevented the toxic effects of Cu on the activities of copper/zinc superoxide dismutase (SOD1), glutathione-S-transferase (GST), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), glutathione reductase (GR) and the glutathione (GSH) content (P < 0.05). However, Cu induced an adaptive increase in the activity of catalase (CAT), and arginine supplementation further increased CAT activity (P < 0.05). Moreover, Cu induced increases in the relative mRNA expressions of SOD1, CAT, GPx, GST, caspase-3, caspase-9, NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), Kelch-like-ECH-associated protein 1a (Keap1a), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β), interleukin-8 (IL-8), transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) and nuclear transcription factor-κB p65 (NF-κB p65) in the gills of grass carp (P < 0.05). In contrast, the relative mRNA expression levels of occludin, zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1), claudin b, claudin 3, claudin 12, target of rapamycin (TOR) and inhibitor factor κBα (IκBα) in the gills were decreased by Cu (P < 0.05). However, pre

  13. Dietary phenylalanine-improved intestinal barrier health in young grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella) is associated with increased immune status and regulated gene expression of cytokines, tight junction proteins, antioxidant enzymes and related signalling molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Lin; Li, Wen; Liu, Yang; Jiang, Wei-Dan; Kuang, Sheng-Yao; Jiang, Jun; Tang, Ling; Wu, Pei; Tang, Wu-Neng; Zhang, Yong-An; Zhou, Xiao-Qiu

    2015-08-01

    The present work evaluated the effects of dietary phenylalanine (Phe) on the intestinal immune response, tight junction proteins transcript abundance, and the gene expression of immune- and antioxidant-related signalling molecules in the intestine. In addition, the dietary Phe (and Phe + Tyr) requirement of young grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella) was also estimated. Fish were fed fish meal-casein-gelatin based diets (302.3 g crude protein kg(-1)) containing 3.4 (basal diet), 6.1, 9.1, 11.5, 14.0 and 16.8 g Phe kg(-1) with a fixed amount of 10.7 g tyrosine kg(-1) for 8 weeks. The results showed that Phe deficiency or excess Phe reduced the lysozyme and acid phosphatase activities and complement C 3 content in the intestine (P 0.05). Gene expression of interleukin-10 (IL-10), transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1), target of rapamycin (TOR) and inhibitor of nuclear factor κBα (IκBα) in proximal intestine (PI), mid intestine (MI) and distal intestine (DI) increased as dietary Phe increased up to 6.1, 9.1, 11.5 and 14.0 g kg(-1), respectively (P < 0.05). However, interleukin-8 (IL-8), tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and nuclear factor-κB p65 (NF-κB p65) mRNA levels showed opposite tendencies. In addition, the mRNA level of superoxide dismutase (SOD) was significantly lower in the intestinal tissue of the group fed a diet with Phe levels of 16.8 g kg(-1) than in those of other groups (P < 0.05). The expression of NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) gene was increased as dietary Phe increased up to 9.1 g kg(-1) (P < 0.05). In conclusion, Phe improved intestinal immune status, and regulated gene expression of cytokines, tight junction proteins, antioxidant enzymes, NF-κB p65, IκBα, TOR, and Nrf2 in the fish intestine. Based on the quadratic regression analysis of lysozyme activity at a 95% maximum, the dietary Phe requirement of young grass carp (256-629 g) was estimated to be 8.31 g kg(-1), corresponding to 2.75 g 100 g(-1) protein.

  14. Is autoinducer-2 a universal signal for interspecies communication: a comparative genomic and phylogenetic analysis of the synthesis and signal transduction pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wagner-Döbler Irene

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Quorum sensing is a process of bacterial cell-to-cell communication involving the production and detection of extracellular signaling molecules called autoinducers. Recently, it has been proposed that autoinducer-2 (AI-2, a furanosyl borate diester derived from the recycling of S-adenosyl-homocysteine (SAH to homocysteine, serves as a universal signal for interspecies communication. Results In this study, 138 completed genomes were examined for the genes involved in the synthesis and detection of AI-2. Except for some symbionts and parasites, all organisms have a pathway to recycle SAH, either using a two-step enzymatic conversion by the Pfs and LuxS enzymes or a one-step conversion using SAH-hydrolase (SahH. 51 organisms including most Gamma-, Beta-, and Epsilonproteobacteria, and Firmicutes possess the Pfs-LuxS pathway, while Archaea, Eukarya, Alphaproteobacteria, Actinobacteria and Cyanobacteria prefer the SahH pathway. In all 138 organisms, only the three Vibrio strains had strong, bidirectional matches to the periplasmic AI-2 binding protein LuxP and the central signal relay protein LuxU. The initial two-component sensor kinase protein LuxQ, and the terminal response regulator luxO are found in most Proteobacteria, as well as in some Firmicutes, often in several copies. Conclusions The genomic analysis indicates that the LuxS enzyme required for AI-2 synthesis is widespread in bacteria, while the periplasmic binding protein LuxP is only present in Vibrio strains. Thus, other organisms may either use components different from the AI-2 signal transduction system of Vibrio strains to sense the signal of AI-2, or they do not have such a quorum sensing system at all.

  15. Airway Epithelial Cell Integrity Protects from Cytotoxicity of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Quorum-Sensing Signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Losa, Davide; Köhler, Thilo; Bacchetta, Marc; Saab, Joanna Bou; Frieden, Maud; van Delden, Christian; Chanson, Marc

    2015-08-01

    Cell-to-cell communication via gap junctions regulates airway epithelial cell homeostasis and maintains the epithelium host defense. Quorum-sensing molecules produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa coordinate the expression of virulence factors by this respiratory pathogen. These bacterial signals may also incidentally modulate mammalian airway epithelial cell responses to the pathogen, a process called interkingdom signaling. We investigated the interactions between the P. aeruginosa N-3-oxo-dodecanoyl-L-homoserine lactone (C12) quorum-sensing molecule and human airway epithelial cell gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC). C12 degradation and its effects on cells were monitored in various airway epithelial cell models grown under nonpolarized and polarized conditions. Its concentration was further monitored in daily tracheal aspirates of colonized intubated patients. C12 rapidly altered epithelial integrity and decreased GJIC in nonpolarized airway epithelial cells, whereas other quorum-sensing molecules had no effect. The effects of C12 were dependent on [Ca(2+)]i and could be prevented by inhibitors of Src tyrosine family and Rho-associated protein kinases. In contrast, polarized airway cells grown on Transwell filters were protected from C12 except when undergoing repair after wounding. In vivo during colonization of intubated patients, C12 did not accumulate, but it paralleled bacterial densities. In vitro C12 degradation, a reaction catalyzed by intracellular paraoxonase 2 (PON2), was impaired in nonpolarized cells, whereas PON2 expression was increased during epithelial polarization. The cytotoxicity of C12 on nonpolarized epithelial cells, combined with its impaired degradation allowing its accumulation, provides an additional pathogenic mechanism for P. aeruginosa infections.

  16. Signaling by Gasotransmitters

    OpenAIRE

    Mustafa, Asif K.; Gadalla, Moataz M.; Snyder, Solomon H

    2009-01-01

    Nitric oxide is well established as a major signaling molecule. Evidence is accumulating that carbon monoxide and hydrogen sulfide also are physiologic mediators in the cardiovascular, immune, and nervous systems. This Review focuses on mechanisms whereby they signal by binding to metal centers in metalloproteins, such as in guanylyl cyclase, or modifying sulfhydryl groups in protein targets.

  17. Quorum sensing communication between bacteria and human cells: signals, targets and functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelika eHolm

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Both direct and long-range interactions between pathogenic Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteria and their eukaryotic hosts are important in the outcome of infections. For cell-to-cell communication, these bacteria employ the quorum sensing (QS system to pass on information of the density of the bacterial population and collectively switch on virulence factor production, biofilm formation and resistance development. Thus, QS allows bacteria to behave as a community to perform tasks which would be impossible for individual cells, e.g. to overcome defense and immune systems and establish infections in higher organisms. This review highlights these aspects of QS and our own recent research on how P.aeruginosa communicates with human cells using the small QS signal molecules N-acyl homoserine lactones (AHL. We focus on how this conversation changes the behavior and function of neutrophils, macrophages and epithelial cells and on how the signaling machinery in human cells responsible for the recognition of AHL. Understanding the bacteria-host relationships at both cellular and molecular levels is essential for the identification of new targets and for the development of novel strategies to fight bacterial infections in the future.

  18. Cell survival signalling through PPARδ and arachidonic acid metabolites in neuroblastoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma Bell

    Full Text Available Retinoic acid (RA has paradoxical effects on cancer cells: promoting cell death, differentiation and cell cycle arrest, or cell survival and proliferation. Arachidonic acid (AA release occurs in response to RA treatment and, therefore, AA and its downstream metabolites may be involved in cell survival signalling. To test this, we inhibited phospholipase A2-mediated AA release, cyclooxygenases and lipoxygenases with small-molecule inhibitors to determine if this would sensitise cells to cell death after RA treatment. The data suggest that, in response to RA, phospholipase A2-mediated release of AA and subsequent metabolism by lipoxygenases is important for cell survival. Evidence from gene expression reporter assays and PPARδ knockdown suggests that lipoxygenase metabolites activate PPARδ. The involvement of PPARδ in cell survival is supported by results of experiments with the PPARδ inhibitor GSK0660 and siRNA-mediated knockdown. Quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR studies demonstrated that inhibition of 5-lipoxygenase after RA treatment resulted in a strong up-regulation of mRNA for PPARδ2, a putative inhibitory PPARδ isoform. Over-expression of PPARδ2 using a tetracycline-inducible system in neuroblastoma cells reduced proliferation and induced cell death. These data provide evidence linking lipoxygenases and PPARδ in a cell survival-signalling mechanism and suggest new drug-development targets for malignant and hyper-proliferative diseases.

  19. 囊泡表面氨基酸信号分子与维生素B6衍生物受体反应平衡常数的估计%Estimation of the chemical equilibrium constants for amino acid signal molecules and a pyridoxal derivative receptor on bilayer vesicles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘俏; 王剑锋; 赵明明; 范圣第

    2012-01-01

    To construct a novel artificial signal transduction supper molecular system whose receptor is a pyridoxal derivative (PL+C16) and signal molecule is amino acid, combination abilities of the receptor PL+C16 and different signal molecules have been investigated. 12 groups of experiments were first conveyed at 40 ℃, under various condition combinations of signal molecule (glycine,p~alanine, y-aminobutyric acid and aspartic acid) and pH values of buffer (7.0, 8.0 and 9.0). In each group of experiments, a series of absorbance values of reacting substances were measured corresponding different initiation concentrations of signal molecule. Then the results were modeled and fitted into nonlinear curves using the toolbox provided by MATLAB. Thus, the value of equilibrium constant K can be estimated and a quantitative assessment of the combination ability can be achieved. The experiment results show that the values of equilibrium constant K have significant difference using the same amino acid but different buffer pH values in reaction of receptor PL+C16 and signal molecule, and the constant K varies distinctively when keeping the pH values the same but using different kinds of amino acid. The results also show that the constant K becomes the largest when using aspartic acid as the signal molecule and the buffer pH is 9.0, and under this condition, the signal molecule exhibits the best combination ability with receptor PL+C16.%为了构建一个新的以维生素B6衍生物(PL+C16)为受体、氨基酸为信号分子的人工细胞信号转导超分子体系,测定在40℃、pH值分别为7.0、8.0及9.0的缓冲液体系下,4种信号分子(甘氨酸、β-丙氨酸、γ-氨基丁酸、天冬氨酸)在不同初始浓度下与受体PL+C16反应的吸光度,通过用MATLAB模型拟合工具包将其实验数据进行非线性拟合,估计反应的平衡常数K,定量考察了4种信号分子到达人工细胞膜载体表面与受体分子的结合能力.结果表明:不同p

  20. QapR (PA5506) represses an operon that negatively affects the Pseudomonas quinolone signal in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tipton, Kyle A; Coleman, James P; Pesci, Everett C

    2013-08-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a Gram-negative, opportunistic pathogen that can cause disease in varied sites within the human body and is a significant source of morbidity and mortality in those afflicted with cystic fibrosis. P. aeruginosa is able to coordinate group behaviors, such as virulence factor production, through the process of cell-to-cell signaling. There are three intercellular signaling systems employed by P. aeruginosa, and one of these systems utilizes the small molecule 2-heptyl-3-hydroxy-4-quinolone (Pseudomonas quinolone signal [PQS]). PQS is required for virulence in multiple infection models and has been found in the lungs of cystic fibrosis patients colonized by P. aeruginosa. In this study, we have identified an RpiR family transcriptional regulator, QapR, which is an autoregulatory repressor. We found that mutation of qapR caused overexpression of the qapR operon. We characterized the qapR operon to show that it contains genes qapR, PA5507, PA5508, and PA5509 and that QapR directly controls the transcription of these genes in a negative manner. We also show that derepression of this operon greatly reduces PQS concentration in P. aeruginosa. Our results suggest that qapR affects PQS concentration by repressing an enzymatic pathway that acts on PQS or a PQS precursor to lower the PQS concentration. We believe that this operon comprises a novel mechanism to regulate PQS concentration in P. aeruginosa.

  1. Single Molecule Raman Detection of Enkephalin on Silver Colloidal Particles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kneipp, Katrin; Kneipp, Holger; Abdali, Salim;

    2004-01-01

    the Raman signal the enkephalin molecules have been attached to silver colloidal cluster structures. The experiments demonstrate that the SERS signal of the strongly enhanced ring breathing vibration of phenylalanine at 1000 cm-1 can be used as “intrinsic marker” for detecting a single enkephalin molecule...... and for monitoring its diffusion on the surface of the silver colloidal cluster without using a specific label molecule....

  2. Intracellular distribution, cell-to-cell trafficking and tubule-inducing activity of the 50 kDa movement protein of Apple chlorotic leaf spot virus fused to green fluorescent protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satoh, H; Matsuda, H; Kawamura, T; Isogai, M; Yoshikawa, N; Takahashi, T

    2000-08-01

    The 50 kDa protein (50KP) encoded by ORF2 of Apple chlorotic leaf spot virus (ACLSV) fused to green fluorescent protein (GFP) was expressed transiently in cells of Nicotiana occidentalis and Chenopodium quinoa leaves. Its intracellular distribution, cell-to-cell trafficking in leaf epidermis and tubule formation on the surface of protoplasts were analysed. The 50KP-GFP fluorescence was distributed as small irregular spots or a fibrous network structure on the periphery of epidermal cells and protoplasts of both plant species. In leaf epidermis of N. occidentalis, the protein spread from the cells that produced it into neighbouring cells in both young and mature leaves and targetted plasmodesmata in these cells. In contrast, GFP was restricted to single cells in most cases in mature leaves. When 50KP and GFP were co-expressed in leaf epidermis of N. occidentalis, GFP spread more widely from the initial cells that produced it than when GFP was expressed alone, suggesting that 50KP facilitated the cell-to-cell trafficking of GFP. 50KP-GFP was able to complement local spread of 50KP-deficient virus when expressed transiently in leaf epidermis of C. quinoa. Expression of 50KP-GFP in protoplasts resulted in the production of tubular structures protruding from the surface. Mutational analyses showed that the C-terminal region (aa 287-457) was not essential for localization to plasmodesmata, cell-to-cell trafficking, complementation of movement of 50KP-deficient virus or tubule formation on protoplasts. In contrast, deletions in the N-terminal region resulted in the complete disruption of all these activities.

  3. Antibodies to several conformation-dependent epitopes of gp120/gp41 inhibit CCR-5-dependent cell-to-cell fusion mediated by the native envelope glycoprotein of a primary macrophage-tropic HIV-1 isolate

    OpenAIRE

    Verrier, Florence C.; Charneau, Pierre; Altmeyer, Ralf; Laurent, Stephanie; Borman, Andrew M.; Girard, Marc

    1997-01-01

    The β-chemokine receptor CCR-5 is essential for the efficient entry of primary macrophage-tropic HIV-1 isolates into CD4+ target cells. To study CCR-5-dependent cell-to-cell fusion, we have developed an assay system based on the infection of CD4+ CCR-5+ HeLa cells with a Semliki Forest virus recombinant expressing the gp120/gp41 envelope (Env) from a primary clade B HIV-1 isolate (BX08), or from a laboratory T cell line-adapted strain (LAI). In this system, gp120/gp41 of the “nonsyncytium-ind...

  4. Cellular signalling properties in microcircuits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toledo-Rodriguez, Maria; El Manira, Abdeljabbar; Wallén, Peter

    2005-01-01

    Molecules and cells are the signalling elements in microcircuits. Recent studies have uncovered bewildering diversity in postsynaptic signalling properties in all areas of the vertebrate nervous system. Major effort is now being invested in establishing the specialized signalling properties at th...

  5. Systemic defense signaling in tomato

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Changbao; SUN Jiaqiang; JIANG Hongling; WU Xiaoyan; LI Chuanyou

    2005-01-01

    The wound-inducible expression of proteinase inhibitors (PIs) genes in tomato provides a powerful model system to elucidate the signal transduction pathway of sys- temic defense response. An increasing body of evidence indi- cates that systemin and jasmonic acid (JA) work in the same signaling pathway to activate the expression of PIs and other defense-related genes. However, little is known about how systemin and JA interact to regulate cell to cell communica- tion over long distances. Genetic analysis of the systemin/JA signaling pathway in tomato plants provides a unique opportunity to dissect the mechanism by which peptide and oxylipin signals interact to coordinate systemic expression of defense-related genes. Previously, it has been proposed that systemin is the long-distance mobile signal for systemic expression of defense related genes. However, recent genetic approach provided new evidence that jasmonic acid, rather than systemin, functions as the systemic wound signal, and that the peptide systemin works to regulate the biosynthesis of JA.

  6. Formation of Ultracold Molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cote, Robin [Univ. of Connecticut, Storrs, CT (United States)

    2016-01-28

    Advances in our ability to slow down and cool atoms and molecules to ultracold temperatures have paved the way to a revolution in basic research on molecules. Ultracold molecules are sensitive of very weak interactions, even when separated by large distances, which allow studies of the effect of those interactions on the behavior of molecules. In this program, we have explored ways to form ultracold molecules starting from pairs of atoms that have already reached the ultracold regime. We devised methods that enhance the efficiency of ultracold molecule production, for example by tuning external magnetic fields and using appropriate laser excitations. We also investigates the properties of those ultracold molecules, especially their de-excitation into stable molecules. We studied the possibility of creating new classes of ultra-long range molecules, named macrodimers, thousand times more extended than regular molecules. Again, such objects are possible because ultra low temperatures prevent their breakup by collision. Finally, we carried out calculations on how chemical reactions are affected and modified at ultracold temperatures. Normally, reactions become less effective as the temperature decreases, but at ultracold temperatures, they can become very effective. We studied this counter-intuitive behavior for benchmark chemical reactions involving molecular hydrogen.

  7. The neural cell adhesion molecule

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berezin, V; Bock, E; Poulsen, F M

    2000-01-01

    During the past year, the understanding of the structure and function of neural cell adhesion has advanced considerably. The three-dimensional structures of several of the individual modules of the neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) have been determined, as well as the structure of the complex...... between two identical fragments of the NCAM. Also during the past year, a link between homophilic cell adhesion and several signal transduction pathways has been proposed, connecting the event of cell surface adhesion to cellular responses such as neurite outgrowth. Finally, the stimulation of neurite...

  8. AI-2 does not function as a quorum sensing molecule in Campylobacter jejuni during exponential growth in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Winzer Klaus

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Campylobacter jejuni contains a homologue of the luxS gene shown to be responsible for the production of the signalling molecule autoinducer-2 (AI-2 in Vibrio harveyi and Vibrio cholerae. The aim of this study was to determine whether AI-2 acted as a diffusible quorum sensing signal controlling C. jejuni gene expression when it is produced at high levels during mid exponential growth phase. Results AI-2 activity was produced by the parental strain NCTC 11168 when grown in rich Mueller-Hinton broth (MHB as expected, but interestingly was not present in defined Modified Eagles Medium (MEM-α. Consistent with previous studies, the luxS mutant showed comparable growth rates to the parental strain and exhibited decreased motility halos in both MEM-α and MHB. Microarray analysis of genes differentially expressed in wild type and luxS mutant strains showed that many effects on mRNA transcript abundance were dependent on the growth medium and linked to metabolic functions including methionine metabolism. Addition of exogenously produced AI-2 to the wild type and the luxS mutant, growing exponentially in either MHB or MEM-α did not induce any transcriptional changes as analysed by microarray. Conclusion Taken together these results led us to conclude that there is no evidence for the role of AI-2 in cell-to-cell communication in C. jejuni strain NCTC 11168 under the growth conditions used, and that the effects of the luxS mutation on the transcriptome are related to the consequential loss of function in the activated methyl cycle.

  9. Healthy sheep that differ in scrapie associated PRNP genotypes exhibit significant differences of expression pattern associated with immune response and cell-to-cell signalling in retropharyngeal lymph nodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komolka, Katrin; Ponsuksili, Siriluck; Schwerin, Manfred

    2013-04-15

    The present study was conducted to test the hypothesis whether prion protein gene (PRNP) associated scrapie susceptibility is connected with physiological changes in tissue involved in pathogen uptake, migration and propagation. Jejunum, ileal Peyer's patches, retropharyngeal lymph nodes, brain stem and liver of healthy and non scrapie-infected sheep with PRNP genotypes representing the scrapie risk class R1 (scrapie-resistant) and R5 (scrapie-susceptible), respectively, were comparatively analysed by microarray technology and quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT qPCR). Significantly higher expression levels of genes involved in immune response and cell communication pathways in retropharyngeal lymph nodes of R1 sheep in comparison with R5 animals strongly suggest PRNP associated physiological processes with impact as an early barrier in pathogen defence. Equal expression patterns in brain stem suggest no physiological differences in brain of healthy R1 and R5 animals. In addition, similar expression pattern in liver indicates that there are no transcriptional differences in genes of the hepatic energy metabolism between animals of scrapie classes R1 and R5.

  10. Gradient sensing by a bistable regulatory motif enhances signal amplification but decreases accuracy in individual cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Rati; Roberts, Elijah

    2016-06-01

    Many vital eukaryotic cellular functions require the cell to respond to a directional gradient of a signaling molecule. The first two steps in any eukaryotic chemotactic/chemotropic pathway are gradient detection and cell polarization. Like many processes, such chemotactic and chemotropic decisions are made using a relatively small number of molecules and are thus susceptible to internal and external fluctuations during signal transduction. Large cell-to-cell variations in the magnitude and direction of a response are therefore possible and do, in fact, occur in natural systems. In this work we use three-dimensional probabilistic modeling of a simple gradient sensing pathway to study the capacity for individual cells to accurately determine the direction of a gradient, despite fluctuations. We include a stochastic external gradient in our simulations using a novel gradient boundary condition modeling a point emitter a short distance away. We compare and contrast three different variants of the pathway, one monostable and two bistable. The simulation data show that an architecture combining bistability with spatial positive feedback permits the cell to both accurately detect and internally amplify an external gradient. We observe strong polarization in all individual cells, but in a distribution of directions centered on the gradient. Polarization accuracy in our study was strongly dependent upon a spatial positive feedback term that allows the pathway to trade accuracy for polarization strength. Finally, we show that additional feedback links providing information about the gradient to multiple levels in the pathway can help the cell to refine initial inaccuracy in the polarization direction.

  11. A Single-Molecule Hershey-Chase Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Van Valen, David; Chen, Yi-Ju; Tuson, Hannah; Wiggins, Paul; Phillips, Rob

    2012-01-01

    Ever since Hershey and Chase used phages to establish DNA as the carrier of genetic information in 1952, the precise mechanisms of phage DNA translocation have been a mystery. While bulk measurements have set a time scale for in vivo DNA translocation during bacteriophage infection, measurements of DNA ejection by single bacteriophages have only been made in vitro. Here, we present direct visualization of single bacteriophages infecting individual Escherichia coli cells. For bacteriophage lambda, we establish a mean ejection time of roughly 5 minutes with significant cell-to-cell variability, including pausing events. In contrast, corresponding in vitro single-molecule ejections take only 10 seconds to reach completion and do not exhibit significant variability. Our data reveal that the velocity of ejection for two different genome lengths collapses onto a single curve. This suggests that in vivo ejections are controlled by the amount of DNA ejected, in contrast with in vitro DNA ejections, which are governed...

  12. Trapping molecules on chips

    CERN Document Server

    Santambrogio, Gabriele

    2015-01-01

    In the last years, it was demonstrated that neutral molecules can be loaded on a microchip directly from a supersonic beam. The molecules are confined in microscopic traps that can be moved smoothly over the surface of the chip. Once the molecules are trapped, they can be decelerated to a standstill, for instance, or pumped into selected quantum states by laser light or microwaves. Molecules are detected on the chip by time-resolved spatial imaging, which allows for the study of the distribution in the phase space of the molecular ensemble.

  13. [Endothelial cell adhesion molecules].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, A N; Norkin, I A; Puchin'ian, D M; Shirokov, V Iu; Zhdanova, O Iu

    2014-01-01

    The review presents current data concerning the functional role of endothelial cell adhesion molecules belonging to different structural families: integrins, selectins, cadherins, and the immunoglobulin super-family. In this manuscript the regulatory mechanisms and factors of adhesion molecules expression and distribution on the surface of endothelial cells are discussed. The data presented reveal the importance of adhesion molecules in the regulation of structural and functional state of endothelial cells in normal conditions and in pathology. Particular attention is paid to the importance of these molecules in the processes of physiological and pathological angiogenesis, regulation of permeability of the endothelial barrier and cell transmigration.

  14. Earliest Holozoan Expansion of Phosphotyrosine Signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suga, Hiroshi; Torruella, Guifré; Burger, Gertraud; Brown, Matthew W.; Ruiz-Trillo, Iñaki

    2015-01-01

    Phosphotyrosine (pTyr) signaling is involved in development and maintenance of metazoans’ multicellular body through cell-to-cell communication. Tyrosine kinases (TKs), tyrosine phosphatases, and other proteins relaying the signal compose the cascade. Domain architectures of the pTyr signaling proteins are diverse in metazoans, reflecting their complex intercellular communication. Previous studies had shown that the metazoan-type TKs, as well as other pTyr signaling proteins, were already diversified in the common ancestor of metazoans, choanoflagellates, and filastereans (which are together included in the clade Holozoa) whereas they are absent in fungi and other nonholozoan lineages. However, the earliest-branching holozoans Ichthyosporea and Corallochytrea, as well as the two fungi-related amoebae Fonticula and Nuclearia, have not been studied. Here, we analyze the complete genome sequences of two ichthyosporeans and Fonticula, and RNAseq data of three additional ichthyosporeans, one corallochytrean, and Nuclearia. Both the ichthyosporean and corallochytrean genomes encode a large variety of receptor TKs (RTKs) and cytoplasmic TKs (CTKs), as well as other pTyr signaling components showing highly complex domain architectures. However, Nuclearia and Fonticula have no TK, and show much less diversity in other pTyr signaling components. The CTK repertoires of both Ichthyosporea and Corallochytrea are similar to those of Metazoa, Choanoflagellida, and Filasterea, but the RTK sets are totally different from each other. The complex pTyr signaling equipped with positive/negative feedback mechanism likely emerged already at an early stage of holozoan evolution, yet keeping a high evolutionary plasticity in extracellular signal reception until the co-option of the system for cell-to-cell communication in metazoans. PMID:24307687

  15. Identification of a novel immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif-containing molecule, STAM2, by mass spectrometry and its involvement in growth factor and cytokine receptor signaling pathways

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pandey, A; Fernandez, M M; Steen, H;

    2000-01-01

    In an effort to clone novel tyrosine-phosphorylated substrates of the epidermal growth factor receptor, we have initiated an approach coupling affinity purification using anti-phosphotyrosine antibodies to mass spectrometry-based identification. Here, we report the identification of a signaling m...

  16. Regulation on expression of toll-like receptors on monocytes after stimulation with the 3-o-C12-HSL molecule from Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Qi; Lin, Yujia; Yang, Xiqiang; Liu, Wei; Zhang, Xianhong; Huang, Daochao; Zhong, Haiying

    2012-10-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) is a type of cell-to-cell communication. The Pseudomonas aeruginosa QS molecule N-3-(oxododecanoyl)-L-homoserine lactone (3-o-C12-HSL) has the potential to modulate the immune system of its host. However, the mechanism of that activity is yet to be fully characterized. To be able to understand this activity, we determined whether 3-o-C12-HSL has a direct effect on the immune function and the expression of toll-like receptors (TLRs) in monocytes. Monocytes were cultured with 3-o-C12-HSL at different concentrations (0, 10, 25, 50, and 100 μmol/L) for 12 h; upon exposure to 3-o-C12-HSL, IL-12 production in monocytes was inhibited, monocyte proliferation was blocked, TLR2- and 4-mRNA expressions were reduced, and TLR5-mRNA expression was increased in a dose-dependent manner. Strikingly, 3-o-C12-HSL was able to significantly induce mRNA changes in the monocytes even at the lowest concentration (10 μmol/L, P < 0.05). Interestingly, though TLR2- and 4-protein levels were reduced, TLR5 protein expression was not changed. These findings provide a new perspective toward understanding the persistence of chronic inflammation in P. aeruginosa infections. They also suggest that TLR2, 4, and 5 may not share the same signaling pathways during monocyte activation.

  17. ISOLATED MOLECULES IN METALS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    1992-01-01

    In this paper, some results obtained on the formation of isolated molecules of composition SnOx in silver and SnFx in copper-are reviewed. Hyperfine interaction and ion beam interaction techniques were used for the identification of these molecules.

  18. Algebraic theory of molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Iachello, F

    1995-01-01

    1. The Wave Mechanics of Diatomic Molecules. 2. Summary of Elements of Algebraic Theory. 3. Mechanics of Molecules. 4. Three-Body Algebraic Theory. 5. Four-Body Algebraic Theory. 6. Classical Limit and Coordinate Representation. 8. Prologue to the Future. Appendices. Properties of Lie Algebras; Coupling of Algebras; Hamiltonian Parameters

  19. Molecules in galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Omont, Alain

    2007-01-01

    The main achievements, current developments and prospects of molecular studies in external galaxies are reviewed. They are put in the context of the results of several decades of studies of molecules in local interstellar medium, their chemistry and their importance for star formation. CO observations have revealed the gross structure of molecular gas in galaxies. Together with other molecules, they are among the best tracers of star formation at galactic scales. Our knowledge about molecular abundances in various local galactic environments is progressing. They trace physical conditions and metallicity, and they are closely related to dust processes and large aromatic molecules. Major recent developments include mega-masers, and molecules in Active Galactic Nuclei; millimetre emission of molecules at very high redshift; and infrared H2 emission as tracer of warm molecular gas, shocks and photodissociation regions. The advent of sensitive giant interferometers from the centimetre to sub-millimetre range, espe...

  20. The Src kinase Yes is activated in pancreatic acinar cells by gastrointestinal hormones/neurotransmitters, but not pancreatic growth factors, which stimulate its association with numerous other signaling molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sancho, Veronica; Nuche-Berenguer, Bernardo; Jensen, R T

    2012-08-01

    For growth factors, cytokines, G-protein-coupled receptors and numerous other stimuli, the Src Family of kinases (SFK) play a central signaling role. SFKs also play an important role in pancreatic acinar cell function including metabolism, secretion, endocytosis, growth and cytoskeletal integrity, although the specific SFKs involved are not fully known. In the present study we used specific antibodies for the SFK, Yes, to determine its presence, activation by pancreatic secretagogues or growth factors, and interaction with cellular signaling cascades mediated by CCK in which Yes participates in to cause acinar cell responses. Yes was identified in acini and secretagogues known to activate phospholipase C (PLC) [CCK, carbachol, bombesin] as well as post-receptor stimulants activating PKC [TPA] or mobilizing cellular calcium [thapsigargin/calcium ionophore (A23187)] each activated Yes. Secretin, which activates adenylate cyclase did not stimulate Yes, nor did pancreatic growth factors. CCK activation of Yes required both high- and low-affinity CCK(1)-receptor states. TPA-/CCK-stimulated Yes activation was completely inhibited by thapsigargin and the PKC inhibitor, GF109203X. CCK/TPA stimulated the association of Yes with focal adhesion kinases (Pyk2, FAK) and its autophosphorylated forms (pY397FAK, pY402Pyk2). Moreover, CCK/TPA stimulated Yes interacted with a number of other signaling proteins, including Shc, PKD, p130(Cas), PI3K and PTEN. This study demonstrates that in rat pancreatic acini, the SFK member Yes is expressed and activated by CCK and other gastrointestinal hormones/neurotransmitters. Because its activation results in the direct activation of many cellular signaling cascades that have been shown to mediate CCK's effect in acinar cell function our results suggest that it is one of the important pancreatic SFKs mediating these effects.

  1. Single-Cell and Single-Molecule Analysis of Gene Expression Regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vera, Maria; Biswas, Jeetayu; Senecal, Adrien

    2016-01-01

    Recent advancements in single-cell and single-molecule imaging technologies have resolved biological processes in time and space that are fundamental to understanding the regulation of gene expression. Observations of single-molecule events in their cellular context have revealed highly dynamic aspects of transcriptional and post-transcriptional control in eukaryotic cells. This approach can relate transcription with mRNA abundance and lifetimes. Another key aspect of single-cell analysis is the cell-to-cell variability among populations of cells. Definition of heterogeneity has revealed stochastic processes, determined characteristics of under-represented cell types or transitional states, and integrated cellular behaviors in the context of multicellular organisms. In this review, we discuss novel aspects of gene expression of eukaryotic cells and multicellular organisms revealed by the latest advances in single-cell and single-molecule imaging technology. PMID:27893965

  2. Ascaroside signaling in C. elegans*

    OpenAIRE

    Ludewig, Andreas H; Schroeder, Frank C.

    2013-01-01

    Over the past 10 years, the relevance of small-molecule signaling for many aspects of C. elegans development and behavior has become apparent. One prominent group of small-molecule signals are the ascarosides, which control dauer entry and exit as well as a variety of sex-specific and social behaviors, including male attraction, hermaphrodite repulsion, olfactory plasticity, and aggregation. This wide range of biological functions is facilitated by a great diversity of ascaroside chemical str...

  3. Single-Molecule Studies in Live Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Ji

    2016-05-01

    Live-cell single-molecule experiments are now widely used to study complex biological processes such as signal transduction, self-assembly, active trafficking, and gene regulation. These experiments' increased popularity results in part from rapid methodological developments that have significantly lowered the technical barriers to performing them. Another important advance is the development of novel statistical algorithms, which, by modeling the stochastic behaviors of single molecules, can be used to extract systemic parameters describing the in vivo biochemistry or super-resolution localization of biological molecules within their physiological environment. This review discusses recent advances in experimental and computational strategies for live-cell single-molecule studies, as well as a selected subset of biological studies that have utilized these new technologies.

  4. Dynamics of Activated Molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mullin, Amy S. [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States)

    2016-11-16

    Experimental studies have been performed to investigate the collisional energy transfer processes of gas-phase molecules that contain large amounts of internal energy. Such molecules are prototypes for molecules under high temperature conditions relevant in combustion and information about their energy transfer mechanisms is needed for a detailed understanding and modeling of the chemistry. We use high resolution transient IR absorption spectroscopy to measure the full, nascent product distributions for collisions of small bath molecules that relax highly vibrationally excited pyrazine molecules with E=38000 cm-1 of vibrational energy. To perform these studies, we developed new instrumentation based on modern IR light sources to expand our experimental capabilities to investigate new molecules as collision partners. This final report describes our research in four areas: the characterization of a new transient absorption spectrometer and the results of state-resolved collision studies of pyrazine(E) with HCl, methane and ammonia. Through this research we have gained fundamental new insights into the microscopic details of relatively large complex molecules at high energy as they undergo quenching collisions and redistribute their energy.

  5. Search for complex organic molecules in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohishi, Masatoshi

    2016-07-01

    It was 1969 when the first organic molecule in space, H2CO, was discovered. Since then many organic molecules were discovered by using the NRAO 11 m (upgraded later to 12 m), Nobeyama 45 m, IRAM 30 m, and other highly sensitive radio telescopes as a result of close collaboration between radio astronomers and microwave spectroscopists. It is noteworthy that many famous organic molecules such as CH3OH, C2H5OH, (CH3)2O and CH3NH2 were detected by 1975. Organic molecules were found in so-called hot cores where molecules were thought to form on cold dust surfaces and then to evaporate by the UV photons emitted from the central star. These days organic molecules are known to exist not only in hot cores but in hot corinos (a warm, compact molecular clump found in the inner envelope of a class 0 protostar) and even protoplanetary disks. As was described above, major organic molecules were known since 1970s. It was very natural that astronomers considered a relationship between organic molecules in space and the origin of life. Several astronomers challenged to detect glycine and other prebiotic molecules without success. ALMA is expected to detect such important materials to further consider the gexogenous deliveryh hypothesis. In this paper I summarize the history in searching for complex organic molecules together with difficulties in observing very weak signals from larger species. The awfully long list of references at the end of this article may be the most useful part for readers who want to feel the exciting discovery stories.

  6. Cell-to-cell contact and antimicrobial peptides play a combined role in the death of Lachanchea thermotolerans during mixed-culture alcoholic fermentation with Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kemsawasd, Varongsiri; Branco, Patrícia; Almeida, Maria Gabriela

    2015-01-01

    The roles of cell-to-cell contact and antimicrobial peptides in the early death of Lachanchea thermotolerans CBS2803 during anaerobic, mixed-culture fermentations with Saccharomyces cerevisiae S101 were investigated using a commercially available, double-compartment fermentation system separated...... by cellulose membranes with different pore sizes, i.e. 1000 kDa for mixed- and single-culture fermentations, and 1000 and 3.5-5 kDa for compartmentalized-culture fermentations. SDS-PAGE and gel filtration chromatography were used to determine an antimicrobial peptidic fraction in the fermentations. Our results......-culture fermentation than in the mixed-culture fermentation. Furthermore, L. thermotolerans died off even more slowly in the 3.5-5 kDa than in the 1000 kDa compartmentalized-culture fermentation, which coincided with the presence of less of the antimicrobial peptidic fraction in the inner compartment...

  7. Expressions of effective molecules transcriptional coactivator with plasma dissociated zircon-binding motif of Hippo signaling pathway in human osteosarcomas and osteosarcoma stem cells%Hippo信号通路作用分子TAZ在人骨肉瘤及骨肉瘤干细胞中的表达

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱忠胜; 张春林; 汪泱

    2014-01-01

    目的:检测在人骨肉瘤组织、骨肉瘤MG63细胞及其干细胞中Hippo信号分子TAZ的表达情况,比较骨肉瘤细胞和骨肉瘤干细胞中 TAZ 的表达差异,并探讨其可能的临床意义。方法2010年1月至2012年1月在我院治疗的骨肉瘤患者中,选取原发骨肉瘤组织标本12例,复发的骨肉瘤标本6例,另选6例骨纤维结构不良组织作阴性对照,并贴壁培养骨肉瘤MG63细胞,采用免疫组化方法检测骨肉瘤组织和骨肉瘤MG63细胞中 TAZ 的表达情况;用无血清悬浮培养骨肉瘤 MG63细胞,分离并收集骨肉瘤细胞球,通过定量反转录-聚合酶链反应( RT-PCR )法检测骨肉瘤MG63细胞及骨肉瘤细胞球中胚胎干细胞标志基因( Nanog, Oct4)和 Hippo 信号分子 TAZ 的表达,Western 印记法检测 MG63细胞和细胞球中 TAZ 蛋白的表达情况。结果在12例人骨肉瘤原发组织标本中,3例骨肉瘤组织TAZ表达阳性,而6例骨肉瘤复发组织中TAZ表达全部阳性,在骨肉瘤细胞MG63中TAZ分子表达也呈阳性,而骨纤维结果不良中全部表达阴性。与骨肉瘤MG63细胞相比,RT-PCR显示培养的骨肉瘤细胞球中干细胞标志基因Nanog,Oct4和Hippo信号分子TAZ明显高表达。Western blot 提示细胞球中 TAZ 蛋白表达明显高于骨肉瘤 MG63细胞。结论骨肉瘤组织中存在TAZ分子的表达,在复发骨肉瘤组织中呈高表达;在骨肉瘤细胞株中也存在TAZ分子的表达,而在干细胞中TAZ分子表达更高;提示其与骨肉瘤干细胞的特征具有一定的相关性。%Objective To detect the expressions of transcriptional coactivator with plasma dissociated zircon ( PDZ )-binding motif ( TAZ ) molecules of Hippo signaling pathway in human osteosarcoma tissues, osteosarcoma MG63 cells and stem cells, to compare the expression differences of TAZ molecules in osteosarcoma cells and osteosarcoma stem cells, and to investigate possible clinical

  8. Electron correlation in molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Wilson, S

    2007-01-01

    Electron correlation effects are of vital significance to the calculation of potential energy curves and surfaces, the study of molecular excitation processes, and in the theory of electron-molecule scattering. This text describes methods for addressing one of theoretical chemistry's central problems, the study of electron correlation effects in molecules.Although the energy associated with electron correlation is a small fraction of the total energy of an atom or molecule, it is of the same order of magnitude as most energies of chemical interest. If the solution of quantum mechanical equatio

  9. Heavy Exotic Molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Yizhuang

    2016-01-01

    We briefly review the formation of pion-mediated heavy-light exotic molecules with both charm and bottom, under the general strictures of chiral and heavy quark symmetries. The charm isosinglet exotic molecules with $J^{PC}=1^{++}$ binds, which we identify as the reported neutral $X(3872)$. The bottom isotriplet exotic with $J^{PC}=1^{+-}$ binds, and is identified as a mixed state of the reported charged exotics $Z^+_b(10610)$ and $Z^+_b(10650)$. The bound bottom isosinglet molecule with $J^{PC}=1^{++}$ is a possible neutral $X_b(10532)$ to be observed.

  10. Identification of poultry meat-derived fatty acids functioning as quorum sensing signal inhibitors of autoinducer-2 (AI-2)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Autoinducer-2 (AI-2) is a compound that plays a key role in bacterial cell-to-cell communication (quorum sensing). Previous research has shown certain food matrices inhibit this signaling compound. Using the reporter strain, Vibrio harveyi BB170, quorum sensing inhibitors contained in poultry meat...

  11. Inhibition of signaling between human CXCR4 and zebrafish ligands by the small molecule IT1t impairs the formation of triple-negative breast cancer early metastases in a zebrafish xenograft model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Tulotta

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC is a highly aggressive and recurrent type of breast carcinoma that is associated with poor patient prognosis. Because of the limited efficacy of current treatments, new therapeutic strategies need to be developed. The CXCR4-CXCL12 chemokine signaling axis guides cell migration in physiological and pathological processes, including breast cancer metastasis. Although targeted therapies to inhibit the CXCR4-CXCL12 axis are under clinical experimentation, still no effective therapeutic approaches have been established to block CXCR4 in TNBC. To unravel the role of the CXCR4-CXCL12 axis in the formation of TNBC early metastases, we used the zebrafish xenograft model. Importantly, we demonstrate that cross-communication between the zebrafish and human ligands and receptors takes place and human tumor cells expressing CXCR4 initiate early metastatic events by sensing zebrafish cognate ligands at the metastatic site. Taking advantage of the conserved intercommunication between human tumor cells and the zebrafish host, we blocked TNBC early metastatic events by chemical and genetic inhibition of CXCR4 signaling. We used IT1t, a potent CXCR4 antagonist, and show for the first time its promising anti-tumor effects. In conclusion, we confirm the validity of the zebrafish as a xenotransplantation model and propose a pharmacological approach to target CXCR4 in TNBC.

  12. Electron-molecule collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Takayanagi, Kazuo

    1984-01-01

    Scattering phenomena play an important role in modern physics. Many significant discoveries have been made through collision experiments. Amongst diverse kinds of collision systems, this book sheds light on the collision of an electron with a molecule. The electron-molecule collision provides a basic scattering problem. It is scattering by a nonspherical, multicentered composite particle with its centers having degrees of freedom of motion. The molecule can even disintegrate, Le., dissociate or ionize into fragments, some or all of which may also be molecules. Although it is a difficult problem, the recent theoretical, experimental, and computational progress has been so significant as to warrant publication of a book that specializes in this field. The progress owes partly to technical develop­ ments in measurements and computations. No less important has been the great and continuing stimulus from such fields of application as astrophysics, the physics of the earth's upper atmosphere, laser physics, radiat...

  13. Single molecules and nanotechnology

    CERN Document Server

    Vogel, Horst

    2007-01-01

    This book focuses on recent advances in the rapidly evolving field of single molecule research. These advances are of importance for the investigation of biopolymers and cellular biochemical reactions, and are essential to the development of quantitative biology. Written by leading experts in the field, the articles cover a broad range of topics, including: quantum photonics of organic dyes and inorganic nanoparticles their use in detecting properties of single molecules the monitoring of single molecule (enzymatic) reactions single protein (un)folding in nanometer-sized confined volumes the dynamics of molecular interactions in biological cells The book is written for advanced students and scientists who wish to survey the concepts, techniques and results of single molecule research and assess them for their own scientific activities.

  14. Purinergic signalling and diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burnstock, Geoffrey; Novak, Ivana

    2013-01-01

    The pancreas is an organ with a central role in nutrient breakdown, nutrient sensing and release of hormones regulating whole body nutrient homeostasis. In diabetes mellitus, the balance is broken-cells can be starving in the midst of plenty. There are indications that the incidence of diabetes...... type 1 and 2, and possibly pancreatogenic diabetes, is rising globally. Events leading to insulin secretion and action are complex, but there is emerging evidence that intracellular nucleotides and nucleotides are not only important as intracellular energy molecules but also as extracellular signalling...... molecules in purinergic signalling cascades. This signalling takes place at the level of the pancreas, where the close apposition of various cells-endocrine, exocrine, stromal and immune cells-contributes to the integrated function. Following an introduction to diabetes, the pancreas and purinergic...

  15. Soluble adhesion molecules in human cancers: sources and fates.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kilsdonk, J.W.J. van; Kempen, L.C.L.T. van; Muijen, G.N.P. van; Ruiter, D.J.; Swart, G.W.

    2010-01-01

    Adhesion molecules endow tumor cells with the necessary cell-cell contacts and cell-matrix interactions. As such, adhesion molecules are involved in cell signalling, proliferation and tumor growth. Rearrangements in the adhesion repertoire allow tumor cells to migrate, invade and form metastases. Be

  16. The role of Notch signaling in kidney podocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asanuma, Katsuhiko; Oliva Trejo, Juan Alejandro; Tanaka, Eriko

    2017-02-01

    The Notch signaling pathway is a basic cell-to-cell communication mechanism. This pathway is activated by the interaction between Notch receptors and the ligands of adjacent cells. Once activated, Notch receptors are cleaved and the intracellular domains translocate into the nucleus, where the transcription of target genes starts. In the mammalian kidney, Notch receptors are activated during nephrogenesis. Afterwards, in the mature glomeruli, the Notch pathway becomes silent. However, many researchers have reported the activation of Notch receptors in mature podocytes under pathological conditions. In this review, we discuss the role of Notch signaling in podocytes.

  17. 烧伤皮肤再生医疗对糖尿病足 ERK1/2和 p38信号通路分子的调控%Regulation of Burn Skin Regeneration on ERK1/2 and p38 Signaling Pathway Molecules in Diabetic Foot

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴标良; 唐乾利; 覃晓洁; 冯烈; 王民登; 何明杰; 吕震

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the regulation of moist exposed burn therapy/ moist exposed burn ointment (MEBT/ MEBO)on the expression of ERK1 / 2 and p38 signaling pathway molecules in diabetic foot and to study the repair mechanism of MEBT/ MEBO therapy on diabetic foot ulcer. Methods We enrolled 40 patients who were definitely diagnosed with T2DM and diabetic foot in the Endocrinology Department of the Affiliated Hospital of Youjiang Medical University for Nationalities and the First Affiliated Hospital of Guangxi University of Chinese Medicine from January 2013 to June 2014. The patients were all administrated with wound surface treatment by MEBT/ MEBO operating process and were administrated with MEBO treatment. The muscle granulation tissue was taken before and after treatment,immuno - histochemistry was undertaken to measure the expression of key molecules of ERK1 / 2 and p38 signaling pathways,including ERK1 / 2,p38,MAPKK6,c -myc,Akt and ATF2. Results After MEBT/ MEBO treatment,14(35. 0% ) patients saw obvious efficacy,25(62. 5% ) saw efficacy,and 1(2. 5% )saw no efficacy,with a total effective rate of 97. 5% (39 / 40). The positive expression rates of signaling molecules( any signaling molecule) after treatment were significantly different from those before treatment( P ﹤0. 001);the positive expression rates of signaling molecules,such as ERK1 / 2,p38,MAPKK6 and its substrate c - myc,Akt and ATF2 after treatment were significantly different from those before treatment( P ﹤ 0. 001). The immuno - histochemical pathology results showed that the signaling molecules had diffusive distribution on wound surface before treatment,and the distribution area became more extensive after treatment. Conclusion MEBT/ MEBO can promote the healing of diabetic foot ulcer,the mechanism may be that it is involved in the regulation of ERK1 / 2 and p38 signaling pathways.%目的:观察烧伤皮肤再生医疗技术〔湿润暴露疗法(MEBT

  18. Quorum Quenching Revisited—From Signal Decays to Signalling Confusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kok-Gan Chan

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available In a polymicrobial community, while some bacteria are communicating with neighboring cells (quorum sensing, others are interrupting the communication (quorum quenching, thus creating a constant arms race between intercellular communication. In the past decade, numerous quorum quenching enzymes have been found and initially thought to inactivate the signalling molecules. Though this is widely accepted, the actual roles of these quorum quenching enzymes are now being uncovered. Recent evidence extends the role of quorum quenching to detoxification or metabolism of signalling molecules as food and energy source; this includes “signalling confusion”, a term coined in this paper to refer to the phenomenon of non-destructive modification of signalling molecules. While quorum quenching has been explored as a novel anti-infective therapy targeting, quorum sensing evidence begins to show the development of resistance against quorum quenching.

  19. Kaempferol induces autophagy through AMPK and AKT signaling molecules and causes G2/M arrest via downregulation of CDK1/cyclin B in SK-HEP-1 human hepatic cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wen-Wen; Tsai, Shih-Chang; Peng, Shu-Fen; Lin, Meng-Wei; Chiang, Jo-Hua; Chiu, Yu-Jen; Fushiya, Shinji; Tseng, Michael T; Yang, Jai-Sing

    2013-06-01

    Kaempferol belongs to the flavonoid family and has been used in traditional folk medicine. Here, we investigated the antitumor effects of kaempferol on cell cycle arrest and autophagic cell death in SK-HEP-1 human hepatic cancer cells. Kaempferol decreased cell viability as determined by MTT assays and induced a G2/M phase cell cycle arrest in a concentration-dependent manner. Kaempferol did not induce DNA fragmentation, apoptotic bodies or caspase-3 activity in SK-HEP-1 cells as determined by DNA gel electrophoresis, DAPI staining and caspase-3 activity assays, respectively. In contrast, kaempferol is involved in the autophagic process. Double-membrane vacuoles, lysosomal compartments, acidic vesicular organelles and cleavage of microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (LC3) were observed by transmission electron microscopy, LysoΤracker red staining, GFP-fluorescent LC3 assays and acridine orange staining, respectively. In SK-HEP-1 cells, kaempferol increased the protein levels of p-AMPK, LC3-II, Atg 5, Atg 7, Atg 12 and beclin 1 as well as inhibited the protein levels of CDK1, cyclin B, p-AKT and p-mTOR. Taken together, CDK1/cyclin B expression and the AMPK and AKT signaling pathways contributed to kaempferol-induced G2/M cell cycle arrest and autophagic cell death in SK-HEP-1 human hepatic cancer cells. These results suggest that kaempferol may be useful for long-term cancer prevention.

  20. The IRS-1 signaling system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, M F

    1994-02-01

    IRS-1 is a principal substrate of the insulin receptor tyrosine kinase. It undergoes multi-site tyrosine phosphorylation and mediates the insulin signal by associating with various signaling molecules containing Src homology 2 domains. Interleukin-4 also stimulates IRS-1 phosphorylation, and it is suspected that a few more growth factors or cytokines will be added to form a select group of receptors that utilize the IRS-1 signaling pathway. More IRS-1-like adapter molecules, such as 4PS (IRS-2), may remain to be found.

  1. Molecules in supernova ejecta

    CERN Document Server

    Cherchneff, Isabelle

    2011-01-01

    The first molecules detected at infrared wavelengths in the ejecta of a Type II supernova, namely SN1987A, consisted of CO and SiO. Since then, confirmation of the formation of these two species in several other supernovae a few hundred days after explosion has been obtained. However, supernova environments appear to hamper the synthesis of large, complex species due to the lack of microscopically-mixed hydrogen deep in supernova cores. Because these environments also form carbon and silicate dust, it is of importance to understand the role played by molecules in the depletion of elements and how chemical species get incorporated into dust grains. In the present paper, we review our current knowledge of the molecular component of supernova ejecta, and present new trends and results on the synthesis of molecules in these harsh, explosive events.

  2. MOLECULES IN {eta} CARINAE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loinard, Laurent; Menten, Karl M.; Guesten, Rolf [Max-Planck Institut fuer Radioastronomie, Auf dem Huegel 69, 53121 Bonn (Germany); Zapata, Luis A.; Rodriguez, Luis F. [Centro de Radioastronomia y Astrofisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Apartado Postal 3-72, 58090 Morelia, Michoacan (Mexico)

    2012-04-10

    We report the detection toward {eta} Carinae of six new molecules, CO, CN, HCO{sup +}, HCN, HNC, and N{sub 2}H{sup +}, and of two of their less abundant isotopic counterparts, {sup 13}CO and H{sup 13}CN. The line profiles are moderately broad ({approx}100 km s{sup -1}), indicating that the emission originates in the dense, possibly clumpy, central arcsecond of the Homunculus Nebula. Contrary to previous claims, CO and HCO{sup +} do not appear to be underabundant in {eta} Carinae. On the other hand, molecules containing nitrogen or the {sup 13}C isotope of carbon are overabundant by about one order of magnitude. This demonstrates that, together with the dust responsible for the dimming of {eta} Carinae following the Great Eruption, the molecules detected here must have formed in situ out of CNO-processed stellar material.

  3. Molecules in \\eta\\ Carinae

    CERN Document Server

    Loinard, Laurent; Guesten, Rolf; Zapata, Luis A; Rodriguez, Luis F

    2012-01-01

    We report the detection toward \\eta\\ Carinae of six new molecules, CO, CN, HCO+, HCN, HNC, and N2H+, and of two of their less abundant isotopic counterparts, 13CO and H13CN. The line profiles are moderately broad (about 100 km /s) indicating that the emission originates in the dense, possibly clumpy, central arcsecond of the Homunculus Nebula. Contrary to previous claims, CO and HCO+ do not appear to be under-abundant in \\eta\\ Carinae. On the other hand, molecules containing nitrogen or the 13C isotope of carbon are overabundant by about one order of magnitude. This demonstrates that, together with the dust responsible for the dimming of eta Carinae following the Great Eruption, the molecules detected here must have formed in situ out of CNO-processed stellar material.

  4. Gated container molecules

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Fang; WANG Hao; HOUK K. N.

    2011-01-01

    Donald J.Cram,the great UCLA chemist,received the Nobel Prize for his discoveries about host-guest complexes [1].Both theoretical and experimental studies have been conducted about the nature and strength of interactions between the host and guest molecules.The concepts of constrictive binding (the activation energy of the binding process) and intrinsic binding (the free energy difference between the complex and the free host and guest molecules) were introduced to characterize different binding properties (Figure 1)[2].

  5. Enzyme molecules as nanomotors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengupta, Samudra; Dey, Krishna K; Muddana, Hari S; Tabouillot, Tristan; Ibele, Michael E; Butler, Peter J; Sen, Ayusman

    2013-01-30

    Using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, we show that the diffusive movements of catalase enzyme molecules increase in the presence of the substrate, hydrogen peroxide, in a concentration-dependent manner. Employing a microfluidic device to generate a substrate concentration gradient, we show that both catalase and urease enzyme molecules spread toward areas of higher substrate concentration, a form of chemotaxis at the molecular scale. Using glucose oxidase and glucose to generate a hydrogen peroxide gradient, we induce the migration of catalase toward glucose oxidase, thereby showing that chemically interconnected enzymes can be drawn together.

  6. PDCD10,一个新的多功能信号转导调节分子%PDCD10, a Novel Signal Transduction Regulating Molecule with Multiple Functions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄东宁; 赵红珊

    2013-01-01

    人程序性细胞死亡分子10(Homo sapiens programmed cell death 10,PDCD10),最初被称为TFAR15 (TF-1 cell apoptosis related gene 15),是由撤除粒细胞-巨噬细胞集落刺激因子诱导凋亡的人红白血病细胞系TF-1中克隆得到的1个凋亡相关基因.后来发现它的突变可引起散发性或家族性颅内海绵状血管瘤(cerebral cavernous malformations,CCMs)的发生,为CCMs的第3个致病基因,所以又被叫做CCM3.近年来研究发现,PDCD10能够和GCKⅢ蛋白、γ-PCDH、CCM2、VEGFR2、ERM等众多蛋白相互作用,并能调控ERK-MAPK通路,增加MST4/VEGFR2的稳定性,增强相应的信号转导,促进细胞的增殖、分化和中枢神经系统的发育,与癌症的发生相关,还能调节细胞的凋亡.以上研究证明了PDCD10的多种生物学效应,并提示其在血管生成、氧化应激、肿瘤中发挥重要作用.%Homo sapiens programmed cell death 10 (PDCD10) , also termed as TF-1 cell apoptosis related gene 15 ( TFAR15 ) , was a apoptosis-related gene initially. It was originally identified in a premyeloid cell line TF-1 , which was induced by removing granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) . Since the mutation of PDCD10 can give rise to sporadic or familial cerebral cavernous malformations, PDCD10 could also be referred as CCM3 , the third disease gene of CCMs. It has been verified that PDCD10 can interact with a wide range of proteins including GCKⅢ, γ-PCDH , CCM2 , VEGFR2 and ERM. It can also stimulate the ERK-MAPK pathway by stabilizing MST4/ VEGFR2, and thus enhance the signal transduction, promote proliferation and differentiation of cells. Recent studies revealed multiple biological effects from PDCD10. The results suggest that PDCD10 play important roles in angiogenesis, oxidative stress and oncogenesis.

  7. Disentangling DNA molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vologodskii, Alexander

    2016-09-01

    The widespread circular form of DNA molecules inside cells creates very serious topological problems during replication. Due to the helical structure of the double helix the parental strands of circular DNA form a link of very high order, and yet they have to be unlinked before the cell division. DNA topoisomerases, the enzymes that catalyze passing of one DNA segment through another, solve this problem in principle. However, it is very difficult to remove all entanglements between the replicated DNA molecules due to huge length of DNA comparing to the cell size. One strategy that nature uses to overcome this problem is to create the topoisomerases that can dramatically reduce the fraction of linked circular DNA molecules relative to the corresponding fraction at thermodynamic equilibrium. This striking property of the enzymes means that the enzymes that interact with DNA only locally can access their topology, a global property of circular DNA molecules. This review considers the experimental studies of the phenomenon and analyzes the theoretical models that have been suggested in attempts to explain it. We describe here how various models of enzyme action can be investigated computationally. There is no doubt at the moment that we understand basic principles governing enzyme action. Still, there are essential quantitative discrepancies between the experimental data and the theoretical predictions. We consider how these discrepancies can be overcome.

  8. Properties of entanglement molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang Yanxia [Department of Physics, Hubei Normal University, Huangshi 435002 (China); Zhan Mingsheng [State Key Laboratory of Magnetic Resonance and Atomic and Molecular Physics, Wuhan Institute of Physics and Mathematics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan 430071 (China)

    2004-09-14

    We propose a scheme to prepare a certain kind of N-atom entangled state that allows us to construct some possible types of entanglement molecules via cavity QED. The entanglement properties of entanglement molecules vertical bar {psi}{sub N}){sub {alpha}} are studied with respect to bipartite entanglement that is robust against the disposal of particles and are compared with entanglement molecules {rho}{sub I} introduced in Dur (2001 Phys. Rev. A 63 020303). We also give the maximal amount of entanglement achievable for two particular situations in two possible configurations. Meanwhile, we investigate the entanglement properties of entanglement molecules vertical bar {psi}{sub N}){sub {alpha}} in terms of local measurement using the maximum connectedness and persistency and compare them with other kinds of N-atom entangled states such as |GHZ), vertical bar W{sub N}) and vertical bar {phi}{sub N}). We show that the maximal value N - 1 of the persistency of the state vertical bar {psi}{sub N}){sub {alpha}} corresponds to the case that all atoms are pairwise entangled. If any pair of atoms {rho}{sub ij} is disentangled, the entanglement of the state vertical bar {psi}{sub N}){sub {alpha}} is very easy to destroy by a single local measurement.

  9. Properties of entanglement molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yan-Xia; Zhan, Ming-Sheng

    2004-09-01

    We propose a scheme to prepare a certain kind of N-atom entangled state that allows us to construct some possible types of entanglement molecules via cavity QED. The entanglement properties of entanglement molecules |psgrNrangagr are studied with respect to bipartite entanglement that is robust against the disposal of particles and are compared with entanglement molecules rgrI introduced in Dur (2001 Phys. Rev. A 63 020303). We also give the maximal amount of entanglement achievable for two particular situations in two possible configurations. Meanwhile, we investigate the entanglement properties of entanglement molecules |psgrNrangagr in terms of local measurement using the maximum connectedness and persistency and compare them with other kinds of N-atom entangled states such as |GHZrang, |WNrang and |phgrNrang. We show that the maximal value N - 1 of the persistency of the state |psgrNrangagr corresponds to the case that all atoms are pairwise entangled. If any pair of atoms rgrij is disentangled, the entanglement of the state |psgrNrangagr is very easy to destroy by a single local measurement.

  10. Atoms, Molecules, and Compounds

    CERN Document Server

    Manning, Phillip

    2007-01-01

    Explores the atoms that govern chemical processes. This book shows how the interactions between simple substances such as salt and water are crucial to life on Earth and how those interactions are predestined by the atoms that make up the molecules.

  11. Disentangling DNA molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vologodskii, Alexander

    2016-09-01

    The widespread circular form of DNA molecules inside cells creates very serious topological problems during replication. Due to the helical structure of the double helix the parental strands of circular DNA form a link of very high order, and yet they have to be unlinked before the cell division. DNA topoisomerases, the enzymes that catalyze passing of one DNA segment through another, solve this problem in principle. However, it is very difficult to remove all entanglements between the replicated DNA molecules due to huge length of DNA comparing to the cell size. One strategy that nature uses to overcome this problem is to create the topoisomerases that can dramatically reduce the fraction of linked circular DNA molecules relative to the corresponding fraction at thermodynamic equilibrium. This striking property of the enzymes means that the enzymes that interact with DNA only locally can access their topology, a global property of circular DNA molecules. This review considers the experimental studies of the phenomenon and analyzes the theoretical models that have been suggested in attempts to explain it. We describe here how various models of enzyme action can be investigated computationally. There is no doubt at the moment that we understand basic principles governing enzyme action. Still, there are essential quantitative discrepancies between the experimental data and the theoretical predictions. We consider how these discrepancies can be overcome.

  12. Diversity in Biological Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newbury, H. John

    2010-01-01

    One of the striking characteristics of fundamental biological processes, such as genetic inheritance, development and primary metabolism, is the limited amount of variation in the molecules involved. Natural selective pressures act strongly on these core processes and individuals carrying mutations and producing slightly sub-optimal versions of…

  13. Synthesis beyond the molecule

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reinhoudt, D.N.; Crego-Calama, M.

    2002-01-01

    Weak, noncovalent interactions between molecules control many biological functions. In chemistry, noncovalent interactions are now exploited for the synthesis in solution of large supramolecular aggregates. The aim of these syntheses is not only the creation of a particular structure, but also the i

  14. Single Molecule Sensitive FRET in Attoliter Droplets

    CERN Document Server

    Milas, Peker; Gamari, Ben D; Goldner, Lori S

    2013-01-01

    Single molecular-pair fluorescence resonance energy transfer (spFRET) has become an cross-disciplinary tool for understanding molecular folding and interactions. While providing detailed information about the individual members of a molecular ensemble, this technique is always limited by fluorophore brightness and stability. In the case of diffusing molecules, the experiment is further limited by the number of photons that can be collected during the time it takes for a molecule to diffuse across the detection volume. To maximize the number of photons it is common to either increase the detection volume at the expense of increased background, or increase the diffusion time by adding glycerol or sucrose to increase viscosity. Here we demonstrate that FRET from attoliter volume (100 nm radius) aqueous droplets in perfluorinated oil has significantly higher signal-to-noise and a much wider dynamic range than FRET from molecules diffusing in solution. However, our measurements also reveal a droplet environment th...

  15. Signal Words

    Science.gov (United States)

    SIGNAL WORDS TOPIC FACT SHEET NPIC fact sheets are designed to answer questions that are commonly asked by the ... making decisions about pesticide use. What are Signal Words? Signal words are found on pesticide product labels, ...

  16. Chiral Molecules Revisited by Broadband Microwave Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnell, Melanie

    2014-06-01

    Chiral molecules have fascinated chemists for more than 150 years. While their physical properties are to a very good approximation identical, the two enantiomers of a chiral molecule can have completely different (bio)chemical activities. For example, the right-handed enantiomer of carvone smells of spearmint while the left-handed one smells of caraway. In addition, the active components of many drugs are of one specific handedness, such as in the case of ibuprofen. However, in nature as well as in pharmaceutical applications, chiral molecules often exist in mixtures with other chiral molecules. The analysis of these complex mixtures to identify the molecular components, to determine which enantiomers are present, and to measure the enantiomeric excesses (ee) remains a challenging task for analytical chemistry, despite its importance for modern drug development. We present here a new method of differentiating enantiomers of chiral molecules in the gas phase based on broadband rotational spectroscopy. The phase of the acquired signal bares the signature of the enantiomer, as it depends upon the combined quantity, μ_a μ_b μ_c, which is of opposite sign between enantiomers. It thus also provides information on the absolute configuration of the particular enantiomer. Furthermore, the signal amplitude is proportional to the ee. A significant advantage of our technique is its inherent mixture compatibility due to the fingerprint-like character of rotational spectra. In this contribution, we will introduce the technique and present our latest results on chiral molecule spectroscopy and enantiomer differentiation. D. Patterson, M. Schnell, J.M. Doyle, Nature 497 (2013) 475-477 V.A. Shubert, D. Schmitz, D. Patterson, J.M. Doyle, M. Schnell, Angewandte Chemie International Edition 53 (2014) 1152-1155

  17. Bacterial invasion reconstructed molecule by molecule

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Werner, James H [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    We propose to visualize the initial stages of bacterial infection of a human host cell with unmatched spatial and temporal resolution. This work will develop a new capability for the laboratory (super-resolution optical imaging), will test unresolved scientific hypotheses regarding host-pathogen interaction dynamics, and leverages state of the art 3D molecular tracking instrumentation developed recently by our group. There is much to be gained by applying new single molecule tools to the important and familiar problem of pathogen entry into a host cell. For example, conventional fluorescence microscopy has identified key host receptors, such as CD44 and {alpha}5{beta}1 integrin, that aggregate near the site of Salmonella typhimurium infection of human cells. However, due to the small size of the bacteria ({approx} 2 {micro}m) and the diffraction of the emitted light, one just sees a fluorescent 'blob' of host receptors that aggregate at the site of attachment, making it difficult to determine the exact number of receptors present or whether there is any particular spatial arrangement of the receptors that facilitates bacterial adhesion/entry. Using newly developed single molecule based super-resolution imaging methods, we will visualize how host receptors are directed to the site of pathogen adhesion and whether host receptors adopt a specific spatial arrangement for successful infection. Furthermore, we will employ our 3D molecular tracking methods to follow the injection of virulence proteins, or effectors, into the host cell by the pathogen Type III secretion system (TTSS). We expect these studies to provide mechanistic insights into the early events of pathogen infection that have here-to-fore been technically beyond our reach. Our Research Goals are: Goal 1--Construct a super-resolution fluorescence microscope and use this new capability to image the spatial distribution of different host receptors (e.g. CD44, as {alpha}5{beta}1 integrin) at the

  18. Molecules in Magnetic Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berdyugina, Svetlana

    2015-08-01

    Molecules probe cool matter in the Universe and various astrophysical objects. Their ability to sense magnetic fields provides new insights into magnetic properties of these objects. During the past fifteen years we have carried out a theoretical study of molecular magnetic effects such as the Zeeman, Paschen-Back and Hanle effects and their applications for inferring magnetic structures and spatial inhomogeneities on the Sun, cool stars, brown dwarfs, and exoplanets from molecular spectro-polarimetry (e.g., Berdyugina 2011). Here, we present an overview of this study and compare our theoretical predictions with recent laboratory measurements of magnetic properties of some molecules. We present also a new web-based tool to compute molecular magnetic effects and polarized spectra which is supported by the ERC Advanced Grant HotMol.

  19. Atoms, molecules & elements

    CERN Document Server

    Graybill, George

    2007-01-01

    Young scientists will be thrilled to explore the invisible world of atoms, molecules and elements. Our resource provides ready-to-use information and activities for remedial students using simplified language and vocabulary. Students will label each part of the atom, learn what compounds are, and explore the patterns in the periodic table of elements to find calcium (Ca), chlorine (Cl), and helium (He) through hands-on activities.

  20. Model molecules mimicking asphaltenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjöblom, Johan; Simon, Sébastien; Xu, Zhenghe

    2015-04-01

    Asphalthenes are typically defined as the fraction of petroleum insoluble in n-alkanes (typically heptane, but also hexane or pentane) but soluble in toluene. This fraction causes problems of emulsion formation and deposition/precipitation during crude oil production, processing and transport. From the definition it follows that asphaltenes are not a homogeneous fraction but is composed of molecules polydisperse in molecular weight, structure and functionalities. Their complexity makes the understanding of their properties difficult. Proper model molecules with well-defined structures which can resemble the properties of real asphaltenes can help to improve this understanding. Over the last ten years different research groups have proposed different asphaltene model molecules and studied them to determine how well they can mimic the properties of asphaltenes and determine the mechanisms behind the properties of asphaltenes. This article reviews the properties of the different classes of model compounds proposed and present their properties by comparison with fractionated asphaltenes. After presenting the interest of developing model asphaltenes, the composition and properties of asphaltenes are presented, followed by the presentation of approaches and accomplishments of different schools working on asphaltene model compounds. The presentation of bulk and interfacial properties of perylene-based model asphaltene compounds developed by Sjöblom et al. is the subject of the next part. Finally the emulsion-stabilization properties of fractionated asphaltenes and model asphaltene compounds is presented and discussed.

  1. Photonic Molecule Lasers Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagnon, Denis; Dumont, Joey; Déziel, Jean-Luc; Dubé, Louis J.

    2014-05-01

    Photonic molecules (PMs) formed by coupling two or more optical resonators are ideal candidates for the fabrication of integrated microlasers, photonic molecule lasers. Whereas most calculations on PM lasers have been based on cold-cavity (passive) modes, i.e. quasi-bound states, a recently formulated steady-state ab initio laser theory (SALT) offers the possibility to take into account the spectral properties of the underlying gain transition, its position and linewidth, as well as incorporating an arbitrary pump profile. We will combine two theoretical approaches to characterize the lasing properties of PM lasers: for two-dimensional systems, the generalized Lorenz-Mie theory will obtain the resonant modes of the coupled molecules in an active medium described by SALT. Not only is then the theoretical description more complete, the use of an active medium provides additional parameters to control, engineer and harness the lasing properties of PM lasers for ultra-low threshold and directional single-mode emission. We will extend our recent study and present new results for a number of promising geometries. The authors acknowledge financial support from NSERC (Canada) and the CERC in Photonic Innovations of Y. Messaddeq.

  2. Hydrogen molecules in semiconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, Joerg [Technische Universitaet Dresden, 01062 Dresden (Germany)], E-mail: joerg.weber@tu-dresden.de; Hiller, Martin; Lavrov, Edward V. [Technische Universitaet Dresden, 01062 Dresden (Germany)

    2007-12-15

    Molecular hydrogen, the simplest of all molecules, allows a direct insight into the fundamental properties of quantum mechanics. In the case of H{sub 2}, the Pauli principle leads to two different species, para-H{sub 2} and ortho-H{sub 2}. A conversion between these species is prohibited. Vibrational mode spectra reflect the fundamental properties and allow an unambiguous identification of the H{sub 2} molecules. Today, we have experimental evidence for the trapping of hydrogen molecules in the semiconductors Si, Ge and GaAs at the interstitial sites, within hydrogen-induced platelets, in voids and at impurities (interstitial oxygen in Si). Interstitial H{sub 2} is a nearly free rotor with a surprisingly simple behavior. We review on interstitial H{sub 2} in semiconductors and report on the unexpected preferential disappearance of the para-H{sub 2} or ortho-D{sub 2} species. The origin of the detected ortho-para conversion will be discussed.

  3. Methanol may function as a cross-kingdom signal.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuri L Dorokhov

    Full Text Available Recently, we demonstrated that leaf wounding results in the synthesis of pectin methylesterase (PME, which causes the plant to release methanol into the air. Methanol emitted by a wounded plant increases the accumulation of methanol-inducible gene mRNA and enhances antibacterial resistance as well as cell-to-cell communication, which facilitates virus spreading in neighboring plants. We concluded that methanol is a signaling molecule involved in within-plant and plant-to-plant communication. Methanol is considered to be a poison in humans because of the alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH-mediated conversion of methanol into toxic formaldehyde. However, recent data showed that methanol is a natural compound in normal, healthy humans. These data call into question whether human methanol is a metabolic waste product or whether methanol has specific function in humans. Here, to reveal human methanol-responsive genes (MRGs, we used suppression subtractive hybridization cDNA libraries of HeLa cells lacking ADH and exposed to methanol. This design allowed us to exclude genes involved in formaldehyde and formic acid detoxification from our analysis. We identified MRGs and revealed a correlation between increases in methanol content in the plasma and changes in human leukocyte MRG mRNA levels after fresh salad consumption by volunteers. Subsequently, we showed that the methanol generated by the pectin/PME complex in the gastrointestinal tract of mice induces the up- and downregulation of brain MRG mRNA. We used an adapted Y-maze to measure the locomotor behavior of the mice while breathing wounded plant vapors in two-choice assays. We showed that mice prefer the odor of methanol to other plant volatiles and that methanol changed MRG mRNA accumulation in the mouse brain.We hypothesize that the methanol emitted by wounded plants may have a role in plant-animal signaling. The known positive effect of plant food intake on human health suggests a role for

  4. Increased susceptibility of peripheral blood mononuclear cells to equine herpes virus type 1 infection upon mitogen stimulation: a role of the cell cycle and of cell-to-cell transmission of the virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Meulen, Karen M; Nauwynck, Hans J; Pensaert, Maurice B

    2002-04-22

    Equine herpesvirus-1 (EHV-1) is an important pathogen of horses, causing abortion and nervous system disorders, even in vaccinated animals. During the cell-associated viremia, EHV-1 is carried by peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), mainly lymphocytes. In vitro, monocytes are the most important fraction of PBMC in which EHV-1 replicates, however, mitogen stimulation prior to EHV-1 infection increases the percentage of infected lymphocytes. The role of the cell cycle in viral replication and the role of cluster formation in cell-to-cell transmission of the virus were examined in mitogen-stimulated PBMC. Involvement of the cell cycle was examined by stimulating PBMC with ionomycin/phorbol dibutyrate (IONO/PDB) during 0, 12, 24 and 36 h prior to inoculation. Cell cycle distribution at the moment of inoculation and the percentage of EHV-1 antigen-positive PBMC at 0, 12 and 24 hours post inoculation (hpi) were determined by flow cytometry and immunofluorescence microscopy, respectively. The role of clusters was examined by immunofluorescence staining within clusters of stimulated PBMC using antibodies against EHV-1. Significant correlations were found between the increase of cells in the S- or G2/M-phase after a certain time interval of prestimulation and the increase of EHV-1 antigen-positive cells. The percentage of clusters with adjacent infected cells significantly increased from 3.3% at 8 hpi to 23.7% at 24 hpi and the maximal number of adjacent infected cells increased from 2 to 7. Addition of anti-EHV-1 hyperimmune serum did not significantly alter these percentages. Mitogen stimulation favours EHV-1 infection in PBMC by: (i) initiating cell proliferation and (ii) inducing formation of clusters, thereby facilitating direct cell-associated transmission of virus.

  5. The equine herpesvirus 1 glycoprotein gp21/22a, the herpes simplex virus type 1 gM homolog, is involved in virus penetration and cell-to-cell spread of virions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osterrieder, N; Neubauer, A; Brandmuller, C; Braun, B; Kaaden, O R; Baines, J D

    1996-06-01

    Experiments to analyze the function of the equine herpesvirus 1 (EHV-1) glycoprotein gM homolog were conducted. To this end, an Rk13 cell line (TCgM) that stably expressed EHV-1 gM was constructed. Proteins with apparent M(r)s of 46,000 to 48,000 and 50,000 to 55,000 were detected in TCgM cells with specific anti-gM antibodies, and the gM protein pattern was indistinguishable from that in cells infected with EHV-1 strain RacL11. A viral mutant (L11deltagM) bearing an Escherichia coli lacZ gene inserted into the EHV-1 strain RacL11 gM gene (open reading frame 52) was purified, and cells infected with L11deltagM did not contain detectable gM. L11deltagM exhibited approximately 100-fold lower titers and a more than 2-fold reduction in plaque size relative to wild-type EHV-1 when grown and titrated on noncomplementing cells. Viral titers were reduced only 10-fold when L11deltagM was grown on the complementing cell line TCgM and titrated on noncomplementing cells. L11deltagM also exhibited slower penetration kinetics compared with those of the parental EHV-1 RacL11. It is concluded that EHV-1 gM plays important roles in the penetration of virus into the target cell and in spread of EHV-1 from cell to cell.

  6. Cell-Free versus Cell-to-Cell Infection by Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 and Human T-Lymphotropic Virus Type 1: Exploring the Link among Viral Source, Viral Trafficking, and Viral Replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutartre, Hélène; Clavière, Mathieu; Journo, Chloé; Mahieux, Renaud

    2016-09-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) are complex retroviruses mainly infecting CD4(+) T lymphocytes. In addition, antigen-presenting cells such as dendritic cells (DCs) are targeted in vivo by both viruses, although to a lesser extent. Interaction of HIV-1 with DCs plays a key role in viral dissemination from the mucosa to CD4(+) T lymphocytes present in lymphoid organs. While similar mechanisms may occur for HTLV-1 as well, most HTLV-1 data were obtained from T-cell studies, and little is known regarding the trafficking of this virus in DCs. We first compared the efficiency of cell-free versus cell-associated viral sources of both retroviruses at infecting DCs. We showed that both HIV-1 and HTLV-1 cell-free particles are poorly efficient at productively infecting DCs, except when DC-SIGN has been engaged. Furthermore, while SAMHD-1 accounts for restriction of cell-free HIV-1 infection, it is not involved in HTLV-1 restriction. In addition, cell-free viruses lead mainly to a nonproductive DC infection, leading to trans-infection of T-cells, a process important for HIV-1 spread but not for that of HTLV-1. Finally, we show that T-DC cell-to-cell transfer implies viral trafficking in vesicles that may both increase productive infection of DCs ("cis-infection") and allow viral escape from immune surveillance. Altogether, these observations allowed us to draw a model of HTLV-1 and HIV-1 trafficking in DCs.

  7. Research progress in mechanical wounding stimulation signal molecules transduction and defensive reaction for fresh-cut fruits and vegetables%鲜切果蔬机械伤害刺激信号分子转导及防御反应的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    闫媛媛; 胡文忠; 姜爱丽; 陈晨

    2015-01-01

    鲜切果蔬在加工过程中会使果蔬受到机械损伤,组织结构遭到破坏,极易发生褐变与受到微生物侵染,从而加速果蔬组织的衰老和腐败。机械伤害刺激信号分子的产生、运转、感知、接受和转导,以激活受伤害诱导的防卫基因表达,进而诱发鲜切果蔬整体协调产生防御反应。茉莉酸类、水杨酸、乙烯、脱落酸和系统素信号分子诱导果蔬防御反应可减轻机械损伤对鲜切果蔬品质的影响,能够有效抑制微生物对受伤部位的侵染以及果蔬组织内部的酶促褐变,改善果蔬贮藏品质。本文从机械伤害刺激信号分子茉莉酸类、水杨酸、乙烯、脱落酸和系统素的产生及转导方面综述了鲜切果蔬对机械伤害防御反应机制,并从伤害防御方面介绍了外源施用茉莉酸类、水杨酸和乙烯的作用机制与保鲜效果。%Fresh-cut fruit and vegetables during processing will be subjected to mechanical damage, in which the organization structure is destroyed, and it is easy to become browning and be infected by microbial, as well as the aging and corruption of the organization of fruits and vegetables are accelerated. Mechanical noxious stimulate the production, operation, perception, acceptance and transduction of signaling molecules, to activate the injury-induced defense gene expression, and then induced fresh-cut fruits and vegetables to produce the overall coordination of defense response. Jasmine acid, salicylic acid, ethylene, abscisic acid and system elements signaling molecules to induce defense reactions of fruits and vegetables can reduce the effect of mechanical damage on the quality of fresh-cut fruits and vegetables, and can effectively inhibit microbial infection of injured area and the organization enzymatic browning of fruit and vegetable,whichimprove storage quality of fruits and vegetables. This paper summarized the defensive responds of mechanical wounding and

  8. What a Dinner Party! Mechanisms and Functions of Interkingdom Signaling in Host-Pathogen Associations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa M. Kendall

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Chemical signaling between cells is an effective way to coordinate behavior within a community. Although cell-to-cell signaling has mostly been studied in single species, it is now appreciated that the sensing of chemical signals across kingdoms can be an important regulator of nutrient acquisition, virulence, and host defense. In this review, we focus on the role of interkingdom signaling in the interactions that occur between bacterial pathogens and their mammalian hosts. We discuss the quorum-sensing (QS systems and other mechanisms used by these bacteria to sense, respond to, and modulate host signals that include hormones, immune factors, and nutrients. We also describe cross talk between these signaling pathways and strategies used by the host to interfere with bacterial signaling, highlighting the complex bidirectional signaling networks that are established across kingdoms.

  9. Phloem-mobile signals affecting flowers: applications for crop breeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGarry, Roisin C; Kragler, Friedrich

    2013-04-01

    Transport of endogenous macromolecules within and between tissues serves as a signaling pathway to regulate numerous aspects of plant growth. The florigenic FT gene product moves via the phloem from leaves to apical tissues and induces the flowering program in meristems. Similarly, short interfering RNA (siRNA) signals produced in source or sink tissues move cell-to-cell and long distance via the phloem to apical tissues. Recent advances in identifying these mobile signals regulating flowering or the epigenetic status of targeted tissues can be applicable to crop-breeding programs. In this review, we address the identity of florigen, the mechanism of allocation, and how virus-induced flowering and grafting of transgenes producing siRNA signals affecting meiosis can produce transgene-free progenies useful for agriculture.

  10. Molecules in crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spackman, Mark A.

    2013-04-01

    Hirshfeld surface analysis has developed from the serendipitous discovery of a novel partitioning of the crystal electron density into discrete molecular fragments, to a suite of computational tools used widely for the identification, analysis and discussion of intermolecular interactions in molecular crystals. The relationship between the Hirshfeld surface and very early ideas on the internal structure of crystals is outlined, and applications of Hirshfeld surface analysis are presented for three molecules of historical importance in the development of modern x-ray crystallography: hexamethylbenzene, hexamethylenetetramine and diketopiperazine.

  11. Concentration dependent differential activity of signalling molecules in Caenorhabditis elegans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caenorhabditis elegans employs specific glycosides of the dideoxysugar ascarylose (the ‘ascarosides’) for monitoring population density/ dauer formation and finding mates. A synergistic blend of three ascarosides, called ascr#2, ascr#3 and ascr#4 acts as a dauer pheromone at a high concentration na...

  12. Development and validation of a UHPLC-MS/MS procedure for quantification of the Pseudomonas Quinolone Signal in bacterial culture after acetylation for characterization of new quorum sensing inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurer, Christine K; Steinbach, Anke; Hartmann, Rolf W

    2013-12-01

    The appearance of antibiotic resistance requires novel therapeutic strategies. One approach is to selectively attenuate bacterial pathogenicity by interfering with bacterial cell-to-cell communication known as quorum sensing. The PQS quorum sensing system of Pseudomonas aeruginosa employs as signal molecule the Pseudomonas Quinolone Signal (PQS; 2-heptyl-3-hydroxy-4-(1H)-quinolone), a key contributor to virulence and biofilm formation. Thus, interference with PQS production is considered as promising approach for the development of novel anti-infectives. Therefore, in this study, we developed and validated an ultra-high performance liquid chromatographic-tandem mass spectrometric approach for reliable quantification of PQS in P. aeruginosa cultures for activity determination of new quorum sensing inhibitors. The poor chromatographic properties of PQS reported by others could be overcome by fast microwave-assisted acetylation. The validation procedure including matrix effects, recovery, process efficiency, selectivity, carry-over, accuracy and precision, stability of the processed sample, and limit of quantification demonstrated that the method fulfilled all requirements of common validation guidelines. Its applicability was successfully proven in routine testing. In addition, two-point calibration was shown to be applicable for fast and reliable PQS quantification saving time and resources. In summary, the described method provides a powerful tool for the discovery of new quorum sensing inhibitors as potential anti-infectives and illustrated the usefulness of chemical derivatization, acetylation, in liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis.

  13. Contextual signaling in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smithson, Laura J; Anastasaki, Corina; Chen, Ran; Toonen, Joseph A; Williams, Sidney B; Gutmann, David H

    2016-10-01

    The formation and maintenance of an organism are highly dependent on the orderly control of cell growth, differentiation, death, and migration. These processes are tightly regulated by signaling cascades in which a limited number of molecules dictate these cellular events. While these signaling pathways are highly conserved across species and cell types, the functional outcomes that result from their engagement are specified by the context in which they are activated. Using the Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) cancer predisposition syndrome as an illustrative platform, we discuss how NF1/RAS signaling can create functional diversity at multiple levels (molecular, cellular, tissue, and genetic/genomic). As such, the ability of related molecules (e.g., K-RAS, H-RAS) to activate distinct effectors, as well as cell type- and tissue-specific differences in molecular composition and effector engagement, generate numerous unique functional effects. These variations, coupled with a multitude of extracellular cues and genomic/genetic changes that each modify the innate signaling properties of the cell, enable precise control of cellular physiology in both health and disease. Understanding these contextual influences is important when trying to dissect the underlying pathogenic mechanisms of cancer relevant to molecularly-targeted therapeutics.

  14. Single-molecule stochastic resonance

    CERN Document Server

    Hayashi, K; Manosas, M; Huguet, J M; Ritort, F; 10.1103/PhysRevX.2.031012

    2012-01-01

    Stochastic resonance (SR) is a well known phenomenon in dynamical systems. It consists of the amplification and optimization of the response of a system assisted by stochastic noise. Here we carry out the first experimental study of SR in single DNA hairpins which exhibit cooperatively folding/unfolding transitions under the action of an applied oscillating mechanical force with optical tweezers. By varying the frequency of the force oscillation, we investigated the folding/unfolding kinetics of DNA hairpins in a periodically driven bistable free-energy potential. We measured several SR quantifiers under varied conditions of the experimental setup such as trap stiffness and length of the molecular handles used for single-molecule manipulation. We find that the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the spectral density of measured fluctuations in molecular extension of the DNA hairpins is a good quantifier of the SR. The frequency dependence of the SNR exhibits a peak at a frequency value given by the resonance match...

  15. Molecules Best Paper Award 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPhee, Derek J

    2013-02-05

    Molecules has started to institute a "Best Paper" award to recognize the most outstanding papers in the area of natural products, medicinal chemistry and molecular diversity published in Molecules. We are pleased to announce the second "Molecules Best Paper Award" for 2013.

  16. Passing Current through Touching Molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schull, G.; Frederiksen, Thomas; Brandbyge, Mads

    2009-01-01

    The charge flow from a single C-60 molecule to another one has been probed. The conformation and electronic states of both molecules on the contacting electrodes have been characterized using a cryogenic scanning tunneling microscope. While the contact conductance of a single molecule between two...

  17. Coherent spectroscopy in the single molecule limit (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potma, Eric O.; Crampton, Kevin; Fast, Alex; Alfonso García, Alba; Apkarian, Vartkess A.

    2016-10-01

    Surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) is a popular technique for detecting and analyzing molecules at very low concentrations. The sensitivity of SERS is high enough to detect single molecules. It has proven difficult, however, to perform similar measurements in the so-called nonlinear optical regime, a regime in which the molecule is responding to multiple light pulses. Nonetheless, recent experiments indicate that after careful optimization, it is possible to generate signals derived from nonlinear analogs of SERS. Such measurements make it possible to view molecular vibrations in real time, which amounts to the femto- to pico-second range. In this contribution, we discuss in detail under which conditions detectable surface-enhanced coherent Raman signals can be expected, provide experimental evidence of coherent Raman scattering of single molecules, and highlight the unique information that can be attained from such measurements.

  18. 黏附分子与川崎病发病机制关系的研究进展%Advances in research of the relationship between adhesion molecules and pathogenesis of Kawasaki disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朝鲁门; 陈柏谕

    2014-01-01

    Adhesion molecules (AM) are a class of molecules that can mediate cell-to-cell and cell-to-matrix interaction. They participate in the cellular recognition, signal transduction, cell proliferation and differentiation, cell stretching and movement through ligand-to-receptor interaction. AM are the molecular basis of immune response, inflammation, blood coagulation, tumor metastasis, wound healing and a series of physiological and pathological processes. Kawasaki disease (KD) is an acute systemic small vasculitis syndrome, mainly affecting coronary artery. KD is the main cause for acquired heart disease in children. To study the relationship between AM and pathogenesis of KD is important in the understanding of KD pathogenesis, prevention and treatment of coronary artery lesions complicated with KD. This review focused on the relationship between AM and pathogenesis of KD.%黏附分子(AM)是介导细胞与细胞间或细胞与基质间相互作用的一类分子总称,通过配体-受体相结合的形式参与细胞间识别、信号转导、细胞增殖与分化、细胞伸展与运动,是免疫应答、炎症发生、凝血、肿瘤转移、创伤愈合等一系列生理病理过程的分子基础。川崎病(KD)是一种急性全身中、小血管炎性综合征,主要累及冠状动脉,是儿童后天获得性心脏病的主要原因之一。研究AM与KD发病机制的关系对了解KD发病机制、预防及治疗KD心血管系统并发症有积极作用。