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Sample records for cell-mediated immunity

  1. Cell-mediated immune response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meyer, Sonja Izquierdo; Fuglsang, Katrine; Blaakaer, Jan

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This clinical review aims to assess the efficacy of human papillomavirus 16/18 (HPV16/18) vaccination on the cell-mediated immune response in women with existing cervical intraepithelial neoplasia or cervical cancer induced by HPV16 or HPV18. DATA SOURCES AND STUDY SELECTION: A focused...... and thorough literature search conducted in five different databases found 996 publications. Six relevant articles were chosen for further review. In total, 154 patients (>18 years of age) were enrolled in prospective study trials with 3-15 months of follow up. The vaccine applications were administered two...... triggered a detectable cell-mediated immune response, some of which were statistically significant. Correlations between immunological response and clinical outcome (histopathology) were not significant, so neoplasms may not be susceptible to vaccine-generated cytotoxic T cells (CD8(+)). CONCLUSIONS...

  2. Ageing and cell-mediated immunity.

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    Fixa, B; Komárková, O; Chmelar, V

    1975-01-01

    The lymphocyte transformation test with phytohemagglutinin as mitogen estimated according to the incorporation of 2-(14)C-thymidine in DNA was used as an indicator of cell-mediated reactivity in 53 healthy subjects. Three age groups were examined: up to 20 years (21 subjects), 21-40 years (10 subjects) and over 70 years (22 subjects). The responsiveness of lymphocytes decreased significantly with age. In the highest age group 12 pathologically low values were found.

  3. Cell mediated immunity to fungi: a reassessment.

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    Romani, Luigina

    2008-09-01

    Protective immunity against fungal pathogens is achieved by the integration of two distinct arms of the immune system, the innate and adaptive responses. Innate and adaptive immune responses are intimately linked and controlled by sets of molecules and receptors that act to generate the most effective form of immunity for protection against fungal pathogens. The decision of how to respond will still be primarily determined by interactions between pathogens and cells of the innate immune system, but the actions of T cells will feed back into this dynamic equilibrium to regulate the balance between tolerogenic and inflammatory responses. In the last two decades, the immunopathogenesis of fungal infections and fungal diseases was explained primarily in terms of Th1/Th2 balance. Although Th1 responses driven by the IL-12/IFN-gamma axis are central to protection against fungi, other cytokines and T cell-dependent pathways have come of age. The newly described Th17 developmental pathway may play an inflammatory role previously attributed to uncontrolled Th1 responses and serves to accommodate the seemingly paradoxical association of chronic inflammatory responses with fungal persistence in the face of an ongoing inflammation. Regulatory T cells in their capacity to inhibit aspects of innate and adaptive antifungal immunity have become an integral component of immune resistance to fungi, and provide the host with immune defense mechanisms adequate for protection, without necessarily eliminating fungal pathogens which would impair immune memory--or causing an unacceptable level of tissue damage. The enzyme indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase and tryptophan metabolites contribute to immune homeostasis by inducing Tregs and taming overzealous or heightened inflammatory responses.

  4. The role of cell-mediated immunity in typhoid.

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    Mabel, T J; Paniker, C K

    1979-06-01

    The cell-mediated immunity in typhoid was assessed by the leukocyte migration inhibition test and delayed hypersensitivity skin test in 60 clinical typhoid patients. The property of leukocyte migration inhibition appeared first and was positive in 28 of 60 (46.7%) patients on admission and 45 of 60 (75%) at the time of discharge. This difference was definitely more in blood culture positive patients. The delayed hypersensitivity appeared later and was positive in 18 of 60 (30%) on admission and 31 of 60 (51.7%) at the time of discharge. Patients with positive cellular-immune response against typhoid antigen did not develop relapse. On the whole cell-mediated immunity seems to play an important role in typoid. The control groups--the medical and surgical patients, doctors, clinical students and preclinical students--showed positive cellular immune response of 43.3 81.3, 40.7 and 25% respectively. The significance of these results is discussed.

  5. Suppression of cell-mediated immunity by misonidazole

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    Rockwell, S.; Neaderland, M.H. (Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (USA). School of Medicine)

    1982-08-01

    The data presented in this report demonstrate that single treatments with large doses of misonidazole (l mg/g) produce significant inhibition of delayed hypersensitivity to DNFB. Contact sensitivity to DNFB is generally considered to be a cell-mediated immune response (Asherson and Ptak 1968, Moorhead 1978, Phanuphak et al. 1974, Zembala and Asherson 1973). The authors' histological observations and the lack of ear swelling in the nude mice support this interpretation.

  6. Cell mediated immune response in human antirabies revaccination

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    Débora Regina Veiga

    1987-04-01

    Full Text Available The occurrence of secondary cell mediated immune response (CMI in human antirabies immunization was studied. The Puenzalida & Palácios vaccine was used because it is routinely used in Brazil. CMI was evaluated by lymphoblastic transformation indices obtained in whole blood culture in the presence of rabies and control (nervous tissue antigens. Eleven volunteers submitted to revaccination constituted the group under study, while three other volunteers submitted primo vaccination were utilized as control group. A clear secondary CMI to rabies antigen was detected in all the revaccinated volunteers who showed earlier and more intense response than the control group. Response to the control antigen, however, present in all the components of the first group was not detectable in two out of the three primovaccinated and very low in the third one.

  7. CXCR5+ T helper cells mediate protective immunity against tuberculosis

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    Slight, Samantha R.; Rangel-Moreno, Javier; Gopal, Radha; Lin, Yinyao; Fallert Junecko, Beth A.; Mehra, Smriti; Selman, Moises; Becerril-Villanueva, Enrique; Baquera-Heredia, Javier; Pavon, Lenin; Kaushal, Deepak; Reinhart, Todd A.; Randall, Troy D.; Khader, Shabaana A.

    2013-01-01

    One third of the world’s population is infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). Although most infected people remain asymptomatic, they have a 10% lifetime risk of developing active tuberculosis (TB). Thus, the current challenge is to identify immune parameters that distinguish individuals with latent TB from those with active TB. Using human and experimental models of Mtb infection, we demonstrated that organized ectopic lymphoid structures containing CXCR5+ T cells were present in Mtb-infected lungs. In addition, we found that in experimental Mtb infection models, the presence of CXCR5+ T cells within ectopic lymphoid structures was associated with immune control. Furthermore, in a mouse model of Mtb infection, we showed that activated CD4+CXCR5+ T cells accumulated in Mtb-infected lungs and produced proinflammatory cytokines. Mice deficient in Cxcr5 had increased susceptibility to TB due to defective T cell localization within the lung parenchyma. We demonstrated that CXCR5 expression in T cells mediated correct T cell localization within TB granulomas, promoted efficient macrophage activation, protected against Mtb infection, and facilitated lymphoid follicle formation. These data demonstrate that CD4+CXCR5+ T cells play a protective role in the immune response against TB and highlight their potential use for future TB vaccine design and therapy. PMID:23281399

  8. Effects of chrysotherapy on cell mediated immune response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorber, A; Jackson, W H; Simon, T M

    1982-01-01

    Auranofin (AF) differs significantly from gold sodium thiomalate (GSTM) in formulation, i.e., aurous gold is stabilized by dual sulfur and phosphorus ligands, hydrophobic rather than hydrophilic characteristics, and lack of ionic charge. These attributes facilitate: oral absorption of AF, plasma membrane penetration, increase in intracellular lymphocyte gold concentration; and perhaps thereby influence lymphocyte function. AF treated subjects recorded prompt and sharp declines in mitogen-induced lymphoproliferative response (LMR) greater than 80%; suppressed response to skin testing with dinitrochlorobenezene (DNCB) in 11 of 14 subjects; and blebbing of lymphocyte membranes by scanning electron microscopy. In contrast, lymphocytes from a matched group of GSTM treated subjects recorded later onset and less suppression of LMR; normal response to DNCB skin testing; and did not manifest membrane blebbing. Accordingly, the therapeutic action of AF on immune response was observed in the 16 subjects receiving 6 mg/d of an average of 45 weeks to effect primarily cell mediated rather than humoral immune response when compared with a matched group of GSTM treated patients.

  9. Assessing humoral and cell-mediated immune response in Hawaiian green turtles, Chelonia mydas

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    Work, T.M.; Balazs, G.H.; Rameyer, R.A.; Chang, S.P.; Berestecky, J.

    2000-01-01

    Seven immature green turtles, Chelonia mydas, captured from Kaneohe Bay on the island of Oahu were used to evaluate methods for assessing their immune response. Two turtles each were immunized intramuscularly with egg white lysozyme (EWL) in Freunda??s complete adjuvant, Gerbu, or ISA-70; a seventh turtle was immunized with saline only and served as a control. Humoral immune response was measured with an indirect enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Cell-mediated immune response was measured using in vitro cell proliferation assays (CPA) using whole blood or peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBM) cultured with concanavalin A (ConA), phytohaemagglutinin (PHA), or soluble egg EWL antigen. All turtles, except for one immunized with Gerbu and the control, produced a detectable humoral immune response by 6 weeks which persisted for at least 14 weeks after a single immunization. All turtles produced an anamnestic humoral immune response after secondary immunization. Antigen specific cell-mediated immune response in PBM was seen in all turtles either after primary or secondary immunization, but it was not as consistent as humoral immune response; antigen specific cell-mediated immune response in whole blood was rarely seen. Mononuclear cells had significantly higher stimulation indices than whole blood regardless of adjuvant, however, results with whole blood had lower variability. Both Gerbu and ISA-70 appeared to potentiate the cell-mediated immune response when PBM or whole blood were cultured with PHA. This is the first time cell proliferation assays have been compared between whole blood and PBM for reptiles. This is also the first demonstration of antigen specific cell-mediated response in reptiles. Cell proliferation assays allowed us to evaluate the cell-mediated immune response of green turtles. However, CPA may be less reliable than ELISA for detecting antigen specific immune response. Either of the three adjuvants appears suitable to safely elicit a

  10. Analysis of cell-mediated immune responses in support of dengue vaccine development efforts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothman, Alan L; Currier, Jeffrey R; Friberg, Heather L; Mathew, Anuja

    2015-12-10

    Dengue vaccine development has made significant strides, but a better understanding of how vaccine-induced immune responses correlate with vaccine efficacy can greatly accelerate development, testing, and deployment as well as ameliorate potential risks and safety concerns. Advances in basic immunology knowledge and techniques have already improved our understanding of cell-mediated immunity of natural dengue virus infection and vaccination. We conclude that the evidence base is adequate to argue for inclusion of assessments of cell-mediated immunity as part of clinical trials of dengue vaccines, although further research to identify useful correlates of protective immunity is needed.

  11. A longitudinal study of cell-mediated immunity in pigs infected with porcine parvovirus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ladekjaer-Mikkelsen, A.S.; Nielsen, Jens

    2002-01-01

    Porcine parvovirus (PPV) is an ubiquitous pathogen causing reproductive failure in swine. Protection against reproductive failure caused by acute PPV infection has commonly been related to the presence of specific antibodies in the dam. However, the role of cell-mediated immunity during chronic PPV...

  12. CELL-MEDIATED IMMUNE RESPONSES IN THE SEA-STAR ASTERIAS RUBENS (ECHINODERM

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    Michel Leclerc

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cell-mediated immune responses occur in sea star system. In Asterias rubens it is said that B sea star lymphocytes and T sea star lymphocytes exist in the axial organ which can be considered as an ancestral lymphoid organ. In the same manner the origin of lymphocytes can be found in Invertebrates such as Echinodermal.

  13. Role of macrophage inflammatory protein-1alpha in T-cell-mediated immunity to viral infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Andreas N; Nansen, Anneline; Christensen, Jan P

    2003-01-01

    The immune response to lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus in mice lacking macrophage inflammatory protein-1alpha (MIP-1alpha) was evaluated. Generation of virus-specific effector T cells is unimpaired in MIP-1alpha-deficient mice. Furthermore, MIP-1alpha is not required for T-cell-mediated virus...

  14. Human cell mediated immunity to porins from Salmonella typhi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco, F; Isibasi, A; Raúl González, C; Ortiz, V; Paniagua, J; Arreguín, C; Kumate, J

    1993-01-01

    The current studies were undertaken to assess the role of the porins and outer membrane proteins (OMP) in the human immune response to Salmonella typhi 9, 12 Vi:d. Experiments were performed to determinate the lymphocyte activation response to porins in individuals who had been vaccinated against typhoid fever. 10 healthy volunteers were studied before and 10 days after oral or subcutaneous immunisation. Five patients with typhoid fever were also studied. Lymphocyte activation was measured by the 3H thymidine incorporation assay. Individuals with typhoid fever as well as those immunised with oral vaccine responded well to porins and outer membrane proteins, as opposed to those immunised with the subcutaneous vaccine. These results suggest that the porins and OMP play a role in the cellular immune response against Salmonella typhi.

  15. VARICELLA ZOSTER VIRUS-ITS PATHOGENESIS, LATENCY & CELL-MEDIATED IMMUNITY

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    Anis Ahmed

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Varicella zoster virus causes primary infection as chickenpox, at which time latencyis established in the neurons of the dorsal root ganglia or ganglia of the cranial nerves.Reactivation produces herpes zoster infection (HZI, commonly called shingles. Anunderstanding of the mechanisms of latency is crucial in developing effective therapies forVZV infections of the nervous system. This article describes the pathogenesis of VZVwhich includes immune response to the virus, immune evasion by the virus, mechanism ofits latency and cell-mediated immunity.

  16. The impact of long-term haemofiltration (continuous veno-venous haemofiltration) on cell-mediated immunity during endotoxaemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toft, P; Nilsen, B U; Bollen, P;

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Increased survival with high-volume continuous veno-venous haemofiltration (CVVH) has been demonstrated in critically ill patients. This may be the result of intensified blood purification or an effect on the immune system. We hypothesized that CVVH modifies the cell-mediated immunity....... However, in the long term, CVVH was unable to modify the endotoxin-induced changes in cell-mediated immunity....

  17. T cell mediated cerebral hemorrhages and microhemorrhages during passive Aβ immunization in APPPS1 transgenic mice

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    de Calignon Alix

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Immunization against amyloid-β (Aβ, the peptide that accumulates in the form of senile plaques and in the cerebrovasculature in Alzheimer's disease (AD, causes a dramatic immune response that prevents plaque formation and clears accumulated Aβ in transgenic mice. In a clinical trial of Aβ immunization, some patients developed meningoencephalitis and hemorrhages. Neuropathological investigations of patients who died after the trial showed clearance of amyloid pathology, but also a powerful immune response involving activated T cells probably underlying the negative effects of the immunization. Results To define the impact of T cells on this inflammatory response we used passive immunization and adoptive transfer to separate the effect of IgG and T cell mediated effects on microhemorrhage in APPPS1 transgenic mice. Neither anti Aβ IgG nor adoptively transferred T cells, alone, led to increased cerebrovascular damage. However, the combination of adoptively transferred T cells and passive immunization led to massive cerebrovascular bleeding that ranged from multiple microhemorrhages in the parenchyma to large hematomas. Conclusions Our results indicate that vaccination can lead to Aβ and T cell induced cerebral micro-hemorrhages and acute hematomas, which are greatly exacerbated by T cell mediated activity.

  18. Impaired cell mediated immunity in haemophilia in the absence of infection with human immunodeficiency virus.

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    Madhok, R; Gracie, A; Lowe, G D; Burnett, A; Froebel, K; Follett, E; Forbes, C D

    1986-10-18

    The cell mediated immune response was evaluated in vivo in 29 patients with clinically severe haemophilia by means of the dinitrochlorobenzene skin test. All patients had a response below the median normal value, and in 19 the response was on or below the lower limit of the normal range. There was no difference in skin response between patients positive and negative for the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV; formerly known as human T cell lymphotropic virus III or lymphadenopathy associated virus). In the whole group, and in seronegative patients (n = 17), there was an inverse relation between exposure to clotting factor and skin response. In seropositive patients (n = 12) no such association was apparent. This study shows that clotting factor concentrate impairs the cell mediated immune response to a new antigen in the absence of infection with HIV.

  19. Activation of cell-mediated immunity by Morinda citrifolia fruit extract and its constituents.

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    Murata, Kazuya; Abe, Yumi; Futamura-Masudaa, Megumi; Uwaya, Akemi; Isami, Fumiyuki; Matsuda, Hideaki

    2014-04-01

    Morinda citrifolia, commonly known as noni, is a traditional natural medicine in French Polynesia and Hawaii. Functional foods derived from M. citrifolia fruit have been marketed to help prevent diseases and promote good health. The objective of this study was to assess the effects of M. citrifolia fruit on cell-mediated immunity. In the picryl chloride-induced contact dermatitis test, M. citrifolia fruit extract (Noni-ext) inhibited the suppression of cell-mediated immunity by immunosuppressive substances isolated from freeze-dried ascites of Ehrlich carcinoma-bearing mice (EC-sup). In addition, Noni-ext inhibited reduction of IL-2 production in EC-sup-treated mice and activated natural killer cells in normal mice. These results suggest that Noni-ext has multiple effects on the recovery of cell-mediated immunity. Furthermore, we investigated the active principles of Noni-ext and identified an iridoid glycoside, deacetylasperulosidic acid. Oral administration of deacetylasperulosidic acid inhibited the reduction of ear swelling, and also cancelled the suppression of IL-2 production along with the activation of natural killer cells in the same manner as that of Noni-ext.

  20. Immunotherapy: Shifting the Balance of Cell-Mediated Immunity and Suppression in Human Prostate Cancer

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    Tucker, Jo A.; Jochems, Caroline [Laboratory of Tumor Immunology and Biology, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Gulley, James L. [Laboratory of Tumor Immunology and Biology, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Medical Oncology Branch, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Schlom, Jeffrey, E-mail: js141c@nih.gov; Tsang, Kwong Y. [Laboratory of Tumor Immunology and Biology, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States)

    2012-12-11

    Active immunotherapy is dependent on the ability of the immune system to recognize and respond to tumors. Despite overwhelming evidence to support a cell-mediated immune response to prostate cancer, it is insufficient to eradicate the disease. This is likely due to a high level of suppression at the tumor site from a variety of sources, including immunosuppressive cells. Immune cells entering the tumor microenvironment may be inhibited directly by the tumor, stromal cells or other immune cells that have been induced to adopt a suppressive phenotype. The resurgence of interest in immunotherapy following the approval of sipuleucel-T and ipilimumab by the Food and Drug Administration has brought about new strategies for overcoming tumor-mediated suppression and bolstering anti-tumor responses. Improved understanding of the immune response to prostate cancer can lead to new combination therapies, such as the use of vaccine with small molecule and checkpoint inhibitors or other immunotherapies.

  1. Immunotherapy: Shifting the Balance of Cell-Mediated Immunity and Suppression in Human Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey Schlom

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Active immunotherapy is dependent on the ability of the immune system to recognize and respond to tumors. Despite overwhelming evidence to support a cell-mediated immune response to prostate cancer, it is insufficient to eradicate the disease. This is likely due to a high level of suppression at the tumor site from a variety of sources, including immunosuppressive cells. Immune cells entering the tumor microenvironment may be inhibited directly by the tumor, stromal cells or other immune cells that have been induced to adopt a suppressive phenotype. The resurgence of interest in immunotherapy following the approval of sipuleucel-T and ipilimumab by the Food and Drug Administration has brought about new strategies for overcoming tumor-mediated suppression and bolstering anti-tumor responses. Improved understanding of the immune response to prostate cancer can lead to new combination therapies, such as the use of vaccine with small molecule and checkpoint inhibitors or other immunotherapies.

  2. Human CD8+ T cells mediate protective immunity induced by a human malaria vaccine in human immune system mice.

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    Li, Xiangming; Huang, Jing; Zhang, Min; Funakoshi, Ryota; Sheetij, Dutta; Spaccapelo, Roberta; Crisanti, Andrea; Nussenzweig, Victor; Nussenzweig, Ruth S; Tsuji, Moriya

    2016-08-31

    A number of studies have shown that CD8+ T cells mediate protective anti-malaria immunity in a mouse model. However, whether human CD8+ T cells play a role in protection against malaria remains unknown. We recently established human immune system (HIS) mice harboring functional human CD8+ T cells (HIS-CD8 mice) by transduction with HLA-A∗0201 and certain human cytokines using recombinant adeno-associated virus-based gene transfer technologies. These HIS-CD8 mice mount a potent, antigen-specific HLA-A∗0201-restricted human CD8+ T-cell response upon immunization with a recombinant adenovirus expressing a human malaria antigen, the Plasmodium falciparum circumsporozoite protein (PfCSP), termed AdPfCSP. In the present study, we challenged AdPfCSP-immunized HIS-CD8 mice with transgenic Plasmodium berghei sporozoites expressing full-length PfCSP and found that AdPfCSP-immunized (but not naïve) mice were protected against subsequent malaria challenge. The level of the HLA-A∗0201-restricted, PfCSP-specific human CD8+ T-cell response was closely correlated with the level of malaria protection. Furthermore, depletion of human CD8+ T cells from AdPfCSP-immunized HIS-CD8 mice almost completely abolished the anti-malaria immune response. Taken together, our data show that human CD8+ T cells mediate protective anti-malaria immunity in vivo.

  3. Role of very late antigen-1 in T-cell-mediated immunity to systemic viral infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørding Kauffmann, Susanne; Thomsen, Allan Randrup; Christensen, Jan Pravsgaard

    2006-01-01

    The T-cell response to lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus was studied in mice lacking very late antigen-1 (VLA-1). The generation of virus-specific effector T cells was unimpaired in VLA-1(-/-) mice. In the memory phase, VLA-1 deficiency did not influence the number of memory CD8(+) T cells or th......, the current findings indicate that the expression of VLA-1 is not pivotal for T-cell-mediated antiviral immunity to a systemic infection.......-cell-mediated inflammation, no significant influence of VLA-1 was found either in the primary response or in the memory phase. However, alpha-VLA-4 antibody reduced the DTH-like reaction in VLA-1(-/-) mice to a higher degree than in wt mice, suggesting a synergistic effect of blocking both integrins. Taken together...

  4. Modulations in cell-mediated immunity of Mytilus edulis following the `Sea Empress` oil spill

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dyrynda, E.A.; Dyrynda, P.E.J.; Ratcliffe, N.A. [University of Wales Swansea (United Kingdom). School of Biological Sciences; Law, R.J.; Kelly, C.A.; Graham, K.L. [MAFF Fisheries Lab., Burnham-on-Crouch (United Kingdom); Pipe, R.K. [Plymouth Marine Lab. (United Kingdom)

    1997-02-01

    The `Sea Empress` oil tanker grounded outside Milford Haven (Wales, UK) in February 1996, spilling {approx} 70,000 tonnes of crude oil and contaminating over 100 km of coastline, causing mass mortalities and strandings of at least 11 mollusc species. Intensive field monitoring commenced after the spill, examining immunity and hydrocarbon levels in the mussel, Mytilus edulis (Mollusca: Bivalvia), a commercially-harvested species which can accumulate contaminants. Comparisons of mussels from oiled and reference sites revealed significant modulations in cell-mediated immunity. Elevations in blood cell (haemocyte) numbers and decreases in superoxide generation and phagocytosis were identified in contaminated animals. The immune response of contaminated mussels gradually improved and generally showed no significant differences compared with clean mussels after 11 weeks. By then, total hydrocarbon content in contaminated mussels had declined by 70-90%, while polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon content had decreased by over 90%. (author)

  5. Cordyceps militaris Enhances Cell-Mediated Immunity in Healthy Korean Men.

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    Kang, Ho Joon; Baik, Hyun Wook; Kim, Sang Jung; Lee, Seong Gyu; Ahn, Hong Yup; Park, Ju Sang; Park, Sang Jong; Jang, Eun Jeong; Park, Sang Woon; Choi, Jin Young; Sung, Ji Hee; Lee, Seung Min

    2015-10-01

    Cordyceps militaris is a mushroom traditionally used for diverse pharmaceutical purposes in East Asia, including China, and has been found to be effective for enhancing immunity through various types of animal testing. The aim of this study is to determine the efficacy of C. militaris for enhancing cell-mediated immunity and its safety in healthy male adults. Healthy male adults were divided into the experimental group (n = 39), given 1.5 g/day of ethanol treated C. militaris in capsules, and the control group (n = 40), given the same number of identical placebo capsules filled with microcrystalline cellulose and lactose for 4 weeks from February 13 to March 14, 2012; the natural killer (NK) cell activity, lymphocyte proliferation index (PI), and T-helper cell 1 (Th1) cytokine cluster (interferon [IFN]-γ, interleukin [IL]-12, IL-2, and tumor necrosis factor [TNF]-α) were measured, along with stability test, at weeks 0, 2, and 4. The C. militaris group showed a statistically significant greater increase in NK200 (P = .0010), lymphocyte PI (P ≤ .0001), IL-2 (P = .0096), and IFN-γ (P = .0126), compared with the basal level, than the placebo group. There was no statistically significant adverse reaction. C. militaris enhanced the NK cell activity and lymphocyte proliferation and partially increased Th1 cytokine secretion. Therefore, C. militaris is safe and effective for enhancing cell-mediated immunity of healthy male adults.

  6. Antigenic role of stress-induced catalase of Salmonella typhimurium in cell-mediated immunity.

    OpenAIRE

    Kagaya, K; Miyakawa, Y; Watanabe, K; Fukazawa, Y.

    1992-01-01

    The ability of the H2O2-induced catalase of Salmonella typhimurium to induce cell-mediated immunity against S. typhimurium infection in mice was examined. When exponentially growing cells of S. typhimurium were treated with 20 microM H2O2, the cells resisted killing by 1 mM H2O2 and showed the induction of a new species of catalase in addition to the constitutively produced one. Two molecules of catalases in S. typhimurium were isolated from mutant strains: H2O2-induced catalase (catalase II,...

  7. Reactivating effect of levamisole on cell-mediated immunity in gastrointestinal cancer patients

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    Miwa,Hiroaki

    1977-10-01

    Full Text Available Cell-mediated immunity was studied in 23 cases of advanced gastrointestinal cancer. The patients received levamisole at 150 mg/day for three consecutive days each week for four weeks. In cases at the terminal stage of gastrointestinal cancer, the blastformation rate of peripheral blood lymphocytes against phytohemagglutinin (PHA after the administration of levamisole showed a slight increase, but cases with blastformation rates over 40% increased markedly three or four weeks after the initial administration of levamisole. The peripheral blood lymphocyte count showed little change in these cases.

  8. Effect of vitamin E levels on the cell-mediated immunity of broilers vaccinated against coccidiosis

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    ICM da Silva

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Studies on the relationships between animal nutrition and immunity have sought reliable methodologies to measure responses. Cell-mediated immune response is similarly studied in humans. The cutaneous basophil hypersensitivity test (CBH is one of the methods to measure that response and consists in the infiltration of inflammatory cells, particularly of lymphocytes and basophils, as result of the application of substances capable of inducing cell proliferation in determined sites, such as wings, wattle, and interdigital space in birds. CBH is considered a simple and fast method and can be applied in birds of different ages. In immunocompetence studies with poultry, phytohemagglutinin-P (PHA-P is a commonly used substance, despite the variability of the response related to the method of application (intradermal injection and the antigens used. In the present experiment, PHA-P was used to observe the cell-mediated immune response of 216 chicks fed three dietary levels of vitamin E from 1 to 36 days of age. All birds were immunologically challenged by vaccination against coccidiosis at three days of age and against Newcastle Disease (NCD at 14 and 30 days of age. At 36 days of age, birds were submitted to the CBH test according to the methodology of Corrier & DeLoach (1990. Birds fed 65mg/kg of vitamin E presented lasting cell reaction (p<0.08, which indicates that this vitamin E level improved cell immune response of birds due to its antioxidant and immunomodulating properties. The use of this vitamin E level can be considered by nutritionists under practical conditions, aiming to improve broiler immunity.

  9. Neo-lymphoid aggregates in the adult liver can initiate potent cell-mediated immunity.

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    Melanie Greter

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Subcutaneous immunization delivers antigen (Ag to local Ag-presenting cells that subsequently migrate into draining lymph nodes (LNs. There, they initiate the activation and expansion of lymphocytes specific for their cognate Ag. In mammals, the structural environment of secondary lymphoid tissues (SLTs is considered essential for the initiation of adaptive immunity. Nevertheless, cold-blooded vertebrates can initiate potent systemic immune responses even though they lack conventional SLTs. The emergence of lymph nodes provided mammals with drastically improved affinity maturation of B cells. Here, we combine the use of different strains of alymphoplastic mice and T cell migration mutants with an experimental paradigm in which the site of Ag delivery is distant from the site of priming and inflammation. We demonstrate that in mammals, SLTs serve primarily B cell priming and affinity maturation, whereas the induction of T cell-driven immune responses can occur outside of SLTs. We found that mice lacking conventional SLTs generate productive systemic CD4- as well as CD8-mediated responses, even under conditions in which draining LNs are considered compulsory for the initiation of adaptive immunity. We describe an alternative pathway for the induction of cell-mediated immunity (CMI, in which Ag-presenting cells sample Ag and migrate into the liver where they induce neo-lymphoid aggregates. These structures are insufficient to support antibody affinity maturation and class switching, but provide a novel surrogate environment for the initiation of CMI.

  10. IL-10 polymorphism and cell-mediated immune response to Chlamydia trachomatis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Öhman, H.; Tiitinen, A; Halttunen, M.

    2006-01-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis infection induces an inflammatory response that is crucial in resolving acute infection but may also play a key role in the pathogenesis of C trachomatis associated infertility. The immune response is linked to cytokine secretion pattern which is influenced by the host genetic...... background. To study a relationship between interleukin-10 (IL-10) promoter -1082 polymorphism and cell-mediated immune response during C trachomatis infection in vitro, lymphocyte proliferation and cytokine (IL-10, IFN-gamma, TNF-alpha, IL-2, IL-4 and IL-5) secretion were analysed in subjects with different...... IL-10 genotypes. Enhanced IL-10 secretion and reduced antigen-specific lymphocyte proliferative and IFN-gamma responses were found in subjects with IL-10 -1082 GG genotype when compared to those with -1082 AA genotype. CD14+ monocytes were main source of IL-10 indicating that these cells...

  11. STIM1 controls T cell-mediated immune regulation and inflammation in chronic infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desvignes, Ludovic; Weidinger, Carl; Shaw, Patrick; Vaeth, Martin; Ribierre, Theo; Liu, Menghan; Fergus, Tawania; Kozhaya, Lina; McVoy, Lauren; Unutmaz, Derya; Ernst, Joel D; Feske, Stefan

    2015-06-01

    Chronic infections induce a complex immune response that controls pathogen replication, but also causes pathology due to sustained inflammation. Ca2+ influx mediates T cell function and immunity to infection, and patients with inherited mutations in the gene encoding the Ca2+ channel ORAI1 or its activator stromal interaction molecule 1 (STIM1) are immunodeficient and prone to chronic infection by various pathogens, including Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). Here, we demonstrate that STIM1 is required for T cell-mediated immune regulation during chronic Mtb infection. Compared with WT animals, mice with T cell-specific Stim1 deletion died prematurely during the chronic phase of infection and had increased bacterial burdens and severe pulmonary inflammation, with increased myeloid and lymphoid cell infiltration. Although STIM1-deficient T cells exhibited markedly reduced IFN-γ production during the early phase of Mtb infection, bacterial growth was not immediately exacerbated. During the chronic phase, however, STIM1-deficient T cells displayed enhanced IFN-γ production in response to elevated levels of IL-12 and IL-18. The lack of STIM1 in T cells was associated with impaired activation-induced cell death upon repeated TCR engagement and pulmonary lymphocytosis and hyperinflammation in Mtb-infected mice. Chronically Mtb-infected, STIM1-deficient mice had reduced levels of inducible regulatory T cells (iTregs) due to a T cell-intrinsic requirement for STIM1 in iTreg differentiation and excessive production of IFN-γ and IL-12, which suppress iTreg differentiation and maintenance. Thus, STIM1 controls multiple aspects of T cell-mediated immune regulation to limit injurious inflammation during chronic infection.

  12. Epistasis between microRNAs 155 and 146a during T cell-mediated antitumor immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huffaker, Thomas B.; Hu, Ruozhen; Runtsch, Marah C.; Bake, Erin; Chen, Xinjian; Zhao, Jimmy; Round, June L.; Baltimore, David; O’Connell, Ryan M.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY An increased understanding of antitumor immunity is necessary to improve cell-based immunotherapies against human cancers. Here, we investigated the roles of two immune system-expressed microRNAs (miRNAs), miR-155 and miR-146a, in the regulation of antitumor immune responses. Our results indicate that miR-155 promotes and miR-146a inhibits IFNγ responses by T cells and reduced solid tumor growth in vivo. Using a novel double knockout (DKO) mouse strain deficient in both miR-155 and miR-146a, we have also identified an epistatic relationship between these two miRNAs. DKO mice had defective T cell responses and tumor growth phenotypes similar to miR-155−/− mice. Further analysis of the T cell compartment revealed that miR-155 modulates IFNγ expression through a mechanism involving repression of Ship1. Our work reveals critical roles for miRNAs in the reciprocal regulation of CD4+ and CD8+ T cell-mediated antitumor immunity, and demonstrates the dominant nature of miR-155 during its promotion of immune responses. PMID:23200854

  13. Epistasis between MicroRNAs 155 and 146a during T Cell-Mediated Antitumor Immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas B. Huffaker

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available An increased understanding of antitumor immunity is necessary for improving cell-based immunotherapies against human cancers. Here, we investigated the roles of two immune system-expressed microRNAs (miRNAs, miR-155 and miR-146a, in the regulation of antitumor immune responses. Our results indicate that miR-155 promotes and miR-146a inhibits interferon γ (IFNγ responses by T cells and reduces solid tumor growth in vivo. Using a double-knockout (DKO mouse strain deficient in both miR-155 and miR-146a, we have also identified an epistatic relationship between these two miRNAs. DKO mice had defective T cell responses and tumor growth phenotypes similar to miR-155−/− mice. Further analysis of the T cell compartment revealed that miR-155 modulates IFNγ expression through a mechanism involving repression of Ship1. Our work reveals critical roles for miRNAs in the reciprocal regulation of CD4+ and CD8+ T cell-mediated antitumor immunity and demonstrates the dominant nature of miR-155 during its promotion of immune responses.

  14. Cell-mediated immune responses in rainbow trout after DNA immunization against the viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Utke, Katrin; Kock, Holger; Schuetze, Heike

    2008-01-01

    To identify viral proteins that induce cell-mediated cytotoxicity (CMC) against viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV)-infected cells, rainbow trout were immunized with DNA vectors encoding the glycoprotein G or the nucleocapsid protein N of VHSV. The G protein was a more potent trigger...... injection site rather than to injection sites of heterologous vaccines, suggesting the antigen specificity of homing. By demonstrating CMC responses to distinct viral proteins and homing in rainbow trout, these results substantially contribute to the understanding of the teleost immune system....... of cytotoxic cells than the N protein. Peripheral blood leukocytes (PBL) isolated from trout immunized against the G protein killed both VHSV-infected MHC class I matched (RTG-2) and VHSV-infected xenogeneic (EPC) target cells, suggesting the involvement of both cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) and NK cells...

  15. Cell mediated immune responses in the placenta following challenge of vaccinated pregnant heifers with Neospora caninum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hecker, Y P; Cantón, G; Regidor-Cerrillo, J; Chianini, F; Morrell, E; Lischinsky, L; Ortega-Mora, L M; Innes, E A; Odeón, A; Campero, C M; Moore, D P

    2015-12-15

    The aim of the present study was to investigate and correlate the cell-mediated immune response and pathological changes at the maternal-fetal interface of Neospora-challenged pregnant cattle previously immunized with live and inactivated experimental vaccines. Pregnant heifers naïve to Neospora caninum were divided in 5 groups of 4 animals, each one immunized before mating: Group A heifers were intravenously (iv) immunized with 6.25 × 10(7) live tachyzoites of the NC-6 strain; group B heifers were immunized twice subcutaneously (sc) 3 weeks apart with native antigen extract of the NC-6 strain formulated with ISCOMs; group C heifers were sc immunized twice 3 weeks apart with three recombinant proteins (rNcSAG1, rNcHSP20, rNcGRA7) of the NC-1 strain formulated with ISCOMs; group D heifers were sc injected with sterile phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) and group E heifers received sc ISCOM-matrix (ISCOMs without antigen). All groups were iv-challenged with 4.7 × 10(7) NC-1 tachyzoites at 70 days of gestation. Heifers were culled at day 104 of gestation and placentomes were examined to evaluate lesions and local cellular immune responses using histopathology, immunohistochemistry and real time-PCR. Immunohistochemistry was performed using bovine leucocyte specific antibodies. Cytokine expression and levels (IFN-γ, IL-4, IL-10, IL-12 and TNF-α) were measured using real-time reverse transcription-PCR and ELISA, respectively. Minimal inflammation was observed in group A placentomes; while placentomes from group B, C, D and E had moderate to severe infiltration with CD3(+), CD4(+), γδ-T cells, CD8(+) cells and macrophages being more numerous in groups B and E placentomes, when compared with groups C and D (P<0.001). Cytokine levels were significantly increased in the caruncles of animals of groups B and C in comparison with the other animal groups (P < 0.001). The results from this study showed that the strongest cellular immune responses were observed in the

  16. Induction of cell-mediated immunity during early stages of infection with intracellular protozoa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gazzinelli R.T.

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Toxoplasma gondii and Trypanosoma cruzi are intracellular parasites which, as part of their life cycle, induce a potent cell-mediated immunity (CMI maintained by Th1 lymphocytes and IFN-g. In both cases, induction of a strong CMI is thought to protect the host against rapid parasite multiplication and consequent pathology and lethality during the acute phase of infection. However, the parasitic infection is not eliminated by the immune system and the vertebrate host serves as a parasite reservoir. In contrast, Leishmania sp, which is a slow growing parasite, appears to evade induction of CMI during early stages of infection as a strategy for surviving in a hostile environment (i.e., inside the macrophages which are their obligatory niche in the vertebrate host. Recent reports show that the initiation of IL-12 synthesis by macrophages during these parasitic infections is a key event in regulating CMI and disease outcome. The studies reviewed here indicate that activation/inhibition of distinct signaling pathways and certain macrophage functions by intracellular protozoa are important events in inducing/modulating the immune response of their vertebrate hosts, allowing parasite and host survival and therefore maintaining parasite life cycles.

  17. Changes in cell-mediated immune response after lung resection surgery for MDR-TB patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Seung-Kyu; Hong, Sunghee; Eum, Seok-Yong; Lee, In Hee; Shin, Donk Ok; Cho, Jang Eun; Cho, Sungae; Cho, Sang-Nae

    2011-07-01

    The immune responses of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) patients undergoing lung resection surgery were investigated in order to understand the mechanism of strong immune suppression in MDR-TB. We examined changes in cell-mediated immune response (CMI) of a total of sixteen MDR-TB patients, three of them extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis (XDR-TB) patients, after the removal of the heavily diseased lung section. The IFN-γ response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis culture filtrate proteins (Mtb-CFP), one of the most important CMI to defend TB, showed a statistically significant elevation in 2-4 months after operation when compared to the preoperative CMI in patients who were converted into AFB negative and cured in two years' follow-up, suggesting that the recovery of CMI may be one of the key factors in the successful treatment of MDR-TB. Interestingly, IL-10 response to Mtb-CFP was also elevated in 2-4 months after surgery in cured patients although both proliferative response and PBMC composition were not significantly changed. Infection with first- or second-line drugs resistant Mtb reduces the efficiency of chemotherapeutic treatment of MDR-TB to about 50%. Thus, this study suggests that chemotherapeutic treatment of MDR-TB may be more effective when combined with accompanying therapy that increases CMI, includes lung resection surgery.

  18. Induction of cell-mediated immunity to Mycobacterium leprae in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patel, P.J.; Lefford, M.J.

    1978-01-01

    The immune response of mice to armadillo-derived, irradiation-killed Mycobacterium leprae (I-ML) was investigated. Following injection of 100 microgram of I-ML into the left hind footpads of mice, a state of cell-mediated immunity (CMI) was engendered to antigens of M. leprae. The evidence for CMI was as follows: (1) development of delayed-type hypersensitivity to both human tuberculin purified protein derivative and soluble M. leprae antigens; (2) T-lymphocyte-dependent macrophage activation at the inoculation site; (3) specific systemaic resistance to the cross-reactive species M. tuberculosis; and (4) immunopotentiation of the delayed-type hypersensitivity response to an unrelated antigen. The CMI induced by I-ML in aqueous suspension was greater than that obtained with the same antigen in water-in-oil emulsion, even though the latter generated a more severe reaction at the site of immunization. I-ML also induced a stronger CMI response than the corresponding dose of heat-killed BCG.

  19. Neonatal Fc receptor expression in dendritic cells mediates protective immunity against colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Kristi; Rath, Timo; Flak, Magdalena B; Arthur, Janelle C; Chen, Zhangguo; Glickman, Jonathan N; Zlobec, Inti; Karamitopoulou, Eva; Stachler, Matthew D; Odze, Robert D; Lencer, Wayne I; Jobin, Christian; Blumberg, Richard S

    2013-12-12

    Cancers arising in mucosal tissues account for a disproportionately large fraction of malignancies. Immunoglobulin G (IgG) and the neonatal Fc receptor for IgG (FcRn) have an important function in the mucosal immune system that we have now shown extends to the induction of CD8(+) T cell-mediated antitumor immunity. We demonstrate that FcRn within dendritic cells (DCs) was critical for homeostatic activation of mucosal CD8(+) T cells that drove protection against the development of colorectal cancers and lung metastases. FcRn-mediated tumor protection was driven by DCs activation of endogenous tumor-reactive CD8(+) T cells via the cross-presentation of IgG complexed antigens (IgG IC), as well as the induction of cytotoxicity-promoting cytokine secretion, particularly interleukin-12, both of which were independently triggered by the FcRn-IgG IC interaction in murine and human DCs. FcRn thus has a primary role within mucosal tissues in activating local immune responses that are critical for priming efficient anti-tumor immunosurveillance.

  20. Cell-mediated immune responses differentiate infections with Brucella suis from Yersinia enterocolitica serotype O : 9 in pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riber, Ulla; Jungersen, Gregers

    2007-01-01

    serological Brucellosis reactions. While 36 of the 39 FPSR pigs were also FPSR in a second test, none of the pigs were test positive in whole blood IFN-gamma assay or Brucellergene OCB skin test. In conclusion, use of IFN-gamma assay and skin test as measurements of cell-mediated immune responses to non...

  1. Novel antigens for detection of cell mediated immune responses to Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis infection in cattle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Heidi; Aagaard, Claus; Nielsen, Søren Saxmose;

    2011-01-01

    Paratuberculosis is a chronic infection of the intestine of ruminants caused by Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP). Early stage MAP infection can be detected by measuring specific cell mediated immune responses, using the whole blood interferon-γ (IFN-γ) assay. Available IFN-γ assa...

  2. Flow cytometric assessment of chicken T cell-mediated immune responses after Newcastle disease virus vaccination and challenge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalgaard, T. S.; Norup, L. R.; Pedersen, A.R.;

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study was to use flow cytometry to assess chicken T cell-mediated immune responses. In this study two inbred genetic chicken lines (L130 and L133) were subjected to two times vaccination against Newcastle disease (ND) and a subsequent challenge by ND virus (NDV) infection...

  3. Stimulatory effect of Eucalyptus essential oil on innate cell-mediated immune response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasi Guido

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Besides few data concerning the antiseptic properties against a range of microbial agents and the anti-inflammatory potential both in vitro and in vivo, little is known about the influence of Eucalyptus oil (EO extract on the monocytic/macrophagic system, one of the primary cellular effectors of the immune response against pathogen attacks. The activities of this natural extract have mainly been recognized through clinical experience, but there have been relatively little scientific studies on its biological actions. Here we investigated whether EO extract is able to affect the phagocytic ability of human monocyte derived macrophages (MDMs in vitro and of rat peripheral blood monocytes/granulocytes in vivo in absence or in presence of immuno-suppression induced by the chemotherapeutic agent 5-fluorouracil (5-FU. Methods Morphological activation of human MDMs was analysed by scanning electron microscopy. Phagocytic activity was tested: i in vitro in EO treated and untreated MDMs, by confocal microscopy after fluorescent beads administration; ii in vivo in monocytes/granulocytes from peripheral blood of immuno-competent or 5-FU immuno-suppressed rats, after EO oral administration, by flow cytometry using fluorescein-labelled E. coli. Cytokine release by MDMs was determined using the BD Cytometric Bead Array human Th1/Th2 cytokine kit. Results EO is able to induce activation of MDMs, dramatically stimulating their phagocytic response. EO-stimulated internalization is coupled to low release of pro-inflammatory cytokines and requires integrity of the microtubule network, suggesting that EO may act by means of complement receptor-mediated phagocytosis. Implementation of innate cell-mediated immune response was also observed in vivo after EO administration, mainly involving the peripheral blood monocytes/granulocytes. The 5-FU/EO combined treatment inhibited the 5-FU induced myelotoxicity and raised the phagocytic activity of the

  4. TRESK channel as a potential target to treat T-cell mediated immune dysfunction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Jaehee [Medical Research Center for Neural Dysfunction, Department of Physiology, Institute of Health Sciences, Gyeongsang National University, School of Medicine, Jinju 660-751 (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Dawon, E-mail: dawon@gnu.ac.kr [Medical Research Center for Neural Dysfunction, Department of Physiology, Institute of Health Sciences, Gyeongsang National University, School of Medicine, Jinju 660-751 (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-12-25

    In this review, we propose that TRESK background K{sup +} channel could serve as a potential therapeutic target for T-cell mediated immune dysfunction. TRESK has many immune function-related properties. TRESK is abundantly expressed in the thymus, the spleen, and human leukemic T-lymphocytes. TRESK is highly activated by Ca{sup 2+}, calcineurin, acetylcholine, and histamine which induce hypertrophy, whereas TRESK is inhibited by immunosuppressants, such as cyclosporin A and FK506. Cyclosporine A and FK506 target the binding site of nuclear factor of activated T-cells (NFAT) to inhibit calcineurin. Interestingly, TRESK possesses an NFAT-like docking site that is present at its intracellular loop. Calcineurin has been found to interact with TRESK via specific NFAT-like docking site. When the T-cell is activated, calcineurin can bind to the NFAT-docking site of TRESK. The activation of both TRESK and NFAT via Ca{sup 2+}-calcineurin-NFAT/TRESK pathway could modulate the transcription of new genes in addition to regulating several aspects of T-cell function.

  5. Therapeutic immunization strategies against cervical cancer : induction of cell-mediated immunity in murine models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bungener, Laura Barbara

    2004-01-01

    The aim of the study described in this thesis is the development of a therapeutic immunization strategy against cervical cancer and pre-malignant precursor lesions of cervical cancer (CIN lesions). Cervical cancer is caused by high risk human papillomavirus (HPV). Two of the early proteins of high r

  6. Cell-mediated immune suppression effect of rocket kerosene through dermal exposure in mice

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    Bing-xin XU

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective To study the effect of cell-mediated immune suppression effect of rocket kerosene (RK through dermal application in mice. Methods Skin delayed type hypersensitivity (DTH was used to observe the relation of the RK amount the skin exposed and the cellular immune inhibitory function. Different amount of the undiluted fuel was smeared directly onto the dorsal skin of mice. Mice in negative and positive control groups were treated with acetone. After the last exposure, all the mice except those in negative control group were allergized by evenly smearing with 1% dinitrofluorobenzene (DNFB solution on their dorsum. Five days after allergy, 1% DNFB solution was smeared onto right ear of all mice to stimulate the allergic reaction. Twenty-four hours after attack, the auricle swelling, spleen index and thymus index in corresponding mice were determined. In the first series of experiments, different dosages of RK were applied once, and the ICR mice were randomly divided into negative control group, positive control group and experimental group (0.5ml/kg.BW×1, 1ml/kg.BW×1 and 2ml/kg.BW×1 group. In the second series of experiments, the certain and same dosage of RK was applied for different times, and the ICR mice were randomly divided into negative control group, positive control group and experimental group (0.5ml/kg.BW×1, 0.5mL/kg.BW×2, 0.5ml/kg.BW×3, 0.5ml/kg.BW×4 and 0.5mL/kg.BW×5 group. In the third series of experiments, the different dosages of RK were applied more than once, and the ICR mice were randomly divided into negative control group, positive control group and experimental group (0.5ml/kg.BW×5, 1ml/kg.BW×5 and 2ml/kg.BW×5 group. Lymphocyte proliferation experiment in vitrowas conducted to observe the persistent time of the cell-mediated immune suppression in mice by RK dermal exposure. The lymphocyte proliferation induced by concanavalin A (Con A was analyzed by MTT assay, and T lymphocyte subsets (CD3+, CD4+ and CD

  7. Immune regulatory effects of simvastatin on regulatory T cell-mediated tumour immune tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, K J; Moon, J Y; Choi, H K; Kim, H O; Hur, G Y; Jung, K H; Lee, S Y; Kim, J H; Shin, C; Shim, J J; In, K H; Yoo, S H; Kang, K H; Lee, S Y

    2010-08-01

    Statins are potent inhibitors of hydroxyl-3-methylglutaryl co-enzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase, and have emerged as potential anti-cancer agents based on preclinical evidence. In particular, compelling evidence suggests that statins have a wide range of immunomodulatory properties. However, little is known about the role of statins in tumour immune tolerance. Tumour immune tolerance involves the production of immunosuppressive molecules, such as interleukin (IL)-10, transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta and indoleamine-2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) by tumours, which induce a regulatory T cell (T(reg)) response. In this study, we investigated the effect of simvastatin on the production of IL-10, TGF-beta and IDO production and the proliferation of T(regs) using several cancer cell lines, and Lewis lung cancer (3LL) cells-inoculated mouse tumour model. Simvastatin treatment resulted in a decrease in the number of cancer cells (3LL, A549 and NCI-H292). The production of the immune regulatory markers IL-10, TGF-beta in 3LL and NCI-H292 cells increased after treatment with simvastatin. The expression of IDO and forkhead box P3 (FoxP3) transcription factor was also increased in the presence of simvastatin. In a murine 3LL model, there were no significant differences in tumour growth rate between untreated and simvastatin-treated mice groups. Therefore, while simvastatin had an anti-proliferative effect, it also exhibited immune tolerance-promoting properties during tumour development. Thus, due to these opposing actions, simvastatin had no net effect on tumour growth.

  8. Cell-mediated immune response of synovial fluid lymphocytes to ureaplasma antigen in Reiter's syndrome

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    Pavlica Ljiljana

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION Reiter's syndrome (RS is an seronegative arthritis that occurs after urogenital or enteric infection which in addition with occular and/or mucocutaneous manifestations presents complete form of disease. According to previous understanding arthritis in the RS is the reactive one, which means that it is impossible to isolate its causative agent. However, there are the more and more authors suggesting that arthritis in the urogenital form of disease is caused by the infective agent in the affected joint. This suggestion is based on numerous studies on the presence of Chlmaydia trachomatis and Ureaplasma urealyticum in the inflamed joint by using new diagnostic methods in molecular biology published in the recent literature [1-3]. Besides, numerous studies of the humoral and cell-mediated immune response to "triggering" bacteria in the affected joint have supported previous suggestions [4-7]. Aim of the study was to determine whether synovial fluid T-cells specifically recognize the "triggering" bacteria presumably responsible for the Reiter's syndrome. METHOD The 3H-thymidine uptake procedure for measuring lymphocyte responses was applied to lymphocytes derived concurrently from synovial fluid (SF and from peripheral blood (PB [8]. Ureaplasma antigen and mitogen PHA stimulated lymphocytes in 24 RS patients (24 PB samples, 9 SF samples and the results were compared with those found in 10 patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA (10 PB samples, 5 SF samples. Preparation of ureaplasma antigen. Ureaplasma was cultured on cell-free liquid medium [9]. Sample of 8 ml was heat-inactivated for 15 minutes at 601C and permanently stirred with magnetic mixer. The sample was centrifuged at 2000 x g for 40 minutes and than deposits carefully carried to other sterile glass tubes (Corex and recentrifuged at 9000 x g for 30 minutes. The deposit was washed 3 times in sterile 0.9% NaCl, and final sediment was resuspended in 1.2 ml sterile 0.9% Na

  9. Studies of cell-mediated immune responses to influenza vaccination in systemic lupus erythematosus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holvast, Albert; Van Assen, Sander; De Haan, Aalzen; Huckriede, Anke; Benne, Cornelis A.; Westra, Johanna; Palache, Abraham; Wilschut, Jan; Kallenberg, Cornelis; Bijl, Marc

    2009-01-01

    Objective. Both antibody and cell-mediated responses are involved in the defense against influenza. In patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), a decreased antibody response to subunit influenza vaccine has been demonstrated, but cell-mediated responses have not yet been assessed. This stud

  10. Epstein-Barr virus reactivation associated with diminished cell-mediated immunity in antarctic expeditioners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, S. K.; Pierson, D. L.; Cooley, H.; Dubow, R.; Lugg, D.

    2000-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) reactivation and cell-mediated immune (CMI) responses were followed in 16 Antarctic expeditioners during winter-over isolation at 2 Australian National Antarctic Research Expedition stations. Delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) skin testing was used as an indicator of the CMI response, that was evaluated 2 times before winter isolation and 3 times during isolation. At all 5 evaluation times, 8 or more of the 16 subjects had a diminished CMI response. Diminished DTH was observed on every test occasion in 4/16 subjects; only 2/16 subjects exhibited normal DTH responses for all 5 tests. A polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay was used to detect EBV DNA in saliva specimens collected before, during, and after the winter isolation. EBV DNA was present in 17% (111/642) of the saliva specimens; all 16 subjects shed EBV in their saliva on at least 1 occasion. The probability of EBV shedding increased (P = 0.013) from 6% before or after winter isolation to 13% during the winter period. EBV appeared in saliva during the winter isolation more frequently (P viruses.

  11. Melatonin treatment prevents modulation of cell-mediated immune response induced by propoxur in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suke, Sanvidhan G; Pathak, Rahul; Ahmed, Rafat S; Tripathi, A K; Banerjee, B D

    2008-08-01

    The effect of melatonin, a major secretory product of the pineal gland, in attenuation of propoxur (2-isopropoxy phenyl N-methyl carbamate)-induced modulation of cell-mediated immune (CMI) response was studied in rats. Male Wistar albino rats were exposed to propoxur (a widely used pesticide) orally (10 mg/kg) and/or melatonin (10 mg/kg) orally for 4 weeks. CMI was measured by delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH), leucocyte and macrophage migration inhibition (LMI and MMI) responses and estimation of cytokines TNF-alpha and IFN-gamma levels. Rats exposed to propoxur for 4 weeks showed significant decrease in DTH, LMI and MMI responses. Propoxur also suppressed TNF-alpha and IFN-gamma production significantly. Administration of melatonin alone caused a significant increase in DTH response. Although there were no changes in the LMI and MMI response, the cytokine levels were significantly increased, as compared to control. Co-administration of melatonin along with propoxur significantly nullified the effect of the pesticide on the CMI response, except DTH and reversed levels of cytokines to near control/normal values. Thus, melatonin treatment considerably attenuated immunomodulation caused by sub-chronic treatment of propoxur in experimental animals.

  12. MYSM1-dependent checkpoints in B cell lineage differentiation and B cell-mediated immune response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Förster, Michael; Farrington, Kyo; Petrov, Jessica C; Belle, Jad I; Mindt, Barbara C; Witalis, Mariko; Duerr, Claudia U; Fritz, Jörg H; Nijnik, Anastasia

    2017-03-01

    MYSM1 is a chromatin-binding histone deubiquitinase. MYSM1 mutations in humans result in lymphopenia whereas loss of Mysm1 in mice causes severe hematopoietic abnormalities, including an early arrest in B cell development. However, it remains unknown whether MYSM1 is required at later checkpoints in B cell development or for B cell-mediated immune responses. We analyzed conditional mouse models Mysm1(fl/fl)Tg.mb1-cre, Mysm1(fl/fl)Tg.CD19-cre, and Mysm1(fl/fl)Tg.CD21-cre with inactivation of Mysm1 at prepro-B, pre-B, and follicular B cell stages of development. We show that loss of Mysm1 at the prepro-B cell stage in Mysm1(fl/fl)Tg.mb1-cre mice results in impaired B cell differentiation, with an ∼2-fold reduction in B cell numbers in the lymphoid organs. Mysm1(fl/fl)Tg.mb1-cre B cells also showed increased expression of activation markers and impaired survival and proliferation. In contrast, Mysm1 was largely dispensable from the pre-B cell stage onward, with Mysm1(fl/fl)Tg.CD19-cre and Mysm1(fl/fl)Tg.CD21-cre mice showing no alterations in B cell numbers and largely normal responses to stimulation. MYSM1, therefore, has an essential role in B cell lineage specification but is dispensable at later stages of development. Importantly, MYSM1 activity at the prepro-B cell stage of development is important for the normal programming of B cell responses to stimulation once they complete their maturation process.

  13. Cell-mediated immunity to insulin: a new criterion for differentiation of diabetes mellitus?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asfandiyarova, Nailya S

    2012-03-01

    Any classification is a step forward and it should help to determine the reason, the course, the prognosis, the treatment of a disease. The current classification of diabetes mellitus (DM) is really very convenient for work, but it has some drawbacks, and the absence of differentiation of type 2 diabetes is the main. The problem is the absence of an adequate criterion, based on pathogenesis for differentiation. We suppose that cell mediated immunity (CMI) to insulin plays the central role in the diabetes genesis. Autoimmune process may be triggered by viruses family Paramyxoviridae, in 10-20% of type 1 diabetes patients the disease is a consequence of direct cytotoxic effect of other viruses to the islet cells of pancreas. In acute phase of viral infection (measles, mumps, parainfluenza) CMI against viruses is developed, in some patients CMI to insulin appeared. We suppose that autoimmune reactions in these cases are the result of cross reaction between viral antigens and insulin. The majorities of patients suppress these reactions and recover from acute infection diseases with the antiviral immunity development and without any complications. Other patients are not able to suppress autoimmune reactions to insulin and pathological process is triggered. Type 1A diabetes is a result of direct CMI to insulin, and this process is responsible for beta-cells destruction; may be type 1B DM is due to the direct cytotoxic effect of other viruses or toxins to them. Some patients with acute viral infection cannot destroy the aggressive clone and they suppress autoimmune reaction to insulin by prostaglandin synthesizing cells (PGSC) or сells with histamine receptors (CHR). As a result of this process the insulin resistance is developed, because these cells or their cytokines form a block to the insulin receptors not only on immunocompetent cells, but in insulin sensitive tissues too. Patients with different reactions to insulin have different courses and outcomes of DM. We

  14. Novel antigens used to detect cell-mediated immune responses over time in Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis infected cattle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Heidi; Aagaard, Claus; Nielsen, Søren Saxmose;

    Early stage Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) infection of cattle can be detected by measuring specific cell mediated immune responses, using the interferon gamma (IFN-γ) test. Available IFN-γ tests are using purified protein derivatives of MAP (PPDj) which are crude products...... on the same 30 heifers from a known MAP infected herd. Determination of cut-off for each antigen was based on samples from a non-infected herd, including 60 heifers. Based on PPDj stimulations, more than 50% of the heifers tested MAP positive at the first two samplings, whereas only 20% tested positive...

  15. Effects of depression on parameters of cell-mediated immunity in patients with digestive tract cancers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ke-Jun Nan; Yong-Chang Wei; Fu-Ling Zhou; Chun-Li Li; Chen-Guang Sui; Ling-Yun Hui; Cheng-Ge Gao

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the effects of depression on parameters of cell-mediated immunity in patients with cancers of the digestive tract.METHODS: One hundred and eight adult patients of both sexes with cancers of the digestive tract admitted between March 2001 and February 2002 in the Department of Medical Oncology, First Affiliated Hospital of Xi'an Jiaotong University were randomly enrolled in the study. The Zung self-rating depression scale (SDS), Zung self-rating anxiety scale(SAS), numeric rating scale (NRS) and social support rating scale (SSRS) were employed to evaluate the degree of depression and their contributing factors. In terms of their SDS index scores, the patients were categorized into depression group (SDS≥50) and non-depression group(SDS<50). Immunological parameters such as T-lymphocyte subsets and natural killer (NK) cell activities in peripheral blood were determined and compared between the two groups of patients.RESULTS: The SDS index was from 33.8 to 66.2 in the 108 cases, 50% of these patients had a SDS index more than 50. Similarly, the SAS index of all the patients ranged from 35.0 to 62.0 and 46.3% of the cases had a SAS index above 50. Cubic curve estimation showed that the depression was positively correlated with anxiety and negatively with social support. Furthermore, the depression correlated with the tumor type, which manifested in a descending order as stomach, gallbladder, pancreas, intestine, esophagus,duodenum and rectum, according to their correlativity. Step-wise regression analysis suggested that hyposexuality,dispidtment, agitation, palpitation, low CD56 and anxiety were the significant factors contributing to depression. More severe anxiety (49.7±7.5 vs 45.3±6.9, P<0.05), pain (6.5±2.8 vs4.6±3.2, P<0.05), poor social support (6.8±2.0 vs 7.6±2.1,P<0.05), as well as decline of lymphocyte count (0.33±0.09vs0.39±0.87, P<0.05) and CD56 (0.26±0.11 vs0.29±0.11,P<0.05) were noted in the depression group compared

  16. Caloric Restriction reduces inflammation and improves T cell-mediated immune response in obese mice but concomitant consumption of curcumin/piperine adds no further benefit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obesity is associated with low-grade inflammation and impaired immune response. Caloric restriction (CR) has been shown to inhibit inflammatory response and enhance cell-mediated immune function. Curcumin, the bioactive phenolic component of turmeric spice, is proposed to have anti-obesity and anti-...

  17. Induction of Wnt-inducible signaling protein-1 correlates with invasive breast cancer oncogenesis and reduced type 1 cell-mediated cytotoxic immunity: a retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klinke, David J

    2014-01-01

    Innate and type 1 cell-mediated cytotoxic immunity function as important extracellular control mechanisms that maintain cellular homeostasis. Interleukin-12 (IL12) is an important cytokine that links innate immunity with type 1 cell-mediated cytotoxic immunity. We recently observed in vitro that tumor-derived Wnt-inducible signaling protein-1 (WISP1) exerts paracrine action to suppress IL12 signaling. The objective of this retrospective study was three fold: 1) to determine whether a gene signature associated with type 1 cell-mediated cytotoxic immunity was correlated with overall survival, 2) to determine whether WISP1 expression is increased in invasive breast cancer, and 3) to determine whether a gene signature consistent with inhibition of IL12 signaling correlates with WISP1 expression. Clinical information and mRNA expression for genes associated with anti-tumor immunity were obtained from the invasive breast cancer arm of the Cancer Genome Atlas study. Patient cohorts were identified using hierarchical clustering. The immune signatures associated with the patient cohorts were interpreted using model-based inference of immune polarization. Reverse phase protein array, tissue microarray, and quantitative flow cytometry in breast cancer cell lines were used to validate observed differences in gene expression. We found that type 1 cell-mediated cytotoxic immunity was correlated with increased survival in patients with invasive breast cancer, especially in patients with invasive triple negative breast cancer. Oncogenic transformation in invasive breast cancer was associated with an increase in WISP1. The gene expression signature in invasive breast cancer was consistent with WISP1 as a paracrine inhibitor of type 1 cell-mediated immunity through inhibiting IL12 signaling and promoting type 2 immunity. Moreover, model-based inference helped identify appropriate immune signatures that can be used as design constraints in genetically engineering better pre

  18. Inter- and intra-individual variation in tests of cell-mediated immunity in young and old women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molls, Roshni R; Ahluwalia, Namanjeet; Fick, Tara; Mastro, Andrea M; Wagstaff, David; Handte, Gordon; Ball, Rick

    2003-05-01

    Exploring means to maintain or improve immunity in older persons has been receiving attention. To establish relationships between immune function and variables of interest, it is important to determine these variables accurately and precisely. Precision relates to the degree of variation in the laboratory test. The nature and magnitude of variability in tests of immune function has not been described extensively. We examined inter- and intra-individual variation in tests of cell-mediated immunity (CMI) in generally healthy and well-nourished young (20-40 years; n=15) and old (60-80 years; n=15) women. Subjects provided blood samples on 2 days within a week to determine leukocyte subsets, T-cell proliferation response to phytohemagglutinin A and concanavalin A, and interleukin (IL)-1beta, IL-2 and IL-6 production by stimulated mononuclear cells. Intra-individual variation was partitioned into day-to-day biological and analytical variation. Inter-individual variation was greater than intra-individual variability for most tests of CMI for both age groups. Furthermore, all CMI tests exhibited large day-to-day intra-individual variation (CV approximately 15% or greater) which was primarily due to biological rather than analytical sources, for both age groups. In conclusion, both age groups showed large between-person and considerable within-person variation in CMI tests. Therefore, assessment of CMI based on a single blood draw may not provide a reliable estimate of immune function.

  19. Development of a lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-supplemented adjuvant and its effects on cell-mediated and humoral immune responses in male rats immunized against sperm

    Science.gov (United States)

    NOGUCHI, Junko; WATANABE, Shinya; NGUYEN, Thanh Q. Dang; KIKUCHI, Kazuhiro; KANEKO, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    Supplementation with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from non-pathogenic Escherichia coli was found to enhance the adjuvant effects of a veterinary vaccine adjuvant (ISA 71VG®). Sperm immunization using 71VG as an adjuvant in the immature period induced infertility in 25% of male rats, whereas this increased to 62.5% after immunization with 71VG + LPS or Freund′s complete adjuvant (FCA). Mean testicular weight of non-sterile males in the 71VG + LPS group was significantly lower than that in the 71VG or FCA group. Histological examination of testicular tissue from sterile males demonstrated severe impairment of spermatogenesis due to experimental autoimmune orchitis, a cell-mediated autoimmune condition. The serum anti-sperm titer was elevated in the three sperm-immunized groups relative to male rats treated with adjuvant alone, but the titer was higher in the 71VG + LPS and FCA groups than in the 71VG group. We consider that this LPS-supplemented adjuvant stimulates both humoral and cell-mediated immune responses to an extent comparable to FCA. PMID:27890874

  20. Effect of rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis extract on weight, hematology and cell-mediated immune response of newborn goat kids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borhan Shokrollahi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed at evaluating the effects of different levels of rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis extract on growth rate, hematology and cell-mediated immune response in Markhoz newborn goat kids. Twenty four goat kids (aged 7±3 days were randomly allotted to four groups with six replicates. The groups included: control, T1, T2 and T3 groups which received supplemented-milk with 0, 100, 200 and 400mg aqueous rosemary extract per kg of live body weight per day for 42 days. Body weights of kids were measured weekly until the end of the experiment. On day 42, 10 ml blood samples were collected from each kid through the jugular vein. Cell-mediated immune response was assessed through the double skin thickness after intradermal injection of phyto-hematoglutinin (PHA at day 21 and 42. No significant differences were seen in initial body weight, average daily gain (ADG and total gain. However, significant differences in globulin (P<0.05, and white blood cells (WBC (P<0.001 were observed. There were no significant differences in haemoglobin (Hb, packed cell volume (PCV, red blood cells (RBC, lymphocytes and neutrophils between the treatments. Skin thickness in response to intra dermal injection of PHA significantly increased in the treated groups as compared to the control group at day 42 (P<0.01 with the T3 group showing the highest response to PHA injection. In conclusion, the results indicated that aqueous rosemary extract supplemented-milk had a positive effect on immunity and skin thickness of newborn goat kids.

  1. Dendritic Cell-Mediated Phagocytosis but Not Immune Activation Is Enhanced by Plasmin.

    OpenAIRE

    Borg, Rachael J.; Samson, Andre L.; Amanda E-L Au; Anja Scholzen; Martina Fuchsberger; Kong, Ying Y.; Roxann Freeman; Nicole A Mifsud; Magdalena Plebanski; Medcalf, Robert L.

    2015-01-01

    Removal of dead cells in the absence of concomitant immune stimulation is essential for tissue homeostasis. We recently identified an injury-induced protein misfolding event that orchestrates the plasmin-dependent proteolytic degradation of necrotic cells. As impaired clearance of dead cells by the innate immune system predisposes to autoimmunity, we determined whether plasmin could influence endocytosis and immune cell stimulation by dendritic cells - a critical cell that links the innate an...

  2. Transfer of T-cell mediated immunity to Hymenolepis nana from mother mice to their neonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asano, K; Okamoto, K

    1992-01-15

    Administration of lymph node cells from Hymenolepis nana-infected mice into lactating mothers, or directly suckling neonates successfully transferred immunity to the neonates. The capacity of lymph node cells to transfer immunity was completely abrogated by pretreatment with anti-Thy-1.2 monoclonal antibody and complement.

  3. Direct and Indirect Role of Toll-Like Receptors in T Cell Mediated Immunity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DamoXu; HaiyingLiu; MousaKomai-Koma

    2004-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLR) are pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) recognition receptors that play an important role in protective immunity against infection and inflammation. They act as central integrators of a wide variety of signals, responding to diverse agonists of microbial products. Stimulation of Toll-like receptors by microbial products leads to signaling pathways that activate not only innate, but also adaptive immunity by APC dependent or independent mechanisms. Recent evidence revealed that TLR signals played a determining role in the skewing of naive T cells towards either Thl or Th2 responses. Activation of Toll-like receptors also directly or indirectly influences regulatory T cell functions. Therefore, TLRs are required in both immune activation and immune regulation. Study of TLRs has significantly enhanced our understanding of innate and adaptive immune responses and provides novel therapeutic approaches against infectious and inflammatory diseases. Cellular & Molecular Immunology.

  4. Direct and Indirect Role of Toll-Like Receptors in T Cell Mediated Immunity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Damo Xu; Haiying Liu; Mousa Komai-Koma

    2004-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLR) are pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) recognition receptors that play an important role in protective immunity against infection and inflammation. They act as central integrators of a wide variety of signals, responding to diverse agonists of microbial products. Stimulation of Toll-like receptors by microbial products leads to signaling pathways that activate not only innate, but also adaptive immunity by APC dependent or independent mechanisms. Recent evidence revealed that TLR signals played a determining role in the skewing of na(i)ve T cells towards either Th1 or Th2 responses. Activation of Toll-like receptors also directly or indirectly influences regulatory T cell functions. Therefore, TLRs are required in both immune activation and immune regulation. Study of TLRs has significantly enhanced our understanding of innate and adaptive immune responses and provides novel therapeutic approaches against infectious and inflammatory diseases.

  5. Differential cell-mediated immune response to S. mutans in children with low and high dental caries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkash, H; Sharma, A; Banerjee, U; Sidhu, S S; Sundaram, K R

    1993-08-01

    Role of cell-mediated immune response (CMI) in dental caries was studied in 171 subjects, comprising of 86 children with low caries (LC), 31 with high caries (HC), and 54 age matched controls. [3H]thymidine mediated lymphoblast transformation test (LTT) using mutans streptococci antigen as stimulant was used to study the stimulation index (SI) of in vitro cultured lymphocytes from these children. The analysis revealed low stimulation index in high caries children whereas low caries children exhibited high stimulation index normally ranging between 2 to 6. The findings indicated that low caries children had strong CMI response as compared to high caries children. Although, the findings are based on limited number of samples, it certainly lays emphasis on protective or regulatory role of CMI in different phases of dental caries.

  6. Global dynamics of cell mediated immunity in viral infection models with distributed delays

    CERN Document Server

    Nakata, Yukihiko

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate global dynamics for a system of delay differential equations which describes a virus-immune interaction in \\textit{vivo}. The model has two distributed time delays describing time needed for infection of cell and virus replication. Our model admits three possible equilibria, an uninfected equilibrium and infected equilibrium with or without immune response depending on the basic reproduction number for viral infection $R_{0}$ and for CTL response $R_{1}$ such that $R_{1}1$. The immune activation has a positive role in the reduction of the infection cells and the increasing of the uninfected cells if $R_{1}>1$.

  7. The Ebola Interferon Inhibiting Domains Attenuate and Dysregulate Cell-Mediated Immune Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Michelle; Koup, Richard A.; Bukreyev, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Ebola virus (EBOV) infections are characterized by deficient T-lymphocyte responses, T-lymphocyte apoptosis and lymphopenia. We previously showed that disabling of interferon-inhibiting domains (IIDs) in the VP24 and VP35 proteins effectively unblocks maturation of dendritic cells (DCs) and increases the secretion of cytokines and chemokines. Here, we investigated the role of IIDs in adaptive and innate cell-mediated responses using recombinant viruses carrying point mutations, which disabled IIDs in VP24 (EBOV/VP24m), VP35 (EBOV/VP35m) or both (EBOV/VP35m/VP24m). Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from cytomegalovirus (CMV)-seropositive donors were inoculated with the panel of viruses and stimulated with CMV pp65 peptides. Disabling of the VP35 IID resulted in increased proliferation and higher percentages of CD4+ T cells secreting IFNγ and/or TNFα. To address the role of aberrant DC maturation in the IID-mediated suppression of T cell responses, CMV-stimulated DCs were infected with the panel of viruses and co-cultured with autologous T-lymphocytes. Infection with EBOV/VP35m infection resulted in a significant increase, as compared to wt EBOV, in proliferating CD4+ cells secreting IFNγ, TNFα and IL-2. Experiments with expanded CMV-specific T cells demonstrated their increased activation following co-cultivation with CMV-pulsed DCs pre-infected with EBOV/VP24m, EBOV/VP35m and EBOV/VP35m/VP24m, as compared to wt EBOV. Both IIDs were found to block phosphorylation of TCR complex-associated adaptors and downstream signaling molecules. Next, we examined the effects of IIDs on the function of B cells in infected PBMC. Infection with EBOV/VP35m and EBOV/VP35m/VP24m resulted in significant increases in the percentages of phenotypically distinct B-cell subsets and plasma cells, as compared to wt EBOV, suggesting inhibition of B cell function and differentiation by VP35 IID. Finally, infection with EBOV/VP35m increased activation of NK cells, as compared to wt

  8. Empirical evidence of cold stress induced cell mediated and humoral immune response in common myna ( Sturnus tristis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandhu, Mansur A.; Zaib, Anila; Anjum, Muhammad S.; Qayyum, Mazhar

    2015-11-01

    Common myna ( Sturnus tristis) is a bird indigenous to the Indian subcontinent that has invaded many parts of the world. At the onset of our investigation, we hypothesized that the immunological profile of myna makes it resistant to harsh/new environmental conditions. In order to test this hypothesis, a number of 40 mynas were caught and divided into two groups, i.e., 7 and 25 °C for 14 days. To determine the effect of cold stress, cell mediated and humoral immune responses were assessed. The macrophage engulfment percentage was significantly ( P blood cells (SRBC). Macrophage engulfment/cell and nitric oxide production behaved in a similar manner. However, splenic cells plaque formation, heterophil to lymphocyte (H/L) ratio, and serum IgM or IgG production remained non-significant. There was a significant increase of IgG antibody production after a second immunization by SRBC. To the best of our knowledge, these findings have never been reported in the progression of this bird's invasion in frosty areas of the world. The results revealed a strengthened humoral immune response of myna and made this bird suitable for invasion in the areas of harsh conditions.

  9. In vitro enhancement of dendritic cell-mediated anti-glioma immune response by graphene oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Li, Zhongjun; Duan, Jinhong; Wang, Chen; Fang, Ying; Yang, Xian-Da

    2014-06-01

    Malignant glioma has extremely poor prognosis despite combination treatments with surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy. Dendritic cell (DC)-based immunotherapy may potentially serve as an adjuvant treatment of glioma, but its efficacy generally needs further improvement. Here we explored whether graphene oxide (GO) nanosheets could modulate the DC-mediated anti-glioma immune response in vitro, using the T98G human glioma cell line as the study model. Pulsing DCs with a glioma peptide antigen (Ag) generated a limited anti-glioma response compared to un-pulsed DCs. Pulsing DCs with GO alone failed to produce obvious immune modulation effects. However, stimulating DCs with a mixture of GO and Ag (GO-Ag) significantly enhanced the anti-glioma immune reaction ( p < 0.05). The secretion of interferon gamma (IFN-γ) by the lymphocytes was also markedly boosted by GO-Ag. Additionally, the anti-glioma immune response induced by GO-Ag appeared to be target-specific. Furthermore, at the concentration used in this study, GO exhibited a negligible effect on the viability of the DCs. These results suggested that GO might have potential utility for boosting a DC-mediated anti-glioma immune response.

  10. Genetic adjuvantation of recombinant MVA with CD40L potentiates CD8 T cell mediated immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henning eLauterbach

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA is a safe and promising viral vaccine vector that is currently investigated in several clinical and pre-clinical trials. In contrast to inactivated or sub-unit vaccines, MVA is able to induce strong humoral as well as cellular immune responses. In order to further improve its CD8 T cell inducing capacity, we genetically adjuvanted MVA with the coding sequence of murine CD40L, a member of the tumor necrosis factor (TNF superfamily. Immunization of mice with this new vector led to strongly enhanced primary and memory CD8 T cell responses. Concordant with the enhanced CD8 T cell response, we could detect stronger activation of dendritic cells and higher systemic levels of innate cytokines (including IL-12p70 early after immunization. Interestingly, acquisition of memory characteristics (i.e., IL-7R expression was accelerated after immunization with MVA-CD40L in comparison to non-adjuvanted MVA. Furthermore, the generated CTLs also showed improved functionality as demonstrated by intracellular cytokine staining and in vivo killing activity. Importantly, the superior CTL response after a single MVA-CD40L immunization was able to protect B cell deficient mice against a fatal infection with ectromelia virus. Taken together, we show that genetic adjuvantation of MVA can change strength, quality and functionality of innate and adaptive immune responses. These data should facilitate a rational vaccine design with a focus on rapid induction of large numbers of CD8 T cells able to protect against specific diseases.

  11. Immunization of Mice with a Live Transconjugant Shigella Hybrid Strain Induced Th1 and Th17 Cell-Mediated Immune Responses and Confirmed Passive Protection Against Heterologous Shigellae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nag, D; Koley, H; Sinha, R; Mukherjee, P; Sarkar, C; Withey, J H; Gachhui, R

    2016-02-01

    An avirulent, live transconjugant Shigella hybrid (LTSHΔstx) strain was constructed in our earlier study by introducing a plasmid vector, pPR1347, into a Shiga toxin gene deleted Shigella dysenteriae 1. Three successive oral administrations of LTSHΔstx to female adult mice produced comprehensive passive heterologous protection in their offspring against challenge with wild-type shigellae. Production of NO and different cytokines such asIL-12p70, IL-1β and IL-23 in peritoneal mice macrophages indicated that LTSHΔstx induced innate and adaptive immunity in mice. Furthermore, production of IFN-γ, IL-10 and IL-17 in LTSH-primed splenic CD4+ T cell suggested that LTSHΔstx may induce Th1 and Th17 cell-mediated immune responses. Exponential increase of the serum IgG and IgA titre against whole shigellae was observed in immunized adult mice during and after the immunization with the highest peak on day 35. Antigen-specific sIgA was also determined from intestinal lavage of immunized mice. The stomach extracts of neonates from immunized mice, mainly containing mother's milk, contained significant levels of anti-LTSHΔstx immunoglobulin. These studies suggest that the LTSHΔstx could be a new live oral vaccine candidate against shigellosis in the near future.

  12. Cell-mediated immunity to Plasmodium falciparum infection: evidence against the involvement of cytotoxic lymphocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Theander, T G; Andersen, B J; Pedersen, B K;

    1988-01-01

    by either SPag or PPD in the presence of immune serum. Studies on subpopulations of PBMC indicated that the inhibitory cells resided among the adherent cell fraction. Furthermore we tested PBMC for cytotoxic activity against P. falciparum-infected autologous or heterologous erythrocytes. Experiments were...... done both in the absence and the presence of immune serum. Neither fresh PBMC nor PBMC activated by SPag or PPD for 7 days prior to assay were cytotoxic, indicating that cytotoxic T cells, natural killer (NK) cells, and K cells did not possess cytotoxic activity directed against parasitized...

  13. Characteristics of Cell-mediated, Anti-listerial Immunity Induced by A Naturally Avirulent Listeria monocytogenes Serotype 4a Strain HCC23

    Science.gov (United States)

    The characteristics of cell-mediated, anti-listerial immune response initiated by an avirulent Listeria monocytogenes serotype 4a strain HCC23 was assessed. Similar to virulent strain EGD, avirulent strain HCC23 grew readily within macrophage-like J774 cells, but nonhemolytic strain ATCC 15313 did n...

  14. Isolation of Mallory bodies and an attempt to demonstrate cell mediated immunity to Mallory body isolate in patients with alcoholic liver disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gluud, C; Hardt, F; Aldershvile, J;

    1981-01-01

    in haematoxylin-eosin stained smears. Electron microscopy confirmed the presence of Mallory bodies in the isolates. The Mallory body isolate was used as antigen in the agarose leucocyte migration inhibition test in order to test the cell-mediated immunity. No significant difference in leucocyte migration...

  15. γδ T Cell-Mediated Immunity to Cytomegalovirus Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khairallah, Camille; Déchanet-Merville, Julie; Capone, Myriam

    2017-01-01

    γδ T lymphocytes are unconventional immune cells, which have both innate- and adaptive-like features allowing them to respond to a wide spectrum of pathogens. For many years, we and others have reported on the role of these cells in the immune response to human cytomegalovirus in transplant patients, pregnant women, neonates, immunodeficient children, and healthy people. Indeed, and as described for CD8+ T cells, CMV infection leaves a specific imprint on the γδ T cell compartment: (i) driving a long-lasting expansion of oligoclonal γδ T cells in the blood of seropositive individuals, (ii) inducing their differentiation into effector/memory cells expressing a TEMRA phenotype, and (iii) enhancing their antiviral effector functions (i.e., cytotoxicity and IFNγ production). Recently, two studies using murine CMV (MCMV) have corroborated and extended these observations. In particular, they have illustrated the ability of adoptively transferred MCMV-induced γδ T cells to protect immune-deficient mice against virus-induced death. In vivo, expansion of γδ T cells is associated with the clearance of CMV infection as well as with reduced cancer occurrence or leukemia relapse risk in kidney transplant patients and allogeneic stem cell recipients, respectively. Taken together, all these studies show that γδ T cells are important immune effectors against CMV and cancer, which are life-threatening diseases affecting transplant recipients. The ability of CMV-induced γδ T cells to act independently of other immune cells opens the door to the development of novel cellular immunotherapies that could be particularly beneficial for immunocompromised transplant recipients.

  16. Memory T-Cell-Mediated Immune Responses Specific to an Alternative Core Protein in Hepatitis C Virus Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bain, Christine; Parroche, Peggy; Lavergne, Jean Pierre; Duverger, Blandine; Vieux, Claude; Dubois, Valérie; Komurian-Pradel, Florence; Trépo, Christian; Gebuhrer, Lucette; Paranhos-Baccala, Glaucia; Penin, François; Inchauspé, Geneviève

    2004-01-01

    In vitro studies have described the synthesis of an alternative reading frame form of the hepatitis C virus (HCV) core protein that was named F protein or ARFP (alternative reading frame protein) and includes a domain coded by the +1 open reading frame of the RNA core coding region. The expression of this protein in HCV-infected patients remains controversial. We have analyzed peripheral blood from 47 chronically or previously HCV-infected patients for the presence of T lymphocytes and antibodies specific to the ARFP. Anti-ARFP antibodies were detected in 41.6% of the patients infected with various HCV genotypes. Using a specific ARFP 99-amino-acid polypeptide as well as four ARFP predicted class I-restricted 9-mer peptides, we show that 20% of the patients display specific lymphocytes capable of producing gamma interferon, interleukin-10, or both cytokines. Patients harboring three different viral genotypes (1a, 1b, and 3) carried T lymphocytes reactive to genotype 1b-derived peptides. In longitudinal analysis of patients receiving therapy, both core and ARFP-specific T-cell- and B-cell-mediated responses were documented. The magnitude and kinetics of the HCV antigen-specific responses differed and were not linked with viremia or therapy outcome. These observations provide strong and new arguments in favor of the synthesis, during natural HCV infection, of an ARFP derived from the core sequence. Moreover, the present data provide the first demonstration of the presence of T-cell-mediated immune responses directed to this novel HCV antigen. PMID:15367612

  17. Recombinant nucleocapsid-like particles from dengue-2 induce functional serotype-specific cell-mediated immunity in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil, Lázaro; Bernardo, Lídice; Pavón, Alequis; Izquierdo, Alienys; Valdés, Iris; Lazo, Laura; Marcos, Ernesto; Romero, Yaremis; Guzmán, María G; Guillén, Gerardo; Hermida, Lisset

    2012-06-01

    The interplay of different inflammatory cytokines induced during dengue virus infection plays a role in either protection or increased disease severity. In this sense, vaccine strategies incorporating whole virus are able to elicit both functional and pathological responses. Therefore, an ideal tetravalent vaccine candidate against dengue should be focused on serotype-specific sequences. In the present work, a new formulation of nucleocapsid-like particles (NLPs) obtained from the recombinant dengue-2 capsid protein was evaluated in mice to determine the level of protection against homologous and heterologous viral challenge and to measure the cytotoxicity and cytokine-secretion profiles induced upon heterologous viral stimulation. As a result, a significant protection rate was achieved after challenge with lethal dengue-2 virus, which was dependent on CD4(+) and CD8(+) cells. In turn, no protection was observed after heterologous challenge. In accordance, in vitro-stimulated spleen cells from mice immunized with NLPs from the four dengue serotypes showed a serotype-specific response of gamma interferon- and tumour necrosis factor alpha-secreting cells. A similar pattern was detected when spleen cells from dengue-immunized animals were stimulated with the capsid protein. Taking these data together, we can assert that NLPs constitute an attractive vaccine candidate against dengue. They induce a functional immune response mediated by CD4(+) and CD8(+) cells in mice, which is protective against viral challenge. In turn, they are potentially safe due to two important facts: induction of serotype specific cell-mediated immunity and lack of induction of antiviral antibodies. Further studies in non-human primates or humanized mice should be carried out to elucidate the usefulness of the NLPs as a potential vaccine candidate against dengue disease.

  18. Clinical study of non-specific cell mediated immunity in the patients with esophageal cancer. Influence of preoperative irradiation and surgical intervention

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakata, Yoshitaka

    1987-06-01

    Few data are available to elucidate the influence of combined preoperative irradiation and surgery on the non-specific cell mediated immunity of patients with esophageal cancer. In vitro and in vivo examinations of the non-specific cell mediated immunity were made before and after irradiation and surgery in 108 patients with esophageal cancer. Decreased immune competence was noticeable one month after surgery in the irradiated group, as compared with the non-irradiated group. Simultaneously, the ratio of concanavalin A to phytohemagglutinin was significantly higher in the irradiated group than the non-irradiated group (p < 0.01). Two months later, both findings in the two groups were similar. There was no consistent tendency toward altered immune competence between the group with curative surgery and the group with non-curative surgery. (Namekawa, K.).

  19. IL-7 inhibits tumor growth by promoting T cell-mediated antitumor immunity in Meth A model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Jian-Cai; Shen, Guo-Bo; Wang, Shi-Min; Wan, Yong-Sheng; Wei, Yu-Quan

    2014-01-01

    Immune suppression is well documented during tumor progression, which includes loss of effect of T cells and expansion of T regulatory (Treg) cells. IL-7 plays a key role in the proliferation, survival and homeostasis of T cells and displays a potent antitumor activity in vivo. In the present study, we investigated the antitumor effect of IL-7 in Meth A model. IL-7 inhibited tumor growth and prolonged the survival of tumor-bearing mice with corresponding increases in the frequency of CD4 and CD8 T cells, Th1 (CD4(+)IFN-γ(+)), Tc1 (CD8(+)IFN-γ(+)) and T cells cytolytic activity against Meth A cells. Neutralization of CD4 or CD8 T cells reversed the antitumor benefit of IL-7. Furthermore, IL-7 decreased regulatory T Foxp3 as well as cells suppressive activity with a reciprocal increase in SMAD7. In addition, we observed an increase of the serum concentrations of IL-6 and IFN-γ, and a significant decrease of TGF-β and IL-10 after IL-7 treatment. Taken together, these results indicate that IL-7 augments T cell-mediated antitumor immunity and improves the effect of antitumor in Meth A model.

  20. Comparison of dendritic cell-mediated immune responses among canine malignant cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamura, Kyoichi; Arai, Hiroyoshi; Ueno, Emi; Saito, Chie; Yagihara, Hiroko; Isotani, Mayu; Ono, Kenichiro; Washizu, Tsukimi; Bonkobara, Makoto

    2007-09-01

    Dendritic cell (DC) vaccination is one of the most attractive immunotherapies for malignancies in dogs. To examine the differences in DC-mediated immune responses from different types of malignancies in dogs, we vaccinated dogs using autologous DCs pulsed with keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH) and cell lysate prepared from squamous cell carcinoma SCC2/88 (SCC-KLH-DC), histiocytic sarcoma CHS-5 (CHS-KLH-DC), or B cell leukemia GL-1 (GL-KLH-DC) in vitro. In vivo inductions of immune responses against these tumor cells were compared by the delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) skin test. The DTH response against SCC2/88 cells were observed in dogs vaccinated with autologous SCC-KLH-DC, while the response was undetectable against CHS-5 and GL-1 cells in dogs vaccinated with autologous CHS-KLH-DC and GL-KLH-DC. Skin biopsies taken from DTH challenge sites were then examined for immunohistochemistry, and recruitment of CD8 and CD4 T cells was detected at the site where SCC2/88 cells were inoculated in dogs vaccinated with SCC-KLH-DC. By contrast, neither CD8 nor CD4 T cell infiltration was found at the DTH challenge site in the dogs vaccinated with CHS-KLH-DC or GL-KLH-DC. These findings may reflect that the efficacy of immune induction by DC vaccination varies among tumor types and that immune responses could be inducible in squamous cell carcinoma. Our results encouraged further investigation of therapeutic vaccination for dogs with advanced squamous cell carcinoma in clinical trials.

  1. Cell-mediated responses of immunized vervet monkeys to defined Leishmania T-cell epitopes.

    OpenAIRE

    Curry, A J; Jardim, A; Olobo, J.O.; Olafson, R W

    1994-01-01

    A population of vervet monkeys was immunized with killed parasites and infected with Leishmania major promastigotes either by needle or by infected-fly bite. The responses of recovered monkeys to mitogens, killed parasites, and molecularly defined T-cell epitopes were then compared with those of control animals. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from both naive and recovered animals proliferated strongly in response to both B- and T-cell mitogens, although the responses of the recover...

  2. Activated T cells sustain myeloid-derived suppressor cell-mediated immune suppression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinton, Laura; Solito, Samantha; Damuzzo, Vera; Francescato, Samuela; Pozzuoli, Assunta; Berizzi, Antonio; Mocellin, Simone; Rossi, Carlo Riccardo; Bronte, Vincenzo; Mandruzzato, Susanna

    2016-01-12

    The expansion of myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSCs), a suppressive population able to hamper the immune response against cancer, correlates with tumor progression and overall survival in several cancer types. We have previously shown that MDSCs can be induced in vitro from precursors present in the bone marrow and observed that these cells are able to actively proliferate in the presence of activated T cells, whose activation level is critical to drive the suppressive activity of MDSCs. Here we investigated at molecular level the mechanisms involved in the interplay between MDSCs and activated T cells. We found that activated T cells secrete IL-10 following interaction with MDSCs which, in turn, activates STAT3 phosphorylation on MDSCs then leading to B7-H1 expression. We also demonstrated that B7-H1+ MDSCs are responsible for immune suppression through a mechanism involving ARG-1 and IDO expression. Finally, we show that the expression of ligands B7-H1 and MHC class II both on in vitro-induced MDSCs and on MDSCs in the tumor microenvironment of cancer patients is paralleled by an increased expression of their respective receptors PD-1 and LAG-3 on T cells, two inhibitory molecules associated with T cell dysfunction. These findings highlight key molecules and interactions responsible for the extensive cross-talk between MDSCs and activated T cells that are at the basis of immune suppression.

  3. Humoral and cell mediated immune responses to a pertussis containing vaccine in pregnant and nonpregnant women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huygen, Kris; Caboré, Raïssa Nadège; Maertens, Kirsten; Van Damme, Pierre; Leuridan, Elke

    2015-08-07

    Vaccination of pregnant women is recommended for some infectious diseases in order to protect both women and offspring through high titres of maternal IgG antibodies. Less is known on the triggering of cellular immune responses by vaccines administered during pregnancy. In an ongoing study on maternal pertussis vaccination (2012-2014) 18 pregnant women were vaccinated with a tetanus-diphtheria-acellular pertussis (Tdap) containing vaccine (Boostrix®) during the third pregnancy trimester. Sixteen age-matched nonpregnant women received the same vaccine in the same time period. A blood sample was taken at the moment of, but before vaccination and one month and one year after vaccination. Anti-Pertussis Toxin (PT), filamentous hemagglutinin (FHA), pertactin (Prn), tetanus toxin (TT) and diphtheria toxin (DT) antibodies were measured by ELISA. Cellular immune responses were analyzed using a diluted whole blood assay, measuring proliferation, and cytokine release in response to vaccine antigens PT, FHA, TT, and to pokeweed mitogen (PWM) as polyclonal stimulus. Antibody levels to all five vaccine components increased significantly and to the same extent after vaccination in pregnant and nonpregnant women. One year after vaccination, antibody titres had decreased particularly to PT, but they were still significantly higher to all antigens than before vaccination. In contrast, proliferative and IFN-γ responses were increased to TT, PT, and FHA in nonpregnant women one month after vaccination, whereas in pregnant women only TT specific T cell responses were increased and to a lesser extent than in the control group. One year after vaccination, cellular responses equaled the baseline levels detected prior to vaccination in both groups. In conclusion, a Tdap vaccination can increase vaccine specific IgG antibodies to the same extent in pregnant and in nonpregnant women, whereas the stimulation of vaccine specific Th1 type cellular immune responses with this acellular vaccine

  4. In vitro evaluation of live attenuated vaccines against Salmonella enteritidis: cell-mediated immune response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Torriani

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of Salmonella enteritidis (SE live attenuated vaccines is one of the major tool to reduce this infection in commercial poultry. In this work, techniques, evaluating the presence and the expression of some cytokines, were studied to improve the knowledge of the cellular-mediated immune response following SE vaccination. This study demonstrated that SE vaccination enhances the production of INF-γ, IL-8, iNOs, while downregulates IL-1β. Between these immunologic parameters, the evaluation of INF-γ seems to be the most significant and easy test to plan and optimize SE vaccination programs.

  5. Trypanosoma cruzi adjuvants potentiate T cell-mediated immunity induced by a NY-ESO-1 based antitumor vaccine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Junqueira

    Full Text Available Immunological adjuvants that induce T cell-mediate immunity (TCMI with the least side effects are needed for the development of human vaccines. Glycoinositolphospholipids (GIPL and CpGs oligodeoxynucleotides (CpG ODNs derived from the protozoa parasite Trypanosoma cruzi induce potent pro-inflammatory reaction through activation of Toll-Like Receptor (TLR4 and TLR9, respectively. Here, using mouse models, we tested the T. cruzi derived TLR agonists as immunological adjuvants in an antitumor vaccine. For comparison, we used well-established TLR agonists, such as the bacterial derived monophosphoryl lipid A (MPL, lipopeptide (Pam3Cys, and CpG ODN. All tested TLR agonists were comparable to induce antibody responses, whereas significant differences were noticed in their ability to elicit CD4(+ T and CD8(+ T cell responses. In particular, both GIPLs (GTH, and GY and CpG ODNs (B344, B297 and B128 derived from T. cruzi elicited interferon-gamma (IFN-γ production by CD4(+ T cells. On the other hand, the parasite derived CpG ODNs, but not GIPLs, elicited a potent IFN-γ response by CD8(+ T lymphocytes. The side effects were also evaluated by local pain (hypernociception. The intensity of hypernociception induced by vaccination was alleviated by administration of an analgesic drug without affecting protective immunity. Finally, the level of protective immunity against the NY-ESO-1 expressing melanoma was associated with the magnitude of both CD4(+ T and CD8(+ T cell responses elicited by a specific immunological adjuvant.

  6. Multivalent TB vaccines targeting the esx gene family generate potent and broad cell-mediated immune responses superior to BCG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villarreal, Daniel O; Walters, Jewell; Laddy, Dominick J; Yan, Jian; Weiner, David B

    2014-01-01

    Development of a broad-spectrum synthetic vaccine against TB would represent an important advance to the limited vaccine armamentarium against TB. It is believed that the esx family of TB antigens may represent important vaccine candidates. However, only 4 esx antigens have been studied as potential vaccine antigens. The challenge remains to develop a vaccine that simultaneously targets all 23 members of the esx family to induce enhanced broad-spectrum cell-mediated immunity. We sought to investigate if broader cellular immune responses could be induced using a multivalent DNA vaccine representing the esx family protein members delivered via electroporation. In this study, 15 designed esx antigens were created to cross target all members of the esx family. They were distributed into groups of 3 self-processing antigens each, resulting in 5 trivalent highly optimized DNA plasmids. Vaccination with all 5 constructs elicited robust antigen-specific IFN-γ responses to all encoded esx antigens and induced multifunctional CD4 Th1 and CD8 T cell responses. Importantly, we show that when all constructs are combined into a cocktail, the RSQ-15 vaccine, elicited substantial broad Ag-specific T cell responses to all esx antigens as compared with vaccination with BCG. Moreover, these vaccine-induced responses were highly cross-reactive with BCG encoded esx family members and were highly immune effective in a BCG DNA prime-boost format. Furthermore, we demonstrate the vaccine potential and immunopotent profile of several novel esx antigens never previously studied. These data highlight the likely importance of these novel immunogens for study as preventative or therapeutic synthetic TB vaccines in combination or as stand alone antigens.

  7. Trypanosoma cruzi adjuvants potentiate T cell-mediated immunity induced by a NY-ESO-1 based antitumor vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junqueira, Caroline; Guerrero, Ana Tereza; Galvão-Filho, Bruno; Andrade, Warrison A; Salgado, Ana Paula C; Cunha, Thiago M; Ropert, Catherine; Campos, Marco Antônio; Penido, Marcus L O; Mendonça-Previato, Lúcia; Previato, José Oswaldo; Ritter, Gerd; Cunha, Fernando Q; Gazzinelli, Ricardo T

    2012-01-01

    Immunological adjuvants that induce T cell-mediate immunity (TCMI) with the least side effects are needed for the development of human vaccines. Glycoinositolphospholipids (GIPL) and CpGs oligodeoxynucleotides (CpG ODNs) derived from the protozoa parasite Trypanosoma cruzi induce potent pro-inflammatory reaction through activation of Toll-Like Receptor (TLR)4 and TLR9, respectively. Here, using mouse models, we tested the T. cruzi derived TLR agonists as immunological adjuvants in an antitumor vaccine. For comparison, we used well-established TLR agonists, such as the bacterial derived monophosphoryl lipid A (MPL), lipopeptide (Pam3Cys), and CpG ODN. All tested TLR agonists were comparable to induce antibody responses, whereas significant differences were noticed in their ability to elicit CD4(+) T and CD8(+) T cell responses. In particular, both GIPLs (GTH, and GY) and CpG ODNs (B344, B297 and B128) derived from T. cruzi elicited interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) production by CD4(+) T cells. On the other hand, the parasite derived CpG ODNs, but not GIPLs, elicited a potent IFN-γ response by CD8(+) T lymphocytes. The side effects were also evaluated by local pain (hypernociception). The intensity of hypernociception induced by vaccination was alleviated by administration of an analgesic drug without affecting protective immunity. Finally, the level of protective immunity against the NY-ESO-1 expressing melanoma was associated with the magnitude of both CD4(+) T and CD8(+) T cell responses elicited by a specific immunological adjuvant.

  8. Host genetic background influences the response to the opportunistic Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection altering cell-mediated immunity and bacterial replication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maura De Simone

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a common cause of healthcare-associated infections including pneumonia, bloodstream, urinary tract, and surgical site infections. The clinical outcome of P. aeruginosa infections may be extremely variable among individuals at risk and patients affected by cystic fibrosis. However, risk factors for P. aeruginosa infection remain largely unknown. To identify and track the host factors influencing P. aeruginosa lung infections, inbred immunocompetent mouse strains were screened in a pneumonia model system. A/J, BALB/cJ, BALB/cAnNCrl, BALB/cByJ, C3H/HeOuJ, C57BL/6J, C57BL/6NCrl, DBA/2J, and 129S2/SvPasCRL mice were infected with P. aeruginosa clinical strain and monitored for body weight and mortality up to seven days. The most deviant survival phenotypes were observed for A/J, 129S2/SvPasCRL and DBA/2J showing high susceptibility while BALB/cAnNCrl and C3H/HeOuJ showing more resistance to P. aeruginosa infection. Next, one of the most susceptible and resistant mouse strains were characterized for their deviant clinical and immunological phenotype by scoring bacterial count, cell-mediated immunity, cytokines and chemokines profile and lung pathology in an early time course. Susceptible A/J mice showed significantly higher bacterial burden, higher cytokines and chemokines levels but lower leukocyte recruitment, particularly neutrophils, when compared to C3H/HeOuJ resistant mice. Pathologic scores showed lower inflammatory severity, reduced intraluminal and interstitial inflammation extent, bronchial and parenchymal involvement and diminished alveolar damage in the lungs of A/J when compared to C3H/HeOuJ. Our findings indicate that during an early phase of infection a prompt inflammatory response in the airways set the conditions for a non-permissive environment to P. aeruginosa replication and lock the spread to other organs. Host gene(s may have a role in the reduction of cell-mediated immunity playing a critical role in

  9. Host genetic background influences the response to the opportunistic Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection altering cell-mediated immunity and bacterial replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Simone, Maura; Spagnuolo, Lorenza; Lorè, Nicola Ivan; Rossi, Giacomo; Cigana, Cristina; De Fino, Ida; Iraqi, Fuad A; Bragonzi, Alessandra

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a common cause of healthcare-associated infections including pneumonia, bloodstream, urinary tract, and surgical site infections. The clinical outcome of P. aeruginosa infections may be extremely variable among individuals at risk and patients affected by cystic fibrosis. However, risk factors for P. aeruginosa infection remain largely unknown. To identify and track the host factors influencing P. aeruginosa lung infections, inbred immunocompetent mouse strains were screened in a pneumonia model system. A/J, BALB/cJ, BALB/cAnNCrl, BALB/cByJ, C3H/HeOuJ, C57BL/6J, C57BL/6NCrl, DBA/2J, and 129S2/SvPasCRL mice were infected with P. aeruginosa clinical strain and monitored for body weight and mortality up to seven days. The most deviant survival phenotypes were observed for A/J, 129S2/SvPasCRL and DBA/2J showing high susceptibility while BALB/cAnNCrl and C3H/HeOuJ showing more resistance to P. aeruginosa infection. Next, one of the most susceptible and resistant mouse strains were characterized for their deviant clinical and immunological phenotype by scoring bacterial count, cell-mediated immunity, cytokines and chemokines profile and lung pathology in an early time course. Susceptible A/J mice showed significantly higher bacterial burden, higher cytokines and chemokines levels but lower leukocyte recruitment, particularly neutrophils, when compared to C3H/HeOuJ resistant mice. Pathologic scores showed lower inflammatory severity, reduced intraluminal and interstitial inflammation extent, bronchial and parenchymal involvement and diminished alveolar damage in the lungs of A/J when compared to C3H/HeOuJ. Our findings indicate that during an early phase of infection a prompt inflammatory response in the airways set the conditions for a non-permissive environment to P. aeruginosa replication and lock the spread to other organs. Host gene(s) may have a role in the reduction of cell-mediated immunity playing a critical role in the control of P

  10. Cyclic AMP represents a crucial component of Treg cell-mediated immune regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias Bopp

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available T regulatory (Treg cells are one of the key players in the immune tolerance network (ITN and a plethora of manuscripts has described their development and function in the course of the last two decades. Nevertheless, it is still a matter of debate which mechanisms and agents are employed by Treg cells, providing the basis of their suppressive potency. One of the important candidates is cyclic AMP (cAMP which is long known as a potent suppressor at least of T cell activation and function. While this suppressive function by itself is widely accepted the source and the mechanism of action of cAMP are less clear and a multitude of seemingly contradictory data allow for in principle two different scenarios of cAMP-mediated suppression. In one scenario Treg cells contain high amounts of cAMP and convey this small molecule via gap junction intercellular communication (GJIC directly to the effector T cells (Teff leading to their suppression. Alternatively, it was shown that Treg cells represent the origin of considerable amounts of adenosine which trigger the adenylate cyclases (AC in Teff via A2A and A2B receptors thus strongly increasing intracellular cAMP. This review will present and discuss initial findings and recent developments concerning the function of cAMP for Treg cells and its impact on immune regulation.

  11. CD8(+) T cell-mediated immunity during Trypanosoma cruzi infection: a path for vaccine development?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dos Santos Virgilio, Fernando; Pontes, Camila; Dominguez, Mariana Ribeiro; Ersching, Jonatan; Rodrigues, Mauricio Martins; Vasconcelos, José Ronnie

    2014-01-01

    MHC-restricted CD8(+) T cells are important during infection with the intracellular protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease. Experimental studies performed in the past 25 years have elucidated a number of features related to the immune response mediated by these T cells, which are important for establishing the parasite/host equilibrium leading to chronic infection. CD8(+) T cells are specific for highly immunodominant antigens expressed by members of the trans-sialidase family. After infection, their activation is delayed, and the cells display a high proliferative activity associated with high apoptotic rates. Although they participate in parasite control and elimination, they are unable to clear the infection due to their low fitness, allowing the parasite to establish the chronic phase when these cells then play an active role in the induction of heart immunopathology. Vaccination with a number of subunit recombinant vaccines aimed at eliciting specific CD8(+) T cells can reverse this path, thereby generating a productive immune response that will lead to the control of infection, reduction of symptoms, and reduction of disease transmission. Due to these attributes, activation of CD8(+) T lymphocytes may constitute a path for the development of a veterinarian or human vaccine.

  12. CD8+ T Cell-Mediated Immunity during Trypanosoma cruzi Infection: A Path for Vaccine Development?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando dos Santos Virgilio

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available MHC-restricted CD8+ T cells are important during infection with the intracellular protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease. Experimental studies performed in the past 25 years have elucidated a number of features related to the immune response mediated by these T cells, which are important for establishing the parasite/host equilibrium leading to chronic infection. CD8+ T cells are specific for highly immunodominant antigens expressed by members of the trans-sialidase family. After infection, their activation is delayed, and the cells display a high proliferative activity associated with high apoptotic rates. Although they participate in parasite control and elimination, they are unable to clear the infection due to their low fitness, allowing the parasite to establish the chronic phase when these cells then play an active role in the induction of heart immunopathology. Vaccination with a number of subunit recombinant vaccines aimed at eliciting specific CD8+ T cells can reverse this path, thereby generating a productive immune response that will lead to the control of infection, reduction of symptoms, and reduction of disease transmission. Due to these attributes, activation of CD8+ T lymphocytes may constitute a path for the development of a veterinarian or human vaccine.

  13. Role of the immune cells, mediators and cytokines in pathogenesis of asthma: a review article

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sedigheh Bahrami Mahne

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disorder of the airways, associated with airway re-modeling and hyperresponsiveness. It is expressed that asthma influences about 300 million people around the world, which is estimated to increase to about 400 million by 2025. The prevalence rate is 15 to 20 percent in children and 5 to 10 percent in adults, while its trend is still increasing. Inflammation plays an important role in the patho-physiology of asthma, which involves an interaction of different types of the immune cells and mediators. It leads to a number of pathophysiology changes, including bron-chial inflammation, airway obstruction, and clinical episodes such as cough, wheeze and shortness of breath. Asthma is now greatly being introduced as a heterogeneous disorder and it is pointed out to the role of T cells, including Th1, Th2, Th17, and regu-latory T cells. Other immune cells, especially neutrophils, macrophages and dendritic cells, as well structural cells such as epithelial and airway smooth muscle cells also pro-duce disease-associated cytokines in asthma. Increased levels of these immune cells and cytokines have been recognized in clinical samples and mouse models of asthma. Different cytokines, including pro-inflammatory cytokines (such as TNFα, IL-1, and IL-6, T helper 2 cytokines (such as IL-4, IL-5, IL-9, IL-13, and growth factors (such as GM-CSF, PDGF play a role in the pathogenesis of asthma. Indeed chemokines (such as MPC-1, RANTES , MIP-1 and the chemokine receptors (such as CCR3, CCR4, CCL11, CCL24, and CCL26 play an important role in the recruitment of circu-lating inflammatory cells into the airways in asthmatic patients and also is related with increased T helper 2 cytokines after inhaled allergens. Among new approaches, treat-ment of asthma with anti-cytokine drugs such as antibodies blocking IL-4, IL-5, IL-9 could reduce recruitment inflammatory cells into the airways and remodeling. The final perspective of asthma

  14. Effects of ascorbic acid on cell mediated, humoral immune response and pathophysiology of

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suchint Simaraks

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to conduct an experiment related to the effects of chronic heat stress on total white blood cell changes, pathophysiology of leukocyte and effects of ascorbic acid on lymphocytes, lympholytic cells and humoral immunity of New-castle disease of broilers under chronic heat stress. Randomized complete block was the design. One hundred-forty-four chickens were maintained at 33+1 oC environmental temperature and on four levels of added ascorbic acid i.e. 0 (control group, 200, 400 and 800 mg/kg in dietsfor 21 days. On days 1, 3, 7, 14 and 21 of the experimental period, total white blood cells count, lympholytic cell and HI titer for Newcastle disease were determined. On day 21, histopathology of lung, liver, kidney, heart and bursa of fabricius of randomly selected broilers (n=36; 3 birds per experimental unit were studied. Total white blood cells (TWBC of the birds were significantly increased on day 3 (P<0.05 and were higheston days 7 and 14 then significantly decreased on days 21 (P<0.05. Monocytes were significantly increased on day 3 (P<0.05. Lymphocytes were significantly increased on day 7, and were highest on day 14 (P<0.05. On day 21, the value of lymphocyte was significantly lower than on days 7 and 14 (P<0.05, respectively. Lympholytic cells were significantly increased on day 3 and 7 (P<0.05, respectively, but on day 21, lympholyticcells were significantly decreased to lower value than on day 7 (P<0.05. Heterophils were significantly increased on day 3 and 7 and then decreased on day 14 (P<0.05. Tissue injury and hemorrhage in broilers under chronic heat stress caused leukocytosis, heterophilia, lympholysis and monocytosis. The size of lobules within the bursa of fabricius in broilers receiving ascorbic acid at 800 mg/kg in the diet were larger than inbirds that received added ascorbic acid at 400, 200 and 0 mg/kg in their diets, respectively. Lymphocytes and lympholytic cells were not significantly different

  15. Tc17 cells mediate vaccine immunity against lethal fungal pneumonia in immune deficient hosts lacking CD4+ T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Som Gowda Nanjappa

    Full Text Available Vaccines may help reduce the growing incidence of fungal infections in immune-suppressed patients. We have found that, even in the absence of CD4(+ T-cell help, vaccine-induced CD8(+ T cells persist and confer resistance against Blastomyces dermatitidis and Histoplasma capsulatum. Type 1 cytokines contribute to that resistance, but they also are dispensable. Although the role of T helper 17 cells in immunity to fungi is debated, IL-17 producing CD8(+ T cells (Tc17 cells have not been investigated. Here, we show that Tc17 cells are indispensable in antifungal vaccine immunity in hosts lacking CD4(+ T cells. Tc17 cells are induced upon vaccination, recruited to the lung on pulmonary infection, and act non-redundantly in mediating protection in a manner that requires neutrophils. Tc17 cells did not influence type I immunity, nor did the lack of IL-12 signaling augment Tc17 cells, indicating a distinct lineage and function. IL-6 was required for Tc17 differentiation and immunity, but IL-1R1 and Dectin-1 signaling was unexpectedly dispensable. Tc17 cells expressed surface CXCR3 and CCR6, but only the latter was essential in recruitment to the lung. Although IL-17 producing T cells are believed to be short-lived, effector Tc17 cells expressed low levels of KLRG1 and high levels of the transcription factor TCF-1, predicting their long-term survival and stem-cell like behavior. Our work has implications for designing vaccines against fungal infections in immune suppressed patients.

  16. Tc17 cells mediate vaccine immunity against lethal fungal pneumonia in immune deficient hosts lacking CD4+ T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanjappa, Som Gowda; Heninger, Erika; Wüthrich, Marcel; Gasper, David Joseph; Klein, Bruce S

    2012-01-01

    Vaccines may help reduce the growing incidence of fungal infections in immune-suppressed patients. We have found that, even in the absence of CD4(+) T-cell help, vaccine-induced CD8(+) T cells persist and confer resistance against Blastomyces dermatitidis and Histoplasma capsulatum. Type 1 cytokines contribute to that resistance, but they also are dispensable. Although the role of T helper 17 cells in immunity to fungi is debated, IL-17 producing CD8(+) T cells (Tc17 cells) have not been investigated. Here, we show that Tc17 cells are indispensable in antifungal vaccine immunity in hosts lacking CD4(+) T cells. Tc17 cells are induced upon vaccination, recruited to the lung on pulmonary infection, and act non-redundantly in mediating protection in a manner that requires neutrophils. Tc17 cells did not influence type I immunity, nor did the lack of IL-12 signaling augment Tc17 cells, indicating a distinct lineage and function. IL-6 was required for Tc17 differentiation and immunity, but IL-1R1 and Dectin-1 signaling was unexpectedly dispensable. Tc17 cells expressed surface CXCR3 and CCR6, but only the latter was essential in recruitment to the lung. Although IL-17 producing T cells are believed to be short-lived, effector Tc17 cells expressed low levels of KLRG1 and high levels of the transcription factor TCF-1, predicting their long-term survival and stem-cell like behavior. Our work has implications for designing vaccines against fungal infections in immune suppressed patients.

  17. Combined local and systemic immunization is essential for durable T-cell mediated heterosubtypic immunity against influenza A virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uddbäck, Ida Elin Maria; Pedersen, Line M I; Pedersen, Sara R;

    2016-01-01

    The threat from unpredictable influenza virus pandemics necessitates the development of a new type of influenza vaccine. Since the internal proteins are highly conserved, induction of T cells targeting these antigens may provide the solution. Indeed, adenoviral (Ad) vectors expressing flu...... (intranasal (i.n.)) immunization elicited delayed, but more lasting protection despite relatively inefficient immunization. However, by far, the most robust protection was induced by simultaneous, combined (i.n. + s.c.) vaccination, and, notably, in this case clinical protection lasted at least 8 months...

  18. CHARACTERISATION OF CELL-MEDIATED IMMUNE RESPONSE IN PIGS IN A CLINICAL CHALLENGE EXPERIMENT OF A VACCINE AGAINST MYCOPLASMA HYOSYNOVIAE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Josephine Skovgaard; Riber, Ulla; Lauritsen, Klara Tølbøll;

    -antigen and recombinant IL-18, significantly higher level of IFN-γ was produced in the vaccine group compared to the placebo group one day before challenge with Mhs. In contrast, significantly higher level of IFN-γ was measured in the placebo group compared to the vaccine group at day 6 after challenge. The latter could...... (Germany) September 10-13, 2009), testing a new vaccine (formalin inactivated Mhs and EMULSIGEN-BCL® (MVP Laboratories)), cell-mediated immune response was measured in the vaccine group (n=13) and not in the placebo group (n=13). In an IFN-γ assay, where whole-blood was co-cultured with Mhs...... to be CD4 and especially CD4CD8 double positive T-cells simultaneously expressing CD25. Interestingly, the proportion of CD4CD8 double positive T-cells within the total population of CD4 positive cells increased in the vaccine group after challenge, indicating that generation of specific T-cell memory had...

  19. Alterations of Cell-Mediated Immunity in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus%2型糖尿病细胞免疫功能的变化

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姚远; 郑佳; 杨敏

    2002-01-01

    Objective To investigate the alterations of cell- mediated immunity in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Methods The level of CD3 CD4 CD8 in 30 normal subjects (NC group) and47 type 2 diabetes mellitus was measured by flow cytometry. Result Type - 2 diabetics had lower levels of CD4 and higher levels of CD8 than the non - diabetic control,especially during the 5 ~ 15 years of diabetes courses. The ratios of CD4 to CD8 was decreased. The correlation analysis showed that the level of CD3 CD4 CD8 and CD4/CD8 was not positively correlated with c - peptide. Conclusion Type - 2 diabeties have alterations of cell- mediated immunity.

  20. Inducible nitric-oxide synthase plays a minimal role in lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus-induced, T cell-mediated protective immunity and immunopathology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartholdy, C; Nansen, A; Christensen, Jeanette Erbo;

    1999-01-01

    -mediated immune response was found to be unaltered in iNOS-deficient mice compared with wild-type C57BL/6 mice, and LCMV- induced general immunosuppression was equally pronounced in both strains. In vivo analysis revealed identical kinetics of virus clearance, as well as unaltered clinical severity of systemic......By using mice with a targetted disruption in the gene encoding inducible nitric-oxide synthase (iNOS), we have studied the role of nitric oxide (NO) in lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV)-induced, T cell-mediated protective immunity and immunopathology. The afferent phase of the T cell....... This might suggest a role of NO in regulating vascular reactivity in the context of T cell-mediated inflammation. In conclusion, these findings indicate a minimal role for iNOS/NO in the host response to LCMV. Except for a reduced local oedema in the knockout mice, iNOS/NO seems to be redundant...

  1. Intranasal administration of HIV-DNA vaccine formulated with a polymer, carboxymethylcellulose, augments mucosal antibody production and cell-mediated immune response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamajima, K; Sasaki, S; Fukushima, J; Kaneko, T; Xin, K Q; Kudoh, I; Okuda, K

    1998-08-01

    We previously reported that intramuscular (i.m.) immunization of DNA vaccine encoding human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)IIIB env and rev genes alone or in combination with appropriate adjuvant induces substantial and enhanced immune response against HIV-1. In the present study, we examined whether a polymer, low-viscosity carboxymethylcellulose sodium salt (CMCS-L), has an adjuvant effect on immune response induced by DNA vaccination. BALB/c mice were immunized with HIV-DNA vaccine formulated with CMCS-L via the intranasal (i.n.) and i.m. routes. The combination with the polymer elicited higher levels of antigen-specific serum IgG and fecal IgA antibodies than DNA vaccine alone. For cell-mediated immunity, HIV-specific delayed-type hypersensitivity response and cytotoxic T lymphocyte activity were measured by the footpad-swelling test and the 51Cr-release assay, respectively. Both were enhanced by the combination with CMCS-L via i.n. and i.m. inoculation. Cytokine analysis in culture media of bulk splenocytes harvested from immunized animals showed higher levels of IL-4 production in i.n. -immunized mice compared with i.m.-immunized mice. Nevertheless, the increased IFN-gamma production resulting from the combination with CMCS-L was observed only in i.n.-immunized mice. These data indicate that i.n. immunization of HIV-DNA vaccine formulated with CMCS-L enhances HIV-specific mucosal antibody (Ab) and systemic Ab and cell-mediated immune response.

  2. Inhibitors of histone deacetylase 1 reverse the immune evasion phenotype to enhance T-cell mediated lysis of prostate and breast carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gameiro, Sofia R; Malamas, Anthony S; Tsang, Kwong Y; Ferrone, Soldano; Hodge, James W

    2016-02-16

    The clinical promise of cancer immunotherapy relies on the premise that the immune system can recognize and eliminate tumor cells identified as non-self. However, tumors can evade host immune surveillance through multiple mechanisms, including epigenetic silencing of genes involved in antigen processing and immune recognition. Hence, there is an unmet clinical need to develop effective therapeutic strategies that can restore tumor immune recognition when combined with immunotherapy, such as immune checkpoint blockade and therapeutic cancer vaccines. We sought to examine the potential of clinically relevant exposure of prostate and breast human carcinoma cells to histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors to reverse tumor immune escape to T-cell mediated lysis. Here we demonstrate that prostate (LNCAP) and breast (MDA-MB-231) carcinoma cells are more sensitive to T-cell mediated lysis in vitro after clinically relevant exposure to epigenetic therapy with either the pan-HDAC inhibitor vorinostat or the class I HDAC inhibitor entinostat. This pattern of immunogenic modulation was observed against a broad range of tumor-associated antigens, such as CEA, MUC1, PSA, and brachyury, and associated with augmented expression of multiple proteins involved in antigen processing and tumor immune recognition. Genetic and pharmacological inhibition studies identified HDAC1 as a key determinant in the reversal of carcinoma immune escape. Further, our findings suggest that the observed reversal of tumor immune evasion is driven by a response to cellular stress through activation of the unfolded protein response. This offers the rationale for combining HDAC inhibitors with immunotherapy, including therapeutic cancer vaccines.

  3. Influence of Ganoderma lucidum (Curt.: Fr.) P. Karst. on T-cell-mediated immunity in normal and immunosuppressed mice line CBA/Ca.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nizhenkovska, Iryna V; Pidchenko, Vitalii T; Bychkova, Nina G; Bisko, Nina A; Rodnichenko, Angela Y; Kozyko, Natalya O

    2015-09-01

    The article presents the results of the investigation of the effect of biomass powder of the fungus Ganoderma lucidum on T-cell-mediated immunity in normal and immunosuppressed mice CBA/Ca. Delayed-type hypersensitivity assay was used. Experimental immunodeficiency was established with intraperitoneal injection of the immunosuppressant cyclophosphamide at a single dose of 150 mg/kg on the first day of the experiment. Results of the study show that the administration of biomass powder of Ganoderma lucidum in a dose of 0.5 mg/kg orally for 10 days increases the delayed-type hypersensitivity response in normal mice CBA/Ca. Administration of 0.5 mg/kg of biomass powder of the fungus Ganoderma lucidum for 10 days blocked the development of the T-cell-mediated immunosuppression, induced by administration of cyclophosphamide and restored the delayed-type hypersensitivity response in immunosuppressed mice. Key words: fungus Ganoderma lucidum cyclophosphamide immunodeficiency T-cell-mediated immunity delayed-type hypersensitivity.

  4. A suicidal DNA vaccine expressing the fusion protein of peste des petits ruminants virus induces both humoral and cell-mediated immune responses in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yong; Yue, Xiaolin; Jin, Hongyan; Liu, Guangqing; Pan, Ling; Wang, Guijun; Guo, Hao; Li, Gang; Li, Yongdong

    2015-12-01

    Peste des petits ruminants (PPR), a highly contagious disease induced by PPR virus (PPRV), affects sheep and goats. PPRV fusion (F) protein is important for the induction of immune responses against PPRV. We constructed a Semliki Forest virus (SFV) replicon-vectored DNA vaccine ("suicidal DNA vaccine") and evaluated its immunogenicity in BALB/c mice. The F gene of PPRV was cloned and inserted into the SFV replicon-based vector pSCA1. The antigenicity of the resultant plasmid pSCA1/F was identified by indirect immunofluorescence and western blotting. BALB/c mice were then intramuscularly injected with pSCA1/F three times at 14-d intervals. Specific antibodies and virus-neutralizing antibodies against PPRV were quantified by indirect ELISA and microneutralization tests, respectively. Cell-mediated immune responses were examined by cytokine and lymphocyte proliferation assays. The pSCA1/F expressed F protein in vitro and induced specific and neutralizing antibody production, and lymphocyte proliferation in mice. Mice vaccinated with pSCA1/F had increased IL-2 and IL-10 levels after 24-h post first immunization. IFN-γ and TNF-α levels increased from that time point and gradually decreased thereafter. Thus, the Semliki Forest virus replicon-vectored DNA vaccine expressing the F protein of PPRV induced both humoral and cell-mediated immune responses in mice. This could be considered as a novel strategy for vaccine development against PPR.

  5. Sex-Specific Effects of High Yolk Androgen Levels on Constitutive and Cell-Mediated Immune Responses in Nestlings of an Altricial Passerine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muriel, Jaime; Pérez-Rodríguez, Lorenzo; Ortiz-Santaliestra, Manuel E; Puerta, Marisa; Gil, Diego

    Avian embryos are exposed to yolk androgens that are incorporated into the egg by the ovulating female. These steroids can affect several aspects of embryo development, often resulting in increases in overall size or the speed of growth of different traits. However, several studies suggest that they also entail immune costs to the offspring. In this study, we explored whether variation in yolk androgen concentration affected several measures of the constitutive and cell-mediated immune axes in the spotless starling (Sturnus unicolor). Using a within-brood design, we injected different doses of androgens (testosterone and androstenedione) into the eggs. Our study showed that experimentally increased yolk androgens led to sex-specific immunosuppression in both the innate and adaptive axes of the immune system. Both cell-mediated immune response (CMI) and lysozyme activity decreased with increasing androgen levels injected into the egg in the case of male nestlings, whereas there were no effects on females. The effects that we found were always linear: no quadratic or threshold patterns were detected. We found no effects of the experimental treatment in hemolysis or agglutination capacity, but these measures were negatively correlated with CMI, suggesting negative correlation among different branches of the immune system. Blood (trypanosomes and hemosporidians) and intestinal (coccidia) parasites were not affected by the experimental increase of yolk androgen levels. Our results show that in our study species yolk androgens induce immunosuppression in some axes of the male nestling immune system. Further studies should analyze the proximate causes for these contrasting effects in different axes of the immune system and the reason for the differential impact on males and females.

  6. INCREASED URINARY NEOPTERIN: CREATININE RATIO AS A MARKER OF ACTIVATION OF CELL-MEDIATED IMMUNITY AND OXIDATIVE STRESS IN THE IRANIAN PATIENTS WITH MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Khorami

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Neopterin, apyrazinopyrimidine compound, is produced by macrophages after induction by interferon gamma (IFN-y and serves as a marker of cellular immune system activation followed by oxidative stress. The aim of this study was to determine urinary neopterin to creatinine ratio (UNCR as a surrogate marker of cell-mediated immune activation in multiple sclerosis (MS. Three weekly early morning urine samples were collected from 27 patients with MS and 31 age- and sex-matched apparently healthy subjects. Urinary neopterin and creatinine were determined using reversed phase high-performance liquid chromatography and Jaffe reaction, respectively. UNCR was significantly higher in patients than in healthy controls indicating IFN-y-induced cellular immunity activation and oxidative stress in multiple sclerosis. As a non-invasive method, UNCR determination may be helpful in monitoring disease progression and the effects of therapies, as well.

  7. Cell-mediated immune responses to Malassezia furfur serovars A, B and C in patients with pityriasis versicolor, seborrheic dermatitis and controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashbee, H R; Ingham, E; Holland, K T; Cunliffe, W J

    1994-06-01

    It has been postulated that patients with Malassezia furfur-associated dermatoses have a deficient cell-mediated immune response to M. furfur. This study examined the cell-mediated immune responses to M. furfur serovars A, B and C of 10 patients with pityriasis versicolor and 10 age- and sex-matched controls; and 10 patients with seborrheic dermatitis and 10 age- and sex-matched controls. The responses to each serovar of M. furfur were assessed using the lymphocyte transformation assay and the leukocyte migration inhibition assay. The lymphocyte transformation responses of the patients with pityriasis versicolor to M. furfur serovars A, B and C (0/10, 6/10 and 5/10 respectively) were not significantly different from those of controls (0/10, 2/10 and 1/10). However, for patients with seborrheic dermatitis, significantly more patients' lymphocytes responded to serovars B and C (6/10 and 6/10 respectively) than those of controls (1/10 and 1/10). No patient or control responded to serovar A. In the leukocyte migration inhibition assay, the leukocytes from a greater proportion of patients with pityriasis versicolor (5/7) responded to serovar B than controls (2/10); and the leukocytes from a greater proportion of patients with seborrheic dermatitis (4/10) responded to serovar C than controls (0/9). Thus, this data did not indicate the presence of any cell-mediated immune deficiency to M. furfur in patients with pityriasis versicolor or seborrheic dermatitis, as measured by the lymphocyte transformation assay or the leukocyte migration inhibition assay. The greater responsiveness of T lymphocytes from patients may indicate that T lymphocytes might be involved in the pathogenesis of these diseases.

  8. Effects of feed supplementation with glycine chelate and iron sulfate on selected parameters of cell-mediated immune response in broiler chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarosz, Łukasz; Kwiecień, Małgorzata; Marek, Agnieszka; Grądzki, Zbigniew; Winiarska-Mieczan, Anna; Kalinowski, Marcin; Laskowska, Ewa

    2016-08-01

    Because little is known about the impact of chelated (Fe-Gly, Fe-Gly+F) and inorganic (FeSO4, FeSO4+F) iron products on immune response parameters in broiler chickens, the objective of the study was to determine the effects of inorganic and organic forms of iron on selected parameters of the cell-mediated immune response in broiler chickens by assessing the percentage of CD3(+)CD4(+), CD3(+)CD8(+), CD25(+), and MHC Class II lymphocytes, as well as the CD4(+)/CD8(+) ratio and IL-2 concentration in the peripheral blood. The experiments were conducted using 50day-old Ross 308 roosters. The test material was peripheral blood. Flow cytometry was used to determine selected cell-mediated immune response parameters. The results obtained indicate that the use of iron chelates in the diet of broiler chickens may stimulate cellular defense mechanisms. As a result of the experiment an increase was observed in the percentage of Th1, mainly T CD4(+) and T CD8(+). It was also noted that application of chelated iron can increase production of T CD8(+) cytotoxic cells and IL-2, which promotes the body's natural response to developing inflammation. There were no changes in T CD4(+), T CD8(+), T CD25(+) or MHC II lymphocyte subpopulations in the chickens following application of the inorganic form of iron.

  9. Detection of herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) -specific cell-mediated immune responses in guinea pigs during latent HSV-2 genital infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Clarice L; Banasik, Brianne N; Gorder, Summer R; Xia, Jingya; Auclair, Sarah; Bourne, Nigel; Milligan, Gregg N

    2016-12-01

    Genital infections with herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) are a source of considerable morbidity and are a health concern for newborns exposed to virus during vaginal delivery. Additionally, HSV-2 infection diminishes the integrity of the vaginal epithelium resulting in increased susceptibility of individuals to infection with other sexually transmitted pathogens. Understanding immune protection against HSV-2 primary infection and immune modulation of virus shedding events following reactivation of the virus from latency is important for the development of effective prophylactic and therapeutic vaccines. Although the murine model of HSV-2 infection is useful for understanding immunity following immunization, it is limited by the lack of spontaneous reactivation of HSV-2 from latency. Genital infection of guinea pigs with HSV-2 accurately models the disease of humans including the spontaneous reactivation of HSV-2 from latency and provides a unique opportunity to examine virus-host interactions during latency. Although the guinea pig represents an accurate model of many human infections, relatively few reagents are available to study the immunological response to infection. To analyze the cell-mediated immune response of guinea pigs at extended periods of time after establishment of HSV-2 latency, we have modified flow-cytometry based proliferation assays and IFN-γ ELISPOT assays to detect and quantify HSV-specific cell-mediated responses during latent infection of guinea pigs. Here we demonstrate that a combination of proliferation and ELISPOT assays can be used to quantify and characterize effecter function of virus-specific immune memory responses during HSV-latency.

  10. Effects of in ovo exposure to PCBs (coplanar congener, kanechlor mixture, hydroxylated metabolite) on the developing cell-mediated immunity in chickens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasegawa, J.; Matsuda, M.; Kawano, M.; Wakimoto, T. [Faculty of Agriculture, Ehime Univ., Matsuyama, Ehime (Japan); Kashima, Y. [Dept. of Hygiene, Yokohama City Univ. School of Medicine, Yokohama (Japan)

    2004-09-15

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are wide spread environmental contaminants and known to cause various adverse effects on health of human and wildlife. Immune system is one of the several targets for toxic effects of PCBs and its normal balance is often disrupted by the exposure of the compounds. For example, PCBs may induce immune suppression and result in increased susceptibility to bacterial and viral infections, or conversely, excessive immune enhancement may cause adverse outcomes including as autoimmune disease and anergy. Therefore immune function is regarded as one of an important endpoint in toxicological risk assessment. There are a number of studies shown that neonatal organisms perinatally exposed to polyhalogenated aromatic hydrocarbons (PHAHs) such as PCBs have severer effects on their immune system than adult. Dioxins and coplanar PCB congeners, structurally planar PHAHs are known to have high affinity for aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR). 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) have the strongest affinity among such compounds and these are considered to act on immune system through AhR. On the other hand, such as non-planar PCB congeners with low affinity for AhR, which are abundantly contained in commercial PCB preparations have non-additive (antagonistic) effects on immune function. Prenatal exposure of TCDD to rodent induced abnormal lymphoid development in the thymus and thymus-dependent immune functions were remarkably disturbed. Although several experimental studies in mammals have been carried out on the developmental immunotoxicity of PCBs, there are still limited information available on avian species. Thus in this study, prenatal exposure to low level of PCBs and the effects on the developing immune system were investigated with chicken as a model animal of avian species, especially it is focused on the cell-mediated immune function.

  11. Chronic active hepatitis induced by Helicobacter hepaticus in the A/JCr mouse is associated with a Th1 cell-mediated immune response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whary, M T; Morgan, T J; Dangler, C A; Gaudes, K J; Taylor, N S; Fox, J G

    1998-07-01

    Helicobacter hepaticus infection in A/JCr mice results in chronic active hepatitis characterized by perivascular, periportal, and parenchymal infiltrates of mononuclear and polymorphonuclear cells. This study examined the development of hepatitis and the immune response of A/JCr mice to H. hepaticus infection. The humoral and cell-mediated T helper immune response was profiled by measuring the postinfection (p.i.) antibody response in serum, feces, and bile and by the production of cytokines and proliferative responses by splenic mononuclear cells to H. hepaticus antigens. Secretory immunoglobulin A (IgA) and systemic IgG2a antibody developed by 4 weeks p.i. and persisted through 12 months. Splenocytes from infected mice proliferated and produced more gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) than interleukin-4 (IL-4) or IL-5 when cultured with H. hepaticus outer membrane proteins. The predominantly IgG2a antibody response in serum and the in vitro production of IFN-gamma in excess of IL-4 or IL-5 are consistent with a Th1 immune response reported in humans and mice infected with Helicobacter pylori and Helicobacter felis, respectively. Mice infected with H. hepaticus developed progressively severe perivascular, periportal, and hepatic parenchymal lesions consisting of lymphohistiocytic and plasmacytic cellular infiltrates. In addition, transmural typhlitis was observed at 12 months p.i. The characterization of a cell-mediated Th1 immune response to H. hepaticus infection in the A/JCr mouse should prove valuable as a model for experimental regimens which manipulate the host response to Helicobacter.

  12. Dim light at night interferes with the development of the short-day phenotype and impairs cell-mediated immunity in Siberian hamsters (Phodopus sungorus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubrecht, Taryn G; Weil, Zachary M; Nelson, Randy J

    2014-10-01

    Winter is a challenging time to survive and breed outside of the tropics. Animals use day length (photoperiod) to regulate seasonally appropriate adaptations in anticipation of challenging winter conditions. The net result of these photoperiod-mediated adjustments is enhanced immune function and increased survival. Thus, the ability to discriminate day length information is critical for survival and reproduction in small animals. However, during the past century, urban and suburban development has rapidly expanded and filled the night sky with light from various sources, obscuring crucial light-dark signals, which alters physiological interpretation of day lengths. Furthermore, reduced space, increased proximity to people, and the presence of light at night may act as stressors for small animals. Whereas acute stressors typically enhance immune responses, chronic exposure to stressors often impairs immune responses. Therefore, we hypothesized that the combination of dim light at night and chronic stress interferes with enhanced cell-mediated immunity observed during short days. Siberian hamsters (Phodopus sungorus) were assigned to short or long days with dark nights (0 lux) or dim (5 lux) light at night for 10 weeks. Following 2 weeks of chronic restraint (6 hr/day), a model of chronic stress, delayed type hypersensitivity (DTH) responses were assessed. Both dim light at night and restraint reduced the DTH response. Dim light at night during long nights produced an intermediate short day phenotype. These results suggest the constant presence of light at night could negatively affect survival of photoperiodic rodents by disrupting the timing of breeding and immune responses.

  13. Aspects of T Cell-Mediated Immunity Induced in Mice by a DNA Vaccine Based on the Dengue-NS1 Antigen after Challenge by the Intracerebral Route

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Edson R. A.; Gonçalves, Antônio J. S.; Costa, Simone M.; Azevedo, Adriana S.; Mantuano-Barradas, Marcio; Nogueira, Ana Cristina M. A.

    2016-01-01

    Dengue disease has emerged as a major public health issue across tropical and subtropical countries. Infections caused by dengue virus (DENV) can evolve to life-threatening forms, resulting in about 20,000 deaths every year worldwide. Several animal models have been described concerning pre-clinical stages in vaccine development against dengue, each of them presenting limitations and advantages. Among these models, a traditional approach is the inoculation of a mouse-brain adapted DENV variant in immunocompetent animals by the intracerebral (i.c.) route. Despite the historical usage and relevance of this model for vaccine testing, little is known about the mechanisms by which the protection is developed upon vaccination. To cover this topic, a DNA vaccine based on the DENV non-structural protein 1 (pcTPANS1) was considered and investigations were focused on the induced T cell-mediated immunity against i.c.-DENV infection. Immunophenotyping assays by flow cytometry revealed that immunization with pcTPANS1 promotes a sustained T cell activation in spleen of i.c.-infected mice. Moreover, we found that the downregulation of CD45RB on T cells, as an indicator of cell activation, correlated with absence of morbidity upon virus challenge. Adoptive transfer procedures supported by CFSE-labeled cell tracking showed that NS1-specific T cells induced by vaccination, proliferate and migrate to peripheral organs of infected mice, such as the liver. Additionally, in late stages of infection (from the 7th day onwards), vaccinated mice also presented reduced levels of circulating IFN-γ and IL-12p70 in comparison to non-vaccinated animals. In conclusion, this work presented new aspects about the T cell-mediated immunity concerning DNA vaccination with pcTPANS1 and the i.c. infection model. These insights can be explored in further studies of anti-dengue vaccine efficacy. PMID:27631083

  14. Effect of renal and non-renal ischemia/reperfusion on cell-mediated immunity in organs and plasma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brøchner, Anne Craveiro; Dagnæs-Hansen, Frederik; Toft, Palle

    2010-01-01

    study, 80 mice were divided into four groups. The following surgeries were performed on the groups compared: bilateral renal I/R by clamping, unilateral renal ischemia, anesthesia only, and unilateral hind leg I/R. Half of the animals were killed after 2 h and the other half after 24 h. To assess...... following renal I/R. All kinds of I/R induced an upregulation of the adhesion molecule CD 11b and a downregulation of MHC II. Renal and non-renal I/R induced neutrophil infiltration in distant organs. Renal I/R does not induce a larger cell-mediated inflammatory response in blood and organs than non-renal I/R....

  15. Co-incubation with IL-18 potentiates antigen-specific IFN-γ response in a whole-blood stimulation assay for measurement of cell-mediated immune responses in pigs experimentally infected with Lawsonia intracellularis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riber, Ulla; Boesen, Henriette Toft; Jakobsen, Jeanne Toft

    2011-01-01

    The whole-blood interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) assay is a quantitative in-vitro assay for a direct read out of Ag-specific cell-mediated immune (CMI) responses to infectious diseases. The IFN-γ assay is robust in severe intracellular infections like Brucella or mycobacteria, but more difficult to evalu......The whole-blood interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) assay is a quantitative in-vitro assay for a direct read out of Ag-specific cell-mediated immune (CMI) responses to infectious diseases. The IFN-γ assay is robust in severe intracellular infections like Brucella or mycobacteria, but more difficult...

  16. The critical role of the tumor microenvironment in shaping natural killer cell-mediated anti-tumor immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna eBaginska

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Considerable evidence has been gathered over the last 10 years showing that the tumor microenvironment (TME is not simply a passive recipient of immune cells, but an active participant in the establishment of immunosuppressive conditions. It is now well documented that hypoxia, within the TME, affects the functions of immune effectors including natural killer (NK cells by multiple overlapping mechanisms. Indeed, each cell in the TME, irrespective of its transformation status, has the capacity to adapt to the hostile TME and produce immune modulatory signals or mediators affecting the function of immune cells either directly or through the stimulation of other cells present in the tumor site. This observation has led to intense research efforts focused mainly on tumor-derived factors. Notably, it has become increasingly clear that tumor cells secrete a number of environmental factors such as cytokines, growth factors, exosomes, and microRNAs impacting the immune cell response. Moreover, tumor cells in hostile microenvironments may activate their own intrinsic resistance mechanisms, such as autophagy, to escape the effective immune response. Such adaptive mechanisms may also include the ability of tumor cells to modify their metabolism and release several metabolites to impair the function of immune cells. In this review, we summarize the different mechanisms involved in the TME that affect the anti-tumor immune function of NK cells.

  17. IL-18 potentiated whole blood IFN-γ assay can identify cell-mediated immune responses towards Lawsonia intracellularis in experimentally infected pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riber, Ulla; Jakobsen, Jeanne Toft; Hvass, Henriette Cordes;

    Lawsonia intracellularis is an obligate intracellular bacteria causing proliferative enteropathy (PE) in pigs. The infection causes diarrhoea, retarded growth and sudden death in pigs and is one of the most economically important diseases in the swine industry worldwide. The infection is one...... indications that cell-mediated immune responses (CMI) are important for the protection against infections with L. intracellularis and in mice models IFN-γ has been shown to play a key role in the host defence against experimental infections . In L. intracellularis infected pigs, IFN-γ is only sparsely...... exhibited a much lower level of IFN-γ response. Thus, age seems to be an important parameter in measurement of IFN-γ in response to L. intracellularis infection. In the young pigs antibiotic treatment (from 3 weeks. p.i.) cleared the L. intracellularis infection. In contrast to the low response observed...

  18. Melatonin improves humoral and cell-mediated immune responses of male golden hamster following stress induced by dexamethasone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vishwas, Dipanshu Kumar; Mukherjee, Arun; Haldar, Chandana

    2013-06-15

    Melatonin is known as an antistress and immunostimulator compound while glucocorticoids have immunosuppressive function. The mechanism of action of both the hormones on immune cells is still a question. We found that melatonin improved the effect of dexamethasone (synthetic glucocorticoid) induced immunosuppression of splenocytes and bone marrow GM-CFU along with increased production of serum IL-2, IgG and the receptor expression for melatonin and glucocorticoid in spleen that might be responsible for the proliferation of immune cells. Thus, seasonal variation in peripheral melatonin might be responsible for the improvement of immune status under different stress conditions experienced by the rodents for better survival.

  19. Towards Developing a Malaria Vaccine Based on CD4 T Cell Mediated Immunity in Blood Stage of Malaria Infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐沪济

    2004-01-01

    Twenty-one years after malaria antigens were first cloned a vaccine still appears to be a long way off. There have been periods of great excitement and in model systems subunit vaccine homologues can induce robust protection. However, significant challenges exist concerning antigenic variation and polymorphism, immunological non-respons-iveness to individual vaccine antigens, parasite-induced apoptosis of immune effector and memory cells and immune deviation as a result of maternal immtmity and alterations of dendritic cell function.

  20. Study of biomaterial-induced macrophage activation, cell-mediated immune response and molecular oxidative damage in patients with dermal bioimplants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, Olga; Rodríguez-Sureda, Víctor; Domínguez, Carmen; Fernández-Figueras, Teresa; Vilches, Angel; Llurba, Elisa; Alijotas-Reig, Jaume

    2012-01-01

    Several soft-tissue dermal fillers have been reported to provoke immunogenicity and may cause adverse reactions despite claims regarding their safety. This study aimed to assess biomaterial-induced macrophage activation, cell-mediated immune response and oxidative stress in 169 patients with dermal bioimplants. To this end, we analysed plasma concentrations of myeloperoxidase (MPO), the chitinase-like proteins chitotriosidase and YKL-40 and molecular oxidative damage. The present study shows, for the first time, that the components of innate immunity: chitotriosidase and YKL-40, are significantly higher in patients with certain bioimplants and these markers of monocyte/macrophage activation rose progressively as adverse reactions (AR) evolved. Plasma MPO levels increased 4-fold in filler users with AR and 3-fold in those without. Analysis by filler type showed subjects injected with calcium hydroxylapatite, methacrylate, acrylamides and silicone to have values significantly above those of non-filler subjects for at least two plasma biomarkers, probably because the afore-mentioned biomaterials are permanent and prone to trigger AR in the long term. By contrast, hyaluronic acid alone elicited little immune response. Plasma concentrations of markers of oxidative damage to lipids and proteins were found to be significantly higher in users of four of the nine dermal fillers studied. These diffusible products of molecular peroxidation would stem from the reaction catalysed by MPO that generates potent oxidants, leading to cell oxidative damage which, in turn, may exert deleterious effects on the organism. Overall, the results of this study on the effects of a range of dermal fillers point to chronic activation of the immune response mediated by macrophages and PMNs. The increases in plasma of MPO, chitotriosidase and YKL-40 proteins and products of macromolecular peroxidation suggests that these molecules could serve as blood-based biochemical markers and alert to the

  1. DNA prime/Adenovirus boost malaria vaccine encoding P. falciparum CSP and AMA1 induces sterile protection associated with cell-mediated immunity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilin Chuang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Gene-based vaccination using prime/boost regimens protects animals and humans against malaria, inducing cell-mediated responses that in animal models target liver stage malaria parasites. We tested a DNA prime/adenovirus boost malaria vaccine in a Phase 1 clinical trial with controlled human malaria infection. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The vaccine regimen was three monthly doses of two DNA plasmids (DNA followed four months later by a single boost with two non-replicating human serotype 5 adenovirus vectors (Ad. The constructs encoded genes expressing P. falciparum circumsporozoite protein (CSP and apical membrane antigen-1 (AMA1. The regimen was safe and well-tolerated, with mostly mild adverse events that occurred at the site of injection. Only one AE (diarrhea, possibly related to immunization, was severe (Grade 3, preventing daily activities. Four weeks after the Ad boost, 15 study subjects were challenged with P. falciparum sporozoites by mosquito bite, and four (27% were sterilely protected. Antibody responses by ELISA rose after Ad boost but were low (CSP geometric mean titer 210, range 44-817; AMA1 geometric mean micrograms/milliliter 11.9, range 1.5-102 and were not associated with protection. Ex vivo IFN-γ ELISpot responses after Ad boost were modest (CSP geometric mean spot forming cells/million peripheral blood mononuclear cells 86, range 13-408; AMA1 348, range 88-1270 and were highest in three protected subjects. ELISpot responses to AMA1 were significantly associated with protection (p = 0.019. Flow cytometry identified predominant IFN-γ mono-secreting CD8+ T cell responses in three protected subjects. No subjects with high pre-existing anti-Ad5 neutralizing antibodies were protected but the association was not statistically significant. SIGNIFICANCE: The DNA/Ad regimen provided the highest sterile immunity achieved against malaria following immunization with a gene-based subunit vaccine (27%. Protection

  2. Influence of Flavonoid of Astragalus Membranaceus's Stem and Leaf on the Function of Cell Mediated Immunity in Mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    焦艳; 闻杰; 于晓红; 张德山

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the immune regulation of flavonoid of Astragalus membranaceus's stem and leaf(FAM-sl). Methods: Changes of total T cell count and subsets in mice were determined by monoclonal antibody assay before and after treatment with FAM-sl, and the lymphokine activated killer cell (LAK) activity was tested simultaneously by isotope label method.Results: FAM-sl could promote the proliferation of lymphocytes induced by ConA, raise the total T cell count and regulate the T cell subsets disturbance, and elevate the LAK activity induced by recombinant interleukin-2 (rIL-2).Conclusion: FAM-sl possesses effects of immune stimulation and immune regulation in treating immunosuppressive mice. This study provides experimental evidence for clinical application of FAM-sl.

  3. The Escape of Cancer from T Cell-Mediated Immune Surveillance: HLA Class I Loss and Tumor Tissue Architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrido, Federico; Perea, Francisco; Bernal, Mónica; Sánchez-Palencia, Abel; Aptsiauri, Natalia; Ruiz-Cabello, Francisco

    2017-01-01

    Tumor immune escape is associated with the loss of tumor HLA class I (HLA-I) expression commonly found in malignant cells. Accumulating evidence suggests that the efficacy of immunotherapy depends on the expression levels of HLA class I molecules on tumors cells. It also depends on the molecular mechanism underlying the loss of HLA expression, which could be reversible/“soft” or irreversible/“hard” due to genetic alterations in HLA, β2-microglobulin or IFN genes. Immune selection of HLA-I negative tumor cells harboring structural/irreversible alterations has been demonstrated after immunotherapy in cancer patients and in experimental cancer models. Here, we summarize recent findings indicating that tumor HLA-I loss also correlates with a reduced intra-tumor T cell infiltration and with a specific reorganization of tumor tissue. T cell immune selection of HLA-I negative tumors results in a clear separation between the stroma and the tumor parenchyma with leucocytes, macrophages and other mononuclear cells restrained outside the tumor mass. Better understanding of the structural and functional changes taking place in the tumor microenvironment may help to overcome cancer immune escape and improve the efficacy of different immunotherapeutic strategies. We also underline the urgent need for designing strategies to enhance tumor HLA class I expression that could improve tumor rejection by cytotoxic T-lymphocytes (CTL). PMID:28264447

  4. PB1 as a potential target for increasing the breadth of T-cell mediated immunity to Influenza A

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uddbäck, Ida E M; Steffensen, Maria A; Pedersen, Sara R

    2016-01-01

    Recently, we showed that combined intranasal and subcutaneous immunization with a non-replicating adenoviral vector expressing NP of influenza A, strain PR8, induced long-standing protection against a range of influenza A viruses. However, H-2(b) mice challenged with an influenza A strain mutated...

  5. Cell-mediated immunity to histocompatibility antigens : controlling factors, with emphasis on Graft-versus-host reactions in mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H. Bril (Herman)

    1984-01-01

    textabstractGraft-versus-Host (GvH) disease is characterized by weight loss, diarrhea, skin lesions, hypofunction of the immune system with concomitant infections, etc. This syndrome is potentially lethal. GvH reactions, which underly this disease, may occur when immunocompetent T lymphocytes are tr

  6. The Escape of Cancer from T Cell-Mediated Immune Surveillance: HLA Class I Loss and Tumor Tissue Architecture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico Garrido

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Tumor immune escape is associated with the loss of tumor HLA class I (HLA-I expression commonly found in malignant cells. Accumulating evidence suggests that the efficacy of immunotherapy depends on the expression levels of HLA class I molecules on tumors cells. It also depends on the molecular mechanism underlying the loss of HLA expression, which could be reversible/“soft” or irreversible/“hard” due to genetic alterations in HLA, β2-microglobulin or IFN genes. Immune selection of HLA-I negative tumor cells harboring structural/irreversible alterations has been demonstrated after immunotherapy in cancer patients and in experimental cancer models. Here, we summarize recent findings indicating that tumor HLA-I loss also correlates with a reduced intra-tumor T cell infiltration and with a specific reorganization of tumor tissue. T cell immune selection of HLA-I negative tumors results in a clear separation between the stroma and the tumor parenchyma with leucocytes, macrophages and other mononuclear cells restrained outside the tumor mass. Better understanding of the structural and functional changes taking place in the tumor microenvironment may help to overcome cancer immune escape and improve the efficacy of different immunotherapeutic strategies. We also underline the urgent need for designing strategies to enhance tumor HLA class I expression that could improve tumor rejection by cytotoxic T-lymphocytes (CTL.

  7. Cell-mediated immunity induced by chimeric tetravalent dengue vaccine in naive or flavivirus-primed subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guy, Bruno; Nougarede, Nolwenn; Begue, Sarah; Sanchez, Violette; Souag, Nadia; Carre, Murielle; Chambonneau, Laurent; Morrisson, Dennis N; Shaw, David; Qiao, Ming; Dumas, Rafaele; Lang, Jean; Forrat, Remi

    2008-10-23

    Three independent, phase 1 clinical trials were conducted in Australia and in USA to assess the safety and immunogenicity of sanofi pasteur dengue vaccine candidates. In this context, Dengue 1-4 and Yellow Fever 17D-204 (YF 17D)-specific CD4 and CD8 cellular responses induced by tetravalent chimeric dengue vaccines (CYD) were analyzed in flavivirus-naive or flavivirus-immune patients. Tetravalent CYD vaccine did not trigger detectable changes in serum pro-inflammatory cytokines, whatever the vaccinees immune status, while inducing significant YF 17D NS3-specific CD8 responses and dengue serotype-specific T helper responses. These responses were dominated by serotype 4 in naive individuals, but a booster vaccination (dose #2) performed 4 months following dose #1 broadened serotype-specific responses. A similar, broader response was seen after primary tetravalent immunization in subjects with pre-existing dengue 1 or 2 immunity caused by prior monovalent live-attenuated dengue vaccination. In all three trials, the profile of induced response was similar, whatever the subjects' immune status, i.e. an absence of Th2 response, and an IFN-gamma/TNF-alpha ratio dominated by IFN-gamma, for both CD4 and CD8 responses. Our results also showed an absence of cross-reactivity between YF 17D or Dengue NS3-specific CD8 responses, and allowed the identification of 3 new CD8 epitopes in the YF 17D NS3 antigen. These data are consistent with the previously demonstrated excellent safety of these dengue vaccines in flavivirus-naive and primed individuals.

  8. MHC class II-associated invariant chain linkage of antigen dramatically improves cell-mediated immunity induced by adenovirus vaccines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, Peter Johannes; Mandrup Jensen, Camilla Maria; Orskov, Cathrine

    2008-01-01

    The ideal vaccine induces a potent protective immune response, which should be rapidly induced, long-standing, and of broad specificity. Recombinant adenoviral vectors induce potent Ab and CD8+ T cell responses against transgenic Ags within weeks of administration, and they are among the most...... potent and versatile Ag delivery vehicles available. However, the impact of chronic infections like HIV and hepatitis C virus underscore the need for further improvements. In this study, we show that the protective immune response to an adenovirus-encoded vaccine Ag can be accelerated, enhanced......, broadened, and prolonged by tethering of the rAg to the MHC class II-associated invariant chain (Ii). Thus, adenovirus-vectored vaccines expressing lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV)-derived glycoprotein linked to Ii increased the CD4+ and CD8+ T cell stimulatory capacity in vitro and in vivo...

  9. Recombinant Listeria monocytogenes as a Live Vaccine Vehicle for the Induction of Protective Anti-Viral Cell-Mediated Immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Hao; Slifka, Mark K.; Matloubian, Mehrdad; Jensen, Eric R.; Ahmed, Rafi; Miller, Jeff F.

    1995-04-01

    Listeria monocytogenes (LM) is a Gram-positive bacterium that is able to enter host cells, escape from the endocytic vesicle, multiply within the cytoplasm, and spread directly from cell to cell without encountering the extracellular milieu. The ability of LM to gain access to the host cell cytosol allows proteins secreted by the bacterium to efficiently enter the pathway for major histocompatibility complex class I antigen processing and presentation. We have established a genetic system for expression and secretion of foreign antigens by recombinant strains, based on stable site-specific integration of expression cassettes into the LM genome. The ability of LM recombinants to induce protective immunity against a heterologous pathogen was demonstrated with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV). LM strains expressing the entire LCMV nucleoprotein or an H-2L^d-restricted nucleoprotein epitope (aa 118-126) were constructed. Immunization of mice with LM vaccine strains conferred protection against challenge with virulent strains of LCMV that otherwise establish chronic infection in naive adult mice. In vivo depletion of CD8^+ T cells from vaccinated mice abrogated their ability to clear viral infection, showing that protective anti-viral immunity was due to CD8^+ T cells.

  10. HPV-E7 Delivered by Engineered Exosomes Elicits a Protective CD8+ T Cell-Mediated Immune Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Di Bonito

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available We developed an innovative strategy to induce a cytotoxic T cell (CTL immune response against protein antigens of choice. It relies on the production of exosomes, i.e., nanovesicles spontaneously released by all cell types. We engineered the upload of huge amounts of protein antigens upon fusion with an anchoring protein (i.e., HIV-1 Nefmut, which is an inactive protein incorporating in exosomes at high levels also when fused with foreign proteins. We compared the immunogenicity of engineered exosomes uploading human papillomavirus (HPV-E7 with that of lentiviral virus-like particles (VLPs incorporating equivalent amounts of the same antigen. These exosomes, whose limiting membrane was decorated with VSV-G, i.e., an envelope protein inducing pH-dependent endosomal fusion, proved to be as immunogenic as the cognate VLPs. It is noteworthy that the immunogenicity of the engineered exosomes remained unaltered in the absence of VSV-G. Most important, we provide evidence that the inoculation in mouse of exosomes uploading HPV-E7 induces production of anti-HPV E7 CTLs, blocks the growth of syngeneic tumor cells inoculated after immunization, and controls the development of tumor cells inoculated before the exosome challenge. These results represent the proof-of-concept about both feasibility and efficacy of the Nefmut-based exosome platform for the induction of CD8+ T cell immunity.

  11. An African horse sickness virus serotype 4 recombinant canarypox virus vaccine elicits specific cell-mediated immune responses in horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Garch, H; Crafford, J E; Amouyal, P; Durand, P Y; Edlund Toulemonde, C; Lemaitre, L; Cozette, V; Guthrie, A; Minke, J M

    2012-09-15

    A recombinant canarypox virus vectored vaccine co-expressing synthetic genes encoding outer capsid proteins, VP2 and VP5, of African horse sickness virus (AHSV) serotype 4 (ALVAC(®)-AHSV4) has been demonstrated to fully protect horses against homologous challenge with virulent field virus. Guthrie et al. (2009) detected weak and variable titres of neutralizing antibody (ranging from horses received two vaccinations twenty-eight days apart and three horses remained unvaccinated. The detection of VP2/VP5 specific IFN-γ responses was assessed by enzyme linked immune spot (ELISpot) assay and clearly demonstrated that all ALVAC(®)-AHSV4 vaccinated horses developed significant IFN-γ production compared to unvaccinated horses. More detailed immune responses obtained by flow cytometry demonstrated that ALVAC(®)-AHSV4 vaccinations induced immune cells, mainly CD8(+) T cells, able to recognize multiple T-epitopes through all VP2 and only the N-terminus sequence of VP5. Neither VP2 nor VP5 specific IFN-γ responses were detected in unvaccinated horses. Overall, our data demonstrated that an experimental recombinant canarypox based vaccine induced significant CMI specific for both VP2 and VP5 proteins of AHSV4.

  12. The effect of Beauveria bassiana infection on cell mediated and humoral immune response in house fly, Musca domestica L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Sapna; Kumar, Peeyush; Malik, Anushree

    2015-10-01

    Entomopathogenic fungi that manifest infections by overcoming insect's immune response could be a successful control agent for the house fly, Musca domestica L. which is a major domestic, medical, and veterinary pest. In this study, the immune response of house fly to Beauveria bassiana infection was investigated to reveal fundamental aspects of house fly hemocyte biology, such as hemocyte numbers and size, which is poorly understood. The total hemocyte counts (THCs) in B. bassiana-infected house fly showed an initial increase (from 6 to 9 h), followed by subsequent decrease (9 to 12 h) with increase in time of infection. The THCs was slightly greater in infected flies than the non-infected ones. Insight into relative hemocyte counts depicted a significant increase in prohemocyte (PR) and decrease in granulocyte (GR) in infected house flies compared to non-infected ones. The relative cell area of hemocyte cells showed a noticeable increase in PR and intermediate cells (ICs), while a considerable reduction was observed for plasmatocyte (PL) and GR. The considerable variation in relative cell number and cell area in the B. bassiana-infected house flies indicated stress development during infection. The present study highlights changes occurring during B. bassiana invasion to house fly leading to establishment of infection along with facilitation in understanding of basic hemocyte biology. The results of the study is expected to help in better understanding of house fly immune response during fungal infection, so as to assist production of more efficient mycoinsecticides for house fly control using B. bassiana.

  13. The effect of garlic extract on growth, haematology and cell-mediated immune response of newborn goat kids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borhan Shokrollahi

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The present study was carried out to evaluate the effect of different levels of garlic extract supplemented in milk on growth rate, haematology and cell–mediated immune response of Markhoz newborn goat kids. Twenty four newborn goat kids (aged 7+/-3days were randomly assigned to four groups. The groups consisted of control (received milk without garlic extract, T1, T2 and T3 which received milk supplemented with 62.5, 125 and 250 mg aqueous garlic extract per kg live weight per day for 42 days, respectively. Body weights were measured weekly throughout the experimental period. At day 42, about 10 ml blood samples were collected from each kid via the jugular vein for haematological study. Cell–mediated immune response was evaluated through double skin thickness after intradermal injection of phyto-hematogglutinin (PHA at day 21 and 42. Total gain was significantly higher for kids in T3 (P<0.05 compared with the control group. Average daily gain (ADG in T3 group in week 4–5 was higher (P<0.05. Significant differences in globulin (P<0.01, hemoglobin (Hb; P<0.001, hematocrit (PCV; P<0.001, erythrocyte (RBC; P<0.001, neutrophil (P<0.001, lymphocyte (P<0.001 and leukocyte (WBC; P<0.001 were observed among groups. Hb, PCV, RBC, lymphocytes and WBC were higher in kids given garlic extract supplementation. There was a significant difference of double skin thickness among the groups at day 42 (P<0.01. In conclusion, this study indicated that milk supplemented with aqueous garlic extract improved growth rate and immunity of newborn goat kids.

  14. Cross-reactivity of cell-mediated immunity between interstitial (type I) and basement membrane (type IV) collagens

    OpenAIRE

    1982-01-01

    In the present study, we demonstrate delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) to homologous type I collagen that cross-reacts with type IV collagen. Mice immunized with native or denatured type I collagens and challenged with these same antigens or native type IV collagen develop a peak DTH response on day 7. Challenge with denatured type IV collagen or collagenase-treated type IV collagen failed to elicit DTH in type I collagen-sensitized mice. Type I collagen-sensitized spleen cells adoptively t...

  15. PB1 as a potential target for increasing the breadth of T-cell mediated immunity to Influenza A

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uddbäck, Ida E M; Steffensen, Maria A; Pedersen, Sara R;

    2016-01-01

    not as efficiently protected against influenza A challenge as similarly NP-vaccinated animals. The reason for this is not a difference in the quality of the primed cells, nor in functional avidity. However, under similar conditions of immunization fewer PB1-specific cells were recruited to the airways, and surface...... in the dominant NP366 epitope were not efficiently protected. To address this problem, we envision the use of a cocktail of adenovectors targeting different internal proteins of influenza A virus. Consequently, we investigated the possibility of using PB1 as a target for an adenovector-based vaccine against...

  16. Hemagglutinin-based polyanhydride nanovaccines against H5N1 influenza elicit protective virus neutralizing titers and cell-mediated immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ross KA

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Kathleen A Ross,1 Hyelee Loyd,2 Wuwei Wu,2 Lucas Huntimer,3 Shaheen Ahmed,4 Anthony Sambol,5 Scott Broderick,6 Zachary Flickinger,2 Krishna Rajan,6 Tatiana Bronich,4 Surya Mallapragada,1 Michael J Wannemuehler,3 Susan Carpenter,2 Balaji Narasimhan1 1Chemical and Biological Engineering, Iowa State University, Ames, IA, USA; 2Animal Science, Iowa State University, Ames, IA, USA; 3Veterinary Microbiology and Preventive Medicine, Iowa State University, Ames, IA, USA; 4Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE, USA; 5Pathology and Microbiology, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE, USA; 6Materials Science and Engineering, Iowa State University, Ames, IA, USA Abstract: H5N1 avian influenza is a significant global concern with the potential to become the next pandemic threat. Recombinant subunit vaccines are an attractive alternative for pandemic vaccines compared to traditional vaccine technologies. In particular, polyanhydride nanoparticles encapsulating subunit proteins have been shown to enhance humoral and cell-mediated immunity and provide protection upon lethal challenge. In this work, a recombinant H5 hemagglutinin trimer (H53 was produced and encapsulated into polyanhydride nanoparticles. The studies performed indicated that the recombinant H53 antigen was a robust immunogen. Immunizing mice with H53 encapsulated into polyanhydride nanoparticles induced high neutralizing antibody titers and enhanced CD4+ T cell recall responses in mice. Finally, the H53-based polyanhydride nanovaccine induced protective immunity against a low-pathogenic H5N1 viral challenge. Informatics analyses indicated that mice receiving the nanovaccine formulations and subsequently challenged with virus were similar to naïve mice that were not challenged. The current studies provide a basis to further exploit the advantages of polyanhydride nanovaccines in pandemic scenarios. Keywords: polymer, nanoparticle, vaccine, subunit

  17. Toll-like receptor activation enhances cell-mediated immunity induced by an antibody vaccine targeting human dendritic cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berger Marc A

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Previously, we have successfully targeted the mannose receptor (MR expressed on monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs using a fully human MR-specific antibody, B11, as a vehicle to deliver whole protein tumor antigens such as the human chorionic gonadotropin hormone (hCGβ. Since MRs play a role in bridging innate immunity with adaptive immunity we have explored several toll-like receptor (TLR-specific ligands that may synergize with MR targeting and be applicable as adjuvants in the clinic. We demonstrate that antigen-specific helper and cytolytic T cells from both healthy donors and cancer patients were effectively primed with B11-hCGβ-treated autologous DCs when a combination of one or several TLR ligands is used. Specifically, concomitant signaling of DCs via TLR3 with dsRNA (poly I:C and DC TLR 7/8 with Resiquimod (R-848, respectively, elicited efficient antigen presentation-mediated by MR-targeting. We demonstrate that MR and TLRs contribute towards maturation and activation of DCs by a mechanism that may be driven by a combination of adjuvant and antibody vaccines that specifically deliver antigenic targets to DCs.

  18. Memory CD8+ T cells mediate antibacterial immunity via CCL3 activation of TNF/ROI+ phagocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narni-Mancinelli, Emilie; Campisi, Laura; Bassand, Delphine; Cazareth, Julie; Gounon, Pierre; Glaichenhaus, Nicolas; Lauvau, Grégoire

    2007-09-03

    Cytolysis, interferon gamma and tumor necrosis factor (TNF) alpha secretion are major effector mechanisms of memory CD8+ T cells that are believed to be required for immunological protection in vivo. By using mutants of the intracellular bacterium Listeria monocytogenes, we found that none of these effector activities is sufficient to protect against secondary infection with wild-type (WT) bacteria. We demonstrated that CCL3 derived from reactivated memory CD8+ T cells is required for efficient killing of WT bacteria. CCL3 induces a rapid TNF-alpha secretion by innate inflammatory mononuclear phagocytic cells (MPCs), which further promotes the production of radical oxygen intermediates (ROIs) by both MPCs and neutrophils. ROI generation is the final bactericidal mechanism involved in L. monocytogenes clearance. These results therefore uncover two levels of regulation of the antibacterial secondary protective response: (a) an antigen-dependent phase in which memory CD8+ T cells are reactivated and control the activation of the innate immune system, and (b) an antigen-independent phase in which the MPCs coordinate innate immunity and promote the bactericidal effector activities. In this context, CCL3-secreting memory CD8+ T cells are able to mediate "bystander" killing of an unrelated pathogen upon antigen-specific reactivation, a mechanism that may be important for the design of therapeutic vaccines.

  19. Seasonal changes in cell mediated immune responses to soluble Plasmodium falciparum antigens in children with haemoglobin AA and haemoglobin AS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abu-Zeid, Y A; Abdulhadi, N H; Theander, T G

    1992-01-01

    In this longitudinal study peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were obtained before and during the malaria season from healthy HbAA and HbAS children. Cells were compared for proliferation in response to stimulation by soluble Plasmodium falciparum antigens (SPAg) or purified derivative of ......AS children during the malaria season. No distinct seasonal change in the response to PPD was found in relation to the haemoglobin phenotype. The study points to the role of the sickle cell trait in modulating the cellular immune responses to falciparum malaria.......In this longitudinal study peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were obtained before and during the malaria season from healthy HbAA and HbAS children. Cells were compared for proliferation in response to stimulation by soluble Plasmodium falciparum antigens (SPAg) or purified derivative...

  20. Influence of Flavonoid of Astragalus Membranaceus's Stem and Leaf on the Function of Cell Mediated Immunity in Mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    jiao; yan

    2001-01-01

    [1]GENG CS, XING ST, ZHOU JH, et al. Study on mechnism of Astragalus membranaceus stimulating antibody production in T cell defect mice. Shanghai J Immunology 1985;5(2)∶69-72.[2]MAO XJ, WANG JZ, WANG FL. Advances in immunological studies of Astragalus membranaceus and Radix Hedysari. J Lanzhou Medical College 1988;(1)∶67-71.[3]WANG WY, CHANG JL, GAO J, et al. Experimental study on effects of Astragalus membranaceus on cytokine production in aged organism. Chinese J Immunology 1995;11(5)∶167-169.[4]MA YL, TIAN ZK, YUAN CS. Studies on chemical ingredients in Astragalus membranaceus's stem and leaf. J Shengyang Pharmacol College 1991;(2)∶121-123,136.[5]LU SH, ZHU YZ, WU SJ. Study on flavonoids in Astragalus membranaceus Bage van mongolicus stem and leaf. Chinese Traditional and Herbal Drugs 1990;21(6)∶249-250,265.[6]JIAO Y, WEN J, ZHANG DS. Effects of flavonoid in Astragalus membranaceus's stem and leaf on immune function in mice. Informations on TCM 1997;14(5)∶44.[7]GUAN HZ, KUANG YD, QING HL, et al. Comparison of 4 methods of assessing interleukin-2(IL-2). Shanghai J Immunology 1986;6(5)∶298-301.[8]MA ZZ, DING RR, SHENG T, et al. Detection of activity of LAK cell in mice by 3H-TdR incorporation. Chinese J Immunology 1989;5 (1)∶20-21,28.[9]SHENG YQ, NA AH, YANG ZJ, et al. Comparison of 12 species of Astragalus membranaceus on immune function in mice. Chinese J Immunology 1989;5(2)∶119-121.

  1. A novel dengue virus serotype-2 nanovaccine induces robust humoral and cell-mediated immunity in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunsawong, Taweewun; Sunintaboon, Panya; Warit, Saradee; Thaisomboonsuk, Butsaya; Jarman, Richard G; Yoon, In-Kyu; Ubol, Sukathida; Fernandez, Stefan

    2015-03-30

    Dengue virus (DENV), a member of the Flaviviridae family, can be transmitted to humans through the bite of infected Aedes mosquitoes. The incidence of dengue has increased worldwide over the past few decades. Inadequate vector control, changing global ecology, increased urbanization, and faster global travel are factors enhancing the rapid spread of the virus and its vector. In the absence of specific antiviral treatments, the search for a safe and effective vaccine grows more imperative. Many strategies have been utilized to develop dengue vaccines. Here, we demonstrate the immunogenic properties of a novel dengue nanovaccine (DNV), composed of ultraviolet radiation (UV)-inactivated DENV-2, which has been loaded into the nanoparticles containing chitosan/Mycobacterium bovis Bacillus Calmette-Guerin cell wall components (CS/BCG-NPs). We investigated the immunogenicity of DNV in a Swiss albino mouse model. Inoculation with various concentrations of vaccine (0.3, 1, 3 and 10μg/dose) with three doses, 15-day apart, induced strong anti-dengue IgM and IgG antibodies in the mouse serum along with neutralizing antibody against DENV-2 reference strain (16681), a clinical-isolate strain (00745/10) and the mouse-adapted New Guinea-C (NGC) strain. Cytokine and chemokine secretion in the serum of DNV-immunized mice showed elevated levels of IFN-γ, IL-2, IL-5, IL-12p40, IL-12p70, IL-17, eotaxin and RANTES, all of which have varying immune functions. Furthermore, we observed a DNV dose-dependent increase in the frequencies of IFN-γ-producing CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells after in vitro stimulation of nucleated cells. Based on these findings, DNV has the potential to become a candidate dengue vaccine.

  2. Vaccination with TAT-antigen fusion protein induces protective, CD8(+) T cell-mediated immunity against Leishmania major.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kronenberg, Katharina; Brosch, Sven; Butsch, Florian; Tada, Yayoi; Shibagaki, Naotaka; Udey, Mark C; von Stebut, Esther

    2010-11-01

    In murine leishmaniasis, healing is mediated by IFN-γ-producing CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells. Thus, an efficacious vaccine should induce Th1 and Tc1 cells. Dendritic cells (DCs) pulsed with exogenous proteins primarily induce strong CD4-dependent immunity; induction of CD8 responses has proven to be difficult. We evaluated the immunogenicity of fusion proteins comprising the protein transduction domain of HIV-1 TAT and the Leishmania antigen LACK (Leishmania homolog of receptors for activated C kinase), as TAT-fusion proteins facilitate major histocompatibility complex class I-dependent antigen presentation. In vitro, TAT-LACK-pulsed DCs induced stronger proliferation of Leishmania-specific CD8(+) T cells compared with DCs incubated with LACK alone. Vaccination with TAT-LACK-pulsed DCs or fusion proteins plus adjuvant in vivo significantly improved disease outcome in Leishmania major-infected mice and was superior to vaccination with DCs treated with LACK alone. Vaccination with DC+TAT-LACK resulted in stronger proliferation of CD8(+) T cells when compared with immunization with DC+LACK. Upon depletion of CD4(+) or CD8(+) T cells, TAT-LACK-mediated protection was lost. TAT-LACK-pulsed IL-12p40-deficient DCs did not promote protection in vivo. In summary, these data show that TAT-fusion proteins are superior in activating Leishmania-specific Tc1 cells when compared with antigen alone and suggest that IL-12-dependent preferential induction of antigen-specific CD8(+) cells promotes significant protection against this important human pathogen.

  3. Circumsporozoite Protein-Specific Kd-Restricted CD8+ T Cells Mediate Protective Antimalaria Immunity in Sporozoite-Immunized MHC-I-Kd Transgenic Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Huang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Although the roles of CD8+ T cells and a major preerythrocytic antigen, the circumsporozoite (CS protein, in contributing protective antimalaria immunity induced by radiation-attenuated sporozoites, have been shown by a number of studies, the extent to which these players contribute to antimalaria immunity is still unknown. To address this question, we have generated C57BL/6 (B6 transgenic (Tg mice, expressing Kd molecules under the MHC-I promoter, called MHC-I-Kd-Tg mice. In this study, we first determined that a single immunizing dose of IrPySpz induced a significant level of antimalaria protective immunity in MHC-I-Kd-Tg mice but not in B6 mice. Then, by depleting various T-cell subsets in vivo, we determined that CD8+ T cells are the main mediator of the protective immunity induced by IrPySpz. Furthermore, when we immunized (MHC-I-Kd-Tg × CS-Tg F1 mice with IrPySpz after crossing MHC-I-Kd-Tg mice with PyCS-transgenic mice (CS-Tg, which are unable to mount PyCS-specific immunity, we found that IrPySpz immunization failed to induce protective antimalaria immunity in (MHC-I-Kd-Tg × CS-Tg F1 mice, thus indicating the absence of PyCS antigen-dependent immunity in these mice. These results indicate that protective antimalaria immunity induced by IrPySpz in MHC-I-Kd-Tg mice is mediated by CS protein-specific, Kd-restricted CD8+ T cells.

  4. Effects of iridovirus-like agent on the cell-mediated immunity in sheatfish (Silurus glanis)--an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siwicki, A K; Pozet, F; Morand, M; Volatier, C; Terech-Majewska, E

    1999-09-01

    An iridovirus-like agent was tested for the first time in vitro on cell-mediated immunity in sheatfish (Silurus glanis). The influence of the iridovirus-like agent on pronephric macrophage metabolism was examined at two temperatures, 20 and 30 degrees C, by studying the respiratory burst activity stimulated by phorbol myristate acetate as well as the proliferative ability of lymphocytes stimulated by concanavalin A (ConA) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) measured by MTT assay. The results showed that the iridovirus-like agent decreased the macrophage activity at incubation temperatures of 20 and 30 degrees C. The highest inhibitory effect was observed at 30 degrees C. The proliferative ability of pronephric lymphocytes had a similar pattern. The results showed that applying a virus at the same time or after the mitogen at 20 and 30 degrees C decreased the lymphocyte proliferation that was stimulated by either ConA or LPS. The highest suppressive effect was observed when virus was applied 14 h after the mitogen. This preliminary in vitro study demonstrated a strong suppressive influence of the iridovirus-like agent on pronephric macrophage and lymphocyte activity in sheatfish.

  5. PD-L1 Expression on Retrovirus-Infected Cells Mediates Immune Escape from CD8+ T Cell Killing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilseyar Akhmetzyanova

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Cytotoxic CD8+ T Lymphocytes (CTL efficiently control acute virus infections but can become exhausted when a chronic infection develops. Signaling of the inhibitory receptor PD-1 is an important mechanism for the development of virus-specific CD8+ T cell dysfunction. However, it has recently been shown that during the initial phase of infection virus-specific CD8+ T cells express high levels of PD-1, but are fully competent in producing cytokines and killing virus-infected target cells. To better understand the role of the PD-1 signaling pathway in CD8+ T cell cytotoxicity during acute viral infections we analyzed the expression of the ligand on retrovirus-infected cells targeted by CTLs. We observed increased levels of PD-L1 expression after infection of cells with the murine Friend retrovirus (FV or with HIV. In FV infected mice, virus-specific CTLs efficiently eliminated infected target cells that expressed low levels of PD-L1 or that were deficient for PD-L1 but the population of PD-L1high cells escaped elimination and formed a reservoir for chronic FV replication. Infected cells with high PD-L1 expression mediated a negative feedback on CD8+ T cells and inhibited their expansion and cytotoxic functions. These findings provide evidence for a novel immune escape mechanism during acute retroviral infection based on PD-L1 expression levels on virus infected target cells.

  6. Targeted antigen delivery to dendritic cells elicits robust antiviral T cell-mediated immunity in the liver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volckmar, Julia; Gereke, Marcus; Ebensen, Thomas; Riese, Peggy; Philipsen, Lars; Lienenklaus, Stefan; Wohlleber, Dirk; Klopfleisch, Robert; Stegemann-Koniszewski, Sabine; Müller, Andreas J.; Gruber, Achim D.; Knolle, Percy; Guzman, Carlos A.; Bruder, Dunja

    2017-01-01

    Hepatotropic viruses such as hepatitis C virus cause life-threatening chronic liver infections in millions of people worldwide. Targeted in vivo antigen-delivery to cross-presenting dendritic cells (DCs) has proven to be extraordinarily efficient in stimulating antigen-specific T cell responses. To determine whether this approach would as well be suitable to induce local antiviral effector T cells in the liver we compared different vaccine formulations based on either the targeting of DEC-205 or TLR2/6 on cross-presenting DCs or formulations not involving in vivo DC targeting. As read-outs we used in vivo hepatotropic adenovirus challenge, histology and automated multidimensional fluorescence microscopy (MELC). We show that targeted in vivo antigen delivery to cross-presenting DCs is highly effective in inducing antiviral CTLs capable of eliminating virus-infected hepatocytes, while control vaccine formulation not involving DC targeting failed to induce immunity against hepatotropic virus. Moreover, we observed distinct patterns of CD8+ T cell interaction with virus-infected and apoptotic hepatocytes in the two DC-targeting groups suggesting that the different vaccine formulations may stimulate distinct types of effector functions. Our findings represent an important step toward the future development of vaccines against hepatotropic viruses and the treatment of patients with hepatic virus infection after liver transplantation to avoid reinfection. PMID:28266658

  7. Rheumatoid arthritis and its association with HLA-DR antigens. I. Cell mediated immune response against connective tissue antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vullo, C M; Pesoa, S A; Onetti, C M; Riera, C M

    1987-04-01

    HLA-DR antigens and cellular sensitivity to native bovine type I and type II collagen and proteoglycans were examined in patients with classic rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and normal individuals. Fifty eight percent of patients with RA (n = 88) and 28% of normals (n = 52) were DR4+ (pc less than 0.01). DR4 phenotype was significantly increased in patients with severe disease stages (III-IV), as defined by the ARA criteria, in contrast to those showing mild disease stages (I-II) (p less than 0.05). Furthermore, peripheral blood mononuclear cells from 55 patients and 30 controls were evaluated for the in vitro production of leukocyte inhibitory factor in response to native type I and type II collagen and proteoglycans. By using this assay, cells from the arthritic group exhibited a statistically significant response when stimulated with native type I collagen and proteoglycans. The cellular immune response was not associated with any particular HLA-DR antigens, or to the disease stage or severity.

  8. Cell-mediated immunity in the rheumatoid diseases. I. Skin testing and mitogenic responses in sero-negative arthritides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froebel, K; Sturrock, R D; Dick, W C; MacSween, R N

    1975-12-01

    Cellular immunity has been investigated in patients with various kinds of sero-negative arthritis. The incidence of cutaneous response to recall antigen streptokinase-streptodornase (SK-SD), and the ability to mount a primary cutaneous response to dinitrochlorobenzene (DNCB) have been examined in patients with ankylosing spondylitis and psoriatic arthritis. The results were not significantly different from normal. In vitro lymphocyte transformation in the presence of phytohaemagglutinin (PHA), concanavalin A (Con A), and pokeweed mitogen (PWM) has been measured using peripheral blood lymphocytes from patients with ankylosing spondylitis, psoriatic arthritis and Reiter's disease. In comparison with a control group, significantly reduced responses were found to a low dose of PHA in the ankylosing spondylitis and Reiter disease patients. Significant increase in response occurred to a high dose of PHA, in patients with psoriatic arthritis and Reiter's disease, and to PWM in Reiter's disease patients. The in vitro results in the ankylosing spondylitis, psoriatic arthritis and Reiter's disease patients suggest some abnormality in the T-cell population in sero-negative arthritis.

  9. Dual Pressure from Antiretroviral Therapy and Cell-Mediated Immune Response on the Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Protease Gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsson, Annika C.; Deeks, Steven G.; Barbour, Jason D.; Heiken, Brandon D.; Younger, Sophie R.; Hoh, Rebecca; Lane, Meghan; Sällberg, Matti; Ortiz, Gabriel M.; Demarest, James F.; Liegler, Teri; Grant, Robert M.; Martin, Jeffrey N.; Nixon, Douglas F.

    2003-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-specific CD8+ T-lymphocyte pressure can lead to the development of viral escape mutants, with consequent loss of immune control. Antiretroviral drugs also exert selection pressures on HIV, leading to the emergence of drug resistance mutations and increased levels of viral replication. We have determined a minimal epitope of HIV protease, amino acids 76 to 84, towards which a CD8+ T-lymphocyte response is directed. This epitope, which is HLA-A2 restricted, includes two amino acids that commonly mutate (V82A and I84V) in the face of protease inhibitor therapy. Among 29 HIV-infected patients who were treated with protease inhibitors and who had developed resistance to these drugs, we show that the wild-type PR82V76-84 epitope is commonly recognized by cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) in HLA-A2-positive patients and that the CTL directed to this epitope are of high avidity. In contrast, the mutant PR82A76-84 epitope is generally not recognized by wild-type-specific CTL, or when recognized it is of low to moderate avidity, suggesting that the protease inhibitor-selected V82A mutation acts both as a CTL and protease inhibitor escape mutant. Paradoxically, the absence of a mutation at position 82 was associated with the presence of a high-avidity CD8+ T-cell response to the wild-type virus sequence. Our results indicate that both HIV type 1-specific CD8+ T cells and antiretroviral drugs provide complex pressures on the same amino acid sequence of the HIV protease gene and, thus, can influence viral sequence evolution. PMID:12767994

  10. Thiol dependent NF-κB suppression and inhibition of T-cell mediated adaptive immune responses by a naturally occurring steroidal lactone Withaferin A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gambhir, Lokesh; Checker, Rahul; Sharma, Deepak; Thoh, M; Patil, Anand; Degani, M; Gota, Vikram; Sandur, Santosh K

    2015-12-01

    Withaferin A (WA), a steroidal lactone isolated from ayurvedic medicinal plant Withania somnifera, was shown to inhibit tumor growth by inducing oxidative stress and suppressing NF-κB pathway. However, its effect on T-cell mediated adaptive immune responses and the underlying mechanism has not been investigated. Since both T-cell responses and NF-κB pathway are known to be redox sensitive, the present study was undertaken to elucidate the effect of WA on adaptive immune responses in vitro and in vivo. WA inhibited mitogen induced T-cell and B-cell proliferation in vitro without inducing any cell death. It inhibited upregulation of T-cell (CD25, CD69, CD71 and CD54) and B-cell (CD80, CD86 and MHC-II) activation markers and secretion of Th1 and Th2 cytokines. WA induced oxidative stress by increasing the basal ROS levels and the immunosuppressive effects of WA were abrogated only by thiol anti-oxidants. The redox modulatory effects of WA in T-cells were attributed to its ability to directly interact with free thiols. WA inhibited NF-κB nuclear translocation in lymphocytes and prevented the direct binding of nuclear NF-κB to its consensus sequence. MALDI-TOF analysis using a synthetic NF-κB-p50 peptide containing Cys-62 residue suggested that WA can modify the cysteine residue of NF-κB. The pharmacokinetic studies for WA were also carried out and in vivo efficacy of WA was studied using mouse model of Graft-versus-host disease. In conclusion, WA is a potent inhibitor of T-cell responses and acts via a novel thiol dependent mechanism and inhibition of NF-κB pathway.

  11. 21 Days head-down bed rest induces weakening of cell-mediated immunity - Some spaceflight findings confirmed in a ground-based analog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelsen, Jens; Bartels, Lars Erik; Dige, Anders; Hvas, Christian Lodberg; Frings-Meuthen, Petra; Boehme, Gisela; Thomsen, Marianne Kragh; Fenger-Grøn, Morten; Dahlerup, Jens Frederik

    2012-08-01

    Several studies indicate a weakening of cell-mediated immunity (CMI) and reactivation of latent herpes viruses during spaceflight. We tested the hypothesis that head-down bed rest (HDBR), a ground-based analog of spaceflight, mimics the impact of microgravity on human immunity. Seven healthy young males underwent two periods of 3 weeks HDBR in the test facility of the German Aerospace Center. As a nutritional countermeasure aimed against bone demineralisation, 90 mmol potassium bicarbonate (KHCO(3)) was administered daily in a crossover design. Blood samples were drawn on five occasions. Whole blood was stimulated with antigen i.e. Candida albicans, purified protein derivative (PPD) tuberculin, tetanus toxoid and Cytomegalovirus (CMV) (CMV-QuantiFERON). Flow cytometric analysis included CD4(+)CD25(+)CD127(-)FOXP3(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs), γδ T cells, B cells, NK cells and dendritic cells. In one of the two bed rest periods, we observed a significant decrease in production of interleukin-2 (IL-2), interferon-γ (IFN-γ) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) following phytohemagglutinin (PHA) stimulation, with a rapid normalization being observed after HDBR. The cytokine levels showed a V-shaped pattern that led to a relativeTh2-shift in cytokine balance. Only three individuals responded to the specific T cell antigens without showing signs of an altered response during HDBR, nor did we observe reactivation of CMV or Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). Of unknown significance, dietary supplementation with KHCO(3) counteracted the decrease in IL-2 levels during HDBR, while there was no impact on other immunological parameters. We conclude that discrete alterations in CMI may be induced by HDBR in selected individuals.

  12. An antibody against the surfactant protein A (SP-A)-binding domain of the SP-A receptor inhibits T cell-mediated immune responses to Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samten, Buka; Townsend, James C; Sever-Chroneos, Zvjezdana; Pasquinelli, Virginia; Barnes, Peter F; Chroneos, Zissis C

    2008-07-01

    Surfactant protein A (SP-A) suppresses lymphocyte proliferation and IL-2 secretion, in part, by binding to its receptor, SP-R210. However, the mechanisms underlying this effect are not well understood. Here, we studied the effect of antibodies against the SP-A-binding (neck) domain (alpha-SP-R210n) or nonbinding C-terminal domain (alpha-SP-R210ct) of SP-R210 on human peripheral blood T cell immune responses against Mycobacterium tuberculosis. We demonstrated that both antibodies bind to more than 90% of monocytes and 5-10% of CD3+ T cells in freshly isolated PBMC. Stimulation of PBMC from healthy tuberculin reactors [purified protein derivative-positive (PPD+)] with heat-killed M. tuberculosis induced increased antibody binding to CD3+ cells. Increased antibody binding suggested enhanced expression of SP-R210, and this was confirmed by Western blotting. The antibodies (alpha-SP-R210n) cross-linking the SP-R210 through the SP-A-binding domain markedly inhibited cell proliferation and IFN-gamma secretion by PBMC from PPD+ donors in response to heat-killed M. tuberculosis, whereas preimmune IgG and antibodies (alpha-SP-R210ct) cross-linking SP-R210 through the non-SP-A-binding, C-terminal domain had no effect. Anti-SP-R210n also decreased M. tuberculosis-induced production of TNF-alpha but increased production of IL-10. Inhibition of IFN-gamma production by alpha-SP-R210n was abrogated by the combination of neutralizing antibodies to IL-10 and TGF-beta1. Together, these findings support the hypothesis that SP-A, via SP-R210, suppresses cell-mediated immunity against M. tuberculosis via a mechanism that up-regulates secretion of IL-10 and TGF-beta1.

  13. Cell-Mediated and Humoral Immune Responses after Immunization of Calves with a Recombinant Multiantigenic Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis Subunit Vaccine at Different Ages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thakur, Aneesh; Aagaard, Claus; Stockmarr, Anders

    2013-01-01

    Neonates and juvenile ruminants are very susceptible to paratuberculosis infection. This is likely due to a high degree of exposure from their dams and an immature immune system. To test the influence of age on vaccine-induced responses, a cocktail of recombinant Mycobacterium avium subsp...... and 12 relative to the first vaccination. Vaccine-induced immune responses, the gamma interferon (IFN-γ) cytokine secretion and antibody responses, were followed for 20 weeks. In general, the specific responses were significantly elevated in all three vaccination groups after the first booster...... vaccination with no or only a minor effect from the second booster. However, significant differences were observed in the immunogenicity levels of the different proteins, and it appears that the older age group produced a more consistent IFN-γ response. In contrast, the humoral immune response is seemingly...

  14. Strategy for eliciting antigen-specific CD8+ T cell-mediated immune response against a cryptic CTL epitope of merkel cell polyomavirus large T antigen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gomez Bianca P

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC is a relatively new addition to the expanding category of oncovirus-induced cancers. Although still comparably rare, the number of cases has risen dramatically in recent years. Further complicating this trend is that MCC is an extremely aggressive neoplasm with poor patient prognosis and limited treatment options for advanced disease. The causative agent of MCC has been identified as the merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV. The MCPyV-encoded large T (LT antigen is an oncoprotein that is theorized to be essential for virus-mediated tumorigenesis and is therefore, an excellent MCC antigen for the generation of antitumor immune responses. As a foreign antigen, the LT oncoprotein avoids the obstacle of immune tolerance, which normally impedes the development of antitumor immunity. Ergo, it is an excellent target for anti-MCC immunotherapy. Since tumor-specific CD8+ T cells lead to better prognosis for MCC and numerous other cancers, we have generated a DNA vaccine that is capable of eliciting LT-specific CD8+ T cells. The DNA vaccine (pcDNA3-CRT/LT encodes the LT antigen linked to a damage-associated molecular pattern, calreticulin (CRT, as it has been demonstrated that the linkage of CRT to antigens promotes the induction of antigen-specific CD8+ T cells. Results The present study shows that DNA vaccine-induced generation of LT-specific CD8+ T cells is augmented by linking CRT to the LT antigen. This is relevant since the therapeutic effects of the pcDNA3-CRT/LT DNA vaccine is mediated by LT-specific CD8+ T cells. Mice vaccinated with the DNA vaccine produced demonstrably more LT-specific CD8+ T cells. The DNA vaccine was also able to confer LT-specific CD8+ T cell-mediated protective and therapeutic effects to prolong the survival of mice with LT-expressing tumors. In the interest of determining the LT epitope which most MCC-specific CD8+ T cells recognize, we identified the amino acid sequence of the

  15. Levamisole Enhances Cell-Mediated Immune Responses and Reduces Shedding of H9N2 Avian Influenza Virus in Japanese Quails (Coturnix coturnix japonica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tahoora Shomali

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Regarding the role of Japanese quails (Coturnix coturnix japonica in reassortment and spreading of avian influenza (AI viruses and inadequate protection of vaccination in this species, the present study aimed to evaluate the effect of levamisole as an immunomodulatory agent on cell-mediated immunity (CMI, antibody responses and shedding of H9N2 AI virus in experimentally infected quails. Approach: On day 20 of age, 100 quails randomly allocated into 4 equal groups. Birds in groups 2, 3 and 4 were inoculated with virus where group 1 kept as control. Groups 3 and 4 orally received 15 mg kg-1 levamisole for three consecutive days just before virus inoculation which was repeated 10 days post inoculation (PI only in group 4. Antibody titers and CMI of all birds were assayed by HI and delayed type hypersensitivity (DTH test respectively and virus detection in fecal and tracheal samples performed by RT-PCR method. Data analyzed by one-way ANOVA and Tukey’s test. Results: Levamisole in both regimens had no appreciable effect on antibody titers (p>0.05 while repeated regimen resulted in higher CMI response than group 2 at 48 and 72 h post DTH test (p = 0.011 and p = 0.031 respectively. Total fecal samples positive for virus from birds in group 3 and 4 were 34.4 and 40% lower than group 2 respectively. For trachea, the positive samples were 33.3% (group 3 and 46.7% (group 4 lower than group 2. Moreover; fecal and tracheal samples from levamisole treated birds (especially from group 4 became void of virus earlier than group 2. Conclusion/Recommendations: Levamisole administration in a repeated regimen enhances CMI response against H9N2 AI virus and reduces virus shedding in quails. This may pave the road for further investigations on potential positive effects of this agent on prevention and management of H9N2 AI infections in quail industry.

  16. DNA Vaccine Encoding HPV16 Oncogenes E6 and E7 Induces Potent Cell-mediated and Humoral Immunity Which Protects in Tumor Challenge and Drives E7-expressing Skin Graft Rejection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, Janin; Dutton, Julie L.; Li, Bo; Woo, Wai-Ping; Xu, Yan; Tolley, Lynn K.; Yong, Michelle; Wells, James W.; R. Leggatt, Graham; Finlayson, Neil

    2017-01-01

    We have previously shown that a novel DNA vaccine technology of codon optimization and the addition of ubiquitin sequences enhanced immunogenicity of a herpes simplex virus 2 polynucleotide vaccine in mice, and induced cell-mediated immunity when administered in humans at relatively low doses of naked DNA. We here show that a new polynucleotide vaccine using the same technology and encoding a fusion protein of the E6 and E7 oncogenes of high-risk human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16) is immunogenic in mice. This vaccine induces long-lasting humoral and cell-mediated immunity and protects mice from establishment of HPV16-E7-expressing tumors. In addition, it suppresses growth of readily established tumors and shows enhanced efficacy when combined with immune checkpoint blockade targeted at PD-L1. This vaccine also facilitates rejection of HPV16-E7-expressing skin grafts that demonstrate epidermal hyperplasia with characteristics of cervical and vulvar intraepithelial neoplasia. Clinical studies evaluating the efficacy of this vaccine in patients with HPV16+ premalignancies are planned. PMID:28166181

  17. Gender-specific effects of genetic variants within Th1 and Th17 cell-mediated immune response genes on the risk of developing rheumatoid arthritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Cáliz

    Full Text Available The present study was conducted to explore whether single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in Th1 and Th17 cell-mediated immune response genes differentially influence the risk of rheumatoid arthritis (RA in women and men. In phase one, 27 functional/tagging polymorphisms in C-type lectins and MCP-1/CCR2 axis were genotyped in 458 RA patients and 512 controls. Carriers of Dectin-2 rs4264222T allele had an increased risk of RA (OR = 1.47, 95%CI 1.10-1.96 whereas patients harboring the DC-SIGN rs4804803G, MCP-1 rs1024611G, MCP-1 rs13900T and MCP-1 rs4586C alleles had a decreased risk of developing the disease (OR = 0.66, 95%CI 0.49-0.88; OR = 0.66, 95%CI 0.50-0.89; OR = 0.73, 95%CI 0.55-0.97 and OR = 0.68, 95%CI 0.51-0.91. Interestingly, significant gender-specific differences were observed for Dectin-2 rs4264222 and Dectin-2 rs7134303: women carrying the Dectin-2 rs4264222T and Dectin-2 rs7134303G alleles had an increased risk of RA (OR = 1.93, 95%CI 1.34-2.79 and OR = 1.90, 95%CI 1.29-2.80. Also five other SNPs showed significant associations only with one gender: women carrying the MCP-1 rs1024611G, MCP-1 rs13900T and MCP-1 rs4586C alleles had a decreased risk of RA (OR = 0.61, 95%CI 0.43-0.87; OR = 0.67, 95%CI 0.47-0.95 and OR = 0.60, 95%CI 0.42-0.86. In men, carriers of the DC-SIGN rs2287886A allele had an increased risk of RA (OR = 1.70, 95%CI 1.03-2.78, whereas carriers of the DC-SIGN rs4804803G had a decreased risk of developing the disease (OR = 0.53, 95%CI 0.32-0.89. In phase 2, we genotyped these SNPs in 754 RA patients and 519 controls, leading to consistent gender-specific associations for Dectin-2 rs4264222, MCP-1 rs1024611, MCP-1 rs13900 and DC-SIGN rs4804803 polymorphisms in the pooled sample (OR = 1.38, 95%CI 1.08-1.77; OR = 0.74, 95%CI 0.58-0.94; OR = 0.76, 95%CI 0.59-0.97 and OR = 0.56, 95%CI 0.34-0.93. SNP-SNP interaction analysis of significant SNPs also showed a

  18. Long-term moderate calorie restriction inhibits inflammation without impairing cell-mediated immunity: a randomized controlled trial in non obese humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calorie restriction (CR) inhibits inflammation and slows aging in many animal species, but in rodents housed in pathogen-free facilities, CR impairs immunity against certain pathogens. However, little is known about the effects of long-term moderate CR on immune function in humans. In this multi-cen...

  19. Improved cell mediated immune responses after successful re-vaccination of non-responders to the hepatitis B virus surface antigen (HBsAg) vaccine using the combined hepatitis A and B vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyström, Jessica; Cardell, Kristina; Björnsdottir, Thora Björg; Fryden, Aril; Hultgren, Catharina; Sällberg, Matti

    2008-11-01

    We successfully re-vaccinated hepatitis B virus (HBV) vaccine non-responders using a double dose of the combined hepatitis A virus (HAV) and HBV vaccine. The hope was to improve priming of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg)-specific cell mediated immune response (CMI) by an increased antigen dose and a theoretical adjuvant-effect from the local presence of a HAV-specific CMI. A few non-responders had a detectable HBsAg-specific CMI before re-vaccination. An in vitro detectable HBsAg-specific CMI was primed equally effective in non-responders (58%) as in first time vaccine recipients (68%). After the third dose a weak, albeit significant, association was observed between the magnitude of HBsAg-specific proliferation and anti-HBs levels. This regimen improves the priming of HBsAg-specific CMIs and antibodies.

  20. Humoral and cell-mediated immunity following vaccination with synthetic Candida cell wall mannan derived heptamannoside-protein conjugate: immunomodulatory properties of heptamannoside-BSA conjugate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulovičová, Lucia; Paulovičová, Ema; Karelin, Alexander A; Tsvetkov, Yury E; Nifantiev, Nikolay E; Bystrický, Slavomír

    2012-10-01

    Chemically defined glycoprotein conjugate composed of synthetically prepared mannan-derived heptamannoside with terminal β-1,2-linked mannose residue attached to the α-1,3-linked mannose residues and BSA as carrier protein (M7-BSA conjugate) was analysed for the capacity to induce protective humoral immunity and appropriate alteration cellular immunity. To identify protective antigenic structure of Candida cell wall mannan M7-BSA conjugate was used for BALB/c mice immunization. The obtained results were compared with placebo group and with heat-inactivated C. albicans whole cells immunization. The administration route of M7-BSA conjugate secondary booster injection significantly affected the intensity of humoral immune response and the specificity of produced antibodies. All prepared sera were able to elevate candidacidal activity of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) in cooperation with complement. Moreover, polyclonal sera obtained after secondary subcutaneous (s.c.) booster injection of M7-BSA conjugate were able to induce candidacidal activity of PMN also in complement independent manner. M7-BSA conjugate immunization induced increases of phagocytic activity and respiratory burst of granulocytes, caused a raise of the proportion of CD3(+) T lymphocytes and increased the CD4(+)/CD8(+) T lymphocyte ratio. We observed also an increasing proportion of CD4(+)CD25(+) T cells compared to immunization with heat inactivated whole C. albicans cells, which in turn promoted an increase of the CD8(+)CD25(+) cell proportion. Immunization with M7-BSA conjugate induced Th1, Th2 and Th17 immune responses as indicated by the elevation of relevant cytokines levels. These data provide some insights on the immunomodulatory properties of oligomannosides and contribute to the development of synthetic oligosaccharide vaccines against fungal diseases.

  1. An oral Salmonella-based vaccine inhibits liver metastases by promoting tumor-specific T cell-mediated immunity in celiac & portal lymph nodes. A preclinical study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandrina eVendrell

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Primary tumor excision is one of the therapies of cancer most widely used. However, the risk of metastases development still exists following tumor resection. The liver is a common site of metastatic disease for numerous cancers. Breast cancer is one of the most frequent source of metastases to the liver. The aim of this work was to evaluate the efficacy of the orally-administered Salmonella Typhi vaccine strain CVD 915 on the development of liver metastases in a mouse model of breast cancer. To this end, one group of BALB/c mice was immunized with CVD 915 via o.g. while another received PBS as a control. After 24 h, mice were injected with LM3 mammary adenocarcinoma cells into the spleen and subjected to splenectomy. This oral Salmonella-based vaccine produced an antitumor effect, leading to a decrease in the number and volume of liver metastases. Immunization with Salmonella induced an early cellular immune response in mice. This innate stimulation rendered a large production of IFN-γ by intrahepatic immune cells (IHIC detected within 24 h. An antitumor adaptive immunity was found in the liver and celiac & portal lymph nodes (LDLN 21 days after oral bacterial inoculation. The antitumor immune response inside the liver was associated with increased CD4+ and DC cell populations as well as with an inflammatory infiltrate located around liver metastatic nodules. Enlarged levels of inflammatory cytokines (IFN-γ and TNF were also detected in IHIC. Furthermore, a tumor-specific production of IFN-γ and TNF as well as tumor-specific IFN-γ-producing CD8 T cells (CD8+IFN-γ+ were found in the celiac & portal lymph nodes of Salmonella-treated mice. This study provides first evidence for the involvement of LDLN in the development of an efficient cellular immune response against hepatic tumors, which resulted in the elimination of liver metastases after oral Salmonella-based vaccination.

  2. An Oral Salmonella-Based Vaccine Inhibits Liver Metastases by Promoting Tumor-Specific T-Cell-Mediated Immunity in Celiac and Portal Lymph Nodes: A Preclinical Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vendrell, Alejandrina; Mongini, Claudia; Gravisaco, María José; Canellada, Andrea; Tesone, Agustina Inés; Goin, Juan Carlos; Waldner, Claudia Inés

    2016-01-01

    Primary tumor excision is one of the most widely used therapies of cancer. However, the risk of metastases development still exists following tumor resection. The liver is a common site of metastatic disease for numerous cancers. Breast cancer is one of the most frequent sources of metastases to the liver. The aim of this work was to evaluate the efficacy of the orally administered Salmonella Typhi vaccine strain CVD 915 on the development of liver metastases in a mouse model of breast cancer. To this end, one group of BALB/c mice was orogastrically immunized with CVD 915, while another received PBS as a control. After 24 h, mice were injected with LM3 mammary adenocarcinoma cells into the spleen and subjected to splenectomy. This oral Salmonella-based vaccine produced an antitumor effect, leading to a decrease in the number and volume of liver metastases. Immunization with Salmonella induced an early cellular immune response in mice. This innate stimulation rendered a large production of IFN-γ by intrahepatic immune cells (IHIC) detected within 24 h. An antitumor adaptive immunity was found in the liver and celiac and portal lymph nodes (LDLN) 21 days after oral bacterial inoculation. The antitumor immune response inside the liver was associated with increased CD4(+) and dendritic cell populations as well as with an inflammatory infiltrate located around liver metastatic nodules. Enlarged levels of inflammatory cytokines (IFN-γ and TNF) were also detected in IHIC. Furthermore, a tumor-specific production of IFN-γ and TNF as well as tumor-specific IFN-γ-producing CD8 T cells (CD8(+)IFN-γ(+)) were found in the celiac and portal lymph nodes of Salmonella-treated mice. This study provides first evidence for the involvement of LDLN in the development of an efficient cellular immune response against hepatic tumors, which resulted in the elimination of liver metastases after oral Salmonella-based vaccination.

  3. Enhanced Early Innate and T Cell-mediated Responses in Subjects Immunized with Anthrax Vaccine Adsorbed Plus CPG 7909 (AV7909)

    OpenAIRE

    Minang, Jacob T.; Inglefield, Jon R.; Harris, Andrea M.; Lathey, Janet L.; Alleva, David G.; Sweeney, Diane L.; Hopkins, Robert J.; Lacy, Michael J.; Bernton, Edward W.

    2014-01-01

    NuThrax™ (Anthrax Vaccine Adsorbed with CPG 7909 Adjuvant) (AV7909) is in development. Samples obtained in a Phase Ib clinical trial were tested to confirm biomarkers of innate immunity and evaluate effects of CPG 7909 (PF-03512676) on adaptive immunity. Subjects received two intramuscular doses of commercial BioThrax® (Anthrax Vaccine Adsorbed, AVA), or two intramuscular doses of one of four formulations of AV7909. IP-10, IL-6, and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels were elevated 24 to 48 hours...

  4. Effects of inhalation exposure to a binary mixture of benzene and toluene on vitamin a status and humoral and cell-mediated immunity in wild and captive American kestrels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsgard, Mandy L; Bortolotti, Gary R; Trask, Brenda R; Smits, Judit E G

    2008-01-01

    Benzene and toluene are representative volatile organic compounds (VOC) released during production, storage, and transportation associated with the oil and gas industry and are chemicals of concern, as they are released in greater and possibly more biologically significant concentrations than other compounds. Most studies of air pollution in high oil and gas activity areas have neglected to consider risks to birds, including top-level predators. Birds can be used as highly sensitive monitors of air quality and since the avian respiratory tract is physiologically different from a rodent respiratory tract, effects of gases cannot be safely extrapolated from rodent studies. Wild and captive male American kestrels were exposed for approximately 1 h daily for 28 d to high (rodent lowest-observed-adverse-effect level [LOAEL] of 10 ppm and 80 ppm, respectively) or environmentally relevant (0.1 ppm and 0.8 ppm, respectively) levels of benzene and toluene. Altered immune responses characteristic of those seen in mammalian exposures were evident in kestrels. A decreased cell-mediated immunity, measured by delayed-type hypersensitivity testing, was evident in all exposed birds. There was no effect on humoral immunity. Plasma retinol levels as measured by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis were decreased in wild and captive kestrels exposed to the rodent LOAEL for combined benzene and toluene. This study indicates that American kestrels are sensitive to combined benzene and toluene. The study also illustrates the need for reference concentrations for airborne pollutants to be calculated, including sensitive endpoints specific to birds. Based on these findings, future studies need to include immune endpoints to determine the possible increased susceptibility of birds to inhaled toxicants.

  5. Enhanced early innate and T cell-mediated responses in subjects immunized with Anthrax Vaccine Adsorbed Plus CPG 7909 (AV7909).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minang, Jacob T; Inglefield, Jon R; Harris, Andrea M; Lathey, Janet L; Alleva, David G; Sweeney, Diane L; Hopkins, Robert J; Lacy, Michael J; Bernton, Edward W

    2014-11-28

    NuThrax™ (Anthrax Vaccine Adsorbed with CPG 7909 Adjuvant) (AV7909) is in development. Samples obtained in a phase Ib clinical trial were tested to confirm biomarkers of innate immunity and evaluate effects of CPG 7909 (PF-03512676) on adaptive immunity. Subjects received two intramuscular doses of commercial BioThrax(®) (Anthrax Vaccine Adsorbed, AVA), or two intramuscular doses of one of four formulations of AV7909. IP-10, IL-6, and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels were elevated 24-48 h after administration of AV7909 formulations, returning to baseline by Day 7. AVA (no CPG 7909) resulted in elevated IL-6 and CRP, but not IP-10. Another marker of CpG, transiently decreased absolute lymphocyte counts (ALCs), correlated with transiently increased IP-10. Cellular recall responses to anthrax protective antigen (PA) or PA peptides were assessed by IFN-γ ELISpot assay performed on cryopreserved PBMCs obtained from subjects prior to immunization and 7 days following the second immunization (study day 21). One-half of subjects that received AV7909 with low-dose (0.25mg/dose) CPG 7909 possessed positive Day 21 T cell responses to PA. In contrast, positive T cell responses occurred at an 11% average rate (1/9) for AVA-treated subjects. Differences in cellular responses due to dose level of CPG 7909 were not associated with differences in humoral anti-PA IgG responses, which were elevated for recipients of AV7909 compared to recipients of AVA. Serum markers at 24 or 48 h (i.e. % ALC decrease, or increase in IL-6, IP-10, or CRP) correlated with the humoral (antibody) responses 1 month later, but did not correlate with cellular ELISpot responses. In summary, biomarkers of early responses to CPG 7909 were confirmed, and adding a CpG adjuvant to a vaccine administered twice resulted in increased T cell effects relative to vaccine alone. Changes in early biomarkers correlated with subsequent adaptive humoral immunity but not cellular immunity.

  6. Varicella-zoster virus-specific, cell-mediated immunity with interferon-gamma release assay after vaccination of college students with no or intermediate IgG antibody response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terada, Kihei; Itoh, Yuri; Fujii, Akihide; Kitagawa, Seiko; Ogita, Satoko; Ouchi, Kazunobu

    2015-02-01

    This study measured Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) specific cell-mediated immunity (CMI) and antibodies to clarify immune response after vaccination in 68 college students with negative or intermediate IgG antibody status. The enrolled numbers of negative, intermediate, and positive VZV-IgG antibody were 27, 41, and 28 students, respectively. The positive rates of CMI were 3.7% (1/27), 41.5% (17/41), and 96.4% (27/28) before vaccination, respectively. After vaccination, the IgG antibody titers became significantly higher in the intermediate IgG group compared to those in the negative IgG group (P vaccination (P vaccination, the IgG antibody and interferon-gamma values increased significantly in the positive CMI group compared to the negative CMI group after vaccination (P vaccination (P vaccination (P history of vaccination became IgG seropositive after a second dose of vaccination, but 22% (5/23) of them remained negative for CMI. CMI is valuable information to identify potential non-responders to vaccination and to predict risk of clinical VZV infection.

  7. Identification and visualization of CD8+ T cell mediated IFN-γ signaling in target cells during an antiviral immune response in the brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Puntel

    Full Text Available CD8(+ T cells infiltrate the brain during an anti-viral immune response. Within the brain CD8(+ T cells recognize cells expressing target antigens, become activated, and secrete IFNγ. However, there are no methods to recognize individual cells that respond to IFNγ. Using a model that studies the effects of the systemic anti-adenoviral immune response upon brain cells infected with an adenoviral vector in mice, we describe a method that identifies individual cells that respond to IFNγ. To identify individual mouse brain cells that respond to IFNγ we constructed a series of adenoviral vectors that contain a transcriptional response element that is selectively activated by IFNγ signaling, the gamma-activated site (GAS promoter element; the GAS element drives expression of a transgene, Cre recombinase (Ad-GAS-Cre. Upon binding of IFNγ to its receptor, the intracellular signaling cascade activates the GAS promoter, which drives expression of the transgene Cre recombinase. We demonstrate that upon activation of a systemic immune response against adenovirus, CD8(+ T cells infiltrate the brain, interact with target cells, and cause an increase in the number of cells expressing Cre recombinase. This method can be used to identify, study, and eventually determine the long term fate of infected brain cells that are specifically targeted by IFNγ. The significance of this method is that it will allow to characterize the networks in the brain that respond to the specific secretion of IFNγ by anti-viral CD8(+ T cells that infiltrate the brain. This will allow novel insights into the cellular and molecular responses underlying brain immune responses.

  8. Sex-Specific Effects of High Yolk Androgen Levels on Constitutive and Cell-Mediated Immune Responses in Nestlings of an Altricial Passerine

    OpenAIRE

    Muriel, Jaime; Pérez-Rodríguez, Lorenzo; Ortíz-Santaliestra, Manuel E.; Puerta, Marisa; Gil, Diego

    2017-01-01

    Avian embryos are exposed to yolk androgens that are incorporated into the egg by the ovulating female. These steroids can affect several aspects of embryo development, often resulting in increases in overall size or the speed of growth of different traits. However, several studies suggest that they also entail immune costs to the offspring. In this study, we explored whether variation in yolk androgen concentration affected several measures of the constitutive and cell-m...

  9. The role of a novel protein ligand hMSH 2 in Vγ9δ2 T cell-mediated anti-cervix cancer immunity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    代玉梅

    2014-01-01

    Objective To explore the role of hMSH2,a novel endogenous tumor-associated protein ligand recognized by Vγ9δ2 T cells,in innate anti-cervix cancer immunity.Methods hMSH2 that expressed on the surface of cervical cancer cell line HeLa cells was blocked by specific antibody.Then the differences in their effects on Vγ9δ2T cells before and after antibody blockage were evaluated by cytotoxicity of Vγ9δ2 T cells and cytokines secretion.

  10. Sub-chronic effects of nitrate in drinking water on red-legged partridge (Alectoris rufa): oxidative stress and T-cell mediated immune function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Estival, Jaime; Martínez-Haro, Mónica; Martín-Hernando, M A Paz; Mateo, Rafael

    2010-07-01

    In order to evaluate the effects of nitrates on birds, we have exposed captive red-legged partridges to nitrates concentrations of 0 (control), 100 (dwell water in farming areas) or 500 mg/l (fertirrigation level). The cellular immune response, plasma biochemistry, methemoglobin concentration (metHb), and oxidative stress biomarkers in blood and tissues were studied after two weeks of exposure. Several blood parameters such as aspartate aminotransferase, creatinine phosphokinase and lactate dehydrogenase activities and magnesium level decreased with nitrate exposure, whereas alkaline phosphatase activity and creatinine level increased. The oxidant effect of nitrates was evidenced by the increase in blood metHb, accompanied by the lipid peroxidation of red blood cells, the increased levels of oxidized glutathione (GSH) in liver, and the generation of oxidative DNA damage in plasma lymphocytes. GSH in erythrocytes was negatively correlated with blood metHb. The cellular immune function was slightly lower at partridges exposed to nitrates. These results suggest that adverse effects of nitrates on birds occur at concentrations potentially present in the field.

  11. Acute Morphine Administration Reduces Cell-Mediated Immunity and Induces Reactivation of Latent Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 in BALB/c Mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shafi Mojadadi; Abbas Jamali; Behzad Khansarinejad; Hoorieh Soleimanjahi; Taravat Bamdad

    2009-01-01

    Acute morphine administration is known to alter the course of herpes simplex virus infection. In this study, the effect of acute morphine administration on the reactivation of latent herpes was investigated in a mouse model. Because of the important role of cytolytic T lymphocyte (CTL) activity in the inhibition of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) reactivation, the effect of acute morphine administration on CTL responses was also evaluated. Furthermore, lymphocyte proliferation and IFN-γ production were evaluated for their roles in the induction of the CTL response. The findings showed that acute morphine administration significantly reduced CTL responses, lymphocyte proliferation, and IFN-γ production. Furthermore, acute morphine administration has been shown to reactivate latent HSV-1. Previous studies have shown that cellular immune responses have important roles in the inhibition of HSV reactivation. These findings suggest that suppression of a portion of the cellular immune response after acute morphine administration may constitute one part of the mechanism that induces HSV reactivation. Cellular & Molecular Immunology.

  12. The glycosylated Rv1860 protein of Mycobacterium tuberculosis inhibits dendritic cell mediated TH1 and TH17 polarization of T cells and abrogates protective immunity conferred by BCG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satchidanandam, Vijaya; Kumar, Naveen; Jumani, Rajiv S; Challu, Vijay; Elangovan, Shobha; Khan, Naseem A

    2014-06-01

    We previously reported interferon gamma secretion by human CD4⁺ and CD8⁺ T cells in response to recombinant E. coli-expressed Rv1860 protein of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) as well as protection of guinea pigs against a challenge with virulent MTB following prime-boost immunization with DNA vaccine and poxvirus expressing Rv1860. In contrast, a Statens Serum Institute Mycobacterium bovis BCG (BCG-SSI) recombinant expressing MTB Rv1860 (BCG-TB1860) showed loss of protective ability compared to the parent BCG strain expressing the control GFP protein (BCG-GFP). Since Rv1860 is a secreted mannosylated protein of MTB and BCG, we investigated the effect of BCG-TB1860 on innate immunity. Relative to BCG-GFP, BCG-TB1860 effected a significant near total reduction both in secretion of cytokines IL-2, IL-12p40, IL-12p70, TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-10, and up regulation of co-stimulatory molecules MHC-II, CD40, CD54, CD80 and CD86 by infected bone marrow derived dendritic cells (BMDC), while leaving secreted levels of TGF-β unchanged. These effects were mimicked by BCG-TB1860His which carried a 6-Histidine tag at the C-terminus of Rv1860, killed sonicated preparations of BCG-TB1860 and purified H37Rv-derived Rv1860 glycoprotein added to BCG-GFP, but not by E. coli-expressed recombinant Rv1860. Most importantly, BMDC exposed to BCG-TB1860 failed to polarize allogeneic as well as syngeneic T cells to secrete IFN-γ and IL-17 relative to BCG-GFP. Splenocytes from mice infected with BCG-SSI showed significantly less proliferation and secretion of IL-2, IFN-γ and IL-17, but secreted higher levels of IL-10 in response to in vitro restimulation with BCG-TB1860 compared to BCG-GFP. Spleens from mice infected with BCG-TB1860 also harboured significantly fewer DC expressing MHC-II, IL-12, IL-2 and TNF-α compared to mice infected with BCG-GFP. Glycoproteins of MTB, through their deleterious effects on DC may thus contribute to suppress the generation of a TH1- and TH17-dominated

  13. The glycosylated Rv1860 protein of Mycobacterium tuberculosis inhibits dendritic cell mediated TH1 and TH17 polarization of T cells and abrogates protective immunity conferred by BCG.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijaya Satchidanandam

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available We previously reported interferon gamma secretion by human CD4⁺ and CD8⁺ T cells in response to recombinant E. coli-expressed Rv1860 protein of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB as well as protection of guinea pigs against a challenge with virulent MTB following prime-boost immunization with DNA vaccine and poxvirus expressing Rv1860. In contrast, a Statens Serum Institute Mycobacterium bovis BCG (BCG-SSI recombinant expressing MTB Rv1860 (BCG-TB1860 showed loss of protective ability compared to the parent BCG strain expressing the control GFP protein (BCG-GFP. Since Rv1860 is a secreted mannosylated protein of MTB and BCG, we investigated the effect of BCG-TB1860 on innate immunity. Relative to BCG-GFP, BCG-TB1860 effected a significant near total reduction both in secretion of cytokines IL-2, IL-12p40, IL-12p70, TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-10, and up regulation of co-stimulatory molecules MHC-II, CD40, CD54, CD80 and CD86 by infected bone marrow derived dendritic cells (BMDC, while leaving secreted levels of TGF-β unchanged. These effects were mimicked by BCG-TB1860His which carried a 6-Histidine tag at the C-terminus of Rv1860, killed sonicated preparations of BCG-TB1860 and purified H37Rv-derived Rv1860 glycoprotein added to BCG-GFP, but not by E. coli-expressed recombinant Rv1860. Most importantly, BMDC exposed to BCG-TB1860 failed to polarize allogeneic as well as syngeneic T cells to secrete IFN-γ and IL-17 relative to BCG-GFP. Splenocytes from mice infected with BCG-SSI showed significantly less proliferation and secretion of IL-2, IFN-γ and IL-17, but secreted higher levels of IL-10 in response to in vitro restimulation with BCG-TB1860 compared to BCG-GFP. Spleens from mice infected with BCG-TB1860 also harboured significantly fewer DC expressing MHC-II, IL-12, IL-2 and TNF-α compared to mice infected with BCG-GFP. Glycoproteins of MTB, through their deleterious effects on DC may thus contribute to suppress the generation of a TH1- and TH

  14. Vaccination of pigs with attenuated Lawsonia intracellularis induced acute phase protein responses and primed cell-mediated immunity without reduction in bacterial shedding after challenge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riber, Ulla; Heegaard, Peter M. H.; Hvass, Henriette Cordes;

    2015-01-01

    nomically important diseases in modern pig production worldwide. The Enterisol®Ileitis vaccine havebeen shown to reduce clinical disease and to increase weight gain, however, while the natural infectionwith L. intracellularis can provide complete protection against re-infection, this has not been...... achievedby this vaccine. We therefore undertook a detailed characterization of immune responses to L. intracel-lularis infection in vaccinated pigs (VAC) compared to previously infected pigs (RE) in order to pinpointimmunological determinants of protection.Results: The VAC pigs shed L. intracellularis...... response was diminished and L. intracellularis specific IgG responseswere delayed and reduced compared to non-vaccinated pigs. On the other hand L. intracellularis specificIFN- responses tended to develop faster in the VAC group compared to controls.Conclusion: Although vaccinated and non-vaccinated pigs...

  15. Cell-mediated immune responses to Plasmodium falciparum purified soluble antigens in sickle-cell trait subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bayoumi, R A; Abu-Zeid, Y A; Abdulhadi, N H

    1990-01-01

    endemic area 300 km south of Khartoum. Antibodies to ring-infected erythrocyte surface antigen (Pf155/RESA) and to circumsporozoite (CS) protein (anti-NANP40) indicated equal exposure to falciparum malaria. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (BMNCs) from 20/35 (57%) Hb AS subjects compared with 10/24 (42......To determine the possible differences in the immune response to Plasmodium falciparum between sickle-cell trait (Hb AS) and normal haemoglobin (Hb AA) individuals, we examined 35 Hb AS and 24 Hb AA subjects matched for age and microenvironment. Their age was 2-55 years and all lived in a malaria......%) Hb AA subjects, responded to affinity-purified P. falciparum soluble antigens (SPAg). Of those responding to SPAg, 9 (26%) Hb AS subjects and only two (8%) Hb AA subjects had high responses. The mean proliferative response to SPAg of BMNCs from Hb AS individuals was significantly higher than in Hb AA...

  16. The vesicle size of DDA:TDB liposomal adjuvants plays a role in the cell-mediated immune response but has no significant effect on antibody production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriksen-Lacey, Malou; Devitt, Andrew; Perrie, Yvonne

    2011-09-05

    The use of cationic liposomes as experimental adjuvants for subunit peptide of protein vaccines is well documented. Recently the cationic liposome CAF01, composed of dimethyldioctadecylammonium (DDA) and trehalose dibehenate (TDB), has entered Phase I clinical trials for use in a tuberculosis (TB) vaccine. CAF01 liposomes are a heterogeneous population with a mean vesicle size of 500 nm; a strong retention of antigen at the injection site and a Th1-biassed immune response are noted. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether CAF01 liposomes of significantly different vesicle sizes exhibited altered pharmacokinetics in vivo and cellular uptake with activation in vitro. Furthermore, the immune response against the TB antigen Ag85B-ESAT-6 was followed when various sized CAF01 liposomes were used as vaccine adjuvants. The results showed no differences in vaccine (liposome or antigen) draining from the injection site, however, significant differences in the movement of liposomes to the popliteal lymph node were noted. Liposome uptake by THP-1 vitamin D3 stimulated macrophage-like cells did not show a liposome size-dependent pattern of uptake. Finally, whilst there were no significant differences in the IgG1/2 regardless of the liposome size used as a delivery vehicle for Ag85B-ESAT-6, vesicle size has a size dependent effect on cell proliferation and IL-10 production with larger liposomes (in excess of 2 μm) promoting the highest proliferation and lowest IL-10 responses, yet vesicles of ~500 nm promoting higher IFN-γ cytokine production from splenocytes and higher IL-1β at the site of injection.

  17. Multiplex-PCR-Based Screening and Computational Modeling of Virulence Factors and T-Cell Mediated Immunity in Helicobacter pylori Infections for Accurate Clinical Diagnosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sinem Oktem-Okullu

    Full Text Available The outcome of H. pylori infection is closely related with bacteria's virulence factors and host immune response. The association between T cells and H. pylori infection has been identified, but the effects of the nine major H. pylori specific virulence factors; cagA, vacA, oipA, babA, hpaA, napA, dupA, ureA, ureB on T cell response in H. pylori infected patients have not been fully elucidated. We developed a multiplex- PCR assay to detect nine H. pylori virulence genes with in a three PCR reactions. Also, the expression levels of Th1, Th17 and Treg cell specific cytokines and transcription factors were detected by using qRT-PCR assays. Furthermore, a novel expert derived model is developed to identify set of factors and rules that can distinguish the ulcer patients from gastritis patients. Within all virulence factors that we tested, we identified a correlation between the presence of napA virulence gene and ulcer disease as a first data. Additionally, a positive correlation between the H. pylori dupA virulence factor and IFN-γ, and H. pylori babA virulence factor and IL-17 was detected in gastritis and ulcer patients respectively. By using computer-based models, clinical outcomes of a patients infected with H. pylori can be predicted by screening the patient's H. pylori vacA m1/m2, ureA and cagA status and IFN-γ (Th1, IL-17 (Th17, and FOXP3 (Treg expression levels. Herein, we report, for the first time, the relationship between H. pylori virulence factors and host immune responses for diagnostic prediction of gastric diseases using computer-based models.

  18. Effects of Bifidobacterium longum BB536 administration on influenza infection, influenza vaccine antibody titer, and cell-mediated immunity in the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namba, Kazuyoshi; Hatano, Michiko; Yaeshima, Tomoko; Takase, Mitsunori; Suzuki, Kunihiko

    2010-01-01

    Twenty-seven elderly subjects (mean age 86.7+/-6.6 years) were pre-administered a test food containing 1x10(11) cfu of BB536 daily for 5 weeks (P1), during which they also received influenza vaccination at week 3. The subjects were then randomized to a BB536 group and a placebo group for 14 weeks (P2). The proportion of subjects who contracted influenza was significantly lower in BB536 group than in the to placebo group. The proportion of subjects with fever was also significantly lower in the BB536 group than in the placebo group. In the P1 period, the NK cell activity and the bactericidal activity of the neutrophils were significantly higher at week 5 than to before BB536 administration. In the P2 period, although NK cell activity and neutrophilic activities declined at the end of the study in both the placebo and the BB536 group, neutrophil phagocytic activity and NK cell activity tended to maintain slightly higher levels in the BB536 group than in the placebo group. These results suggest that continuous ingestion of BB536 reduces the incidence of influenza and fever, probably by potentiating innate immunity.

  19. Alleviation of collagen-induced arthritis by the benzoxathiole derivative BOT-4-one in mice: Implication of the Th1- and Th17-cell-mediated immune responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Byung-Hak; Yoon, Bo Ruem; Kim, Eun Kyoung; Noh, Kum Hee; Kwon, Sun-Ho; Yi, Eun Hee; Lee, Hyun Gyu; Choi, Jung Sook; Kang, Seong Wook; Park, In-Chul; Lee, Won-Woo; Ye, Sang-Kyu

    2016-06-15

    Autoimmune rheumatoid arthritis is characterized by chronic inflammation and hyperplasia in the synovial joints. Although the cause of rheumatoid arthritis is largely unknown, substantial evidence has supported the importance of immune cells and inflammatory cytokines in the initiation and progression of this disease. Herein, we demonstrated that the benzoxathiole derivative 2-cyclohexylimino-6-methyl-6,7-dihydro-5H-benzo[1,3]oxathiol-4-one (BOT-4-one) alleviated type II collagen-induced arthritis in a mouse model. The levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines are elevated in both human patients with rheumatoid arthritis and mice with collagen-induced arthritis. BOT-4-one treatment reduced the levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines in mice and endotoxin-stimulated macrophages. BOT-4-one treatment suppressed the polarization of Th1- and Th17-cell subsets by inhibiting the expression and production of their lineage-specific master transcription factors and cytokines, as well as activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription proteins. In addition, BOT-4-one inhibited mitogen-activated protein kinase and NF-kappaB signaling as well as the transcriptional activities and DNA-binding of transcription factors, including activator protein-1, cAMP response element-binding protein and NF-kappaB. Our results suggest that BOT-4-one may have therapeutic potential for the treatment of chronic inflammation associated with autoimmune rheumatoid arthritis.

  20. The effects of reduced gluten barley diet on humoral and cell-mediated systemic immune responses of gluten-sensitive rhesus macaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sestak, Karol; Thwin, Hazel; Dufour, Jason; Aye, Pyone P; Liu, David X; Moehs, Charles P

    2015-03-06

    Celiac disease (CD) affects approximately 1% of the general population while an estimated additional 6% suffers from a recently characterized, rapidly emerging, similar disease, referred to as non-celiac gluten sensitivity (NCGS). The only effective treatment of CD and NCGS requires removal of gluten sources from the diet. Since required adherence to a gluten-free diet (GFD) is difficult to accomplish, efforts to develop alternative treatments have been intensifying in recent years. In this study, the non-human primate model of CD/NCGS, e.g., gluten-sensitive rhesus macaque, was utilized with the objective to evaluate the treatment potential of reduced gluten cereals using a reduced gluten (RG; 1% of normal gluten) barley mutant as a model. Conventional and RG barleys were used for the formulation of experimental chows and fed to gluten-sensitive (GS) and control macaques to determine if RG barley causes a remission of dietary gluten-induced clinical and immune responses in GS macaques. The impacts of the RG barley diet were compared with the impacts of the conventional barley-containing chow and the GFD. Although remission of the anti-gliadin antibody (AGA) serum responses and an improvement of clinical diarrhea were noted after switching the conventional to the RG barley diet, production of inflammatory cytokines, e.g., interferon-gamma (IFN-γ), tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and interleukin-8 (IL-8) by peripheral CD4+ T helper lymphocytes, persisted during the RG chow treatment and were partially abolished only upon re-administration of the GFD. It was concluded that the RG barley diet might be used for the partial improvement of gluten-induced disease but its therapeutic value still requires upgrading-by co-administration of additional treatments.

  1. The Effects of Reduced Gluten Barley Diet on Humoral and Cell-Mediated Systemic Immune Responses of Gluten-Sensitive Rhesus Macaques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karol Sestak

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Celiac disease (CD affects approximately 1% of the general population while an estimated additional 6% suffers from a recently characterized, rapidly emerging, similar disease, referred to as non-celiac gluten sensitivity (NCGS. The only effective treatment of CD and NCGS requires removal of gluten sources from the diet. Since required adherence to a gluten-free diet (GFD is difficult to accomplish, efforts to develop alternative treatments have been intensifying in recent years. In this study, the non-human primate model of CD/NCGS, e.g., gluten-sensitive rhesus macaque, was utilized with the objective to evaluate the treatment potential of reduced gluten cereals using a reduced gluten (RG; 1% of normal gluten barley mutant as a model. Conventional and RG barleys were used for the formulation of experimental chows and fed to gluten-sensitive (GS and control macaques to determine if RG barley causes a remission of dietary gluten-induced clinical and immune responses in GS macaques. The impacts of the RG barley diet were compared with the impacts of the conventional barley-containing chow and the GFD. Although remission of the anti-gliadin antibody (AGA serum responses and an improvement of clinical diarrhea were noted after switching the conventional to the RG barley diet, production of inflammatory cytokines, e.g., interferon-gamma (IFN-γ, tumor necrosis factor (TNF and interleukin-8 (IL-8 by peripheral CD4+ T helper lymphocytes, persisted during the RG chow treatment and were partially abolished only upon re-administration of the GFD. It was concluded that the RG barley diet might be used for the partial improvement of gluten-induced disease but its therapeutic value still requires upgrading—by co-administration of additional treatments.

  2. Increased expression of programmed death (PD)-1 and its ligand PD-L1 correlates with impaired cell-mediated immunity in high-risk human papillomavirus-related cervical intraepithelial neoplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wen; Song, Yan; Lu, Yun-Long; Sun, Jun-Zhong; Wang, Hong-Wei

    2013-08-01

    Impaired local cellular immunity contributes to the pathogenesis of persistent high-risk human papillomavirus (HR-HPV) infection and related cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN), but the underlying molecular mechanisms remain unclear. Recently, the programmed death 1/programmed death 1 ligand (PD-1/PD-L1; CD279/CD274) pathway was demonstrated to play a critical role in attenuating T-cell responses and promoting T-cell tolerance during chronic viral infections. In this study, we examined the expression of PD-1 and PD-L1 on cervical T cells and dendritic cells (DCs), respectively, from 40 women who were HR-HPV-negative (-) or HR-HPV-positive (+) with CIN grades 0, I and II-III. We also measured interferon-γ, interleukin-12 (IL-12) and IL-10 in cervical exudates. The most common HPV type was HPV 16, followed by HPV 18, 33, 51 and 58. PD-1 and PD-L1 expression on cervical T cells and DCs, respectively, was associated with HR-HPV positivity and increased in parallel with increasing CIN grade. The opposite pattern was observed for CD80 and CD86 expression on DCs, which decreased in HR-HPV+ patients in parallel with increasing CIN grade. Similarly, reduced levels of the T helper type 1 cytokines interferon-γ and IL-12 and increased levels of the T helper type 2 cytokine IL-10 in cervical exudates correlated with HR-HPV positivity and CIN grade. Our results suggest that up-regulation of the inhibitory PD-1/PD-L1 pathway may negatively regulate cervical cell-mediated immunity to HPV and contribute to the progression of HR-HPV-related CIN. These results may aid in the development of PD-1/PD-L1 pathway-based strategies for immunotherapy of HR-HPV-related CIN.

  3. New drug targets in depression: inflammatory, cell-mediated immune, oxidative and nitrosative stress, mitochondrial, antioxidant, and neuroprogressive pathways. And new drug candidates--Nrf2 activators and GSK-3 inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maes, Michael; Fišar, Zdenĕk; Medina, Miguel; Scapagnini, Giovanni; Nowak, Gabriel; Berk, Michael

    2012-06-01

    This paper reviews new drug targets in the treatment of depression and new drug candidates to treat depression. Depression is characterized by aberrations in six intertwined pathways: (1) inflammatory pathways as indicated by increased levels of proinflammatory cytokines, e.g. interleukin-1 (IL-1), IL-6, and tumour necrosis factor α. (2) Activation of cell-mediated immune pathways as indicated by an increased production of interferon γ and neopterin. (3) Increased reactive oxygen and nitrogen species and damage by oxidative and nitrosative stress (O&NS), including lipid peroxidation, damage to DNA, proteins and mitochondria. (4) Lowered levels of key antioxidants, such as coenzyme Q10, zinc, vitamin E, glutathione, and glutathione peroxidase. (5) Damage to mitochondria and mitochondrial DNA and reduced activity of respiratory chain enzymes and adenosine triphosphate production. (6) Neuroprogression, which is the progressive process of neurodegeneration, apoptosis, and reduced neurogenesis and neuronal plasticity, phenomena that are probably caused by inflammation and O&NS. Antidepressants tend to normalize the above six pathways. Targeting these pathways has the potential to yield antidepressant effects, e.g. using cytokine antagonists, minocycline, Cox-2 inhibitors, statins, acetylsalicylic acid, ketamine, ω3 poly-unsaturated fatty acids, antioxidants, and neurotrophic factors. These six pathways offer new, pathophysiologically guided drug targets suggesting that novel therapies could be developed that target these six pathways simultaneously. Both nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf2) activators and glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3) inhibitors target the six above-mentioned pathways. GSK-3 inhibitors have antidepressant effects in animal models of depression. Nrf2 activators and GSK-3 inhibitors have the potential to be advanced to phase-2 clinical trials to examine whether they augment the efficacy of antidepressants or are useful as monotherapy.

  4. Mast Cell-Mediated Mechanisms of Nociception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aich, Anupam; Afrin, Lawrence B; Gupta, Kalpna

    2015-12-04

    Mast cells are tissue-resident immune cells that release immuno-modulators, chemo-attractants, vasoactive compounds, neuropeptides and growth factors in response to allergens and pathogens constituting a first line of host defense. The neuroimmune interface of immune cells modulating synaptic responses has been of increasing interest, and mast cells have been proposed as key players in orchestrating inflammation-associated pain pathobiology due to their proximity to both vasculature and nerve fibers. Molecular underpinnings of mast cell-mediated pain can be disease-specific. Understanding such mechanisms is critical for developing disease-specific targeted therapeutics to improve analgesic outcomes. We review molecular mechanisms that may contribute to nociception in a disease-specific manner.

  5. The other way around: probiotic Lactobacillus acidophilus NP51 restrict progression of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP) infection in Balb/c mice via activiation of CD8 alpha+ immune cell-mediated immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objective of this study was to examine the immune-modulating effects of feeding a novel probiotic Lactobacillus acidophilus strain NP51 to specific pathogen-free Balb/c mice challenged with Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP), the causative agent of Johne’s disease (JD) in rumi...

  6. Effects of injectable trace minerals on humoral and cell-mediated immune responses to Bovine viral diarrhea virus, Bovine herpes virus 1 and Bovine respiratory syncytial virus following administration of a modified-live virus vaccine in dairy calves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palomares, R A; Hurley, D J; Bittar, J H J; Saliki, J T; Woolums, A R; Moliere, F; Havenga, L J; Norton, N A; Clifton, S J; Sigmund, A B; Barber, C E; Berger, M L; Clark, M J; Fratto, M A

    2016-10-01

    Our objective was to evaluate the effect of an injectable trace mineral (ITM) supplement containing zinc, manganese, selenium, and copper on the humoral and cell mediated immune (CMI) responses to vaccine antigens in dairy calves receiving a modified-live viral (MLV) vaccine containing BVDV, BHV1, PI3V and BRSV. A total of 30 dairy calves (3.5 months of age) were administered a priming dose of the MLV vaccine containing BHV1, BVDV1 & 2, BRSV, PI3V, and an attenuated-live Mannheimia-Pasteurella bacterin subcutaneously (SQ). Calves were randomly assigned to 1 of 2 groups: (1) administration of ITM SQ (ITM, n=15) or (2) injection of sterile saline SQ (Control; n=15). Three weeks later, calves received a booster of the same vaccine combination SQ, and a second administration of ITM, or sterile saline, according to the treatment group. Blood samples were collected on days 0, 7, 14, 21, 28, 42, 56, and 90 post-vaccination for determination of antibody titer, viral recall antigen-induced IFN-γ production, and viral antigen-induced proliferation by peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). Administration of ITM concurrently with MLV vaccination resulted in higher antibody titers to BVDV1 on day 28 after priming vaccination compared to the control group (P=0.03). Calves treated with ITM showed an earlier enhancement in PBMC proliferation to BVDV1 following vaccination compared to the control group. Proliferation of PBMC after BVDV stimulation tended to be higher on day 14 after priming vaccination in calves treated with ITM than in the control group (P=0.08). Calves that received ITM showed higher PBMC proliferation to BRSV stimulation on day 7 after priming vaccination compared to the control group (P=0.01). Moreover, calves in the ITM group also had an enhanced production IFN-γ by PBMC after stimulation with BRSV on day 21 after priming vaccination compared to day 0 (P<0.01). In conclusion, administration of ITM concurrently with MLV vaccination in dairy calves

  7. Prophylactic Herpes Simplex Virus 2 (HSV-2) Vaccines Adjuvanted with Stable Emulsion and Toll-Like Receptor 9 Agonist Induce a Robust HSV-2-Specific Cell-Mediated Immune Response, Protect against Symptomatic Disease, and Reduce the Latent Viral Reservoir.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hensel, Michael T; Marshall, Jason D; Dorwart, Michael R; Heeke, Darren S; Rao, Eileen; Tummala, Padmaja; Yu, Li; Cohen, Gary H; Eisenberg, Roselyn J; Sloan, Derek D

    2017-02-22

    glycoproteins necessary for HSV-2 viral entry as target antigens, and to which the dominant neutralizing antibody response is directed during natural infection. Individuals with asymptomatic infection have exhibited T-cell responses against specific HSV-2 antigens not observed in symptomatic individuals. We describe for the first time the immunogenicity profile in animal models of UL40, a novel HSV-2 T-cell antigen that has been correlated with asymptomatic HSV-2 disease. Additionally, vaccine candidates adjuvanted by a robust formulation of CpG oligonucleotide delivered in emulsion were superior to unadjuvanted or MPL/alum-adjuvanted formulations at eliciting a robust cell mediated immune response and blocking establishment of a latent viral reservoir in the guinea pig challenge model of HSV-2 infection.

  8. Molecular imaging of cell-mediated cancer immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucignani, Giovanni; Ottobrini, Luisa; Martelli, Cristina; Rescigno, Maria; Clerici, Mario

    2006-09-01

    New strategies based on the activation of a patient's immune response are being sought to complement present conventional exogenous cancer therapies. Elucidating the trafficking pathways of immune cells in vivo, together with their migratory properties in relation to their differentiation and activation status, is useful for understanding how the immune system interacts with cancer. Methods based on tissue sampling to monitor immune responses are inadequate for repeatedly characterizing the responses of the immune system in different organs. A solution to this problem might come from molecular and cellular imaging - a branch of biomedical sciences that combines biotechnology and imaging methods to characterize, in vivo, the molecular and cellular processes involved in normal and pathologic states. The general concepts of noninvasive imaging of targeted cells as well as the technology and probes applied to cell-mediated cancer immunotherapy imaging are outlined in this review.

  9. Vaccination with recombinant 4 × M2e.HSP70c fusion protein as a universal vaccine candidate enhances both humoral and cell-mediated immune responses and decreases viral shedding against experimental challenge of H9N2 influenza in chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabaghian, Mehran; Latify, Ali Mohammad; Tebianian, Majid; Nili, Hassan; Ranjbar, Ali Reza Tevangar; Mirjalili, Ali; Mohammadi, Mashallah; Banihashemi, Reza; Ebrahimi, Seyyed Mahmoud

    2014-11-07

    As cellular immunity is essential for virus clearance, it is commonly accepted that no adequate cellular immunity is achieved by all available inactivated HA-based influenza vaccines. Thus, an improved influenza vaccine to induce both humoral and cell-mediated immune responses is urgently required to control LPAI H9N2 outbreaks in poultry farms. M2e-based vaccines have been suggested and developed as a new generation of universal vaccine candidate against influenza A infection. Our previous study have shown that a prime-boost administration of recombinant 4×M2e.HSP70c (r4M2e/H70c) fusion protein compared to conventional HA-based influenza vaccines provided full protection against lethal dose of influenza A viruses in mice. In the present study, the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of (r4M2e/H70c) was examined in chickens. The data reported herein show that protection against H9N2 viral challenge was significantly increased in chickens by injection of r4M2e/H70c compared with injection of conventional HA-based influenza vaccine adjuvanted with MF59 or recombinant 4×M2e (r4M2e) without HSP70c. Oropharyngeal and cloacal shedding of the virus was detected in all of the r4M2e/H70c vaccinated birds at 2 days after challenge, but the titer was low and decreased rapidly to reach undetectable levels at 7 days after challenge. Moreover, comparison of protective efficacy against LPAI H9N2 in birds intramuscularly immunized with r4M2e/H70c likely represented the ability of the M2e-based vaccine in providing cross-protection against heterosubtypic H9N2 challenge and also allowed the host immune system to induce HA-homosubtype neutralizing antibody against H9N2 challenge. This protective immunity might be attributed to enhanced cell-mediated immunity, which is interpreted as increased lymphocytes proliferation, increased levels of Th1-type (IFN-γ) and Th2-type (IL-4) cytokines production and increased CD4(+) to CD8(+) ratios, resulting from the injection of four tandem

  10. HBsAg及B7-2抗原重组腺病毒载体感染免疫研究%Humoral immunization and cell-mediated immunization evoked by HBsAg and B7-2 Ag coexpression recombinant adenovirus vector

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周智; 张定凤; 任红

    2001-01-01

    regular dose of HBsAg antigen vaccine. The cell-mediated immune response was highly induced by the recombinant adenovirus infection. No clear side effect was observed after immunization. Conclusions This could be a novel strategy for a development of both preventive and therapeutic vaccines against HBV infection. The recombinant adenovirus vector is an effective and safety vector system suitable to the experiments of gene immunization and gene therapy for incurable diseases.

  11. Sublingual administration of an adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5)-based vaccine confirms Toll-like receptor agonist activity in the oral cavity and elicits improved mucosal and systemic cell-mediated responses against HIV antigens despite preexisting Ad5 immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appledorn, Daniel M; Aldhamen, Yasser A; Godbehere, Sarah; Seregin, Sergey S; Amalfitano, Andrea

    2011-01-01

    HIV/AIDS continue to devastate populations worldwide. Recent studies suggest that vaccines that induce beneficial immune responses in the mucosal compartment may improve the efficacy of HIV vaccines. Adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5)-based vectors remain a promising platform for the development of effective vaccines. In an effort to improve the efficacy of Ad5-based vaccines, even in the presence of preexisting Ad5 immunity, we evaluated the potential for an Ad5-based HIV vaccine to induce antigen-specific immune responses following sublingual (s.l.) administration, a route not previously tested in regard to Ad-based vaccines. s.l. vaccination with an Ad5-based HIV-Gag vaccine resulted in a significant induction of Gag-specific cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) responses in both the systemic and the mucosal compartment. We also show that s.l. immunization not only avoided preexisting Ad5 immunity but also elicited a broad repertoire of antigen-specific CTL clones. Additionally, we confirm for the first time that oral delivery of a vaccine expressing a potent Toll-like receptor (TLR) agonist can stimulate innate immune responses through induction of cytokines and chemokines and activation of NK cells, NKT cells, and macrophages in vivo. These results positively correlated with improved antigen-specific CTL responses. These results could be achieved both in Ad5-naïve mice and in mice with preexisting immunity to Ad5. The simplicity of the s.l. vaccination regimen coupled with augmentation of TLR-dependent pathways active in the oral cavity makes s.l. delivery a promising method for HIV vaccine development specifically, as well as for many other vaccine applications in general.

  12. Mucosal priming of newborn mice with S. Typhi Ty21a expressing anthrax protective antigen (PA) followed by parenteral PA-boost induces B and T cell-mediated immunity that protects against infection bypassing maternal antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Karina; Ditamo, Yanina; Galen, James E.; Baillie, Les W. J.; Pasetti, Marcela F.

    2010-01-01

    The currently licensed anthrax vaccine has several limitations and its efficacy has been proven only in adults. Effective immunization of newborns and infants requires adequate stimulation of their immune system, which is competent but not fully activated. We explored the use of the licensed live attenuated S. Typhi vaccine strain Ty21a expressing Bacillus anthracis protective antigen [Ty21a(PA)] followed PA-alum as a strategy for immunizing the pediatric population. Newborn mice primed with a single dose of Ty21a(PA) exhibited high frequencies of mucosal IgA-secreting B cells and IFN-γ-secreting T cells during the neonatal period, none of which was detected in newborns immunized with a single dose of PA-alum. Priming with Ty21a(PA) followed by PA-boost resulted in high levels of PA-specific IgG, toxin-neutralizing and opsonophagocytic antibodies and increased frequency of bone marrow IgG plasma cells and memory B cells compared with repeated immunization with PA-alum alone. Robust B and T cell responses developed even in the presence of maternal antibodies. The prime-boost protected against systemic and respiratory infection. Mucosal priming with a safe and effective S. Typhi-based anthrax vaccine followed by PA-boost could serve as a practical and effective prophylactic approach to prevent anthrax early in life. PMID:20619377

  13. The other way around: Probiotic lactobacillus acidophilus NP51 restricts progression of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP) infection in Balb/c mice through activation of CD8+ T cell-mediated immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objective of this study was to examine immune effects of feeding novel probiotic Lactobacillus acidophilus strain NP51 to specific pathogen-free Balb/c mice challenged with Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP), the causative agent of Johne’s disease (JD). We hypothesized that fe...

  14. Montanide™ ISA 71 VG adjuvant enhances antibody and cell-mediated immune responses to profilin subunit antigen vaccination and promotes protection against Eimeria acervulina and Eimeria tenella. Experimental Parasitology

    Science.gov (United States)

    The present study was conducted to investigate the immunoenhancing effects of MontanideTM ISA 71 VG adjuvant on profilin subunit antigen vaccination. Broiler chickens were immunized subcutaneously with a purified Eimeria acervulina recombinant profilin protein, either alone or mixed with ISA 71 VG, ...

  15. HLA-A2 Supertype-Restricted Cell-Mediated Immunity by Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells Derived from Malian Children with Severe or Uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum Malaria and Healthy Controls

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-04-25

    Hyg. 68:421–430. 15. Gonzalez, J. M., K. Peter , F. Esposito, I. Nebie, J. M. Tiercy, A. Bonelo, M. Arevalo-Herrera, D. Valmori, P. Romero, S. Herrera, G...U.S. volunteers. Infect. Immun. 68:1196–1201. 33. Troye- Blomberg , M., E. M. Riley, L. Kabilan, M. Holmberg, H. Perlmann, U. Andersson, C. H. Heusser

  16. CD4 T cells mediate both positive and negative regulation of the immune response to HIV infection: complex role of T follicular helper cells and Regulatory T cells in pathogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chansavath ePhetsouphanh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available HIV-1 infection results in chronic activation of cells in lymphoid tissue, including T cells, B cells and myeloid lineage cells. The resulting characteristic hyperplasia is an amalgam of proliferating host immune cells in the adaptive response, increased concentrations of innate response mediators due to viral and bacterial products, and homeostatic responses to inflammation. While it is generally thought that CD4 T cells are greatly depleted, in fact, two types of CD4 T cells appear to be increased, namely regulatory T cells (Tregs and T follicular helper cells (Tfh. These cells have opposing roles, but may both be important in the pathogenic process. Whether Tregs are failing in their role to limit lymphocyte activation is unclear, but there is no doubt now that Tfh are associated with B cell hyperplasia and increased germinal centre activity. Antiretroviral therapy (ART may reduce the lymphocyte activation, but not completely, and therefore there is a need for interventions that selectively enhance normal CD4 function without exacerbating Tfh, B cell or Treg dysfunction.

  17. Role of IL-33 and Its Receptor in T Cell-Mediated Autoimmune Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing Zhao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Interleukin-33 (IL-33 is a new cytokine of interleukin-1 family, whose specific receptor is ST2. IL-33 exerts its functions via its target cells and plays different roles in diseases. ST2 deletion and exclusion of IL-33/ST2 axis are accompanied by enhanced susceptibility to dominantly T cell-mediated organ-specific autoimmune diseases. It has been reported that IL-33/ST2 pathway plays a key role in host defense and immune regulation in inflammatory and infectious diseases. This review focuses on new findings in the roles of IL-33 and ST2 in several kinds of T cell-mediated autoimmune diseases.

  18. Cell-mediated mutagenesis by chemical carcinogens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huberman, E.; Langenbach, R.

    1978-01-01

    The cell-mediated mutation system, with the proper choice of metabolizing cells, can be used to detect the mutagenic activities of different classes of chemical carcinogens. When fibroblastic cells were used as the metabolizing cells, a correlation between the in vivo carcinogenic activity and the in vitro mutagenic activity of 11 aromatic polycyclic hydrocarbons was observed. When primary liver cells were used as the metabolizing cells, three known liver carcinogens were demonstrated to be mutagenic by the cell-mediated assay, while two non-carcinogenic analogues were not mutagenic. These results from the cell-mediated system suggest that the reactive intermediates of the carcinogens are stable enough to be transferred from the metabolizing cells to the V79 cells. The cell-mediated mutagenesis system is a simple in vitro assay which may simulate the in vivo situation. It was concluded that this approach could be extended to the co-cultivation of cells from other organs or tissues with mutable mammalian cells.

  19. Alterations of cell-mediated immune response in children with febrile seizures Alterações da resposta imune celular em crianças portadoras de convulsão febril

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terezinha C.B. Montelli

    1997-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present investigation was to study the distribution of T-cell subsets in peripheral blood defined by monoclonal antibodies and by the lymphocyte proliferative response to phytohemagglutinin (PH A in 30 children with febrile seizures and in 14 age-matched control subjects. Frequent respiratory, urinary and dermatologic infections were observed in 22 patients. The immunologic parameters showed that 64% of the patients presented an increased number of CD8+ cells and a low helper/suppressor ratio was observed in 60% of the patients. In addition, the proliferative response of lymphocytes to PHA was impaired in the patients. It was observed the presence of inhibitory activity on lymphocyte function in the plasma of 33% of children with febrile seizures. These results suggest that patients with febrile seizures have an impairment of cellular immunity that may be connected with this epileptic syndrome and explain the infections observed.O objetivo da presente investigação foi estudar a distribuição das subpopulações de células T por meio de anticorpos monoclonais e a resposta proliferativa de linfócitos em resposta a fito-hemaglutinina (PHA em 30 crianças portadoras de convulsão febril e em 14 crianças saudáveis de mesma faixa etária dos pacientes. Infecções respiratórias, urinárias e dermatológicas frequentes foram observadas em 22 pacientes. Os parâmetros imunológicos demonstraram que 64% dos pacientes apresentaram valores elevados de células CD8+. Diminuição da relação de células CD4/CD8 foi observada em 60% dos pacientes. Além disso, a resposta proliferativa de linfócitos frente a PHA apresentou-se deprimida nos pacientes. Foi observada a presença de atividade inibidora da função de linfócitos no plasma de 33% das crianças com convulsão febril. Esses resultados sugerem que pacientes com convulsão febril apresentam depressão da resposta imune celular que poderia implicar em associação patog

  20. Chlamydia trachomatis and chlamydial heat shock protein 60-specific antibody and cell-mediated responses predict tubal factor infertility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tiitinen, A.; Surcel, H.-M.; Halttunen, M.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To evaluate the role of Chlamydia trachomatis-induced humoral and cell-mediated immune (CMI) responses in predicting tubal factor infertility (TFI). METHODS: Blood samples were taken from 88 women with TFI and 163 control women. C. trachomatis and chlamydial heat shock protein 60 (CHSP...

  1. Immunity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1992-01-01

    920630 Effects of the spleen on immunestate of patients with gastric cancer.QIUDengbo (仇登波), et al. Dept General Surg,Union Hosp, Tongji Med Univ, Wuhan, 430022.Natl Med J China 1992; 72(6): 334-337. For analysing the effects of the spleen on im-mune state of gastric cancer patients.T-lym-

  2. Mast Cell-Mediated Mechanisms of Nociception

    OpenAIRE

    Anupam Aich; Afrin, Lawrence B.; Kalpna Gupta

    2015-01-01

    Mast cells are tissue-resident immune cells that release immuno-modulators, chemo-attractants, vasoactive compounds, neuropeptides and growth factors in response to allergens and pathogens constituting a first line of host defense. The neuroimmune interface of immune cells modulating synaptic responses has been of increasing interest, and mast cells have been proposed as key players in orchestrating inflammation-associated pain pathobiology due to their proximity to both vasculature and nerve...

  3. The PHA test reflects acquired T-cell mediated immunocompetence in birds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José L Tella

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: cological immunology requires techniques to reliably measure immunocompetence in wild vertebrates. The PHA-skin test, involving subcutaneous injection of a mitogen (phytohemagglutinin, PHA and measurement of subsequent swelling as a surrogate of T-cell mediated immunocompetence, has been the test of choice due to its practicality and ease of use in the field. However, mechanisms involved in local immunological and inflammatory processes provoked by PHA are poorly known, and its use and interpretation as an acquired immune response is currently debated. METHODOLOGY: Here, we present experimental work using a variety of parrot species, to ascertain whether PHA exposure produces larger secondary than primary responses as expected if the test reflects acquired immunocompetence. Moreover, we simultaneously quantified T-lymphocyte subsets (CD4(+, CD5(+ and CD8(+ and plasma proteins circulating in the bloodstream, potentially involved in the immunological and inflammatory processes, through flow cytometry and electrophoresis. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Our results showed stronger responses after a second PHA injection, independent of species, time elapsed and changes in body mass of birds between first and second injections, thus supporting the adaptive nature of this immune response. Furthermore, the concomitant changes in the plasma concentrations of T-lymphocyte subsets and globulins indicate a causal link between the activation of the T-cell mediated immune system and local tissue swelling. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These findings justify the widespread use of the PHA-skin test as a reliable evaluator of acquired T-cell mediated immunocompetence in diverse biological disciplines. Further experimental research should be aimed at evaluating the relative role of innate immunocompetence in wild conditions, where the access to dietary proteins varies more than in captivity, and to ascertain how PHA responses relate to particular host

  4. CD4+ type II NKT cells mediate ICOS and programmed death-1-dependent regulation of type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kadri, Nadir; Korpos, Eva; Gupta, Shashank

    2012-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is a chronic autoimmune disease that results from T cell-mediated destruction of pancreatic ß cells. CD1d-restricted NKT lymphocytes have the ability to regulate immunity, including autoimmunity. We previously demonstrated that CD1d-restricted type II NKT cells, which carry ...

  5. Mesenchymal stem cell-mediated functional tooth regeneration in swine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wataru Sonoyama

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem cell-mediated tissue regeneration is a promising approach for regenerative medicine for a wide range of applications. Here we report a new population of stem cells isolated from the root apical papilla of human teeth (SCAP, stem cells from apical papilla. Using a minipig model, we transplanted both human SCAP and periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs to generate a root/periodontal complex capable of supporting a porcelain crown, resulting in normal tooth function. This work integrates a stem cell-mediated tissue regeneration strategy, engineered materials for structure, and current dental crown technologies. This hybridized tissue engineering approach led to recovery of tooth strength and appearance.

  6. Mesenchymal stem cell-mediated functional tooth regeneration in swine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonoyama, Wataru; Liu, Yi; Fang, Dianji; Yamaza, Takayoshi; Seo, Byoung-Moo; Zhang, Chunmei; Liu, He; Gronthos, Stan; Wang, Cun-Yu; Wang, Songlin; Shi, Songtao

    2006-12-20

    Mesenchymal stem cell-mediated tissue regeneration is a promising approach for regenerative medicine for a wide range of applications. Here we report a new population of stem cells isolated from the root apical papilla of human teeth (SCAP, stem cells from apical papilla). Using a minipig model, we transplanted both human SCAP and periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs) to generate a root/periodontal complex capable of supporting a porcelain crown, resulting in normal tooth function. This work integrates a stem cell-mediated tissue regeneration strategy, engineered materials for structure, and current dental crown technologies. This hybridized tissue engineering approach led to recovery of tooth strength and appearance.

  7. The Role of Antibody Isotypes Against Fasciola Gigantica In Immune Response With An Emphasis On Antibody Dependent Cell Mediated Cytoxicity%抗巨片形吸虫同型抗体在动物巨片形吸虫感染所致的抗体依赖性细胞介导的细胞毒反应( ADCC )免疫应答作用的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈思礼; 陈强; 周雨丝; 李玲; 陈思义; 吴风娇; 陈思祗; 丁书茂; SPITHILL Terry

    2003-01-01

    The study was carried out in two breeds of sheep, Indonesia Thin Tail (ITT) and Merino, both infected with F. gigantica. Kinetic analysis of Fasciola gigantica specific antibody responses revealed that resistant ITT do not produce a parasite specific IgG2 response; whereas susceptible Merino sheep produce a high parasite specific IgG2 response. The IgG2 produced in Merino sheep might act as a blocking antibody for antibody dependant cell mediated cytotoxicity by macrophages. Whereas, ITT appeared to down regulate IgG2 response, which might enable these sheep to possess an enhanced capacity of killing F. gigantica. The purified IgG1 and IgG2 were used in in vitro killing assays. IgG1 promotes the highest amount of killing compared to immune sera and IgG2 using purified Merino sera antibodies for in vitro killing assays. F. gigantica cultured in increasing amount of IgG1 had a trend of increasing the death rate. Parasites cultured in 10 ug/ml of IgG1 showed the highest amount of death. F. gigantica cultured in eosinophils with immune ITT sera (Day35) was 55% death after 24 hours. It should be that using purified eosinophils with immune ITT serum resulted in a strong trend of killing occurring in those wells which contained a combination of immune sera complement, IL-5 and eosinophils.%以印尼短尾羊(ITT)和美利奴细毛羊( Merino )两种品系的绵羊为实验动物,研究动物感染巨片形吸虫后所产生的抗体依赖性细胞介导的细胞毒反应的免疫应答.结果显示:对巨片形吸虫感染具有抗性的印尼短尾羊不产生特异性的IgG2, 而易感品系的美利奴细毛羊感染巨片形吸虫后体内产生高滴度特异性IgG2抗体.特异性IgG2抗体在免疫应答中起着封闭抗体的作用,抑制巨噬细胞抗体依赖性细胞介导的细胞毒反应.由于印尼短尾羊不产生特异性IgG2抗体,对巨噬细胞抗体依赖性细胞介导的细胞毒反应不产生抑制作用,因此印尼短尾羊对巨片形吸

  8. Type I NKT-cell-mediated TNF-α is a positive regulator of NLRP3 inflammasome priming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Melvyn T; Duret, Helene; Andrews, Daniel M; Faveeuw, Christelle; Möller, Andreas; Smyth, Mark J; Paget, Christophe

    2014-07-01

    The NLRP3 inflammasome plays a crucial role in the innate immune response to pathogens and exogenous or endogenous danger signals. Its activity must be precisely and tightly regulated to generate tailored immune responses. However, the immune cell subsets and cytokines controlling NLRP3 inflammasome activity are still poorly understood. Here, we have shown a link between NKT-cell-mediated TNF-α and NLRP3 inflammasome activity. The NLRP3 inflammasome in APCs was critical to potentiate NKT-cell-mediated immune responses, since C57BL/6 NLRP3 inflammasome-deficient mice exhibited reduced responsiveness to α-galactosylceramide. Importantly, NKT cells were found to act as regulators of NLRP3 inflammasome signaling, as NKT-cell-derived TNF-α was required for optimal IL-1β and IL-18 production by myeloid cells in response to α-galactosylceramide, by acting on the NLRP3 inflammasome priming step. Thus, NKT cells play a role in the positive regulation of NLRP3 inflammasome priming by mediating the production of TNF-α, thus demonstrating another means by which NKT cells control early inflammation.

  9. Psychoneuroimmunology in Pregnancy: Immune Pathways Linking Stress with Maternal Health, Adverse Birth Outcomes, and Fetal Development

    OpenAIRE

    Christian, Lisa M.

    2011-01-01

    It is well-established that psychological stress promotes immune dysregulation in nonpregnant humans and animals. Stress promotes inflammation, impairs antibody responses to vaccination, slows wound healing, and suppresses cell-mediated immune function. Importantly, the immune system changes substantially to support healthy pregnancy, with attenuation of inflammatory responses and impairment of cell-mediated immunity. This adaptation is postulated to protect the fetus from rejection by the ma...

  10. Origins of adaptive immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liongue, Clifford; John, Liza B; Ward, Alister

    2011-01-01

    Adaptive immunity, involving distinctive antibody- and cell-mediated responses to specific antigens based on "memory" of previous exposure, is a hallmark of higher vertebrates. It has been argued that adaptive immunity arose rapidly, as articulated in the "big bang theory" surrounding its origins, which stresses the importance of coincident whole-genome duplications. Through a close examination of the key molecules and molecular processes underpinning adaptive immunity, this review suggests a less-extreme model, in which adaptive immunity emerged as part of longer evolutionary journey. Clearly, whole-genome duplications provided additional raw genetic materials that were vital to the emergence of adaptive immunity, but a variety of other genetic events were also required to generate some of the key molecules, whereas others were preexisting and simply co-opted into adaptive immunity.

  11. Flow cytometry evaluation of cell-mediated cytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarcone, D; Tilden, A B; Cloud, G; Friedman, H M; Landay, A; Grossi, C E

    1986-11-20

    A novel flow cytometry method for the evaluation of cell-mediated cytotoxicity is described. This method uses flow cytometry analysis to distinguish target cells from effector cells by differences in volume and light scatter characteristics. Non-viable target cells, following their interaction with effector cells, are determined via propidium iodide (PI) dye exclusion and then expressed as a percentage of the total target cell population. This assay is suitable both for analysis of systems which allow recycling of cytotoxic effector cells (total cell cytotoxicity assays, TCCA), and of systems in which recycling does not occur (single cell cytotoxicity assays, SCCA). Natural killer (NK) cell-mediated cytotoxicity evaluated by flow cytometry is significantly correlated with the standard 51Cr release assay. Flow cytometry can also be used to evaluate the competitive inhibition that certain cell types exert on the cell-mediated killing of NK-sensitive targets. A prerequisite for this assay is that competitor cells and target cells are distinguishable through their volume and light scatter characteristics. Advantages and pitfalls of the flow cytometry method are discussed, in comparison with the 51Cr-release assay.

  12. Opposing effects of CXCR3 and CCR5 deficiency on CD8+ T cell-mediated inflammation in the central nervous system of virus-infected mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Lemos, Carina; Christensen, Jeanette Erbo; Nansen, Anneline;

    2005-01-01

    T cells play a key role in the control of viral infection in the CNS but may also contribute to immune-mediated cell damage. To study the redundancy of the chemokine receptors CXCR3 and CCR5 in regulating virus-induced CD8+ T cell-mediated inflammation in the brain, CXCR3/CCR5 double-deficient mice...... and therefore protect mice against the otherwise fatal CD8+ T cell-mediated immune attack. Contrary to expectations, the accumulation of mononuclear cells in cerebrospinal fluid was only slightly delayed compared with mice with normal expression of both receptors. Even more surprising, CXCR3/CCR5 double...... an important role in controlling CNS inflammation, other receptors but not CCR5 also contribute significantly. Additionally, our results suggest that CCR5 primarily functions as a negative regulator of the antiviral CD8+ T cell response....

  13. Immunomodulatory activity of xanthohumol: inhibition of T cell proliferation, cell-mediated cytotoxicity and Th1 cytokine production through suppression of NF-κB

    OpenAIRE

    Gao, Xiaohua; Deeb, Dorrah; Liu, Yongbo; DULCHAVSKY, SCOTT A.; Gautam, Subhash C.

    2009-01-01

    Xanthohumol (XN), a prenylated chalcone present in hops (Humulus lupus L.) and beer, exhibits anti-inflammatory, antioxidant and antiproliferative activity, but has not been studied for effects on T cell-mediated immune responses. Here we demonstrate that XN has profound immunosuppressive effects on T cell proliferation, development of IL-2 activated killer (LAK) cells, cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs), and production of Th1 cytokines (IL-2, IFN-γ and TNF-α). The suppression of these cell-media...

  14. Cord blood T cells mediate enhanced antitumor effects compared with adult peripheral blood T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiwarkar, Prashant; Qasim, Waseem; Ricciardelli, Ida; Gilmour, Kimberly; Quezada, Sergio; Saudemont, Aurore; Amrolia, Persis; Veys, Paul

    2015-12-24

    Unrelated cord blood transplantation (CBT) without in vivo T-cell depletion is increasingly used to treat high-risk hematologic malignancies. Following T-replete CBT, naïve CB T cells undergo rapid peripheral expansion with memory-effector differentiation. Emerging data suggest that unrelated CBT, particularly in the context of HLA mismatch and a T-replete graft, may reduce leukemic relapse. To study the role of CB T cells in mediating graft-versus-tumor responses and dissect the underlying immune mechanisms for this, we compared the ability of HLA-mismatched CB and adult peripheral blood (PB) T cells to eliminate Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-driven human B-cell lymphoma in a xenogeneic NOD/SCID/IL2rg(null) mouse model. CB T cells mediated enhanced tumor rejection compared with equal numbers of PB T cells, leading to improved survival in the CB group (P cells that were autologous vs allogeneic to the lymphoma demonstrated that this antitumor effect was mediated by alloreactive rather than EBV-specific T cells. Analysis of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes demonstrated that CB T cells mediated this enhanced antitumor effect by rapid infiltration of the tumor with CCR7(+)CD8(+) T cells and prompt induction of cytotoxic CD8(+) and CD4(+) T-helper (Th1) T cells in the tumor microenvironment. In contrast, in the PB group, this antilymphoma effect is impaired because of delayed tumoral infiltration of PB T cells and a relative bias toward suppressive Th2 and T-regulatory cells. Our data suggest that, despite being naturally programmed toward tolerance, reconstituting T cells after unrelated T-replete CBT may provide superior Tc1-Th1 antitumor effects against high-risk hematologic malignancies.

  15. T Cell-Mediated Modulation of Mast Cell Function: Heterotypic Adhesion-Induced Stimulatory or Inhibitory Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoseph A. Mekori

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Close physical proximity between mast cells and T cells has been demonstrated in several T cell mediated inflammatory processes such as rheumatoid arthritis and sarcoidosis. However, the way by which mast cells are activated in these T cell-mediated immune responses has not been fully elucidated. We have identified and characterized a novel mast cell activation pathway initiated by physical contact with activated T cells, and showed that this pathway is associated with degranulation and cytokine release. The signaling events associated with this pathway of mast cell activation have also been elucidated confirming the activation of the Ras MAPK systems. More recently, we hypothesized and demonstrated that mast cells may also be activated by microparticles released from activated T cells that are considered as miniature version of a cell. By extension, microparticles might affect the activity of mast cells, which are usually not in direct contact with T cells at the inflammatory site. Recent works have also focused on the effects of regulatory T cells on mast cells. These reports highlighted the importance of the cytokines IL-2 and IL-9, produced by mast cells and T cells, respectively, in obtaining optimal immune suppression. Finally, physical contact, associated by OX40-OX40L engagement has been found to underlie the down-regulatory effects exerted by regulatory T cells on mast cell function.

  16. MutS homolog 2 plays a role in Vγ9δ2 T cell-mediated anti-gastric carcinoma immunity%hMSH2参与Vγ9δ2T细胞介导的胃癌细胞株杀伤作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    代玉梅; 陈慧; 莫辰; 师敬飞; 刘云峰; 李文利; 崔莲仙; 何维

    2014-01-01

    目的:探讨Vγ9δ2 T细胞识别的肿瘤相关内源性新蛋白质配体MutS同源蛋白2(hMSH2)在胃癌免疫中的作用与意义。方法通过特异性抗体阻断胃癌细胞膜异位表达的hMSH2分子,观察Vγ9δ2 T细胞杀伤功能变化及IFN-γ和TNF-α分泌情况;使用肿瘤组织芯片( TMA)免疫组化染色分析hMSH2在胃癌中的亚细胞分布。结果 hMSH2在胃癌细胞中存在较高水平的膜异位表达;anti-hMSH2抗体封闭后, Vγ9δ2 T 细胞对胃癌细胞的杀伤效率显著降低, IFN-γ分泌减少, TNF-α分泌则增多;hMSH2在不同类型、不同分期的胃癌组织中均呈异常的细胞膜、细胞质分布,但细胞核表达并未明显减低或缺失,作为非癌对照的浅表性胃炎组织标本hMSH2表达亦明显增强。结论异位表达的hMSH2可作为内源性应激性配体促进Vγ9δ2 T细胞杀伤胃癌细胞及分泌IFN-γ,在胃癌固有免疫中具有重要意义。%Objective To study the role of human MutS homolog 2 (hMSH2), a newly identified protein ligand that was recognized by Vγ9δ2 T cells , in innate anti-gastric carcinoma immunity .Methods Flow cytometry and laser confocal microscopy were used to identify hMSH 2 that ectopically expressed on gas-tric carcinoma cell line 803.An anti-hMSH2 antibody was used to block hMSH2 to evaluate its effects on the cytotoxicity of Vγ9δ2 T cells and their cytokines secretion .Subcellular distribution of hMSH 2 in gastric car-cinoma tissues was examined by tissue microarray immunohistochemistry analysis .Results Ectopic mem-brane expression of hMSH 2 was observed on 803 cells at a relatively high level .Vγ9δ2 T cells blocked with specific anti-hMSH2 antibody showed a decreased cytotoxicity and a reduced IFN-γbut an increased TNF-αsecretion.Ectopic expression of hMSH2 was found in various types of gastric carcinoma tissues at different stages.Enhanced expression of hMSH2 was detected in specimens collected from

  17. 葎草花粉变应原核酸疫苗通过诱导Foxp3+Treg细胞分化介导对哮喘模型小鼠的免疫保护作用%Foxp3+Treg cells mediate immune protection of humulus pollen allergy DNA vaccine pcD-NA3.1-Hum in asthmatic mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    卢家美; 李满祥; 孙秀珍; 张永红; 刘昀; 徐晶; 张苏梅

    2014-01-01

    Objective To construct a humulus pollen allergy DNA vaccine pcDNA3.1-Hum and investigate its effect for immune protection mediated by Foxp3+Treg cells in asthmatic mice. Methods The target humulus gene obtained from pTripIEx2-Hum plasmid by double enzyme digestion was inserted sequentially into pcDNA3.1(-) vector to generate the recombinant plasmid pcDNA3.1-Hum, which was validated by sequencing. The pcDNA3.1-Hum plasmid was transfected into COS-7 cells and the expression of the ectopic protein was analyzed using Western blotting. Co-cultured dendritic cells and CD4+CD25-T cells were stimulated with the expressed protein to test its efficacy in inducing Foxp3+Treg cells. The levels of humulus-specific IgE and IgG2a were assayed to evaluate the allergenicity and immunogenicity of pcDNA3.1-Hum in mice. The immunoprotective effect of pcDNA3.1-Hum was assessed in a mouse model of humulus-specific asthma. Results The constructed pcDNA3.1-Hum plasmid was validated by sequencing and Western blotting, and the expressed protein was shown to induce Foxp3+Treg cells in the co-culture. In normal mice, pcDNA3.1-Hum induced a significant increase of humulus-specific IgG2a but had no effect on IgE. In the asthmatic mice, pcDNA3.1-Hum significantly decreased inflammatory cell counts and eosinophil percentages in the BALF, ameliorated lung inflammation, and lowered AHR and IL-4 levels; immunization of the mice with pcDNA3.1-Hum reversed humulus-induced reduction of serum IFN-γ and prevented the humulus-triggered reduction of Foxp3+Treg cell percentage in the spleen. Conclusion We have successfully constructed a highly immunogenic pcDNA3.1-Hum DNA vaccine that can mediate immune protection by inducing Foxp3+Treg cells.%目的:构建葎草花粉变应原核酸疫苗pcDNA3.1-Hum,并探讨其是否通过诱导Foxp3+Treg细胞分化介导对哮喘模型小鼠的免疫保护作用。方法双酶切pTripIEx2-Hum质粒以获取目的基因,定向插入pcDNA3.1(-)载

  18. Narcolepsy-Associated HLA Class I Alleles Implicate Cell-Mediated Cytotoxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tafti, Mehdi; Lammers, Gert J.; Dauvilliers, Yves; Overeem, Sebastiaan; Mayer, Geert; Nowak, Jacek; Pfister, Corinne; Dubois, Valérie; Eliaou, Jean-François; Eberhard, Hans-Peter; Liblau, Roland; Wierzbicka, Aleksandra; Geisler, Peter; Bassetti, Claudio L.; Mathis, Johannes; Lecendreux, Michel; Khatami, Ramin; Heinzer, Raphaël; Haba-Rubio, José; Feketeova, Eva; Baumann, Christian R.; Kutalik, Zoltán; Tiercy, Jean-Marie

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: Narcolepsy with cataplexy is tightly associated with the HLA class II allele DQB1*06:02. Evidence indicates a complex contribution of HLA class II genes to narcolepsy susceptibility with a recent independent association with HLA-DPB1. The cause of narcolepsy is supposed be an autoimmune attack against hypocretin-producing neurons. Despite the strong association with HLA class II, there is no evidence for CD4+ T-cell-mediated mechanism in narcolepsy. Since neurons express class I and not class II molecules, the final effector immune cells involved might include class I-restricted CD8+ T-cells. Methods: HLA class I (A, B, and C) and II (DQB1) genotypes were analyzed in 944 European narcolepsy with cataplexy patients and in 4,043 control subjects matched by country of origin. All patients and controls were DQB1*06:02 positive and class I associations were conditioned on DQB1 alleles. Results: HLA-A*11:01 (OR = 1.49 [1.18–1.87] P = 7.0*10−4), C*04:01 (OR = 1.34 [1.10–1.63] P = 3.23*10−3), and B*35:01 (OR = 1.46 [1.13–1.89] P = 3.64*10−3) were associated with susceptibility to narcolepsy. Analysis of polymorphic class I amino-acids revealed even stronger associations with key antigen-binding residues HLA-A-Tyr9 (OR = 1.32 [1.15–1.52] P = 6.95*10−5) and HLA-C-Ser11 (OR = 1.34 [1.15–1.57] P = 2.43*10−4). Conclusions: Our findings provide a genetic basis for increased susceptibility to infectious factors or an immune cytotoxic mechanism in narcolepsy, potentially targeting hypocretin neurons. Citation: Tafti M, Lammers GJ, Dauvilliers Y, Overeem S, Mayer G, Nowak J, Pfister C, Dubois V, Eliaou JF, Eberhard HP, Liblau R, Wierzbicka A, Geisler P, Bassetti CL, Mathis J, Lecendreux M, Khatami R, Heinzer R, Haba-Rubio J, Feketeova E, Baumann CR, Kutalik Z, Tiercy JM. Narcolepsy-associated HLA class I alleles implicate cell-mediated cytotoxicity. SLEEP 2016;39(3):581–587. PMID:26518595

  19. Comparison of stem-cell-mediated osteogenesis and dentinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batouli, S; Miura, M; Brahim, J; Tsutsui, T W; Fisher, L W; Gronthos, S; Robey, P Gehron; Shi, S

    2003-12-01

    The difference between stem-cell-mediated bone and dentin regeneration is not yet well-understood. Here we use an in vivo stem cell transplantation system to investigate differential regulation mechanisms of bone marrow stromal stem cells (BMSSCs) and dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs). Elevated expression of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) and matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9, gelatinase B) was found to be associated with the formation of hematopoietic marrow in BMSSC transplants, but not in the connective tissue of DPSC transplants. The expression of dentin sialoprotein (DSP) specifically marked dentin synthesis in DPSC transplants. Moreover, DPSCs were found to be able to generate reparative dentin-like tissue on the surface of human dentin in vivo. This study provided direct evidence to suggest that osteogenesis and dentinogenesis mediated by BMSSCs and DPSCs, respectively, may be regulated by distinct mechanisms, leading to the different organization of the mineralized and non-mineralized tissues.

  20. Loss of STAT3 in Lymphoma Relaxes NK Cell-Mediated Tumor Surveillance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Putz, Eva Maria [Institute of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Veterinary Medicine, Veterinaerplatz 1, Vienna 1210 (Austria); Hoelzl, Maria Agnes [Institute of Pharmacology, Center for Physiology and Pharmacology, Medical University of Vienna (MUV), Waehringer Strasse 13A, Vienna 1090 (Austria); Baeck, Julia [Institute of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Veterinary Medicine, Veterinaerplatz 1, Vienna 1210 (Austria); Bago-Horvath, Zsuzsanna [Institute of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Veterinary Medicine, Veterinaerplatz 1, Vienna 1210 (Austria); Clinical Institute of Pathology, Medical University of Vienna (MUV), Waehringer Gürtel 18-20, Vienna 1090 (Austria); Schuster, Christian [Institute of Pharmacology, Center for Physiology and Pharmacology, Medical University of Vienna (MUV), Waehringer Strasse 13A, Vienna 1090 (Austria); Reichholf, Brian [Institute of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Veterinary Medicine, Veterinaerplatz 1, Vienna 1210 (Austria); Kern, Daniela; Aberger, Fritz [Department of Molecular Biology, University of Salzburg, Hellbrunnerstrasse 34, Salzburg 5020 (Austria); Sexl, Veronika; Hoelbl-Kovacic, Andrea, E-mail: andrea.hoelbl@vetmeduni.ac.at [Institute of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Veterinary Medicine, Veterinaerplatz 1, Vienna 1210 (Austria)

    2014-01-27

    The transcription factors and proto-oncogenes STAT3 and STAT5 are highly activated in hematological malignancies and represent promising therapeutic targets. Whereas the importance of STAT5 as tumor promoter is beyond doubt, the role of STAT3 in hematological cancers is less well understood. Both, enforced as well as attenuated expression of STAT3 were reported in hematopoietic malignancies. Recent evidence implicates STAT3 as key player for tumor immune surveillance as it both mediates the production of and response to inflammatory cytokines. Here we investigated the effects of STAT3 deletion in a BCR/ABL-induced lymphoma model, which is tightly controlled by natural killer (NK) cells in vivo. Upon STAT3 deletion tumor growth is significantly enhanced when compared to STAT3-expressing controls. The increased tumor size upon loss of STAT3 was accompanied by reduced NK cell infiltration and decreased levels of the cytokine IFN-γ and the chemokine RANTES. Upon transplantation into NK cell-deficient mice differences in lymphoma size were abolished indicating that STAT3 expression in the tumor cells controls NK cell-dependent tumor surveillance. Our findings indicate that STAT3 inhibition in lymphoma patients will impair NK cell-mediated tumor surveillance, which needs to be taken into account when testing STAT3 inhibitors in preclinical or clinical trials.

  1. Human mast cell mediator cocktail excites neurons in human and guinea-pig enteric nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schemann, M; Michel, K; Ceregrzyn, M; Zeller, F; Seidl, S; Bischoff, S C

    2005-04-01

    Neuroimmune interactions are an integral part of gut physiology and involved in the pathogenesis of inflammatory and functional bowel disorders. Mast cells and their mediators are important conveyors in the communication from the innate enteric immune system to the enteric nervous system (ENS). However, it is not known whether a mediator cocktail released from activated human mast cells affects neural activity in the ENS. We used the Multi-Site Optical Recording Technique to image single cell activity in guinea-pig and human ENS after application of a mast cell mediator cocktail (MCMC) that was released from isolated human intestinal mucosa mast cells stimulated by IgE-receptor cross-linking. Local application of MCMC onto individual ganglia evoked an excitatory response consisting of action potential discharge. This excitatory response occurred in 31%, 38% or 11% neurons of guinea-pig submucous plexus, human submucous plexus, or guinea-pig myenteric plexus, respectively. Compound action potentials from nerve fibres or fast excitatory synaptic inputs were not affected by MCMC. This study demonstrates immunoneural signalling in the human gut and revealed for the first time that an MCMC released from stimulated human intestinal mast cells induces excitatory actions in the human and guinea-pig ENS.

  2. Loss of STAT3 in Lymphoma Relaxes NK Cell-Mediated Tumor Surveillance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Maria Putz

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The transcription factors and proto-oncogenes STAT3 and STAT5 are highly activated in hematological malignancies and represent promising therapeutic targets. Whereas the importance of STAT5 as tumor promoter is beyond doubt, the role of STAT3 in hematological cancers is less well understood. Both, enforced as well as attenuated expression of STAT3 were reported in hematopoietic malignancies. Recent evidence implicates STAT3 as key player for tumor immune surveillance as it both mediates the production of and response to inflammatory cytokines. Here we investigated the effects of STAT3 deletion in a BCR/ABL-induced lymphoma model, which is tightly controlled by natural killer (NK cells in vivo. Upon STAT3 deletion tumor growth is significantly enhanced when compared to STAT3-expressing controls. The increased tumor size upon loss of STAT3 was accompanied by reduced NK cell infiltration and decreased levels of the cytokine IFN-γ and the chemokine RANTES. Upon transplantation into NK cell-deficient mice differences in lymphoma size were abolished indicating that STAT3 expression in the tumor cells controls NK cell-dependent tumor surveillance. Our findings indicate that STAT3 inhibition in lymphoma patients will impair NK cell-mediated tumor surveillance, which needs to be taken into account when testing STAT3 inhibitors in preclinical or clinical trials.

  3. Endogenous n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids attenuate T cell-mediated hepatitis via autophagy activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanli Li

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFAs exert anti-inflammatory effects in several liver disorders, including cirrhosis, acute liver failure, and fatty liver disease. To date, little is known about their role in immune-mediated liver diseases. In this study, we used fat-1 transgenic mice rich in endogenous n-3 PUFAs to examine the role of n-3 PUFAs in immune-mediated liver injury. Concanavalin A (Con A was administered intravenously to wild-type (WT and fat-1 transgenic mice to induce T cell-mediated hepatitis. Reduced liver damage was shown in Con A-administrated fat-1 transgenic mice, as evidenced by decreased mortality, attenuated hepatic necrosis, lessened serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT activity, and inhibited production of pro-inflammatory cytokines (e.g. TNF-α, IL-6, IL-17A and IFN-γ. In vivo and in vitro studies demonstrated that n-3 PUFAs significantly inhibited the activation of hepatic T cells and the differentiation of Th1 cells after Con A challenge. Further studies showed that n-3 PUFAs markedly increased autophagy level in Con A-treated fat-1 T cells compared with the WT counterparts. Blocking hepatic autophagy activity with chloroquine diminished the differences in T cell activation and liver injury between Con A-injected WT and fat-1 transgenic mice. We conclude that n-3 PUFAs limit Con A-induced hepatitis via an autophagy-dependent mechanism, and could be exploited as a new therapeutic approach for autoimmune hepatitis.

  4. Endogenous n-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids Attenuate T Cell-Mediated Hepatitis via Autophagy Activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yanli; Tang, Yuan; Wang, Shoujie; Zhou, Jing; Zhou, Jia; Lu, Xiao; Bai, Xiaochun; Wang, Xiang-Yang; Chen, Zhengliang; Zuo, Daming

    2016-01-01

    Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFAs) exert anti-inflammatory effects in several liver disorders, including cirrhosis, acute liver failure, and fatty liver disease. To date, little is known about their role in immune-mediated liver diseases. In this study, we used fat-1 transgenic mice rich in endogenous n-3 PUFAs to examine the role of n-3 PUFAs in immune-mediated liver injury. Concanavalin A (Con A) was administered intravenously to wild-type (WT) and fat-1 transgenic mice to induce T cell-mediated hepatitis. Reduced liver damage was shown in Con A-administrated fat-1 transgenic mice, as evidenced by decreased mortality, attenuated hepatic necrosis, lessened serum alanine aminotransferase activity, and inhibited production of pro-inflammatory cytokines (e.g., TNF-α, IL-6, IL-17A, and IFN-γ). In vivo and in vitro studies demonstrated that n-3 PUFAs significantly inhibited the activation of hepatic T cells and the differentiation of Th1 cells after Con A challenge. Further studies showed that n-3 PUFAs markedly increased autophagy level in Con A-treated fat-1 T cells compared with the WT counterparts. Blocking hepatic autophagy activity with chloroquine diminished the differences in T cell activation and liver injury between Con A-injected WT and fat-1 transgenic mice. We conclude that n-3 PUFAs limit Con A-induced hepatitis via an autophagy-dependent mechanism and could be exploited as a new therapeutic approach for autoimmune hepatitis. PMID:27679638

  5. Mast cell mediators and peritoneal adhesion formation in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langer, J C; Liebman, S M; Monk, P K; Pelletier, G J

    1995-09-01

    We have previously shown that mast cell stabilization attenuates peritoneal adhesion formation in the rat. The present study investigated the mechanism of this protection. Adhesions were created in weanling rats using cecal scraping and application of 95% ethanol. Rats received specific blockers for the mast cell products histamine, serotonin (5HT), leukotriene D4, and platelet activating factor intraperitoneally 30 min before laparotomy and at the time of abdominal closure. Control animals received saline. Adhesions were assessed blindly 1 week later using a standardized scale. Adhesion formation was not affected by histamine blockade using combined mepyramine and ranitidine, 5-HT1 blockade using methysergide, 5-HT3 blockade using ondansetron, leukotriene D4 blockade using MK-571, or platelet activating factor blockade using WEB-2086. However, blockade of the 5-HT2 receptor using ketanserin resulted in significant dose-dependent attenuation of adhesions compared to saline. These data suggest that mast cells mediate peritoneal adhesion formation in the rat through release of serotonin acting on 5HT2 receptors. Further understanding of this process may lead to new strategies for the prevention of postoperative adhesions.

  6. Lung Regeneration: Endogenous and Exogenous Stem Cell Mediated Therapeutic Approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akram, Khondoker M; Patel, Neil; Spiteri, Monica A; Forsyth, Nicholas R

    2016-01-19

    The tissue turnover of unperturbed adult lung is remarkably slow. However, after injury or insult, a specialised group of facultative lung progenitors become activated to replenish damaged tissue through a reparative process called regeneration. Disruption in this process results in healing by fibrosis causing aberrant lung remodelling and organ dysfunction. Post-insult failure of regeneration leads to various incurable lung diseases including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. Therefore, identification of true endogenous lung progenitors/stem cells, and their regenerative pathway are crucial for next-generation therapeutic development. Recent studies provide exciting and novel insights into postnatal lung development and post-injury lung regeneration by native lung progenitors. Furthermore, exogenous application of bone marrow stem cells, embryonic stem cells and inducible pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) show evidences of their regenerative capacity in the repair of injured and diseased lungs. With the advent of modern tissue engineering techniques, whole lung regeneration in the lab using de-cellularised tissue scaffold and stem cells is now becoming reality. In this review, we will highlight the advancement of our understanding in lung regeneration and development of stem cell mediated therapeutic strategies in combating incurable lung diseases.

  7. Lung Regeneration: Endogenous and Exogenous Stem Cell Mediated Therapeutic Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khondoker M. Akram

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The tissue turnover of unperturbed adult lung is remarkably slow. However, after injury or insult, a specialised group of facultative lung progenitors become activated to replenish damaged tissue through a reparative process called regeneration. Disruption in this process results in healing by fibrosis causing aberrant lung remodelling and organ dysfunction. Post-insult failure of regeneration leads to various incurable lung diseases including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. Therefore, identification of true endogenous lung progenitors/stem cells, and their regenerative pathway are crucial for next-generation therapeutic development. Recent studies provide exciting and novel insights into postnatal lung development and post-injury lung regeneration by native lung progenitors. Furthermore, exogenous application of bone marrow stem cells, embryonic stem cells and inducible pluripotent stem cells (iPSC show evidences of their regenerative capacity in the repair of injured and diseased lungs. With the advent of modern tissue engineering techniques, whole lung regeneration in the lab using de-cellularised tissue scaffold and stem cells is now becoming reality. In this review, we will highlight the advancement of our understanding in lung regeneration and development of stem cell mediated therapeutic strategies in combating incurable lung diseases.

  8. Cell-mediated mutagenesis and cell transformation by chemical carcinogens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huberman, E.; Langenbach, R.

    1977-01-01

    Results are reported from studies that showed that mutagenesis of mammalian cells can be achieved by carcinogenic polycyclic hydrocarbons, nitrosamines, and aflatoxins when tested in the presence of fibroblasts and hepatocytes which are able to metabolize these carcinogens. Further, we have found that there is a relationship between the degree of mutant induction and the degree of carcinogenicity of the different chemicals tested. By simultaneously measuring the frequency of cell transformation and the frequency of mutation at one locus (ouabain resistance) in the same cell system, it was possible to estimate the genetic target site for cell transformation. The results indicated that the target site for transformation is approximately 20 times larger than that determined for ouabain resistance. The results suggest that cell transformation may be due to a mutational event and the mutation can occur in one out of a small number of the same or different genes, and that the cell-mediated mutagenesis approach may be a valuable means of detecting tissue-specific carcinogens.

  9. Evidence of cell mediated immune response in infection with Eimeria bareillyi in buffaloes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanyal, P K; Ruprah, N S; Chhabra, M B

    1985-01-01

    Delayed dermal hypersensitivity and leucocyte migrations were measured in buffalo calves experimentally inoculated with Eimeria bareillyi. Dermal hypersensitivity, characterized by increased thickness and local inflammation, was observed in calves inoculated intradermally with E. bareillyi antigen on Days 21 and 28 after infection. The highest inhibition of leucocyte migration was observed in infected buffalo calves on Days 21 and 28 post-infection.

  10. Genetic risk and a primary role for cell-mediated immune mechanisms in multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sawcer, Stephen; Hellenthal, Garrett; Pirinen, Matti;

    2011-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis is a common disease of the central nervous system in which the interplay between inflammatory and neurodegenerative processes typically results in intermittent neurological disturbance followed by progressive accumulation of disability. Epidemiological studies have shown that g...... the independent protective effect attributable to the class I region. Immunologically relevant genes are significantly overrepresented among those mapping close to the identified loci and particularly implicate T-helper-cell differentiation in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis....

  11. Genetic risk and a primary role for cell-mediated immune mechanisms in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawcer, Stephen; Hellenthal, Garrett; Pirinen, Matti; Spencer, Chris C A; Patsopoulos, Nikolaos A; Moutsianas, Loukas; Dilthey, Alexander; Su, Zhan; Freeman, Colin; Hunt, Sarah E; Edkins, Sarah; Gray, Emma; Booth, David R; Potter, Simon C; Goris, An; Band, Gavin; Oturai, Annette Bang; Strange, Amy; Saarela, Janna; Bellenguez, Céline; Fontaine, Bertrand; Gillman, Matthew; Hemmer, Bernhard; Gwilliam, Rhian; Zipp, Frauke; Jayakumar, Alagurevathi; Martin, Roland; Leslie, Stephen; Hawkins, Stanley; Giannoulatou, Eleni; D'alfonso, Sandra; Blackburn, Hannah; Martinelli Boneschi, Filippo; Liddle, Jennifer; Harbo, Hanne F; Perez, Marc L; Spurkland, Anne; Waller, Matthew J; Mycko, Marcin P; Ricketts, Michelle; Comabella, Manuel; Hammond, Naomi; Kockum, Ingrid; McCann, Owen T; Ban, Maria; Whittaker, Pamela; Kemppinen, Anu; Weston, Paul; Hawkins, Clive; Widaa, Sara; Zajicek, John; Dronov, Serge; Robertson, Neil; Bumpstead, Suzannah J; Barcellos, Lisa F; Ravindrarajah, Rathi; Abraham, Roby; Alfredsson, Lars; Ardlie, Kristin; Aubin, Cristin; Baker, Amie; Baker, Katharine; Baranzini, Sergio E; Bergamaschi, Laura; Bergamaschi, Roberto; Bernstein, Allan; Berthele, Achim; Boggild, Mike; Bradfield, Jonathan P; Brassat, David; Broadley, Simon A; Buck, Dorothea; Butzkueven, Helmut; Capra, Ruggero; Carroll, William M; Cavalla, Paola; Celius, Elisabeth G; Cepok, Sabine; Chiavacci, Rosetta; Clerget-Darpoux, Françoise; Clysters, Katleen; Comi, Giancarlo; Cossburn, Mark; Cournu-Rebeix, Isabelle; Cox, Mathew B; Cozen, Wendy; Cree, Bruce A C; Cross, Anne H; Cusi, Daniele; Daly, Mark J; Davis, Emma; de Bakker, Paul I W; Debouverie, Marc; D'hooghe, Marie Beatrice; Dixon, Katherine; Dobosi, Rita; Dubois, Bénédicte; Ellinghaus, David; Elovaara, Irina; Esposito, Federica; Fontenille, Claire; Foote, Simon; Franke, Andre; Galimberti, Daniela; Ghezzi, Angelo; Glessner, Joseph; Gomez, Refujia; Gout, Olivier; Graham, Colin; Grant, Struan F A; Guerini, Franca Rosa; Hakonarson, Hakon; Hall, Per; Hamsten, Anders; Hartung, Hans-Peter; Heard, Rob N; Heath, Simon; Hobart, Jeremy; Hoshi, Muna; Infante-Duarte, Carmen; Ingram, Gillian; Ingram, Wendy; Islam, Talat; Jagodic, Maja; Kabesch, Michael; Kermode, Allan G; Kilpatrick, Trevor J; Kim, Cecilia; Klopp, Norman; Koivisto, Keijo; Larsson, Malin; Lathrop, Mark; Lechner-Scott, Jeannette S; Leone, Maurizio A; Leppä, Virpi; Liljedahl, Ulrika; Bomfim, Izaura Lima; Lincoln, Robin R; Link, Jenny; Liu, Jianjun; Lorentzen, Aslaug R; Lupoli, Sara; Macciardi, Fabio; Mack, Thomas; Marriott, Mark; Martinelli, Vittorio; Mason, Deborah; McCauley, Jacob L; Mentch, Frank; Mero, Inger-Lise; Mihalova, Tania; Montalban, Xavier; Mottershead, John; Myhr, Kjell-Morten; Naldi, Paola; Ollier, William; Page, Alison; Palotie, Aarno; Pelletier, Jean; Piccio, Laura; Pickersgill, Trevor; Piehl, Fredrik; Pobywajlo, Susan; Quach, Hong L; Ramsay, Patricia P; Reunanen, Mauri; Reynolds, Richard; Rioux, John D; Rodegher, Mariaemma; Roesner, Sabine; Rubio, Justin P; Rückert, Ina-Maria; Salvetti, Marco; Salvi, Erika; Santaniello, Adam; Schaefer, Catherine A; Schreiber, Stefan; Schulze, Christian; Scott, Rodney J; Sellebjerg, Finn; Selmaj, Krzysztof W; Sexton, David; Shen, Ling; Simms-Acuna, Brigid; Skidmore, Sheila; Sleiman, Patrick M A; Smestad, Cathrine; Sørensen, Per Soelberg; Søndergaard, Helle Bach; Stankovich, Jim; Strange, Richard C; Sulonen, Anna-Maija; Sundqvist, Emilie; Syvänen, Ann-Christine; Taddeo, Francesca; Taylor, Bruce; Blackwell, Jenefer M; Tienari, Pentti; Bramon, Elvira; Tourbah, Ayman; Brown, Matthew A; Tronczynska, Ewa; Casas, Juan P; Tubridy, Niall; Corvin, Aiden; Vickery, Jane; Jankowski, Janusz; Villoslada, Pablo; Markus, Hugh S; Wang, Kai; Mathew, Christopher G; Wason, James; Palmer, Colin N A; Wichmann, H-Erich; Plomin, Robert; Willoughby, Ernest; Rautanen, Anna; Winkelmann, Juliane; Wittig, Michael; Trembath, Richard C; Yaouanq, Jacqueline; Viswanathan, Ananth C; Zhang, Haitao; Wood, Nicholas W; Zuvich, Rebecca; Deloukas, Panos; Langford, Cordelia; Duncanson, Audrey; Oksenberg, Jorge R; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A; Haines, Jonathan L; Olsson, Tomas; Hillert, Jan; Ivinson, Adrian J; De Jager, Philip L; Peltonen, Leena; Stewart, Graeme J; Hafler, David A; Hauser, Stephen L; McVean, Gil; Donnelly, Peter; Compston, Alastair

    2011-08-10

    Multiple sclerosis is a common disease of the central nervous system in which the interplay between inflammatory and neurodegenerative processes typically results in intermittent neurological disturbance followed by progressive accumulation of disability. Epidemiological studies have shown that genetic factors are primarily responsible for the substantially increased frequency of the disease seen in the relatives of affected individuals, and systematic attempts to identify linkage in multiplex families have confirmed that variation within the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) exerts the greatest individual effect on risk. Modestly powered genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have enabled more than 20 additional risk loci to be identified and have shown that multiple variants exerting modest individual effects have a key role in disease susceptibility. Most of the genetic architecture underlying susceptibility to the disease remains to be defined and is anticipated to require the analysis of sample sizes that are beyond the numbers currently available to individual research groups. In a collaborative GWAS involving 9,772 cases of European descent collected by 23 research groups working in 15 different countries, we have replicated almost all of the previously suggested associations and identified at least a further 29 novel susceptibility loci. Within the MHC we have refined the identity of the HLA-DRB1 risk alleles and confirmed that variation in the HLA-A gene underlies the independent protective effect attributable to the class I region. Immunologically relevant genes are significantly overrepresented among those mapping close to the identified loci and particularly implicate T-helper-cell differentiation in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis.

  12. Genetic risk and a primary role for cell-mediated immune mechanisms in multiple sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawcer, Stephen; Hellenthal, Garrett; Pirinen, Matti; Spencer, Chris C.A.; Patsopoulos, Nikolaos A.; Moutsianas, Loukas; Dilthey, Alexander; Su, Zhan; Freeman, Colin; Hunt, Sarah E.; Edkins, Sarah; Gray, Emma; Booth, David R.; Potter, Simon C.; Goris, An; Band, Gavin; Oturai, Annette Bang; Strange, Amy; Saarela, Janna; Bellenguez, Céline; Fontaine, Bertrand; Gillman, Matthew; Hemmer, Bernhard; Gwilliam, Rhian; Zipp, Frauke; Jayakumar, Alagurevathi; Martin, Roland; Leslie, Stephen; Hawkins, Stanley; Giannoulatou, Eleni; D’alfonso, Sandra; Blackburn, Hannah; Boneschi, Filippo Martinelli; Liddle, Jennifer; Harbo, Hanne F.; Perez, Marc L.; Spurkland, Anne; Waller, Matthew J; Mycko, Marcin P.; Ricketts, Michelle; Comabella, Manuel; Hammond, Naomi; Kockum, Ingrid; McCann, Owen T.; Ban, Maria; Whittaker, Pamela; Kemppinen, Anu; Weston, Paul; Hawkins, Clive; Widaa, Sara; Zajicek, John; Dronov, Serge; Robertson, Neil; Bumpstead, Suzannah J.; Barcellos, Lisa F.; Ravindrarajah, Rathi; Abraham, Roby; Alfredsson, Lars; Ardlie, Kristin; Aubin, Cristin; Baker, Amie; Baker, Katharine; Baranzini, Sergio E.; Bergamaschi, Laura; Bergamaschi, Roberto; Bernstein, Allan; Berthele, Achim; Boggild, Mike; Bradfield, Jonathan P.; Brassat, David; Broadley, Simon A.; Buck, Dorothea; Butzkueven, Helmut; Capra, Ruggero; Carroll, William M.; Cavalla, Paola; Celius, Elisabeth G.; Cepok, Sabine; Chiavacci, Rosetta; Clerget-Darpoux, Françoise; Clysters, Katleen; Comi, Giancarlo; Cossburn, Mark; Cournu-Rebeix, Isabelle; Cox, Mathew B.; Cozen, Wendy; Cree, Bruce A.C.; Cross, Anne H.; Cusi, Daniele; Daly, Mark J.; Davis, Emma; de Bakker, Paul I.W.; Debouverie, Marc; D’hooghe, Marie Beatrice; Dixon, Katherine; Dobosi, Rita; Dubois, Bénédicte; Ellinghaus, David; Elovaara, Irina; Esposito, Federica; Fontenille, Claire; Foote, Simon; Franke, Andre; Galimberti, Daniela; Ghezzi, Angelo; Glessner, Joseph; Gomez, Refujia; Gout, Olivier; Graham, Colin; Grant, Struan F.A.; Guerini, Franca Rosa; Hakonarson, Hakon; Hall, Per; Hamsten, Anders; Hartung, Hans-Peter; Heard, Rob N.; Heath, Simon; Hobart, Jeremy; Hoshi, Muna; Infante-Duarte, Carmen; Ingram, Gillian; Ingram, Wendy; Islam, Talat; Jagodic, Maja; Kabesch, Michael; Kermode, Allan G.; Kilpatrick, Trevor J.; Kim, Cecilia; Klopp, Norman; Koivisto, Keijo; Larsson, Malin; Lathrop, Mark; Lechner-Scott, Jeannette S.; Leone, Maurizio A.; Leppä, Virpi; Liljedahl, Ulrika; Bomfim, Izaura Lima; Lincoln, Robin R.; Link, Jenny; Liu, Jianjun; Lorentzen, Åslaug R.; Lupoli, Sara; Macciardi, Fabio; Mack, Thomas; Marriott, Mark; Martinelli, Vittorio; Mason, Deborah; McCauley, Jacob L.; Mentch, Frank; Mero, Inger-Lise; Mihalova, Tania; Montalban, Xavier; Mottershead, John; Myhr, Kjell-Morten; Naldi, Paola; Ollier, William; Page, Alison; Palotie, Aarno; Pelletier, Jean; Piccio, Laura; Pickersgill, Trevor; Piehl, Fredrik; Pobywajlo, Susan; Quach, Hong L.; Ramsay, Patricia P.; Reunanen, Mauri; Reynolds, Richard; Rioux, John D.; Rodegher, Mariaemma; Roesner, Sabine; Rubio, Justin P.; Rückert, Ina-Maria; Salvetti, Marco; Salvi, Erika; Santaniello, Adam; Schaefer, Catherine A.; Schreiber, Stefan; Schulze, Christian; Scott, Rodney J.; Sellebjerg, Finn; Selmaj, Krzysztof W.; Sexton, David; Shen, Ling; Simms-Acuna, Brigid; Skidmore, Sheila; Sleiman, Patrick M.A.; Smestad, Cathrine; Sørensen, Per Soelberg; Søndergaard, Helle Bach; Stankovich, Jim; Strange, Richard C.; Sulonen, Anna-Maija; Sundqvist, Emilie; Syvänen, Ann-Christine; Taddeo, Francesca; Taylor, Bruce; Blackwell, Jenefer M.; Tienari, Pentti; Bramon, Elvira; Tourbah, Ayman; Brown, Matthew A.; Tronczynska, Ewa; Casas, Juan P.; Tubridy, Niall; Corvin, Aiden; Vickery, Jane; Jankowski, Janusz; Villoslada, Pablo; Markus, Hugh S.; Wang, Kai; Mathew, Christopher G.; Wason, James; Palmer, Colin N.A.; Wichmann, H-Erich; Plomin, Robert; Willoughby, Ernest; Rautanen, Anna; Winkelmann, Juliane; Wittig, Michael; Trembath, Richard C.; Yaouanq, Jacqueline; Viswanathan, Ananth C.; Zhang, Haitao; Wood, Nicholas W.; Zuvich, Rebecca; Deloukas, Panos; Langford, Cordelia; Duncanson, Audrey; Oksenberg, Jorge R.; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A.; Haines, Jonathan L.; Olsson, Tomas; Hillert, Jan; Ivinson, Adrian J.; De Jager, Philip L.; Peltonen, Leena; Stewart, Graeme J.; Hafler, David A.; Hauser, Stephen L.; McVean, Gil; Donnelly, Peter; Compston, Alastair

    2011-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (OMIM 126200) is a common disease of the central nervous system in which the interplay between inflammatory and neurodegenerative processes typically results in intermittent neurological disturbance followed by progressive accumulation of disability.1 Epidemiological studies have shown that genetic factors are primarily responsible for the substantially increased frequency of the disease seen in the relatives of affected individuals;2,3 and systematic attempts to identify linkage in multiplex families have confirmed that variation within the Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) exerts the greatest individual effect on risk.4 Modestly powered Genome-Wide Association Studies (GWAS)5-10 have enabled more than 20 additional risk loci to be identified and have shown that multiple variants exerting modest individual effects play a key role in disease susceptibility.11 Most of the genetic architecture underlying susceptibility to the disease remains to be defined and is anticipated to require the analysis of sample sizes that are beyond the numbers currently available to individual research groups. In a collaborative GWAS involving 9772 cases of European descent collected by 23 research groups working in 15 different countries, we have replicated almost all of the previously suggested associations and identified at least a further 29 novel susceptibility loci. Within the MHC we have refined the identity of the DRB1 risk alleles and confirmed that variation in the HLA-A gene underlies the independent protective effect attributable to the Class I region. Immunologically relevant genes are significantly over-represented amongst those mapping close to the identified loci and particularly implicate T helper cell differentiation in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis. PMID:21833088

  13. T-Cell Mediated Immune Responses Induced in ret Transgenic Mouse Model of Malignant Melanoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abschuetz, Oliver [Skin Cancer Unit, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg and Department of Dermatology, Venereology and Allergology, University Medical Center Mannheim, Ruprecht-Karl University of Heidelberg, Mannheim , Heidelberg 69120 (Germany); Osen, Wolfram [Division of Translational Immunology, German Cancer Center, Heidelberg 69120 (Germany); Frank, Kathrin [Skin Cancer Unit, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg and Department of Dermatology, Venereology and Allergology, University Medical Center Mannheim, Ruprecht-Karl University of Heidelberg, Mannheim , Heidelberg 69120 (Germany); Kato, Masashi [Unit of Environmental Health Sciences, Department of Biomedical Sciences, College of Life and Health Sciences, Chubu University, Aichi 487-8501 (Japan); Schadendorf, Dirk [Department of Dermatology, University Hospital Essen, Essen 45122 (Germany); Umansky, Viktor, E-mail: v.umansky@dkfz.de [Skin Cancer Unit, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg and Department of Dermatology, Venereology and Allergology, University Medical Center Mannheim, Ruprecht-Karl University of Heidelberg, Mannheim , Heidelberg 69120 (Germany)

    2012-04-26

    Poor response of human malignant melanoma to currently available treatments requires a development of innovative therapeutic strategies. Their evaluation should be based on animal models that resemble human melanoma with respect to genetics, histopathology and clinical features. Here we used a transgenic mouse model of spontaneous skin melanoma, in which the ret transgene is expressed in melanocytes under the control of metallothionein-I promoter. After a short latency, around 25% mice develop macroscopic skin melanoma metastasizing to lymph nodes, bone marrow, lungs and brain, whereas other transgenic mice showed only metastatic lesions without visible skin tumors. We found that tumor lesions expressed melanoma associated antigens (MAA) tyrosinase, tyrosinase related protein (TRP)-1, TRP-2 and gp100, which could be applied as targets for the immunotherapy. Upon peptide vaccination, ret transgenic mice without macroscopic melanomas were able to generate T cell responses not only against a strong model antigen ovalbumin but also against typical MAA TRP-2. Although mice bearing macroscopic primary tumors could also display an antigen-specific T cell reactivity, it was significantly down-regulated as compared to tumor-free transgenic mice or non-transgenic littermates. We suggest that ret transgenic mice could be used as a pre-clinical model for the evaluation of novel strategies of melanoma immunotherapy.

  14. Genetic risk and a primary role for cell-mediated immune mechanisms in multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sawcer, Stephen; Hellenthal, Garrett; Pirinen, Matti

    2011-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis is a common disease of the central nervous system in which the interplay between inflammatory and neurodegenerative processes typically results in intermittent neurological disturbance followed by progressive accumulation of disability. Epidemiological studies have shown that g...

  15. Stimulation by levamisole of cell-mediated immunity in weaned pigs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frane Božić

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Commercial crossbred pigs weaned at four weeks were allocated into three equal groups. The experimental group 1 was primed intramuscularly, and the experimental group 2 was primed per os, with levamisole at an immunostimulatory dose of 2.5mg/kg once daily, for three consecutive days, and controls received saline. Venous blood samples from all pigs were collected after the last levamisole or saline dose was given (day 0, and 35 days later (day 35 for flow cytometry analysis. The results obtained by immunophenotyping of isolated circulating lymphocytes on day 35 indicate that priming by levamisole of weaned pigs selectively recruited CD4+, CD8+ and CD4+CD8+, but not CD21+ cells in the systemic circulation.

  16. Cell-mediated immune response to Leishmania chagasi experimental infection of BALB/c immunosuppressed mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JG Machado

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Leishmaniasis, a zoonosis of worldwide distribution, presents a significant impact on immunosupressed patients. This study aimed to evaluate Leishmania chagasi infection in BALB/c mice immunosuppressed with dexamethasone. Spleen cells stimulated or not with L. chagasi were cultured for cytokine quantification (IFN-γ, IL-2, IL-4 and IL-10 by sandwich ELISA. Parasite loads in the spleen and liver were determined by means of culture microtitration. Immunosuppressed groups showed statistically lower spleen weight and CD4-cell percentage in blood on the day of infection and produced Th1 and Th2 cytokines on other days of the study. The other infected groups, weather immunosupressed or not, also produced Th1 and Th2 cytokines. Parasite loads in the spleen and liver were not statistically different among the groups. It was concluded that L. chagasi infection was not affected by dexamethasone-induced immunosuppression, probably due the reversible effect of the treatment.

  17. Altered cell-mediated immunity to group A haemolytic streptococcal antigens in chronic plaque psoriasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, B S; Powles, A V; Malkani, A K; Lewis, H; Valdimarsson, H; Fry, L

    1991-07-01

    The proliferative lymphocyte response to sonicated group A, beta-haemolytic streptococci (Strep-A) was measured by thymidine incorporation in 78 patients with psoriasis (guttate, chronic plaque or both). Lymphocytes from 72 of these patients were also cultured with streptokinase/streptodornase (SK/SD), and 20 of the patients with chronic plaque psoriasis were further tested with PPD, Candida albicans and sonicated Streptococcus mutans, a bacterial type not associated clinically with psoriasis. The median stimulation index (SI) of the psoriasis group to the Strep-A preparation was significantly higher than that of a group of 27 non-psoriatic individuals (P less than 0.05). Within this group, only the patients with chronic plaque psoriasis (n = 42) showed a significantly increased proliferative response compared to the non-psoriatic controls (median SI = 123.8 and 31.9, respectively, P less than 0.01). Although the lymphocyte response of the chronic plaque group to SK/SD was also markedly higher than that of the control group, this difference did not reach statistical significance. In addition, these patients did not show significantly increased responses to any of the other antigens tested, including S. mutans. No correlation was observed between the degree of proliferation to Strep-A and disease extent or activity. Similarly, ASO titres, which were raised in 11 out of 23 guttate and three out of nine chronic plaque psoriasis patients tested, did not correlate with the proliferative responses observed.

  18. The role of cytokines and chemokines in the T-cell-mediated autoimmune process in alopecia areata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Taisuke; Tokura, Yoshiki

    2014-11-01

    The aetiology of alopecia areata (AA) is still not fully understood. However, recent clinical and experimental studies have provided insights into the pathomechanisms of AA and revealed that it is an organ-specific and cell-mediated autoimmune disease. Some triggers, such as viral infections, trauma, hormones and emotional/physical stressors, may cause activation of autoreactive T cells that target hair follicle (HF) autoantigens. In these immunological responses, cytokines and chemokines are regarded as key players that mediate the autoimmune inflammation. This results in the collapse of HF immune privilege, which is central to the pathogenesis of AA. This essay will focus on how cytokines and chemokines contribute to the immunological aspects of AA. The management of AA often remains difficult in a number of cases. Our review suggests that novel therapies for AA may involve targeting cytokines and chemokines.

  19. [Four levels (types) of immune reponse in children with viral parotitis infections].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheleznikova, G F; Ivanova, V V; Bekhtereva, M K; Monakhova, N E; Novozhilova, E V; Goleva, O V; Sizemov, A N

    2001-01-01

    Four levels (types) of immune response, differing by expression of cytokines (TNF-alpha, IL-1 beta, IL-4, and gamma-IFN) and immunoglobulins IgG2, IgG3, IgG4, and IgE) and by expression and time course of specific cell-mediated and humoral immune response, were detected in children with different clinical forms of mumps. Types 1 and 3 immune response are predominantly cell-mediated, while types 2 and 4 predominantly humoral during the acute phase of the disease. The cytokine and antigen-specific profiles of each type of immune response correlate with the severity of clinical course of mumps.

  20. Combined local and systemic immunization is essential for durable T-cell mediated heterosubtypic immunity against influenza A virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uddbäck, Ida Elin Maria; Pedersen, Line M I; Pedersen, Sara R

    2016-01-01

    The threat from unpredictable influenza virus pandemics necessitates the development of a new type of influenza vaccine. Since the internal proteins are highly conserved, induction of T cells targeting these antigens may provide the solution. Indeed, adenoviral (Ad) vectors expressing flu...

  1. NK cell mediated antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity in cancer immunotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei eWang

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Natural killer (NK cells play a major role in cancer immunotherapies that involve tumor-antigen targeting by monoclonal antibodies (mAbs. NK cells express a variety of activating and inhibitory receptors that serve to regulate the function and activity of the cells. In the context of targeting cells, NK cells can be specifically activated through certain Fc receptors that are expressed on their cell surface. NK cells can express FcγRIIIA and/or FcγRIIC, which can bind to the Fc portion of immunoglobulins, transmitting activating signals within NK cells. Once activated through Fc receptors by antibodies bound to target cells, NK cells are able to lyse target cells without priming, and secrete cytokines like interferon gamma to recruit adaptive immune cells. This antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC of tumor cells is utilized in the treatment of various cancers overexpressing unique antigens, such as neuroblastoma, breast cancer, B cell lymphoma, and others. NK cells also express a family of receptors called Killer Immunoglobulin-like Receptors (KIRs, which regulate the function and response of NK cells towards target cells through their interaction with their cognate ligands that are expressed on tumor cells. Genetic polymorphisms in KIR and KIR ligands, as well as FcγRs may influence NK cell responsiveness in conjunction with mAb immunotherapies. This review focuses on current therapeutic mAbs, different strategies to augment the anti-tumor efficacy of ADCC, and genotypic factors that may influence patient responses to antibody-dependent immunotherapies.

  2. Enhancement of antibody-dependent cell mediated cytotoxicity: a new era in cancer treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajasekaran N

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Narendiran Rajasekaran,1,* Cariad Chester,1,* Atsushi Yonezawa,1,2 Xing Zhao,1,3 Holbrook E Kohrt1 1Division of Oncology, Stanford School of Medicine, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA; 2Department of Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics, Kyoto University Hospital, Kyoto, Japan; 3Tissue Engineering and Stem Cells Research Center, Department of Immunology, Guiyang Medical University, Guiyang, Guizhou Province, People's Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: The therapeutic efficacy of some anti-tumor monoclonal antibodies (mAbs depends on the capacity of the mAb to recognize the tumor-associated antigen and induce cytotoxicity via a network of immune effector cells. This process of antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC against tumor cells is triggered by the interaction of the fragment crystallizable (Fc portion of the mAb with the Fc receptors on effector cells like natural killer cells, macrophages, γδ T cells, and dendritic cells. By augmenting ADCC, the antitumor activity of mAbs can be significantly increased. Currently, identifying and developing therapeutic agents that enhance ADCC is a growing area of research. Combining existing tumor-targeting mAbs and ADCC-promoting agents that stimulate effector cells will translate to greater clinical responses. In this review, we discuss strategies for enhancing ADCC and emphasize the potential of combination treatments that include US Food and Drug Administration-approved mAbs and immunostimulatory therapeutics. Keywords: ADCC, NK cell, reovirus, TLR, CD137

  3. Effector cell mediated cytotoxicity measured by intracellular Granzyme B release in HIV infected subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahajan Supriya D.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL activity is currently believed to be one of the key immunologic mechanisms responsible for the prevention or attenuation of HIV-1 infection. The induction of CD8+ T cell activation may also result in the production of soluble or non-classical lytic factors that are associated with protection from infection or slower disease progression. Traditionally, CD8+ CTL responses have been measured by the classic chromium release assay, monitoring the ability of T cells (Effector cells to lyse radiolabelled HLA – matched “target cells” that express the appropriate antigen-MHC complex. This method is not only labor intensive, semi quantitative assay at best, but also needs fresh, non-cryopreserved cells. Recently, cytokine specific ELISPOT assays or tetrameric MHC-I/ peptide complexes have utilized to directly quantitate circulating CD8+ effector cells, and these assays are more sensitive, quantitative and reproducible than the traditional CTL lysis assay and can also be performed on cryopreserved cells. Although these are reproducible assays for the assessment of soluble antiviral activity secreted by activated T cell populations they can be extremely expensive to perform. We have used FACS Analysis to measure Granzyme B release as a function of cell mediated cytotoxicity. This method helps quantitate the CTL activity and also identifies the phenotype of the cells elucidating this immune response. The method described not only monitors immunological response but also is also simple to perform, precise and extremely time efficient and is ideal for screening a large number of samples.

  4. Antibody-Mediated Immunity against Tuberculosis: Implications for Vaccine Development

    OpenAIRE

    Achkar, Jacqueline M; Casadevall, Arturo

    2013-01-01

    There is an urgent need for new and better vaccines against tuberculosis (TB). Current vaccine design strategies are generally focused on the enhancement of cell-mediated immunity. Antibody-based approaches are not being considered, mostly due to the paradigm that humoral immunity plays little role in the protection against intracellular pathogens. Here, we reappraise and update the increasing evidence for antibody-mediated immunity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis, discuss the complexity o...

  5. Genetic Immunization Elicits Antigen-Specific Protective Immune Responses and Decreases Disease Severity in Trypanosoma cruzi Infection

    OpenAIRE

    2002-01-01

    Immunity to Trypanosoma cruzi requires elicitation of humoral and cell-mediated immune responses to extracellular trypomastigotes and intracellular amastigotes. In this study, the effectiveness of the T. cruzi trans-sialidase family (ts) genes ASP-1, ASP-2, and TSA-1 as genetic vaccines was assessed. Immunization of mice with plasmids encoding ASP-1, ASP-2, or TSA-1 elicited poor antigen-specific cytotoxic-T-lymphocyte (CTL) activity and T. cruzi-specific antibody responses. Codelivery of int...

  6. Induction of mucosal immunity through systemic immunization: Phantom or reality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Fei; Patel, Girishchandra B; Hu, Songhua; Chen, Wangxue

    2016-04-02

    Generation of protective immunity at mucosal surfaces can greatly assist the host defense against pathogens which either cause disease at the mucosal epithelial barriers or enter the host through these surfaces. Although mucosal routes of immunization, such as intranasal and oral, are being intensely explored and appear promising for eliciting protective mucosal immunity in mammals, their application in clinical practice has been limited due to technical and safety related challenges. Most of the currently approved human vaccines are administered via systemic (such as intramuscular and subcutaneous) routes. Whereas these routes are acknowledged as being capable to elicit antigen-specific systemic humoral and cell-mediated immune responses, they are generally perceived as incapable of generating IgA responses or protective mucosal immunity. Nevertheless, currently licensed systemic vaccines do provide effective protection against mucosal pathogens such as influenza viruses and Streptococcus pneumoniae. However, whether systemic immunization induces protective mucosal immunity remains a controversial topic. Here we reviewed the current literature and discussed the potential of systemic routes of immunization for the induction of mucosal immunity.

  7. Immunity to Fish Rhabdoviruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maureen K. Purcell

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Members of the family Rhabdoviridae are single-stranded RNA viruses and globally important pathogens of wild and cultured fish and thus relatively well studied in their respective hosts or other model systems. Here, we review the protective immune mechanisms that fish mount in response to rhabdovirus infections. Teleost fish possess the principal components of innate and adaptive immunity found in other vertebrates. Neutralizing antibodies are critical for long-term protection from fish rhabdoviruses, but several studies also indicate a role for cell-mediated immunity. Survival of acute rhabdoviral infection is also dependent on innate immunity, particularly the interferon (IFN system that is rapidly induced in response to infection. Paradoxically, rhabdoviruses are sensitive to the effects of IFN but virulent rhabdoviruses can continue to replicate owing to the abilities of the matrix (M protein to mediate host-cell shutoff and the non‑virion (NV protein to subvert programmed cell death and suppress functional IFN. While many basic features of the fish immune response to rhabdovirus infections are becoming better understood, much less is known about how factors in the environment affect the ecology of rhabdovirus infections in natural populations of aquatic animals.

  8. Innate immunity and chronic immune activation in HCV/HIV-1 co-infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Veronica D; Landay, Alan L; Sandberg, Johan K

    2010-04-01

    Innate immune responses are critical in the defense against viral infections. NK cells, myeloid and plasmacytoid dendritic cells, and invariant CD1d-restricted NKT cells mediate both effector and regulatory functions in this early immune response. In chronic uncontrolled viral infections such as HCV and HIV-1, these essential immune functions are compromised and can become a double edged sword contributing to the immunopathogenesis of viral disease. In particular, recent findings indicate that innate immune responses play a central role in the chronic immune activation which is a primary driver of HIV-1 disease progression. HCV/HIV-1 co-infection is affecting millions of people and is associated with faster viral disease progression. Here, we review the role of innate immunity and chronic immune activation in HCV and HIV-1 infection, and discuss how mechanisms of innate immunity may influence protection as well as immunopathogenesis in the HCV/HIV-1 co-infected human host.

  9. DAP10 contributes to CD8(+) T cell-mediated cytotoxic effector mechanisms during Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hessmann, Manuela; Rausch, Alexandra; Rückerl, Dominik; Adams, Pamela Scott; Simon, Markus; Gilfillan, Susan; Colonna, Marco; Ehlers, Stefan; Hölscher, Christoph

    2011-05-01

    The activating C-type lectin-like receptor NKG2D, which is expressed by mouse NK cells and activated CD8 T cells, was previously demonstrated to be involved in tumor rejection and as a defense mechanism against viral and bacterial infections. Because CD8 T cells are important for protective immune responses during chronic Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) infection and represent a promising target for new vaccine strategies to prevent human pulmonary tuberculosis (TB), we studied the immune response in mice deficient for the NKG2D adapter molecule DAP10 during experimental TB. After aerosol infection, DAP10-defcient mice displayed an unimpaired recruitment, activation and development of antigen-specific CD8 T cells. Whereas the frequency of interferon-gamma-producing CD8 T cells from Mtb-infected DAP10-defcient mice was not affected, CD8 T cell-mediated cytotoxicity was significantly reduced in the absence of DAP10. The loss of cytotoxic activity in DAP10-deficient CD8 T cells was associated with an impaired release of cytotoxic granules. Together, our results suggest that during Mtb infection DAP10 is required for maximal cytolytic activity of CD8 T cells.

  10. [Immune system evolution. (From cells to humans)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belek, A S

    1992-01-01

    The great variety of cells and molecules observed in the mammalian immune system can be explained by stepwise acquisition of them during phylogeny. Self/nonself discrimination and cell-mediated immunity have been present since the early stages of evolution. Although some inducible antimicrobial molecules have been demonstrated in invertebrates, immunoglobulins appear in vertebrates. T and B cell diversity, development of the lymphoid organs, MHC molecules, complement and cytokines are the characteristics that appear through the evolution of vertebrates. Further knowledge that will be obtained from phylogenetic studies will improve our understanding of the immune system of human.

  11. Towards Future T Cell-Mediated Influenza Vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thi H. O. Nguyen

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Influenza A virus (IAVs infections impact significantly on global health, being particularly problematic in children, the elderly, pregnant women, indigenous populations and people with co-morbidities. Antibody-based vaccines require annual administration to combat rapidly acquired mutations modifying the surface haemagglutinin (HA and neuraminidase (NA glycoproteins. Conversely, influenza-specific CD8+ T cell responses directed at peptides derived from the more conserved internal virus proteins are known to be protective, suggesting that T cell-based vaccines may provide long-lasting cross-protection. This review outlines the importance of CD8+ T cell immunity to seasonal influenza and pandemic IAVs and summarises current vaccination strategies for inducing durable CD8+ T cell memory. Aspects of future IAV vaccine design and the use of live virus challenge in humans to establish proof of principle are also discussed.

  12. T cell mediated pathogenesis in EAE: Molecular mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian C Kurschus

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available T cells are major initiators and mediators of disease in multiple sclerosis (MS and in its animal model experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE. EAE is an antigen-driven autoimmune model in which immunization against myelin autoantigens elicits strong T cell responses which initiate its pathology with CNS myelin destruction. T cells cause pathogenic events by several mechanisms; some work in a direct fashion in the CNS, such as direct cytokine-induced damage, granzyme-mediated killing, or glutamate-induced neurotoxicity, whereas most are indirect mechanisms, such as activation of other cell types like macrophages, B cells, or neutrophils. This review aims to describe and discuss the molecular effector mechanism by which T cells harm the CNS during EAE.

  13. Combination approaches with immune checkpoint blockade in cancer therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maarten Swart

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available In healthy individuals, immune checkpoint molecules prevent autoimmune responses and limit immune cell-mediated tissue damage. Tumors frequently exploit these molecules to evade eradication by the immune system. Over the past years, immune checkpoint blockade of cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen-4 (CTLA-4 and programmed death-1 (PD-1 emerged as promising strategies to activate anti-tumor cytotoxic T cell responses. Although complete regression and long-term survival is achieved in some patients, not all patients respond. This review describes promising, novel combination approaches involving immune checkpoint blockade, aimed at increasing response-rates to the single treatments.

  14. [Effect of deltaran and melatonin on immune system in rats with experimental contact dermatitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shandra, O O

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the work was investigation of both humoral and cell-mediated immunity together with leukocytes functional stability indexes in rats with the experimental contact dermatitis (ECD) in conditions of complex pharmacological correction using deltaran and melatonin. Experimental trials were performed under conditions of chronic experiment on model chrome-induced ECD. Both deltaran and melatonin either alone or in combination were used for complex pharmacological correction of humoral and cell-mediated immunity and also for stability of leukocytes. The data obtained showed the expressed disturbances of humoral and cell-mediated immunity and neutrophils' functional stability damage under conditions of chrome-induced ECD in rats. The revealed alterations in functional activity of the immune system were successfully corrected using the combined administration of deltaran and melatonin. The activity of medical complex had exponential character.

  15. μ-opioid Receptor-Mediated Alterations of Allergen-Induced Immune Responses of Bronchial Lymph Node Cells in a Murine Model of Stress Asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaori Okuyama

    2012-01-01

    Conclusions: Restraint stress aggravated allergic airway inflammation in association with alterations in local immunity characterized by greater Th2-associated cytokine production and a reduced development of regulatory T cells, mediated by MORs.

  16. Immunotoxicity of aflatoxin B1: impairment of the cell-mediated response to vaccine antigen and modulation of cytokine expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meissonnier, Guylaine M; Pinton, Philippe; Laffitte, Joëlle; Cossalter, Anne-Marie; Gong, Yun Yun; Wild, Christopher P; Bertin, Gérard; Galtier, Pierre; Oswald, Isabelle P

    2008-09-01

    Aflatoxin B1 (AFB1), a mycotoxin produced by Aspergillus flavus or A. parasiticus, is a frequent contaminant of food and feed. This toxin is hepatotoxic and immunotoxic. The present study analyzed in pigs the influence of AFB1 on humoral and cellular responses, and investigated whether the immunomodulation observed is produced through interference with cytokine expression. For 28 days, pigs were fed a control diet or a diet contaminated with 385, 867 or 1807 microg pure AFB1/kg feed. At days 4 and 15, pigs were vaccinated with ovalbumin. AFB1 exposure, confirmed by an observed dose-response in blood aflatoxin-albumin adduct, had no major effect on humoral immunity as measured by plasma concentrations of total IgA, IgG and IgM and of anti-ovalbumin IgG. Toxin exposure did not impair the mitogenic response of lymphocytes but delayed and decreased their specific proliferation in response to the vaccine antigen, suggesting impaired lymphocyte activation in pigs exposed to AFB1. The expression level of pro-inflammatory (TNF-alpha, IL-1beta, IL-6, IFN-gamma) and regulatory (IL-10) cytokines was assessed by real-time PCR in spleen. A significant up-regulation of all 5 cytokines was observed in spleen from pigs exposed to the highest dose of AFB1. In pigs exposed to the medium dose, IL-6 expression was increased and a trend towards increased IFN-gamma and IL-10 was observed. In addition we demonstrate that IL-6 impaired in vitro the antigenic- but not the mitogenic-induced proliferation of lymphocytes from control pigs vaccinated with ovalbumin. These results indicate that AFB1 dietary exposure decreases cell-mediated immunity while inducing an inflammatory response. These impairments in the immune response could participate in failure of vaccination protocols and increased susceptibility to infections described in pigs exposed to AFB1.

  17. Cell mediated therapeutics for cancer treatment: Tumor homing cells as therapeutic delivery vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balivada, Sivasai

    Many cell types were known to have migratory properties towards tumors and different research groups have shown reliable results regarding cells as delivery vehicles of therapeutics for targeted cancer treatment. Present report discusses proof of concept for 1. Cell mediated delivery of Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) and targeted Magnetic hyperthermia (MHT) as a cancer treatment by using in vivo mouse cancer models, 2. Cells surface engineering with chimeric proteins for targeted cancer treatment by using in vitro models. 1. Tumor homing cells can carry MNPs specifically to the tumor site and tumor burden will decrease after alternating magnetic field (AMF) exposure. To test this hypothesis, first we loaded Fe/Fe3O4 bi-magnetic NPs into neural progenitor cells (NPCs), which were previously shown to migrate towards melanoma tumors. We observed that NPCs loaded with MNPs travel to subcutaneous melanoma tumors. After alternating magnetic field (AMF) exposure, the targeted delivery of MNPs by the NPCs resulted in a mild decrease in tumor size (Chapter-2). Monocytes/macrophages (Mo/Ma) are known to infiltrate tumor sites, and also have phagocytic activity which can increase their uptake of MNPs. To test Mo/Ma-mediated MHT we transplanted Mo/Ma loaded with MNPs into a mouse model of pancreatic peritoneal carcinomatosis. We observed that MNP-loaded Mo/Ma infiltrated pancreatic tumors and, after AMF treatment, significantly prolonged the lives of mice bearing disseminated intraperitoneal pancreatic tumors (Chapter-3). 2. Targeted cancer treatment could be achieved by engineering tumor homing cell surfaces with tumor proteases cleavable, cancer cell specific recombinant therapeutic proteins. To test this, Urokinase and Calpain (tumor specific proteases) cleavable; prostate cancer cell (CaP) specific (CaP1 targeting peptide); apoptosis inducible (Caspase3 V266ED3)- rCasp3V266ED3 chimeric protein was designed in silico. Hypothesized membrane anchored chimeric protein (rCasp3V

  18. CD4+ T cell-mediated presentation of non-infectious HIV-1virion antigens to HIV-specific CD8+ T cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Jian-qing; Franco Lori; Julianna Lisziewicz

    2006-01-01

    Background The mechanism of chronic immune activation and impairment of HIV-specific immune responses during chronic infection is not fully understood. However, it is known that high immune activation leads to more rapid progression to AIDS. We hypothesize that CD4+ T cell-mediated viral antigen presentation contributes to this pathologic immune activation in HIV-infected individuals.Methods HIV-specific T cells, responding to noninfectious HIV-1 virions as antigen, were measured by flow cytometric assays. These experimental conditions reflect the in vivo condition where noninfectious HIV-1 represents more than 99% of the antigens.Results CD4+ T cells purified from HIV-infected individuals were capable of cross presenting exogenous noninfectious HIV-1 virions to HIV-1-specific CD8+ T cells. Cross presentation required the entry of HIV-1 to CD4+ T cells and antigen translocation from endoplasmic reticulum to the Golgi complex. Blocking CD4+mediated activation of HIV-specific CD8+ T cells and redirecting the viral antigens to antigen presenting cells improved HIV-specific T cell responses.Conclusions One possible cause of chronic immune activation and impairment of HIV-1 specific T cell responses is represented by HIV-1 harboring CD4+ T cells cross presenting HIV-1 antigen to activate CD8+ T cells. This new mechanism provides the first evidence that cross presentation of noninfectious HIV-1. Virions play a role in the immunopathogenesis of HIV-1 infection.

  19. Addressing immune tolerance issues in inflammatory bowel disease and adeno-associated virus based gene transfer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Majowicz, Anna

    2014-01-01

    This thesis is focusing on cell-mediated induction of immune tolerance and consists of two parts. The studies described in Part I report the development of strategies for possible treatment of Inflammatory Bowel Diseases (IBD). Induction of immune tolerance, in IBD mouse model, with the use of regul

  20. Effects of alcohol consumption on the allergen-specific immune response in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linneberg, Allan; Roursgaard, Martin; Hersoug, Lars-Georg;

    2008-01-01

    There is evidence that chronic alcohol consumption impairs the T-helper 1 (Th1) lymphocyte-regulated cell-mediated immune response possibly favoring a Th2 deviation of the immune response. Moreover, a few epidemiological studies have linked alcohol consumption to allergen-specific IgE sensitization....

  1. Insect immune resistance to parasitoids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yves Carton; Marylène Poirié; Anthony J. Nappi

    2008-01-01

    Insect host-parasitoid interactions involve complex physiological, biochemical and genetic interactions. Against endoparasitoids, immune-competent hosts initiate a blood cell-mediated response that quickly destroys the intruders and envelops them in a multilayered melanotic capsule. During the past decade, considerable progress has been made in identifying some of the critical components of the host response, mainly because of the use of efficient molecular tools. This review examines some of the components of the innate immune response of Drosophila, an insect that has served as an exceptionally good experimental model for studying non-self recognition processes and immune cell signaling mechanisms. Topics considered in this review include hematopoiesis, proliferation and adhesion of hemocytes, melanogenesis and associated cytotoxic molecules, and the genetic aspects of the host-parasitoid interaction.

  2. Psychoneuroimmunology in pregnancy: immune pathways linking stress with maternal health, adverse birth outcomes, and fetal development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christian, Lisa M

    2012-01-01

    It is well-established that psychological stress promotes immune dysregulation in nonpregnant humans and animals. Stress promotes inflammation, impairs antibody responses to vaccination, slows wound healing, and suppresses cell-mediated immune function. Importantly, the immune system changes substantially to support healthy pregnancy, with attenuation of inflammatory responses and impairment of cell-mediated immunity. This adaptation is postulated to protect the fetus from rejection by the maternal immune system. Thus, stress-induced immune dysregulation during pregnancy has unique implications for both maternal and fetal health, particularly preterm birth. However, very limited research has examined stress-immune relationships in pregnancy. The application of psychoneuroimmunology research models to the perinatal period holds great promise for elucidating biological pathways by which stress may affect adverse pregnancy outcomes, maternal health, and fetal development.

  3. Signaling factors in stem cell-mediated repair of infarcted myocardium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vandervelde, S; van Luyn, MJA; Tio, RA; Harmsen, MC

    2005-01-01

    Myocardial infarction leads to scar formation and subsequent reduced cardiac performance. The ultimate therapy after myocardial infarction would pursue stem cell-based regeneration. The aim of stem cell-mediated cardiac repair embodies restoration of cardiac function by regeneration of healthy myoca

  4. Immune Suppression by Dermal Application of JP-8 Jet Fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-10-13

    transmitting the immunosuppressive signal from the skin to the immune system ( Limon -Flores, et al., Mast Cells mediate the Immune suppression Induced by...human and murine data. Nat Rev Immunol 7, 93-104. Byrne, S. N., Limon -Flores, A. Y. and Ullrich, S. E. (2008). Mast cell migration from the skin to...Ramos, G., Limon -Flores, A. Y. and Ullrich, S. E. (2007). Dermal exposure to jet fuel suppresses delayed-type hypersensitivity: a critical role

  5. Allergic contact dermatitis: immune system involvement and distinctive clinical cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imbesi, S; Minciullo, P L; Isola, S; Gangemi, S

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this review is drawing the attention to the contact dermatitis, an inflammatory skin condition due to pro-inflammatory and toxic factors able to activate the skin innate immunity (irritant contact dermatitis) or caused by a T-cell- mediated hypersensitivity reaction (allergic contact dermatitis). The immune system involvement and a variety of clinical pictures are described in order to better diagnose, prevent and treat allergic contact dermatitis.

  6. A Possible Role for CD8+ T Lymphocytes in the Cell-Mediated Pathogenesis of Pemphigus Vulgaris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federica Giurdanella

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Pemphigus vulgaris (PV is an autoimmune blistering disease whose pathogenesis involves both humoral and cell-mediated immune response. Though the pathogenetic role of autoantibodies directed against desmoglein 3 is certain, a number of other factors have been suggested to determine acantholysis in PV. In this study we examined the possible role of CD8+ T cells in the development of acantholysis by a passive transfer of PV autoantibodies using CD8 deficient mice, and we also studied the inflammatory infiltrate of PV skin lesions by immunohistochemical staining. The results of the immunohistochemical staining to study the expression of CD3, CD4, and CD8 in PV skin lesions showed that CD4+ are more expressed than CD8+ in the inflammatory infiltrate of PV lesions, confirming the data of the previous literature. The passive transfer study showed a lower incidence of pemphigus in the group of CD8 deficient mice compared to the control one of wild-type mice. These results suggest that CD8+ T cells may play a role in the pathogenesis of PV, perhaps through the Fas/FasL pathway.

  7. Paraflagellar rod proteins administered with alum and IL-12 or recombinant adenovirus expressing IL-12 generates antigen-specific responses and protective immunity in mice against Trypanosoma cruzi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrightsman, R A; Manning, J E

    2000-01-31

    Successful vaccination of mice against an otherwise lethal challenge with the Peru strain of Trypanosoma cruzi necessitates the induction of a strong cell mediated immune response. Previously, immunization of mice with the paraflagellar rod proteins from Trypanosoma cruzi90% reduction in parasitemia in immunized mice challenged with the bloodstream stage of Trypanosoma cruzi.

  8. The role of CC chemokine receptor 5 in antiviral immunity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nansen, Anneline; Christensen, Jan Pravsgaard; Andreasen, Susanne Ørding;

    2002-01-01

    that the virus-induced clonal expansion of antigen-specific T cells was augmented in CCR5(-/-) mice especially with regard to the CD4(+) subset. Despite absence of CCR5, intracerebral infection invariably resulted in lethal T cell-mediated meningitis, and quantitative and qualitative analysis of the inflammatory...... influence of CCR5 was found, not even when viral peptide was used as local trigger instead of live virus. Finally, long-term CD8(+) T cell-mediated immune surveillance was efficiently sustained in CCR5(-/-) mice. Taken together, these results indicate that expression of CCR5 is not critical for T cell...

  9. Defence mechanisms and immune evasion in the interplay between the humane immune system and Plasmodium falciparum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Theander, T G

    1992-01-01

    Immunity to P. falciparum malaria is developed as a result of long term exposure to the parasite and depends on immunological memory. The key directors in immune recognition and regulation of the immunological responses are the T-cells. It seems reasonable to propose that immunity is acquired when...... a critical mass of T-cells, recognizing relevant malaria antigens, has been developed. These T-cells mediate immunity by regulating macrophage and B-cell activity, but they may also act directly as cytotoxic cells on infected hepatocytes and through production of parasite-toxic cytokines. The potential...... with development of immunity. Several mechanisms seem to be operating. 1) Induction of the immune response to some macromolecules is avoided because the parasites are living inside host cells during part of their life cycle, and the reaction to other molecules is apparently avoided by mimicry of host molecules. 2...

  10. Oxaliplatin regulates expression of stress ligands in ovarian cancer cells and modulates their susceptibility to natural killer cell-mediated cytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siew, Yin-Yin; Neo, Soek-Ying; Yew, Hui-Chuing; Lim, Shun-Wei; Ng, Yi-Cheng; Lew, Si-Min; Seetoh, Wei-Guang; Seow, See-Voon; Koh, Hwee-Ling

    2015-12-01

    Selected cytotoxic chemicals can provoke the immune system to recognize and destroy malignant tumors. Most of the studies on immunogenic cell death are focused on the signals that operate on a series of receptors expressed by dendritic cells to induce tumor antigen-specific T-cell responses. Here, we explored the effects of oxaliplatin, an immunogenic cell death inducer, on the induction of stress ligands and promotion of natural killer (NK) cell-mediated cytotoxicity in human ovarian cancer cells. The results indicated that treatment of tumor cells with oxaliplatin induced the production of type I interferons and chemokines and enhanced the expression of major histocompatibility complex class I-related chains (MIC) A/B, UL16-binding protein (ULBP)-3, CD155 and TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL)-R1/R2. Furthermore, oxaliplatin but not cisplatin treatment enhanced susceptibility of ovarian cancer cells to NK cell-mediated cytolysis. In addition, activated NK cells completely abrogated the growth of cancer cells that were pretreated with oxaliplatin. However, cancer cells pretreated with the same concentration of oxaliplatin alone were capable of potentiating regrowth over a period of time. These results suggest an advantage in combining oxaliplatin and NK cell-based therapy in the treatment of ovarian cancer. Further investigation on such potential combination therapy is warranted.

  11. Immune response to fungal infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco, Jose L; Garcia, Marta E

    2008-09-15

    The immune mechanisms of defence against fungal infections are numerous, and range from protective mechanisms that were present early in evolution (innate immunity) to sophisticated adaptive mechanisms that are induced specifically during infection and disease (adaptive immunity). The first-line innate mechanism is the presence of physical barriers in the form of skin and mucous membranes, which is complemented by cell membranes, cellular receptors and humoral factors. There has been a debate about the relative contribution of humoral and cellular immunity to host defence against fungal infections. For a long time it was considered that cell-mediated immunity (CMI) was important, but humoral immunity had little or no role. However, it is accepted now that CMI is the main mechanism of defence, but that certain types of antibody response are protective. In general, Th1-type CMI is required for clearance of a fungal infection, while Th2 immunity usually results in susceptibility to infection. Aspergillosis, which is a disease caused by the fungus Aspergillus, has been the subject of many studies, including details of the immune response. Attempts to relate aspergillosis to some form of immunosuppression in animals, as is the case with humans, have not been successful to date. The defence against Aspergillus is based on recognition of the pathogen, a rapidly deployed and highly effective innate effector phase, and a delayed but robust adaptive effector phase. Candida albicans, part of the normal microbial flora associated with mucous surfaces, can be present as congenital candidiasis or as acquired defects of cell-mediated immunity. Resistance to this yeast is associated with Th1 CMI, whereas Th2 immunity is associated with susceptibility to systemic infection. Dermatophytes produce skin alterations in humans and other animals, and the essential role of the CMI response is to destroy the fungi and produce an immunoprotective status against re-infection. The resolution

  12. Angiogenesis in patients with psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis: cell-mediated and humoral mechanisms, its role in pathogenesis, and searching for promising therapeutic targets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.V. Korotaeva

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Modern concepts of the role of angiogenesis in pathogenesis of psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis (PsA are analyzed. The features of cell-mediated and humoral immune responses resulting in proliferation of synovial membrane and vessel overgrowth in patients with this pathology are discussed. A number of angiogenesis mediators, pro-angiogenic cytokines, growth factors, matrix metalloproteinases, etc. are shown to be involved in progression of neovascularization. The role of tumor necrosis factor α as a key therapeutic target for treatment of psoriasis and PsA is emphasized. Drugs inhibiting some stages of angiogenesis, which are either used in clinical practice or are being developed, are discussed. 

  13. Protective immunity against tuberculosis induced by vaccination with major extracellular proteins of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    OpenAIRE

    1995-01-01

    Tuberculosis, caused by the intracellular pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis, is the world's leading cause of death in humans from a single infectious agent. A safe and effective vaccine against this scourge is urgently needed. This study demonstrates that immunization with the 30-kDa major secretory protein, alone or in combination with other abundant extracellular proteins of M. tuberculosis, induces strong cell-mediated immune responses and substantial protective immunity against aerosol ...

  14. Relationships between maternal malaria and malarial immune responses in mothers and neonates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasheed, F N; Bulmer, J N; De Francisco, A;

    1995-01-01

    Immune responses of 97 Gambian women and their neonates were studied. New methods distinguished between active and previous placental malaria, were used to examine relationships between maternal malaria and neonatal immune responses. Many placentas (61%) had active or previous malarial infection...... lymphoproliferation to PPD and malarial antigens, suggesting common immunoregulation. Higher cortisol or other circulating factors in first pregnancies may be implicated. The relevance of cell-mediated malarial immune responses detected at birth remains to be established....

  15. Review: Adjuvant effects of saponins on animal immune responses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    RAJPUT Zahid Iqbal; HU Song-hua; XIAO Chen-wen; ARIJO Abdullah G.

    2007-01-01

    Vaccines require optimal adjuvants including immunopotentiator and delivery systems to offer long term protection from infectious diseases in animals and man. Initially it was believed that adjuvants are responsible for promoting strong and sustainable antibody responses. Now it has been shown that adjuvants influence the isotype and avidity of antibody and also affect the properties of cell-mediated immunity. Mostly oil emulsions, lipopolysaccharides, polymers, saponins, liposomes, cytokines,ISCOMs (immunostimulating complexes), Freund's complete adjuvant, Freund's incomplete adjuvant, alums, bacterial toxins etc.,are common adjuvants under investigation. Saponin based adjuvants have the ability to stimulate the cell mediated immune system as well as to enhance antibody production and have the advantage that only a low dose is needed for adjuvant activity. In the present study the importance of adjuvants, their role and the effect of saponin in immune system is reviewed.

  16. Genetically attenuated, P36p-deficient malarial sporozoites induce protective immunity and apoptosis of infected liver cells.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijk, M.R. van; Douradinha, B.; Franke-Fayard, B.; Heussler, V.; Dooren, M.W. van; Schaijk, B.C.L. van; Gemert, G.J.A. van; Sauerwein, R.W.; Mota, M.M.; Waters, A.P.; Janse, C.J.

    2005-01-01

    Immunization with Plasmodium sporozoites that have been attenuated by gamma-irradiation or specific genetic modification can induce protective immunity against subsequent malaria infection. The mechanism of protection is only known for radiation-attenuated sporozoites, involving cell-mediated and hu

  17. Effect of disodium cromoglycate on mast cell-mediated immediate-type allergic reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Hye-Young; Kim, Jung-Sook; An, Nyeon-Hyoung; Park, Rae-Kil; Kim, Hyung-Min

    2004-04-23

    We investigated the effect of disodium cromoglycate (DSCG) on mast cell-mediated immediate-type hypersensitivity. DSCG inhibited systemic allergic reaction induced by compound 48/80 dose-dependently. Passive cutaneous anaphylaxis was inhibited by 71.6% by oral administration of DSCG (1 g/kg). When DSCG was pretreated at concentration rang from 0.01-1000 g/kg, the serum histamine levels were reduced in a dose dependent manner. DSCG also significantly inhibited histamine release from rat peritoneal mast cell (RPMC) by compound 48/80. We confirmed that DSCG inhibited compound 48/80-induced degranulation of RPMC by alcian blue/nuclear fast red staining. In addition, DSCG showed a significant inhibitory effect on anti-dinitrophenyl IgE-mediated tumor necrosis factor-alpha production. These results indicate that DSCG inhibits mast cell-mediated immediate-type allergic reaction.

  18. Fas involvement in Ca(2+)-independent T cell-mediated cytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouvier, E; Luciani, M F; Golstein, P

    1993-01-01

    Mechanisms of T cell-mediated cytotoxicity remain poorly defined at the molecular level. To investigate some of these mechanisms, we used as target cells, on the one hand, thymocytes from lpr and gld mouse mutants, and on the other hand, L1210 cells transfected or not with the apoptosis-inducing Fas molecule. These independent mutant or transfectant-based approaches both led to the conclusion that Fas was involved in the Ca(2+)-independent component of cytotoxicity mediated by at least two sources of T cells, namely nonantigen-specific in vitro activated hybridoma cells, and antigen-specific in vivo raised peritoneal exudate lymphocytes. Thus, in these cases, T cell-mediated cytotoxicity involved transduction via Fas of the target cell death signal.

  19. Cellular immunity in Hodgkin's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Advani, S H; D'Silva, H; Gothoskar, B P; Dinshaw, K A; Nair, C N; Gopalkrishna, R; Talwalkar, G V; Desai, P B

    1979-02-01

    Defective cell-mediated immunity (CMI) occurs early in the course of Hodgkin's disease (HD) and may persist even two years after successful treatment. This has been confirmed by in vivo and in vitro tests performed on 51 untreated and 52 treated patients of HD. The grading of skin reponse in vivo to dinitrochlorobenzene (DNCB) correlated very well with the in vitro leukocyte migration inhibition (LMI) response against phytohemagglutinin (PHA). An inhibitory influence of HD patients' sera was demonstrated by LMI tests in vitro. The response of peripheral leukocytes from HD patients in the LMI tests could be augmented in vitro by addition of levamisole (an immuno-potentiator) to the culture medium, thus pointing to an intrinsic defect in Lymphocytes. The data indicate that defect at multiple sites in the immune system is responsible for persistent anergy in HD.

  20. Saos-2 cell-mediated mineralization on collagen gels: Effect of densification and bioglass incorporation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Gengbo; Pastakia, Meet; Fenn, Michael B; Kishore, Vipuil

    2016-05-01

    Plastic compression is a collagen densification process that has been widely used for the development of mechanically robust collagen-based materials. Incorporation of bioglass within plastically compressed collagen gels has been shown to mimic the microstructural properties of native bone and enhance in vitro cell-mediated mineralization. The current study seeks to decouple the effects of collagen densification and bioglass incorporation to understand the interplay between collagen packing density and presence of bioglass on cell-mediated mineralization. Saos-2 cell-mediated mineralization was assessed as a measure of the osteoconductivity of four different collagen gels: (1) uncompressed collagen gel (UC), (2) bioglass incorporated uncompressed collagen gel (UC + BG), (3) plastically compressed collagen gel (PC), and (4) bioglass incorporated plastically compressed collagen gel (PC + BG). The results indicated that collagen densification enhanced mineralization as shown by SEM, increased alkaline phosphatase activity and produced significantly higher amounts of mineralized nodules on PC gels compared to UC gels. Further, the amount of nodule formation on PC gels was significantly higher compared to UC + BG gels indicating that increase in matrix stiffness due to collagen densification had a greater effect on cell-mediated mineralization compared to bioglass incorporation into loosely packed UC gels. Incorporation of bioglass into PC gels further enhanced mineralization as evidenced by significantly larger nodule size and higher amount of mineralization on PC + BG gels compared to PC gels. In conclusion, collagen densification via plastic compression improves the osteoconductivity of collagen gels. Further, incorporation of bioglass within PC gels has an additive effect and further enhances the osteoconductivity of collagen gels.

  1. Free-living amoebae: pathogenicity and immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrante, A

    1991-01-01

    Free-living amoebae causes three well-defined disease entities: (i) primary amoebic meningoencephalitis, caused by Naegleria fowleri, (ii) granulomatous amoebic encephalitis and (iii) chronic amoebic keratitis, caused by species of Acanthamoeba. Both Naegleria infections and chronic amoebic keratitis occur in healthy individuals while granulomatous amoebic encephalitis is often associated with patients with acquired immunodeficiencies. The different pathogenic behaviour of these organisms is associated with differences in life cycle, amoeboidal locomotion, enzyme composition (such as phospholipase A), and cytotoxins, as well as natural host immunity. Immunity against these amoebae (whether acquired or natural) involves a combination of complement, antibody and cell-mediated immunity. Evidence suggests that the major mechanisms of immunity against these amoebae is activation of phagocytic cells, especially neutrophils, by lymphokines and opsonization of the amoebae by antibody which promote an antibody dependent cellular destruction of the organism.

  2. Innate immune cells in the pathogenesis of primary systemic vasculitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Durga Prasanna; Agarwal, Vikas

    2016-02-01

    Innate immune system forms the first line of defense against foreign substances. Neutrophils, eosinophils, erythrocytes, platelets, monocytes, macrophages, dendritic cells, γδ T cells, natural killer and natural killer T cells comprise the innate immune system. Genetic polymorphisms influencing the activation of innate immune cells predispose to development of vasculitis and influence its severity. Abnormally activated innate immune cells cross-talk with other cells of the innate immune system, present antigens more efficiently and activate T and B lymphocytes and cause tissue destruction via cell-mediated cytotoxicity and release of pro-inflammatory cytokines. These secreted cytokines further recruit other cells to the sites of vascular injury. They are involved in both the initiation as well as the perpetuation of vasculitis. Evidences suggest reversal of aberrant activation of immune cells in response to therapy. Understanding the role of innate immune cells in vasculitis helps understand the potential of therapeutic modulation of their activation to treat vasculitis.

  3. Dehydroeffusol effectively inhibits human gastric cancer cell-mediated vasculogenic mimicry with low toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Wenming; Meng, Mei; Zhang, Bin; Du, Longsheng; Pan, Yanyan; Yang, Ping; Gu, Zhenlun; Zhou, Quansheng, E-mail: quanshengzhou@yahoo.com; Cao, Zhifei, E-mail: hunancao@163.com

    2015-09-01

    Accumulated data has shown that various vasculogenic tumor cells, including gastric cancer cells, are able to directly form tumor blood vessels via vasculogenic mimicry, supplying oxygen and nutrients to tumors, and facilitating progression and metastasis of malignant tumors. Therefore, tumor vasculogenic mimicry is a rational target for developing novel anticancer therapeutics. However, effective antitumor vasculogenic mimicry-targeting drugs are not clinically available. In this study, we purified 2,7-dihydroxyl-1-methyl-5-vinyl-phenanthrene, termed dehydroeffusol, from the traditional Chinese medicinal herb Juncus effusus L., and found that dehydroeffusol effectively inhibited gastric cancer cell-mediated vasculogenic mimicry in vitro and in vivo with very low toxicity. Dehydroeffusol significantly suppressed gastric cancer cell adhesion, migration, and invasion. Molecular mechanistic studies revealed that dehydroeffusol markedly inhibited the expression of a vasculogenic mimicry master gene VE-cadherin and reduced adherent protein exposure on the cell surface by inhibiting gene promoter activity. In addition, dehydroeffusol significantly decreased the expression of a key vasculogenic gene matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP2) in gastric cancer cells, and diminished MMP2 protease activity. Together, our results showed that dehydroeffusol effectively inhibited gastric cancer cell-mediated vasculogenic mimicry with very low toxicity, suggesting that dehydroeffusol is a potential drug candidate for anti-gastric cancer neovascularization and anti-gastric cancer therapy. - Highlights: • Dehydroeffusol markedly inhibits gastric cancer cell-mediated vasculogenic mimicry. • Dehydroeffusol suppresses the expression of vasculogenic mimicry key gene VE-cadherin. • Dehydroeffusol decreases the MMP2 expression and activity in gastric cancer cells. • Dehydroeffusol is a potential anti-cancer drug candidate with very low toxicity.

  4. A preliminary study to evaluate the immune responses induced by immunization of dogs with inactivated Ehrlichia canis organisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunita Mahan

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Ehrlichia canis is an intracellular pathogen that causes canine monocytic ehrlichiosis. Although the role of antibody responses cannot be discounted, control of this intracellular pathogen is expected to be by cell mediated immune responses. The immune responses in dogs immunized with inactivated E. canis organisms in combination with Quil A were evaluated. Immunization provoked strong humoral and cellular immune responses, which were demonstrable by Western blotting and lymphocyte proliferation assays. By Western blotting antibodies to several immunodominant E. canis proteins were detected in serum from immunized dogs and antibody titres increased after each immunization. The complement of immunogenic proteins recognized by the antisera were similar to those recognized in serum from infected dogs. Upon challenge with live E. canis, rapid anamnestic humoral responses were detected in the serum of immunized dogs and primary antibody responses were detected in the serum from control dogs. Following immunization, a lymphocyte proliferative response (cellular immunity was detected in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMNs of immunized dogs upon stimulation with E. canis antigens. These responses were absent from non-immunized control dogs until after infection with live E. canis, when antigen specific-lymphocyte proliferation responses were also detected in the PBMNs of the control dogs. It can be thus concluded that immunization against canine monocytic ehrlichiosis may be feasible. However, the immunization regimen needs to be optimized and a detailed investigation needs to be done to determine if this regimen can prevent development of acute and chronic disease.

  5. Immune Privilege as an Intrinsic CNS Property: Astrocytes Protect the CNS against T-Cell-Mediated Neuroinflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrike Gimsa

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Astrocytes have many functions in the central nervous system (CNS. They support differentiation and homeostasis of neurons and influence synaptic activity. They are responsible for formation of the blood-brain barrier (BBB and make up the glia limitans. Here, we review their contribution to neuroimmune interactions and in particular to those induced by the invasion of activated T cells. We discuss the mechanisms by which astrocytes regulate pro- and anti-inflammatory aspects of T-cell responses within the CNS. Depending on the microenvironment, they may become potent antigen-presenting cells for T cells and they may contribute to inflammatory processes. They are also able to abrogate or reprogram T-cell responses by inducing apoptosis or secreting inhibitory mediators. We consider apparently contradictory functions of astrocytes in health and disease, particularly in their interaction with lymphocytes, which may either aggravate or suppress neuroinflammation.

  6. Combination Approaches with Immune-Checkpoint Blockade in Cancer Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swart, Maarten; Verbrugge, Inge; Beltman, Joost B.

    2016-01-01

    In healthy individuals, immune-checkpoint molecules prevent autoimmune responses and limit immune cell-mediated tissue damage. Tumors frequently exploit these molecules to evade eradication by the immune system. Over the past years, immune-checkpoint blockade of cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen-4 and programed death-1 emerged as promising strategies to activate antitumor cytotoxic T cell responses. Although complete regression and long-term survival is achieved in some patients, not all patients respond. This review describes promising, novel combination approaches involving immune-checkpoint blockade in the context of the cancer-immunity cycle, aimed at increasing response rates to the single treatments. Specifically, we discuss combinations that promote antigen release and presentation, that further amplify T cell activation, that inhibit trafficking of regulatory T cells or MSDCs, that stimulate intratumoral T cell infiltration, that increase cancer recognition by T cells, and that stimulate tumor killing. PMID:27847783

  7. Combination Approaches with Immune-Checkpoint Blockade in Cancer Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swart, Maarten; Verbrugge, Inge; Beltman, Joost B

    2016-01-01

    In healthy individuals, immune-checkpoint molecules prevent autoimmune responses and limit immune cell-mediated tissue damage. Tumors frequently exploit these molecules to evade eradication by the immune system. Over the past years, immune-checkpoint blockade of cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen-4 and programed death-1 emerged as promising strategies to activate antitumor cytotoxic T cell responses. Although complete regression and long-term survival is achieved in some patients, not all patients respond. This review describes promising, novel combination approaches involving immune-checkpoint blockade in the context of the cancer-immunity cycle, aimed at increasing response rates to the single treatments. Specifically, we discuss combinations that promote antigen release and presentation, that further amplify T cell activation, that inhibit trafficking of regulatory T cells or MSDCs, that stimulate intratumoral T cell infiltration, that increase cancer recognition by T cells, and that stimulate tumor killing.

  8. Novel mathematical models for cell-mediated cytotoxicity assays without applying enzyme kinetics but with combinations and probability: bystanders in bulk effector cells influence results of cell-mediated cytotoxicity assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takayanagi, Toshiaki

    2011-07-01

    Cell-mediated cytotoxicity assays are widely implemented to evaluate cell-mediated cytotoxic activity, and some assays are analyzed using the analogy of enzyme kinetics. In the analogy, the effector cell is regarded as the enzyme, the target cell as the substrate, the effector cell-target cell conjugate as the enzyme-substrate complex and the dead target cell as the product. However, the assumptions analogous to those of enzyme kinetics are not always true in cell-mediated cytotoxicity assays, and the parameter analogous to the Michaelis-Menten constant is not constant but is dependent on the number of effector cells. Therefore I present novel mathematical models for cell-mediated cytotoxicity assays without applying enzyme kinetics. I instead use combinations and probability, because analysis of cell-mediated cytotoxicity assays by applying enzyme kinetics seems controversial. With my original models, I demonstrate simulations of the data in previously published papers. The results are exhibited in the same forms as the corresponding data. Comparing the simulation results with the published data, the results seem to agree well with the data. From simulations of cytotoxic assays with bulk effector cells, it appears that bystanders in bulk effector cells increase both the cytotoxic activity and the motility of effector cells.

  9. Stephanthraniline A suppressed CD4(+) T cell-mediated immunological hepatitis through impairing PKCθ function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Feng-Yang; Zhou, Li-Fei; Li, Xiao-Yu; Zhao, Jia-Wen; Xu, Shi-Fang; Huang, Wen-Hai; Gao, Li-Juan; Hao, Shu-Juan; Ye, Yi-Ping; Sun, Hong-Xiang

    2016-10-15

    Stephanthraniline A (STA), a C21 steroid isolated from Stephanotis mucronata (Blanco) Merr., was previously shown to inhibit T cells activation and proliferation in vitro and in vivo. The purpose of this study was to further evaluate the in vivo immunosuppressive activity of STA and to elucidate its potential mechanisms. The results showed that pretreatment with STA significantly attenuated concanavalin A (Con A)-induced hepatitis and reduced CD4(+) T cells activation and aggregation in hepatic tissue in mice. STA directly suppressed the activation and proliferation of Con A-induced CD4(+) T cells, and inhibited NFAT, NFκB and MAPK signaling cascades in activated CD4(+) T cells in vitro. Moreover, it was proved that STA inhibited T cells activation and proliferation through proximal T cell-receptor (TCR) signaling- and Ca(2+) signaling-independent way. The molecular docking studies predicted that STA could tight bind to PKCθ via five hydrogen. The further findings indicated STA directly inhibited PKCθ kinase activity, and its phosphorylation in activated CD4(+) T cells in vitro. Collectively, the present study indicated that STA could protect against CD4(+) T cell-mediated immunological hepatitis in mice through PKCθ and its downstream NFAT, NFκB and MAPK signaling cascades. These results highlight the potential of STA as an effective leading compound for use in the treatment of CD4(+) T cell-mediated inflammatory and autoimmune diseases.

  10. NK cell-mediated killing of AML blasts. Role of histamine, monocytes and reactive oxygen metabolites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brune, M.; Mellqvist, U.H. [Sahlgren`s Univ. Hospital, Dept. of Medicine, Haematology Section, Goeteborg (Sweden); Hansson, M.; Hermodsson, S.; Hellstrand, K. [Sahlgren`s Univ. Hospital, Dept. of Virology, Goeteborg (Sweden)

    1996-10-01

    Blasts recovered from patients with acute myelogenous leukaemia (AML) were lysed by heterologeous natural killer (NK) cells treated with NK cell-activating cytokine-induced killing of AML blasts was inhibited by monocytes, recovered from peripheral blood by counterflow centrifugal elutriation. Histamine, at concentrations exceeding 0.1 {mu}M, abrogated the monocyte-induced inhibition of NK cells; thereby, histamine and IL-2 or histamine and IFN-{alpha} synergistically induced NK cell-mediated destruction of AML blasts. The effect of histamine was completely blocked by the histamine H2-receptor (H2R) antagonist ranitidine but not by its chemical control AH20399AA. Catalase, a scavenger of reactive oxygen metabolites (ROM), reversed the monocyte-induced inhibition of NK cell-mediated killing of blast cells, indicating that the inhibitory signal was mediated by products of the respiratory burst of monocytes. It is concluded that (i) monocytes inhibit anti-leukemic properties of NK cells, (ii) the inhibition is conveyed by monocyte-derived ROM, and (iii) histamine reverses the inhibitory signal and, thereby, synergizes with NK cell-activating cytokines to induce killing of AML blasts. (au) 19 refs.

  11. Cell-mediated BMP-2 liberation promotes bone formation in a mechanically unstable implant environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hägi, Tobias T; Wu, Gang; Liu, Yuelian; Hunziker, Ernst B

    2010-05-01

    The flexible alloplastic materials that are used in bone-reconstruction surgery lack the mechanical stability that is necessary for sustained bone formation, even if this process is promoted by the application of an osteogenic agent, such as BMP-2. We hypothesize that if BMP-2 is delivered gradually, in a cell-mediated manner, to the surgical site, then the scaffolding material's lack of mechanical stability becomes a matter of indifference. Flexible discs of Ethisorb were functionalized with BMP-2, which was either adsorbed directly onto the material (rapid release kinetics) or incorporated into a calcium-phosphate coating (slow release kinetics). Unstabilized and titanium-plate-stabilized samples were implanted subcutaneously in rats and retrieved up to 14 days later for a histomorphometric analysis of bone and cartilage volumes. On day 14, the bone volume associated with titanium-plate-stabilized discs bearing an adsorbed depot of BMP-2 was 10-fold higher than that associated with their mechanically unstabilized counterparts. The bone volume associated with discs bearing a coating-incorporated depot of BMP-2 was similar in the mechanically unstabilized and titanium-plate-stabilized groups, and comparable to that associated with the titanium-plate-stabilized discs bearing an adsorbed depot of BMP-2. Hence, if an osteogenic agent is delivered in a cell-mediated manner (via coating degradation), ossification can be promoted even within a mechanically unstable environment.

  12. Immune correlates for dengue vaccine development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srikiatkhachorn, Anon; Yoon, In-Kyu

    2016-01-01

    Dengue virus is the leading cause of vector-borne viral disease with four serotypes in circulation. Vaccine development has been complicated by the potential for both protection and disease enhancement during heterologous infection. Secondary infection triggers cross-reactive immune memory responses that have varying functional and epitope specificities that determine protection or risk. Strongly neutralizing antibodies to quaternary epitopes may be especially important for virus neutralization. Cell-mediated immunity dominated by Th1 functions may also play an important role. Determining an immune correlate of protection or risk would be highly beneficial for vaccine development but is hampered by mechanistic uncertainties and assay limitations. Clinical efficacy trials and human infection models along with a systems approach may provide future opportunities to elucidate such correlates.

  13. Effects of Long-Term Immunization with Multiple Antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-01-01

    such as the Guillain - barre syndrome, may occur by a mechanism not yet clarified. The administration of vaccines containing viable agents can result in...mainly from a cell-mediated immunologic reaction directed at peripheral nervous tissue. However, the observation that Landry- Guillain - Barr ( syndrome...complex reaction. Two reports of patients with Landry- Guillain - Barr ( syndrome and immune-complex glomerulonedphritis suggest cellular sen- sitivity to

  14. The Qa-1 Dependent CD8+ T Cell Mediated Regulatory Pathway

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong Jiang

    2005-01-01

    The immune system has evolved a variety of regulatory mechanisms to ensure the peripheral self-tolerance as well as the optimal capacity to elicit effective anti-infection immunity. At present, there is no satisfactory conceptual framework to explain how the peripheral immunity is regulated at a biological system level, which enables the immune system to perform its essential functions to mount effective immunity to virtually any foreign antigens but avoid harmful immune responses to self. In this regard, during the past few years, an "affinity/avidity model of peripheral T cell regulation" has been proposed and tested, which opens up a new paradigm to understand how the peripheral immunity, to both self and foreign antigens, is regulated. The paradigm is based on the discovery of a subset CD8+ T cells with TCRs which specifically recognize a unique set of self-peptides presented by the MHC class Ib molecule Qa-1 differentially expressed on T cells as a function of the affinity/avidity of T cell activation.These Qa-1 restricted CD8+ T cells represent an example of how the immune system utilizes a unified mechanism to regulate adaptive immunity to both self and foreign antigens. Thus, by selectively down-regulating T cells of intermediate affinity/avidity, to any antigens, the immune system controls the adaptive immunity without the necessity to distinguish self from non-self in the periphery at the level of T cell regulation.

  15. CAF01 potentiates immune responses and efficacy of an inactivated influenza vaccine in ferrets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martel, Cyril Jean-Marie; Agger, Else Marie; Poulsen, Julie Juul;

    2011-01-01

    Trivalent inactivated vaccines (TIV) against influenza are given to 350 million people every year. Most of these are non-adjuvanted vaccines whose immunogenicity and protective efficacy are considered suboptimal. Commercially available non-adjuvanted TIV are known to elicit mainly a humoral immune...... response, whereas the induction of cell-mediated immune responses is negligible. Recently, a cationic liposomal adjuvant (dimethyldioctadecylammonium/trehalose 6,6'-dibehenate, CAF01) was developed. CAF01 has proven to enhance both humoral and cell-mediated immune responses to a number of different...... experimental vaccine candidates. In this study, we compared the immune responses in ferrets to a commercially available TIV with the responses to the same vaccine mixed with the CAF01 adjuvant. Two recently circulating H1N1 viruses were used as challenge to test the vaccine efficacy. CAF01 improved...

  16. Immune response

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and tetanus antitoxin are examples of passive immunization. BLOOD COMPONENTS The immune system includes certain types of white ... lymphocytes develop, they normally learn to tell the difference between your own body tissues and substances that ...

  17. The innate immune playbook for restricting West Nile virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quicke, Kendra M; Suthar, Mehul S

    2013-10-30

    West Nile virus (WNV) is an emerging mosquito-borne flavivirus that causes annual epidemics of encephalitic disease throughout the world. Despite the ongoing risk to public health, no approved vaccines or therapies exist for use in humans to prevent or combat WNV infection. The innate immune response is critical for controlling WNV replication, limiting virus-induced pathology, and programming protective humoral and cell-mediated immunity to WNV infection. The RIG-I like receptors, Toll-like receptors, and Nod-like receptors detect and respond to WNV by inducing a potent antiviral defense program, characterized by production of type I IFN, IL-1β and expression of antiviral effector genes. Recent research efforts have focused on uncovering the mechanisms of innate immune sensing, antiviral effector genes that inhibit WNV, and countermeasures employed by WNV to antagonize innate immune cellular defenses. In this review, we highlight the major research findings pertaining to innate immune regulation of WNV infection.

  18. Mechanisms of protective immunity in Hymenolepis nana/mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bortoletti, G; Gabriele, F; Palmas, C

    1992-12-01

    Some immunological and parasitological aspects related to the infection of Hymenolepsis nana in mice are summarized in this review, focusing on the immune effector mechanisms involved in this host/parasite relationship. H. nana is a small cestode tapeworm of man and mice. A primary egg-infection determines within few days a strong immunity. Immunity elicited by low-level primary infection is effective as a high-level infection. The protective role of both humoral and cell-mediated immunity is summarized. The histological findings demonstrate that eosinophils and mast-cells are implicated as effector cells. This review is an attempt to re-examine, at low-level infection, the immune mechanisms in H. nana/mouse model.

  19. Understanding the vertebrate immune system: insights from the reptilian perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, L M; Vogel, L A; Bowden, R M

    2010-03-01

    Reptiles are ectothermic amniotes, providing the key link between ectothermic anamniotic fishes and amphibians, and endothermic amniotic birds and mammals. A greater understanding of reptilian immunity will provide important insights into the evolutionary history of vertebrate immunity as well as the growing field of eco-immunology. Like mammals, reptile immunity is complex and involves innate, cell-mediated and humoral compartments but, overall, there is considerably less known about immune function in reptiles. We review the current literature on each branch of the reptilian immune system, placing this information in context to other vertebrates. Further, we identify key areas that are prime for research as well as areas that are lagging because of lack of reagents in non-model systems.

  20. A non-surgical approach for male germ cell mediated gene transmission through transgenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usmani, Abul; Ganguli, Nirmalya; Sarkar, Hironmoy; Dhup, Suveera; Batta, Suryaprakash R; Vimal, Manoj; Ganguli, Nilanjana; Basu, Sayon; Nagarajan, P; Majumdar, Subeer S

    2013-01-01

    Microinjection of foreign DNA in male pronucleus by in-vitro embryo manipulation is difficult but remains the method of choice for generating transgenic animals. Other procedures, including retroviral and embryonic stem cell mediated transgenesis are equally complicated and have limitations. Although our previously reported technique of testicular transgenesis circumvented several limitations, it involved many steps, including surgery and hemicastration, which carried risk of infection and impotency. We improved this technique further, into a two step non-surgical electroporation procedure, for making transgenic mice. In this approach, transgene was delivered inside both testes by injection and modified parameters of electroporation were used for in-vivo gene integration in germ cells. Using variety of constructs, germ cell integration of the gene and its transmission in progeny was confirmed by PCR, slot blot and immunohistochemical analysis. This improved technique is efficient, requires substantially less time and can be easily adopted by various biomedical researchers.

  1. Cell-mediated mutagenesis and cell transformation of mammalian cells by chemical carcinogens. [Rats, hamsters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huberman, E.; Langenbach, R.

    1977-01-01

    We have developed a cell-mediated mutagenesis assay in which cells with the appropriate markers for mutagenesis are co-cultivated with either lethally irradiated rodent embryonic cells that can metabolize carcinogenic hydrocarbons or with primary rat liver cells that can metabolize chemicals carcinogenic to the liver. During co-cultivation, the reactive metabolites of the procarcinogen appear to be transmitted to the mutable cells and induce mutations in them. Assays of this type make it possible to demonstrate a relationship between carcinogenic potency of the chemicals and their ability to induce mutations in mammalian cells. In addition, by simultaneously comparing the frequencies of transformation and mutation induced in normal diploid hamster cells by benzo(a)pyrene (BP) and one of its metabolites, it is possible to estimate the genetic target size for cell transformation in vitro.

  2. Cell-mediated infection of cervix derived epithelial cells with primary isolates of human immunodeficiency virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, X; Phillips, D M

    1996-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated that HIV-infected transformed T-cells or monocytes adhere to monolayers of CD4-negative epithelial cells. Adhesion is soon followed by budding of HIV from infected mononuclear cells onto the surface of epithelial cells. Epithelial cells subsequently take up virus and become productively infected. Based on these findings, we proposed that sexual transmission of HIV may involve cell-mediated infection of intact mucosal epithelia of the urogenital tract. However, it has become increasingly clear that primary cells and HIV strains isolated from patients are more appropriate models for HIV infection than established cell lines and lab strains of virus. In the studies described here, we infected cervix-derived epithelial monolayers with primary monocytes infected with patient isolates of non-syncytial inducing (NSI) macrophage-tropic strains of HIV. Under the culture conditions employed, HIV-infected primary monocytes do not remain adherent to the apical surface of the epithelium, as did HIV-infected transformed cells. Instead, following adherence, the primary cells migrate between epithelial cells. Virus is secreted from a pseudopod as HIV-infected primary monocytes pass between cells of the epithelium. Productive infection of the epithelium was detected by p24 ELISA and PCR Southern blot analysis. Infection can be blocked by sera from HIV-seropositive individuals or by certain sulfated polysaccharides. These findings support the supposition that transmission of HIV may occur via cell-mediated infection of intact epithelia. The observations also hint at the possibility that-HIV-infected monocyte/macrophages in semen or cervical-vaginal secretions could cross intact epithelia by passing between epithelial cells. Blocking studies suggest that it may be possible to inhibit sexual transmission of HIV either by antibodies in genital tract secretions or by a topical formulation containing certain sulfated polysaccharides.

  3. Susceptibility to T cell-mediated liver injury is enhanced in asialoglycoprotein receptor-deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McVicker, Benita L; Thiele, Geoffrey M; Casey, Carol A; Osna, Natalia A; Tuma, Dean J

    2013-05-01

    T cell activation and associated pro-inflammatory cytokine production is a pathological feature of inflammatory liver disease. It is also known that liver injury is associated with marked impairments in the function of many hepatic proteins including a hepatocyte-specific binding protein, the asialoglycoprotein receptor (ASGPR). Recently, it has been suggested that hepatic ASGPRs may play an important role in the physiological regulation of T lymphocytes, leading to our hypothesis that ASGPR defects correlate with inflammatory-mediated events in liver diseases. Therefore, in this study we investigated whether changes in hepatocellular ASGPR expression were related to the dysregulation of intrahepatic T lymphocytes and correlate with the development of T-cell mediated hepatitis. Mice lacking functional ASGPRs (receptor-deficient, RD), and wild-type (WT) controls were intravenously injected with T-cell mitogens, Concanavalin A (Con A) or anti-CD3 antibody. As a result of T cell mitogen treatment, RD mice lacking hepatic ASGPRs displayed enhancements in liver pathology, transaminase activities, proinflammatory cytokine expression, and caspase activation compared to that observed in normal WT mice. Furthermore, FACS analysis demonstrated that T-cell mitogen administration resulted in a significant rise in the percentage of CD8+ lymphocytes present in the livers of RD animals versus WT mice. Since these two mouse strains differ only in whether they express the hepatic ASGPR, it can be concluded that proper ASGPR function exerts a protective effect against T cell mediated hepatitis and that impairments to this hepatic receptor could be related to the accumulation of cytotoxic T cells that are observed in inflammatory liver diseases.

  4. Inhibitory effects of atractylone on mast cell-mediated allergic reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Na-Ra; Moon, Phil-Dong; Nam, Sun-Young; Ryu, Ka-Jung; Yoou, Myoung-Schook; Choi, Jung-Hye; Hwang, Sung-Yeoun; Kim, Hyung-Min; Jeong, Hyun-Ja

    2016-10-25

    This study investigated a salutary effect of atractylone (Atr) which is an active constituent of Pyeongwee-San (KMP6) on mast cell-mediated allergic reactions. Our previous report indicated that KMP6 regulated allergic reactions. Thus, this study sought to determine the potential of Atr in vitro models, compound 48/80-stimulated rat peritoneal mast cells (RPMCs), phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) plus A23187-stimulated human mast cell line (HMC-1) cells, and stem cell factor (SCF)-stimulated RPMCs as well as in vivo models, IgE-mediated passive cutaneous anaphylaxis (PCA), compound 48/80-induced systemic anaphylaxis, and compound 48/80-induced ear swelling. The results showed that Atr inhibited compound 48/80-induced RPMCs degranulation, intracellular calcium level, tryptase release, and histamine release. Atr inhibited the up-regulation of p56(lck) tyrosine kinase activity by compound 48/80. And Atr reduced tryptase and histamine releases from PMA plus A23187-stimulated HMC-1 cells. In addition, Atr decreased histidine decarboxylase activity and expression in the activated HMC-1 cells. Atr inhibited SCF-induced morphological alteration and filamentous actin formation in RPMCs. Atr improved IgE-induced PCA reaction by decreasing the levels of histamine, IgE, interleukin (IL)-4, IL-5, IL-6, vascular endothelial growth factor, and IL-13 in the serum of PCA-induced mice. Furthermore, Atr mitigated compound 48/80-induced systemic anaphylaxis and ear swelling. Taken together, these results of this study indicate that Atr regulates the degranulation of mast cell, proving its potential in the treatment of mast cell-mediated allergic reactions.

  5. A convergent and essential interneuron pathway for Mauthner-cell-mediated escapes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacoste, Alix M B; Schoppik, David; Robson, Drew N; Haesemeyer, Martin; Portugues, Ruben; Li, Jennifer M; Randlett, Owen; Wee, Caroline L; Engert, Florian; Schier, Alexander F

    2015-06-01

    The Mauthner cell (M-cell) is a command-like neuron in teleost fish whose firing in response to aversive stimuli is correlated with short-latency escapes [1-3]. M-cells have been proposed as evolutionary ancestors of startle response neurons of the mammalian reticular formation [4], and studies of this circuit have uncovered important principles in neurobiology that generalize to more complex vertebrate models [3]. The main excitatory input was thought to originate from multisensory afferents synapsing directly onto the M-cell dendrites [3]. Here, we describe an additional, convergent pathway that is essential for the M-cell-mediated startle behavior in larval zebrafish. It is composed of excitatory interneurons called spiral fiber neurons, which project to the M-cell axon hillock. By in vivo calcium imaging, we found that spiral fiber neurons are active in response to aversive stimuli capable of eliciting escapes. Like M-cell ablations, bilateral ablations of spiral fiber neurons largely eliminate short-latency escapes. Unilateral spiral fiber neuron ablations shift the directionality of escapes and indicate that spiral fiber neurons excite the M-cell in a lateralized manner. Their optogenetic activation increases the probability of short-latency escapes, supporting the notion that spiral fiber neurons help activate M-cell-mediated startle behavior. These results reveal that spiral fiber neurons are essential for the function of the M-cell in response to sensory cues and suggest that convergent excitatory inputs that differ in their input location and timing ensure reliable activation of the M-cell, a feedforward excitatory motif that may extend to other neural circuits.

  6. Ibrutinib interferes with the cell-mediated anti-tumor activities of therapeutic CD20 antibodies: implications for combination therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Da Roit, F.; Engelberts, P. J.; Taylor, R. P.

    2015-01-01

    -treatment with ibrutinib did not inhibit complement activation or complement-mediated lysis. In contrast, ibrutinib strongly inhibited all cell-mediated mechanisms induced by anti-CD20 antibodies rituximab, ofatumumab or obinutuzumab, either in purified systems or whole blood assays. Activation of natural killer cells...

  7. A 17 year experience in perioperative anaphylaxis 1998-2015: harmonising optimal detection of mast cell mediator release.

    OpenAIRE

    Egner, W.; Sargur, R.; Shrimpton, A.; York, M.; Green, K

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Sheffield NARCOS (National Adverse Reactions Advisory Service) investigates suspected perioperative anaesthetic reactions using serial tryptase, urinary methylhistamine and clinical information. Further recommendations for additional allergy clinic assessment are provided. OBJECTIVE: To establish a robustly measurable protocol for identifying mast cell mediator (MMR) release in this cohort. To compare these thresholds with previous suggested thresholds and algorithms. METHOD: A re...

  8. A prospective study of the influence of a thalassaemia on morbidity from malaria and immune responses to defined Plasmodium falciparum antigens in Gambian children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Allen, S J; Rowe, P; Allsopp, C E

    1993-01-01

    and morbidity from malaria determined by weekly surveillance were similar in children with alpha thalassaemia and in those with a normal alpha-globin genotype. However, the small number of children who carried both alpha thalassaemia and the sickle cell trait had fewer clinical episodes of malaria than children...... with the sickle cell trait alone. Specific antibody responses and cell-mediated immune responses in vitro to defined Plasmodium falciparum antigens were measured in children participating in the study. In general, there was no evidence of an increased prevalence or intensity of humoral or cell-mediated immune...

  9. Protective immune responses in lawsonia intracellularis infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cordes, Henriette; Riber, Ulla; Boutrup, Torsten;

    and no increase in acute phase response after challenge with a pathogenic isolate. Here we show results from measurements of serology as well as cell-mediated immune responses from this experiment. We found that Lawsonia-specific IgA peaked in serum around day 17-24 after a primary infection in experimentally......Lawsonia intracellularis is the cause of porcine proliferative enteropathy, one of the major causes of antibiotics usage in modern pig production. L. intracellularis is an obligate intracellular bacterium preferable infecting epithelial cells of pigs intestine. We have demonstrated earlier......, but exhibited a high, but short-lasting peak after re-infection. Specific IFN responses were also measured using a whole blood IFN-γ assay. These were very high in challenge infected and re-infected animals as compared to controls. These specific immune responses may contribute to the explanation of mechanisms...

  10. HIV-1 DNA vaccine with adjuvant cytokines induces specific immune responses against HIV-1 infection in mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Fu-xiang; SUN Yong-tao; WANG Lin-xu; LIU Juan

    2006-01-01

    @@ There is mounting evidence that the induction of strong mucosal and cell-mediated immune responses is key element to consider in constructing efficacious HIV-1 vaccine. Therapeutic vaccines that induce high levels of CTL specific to HIV are currently being developed worldwide.

  11. Immune Responses of Dairy Cattle to Parainfluenza-3 Virus in Intranasal Infectious Bovine Rhinotracheitis-Parainfluenza-3 Virus Vaccines

    OpenAIRE

    Burroughs, A.L.; Morrill, J L; Bostwick, J.L.; Ridley, R K; Fryer, H. C.

    1982-01-01

    Two hundred and fifty dairy heifers were vaccinated at three to six months of age with an intranasal infectious bovine rhinotracheitis-parainfluenza-3 vaccine. Eighteen additional heifers were tested prior to vaccination and again three to four weeks after vaccination. Neither cell-mediated nor humoral immunity was significantly raised to parainfluenza-3 virus in either group of cattle.

  12. Intramuscular Priming and Intranasal Boosting Induce Strong Genital Immunity Through Secretory IgA in Minipigs Infected with Chlamydia trachomatis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lorenzen, Emma; Follmann, Frank; Bøje, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    with a reproductive system very similar to humans. The vaccine was composed of C. trachomatis subunit antigens formulated in the Th1/Th17 promoting CAF01 adjuvant. IM priming immunizations with CAF01 induced a significant cell-mediated interferon gamma and interleukin 17A response and a significant systemic high...

  13. Immune System

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuper, C.F.; Ruehl-Fehlert, C.; Elmore, S.A.; Parker, G.A.

    2013-01-01

    Cells of the immune system are found in every organ, from the classic lymphoid organs to tissues such as liver, mucosae, and omental adipose tissue. Toxicity to the immune system may be from a direct or indirect injury to lymphoid organs. The morphological responses range from lymphocyte depletion t

  14. Immune System

    Science.gov (United States)

    A properly functioning immune system is essential to good health. It defends the body against infectious agents and in some cases tumor cells. Individuals with immune deficiencies resulting from genetic defects, diseases (e.g., AIDS, leukemia), or drug therapies are more suscepti...

  15. Hepatic non-parenchymal cells and extracellular matrix participate in oval cell-mediated liver regeneration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Zhang; Xiao-Ping Chen; Wan-Guang Zhang; Feng Zhang; Shuai Xiang; Han-Hua Dong; Lei Zhang

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To elucidate the interaction between nonparenchymal cells, extracellular matrix and oval cells during the restituting process of liver injury induced by partial hepatectomy (PH). METHODS: We examined the localization of oval cells, non-parenchymal cells, and the extracellular matrix components using immunohistochemical and double immunofluorescent analysis during the proliferation and differentiation of oval cells in N-2-acetylaminofluorene (2-AAF)/PH rat model. RESULTS: By day 2 after PH, small oval cells began to proliferate around the portal area. Most of stellate cells and laminin were present along the hepatic sinusoids in the periportal area. Kupffer cells and fibronectin markedly increased in the whole hepatic lobule. From day 4 to 9, oval cells spread further into hepatic parenchyma, closely associated with stellate cells, fibronectin and laminin. Kupffer cells admixed with oval cells by day 6 and then decreased in the periportal zone. From day 12 to 15, most of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs), laminin and fibronectin located around the small hepatocyte nodus, and minority of them appeared in the nodus. Kupffer cells were mainly limited in the pericentral sinusoids. After day 18, the normal liver lobule structures began to recover.CONCLUSION: Local hepatic microenvironment may participate in the oval cell-mediated liver regeneration through the cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions.

  16. Micro-RNA dysregulation in multiple sclerosis favours pro-inflammatory T-cell-mediated autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerau-de-Arellano, Mireia; Smith, Kristen M; Godlewski, Jakub; Liu, Yue; Winger, Ryan; Lawler, Sean E; Whitacre, Caroline C; Racke, Michael K; Lovett-Racke, Amy E

    2011-12-01

    Pro-inflammatory T cells mediate autoimmune demyelination in multiple sclerosis. However, the factors driving their development and multiple sclerosis susceptibility are incompletely understood. We investigated how micro-RNAs, newly described as post-transcriptional regulators of gene expression, contribute to pathogenic T-cell differentiation in multiple sclerosis. miR-128 and miR-27b were increased in naïve and miR-340 in memory CD4(+) T cells from patients with multiple sclerosis, inhibiting Th2 cell development and favouring pro-inflammatory Th1 responses. These effects were mediated by direct suppression of B lymphoma Mo-MLV insertion region 1 homolog (BMI1) and interleukin-4 (IL4) expression, resulting in decreased GATA3 levels, and a Th2 to Th1 cytokine shift. Gain-of-function experiments with these micro-RNAs enhanced the encephalitogenic potential of myelin-specific T cells in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. In addition, treatment of multiple sclerosis patient T cells with oligonucleotide micro-RNA inhibitors led to the restoration of Th2 responses. These data illustrate the biological significance and therapeutic potential of these micro-RNAs in regulating T-cell phenotypes in multiple sclerosis.

  17. In vitro cell-mediated cytotoxicity to the male specific (H-Y) antigen in man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singal, D P; Wadia, Y J; Naipaul, N

    1981-02-01

    We have studied the role of HLA antigens in restricting specificity of the cytotoxic lymphocytes (CTL). CTL's developed between female responder/male stimulator combinations, were tested for H-Y antigen killing in cell-mediated lympholysis. Two CTL's demonstrated HLA-restricted H-Y cytotoxicity. In both instances, the responders are married parous females and both are positive for HLA-A2. These CTL's lysed target cells from donors who are either positive for the sensitizing HLA antigen or who are HLA-A2-positive males. On the other hand, one CTL where the HLA-A2-positive responder is not a parous female did not show HLA-restricted H-Y cytotoxicity. Also, CTL's where responders do not carry HLA-A2 showed no H-Y cytotoxicity. The data suggest that pregnancy(ies) is sufficient in itself to induce HLA-restricted H-Y cytotoxicity and that it can be recalled by in vitro stimulation with lymphocytes from an unrelated male donor. Also, in these studies HLA-restricted H-Y cytotoxicity was obtained only with targets that shared HLA-A2 with the effectors.

  18. Activation by SLAM Family Receptors Contributes to NK Cell Mediated "Missing-Self" Recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alari-Pahissa, Elisenda; Grandclément, Camille; Jeevan-Raj, Beena; Leclercq, Georges; Veillette, André; Held, Werner

    2016-01-01

    Natural Killer (NK) cells attack normal hematopoietic cells that do not express inhibitory MHC class I (MHC-I) molecules, but the ligands that activate NK cells remain incompletely defined. Here we show that the expression of the Signaling Lymphocyte Activation Molecule (SLAM) family members CD48 and Ly9 (CD229) by MHC-I-deficient tumor cells significantly contributes to NK cell activation. When NK cells develop in the presence of T cells or B cells that lack inhibitory MHC-I but express activating CD48 and Ly9 ligands, the NK cells' ability to respond to MHC-I-deficient tumor cells is severely compromised. In this situation, NK cells express normal levels of the corresponding activation receptors 2B4 (CD244) and Ly9 but these receptors are non-functional. This provides a partial explanation for the tolerance of NK cells to MHC-I-deficient cells in vivo. Activating signaling via 2B4 is restored when MHC-I-deficient T cells are removed, indicating that interactions with MHC-I-deficient T cells dominantly, but not permanently, impair the function of the 2B4 NK cell activation receptor. These data identify an important role of SLAM family receptors for NK cell mediated "missing-self" reactivity and suggest that NK cell tolerance in MHC-I mosaic mice is in part explained by an acquired dysfunction of SLAM family receptors.

  19. Paper-based bioactive scaffolds for stem cell-mediated bone tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyun-Ji; Yu, Seung Jung; Yang, Kisuk; Jin, Yoonhee; Cho, Ann-Na; Kim, Jin; Lee, Bora; Yang, Hee Seok; Im, Sung Gap; Cho, Seung-Woo

    2014-12-01

    Bioactive, functional scaffolds are required to improve the regenerative potential of stem cells for tissue reconstruction and functional recovery of damaged tissues. Here, we report a paper-based bioactive scaffold platform for stem cell culture and transplantation for bone reconstruction. The paper scaffolds are surface-engineered by an initiated chemical vapor deposition process for serial coating of a water-repellent and cell-adhesive polymer film, which ensures the long-term stability in cell culture medium and induces efficient cell attachment. The prepared paper scaffolds are compatible with general stem cell culture and manipulation techniques. An optimal paper type is found to provide structural, physical, and mechanical cues to enhance the osteogenic differentiation of human adipose-derived stem cells (hADSCs). A bioactive paper scaffold significantly enhances in vivo bone regeneration of hADSCs in a critical-sized calvarial bone defect. Stacking the paper scaffolds with osteogenically differentiated hADSCs and human endothelial cells resulted in vascularized bone formation in vivo. Our study suggests that paper possesses great potential as a bioactive, functional, and cost-effective scaffold platform for stem cell-mediated bone tissue engineering. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study reporting the feasibility of a paper material for stem cell application to repair tissue defects.

  20. Xanthohumol attenuates tumour cell-mediated breaching of the lymphendothelial barrier and prevents intravasation and metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viola, Katharina; Kopf, Sabine; Rarova, Lucie; Jarukamjorn, Kanokwan; Kretschy, Nicole; Teichmann, Mathias; Vonach, Caroline; Atanasov, Atanas G; Giessrigl, Benedikt; Huttary, Nicole; Raab, Ingrid; Krieger, Sigurd; Strnad, Miroslav; de Martin, Rainer; Saiko, Philipp; Szekeres, Thomas; Knasmüller, Siegfried; Dirsch, Verena M; Jäger, Walter; Grusch, Michael; Dolznig, Helmut; Mikulits, Wolfgang; Krupitza, Georg

    2013-07-01

    Health beneficial effects of xanthohumol have been reported, and basic research provided evidence for anti-cancer effects. Furthermore, xanthohumol was shown to inhibit the migration of endothelial cells. Therefore, this study investigated the anti-metastatic potential of xanthohumol. MCF-7 breast cancer spheroids which are placed on lymphendothelial cells (LECs) induce "circular chemorepellent-induced defects" (CCIDs) in the LEC monolayer resembling gates for intravasating tumour bulks at an early step of lymph node colonisation. NF-κB reporter-, EROD-, SELE-, 12(S)-HETE- and adhesion assays were performed to investigate the anti-metastatic properties of xanthohumol. Western blot analyses were used to elucidate the mechanisms inhibiting CCID formation. Xanthohumol inhibited the activity of CYP, SELE and NF-kB and consequently, the formation of CCIDs at low micromolar concentrations. More specifically, xanthohumol affected ICAM-1 expression and adherence of MCF-7 cells to LECs, which is a prerequisite for CCID formation. Furthermore, markers of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and of cell mobility such as paxillin, MCL2 and S100A4 were suppressed by xanthohumol. Xanthohumol attenuated tumour cell-mediated defects at the lymphendothelial barrier and inhibited EMT-like effects thereby providing a mechanistic explanation for the anti-intravasative/anti-metastatic properties of xanthohumol.

  1. Fibrocyte-like cells mediate acquired resistance to anti-angiogenic therapy with bevacizumab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsuhashi, Atsushi; Goto, Hisatsugu; Saijo, Atsuro; Trung, Van The; Aono, Yoshinori; Ogino, Hirokazu; Kuramoto, Takuya; Tabata, Sho; Uehara, Hisanori; Izumi, Keisuke; Yoshida, Mitsuteru; Kobayashi, Hiroaki; Takahashi, Hidefusa; Gotoh, Masashi; Kakiuchi, Soji; Hanibuchi, Masaki; Yano, Seiji; Yokomise, Hiroyasu; Sakiyama, Shoji; Nishioka, Yasuhiko

    2015-12-04

    Bevacizumab exerts anti-angiogenic effects in cancer patients by inhibiting vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). However, its use is still limited due to the development of resistance to the treatment. Such resistance can be regulated by various factors, although the underlying mechanisms remain incompletely understood. Here we show that bone marrow-derived fibrocyte-like cells, defined as alpha-1 type I collagen-positive and CXCR4-positive cells, contribute to the acquired resistance to bevacizumab. In mouse models of malignant pleural mesothelioma and lung cancer, fibrocyte-like cells mediate the resistance to bevacizumab as the main producer of fibroblast growth factor 2. In clinical specimens of lung cancer, the number of fibrocyte-like cells is significantly increased in bevacizumab-treated tumours, and correlates with the number of treatment cycles, as well as CD31-positive vessels. Our results identify fibrocyte-like cells as a promising cell biomarker and a potential therapeutic target to overcome resistance to anti-VEGF therapy.

  2. The Role of Non-specific and Specific Immune Systems in Poultry against Newcastle Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dyah Ayu Hewajuli

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Newcastle disease (ND is caused by avian paramyxovirus-1 which belong to Avulavirus genus and Paramyxoviridae family. The birds have abnormalities in humoral (bursa fabricius and cellular (thymus and spleen lymphoid organs. Lesions decrease the immune system. Immune system consists of non-specific and specific immune systems. The main components of non-specific immunity are physical and chemical barrier (feather and skin or mucosa, phagocytic cells (macrophages and natural killer, protein complement and the mediator of inflammation and cytokines. Interferons (IFNs belong to a group of cytokines that play a major role in the nonspecific or innate (natural immunity. The virulent ND virus encodes protein of V gene can be suppressed IFN type I. This leads to non-specific immune system fail to respond to the virulent strains resulting in severe pathogenicity. The defense mechanism of the host is replaced by specific immunity (adaptive immunity when natural immunity fails to overcome the infection. The specific immune system consists of humoral mediated immunity (HMI and cell-mediated immunity (CMI. The cells of immune system that react specifically with the antigen are B lymphocytes producing the antibodies, T lymphocytes that regulate the synthesis of antibodies and T cells as effector or the direct cytotoxic cells. Both non-specific and specific immunities are complementary against the invasion of ND virus in the birds. The objective of this article is to discuss the role of non specific and specific immune system in ND.

  3. Distinct effects on diversifying selection by two mechanisms of immunity against Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Li

    Full Text Available Antigenic variation to evade host immunity has long been assumed to be a driving force of diversifying selection in pathogens. Colonization by Streptococcus pneumoniae, which is central to the organism's transmission and therefore evolution, is limited by two arms of the immune system: antibody- and T cell- mediated immunity. In particular, the effector activity of CD4(+ T(H17 cell mediated immunity has been shown to act in trans, clearing co-colonizing pneumococci that do not bear the relevant antigen. It is thus unclear whether T(H17 cell immunity allows benefit of antigenic variation and contributes to diversifying selection. Here we show that antigen-specific CD4(+ T(H17 cell immunity almost equally reduces colonization by both an antigen-positive strain and a co-colonized, antigen-negative strain in a mouse model of pneumococcal carriage, thus potentially minimizing the advantage of escape from this type of immunity. Using a proteomic screening approach, we identified a list of candidate human CD4(+ T(H17 cell antigens. Using this list and a previously published list of pneumococcal Antibody antigens, we bioinformatically assessed the signals of diversifying selection among the identified antigens compared to non-antigens. We found that Antibody antigen genes were significantly more likely to be under diversifying selection than the T(H17 cell antigen genes, which were indistinguishable from non-antigens. Within the Antibody antigens, epitopes recognized by human antibodies showed stronger evidence of diversifying selection. Taken together, the data suggest that T(H17 cell-mediated immunity, one form of T cell immunity that is important to limit carriage of antigen-positive pneumococcus, favors little diversifying selection in the targeted antigen. The results could provide new insight into pneumococcal vaccine design.

  4. CTA1-DD adjuvant promotes strong immunity against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 envelope glycoproteins following mucosal immunization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundling, Christopher; Schön, Karin; Mörner, Andreas; Forsell, Mattias N E; Wyatt, Richard T; Thorstensson, Rigmor; Karlsson Hedestam, Gunilla B; Lycke, Nils Y

    2008-12-01

    Strategies to induce potent and broad antibody responses against the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) envelope glycoproteins (Env) at both systemic and mucosal sites represent a central goal for HIV-1 vaccine development. Here, we show that the non-toxic CTA1-DD adjuvant promoted mucosal and systemic humoral and cell-mediated immune responses following intranasal (i.n.) immunizations with trimeric or monomeric forms of HIV-1 Env in mice and in non-human primates. Env-specific IgG subclasses in the serum of immunized mice reflected a balanced Th1/Th2 type of response. Strikingly, i.n. immunizations with Env and the CTA1-DD adjuvant induced substantial levels of mucosal anti-Env IgA in bronchial alveolar lavage and also detectable levels in vaginal secretions. By contrast, parenteral immunizations of Env formulated in Ribi did not stimulate mucosal IgA responses, while the two adjuvants induced a similar distribution of Env-specific IgG-subclasses in serum. A single parenteral boost with Env in Ribi adjuvant into mice previously primed i.n. with Env and CTA1-DD, augmented the serum anti-Env IgG levels to similar magnitudes as those observed after three intraperitoneal immunizations with Env in Ribi. The augmenting potency of CTA1-DD was similar to that of LTK63 or CpG oligodeoxynucleotides (ODN). However, in contrast to CpG ODN, the effect of CTA1-DD and LTK63 appeared to be independent of MyD88 and toll-like receptor signalling. This is the first demonstration that CTA1-DD augments specific immune responses also in non-human primates, suggesting that this adjuvant could be explored further as a clinically safe mucosal vaccine adjuvant for humoral and cell-mediated immunity against HIV-1 Env.

  5. Is there a psychoneuroimmunological pathway between alexithymia and immunity? Immune and physiological correlates of alexithymia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guilbaud, Olivier; Corcos, Maurice; Hjalmarsson, Linnea; Loas, Gwenolé; Jeammet, Philippe

    2003-09-01

    The term "alexithymia" was coined by Sifneos. It is characterised by a lack of words to express emotion (a: absence of; lexi: words; thymia: emotions, affects). Its characteristics were suggested to occur more frequently in individuals with so-called "psychosomatic disorders", but this is still a matter of controversy. Here we review the psychosomatic network of alexithymia, i.e. the immune and physiological correlates of alexithymia. Some studies suggest that inaccuracy in recognising emotional states, or the way of coping with negative emotions, may influence immune function. Alexithymia is associated with higher tonic baseline levels of sympathetic activity and lower sympathetic reactivity during acute stress. Few studies have reported a diminished immune-mediated cellular response in alexithymics with oversecretion of glucocorticoids. We hypothesise that alexithymic subjects may suffer from unnoticed chronic stress with physiological and endocrine and immune consequences. Alexithymia may skew the Th-1/Th-2 balance toward Th-2 dominant immunity and lower cell-mediated (Th-1) immune response and may increase an individual's risk for stress-related disorder.

  6. Two sides of one coin: massive hepatic necrosis and progenitor cell-mediated regeneration in acute liver failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Hong-Lei; Cai, Xiaobo; Yuan, Xiaodong; Liebe, Roman; Dooley, Steven; Li, Hai; Wang, Tai-Ling

    2015-01-01

    Massive hepatic necrosis is a key event underlying acute liver failure, a serious clinical syndrome with high mortality. Massive hepatic necrosis in acute liver failure has unique pathophysiological characteristics including extremely rapid parenchymal cell death and removal. On the other hand, massive necrosis rapidly induces the activation of liver progenitor cells, the so-called "second pathway of liver regeneration." The final clinical outcome of acute liver failure depends on whether liver progenitor cell-mediated regeneration can efficiently restore parenchymal mass and function within a short time. This review summarizes the current knowledge regarding massive hepatic necrosis and liver progenitor cell-mediated regeneration in patients with acute liver failure, the two sides of one coin.

  7. B cells responses and cytokine production are regulated by their immune microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vazquez, Monica I; Catalan-Dibene, Jovani; Zlotnik, Albert

    2015-08-01

    The adaptive immune system consists of two types of lymphocytes: T and B cells. These two lymphocytes originate from a common precursor, yet are fundamentally different with B cells mediating humoral immunity while T cells mediate cell mediated immunity. In cytokine production, naïve T cells produce multiple cytokines upon activation while naïve activated B cells do not. B cells are capable of producing cytokines, but their cytokine production depends on their differentiation state and activation conditions. Hence, unlike T cells that can produce a large amount of cytokines upon activation, B cells require specific differentiation and activation conditions to produce cytokines. Many cytokines act on B cells as well. Here, we discuss several cytokines and their effects on B cells including: Interleukins, IL-7, IL-4, IL-6, IL-10, and Interferons, IFN-α, IFN-β, IFN-γ. These cytokines play important roles in the development, survival, differentiation and/or proliferation of B cells. Certain chemokines also play important roles in B cell function, namely antibody production. As an example, we discuss CCL28, a chemokine that directs the migration of plasma cells to mucosal sites. We conclude with a brief overview of B cells as cytokine producers and their likely functional consequences on the immune response.

  8. Immune modulation with sulfasalazine attenuates immunopathogenesis but enhances macrophage-mediated fungal clearance during Pneumocystis pneumonia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Wang

    Full Text Available Although T cells are critical for host defense against respiratory fungal infections, they also contribute to the immunopathogenesis of Pneumocystis pneumonia (PcP. However, the precise downstream effector mechanisms by which T cells mediate these diverse processes are undefined. In the current study the effects of immune modulation with sulfasalazine were evaluated in a mouse model of PcP-related Immune Reconstitution Inflammatory Syndrome (PcP-IRIS. Recovery of T cell-mediated immunity in Pneumocystis-infected immunodeficient mice restored host defense, but also initiated the marked pulmonary inflammation and severe pulmonary function deficits characteristic of IRIS. Sulfasalazine produced a profound attenuation of IRIS, with the unexpected consequence of accelerated fungal clearance. To determine whether macrophage phagocytosis is an effector mechanism of T cell-mediated Pneumocystis clearance and whether sulfasalazine enhances clearance by altering alveolar macrophage phagocytic activity, a novel multispectral imaging flow cytometer-based method was developed to quantify the phagocytosis of Pneumocystis in vivo. Following immune reconstitution, alveolar macrophages from PcP-IRIS mice exhibited a dramatic increase in their ability to actively phagocytose Pneumocystis. Increased phagocytosis correlated temporally with fungal clearance, and required the presence of CD4(+ T cells. Sulfasalazine accelerated the onset of the CD4(+ T cell-dependent alveolar macrophage phagocytic response in PcP-IRIS mice, resulting in enhanced fungal clearance. Furthermore, sulfasalazine promoted a TH2-polarized cytokine environment in the lung, and sulfasalazine-enhanced phagocytosis of Pneumocystis was associated with an alternatively activated alveolar macrophage phenotype. These results provide evidence that macrophage phagocytosis is an important in vivo effector mechanism for T cell-mediated Pneumocystis clearance, and that macrophage phenotype can be altered

  9. A Neutralizing Antibody Assay Based on a Reporter of Antibody-Dependent Cell-Mediated Cytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yuling; Li, Jia J; Kim, Hyun Jun; Liu, Xu; Liu, Weiyi; Akhgar, Ahmad; Bowen, Michael A; Spitz, Susan; Jiang, Xu-Rong; Roskos, Lorin K; White, Wendy I

    2015-11-01

    Benralizumab is a humanized anti-IL5 receptor α (IL5Rα) monoclonal antibody (mAb) with enhanced (afucosylation) antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) function. An ADCC reporter cell-based neutralizing antibody (NAb) assay was developed and characterized to detect NAb against benralizumab in human serum to support the clinical development of benralizumab. The optimal ratio of target cells to effector cells was 3:1. Neither parental benralizumab (fucosylated) nor benralizumab Fab resulted in ADCC activity, confirming the requirement for ADCC activity in the NAb assay. The serum tolerance of the cells was determined to be 2.5%. The cut point derived from normal and asthma serum samples was comparable. The effective range of benralizumab was determined, and 35 ng/mL [80% maximal effective concentration (EC80)] was chosen as the standard concentration to run in the assessment of NAb. An affinity purified goat anti-benralizumab polyclonal idiotype antibody preparation was shown to have NAb since it inhibited ADCC activity in a dose-dependent fashion. The low endogenous concentrations of IL5 and soluble IL5 receptor (sIL5R) did not demonstrate to interfere with the assay. The estimated assay sensitivities at the cut point were 1.02 and 1.10 μg/mL as determined by the surrogate neutralizing goat polyclonal and mouse monoclonal anti-drug antibody (ADA) controls, respectively. The assay can detect NAb (at 2.5 μg/mL) in the presence of 0.78 μg/mL benralizumab. The assay was not susceptible to non-specific matrix effects. This study provides an approach and feasibility of developing an ADCC cell-based NAb assay to support biopharmaceuticals with an ADCC function.

  10. Curcuma oil reduces endothelial cell-mediated inflammation in postmyocardial ischemia/reperfusion in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manhas, Amit; Khanna, Vivek; Prakash, Prem; Goyal, Dipika; Malasoni, Richa; Naqvi, Arshi; Dwivedi, Anil K; Dikshit, Madhu; Jagavelu, Kumaravelu

    2014-09-01

    Endothelial cells initiated inflammation persisting in postmyocardial infarction needs to be controlled and moderated for avoiding fatal complications. Curcuma oil (C.oil, Herbal Medicament), a standardized hexane soluble fraction of Curcuma longa has possessed neuroprotective effect. However, its effect on myocardial ischemia/reperfusion (MI/RP) and endothelial cells remains incompletely defined. Here, using in vivo rat MI/RP injury model and in vitro cellular approaches using EA.hy926 endothelial cells, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, real-time polymerase chain reaction, and myograph, we provide evidence that with effective regimen and preconditioning of rats with C.oil (250 mg/kg, PO), before and after MI/RP surgery protects rats from MI/RP-induced injury. C.oil treatment reduces left ventricular ischemic area and endothelial cell-induced inflammation, specifically in the ischemic region (*P < 0.0001) and improved endothelial function by reducing the expression of proinflammatory genes and adhesion factors on endothelial cells both in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, mechanistic studies have revealed that C.oil reduced the expression of adhesion factors like E-selectin (#P = 0.0016) and ICAM-1 ($P = 0.0069) in initiating endothelial cells-induced inflammation. In line to the real-time polymerase chain reaction expression data, C.oil reduced the adhesion of inflammatory cells to endothelial cells as assessed by the interaction of THP-1 monocytes with the endothelial cells using flow-based adhesion and under inflammatory conditions. These studies provide evidence that salutary effect of C.oil on MI/RP could be achieved with pretreatment and posttreatment of rats, C.oil reduced MI/RP-induced injury by reducing the endothelial cell-mediated inflammation, specifically in the ischemic zone of MI/RP rat heart.

  11. Precision Subtypes of T Cell-Mediated Rejection Identified by Molecular Profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadota, Paul Ostrom; Hajjiri, Zahraa; Finn, Patricia W.; Perkins, David L.

    2015-01-01

    Among kidney transplant recipients, the treatment of choice for acute T cell-mediated rejection (TCMR) with pulse steroids or antibody protocols has variable outcomes. Some rejection episodes are resistant to an initial steroid pulse, but respond to subsequent antibody protocols. The biological mechanisms causing the different therapeutic responses are not currently understood. Histological examination of the renal allograft is considered the gold standard in the diagnosis of acute rejection. The Banff Classification System was established to standardize the histopathological diagnosis and to direct therapy. Although widely used, it shows variability among pathologists and lacks criteria to guide precision individualized therapy. The analysis of the transcriptome in allograft biopsies, which we analyzed in this study, provides a strategy to develop molecular diagnoses that would have increased diagnostic precision and assist the development of individualized treatment. Our hypothesis is that the histological classification of TCMR contains multiple subtypes of rejection. Using R language algorithms to determine statistical significance, multidimensional scaling, and hierarchical, we analyzed differential gene expression based on microarray data from biopsies classified as TCMR. Next, we identified KEGG functions, protein–protein interaction networks, gene regulatory networks, and predicted therapeutic targets using the integrated database ConsesnsusPathDB (CPDB). Based on our analysis, two distinct clusters of biopsies termed TCMR01 and TCMR02 were identified. Despite having the same Banff classification, we identified 1933 differentially expressed genes between the two clusters. These genes were further divided into three major groups: a core group contained within both the TCMR01 and TCMR02 subtypes, as well as genes unique to TCMR01 or TCMR02. The subtypes of TCMR utilized different biological pathways, different regulatory networks and were predicted to

  12. Epitope specificity plays a critical role in regulating antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity against influenza A virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Wenqian; Tan, Gene S; Mullarkey, Caitlin E; Lee, Amanda J; Lam, Mannie Man Wai; Krammer, Florian; Henry, Carole; Wilson, Patrick C; Ashkar, Ali A; Palese, Peter; Miller, Matthew S

    2016-10-18

    The generation of strain-specific neutralizing antibodies against influenza A virus is known to confer potent protection against homologous infections. The majority of these antibodies bind to the hemagglutinin (HA) head domain and function by blocking the receptor binding site, preventing infection of host cells. Recently, elicitation of broadly neutralizing antibodies which target the conserved HA stalk domain has become a promising "universal" influenza virus vaccine strategy. The ability of these antibodies to elicit Fc-dependent effector functions has emerged as an important mechanism through which protection is achieved in vivo. However, the way in which Fc-dependent effector functions are regulated by polyclonal influenza virus-binding antibody mixtures in vivo has never been defined. Here, we demonstrate that interactions among viral glycoprotein-binding antibodies of varying specificities regulate the magnitude of antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity induction. We show that the mechanism responsible for this phenotype relies upon competition for binding to HA on the surface of infected cells and virus particles. Nonneutralizing antibodies were poor inducers and did not inhibit antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity. Interestingly, anti-neuraminidase antibodies weakly induced antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity and enhanced induction in the presence of HA stalk-binding antibodies in an additive manner. Our data demonstrate that antibody specificity plays an important role in the regulation of ADCC, and that cross-talk among antibodies of varying specificities determines the magnitude of Fc receptor-mediated effector functions.

  13. Immune markers and correlates of protection for vaccine induced immune responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thakur, Aneesh; Pedersen, Lasse Eggers; Jungersen, Gregers

    2012-01-01

    Vaccines have been a major innovation in the history of mankind and still have the potential to address the challenges posed by chronic intracellular infections including tuberculosis, HIV and malaria which are leading causes of high morbidity and mortality across the world. Markers...... of an appropriate humoral response currently remain the best validated correlates of protective immunity after vaccination. Despite advancements in the field of immunology over the past few decades currently there are, however, no sufficiently validated immune correlates of vaccine induced protection against...... chronic infections in neither human nor veterinary medicine. Technological and conceptual advancements within cell-mediated immunology have led to a number of new immunological read-outs with the potential to emerge as correlates of vaccine induced protection. For TH1 type responses, antigen...

  14. Evidence for Natural Killer Cell-Mediated Protection from Metastasis Formation in Uveal Melanoma Patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maat, Willem; van der Slik, Arno R.; Verhoeven, Dirk H. J.; Alizadeh, Behrooz Z.; Ly, Long V.; Verduijn, Willem; Luyten, Gregorius P. M.; Mulder, Arend; van Hall, Thorbald; Koning, Frits; Jager, Martine J.; van Bergen, Jeroen

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE. In uveal melanoma, low human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I expression on primary tumors is associated with a decreased risk of metastasis. Consequently, it has been suggested that natural killer (NK) cells, which detect decreased expression of HLA class I, are involved in the immune contr

  15. Distinct gut-derived lactic acid bacteria elicit divergent dendritic cell-mediated NK cell responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fink, Lisbeth Nielsen; Zeuthen, Louise Hjerrild; Christensen, Hanne

    2007-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are abundant in the gastrointestinal tract where they continuously regulate the immune system. NK cells are potently activated by dendritic cells (DCs) matured by inflammatory stimuli, and NK cells are present in the gut epithelium and in mesenteric lymph nodes...

  16. Innate and adaptive immune responses in allergic contact dermatitis and autoimmune skin diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edele, Fanny; Esser, Philipp R; Lass, Christian; Laszczyk, Melanie N; Oswald, Eva; Strüh, Christian M; Rensing-Ehl, Anne; Martin, Stefan F

    2007-12-01

    Allergic contact dermatitis is induced by chemicals or metal ions. A hallmark of this T cell mediated skin disease is the activation of the innate immune system by contact allergens. This immune response results in inflammation and is a prerequisite for the activation of the adaptive immune system with tissue-specific migration of effector and regulatory T cells. Recent studies have begun to address in detail the innate immune cells as well as the innate receptors on these cells and the associated signaling pathways which lead to skin inflammation. We review here recent findings regarding innate and adaptive immune responses and immune regulation of contact dermatitis and other skin diseases as well as recent developments towards an in vitro assessment of the allergenic potential of chemicals. The elucidation of the innate inflammatory pathways, cellular components and mediators will help to identify new drug targets for more efficient treatment of allergic contact dermatitis and hopefully also for its prevention.

  17. Obesity, inflammation and the immune system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Heredia, Fátima Pérez; Gómez-Martínez, Sonia; Marcos, Ascensión

    2012-05-01

    Obesity shares with most chronic diseases the presence of an inflammatory component, which accounts for the development of metabolic disease and other associated health alterations. This inflammatory state is reflected in increased circulating levels of pro-inflammatory proteins, and it occurs not only in adults but also in adolescents and children. The chronic inflammatory response has its origin in the links existing between the adipose tissue and the immune system. Obesity, like other states of malnutrition, is known to impair the immune function, altering leucocyte counts as well as cell-mediated immune responses. In addition, evidence has arisen that an altered immune function contributes to the pathogenesis of obesity. This review attempts to briefly comment on the various plausible explanations that have been proposed for the phenomenon: (1) the obesity-associated increase in the production of leptin (pro-inflammatory) and the reduction in adiponectin (anti-inflammatory) seem to affect the activation of immune cells; (2) NEFA can induce inflammation through various mechanisms (such as modulation of adipokine production or activation of Toll-like receptors); (3) nutrient excess and adipocyte expansion trigger endoplasmic reticulum stress; and (4) hypoxia occurring in hypertrophied adipose tissue stimulates the expression of inflammatory genes and activates immune cells. Interestingly, data suggest a greater impact of visceral adipose tissue and central obesity, rather than total body fat, on the inflammatory process. In summary, there is a positive feedback loop between local inflammation in adipose tissue and altered immune response in obesity, both contributing to the development of related metabolic complications.

  18. CANCER IMMUNOTHERAPY BASED ON THE BLOCKADE OF IMMUNE CHECKPOINTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Bogolyubova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Immune checkpoints represent the system of inhibitory mechanisms regulating the activation of the immune response, preventing the autoimmune processes and modulating the immune response by decreasing the immune cell-mediated damage of tissues and organs. Tumor cells may utilize these checkpoints to prevent the activation of tumor-specific lymphocytes, thereby acquiring resistance against the immune response. The blockade of inhibitory signal that is transduced in immune checkpoints leading to the reactivation of antitumor immune response is a promising method of tumor immunotherapy. Since the majority of immune checkpoints are based on the ligand-receptor interactions, one of contemporary modalities of anti-tumor therapy is based on the development of ligandor receptor-blocking therapeutic monoclonal antibodies, as well as soluble recombinant receptors capable of competing for a ligand and thereby modulating the signal transduction. In the past few years, this field of tumor immunotherapy experienced an impressive success; however, the potential tradeoff for altering of the natural suppressive mechanisms is the development of the autoimmune reactions.

  19. Suppressive action of melatonin on the TH-2 immune response in rats infected with Trypanosoma cruzi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santello, Fabricia Helena; Frare, Eduardo Osório; dos Santos, Carla Domingues; Caetano, Leony Cristina; Alonso Toldo, Míriam Paula; do Prado, José Clóvis

    2008-10-01

    Control of the acute phase of Trypanosoma cruzi infection is critically dependent on cytokine-mediated macrophage activation to intracellular killing, natural killer (NK) cells, CD4(+) T cells, CD8(+) T cells and B cells. Cell-mediated immunity in T. cruzi infection is also modulated by cytokines, but in addition to parasite-specific responses, autoimmunity can be also triggered. Importantly, cytokines may also play a role in the cell-mediated immunity of infected subjects. Here we studied the role of cytokines in the regulation of innate and adaptive immunity during the acute phase of T. cruzi infection in Wistar rats. Melatonin is an effective regulator of the immune system. Macrophages and T lymphocytes, which have melatonin receptors, are target cells for the immunomodulatory function of melatonin. In this paper melatonin was orally given via two protocols: prior to and concomitant with infection. Both treatments were highly effective against T. cruzi with enhanced action for the concomitant treatment. The data suggest an up-regulation of the TH-1 immune response as all analyzed parameters, interleukin (IL)-4, IL-10, transforming growth factor-beta1 and splenocyte proliferation, displayed reduced levels as compared with the untreated counterparts. However, the direct effects of melatonin on immune cells have not been fully investigated during T. cruzi infection. We conclude that in light of the current results, melatonin exerted important therapeutic benefits through its immune regulatory effects.

  20. [Immunity and malnutrition in alcoholic liver diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hevia Ojanguren, C; Fanjul Cabeza, B; González Vázquez, M I; Linares Rodríguez, A; Rodrigo Sáez, L

    1994-10-01

    Assessment of immunity was performed in 150 patients with alcoholic liver disease (15 steatosis, 30 hepatitis and 105 cirrhosis: 34 in grade A, 34 in grade B and 37 in grade C, according to Child-Pugh classification). This assessment was based on the total lymphocyte count and a delayed hypersensitivity skin multiple test. Likewise, nutritional status of patients was studied using anthropometric and biochemical parameters (triceps skinfold thickness, arm muscle circumference and serum albumin). The association between alcoholic liver disease, malnutrition and immunity was analyzed. The results show that lymphopenia and disorders in cell-mediate immunity were more common in those patients with cirrhosis, increasing the number of anergic patients while the degree of hepatocellular insufficiency worsens (8.8% in grade A, 11.8% in grade B and 32.4% in grade C). Although there where significantly more alterations of delayed cutaneous hypersensitivity in cirrhotics with malnutrition (hypoergy: 55.2% and anergy: 37.9%) than in those well nourished (hypoergy: 23.7% and anergy: 10.5%, p < 0.01), lymphopenia didn't show differences between these groups. We think that immunity mus'nt be considered a parameter in nutritional assessment.

  1. Tetherin does not significantly restrict dendritic cell-mediated HIV-1 transmission and its expression is upregulated by newly synthesized HIV-1 Nef

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Li

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dendritic cells (DCs are among the first cells to encounter HIV-1 and play important roles in viral transmission and pathogenesis. Immature DCs allow productive HIV-1 replication and long-term viral dissemination. The pro-inflammatory factor lipopolysaccharide (LPS induces DC maturation and enhances the efficiency of DC-mediated HIV-1 transmission. Type I interferon (IFN partially inhibits HIV-1 replication and cell-cell transmission in CD4+ T cells and macrophages. Tetherin is a type I IFN-inducible restriction factor that blocks HIV-1 release and modulates CD4+ T cell-mediated cell-to-cell transmission of HIV-1. However, the role of type I IFN and tetherin in HIV-1 infection of DCs and DC-mediated viral transmission remains unknown. Results We demonstrated that IFN-alpha (IFNα-induced mature DCs restricted HIV-1 replication and trans-infection of CD4+ T cells. Tetherin expression in monocyte-derived immature DCs was undetectable or very low. High levels of tetherin were transiently expressed in LPS- and IFNα-induced mature DCs, while HIV-1 localized into distinct patches in these DCs. Knockdown of induced tetherin in LPS- or IFNα-matured DCs modestly enhanced HIV-1 transmission to CD4+ T cells, but had no significant effect on wild-type HIV-1 replication in mature DCs. Intriguingly, we found that HIV-1 replication in immature DCs induced significant tetherin expression in a Nef-dependent manner. Conclusions The restriction of HIV-1 replication and transmission in IFNα-induced mature DCs indicates a potent anti-HIV-1 response; however, high levels of tetherin induced in mature DCs cannot significantly restrict wild-type HIV-1 release and DC-mediated HIV-1 transmission. Nef-dependent tetherin induction in HIV-1-infected immature DCs suggests an innate immune response of DCs to HIV-1 infection.

  2. Anandamide attenuates Th-17 cell-mediated delayed-type hypersensitivity response by triggering IL-10 production and consequent microRNA induction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Austin R Jackson

    Full Text Available Endogenous cannabinoids [endocannabinoids] are lipid signaling molecules that have been shown to modulate immune functions. However, their role in the regulation of Th17 cells has not been studied previously. In the current study, we used methylated Bovine Serum Albumin [mBSA]-induced delayed type hypersensitivity [DTH] response in C57BL/6 mice, mediated by Th17 cells, as a model to test the anti-inflammatory effects of endocannabinoids. Administration of anandamide [AEA], a member of the endocannabinoid family, into mice resulted in significant mitigation of mBSA-induced inflammation, including foot pad swelling, cell infiltration, and cell proliferation in the draining lymph nodes [LN]. AEA treatment significantly reduced IL-17 and IFN-γ production, as well as decreased RORγt expression while causing significant induction of IL-10 in the draining LNs. IL-10 was critical for the AEA-induced mitigation of DTH response inasmuch as neutralization of IL-10 reversed the effects of AEA. We next analyzed miRNA from the LN cells and found that 100 out of 609 miRNA species were differentially regulated in AEA-treated mice when compared to controls. Several of these miRNAs targeted proinflammatory mediators. Interestingly, many of these miRNA were also upregulated upon in vitro treatment of LN cells with IL-10. Together, the current study demonstrates that AEA may suppress Th-17 cell-mediated DTH response by inducing IL-10 which in turn triggers miRNA that target proinflammatory pathways.

  3. Fasting-Mimicking Diet Reduces HO-1 to Promote T Cell-Mediated Tumor Cytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Biase, Stefano; Lee, Changhan; Brandhorst, Sebastian; Manes, Brianna; Buono, Roberta; Cheng, Chia-Wei; Cacciottolo, Mafalda; Martin-Montalvo, Alejandro; de Cabo, Rafael; Wei, Min; Morgan, Todd E; Longo, Valter D

    2016-07-11

    Immune-based interventions are promising strategies to achieve long-term cancer-free survival. Fasting was previously shown to differentially sensitize tumors to chemotherapy while protecting normal cells, including hematopoietic stem and immune cells, from its toxic side effects. Here, we show that the combination of chemotherapy and a fasting-mimicking diet (FMD) increases the levels of bone marrow common lymphoid progenitor cells and cytotoxic CD8(+) tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs), leading to a major delay in breast cancer and melanoma progression. In breast tumors, this effect is partially mediated by the downregulation of the stress-responsive enzyme heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1). These data indicate that FMD cycles combined with chemotherapy can enhance T cell-dependent targeted killing of cancer cells both by stimulating the hematopoietic system and by enhancing CD8(+)-dependent tumor cytotoxicity.

  4. Candida Immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julian R. Naglik

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The human pathogenic fungus Candida albicans is the predominant cause of both superficial and invasive forms of candidiasis. C. albicans primarily infects immunocompromised individuals as a result of either immunodeficiency or intervention therapy, which highlights the importance of host immune defences in preventing fungal infections. The host defence system utilises a vast communication network of cells, proteins, and chemical signals distributed in blood and tissues, which constitute innate and adaptive immunity. Over the last decade the identity of many key molecules mediating host defence against C. albicans has been identified. This review will discuss how the host recognises this fungus, the events induced by fungal cells, and the host innate and adaptive immune defences that ultimately resolve C. albicans infections during health.

  5. CD8+ T cells mediate antibody-independent platelet clearance in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arthur, Connie M; Patel, Seema R; Sullivan, H Cliff; Winkler, Annie M; Tormey, Chris A; Hendrickson, Jeanne E; Stowell, Sean R

    2016-04-07

    Platelet transfusion provides an important therapeutic intervention in the treatment and prevention of bleeding. However, some patients rapidly clear transfused platelets, preventing the desired therapeutic outcome. Although platelet clearance can occur through a variety of mechanisms, immune-mediated platelet removal often plays a significant role. Numerous studies demonstrate that anti-platelet alloantibodies can induce significant platelet clearance following transfusion. In fact, for nearly 50 years, anti-platelet alloantibodies were considered to be the sole mediator of immune-mediated platelet clearance in platelet-refractory individuals. Although nonimmune mechanisms of platelet clearance can often explain platelet removal in the absence of anti-platelet alloantibodies, many patients experience platelet clearance following transfusion in the absence of a clear mechanism. These results suggest that other processes of antibody-independent platelet clearance may occur. Our studies demonstrate that CD8(+)T cells possess the unique ability to induce platelet clearance in the complete absence of anti-platelet alloantibodies. These results suggest a previously unrecognized form of immune-mediated platelet clearance with significant implications in the appropriate management of platelet-refractory individuals.

  6. Suppression of NK cell-mediated cytotoxicity against PRRSV-infected porcine alveolar macrophages in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Jun; Grauwet, Korneel; Vermeulen, Ben; Devriendt, Bert; Jiang, Ping; Favoreel, Herman; Nauwynck, Hans

    2013-06-28

    The adaptive immunity against PRRSV has already been studied in depth, but only limited data are available on the innate immune responses against this pathogen. In the present study, we analyzed the interaction between porcine natural killer (NK) cells and PRRSV-infected primary porcine alveolar macrophages (PAMs), since NK cells are one of the most important components of innate immunity and PAMs are primary target cells of PRRSV infection. NK cytotoxicity assays were performed using enriched NK cells as effector cells and virus-infected or mock-inoculated PAMs as target cells. The NK cytotoxicity against PRRSV-infected PAMs was decreased starting from 6h post inoculation (hpi) till the end of the experiment (12 hpi) and was significantly lower than that against pseudorabies virus (PrV)-infected PAMs. UV-inactivated PRRSV also suppressed NK activity, but much less than infectious PRRSV. Furthermore, co-incubation with PRRSV-infected PAMs inhibited degranulation of NK cells. Finally, using the supernatant of PRRSV-infected PAMs collected at 12 hpi showed that the suppressive effect of PRRSV on NK cytotoxicity was not mediated by soluble factors. In conclusion, PRRSV-infected PAMs showed a reduced susceptibility toward NK cytotoxicity, which may represent one of the multiple evasion strategies of PRRSV.

  7. Feline infectious peritonitis. An immune-mediated coronaviral vasculitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    August, J R

    1984-09-01

    Mainly through studies inducing experimental infection of susceptible cats, significant advances have recently been made in our understanding of the pathogenesis of FIP. Much of this knowledge should not presently be directly extrapolated to field cases of FIP, because the route of infection and challenge dose and strain of virus may be significantly different. Advances in the prevention and treatment of FIP will depend greatly on clarification of the exact nature of the several coronaviruses affecting cats and the role of cell-mediated immunity in resistance to FIPV.

  8. The immune system and skin cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Sherry H; Bordeaux, Jeremy S; Baron, Elma D

    2014-01-01

    Carcinogenesis involves multiple mechanisms that disturb genomic integrity and encourage abnormal proliferation. The immune system plays an integral role in maintaining homeostasis and these mechanisms may arrest or enhance dysplasia. There exists a large body of evidence from organ transplantation literature supporting the significance of the immune suppression in the development of skin cancer. Nonmelanoma skin cancers are the most frequent neoplasms after organ transplantation, with organ transplant recipients having a 65-fold increase in squamous cell carcinoma incidence and 10-fold increase in basal cell carcinoma incidence. Similarly, UV-radiation (UVR) induced immunosuppression is correlated with the development of cutaneous malignancies in a dose-dependent manner. This was first shown several decades ago by Margaret Kripke, when transplanted tumors were rejected in mice with competent immune systems, but grew unchecked in immunosuppressed specimens. After UV exposure, chromophores initiate a cascade that leads to immunosuppression via derangement of Langerhans cells' antigen-presenting capacity. UV-irradiated Langerhans cells present antigens to Th2 cells, but fail to stimulate Th1 cells. A subset of T regulatory cells, specific for the antigen encountered after UVR, is also stimulated to proliferate. In general UV irradiation leads to a greater number of T regulatory cells and fewer effector T cells in the skin, shiftingthe balance from T-cell-mediated immunity to immunosuppression. These regulatory cells have the phenotype CD4+, CD25+, Foxp3+, CTLA-4+. These and many other changes in local immunity lead to a suppressed immune state, which allow for skin cancer development.

  9. EBV Infection of Mice with Reconstituted Human Immune System Components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Münz, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) was discovered 50 years ago as the first candidate human tumor virus. Since then, we have realized that this human γ-herpesvirus establishes persistent infection in the majority of adult humans, but fortunately causes EBV-associated diseases only in few individuals. This is an incredible success story of the human immune system, which controls EBV infection and its transforming capacity for decades. A better understanding of this immune control would not only benefit patients with EBV-associated malignancies, but could also provide clues how to establish such a potent, mostly cell-mediated immune control against other pathogens and tumors. However, the functional relevance of EBV-specific immune responses can only be addressed in vivo, and mice with reconstituted human immune system components (huMice) constitute a small animal model to interrogate the protective value of immune compartments during EBV infection, but also might provide a platform to test EBV-specific vaccines. This chapter will summarize the insights into EBV immunobiology that have already been gained in these models and provide an outlook into promising future avenues to develop this in vivo model of EBV infection and human immune responses further.

  10. Expression of Glycosylphosphatidylinositol-Anchored CD59 on Target Cells Enhances Human NK Cell-Mediated Cytotoxicity1

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    NK cell-mediated cytotoxicity of target cells is the result of a balance between the activating and inhibitory signals provided by their respective ligand-receptor interactions. In our current study, we have investigated the significance of CD59 on human target cells in modulating this process. A range of CD59 site-specific Abs were used in NK cytotoxicity blocking studies against the CD59-expressing K562 target cell line. Significantly reduced cytotoxicity was observed in the presence of Abs...

  11. Immunizations: Active vs. Passive

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Prevention > Immunizations > Immunizations: Active vs. Passive Safety & Prevention Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Immunizations: Active vs. Passive Page Content Article Body Pediatricians can ...

  12. Parental Exposure to Dim Light at Night Prior to Mating Alters Offspring Adaptive Immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cissé, Yasmine M.; Russart, Kathryn L.G.; Nelson, Randy J.

    2017-01-01

    Exposure to dim light at night (dLAN) disrupts natural light/dark cycles and impairs endogenous circadian rhythms necessary to maintain optimal biological function, including the endocrine and immune systems. We have previously demonstrated that white dLAN compromises innate and cell mediated immune responses in adult Siberian hamsters (Phodopus sungorus). We hypothesized that dLAN has transgenerational influences on immune function. Adult male and female Siberian hamsters were exposed to either dark nights (DARK) or dLAN (~5 lux) for 9 weeks, then paired in full factorial design, mated, and thereafter housed under dark nights. Offspring were gestated and reared in dark nights, then tested as adults for cell-mediated and humoral immunity. Maternal exposure to dLAN dampened delayed type hypersensitivity (DTH) responses in male offspring. Maternal and paternal exposure to dLAN reduced DTH responses in female offspring. IgG antibodies to a novel antigen were elevated in offspring of dams exposed to dLAN. Paternal exposure to dLAN decreased splenic endocrine receptor expression and global methylation in a parental sex-specific manner. Together, these data suggest that exposure to dLAN has transgenerational effects on endocrine-immune function that may be mediated by global alterations in the epigenetic landscape of immune tissues. PMID:28361901

  13. Endocine™, N3OA and N3OASq; three mucosal adjuvants that enhance the immune response to nasal influenza vaccination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tina Falkeborn

    Full Text Available Annual outbreaks of seasonal influenza are controlled or prevented through vaccination in many countries. The seasonal vaccines used are either inactivated, currently administered parenterally, or live-attenuated given intranasally. In this study three mucosal adjuvants were examined for the influence on the humoral (mucosal and systemic and cellular influenza A-specific immune responses induced by a nasally administered vaccine. We investigated in detail how the anionic Endocine™ and the cationic adjuvants N3OA and N3OASq mixed with a split inactivated influenza vaccine induced influenza A-specific immune responses as compared to the vaccine alone after intranasal immunization. The study showed that nasal administration of a split virus vaccine together with Endocine™ or N3OA induced significantly higher humoral and cell-mediated immune responses than the non-adjuvanted vaccine. N3OASq only significantly increased the cell-mediated immune response. Furthermore, nasal administration of the influenza vaccine in combination with any of the adjuvants; Endocine™, N3OA or N3OASq, significantly enhanced the mucosal immunity against influenza HA protein. Thus the addition of these mucosal adjuvants leads to enhanced immunity in the most relevant tissues, the upper respiratory tract and the systemic circulation. Nasal influenza vaccination with an inactivated split vaccine can therefore provide an important mucosal immune response, which is often low or absent after traditional parenteral vaccination.

  14. Acquired pMHC I Complexes Greatly Enhance CD4+ Th Cell's Stimulatory Effect on CD8+ T Cell-Mediated Diabetes in Transgenic RIP-mOVA Mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Khawaja Ashfaque Ahmed; Yufeng Xie; Xueshu Zhang; Jim Xiang

    2008-01-01

    CD4+ helper T (Th) cells play pivotal roles in induction of CD8+ CTL immunity. However, the mechanism of CD4+ T cell help delivery to CD8+ T cells in vivo is still elusive. In this study, we used ovalbumin (OVA)-pulsed dendritic cells (DCovA) to activate OT-Ⅱ mouse CD4+ T cells, and then studied the help effect of these CD4+ T cells on CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) responses. We also examined CTL mediated islet β cell destruction which leaded to diabetes in wild-type C57BL/6 mice and transgenic rat insulin promoter (RIP)-mOVA mice expressing β cell antigen OVA with self OVA-specific tolerance, respectively. In adoptive transfer experiments, we demonstrated that help, in the form of peptide/major histocompatibility complex (pMHC) I acquired from DCovA by DCovA activation, was required for induction of OVA-specific CTL responses in C57BL/6 mice. However, in combination with TCR transgenic OT-I mouse CD8+ T cells, the tolerogenic dosage of CD4+ Th cells with acquired pMHC I, but not CD4+ (Kb-/-) Th cells without acquired pMHC I were able to cause diabetes in 8/10 (80%) RIP-mOVA mice.This study thus expands the current knowledge in T cell-mediated autoimmunity and provides insight into the nature of CD4+ T cell-mediated help in CD8+ CTL induction. Cellular & Molecular Immunology. 2008;5(6):407-415.

  15. Intramuscular Priming and Intranasal Boosting Induce Strong Genital Immunity Through Secretory IgA in Minipigs Infected with Chlamydia trachomatis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lorenzen, Emma; Follmann, Frank; Bøje, Sarah;

    2015-01-01

    International efforts in developing a vaccine against Chlamydia trachomatis have highlighted the need for novel immunization strategies for the induction of genital immunity. In this study, we evaluated an intramuscular (IM) prime/intranasal boost vaccination strategy in a Göttingen Minipig model...... with a reproductive system very similar to humans. The vaccine was composed of C. trachomatis subunit antigens formulated in the Th1/Th17 promoting CAF01 adjuvant. IM priming immunizations with CAF01 induced a significant cell-mediated interferon gamma and interleukin 17A response and a significant systemic high...

  16. Toxic effects of dietary methylmercury on immune system development in nestling American kestrels (Falco sparverius).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallacara, Dawn M; Halbrook, Richard S; French, John B

    2011-06-01

    This study evaluated the effects of dietary methylmercury (MeHg) on immune system development in captive-reared nestling American kestrels (Falco sparverius) to determine whether T cell-mediated and antibody-mediated adaptive immunity are targets for MeHg toxicity at environmentally relevant concentrations. Nestlings received various diets, including 0 (control), 0.6, and 3.9 µg/g (dry wt) MeHg for up to 18 d posthatch. Immunotoxicity endpoints included cell-mediated immunity (CMI) using the phytohemagglutinin (PHA) skin-swelling assay and antibody-mediated immune response via the sheep red blood cell (SRBC) hemagglutination assay. T cell- and B cell-dependent histological parameters in the spleen, thymus, and bursa of Fabricius were correlated with the functional assays. For nestlings in the 0.6 and 3.9 µg/g MeHg groups, CMI was suppressed by 73 and 62%, respectively, at 11 d of age. Results of this functional assay were correlated with T cell-dependent components of the spleen and thymus. Dose-dependent lymphoid depletion in spleen tissue directly affected the proliferation of T-lymphocyte populations, insofar as lower stimulation indexes from the PHA assay occurred in nestlings with lower proportions of splenic white pulp and higher THg concentrations. Nestlings in the 3.9 µg/g group also exhibited lymphoid depletion and a lack of macrophage activity in the thymus. Methylmercury did not have a noticeable effect on antibody-mediated immune function or B cell-dependent histological correlates. We conclude that T cell-mediated immunosuppression is the primary target of MeHg toward adaptive immunity in developing kestrels. This study provides evidence that environmentally relevant concentrations of MeHg may compromise immunocompetence in a developing terrestrial predator and raises concern regarding the long-term health effects of kestrels that were exposed to dietary MeHg during early avian development.

  17. Adult Immunization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omer Coskun

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Despite the many advances in modern medicine, each year thousands of people in the world die from diseases that are easily prevented by safe and effective vaccines. Few measures in preventive medicine are of such proven value and as easy to implement as routine immunization against infectious diseases. Prevention of infection by immunization is a lifelong process. There are a number of vaccines that all adults (¡I18 years require. There are also other vaccines that need to be tailored to meet individual variations in risk resulting from occupation, foreign travel, underlying illness, lifestyle and age. In this study, we tried to review this important subject. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2008; 7(2.000: 159-166

  18. Capsid protein: evidences about the partial protective role of neutralizing antibody-independent immunity against dengue in monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil, Lázaro; Izquierdo, Alienys; Lazo, Laura; Valdés, Iris; Ambala, Peris; Ochola, Lucy; Marcos, Ernesto; Suzarte, Edith; Kariuki, Thomas; Guzmán, Guadalupe; Guillén, Gerardo; Hermida, Lisset

    2014-05-01

    The role of cellular immune response in dengue virus infection is not yet fully understood. Only few studies in murine models propose that CD8(+) T-cells are associated with protection from infection and disease. At the light of recent reports about the protective role of CD8(+) T-cells in humans and the no correlation between neutralizing antibodies and protection observed in several studies, a vaccine based on cell-mediated immunity constitute an attractive approach. Our group has developed a capsid-based vaccine as nucleocpasid-like particles from dengue-2 virus, which induced a protective CD4(+) and CD8(+) cell-mediated immunity in mice, without the contribution of neutralizing antibodies. Herein we evaluated the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of this molecule in monkeys. Neither IgG antibodies against the whole virus nor neutralizing antibodies were elicited after the antigen inoculation. However, animals developed a cell-mediated immunity, measured by gamma interferon secretion and cytotoxic capacity. Although only one out of three vaccinated animals was fully protected against viral challenge, a viral load reduction was observed in this group compared with the placebo one, suggesting that capsid could be the base on an attractive vaccine against dengue.

  19. Antagonizing arachidonic acid-derived eicosanoids reduces inflammatory Th17 and Th1 cell-mediated inflammation and colitis severity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monk, Jennifer M; Turk, Harmony F; Fan, Yang-Yi; Callaway, Evelyn; Weeks, Brad; Yang, Peiying; McMurray, David N; Chapkin, Robert S

    2014-01-01

    During colitis, activation of two inflammatory T cell subsets, Th17 and Th1 cells, promotes ongoing intestinal inflammatory responses. n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acid- (PUFA-) derived eicosanoids, such as prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), promote Th17 cell-mediated inflammation, while n-3 PUFA antagonize both Th17 and Th1 cells and suppress PGE2 levels. We utilized two genetic mouse models, which differentially antagonize PGE2 levels, to examine the effect on Th17 cells and disease outcomes in trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid- (TNBS-) induced colitis. Fat-1 mice contain the ω3 desaturase gene from C. elegans and synthesize n-3 PUFA de novo, thereby reducing the biosynthesis of n-6 PUFA-derived eicosanoids. In contrast, Fads1 Null mice contain a disrupted Δ5 desaturase gene and produce lower levels of n-6 PUFA-derived eicosanoids. Compared to Wt littermates, Fat-1 and Fads1 Null mice exhibited a similar colitic phenotype characterized by reduced colonic mucosal inflammatory eicosanoid levels and mRNA expression of Th17 cell markers (IL-17A, RORγτ, and IL-23), decreased percentages of Th17 cells and, improved colon injury scores (P ≤ 0.05). Thus, during colitis, similar outcomes were obtained in two genetically distinct models, both of which antagonize PGE2 levels via different mechanisms. Our data highlight the critical impact of n-6 PUFA-derived eicosanoids in the promotion of Th17 cell-mediated colonic inflammation.

  20. Antagonizing Arachidonic Acid-Derived Eicosanoids Reduces Inflammatory Th17 and Th1 Cell-Mediated Inflammation and Colitis Severity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer M. Monk

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available During colitis, activation of two inflammatory T cell subsets, Th17 and Th1 cells, promotes ongoing intestinal inflammatory responses. n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acid- (PUFA- derived eicosanoids, such as prostaglandin E2 (PGE2, promote Th17 cell-mediated inflammation, while n-3 PUFA antagonize both Th17 and Th1 cells and suppress PGE2 levels. We utilized two genetic mouse models, which differentially antagonize PGE2 levels, to examine the effect on Th17 cells and disease outcomes in trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid- (TNBS- induced colitis. Fat-1 mice contain the ω3 desaturase gene from C. elegans and synthesize n-3 PUFA de novo, thereby reducing the biosynthesis of n-6 PUFA-derived eicosanoids. In contrast, Fads1 Null mice contain a disrupted Δ5 desaturase gene and produce lower levels of n-6 PUFA-derived eicosanoids. Compared to Wt littermates, Fat-1 and Fads1 Null mice exhibited a similar colitic phenotype characterized by reduced colonic mucosal inflammatory eicosanoid levels and mRNA expression of Th17 cell markers (IL-17A, RORγτ, and IL-23, decreased percentages of Th17 cells and, improved colon injury scores (P≤0.05. Thus, during colitis, similar outcomes were obtained in two genetically distinct models, both of which antagonize PGE2 levels via different mechanisms. Our data highlight the critical impact of n-6 PUFA-derived eicosanoids in the promotion of Th17 cell-mediated colonic inflammation.

  1. Cell-mediated cytotoxicity in rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss, infected with viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Utke, K.; Bergmann, S.; Lorenzen, Niels

    2007-01-01

    Mammalian cytotoxic T cells as part of the adaptive immune system recognize virus-infected target cells by binding of their T-cell receptors (TCR) to classical MHC class I molecules loaded with viral peptides. Our previous studies have shown that the allele of the single dominant polymorphic...... classical MHC class I locus Onmy-UBA is identical in the rainbow trout clone C25 and in the permanent rainbow trout cell line RTG-2. This enabled us to develop an assay to measure antiviral cytotoxicity in rainbow trout using a system of MHC class I-matched effector and target cells. Peripheral blood...... level of the CD8 alpha gene which is a typical marker for mammalian cytotoxic T cells. Concurrently, the expression of the natural killer cell enhancement factor (NKEF)-like gene was enhanced as measured by real-time RT-PCR. Taken together, these results suggest that both innate and adaptive cell...

  2. The Immune System of HIV-Exposed Uninfected Infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Raya, Bahaa; Kollmann, Tobias R.; Marchant, Arnaud; MacGillivray, Duncan M.

    2016-01-01

    Infants born to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infected women are HIV-exposed but the majority remains uninfected [i.e., HIV-exposed uninfected (HEU)]. HEU infants suffer greater morbidity and mortality from infections compared to HIV-unexposed (HU) peers. The reason(s) for these worse outcomes are uncertain, but could be related to an altered immune system state. This review comprehensively summarizes the current literature investigating the adaptive and innate immune system of HEU infants. HEU infants have altered cell-mediated immunity, including impaired T-cell maturation with documented hypo- as well as hyper-responsiveness to T-cell activation. And although prevaccination vaccine-specific antibody levels are often lower in HEU than HU, most HEU infants mount adequate humoral immune response following primary vaccination with diphtheria toxoid, haemophilus influenzae type b, whole cell pertussis, measles, hepatitis B, tetanus toxoid, and pneumococcal conjugate vaccines. However, HEU infants are often found to have lower absolute neutrophil counts as compared to HU infants. On the other hand, an increase of innate immune cytokine production and expression of co-stimulatory markers has been noted in HEU infants, but this increase appears to be restricted to the first few weeks of life. The immune system of HEU children beyond infancy remains largely unexplored. PMID:27733852

  3. Induced Th2 dominant immune response in APPswe, PSEN1dE9 transgenic mice after nasal immunization with an adenoviral vector encoding 10 tandem repeats of beta-amyloid 3-10

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rong Guo; Kui Huang; Tongzi Jiang; Jian Li; Yu Li; Xiaona Xing; Yunpeng Cao

    2011-01-01

    Immunotherapy for Alzheimer's disease (AD) is effective in improving cognitive function in transgenic mouse models of AD. Because the AN1792 [beta-amyloid (Aβ) 1-42] vaccine was halted because of T cell mediated meningoencephalitis, many scientists are searching for a novel vaccine to avoid the T cell mediated immune response caused by the Aβ1-42. Importantly, the time when the immunization is begun can influence the immune effect. In this study, an adenovirus vaccine was constructed containing 10 × Aβ3-10 repeats and gene adjuvant CpG DNA. Transgenic AD mice were immunized intranasally for 3 months. After 10 × Aβ3-10 vaccine immunization, high titers of anti-Aβ42 IgG1 predominant antibodies were induced. In spatial learning ability and probe tests, the 10 × Aβ3-10 immunized mice showed significantly improved memories compared to control mice. The 10 × Aβ3-10 vaccine resulted in a robust Th2 dominant humoral immune response and reduced learning deficits in AD mice. In addition, the 10 × Aβ3-10 vaccine might be more efficient if administered before Aβ aggregation at an early stage in the AD mouse brain. Thus, the adenovirus vector encoding 10 × Aβ3-10 is a promising vaccine for AD.

  4. Relationship between immune state and tumor growth rate in rats bearing progressive and non-progressive mammary tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remedi, M M; Hliba, E; Demarchi, M; Depiante-Depaoli, M

    1998-08-01

    Impaired immune responses occur frequently in cancer patients or in tumor-bearing animals, but the mechanisms of the tumor-induced immune defects remain poorly understood. The aim of the present study was to determine the relevance of the immune system in the control of tumor growth. We have developed a model of progressive and non-progressive mammary tumor, chemically induced in female Wistar rats. In this model we evaluated the development of an immune response after immunization of rats bearing progressive and non-progressive tumors with a non-related antigen, such as sheep red blood cells. We also studied the activation state of peritoneal macrophages from animals bearing tumors by evaluating the production of free radicals. Our findings indicated that the cell-mediated immunity in rats bearing progressive tumors fails to respond to heterologous antigen in vivo, as demonstrated by a negative delayed-type hypersensitivity reaction, and is accompanied by minor nitric oxide production by peritoneal exudate cells as well as a lower capacity for macrophage activation. The study of non-progressive tumor-bearing rats indicated that the cell-mediated immune response was intact and an activated state of macrophages was found in vivo. The results described in this paper should be taken into account when therapies based on cancer vaccines are chosen for the treatment of cancer.

  5. Immunization of Mice with Recombinant Brucella abortus Organic Hydroperoxide Resistance (Ohr) Protein Protects Against a Virulent Brucella abortus 544 Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hop, Huynh Tan; Reyes, Alisha Wehdnesday Bernardo; Simborio, Hannah Leah Tadeja; Arayan, Lauren Togonon; Min, Won Gi; Lee, Hu Jang; Lee, Jin Ju; Chang, Hong Hee; Kim, Suk

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the Brucella abortus ohr gene coding for an organic hydroperoxide resistance protein (Ohr) was cloned into a maltose fusion protein expression system (pMAL), inserted into Escherichia coli, and purified, and its immunogenicity was evaluated by western blot analysis using Brucella-positive mouse sera. The purified recombinant Ohr (rOhr) was treated with adjuvant and injected intraperitoneally into BALB/c mice. A protective immune response analysis revealed that rOhr induced a significant increase in both the IgG1 and IgG2a titers, and IgG2a reached a higher level than IgG1 after the second and third immunizations. Additionally, immunization with rOhr induced high production of IFN-γ as well as proinflammatory cytokines such as TNF, MCP-1, IL-12p70, and IL-6, but a lesser amount of IL-10, suggesting that rOhr predominantly elicited a cell-mediated immune response. In addition, immunization with rOhr caused a significantly higher degree of protection against a virulent B. abortus infection compared with a positive control group consisting of mice immunized with maltose-binding protein. These findings showed that B. abortus rOhr was able to induce both humoral and cell-mediated immunity in mice, which suggested that this recombinant protein could be a potential vaccine candidate for animal brucellosis.

  6. From Space to the Patient: A New Cytokine Release Assay to Monitor the Immune Status of HIV Infected Patients and Sepsis Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufmann, I.; Draenert, R.; Gruber, M.; Feuerecker, M.; Crucian, B. E.; Mehta, S. L.; Roider, J.; Pierson, D. L.; Briegel, J. M.; Schelling, G.; Sams, C. F.; Chouker, A.

    2013-01-01

    Monitoring of humans either in the healthy men under extreme environmental stress like space flight, in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infected patients or in sepsis is of critical importance with regard to the timing of adequate therapeutic (counter-)measures. The in vivo skin delayed-type hypersensitivity test (DTH) served for many years as a tool to evaluate cell mediated immunity. However, this standardised in vivo test was removed from the market in 2002 due to the risk of antigen stabilization. To the best of our knowledge an alternative test as monitoring tool to determine cell mediated immunity is not available so far. For this purpose we tested a new alternative assay using elements of the skin DTH which is based on an ex vivo cytokine release from whole blood and asked if it is suitable and applicable to monitor immune changes in HIV infected patients and in patients with septic shock.

  7. European Sea Bass (Dicentrarchus labrax Immune Status and Disease Resistance Are Impaired by Arginine Dietary Supplementation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita Azeredo

    Full Text Available Infectious diseases and fish feeds management are probably the major expenses in the aquaculture business. Hence, it is a priority to define sustainable strategies which simultaneously avoid therapeutic procedures and reinforce fish immunity. Currently, one preferred approach is the use of immunostimulants which can be supplemented to the fish diets. Arginine is a versatile amino acid with important mechanisms closely related to the immune response. Aiming at finding out how arginine affects the innate immune status or improve disease resistance of European seabass (Dicentrarchus labrax against vibriosis, fish were fed two arginine-supplemented diets (1% and 2% arginine supplementation. A third diet meeting arginine requirement level for seabass served as control diet. Following 15 or 29 days of feeding, fish were sampled for blood, spleen and gut to assess cell-mediated immune parameters and immune-related gene expression. At the same time, fish from each dietary group were challenged against Vibrio anguillarum and survival was monitored. Cell-mediated immune parameters such as the extracellular superoxide and nitric oxide decreased in fish fed arginine-supplemented diets. Interleukins and immune-cell marker transcripts were down-regulated by the highest supplementation level. Disease resistance data were in accordance with a generally depressed immune status, with increased susceptibility to vibriosis in fish fed arginine supplemented diets. Altogether, these results suggest a general inhibitory effect of arginine on the immune defences and disease resistance of European seabass. Still, further research will certainly clarify arginine immunomodulation pathways thereby allowing the validation of its potential as a prophylactic strategy.

  8. Lymph node trafficking of regulatory T cells is prerequisite for immune suppression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Miao-Tzu; Lin, Been-Ren; Liu, Wei-Liang; Lu, Chun-Wei; Chiang, Bor-Luen

    2016-04-01

    Regulatory T cells have a crucial role in health and disease because of their immune regulation function. However, the anatomic sites where regulatory T cells exert optimal immune regulation are open to debate. In our current study with the use of a shear-stress flow assay, we found that regulatory T cells exhibited significantly decreased adhesion to either activated endothelial monolayer or intercellular adhesion molecule 1 or E-selectin-coated surfaces compared with activated effector T cells. The less transmigration capacity of the regulatory T cells prompted our speculation of preferential lymph node localization for the regulatory T cells that endowed these cells with immune regulation function in the most efficient manner. To test this hypothesis, the role of lymph node localization in regulatory T cell-mediated immune suppression was evaluated with a footpad inflammation model. We found that adoptively transferred regulatory T cells inhibited the development of footpad inflammation. In addition, although blockage of CCR7 or CD62L had no effect on the immune suppressive function of the regulatory T cells per se, pretreatment of the regulatory T cells with either CCR7 or CD62L blocking antibodies prevented their recruitment into draining lymph nodes and concomitantly abrogated the immune suppressive effects of adoptively transferred regulatory T cells during footpad inflammation. Our data demonstrate the crucial role of lymph node localization in regulatory T cell-mediated immune suppression and suggest a probable hierarchy in the anatomic sites for optimal immune regulation. Elucidating the relationships between the transmigration characteristics of the regulatory T cells and their immune regulation function will provide insightful information for regulatory T cell-based cell therapy.

  9. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells mediate tolerance induction in autoimmune disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegner, Anja; Verhagen, Johan; Wraith, David C

    2017-01-31

    In multiple sclerosis (MS) T cells aberrantly recognize self-peptides of the myelin sheath and attack the central nervous system (CNS). Antigen-specific peptide immunotherapy, which aims to restore tolerance while avoiding the use of non-specific immunosuppressive drugs, is a promising approach to combat autoimmune disease, but the cellular mechanisms behind successful therapy remain poorly understood. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) have been studied intensively in the field of cancer and to a lesser extent in autoimmunity. Because of their suppressive effect on the immune system in cancer, we hypothesized that the development of MDSCs and their interaction with CD4(+) T cells could be beneficial for antigen-specific immunotherapy. Hence, changes in the quantity, phenotype and function of MDSCs during tolerance induction in our model of MS were evaluated. We reveal, for the first time, an involvement of a subset of MDSCs, known as polymorphonuclear (PMN)-MDSCs, in the process of tolerance induction. PMN-MDSCs were shown to adopt a more suppressive phenotype during peptide immunotherapy and inhibit CD4(+) T-cell proliferation in a cell-contact-dependent manner, mediated by arginase-1. Moreover, increased numbers of tolerogenic PMN-MDSCs, such as observed over the course of peptide immunotherapy, were demonstrated to provide protection from disease in a model of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

  10. Protection of hepatocytes from cytotoxic T cell mediated killing by interferon-alpha.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian B Willberg

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cellular immunity plays a key role in determining the outcome of hepatitis C virus (HCV infection, although the majority of infections become persistent. The mechanisms behind persistence are still not clear; however, the primary site of infection, the liver, may be critical. We investigated the ability of CD8+ T-cells (CTL to recognise and kill hepatocytes under cytokine stimulation. METHODS/PRINCIPLE FINDINGS: Resting hepatocytes cell lines expressed low levels of MHC Class I, but remained susceptible to CTL cytotoxicity. IFN-alpha treatment, in vitro, markedly increased hepatocyte MHC Class I expression, however, reduced sensitivity to CTL cytotoxicity. IFN-alpha stimulated hepatocyte lines were still able to present antigen and induce IFN-gamma expression in interacting CTL. Resistance to killing was not due to the inhibition of the FASL/FAS- pathway, as stimulated hepatocytes were still susceptible to FAS-mediated apoptosis. In vitro stimulation with IFN-alpha, or the introduction of a subgenomic HCV replicon into the HepG2 line, upregulated the expression of the granzyme-B inhibitor-proteinase inhibitor 9 (PI-9. PI-9 expression was also observed in liver tissue biopsies from patients with chronic HCV infection. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: IFN-alpha induces resistance in hepatocytes to perforin/granzyme mediate CTL killing pathways. One possible mechanism could be through the expression of the PI-9. Hindrance of CTL cytotoxicity could contribute to the chronicity of hepatic viral infections.

  11. Mast cell mediators: Their differential release and the secretory pathways involved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tae Chul eMoon

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Mast cells (MC are widely distributed throughout the body and are common at mucosal surfaces, a major host-environment interface. MC are functionally and phenotypically heterogeneous depending on the microenvironment in which they mature. Although MC have been classically viewed as effector cells of IgE-mediated allergic diseases, they are also recognized as important in host defense, innate and acquired immunity, homeostatic responses, and immunoregulation. MC activation can induce release of preformed mediators such as histamine from their granules, as well as release of de novo synthesized lipid mediators, cytokines and chemokines that play diverse roles, not only in allergic reactions but also in numerous physiological and pathophysiological responses. Indeed, MC release their mediators in a discriminating and chronological manner, depending upon the stimuli involved and their signaling cascades (e.g., IgE-mediated or Toll Like Receptor-mediated. However, the precise mechanisms underlying differential mediator release in response to these stimuli are poorly known. This review summarizes our knowledge of MC mediators and will focus on what is known about the discriminatory release of these mediators dependent upon diverse stimuli, MC phenotypes and species of origin, as well as on the intracellular synthesis, storage and secretory processes involved.

  12. MFG-E8 Is Critical for Embryonic Stem Cell-Mediated T Cell Immunomodulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Tan

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The molecules and mechanisms pertinent to the low immunogenicity of undifferentiated embryonic stem cells (ESCs remain poorly understood. Here, we provide evidence that milk fat globule epidermal growth factor 8 (MFG-E8 is a vital mediator in this phenomenon and directly suppresses T cell immune responses. MFG-E8 is enriched in undifferentiated ESCs but diminished in differentiated ESCs. Upregulation of MFG-E8 in ESCs increases the successful engraftment of both undifferentiated and differentiated ESCs across major histocompatibility complex barriers. MFG-E8 suppresses T cell activation/proliferation and inhibits Th1, Th2, and Th17 subpopulations while increasing regulatory T cell subsets. Neutralizing MFG-E8 substantially abrogates these effects, whereas addition of recombinant MFG-E8 to differentiated ESCs restores immunosuppression. Furthermore, we provide the evidence that MFG-E8 suppresses T cell activation and regulates T cell polarization by inhibiting PKCθ phosphorylation through the α3/5βV integrin receptor. Our findings offer an approach to facilitate transplantation acceptance.

  13. Intracellular protease activation in apoptosis and cell-mediated cytotoxicity characterized by cell-permeable fluorogenic protease substrates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Beverly Z Packard; Akira Komoriya

    2008-01-01

    Over the past decade the importance of signaling from reporter molecules inside live cells and tissues has been clearly established. Biochemical events related to inflammation, tumor metastasis and proliferation, and viral infectivity and replication are examples of processes being further defined as more molecular tools for live cell measurements become available. Moreover, in addition to quantitating parameters related to physiologic processes, real-time imaging of molecular interactions that compose basic cellular activities are providing insights into understanding disease mechanisms as well as extending clinical efficacy of therapeutic regimens. In this review the use of highly cell-permeable fluorogenic substrates that report protease activities inside live cells is described; applications to defining the molecular events of two cellular processes, i.e., apoptosis and cell-mediated cytotoxicity, are then illustrated.

  14. Immune responses of poultry to Newcastle disease virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapczynski, Darrell R; Afonso, Claudio L; Miller, Patti J

    2013-11-01

    Newcastle disease (ND) remains a constant threat to poultry producers worldwide, in spite of the availability and global employment of ND vaccinations since the 1950s. Strains of Newcastle disease virus (NDV) belong to the order Mononegavirales, family Paramyxoviridae, and genus Avulavirus, are contained in one serotype and are also known as avian paramyxovirus serotype-1 (APMV-1). They are pleomorphic in shape and are single-stranded, non-segmented, negative sense RNA viruses. The virus has been reported to infect most orders of birds and thus has a wide host range. Isolates are characterized by virulence in chickens and the presence of basic amino acids at the fusion protein cleavage site. Low virulent NDV typically produce subclinical disease with some morbidity, whereas virulent isolates can result in rapid, high mortality of birds. Virulent NDV are listed pathogens that require immediate notification to the Office of International Epizootics and outbreaks typically result in trade embargos. Protection against NDV is through the use of vaccines generated with low virulent NDV strains. Immunity is derived from neutralizing antibodies formed against the viral hemagglutinin and fusion glycoproteins, which are responsible for attachment and spread of the virus. However, new techniques and technologies have also allowed for more in depth analysis of the innate and cell-mediated immunity of poultry to NDV. Gene profiling experiments have led to the discovery of novel host genes modulated immediately after infection. Differences in virus virulence alter host gene response patterns have been demonstrated. Furthermore, the timing and contributions of cell-mediated immune responses appear to decrease disease and transmission potential. In view of recent reports of vaccine failure from many countries on the ability of classical NDV vaccines to stop spread of disease, renewed interest in a more complete understanding of the global immune response of poultry to NDV will be

  15. Cytomegalovirus-Infected Cells Resist T Cell Mediated Killing in an HLA-Recognition Independent Manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proff, Julia; Walterskirchen, Christian; Brey, Charlotte; Geyeregger, Rene; Full, Florian; Ensser, Armin; Lehner, Manfred; Holter, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    In order to explore the potential of HLA-independent T cell therapy for human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infections, we developed a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) directed against the HCMV encoded glycoprotein B (gB), which is expressed at high levels on the surface of infected cells. T cells engineered with this anti-gB CAR recognized HCMV-infected cells and released cytokines and cytotoxic granules. Unexpectedly, and in contrast to analogous approaches for HIV, Hepatitis B or Hepatitis C virus, we found that HCMV-infected cells were resistant to killing by the CAR-modified T cells. In order to elucidate whether this phenomenon was restricted to the use of CARs, we extended our experiments to T cell receptor (TCR)-mediated recognition of infected cells. To this end we infected fibroblasts with HCMV-strains deficient in viral inhibitors of antigenic peptide presentation and targeted these HLA-class I expressing peptide-loaded infected cells with peptide-specific cytotoxic T cells (CTLs). Despite strong degranulation and cytokine production by the T cells, we again found significant inhibition of lysis of HCMV-infected cells. Impairment of cell lysis became detectable 1 day after HCMV infection and gradually increased during the following 3 days. We thus postulate that viral anti-apoptotic factors, known to inhibit suicide of infected host cells, have evolved additional functions to directly abrogate T cell cytotoxicity. In line with this hypothesis, CAR-T cell cytotoxicity was strongly inhibited in non-infected fibroblasts by expression of the HCMV-protein UL37x1, and even more so by additional expression of UL36. Our data extend the current knowledge on Betaherpesviral evasion from T cell immunity and show for the first time that, beyond impaired antigen presentation, infected cells are efficiently protected by direct blockade of cytotoxic effector functions through viral proteins.

  16. Gene expression profiles of human liver cells mediated by hepatitis B virus X protein

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei-ying ZHANG; Fu-qing XU; Chang-liang SHAN; Rong XIANG; Li-hong YE; Xiao-dong ZHANG

    2009-01-01

    Aim: To demonstrate the gene expression profiles mediated by hepatitis B virus X protein (HBx), we characterized the molecular features of pathogenesis associated with HBx in a human liver cell model.Methods: We examined gene expression profiles in L-O2-X cells, an engineered L-O2 cell line that constitutively expresses HBx, relative to L-O2 cells using an Agilent 22 K human 70-mer oligonucleotide microarray representing more than 21,329 unique, well-characterized Homo sapiens genes, Western blot analysis and RNA interference (RNAi) targeting HBx mRNA validated the overexpression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and Bcl-2 in L-O2-X cells. Meanwhile, the BrdU incorporation assay was used to test cell proliferation mediated by upregulated cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2).Results: The microarray showed that the expression levels of 152 genes were remarkably altered; 82 of the genes were upregulated and 70 genes were downregulated in L-O2-X cells. The altered genes were associated with signal transduction pathways, cell cycle, metastasis, transcriptional regulation, immune response, metabolism, and other processes. PCNA and Bcl-2 were upregulated in L-O2-X cells. Furthermore, we found that COX-2 upregulation in L-O2-X cells enhanced proliferation using the BrdU incorporation assay, whereas indomethacin (an inhibitor of COX-2) abolished the promotion.Conclusion: Our findings provide new evidence that HBx is able to regulate many genes that may be involved in the car-cinogenesis. These regulated genes mediated by HBx may serve as molecular targets for the prevention and treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma.

  17. Insights into the mechanisms of protective immunity against Cryptococcus neoformans infection using a mouse model of pulmonary cryptococcosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wozniak, Karen L; Ravi, Sailatha; Macias, Sandra; Young, Mattie L; Olszewski, Michal A; Steele, Chad; Wormley, Floyd L

    2009-09-03

    Cryptococcus neoformans is an opportunistic fungal pathogen that causes life-threatening pneumonia and meningoencephalitis in immune compromised individuals. Previous studies have shown that immunization of BALB/c mice with an IFN-gamma-producing C. neoformans strain, H99gamma, results in complete protection against a second pulmonary challenge with an otherwise lethal cryptococcal strain. The current study evaluated local anamnestic cell-mediated immune responses against pulmonary cryptococcosis in mice immunized with C. neoformans strain H99gamma compared to mice immunized with heat-killed C. neoformans (HKC.n.). Mice immunized with C. neoformans strain H99gamma had significantly reduced pulmonary fungal burden post-secondary challenge compared to mice immunized with HKC.n. Protection against pulmonary cryptococcosis was associated with increased pulmonary granulomatous formation and leukocyte infiltration followed by a rapid resolution of pulmonary inflammation, which protected the lungs from severe allergic bronchopulmonary mycosis (ABPM)-pathology that developed in the lungs of mice immunized with HKC.n. Pulmonary challenge of interleukin (IL)-4 receptor, IL-12p40, IL-12p35, IFN-gamma, T cell and B cell deficient mice with C. neoformans strain H99gamma demonstrated a requirement for Th1-type T cell-mediated immunity, but not B cell-mediated immunity, for the induction of H99gamma-mediated protective immune responses against pulmonary C. neoformans infection. CD4(+) T cells, CD11c(+) cells, and Gr-1(+) cells were increased in both proportion and absolute number in protected mice. In addition, significantly increased production of Th1-type/pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, and conversely, reduced Th2-type cytokine production was observed in the lungs of protected mice. Interestingly, protection was not associated with increased production of cytokines IFN-gamma or TNF-alpha in lungs of protected mice. In conclusion, immunization with C. neoformans

  18. Insights into the mechanisms of protective immunity against Cryptococcus neoformans infection using a mouse model of pulmonary cryptococcosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen L Wozniak

    Full Text Available Cryptococcus neoformans is an opportunistic fungal pathogen that causes life-threatening pneumonia and meningoencephalitis in immune compromised individuals. Previous studies have shown that immunization of BALB/c mice with an IFN-gamma-producing C. neoformans strain, H99gamma, results in complete protection against a second pulmonary challenge with an otherwise lethal cryptococcal strain. The current study evaluated local anamnestic cell-mediated immune responses against pulmonary cryptococcosis in mice immunized with C. neoformans strain H99gamma compared to mice immunized with heat-killed C. neoformans (HKC.n.. Mice immunized with C. neoformans strain H99gamma had significantly reduced pulmonary fungal burden post-secondary challenge compared to mice immunized with HKC.n. Protection against pulmonary cryptococcosis was associated with increased pulmonary granulomatous formation and leukocyte infiltration followed by a rapid resolution of pulmonary inflammation, which protected the lungs from severe allergic bronchopulmonary mycosis (ABPM-pathology that developed in the lungs of mice immunized with HKC.n. Pulmonary challenge of interleukin (IL-4 receptor, IL-12p40, IL-12p35, IFN-gamma, T cell and B cell deficient mice with C. neoformans strain H99gamma demonstrated a requirement for Th1-type T cell-mediated immunity, but not B cell-mediated immunity, for the induction of H99gamma-mediated protective immune responses against pulmonary C. neoformans infection. CD4(+ T cells, CD11c(+ cells, and Gr-1(+ cells were increased in both proportion and absolute number in protected mice. In addition, significantly increased production of Th1-type/pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, and conversely, reduced Th2-type cytokine production was observed in the lungs of protected mice. Interestingly, protection was not associated with increased production of cytokines IFN-gamma or TNF-alpha in lungs of protected mice. In conclusion, immunization with C

  19. Antagonizing interferon-mediated immune response by porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Rong; Zhang, Yan-Jin

    2014-01-01

    Interferons (IFNs) are important components in innate immunity involved in the first line of defense to protect host against viral infection. Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) leads to severe economic losses for swine industry since being first identified in early 1990s. PRRSV interplays with host IFN production and IFN-activated signaling, which may contribute to the delayed onset and low level of neutralizing antibodies, as well as weak cell-mediated immune response in infected pigs. PRRSV encodes several proteins that act as antagonists for the IFN signaling. In this review, we summarized the various strategies used by PRRSV to antagonize IFN production and thwart IFN-activated antiviral signaling, as well as the variable interference with IFN-mediated immune response by different PRRSV strains. Thorough understanding of the interaction between PRRSV and host innate immune response will facilitate elucidation of PRRSV pathogenesis and development of a better strategy to control PRRS.

  20. Capacity of lactic acid bacteria in immunity enhancement and cancer prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riaz Rajoka, Muhammad Shahid; Shi, Junling; Zhu, Jing; Shao, Dongyan; Huang, Qingsheng; Yang, Hui; Jin, Mingliang

    2017-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria are associated with the human gastrointestinal tract. They are important for maintaining the balance of microflora in the human gut. An increasing number of published research reports in recent years have denoted the importance of producing interferon-gamma and IgA for treatment of disease. These agents can enhance the specific and nonspecific immune systems that are dependent on specific bacterial strains. The mechanisms of these effects were revealed in this investigation, where the cell walls of these bacteria were modulated by the cytokine pathways, while the whole bacterial cell mediated the host cell immune system and regulated the production of tumor necrosis factors and interleukins. A supplement of highly active lactic acid bacteria strains provided significant potential to enhance host's immunity, offering prevention from many diseases including some cancers. This review summarizes the current understanding of the function of lactic acid bacteria immunity enhancement and cancer prevention.

  1. Antagonizing Interferon-Mediated Immune Response by Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rong Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Interferons (IFNs are important components in innate immunity involved in the first line of defense to protect host against viral infection. Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV leads to severe economic losses for swine industry since being first identified in early 1990s. PRRSV interplays with host IFN production and IFN-activated signaling, which may contribute to the delayed onset and low level of neutralizing antibodies, as well as weak cell-mediated immune response in infected pigs. PRRSV encodes several proteins that act as antagonists for the IFN signaling. In this review, we summarized the various strategies used by PRRSV to antagonize IFN production and thwart IFN-activated antiviral signaling, as well as the variable interference with IFN-mediated immune response by different PRRSV strains. Thorough understanding of the interaction between PRRSV and host innate immune response will facilitate elucidation of PRRSV pathogenesis and development of a better strategy to control PRRS.

  2. [The effect of Clostridium tetani cultures on immunization with tetanus anatoxin in an experiment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stovbun, S F; Bukova, V E

    1995-01-01

    The paper presents the data on the study, carried out on 383 guinea pigs, of the action of C.tetani cultures on immune reactions of the animals after the injection of tetanus toxoid. The state of the humoral and cell-mediated immunity of the animals (in the hemagglutination inhibition test, the neutralization test, the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and the skin allergic test with tetanin), as well as their resistance to challenge with C.tetani. The inhibiting effect of C.tetani on primary immune response to tetanus toxoid and their stimulating effect on secondary immune response have been established. This fact may be used for enhancing the quality of antitetanus preparations, such as toxoid and serum, as well as for working out tactical approaches for the rapid prevention of tetanus.

  3. Immune Efficacy of a Genetically Engineered Vaccine against Lymphocystis Disease Virus: Analysis of Different Immunization Strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fengrong Zheng

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Here, we report the construction of a vaccine against lymphocystis disease virus (LCDV using nucleic acid vaccination technology. A fragment of the major capsid protein encoding gene from an LCDV isolated from China (LCDV-cn was cloned into an eukaryotic expression vector pEGFP-N2, yielding a recombinant plasmid pEGFP-N2-LCDV-cn0.6 kb. This plasmid was immediately expressed after liposomal transfer into the Japanese flounder embryo cell line. The recombinant plasmid was inoculated into Japanese flounder via two routes (intramuscular injection and hypodermic injection at three doses (0.1, 5, and 15 μg, and then T-lymphopoiesis in different tissues and antibodies raised against LCDV were evaluated. The results indicated that this recombinant plasmid induced unique humoral or cell-mediated immune responses depending on the inoculation route and conferred immune protection. Furthermore, the humoral immune responses and protective effects were significantly increased at higher vaccine doses via the two injection routes. Plasmid pEGFP-N2-LCDV0.6 kb is therefore a promising vaccine candidate against LCDV in Japanese flounder.

  4. T-cells mediate an inhibitory effect of interleukin-4 on osteoclastogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirosavljevic, Danijela; Quinn, Julian M W; Elliott, Jan; Horwood, Nicole J; Martin, T John; Gillespie, Matthew T

    2003-06-01

    IL-4 is an important cytokine that can influence bone. We identified two distinct actions of IL-4 to inhibit osteoclast formation: one direct on osteoclast progenitors and the second through the production of a novel T-cell surface-associated molecule(s). These data show a new link between the immune system and bone. The Th2 cytokine interleukin (IL)-4 inhibits osteoclast formation in vitro but also acts on other cell types found in bone, including T-cells and macrophages. Because some osteoclastogenesis inhibitors (e.g., IL-12) act indirectly through T-cells, we investigated IL-4 action on osteoclastogenesis in the presence of T-cells. Osteoclast formation from murine spleen cells treated with RANKL and macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) was blocked by IL-4 even when spleen cells were depleted of T-cells (Thy 1.2+) and/or B-cells (B220+). Also, IL-4 inhibited osteoclastogenesis in RANKL/M-CSF-stimulated adherent spleen cells, Rag1 -/- (lymphocyte-deficient) spleen cells, and bone marrow macrophages, indicating an action on myelomonocytic cells to block osteoclastogenesis. In contrast, IL-4 did not inhibit osteoclastogenesis in cells from IL-4 receptor null mice (IL-4R -/-). However, when wildtype T-cells were added to IL-4R -/- spleen cell cultures, IL-4 inhibited osteoclast formation, indicating a T-cell-dependent action. Osteoclast formation in RANKL-stimulated RAW 264.7 cells was not inhibited by IL-4 unless T-cells were added to the culture. Separation of RAW 264.7 cells and T-cells by semipermeable membrane ablated this action of IL-4, suggesting the induction of a membrane-associated osteoclastogenesis inhibitor. However, membrane-bound inhibitors thymic shared antigen-1 (TSA-1) and osteoclast inhibitory lectin (OCIL) were not regulated by IL-4. In summary, at least two mechanisms of IL-4 -mediated osteoclastogenesis inhibition exist, including a direct action on myelomonocytic progenitors (from which osteoclasts derive) and an indirect action

  5. Induction of antigen-specific immunity by pH-sensitive carbonate apatite as a potent vaccine carrier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hebishima, Takehisa [Viral Infectious Diseases Unit, RIKEN Advanced Science Institute, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Tada, Seiichi [Nano Medical Engineering Laboratory, RIKEN Advanced Science Institute, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Takeshima, Shin-nosuke [Viral Infectious Diseases Unit, RIKEN Advanced Science Institute, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Akaike, Toshihiro [Department of Biomolecular Engineering, Graduate School of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Yokohama 226-8501 (Japan); Ito, Yoshihiro [Nano Medical Engineering Laboratory, RIKEN Advanced Science Institute, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Aida, Yoko, E-mail: aida@riken.jp [Viral Infectious Diseases Unit, RIKEN Advanced Science Institute, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan)

    2011-12-02

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer To develop effective vaccine, we examined the effects of CO{sub 3}Ap as an antigen carrier. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer OVA contained in CO{sub 3}Ap was taken up by BMDCs more effectively than free OVA. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer OVA-immunized splenocytes was activated by OVA contained in CO{sub 3}Ap effectively. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer OVA contained in CO{sub 3}Ap induced strong OVA-specific immune responses to C57BL/6 mice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CO{sub 3}Ap is promising antigen carrier for the achievement of effective vaccine. -- Abstract: The ability of carbonate apatite (CO{sub 3}Ap) to enhance antigen-specific immunity was examined in vitro and in vivo to investigate its utility as a vaccine carrier. Murine bone marrow-derived dendritic cells took up ovalbumin (OVA) containing CO{sub 3}Ap more effectively than free OVA. Interestingly, mice immunized with OVA-containing CO{sub 3}Ap produced OVA-specific antibodies more effectively than mice immunized with free OVA. Furthermore, immunization of C57BL/6 mice with OVA-containing CO{sub 3}Ap induced the proliferation and antigen-specific production of IFN-{gamma} by splenocytes more strongly than immunization with free OVA. Moreover, no significant differences were detected in the induction of delayed-type hypersensitivity responses, an immune reaction involving an antigen-specific, cell-mediated immune response between OVA-containing CO{sub 3}Ap and OVA-containing alumina salt (Alum), suggesting that CO{sub 3}Ap induced cell-mediated immune response to the same degree as Alum, which is commonly used for clinical applications. This study is the first to demonstrate the induction of antigen-specific immune responses in vivo by CO{sub 3}Ap.

  6. Ascaridia galli infection influences the development of both humoral and cell-mediated immunity after Newcastle Disease vaccination in chickens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pleidrup, Janne; Dalgaard, Tina S.; Norup, Liselotte R.

    2014-01-01

    Potent vaccine efficiency is crucial for disease control in both human and livestock vaccination programmes. Free range chickens and chickens with access to outdoor areas have a high risk of infection with parasites including Ascaridia galli, a gastrointestinal nematode with a potential influence...

  7. A Novel MVA-Based Multiphasic Vaccine for Prevention or Treatment of Tuberculosis Induces Broad and Multifunctional Cell-Mediated Immunity in Mice and Primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung-Theung-Long, Stéphane; Gouanvic, Marie; Coupet, Charles-Antoine; Ray, Aurélie; Tupin, Emmanuel; Silvestre, Nathalie; Marchand, Jean-Baptiste; Schmitt, Doris; Hoffmann, Chantal; Klein, Murielle; Seegren, Philip; Huaman, Maria C; Cristillo, Anthony D; Inchauspé, Geneviève

    2015-01-01

    Bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccination of new born babies can protect children against tuberculosis (TB), but fails to protect adults consistently against pulmonary TB underlying the urgent need to develop novel TB vaccines. Majority of first generation TB vaccine candidates have relied on a very limited number of antigens typically belonging to the active phase of infection. We have designed a multi-antigenic and multiphasic vaccine, based on the Modified Vaccinia Ankara virus (MVA). Up to fourteen antigens representative of the three phases of TB infection (active, latent and resuscitation) were inserted into MVA. Using three different strains of mouse (BALB/c, C57BL/6 and C3H/HeN), we show that a single vaccination results in induction of both CD4 and CD8 T cells, displaying capacity to produce multiple cytokines together with cytolytic activity targeting a large array of epitopes. As expected, dominance of responses was linked to the mouse haplotype although for a given haplotype, responses specific of at least one antigen per phase could always be detected. Vaccination of non-human primates with the 14 antigens MVA-TB candidate resulted in broad and potent cellular-based immunogenicity. The remarkable plasticity of MVA opens the road to development of a novel class of highly complex recombinant TB vaccines to be evaluated in both prophylactic and therapeutic settings.

  8. A Novel MVA-Based Multiphasic Vaccine for Prevention or Treatment of Tuberculosis Induces Broad and Multifunctional Cell-Mediated Immunity in Mice and Primates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stéphane Leung-Theung-Long

    Full Text Available Bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG vaccination of new born babies can protect children against tuberculosis (TB, but fails to protect adults consistently against pulmonary TB underlying the urgent need to develop novel TB vaccines. Majority of first generation TB vaccine candidates have relied on a very limited number of antigens typically belonging to the active phase of infection. We have designed a multi-antigenic and multiphasic vaccine, based on the Modified Vaccinia Ankara virus (MVA. Up to fourteen antigens representative of the three phases of TB infection (active, latent and resuscitation were inserted into MVA. Using three different strains of mouse (BALB/c, C57BL/6 and C3H/HeN, we show that a single vaccination results in induction of both CD4 and CD8 T cells, displaying capacity to produce multiple cytokines together with cytolytic activity targeting a large array of epitopes. As expected, dominance of responses was linked to the mouse haplotype although for a given haplotype, responses specific of at least one antigen per phase could always be detected. Vaccination of non-human primates with the 14 antigens MVA-TB candidate resulted in broad and potent cellular-based immunogenicity. The remarkable plasticity of MVA opens the road to development of a novel class of highly complex recombinant TB vaccines to be evaluated in both prophylactic and therapeutic settings.

  9. DNA Prime/Adenovirus Boost Malaria Vaccine Encoding P. falciparum CSP and AMA1 Induces Sterile Protection Associated with Cell-Mediated Immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-14

    next 5 years, based on gender, blood pressure, body mass index, smoking history and presence or absence of diabetes [29]. This was done to avoid the...9.2 African-American 11 (55%) 4 (67%) Caucasian 6 (30%) 2 (33%) Asian 3 (15%) 0 (0%) n = 15 n = 6 Ad5 neutralizing antibody ,12, ,12, ,12, ,12, ,12...using previously described methods [15]. Control stimulants were medium alone and the CEF peptide pool (Anaspec, San Jose, CA). Cells were phenotyped as

  10. Immune tolerance. Group 3 innate lymphoid cells mediate intestinal selection of commensal bacteria-specific CD4⁺ T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hepworth, Matthew R; Fung, Thomas C; Masur, Samuel H; Kelsen, Judith R; McConnell, Fiona M; Dubrot, Juan; Withers, David R; Hugues, Stephanie; Farrar, Michael A; Reith, Walter; Eberl, Gérard; Baldassano, Robert N; Laufer, Terri M; Elson, Charles O; Sonnenberg, Gregory F

    2015-05-29

    Inflammatory CD4(+) T cell responses to self or commensal bacteria underlie the pathogenesis of autoimmunity and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), respectively. Although selection of self-specific T cells in the thymus limits responses to mammalian tissue antigens, the mechanisms that control selection of commensal bacteria-specific T cells remain poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that group 3 innate lymphoid cell (ILC3)-intrinsic expression of major histocompatibility complex class II (MHCII) is regulated similarly to thymic epithelial cells and that MHCII(+) ILC3s directly induce cell death of activated commensal bacteria-specific T cells. Further, MHCII on colonic ILC3s was reduced in pediatric IBD patients. Collectively, these results define a selection pathway for commensal bacteria-specific CD4(+) T cells in the intestine and suggest that this process is dysregulated in human IBD.

  11. Transcriptomic analysis of persistent infection with foot-and-mouth disease virus in cattle suggests impairment of cell-mediated immunity in the nasopharynx

    Science.gov (United States)

    In order to investigate the mechanisms of persistent foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) infection in cattle, transcriptome alterations associated with the FMDV carrier state were characterized using a bovine whole-transcriptome microarray. Eighteen cattle (8 vaccinated with a recombinant FMDV A vac...

  12. The Effects of Reduced Gluten Barley Diet on Humoral and Cell-Mediated Systemic Immune Responses of Gluten-Sensitive Rhesus Macaques

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) affects approximately 1% of the general population while an estimated additional 6% suffers from a recently characterized, rapidly emerging, similar disease, referred to as non-celiac gluten sensitivity (NCGS). The only effective treatment of CD and NCGS requires removal of gluten sources from the diet. Since required adherence to a gluten-free diet (GFD) is difficult to accomplish, efforts to develop alternative treatments have been intensifying in recent years. In this s...

  13. The Innate Immune Playbook for Restricting West Nile Virus Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kendra M. Quicke

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available West Nile virus (WNV is an emerging mosquito-borne flavivirus that causes annual epidemics of encephalitic disease throughout the world. Despite the ongoing risk to public health, no approved vaccines or therapies exist for use in humans to prevent or combat WNV infection. The innate immune response is critical for controlling WNV replication, limiting virus-induced pathology, and programming protective humoral and cell-mediated immunity to WNV infection. The RIG-I like receptors, Toll-like receptors, and Nod-like receptors detect and respond to WNV by inducing a potent antiviral defense program, characterized by production of type I IFN, IL-1β and expression of antiviral effector genes. Recent research efforts have focused on uncovering the mechanisms of innate immune sensing, antiviral effector genes that inhibit WNV, and countermeasures employed by WNV to antagonize innate immune cellular defenses. In this review, we highlight the major research findings pertaining to innate immune regulation of WNV infection.

  14. Antigen-specific acquired immunity in human brucellosis: implications for diagnosis, prognosis, and vaccine development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony P Cannella

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Brucella spp. are facultative intracellular Gram negative bacteria with specific tropism for monocytes/macrophages. Clinical manifestations of brucellosis are primarily immune-mediated and not thought to be due to bacterial virulence factors. Acquired immunity to brucellosis has been studied through observations of naturally infected hosts (cattle, goats, laboratory mouse models, and human infection. Cell-mediated immunity drives the clinical manifestations of human disease after exposure to Brucella species but high antibody responses are not associated with protective immunity. The precise mechanisms by which cell-mediated immune responses confer protection or lead to disease manifestations remain poorly understood. Descriptive studies of immune responses in human brucellosis show that TH1 (interferon-gamma are associated with dominant immune responses, findings consistent with animal studies. Whether these T cell responses are protective, or determine the different clinical responses associated with brucellosis is unknown, especially with regard to undulant fever manifestations, relapsing disease, or are associated with responses to distinct sets of Brucella spp. antigens are unknown. Few data regarding T cell responses in terms of specific recognition of Brucella spp. protein antigens and peptidic epitopes, either by CD4+ or CD8+ T cells, have been identified in human brucellosis patients. Additionally because current attenuated Brucella vaccines used in animals cause human disease, there is a true need for a recombinant protein subunit vaccine for human brucellosis, as well as for improved diagnostics in terms of prognosis and identification of unusual forms of brucellosis. This review will focus on current understandings of antigen-specific immune responses induced by Brucella protein antigens that has promise for yielding new insights into vaccine and diagnostics development, and for understanding pathogenetic mechanisms of human

  15. Immune Memory to Sudan Virus: Comparison between Two Separate Disease Outbreaks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariel Sobarzo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Recovery from ebolavirus infection in humans is associated with the development of both cell-mediated and humoral immune responses. According to recent studies, individuals that did not survive infection with ebolaviruses appear to have lacked a robust adaptive immune response and the expression of several early innate response markers. However, a comprehensive protective immune profile has yet to be described. Here, we examine cellular memory immune responses among survivors of two separate Ebolavirus outbreaks (EVDs due to Sudan virus (SUDV infection in Uganda—Gulu 2000–2001 and Kibaale 2012. Freshly collected blood samples were stimulated with inactivated SUDV, as well as with recombinant SUDV or Ebola virus (EBOV GP (GP1–649. In addition, ELISA and plaque reduction neutralization assays were performed to determine anti-SUDV IgG titers and neutralization capacity. Cytokine expression was measured in whole blood cultures in response to SUDV and SUDV GP stimulation in both survivor pools, demonstrating recall responses that indicate immune memory. Cytokine responses between groups were similar but had distinct differences. Neutralizing, SUDV-specific IgG activity against irradiated SUDV and SUDV recombinant proteins were detected in both survivor cohorts. Furthermore, humoral and cell-mediated crossreactivity to EBOV and EBOV recombinant GP1–649 was observed in both cohorts. In conclusion, immune responses in both groups of survivors demonstrate persistent recognition of relevant antigens, albeit larger cohorts are required in order to reach greater statistical significance. The differing cytokine responses between Gulu and Kibaale outbreak survivors suggests that each outbreak may not yield identical memory responses and promotes the merits of studying the immune responses among outbreaks of the same virus. Finally, our demonstration of cross-reactive immune recognition suggests that there is potential for developing cross

  16. Immunity and immunization in elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourée, Patrice

    2003-12-01

    As the average life expectancy increases, retired people want to travel. Five to 8% of travellers in tropical areas are old persons. Immune system suffers of old age as the other organs. The number and the functions of the T-lymphocytes decrease, but the B-lymphocytes are not altered. So, the response to the vaccinations is slower and lower in the elderly. Influenza is a great cause of death rate in old people. The seroconversion, after vaccine, is 50% from 60 to 70 years old, 31% from 70 to 80 years old, and only 11% after 80 years old. But in public health, the vaccination reduced the morbidity by 25%, admission to hospital by 20%, pneumonia by 50%, and mortality by 70%. Antipoliomyelitis vaccine is useful for travellers, as the vaccines against hepatitis and typhoid fever. Pneumococcal vaccine is effective in 60%. Tetanus is fatal in at last 32% of the people above 80 years, therefore this vaccine is very important.

  17. Mechanisms of pancreatic islet cell destruction. Dose-dependent cytotoxic effect of soluble blood mononuclear cell mediators on isolated islets of Langerhans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mandrup-Poulsen, T; Bendtzen, K; Nerup, J;

    1986-01-01

    reconstituted with tuberculin or phytohaemagglutinin did not impair islet function. Electron microscopy demonstrated that supernatants were cytotoxic to islet cells. The cytotoxic mononuclear cell mediator(s) was non-dialysable, sensitive to heating to 56 degrees C, labile even when stored at -70 degrees C...

  18. Enhancement of NK cell-mediated lysis of non-small lung cancer cells by nPKC activator, ingenol 3,20 dibenzoate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Chenyuan; Yao, Chao; Xu, Zihang; Ni, Zhongya; Zhu, Xiaowen; Wang, Lixin; Yan, Xuewei; Zhou, Wuxiong; Zhu, Shiguo

    2017-03-01

    The IFN-γ production is crucial for NK cell-mediated lysis of cancer cells. Thus increasing the IFN-γ production by NK cells may be an ideal strategy to improve their tumoricidal effect. Since the focus on new drug development has shifted towards natural products, limited information is out there about natural products that enhance the IFN-γ production by NK cells. In this study, through a high-throughput screening, we have identified a natural product ingenol 3,20 dibenzoate (IDB), an activator of tumor suppressor protein kinase C (PKC) isozymes, could increase the IFN-γ production and degranulation by NK cells, especially when NK cells were stimulated by non-small lung cancer (NSCLC) cells. IDB also significantly enhanced the NK cell-mediated lysis of NSCLC cells. Furthermore, PKC inhibitor, sotrastaurin abrogated IDB-induced IFN-γ production, degranulation and cytotoxicity, but did not affect IFN-γ production by NK cells without IDB treatment and NSCLC cell stimulation. The IFN-γ neutralization reversed the IDB-induced enhancement of NK cell mediated killing. In conclusion, our study indicated that IDB enhanced NK cell-mediated lysis of NSCLC cells is dependent on specific PKC mediated IFN-γ production and degranulation. Thus, IDB may have a promising application in clinic for NK cell-based cancer immunotherapy.

  19. Evaluation of Chosen Cytokine Levels among Patients with Herpes Zoster as Ability to Provide Immune Response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agata Zajkowska

    Full Text Available Herpes zoster is a viral disease caused by the reactivation of varicella-zoster virus (VZV which remained latent in the cranial nerve or dorsal root ganglia. Cell-mediated immunity is known to decline with age as part of immunosenescence and can lead to the reactivation of VZV. Whereas herpes zoster is usually mild in healthy young persons, older patients are at increased risk for complications. In the present study we investigated the serum cytokine profile (IL-17, IL-23, IL-21, IL-4, IL-12, representing cellular and humoral immunity and assessed the level of VZV IgG antibodies in patients with herpes zoster.We investigated the serum concentrations of IL-17, IL-23, IL-21, IL-4, IL-12 and the level of VZV IgG antibodies in 23 patients with herpes zoster who did not develop superinfection. The control group was represented by 21 individuals in similar age with no inflammatory and infectious diseases. Cytokine and antibodies levels were measured by ELISA method. Statistical analysis was performed using the ROC curve (receiver operating characteristic, t-test, Welch's t-test, and nonparametric tests with STATISTICA 10 software.In patients with herpes zoster, the serum level of IL-17, IL-23, IL-21, IL-4 and IL-12 as well as VZV IgG antibodies titer were statistically significantly increased compared to control group.Our results confirm the broad activation of the immune system involving humoral and cell-mediated immunity.

  20. Effects of benzene inhalation on lymphocyte subpopulations and immune response in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoyama, K

    1986-08-01

    To clarify the immunotoxicity of benzene, the effects of benzene inhalation on T and B lymphocytes and immune responses in mice were examined. BALB/c male mice were exposed to 50 or 200 ppm benzene vapor, 6 hr/day for 7 or 14 consecutive days. T and B lymphocytes, in blood and spleen, were detected by the cytotoxicity assay with anti-Thy-1.2 monoclonal antibody and the membrane immunofluorescence test with anti-immunoglobulin antibody, respectively. Humoral immune response to sheep red blood cells was determined by the hemolytic plaque-forming cell assay. Cell-mediated immune response was measured by contact sensitivity (CS) to picryl chloride. The activity of suppressor cells was evaluated in spleen by the suppressive effect on passive transfer of CS. The ratio and absolute number of T and B lymphocytes in blood and spleen were depressed after a 7-day exposure at 50 ppm benzene. The depression of B lymphocytes was dose dependent and more intense than that of T lymphocytes. The ability to form antibodies was suppressed by benzene at all exposure levels, but the CS response was resistant to benzene inhalation and rather enhanced at 200 ppm exposure for 14 days. The activity of suppressor cells could not be detected at this dose level. These data show that benzene inhalation effects on humoral and cell-mediated immune responses are a result of the selective toxicity of benzene to B lymphocytes and suppressor T cells.

  1. TUMOR-SPECIFIC IMMUNE RESPONSE AFTER PHOTODYNAMIC THERAPY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. N. Anokhin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Increased incidence of malignancies requires a search for new therapeutic approaches. E.g., photodynamic therapy (PDT is an effective anti-cancer treatment that involves administration of a photosensitizing dye followed by visible light irradiation of the tumor. Pre-clinical studies have shown that local photodynamic therapy enhances systemic antitumor immunity. Moreover, it is well known that the long-term effects of PDT depend on functioning of intact adaptive immune response. In this context, the immune system plays a fundamental role. Interestingly, the PDT action is associated with stimulation of systemic immune response against a locally treated tumor. In fact, PDT has been shown to effectively stimulate both innate and adaptive immune systems of the host, by triggering the release of various pro-inflammatory and acutephase response mediators thus leading to massive infiltration of the treated site with neutrophils, dendritic cells and other inflammatory cells. PDT efficacy depends, in part, on induction of tumor-specific immune response which is dependent on cytotoxic T lymphocytes and natural killer (NK cells. The set of specific receptors enables NK cells to recognize surface molecules on the target cells. Expression of the latter molecules is indicative of viral infection, tumor formation, or cell stress (e.g., DNA damage. The NK cells are also involved into various biological processes in the organism, playing a critical role in immune surveillance, thus representing a potential tool for cancer therapy. It was shown that the tumor cells have increased sensitivity to NK cell-mediated lytic action following PDT. In this review, we further discuss potential relationships between PDT and antitumor immune response.

  2. Regulation of B lymphocytes and plasma cells by innate immune mechanisms and stromal cells in rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maseda, Damian; Bonami, Rachel H; Crofford, Leslie J

    2014-06-01

    B cells mediate multiple functions that influence immune and inflammatory responses in rheumatoid arthritis. Production of a diverse array of autoantibodies can happen at different stages of the disease, and are important markers of disease outcome. In turn, the magnitude and quality of acquired humoral immune responses is strongly dependent on signals delivered by innate immune cells. Additionally, the milieu of cells and chemokines that constitute a niche for plasma cells rely strongly on signals provided by stromal cells at different anatomical locations and times. The chronic inflammatory state therefore importantly impacts the developing humoral immune response and its intensity and specificity. We focus this review on B cell biology and the role of the innate immune system in the development of autoimmunity in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

  3. A Human Anti-M2 Antibody Mediates Antibody-Dependent Cell-Mediated Cytotoxicity (ADCC and Cytokine Secretion by Resting and Cytokine-Preactivated Natural Killer (NK Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkateswara R Simhadri

    Full Text Available The highly conserved matrix protein 2 (M2 is a good candidate for the development of a broadly protective influenza vaccine that induces long-lasting immunity. In animal models, natural killer (NK cells have been proposed to play an important role in the protection provided by M2-based vaccines through a mechanism of antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC. We investigated the ability of the human anti-M2 Ab1-10 monoclonal antibody (mAb to activate human NK cells. They mediated ADCC against M2-expressing cells in the presence of Ab1-10 mAb. Furthermore, NK cell pro-inflammatory cytokine and chemokine secretion is also enhanced when Ab1-10 mAb is present. We also generated cytokine-preactivated NK cells and showed that they still displayed increased effector functions in the presence of Ab1-10 mAb. Thus, our study has demonstrated that human resting and cytokine-preactivated NK cells may have a very important role in the protection provided by anti-M2 Abs.

  4. Immunization with chlamydial plasmid protein pORF5 DNA vaccine induces protective immunity against genital chlamydial infection in mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    To validate the immune protective efficacy of pORF5 DNA vaccine and to analyze potential mechanisms related to this protection. In this study, pORF5 DNA vaccine was constructed and evaluated for its protective immunity in a mouse model of genital chlamydial infection. Groups of BALB/c mice were immunized intranasally with pORF5 DNA vaccine. Humoral and cell mediated immune responses were evaluated. The clearance ability of chlamydial challenge from the genital tract and the chlamy- dia-induced upper genital tract gross pathology and histopathological characterization were also de- tected. The results showed that the total and the IgG2a anti-pORF5 antibody levels in serum were sig- nificantly elevated after pcDNA3.1-pORF5 vaccination, as were the total antibody and IgA levels in vaginal fluids. pcDNA3.1-pORF5 induced a significantly high level of Th1 response as measured by robust gamma interferon (IFN-γ). Minimal IL-4 was produced by immune T cells in response to the re-stimulation with pORF5 protein or the inactive elementary body in vitro. pcDNA3.1-pORF5-vacci- nated mice displayed significantly reduced bacterial shedding upon a chlamydial challenge and an accelerated resolution of infection. 100% of pcDNA3.1-pORF5 vaccinated mice successfully resolved the infection by day 24. pcDNA3.1-pORF5-immunized mice also exhibited protection against patho- logical consequences of chlamydial infection. The stimulated index was significantly higher than that of mice immunized with pcDNA3.1 and PBS (P<0.05). Together, these results demonstrated that immu- nization with pORF5 DNA vaccine is a promising approach for eliciting a protective immunity against a genital chlamydial challenge.

  5. Genetic immunization elicits antigen-specific protective immune responses and decreases disease severity in Trypanosoma cruzi infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Nisha; Tarleton, Rick L

    2002-10-01

    Immunity to Trypanosoma cruzi requires elicitation of humoral and cell-mediated immune responses to extracellular trypomastigotes and intracellular amastigotes. In this study, the effectiveness of the T. cruzi trans-sialidase family (ts) genes ASP-1, ASP-2, and TSA-1 as genetic vaccines was assessed. Immunization of mice with plasmids encoding ASP-1, ASP-2, or TSA-1 elicited poor antigen-specific cytotoxic-T-lymphocyte (CTL) activity and T. cruzi-specific antibody responses. Codelivery of interleukin-12 and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor plasmids with antigen-encoding plasmids resulted in a substantial increase in CTL activity and antibody production and in increased resistance to T. cruzi infection. In pooled results from two to four experiments, 30 to 60% of mice immunized with antigen-encoding plasmids and 60 to 80% of mice immunized with antigen-encoding plasmids plus cytokine adjuvants survived a lethal challenge with T. cruzi. In comparison, 90% of control mice injected with empty plasmid DNA died during the acute phase of infection. However, the pool of three ts genes provided no greater protection than the most effective single gene (ASP-2) either with or without coadministration of cytokine plasmids. Importantly, the extent of tissue parasitism, inflammation, and associated tissue damage in skeletal muscles during the chronic phase of T. cruzi infection in mice immunized with antigen-encoding plasmids plus cytokine adjuvants was remarkably reduced compared to mice immunized with only cytokine adjuvants or empty plasmid DNA. These results identify new vaccine candidates and establish some of the methodologies that might be needed to develop effective vaccine-mediated control of T. cruzi infection. In addition, this work provides the first evidence that prophylactic genetic immunization can prevent the development of Chagas' disease.

  6. DNA vaccine encoding L7/L12-P39 of Brucella abortus induces protective immunity in BALB/c mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LUO De-yan; LI Peng; XING Li; ZHAO Guang-yu; SHI Wei; ZHANG Song-le; WANG Xi-liang

    2006-01-01

    @@ Brucella abortus is a gram-negative, facultative, intracellular bacterium that infects both cattle and humans, causing abortion and infertility in the former and undulant fever, endocarditis, arthritis, and osteomyelitis. Resistance to Brucella depends on acquired cell-mediated immunity (CMI).1 Live attenuated vaccines can stimulate strong CMI response, which are usually very effective against brucellosis and are used to control brucellosis in domestic animals. However, there is no safe and effective vaccine available for human because the vaccine strains used for animals are considered too virulent for humans. A vaccine that will be noninfectious to humans but effective in stimulating a broad protective immune response is needed.2

  7. Characterization of the long-term immune response to vaccination against Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in Danish dairy cows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Vibeke Thulstrup; Nielsen, Søren Saxmose; Thakur, Aneesh;

    2012-01-01

    of vaccination on the cell-mediated immune response and to evaluate a possible interference with the diagnosis of M. bovis infections.The results showed that 37% of samples from vaccinated animals and 5% of samples from non-vaccinated animals, respectively, were test positive in the milk antibody ELISA......Vaccination of cattle against Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) provides partial protection by delayed shedding of MAP and reduced numbers of clinically affected animals. The duration of vaccine induced immune response is not known. The primary objective of this study was therefore...

  8. Oral immunization of mice against Clostridium perfringens epsilon toxin with a Lactobacillus casei vector vaccine expressing epsilon toxoid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alimolaei, Mojtaba; Golchin, Mehdi; Daneshvar, Hamid

    2016-06-01

    Clostridium perfringens type D infects ruminants and causes the enterotoxemia disease by ε-toxin. A mutated ε-toxin gene lacking toxicity was designed, synthesized, and cloned into the pT1NX vector and electroporated into Lactobacillus casei competent cells to yield LC-pT1NX-ε recombinant strain. BALB/c mice, immunized orally with this strain, highly induced mucosal, humoral, and cell-mediated immune responses and developed a protection against 200 MLD/ml of the activated ε-toxin. This study showed that the LC-pT1NX-ε could be a promising vaccine candidate against the enterotoxemia disease.

  9. Characterization of in vitro antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity activity of therapeutic antibodies - impact of effector cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Shan; Lin, Yuwen L; Reed, Chae; Ng, Carl; Cheng, Zhijie Jey; Malavasi, Fabio; Yang, Jihong; Quarmby, Valerie; Song, An

    2014-05-01

    Antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) is an important mechanism of action implicated in the clinical efficacy of several therapeutic antibodies. In vitro ADCC assays employing effector cells capable of inducing lysis of target cells bound by antibodies are routinely performed to support the research and development of therapeutic antibodies. ADCC assays are commonly performed using peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), natural killer (NK) cells or engineered cell lines as effector cells. In this study we evaluated the impact of different effector cell types including primary PBMCs, primary NK cells, engineered NK cell lines, and an engineered reporter cell line, on the in vitro ADCC activity of two glycoforms of a humanized IgG1 antibody. The results of this study show the differential effects on both the efficacy and potency of the antibodies by different effector cells and the finding that both the allotype and the expression level of CD16a affect the potency of effector cells in ADCC assays. Our results also show that engineered NK or reporter cell lines provide reduced variability compared to primary effector cells for in vitro ADCC assays.

  10. The Ameliorative Effect of Sophoricoside on Mast Cell-Mediated Allergic Inflammation in Vivo and in Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae-Young Um

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Sophoricoside exhibits numerous pharmacological effects, including anti- inflammatory and anti-cancer actions, yet the exact mechanism that accounts for the anti-allergic effects of sophoricoside is not completely understood. The aim of the present study was to elucidate whether and how sophoricoside modulates the mast cell-mediated allergic inflammation in vitro and in vivo. We investigated the pharmacological effects of sophoricoside on both compound 48/80 or histamine-induced scratching behaviors and 2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene (DNCB-induced atopic dermatitis in mice. Additionally, to find a possible explanation for the anti-inflammatory effects of sophoricoside, we evaluated the effects of sophoricoside on the production of histamine and inflammatory cytokines and activation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB and caspase-1 in phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate plus calcium ionophore A23187 (PMACI-stimulated human mast cells (HMC-1. The finding of this study demonstrated that sophoricoside reduced compound 48/80 or histamine-induced scratching behaviors and DNCB-induced atopic dermatitis in mice. Additionally, sophoricoside inhibited the production of inflammatory cytokines as well as the activation of NF-κB and caspase-1 in stimulated HMC-1. Collectively, the findings of this study provide us with novel insights into the pharmacological actions of sophoricoside as a potential molecule for use in the treatment of allergic inflammation diseases.

  11. Antimicrobial peptide LL-37 promotes antigen-specific immune responses in mice by enhancing Th17-skewed mucosal and systemic immunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sae-Hae; Yang, In-Young; Kim, Ju; Lee, Kyung-Yeol; Jang, Yong-Suk

    2015-05-01

    The human antimicrobial peptide LL-37 is known to have chemotactic and modulatory activities on various cells including monocytes, T cells, and epithelial cells. Given that LL-37 enhances chemotactic attraction and modulates the activity of DCs, it is conceivable that it might play a role as an immune adjuvant by skewing the immune environment toward immunostimulatory conditions. In this study, we characterized the mucosal adjuvant activity of LL-37 using model and pathogenic Ags. When LL-37-conjugated Ag was administered orally to mice, a tolerogenic Peyer's patch environment was altered to cell populations containing IL-6-secreting CD11c(+), CD11c(+) CD70(+), and Th17 cells capable of evoking a subsequent LL-37-conjugated Ag-specific immune response in both systemic and mucosal immune compartments. In addition, we showed presentation of formyl peptide receptor, an LL-37 receptor, on M cells, which may aid the initiation of an LL-37-mediated enhanced immune response through targeting and transcytosis of the conjugated Ag. Based on our findings, we conclude that LL-37 has potential as an oral mucosal adjuvant, not only by enhancing the delivery of LL-37-conjugated Ag to M cells, but also by triggering T-cell-mediated Ag-specific immune responses through modulation of the mucosal immune environment.

  12. Understanding Herd Immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metcalf, C J E; Ferrari, M; Graham, A L; Grenfell, B T

    2015-12-01

    Individual immunity is a powerful force affecting host health and pathogen evolution. Importantly, the effects of individual immunity also scale up to affect pathogen transmission dynamics and the success of vaccination campaigns for entire host populations. Population-scale immunity is often termed 'herd immunity'. Here we outline how individual immunity maps to population outcomes and discuss implications for control of infectious diseases. Particular immunological characteristics may be more or less likely to result in a population level signature of herd immunity; we detail this and also discuss other population-level outcomes that might emerge from individual-level immunity.

  13. The pH-sensitive fusogenic 3-methyl-glutarylated hyperbranched poly(glycidol)-conjugated liposome induces antigen-specific cellular and humoral immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hebishima, Takehisa; Yuba, Eiji; Kono, Kenji; Takeshima, Shin-Nosuke; Ito, Yoshihiro; Aida, Yoko

    2012-09-01

    We examined the ability of a novel liposome, surface modified by 3-methyl-glutarylated hyperbranched poly(glycidol) (MGlu-HPG), to enhance antigen-specific immunity in vitro and in vivo and to function as a vaccine carrier. Murine bone marrow-derived dendritic cells took up ovalbumin (OVA) encapsulated in MGlu-HPG-modified liposomes more effectively than free OVA or OVA encapsulated in unmodified liposomes. Immunization of mice with OVA-containing MGlu-HPG-modified liposomes induced antigen-specific splenocyte proliferation and production of gamma interferon (IFN-γ) more strongly than did immunization with free OVA or OVA encapsulated in unmodified liposomes. The immune responses induced by OVA encapsulated in MGlu-HPG-modified liposomes were significantly suppressed by addition of anti-major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I and class II monoclonal antibodies, indicating the involvement of antigen presentation via MHC class I and II. Furthermore, delayed-type hypersensitivity responses and OVA-specific antibodies were induced more effectively in mice immunized with OVA encapsulated by MGlu-HPG-modified liposomes than with unencapsulated OVA or OVA encapsulated in unmodified liposomes. These results suggested that MGlu-HPG-modified liposomes effectively induced both cell-mediated and humoral immune responses. Collectively, this study is the first to demonstrate the induction of both cell-mediated and humoral immune responses in vivo by MGlu-HPG-modified liposomes.

  14. Comparison of Th1- and Th2-associated immune reactivities stimulated by single versus multiple vaccination of mice with irradiated Schistosoma mansoni cercariae

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    Caulada-Benedetti, Z.; Al-Zamel, F.; Sher, A.; James, S. (NIAID, Bethesda, MD (USA))

    1991-03-01

    Mice immunized against Schistosoma mansoni by a single percutaneous exposure to radiation-attenuated parasite larvae demonstrate partial resistance to challenge infection that has been shown to correlate with development of cell-mediated immunity, whereas mice hyperimmunized by multiple exposure to attenuated larvae produce antibodies capable of transferring partial protection to naive recipients. Measurement of Ag-specific lymphokine responses in these animals suggested that the difference in resistance mechanisms may be due to the differential induction of Th subset response by the two immunization protocols. Thus, upon Ag stimulation, singly immunized mice predominantly demonstrated responses associated with Th1 reactivity, including IL-2 and IFN-gamma production, whereas multiply immunized animals showed increased IL-5, IL-4, and IgG1 antibody production associated with enhanced Th2 response. These responses demonstrated some degree of organ compartmentalization, with splenocytes demonstrating higher Th1-related lymphokine production and cells from draining lymph nodes showing stronger proliferation and Th2 type reactivity. However, hyperimmunized mice also continued to demonstrate substantial Th1-associated immune reactivity. Moreover, in vivo Ag challenge elicited activated larvacidal macrophages in hyperimmunized animals. These observations indicate that protective cell-mediated mechanisms associated with induction of CD4+ Th1 cell reactivity predominate in singly vaccinated mice. Further vaccination stimulates Th2 responses, such as enhanced IgG1 production, that may also contribute to protective immunity.

  15. Dietary supplementation of mannan-oligosaccharide enhances neonatal immune responses in chickens during natural exposure to Eimeria spp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nava Gerardo M

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Control and eradication of intestinal infections caused by protozoa are important biomedical challenges worldwide. Prophylactic control of coccidiosis has been achieved with the use of anticoccidial drugs; however, the increase in anticoccidial resistance has raised concerns about the need for new alternatives for the control of coccidial infections. In fact, new strategies are needed to induce potent protective immune responses in neonatal individuals. Methods The effects of a dietary supplementation of mannan-oligosaccharide (yeast cell wall; YCW on the local, humoral and cell-mediated immune responses, and intestinal replication of coccidia were evaluated in a neonatal animal model during natural exposure to Eimeria spp. A total of 840 one-day-old chicks were distributed among four dietary regimens: A Control diet (no YCW plus anticoccidial vaccine; B Control diet plus coccidiostat; C YCW diet plus anticoccidial vaccination; and D YCW diet plus coccidiostat. Weight gain, feed consumption and immunological parameters were examined within the first seven weeks of life. Results Dietary supplementation of 0.05% of YCW increased local mucosal IgA secretions, humoral and cell-mediated immune responses, and reduced parasite excretion in feces. Conclusion Dietary supplementation of yeast cell wall in neonatal animals can enhance the immune response against coccidial infections. The present study reveals the potential of YCW as adjuvant for modulating mucosal immune responses.

  16. The Xs and Y of immune responses to viral vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Sabra L; Jedlicka, Anne; Pekosz, Andrew

    2010-05-01

    The biological differences associated with the sex of an individual are a major source of variation, affecting immune responses to vaccination. Compelling clinical data illustrate that men and women differ in their innate, humoral, and cell-mediated responses to viral vaccines. Sex affects the frequency and severity of adverse effects of vaccination, including fever, pain, and inflammation. Pregnancy can also substantially alter immune responses to vaccines. Data from clinical trials and animal models of vaccine efficacy lay the groundwork for future studies aimed at identifying the biological mechanisms that underlie sex-specific responses to vaccines, including genetic and hormonal factors. An understanding and appreciation of the effect of sex and pregnancy on immune responses might change the strategies used by public health officials to start efficient vaccination programmes (optimising the timing and dose of the vaccine so that the maximum number of people are immunised), ensure sufficient levels of immune responses, minimise adverse effects, and allow for more efficient protection of populations that are high priority (eg, pregnant women and individuals with comorbid conditions).

  17. Hydroxytyrosol and oleuropein of olive oil inhibit mast cell degranulation induced by immune and non-immune pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persia, Fabio Andrés; Mariani, María Laura; Fogal, Teresa Hilda; Penissi, Alicia Beatriz

    2014-09-25

    The aim of this study was to determine whether hydroxytyrosol and oleuropein, the major phenols found in olives and olive oil, inhibit mast cell activation induced by immune and non-immune pathways. Purified peritoneal mast cells were preincubated in the presence of test compounds (hydroxytyrosol or oleuropein), before incubation with concanavalin A, compound 48/80 or calcium ionophore A23187. Dose-response and time-dependence studies were carried out. Comparative studies with sodium cromoglycate, a classical mast cell stabilizer, were also made. After incubation the supernatants and pellets were used to determine the β-hexosaminidase content by colorimetric reaction. The percentage of β-hexosaminidase release in each tube was calculated and taken as a measure of mast cell activation. Other samples of cell pellets were used for cell viability studies by the trypan blue dye exclusion test, or fixed for light and electron microscopy. Biochemical and morphological findings of the present study showed for the first time that hydroxytyrosol and oleuropein inhibit mast cell degranulation induced by both immune and non-immune pathways. These results suggest that olive phenols, particularly hydroxytyrosol and oleuropein, may provide insights into the development of useful tools for the prevention and treatment of mast cell-mediated disorders.

  18. Murine immune responses to oral BCG immunization in the presence or absence of prior BCG sensitization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, Martin L; Lambeth, Matthew R; Aldwell, Frank E

    2010-02-01

    Oral delivery of live Mycobacterium bovis BCG in a lipid matrix invokes cell-mediated immune (CMI) responses in mice and consequent protection against pulmonary challenge with virulent mycobacteria. To investigate the influence of prior BCG sensitization on oral vaccine efficacy, we assessed CMI responses and BCG colonization of the alimentary tract lymphatics 5 months after oral vaccination, in both previously naive mice and in mice that had been sensitized to BCG by injection 6 months previously. CMI responses did not differ significantly between mice that received subcutaneous BCG followed by oral BCG and those that received either injected or oral BCG alone. In vivo BCG colonization was predominant in the mesenteric lymph nodes after oral vaccination; this colonizing ability was not influenced by prior BCG sensitization. From this murine model study, we conclude that although prior parenteral-route BCG sensitization does not detrimentally affect BCG colonization after oral vaccination, there is no significant immune-boosting effect of the oral vaccine either.

  19. Reactive oxygen species induced by therapeutic CD20 antibodies inhibit natural killer cell-mediated antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity against primary CLL cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werlenius, Olle; Aurelius, Johan; Hallner, Alexander; Akhiani, Ali A.; Simpanen, Maria; Martner, Anna; Andersson, Per-Ola; Hellstrand, Kristoffer; Thorén, Fredrik B.

    2016-01-01

    The antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) of natural killer (NK) cells is assumed to contribute to the clinical efficacy of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) and other hematopoietic malignancies of B cell origin. We sought to determine whether reactive oxygen species (ROS)-producing monocytes regulate the ADCC of NK cells against primary CLL cells using anti-CD20 as the linking antibody. The monoclonal CD20 antibodies rituximab and ofatumumab were found to trigger substantial release of ROS from monocytes. Antibody-exposed monocytes induced NK cell apoptosis and restricted NK cell-mediated ADCC against autologous CLL cells. The presence of inhibitors of ROS formation and scavengers of ROS preserved NK cell viability and restored NK cell-mediated ADCC against primary CLL cells. We propose that limiting the antibody-induced induction of immunosuppressive ROS may improve the anti-leukemic efficacy of anti-CD20 therapy in CLL. PMID:27097113

  20. Signaling pathways implicated in the cellular innate immune responses of Drosophila

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AJ Nappi

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available The phylogenetically conserved innate immune systems of insects and other invertebrates employblood cells (hemocytes that are functionally reminiscent of vertebrate macrophages, attesting to theimportance of phagocytosis and other cell-mediated responses in eliminating various pathogens. Receptorligandbinding activates signaling cascades that promote collaborative cellular interactions and theproduction of pathogen-specific cytotoxic responses. Numerous comparative genetic and molecularstudies have shown the cytotoxic effector responses made by cells of the innate immune system to beevolutionarily conserved. Comparative analyses of genomic sequences provide convincing evidence thatmany of the biochemical processes manifested by immune-activated hemocytes are similar to thosemade by activated vertebrate macrophages. Included in this genomic repertoire are enzymes associatedwith reactive intermediates of oxygen and nitrogen, cellular redox homeostasis, and apoptosis, thesynthesis of extracellular matrix, cell adhesion and pattern recognition molecules. Surprisingly, little isknown of the types of cytotoxic molecules produced by invertebrate hemocytes, and the signaling andtranscriptional events associated with their collaborative interactions when engaging pathogens andparasites. This review examines certain aspects of the blood cell-mediated defense responses ofDrosophila, and some of the signaling pathways that have been implicated in hemocyte activation,differentiation, and the regulation of hematopoiesis.

  1. Evolutionary origin of the immune system: a dialogue with Rod Langman.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagy, Z A

    2008-04-01

    The need of a specific defence mechanism against intracellular pathogens is proposed to have arisen very early in evolution, perhaps already in protozoa, e.g. amoebae. The phagocytic machinery of amoebae lends itself as a possible starting point for the evolution of such a mechanism. The hypothetical evolutionary pathway described here has been constructed to demonstrate the feasibility of developing a defence system against pathogens in the amoeba, which bears resemblances to contemporary cell-mediated immunity, and can thus be considered as its ancestor.

  2. The dual role of interleukin-25 in the control of immune-mediated pathologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caruso, R; Stolfi, C; De Nitto, D; Pallone, F; Monteleone, G

    2011-02-01

    Interleukin-25 (IL-25) plays a key role in the initiation and expansion of T helper (Th) 2 cell-mediated immune responses, thereby contributing to allergic diseases and host defense against helminthic parasites. More recent studies have however shown that IL-25 can also control the function of non-T cells, such as antigen presenting cells and endothelial cells, and reduces Th1/Th17-mediated pathologies. These new and exciting observations reveal a broader role for IL-25 than previously anticipated, and delineate various scenarios where therapeutic interventions around IL-25 activity can be imagined.

  3. Schwann Cell-Mediated Preservation of Vision in Retinal Degenerative Diseases via the Reduction of Oxidative Stress: A Possible Mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    MAHMOUDZADEH, Raziyeh; HEIDARI-KESHEL, Saeed; LASHAY, Alireza

    2016-01-01

    After injury to the central nervous system (CNS), regeneration is often inadequate, except in the case of remyelination. This remyelination capacity of the CNS is a good example of a stem/precursor cell-mediated renewal process. Schwann cells have been found to act as remyelinating agents in the peripheral nervous system (PNS), but several studies have highlighted their potential role in remyelination in the CNS too. Schwann cells are able to protect and support retinal cells by secreting growth factors such as brain-derived neurotrophic factor, glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor, and basic fibroblast growth factor. Retinal degenerative diseases can be highly debilitating, and they are a major concern in countries with an ageing populations. One of the leading causes of permanent loss of vision in the West is a retinal degenerative disease known as age-related macular degeneration (AMD). In the United States, nearly 1.75 million people over the age of 40 have advanced AMD, and it is estimated that this number will increase to approximately 3 million people by 2020. One of the most common pathways involved in the initiation and development of retinal diseases is the oxidative stress pathway. In patients with diabetes, Schwann cells have been shown to be able to secrete large amounts of antioxidant enzymes that protect the PNS from the oxidative stress that results from fluctuations in blood glucose levels. This antioxidant ability may be involved in the mechanism by which Schwann cells are able to promote reconstruction in the CNS, especially in individuals with retinal injuries and degenerative diseases. PMID:28293647

  4. An impedance-based cytotoxicity assay for real-time and label-free assessment of T-cell-mediated killing of adherent cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peper, Janet Kerstin; Schuster, Heiko; Löffler, Markus W; Schmid-Horch, Barbara; Rammensee, Hans-Georg; Stevanović, Stefan

    2014-03-01

    The in vitro assessment of T-cell-mediated cytotoxicity plays an important and increasingly relevant role both in preclinical target evaluation and during immunomonitoring to accompany clinical trials employing targeted immunotherapies. For a long time, the gold standard for this purpose has been the chromium release assay (CRA). This end point assay, however, shows several disadvantages including the inevitable use of radioactivity. Based on electrical impedance measurements (using the xCELLigence system), we have established a label-free assay, facilitating the real-time monitoring of T-cell-mediated cytotoxicity. The coculture of peptide-specific T-cell lines with peptide-loaded target cells reproducibly led to a decrease in impedance due to induced apoptosis and detachment of target cells. Comparing our results to the standard CRA assay, we could demonstrate that impedance-based measurements show comparable results after short incubation periods (6h) but outperform the CRA both in reproducibility and sensitivity after prolonged incubation (24h), enabling the detection of target cell lysis with an effector to target ratio as low as 0.05:1. The impedance-based assay represents a valuable and highly sensitive tool for label-free real-time high throughput analysis of T-cell-mediated cytotoxicity.

  5. Skin innate immune system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berna Aksoy

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available All multicellular organisms protect themselves from external universe and microorganisms by innate immune sytem that is constitutively present. Skin innate immune system has several different components composed of epithelial barriers, humoral factors and cellular part. In this review information about skin innate immune system and its components are presented to the reader. Innate immunity, which wasn’t adequately interested in previously, is proven to provide a powerfull early protection system, control many infections before the acquired immunity starts and directs acquired immunity to develop optimally

  6. Immune Responses Following Mouse Peripheral Nerve Xenotransplantation in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lai-Jin Lu

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Xenotransplantation offers a potentially unlimited source for tissues and organs for transplantation, but the strong xenoimmune responses pose a major obstacle to its application in the clinic. In this study, we investigate the rejection of mouse peripheral nerve xenografts in rats. Severe intragraft mononuclear cell infiltration, graft distension, and necrosis were detected in the recipients as early as 2 weeks after mouse nerve xenotransplantation. The number of axons in xenografts reduced progressively and became almost undetectable at week 8. However, mouse nerve xenotransplantation only led to a transient and moderate increase in the production of Th1 cytokines, including IL-2, IFN-γ, and TNF-α. The data implicate that cellular immune responses play a critical role in nerve xenograft rejection but that further identification of the major effector cells mediating the rejection is required for developing effective means to prevent peripheral nerve xenograft rejection.

  7. Lactose inhibits regulatory T-cell-mediated suppression of effector T-cell interferon-γ and IL-17 production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paasela, Monika; Kolho, Kaija-Leena; Vaarala, Outi; Honkanen, Jarno

    2014-12-14

    Our interest in lactose as an immunomodulatory molecule results from studies showing that lactose binds to galectin-9, which has been shown to have various regulatory functions in the immune system including regulation of T-cell responses. Impaired regulation of T helper (Th)1 and Th17 type immune responses and dysfunction of regulatory T cells (Treg) have been implicated in many human immune-mediated diseases. In the present study, we investigated the effects of lactose on immune regulation using co-cultures of human peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC)-derived Treg and effector T cells (Teff) obtained from twenty healthy adults. Treg, i.e. CD4+CD25+CD127-, were isolated from PBMC by immunomagnetic separation. The fraction of CD4+CD127- cells that was depleted of CD25+ cells was used as Teff. Treg and Teff at a ratio 1:5 were activated and the effects of lactose on the secretion of interferon-γ (IFN-γ) and IL-17 were analysed using ELISA for protein and quantitative RT-PCR for mRNA. Treg down-regulated the secretion of both IFN-γ (8.8-3.9 ng/ml, n 20, P= 0.003) and IL-17 (0.83-0.64 ng/ml, n 15, P= 0.04) in co-cultures, while in the presence of lactose the levels of secreted IFN-γ and IL-17 remained high and no down-regulation was observed (16.4 v. 3.99 ng/ml, n 20, Plactose inhibits human Treg-mediated suppression of Th1 and Th17 immune responses in vitro.

  8. Aging changes in immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/004008.htm Aging changes in immunity To use the sharing features ... cells and antibodies that destroy these harmful substances. Aging Changes and Their Effects on the Immune System ...

  9. Immune System and Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Your immune system is a complex network of cells, tissues, and organs that work together to defend against germs. It ... t, to find and destroy them. If your immune system cannot do its job, the results can be ...

  10. MDV-1 VP22 conjugated VP2 enhancing immune response against infectious bursal disease virus by DNA vaccination in mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    VP22 of Marek’s disease virus serotype 1 (MDV-1) could function in protein transduction. In this study, an infectious bursal disease virus VP2 gene was fused to the carboxyl termini of VP22. It showed that the fusion protein did not spread into the bystander cells from the cells transfected with pVP22-VP2, as the VP22 alone could. The VP22 proteins were found to be translocated into all the nuclei in the neighboring COS-1 cells, as analyzed by a fluorescence assay. Although mice were immunized with the recombinant DNAs mixed with polyethylenimine (PEI) at a dose of 1:2, it failed to enhance the antibody response against IBDV VP2, as measured by the indirect ELISA assay, yet the cell mediated immune response was significantly increased. The ratio of CD8+/CD4+ T cells was significantly increased in the immunized group with the fusion genes, compared with the group immunized with VP2 (P<0.05). Our results demonstrated that VP22 indeed enhances the cell-mediated response in the fused VP2 in a mice model system, possibly due to the fact that the IBDV VP2 could be carried into the surrounding cells at a limited level under pressure from MDV VP22.

  11. Immune Disorder HSCT Protocol

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-01

    Immune Deficiency Disorders; Severe Combined Immunodeficiency; Chronic Granulomatous Disease; X-linked Agammaglobulinemia; Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome; Hyper-IgM; DiGeorge Syndrome; Chediak-Higashi Syndrome; Common Variable Immune Deficiency; Immune Dysregulatory Disorders; Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis; IPEX; Autoimmune Lymphoproliferative Syndrome; X-linked Lymphoproliferative Syndrome

  12. The Immune System Game

    Science.gov (United States)

    Work, Kirsten A.; Gibbs, Melissa A.; Friedman, Erich J.

    2015-01-01

    We describe a card game that helps introductory biology students understand the basics of the immune response to pathogens. Students simulate the steps of the immune response with cards that represent the pathogens and the cells and molecules mobilized by the immune system. In the process, they learn the similarities and differences between the…

  13. The Granzyme B ELISPOT assay: an alternative to the 51Cr-release assay for monitoring cell-mediated cytotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baseler Michael

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The interferon-γ (IFN-γ ELISPOT assay is one of the most useful techniques for immunological monitoring of cancer vaccine trials and has gained increased application as a measure of specific T cell activation. However, it does not assess cell-mediated cytotoxicity directly as IFN-γ secretion is not limited to only cytolytic cells. Granzyme B (GrB is a key mediator of target cell death via the granule-mediated pathway. Therefore, the release of GrB by cytolytic lymphocytes upon effector-target interaction may be a more specific indicator of CTL and NK cytotoxic ability than IFN-γ secretion. Methods We assessed whether the GrB ELISPOT assay is a viable alternative to the 51Cr-release and IFN-γ ELISPOT assays for measuring antigen-specific CTL cytotoxicity. Direct comparisons between the three assays were made using human CTL cell lines (αEN-EBV and αJY and an in vitro stimulated anti-Flu matrix peptide (FMP-specific CTL. Results When the GrB ELISPOT was directly compared to the IFN-γ ELISPOT and 51Cr-release assays, excellent cross-correlation between all three assays was shown. However, measurable IFN-γ secretion in the ELISPOT assay was observed only after 1 hour of incubation and cytotoxicity assessed via the 51Cr-release assay after 4 hours, whereas GrB secretion was detectable within 10 min of effector-target contact with significant secretion observed after 1 h. Titration studies demonstrated a strong correlation between the number of effector cells and GrB spots per well. Irrelevant targets or antigens did not induce significant GrB secretion. Additionally, GrB secretion was abrogated when CTL cultures were depleted of CD8+ cells. Conclusion Our findings demonstrate that the GrB ELISPOT assay is a superior alternative to the 51Cr-release assay since it is significantly more sensitive and provides an estimation of cytotoxic effector cell frequency. Additionally, unlike the IFN-γ ELISPOT assay, the GrB ELISPOT

  14. Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Autoimmune or Immune-mediated Pathogenesis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhonghui Wen

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The pathogenesis of Crohn's disease (CD and ulcerative colitis (UC, the two main forms of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD, is still unclear, but both autoimmune and immune-mediated phenomena are involved. Autoimmune phenomena include the presence of serum and mucosal autoantibodies against intestinal epithelial cells in either form of IBD, and against human tropomyosin fraction five selectively in UC. In addition, perinuclear antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (pANCA are common in UC, whereas antibodies against Saccharomyces cerevisiae (ASCA are frequently found in CD. Immune-mediate phenomena include a variety of abnormalities of humoral and cell-mediated immunity, and a generalized enhanced reactivity against intestinal bacterial antigens in both CD and UC. It is currently believed that loss of tolerance against the indigenous enteric flora is the central event in IBD pathogenesis. Various complementary factors probably contribute to the loss of tolerance to commensal bacteria in IBD. They include defects in regulatory T-cell function, excessive stimulation of mucosal dendritic cells, infections or variants of proteins critically involved in bacterial antigen recognition, such as the products of CD-associated NOD2/CARD15 mutations.

  15. A mathematical model of tumor–immune interactions

    KAUST Repository

    Robertson-Tessi, Mark

    2012-02-01

    A mathematical model of the interactions between a growing tumor and the immune system is presented. The equations and parameters of the model are based on experimental and clinical results from published studies. The model includes the primary cell populations involved in effector T-cell mediated tumor killing: regulatory T cells, helper T cells, and dendritic cells. A key feature is the inclusion of multiple mechanisms of immunosuppression through the main cytokines and growth factors mediating the interactions between the cell populations. Decreased access of effector cells to the tumor interior with increasing tumor size is accounted for. The model is applied to tumors with different growth rates and antigenicities to gauge the relative importance of various immunosuppressive mechanisms. The most important factors leading to tumor escape are TGF-Β-induced immunosuppression, conversion of helper T cells into regulatory T cells, and the limitation of immune cell access to the full tumor at large tumor sizes. The results suggest that for a given tumor growth rate, there is an optimal antigenicity maximizing the response of the immune system. Further increases in antigenicity result in increased immunosuppression, and therefore a decrease in tumor killing rate. This result may have implications for immunotherapies which modulate the effective antigenicity. Simulation of dendritic cell therapy with the model suggests that for some tumors, there is an optimal dose of transfused dendritic cells. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd.

  16. From T cell "exhaustion" to anti-cancer immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdeil, Grégory; Fuertes Marraco, Silvia A; Murray, Timothy; Speiser, Daniel E

    2016-01-01

    The immune system has the potential to protect from malignant diseases for extended periods of time. Unfortunately, spontaneous immune responses are often inefficient. Significant effort is required to develop reliable, broadly applicable immunotherapies for cancer patients. A major innovation was transplantation with hematopoietic stem cells from genetically distinct donors for patients with hematologic malignancies. In this setting, donor T cells induce long-term remission by keeping cancer cells in check through powerful allogeneic graft-versus-leukemia effects. More recently, a long awaited breakthrough for patients with solid tissue cancers was achieved, by means of therapeutic blockade of T cell inhibitory receptors. In untreated cancer patients, T cells are dysfunctional and remain in a state of T cell "exhaustion". Nonetheless, they often retain a high potential for successful defense against cancer, indicating that many T cells are not entirely and irreversibly exhausted but can be mobilized to become highly functional. Novel antibody therapies that block inhibitory receptors can lead to strong activation of anti-tumor T cells, mediating clinically significant anti-cancer immunity for many years. Here we review these new treatments and the current knowledge on tumor antigen-specific T cells.

  17. Viral infections in mice with reconstituted human immune system components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Münz, Christian

    2014-09-01

    Pathogenic viruses are often difficult to study due to their exclusive tropism for humans. The development of mice with human immune system components opens the possibility to study those human pathogens with a tropism for the human hematopoietic lineage in vivo. These include HCMV, EBV, KSHV, HIV, HTLV-1, dengue virus and JC virus. Furthermore, some human pathogens, like HSV-2, adenovirus, HCV, HBV and influenza A virus, with an additional tropism for somatic mouse tissues or for additional transplanted human tissues, mainly liver, have been explored in these models. The cellular tropism of these viruses, their associated diseases and primarily cell-mediated immune responses to these viral infections will be discussed in this review. Already some exciting information has been gained from these novel chimeric in vivo models and future avenues to gain more insights into the pathology, but also potential therapies, will be outlined. Although the respective in vivo models of human immune responses can still be significantly improved, they already provide preclinical systems for in vivo studies of important viral pathogens of humans.

  18. Cell-mediated lympholysis of trinitrophenyl-modified autologous lymphocytes. Effector cell specificity to modified cell surface components controlled by H-2K and H-2D serological regions of the murine major histocompatibility complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shearer, G M; Rehn, T G; Garbarino, C A

    1975-06-01

    Splenic lymphocytes from four C57BL/10 congenic resistant mouse strains were sensitized in vitro with trinitrophenyl (TNP)-modified autologous spleen cellsmthe effector cells generated were incubated with 51-Cr-labeled unmodified or TNP-modified spleen or tumor target cells, and the percentage of specific lympholysis determined. The results obtained using syngeneic-, congenic-, recombinante, and allogeneic-modified target cells indicated that TNP modification of the target cells was a necessary but insufficient requirement for lympholysis. Intra-H-2 homology either between modified stimulating cells and modified target cells or between responding lymphocytes and modified target cells was also important in the specificity for lysis. Homology at the K serological region or at K plus I-A in the B10.A and B10BR strains, and at either the D serological region or at some other region (possibly K) in the B10.D2 and C57BL/10 strains were shown to be necessary in order to detect lympholysis. Experiments using (B10itimes C57BL/10)F1 responding lymphocytes sensitized and assayed with TNP-modified parental cells indicated that the homology required for lympholysis was between modified stimulating and modified target cellsmthe possibility is raised that histocompatibility antigens may serve in the autologous system as cell surface components which are modified by viruses or autoimmune complexes to form cell-bound modified-self antigens, which are particularly suited for cell-mediated immune reactions. Evidence is presented suggesting that H-2-linked Ir genes are expressed in the TNP-modified autologous cytotoxic system. These findings imply that the major histocompatibility complex can be functionally involved both in the response potential to and in the formation of new antigenic determinants involving modified-self components.

  19. Activation of Toll-like Receptor-2 by Endogenous Matrix Metalloproteinase-2 Modulates Dendritic-Cell-Mediated Inflammatory Responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuelle Godefroy

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2 is involved in several physiological mechanisms, including wound healing and tumor progression. We show that MMP-2 directly stimulates dendritic cells (DCs to both upregulate OX40L on the cell surface and secrete inflammatory cytokines. The mechanism underlying DC activation includes physical association with Toll-like receptor-2 (TLR2, leading to NF-κB activation, OX40L upregulation on DCs, and ensuing TH2 differentiation. Significantly, MMP-2 polarizes T cells toward type 2 responses in vivo, in a TLR2-dependent manner. MMP-2-dependent type 2 polarization may represent a key immune regulatory mechanism for protection against a broad array of disorders, such as inflammatory, infectious, and autoimmune diseases, which can be hijacked by tumors to evade immunity.

  20. Activation of Toll-like receptor-2 by endogenous matrix metalloproteinase-2 modulates dendritic cell-mediated inflammatory responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godefroy, Emmanuelle; Gallois, Anne; Idoyaga, Juliana; Merad, Miriam; Tung, Navpreet; Monu, Ngozi; Saenger, Yvonne; Fu, Yichun; Nair, Rajesh; Pulendran, Bali; Jotereau, Francine; Trombetta, Sergio; Bhardwaj, Nina

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) is involved in several physiological mechanisms, including wound healing and tumor progression. We show that MMP-2 directly stimulates dendritic cells (DCs) to both up-regulate OX40L on the cell surface and secrete inflammatory cytokines. The mechanism underlying DC activation includes physical association with Toll-like receptor-2 (TLR2), leading to NF-κB activation, OX40L up-regulation on DCs and ensuing TH2 differentiation. Significantly, MMP-2 polarizes T cells towards type-2 responses in vivo, in a TLR2-dependent manner. MMP-2-dependent type-2 polarization may represent a key immune regulatory mechanism to protect against a broad array of disorders, such as inflammatory, infectious and autoimmune diseases, which can be hijacked by tumors to evade immunity. PMID:25466255

  1. Activation of toll-like receptor-2 by endogenous matrix metalloproteinase-2 modulates dendritic-cell-mediated inflammatory responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godefroy, Emmanuelle; Gallois, Anne; Idoyaga, Juliana; Merad, Miriam; Tung, Navpreet; Monu, Ngozi; Saenger, Yvonne; Fu, Yichun; Ravindran, Rajesh; Pulendran, Bali; Jotereau, Francine; Trombetta, Sergio; Bhardwaj, Nina

    2014-12-11

    Matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) is involved in several physiological mechanisms, including wound healing and tumor progression. We show that MMP-2 directly stimulates dendritic cells (DCs) to both upregulate OX40L on the cell surface and secrete inflammatory cytokines. The mechanism underlying DC activation includes physical association with Toll-like receptor-2 (TLR2), leading to NF-κB activation, OX40L upregulation on DCs, and ensuing TH2 differentiation. Significantly, MMP-2 polarizes T cells toward type 2 responses in vivo, in a TLR2-dependent manner. MMP-2-dependent type 2 polarization may represent a key immune regulatory mechanism for protection against a broad array of disorders, such as inflammatory, infectious, and autoimmune diseases, which can be hijacked by tumors to evade immunity.

  2. Immune tolerance induction using fetal directed placental injection in rodent models: a murine model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kei Takahashi

    Full Text Available Induction of the immune response is a major problem in replacement therapies for inherited protein deficiencies. Tolerance created in utero can facilitate postnatal treatment. In this study, we aimed to induce immune tolerance towards a foreign protein with early gestational cell transplantation into the chorionic villi under ultrasound guidance in the murine model.Pregnant C57BL/6 (B6 mice on day 10 of gestation were anesthetized and imaged by high resolution ultrasound. Murine embryos and their placenta were positioned to get a clear view in B-mode with power mode of the labyrinth, which is the equivalent of chorionic villi in the human. Bone marrow cells (BMCs from B6-Green Fluorescence Protein (B6GFP transgenic mice were injected into the fetal side of the placenta which includes the labyrinth with glass microcapillary pipettes. Each fetal mouse received 2 x 105 viable GFP-BMCs. After birth, we evaluated the humoral and cell-mediated immune response against GFP.Bone marrow transfer into fetal side of placenta efficiently distributed donor cells to the fetal mice. The survival rate of this procedure was 13.5%(5 out of 37. Successful engraftment of the B6-GFP donor skin grafts was observed in all recipient (5 out of 5 mice 6 weeks after birth. Induction of anti-GFP antibodies was completely inhibited. Cytotoxic immune reactivity of thymic cells against cells harboring GFP was suppressed by ELISPOT assay.In this study, we utilized early gestational placental injection targeting the murine fetus, to transfer donor cells carrying a foreign protein into the fetal circulation. This approach is sufficient to induce both humoral and cell-mediated immune tolerance against the foreign protein.

  3. Enhanced Dendritic Cell-Mediated Antigen-Specific CD4+ T Cell Responses: IFN-Gamma Aids TLR Stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuo-Ching Sheng

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Phenotypic maturation and T cell stimulation are two functional attributes of DCs critical for immune induction. The combination of antigens, including those from cancer, with Toll-like receptor (TLR ligands induces far superior cellular immune responses compared to antigen alone. In this study, IFN-gamma treatment of bone marrow-derived DC, followed by incubation with the TLR2, TLR4, or TLR9 agonists, enhanced DC activation compared to TLR ligation alone. Most notably, the upregulation of CD40 with LPS stimulation and CD86 with CpG stimulation was observed in in vitro cultures. Similarly, IFN-gamma coinjected with TLR ligands was able to promote DC activation in vivo, with DCs migrating from the site of immunization to the popliteal lymph nodes demonstrating increased expression of CD80 and CD86. The heightened DC activation translated to a drastic increase in T cell stimulatory capacity in both antigen independent and antigen dependent fashions. This is the first time that IFN-gamma has been shown to have a combined effect with TLR ligation to enhance DC activation and function. The results demonstrate the novel use of IFN-gamma together with TLR agonists to enhance antigen-specific T cell responses, for applications in the development of enhanced vaccines and drug targets against diseases including cancer.

  4. Synergistic immune responses induced by endogenous retrovirus and herpesvirus antigens result in increased production of inflammatory cytokines in multiple sclerosis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brudek, Tomasz; Christensen, Tove; Hansen, Hans Jacob;

    2008-01-01

    effect on cell-mediated immune responses, which tend to be higher in MS patients in comparison with healthy individuals. Here, we investigate whether these synergistic immune responses are reflected in changes in the production of proinflammatory cytokines. Using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays...... (ELISAs), we have performed a comparative study between MS patients and healthy controls to investigate the production of interferon (IFN)-gamma, interleukin (IL) 2, or IL-10 as well as the balance between Th1 and Th2 responses in supernatants from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) stimulated...

  5. Costs and benefits of experimentally induced changes in the allocation of growth versus immune function under differential exposure to ectoparasites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Pitala

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Ecological immunology has focused on the costs of investment in immunocompetence. However, understanding optimal resource allocation to immune defence requires also identification of its benefits, which are likely to occur only when parasites are abundant. METHODOLOGY: We manipulated the abundance of parasitic hen fleas in blue tit (Cyanistes caeruleus nests, and supplemented their hosts, the nestlings, with methionine (a sulphur amino acid enhancing cell-mediated immunity during day 3-6. We found a significant interaction between these two experimental factors on the development of immune defences and growth rates. Only in parasitized nests did methionine supplementation boost immune (PHA response, and did nestling with experimentally increased immunocompetence show a relatively faster growth rate than control nestlings between days 6-9. Hence, the allocation of resources into immune defence and its growth-benefits are apparent only in presence of parasites. The main cost of methionine-induced increased allocation to the immune system was an increase in mortality, independently of ectoparasites. Nestlings in all treatments compensated initial growth reduction and all reached equal body size at day 16 (just prior to fledging, indicating a lack of long-term benefits. In addition, methionine treatment tended (P = 0.09 to lower circulating plasma immunoglobulin levels, possibly indicating a trade-off between the cell-mediated and humoral components of the immune system. CONCLUSIONS: We found no strong benefits of an increased investment in immunocompetence in a parasite-rich environment. Any deviation from the growth trajectory (due to changes in allocation induced by methionine is largely detrimental for survival. Hence, while costs are apparent identifying the benefits of investment in immunocompetence during ontogeny is challenging.

  6. Signatures of T cells as correlates of immunity to Francisella tularensis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kjell Eneslätt

    Full Text Available Tularemia or vaccination with the live vaccine strain (LVS of Francisella tularensis confers long-lived cell-mediated immunity. We hypothesized that this immunity depends on polyfunctional memory T cells, i.e., CD4(+ and/or CD8(+ T cells with the capability to simultaneously express several functional markers. Multiparametric flow cytometry, measurement of secreted cytokines, and analysis of lymphocyte proliferation were used to characterize in vitro recall responses of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC to killed F. tularensis antigens from the LVS or Schu S4 strains. PBMC responses were compared between individuals who had contracted tularemia, had been vaccinated, or had not been exposed to F. tularensis (naïve. Significant differences were detected between either of the immune donor groups and naïve individuals for secreted levels of IL-5, IL-6, IL-10, IL-12, IL-13, IFN-γ, MCP-1, and MIP-1β. Expression of IFN-γ, MIP-1β, and CD107a by CD4(+CD45RO(+ or CD8(+CD45RO(+ T cells correlated to antigen concentrations. In particular, IFN-γ and MIP-1β strongly discriminated between immune and naïve individuals. Only one cytokine, IL-6, discriminated between the two groups of immune individuals. Notably, IL-2- or TNF-α-secretion was low. Our results identify functional signatures of T cells that may serve as correlates of immunity and protection against F. tularensis.

  7. Immune Adjuvant Effect of Molecularly-defined Toll-Like Receptor Ligands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deana N. Toussi

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Vaccine efficacy is optimized by addition of immune adjuvants. However, although adjuvants have been used for over a century, to date, only few adjuvants are approved for human use, mostly aimed at improving vaccine efficacy and antigen-specific protective antibody production. The mechanism of action of immune adjuvants is diverse, depending on their chemical and molecular nature, ranging from non-specific effects (i.e., antigen depot at the immunization site to specific activation of immune cells leading to improved host innate and adaptive responses. Although the detailed molecular mechanism of action of many adjuvants is still elusive, the discovery of Toll-like receptors (TLRs has provided new critical information on immunostimulatory effect of numerous bacterial components that engage TLRs. These ligands have been shown to improve both the quality and the quantity of host adaptive immune responses when used in vaccine formulations targeted to infectious diseases and cancer that require both humoral and cell-mediated immunity. The potential of such TLR adjuvants in improving the design and the outcomes of several vaccines is continuously evolving, as new agonists are discovered and tested in experimental and clinical models of vaccination. In this review, a summary of the recent progress in development of TLR adjuvants is presented.

  8. Immune function and nutrition. The clinical role of the intravenous nurse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, S

    1991-01-01

    Protein-calorie malnutrition is considered to be one of the most frequent causes of immunosuppression in the world today. Malnutrition can affect the functioning of T cells, B cells, and macrophages, the principle players involved in cell-mediated and humoral immunity. Immune function is measured by the total lymphocyte count and delayed cutaneous hypersensitivity reaction. Nutritional markers include serum albumin and transferrin levels. Immune function is affected by protein (especially arginine intake); the balance between omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acid intake; and adequate amounts of vitamins A, E, and C, and the minerals zinc and iron. A deficiency of these nutrients puts the patient at increased risk of infection. Non-nutritional factors can influence immune functioning as well. The intravenous nurse must review the patients history, physical examination, and laboratory values to achieve a global view of the patient's immune function and nutrition status in order to be able to develop an appropriate care plan based on this nursing diagnosis: potential for infection secondary to alteration in immune function.

  9. Dendritic Cells in Innate and Adaptive Immune Responses against Influenza Virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Artur Summerfield

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells (DC are major players in both innate and adaptive immune responses against influenza virus. These immune responses, as well as the important interface between the innate and adaptive systems, are orchestrated by specialized subsets of DC, including conventional steady-state DC, migratory DC and plasmacytoid DC. The characteristics and efficacy of the responses are dependent on the relative activity of these DC subsets, rendering DC crucial for the development of both naïve and memory immune responses. However, due to their critical role, DC also contribute to the immunopathological processes observed during acute influenza, such as that caused by the pathogenic H5N1 viruses. Therein, the role of different DC subsets in the induction of interferon type I, proinflammatory cytokine and chemokine responses is important for the outcome of interaction between the virus and host immune defences. The present review will present current knowledge on this area, relating to the importance of DC activity for the induction of efficacious humoral and cell-mediated immune responses. This will include the main viral elements associated with the triggering or inhibition of DC activation. Finally, the current knowledge on understanding how differences in various vaccines influence the manner of immune defence induction will be presented.

  10. The role of the innate and adaptive immune responses in Acanthamoeba keratitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niederkorn, Jerry Y

    2002-01-01

    Infections of the corneal surface are an important cause of blindness. Protozoal, viral, bacterial, and helminthic infections of the cornea account for up to 9 million cases of corneal blindness. Free-living amoebae of the genus Acanthamoeba produce a progressive infection of the cornea called Acanthamoeba keratitis. Disease is usually transmitted by Acanthamoeba trophozoites bound to soft contact lenses. Infection of the cornea is initiated when the parasite binds to the corneal epithelial surface. Recrudescence can occur and suggests that the adaptive immune response is not aroused by corneal Acanthamoeba infections. Systemic immunization with Acanthamoeba antigens elicits robust Th1 cell-mediated immunity and serum IgG antibody, yet fails to prevent the development of Acanthamoeba keratitis. However, immunization via mucosal surfaces induces anti-Acanthamoeba IgA antibodies in the tears and provides solid protection against the development of Acanthamoeba keratitis. Unlike other immune effector mechanisms that rely on cytolysis, inflammation, release of toxic molecules, or the induction of host cell death, the adaptive immune apparatus prevents Acanthamoeba infections of the cornea by simply preventing the attachment of the parasite to the epithelial surface. The beauty of this mechanism lies in its exquisite simplicity and efficacy.

  11. Simultaneous immunization against tuberculosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elma Z Tchilian

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: BCG, the only licensed vaccine against tuberculosis, provides some protection against disseminated disease in infants but has little effect on prevention of adult pulmonary disease. Newer parenteral immunization prime boost regimes may provide improved protection in experimental animal models but are unproven in man so that there remains a need for new and improved immunization strategies. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Mice were immunized parenterally, intranasally or simultaneously by both routes with BCG or recombinant mycobacterial antigens plus appropriate adjuvants. They were challenged with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb and the kinetics of Mtb growth in the lungs measured. We show that simultaneous immunization (SIM of mice by the intranasal and parenteral routes is highly effective in increasing protection over parenteral BCG administration alone. Intranasal immunization induces local pulmonary immunity capable of inhibiting the growth of Mtb in the early phase (the first week of infection, while parenteral immunization has a later effect on Mtb growth. Importantly, these two effects are additive and do not depend on priming and boosting the immune response. The best SIM regimes reduce lung Mtb load by up to 2 logs more than BCG given by either route alone. CONCLUSIONS: These data establish SIM as a novel and highly effective immunization strategy for Mtb that could be carried out at a single clinic visit. The efficacy of SIM does not depend on priming and boosting an immune response, but SIM is complementary to prime boost strategies and might be combined with them.

  12. An investigation of the general immune status and specific immune responsiveness to retinal-(S)-antigen in patients with chronic posterior uveitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froebel, K S; Armstrong, S S; Cliffe, A M; Urbaniak, S J; Forrester, J V

    1989-01-01

    Immunological abnormalities in endogenous posterior uveitis are widely reported but difficult to verify. We have therefore studied several immunological parameters in 14 patients with chronic posterior uveitis and compared the results with 14 healthy controls. Both the general immune status and the specific immune responsiveness to retinal S-antigen have been investigated. Results for the patient group as a whole were not significantly different from the control group. However the patients with severe eye disease (n = 4) had a reduced proliferative response to streptokinase-streptodornase antigen and two further individuals showed a general deficiency in functional cell mediated immunity. Circulating T-helper cells were marginally but not significantly reduced in patients. Responsiveness to bovine retinal S-antigen varied to a similar degree in both the patient and control groups. These findings indicate that, although severe uveitis may be associated with functional defects in cellular immunity in certain cases, in general the measurement of immune responsiveness of peripheral blood lymphocytes is unlikely to aid in the diagnosis or management of chronic posterior uveitis.

  13. Comparison of subcutaneous versus intranasal immunization of male koalas (Phascolarctos cinereus) for induction of mucosal and systemic immunity against Chlamydia pecorum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waugh, Courtney A; Timms, Peter; Andrew, Dean; Rawlinson, Galit; Brumm, Jacqui; Nilsson, Karen; Beagley, Kenneth W

    2015-02-11

    Chlamydia pecorum infections are debilitating in the koala, contributing significantly to morbidity and mortality, with current antibiotic treatments having minimal success and adversely affecting gut microflora. This, combined with the sometimes-asymptomatic nature of the infection, suggests that an efficacious anti-chlamydial vaccine is required to control chlamydial infections in the koala. To date vaccination studies have focused primarily on female koalas, however, given the physiological differences between male and female reproductive tracts, we tested the efficacy of a vaccine in 12 captive male koalas. We evaluated the potential of both subcutaneous and intranasal vaccine delivery to elicit mucosal immunity in male koalas. Our results showed that both intranasal and subcutaneous delivery of a vaccine consisting of C. pecorum major outer membrane protein (MOMP) and the adjuvant immunostimulating complex (ISC) induced significant immune responses in male koalas. Subcutaneous immunization elicited stronger cell-mediated responses in peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL), and greater plasma antibody levels whereas the intranasal immunization elicited stronger humoral responses in urogenital tract (UGT) secretions. This is the first time a Chlamydia vaccine has been tested in the male koala and the first assessment of a mucosal vaccination route in this species. Our results suggest that vaccination of male koalas can elicit mucosal immunity and could contribute to the long-term survivability of wild populations of the koala.

  14. Participation of CD45, NKR-P1A and ANK61 antigen in rat hepatic NK cell (pit cell)-mediated target cell cytotoxicity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dian Zhong Luo; David Vermijlen; B lent Ahishali; Vasilis Triantis; Eddie Wisse; Karin Vanderkerken; Peter J.K. Kuppen

    2000-01-01

    AIM Several triggering receptors have been described to be involved in natural killer (NK) cellmediated target cytotoxicity. In these studies, NK cells derived from blood or spleen were used. Pit cells are liver-specific NK cells that possess a higher level of natural cytotoxicity and a different morphology when compared to blood NK cells. The aim of this study was to characterize the role of the NK-triggering molecules NKR-P1A, ANK61 antigen, and CD45 in pit cell-mediated killing of target cells. METHODS 51 Cr-release and DNA fragmentation were used to quantify target cell lysis and apoptosis, respectively. RESULTS Flow cytometric analysis showed that pit cells expressed CD45, NKR-P1A, and ANK61 antigen. Treatment of pit cells with monoclonal antibody ( mAb ) to CD45 ( ANK74 ) not only inhibited CC531s or YAC-1 target lysis but also apoptosis induced by pit cells. The mAbs to NKRP1A (3.2.3) and ANK61 antigen (ANK61) had no effect on pit cell-mediated CC531s or YAC-1 target cytolysis or apoptosis, while they did increase the Fcγ receptor positive (FcγR+) P815 cytolysis and apoptosis. This enhanced cytotoxicity could he inhibited by 3,4-dichloroisocoumarin, an inhibitor of granzymes. CONCLUSION These results indicate that CD45 participates in pit cell-mediated CC531s and YAC-1 target cytolysis and apoptosis. NKR-P1A and ANK61 antigen on pit cells function as activation structures against FcγR+ P815 cells, which was mediated by the perforin/granzyme pathway.

  15. Biochemical and Functional Insights into the Integrated Regulation of Innate Immune Cell Responses by Teleost Leukocyte Immune-Type Receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chenjie Fei

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Across vertebrates, innate immunity consists of a complex assortment of highly specialized cells capable of unleashing potent effector responses designed to destroy or mitigate foreign pathogens. The execution of various innate cellular behaviors such as phagocytosis, degranulation, or cell-mediated cytotoxicity are functionally indistinguishable when being performed by immune cells isolated from humans or teleost fishes; vertebrates that diverged from one another more than 450 million years ago. This suggests that vital components of the vertebrate innate defense machinery are conserved and investigating such processes in a range of model systems provides an important opportunity to identify fundamental features of vertebrate immunity. One characteristic that is highly conserved across vertebrate systems is that cellular immune responses are dependent on specialized immunoregulatory receptors that sense environmental stimuli and initiate intracellular cascades that can elicit appropriate effector responses. A wide variety of immunoregulatory receptor families have been extensively studied in mammals, and many have been identified as cell- and function-specific regulators of a range of innate responses. Although much less is known in fish, the growing database of genomic information has recently allowed for the identification of several immunoregulatory receptor gene families in teleosts. Many of these putative immunoregulatory receptors have yet to be assigned any specific role(s, and much of what is known has been based solely on structural and/or phylogenetic relationships with mammalian receptor families. As an attempt to address some of these shortcomings, this review will focus on our growing understanding of the functional roles played by specific members of the channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus leukocyte immune-type receptors (IpLITRs, which appear to be important regulators of several innate cellular responses via classical as well

  16. Synergistic COX2 Induction by IFNγ and TNFα Self-Limits Type-1 Immunity in the Human Tumor Microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Jeffrey L; Obermajer, Nataša; Odunsi, Kunle; Edwards, Robert P; Kalinski, Pawel

    2016-04-01

    Maintenance of CTL-, Th1-, and NK cell-mediated type-1 immunity is essential for effective antitumor responses. Unexpectedly, we observed that the critical soluble mediators of type-1 immune effector cells, IFNγ and TNFα, synergize in the induction of cyclooxygenase 2 (COX2), the key enzyme in prostaglandin (PG)E2 synthesis, and the subsequent hyperactivation of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) within the tumor microenvironment (TME) of ovarian cancer patients. MDSC hyperactivation by type-1 immunity and the resultant overexpression of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS/NOS2), IL10, and additional COX2 result in strong feedback suppression of type-1 immune responses. This paradoxical immune suppression driven by type-1 immune cell activation was found to depend on the synergistic action of IFNγ and TNFα, and could not be reproduced by either of these factors alone. Importantly, from a therapeutic standpoint, these negative feedback limiting type-1 responses could be eliminated by COX2 blockade, allowing amplification of type-1 immunity in the ovarian cancer TME. Our data demonstrate a new mechanism underlying the self-limiting nature of type-1 immunity in the human TME, driven by the synergistic induction of COX2 by IFNγ and TNFα, and provide a rationale for targeting the COX2-PGE2 axis to enhance the effectiveness of cancer immunotherapies.

  17. Commensal-induced regulatory T cells mediate protection against pathogen-stimulated NF-kappaB activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caitlin O'Mahony

    Full Text Available Host defence against infection requires a range of innate and adaptive immune responses that may lead to tissue damage. Such immune-mediated pathologies can be controlled with appropriate T regulatory (Treg activity. The aim of the present study was to determine the influence of gut microbiota composition on Treg cellular activity and NF-kappaB activation associated with infection. Mice consumed the commensal microbe Bifidobacterium infantis 35624 followed by infection with Salmonella typhimurium or injection with LPS. In vivo NF-kappaB activation was quantified using biophotonic imaging. CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ T cell phenotypes and cytokine levels were assessed using flow cytometry while CD4+ T cells were isolated using magnetic beads for adoptive transfer to naïve animals. In vivo imaging revealed profound inhibition of infection and LPS induced NF-kappaB activity that preceded a reduction in S. typhimurium numbers and murine sickness behaviour scores in B. infantis-fed mice. In addition, pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion, T cell proliferation, and dendritic cell co-stimulatory molecule expression were significantly reduced. In contrast, CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ T cell numbers were significantly increased in the mucosa and spleen of mice fed B. infantis. Adoptive transfer of CD4+CD25+ T cells transferred the NF-kappaB inhibitory activity. Consumption of a single commensal micro-organism drives the generation and function of Treg cells which control excessive NF-kappaB activation in vivo. These cellular interactions provide the basis for a more complete understanding of the commensal-host-pathogen trilogue that contribute to host homeostatic mechanisms underpinning protection against aberrant activation of the innate immune system in response to a translocating pathogen or systemic LPS.

  18. Sarcomas as a mise en abyme of mesenchymal stem cells: exploiting interrelationships for cell mediated anticancer therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burns, Jorge S; Safwat, Akmal; Grisendi, Giulia;

    2012-01-01

    Mise en abyme meaning "placed into abyss or infinite recurrence" is an apt paradigm for the relentless growth of sarcoma cells. Its alternative meaning, "self-reflexive embedding" fits the central role attributed to cancer stem cells (CSCs). Diversely sourced and defined, mesenchymal stem cells...... (MSCs) may be the cells of sarcoma origin, evolve a CSC phenotype and/or contribute to tumor growth through inherent qualities for homing, neovascularization, paracrine cross-feeding, microvesicle secretion, cell fusion, entosis and immune modulation. Exploiting these qualities, MSC expressing modified...

  19. Human immune system variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodin, Petter; Davis, Mark M

    2017-01-01

    The human immune system is highly variable between individuals but relatively stable over time within a given person. Recent conceptual and technological advances have enabled systems immunology analyses, which reveal the composition of immune cells and proteins in populations of healthy individuals. The range of variation and some specific influences that shape an individual's immune system is now becoming clearer. Human immune systems vary as a consequence of heritable and non-heritable influences, but symbiotic and pathogenic microbes and other non-heritable influences explain most of this variation. Understanding when and how such influences shape the human immune system is key for defining metrics of immunological health and understanding the risk of immune-mediated and infectious diseases.

  20. Proteomics and insect immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L Shi

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Insect innate immunity is both a model for vertebrate immunity as well as a key system that impactsmedically important pathogens that are transmitted by insects. Recent developments in proteomics andprotein identification techniques combined with the completion of genome sequences for Anophelesgambiae and Drosophila melanogaster provided the tools for examining insect immunity at a new level ofmolecular detail. Application of proteomics to insect immunity resulted in predictions of new roles inimmunity for proteins already known in other contexts (e.g. ferritin, transferrin, Chi-lectins and helped totarget specific members of multi-gene families that respond to different pathogens (e.g. serine proteases,thioester proteins. In addition, proteomics studies verify that post-translational modifications play a keyrole in insect immunity since many of the identified proteins are modified in some way. These studiescomplement recent work on insect transcriptomes and provide new directions for further investigation ofinnate immunity.

  1. Targeting immune response induction with cochleate and liposome-based vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannino; Canki; Feketeova; Scolpino; Wang; Zhang; Kheiri; Gould-Fogerite

    1998-07-06

    The immune response generated by infection with a pathogenic organism, or by vaccination with a live attenuated or whole killed pathogen, often does not stimulate optimal protection against that organism. Lipid matrix-based subunit vaccines can be used to produce custom-designed vaccines, that elicit desired immune responses targeted to specific parts of the pathogen that are relevant to protection. Harmful or competitive responses can be minimized or avoided. Earlier work with liposomes has allowed the development of a new class of subunit vaccines called cochleate delivery vehicles, whose structure and properties are very different from liposomes. Protein and DNA cochleates are highly effective vaccines when given via mucosal or parenteral routes, including oral, intranasal, intramuscular, or subcutaneous. Strong, long-lasting, mucosal and circulating, antibody and cell-mediated responses are generated. Protection from challenge with live viruses following oral or intramuscular administration has been achieved.

  2. A cascade reaction network mimicking the basic functional steps of adaptive immune response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Da; Wu, Cuichen; You, Mingxu; Zhang, Tao; Wan, Shuo; Chen, Tao; Qiu, Liping; Zheng, Zheng; Liang, Hao; Tan, Weihong

    2015-10-01

    Biological systems use complex ‘information-processing cores’ composed of molecular networks to coordinate their external environment and internal states. An example of this is the acquired, or adaptive, immune system (AIS), which is composed of both humoral and cell-mediated components. Here we report the step-by-step construction of a prototype mimic of the AIS that we call an adaptive immune response simulator (AIRS). DNA and enzymes are used as simple artificial analogues of the components of the AIS to create a system that responds to specific molecular stimuli in vitro. We show that this network of reactions can function in a manner that is superficially similar to the most basic responses of the vertebrate AIS, including reaction sequences that mimic both humoral and cellular responses. As such, AIRS provides guidelines for the design and engineering of artificial reaction networks and molecular devices.

  3. [Effect of an anabolic steroid on the cellular immunity and postoperative evaluation of uterine cervical cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ooshika, Y; Umesaki, N; Sako, H; Kawabata, M; Sugana, T

    1984-10-01

    The effects of an anabolic steroid on the immune activity and clinical condition of patients with cancer of the uterine cervix were studied. The effects of the steroid on tumor growth were also studied in animals. The results obtained demonstrated that the anabolic steroid (1) enhanced the activity of macrophages and cell-mediated immune activity, (2) reduced the incidence of post-operative infection, (3) reduced pose-operative loss of weight of patients due to the intrinsic anabolic activity of the steroid, and (4) did not exert any influence on tumor growth. Judging from these results, administration of the anabolic steroid would appear to be effective for the improvement of the general condition of cancer patients following surgery or in terminal cases.

  4. Possible Implication of Local Immune Response in Darier's Disease: An Immunohistochemical Characterization of Lesional Inflammatory Infiltrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clelia Miracco

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Cell-mediated immunity is considered to be normal in Darier's Disease (DD, an inherited skin disorder complicated by skin infections. To date, there are no investigations on the local inflammatory infiltrate in DD skin lesions. In this immunohistochemical study we characterized and quantified it, making comparisons with two other inflammatory skin disorders, that is, pemphigus vulgaris (PV and lichen ruber planus (LRP, and with the normal skin (NSk. We found a significant (<.05 decrease of CD1a+ Langerhans cells (LCs in DD, compared to PV, LRP, and NSk, and of CD123+ plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs, compared to PV and LRP. We hypothesize that the genetic damage of keratinocytes might result in a loss of some subsets of dendritic cells and, consequently, in an impaired local immune response, which might worsen the infections that inevitably occur in this disease.

  5. Chimeric flagellin expressed by Salmonella typhimurium induces an ESAT-6-specific Th 1-type immune response and CTL effects following intranasal immunization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hui Zhang; Liu Liu; Ke Wen; Jinlin Huang; Shizhong Geng; Junsong Shen; Zhiming Pan; Xinan Jiao

    2011-01-01

    The flagellin component FliC of Salmonella typhimurium is capable of activating the innate immune system via specific interactions with TLR5 and can also act as a carrier of foreign antigen to elicit antigen-specific immune responses.Thus,we constructed an attenuated Salmonella strain SL5928(fliC/esat) expressing chimeric flagellin that contained the ESAT-6 antigen coding sequence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis inserted into the highly variable region of the Salmonella flagellin coding gene fliCi.The chimeric flagellin functioned normally,as demonstrated using a flagella swarming assay and electron microscopy.To analyze the effects of chimeric flagellin,the cell-mediated immune response and cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) effects specific for ESAT-6antigen were tested after intranasal immunization of mice with flagellated Salmonella SL5928(fliC/esat).The results showed that SL5928(fliC/esat) intranasal immunization can strongly elicit an ESAT-6-specific T helper (Th) 1-type immune response in mucosal lymphoid tissues,such as nasopharynx-associated lymph nodes,lung and Peyer's patches,and a Th 1/Th2 response was elicited in spleen and mesenteric lymph nodes.Furthermore,intranasal immunization of SL5928(fliC/esat) produced efficient CTL effects,as demonstrated using a 5-and 6-carboxyfluorescein diacetate succinimidyl ester (CFSE) assay.Thus,our study revealed that Salmonella flagellin acts as a carrier for foreign antigen and triggers strong Th 1 and CTL responses during intranasal immunization.Chimeric flagellin is potentially an effective strategy for the development of novel vaccines against tuberculosis in humans and animals.

  6. Whole blood assay to access T cell-immune responses to Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigens in healthy Brazilian individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo RZ Antas

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available The production of interferon gamma (IFNgamma guarantees effective T cell-mediated immunity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection. In the present study, we simply compare the in vitro immune responses to Mycobacterium antigens in terms of IFNg production in a total of 10 healthy Brazilian volunteers. Whole blood and mononuclear cells were cultivated in parallel with PPD, Ag85B, and M. bovis hsp65, and five-days supernatants were harvested for cytokine detection by ELISA. The inter-assay result was that the overall profile of agreement in response to antigens was highly correlated (r² = 0.9266; p = 0.0102. Potential analysis is in current progress to dictate the usefulness of this method to access the immune responses also in tuberculosis patients and its contacts.

  7. Update on the use of intravenous immune globulin in the treatment of patients with inflammatory muscle disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalakas, M C

    1995-11-01

    The inflammatory myopathies consist of three distinct groups: dermatomyositis, polymyositis, and inclusion body myositis. Dermatomyositis is distinguished by its characteristic rash, while polymyositis is a diagnosis of exclusion. Inclusion body myositis is characterized by early involvement of distal muscle groups and the quadriceps. Definitive diagnosis is made by muscle biopsy, which demonstrates histological features characteristic for each disorder. Immune mechanisms play a role in the pathogenesis of the inflammatory myopathies. A complement-mediated microangiopathy is seen in dermatomyositis, while there is evidence for a T cell-mediated process in polymyositis and inclusion body myositis. Treatment with prednisone is helpful to a majority of patients for a period of time. Immunosuppressive drugs have met with limited success. We describe a group of patients with dermatomyositis, resistant to available therapies, whose muscle strength, skin changes, and muscle biopsies improved significantly during treatment with intravenous immune globulin. The treatment of polymyositis and inclusion body myositis with intravenous immune globulin is currently under study.

  8. T cell metabolism. The protein LEM promotes CD8⁺ T cell immunity through effects on mitochondrial respiration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okoye, Isobel; Wang, Lihui; Pallmer, Katharina; Richter, Kirsten; Ichimura, Takahuru; Haas, Robert; Crouse, Josh; Choi, Onjee; Heathcote, Dean; Lovo, Elena; Mauro, Claudio; Abdi, Reza; Oxenius, Annette; Rutschmann, Sophie; Ashton-Rickardt, Philip G

    2015-05-29

    Protective CD8(+) T cell-mediated immunity requires a massive expansion in cell number and the development of long-lived memory cells. Using forward genetics in mice, we identified an orphan protein named lymphocyte expansion molecule (LEM) that promoted antigen-dependent CD8(+) T cell proliferation, effector function, and memory cell generation in response to infection with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus. Generation of LEM-deficient mice confirmed these results. Through interaction with CR6 interacting factor (CRIF1), LEM controlled the levels of oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) complexes and respiration, resulting in the production of pro-proliferative mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (mROS). LEM provides a link between immune activation and the expansion of protective CD8(+) T cells driven by OXPHOS and represents a pathway for the restoration of long-term protective immunity based on metabolically modified cytotoxic CD8(+) T cells.

  9. Humoral and cellular immunity to hepatitis B virus-derived antigens: comparative activity of Freund complete adjuvant alum, and liposomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Y; Ionescu-Matiu, I; Dreesman, G R; Kramp, W; Six, H R; Hollinger, F B; Melnick, J L

    1980-01-01

    Complete Freud adjuvant, aluminum gel, and liposomes were compared for their ability to enhance the immunogenicity of an intact 22-nm HBsAg particle vaccine and an HBsAg-derived polypeptide vaccine in guinea pigs. Both humoral and cell-mediated immune responses were evaluated. The greatest immune response was obtained with complete Freund adjuvant, regardless of the antigen preparation. Aluminum gel appeared to be a better adjuvant for 22-nm HBsAg particles, but the liposomes rendered polypeptide preparations more immunogenic. The possibility that various proportions were entrapped in aqueous compartments instead of being inserted into the lipid bilayers of liposomes might account for this difference. The development of both humoral and cellular immunity was dependent upon the use of an adjuvant, because aqueous preparations had poor immunogenicity. PMID:7014445

  10. MFG-E8 regulates the immunogenic potential of dendritic cells primed with necrotic cell-mediated inflammatory signals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Baghdadi

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells (DC manipulate tissue homeostasis by recognizing dying cells and controlling immune functions. However, the precise mechanisms by which DC recognize different types of dying cells and devise distinct immunologic consequences remain largely obscure. Herein, we demonstrate that Milk-fat globule-EGF VIII (MFG-E8 is a critical mediator controlling DC immunogenicity in inflammatory microenvironments. MFG-E8 restrains DC-mediated uptake and recognition of necrotic cells. The MFG-E8-mediated suppression of necrotic cell uptake by DC resulted in the decreased proinflammatory cytokines production and activated signal components such as STAT3 and A20, which are critical to maintain tolerogenic properties of DC. Furthermore, the DC-derived MFG-E8 negatively regulates the cross-priming and effector functions of antigen-specific T cells upon recognition of necrotic cells. MFG-E8 deficiency enhances an ability of necrotic cell-primed DC to stimulate antitumor immune responses against established tumors. Our findings define what we believe to a novel mechanism whereby MFG-E8 regulates the immunogenicity of DC by modulating the modes of recognition of dying cells. Manipulating MFG-E8 levels in DC may serve as a useful strategy for controlling inflammatory microenvironments caused by various pathological conditions including cancer and autoimmunity.

  11. Immune hemolytic anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anemia - immune hemolytic; Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) ... for no reason, the condition is called idiopathic autoimmune hemolytic anemia . The antibodies may also be caused by: Complication ...

  12. Development of maternal and foetal immune responses in cattle following experimental challenge with Neospora caninum at day 210 of gestation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartley, Paul M; Katzer, Frank; Rocchi, Mara S; Maley, Stephen W; Benavides, Julio; Nath, Mintu; Pang, Yvonne; Cantón, Germán; Thomson, Jackie; Chianini, Francesca; Innes, Elisabeth A

    2013-10-03

    This study examined the immunological responses of pregnant cattle and their foetuses following an experimental challenge with live Neospora caninum tachyzoites at day 210 of gestation. Animals were bled prior to and weekly throughout the experiment and sacrificed at 14, 28, 42 and 56 days post inoculation (dpi). At post mortem examination, samples of lymph nodes and spleen were collected from both dam and foetus for immunological analysis. Subcutaneous (sc) inoculation over the left prefemoral (LPF) lymph node of pregnant cattle at day 210 of gestation, led to the vertical transmission of parasites by 14 dpi, however no foetal deaths were observed in the infected animals. Foetuses from infected dams mounted Neospora-specific humoral and cell-mediated immune (CMI) responses by 14 dpi. These responses involved anti-Neospora IgG, antigen-specific lymphocyte proliferation, and the production of the cytokines IFN-γ, interleukin (IL)-4 and IL-10. There was also evidence of innate immunity during the response against Neospora from infected dams, with statistically significant (p Neospora-specific cell mediated, humoral and innate immune responses.

  13. Evaluation of Chosen Cytokine Levels among Patients with Herpes Zoster as Ability to Provide Immune Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zajkowska, Agata; Garkowski, Adam; Świerzbińska, Renata; Kułakowska, Alina; Król, Monika Emilia; Ptaszyńska-Sarosiek, Iwona; Nowicka-Ciełuszecka, Anna; Pancewicz, Sławomir; Czupryna, Piotr; Moniuszko, Anna; Zajkowska, Joanna

    2016-01-01

    Aim and Background Herpes zoster is a viral disease caused by the reactivation of varicella–zoster virus (VZV) which remained latent in the cranial nerve or dorsal root ganglia. Cell-mediated immunity is known to decline with age as part of immunosenescence and can lead to the reactivation of VZV. Whereas herpes zoster is usually mild in healthy young persons, older patients are at increased risk for complications. In the present study we investigated the serum cytokine profile (IL-17, IL-23, IL-21, IL-4, IL-12), representing cellular and humoral immunity and assessed the level of VZV IgG antibodies in patients with herpes zoster. Methods We investigated the serum concentrations of IL-17, IL-23, IL-21, IL-4, IL-12 and the level of VZV IgG antibodies in 23 patients with herpes zoster who did not develop superinfection. The control group was represented by 21 individuals in similar age with no inflammatory and infectious diseases. Cytokine and antibodies levels were measured by ELISA method. Statistical analysis was performed using the ROC curve (receiver operating characteristic), t-test, Welch’s t-test, and nonparametric tests with STATISTICA 10 software. Results In patients with herpes zoster, the serum level of IL-17, IL-23, IL-21, IL-4 and IL-12 as well as VZV IgG antibodies titer were statistically significantly increased compared to control group. Conclusion Our results confirm the broad activation of the immune system involving humoral and cell-mediated immunity. PMID:26934574

  14. SOX9 indirectly regulates CEACAM1 expression and immune resistance in melanoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashkenazi, Shira; Ortenberg, Rona; Besser, Michal; Schachter, Jacob; Markel, Gal

    2016-05-24

    As melanoma cells are immunogenic, they instigate an adaptive immune response and production of anti-tumor T-cells. A central factor in this interaction is CEACAM1 (carcinoembryonic antigen cell adhesion molecule 1), a transmembrane glycoprotein previously shown in our lab to protect melanoma cells from T cell-mediated killing. In this study, we examine the role of transcription factor SOX9 in the regulation of CEACAM1 expression and immune resistance in melanoma cells. Knockdown of endogenous SOX9 results in CEACAM1 up-regulation, while its overexpression leads to the opposite effect. We show that SOX9 controls CEACAM1 expression at a transcriptional level, but in an indirect manner, as regulation of the CEACAM1 promoter remains intact even when all eight potential SOX9-binding sites are abolished. A series of promoter truncations localizes the SOX9-controlled area to the proximal 200bp of the promoter. Point mutations in putative Sp1 and ETS1 binding sites identify these transcription factors as the primary SOX9-controlled mediators. Co-immunoprecipitation studies show that SOX9 and Sp1 physically interact in melanoma cells, while silencing of SOX9 down-regulates ETS1, but not Sp1, in the same cells. Finally, knockdown of SOX9 indeed renders melanoma cells resistant to T cell-mediated killing, in line with the increased CEACAM1 expression. In conclusion, we show that SOX9 regulates CEACAM1 expression in melanoma cells, and thereby their immune resistance. As CEACAM1 is a pivotal protein in melanoma biology and immune crosstalk, further understanding of its regulation can provide new insights and contribute to the development of novel approaches to therapy.

  15. The Smac Mimetic BV6 Improves NK Cell-Mediated Killing of Rhabdomyosarcoma Cells by Simultaneously Targeting Tumor and Effector Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Kyra; Tognarelli, Sara; Roesler, Stefanie; Boedicker, Cathinka; Schubert, Ralf; Steinle, Alexander; Klingebiel, Thomas; Bader, Peter; Fulda, Simone; Ullrich, Evelyn

    2017-01-01

    Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS), the most common cancer of connective tissues in pediatrics, is often resistant to conventional therapies. One underlying mechanism of this resistance is the overexpression of Inhibitor of Apoptosis (IAP) proteins, leading to a dysfunctional cell death program within tumor cells. Smac mimetics (SM) are small molecules that can reactivate the cell death program by antagonizing IAP proteins and thereby compensating their overexpression. Here, we report that SM sensitize two RMS cell lines (RD and RH30) toward natural killer (NK) cell-mediated killing on the one hand, and increase the cytotoxic potential of NK cells on the other. The SM-induced sensitization of RH30 cells toward NK cell-mediated killing is significantly reduced through blocking tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) on NK cells prior to coculture. In addition, the presence of zVAD.fmk, a pancaspase inhibitor, rescues tumor cells from the increase in killing, indicating an apoptosis-dependent cell death. On the NK cell side, the presence of SM in addition to IL-2 during the ex vivo expansion leads to an increase in their cytotoxic activity against RH30 cells. This effect is mainly TNFα-dependent and partially mediated by NK cell activation, which is associated with transcriptional upregulation of NF-κB target genes such as IκBα and RelB. Taken together, our findings implicate that SM represent a novel double-hit strategy, sensitizing tumor and activating NK cells with one single drug.

  16. Induction of NKG2D ligands and increased sensitivity of tumor cells to NK cell-mediated cytotoxicity by hematoporphyrin-based photodynamic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Min-Ju; Bae, Jae-Ho; Chung, Joo Seop; Kim, Sun-Hee; Kang, Chi-Dug

    2011-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are important innate effector cells which can irradicate tumor cells through specific interactions between activating receptors on NK cells and their cognate ligands on cancer cells. Recently, it has been known that induction of activating NKG2D ligands including MHC class I chain-related (MIC) and UL16-binding protein (ULBP) families on tumor cells by various stresses makes them more susceptible to NK cell-mediated cytotoxicity. Therefore, it was investigated whether sublethal dose of hematoporphyrin-based photodynamic therapy (PDT) could up-regulate NKG2D ligands on tumor cells and increase the susceptibility of cancer cells against NK cells. Treatment with sublethal dose of hematoporphyrin-based PDT increased mRNA transcription and surface expression of ULBP1 and ULBP2 genes in SNU-1 human gastric tumor cell line and MICA/B, ULBP1, ULBP2 and ULBP3 genes in SW-900 human lung cancer cell line. These results were followed by increased susceptibility of cancer cells to NK cell-mediated cytotoxicity after sublethal PDT, which was abolished by addition of a blocking NKG2D mAb. Therefore, it could be suggested that the effect of hematoporphyrin-based PDT might be mediated in part by the increased susceptibility to NK cells via induction of NKG2D ligands on tumor cells, which survived after treatment with PDT.

  17. Adaptive immunity to fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Akash; Wüthrich, Marcel; Deepe, George; Klein, Bruce

    2014-11-06

    Life-threatening fungal infections have risen sharply in recent years, owing to the advances and intensity of medical care that may blunt immunity in patients. This emerging crisis has created the growing need to clarify immune defense mechanisms against fungi with the ultimate goal of therapeutic intervention. We describe recent insights in understanding the mammalian immune defenses that are deployed against pathogenic fungi. We focus on adaptive immunity to the major medically important fungi and emphasize three elements that coordinate the response: (1) dendritic cells and subsets that are mobilized against fungi in various anatomical compartments; (2) fungal molecular patterns and their corresponding receptors that signal responses and shape the differentiation of T-cell subsets and B cells; and, ultimately (3) the effector and regulatory mechanisms that eliminate these invaders while constraining collateral damage to vital tissue. These insights create a foundation for the development of new, immune-based strategies for prevention or enhanced clearance of systemic fungal diseases.

  18. Behavioral Immunity in Insects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thierry Lefèvre

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Parasites can dramatically reduce the fitness of their hosts, and natural selection should favor defense mechanisms that can protect hosts against disease. Much work has focused on understanding genetic and physiological immunity against parasites, but hosts can also use behaviors to avoid infection, reduce parasite growth or alleviate disease symptoms. It is increasingly recognized that such behaviors are common in insects, providing strong protection against parasites and parasitoids. We review the current evidence for behavioral immunity in insects, present a framework for investigating such behavior, and emphasize that behavioral immunity may act through indirect rather than direct fitness benefits. We also discuss the implications for host-parasite co-evolution, local adaptation, and the evolution of non-behavioral physiological immune systems. Finally, we argue that the study of behavioral immunity in insects has much to offer for investigations in vertebrates, in which this topic has traditionally been studied.

  19. Transplantation Immunity. Contemporary Views.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaretskaya, Yuliya M.

    1999-12-01

    "Transplantation immunity in Cyclosporin era" is a special chapter in science under name transplantation immunity. Nowadays, practically all the organs can be grafted: kidney, heart, lung, liver, pancreas both as organ, and as islet cells, bone marrow from relative and unrelative donors. The broad spectrum of grafted organs gave one more surprising peculiarity of transplantation immunity: it operates with different strength after transplantation of various organs. If the decreasing gradient of transplantation immunity could be composed, then it appeared to be approximately in the following order: bone marrow - skin - kidney - heart - lung. The most complicated operating activity of transplantation immunity is occurring after bone marrow transplantation, especially from unrelative donor, because in bone marrow transplantation immunological process develops in both directions. Therefore now, bone marrow is the only organ (tissue), when the complete compatibility between donor and recipient is required after its transplantation; especially in cases with unrelative donors.

  20. Artificial Immune Systems (2010)

    CERN Document Server

    Greensmith, Julie; Aickelin, Uwe

    2010-01-01

    The human immune system has numerous properties that make it ripe for exploitation in the computational domain, such as robustness and fault tolerance, and many different algorithms, collectively termed Artificial Immune Systems (AIS), have been inspired by it. Two generations of AIS are currently in use, with the first generation relying on simplified immune models and the second generation utilising interdisciplinary collaboration to develop a deeper understanding of the immune system and hence produce more complex models. Both generations of algorithms have been successfully applied to a variety of problems, including anomaly detection, pattern recognition, optimisation and robotics. In this chapter an overview of AIS is presented, its evolution is discussed, and it is shown that the diversification of the field is linked to the diversity of the immune system itself, leading to a number of algorithms as opposed to one archetypal system. Two case studies are also presented to help provide insight into the m...

  1. Cytokines in Drosophila immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanha-Aho, Leena-Maija; Valanne, Susanna; Rämet, Mika

    2016-02-01

    Cytokines are a large and diverse group of small proteins that can affect many biological processes, but most commonly cytokines are known as mediators of the immune response. In the event of an infection, cytokines are produced in response to an immune stimulus, and they function as key regulators of the immune response. Cytokines come in many shapes and sizes, and although they vary greatly in structure, their functions have been well conserved in evolution. The immune signaling pathways that respond to cytokines are remarkably conserved from fly to man. Therefore, Drosophila melanogaster, provides an excellent platform for studying the biology and function of cytokines. In this review, we will describe the cytokines and cytokine-like molecules found in the fly and discuss their roles in host immunity.

  2. Skin scarification with Plasmodium falciparum peptide vaccine using synthetic TLR agonists as adjuvants elicits malaria sporozoite neutralizing immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Robert A.; Altszuler, Rita; Frevert, Ute; Nardin, Elizabeth H.

    2016-01-01

    Malaria eradication will require a combination of vector control, chemotherapy and an easily administered vaccine. Sterile immunity can be elicited in humans by immunization with sporozoites, the infective stage injected by bite of the mosquito vector, however, whole parasite vaccines present formidable logistical challenges for production, storage and administration. The “gold standard” for infectious disease eradiation, the Smallpox Eradication Programme, utilized mass immunization using the skin scarification (SS) route. SS may more closely mimic the natural route of malaria infection initiated by sporozoites injected by mosquito bite which elicits both neutralizing antibodies and protective cell mediated immunity. We investigated the potential of SS immunization using a malaria repeat peptide containing a protective B cell epitope of Plasmodium falciparum, the most lethal human species, and delivery vehicles containing TLR agonists as adjuvants. In a murine model, SS immunization with peptide in combination with TLR-7/8 and -9 agonists elicited high levels of systemic sporozoite neutralizing antibody, Th1- type CD4+ T cells and resistance to challenge by bites of infected mosquitoes. SS provides the potential to elicit humoral immunity to target Plasmodium at multiple stages of its complex life cycle. PMID:27624667

  3. Effect of dose and source of supplemental zinc on immune response and oxidative enzymes in lambs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagalakshmi, D; Dhanalakshmi, K; Himabindu, D

    2009-10-01

    An experiment of 150 days was conducted on 42 male Nellore lambs (28.3 +/- 0.64 kg) to determine the effect of zinc (Zn) supplementation (0,15, 30 and 45 ppm) in diet from inorganic (ZnSO(4)) and organic (Zn proteinate) sources on immune response and antioxidant enzyme activities by allotting them randomly to 7 groups in completely randomized design. The basal diet (BD) contained 29.28 ppm Zn. The humoral immune response assessed at 75 d against B. abortus was higher (Peffect on titres against chicken RBC antigen. The cell mediated immune response assessed as delayed type hypersensitivity (DTH) response against phytohaemagglutinin-P and in vitro lymphocyte proliferative response against concanavalin A at 150 d was higher (Peffect on immune response. The DTH response and antibody titres against B.abortus were higher (Pconcentration and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity (75 d of experiment) was higher in Zn supplemented lambs. The ALP activity increased (P enzyme activities and immune response compared to ZnSO(4).

  4. Lesion-Specific Immune Response in Granulomas of Patients with Pulmonary Tuberculosis: A Pilot Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selvakumar Subbian

    Full Text Available The formation and maintenance of granulomas is central to the host response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb infection. It is widely accepted that the lungs of patients with tuberculosis (TB usually contain multiple infection foci, and that the granulomas evolve and differentiate independently, resulting in considerable heterogeneity. Although gene expression profiles of human blood cells have been proposed as biomarkers of Mtb infection and/or active disease, the immune profiles of discrete lesion types has not been studied extensively. Using histology, immunopathology and genome-wide transcriptome analysis, we explored the immunological profile of human lung TB granulomas. We show that although the different granulomas share core similarities in their immunological/inflammatory characteristics, they also exhibit significant divergence. Despite similar numbers of CD68+ macrophages in the different lesions, the extent of immune reactivity, as determined by the density of CD3+ T cells in the macrophage rich areas, and the extent of fibrosis, shows considerable variation. Both quantitative and qualitative differences among significantly differentially expressed genes (SDEG were noted in each of the lesion types studied. Further, network/pathway analysis of SDEG revealed differential regulation of inflammatory response, immune cell trafficking, and cell mediated immune response in the different lesions. Our data highlight the formidable challenges facing ongoing efforts to identify peripheral blood biomarkers due to the diversity of lesion types and complexity of local immune responses in the lung.

  5. Regulatory mechanisms of immune tolerance in type 1 diabetes and their failures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhn, Chantal; Besançon, Alix; Lemoine, Sébastien; You, Sylvaine; Marquet, Cindy; Candon, Sophie; Chatenoud, Lucienne

    2016-07-01

    In this brief review we propose to discuss salient data showing the importance of immune regulatory mechanisms, and in particular of Treg, for the control of pathogenic anti-β-cell response in autoimmune diabetes. Disease progression that culminates with the massive destruction of insulin-secreting β-cells and advent of hyperglycemia and glycosuria tightly correlates with a functional deficit in immune regulation. Better dissection of the cellular and molecular mechanisms through which the immune system normally sustains tolerance to "self", and which become defective when autoimmune aggression is overt, is the only direct and robust way to learn how to harness these effectively, so as to restore immune tolerance in patients with insulin-dependent type 1 diabetes. No doubt that regulatory T cells are a privileged mechanism underlying this self-tolerance in the periphery. The discovery of the key role of the transcription factor FoxP3, represented the cornerstone leading to the great advances in the field we are witnessing today. Type 1 diabetes is certainly one of the prototypic T cell-mediated autoimmune diseases where immune regulatory mechanisms relying on specialized subsets of T cells have been the most thoroughly analyzed from the fundamental point of view and also largely exploited in a translational therapeutic perspective.

  6. Linking immune patterns and life history shows two distinct defense strategies in land snails (gastropoda, pulmonata).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Jacqueline; Madec, Luc

    2013-01-01

    Life history integration of the defense response was investigated at intra- and interspecific levels in land snails of the family Helicidae. Two hypotheses were tested: (i) fitness consequences of defense responses are closely related to life history traits such as size at maturity and life span; (ii) different pathways of the immune response based on "nonspecific" versus "specific" responses may reflect different defense options. Relevant immune responses to a challenge with E. coli were measured using the following variables: blood cell density, cellular or plasma antibacterial activity via reactive oxygen species (ROS) level, and bacterial growth inhibition. The results revealed that the largest snails did not exhibit the strongest immune response. Instead, body mass influenced the type of response in determining the appropriate strategy. Snails with a higher body mass at maturity had more robust plasma immune responses than snails with a lower mass, which had greater cell-mediated immune responses with a higher hemocyte density. In addition, ROS appeared also to be a stress mediator as attested by differences between sites and generations for the same species.

  7. Immunity in urogenital protozoa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malla, N; Goyal, K; Dhanda, R S; Yadav, M

    2014-09-01

    Innate and adaptive immunity play a significant role in urogenital infections. Innate immunity is provided by the epithelial cells and mucus lining along with acidic pH, which forms a strong physical barrier against the pathogens in female reproductive tract. Cells of innate immune system, antimicrobial peptides, cytokines, chemokines and adaptive immunity in the reproductive tract are evolved during infection, and a pro-inflammatory response is generated to fight against the invading pathogen Trichomonas vaginalis, a primary urogenital protozoa, the etiological agent of human trichomoniasis, a curable sexually transmitted infection. The involvement of the urogenital tract by other protozoal infections such as P. falciparum, Trypanosoma, Leishmania, Toxoplasma, Entamoeba histolytica and Acanthamoeba infection is rarely reported. Trichomonas induce pro-inflammatory and immunosuppressive responses in infected subjects. Multifactorial pathogenic mechanisms including parasite adherence, cysteine proteases, lipophosphoglycan, free radical, cytokine generation and Toll-like receptors appear to interplay with the induction of local and systemic immune responses that ultimately determine the outcome of the infection. However, the involvement of urogenital pathogen-specific immune mechanisms and effect of normal local resident flora on the outcome (symptomatic vs. asymptomatic) of infection are poorly understood. Moreover, immune interactions in trichomoniasis subjects co-infected with bacterial and viral pathogens need to be elucidated.

  8. Innate immune recognition and regulation in liver injury: A brief report from a series of studies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TIAN ZhiGang

    2009-01-01

    The discovery of innate immune receptors and the emergence of liver Immunology (high content of NK and NKT cells in liver) led to the second research summit in innate immunity since the finding of NK cells in the middle 1970s. Liver disease is one of the most dangerous threats to humans, and the pro-gress in innate immunology and liver immunology made it possible to re-explain the cellular end too-lecular immune mechanisms of liver disease. In the past ten years, we have found that innate recogni-tion of hepatic NK and NKT subsets were involved in murine liver injury. We established a novel NK cell-dependent acute murine hepatitis model by activating Toll-like receptor-3 (TLR-3) with an injection of poly I:C, which may mimic mild viral hepatitis (such as Chronic Hepatitis B). We observed that a network of innate immune cells including NK, NKT and Kupffer cells is involved in liver immune injury in our established NK cell-dependent murine model. We noted that TLR-3 on Kupffer ceils activated by pretreatment with poly I:C might protect against bacterial toxin (LPS)-induced fuIminant hepatitis by down-regulating TLR-4 function, while TLR-3 pre-activation of NK cells might reduce Con A-induced NKT cell-mediated fulminant hepatitis by blocking NKT cell recruitment to the liver. We also found that the oversensitivity to injury by immune stimulation in HBV (hepatitis B virus) transgenic mice (full HBV gene-tg or HBs-tg) correlated to the over-expression of Real, an NKG2D (natural killer cell group 2D) ligand of NK cells or CDld, a ligand of TCR-V14 of NKT cells, on HBV+ hepatocytes, which leads to an innate immune response against hepatocytes and is critical in liver immune injury and regeneration.

  9. Unexpected role for IL-17 in protective immunity against hypervirulent Mycobacterium tuberculosis HN878 infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radha Gopal

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb, the causative agent of tuberculosis (TB, infects one third of the world's population. Among these infections, clinical isolates belonging to the W-Beijing appear to be emerging, representing about 50% of Mtb isolates in East Asia, and about 13% of all Mtb isolates worldwide. In animal models, infection with W-Beijing strain, Mtb HN878, is considered "hypervirulent" as it results in increased mortality and causes exacerbated immunopathology in infected animals. We had previously shown the Interleukin (IL -17 pathway is dispensable for primary immunity against infection with the lab adapted Mtb H37Rv strain. However, it is not known whether IL-17 has any role to play in protective immunity against infection with clinical Mtb isolates. We report here that lab adapted Mtb strains, such as H37Rv, or less virulent Mtb clinical isolates, such as Mtb CDC1551, do not require IL-17 for protective immunity against infection while infection with Mtb HN878 requires IL-17 for early protective immunity. Unexpectedly, Mtb HN878 induces robust production of IL-1β through a TLR-2-dependent mechanism, which supports potent IL-17 responses. We also show that the role for IL-17 in mediating protective immunity against Mtb HN878 is through IL-17 Receptor signaling in non-hematopoietic cells, mediating the induction of the chemokine, CXCL-13, which is required for localization of T cells within lung lymphoid follicles. Correct T cell localization within lymphoid follicles in the lung is required for maximal macrophage activation and Mtb control. Since IL-17 has a critical role in vaccine-induced immunity against TB, our results have far reaching implications for the design of vaccines and therapies to prevent and treat emerging Mtb strains. In addition, our data changes the existing paradigm that IL-17 is dispensable for primary immunity against Mtb infection, and instead suggests a differential role for IL-17 in early protective

  10. Unexpected Role for IL-17 in Protective Immunity against Hypervirulent Mycobacterium tuberculosis HN878 Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopal, Radha; Monin, Leticia; Slight, Samantha; Uche, Uzodinma; Blanchard, Emmeline; A. Fallert Junecko, Beth; Ramos-Payan, Rosalio; Stallings, Christina L.; Reinhart, Todd A.; Kolls, Jay K.; Kaushal, Deepak; Nagarajan, Uma; Rangel-Moreno, Javier; Khader, Shabaana A.

    2014-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), the causative agent of tuberculosis (TB), infects one third of the world's population. Among these infections, clinical isolates belonging to the W-Beijing appear to be emerging, representing about 50% of Mtb isolates in East Asia, and about 13% of all Mtb isolates worldwide. In animal models, infection with W-Beijing strain, Mtb HN878, is considered “hypervirulent” as it results in increased mortality and causes exacerbated immunopathology in infected animals. We had previously shown the Interleukin (IL) -17 pathway is dispensable for primary immunity against infection with the lab adapted Mtb H37Rv strain. However, it is not known whether IL-17 has any role to play in protective immunity against infection with clinical Mtb isolates. We report here that lab adapted Mtb strains, such as H37Rv, or less virulent Mtb clinical isolates, such as Mtb CDC1551, do not require IL-17 for protective immunity against infection while infection with Mtb HN878 requires IL-17 for early protective immunity. Unexpectedly, Mtb HN878 induces robust production of IL-1β through a TLR-2-dependent mechanism, which supports potent IL-17 responses. We also show that the role for IL-17 in mediating protective immunity against Mtb HN878 is through IL-17 Receptor signaling in non-hematopoietic cells, mediating the induction of the chemokine, CXCL-13, which is required for localization of T cells within lung lymphoid follicles. Correct T cell localization within lymphoid follicles in the lung is required for maximal macrophage activation and Mtb control. Since IL-17 has a critical role in vaccine-induced immunity against TB, our results have far reaching implications for the design of vaccines and therapies to prevent and treat emerging Mtb strains. In addition, our data changes the existing paradigm that IL-17 is dispensable for primary immunity against Mtb infection, and instead suggests a differential role for IL-17 in early protective immunity against

  11. Intracellular haemolytic agents of Heterocapsa circularisquama exhibit toxic effects on H. circularisquama cells themselves and suppress both cell-mediated haemolytic activity and toxicity to rotifers (Brachionus plicatilis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiguchi, Tomoki; Cho, Kichul; Yasutomi, Masumi; Ueno, Mikinori; Yamaguchi, Kenichi; Basti, Leila; Yamasaki, Yasuhiro; Takeshita, Satoshi; Kim, Daekyung; Oda, Tatsuya

    2016-10-01

    A harmful dinoflagellate, Heterocapsa circularisquama, is highly toxic to shellfish and the zooplankton rotifer Brachionus plicatilis. A previous study found that H. circularisquama has both light-dependent and -independent haemolytic agents, which might be responsible for its toxicity. Detailed analysis of the haemolytic activity of H. circularisquama suggested that light-independent haemolytic activity was mediated mainly through intact cells, whereas light-dependent haemolytic activity was mediated by intracellular agents which can be discharged from ruptured cells. Because H. circularisquama showed similar toxicity to rotifers regardless of the light conditions, and because ultrasonic ruptured H. circularisquama cells showed no significant toxicity to rotifers, it was suggested that live cell-mediated light-independent haemolytic activity is a major factor responsible for the observed toxicity to rotifers. Interestingly, the ultrasonic-ruptured cells of H. circularisquama suppressed their own lethal effect on the rotifers. Analysis of samples of the cell contents (supernatant) and cell fragments (precipitate) prepared from the ruptured H. circularisquama cells indicated that the cell contents contain inhibitors for the light-independent cell-mediated haemolytic activity, toxins affecting H. circularisquama cells themselves, as well as light-dependent haemolytic agents. Ethanol extract prepared from H. circularisquama, which is supposed to contain a porphyrin derivative that displays photosensitising haemolytic activity, showed potent toxicity to Chattonella marina, Chattonella antiqua, and Karenia mikimotoi, as well as to H. circularisquama at the concentration range at which no significant toxicity to rotifers was observed. Analysis on a column of Sephadex LH-20 revealed that light-dependent haemolytic activity and inhibitory activity on cell-mediated light-independent haemolytic activity existed in two separate fractions (f-2 and f-3), suggesting that both