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Sample records for cell-based fluorescence resonance

  1. Development of a Cell-Based Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer Reporter for Bacillus anthracis Lethal Factor Protease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kimura, R H; Steenblock, E R; Camarero, J A

    2007-03-22

    We report the construction of a cell-based fluorescent reporter for anthrax lethal factor (LF) protease activity using the principle of fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). This was accomplished by engineering an Escherichia coli cell line to express a genetically encoded FRET reporter and LF protease. Both proteins were encoded in two different expression plasmids under the control of different tightly controlled inducible promoters. The FRET-based reporter was designed to contain a LF recognition sequence flanked by the FRET pair formed by CyPet and YPet fluorescent proteins. The length of the linker between both fluorescent proteins was optimized using a flexible peptide linker containing several Gly-Gly-Ser repeats. Our results indicate that this FRET-based LF reporter was readily expressed in E. coli cells showing high levels of FRET in vivo in the absence of LF. The FRET signal, however, decreased 5 times after inducing LF expression in the same cell. These results suggest that this cell-based LF FRET reporter may be used to screen genetically encoded libraries in vivo against LF.

  2. Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence for Nuclear Materials Assay

    OpenAIRE

    Quiter, Brian Joseph

    2010-01-01

    This dissertation examines the measurement of nuclear resonance fluorescence gamma-rays as a technique to non-destructively determine isotopic compositions of target materials that are of interest for nuclear security applications. The physical processes that can result in non-resonant background to nuclear resonance fluorescence measurements are described and investigated using a radiation transport computer code that relies on the Monte Carlo technique, MCNPX. The phenomenon of nuclear reso...

  3. Magnetic resonance imaging and cell-based neurorestorative therapy after brain injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Quan Jiang

    2016-01-01

    Restorative cell-based therapies for experimental brain injury, such as stroke and traumatic brain injury, substantially improve functional outcome. We discuss and review state of the art magnetic resonance im-aging methodologies and their applications related to cell-based treatment after brain injury. We focus on the potential of magnetic resonance imaging technique and its associated challenges to obtain useful new information related to cell migration, distribution, and quantitation, as well as vascular and neuronal remodeling in response to cell-based therapy after brain injury. The noninvasive nature of imaging might more readily help with translation of cell-based therapy from the laboratory to the clinic.

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging and cell-based neurorestorative therapy after brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quan Jiang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Restorative cell-based therapies for experimental brain injury, such as stroke and traumatic brain injury, substantially improve functional outcome. We discuss and review state of the art magnetic resonance imaging methodologies and their applications related to cell-based treatment after brain injury. We focus on the potential of magnetic resonance imaging technique and its associated challenges to obtain useful new information related to cell migration, distribution, and quantitation, as well as vascular and neuronal remodeling in response to cell-based therapy after brain injury. The noninvasive nature of imaging might more readily help with translation of cell-based therapy from the laboratory to the clinic.

  5. A Wireless, Passive Load Cell based on Magnetoelastic Resonance

    OpenAIRE

    Brandon D. Pereles; Dienhart, Thomas; Sansom, Thadeus; Johnston, Kyle; Ong, Keat Ghee

    2012-01-01

    A wireless, battery-less load cell was fabricated based on the resonant frequency shift of a vibrating magnetoelastic strip when exposed to an AC magnetic field. Since the vibration of the magnetoelastic strip generated a secondary field, the resonance was remotely detected with a coil. When a load was applied to a small area on the surface of the magnetoelastic strip via a circular rod applicator, the resonant frequency and amplitude decreased due to the damping on its vibration. The force s...

  6. A wireless, passive load cell based on magnetoelastic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A wireless, battery-less load cell was fabricated based on the resonant frequency shift of a vibrating magnetoelastic strip when exposed to an AC magnetic field. Since the vibration of the magnetoelastic strip generated a secondary field, the resonance was remotely detected with a coil. When a load was applied to a small area on the surface of the magnetoelastic strip via a circular rod applicator, the resonant frequency and amplitude decreased due to the damping of its vibration. The force sensitivity of the load cell was controlled by changing the size of the force applicator and placing the applicator at different locations on the strip’s surface. Experimental results showed that the force sensitivity increased when a larger applicator was placed near the edge of the strip. The novelty of this load cell is not only its wireless passive nature, but also the controllability of the force sensitivity. (paper)

  7. Resonance fluorescence in a waveguide geometry

    OpenAIRE

    Kocabaş, Şukrü Ekin; Rephaeli, Eden; Fan, Shanhui

    2011-01-01

    PHYSICAL REVIEW A 85, 023817 (2012) Resonance fluorescence in a waveguide geometry S¸ ¨ukr¨u Ekin Kocabas¸,1,* Eden Rephaeli,2,† and Shanhui Fan3,‡ 1Department of Electrical & Electronics Engineering, Koc¸ University, Rumeli Feneri Yolu TR-34450 Sarıyer, ˙Istanbul, Turkey 2Department of Applied Physics, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA 3Ginzton Laboratory, Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA (Received...

  8. Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) sensor

    OpenAIRE

    Hussain, Syed Arshad; Dey, Dibyendu; CHAKRABORTY, SEKHAR; Saha, Jaba; Roy, Arpan Datta; Chakraborty, Santanu; Debnath, Pintu; Bhattacharjee, D.

    2014-01-01

    The applications of Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) have expanded tremendously in the last 25 years, and the technique has become a staple technique in many biological and biophysical fields. FRET can be used as spectroscopic ruler in various areas such as structural elucidation of biological molecules and their interactions, in vitro assays, in vivo monitoring in cellular research, nucleic acid analysis, signal transduction, light harvesting, and metallic nanomaterials etc. Bas...

  9. Surface Plasmon Resonance for Cell-Based Clinical Diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuhki Yanase

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Non-invasive real-time observations and the evaluation of living cell conditions and functions are increasingly demanded in life sciences. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR sensors detect the refractive index (RI changes on the surface of sensor chips in label-free and on a real-time basis. Using SPR sensors, we and other groups have developed techniques to evaluate living cells’ reactions in response to stimuli without any labeling in a real-time manner. The SPR imaging (SPRI system for living cells may visualize single cell reactions and has the potential to expand application of SPR cell sensing for clinical diagnosis, such as multi-array cell diagnostic systems and detection of malignant cells among normal cells in combination with rapid cell isolation techniques.

  10. Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) sensor

    CERN Document Server

    Hussain, Syed Arshad; Chakraborty, Sekhar; Saha, Jaba; Roy, Arpan Datta; Chakraborty, Santanu; Debnath, Pintu; Bhattacharjee, D

    2014-01-01

    The applications of Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) have expanded tremendously in the last 25 years, and the technique has become a staple technique in many biological and biophysical fields. FRET can be used as spectroscopic ruler in various areas such as structural elucidation of biological molecules and their interactions, in vitro assays, in vivo monitoring in cellular research, nucleic acid analysis, signal transduction, light harvesting, and metallic nanomaterials etc. Based on the mechanism of FRET a variety of novel chemical sensors and Biosensors have been developed. This review highlights the recent applications of sensitive and selective ratiometric FRET based sensors.

  11. Nondestructive assay using nuclear resonance fluorescence scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nondestructive assay using Nuclear resonance fluorescence (NRF) with a laser Compton scattering (LCS) gamma-ray beam is considered to be useful method to measure Pu-239 inside of a spent nuclear fuel and a melted fuel. We have proposed some detection methods coupled with NRF. One of them is the measuring the scattering gamma-ray from the target. In this method, the various background increases the statistical error of the measured quantity of Pu-239. We discuss the statistical precise with a function of the energy of the incident LCS gamma-ray. (author)

  12. Magnetic resonance tracking of fluorescent nanodiamond fabrication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnetic resonance techniques (electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)) are used for tracking the multi-stage process of the fabrication of fluorescent nanodiamonds (NDs) produced by high-energy electron irradiation, annealing, and subsequent nano-milling. Pristine commercial high pressure and high temperature microdiamonds (MDs) with mean size 150 μm contain ∼5  ×  1018 spins/g of singlet (S = 1/2) substitutional nitrogen defects P1, as well as sp3 C–C dangling bonds in the crystalline lattice. The half-field X-band EPR clearly shows (by the appearance of the intense ‘forbidden’ g = 4.26 line) that high-energy electron irradiation and annealing of MDs induce a large amount (∼5  ×  1017 spins/g) of triplet (S = 1) magnetic centers, which are identified as negatively charged nitrogen vacancy defects (NV−). This is supported by EPR observations of the ‘allowed’ transitions between Zeeman sublevels of the triplet state. After progressive milling of the fluorescent MDs down to an ultrasubmicron scale (≤100 nm), the relative abundance of EPR active NV− defects in the resulting fluorescent NDs (FND) substantially decreases and, vice versa, the content of C-inherited singlet defects correlatively increases. In the fraction of the finest FNDs (mean particle size <20 nm), which are contained in the dried supernatant of ultracentrifuged aqueous dispersion of FNDs, the NV− content is found to be reduced by one order of magnitude whereas the singlet defects content increases up to ∼2  ×  1019 spins/g. In addition, another triplet-type defect, which is characterized by the g = 4.00 ‘forbidden’ line, appears. On reduction of the particle size below the 20 nm limit, the ‘allowed’ EPR lines become practically unobservable, whereas the ‘forbidden’ lines remain as a reliable fingerprint of the presence of NV− centers in small ND systems. The same size reduction causes the

  13. Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence for Materials Assay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quiter, Brian J.; Ludewigt, Bernhard; Mozin, Vladimir; Prussin, Stanley

    2009-06-29

    This paper discusses the use of nuclear resonance fluorescence (NRF) techniques for the isotopic and quantitative assaying of radioactive material. Potential applications include age-dating of an unknown radioactive source, pre- and post-detonation nuclear forensics, and safeguards for nuclear fuel cycles Examples of age-dating a strong radioactive source and assaying a spent fuel pin are discussed. The modeling work has ben performed with the Monte Carlo radiation transport computer code MCNPX, and the capability to simulate NRF has bee added to the code. Discussed are the limitations in MCNPX?s photon transport physics for accurately describing photon scattering processes that are important contributions to the background and impact the applicability of the NRF assay technique.

  14. Detecting clandestine material with nuclear resonance fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pruet, J.; McNabb, D. P.; Hagmann, C. A.; Hartemann, F. V.; Barty, C. P. J.

    2006-06-01

    We study the performance of a class of interrogation systems that exploit nuclear resonance fluorescence (NRF) to detect specific isotopes. In these systems the presence of a particular nuclide is inferred by observing the preferential attenuation of photons that strongly excite an electromagnetic transition in that nuclide. Estimates for the false positive/negative error rates, radiological dose, and detection sensitivity associated with discovering clandestine material embedded in cargo are presented. The relation between performance of the detection system and properties of the beam of interrogating photons is also considered. Bright gamma-ray sources with fine energy and angular resolution, such as those based on Thomson upscattering of laser light, are found to be associated with uniquely low radiological dose, scan times, and error rates. For this reason a consideration of NRF-based interrogation systems may provide impetus for efforts in light source development for applications related to national security and industry.

  15. Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence for Materials Assay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quiter, Brian; Ludewigt, Bernhard; Mozin, Vladimir; Prussin, Stanley

    2009-06-05

    This paper discusses the use of nuclear resonance fluorescence (NRF) techniques for the isotopic and quantitative assaying of radioactive material. Potential applications include age-dating of an unknown radioactive source, pre- and post-detonation nuclear forensics, and safeguards for nuclear fuel cycles Examples of age-dating a strong radioactive source and assaying a spent fuel pin are discussed. The modeling work has ben performed with the Monte Carlo radiation transport computer code MCNPX, and the capability to simulate NRF has bee added to the code. Discussed are the limitations in MCNPX's photon transport physics for accurately describing photon scattering processes that are important contributions to the background and impact the applicability of the NRF assay technique.

  16. Distance dependence of fluorescence resonance energy transfer

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R S Swathi; K L Sebastian

    2009-09-01

    Deviations from the usual -6 dependence of the rate of fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) on the distance between the donor and the acceptor have been a common scenario in the recent times. In this paper, we present a critical analysis of the distance dependence of FRET, and try to illustrate the non--6 type behaviour of the rate for the case of transfer from a localized electronic excitation on the donor, a dye molecule to three different energy acceptors with delocalized electronic excitations namely, graphene, a two-dimensional semiconducting sheet and the case of such a semiconducting sheet rolled to obtain a nanotube. We use simple analytic models to understand the distance dependence in each case.

  17. Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence Using Different Photon Sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear resonance fluorescence (NRF) is a photon-based active interrogation approach that provides isotope-specific signatures that can be used to detect and characterize samples. As NRF systems are designed to address specific applications, an obvious first question to address is the type of photon source to be employed for the application. Our collaboration has conducted a series of NRF measurements using different photon sources to begin to examine this issue. The measurements were designed to be as similar as possible to facilitate a straightforward comparison of the different sources. Measurements were conducted with a high-duty factor electron accelerator using bremsstrahlung photons, with a pulsed linear accelerator using bremsstrahlung photons, and with a narrow bandwidth photon source using Compton backscattered photons. We present our observations on the advantages and disadvantages of each photon source type. Issues such as signal rate, the signal-to-noise ratio, and absorbed dose are discussed

  18. Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence for Materials Assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper discusses the use of nuclear resonance fluorescence (NRF) techniques for the isotopic and quantitative assaying of radioactive material. Potential applications include age-dating of an unknown radioactive source, pre- and post-detonation nuclear forensics, and safeguards for nuclear fuel cycles Examples of age-dating a strong radioactive source and assaying a spent fuel pin are discussed. The modeling work has been performed with the Monte Carlo radiation transport computer code MCNPX, and the capability to simulate NRF has bee added to the code. Discussed are the limitations in MCNPX?s photon transport physics for accurately describing photon scattering processes that are important contributions to the background and impact the applicability of the NRF assay technique.

  19. A Label-Free Microfluidic Biosensor for Activity Detection of Single Microalgae Cells Based on Chlorophyll Fluorescence

    OpenAIRE

    Junsheng Wang; Jinyang Sun; Yongxin Song; Yongyi Xu; Xinxiang Pan; Yeqing Sun; Dongqing Li

    2013-01-01

    Detection of living microalgae cells is very important for ballast water treatment and analysis. Chlorophyll fluorescence is an indicator of photosynthetic activity and hence the living status of plant cells. In this paper, we developed a novel microfluidic biosensor system that can quickly and accurately detect the viability of single microalgae cells based on chlorophyll fluorescence. The system is composed of a laser diode as an excitation light source, a photodiode detector, a signal anal...

  20. A Cell-Based Fluorescent Assay to Detect the Activity of Shiga Toxin and Other Toxins That Inhibit Protein Synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escherichia coli O157:H7, a major cause of food-borne illness, produces Shiga toxins that block protein synthesis by inactivating the ribosome. In this chapter we describe a simple cell-based fluorescent assay to detect Shiga toxins and inhibitors of toxin activity. The assay can also be used to d...

  1. An Introduction to Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET)

    OpenAIRE

    Hussain, Syed Arshad

    2009-01-01

    Recent advances in Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) provides a way to measure and understand different biological systems and molecular interactions in nanometer order. In this report the introduction and principle of the FRET process have been explained.

  2. Resonance fluorescence from quantum dots: beyond the Mollow triplet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Anders Mølbjerg; Nielsen, Per Kær; Lorke, Michael;

    2011-01-01

    We show that the resonance fluorescence spectrum of a quantum dot excited by a strong pulse contains multiple peaks. An analytical model shows how the peak positions depend on pulse width and amplitude.......We show that the resonance fluorescence spectrum of a quantum dot excited by a strong pulse contains multiple peaks. An analytical model shows how the peak positions depend on pulse width and amplitude....

  3. Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence for Safeguards Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ludewigt, Bernhard A; Quiter, Brian J; Ambers, Scott D

    2011-02-04

    In nuclear resonance fluorescence (NRF) measurements, resonances are excited by an external photon beam leading to the emission of {gamma} rays with specific energies that are characteristic of the emitting isotope. The promise of NRF as a non-destructive analysis technique (NDA) in safeguards applications lies in its potential to directly quantify a specific isotope in an assay target without the need for unfolding the combined responses of several fissile isotopes as often required by other NDA methods. The use of NRF for detection of sensitive nuclear materials and other contraband has been researched in the past. In the safeguards applications considered here one has to go beyond mere detection and precisely quantify the isotopic content, a challenge that is discussed throughout this report. Basic NRF measurement methods, instrumentation, and the analytical calculation of NRF signal strengths are described in Section 2. Well understood modeling and simulation tools are needed for assessing the potential of NRF for safeguards and for designing measurement systems. All our simulations were performed with the radiation transport code MCNPX, a code that is widely used in the safeguards community. Our initial studies showed that MCNPX grossly underestimated the elastically scattered background at backwards angles due to an incorrect treatment of Rayleigh scattering. While new, corrected calculations based on ENDF form factors showed much better agreement with experimental data for the elastic scattering of photons on an uranium target, the elastic backscatter is still not rigorously treated. Photonuclear scattering processes (nuclear Thomson, Delbruck and Giant Dipole Resonance scattering), which are expected to play an important role at higher energies, are not yet included. These missing elastic scattering contributions were studied and their importance evaluated evaluated against data found in the literature as discussed in Section 3. A transmission experiment

  4. Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence for Safeguards Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In nuclear resonance fluorescence (NRF) measurements, resonances are excited by an external photon beam leading to the emission of γ rays with specific energies that are characteristic of the emitting isotope. The promise of NRF as a non-destructive analysis technique (NDA) in safeguards applications lies in its potential to directly quantify a specific isotope in an assay target without the need for unfolding the combined responses of several fissile isotopes as often required by other NDA methods. The use of NRF for detection of sensitive nuclear materials and other contraband has been researched in the past. In the safeguards applications considered here one has to go beyond mere detection and precisely quantify the isotopic content, a challenge that is discussed throughout this report. Basic NRF measurement methods, instrumentation, and the analytical calculation of NRF signal strengths are described in Section 2. Well understood modeling and simulation tools are needed for assessing the potential of NRF for safeguards and for designing measurement systems. All our simulations were performed with the radiation transport code MCNPX, a code that is widely used in the safeguards community. Our initial studies showed that MCNPX grossly underestimated the elastically scattered background at backwards angles due to an incorrect treatment of Rayleigh scattering. While new, corrected calculations based on ENDF form factors showed much better agreement with experimental data for the elastic scattering of photons on an uranium target, the elastic backscatter is still not rigorously treated. Photonuclear scattering processes (nuclear Thomson, Delbruck and Giant Dipole Resonance scattering), which are expected to play an important role at higher energies, are not yet included. These missing elastic scattering contributions were studied and their importance evaluated evaluated against data found in the literature as discussed in Section 3. A transmission experiment was

  5. Investigation of Quenching Mechanism in Thermoreversible Fluorescent Recording Materials of Fluorescence Using Thermochromic Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuzo Hirata,; Martin Vacha,; Toshiyuki Watanabe,

    2010-05-01

    We demonstrated reversible thermosensitive recording of a fluorescent image (TRF) using a low-molecular-weight mixture consisting of a fluorescent dye, a fluoran dye, a developer, and a reversible matrix. In this material, reversible thermoresponsive disorder-crystal transition triggers a cyclical colorless-color change of a fluoran dye, which induces on-off switching of fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) from a fluorescent dye to a fluoran dye. On-off switching of fluorescence is induced by heat-promoted off-on switching of FRET. Modulation of fluorescence is held at room temperature by utilizing thermal hysteresis, and nondestructive readout of the fluorescent image is accomplished in the presence of excitation light. Here, we investigate the on-off switching mechanism of fluorescence in this recording material. We analyzed the theoretical factor of emission quenching in the erasing state by comparing the theoretical overlap integral Ω between fluorescent dyes and fluoran dyes on the basis of the FRET theory with experimental emission contrast for various combinations of fluorescent dyes and fluoran dyes. It was proved that fluorescence on-off switching occurs mainly by concentration quenching due to the aggregation of fluorescent dyes and FRET from isolated fluorescent dyes to colored fluoran dyes. The key issue to obtain both high-contrast fluorescence and high fluorescence quantum yield is to control these two factors.

  6. Resonance fluorescence from a telecom-wavelength quantum dot

    CERN Document Server

    Al-Khuzheyri, R; Huwer, J; Santana, T S; Szymanska, J Skiba-; Felle, M; Ward, M B; Stevenson, R M; Farrer, I; Tanner, M G; Hadfield, R H; Ritchie, D A; Shields, A J; Gerardot, B D

    2016-01-01

    We report on resonance fluorescence from a single quantum dot emitting at telecom wavelengths. We perform high-resolution spectroscopy and observe the Mollow triplet in the Rabi regime--a hallmark of resonance fluorescence. The measured resonance-fluorescence spectra allow us to rule out pure dephasing as a significant decoherence mechanism in these quantum dots. Combined with numerical simulations, the experimental results provide robust characterisation of charge noise in the environment of the quantum dot. Resonant control of the quantum dot opens up new possibilities for on-demand generation of indistinguishable single photons at telecom wavelengths as well as quantum optics experiments and direct manipulation of solid-state qubits in telecom-wavelength quantum dots.

  7. 基于TiO2和CdTe荧光共振能量转移的PDT体外灭活HL60细胞实验研究%Experimental Research on the PDT Vitro Inactivation of HL60 Cells Based on Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer between TiO2 and CdTe Quantum Dots

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    罗有焕; 张卿; 陈丽; 艾保全; 熊建文

    2015-01-01

    为研究TiO2和CdTe量子点间荧光共振能量转移效率对PDT体外灭活HL60细胞的影响,本文以发射波长为407.8 nm的TiO2为供体,CdTe为受体,通过TiO2与CdTe超声混合构建荧光共振能量转移体系,研究了TiO2和CdTe量子点间荧光共振能量转移;其中体系中TiO2浓度为200μg/mL时,通过逐渐增加体系中CdTe浓度来观察供体TiO2荧光强度变化,根据Forster能量共振转移理论计算体系能量转移效率.之后将体系用于PDT体外灭活HL60细胞的实验研究,采用CCK-8法,结合酶联免疫检测仪进行细胞活性检测,得出不同浓度下体系的PDT灭活效率.发现当TiO2-CdTe体系荧光共振能量转移效率20.21%时,PDT灭活效率为53.75%,而当体系能量转移效率为6.77%时,灭活效率达到了71.54%,实验表明在一定浓度范围内,TiO2-CdTe混合体系荧光共振能量转移效率低时,PDT灭活效率更高.这可能是由于TiO2-CdTe之间能量共振转移低时,容易致使TiO2表面光生电子和空穴复合率降低,提高了二氧化钛的光催化活性,导致灭活效率增高.%A fluorescence resonance energy transfer system based on TiO2 and CdTe ultrasonic mix was built to study how fluorescence resonance energy transfer between TiO2 and CdTe quantum dots influence HL60 viability in PDT exper-iment.TiO2 with 407.8 nm emission wavelength was used as donor,and CdTe as acceptor.The intensity change of do-nor TiO2 was observed when the concentration of CdTe was increased in proportion,and the concentration of TiO2 re-mained at 200 μg/mL.The system energy transfer efficiency was calculated according to the theory of Forster energy transfer.The system was then applied in in vitro PDT experiment based on HL60 cells.With CCK-8 method,the cell vi-ability under different drug concentration was calculated.Our data showed that when the fluorescence resonance energy transfer efficiency of TiO2-CdTe hybrid system was 20.21%,the PDT inactivated efficiency was 53

  8. Resonance fluorescence and electron spin in semiconductor quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Yong

    2009-11-18

    The work presented in this dissertation contains the first observation of spin-resolved resonance fluorescence from a single quantum dot and its application of direct measurement of electron spin dynamics. The Mollow triplet and the Mollow quintuplet, which are the hallmarks of resonance fluorescence, are presented as the non-spin-resolved and spin-resolved resonance fluorescence spectrum, respectively. The negligible laser background contribution, the near pure radiative broadened spectrum and the anti-bunching photon statistics imply the sideband photons are background-free and near transform-limited single photons. This demonstration is a promising step towards the heralded single photon generation and electron spin readout. Instead of resolving spectrum, an alternative spin-readout scheme by counting resonance fluorescence photons under moderate laser power is demonstrated. The measurements of n-shot time-resolved resonance fluorescence readout are carried out to reveal electron spin dynamics of the measurement induced back action and the spin relaxation. Hyperfine interaction and heavy-light hole mixing are identified as the relevant mechanisms for the back action and phonon-assistant spin-orbit interaction dominates the spin relaxation. After a detailed discussion on charge-spin configurations in coupled quantum dots system, the single-shot readout on electron spin are proposed. (orig.)

  9. Manipulation of the atomic localization via resonance fluorescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The possibility of manipulating the position of atoms dressed in the standing field of the cavity, based on the resonance fluorescence emission, is discussed. Stark dynamics modification and the strong coupling between two undistinguishable radiators situated in non-symmetric positions of the anti-nodes are investigated. The fluorescent spectrum is shown versus the second atom localization and external field parameters. We describe the conditions in which the Rabi frequencies of atoms change their correlations and cooperative emission. (paper)

  10. New method for tissue indentification: resonance fluorescence spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neu, Walter

    1991-11-01

    The method proposed in this paper is based on the detection of resonantly enhanced fluorescence emission induced by a tunable dye laser. First test on anorganic samples exposed to air and to saline solution demonstrate the potential of this technique. A XeCl excimer-laser ((lambda) equals308 nm) pulse, guided by quartz fibers, causes an efficient ablation of the irradiated samples. The specific species to be detected in the ablation plume determines the wavelength of the narrow-band dye-laser radiation. Preferably, it is set to a strong transition of the selected ablation product. Taking into account the formation of the plume, the dye-laser pulse is applied with a certain delay in order to excite resonantly the chosen species in the plume. The resulting resonance fluorescence is then guided by optical fibers to an OMA system. Compared to the broad-band excimer-laser-indiced fluorescence during the ablation process, the resonance fluorescence signal shows a distinct and easily detectable sharp peak. The signal-to-background ratio is improved by one order of magnitude. The achieved increase in sensitivity as well as selectivity is for the benefit of a reliable identification of ablated tissue.

  11. Diagnosis of atherosclerotic tissue by resonance fluorescence spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neu, Walter; Haase, Karl K.; Tischler, Christian; Nyga, Ralf; Karsch, Karl R.

    1991-05-01

    Resonantly enhanced fluorescence emission induced by a tunable dye laser can be used for the identification of ablated atherosclerotic tissue. This method has been tested with anorganic samples exposed to air and to saline solution. A XeCl excimer laser pulse ((lambda) = 308 nm), delivered by a fused silica optical fiber, causes an efficient ablation of the irradiated samples. The wavelength of the narrow-band dye laser radiation is set to a strong transition of a specific species to be detected in the ablation plume. Taking into account the formation of the plume, the dye laser pulse is applied with a certain delay in order to excite resonantly the selected species in the plume. The resulting resonance fluorescence then is guided by optical fibers to an optical multi-channel analyzer system. Compared to the broad-band fluorescence during excimer laser ablation the resonance fluorescence signal shows a distinct and easily detectable sharp peak. The signal-to-background ratio is improved by one order of magnitude.

  12. Correlation signals in resonance fluorescence : interpretation via photon scattering amplitudes

    OpenAIRE

    Dalibard, J.; Reynaud, S.

    1983-01-01

    Resonance fluorescence is treated as a collision process where incident laser photons are scattered by an atom. Correlation signals are extracted from an expansion to the second order of the post collision field state. Photon antibunching effect appears as a quantum interference between all the possible scattering amplitudes. When Rayleigh photons are rejected, some amplitudes vanish, leading to a bunching behaviour.

  13. Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer Using Spiropyran and Diarylethene Photochromic Acceptors

    OpenAIRE

    E. A. Jares-Erijman; Irie, M.; Jovin, T M; Song, L.; Macareno, J.; GIORDANO, L.

    2000-01-01

    We describe the preparation and photophysical characterization of two model compounds designed to test a new approach for the quantitative determination of Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) in biological systems. The method enables modulation of FRET by exploiting the unique reversible spectral properties of photochromic diarylethenes and spiropyrans to create switchable energy acceptors.

  14. Using magnetic resonance imaging to evaluate dendritic cell-based vaccination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter M Ferguson

    Full Text Available Cancer immunotherapy with antigen-loaded dendritic cell-based vaccines can induce clinical responses in some patients, but further optimization is required to unlock the full potential of this strategy in the clinic. Optimization is dependent on being able to monitor the cellular events that take place once the dendritic cells have been injected in vivo, and to establish whether antigen-specific immune responses to the tumour have been induced. Here we describe the use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI as a simple, non-invasive approach to evaluate vaccine success. By loading the dendritic cells with highly magnetic iron nanoparticles it is possible to assess whether the injected cells drain to the lymph nodes. It is also possible to establish whether an antigen-specific response is initiated by assessing migration of successive rounds of antigen-loaded dendritic cells; in the face of a successfully primed cytotoxic response, the bulk of antigen-loaded cells are eradicated on-route to the node, whereas cells without antigen can reach the node unchecked. It is also possible to verify the induction of a vaccine-induced response by simply monitoring increases in draining lymph node size as a consequence of vaccine-induced lymphocyte trapping, which is an antigen-specific response that becomes more pronounced with repeated vaccination. Overall, these MRI techniques can provide useful early feedback on vaccination strategies, and could also be used in decision making to select responders from non-responders early in therapy.

  15. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer from allophycocyanin to malachite green

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolinski, O. J.; Birch, D. J. S.; McCartney, L. J.; Pickup, J. C.

    1999-08-01

    The near-infrared fluorescence resonance energy transfer kinetics of the phycobiliprotein allophycocyanin (APC) to malachite green (MG) have been investigated. A model is proposed to account for the fluorescence decay whereby MG binds to APC with a donor-acceptor site distribution which can be best described by 2D quenching kinetics. The results highlight a potential fallacy when interpreting the dimensionality of complex systems or the location of binding sites from Förster decay kinetics. The use of APC in trans-dermal measurements is proposed.

  16. Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) systems for biomedical sensor applications

    OpenAIRE

    Bird , Aoibheann

    2010-01-01

    This thesis investigates the use of Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) for biomedical sensor applications. FRET is a process by which energy is transferred, via long range dipole-dipole interactions, from a donor molecule (D) in an excited electronic state to an acceptor molecule (A). The emission band of D must overlap the absorption band of A in order for FRET to occur. FRET is employed in a variety of biomedical applications, including the study of cell biology an...

  17. Photon statistics and dynamics of Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer

    OpenAIRE

    Berglund, Andrew J.; Doherty, Andrew C.; Mabuchi, Hideo

    2002-01-01

    We report high time-resolution measurements of photon statistics from pairs of dye molecules coupled by fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). In addition to quantum-optical photon antibunching, we observe photon bunching on a time scale of several nanoseconds. We show by numerical simulation that configuration fluctuations in the coupled fluorophore system could account for minor deviations of our data from predictions of basic Förster theory. With further characterization we believe...

  18. A cell-based fluorescent glucose transporter assay for SGLT2 inhibitor discovery

    OpenAIRE

    Yi Huan; Linyi Li; Quan Liu; Shuainan Liu; Zhufang Shen

    2013-01-01

    The sodium/glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2) is responsible for the majority of glucose reabsorption in the kidney, and currently, SGLT2 inhibitors are considered as promising hypoglycemic agents for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus. By constructing CHO cell lines that stably express the human SGLT2 transmembrane protein, along with a fluorescent glucose transporter assay that uses 2-[N-(7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazol-4-yl)amino]2-deoxyglucose (2-NBDG) as a glucose analog, we have develo...

  19. Performance of a Cyanobacteria Whole Cell-Based Fluorescence Biosensor for Heavy Metal and Pesticide Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salmijah Surif

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Whole cell biosensors always face the challenge of low stability of biological components and short storage life. This paper reports the effects of poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (pHEMA immobilization on a whole cell fluorescence biosensor for the detection of heavy metals (Cu, Pb, Cd, and pesticides (dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D, and chlorpyrifos. The biosensor was produced by entrapping the cyanobacterium Anabaena torulosa on a cellulose membrane, followed by applying a layer of pHEMA, and attaching it to a well. The well was then fixed to an optical probe which was connected to a fluorescence spectrophotometer and an electronic reader. The optimization of the biosensor using several factors such as amount of HEMA and drying temperature were undertaken. The detection limits of biosensor without pHEMA for Cu, Cd, Pb, 2,4-D and chlorpyrifos were 1.195, 0.027, 0.0100, 0.025 and 0.025 µg/L respectively. The presence of pHEMA increased the limits of detection to 1.410, 0.250, 0.500, 0.235 and 0.117 µg/L respectively. pHEMA is known to enhance the reproducibility of the biosensor with average relative standard deviation (RSD of ±1.76% for all the pollutants tested, 48% better than the biosensor without pHEMA (RSD = ±3.73%. In storability test with Cu 5 µg/L, the biosensor with pHEMA performed 11.5% better than the test without pHEMA on day-10 and 5.2% better on day-25. pHEMA is therefore a good candidate to be used in whole cell biosensors as it increases reproducibility and enhances biosensor storability.

  20. Tastant quantitative analysis from complex mixtures using taste cell-based sensor and double-layered cascaded series stochastic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, tastant quantitative analysis from complex mixtures using taste cell-based sensor and double-layered cascaded series stochastic resonance (DCSSR) method has been investigated. Taste cells, NCI-H716 cells and STC-1 cells, are cultured on carbon screen printed electrode (CSPE) to fabricate integrated sensing devices. Cell culture status on CSPE is observed by scanning electron microscope (SEM) method. Molecular components referring to taste receptor protein and signal transduction (α-gustducin) in taste cells are identified by immunocytochemistry. The chemical mixtures containing sweet/bitter tastants in 7 concentrations are measured by corresponding cell-based sensor. Real-time EIS measurement data of taste cell-based sensor is recorded and processed by DCSSR. Tastant mixtures containing the same chemical components share the same eigen peak located noise intensities (EPLNIs). Correlations and statistical tests on DCSSR signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) maximums (Max-SNR) have been conducted to give a clearly comparison with stochastic resonance (SR) method. Results demonstrate that DCSSR method presents better quantitative perception abilities for sucrose/quinine tastants than SR. Sucrose/quinine concentrations can be discriminated by Max-SNR values. The proposed method provides a promising way for the construction of a novel biological tongue

  1. A Label-Free Microfluidic Biosensor for Activity Detection of Single Microalgae Cells Based on Chlorophyll Fluorescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junsheng Wang

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Detection of living microalgae cells is very important for ballast water treatment and analysis. Chlorophyll fluorescence is an indicator of photosynthetic activity and hence the living status of plant cells. In this paper, we developed a novel microfluidic biosensor system that can quickly and accurately detect the viability of single microalgae cells based on chlorophyll fluorescence. The system is composed of a laser diode as an excitation light source, a photodiode detector, a signal analysis circuit, and a microfluidic chip as a microalgae cell transportation platform. To demonstrate the utility of this system, six different living and dead algae samples (Karenia mikimotoi Hansen, Chlorella vulgaris, Nitzschia closterium, Platymonas subcordiformis, Pyramidomonas delicatula and Dunaliella salina were tested. The developed biosensor can distinguish clearly between the living microalgae cells and the dead microalgae cells. The smallest microalgae cells that can be detected by using this biosensor are 3 μm ones. Even smaller microalgae cells could be detected by increasing the excitation light power. The developed microfluidic biosensor has great potential for in situ ballast water analysis.

  2. Nanosecond Dynamics of Single-Molecule Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer

    CERN Document Server

    Ariunbold, G O; Wang, Z; Walther, H; Scully, M O

    2004-01-01

    Motivated by recent experiments on photon statistics from individual dye pairs planted on biomolecules and coupled by fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET), we show here that the FRET dynamics can be modelled by Gaussian random processes with colored noise. Using Monte-Carlo numerical simulations, the photon intensity correlations from the FRET pairs are calculated, and are turned out to be very close to those observed in experiment. The proposed stochastic description of FRET is consistent with existing theories for microscopic dynamics of the biomolecule that carries the FRET coupled dye pairs.

  3. Phase-dependent fluctuations of intermittent resonance fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro-Beltrán, Héctor M.; Román-Ancheyta, Ricardo; Gutiérrez, Luis

    2016-03-01

    Electron shelving gives rise to bright and dark periods in the resonance fluorescence of a three-level atom. The spectral signature of such blinking is a very narrow inelastic peak on top of the two-level atom spectrum. Here, we investigate theoretically phase-dependent fluctuations (e.g., squeezing) of intermittent resonance fluorescence in the frameworks of balanced and conditional homodyne detection (BHD and CHD, respectively). In BHD, the squeezing is reduced significantly in size and Rabi frequency range compared to that for a two-level atom. The sharp peak is found only in the spectrum of the squeezed quadrature, splitting the negative broader squeezing peak for weak fields. CHD correlates the BHD signal with the detection of emitted photons. It is thus sensitive to third-order fluctuations of the field, produced by the atom-laser nonlinearity, that cause noticeable deviations from the second-order BHD results. For weak driving, the third-order spectrum is negative, enlarging the squeezing peak but also reducing the sharp peak. For strong driving, the spectrum is dominated by third-order fluctuations, with a large sharp peak and the sidebands becoming dispersive. Finally, the addition of third-order fluctuations makes the integrated spectra of both quadratures equal in magnitude in CHD, in contrast to those by BHD. A simple mathematical approach allows us to obtain very accurate analytical results in the shelving regime.

  4. Assessment of Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence for Spent Nuclear Fuel Assay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quiter, Brian; Ludewigt, Bernhard; Ambers, Scott

    2011-06-30

    In nuclear resonance fluorescence (NRF) measurements, resonances are excited by an external photon beam leading to the emission of gamma rays with specific energies that are characteristic of the emitting isotope. NRF promises the unique capability of directly quantifying a specific isotope without the need for unfolding the combined responses of several fissile isotopes as is required in other measurement techniques. We have analyzed the potential of NRF as a non-destructive analysis technique for quantitative measurements of Pu isotopes in spent nuclear fuel (SNF). Given the low concentrations of 239Pu in SNF and its small integrated NRF cross sections, the main challenge in achieving precise and accurate measurements lies in accruing sufficient counting statistics in a reasonable measurement time. Using analytical modeling, and simulations with the radiation transport code MCNPX that has been experimentally tested recently, the backscatter and transmission methods were quantitatively studied for differing photon sources and radiation detector types. Resonant photon count rates and measurement times were estimated for a range of photon source and detection parameters, which were used to determine photon source and gamma-ray detector requirements. The results indicate that systems based on a bremsstrahlung source and present detector technology are not practical for high-precision measurements of 239Pu in SNF. Measurements that achieve the desired uncertainties within hour-long measurements will either require stronger resonances, which may be expressed by other Pu isotopes, or require quasi-monoenergetic photon sources with intensities that are approximately two orders of magnitude higher than those currently being designed or proposed.This work is part of a larger effort sponsored by the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative to develop an integrated instrument, comprised of individual NDA techniques with complementary features, that is fully capable of

  5. Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence from Uranium above 2 MeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwan, E.; Howell, C. R.; Raut, R.; Rusev, G.; Tonchev, A. P.; Tornow, W.; Adekola, A.; Hammond, S. L.; Karwowski, H. J.; Tompkins, J. R.; Huibregtse, C.; Kelley, J. H.; Johnson, B.

    2009-10-01

    The detection of special nuclear materials is critical to the nation's efforts to counter serious threat from nuclear terrorist attacks. A research program has been initiated at TUNL to address the need for new nuclear data on the actinides using the High-Intensity Gamma-Ray Source (HIγS). The high-intensity nearly monoenergic and 100% polarized γ-ray beams from HγS were utilized to search for dipole states in ^235U and ^238U above 2 MeV. This information is necessary for developing technologies using Nuclear-Resonance Fluorescence (NRF) to nonintrusively scan cargo for specific nuclei. The existence of strong nuclear dipole transitions in the actinides above 2 MeV is important for nuclear forensics, because interrogation photons using NRF are the most penetrating at these energies. Results from our experiments at Eγ> 2.0 MeV on uranium will be presented.

  6. A novel cell-based duplex high-throughput screening assay combining fluorescent Ca(2+) measurement with homogeneous time-resolved fluorescence technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiss, László; Cselenyák, Attila; Varga, Ágnes; Visegrády, András

    2016-08-15

    Cell-based assays for G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) activation applied in high-throughput screening (HTS) monitor various readouts for second messengers or intracellular effectors. Recently, our understanding of diverging signaling pathways downstream of receptor activation and the capability of small molecules to selectively modulate signaling routes has increased substantially, underlining the importance of selecting appropriate readouts in cellular functional screens. To minimize the rate of false negatives in large-scale screening campaigns, it is crucial to maximize the chance of a ligand being detected, and generally applicable methods for detecting multiple analytes from a single well might serve this purpose. The few assays developed so far based on multiplexed GPCR readouts are limited to only certain applications and usually rely on genetic manipulations hindering screening in native or native-like cellular systems. Here we describe a more generally applicable and HTS-compatible homogeneous assay based on the combination of fluorometric detection of [Ca(2+)] with subsequent homogeneous time-resolved fluorescence (HTRF) cAMP readout in the same well. Besides describing development and validation of the assay, using a cell line recombinantly expressing the human PTH1 receptor screening of a small library is also presented, demonstrating the robustness and HTS compatibility of the novel paradigm. PMID:27235172

  7. Controlled degradation stochastic resonance in adaptive averaging cell-based architectures

    OpenAIRE

    Aymerich Capdevila, Nivard; Cotofana, Sorin; Rubio Sola, Jose Antonio

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we first analyze the degradation stochastic resonance (DSR) effect in the context of adaptive averaging (AD-AVG) architectures. The AD-AVG is the adaptive version of the well-known AVG architecture . It is an optimized fault-tolerant design for future technologies with very high rates of failures and defects. With system degradation the AD-AVG reliability is diminishing, as expected, but at a certain moment in time it increases due to the DSR occurrence, which is counterintuiti...

  8. Imaging of surfaces by surface plasmon resonance and surface plasmon resonance-enhanced fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thariani, Rahber A.

    An instrument system capable of concurrent imaging of surfaces by surface plasmon resonance microscopy (SPRM) and surface plasmon resonance-enhanced fluorescence (SPRF) is presented. A conventional laser pointer is adopted as a light source, and a reflective diffuser coupled to an acoustic transducer is used to remove speckle artifacts due to coherent beam interference. Both SPRM and SPRF systems are characterized, and a careful choice of widely available, inexpensive, off-the-shelf components allows the entire system to be constructed at low cost. A model streptavidin-biotin system is explored utilizing the different modalities of the instrument. Applications of the system include mobile, cost-effective point-of-care diagnostics system and research laboratories in resource-limited settings where cost efficacy is a prime concern.

  9. Nondestructive Spent Fuel Assay Using Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quantifying the isotopic composition of spent fuel is an important challenge and essential for many nuclear safeguards applications, such as independent verification of the Pu content declared by a regulated facility, shipper/receiver measurements, and quantifying isotopic input masses at a reprocessing facility. As part of the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative, NA-241 has recently funded a multilab/university collaboration to investigate a variety of nondestructive methods for determining the elemental Pu mass in spent fuel assemblies. Nuclear resonance fluorescence (NRF) is one of the methods being investigated. First modeling studies have been performed to investigate the feasibility of assaying a single fuel pin using a bremsstrahlung photon source. MCNPX modeling results indicate that NRF signals are significantly more intense than the background due to scattered interrogation photons even for isotopes with concentrations below 1percent. However, the studies revealed that the dominant contribution to the background is elastic scattering, which is currently not simulated by MCNPX. Critical to this effort, we have added existing NRF data to the MCNPX photonuclear data files and are now able to incorporate NRF physics into MCNPX simulations. Addition of the non-resonant elastic scattering data to MCNPX is in progress. Assaying fuel assemblies with NRF poses additional challenges: photon penetration through the assembly is small and the spent fuel radioactive decay and neutron activity lead to significantly higher backgrounds. First modeling studies to evaluate the efficacy of NRF for assaying assemblies have been initiated using the spent fuel assembly library created at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL).

  10. Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence for Material Verification in Dismantlement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warren, Glen A.; Detwiler, Rebecca S.

    2011-10-01

    Nuclear resonance fluorescence (NRF) is a well-established physical process that provides an isotope-specific signature that can be exploited for isotopic detection and characterization of samples. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory has been investigating possible applications of NRF for national security. Of the investigated applications, the verification of material in the dismantlement process is the most promising. Through a combination of benchmarking measurements and radiation transport modeling, we have shown that NRF techniques with existing bremsstrahlung photon sources and a modest detection system can be used to detect highly enriched uranium in the quantities and time limits relevant to the dismantlement process. Issues such as orientation, placement and material geometry do not significantly impact the sensitivity of the technique. We have also investigated how shielding of the uranium would be observed through non-NRF processes to enable the accurate assay of the material. This paper will discuss our findings on how NRF and photon-interrogation techniques may be applied to the material verification in the dismantlement process.

  11. Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence for Material Verification in Dismantlement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear resonance fluorescence (NRF) is a well-established physical process that provides an isotope-specific signature that can be exploited for isotopic detection and characterization of samples. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory has been investigating possible applications of NRF for national security. Of the investigated applications, the verification of material in the dismantlement process is the most promising. Through a combination of benchmarking measurements and radiation transport modeling, we have shown that NRF techniques with existing bremsstrahlung photon sources and a modest detection system can be used to detect highly enriched uranium in the quantities and time limits relevant to the dismantlement process. Issues such as orientation, placement and material geometry do not significantly impact the sensitivity of the technique. We have also investigated how shielding of the uranium would be observed through non-NRF processes to enable the accurate assay of the material. This paper will discuss our findings on how NRF and photon-interrogation techniques may be applied to the material verification in the dismantlement process.

  12. Near-infrared emitting fluorescent nanocrystals-labeled natural killer cells as a platform technology for the optical imaging of immunotherapeutic cells-based cancer therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study describes the development of near-infrared optical imaging technology for the monitoring of immunotherapeutic cell-based cancer therapy using natural killer (NK) cells labeled with fluorescent nanocrystals. Although NK cell-based immunotherapeutic strategies have drawn interest as potent preclinical or clinical methods of cancer therapy, there are few reports documenting the molecular imaging of NK cell-based cancer therapy, primarily due to the difficulty of labeling of NK cells with imaging probes. Human natural killer cells (NK92MI) were labeled with anti-human CD56 antibody-coated quantum dots (QD705) for fluorescence imaging. FACS analysis showed that the NK92MI cells labeled with anti-human CD56 antibody-coated QD705 have no effect on the cell viability. The effect of anti-human CD56 antibody-coated QD705 labeling on the NK92MI cell function was investigated by measuring interferon gamma (IFN- γ) production and cytolytic activity. Finally, the NK92MI cells labeled with anti-human CD56 antibody-coated QD705 showed a therapeutic effect similar to that of unlabeled NK92MI cells. Images of intratumorally injected NK92MI cells labeled with anti-human CD56 antibody-coated could be acquired using near-infrared optical imaging both in vivo and in vitro. This result demonstrates that the immunotherapeutic cells labeled with fluorescent nanocrystals can be a versatile platform for the effective tracking of injected therapeutic cells using optical imaging technology, which is very important in cell-based cancer therapies.

  13. Biomolecular interactions probed by fluorescence resonance energy transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, Daniela Charlotte

    2000-09-01

    This thesis describes how a physical phenomenon, Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET), can be exploited for the study of interactions between biomolecules. The physical basis of this phenomenon is discussed and it is described how some of its characteristics can be exploited in measurement. A recently introduced method, photobleaching FRET microscopy, was implemented and its image analysis refined to suit our biological context. Further, a new technique is proposed, which combines FRET with confocal laser scanning microscopy to optimize resolution and to allow for 3D-studies in living cells. The first part of this thesis presents the application of FRET to the study of oligomerization of G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs), which was performed at the Fraser Laboratories at McGill University in Montreal. It is demonstrated how FRET microscopy allowed us to circumvent problems of traditional biochemical approaches and provided the first direct evidence for GPCR oligomerization in intact cells. We found that somatostatin receptors (SSTRs) functionally interact by forming oligomers with their own kind, with different SSTR isoforms, and even with distantly related GPCRs, such as dopamine receptors, the latter of which is breaking with the dogma that GPCRs would only pair up with their own kind. The high sensitivity of the FRET technique allowed us to characterize these interactions under more physiological conditions, which lead to the observation that oligomerization is induced by receptor agonist. We further studied the differential effects of agonists and antagonists on receptor oligomerization, leading to a model for the molecular mechanism underlying agonist/antagonist function and receptor activation. The second part was carried out at the Neurobiology Laboratory of the VA Medical Center in Newington, CT. The objective was to further our understanding of Niemann- Pick type C disease, which is characterized by a defect in intracellular cholesterol

  14. Titanium atom detection by resonance fluorescence excited with a nitrogen laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coincidence of wave lengths of nitrogen laser basing lines and resonance transitions in titanium atom is investigated. It is shown that resonance fluorescence excited by nitrogen laser can be used for absolute titanium atom density measurements. Experiments on titanium atom detection in a vapour cloud formed under irradiation of a titanium target in vacuum by dye laser pulse, are conducted. Fluorescence extinguishing is observed under high evaporation power

  15. Resonance Fluorescence in Two-Photon JC Models Analyzed by Supersymmetric Transformation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIANG Xian-Ting; SUN Ming-Zhai

    2002-01-01

    Resonance fluorescences of two-photon two-level and two-photon three-level atoms driven by laser are investigated with supersymmetric transformation.It is shown that the spectrum of fluorescent light obtained from the supersymmetric transformation is more accurate and the physical process shown by this method is clearer than that from dress transformation.

  16. Direct observation of resonance tryptophan-to-chromophore energy transfer in visible fluorescent proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, NV; Borst, JW; Hink, MA; van Hoek, A; Visser, AJWG

    2005-01-01

    Visible fluorescent proteins from Aequorea victoria contain next to the fluorophoric group a single tryptophan residue. Both molecules form a single donor-acceptor pair for resonance energy transfer (RET) within the protein. Time-resolved fluorescence experiments using tryptophan excitation have sho

  17. Optical resonance shifts in the fluorescence imaging of thermal and cold Rubidium atomic gases

    CERN Document Server

    Jenkins, S D; Javanainen, J; Bourgain, R; Jennewein, S; Sortais, Y R P; Browaeys, A

    2016-01-01

    We show that the resonance shifts in fluorescence of a cold gas of rubidium atoms substantially differ from those of thermal atomic ensembles that obey the standard continuous medium electrodynamics. The analysis is based on large-scale microscopic numerical simulations and experimental measurements of the resonance shifts in a steady-state response in light propagation.

  18. Optical Resonance Shifts in the Fluorescence of Thermal and Cold Atomic Gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, S. D.; Ruostekoski, J.; Javanainen, J.; Bourgain, R.; Jennewein, S.; Sortais, Y. R. P.; Browaeys, A.

    2016-05-01

    We show that the resonance shifts in the fluorescence of a cold gas of rubidium atoms substantially differ from those of thermal atomic ensembles that obey the standard continuous medium electrodynamics. The analysis is based on large-scale microscopic numerical simulations and experimental measurements of the resonance shifts in a steady-state response in light propagation.

  19. Multi-Channel Hyperspectral Fluorescence Detection Excited by Coupled Plasmon-Waveguide Resonance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yonghong He

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available We propose in this paper a biosensor scheme based on coupled plasmon-waveguide resonance (CPWR excited fluorescence spectroscopy. A symmetrical structure that offers higher surface electric field strengths, longer surface propagation lengths and depths is developed to support guided waveguide modes for the efficient excitation of fluorescence. The optimal parameters for the sensor films are theoretically and experimentally investigated, leading to a detection limit of 0.1 nM (for a Cy5 solution. Multiplex analysis possible with the fluorescence detection is further advanced by employing the hyperspectral fluorescence technique to record the full spectra for every pixel on the sample plane. We demonstrate experimentally that highly overlapping fluorescence (Cy5 and Dylight680 can be distinguished and ratios of different emission sources can be determined accurately. This biosensor shows great potential for multiplex detections of fluorescence analytes.

  20. Measuring protein interactions using Förster resonance energy transfer and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Day, Richard N

    2013-01-01

    The method of fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) is a quantitative approach that can be used to detect Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET). The use of FLIM to measure the FRET that results from the interactions between proteins labeled with fluorescent proteins (FPs) inside living cells provides a non-invasive method for mapping interactomes. Here, the use of the phasor plot method to analyze frequency domain (FD) FLIM measurements is described, and measurements obtained fro...

  1. The stationary resonance fluorescence of a two-level atom in a cat-state field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomilin, V. A.; Il'ichov, L. V.

    2016-09-01

    We investigate the resonance fluorescence of a two-level atom placed in non-classical field which is a superposition of Glauber coherent states. The source of this superposition known under the common name of 'Schrödinger cat'-states is explicitly incorporated into the model. This let us to explore the stationary regime. In the strong (multiphoton) field limit the steady-state of the atom+photons system is found. We evaluated the spectrum of the resonance fluorescence. It appears to be one-component in contrast to the case with the classical external field.

  2. Study of the dispersion phenomena connected with the absorption by recoilless nuclear resonance fluorescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In nuclear resonance fluorescence as in the optical field abnormal dispersion curves are related to the absorption lines. It is possible, by using quadrupolar or magnetic splitting of the line in the case of recoilless resonance fluorescence (Moessbauer effect) to obtain differential dispersion effects between the two orthogonal linear or the two inverse circular components of the incident gamma radiation. These effects induce bi-refraction phenomena or Faraday rotation on the gamma beam, which have been studied on Fe-57 enriched absorbers. (author)

  3. Study of nuclear levels of natural arsenic by resonance fluorescence method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mean lives of nuclear levels of 75As, measured at 572.5, 823.0, 865.5, 1,076.0, 1,128.5, 1,349.0 and 1,370 keV are determined by resonance fluorescence method: distribution curves of the exciting bremsstrahlung obtained with 63Cu and 65Cu being used

  4. Determination of level widths in 15N using nuclear resonance fluorescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szücs T.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Level widths in 15N have been measured with the nuclear resonance fluorescence (NRF technique. Solid nitrogen compounds, bremsstrahlung, and HPGe detectors have been used as target, beam, and detectors, respectively. The preliminarily level widths are in agreement with the literature values, but more precise.

  5. Effects of spontaneously generated coherence on resonance fluorescence from triple quantum dot molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tian, Si-Cong [State Key Laboratory of Luminescence and Applications, Changchun Institute of Optics, Fine Mechanics and Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun 130033 (China); Tong, Cun-Zhu, E-mail: tongcz@ciomp.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Luminescence and Applications, Changchun Institute of Optics, Fine Mechanics and Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun 130033 (China); Wang, Chun-Liang [Laboratory for UV Light-Emitting Materials and Technology of Ministry of Education, Northeast Normal University, Changchun 130024 (China); Ning, Yong-Qiang [State Key Laboratory of Luminescence and Applications, Changchun Institute of Optics, Fine Mechanics and Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun 130033 (China)

    2014-09-15

    The resonance fluorescence spectrum from a triple quantum dot molecules controlled by tunneling is investigated. The positions, widths and heights of the resonance fluorescence peaks can be modified by the tunneling between the dots rather than the laser field, and interesting features such as controllable triple narrow peaks are obtained. The spectrum is explained with the transition properties of the dressed states generated by the coupling of the tunneling and the laser field. These features can also be viewed as the effects of spontaneously generated coherence between the close-lying states in the dressed state picture of the tunneling couplings, which can permit the observation of spontaneously generated coherence in quantum dot molecules. - Highlights: • The resonance fluorescence spectrum from triple quantum dot molecules is investigated for the first time. • The resonance fluorescence spectrum is controlled by the tunneling coupling rather than the laser fields. • Some interesting features such as controllable triple narrow peaks are obtained. • The results can be interpreted well in the dressed state picture generated by tunneling. • The tunneling coupling between the quantum dots can simulate spontaneous generated coherence (SGC)

  6. DEVELOPMENT OF A REAL-TIME FLUORESCENCE RESONANCE ENERGY TRANSFER (FRET) PCR TO DETECT ARCOBACTER SPECIES

    Science.gov (United States)

    A real-time PCR targeting the gyrase A subunit gene outside the quinolone resistance-determining region has been developed to detect Arcobacter species. The species identification was made by probe hybridization and melting curve analysis, using the Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer technology...

  7. DEVELOPMENT OF A REAL-TIME FLUORESCENCE RESONANCE ENERGY TRANSFER PCR TO DETECT ARCOBACTER SPECIES

    Science.gov (United States)

    A real-time PCR targeting the gyrase A subunit gene outside the quinolone resistance-determining region has been developed to detect Arcobacter species. The species identification was made by probe hybridization and melting curve analysis, using Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer technology. D...

  8. Study on the interaction between diphenhydramine and erythrosin by absorption, fluorescence and resonance Rayleigh scattering spectra

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANG XiaoLing; LIU ZhongFang; LIU ShaoPu; HU XiaoLi

    2007-01-01

    In pH 4.5 Britton-Robinson (BR) buffer solution, erythrosin (ET) can react with diphenhydramine (DP) to form a 1:1 ion-association complex, which not only results in the change of the absorption spectra, but also results in the great enhancement of resonance Rayleigh scattering (RRS) and the quenching of fluorescence. Furthermore, a new RRS spectrum will appear, and the maximum RRS wavelength was located at about 580 nm.In this work, the spectral characteristics of the absorption, fluorescence and RRS, the optimum conditions of the reaction and the properties of an analytical chemistry were investigated. A sensitive, simple and new method for the determination of DP by using erythrosin as a probe has been developed. The detection limits for DP were 0.0020 μg/mL for RRS method, 0.088 μg/mL for absorption method and 0.094 μg/mL for fluorophotometry. There was a linear relationship between the absorbance, RRS and fluorescence intensities and the drug concentration in the range of 0.0067-2.0, 0.29-6.4 and 0.31-3.2 μg/mL, respectively. The effects of the interaction of diphenhydramine and erythrosin on the absorption, fluorescence and resonance Rayleigh scattering spectra were discussed. In light polarization experiment, the polarization of RRS at maximum wavelength was measured to be P = 0.9779, and it revealed that the RRS spectrum of DP-ET complex consists mostly of resonance scattering and few resonance fluorescence. In this study, enthalpy of formation and mean polarizability were calculated by AM1 quantum chemistry method. In addition, the reaction mechanism and the reasons for the enhancement of scattering spectra and the energy transfer between absorption, fluorescence and RRS were discussed.

  9. Lambda/4 resonance of an optical monopole antenna probed by single molecule fluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taminiau, Tim H; Moerland, Robert J; Segerink, Frans B; Kuipers, Laurens; van Hulst, Niek F

    2007-01-01

    We present a resonant optical nanoantenna positioned at the end of a metal-coated glass fiber near-field probe. Antenna resonances, excitation conditions, and field localization are directly probed in the near field by single fluorescent molecules and compared to finite integration technique simulations. It is shown that the antenna is equivalent to its radio frequency analogue, the monopole antenna. For the right antenna length and local excitation conditions, antenna resonances occur that lead to an enhanced localized field near the antenna apex. Direct mapping of this field with single fluorescent molecules reveals a spatial localization of 25 nm, demonstrating the importance of such antennas for nanometer resolution optical microscopy. PMID:17212435

  10. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer from tryptophan in human serum albumin to a bioactive indoloquinolizine system

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Paramita Das; Arabinda Mallick; Basudeb Haldar; Alok Chakrabarty; Nitin Chattopadhyay

    2007-03-01

    The interaction between a bioactive molecule, 3-acetyl-4-oxo-6,7-dihydro-12H indolo-[2,3-a] quinolizine (AODIQ), with human serum albumin (HSA) has been studied using steady-state absorption and fluorescence techniques. A 1 : 1 complex formation has been established and the binding constant () and free energy change for the process have been reported. The AODIQ-HSA complex results in fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) from the tryptophan moiety of HSA to the probe. The critical energy-transfer distance (0) for FRET and the Stern-Volmer constant (sv) for the fluorescence quenching of the donor in the presence of the acceptor have been determined. Importantly, SV has been shown to be equal to the binding constant itself, implying that the fluorescence quenching arises only from the FRET process. The study suggests that the donor and the acceptor are bound to the same protein at different locations but within the quenching distance.

  11. Detection of Early Stage Apoptotic Cells Based on Label-Free Cytochrome c Assay Using Bioconjugated Metal Nanoclusters as Fluorescent Probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamsipur, Mojtaba; Molaabasi, Fatemeh; Hosseinkhani, Saman; Rahmati, Fereshteh

    2016-02-16

    Cytochrome c (Cyt c) is an important biomarker in cell lysates for the early stage of apoptosis or anticancer agents. Here, two novel label-free fluorescence assays based on hemoglobin-stabilized gold nanoclusters (Hb/AuNCs) and aptamer-stabilized silver nanoclusters (DNA/AgNCs) for analysis of Cyt c are presented. The heme group of the protein induces sensitive sensing platforms accompanied by the decreased fluorescence of both metal nanoclusters. The quenching processes observed found to be based on the fluorescence resonance energy transfer mechanism from Hb/AuNCs to Cyt c and photoinduced electron transfer from DNA/AgNCs to the aptamer-Cyt c complex. The linear range for Cyt c was found to be 0-10 μM for Hb/AuNCs and from 0 to 1 μM for DNA/AgNCs, with limits of detection of ∼15 nM. On the basis of strong binding affinity of DNA aptamers for their target proteins, the DNA/AgNCs probe was successfully applied to the quantitative determination of Cyt c in cell lysates, which opens a new avenue to early diagnostics and drug screening with high sensitivity. Compared to the conventional Western blot method, the presented assays are low cost, easy to prepare the fluorescent probes, and sensitive, while overall time for the detection and quantitation of Cyt c from isolated mitochondria is only 20 min. The proposed method for Cyt c detection may also be useful for the study of those materials that cause mitochondrial dysfunction and apoptotic cell death. PMID:26812937

  12. Firefly Luciferase-Based Sequential Bioluminescence Resonance Energy Transfer (BRET)-Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) Protease Assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branchini, Bruce

    2016-01-01

    We describe here the preparation of ratiometric luminescent probes that contain two well-separated emission peaks produced by a sequential bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET)-fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) process. The probes are single soluble fusion proteins consisting of a thermostable firefly luciferase variant that catalyzes yellow-green (560 nm maximum) bioluminescence and a red fluorescent protein covalently labeled with a near-Infrared fluorescent dye. The two proteins are connected by a decapeptide containing a protease recognition site specific for factor Xa, thrombin, or caspase 3. The rates of protease cleavage of the fusion protein substrates were monitored by recording emission spectra and plotting the change in peak ratios over time. Detection limits of 0.41 nM for caspase 3, 1.0 nM for thrombin, and 58 nM for factor Xa were realized with a scanning fluorometer. This method successfully employs an efficient sequential BRET-FRET energy transfer process based on firefly luciferase bioluminescence to assay physiologically important protease activities and should be generally applicable to the measurement of any endoprotease lacking accessible cysteine residues. PMID:27424898

  13. Characterize the interaction between polyethylenimine and serum albumin using surface plasmon resonance and fluorescence method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polyethylenimine (PEI) is a type of cationic polymer which is efficient in DNA transfer. The characters of PEI binding to bovine serum albumin and human serum albumin (HSA) were described by fluorescence quenching, surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy. The fluorescence quenching results showed that the binding processes occurred on the surface of the protein molecules. The accurate binding constants between PEI and the two proteins were obtained by SPR spectroscopy. The CD spectra results showed that the confirmations of the two proteins were affected with the addition of PEI.

  14. A fluorescence resonance energy transfer-based method for histone methyltransferases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Devkota, Kanchan; Lohse, Brian; Nyby Jakobsen, Camilla;

    2015-01-01

    A simple dye–quencher fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based assay for methyltransferases was developed and used to determine kinetic parameters and inhibitory activity at EHMT1 and EHMT2. Peptides mimicking the truncated histone H3 tail were functionalized in each end with a dye and a...... quencher, respectively. When lysine-9 residues in the peptides were methylated, they were protected from cleavage by endoproteinase–EndoLysC, whereas unmethylated peptides were cleaved, resulting in an increase in fluorescent intensity....

  15. Resonant fluorescence spectra of a multilevel system in intense radiation and external magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theory and methods of computer simulations permit investigation of the interaction of high-power laser radiation, up to GW/cm2, with atoms having both small and large fine-structure intervals compared with interactions with a laser field and an external magnetic field. The modifications of the energies and population of atomic levels due to such interactions lead to nonlinear effects. Besides modifications in the Raman effect and new effects of rotation of the plane of polarization and circular dichroism that were investigated earlier, there are such nonlinear effects as the modification of the number, positions, intensifies, and polarizations of the lines in the resonant fluorescence spectrum. Numerical experiments permit investigation of the characteristics of resonant fluorescence and comparison with known experimental results. (author)

  16. Denaturation studies of active-site labeled papain using electron paramagnetic resonance and fluorescence spectroscopy.

    OpenAIRE

    Ping, Z A; Butterfiel, D A

    1991-01-01

    A spin-labeled p-chloromercuribenzoate (SL-PMB) and a fluorescence probe, 6-acryloyl-2-dimethylaminonaphthalene (Acrylodan), both of which bind to the single SH group located in the active site of papain, were used to investigate the interaction of papain (EC 3.4.22.2) with two protein denaturants. It was found that the active site of papain was highly stable in urea solution, but underwent a large conformational change in guanidine hydrochloride solution. Electron paramagnetic resonance and ...

  17. Intracellular ribozyme-catalyzed trans-cleavage of RNA monitored by fluorescence resonance energy transfer.

    OpenAIRE

    Vitiello, D; Pecchia, D B; Burke, J M

    2000-01-01

    Small catalytic RNAs like the hairpin ribozyme are proving to be useful intracellular tools; however, most attempts to demonstrate trans-cleavage of RNA by ribozymes in cells have been frustrated by rapid cellular degradation of the cleavage products. Here, we describe a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) assay that directly monitors cleavage of target RNA in tissue-culture cells. An oligoribonucleotide substrate was modified to inhibit cellular ribonuclease degradation without int...

  18. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer sensors for quantitative monitoring of pentose and disaccharide accumulation in bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Looger Loren L

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Engineering microorganisms to improve metabolite flux requires detailed knowledge of the concentrations and flux rates of metabolites and metabolic intermediates in vivo. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer sensors represent a promising technology for measuring metabolite levels and corresponding rate changes in live cells. These sensors have been applied successfully in mammalian and plant cells but potentially could also be used to monitor steady-state levels of metabolites in microorganisms using fluorimetric assays. Sensors for hexose and pentose carbohydrates could help in the development of fermentative microorganisms, for example, for biofuels applications. Arabinose is one of the carbohydrates to be monitored during biofuels production from lignocellulose, while maltose is an important degradation product of starch that is relevant for starch-derived biofuels production. Results An Escherichia coli expression vector compatible with phage λ recombination technology was constructed to facilitate sensor construction and was used to generate a novel fluorescence resonance energy transfer sensor for arabinose. In parallel, a strategy for improving the sensor signal was applied to construct an improved maltose sensor. Both sensors were expressed in the cytosol of E. coli and sugar accumulation was monitored using a simple fluorimetric assay of E. coli cultures in microtiter plates. In the case of both nanosensors, the addition of the respective ligand led to concentration-dependent fluorescence resonance energy transfer responses allowing quantitative analysis of the intracellular sugar levels at given extracellular supply levels as well as accumulation rates. Conclusion The nanosensor destination vector combined with the optimization strategy for sensor responses should help to accelerate the development of metabolite sensors. The new carbohydrate fluorescence resonance energy transfer sensors can be used for in vivo

  19. High-precision metrology of highly charged ions via relativistic resonance fluorescence

    OpenAIRE

    Postavaru, O; Harman, Z.; Keitel, C. H.

    2010-01-01

    Resonance fluorescence of laser-driven highly charged ions is studied in the relativistic regime by solving the time-dependent master equation in a multi-level model. Our ab initio approach based on the Dirac equation allows for investigating highly relativistic ions, and, consequently, provides a sensitive means to test correlated relativistic dynamics, bound-state quantum electrodynamic phenomena and nuclear effects by applying coherent light with x-ray frequencies. Atomic dipole or multipo...

  20. Resonance fluorescence spectra from coherently driven quantum dots coupled to slow-light photonic crystal waveguides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy-Choudhury, Kaushik; Mann, Nishan; Manson, Ross; Hughes, Stephen

    2016-06-01

    Using a polaron master equation approach, we investigate the resonance fluorescence spectra from coherently driven quantum dots (QDs) coupled to an acoustic phonon bath and photonic crystal waveguides with a rich local density of photon states (LDOS). Resonance fluorescence spectra from QDs in semiconductor crystals are known to show strong signatures of electron-phonon interactions, but when coupled to a structured photonic reservoir, the QD emission properties are also determined by the frequency dependence of the LDOS of the photon reservoir. Here, we investigate the simultaneous role of coupled photon and phonon baths on the characteristic Mollow triplet spectra from a strongly driven QD. As an example structured photonic reservoir, we first study a photonic crystal coupled cavity waveguide, and find that photons and phonons have counterinteracting effects near the upper mode edge of the coupled-cavity waveguide, thus establishing the importance of their separate roles in determining the emission spectra. The general theory is developed for arbitrary photonic reservoirs and is further applied to determine the resonance fluorescence spectra from a realistic, disordered W1 photonic crystal waveguide showing important photon-phonon interaction effects that are directly relevant to emerging experiments and theoretical proposals.

  1. Resonance fluorescence of strongly driven two-level system coupled to multiple dissipative reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Yiying; Lü, Zhiguo; Zheng, Hang

    2016-08-01

    We present a theoretical formalism for resonance fluorescence radiating from a two-level system (TLS) driven by any periodic driving and coupled to multiple reservoirs. The formalism is derived analytically based on the combination of Floquet theory and Born-Markov master equation. The formalism allows us to calculate the spectrum when the Floquet states and quasienergies are analytically or numerically solved for simple or complicated driving fields. We can systematically explore the spectral features by implementing the present formalism. To exemplify this theory, we apply the unified formalism to comprehensively study a generic model that a harmonically driven TLS is simultaneously coupled to a radiative reservoir and a dephasing reservoir. We demonstrate that the significant features of the fluorescence spectra, the driving-induced asymmetry and the dephasing-induced asymmetry, can be attributed to the violation of detailed balance condition, and explained in terms of the driving-related transition quantities between Floquet-states and their steady populations. In addition, we find the distinguished features of the fluorescence spectra under the biharmonic and multiharmonic driving fields in contrast with that of the harmonic driving case. In the case of the biharmonic driving, we find that the spectra are significantly different from the result of the RWA under the multiple resonance conditions. By the three concrete applications, we illustrate that the present formalism provides a routine tool for comprehensively exploring the fluorescence spectrum of periodically strongly driven TLSs.

  2. Paper-based fluorescence resonance energy transfer assay for directly detecting nucleic acids and proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hua; Fang, Xueen; Cao, Hongmei; Kong, Jilie

    2016-06-15

    Paper-based fluorescence resonance energy transfer assay (FRET) is gaining great interest in detecting macro-biological molecule. It is difficult to achieve conveniently and fast detection for macro-biological molecule. Herein, a graphene oxide (GO)-based paper chip (glass fiber) integrated with fluorescence labeled single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) for fast, inexpensive and direct detection of biological macromolecules (proteins and nucleic acids) has been developed. In this paper, we employed the Cy3/FAM-labeled ssDNA as the reporter and the GO as quencher and the original glass fiber paper as data acquisition substrates. The chip which was designed and fabricated by a cutting machine is a miniature biosensor that monitors fluorescence recovery from resonance energy transfer. The hybridization assays and fluorescence detection were all simplified, and the surface of the chip did not require immobilization or washing. A Nikon Eclipse was employed as excited resource and a commercial digital camera was employed for capturing digital images. This paper-based microfluidics chip has been applied in the detection of proteins and nucleic acids. The biosensing capability meets many potential requirements for disease diagnosis and biological analysis. PMID:26807518

  3. Magnetic Separation-Assistant Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer Inhibition for Highly Sensitive Probing of Nucleolin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan-Ran; Liu, Qian; Hong, Zhangyong; Wang, He-Fang

    2015-12-15

    For the widely used "off-on" fluorescence (or phosphorescence) resonance energy transfer (FRET or PRET) system, the separation of donors and acceptors species was vital for enhancing the sensitivity. To date, separation of free donors from FRET/PRET inhibition systems was somewhat not convenient, whereas separation of the target-induced far-between acceptors has hardly been reported yet. We presented here a novel magnetic separation-assistant fluorescence resonance energy transfer (MS-FRET) inhibition strategy for highly sensitive detection of nucleolin using Cy5.5-AS1411 as the donor and Fe3O4-polypyrrole core-shell (Fe3O4@PPY) nanoparticles as the NIR quenching acceptor. Due to hydrophobic interaction and π-π stacking of AS1411 and PPY, Cy5.5-AS1411 was bound onto the surface of Fe3O4@PPY, resulting in 90% of fluorescence quenching of Cy5.5-AS1411. Owing to the much stronger specific interaction of AS1411 and nucleolin, the presence of nucleolin could take Cy5.5-AS1411 apart from Fe3O4@PPY and restore the fluorescence of Cy5.5-AS1411. The superparamagnetism of Fe3O4@PPY enabled all separations and fluorescence measurements complete in the same quartz cell, and thus allowed the convenient but accurate comparison of the sensitivity and fluorescence recovery in the cases of separation or nonseparation. Compared to nonseparation FRET inhibition, the separation of free Cy5.5-AS1411 from Cy5.5-AS1411-Fe3O4@PPY solution (the first magnetic separation, MS-1) had as high as 25-fold enhancement of the sensitivity, whereas further separation of the nucleolin-inducing far-between Fe3O4@PPY from the FRET inhibition solution (the second magnetic separation, MS-2) could further enhance the sensitivity to 35-fold. Finally, the MS-FRET inhibition assay displayed the linear range of 0.625-27.5 μg L(-1) (8.1-359 pM) and detection limit of 0.04 μg L(-1) (0.05 pM) of nucleolin. The fluorescence intensity recovery (the percentage ratio of the final restoring fluorescence intensity

  4. The Effect of Incoherent Population Pumping on Squeezing in Resonance Fluorescence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Zhaoyang; ZHANG Jingtao; XU Zhizhan

    2000-01-01

    The effect of incoherent population pumping on the steady-state population inversion and the quadrature squeezing spectra produced in the resonance fluorescence of a two-level atom is investigated. In the presence of incoherent population pumping, the steady-state population inversion is increased for small frequency detuning but is not changed for large frequency detuning. For resonant excitation at low intensities, the weak incoherent pumping degrades the degree of the squeezing and shifts the position of the maximum squeezing; for off-resonant excitation at strong intensities, the weak incoherent pumping hardly changes the squeezing spectra. But when the incoherent pumping is strong the squeezing may be completely destroyed for both cases.

  5. Intrinsic Tryptophan Fluorescence in the Detection and Analysis of Proteins: A Focus on Förster Resonance Energy Transfer Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amar B. T. Ghisaidoobe

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available F resonance energy transfer (FRET occurs when the distance between a donor fluorophore and an acceptor is within 10 nm, and its application often necessitates fluorescent labeling of biological targets. However, covalent modification of biomolecules can inadvertently give rise to conformational and/or functional changes. This review describes the application of intrinsic protein fluorescence, predominantly derived from tryptophan (\\(\\uplambda_{\\textsc{ex}}\\sim\\ nm, \\(\\uplambda_{\\textsc{em}}\\sim\\ 350 nm, in protein-related research and mainly focuses on label-free FRET techniques. In terms of wavelength and intensity, tryptophan fluorescence is strongly influenced by its (or the proteinlocal environment, which, in addition to fluorescence quenching, has been applied to study protein conformational changes. Intrinsic F resonance energy transfer (iFRET, a recently developed technique, utilizes the intrinsic fluorescence of tryptophan in conjunction with target-specific fluorescent probes as FRET donors and acceptors, respectively, for real time detection of native proteins.

  6. Amplification of the Signal Intensity of Fluorescence-Based Fiber-Optic Biosensors Using a Fabry-Perot Resonator Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng-Chang Hsieh

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Fluorescent biosensors have been widely used in biomedical applications. To amplify the intensity of fluorescence signals, this study developed a novel structure for an evanescent wave fiber-optic biosensor by using a Fabry-Perot resonator structure. An excitation light was coupled into the optical fiber through a laser-drilled hole on the proximal end of the resonator. After entering the resonator, the excitation light was reflected back and forth inside the resonator, thereby amplifying the intensity of the light in the fiber. Subsequently, the light was used to excite the fluorescent molecules in the reactive region of the sensor. The experimental results showed that the biosensor signal was amplified eight-fold when the resonator reflector was formed using a 92% reflective coating. Furthermore, in a simulation, the biosensor signal could be amplified 20-fold by using a 99% reflector.

  7. Ratio-metric sensor to detect riboflavin via fluorescence resonance energy transfer with ultrahigh sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jilong; Su, Siheng; Wei, Junhua; Bahgi, Roya; Hope-Weeks, Louisa; Qiu, Jingjing; Wang, Shiren

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, a novel fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) ration-metric fluorescent probe based on heteroatom N, S doped carbon dots (N, S-CDs) was developed to determine riboflavin in aqueous solutions. The ratio of two emission intensities at different wavelengths is applied to determine the concentration of riboflavin (RF). This method is more effective in reducing the background interference and fluctuation of diverse conditions. Therefore, this probe obtains high sensitivity with a low limit of detection (LOD) of 1.9 nM (0.7 ng/ml) which is in the highest level of all riboflavin detection approaches and higher than single wavelength intensity detection (1.9 μM). In addition, this sensor has a high selectivity of detecting riboflavin in deionized water (pH=7) with other biochemical like amino acids. Moreover, riboflavin in aqueous solution is very sensitive to sunlight and can be degraded to lumiflavin, which is toxic. Because the N, S doped carbon dots cannot serve as an energy donor for N, S doped carbon dots and lumiflavin system, this system makes it easy to determine whether the riboflavin is degraded or not, which is first to be reported. This platform may provide possibilities to build a new and facile fluorescence resonance energy transfer based sensor to detect analytes and metamorphous analytes in aqueous solution.

  8. Probing symmetry and symmetry breaking in resonant soft-x-ray fluorescence spectra of molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glans, P.; Gunnelin, K.; Guo, J. [Uppsala Univ. (Sweden)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    Conventional non-resonant soft X-ray emission brings about information about electronic structure through its symmetry and polarization selectivity, the character of which is governed by simple dipole rules. For centro-symmetric molecules with the emitting atom at the inversion center these rules lead to selective emission through the required parity change. For the more common classes of molecules which have lower symmetry or for systems with degenerate core orbitals (delocalized over identical sites), it is merely the local symmetry selectivity that provides a probe of the local atomic orbital contribution to the molecular orbital. For instance, in X-ray spectra of first row species the intensities essentially map the p-density at each particular atomic site, and, in a molecular orbital picture, the contribution of the local p-type atomic orbitals in the LCAO description of the molecular orbitals. The situation is different for resonant X-ray fluorescence spectra. Here strict parity and symmetry selectivity gives rise to a strong frequency dependence for all molecules with an element of symmetry. In addition to symmetry selectivity the strong frequency dependence of resonant X-ray emission is caused by the interplay between the shape of a narrow X-ray excitation energy function and the lifetime and vibrational broadenings of the resonantly excited core states. This interplay leads to various observable effects, such as linear dispersion, resonance narrowing and emission line (Stokes) doubling. Also from the point of view of polarization selectivity, the resonantly excited X-ray spectra are much more informative than the corresponding non-resonant spectra. Examples are presented for nitrogen, oxygen, and carbon dioxide molecules.

  9. Comparing implementations of magnetic-resonance-guided fluorescence molecular tomography for diagnostic classification of brain tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Scott C.; Samkoe, Kimberley S.; O'Hara, Julia A.; Gibbs-Strauss, Summer L.; Paulsen, Keith D.; Pogue, Brian W.

    2010-09-01

    Fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT) systems coupled to conventional imaging modalities such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography provide unique opportunities to combine data sets and improve image quality and content. Yet, the ideal approach to combine these complementary data is still not obvious. This preclinical study compares several methods for incorporating MRI spatial prior information into FMT imaging algorithms in the context of in vivo tissue diagnosis. Populations of mice inoculated with brain tumors that expressed either high or low levels of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) were imaged using an EGF-bound near-infrared dye and a spectrometer-based MRI-FMT scanner. All data were spectrally unmixed to extract the dye fluorescence from the tissue autofluorescence. Methods to combine the two data sets were compared using student's t-tests and receiver operating characteristic analysis. Bulk fluorescence measurements that made up the optical imaging data set were also considered in the comparison. While most techniques were able to distinguish EGFR(+) tumors from EGFR(-) tumors and control animals, with area-under-the-curve values=1, only a handful were able to distinguish EGFR(-) tumors from controls. Bulk fluorescence spectroscopy techniques performed as well as most imaging techniques, suggesting that complex imaging algorithms may be unnecessary to diagnose EGFR status in these tissue volumes.

  10. Resonance fluorescence beyond the dipole approximation of a quantum dot in a plasmonic nanostructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chun-Jie; An, Jun-Hong

    2016-05-01

    The mesoscopic characteristics of a quantum dot (QD), which make the dipole approximation (DA) break down, provide a new dimension to manipulate light-matter interaction [M. L. Andersen et al., Nat. Phys. 7, 215 (2011)], 10.1038/nphys1870. Here we investigate the power spectrum and the second-order correlation property of the fluorescence from a resonantly driven QD placed on a planar metal. It is revealed that due to the pronounced QD spatial extension and the dramatic variation of the triggered surface plasmon near the metal, the fluorescence has a notable contribution from the quadrupole moment. The π -rotation symmetry of the fluorescence to the QD orientation under the DA is broken. By manipulating the QD orientation and quadrupole moment, the spectrum can be switched between the Mollow triplet and a single peak, and the fluorescence characterized by the antibunching in the second-order correlation function can be changed from the weak to the strong radiation regime. Our result is instructive for utilizing the unique mesoscopic effects to develop nanophotonic devices.

  11. Novel fluorescent silica nanoparticle probe for Förster Resonance Energy Transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mouhamad Khalil

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The preparation and utilization of a novel particulate label based on fluorescent hybrid silica nanoparticles are reported in this article. These fluorescent nanoparticles have shown several unique advantages over existing dye molecules, quantum dots, and latex-based fluorescent particles in easy preparation, good photostability and high sensitivity. Alexa Fluor® dyes, the leading and most trusted fluorescent dyes available today were used to make the grafting onto silica nanoparticles. Alexa Fluor® was modified with 3-aminopropyl-triethoxysilane (APS to provide reactive groups Alexa-APS. Alexa-APS can be grafted onto silica nanoparticles via silylation process. The silica nanoparticles were prepared by Stöber methods and treated by Etching to functionalized their surface. A mixture of Alexafluoro donor A488 and Alexafluoro acceptor A568 coated silica nanoparticles leads to the Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET by excitation of the acceptor when the particles are distant by less than 10nm.

  12. A fluorescence resonance energy transfer method for measuring the binding of inhibitors to stromelysin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epps, D E; Mitchell, M A; Petzold, G L; VanDrie, J H; Poorman, R A

    1999-11-15

    A sensitive fluorescence resonance energy transfer method was developed for the direct measurement of the dissociation constants of stromelysin inhibitors. The method is applied to the thiadiazole class of stromelysin inhibitors and it takes advantage of the fact that, upon binding to the active site of enzyme, the thiadiazole ring, with its absorbance centered at 320 nm, is able to quench the fluorescence of the tryptophan residues surrounding the catalytic site. The changes in fluorescence are proportional to the occupancy of the active site: Analysis of the fluorescence versus inhibitor concentration data yields dissociation constants that are in agreement with the corresponding competitive inhibitory constants measured by a catalytic rate assay. The affinity of nonthiadiazole inhibitors of stromelysin-such as hydroxamic acids and others-can be determined from the concentration-dependent displacement of a thiadiazole of known affinity. Using this displacement method, we determined the affinities of a number of structurally diverse inhibitors toward stromelysin. Since the three tryptophan residues located in the vicinity of the active site of stromelysin are conserved in gelatinase and collagenase, the method should also be applicable to inhibitors of other matrix metalloproteinases. PMID:10552897

  13. The Photochemical Study of HSA and BSA with Resonance Light-Scattering and Fluorescence Spectra

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The resonance light-scattering (RLS) of human serum albumin (HSA) and bovine serum albumin (BSA) is reported for the first time, and applied to study photochemical reaction of HSA and BSA. The fact of photocrosslinking self-association effect in HSA and BSA solutions is identified by the enhancement of RLS. The fluorescence quenching at about 350 nm and 700 nm proves that tryptophan (Trp) residues are one of the photochemical activity sites in HSA and BSA molecules. The Rayleigh scattering (RS) spectra of HSA and BSA that were neglected in fluorescence spectra before are found at about 296 nm, 592 nm and 888 nm for the first time, and are of adventageous to studying the aggregation of HSA or BSA. The possible photochemical reaction mechanism is also proposed.

  14. RecQ Helicase-catalyzed DNA Unwinding Detected by Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xing-Dong ZHANG; Shuo-Xing DOU; Ping XIE; Peng-Ye WANG; Xu Guang XI

    2005-01-01

    A fluorometric assay was used to study the DNA unwinding kinetics induced by Escherichia coli RecQ helicase. This assay was based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer and carried out on stopped-flow, in which DNA unwinding was monitored by fluorescence emission enhancement of fluorescein resulting from helicase-catalyzed DNA unwinding. By this method, we determined the DNA unwinding rate of RecQ at different enzyme concentrations. We also studied the dependences of DNA unwinding magnitude and rate on magnesium ion concentration. We showed that this method could be used to determine the polarity of DNA unwinding. This assay should greatly facilitate further study of the mechanism for RecQcatalyzed DNA unwinding.

  15. Far-field resonance fluorescence from a dipole-interacting laser-driven cold atomic gas

    CERN Document Server

    Jones, Ryan; Olmos, Beatriz

    2016-01-01

    We analyze the temporal response of the fluorescence light that is emitted from a dense gas of cold atoms driven by a laser. When the average interatomic distance is smaller than the wavelength of the photons scattered by the atoms, the system exhibits strong dipolar interactions and collective dissipation. We solve the exact dynamics of small systems with different geometries and show how these collective features are manifest in the scattered light properties such as the photon emission rate, the power spectrum and the second-order correlation function. By calculating these quantities beyond the weak driving limit, we make progress in understanding the signatures of collective behavior in these many-body systems. Furthermore, we clarify the role of disorder on the resonance fluorescence, of direct relevance for recent experimental efforts that aim at the exploration of many-body effects in dipole-dipole interacting gases of atoms.

  16. Resonance fluorescence spectra of three-level atoms in a squeezed vacuum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The fluorescence field from one of the two allowed transitions in a three-level atom can sense squeezed fluctuations of a vacuum field coupled to the other transition. We examine the fluorescence spectra of strongly driven three-level atoms in Λ, V, and cascade configurations in which one of the two one-photon transitions is coupled to a finite-bandwidth squeezed vacuum field, when the bandwidth is much smaller than the difference in the atomic transition frequencies, though much larger than atomic decay rates and Rabi frequencies of the driving fields. The driving fields are on one-photon resonance, and the squeezed vacuum field is generated by a degenerate parameter oscillator. Details are only given for the Λ configuration. The extension to the V and cascade configurations is straightforward. We find that in all configurations the fluorescence spectra of the transition not coupled to the squeezed vacuum field are composed of five lines, one central and two pairs of sidebands, with intensities and widths strongly influenced by the squeezed vacuum field. However, only the central component and the outer sidebands exhibit a dependence on the squeezing phase. We also examine the fluorescence spectrum for the cascade configuration with a squeezed vacuum field on resonance with the two-photon transition between the ground and the most excited states and now generated by a nondegenerate parametric oscillator. In this case, where the squeezed vacuum field can be made coupled to both transitions, all spectral lines depend on the squeezing phase. The spectral features are explained in terms of the dressed-atom model of the system. We show that the coherent mixing of the atomic states by the strong driving fields modifies transition rates between the dressed states, which results in the selective phase dependence of the spectral features. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  17. Nondestructive assay of Pu in spent fuel using nuclear resonance fluorescence with monochromatic gamma-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have proposed a nondestructive assay for Pu-239 in spent fuel assembly using nuclear resonance fluorescence with energy tunable monochromatic gamma-rays generated by Compton scattering of laser photons and high energy electrons. To demonstrate this method, we carried out nuclear experiments using available laser Compton scattering gamma-rays. We measured NRF gamma-rays of Pb-208 concealed in an iron box with a thickness of 15 mm using LCS gamma-rays at National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology. We also measured NRF gamma-rays of U-238 using LCS gamma-rays at Duke University. (author)

  18. Resonantly Enhanced Multi-Photon Ionization Spectrum of the Neutral Green Fluorescent Protein Chromophore

    OpenAIRE

    greenwood, jason; Miles, Jordan; De Camillis, Simone; Mulholland, Peter; Zhang, Lijuan; Parkes, Michael A.; Hailes, Helen C.; Fielding, Helen H.

    2014-01-01

    The photophysics of the green fluorescent protein is governed by the electronic structure of the chromophore at the heart of its β-barrel protein structure. We present the first two-color, resonance-enhanced, multiphoton ionization spectrum of the isolated neutral chromophore in vacuo with supporting electronic structure calculations. We find the absorption maximum to be 3.65 ± 0.05 eV (340 ± 5 nm), which is blue-shifted by 0.5 eV (55 nm) from the absorption maximum of the protein in its neut...

  19. Multiway study of hybridization in nanoscale semiconductor labeled DNA based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gholami, Somayeh; Kompany Zare, Mohsen

    2013-01-01

    The resolution of the ternary-binary complex competition of a target sequence and of its two complementary probes in sandwich DNA hybridization is reported. To achieve this goal, Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) between oligonucleotide-functionalized quantum dot (QD) nanoprobes (QD...... first time. Equilibrium constants illustrated that the extent of hybridization in one side on the target strand depends on hybridization conditions on the other side of the strand. Effects of guanine (G) and cytosine (C) contents of strands on the extent and rate of hybridization were investigated. In...

  20. Highly sensitive fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based nanosensor for rapid detection of clenbuterol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study we investigate the fabrication of a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based nanosensor for the detection of clenbuterol. The nanosensor consists of CdTe quantum dots coated by clenbuterol recognizable agent naphthol and diazotized clenbuterol. Changes in maximal photoluminescent intensities of the nanosensor were utilized to measure clenbuterol concentrations. The maximal photoluminescent intensities of the nanosensor were found to decrease with increasing clenbuterol concentrations, following a linear correlation. We have successfully fabricated a nanosensor for detection of clenbuterol with sensitivity up to 10 pg ml−1. (paper)

  1. Highly sensitive fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based nanosensor for rapid detection of clenbuterol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nghia Nguyen, Duc; Ngo, Trinh Tung; Liem Nguyen, Quang

    2012-09-01

    In this study we investigate the fabrication of a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based nanosensor for the detection of clenbuterol. The nanosensor consists of CdTe quantum dots coated by clenbuterol recognizable agent naphthol and diazotized clenbuterol. Changes in maximal photoluminescent intensities of the nanosensor were utilized to measure clenbuterol concentrations. The maximal photoluminescent intensities of the nanosensor were found to decrease with increasing clenbuterol concentrations, following a linear correlation. We have successfully fabricated a nanosensor for detection of clenbuterol with sensitivity up to 10 pg ml‑1.

  2. Gold/Silica biochips: applications to Surface Plasmon Resonance and fluorescence quenching

    CERN Document Server

    Mangeat, Thomas; Elie-Caille, Céline; Perrin, Maud; Boireau, Wilfrid; Pieralli, Christian; Wacogne, Bruno; 10.1134/S1054660X09020170

    2010-01-01

    We report Gold/Silica biochips for low cost biosensor devices. Firstly, the study of biochemical interactions on silica by means of Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) is presented. Secondly, Gold/Silica biochips are employed to reduce the strong quenching that occurs when a fluorophore is close to the gold surface. Furthermore, the control of the Silica-like thickness allows optimizing the distance between the metallic surface and the fluorophore in order to enhance the fluorescent signal. These results represent the first steps towards highly sensitive, specific and low cost biosensors based, for example, on Surface Plasmon Coupled Emission (SPCE) techniques.

  3. Efficiency calibration of the ELBE nuclear resonance fluorescence setup using a proton beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trompler, Erik; Bemmerer, Daniel; Beyer, Roland; Erhard, Martin; Grosse, Eckart; Hannaske, Roland; Junghans, Arnd Rudolf; Marta, Michele; Nair, Chithra; Schwengner, R.; Wagner, Andreas; Yakorev, Dmitry [Forschungszentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (FZD), Dresden (Germany); Broggini, Carlo; Caciolli, Antonio; Menegazzo, Roberto [INFN Sezione di Padova, Padova (Italy); Fueloep, Zsolt; Gyuerky, Gyoergy; Szuecs, Tamas [Atomki, Debrecen (Hungary)

    2009-07-01

    The nuclear resonance fluorescence (NRF) setup at ELBE uses bremsstrahlung with endpoint energies up to 20 MeV. The setup consists of four 100% high-purity germanium detectors, each surrounded by a BGO escape-suppression shield and a lead collimator. The detection efficiency up to E{sub {gamma}}=12 MeV has been determined using the proton beam from the FZD Tandetron and well-known resonances in the {sup 11}B(p,{gamma}){sup 12}C, {sup 14}N(p,{gamma}){sup 15}O, and {sup 27}Al(p,{gamma}){sup 28}Si reactions. The deduced efficiency curve allows to check efficiency curves calculated with GEANT. Future photon-scattering work can be carried out with improved precision at high energy.

  4. Searching for illicit materials using nuclear resonance fluorescence stimulated by narrow-band photon sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report the results of an experimental study of the sensitivity of two distinct classes of systems that exploit nuclear resonance fluorescence (NRF) to search for illicit materials in containers. One class of systems is based on the direct detection of NRF photons emitted from isotopes of interest. The other class infers the presence of a particular isotope by observing the preferential attenuation of resonant photons in the incident beam. We developed a detailed analytical model for both approaches. We performed experiments to test the model using depleted uranium as a surrogate for illicit material and used tungsten as a random choice for shielding. We performed the experiments at Duke University’s High Intensity Gamma Source (HIGS). Using the methodology we detail in this paper one can use this model to estimate the performance of potential inspection systems in certifying containers as free of illicit materials and for detecting the presence of those same materials.

  5. Intracellular ribozyme-catalyzed trans-cleavage of RNA monitored by fluorescence resonance energy transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitiello, D; Pecchia, D B; Burke, J M

    2000-04-01

    Small catalytic RNAs like the hairpin ribozyme are proving to be useful intracellular tools; however, most attempts to demonstrate trans-cleavage of RNA by ribozymes in cells have been frustrated by rapid cellular degradation of the cleavage products. Here, we describe a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) assay that directly monitors cleavage of target RNA in tissue-culture cells. An oligoribonucleotide substrate was modified to inhibit cellular ribonuclease degradation without interfering with ribozyme cleavage, and donor (fluorescein) and acceptor (tetramethylrhodamine) fluorophores were introduced at positions flanking the cleavage site. In simple buffers, the intact substrate produces a strong FRET signal that is lost upon cleavage, resulting in a red-to-green shift in dominant fluorescence emission. Hairpin ribozyme and fluorescent substrate were microinjected into murine fibroblasts under conditions in which substrate cleavage can occur only inside the cell. A strong FRET signal was observed by fluorescence microscopy when substrate was injected, but rapid decay of the FRET signal occurred when an active, cognate ribozyme was introduced with the substrate. No acceleration in cleavage rates was observed in control experiments utilizing a noncleavable substrate, inactive ribozyme, or an active ribozyme with altered substrate specificity. Subsequently, the fluorescent substrates were injected into clonal cell lines that expressed cognate or noncognate ribozymes. A decrease in FRET signal was observed only when substrate was microinjected into cells expressing its cognate ribozyme. These results demonstrate trans-cleavage of RNA within mammalian cells, and provide an experimental basis for quantitative analysis of ribozyme activity and specificity within the cell. PMID:10786853

  6. High Repetition Rate, LINAC-based Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence FY 2009 Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mathew Kinlaw; Scott Watson; James Johnson; Alan Hunt; Heather Seipel; Edward Reedy

    2009-10-01

    Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence (NRF), which is possible for nuclei with atomic numbers greater than helium (Z=2), occurs when a nuclear level is excited by resonant absorption of a photon and subsequently decays by reemission of a photon. The excited nuclear states can become readily populated, provided the incident photon’s energy is within the Doppler-broadened width of the energy level being excited. Utilizing continuous energy photon spectra, as is characteristic of a bremsstrahlung photon beam, as the inspection source, ensures that at least some fraction of the impinging beam will contribute to the population of the excited energy levels in the material of interest. Upon de-excitation, either to the ground state or to a lower-energy excited state, the emitted fluorescence photon’s energy will correspond to the energy difference between the excited state and the state to which it decays. As each isotope inherently contains unique nuclear energy levels, the NRF states for each isotope are also unique. By exploiting this phenomenon, NRF photon detection provides a well-defined signature for identifying the presence of individual nuclear species. This report summarizes the second year (Fiscal Year [FY] 2009) of a collaborative research effort between Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho State University’s Idaho Accelerator Center, and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. This effort focused on continuing to assess and optimize NRF-based detection techniques utilizing a slightly modified, commercially available, pulsed medical electron accelerator.

  7. Resonance fluorescence in ultrafast and intense x-ray free-electron-laser pulses

    CERN Document Server

    Cavaletto, S M; Harman, Z; Kanter, E P; Southworth, S H; Young, L; Keitel, C H

    2012-01-01

    The spectrum of resonance fluorescence is calculated for a two-level system excited by an intense, ultrashort x-ray pulse made available for instance by free-electron lasers such as the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). We allow for inner-shell hole decay widths and destruction of the system by further photoionization. This two-level description is employed to model neon cations strongly driven by x rays tuned to the $1s 2p^{-1}\\rightarrow 1s^{-1} 2p$ transition at 848 eV; the x rays induce Rabi oscillations which are so fast that they compete with Ne $1s$-hole decay. We predict resonance fluorescence spectra for two different scenarios: first, chaotic pulses based on the Self Amplified Spontaneous Emission principle, like those presently generated at XFEL facilities and, second, Gaussian pulses which will become available in the foreseeable future with self-seeding techniques. As an example of the exciting opportunities deriving from the use of seeding methods, we predict, in spite of above obstacles, the ...

  8. ``Green'' functionalization of magnetic nanoparticles via tea polyphenol for magnetic resonance/fluorescent dual-imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Wen; Lai, Kuilin; Liu, Kexia; Xia, Rui; Gao, Fabao; Wu, Yao; Gu, Zhongwei

    2014-01-01

    Tea polyphenol serves as an environmentally friendly ligand-exchange molecule to synthesize multifunctional metal-doped superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles via a catechol-metal coordination interaction. The resultant particles not only exhibit excellent hydrophilicity and protein adsorption resistance, but also are applicable as magnetic resonance/fluorescent dual-imaging probes due to their high T2 relaxivity, autofluorescence and large cellular uptake.Tea polyphenol serves as an environmentally friendly ligand-exchange molecule to synthesize multifunctional metal-doped superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles via a catechol-metal coordination interaction. The resultant particles not only exhibit excellent hydrophilicity and protein adsorption resistance, but also are applicable as magnetic resonance/fluorescent dual-imaging probes due to their high T2 relaxivity, autofluorescence and large cellular uptake. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Additional information and figures (Fig. S1-S7), including experimental sections, characterization of the products, protein corona analysis, cytotoxicity and cellular uptake quantification. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr05003c

  9. Intramolecular fluorescence resonance energy transfer and living cell imaging of novel pyridyltriphenylamine dye

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Duojun; Qian, Ying

    2016-07-01

    A novel pyridyltriphenylamine-rhodamine dye PTRh and a pyridyltriphenylamine derivative PTO were synthesized and characterized by 1H NMR and HRMS-MALDI-TOF. PTRh performed typical fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) signal from pyridyltriphenylamine to rhodamine along with notable color change from green to rose when interacting with Hg2+ in EtOH/H2O. And PTRh as a ratiometric probe for Hg2+ based on FRET could achieve a very low detection limit of 32 nM and energy transfer efficiency of 83.7% in aqueous organic system. On the other hand, spectra properties of PTO in its aggregates, THF/H2O mixed solution and silica nanoparticles (Si-NPs) dispersed in water were investigated. And the results indicated PTO exhibited bright green fluorescence in solid state, and PTO was successfully encapsulated in silica matrix (30-40 nm), emitting bright blue fluorescence with 11.7% quantum yield. Additionally, living cell imaging experiments demonstrated that PTRh could effectively response to intracellular Hg2+ and PTO-doped Si-NPs were well uptaken by MCF-7 breast cancer cells. It could be concluded that the chromophores are promising materials used as biosensors.

  10. Absorption, fluorescence and resonance Rayleigh scattering spectral characteristics of interaction of gold nanoparticle with safranine T

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Youqiu; LIU Shaopu; LIU Qin; LIU Zhongfang; HU Xiaoli

    2005-01-01

    The interaction between gold nanoparticle and safranine T (ST) has been studied with resonance Rayleigh scattering (RRS) spectra, absorption and fluorescence spectra. In the pH 5 solution, citrate [(H2L)2-] self-assembles on the surface of positively-charged gold nanoparticle, which results in the [(Au)n(H2L)m]x- complex. In other words, one of carboxylate oxygens in (H2L)2- moves inward and combines with gold nanoparticle. The other carboxylate oxygens moves outward to form a supermolecular complex anion with x negative charges. Then by virtue of electrostatic attraction, hydrophobic force and charge transfer action, the complex anion binds with ST cation to form a new ion-association complex. Here (H2L)2- acts as a bridge. The formation of the complex results in the significant enhancement of RRS intensity, the appearance of new RRS spectrum, the red shift of plasma absorption band of gold nanoparticle as well as the decrease in the absorbance and fluorescence quenching for safranine T. In this work, the interaction between gold nanoparticle and ST on the RRS, absorption and fluorescence spectra has been investigated. The reason why RRS intensity increases greatly and the reaction mechanism have been inquired. The results show that RRS spectra can not only be used to study nanoparticle and reaction product, but also are a sensitive means to characterize and detect nanoparticles.

  11. Probing the graphite band structure with resonant soft-x-ray fluorescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlisle, J.A.; Shirley, E.L.; Hudson, E.A. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    Soft x-ray fluorescence (SXF) spectroscopy using synchrotron radiation offers several advantages over surface sensitive spectroscopies for probing the electronic structure of complex multi-elemental materials. Due to the long mean free path of photons in solids ({approximately}1000 {angstrom}), SXF is a bulk-sensitive probe. Also, since core levels are involved in absorption and emission, SXF is both element- and angular-momentum-selective. SXF measures the local partial density of states (DOS) projected onto each constituent element of the material. The chief limitation of SXF has been the low fluorescence yield for photon emission, particularly for light elements. However, third generation light sources, such as the Advanced Light Source (ALS), offer the high brightness that makes high-resolution SXF experiments practical. In the following the authors utilize this high brightness to demonstrate the capability of SXF to probe the band structure of a polycrystalline sample. In SXF, a valence emission spectrum results from transitions from valence band states to the core hole produced by the incident photons. In the non-resonant energy regime, the excitation energy is far above the core binding energy, and the absorption and emission events are uncoupled. The fluorescence spectrum resembles emission spectra acquired using energetic electrons, and is insensitive to the incident photon`s energy. In the resonant excitation energy regime, core electrons are excited by photons to unoccupied states just above the Fermi level (EF). The absorption and emission events are coupled, and this coupling manifests itself in several ways, depending in part on the localization of the empty electronic states in the material. Here the authors report spectral measurements from highly oriented pyrolytic graphite.

  12. Vibrational techniques applied to photosynthesis: Resonance Raman and fluorescence line-narrowing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gall, Andrew; Pascal, Andrew A; Robert, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    Resonance Raman spectroscopy may yield precise information on the conformation of, and the interactions assumed by, the chromophores involved in the first steps of the photosynthetic process. Selectivity is achieved via resonance with the absorption transition of the chromophore of interest. Fluorescence line-narrowing spectroscopy is a complementary technique, in that it provides the same level of information (structure, conformation, interactions), but in this case for the emitting pigment(s) only (whether isolated or in an ensemble of interacting chromophores). The selectivity provided by these vibrational techniques allows for the analysis of pigment molecules not only when they are isolated in solvents, but also when embedded in soluble or membrane proteins and even, as shown recently, in vivo. They can be used, for instance, to relate the electronic properties of these pigment molecules to their structure and/or the physical properties of their environment. These techniques are even able to follow subtle changes in chromophore conformation associated with regulatory processes. After a short introduction to the physical principles that govern resonance Raman and fluorescence line-narrowing spectroscopies, the information content of the vibrational spectra of chlorophyll and carotenoid molecules is described in this article, together with the experiments which helped in determining which structural parameter(s) each vibrational band is sensitive to. A selection of applications is then presented, in order to illustrate how these techniques have been used in the field of photosynthesis, and what type of information has been obtained. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Vibrational spectroscopies and bioenergetic systems. PMID:25268562

  13. Multifunctional nanoprobe for cancer cell targeting and simultaneous fluorescence/magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Zhenzhen; Wu, Yafeng; Zhao, Yuewu; Mi, Li; Wang, Jintao; Wang, Jimin; Zhao, Jinjin; Wang, Lixin; Liu, Anran; Li, Ying; Wei, Wei; Zhang, Yuanjian; Liu, Songqin

    2016-09-28

    Multifunctional nanoprobes with distinctive magnetic and fluorescent properties are highly useful in accurate and early cancer diagnosis. In this study, nanoparticles of Fe3O4 core with fluorescent SiO2 shell (MFS) are synthesized by a facile improved Stöber method. These nanoparticles owning a significant core-shell structure exhibit good dispersion, stable fluorescence, low cytotoxicity and excellent biocompatibility. TLS11a aptamer (Apt1), a specific membrane protein for human liver cancer cells which could be internalized into cells, is conjugated to the MFS nanoparticles through the formation of amide bond working as a target-specific moiety. The attached TLS11a aptamers on nanoparticles are very stable and can't be hydrolyzed by DNA hydrolytic enzyme in vivo. Both fluorescence and magnetic resonance imaging show significant uptake of aptamer conjugated nanoprobe by HepG2 cells compared to 4T1, SGC-7901 and MCF-7 cells. In addition, with the increasing concentration of the nanoprobe, T2-weighted MRI images of the as-treated HepG2 cells are significantly negatively enhanced, indicating that a high magnetic field gradient is generated by MFS-Apt1 which has been specifically captured by HepG2 cells. The relaxivity of nanoprobe is calculated to be 11.5 mg(-1)s(-1). The MR imaging of tumor-bearing nude mouse is also confirmed. The proposed multifunctional nanoprobe with the size of sub-100 nm has the potential to provide real-time imaging in early liver cancer cell diagnosis. PMID:27619098

  14. Iodinated oil-loaded, fluorescent mesoporous silica-coated iron oxide nanoparticles for magnetic resonance imaging/computed tomography/fluorescence trimodal imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Sihan; Wang, Yao; Wang, Mengxing; Zhang, Lu; Du, Xiaoxia; Gu, Hongchen; Zhang, Chunfu

    2014-01-01

    In this study, a novel magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)/computed tomography (CT)/fluorescence trifunctional probe was prepared by loading iodinated oil into fluorescent mesoporous silica-coated superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (i-fmSiO4@SPIONs). Fluorescent mesoporous silica-coated superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (fmSiO4@SPIONs) were prepared by growing fluorescent dye-doped silica onto superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) directed by a cetyltrimethylammonium bromide template. As prepared, fmSiO4@SPIONs had a uniform size, a large surface area, and a large pore volume, which demonstrated high efficiency for iodinated oil loading. Iodinated oil loading did not change the sizes of fmSiO4@SPIONs, but they reduced the MRI T2 relaxivity (r2) markedly. I-fmSiO4@SPIONs were stable in their physical condition and did not demonstrate cytotoxic effects under the conditions investigated. In vitro studies indicated that the contrast enhancement of MRI and CT, and the fluorescence signal intensity of i-fmSiO4@SPION aqueous suspensions and macrophages, were intensified with increased i-fmSiO4@SPION concentrations in suspension and cell culture media. Moreover, for the in vivo study, the accumulation of i-fmSiO4@SPIONs in the liver could also be detected by MRI, CT, and fluorescence imaging. Our study demonstrated that i-fmSiO4@SPIONs had great potential for MRI/CT/fluorescence trimodal imaging. PMID:24904212

  15. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer from pyrene to perylene labels for nucleic acid hybridization assays under homogeneous solution conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Masuko, Masayuki; Ohuchi, Shohkichi; Sode, Koji; Ohtani, Hiroyuki; Shimadzu, Akira

    2000-01-01

    We characterized the fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) from pyrene (donor) to perylene (acceptor) for nucleic acid assays under homogeneous solution conditions. We used the hybridization between a target 32mer and its complementary two sequential 16mer deoxyribonucleotides whose neighboring terminals were each respectively labeled with a pyrene and a perylene residue. A transfer efficiency of ~100% was attained upon the hybridization when observing perylene fluorescence at 459 nm ...

  16. High Repetition Rate, LINAC-Based Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence FY 2008 Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This summarizes the first year of a multi-laboratory/university, multi-year effort focusing on high repetition rate, pulsed LINAC-based nuclear resonance fluorescence (NRF) measurements. Specifically, this FY2008 effort centered on experimentally assessing NRF measurements using pulsed linear electron accelerators, operated at various repetition rates, and identifying specific detection requirements to optimize such measurements. Traditionally, interest in NRF as a detection technology, which continues to receive funding from DHS and DOE/NA-22, has been driven by continuous-wave (CW), Van de Graff-based bremsstrahlung sources. However, in addition to the relatively sparse present-day use of Van de Graff sources, only limited NRF data from special nuclear materials has been presented; there is even less data available regarding shielding effects and photon source optimization for NRF measurements on selected nuclear materials

  17. High Repetition Rate, LINAC-Based Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence FY 2008 Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott M Watson; Mathew T Kinlaw; James L Jones; Alan W. Hunt; Glen A. Warren

    2008-12-01

    This summarizes the first year of a multi-laboratory/university, multi-year effort focusing on high repetition rate, pulsed LINAC-based nuclear resonance fluorescence (NRF) measurements. Specifically, this FY2008 effort centered on experimentally assessing NRF measurements using pulsed linear electron accelerators, operated at various repetition rates, and identifying specific detection requirements to optimize such measurements. Traditionally, interest in NRF as a detection technology, which continues to receive funding from DHS and DOE/NA-22, has been driven by continuous-wave (CW), Van de Graff-based bremsstrahlung sources. However, in addition to the relatively sparse present-day use of Van de Graff sources, only limited NRF data from special nuclear materials has been presented; there is even less data available regarding shielding effects and photon source optimization for NRF measurements on selected nuclear materials.

  18. Transmission Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence Measurements of 238U in Thick Targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quiter, Brian J.; Ludewigt, Bernhard A.; Mozin, Vladimir V.; Wilson, Cody; Korbly, Steve

    2010-08-31

    Transmission nuclear resonance fluorescence measurements were made on targets consisting of Pb and depleted U with total areal densities near 86 g/cm2. The 238U content n the targets varied from 0 to 8.5percent (atom fraction). The experiment demonstrates the capability of using transmission measurements as a non-destructive technique to identify and quantify the presence of an isotope in samples with thicknesses comparable to he average thickness of a nuclear fuel assembly. The experimental data also appear to demonstrate the process of notch refilling with a predictable intensity. Comparison of measured spectra to previous backscatter 238U measurements indicates general agreement in observed excited states. Two new 238U excited states and possibly a third state have also been observed.

  19. Resonance energy transfer between fluorescent BSA protected Au nanoclusters and organic fluorophores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raut, Sangram; Rich, Ryan; Fudala, Rafal; Butler, Susan; Kokate, Rutika; Gryczynski, Zygmunt; Luchowski, Rafal; Gryczynski, Ignacy

    2013-12-01

    Bovine serum albumin (BSA) protected nanoclusters (Au and Ag) represent a group of nanomaterials that holds great promise in biophysical applications due to their unique fluorescence properties and lack of toxicity. These metal nanoclusters have utility in a variety of disciplines including catalysis, biosensing, photonics, imaging and molecular electronics. However, they suffer from several disadvantages such as low fluorescence quantum efficiency (typically near 6%) and broad emission spectrum (540 nm to 800 nm). We describe an approach to enhance the apparent brightness of BSA Au clusters by linking them with a high extinction donor organic dye pacific blue (PB). In this conjugate PB acts as a donor to BSA Au clusters and enhances its brightness by resonance energy transfer (RET). We found that the emission of BSA Au clusters can be enhanced by a magnitude of two-fold by resonance energy transfer (RET) from the high extinction donor PB, and BSA Au clusters can act as an acceptor to nanosecond lifetime organic dyes. By pumping the BSA Au clusters using a high extinction donor, one can increase the effective brightness of less bright fluorophores like BSA Au clusters. Moreover, we prepared another conjugate of BSA Au clusters with the near infrared (NIR) dye Dylight 750 (Dy750), where BSA Au clusters act as a donor to Dy750. We observed that BSA Au clusters can function as a donor, showing 46% transfer efficiency to the NIR dye Dy750 with a long lifetime component in the acceptor decay through RET. Such RET-based probes can be used to prevent the problems of a broad emission spectrum associated with the BSA Au clusters. Moreover, transferring energy from BSA Au clusters to Dy750 will result in a RET probe with a narrow emission spectrum and long lifetime component which can be utilized in imaging applications.Bovine serum albumin (BSA) protected nanoclusters (Au and Ag) represent a group of nanomaterials that holds great promise in biophysical applications due to

  20. A homogeneous time-resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer assay for phosphatidylserine exposure on apoptotic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasser, Jean-Philippe; Hehl, Michaela; Millward, Thomas A

    2009-01-01

    A simple, "mix-and-measure" microplate assay for phosphatidylserine (PtdSer) exposure on the surface of apoptotic cells is described. The assay exploits the fact that annexin V, a protein with high affinity and specificity for PtdSer, forms trimers and higher order oligomers on binding to membranes containing PtdSer. The transition from soluble monomer to cell-bound oligomer is detected using time-resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer from europium chelate-labeled annexin V to Cy5-labeled annexin V. PtdSer detection is achieved by a single addition of a reagent mix containing labeled annexins and calcium ions directly to cell cultures in a 96-well plate, followed by a brief incubation before fluorescence measurement. The assay can be used to quantify PtdSer exposure on both suspension cells and adherent cells in situ. This method is simpler and faster than existing annexin V binding assays based on flow cytometry or microscopy, and it yields precise data with Z' values of 0.6-0.7. PMID:18835236

  1. Miniature fiber optic spectrometer-based quantitative fluorescence resonance energy transfer measurement in single living cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Liuying; Zhang, Jianwei; Zhang, Lili; Chen, Tongsheng

    2015-03-01

    Spectral measurement of fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET), spFRET, is a widely used FRET quantification method in living cells today. We set up a spectrometer-microscope platform that consists of a miniature fiber optic spectrometer and a widefield fluorescence microscope for the spectral measurement of absolute FRET efficiency (E) and acceptor-to-donor concentration ratio (RC) in single living cells. The microscope was used for guiding cells and the spectra were simultaneously detected by the miniature fiber optic spectrometer. Moreover, our platform has independent excitation and emission controllers, so different excitations can share the same emission channel. In addition, we developed a modified spectral FRET quantification method (mlux-FRET) for the multiple donors and multiple acceptors FRET construct (mD˜nA) sample, and we also developed a spectra-based 2-channel acceptor-sensitized FRET quantification method (spE-FRET). We implemented these modified FRET quantification methods on our platform to measure the absolute E and RC values of tandem constructs with different acceptor/donor stoichiometries in single living Huh-7 cells.

  2. Raman and fluorescence characteristics of resonant inelastic X-ray scattering from doped superconducting cuprates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, H Y; Jia, C J; Chen, Z Y; Wohlfeld, K; Moritz, B; Devereaux, T P; Wu, W B; Okamoto, J; Lee, W S; Hashimoto, M; He, Y; Shen, Z X; Yoshida, Y; Eisaki, H; Mou, C Y; Chen, C T; Huang, D J

    2016-01-01

    Measurements of spin excitations are essential for an understanding of spin-mediated pairing for superconductivity; and resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) provides a considerable opportunity to probe high-energy spin excitations. However, whether RIXS correctly measures the collective spin excitations of doped superconducting cuprates remains under debate. Here we demonstrate distinct Raman- and fluorescence-like RIXS excitations of Bi1.5Pb0.6Sr1.54CaCu2O(8+δ). Combining photon-energy and momentum dependent RIXS measurements with theoretical calculations using exact diagonalization provides conclusive evidence that the Raman-like RIXS excitations correspond to collective spin excitations, which are magnons in the undoped Mott insulators and evolve into paramagnons in doped superconducting compounds. In contrast, the fluorescence-like shifts are due primarily to the continuum of particle-hole excitations in the charge channel. Our results show that under the proper experimental conditions RIXS indeed can be used to probe paramagnons in doped high-Tc cuprate superconductors. PMID:26794437

  3. Electron paramagnetic resonance and fluorescence spectra of Mg-doped ZnSe precursor nanoribbon bundles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manganese-doped ZnSe precursor (ZnSe·3en) nanoribbon bundles were prepared through a mixed solvothermal approach, which is time-saving and efficient compared with traditional route. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and Fluorescence spectra are used to confirm that the Mn impurities are embedded inside the ZnSe crystal lattice and partly substitute the place of Zn. Shown in fluorescence spectra, ZnSe has an emission peak centered at 588 nm and the introduction of Mn strongly increases the intensity of peak The internal Mn transition (4T1→6A1) which strongly increases the peak intensity depends on the average number of Mn atoms in the nanoparticals. As the Mn concentration increases, the peak intensity enhances. It has been clearly seen that EPR spectra of the sample have six hyperfine lines which are attributed to the Mn2+ ions. Strong signal and small background imply successful doping. A series of samples with different Mn concentration was prepared and studied. In the last, it's summarized a suitable conditions and Mn concentration which led to best doping. (authors)

  4. Development of L-lactate dehydrogenase biosensor based on porous silicon resonant microcavities as fluorescence enhancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenie, S N Aisyiyah; Prieto-Simon, Beatriz; Voelcker, Nicolas H

    2015-12-15

    The up-regulation of L-lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), an intracellular enzyme present in most of all body tissues, is indicative of several pathological conditions and cellular death. Herein, we demonstrate LDH detection using porous silicon (pSi) microcavities as a luminescence-enhancing optical biosensing platform. Non-fluorescent resazurin was covalently attached onto the pSi surface via thermal hydrocarbonisation, thermal hydrosylilation and acylation. Each surface modification step was confirmed by means of FTIR and the optical shifts of the resonance wavelength of the microcavity. Thermal hydrocarbonisation also afforded excellent surface stability, ensuring that the resazurin was not reduced on the pSi surface. Using a pSi microcavity biosensor, the fluorescence signal upon detection of LDH was amplified by 10 and 5-fold compared to that of a single layer and a detuned microcavity, respectively, giving a limit of detection of 0.08 U/ml. The biosensor showed a linear response between 0.16 and 6.5 U/ml, covering the concentration range of LDH in normal as well as damaged tissues. The biosensor was selective for LDH and did not produce a signal upon incubation with another NAD-dependant enzyme L-glutamic dehydrogenase. The use of the pSi microcavity as a sensing platform reduced reagent usage by 30% and analysis time threefold compared to the standard LDH assay in solution. PMID:26201980

  5. Measuring protein interactions using Förster resonance energy transfer and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, Richard N

    2014-03-15

    The method of fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) is a quantitative approach that can be used to detect Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET). The use of FLIM to measure the FRET that results from the interactions between proteins labeled with fluorescent proteins (FPs) inside living cells provides a non-invasive method for mapping interactomes. Here, the use of the phasor plot method to analyze frequency domain (FD) FLIM measurements is described, and measurements obtained from cells producing the 'FRET standard' fusion proteins are used to validate the FLIM system for FRET measurements. The FLIM FRET approach is then used to measure both homologous and heterologous protein-protein interactions (PPI) involving the CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein alpha (C/EBPα). C/EBPα is a transcription factor that controls cell differentiation, and localizes to heterochromatin where it interacts with the heterochromatin protein 1 alpha (HP1α). The FLIM-FRET method is used to quantify the homologous interactions between the FP-labeled basic leucine zipper (BZip) domain of C/EBPα. Then the heterologous interactions between the C/EBPa BZip domain and HP1a are quantified using the FRET-FLIM method. The results demonstrate that the basic region and leucine zipper (BZip) domain of C/EBPα is sufficient for the interaction with HP1α in regions of heterochromatin. PMID:23806643

  6. Drug transport mechanism of P-glycoprotein monitored by single molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, S.; Verhalen, B.; Zarrabi, N.; Wilkens, S.; Börsch, M.

    2011-03-01

    In this work we monitor the catalytic mechanism of P-glycoprotein (Pgp) using single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). Pgp, a member of the ATP binding cassette family of transport proteins, is found in the plasma membrane of animal cells where it is involved in the ATP hydrolysis driven export of hydrophobic molecules. When expressed in the plasma membrane of cancer cells, the transport activity of Pgp can lead to the failure of chemotherapy by excluding the mostly hydrophobic drugs from the interior of the cell. Despite ongoing effort, the catalytic mechanism by which Pgp couples MgATP binding and hydrolysis to translocation of drug molecules across the lipid bilayer is poorly understood. Using site directed mutagenesis, we have introduced cysteine residues for fluorescence labeling into different regions of the nucleotide binding domains (NBDs) of Pgp. Double-labeled single Pgp molecules showed fluctuating FRET efficiencies during drug stimulated ATP hydrolysis suggesting that the NBDs undergo significant movements during catalysis. Duty cycle-optimized alternating laser excitation (DCO-ALEX) is applied to minimize FRET artifacts and to select the appropriate molecules. The data show that Pgp is a highly dynamic enzyme that appears to fluctuate between at least two major conformations during steady state turnover.

  7. Thrombin detection in murine plasma using engineered fluorescence resonance energy transfer aptadimers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trapaidze, Ana; Brut, Marie; Mazères, Serge; Estève, Daniel; Gué, Anne-Marie; Bancaud, Aurélien

    2015-12-01

    Biodetection strategies, in which two sides of one target protein are targeted simultaneously, have been shown to increase specificity, selectivity, and affinity, and it has been suggested that they constitute excellent candidates for protein sensing in complex media. In this study we propose a method to engineer the sequence of a DNA construct dedicated to reversible thrombin detection. This construct, called Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) aptadimer, is assembled with two aptamers, which target different epitopes of thrombin, interconnected with a DNA linker that contains a FRET couple and a reversible double helix stem. In the absence of target, the stem is stable maintaining a FRET couple in close proximity, and fluorescence is unquenched upon thrombin addition due to the dehybridization of the stem. We define design rules for the conception of FRET aptadimers, and develop a software to optimize their functionality. One engineered FRET aptadimer sequence is subsequently characterized experimentally by temperature scanning fluorimetry, demonstrating the relevance of our technology for thrombin sensing in bulk and diluted murine plasma.

  8. High-sensitivity quantum dot-based fluorescence resonance energy transfer bioanalysis by capillary electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yong-Qiang; Wang, Jian-Hao; Zhang, Hai-Li; Yang, Jie; Guan, Li-Yun; Chen, Hong; Luo, Qing-Ming; Zhao, Yuan-Di

    2010-02-15

    Here a new method for high-sensitivity quantum dot (QD)-based fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) bioanalysis was developed. In this method, capillary electrophoresis (CE) with fluorescence detection was applied. The FRET system consisted of water-soluble 532-nm emitting CdTe QDs donor and 632-nm emitting CdSe/ZnS QDs acceptor which were covalently conjugated with mouse IgG and goat anti-mouse IgG, respectively. The bio-affinity between antigen and antibody brought two kinds of QDs close enough to make the FRET happen between them. In the CE experiments, highly efficient separation of donor-acceptor immunocomplexes was obtained, and the process of FRET was monitored. Results showed that FRET efficiency obtained by CE (38.56-69.58%) improved substantially in comparison with that obtained by ensemble measurement (12.77-52.37%). The high efficient separation of donor-acceptor immunocomplexes and the possible conformation change of antigen and antibody, contributes to the lower analysis uncertainty (variance) and higher FRET efficiency obtained in CE and consequentially, this makes the analysis of FRET more sensitive. This novel CE-based technique can be easily extended to other FRET system based on QDs and may have potential application in the study of biomolecule conformation change. PMID:19914053

  9. Ratiometric fluorescent ion detection in water with high sensitivity via aggregation-mediated fluorescence resonance energy transfer using a conjugated polyelectrolyte as an optical platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Van Sang; Kim, Boram; Lee, Wonho; Jeong, Ji-Eun; Yang, Renqiang; Woo, Han Young

    2013-05-14

    A cationic conjugated polyelectrolyte was designed and synthesized based on poly(fluorene-co-phenylene) containing 5 mol% benzothiadiazole (BT) as a low energy trap and 15-crown-5 as a recognizing group for potassium ions. A potassium ion can form a sandwich-type 2:1 Lewis acid-based complex with 15-crown-5, to cause the intermolecular aggregation of polymers. This facilitates inter-chain fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) to a low-energy BT segment, resulting in fluorescent signal amplification, even at dilute analyte concentrations. Highly sensitive and selective detection of K(+) ions was demonstrated in water. The linear response of ratiometric fluorescent signal as a function of [K(+) ] allows K(+) quantification in a range of nanomolar concentrations with a detection limit of ≈0.7 × 10(-9) M. PMID:23417971

  10. Resonant inelastic scattering in dilute magnetic semiconductors by x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawniczak-Jablonska, K. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)]|[Institute of Physics, Warsaw (Poland); Jia, J.J.; Underwood, J.H. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    As modern, technologically important materials have become more complex, element specific techniques have become invaluable in studying the electronic structure of individual components from the system. Soft x-ray fluorescence (SXF) and absorption (SXA) spectroscopies provide a unique means of measuring element and angular momentum density of electron states, respectively, for the valence and conducting bands in complex materials. X-ray absorption and the decay through x-ray emission are generally assumed to be two independent one-photon processes. Recent studies, however have demonstrated that SXF excited near the absorption threshold generate an array of spectral features that depend on nature of materials, particularly on the localization of excited states in s and d-band solids and that these two processes can no be longer treated as independent. Resonant SXF offers thus the new way to study the dynamics of the distribution of electronic valence states in the presence of a hole which is bound to the electron low lying in the conduction band. This process can simulate the interaction between hole-electron pair in wide gap semiconductors. Therefore such studies can help in understanding of transport and optics phenomena in the wide gap semiconductors. The authors report the result of Mn and S L-resonant emission in Zn{sub 1{minus}x}Mn{sub x}S (with x=0.2 and 0.3) and MnS as the energy of exciting radiation is tuned across the Mn and S L{sub 3,2} absorption edge, along with the resonant excited spectra from elemental Mn as a reference.

  11. A reduced graphene oxide-based fluorescence resonance energy transfer sensor for highly sensitive detection of matrix metalloproteinase 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Gaina; Wang, Xiaoping; Chen, Tongsheng

    2016-01-01

    A novel fluorescence nanoprobe (reduced nano-graphene oxide [nrGO]/fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled peptide [Pep-FITC]) for ultrasensitive detection of matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP2) has been developed by engineering the Pep-FITC comprising the specific MMP2 substrate domain (PLGVR) onto the surface of nrGO particles through non-covalent linkage. The nrGO was obtained by water bathing nano-graphene oxide under 90°C for 4 hours. After mixing the nrGO and Pep-FITC for 30 seconds, the fluorescence from Pep-FITC was almost completely quenched due to the fluorescence resonance energy transfer between fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) and nrGO. Upon cleavage of the amide bond between Leu and Gly in the Pep-FITC by protease-MMP2, the FITC bound to nrGO was separated from nrGO surface, disrupting the fluorescence resonance energy transfer process and resulting in fluorescence recovery of FITC. Under optimal conditions, the fluorescence recovery of nrGO/Pep-FITC was found to be directly proportional to the concentration of MMP2 within 0.02–0.1 nM. The detection limit of the nrGO/Pep-FITC was determined to be 3 pM, which is approximately tenfold lower than that of the unreduced carboxylated nano-graphene oxide/Pep-FITC probe.

  12. Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence to Measure Plutonium Mass in Spent Nuclear Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ludewigt, Bernhard A; Quiter, Brian J.; Ambers, Scott D.

    2011-01-14

    The Next Generation Safeguard Initiative (NGSI) of the U.S Department of Energy is supporting a multi-lab/university collaboration to quantify the plutonium (Pu) mass in spent nuclear fuel (SNF) assemblies and to detect the diversion of pins with non-destructive assay (NDA) methods. The following 14 NDA techniques are being studied: Delayed Neutrons, Differential Die-Away, Differential Die-Away Self-Interrogation, Lead Slowing Down Spectrometer, Neutron Multiplicity, Passive Neutron Albedo Reactivity, Total Neutron (Gross Neutron), X-Ray Fluorescence, {sup 252}Cf Interrogation with Prompt Neutron Detection, Delayed Gamma, Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence, Passive Prompt Gamma, Self-integration Neutron Resonance Densitometry, and Neutron Resonance Transmission Analysis. Understanding and maturity of the techniques vary greatly, ranging from decades old, well-understood methods to new approaches. Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence (NRF) is a technique that had not previously been studied for SNF assay or similar applications. Since NRF generates isotope-specific signals, the promise and appeal of the technique lies in its potential to directly measure the amount of a specific isotope in an SNF assay target. The objectives of this study were to design and model suitable NRF measurement methods, to quantify capabilities and corresponding instrumentation requirements, and to evaluate prospects and the potential of NRF for SNF assay. The main challenge of the technique is to achieve the sensitivity and precision, i.e., to accumulate sufficient counting statistics, required for quantifying the mass of Pu isotopes in SNF assemblies. Systematic errors, considered a lesser problem for a direct measurement and only briefly discussed in this report, need to be evaluated for specific instrument designs in the future. Also, since the technical capability of using NRF to measure Pu in SNF has not been established, this report does not directly address issues such as cost, size

  13. Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence to Measure Plutonium Mass in Spent Nuclear Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Next Generation Safeguard Initiative (NGSI) of the U.S Department of Energy is supporting a multi-lab/university collaboration to quantify the plutonium (Pu) mass in spent nuclear fuel (SNF) assemblies and to detect the diversion of pins with non-destructive assay (NDA) methods. The following 14 NDA techniques are being studied: Delayed Neutrons, Differential Die-Away, Differential Die-Away Self-Interrogation, Lead Slowing Down Spectrometer, Neutron Multiplicity, Passive Neutron Albedo Reactivity, Total Neutron (Gross Neutron), X-Ray Fluorescence, 252Cf Interrogation with Prompt Neutron Detection, Delayed Gamma, Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence, Passive Prompt Gamma, Self-integration Neutron Resonance Densitometry, and Neutron Resonance Transmission Analysis. Understanding and maturity of the techniques vary greatly, ranging from decades old, well-understood methods to new approaches. Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence (NRF) is a technique that had not previously been studied for SNF assay or similar applications. Since NRF generates isotope-specific signals, the promise and appeal of the technique lies in its potential to directly measure the amount of a specific isotope in an SNF assay target. The objectives of this study were to design and model suitable NRF measurement methods, to quantify capabilities and corresponding instrumentation requirements, and to evaluate prospects and the potential of NRF for SNF assay. The main challenge of the technique is to achieve the sensitivity and precision, i.e., to accumulate sufficient counting statistics, required for quantifying the mass of Pu isotopes in SNF assemblies. Systematic errors, considered a lesser problem for a direct measurement and only briefly discussed in this report, need to be evaluated for specific instrument designs in the future. Also, since the technical capability of using NRF to measure Pu in SNF has not been established, this report does not directly address issues such as cost, size, development

  14. Fluorescence-based sensing of glucose using engineered glucose/galactose-binding protein: A comparison of fluorescence resonance energy transfer and environmentally sensitive dye labelling strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fluorescence-based glucose sensors using glucose-binding protein (GBP) as the receptor have employed fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) and environmentally sensitive dyes, but with widely varying sensitivity. We therefore compared signal changes in (a) a FRET system constructed by transglutaminase-mediated N-terminal attachment of Alexa Fluor 488/555 as donor and QSY 7 as acceptor at Cys 152 or 182 mutations with (b) GBP labelled with the environmentally sensitive dye badan at C152 or 182. Both FRET systems had a small maximal fluorescence change at saturating glucose (7% and 16%), badan attached at C152 was associated with a 300% maximal fluorescence increase with glucose, though with badan at C182 there was no change. We conclude that glucose sensing based on GBP and FRET does not produce a larger enough signal change for clinical use; both the nature of the environmentally sensitive dye and its site of conjugation seem important for maximum signal change; badan-GBP152C has a large glucose-induced fluorescence change, suitable for development as a glucose sensor

  15. Improvement of the Mutation-Discrimination Threshold for Rare Point Mutations by a Separation-Free Ligase Detection Reaction Assay Based on Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagihara, Kenta; Tsukagoshi, Kazuhiko; Nakajima, Chinami; Esaki, Shinsuke; Hashimoto, Masahiko

    2016-01-01

    We previously developed a separation-free ligase detection reaction assay based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer from a donor quantum dot to an acceptor fluorescent dye. This assay could successfully detect one cancer mutation among 10 wild-type templates. In the current study, the mutation-discrimination threshold was improved by one order of magnitude by replacing the original acceptor dye (Alexa Fluor 647) with another fluorescent dye (Cyanine 5) that was spectrally similar but more fluorescent. PMID:26960620

  16. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer in AOT/4-chlorophenol/m-xylene organogels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dandapat, Manika; Mandal, Debabrata, E-mail: dmandal.chemistry@gmail.com

    2015-06-15

    Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) between donor coumarins (C102 and C153) and acceptor Rhodamine 6G were studied in AOT/4-chlorophenol/m-xylene organogels. The gel comprises a three-dimensional network of fiber bundles trapping the m-xylene solvent. Each fiber is an aggregate of several strands, and each strand consists of a central columnar stack of the phenols, surrounded by AOT headgroups. Our acceptor is ionic so that it was concentrated near the polar center of the strand, while the neutral donors were likely distributed over a wider region. With C153 as donor, clear evidence of FRET (time-constant~100 ps) was found, which indicated that the donor and acceptor may reside in neighboring strands within the same fiber. However, with C102 as donor, FRET probably occurred over an ultrashort, sub-picosecond time-scale suggesting that the donor and acceptor in this case resided in close vicinity. Thus, C102 tends to localize near the polar centre of the strands, compared to the more hydrophobic C153, which prefers to occupy the relatively non-polar peripheral regions of the strands and fibers. - Highlights: • FRET between coumarin donors and Rhodamine 6G acceptor studied in AOT organogels. • With Coumarin 153 donor, a ~100 ps FRET component detected in both donor and acceptor fluorescence. • With Coumarin 102 donor, FRET component too short to be detected with a time-resolution of ~70 ps. • The FRET rates reveal crucial differences in donor–acceptor distances for the two coumarin donors.

  17. Homogeneous fluorescence immunoassay for whole blood analysis. Spectroscopic characterization of a red fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Complete text of publication follows. The demand for fast, easy-to-use, cost-effective and miniaturized point of care (POC) systems for whole blood analysis in clinical diagnostics is huge. Potential test systems aim for separation-free whole blood assays, in which very small sample volumes ( 650 nm). The innovative FRET system absorbs (= excitation wavelength) and emits (detection wavelength) in the so-called optical window of blood. This FRET system is designed of ATTO610 as the donor and ATTO680 as the acceptor dye. Both fluorescent dyes were covalently linked to the 5'ends of single-stranded (ss) DNA oligomers with different length. Through the formation of double-stranded (ds) DNA via hybridization, both dyes are brought into defined spatial proximity in order to study the fundamental photophysical parameters of the FRET pair. In the first experiments, fluorescence quantum yield, fluorescence anisotropy and fluorescence decay time of the ssDNA-conjugated dyes were evaluated and compared with those of the free dyes in order to analyze possible effects of the labelling to DNA. The FRET efficiencies were determined from the dsDNA-conjugated donor's fluorescence quenching using steady state and time resolved fluorescence measurements and subsequently, the distance dependence was evaluated as well. The experimental data were compared with calculations based on the Foerster equations and an excellent agreement was found. The FRET efficiencies were further investigated on a single molecular level using single molecule spectroscopy (SMS). First measurements in whole blood were performed as well. Future steps will include fluorescence detection in a customized microfluidic cell system which allows for using whole blood samples of only one microliter.

  18. Study on the interaction between diphenhydramine and erythrosin by absorption,fluorescence and resonance Rayleigh scattering spectra

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    In pH 4.5 Britton-Robinson(BR)buffer solution,erythrosin(ET)can react with diphenhydramine(DP)to form a 1:1 ion-association complex,which not only results in the change of the absorption spectra,but also results in the great enhancement of resonance Rayleigh scattering(RRS)and the quenching of fluorescence.Furthermore,a new RRS spectrum will appear,and the maximum RRS wavelength was located at about 580 nm.In this work,the spectral characteristics of the absorption,fluorescence and RRS,the optimum conditions of the reaction and the properties of an analytical chemistry were inves- tigated.A sensitive,simple and new method for the determination of DP by using erythrosin as a probe has been developed.The detection limits for DP were 0.0020μg/mL for RRS method,0.088μg/mL for absorption method and 0.094μg/mL for fluorophotometry.There was a linear relationship between the absorbance,RRS and fluorescence intensities and the drug concentration in the range of 0.0067-2.0, 0.29-6.4 and 0.31-3.2μg/mL,respectively.The effects of the interaction of diphenhydramine and erythrosin on the absorption,fluorescence and resonance Rayleigh scattering spectra were discussed. In light polarization experiment,the polarization of RRS at maximum wavelength was measured to be P =0.9779,and it revealed that the RRS spectrum of DP-ET complex consists mostly of resonance scat- tering and few resonance fluorescence.In this study,enthalpy of formation and mean polarizability were calculated by AM1 quantum chemistry method.In addition,the reaction mechanism and the rea- sons for the enhancement of scattering spectra and the energy transfer between absorption,fluores- cence and RRS were discussed.

  19. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer between perylene and riboflavin in micellar solution and analytical application on determination of vitamin B2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) between perylene and riboflavin is studied in micellar solution of sodium dodecyl sulfate. The fluorescence of perylene is quenched by riboflavin and quenching is in accordance with Stern-Volmer relation. The efficiency of energy transfer is found to depend on the concentration of riboflavin. The value of critical energy transfer distance (R0) calculated by using Foster relation is 32.13 A, and as it is less than 50 A, it indicates efficient energy transfer in the present system. The analytical relation was established between extent of sensitization and concentration of riboflavin, which helped to estimate vitamin B2 directly from pharmaceutical tablets

  20. Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer between Lipid Probes Detects Nanoscopic Heterogeneity in the Plasma Membrane of Live Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Sengupta, Prabuddha; Holowka, David; Baird, Barbara

    2007-01-01

    Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) between matched carbocyanine lipid analogs in the plasma membrane outer leaflet of RBL mast cells was used to investigate lateral distributions of lipids and to develop a general method for quantitative measurements of lipid heterogeneity in live cell membranes. FRET measured as fluorescence quenching of long-chain donor probes such as DiO-C18 is greater with long-chain, saturated acceptor probes such as DiI-C16 than with unsaturated or shorter-ch...

  1. Synthesis of a fluorescence resonance energy transfer-based probe containing a tricyclic nucleoside analog for single nucleotide polymorphism typing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayai, Aya; Maeda, Yusuke; Ueno, Yoshihito

    2016-08-01

    Here, we report the synthesis of a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based probe for single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) typing. The probe contains a fluorescent tricyclic base, 8-amino-3-(2,3-dihydroxypropyl)imidazo[4',5':5,6]pyrido[2,3-d]pyrimidine, as a donor molecule and 7-diethylaminocoumarin-3-carboxylic acid as an acceptor molecule. FRET was observed between the donor and acceptor molecules on the probe. The identity of the target bases on DNA and RNA strands could be determined using the probe. PMID:27329795

  2. Iodinated oil-loaded, fluorescent mesoporous silica-coated iron oxide nanoparticles for magnetic resonance imaging/computed tomography/fluorescence trimodal imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue S

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Sihan Xue,1 Yao Wang,1 Mengxing Wang,2 Lu Zhang,1 Xiaoxia Du,2 Hongchen Gu,1 Chunfu Zhang1,31School of Biomedical Engineering and Med-X Research Institute, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 2Shanghai Key Laboratory of Magnetic Resonance, Department of Physics, East China Normal University, 3State Key Laboratory of Oncogenes and Related Genes, Shanghai Cancer Institute, School of Biomedical Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, People’s Republic of ChinaAbstract: In this study, a novel magnetic resonance imaging (MRI/computed tomography (CT/fluorescence trifunctional probe was prepared by loading iodinated oil into fluorescent mesoporous silica-coated superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (i-fmSiO4@SPIONs. Fluorescent mesoporous silica-coated superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (fmSiO4@SPIONs were prepared by growing fluorescent dye-doped silica onto superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs directed by a cetyltrimethylammonium bromide template. As prepared, fmSiO4@SPIONs had a uniform size, a large surface area, and a large pore volume, which demonstrated high efficiency for iodinated oil loading. Iodinated oil loading did not change the sizes of fmSiO4@SPIONs, but they reduced the MRI T2 relaxivity (r2 markedly. I-fmSiO4@SPIONs were stable in their physical condition and did not demonstrate cytotoxic effects under the conditions investigated. In vitro studies indicated that the contrast enhancement of MRI and CT, and the fluorescence signal intensity of i-fmSiO4@SPION aqueous suspensions and macrophages, were intensified with increased i-fmSiO4@SPION concentrations in suspension and cell culture media. Moreover, for the in vivo study, the accumulation of i-fmSiO4@SPIONs in the liver could also be detected by MRI, CT, and fluorescence imaging. Our study demonstrated that i-fmSiO4@SPIONs had great potential for MRI/C/fluorescence trimodal imaging.Keywords: multifunctional probe, SPIONs, mesoporous silica

  3. Single-molecule-sensitive fluorescence resonance energy transfer in freely-diffusing attoliter droplets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) from individual, dye-labeled RNA molecules confined in freely-diffusing attoliter-volume aqueous droplets is carefully compared to FRET from unconfined RNA in solution. The use of freely-diffusing droplets is a remarkably simple and high-throughput technique that facilitates a substantial increase in signal-to-noise for single-molecular-pair FRET measurements. We show that there can be dramatic differences between FRET in solution and in droplets, which we attribute primarily to an altered pH in the confining environment. We also demonstrate that a sufficient concentration of a non-ionic surfactant mitigates this effect and restores FRET to its neutral-pH solution value. At low surfactant levels, even accounting for pH, we observe differences between the distribution of FRET values in solution and in droplets which remain unexplained. Our results will facilitate the use of nanoemulsion droplets as attoliter volume reactors for use in biophysical and biochemical assays, and also in applications such as protein crystallization or nanoparticle synthesis, where careful attention to the pH of the confined phase is required

  4. Quantitative imaging of cell-permeable magnetic resonance contrast agents using x-ray fluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endres, Paul J; Macrenaris, Keith W; Vogt, Stefan; Allen, Matthew J; Meade, Thomas J

    2006-01-01

    The inability to transduce cellular membranes is a limitation of current magnetic resonance imaging probes used in biologic and clinical settings. This constraint confines contrast agents to extracellular and vascular regions of the body, drastically reducing their viability for investigating processes and cycles in developmental biology. Conversely, a contrast agent with the ability to permeate cell membranes could be used in visualizing cell patterning, cell fate mapping, gene therapy, and, eventually, noninvasive cancer diagnosis. Therefore, we describe the synthesis and quantitative imaging of four contrast agents with the capability to cross cell membranes in sufficient quantity for detection. Each agent is based on the conjugation of a Gd(III) chelator with a cellular transduction moiety. Specifically, we coupled Gd(III)-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid DTPA and Gd(III)-1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid with an 8-amino acid polyarginine oligomer and an amphipathic stilbene molecule, 4-amino-4'-(N,N-dimethylamino)stilbene. The imaging modality that provided the best sensitivity and spatial resolution for direct detection of the contrast agents is synchrotron radiation x-ray fluorescence (SR-XRF). Unlike optical microscopy, SR-XRF provides two-dimensional images with resolution 10(3) better than (153)Gd gamma counting, without altering the agent by organic fluorophore conjugation. The transduction efficiency of the intracellular agents was evaluated by T(1) analysis and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry to determine the efficacy of each chelate-transporter combination. PMID:17150161

  5. Fluorescent Heterodoped Nanotetrapods as Synergistically Enhancing Positive and Negative Magnetic Resonance Imaging Contrast Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, V K; Alipour, A; Soran-Erdem, Z; Kelestemur, Y; Aykut, Z G; Demir, H V

    2016-05-18

    In this work, we report Mn-Fe heterodoped ZnSe tetrapod nanocrystals (NCs) synthesized to synergistically enhance contrast in both T1- and T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The proposed NCs were prepared using a customized heteroarchitecture such that the manganese (Mn) is confined in the core and iron (Fe) in the branches of the tetrapods. The elemental composition and profile of these NCs were studied using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy. Photoluminescence quantum yield of these heterodoped NCs in water is ∼30%. Magnetic measurements reveal the simultaneous presence of superparamagnetic and paramagnetic behavior in these NCs because of the coexistence of Mn(2+) and Fe(2+) dopants. Their potential as simultaneous positive and negative MRI contrast agents was demonstrated by relaxivity measurements and in vivo MRI. From the in vivo studies, we also found that these NCs (with a hydrodynamic diameter of 20 nm) are excreted from the body within 24 h after the injection. Therefore, these heterodoped tetrapods NCs, while being fluorescent and safe, hold great future as a synergistically enhancing dual-modal MRI contrast agent. PMID:27139918

  6. Detection of Citrus tristeza virus by using fluorescence resonance energy transfer-based biosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shojaei, Taha Roodbar; Salleh, Mohamad Amran Mohd; Sijam, Kamaruzaman; Rahim, Raha Abdul; Mohsenifar, Afshin; Safarnejad, Reza; Tabatabaei, Meisam

    2016-12-01

    Due to the low titer or uneven distribution of Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) in field samples, detection of CTV by using conventional detection techniques may be difficult. Therefore, in the present work, the cadmium-telluride quantum dots (QDs) was conjugated with a specific antibody against coat protein (CP) of CTV, and the CP were immobilized on the surface of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) to develop a specific and sensitive fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based nanobiosensor for detecting CTV. The maximum FRET efficiency for the developed nano-biosensor was observed at 60% in AuNPs-CP/QDs-Ab ratio of 1:8.5. The designed system showed higher sensitivity and specificity over enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) with a limit of detection of 0.13μgmL(-1) and 93% and 94% sensitivity and specificity, respectively. As designed sensor is rapid, sensitive, specific and efficient in detecting CTV, this could be envisioned for diagnostic applications, surveillance and plant certification program. PMID:27380305

  7. Single-molecule-sensitive fluorescence resonance energy transfer in freely-diffusing attoliter droplets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahmanseresht, Sheema; Ramos, Kieran P.; Gamari, Ben D.; Goldner, Lori S., E-mail: lgoldner@physics.umass.edu [Department of Physics, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, Massachusetts 01003 (United States); Milas, Peker [Department of Neuroscience, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53705 (United States)

    2015-05-11

    Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) from individual, dye-labeled RNA molecules confined in freely-diffusing attoliter-volume aqueous droplets is carefully compared to FRET from unconfined RNA in solution. The use of freely-diffusing droplets is a remarkably simple and high-throughput technique that facilitates a substantial increase in signal-to-noise for single-molecular-pair FRET measurements. We show that there can be dramatic differences between FRET in solution and in droplets, which we attribute primarily to an altered pH in the confining environment. We also demonstrate that a sufficient concentration of a non-ionic surfactant mitigates this effect and restores FRET to its neutral-pH solution value. At low surfactant levels, even accounting for pH, we observe differences between the distribution of FRET values in solution and in droplets which remain unexplained. Our results will facilitate the use of nanoemulsion droplets as attoliter volume reactors for use in biophysical and biochemical assays, and also in applications such as protein crystallization or nanoparticle synthesis, where careful attention to the pH of the confined phase is required.

  8. Forster Resonance Energy Transfer and Laser Fluorescent Analysis of Defects in DNA Double Helix

    CERN Document Server

    Bregadze, Vasil G; Giorgadze, Tamar G; Jaliashvili, Zaza V; Chkhaberidze, Jemal G; Monaselidze, Jamlet R; Khuskivadze, Temur B

    2013-01-01

    Real time laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy usage for microanalysis of DNA double helix defects is shown. The method is based on Forster resonance energy transfer (FRET) in intercalator-donor pair (acridine orange as a donor and ethidium bromide as an acceptor). Transition metal ions such as Cu(II), Cu(I), Ag(I), silver nanoparticles (AgNPs), photo- and thermo effects were used to cause double helix defects in DNA. FRET radii were experimentally estimated in background electrolyte solution (0.01 M NaNO3) and proved to be 3.9 +- 0.3 nm and the data are in satisfactory agreement with the theoretically calculated value Ro = 3.5 +- 0.3 nm. Concentration of DNA sites, exposed to Cu(II), Cu(I), Ag(I) ions, AgNPs impact as well as laser irradiation ({\\lambda} = 457 nm) and temperature, which are applicable for intercalation, were estimated in relative units. FRET method allows to estimate the concentration of double helix areas with high quality stability applicable for intercalation in DNA after it was subjec...

  9. Phase-resolved x-ray ferromagnetic resonance measurements in fluorescence yield

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcham, M. K.; Keatley, P. S.; Neudert, A.; Hicken, R. J.; Cavill, S. A.; Shelford, L. R.; van der Laan, G.; Telling, N. D.; Childress, J. R.; Katine, J. A.; Shafer, P.; Arenholz, E.

    2010-10-14

    Phase-resolved x-ray ferromagnetic resonance (XFMR) has been measured in fluorescence yield, extending the application of XFMR to opaque samples on opaque substrates. Magnetization dynamics were excited in a Co{sub 50}Fe{sub 50}(0.7)/Ni{sub 90}Fe{sub 10}(5) bilayer by means of a continuous wave microwave excitation, while x-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) spectra were measured stroboscopically at different points in the precession cycle. By tuning the x-ray energy to the L{sub 3} edges of Ni and Fe, the dependence of the real and imaginary components of the element specific magnetic susceptibility on the strength of an externally applied static bias field was determined. First results from measurements on a Co{sub 50}Fe{sub 50}(0.7)/Ni{sub 90}Fe{sub 10}(5)/Dy(1) sample confirm that enhanced damping results from the addition of the Dy cap.

  10. Excited-State-Proton-Transfer-Triggered Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer: from 2-Naphthylamine to Phenosafranin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Debanjana; Bose, Debosreeta; Sarkar, Deboleena; Chattopadhyay, Nitin

    2009-09-01

    Excited-state proton transfer (ESPT) and fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) have been linearly coupled leading to an efficient pH-sensitive energy transfer from 2-naphthylamine (2NA) to a potentially bioactive cationic phenazinium dye, phenosafranin (PSF). The prototropic product produced exclusively from the photoexcited 2NA in the presence of added alkali serves as the donor for the energy transfer process. The energy transfer process is turned on at pH ≥ 12, whereas the process is turned off at a pH lower than that. Within the range of pH 12 to 13, the energy transfer efficiency (E) has been shown to follow a linear relation with the solution pH establishing the governing role of pH of the solution on the energy transfer process. The energy transfer follows a long-range dipole-dipole interaction mechanism. The critical energy transfer distance (R0) and the distance between the acceptor and the donor (r) have been determined for the ESPT-promoted FRET process at an optimum pH of 13. The present study involving the coupled processes is simple but has its implication due to its potential to be exploited for designing a pH-sensitive molecular switch.

  11. Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer Assay for High-Throughput Screening of ADAMTS1 Inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guanhua Du

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available A disintegrin and metalloprotease with thrombospondin type I motifs-1 (ADAMTS1 plays a crucial role in inflammatory joint diseases and its inhibitors are potential candidates for anti-arthritis drugs. For the purposes of drug discovery, we reported the development and validation of fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET assay for high-throughput screening (HTS of the ADAMTS1 inhibitors. A FRET substrate was designed for a quantitative assay of ADAMTS1 activity and enzyme kinetics studies. The assay was developed into a 50-µL, 384-well assay format for high throughput screening of ADAMTS1 inhibitors with an overall Z’ factor of 0.89. ADAMTS1 inhibitors were screened against a diverse library of 40,960 total compounds with the established HTS system. Four structurally related hits, naturally occurring compounds, kuwanon P, kuwanon X, albafuran C and mulberrofuran J, extracted from the Chinese herb Morus alba L., were identified for further investigation. The results suggest that this FRET assay is an excellent tool, not only for measurement of ADAMTS1 activity but also for discovery of novel ADAMTS1 inhibitors with HTS.

  12. A Cell-Based Internalization and Degradation Assay with an Activatable Fluorescence-Quencher Probe as a Tool for Functional Antibody Screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan; Liu, Peter Corbett; Shen, Yang; Snavely, Marshall D; Hiraga, Kaori

    2015-08-01

    For the development of therapeutically potent anti-cancer antibody drugs, it is often important to identify antibodies that internalize into cells efficiently, rather than just binding to antigens on the cell surface. Such antibodies can mediate receptor endocytosis, resulting in receptor downregulation on the cell surface and potentially inhibiting receptor function and tumor growth. Also, efficient antibody internalization is a prerequisite for the delivery of cytotoxic drugs into target cells and is critical for the development of antibody-drug conjugates. Here we describe a novel activatable fluorescence-quencher pair to quantify the extent of antibody internalization and degradation in the target cells. In this assay, candidate antibodies were labeled with a fluorescent dye and a quencher. Fluorescence is inhibited outside and on the surface of cells, but activated upon endocytosis and degradation of the antibody. This assay enabled the development of a process for rapid characterization of candidate antibodies potentially in a high-throughput format. By employing an activatable secondary antibody, primary antibodies in purified form or in culture supernatants can be screened for internalization and degradation. Because purification of candidate antibodies is not required, this method represents a direct functional screen to identify antibodies that internalize efficiently early in the discovery process. PMID:26024945

  13. Sensitive fluorescence assay of organophosphorus pesticides based on the fluorescence resonance energy transfer between CdTe quantum dots and porphyrin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Gao; Yue, Zhao; Bing, Zhang; Yiwei, Tang; Xiuying, Liu; Jianrong, Li

    2016-08-01

    A sensitive and selective quantum dot (QD)-based fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) biosensor was successfully fabricated for the detection of organophosphorus pesticides (OPs). 5,10,15,20-Tetra(4-pyridyl)porphyrin (TPyP) with meso-pyridyl substituents was bound to the surface of CdTe QDs to produce self-assembled nanosensors, and the process of FRET between QDs and TPyP occurred. However, the process of FRET was switched off with the addition of OPs, due to the combination between TPyP and OPs. The fluorescence intensity of TPyP (donor) would decrease gradually with the increasing concentration of OPs. Under optimal conditions, a linear correlation was established between the fluorescence intensity ratio ITPyP/IQDs and the concentration of paraoxon in the range of 9.09 × 10(-12)-1.09 × 10(-6) mol L(-1) with a detection limit of 3.15 × 10(-12) mol L(-1). The attractive sensitivity was obtained due to the efficient FRET and the superior fluorescence properties of QDs. The proposed method was successfully applied to the determination of the OPs in real fruit samples with satisfactory results. PMID:27305657

  14. Efficient stray-light suppression for resonance fluorescence in quantum dot micropillars using self-aligned metal apertures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopfmann, Caspar; Musiał, Anna; Maier, Sebastian; Emmerling, Monika; Schneider, Christian; Höfling, Sven; Kamp, Martin; Reitzenstein, Stephan

    2016-09-01

    Within this work we propose and demonstrate a technological approach to efficiently suppress excitation laser stray-light in resonance fluorescence experiments on quantum dot micropillars. To ensure efficient stray-light suppression, their fabrication process includes a planarization step and subsequent covering with a titanium mask to fabricate self-aligned apertures at the micropillar positions. These apertures aim to limit laser stray-light in the side-excitation vertical-detection configuration, while enabling detection of the optical signal through the top facet of the micropillars. The beneficial effects of these apertures are proven and quantitatively evaluated within a statistical study in which we determine and compare the stray-light suppression of 48 micropillars with and without metal apertures. Actual resonance fluorescence experiments on single quantum dots coupled to the cavity mode prove the relevance of the proposed approach and demonstrate that it will foster further studies on cavity quantum electrodynamics phenomena under coherent optical excitation.

  15. Early Detection of Trichinella spiralis in Muscle of Infected Mice by Real-Time Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer PCR

    OpenAIRE

    Tantrawatpan, Chairat; Intapan, Pewpan M.; Thanchomnang, Tongjit; Sanpool, Oranuch; Janwan, Penchom; Boonmars, Thidarut; Morakote, Nimit; Maleewong, Wanchai

    2013-01-01

    Real-time fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) PCR and melting curve analysis using newly developed fluorophore-labeled hybridization probes were applied for the detection of Trichinella spiralis DNA in muscle of mice following oral inoculation with 300 T. spiralis larvae. The developed assay could detect and differentiate T. spiralis, Trichinella papuae, and Trichinella pseudospiralis DNAs by the different melting temperatures (Tm). The assay had a detection limit of 5×102 positive ...

  16. Visualization of Polarized Membrane Type 1 Matrix Metalloproteinase Activity in Live Cells by Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer Imaging*S⃞

    OpenAIRE

    Ouyang, Mingxing; Lu, Shaoying; Li, Xiao-Yan; Xu, Jing; Seong, Jihye; Giepmans, Ben N. G.; Shyy, John Y.-J.; Weiss, Stephen J.; Wang, Yingxiao

    2008-01-01

    Membrane type 1 matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP) plays a critical role in cancer cell biology by proteolytically remodeling the extracellular matrix. Utilizing fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) imaging, we have developed a novel biosensor, with its sensing element anchoring at the extracellular surface of cell membrane, to visualize MT1-MMP activity dynamically in live cells with subcellular resolution. Epidermal growth factor (EGF) induced significant FR...

  17. Structurally Rigid 9-Amino-benzo[c]cinnoliniums Make Up a Class of Compact and Large Stokes-Shift Fluorescent Dyes for Cell-Based Imaging Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yanming; Shang, Zhihao; Yang, Yanhong; Zhu, Shaojia; Qian, Xuhong; Shi, Ping; Zheng, Jing; Yang, Youjun

    2015-06-01

    Classic fluorescent dyes, such as coumarin, naphthalimide, fluorescein, BODIPY, rhodamine, and cyanines, are cornerstones of various spectroscopic and microscopic methods, which hold a prominent position in biological studies. We recently found that 9-amino-benzo[c]cinnoliniums make up a novel group of fluorophores that can be used in biological studies. They are featured with a succinct conjugative push-pull backbone, a broad absorption band, and a large Stokes shift. They are potentially useful as a small-molecule alternative to R-phycoerythrin to pair with fluorescein in multiplexing applications. PMID:25951429

  18. Status of miniature integrated UV resonance fluorescence and Raman sensors for detection and identification of biochemical warfare agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hug, William F.; Bhartia, Rohit; Taspin, Alexandre; Lane, Arthur; Conrad, Pamela; Sijapati, Kripa; Reid, Ray D.

    2005-11-01

    Laser induced native fluorescence (LINF) is the most sensitive method of detection of biological material including microorganisms, virus', and cellular residues. LINF is also a sensitive method of detection for many non-biological materials as well. The specificity with which these materials can be classified depends on the excitation wavelength and the number and location of observation wavelengths. Higher levels of specificity can be obtained using Raman spectroscopy but a much lower levels of sensitivity. Raman spectroscopy has traditionally been employed in the IR to avoid fluorescence. Fluorescence rarely occurs at wavelength below about 270nm. Therefore, when excitation occurs at a wavelength below 250nm, no fluorescence background occurs within the Raman fingerprint region for biological materials. When excitation occurs within electronic resonance bands of the biological target materials, Raman signal enhancement over one million typically occurs. Raman sensitivity within several hundred times fluorescence are possible in the deep UV where most biological materials have strong absorption. Since the Raman and fluorescence emissions occur at different wavelength, both spectra can be observed simultaneously, thereby providing a sensor with unique sensitivity and specificity capability. We will present data on our integrated, deep ultraviolet, LINF/Raman instruments that are being developed for several applications including life detection on Mars as well as biochemical warfare agents on Earth. We will demonstrate the ability to discriminate organic materials based on LINF alone. Together with UV resonance Raman, higher levels of specificity will be demonstrated. In addition, these instruments are being developed as on-line chemical sensors for industrial and municipal waste streams and product quality applications.

  19. Establishment and validation of whole-cell based fluorescence assays to identify anti-mycobacterial compounds using the Acanthamoeba castellanii-Mycobacterium marinum host-pathogen system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sébastien Kicka

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis is considered to be one of the world's deadliest disease with 2 million deaths each year. The need for new antitubercular drugs is further exacerbated by the emergence of drug-resistance strains. Despite multiple recent efforts, the majority of the hits discovered by traditional target-based screening showed low efficiency in vivo. Therefore, there is heightened demand for whole-cell based approaches directly using host-pathogen systems. The phenotypic host-pathogen assay described here is based on the monitoring of GFP-expressing Mycobacterium marinum during infection of the amoeba Acanthamoeba castellanii. The assay showed straight-forward medium-throughput scalability, robustness and ease of manipulation, demonstrating its qualities as an efficient compound screening system. Validation with a series of known antitubercular compounds highlighted the advantages of the assay in comparison to previously published macrophage-Mycobacterium tuberculosis-based screening systems. Combination with secondary growth assays based on either GFP-expressing D. discoideum or M. marinum allowed us to further fine-tune compound characterization by distinguishing and quantifying growth inhibition, cytotoxic properties and antibiotic activities of the compounds. The simple and relatively low cost system described here is most suitable to detect anti-infective compounds, whether they present antibiotic activities or not, in which case they might exert anti-virulence or host defense boosting activities, both of which are largely overlooked by classical screening approaches.

  20. Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer in Quantum Dot-Protein Kinase Assemblies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Françisco M. Raymo

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available In search of viable strategies to identify selective inhibitors of protein kinases, we have designed a binding assay to probe the interactions of human phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase-1 (PDK1 with potential ligands. Our protocol is based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET between semiconductor quantum dots (QDs and organic dyes. Specifically, we have expressed and purified the catalytic kinase domain of PDK1 with an N-terminal histidine tag [His6-PDK1(ΔPH]. We have conjugated this construct to CdSe-ZnS core-shell QDs coated with dihydrolipoic acid (DHLA and tested the response of the resulting assembly to a molecular dyad incorporating an ATP ligand and a BODIPY chromophore. The supramolecular association of the BODIPY-ATP dyad with the His6-PDK1(ΔPH-QD assembly encourages the transfer of energy from the QDs to the BODIPY dyes upon excitation. The addition of ATP results in the displacement of BODIPY-ATP from the binding domain of the His6-PDK1(ΔPH conjugated to the nanoparticles. The competitive binding, however, does not prevent the energy transfer process. A control experiment with QDs, lacking the His6-PDK1(ΔPH, indicates that the BODIPY-ATP dyad adsorbs nonspecifically on the surface of the nanoparticles, promoting the transfer of energy from the CdSe core to the adsorbed BODIPY dyes. Thus, the implementation of FRET-based assays to probe the binding domain of PDK1 with luminescent QDs requires the identification of energy acceptors unable to interact nonspecifically with the surface of the nanoparticles.

  1. Ultrafast fluorescence resonance energy transfer in a bile salt aggregate: Excitation wavelength dependence

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ujjwal Mandal; Subhadip Ghosh; Dibyendu Kumar Das; Aniruddha Adhikari; Shantanu Dey; Kankan Bhattacharyya

    2008-01-01

    Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) from Coumarin 153 (C153) to Rhodamine 6G (R6G) in a secondary aggregate of a bile salt (sodium deoxycholate, NaDC) is studied by femtosecond up-conversion. The emission spectrum of C153 in NaDC is analysed in terms of two spectra-one with emission maximum at 480 nm which corresponds to a non-polar and hydrophobic site and another with maximum at ∼ 530 nm which arises from a polar hydrophilic site. The time constants of FRET were obtained from the rise time of the emission of the acceptor (R6G). In the NaDC aggregate, FRET occurs in multiple time scales -4 ps and 3700 ps. The 4 ps component is assigned to FRET from a donor (D) to an acceptor (A) held at a close distance (DA ∼ 17 Å) inside the bile salt aggregate. The 3700 ps component corresponds to a donor-acceptor distance ∼ 48 Å. The long (3700 ps) component may involve diffusion of the donor. With increase in the excitation wavelength (ex) from 375 to 435 nm, the relative contribution of the ultrafast component of FRET (∼ 4 ps) increases from 3 to 40% with a concomitant decrease in the contribution of the ultraslow component (∼3700 ps) from 97 to 60%. The ex dependence is attributed to the presence of donors at different locations. At a long ex (435 nm) donors in the highly polar peripheral region are excited. A short ex (375 nm) `selects’ donor at a hydrophobic location.

  2. Label-free distinguishing between neurons and glial cells based on two-photon excited fluorescence signal of neuron perinuclear granules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Huiping; Jiang, Liwei; Wang, Xingfu; Liu, Gaoqiang; Wang, Shu; Zheng, Liqin; Li, Lianhuang; Zhuo, Shuangmu; Zhu, Xiaoqin; Chen, Jianxin

    2016-08-01

    Neurons and glial cells are two critical cell types of brain tissue. Their accurate identification is important for the diagnosis of psychiatric disorders such as depression and schizophrenia. In this paper, distinguishing between neurons and glial cells by using the two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) signals of intracellular intrinsic sources was performed. TPEF microscopy combined with TUJ-1 and GFAP immunostaining and quantitative image analysis demonstrated that the perinuclear granules of neurons in the TPEF images of brain tissue and the primary cultured cortical cells were a unique characteristic of neurons compared to glial cells which can become a quantitative feature to distinguish neurons from glial cells. With the development of miniaturized TPEF microscope (‘two-photon fiberscopes’) imaging devices, TPEF microscopy can be developed into an effective diagnostic and monitoring tool for psychiatric disorders such as depression and schizophrenia.

  3. Study on molecular interactions between proteins on live cell membranes using quantum dot-based fluorescence resonance energy transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tian-Cai; Zhang, Hai-Li; Wang, Jian-Hao; Wang, Hai-Qiao; Zhang, Zhi-Hong; Hua, Xiao-Feng; Cao, Yuan-Cheng; Luo, Qing-Ming; Zhao, Yuan-Di

    2008-08-01

    Mouse anti-human CD71 monoclonal antibody (anti-CD71) was conjugated with red quantum dots (QDs; 5.3 nm, emission wavelength lambda(em) = 614 nm) and used to label HeLa cells successfully. Then green QD-labeled goat anti-mouse immunoglobulin G (IgG; the size of the green QDs was 2.2 nm; lambda(em) = 544 nm) was added to bind the red-QD-conjugated anti-CD71 on the cell surface by immunoreactions. Such interaction between anti-CD71 and IgG lasted 4 min and was observed from the fluorescence spectra: the fluorescence intensity of the "red" peak at 614 nm increased by 32%; meanwhile that of the "green" one at 544 nm decreased by 55%. The ratio of the fluorescence intensities (I(544 nm)/I(614 nm)) decreased from 0.5 to 0.2. The fluorescence spectra as well as cell imaging showed that fluorescence resonance energy transfer took place between these two kinds of QDs on the HeLa cells through interactions between the primary antibody and the secondary antibody. PMID:18537029

  4. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) for DNA biosensors: FRET pairs and Foerster distances for various dye-DNA conjugates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) between the extrinsic dye labels Cyanine 3 (Cy3), Cyanine 5 (Cy5), Carboxytetramethyl Rhodamine (TAMRA), Iowa Black Fluorescence Quencher (IabFQ), and Iowa Black RQ (IabRQ) has been studied. The Foerster distances for these FRET-pairs in single- and double-stranded DNA conjugates have been determined. In particular, it should be noted that the quantum yield of the donors Cy3 and TAMRA varies between single- and double-stranded DNA. While this alters the Foerster distance for a donor-acceptor pair, this also allows for detection of thermal denaturation events with a single non-intercalating fluorophore. The utility of FRET in the development of nucleic acid biosensor technology is illustrated by using TAMRA and IabRQ as a FRET pair in selectivity experiments. The differential quenching of TAMRA fluorescence by IabRQ in solution has been used to discriminate between 0 and 3 base pair mismatches at 60 deg. C for a 19 base sequence. At room temperature, the quenching of TAMRA fluorescence was not an effective indicator of the degree of base pair mismatch. There appears to be a threshold of duplex stability at room temperature which occurs beyond two base pair mismatches and reverses the observed trend in TAMRA fluorescence prior to that degree of mismatch. When this experimental system is transferred to a glass surface through covalent coupling and organosilane chemistry, the observed trend in TAMRA fluorescence at room temperature is similar to that obtained in bulk solution, but without a threshold of duplex stability. In addition to quenching of fluorescence by FRET, it is believed that several other quenching mechanisms are occurring at the surface

  5. Detection of influenza A virus based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer from quantum dots to carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tian Junping [Key Laboratory of Industrial Ecology and Environmental Engineering (Ministry of Education, China), School of Environmental Science and Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Zhao Huimin, E-mail: zhaohuim@dlut.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Industrial Ecology and Environmental Engineering (Ministry of Education, China), School of Environmental Science and Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Liu Meng; Chen Yaqiong; Quan Xie [Key Laboratory of Industrial Ecology and Environmental Engineering (Ministry of Education, China), School of Environmental Science and Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China)

    2012-04-20

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The quantum dots-ssDNA probe was designed for the determination of virus DNA. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The fluorescence of quantum dots was effectively quenched by carbon nanotubes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The addition of target H5N1 DNA restored the quenched fluorescence of quantum dots. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The proposed method exhibited high sensitivity and good selectivity for H5N1 DNA. - Abstract: In this paper, a simple and sensitive approach for H5N1 DNA detection was described based on the fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) from quantum dots (QDs) to carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in a QDs-ssDNA/oxCNTs system, in which the QDs (CdTe) modified with ssDNA were used as donors. In the initial stage, with the strong interaction between ssDNA and oxCNTs, QDs fluorescence was effectively quenched. Upon the recognition of the target, the effective competitive bindings of it to QDs-ssDNA occurred, which decreased the interactions between the QDs-ssDNA and oxCNTs, leading to the recovery of the QDs fluorescence. The recovered fluorescence of QDs was linearly proportional to the concentration of the target in the range of 0.01-20 {mu}M with a detection limit of 9.39 nM. Moreover, even a single-base mismatched target with the same concentration of target DNA can only recover a limited low fluorescence of QDs, illustrating the good anti-interference performance of this QDs-ssDNA/oxCNTs system. This FRET platform in the QDs-ssDNA/oxCNTs system was facilitated to the simple, sensitive and quantitative detection of virus nucleic acids and could have a wide range of applications in molecular diagnosis.

  6. Study on the interaction between fluoroquinolones and erythrosine by absorption, fluorescence and resonance Rayleigh scattering spectra and their application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jian; Liu, Zhongfang; Liu, Jiangtao; Liu, Shaopu; Shen, Wei

    2008-03-01

    In pH 4.4-4.5 Britton-Robinson (BR) buffer solution, fluoroquinolone antibiotics (FLQs) including ciprofloxacin (CIP), norfloxacin (NOR), levofloxacin (LEV) and lomefloxacin (LOM) could react with erythrosine (Ery) to form 1:1 ion-association complexes, which not only resulted in the changes of the absorption spectra and the quenching of fluorescence, but also resulted in the great enhancement of resonance Rayleigh scattering (RRS). These offered some indications of the determination of fluoroquinolone antibiotics by spectrophotometric, fluorescence and resonance Rayleigh scattering methods. The detection limits for fluoroquinolone antibiotics were in the range of 0.097-0.265 μg/mL for absorption methods, 0.022-0.100 μg/mL for fluorophotometry and 0.014-0.027 μg/mL for RRS method, respectively. Among them, the RRS method had the highest sensitivity. In this work, the spectral characteristics of the absorption, fluorescence and RRS, the optimum conditions of the reactions and the properties of the analytical chemistry were investigated. The methods have been successfully applied to determination of some fluoroquinolone antibiotics in human urine samples and tablets. Taking CIP-Ery system as an example, the charge distribution, the enthalpy of formation and the mean polarizability were calculated by density function theory (DFT) method. In addition, the reasons for the enhancement of scattering spectra were discussed.

  7. The inhibition of fluorescence resonance energy transfer between multicolor quantum dots for rapid and sensitive detection of Staphylococcus aureus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Beibei; Wang, Qi; Ma, Meihu; Cai, Zhaoxia

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we constructed the fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) system between two multi-color quantum dots (QDs) of two sizes for rapid and sensitive detection of Staphylococcus aureus. In this system, green-emitting QDs conjugated with rabbit anti-S. aureus antibodies were used as energy donors while orange-emitting QDs conjugated with goat-anti-rabbit IgG were used as energy acceptors to form FRET system. Pre-binding of Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) on the donor occupied the binding sites and thus blocked resonance energy transfer between two colors QDs, leading to the quenching fluorescence of the acceptor. The fluorescence of acceptor has a linear calibration graph with the concentrations of S. aureus from 52 to 2.6 × 105 CFU mL-1. The low detection limit was 10 CFU/mL. It was worth mentioning that the detection method of S. aureus had been applied to the analysis of apple juice and milk samples, which could potentially be developed into a sensor in the further study.

  8. Special characteristics of fluorescence and resonance Rayleigh scattering for cadmium telluride nanocrystal aqueous solution and its interactions with aminoglycoside antibiotics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI TaiShan; LIU ShaoPu; LIU ZhongFang; HU XiaoLi; ZHANG LiPing

    2009-01-01

    CdTe nanocrystals (CdTe NCs) were achieved by reaction of CdCl2 with KHTe solution and were capped with sodium mercaptoacetate. The product was detected by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), fluorescence spectra, ultraviolet-visible spectra and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The CdTe NCs are of cubic structure and the average size is about 5 nm. The fluorescence quantum yield of CdTe NCs aqueous solution increased from 37% to 97% after 20 d under room light. The maximum λem of fluorescence changed from 543 nm to 510 nm and the blue shift was 33 nm. CdTe NCs aqueous solution can be steady for at least 10 months at 4℃ in a refrigerator. The resonance Rayleigh scattering (RRS) of CdTe NCs in the aqueous solution was investigated. The maximum scattering peak was located at about 554 nm. The interactions of CdTe NCs with amikacin sulfate (AS) and micronomicin sulfate (MS) were in-vestigated respectively. The effects of AS and MS on fluorescence and RRS of CdTe NCs were analyzed. It was found that AS and MS quenched the photoluminescence of CdTe NCs and enhanced RRS of CdTe NCs. Under optimum conditions, there are linear relationships between quenching intensity (F0-F), intensity of RRS (1-10) and concentration of AS and MS. The detection limits (3σ) of AS and MS are re-spectively 3.4 ng.mL-1 and 2.6 ng.mL-1 by the fluorescence quenching method, and 15.2 ng.mL-1 and 14.0 ng.mL-1 by the RRS method. The methods have high sensitivity, thus CdTe NCs may be used as fluorescence probes and RRS probes for the detection of aminoglycoside antibiotics.

  9. Monitoring triplex DNA formation with fluorescence resonance energy transfer between a fluorophore-labeled probe and intercalating dyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiou, Chiuan-Chian; Chen, Shiau-Wen; Luo, Ji-Dung; Chien, Yu-Tzu

    2011-09-01

    Triplex-forming oligonucleotides (TFOs) are sequence-dependent DNA binders that may be useful for DNA targeting and detection. A sensitive and convenient method to monitor triplex formation by a TFO and its target DNA duplex is required for the application of TFO probes. Here we describe a novel design by which triplex formation can be monitored homogeneously without prelabeling the target duplex. The design uses a TFO probe tagged with a fluorophore that undergoes fluorescence resonance energy transfer with fluorescent dyes that intercalate into the target duplex. Through color compensation analysis, the specific emission of the TFO probe reveals the status of the triple helices. We used this method to show that triple helix formation with TFOs is magnesium dependent. We also demonstrated that the TFO probe can be used for detection of sequence variation in melting analysis and for DNA quantitation in real-time polymerase chain reaction. PMID:21609711

  10. DNAzyme-based biosensor for Cu(2+) ion by combining hybridization chain reaction with fluorescence resonance energy transfer technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ying; Chen, Ling; Ou, Yidian; Wang, Zhenhua; Fu, Fengfu; Guo, Liangqia

    2016-08-01

    A novel signal amplification strategy based on Cu(2+)-dependent DNAzyme was developed for sensing Cu(2+) ion by combining hybridization chain reaction (HCR) with fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) technique. In the presence of Cu(2+) ion, the substrate strands of Cu(2+)-dependent DNAzyme immobilized on magnetic beads were specifically cleaved and released. The released strands initiated the HCR process of hairpin H1 and H2 labeled with FAM as the donor and TAMRA as the acceptor, respectively. Long nicked dsDNA structures were self-assembled to bring the donor and the acceptor in close proximity, resulting in a FRET process. The relative ratio of fluorescent intensities of the acceptor and donor was used to quantitatively detect Cu(2+) ion with a limit of detection of 0.5nmolL(-1). This proposed biosensor was applied to detect Cu(2+) ion in tap water with satisfactory results. PMID:27216680

  11. Photospheric Fluorescence and Resonance Scattering: Non Classical Diagnostics and the Future of X-ray Stellar Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, Jeremy

    1998-01-01

    High resolution AXAF and XMM observations of stellar coronae will yield a wealth of X-ray plasma line diagnostics that will provide a giant leap forward in our understanding of coronal densities, abundance anomalies and emission measure distributions. Unfortunately, there is one very basic unanswered question in the physics of active stellar coronae that the usual plasma diagnostics cannot address directly: What are the spatial characteristics of stellar coronae-the scale height and filling factor? What do other stellar coronae actually look like? I will discuss two novel diagnostics of coronal geometry and their application to future X-ray spectra: photospheric fluorescence and resonance line optical depths.

  12. Direct visualization of triplex DNA molecular dynamics by fluorescence resonance energy transfer and atomic force microscopy measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chia-Ching; Lin, Po-Yen; Chen, Yen-Fu; Chang, Chia-Seng; Kan, Lou-Sing

    2007-11-01

    We have detected the dynamics of 17-mer DNA triplex dissociation mechanism at the molecular level. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) was used as an indicator of intermolecular interaction in nanometer range, whereas atomic force microscopy (AFM) was employed to address single molecule with sub-angstrom precision. The maximum rupture force of DNA triplex was found at pH 4.65, consistent with macroscopic observations. These results indicated that the FRET together with an AFM detection system could be used to reveal the DNA triplex interaction in nanometer scale unambiguously.

  13. Characterization and inhibition of norovirus proteases of genogroups I and II using a fluorescence resonance energy transfer assay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Kyeong-Ok [Department of Diagnostic Medicine and Pathobiology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Kansas State University, KS 66506 (United States); Takahashi, Daisuke; Prakash, Om [Department of Biochemistry, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 66506 (United States); Kim, Yunjeong, E-mail: ykim@vet.ksu.edu [Department of Diagnostic Medicine and Pathobiology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Kansas State University, KS 66506 (United States)

    2012-02-20

    Noroviruses are the major cause of food- or water-borne gastroenteritis outbreaks in humans. The norovirus protease that cleaves a large viral polyprotein to nonstructural proteins is essential for virus replication and an attractive target for antiviral drug development. Noroviruses show high genetic diversity with at least five genogroups, GI-GV, of which GI and GII are responsible for the majority of norovirus infections in humans. We cloned and expressed proteases of Norwalk virus (GI) and MD145 virus (GII) and characterized the enzymatic activities with fluorescence resonance energy transfer substrates. We demonstrated that the GI and GII proteases cleaved the substrates derived from the naturally occurring cleavage site in the open reading frame (ORF) 1 of G1 norovirus with similar efficiency, and that enzymatic activity of both proteases was inhibited by commercial protease inhibitors including chymostatin. The interaction of chymostatin to Norwalk virus protease was validated by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy.

  14. Characterization and inhibition of norovirus proteases of genogroups I and II using a fluorescence resonance energy transfer assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noroviruses are the major cause of food- or water-borne gastroenteritis outbreaks in humans. The norovirus protease that cleaves a large viral polyprotein to nonstructural proteins is essential for virus replication and an attractive target for antiviral drug development. Noroviruses show high genetic diversity with at least five genogroups, GI–GV, of which GI and GII are responsible for the majority of norovirus infections in humans. We cloned and expressed proteases of Norwalk virus (GI) and MD145 virus (GII) and characterized the enzymatic activities with fluorescence resonance energy transfer substrates. We demonstrated that the GI and GII proteases cleaved the substrates derived from the naturally occurring cleavage site in the open reading frame (ORF) 1 of G1 norovirus with similar efficiency, and that enzymatic activity of both proteases was inhibited by commercial protease inhibitors including chymostatin. The interaction of chymostatin to Norwalk virus protease was validated by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy.

  15. Measuring ligand-dependent and ligand-independent interactions between nuclear receptors and associated proteins using Bioluminescence Resonance Energy Transfer (BRET2)

    OpenAIRE

    Koterba, Kristen L.; Rowan, Brian G.

    2006-01-01

    Bioluminescent resonance energy transfer (BRET2) is a recently developed technology for the measurement of protein-protein interactions in a live, cell-based system. BRET2 is characterized by the efficient transfer of excited energy between a bioluminescent donor molecule (Renilla luciferase) and a fluorescent acceptor molecule (a mutant of Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP2)). The BRET2 assay offers advantages over fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) because it does not require an ext...

  16. Homogeneous detection of concanavalin A using pyrene-conjugated maltose assembled graphene based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qiushui; Wei, Weili; Lin, Jin-Ming

    2011-07-15

    In this work, we proposed a novel biosensor to homogeneously detect concanavalin A (ConA) using pyrene-conjugated maltose assembled graphene based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). Maltose-grafted-aminopyrene (Mal-Apy) was synthesized and characterized by mass spectra, UV-vis and fluorescence spectra. The Mal-Apy was further employed for fluorescence switch and ConA recognition. When Mal-Apy was self-assembled on the surface of graphene by means of π-stacking interaction, its fluorescence was adequately quenched because the graphene acted as a "nanoquencher" of the pyrene rings due to FRET. As a result, in the presence of ConA, competitive binding of ConA with glucose destroyed the π-stacking interaction between the pyrene and graphene, thereby causing the fluorescence recovery. This method was demonstrated the selective sensing of ConA, and the linear range is 2.0 × 10⁻² to 1.0 μM with the linear equation y=1.029x + 0.284 (R = 0.996). The limit of detection for ConA was low to 0.8 nM, and the detection of ConA could be performed in 5 min, indicating that this method could be used for fast, sensitive, and selective sensing of ConA. Such data suggests that the graphene FRET platform is a great potential application for protein-carbohydrate studies, and would be widely applied in drug screening, bimolecular recognition and disease diagnosis. PMID:21621405

  17. Full genotyping of a highly polymorphic human gene trait by time-resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edoardo Totè

    Full Text Available The ability of detecting the subtle variations occurring, among different individuals, within specific DNA sequences encompassed in highly polymorphic genes discloses new applications in genomics and diagnostics. DQB1 is a gene of the HLA-II DQ locus of the Human Leukocyte Antigens (HLA system. The polymorphisms of the trait of the DQB1 gene including codons 52-57 modulate the susceptibility to a number of severe pathologies. Moreover, the donor-receiver tissue compatibility in bone marrow transplantations is routinely assessed through crossed genotyping of DQB and DQA. For the above reasons, the development of rapid, reliable and cost-effective typing technologies of DQB1 in general, and more specifically of the codons 52-57, is a relevant although challenging task. Quantitative assessment of the fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET efficiency between chromophores labelling the opposite ends of gene-specific oligonucleotide probes has proven to be a powerful tool to type DNA polymorphisms with single-nucleotide resolution. The FRET efficiency can be most conveniently quantified by applying a time-resolved fluorescence analysis methodology, i.e. time-correlated single-photon counting, which allows working on very diluted template specimens and in the presence of fluorescent contaminants. Here we present a full in-vitro characterization of the fluorescence responses of two probes when hybridized to oligonucleotide mixtures mimicking all the possible genotypes of the codons 52-57 trait of DQB1 (8 homozygous and 28 heterozygous. We show that each genotype can be effectively tagged by the combination of the fluorescence decay constants extrapolated from the data obtained with such probes.

  18. The fluorescence and resonance Rayleigh scattering spectral study and analytical application of cerium (IV) and cefoperazone system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Yusheng; Fu, Shenghui; Xu, Qianying; Yang, Jidong; Hu, Xiaoli; Liu, Shaopu

    2016-06-01

    In weak acidic medium of pH3.5-5.6, Ce(IV) can be reduced by cefoperazone (CPZ) to be Ce(III), which further combined with CPZ to form complex Ce(OH)3CPZ. This complex not only has higher fluorescence than Ce(III), but also results in significant increase of resonance Rayleigh scattering (RRS), second order scattering (SOS) and frequency doubling scattering (FDS). The wavelengths of maximum fluorescence exciting and emission are located at 356nm/349nm, while the maximum wavelengths of RRS, SOS and FDS are at 312nm, 550nm and 390nm, respectively. The intensity of fluorescence and scattering are all linear with the concentration of CPZ in certain conditions. The detection limit of most sensitive RRS method for CPZ is 2.1ngmL(-1). The optimum conditions for detecting CPZ using RRS method are investigated. The effect of co-existing substances shows that the method has excellent selectivity, especially since other cephalosporins don't have similar reactions. Therefore, it can be achieved to determine CPZ in cephalosporins selectively. The paper also focuses on the reaction mechanism, the consistent and contracture of the resultant. The reasons for enhanced intensity are presumed in the meantime. PMID:26994317

  19. In vivo dynamics of enterovirus protease revealed by fluorescence resonance emission transfer (FRET) based on a novel FRET pair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An in vivo protease assay suitable for analysis by fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) was developed on the basis of a novel FRET pair. The specifically designed fusion substrate consists of green fluorescent protein 2 (GFP2)-peptide-red fluorescent protein 2 (DsRed2), with a cleavage motif for the enterovirus 2A protease (2Apro) embedded within the peptide region. FRET can be readily visualized in real-time from cells expressing the fusion substrate until a proteolytic cleavage by 2Apro from the input virus. The level of FRET decay is a function of the amount and infection duration of the inoculated virus as measured by a fluorometer assay. The FRET biosensor also responded well to other related enteroviruses but not to a phylogenetically distant virus. Western blot analysis confirmed the physical cleavage of the fusion substrate upon the infections. The study provides proof of principle for applying the FRET technology to diagnostics, screening procedures, and cell biological research

  20. Boronate Affinity Fluorescent Nanoparticles for Förster Resonance Energy Transfer Inhibition Assay of cis-Diol Biomolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shuangshou; Ye, Jin; Li, Xinglin; Liu, Zhen

    2016-05-17

    Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) has been essential for many applications, in which an appropriate donor-acceptor pair is the key. Traditional dye-to-dye combinations remain the working horses but are rather nonspecifically susceptive to environmental factors (such as ionic strength, pH, oxygen, etc.). Besides, to obtain desired selectivity, functionalization of the donor or acceptor is essential but usually tedious. Herein, we present fluorescent poly(m-aminophenylboronic acid) nanoparticles (poly(mAPBA) NPs) synthesized via a simple procedure and demonstrate a FRET scheme with suppressed environmental effects for the selective sensing of cis-diol biomolecules. The NPs exhibited stable fluorescence properties, resistance to environmental factors, and a Förster distance comparable size, making them ideal donor for FRET applications. By using poly(mAPBA) NPs and adenosine 5'-monophosphate modified graphene oxide (AMP-GO) as a donor and an acceptor, respectively, an environmental effects-suppressed boronate affinity-mediated FRET system was established. The fluorescence of poly(mAPBA) NPs was quenched by AMP-GO while it was restored when a competing cis-diol compounds was present. The FRET system exhibited excellent selectivity and improved sensitivity toward cis-diol compounds. Quantitative inhibition assay of glucose in human serum was demonstrated. As many cis-diol compounds such as sugars and glycoproteins are biologically and clinically significant, the FRET scheme presented herein could find more promising applications. PMID:27089186

  1. Collective resonance fluorescence in small and dense atom clouds: Comparison between theory and experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Jenkins, S D; Javanainen, J; Jennewein, S; Bourgain, R; Pellegrino, J; Sortais, Y R P; Browaeys, A

    2016-01-01

    We study the emergence of a collective optical response of a cold and dense $^{87}$Rb atomic cloud to a near-resonant low-intensity light when the atom number is gradually increased. Experimental observations are compared with microscopic stochastic simulations of recurrent scattering processes between the atoms that incorporate the atomic multilevel structure and the optical measurement setup. We analyze the optical response of an inhomogeneously-broadened gas and find that the experimental observations of the resonance line shifts and the total collected scattered light intensity in cold atom clouds substantially deviate from those of thermal atomic ensembles, indicating strong light-induced resonant dipole-dipole interactions between the atoms. At high densities, the simulations also predict a significantly slower decay of light-induced excitations in cold than in thermal atom clouds. The role of dipole-dipole interactions is discussed in terms of resonant coupling examples and the collective radiative exc...

  2. A new biosensor for glucose determination in serum based on up-converting fluorescence resonance energy transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Jianhong; Wang, Yuhui; Wang, Jialan; Zhou, Xin; Liu, Zhihong

    2011-10-15

    In this work, a new glucose sensor based on up-converting fluorescence resonance energy transfer (UC-FRET) was developed. Up-converting phosphors (UCPs, NaYF(4): Yb, Er), which were covalently labeled with Concanavalin A (ConA), were used as the energy donor with thiolated β-cyclodextrins (SH-β-CDs) functionalized gold nanoparticles as the energy acceptor. Due to the combination between ConA and SH-β-CDs, the energy donor and the acceptor were brought to close proximity, resulting in the quenching of the fluorescence of UCPs by gold nanoparticles. In the presence of glucose which competed with SH-β-CDs towards the binding sites of ConA, the biosensor (UCPs-ConA-SH-β-CDs-Au) was decomposed and the energy donor was separated from the acceptor. Therefore, the fluorescence of UCPs was restored dependent on the concentration of glucose. The increase of UCPs fluorescence intensity was proportional to glucose concentration within the range from 0.4 μM to 10μM in aqueous buffer, with a limit of detection (LOD) of 0.043 μM. A same linear range of glucose concentration was obtained in a human serum matrix (which was pretreated and thus contained no glucose) with a slightly higher LOD (0.065 μM). The glucose sensor was applied to real human serum samples with the results consistent with that of a classic hexokinase (HK) method, indicating that the UC-FRET biosensor was competent for directly sensing glucose in serum samples without optical interference, which benefited from the near infrared (NIR) excitation nature of UCPs. The results of this work suggested that the UC-FRET technique could be a promising alternative for detecting biomolecules in complex biological sample matrixes for diagnostic purposes. PMID:21852101

  3. Magnetic resonance-coupled fluorescence tomography scanner for molecular imaging of tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Scott C.; Pogue, Brian W.; Springett, Roger; Leussler, Christoph; Mazurkewitz, Peter; Tuttle, Stephen B.; Gibbs-Strauss, Summer L.; Jiang, Shudong S.; Dehghani, Hamid; Paulsen, Keith D.

    2008-06-01

    A multichannel spectrally resolved optical tomography system to image molecular targets in small animals from within a clinical MRI is described. Long source/detector fibers operate in contact mode and couple light from the tissue surface in the magnet bore to 16 spectrometers, each containing two optical gratings optimized for the near infrared wavelength range. High sensitivity, cooled charge coupled devices connected to each spectrograph provide detection of the spectrally resolved signal, with exposure times that are automated for acquisition at each fiber. The design allows spectral fitting of the remission light, thereby separating the fluorescence signal from the nonspecific background, which improves the accuracy and sensitivity when imaging low fluorophore concentrations. Images of fluorescence yield are recovered using a nonlinear reconstruction approach based on the diffusion approximation of photon propagation in tissue. The tissue morphology derived from the MR images serves as an imaging template to guide the optical reconstruction algorithm. Sensitivity studies show that recovered values of indocyanine green fluorescence yield are linear to concentrations of 1nM in a 70mm diameter homogeneous phantom, and detection is feasible to near 10pM. Phantom data also demonstrate imaging capabilities of imperfect fluorophore uptake in tissue volumes of clinically relevant sizes. A unique rodent MR coil provides optical fiber access for simultaneous optical and MR data acquisition of small animals. A pilot murine study using an orthotopic glioma tumor model demonstrates optical-MRI imaging of an epidermal growth factor receptor targeted fluorescent probe in vivo.

  4. Special characteristics of fluorescence and resonance Rayleigh scattering for cadmium telluride nanocrystal aqueous solution and its interactions with aminoglycoside antibiotics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    CdTe nanocrystals(CdTe NCs) were achieved by reaction of CdCl2 with KHTe solution and were capped with sodium mercaptoacetate.The product was detected by transmission electron microscopy(TEM),high-resolution transmission electron microscopy(HRTEM),energy dispersive spectroscopy(EDS),fluorescence spectra,ultraviolet-visible spectra and X-ray diffraction(XRD).The CdTe NCs are of cubic structure and the average size is about 5 nm.The fluorescence quantum yield of CdTe NCs aqueous solution increased from 37% to 97% after 20 d under room light.The maximum λem of fluorescence changed from 543 nm to 510 nm and the blue shift was 33 nm.CdTe NCs aqueous solution can be steady for at least 10 months at 4℃ in a refrigerator.The resonance Rayleigh scattering(RRS) of CdTe NCs in the aqueous solution was investigated.The maximum scattering peak was located at about 554 nm.The interactions of CdTe NCs with amikacin sulfate(AS) and micronomicin sulfate(MS) were investigated respectively.The effects of AS and MS on fluorescence and RRS of CdTe NCs were analyzed.It was found that AS and MS quenched the photoluminescence of CdTe NCs and enhanced RRS of CdTe NCs.Under optimum conditions,there are linear relationships between quenching intensity(F0-F),intensity of RRS(I-I0) and concentration of AS and MS.The detection limits(3б) of AS and MS are respectively 3.4 ng·mL-1 and 2.6 ng·mL-1 by the fluorescence quenching method,and 15.2 ng·mL-1 and 14.0 ng·mL-1 by the RRS method.The methods have high sensitivity,thus CdTe NCs may be used as fluorescence probes and RRS probes for the detection of aminoglycoside antibiotics.

  5. Excitonic Heterodimer Formation in an HIV-1 Oligonucleotide Labeled with a Donor-Acceptor Pair Used for Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer

    OpenAIRE

    Bernacchi, Serena; Piémont, Etienne; Potier, Noelle; Van Dorsselaer, Alain; Mély, Yves

    2003-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the absorbance and fluorescence properties of cTAR, the complementary DNA sequence of the transactivation response element of the HIV-1 genome, doubly end-labeled by different dyes, 5(and 6)-carboxyfluorescein (Fl) and 5(and 6)-carboxytetramethylrhodamine (TMR), frequently used in fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) studies. This oligonucleotide forms a stable stem-loop structure. The absorption spectrum of this species clearly differed from that of a ...

  6. Facile preparation of Gd3+ doped carbon quantum dots: Photoluminescence materials with magnetic resonance response as magnetic resonance/fluorescence bimodal probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, X. Y.; Yuan, X. X.; Wang, Y. P.; Liu, C. L.; Qin, Y.; Guo, L. P.; Liu, L. H.

    2016-07-01

    There are a few bimodal molecular imaging probes constructed by gadolinium (3+) ions in combination with carbon quantum dots (CQDs), and the reported ones show such obvious drawbacks as low luminous efficiency and weak MRI contrast. In the paper, a kind of CQDs photoluminescence materials with magnetic resonance response was prepared by hydrothermal method and employing gadopentetate monomeglumine (GdPM) as a precusor. Here, the GdPM plays a role of not only carbon source, but also gadolinium (3+) sources. When the GdPM aqueous solution with a concentration of 4 mg mL-1 was pyrolyzed under 220 °C and 2.0 MPa for 8 h, an optimal CQDs was obtained which are doped with gadolinium (3+) ions in both chelates and Gd2O3 (named as Gd3+-CQDs). The average diameter of the Gd3+-CQDs is about 1.6 nm, which show a high photoluminescence quantum yield of 7.1%, as well as high longitudinal relaxivity (r1) of 9.87 mM-1 s-1. And owing to the unconspicuous cell toxicity, the Gd3+-CQDs show big possibility for clinical application in magnetic resonance/fluorescence bimodal molecular imaging.

  7. Handheld Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET)-Aptamer Sensor for Bone Markers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruno, John G.

    2015-01-01

    Astronauts lose significant bone mass during lengthy space flights. NASA wishes to monitor this bone loss in order to develop nutritional and exercise countermeasures. Operational Technologies Corporation (OpTech) has developed a handheld device that quantifies bone loss in a spacecraft environment. The innovation works by adding fluorescent dyes and quenchers to aptamers to enable pushbutton, one-step bind-and-detect FRET assays that can be freeze-dried, rehydrated with body fluids, and used to quantify bone loss.

  8. Luminescence resonance energy transfer from an upconverting nanoparticle to a fluorescent phycobiliprotein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vetrone, Fiorenzo; Naccache, Rafik; Morgan, Christopher G.; Capobianco, John A.

    2010-07-01

    Water dispersible upconverting polyethylenimine (PEI)-capped NaYF4 nanoparticles co-doped with trivalent erbium (Er3+) and ytterbium (Yb3+) were prepared via solvothermal synthesis with an 18 nm average particle diameter. These upconverting nanoparticles can be used to sensitize a light-harvesting phycobiliprotein (R-Phycoerythrin) via luminescence resonance energy transfer (LRET).

  9. Time-resolved spectroscopy and fluorescence resonance energy transfer in the study of excimer laser damage of chromatin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radu, L.; Mihailescu, I.; Radu, S.; Gazdaru, D.

    2007-09-01

    The analysis of chromatin damage produced by a 248 nm excimer laser radiation, for doses of 0.3-3 MJ/m 2 was carried out by time-resolved spectroscopy and fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). The chromatin was extracted from a normal and a tumoral tissue of Wistar rats. The decrease with laser dose of the relative contribution of the excited state lifetimes of ethidium bromide (EtBr) bounded to chromatin constitutes an evidence of the reduction of chromatin deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) double-strand structure. FRET was performed from dansyl chloride to acridine orange, both coupled to chromatin. The increase of the average distance between these ligands, under the action of laser radiation, reflects a loosening of the chromatin structure. The radiosensitivity of tumor tissue chromatin is higher than that of a normal tissue. The determination of the chromatin structure modification in an excimer laser field can be of interest in laser therapy.

  10. Final Report for Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence Measurements of 239Pu above 2.5 MeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, M S; McNabb, D P

    2009-01-07

    Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence measurements were performed at the free electron laser facility at UC Santa Barbara using a bremsstrahlung beam. Three endpoint energies were chosen for the bremsstrahlung to cover as much area above 2.5 MeV as possible. We were able to set an upper limit of NRF state strengths between 2.5 and 3.8 MeV at roughly 38(5) eV barns at the 4-sigma level and 9(2) eV barns at the 1-sigma level. Published results on states near 2.4 MeV indicate strengths about 10(2) eV barns. Details of the results are presented in this report.

  11. Monochromatic X-ray propagation in multi-Z media for imaging and diagnostics including Kα Resonance Fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westphal, Maximillian; Lim, Sara; Nahar, Sultana; Pradhan, Anil

    2016-05-01

    Aimed at monochromatic X-ray imaging and therapy, broadband, monochromatic, and quasi-monochromatic X-ray sources and propagation through low and high-Z (HZ) media were studied with numerically and experimentally. Monte Carlo simulations were performed using the software package Geant4, and a new code Photx, to simulate X-ray image contrast, depth of penetration, and total attenuation. The data show that monochromatic and quasi-monochromatic X-rays achieve improved contrast at lower absorbed radiation doses compared to conventional broadband 120 kV or CT scans. Experimental quasi-monochromatic high-intensity laser-produced plasma sources and monochromatic synchrotron beam data are compared. Physical processes responsible for X-ray photoexcitation and absorption are numerically modelled, including a novel mechanism for accelerating Kα resonance fluorescence via twin monochromatic X-ray beam. Potential applications are medical diagnostics and high-Z material detection. Acknowledgement: Ohio Supercomputer Center, Columbus, OH.

  12. Analysis of nuclear resonance fluorescence excitation measured with LaBr3(Ce) detectors near 2 MeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The performance of LaBr3(Ce) to measure nuclear resonance fluorescence (NRF) excitations is discussed in terms of limits of detection and in comparison with high-purity germanium (HPGe) detectors near the 2 MeV region where many NRF excitation levels from special nuclear materials are located. The NRF experiment was performed at the High Intensity γ-ray Source (HIγS) facility. The incident γ-rays, of 2.12 MeV energy, hit a B4C target to excite the 11B nuclei to the first excitation level. The statistical-sensitive non-linear peak clipping (SNIP) algorithm was implemented to eliminate the background and enhance the limits of detection for the spectra measured with LaBr3(Ce). Both detection and determination limits were deduced from the experimental data

  13. A fluorescence detected magnetic resonance investigation of the carotenoid triplet states associated with Photosystem II of isolated spinach thylakoid membranes

    CERN Document Server

    Santabarbara, S; Carbonera, D; Heathcote, P

    2005-01-01

    The carotenoid triplet populations associated with the fluorescence emission chlorophyll forms of Photosystem II have been investigated in isolated spinach thylakoid membranes by means of fluorescence detected magnetic resonance in zero field (FDMR). The spectra collected in the 680-690 nm emission range, have been fitted by a global analysis procedure. At least five different carotenoid triplet states coupled to the terminal emitting chlorophyll forms of PS II, peaking at 682 nm, 687 nm and 692 nm, have been characterised. The triplets associated with the outer antenna emission forms, at 682 nm, have zero field splitting parameters D = 0.0385 cm/sup -1/, E = 0.00367 cm/sup -1/; D = 0.0404 cm/sup -1/, E = 0.00379 cm/sup -1/ and D = 0.0386 cm/sup -1/, E = 0.00406 cm/sup -1/ which are very similar to those previously reported for the xanthophylls of the isolated LHC II complex. Therefore the FDMR spectra recorded in this work provide insights into the organisation of the LHC II complex in the unperturbed enviro...

  14. Lifetime-based optical sensor for high-level pCO2 detection employing fluorescence resonance energy transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An optical sensor for the measurement of high levels of carbon dioxide in gas phase has been developed. It is based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) between a long-lifetime ruthenium polypyridyl complex and the pH-active disazo dye Sudan III. The donor luminophore and the acceptor dye are both immobilised in a hydrophobic silica sol-gel/ethyl cellulose hybrid matrix material. Tetraoctylammonium hydroxide (TOA-OH) is used as an internal buffering system. Fluorescence lifetime is measured in the frequency domain, using low-cost phase modulation measurement technology. The use of Sudan III as an acceptor dye has enabled the sensor to have a dynamic range up to 100% carbon dioxide. The sensor displays 11.2 deg. phase shift between the limit of detection (LOD) of 0.06 and 100% CO2 with a resolution of better than 2%. The encapsulation in the silica/polymer hybrid material has provided the sensor with good mechanical and chemical stability. The effect of molecular oxygen, humidity and temperature on the sensor performance was studied in detail

  15. Early detection of Trichinella spiralis in muscle of infected mice by real-time fluorescence resonance energy transfer PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tantrawatpan, Chairat; Intapan, Pewpan M; Thanchomnang, Tongjit; Sanpool, Oranuch; Janwan, Penchom; Boonmars, Thidarut; Morakote, Nimit; Maleewong, Wanchai

    2013-09-01

    Real-time fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) PCR and melting curve analysis using newly developed fluorophore-labeled hybridization probes were applied for the detection of Trichinella spiralis DNA in muscle of mice following oral inoculation with 300 T. spiralis larvae. The developed assay could detect and differentiate T. spiralis, Trichinella papuae, and Trichinella pseudospiralis DNAs by the different melting temperatures (Tm). The assay had a detection limit of 5 × 10(2) positive control plasmid copies, which was equivalent to 1 ng of T. spiralis DNA spiked into 250 mg of muscle sample. No fluorescence signal was detected when the technique was applied to the DNA of 27 parasites other than Trichinella spp. The assay could detect T. spiralis DNA in muscle at 7, 14, and 21 days postinoculation. The range, mean ± standard deviation, and median of the Tm values of all positive muscle tissue samples were 60.4-60.8, 60.6 ± 0.2, and 60.5, respectively. This assay provides an effective tool for the specific, sensitive, and high-throughput detection of T. spiralis DNA in muscle during the early stage of infection. In addition, the technique can be useful for epidemiologic surveillance in naturally infected wildlife. PMID:23808975

  16. Multifunctional iron platinum stealth immunomicelles: targeted detection of human prostate cancer cells using both fluorescence and magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) are the most common type of contrast agents used in contrast agent-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Still, there is a great deal of room for improvement, and nanoparticles with increased MRI relaxivities are needed to increase the contrast enhancement in MRI applied to various medical conditions including cancer. We report the synthesis of superparamagnetic iron platinum nanoparticles (SIPPs) and subsequent encapsulation using PEGylated phospholipids to create stealth immunomicelles (DSPE-SIPPs) that can be specifically targeted to human prostate cancer cell lines and detected using both MRI and fluorescence imaging. SIPP cores and DSPE-SIPPs were 8.5 ± 1.6 nm and 42.9 ± 8.2 nm in diameter, respectively, and the SIPPs had a magnetic moment of 120 A m2/kg iron. J591, a monoclonal antibody against prostate specific membrane antigen (PSMA), was conjugated to the DSPE-SIPPs (J591-DSPE-SIPPs), and specific targeting of J591-DSPE-SIPPs to PSMA-expressing human prostate cancer cell lines was demonstrated using fluorescence confocal microscopy. The transverse relaxivity of the DSPE-SIPPs, measured at 4.7 Tesla, was 300.6 ± 8.5 s−1 mM−1, which is 13-fold better than commercially available SPIONs (23.8 ± 6.9 s−1 mM−1) and ∼3-fold better than reported relaxivities for Feridex® and Resovist®. Our data suggest that J591-DSPE-SIPPs specifically target human prostate cancer cells in vitro, are superior contrast agents in T2-weighted MRI, and can be detected using fluorescence imaging. To our knowledge, this is the first report on the synthesis of multifunctional SIPP micelles and using SIPPs for the specific detection of prostate cancer.

  17. A Study of the Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence Reaction Yield Dependence on the Target Thickness of 208PB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negm, Hani; Daito, Izuru; Zen, Heishun; Kii, Toshiteru; Masuda, Kai; Hori, Toshitada; Ohgaki, Hideaki; Hajima, Ryoichi; Shizuma, Toshiyuki; Hayakawa, Takehito; Kikuzawa, Nobuhiro; Toyokawa, Hiroyuki

    2015-10-01

    We have been developing an active, non-destructive detection system based on nuclear resonance fluorescence (NRF) for inspecting special nuclear materials (SNMs) such as 235U in a container at a seaport. The study of the NRF yield dependence on the target thickness of SNMs is required to evaluate the performance of the inspection system. To this end, an NRF experiment has been performed using a laser Compton backscattering γ-ray beam line at New SUBARU in 208Pb. Cylindrical shaped natural lead targets with a 0.5 cm radius and varying thicknesses of 1.0, 1.44, and 3.05 cm were irradiated at a resonance energy of 7.332 MeV. The NRF yield was detected using two HPG detectors with relative efficiencies of 120% and 100% positioned at scattering angles of 90° and 130°, respectively, relative to the incident γ-ray beam. As a result, the NRF yield exhibited a saturation behavior for the thick lead target. An analytic treatment and Monte Carlo simulation using GEANT4 was performed to interpret the reaction yield (RY) of the NRF interaction. The simulation result is in good agreement with the experimental data for the target thickness dependence. The analytic treatment, the NRF RY model, is also in reasonable agreement.

  18. Identification of weak autoionizing resonances observed through fluorescence from the satellite states of Ar{sup +}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McLaughlin, K.W.; Yenen, O.; Samson, J.A.R. [Univ. of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE (United States)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    Photoionization accompanied by excitation of the residual ionic state violates an independent electron model since, according to QED, photons interact only with individual electrons. By allowing measurements at a threshold event with high resolution, the observation of the fluorescence from the decay of these excited states (satellite states) is a sensitive method in the study of electron-electron interactions, providing complementary information to photoelectron spectroscopy. In the measurements reported here, an atomic beam of argon has been photoionized with 34 to 39 eV synchrotron radiation at beamline 9.0.1 of the Advanced Light Source. This energy range encompasses the 3p{sup 4} [{sup 3}P] 4p {sup 4}P, {sup 2}P, and {sup 2}D as well as the [{sup 1}D]4p {sup 2}F satellite states of Ar{sup +}. By observing the fine-structure resolved fluorescence from these satellite states, new Rydberg series and extensions of previously known series have been resolved with an energy resolution of 3 meV. With the high photon flux available from the high resolution monochromator of beamline 9.0.1, even the weakly excited [{sup 3}P] 4p ({sup 2}S) ns,d autoionizing structure has been observed for the first time.

  19. Determination of metallothioneins by fluorescence and resonance light scattering strategies based on ciprofloxacin–Cu(II) system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Lu [College of Public Health, University of South China, Hengyang 421001 (China); Wang, Yong-Sheng, E-mail: yongsheng.w@tom.com [College of Public Health, University of South China, Hengyang 421001 (China); Xue, Jin-Hua; Yang, Hui-Xian; Li, Qiu; Zhou, Bin; Wang, Jia-Cheng; Yin, Ji-Cheng; Wang, Yong-Song [College of Public Health, University of South China, Hengyang 421001 (China); Xiao, Xi-Lin [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, University of South China, Hengyang 421001 (China)

    2013-06-15

    Based on ciprofloxacin (CIP)–Cu(II) system, the novel methods for the detection of metallothioneins (MTs) have been developed by fluorescence (FL) and resonance light scattering (RLS) strategies. The FL strategy avoids the label and derivatization steps in common methods, while the RLS strategy can be applied for determining bio-macromolecules and small molecules without native fluorescence. The response signals linearly correlated with the concentration of MTs over the ranges of 1.03×10{sup −8}–1.23×10{sup −6} mol L{sup −1} for FL, and of 2.56×10{sup −7}–1.54×10{sup −6} mol L{sup −1} for RLS. The limits of detection (LOD) are 3.1×10{sup −9} mol L{sup −1} for FL and 7.68×10{sup −8} mol L{sup −1} for RLS. This study represents the comparison of these two methods using the same CIP–Cu{sup 2+}–MTs system. They not only allow practical application for MTs detection but also serve as a potential choice for the operators according to their concrete needs. In addition, the mechanisms for FL and RLS enhancement of the system were also discussed. -- Highlights: ► Determination of MTs was developed based on CIP–Cu(II) system by FL and RLS strategies. ► FL strategy provides lower limit of detection and wider linear range, and avoids the label and derivatization steps. ► RLS strategy can be applied for determining bio-macromolecules and small molecules. ► The mechanism of interaction of MTs with CIP–Cu(II) chelate was discussed.

  20. Determination of metallothioneins by fluorescence and resonance light scattering strategies based on ciprofloxacin–Cu(II) system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Based on ciprofloxacin (CIP)–Cu(II) system, the novel methods for the detection of metallothioneins (MTs) have been developed by fluorescence (FL) and resonance light scattering (RLS) strategies. The FL strategy avoids the label and derivatization steps in common methods, while the RLS strategy can be applied for determining bio-macromolecules and small molecules without native fluorescence. The response signals linearly correlated with the concentration of MTs over the ranges of 1.03×10−8–1.23×10−6 mol L−1 for FL, and of 2.56×10−7–1.54×10−6 mol L−1 for RLS. The limits of detection (LOD) are 3.1×10−9 mol L−1 for FL and 7.68×10−8 mol L−1 for RLS. This study represents the comparison of these two methods using the same CIP–Cu2+–MTs system. They not only allow practical application for MTs detection but also serve as a potential choice for the operators according to their concrete needs. In addition, the mechanisms for FL and RLS enhancement of the system were also discussed. -- Highlights: ► Determination of MTs was developed based on CIP–Cu(II) system by FL and RLS strategies. ► FL strategy provides lower limit of detection and wider linear range, and avoids the label and derivatization steps. ► RLS strategy can be applied for determining bio-macromolecules and small molecules. ► The mechanism of interaction of MTs with CIP–Cu(II) chelate was discussed

  1. Fluorescence enhancement using Fano-resonant a plasmonic nanostructure with selective functionalization of molecules at the electromagnetic hot spot (Presentation Recording)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaolong; Martin, Olivier J. F.

    2015-09-01

    In recent years, one has paid significant attention to plasmonic nanostructures due to their potential for practical applications. Especially, in most plasmonic nanostructures, the local density of optical states is strongly enhanced and confined in the nanogap region - like for example in plasmonic antennas - which results in the so-called electromagnetic hot spots. In this work, we use 4-nanorod structures made with silver to generate and tune Fano resonances exhibiting an asymmetric and narrow lineshape. In such a system, a strongly enhanced electromagnetic field is created in the nanogap when the two antenna modes undergo destructive interference, i.e. at the Fano resonance. The local near field is thus strongly enhanced since most of the energy is not radiated into the far field at that wavelength. We will show that using a 4-nanorod structure in silver, we can easily tune the Fano resonance through the fluorescence spectrum of the molecule under study, thus exploring the different resonance conditions between the molecule absorption/emission bands and the plasmonic nanostructure; both the excitation and emission rates of the molecule can be enhanced when it is placed within the hot spot. To this end, we have developed a double electron beam lithography process to fabricate the plasmonic nanostructures and then selectively immobilize the molecule in the hot spot, in order to investigate the fluorescence enhancement under well-controlled conditions. The fluorescence enhancement is demonstrated by measuring the fluorescence lifetime and the fluorescence count rate. The experimental results are supported by theoretical modelling and numerical calculations with the Green's tensor method.

  2. Characterization of the AT180 epitope of phosphorylated Tau protein by a combined nuclear magnetic resonance and fluorescence spectroscopy approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → pThr231 of the Tau protein is necessary for the binding of the AT180 antibody. → pSer235 of the Tau protein does not interfere with the AT180 recognition of pThr231. → Epitope mapping is efficiently achieved by combining NMR and FRET spectroscopy. -- Abstract: We present here the characterization of the epitope recognized by the AT180 monoclonal antibody currently used to define an Alzheimer's disease (AD)-related pathological form of the phosphorylated Tau protein. Some ambiguity remains as to the exact phospho-residue(s) recognized by this monoclonal: pThr231 or both pThr231 and pSer235. To answer this question, we have used a combination of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and fluorescence spectroscopy to characterize in a qualitative and quantitative manner the phospho-residue(s) essential for the epitope recognition. Data from the first step of NMR experiments are used to map the residues bound by the antibodies, which were found to be limited to a few residues. A fluorophore is then chemically attached to a cystein residue introduced close-by the mapped epitope, at arginine 221, by mutagenesis of the recombinant protein. The second step of Foerster resonance energy transfer (FRET) between the AT180 antibody tryptophanes and the phospho-Tau protein fluorophore allows to calculate a dissociation constant Kd of 30 nM. We show that the sole pThr231 is necessary for the AT180 recognition of phospho-Tau and that phosphorylation of Ser235 does not interfere with the binding.

  3. Characterization of the AT180 epitope of phosphorylated Tau protein by a combined nuclear magnetic resonance and fluorescence spectroscopy approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amniai, Laziza [CNRS-UMR 8576 UGSF-IFR 147, Universite des Sciences et Technologies de Lille 1, 59655 Villeneuve d' Ascq Cedex (France); Lippens, Guy, E-mail: guy.lippens@univ-lille1.fr [CNRS-UMR 8576 UGSF-IFR 147, Universite des Sciences et Technologies de Lille 1, 59655 Villeneuve d' Ascq Cedex (France); Landrieu, Isabelle, E-mail: isabelle.landrieu@univ-lille1.fr [CNRS-UMR 8576 UGSF-IFR 147, Universite des Sciences et Technologies de Lille 1, 59655 Villeneuve d' Ascq Cedex (France)

    2011-09-09

    Highlights: {yields} pThr231 of the Tau protein is necessary for the binding of the AT180 antibody. {yields} pSer235 of the Tau protein does not interfere with the AT180 recognition of pThr231. {yields} Epitope mapping is efficiently achieved by combining NMR and FRET spectroscopy. -- Abstract: We present here the characterization of the epitope recognized by the AT180 monoclonal antibody currently used to define an Alzheimer's disease (AD)-related pathological form of the phosphorylated Tau protein. Some ambiguity remains as to the exact phospho-residue(s) recognized by this monoclonal: pThr231 or both pThr231 and pSer235. To answer this question, we have used a combination of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and fluorescence spectroscopy to characterize in a qualitative and quantitative manner the phospho-residue(s) essential for the epitope recognition. Data from the first step of NMR experiments are used to map the residues bound by the antibodies, which were found to be limited to a few residues. A fluorophore is then chemically attached to a cystein residue introduced close-by the mapped epitope, at arginine 221, by mutagenesis of the recombinant protein. The second step of Foerster resonance energy transfer (FRET) between the AT180 antibody tryptophanes and the phospho-Tau protein fluorophore allows to calculate a dissociation constant Kd of 30 nM. We show that the sole pThr231 is necessary for the AT180 recognition of phospho-Tau and that phosphorylation of Ser235 does not interfere with the binding.

  4. Kinetics and thermodynamics of glycans and glycoproteins binding to Holothuria scabra lectin: a fluorescence and surface plasmon resonance spectroscopic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gowda, Nagaraj M; Gaikwad, Sushama M; Khan, M Islam

    2013-11-01

    Holothuria scabra produces a monomeric lectin (HSL) of 182 kDa. HSL showed strong antibacterial activity and induced bacterial agglutination under in vitro conditions, indicating its role in animals' innate immune responses. Very few lectins have been reported from echinoderms and none of these lectins have been explored in detail for their sugar-binding kinetics. Affinity, kinetics and thermodynamic analysis of glycans and glycoproteins binding to HSL were studied by fluorescence and surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy. Lectin binds with higher affinity to O-linked than N-linked asialo glycans, and the affinities were relatively higher than that for sialated glycans and glycoproteins. T-antigen α-methyl glycoside was the most potent ligand having the highest affinity (Ka 8.32 ×10(7) M(-1)). Thermodynamic and kinetic analysis indicated that the binding of galactosyl Tn-antigen and asialo glycans is accompanied by an enthalpic contribution in addition to higher association rate coupled by low activation energy for the association process. Presence of sialic acid or protein matrix inhibits binding. Higher affinity of HSL for O-glycans than N-glycans had biological implications; since HSL specifically recognizes bacteria, which have mucin or O-glycan cognate on their cell surfaces and play a major role in animal innate immunity. Since, HSL had higher affinity to T-antigen, makes it a useful tool for cancer diagnostic purpose. PMID:23736907

  5. Investigation of high-contrast velocity selective optical pumping resonance at the cycling transition of Cs using fluorescence technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dey, Saswati; Ray, Biswajit; Ghosh, Pradip Narayan; Cartaleva, Stefka; Slavov, Dimitar

    2015-12-01

    A high contrast (∼48%) Velocity Selective Optical Pumping (VSOP) resonance at the closed transition Fg=4→Fe=5 of Cs-D2 line is obtained in the fluorescence signal under co-propagating pump-probe configuration. We use a 5.2 μm cell operating at reduced temperature (∼55 °C) and the intensity of the pump-laser is kept lower than that of the probe-laser. The observed sharp narrow structure is suitable for side-arms frequency-locking of the cooling- (i.e. probe-) laser in a cold atom experiment, with possibility for "-Γ" to "-4Γ" red-detuning and "+Γ" to "+10Γ" blue-detuning using the standard properties of the commercially available electronics. We have developed a theoretical model corresponding to the thin cell, incorporating the atomic time-of-flight dependent optical pumping decay rate to describe the dimensional anisotropy of the thin cell. The model shows good qualitative agreement with the observation and simulates as well the cases of cells with smaller thickness. It also describes correctly the temperature dependence of the line broadening and shows the potential for further optimization and red-shift detuning above "-4Γ". It may be of interest for further development of miniaturized modules, like the recently developed portable small magneto-optical traps.

  6. A Quantitative Theoretical Framework For Protein-Induced Fluorescence Enhancement-Förster-Type Resonance Energy Transfer (PIFE-FRET).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerner, Eitan; Ploetz, Evelyn; Hohlbein, Johannes; Cordes, Thorben; Weiss, Shimon

    2016-07-01

    Single-molecule, protein-induced fluorescence enhancement (PIFE) serves as a molecular ruler at molecular distances inaccessible to other spectroscopic rulers such as Förster-type resonance energy transfer (FRET) or photoinduced electron transfer. In order to provide two simultaneous measurements of two distances on different molecular length scales for the analysis of macromolecular complexes, we and others recently combined measurements of PIFE and FRET (PIFE-FRET) on the single molecule level. PIFE relies on steric hindrance of the fluorophore Cy3, which is covalently attached to a biomolecule of interest, to rotate out of an excited-state trans isomer to the cis isomer through a 90° intermediate. In this work, we provide a theoretical framework that accounts for relevant photophysical and kinetic parameters of PIFE-FRET, show how this framework allows the extraction of the fold-decrease in isomerization mobility from experimental data, and show how these results provide information on changes in the accessible volume of Cy3. The utility of this model is then demonstrated for experimental results on PIFE-FRET measurement of different protein-DNA interactions. The proposed model and extracted parameters could serve as a benchmark to allow quantitative comparison of PIFE effects in different biological systems. PMID:27184889

  7. Thin solid europium(III) dye layers as donors in time-resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer assays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lanthanide chelates and lanthanide nanoparticle labels are attractive donors for separation-free time-resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer (TR-FRET) assays. In fully dyed nanoparticles, the inner volume of nanoparticle labels in TR-FRET assays are incapable of participating to energy transfer due to large distances to acceptors on the surface. Our interest was to study surface-based TR-FRET and, therefore, various europium(III) (Eu) chelate layers were investigated for TR-FRET efficiency. Eu(III) chelates incorporated in a siloxane layer, Eu(III) chelate covalently coupled on silanized surface and Eu(III) labeled protein surface were prepared and compared to nanoparticle-based TR-FRET. Energy transfer between the solid-phase donors and Cy5-labeled protein were obtained with signal-to-background ratios ranging from 1.2 to 9.9. In this study, a thin layer prepared using Eu(III)-labeled protein gave the most efficient TR-FRET. This thin donor layer was tested in a competitive separation-free immunoassay of human albumin (hAlb). hAlb was measured in a clinically relevant concentrations from 0.05 to 10 mg l-1 with the coefficient of variation ranging from 1.0% to 12.4%.

  8. Fluorescence/bioluminescence resonance energy transfer techniques to study G-protein-coupled receptor activation and signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohse, Martin J; Nuber, Susanne; Hoffmann, Carsten

    2012-04-01

    Fluorescence and bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (FRET and BRET) techniques allow the sensitive monitoring of distances between two labels at the nanometer scale. Depending on the placement of the labels, this permits the analysis of conformational changes within a single protein (for example of a receptor) or the monitoring of protein-protein interactions (for example, between receptors and G-protein subunits). Over the past decade, numerous such techniques have been developed to monitor the activation and signaling of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) in both the purified, reconstituted state and in intact cells. These techniques span the entire spectrum from ligand binding to the receptors down to intracellular second messengers. They allow the determination and the visualization of signaling processes with high temporal and spatial resolution. With these techniques, it has been demonstrated that GPCR signals may show spatial and temporal patterning. In particular, evidence has been provided for spatial compartmentalization of GPCRs and their signals in intact cells and for distinct physiological consequences of such spatial patterning. We review here the FRET and BRET technologies that have been developed for G-protein-coupled receptors and their signaling proteins (G-proteins, effectors) and the concepts that result from such experiments. PMID:22407612

  9. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) in chemistry and biology: Non-Förster distance dependence of the FRET rate

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sangeeta Saini; Harjinder Singh; Biman Bagchi

    2006-01-01

    Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) is a popular tool to study equilibrium and dynamical properties of polymers and biopolymers in condensed phases and is now widely used in conjunction with single molecule spectroscopy. In the data analysis, one usually employs the Förster expression which predicts (1/6) distance dependence of the energy transfer rate. However, critical analysis shows that this expression can be of rather limited validity in many cases. We demonstrate this by explicitly considering a donor-acceptor system, polyfluorene (PF6)-tetraphenylporphyrin (TPP), where the size of both donor and acceptor is comparable to the distance separating them. In such cases, one may expect much weaker distance (as 1/2 or even weaker) dependence. We have also considered the case of energy transfer from a dye to a nanoparticle. Here we find 1/4 distance dependence at large separations, completely different from Förster. We also discuss recent application of FRET to study polymer conformational dynamics.

  10. Development of a Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET-Based DNA Biosensor for Detection of Synthetic Oligonucleotide of Ganoderma boninense

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noremylia Mohd Bakhori

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available An optical DNA biosensor based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET utilizing synthesized quantum dot (QD has been developed for the detection of specific-sequence of DNA for Ganoderma boninense, an oil palm pathogen. Modified QD that contained carboxylic groups was conjugated with a single-stranded DNA probe (ssDNA via amide-linkage. Hybridization of the target DNA with conjugated QD-ssDNA and reporter probe labeled with Cy5 allows for the detection of related synthetic DNA sequence of Ganoderma boninense gene based on FRET signals. Detection of FRET emission before and after hybridization was confirmed through the capability of the system to produce FRET at 680 nm for hybridized sandwich with complementary target DNA. No FRET emission was observed for non-complementary system. Hybridization time, temperature and effect of different concentration of target DNA were studied in order to optimize the developed system. The developed biosensor has shown high sensitivity with detection limit of 3.55 × 10−9 M. TEM results show that the particle size of QD varies in the range between 5 to 8 nm after ligand modification and conjugation with ssDNA. This approach is capable of providing a simple, rapid and sensitive method for detection of related synthetic DNA sequence of Ganoderma boninense.

  11. Determination of the electromagnetic dipole strength distribution in medium-heavy atomic nuclei by means of nuclear resonance fluorescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the last hundred years several models were developed to describe the configuration of nuclei. These models have to make predictions, which should be comparable with experiments. As a standard type of experiment the nuclear resonance fluorescence was established. A nucleus is excited by irradiation with photons. By emitting one or more photons the nucleus decays back to the ground state. With this method it is possible to measure energy levels and to determine the strength of their excitation. A continuum of unresolved peaks gives additional strength. The existing setup at the linear electron accelerator ELBE of the Forschungszentrum Dresden-Rossendorf uses bremsstrahlung, produced as a secondary beam in a thin Niobium foil. During the years 2008/09 experiments on the nuclei of 86Kr and 136Ba took place there. In this work they will be analyzed. Photon flux and efficiency determination have been done as well as simulations on detector response and non-nuclear scattered background events. For this purpose the GEANT4 package was used. Finally the resulting cross sections were corrected for branching and feeding.

  12. A Quantitative Theoretical Framework For Protein-Induced Fluorescence Enhancement–Förster-Type Resonance Energy Transfer (PIFE-FRET)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Single-molecule, protein-induced fluorescence enhancement (PIFE) serves as a molecular ruler at molecular distances inaccessible to other spectroscopic rulers such as Förster-type resonance energy transfer (FRET) or photoinduced electron transfer. In order to provide two simultaneous measurements of two distances on different molecular length scales for the analysis of macromolecular complexes, we and others recently combined measurements of PIFE and FRET (PIFE-FRET) on the single molecule level. PIFE relies on steric hindrance of the fluorophore Cy3, which is covalently attached to a biomolecule of interest, to rotate out of an excited-state trans isomer to the cis isomer through a 90° intermediate. In this work, we provide a theoretical framework that accounts for relevant photophysical and kinetic parameters of PIFE-FRET, show how this framework allows the extraction of the fold-decrease in isomerization mobility from experimental data, and show how these results provide information on changes in the accessible volume of Cy3. The utility of this model is then demonstrated for experimental results on PIFE-FRET measurement of different protein–DNA interactions. The proposed model and extracted parameters could serve as a benchmark to allow quantitative comparison of PIFE effects in different biological systems. PMID:27184889

  13. A study of the 4p-excited autoionization resonances in Sr by measurement of the angular correlation between the photoejected electrons and polarized fluorescent photons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For five autoionization resonances of Sr in the 4p excitation region, we have determined the ratios of five amplitudes and one phase difference for the photo-ejected electron waves which leave the Sr+ ion in the 5p 2P1/2,3/2 excited states. The technique employed is a combination of conventional angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy, and angular correlation measurements between photoejected electrons and polarized fluorescent photons. We discuss how the ratios of the dipole amplitudes are related to the spectroscopic descriptions of the resonances studied. (author)

  14. Cell-based bioassays in microfluidic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itle, Laura J.; Zguris, Jeanna C.; Pishko, Michael V.

    2004-12-01

    The development of cell-based bioassays for high throughput drug screening or the sensing of biotoxins is contingent on the development of whole cell sensors for specific changes in intracellular conditions and the integration of those systems into sample delivery devices. Here we show the feasibility of using a 5-(and-6)-carboxy SNARF-1, acetoxymethyl ester, acetate, a fluorescent dye capable of responding to changes in intracellular pH, as a detection method for the bacterial endotoxin, lipopolysaccharide. We used photolithography to entrap cells with this dye within poly(ethylene) glyocol diacrylate hydrogels in microfluidic channels. After 18 hours of exposure to lipopolysaccharide, we were able to see visible changes in the fluorescent pattern. This work shows the feasibility of using whole cell based biosensors within microfluidic networks to detect cellular changes in response to exogenous agents.

  15. Interfacial Chemistry and the Design of Solid-Phase Nucleic Acid Hybridization Assays Using Immobilized Quantum Dots as Donors in Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer

    OpenAIRE

    Ulrich J. Krull; W. Russ Algar

    2011-01-01

    The use of quantum dots (QDs) as donors in fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) offer several advantages for the development of multiplexed solid-phase QD-FRET nucleic acid hybridization assays. Designs for multiplexing have been demonstrated, but important challenges remain in the optimization of these systems. In this work, we identify several strategies based on the design of interfacial chemistry for improving sensitivity, obtaining lower limits of detection (LOD) and enabling th...

  16. Resonances

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    an impetus or drive to that account: change, innovation, rupture, or discontinuity. Resonances: Historical Essays on Continuity and Change explores the historiographical question of the modes of interrelation between these motifs in historical narratives. The essays in the collection attempt to...... realize theoretical consciousness through historical narrative ‘in practice’, by discussing selected historical topics from Western cultural history, within the disciplines of history, literature, visual arts, musicology, archaeology, philosophy, and theology. The title Resonances indicates the overall...

  17. Effect of enhanced Renilla luciferase and fluorescent protein variants on the Foerster distance of Bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dacres, Helen, E-mail: helen.dacres@csiro.au [CSIRO Food Futures Flagship and Ecosystem Sciences, Canberra (Australia); Michie, Michelle; Wang, Jian [CSIRO Food Futures Flagship and Ecosystem Sciences, Canberra (Australia); Pfleger, Kevin D.G. [Laboratory for Molecular Endocrinology-GPCRs, Western Australian Institute for Medical Research (WAIMR) and Centre for Medical Research, The University of Western Australia, Perth (Australia); Trowell, Stephen C. [CSIRO Food Futures Flagship and Ecosystem Sciences, Canberra (Australia)

    2012-08-31

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer First experimental determination of Foerster distance (R{sub 0}) for enhanced BRET systems. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Effect of brighter BRET components RLuc2, RLuc8 and Venus was assessed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Using brighter BRET components substantially increased (25%) R{sub 0} of the BRET{sup 1} system. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Using brighter BRET components marginally increased (2-9%) R{sub 0} of the BRET{sup 2} system. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Brighter BRET components improve the different weaknesses of BRET{sup 1} and BRET{sup 2} systems. -- Abstract: Bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) is an important tool for monitoring macromolecular interactions and is useful as a transduction technique for biosensor development. Foerster distance (R{sub 0}), the intermolecular separation characterized by 50% of the maximum possible energy transfer, is a critical BRET parameter. R{sub 0} provides a means of linking measured changes in BRET ratio to a physical dimension scale and allows estimation of the range of distances that can be measured by any donor-acceptor pair. The sensitivity of BRET assays has recently been improved by introduction of new BRET components, RLuc2, RLuc8 and Venus with improved quantum yields, stability and brightness. We determined R{sub 0} for BRET{sup 1} systems incorporating novel RLuc variants RLuc2 or RLuc8, in combination with Venus, as 5.68 or 5.55 nm respectively. These values were approximately 25% higher than the R{sub 0} of the original BRET{sup 1} system. R{sub 0} for BRET{sup 2} systems combining green fluorescent proteins (GFP{sup 2}) with RLuc2 or RLuc8 variants was 7.67 or 8.15 nm, i.e. only 2-9% greater than the original BRET{sup 2} system despite being {approx}30-fold brighter.

  18. Application of the laser induced fluorescence to the investigation of highly magnetized plasmas, heated by ion cyclotron resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work has been achieved in the frame of isotopic separation studies by in cyclotron resonance. For this purpose, in a highly magnetized (2 to 3 Tesla) and non-collisional (1012 ions/cm3) plasma, composed of metallic ions, a wave near the ion cyclotron frequency is thrown in order to heat selectively a given species. A laser induced fluorescence (LIP) has been developed on barium and gadolinium plasmas. The Larmor gyration of ions greatly modifies the interaction, which has been modelled through the time-dependent Schroedinger equation. The obtained excitation probably has been integrated over all the ions excited in the measurement volume in order to check that the LIF still leads to the distribution function of ion velocities. The influence of the Larmor motion of ions on the spectral distribution of LIF has been derived both theoretically and experimentally. The LIF diagnostics has been achieved with a dye O'ring laser. The barium ion has been excited on the transition 6142 angstrom, using rhodamine 6G dye, and the gadolinium ion on the pseudo-triplet 3861 angstrom, using exalite dye. Data treatment has been developed taking into account the Zeeman effect and the different heating of isotopes. The ionic temperature (from 1 eV to some hundreds eV) has been measured as a function of radiofrequency heating. Our experimental results are in good agreement with the selective heating theory. Also, the ion velocity distribution function has been found locally Maxwellian. And the behaviour of the plasma has been studied as a function of control parameters of the plasma source. (author)

  19. Determination of trace uranium by resonance fluorescence method coupled with photo-catalytic technology and dual cloud point extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiekang; Li, Guirong; Han, Qian

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, two kinds of salophens (Sal) with different solubilities, Sal1 and Sal2, have been respectively synthesized, and they all can combine with uranyl to form stable complexes: [UO2(2+)-Sal1] and [UO2(2+)-Sal2]. Among them, [UO2(2+)-Sal1] was used as ligand to extract uranium in complex samples by dual cloud point extraction (dCPE), and [UO2(2+)-Sal2] was used as catalyst for the determination of uranium by photocatalytic resonance fluorescence (RF) method. The photocatalytic characteristic of [UO2(2+)-Sal2] on the oxidized pyronine Y (PRY) by potassium bromate which leads to the decrease of RF intensity of PRY were studied. The reduced value of RF intensity of reaction system (ΔF) is in proportional to the concentration of uranium (c), and a novel photo-catalytic RF method was developed for the determination of trace uranium (VI) after dCPE. The combination of photo-catalytic RF techniques and dCPE procedure endows the presented methods with enhanced sensitivity and selectivity. Under optimal conditions, the linear calibration curves range for 0.067 to 6.57ngmL(-1), the linear regression equation was ΔF=438.0 c (ngmL(-1))+175.6 with the correlation coefficient r=0.9981. The limit of detection was 0.066ngmL(-1). The proposed method was successfully applied for the separation and determination of uranium in real samples with the recoveries of 95.0-103.5%. The mechanisms of the indicator reaction and dCPE are discussed. PMID:27380304

  20. Rocket observation of atomic oxygen and night airglow: Measurement of concentration with an improved resonance fluorescence technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Kita

    Full Text Available An improved resonant fluorescence instrument for measuring atomic oxygen concentration was developed to avoid the Doppler effect and the aerodynamic shock effect due to the supersonic motion of a rocket. The shock effect is reduced by adopting a sharp wedge-shaped housing and by scanning of the detector field of view to change the distance between the scattering volume and the surface of the housing. The scanning enables us to determine absolute values of atomic oxygen concentration from relative variation of the scattered light signal due to the self-absorption. The instrument was calibrated in the laboratory, and the numerical simulation reproduced the calibration result. Using the instrument, the altitude profile of atomic oxygen concentration was observed by a rocket experiment at Uchinoura (31°N on 28 January 1992. The data obtained from the rocket experiment were not perfectly free from the shock effect, but errors due to the effect were reduced by the data analysis procedure. The observed maximum concentration was 3.8× 1011 cm–3 at altitudes around 94 km. The systematic error is estimated to be less than ±0.7×1011 cm–3 and the relative random error is less than±0.07× 1011 cm–3at the same altitudes. The altitude profile of the OI 557.7-nm airglow was also observed in the same rocket experiment. The maximum volume emission rate was found to be 150 photons cm–3 s–1 at 94 km. The observed altitude profiles are compared with the MSIS model and other in situ observations.

  1. A high-throughput fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based endothelial cell apoptosis assay and its application for screening vascular disrupting agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Xiaoming; Fu, Afu [Division of Bioengineering, School of Chemical and Biomedical Engineering, Nanyang Technological University (Singapore); Luo, Kathy Qian, E-mail: kluo@ntu.edu.sg [Division of Bioengineering, School of Chemical and Biomedical Engineering, Nanyang Technological University (Singapore)

    2012-02-24

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An endothelial cell apoptosis assay using FRET-based biosensor was developed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The fluorescence of the cells changed from green to blue during apoptosis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This method was developed into a high-throughput assay in 96-well plates. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This assay was applied to screen vascular disrupting agents. -- Abstract: In this study, we developed a high-throughput endothelial cell apoptosis assay using a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based biosensor. After exposure to apoptotic inducer UV-irradiation or anticancer drugs such as paclitaxel, the fluorescence of the cells changed from green to blue. We developed this method into a high-throughput assay in 96-well plates by measuring the emission ratio of yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) to cyan fluorescent protein (CFP) to monitor the activation of a key protease, caspase-3, during apoptosis. The Z Prime factor for this assay was above 0.5 which indicates that this assay is suitable for a high-throughput analysis. Finally, we applied this functional high-throughput assay for screening vascular disrupting agents (VDA) which could induce endothelial cell apoptosis from our in-house compounds library and dioscin was identified as a hit. As this assay allows real time and sensitive detection of cell apoptosis, it will be a useful tool for monitoring endothelial cell apoptosis in living cell situation and for identifying new VDA candidates via a high-throughput screening.

  2. A high-throughput fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based endothelial cell apoptosis assay and its application for screening vascular disrupting agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► An endothelial cell apoptosis assay using FRET-based biosensor was developed. ► The fluorescence of the cells changed from green to blue during apoptosis. ► This method was developed into a high-throughput assay in 96-well plates. ► This assay was applied to screen vascular disrupting agents. -- Abstract: In this study, we developed a high-throughput endothelial cell apoptosis assay using a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based biosensor. After exposure to apoptotic inducer UV-irradiation or anticancer drugs such as paclitaxel, the fluorescence of the cells changed from green to blue. We developed this method into a high-throughput assay in 96-well plates by measuring the emission ratio of yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) to cyan fluorescent protein (CFP) to monitor the activation of a key protease, caspase-3, during apoptosis. The Z′ factor for this assay was above 0.5 which indicates that this assay is suitable for a high-throughput analysis. Finally, we applied this functional high-throughput assay for screening vascular disrupting agents (VDA) which could induce endothelial cell apoptosis from our in-house compounds library and dioscin was identified as a hit. As this assay allows real time and sensitive detection of cell apoptosis, it will be a useful tool for monitoring endothelial cell apoptosis in living cell situation and for identifying new VDA candidates via a high-throughput screening.

  3. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer based immunosensing of human IgG by using quantum dot/GIgG-gold nanoparticles/IgG conjugation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Lin; Liu, Zhao; Li, Jianjun; Zhu, Jian

    2014-06-01

    A novel immunosensor of human immune globulin (IgG) was fabricated based on the fluorescence transfer between luminescent semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) and gold nanoparticles (AuNPs). AuNPs and CdSe/ZnS QDs were respectively labeled with immune reaction pair:IgG and goat anti-human immunoglobulin (GIgG), by optimizing the conditions including pH value and protein amount. In the assembled QD-GIgG-IgG-AuNP fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) immunocomplex system, the presence of AuNP-IgG directly reduced the fluorescence intensity of the GIgG conjugated QDs. As a result, the concentration of AuNP-IgG had a linear relationship with the fluorescence decrease in a range of 0-1.57 microg/mL. Furthermore, the mechanism of the QDs' fluorescence decay has also been discussed and attributed to the light-induced photobleaching. This novel sensing method achieves quantitative detection of trace proteins, suggesting the potential of biomolecule-AuNPs conjugation based analytical methods in further application. PMID:24738348

  4. Construction of fluorescence resonance energy transfer vectors and their application in study of structure and function of signal transducers and activators of transcription 1

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fujun Han; Yongfeng Luo; Nanhai Ge; Jun Xu

    2008-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions have been studied extensively by green fluorescent protein-based fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). The fluorescent proteins (FP) can be fused either to the N- or C-terminus of a host protein, but it is difficult to predict which order will perturb the host protein the least and provide the largest FRET. Therefore, a researcher needs to fuse host proteins with FP at both the N- and C-termini and test every possible combination (N-N,N-C, or C-C) to promote the energy transfer efficiency.Consequently, researchers required to do many subelonings.Herein, we designed FRET vectors to make them more efficient. The expression vectors ofpCTP.YFP and pYFP-CFP were constructed with both cyan fluorescent protein (CFP)-yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) and YFP-CFP coding sequences flanked by two restriction enzyme sites, and with multiple cloning regions in the middle of both coding sequences. To select an optimal combination for FRET detection, we created plasmids encoding various fusion proteins of FP and signal transducers and activators of transcription 1 (STAT1). We found that the nuclear:cytoplasmic fluorescence intensity ratios of STAT1 -FP were significantly higher than those of FP-STAT1 at steady state,and fluorescence redistribution was only observed for STAT1-FP upon interferon gamma (IFNΥ) stimulation. In addition, positive FRET signals were only detected in the C-C interactions of STAT 1 homodimer. Taken together, these data indicate that fusing STATI at the N.terminus with Fpimpairs the interactions ofunphospborylated STAT1 homodimers and possibly diminishes its binding with DNA. In contrast, STATIFP was functional with respect to its activation. Moreover, the FRET vectors are able to facilitate FRET studies.

  5. In vivo magnetic resonance and fluorescence dual imaging of tumor sites by using dye-doped silica-coated iron oxide nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The difficulty in delineating tumor is a major obstacle for better outcomes in cancer treatment of patients. The use of single-imaging modality is often limited by inadequate sensitivity and resolution. Here, we present the synthesis and the use of monodisperse iron oxide nanoparticles coated with fluorescent silica nano-shells for fluorescence and magnetic resonance dual imaging of tumor. The as-synthesized core–shell nanoparticles were designed to improve the accuracy of diagnosis via simultaneous tumor imaging with dual imaging modalities by a single injection of contrast agent. The iron oxide nanocrystals (∼11 nm) were coated with Rhodamine B isothiocyanate-doped silica shells via reverse microemulsion method. Then, the core–shell nanoparticles (∼54 nm) were analyzed to confirm their size distribution by transmission electron microscopy and dynamic laser scattering. Photoluminescence spectroscopy was used to characterize the fluorescent property of the dye-doped silica shell-coated nanoparticles. The cellular compatibility of the as-prepared nanoparticles was confirmed by a trypan blue dye exclusion assay and the potential as a dual-imaging contrast agent was verified by in vivo fluorescence and magnetic resonance imaging. The experimental results show that the uniform-sized core–shell nanoparticles are highly water dispersible and the cellular toxicity of the nanoparticles is negligible. In vivo fluorescence imaging demonstrates the capability of the developed nanoparticles to selectively target tumors by the enhanced permeability and retention effects and ex vivo tissue analysis was corroborated this. Through in vitro phantom test, the core/shell nanoparticles showed a T2 relaxation time comparable to Feridex® with smaller size, indicating that the as-made nanoparticles are suitable for imaging tumor. This new dual-modality-nanoparticle approach has promised for enabling more accurate tumor imaging.

  6. In vivo magnetic resonance and fluorescence dual imaging of tumor sites by using dye-doped silica-coated iron oxide nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Haeyun; Lee, Chaedong [Seoul National University, Program in Nano Science and Technology, Graduate School of Convergence Science and Technology (Korea, Republic of); Nam, Gi-Eun [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Asan Medical Center (Korea, Republic of); Quan, Bo [Seoul National University, Program in Nano Science and Technology, Graduate School of Convergence Science and Technology (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Hyuck Jae [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Asan Medical Center (Korea, Republic of); Yoo, Jung Sun [Seoul National University, Department of Transdisciplinary Studies, Graduate School of Convergence Science and Technology, Smart Humanity Convergence Center (Korea, Republic of); Piao, Yuanzhe, E-mail: parkat9@snu.ac.kr [Seoul National University, Program in Nano Science and Technology, Graduate School of Convergence Science and Technology (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-02-15

    The difficulty in delineating tumor is a major obstacle for better outcomes in cancer treatment of patients. The use of single-imaging modality is often limited by inadequate sensitivity and resolution. Here, we present the synthesis and the use of monodisperse iron oxide nanoparticles coated with fluorescent silica nano-shells for fluorescence and magnetic resonance dual imaging of tumor. The as-synthesized core–shell nanoparticles were designed to improve the accuracy of diagnosis via simultaneous tumor imaging with dual imaging modalities by a single injection of contrast agent. The iron oxide nanocrystals (∼11 nm) were coated with Rhodamine B isothiocyanate-doped silica shells via reverse microemulsion method. Then, the core–shell nanoparticles (∼54 nm) were analyzed to confirm their size distribution by transmission electron microscopy and dynamic laser scattering. Photoluminescence spectroscopy was used to characterize the fluorescent property of the dye-doped silica shell-coated nanoparticles. The cellular compatibility of the as-prepared nanoparticles was confirmed by a trypan blue dye exclusion assay and the potential as a dual-imaging contrast agent was verified by in vivo fluorescence and magnetic resonance imaging. The experimental results show that the uniform-sized core–shell nanoparticles are highly water dispersible and the cellular toxicity of the nanoparticles is negligible. In vivo fluorescence imaging demonstrates the capability of the developed nanoparticles to selectively target tumors by the enhanced permeability and retention effects and ex vivo tissue analysis was corroborated this. Through in vitro phantom test, the core/shell nanoparticles showed a T2 relaxation time comparable to Feridex{sup ®} with smaller size, indicating that the as-made nanoparticles are suitable for imaging tumor. This new dual-modality-nanoparticle approach has promised for enabling more accurate tumor imaging.

  7. A general thiol assay based on the suppression of fluorescence resonance energy transfer in magnetic-resin core-shell nanospheres coated with gold nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A simple, rapid and sensitive fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) method is presented for the determination of thiols. It is based on the thiol-induced enhancement effect of the surfactant sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) on the efficiency of fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) in nanospheres consisting of a magnetic (Fe3O4) core and a phenol-formaldehyde resin (PFR) shell containing gold nanoparticles (AuNPs). The luminescence of the core-shell nanospheres at excitation/emission wavelengths of 390/445 nm, respectively, is quenched by the AuNPs which act as energy acceptors. The interaction of AuNPs with thiol compounds in the presence of SDS suppresses FRET and gives rise to a fluorescent signal whose intensity is proportional to the thiol concentration. The analytical features of seven thiols (homocysteine, thioglycolic acid, glutathione, dodecanethiol, cysteamine, cysteine and N-acetylcysteine) were studied. Detection limits are in the range from 0.14 to 0.49 μmol L−1. The precision of the method, expressed as the relative standard deviation, ranges from 0.4 to 4.9 %. The method was applied to the determination of total thiols in water samples with recovery values between 88.7 and 104.6 %. (author)

  8. Intercomparison of peroxy radical measurements obtained at atmospheric conditions by laser-induced fluorescence and electron spin resonance spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Hofzumahaus

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Measurements of hydroperoxy radical (HO2 and organic peroxy radical (RO2 concentrations were performed by two different techniques in the atmospheric simulation chamber SAPHIR in Jülich, Germany. The first technique was the well-established Matrix Isolation Electron Spin Resonance (MIESR, which provides absolute measurements with a time resolution of 30 min and high accuracy (10%, 2 σ. The other technique, ROxLIF, has been newly developed. It is based on the selective chemical conversion of ROx radicals (HO2 and RO2 to OH, which is detected with high sensitivity by laser-induced fluorescence (LIF. ROxLIF is calibrated by quantitative photolysis of water vapor at 185 nm and provides ambient measurements at a temporal resolution of 1 min and accuracy of 20% (2 σ. The measurements of HO2 and RO2 obtained by the two techniques were compared for two types of atmospheric simulation experiments. In one experiment, HO2 and CH3O2 radicals were produced by photooxidation of methane in air at tropospheric conditions. In the second experiment, HO2 and C2H5O2 were produced by ozonolysis of 1-butene in air at dark conditions. The radical concentrations were within the range of 16 to 100 pptv for HO2 and 12 to 45 pptv for RO2. Good agreement was found in the comparison of the ROxLIF and MIESR measurements within their combined experimental uncertainties. Linear regressions to the combined data set yield slopes of 1.02±0.13 (1 σ for RO2 and 0.98±0.08 (1 σ for HO2 without significant offsets. The results confirm the calibration of the ROxLIF instrument and demonstrate that it can be applied with good accuracy for measurements of atmospheric peroxy radical concentrations.

  9. Tomography of epidermal growth factor receptor binding to fluorescent Affibody in vivo studied with magnetic resonance guided fluorescence recovery in varying orthotopic glioma sizes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, Robert W.; Demers, Jennifer-Lynn H.; Sexton, Kristian J.; Gunn, Jason R.; Davis, Scott C.; Samkoe, Kimberley S.; Pogue, Brian W.

    2015-02-01

    The ability to image targeted tracer binding to epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) was studied in vivo in orthotopically grown glioma tumors of different sizes. The binding potential was quantified using a dual-tracer approach, which employs a fluorescently labeled peptide targeted to EGFR and a reference tracer with similar pharmacokinetic properties but no specific binding, to estimate the relative bound fraction from kinetic compartment modeling. The recovered values of binding potential did not vary significantly as a function of tumor size (1 to 33 mm3), suggesting that binding potential may be consistent in the U251 tumors regardless of size or stage after implantation. However, the fluorescence yield of the targeted fluorescent tracers in the tumor was affected significantly by tumor size, suggesting that dual-tracer imaging helps account for variations in absolute uptake, which plague single-tracer imaging techniques. Ex vivo analysis showed relatively high spatial heterogeneity in each tumor that cannot be resolved by tomographic techniques. Nonetheless, the dual-tracer tomographic technique is a powerful tool for longitudinal bulk estimation of receptor binding.

  10. Fluorescent oligo(p-phenyleneethynylene) contained amphiphiles-encapsulated magnetic nanoparticles for targeted magnetic resonance and two-photon optical imaging in vitro and in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Chao; Hong, Binbin; Gong, Zhaocui; Zhao, Hui; Hu, Wenbo; Lu, Xiaomei; Li, Jie; Li, Xiang; Yang, Zhen; Fan, Quli; Yao, Yuyu; Huang, Wei

    2015-05-01

    Folate receptor-targeted multifunctional fluorescent magnetic nanoparticles (FMNPs) composed of cores containing iron oxide nanocrystals and amphiphilic oligo(p-phenyleneethynylene) shells with multimodal imaging capability were successfully prepared through a convenient hydrophobic encapsulation approach. The iron oxide nanoparticles in the core provided T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), whereas the amphiphilic oligomers on the surface of the nanoparticles introduced good water-solubility, biocompatibility, excellent fluorescent properties and cancer-targeting. These nanoparticles exhibited superparamagnetic properties with saturation magnetization (Ms) of 23 emu g-1 and a transverse relaxivity rate of 140.89 mM-1 s-1. In vitro studies indicated that the dual-modal FMNPs can serve as an effective two-photon fluorescent and a magnetic probe to achieve the targeted imaging of Hela cells without obvious cytotoxicity. In vivo two-photon fluorescence and MRI results demonstrated that the FMNPs were able to preferentially accumulate in tumor tissues to allow dual-modal detection of tumors in a living body. These studies provided insight in developing novel multifunctional probes for multimodal imaging, which would play an important role for theranostics in biomedical science.

  11. Development of a fluorescence model for the determination of constants associated with binding, quenching, and Förster resonance energy transfer efficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casciato, Shelly L. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Sapling Learning, Austin, TX (United States); Liljestrand, Howard M. [Department of Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Holcombe, James A., E-mail: holcombe@mail.utexas.edu [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States)

    2014-02-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • The development of a FRET signal is modeled. • Absorbance of acceptor and donor and K{sub D} of the complex are accounted for. • The FRET efficiency and quenching are included as adjustable parameters. • Software provided for fitting the parameters to the experimental data. • Simulations can also be performed to study the impact of the various parameters. - Abstract: Determining accurate dissociation constants for equilibrium processes involving a fluorescent mechanism can prove to be quite challenging. Typically, titration curves and nonlinear least squares fitting of the data using computer programs are employed to obtain such constants. However, these approaches only consider the total fluorescence signal and often ignore other energy transfer processes within the system. The current model considers the impact on fluorescence from equilibrium binding (viz., metal-ligand, ligand-substrate, etc.), quenching, and resonance energy transfer. This model should provide more accurate binding constant as well as insights into other photonic processes. The equations developed for this model are discussed and are applied to experimental data from titrimetric experiments. Since the experimental data are generally in excess of the number of parameters that are needed to define the system, fitting is operated in an overdetermined mode and employs error minimization (either absolute or relative) to define goodness of fit. Examples of how changes in certain parameters affect the shape of the titrimetric curve are also presented. The current model does not consider chelation-enhanced fluorescence.

  12. Gadolinium- and manganite-based contrast agents with fluorescent probes for both magnetic resonance and fluorescence imaging of pancreatic islets: a comparative study

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Berková, Z.; Jirák, D.; Zacharovová, K.; Lukeš, I.; Kotková, Z.; Kotek, J.; Kačenka, M.; Kaman, Ondřej; Řehoř, I.; Hájek, M.; Saudek, F.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 4 (2013), s. 614-621. ISSN 1860-7179 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : contrast agents * gadolinium * magnetic resonance imaging * manganite * pancreatic islets Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 3.046, year: 2013

  13. Imaging of the expansion of femtosecond-laser-produced silicon plasma atoms by off-resonant planar laser-induced fluorescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Planar laser-induced fluorescence measurements were used to investigate the expansion dynamics of a femtosecond laser-induced plasma. Temporally and spatially resolved measurements were performed to monitor the atoms that were ablated from a silicon target. A dye laser (λ = 288.16 nm) was used to excite fluorescence signals. The radiation of an off-resonant transition (Si 390.55 nm) was observed at different distances from the target surface. This allowed easy detection of the ablated Si atoms without problems caused by scattered laser light. Abel inversion was applied to obtain the radial distribution of the Si atoms. The atom distribution in the plasma shows some peculiarities, depending on the crater depth

  14. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer between perylene and riboflavin in micellar solution and analytical application on determination of vitamin B{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhattar, S.L.; Kolekar, G.B. [Fluorescence Spectroscopy Research Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, Shivaji University, Kolhapur 416 004, Maharashtra (India); Patil, S.R. [Fluorescence Spectroscopy Research Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, Shivaji University, Kolhapur 416 004, Maharashtra (India)], E-mail: srp_fsl@rediffmail.com

    2008-03-15

    Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) between perylene and riboflavin is studied in micellar solution of sodium dodecyl sulfate. The fluorescence of perylene is quenched by riboflavin and quenching is in accordance with Stern-Volmer relation. The efficiency of energy transfer is found to depend on the concentration of riboflavin. The value of critical energy transfer distance (R{sub 0}) calculated by using Foster relation is 32.13 A, and as it is less than 50 A, it indicates efficient energy transfer in the present system. The analytical relation was established between extent of sensitization and concentration of riboflavin, which helped to estimate vitamin B{sub 2} directly from pharmaceutical tablets.

  15. Two-photon-excited fluorescence resonance energy transfer in an aqueous system of CdTe quantum dots and Rhodamine B

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two-photon excited fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) between CdTe quantum dots with different emission peaks and Rhodamine B in aqueous solution are investigated both experimentally and theoretically. The photoluminescence and lifetime are measured using a time-resolved fluorescence test system. The two-photon excited FRET efficiency is found to increase as the degree of spectral overlap of the emission spectrum of CdTe and the absorption spectrum of Rhodamine B increases, which is due to the increase of Forster radius of the sample. Moreover, FRET efficiency increases when the ratio of acceptor/donor concentration increases. The two-photon excited FRET efficiency was found to reach 40%

  16. Multimodal Mn-doped I-III-VI quantum dots for near infrared fluorescence and magnetic resonance imaging: from synthesis to in vivo application.

    OpenAIRE

    Sitbon, Gary; Bouccara, Sophie; Tasso, Mariana; Francois, Aurélie; Bezdetnaya, Lina; Marchal, Frédéric; Beaumont, Marine; Pons, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    The development of sensitive multimodal contrast agents is a key issue to provide better global, multi-scale images for diagnostic or therapeutic purposes. Here we present the synthesis of Zn-Cu-In-(S, Se)/Zn(1-x)Mn(x)S core-shell quantum dots (QDs) that can be used as markers for both near-infrared fluorescence imaging and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We first present the synthesis of Zn-Cu-In-(S, Se) cores coated with a thick ZnS shell doped with various proportions of Mn. Their emissi...

  17. Iodinated oil-loaded, fluorescent mesoporous silica-coated iron oxide nanoparticles for magnetic resonance imaging/computed tomography/fluorescence trimodal imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Xue S; Wang Y; Wang M; Zhang L; Du X; Gu H; Zhang C

    2014-01-01

    Sihan Xue,1 Yao Wang,1 Mengxing Wang,2 Lu Zhang,1 Xiaoxia Du,2 Hongchen Gu,1 Chunfu Zhang1,31School of Biomedical Engineering and Med-X Research Institute, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 2Shanghai Key Laboratory of Magnetic Resonance, Department of Physics, East China Normal University, 3State Key Laboratory of Oncogenes and Related Genes, Shanghai Cancer Institute, School of Biomedical Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, People’s Republic of ChinaAbstract: In this...

  18. Super-resolution Localization and Defocused Fluorescence Microscopy on Resonantly Coupled Single-Molecule, Single-Nanorod Hybrids

    OpenAIRE

    Su, Liang; Yuan, Haifeng; Lu, Gang; Rocha, Susana; Orrit, Michel; Hofkens, Johan; Uji-i, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Optical antennas made of metallic nanostructures dramatically enhance single-molecule fluorescence to boost the detection sensitivity. Moreover, emission properties detected at the optical far field are dictated by the antenna. Here we study the emission from molecule–antenna hybrids by means of super-resolution localization and defocused imaging. Whereas gold nanorods make single-crystal violet molecules in the tip’s vicinity visible in fluorescence, super-resolution localization on the enha...

  19. Cyclodextrin-Based Metal-Organic Nanotube as Fluorescent Probe for Selective Turn-On Detection of Hydrogen Sulfide in Living Cells Based on H2S-Involved Coordination Mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Xuelian; Wang, Jingxin; Gong, Chuanfang; Xu, Hai; Wang, Rongming; Ji, Shijie; Dong, Hanxiao; Meng, Qingguo; Zhang, Liangliang; Dai, Fangna; Sun, Daofeng

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) has been considered as the third biologically gaseous messenger (gasotransmitter) after nitric oxide (NO) and carbon monoxide (CO). Fluorescent detection of H2S in living cells is very important to human health because it has been found that the abnormal levels of H2S in human body can cause Alzheimer’s disease, cancers and diabetes. Herein, we develop a cyclodextrin-based metal-organic nanotube, CD-MONT-2, possessing a {Pb14} metallamacrocycle for efficient detection of H2S. CD-MONT-2′ (the guest-free form of CD-MONT-2) exhibits turn-on detection of H2S with high selectivity and moderate sensitivity when the material was dissolved in DMSO solution. Significantly, CD-MONT-2′ can act as a fluorescent turn-on probe for highly selective detection of H2S in living cells. The sensing mechanism in the present work is based on the coordination of H2S as the auxochromic group to the central Pb(II) ion to enhance the fluorescence intensity, which is studied for the first time. PMID:26911657

  20. Cyclodextrin-Based Metal-Organic Nanotube as Fluorescent Probe for Selective Turn-On Detection of Hydrogen Sulfide in Living Cells Based on H2S-Involved Coordination Mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Xuelian; Wang, Jingxin; Gong, Chuanfang; Xu, Hai; Wang, Rongming; Ji, Shijie; Dong, Hanxiao; Meng, Qingguo; Zhang, Liangliang; Dai, Fangna; Sun, Daofeng

    2016-02-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) has been considered as the third biologically gaseous messenger (gasotransmitter) after nitric oxide (NO) and carbon monoxide (CO). Fluorescent detection of H2S in living cells is very important to human health because it has been found that the abnormal levels of H2S in human body can cause Alzheimer’s disease, cancers and diabetes. Herein, we develop a cyclodextrin-based metal-organic nanotube, CD-MONT-2, possessing a {Pb14} metallamacrocycle for efficient detection of H2S. CD-MONT-2‧ (the guest-free form of CD-MONT-2) exhibits turn-on detection of H2S with high selectivity and moderate sensitivity when the material was dissolved in DMSO solution. Significantly, CD-MONT-2‧ can act as a fluorescent turn-on probe for highly selective detection of H2S in living cells. The sensing mechanism in the present work is based on the coordination of H2S as the auxochromic group to the central Pb(II) ion to enhance the fluorescence intensity, which is studied for the first time.

  1. Binding of 5-fluorotryptamine to polynucleotides as a model for protein-nucleic acid interactions: fluorine-19 nuclear magnetic resonance, absorption, and fluorescence studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fluorine-19 nuclear magnetic resonance (19F NMR), optical absorption, and fluorescence spectroscopy have been used to study the interaction of 5-fluorotryptamine (5FTA) with polynucleotides as a model for protein-nucleic acid interactions. In the presence of DNA, denatured DNA, poly(A), and poly(A)-poly(U), the 19F resonance of 5FTA shifted 0.3-0.6 ppm upfield while the presence of poly(I)-poly(C) had little effect on the chemical shift. Differences in the 19F chemical shift induced upon changing from H2O to 2H2O indicate difference in the solvent accesibility of 5FTA bound to the various polynucleotides. 19F NMR relaxation experiments were carried out for free 5FTA and in its nucleic acid complexes, and the results were interpreted by using a two correlation time model that included contributions to relaxation from dipolar coupling and chemical shift anisotropy. Values for the internal motion correlation time and the overall motion correlation time are reported. The effect of 5FTA on the melting transition of the double-stranded polynucleotides and on the quenching of 5FTA fluorescence was also studied. The 19F NMR results support the model of partial intercalation of the 5FTA chromophore into the polynucleotides, and the implications for protein-nucleic acid interactions are discussed

  2. Simultaneous detection of pathogenic bacteria using an aptamer based biosensor and dual fluorescence resonance energy transfer from quantum dots to carbon nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report on a method for simultaneous detection of the pathogens Vibrio parahaemolyticus and Salmonella typhimurium. It is based on dual fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) from green-emitting quantum-dots (gQDs) and red-emitting quantum-dots (rQDs) as donors, and on novel amorphous carbon nanoparticles (CNPs) that act as acceptor. The gQDs were modified with an aptamer (Apt 1) recognizing V. parahaemolyticus, and the rQDs with an aptamer (Apt 2) recognizing S. typhimurium. The fluorescence of both QDs is strongly quenched in the presence of CNPs. However, on addition of the target analytes, the QDs-aptamer-target complex is formed and quenching by CNPs is suppressed. The fluorescence of the QDs is linearly proportional to the concentration of the two pathogens in the range from 50 to 106 cfu·mL−1, with detection limits as low as 25 cfu·mL−1 for V. parahaemolyticus, and of 35 cfu·mL−1 for S. typhimurium. The assay was applied to real food samples, and the results were consistent with the results obtained with plate counting methods. We presume that this strategy can be extended to the detection of other pathogenic bacteria and biomolecules by simply substituting the aptamer. (author)

  3. Gd (III) complex conjugate of low-molecular-weight chitosan as a contrast agent for magnetic resonance/fluorescence dual-modal imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yan; Boamah, Peter Osei; Gong, Jianbo; Zhang, Qi; Hua, Mingqing; Ye, Yuzhen

    2016-06-01

    The fusion of molecular and anatomical modalities facilitates more reliable and accurate detection in clinic. In this work, we prepared gadolinium (III) complex Gd-DTPA-FITC-CS11 with magnetic resonance (MR) and fluorescence dual-modal imaging modalities. Gd-DTPA-FITC-CS11 consisted of fluorescein isothiocyanate and low-molecular-weight chitosan (CS11) units conjugated with gadolinium diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (Gd-DTPA). Gd-DTPA-FITC-CS11 exhibited a higher longitudinal relaxivity (14.09mM(-1)s(-1)) than the clinical Gd-DTPA (3.85mM(-1)s(-1)). T1-weighted MR contrast enhancement was also demonstrated the comparability to Gd-DTPA at lower dosage. The binding with bovine serum albumin (BSA) was investigated. The fluorescence of BSA in the presence of Gd-DTPA-FITC-CS11 was weakened due to static quenching mechanism. The conformation of BSA was slightly changed but α-helix was dominant. The binding was entropy-driven and spontaneous and the main contribution was hydrophobic interaction. Our results suggested the potential of Gd-DTPA-FITC-CS11 as an MR/fluorescence dual-modal imaging contrast agent in improving the diagnostic sensitivity and accuracy. PMID:27083371

  4. Preparation of liposomes loaded with quantum dots, fluorescence resonance energy transfer studies, and near-infrared in-vivo imaging of mouse tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report on a simple, fast and convenient method to engineer lipid vesicles loaded with quantum dots (QDs) by incorporating QDs into a vesicle-type of lipid bilayer using a phase transfer reagent. Hydrophilic CdTe QDs and near-infrared (NIR) QDs of type CdHgTe were incorporated into liposomes by transferring the QDs from an aqueous solution into chloroform by addition of a surfactant. The QD-loaded liposomes display bright fluorescence, and the incorporation of the QDs into the lipid bilayer leads to enhanced storage stability and reduced sensitivity to UV irradiation. The liposomes containing the QD were applied to label living cells and to image mouse tissue in-vivo using a confocal laser scanning microscope, while NIR images of mouse tissue were acquired with an NIR fluorescence imaging system. We also report on the fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) that occurs between the CdTe QDs (the donor) and the CdHgTe QDs (the acceptor), both contained in liposomes. Based on these data, this NIR FRET system shows promise as a tool that may be used to study the release of drug-loaded liposomes and their in vivo distribution. (author)

  5. Super-resolution Localization and Defocused Fluorescence Microscopy on Resonantly Coupled Single-Molecule, Single-Nanorod Hybrids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Liang; Yuan, Haifeng; Lu, Gang; Rocha, Susana; Orrit, Michel; Hofkens, Johan; Uji-I, Hiroshi

    2016-02-23

    Optical antennas made of metallic nanostructures dramatically enhance single-molecule fluorescence to boost the detection sensitivity. Moreover, emission properties detected at the optical far field are dictated by the antenna. Here we study the emission from molecule-antenna hybrids by means of super-resolution localization and defocused imaging. Whereas gold nanorods make single-crystal violet molecules in the tip's vicinity visible in fluorescence, super-resolution localization on the enhanced molecular fluorescence reveals geometrical centers of the nanorod antenna instead. Furthermore, emission angular distributions of dyes linked to the nanorod surface resemble that of nanorods in defocused imaging. The experimental observations are consistent with numerical calculations using the finite-difference time-domain method. PMID:26815168

  6. Determination of the cationic amphiphilic drug-DNA binding mode and DNA-assisted fluorescence resonance energy transfer amplification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaseen, Zahid; Banday, Abdul Rouf; Hussain, Mohammed Aamir; Tabish, Mohammad; Kabir-ud-Din

    2014-03-01

    Understanding the mechanism of drug-DNA binding is crucial for predicting the potential genotoxicity of drugs. Agarose gel electrophoresis, absorption, steady state fluorescence, and circular dichroism have been used in exploring the interaction of cationic amphiphilic drugs (CADs) such as amitriptyline hydrochloride (AMT), imipramine hydrochloride (IMP), and promethazine hydrochloride (PMT) with calf thymus or pUC19 DNA. Agarose gel electrophoresis assay, along with absorption and steady state fluorescence studies, reveal interaction between the CADs and DNA. A comparative study of the drugs with respect to the effect of urea, iodide induced quenching, and ethidium bromide (EB) exclusion assay reflects binding of CADs to the DNA primarily in an intercalative fashion. Circular dichroism data also support the intercalative mode of binding. Besides quenching, there is fluorescence exchange energy transfer (FRET) in between CADs and EB using DNA as a template.

  7. Low-energy d-d excitations in MnO studied by resonant x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Resonant soft X-ray emission spectroscopy has been demonstrated to possess interesting abilities for studies of electronic structure in various systems, such as symmetry probing, alignment and polarization dependence, sensitivity to channel interference, etc. In the present abstract the authors focus on the feasibility of resonant soft X-ray emission to probe low energy excitations by means of resonant electronic X-ray Raman scattering. Resonant X-ray emission can be regarded as an inelastic scattering process where a system in the ground state is transferred to a low excited state via a virtual core excitation. The energy closeness to a core excitation of the exciting radiation enhances the (generally) low probability for inelastic scattering at these wavelengths. Therefore soft X-ray emission spectroscopy (in resonant electronic Raman mode) can be used to study low energy d-d excitations in transition metal systems. The involvement of the intermediate core state allows one to use the selection rules of X-ray emission, and the appearance of the elastically scattered line in the spectra provides the reference to the ground state

  8. Low-energy d-d excitations in MnO studied by resonant x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butorin, S.M.; Guo, J.; Magnuson, M. [Uppsala Univ. (Sweden)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    Resonant soft X-ray emission spectroscopy has been demonstrated to possess interesting abilities for studies of electronic structure in various systems, such as symmetry probing, alignment and polarization dependence, sensitivity to channel interference, etc. In the present abstract the authors focus on the feasibility of resonant soft X-ray emission to probe low energy excitations by means of resonant electronic X-ray Raman scattering. Resonant X-ray emission can be regarded as an inelastic scattering process where a system in the ground state is transferred to a low excited state via a virtual core excitation. The energy closeness to a core excitation of the exciting radiation enhances the (generally) low probability for inelastic scattering at these wavelengths. Therefore soft X-ray emission spectroscopy (in resonant electronic Raman mode) can be used to study low energy d-d excitations in transition metal systems. The involvement of the intermediate core state allows one to use the selection rules of X-ray emission, and the appearance of the elastically scattered line in the spectra provides the reference to the ground state.

  9. Mammalian Cell-Based Sensor System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Pratik; Franz, Briana; Bhunia, Arun K.

    Use of living cells or cellular components in biosensors is receiving increased attention and opens a whole new area of functional diagnostics. The term "mammalian cell-based biosensor" is designated to biosensors utilizing mammalian cells as the biorecognition element. Cell-based assays, such as high-throughput screening (HTS) or cytotoxicity testing, have already emerged as dependable and promising approaches to measure the functionality or toxicity of a compound (in case of HTS); or to probe the presence of pathogenic or toxigenic entities in clinical, environmental, or food samples. External stimuli or changes in cellular microenvironment sometimes perturb the "normal" physiological activities of mammalian cells, thus allowing CBBs to screen, monitor, and measure the analyte-induced changes. The advantage of CBBs is that they can report the presence or absence of active components, such as live pathogens or active toxins. In some cases, mammalian cells or plasma membranes are used as electrical capacitors and cell-cell and cell-substrate contact is measured via conductivity or electrical impedance. In addition, cytopathogenicity or cytotoxicity induced by pathogens or toxins resulting in apoptosis or necrosis could be measured via optical devices using fluorescence or luminescence. This chapter focuses mainly on the type and applications of different mammalian cell-based sensor systems.

  10. Cooperative Resonance Interaction Between One-and Two-Photon Super-fluorescences Trough the Vacuum Field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The theoretical approach takes in consideration the cooperative phenomena which appear between three particle in two-photon resonance in the process of single- and two- photon decay. This type of single- and two-quanta cooperative effect between three subsystems of radiators are described by master equation which takes into account three-particle cooperative resonance in the system. The resonance between the spontaneous emissions by two- and single photon transitions of three inverted radiators from the ensemble is proposed in order to accelerate the collective decay rate of the entangled photon pairs generated by the system. This effect is accompanied with the interferences between one-photon and two-quantum collective transitions of three inverted radiators from the ensemble. The three particle collective decay rate is defined in the description of three atomic correlation functions.

  11. Cooperative Resonance Interaction Between One-and Two-Photon Super-fluorescences Trough the Vacuum Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enaki, Nicolae A.

    2012-02-01

    The theoretical approach takes in consideration the cooperative phenomena which appear between three particle in two-photon resonance in the process of single- and two- photon decay. This type of single- and two-quanta cooperative effect between three subsystems of radiators are described by master equation which takes into account three-particle cooperative resonance in the system. The resonance between the spontaneous emissions by two- and single photon transitions of three inverted radiators from the ensemble is proposed in order to accelerate the collective decay rate of the entangled photon pairs generated by the system. This effect is accompanied with the interferences between one-photon and two-quantum collective transitions of three inverted radiators from the ensemble. The three particle collective decay rate is defined in the description of three atomic correlation functions.

  12. pH-Responsive Tumor-Targetable Theranostic Nanovectors Based on Core Crosslinked (CCL Micelles with Fluorescence and Magnetic Resonance (MR Dual Imaging Modalities and Drug Delivery Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sidan Tian

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The development of novel theranostic nanovectors is of particular interest in treating formidable diseases (e.g., cancers. Herein, we report a new tumor-targetable theranostic agent based on core crosslinked (CCL micelles, possessing tumor targetable moieties and fluorescence and magnetic resonance (MR dual imaging modalities. An azide-terminated diblock copolymer, N3-POEGMA-b-P(DPA-co-GMA, was synthesized via consecutive atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP, where OEGMA, DPA, and GMA are oligo(ethylene glycolmethyl ether methacrylate, 2-(diisopropylaminoethyl methacrylate, and glycidyl methacrylate, respectively. The resulting diblock copolymer was further functionalized with DOTA(Gd (DOTA is 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetrakisacetic acid or benzaldehyde moieties via copper(I-catalyzed alkyne-azide cycloaddition (CuAAC chemistry, resulting in the formation of DOTA(Gd-POEGMA-b-P(DPA-co-GMA and benzaldehyde-POEGMA-b-P(DPA-co-GMA copolymers. The resultant block copolymers co-assembled into mixed micelles at neutral pH in the presence of tetrakis[4-(2-mercaptoethoxyphenyl]ethylene (TPE-4SH, which underwent spontaneous crosslinking reactions with GMA residues embedded within the micellar cores, simultaneously switching on TPE fluorescence due to the restriction of intramolecular rotation. Moreover, camptothecin (CPT was encapsulated into the crosslinked cores at neutral pH, and tumor-targeting pH low insertion peptide (pHLIP, sequence: AEQNPIYWARYADWLFTTPLLLLDLALLVDADEGTCG moieties were attached to the coronas through the Schiff base chemistry, yielding a theranostic nanovector with fluorescence and MR dual imaging modalities and tumor-targeting capability. The nanovectors can be efficiently taken up by A549 cells, as monitored by TPE fluorescence. After internalization, intracellular acidic pH triggered the release of loaded CPT, killing cancer cells in a selective manner. On the other hand, the nanovectors labeled with DOTA

  13. Observation of resonance fluorescence and the Mollow triplet from a coherently driven site-controlled quantum dot

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Unsleber, Sebastian; Maier, Sebastian; McCutcheon, Dara;

    2015-01-01

    Resonant excitation of solid state quantum emitters has the potential to deterministically excite a localized exciton while ensuring a maximally coherent emission. In this work, we demonstrate the coherent coupling of an exciton localized in a lithographically positioned, site-controlled semicond...

  14. Deep tissue fluorescence resonance energy transfer imaging and the application of the Bethe-Salpeter equation to non-diffusive wave propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaind, Vaibhav

    Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) has found many applications in in vitro imaging as an indicator of molecular activity. However, till now, in vivo FRET imaging has been restricted to near-surface multiphoton microscopy. Optical diffusion tomography (ODT) is an emerging tool for deep tissue imaging. In this work, FRET was incorporated in an ODT framework, thereby allowing FRET to be applied in deep tissue imaging. Using simulations and tissue phantom and small animal imaging experiments, the possibility of imaging molecular activity on the nanometer scale using macroscopic measurements is demonstrated. The diffusion equation model is limited to regions of high scatter and low absorption. The Bethe-Salpeter equation has been used extensively to explain various scattering phenomena and is more fundamental than the Boltzmann transport equation. In this work, the Bethe-Salpeter equation has been investigated for modeling photon transport in the non-diffusive regime.

  15. Microfluidic-Based Amplification-Free Bacterial DNA Detection by Dielectrophoretic Concentration and Fluorescent Resonance Energy Transfer Assisted in Situ Hybridization (FRET-ISH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maxim Shusteff

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Although real-time PCR (RT-PCR has become a diagnostic standard for rapid identification of bacterial species, typical methods remain time-intensive due to sample preparation and amplification cycle times. The assay described in this work incorporates on-chip dielectrophoretic capture and concentration of bacterial cells, thermal lysis, cell permeabilization, and nucleic acid denaturation and fluorescence resonance energy transfer assisted in situ hybridization (FRET-ISH species identification. Combining these techniques leverages the benefits of all of them, allowing identification to be accomplished completely on chip less than thirty minutes after receipt of sample, compared to multiple hours required by traditional RT-PCR and its requisite sample preparation.

  16. Self-assembled dual-modality contrast agents for non-invasive stem cell tracking via near-infrared fluorescence and magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hong; Tan, Yan; Xie, Lisi; Yang, Lei; Zhao, Jing; Bai, Jingxuan; Huang, Ping; Zhan, Wugen; Wan, Qian; Zou, Chao; Han, Yali; Wang, Zhiyong

    2016-09-15

    Stem cells hold great promise for treating various diseases. However, one of the main drawbacks of stem cell therapy is the lack of non-invasive image-tracking technologies. Although magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) imaging have been employed to analyse cellular and subcellular events via the assistance of contrast agents, the sensitivity and temporal resolution of MRI and the spatial resolution of NIRF are still shortcomings. In this study, superparamagnetic iron oxide nanocrystals and IR-780 dyes were co-encapsulated in stearic acid-modified polyethylenimine to form a dual-modality contrast agent with nano-size and positive charge. These resulting agents efficiently labelled stem cells and did not influence the cellular viability and differentiation. Moreover, the labelled cells showed the advantages of dual-modality imaging in vivo. PMID:27299677

  17. Preparation and Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer of Carbon Dots%碳点的制备及其荧光共振能量转移

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张煌博; 曹学功; 孙向英

    2014-01-01

    Amino-modified carbon dots were synthesized by the low temperature carbonization of citric acid in the pres-ence of branched polyethylenimine in one step.The bright blue emission was observed under the excitation of ultraviolet rays.Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and X-ray powder diffraction were used to characterize its structure.Mean-while,the fluorescence resonance energy transfer between amino-modified carbon dots and CdTe QDs in liquid or solid-liquid phase was studied.The results show that fluorescence resonance energy transfer efficiency in liquid is much larger than the solid-liquid phase and it also has a limit.%以枝状聚乙烯亚胺和柠檬酸为原料,低温熔融法一步合成水溶性的氨基化碳点,碳点在紫外光激发下发出明亮的蓝光。采用傅里叶变换红外光谱和 X 射线粉末衍射仪对其结构进行表征,并研究其与碲化镉量子点在液相和固液界面的荧光共振能量转移。实验结果表明:液相中的荧光共振能量转移效率远大于固液界面的荧光共振能量转移,且能量转移具有一定的限度。

  18. In Vivo Magnetic Resonance and Fluorescence Dual-Modality Imaging of Tumor Angiogenesis in Rats Using GEBP11 Peptide Targeted Magnetic Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Tao; Wang, Yabin; Wang, Jiinda; Han, Dong; Ma, Sai; Cao, Jianbo; Li, Xiujuan; Zhang, Ran; Qiao, Hongyu; Liang, Jimin; Liu, Gang; Yang, Bo; Liang, Shuhui; Nie, Yongzhan; Wu, Kaichun; Li, Jiayi; Cao, Feng

    2016-05-01

    Angiogenesis is an essential process for tumor progression. Tumor vasculature-targeting peptides have shown great potential for use in cancer imaging and therapy. Our previous studies have shown that GEBP11, a novel vasculature-specific binding peptide that exhibits high affinity and specificity to tumor angiogenesis, is a promising candidate for the diagnosis and targeted radiotherapy of gastric cancer. In the present study, we developed a novel magnetic resonance and fluorescence (MR/Fluo) dual-modality imaging probe by covalently coupling 2,3-dimercaptosuccinnic acid-coated paramagnetic nanoparticles (DMSA-MNPs) and Cy5.5 to the GEBP11 peptide. The probe Cy5.5-GEBP11-DMSA-MNPs (CGD-MNPs), with a hydrodynamic diameter of 82.8 ± 6.5 nm, exhibited good imaging properties, high stability and little cytotoxicity. In vivo MR/Fluo imaging revealed that CGD-MNPs were successfully applied to visualize tumor angiogenesis in SGC-7901 xenograft mouse models. Prussian blue and CD31 immunohistochemical staining confirmed that CGD-MNPs co-localized with tumor blood vessels. In conclusion, CGD-MNPs are promising candidates for use as MR and fluorescence imaging probes for visualizing gastric cancer angiogenesis in vivo. PMID:27305822

  19. Study on the absorption and fluorescence and resonance Rayleigh scattering spectra of Cu (Ⅱ)-fluoroquinolone chelates with erythrosine and their applications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    In pH 4.2-5.0 Britton-Robinson buffer solution medium, fluoroquinolone antibiotics (FLQs), such as ciprofloxacin (CIP), norfloxacin (NOR), ofloxacin (OF), levofloxacin (LEV), lomefloxacin (LOM), and sparfloxacin (SPA), react with Cu (Ⅱ) to form chelate cations, which further bind with erythrosine to form the ion association complexes. They can result in the changes of the absorption spectra. Simultaneously, erythrosine fades obviously and the maximum fading wavelength is located at 526 nm. The fading reactions have high sensitivities. Thus, new spectrophotometries of determination for these drugs are developed. The ion-association reactions result in the quenching of fluorescence, which also have high sensitivities. The detection limits for six antibiotics are in the range of 7.1-12.2 μg·L-1. Furthermore, the reactions can result in the enhancement of resonance Rayleigh scattering (RRS). The maximum scattering peaks of six ion-association complexes are located at 566 nm, and there are two small RRS peaks at 333 nm and 287 nm. The detection limits for fluoroquinolone antibiotics are in the range of 1.70-3.10 μg·L-1 for RRS method. Among the above three methods, the RRS method has the highest sensitivity. In this work, we investigated the spectral characteristics of the absorption, fluorescence and RRS, the optimum conditions of the reactions, and the properties of the analytical chemistry. In addition, the mechanism of reactions were discussed by density function theory (DFT) and AM1 methods.

  20. Continuous Monitoring of Specific mRNA Expression Responses with a Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer-Based DNA Nano-tweezer Technique That Does Not Require Gene Recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shigeto, Hajime; Nakatsuka, Keisuke; Ikeda, Takeshi; Hirota, Ryuichi; Kuroda, Akio; Funabashi, Hisakage

    2016-08-16

    This letter discusses the feasibility of continuously monitoring specific mRNA expression responses in a living cell with a probe structured as a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based DNA nano-tweezer (DNA-NT). The FRET-based DNA-NT, self-assembled from three single-stranded DNAs, alters its structure from an open state to a closed state in recognition of a target mRNA, resulting in the closing of the distal relation of previously modified FRET-paired fluorescent dyes and generating a FRET signal. The expressions of glucose transporters (GLUT) 1 and 4 in a mouse hepato-carcinoma (Hepa 1-6 cells) were selected as the target model. Live-cell imaging analysis of Hepa 1-6 cells with both FRET-based DNA-NTs indicated that the behaviors of the FRET signals integrated in each individual cell were similar to those measured with the conventional mass analysis technique of semiquantitative real-time (RT) polymerase chain reaction (PCR). From these results, it is concluded that continuous monitoring of gene expression response without gene recombination is feasible with a FRET-based DNA-NT, even in a single cell manner. PMID:27458920

  1. Intramolecular ex vivo Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET of Dihydropyridine Receptor (DHPR β1a Subunit Reveals Conformational Change Induced by RYR1 in Mouse Skeletal Myotubes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dipankar Bhattacharya

    Full Text Available The dihydropyridine receptor (DHPR β1a subunit is essential for skeletal muscle excitation-contraction coupling, but the structural organization of β1a as part of the macromolecular DHPR-ryanodine receptor type I (RyR1 complex is still debatable. We used fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET to probe proximity relationships within the β1a subunit in cultured skeletal myotubes lacking or expressing RyR1. The fluorescein biarsenical reagent FlAsH was used as the FRET acceptor, which exhibits fluorescence upon binding to specific tetracysteine motifs, and enhanced cyan fluorescent protein (CFP was used as the FRET donor. Ten β1a reporter constructs were generated by inserting the CCPGCC FlAsH binding motif into five positions probing the five domains of β1a with either carboxyl or amino terminal fused CFP. FRET efficiency was largest when CCPGCC was positioned next to CFP, and significant intramolecular FRET was observed for all constructs suggesting that in situ the β1a subunit has a relatively compact conformation in which the carboxyl and amino termini are not extended. Comparison of the FRET efficiency in wild type to that in dyspedic (lacking RyR1 myotubes revealed that in only one construct (H458 CCPGCC β1a -CFP FRET efficiency was specifically altered by the presence of RyR1. The present study reveals that the C-terminal of the β1a subunit changes conformation in the presence of RyR1 consistent with an interaction between the C-terminal of β1a and RyR1 in resting myotubes.

  2. Development of a fluorescence resonance energy transfer assay for monitoring bacterial collagenase triple-helical peptidase activity

    OpenAIRE

    Tokmina-Roszyk, Michal; Tokmina-Roszyk, Dorota; Bhowmick, Manishabrata; Fields, Gregg B.

    2014-01-01

    Due to their efficiency in the hydrolysis of the collagen triple-helix, Clostridial histolyticum collagenases are utilized for isolation of cells from various tissues, including isolation of the human pancreatic islets. However, the instability of Clostridial collagenase I (Col G) results in a degraded Col G that has weak collagenolytic activity and an adverse effect on islet isolation and viability. A Föster resonance energy transfer (FRET) triple-helical peptide (fTHP) substrate has been de...

  3. Fluorescent scattering by molecules embedded in small particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studies are reported in these areas: double resonance in fluorescent and Raman scattering; surface enhanced Raman scattering; fluorescence by molecules embedded in small particles; fluorescence by a liquid droplet; and fluorescence by conical pits in surfaces

  4. Study on the absorption and fluorescence and resonance Rayleigh scattering spectra of Cu (II)-fluoroquinolone chelates with erythrosine and their applications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    In pH 4.2-5.0 Britton-Robinson buffer solution medium, fluoroquinolone antibiotics (FLQs), such as ciprofloxacin (CIP), norfloxacin (NOR), ofloxacin (OF), levofloxacin (LEV), lomefloxacin (LOM), and sparfloxacin (SPA), react with Cu (II) to form chelate cations, which further bind with erythrosine to form the ion association complexes. They can result in the changes of the absorption spectra. Simultane- ously, erythrosine fades obviously and the maximum fading wavelength is located at 526 nm. The fad- ing reactions have high sensitivities. Thus, new spectrophotometries of determination for these drugs are developed. The ion-association reactions result in the quenching of fluorescence, which also have high sensitivities. The detection limits for six antibiotics are in the range of 7.1-12.2 μg·L?1. Furthermore, the reactions can result in the enhancement of resonance Rayleigh scattering (RRS). The maximum scattering peaks of six ion-association complexes are located at 566 nm, and there are two small RRS peaks at 333 nm and 287 nm. The detection limits for fluoroquinolone antibiotics are in the range of 1.70 -3.10 μg·L?1 for RRS method. Among the above three methods, the RRS method has the highest sen- sitivity. In this work, we investigated the spectral characteristics of the absorption, fluorescence and RRS, the optimum conditions of the reactions, and the properties of the analytical chemistry. In addi- tion, the mechanism of reactions were discussed by density function theory (DFT) and AM1 methods.

  5. Differential detection of Trichinella papuae, T. spiralis and T. pseudospiralis by real-time fluorescence resonance energy transfer PCR and melting curve analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tantrawatpan, Chairat; Intapan, Pewpan M; Thanchomnang, Tongjit; Lulitanond, Viraphong; Boonmars, Thidarut; Wu, Zhiliang; Morakote, Nimit; Maleewong, Wanchai

    2012-04-30

    Trichinellosis caused by nematodes of Trichinella spp. is a zoonotic foodborne disease. Three Trichinella species of the parasite including Trichinella spiralis, Trichinella papuae and Trichinella pseudospiralis, have been etiologic agents of human trichinellosis in Thailand. Definite diagnosis of this helminthiasis is based on a finding of the Trichinella larva (e) in a muscle biopsy. The parasite species or genotype can be determined using molecular methods, e.g., polymerase chain reaction (PCR). This study has utilized real-time fluorescence resonance energy transfer PCR (real-time FRET PCR) and a melting curve analysis for the differential diagnosis of trichinellosis. Three common Trichinella species in Thailand were studied using one set of primers and fluorophore-labeled hybridization probes specific for the small subunit of the mitochondrial ribosomal RNA gene. Using fewer than 35 cycles as the cut-off for positivity and using different melting temperatures (T(m)), this assay detected T. spiralis, T. papuae and T. pseudospiralis in muscle tissue and found the mean T(m) ± SD values to be 51.79 ± 0.06, 66.09 ± 0.46 and 51.46 ± 0.09, respectively. The analytical sensitivity of the technique enabled the detection of a single Trichinella larva of each species, and the detection limit for the target DNA sequence was 16 copies of positive control plasmid. A test of the technique's analytical specificity showed no fluorescence signal for a panel of 19 non-Trichinella parasites or for human and mouse genomic DNA. Due to the sensitivity and specificity of the detection of these Trichinella species, as well as the fast and high-throughput nature of these tools, this method has application potential in differentiating non-encapsulated larvae of T. papuae from T. spiralis and T. pseudospiralis in tissues of infected humans and animals. PMID:22037059

  6. Towards multi-colour strategies for the detection of oligonucleotide hybridization using quantum dots as energy donors in fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The potential for a simultaneous two-colour diagnostic scheme for nucleic acids operating on the basis of fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) has been demonstrated. Upon ultraviolet excitation, two-colours of CdSe/ZnS quantum dots with conjugated oligonucleotide probes act as energy donors yielding FRET-sensitized acceptor emission upon hybridization with fluorophore (Cy3 and Alexa647) labeled target oligonucleotides. Energy transfer efficiencies, Foerster distances, changes in quantum yield and lifetime, and signal-to-noise with respect to non-specific adsorption have been investigated. The dynamic range and limit-of-detection are tunable with the concentration of QD-DNA conjugate. The Cy3 and Alexa647 acceptor schemes can detect target from 4 to 100% or 10 to 100% of the QD-DNA conjugate concentration, respectively. Nanomolar limits of detection have been demonstrated in this paper, however, results indicate that picomolar detection limits can be achieved with standard instrumentation. The use of an intercalating dye (ethidium bromide) as an acceptor to alleviate non-specific adsorption is also described and increases signal-to-noise from S/N < 2 to S/N = 9-10. The ethidium bromide system had a dynamic range from 8 to 100% of the QD-DNA conjugate concentration and could detect target in a matrix containing an excess of non-complementary nucleic acid

  7. A bead-based fluorescence immunosensing technique enabled by the integration of Förster resonance energy transfer and optoelectrokinetic concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jhih-Cheng; Ku, Hu-Yao; Shieh, Dar-Bin; Chuang, Han-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Bead-based immunosensing has been growing as a promising technology in the point-of-care diagnostics due to great flexibility. For dilute samples, functionalized particles can be used to collect dispersed analytes and act as carriers for particle manipulation. To realize rapid and visual immunosensing, Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) was used herein to ensure only the diabetic biomarker, lipocalin 1, to be detected. The measurement was made in an aqueous droplet sandwiched between two parallel plate electrodes. With an electric field and a focused laser beam applying on the microchip simultaneously, the immunocomplexes in the droplet were further concentrated to enhance the FRET fluorescent signal. The optoelectrokinetic technique, termed rapid electrokinetic patterning (REP), has been proven to be excellent in dynamic and programmable particle manipulation. Therefore, the detection can be complete within several tens of seconds. The lower detection limit of the REP-enabled bead-based diagnosis reached nearly 5 nM. The combinative use of FRET and the optoelectrokinetic technique for the bead-based immunosensing enables a rapid measure to diagnose early stage diseases and dilute analytes. PMID:26865906

  8. Interfacial Chemistry and the Design of Solid-Phase Nucleic Acid Hybridization Assays Using Immobilized Quantum Dots as Donors in Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrich J. Krull

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The use of quantum dots (QDs as donors in fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET offer several advantages for the development of multiplexed solid-phase QD-FRET nucleic acid hybridization assays. Designs for multiplexing have been demonstrated, but important challenges remain in the optimization of these systems. In this work, we identify several strategies based on the design of interfacial chemistry for improving sensitivity, obtaining lower limits of detection (LOD and enabling the regeneration and reuse of solid-phase QD-FRET hybridization assays. FRET-sensitized emission from acceptor dyes associated with hybridization events at immobilized QD donors provides the analytical signal in these assays. The minimization of active sensing area reduces background from QD donor PL and allows the resolution of smaller amounts of acceptor emission, thus lowering the LOD. The association of multiple acceptor dyes with each hybridization event can enhance FRET efficiency, thereby improving sensitivity. Many previous studies have used interfacial protein layers to generate selectivity; however, transient destabilization of these layers is shown to prevent efficient regeneration. To this end, we report a protein-free interfacial chemistry and demonstrate the specific detection of as little as 2 pmol of target, as well as an improved capacity for regeneration.

  9. A novel ionic liquid-in-oil microemulsion composed of biologically acceptable components: an excitation wavelength dependent fluorescence resonance energy transfer study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, Sarthak; Ghosh, Surajit; Banerjee, Chiranjib; Kuchlyan, Jagannath; Banik, Debasis; Sarkar, Nilmoni

    2013-03-21

    In this work we have reported the formulation of a novel ionic liquid-in-oil (IL/O) microemulsion where the polar core of the ionic liquid, 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium n-butylsulfate ([C2mim][C4SO4]), is stabilized by a mixture of two nontoxic nonionic surfactants, polyoxyethylene sorbitan monooleate (Tween-80) and sorbitan laurate (Span-20), in a biological oil phase of isopropyl myristate (IPM). The formation of the microemulsion droplets has been confirmed from the dynamic light scattering (DLS) and phase behavior study. To assess the dynamic heterogeneity of this tween-based IL/O microemulsion, we have performed an excitation wavelength dependent fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) from coumarin 480 (C480) to rhodamine 6G (R6G). The multiple donor-acceptor (D-A) distances, ∼15, 30, and 45 Å, obtained from the rise times of the acceptor emission in the presence of a donor can be rationalized from the varying distribution of the donor, C480, in the different regions of the microemulsion system. With increasing the excitation wavelength from 375 to 408 nm, the contribution of the rise component of ∼240 ps which results the D-A distance of ∼30 Å increases significantly due to the enhanced contribution of the C480 probe molecules closer to the acceptor in the ionic liquid pool of the microemulsion. PMID:23445434

  10. Determination of the electromagnetic dipole strength distribution in medium-heavy atomic nuclei by means of nuclear resonance fluorescence; Bestimmung der elektromagnetischen Dipolstaerkeverteilung in mittelschweren Atomkernen mittels Kernresonanzfluoreszenz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Massarczyk, Ralph Jens

    2011-01-17

    During the last hundred years several models were developed to describe the configuration of nuclei. These models have to make predictions, which should be comparable with experiments. As a standard type of experiment the nuclear resonance fluorescence was established. A nucleus is excited by irradiation with photons. By emitting one or more photons the nucleus decays back to the ground state. With this method it is possible to measure energy levels and to determine the strength of their excitation. A continuum of unresolved peaks gives additional strength. The existing setup at the linear electron accelerator ELBE of the Forschungszentrum Dresden-Rossendorf uses bremsstrahlung, produced as a secondary beam in a thin Niobium foil. During the years 2008/09 experiments on the nuclei of {sup 86}Kr and {sup 136}Ba took place there. In this work they will be analyzed. Photon flux and efficiency determination have been done as well as simulations on detector response and non-nuclear scattered background events. For this purpose the GEANT4 package was used. Finally the resulting cross sections were corrected for branching and feeding.

  11. Application of the laser induced fluorescence to the investigation of highly magnetized plasmas, heated by ion cyclotron resonance; Fluorescence induite par laser sur des plasmas fortement magnetises, chauffes par resonnance cyclotron ionique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pailloux, A. [CEA Centre d`Etudes de Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France). Dept. des Procedes d`Enrichissement]|[Universite Louis Pasteur, 67 - Strasbourg (France)

    1997-12-31

    This work has been achieved in the frame of isotopic separation studies by in cyclotron resonance. For this purpose, in a highly magnetized (2 to 3 Tesla) and non-collisional (10{sup 12} ions/cm{sup 3}) plasma, composed of metallic ions, a wave near the ion cyclotron frequency is thrown in order to heat selectively a given species. A laser induced fluorescence (LIP) has been developed on barium and gadolinium plasmas. The Larmor gyration of ions greatly modifies the interaction, which has been modelled through the time-dependent Schroedinger equation. The obtained excitation probably has been integrated over all the ions excited in the measurement volume in order to check that the LIF still leads to the distribution function of ion velocities. The influence of the Larmor motion of ions on the spectral distribution of LIF has been derived both theoretically and experimentally. The LIF diagnostics has been achieved with a dye O`ring laser. The barium ion has been excited on the transition 6142 angstrom, using rhodamine 6G dye, and the gadolinium ion on the pseudo-triplet 3861 angstrom, using exalite dye. Data treatment has been developed taking into account the Zeeman effect and the different heating of isotopes. The ionic temperature (from 1 eV to some hundreds eV) has been measured as a function of radiofrequency heating. Our experimental results are in good agreement with the selective heating theory. Also, the ion velocity distribution function has been found locally Maxwellian. And the behaviour of the plasma has been studied as a function of control parameters of the plasma source. (author) 62 refs.

  12. Lateral Distribution of NBD-PC Fluorescent Lipid Analogs in Membranes Probed by Molecular Dynamics-Assisted Analysis of Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET and Fluorescence Quenching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luís M. S. Loura

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET is a powerful tool used for many problems in membrane biophysics, including characterization of the lateral distribution of lipid components and other species of interest. However, quantitative analysis of FRET data with a topological model requires adequate choices for the values of several input parameters, some of which are difficult to obtain experimentally in an independent manner. For this purpose, atomistic molecular dynamics (MD simulations can be potentially useful as they provide direct detailed information on transverse probe localization, relative probe orientation, and membrane surface area, all of which are required for analysis of FRET data. This is illustrated here for the FRET pairs involving 1,6-diphenylhexatriene (DPH as donor and either 1-palmitoyl,2-(6-[N-(7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazol-4-ylamino] hexanoyl- sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (C6-NBD-PC or 1-palmitoyl,2-(12-[N-(7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazol-4-ylamino]dodecanoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (C12-NBD-PC as acceptors, in fluid vesicles of 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-3-glycerophosphocholine (DPPC, 50 °C. Incorporation of results from MD simulations improves the statistical quality of model fitting to the experimental FRET data. Furthermore, the decay of DPH in the presence of moderate amounts of C12-NBD-PC (>0.4 mol% is consistent with non-random lateral distribution of the latter, at variance with C6-NBD-PC, for which aggregation is ruled out up to 2.5 mol% concentration. These conclusions are supported by analysis of NBD-PC fluorescence self-quenching. Implications regarding the relative utility of these probes in membrane studies are discussed.

  13. Lateral distribution of NBD-PC fluorescent lipid analogs in membranes probed by molecular dynamics-assisted analysis of Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) and fluorescence quenching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loura, Luís M S

    2012-01-01

    Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) is a powerful tool used for many problems in membrane biophysics, including characterization of the lateral distribution of lipid components and other species of interest. However, quantitative analysis of FRET data with a topological model requires adequate choices for the values of several input parameters, some of which are difficult to obtain experimentally in an independent manner. For this purpose, atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations can be potentially useful as they provide direct detailed information on transverse probe localization, relative probe orientation, and membrane surface area, all of which are required for analysis of FRET data. This is illustrated here for the FRET pairs involving 1,6-diphenylhexatriene (DPH) as donor and either 1-palmitoyl,2-(6-[N-(7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazol-4-yl)amino] hexanoyl)- sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (C6-NBD-PC) or 1-palmitoyl,2-(12-[N-(7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazol-4-yl)amino]dodecanoyl)-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (C12-NBD-PC) as acceptors, in fluid vesicles of 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-3-glycerophosphocholine (DPPC, 50 °C). Incorporation of results from MD simulations improves the statistical quality of model fitting to the experimental FRET data. Furthermore, the decay of DPH in the presence of moderate amounts of C12-NBD-PC (>0.4 mol%) is consistent with non-random lateral distribution of the latter, at variance with C6-NBD-PC, for which aggregation is ruled out up to 2.5 mol% concentration. These conclusions are supported by analysis of NBD-PC fluorescence self-quenching. Implications regarding the relative utility of these probes in membrane studies are discussed. PMID:23203080

  14. Study of the dispersion phenomena connected with the absorption by recoilless nuclear resonance fluorescence; Etude des phenomenes de dispersion lies a l'absorption resonnante sans recul des noyaux atomiques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imbert, P. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1965-12-01

    In nuclear resonance fluorescence as in the optical field abnormal dispersion curves are related to the absorption lines. It is possible, by using quadrupolar or magnetic splitting of the line in the case of recoilless resonance fluorescence (Moessbauer effect) to obtain differential dispersion effects between the two orthogonal linear or the two inverse circular components of the incident gamma radiation. These effects induce bi-refraction phenomena or Faraday rotation on the gamma beam, which have been studied on Fe-57 enriched absorbers. (author) [French] Comme dans le domaine optique, aux raies d'absorption de fluorescence resonnante des noyaux atomiques sont associees des courbes de dispersion anormale. Les decompositions des raies d'absorption de fluorescence resonnante sans recul (raies Moessbauer) par couplage quadrupolaire ou effet Zeeman permettent d'obtenir des effets dispersifs differentiels entre composantes lineaires orthogonales ou circulaires inverses du rayonnement gamma incident. Ces effets se traduisent par des phenomenes de birefringence ou de rotation Faraday, qui ont pu etre etudies sur des milieux enrichis en fer-57. (auteur)

  15. Optical-optical double resonance, laser induced fluorescence, and revision of the signs of the spin-spin constants of the boron carbide (BC) free radical

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunahori, Fumie X.; Nagarajan, Ramya; Clouthier, Dennis J.

    2015-12-01

    The cold boron carbide free radical (BC X 4Σ-) has been produced in a pulsed discharge free jet expansion using a precursor mixture of trimethylborane in high pressure argon. High resolution laser induced fluorescence spectra have been obtained for the B 4Σ--X 4Σ- and E 4Π-X 4Σ- band systems of both 11BC and 10BC. An optical-optical double resonance (OODR) scheme was implemented to study the finer details of both band systems. This involved pumping a single rotational level of the B state with one laser and then recording the various allowed transitions from the intermediate B state to the final E state with a second laser by monitoring the subsequent E-X ultraviolet fluorescence. In this fashion, we were able to prove unambiguously that, contrary to previous studies, the spin-spin constant λ is negative in the ground state and positive in the B 4Σ- excited state. It has been shown that λ″ < 0 is in fact expected based on a semiempirical second order perturbation theory calculation of the magnitude of the spin-spin constant. The OODR spectra have also been used to validate our assignments of the complex and badly overlapped E 4Π-X 4Σ- 0-0 and 1-0 bands of 11BC. The E-X 0-0 band of 10BC was found to be severely perturbed. The ground state main electron configuration is …3σ24σ25σ11π22π0 and the derived bond lengths show that there is a 0.03 Å contraction in the B state, due to the promotion of an electron from the 4σ antibonding orbital to the 5σ bonding orbital. In contrast, the bond length elongates by 0.15 Å in the E state, a result of promoting an electron from the 5σ bonding orbital to the 2π antibonding orbitals.

  16. Optical-optical double resonance, laser induced fluorescence, and revision of the signs of the spin-spin constants of the boron carbide (BC) free radical

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The cold boron carbide free radical (BC X 4Σ−) has been produced in a pulsed discharge free jet expansion using a precursor mixture of trimethylborane in high pressure argon. High resolution laser induced fluorescence spectra have been obtained for the B 4Σ−–X 4Σ− and E 4Π–X 4Σ− band systems of both 11BC and 10BC. An optical-optical double resonance (OODR) scheme was implemented to study the finer details of both band systems. This involved pumping a single rotational level of the B state with one laser and then recording the various allowed transitions from the intermediate B state to the final E state with a second laser by monitoring the subsequent E–X ultraviolet fluorescence. In this fashion, we were able to prove unambiguously that, contrary to previous studies, the spin-spin constant λ is negative in the ground state and positive in the B 4Σ− excited state. It has been shown that λ″ < 0 is in fact expected based on a semiempirical second order perturbation theory calculation of the magnitude of the spin-spin constant. The OODR spectra have also been used to validate our assignments of the complex and badly overlapped E 4Π–X 4Σ− 0-0 and 1-0 bands of 11BC. The E–X 0-0 band of 10BC was found to be severely perturbed. The ground state main electron configuration is …3σ24σ25σ11π22π0 and the derived bond lengths show that there is a 0.03 Å contraction in the B state, due to the promotion of an electron from the 4σ antibonding orbital to the 5σ bonding orbital. In contrast, the bond length elongates by 0.15 Å in the E state, a result of promoting an electron from the 5σ bonding orbital to the 2π antibonding orbitals

  17. Optical-optical double resonance, laser induced fluorescence, and revision of the signs of the spin-spin constants of the boron carbide (BC) free radical

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sunahori, Fumie X. [Department of Chemistry and Physics, Franklin College, Franklin, Indiana 46131 (United States); Nagarajan, Ramya; Clouthier, Dennis J., E-mail: dclaser@uky.edu [Department of Chemistry, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky 40506-0055 (United States)

    2015-12-14

    The cold boron carbide free radical (BC X {sup 4}Σ{sup −}) has been produced in a pulsed discharge free jet expansion using a precursor mixture of trimethylborane in high pressure argon. High resolution laser induced fluorescence spectra have been obtained for the B {sup 4}Σ{sup −}–X {sup 4}Σ{sup −} and E {sup 4}Π–X {sup 4}Σ{sup −} band systems of both {sup 11}BC and {sup 10}BC. An optical-optical double resonance (OODR) scheme was implemented to study the finer details of both band systems. This involved pumping a single rotational level of the B state with one laser and then recording the various allowed transitions from the intermediate B state to the final E state with a second laser by monitoring the subsequent E–X ultraviolet fluorescence. In this fashion, we were able to prove unambiguously that, contrary to previous studies, the spin-spin constant λ is negative in the ground state and positive in the B {sup 4}Σ{sup −} excited state. It has been shown that λ″ < 0 is in fact expected based on a semiempirical second order perturbation theory calculation of the magnitude of the spin-spin constant. The OODR spectra have also been used to validate our assignments of the complex and badly overlapped E {sup 4}Π–X {sup 4}Σ{sup −} 0-0 and 1-0 bands of {sup 11}BC. The E–X 0-0 band of {sup 10}BC was found to be severely perturbed. The ground state main electron configuration is …3σ{sup 2}4σ{sup 2}5σ{sup 1}1π{sup 2}2π{sup 0} and the derived bond lengths show that there is a 0.03 Å contraction in the B state, due to the promotion of an electron from the 4σ antibonding orbital to the 5σ bonding orbital. In contrast, the bond length elongates by 0.15 Å in the E state, a result of promoting an electron from the 5σ bonding orbital to the 2π antibonding orbitals.

  18. A Fluorescent Indicator for Imaging Lysosomal Zinc(II) with Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET)-Enhanced Photostability and a Narrow Band of Emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sreenath, Kesavapillai; Yuan, Zhao; Allen, John R.

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate a strategy to transfer the zinc(II) sensitivity of a fluoroionophore with low photostability and a broad emission band to a bright and photostable fluorophore with a narrow emission band. The two fluorophores are covalently connected to afford an intramolecular Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) conjugate. The FRET donor in the conjugate is a zinc(II)-sensitive arylvinylbipyridyl fluoroionophore, the absorption and emission of which undergo bathochromic shifts upon zinc(II) coordination. When the FRET donor is excited, efficient intramolecular energy transfer occurs to result in the emission of the acceptor boron dipyrromethene (4,4-difluoro-4-bora-3a,4a-diaza-s-indacene or BODIPY) as a function of zinc(II) concentration. The broad emission band of the donor/zinc(II) complex is transformed into the strong, narrow emission band of the BODIPY acceptor in the FRET conjugates, which can be captured within the narrow emission window that is preferred for multicolor imaging experiments. In addition to competing with other nonradiative decay processes of the FRET donor, the rapid intramolecular FRET of the excited FRET-conjugate molecule protects the donor fluorophore from photobleaching, thus enhancing the photostability of the indicator. FRET conjugates 3 and 4 contain aliphatic amino groups, which selectively target lysosomes in mammalian cells. This subcellular localization preference was verified by using confocal fluorescence microscopy, which also shows the zinc(II)-enhanced emission of 3 and 4 in lysosomes. It was further shown using two-color structured illumination microscopy (SIM), which is capable of extending the lateral resolution over the Abbe diffraction limit by a factor of two, that the morpholino-functionalized compound 4 localizes in the interior of lysosomes, rather than anchoring on the lysosomal membranes, of live HeLa cells. PMID:25382395

  19. Preliminary Study of the Efficacy of Using Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence with Quasi-Monoenergetic Gamma-Ray Sources for Nuclear Safeguards Assay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, M S; McNabb, D P; Hall, J M; Gonzalez, J J

    2011-02-17

    We have studied the efficacy of using nuclear resonance fluorescence (NRF)-based techniques to assay spent nuclear fuel for Pu content using quasi-monoenergetic sources. We have developed two techniques to precisely determine the Pu content in a fuel rod/pin. One of our approaches is virtually free of systematic uncertainties. Using analytical models, we have determined the amount of time required to measure the Pu content in spent nuclear fuel rods and spent fuel assemblies to within 1% precision. We note that Pu content can be determined in a fuel assembly about as fast as in a single fuel pin. The performance of NRF-based assay techniques with improved photon sources, which are currently under development, will also estimated. For follow-on research we propose to: (1) Construct research prototype detection systems for both of the NRF-based assay systems proposed in this paper and measure their calibration curves; (2) Determine the systematic errors associated with both assay methods, explore ways to reduce the errors and fold the results into future performance calculations; (3) Develop an algorithm to assay a fuel assembly; (4) Perform validation measurements using a single pin and scaled assemblies; (5) Research and develop current-mode detection and/or threshold detection techniques to improve assay times; (6) Characterize the flux of newly constructed sources and fold the results into the calculations presented here to determine the feasibility of a variety of proposed sources; and (7) Collaborate with others in the safeguards community to build a prototype system and perform an NRF-based assay demonstration on spent fuel.

  20. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer between NaYF{sub 4}:Yb,Tm upconversion nanoparticles and gold nanorods: Near-infrared responsive biosensor for streptavidin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Shuang; Wang, Jing; Xu, Wen; Chen, Boting; Yu, Wei; Xu, Lin; Song, Hongwei, E-mail: songhw@jlu.edu.cn

    2014-03-15

    We represent a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) system using upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs) and the gold nanorods (GNRs) as the energy donor–acceptor pair for directly determining streptavidin in near-infrared (NIR) region. NaYF{sub 4}:Yb,Tm UCNPs, which had a strong emission at 800 nm under 980-nm excitation, were adopted as the energy donor. The GNRs, which demonstrated strong surface plasmon absorption around 800 nm, were chosen as acceptor to quench the 800 nm emissions of the UCNPs. There had the spectral overlap between the emission of the donor nanoparticles (UCNPs) and the absorption of the acceptor nanoparticles (GNRs). This UCNP-based FRET system was then used to determine the amount of streptavidin. In this system, NaYF{sub 4}:Yb,Tm UCNPs conjugated with biotin, while GNRs conjugated with streptavidin. When added GNRs into UCNPs, the streptavidin were preferred to bind with biotin and decreased spacing between the donor and acceptor NPs. Consequently, FRET occurred and a linear relationship between the luminescence quenching efficiency and the concentration of streptavidin was obtained. Owing to the aforementioned merits of UCNPs as an energy donor and the strong quenching ability of GNRs, satisfactory analytical performances have been acquired. -- Highlights: • NaYF4:Yb,Tm and GNRs are as NIR energy donor and quenching acceptor for FRET. • Linkage between biotin and streptavidin make the distance between the donors and the acceptors short enough for FRET. • The FRET system in this work was applicable for the detection of streptavidin. • The donor and acceptor NPs can be modified by proper molecules for other biological molecules detection.

  1. Effect of enhanced Renilla luciferase and fluorescent protein variants on the Förster distance of Bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► First experimental determination of Förster distance (R0) for enhanced BRET systems. ► Effect of brighter BRET components RLuc2, RLuc8 and Venus was assessed. ► Using brighter BRET components substantially increased (25%) R0 of the BRET1 system. ► Using brighter BRET components marginally increased (2–9%) R0 of the BRET2 system. ► Brighter BRET components improve the different weaknesses of BRET1 and BRET2 systems. -- Abstract: Bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) is an important tool for monitoring macromolecular interactions and is useful as a transduction technique for biosensor development. Förster distance (R0), the intermolecular separation characterized by 50% of the maximum possible energy transfer, is a critical BRET parameter. R0 provides a means of linking measured changes in BRET ratio to a physical dimension scale and allows estimation of the range of distances that can be measured by any donor–acceptor pair. The sensitivity of BRET assays has recently been improved by introduction of new BRET components, RLuc2, RLuc8 and Venus with improved quantum yields, stability and brightness. We determined R0 for BRET1 systems incorporating novel RLuc variants RLuc2 or RLuc8, in combination with Venus, as 5.68 or 5.55 nm respectively. These values were approximately 25% higher than the R0 of the original BRET1 system. R0 for BRET2 systems combining green fluorescent proteins (GFP2) with RLuc2 or RLuc8 variants was 7.67 or 8.15 nm, i.e. only 2–9% greater than the original BRET2 system despite being ∼30-fold brighter.

  2. Application of fluorescence resonance energy transfer techniques to the study of lectin-binding site distribution on Paramecium primaurelia (Protista, Ciliophora) cell surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locatelli, D; Delmonte Corrado, M U; Politi, H; Bottiroli, G

    1998-01-01

    Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) is a photophysical phenomenon occurring between the molecules of two fluorochromes with suitable spectral characteristics (donor-acceptor dye pair), and consisting in an excitation energy migration through a non-radiative process. Since the efficiency of the process is strictly dependent on the distance and reciprocal orientation of the donor and acceptor molecules, FRET-based techniques can be successfully applied to the study of biomolecules and cell component organisation and distribution. These techniques have been employed in studying Paramecium primaurelia surface membrane for the reciprocal distribution of N-acetylneuraminic acid (NeuAc) and N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) glycosidic residues, which were found to be involved in mating cell pairing. NeuAc and GlcNAc were detected by their specific binding lectins, Limulus polyphemus agglutinin (LPA) and wheat germ agglutinin (WGA), respectively. Microspectrofluorometric analysis afforded the choice of fluorescein isothiocyanate and Texas red conjugated with LPA and WGA, respectively, as a suitable donor-acceptor couple efficiently activating FRET processes. Studies performed both in solution and in cells allowed to define the experimental conditions favourable for a FRET analysis. The comparative study carried out both on the conjugating-region and the non conjugating region of the surface membrane, indicates that FRET distribution appears quite homogeneous in mating-competent mating type (mt) I, whereas, in mating-competent mt II cells, FRET distribution seems to be preferentially localised on the conjugating-region functionally involved in mating cell pairing. This difference in the distribution of lectin-binding sites is suggested to be related to mating-competence acquisition. PMID:9857246

  3. Preliminary Study of the Efficacy of Using Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence with Quasi-Monoenergetic Gamma-Ray Sources for Nuclear Safeguards Assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have studied the efficacy of using nuclear resonance fluorescence (NRF)-based techniques to assay spent nuclear fuel for Pu content using quasi-monoenergetic sources. We have developed two techniques to precisely determine the Pu content in a fuel rod/pin. One of our approaches is virtually free of systematic uncertainties. Using analytical models, we have determined the amount of time required to measure the Pu content in spent nuclear fuel rods and spent fuel assemblies to within 1% precision. We note that Pu content can be determined in a fuel assembly about as fast as in a single fuel pin. The performance of NRF-based assay techniques with improved photon sources, which are currently under development, will also estimated. For follow-on research we propose to: (1) Construct research prototype detection systems for both of the NRF-based assay systems proposed in this paper and measure their calibration curves; (2) Determine the systematic errors associated with both assay methods, explore ways to reduce the errors and fold the results into future performance calculations; (3) Develop an algorithm to assay a fuel assembly; (4) Perform validation measurements using a single pin and scaled assemblies; (5) Research and develop current-mode detection and/or threshold detection techniques to improve assay times; (6) Characterize the flux of newly constructed sources and fold the results into the calculations presented here to determine the feasibility of a variety of proposed sources; and (7) Collaborate with others in the safeguards community to build a prototype system and perform an NRF-based assay demonstration on spent fuel.

  4. Ultrafast resonance energy transfer from a site-specifically attached fluorescent chromophore reveals the folding of the N-terminal domain of CP29

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oort, van B.F.; Murali, S.; Wientjes, E.; Koehorst, R.B.M.; Spruijt, R.B.; Hoek, van A.; Croce, R.; Amerongen, van H.

    2009-01-01

    The photosynthetic minor antenna complex CP29 of higher plants was singly mutated, overexpressed in Escherichia coli, selectively labeled with the fluorescent dye TAMRA at three positions in the N-terminal domain, and reconstituted with its natural pigments. Picosecond fluorescence experiments revea

  5. Cell-Based Biosensors Principles and Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Ping

    2009-01-01

    Written by recognized experts the field, this leading-edge resource is the first book to systematically introduce the concept, technology, and development of cell-based biosensors. You find details on the latest cell-based biosensor models and novel micro-structure biosensor techniques. Taking an interdisciplinary approach, this unique volume presents the latest innovative applications of cell-based biosensors in a variety of biomedical fields. The book also explores future trends of cell-based biosensors, including integrated chips, nanotechnology and microfluidics. Over 140 illustrations hel

  6. Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer Probe Based on Nano-Ag-EY-DNA System%基于纳米银-曙红Y-DNA的荧光共振能量转移探针

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    魏光成; 闫苗苗; 马丽英

    2012-01-01

    The resonance energy transfer between nano-Ag and eosin Y (EY)-DNA was studied by UV-Vis spectrophotometry, fluorospectrophotometry and electrophoresis with EY-DNA as fluorescence probe. The phenomenon of interaction between nano-Ag and EY-DNA was explained by the theory of fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). It was found that the reaction of EY with DNA was due to inserting action, and the reaction between nano Ag and DNA was due to electrostatic action. The structure of DNA was changed after binding with EY and nano-Ag.%以曙红Y—DNA为荧光探针,运用紫外可见光谱法、荧光光谱法和电泳法研究了纳米银与曙红Y—DNA之间的共振能量转移,并应用能量共振转移的原理解释了纳米银及曙红Y与DNA之间的相互作用。结果表明,曙红Y与DNA的作用方式为嵌插作用,纳米银与DNA的作用方式为静电作用,曙红Y和纳米银结合到DNA上以后,导致了DNA结构的改变。

  7. Fabricating a novel label-free aptasensor for acetamiprid by fluorescence resonance energy transfer between NH2-NaYF4: Yb, Ho@SiO2 and Au nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Weiwei; Chen, Quansheng; Li, Huanhuan; Ouyang, Qin; Zhao, Jiewen

    2016-06-15

    Rare earth-doped upconversion nanoparticles have promising potential in the field of pesticide detection because of their unique frequency upconverting capability and high detection sensitivity. This paper reports a novel aptamer-based nanosensor for acetamiprid detection using fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) between NH2-NaYF4: Yb, Ho@SiO2 (UCNPs) and gold nanoparticles (GNPs). Herein, GNPs as acceptors efficiently quench the fluorescence of UCNPs and acetamiprid specifically interacts with acetamiprid binding aptamer (ABA), causing the conformation changes of ABA from random coil to hairpin structure. Accordingly, ABA no longer stabilizes the GNPs in salt solution, leading to the varying aggregation extent of GNPs. Thus, the fluorescence of UCNPs are proportionally recovered. Under the optimized conditions, the enhancement efficiency was observed to increase linearly with the concentration of acetamiprid from 50nM to 1000nM, resulting in a relatively low limit of 3.2nM. Additionally, the aptasensor demonstrated high selectivity to similar structure pesticides such as imidacloprid and chlorpyrifos, and further confirmed its application capacity in adulterated tea samples. PMID:26874106

  8. A fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) based "Turn-On" nanofluorescence sensor using a nitrogen-doped carbon dot-hexagonal cobalt oxyhydroxide nanosheet architecture and application to α-glucosidase inhibitor screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guoliang; Kong, Weiheng; Zhao, Mei; Lu, Shuaimin; Gong, Peiwei; Chen, Guang; Xia, Lian; Wang, Hua; You, Jinmao; Wu, Yongning

    2016-05-15

    The medicines targeted at α-glucosidase played an important role in anti-diabetes and anti-HIV therapy. Unfortunately, the method based on fluorescent assay strategy for α-glucosidase inhibitor screening remains poorly investigated. In this study, a novel "Turn On" fluorescence sensor platform has been developed for trace α-glucosidase inhibitor screening from natural medicines. Firstly, carbon dots were prepared by one-pot synthesis and used as the signal output. Combining with the carbon dots, cobalt oxyhydroxide (CoOOH) nanoflakes were employed to build the fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) based sensor platform. Secondly, L-ascorbic acid-2-O-α-D-glucopyranosyl (AAG) was innovatively introduced as α-glucosidase substrate. With hydrolysis of AAG by α-glucosidase, ascorbic acids (AA) were released that can rapidly reduce CoOOH nanoflakes to Co(2+), and then FRET was stopped accompanying with the fluorescence recovery of CDs. The sensor platform was ultrasensitive to AA with a detection limit of 5nM, ensuring the sensitive monitoring of enzyme activity. Acarbose was used as the inhibitor model and its inhibition rate is proportional to the logarithm of concentration in range of 10(-9)-10(-3)M with the correlation coefficient of R(2)=0.996, and an ultralow limit of detection of ~1×10(-9)M was obtained. The inhibiting ability of seven compounds isolated from natural medicines was also evaluated. The constructed sensor platform was proven to be sensitive and selective as well as cost-effective, facile and reliable, making it promising as a candidate for trace α-glucosidase inhibitor screening. PMID:26774085

  9. Lateral Distribution of NBD-PC Fluorescent Lipid Analogs in Membranes Probed by Molecular Dynamics-Assisted Analysis of Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) and Fluorescence Quenching

    OpenAIRE

    Luís M. S. Loura

    2012-01-01

    Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) is a powerful tool used for many problems in membrane biophysics, including characterization of the lateral distribution of lipid components and other species of interest. However, quantitative analysis of FRET data with a topological model requires adequate choices for the values of several input parameters, some of which are difficult to obtain experimentally in an independent manner. For this purpose, atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simul...

  10. Auxiliary pattern for cell-based OPC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahng, Andrew B.; Park, Chul-Hong

    2006-10-01

    The runtime of model-based optical proximity correction (OPC) tools has grown unacceptably with each successive technology generation, and has emerged as one of the major bottlenecks for turnaround time (TAT) of IC data preparation and manufacturing. The cell-based OPC approach improves runtime by performing OPC once per cell definition as opposed to once per cell instantiation in the layout. However, cell-based OPC does not comprehend inter-cell optical interactions that affect feature printability in a layout context. In this work, we propose auxiliary pattern-enabled cell-based OPC which can minimize the CD differences between cell-based OPC and model-based OPC. To enable effective insertion of auxiliary pattern (AP) in the design, we also propose a post-placement optimization of a standard cell block with respect to detailed placement. By dynamic programming-based placement perturbation, we achieve 100% AP applicability in designs with placement utilizations of cell-based OPC with AP can match gate edge placement error (EPE) count of model-based OPC within 4%. This is an improvement of 90%, on average, over cell-based OPC without APs. The AP-based OPC approach can reduce OPC runtimes versus model-based OPC by up to 40X in our benchmark designs. We can also achieve reduction of GDSII file size and ORC runtimes due to hierarchy maintenance of cell-based OPC.

  11. Targeting human c-Myc promoter duplex DNA with actinomycin D by use of multi-way analysis of quantum-dot-mediated fluorescence resonance energy transfer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gholami, Somayeh; Kompany Zare, Mohsen

    2013-01-01

    investigated by use of 2D-photoluminescence emission (2D-PLE), and the resulting data were subjected to analysis by use of convenient and powerful multi-way approaches. Fluorescence measurements were performed by use of the quantum dot (QD)-conjugated c-Myc promoter. Intercalation of 7AAD within duplex base...... important advantage over univariate classical methods of enabling us to investigate the source of variance in the fluorescence signal of the DNA-drug complex. It was established that hard trilinear decomposition analysis of FRET-measured data overcomes the problem of rank deficiency, enabling calculation of...... hybridization stability 1.0 x 10(8) mol(-1) L obtained were in good agreement with values reported in the literature. The analytical concentration of the QD-labeled DNA was determined by use of nonlinear fitting, without using external standard calibration samples. This study was a successful application of...

  12. Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer of the Tb(III)-Nd(III) Binary System in Molten LiCl-KCl Eutectic Salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The lanthanides act as a neutron poison in nuclear reactor with large neutron absorption cross section. For that reason, very low amount of lanthanides is required in the recovered U/TRU ingot product from pyrochemical process. In view of that, the investigation of thermodynamic properties and chemical behaviors of lanthanides in molten chloride salt are necessary to estimate the performance efficiency of pyrochemical process. However, there are uncertainties about knowledge and understanding of basic mechanisms in pyrochemical process, such as chemical speciation and redox behaviors due to the lack of in-situ monitoring methods for high temperature molten salt. The spectroscopic analysis is one of the probable techniques for in-situ qualitative and quantitative analysis. Recently, a few fluorescence spectroscopic measurements on single lanthanide element in molten LiCl-KCl eutectic have been investigated. The fluorescence intensity and the fluorescence lifetime of Tb(III) were decreased as increasing the concentration of Nd(III), demonstrating collisional quenching between donor ions and acceptor ions. The Forster distance (..0) of Tb(III)-Nd(III) binary system in molten LiCl-KCl eutectic was determined in the specific range of .... (0.1-1.0) and .. (1.387-1.496)

  13. Ultrafast resonance energy transfer from a site-specifically attached fluorescent chromophore reveals the folding of the N-terminal domain of CP29

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Oort, Bart; Murali, Sukumaran; Wientjes, Emilie; Koehorst, Rob B. M.; Spruijt, Ruud B.; van Hoek, Arie; Croce, Roberta; van Amerongen, Herbert

    2009-02-01

    The photosynthetic minor antenna complex CP29 of higher plants was singly mutated, overexpressed in Escherichia coli, selectively labeled with the fluorescent dye TAMRA at three positions in the N-terminal domain, and reconstituted with its natural pigments. Picosecond fluorescence experiments revealed rapid excitation energy transfer (˜20 ps) from TAMRA covalently attached to a cysteine at either position 4 or 97 (near the beginning and end of the N-terminal domain) to the chlorophylls in the hydrophobic part of the protein. This indicates that the N-terminus is folded back on the hydrophobic core. In 20% of the complexes, efficient transfer was lacking, indicating that the N-terminus can adopt different conformations. Time-resolved polarized fluorescence measurements demonstrate that the non-transferring conformations only allow restricted rotational motion of the dye molecule. When TAMRA was attached to a cysteine at position 40, the overall transfer efficiency was far lower, reflecting a larger distance to the hydrophobic region.

  14. Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer of the Tb(III)-Nd(III) Binary System in Molten LiCl-KCl Eutectic Salt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, B. Y. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Yun, J. I. [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    The lanthanides act as a neutron poison in nuclear reactor with large neutron absorption cross section. For that reason, very low amount of lanthanides is required in the recovered U/TRU ingot product from pyrochemical process. In view of that, the investigation of thermodynamic properties and chemical behaviors of lanthanides in molten chloride salt are necessary to estimate the performance efficiency of pyrochemical process. However, there are uncertainties about knowledge and understanding of basic mechanisms in pyrochemical process, such as chemical speciation and redox behaviors due to the lack of in-situ monitoring methods for high temperature molten salt. The spectroscopic analysis is one of the probable techniques for in-situ qualitative and quantitative analysis. Recently, a few fluorescence spectroscopic measurements on single lanthanide element in molten LiCl-KCl eutectic have been investigated. The fluorescence intensity and the fluorescence lifetime of Tb(III) were decreased as increasing the concentration of Nd(III), demonstrating collisional quenching between donor ions and acceptor ions. The Forster distance (..0) of Tb(III)-Nd(III) binary system in molten LiCl-KCl eutectic was determined in the specific range of .... (0.1-1.0) and .. (1.387-1.496)

  15. Analysis of the near-resonant fluorescence spectra of a single rubidium atom localized in a three-dimensional optical lattice

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Wookrae; Kim, Jung-Ryul; Lee, Yea-Lee; Ihm, Jisoon; An, Kyungwon

    2010-01-01

    Supplementary information is presented on the recent work by W. Kim et al. on the matter-wave-tunneling-induced broadening in the near-resonant spectra of a single rubidium atom localized in a three-dimensional optical lattice in a strong Lamb-Dicke regime.

  16. Biotoxin Detection Using Cell-Based Sensors

    OpenAIRE

    Pratik Banerjee; Spyridon Kintzios; Balabhaskar Prabhakarpandian

    2013-01-01

    Cell-based biosensors (CBBs) utilize the principles of cell-based assays (CBAs) by employing living cells for detection of different analytes from environment, food, clinical, or other sources. For toxin detection, CBBs are emerging as unique alternatives to other analytical methods. The main advantage of using CBBs for probing biotoxins and toxic agents is that CBBs respond to the toxic exposures in the manner related to actual physiologic responses of the vulnerable subjects. The results ob...

  17. Novel Mn3 [Co(CN)6]2@SiO2@Ag Core-Shell Nanocube: Enhanced Two-Photon Fluorescence and Magnetic Resonance Dual-Modal Imaging-Guided Photothermal and Chemo-therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dongdong; Guo, Zhen; Zhou, Jiajia; Chen, Jian; Zhao, Gaozheng; Chen, Ruhui; He, Mengni; Liu, Zhenbang; Wang, Haibao; Chen, Qianwang

    2015-11-25

    The versatile Mn3[Co(CN)6]2@SiO2@Ag core-shell NCs are prepared by a simple coprecipitation method. Ag nanoparticles with an average diameter of 12 nm deposited on the surface of Mn3[Co(CN)6]2@SiO2 through S-Ag bonding are fabricated in ethanol solution by reducing silver nitrate (AgNO3 ) with NaBH4 . The NCs possess T1 -T2 dual-modal magnetic resonance imaging ability. The inner Prussian blue analogs (PBAs) Mn3[Co(CN)6]2 exhibit bright two-photon fluorescence (TPF) imaging when excited at 730 nm. Moreover, the TPF imaging intensity displays 1.85-fold enhancement after loading of Ag nanoparticles. Besides, the sample also has multicolor fluorescence imaging ability under 403, 488, and 543 nm single photon excitation. The as-synthesized Mn3[Co(CN)6]2@SiO2@Ag NCs show a DOX loading capacity of 600 mg g(-1) and exhibit an excellent ability of near-infrared (NIR)-responsive drug release and photothermal therapy (PTT) which is induced from the relative high absorbance in NIR region. The combined chemotherapy and PTT against cancer cells in vitro test shows high therapeutic efficiency. The multimodal treatment and imaging could lead to this material a potential multifunctional system for biomedical diagnosis and therapy. PMID:26437078

  18. Yeast cell-based analysis of human lactate dehydrogenase isoforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Lulu Ahmed; Tachikawa, Hiroyuki; Gao, Xiao-Dong; Nakanishi, Hideki

    2015-12-01

    Human lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) has attracted attention as a potential target for cancer therapy and contraception. In this study, we reconstituted human lactic acid fermentation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, with the goal of constructing a yeast cell-based LDH assay system. pdc null mutant yeast (mutated in the endogenous pyruvate decarboxylase genes) are unable to perform alcoholic fermentation; when grown in the presence of an electron transport chain inhibitor, pdc null strains exhibit a growth defect. We found that introduction of the human gene encoding LDHA complemented the pdc growth defect; this complementation depended on LDHA catalytic activity. Similarly, introduction of the human LDHC complemented the pdc growth defect, even though LDHC did not generate lactate at the levels seen with LDHA. In contrast, the human LDHB did not complement the yeast pdc null mutant, although LDHB did generate lactate in yeast cells. Expression of LDHB as a red fluorescent protein (RFP) fusion yielded blebs in yeast, whereas LDHA-RFP and LDHC-RFP fusion proteins exhibited cytosolic distribution. Thus, LDHB exhibits several unique features when expressed in yeast cells. Because yeast cells are amenable to genetic analysis and cell-based high-throughput screening, our pdc/LDH strains are expected to be of use for versatile analyses of human LDH. PMID:26126931

  19. Blue Fluorescent cGMP Sensor for Multiparameter Fluorescence Imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Niino, Yusuke; Hotta, Kohji; Oka, Kotaro

    2010-01-01

    Cyclic GMP (cGMP) regulates many physiological processes by cooperating with the other signaling molecules such as cyclic AMP (cAMP) and Ca2+. Genetically encoded sensors for cGMP have been developed based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) between fluorescent proteins. However, to analyze the dynamic relationship among these second messengers, combined use of existing sensors in a single cell is inadequate because of the significant spectral overlaps. A single wavelength indica...

  20. Fabrication of partially oxidized ultra-thin nanocrystalline silver films: effect of surface plasmon resonance on fluorescence quenching and surface enhanced Raman scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plasmonically active nanocrystalline silver (Ag) films of mass thickness ∼1 nm were fabricated using thermal evaporation followed by air annealing process temperature varying from 50 °C to 250 °C. The effect of air annealing on surface morphology and optical absorbance of quasi-amorphous and nanocrystalline Ag films was studied. The possibility of formation of silver oxide (AgO) at the surface level of Ag nanostructures due to air annealing was studied using a confocal Raman spectrometer. Surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) enhancement and its reverse mechanism known as fluorescence quenching corresponding to Rhodamine-6G (Rh6G) molecules were studied on Ag films through altering crystallinity, interparticles distance, size distribution and number density of Ag nanopartices (NPs). (papers)

  1. Cell-Based Therapies for Diabetic Complications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stella Bernardi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, accumulating experimental evidence supports the notion that diabetic patients may greatly benefit from cell-based therapies, which include the use of adult stem and/or progenitor cells. In particular, mesenchymal stem cells and the circulating pool of endothelial progenitor cells have so far been the most studied populations of cells proposed for the treatment of vascular complications affecting diabetic patients. We review the evidence supporting their use in this setting, the therapeutic benefits that these cells have shown so far as well as the challenges that cell-based therapies in diabetic complications put out.

  2. J Fluorescence

    OpenAIRE

    Resch-Genger, U.; Hoffmann, K.; Nietfeld, W; A. Engel; Neukammer, J.; Nitschke, R.; Ebert, P.; Macdonald, R

    2005-01-01

    The scope of this paper is to illustrate the need for an improved quality assurance in fluorometry. For this purpose, instrumental sources of error and their influences on the reliability and comparability of fluorescence data are highlighted for frequently used photoluminescence techniques ranging from conventional macro- and microfluorometry over fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry to microarray technology as well as in vivo fluorescence imaging. Particularly, the need for and requir...

  3. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer measured by spatial photon migration in CdSe-ZnS quantum dots colloidal systems as a function of concentration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The study of the spatial photon migration as a function of the concentration brings into attention the problem of the energy transfer in quantum dot embedded systems. By measuring the photon propagation and its spatial dependence, it is possible to understand the whole dynamics in a quantum dot system, and also improve their concentration dependence to maximize energy propagation due to radiative and non-radiative processes. In this work, a confocal microscope was adapted to scan the spatial distribution of photoluminescence from CdSe-ZnS core-shell quantum dots in colloidal solutions. The energy migration between the quantum dots was monitored by the direct measurement of the photon diffusion length, according to the diffusion theory. We observed that the photon migration length decreases by increasing the quantum dot concentration, this kind of behavior has been regarded as a signature of Förster resonance energy transfer in the system

  4. Fluorogenic Cell-Based Biosensors for Monitoring Microbes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Theresa; Salazar, Noe; Tabb, Joel; Chase, Chris

    2010-01-01

    Fluorogenic cell-based sensor systems for detecting microbes (especially pathogenic ones) and some toxins and allergens are undergoing development. These systems harness the natural signaltransduction and amplification cascades that occur in mast cells upon activation with antigens. These systems include (1) fluidic biochips for automated containment of samples, reagents, and wastes and (2) sensitive, compact fluorometers for monitoring the fluorescent responses of mast cells engineered to contain fluorescent dyes. It should be possible to observe responses within minutes of adding immune complexes. The systems have been shown to work when utilizing either immunoglobulin E (IgE) antibodies or traditionally generated rat antibodies - a promising result in that it indicates that the systems could be developed to detect many target microbes. Chimeric IgE antibodies and rat immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies could be genetically engineered for recognizing biological and chemical warfare agents and airborne and food-borne allergens. Genetic engineering efforts thus far have yielded (1) CD14 chimeric antibodies that recognize both Grampositive and Gram-negative bacteria and bind to the surfaces of mast cells, eliciting a degranulation response and (2) rat IgG2a antibodies that act similarly in response to low levels of canine parvovirus.

  5. Near Infrared Microspectroscopy, Fluorescence Microspectroscopy, Infrared Chemical Imaging and High Resolution Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Analysis of Soybean Seeds, Somatic Embryos and Single Cells

    CERN Document Server

    Baianu, I C; Hofmann, N E; Korban, S S; Lozano, P; You, T; AOCS 94th Meeting, Kansas

    2002-01-01

    Novel methodologies are currently being developed and established for the chemical analysis of soybean seeds, embryos and single cells by Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR), Fourier Transform Near Infrared (FT-NIR) Microspectroscopy, Fluorescence and High-Resolution NMR (HR-NMR). The first FT-NIR chemical images of biological systems approaching one micron resolution are presented here. Chemical images obtained by FT-NIR and FT-IR Microspectroscopy are presented for oil in soybean seeds and somatic embryos under physiological conditions. FT-NIR spectra of oil and proteins were obtained for volumes as small as two cubic microns. Related, HR-NMR analyses of oil contents in somatic embryos are also presented here with nanoliter precision. Such 400 MHz 1H NMR analyses allowed the selection of mutagenized embryos with higher oil content (e.g. ~20%) compared to non-mutagenized control embryos. Moreover, developmental changes in single soybean seeds and/or somatic embryos may be monitored by FT-NIR with a precision ...

  6. Fourier Transform Near Infrared Microspectroscopy, Infrared Chemical Imaging, High-Resolution Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and Fluorescence Microspectroscopy Detection of Single Cancer Cells and Single Viral Particles

    CERN Document Server

    Baianu,I C; Hofmann, N E; Korban, S S; Lozano, P; You, T

    2004-01-01

    Single Cancer Cells from Human tumors are being detected and imaged by Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR), Fourier Transform Near Infrared (FT-NIR)Hyperspectral Imaging and Fluorescence Correlation Microspectroscopy. The first FT-NIR chemical, microscopic images of biological systems approaching one micron resolution are here reported. Chemical images obtained by FT-NIR and FT-IR Microspectroscopy are also presented for oil in soybean seeds and somatic embryos under physiological conditions. FT-NIR spectra of oil and proteins were obtained for volumes as small as two cubic microns. Related, HR-NMR analyses of oil contents in somatic embryos as well as 99% accurate calibrations are also presented here with nanoliter precision. Such high-resolution, 400 MHz H-1 NMR analyses allowed the selection of mutagenized embryos with higher oil content (e.g. >~20%) compared to the average levels in non-mutagenized control embryos. Moreover, developmental changes in single soybean seeds and/or somatic embryos may be monito...

  7. Identification of interaction sites between human betaA3- and alphaA/alphaB-crystallins by mammalian two-hybrid and fluorescence resonance energy transfer acceptor photobleaching methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Ratna; Srivastava, Om P

    2009-07-01

    Our recent study has shown that betaA3-crystallin along with betaB1- and betaB2-crystallins were part of high molecular weight complex obtained from young, old, and cataractous lenses suggesting potential interactions between alpha- and beta-crystallins (Srivastava, O. P., Srivastava, K., and Chaves, J. M. (2008) Mol. Vis. 14, 1872-1885). To investigate this further, this study was carried out to determine the interaction sites of betaA3-crystallin with alphaA- and alphaB-crystallins. The study employed a mammalian two-hybrid method, an in vivo assay to determine the regions of betaA3-crystallin that interact with alphaA- and alphaB-crystallins. Five regional truncated mutants of betaA3-crystallin were generated using specific primers with deletions of N-terminal extension (NT) (named betaA3-NT), N-terminal extension plus motif I (named betaA3-NT + I), N-terminal extension plus motifs I and II (named betaA3-NT + I + II), motif III plus IV (named betaA3-III + IV), and motif IV (named betaA3-IV). The mammalian two-hybrid studies were complemented with fluorescence resonance energy transfer acceptor photobleaching studies using the above described mutant proteins, fused with DsRed (Red) and AcGFP fluorescent proteins. The results showed that the motifs III and IV of betaA3-crystallin were interactive with alphaA-crystallin, and motifs II and III of betaA3-crystallin primarily interacted with alphaB-crystallin. PMID:19401464

  8. Resonance Energy Transfer

    OpenAIRE

    Andrews, David; Bradshaw, David; Dinshaw, Rayomond; Scholes, Gregory

    2015-01-01

    Resonance energy transfer, also known as Förster- or fluorescence- resonance energy transfer, or electronic energy transfer, is a photonic process whose relevance in many major areas of science is reflected both by a wide prevalence of the effect and through numerous technical applications. The process, operating through an optical near-field mechanism, effects a transport of electronic excitation between physically distinct atomic or molecular components, based on transition dipole-dipole co...

  9. Surface plasmon resonance in nano-gold antimony glass-ceramic dichroic nanocomposites: One-step synthesis and enhanced fluorescence application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A single-step melt-quench in situ thermochemical reduction technique has been used to synthesize a new series of Auo nanoparticles embedded antimony glass-ceramic (K2O-B2O3-Sb2O3-ZnO) dichroic nanocomposites. X-ray and selected area electron diffractions manifest growth of Auo nanoparticles along (2 0 0) planes. The particle sizes obtained from X-ray diffraction patterns are found to vary in the range 4-21 nm. Dichroic behavior is attributed to the elliptical shape gold nanoparticles having aspect ratio 1.2, as observed from the transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images. The Auo nanoparticles exhibit surface plasmon resonance band (SPR) around 600 nm, which experiences red-shifts with increasing Au concentration. These nanocomposites when co-doped with Sm2O3 and excited at 949 nm, exhibit 2-fold intensification of 636 nm red emission transition (4G5/2 → 6H9/2) due to SPR induced local field enhancement of Auo nanoparticles and are promising materials for display applications.

  10. Label-free characterization of carbonic anhydrase-novel inhibitor interactions using surface plasmon resonance, isothermal titration calorimetry and fluorescence-based thermal shift assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogez-Florent, Tiphaine; Duhamel, Laetitia; Goossens, Laurence; Six, Perrine; Drucbert, Anne-Sophie; Depreux, Patrick; Danzé, Pierre-Marie; Landy, David; Goossens, Jean-François; Foulon, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    This work describes the development of biophysical unbiased methods to study the interactions between new designed compounds and carbonic anhydrase II (CAII) enzyme. These methods have to permit both a screening of a series of sulfonamide derivatives and the identification of a lead compound after a thorough study of the most promising molecules. Interactions data were collected using surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and thermal shift assay (TSA). In the first step, experiments were performed with bovine CAII isoform and were extended to human CAII. Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) experiments were also conducted to obtain thermodynamics parameters necessary for the processing of the TSA data. Results obtained with this reference methodology demonstrate the effectiveness of SPR and TSA. KD values obtained from SPR data were in perfect accordance with ITC. For TSA, despite the fact that the absolute values of KD were quite different, the same affinity scale was obtained for all compounds. The binding affinities of the analytes studied vary by more than 50 orders of magnitude; for example, the KD value determined by SPR were 6 ± 4 and 299 ± 25 nM for compounds 1 and 3, respectively. This paper discusses some of the theoretical and experimental aspects of the affinity-based methods and evaluates the protein consumption to develop methods for the screening of further new compounds. The double interest of SPR, that is, for screening and for the quick thorough study of the interactions parameters (ka , kd , and KD ), leads us to choose this methodology for the study of new potential inhibitors. PMID:24375583

  11. Modulation of Intracellular Quantum Dot to Fluorescent Protein Förster Resonance Energy Transfer via Customized Ligands and Spatial Control of Donor–Acceptor Assembly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren D. Field

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Understanding how to controllably modulate the efficiency of energy transfer in Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET-based assemblies is critical to their implementation as sensing modalities. This is particularly true for sensing assemblies that are to be used as the basis for real time intracellular sensing of intracellular processes and events. We use a quantum dot (QD donor -mCherry acceptor platform that is engineered to self-assemble in situ wherein the protein acceptor is expressed via transient transfection and the QD donor is microinjected into the cell. QD-protein assembly is driven by metal-affinity interactions where a terminal polyhistidine tag on the protein binds to the QD surface. Using this system, we show the ability to modulate the efficiency of the donor–acceptor energy transfer process by controllably altering either the ligand coating on the QD surface or the precise location where the QD-protein assembly process occurs. Intracellularly, a short, zwitterionic ligand mediates more efficient FRET relative to longer ligand species that are based on the solubilizing polymer, poly(ethylene glycol. We further show that a greater FRET efficiency is achieved when the QD-protein assembly occurs free in the cytosol compared to when the mCherry acceptor is expressed tethered to the inner leaflet of the plasma membrane. In the latter case, the lower FRET efficiency is likely attributable to a lower expression level of the mCherry acceptor at the membrane combined with steric hindrance. Our work points to some of the design considerations that one must be mindful of when developing FRET-based sensing schemes for use in intracellular sensing.

  12. Imaging protein complex formation in the autophagy pathway: analysis of the interaction of LC3 and Atg4BC74A in live cells using Förster resonance energy transfer and fluorescence recovery after photobleaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraft, Lewis J.; Kenworthy, Anne K.

    2012-01-01

    The protein microtubule-associated protein 1, light chain 3 (LC3) functions in autophagosome formation and plays a central role in the autophagy pathway. Previously, we found LC3 diffuses more slowly in cells than is expected for a freely diffusing monomer, suggesting it may constitutively associate with a macromolecular complex containing other protein components of the pathway. In the current study, we used Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) microscopy and fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) to investigate the interactions of LC3 with Atg4BC74A, a catalytically inactive mutant of the cysteine protease involved in lipidation and de-lipidation of LC3, as a model system to probe protein complex formation in the autophagy pathway. We show Atg4BC74A is in FRET proximity with LC3 in both the cytoplasm and nucleus of living cells, consistent with previous biochemical evidence that suggests these proteins directly interact. In addition, overexpressed Atg4BC74A diffuses significantly more slowly than predicted based on its molecular weight, and its translational diffusion coefficient is significantly slowed upon coexpression with LC3 to match that of LC3 itself. Taken together, these results suggest Atg4BC74A and LC3 are contained within the same multiprotein complex and that this complex exists in both the cytoplasm and nucleoplasm of living cells.

  13. Förster resonance energy transfer mediated enhancement of the fluorescence lifetime of organic fluorophores to the millisecond range by coupling to Mn-doped CdS/ZnS quantum dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, Uwe; Sabir, Nadeem; Carrillo-Carrion, Carolina; del Pino, Pablo; Bossi, Mariano; Heimbrodt, Wolfram; Parak, Wolfgang J

    2016-02-01

    Manganese-doped CdS/ZnS quantum dots have been used as energy donors in a Förster-like resonance energy transfer (FRET) process to enhance the effective lifetime of organic fluorophores. It was possible to tune the effective lifetime of the fluorophores by about six orders of magnitude from the nanosecond (ns) up to the millisecond (ms) region. Undoped and Mn-doped CdS/ZnS quantum dots functionalized with different dye molecules were selected as a model system for investigating the multiple energy transfer process and the specific interaction between Mn ions and the attached dye molecules. While the lifetime of the free dye molecules was about 5 ns, their linking to undoped CdS/ZnS quantum dots led to a long effective lifetime of about 150 ns, following a non-exponential transient. Manganese-doped core-shell quantum dots further enhanced the long-lasting decay time of the dye to several ms. This opens up a pathway to analyse different fluorophores in the time domain with equal spectral emissions. Such lifetime multiplexing would be an interesting alternative to the commonly used spectral multiplexing in fluorescence detection schemes. PMID:26670636

  14. Stem cell-based bone repair

    OpenAIRE

    Fei, Yurong; Xu, Ren-He; Hurley, Marja M.

    2012-01-01

    To accelerate bone repair, one strategy is to deliver the cells that make bone. The current review focuses on stem cell-based bone repair. Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) can self-renew unlimitedly and differentiate into the bone forming cells – osteoblasts. Scientists have been actively investigating culture conditions to stably and efficiently induce differentiation of these stem cells into osteoblasts. However, ESCs have the issues of ethnics, immune ...

  15. Fluorescent refrigeration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, Richard I.; Edwards, Bradley C.; Buchwald, Melvin I.; Gosnell, Timothy R.

    1995-01-01

    Fluorescent refrigeration is based on selective radiative pumping, using substantially monochromatic radiation, of quantum excitations which are then endothermically redistributed to higher energies. Ultimately, the populated energy levels radiatively deexcite emitting, on the average, more radiant energy than was initially absorbed. The material utilized to accomplish the cooling must have dimensions such that the exciting radiation is strongly absorbed, but the fluorescence may exit the material through a significantly smaller optical pathlength. Optical fibers and mirrored glasses and crystals provide this requirement.

  16. Resonances and resonance widths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two-dimensional betatron resonances are much more important than their simple one-dimensional counterparts and exhibit a strong dependence on the betatron phase advance per cell. A practical definition of ''width'' is expanded upon in order to display these relations in tables. A primarily pedagogical introduction is given to explain the tables, and also to encourage a wider capability for deriving resonance behavior and wider use of ''designer'' resonances

  17. Cell-Based Therapy for Silicosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes-Pacheco, Miquéias; Bandeira, Elga; Morales, Marcelo M

    2016-01-01

    Silicosis is the most common pneumoconiosis globally, with higher prevalence and incidence in developing countries. To date, there is no effective treatment to halt or reverse the disease progression caused by silica-induced lung injury. Significant advances have to be made in order to reduce morbidity and mortality related to silicosis. In this review, we have highlighted the main mechanisms of action that cause lung damage by silica particles and summarized the data concerning the therapeutic promise of cell-based therapy for silicosis. PMID:27066079

  18. Cell-Based Therapy for Silicosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miquéias Lopes-Pacheco

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Silicosis is the most common pneumoconiosis globally, with higher prevalence and incidence in developing countries. To date, there is no effective treatment to halt or reverse the disease progression caused by silica-induced lung injury. Significant advances have to be made in order to reduce morbidity and mortality related to silicosis. In this review, we have highlighted the main mechanisms of action that cause lung damage by silica particles and summarized the data concerning the therapeutic promise of cell-based therapy for silicosis.

  19. Radiation induced centers in irradiated SrB{sub 4}O{sub 7} doped europium and their role in thermally stimulated reactions: Thermally stimulated luminescence, fluorescence and electron paramagnetic resonance studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kadam, R.M.; Rajeswari, B., E-mail: rajibala@barc.gov.in; Mohapatra, M.; Porwal, N.K.; Hon, N.S.; Seshagiri, T.K.; Natarajan, V.

    2015-02-15

    Polycrystalline samples of strontium tetraborate (SrB{sub 4}O{sub 7}: SBO) samples doped with different concentrations of europium (0%, 0.05%, 1% and 2%) were synthesized using solid state reaction in air at high temperature. These samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), photoluminescence (PL), thermally stimulated luminescence (TSL) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) techniques. X-ray diffraction studies indicated that SrB{sub 4}O{sub 7} has orthorhombic structure with lattice parameters a=4.237±0.001, b=4.431±0.001, c=10.704±0.010, space group Pnm2{sub i}, Z=2. Thermally Stimulated Luminescence (TSL) investigations on the gamma irradiated sample showed an intense glow peak at 407 K and a weak glow peak at 500 K. The trap parameters namely activation energy (E), order of kinetics (b) and the frequency factor (s) for the main peak at 407 K were determined using the glow curve method. Fluorescence studies showed weak emission at ca 367 nm, which was attributed to f-d transition (4f{sup 6}5d-4f{sup 7}) of Eu{sup 2+} ions in the host lattice, whereas an intense emission in the range 570–650 nm was assigned to {sup 5}D{sub 0}→{sup 7}F{sub J}, J=0,1,2,3 and 4 transition of Eu{sup 3+} in the host lattice. The large value of I{sub (R)}/I{sub (O)} suggested that Eu{sup 3+} ions are situated at sites without center of inversion (lower symmetry) in SBO matrix. EPR studies suggested the formation of boron–oxygen hole trapped center viz, BOHC, electron trapped at oxygen vacancies and some impurity radicals like NO{sub 3}{sup 2−} and CO{sub 2}{sup −} radicals in SBO on irradiation. EPR temperature variation studies in the range 300–475 K on gamma irradiated europium doped samples, suggested a recombination process occurring between boronoxygen hole trapped species and electron trapped species and subsequently energy is transferred to Eu{sup 3+} ion, which on de-excitation yields thermally stimulated luminescence yielding an intense TSL glow

  20. Cell-based strategies for vascular regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Tongqiang; Fan, Jiabing; Fartash, Armita; Liu, Haifeng; Fan, Yubo

    2016-05-01

    Vascular regeneration is known to play an essential role in the repair of injured tissues mainly through accelerating the repair of vascular injury caused by vascular diseases, as well as the recovery of ischemic tissues. However, the clinical vascular regeneration is still challenging. Cell-based therapy is thought to be a promising strategy for vascular regeneration, since various cells have been identified to exert important influences on the process of vascular regeneration such as the enhanced endothelium formation on the surface of vascular grafts, and the induction of vessel-like network formation in the ischemic tissues. Here are a vast number of diverse cell-based strategies that have been extensively studied in vascular regeneration. These strategies can be further classified into three main categories, including cell transplantation, construction of tissue-engineered grafts, and surface modification of scaffolds. Cells used in these strategies mainly refer to terminally differentiated vascular cells, pluripotent stem cells, multipotent stem cells, and unipotent stem cells. The aim of this review is to summarize the reported research advances on the application of various cells for vascular regeneration, yielding insights into future clinical treatment for injured tissue/organ. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 1297-1314, 2016. PMID:26864677

  1. Biotoxin detection using cell-based sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Pratik; Kintzios, Spyridon; Prabhakarpandian, Balabhaskar

    2013-12-01

    Cell-based biosensors (CBBs) utilize the principles of cell-based assays (CBAs) by employing living cells for detection of different analytes from environment, food, clinical, or other sources. For toxin detection, CBBs are emerging as unique alternatives to other analytical methods. The main advantage of using CBBs for probing biotoxins and toxic agents is that CBBs respond to the toxic exposures in the manner related to actual physiologic responses of the vulnerable subjects. The results obtained from CBBs are based on the toxin-cell interactions, and therefore, reveal functional information (such as mode of action, toxic potency, bioavailability, target tissue or organ, etc.) about the toxin. CBBs incorporate both prokaryotic (bacteria) and eukaryotic (yeast, invertebrate and vertebrate) cells. To create CBB devices, living cells are directly integrated onto the biosensor platform. The sensors report the cellular responses upon exposures to toxins and the resulting cellular signals are transduced by secondary transducers generating optical or electrical signals outputs followed by appropriate read-outs. Examples of the layout and operation of cellular biosensors for detection of selected biotoxins are summarized. PMID:24335754

  2. Biotoxin Detection Using Cell-Based Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pratik Banerjee

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Cell-based biosensors (CBBs utilize the principles of cell-based assays (CBAs by employing living cells for detection of different analytes from environment, food, clinical, or other sources. For toxin detection, CBBs are emerging as unique alternatives to other analytical methods. The main advantage of using CBBs for probing biotoxins and toxic agents is that CBBs respond to the toxic exposures in the manner related to actual physiologic responses of the vulnerable subjects. The results obtained from CBBs are based on the toxin-cell interactions, and therefore, reveal functional information (such as mode of action, toxic potency, bioavailability, target tissue or organ, etc. about the toxin. CBBs incorporate both prokaryotic (bacteria and eukaryotic (yeast, invertebrate and vertebrate cells. To create CBB devices, living cells are directly integrated onto the biosensor platform. The sensors report the cellular responses upon exposures to toxins and the resulting cellular signals are transduced by secondary transducers generating optical or electrical signals outputs followed by appropriate read-outs. Examples of the layout and operation of cellular biosensors for detection of selected biotoxins are summarized.

  3. Multichromophoric sugar for fluorescence photoswitching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stéphane Maisonneuve

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available A multichromophoric glucopyranoside 2 bearing three dicyanomethylenepyran (DCM fluorophores and one diarylethene (DAE photochrome has been prepared by Cu(I-catalyzed alkyne–azide cycloaddition reaction. The fluorescence of 2 was switched off upon UV irradiation, in proportion with the open to closed form (OF to CF conversion extent of the DAE moiety. A nearly 100% Förster-type resonance energy transfer (FRET from all three DCM moieties to a single DAE (in its CF moiety was achieved. Upon visible irradiation, the initial fluorescence intensity was recovered. The observed photoswiching is reversible, with excellent photo resistance.

  4. Fluorescence of Alexa Fluor dye tracks protein folding

    OpenAIRE

    Simon Lindhoud; Westphal, Adrie H.; Visser, Antonie J.W.G.; Jan Willem Borst; van Mierlo, Carlo P. M.

    2012-01-01

    Fluorescence spectroscopy is an important tool for the characterization of protein folding. Often, a protein is labeled with appropriate fluorescent donor and acceptor probes and folding-induced changes in Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) are monitored. However, conformational changes of the protein potentially affect fluorescence properties of both probes, thereby profoundly complicating interpretation of FRET data. In this study, we assess the effects protein folding has on fluoresc...

  5. Antibody-based fluorescent and fluorescent ratiometric indicators for detection of phosphotyrosine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huynh Nhat, Kim Phuong; Watanabe, Takayoshi; Yoshikoshi, Kensuke; Hohsaka, Takahiro

    2016-08-01

    Fluorescent indicators for protein phosphorylation are very important in not only fundamental biology but also biomedical applications. In this study, we developed novel fluorescent and fluorescent ratiometric indicators for detection of phosphotyrosine (pTyr) derivatives. A single-chain antibody variable fragment (scFv) against phosphotyrosine was fluorescent-labeled by incorporation of tetramethylrhodamine (TAMRA)-linked nonnatural amino acid at the N- or C-terminus. The TAMRA-labeled scFv showed fluorescence enhancement upon addition of pTyr-containing peptides based on antigen-dependent fluorescence quenching effect on TAMRA. The TAMRA-labeled scFv was further fused with enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) to generate a double-labeled scFv for pTyr. In the absence of antigen, fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) occurred from EGFP to TAMRA but TAMRA was quenched. The antigen-binding removed the quenching of TAMRA while FRET occurred without altering its efficiency. As a result of the FRET and antigen-dependent fluorescence quenching effect, the double-labeled scFv exhibited fluorescence ratio enhancement upon the antigen-binding. The fluorescent and fluorescent ratiometric indicators obtained in this study will become a novel tool for analysis of protein phosphorylation. Moreover, this strategy utilizes antibody derivatives, and therefore, can be easily applied to other antigen-antibody pairs to generate fluorescent ratiometric indicators for various target molecules. PMID:26896314

  6. The phenomenon of fluorescence in immunosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kłos-Witkowska, Aleksandra

    2016-01-01

    The phenomenon of fluorescence in immunosensors is described in this paper. Both structure and characteristics of biosensors and immunosensors are presented. Types of immunosensors and the response of bioreceptor layers to the reaction with analytes as well as measurements of electrochemical, piezoelectric and optical parameters in immunosensors are also presented. In addition, detection techniques used in studies of optical immunosensors based on light-matter interactions (absorbance, reflectance, dispersion, emission) such as: UV/VIS spectroscopy, reflectometric interference spectroscopy (RIfs), surface plasmon resonance (SPR), optical waveguide light-mode spectroscopy (OWLS), fluorescence spectroscopy. The phenomenon of fluorescence in immunosensors and standard configurations of immunoreactions between an antigen and an antibody (direct, competitive, sandwich, displacement) is described. Fluorescence parameters taken into account in analyses and fluorescence detection techniques used in research of immunosensors are presented. Examples of immunosensor applications are given. PMID:27192088

  7. Nanoantenna array-induced fluorescence enhancement and reduced lifetimes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Enhanced fluorescence is observed from dye molecules interacting with optical nanoantenna arrays. Elliptical gold dimers form individual nanoantennae with tunable plasmon resonances depending upon the geometry of the two particles and the size of the gap between them. A fluorescent dye, Rhodamine 800, is uniformly embedded in a dielectric host that coats the nanoantennae. The nanoantennae act to enhance the dye absorption. In turn, emission from the dye drives the plasmon resonance of the antennae; the nanoantennae act to enhance the fluorescence signal and change the angular distribution of emission. These effects depend upon the overlap of the plasmon resonance with the excitation wavelength and the fluorescence emission band. A decreased fluorescence lifetime is observed along with highly polarized emission that displays the characteristics of the nanoantenna's dipole mode. Being able to engineer the emission of the dye-nanoantenna system is important for future device applications in both bio-sensing and nanoscale optoelectronic integration.

  8. Nanoantenna array-induced fluorescence enhancement and reduced lifetimes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bakker, R. M.; Drachev, V. P.; Liu, Z.;

    2008-01-01

    Enhanced fluorescence is observed from dye molecules interacting with optical nanoantenna arrays. Elliptical gold dimers form individual nanoantennae with tunable plasmon resonances depending upon the geometry of the two particles and the size of the gap between them. A fluorescent dye, Rhodamine...... 800, is uniformly embedded in a dielectric host that coats the nanoantennae. The nanoantennae act to enhance the dye absorption. In turn, emission from the dye drives the plasmon resonance of the antennae; the nanoantennae act to enhance the fluorescence signal and change the angular distribution of...... emission. These effects depend upon the overlap of the plasmon resonance with the excitation wavelength and the fluorescence emission band. A decreased fluorescence lifetime is observed along with highly polarized emission that displays the characteristics of the nanoantenna's dipole mode. Being able to...

  9. A dual mode targeting probe for distinguishing HER2-positive breast cancer cells using silica-coated fluorescent magnetic nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Jia [Medical School Southeast University, Department of Ultrasonography, Zhongda Hospital (China); An, Yan-Li; Zang, Feng-Chao [Southeast University, Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Molecular and Functional Imaging (China); Zong, Shen-Fei; Cui, Yi-Ping, E-mail: cyp@seu.edu.cn [Southeast University, Advanced Photonics Center (China); Teng, Gao-Jun, E-mail: gjteng@vip.sina.com [Southeast University, Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Molecular and Functional Imaging (China)

    2013-10-15

    We report a composite nanoprobe based on silica-coated magnetic nanoparticles (NPs) for distinguishing breast cancers at different HER2 statuses. The nanoprobe has a core-shell structure, with Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} NPs as the magnetic core and dye-embedded silica as the fluorescent shell, whose average size is about 150 nm. Besides, the outmost surfaces of the probes were modified with specific antibodies to endow the probe with a targeting ability. With such a structure, the nanoprobe can accomplish dual mode targeting of human breast cancer cells based on fluorescence and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In the experiments, three human breast cancer cell lines were used to test the targeting ability of the nanoprobe. Specifically, SKBR3 cells with a high HER2 expression level were used as the model target cells, while MCF7 cells with a lower HER2 expression levels and HER2-negative MDA-MB-231 cells were used as the controls. Both the fluorescence and MRI imaging results confirmed that the nanoprobe can distinguish three cancer cell lines with different HER2 expression levels. With the dual mode imaging and specific targeting properties, we anticipate that the presented nanoprobe may have a great potential in the diagnosis and treatment of cancerous diseases.

  10. Polarization of fluorescence: a probe of molecular autoionization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leroi, G. E. [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States); Dehmer, Joseph L. [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Parr, Albert C. [National Bureau of Standards, Washington, DC (United States); Poliakoff, E. D. [Boston Univ., MA (United States)

    1983-01-01

    The polarization of fluorescence from excited-state molecular photoions provides a direct probe of the photoionization dynamics and the symmetry signatures of autoionizing resonances. Measurements on CO₂ and CS₂ are presented as examples.

  11. Fluorescence detection: SPIE volume 743

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book contains proceedings arranged into four sessions. They are: Fluorescence spectroscopic techniques; Fluorescence in analysis and materials characterization; Fluorescence in medicine and biochemistry; and Fluorescence in criminalistics

  12. Fluorescence detection: SPIE volume 743

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menzel, E.R.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains proceedings arranged into four sessions. They are: Fluorescence spectroscopic techniques; Fluorescence in analysis and materials characterization; Fluorescence in medicine and biochemistry; and Fluorescence in criminalistics.

  13. Development of a fluorescent substrate to measure hyaluronidase activity

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Li-Shu; Mummert, Mark E.

    2008-01-01

    A novel fluorescent substrate (termed FRET-HA) to quantitatively assess hyaluronidase activity was developed. Hyaluronan (HA), the major substrate for hyaluronidase, was dual labeled with fluorescein amine and rhodamine B amine. The fluorescein amine fluorescence signal was significantly quenched while the rhodamine B amine signal was significantly enhanced due to fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). In the presence of bovine testes hyaluronidase, cleavage of HA disrupted FRET resul...

  14. Cell-Based Biosensors: Electrical Sensing in Microfluidic Devices

    OpenAIRE

    Noemi Rozlosnik; Katrine Kiilerich-Pedersen

    2012-01-01

    Cell-based biosensors provide new horizons for medical diagnostics by adopting complex recognition elements such as mammalian cells in microfluidic devices that are simple, cost efficient and disposable. This combination renders possible a new range of applications in the fields of diagnostics and personalized medicine. The review looks at the most recent developments in cell-based biosensing microfluidic systems with electrical and electrochemical transduction, and relevance to medical diagn...

  15. Fluorescent taggants with temporally coded signatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Siyang; Vyas, Raul; Dwyer, Chris

    2016-07-11

    In this paper, resonance energy transfer (RET) networks between chromophores are used to implement fluorescent taggants with temporally coded signatures. Because the temporal signature of such a fluorescent taggant is a phase-type distribution defined by the geometry of its RET network, the taggant design is not constrained by resolvable dyes and has a significantly larger coding capacity than spectrally or lifetime coded fluorescent taggants. Meanwhile, the detection process becomes highly efficient when the signatures are coded in the time domain. The taggant identification method is based on the multinomial distribution of detected photons and Maximum Likelihood Estimation, which guarantees high accuracy even with only a few hundred photons and also applies to a mixture of taggants in multiplex detection. Therefore, these temporally coded fluorescent taggants have great potential for both in situ and Lidar applications. PMID:27410827

  16. Development of fluorescence-based high-throughput screening assays: choice of appropriate instrumentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, David J.; Alder, Elisabeth; Fan, Yi-Hong; McKeegan, Evelyn; Warrior, Usha; Beutel, Bruce

    1998-04-01

    Fluorescence-based assays have become increasingly popular in high throughput screening for a variety of reasons (e.g. sensitivity). However, new screening technologies are pushing the limits of conventional fluorescence plate readers. For example, instruments that have optical sensitivities beyond most of the commercially available plate readers are required to reproducibly measure the fluorescence generated by the green fluorescent protein (GFP)--a novel reporter gene. Also, miniaturization of screening formats (with densities higher than the conventional 96-well plate) requires high resolution instrumentation to measure fluorescence. Several assays based on optical fluorescence measurements have been developed and screened in our Biological Screening group. These assays include various fluorescence-based protease assays (standard end-point and kinetic modes) and a functional cell-based screen using the green fluorescent protein as a reporter gene. The choice of instrumentation was the critical factor in the performance and success of each of these arrays. Data will be presented for the cell- based reporter assay including the type of instrumentation (fluorescence plate readers; fluorescence imaging systems) used for detection of GFP fluorescence.

  17. Plasmonic Molecular Nanohybrids—Spectral Dependence of Fluorescence Quenching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Olejnik

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrate strong spectral dependence of the efficiency of fluorescence quenching in molecular systems composed of organic dyes and gold nanoparticles. In order to probe the coupling with metallic nanoparticles we use dyes with varied spectral overlap between the plasmon resonance and their absorption. Hybrid molecular structures were obtained via conjugation of metallic nanoparticles with the dyes using biotin-streptavidin linkage. For dyes featuring absorption above the plasmon excitation in gold nanoparticles, laser excitation induces minute changes in the fluorescence intensity and its lifetime for both conjugated and non-conjugated mixtures, which are the reference. In contrast, when the absorption of the dye overlaps with the plasmon resonance, the effect is quite dramatic, reaching 85% and 95% fluorescence quenching for non-conjugated and conjugated mixtures, respectively. The degree of fluorescence quenching strongly depends upon the concentration of metallic nanoparticles. Importantly, the origin of the fluorescence quenching is different in the case of the conjugated mixture, as evidenced by time-resolved fluorescence. For conjugated mixtures of dyes resonant with plasmon, excitation features two-exponential decay. This is in contrast to the single exponential decay measured for the off-resonant configuration. The results provide valuable insight into spectral dependence of the fluorescence quenching in molecular assemblies involving organic dyes and metallic nanoparticles.

  18. Revealing the radiative and non-radiative relaxation rates of the fluorescent dye Atto488 in a λ/2 Fabry-Pérot-resonator by spectral and time resolved measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konrad, Alexander; Metzger, Michael; Kern, Andreas M.; Brecht, Marc; Meixner, Alfred J.

    2016-07-01

    Using a Fabry-Pérot-microresonator with controllable cavity lengths in the λ/2-regime, we show the controlled modification of the vibronic relaxation dynamics of a fluorescent dye molecule in the spectral and time domain. By altering the photonic mode density around the fluorophores we are able to shape the fluorescence spectrum and enhance specifically the probability of the radiative transitions from the electronic excited state to distinct vibronic excited states of the electronic ground state. Analysis and correlation of the spectral and time resolved measurements by a theoretical model and a global fitting procedure allows us to reveal quantitatively the spectrally distributed radiative and non-radiative relaxation dynamics of the respective dye molecule under ambient conditions at the ensemble level.Using a Fabry-Pérot-microresonator with controllable cavity lengths in the λ/2-regime, we show the controlled modification of the vibronic relaxation dynamics of a fluorescent dye molecule in the spectral and time domain. By altering the photonic mode density around the fluorophores we are able to shape the fluorescence spectrum and enhance specifically the probability of the radiative transitions from the electronic excited state to distinct vibronic excited states of the electronic ground state. Analysis and correlation of the spectral and time resolved measurements by a theoretical model and a global fitting procedure allows us to reveal quantitatively the spectrally distributed radiative and non-radiative relaxation dynamics of the respective dye molecule under ambient conditions at the ensemble level. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/C6NR02380K

  19. Fundamentals of fluorescence and fluorescence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, David E

    2013-01-01

    This chapter discusses the fundamental physics of fluorescence. The application of fluorescence to microscopy represents an important transition in the development of microscopy, particularly as it applies to biology. It enables quantitating the amounts of specific molecules within a cell, determining whether molecules are complexing on a molecular level, measuring changes in ionic concentrations within cells and organelles, and measuring molecular dynamics. This chapter also discusses the issues important to quantitative measurement of fluorescence and focuses on four of quantitative measurements of fluorescence--boxcar-gated detection, streak cameras, photon correlation, and phase modulation. Although quantitative measurement presents many pitfalls to the beginner, it also presents significant opportunities to one skilled in the art. This chapter also examines how fluorescence is measured in the steady state and time domain and how fluorescence is applied in the modern epifluorescence microscope. PMID:23931503

  20. Refractometric Sensing of Heavy Oils in Fluorescent Core Microcapillaries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zamora V.

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The refractometric sensing of calibrated heavy oils (density > 1 000 kg/m3 is demonstrated using fluorescent-core microcapillaries. A 25-micron capillary channel was first coated with a high-index layer of fluorescent silicon Quantum Dots (QD. This QD film supports the development of cylindrical Whispering Gallery Mode (WGM resonances inside the capillary. Heavy oils spanning a wide range of refractive index were pumped into the capillary channel, causing large shifts in the fluorescence WGM resonant wavelengths. The sensitivity for heavy oils approached 250 nm per Refractive Index Unit (nm/RIU at the higher oil indices, which is the highest sensitivity so far observed for a refractometric sensor operating in the fluorescence mode. This suggests that fluorescent core microcapillaries may be a viable microfluidic alternative for refractometric or chemical sensing in various stages of oil and gas processing, monitoring and usage.

  1. Novel patient cell-based HTS assay for identification of small molecules for a lysosomal storage disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haifeng Geng

    Full Text Available Small molecules have been identified as potential therapeutic agents for lysosomal storage diseases (LSDs, inherited metabolic disorders caused by defects in proteins that result in lysosome dysfunctional. Some small molecules function assisting the folding of mutant misfolded lysosomal enzymes that are otherwise degraded in ER-associated degradation. The ultimate result is the enhancement of the residual enzymatic activity of the deficient enzyme. Most of the high throughput screening (HTS assays developed to identify these molecules are single-target biochemical assays. Here we describe a cell-based assay using patient cell lines to identify small molecules that enhance the residual arylsulfatase A (ASA activity found in patients with metachromatic leukodystrophy (MLD, a progressive neurodegenerative LSD. In order to generate sufficient cell lines for a large scale HTS, primary cultured fibroblasts from MLD patients were transformed using SV40 large T antigen. These SV40 transformed (SV40t cells showed to conserve biochemical characteristics of the primary cells. Using a specific colorimetric substrate para-nitrocatechol sulfate (pNCS, detectable ASA residual activity were observed in primary and SV40t fibroblasts from a MLD patient (ASA-I179S cultured in multi-well plates. A robust fluorescence ASA assay was developed in high-density 1,536-well plates using the traditional colorimetric pNCS substrate, whose product (pNC acts as "plate fluorescence quencher" in white solid-bottom plates. The quantitative cell-based HTS assay for ASA generated strong statistical parameters when tested against a diverse small molecule collection. This cell-based assay approach can be used for several other LSDs and genetic disorders, especially those that rely on colorimetric substrates which traditionally present low sensitivity for assay-miniaturization. In addition, the quantitative cell-based HTS assay here developed using patient cells creates an

  2. Principles of fluorescence techniques

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescence techniques are being used and applied increasingly in academics and industry. The Principles of Fluorescence Techniques course will outline the basic concepts of fluorescence techniques and the successful utilization of the currently available commercial instrumentation. The course is designed for students who utilize fluorescence techniques and instrumentation and for researchers and industrial scientists who wish to deepen their knowledge of fluorescence applications. Key scientists in the field will deliver theoretical lectures. The lectures will be complemented by the direct utilization of steady-state and lifetime fluorescence instrumentation and confocal microscopy for FLIM and FRET applications provided by leading companies.

  3. Reviews in fluorescence 2010

    CERN Document Server

    Geddes, Chris D

    2011-01-01

    ""Reviews in Fluorescence 2010"", the seventh volume of the book serial from Springer, serves as a comprehensive collection of current trends and emerging hot topics in the field of fluorescence and closely related disciplines. It summarizes the year's progress in fluorescence and its applications, with authoritative analytical reviews specialized enough to be attractive to professional researchers, yet also appealing to the wider audience of scientists in related disciplines of fluorescence. ""Reviews in Fluorescence"" offers an essential reference material for any lab working in the fluoresc

  4. Cell-based biosensors: Towards the development of cellular monitoring

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Cell-based biosensors (CBBs), a research hotspot of biosensors, which treat living cells as sensing elements, can detect the functional information of biologically active analytes. They characterize with high sensitivity, excellent selectivity and rapid response, and have been applied in many fields, such as biomedicine, environmental monitoring and pharmaceutical screening. Recently cell-cultured technology, silicon microfabrication technology and genetic technology have promoted exploration of CBBs dramatically. To elucidate the novel research findings and applications of cell- based biosensors, this paper summarizes various research approaches, presents some challenges and proposes the research trends.

  5. Fluorescent optical position sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Jonathan D.

    2005-11-15

    A fluorescent optical position sensor and method of operation. A small excitation source side-pumps a localized region of fluorescence at an unknown position along a fluorescent waveguide. As the fluorescent light travels down the waveguide, the intensity of fluorescent light decreases due to absorption. By measuring with one (or two) photodetectors the attenuated intensity of fluorescent light emitted from one (or both) ends of the waveguide, the position of the excitation source relative to the waveguide can be determined by comparing the measured light intensity to a calibrated response curve or mathematical model. Alternatively, excitation light can be pumped into an end of the waveguide, which generates an exponentially-decaying continuous source of fluorescent light along the length of the waveguide. The position of a photodetector oriented to view the side of the waveguide can be uniquely determined by measuring the intensity of the fluorescent light emitted radially at that location.

  6. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.A. Hink

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescence fluctuation spectroscopy techniques allow the quantification of fluorescent molecules present at the nanomolar concentration level. After a brief introduction to the technique, this chapter presents a protocol including background information in order to measure and quantify the molecul

  7. Demonstration of a visual cell-based assay for screening glucose transporter 4 translocation modulators in real time

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Maleppillil Vavachan Vijayakumar; Amrendra Kumar Ajay; Manoj Kumar Bhat

    2010-12-01

    Insulin-stimulated translocation of glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) to cell membrane leading to glucose uptake is the rate-limiting step in diabetes. It is also a defined target of antidiabetic drug research. Existing GLUT4 translocation assays are based on time-consuming immunoassays and are hampered by assay variability and low sensitivity. We describe a real-time, visual, cell-based qualitative GLUT4 translocation assay using CHO-HIRc-myc-GLUT4eGFP cells that stably express myc- and eGFP-tagged GLUT4 in addition to human insulin receptor (HIRc). GLUT4 translocation is visualized by live cell imaging based on GFP fluorescence by employing a cooled charge-coupled device camera attached to a fluorescent microscope. This video imaging method and further quantitative analysis of GLUT4 on the cell membrane provide rapid and foolproof visual evidence that this method is suitable for screening GLUT4 translocation modulators.

  8. Nonlinear resonances

    CERN Document Server

    Rajasekar, Shanmuganathan

    2016-01-01

    This introductory text presents the basic aspects and most important features of various types of resonances and anti-resonances in dynamical systems. In particular, for each resonance, it covers the theoretical concepts, illustrates them with case studies, and reviews the available information on mechanisms, characterization, numerical simulations, experimental realizations, possible quantum analogues, applications and significant advances made over the years. Resonances are one of the most fundamental phenomena exhibited by nonlinear systems and refer to specific realizations of maximum response of a system due to the ability of that system to store and transfer energy received from an external forcing source. Resonances are of particular importance in physical, engineering and biological systems - they can prove to be advantageous in many applications, while leading to instability and even disasters in others. The book is self-contained, providing the details of mathematical derivations and techniques invo...

  9. Fluorescent S-layer fusion proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work describes the construction and characterisation of fluorescent S-layer fusion proteins used as building blocks for the fabrication of nanostructured monomolecular biocoatings on silica particles with defined fluorescence properties. The S-layer protein SgsE of Geobacillus stearothermophilus NRS 2004/3a was fused with the pH-dependant cyan, green and yellow variant of the green fluorescent protein (GFP) and the red fluorescent protein mRFP1. These fluorescent S-layer fusion proteins, acting as scaffold and optical sensing element simultaneously, were able to reassemble in solution and on silica particles forming 2D nanostructures with p2 lattice symmetry (a=11 ±0.5 nm, b=14 ±0.4 nm, g=80 ±1o). The pH-dependant fluorescence behaviour was studied with fluorimetry, confocal microscopy and flow cytometry. These fluorescent S-layer fusion proteins can be used as pH-sensor. 50% of the fluorescence intensity decreases at their calculated pKa values (pH6 - pH5). The fluorescence intensity of the GFP variants vanished completely between pH4 and pH3 whereas the chromophore of the red protein mRFP1 was only slightly affected in acidic conditions. At the isoelectric point of the S-layer coated silica particles (pH4.6 ±0.2) an increase in particle aggregation was detected by flow cytometry. The cyan and yellow fluorescent proteins were chosen to create a bi-fluorescent S-layer tandem fusion protein with the possibility for resonance energy transfer (FRET). A transfer efficiency of 20% and a molecular distance between the donor (ECFP) and acceptor (YFP) chromophores of around 6.2 nm could be shown. This bi-fluorescent ECFP-SgsE-YFP tandem fusion protein was able to reassemble on solid surfaces. The remarkable combination of fluorescence and self-assembly and the design of bi-functional S-layer tandem fusion protein matrices makes them to a promising tool in nanobiotechnology. (author)

  10. Droplet Enhanced Fluorescence for Ultrasensitive Detection Using Inkjet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Hulie; Katagiri, Daisuke; Ogino, Taisuke; Nakajima, Hizuru; Kato, Shungo; Uchiyama, Katsumi

    2016-06-21

    A fluorescence enhanced phenomenon was found within a micrometer-sized liquid droplet, and it was adopted to construct droplet enhanced fluorescence (DEF) for ultrasensitive fluorescence detection. In this paper, an inkjet was utilized to eject perfect spherical droplets to construct a microspherical resonator and to develop a DEF system. It was utilized to implement ultrasensitive fluorescence detection in a liquid specimen with a volume of several microliters. The DEF detection of fluorescent molecules, fluorescein sodium, was used as a model to validate the proposed enhanced fluorescence detection method. A low limit of detection (LOD) for fluorescein sodium of 124 pM was obtained. The sensitive detection of single stranded DNA (ssDNA) was experimentally completed, with a wide range of linearity with a LOD of 312 pM. The proposed mechanism can be used as an ultrasensitive detection technique for analyzing microliters of liquid samples. PMID:27282958

  11. Global Distribution of Businesses Marketing Stem Cell-Based Interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Israel; Ahmad, Amina; Bansal, Akhil; Kapoor, Tanvir; Sipp, Douglas; Rasko, John E J

    2016-08-01

    A structured search reveals that online marketing of stem-cell-based interventions is skewed toward developed economies including the United States, Ireland, Australia, and Germany. Websites made broad, imprecise therapeutic claims and frequently failed to detail procedures. Widespread marketing poses challenges to regulators, bioethicists, and those seeking realistic hope from therapies. PMID:27494673

  12. Fluorescence energy transfer enhancement in aluminum nanoapertures

    CERN Document Server

    de Torres, Juan; Moparthi, Satish Babu; Grigoriev, Victor; Wenger, Jérome

    2015-01-01

    Zero-mode waveguides (ZMWs) are confining light into attoliter volumes, enabling single molecule fluorescence experiments at physiological micromolar concentrations. Among the fluorescence spectroscopy techniques that can be enhanced by ZMWs, F\\"{o}rster resonance energy transfer (FRET) is one of the most widely used in life sciences. Combining zero-mode waveguides with FRET provides new opportunities to investigate biochemical structures or follow interaction dynamics at micromolar concentration with single molecule resolution. However, prior to any quantitative FRET analysis on biological samples, it is crucial to establish first the influence of the ZMW on the FRET process. Here, we quantify the FRET rates and efficiencies between individual donor-acceptor fluorophore pairs diffusing in aluminum zero-mode waveguides. Aluminum ZMWs are important structures thanks to their commercial availability and the large literature describing their use for single molecule fluorescence spectroscopy. We also compare the ...

  13. Cooperative Fluorescence from a Strongly Driven Dilute Cloud of Atoms

    OpenAIRE

    Ott, Johan Raunkjær; Wubs, Martijn; Lodahl, Peter; Mortensen, N. Asger; Kaiser, R.

    2013-01-01

    We investigate cooperative fluorescence in a dilute cloud of strongly driven two-level emitters. Starting from the Heisenberg equations of motion, we compute the first-order scattering corrections to the saturation of the excited-state population and to the resonance-fluorescence spectrum, which both require going beyond the state-of-the-art linear-optics approach to describe collective phenomena. A dipole blockade is observed due to long-range dipole-dipole coupling that vanishes at stronger...

  14. Stem Cell-Based Therapeutics to Improve Wound Healing

    OpenAIRE

    Hu, Michael S.; Tripp Leavitt; Samir Malhotra; Dominik Duscher; Pollhammer, Michael S.; Walmsley, Graham G.; Zeshaan N. Maan; Alexander T. M. Cheung; Manfred Schmidt; Georg M. Huemer; Longaker, Michael T.; Peter Lorenz, H.

    2015-01-01

    Issues surrounding wound healing have garnered deep scientific interest as well as booming financial markets invested in novel wound therapies. Much progress has been made in the field, but it is unsurprising to find that recent successes reveal new challenges to be addressed. With regard to wound healing, large tissue deficits, recalcitrant wounds, and pathological scar formation remain but a few of our most pressing challenges. Stem cell-based therapies have been heralded as a promising mea...

  15. Cell-Based Strategies for Meniscus Tissue Engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Wei Niu; Weimin Guo; Shufeng Han; Yun Zhu; Shuyun Liu; Quanyi Guo

    2016-01-01

    Meniscus injuries remain a significant challenge due to the poor healing potential of the inner avascular zone. Following a series of studies and clinical trials, tissue engineering is considered a promising prospect for meniscus repair and regeneration. As one of the key factors in tissue engineering, cells are believed to be highly beneficial in generating bionic meniscus structures to replace injured ones in patients. Therefore, cell-based strategies for meniscus tissue engineering play a ...

  16. Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis - Cell Based Therapy and Novel Therapeutic Development

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Changsung; Lee, Hee Chul; Sung, Jung-Joon

    2014-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a neurodegenerative disease, characterized by the predominant loss of motor neurons (MNs) in primary motor cortex, the brainstem, and the spinal cord, causing premature death in most cases. Minimal delay of pathological development by available medicine has prompted the search for novel therapeutic treatments to cure ALS. Cell-based therapy has been proposed as an ultimate source for regeneration of MNs. Recent completion of non-autologous fetal spinal s...

  17. Dendritic cell-based cancer immunotherapy for colorectal cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Kajihara, Mikio; Takakura, Kazuki; Kanai, Tomoya; Ito, Zensho; Saito, Keisuke; Takami, Shinichiro; Shimodaira, Shigetaka; Okamoto, Masato; Ohkusa, Toshifumi; Koido, Shigeo

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most common cancers and a leading cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide. Although systemic therapy is the standard care for patients with recurrent or metastatic CRC, the prognosis is extremely poor. The optimal sequence of therapy remains unknown. Therefore, alternative strategies, such as immunotherapy, are needed for patients with advanced CRC. This review summarizes evidence from dendritic cell-based cancer immunotherapy strategies that are curr...

  18. Scaffold and stem cell based modeling of brain disease

    OpenAIRE

    Karpiak, Jerome V.

    2016-01-01

    Cellular models of brain disease involve genetic modulation, geometric patterning, neurophysiologic monitoring and analyses of both primary and immortalized cell lines. Additionally, recent neurological disease models often necessitate in vitro directed differentiation and maturation of human stem cell lines. To advance human stem cell based neural disease models within this evolving field, adaptive approaches of progressive complexity are essential. First, I invented an adaptable 3D laminar ...

  19. Safety issues in cell-based intervention trials

    OpenAIRE

    Dawson, Liza; Bateman-House, Alison S; Mueller Agnew, Dawn; Bok, Hilary; Brock, Dan W.; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Greene, Mark; King, Patricia A.; O'Brien, Stephen J.; Sachs, David H.; Schill, Kathryn E; Siegel, Andrew; Solter, Davor; Suter, Sonia M; Verfaillie, Catherine

    2003-01-01

    We report on the deliberations of an interdisciplinary group of experts in science, law, and philosophy who convened to discuss novel ethical and policy challenges in stem cell research. In this report we discuss the ethical and policy implications of safety concerns in the transition from basic laboratory research to clinical applications of cell-based therapies derived from stem cells. Although many features of this transition from lab to clinic are common to other therapies, three aspects ...

  20. Fluorescent fiber diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toeppen, John S.

    1994-01-01

    A fluorescent fiber (13) having a doped core (16) is pumped (11) by light (18) of a relatively short wavelength to produce fluorescence at a longer wavelength that is detected by detector (24). The level of fluorescence is monitored (26) and evaluated to provide information as to the excitation of the fiber (13) or the environment thereof. In particular, the level of intensity of the detected fluorescence may be used to measure the intensity of a light beam (18) passing axially through an optical fiber system (12) (FIG. 1 ), or the intensity of a light beam (46) passing radially through a fluorescent fiber (13) (FIG. 2 ), or the level of a fluid (32) in a tank (31) (FIG. 3 ), or a scintillation event (37) in a fluorescent fiber (13) pumped to produce amplification of the scintillation event (FIG. 4 ).

  1. Stem cell-based therapy in neural repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Yi-Chao; Chen, Su-Liang; Wang, Dan-Yen; Chiu, Ing-Ming

    2013-01-01

    Cell-based therapy could aid in alleviating symptoms or even reversing the progression of neurodegenerative diseases and nerve injuries. Fibroblast growth factor 1 (FGF1) has been shown to maintain the survival of neurons and induce neurite outgrowth. Accumulating evidence suggests that combination of FGF1 and cell-based therapy is promising for future therapeutic application. Neural stem cells (NSCs), with the characteristics of self-renewal and multipotency, can be isolated from embryonic stem cells, embryonic ectoderm, and developing or adult brain tissues. For NSC clinical application, several critical problems remain to be resolved: (1) the source of NSCs should be personalized; (2) the isolation methods and protocols of human NSCs should be standardized; (3) the clinical efficacy of NSC transplants must be evaluated in more adequate animal models; and (4) the mechanism of intrinsic brain repair needs to be better characterized. In addition, the ideal imaging technique for tracking NSCs would be safe and yield high temporal and spatial resolution, good sensitivity and specificity. Here, we discuss recent progress and future development of cell-based therapy, such as NSCs, induced pluripotent stem cells, and induced neurons, in neurodegenerative diseases and peripheral nerve injuries. PMID:23806879

  2. Fluorescent minerals, a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modreski, P.J.; Aumente-Modreski, R.

    1996-01-01

    Fluorescent minerals are more than just an attractive novelty, and collecting them is a speciality for thousands of individuals who appreciate their beauty, rarity, and scientific value. Fluorescent properties can be used as an aid to mineral identification, locality determination, and distinction between natural and synthetic gemstones. This article gives an overview of those aspects of fluorescence that are of most interest to collectors, hobbyists, and mineralogists. -from Authors

  3. Enhancement of cell-based therapeutic angiogenesis using a novel type of injectable scaffolds of hydroxyapatite-polymer nanocomposite microspheres.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yohei Mima

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Clinical trials demonstrate the effectiveness of cell-based therapeutic angiogenesis in patients with severe ischemic diseases; however, their success remains limited. Maintaining transplanted cells in place are expected to augment the cell-based therapeutic angiogenesis. We have reported that nano-hydroxyapatite (HAp coating on medical devices shows marked cell adhesiveness. Using this nanotechnology, HAp-coated poly(l-lactic acid (PLLA microspheres, named nano-scaffold (NS, were generated as a non-biological, biodegradable and injectable cell scaffold. We investigate the effectiveness of NS on cell-based therapeutic angiogenesis. METHODS AND RESULTS: Bone marrow mononuclear cells (BMNC and NS or control PLLA microspheres (LA were intramuscularly co-implanted into mice ischemic hindlimbs. When BMNC derived from enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP-transgenic mice were injected into ischemic muscle, the muscle GFP level in NS+BMNC group was approximate fivefold higher than that in BMNC or LA+BMNC groups seven days after operation. Kaplan-Meier analysis demonstrated that NS+BMNC markedly prevented hindlimb necrosis (P<0.05 vs. BMNC or LA+BMNC. NS+BMNC revealed much higher induction of angiogenesis in ischemic tissues and collateral blood flow confirmed by three-dimensional computed tomography angiography than those of BMNC or LA+BMNC groups. NS-enhanced therapeutic angiogenesis and arteriogenesis showed good correlations with increased intramuscular levels of vascular endothelial growth factor and fibroblast growth factor-2. NS co-implantation also prevented apoptotic cell death of transplanted cells, resulting in prolonged cell retention. CONCLUSION: A novel and feasible injectable cell scaffold potentiates cell-based therapeutic angiogenesis, which could be extremely useful for the treatment of severe ischemic disorders.

  4. CdTe量子点与罗丹明B水溶液体系下的双光子激发荧光共振能量转移∗%Fluorescence resonance energy transfer in a aqueous system of CdTe quantum dots and Rho damine B with two-photon excitation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李牧野; 李芳; 魏来; 何志聪; 张俊佩; 韩俊波; 陆培祥

    2015-01-01

    采用时间分辨荧光光谱技术研究了在双光子激发下不同尺寸的量子点与罗丹明B 之间的荧光共振能量转移.研究结果表明,在800 nm的双光子激发条件下,体系间能量转移效率随着供体吸收光谱与受体荧光光谱的光谱重叠程度增加而增加;理论分析表明,供体和受体间的Förster半径增加是导致其双光子能量转移效率增大的物理原因.同时,研究了罗丹明B浓度对荧光共振能量转移效率的影响.研究结果表明,量子点的荧光寿命随着罗丹明B浓度的增加而减小;量子点与罗丹明B之间的荧光共振能量转移效率随着罗丹明B浓度的增加而增加;当罗丹明B浓度为3.0×10−5 mol·L−1时,双光子荧光共振能量转移效率为40.1%.%Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) is non-radiation energy transfer that occurs between a donor (D) molecule in an excited state and an acceptor (A) molecule in a ground state by dipole-dipole interactions. The efficiency of FRET is dependent on the extent of spectral overlap between the donor photoluminescence peak and the absorption spectrum of acceptor, the quantum yield of the donor, and the distance between the donor and acceptor molecules. Cur-rently, FRET is commonly used for determining the metal ion, analyzing the protein, biological molecular fluorescence probe, etc. In this study, the FRET between CdTe quantum dots (QDs) with different sizes and Rhodamine B (RhB) in aqueous solution is investigated by using the time-resolved fluorescence test system under two-photon excitation. In this two-photon FRET aqueous system, QD is used as donor while RhB as acceptor. The time resolved two-photon photo-luminescence and fluorescence lifetime measurements are performed for analyzing the two-photon-excited luminescence by using a titanium sapphire femtosecond laser with a wavelength of 800 nm, pulse width of 130 fs, repetition frequency of 76 MHz, with the power fixed at

  5. Multi-dimensional fluorescence lifetime measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biskup, Christoph; Hoffmann, Birgit; Kelbauskas, Laimonas; Zimmer, Thomas; Dietrich, Sascha; Becker, Wolfgang; Bergmann, Axel; Klöcker, Nikolaj; Benndorf, Klaus

    2007-02-01

    In this study, we present two different approaches that allow multi-wavelength fluorescence lifetime measurements in the time domain. One technique is based on a streak camera system, the other technique is based on a time-correlated singlephoton- counting (TCSPC) approach. The setup consists of a confocal laser-scanning microscope (LSM 510, Zeiss) and a Titanium:Sapphire-laser (Mira 900D, Coherent) that is used for pulsed one- and two-photon excitation. Fluorescence light emitted by the sample is dispersed by a polychromator (250is, Chromex) and recorded by a streak camera (C5680 with M5677 sweep unit, Hamamatsu Photonics) or a 16 channel TCSPC detector head (PML-16, Becker & Hickl) connected to a TCSPC imaging module (SPC-730/SPC-830, Becker & Hickl). With these techniques it is possible to acquire fluorescence decays in several wavelength regions simultaneously. We applied these methods to Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) measurements and discuss the advantages over fluorescence techniques that are already well established in the field of confocal microscopy, such as spectrally resolved intensity measurements or single-wavelength fluorescence lifetime measurements.

  6. Resonance Raman study of benzyl radical

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langkilde, F.W.; Bajdor, K.; Wilbrandt, R.

    1992-01-01

    Time-resolved resonance Raman spectra are obtained of benzyl radicals created by laser flash photolysis of benzylchloride and diphenylacetone in solution. The spectra are obtained in resonance with the intense 2 2A2-1 B-2(2) transition of benzyl. The strong Raman bands are assigned to totally...... symmetric a1 modes. The remaining observed bands are tentatively assigned to fundamental modes of b1, a2, and b2 symmetry, and to overtones and combinations. The resonance Raman spectra are found to be quite different from previous fluorescence spectra of benzyl, and the origins of these differences are...

  7. Neuroaesthetic Resonance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brooks, Anthony Lewis

    2013-01-01

    the unencumbered motion-to-computer-generated activities - ‘Music Making’, ‘Painting’, ‘Robotic’ and ‘Video Game’ control. A focus of this position paper is to highlight how Aesthetic Resonance, in this context, relates to the growing body of research on Neuroaesthetics to evolve Neuroaesthetic Resonance.......Neuroaesthetic Resonance emerged from a mature body of patient- centered gesture-control research investigating non-formal rehabilitation via ICT-enhanced-Art to question ‘Aesthetic Resonance’. Motivating participation, ludic engagement, and augmenting physical motion in non-formal (fun) treatment...... tailored channeling of sensory stimulus aligned as ‘art-making’ and ‘game playing’ core experiences. Thus, affecting brain plasticity and human motoric-performance via the adaptability (plasticity) of digital medias result in closure of the human afferent-efferent neural feedback loop closure through...

  8. Recent Progress on Plasmon-Enhanced Fluorescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Jun

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The optically generated collective electron density waves on metal–dielectric boundaries known as surface plasmons have been of great scientific interest since their discovery. Being electromagnetic waves on gold or silver nanoparticle’s surface, localised surface plasmons (LSP can strongly enhance the electromagnetic field. These strong electromagnetic fields near the metal surfaces have been used in various applications like surface enhanced spectroscopy (SES, plasmonic lithography, plasmonic trapping of particles, and plasmonic catalysis. Resonant coupling of LSPs to fluorophore can strongly enhance the emission intensity, the angular distribution, and the polarisation of the emitted radiation and even the speed of radiative decay, which is so-called plasmon enhanced fluorescence (PEF. As a result, more and more reports on surface-enhanced fluorescence have appeared, such as SPASER-s, plasmon assisted lasing, single molecule fluorescence measurements, surface plasmoncoupled emission (SPCE in biological sensing, optical orbit designs etc. In this review, we focus on recent advanced reports on plasmon-enhanced fluorescence (PEF. First, the mechanism of PEF and early results of enhanced fluorescence observed by metal nanostructure will be introduced. Then, the enhanced substrates, including periodical and nonperiodical nanostructure, will be discussed and the most important factor of the spacer between molecule and surface and wavelength dependence on PEF is demonstrated. Finally, the recent progress of tipenhanced fluorescence and PEF from the rare-earth doped up-conversion (UC and down-conversion (DC nanoparticles (NPs are also commented upon. This review provides an introduction to fundamentals of PEF, illustrates the current progress in the design of metallic nanostructures for efficient fluorescence signal amplification that utilises propagating and localised surface plasmons.

  9. Recent Progress on Plasmon-Enhanced Fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Jun; Zhang, Zhenglong; Zheng, Hairong; Sun, Mentao

    2015-12-01

    The optically generated collective electron density waves on metal-dielectric boundaries known as surface plasmons have been of great scientific interest since their discovery. Being electromagnetic waves on gold or silver nanoparticle's surface, localised surface plasmons (LSP) can strongly enhance the electromagnetic field. These strong electromagnetic fields near the metal surfaces have been used in various applications like surface enhanced spectroscopy (SES), plasmonic lithography, plasmonic trapping of particles, and plasmonic catalysis. Resonant coupling of LSPs to fluorophore can strongly enhance the emission intensity, the angular distribution, and the polarisation of the emitted radiation and even the speed of radiative decay, which is so-called plasmon enhanced fluorescence (PEF). As a result, more and more reports on surface-enhanced fluorescence have appeared, such as SPASER-s, plasmon assisted lasing, single molecule fluorescence measurements, surface plasmoncoupled emission (SPCE) in biological sensing, optical orbit designs etc. In this review, we focus on recent advanced reports on plasmon-enhanced fluorescence (PEF). First, the mechanism of PEF and early results of enhanced fluorescence observed by metal nanostructure will be introduced. Then, the enhanced substrates, including periodical and nonperiodical nanostructure, will be discussed and the most important factor of the spacer between molecule and surface and wavelength dependence on PEF is demonstrated. Finally, the recent progress of tipenhanced fluorescence and PEF from the rare-earth doped up-conversion (UC) and down-conversion (DC) nanoparticles (NPs) are also commented upon. This review provides an introduction to fundamentals of PEF, illustrates the current progress in the design of metallic nanostructures for efficient fluorescence signal amplification that utilises propagating and localised surface plasmons.

  10. Fluorescent Nanoparticle Uptake for Brain Tumor Visualization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel Tréhin

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Accurate delineation of tumor margins is vital to the successful surgical resection of brain tumors. We have previously developed a multimodal nanoparticle CLIO-Cy5.5, which is detectable by both magnetic resonance imaging and fluorescence, to assist in intraoperatively visualizing tumor boundaries. Here we examined the accuracy of tumor margin determination of orthotopic tumors implanted in hosts with differing immune responses to the tumor. Using a nonuser-based signal intensity method applied to fluorescent micrographs of 9L gliosarcoma green fluorescent protein (GFP tumors, mean overestimations of 2 and 24 µm were obtained using Cy5.5 fluorescence, compared to the true tumor margin determined by GFP fluorescence, in nude mice and rats, respectively. To resolve which cells internalized the nanoparticle and to quantitate degree of uptake, tumors were disaggregated and cells were analyzed by flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy. Nanoparticle uptake was seen in both CD11b+ cells (representing activated microglia and macrophages and tumor cells in both animal models by both methods. CD11b+ cells were predominantly found at the tumor margin in both hosts, but were more pronounced at the margin in the rat model. Additional metastatic (CT26 colon and primary (Gli36 glioma brain tumor models likewise demonstrated that the nanoparticle was internalized both by tumor cells and by host cells. Together, these observations suggest that fluorescent nanoparticles provide an accurate method of tumor margin estimation based on a combination of tumor cell and host cell uptake for primary and metastatic tumors in animal model systems and offer potential for clinical translation.

  11. Recent developments in fluorescence-based microscopy applied in biomedical sciences

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The present short review aims to give an overview of the most recent de velopments in fluorescence microscopy and its applications in biomedical science s. Apart from improvements in well-established methods based on conventional fl u orescence microscopy and confocal microscopy (fluorescence in situ hybridisa tion (FISH), tyramide signal amplification (TSA) in immunocytochemistry, new fluorop hores), more recently introduced techniques like fluorescence resonance energy t ransfer (FRET), fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP), multiphoton m icroscopy and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) will be discussed.

  12. Fluorescence of atopic allergens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berrens, L.

    1967-01-01

    Purified atopic allergens have been found to emit flue fluorescence upon irradiation with ultraviolet light of 365 mμ wavelength. The maximum of fluorescence is in the region 445–490 mμ and the intensity is of the same order of magnitude for different atopic allergens. Synthetic model compounds, inc

  13. Membranes and Fluorescence microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagatolli, Luis

    2009-01-01

    Fluorescence spectroscopy-based techniques using conventional fluorimeters have been extensively applied since the late 1960s to study different aspects of membrane-related phenomena, i.e., mainly relating to lipid-lipid and lipid-protein (peptide) interactions. Even though fluorescence...

  14. Dendritic cell-based cancer immunotherapy for colorectal cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kajihara, Mikio; Takakura, Kazuki; Kanai, Tomoya; Ito, Zensho; Saito, Keisuke; Takami, Shinichiro; Shimodaira, Shigetaka; Okamoto, Masato; Ohkusa, Toshifumi; Koido, Shigeo

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most common cancers and a leading cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide. Although systemic therapy is the standard care for patients with recurrent or metastatic CRC, the prognosis is extremely poor. The optimal sequence of therapy remains unknown. Therefore, alternative strategies, such as immunotherapy, are needed for patients with advanced CRC. This review summarizes evidence from dendritic cell-based cancer immunotherapy strategies that are currently in clinical trials. In addition, we discuss the possibility of antitumor immune responses through immunoinhibitory PD-1/PD-L1 pathway blockade in CRC patients. PMID:27158196

  15. Sorting live stem cells based on Sox2 mRNA expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans M Larsson

    Full Text Available While cell sorting usually relies on cell-surface protein markers, molecular beacons (MBs offer the potential to sort cells based on the presence of any expressed mRNA and in principle could be extremely useful to sort rare cell populations from primary isolates. We show here how stem cells can be purified from mixed cell populations by sorting based on MBs. Specifically, we designed molecular beacons targeting Sox2, a well-known stem cell marker for murine embryonic (mES and neural stem cells (NSC. One of our designed molecular beacons displayed an increase in fluorescence compared to a nonspecific molecular beacon both in vitro and in vivo when tested in mES and NSCs. We sorted Sox2-MB(+SSEA1(+ cells from a mixed population of 4-day retinoic acid-treated mES cells and effectively isolated live undifferentiated stem cells. Additionally, Sox2-MB(+ cells isolated from primary mouse brains were sorted and generated neurospheres with higher efficiency than Sox2-MB(- cells. These results demonstrate the utility of MBs for stem cell sorting in an mRNA-specific manner.

  16. Cell-Based Assay Design for High-Content Screening of Drug Candidates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nierode, Gregory; Kwon, Paul S; Dordick, Jonathan S; Kwon, Seok-Joon

    2016-02-01

    To reduce attrition in drug development, it is crucial to consider the development and implementation of translational phenotypic assays as well as decipher diverse molecular mechanisms of action for new molecular entities. High-throughput fluorescence and confocal microscopes with advanced analysis software have simplified the simultaneous identification and quantification of various cellular processes through what is now referred to as highcontent screening (HCS). HCS permits automated identification of modifiers of accessible and biologically relevant targets and can thus be used to detect gene interactions or identify toxic pathways of drug candidates to improve drug discovery and development processes. In this review, we summarize several HCS-compatible, biochemical, and molecular biology-driven assays, including immunohistochemistry, RNAi, reporter gene assay, CRISPR-Cas9 system, and protein-protein interactions to assess a variety of cellular processes, including proliferation, morphological changes, protein expression, localization, post-translational modifications, and protein-protein interactions. These cell-based assay methods can be applied to not only 2D cell culture but also 3D cell culture systems in a high-throughput manner. PMID:26428732

  17. Studies in atomic-fluorescence spectroscopy-V The fluorescence characteristics and determination of antimony.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagnall, R M; Thompson, K C; West, T S

    1967-10-01

    Atomic-fluorescence of antimony may be generated in an air-propane flame by nebulizing aqueous solutions of antimony salts whilst irradiating the flame by means of a microwave-excited electrode-less discharge tube operating at 30 W. The strongest fluorescence is exhibited by the (4)S(11 2 ) --> (4)P(1 3 ) 2311 A resonance line and weaker signals are observed at the 2068 and 2176 A resonance lines and at four intercombination lines, at 2598, 2671, 2770 and 2878 A. A process of thermally assisted direct-line fluorescence is postulated to account for the otherwise inexplicable intensity of the 2598 A line emission. Atomic-fluorescence spectroscopy at 2176 A permits the determination of antimony in the range 0.1-120 ppm with a detection limit of 0.05 ppm. With the same equipment and source, the range of measurement for atomic-absorption was 6-120 ppm and the detection limit was 1 ppm. No interferences were observed from 100-fold molar amounts of Cd, Co, Cu, Fe, Hg, K, Mg, Mn, Mo, Na, NH(4), Pb and Zn or from arsenate, chloride, nitrate, phosphate and sulphate. PMID:18960212

  18. Fluorescence and Spectral Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ralph S. DaCosta

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Early identification of dysplasia remains a critical goal for diagnostic endoscopy since early discovery directly improves patient survival because it allows endoscopic or surgical intervention with disease localized without lymph node involvement. Clinical studies have successfully used tissue autofluorescence with conventional white light endoscopy and biopsy for detecting adenomatous colonic polyps, differentiating benign hyperplastic from adenomas with acceptable sensitivity and specificity. In Barrett's esophagus, the detection of dysplasia remains problematic because of background inflammation, whereas in the squamous esophagus, autofluorescence imaging appears to be more dependable. Point fluorescence spectroscopy, although playing a crucial role in the pioneering mechanistic development of fluorescence endoscopic imaging, does not seem to have a current function in endoscopy because of its nontargeted sampling and suboptimal sensitivity and specificity. Other point spectroscopic modalities, such as Raman spectroscopy and elastic light scattering, continue to be evaluated in clinical studies, but still suffer the significant disadvantages of being random and nonimaging. A recent addition to the fluorescence endoscopic imaging arsenal is the use of confocal fluorescence endomicroscopy, which provides real-time optical biopsy for the first time. To improve detection of dysplasia in the gastrointestinal tract, a new and exciting development has been the use of exogenous fluorescence contrast probes that specifically target a variety of disease-related cellular biomarkers using conventional fluorescent dyes and novel potent fluorescent nanocrystals (i.e., quantum dots. This is an area of great promise, but still in its infancy, and preclinical studies are currently under way.

  19. Large Enhancement of Quantum Dot Fluorescence by Highly Scalable Nanoporous Gold

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Ling; Song, Yunke; Fujita, Takeshi; Zhang, Ye; Chen, Mingwei; Wang, Tza-Huei

    2013-01-01

    Nanoengineered metallic materials have been shown to have a number of exclusive physicochemical properties not available at neither larger (micro- and macroscopic) nor smaller (molecular) scales. Recently, these materials in particular have drawn significant attention due to their capability to enhance fluorescent signals of nearby fluorescent species through a phenomenon known as metal enhanced fluorescence (MEF). MEF originates from the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR), a collecti...

  20. Cell-Based Strategies for Meniscus Tissue Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Wei; Guo, Weimin; Han, Shufeng; Zhu, Yun; Liu, Shuyun; Guo, Quanyi

    2016-01-01

    Meniscus injuries remain a significant challenge due to the poor healing potential of the inner avascular zone. Following a series of studies and clinical trials, tissue engineering is considered a promising prospect for meniscus repair and regeneration. As one of the key factors in tissue engineering, cells are believed to be highly beneficial in generating bionic meniscus structures to replace injured ones in patients. Therefore, cell-based strategies for meniscus tissue engineering play a fundamental role in meniscal regeneration. According to current studies, the main cell-based strategies for meniscus tissue engineering are single cell type strategies; cell coculture strategies also were applied to meniscus tissue engineering. Likewise, on the one side, the zonal recapitulation strategies based on mimicking meniscal differing cells and internal architectures have received wide attentions. On the other side, cell self-assembling strategies without any scaffolds may be a better way to build a bionic meniscus. In this review, we primarily discuss cell seeds for meniscus tissue engineering and their application strategies. We also discuss recent advances and achievements in meniscus repair experiments that further improve our understanding of meniscus tissue engineering. PMID:27274735

  1. Cell-Based Strategies for Meniscus Tissue Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Niu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Meniscus injuries remain a significant challenge due to the poor healing potential of the inner avascular zone. Following a series of studies and clinical trials, tissue engineering is considered a promising prospect for meniscus repair and regeneration. As one of the key factors in tissue engineering, cells are believed to be highly beneficial in generating bionic meniscus structures to replace injured ones in patients. Therefore, cell-based strategies for meniscus tissue engineering play a fundamental role in meniscal regeneration. According to current studies, the main cell-based strategies for meniscus tissue engineering are single cell type strategies; cell coculture strategies also were applied to meniscus tissue engineering. Likewise, on the one side, the zonal recapitulation strategies based on mimicking meniscal differing cells and internal architectures have received wide attentions. On the other side, cell self-assembling strategies without any scaffolds may be a better way to build a bionic meniscus. In this review, we primarily discuss cell seeds for meniscus tissue engineering and their application strategies. We also discuss recent advances and achievements in meniscus repair experiments that further improve our understanding of meniscus tissue engineering.

  2. Improving translation success of cell-based therapies in orthopaedics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bara, Jennifer J; Herrmann, Marietta; Evans, Christopher H; Miclau, Theodore; Ratcliffe, Anthony; Richards, R Geoff

    2016-01-01

    There is a clear discrepancy between the growth of cell therapy and tissue engineering research in orthopaedics over the last two decades and the number of approved clinical therapies and products available to patients. At the 2015 annual meeting of the Orthopaedic Research Society, a workshop was held to highlight important considerations from the perspectives of an academic scientist, clinical researcher, and industry representative with the aim of helping researchers to successfully translate their ideas into clinical and commercial reality. Survey data acquired from workshop participants indicated an overall positive opinion on the future potential of cell-based therapies to make a significant contribution to orthopaedic medicine. The survey also indicated an agreement on areas requiring improvement in the development of new therapies, specifically; increased support for fundamental research and education and improved transparency of regulatory processes. This perspectives article summarises the content and conclusions of the workshop and puts forward suggestions on how translational success of cell-based therapies in orthopaedics may be achieved. PMID:26403666

  3. Stem Cell-Based Cell Therapy for Glomerulonephritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meiling Jin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Glomerulonephritis (GN, characterized by immune-mediated inflammatory changes in the glomerular, is a common cause of end stage renal disease. Therapeutic options for glomerulonephritis applicable to all cases mainly include symptomatic treatment and strategies to delay progression. In the attempt to yield innovative interventions fostering the limited capability of regeneration of renal tissue after injury and the uncontrolled pathological process by current treatments, stem cell-based therapy has emerged as novel therapy for its ability to inhibit inflammation and promote regeneration. Many basic and clinical studies have been performed that support the ability of various stem cell populations to ameliorate glomerular injury and improve renal function. However, there is a long way before putting stem cell-based therapy into clinical practice. In the present article, we aim to review works performed with respect to the use of stem cell of different origins in GN, and to discuss the potential mechanism of therapeutic effect and the challenges for clinical application of stem cells.

  4. Stem cell-based therapies for HIV/AIDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pernet, Olivier; Yadav, Swati Seth; An, Dong Sung

    2016-08-01

    One of the current focuses in HIV/AIDS research is to develop a novel therapeutic strategy that can provide a life-long remission of HIV/AIDS without daily drug treatment and, ultimately, a cure for HIV/AIDS. Hematopoietic stem cell-based anti-HIV gene therapy aims to reconstitute the patient immune system by transplantation of genetically engineered hematopoietic stem cells with anti-HIV genes. Hematopoietic stem cells can self-renew, proliferate and differentiate into mature immune cells. In theory, anti-HIV gene-modified hematopoietic stem cells can continuously provide HIV-resistant immune cells throughout the life of a patient. Therefore, hematopoietic stem cell-based anti-HIV gene therapy has a great potential to provide a life-long remission of HIV/AIDS by a single treatment. Here, we provide a comprehensive review of the recent progress of developing anti-HIV genes, genetic modification of hematopoietic stem progenitor cells, engraftment and reconstitution of anti-HIV gene-modified immune cells, HIV inhibition in in vitro and in vivo animal models, and in human clinical trials. PMID:27151309

  5. General purpose, field-portable cell-based biosensor platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilchrist, K H; Barker, V N; Fletcher, L E; DeBusschere, B D; Ghanouni, P; Giovangrandi, L; Kovacs, G T

    2001-09-01

    There are several groups of researchers developing cell-based biosensors for chemical and biological warfare agents based on electrophysiologic monitoring of cells. In order to transition such sensors from the laboratory to the field, a general-purpose hardware and software platform is required. This paper describes the design, implementation, and field-testing of such a system, consisting of cell-transport and data acquisition instruments. The cell-transport module is a self-contained, battery-powered instrument that allows various types of cell-based modules to be maintained at a preset temperature and ambient CO(2) level while in transit or in the field. The data acquisition module provides 32 channels of action potential amplification, filtering, and real-time data streaming to a laptop computer. At present, detailed analysis of the data acquired is carried out off-line, but sufficient computing power is available in the data acquisition module to enable the most useful algorithms to eventually be run real-time in the field. Both modules have sufficient internal power to permit realistic field-testing, such as the example presented in this paper. PMID:11544049

  6. Theory of analytical curves in atomic fluorescence flame spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hooymayers, H.P.

    1968-01-01

    An explicit expression for the intensity of atomic resonance fluorescence as a function of atomic concentration in a flame is derived under certain idealized conditions. The expression is generally valid for a pure Doppler absorption line profile as well as for a combined Doppler and collisional bro

  7. Highly thermostable fluorescent proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradbury, Andrew M.; Waldo, Geoffrey S.; Kiss, Csaba

    2011-03-22

    Thermostable fluorescent proteins (TSFPs), methods for generating these and other stability-enhanced proteins, polynucleotides encoding such proteins, and assays and method for using the TSFPs and TSFP-encoding nucleic acid molecules are provided. The TSFPs of the invention show extremely enhanced levels of stability and thermotolerance. In one case, for example, a TSFP of the invention is so stable it can be heated to 99.degree. C. for short periods of time without denaturing, and retains 85% of its fluorescence when heated to 80.degree. C. for several minutes. The invention also provides a method for generating stability-enhanced variants of a protein, including but not limited to fluorescent proteins.

  8. Neuroaesthetic Resonance

    OpenAIRE

    Brooks, Anthony Lewis

    2013-01-01

    Neuroaesthetic Resonance emerged from a mature body of patient- centered gesture-control research investigating non-formal rehabilitation via ICT-enhanced-Art to question ‘Aesthetic Resonance’. Motivating participation, ludic engagement, and augmenting physical motion in non-formal (fun) treatment sessions are achieved via adaptive action-analyzed activities. These interactive virtual environments are designed to empower patients’ creative and/or playful expressions via digital feedback stimu...

  9. Fluorescent monomers: "bricks" that make a molecularly imprinted polymer "bright".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Wei; Wagner, Sabine; Rurack, Knut

    2016-03-01

    Molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) are potent and established recognition phases in separation and enrichment applications. Because of their robustness, versatility and format adaptability, they also constitute very promising sensing phases, especially when the active sensing element is directly integrated into the MIP. Fluorescent MIPs incorporating fluorescent monomers are perhaps the best developed and most successful approach here. This article reviews the state of the art in this field, discussing the pros and cons of the use of fluorescent dye and probe derivatives as such monomers, the different molecular interaction forces for template complexation, signalling modes and a variety of related approaches that have been realized over the years, including Förster resonance energy transfer processes, covalent imprinting, postmodification attachment of fluorescent units and conjugated polymers as MIPs; other measurement schemes and sensing chemistries that use MIPs and fluorescence interrogation to solve analytical problems (fluorescent competitive assays, fluorescent analytes, etc.) are not covered here. Throughout the article, photophysical processes are discussed to facilitate understanding of the effects that can occur when one is planning for a fluorescence response to happen in a constrained polymer matrix. The article concludes with a concise assessment of the suitability of the different formats for sensor realization. PMID:26613794

  10. Fluorescent filtered electrophosphorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrest, Stephen R.; Sun, Yiru; Giebink, Noel; Thompson, Mark E.

    2009-01-06

    The present invention relates to organic light emitting devices (OLEDs), and more specifically to OLEDS that emit light using a combination of fluorescent emitters and phosphorescent emitters for the efficient utilization of all of the electrically generated excitons.

  11. Fluorescence enhancement in visible light: dielectric or noble metal?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, S; Wu, L; Bai, P; Png, C E

    2016-07-28

    A high permittivity dielectric gives the impression of outperforming plasmonic noble metal in visible light fluorescence enhancement primarily because of its small loss. Nonetheless, the performances of these two platforms in various situations remain obscure due to the different optical confinement mechanisms as well as the complexity in the fluorescence enhancement process. This study presents a comprehensive comparison between these two platforms based on nanoparticles (NPs) to evaluate their capability and applicability in fluorescence enhancement by taking into account the fluorescence excitation rate, the quantum yield, the fluorophore wavelengths and Stokes shifts as well as the far field intensity. In a low permittivity sensing medium (e.g. air), the dielectric NP can achieve comparable or higher fluorescence enhancement than the metal NP due to its decent NP-enhanced excitation rate and larger quantum yield. In a relatively high permittivity sensing medium (e.g. water), however, there is a significant decrement of the excitation rate of the dielectric NP as the permittivity contrast decreases, leading to a smaller fluorescence enhancement compared to the metallic counterpart. Combining the fluorescence enhancement and the far field intensity studies, we further conclude that for both dielectric and plasmonic NPs, the optimal situation occurs when the fluorescence excitation wavelength, the fluorescence emission wavelength and the electric-dipole-mode of the dielectric NP (or the plasmonic resonance of the metal NP) are the same and all fall in the low conductivity region of the NP material. We also find that the electric-dipole-mode of the dielectric NP performs better than the magnetic-dipole-mode for fluorescence enhancement applications because only the electric-dipole-mode can be strongly excited by the routinely used fluorescent dyes and quantum dots, which behave as electric dipoles by nature. PMID:27374052

  12. Fluorescence fluctuation immunoassay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elings, V B; Nicoli, D F; Briggs, J

    1983-01-01

    The homogeneous fluorescent immunoassay described above allows one to measure the brightness of fluorescently tagged carrier particles that are suspended in a background of free, unbound fluorescent sources. We have demonstrated the feasibility of our technique using a gentamicin competitive assay as well as idealized model systems. We have seen that the fluctuation-correlation method is able to discriminate against free background sources because each fluorescing particle in solution contributes to the correlation peak [Eq. (4)] with a weighting equal to the square of its respective intensity. Hence, a few very bright sources contribute disproportionately to the "signal" relative to many weak ones. To take advantage of this property, one would therefore design an assay that uses relatively larger carrier particles, each of which is capable of binding on the order of 10(3) to 10(4) tagged antibodies or antigens. Unfortunately, the nonlinear dependence of the correlation peak on the brightness of the fluorescing species causes the technique to be perturbed by carrier particle aggregation; the apparent bound fluorescence intensity increases with the extent of aggregation. The latter may be an unavoidable consequence of performing assays using raw blood serum, for example. The ultimate usefulness of this method will depend on its sensitivity and speed when applied to "real" assays of clinical significance. These characteristics will be influenced by a number of technical details. Given our limited experience with the method thus far, it would appear that its principal drawback is its relatively slow speed. In order to decrease the time needed for a reliable measurement, one must average the random fluctuations in the fluorescent intensity to zero more quickly. In principle, this can be accomplished by decreasing the shot noise by collecting a larger fraction of the fluorescent light, and increasing the sampling rate. The method requires rather complicated

  13. Fluorescent silver nanoparticles via exploding wire technique

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Alqudami Abdullah; S Annapoorni

    2005-11-01

    Aqueous solution containing spherical silver nanoparticles of 20–80 nm size have been generated using a newly developed novel electro-exploding wire (EEW) technique where thin silver wires have been exploded in double distilled water. Structural properties of the resulted nanoparticles have been studied by means of X-ray diffractometer (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The absorption spectrum of the aqueous solution of silver nanoparticles showed the appearance of a broad surface plasmon resonance (SPR) peak centered at a wavelength of 390 nm. The theoretically generated SPR peak seems to be in good agreement with the experimental one. Strong green fluorescence emission was observed from the water-suspended silver nanoparticles excited with light of wavelengths 340, 360 and 390 nm. The fluorescence of silver nanoparticles could be due to the excitation of the surface plasmon coherent electronic motion with the small size effect and the surface effect considerations.

  14. Plasmonic antennas and zero mode waveguides to enhance single molecule fluorescence detection and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy towards physiological concentrations

    CERN Document Server

    Punj, Deep; Moparthi, Satish Babu; de Torres, Juan; Grigoriev, Victor; Rigneault, Hervé; Wenger, Jérôme

    2014-01-01

    Single-molecule approaches to biology offer a powerful new vision to elucidate the mechanisms that underpin the functioning of living cells. However, conventional optical single molecule spectroscopy techniques such as F\\"orster fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) or fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) are limited by diffraction to the nanomolar concentration range, far below the physiological micromolar concentration range where most biological reaction occur. To breach the diffraction limit, zero mode waveguides and plasmonic antennas exploit the surface plasmon resonances to confine and enhance light down to the nanometre scale. The ability of plasmonics to achieve extreme light concentration unlocks an enormous potential to enhance fluorescence detection, FRET and FCS. Single molecule spectroscopy techniques greatly benefit from zero mode waveguides and plasmonic antennas to enter a new dimension of molecular concentration reaching physiological conditions. The application of nano-optics...

  15. UV fluorescence of molecular hydrogen and red dust emission in the Gamma Cassiopeiae nebula IC 63

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witt, Adolf N.; Stecher, Theodore P.; Boroson, Todd A.; Bohlin, Ralph C.

    1989-01-01

    Resonant fluorescence of molecular hydrogen has been observed in the reflection nebula IC 63 with the IUE satellite. Both the noncoherent resonant scattering and the dissociative continuum are shown to agree well with molecular theory. Extended red emission is also found in this nebula and may be physically related to the dissociation of H2.

  16. A stem cell-based approach to cartilage repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Kristen; Zhu, Shoutian; Tremblay, Matthew S; Payette, Joshua N; Wang, Jianing; Bouchez, Laure C; Meeusen, Shelly; Althage, Alana; Cho, Charles Y; Wu, Xu; Schultz, Peter G

    2012-05-11

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a degenerative joint disease that involves the destruction of articular cartilage and eventually leads to disability. Molecules that promote the selective differentiation of multipotent mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) into chondrocytes may stimulate the repair of damaged cartilage. Using an image-based high-throughput screen, we identified the small molecule kartogenin, which promotes chondrocyte differentiation (median effective concentration = 100 nM), shows chondroprotective effects in vitro, and is efficacious in two OA animal models. Kartogenin binds filamin A, disrupts its interaction with the transcription factor core-binding factor β subunit (CBFβ), and induces chondrogenesis by regulating the CBFβ-RUNX1 transcriptional program. This work provides new insights into the control of chondrogenesis that may ultimately lead to a stem cell-based therapy for osteoarthritis. PMID:22491093

  17. Cell-based screens and phenomics with fission yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rallis, Charalampos; Bähler, Jürg

    2016-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing approaches have considerably advanced our understanding of genome function and regulation. However, the knowledge of gene function and complex cellular processes remains a challenge and bottleneck in biological research. Phenomics is a rapidly emerging area, which seeks to rigorously characterize all phenotypes associated with genes or gene variants. Such high-throughput phenotyping under different conditions can be a potent approach toward gene function. The fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe (S. pombe) is a proven eukaryotic model organism that is increasingly used for genomewide screens and phenomic assays. In this review, we highlight current large-scale, cell-based approaches used with S. pombe, including computational colony-growth measurements, genetic interaction screens, parallel profiling using barcodes, microscopy-based cell profiling, metabolomic methods and transposon mutagenesis. These diverse methods are starting to offer rich insights into the relationship between genotypes and phenotypes. PMID:26523839

  18. Cell-Based Microarrays for In Vitro Toxicology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegener, Joachim

    2015-07-01

    DNA/RNA and protein microarrays have proven their outstanding bioanalytical performance throughout the past decades, given the unprecedented level of parallelization by which molecular recognition assays can be performed and analyzed. Cell microarrays (CMAs) make use of similar construction principles. They are applied to profile a given cell population with respect to the expression of specific molecular markers and also to measure functional cell responses to drugs and chemicals. This review focuses on the use of cell-based microarrays for assessing the cytotoxicity of drugs, toxins, or chemicals in general. It also summarizes CMA construction principles with respect to the cell types that are used for such microarrays, the readout parameters to assess toxicity, and the various formats that have been established and applied. The review ends with a critical comparison of CMAs and well-established microtiter plate (MTP) approaches.

  19. CdTe量子点与罗丹明6G间的荧光共振能量转移机理研究%Study on Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer between CdTe Quantum Dots and Rhodamine 6G

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    罗建梅; 毕宁; 张曼君; 茶文丽; 梁建功; 陆冬莲

    2011-01-01

    本文在合成水溶性巯基乙酸修饰的CdTe量子点的基础上,研究了CdTe量子点与罗丹明6G之间的荧光共振能量转移.实验结果表明:构建的CdTe量子点(供体)-罗丹明6G(受体)荧光共振能量转移体系在磷酸盐缓冲溶液中有较好的转移效果.当磷酸缓冲溶液pH值为7.4,NaCl浓度为1.0 mol/L时,构建的CdTe量子点-罗丹明6G荧光共振能量转移效率为62%;罗丹明6G既能与CdTe量子点表面的修饰试剂作用,也能与CdTe量子点本身直接作用,其作用力为静电相互作用和配位作用.%CdTe quantum dots (QDs) were synthesized in aqueous medium by employing thioglycolic acid as a stabilizer. The fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) between CdTe QDs and rhodamine 6G (Rh 6G) was investigated. The results showed that the energy transfer efficiency was 62% at pH=7.4 in 1.0 mol/L NaC1. Rh 6G molecules interacted not only with thioglycolic acid but also with the surface of CdTe QDs directly. The forces of the interaction were electrostatic interaction and coordinate interaction.

  20. Development of a novel cell-based assay system EPISSAY for screening epigenetic drugs and liposome formulated decitabine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Despite the potential of improving the delivery of epigenetic drugs, the subsequent assessment of changes in their epigenetic activity is largely dependent on the availability of a suitable and rapid screening bioassay. Here, we describe a cell-based assay system for screening gene reactivation. A cell-based assay system (EPISSAY) was designed based on a silenced triple-mutated bacterial nitroreductase TMnfsB fused with Red-Fluorescent Protein (RFP) expressed in the non-malignant human breast cell line MCF10A. EPISSAY was validated using the target gene TXNIP, which has previously been shown to respond to epigenetic drugs. The potency of a epigenetic drug model, decitabine, formulated with PEGylated liposomes was also validated using this assay system. Following treatment with DNA methyltransferase (DNMT) and histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors such as decitabine and vorinostat, increases in RFP expression were observed, indicating expression of RFP-TMnfsB. The EPISSAY system was then used to test the potency of decitabine, before and after PEGylated liposomal encapsulation. We observed a 50% higher potency of decitabine when encapsulated in PEGylated liposomes, which is likely to be due to its protection from rapid degradation. The EPISSAY bioassay system provides a novel and rapid system to compare the efficiencies of existing and newly formulated drugs that reactivate gene expression

  1. Resonant energy transfer based biosensor for detection of multivalent proteins.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, X. (Xuedong); Swanson, Basil I.

    2001-01-01

    We have developed a new fluorescence-based biosensor for sensitive detection of species involved in a multivslent interaction. The biosensor system utilizes specific interactions between proteins and cell surface receptors, which trigger a receptor aggregation process. Distance-dependent fluorescence self-quenching and resonant energy transfer mechanisms were coupled with a multivalent interaction to probe the receptor aggregation process, providing a sensitive and specific signal transduction method for such a binding event. The fluorescence change induced by the aggregation process can be monitored by different instrument platforms, e.g. fluorimetry and flow cytometry. In this article, a sensitive detection of pentavalent cholera toxin which recognizes ganglioside GM1 has been demonstrated through the resonant energy transfer scheme, which can achieve a double color change simultaneously. A detection sensitivity as high as 10 pM has been achieved within a few minutes (c.a. 5 minutes). The simultaneous double color change (an increase of acceptor fluorescence and a decrease of donor fluorescence intensity) of two similar fluorescent probes provides particularly high detection reliability owing to the fact that they act as each other's internal reference. Any external perturbation such as environmental temperature change causes no significant change in signal generation. Besides the application for biological sensing, the method also provides a useful tool for investigation of kinetics and thermodynamics of a multivalent interaction. Keywords: Biosensor, Fluorescence resonant energy transfer, Multivalent interaction, Cholera Toxin, Ganglioside GM1, Signal Transduction

  2. Fluorescent image tracking velocimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaffer, Franklin D.

    1994-01-01

    A multiple-exposure fluorescent image tracking velocimeter (FITV) detects and measures the motion (trajectory, direction and velocity) of small particles close to light scattering surfaces. The small particles may follow the motion of a carrier medium such as a liquid, gas or multi-phase mixture, allowing the motion of the carrier medium to be observed, measured and recorded. The main components of the FITV include: (1) fluorescent particles; (2) a pulsed fluorescent excitation laser source; (3) an imaging camera; and (4) an image analyzer. FITV uses fluorescing particles excited by visible laser light to enhance particle image detectability near light scattering surfaces. The excitation laser light is filtered out before reaching the imaging camera allowing the fluoresced wavelengths emitted by the particles to be detected and recorded by the camera. FITV employs multiple exposures of a single camera image by pulsing the excitation laser light for producing a series of images of each particle along its trajectory. The time-lapsed image may be used to determine trajectory and velocity and the exposures may be coded to derive directional information.

  3. Fluorescence of Alexa fluor dye tracks protein folding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Lindhoud

    Full Text Available Fluorescence spectroscopy is an important tool for the characterization of protein folding. Often, a protein is labeled with appropriate fluorescent donor and acceptor probes and folding-induced changes in Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET are monitored. However, conformational changes of the protein potentially affect fluorescence properties of both probes, thereby profoundly complicating interpretation of FRET data. In this study, we assess the effects protein folding has on fluorescence properties of Alexa Fluor 488 (A488, which is commonly used as FRET donor. Here, A488 is covalently attached to Cys69 of apoflavodoxin from Azotobacter vinelandii. Although coupling of A488 slightly destabilizes apoflavodoxin, the three-state folding of this protein, which involves a molten globule intermediate, is unaffected. Upon folding of apoflavodoxin, fluorescence emission intensity of A488 changes significantly. To illuminate the molecular sources of this alteration, we applied steady state and time-resolved fluorescence techniques. The results obtained show that tryptophans cause folding-induced changes in quenching of Alexa dye. Compared to unfolded protein, static quenching of A488 is increased in the molten globule. Upon populating the native state both static and dynamic quenching of A488 decrease considerably. We show that fluorescence quenching of Alexa Fluor dyes is a sensitive reporter of conformational changes during protein folding.

  4. Resonant Nucleation

    CERN Document Server

    Gleiser, M; Gleiser, Marcelo; Howell, Rafael

    2004-01-01

    We investigate the role played by fast quenching on the decay of metastable (or false vacuum) states. Instead of the exponentially-slow decay rate per unit volume, $\\Gamma_{\\rm HN} \\sim \\exp[-E_b/k_BT]$ ($E_b$ is the free energy of the critical bubble), predicted by Homogeneous Nucleation theory, we show that under fast enough quenching the decay rate is, in fact, a power law $\\Gamma_{\\rm RN} \\sim [E_b/k_BT]^{-B}$, where $B$ is weakly sensitive to the temperature. We argue that the fast quench generates large-amplitude fluctuations about the metastable state which promote its rapid decay via parametric resonance. Possible decay mechanisms and their dependence on $E_b$ are proposed and illustrated in a (2+1)-dimensional scalar field model with an asymmetric double-well potential.

  5. Resonance Fluorescence from Semiconductor Quantum Dots: Beyond the Mollow Triplet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Anders Mølbjerg; Nielsen, Per Kær; Lorke, Michael;

    2012-01-01

    analytical theory has been derived, which quantitatively accounts for the appearance and position of the peaks. This theory explains the physics responsible for the multiple peaks. By considering the time-dependent spectrum we demonstrate a time ordering of the side peaks, which is further evidence for the...

  6. Enhancement of Single Molecule Fluorescence Signals by Colloidal Silver Nanoparticles in Studies of Protein Translation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharill, Shashank; Chen, Chunlai; Stevens, Benjamin; Kaur, Jaskiran; Smilansky, Zeev; Mandecki, Wlodek; Gryczynski, Ignacy; Gryczynski, Zygmunt; Cooperman, Barry S.; Goldman, Yale E.

    2011-01-01

    Metal enhanced fluorescence (MEF) increased total photon emission of Cy3- and Cy5-labeled ribosomal initiation complexes near 50 nm silver particles 4- and 5.5-fold respectively. Fluorescence intensity fluctuations above shot noise, at 0.1 – 5 Hz, were greater on silver particles. Overall signal to noise ratio was similar or slightly improved near the particles. Proximity to silver particles did not compromise ribosome function, as measured by codon-dependent binding of fluorescent tRNA, dynamics of fluorescence resonance energy transfer between adjacent tRNAs in the ribosome, and tRNA translocation induced by elongation factor G. PMID:21158483

  7. Enhancement of single-molecule fluorescence signals by colloidal silver nanoparticles in studies of protein translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharill, Shashank; Chen, Chunlai; Stevens, Benjamin; Kaur, Jaskiran; Smilansky, Zeev; Mandecki, Wlodek; Gryczynski, Ignacy; Gryczynski, Zygmunt; Cooperman, Barry S; Goldman, Yale E

    2011-01-25

    Metal-enhanced fluorescence (MEF) increased total photon emission of Cy3- and Cy5-labeled ribosomal initiation complexes near 50 nm silver particles 4- and 5.5-fold, respectively. Fluorescence intensity fluctuations above shot noise, at 0.1-5 Hz, were greater on silver particles. Overall signal-to-noise ratio was similar or slightly improved near the particles. Proximity to silver particles did not compromise ribosome function, as measured by codon-dependent binding of fluorescent tRNA, dynamics of fluorescence resonance energy transfer between adjacent tRNAs in the ribosome, and tRNA translocation induced by elongation factor G. PMID:21158483

  8. Applied neutron resonance theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Utilisation of resonance theory in basic and applications-oriented neutron cross section work is reviewed. The technically important resonance formalisms, principal concepts and methods as well as representative computer programs for resonance parameter extraction from measured data, evaluation of resonance data, calculation of Doppler-broadened cross sections and estimation of level-statistical quantities from resonance parameters are described. (orig.)

  9. Fluorescence uranium determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An equipment for analysis of uranium by fluorescence was developed in order to determine it at such a low concentration that it can not be determined by the most sensible analytical methods. this new fluorimeter was adapted to measure the fluorescence emitted by the phosphorus sodium fluoride-sodium carbonate-potasium carbonate-uranyl, being excited by ultraviolet light of 3,650 A the intensity of the light emitted was measure with a photomultiplicator RCA 5819 and the adequate electronic equipment. (Author) 19 refs

  10. Nanosecond fluorescence spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article is a summary of a short course lecture given in conjunction with the 1984 Nuclear Science Symposium. Measuring systems for nanosecond fluorescence spectroscopy using single-photon counting techniques are presented. These involve systems based on relaxation-type spark gap light pulser and synchronously pumped mode-locked dye lasers. Furthermore, typical characteristics and optimization of operating conditions of the critical components responsible for the system time resolution are discussed. A short comparison of the most important deconvolution methods for numerical analysis of experimental data is given particularly with respect to the signal-to-noise ratio of the fluorescence signal. 22 refs., 8 figs

  11. Fluorescence activated cell sorting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonner, W. A.; Hulett, H. R.; Sweet, R. G.; Herzenberg, L. A.

    1972-01-01

    An instrument has been developed for sorting biological cells. The cells are rendered differentially fluorescent and incorporated into a small liquid stream illuminated by a laser beam. The cells pass sequentially through the beam, and fluorescent light from the cells gives rise to electrical signals. The stream is broken into a series of uniform size drops downstream of the laser. The cell signals are used to give appropriate electrostatic charges to drops containing the cells. The drops then pass between two charged plates and are deflected to appropriate containers. The system has proved capable of providing fractions containing large numbers of viable cells highly enriched in a particular functional type.

  12. A novel multi-functional cell-based microphysiometer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Ying; XU Gaixia; LIU Qingjun; CAI Hua; LI Yan; LI Rong; WANG Ping

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents a novel multi-functional microphysiometer for simultaneous measurements of several extracellular ion concentrations and action potential measurement in living cells based on MLAPS (multi-light addressable potentiometric sensor). In the microphysiometer, sorts of sensitive membranes are illuminated in parallel with n light sources at working frequencies, and the response amplitudes of each frequency component can be measured on-line by parallel processing algorithm. In the experiments, the relations of the extracellular environmental H+, Na +, K +, Ca2 + under the effects of western medicines (dilantin, phenobarbital sodium) and Chinese drugs (scutellaria, medlar, hemlock parsley) were analyzed, and the effects of several drugs were evaluated. Moreover, the action potential signals of different cell types (cardiac myocytes and neurons) could be measured and analyzed by LAPS. By detecting these parameters, the system can monitor the real-time process of the cell metabolism and action potential, observe the functional responses of different kinds of membrane-bound receptors, and evaluate the activities of drugs.

  13. Stem cell-based therapies for acute radiation syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Exposure to high doses of ionizing radiation in the event of accidental or intentional incident such as nuclear/radiological terrorism can lead to debilitating injuries to multiple organs resulting in death within days depending on the amount of radiation dose and the quality of radiation. Unfortunately, there is not a single FDA-licensed drug approved against acute radiation injury. The RadStem Center for Medical Countermeasures against Radiation (RadStem CMGR) program at Einstein is developing stem cell-based therapies to treat acute radiation syndrome (ARS). We have demonstrated that intravenous transplantation of bone marrow-derived and adipose-derived stromal cells, consisting of a mixture of mesenchymal, endothelial and myeloid progenitors can mitigate mice exposed to whole body irradiation of 12 Gy or whole abdominal irradiation of up to 20 Gy. We identified a variety of growth and differentiation factors that individually is unable to improve survival of animals exposed to lethal irradiation, but when administered sequentially mitigates radiation injury and improves survival. We termed this phenomenon as synthetic survival and describe a new paradigm whereby the 'synthetic survival' of irradiated tissues can be promoted by systemic administration of growth factors to amplify residual stem cell clonogens post-radiation exposure, followed by a differentiation factor that favors tissue stem cell differentiation. Synthetic survival can be applied to mitigate lethal radiation injury in multiple organs following radiation-induced hematopoeitic, gastrointestinal and pulmonary syndromes. (author)

  14. [Safety monitoring of cell-based medicinal products (CBMPs)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funk, Markus B; Frech, Marion; Spranger, Robert; Keller-Stanislawski, Brigitte

    2015-11-01

    Cell-based medicinal products (CBMPs), a category of advanced-therapy medicinal products (ATMPs), are authorised for the European market by the European Commission by means of the centralized marketing authorisation. By conforming to the German Medicinal Products Act (Sec. 4b AMG), national authorisation can be granted by the Paul-Ehrlich-Institut in Germany exclusively for ATMPs not based on a routine manufacturing procedure. In both procedures, quality, efficacy, and safety are evaluated and the risk-benefit balance is assessed. For the centralised procedure, mainly controlled clinical trial data must be submitted, whereas the requirements for national procedures could be modified corresponding to the stage of development of the ATMP. After marketing authorization, the marketing authorization/license holder is obligated to report all serious adverse reactions to the competent authority and to provide periodic safety update reports. If necessary, post-authorization safety studies could be imposed. On the basis of these regulatory measures, the safety of advanced therapies can be monitored and improved. PMID:26391098

  15. Regulations and guidelines governing stem cell based products: Clinical considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bobby George

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of stem cells as medicines is a promising and upcoming area of research as they may be able to help the body to regenerate damaged or lost tissue in a host of diseases like Parkinson′s, multiple sclerosis, heart disease, liver disease, spinal cord damage, cancer and many more. Translating basic stem cell research into routine therapies is a complex multi-step process which entails the challenge related to managing the expected therapeutic benefits with the potential risks while complying with the existing regulations and guidelines. While in the United States (US and European Union (EU regulations are in place, in India, we do not have a well-defined regulatory framework for "stem cell based products (SCBP". There are several areas that need to be addressed as it is quite different from that of pharmaceuticals. These range from establishing batch consistency, product stability to product safety and efficacy through pre-clinical, clinical studies and marketing authorization. This review summarizes the existing regulations/guidelines in US, EU, India, and the associated challenges in developing SCBP with emphasis on clinical aspects.

  16. Microbial fuel cell based on electroactive sulfate-reducing biofilm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Regulation and management of electricity generation by variation of residence time. ► Design of microbial fuel cell based on electroactive biofilm on zeolite. ► Engineering solution for removing of the obtained elemental sulfur. - abstract: A two chambered laboratory scale microbial fuel cell (MFC) has been developed, based on natural sulfate-reducing bacterium consortium in electroactive biofilm on zeolite. The MFC utilizes potassium ferricyanide in the cathode chamber as an electron acceptor that derives electrons from the obtained in anode chamber H2S. The molecular oxygen is finally used as a terminal electron acceptor at cathode compartment. The generated power density was 0.68 W m−2 with current density of 3.2 A m−2 at 150 Ω electrode resistivity. The hydrogen sulfide itself is produced by microbial dissimilative sulfate reduction process by utilizing various organic substrates. Finally, elemental sulfur was identified as the predominant final oxidation product in the anode chamber. It was removed from MFC through medium circulation and gathering in an external tank. This report reveals dependence relationship between the progress of general electrochemical parameters and bacterial sulfate-reduction rate. The presented MFC design can be used for simultaneous sulfate purification of mining drainage wastewater and generation of renewable electricity

  17. MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Procedures Medical Imaging MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... 8 MB) Also available in Other Language versions . Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is a medical imaging procedure for making ...

  18. Ultraviolet fluorescence monitor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hargis, P.J. Jr.; Preppernau, B.L.; Aragon, B.P. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Laser, Optics and Remote Sensing Dept.

    1997-05-01

    A multispectral ultraviolet (UV) fluorescence imaging fluorometer and a pulsed molecular beam laser fluorometer were developed to detect volatile organic compounds of interest in environmental monitoring and drug interdiction applications. The UV fluorescence imaging fluorometer is a relatively simple instrument which uses multiple excitation wavelengths to measure the excitation/emission matrix for irradiated samples. Detection limits in the high part-per-million to low part-per-million range were measured for a number of volatile organic vapors in the atmosphere. Detection limits in the low part-per-million range were obtained using cryogenic cooling to pre-concentrate unknown samples before introducing them into the imaging fluorometer. A multivariate analysis algorithm was developed to analyze the excitation/emission matrix and used to determine the relative concentrations of species in computer synthesized mixtures containing up to five organic compounds. Analysis results demonstrated the utility of multispectral UV fluorescence in analytical measurements. A transportable UV fluorescence imaging fluorometer was used in two field tests. Field test results demonstrated that detection limits in the part-per-billion range were needed to reliably identify volatile organic compounds in realistic field test measurements. The molecular beam laser fluorometer, a more complex instrument with detection limits in the part-per-billion to part-per-trillion range, was therefore developed to satisfy detection sensitivity requirements for field test measurements. High-resolution spectroscopic measurements made with the molecular beam laser fluorometer demonstrated its utility in identifying volatile organic compounds in the atmosphere.

  19. Yeast fluorescence microscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hašek, Jiří

    New Jersey : Humana Press, 2005, s. 85-96. ISBN 1-59259-958-3 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA5020102; GA ČR GA204/02/1424 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : yeast * fluorescence microscopy * immunofluorescence Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology

  20. Cooperative fluorescence from a strongly driven dilute cloud of atoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ott, Johan Raunkjær; Wubs, Martijn; Lodahl, Peter;

    2013-01-01

    We investigate cooperative fluorescence in a dilute cloud of strongly driven two-level emitters. Starting from the Heisenberg equations of motion, we compute the first-order scattering corrections to the saturation of the excited-state population and to the resonance-fluorescence spectrum, which...... both require going beyond the state-of-the-art linear-optics approach to describe collective phenomena. A dipole blockade is observed due to long-range dipole-dipole coupling that vanishes at stronger driving fields. Furthermore, we compute the inelastic component of the light scattered by a cloud of...

  1. Statistical filtering in fluorescence microscopy and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Macháň, Radek; Kapusta, Peter; Hof, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 406, č. 20 (2014), s. 4797-4813. ISSN 1618-2642 R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP208/12/G016 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : Filtered fluorescence correlation spectroscopy * Fluorescence lifetime correlation spectroscopy * Fluorescence spectral correlation spectroscopy Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.436, year: 2014

  2. Laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy for FTU

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy (LIFS) is based on the absorption of a short pulse of tuned laser light by a group of atoms and the observation of the resulting fluorescence radiation from the excited state. Because the excitation is resonant it is very efficient, and the fluorescence can be many times brighter than the normal spontaneous emission, so low number densities of the selected atoms can be detected and measured. Good spatial resolution can be achieved by using a narrow laser beam. If the laser is sufficiently monochromatic, and it can be tuned over the absorption line profile of the selected atoms, information can also be obtained about the velocities of the atoms from the Doppler effect which can broaden and shift the line. In this report two topics are examined in detail. The first is the effect of high laser irradiance, which can cause 'power broadening' of the apparent absorption line profile. The second is the effect of the high magnetic field in FTU. Detailed calculations are given for LIFS of neutral iron and molybdenum atoms, including the Zeeman effect, and the implementation of LIFS for these atoms on FTU is discussed

  3. Resonances, resonance functions and spectral deformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present paper is aimed at an analysis of resonances and resonance states from a mathematical point of view. Resonances are characterized as singular points of the analytically continued Lippman-Schwinger equation, as complex eigenvalues of the Hamiltonian with a purely outgoing, exponentially growing eigenfunction, and as poles of the S-matrix. (orig./HSI)

  4. Surface-Enhanced X-Ray Fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Surface-enhanced x-ray fluorescence (SEn-XRF) spectroscopy is a form of surface- enhanced spectroscopy that was conceived as a means of obtaining greater sensitivity in x-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectroscopy. As such, SEn-XRF spectroscopy joins the ranks of such other, longer-wavelength surface-enhanced spectroscopies as those based on surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS), surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering (SERRS), and surfaceenhanced infrared Raman absorption (SEIRA), which have been described in previous NASA Tech Briefs articles. XRF spectroscopy has been used in analytical chemistry for determining the elemental compositions of small samples. XRF spectroscopy is rapid and quantitative and has been applied to a variety of metal and mineralogical samples. The main drawback of XRF spectroscopy as practiced heretofore is that sensitivity has not been as high as required for some applications. In SEn-XRF as in the other surface-enhanced spectroscopies, one exploits several interacting near-field phenomena, occurring on nanotextured surfaces, that give rise to local concentrations of incident far-field illumination. In this case, the far-field illumination comes from an x-ray source. Depending on the chemical composition and the geometry of a given nanotextured surface, these phenomena could include the lightning-rod effect (concentration of electric fields at the sharpest points on needlelike surface features), surface plasmon resonances, and grazing incidence geometric effects. In the far field, the observable effect of these phenomena is an increase in the intensity of the spectrum of interest - in this case, the x-ray fluorescence spectrum of chemical elements of interest that may be present within a surface layer at distances no more than a few nanometers from the surface.

  5. Magnetic resonance angiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    MRA; Angiography - magnetic resonance ... Kwong RY. Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Imaging. In: Bonow RO, Mann DL, Zipes DP, Libby P, eds. Braunwald's Heart Disease: A Textbook of Cardiovascular Medicine . ...

  6. Comparison of Static and Microfluidic Protease Assays Using Modified Bioluminescence Resonance Energy Transfer Chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Nan; Dacres, Helen; Anderson, Alisha; Stephen C Trowell; Zhu, Yonggang

    2014-01-01

    Background Fluorescence and bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (F/BRET) are two forms of Förster resonance energy transfer, which can be used for optical transduction of biosensors. BRET has several advantages over fluorescence-based technologies because it does not require an external light source. There would be benefits in combining BRET transduction with microfluidics but the low luminance of BRET has made this challenging until now. Methodology We used a thrombin bioprobe based on...

  7. Stem Cell-Based Therapy in Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barczyk, Marek; Schmidt, Matthias; Mattoli, Sabrina

    2015-08-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis is a progressive fibrosing disorder for which there is no cure and no pharmacological treatment capable of increasing in a meaningful way the survival rate. Lung transplantation remains the only possible treatment for patients with advanced disease, although the increase in 5-year survival is only 45 %. Some preclinical studies have generated promising results about the therapeutic potential of exogenous stem cells. However, two initial clinical trials involving the endobronchial or systemic delivery of autologous adipose tissue-derived or unrelated-donor, placenta-derived mesenchymal stem cells have not convincingly demonstrated that these treatments are acceptably safe. The results of other ongoing clinical trials may help to identify the best source and delivery route of mesenchymal stem cells and to estimate the risk of unwanted effects related to the mesenchymal nature of the transplanted cells. Considering that most of the therapeutic potential of these cells has been ascribed to paracrine signaling, the use of mesenchymal stem cell-derived secretome as an alternative to the transplantation of single cell suspension may circumvent many regulatory and clinical problems. Technical and safety concerns still limit the possibility of clinical applications of other promising interventions that are based on the use of human amnion stem cells, embryonic stem cells or induced pluripotent stem cells to replace or regenerate the dysfunctional alveolar epithelium. We summarize the current status of the field and identify major challenges and opportunities for the possible future integration of stem cell-based treatments into the currently recommended clinical management strategy for idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. PMID:25896401

  8. Hybrid solar cells based on colloidal nanocrystals and conjugated polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, monodispersed colloidal titanium dioxide (TiO2) was synthesized and applied with poly(3-octylthiophene-2,5-diyl) (P3OT), phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM), poly(3,4-ethylene dioxythiophene) (PEDOT), and poly(styrenesulfonate (PSS) to fabricate an aluminum/calcium/P3OT:PCBM:TiO2/PEDOT:PSS/indium tin oxide hybrid solar cell using spin coating and evaporation deposition. The effects of the TiO2 content and annealing temperature on cell performances were investigated. The results showed that optimization of the TiO2 content (15 wt.%) and annealing temperature (150 °C) effectively enhanced the performance of the hybrid solar cells. The PCBM and TiO2 absorbed more light photons in the P3OT:PCBM:TiO2 active layer. The charge transfer in the P3OT:PCBM:TiO2 active layer was more efficient, increasing the amount of photoluminescence quenching. The increased active layer surface roughness reduced the charge-transport distance and enhanced the internal light scattering and light absorption. The best values for the open circuit voltage, short-circuit current density, fill factor, and efficiency for the prepared hybrid solar cell were 0.61 V, 9.50 mA/cm2, 34.46%, and 2.09%, respectively. - Highlights: • Solar cell based on titania and conjugated polymer was fabricated. • Optimal titania content and annealing temperature were investigated. • Solar cell with 2.09% efficiency was obtained

  9. High content cell-based assay for the inflammatory pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Abhishek; Song, Joon Myong

    2015-07-01

    Cellular inflammation is a non-specific immune response to tissue injury that takes place via cytokine network orchestration to maintain normal tissue homeostasis. However chronic inflammation that lasts for a longer period, plays the key role in human diseases like neurodegenerative disorders and cancer development. Understanding the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying the inflammatory pathways may be effective in targeting and modulating their outcome. Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) is a pro-inflammatory cytokine that effectively combines the pro-inflammatory features with the pro-apoptotic potential. Increased levels of TNF-α observed during acute and chronic inflammatory conditions are believed to induce adverse phenotypes like glucose intolerance and abnormal lipid profile. Natural products e. g., amygdalin, cinnamic acid, jasmonic acid and aspirin have proven efficacy in minimizing the TNF-α induced inflammation in vitro and in vivo. Cell lysis-free quantum dot (QDot) imaging is an emerging technique to identify the cellular mediators of a signaling cascade with a single assay in one run. In comparison to organic fluorophores, the inorganic QDots are bright, resistant to photobleaching and possess tunable optical properties that make them suitable for long term and multicolor imaging of various components in a cellular crosstalk. Hence we tested some components of the mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway during TNF-α induced inflammation and the effects of aspirin in HepG2 cells by QDot multicolor imaging technique. Results demonstrated that aspirin showed significant protective effects against TNF-α induced cellular inflammation. The developed cell based assay paves the platform for the analysis of cellular components in a smooth and reliable way.

  10. The promise of fuel cell-based automobiles

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A K Shukla; C L Jackson; K Scott

    2003-02-01

    Fuel cell-based automobiles have gained attention in the last few years due to growing public concern about urban air pollution and consequent environmental problems. From an analysis of the power and energy requirements of a modern car, it is estimated that a base sustainable power of $ca$. 50 kW supplemented with short bursts up to 80 kW will suffice in most driving requirements. The energy demand depends greatly on driving characteristics but under normal usage is expected to be 200 Wh/km. The advantages and disadvantages of candidate fuel-cell systems and various fuels are considered together with the issue of whether the fuel should be converted directly in the fuel cell or should be reformed to hydrogen onboard the vehicle. For fuel cell vehicles to compete successfully with conventional internal-combustion engine vehicles, it appears that direct conversion fuel cells using probably hydrogen, but possibly methanol, are the only realistic contenders for road transportation applications. Among the available fuel cell technologies, polymer–electrolyte fuel cells directly fueled with hydrogen appear to be the best option for powering fuel cell vehicles as there is every prospect that these will exceed the performance of the internal-combustion engine vehicles but for their first cost. A target cost of $ 50/kW would be mandatory to make polymer–electrolyte fuel cells competitive with the internal combustion engines and can only be achieved with design changes that would substantially reduce the quantity of materials used. At present, prominent car manufacturers are deploying important research and development efforts to develop fuel cell vehicles and are projecting to start production by 2005.

  11. Green fluorescent protein: A perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Remington, S James

    2011-01-01

    A brief personal perspective is provided for green fluorescent protein (GFP), covering the period 1994–2011. The topics discussed are primarily those in which my research group has made a contribution and include structure and function of the GFP polypeptide, the mechanism of fluorescence emission, excited state protein transfer, the design of ratiometric fluorescent protein biosensors and an overview of the fluorescent proteins derived from coral reef animals. Structure-function relationship...

  12. Synthesis and Fluorescence Spectra of Triazolylcoumarin Fluorescent Dyes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PENG Xian-fu; LI Hong-qi

    2009-01-01

    Much attention is devoted to fluorescent dyes especially those with potential in versatile applications. Reactions under "click" conditions between nonfluorescent 3 - azidocoumarins and terminal alkynes produced 3 -(1, 2, 3- triazol- 1 - yl)cournarins, a novel type of fluorescent dyes with intense fluorescence. The structures of the new coumarins were characterized by 1H NMR, MS, and IR spectra. Fluorescence spectra measurement demonstrated excellent fluorescence performance of the triazolylcoumarins and this click reaction is a promising candidate for bioconjugation and bioimaging applications since both azide and alkynes are quite inert to biological systems.

  13. A "turn-on" silver nanocluster based fluorescent sensor for folate receptor detection and cancer cell imaging under visual analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Hong; Xu, Gang; Sun, Yimin; Zheng, Weiwei; Zhu, Xiangxiang; Wang, Baojuan; Zhang, Xiaojun; Wang, Guangfeng

    2015-07-28

    A novel terminal protection based label-free and "turn-on" fluorescent sensor for detection of folate receptors (FRs) and HeLa cells is developed by fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) between single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and silver nanoclusters (AgNCs). Multilevel visual analysis (m(2)VA) was firstly proposed and applied in optimizing the experimental parameters. PMID:26108636

  14. Fluorescence nanoscopy. Methods and applications

    OpenAIRE

    Requejo-Isidro, Jose

    2013-01-01

    Fluorescence nanoscopy refers to the experimental techniques and analytical methods used for fluorescence imaging at a resolution higher than conventional, diffraction-limited, microscopy. This review explains the concepts behind fluorescence nanoscopy and focuses on the latest and promising developments in acquisition techniques, labelling strategies to obtain highly detailed super-resolved images and in the quantitative methods to extract meaningful information from them.

  15. Fluorescence spectroscopy of dental calculus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the fluorescence properties of dental calculus in comparison with the properties of adjacent unaffected tooth structure using both lasers and LEDs in the UV-visible range for fluorescence excitation. The influence of calculus color on the informative signal is demonstrated. The optimal spectral bands of excitation and registration of the fluorescence are determined

  16. Tunable fluorescence from patterned silver nano-island arrays for sensitive sub-cell imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surface-enhanced fluorescence, a burgeoning technique in biological detection, provides largely enhanced fluorescence signal by exciting localized surfaces plasmons resonance with fluorescent dyes. Nanostructure and surroundings brings great impact on the emission signal, however, insufficient physics about the process limits further improvement on the nanostructure design. In this study, optical properties of Rhodamin-6G molecules on patterned silver nano-island arrays are tailored by precisely controlling the distance between the dyes and silver arrays. The fluorescence signal depends on the distance and the largest enhancement of 10 folds is achieved when the distance is 10 nm. The results are theoretically corroborated by finite difference time domain simulation and applied to cytoskeleton fluorescence imaging using phalloidin–fluorescein isothiocyanate. Our study provides insights into the physical mechanisms associated with the fluorescence enhancement and quenching, and our experiments suggest potential applications to high-sensitivity sub-cell imaging. (paper)

  17. Dependence of fluorescent protein brightness on protein concentration in solution and enhancement of it

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morikawa, Takamitsu J.; Fujita, Hideaki; Kitamura, Akira; Horio, Takashi; Yamamoto, Johtaro; Kinjo, Masataka; Sasaki, Akira; Machiyama, Hiroaki; Yoshizawa, Keiko; Ichimura, Taro; Imada, Katsumi; Nagai, Takeharu; Watanabe, Tomonobu M.

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescent proteins have been widely used in biology because of their compatibility and varied applications in living specimens. Fluorescent proteins are often undesirably sensitive to intracellular conditions such as pH and ion concentration, generating considerable issues at times. However, harnessing these intrinsic sensitivities can help develop functional probes. In this study, we found that the fluorescence of yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) depends on the protein concentration in the solution and that this dependence can be enhanced by adding a glycine residue in to the YFP; we applied this finding to construct an intracellular protein-crowding sensor. A Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) pair, involving a cyan fluorescent protein (CFP) insensitive to protein concentration and a glycine-inserted YFP, works as a genetically encoded probe to evaluate intracellular crowding. By measuring the fluorescence of the present FRET probe, we were able to detect dynamic changes in protein crowding in living cells. PMID:26956628

  18. Imaging in cell-based therapy for neurodegenerative diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fetal cell transplantation for the treatment of Parkinson's and Huntington's diseases has been developed over the past two decades and is now in early clinical testing phase. Direct assessment of the graft's survival, integration into the host brain and impact on neuronal functions requires advanced in vivo neuroimaging techniques. Owing to its high sensitivity, positron emission tomography is today the most widely used tool to evaluate the viability and function of the transplanted tissue in the brain. Nuclear magnetic resonance techniques are opening new possibilities for imaging neurochemical events in the brain. The ultimate goal will be to use the combination of multiple imaging modalities for complete functional monitoring of the repair processes in the central nervous system. (orig.)

  19. Enhanced 3D fluorescence live cell imaging on nanoplasmonic substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gartia, Manas Ranjan [Department of Nuclear, Plasma and Radiological Engineering, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Hsiao, Austin; Logan Liu, G [Department of Bioengineering, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Sivaguru, Mayandi [Institute for Genomic Biology, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Chen Yi, E-mail: loganliu@illinois.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States)

    2011-09-07

    We have created a randomly distributed nanocone substrate on silicon coated with silver for surface-plasmon-enhanced fluorescence detection and 3D cell imaging. Optical characterization of the nanocone substrate showed it can support several plasmonic modes (in the 300-800 nm wavelength range) that can be coupled to a fluorophore on the surface of the substrate, which gives rise to the enhanced fluorescence. Spectral analysis suggests that a nanocone substrate can create more excitons and shorter lifetime in the model fluorophore Rhodamine 6G (R6G) due to plasmon resonance energy transfer from the nanocone substrate to the nearby fluorophore. We observed three-dimensional fluorescence enhancement on our substrate shown from the confocal fluorescence imaging of chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells grown on the substrate. The fluorescence intensity from the fluorophores bound on the cell membrane was amplified more than 100-fold as compared to that on a glass substrate. We believe that strong scattering within the nanostructured area coupled with random scattering inside the cell resulted in the observed three-dimensional enhancement in fluorescence with higher photostability on the substrate surface.

  20. Magnetic fluorescent lamp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berman, S.M.; Richardson R.W.

    1983-12-29

    The radiant emission of a mercury-argon discharge in a fluorescent lamp assembly is enhanced by providing means for establishing a magnetic field with lines of force along the path of electron flow through the bulb of the lamp assembly, to provide Zeeman splitting of the ultraviolet spectral line. Optimum results are obtained when the magnetic field strength causes a Zeeman splitting of approximately 1.7 times the thermal line width.

  1. Plasmonic fluorescent quantum dots

    OpenAIRE

    Jin, Yongdong; Gao, Xiaohu

    2009-01-01

    Combining multiple discrete components into a single multifunctional nanoparticle could be useful in a variety of applications. Retaining the unique optical and electrical properties of each component after nanoscale integration is, however, a long-standing problem1,2. It is particularly difficult when trying to combine fluorophores such as semiconductor quantum dots with plasmonic materials such as gold, because gold and other metals can quench the fluorescence3,4. So far, the combination of...

  2. Femtosecond laser fluorescence and propagation in very dense potassium vapor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makdisi, Y; Kokaj, J; Afrousheh, K; Nair, R; Mathew, J; Pichler, G

    2013-12-16

    Femtosecond (fs) laser propagation and fluorescence of dense potassium vapor was studied, and the spectral region around the first and the second doublets of the principal series lines of potassium atoms was investigated. In our search we did not observe the conical emission in the far field, although it was previously observed in the case of rubidium. We discuss the possible reason of this unexpected result. The fluorescence spectrum revealed Rb impurity resonance lines in emission due to the collisional redistribution from the K(4p) levels into the Rb(5p) levels. In the forward propagation of 400 nm femtosecond light we observed the molecular band red shifted from potassium second doublet. However, no molecular spectrum was observed when the mode-locked fs laser light was discretely tuned within the wings of the first resonance lines, at 770 nm. PMID:24514609

  3. Fluorescent nanodiamond for biomedicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    NV centers in diamond have gained strong interest as a novel tool for quantum information processing, quantum computing and quantum photonics. These applications are based on fluorescent and spin properties of NV-centres. However, in some conditions NV- can lose an electron and turn to NV0. The occupation of NV0 and NV- charge states depend on the position of their ground states with respect to the Fermi level and the mechanism of the charge transfer. Interestingly, that the charge switch has important implications on applications of fluorescent nanodiamond (fND) to nano-biology and nano-medicine. fND can be used for bio-marking and bio-tracking but also for the monitoring of targeted delivery to the cells. In this presentation we review the current state-of-the art for using fND particles for fluorescent bio imaging in cells and discuss the charge transfer and its luminescence stability by using ultra high sensitive spectroscopy methods to study the NV0 and NV- state occupation. (author)

  4. Spectrally resolved multidepth fluorescence imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yuan; Zervantonakis, Ioannis K.; Oh, Se Baek; Kamm, Roger D.; Barbastathis, George

    2011-09-01

    We present a multicolor fluorescence imaging modality to visualize in real-time tissue structures emitting multispectral fluorescent light from different focal depths. Each designated spectrum of fluorescent emission from a specific depth within a volumetric tissue is probed by a depth-spectrum selective holographic grating. The grating for each fluorescent color are multiplexed within a volume hologram, which enables simultaneously obtaining multicolored fluorescent information at different depths within a biological tissue sample. We demonstrate the imaging modality's ability to obtain laser-induced multicolored fluorescence images of a biological sample from different depths without scanning. We also experimentally demonstrate that the imaging modality can be simultaneously operated at both fluorescent and bright field modes to provide complementary information of volumetric tissue structures at different depths in real-time.

  5. Gold nanoparticle-fluorophore complex for conditionally fluorescing signal mediator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Jianting [Department of Chemical Engineering University of, Louisville, KY 40292 (United States); Achilefu, Samuel [Department of Radiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63110 (United States); Nantz, Michael [Department of Chemistry, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY 40292 (United States); Kang, Kyung A., E-mail: kyung.kang@louisville.edu [Department of Chemical Engineering University of, Louisville, KY 40292 (United States)

    2011-06-10

    Fluorescent contrast agents with high specificity and sensitivity are valuable for accurate disease detection and diagnosis. Spherical gold nanoparticles (GNPs) can be smartly utilized for developing highly effective agents. The strong electromagnetic (plasmon) field on their surface can be very effective in influencing the electrons of fluorophores and, thus, manipulating the fluorescence output (i.e., either quenching or enhancement). Fluorescence quenching can be used for negative sensing, or for conditional de-quenching to increase the specificity. Fluorescence enhancement allows sensing to be more sensitive. The level of fluorescence alteration depends on the GNP size, the excitation and emission wavelengths and quantum yield of the fluorophore, and the distance between the GNP and the fluorophore. To understand the mechanisms of the fluorescence change by GNP, we have theoretically analyzed the parameters involved in the fluorescence alteration for commonly used fluorophores, with an emphasis on quenching. The results showed that the fluorescence of fluorophores with the excitation (Ex) and emission (Ex) wavelengths close to the GNP resonance peak tended to be significantly quenched by GNPs. For those fluorophores emitting fluorescence in red or near infrared, to achieve quenching, the distance between GNP and the fluorophore was required to be very short. In general, a shorter distance resulted in more quenching. Bigger GNPs require a shorter distance to achieve the same level of quenching. The fluorescence of a fluorophore with a lower quantum yield (especially the one with emission in far-red or near-infrared) is more difficult to be quenched by GNPs (requires very short distance). Instead, it can be enhanced. Based on the theoretical study, we have developed a near-infrared contrast agent, i.e., Cypate conjugated GNP via a short peptide spacer. Normally the fluorescence of Cypate was quenched. The spacer has a motif of a substrate for urokinase type

  6. Cavity- and waveguide-resonators in electron paramagnetic resonance, nuclear magnetic resonance, and magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Andrew

    2014-11-01

    Cavity resonators are widely used in electron paramagnetic resonance, very high field magnetic resonance microimaging and also in high field human imaging. The basic principles and designs of different forms of cavity resonators including rectangular, cylindrical, re-entrant, cavity magnetrons, toroidal cavities and dielectric resonators are reviewed. Applications in EPR and MRI are summarized, and finally the topic of traveling wave MRI using the magnet bore as a waveguide is discussed. PMID:25456314

  7. Make caffeine visible: a fluorescent caffeine "traffic light" detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wang; Kim, Tae-Hyeong; Zhai, Duanting; Er, Jun Cheng; Zhang, Liyun; Kale, Anup Atul; Agrawalla, Bikram Keshari; Cho, Yoon-Kyoung; Chang, Young-Tae

    2013-01-01

    Caffeine has attracted abundant attention due to its extensive existence in beverages and medicines. However, to detect it sensitively and conveniently remains a challenge, especially in resource-limited regions. Here we report a novel aqueous phase fluorescent caffeine sensor named Caffeine Orange which exhibits 250-fold fluorescence enhancement upon caffeine activation and high selectivity. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy indicate that π-stacking and hydrogen-bonding contribute to their interactions while dynamic light scattering and transmission electron microscopy experiments demonstrate the change of Caffeine Orange ambient environment induces its fluorescence emission. To utilize this probe in real life, we developed a non-toxic caffeine detection kit and tested it for caffeine quantification in various beverages. Naked-eye sensing of various caffeine concentrations was possible based on color changes upon irradiation with a laser pointer. Lastly, we performed the whole system on a microfluidic device to make caffeine detection quick, sensitive and automated. PMID:23877095

  8. Coumarin amide derivatives as fluorescence chemosensors for cyanide anions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Four coumarin amide derivatives with 4-methyl coumarin or pyrene as terminal group have been synthesized. Their photophysical properties and recognition properties for cyanide anions have been examined. The results indicate that the compounds can recognize cyanide anions with obvious absorption and fluorescence spectra change, at the same time, obvious color and fluorescence change can be observed by naked eye. The in situ hydrogen nuclear magnetic resonance spectra and photophysical properties change confirm that Michael additions between the chemosensors and cyanide anions take place at the 4-position of coumarin. - Highlights: • Four coumarin amide derivatives with 4-methyl coumarin or pyrene as terminal group were synthesized. • The compounds can recognize cyanide anions with obvious absorption and fluorescence spectra change. • Michael additions between the chemosensors and cyanide anions take place at the 4-position of coumarin

  9. Monitoring of the gadolinium photoionization process by using fluorescence measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The population dynamics in a resonant three-photon ionization process of the gadolinium (Gd) atom is experimentally studied by investigating ion signals and fluorescence signals. We detect the ion signals by using a time-of-flight mass spectrometer, and at the same time, we probe the fluorescence coming out of the excited states involved in the ionization process. The number of residual atoms that remain in excited states after the laser beams have passed is estimated by measuring the variation of the fluorescence signal. Since this information is directly related to how many atoms are not ionized, we can use this method for monitoring the ionization process. Using this method, we estimate the ionization efficieny of the Gd atom

  10. Efficient screening of dioxins in food and feed using shape-selective pressurized liquid extraction and cell based bioassay analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nording, M. [Swedish Defence Research Agency, Umea (Sweden)]|[Umea Univ. (Sweden). Environmental Chemistry, Dept. of Chemistry; Sporring, S.; Bjoerklund, E. [Lund Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Analytical Chemistry; Wiberg, K.; Haglund, P. [Umea Univ. (Sweden). Environmental Chemistry, Dept. of Chemistry

    2004-09-15

    Cell based bioassays with enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) detection are potential screening methods for determination of aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) ligands, such as dioxins and similar compounds, in environmental samples. With this technique, it is possible to detect dioxins at levels normally found in food and feed, i.e. pg toxic equivalents (TEQ)/g. Since the signal from the bioassay might be caused by compounds other than dioxins binding to the AhR, determination of the dioxin TEQ generally involve extraction with organic solvents or solvent mixtures, e.g. using a Soxhlet apparatus, followed by clean-up with sulphuric acid or sulphuric acid impregnated silica gel and carbon fractionation in order to exclude possible interferences from the extracts. Until now, sample preparation has been time consuming and labour intensive, but alternatives to traditional methods have recently been developed, with the benefits of shorter analysis times and reduced organic solvent consumption. Pressurized liquid extraction (PLE) may, for instance, be used with a fat retainer in the PLE cell to selectively extract PCBs from food, feed, and biota matrices. In order to further streamline the sample preparation, new assemblies have been developed to fit into a commercially available PLE-equipment. The assemblies are packed with an activated carbon/celite mixture and the sample. In the subsequent extraction, the pollutants are fractionated into three fractions according to their planarity (shape-selective extraction). In the first fraction (I) bulk lipids and PCBs are eluted, in the second fraction (II) the majority of planar (non-ortho) PCBs, and in the third fraction (III), which is back-flushed, the dioxins are recovered. In this way, a pure dioxin fraction may be isolated and analysed separately with the cell based bioassay described above. This study was conducted to meet the imperative demands for dioxin monitoring. The aim was to develop a comprehensive method for

  11. An efficient core-shell fluorescent silica nanoprobe for ratiometric fluorescence detection of pH in living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Jingni; Ding, Changqin; Zhu, Anwei; Tian, Yang

    2016-08-01

    Intracellular pH plays a vital role in cell biology, including signal transduction, ion transport and homeostasis. Herein, a ratiometric fluorescent silica probe was developed to detect intracellular pH values. The pH sensitive dye fluorescein isothiocyanate isomer I (FITC), emitting green fluorescence, was hybridized with reference dye rhodamine B (RB), emitting red fluorescence, as a dual-emission fluorophore, in which RB was embedded in a silica core of ∼40 nm diameter. Moreover, to prevent fluorescence resonance energy transfer between FITC and RB, FITC was grafted onto the surface of core-shell silica colloidal particles with a shell thickness of 10-12 nm. The nanoprobe exhibited dual emission bands centered at 517 and 570 nm, under single wavelength excitation of 488 nm. RB encapsulated in silica was inert to pH change and only served as reference signals for providing built-in correction to avoid environmental effects. Moreover, FITC (λem = 517 nm) showed high selectivity toward H(+) against metal ions and amino acids, leading to fluorescence variation upon pH change. Consequently, variations of the two fluorescence intensities (Fgreen/Fred) resulted in a ratiometric pH fluorescent sensor. The specific nanoprobe showed good linearity with pH variation in the range of 6.0-7.8. It can be noted that the fluorescent silica probe demonstrated good water dispersibility, high stability and low cytotoxicity. Accordingly, imaging and biosensing of pH variation was successfully achieved in HeLa cells. PMID:27291898

  12. Make Caffeine Visible: a Fluorescent Caffeine “Traffic Light” Detector

    OpenAIRE

    Wang Xu; Tae-Hyeong Kim; Duanting Zhai; Jun Cheng Er; Liyun Zhang; Anup Atul Kale; Bikram Keshari Agrawalla; Yoon-Kyoung Cho; Young-Tae Chang

    2013-01-01

    Caffeine has attracted abundant attention due to its extensive existence in beverages and medicines. However, to detect it sensitively and conveniently remains a challenge, especially in resource-limited regions. Here we report a novel aqueous phase fluorescent caffeine sensor named Caffeine Orange which exhibits 250-fold fluorescence enhancement upon caffeine activation and high selectivity. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy indicate that π-s...

  13. Studies of crystalline water at low temperatures by selective laser excitation of impurity uranyl ion fluorescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fine-structure fluorescence spectrum of uranyl aqueous solution is obtained for the first time at low temperatures. It is established that the uranyl local surrounding in crystals of ice is characterized by low ordering, more typical for glasses. Temperature dependence of the width of the fluorescence resonance 0-0 line is measured. This dependence at temperatures above 20 K is described by interaction with phonons within the frames of the Debye model

  14. DNA origami as a tool for single-molecule fluorescence studies

    OpenAIRE

    Stein, Ingo

    2012-01-01

    Single-molecule fluorescence studies have become a routine practice in laboratories worldwide. As an experimental tool, especially fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) has helped to unravel conformational changes and interactions of biomolecules. With the DNA origami method a new technique to create nanoscale shapes with DNA as a building material was recently introduced. As shown in this work, DNA nanotechnology can be readily combined with single-molecule FRET experiments, opening ...

  15. Surface plasmons for fluorescence enhancement in Sm-doped borate glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heat treatment of Sm-activated lithium and sodium borate glasses which are additionally doped with silver oxide leads to a reduction of the doped silver ions and to the formation of metallic silver nanoparticles indicated by a broad plasmon-related absorption band in the visible spectral range. The influence of the plasmon resonance field enhancement on the Sm3+ fluorescence excitation bands is too small to lead to enhanced fluorescence emission intensities.

  16. Planar Resonators for Metamaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Blaha

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of an investigation into a combination of electric and magnetic planar resonators in order to design the building element of a volumetric metamaterial showing simultaneously negative electric and magnetic polarizabilities under irradiation by an electromagnetic wave. Two combinations of particular planar resonators are taken into consideration. These planar resonators are an electric dipole, a split ring resonator and a double H-shaped resonator. The response of the single resonant particle composed of a resonator with an electric response and a resonator with a magnetic response is strongly anisotropic. Proper spatial arrangement of these particles can make the response isotropic. This is obtained by proper placement of six planar resonators on the surface of a cube that now represents a metamaterial unit cell. The cells are distributed in space with 3D periodicity.

  17. Cell-based analysis of Chikungunya virus E1 protein in membrane fusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuo Szu-Cheng

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chikungunya fever is a pandemic disease caused by the mosquito-borne Chikungunya virus (CHIKV. E1 glycoprotein mediation of viral membrane fusion during CHIKV infection is a crucial step in the release of viral genome into the host cytoplasm for replication. How the E1 structure determines membrane fusion and whether other CHIKV structural proteins participate in E1 fusion activity remain largely unexplored. Methods A bicistronic baculovirus expression system to produce recombinant baculoviruses for cell-based assay was used. Sf21 insect cells infected by recombinant baculoviruses bearing wild type or single-amino-acid substitution of CHIKV E1 and EGFP (enhanced green fluorescence protein were employed to investigate the roles of four E1 amino acid residues (G91, V178, A226, and H230 in membrane fusion activity. Results Western blot analysis revealed that the E1 expression level and surface features in wild type and mutant substituted cells were similar. However, cell fusion assay found that those cells infected by CHIKV E1-H230A mutant baculovirus showed little fusion activity, and those bearing CHIKV E1-G91D mutant completely lost the ability to induce cell-cell fusion. Cells infected by recombinant baculoviruses of CHIKV E1-A226V and E1-V178A mutants exhibited the same membrane fusion capability as wild type. Although the E1 expression level of cells bearing monomeric-E1-based constructs (expressing E1 only was greater than that of cells bearing 26S-based constructs (expressing all structural proteins, the sizes of syncytial cells induced by infection of baculoviruses containing 26S-based constructs were larger than those from infections having monomeric-E1 constructs, suggesting that other viral structure proteins participate or regulate E1 fusion activity. Furthermore, membrane fusion in cells infected by baculovirus bearing the A226V mutation constructs exhibited increased cholesterol-dependences and lower pH thresholds

  18. Fluorescence analyzer for lignin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berthold, John W.; Malito, Michael L.; Jeffers, Larry

    1993-01-01

    A method and apparatus for measuring lignin concentration in a sample of wood pulp or black liquor comprises a light emitting arrangement for emitting an excitation light through optical fiber bundles into a probe which has an undiluted sensing end facing the sample. The excitation light causes the lignin concentration to produce fluorescent emission light which is then conveyed through the probe to analyzing equipment which measures the intensity of the emission light. Measures a This invention was made with Government support under Contract Number DOE: DE-FC05-90CE40905 awarded by the Department of Energy (DOE). The Government has certain rights in this invention.

  19. Fluorescent temperature sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Gary A [Los Alamos, NM; Baker, Sheila N [Los Alamos, NM; McCleskey, T Mark [Los Alamos, NM

    2009-03-03

    The present invention is a fluorescent temperature sensor or optical thermometer. The sensor includes a solution of 1,3-bis(1-pyrenyl)propane within a 1-butyl-1-1-methylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide ionic liquid solvent. The 1,3-bis(1-pyrenyl)propane remains unassociated when in the ground state while in solution. When subjected to UV light, an excited state is produced that exists in equilibrium with an excimer. The position of the equilibrium between the two excited states is temperature dependent.

  20. A fluorescence scanning electron microscope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takaaki Kanemaru

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Fluorescence techniques are widely used in biological research to examine molecular localization, while electron microscopy can provide unique ultrastructural information. To date, correlative images from both fluorescence and electron microscopy have been obtained separately using two different instruments, i.e. a fluorescence microscope (FM and an electron microscope (EM. In the current study, a scanning electron microscope (SEM (JEOL JXA8600 M was combined with a fluorescence digital camera microscope unit and this hybrid instrument was named a fluorescence SEM (FL-SEM. In the labeling of FL-SEM samples, both Fluolid, which is an organic EL dye, and Alexa Fluor, were employed. We successfully demonstrated that the FL-SEM is a simple and practical tool for correlative fluorescence and electron microscopy.

  1. Highly confined, enhanced surface fluorescence imaging with two-dimensional silver nanoparticle sheets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method of obtaining highly confined, enhanced surface fluorescence imaging is proposed using two-dimensional (2D) silver nanoparticle (AgMy) sheets. This technique is based on the localized surface plasmon resonance excited homogeneously on a 2D silver nanoparticle sheet. The AgMy sheets are fabricated at the air–water interface by self-assembly and transferred onto hydrophobic glass substrates. These sheets can enhance the fluorescence only when the excitation wavelength overlaps with the plasmon resonance wavelength. To confirm the validity of this technique, two separate test experiments are performed. One is the epifluorescence microscope imaging of a quantum dot 2D sheet on the AgMy 2D sheet with a SiO2 spacer layer, where the fluorescence is maximized with the 20 nm SiO2 layer, determined by the Förster resonance energy transfer distances. The second experiment is the imaging of a single fluorescence bead with a total internal reflection fluorescent microscope. We confirmed that the AgMy sheet provides a 4-fold increase in fluorescence with a 160-nm spatial resolution at 30 ms/frame snapshot. The AgMy sheet will be a powerful tool for high sensitivity and high-resolution real time bioimaging at nanointerfaces

  2. Polymer microspheres carrying fluorescent DNA probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaoyu; Dai, Zhao; Zhang, Jimei; Xu, Shichao; Wu, Chunrong; Zheng, Guo

    2010-07-01

    A polymer microspheres carried DNA probe, which was based on resonance energy transfer, was presented in this paper when CdTe quantum dots(QDs) were as energy donors, Au nanoparticles were as energy accepters and poly(4- vinylpyrindine-co-ethylene glycol dimethacrylate) microspheres were as carriers. Polymer microspheres with functional group on surfaces were prepared by distillation-precipitation polymerization when ethylene glycol dimethacrylate was as crosslinker in acetonitrile. CdTe QDs were prepared when 3-mercaptopropionic acid(MPA) was as the stabilizer in aqueous solution. Because of the hydrogen-bonding between the carboxyl groups of MPA on QDs and the pyrindine groups on the microspheres, the QDs were self-assembled onto the surfaces of microspheres. Then, the other parts of DNA probe were finished according to the classic method. The DNA detection results indicated that this novel fluorescent DNA probe system could recognize the existence of complementary target DNA or not.

  3. Dark resonances in the field of frequency shifted feedback laser radiation

    OpenAIRE

    Romanenko, V. I.; Romanenko, A. V.; Yatsenko, L. P.; Kazakov, G. A.; Litvinov, A. N.; Matisov, B. G.; Rozhdestvensky, Yu. V.

    2010-01-01

    We present a theory of dark resonances in a fluorescence of a three-level atom gas interacting with a polychromatic field of a frequency shifted feedback (FSF) laser. We show that conditions for the resonance observation are optimal when the phase relations between the laser spectral components provide generation of a light pulses train. We study analytically the field broadening and the light shift of the resonances.

  4. Dark resonances in the field of frequency-shifted feedback laser radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanenko, V. I.; Romanenko, A. V.; Yatsenko, L. P.; Kazakov, G. A.; Litvinov, A. N.; Matisov, B. G.; Rozhdestvensky, Yu V.

    2010-11-01

    We present a theory of dark resonances in fluorescence of a three-level atom gas interacting with a polychromatic field of a frequency-shifted feedback laser. We show that conditions for the resonance observation are optimal when the phase relations between the laser spectral components provide generation of a light pulse train. We study analytically the field broadening and the light shift of the resonances.

  5. Dark resonances in the field of frequency-shifted feedback laser radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a theory of dark resonances in fluorescence of a three-level atom gas interacting with a polychromatic field of a frequency-shifted feedback laser. We show that conditions for the resonance observation are optimal when the phase relations between the laser spectral components provide generation of a light pulse train. We study analytically the field broadening and the light shift of the resonances.

  6. Dark resonances in the field of frequency-shifted feedback laser radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romanenko, V I; Romanenko, A V; Yatsenko, L P [Institute of Physics, National Academy of Science of Ukraine, 46, Nauky Avenue, Kyiv 03028 (Ukraine); Kazakov, G A; Litvinov, A N; Matisov, B G [St Petersburg State Polytechnical University, 29, Polytechnicheskaya st, St. Petersburg 195251 (Russian Federation); Rozhdestvensky, Yu V, E-mail: vr@iop.kiev.u, E-mail: andrey.litvinov@mail.r [S I Vavilov State Optical Institute 12, Birzhevaya Liniya st, St Petersburg 199034 (Russian Federation)

    2010-11-14

    We present a theory of dark resonances in fluorescence of a three-level atom gas interacting with a polychromatic field of a frequency-shifted feedback laser. We show that conditions for the resonance observation are optimal when the phase relations between the laser spectral components provide generation of a light pulse train. We study analytically the field broadening and the light shift of the resonances.

  7. Performance of Eudragit Coated Whispering Gallery Mode Resonator-Based Immunosensors

    OpenAIRE

    Franco Cosi; Silvia Soria; Gualtiero Nunzi Conti; Francesco Baldini; Ambra Giannetti; Simone Berneschi

    2012-01-01

    Whispering gallery mode resonators (WGMR) are an efficient tool for the realization of optical biosensors. A high Q factor preservation is a crucial requirement for good biosensor performances. In this work we present an Eudragit®L100 coated microspherical WGMR as an efficient immunosensor. The developed resonator was morphologically characterized using fluorescence microscopy. The functionalization process was tuned to preserve the high Q factor of the resonator. The protein binding assay wa...

  8. Resonant Raman scattering of x rays: Evidence for K-M scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Resonant Raman x-ray scattering on molybdenum was studied using a Mo-anode x-ray tube and a LiF crystal monochromator. Beside the usual resonant Raman peak corresponding to the fluorescent Kα lines, another peak with a smaller energy loss was found. It is attributed to resonant Raman scattering with a final-state M-shell vacancy corresponding to the fluorescent Kβ lines. Both contributions are shown to be independent of the scattering angle. Absolute cross sections have been determined and compared with theoretical predictions

  9. Resonant Raman scattering of x rays: evidence for K--M scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Resonant Raman x-ray scattering on molybdenum was studied using a Mo-anode x-ray tube and a LiF crystal monochromator. Beside the usual resonant Raman peak corresponding to the fluorescent Kα lines another peak with a smaller energy loss was found. It is attributed to resonant Raman scattering with a final state M-shell vacancy corresponding to the fluorescent Kβ lines. Both contributions are shown to be independent of the scattering angle. Absolute cross sections were determined and compared with theoretical predictions. 9 references

  10. Isotropically sensitive optical filter employing atomic resonance transitions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An ultra-high Q isotropically sensitive optical filter or optical detector employing atomic resonance transitions is described. More specifically, atomic resonance transitions utilized in conjunction with two optical bandpass filters provide an optical detector having a wide field of view (*2 pi steradians) and very narrow acceptance bandwidth approaching 0.01 A. A light signal to be detected is transmitted through an outer bandpass filter into a resonantly absorbing atomic vapor, the excited atomic vapor then providing a fluorescence signal at a different wavelength which is transmitted through an inner bandpass filter. The outer and inner bandpass filters have no common transmission band, thereby resulting in complete blockage of all optical signals that are not resonantly shifted in wavelength by the intervening atomic vapor. Two embodiments are disclosed, one in which the light signal raises atoms contained in the atomic vapor from the ground state to an excited state from which fluorescence occurs, and the other in which a pump laser is used to raise the atoms in the ground state to a first excited state from which the light signal then is resonantly absorbed, thereby raising the atoms to a second excited state from which fluorescence occurs. A specific application is described in which an optical detector according to the present invention can be used as an underwater detector for light from an optical transmitter which could be located in an orbiting satellite

  11. Concentration Dependence of Gold Nanoparticles for Fluorescence Enhancement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Joel; Wittmershaus, Bruce

    Noble metal nanoparticles possess a unique property known as surface plasmon resonance in which the conduction electrons oscillate due to incoming light, dramatically increasing their absorption and scattering of light. The oscillating electrons create a varying electric field that can affect nearby molecules. The fluorescence and photostability of fluorophores can be enhanced significantly when they are near plasmonic nanoparticles. This effect is called metal enhanced fluorescence (MEF). MEF from two fluorescence organic dyes, Lucifer Yellow CH and Riboflavin, was measured with different concentrations of 50-nm colloidal gold nanoparticles (Au-NP). The concentration range of Au-NP was varied from 2.5 to 250 pM. To maximize the interaction, the dyes were chosen so their emission spectra had considerable overlap with the absorption spectra of the Au-NP, which is common in MEF studies. If the dye molecules are too close to the surface of Au-NP, fluorescence quenching can occur instead of MEF. To try to observe this difference, silica-coated Au-NP were compared to citrate-based Au-NP; however, fluorescence quenching was observed with both Au-NP. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant Number NSF-ECCS-1306157.

  12. Directional fluorescence emission co-enhanced by localized and propagating surface plasmons for biosensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yi; Wu, Lin; Wong, Ten It; Bauch, Martin; Zhang, Qingwen; Zhang, Jinling; Liu, Xiaohu; Zhou, Xiaodong; Bai, Ping; Dostalek, Jakub; Liedberg, Bo

    2016-04-01

    We investigated the simultaneous excitation of localized surface plasmons (LSPs) and propagating surface plasmons (PSPs) on a thin metallic film with an array of nanoholes for the enhancement of fluorescence intensity in heterogeneous bioassays. Experiments supported by simulations reveal that the co-excitation of PSP and LSP modes on the nanohole array in a Kretschmann configuration allows for fluorescence enhancement of about 102 as compared to a flat Au surface irradiated off-resonance. Moreover, this fluorescence signal was about 3-fold higher on the substrate supporting both PSPs and LSPs than that on a flat surface where only PSPs were resonantly excited. Simulations also indicated the highly directional fluorescence emission as well as the high fluorescence collection efficiency on the nanohole array substrate. Our contribution attempts to de-convolute the origin of this enhancement and identify further ways to maximize the efficiency of surface plasmon-enhanced fluorescence spectroscopy for implementation in ultra-sensitive bioassays.We investigated the simultaneous excitation of localized surface plasmons (LSPs) and propagating surface plasmons (PSPs) on a thin metallic film with an array of nanoholes for the enhancement of fluorescence intensity in heterogeneous bioassays. Experiments supported by simulations reveal that the co-excitation of PSP and LSP modes on the nanohole array in a Kretschmann configuration allows for fluorescence enhancement of about 102 as compared to a flat Au surface irradiated off-resonance. Moreover, this fluorescence signal was about 3-fold higher on the substrate supporting both PSPs and LSPs than that on a flat surface where only PSPs were resonantly excited. Simulations also indicated the highly directional fluorescence emission as well as the high fluorescence collection efficiency on the nanohole array substrate. Our contribution attempts to de-convolute the origin of this enhancement and identify further ways to maximize

  13. Uptake and distribution of fluorescently labeled cobalamin in neoplastic and healthy breast tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannon, Michelle J.; McGreevy, James M.; Holden, Joseph A.; West, Frederick G.; Grissom, Charles B.

    2000-05-01

    Fluorescent analogs of cobalamin (vitamin B12) have been developed as diagnostic markers of cancer cells. These compounds are recognized by transcobalamin, a cobalamin transport protein, with high affinity, as shown by surface plasmon resonance. The cellular sequestration and gross distribution of fluorescent cobalamin bioconjugates in breast tissue is being examined by epifluorescence microscopy. The distribution of each compound is being evaluated in proliferative and non-proliferative tissue, i.e. normal tissue and breast carcinoma. The results of preliminary studies suggest that fluorescent analogs of cobalamin may be a useful tool in therapeutic breast operations to define tumor margins and to distinguish neoplastic breast tissue from healthy breast tissue.

  14. Plasmonic-enhanced fluorescence emission using D-shape microstructured optical fiber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highly sensitive side-polished D-shaped optical fiber sensors have been fabricated based on surface plasmon resonance (SPR) technology. Current techniques in plasmonic-enhanced total internal reflection microscopy (TIRM) and evanescent wave microscopy, although advantageous, require cumbersome set-ups and encompass large coupling losses. A gold coated D-shaped optical fiber was demonstrated to provide fluorescence enhanced spectroscopy. Comparison was made between a gold coated and uncoated D-shaped microstructured optical fiber (MOF) with respect to excitation of Rhodamine B (Rh B). Results highlighted improved fluorescence emission intensity and heightened sensitivity in fluorescence spectroscopy in the gold coated device, indicating potential in enhanced bio-imaging applications.

  15. Crossing simple resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A simple criterion governs the beam distortion and/or loss of protons on a fast resonance crossing. Results from numerical integrations are illustrated for simple sextupole, octupole, and 10-pole resonances

  16. Modulation gamma resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Possibility to control dynamic processes in a matter through gamma-resonance modulation by high-frequency external variable fields in excess of inverse lifetimes of the Moessbauer nuclei excited states, that is, within the megahertz frequency range lies in the heart of the modulation gamma-resonance spectroscopy. Through the use of the gamma-resonance process theoretical analysis methods and of the equation solution method for the density matrix with the secondary quantization of gamma-radiation field one attacks the problems dealing with the effect of both variable fields and relaxation on gamma-resonance. One has studied the gamma-radiation ultrasound modulation stages. One points out a peculiar role of the gamma-magnetic resonance effect in modulation gamma resonance spectroscopy formation. One forecasts development of the modulation gamma-resonance spectroscopy into the nonlinear gamma-resonance spectroscopy

  17. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Resonance Imaging (MRI) What is an MRI? MRI stands for Magnetic Resonance Imaging. It is an important ... MRI is often used for diagnosis or for monitoring disease. For example, if someone is having severe ...

  18. Neutron resonance averaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The principles of resonance averaging as applied to neutron capture reactions are described. Several illustrations of resonance averaging to problems of nuclear structure and the distribution of radiative strength in nuclei are provided. 30 refs., 12 figs

  19. Droplet resonator based optofluidic microlasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiraz, Alper; Jonáš, Alexandr; Aas, Mehdi; Karadag, Yasin; Brzobohatý, Oto; Ježek, Jan; Pilát, Zdeněk.; Zemánek, Pavel; Anand, Suman; McGloin, David

    2014-03-01

    We introduce tunable optofluidic microlasers based on active optical resonant cavities formed by optically stretched, dye-doped emulsion droplets confined in a dual-beam optical trap. To achieve tunable dye lasing, optically pumped droplets of oil dispersed in water are stretched by light in the dual-beam trap. Subsequently, resonant path lengths of whispering gallery modes (WGMs) propagating in the droplet are modified, leading to shifts in the microlaser emission wavelengths. We also report lasing in airborne, Rhodamine B-doped glycerolwater droplets which were localized using optical tweezers. While being trapped near the focal point of an infrared laser, the droplets were pumped with a Q-switched green laser. Furthermore, biological lasing in droplets supported by a superhydrophobic surface is demonstrated using a solution of Venus variant of the yellow fluorescent protein or E. Coli bacterial cells expressing stably the Venus protein. Our results may lead to new ways of probing airborne particles, exploiting the high sensitivity of stimulated emission to small perturbations in the droplet laser cavity and the gain medium.

  20. Laser Induced Fluorescence of the Iodine Ion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hargus, William

    2014-10-01

    Iodine (I2) has been considered as a potential electrostatic spacecraft thruster propellant for approximately 2 decades, but has only recently been demonstrated. Energy conversion efficiency appears to be on par with xenon without thruster modification. Intriguingly, performance appears to exceed xenon at high acceleration potentials. As part of a continuing program for the development of non-intrusive plasma diagnostics for advanced plasma spacecraft propulsion, we have identified the I II 5d5D4 o state as metastable, and therefore containing a reservoir of excited state ions suitable for laser probing. The 5d5D4 o - 6p5P3 transition at 695.878 nm is convenient for diode laser excitation with the 5s5S2 o - 6p5P3 transition at 516.12 nm as an ideal candidate for non-resonant fluorescence collection. We have constructed a Penning type iodine microwave discharge lamp optimized for I II production for table-top measurements. This work demonstrates I II laser-induced fluorescence in a representative iodine discharge and will validate our previous theoretical work based on the limited available historical I II spectral data.

  1. Rapid global fitting of large fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy datasets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean C Warren

    Full Text Available Fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM is widely applied to obtain quantitative information from fluorescence signals, particularly using Förster Resonant Energy Transfer (FRET measurements to map, for example, protein-protein interactions. Extracting FRET efficiencies or population fractions typically entails fitting data to complex fluorescence decay models but such experiments are frequently photon constrained, particularly for live cell or in vivo imaging, and this leads to unacceptable errors when analysing data on a pixel-wise basis. Lifetimes and population fractions may, however, be more robustly extracted using global analysis to simultaneously fit the fluorescence decay data of all pixels in an image or dataset to a multi-exponential model under the assumption that the lifetime components are invariant across the image (dataset. This approach is often considered to be prohibitively slow and/or computationally expensive but we present here a computationally efficient global analysis algorithm for the analysis of time-correlated single photon counting (TCSPC or time-gated FLIM data based on variable projection. It makes efficient use of both computer processor and memory resources, requiring less than a minute to analyse time series and multiwell plate datasets with hundreds of FLIM images on standard personal computers. This lifetime analysis takes account of repetitive excitation, including fluorescence photons excited by earlier pulses contributing to the fit, and is able to accommodate time-varying backgrounds and instrument response functions. We demonstrate that this global approach allows us to readily fit time-resolved fluorescence data to complex models including a four-exponential model of a FRET system, for which the FRET efficiencies of the two species of a bi-exponential donor are linked, and polarisation-resolved lifetime data, where a fluorescence intensity and bi-exponential anisotropy decay model is applied to the analysis

  2. Detection of brain tumors using fluorescence diffuse optical tomography and nanoparticles as contrast agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortin, Pierre-Yves; Genevois, Coralie; Koenig, Anne; Heinrich, Emilie; Texier, Isabelle; Couillaud, Franck

    2012-12-01

    Near-infrared fluorescence-enhanced diffuse optical tomography (fDOT) is used to localize tumors in mice using fluorescent nanoparticles as a blood pool contrast agent. The infrared dye DiR is loaded in the lipid core of nontargeted nanoparticles (DiR-lipidots) and injected systemically via the tail vein in mice bearing U87 tumors. Distribution and time-course of DiR-lipidots are followed using in vivo fluorescence reflectance imaging and reveal enhanced fluorescent signal within the subcutaneous tumors up to seven days due to the enhanced permeability and retention effect. Tumor growth into the brain is followed using bioluminescent imaging, and tumor localization is further determined by magnetic resonance imaging. The fDOT provides three-dimensional fluorescent maps that allow for consistent localization for both subcutaneous and brain tumors.

  3. Green fluorescence of terbium ions in lithium fluoroborate glasses for fibre lasers and display devices

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    G R DILLIP; C MADHUKAR REDDY; M RAJESH; SHIVANAND CHAURASIA; B DEVA PRASAD RAJU; S W JOO

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, for the first time, the visible fluorescence properties, resonance energy transfer mechanism responsible for non-radiative decay rates of ${}^5$D$_4$ $\\to$ ${}^7$F$_5$ transition and also quenching of fluorescence intensity of the ${}^5$D$_3$ $\\to$ ${}^7$F$_5$ transition of various concentrations of Tb$^{3+}$ ions in LBZLFB glasses are reported. Optical absorption, fluorescence spectra and quantum efficiencies are measured and analysed. Green fluorescence related to ${}^5$D$_4$ $\\to$ ${}^7$F$_5$ (548 nm) transition is registered under excitation of 378 nm of Tb$^{3+}$ ions. Based on excitation and fluorescence measurements, several spectroscopic parameters for Tb$^{3+}$ ions are examined as a function of concentration by Judd–Ofelt theory to judge the suitability of studied glasses for display devices and fibre lasers.

  4. Using gold colloid nanoparticles to modulate the surface enhanced fluorescence of Rhodamine B

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Enhanced fluorescence from Rhodamine B (RB) mixed with gold colloids has been observed under ultraviolet irradiation. Spectroscopic studies show that with the increasing gold colloids content, the fluorescence of RB at about 590 nm increases firstly and then decreases with slight red shift. These features observed in the experiment can be explained by the local electric field enhancement via surface plasmon resonance (SPR) of gold nanoparticles. Fluorescence enhancement is obtained when the emission frequency of RB lies within the bandwidth of local field enhancement from gold nanoparticles. Theoretical calculation results show that the local field band red shifts obviously with increase the thickness of dye shell which capped on gold particle, whereas the fluorescence band of RB is fixed around 590 nm. Therefore, the red shift and non-monotonic change of fluorescence intensity from RB is attributed to the dye shell dependent red shift of local field band of gold particles

  5. Plasmon resonances in nanoparticles

    CERN Document Server

    Mayergoyz, Isaak D

    2012-01-01

    This unique volume provides a broad introduction to plasmon resonances in nanoparticles and their novel applications. Here, plasmon resonances are treated as an eigenvalue problem for specific boundary integral equations and general physical properties of plasmon spectrum are studied in detail. The coupling of incident radiation to specific plasmon modes, the time dynamics of their excitation and dephasing are also analytically treated. Finally, the applications of plasmon resonances to SERS, light controllability (gating) of plasmon resonances in semiconductor nanoparticles, the use of plasmo

  6. Probes for biomolecules detection based on RET-enhanced fluorescence polarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Dahai; Wang, Jun; Wang, Bin; You, Zheng

    2016-05-15

    Fluorescent probes based on the principle of resonance energy transfer (RET) or the principle of fluorescence polarization (FP) are already used to detect biomolecules independently. However, there were no in-depth studies about the impact of RET on FP. Also, very few studies gave a comprehensive analysis on how to effectively design such a fluorescent probe. Based on the principle of resonance energy transfer (RET), we constructed fluorescent probes (SA-488-sub-nanogold) using streptavidin labeled Alexa488 (SA-488), nanogold and biotinylated substrate peptide (biotin-subpeptide). The influence of the structure and the ingredients of the substrate peptide were discussed. After SA-488 was combined with the biotin-subpeptide and the nanogold, its fluorescence intensity (FI) would be suppressed due to the energy transfer, leading to an increase in its volume and mass. The suppression of the FI led to a decrease in SA-488's effective concentration, and the increase in the volume or mass prolonged the SA-488's rotational relaxation time. Both changes increased SA-488's polarization in the solution. Therefore, the FP performance of the probe is enhanced by the RET. Using the probe, trypsin and biotin were detected by the change in both fluorescence intensity and fluorescence polarization, showing higher reliability, higher sensitivity, and a lower detection limit. PMID:26774994

  7. Implication of Cord Blood for Cell-Based Therapy in Refractory Childhood Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Young-Ho

    2010-01-01

    Since cord blood (CB) contains hematopoietic stem cells as well as a mixture of multipotent stem cells, CB has the ability to give rise to hematopoietic, epithelial, endothelial and neural tissues. Recently, the application of cell-based therapy using CB has expanded its clinical utility, particularly, by using autologous CB in children with refractory diseases. This review focuses clinical and pre-clinical application of CB cell-based therapy for inherited metabolic diseases as well as tissu...

  8. Cell-based delivery of glucagon-like peptide-1 using encapsulated mesenchymal stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wallrapp, Christine; Thoenes, Eric; Thürmer, Frank;

    2013-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) CellBeads are cell-based implants for the sustained local delivery of bioactive factors. They consist of GLP-1 secreting mesenchymal stem cells encapsulated in a spherically shaped immuno-isolating alginate matrix. A highly standardized and reproducible encapsulati...... preclinical studies and an ongoing safety trial in humans but further studies have to prove the overall potential of CellBead technology in cell-based regenerative medicine....

  9. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... How Can I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) KidsHealth > For Teens > Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Print A A A Text Size What's ... Exam Safety Getting Your Results What Is MRI? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a type of safe, painless testing ...

  10. Assessing Photosynthesis by Fluorescence Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saura, Pedro; Quiles, Maria Jose

    2011-01-01

    This practical paper describes a novel fluorescence imaging experiment to study the three processes of photochemistry, fluorescence and thermal energy dissipation, which compete during the dissipation of excitation energy in photosynthesis. The technique represents a non-invasive tool for revealing and understanding the spatial heterogeneity in…

  11. X-ray Fluorescence Sectioning

    CERN Document Server

    Cong, Wenxiang

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we propose an x-ray fluorescence imaging system for elemental analysis. The key idea is what we call "x-ray fluorescence sectioning". Specifically, a slit collimator in front of an x-ray tube is used to shape x-rays into a fan-beam to illuminate a planar section of an object. Then, relevant elements such as gold nanoparticles on the fan-beam plane are excited to generate x-ray fluorescence signals. One or more 2D spectral detectors are placed to face the fan-beam plane and directly measure x-ray fluorescence data. Detector elements are so collimated that each element only sees a unique area element on the fan-beam plane and records the x-ray fluorescence signal accordingly. The measured 2D x-ray fluorescence data can be refined in reference to the attenuation characteristics of the object and the divergence of the beam for accurate elemental mapping. This x-ray fluorescence sectioning system promises fast fluorescence tomographic imaging without a complex inverse procedure. The design can be ad...

  12. Ovenized microelectromechanical system (MEMS) resonator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsson, Roy H; Wojciechowski, Kenneth; Kim, Bongsang

    2014-03-11

    An ovenized micro-electro-mechanical system (MEMS) resonator including: a substantially thermally isolated mechanical resonator cavity; a mechanical oscillator coupled to the mechanical resonator cavity; and a heating element formed on the mechanical resonator cavity.

  13. Optical Properties of Fluorescent Dyes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李戎; 陈东辉

    2001-01-01

    Fluorescent dyes have been widely used these years.Because of the special optical performance, conventional CCM systems seem to be unable to predict the recipes of fabrics dyed with fluorescent dyes. In order to enhance the functions of CCM systems, the optical properties of fluorescent dyes in their absorption region were investigated. It has been found that there was a fixed maximum absorption wavelength for each fluorescent dyes whatever its concentration is. Both absorption region and maximum absorption wavelength of the dyes in solution are the same to those in fabric, and that the absorption is directly proportional to the concentration of the dye. So the optical properties obtained in solutions cna be applied for describing the optics performance of fluorescent dyes in fabrics.

  14. Time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article addresses the evolution in time of light emitted by a molecular system after a brief photo-excitation. The authors first describe fluorescence from a photo-physical point of view and discuss the characterization of the excited state. Then, they explain some basic notions related to fluorescence characterization (lifetime and decays, quantum efficiency, so on). They present the different experimental methods and techniques currently used to study time-resolved fluorescence. They discuss basic notions of time resolution and spectral reconstruction. They briefly present some conventional methods: intensified Ccd cameras, photo-multipliers and photodiodes associated with a fast oscilloscope, and phase modulation. Other methods and techniques are more precisely presented: time-correlated single photon counting (principle, examples, and fluorescence lifetime imagery), streak camera (principle, examples), and optical methods like the Kerr optical effect (principle and examples) and fluorescence up-conversion (principle and theoretical considerations, examples of application)

  15. Magnetic resonance energy and topological resonance energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aihara, Jun-Ichi

    2016-04-28

    Ring-current diamagnetism of a polycyclic π-system is closely associated with thermodynamic stability due to the individual circuits. Magnetic resonance energy (MRE), derived from the ring-current diamagnetic susceptibility, was explored in conjunction with graph-theoretically defined topological resonance energy (TRE). For many aromatic molecules, MRE is highly correlative with TRE with a correlation coefficient of 0.996. For all π-systems studied, MRE has the same sign as TRE. The only trouble with MRE may be that some antiaromatic and non-alternant species exhibit unusually large MRE-to-TRE ratios. This kind of difficulty can in principle be overcome by prior geometry-optimisation or by changing spin multiplicity. Apart from the semi-empirical resonance-theory resonance energy, MRE is considered as the first aromatic stabilisation energy (ASE) defined without referring to any hypothetical polyene reference. PMID:26878709

  16. Resonance splitting in gyrotropic ring resonators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalas, Dirk; Petrov, Alexander; Krause, Michael; Hampe, Jan; Eich, Manfred

    2010-10-15

    We present the theoretical concept of an optical isolator based on resonance splitting in a silicon ring resonator covered with a magneto-optical polymer cladding. For this task, a perturbation method is derived for the modes in the cylindrical coordinate system. A polymer magneto-optical cladding causing a 0.01 amplitude of the off-diagonal element of the dielectric tensor is assumed. It is shown that the derived resonance splitting of the clockwise and counterclockwise modes increases for smaller ring radii. For the ring with a radius of approximately 1.5μm, a 29GHz splitting is demonstrated. An integrated optical isolator with a 10μm geometrical footprint is proposed based on a critically coupled ring resonator. PMID:20967092

  17. Shedding Some Light on Fluorescent Bulbs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guilbert, Nicholas R.

    1996-01-01

    Explores some of the principles behind the working of fluorescent bulbs using a specially prepared fluorescent bulb with the white inner fluorescent coating applied along only half its length. Discusses the spectrum, the bulb plasma, and light production. (JRH)

  18. Resonance energy transfer: Dye to metal nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the present study, surface energy transfer (SET) from Coumarin 540A (C540 A) to Gold nanoparticle (Au) is demonstrated. The observed results show pronounced effect on the photoluminescence intensity and shortening of the lifetime of Coumarin 540A upon interaction with the spherical gold nanoparticle, also there are measured effects on radiative rate of the dye. Experimental results are analyzed with fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) and SET theories. The results obtained from distance-dependent quenching provide experimental evidence that the efficiency curve slope and distance of quenching is best modeled by surface energy transfer process

  19. Two-dimensional fluorescence spectroscopy of laser-produced plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harilal, Sivanandan S.; LaHaye, Nicole L.; Phillips, Mark C.

    2016-08-01

    We use a two-dimensional laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy technique to measure the coupled absorption and emission properties of atomic species in plasmas produced via laser ablation of solid aluminum targets at atmospheric pressure. Emission spectra from the Al I 394.4 nm and Al I 396.15 nm transitions are measured while a frequency-doubled, continuous-wave, Ti:Sapphire laser is tuned across the Al I 396.15 nm transition. The resulting two-dimensional spectra show the energy coupling between the two transitions via increased emission intensity for both transitions during resonant absorption of the continuous-wave laser at one transition. Time-delayed and gated detection of the emission spectrum is used to isolate the resonantly-excited fluorescence emission from the thermally-excited emission from the plasma. In addition, the tunable continuous-wave laser measures the absorption spectrum of the Al transition with ultra-high resolution after the plasma has cooled, resulting in narrower spectral linewidths than observed in emission spectra. Our results highlight that fluorescence spectroscopy employing continuous-wave laser re-excitation after pulsed laser ablation combines benefits of both traditional emission and absorption spectroscopic methods.

  20. Far-field infrared super-resolution microscopy using picosecond time-resolved transient fluorescence detected IR spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Makoto; Kawashima, Yasutake; Takeda, Akihiro; Ohmori, Tsutomu; Fujii, Masaaki

    2007-05-01

    A new far-field infrared super-resolution microscopy combining laser fluorescence microscope and picosecond time-resolved transient fluorescence detected IR (TFD-IR) spectroscopy is proposed. TFD-IR spectroscopy is a kind of IR-visible/UV double resonance spectroscopy, and detects IR transitions by the transient fluorescence due to electronic transition originating from vibrationally excited level populated by IR light. IR images of rhodamine-6G solution and of fluorescent beads were clearly observed by monitoring the transient fluorescence. Super-resolution twice higher than the diffraction limit for IR light was achieved. The IR spectrum due to the transient fluorescence was also measured from spatial domains smaller than the diffraction limit.