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Sample records for cell-associated hemolysis activity

  1. Impact of Hot Environment on Fluid and Electrolyte Imbalance, Renal Damage, Hemolysis, and Immune Activation Postmarathon

    Rodrigo Assunção Oliveira

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have demonstrated the physiological changes induced by exercise exposure in hot environments. We investigated the hematological and oxidative changes and tissue damage induced by marathon race in different thermal conditions. Twenty-six male runners completed the São Paulo International Marathon both in hot environment (HE and in temperate environment (TE. Blood and urine samples were collected 1 day before, immediately after, 1 day after, and 3 days after the marathon to analyze the hematological parameters, electrolytes, markers of tissue damage, and oxidative status. In both environments, the marathon race promotes fluid and electrolyte imbalance, hemolysis, oxidative stress, immune activation, and tissue damage. The marathon runner’s performance was approximately 13.5% lower in HE compared to TE; however, in HE, our results demonstrated more pronounced fluid and electrolyte imbalance, renal damage, hemolysis, and immune activation. Moreover, oxidative stress induced by marathon in HE is presumed to be related to protein/purine oxidation instead of other oxidative sources. Fluid and electrolyte imbalance and protein/purine oxidation may be important factors responsible for hemolysis, renal damage, immune activation, and impaired performance after long-term exercise in HE. Nonetheless, we suggested that the impairment on performance in HE was not associated to the muscle damage and lipoperoxidation.

  2. The renin-angiotensin system in malignant hypertension revisited: plasma renin activity, microangiopathic hemolysis, and renal failure in malignant hypertension

    van den Born, Bert-Jan H.; Koopmans, Richard P.; van Montfrans, Gert A.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Malignant hypertension is a renin-dependent form of hypertension. However, the variations in renin-angiotensin system (RAS) activation in malignant hypertension are not completely understood. A proposed mechanism for ongoing RAS activation is the presence of microangiopathic hemolysis

  3. Protective effects of kaempferol against reactive oxygen species-induced hemolysis and its antiproliferative activity on human cancer cells.

    Liao, Wenzhen; Chen, Luying; Ma, Xiang; Jiao, Rui; Li, Xiaofeng; Wang, Yong

    2016-05-23

    The protective effects of kaempferol against reactive oxygen species (ROS)-induced hemolysis and its antiproliferative activity on human cancer cells were evaluated in this study. Kaempferol exhibited strong cellular antioxidant ability (CAA) with a CAA value of 59.80 ± 0.379 μM of quercetin (QE)/100 μM (EC50 = 7.74 ± 0.049 μM). Pretreatment with kaempferol significantly attenuated the ROS-induced hemolysis of human erythrocyte (87.4% hemolysis suppressed at 100 μg/mL) and reduced the accumulation of toxic lipid peroxidation product malondialdehyde (MDA). The anti-hemolytic activity of kaempferol was mainly through scavenging excessive ROS and preserving the intrinsic antioxidant enzymes (superoxide dismutase, SOD; catalase, CAT; and glutathione peroxidase, GPx) activities in normal levels. Additionally, kaempferol showed significant antiproliferative activity on a panel of human cancer cell lines including human breast carcinoma (MCF-7) cells, human stomach carcinoma (SGC-7901) cells, human cervical carcinoma (Hela) cells and human lung carcinoma (A549) cells. Kaemperol induced apoptosis of MCF-7 cells accompanied with nuclear condensation and mitochondria dysfunction. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Antioxidant activity and protective effect of banana peel against oxidative hemolysis of human erythrocyte at different stages of ripening.

    Sundaram, Shanthy; Anjum, Shadma; Dwivedi, Priyanka; Rai, Gyanendra Kumar

    2011-08-01

    Phytochemicals such as polyphenols and carotenoids are gaining importance because of their contribution to human health and their multiple biological effects such as antioxidant, antimutagenic, anticarcinogenic, and cytoprotective activities and their therapeutic properties. Banana peel is a major by-product in pulp industry and it contains various bioactive compounds like polyphenols, carotenoids, and others. In the present study, effect of ripening, solvent polarity on the content of bioactive compounds of crude banana peel and the protective effect of peel extracts of unripe, ripe, and leaky ripe banana fruit on hydrogen peroxide-induced hemolysis and their antioxidant capacity were investigated. Banana (Musa paradisica) peel at different stages of ripening (unripe, ripe, leaky ripe) were treated with 70% acetone, which were partitioned in order of polarity with water, ethyl acetate, chloroform (CHCl₃), and hexane sequentially. The antioxidant activity of the samples was evaluated by the red cell hemolysis assay, free radical scavenging (1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl free radical elimination) and superoxide dismutase activities. The Folin-Ciocalteu's reagent assay was used to estimate the phenolic content of extracts. The findings of this investigation suggest that the unripe banana peel sample had higher antioxidant potency than ripe and leaky ripe. Further on fractionation, ethyl acetate and water soluble fractions of unripe peel displayed high antioxidant activity than CHCl₃ and hexane fraction, respectively. A positive correlation between free radical scavenging capacity and the content of phenolic compound were found in unripe, ripe, and leaky ripe stages of banana peel.

  5. Interactions of PLGA nanoparticles with blood components: protein adsorption, coagulation, activation of the complement system and hemolysis studies.

    Fornaguera, Cristina; Calderó, Gabriela; Mitjans, Montserrat; Vinardell, Maria Pilar; Solans, Conxita; Vauthier, Christine

    2015-04-14

    The intravenous administration of poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid (PLGA) nanoparticles has been widely reported as a promising alternative for delivery of drugs to specific cells. However, studies on their interaction with diverse blood components using different techniques are still lacking. Therefore, in the present work, the interaction of PLGA nanoparticles with blood components was described using different complementary techniques. The influence of different encapsulated compounds/functionalizing agents on these interactions was also reported. It is worth noting that all these techniques can be simply performed, without the need for highly sophisticated apparatus or skills. Moreover, their transference to industries and application of quality control could be easily performed. Serum albumin was adsorbed onto all types of tested nanoparticles. The saturation concentration was dependent on the nanoparticle size. In contrast, fibrinogen aggregation was dependent on nanoparticle surface charge. The complement activation was also influenced by the nanoparticle functionalization; the presence of a functionalizing agent increased complement activation, while the addition of an encapsulated compound only caused a slight increase. None of the nanoparticles influenced the coagulation cascade at low concentrations. However, at high concentrations, cationized nanoparticles did activate the coagulation cascade. Interactions of nanoparticles with erythrocytes did not reveal any hemolysis. Interactions of PLGA nanoparticles with blood proteins depended both on the nanoparticle properties and the protein studied. Independent of their loading/surface functionalization, PLGA nanoparticles did not influence the coagulation cascade and did not induce hemolysis of erythrocytes; they could be defined as safe concerning induction of embolization and cell lysis.

  6. Antibacterial and hemolysis activity of polypyrrole nanotubes decorated with silver nanoparticles by an in-situ reduction process.

    Upadhyay, J; Kumar, A; Gogoi, B; Buragohain, A K

    2015-09-01

    Polypyrrole nanotube-silver nanoparticle nanocomposites (PPy-NTs:Ag-NPs) have been synthesized by in-situ reduction of silver nitrate (AgNO3) to suppress the agglomeration of Ag-NPs. The morphology and chemical structure of the nanocomposites have been studied by HRTEM, SEM, XRD, FTIR and UV-vis spectroscopy. The average diameter of the polypyrrole nanotubes (PPy-NTs) is measured to be 130.59±5.5 nm with their length in the micrometer range, while the silver nanoparticles (Ag-NPs) exhibit spherical shape with an average diameter of 23.12±3.23 nm. In-vitro blood compatibility of the nanocomposites has been carried out via hemolysis assay. Antimicrobial activity of the nanocomposites has been investigated with Escherichia coli (E. coli) and Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) bacteria. The results depict that the hemolysis and antimicrobial activities of the nanocomposites increase with increasing Ag-NP concentration that can be controlled by the AgNO3 precursor concentration in the in-situ process. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Acute Hemolysis Caused by Incidental Trichlorfon Exposure

    Ming-Ling Wu

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Trichlorfon (o-o-dimethyl-2,2,2-trichloro-hydroxyethylphosphate, an organophosphate, has a moderately potent anti-cholinesterase activity. Organophosphate poisoning is well known for its characteristic symptoms and signs, but acute hemolysis caused by trichlorfon is rarely reported. We present a patient who developed acute hemolysis and renal function impairment after percutaneous trichlorfon exposure. A 54-year-old man applied trichlorfon powder to his dog to kill its parasites. Half an hour later, the dog was suspected to die of cholinergic crisis and the patient felt abdominal cramping pain. Later, he developed severe nausea, vomiting, chills, high fever, and cold sweat. Laboratory work-up disclosed a picture of acute hemolysis, jaundice, renal function impairment and leukocytosis. However, there were no clinical features of acute cholinergic syndrome except gastrointestinal symptoms, and blood cholinesterase activities were also normal. He eventually had a full recovery. Trichlorfon should be added to the toxins known to cause acute hemolysis.

  8. Oxidative Hemolysis of Erythrocytes

    Wlodek, Lidia; Kusior, Dorota

    2006-01-01

    This exercise for students will allow them to simultaneously observe lipid peroxidation and consequent hemolysis of rat erythrocytes and the effect of sodium azide, a catalase inhibitor, on these processes. It will also demonstrate a protective action of antioxidants, the therapeutically used N-acetylcysteine and albumins present in plasma.

  9. Ambient hemolysis and activation of coagulation is different between HeartMate II and HeartWare left ventricular assist devices.

    Birschmann, Ingvild; Dittrich, Marcus; Eller, Thomas; Wiegmann, Bettina; Reininger, Armin J; Budde, Ulrich; Strüber, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Thromboembolic and bleeding events in patients with a left ventricular assist device (LVAD) are still a major cause of complications. Therefore, the balance between anti-coagulant and pro-coagulant factors needs to be tightly controlled. The principle hypothesis of this study is that different pump designs may have an effect on hemolysis and activation of the coagulation system. Referring to this, the HeartMate II (HMII; Thoratec Corp, Pleasanton, CA) and the HeartWare HVAD (HeartWare International Inc, Framingham, MA) were investigated. For 20 patients with LVAD support (n = 10 each), plasma coagulation, full blood count, and clinical chemistry parameters were measured. Platelet function was monitored using platelet aggregometry, platelet function analyzer-100 system ( Siemens, Marburg, Germany), vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein phosphorylation assay, immature platelet fraction, platelet-derived microparticles, and von Willebrand diagnostic. Acquired von Willebrand syndrome could be detected in all patients. Signs of hemolysis, as measured by lactate dehydrogenase levels (mean, 470 U/liter HMII, 250 U/liter HVAD; p < 0.001), were more pronounced in the HMII patients. In contrast, D-dimer analysis indicated a significantly higher activation of the coagulation system in HVAD patients (mean, 0.94 mg/liter HMII, 2.01 mg/liter HVAD; p < 0.01). The efficacy of anti-platelet therapy using clopidogrel was not sufficient in more than 50% of the patients. Our results support the finding that all patients with rotary blood pumps suffered from von Willebrand syndrome. In addition, a distinct footprint of effects on hemolysis and the coagulation system can be attributed to different devices. As a consequence, the individual status of the coagulation system needs to be controlled in long-term patients. © 2013 Published by International Society for the Heart and Lung Transplantation on behalf of International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation.

  10. Activity of microemulsion-based nanoparticles at the human bio-nano interface: concentration-dependent effects on thrombosis and hemolysis in whole blood

    Morey, Timothy E.; Varshney, Manoj; Flint, Jason A.; Seubert, Christoph N.; Smith, W. Brit; Bjoraker, David G.; Shah, Dinesh O.; Dennis, Donn M.

    2004-01-01

    Background: Although microemulsion-based nanoparticles (MEs) may be useful for drug delivery or scavenging, these benefits must be balanced against potential nanotoxicological effects in biological tissue (bio-nano interface). We investigated the actions of assembled MEs and their individual components at the bio-nano interface of thrombosis and hemolysis in human blood.Methods: Oil-in-water MEs were synthesized using ethylbutyrate, sodium caprylate, and pluronic F-68 (ME4) or F-127 (ME6) in 0.9% NaCl w/v . The effects of MEs or components on thrombosis were determined using thrombo-elastography, platelet contractile force, clot elastic modulus, and platelet counting. For hemolysis, ME or components were incubated with erythrocytes, centrifuged, and washed for measurement of free hemoglobin by spectroscopy.Results and conclusions: The mean particle diameters (polydispersity index) for ME6 and ME4 were 23.6 ± 2.5 nm (0.362) and 14.0 ± 1.0 nm (0.008), respectively. MEs (0, 0.03, 0.3, 3 mM) markedly reduced the thromboelastograph maximal amplitude in a concentration-dependent manner (49.0 ± 4.2, 39.0 ± 5.6, 15.0 ± 8.7, 3.8 ± 1.3 mm, respectively), an effect highly correlated (r2 = 0.94) with similar changes caused by pluronic surfactants (48.7 ± 10.9, 30.7 ± 15.8, 20.0 ± 11.3, 2.0 ± 0.5) alone. Neither oil nor sodium caprylate alone affected the thromboelastograph. The clot contractile force was reduced by ME (27.3 ± 11.1-6.7 ± 3.4 kdynes/cm 2 , P = 0.02, n = 5) whereas the platelet population not affected (175 ± 28-182 ± 23 10 6 /ml, P = 0.12, n = 6). This data suggests that MEs reduced platelet activity due to associated pluronic surfactants, but caused minimal changes in protein function necessary for coagulation. Although pharmacological concentrations of sodium caprylate caused hemolysis (EC 50 = 213 mM), MEs and pluronic surfactants did not disrupt erythrocytes. Knowledge of nanoparticle activity and potential associated nanotoxicity at this bio

  11. Activity of microemulsion-based nanoparticles at the human bio-nano interface: concentration-dependent effects on thrombosis and hemolysis in whole blood

    Morey, Timothy E.; Varshney, Manoj; Flint, Jason A.; Seubert, Christoph N.; Smith, W. Brit; Bjoraker, David G.; Shah, Dinesh O.; Dennis, Donn M. [University of Florida, Departments of Anesthesiology, Chemical Engineering, and Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics, Engineering Research Center for Particle Science and Technology (United States)], E-mail: DDennis@ufl.edu

    2004-06-15

    Background: Although microemulsion-based nanoparticles (MEs) may be useful for drug delivery or scavenging, these benefits must be balanced against potential nanotoxicological effects in biological tissue (bio-nano interface). We investigated the actions of assembled MEs and their individual components at the bio-nano interface of thrombosis and hemolysis in human blood.Methods: Oil-in-water MEs were synthesized using ethylbutyrate, sodium caprylate, and pluronic F-68 (ME4) or F-127 (ME6) in 0.9% NaCl{sub w/v}. The effects of MEs or components on thrombosis were determined using thrombo-elastography, platelet contractile force, clot elastic modulus, and platelet counting. For hemolysis, ME or components were incubated with erythrocytes, centrifuged, and washed for measurement of free hemoglobin by spectroscopy.Results and conclusions: The mean particle diameters (polydispersity index) for ME6 and ME4 were 23.6 {+-} 2.5 nm (0.362) and 14.0 {+-} 1.0 nm (0.008), respectively. MEs (0, 0.03, 0.3, 3 mM) markedly reduced the thromboelastograph maximal amplitude in a concentration-dependent manner (49.0 {+-} 4.2, 39.0 {+-} 5.6, 15.0 {+-} 8.7, 3.8 {+-} 1.3 mm, respectively), an effect highly correlated (r2 = 0.94) with similar changes caused by pluronic surfactants (48.7 {+-} 10.9, 30.7 {+-} 15.8, 20.0 {+-} 11.3, 2.0 {+-} 0.5) alone. Neither oil nor sodium caprylate alone affected the thromboelastograph. The clot contractile force was reduced by ME (27.3 {+-} 11.1-6.7 {+-} 3.4 kdynes/cm{sup 2}, P = 0.02, n = 5) whereas the platelet population not affected (175 {+-} 28-182 {+-} 23 10{sup 6}/ml, P = 0.12, n = 6). This data suggests that MEs reduced platelet activity due to associated pluronic surfactants, but caused minimal changes in protein function necessary for coagulation. Although pharmacological concentrations of sodium caprylate caused hemolysis (EC{sub 50} = 213 mM), MEs and pluronic surfactants did not disrupt erythrocytes. Knowledge of nanoparticle activity and

  12. Hemolysis induced by PMIVSD occluder

    D. Sheshagiri Rao

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Hemolysis related to occluder, prosthetic valve, and prosthetic ring used for mitral valve annuloplasty are not very unusual. However, hemolysis related to transcathetor closure of post-myocardial infarction ventricular septal defect (PMIVSD is infrequent. A close follow-up for spontaneous resolution with or without blood transfusion has been reported in a few cases. Occasionally, surgical retrieval is unavoidable or lifelong blood transfusion is required if surgery cannot be done because of higher risk. In this illustration, we have showed a close follow-up of a case of hemolysis induced by atrial septal occluder used for VSD closure after myocardial infarction. Despite successful device closure of PMIVSD which is difficult, a close watch is needed for complications like residual leak, device embolization, and hemolysis.

  13. Hemolysis induced by PMIVSD occluder.

    Rao, D Sheshagiri; Barik, Ramachandra; Siva Prasad, Akula

    2016-09-01

    Hemolysis related to occluder, prosthetic valve, and prosthetic ring used for mitral valve annuloplasty are not very unusual. However, hemolysis related to transcathetor closure of post-myocardial infarction ventricular septal defect (PMIVSD) is infrequent. A close follow-up for spontaneous resolution with or without blood transfusion has been reported in a few cases. Occasionally, surgical retrieval is unavoidable or lifelong blood transfusion is required if surgery cannot be done because of higher risk. In this illustration, we have showed a close follow-up of a case of hemolysis induced by atrial septal occluder used for VSD closure after myocardial infarction. Despite successful device closure of PMIVSD which is difficult, a close watch is needed for complications like residual leak, device embolization, and hemolysis. Copyright © 2016 Cardiological Society of India. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. An experimental model of hemolysis-induced acute pancreatitis

    Saruc M.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The literature indicates that acute pancreatitis is a complication of massive hemolysis with a prevalence of about 20%. We describe an experimental model of hemolysis-induced acute pancreatitis. Hemolytic anemia was induced in rats by a single ip injection of 60 mg/kg of 20 mg/ml acetylphenylhydrazine (APH in 20% (v/v ethanol on the first experimental day (day 0. One hundred and fifty Wistar albino rats weighing 180-200 g were divided into three groups of 50 animals each: groups 1, 2 and 3 were injected ip with APH, 20% ethanol, and physiological saline, respectively. Ten rats from each group were sacrificed on study days 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5. Serum amylase, lipase levels and pancreatic tissue tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha and platelet-activating factor (PAF contents were determined and a histological examination of the pancreas was performed. No hemolysis or pancreatitis was observed in any of the rats in groups 2 and 3. In group 1, massive hemolysis was observed in 35 (70% of 50 rats, moderate hemolysis in seven (14%, and no hemolysis in eight (16%. Thirty-three of 35 (94.2% rats with massive hemolysis had hyperamylasemia, and 29 of these rats (82.8% had histologically proven pancreatitis. The most severe pancreatitis occurred on day 3, as demonstrated by histology. Tissue TNF-alpha and PAF levels were statistically higher in group 1 than in groups 2 and 3. Acute massive hemolysis induced acute pancreatitis, as indicated by histology, in almost 80% of cases. Hemolysis may induce acute pancreatitis by triggering the release of proinflammatory and immunoregulatory cytokines.

  15. Hemolysis in a patient with alkaptonuria and chronic kidney failure.

    Heng, Anne-Elisabeth; Courbebaisse, Marie; Kemeny, Jean Louis; Matesan, Raluca; Bonniol, Claude; Deteix, Patrice; Souweine, Bertrand

    2010-07-01

    In alkaptonuria, the absence of homogentisic acid oxidase results in the accumulation of homogentisic acid (HGA) in the body. Fatal disease cases are infrequent, and death often results from kidney or cardiac complications. We report a 24-year-old alkaptonuric man with severe decreased kidney function who developed fatal metabolic acidosis and intravascular hemolysis. Hemolysis may have been caused by rapid and extensive accumulation of HGA and subsequent accumulation of plasma soluble melanins. Toxic effects of plasma soluble melanins, their intermediates, and reactive oxygen side products are increased when antioxidant mechanisms are overwhelmed. A decrease in serum antioxidative activity has been reported in patients with chronic decreased kidney function. However, despite administration of large doses of an antioxidant agent and ascorbic acid and intensive kidney support, hemolysis and acidosis could not be brought under control and hemolysis led to the death of the patient.

  16. Hemolysis

    ... eds. Goldman's Cecil Medicine . 25th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016:chap 161. Gallagher PG. Red blood ... Basic Principles and Practice . 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2013:chap 43. Michel M. Autoimmune and intravascular ...

  17. Moderate glucose supply reduces hemolysis during systemic inflammation

    Jägers J

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Johannes Jägers,1 Stephan Brauckmann,2 Michael Kirsch,1 Katharina Effenberger-Neidnicht1,3 1Institute of Physiological Chemistry, University Hospital Essen, Essen, Germany; 2Clinic for Anesthesiology and Intensive Care, University Hospital Essen, Essen, Germany; 3Institute of Physiological Chemistry, University Hospital Essen, Essen, Germany Background: Systemic inflammation alters energy metabolism. A sufficient glucose level, however, is most important for erythrocytes, since erythrocytes rely on glucose as sole source of energy. Damage to erythrocytes leads to hemolysis. Both disorders of glucose metabolism and hemolysis are associated with an increased risk of death. The objective of the study was to investigate the impact of intravenous glucose on hemolysis during systemic inflammation.Materials and methods: Systemic inflammation was accomplished in male Wistar rats by continuous lipopolysaccharide (LPS infusion (1 mg LPS/kg and h, 300 min. Sham control group rats received Ringer’s solution. Glucose was supplied moderately (70 mg glucose/kg and h or excessively (210 mg glucose/kg and h during systemic inflammation. Vital parameters (eg, systemic blood pressure as well as blood and plasma parameters (eg, concentrations of glucose, lactate and cell-free hemoglobin, and activity of lactate dehydrogenase were measured hourly. Clot formation was analyzed by thromboelastometry.Results: Continuous infusion of LPS led to a so-called post-aggression syndrome with disturbed electrolyte homeostasis (hypocalcemia, hyperkalemia, and hypernatremia, changes in hemodynamics (tachycardia and hypertension, and a catabolic metabolism (early hyperglycemia, late hypoglycemia, and lactate formation. It induced severe tissue injury (significant increases in plasma concentrations of transaminases and lactate dehydrogenase, alterations in blood coagulation (disturbed clot formation, and massive hemolysis. Both moderate and excessive glucose supply reduced LPS

  18. Time course of hemolysis in respiratory alkalosis

    A. Babaknia

    1969-01-01

    Full Text Available Blood pH and plasma hemoglobin concentration were measured in dog undergoing hyperventilation with or without 6 %CO 2. Blood pH rose in the first minutes in the alkalotic group and hemolysis appeared mostly during second hour after alkalosis was established. It increased gradually during the following hours of hyperventilation. No hemolysis was observed in the group undergoing hyperventilation with 6% C02. It is concluded thal hemolysis is unrelated to mechanical action of hyperventilatroi n and in due to alkalosis. the possible cause of hemo lysis and related Iitrature is discussed.

  19. T helper 17.1 cells associate with multiple sclerosis disease activity: perspectives for early intervention.

    van Langelaar, Jamie; van der Vuurst de Vries, Roos M; Janssen, Malou; Wierenga-Wolf, Annet F; Spilt, Isis M; Siepman, Theodora A; Dankers, Wendy; Verjans, Georges M G M; de Vries, Helga E; Lubberts, Erik; Hintzen, Rogier Q; van Luijn, Marvin M

    2018-05-01

    Interleukin-17-expressing CD4+ T helper 17 (Th17) cells are considered as critical regulators of multiple sclerosis disease activity. However, depending on the species and pro-inflammatory milieu, Th17 cells are functionally heterogeneous, consisting of subpopulations that differentially produce interleukin-17, interferon-gamma and granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor. In the current study, we studied distinct effector phenotypes of human Th17 cells and their correlation with disease activity in multiple sclerosis patients. T helper memory populations single- and double-positive for C-C chemokine receptor 6 (CCR6) and CXC chemokine receptor 3 (CXCR3) were functionally assessed in blood and/or cerebrospinal fluid from a total of 59 patients with clinically isolated syndrome, 35 untreated patients and 24 natalizumab-treated patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis, and nine patients with end-stage multiple sclerosis. Within the clinically isolated syndrome group, 23 patients had a second attack within 1 year and 26 patients did not experience subsequent attacks during a follow-up of >5 years. Low frequencies of T helper 1 (Th1)-like Th17 (CCR6+CXCR3+), and not Th17 (CCR6+CXCR3-) effector memory populations in blood strongly associated with a rapid diagnosis of clinically definite multiple sclerosis. In cerebrospinal fluid of clinically isolated syndrome and relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis patients, Th1-like Th17 effector memory cells were abundant and showed increased production of interferon-gamma and granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor compared to paired CCR6+ and CCR6-CD8+ T cell populations and their blood equivalents after short-term culturing. Their local enrichment was confirmed ex vivo using cerebrospinal fluid and brain single-cell suspensions. Across all pro-inflammatory T helper cells analysed in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis blood, Th1-like Th17 subpopulation T helper 17.1 (Th17.1; CCR6+CXCR3+CCR4

  20. Anti-biofilm, anti-hemolysis, and anti-virulence activities of black pepper, cananga, myrrh oils, and nerolidol against Staphylococcus aureus.

    Lee, Kayeon; Lee, Jin-Hyung; Kim, Soon-Il; Cho, Moo Hwan; Lee, Jintae

    2014-11-01

    The long-term usage of antibiotics has resulted in the evolution of multidrug-resistant bacteria. Unlike antibiotics, anti-virulence approaches target bacterial virulence without affecting cell viability, which may be less prone to develop drug resistance. Staphylococcus aureus is a major human pathogen that produces diverse virulence factors, such as α-toxin, which is hemolytic. Also, biofilm formation of S. aureus is one of the mechanisms of its drug resistance. In this study, anti-biofilm screening of 83 essential oils showed that black pepper, cananga, and myrrh oils and their common constituent cis-nerolidol at 0.01 % markedly inhibited S. aureus biofilm formation. Furthermore, the three essential oils and cis-nerolidol at below 0.005 % almost abolished the hemolytic activity of S. aureus. Transcriptional analyses showed that black pepper oil down-regulated the expressions of the α-toxin gene (hla), the nuclease genes, and the regulatory genes. In addition, black pepper, cananga, and myrrh oils and cis-nerolidol attenuated S. aureus virulence in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. This study is one of the most extensive on anti-virulence screening using diverse essential oils and provides comprehensive data on the subject. This finding implies other beneficial effects of essential oils and suggests that black pepper, cananga, and myrrh oils have potential use as anti-virulence strategies against persistent S. aureus infections.

  1. Preanalytic Factors Associated With Hemolysis in Emergency Department Blood Samples.

    Phelan, Michael P; Reineks, Edmunds Z; Schold, Jesse D; Hustey, Frederic M; Chamberlin, Janelle; Procop, Gary W

    2018-02-01

    - Hemolysis of emergency department blood samples is a common occurrence and has a negative impact on health care delivery. - To determine the effect of preanalytic factors (straight stick, intravenous [IV] line, needle gauge, location of blood draw, syringe versus vacuum tube use, tourniquet time) on hemolysis in emergency department blood samples. - A single 65 000-visit emergency department's electronic health record was queried for emergency department potassium results and blood draw technique for all samples obtained in calendar year 2014, resulting in 54 531 potassium results. Hemolyzed potassium was measured by hemolysis index. Comparisons of hemolysis by sampling technique were conducted by χ 2 tests. - Overall hemolysis was 10.0% (5439 of 54 531). Hemolysis among samples obtained from straight stick was significantly less than among those obtained with IV line (5.4% [33 of 615] versus 10.2% [4821 of 47 266], P < .001). For IV-placed blood draws, antecubital location had a statistically significant lower overall hemolysis compared with other locations: 7.4% (2117 of 28 786) versus 14.6% (2622 of 17 960) ( P < .001). For blood drawn with a syringe compared with vacuum, hemolysis was 13.0% (92 of 705) and 11.0% (1820 of 16 590), respectively ( P = .09, not significant). For large-gauge IV blood draws versus smaller-gauge IV lines, a lower hemolysis was also observed (9.3% [3882 of 41 571] versus 16.7% [939 of 5633]) ( P < .001). For IV-drawn blood with tourniquet time less than 60 seconds, hemolysis was 10.3% (1362 of 13 162) versus 13.9% for more than 60 seconds (532 of 3832), P < .001. - This study confirmed previous findings that straight stick and antecubital location are significantly associated with reduced hemolysis and indicated that shorter tourniquet time and larger gauge for IV draws were significantly associated with lower hemolysis.

  2. Ceramide-Enriched Membrane Domains in Red Blood Cells and the Mechanism ofSphingomyelinase-Induced Hot-Cold Hemolysis

    Montes, Ruth; Lopez, David; Sot, Jesus

    2008-01-01

    Hot-cold hemolysis is the phenomenon whereby red blood cells, preincubated at 37 °C in the presence of certain agents, undergo rapid hemolysis when transferred to 4 °C. The mechanism of this phenomenon is not understood. PlcHR2, a phospholipase C/sphingomyelinase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa......) but also in goat erythrocytes, which lack PC. However, in horse erythrocytes, with a large proportion of PC and almost no SM, hot-cold hemolysis induced by PlcHR2 is not observed. Fluorescence microscopy observations confirm the formation of ceramide-enriched domains as a result of PlcHR2 activity. After......-cold hemolysis. Differential scanning calorimetry of erytrocyte membranes treated with PlcHR2 demonstrates the presence of ceramide-rich domains that are rigid at 4 °C but fluid at 37 °C. Ceramidase treatment causes the disapperance of the calorimetric signal assigned to ceramide-rich domains. Finally...

  3. Erythrocyte hemolysis by organic tin and lead compounds

    Kleszcynska, H. [Agricultural Univ., Wroclaw (Poland). Dept. of Physics and Biophysics; Hladyszowski, J. [Agricultural Univ., Wroclaw (Poland). Dept. of Physics and Biophysics; Pruchnik, H. [Agricultural Univ., Wroclaw (Poland). Dept. of Physics and Biophysics; Przestalski, S. [Agricultural Univ., Wroclaw (Poland). Dept. of Physics and Biophysics

    1997-01-01

    The effect of trialkyllead and trialkyltin on pig erythrocyte hemolysis has been studied and compared. The results of experiments showed that the hemolytic activity of organoleads increases with their hydrophobicity and follows the sequence: triethyllead chloride < tri-n-propyllead chloride < tributyllead chloride. And similarly in the case of organotins: triethyltin chloride < tri-n-propyltin chloride < tributyltin chloride. Comparison of the hemolytic activity of organoleads and organotins indicates that the lead compounds exhibit higher hemolytic activity. The methods of quantum chemistry allowed to determine the maximum electric potential of the ions R{sub 3}Pb{sup +} and R{sub 3}Sn{sup +}, and suggest a relationship between the potential and toxicity. (orig.)

  4. Standardization of incubation conditions for hemolysis testing of biomaterials

    Henkelman, Sandra; Rakhorst, Gerhard; Blanton, John; van Oeveren, Willem

    2009-01-01

    Hemolysis testing is the most common method to determine the hemocompatibility properties of biomaterials. There is however no consensus on the procedures of hemolysis testing due to insufficient comparative studies on the quality of the red blood cells used and the experimental conditions of

  5. Using Lean-Six Sigma to reduce hemolysis in the emergency care center in a collaborative quality improvement project with the hospital laboratory.

    Damato, Charlotte; Rickard, Dana

    2015-03-01

    As part of a strategic quality improvement plan, laboratory management at Sarasota Memorial Health Care System (SMHCS) focused its efforts on improving preanalytical work flow and blood collection processes-both negatively affected by hemolyzed specimens. When hemolysis is detected in a blood specimen, blood may need to be re-collected, resulting in bottlenecks and rework all along the value stream. From July through December 2009, hemolysis averaged 9.8% in the Emergency Care Center (ECC) and 3.4% housewide. The goal was set to reduce hemolysis to 2%. The project team identified hemolysis as one of seven factors contributing to non-value-added activities and bottlenecks in blood collection and preanalytical processes. Observations and interviews helped to identify error-prone practices and process variation. To verify the root causes of hemolysis, the findings were compared against best practices. The team developed a housewide protocol, standardized collection processes, created competency-based training, and enhanced ECC hiring practices. During December 2010-March 2011, following initial housewide interventions and ECC self-sustaining solutions, ECC hemolysis decreased by 91%-from 9.8% (423 hemolyzed/4,295 collected) to 0.88% (58 hemolyzed/6,560 collected). Housewide hemolysis decreased by 59%-from 3.4% (2,046 hemolyzed/60,307 collected) to 1.39% (619 hemolyzed/44,528 collected). Since the project, hemolysis has continued to trend downward; the mean percentage has consistently been Lean-Six Sigma tools helped to pinpoint hemolysis as a key inefficiency in blood collection and preanalytical work flow. Although focused on the ECC, the project team standardized blood collection practices and instituted quality devices to achieve hemolysis reductions housewide.

  6. Erythrocyte creatine as a marker of intravascular hemolysis due to left ventricular outflow tract obstruction in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    Kubo, Toru; Okumiya, Toshika; Baba, Yuichi; Hirota, Takayoshi; Tanioka, Katsutoshi; Yamasaki, Naohito; Sugiura, Tetsuro; Doi, Yoshinori L; Kitaoka, Hiroaki

    2016-03-01

    Erythrocyte creatine, a marker of erythrocyte age that increases with shortening of erythrocyte survival, has been reported to be a quantitative and reliable marker for intravascular hemolysis. We hypothesized that hemolysis could also occur due to intraventricular obstruction in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). The purpose of this study was to examine the presence of subclinical hemolysis and the relation between intravascular hemolysis and intraventricular pressure gradient (IVPG). We measured erythrocyte creatine in 92 HCM patients. Twelve patients had left ventricular outflow tract obstruction (LVOTO), 4 had midventricular obstruction (MVO), and the remaining 76 were non-obstructive. Erythrocyte creatine levels ranged from 0.92 to 4.36μmol/g hemoglobin. Higher levels of erythrocyte creatine were associated with higher IVPG (r=0.437, pcreatine levels are high (≥1.8μmol/g hemoglobin), subclinical hemolysis is considered to be present. Half of LVOTO patients and no MVO patients showed high erythrocyte creatine levels. Although non-obstructive patients did not show significant intraventricular obstruction at rest, some showed high erythrocyte creatine levels. When LVOT-PG was measured during the strain phase of the Valsalva maneuver in 20 non-obstructive patients, 7 of those 20 patients showed LVOTO. In the 20 patients, there was no relation between erythrocyte creatine levels and LVOT-PG before the Valsalva maneuver (r=0.125, p=0.600), whereas there was a significant correlation between erythrocyte creatine and LVOT-PG provoked by the Valsalva maneuver (r=0.695, p=0.001). There is biochemical evidence of subclinical hemolysis in patients with HCM, and this hemolysis seems to be associated with LVOTO provoked by daily physical activities. Copyright © 2015 Japanese College of Cardiology. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. [Hemolysis Performance Analysis of the Centrifugal Maglev Blood Pump].

    Wang, Yiwen; Zhang, Fan; Fang, Yuan; Dong, Baichuan; Zhou, Liang

    2016-05-01

    In order to analyze and study the hemolysis performance of the centrifugal maglev blood pump, which was designed by ourselves, this paper built the mathematical model and computational fluid dynamics analyzed it using Fluent. Then we set up the in vitro hemolysis experiment platform, in case of the design condition, the content of free hemoglobin and hematocrit in plasma were measured in a certain time interval, and calculated the normalized index of hemolysis of the blood pump. The numerical simulation results show the internal static pressure distribution is smooth inside the pump, the wal shear stress inside the pump is less than 150 Pa. Therefore, the red blood cel damage and exposure time is independent. The normalized index of hemolysis is (0.002 9±0.000 7) mg/L, which is in accordance with human physiological requirement.

  8. Plasminogen activation by receptor-bound urokinase. A kinetic study with both cell-associated and isolated receptor

    Ellis, V; Behrendt, N; Danø, K

    1991-01-01

    .67 microM, below the physiological Plg concentration of 2 microM. A concomitant 6-fold reduction in kcat resulted in an increase in the overall catalytic efficiency, kcat/Km, of 5.7-fold. This high affinity Plg activation was abolished in the presence of a Plg-binding antagonist. In contrast to intact...

  9. Hemolysis and cytotoxicity mechanisms of biodegradable magnesium and its alloys

    Zhen, Zhen; Liu, Xiaoli; Huang, Tao; Xi, TingFei; Zheng, Yufeng

    2015-01-01

    Good hemocompatibility and cell compatibility are essential requirements for coronary stents, especially for biodegradable magnesium alloy stents, which could change the in situ environment after implanted. In this work, the effects of magnesium ion concentration and pH value on the hemolysis and cytotoxicity have been evaluated. Solution with different Mg 2+ concentration gradients and pH values of normal saline and cell culture media DMEM adjusted by MgCl 2 and NaOH respectively were tested for the hemolysis and cell viability. Results show that even when the concentration of Mg 2+ reaches 1000 μg/mL, it has little destructive effect on erythrocyte, and the high pH value over 11 caused by the degradation is the real reason for the high hemolysis ratio. Low concentrations of Mg 2+ (< 100 μg/mL) cause no cytotoxicity to L929 cells, of which the cell viability is above 80%, while high concentrations of Mg 2+ (> 300 μg/mL) could induce obvious death of the L929 cells. The pH of the extract plays a synergetic effect on cytotoxicity, due to the buffer action of the cell culture medium. To validate this conclusion, commercial pure Mg using normal saline and PBS as extract was tested with the measurement of pH and Mg 2+ concentration. Pure Mg leads to a higher hemolysis ratio in normal saline (47.76%) than in buffered solution (4.38%) with different pH values and low concentration of Mg 2+ . The Mg extract culture media caused no cytotoxicity, with pH = 8.44 and 47.80 μg/mL Mg 2+ . It is suggested that buffered solution and dynamic condition should be adopted in the hemolysis evaluation. - Highlights: • Mg 2+ and pH have been tested for hemolysis and cytotoxicity of biomedical Mg. • Even 1000 μg/ml Mg 2+ cannot cause hemolysis, but hemolysis reaches 53.8% when pH > 11. • Mg 2+ > 300 μg/mL induces death of L929 and slight alkaline improves the proliferation. • Pure Mg in normal saline induces high hemolysis, but in PBS causes no hemolysis. • True reason

  10. Hemolysis and cytotoxicity mechanisms of biodegradable magnesium and its alloys

    Zhen, Zhen [Center for Biomedical Materials and Tissue Engineering, Academy for Advanced Interdisciplinary Studies, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Liu, Xiaoli [School of Material Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Huang, Tao [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, State Key Laboratory for Turbulence and Complex System, College of Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Xi, TingFei, E-mail: xitingfei@pku.edu.cn [Center for Biomedical Materials and Tissue Engineering, Academy for Advanced Interdisciplinary Studies, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Biomedical Engineering Research Center, Shenzhen Institute, Peking University, Shenzhen 518057 (China); Shenzhen Key Laboratory of Human Tissue Regeneration and Repair, Shenzhen Institute, Peking University, Shenzhen 518057 (China); Zheng, Yufeng [Center for Biomedical Materials and Tissue Engineering, Academy for Advanced Interdisciplinary Studies, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, State Key Laboratory for Turbulence and Complex System, College of Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Shenzhen Key Laboratory of Human Tissue Regeneration and Repair, Shenzhen Institute, Peking University, Shenzhen 518057 (China)

    2015-01-01

    Good hemocompatibility and cell compatibility are essential requirements for coronary stents, especially for biodegradable magnesium alloy stents, which could change the in situ environment after implanted. In this work, the effects of magnesium ion concentration and pH value on the hemolysis and cytotoxicity have been evaluated. Solution with different Mg{sup 2+} concentration gradients and pH values of normal saline and cell culture media DMEM adjusted by MgCl{sub 2} and NaOH respectively were tested for the hemolysis and cell viability. Results show that even when the concentration of Mg{sup 2+} reaches 1000 μg/mL, it has little destructive effect on erythrocyte, and the high pH value over 11 caused by the degradation is the real reason for the high hemolysis ratio. Low concentrations of Mg{sup 2+} (< 100 μg/mL) cause no cytotoxicity to L929 cells, of which the cell viability is above 80%, while high concentrations of Mg{sup 2+} (> 300 μg/mL) could induce obvious death of the L929 cells. The pH of the extract plays a synergetic effect on cytotoxicity, due to the buffer action of the cell culture medium. To validate this conclusion, commercial pure Mg using normal saline and PBS as extract was tested with the measurement of pH and Mg{sup 2+} concentration. Pure Mg leads to a higher hemolysis ratio in normal saline (47.76%) than in buffered solution (4.38%) with different pH values and low concentration of Mg{sup 2+}. The Mg extract culture media caused no cytotoxicity, with pH = 8.44 and 47.80 μg/mL Mg{sup 2+}. It is suggested that buffered solution and dynamic condition should be adopted in the hemolysis evaluation. - Highlights: • Mg{sup 2+} and pH have been tested for hemolysis and cytotoxicity of biomedical Mg. • Even 1000 μg/ml Mg{sup 2+} cannot cause hemolysis, but hemolysis reaches 53.8% when pH > 11. • Mg{sup 2+} > 300 μg/mL induces death of L929 and slight alkaline improves the proliferation. • Pure Mg in normal saline induces high

  11. Production of interferon-gamma by in vivo tumor-sensitized T cells: Association with active antitumor immunity

    Bursuker, I.; Pearce, M.T.

    1990-01-01

    The state of active immunity to Meth A fibrosarcoma in mice immunized with an admixture of Meth A cells and Propionibacterium acnes is associated with possession by the host of spleen cells capable of producing interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) upon in vitro restimulation with irradiated tumor cells. The ability of spleen cells from immunized mice to produce IFN-gamma in response to irradiated Meth A cells decays as active antitumor immunity is replaced by a state of immunological memory. The IFN-producing cells are L3T4+Ly2+, cyclophosphamide-sensitive and radiosensitive T cells, as determined by their sensitivity to corresponding monoclonal antibodies and complement. The induction of IFN-gamma production by in vivo tumor-sensitized T cells is tumor specific, in that spleen cells from mice immunized against Meth A fibrosarcoma can produce IFN in response to irradiated Meth A cells but not in response to another syngeneic tumor M109 lung carcinoma

  12. Antiretroviral Drug Activity in Macaques Infected during Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis Has a Transient Effect on Cell-Associated SHIV DNA Reservoirs.

    Mian-Er Cong

    Full Text Available Pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP with emtricitabine and tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (FTC/TDF is a novel HIV prevention strategy. Suboptimal PrEP adherence and HIV infection creates an opportunity for continued antiretroviral drug activity during undiagnosed infection. We previously showed that macaques infected with SHIV during PrEP with FTC/TDF display reduced acute plasma viremias and limited virus diversity. We investigated the effect of PrEP on acute SHIV DNA dynamics and on the size of the persistent virus reservoir in lymphoid tissues.Cell-associated SHIV DNA levels in PBMCs were measured in 8 macaques infected during PrEP with FTC/TDF or single-agent TAF and was compared to those seen in untreated infections (n = 10. PrEP breakthrough infections continued treatment with 1-2 weekly drug doses to model suboptimal drug exposure during undiagnosed HIV infection in humans. SHIV DNA was also measured in lymphoid tissues collected from FTC/TDF PrEP breakthroughs after 1 year of infection.Compared to untreated controls, PrEP infections had reduced plasma RNA viremias both at peak and throughout weeks 1-12 (p<0.005. SHIV DNA levels were also reduced at peak and during the first 12 weeks of infection (p<0.043 but not throughout weeks 12-20. At 1 year, SHIV DNA reservoirs in lymphoid tissues were similar in size among macaques that received PrEP or placebo.Antiviral drug activity due to PrEP limits acute SHIV replication but has only a transient effect on cell-associated SHIV DNA levels. Our model suggests that suboptimal drug exposure in persons that are taking PrEP and become infected with HIV may not be sufficient to reduce the pool of HIV-infected cells, and that treatment intensification may be needed to sustain potential virological benefits from the PrEP regimen.

  13. Endothelial cells activate the cancer stem cell-associated NANOGP8 pathway in colorectal cancer cells in a paracrine fashion.

    Wang, Rui; Bhattacharya, Rajat; Ye, Xiangcang; Fan, Fan; Boulbes, Delphine R; Xia, Ling; Ellis, Lee M

    2017-08-01

    In colorectal cancer (CRC), cancer stem cells (CSCs) have been hypothesized to mediate cell survival and chemoresistance. Previous studies from our laboratory described a role for liver parenchymal endothelial cells (LPECs) in mediating the CSC phenotype in CRC cells in a paracrine/angiocrine fashion. The objectives of this study were to determine whether endothelial cells (ECs) from different organs can induce the CSC phenotype in CRC cells and to elucidate the signaling pathways involved. We treated a newly developed CRC cell line (HCP-1) and established CRC cell lines (HT29 and SW480) with conditioned medium (CM) from primary ECs isolated from nonmalignant liver, lung, colon mucosa, and kidney. Our results showed that CM from ECs from all organs increased the number of CSCs, as determined by sphere formation, and protein levels of NANOG and OCT4 in CRC cells. With the focus of further elucidating the role of the liver vascular network in mediating the CSC phenotype, we demonstrated that CM from LPECs increased resistance to 5-fluorouracil in CRC cells. Moreover, we showed that LPEC CM specifically induced NANOGP8 expression in CRC cells by specific enzyme digestion and a luciferase reporter assay using a vector containing the NANOGP8 promoter. Lastly, we found that LPEC CM-induced NANOGP8 expression and sphere formation were mediated by AKT activation. Our studies demonstrated a paracrine role for ECs in regulating the CSC phenotype and chemoresistance in CRC cells by AKT-mediated induction of NANOGP8. These studies suggest a more specific approach to target CSCs by blocking the expression of NANOGP8 in cancer cells. © 2017 The Authors. Published by FEBS Press and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Hemolysis-induced Lung Vascular Leakage Contributes to the Development of Pulmonary Hypertension.

    Rafikova, Olga; Williams, Elissa R; McBride, Matthew L; Zemskova, Marina; Srivastava, Anup; Nair, Vineet; Desai, Ankit A; Langlais, Paul R; Zemskov, Evgeny; Simon, Marc; Mandarino, Lawrence J; Rafikov, Ruslan

    2018-04-13

    While hemolytic anemia-associated pulmonary hypertension (PH) and pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) are more common than the prevalence of idiopathic PAH alone, the role of hemolysis in the development of PAH is poorly characterized. We hypothesized that hemolysis independently contributes to PAH pathogenesis via endothelial barrier dysfunction with resulting perivascular edema and inflammation. Plasma samples from patients with and without PAH (both confirmed by right heart catheterization) were used to measure free hemoglobin (Hb) and its correlation with PAH severity. A sugen(50mg/kg)/hypoxia(3wks)/normoxia(2wks) rat model was used to elucidate the role of free Hb/heme pathways in PAH. Human lung microvascular endothelial cells (HLMVECs) were utilized to study heme-mediated endothelial barrier effects. Our data indicate that PAH patients have increased levels of free Hb in plasma that correlate with PAH severity. There is also a significant accumulation of free Hb and depletion of haptoglobin in the rat model. In rats, perivascular edema was observed at early time points concomitant with increased infiltration of inflammatory cells. Heme-induced endothelial permeability in HLMVECs involved activation of the p38/HSP27 pathway. Indeed, the rat model also exhibited increased activation of p38/HSP27 during the initial phase of PH. Surprisingly, despite the increased levels of hemolysis and heme-mediated signaling, there was no heme oxygenase-1 activation. This can be explained by observed destabilization of HIF1a during the first two weeks of PH regardless of hypoxic conditions. Our data suggest that hemolysis may play a significant role in PAH pathobiology.

  15. Erythrocytic ferroportin reduces intracellular iron accumulation, hemolysis, and malaria risk.

    Zhang, De-Liang; Wu, Jian; Shah, Binal N; Greutélaers, Katja C; Ghosh, Manik C; Ollivierre, Hayden; Su, Xin-Zhuan; Thuma, Philip E; Bedu-Addo, George; Mockenhaupt, Frank P; Gordeuk, Victor R; Rouault, Tracey A

    2018-03-30

    Malaria parasites invade red blood cells (RBCs), consume copious amounts of hemoglobin, and severely disrupt iron regulation in humans. Anemia often accompanies malaria disease; however, iron supplementation therapy inexplicably exacerbates malarial infections. Here we found that the iron exporter ferroportin (FPN) was highly abundant in RBCs, and iron supplementation suppressed its activity. Conditional deletion of the Fpn gene in erythroid cells resulted in accumulation of excess intracellular iron, cellular damage, hemolysis, and increased fatality in malaria-infected mice. In humans, a prevalent FPN mutation, Q248H (glutamine to histidine at position 248), prevented hepcidin-induced degradation of FPN and protected against severe malaria disease. FPN Q248H appears to have been positively selected in African populations in response to the impact of malaria disease. Thus, FPN protects RBCs against oxidative stress and malaria infection. Copyright © 2018 The Authors, some rights reserved; exclusive licensee American Association for the Advancement of Science. No claim to original U.S. Government Works.

  16. Optofluidic Sensor for Inline Hemolysis Detection on Whole Blood

    Zhou, Chen; Keshavarz Hedayati, Mehdi; Zhu, Xiaolong

    2018-01-01

    Hemolysis is the rupture of red blood cells and constitutes the most common reason for unsuitable blood samples in the clinic. To detect hemolysis, one has to separate the hemoglobin in blood plasma from that in red blood cells. However, current methods entail centrifugation for cell......-time inline detection on whole blood without extra sample preparation like centrifugation. Long-term testing with inline integration in a modified, commercial blood gas analyzer shows high reliability and repeatability of the measurements even with the presence of interference from bilirubin. We envision...... that the present work has large potential in improving diagnosis quality by enabling PoC hemolysis detection in blood gas analyzers and can also lend unique sensing capabilities to other applications dealing with complex turbid media....

  17. Numerical calculation of hemolysis levels in peripheral hemodialysis cannulas

    De Wachter, D; Verdonck, P

    Hemolysis in extracorporeal life support systems presents an underestimated problem. In this article, we investigate the hemolytic potential of peripheral hemodialysis cannulas numerically. An axisymmetrical finite element model of 3 cannula sizes was built (13G, 14G, and 16G) that was refined

  18. A low-hemolysis blood aspirator conserves blood during surgery.

    Clague, C T; Blackshear, P L

    1995-01-01

    Blood damage caused by traditional vacuum-operated suction tubes, particularly when air is aspirated along with the blood, usually exceeds damage from all other components. In addition to platelet injury, there is a high degree of hemolysis, which leads to high plasma hemoglobin levels and reduces the number of red blood cells available for reinfusion during cases of blood conservation, such as autologous transfusion and cardiac bypass. This work was undertaken to minimize hemolysis, and the accompanying platelet destruction, during aspiration, with the design of a jet-driven aspirator that separates and removes air from blood immediately within the suction tip. The jet-driven aspirator can suction blood at a range of rates from 100 to at least 700 ml/min, separates and removes 80-100% of aspirated air, operates at any orientation, and generates subatmospheric pressures on the order of only 1 inch H2O. In-vitro hemolysis testing showed a significant reduction in average plasma hemoglobin release, from 19.4 mg/dl to 1.8 mg/dl, when air was removed during blood aspiration. In comparative testing with a conventional vacuum suction tube, the jet-driven aspirator showed significantly less hemolysis than the conventional aspirator at comparable rates of air and blood aspiration.

  19. Role of hemolysis in potassium release by iodinated contrast medium

    Hayakawa, K.; Nakamura, T.; Shimizu, Y. [Department of Radiology, Kyoto City Hospital (Japan)

    1999-09-01

    It has been demonstrated that an iodinated contrast medium (CM) causes release of potassium into blood vessel lumina, resulting in an increase in serum potassium. The purpose of the present study was to assess whether this potassium release is due to hemolysis. Fresh human blood was mixed in vitro with CM at a ratio of 10:2. Potassium release rates were determined, and serum haptoglobin and free hemoglobin were measured after 30 min of exposure to CM. To compare the potassium release curve between CM exposure and true hemolysis induced by distilled water, fresh human blood was also mixed with distilled water. The level of serum haptoglobin decreased due to hemodilution. Changes in haptoglobin were not correlated with potassium release rates. The serum free hemoglobin level did not increase significantly, and there was no correlation between changes in the free hemoglobin level and the rate of potassium release. Hemolysis caused by water occurred instantaneously, whereas potassium release caused by CM was a slow response, which was linearly correlated with exposure time. Potassium release from blood cannot be explained by hemolysis. (orig.) With 4 figs., 4 tabs., 3 refs.

  20. Hemolysis and cytotoxicity mechanisms of biodegradable magnesium and its alloys.

    Zhen, Zhen; Liu, Xiaoli; Huang, Tao; Xi, TingFei; Zheng, Yufeng

    2015-01-01

    Good hemocompatibility and cell compatibility are essential requirements for coronary stents, especially for biodegradable magnesium alloy stents, which could change the in situ environment after implanted. In this work, the effects of magnesium ion concentration and pH value on the hemolysis and cytotoxicity have been evaluated. Solution with different Mg(2+) concentration gradients and pH values of normal saline and cell culture media DMEM adjusted by MgCl2 and NaOH respectively were tested for the hemolysis and cell viability. Results show that even when the concentration of Mg(2+) reaches 1000 μg/mL, it has little destructive effect on erythrocyte, and the high pH value over 11 caused by the degradation is the real reason for the high hemolysis ratio. Low concentrations of Mg(2+) (300 μg/mL) could induce obvious death of the L929 cells. The pH of the extract plays a synergetic effect on cytotoxicity, due to the buffer action of the cell culture medium. To validate this conclusion, commercial pure Mg using normal saline and PBS as extract was tested with the measurement of pH and Mg(2+) concentration. Pure Mg leads to a higher hemolysis ratio in normal saline (47.76%) than in buffered solution (4.38%) with different pH values and low concentration of Mg(2+). The Mg extract culture media caused no cytotoxicity, with pH=8.44 and 47.80 μg/mL Mg(2+). It is suggested that buffered solution and dynamic condition should be adopted in the hemolysis evaluation. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. Blood sampling and hemolysis affect concentration of plasma metabolites

    Theil, Peter Kappel; Pedersen, Lene Juul; Jensen, Margit Bak

    2012-01-01

    design and blood was collected after restraint via vein puncture 1, 4, 11, and 23 h after morning feeding. Plasma samples were categorized as without or with minor or major hemolysis [clear (n = 218), yellow (n = 97), or red (n = 37)] upon centrifugation. Plasma NEFA (P ...Two experiments were carried out to reveal and quantify plasma metabolites that are sensitive to hemolysis and animal stress due to the blood sampling procedure (vein puncture vs. catheter). In Exp. 1, 48 sows were fed 4 diets either once (0800 h) or twice daily (0800 h and 1500 h) in a crossover......, a subset of samples from 24 sows fed twice daily in Exp. 1 was combined with data obtained from 30 sows sampled using jugular vein catheters. All sows in Exp. 2 were fed twice daily (0800 h and 1500 h) and blood samples collected repeatedly 1, 4, 11, and 23 h after morning feeding (other conditions were...

  2. Measuring osmosis and hemolysis of red blood cells.

    Goodhead, Lauren K; MacMillan, Frances M

    2017-06-01

    Since the discovery of the composition and structure of the mammalian cell membrane, biologists have had a clearer understanding of how substances enter and exit the cell's interior. The selectively permeable nature of the cell membrane allows the movement of some solutes and prevents the movement of others. This has important consequences for cell volume and the integrity of the cell and, as a result, is of utmost clinical importance, for example in the administration of isotonic intravenous infusions. The concepts of osmolarity and tonicity are often confused by students as impermeant isosmotic solutes such as NaCl are also isotonic; however, isosmotic solutes such as urea are actually hypotonic due to the permeant nature of the membrane. By placing red blood cells in solutions of differing osmolarities and tonicities, this experiment demonstrates the effects of osmosis and the resultant changes in cell volume. Using hemoglobin standard solutions, where known concentrations of hemoglobin are produced, the proportion of hemolysis and the effect of this on resultant hematocrit can be estimated. No change in cell volume occurs in isotonic NaCl, and, by placing blood cells in hypotonic NaCl, incomplete hemolysis occurs. By changing the bathing solution to either distilled water or isosmotic urea, complete hemolysis occurs due to their hypotonic effects. With the use of animal blood in this practical, students gain useful experience in handling tissue fluids and calculating dilutions and can appreciate the science behind clinical scenarios. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  3. Poor knowledge and faulty thinking regarding hemolysis and potassium elevation.

    Hawkins, Robert C

    2005-01-01

    A questionnaire to assess knowledge of the expected elevation in serum K measurement with different grades of hemolysis was administered to medical technologists working in biochemistry laboratories, hospital physicians and nurses. The questions involved different grades of hemolysis (mild, 1.0, moderate, 2.5 and severe, 5.0 g/L) and different final K measurements (2.9, 4.0, 5.2 and 8.2 mmol/L). Subjects estimated the K concentration in a non-hemolyzed sample for each scenario. Adjustment values (difference between final hemolyzed K concentration and subject's response) were calculated. For the 132 respondees, the mean correct score was 1.7/12. Mean adjustment values were: mild, 0.43 mmol/L (K 2.9), 0.55 (4.0), 0.88 (5.2) and 1.53 (8.2); moderate, 0.85 (2.9), 0.92 (4.0), 1.33 (5.2) and 2.50 (8.2); and severe, 0.93 (2.9), 1.48 (4.0), 1.96 (5.2), 2.96 (8.2). Correct adjustments were: mild, 0.28; moderate, 0.70; and severe, 1.40 mmol/L. Healthcare staff overestimated the effect of hemolysis on potassium measurement and used an incorrect proportional adjustment approach to the problem. Such poor knowledge and faulty thinking could lead to diagnostic delays or misdiagnoses. There is potential for such faulty thinking in all areas of laboratory medicine, and laboratories should review their educational responsibilities and reporting practices in light of this.

  4. Pathophysiological consequences of hemolysis. Role of cell-free hemoglobin

    Tomasz Misztal

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abundant hemolysis is associated with a number of inherent and acquired diseases including sickle-cell disease (SCD, polycythemia, paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH and drug-induced hemolytic anemia. Despite different etiopathology of hemolytic diseases, many concomitant symptoms are comparable and include e.g. hypertension, hemoglobinuria and hypercoagulation state. Studies in the last years have shown a growing list of mechanisms lying at the basis of those symptoms, in particular irreversible reaction between cell-free hemoglobin (Hb and nitric oxide (NO – endogenous vasorelaxant and anti-thrombotic agent. Saturation of protective physiological cell-free Hb-scavenging mechanisms results in accumulation of Hb in plasma and hemoglobinemia. Extensive hemoglobinemia subsequently leads to hemoglobinuria, which may cause kidney damage and development of Fanconi syndrome. A severe problem in patients with SCD and PNH is pulmonary and systemic hypertension. It may lead to circulation failure, including stroke, and it is related to abolition of NO bioavailability for vascular smooth muscle cells. Thrombotic events are the major cause of death in SCD and PNH. It ensues from lack of platelet inhibition evoked by Hb-mediated NO scavenging. A serious complication that affects patients with excessive hemolysis is erectile dysfunction. Also direct cytotoxic, prooxidant and proinflammatory effects of cell-free hemoglobin and heme compose the clinical picture of hemolytic diseases. The pathophysiological role of plasma Hb, mechanisms of its elimination, and direct and indirect (via NO scavenging deleterious effects of cell-free Hb are presented in detail in this review. Understanding the critical role of hemolysis and cell-free Hb is important in the perspective of treating patients with hemolytic diseases and to design new effective therapies in future.

  5. Air bubbles and hemolysis of blood samples during transport by pneumatic tube systems.

    Mullins, Garrett R; Bruns, David E

    2017-10-01

    Transport of blood samples through pneumatic tube systems (PTSs) generates air bubbles in transported blood samples and, with increasing duration of transport, the appearance of hemolysis. We investigated the role of air-bubble formation in PTS-induced hemolysis. Air was introduced into blood samples for 0, 1, 3 or 5min to form air bubbles. Hemolysis in the blood was assessed by (H)-index, lactate dehydrogenase (LD) and potassium in plasma. In an effort to prevent PTS-induced hemolysis, blood sample tubes were completely filled, to prevent air bubble formation, and compared with partially filled samples after PTS transport. We also compared hemolysis in anticoagulated vs clotted blood subjected to PTS transport. As with transport through PTSs, the duration of air bubble formation in blood by a gentle stream of air predicted the extent of hemolysis as measured by H-index (pair space in a blood sample prevented bubble formation and fully protected the blood from PTS-induced hemolysis (ptransport and was partially protected from hemolysis vs anticoagulated blood as indicated by lower LD (ptransport. Prevention of air bubble formation in blood samples during PTS transport protects samples from hemolysis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. High prevalence of Dapsone-induced oxidant hemolysis in North American SCT recipients without glucose-6-phosphate-dehydrogenase deficiency.

    Olteanu, H; Harrington, A M; George, B; Hari, P N; Bredeson, C; Kroft, S H

    2012-03-01

    Dapsone (4-4'-diaminodiphenylsulfone) is commonly used for Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia (PCP) prophylaxis in immunocompromised patients. Oxidant hemolysis is a known complication of dapsone, but its frequency in adult patients who have undergone a SCT for hematological malignancies is not well established. We studied the presence of oxidant hemolysis, by combining examination of RBC morphology and laboratory data, in 30 patients who underwent a SCT and received dapsone for PCP prophylaxis, and compared this group with 26 patients who underwent a SCT and received trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (TMP-SMX) for PCP prophylaxis. All patients had normal glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH) enzymatic activity. In SCT patients, dapsone compared with TMP-SMX for PCP prophylaxis was associated with a high incidence of oxidant hemolysis (87 vs 0%, PSCT patients is 20-fold higher than the reported rate in the population of HIV-infected patients, and thus much higher than the prevalence of G6PDH variants in the general population. In our patients, it manifested clinically as a lower Hb that was not significant enough to result in increased packed RBC transfusions.

  7. THE STRUCTURE OF THE LIPID PHASE OF THE ERYTHROCYTE MEMBRANE IN PATIENTS WITH EXPRESSED HEMOLYSIS AFTER SURGERY WITH CARDIOPULMONARY BYPASS

    O. A. Khokhlov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The composition of lipid phase of red-cell membrane in patients with ischemic heart disease (IHD with pronounced postperfusion hemolysis (18 patients before coronary artery bypass surgery and 1 hour after the completion of cardia bypass (CB has been studied. It is shown that patients with IHD with pronounced hemolysis are characterized by the normal ratio of phospholipids (PL fractions in red-cell membrane before surgery, which is connected with eth high content of young forms of red cells in blood at this stage. After surgery, the fraction of lysophosphatidylcholine and phosphatidic acid in red-cell membrane increases against the background of decrease of phosphatidylinositol  and phosphatidylcholine, which likely reflects the simultaneous activation of phospholipases of three classes (A, C, and D in red cells during CB. Regardless of the phase of the study, the total content of PL in red-cell membrane of IHD patients with pronounced hemolysis is decrease at the high level of cholesterol (CS and the CS/Pl ratio.

  8. Hepatic Rupture Caused by Hemolysis, Elevated Liver Enzyme, and Low Platelet Count Syndrome: A Case Report with Computed Tomographic and Conventional Angiographic Findings

    Lee, Cheong Bok; Ahn, Jae Hong; Choi, Soo Jung; Lee, Jong Hyeog; Park, Man Soo; Jung, Seung Mun; Ryu, Dae Sik [Dept. of Radiology, Asan Foundation, Gangneung Asan Hospital, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Gangneung (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-03-15

    The authors recently obtained successful clinical outcome after embolization of the hepatic artery and right inferior phrenic artery in a pregnant patient with hemolysis, elevated liver enzyme, and low platelet count (HELLP) syndrome causing hepatic rupture. We report the computed tomographic and conventional angiographic findings in a case of HELLP syndrome, resulting in hepatic infarction and rupture with active bleeding.

  9. Optofluidic Sensor for Inline Hemolysis Detection on Whole Blood

    Zhou, Chen; Keshavarz Hedayati, Mehdi; Zhu, Xiaolong

    2018-01-01

    -plasma separation, which is complex, time-consuming, and not easy to integrate into point-of-care (PoC) systems. Here, we demonstrate an optofluidic sensor composed of nanofilters on an optical waveguide, which enables evanescent-wave absorption measurement of hemoglobin in plasma with the capability of real......-time inline detection on whole blood without extra sample preparation like centrifugation. Long-term testing with inline integration in a modified, commercial blood gas analyzer shows high reliability and repeatability of the measurements even with the presence of interference from bilirubin. We envision...... that the present work has large potential in improving diagnosis quality by enabling PoC hemolysis detection in blood gas analyzers and can also lend unique sensing capabilities to other applications dealing with complex turbid media....

  10. RNase MC2: a new Momordica charantia ribonuclease that induces apoptosis in breast cancer cells associated with activation of MAPKs and induction of caspase pathways.

    Fang, Evandro Fei; Zhang, Chris Zhi Yi; Fong, Wing Ping; Ng, Tzi Bun

    2012-04-01

    Ribonucleases (RNases) are ubiquitously distributed nucleases that cleave RNA into smaller pieces. They are promising drugs for different cancers based on their concrete antitumor activities in vitro and in vivo. Here we report for the first time purification and characterization of a 14-kDa RNase, designated as RNase MC2, in the seeds of bitter gourd (Momordica charantia). RNase MC2 manifested potent RNA-cleavage activity toward baker's yeast tRNA, tumor cell rRNA, and an absolute specificity for uridine. RNase MC2 demonstrated both cytostatic and cytotoxic activities against MCF-7 breast cancer cells. Treatment of MCF-7 cells with RNase MC2 caused nuclear damage (karyorrhexis, chromatin condensation, and DNA fragmentation), ultimately resulting in early/late apoptosis. Further molecular studies unveiled that RNase MC2 induced differential activation of MAPKs (p38, JNK and ERK) and Akt. On the other hand, RNase MC2 exposure activated caspase-8, caspase-9, caspase-7, increased the production of Bak and cleaved PARP, which in turn contributed to the apoptotic response. In conclusion, RNase MC2 is a potential agent which can be exploited in the worldwide fight against breast cancer.

  11. Key factors influencing the incidence of hemolysis: A critical appraisal of current evidence.

    McCaughey, Euan James; Vecellio, Elia; Lake, Rebecca; Li, Ling; Burnett, Leslie; Chesher, Douglas; Braye, Stephen; Mackay, Mark; Gay, Stephanie; Badrick, Tony; Westbrook, Johanna; Georgiou, Andrew

    2017-01-01

    Hemolysis is a leading cause of pre-analytical laboratory errors. The identification of contributing factors is an important step towards the development of effective practices to reduce and prevent hemolysis. We performed a review of PUBMED, Embase, Medline and CINAHL to identify articles published between January 2000 and August 2016 that identified factors influencing in vitro hemolysis rates. The 40 studies included in this review provide excellent evidence that hemolysis rates are higher in Emergency Departments (EDs), for non-antecubital draws, for specimens drawn using an intravenous catheter compared to venipuncture and for samples transported by pneumatic tube compared to by hand. There is also good evidence that hemolysis rates are higher when specimens are not collected by professional phlebotomists, larger volume specimen tubes are used, specimen tubes are filled less than halfway and tourniquet time is greater than one minute. The results of this review suggest that hospitals and clinical laboratories should consider deploying phlebotomists in EDs, drawing all blood through a venipuncture, using the antecubital region as the optimum blood collection site and transporting specimens by laboratory assistant/other personnel, or if this in not practical, ensuring that pneumatic transport systems are validated, maintained and monitored. Studies also recommend making hemolysis a hospital-wide issue and ensuring high-quality staff training and adherence to standard operating procedures to reduce hemolysis rates. Awareness of the factors that influence hemolysis rates, and adoption of strategies to mitigate these risk factors, is an important step towards creating quality practices to reduce hemolysis rates and improve the quality of patient care.

  12. Study to determine the clinical significance of HEmolysis During Orbital AtheRectomy (CLEAR study).

    Staniloae, Cezar S; Korabathina, Ravikiran; Lane, Thomas A; Dattilo, Raymond; Church, Kevin J; Mody, Kanika P; Mayeda, Guy S

    2011-02-01

    To evaluate the incidence of clinically evident hemolysis associated with orbital atherectomy used to treat severe peripheral artery disease. The observational CLEAR study enrolled 31 subjects (16 men; mean age 71 ± 10 years, range 44-92) with claudication (58.1%) or critical limb ischemia (38.7%) who underwent orbital atherectomy with the Diamondback 360 system at 4 US centers. The 42 lesions in 31 limbs were located in the superficial femoral (n = 19, 45.2%), popliteal (n = 8, 19.0%), and tibial arteries (n = 15, 35.8%). The majority of lesions (34, 81.0%) were de novo; moderate or severe calcification was identified in 90.5% of cases. Lesion and procedural parameters were analyzed at a core laboratory. Blood samples were collected during and post procedure and analyzed for markers of hemolysis. The primary endpoint was the occurrence of clinically significant hemolysis. The secondary endpoints included the occurrence of any clinical symptoms/signs potentially related to hemolysis. Statistical analysis was performed to identify predictors for hemolysis. Laboratory evidence of hemolysis was seen in 11 (35.5%) subjects. No one met the clinical event criteria, and so the primary endpoint of the study was not reached. The secondary endpoints were hypertensive crisis (1, 3.2%) and transient hemoglobinuria (3, 9.7%). Lower glomerular filtration rates, calcified plaque, long atherectomy runs, and solid crown selection were independent predictors of hemolysis. There was no clinically significant hemolysis after orbital atherectomy. The results of this study will enable users to predict conditions that predispose to high levels of red cell hemolysis following orbital atherectomy and to take appropriate measures to limit its occurrence.

  13. Identification of a Hemolysis Threshold That Increases Plasma and Serum Zinc Concentration.

    Killilea, David W; Rohner, Fabian; Ghosh, Shibani; Otoo, Gloria E; Smith, Lauren; Siekmann, Jonathan H; King, Janet C

    2017-06-01

    Background: Plasma or serum zinc concentration (PZC or SZC) is the primary measure of zinc status, but accurate sampling requires controlling for hemolysis to prevent leakage of zinc from erythrocytes. It is not established how much hemolysis can occur without changing PZC/SZC concentrations. Objective: This study determines a guideline for the level of hemolysis that can significantly elevate PZC/SZC. Methods: The effect of hemolysis on PZC/SZC was estimated by using standard hematologic variables and mineral content. The calculated hemolysis threshold was then compared with results from an in vitro study and a population survey. Hemolysis was assessed by hemoglobin and iron concentrations, direct spectrophotometry, and visual assessment of the plasma or serum. Zinc and iron concentrations were determined by inductively coupled plasma spectrometry. Results: A 5% increase in PZC/SZC was calculated to result from the lysis of 1.15% of the erythrocytes in whole blood, corresponding to ∼1 g hemoglobin/L added into the plasma or serum. Similarly, the addition of simulated hemolysate to control plasma in vitro caused a 5% increase in PZC when hemoglobin concentrations reached 1.18 ± 0.10 g/L. In addition, serum samples from a population nutritional survey were scored for hemolysis and analyzed for changes in SZC; samples with hemolysis in the range of 1-2.5 g hemoglobin/L showed an estimated increase in SZC of 6% compared with nonhemolyzed samples. Each approach indicated that a 5% increase in PZC/SZC occurs at ∼1 g hemoglobin/L in plasma or serum. This concentration of hemoglobin can be readily identified directly by chemical hemoglobin assays or indirectly by direct spectrophotometry or matching to a color scale. Conclusions: A threshold of 1 g hemoglobin/L is recommended for PZC/SZC measurements to avoid increases in zinc caused by hemolysis. The use of this threshold may improve zinc assessment for monitoring zinc status and nutritional interventions.

  14. Hemolysis research of implantable axial flow pump for two -step heart transplantation in children

    O. Yu. Dmitrieva

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. One of the main indicators characterizing mechanical circulatory support devices (artificial valve, implantable pumps, etc. is trauma of blood cells. Therefore, while developing new pumps, one of the key studies in vitro is to evaluate blood hemolysis. For an objective hemolysis analysis of pump it is required to create a standardized methodology of hemolysis studies. The object of the study in this paper is implantable axial pump DON for two-step heart transplantation in children.The aim of study is to develop a standardized methodology of hemolysis studies of blood pumps and to conduct research of pediatric axial pump DON.Materials and methods. To conduct hemolysis research we created a mock circulatory system consisting of a reservoir placed in water bath maintaining a constant working fluid (blood temperature, hydrodynamic resistance, connecting tubes, ports for blood sampling and pressure and flow measurement systems, and research pump. Test method is to estimate levels of free hemoglobin pHb obtained by blood samples during pump working in operating mode (for pediatric pump: blood flow 2.5 l/min, pressure difference 80 mmHg. Using the data obtained the standardized indices of hemolysis NIH and MIH are calculated based on pHb values, hematocrit, total hemoglobin, blood flow and working pump time.Results. We developed and realized a standardized methodology of hemolysis research by which we evaluated hemolysis of pediatric axial pump. The results of hemolysis tests allowed us to optimize the design of DON. Obtained values of hemolysis of the latest version of pediatric pump DON-3 have shown that they do conform to the requirements of minimum blood injury and it allows us to proceed to the next step of pediatric pump research – animal experiments.Conclusion. Developed methods and evaluation tools of hemolysis allow us to provide objective information on one of the most important indicators of developing

  15. [Intravascular Hemolysis Caused by Stenosis of an Elephant Trunk;Report of a Case].

    Takamaru, Rikako; Kawahito, Koji; Aizawa, Kei; Misawa, Yoshio

    2017-07-01

    Symptomatic intravascular hemolysis after prosthetic aortic graft replacement is rare. It is primarily attributed to mechanical injury of red blood cells caused by stenosis of the vascular graft. A 50-year-old man presented with hemolytic anemia, 5 years after total arch replacement with an elephant trunk for type A aortic dissection. The hemolysis was caused by graft stenosis of the elephant trunk. Endovascular treatment for the stenotic elephant trunk was successfully performed. The postoperative course was uneventful, and the hemolysis was resolved immediately after operation.

  16. Efficacy of Intravenous Cyclophosphamide Pulse Therapy for P-Glycoprotein-expressing B Cell-associated Active True Renal Lupus Vasculitis in Lupus Nephritis

    Kawabe, Akio; Tsujimura, Shizuyo; Saito, Kazuyoshi; Tanaka, Yoshiya

    2017-01-01

    True renal lupus vasculitis (TRLV), a vascular lesion usually associated with proliferative lupus nephritis (LN), is resistant to conventional treatments. The expression of P-glycoprotein (P-gp) on activated lymphocytes causes drug resistance. We herein report a patient with TRLV, minimal change LN, overexpression of P-gp on peripheral B cells, and accumulation of P-gp+ B cells at the site of TRLV. High-dose corticosteroids combined with intravenous cyclophosphamide pulse therapy resulted in clinical remission and the long-term normal renal function. PMID:28626187

  17. Hemolysis in Transurethral Resection of the Prostate Using Distilled Water as the Irrigant

    Shiou-Sheng Chen

    2006-06-01

    Conclusion: Using distilled water as an irrigant for TURP might cause hemolysis, especially in patients with larger prostates and longer resection times. It is necessary to carry out every effort to shorten resection time and avoid extravasation during surgery.

  18. Correlation between microbubble-induced acoustic cavitation and hemolysis in vitro

    Zhang Chun-Bing; Liu Zheng; Guo Xia-Sheng; Zhang Dong

    2011-01-01

    Microbubbles promise to enhance the efficiency of ultrasound-mediated drug delivery and gene therapy by taking advantage of artificial cavitation nuclei. The purpose of this study is to examine the ultrasound-induced hemolysis in the application of drug delivery in the presence of microbubbles. To achieve this goal, human red blood cells mixed with microbubbles were exposed to 1-MHz pulsed ultrasound. The hemolysis level was measured by a flow cytometry, and the cavitation dose was detected by a passive cavitation detecting system. The results demonstrate that larger cavitation dose would be generated with the increase of acoustic pressure, which might give rise to the enhancement of hemolysis. Besides the experimental observations, the acoustic pressure dependence of the radial oscillation of microbubble was theoretically estimated. The comparison between the experimental and calculation results indicates that the hemolysis should be highly correlated to the acoustic cavitation. (classical areas of phenomenology)

  19. Testosterone-dependent sex differences in red blood cell hemolysis in storage, stress, and disease.

    Kanias, Tamir; Sinchar, Derek; Osei-Hwedieh, David; Baust, Jeffrey J; Jordan, Andrew; Zimring, James C; Waterman, Hayley R; de Wolski, Karen S; Acker, Jason P; Gladwin, Mark T

    2016-10-01

    Red blood cell (RBC) hemolysis represents an intrinsic mechanism for human vascular disease. Intravascular hemolysis releases hemoglobin and other metabolites that inhibit nitric oxide signaling and drive oxidative and inflammatory stress. Although these pathways are important in disease pathogenesis, genetic and population modifiers of hemolysis, including sex, have not been established. We studied sex differences in storage or stress-induced hemolysis in RBC units from the United States and Canada in 22 inbred mouse strains and in patients with sickle cell disease (SCD) using measures of hemolysis in 315 patients who had homozygous SS hemoglobin from the Walk-PHASST cohort. A mouse model also was used to evaluate posttransfusion recovery of stored RBCs, and gonadectomy was used to determine the mechanisms related to sex hormones. An analysis of predisposition to hemolysis based on sex revealed that male RBCs consistently exhibit increased susceptibility to hemolysis compared with females in response to routine cold storage, under osmotic or oxidative stress, after transfusion in mice, and in patients with SCD. The sex difference is intrinsic to the RBC and is not mediated by plasmatic factors or female sex hormones. Importantly, orchiectomy in mice improves RBC storage stability and posttransfusion recovery, whereas testosterone repletion therapy exacerbates hemolytic response to osmotic or oxidative stress. Our findings suggest that testosterone increases susceptibility to hemolysis across human diseases, suggesting that male sex may modulate clinical outcomes in blood storage and SCD and establishing a role for donor genetic variables in the viability of stored RBCs and in human hemolytic diseases. © 2016 AABB.

  20. Influence of Hemolysis on Analytic Results of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance-based Metabonomics

    Qiao LIU

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To explore the changes of small molecular metabolites and their content in plasma samples due to hemolysis so as to analyze the influence of hemolysis of plasma samples on metabonomic study. Methods: Healthy adult males undergoing physical examination without drug administration history in recent period were selected to collect 10 hemolytic plasma samples and 10 hemolysis-free samples from them. Spectrograms of hydrogen nuclear magnetic resonance (1H-NMR were collected and Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG pulse sequence was used to inhibit the production of broad peak by protein and lipid, and SIMCA-P+12.0 software was applied to conduct mode recognition and Pearson correlation analysis.Results: CPMG-1H NMR plasma metabolism spectrums showed that compared with hemolysis-free samples, hemolytic samples were evidently higher in the contents of acetate, acetone and pyruvic acid, but markedly lower in that of glucose. In addition, the chemical shift of glycine-CH2 in hemolysis group moved to the lower field. Orthogonal partial least-square discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA was further applied to initiate mode recognition analysis and the results demonstrated that hemolysis group was prominently higher in the contents of metabolites, such as leucine, valine, lysine, acetate, proline, acetone, pyruvic acid, creatine, creatinine, glycine, glycerol, serine and lactic acid, but obviously lower in the contents of isoleucine and glucose than hemolysis-free group. Pearson correlation analysis indicated that in hemolytic samples, the contents of eucine, valine, lysine, proline, N-acetyl-glycoprotein, creatine, creatinine, glycerol and serine were higher but that of isoleucine was lower.Conclusion: Hemolysis can lead to the changes of multiple metabolite content and influence the analytic results of metabonomics, so in practical operation, hemolytic samples should be excluded from the study.

  1. A Newborn Case of “c” Subgroup Mismatch Presenting with Severe Hemolysis and Anemia

    Ezgi Yangın Ergon; Senem Alkan Özdemir; Rüya Çolak; Kıymet Çelik; Özgür Olukman; Şebnem Çalkavur

    2017-01-01

    Hemolysis and jaundice related to Rh incompatibility in the neonatal period has decreased substantially due to the widespread use of anti-D gammaglobulin in recent years. Nevertheless, the rate of subgroup mismatch in the etiology of hemolytic diseases of the newborn has increased significantly. In this article an 8-day-old newborn infant with “c” subgroup incompatibility and presenting with severe anemia, in whom hemolysis could be controlled with intravenous immunoglobulin infusion and subg...

  2. Resistance of human erythrocytes containing elevated levels of vitamin E to radiation-induced hemolysis

    Brown, M.A.

    1983-01-01

    Human erythrocytes were isolated from the blood of healthy donors and then incubated in the presence of suspensions of alpha-tocopherol for 30 min at 37 degrees C. Unabsorbed tocopherol was removed by centrifugation using several washes of isotonic phosphate-buffered saline. Washed erythrocytes were resuspended to 0.05%. Hct and exposed to hemolyzing doses of 60 Co gamma radiation, and hemolysis was monitored continuously by light scattering at 700 nm in a recording spectrophotometer. The extent of hemolysis with time was sigmoid and data analysis was carried out on the time taken for 50% hemolysis to occur (t50%). The vitamin E content of erythrocytes was significantly elevated by the incubation procedure and resulted in the cells exhibiting a significantly increased resistance to hemolysis as reflected by the extended t50% values. Oral supplementation of 500 IU of vitamin E per day to eight normal human subjects for a period of 16 days also resulted in their washed erythrocytes exhibiting a significant increase in resistance to radiation-induced hemolysis. When comparing vitamin E incubated cells with control cells, both the dose-reducing factor (DRF) and the time for 50% hemolysis quotient (Qt50%) were observed to increase with increasing radiation dose

  3. Interesting case of G6PD deficiency anemia with severe hemolysis

    Anupam Chhabra

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Severe hemolysis was observed in a critically ill patient with G6Pd deficiency where the causative trigger could not be identified. We describe one young patient with severe hemolysis treated with two cycles of plasmapheresis which proved to be an effective tool in the treatment. The patient presented with diffuse pain abdomen, vomiting, yellowish discoloration of sclera and skin and acute breathlessness. Hemoglobin 5.4 mg/dl and total (T serum bilirubin 17.08 mg/dl: Direct (D 4.10 mg/dl and Indirect (I 12.98 mg/dl. Subsequently patient started passing black color urine. As the patient developed severe hemolysis and the trigger agent of hemolysis was unknown, two cycles of plasmapheresis were performed with the aim to remove unknown causative agent. Consequently no trace of hemolysis was found and patient stabilized. Plasmapheresis can be used to treat G6PD deficient patients with severe hemolysis due to unidentified trigger agent.

  4. The Effect of Pneumatic Tube Systems on the Hemolysis of Biochemistry Blood Samples.

    Cakirca, Gokhan; Erdal, Huseyin

    2017-05-01

    Pneumatic tube systems (PTSs) are widely used in many hospitals because they lead to reduced turnaround times and cost efficiency. However, PTSs may affect the quality of the blood samples transported to the laboratory. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of the PTS used in our hospital on the hemolysis of the biochemical blood samples transported to the laboratory. A total of 148 samples were manually transported to the laboratory by hospital staff, 148 samples were transported with the PTS, and 113 were transported with the PTS without use of sponge-rubber inserts (PTSws). Hemolysis rates and the levels of biochemical analytes for the different transportation methods were compared. No significant difference was found between the samples transported manually and with the PTS with regard to hemolysis rate and the levels of biochemical analytes. However, the samples transported with the PTSws showed a significant difference compared with the samples transported manually and with the PTS with regard to hemolysis rate and potassium and lactate dehydrogenase levels. The percentages of the samples that exceeded the permissible threshold for the hemolysis among the samples transported manually, with the PTS, and with the PTSws were 10%, 8%, and 47%, respectively. A PTS can be used safely for transporting biochemistry blood samples to the laboratory. However, a sponge-rubber insert that holds sample tubes must be used with the PTS to prevent the hemolysis of blood samples. Copyright © 2016 Emergency Nurses Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Continuous optical measurement system of hemolysis during a photosensitization reaction using absorption spectrum

    Hamada, R.; Ogawa, E.; Arai, T.

    2018-02-01

    To investigate hemolysis phenomena during a photosensitization reaction with the reaction condition continuously and simultaneously for a safety assessment of hemolysis side effect, we constructed an optical system to measure blood sample absorption spectrum during the reaction. Hemolysis degree might be under estimated in general evaluation methods because there is a constant oxygen pressure assumption in spite of oxygen depression take place. By investigating hemoglobin oxidation and oxygen desorption dynamics obtained from the contribution of the visible absorption spectrum and multiple regression analysis, both the hemolysis phenomena and its oxygen environment might be obtained with time. A 664 nm wavelength laser beam for the reaction excitation and 475-650 nm light beam for measuring the absorbance spectrum were arranged perpendicularly crossing. A quartz glass cuvette with 1×10 mm in dimensions for the spectrum measurement was located at this crossing point. A red blood cells suspension medium was arranged with low hematocrit containing 30 μg/ml talaporfin sodium. This medium was irradiated up to 40 J/cm2 . The met-hemoglobin, oxygenatedhemoglobin, and deoxygenated-hemoglobin concentrations were calculated by a multiple regression analysis from the measured spectra. We confirmed the met-hemoglobin concentration increased and oxygen saturation decreased with the irradiation time, which seems to indicate the hemolysis progression and oxygen consumption, respectively. By using our measuring system, the hemolysis progression seems to be obtained with oxygen environment information.

  6. Next-generation sequencing-based molecular diagnosis of chronic non-spherocytic hemolysis in erythrocytic enzymopathies

    Manu Jamwal

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in genes encoding red blood cell enzymes are often inherited in an autosomal recessive manner and can lead to chronic nonspherocytic hemolytic anemia (CNSHA in homozygotes and compound heterozygotes. Usual clinical manifestations include jaundice, cholelithiasis and splenomegaly with normocytic normochromic hemolysis. Phenotypes range from fully-compensated hemolysis (without anemia to transfusion-dependent states. Definitive diagnosis requires biochemical testing of enzyme levels, which for rarer enzymes are often difficult and not easily available. Molecular diagnosis using a gene-by-gene approach is expensive, time-consuming and cumbersome. Targeted resequencing can expedite the molecular diagnosis in cases where the hemolysis remains unexplained after routine laboratory tests. Ten patients with clinical and laboratory evidence suggestive of hemolytic anemia, but negative family history, were enrolled. Various biochemical and molecular tests were used to exclude glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD deficiency, thalassemias, hemoglobinopathies, autoimmune hemolysis, hereditary spherocytosis and pyruvate kinase (PKLR deficiency. Common G6PD and PKLR variants were excluded by molecular tests. DNA Libraries were prepared using TruSight One™ panel and sequenced on MiSeq™ Sequencing System. MiSeq Reporter™ and VariantStudio™ v2.1 were used for analysis, classification, and reporting of genomic variants reporting genomic variants. All 10 patients’ diagnoses were resolved by targeted resequencing: two had G6PD deficiency, two had glucose-6-phosphate isomerase (GPI deficiency and six unexpectedly had pyruvate kinase deficiency despite pyruvate kinase enzyme activity assays previously being normal in all. All the mutations were predicted deleterious by PolyPhen, SIFT, Provean, mutpred and Mutationtaster software. The mutations were validated in parents and/or siblings (where available to establish the mode of inheritance. Our

  7. Influence of Cocoa Flavanols and Procyanidins on Free Radical-induced Human Erythrocyte Hemolysis

    Qin Yan Zhu

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Cocoa can be a rich source of antioxidants including the flavan-3-ols, epicatechin and catechin, and their oligomers (procyanidins. While these flavonoids have been reported to reduce the rate of free radical-induced erythrocyte hemolysis in experimental animal models, little is known about their effect on human erythrocyte hemolysis. The major objective of this work was to study the effect of a flavonoid-rich cocoa beverage on the resistance of human erythrocytes to oxidative stress. A second objective was to assess the effects of select purified cocoa flavonoids, epicatechin, catechin, the procyanidin Dimer B2 and one of its major metabolites, 3ʹ-O-methyl epicatechin, on free radical-induced erythrocyte hemolysis in vitro. Peripheral blood was obtained from 8 healthy subjects before and 1, 2, 4 and 8 h after consuming a flavonoid-rich cocoa beverage that provided 0.25 g/kg body weight (BW, 0.375 or 0.50 g/kg BW of cocoa. Plasma flavanol and dimer concentrations were determined for each subject. Erythrocyte hemolysis was evaluated using a controlled peroxidation reaction. Epicatechin, catechin, 3ʹ-O-methyl epicatechin and (--epicatechin-(4β > 8epicatechin (Dimer B2 were detected in the plasma within 1 h after the consumption of the beverage. The susceptibility of erythrocytes to hemolysis was reduced significantly following the consumption of the beverages. The duration of the lag time, which reflects the capacity of cells to buffer free radicals, was increased. Consistent with the above, the purified flavonoids, epicatechin, catechin, Dimer B2 and the metabolite 3ʹ-O-methyl epicatechin, exhibited dose-dependent protection against AAPH-induced erythrocyte hemolysis at concentrations ranging from 2.5 to 20 μM. Erythrocytes from subjects consuming flavonoid-rich cocoa show reduced susceptibility to free radical-induced hemolysis (p < 0.05.

  8. Role of hemolysis in red cell adenosine triphosphate release in simulated exercise conditions in vitro.

    Mairbäurl, Heimo; Ruppe, Florian A; Bärtsch, Peter

    2013-10-01

    Specific adenosine triphosphate (ATP) release from red blood cells has been discussed as a possible mediator controlling microcirculation in states of decreased tissue oxygen. Because intravascular hemolysis might also contribute to plasma ATP, we tested in vitro which portion of ATP release is due to hemolysis in typical exercise-induced strains to the red blood cells (shear stress, deoxygenation, and lactic acidosis). Human erythrocytes were suspended in dextran-containing media (hematocrit 10%) and were exposed to shear stress in a rotating Couette viscometer at 37°C. Desaturation (oxygen saturation of hemoglobin ∼20%) was achieved by tonometry with N2 before shear stress exposure. Cells not exposed to shear stress were used as controls. Na lactate (15 mM), lactic acid (15 mM, pH 7.0), and HCl (pH 7.0) were added to simulate exercise-induced lactic acidosis. After incubation, extracellular hemoglobin was measured to quantify hemolysis. ATP was measured with the luciferase assay. Shear stress increased extracellular ATP in a stress-related and time-dependent manner. Hypoxia induced a ∼10-fold increase in extracellular ATP in nonsheared cells and shear stress-exposed cells. Lactic acid had no significant effect on ATP release and hemolysis. In normoxic cells, approximately 20%-50% of extracellular ATP was due to hemolysis. This proportion decreased to less than 10% in hypoxic cells. Our results indicate that when exposing red blood cells to typical strains they encounter when passing through capillaries of exercising skeletal muscle, ATP release from red blood cells is caused mainly by deoxygenation and shear stress, whereas lactic acidosis had only a minor effect. Hemolysis effects were decreased when hemoglobin was deoxygenated. Together, by specific release and hemolysis, extracellular ATP reaches values that have been shown to cause local vasodilatation.

  9. Hemolysis, myopathy, and cardiac disease associated with hereditary phosphofructokinase deficiency in two Whippets

    Gerber, Karen; Harvey, John W.; D'Agorne, Sara; Wood, Jonathan; Giger, Urs

    2009-01-01

    Two male castrated Whippet littermates were presented at 1 year of age for pallor, tachycardia, systolic heart murmur, dark yellow to orange feces, intermittent lethargy, pigmenturia, and muscle shivering or cramping after exercise. Persistent macrocytic hypochromic anemia with marked reticulocytosis and metarubricytosis was found when CBC results were compared with reference values for Whippets. Increased serum creatine kinase activity and hyperkalemia also were sometimes present over the 4-year period of evaluation. Progressively increasing serum concentrations of N-terminal prohormone brain natriuretic peptide suggested cardiac disease. Erythrocytes from the whippets were less osmotically fragile but more alkaline fragile than those from control dogs. Erythrocyte phosphofructokinase (PFK) activities and 2,3-diphosphoglycerate concentrations were decreased. Restriction enzyme-based DNA test screening and DNA sequencing revealed the same mutation in the muscle-PFK gene of the Whippets as seen in English Springer Spaniel dogs with PFK deficiency. This is the first report of PFK deficiency in Whippet dogs. In addition to causing hemolysis and exertional myopathy, heart disease may be a prominent clinical component of PFK deficiency in this breed and has not been previously recognized in PFK-deficient English Springer Spaniels. PMID:19228357

  10. Hemolysis in a laminar flow-through Couette shearing device: an experimental study.

    Boehning, Fiete; Mejia, Tzahiry; Schmitz-Rode, Thomas; Steinseifer, Ulrich

    2014-09-01

    Reducing hemolysis has been one of the major goals of rotary blood pump development and in the investigational phase, the capability of hemolysis estimation for areas of elevated shear stresses is valuable. The degree of hemolysis is determined by the amplitude of shear stress and the exposure time, but to date, the exact hemolytic behavior at elevated shear stresses and potential thresholds for subcritical shear exposure remain vague. This study provides experimental hemolysis data for a set of shear stresses and exposure times to allow better estimations of hemolysis for blood exposed to elevated shearing. Heparinized porcine blood with a hematocrit of 40% was mechanically damaged in a flow-through laminar Couette shear flow at a temperature of 23°C. Four levels of shear stress, 24, 592, 702, and 842 Pa, were replicated at two exposure times, 54 and 873 ms. For the calculation of the shear stresses, an apparent viscosity of 5 mPas was used, which was verified in an additional measurement of the blood viscosity. The hemolysis measurements were repeated four times, whereby all conditions were measured once within the same day and with blood from the same source. Samples were taken at the inlet and outlet of the shear region and an increase in plasma-free hemoglobin was measured. An index of hemolysis (IH) was thereby calculated giving the ratio of free to total hemoglobin. The results are compared with data from previously published studies using a similar shearing device. Hemolysis was found to increase exponentially with shear stress, but high standard deviations existed at measurements with elevated IH. At short exposure times, the IH remained low at under 0.5% for all shear stress levels. For high exposure times, the IH increased from 0.84% at 592 Pa up to 3.57% at the highest shear stress level. Hemolysis was significant for shear stresses above ∼600 Pa at the high exposure time of 873 ms. Copyright © 2014 International Center for Artificial

  11. Discriminating the hemolytic risk of blood type A plasmas using the complement hemolysis using human erythrocytes (CHUHE) assay.

    Cunnion, Kenji M; Hair, Pamela S; Krishna, Neel K; Sass, Megan A; Enos, Clinton W; Whitley, Pamela H; Maes, Lanne Y; Goldberg, Corinne L

    2017-03-01

    The agglutination-based cross-matching method is sensitive for antibody binding to red blood cells but is only partially predictive of complement-mediated hemolysis, which is important in many acute hemolytic transfusion reactions. Here, we describe complement hemolysis using human erythrocytes (CHUHE) assays that directly evaluate complement-mediated hemolysis between individual serum-plasma and red blood cell combinations. The CHUHE assay is used to evaluate correlations between agglutination titers and complement-mediated hemolysis as well as the hemolytic potential of plasma from type A blood donors. Plasma or serum from each type A blood donor was incubated with AB or B red blood cells in the CHUHE assay and measured for free hemoglobin release. CHUHE assays for serum or plasma demonstrate a wide, dynamic range and high sensitivity for complement-mediated hemolysis for individual serum/plasma and red blood cell combinations. CHUHE results suggest that agglutination assays alone are only moderately predictive of complement-mediated hemolysis. CHUHE results also suggest that plasma from particular type A blood donors produce minimal complement-mediated hemolysis, whereas plasma from other type A blood donors produce moderate to high-level complement-mediated hemolysis, depending on the red blood cell donor. The current results indicate that the CHUHE assay can be used to assess complement-mediated hemolysis for plasma or serum from a type A blood donor, providing additional risk discrimination over agglutination titers alone. © 2016 AABB.

  12. On a turbulent wall model to predict hemolysis numerically in medical devices

    Lee, Seunghun; Chang, Minwook; Kang, Seongwon; Hur, Nahmkeon; Kim, Wonjung

    2017-11-01

    Analyzing degradation of red blood cells is very important for medical devices with blood flows. The blood shear stress has been recognized as the most dominant factor for hemolysis in medical devices. Compared to laminar flows, turbulent flows have higher shear stress values in the regions near the wall. In case of predicting hemolysis numerically, this phenomenon can require a very fine mesh and large computational resources. In order to resolve this issue, the purpose of this study is to develop a turbulent wall model to predict the hemolysis more efficiently. In order to decrease the numerical error of hemolysis prediction in a coarse grid resolution, we divided the computational domain into two regions and applied different approaches to each region. In the near-wall region with a steep velocity gradient, an analytic approach using modeled velocity profile is applied to reduce a numerical error to allow a coarse grid resolution. We adopt the Van Driest law as a model for the mean velocity profile. In a region far from the wall, a regular numerical discretization is applied. The proposed turbulent wall model is evaluated for a few turbulent flows inside a cannula and centrifugal pumps. The results present that the proposed turbulent wall model for hemolysis improves the computational efficiency significantly for engineering applications. Corresponding author.

  13. Firm insoles effectively reduce hemolysis in runners during long distance running - a comparative study.

    Janakiraman, Kamal; Shenoy, Shweta; Sandhu, Jaspal Singh

    2011-06-09

    Shock absorbing insoles are effective in reducing the magnitude and rate of loading of peak impact forces generated at foot strike during running, whereas the foot impact force during running has been considered to be an important cause of intravascular hemolysis in long distance runners. Objective of this study was to evaluate the intravascular hemolysis during running and compare the effect of two different types of insoles (Soft and Firm) on hemolysis. Twenty male long and middle distance runners volunteered to participate in this study. We selected two insoles (Soft and Firm) according to their hardness level (SHORE 'A' scale). Participants were randomly assigned to the soft insole (group 1) and firm insole (group 2) group with ten athletes in each group. Each athlete completed one hour of running at the calculated target heart rate (60-70%). Venous blood samples were collected before and immediately after running. We measured unconjucated bilirubin (mg/dl), lactate dehydrogenase (μ/ml), hemoglobin (g/l) and serum ferritin (ng/ml) as indicators of hemolysis. Our study revealed a significant increase in the mean values of unconjucated bilirubin (P firm insoles effectively reduces the amount of hemolysis in runners compared to soft insoles.

  14. Heat generation and hemolysis at the shaft seal in centrifugal blood pumps.

    Araki, K; Taenaka, Y; Wakisaka, Y; Masuzawa, T; Tatsumi, E; Nakatani, T; Baba, Y; Yagura, A; Eya, K; Toda, K

    1995-01-01

    The heat and hemolysis around a shaft seal were investigated. Materials were original pumps (Nikkiso HMS-15:N-original, and 3M Delphin:D-original), vane-removed pumps (Nvane(-), Dvane(-)), and a small chamber with a shaft coiled by nichrome wire (mock pump). The original pumps were driven at 500 mmHg and 5 L/min, and vane-removed pumps were driven at the same rotation number. An electrical powers of 0, 0.5, 2, and 10 W was supplied to the mock pumps. In vitro hemolytic testing showed that hemolytic indices were 0.027 g/100 L in N-original, 0.013 in Nvane(-), 0.061 in D-original, and 0.012 in Dvane(-). Measurement of heat with a thermally insulated water chamber showed total heat within the pump of 8.62 and 10.85 W, and heat at the shaft seal of 0.87 and 0.62 W in the Nikkiso and Delphin pumps, respectively. Hemolysis and heat generation of mock pumps remained low. The results indicate that the heat generated around the shaft seal was minimal. Hemolysis at the shaft-seal was considerable but not major. Local heat did not affect hemolysis. It was concluded that the shaft-seal affected hemolysis, not by local heat but friction itself.

  15. Percussion hemoglobinuria - a novel term for hand trauma-induced mechanical hemolysis: a case report

    Hariharan Sundaram

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Extracorpuscular hemolysis caused by mechanical trauma has been well described in relation to lower extremity use, such as in soldiers and runners. Terms such as "march hemoglobinuria", "foot strike hemolysis" and "runners hemoglobinuria" have previously been coined and are easily recalled. Newer cases, however, are being identified in individuals vigorously using their upper extremities, such as drum players who use their hands to strike the instrument. Given the increased recognition of upper extremity-related mechanical hemolysis and hemoglobinuria in drummers, and the use of hand drumming worldwide, we would like introduce a novel term for this condition and call it "percussion hemoglobinuria". Case presentation A 24-year-old Caucasian man presented with reddish brown discoloration of his urine after playing the djembe drum. Urine examination after a rigorous practice session revealed blood on the dipstick, and 0 to 2 red blood cells per high power field microscopically. The urine sample was negative for myoglobulin. Other causes of hemolysis and hematuria were excluded and cessation of drum playing resulted in resolution of his symptoms. Conclusions The association of mechanical trauma-induced hemoglobinuria and playing hand percussion instruments is increasingly being recognized. We, however, feel that the true prevalence is higher than what has been previously recorded in the literature. By coining the term "percussion hemoglobinuria" we hope to raise the awareness of screening for upper extremity trauma-induced mechanical hemolysis in the evaluation of a patient with hemoglobinuria.

  16. Does Pneumatic Tube System Transport Contribute to Hemolysis in ED Blood Samples?

    Fredric M. Hustey

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Our goal was to determine if the hemolysis among blood samples obtained in an emergency department and then sent to the laboratory in a pneumatic tube system was different from those in samples that were hand-carried. Methods: The hemolysis index is measured on all samples submitted for potassium analysis. We queried our hospital laboratory database system (SunQuest® for potassium results for specimens obtained between January 2014 and July 2014. From facility maintenance records, we identified periods of system downtime, during which specimens were hand-carried to the laboratory. Results: During the study period, 15,851 blood specimens were transported via our pneumatic tube system and 92 samples were hand delivered. The proportions of hemolyzed specimens in the two groups were not significantly different (13.6% vs. 13.1% [p=0.90]. Results were consistent when the criterion was limited to gross (3.3% vs 3.3% [p=0.99] or mild (10.3% vs 9.8% [p=0.88] hemolysis. The hemolysis rate showed minimal variation during the study period (12.6%–14.6%. Conclusion: We found no statistical difference in the percentages of hemolyzed specimens transported by a pneumatic tube system or hand delivered to the laboratory. Certain features of pneumatic tube systems might contribute to hemolysis (e.g., speed, distance, packing material. Since each system is unique in design, we encourage medical facilities to consider whether their method of transport might contribute to hemolysis in samples obtained in the emergency department.

  17. Does Pneumatic Tube System Transport Contribute to Hemolysis in ED Blood Samples?

    Phelan, Michael P; Reineks, Edmunds Z; Hustey, Fredric M; Berriochoa, Jacob P; Podolsky, Seth R; Meldon, Stephen; Schold, Jesse D; Chamberlin, Janelle; Procop, Gary W

    2016-09-01

    Our goal was to determine if the hemolysis among blood samples obtained in an emergency department and then sent to the laboratory in a pneumatic tube system was different from those in samples that were hand-carried. The hemolysis index is measured on all samples submitted for potassium analysis. We queried our hospital laboratory database system (SunQuest(®)) for potassium results for specimens obtained between January 2014 and July 2014. From facility maintenance records, we identified periods of system downtime, during which specimens were hand-carried to the laboratory. During the study period, 15,851 blood specimens were transported via our pneumatic tube system and 92 samples were hand delivered. The proportions of hemolyzed specimens in the two groups were not significantly different (13.6% vs. 13.1% [p=0.90]). Results were consistent when the criterion was limited to gross (3.3% vs 3.3% [p=0.99]) or mild (10.3% vs 9.8% [p=0.88]) hemolysis. The hemolysis rate showed minimal variation during the study period (12.6%-14.6%). We found no statistical difference in the percentages of hemolyzed specimens transported by a pneumatic tube system or hand delivered to the laboratory. Certain features of pneumatic tube systems might contribute to hemolysis (e.g., speed, distance, packing material). Since each system is unique in design, we encourage medical facilities to consider whether their method of transport might contribute to hemolysis in samples obtained in the emergency department.

  18. The relationship between vacuum and hemolysis during catheter blood collection: a retrospective analysis of six large cohorts.

    Mrazek, Cornelia; Simundic, Ana-Maria; Wiedemann, Helmut; Krahmer, Florian; Felder, Thomas Klaus; Kipman, Ulrike; Hoppe, Uta; Haschke-Becher, Elisabeth; Cadamuro, Janne

    2017-07-26

    Blood collection through intravenous (IV) catheters is a common practice at emergency departments (EDs). This technique is associated with higher in vitro hemolysis rates and may even be amplified by the use of vacuum collection tubes. Our aim was to investigate the association of five different vacuum tubes with hemolysis rates in comparison to an aspiration system under real-life conditions and to propose an equation to estimate the amount of hemolysis, depending on the vacuum collection tube type. We retrospectively evaluated hemolysis data of plasma samples from our ED, where blood is drawn through IV catheters. Over the past 5 years, we compared 19,001 hemolysis index values amongst each other and against the respective vacuum pressure (Pv) of the collection tubes, which were used within the six observational periods. The highest hemolysis rates were associated with full-draw evacuated tubes. Significantly reduced hemolysis was observed for two kinds of partial-draw tubes. The hemolysis rate of one partial-draw blood collection tube was comparable to those of the aspiration system. Regression analysis of Pv and mean free hemoglobin (fHb) values yielded the formula fHb (g/L)=0.0082*Pv2-0.1143*Pv+ 0.5314 with an R2 of 0.99. If IV catheters are used for blood collection, hemolysis rates directly correlate with the vacuum within the tubes and can be estimated by the proposed formula. By the use of partial-draw vacuum blood collection tubes, hemolysis rates in IV catheter collections can be reduced to levels comparable with collections performed by aspiration systems.

  19. Prevalence of anti‑A and anti‑B hemolysis among blood group O ...

    Background: Group O donor blood is more readily available and is frequently used as universal red cell donor in our environment. The presence of hemolysins in the donors may however lead to hemolysis in the recipients. Attempts have been made to study the prevalence of hemolysins in various populations with results ...

  20. L-sorbose but not D-tagatose induces hemolysis of dog erythrocytes in vitro

    Bär, A.; Leeman, W.R.

    1999-01-01

    Previous investigations have demonstrated that L-sorbose induces hemolysis of dog erythrocytes. This effect is probably the consequence of an ATP depletion of the red blood cells subsequent to inhibition of hexokinase, and thus the glycolytic pathway, by sorbose 1-phosphate. In the present study,

  1. Pressure Infusion Cuff and Blood Warmer during Massive Transfusion: An Experimental Study About Hemolysis and Hypothermia.

    Poder, Thomas G; Pruneau, Denise; Dorval, Josée; Thibault, Louis; Fisette, Jean-François; Bédard, Suzanne K; Jacques, Annie; Beauregard, Patrice

    2016-01-01

    Blood warmers were developed to reduce the risk of hypothermia associated with the infusion of cold blood products. During massive transfusion, these devices are used with compression sleeve, which induce a major stress to red blood cells. In this setting, the combination of blood warmer and compression sleeve could generate hemolysis and harm the patient. We conducted this study to compare the impact of different pressure rates on the hemolysis of packed red blood cells and on the outlet temperature when a blood warmer set at 41.5°C is used. Pressure rates tested were 150 and 300 mmHg. Ten packed red blood cells units were provided by Héma-Québec and each unit was sequentially tested. We found no increase in hemolysis either at 150 or 300 mmHg. By cons, we found that the blood warmer was not effective at warming the red blood cells at the specified temperature. At 150 mmHg, the outlet temperature reached 37.1°C and at 300 mmHg, the temperature was 33.7°C. To use a blood warmer set at 41.5°C in conjunction with a compression sleeve at 150 or 300 mmHg does not generate hemolysis. At 300 mmHg a blood warmer set at 41.5°C does not totally avoid a risk of hypothermia.

  2. Prevalence of anti‑A and anti‑B hemolysis among blood group O ...

    2014-10-20

    Oct 20, 2014 ... Background: Group O donor blood is more readily available and is frequently used as universal red cell donor in our environment. The presence of hemolysins in the donors may however lead to hemolysis in the recipients. Attempts have been made to study the prevalence of hemolysins in various ...

  3. Influence of artistic gymnastics on iron nutritional status and exercise-induced hemolysis in female athletes.

    Sureira, Thaiz Mattos; Amancio, Olga Silverio; Pellegrini Braga, Josefina Aparecida

    2012-08-01

    This study evaluates the relationship between body iron losses and gains in artistic gymnastics female athletes. It shows that despite the low iron intake and exercise-induced hemolysis, iron deficiency or iron-deficiency anemia does not occur, but partial changes in the hematological profile do. The hypothesis that gymnasts' nutritional behavior contributes to anemia, which may be aggravated by exercise-induced hemolysis, led to this cross-sectional study, conducted with 43 female artistic gymnasts 6-16 yr old. The control group was formed by 40 nontraining girls, paired by age. Hemogram, serum iron, ferritin, soluble transferrin receptor, haptoglobin, total and fractional bilirubin, Type I urine, and parasitologic and occult fecal blood tests were evaluated. The athletes presented mean hematimetric and serum iron values (p = .020) higher than those of the control group. The bilirubin result discarded any hemolytic alteration in both groups. The haptoglobin results were lower in the athlete group (p = .002), confirming the incidence of exercise-induced hemolysis. Both groups presented low iron intake. The results suggest that artistic gymnastics practice leads to exercise-induced hemolysis and partially changes the hematological profile, although not causing iron deficiency or iron-deficiency anemia, even in the presence of low iron intake.

  4. Blood Warming and Hemolysis: A Systematic Review With Meta-Analysis.

    Poder, Thomas G; Nonkani, Wendyam G; Tsakeu Leponkouo, Élyonore

    2015-07-01

    The use of fluid warmers during blood transfusion is recommended to avoid inducing hypothermia and its harmful effects. Fluid warmers offered by manufacturers can reach temperatures of 43°C. However, the recommendations of national regulatory organizations do not clearly indicate the maximum heating temperature in relation to the risk of hemolysis. To fill this gap, we conducted a systematic review of the literature with meta-analysis. To match clinical practice, this review was limited to fluid warmers that used contact heating; thus, studies that used radiofrequency or microwave heating were excluded. Twenty-four observational studies were included, 17 of which were the subject of a meta-analysis. A preliminary descriptive analysis indicated that multiple factors can influence the level of hemolysis during blood heating with a liquid warmer, including blood age, anticoagulant type, duration of exposure to heat, stirring the blood during heating, and various elements of the circuit through which blood flows (eg, type of infusion pump with pressure and flow, type of microfilter, and type of tubing). Moreover, the duration between sampling and hemolysis assay was a source of heterogeneity among studies, as were the initial free hemoglobin levels in the various experiments. In general, the increase generated by each of these factors other than temperature appears to have been limited except for blood age, which is an important parameter of hemolysis, the length of exposure to heat, and, in some studies, the type of infusion pump used. Regarding the meta-analysis, at temperatures at or less than 43°C and even up to 45-46°C, it appears that blood heating is safe and causes hemolysis only in clinically negligible proportions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Characteristics of enterotoxin distribution, hemolysis, lecithinase, and starch hydrolysis of Bacillus cereus isolated from infant formulas and ready-to-eat foods.

    Hwang, Ji-Yeon; Park, Jong-Hyun

    2015-03-01

    Bacillus cereus is a ubiquitous environmental microbe implicated as a main cause of food poisoning with various symptoms, depending on the strain type and the isolation source. In this study, the potential virulence factors and biochemical properties of B. cereus isolated from infant formulas and ready-to-eat (RTE) foods were analyzed and compared. A total of 347 B. cereus strains were isolated and identified from 687 infant food formulas and RTE food samples. All the isolates had one or more enterotoxin genes, and one-half of the strains had all 3 enterotoxin genes (hbl, nhe, and cytK) that are involved in food poisoning in humans. Here, all the 3 genes were detected in 50% of the B. cereus isolates from RTE foods and only 14% of the isolates were identified from infant formulas. The latter harbored low cytK and bceT, and very low hbl genes. Most B. cereus isolates possessed the hemolysis gene, but not the ces gene. The infant formula isolates showed stronger hemolysis activity than the other isolates. In addition, 26% of the total isolates showed low lecithinase activities and 10% showed high lecithinase activities. A greater number of isolates from the infant formula showed high lecithinase activity than those from the RTE foods. Approximately 83% of the isolates were positive and 17% were negative for starch hydrolysis. Over 90% of the RTE food isolates and only 35% of the infant formula isolates were positive for starch hydrolysis. However, all the strains possessed nhe, but their harboring patterns of hbl and cytK were significantly different. Most starch-hydrolyzing strains possessed hbl, but only 23% nonstarch-hydrolyzing isolates possessed this gene. Moreover, very low nonstarch hydrolyzing strains harbored cytK. Most nonstarch-hydrolyzing isolates showed high lecithinase and strong hemolysis activities, and very low hbl and cytK harboring. In summary, most infant formula isolates showed stronger hemolysis and higher lecithinase activities with lower

  6. Increased serum levels of hyaluronic acid in pregnancies complicated by preeclampsia or hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, and low platelets syndrome.

    Osmers, R G; Schütz, E; Diedrich, F; Wehry, B; Krauss, T; Oellerich, M; Kuhn, W

    1998-02-01

    Fifteen percent of patients who later have hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, and low platelets syndrome develop initially have nonspecific symptoms. Early diagnosis could ensure adequate obstetric management; however, prognostic biochemical tests are lacking. We hypothesized that elevated hyaluronic acid serum levels might be an early indicator of hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, and low platelets syndrome because it is known to be a sensitive marker of liver cell function. Hyaluronic acid in serum was measured in patients with normal pregnancies (n = 109) and in those patients with pregnancies complicated by preeclampsia (n = 14) or hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, and low platelets syndrome (n = 11). A significant increase in hyaluronic acid serum concentrations was observed in patients with hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, and low platelets syndrome or with preeclampsia (p hyaluronic acid serum levels in hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, and low platelets syndrome correlated with the clinical severity of the individual course of disease as measured by intensive care unit time (r = 0.72; p hyaluronic acid in preeclampsia and hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, and low platelets syndrome are significantly elevated and might play an important diagnostic and prognostic role in patients with hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, and low platelets syndrome.

  7. First Trimester Hemolysis, Elevated Liver Enzymes, Low Platelets Syndrome in a Surrogate Pregnancy.

    Myer, Emily; Hill, James

    2015-10-01

    Background The occurrence of hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, low platelets (HELLP) syndrome before 20 weeks of gestation is rare. HELLP is a possible but rare syndrome in gestational surrogate pregnancies for surrogates with risk factors for development of preeclampsia. Case A 32-year-old patient with chronic hypertension and positive antinuclear antibody presented for prenatal care at 13 weeks and 1 day. She was a surrogate for the embryo of a 43-year-old couple. By 15 weeks she developed uncontrolled hypertension requiring hospitalization. She was expectantly managed until her condition deteriorated. At 16 weeks and 1 day she developed hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, thrombocytopenia, and fetal demise. Conclusions HELLP syndrome is rare and carries a significant morbidity and mortality for the mother and fetus. Clinicians should encourage the surrogate to share her medical history with the embryo donor for appropriate counseling on pregnancy risks.

  8. A Newborn Case of “c” Subgroup Mismatch Presenting with Severe Hemolysis and Anemia

    Ezgi Yangın Ergon

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Hemolysis and jaundice related to Rh incompatibility in the neonatal period has decreased substantially due to the widespread use of anti-D gammaglobulin in recent years. Nevertheless, the rate of subgroup mismatch in the etiology of hemolytic diseases of the newborn has increased significantly. In this article an 8-day-old newborn infant with “c” subgroup incompatibility and presenting with severe anemia, in whom hemolysis could be controlled with intravenous immunoglobulin infusion and subgroup appropriate blood transfusion, has been presented. Scientific studies have demonstrated that the hemolytic disease of patients who don’t have major blood group incompatibility but carry anti-C antibodies can be rather serious. Therefore, subgroup mismatch should always be kept in mind for newborns presenting with severe hemolytic anemia, and transfusion or if necessary exchange transfusion should be provided with subgroup matched blood products.

  9. Orientated hemolysis of the red blood cells of miners from uranium mines

    Nosek, J.

    1975-06-01

    The method of orientated hemolysis was used to investigate the suspension of the washed red blood cells. The control group and the test group of miners were set up. It was found that the groups did not differ either in the number of the test tubes where the hemolysis took place, or in the number of the hemolytic zones. However they did differ in the average width of the hemolytic zones and their most probable location. A more frequent occurrence of wide hemolytic zones and their placement at the end of a row of 40 test tubes has been observed in the group of miners of the uranium mines. The reason for this was not elucidated but it was shown that the phenomenon can be simulated artifically by adding uranyl and lead salts to the suspension of the red blood cells. (author)

  10. The Study of Hemolysis Effects on Coagulation Parameters

    and activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) testing, states that samples ... two groups of healthy donors and patient population. ... The second group was selected from the samples, ... [10] The presence or absence ... These conditions are not dependent upon .... Favaloro EJ, Funk DM, Lippi G. Pre‑analytical variables.

  11. Development of a Novel Quality Improvement Indicator Based on the Hemolysis Index.

    Lee, Eun Jin; Kim, Miyoung; Kim, Han Sung; Park, Min Jeong; Lee, Young Kyung; Kang, Hee Jung

    2016-11-01

    Hemolysis frequently causes preanalytical errors in laboratory measurements. We aimed to develop a quality improvement indicator for evaluating the extent of inappropriate procedures causing hemolysis in clinical samples collected in medical care units. We defined the threshold value of the hemolysis index (H index) causing significant interference with analyte measurement and analyzed the H index values of clinical samples in relation to the threshold. The H index threshold value causing a 10% bias in the measurement of lactate dehydrogenase was found to be 25. The monthly mean H index and monthly frequency of samples with an H index >25 were significantly different among the types of ward (P=0.001, respectively), and significantly decreased after replacement of a laboratory centrifuge lacking temperature control (20.6±0.58 vs 23.30±1.08, P=0.01; 23.4±1.69% vs 32.6±1.78%, P=0.01). The monthly mean H index and the monthly frequency of samples with an H index above a threshold value may be useful quality improvement indicators for detection of inappropriate procedures in the acquisition and handling of blood samples in medical care units.

  12. L-Sorbose but not D-tagatose induces hemolysis of dog erythrocytes in vitro.

    Bär, A; Leeman, W R

    1999-04-01

    Previous investigations have demonstrated that L-sorbose induces hemolysis of dog erythrocytes. This effect is probably the consequence of an ATP depletion of the red blood cells subsequent to inhibition of hexokinase, and thus the glycolytic pathway, by sorbose 1-phosphate. In the present study, the susceptibility of dog erythrocytes to D-tagatose, a stereoisomer of L-sorbose, was examined. Washed dog erythrocytes were suspended in Hanks' balanced salt solution (HBSS, containing 5.6 mM glucose) with or without the addition of 0.6, 6, and 60 mM L-sorbose or D-tagatose, or in HBSS with total glucose concentrations of 5.6, 6 and 60 mM D-glucose. After incubation for 24 h at 34 degrees C, the suspensions were centrifuged, and the percentage of hemolysis was determined by measuring the hemoglobin in the sediment and the supernatant. The amount of hemoglobin released in the medium did not differ significantly between the control (HBSS) and the test incubations with glucose or D-tagatose supplementation. In contrast, the addition of 6 and 60 mM L-sorbose resulted in significant hemolysis. At the low dose (0.6 mM), L-sorbose did not have an adverse effect. It is concluded that D-tagatose, unlike L-sorbose, does not have a hemolytic effect on canine erythrocytes. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  13. Molecular sieving action of the cell membrane during gradual osmotic hemolysis

    MacGregor, R.D. II

    1977-05-01

    Rat erythrocytes were hemolyzed by controlled gradual osmotic hemolysis to study cell morphology and hemoglobin loss from individual cells. Results suggest that each increase in the rate of loss of a protein from the cells during the initial phases of controlled gradual osmotic hemolysis is caused by the passage of a previously impermeable species across the stressed membrane. Similarly, during the final stages of controlled gradual osmotic hemolysis, each sharp decrease in the rate of loss of a protein corresponds to the termination of a molecular flow. A theoretical model is described that predicts the molecular sieving of soluble globular proteins across the stressed red cell membrane. Hydrophobic interactions occur between the soluble proteins and the lipid bilayer portion of the cell membrane. A spectrin network subdivides the bilayer into domains that restrict the insertion of large molecules into the membrane. Other membrane proteins affect soluble protein access to the membrane. Changes in the loss curves caused by incubation of red cells are discussed in terms of the model.

  14. Effect of hemolysis and free hemoglobin on optical hematocrit measurements in the extracorporeal circulation.

    Paluszkiewicz, Aleksandra; Kellner, Josef; Elshehabi, Morad; Schneditz, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    Clinically significant hemolysis is a rare but serious problem in dialysis. Because hemolysis affects red blood cell count and optical density of plasma it has been speculated whether techniques used for online blood volume monitoring would be useful to detect hemolysis. In this study the influence of free hemoglobin on hematocrit and relative blood volume changes measured by optical means (CritLine, HemaMetrics, Kaysville, UT) were examined using an in vitro model with bovine blood. Free hemoglobin solutions were added in steps to circulating whole blood at baseline hematocrits covering a range from 30% to 60% and at blood flows of approximately 200 and 400 ml/min. The free hemoglobin concentration reached was in the range of 2 to 3 g/dl. The presence of free hemoglobin led to a relative increase in hematocrit in the range of 0.3% per 0.1 g of free hemoglobin per dl (+3% dl/g). As an increase in hematocrit is interpreted as a decrease in blood volume, this change referred to an apparent decrease in relative blood volume in the same order of magnitude (-3% dl/g). Effects were more pronounced at low baseline hematocrit. Thus, although optical hematocrit readings are affected by the presence of free hemoglobin the changes at levels associated with clinical symptoms appear to be too small to be accurately detected in the in vivo situation where the hematocrit and the resulting optical signal is affected by various physiological processes and therefore much noisier.

  15. Chronic hyper-hemolysis in sickle cell anemia: association of vascular complications and mortality with less frequent vasoocclusive pain.

    James G Taylor

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Intravascular hemolysis in sickle cell anemia could contribute to complications associated with nitric oxide deficiency, advancing age, and increased mortality. We have previously reported that intense hemolysis is associated with increased risk of vascular complications in a small cohort of adults with sickle cell disease. These observations have not been validated in other populations.The distribution of serum lactic dehydrogenase (LDH values was used as a surrogate measure of intravascular hemolysis in a contemporaneous patient group and an historical adult population from the Cooperative Study of Sickle Cell Disease (CSSCD, all with sickle cell anemia. Chronic hyper-hemolysis was defined by the top LDH quartile and was compared to the lowest LDH quartile.Hyper-hemolysis subjects had higher systolic blood pressure, higher prevalence of leg ulcers (OR 3.27, 95% CI 1.92-5.53, P<0.0001, priapism (OR 2.62, 95% CI 1.13-6.90, P = 0.03 and pulmonary hypertension (OR 4.32, 95% CI 2.12-8.60, P<0.0001, while osteonecrosis (OR 0.32, 95% CI 0.19-0.54, P<0.0001 and pain (OR 0.23, 95% CI 0.09-0.55, P = 0.0004 were less prevalent. Hyper-hemolysis was influenced by fetal hemoglobin and alpha thalassemia, and was a risk factor for early death in the CSSCD population (Hazard Ratio = 1.97, P = 0.02.Steady state LDH measurements can identify a chronic hyper-hemolysis phenotype which includes less frequent vasooclusive pain and earlier mortality. Clinicians should consider sickle cell specific therapies for these patients, as is done for those with more frequent acute pain. The findings also suggest that an important class of disease modifiers in sickle cell anemia affect the rate of hemolysis.

  16. Protective effects of aqueous and ethanolic extracts of Nigella sativa L.and Portulaca oleracea L. on free radical induced hemolysis of RBCs

    E Taghiabadi

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available "n  Background and the purpose of the study: It has been shown that Nigella sativa L. and Portulaca oleracea L. have many antioxidant components. In the present study, the cytoprotective effect of ethanolic and aqueous extracts of N.sativa and P.oleracea against hemolytic damages induced by free radical initiator, AAPH [2, 2' azobis (2- amidinopropane hydrochloride] was evaluated. "n  Methods: Hemolysis was induced by addition of AAPH. To study the cytoprotective effect, aqueous (50, 200, 300, 400, 800 μg/ml and ethanolic (25, 100, 150, 200 and 400 μg/ml extracts of N. sativa and aqueous (25, 50, 100, 150, 200 and 400 μg/ml and ethanolic (300, 600, 900, 1200 and 1800 μg/ml extracts of P. oleracea were employed. RBCs were incubated with both extracts and AAPH at 37 °C for 6 hrs. In order to evaluate the impact of the time of addition, extracts were added one and 2 hrs after AAPH. Samples of suspensions were removed at different times and the degree of hemolysis was assessed spectrophotometrically by reading the absorption of supernatants at 540 nm. "n  Results: Aqueous (300, 400 and 800 μg/ml and ethanolic (150, 200 and 400 μg/ml extracts of N.sativa and also, aqueous (100, 150, 200 and 400 μg/ml and ethanolic (1200, 1800 μg/ml extracts of P.oleracea showed concentration-dependent cytoprotective effects. Addition of extracts one hour after AAPH reduced but did not eliminate protective activities of extracts. "n  Conclusion: Cytorotective effect of aqueous and ethanolic extracts of N. sativa and P. oleracea against AAPH- induced hemolysis may be related to antioxidant properties of these plants.

  17. Protective effects of aqueous and ethanolic extracts of Nigella sativa L. and Portulaca oleracea L. on free radical induced hemolysis of RBCs

    Karimi, G; Aghasizadeh, M; Razavi, M; Taghiabadi, E

    2011-01-01

    Background and the purpose of the study It has been shown that Nigella sativa L. and Portulaca oleracea L. have many antioxidant components. In the present study, the cytoprotective effect of ethanolic and aqueous extracts of N.sativa and P.oleracea against hemolytic damages induced by free radical initiator, AAPH [2, 2’ azobis (2- amidinopropane) hydrochloride] was evaluated. Methods Hemolysis was induced by addition of AAPH. To study the cytoprotective effect, aqueous (50, 200, 300, 400, 800 µg/ml) and ethanolic (25, 100, 150, 200 and 400 µg/ml) extracts of N. sativa and aqueous (25, 50, 100, 150, 200 and 400 µg/ml) and ethanolic (300, 600, 900, 1200 and 1800 µg/ml) extracts of P. oleracea were employed. RBCs were incubated with both extracts and AAPH at 37 °C for 6 hrs. In order to evaluate the impact of the time of addition, extracts were added one and 2 hrs after AAPH. Samples of suspensions were removed at different times and the degree of hemolysis was assessed spectrophotometrically by reading the absorption of supernatants at 540 nm. Results Aqueous (300, 400 and 800 µg/ml) and ethanolic (150, 200 and 400 µg/ml) extracts of N.sativa and also, aqueous (100, 150, 200 and 400 µg/ml) and ethanolic (1200, 1800 µg/ml) extracts of P.oleracea showed concentration-dependent cytoprotective effects. Addition of extracts one hour after AAPH reduced but did not eliminate protective activities of extracts. Conclusion Cytorotective effect of aqueous and ethanolic extracts of N. sativa and P. oleracea against AAPH- induced hemolysis may be related to antioxidant properties of these plants. PMID:22615672

  18. Blood cell oxidative stress precedes hemolysis in whole blood-liver slice co-cultures of rat, dog, and human tissues

    Vickers, Alison E.M.; Sinclair, John R.; Fisher, Robyn L.; Morris, Stephen R.; Way, William

    2010-01-01

    A novel in vitro model to investigate time-dependent and concentration-dependent responses in blood cells and hemolytic events is studied for rat, dog, and human tissues. Whole blood is co-cultured with a precision-cut liver slice. Methimazole (MMI) was selected as a reference compound, since metabolism of its imidazole thione moiety is linked with hematologic disorders and hepatotoxicity. An oxidative stress response occurred in all three species, marked by a decline in blood GSH levels by 24 h that progressed, and preceded hemolysis, which occurred at high MMI concentrations in the presence of a liver slice with rat (≥ 1000 μM at 48 h) and human tissues (≥ 1000 μM at 48 h, ≥ 750 μM at 72 h) but not dog. Human blood-only cultures exhibited a decline of GSH levels but minimal to no hemolysis. The up-regulation of liver genes for heme degradation (Hmox1 and Prdx1), iron cellular transport (Slc40a1), and GSH synthesis and utilization (mGST1 and Gclc) were early markers of the oxidative stress response. The up-regulation of the Kupffer cell lectin Lgals3 gene expression indicated a response to damaged red blood cells, and Hp (haptoglobin) up-regulation is indicative of increased hemoglobin uptake. Up-regulation of liver IL-6 and IL-8 gene expression suggested an activation of an inflammatory response by liver endothelial cells. In summary, MMI exposure led to an oxidative stress response in blood cells, and an up-regulation of liver genes involved with oxidative stress and heme homeostasis, which was clearly separate and preceded frank hemolysis.

  19. The role of carboxyhemoglobin measured with CO-oximetry in the detection of hemolysis in newborns with ABO alloimmunization.

    Lozar-Krivec, Jana; Bratanic, Borut; Paro-Panjan, Darja

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate carboxyhemoglobin (COHb) values measured with a CO-oximeter (Roche-cobas b 221) in jaundiced newborns with or without hemolysis and healthy controls in order to assess whether COHb measurement determined with a CO-oximeter could be used as an indicator of hemolysis in newborns with ABO alloimmunization. A total of 86 term newborn infants were prospectively studied. The study cohort consisted of three subgroups: 18 infants with ABO HDN, 21 infants with hyperbilirubinemia without hemolytic disease who required phototherapy, and 47 healthy controls. The COHb, bilirubin, and Hb levels were measured. The three subgroups did not differ significantly with respect to birth weight, gestational age, gender, Apgar score, or mode of delivery. The ABO HDN infants had significantly higher COHb values than the healthy controls (median 2.4% versus 1.3%, p < 0.0005) and the group with hyperbilirubinemia without hemolytic disease (median 2.4% versus 1.3%, p < 0.0005), although the infants with hyperbilirubinemia without hemolytic disease did not have significantly higher COHb values compared with the healthy controls. The cut-off value of 1.7% COHb had 72% sensitivity and 97% specificity for confirming hemolysis in ABO alloimmunization. Our data show that COHb values determined with CO-oximeters are higher in newborns with hemolysis than in those without hemolysis. COHb measured with CO-oximeters could be used to confirm hemolysis in infants with ABO alloimmunization.

  20. Technical-Induced Hemolysis in Patients with Respiratory Failure Supported with Veno-Venous ECMO - Prevalence and Risk Factors.

    Lehle, Karla; Philipp, Alois; Zeman, Florian; Lunz, Dirk; Lubnow, Matthias; Wendel, Hans-Peter; Göbölös, Laszlo; Schmid, Christof; Müller, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to explore the prevalence and risk factors for technical-induced hemolysis in adults supported with veno-venous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (vvECMO) and to analyze the effect of hemolytic episodes on outcome. This was a retrospective, single-center study that included 318 adult patients (Regensburg ECMO Registry, 2009-2014) with acute respiratory failure treated with different modern miniaturized ECMO systems. Free plasma hemoglobin (fHb) was used as indicator for hemolysis. Throughout a cumulative support duration of 4,142 days on ECMO only 1.7% of the fHb levels were above a critical value of 500 mg/l. A grave rise in fHb indicated pumphead thrombosis (n = 8), while acute oxygenator thrombosis (n = 15) did not affect fHb. Replacement of the pumphead normalized fHb within two days. Neither pump or cannula type nor duration on the first system was associated with hemolysis. Multiple trauma, need for kidney replacement therapy, increased daily red blood cell transfusion requirements, and high blood flow (3.0-4.5 L/min) through small-sized cannulas significantly resulted in augmented blood cell trauma. Survivors were characterized by lower peak levels of fHb [90 (60, 142) mg/l] in comparison to non-survivors [148 (91, 256) mg/l, p≤0.001]. In conclusion, marked hemolysis is not common in vvECMO with modern devices. Clinically obvious hemolysis often is caused by pumphead thrombosis. High flow velocity through small cannulas may also cause technical-induced hemolysis. In patients who developed lung failure due to trauma, fHb was elevated independantly of ECMO. In our cohort, the occurance of hemolysis was associated with increased mortality.

  1. Technical-Induced Hemolysis in Patients with Respiratory Failure Supported with Veno-Venous ECMO - Prevalence and Risk Factors.

    Karla Lehle

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to explore the prevalence and risk factors for technical-induced hemolysis in adults supported with veno-venous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (vvECMO and to analyze the effect of hemolytic episodes on outcome. This was a retrospective, single-center study that included 318 adult patients (Regensburg ECMO Registry, 2009-2014 with acute respiratory failure treated with different modern miniaturized ECMO systems. Free plasma hemoglobin (fHb was used as indicator for hemolysis. Throughout a cumulative support duration of 4,142 days on ECMO only 1.7% of the fHb levels were above a critical value of 500 mg/l. A grave rise in fHb indicated pumphead thrombosis (n = 8, while acute oxygenator thrombosis (n = 15 did not affect fHb. Replacement of the pumphead normalized fHb within two days. Neither pump or cannula type nor duration on the first system was associated with hemolysis. Multiple trauma, need for kidney replacement therapy, increased daily red blood cell transfusion requirements, and high blood flow (3.0-4.5 L/min through small-sized cannulas significantly resulted in augmented blood cell trauma. Survivors were characterized by lower peak levels of fHb [90 (60, 142 mg/l] in comparison to non-survivors [148 (91, 256 mg/l, p≤0.001]. In conclusion, marked hemolysis is not common in vvECMO with modern devices. Clinically obvious hemolysis often is caused by pumphead thrombosis. High flow velocity through small cannulas may also cause technical-induced hemolysis. In patients who developed lung failure due to trauma, fHb was elevated independantly of ECMO. In our cohort, the occurance of hemolysis was associated with increased mortality.

  2. Binary release of ascorbic acid and lecithin from core-shell nanofibers on blood-contacting surface for reducing long-term hemolysis of erythrocyte.

    Shi, Qiang; Fan, Qunfu; Ye, Wei; Hou, Jianwen; Wong, Shing-Chung; Xu, Xiaodong; Yin, Jinghua

    2015-01-01

    There is an urgent need to develop blood-contacting biomaterials with long-term anti-hemolytic capability. To obtain such biomaterials, we coaxially electrospin [ascorbic acid (AA) and lecithin]/poly (ethylene oxide) (PEO) core-shell nanofibers onto the surface of styrene-b-(ethylene-co-butylene)-b-styrene elastomer (SEBS) that has been grafted with poly (ethylene glycol) (PEG) chains. Our strategy is based on that the grafted layers of PEG render the surface hydrophilic to reduce the mechanical injure to red blood cells (RBCs) while the AA and lecithin released from nanofibers on blood-contacting surface can actively interact with RBCs to decrease the oxidative damage to RBCs. We demonstrate that (AA and lecithin)/PEO core-shell structured nanofibers have been fabricated on the PEG grafted surface. The binary release of AA and lecithin in the distilled water is in a controlled manner and lasts for almost 5 days; during RBCs preservation, AA acts as an antioxidant and lecithin as a lipid supplier to the membrane of erythrocytes, resulting in low mechanical fragility and hemolysis of RBCs, as well as high deformability of stored RBCs. Our work thus makes a new approach to fabricate blood-contacting biomaterials with the capability of long-term anti-hemolysis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Low bone mass density is associated with hemolysis in brazilian patients with sickle cell disease

    Gabriel Baldanzi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To determine whether kidney disease and hemolysis are associated with bone mass density in a population of adult Brazilian patients with sickle cell disease. INTRODUCTION: Bone involvement is a frequent clinical manifestation of sickle cell disease, and it has multiple causes; however, there are few consistent clinical associations between bone involvement and sickle cell disease. METHODS: Patients over 20 years of age with sickle cell disease who were regularly followed at the Hematology and Hemotherapy Center of Campinas, Brazil, were sorted into three groups, including those with normal bone mass density, those with osteopenia, and those with osteoporosis, according to the World Health Organization criteria. The clinical data of the patients were compared using statistical analyses. RESULTS: In total, 65 patients were included in this study: 12 (18.5% with normal bone mass density, 37 (57% with osteopenia and 16 (24.5% with osteoporosis. Overall, 53 patients (81.5% had bone mass densities below normal standards. Osteopenia and osteoporosis patients had increased lactate dehydrogenase levels and reticulocyte counts compared to patients with normal bone mass density (p<0.05. Osteoporosis patients also had decreased hemoglobin levels (p<0.05. Hemolysis was significantly increased in patients with osteoporosis compared with patients with osteopenia, as indicated by increased lactate dehydrogenase levels and reticulocyte counts as well as decreased hemoglobin levels. Osteoporosis patients were older, with lower glomerular filtration rates than patients with osteopenia. There was no significant difference between the groups with regard to gender, body mass index, serum creatinine levels, estimated creatinine clearance, or microalbuminuria. CONCLUSION: A high prevalence of reduced bone mass density that was associated with hemolysis was found in this population, as indicated by the high lactate dehydrogenase levels, increased

  4. Repetitive Supra-Physiological Shear Stress Impairs Red Blood Cell Deformability and Induces Hemolysis.

    Horobin, Jarod T; Sabapathy, Surendran; Simmonds, Michael J

    2017-11-01

    The supra-physiological shear stress that blood is exposed to while traversing mechanical circulatory assist devices affects the physical properties of red blood cells (RBCs), impairs RBC deformability, and may induce hemolysis. Previous studies exploring RBC damage following exposure to supra-physiological shear stress have employed durations exceeding clinical instrumentation, thus we explored changes in RBC deformability following exposure to shear stress below the reported "hemolytic threshold" using shear exposure durations per minute (i.e., duty-cycles) reflective of that employed by circulatory assist devices. Blood collected from 20 male donors, aged 18-38 years, was suspended in a viscous medium and exposed to an intermittent shear stress protocol of 1 s at 100 Pa, every 60 s for 60 duty-cycles. During the remaining 59 s/min, the cells were left at stasis until the subsequent duty-cycle commenced. At discrete time points (15/30/45/60 duty-cycles), an ektacytometer measured RBC deformability immediately after shear exposure at 100 Pa. Plasma-free hemoglobin, a measurement of hemolysis, was quantified via spectrophotometry. Supra-physiological shear stress impaired RBC properties, as indicated by: (1) decreased maximal elongation of RBCs at infinite shear stress following 15 duty-cycles (P supra-physiological shear stress protocol (100 Pa) following exposure to 1 duty-cycle (F (1.891, 32.15) = 12.21, P = 0.0001); and (3) increased plasma-free hemoglobin following 60 duty-cycles (P supra-physiological shear stress, impairs RBC deformability, with the extent of impairment exacerbated with each duty-cycle, and ultimately precipitates hemolysis. © 2017 International Center for Artificial Organs and Transplantation and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Elevated pulse pressure is associated with hemolysis, proteinuria and chronic kidney disease in sickle cell disease.

    Enrico M Novelli

    Full Text Available A seeming paradox of sickle cell disease is that patients do not suffer from a high prevalence of systemic hypertension in spite of endothelial dysfunction, chronic inflammation and vasculopathy. However, some patients do develop systolic hypertension and increased pulse pressure, an increasingly recognized major cardiovascular risk factor in other populations. Hence, we hypothesized that pulse pressure, unlike other blood pressure parameters, is independently associated with markers of hemolytic anemia and cardiovascular risk in sickle cell disease. We analyzed the correlates of pulse pressure in patients (n  =  661 enrolled in a multicenter international sickle cell trial. Markers of hemolysis were analyzed as independent variables and as a previously validated hemolytic index that includes multiple variables. We found that pulse pressure, not systolic, diastolic or mean arterial pressure, independently correlated with high reticulocyte count (beta  =  2.37, p  =  0.02 and high hemolytic index (beta  =  1.53, p = 0.002 in patients with homozygous sickle cell disease in two multiple linear regression models which include the markers of hemolysis as independent variables or the hemolytic index, respectively. Pulse pressure was also independently associated with elevated serum creatinine (beta  =  3.21, p  =  0.02, and with proteinuria (beta  =  2.52, p  =  0.04. These results from the largest sickle cell disease cohort to date since the Cooperative Study of Sickle Cell Disease show that pulse pressure is independently associated with hemolysis, proteinuria and chronic kidney disease. We propose that high pulse pressure may be a risk factor for clinical complications of vascular dysfunction in sickle cell disease. Longitudinal and mechanistic studies should be conducted to confirm these hypotheses.

  6. First Trimester Hemolysis, Elevated Liver Enzymes, Low Platelets Syndrome in a Surrogate Pregnancy

    Myer, Emily; Hill, James

    2015-01-01

    Background The occurrence of hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, low platelets (HELLP) syndrome before 20 weeks of gestation is rare. HELLP is a possible but rare syndrome in gestational surrogate pregnancies for surrogates with risk factors for development of preeclampsia. Case A 32-year-old patient with chronic hypertension and positive antinuclear antibody presented for prenatal care at 13 weeks and 1 day. She was a surrogate for the embryo of a 43-year-old couple. By 15 weeks she developed...

  7. Successful use of plasma exchange for profound hemolysis in a child with loxoscelism.

    Said, Ahmed; Hmiel, Paul; Goldsmith, Matthew; Dietzen, Dennis; Hartman, Mary E

    2014-11-01

    We describe a 6-year-old boy who presented with massive hemolysis, shock, disseminated intravascular coagulopathy, and acute renal failure after loxosceles envenomation. In this patient, plasma exchange therapy (PEX) successfully cleared the plasma from an initial hemolytic index of 2000 (equivalent to 2 g/dL hemoglobin, where optimetric laboratory evaluation is impossible) to an index of impossible. In this setting, PEX can be used to clear the plasma, restoring the ability to perform routine laboratory assessments. Copyright © 2014 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  8. Basic evaluation of typical nanoporous silica nanoparticles in being drug carrier: Structure, wettability and hemolysis.

    Li, Jing; Guo, Yingyu

    2017-04-01

    Herein, the present work devoted to study the basic capacity of nanoporous silica nanoparticles in being drug carrier that covered structure, wettability and hemolysis so as to provide crucial evaluation. Typical nanoporous silica nanoparticles that consist of nanoporous silica nanoparticles (NSN), amino modified nanoporous silica nanoparticles (amino-NSN), carboxyl modified nanoporous silica nanoparticles (carboxyl-NSN) and hierachical nanoporous silica nanoparticles (hierachical-NSN) were studied. The results showed that their wettability and hemolysis were closely related to structure and surface modification. Basically, wettability became stronger as the amount of OH on the surface of NSN was higher. Both large nanopores and surface modification can reduce the wettability of NSN. Furthermore, NSN series were safe to be used when they circulated into the blood in low concentration, while if high concentration can not be avoided during administration, high porosity or amino modification of NSN were safer to be considered. It is believed that the basic evaluation of NSN can make contribution in providing scientific instruction for designing drug loaded NSN systems. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Effects of Hypoxia on Erythrocyte Membrane Properties—Implications for Intravascular Hemolysis and Purinergic Control of Blood Flow

    Ryszard Grygorczyk

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Intravascular hemolysis occurs in hereditary, acquired, and iatrogenic hemolytic conditions but it could be also a normal physiological process contributing to intercellular signaling. New evidence suggests that intravascular hemolysis and the associated release of adenosine triphosphate (ATP may be an important mechanism for in vivo local purinergic signaling and blood flow regulation during exercise and hypoxia. However, the mechanisms that modulate hypoxia-induced RBC membrane fragility remain unclear. Here, we provide an overview of the role of RBC ATP release in the regulation of vascular tone and prevailing assumptions on the putative release mechanisms. We show importance of intravascular hemolysis as a source of ATP for local purinergic regulation of blood flow and discuss processes that regulate membrane propensity to rupture under stress and hypoxia.

  10. The degree of acceptability of swine blood values at increasing levels of hemolysis evaluated through visual inspection versus automated quantification.

    Di Martino, Guido; Stefani, Anna Lisa; Lippi, Giuseppe; Gagliazzo, Laura; McCormick, Wanda; Gabai, Gianfranco; Bonfanti, Lebana

    2015-05-01

    The pronounced fragility that characterizes swine erythrocytes is likely to produce a variable degree of hemolysis during blood sampling, and the free hemoglobin may then unpredictably bias the quantification of several analytes. The aim of this study was to evaluate the degree of acceptability of values obtained for several biochemical parameters at different levels of hemolysis. Progressively increased degrees of physical hemolysis were induced in 3 aliquots of 30 nonhemolytic sera, and the relative effects on the test results were assessed. To define the level of hemolysis, we used both visual estimation (on a scale of 0 to 3+) and analytical assessment (hemolytic index) and identified the best analytical cutoff values for discriminating the visual levels of hemolysis. Hemolysis led to a variable and dose-dependent effect on the test results that was specific for each analyte tested. In mildly hemolyzed specimens, C-reactive protein, haptoglobin, β1-globulin, β2-globulin, α1-globulin, γ-globulin, sodium, calcium, and alkaline phosphatase were not significantly biased, whereas α2-globulin, albumin, urea, creatinine, glucose, total cholesterol, aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, gamma-glutamyl transferase, nonesterified fatty acids, bilirubin, phosphorus, magnesium, iron, zinc, copper, lipase, triglycerides, lactate dehydrogenase, unbound iron-binding capacity, and uric acid were significantly biased. Chloride and total protein were unbiased even in markedly hemolyzed samples. Analytical interference was hypothesized to be the main source of this bias, leading to a nonlinear trend that confirmed the difficulty in establishing reliable coefficients of correction for adjusting the test results. © 2015 The Author(s).

  11. Evaluation of a Spiral Groove Geometry for Improvement of Hemolysis Level in a Hydrodynamically Levitated Centrifugal Blood Pump.

    Murashige, Tomotaka; Kosaka, Ryo; Sakota, Daisuke; Nishida, Masahiro; Kawaguchi, Yasuo; Yamane, Takashi; Maruyama, Osamu

    2015-08-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate a spiral groove geometry for a thrust bearing to improve the hemolysis level in a hydrodynamically levitated centrifugal blood pump. We compared three geometric models: (i) the groove width is the same as the ridge width at any given polar coordinate (conventional model); (ii) the groove width contracts inward from 9.7 to 0.5 mm (contraction model); and (iii) the groove width expands inward from 0.5 to 4.2 mm (expansion model). To evaluate the hemolysis level, an impeller levitation performance test and in vitro hemolysis test were conducted using a mock circulation loop. In these tests, the driving conditions were set at a pressure head of 200 mm Hg and a flow rate of 4.0 L/min. As a result of the impeller levitation performance test, the bottom bearing gaps of the contraction and conventional models were 88 and 25 μm, respectively. The impeller of the expansion model touched the bottom housing. In the hemolysis test, the relative normalized index of hemolysis (NIH) ratios of the contraction model in comparison with BPX-80 and HPM-15 were 0.6 and 0.9, respectively. In contrast, the relative NIH ratios of the conventional model in comparison with BPX-80 and HPM-15 were 9.6 and 13.7, respectively. We confirmed that the contraction model achieved a large bearing gap and improved the hemolysis level in a hydrodynamically levitated centrifugal blood pump. Copyright © 2015 International Center for Artificial Organs and Transplantation and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Hemolysis is associated with low reticulocyte production index and predicts blood transfusion in severe malarial anemia.

    Rolf Fendel

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Falciparum Malaria, an infectious disease caused by the apicomplexan parasite Plasmodium falciparum, is among the leading causes of death and morbidity attributable to infectious diseases worldwide. In Gabon, Central Africa, one out of four inpatients have severe malarial anemia (SMA, a life-threatening complication if left untreated. Emerging drug resistant parasites might aggravate the situation. This case control study investigates biomarkers of enhanced hemolysis in hospitalized children with either SMA or mild malaria (MM. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Ninety-one children were included, thereof 39 SMA patients. Strict inclusion criteria were chosen to exclude other causes of anemia. At diagnosis, erythrophagocytosis (a direct marker for extravascular hemolysis, EVH was enhanced in SMA compared to MM patients (5.0 arbitrary units (AU (interquartile range (IR: 2.2-9.6 vs. 2.1 AU (IR: 1.3-3.9, p<0.01. Furthermore, indirect markers for EVH, (i.e. serum neopterin levels, spleen size enlargement and monocyte pigment were significantly increased in SMA patients. Markers for erythrocyte ageing, such as CD35 (complement receptor 1, CD55 (decay acceleration factor and phosphatidylserine exposure (annexin-V-binding were investigated by flow cytometry. In SMA patients, levels of CD35 and CD55 on the red blood cell surface were decreased and erythrocyte removal markers were increased when compared to MM or reconvalescent patients. Additionally, intravascular hemolysis (IVH was quantified using several indirect markers (LDH, alpha-HBDH, haptoglobin and hemopexin, which all showed elevated IVH in SMA. The presence of both IVH and EVH predicted the need for blood transfusion during antimalarial treatment (odds ratio 61.5, 95% confidence interval (CI: 8.9-427. Interestingly, this subpopulation is characterized by a significantly lowered reticulocyte production index (RPI, p<0.05. CONCLUSIONS: Our results show the multifactorial pathophysiology of SMA

  13. Influence of static pressure and shear rate on hemolysis of red blood cells.

    Yasuda, T; Funakubo, A; Miyawaki, F; Kawamura, T; Higami, T; Fukui, Y

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of multiple mechanical forces in hemolysis. Specific attention is focused on the effects of shear and pressure. An experimental apparatus consisting of a rotational viscometer, compression chamber, and heat exchanger was prepared to apply multiple mechanical forces to a blood sample. The rotational viscometer, in which bovine blood was subjected to shear rates of 0, 500, 1,000, and 1,500 s(-1), was set in the compression chamber and pressurized with an air compressor at 0, 200, 400, and 600 mm Hg. The blood temperature was maintained at 21 degrees C and 28 degrees C. Free hemoglobin at 600 mm Hg was observed to be approximately four times higher than at 0 mm Hg for a shear rate of 1,500 s(-1) (p dynamics analysis, flow visualization, and computational fluid dynamics.

  14. Maternal cautopyreiophagia as a rare cause of neonatal hemolysis: a case report.

    Bernardo, Erika O; Matos, Renée I; Dawood, Taslim; Whiteway, Susan L

    2015-03-01

    Hyperbilirubinemia in the first 24 hours of life in a newborn is pathologic, necessitating additional evaluation. We report the first case of hemolysis and subsequent hyperbilirubinemia in an otherwise normal term neonate resulting from oxidative stress in the form of maternal cautopyreiophagia: the ingestion of burnt matchstick heads. During the third trimester of pregnancy, the infant's mother consumed more than 300 burnt matchstick heads weekly for 4 weeks. Matches contain potassium chlorate, a powerful oxidant that when ingested can ultimately lead to the destruction of erythrocytes, disseminated intravascular coagulation, kidney injury, or death. The infant's bilirubin rose as high as 17 mg/dL at 22 hours of life; however, the infant did well with a brief course of phototherapy. This case highlights the importance of prenatal questioning about maternal ingestion of potentially oxidative substances and assessing the possible risk for the infant. published in the public domain by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  15. Spray drying for preservation of erythrocytes: effect of atomization on hemolysis.

    McLean, Mary; Han, Xiao-Yue; Higgins, Adam Z

    2013-04-01

    Spray drying has the potential to enable storage of erythrocytes at room temperature in the dry state. The spray drying process involves atomization of a liquid into small droplets and drying of the droplets in a gas stream. In this short report, we focus on the atomization process. To decouple atomization from drying, erythrocyte suspensions were sprayed with a two-fluid atomizer nozzle using humid nitrogen as the atomizing gas. The median droplet size was less than 100 μm for all of the spray conditions investigated, indicating that the suspensions were successfully atomized. Hemolysis was significantly affected by the hematocrit of the erythrocyte suspension, the suspension flow rate, and the atomizing gas flow rate (pspray drying may be a feasible option for erythrocyte biopreservation.

  16. Bovine serum albumin bioconjugated graphene oxide: Red blood cell adhesion and hemolysis studied by QCM-D

    Cai, Bing; Hu, Kebang; Li, Chunming; Jin, Jing; Hu, Yuexin

    2015-11-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) had great potential in various applications especial biomedical materials. In this study, we improved the hemocompatibility especial hemolysis properties of GO nanosheets by grafting bovine serum albumin (BSA). The hemocompatibility of GO-g-BSA was improved. The hemolysis ratio of GO-g-BSA was lower than 0.2% and no visible hemoglobin release was observed. In a flowed condition, the interaction between GO and RBC was monitored real time by quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) and the hemolysis rates of eluted RBC solution was determined. The balance between the adsorption and degradation of RBC on the surface of GO was a linear process. The GO-g-BSA surface decreased the adhesion of RBC in a flowed condition, maintained the morphology of RBC and reduced the hemolysis rate in the most effective manner. The inert of BSA resisted GO interacting with the lipid bilayers of RBC and the negative charge on the surface of BSA repelled the approach of negative charged RBC. The excellent hemocompatibility of the BSA modified GO might confer its great potentials for various biomedical applications.

  17. Total Artificial Heart Implantation Blood Pressure Management as Resolving Treatment for Massive Hemolysis following Total Artificial Heart Implantation.

    Ghodsizad, Ali; Koerner, Michael M; El-Banayosy, A; Zeriouh, Mohamed; Ruhparwar, Arjang; Loebe, Matthias

    2016-10-21

    The SynCardia Total Artificial Heart (TAH) has been used for patients with biventricular failure, who cannot be managed with implantation of a left ventricular (LV) assist device. Following TAH implantation, our patient developed severe hemolysis, which could only be managed successfully by aggressive blood pressure control [Ohashi 2003; Nakata 1998].

  18. Pattern of AST and ALT changes in Relation to Hemolysis in sickle cell Disease

    K. Nsiah

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Elevated aminotransferase levels are commonly associated with compromised hepatic integrity from various insults. In sickle cell disease, aspartate transaminase (AST is also released via intravascular hemolysis. This study was done to determine the pattern of changes in AST and alanine transaminase (ALT, in particular the AST:ALT ratio, and to relate these to the hemolytic state, which we consider to be more important than hepatic and cardiac dysfunction in some individuals with sickle cell disease. Methods Serum aminotransferase levels were measured in 330 subjects with sickle cell disease, as well as hemoglobin, reticulocytes, and lactate dehydrogenase. The AST:ALT ratio was designated as a hemolytic marker, and simple and multivariate regression analyses were carried out between this ratio and other hemolytic markers. Results Mean AST and ALT levels were 48.24 % 27.78 and 26.48 % 22.73 U/L, respectively. However, for 49 subjects without sickle cell disease, mean AST and ALT levels were the same, ie, 23.0 U/L. In the subjects with sickle cell disease, the increases in AST levels were far higher than for ALT, supporting its release via intravascular hemolysis. In 95.8% of the subjects with sickle cell disease, the AST:ALT ratio was > 1, but our results did not suggest overt malfunctioning of the liver and heart in the majority of subjects. Conclusion Regression analyses support the use of the AST:ALT ratio as a hemolytic marker, because it has an inverse association with the hemoglobin level. Whether in steady state or in crisis, provided hepatic and cardiac integrity has not been compromised, subjects with sickle cell disease would have higher AST levels due to the hemolytic nature of the condition. This is the first report highlighting the AST:ALT ratio in sickle cell disease.

  19. Random uncertainty of photometric determination of hemolysis index on the Abbott Architect c16000 platform.

    Aloisio, Elena; Carnevale, Assunta; Pasqualetti, Sara; Birindelli, Sarah; Dolci, Alberto; Panteghini, Mauro

    2018-01-16

    Automatic photometric determination of the hemolysis index (HI) on serum and plasma samples is central to detect potential interferences of in vitro hemolysis on laboratory tests. When HI is above an established cut-off for interference, results may suffer from a significant bias and undermine clinical reliability of the test. Despite its undeniable importance for patient safety, the analytical performance of HI estimation is not usually checked in laboratories. Here we evaluated for the first time the random source of measurement uncertainty of HI determination on the two Abbott Architect c16000 platforms in use in our laboratory. From January 2016 to September 2017, we collected data from daily photometric determination of HI on a fresh-frozen serum pool with a predetermined HI value of ~100 (corresponding to ~1g/L of free hemoglobin). Monthly and cumulative CVs were calculated. During 21months, 442 and 451 measurements were performed on the two platforms, respectively. Monthly CVs ranged from 0.7% to 2.7% on c16000-1 and from 0.8% to 2.5% on c16000-2, with a between-platform cumulative CV of 1.82% (corresponding to an expanded uncertainty of 3.64%). Mean HI values on the two platforms were just slightly biased (101.3 vs. 103.1, 1.76%), but, due to the high precision of measurements, this difference assumed statistical significance (p<0.0001). Even though no quality specifications are available to date, our study shows that the HI measurement on Architect c16000 platform has nice reproducibility that could be considered in establishing the state of the art of the measurement. Copyright © 2018 The Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Beta-mangostin from Cratoxylum arborescens activates the intrinsic apoptosis pathway through reactive oxygen species with downregulation of the HSP70 gene in the HL60 cells associated with a G0/G1 cell-cycle arrest.

    Omer, Fatima Abdelmutaal Ahmed; Hashim, Najihah Binti Mohd; Ibrahim, Mohamed Yousif; Dehghan, Firouzeh; Yahayu, Maizatulakmal; Karimian, Hamed; Salim, Landa Zeenelabdin Ali; Mohan, Syam

    2017-11-01

    Xanthones are phytochemical compounds found in a number of fruits and vegetables. Characteristically, they are noted to be made of diverse properties based on their biological, biochemical, and pharmacological actions. Accordingly, the apoptosis mechanisms induced by beta-mangostin, a xanthone compound isolated from Cratoxylum arborescens in the human promyelocytic leukemia cell line (HL60) in vitro, were examined in this study. The 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay was done to estimate the cytotoxicity effect of β-mangostin on the HL60 cell line. Acridine orange/propidium iodide and Hoechst 33342 dyes and Annexin V tests were conducted to detect the apoptosis features. Caspase-3 and caspase-9 activities; reactive oxygen species; real-time polymerase chain reaction for Bcl-2, Bax, caspase-3, and caspase-9 Hsp70 genes; and western blot for p53, cytochrome c, and pro- and cleavage-caspase-3 and caspase-9 were assessed to examine the apoptosis mechanism. Cell-cycle analysis conducted revealed that β-mangostin inhibited the growth of HL60 at 58 µM in 24 h. The administration of β-mangostin with HL60 caused cell morphological changes related to apoptosis which increased the number of early and late apoptotic cells. The β-mangostin-catalyzed apoptosis action through caspase-3, caspase-7, and caspase-9 activation overproduced reactive oxygen species which downregulated the expression of antiapoptotic genes Bcl-2 and HSP70. Conversely, the expression of the apoptotic genes Bax, caspase-3, and caspase-9 were upregulated. Meanwhile, at the protein level, β-mangostin activated the formation of cleaved caspase-3 and caspase-9 and also upregulated the p53. β-mangostin arrested the cell cycle at the G 0 /G 1 phase. Overall, the results for β-mangostin showed an antiproliferative effect in HL60 via stopping the cell cycle at the G 0 /G 1 phase and prompted the intrinsic apoptosis pathway.

  1. Ferulago angulata activates intrinsic pathway of apoptosis in MCF-7 cells associated with G1 cell cycle arrest via involvement of p21/p27

    Karimian H

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Hamed Karimian,1 Soheil Zorofchian Moghadamtousi,2 Mehran Fadaeinasab,3 Shahram Golbabapour,2 Mahboubeh Razavi,1 Maryam Hajrezaie,2 Aditya Arya,1 Mahmood Ameen Abdulla,4 Syam Mohan,5 Hapipah Mohd Ali,2 Mohamad Ibrahim Noordin1 1Department of Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, 2Institute of Biological Sciences, Faculty of Science, 3Department of Chemistry, 4Department of Biomedical Science, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, 5Medical Research Centre, Jazan University, Jazan, Saudi Arabia Abstract: Ferulago angulata is a medicinal plant that is traditionally known for its ­anti-inflammatory and antiulcer properties. The present study was aimed to evaluate its anticancer activity and the possible mechanism of action using MCF-7 as an in vitro model. F. angulata leaf extracts were prepared using solvents in the order of increasing polarity. As determined by MTT assay, F. angulata leaves hexane extract (FALHE revealed the strongest cytotoxicity against MCF-7 cells with the half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50 value of 5.3±0.82 µg/mL. The acute toxicity study of FALHE provided evidence of the safety of the plant extract. Microscopic and flow cytometric analysis using annexin-V probe showed an induction of apoptosis in MCF-7 by FALHE. Treatment of MCF-7 cells with FALHE encouraged the intrinsic pathway of apoptosis, with cell death transducing signals that reduced the mitochondrial membrane potential with cytochrome c release from mitochondria to cytosol. The released cytochrome c triggered the activation of caspase-9. Meanwhile, the overexpression of caspase-8 suggested the involvement of an extrinsic pathway in the induced apoptosis at the late stage of treatment. Moreover, flow cytometric analysis showed that FALHE treatment significantly arrested MCF-7 cells in the G1 phase, which was associated with upregulation of p21 and p27 assessed by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Immunofluorescence

  2. Seizure is a rare presentation for acute hemolysis due to G6PD deficiency. We report a previously healthy boy who presented initially with seizure and cyanosis and subsequently acute hemolysis, due to glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency (G6PD) an

    Afshin FAYYAZI; Ali KHAJEH; Hosein ESFAHANI

    2012-01-01

    Seizure is a rare presentation for acute hemolysis due to G6PD deficiency. We report a previously healthy boy who presented initially with seizure and cyanosis and subsequently acute hemolysis, due to glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency (G6PD) and probably secondary methemoglobinemia, following the ingestion of fava beans.

  3. Ophthalmic manifestations of 107 cases with hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes and low platelet count syndrome

    Erbagci, I.; Okumus, S.; Bekir, Necdet A.; Karaca, M.; Ugur, Mete G.

    2008-01-01

    Objective was to present various ophthalmologic disorders in a clinical series of hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes and low platelet count (HELLP) syndrome cases. This is a prospective clinical study performed between 2002 and 2005. One hundred seven HELLP attended in either Departments of Ophthalmology or Obstetrics and Gynecology, Medical School, Gaziantep University, Gaziantep, Turkey were evaluated. Mean age was 25.5 (22-36 years). Mean levels were 2.5 gravidity, 1.3 parity, 55,200/mm3 platelet counts, 308.7 U/I aspartate transaminase, 255.4 U/I alanine transminase and 1711.6U/I lactate dehydrogenase. Four patients died (3.7%) despite the proper treatments. Cortical blindness was observed in 3 cases (2.7%), serous retinal detachments in 4 (3.7%) and mild hypertension changes in 18 (16%). Ophthalmic complications are possible during and after this syndrome. Almost all ophthalmologic changes recover after delivery by cesarean section, nevertheless, it is essential that ophthalmologists should be aware of retinal disorders when this fatal complication of pregnancy is encountered. (author)

  4. Brown Recluse spider bite mediated hemolysis: clinical features, a possible role for complement inhibitor therapy, and reduced RBC surface glycophorin A as a potential biomarker of venom exposure.

    Eric A Gehrie

    Full Text Available The venom of Loxosceles reclusa (Brown Recluse spider can cause a severe, life-threatening hemolysis in humans for which no therapy is currently available in the USA beyond supportive measures. Because this hemolysis is uncommon, relatively little is known about its clinical manifestation, diagnosis, or management. Here, we aimed to clarify the clinical details of envenomation, to determine the efficacy of the complement inhibitor eculizumab to prevent the hemolysis in vitro, and to investigate markers of exposure to Brown Recluse venom.We performed a 10-year chart review of cases of Brown Recluse spider bite-mediated hemolysis at our institution. We also designed an in vitro assay to test the efficacy of eculizumab to inhibit hemolysis of venom exposed red blood cells. Finally, we compared levels of CD55, CD59 and glycophorin A on venom exposed versus venom-naïve cells.Most victims of severe Brown Recluse spider mediated hemolysis at our institution are children and follow an unpredictable clinical course. Brown Recluse spider bite mediated hemolysis is reduced by 79.2% (SD=18.8% by eculizumab in vitro. Erythrocyte glycophorin A, but not CD55 or CD59, is reduced after red blood cells are incubated with venom in vitro.Taken together, our laboratory data and clinical observations indicate that L. reclusa venom exposure results in non-specific antibody and complement fixation on red blood cells, resulting in complement mediated hemolysis that is curtailed by the complement inhibitor eculizumab in vitro. Glycophorin A measurement by flow cytometry may help to identify victims of L. reclusa envenomation.

  5. Modifications of nano-titania surface for in vitro evaluations of hemolysis, cytotoxicity, and nonspecific protein binding

    Datta, Aparna, E-mail: adatta.research@gmail.com [Jadavpur University, School of Materials Science and Nanotechnology (India); Dasgupta, Sayantan [NRS Medical College and Hospital, Department of Biochemistry (India); Mukherjee, Siddhartha [Jadavpur University, Department of Metallurgical and Material Engineering (India)

    2017-04-15

    In the past decade, a variety of drug carriers based on mesoporous silica nanoparticles has been extensively reported. However, their biocompatibility still remains debatable, which motivated us to explore the porous nanostructures of other metal oxides, for example titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}), as potential drug delivery vehicles. Herein, we report the in vitro hemolysis, cytotoxicity, and protein binding of TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles, synthesized by a sol–gel method. The surface of the TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles was modified with hydroxyl, amine, or thiol containing moieties to examine the influence of surface functional groups on the toxicity and protein binding aspects of the nanoparticles. Our study revealed the superior hemocompatibility of pristine, as well as functionalized TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles, compared to that of mesoporous silica, the present gold standard. Among the functional groups studied, aminosilane moieties on the TiO{sub 2} surface substantially reduced the degree of hemolysis (down to 5%). Further, cytotoxicity studies by MTT assay suggested that surface functional moieties play a crucial role in determining the biocompatibility of the nanoparticles. The presence of NH{sub 2}– functional groups on the TiO{sub 2} nanoparticle surface enhanced the cell viability by almost 28% as compared to its native counterpart (at 100 μg/ml), which was in agreement with the hemolysis assay. Finally, nonspecific protein adsorption on functionalized TiO{sub 2} surfaces was examined using human serum albumin and it was found that negatively charged surface moieties, like –OH and –SH, could mitigate protein adsorption to a significant extent.

  6. Modifications of nano-titania surface for in vitro evaluations of hemolysis, cytotoxicity, and nonspecific protein binding

    Datta, Aparna; Dasgupta, Sayantan; Mukherjee, Siddhartha

    2017-04-01

    In the past decade, a variety of drug carriers based on mesoporous silica nanoparticles has been extensively reported. However, their biocompatibility still remains debatable, which motivated us to explore the porous nanostructures of other metal oxides, for example titanium dioxide (TiO2), as potential drug delivery vehicles. Herein, we report the in vitro hemolysis, cytotoxicity, and protein binding of TiO2 nanoparticles, synthesized by a sol-gel method. The surface of the TiO2 nanoparticles was modified with hydroxyl, amine, or thiol containing moieties to examine the influence of surface functional groups on the toxicity and protein binding aspects of the nanoparticles. Our study revealed the superior hemocompatibility of pristine, as well as functionalized TiO2 nanoparticles, compared to that of mesoporous silica, the present gold standard. Among the functional groups studied, aminosilane moieties on the TiO2 surface substantially reduced the degree of hemolysis (down to 5%). Further, cytotoxicity studies by MTT assay suggested that surface functional moieties play a crucial role in determining the biocompatibility of the nanoparticles. The presence of NH2- functional groups on the TiO2 nanoparticle surface enhanced the cell viability by almost 28% as compared to its native counterpart (at 100 μg/ml), which was in agreement with the hemolysis assay. Finally, nonspecific protein adsorption on functionalized TiO2 surfaces was examined using human serum albumin and it was found that negatively charged surface moieties, like -OH and -SH, could mitigate protein adsorption to a significant extent.

  7. Shrimp pathogenicity, hemolysis, and the presence of hemolysin and TTSS genes in Vibrio harveyi isolated from Thailand.

    Rattanama, Pimonsri; Srinitiwarawong, Kanchana; Thompson, Janelle R; Pomwised, Rattanaruji; Supamattaya, Kidchakarn; Vuddhakul, Varaporn

    2009-09-23

    The virulence factors of Vibrio harveyi, the causative agent of luminous vibriosis, are not completely understood. We investigated the correlations between shrimp mortality, hemolysis, the presence of a hemolysin gene (vhh), and a gene involved in the type III secretion system (the Vibrio calcium response gene vcrD). V harveyi HY01 was isolated from a shrimp that died from vibriosis, and 36 other V. harveyi isolates were obtained from fish and shellfish in Hat Yai city, Thailand. An ocean isolate of V. harveyi BAA-1116 was also included. Thirteen isolates including V harveyi HYO1 caused shrimp death 12 h after injection. Most V harveyi isolates in this group (designated as Group A) caused hemolysis on prawn blood agar. None of the shrimp died after injection with V harveyi BAA-1116. Molecular analysis of all V harveyi isolates revealed the presence of vcrD in both pathogenic and non-pathogenic strains. Although vhh was detected in all V harveyi isolates, some isolates did not cause hemolysis, indicating that vhh gene expression might be regulated. Analysis of the V harveyi HYO1 genome revealed a V cholerae like-hemolysin gene, hlyA (designated as hhl). Specific primers designed for hhl detected this gene in 3 additional V harveyi isolates but the presence of this gene was not correlated with pathogenicity. Random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analysis revealed a high degree of genetic diversity in all V harveyi isolates, and there were no correlations among the hhl-positive isolates or the pathogenic strains.

  8. Centrifugal pumps and hemolysis in pediatric extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) patients: An analysis of Extracorporeal Life Support Organization (ELSO) registry data.

    O'Brien, Ciaran; Monteagudo, Julie; Schad, Christine; Cheung, Eva; Middlesworth, William

    2017-06-01

    It is currently unclear whether centrifugal pumps cause more hemolysis than roller pumps in extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) circuits. The aim of this study was to help answer that question in pediatric patients. A limited deidentified data set was extracted from the international multicenter Extracorporeal Life Support Organization (ELSO) registry comprising all reported ECMO runs for patients 18years or younger between 2010 and 2015. Logistic regression was used to evaluate a possible association between hemolysis and pump type, controlling for patient demographics, circuit factors, and complications. 14,776 ECMO runs for 14,026 patients had pump type recorded. Centrifugal pumps were employed in 60.4% of ECMO circuits. Hemolysis was a reported complication for 1272 (14%) centrifugal pump runs and for 291 (5%) roller pump runs. 1755 (20%) centrifugal pump runs reported kidney injury as compared to 797 (14%) roller pump runs. In the full logistic regression, the odds of hemolysis were significantly greater for runs using centrifugal pumps (OR 3.3, 95% CI 2.9-3.8, ppumps was associated with increased rates of hemolysis, hyperbilirubinemia, and kidney injury. Retrospective cohort study. Level III. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Measuring End-Tidal Carbon Monoxide of Jaundiced Neonates in the Birth Hospital to Identify Those with Hemolysis.

    Christensen, Robert D; Malleske, Daniel T; Lambert, Diane K; Baer, Vickie L; Prchal, Josef T; Denson, Leslie E; Gerday, Erick; Weaver Lewis, Kimberlee A; Shepherd, JuLyn G

    2016-01-01

    End-tidal breath carbon monoxide (ETCOc) levels correlate with catabolism of heme, but until recently, this measurement was not readily available for application to neonatology practice. We performed a prospective, multihospital, test-of-concept study where ETCOc was measured during the birth hospitalization of neonates with a total bilirubin (TB) value >75th percentile on the Bhutani bilirubin nomogram. This was done to test the feasibility and ease of use of this new device. Neonates with an elevated ETCOc (with a >95th percentile reference interval previously established) were labeled as having 'hemolytic jaundice'. We recommended a follow-up TB check jaundice treatment compared with a rate of 2.99 rehospitalizations per 100 control neonates who had a TB value >75th percentile (p = 0.079). ETCOc measurement is a feasible means of assessing hemolysis in jaundiced neonates during the birth hospitalization. When hemolysis is identified, parents are likely to comply with instructions to bring the infant for a TB checkup <24 h after discharge home. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  10. Controlled lecithin release from a hierarchical architecture on blood-contacting surface to reduce hemolysis of stored red blood cells.

    Shi, Qiang; Fan, Qunfu; Ye, Wei; Hou, Jianwen; Wong, Shing-Chung; Xu, Xiaodong; Yin, Jinghua

    2014-06-25

    Hemolysis of red blood cells (RBCs) caused by implant devices in vivo and nonpolyvinyl chloride containers for RBC preservation in vitro has recently gained much attention. To develop blood-contacting biomaterials with long-term antihemolysis capability, we present a facile method to construct a hydrophilic, 3D hierarchical architecture on the surface of styrene-b-(ethylene-co-butylene)-b-styrene elastomer (SEBS) with poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO)/lecithin nano/microfibers. The strategy is based on electrospinning of PEO/lecithin fibers onto the surface of poly [poly(ethylene glycol) methyl ether methacrylate] [P(PEGMEMA)]-modified SEBS, which renders SEBS suitable for RBC storage in vitro. We demonstrate that the constructed 3D architecture is composed of hydrophilic micro- and nanofibers, which transforms to hydrogel networks immediately in blood; the controlled release of lecithin is achieved by gradual dissolution of PEO/lecithin hydrogels, and the interaction of lecithin with RBCs maintains the membrane flexibility and normal RBC shape. Thus, the blood-contacting surface reduces both mechanical and oxidative damage to RBC membranes, resulting in low hemolysis of preserved RBCs. This work not only paves new way to fabricate high hemocompatible biomaterials for RBC storage in vitro, but provides basic principles to design and develop antihemolysis biomaterials for implantation in vivo.

  11. Is Efficacy of the Anti-Cd20 Antibody Rituximab Preventing Hemolysis Due to Passenger Lymphocyte Syndrome?

    Tsujimura, Kazuma; Ishida, Hideki; Tanabe, Kazunari

    2017-02-01

    Passenger lymphocyte syndrome (PLS) often occurs after ABO-mismatched solid organ and/or bone marrow transplantation between a donor and recipient. Viable donor B-lymphocytes transferred during organ transplantation produce antibodies against recipient red cell antigens, leading to hemolysis. The incidence of PLS has been reported to be around 9% after renal transplantation. A previous report showed that rituximab (Rit) was useful for treatment of PLS in allogeneic stem cell transplantation, bowel transplant and severe cases of hemolysis. However, the effectiveness of Rit in preventing PLS after renal transplantation has not yet been evaluated. The participants in this study were 85 patients who had undergone ABO-mismatched renal transplantation from January 2005 to April 2013. Rit was administered to these patients before transplantation. None of the patients that received Rit treatment developed PLS. Thus administration of Rit before transplantation effectively controlled the production of antibodies by B-lymphocytes, which probably prevented the development of PLS. © 2016 International Society for Apheresis, Japanese Society for Apheresis, and Japanese Society for Dialysis Therapy.

  12. Improving a Complement-fixation Test for Equine Herpesvirus Type-1 by Pretreating Sera with Potassium Periodate to Reduce Non-specific Hemolysis

    BANNAI, Hiroshi; NEMOTO, Manabu; TSUJIMURA, Koji; YAMANAKA, Takashi; KONDO, Takashi; MATSUMURA, Tomio

    2013-01-01

    Non-specific hemolysis has often been observed during complement-fixation (CF) tests for equine herpesvirus type-1 (EHV-1), even when the sera have virus-specific CF antibodies. This phenomenon has also been reported in CF tests for various infectious diseases of swine. We found that the sera from 22 of 85 field horses (25.9%) showed non-specific hemolysis during conventional CF testing for EHV-1. Because pretreatment of swine sera with potassium periodate (KIO4) improves the CF test for swine influenza, we applied this method to horse sera. As we expected, horse sera treated with KIO4 did not show non-specific hemolysis in the EHV-1 CF test, and precise determination of titers was achieved. PMID:24834005

  13. Hemolysis of human red blood cells induced by the combination of diethyldithiocarbamate (DDC) and divalent metals: modulation by anaerobiosis, certain antioxidants and oxidants.

    Ginsburg, I; Sadovnic, M; Varani, J; Tirosh, O; Kohen, R

    1999-08-01

    The objective of the present communication is to describe the role played by combinations between diethydithiocarbamate (DDC) and divalent metals in hemolysis of human RBC. RBC which had been treated with DDC (10-50 microM) were moderately hemolyzed (about 50%) upon the addition of subtoxic amounts of Cu2+ (50 microM). However, a much stronger and a faster hemolysis occurred either if mixtures of RBC-DDC were immediately treated either by Co2+ (50 microM) or by a premixture of Cu2+ and Co2+ (Cu:Co) (50 microM). While Fe2+ and Ni2+, at 50 microM, initiated 30-50% hemolysis when combined with DDC (50 microM), on a molar basis, Cd2+ was at least 50 fold more efficient than any of the other metals in the initiation of hemolysis by DDC. On the other hand, neither Mn2+ nor Zn2+, had any hemolysis-initiating effects. Co2+ was the only metal which totally blocked hemolysis if added to DDC prior to the addition of the other metals. Hemolysis by mixtures of DDC + (Cu:Co) was strongly inhibited by anaerobiosis (flushing with nitrogen gas), by the reducing agents glutathione, N-acetyl cysteine, mercaptosuccinate, ascorbate, TEMPO, and alpha-tocopherol, by the PLA2 inhibitorbromophenacylbromide (BrPACBr), by tetracycline as well as by phosphatidyl choline, cholesterol and by trypan blue. However, TEMPO, BrPACBr and PC were the only agents which inhibited hemolysis induced by DDC: Cd2+ complexes. On the other hand, none of the classical scavengers of reactive oxygen species (ROS) employed e.g dimethylthiourea, catalase, histidine, mannitol, sodium benzoate, nor the metal chelators desferal and phenanthroline, had any appreciable inhibitory effects on hemolysis induced by DDC + (Cu:Co). DDC oxidized by H2O2 lost its capacity to act in concert either with Cu2+ or with Cd2+ to hemolyze RBC. While either heating RBC to temperatures greater than 37 degrees C or exposure of the cells to glucose-oxidase-generated peroxide diminished their susceptibility to hemolysis, exposure to the

  14. Hemolysis During Open-Heart Surgery With Vacuum-Assisted Venous Drainage at Different Negative Pressures in Pediatric Patients Weighing Less Than 10 kilograms.

    Kwak, Jae Gun; Lee, Jinkwon; Park, Minkyoung; Seo, Yu-Jin; Lee, Chang-Ha

    2017-03-01

    This study examined the degree of hemolysis during vacuum-assisted venous drainage at different negative pressures to identify an adequate negative pressure that provides effective venous drainage without significant hemolysis in open-heart surgery in children weighing less than 10 kg. Patients weighing less than 10 kg who underwent surgery for ventricular septal defect or atrial septal defect from 2011 to 2014 were enrolled. We used one of four negative pressures (20, 30, 40, or 60 mm Hg) for each patient. We measured haptoglobin, plasma hemoglobin, aspartate aminotransferase, and lactate dehydrogenase levels in the patients' blood three times perioperatively and determined the potential correlation between the change in each parameter with the level of negative pressure. Forty-six patients were enrolled in this study (mean age: 7.1 ± 7.0 months, mean body weight: 6.1 ± 1.8 kg). There were no significant differences according to the degree of negative pressure with respect to patient age, body weight, cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) time, aorta cross-clamping time, blood flow during CPB, or lowest body temperature. All parameters that we measured reflected progression of hemolysis during CPB; however, the degree of change in the parameters did not correlate with negative pressure. In pediatric patients weighing less than 10 kg, the change in the degree of hemolysis did not differ with the amount of negative pressure. We may apply negative pressures up to 60 mm Hg without increasing the risk of hemolysis, with almost same the level of hemolysis using negative pressures of 20, 30, and 40 mm Hg for effective venous drainage and an ideal operative field during open-heart surgery.

  15. Citrem Modulates Internal Nanostructure of Glyceryl Monooleate Dispersions and Bypasses Complement Activation

    Wibroe, Peter P; Mat Azmi, Intan Diana Binti; Nilsson, Christa

    2015-01-01

    Lyotropic non-lamellar liquid crystalline (LLC) aqueous nanodispersions hold a great promise in drug solubilization and delivery, but these nanosystems often induce severe hemolysis and complement activation, which limit their applications for safe intravenous administration. Here, we engineer an...

  16. Hemólise produzida por Candida tropicalis isoladas de amostras clínicas Hemolysis produced by Candida tropicalis isolates from clinical samples

    Emanuele Júlio Galvão de França

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUÇÃO: Leveduras do gênero Candida são responsáveis pela maioria das infecções fúngicas em humanos. Candida tropicalis tem sido uma das mais comumente isoladas dentre as espécies não-albicans. O objetivo foi analisar a hemólise in vitro promovida por isolados clínicos de C. tropicalis provenientes de sangue e outras amostras clínicas de pacientes internados no Hospital Universitário da UEL, PR-Brasil. MÉTODOS: Foi avaliada a hemólise promovida por 28 isolados clínicos de C. tropicalis, sendo os isolados agrupados em classes de acordo com os níveis de hemólise. RESULTADOS: A maioria dos isolados de sangue apresentou hemólise fraca (+, enquanto as classes de hemólise forte (+++ e muito forte (++++ foram as predominantes nos isolados de outras amostras clínicas como urina, lesão de unha e secreção traqueal, embora não tenham sido detectadas diferenças estatísticas (p>0,05. CONCLUSÕES: Isolados de C. tropicalis, obtidos de diferentes amostras clínicas, apresentam capacidade de promover hemólise in vitro.INTRODUCTION: Yeasts belonging to the genus Candida are responsible for the majority of fungal infections in humans. Candida tropicalis has been one of most commonly isolated non-albicans species. To analyze in vitro hemolysis promoted by clinical isolates of C. tropicalis obtained from blood and other clinical samples from hospitalized patients at the University Hospital of Londrina State University, Paraná, Brazil. METHODS: The hemolysis promoted by 28 clinical isolates of C. tropicalis was evaluated, and the isolates were grouped into classes according to the hemolysis levels. RESULTS: The majority of the blood isolates showed weak hemolysis (+, while the classes of strong hemolysis (+++ and very strong hemolysis (++++ predominated among isolates from other clinical samples such as urine, nail lesions and tracheal secretions. However, no statistical differences were detected (p> 0.05. CONCLUSIONS: Isolates of C

  17. Polyethylene glycol enhances lipoplex-cell association and lipofection.

    Ross, P C; Hui, S W

    1999-10-15

    The association between liposome-DNA complexes (lipoplexes) and targeted cell membranes is a limiting step of cationic liposome-mediated transfection. A novel technique was developed where lipoplex-cell membrane association is enhanced by the addition of 2-6% polyethylene glycol (PEG) to the transfection media. Lipoplex-cell association was found to increase up to 100 times in the presence of PEG. Transfection increased correspondingly in the presence of PEG. This increase was found in several cell lines. These results show that lipoplex adsorption to cell membranes is a critical step in liposome-mediated transfection. This step can be facilitated by PEG-induced particle aggregation.

  18. Nanoparticles-cell association predicted by protein corona fingerprints

    Palchetti, S.; Digiacomo, L.; Pozzi, D.; Peruzzi, G.; Micarelli, E.; Mahmoudi, M.; Caracciolo, G.

    2016-06-01

    In a physiological environment (e.g., blood and interstitial fluids) nanoparticles (NPs) will bind proteins shaping a ``protein corona'' layer. The long-lived protein layer tightly bound to the NP surface is referred to as the hard corona (HC) and encodes information that controls NP bioactivity (e.g. cellular association, cellular signaling pathways, biodistribution, and toxicity). Decrypting this complex code has become a priority to predict the NP biological outcomes. Here, we use a library of 16 lipid NPs of varying size (Ø ~ 100-250 nm) and surface chemistry (unmodified and PEGylated) to investigate the relationships between NP physicochemical properties (nanoparticle size, aggregation state and surface charge), protein corona fingerprints (PCFs), and NP-cell association. We found out that none of the NPs' physicochemical properties alone was exclusively able to account for association with human cervical cancer cell line (HeLa). For the entire library of NPs, a total of 436 distinct serum proteins were detected. We developed a predictive-validation modeling that provides a means of assessing the relative significance of the identified corona proteins. Interestingly, a minor fraction of the HC, which consists of only 8 PCFs were identified as main promoters of NP association with HeLa cells. Remarkably, identified PCFs have several receptors with high level of expression on the plasma membrane of HeLa cells.In a physiological environment (e.g., blood and interstitial fluids) nanoparticles (NPs) will bind proteins shaping a ``protein corona'' layer. The long-lived protein layer tightly bound to the NP surface is referred to as the hard corona (HC) and encodes information that controls NP bioactivity (e.g. cellular association, cellular signaling pathways, biodistribution, and toxicity). Decrypting this complex code has become a priority to predict the NP biological outcomes. Here, we use a library of 16 lipid NPs of varying size (Ø ~ 100-250 nm) and surface

  19. Hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn due to anti-Ge3: combined antibody-dependent hemolysis and erythroid precursor cell growth inhibition.

    Blackall, Douglas P; Pesek, Gina D; Montgomery, Matthew M; Oza, Krishna K; Arndt, Patricia A; Garratty, George; Shahcheraghi, Ali; Denomme, Gregory A

    2008-10-01

    The Gerbich (Ge) antigens are a collection of high-incidence antigens carried on the red blood cell membrane glycoproteins, glycophorins C and D. Antibodies against these antigens are uncommon, and there have been only rare case reports of hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn due to anti-Ge. In this case report, we present a neonate with severe anemia and hyperbilirubinemia due to anti-Ge3. Routine and special laboratory studies undertaken in this case suggested two mechanisms for the patient's hemolysis and persistent anemia. Antibody-dependent hemolysis was associated with early-onset hyperbilirubinemia, anemia, and a mild reticulocytosis, and inhibition of erythroid progenitor cell growth was associated with late anemia and normal bilirubin and reticulocyte values. Though rare, anti-Ge3 can be a dangerous antibody in pregnancy. Affected neonates may require intensive initial therapy and close follow-up for at least several weeks after delivery.

  20. Can the Roche hemolysis index be used for automated determination of cell-free hemoglobin? A comparison to photometric assays.

    Petrova, Darinka Todorova; Cocisiu, Gabriela Ariadna; Eberle, Christoph; Rhode, Karl-Heinz; Brandhorst, Gunnar; Walson, Philip D; Oellerich, Michael

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a novel method for automated quantification of cell-free hemoglobin (fHb) based on the HI (Roche Diagnostics). The novel fHb method based on the HI was correlated with fHb measured using the triple wavelength methods of both Harboe [fHb, g/L = (0.915 * HI + 2.634)/100] and Fairbanks et al. [fHb, g/L = (0.917 * HI + 2.131)/100]. fHb concentrations were estimated from the HI using the Roche Modular automated platform in self-made and commercially available quality controls, as well as samples from a proficiency testing scheme (INSTAND). The fHb using Roche automated HI results were then compared to results obtained using the traditional spectrophotometric assays for one hundred plasma samples with varying degrees of hemolysis, lipemia and/or bilirubinemia. The novel method using automated HI quantification on the Roche Modular clinical chemistry platform correlated well with results using the classical methods in the 100 patient samples (Harboe: r = 0.9284; Fairbanks et al.: r = 0.9689) and recovery was good for self-made controls. However, commercially available quality controls showed poor recovery due to an unidentified matrix problem. The novel method produced reliable determination of fHb in samples without interferences. However, poor recovery using commercially available fHb quality control samples currently greatly limits its usefulness. © 2013.

  1. Severe Hemolysis in a Patient With Erythrocytosis During Coupled Plasma Filtration Adsorption Therapy Was Prevented by Changing From Membrane-Based Technique to a Centrifuge-Based One.

    Fan, Rong; Wu, Buyun; Kong, Ling; Gong, Dehua

    2016-01-01

    Coupled plasma filtration adsorption (CPFA) usually adopts membrane to separate plasma from blood. Here, we reported a case with erythrocytosis experienced severe hemolysis and membrane rupture during CPFA, which was avoided by changing from membrane-based technique to a centrifuge-based one. A 66-year-old man was to receive CPFA for severe hyperbilirubinemia (total bilirubin 922 μmol/L, direct bilirubin 638 μmol/L) caused by obstruction of biliary tract. He had erythrocytosis (hemoglobin 230 g/L, hematocrit 0.634) for years because of untreated tetralogy of Fallot. Severe hemolysis and membrane rupture occurred immediately after blood entering into the plasma separator even at a low flow rate (50 mL/min) and persisted after changing a new separator. Finally, centrifugal plasma separation technique was used for CPFA in this patient, and no hemolysis occurred. After 3 sessions of CPFA, total bilirubin level decreased to 199 μmol/L with an average decline by 35% per session. Thereafter, the patient received endoscopic biliary stent implantation, and total bilirubin level returned to nearly normal. Therefore, centrifugal-based plasma separation can also be used in CPFA and may be superior to a membrane-based one in patients with hyperviscosity.

  2. A Serratia marcescens PigP homolog controls prodigiosin biosynthesis, swarming motility and hemolysis and is regulated by cAMP-CRP and HexS.

    Robert M Q Shanks

    Full Text Available Swarming motility and hemolysis are virulence-associated determinants for a wide array of pathogenic bacteria. The broad host-range opportunistic pathogen Serratia marcescens produces serratamolide, a small cyclic amino-lipid, that promotes swarming motility and hemolysis. Serratamolide is negatively regulated by the transcription factors HexS and CRP. Positive regulators of serratamolide production are unknown. Similar to serratamolide, the antibiotic pigment, prodigiosin, is regulated by temperature, growth phase, HexS, and CRP. Because of this co-regulation, we tested the hypothesis that a homolog of the PigP transcription factor of the atypical Serratia species ATCC 39006, which positively regulates prodigiosin biosynthesis, is also a positive regulator of serratamolide production in S. marcescens. Mutation of pigP in clinical, environmental, and laboratory strains of S. marcescens conferred pleiotropic phenotypes including the loss of swarming motility, hemolysis, and severely reduced prodigiosin and serratamolide synthesis. Transcriptional analysis and electrophoretic mobility shift assays place PigP in a regulatory pathway with upstream regulators CRP and HexS. The data from this study identifies a positive regulator of serratamolide production, describes novel roles for the PigP transcription factor, shows for the first time that PigP directly regulates the pigment biosynthetic operon, and identifies upstream regulators of pigP. This study suggests that PigP is important for the ability of S. marcescens to compete in the environment.

  3. Comparative effects of macro-sized aluminum oxide and aluminum oxide nanoparticles on erythrocyte hemolysis: influence of cell source, temperature, and size

    Vinardell, M. P., E-mail: mpvinardellmh@ub.edu; Sordé, A. [Universitat de Barcelona, Departament de Fisiologia, Facultat de Farmàcia (Spain); Díaz, J. [Universitat de Barcelona CCiT, Scientific and Technological Centers (Spain); Baccarin, T.; Mitjans, M. [Universitat de Barcelona, Departament de Fisiologia, Facultat de Farmàcia (Spain)

    2015-02-15

    Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} is the most abundantly produced nanomaterial and has been used in diverse fields, including the medical, military, and industrial sectors. As there are concerns about the health effects of nanoparticles, it is important to understand how they interact with cells, and specifically with red blood cells. The hemolysis induced by three commercial nano-sized aluminum oxide particles (nanopowder 13 nm, nanopowder <50 nm, and nanowire 2–6 × 200–400 nm) was compared to aluminum oxide and has been studied on erythrocytes from humans, rats, and rabbits, in order to elucidate the mechanism of action and the influence of size and shape on hemolytic behavior. The concentrations inducing 50 % hemolysis (HC{sub 50}) were calculated for each compound studied. The most hemolytic aluminum oxide particles were of nanopowder 13, followed by nanowire and nanopowder 50. The addition of albumin to PBS induced a protective effect on hemolysis in all the nano-forms of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, but not on Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. The drop in HC{sub 50} correlated to a decrease in nanomaterial size, which was induced by a reduction of aggregation. Aluminum oxide nanoparticles are less hemolytic than other oxide nanoparticles and behave differently depending on the size and shape of the nanoparticles. The hemolytic behavior of aluminum oxide nanoparticles differs from that of aluminum oxide.

  4. Mentha pulegium crude extracts induce thiol oxidation and potentiate hemolysis when associated to t-butyl hydroperoxide in human’s erythrocytes

    MATHEUS C. BIANCHINI

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Mentha pulegium (Lamiaceae tea has been used as a traditional medicine; however, the modulatory effect of M. pulegium extracts on damage to human erythrocytes associated to t-butyl hydroperoxide (t-BHP exposure remains to be investigated. Accordingly, we perform this study in order to test the hypothesis that aqueous and ethanolic extracts of M. pulegium could modulate the hemolysis associated to t-BHP exposure, non-protein thiol (NPSH oxidation and lipid peroxidation (measured as thiobarbituric acid reactive substances - TBARS in human erythrocytes. Samples were co-incubated with t-BHP (4 mmol/L and/or aqueous or ethanolic extracts (10-1000 mg/mL during 120 min to further analysis. We found that both extracts, when associated to t-BHP, potentiate NPSH oxidation and hemolysis. Moreover, both extracts significantly prevents against t-BHP-induced TBARS production. A significant correlation among hemolysis and NPSH levels was found. Taking together, our data points that the association of M. pulegium extracts with t-BHP culminates in toxic effect to exposed erythrocytes, besides its protective effect against t-BHP-induced TBARS production. So, we infer that the use of this extract may exert negative effect during painful crisis in sickle cell anemia. However, more studies are still necessary to better investigate/understand the mechanism(s involved in the toxic effect resultant from this association.

  5. Saponin Interactions with Model Membrane Systems - Langmuir Monolayer Studies, Hemolysis and Formation of ISCOMs.

    de Groot, Carolin; Müller-Goymann, Christel C

    2016-12-01

    Saponins are used in medicine due to their pharmacological and immunological effects. To better understand interactions of saponins with model membranes and natural membranes of, for example, erythrocytes, Langmuir film balance experiments are well established. For most saponins, a strong interaction with cholesterol was demonstrated in dependence of both the aglycone part and the sugar moieties and is suggested to be correlated with a strong hemolytic activity, high toxicity, and high surface activity, as was demonstrated for the steroid saponin digitonin. In general, changes in the sugar chain or in substituents of the aglycone result in a modification of the saponin properties. A promising saponin with regard to fairly low hemolytic activity and high adjuvant effect is α -tomatine, which still shows a high affinity for cholesterol. An interaction with cholesterol and lipids has also been proven for the Quillaja saponin from the bark of Quillaja saponaria Molina. This triterpene saponin was approved in marketed vaccines as an adjuvant due to the formation of immunostimulating complexes. Immunostimulating complexes consist of a Quillaja saponin, cholesterol, phospholipids, and a corresponding antigen. Recently, another saponin from Quillaja brasiliensis was successfully tested in immunostimulating complexes, too. Based on the results of interaction studies, the formation of drug delivery systems such as immunostimulating complexes or similar self-assembled colloids is postulated for a variety of saponins. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  6. Mural cell associated VEGF is required for organotypic vessel formation.

    Lasse Evensen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Blood vessels comprise endothelial cells, mural cells (pericytes/vascular smooth muscle cells and basement membrane. During angiogenesis, mural cells are recruited to sprouting endothelial cells and define a stabilizing context, comprising cell-cell contacts, secreted growth factors and extracellular matrix components, that drives vessel maturation and resistance to anti-angiogenic therapeutics. METHODS AND FINDINGS: To better understand the basis for mural cell regulation of angiogenesis, we conducted high content imaging analysis on a microtiter plate format in vitro organotypic blood vessel system comprising primary human endothelial cells co-cultured with primary human mural cells. We show that endothelial cells co-cultured with mural cells undergo an extensive series of phenotypic changes reflective of several facets of blood vessel formation and maturation: Loss of cell proliferation, pathfinding-like cell migration, branching morphogenesis, basement membrane extracellular matrix protein deposition, lumen formation, anastamosis and development of a stabilized capillary-like network. This phenotypic sequence required endothelial-mural cell-cell contact, mural cell-derived VEGF and endothelial VEGFR2 signaling. Inhibiting formation of adherens junctions or basement membrane structures abrogated network formation. Notably, inhibition of mural cell VEGF expression could not be rescued by exogenous VEGF. CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest a unique role for mural cell-associated VEGF in driving vessel formation and maturation.

  7. Cytotoxicity of cuprous oxide nanoparticles to fish blood cells: hemolysis and internalization

    Chen Liqiang, E-mail: chenlq@ynu.edu.cn; Kang Bin [Yunnan University, Asian International Rivers Center, Yunnan Key Laboratory of International Rivers and Trans-boundary Eco-security (China); Ling Jian [Yunnan University, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering (China)

    2013-03-15

    Cuprous oxide nanoparticles (Cu{sub 2}O NPs) possess unique physical and chemical properties which are employed in a broad variety of applications. However, little is known about the adverse effects of Cu{sub 2}O NPs on organisms. In the current study, in vitro cytotoxicity of Cu{sub 2}O NPs (ca. 60 nm in diameter) to the blood cells of freshwater fish Carassius auratus was evaluated. A concentration-dependent hemolytic activity of Cu{sub 2}O NPs to red blood cells (RBCs) and the phagocytosis of Cu{sub 2}O NPs by leukocytes were revealed. The results showed that dosages of Cu{sub 2}O NPs greater than 40 {mu}g/mL were toxic to blood cells, and could cause serious membrane damage to RBCs. The EC{sub 50} value of Cu{sub 2}O NPs as obtained from RBCs and whole blood exposure was 26 and 63 {mu}g/mL, respectively. The generation of reactive oxygen species and the direct interaction between Cu{sub 2}O NPs and the cell membrane were suggested as the possible mechanism for cytotoxicity, and the intrinsic hemolytic active of Cu{sub 2}O NPs was the main contributor to the toxicity rather than solubilized copper ions. The adsorption of plasma proteins on the surfaces of Cu{sub 2}O NPs led to their aggregation in whole blood, and aggregate formation can significantly alleviate the hemolytic effect and subsequently mediate the phagocytosis of Cu{sub 2}O NPs by leukocytes.

  8. Hemolysis, Elevated Liver Enzymes, and Low Platelets, Severe Fetal Growth Restriction, Postpartum Subarachnoid Hemorrhage, and Craniotomy: A Rare Case Report and Systematic Review

    Shadi Rezai

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, and low platelets (HELLP syndrome is a relatively uncommon but traumatic condition occurring in the later stage of pregnancy as a complication of severe preeclampsia or eclampsia. Prompt brain computed tomography (CT or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and a multidisciplinary management approach are required to improve perinatal outcome. Case. A 37-year-old, Gravida 6, Para 1-0-4-1, Hispanic female with a history of chronic hypertension presented at 26 weeks and 6 days of gestational age. She was noted to have hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, and low platelets (HELLP syndrome accompanied by fetal growth restriction (FGR, during ultrasound evaluation, warranting premature delivery. The infant was delivered in stable condition suffering no permanent neurological deficit. Conclusion. HELLP syndrome is an uncommon and traumatic obstetric event which can lead to neurological deficits if not managed in a responsive and rapid manner. The central aggravating factor seems to be hypertension induced preeclamptic or eclamptic episode and complications thereof. The syndrome itself is manifested by hemolytic anemia, increased liver enzymes, and decreasing platelet counts with a majority of neurological defects resulting from hemorrhagic stroke or subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH. To minimize adverse perinatal outcomes, obstetric management of this medical complication must include rapid clinical assessment, diagnostic examination, and neurosurgery consultation.

  9. Regulatory T-Cell-Associated Cytokines in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    Akiko Okamoto

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE is an autoimmune disease characterized by autoantibody production, complement activation, and immune complex deposition, resulting in tissue and organ damage. An understanding of the mechanisms responsible for homeostatic control of inflammation, which involve both innate and adoptive immune responses, will enable the development of novel therapies for SLE. Regulatory T cells (Treg play critical roles in the induction of peripheral tolerance to self- and foreign antigens. Naturally occurring CD4+CD25+ Treg, which characteristically express the transcription factor forkhead box protein P3 (Foxp3, have been intensively studied because their deficiency abrogates self-tolerance and causes autoimmune disease. Moreover, regulatory cytokines such as interleukin-10 (IL-10 also play a central role in controlling inflammatory processes. This paper focuses on Tregs and Treg-associated cytokines which might regulate the pathogenesis of SLE and, hence, have clinical applications.

  10. Normalization of elevated cardiac, kidney, and hemolysis plasma markers within 48 h in Mexican Tarahumara runners following a 78 km race at moderate altitude

    Christensen, Dirk Lund; Espino, Diana; Infante-Ramírez, Rocío

    2014-01-01

    ) participated in a 78 km race in Chihuahua, Mexico at 2,400 m above sea level. Cardiac, kidney, and hematology plasma markers were measured pre-race and h, 3 h, 6 h, 24 h, and 48 h post-race. Anthropometry, blood pressure, pulse rate, electrocardiography, HbA1c, hemoglobin and VO2max (estimated from...... the race was 68 (11)%VO2 max. Mean SpO2 was 92 (3)% h post-race, but had returned to pre-race values after 48 h....... The plasma concentrations of mid-regional proatrial natiuretic peptide and copeptin returned to pre-race concentrations after 1 and 6 h, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Altered cardiac, renal, and hemolysis plasma markers were normalized after 48 h following 78 km of running, suggesting that the impact...

  11. Postpartum plasma exchange in a woman with suspected thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) vs. hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, and low platelet syndrome (HELLP): a case study.

    Myers, Linda

    2010-01-01

    The occurrence of a hypercoagulable state and decreasing concentration of ADAMTS 13 in late pregnancy and during the postpartum period increases the risk for a woman to develop life-threatening thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP). This is also the time of great risk for the more common obstetric complications of preeclampsia; eclampsia; and hemolysis, elevated liver functions tests, low platelets (HELLP) syndrome. These conditions are associated with high maternal and perinatal mortality. Differential diagnosis may be difficult due to the overlapping of clinical and laboratory findings, including thrombocytopenia, microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, neurologic symptoms, and renal insufficiency, making it difficult or impossible to distinguish them from TTP. Management of microangiopathic disorders encountered during pregnancy differ; therefore, an accurate diagnosis is required. Outcomes of TTP without plasma exchange therapy (TPE) are almost uniformly fatal. Early recognition and management of symptoms with prompt and aggressive TPE is essential when TTP is suspected.

  12. Biomarkers on melanoma patient T Cells associated with ipilimumab treatment

    Wang Wenshi

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ipilimumab induces long-lasting clinical responses in a minority of patients with metastatic melanoma. To better understand the mechanism(s of action and to identify novel biomarkers associated with the clinical benefit and toxicity of ipilimumab, baseline characteristics and changes in CD4+ and CD8+ T cells from melanoma patients receiving ipilimumab were characterized by gene profiling and flow cytometry. Methods Microarray analysis of flow-cytometry purified CD4+ and CD8+ T cells was employed to assess gene profiling changes induced by ipilimumab. Selected molecules were further investigated by flow cytometry on pre, 3-month and 6-month post-treatment specimens. Results Ipilimumab up-regulated Ki67 and ICOS on CD4+ and CD8+ cells at both 3- and 6-month post ipilimumab (p ≤ 0.001, decreased CCR7 and CD25 on CD8+ at 3-month post ipilimumab (p ≤ 0.02, and increased Gata3 in CD4+ and CD8+ cells at 6-month post ipilimumab (p ≤ 0.001. Increased EOMES+CD8+, GranzymeB+EOMES+CD8+ and decreased Ki67+EOMES+CD4+ T cells at 6 months were significantly associated with relapse (all p ≤ 0.03. Decreased Ki67+CD8+ T cells were significantly associated with the development of irAE (p = 0.02. At baseline, low Ki67+EOMES+CD8+ T cells were associated with relapse (p ≤ 0.001, and low Ki67+EOMES+CD4+ T cells were associated with irAE (p ≤ 0.008. Conclusions Up-regulation of proliferation and activation signals in CD4+ and CD8+ T cells were pharmacodynamic markers for ipilimumab. Ki67+EOMES+CD8+ and Ki67+EOMES+CD4+T cells at baseline merit further testing as biomarkers associated with outcome and irAEs, respectively.

  13. Telomere Attrition in Human Lens Epithelial Cells Associated with Oxidative Stress Provide a New Therapeutic Target for the Treatment, Dissolving and Prevention of Cataract with N-Acetylcarnosine Lubricant Eye Drops. Kinetic, Pharmacological and Activity-Dependent Separation of Therapeutic Targeting: Transcorneal Penetration and Delivery of L-Carnosine in the Aqueous Humor and Hormone-Like Hypothalamic Antiaging Effects of the Instilled Ophthalmic Drug Through a Safe Eye Medication Technique.

    Babizhayev, Mark A; Yegorov, Yegor E

    2016-01-01

    Visual impairment broadly impacts the ability of affected people to maintain their function and to remain independent during their daily occupations as they grow older. Visual impairment affects survival of older patients, quality of life, can affect a person's self-ranking of health, may be associated with social and functional decline, use of community support services, depression, falls, nursing home placement, and increased mortality. It has been hypothesized that senile cataract may serve as a marker for generalised tissue aging, since structural changes occurring in the proteins of the lens during cataract formation are similar to those which occur elsewhere as part of the aging process. The published analysis revealed a strong age-dependent relationship between undergoing cataract surgery and subsequent mortality. Nuclear opacity, particularly severe nuclear opacity, and mixed opacities with nuclear were significant predictors of mortality independent of body mass index, comorbid conditions, smoking, age, race, and sex. The lens opacity status is considered as an independent predictor of 2-year mortality, an association that could not be explained by potential confounders. Telomeres have become important biomarkers for aging as well as for oxidative stress-related disease. The lens epithelium is especially vulnerable to oxidative stress. Oxidative damage to the cuboidal epithelial cells on the anterior surface of the lens mediated by reactive oxygen species and phospholipid hydroperoxides can precede and contribute to human lens cataract formation. The erosion and shortening of telomeres in human lens epithelial cells in the lack of telomerase activity has been recognized as a primary cause of premature lens senescence phenotype that trigger human cataractogenesis. In this study we aimed to be focused on research defining the mechanisms that underlie linkages among telomere attrition in human lens epithelial cells associated with oxidative stress, biology of

  14. Vaginal microbiota and sexually transmitted infections that may influence transmission of cell-associated HIV.

    Cone, Richard A

    2014-12-15

    Vaginal microbiota and sexually transmitted infections (STIs) are likely to influence the transmission of cell-associated human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Lactic acid produced by Lactobacillus-dominated microbiota (Nugent score 0-3) will likely inhibit transmission, especially female-to-male transmission. In contrast, polymicrobial microbiota (Nugent score 4-10), community state types IV-A and IV-B, and STIs will likely increase transmission of cell-associated HIV. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Neutrophil activation and nucleosomes as markers of systemic inflammation in paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria: effects of eculizumab

    Bijnen, S.T. van; Wouters, D.; Mierlo, G.J. van; Muus, P.; Zeerleder, S.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH) is characterized by complement-mediated hemolysis and a high risk of life-threatening venous and arterial thrombosis. Uncontrolled complement activation and the release of cell-free heme may result in systemic inflammation, neutrophil activation,

  16. Neutrophil activation and nucleosomes as markers of systemic inflammation in paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria: effects of eculizumab

    van Bijnen, S. T. A.; Wouters, D.; van Mierlo, G. J.; Muus, P.; Zeerleder, S.

    2015-01-01

    Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH) is characterized by complement-mediated hemolysis and a high risk of life-threatening venous and arterial thrombosis. Uncontrolled complement activation and the release of cell-free heme may result in systemic inflammation, neutrophil activation, and the

  17. Characterization of core/shell Cu/Ag nanopowders synthesized by electrochemistry and assessment of their impact on hemolysis, platelet aggregation, and coagulation on human blood for potential wound dressing use

    Laloy, Julie; Haguet, Hélène; Alpan, Lutfiye; Mancier, Valérie; Mejia, Jorge; Levi, Samuel; Dogné, Jean-Michel; Lucas, Stéphane; Rousse, Céline; Fricoteaux, Patrick

    2017-08-01

    Copper/silver core/shell nanopowders with different metal ratio have been elaborated by electrochemistry (ultrasound-assisted electrolysis followed by a displacement reaction). Characterization was performed by several methods (X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscope, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, centrifugal liquid sedimentation, and zeta potential measurements). The mean diameter of all nanoparticles is around 10 nm. The impact of each nanopowder on hemolysis, platelet aggregation, and coagulation has been studied on whole human blood. Hemolysis assays were performed with spectrophotometric measurement and platelet aggregation, with light transmission aggregometry and was compared to Cu/Pt core/shell nanoparticles with similar size as negative control. Calibrated thrombin generation test has been used for a coagulation study. They neither impact platelet aggregation nor hemolysis and have a procoagulant effect whatever their composition (i.e., metal ratio). These results highlight that such nanopowders have a potential use in medical applications (e.g., wound dressing).

  18. What do we measure when we measure cell-associated HIV RNA.

    Pasternak, Alexander O; Berkhout, Ben

    2018-01-29

    Cell-associated (CA) HIV RNA has received much attention in recent years as a surrogate measure of the efficiency of HIV latency reversion and because it may provide an estimate of the viral reservoir size. This review provides an update on some recent insights in the biology and clinical utility of this biomarker. We discuss a number of important considerations to be taken into account when interpreting CA HIV RNA measurements, as well as different methods to measure this biomarker.

  19. Dynamic imaging of cell-free and cell-associated viral capture in mature dendritic cells.

    Izquierdo-Useros, Nuria; Esteban, Olga; Rodriguez-Plata, Maria T; Erkizia, Itziar; Prado, Julia G; Blanco, Julià; García-Parajo, Maria F; Martinez-Picado, Javier

    2011-12-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) capture human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) through a non-fusogenic mechanism that enables viral transmission to CD4(+) T cells, contributing to in vivo viral dissemination. Although previous studies have provided important clues to cell-free viral capture by mature DCs (mDCs), dynamic and kinetic insight on this process is still missing. Here, we used three-dimensional video microscopy and single-particle tracking approaches to dynamically dissect both cell-free and cell-associated viral capture by living mDCs. We show that cell-free virus capture by mDCs operates through three sequential phases: virus binding through specific determinants expressed in the viral particle, polarized or directional movements toward concrete regions of the cell membrane and virus accumulation in a sac-like structure where trapped viral particles display a hindered diffusive behavior. Moreover, real-time imaging of cell-associated viral transfer to mDCs showed a similar dynamics to that exhibited by cell-free virus endocytosis leading to viral accumulation in compartments. However, cell-associated HIV type 1 transfer to mDCs was the most effective pathway, boosted throughout enhanced cellular contacts with infected CD4(+) T cells. Our results suggest that in lymphoid tissues, mDC viral uptake could occur either by encountering cell-free or cell-associated virus produced by infected cells generating the perfect scenario to promote HIV pathogenesis and impact disease progression. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  20. Transient hemolysis due to anti-D and anti-A1 produced by engrafted donor's lymphocytes after allogeneic unmanipulated haploidentical hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    Bailén, Rebeca; Kwon, Mi; Pérez-Corral, Ana María; Pascual, Cristina; Buño, Ismael; Balsalobre, Pascual; Serrano, David; Gayoso, Jorge; Díez-Martín, José Luis; Anguita, Javier

    2017-10-01

    Development of de novo alloantibodies against recipient's red blood cell (RBC) antigens by engrafted donor's lymphocytes is a known phenomenon in the setting of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). This situation is usually clinically insignificant. We report a case of early clinically relevant hemolytic anemia in a blood group A 1 D+ patient, due to a limited production of anti-D and anti-A 1 produced by nonpreviously sensitized newly engrafted donor's immune system. A 31-year-old Caucasian woman, blood group A 1 , D+, with Hodgkin's lymphoma, received an unmanipulated haploidentical allogeneic peripheral blood HSCT after a nonmyeloablative conditioning regimen. Donor blood group was A 2 B, D-. The patient had an uneventful course until Day +34, when she developed clinically significant hemolytic anemia with a positive direct antiglobulin test. Anti-D and anti-A 1 produced by the donor-engrafted lymphocytes were detected both in serum and in eluate. The hemolysis produced an accelerated group change, turning the patient's ABO group into A 2 B 2 weeks after the detection of the alloantibodies. As the residual patient's RBCs progressively disappeared, anti-D and anti-A 1 production decreased and were not detected in serum by Day +41. This case illustrates that de novo alloantibody production against ABO and D antigens by the newly engrafted donor's lymphocytes can occasionally cause clinically significant anemia. To our knowledge, this is the first case reported of clinically significant hemolytic anemia due to a transient anti-D anti-A 1 alloimmunization after T-cell-repleted haploidentical HSCT. © 2017 AABB.

  1. Hemolytic activity of Trichomonas vaginalis and Tritrichomonas foetus

    Geraldo A De Carli

    1996-02-01

    Full Text Available The hemolytic activity of live isolates and clones of Trichomonas vaginalis and Tritrichomonas foetus was investigated. The isolates were tested against human erythrocytes. No hemolytic activity was detected by the isolates of T. foetus. Whereas the isolates of T. vaginalis lysed erythrocytes from all human blood groups. No hemolysin released by the parasites could be detected. Our preliminary results suggest that hemolysis depend on the susceptibility of red cell membranes to destabilization and the intervention of cell surface receptors as a mechanism of the hemolytic activity. The mechanism could be subject to strain-species-genera specific variation of trichomonads. The hemolytic activity of T. vaginalis is not due to a hemolysin or to a product of its metabolism. Pretreatment of trichomonads with concanavalin A reduced levels of hemolysis by 40%.

  2. Antioxidant and antifungal activities of Camellia sinensis (L. Kuntze leaves obtained by different forms of production

    L. E. A. Camargo

    Full Text Available Abstract The antioxidant and anticandidal activities of leaves obtained from Camellia sinensis by non-fermentation (green and white teas, semi-fermentation (red tea and fermentation method (black tea were investigated. It was evaluated the total phenolic content by Folin-Ciocalteau assay; antioxidant capacities were evaluated in vitro using DPPH and ABTS radicals, hypochlorous acid and superoxide anion scavenger assays, induced hemolysis, lipid peroxidation by conjugated diene formation and myeloperoxidase activity. Anticandidal activity was performed on three strains of Candida spp. The results showed that non-fermented teas have a higher concentration of phenolic compounds, and then presented the best inhibitory activity of AAPH-induced hemolysis, the best inhibition of conjugated diene formation and more pronounced antioxidant activity in all tests. The highest anticandidal activity was obtained from fermented tea, followed by non-fermented tea. These results indicate that the antioxidant activity demonstrated has no direct relation with the anticandidal activity.

  3. Radioprotective activity of the Piper betle-derived phenolic, allylpyrocatechol against gamma-ray induced hemolysis of human red blood cells

    Meenakshi, K.; Chattopadhyay, S.

    2016-01-01

    As an oxidative shuttle, human (RBCs) are most susceptible to oxidative damages leading to multiple diseases including haemolytic anemia that is a major public health problem in the developing countries. The present effort was aimed at formulating some natural phenolic compounds isolated from piper betle - allylpyrocatechol (APC) to prevent the alterations in the RBC membrane. The biochemical parameters which are considered as biomarkers of redox balance primarily contribute to damages in RBC membrane during gamma radiation induced oxidative stress were investigated

  4. Characterization of innate immune activity in Phrynops geoffroanus (Testudines: Chelidae

    Bruno O. Ferronato

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The innate immune activity of the freshwater turtle Phrynops geoffroanus (Schweigger, 1812 was investigated, using a sheep-red-blood cell hemolysis assay. The time- and concentration-dependent hemolytic activity of the turtle plasma was low compared to that reported for other reptiles. However the plasma of P. geoffroanus exhibited higher activity at elevated temperatures, resulting in temperature-dependent hemolysis. The sensitivity of turtle plasma to temperature could be interpreted as a mechanism by which freshwater turtles use basking behavior to elevate body temperature, thus enhancing the innate immune response. However, we cannot discard the possibility that environmental contaminants could be affecting the turtle's immune response, since the animals in this investigation were captured in a polluted watercourse.

  5. Cloning of regions required for contact hemolysis and entry into LLC-MK2 cells from Shigella sonnei form I plasmid: virF is a positive regulator gene for these phenotypes.

    Kato, J; Ito, K; Nakamura, A; Watanabe, H

    1989-01-01

    Two distinct regions required for both contact hemolysis and entry into LLC-MK2 cells were cloned into Escherichia coli from the Shigella sonnei form I plasmid, pSS120. The first region was cloned into an E. coli HB101 strain containing noninvasive Tn1 insertion mutants of the form I plasmid, and expression of ipa (invasion plasmid antigen) gene products was restored. The plasmid carrying the first region was then transformed into E. coli lacking the form I plasmid, and additional DNA fragmen...

  6. Influence of Boiling, Steaming and Frying of Selected Leafy Vegetables on the In Vitro Anti-inflammation Associated Biological Activities

    K. D. P. P. Gunathilake

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of cooking (boiling, steaming, and frying on anti-inflammation associated properties in vitro of six popularly consumed green leafy vegetables in Sri Lanka, namely: Centella asiatica, Cassia auriculata, Gymnema lactiferum, Olax zeylanica, Sesbania grnadiflora, and Passiflora edulis. The anti-inflammation associated properties of methanolic extracts of cooked leaves were evaluated using four in vitro biological assays, namely, hemolysis inhibition, proteinase inhibition, protein denaturation inhibition, and lipoxygenase inhibition. Results revealed that the frying of all the tested leafy vegetables had reduced the inhibition abilities of protein denaturation, hemolysis, proteinase, and lipoxygenase activities when compared with other food preparation methods. Steaming significantly increased the protein denaturation and hemolysis inhibition in O. zeylanica and P. edulis. Steaming of leaves increased inhibition activity of protein denaturation in G. lactiferum (by 44.8% and P. edulis (by 44%; hemolysis in C. asiatica, C. auriculata, and S. grandiflora; lipoxygenase inhibition ability in P. edulis (by 50%, C. asiatica (by 400%, and C. auriculata leaves (by 250%; proteinase inhibition in C. auriculata (100% when compared with that of raw leaves. In general, steaming and boiling in contrast to frying protect the health-promoting properties of the leafy vegetables.

  7. [Biologically active compounds from the aqueous extract of Urtica dioica].

    Wagner, H; Willer, F; Kreher, B

    1989-10-01

    From the water extract of the roots of Urtica dioica (stinging nettle) a polysaccharide fraction was isolated which revealed activity in the carrageenan rat paw edema model and lymphocyte transformation test. Ion exchange chromatography and gel filtration of this fraction afforded 4 different polysaccharides, one of which reduced dose dependent hemolysis in the classical pathway of the complement test. The Urtica dioica lectin (UDA) was reisolated and found to stimulate the proliferation of human lymphocytes.

  8. Erythrocyte membrane stabilization effect and antioxidant activity of methyl methacrylate

    Popov, B.

    2004-01-01

    Methyl methacrylate (MMK) is a synthetic product with mild impact on human health that is not well studied on cellular basis. Here, human erythrocytes were used to investigate the effects MMK exerts on acid and heat-induced hemolysis. Biphasic effect of MMK was observed for acid-induced hemolysis; i.e., protection at low (0 - 0.05% v/v) and stimulation at higher (0.1- 0.4% v/v) concentrations. The maximal protective effect was produced at 0.03% (v/v). At this concentration MMK increased the temperatures of heat denaturation of erythrocyte membrane proteins, spectrin and integral proteins, by about 2 0 C and inhibited the heat-induced hemolysis by 20 %. This membrane stabilization effect of MMK is similar to that produced by some anti-inflammatory and antirheumatic drugs. The increased acid resistance possibly indicated anti-oxidant properties of MMK. The nonenzymatic antioxidant activity test evidenced that MMK has no superoxide dismutase-like activity but demonstrates strong catalase-like activity (about 900 kU/mmol at 0.05-0.1 mmol/l concentration). The results indicate that at low concentration MMK exerts benign effect on cellular membrane that could find therapeutic usage. (author)

  9. Larvicidal activity and in vitro effects of green tea (Camellia sinensis L. water infusion

    Žabar, A.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study green tea water infusion was tested on Drosophila melanogaster wild-type larvae in vivo, also an in vitro antihemolytic and hemolytic tests were performed. Three different concentrations were used 7.5 mg/ml, 37.5 mg/ml and 75 mg/ml, the lowest dose representing the recommended dose followed by five times and ten times higher doses. Effect of these three concentrations was monitored and tested in vivo on Drosophila melanogaster (Meigen, 1830 wt (wild type larval development and surviving. All three concentrations showed toxic effect for larvae, with toxicity being increased in dose – depended manner. The time needed for larvae to fully develop was delayed. This decrease of developmental time was in dose – dependent manner, too. Amount of hemolysis caused by the lowest concentration was very small when compared with the percent of spontaneous hemolysis. Other two higher concentrations, 37.5 mg/ml and 75 mg/ml, showed higher hemolytic effect. During the four hour incubation period percent of hemolysis grew in time – dependent manner. The highest hemolytic effect was recorded for the concentration of 37.5 mg/ml. Antihemolytic test showed that the lowest concentration had the highest inhibitory effect to H2O2 induced hemolysis. The 37.5 mg/ml and 75 mg/ml concentrations had lower inhibitory effect when compared with the dose of 7.5 mg/ml. According to our study it can be concluded that the high concentrations of green tea water infusion exhibit larvicidal activity against D. melanogaster larvae, don't have protective effect to RBC membrane and cause greater hemolysis.

  10. Intrathymic lymphopoiesis: stromal cell-associated proliferation of T cells is independent of lymphocyte genotype.

    Kyewski, B A; Travis, M; Kaplan, H S

    1984-09-01

    We analyzed the genetic restriction of direct cell-cell interactions between thymocytes and a) cortical epithelial cells, b) macrophages, and c) medullary dendritic cells in the mouse thymus. Thymectomized (C3H X C57BL/Ka)F1 hybrid mice were doubly grafted with P1 and P2 neonatal thymus grafts, were lethally irradiated, and were reconstituted with a mixture of P1 and P2 bone marrow cells which differed in the Thy-1 locus. The contributions of both parental inocula to the composition of the free and stromal cell-associated T cell compartments were analyzed separately in thymic grafts of each parental strain. The lymphoid composition in both compartments essentially reflected the peripheral T cell-chimerism in the host. The development of lymphostromal complexes was not restricted by the genotype of the partner cells. Statistical analysis of the distributions of P1 and P2 T cells among free thymocytes and within individual lymphostromal complexes, however, suggests that the T cells of an individual complex are the progeny of oligoclonal proliferation. Thus, both epithelial cells and bone marrow-derived stromal cells seem to be involved in different stages of intrathymic lymphopoiesis.

  11. Cell-associated proteoheparan sulfate from bovine arterial smooth muscle cells

    Schmidt, A.; Buddecke, E.

    1988-01-01

    Cell-associated proteoheparan sulfate has been isolated from bovine arterial smooth muscle cells preincubated with [ 35 S]sulfate or a combination of [ 3 H]glucosamine and [ 35 S]methionine. The purified proteoheparan sulfate had an apparent M r of 200,000 on calibrated Sepharose CL-2B columns. The glycosaminoglycan component (M r ∼30,000) was identified as heparan sulfate by its susceptibility to specific enzymatic and chemical degradation. After degradation of the proteoheparan sulfate by microbial heparitinase the resulting protein core had an apparent M r of 92,000 on SDS-polyacrylamide gels. Its mobility was similar in the absence and presence of reducing agents indicating that the protein core consists of a single polypeptide chain. Pulse-chase experiments revealed that about 40% of the cell layer-associated proteoheparan sulfate was released into the medium, while the remainder was internalized and converted to smaller species through a series of degradation steps. Initially there was a proteolytical cleavage of the protein core generating glycosaminoglycan peptide intermediates with polysaccharides chains similar in size to the original. The half-life of the native proteoheparan sulfate was found to be about 4 h

  12. Structural basis of the phospholipase C activity in neutral sphingomyelinase from Bacillus cereus

    Ago, Hideo; Miyano, Masashi

    2007-01-01

    Degradation of cell membrane and mucosa, of which phospholipids are major components, and production of lipid mediators are roles of phospholipases from pathogenic bacteria to grow, survive and spread in the host organism. The studies on the enzymes the important for the pathobiology of bacterial infectious disease. The crystal structure of Sphingomyelinase from Bacillus cereus revealed the structure basis of the phospholipase C and hemolysis activities in a divalent cation dependent manner. The water-bridged double divalent cations were concluded to be the catalytic architecture to the phospholipase C activity. In addition, the β-hairpin structure with aromatic amino acid residues was shown to be involved in the membrane binding of the enzyme as a part of the hemolysis activity. (author)

  13. Comparison of droplet digital PCR and seminested real-time PCR for quantification of cell-associated HIV-1 RNA

    Kiselinova, Maja; Pasternak, Alexander O.; de Spiegelaere, Ward; Vogelaers, Dirk; Berkhout, Ben; Vandekerckhove, Linos

    2014-01-01

    Cell-associated (CA) HIV-1 RNA is considered a potential marker for assessment of viral reservoir dynamics and antiretroviral therapy (ART) response in HIV-infected patients. Recent studies employed sensitive seminested real-time quantitative (q)PCR to quantify CA HIV-1 RNA. Digital PCR has been

  14. High-Throughput, Multiplex Genotyping Directly from Blood or Dried Blood Spot without DNA Extraction for the Screening of Multiple G6PD Gene Variants at Risk for Drug-Induced Hemolysis.

    Tian, Xiaoyi; Zhou, Jun; Zhao, Ye; Cheng, Zhibin; Song, Wenqi; Sun, Yu; Sun, Xiaodong; Zheng, Zhi

    2017-09-01

    Clinical or epidemiologic screening of single-nucleotide polymorphism markers requires large-scale multiplexed genotyping. Available genotyping tools require DNA extraction and multiplex PCR, which may limit throughput and suffer amplification bias. Herein, a novel genotyping approach has been developed, multiplex extension and ligation-based probe amplification (MELPA), which eliminates DNA extraction and achieves uniform PCR amplification. MELPA lyses blood or dried blood spot and directly captures specific target DNA to 96-well plates using tailed probes. Subsequent enzymatic extension and ligation form target single-nucleotide polymorphism-spanning single-stranded templates, which are PCR-amplified using universal primers. Multiplexed genotyping by single-base primer extension is analyzed by mass spectrometry, with a call rate >97%. MELPA was compared with a commercial assay (iPLEX) for detecting 24 G6PD variants known to be at risk for primaquine-induced hemolysis. MELPA provided results that were more reliable than iPLEX, with higher throughput and lower cost. Genotyping archival blood from 106 malaria patients taking primaquine found 10 G6PD-deficient variants, including 1 patient with a hemizygous Mahidol mutation who had hemolysis. Preemptive G6PD genotyping of 438 dried blood spots from a malaria-endemic area identified three variants. MELPA also enabled pooled genotyping without diluting rare alleles, in which undesired common-allele background increased by sample pooling can be repressed by adding specific common allele blockers. Thus, MELPA represents a high-throughput, cost-effective approach to targeted genotyping at the population level. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Investigative Pathology and the Association for Molecular Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Lytic activities in coelomic fluid of Eisenia foetida and Lumbricus terrestris.

    Tucková, L; Rejnek, J; Síma, P; Ondrejová, R

    1986-01-01

    Coelomic fluids of the two earthworm species E.foetida (E.F.) and L.terrestris (L.T.) have not only the ability to lyse various vertebrate erythrocytes but also to digest vertebrate serum proteins. Both activities are carried by different molecules since hemolysis but not proteolysis was inhibited by simple sugars. In contrary, proteolysis was blocked by PMSF which did not influence hemolysis. Coelomic fluids of E.F. digest effectively vertebrate serum proteins (PIgG, HSA) but not the proteins of L.T. coelomic fluids. The proteolytic activity was detected in approximately 40 000 mol. wt. fraction. After digestion proteolytic fragments were analyzed by immunoelectrophoresis, SDS-PAGE and TCA precipitation. Two of the fragments reacting with PIgG antisera remained intact even after 120 h digestion.

  16. Oral epithelial cells are susceptible to cell-free and cell-associated HIV-1 infection in vitro

    Moore, Jennifer S.; Rahemtulla, Firoz; Kent, Leigh W.; Hall, Stacy D.; Ikizler, Mine R.; Wright, Peter F.; Nguyen, Huan H.; Jackson, Susan

    2003-01-01

    Epithelial cells lining the oral cavity are exposed to HIV-1 through breast-feeding and oral-genital contact. Genital secretions and breast milk of HIV-1-infected subjects contain both cell-free and cell-associated virus. To determine if oral epithelial cells can be infected with HIV-1 we exposed gingival keratinocytes and adenoid epithelial cells to cell-free virus and HIV-1-infected peripheral blood mononuclear cells and monocytes. Using primary isolates we determined that gingival keratinocytes are susceptible to HIV-1 infection via cell-free CD4-independent infection only. R5 but not X4 viral strains were capable of infecting the keratinocytes. Further, infected cells were able to release infectious virus. In addition, primary epithelial cells isolated from adenoids were also susceptible to infection; both cell-free and cell-associated virus infected these cells. These data have potential implications in the transmission of HIV-1 in the oral cavity

  17. Tryptophan-Containing Cyclic Decapeptides with Activity against Plant Pathogenic Bacteria

    Cristina Camó

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available A library of 66 cyclic decapeptides incorporating a Trp residue was synthesized on solid phase and screened against the phytopathogenic bacteria Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae, Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. vesicatoria, and Erwinia amylovora. The hemolytic activity of these peptides was also evaluated. The results obtained were compared with those of a collection of Phe analogues previously reported. The analysis of the data showed that the presence of the Trp improved the antibacterial activity against these three pathogens. In particular, 40 to 46 Trp analogues displayed lower minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC values than their corresponding Phe counterparts. Interestingly, 26 Trp-containing sequences exhibited MIC of 0.8 to 3.1 μM against X. axonopodis pv. vesicatoria, 21 peptides MIC of 1.6 to 6.2 μM against P. syringae pv. syringae and six peptides MIC of 6.2 to 12.5 μM against E. amylovora. Regarding the hemolysis, in general, Trp derivatives displayed a percentage of hemolysis comparable to that of their Phe analogues. Notably, 49 Trp-containing cyclic peptides showed a hemolysis ≤ 20% at 125 μM. The peptides with the best biological activity profile were c(LKKKLWKKLQ (BPC086W and c(LKKKKWLLKQ (BPC108W, which displayed MIC values ranging from 0.8 to 12.5 μM and a hemolysis ≤ 8% at 125 μM. Therefore, it is evident that these Trp sequences constitute promising candidates for the development of new agents for use in plant protection.

  18. Lactobacillus reuteri Strains Convert Starch and Maltodextrins into Homoexopolysaccharides Using an Extracellular and Cell-Associated 4,6-α-Glucanotransferase.

    Bai, Yuxiang; Böger, Markus; van der Kaaij, Rachel Maria; Woortman, Albert Jan Jacob; Pijning, Tjaard; van Leeuwen, Sander Sebastiaan; van Bueren, Alicia Lammerts; Dijkhuizen, Lubbert

    2016-04-13

    Exopolysaccharides (EPS) of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are of interest for food applications. LAB are well-known to produce α-glucan from sucrose by extracellular glucansucrases. Various Lactobacillus reuteri strains also possess 4,6-α-glucanotransferase (4,6-α-GTase) enzymes. Purified 4,6-α-GTases (e.g., GtfB) were shown to act on starches (hydrolysates), cleaving α1→4 linkages and synthesizing α1→6 linkages, yielding isomalto-/maltopolysaccharides (IMMP). Here we report that also L. reuteri cells with these extracellular, cell-associated 4,6-α-GTases synthesize EPS (α-glucan) from starches (hydrolysates). NMR, SEC, and enzymatic hydrolysis of EPS synthesized by L. reuteri 121 cells showed that these have similar linkage specificities but generally are much bigger in size than IMMP produced by the GtfB enzyme. Various IMMP-like EPS are efficiently used as growth substrates by probiotic Bifidobacterium strains that possess amylopullulanase activity. IMMP-like EPS thus have potential prebiotic activity and may contribute to the application of probiotic L. reuteri strains grown on maltodextrins or starches as synbiotics.

  19. Prior mucosal exposure to heterologous cells alters the pathogenesis of cell-associated mucosal feline immunodeficiency virus challenge

    Leavell Sarah

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several lines of research suggest that exposure to cellular material can alter the susceptibility to infection by HIV-1. Because sexual contact often includes exposure to cellular material, we hypothesized that repeated mucosal exposure to heterologous cells would induce an immune response that would alter the susceptibility to mucosal infection. Using the feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV model of HIV-1 mucosal transmission, the cervicovaginal mucosa was exposed once weekly for 12 weeks to 5,000 heterologous cells or media (control and then cats were vaginally challenged with cell-associated or cell-free FIV. Results Exposure to heterologous cells decreased the percentage of lymphocytes in the mucosal and systemic lymph nodes (LN expressing L-selectin as well as the percentage of CD4+ CD25+ T cells. These shifts were associated with enhanced ex-vivo proliferative responses to heterologous cells. Following mucosal challenge with cell-associated, but not cell-free, FIV, proviral burden was reduced by 64% in cats previously exposed to heterologous cells as compared to media exposed controls. Conclusions The pathogenesis and/or the threshold for mucosal infection by infected cells (but not cell-free virus can be modulated by mucosal exposure to uninfected heterologous cells.

  20. 7-ketocholesterol induces apoptosis of MC3T3-E1 cells associated with reactive oxygen species generation, endoplasmic reticulum stress and caspase-3/7 dependent pathway

    Yuta Sato

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM is associated with an increased risk of bone fractures without reduction of bone mineral density. The cholesterol oxide 7-ketocholesterol (7KCHO has been implicated in numerous diseases such as atherosclerosis, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, cancer, age-related macular degeneration and T2DM. In the present study, 7KCHO decreased the viability of MC3T3-E1 cells, increased reactive oxygen species (ROS production and apoptotic rate, and upregulated the caspase-3/7 pathway. Furthermore, these effects of 7KCHO were abolished by pre-incubation of the cells with N-acetylcysteine (NAC, an ROS inhibitor. Also, 7KCHO enhanced the mRNA expression of two endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress markers; CHOP and GRP78, in MC3T3-E1 cells. Pre-incubation of the cells with NAC suppressed the 7KCHO-induced upregulation of CHOP, but not GRP78. In conclusion, we demonstrated that 7KCHO induced apoptosis of MC3T3-E1 cells associated with ROS generation, ER stress, and caspase-3/7 activity, and the effects of 7KCHO were abolished by the ROS inhibitor NAC. These findings may provide new insight into the relationship between oxysterol and pathophysiology of osteoporosis seen in T2DM.

  1. Fluorescent reporter signals, EGFP and DsRed, encoded in HIV-1 facilitate the detection of productively infected cells and cell-associated viral replication levels

    Kazutaka eTerahara

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Flow cytometric analysis is a reliable and convenient method for investigating molecules at the single cell level. Previously, recombinant human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 strains were constructed that express a fluorescent reporter, either enhanced green fluorescent protein or DsRed, which allow the monitoring of HIV-1-infected cells by flow cytometry. The present study further investigated the potential of these recombinant viruses in terms of whether the HIV-1 fluorescent reporters would be helpful in evaluating viral replication based on fluorescence intensity. When primary CD4+ T cells were infected with recombinant viruses, the fluorescent reporter intensity measured by flow cytometry was associated with the level of CD4 downmodulation and Gag p24 expression in infected cells. Interestingly, some HIV-1-infected cells, in which CD4 was only moderately downmodulated, were reporter-positive but Gag p24-negative. Furthermore, when the activation status of primary CD4+ T cells was modulated by T cell receptor-mediated stimulation, we confirmed the preferential viral production upon strong stimulation and showed that the intensity of the fluorescent reporter within a proportion of HIV-1-infected cells was correlated with the viral replication level. These findings indicate that a fluorescent reporter encoded within HIV-1 is useful for the sensitive detection of productively-infected cells at different stages of infection and for evaluating cell-associated viral replication at the single cell level.

  2. The Agr quorum-sensing system regulates fibronectin binding but not hemolysis in the absence of a functional electron transport chain.

    Pader, Vera; James, Ellen H; Painter, Kimberley L; Wigneshweraraj, Sivaramesh; Edwards, Andrew M

    2014-10-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is responsible for numerous chronic and recurrent infections, which are frequently associated with the emergence of small-colony variants (SCVs) that lack a functional electron transport chain. SCVs exhibit enhanced expression of fibronectin-binding protein (FnBP) and greatly reduced hemolysin production, although the basis for this is unclear. One hypothesis is that these phenotypes are a consequence of the reduced Agr activity of SCVs, while an alternative is that the lack of a functional electron transport chain and the resulting reduction in ATP production are responsible. Disruption of the electron transport chain of S. aureus genetically (hemB and menD) or chemically, using 2-n-heptyl-4-hydroxyquinoline N-oxide (HQNO), inhibited both growth and Agr activity and conferred an SCV phenotype. Supplementation of the culture medium with synthetic autoinducing peptide (sAIP) significantly increased Agr expression in both hemB mutant strains and S. aureus grown with HQNO and significantly reduced staphylococcal adhesion to fibronectin. However, sAIP did not promote hemolysin expression in hemB mutant strains or S. aureus grown with HQNO. Therefore, while Agr regulates fibronectin binding in SCVs, it cannot promote hemolysin production in the absence of a functional electron transport chain. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  3. Synthesis of new bioactive aminophosphonates and study of their antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and antibacterial activities as well the assessment of their toxicological activity

    Damiche, Rebiha; Chafaa, Salah

    2017-02-01

    Two new categories of α-aminophosphonates molecules were synthesized and characterized by UV-Vis, IR, and NMR. Their spectral properties show a perfect convergence. Their biological activities were evaluated. Molecules 1a, 2a, and 1d present a greater antioxidant potential than BHT and vitamin C. The best anti-inflammatory activity is shown by the 2b molecule and that of 1a, 2a, and 2c molecules are closely comparable to that of diclofenac. The antibacterial activity of the synthesized compounds is significantly higher than the antibiotic amoxicillin. The hemolysis rate HR of compounds 1b, 1c, 2b, and 2c was lower than 5%.

  4. Cell-associated flagella enhance the protection conferred by mucosally-administered attenuated Salmonella Paratyphi A vaccines.

    Orit Gat

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Antibiotic-resistant Salmonella enterica serovar Paratyphi A, the agent of paratyphoid A fever, poses an emerging public health dilemma in endemic areas of Asia and among travelers, as there is no licensed vaccine. Integral to our efforts to develop a S. Paratyphi A vaccine, we addressed the role of flagella as a potential protective antigen by comparing cell-associated flagella with exported flagellin subunits expressed by attenuated strains.S. Paratyphi A strain ATCC 9150 was first deleted for the chromosomal guaBA locus, creating CVD 1901. Further chromosomal deletions in fliD (CVD 1901D or flgK (CVD 1901K were then engineered, resulting in the export of unpolymerized FliC, without impairing its overall expression. The virulence of the resulting isogenic strains was examined using a novel mouse LD(50 model to accommodate the human-host restricted S. Paratyphi A. The immunogenicity of the attenuated strains was then tested using a mouse intranasal model, followed by intraperitoneal challenge with wildtype ATCC 9150.Mucosal (intranasal immunization of mice with strain CVD 1901 expressing cell-associated flagella conferred superior protection (vaccine efficacy [VE], 90% against a lethal intraperitoneal challenge, compared with the flagellin monomer-exporting mutants CVD 1901K (30% VE or CVD 1901D (47% VE. The superior protection induced by CVD 1901 with its cell-attached flagella was associated with an increased IgG2a:IgG1 ratio of FliC-specific antibodies with enhanced opsonophagocytic capacity.Our results clearly suggest that enhanced anti-FliC antibody-mediated clearance of S. Paratyphi A by phagocytic cells, induced by vaccines expressing cell-associated rather than exported FliC, might be contributing to the vaccine-induced protection from S. Paratyphi A challenge in vivo. We speculate that an excess of IgG1 anti-FliC antibodies induced by the exported FliC may compete with the IgG2a subtype and block binding to specific phagocyte Fc

  5. T cell--associated immunoregulation and antiviral effect of oxymatrine in hydrodynamic injection HBV mouse model.

    Sang, Xiuxiu; Wang, Ruilin; Han, Yanzhong; Zhang, Cong'en; Shen, Honghui; Yang, Zhirui; Xiong, Yin; Liu, Huimin; Liu, Shijing; Li, Ruisheng; Yang, Ruichuang; Wang, Jiabo; Wang, Xuejun; Bai, Zhaofang; Xiao, Xiaohe

    2017-05-01

    Although oxymatrine (OMT) has been shown to directly inhibit the replication of hepatitis B virus (HBV) in vitro , limited research has been done with this drug in vivo . In the present study, the antiviral effect of OMT was investigated in an immunocompetent mouse model of chronic HBV infection. The infection was achieved by tail vein injection of a large volume of DNA solution. OMT (2.2, 6.7 and 20 mg/kg) was administered by daily intraperitoneal injection for 6 weeks. The efficacy of OMT was evaluated by the levels of HBV DNA, hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg), hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg) and hepatitis B core antigen (HBcAg). The immunoregulatory activity of OMT was evaluated by serum ELISA and flow cytometry. Results shows that OMT at 20 mg/kg inhibited HBV replication, and it was more efficient than entecavir (ETV) in the elimination of serum HBsAg and intrahepatic HBcAg. In addition, OMT accelerated the production of interferon- γ (IFN- γ ) in a dose-dependent manner in CD4 + T cells. Our findings demonstrate the beneficial effects of OMT on the enhancement of immunological function and in the control of HBV antigens. The findings suggest this drug to be a good antiviral therapeutic candidate for the treatment of HBV infection.

  6. Computer-assisted diagnostic tool to quantify the pulmonary veins in sickle cell associated pulmonary hypertension

    Jajamovich, Guido H.; Pamulapati, Vivek; Alam, Shoaib; Mehari, Alem; Kato, Gregory J.; Wood, Bradford J.; Linguraru, Marius George

    2012-03-01

    Pulmonary hypertension is a common cause of death among patients with sickle cell disease. This study investigates the use of pulmonary vein analysis to assist the diagnosis of pulmonary hypertension non-invasively with CT-Angiography images. The characterization of the pulmonary veins from CT presents two main challenges. Firstly, the number of pulmonary veins is unknown a priori and secondly, the contrast material is degraded when reaching the pulmonary veins, making the edges of these vessels to appear faint. Each image is first denoised and a fast marching approach is used to segment the left atrium and pulmonary veins. Afterward, a geodesic active contour is employed to isolate the left atrium. A thinning technique is then used to extract the skeleton of the atrium and the veins. The locations of the pulmonary veins ostia are determined by the intersection of the skeleton and the contour of the atrium. The diameters of the pulmonary veins are measured in each vein at fixed distances from the corresponding ostium, and for each distance, the sum of the diameters of all the veins is computed. These indicators are shown to be significantly larger in sickle-cell patients with pulmonary hypertension as compared to controls (p-values < 0.01).

  7. Synthesis, characterization and hemolysis studies of Zn{sub (1−x)}Ca{sub x}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} ferrites synthesized by sol-gel for hyperthermia treatment applications

    Jasso-Terán, Rosario Argentina, E-mail: arg.jasso@gmail.com; Cortés-Hernández, Dora Alicia; Sánchez-Fuentes, Héctor Javier; Reyes-Rodríguez, Pamela Yajaira; León-Prado, Laura Elena de; Escobedo-Bocardo, José Concepción; Almanza-Robles, José Manuel

    2017-04-01

    The synthesis of Zn{sub (1−x)}Ca{sub x}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanoparticles, x=0, 0.25, 0.50, 0.75 and 1.0, was performed by sol-gel method followed by a heat treatment at 400 °C for 30 min. These ferrites showed nanometric sizes and nearly superparamagnetic behavior. The Zn{sub 0.50}Ca{sub 0.50}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} and CaFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} ferrites presented a size within the range of 12–14 nm and appropriate heating ability for hyperthermia applications. Hemolysis testing demonstrated that Zn{sub 0.50}Ca{sub 0.50}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} ferrite was not cytotoxic when using 10 mg of ferrite/mL of solution. According to the results obtained, Zn{sub 0.50}Ca{sub 0.50}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} is a potential material for cancer treatment by magnetic hyperthermia therapy. - Highlights: • The synthesis of Zn{sub (1−x)}Ca{sub x}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} ferrites was performed by sol-gel method. • CaFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} and Zn{sub 0.50}Ca{sub 0.}50Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} ferrites showed heating ability. • The Zn{sub 0.50}Ca{sub 0.50}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} ferrite demonstrated to be no hemolytic.

  8. Cell-associated HIV DNA measured early during infection has prognostic value independent of serum HIV RNA measured concomitantly

    Katzenstein, Terese L; Oliveri, Roberto S; Benfield, Thomas

    2002-01-01

    Using data from the Danish AIDS Cohort of HIV-infected homosexual men established in the 1980s, the prognostic value of early HIV DNA loads was evaluated. In addition to DNA measurements, concomitant serum HIV RNA levels, CD4 cell counts and CCR5 genotypes were determined. The patients were divided...... into 3 groups, according to whether their cell-associated HIV DNA load was or = 2,500 DNA copies/10(6) peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Clinical progression rates differed significantly between the groups (p value independent...... of serum HIV RNA (p value. Patients heterozygous for the CCR5 delta 32 allele had significantly lower HIV DNA loads than those homozygous for the normal allele (p

  9. Effect of haemopoietic system activation on radiosensitivity of animals

    Bitny-Szlachto, S.

    1985-01-01

    The aim of these investigations was to study the influence of activation of erythropoiesis by carbon monoxide, blood letting and blood transfuzing, hypobaric hypoxia, fenylohydrazine induced hemolysis, pertussis vaccine and also sublethal irradiation and later polycythemia on the blood-forming system's ability to postirradiation regeneration after lethal and sublethal X ray irradiation on the whole body of mouse. Results were positive except pertusis vaccine which caused considerable decrease in survival of irradiated mice. Ionizing radiation and fenylohydrazine were the most effective. 21 refs.,5 tabs. (author)

  10. Isolation of hemopoietic stem cell subsets from murine bone marrow: II. Evidence for an early precursor of day-12 CFU-S and cells associated with radioprotective ability

    Ploemacher, R.E.; Brons, N.H.

    1988-01-01

    Counterflow centrifugal elutriation (CCE) in combination with plastic adherence and fluorescence-activated cell sorting were used consecutively to enrich functionally different subpopulations of pluripotent hemopoietic stem cells (HSC) from mouse bone marrow. The nonadherent CCE fractions were labeled with wheat germ agglutinin (WGA)-fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) and sorted according to differences in fluorescence within various windows on the basis of forward (FLS) and perpendicular (PLS) light scatter. The sorted cells were then assayed for their (1) in vivo colony-forming ability (day-7 and day-12 spleen colony-forming units [CFU-S]), (2) radioprotective ability (RPA; 30-day survival), and (3) their ability to repopulate the bone marrow or spleen over a 13-day period with day-12 CFU-S, granulocyte-macrophage colony-forming units (CFU-GM), nucleated cells, or cells associated with RPA. The highest incidence of day-12 CFU-S and cells with RPA was obtained by sorting the most WGA-positive cells with relatively high PLS (enrichment, 50- to 200-fold), lowering the effective dose (ED 50/30) to an average of 80 cells. The separative procedure enabled hemopoietic stem cells that repopulate both bone marrow and spleen with secondary RPA cells, CFU-S-12, and CFU-GM to be enriched and separated from part of the RPA cells, CFU-S-12, and cells that reconstitute the cellularity of bone marrow and spleen. These data suggest that cells generating both day-12 CFU-S and RPA cells differ from day-12 CFU-S and RPA cells themselves on the basis of PLS characteristics and affinity for WGA. Such early stem cells have also been detected in sorted fractions meeting the FLS/PLS characteristics of lymphocytes

  11. Differential protein expression of hepatic cells associated with MeHg exposure: deepening into the molecular mechanisms of toxicity

    Cuello, Susana; Madrid, Yolanda; Luque-Garcia, Jose L.; Camara, Carmen [Complutense University of Madrid, Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, Madrid (Spain); Ramos, Sonia [Institute of Food Science, Technology and Nutrition, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas (CSIC), Madrid (Spain)

    2012-08-15

    Understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying MeHg toxicity and the way in which this molecule interacts with living organisms is a critical point since MeHg represents a well-known risk to ecosystems and human health. We used a quantitative proteomic approach based on stable isotopic labeling by amino acids in cell culture in combination with SDS-PAGE and nanoflow LC-ESI-LTQ for analyzing the differential protein expression of hepatic cells associated to MeHg exposure. Seventy-eight proteins were found de-regulated by more than 1.5-fold. We identified a number of proteins involved in different essential biological processes including apoptosis, mitochondrial dysfunction, cellular trafficking and energy production. Among these proteins, we found several molecules whose de-regulation has been already related to MeHg exposure, thus confirming the usefulness of our discovery approach, and new ones that helped to gain a deeper insight into the biomolecular mechanisms related to MeHg-induced toxicity. Overexpression of several HSPs and the proteasome 26S subunit itself showed the proteasome system as a molecular target of toxic MeHg. As for the interaction networks, the top ranked was the nucleic acid metabolism, where many of the identified de-regulated proteins are involved. (orig.)

  12. Changes in the expression of Th17 cell-associated cytokines in the development of rheumatic heart disease.

    Wen, Yun; Zeng, Zhiyu; Gui, Chun; Li, Lang; Li, Wenting

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmunity plays a critical role in the development of rheumatic heart disease (RHD). Recent studies have linked Th17 cells to the autoimmune mechanism associated with RHD. This study aimed to investigate changes in Th17 cell-related cytokine expression in acute and chronic RHD. We established a Lewis rat model of experimental RHD, which was induced by inactivated Group A streptococci and complete Freund's adjuvant. After 7- and 24-week intervention treatments, we measured serum levels of interleukin-17 (IL-17) and IL-6, key cytokines associated with Th17 cells, using a Luminex liquichip method, and levels of IL-17 and IL-6 in heart tissues using immunohistochemical assays. Moreover, expression levels of IL-17, IL-21, IL-6, and IL-23 in mitral valve tissues of human RHD patients were also measured using immunohistochemistry. Compared with the normal control group, serum IL-17 and IL-6 concentrations were significantly increased, and the expression levels of IL-17 and IL-6 in the mitral valve were also significantly increased in 7- or 24-week RHD rats (P<.017). Compared with the control group, expression of IL-17, IL-21, IL-6, and IL-23 in mitral valve tissues was significantly increased in RHD patients (P<.05). Our study suggested that the increased expression of Th17 cell-associated cytokines might play an important role in the pathogenesis and development of RHD. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Negative regulation of ciliary length by ciliary male germ cell-associated kinase (Mak) is required for retinal photoreceptor survival.

    Omori, Yoshihiro; Chaya, Taro; Katoh, Kimiko; Kajimura, Naoko; Sato, Shigeru; Muraoka, Koichiro; Ueno, Shinji; Koyasu, Toshiyuki; Kondo, Mineo; Furukawa, Takahisa

    2010-12-28

    Cilia function as cell sensors in many organs, and their disorders are referred to as "ciliopathies." Although ciliary components and transport machinery have been well studied, regulatory mechanisms of ciliary formation and maintenance are poorly understood. Here we show that male germ cell-associated kinase (Mak) regulates retinal photoreceptor ciliary length and subcompartmentalization. Mak was localized both in the connecting cilia and outer-segment axonemes of photoreceptor cells. In the Mak-null retina, photoreceptors exhibit elongated cilia and progressive degeneration. We observed accumulation of intraflagellar transport 88 (IFT88) and IFT57, expansion of kinesin family member 3A (Kif3a), and acetylated α-tubulin signals in the Mak-null photoreceptor cilia. We found abnormal rhodopsin accumulation in the Mak-null photoreceptor cell bodies at postnatal day 14. In addition, overexpression of retinitis pigmentosa 1 (RP1), a microtubule-associated protein localized in outer-segment axonemes, induced ciliary elongation, and Mak coexpression rescued excessive ciliary elongation by RP1. The RP1 N-terminal portion induces ciliary elongation and increased intensity of acetylated α-tubulin labeling in the cells and is phosphorylated by Mak. These results suggest that Mak is essential for the regulation of ciliary length and is required for the long-term survival of photoreceptors.

  14. Evaluation of In Vitro Anti-inflammatory Activity of Azomethines of Aryl Oxazoles

    V. Niraimathi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Ability to inhibit erythrocyte hemolysis is often used as a characteristic of the membrane stabilising action of chemical compounds. Azomethines of aryl oxazoles were evaluated for anti-inflammatory by in vitro hemolytic membrane stabilising study. The effect of inflammation condition was studied on erythrocyte exposed to hypotonic solution. In this in vitro method the membrane stabilising action leads to anti-inflammatory activity and was compared with that produced by diclofenac sodium as the reference standard. Results of the evaluation indicate that the synthesised compounds found to exhibit membrane stabilising activity.

  15. Decreased neutrophil-associated miRNA and increased B-cell associated miRNA expression during tuberculosis.

    van Rensburg, I C; du Toit, L; Walzl, G; du Plessis, N; Loxton, A G

    2018-05-20

    MicroRNAs are short non-coding RNAs that regulate gene expression by binding to, and suppressing the expression of genes. Research show that microRNAs have potential to be used as biomarkers for diagnosis, treatment response and can be used for therapeutic interventions. Furthermore, microRNA expression has effects on immune cell functions, which may lead to disease. Considering the important protective role of neutrophils and B-cells during M.tb infection, we evaluated the expression of microRNAs, known to alter function of these cells, in the context of human TB. We utilised real-time PCR to evaluate the levels of microRNA transcripts in the peripheral blood of TB cases and healthy controls. We found that neutrophil-associated miR-197-3p, miR-99b-5p and miR-191-5p transcript levels were significantly lower in TB cases. Additionally, B-cell-associated miR-320a, miR-204-5p, miR331-3p and other transcript levels were higher in TB cases. The miRNAs differentially expressed in neutrophils are predominantly implicated in signalling pathways leading to cytokine productions. Here, the decreased expression in TB cases may imply a lack of suppression on signalling pathways, which may lead to increased production of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as interferon-gamma. Furthermore, the miRNAs differentially expressed in B-cells are mostly involved in the induction/suppression of apoptosis. Further functional studies are however required to elucidate the significance and functional effects of changes in the expression of these microRNAs. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Alteration of protein expression pattern of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) from soluble to cell-associated isoform during tumourigenesis

    Cressey, Ratchada; Wattananupong, Onusa; Lertprasertsuke, Nirush; Vinitketkumnuen, Usanee

    2005-01-01

    colorectal and 1,251 ± 568 pg/ml in lung) than a healthy volunteer group (543 ± 344 pg/ml). No correlation between the level of circulating VEGF and the pathologic features of tumours was observed. Our findings indicate that the expression patterns of VEGF isoforms are altered during tumourigenesis as certain isoform overexpression in tumour tissues correlated with tumour progression indicating their important role in tumour development. However, measurement of VEGF in the circulation as a prognostic marker needs to be carefully evaluated as the cell-associated isoform (VEGF 189 ), but not the soluble isoform (VEGF 121 and VEGF 165 ) appears to play important role in tumour progression

  17. Limitations of ADAMTS-13 activity level in diagnosing thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura in pregnancy.

    Ehsanipoor, Robert M; Rajan, Priya; Holcombe, Randall F; Wing, Deborah A

    2009-10-01

    In pregnancy, it may be difficult to differentiate the syndrome of hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, and low platelets from thrombotic thrombocytopenia purpura. Severely depressed (present a case of a patient that presented at 20 weeks gestation with elevated liver enzymes and thrombocytopenia. The diagnosis was unclear at the time of presentation. She underwent induction of labor, and during the postpartum course, she was eventually diagnosed with thrombotic thrombocytopenia purpura; however, her activity level of a disintegrin and metalloproteinase with thrombospondin motifs-13 was only moderately depressed at 15% (normal pregnancy value 41%-105%).

  18. Concurrent measurement of cellular turbidity and hemoglobin to evaluate the antioxidant activity of plants.

    Bellik, Yuva; Iguer-Ouada, Mokrane

    2016-01-01

    In past decades, a multitude of analytical methods for measuring antioxidant activity of plant extracts has been developed. However, when using methods to determine hemoglobin released from human erythrocytes treated with ginger extracts, we found hemoglobin concentrations were significantly higher than in untreated control samples. This suggests in the presence of antioxidants that measuring hemoglobin alone is not sufficient to determine hemolysis. We show concurrent measurement of erythrocyte concentration and hemoglobin is essential in such assays, and describe a new protocol based on simultaneous measurement of cellular turbidity and hemoglobin. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Low Water Activity Induces the Production of Bioactive Metabolites in Halophilic and Halotolerant Fungi

    Nina Gunde-Cimerman

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to investigate indigenous fungal communities isolated from extreme environments (hypersaline waters of solar salterns and subglacial ice, for the production of metabolic compounds with selected biological activities: hemolysis, antibacterial, and acetylcholinesterase inhibition. In their natural habitats, the selected fungi are exposed to environmental extremes, and therefore the production of bioactive metabolites was tested under both standard growth conditions for mesophilic microorganisms, and at high NaCl and sugar concentrations and low growth temperatures. The results indicate that selected halotolerant and halophilic species synthesize specific bioactive metabolites under conditions that represent stress for non-adapted species. Furthermore, adaptation at the level of the chemical nature of the solute lowering the water activity of the medium was observed. Increased salt concentrations resulted in higher hemolytic activity, particularly within species dominating the salterns. The appearance of antibacterial potential under stress conditions was seen in the similar pattern of fungal species as for hemolysis. The active extracts exclusively affected the growth of the Gram-positive bacterium tested, Bacillus subtilis. None of the extracts tested showed inhibition of acetylcholinesterase activity.

  20. THE COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF THE ACTIVITY ASSAY METHODS FOR MG2+-DEPENDENT NA+/K+-ACTIVATED ATPASE IN ERYTHROCYTE MEMBRANES

    Polina Anatolevna Petrova

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This review considers the methodological reasons for the wide range of results for the red blood cells Mg2+-dependent Na+/K+-ATPase activity described by different authors. We assert that the differences in the Na+/K+-ATPase activity obtained by the researchers are due to the methodological peculiarities associated with methods of obtaining and measurement of the enzyme activity, such as red blood cells separation and storage (centrifugation, concentration and composition of the lysing solution, time and temperature of hemolysis and freezing, as well as the peculiarities of methods for the quantitative determination of protein and inorganic phosphorus. On the basis of the literature data analysis we recommend that for the most accurate determination of the Na+/K+-ATPase activity it is better to use the chelator in the lysing buffer solution and Fiske-Subbarow and Lowry methods for the determination of inorganic phosphorus and quantitative protein content, respectively.

  1. Sensitization to epithelial antigens in chronic mucosal inflammatory disease. Characterization of human intestinal mucosa-derived mononuclear cells reactive with purified epithelial cell-associated components in vitro.

    Roche, J K; Fiocchi, C; Youngman, K

    1985-01-01

    To explore the auto-reactive potential of cells infiltrating the gut mucosa in idiopathic chronic inflammatory bowel disease, intestinal lamina propria mononuclear cells (LPMC) were isolated, characterized morphologically and phenotypically, and evaluated for antigen-specific reactivity. The last was assessed by quantitating LPMC cytotoxic capabilities against purified, aqueous-soluble, organ-specific epithelial cell-associated components (ECAC) characterized previously. Enzyme-isolated infla...

  2. Anti-inflammatory and antinociceptive activities of Rhipicephalus microplus saliva

    D F Buccini

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory activities and the toxic effects of Rhipicephalus microplus saliva for elucidating the modulation mechanism between arthropod saliva and host. Methods: For saliva collection, engorged ticks were obtained from a controlled bovine infestation and collected by natural fall. The ticks were fixed and injected pilocarpine 0.2% for induction of salivation. Saliva was collected, lyophilized and stored at - 80 °C. Cytotoxic activity was assessed by the hemolysis method (25, 50, 100, 200 and 300 μ g/mL and MTT cell viability assay (2.5, 5, 10, 20 and 40 μ g/mL for 24, 48 and 72 h. Anti-inflammatory activity was evaluated using the method of neutrophil migration to the peritoneal cavity of mice at doses of 10, 15 and 20 mg/kg; antinociceptive activity was assessed using the acetic acid-induced writhing test, and formalin-induced paw-licking in mice at dose of 15 mg/kg. Results: Saliva did not cause erythrocytes hemolysis at any concentration tested, as well as did not decrease cell viability in the MTT assay. Saliva inhibited neutrophil migration by 87% and 73% at doses of 15 and 20 mg/kg, respectively. In the nociceptive tests, saliva presented analgesic activity of 69.96% in the abdominal writhing test, and of 84.41% in the formalin test. Conclusions: The study proves that Rhipicephalus microplus saliva has significant in vivo anti-inflammatory and antinociceptive activities. The data presented herein support the development of further studies to elucidate the active principles of Rhipicephalus microplus saliva and its mechanism of action and, in future, to develop novel anti-inflammatory and analgesic drugs.

  3. Antioxidant activity of flower, stem and leaf extracts of Ferula gummosa Boiss

    Nabavi, S. F.; Ebrahimzadeh, M. A.; Nabavi, S. M.; Eslami, B.

    2010-07-01

    The Antioxidant and anti hemolytic activities of hydro alcoholic extracts of the flowers, stems and leaves of the Ferula gummosa Boiss were investigated employing different in vitro assay systems. Leaf extract showed better activity in DPPH radical scavenging. In addition it showed better activity in nitric oxide and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} scavenging and Fe{sup 2}+ chelating activity than the other parts. The extracts exhibited good antioxidant activity in linoleic acid system test but were not comparable with vitamin C (p< 0.001). The extracts showed weak reducing power activity. The F. gummosa stem extract showed better anti hemolytic activity against H{sub 2}O{sub 2} induced hemolysis. Among the extracts, the flowers had higher phenolic and flavonoid contents. This plant is very promising for further biochemical experiments. (Author) 43 refs.

  4. Differentiation of 3T3-L1 preadipocytes with 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine and dexamethasone stimulates cell-associated and soluble chondroitin 4-sulfate proteoglycans

    Calvo, J.C.; Rodbard, D.; Katki, A.; Chernick, S.; Yanagishita, M.

    1991-01-01

    The proteoglycans (cell-associated and culture media) in 3T3-L1 preadipocytes in culture were analyzed before and during differentiation into adipocytes. Cells were metabolically labeled with [35S]sulfate and [3H] glucosamine for 24 h and then extracted and analyzed. There was a 1.68 ± 0.07-fold increase in the 35S in medium proteoglycan during differentiation, whereas cell-associated proteoglycan radioactivity showed no increase. Analyses of radiolabeled molecules using ion-exchange chromatography, gel filtration, and high performance liquid chromatography after enzymatic or alkaline digestion indicated that all of the 35S label was recovered as two major species of chondroitin 4-sulfate proteoglycans (CSPG-I and CSPG-II) and 7% as heparan sulfate proteoglycan. CSPG-I has a mass of ∼ 970 kDa with multiple chondroitin sulfate chains (average of 50 kDa each) and a core protein of ∼ 370 kDa including oligosaccharides. CSPG-II has a mass of 140 kDa with one or two chondroitin sulfate chains (average of 68 kDa each) and a core protein of 41 kDa including oligosaccharides. CSPG-I appears to be similar to versican, whereas CSPG-II is similar to decorin and/or biglycan, found in other fibroblastic cells. Cell differentiation was associated with a specific increase in CSPG-I (4.0 ± 0.2-fold in media and 3.2 ± 0.5-fold in the cell-associated form). This system should facilitate study of the functional roles of proteoglycans during growth and differentiation

  5. Low pH immobilizes and kills human leukocytes and prevents transmission of cell-associated HIV in a mouse model

    Markham Richard B

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Both cell-associated and cell-free HIV virions are present in semen and cervical secretions of HIV-infected individuals. Thus, topical microbicides may need to inactivate both cell-associated and cell-free HIV to prevent sexual transmission of HIV/AIDS. To determine if the mild acidity of the healthy vagina and acid buffering microbicides would prevent transmission by HIV-infected leukocytes, we measured the effect of pH on leukocyte motility, viability and intracellular pH and tested the ability of an acidic buffering microbicide (BufferGel® to prevent the transmission of cell-associated HIV in a HuPBL-SCID mouse model. Methods Human lymphocyte, monocyte, and macrophage motilities were measured as a function of time and pH using various acidifying agents. Lymphocyte and macrophage motilities were measured using video microscopy. Monocyte motility was measured using video microscopy and chemotactic chambers. Peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC viability and intracellular pH were determined as a function of time and pH using fluorescent dyes. HuPBL-SCID mice were pretreated with BufferGel, saline, or a control gel and challenged with HIV-1-infected human PBMCs. Results Progressive motility was completely abolished in all cell types between pH 5.5 and 6.0. Concomitantly, at and below pH 5.5, the intracellular pH of PBMCs dropped precipitously to match the extracellular medium and did not recover. After acidification with hydrochloric acid to pH 4.5 for 60 min, although completely immotile, 58% of PBMCs excluded ethidium homodimer-1 (dead-cell dye. In contrast, when acidified to this pH with BufferGel, a microbicide designed to maintain vaginal acidity in the presence of semen, only 4% excluded dye at 10 min and none excluded dye after 30 min. BufferGel significantly reduced transmission of HIV-1 in HuPBL-SCID mice (1 of 12 infected compared to saline (12 of 12 infected and a control gel (5 of 7 infected. Conclusion These

  6. Methylation of cancer-stem-cell-associated Wnt target genes predicts poor prognosis in colorectal cancer patients

    de Sousa E Melo, Felipe; Colak, Selcuk; Buikhuisen, Joyce; Koster, Jan; Cameron, Kate; de Jong, Joan H.; Tuynman, Jurriaan B.; Prasetyanti, Pramudita R.; Fessler, Evelyn; van den Bergh, Saskia P.; Rodermond, Hans; Dekker, Evelien; van der Loos, Chris M.; Pals, Steven T.; van de Vijver, Marc J.; Versteeg, Rogier; Richel, Dick J.; Vermeulen, Louis; Medema, Jan Paul

    2011-01-01

    Gene signatures derived from cancer stem cells (CSCs) predict tumor recurrence for many forms of cancer. Here, we derived a gene signature for colorectal CSCs defined by high Wnt signaling activity, which in agreement with previous observations predicts poor prognosis. Surprisingly, however, we

  7. Alarin but not its alternative-splicing form, GALP (Galanin-like peptide) has antimicrobial activity

    Wada, Akihiro, E-mail: a-wada@nagasaki-u.ac.jp [Department of Bacteriology, Institute of Tropical Medicine, Nagasaki University, Nagasaki 8528523 (Japan); Wong, Pooi-Fong [Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Hojo, Hironobu [Department of Applied Biochemistry, Institute of Glycoscience, Tokai University, Kanagawa 2591292 (Japan); Hasegawa, Makoto [Department of Bioscience, Faculty of Bioscience, Nagahama Institute of Bio-Science and Technology, Shiga 5260829 (Japan); Ichinose, Akitoyo [Electron Microscopy Shop Central Laboratory, Institute of Tropical Medicine, Nagasaki University, Nagasaki 8528523 (Japan); Llanes, Rafael [Institute Pedro Kouri, Havana (Cuba); Kubo, Yoshinao [Division of Cytokine Signaling, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Nagasaki University, Nagasaki 8528523 (Japan); Senba, Masachika [Department of Pathology, Institute of Tropical Medicine, Nagasaki University, Nagasaki 8528523 (Japan); Ichinose, Yoshio [Kenya Research Station, Institute of Tropical Medicine, Nagasaki University, Nagasaki 8528523 (Japan)

    2013-05-03

    Highlights: • Alarin inhibits the growth of E. coli but not S. aureus. • Alarin’s potency is comparable to LL-37 in inhibiting the growth of E. coli. • Alarin can cause bacterial membrane blebbing. • Alalin does not induce hemolysis on erythrocytes. -- Abstract: Alarin is an alternative-splicing form of GALP (galanin-like peptide). It shares only 5 conserved amino acids at the N-terminal region with GALP which is involved in a diverse range of normal brain functions. This study seeks to investigate whether alarin has additional functions due to its differences from GALP. Here, we have shown using a radial diffusion assay that alarin but not GALP inhibited the growth of Escherichia coli (strain ML-35). The conserved N-terminal region, however, remained essential for the antimicrobial activity of alarin as truncated peptides showed reduced killing effect. Moreover, alarin inhibited the growth of E. coli in a similar potency as human cathelicidin LL-37, a well-studied antimicrobial peptide. Electron microscopy further showed that alarin induced bacterial membrane blebbing but unlike LL-37, it did not cause hemolysis of erythrocytes. In addition, alarin is only active against the gram-negative bacteria, E. coli but not the gram-positive bacteria, Staphylococcus aureus. Thus, these data suggest that alarin has potentials as an antimicrobial and should be considered for the development in human therapeutics.

  8. Hemolytic potency and phospholipase activity of some bee and wasp venoms.

    Watala, C; Kowalczyk, J K

    1990-01-01

    1. The action of crude venoms of four aculeate species: Apis mellifera, Vespa crabro, Vespula germanica and Vespula vulgaris on human erythrocytes was investigated in order to determine the lytic and phospholipase activity of different aculeate venoms and their ability to induce red blood cell hemolysis. 2. Bee venom was the only extract to completely lyse red blood cells at the concentration of 2-3 micrograms/ml. 3. Phospholipase activity in all of the examined vespid venoms was similar and the highest value was recorded in V. germanica. 4. Vespid venoms exhibited phospholipase B activity, which is lacking in honeybee venom. 5. In all membrane phospholipids but lecithin, lysophospholipase activity of vespid venoms was 2-6 times lower than the relevant phospholipase activity. 6. The incubation of red blood cells with purified bee venom phospholipase A2 was not accompanied by lysis and, when supplemented with purified melittin, the increase of red blood cell lysis was approximately 30%.

  9. Antimicrobial, antioxidant and cytotoxic activities of propolis from Melipona orbignyi (Hymenoptera, Apidae).

    Campos, Jaqueline Ferreira; dos Santos, Uilson Pereira; Macorini, Luis Fernando Benitez; de Melo, Adriana Mary Mestriner Felipe; Balestieri, José Benedito Perrella; Paredes-Gamero, Edgar Julian; Cardoso, Claudia Andrea Lima; de Picoli Souza, Kely; dos Santos, Edson Lucas

    2014-03-01

    Propolis from stingless bees is well known for its biologic properties; however, few studies have demonstrated these effects. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate the chemical composition and antimicrobial, antioxidant and cytotoxic activities of propolis from the stingless bee Melipona orbignyi, found in Mato Grosso do Sul, Brazil. The chemical composition of the ethanol extract of propolis (EEP) indicated the presence of aromatic acids, phenolic compounds, alcohols, terpenes and sugars. The EEP was active against the bacterium Staphylococcus aureus and the fungus Candida albicans. The EEP showed antioxidant activity by scavenging free radicals and inhibiting hemolysis and lipid peroxidation in human erythrocytes incubated with an oxidizing agent. Additionally, EEP promoted cytotoxic activity and primarily necrotic death in K562 erythroleukemia cells. Taken together, these results indicate that propolis from M. orbignyi has therapeutic potential for the treatment and/or prevention of diseases related to microorganism activity, oxidative stress and tumor cell proliferation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Comparative evaluation of the medicinal activities of methanolic extract of seeds, fruit pulps and fresh juice of Syzygium cumini in vitro

    Repon Kumer Saha

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To establish the health benefits of Syzgium cumin to discover functional components present in the seeds, fruit pulps and fresh juice of this fruit grown in Bangladesh. Methods: Thin layer chromatography and ultra-violet spectroscopy were used to detect the presence of various types of compound in seeds and juice. Antioxidant effects were measured by DPPH scavenging assay and total reducing assay. Receptor binding activities was performed by hemagglutination inhibition assay. Anti-inflammatory assay and hydrogen peroxide induced hemolysis assay was also investigated. Disc diffusion assay was performed to show the antibacterial effect using Gram positive, Gram negative strains of bacteria and fungi. Results: Methanolic extract of the seeds showed stronger antioxidant, hydrogen peroxide induced hemolysis activities, hemagglutination inhibition activities and membrane stabilization activities than those of fresh juice. However, fresh juice showed stronger antibacterial and antifungal activities than those of methanolic seed extract. The seed contains higher amount of polyphenols and flavanoids than those of fruit juice. Conclusions: Therefore, fruit juice, fruit pulp and seed of Syzygium cumini contain medicinal active components in different ratios.

  11. Circulating erythrocyte-derived microparticles are associated with coagulation activation in sickle cell disease

    van Beers, Eduard J.; Schaap, Marianne C.L.; Berckmans, René J.; Nieuwland, Rienk; Sturk, Augueste; van Doormaal, Frederiek F.; Meijers, Joost C.M.; Biemond, Bart J.

    2009-01-01

    Background Sickle cell disease is characterized by a hypercoagulable state as a result of multiple factors, including chronic hemolysis and circulating cell-derived microparticles. There is still no consensus on the cellular origin of such microparticles and the exact mechanism by which they may enhance coagulation activation in sickle cell disease. Design and Methods In the present study, we analyzed the origin of circulating microparticles and their procoagulant phenotype during painful crises and steady state in 25 consecutive patients with sickle cell disease. Results The majority of microparticles originated from platelets (GPIIIa,CD61) and erythrocytes (glycophorin A,CD235), and their numbers did not differ significantly between crisis and steady state. Erythrocyte-derived microparticles strongly correlated with plasma levels of markers of hemolysis, i.e. hemoglobin (r=−0.58, pmicroparticles (r=0.63, p0.05). The extent of factor XI inhibition was associated with erythrocyte-derived microparticles (r=0.50, p=0.023). Conclusions We conclude that the procoagulant state in sickle cell disease is partially explained by the factor XI-dependent procoagulant properties of circulating erythrocyte-derived microparticles. PMID:19815831

  12. Evolving Identification of Blood Cells Associated with Clinically Isolated Syndrome: Importance of Time since Clinical Presentation and Diagnostic MRI.

    Trend, Stephanie; Jones, Anderson P; Geldenhuys, Sian; Byrne, Scott N; Fabis-Pedrini, Marzena J; Nolan, David; Booth, David R; Carroll, William M; Lucas, Robyn M; Kermode, Allan G; Hart, Prue H

    2017-06-15

    It is not clear how the profile of immune cells in peripheral blood differs between patients with clinically isolated syndrome (CIS) and healthy controls (HC). This study aimed to identify a CIS peripheral blood signature that may provide clues for potential immunomodulatory approaches early in disease. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were collected from 18 people with CIS, 19 HC and 13 individuals with other demyelinating conditions (ODC) including multiple sclerosis (MS). Individuals with CIS separated into two groups, namely those with early (≤14 days post-diagnostic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI); n = 6) and late (≥27 days; n = 12) blood sampling. Transitional B cells were increased in the blood of CIS patients independently of when blood was taken. However, there were two time-dependent effects found in the late CIS group relative to HC, including decreased CD56bright NK cells, which correlated significantly with time since MRI, and increased CD141+ myeloid dendritic cell (mDC2) frequencies. Higher CD1c+ B cells and lower non-classical monocyte frequencies were characteristic of more recent demyelinating disease activity (ODC and early CIS). Analysing cell populations by time since symptoms (subjective) and diagnostic MRI (objective) may contribute to understanding CIS.

  13. Tumor endothelial markers define novel subsets of cancer-specific circulating endothelial cells associated with antitumor efficacy

    Mehran, Reza; Nilsson, Monique; Khajavi, Mehrdad; Du, Zhiqiang; Cascone, Tina; Wu, Hua Kang; Cortes, Andrea; Xu, Li; Zurita, Amado; Schier, Robert; Riedel, Bernhard; El-Zein, Randa; Heymach, John V.

    2014-01-01

    Circulating endothelial cells (CEC) are derived from multiple sources including bone marrow (circulating endothelial progenitors [CEP]) and established vasculature (mature CEC). Although CEC have shown promise as a biomarker for cancer patients, their utility has been limited in part by the lack of specificity for tumor vasculature and the different non-malignant causes that can impact CEC. Tumor endothelial markers (TEM) are antigens enriched in tumor vs non-malignant endothelia. We hypothesized that TEMs may be detectable on CEC and that these circulating TEM+ endothelial cells (CTEC) may be a more specific marker for cancer and tumor response than standard CEC. We found that tumor-bearing mice had a relative increase in numbers of circulating CTEC, specifically with increased levels of TEM7 and TEM8 expression. Following treatment with various vascular targeting agents, we observed a decrease in CTEC that correlated with the reductions in tumor growth. We extended these findings to human clinical samples and observed that CTEC were present in esophageal cancer and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients (N=40) and their levels decreased after surgical resection. These results demonstrate that CTEC are detectable in preclinical cancer models and cancer patients. Further, they suggest that CTEC offer a novel cancer-associated marker that may be useful as a blood-based surrogate for assessing the presence of tumor vasculature and antiangiogenic drug activity. PMID:24626092

  14. Functional study of risk loci of stem cell-associated gene lin-28B and associations with disease survival outcomes in epithelial ovarian cancer.

    Lu, Lingeng; Katsaros, Dionyssios; Mayne, Susan T; Risch, Harvey A; Benedetto, Chiara; Canuto, Emilie Marion; Yu, Herbert

    2012-11-01

    Several single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of the stem cell-associated gene lin-28B have been identified in association with ovarian cancer and ovarian cancer-related risk factors. However, whether these SNPs are functional or might be potential biomarkers for ovarian cancer prognosis remains unknown. The purposes of this study were to investigate the functional relevance of the identified lin-28B SNPs, as well as the associations of genotype and phenotype with epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) survival. We analyzed five SNPs and mRNA levels of lin-28B in 211 primary EOC tissues using Taqman(®) SNP genotyping assays and SYBR green-based real-time PCR, respectively. The RNA secondary structures at the region of a genome-wide association-identified intronic rs314276 were analyzed theoretically with mfold and experimentally with circular dichroism spectroscopy. We found that rs314276 was a cis-acting expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL) in both additive and dominant models, while rs7759938 and rs314277 were significant or of borderline significance in dominant models only. The rs314276 variant significantly affects RNA secondary structure. No SNPs alone were associated with patient survival. However, we found that among patients initially responding to chemotherapy, those with higher lin-28B expression had higher mortality risk (hazard ratio =3.27, 95% confidence interval: 1.63-6.56) and relapse risk (hazard ratio = 2.53, 95% confidence interval: 1.41-4.54) than those with lower expression, and these associations remained in multivariate analyses. These results suggest that rs314276 alters RNA secondary structure and thereby influences gene expression, and that lin-28B is a cancer stem cell-associated marker, which may be a pharmaceutical target in the management of EOC.

  15. The [Mo₆Cl14]2- Cluster is Biologically Secure and Has Anti-Rotavirus Activity In Vitro.

    Rojas-Mancilla, Edgardo; Oyarce, Alexis; Verdugo, Viviana; Morales-Verdejo, Cesar; Echeverria, Cesar; Velásquez, Felipe; Chnaiderman, Jonas; Valiente-Echeverría, Fernando; Ramirez-Tagle, Rodrigo

    2017-07-05

    The molybdenum cluster [Mo₆Cl 14 ] 2- is a fluorescent component with potential for use in cell labelling and pharmacology. Biological safety and antiviral properties of the cluster are as yet unknown. Here, we show the effect of acute exposition of human cells and red blood cells to the molybdenum cluster and its interaction with proteins and antiviral activity in vitro. We measured cell viability of HepG2 and EA.hy926 cell lines exposed to increasing concentrations of the cluster (0.1 to 250 µM), by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) colorimetric assay. Hemolysis and morphological alterations of red blood cells, obtained from healthy donors, exposed to the cluster (10 to 200 µM) at 37 °C were analyzed. Furthermore, quenching of tryptophan residues of albumin was performed. Finally, plaque formation by rotavirus SA11 in MA104 cells treated with the cluster (100 to 300 µM) were analyzed. We found that all doses of the cluster showed similar cell viability, hemolysis, and morphology values, compared to control. Quenching of tryptophan residues of albumin suggests a protein-cluster complex formation. Finally, the cluster showed antiviral activity at 300 µM. These results indicate that the cluster [Mo₆Cl 14 ] 2- could be intravenously administered in animals at therapeutic doses for further in vivo studies and might be studied as an antiviral agent.

  16. Inhibitory Effect of Plant Manilkara subsericea against Biological Activities of Lachesis muta Snake Venom

    Eduardo Coriolano De Oliveira

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Snake venom is composed of a mixture of substances that caused in victims a variety of pathophysiological effects. Besides antivenom, literature has described plants able to inhibit injuries and lethal activities induced by snake venoms. This work describes the inhibitory potential of ethanol, hexane, ethyl acetate, or dichloromethane extracts and fractions from stem and leaves of Manilkara subsericea against in vivo (hemorrhagic and edema and in vitro (clotting, hemolysis, and proteolysis activities caused by Lachesis muta venom. All the tested activities were totally or at least partially reduced by M. subsericea. However, when L. muta venom was injected into mice 15 min first or after the materials, hemorrhage and edema were not inhibited. Thus, M. subsericea could be used as antivenom in snakebites of L. muta. And, this work also highlights Brazilian flora as a rich source of molecules with antivenom properties.

  17. Antioxidant activity of dorzolamide/timolol fixed combination in neuroprotective therapy in glaucoma

    N. I. Kurysheva

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to study the antioxidant activity of carbonic anhydrase inhibitors and timolol fixed combinations and to compare it with other fixed combinations.Methods: Antioxidant activity (AOA of dorzolamide/timolol (Cosopt, dorzolamide/timolol (Dorzopt Plus, latanoprost/timolol, brimonidine/timolol, travoprost/timolol and bimatoprost/timolol fixed combinations was measured in vitro using the model of oxida- tive hemolysis.Results: Dorzolamide/timolol (Cosopt AOA was higher than that of other fixed combinations and increased with the quantity of the drugs added to the model system: 40%, 52% and 75% in 30 μl, 60 μl and 90 μl respectively.Conclusion: these findings suggest that dorzolamide/timolol fixed combination has potential advantages over the other fixed combinations due to its high antioxidant activity and might be used as the neuroptotective agent for glaucoma treatment.

  18. Inhibitory effect of a Brazilian marine brown alga Spatoglossum schröederi on biological activities of Lachesis muta snake venom

    Thaisa Francielle Souza Domingos

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The ability of crude extracts of the brown seaweed Spatoglossum schröederi to counteract some of the biological activities of Lachesis muta snake venom was evaluated. In vitro assays showed that only the extract of S. schröederi prepared in ethyl acetate was able to inhibit the clotting of fibrinogen induced by L. muta venom. On the other hand, all extracts were able to inhibit partially the hemolysis caused by venom and those prepared in dichloromethane or ethyl acetate fully neutralized the proteolysis and hemorrhage produced by the venom. Moreover, the dichloromethane or ethyl acetate extracts inhibited the hemolysis induced by an isolated phospholipase A2 from L. muta venom, called LM-PLA2-I. In contrast, the hexane extract failed to protect mice from hemorrhage or to inhibit proteolysis and clotting. These results show that the polarity of the solvent used to prepare the extracts of S. schröederi algae influenced the potency of the inhibitory effect of the biological activities induced by L. muta venom. Thus, the seaweed S. schröederi may be a promising source of natural inhibitors of the enzymes involved in biological activities of L. muta venom.

  19. Biological Activity of Mesoporous Dendrimer-Coated Titanium Dioxide: Insight on the Role of the Surface-Interface Composition and the Framework Crystallinity.

    Milowska, Katarzyna; Rybczyńska, Aneta; Mosiolek, Joanna; Durdyn, Joanna; Szewczyk, Eligia M; Katir, Nadia; Brahmi, Younes; Majoral, Jean-Pierre; Bousmina, Mosto; Bryszewska, Maria; El Kadib, Abdelkrim

    2015-09-16

    Hitherto, the field of nanomedicine has been overwhelmingly dominated by the use of mesoporous organosilicas compared to their metal oxide congeners. Despite their remarkable reactivity, titanium oxide-based materials have been seldom evaluated and little knowledge has been gained with respect to their "structure-biological activity" relationship. Herein, a fruitful association of phosphorus dendrimers (both "ammonium-terminated" and "phosphonate-terminated") and titanium dioxide has been performed by means of the sol-gel process, resulting in mesoporous dendrimer-coated nanosized crystalline titanium dioxide. A similar organo-coating has been reproduced using single branch-mimicking dendrimers that allow isolation of an amorphous titanium dioxide. The impact of these materials on red blood cells was evaluated by studying cell hemolysis. Next, their cytotoxicity toward B14 Chinese fibroblasts and their antimicrobial activity were also investigated. Based on their variants (cationic versus anionic terminal groups and amorphous versus crystalline titanium dioxide phase), better understanding of the role of the surface-interface composition and the nature of the framework has been gained. No noticeable discrimination was observed for amorphous and crystalline material. In contrast, hemolysis and cytotoxicity were found to be sensitive to the nature of the interface composition, with the ammonium-terminated dendrimer-coated titanium dioxide being the most hemolytic and cytotoxic material. This surface-functionalization opens the door for creating a new synergistic machineries mechanism at the cellular level and seems promising for tailoring the biological activity of nanosized organic-inorganic hybrid materials.

  20. Atomic force microscopy reveals a morphological differentiation of chromobacterium violaceum cells associated with biofilm development and directed by N-hexanoyl-L-homoserine lactone.

    Anara A Kamaeva

    Full Text Available Chromobacterium violaceum abounds in soil and water ecosystems in tropical and subtropical regions and occasionally causes severe and often fatal human and animal infections. The quorum sensing (QS system and biofilm formation are essential for C. violaceum's adaptability and pathogenicity, however, their interrelation is still unknown. C. violaceum's cell and biofilm morphology were examined by atomic force microscopy (AFM in comparison with growth rates, QS-dependent violacein biosynthesis and biofilm biomass quantification. To evaluate QS regulation of these processes, the wild-type strain C. violaceum ATCC 31532 and its mini-Tn5 mutant C. violaceum NCTC 13274, cultivated with and without the QS autoinducer N-hexanoyl-L-homoserine lactone (C6-HSL, were used. We report for the first time the unusual morphological differentiation of C. violaceum cells, associated with biofilm development and directed by the QS autoinducer. AFM revealed numerous invaginations of the external cytoplasmic membrane of wild-type cells, which were repressed in the mutant strain and restored by exogenous C6-HSL. With increasing bacterial growth, polymer matrix extrusions formed in place of invaginations, whereas mutant cells were covered with a diffusely distributed extracellular substance. Thus, quorum sensing in C. violaceum involves a morphological differentiation that organises biofilm formation and leads to a highly differentiated matrix structure.

  1. Atomic force microscopy reveals a morphological differentiation of chromobacterium violaceum cells associated with biofilm development and directed by N-hexanoyl-L-homoserine lactone.

    Kamaeva, Anara A; Vasilchenko, Alexey S; Deryabin, Dmitry G

    2014-01-01

    Chromobacterium violaceum abounds in soil and water ecosystems in tropical and subtropical regions and occasionally causes severe and often fatal human and animal infections. The quorum sensing (QS) system and biofilm formation are essential for C. violaceum's adaptability and pathogenicity, however, their interrelation is still unknown. C. violaceum's cell and biofilm morphology were examined by atomic force microscopy (AFM) in comparison with growth rates, QS-dependent violacein biosynthesis and biofilm biomass quantification. To evaluate QS regulation of these processes, the wild-type strain C. violaceum ATCC 31532 and its mini-Tn5 mutant C. violaceum NCTC 13274, cultivated with and without the QS autoinducer N-hexanoyl-L-homoserine lactone (C6-HSL), were used. We report for the first time the unusual morphological differentiation of C. violaceum cells, associated with biofilm development and directed by the QS autoinducer. AFM revealed numerous invaginations of the external cytoplasmic membrane of wild-type cells, which were repressed in the mutant strain and restored by exogenous C6-HSL. With increasing bacterial growth, polymer matrix extrusions formed in place of invaginations, whereas mutant cells were covered with a diffusely distributed extracellular substance. Thus, quorum sensing in C. violaceum involves a morphological differentiation that organises biofilm formation and leads to a highly differentiated matrix structure.

  2. Role of Serum Iron in the Activation of Lipid Peroxidation in Critical Conditions

    Yu. P. Orlov

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Twenty-four critically ill patients due to generalized purulent peritonitis, pancreatonecrosis, thermal skin injuries, and severe poisoning by acetic acid were examined. The general regularities of the effect of high serum iron concentrations on the health status of patients, on the activity of antioxidative enzymes, and on the initiation of lipid peroxidation (LPO processes, as supported by the values of Fe2+-induced chemiluminescence, were revealed. In critically ill patients, iron metabolism occurs with the overload of a transport protein, such as transferrin, which is caused by intravascular hemolysis and hemoglobin metabolism to ionized iron. The overload of proteins responsible for iron transport leads to the tissue accumulation of free (ferrous and ferric iron that is actively involved in the processes of LPO initiation with excess synthesis of cytotoxic radicals, which in turn accounts for the severity of endotoxicosis.

  3. Comparison of biochemical and cytotoxic activities of extracts obtained from dorsal spines and caudal fin of adult and juvenile non-native Caribbean lionfish (Pterois volitans/miles).

    Sáenz, Aránzazu; Ortiz, Natalia; Lomonte, Bruno; Rucavado, Alexandra; Díaz, Cecilia

    2017-10-01

    Pterois volitans/miles lionfish (adult and juvenile) dorsal spines and caudal fin extracts were compared in their general composition, enzymatic activities and hemolytic and cytotoxic effects on bovine aortic endothelial cells and murine myoblasts, to distinguish between the activities present in the venom and epidermal mucus. Intradermal and intramuscular injections were also administered in mice to determine in vivo effects. This work shows that crude venom of Caribbean species of lionfish, present in dorsal spines, induces several in vitro effects including hemolysis, weak cytotoxicity, proteolytic and hyaluronidase activities, whereas in vivo, it is not hemorrhagic nor myotoxic, but causes edema, plasma extravasation and a thrombotic-associated lesion on the skin. Some small differences were observed between adult and juvenile venomous secretions. Gelatinolytic activity of the epidermal mucus, the only activity found in caudal fin extracts, could contribute to the in vivo toxicity of the venom. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Contrasting respirable quartz and kaolin retention of lecithin surfactant and expression of membranolytic activity following phospholipase A2 digestion.

    Wallace, W E; Keane, M J; Mike, P S; Hill, C A; Vallyathan, V; Regad, E D

    1992-11-01

    Respirable-sized quartz, a well-established fibrogenic mineral dust, is compared with kaolin in erythrocyte hemolysis assays after treatment with saline dispersion of dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine, a primary phospholipid component of pulmonary surfactant. Both dusts are rendered inactive after treatment, but the membranolytic activity is partly to fully restored after treatment with phospholipase A2, an enzyme normally associated with cellular plasma membranes and lysosomes. Phospholipid-coated dusts were incubated for periods of 2-72 h at a series of applied enzyme concentrations, and the adsorbed lipid species and hemolytic activity were quantitated at each time for both dusts. Surfactant was lost more readily from quartz than from kaolin, with consequent more rapid restoration of mineral surface hemolytic activity for quartz. Interactions of surfactant and mineral surface functional groups responsible for the mineral-specific rate differences, and implications for determining the mineral surface bioavailability of silica and silicate dusts, are discussed.

  5. Enhancement of mouse germ cell-associated genes expression by injection of human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells into the testis of chemical-induced azoospermic mice

    Rui-Feng Yang

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Various methods are currently under investigation to preserve fertility in males treated with high-dose chemotherapy and radiation for malignant and nonmalignant disorders. Human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells (HUC-MSCs, which possess potent immunosuppressive function and secrete various cytokines and growth factors, have the potential clinical applications. As a potential alternative, we investigate whether injection of HUC-MSCs into the interstitial compartment of the testes to promote spermatogenic regeneration efficiently. HUC-MSCs were isolated from different sources of umbilical cords and injected into the interstitial space of one testis from 10 busulfan-treated mice (saline and HEK293 cells injections were performed in a separate set of mice and the other testis remained uninjected. Three weeks after MSCs injection, Relative quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction was used to identify the expression of 10 of germ cell associated, which are all related to meiosis, demonstrated higher levels of spermatogenic gene expression (2-8 fold in HUC-MSCs injected testes compared to the contralateral uninjected testes (five mice. Protein levels for germ cell-specific genes, miwi, vasa and synaptonemal complex protein (Scp3 were also higher in MSC-treated testes compared to injected controls 3 weeks after treatment. However, no different expression was detected in saline water and HEK293 cells injection control group. We have demonstrated HUC-MSCs could affect mouse germ cell-specific genes expression. The results also provide a possibility that the transplanted HUC-MSCs may promote the recovery of spermatogenesis. This study provides further evidence for preclinical therapeutic effects of HUC-MSCs, and explores a new approach to the treatment of azoospermia.

  6. Berberine diminishes side population and down-regulates stem cell-associated genes in the pancreatic cancer cell lines PANC-1 and MIA PaCa-2.

    Park, S H; Sung, J H; Chung, N

    2014-09-01

    Cancer stem cells play an important role in metastasis and the relapse of drug resistant cancers. Side-population (SP) cells are capable of effluxing Hoechst 33342 dye and are referred to as cancer stem cells. We investigated the effect of berberine on pancreatic cancer stem cells of PANC-1 and MIA PaCa-2. For both cell lines, the proportions of SP cells in the presence of berberine were investigated and compared to the proportions in the presence of gemcitabine, a standard pancreatic anti-cancer drug. The proportions of SP cells in the PANC-1 and MIA PaCa-2 cell lines were about 9 and PANC-1 decreased to 5.7 ± 2.0 and 6.8 ± 0.8%, respectively, which compares to the control proportion of (9.7 ± 1.7). After berberine and gemcitabine treatment of PANC-1, of the four stem cell-associated genes (SOX2, POU5F1, NANOG, and NOTCH1), all but NOTCH1 were down-regulated. Unfortunately, the effect of berberine and gemcitabine treatments on MIA PaCa-2 SP cells could not be clearly observed because SP cells represented only a very small proportion of MIA PaCa-2 cells. However, SOX2, POU5F1, and NANOG genes were shown to be effectively down-regulated in the MIA PaCa-2 cell line as a whole. Taken together, these results indicate that berberine is as effective at targeting pancreatic cancer cell lines as gemcitabine. Therefore, we believe that POU5F1, SOX2, and NANOG can serve as potential markers, and berberine may be an effective anti-cancer agent when targeting human pancreatic cancer cells and/or their cancer stem cells.

  7. Comparative antihemolytic and radical scavenging activities of strawberry tree (Arbutus unedo L.) leaf and fruit.

    Mendes, Lídia; de Freitas, Victor; Baptista, Paula; Carvalho, Márcia

    2011-09-01

    The present study reports the antioxidant properties of Arbutus unedo L. leaf and fruit extracts using different in vitro assays including (i) reducing power, (ii) scavenging effect on DPPH free radicals, and (iii) inhibitory effect on AAPH-induced hemolysis and lipid peroxidation in human erythrocytes. All assays demonstrated antioxidant efficiency for A. unedo L. aqueous extracts, being consistently higher in the leaf. EC(50) values for reducing power and DPPH radical scavenging activities were, respectively, 0.318 ± 0.007 and 0.087 ± 0.007 mg/mL for leaf, and 2.894 ± 0.049 and 0.790 ± 0.016 mg/mL for fruit extracts. Under the oxidative action of AAPH, A. unedo leaf and fruit extracts protected the erythrocyte membrane from hemolysis (IC(50) of 0.062 ± 0.002 and 0.430 ± 0.091 mg/mL, respectively) and decreased the levels of malondialdehyde, a breakdown product of lipid peroxidation (IC(50) of 0.075 ± 0.014 and 0.732 ± 0.452 mg/mL, respectively). In accordance with antioxidant activity, phenolic content was found to be significantly higher in leaf extract. To our knowledge, this is the first time that the antioxidant activity of A. unedo species is evaluated using human biological membranes. Overall, our results suggest that A. unedo leaves are a promising source of natural antioxidants with potential application in diseases mediated by free radicals. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Antioxidant and Hypolipidemic Activity of the Hydroethanolic Extract of Curatella americana L. Leaves.

    Lopes, Rafael Henrique Oliveira; Macorini, Luis Fernando Benitez; Antunes, Katia Ávila; Espindola, Priscilla Pereira de Toledo; Alfredo, Tamaeh Monteiro; da Rocha, Paola Dos Santos; Pereira, Zefa Valdivina; Dos Santos, Edson Lucas; de Picoli Souza, Kely

    2016-01-01

    High levels of reactive oxygen species in the body and hyperlipidemia are key factors for the development of cardiovascular diseases such as atherosclerosis. The present study investigated the antioxidant and hypolipidemic activity of hydroethanolic extract of Curatella americana L. leaves (ExC). The antioxidant activity of ExC was assessed by 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl free radical (DPPH) scavenging capacity and protection against hemolysis induced by 2,2'-azobis(2-amidinopropane) dihydrochloride (AAPH), followed by quantification of malondialdehyde (MDA). Wistar rats with hyperlipidemia induced by high-fructose diet (60%) were treated for 60 days with water, simvastatin (30 mg·Kg(-1)), ciprofibrate (2 mg·Kg(-1)), and ExC (200 mg·Kg(-1)). ExC revealed IC50 of 6.0 ± 0.5 μg·mL(-1), an intermediary value among positive controls used in the assay of DPPH scavenging capacity. At all concentrations (50 to 125 μg·mL(-1)) and times (60 to 240 min) evaluated, ExC protected erythrocytes against AAPH-induced hemolysis, which was confirmed by lower MDA levels. In vivo tests showed a reduction of 34 and 45%, respectively, in serum concentration of cholesterol and triglycerides in hyperlipidemic rats treated with ExC, a similar effect compared to the reference drugs, simvastatin and ciprofibrate, respectively. Together, the results showed the antioxidant activity of ExC and its ability to improve the serum lipid profile in hyperlipidemic rats.

  9. Antioxidant and Hypolipidemic Activity of the Hydroethanolic Extract of Curatella americana L. Leaves

    Rafael Henrique Oliveira Lopes

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available High levels of reactive oxygen species in the body and hyperlipidemia are key factors for the development of cardiovascular diseases such as atherosclerosis. The present study investigated the antioxidant and hypolipidemic activity of hydroethanolic extract of Curatella americana L. leaves (ExC. The antioxidant activity of ExC was assessed by 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl free radical (DPPH scavenging capacity and protection against hemolysis induced by 2,2′-azobis(2-amidinopropane dihydrochloride (AAPH, followed by quantification of malondialdehyde (MDA. Wistar rats with hyperlipidemia induced by high-fructose diet (60% were treated for 60 days with water, simvastatin (30 mg·Kg−1, ciprofibrate (2 mg·Kg−1, and ExC (200 mg·Kg−1. ExC revealed IC50 of 6.0±0.5 μg·mL−1, an intermediary value among positive controls used in the assay of DPPH scavenging capacity. At all concentrations (50 to 125 μg·mL−1 and times (60 to 240 min evaluated, ExC protected erythrocytes against AAPH-induced hemolysis, which was confirmed by lower MDA levels. In vivo tests showed a reduction of 34 and 45%, respectively, in serum concentration of cholesterol and triglycerides in hyperlipidemic rats treated with ExC, a similar effect compared to the reference drugs, simvastatin and ciprofibrate, respectively. Together, the results showed the antioxidant activity of ExC and its ability to improve the serum lipid profile in hyperlipidemic rats.

  10. Distinct phenotype, longitudinal changes of numbers and cell-associated virus in blood dendritic cells in SIV-infected CD8-lymphocyte depleted macaques.

    Caroline Soulas

    Full Text Available Loss of circulating CD123+ plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs during HIV infection is well established. However, changes of myeloid DCs (mDCs are ambiguous since they are studied as a homogeneous CD11c+ population despite phenotypic and functional heterogeneity. Heterogeneity of CD11c+ mDCs in primates is poorly described in HIV and SIV infection. Using multiparametric flow cytometry, we monitored longitudinally cell number and cell-associated virus of CD123+ pDCs and non-overlapping subsets of CD1c+ and CD16+ mDCs in SIV-infected CD8-depleted rhesus macaques. The numbers of all three DC subsets were significantly decreased by 8 days post-infection. Whereas CD123+ pDCs were persistently depleted, numbers of CD1c+ and CD16+ mDCs rebounded. Numbers of CD1c+ mDCs significantly increased by 3 weeks post-infection while numbers of CD16+ mDCs remained closer to pre-infection levels. We found similar changes in the numbers of all three DC subsets in CD8 depleted animals as we found in animals that were SIV infected animals that were not CD8 lymphocyte depleted. CD16+ mDCs and CD123+ pDCs but not CD1c+ mDCs were significantly decreased terminally with AIDS. All DC subsets harbored SIV RNA as early as 8 days and then throughout infection. However, SIV DNA was only detected in CD123+ pDCs and only at 40 days post-infection consistent with SIV RNA, at least in mDCs, being surface-bound. Altogether our data demonstrate that SIV infection differently affects CD1c+ and CD16+ mDCs where CD16+ but not CD1c+ mDCs are depleted and might be differentially regulated in terminal AIDS. Finally, our data underline the importance of studying CD1c+ and CD16+ mDCs as discrete populations, and not as total CD11c+ mDCs.

  11. Cancer cell-associated cytoplasmic B7–H4 is induced by hypoxia through hypoxia-inducible factor-1α and promotes cancer cell proliferation

    Jeon, You-Kyoung [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Inje University College of Medicine, Busan 614-735 (Korea, Republic of); Advanced Research Center for Multiple Myeloma, Inje University College of Medicine, Busan 614-735 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Sae-Gwang; Choi, Il-Whan [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Inje University College of Medicine, Busan 614-735 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Soo-Woong [Advanced Research Center for Multiple Myeloma, Inje University College of Medicine, Busan 614-735 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sang Min [Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Hematology/Oncology, Busan Paik Hospital, Inje University, Busan 614-735 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Inhak, E-mail: miccih@inje.ac.kr [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Inje University College of Medicine, Busan 614-735 (Korea, Republic of); Advanced Research Center for Multiple Myeloma, Inje University College of Medicine, Busan 614-735 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-04-03

    Aberrant B7–H4 expression in cancer tissues serves as a novel prognostic biomarker for poor survival in patients with cancer. However, the factor(s) that induce cancer cell-associated B7–H4 remain to be fully elucidated. We herein demonstrate that hypoxia upregulates B7–H4 transcription in primary CD138{sup +} multiple myeloma cells and cancer cell lines. In support of this finding, analysis of the Multiple Myeloma Genomics Portal (MMGP) data set revealed a positive correlation between the mRNA expression levels of B7–H4 and the endogenous hypoxia marker carbonic anhydrogenase 9. Hypoxia-induced B7–H4 expression was detected in the cytoplasm, but not in cancer cell membranes. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis demonstrated binding of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) to proximal hypoxia-response element (HRE) sites within the B7–H4 promoter. Knockdown of HIF-1α and pharmacological inhibition of HIF-1α diminished B7–H4 expression. Furthermore, knockdown of cytoplasmic B7–H4 in MCF-7 decreased the S-phase cell population under hypoxia. Finally, MMGP analysis revealed a positive correlation between the transcript levels of B7–H4 and proliferation-related genes including MKI67, CCNA1, and Myc in several patients with multiple myeloma. Our results provide insight into the mechanisms underlying B7–H4 upregulation and its role in cancer cell proliferation in a hypoxic tumor microenvironment. - Highlights: • Hypoxia upregulates B7–H4 transcription and protein expression. • Hypoxia-induced B7–H4 is detected in the cytoplasm, but not on membrane. • ChIP assay reveals a binding of HIF-1α to B7–H4 promoter at HRE site. • Knockdown and pharmacological inhibition of HIF-1α reduce B7–H4 expression. • B7–H4 knockdown decrease the number of cells in S-phase of cell cycle.

  12. Micrurus snake venoms activate human complement system and generate anaphylatoxins

    Tanaka Gabriela D

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The genus Micrurus, coral snakes (Serpentes, Elapidae, comprises more than 120 species and subspecies distributed from the south United States to the south of South America. Micrurus snake bites can cause death by muscle paralysis and further respiratory arrest within a few hours after envenomation. Clinical observations show mainly neurotoxic symptoms, although other biological activities have also been experimentally observed, including cardiotoxicity, hemolysis, edema and myotoxicity. Results In the present study we have investigated the action of venoms from seven species of snakes from the genus Micrurus on the complement system in in vitro studies. Several of the Micrurus species could consume the classical and/or the lectin pathways, but not the alternative pathway, and C3a, C4a and C5a were generated in sera treated with the venoms as result of this complement activation. Micrurus venoms were also able to directly cleave the α chain of the component C3, but not of the C4, which was inhibited by 1,10 Phenanthroline, suggesting the presence of a C3α chain specific metalloprotease in Micrurus spp venoms. Furthermore, complement activation was in part associated with the cleavage of C1-Inhibitor by protease(s present in the venoms, which disrupts complement activation control. Conclusion Micrurus venoms can activate the complement system, generating a significant amount of anaphylatoxins, which may assist due to their vasodilatory effects, to enhance the spreading of other venom components during the envenomation process.

  13. Hemolytic disease of the newborn- anti c antibody induced hemolysis.

    Murki, Srinivas; Kandraju, Hemasree; Devi, Surekha A

    2012-02-01

    Hemolytic disease in the newborn, as a cause of early jaundice, is not uncommon. This is mostly due to Rh (D), ABO incompatibility and rarely due to other minor blood group incompatibility. The authors report two cases of Rh anti c isoimmunization presenting as significant early neonatal jaundice within the 20 h of life. Both the babies were treated with intensive phototherapy. One baby underwent exchange transfusion and the other required packed cell transfusion for anemia.

  14. Effect of chlorphenesin on localized hemolysis in gel assay.

    Fukui, G M; Berger, F M; Chandlee, G C; Goldenbaum, E G

    1968-10-01

    Chlorphenesin, a simple glycerol ether, when added to Jerne plates greatly reduced the number of hemolytic plaques. This effect appeared to be related to dose, and was clearly demonstrable with antibody-forming spleen cells from mice that had been immunized either with sheep red blood cells or with penicillin G conjugated with Keyhole limpet hemocyanin. Chlorphenesin did not affect the antigen, destroy complement, or interfere with the interaction of complement and the antigen-antibody complexes. Incubation of spleen cell suspensions with chlorphenesin prior to plating was more effective in reducing the number of plaques than was addition of the substance to the plates. It may act by reducing the ability of antibodies to react with antigens or by affecting the release of antibodies from the spleen cells.

  15. Antioxidant, antihyperglycemic, and antidiabetic activity of Apis mellifera bee tea.

    Janielle da Silva Melo da Cunha

    Full Text Available Diabetes has emerged as one of the largest global epidemics; it is estimated that by 2035, there will be 592 million diabetic people in the world. Brazilian biodiversity and the knowledge of traditional peoples have contributed to the treatment of several diseases, including diabetes. Apis mellifera bee tea is used by indigenous Brazilians to treat diabetes, and this traditional knowledge needs to be recorded and studied.The objective of this study was to record the use and to evaluate the antioxidant, antihyperglycemic, and antidiabetic activity of Apis mellifera bee tea, which is used by the Guarani and Kaiowá indigenous people for the treatment of diabetes. Semi-structured interviews were performed with Guarani and Kaiowá ethnic indigenous people from the State of Mato Grosso do Sul, Brazil, seeking to identify the animal species used for medicinal purposes. For the experimental procedures, tea prepared with macerated Apis mellifera bees was used. In vitro assays were performed to evaluate antioxidant activity; direct free radical scavenging, protection against oxidative hemolysis, lipid peroxidation were evaluated in human erythrocytes and potential in inhibiting the formation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs. In vivo, normoglycemic Swiss male mice treated with Apis mellifera tea (AmT were subjected to the oral glucose tolerance test and compared with control and metformin-treated groups. Diet-induced diabetic mice were treated for 21 days with AmT and evaluated for glycemia and malondialdehyde levels in the blood, liver, nervous system, and eyes. During interviews, the indigenous people described the use of Apis mellifera bee tea for the treatment of diabetes. In in vitro assays, AmT showed direct antioxidant activity and reduced oxidative hemolysis and malondialdehyde generation in human erythrocytes. The AmT inhibited the formation of AGEs by albumin-fructose pathways and methylglyoxal products. In vivo, after oral glucose

  16. Antioxidant, antihyperglycemic, and antidiabetic activity of Apis mellifera bee tea.

    Melo da Cunha, Janielle da Silva; Alfredo, Tamaeh Monteiro; Dos Santos, Jéssica Maurino; Alves Junior, Valter Vieira; Rabelo, Luiza Antas; Lima, Emerson Silva; Boleti, Ana Paula de Araújo; Carollo, Carlos Alexandre; Dos Santos, Edson Lucas; de Picoli Souza, Kely

    2018-01-01

    Diabetes has emerged as one of the largest global epidemics; it is estimated that by 2035, there will be 592 million diabetic people in the world. Brazilian biodiversity and the knowledge of traditional peoples have contributed to the treatment of several diseases, including diabetes. Apis mellifera bee tea is used by indigenous Brazilians to treat diabetes, and this traditional knowledge needs to be recorded and studied.The objective of this study was to record the use and to evaluate the antioxidant, antihyperglycemic, and antidiabetic activity of Apis mellifera bee tea, which is used by the Guarani and Kaiowá indigenous people for the treatment of diabetes. Semi-structured interviews were performed with Guarani and Kaiowá ethnic indigenous people from the State of Mato Grosso do Sul, Brazil, seeking to identify the animal species used for medicinal purposes. For the experimental procedures, tea prepared with macerated Apis mellifera bees was used. In vitro assays were performed to evaluate antioxidant activity; direct free radical scavenging, protection against oxidative hemolysis, lipid peroxidation were evaluated in human erythrocytes and potential in inhibiting the formation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs). In vivo, normoglycemic Swiss male mice treated with Apis mellifera tea (AmT) were subjected to the oral glucose tolerance test and compared with control and metformin-treated groups. Diet-induced diabetic mice were treated for 21 days with AmT and evaluated for glycemia and malondialdehyde levels in the blood, liver, nervous system, and eyes. During interviews, the indigenous people described the use of Apis mellifera bee tea for the treatment of diabetes. In in vitro assays, AmT showed direct antioxidant activity and reduced oxidative hemolysis and malondialdehyde generation in human erythrocytes. The AmT inhibited the formation of AGEs by albumin-fructose pathways and methylglyoxal products. In vivo, after oral glucose overload, normoglycemic

  17. Antibacterial, Antioxidant, and Anticholinesterase Activities of Plant Seed Extracts from Brazilian Semiarid Region

    Davi Felipe Farias

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The antimicrobial, antioxidant, and anticholinesterase activities of ethanolic seed extracts of twenty-one plant species from Brazilian semiarid region were investigated. The extracts were tested for antimicrobial activity against six bacteria strains and three yeasts. Six extracts presented activity against the Gram (− organism Salmonella choleraesuis and the Gram (+ organisms Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus subtilis. The MIC values ranged from 4.96 to 37.32 mg/mL. The Triplaris gardneriana extract presented activity against the three species, with MIC values 18.8, 13.76, and 11.15 mg/mL, respectively. Five extracts presented antioxidant activity, with EC50 values ranging from 69.73 μg/mL (T. gardneriana to 487.51 μg/mL (Licania rigida. For the anticholinesterase activity, eleven extracts were capable of inhibiting the enzyme activity. From those, T. gardneriana, Parkia platycephala and Connarus detersus presented the best activities, with inhibition values of 76.7, 71.5, and 91.9%, respectively. The extracts that presented antimicrobial activity were tested for hemolytic assay against human A, B, and O blood types and rabbit blood. From those, only the Myracrodruon urundeuva extract presented activity (about 20% of hemolysis at the lowest tested concentration, 1.9 µg/mL. Infrared spectroscopy of six representative extracts attested the presence of tannins, polyphenols, and flavonoids, which was confirmed by a qualitative phytochemical assay.

  18. Antibacterial, antioxidant, and anticholinesterase activities of plant seed extracts from Brazilian semiarid region.

    Farias, Davi Felipe; Souza, Terezinha Maria; Viana, Martônio Ponte; Soares, Bruno Marques; Cunha, Arcelina Pacheco; Vasconcelos, Ilka Maria; Ricardo, Nágila Maria Pontes Silva; Ferreira, Paulo Michel Pinheiro; Melo, Vânia Maria Maciel; Carvalho, Ana Fontenele Urano

    2013-01-01

    The antimicrobial, antioxidant, and anticholinesterase activities of ethanolic seed extracts of twenty-one plant species from Brazilian semiarid region were investigated. The extracts were tested for antimicrobial activity against six bacteria strains and three yeasts. Six extracts presented activity against the Gram (-) organism Salmonella choleraesuis and the Gram (+) organisms Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus subtilis. The MIC values ranged from 4.96 to 37.32 mg/mL. The Triplaris gardneriana extract presented activity against the three species, with MIC values 18.8, 13.76, and 11.15 mg/mL, respectively. Five extracts presented antioxidant activity, with EC50 values ranging from 69.73 μ g/mL (T. gardneriana) to 487.51 μ g/mL (Licania rigida). For the anticholinesterase activity, eleven extracts were capable of inhibiting the enzyme activity. From those, T. gardneriana, Parkia platycephala and Connarus detersus presented the best activities, with inhibition values of 76.7, 71.5, and 91.9%, respectively. The extracts that presented antimicrobial activity were tested for hemolytic assay against human A, B, and O blood types and rabbit blood. From those, only the Myracrodruon urundeuva extract presented activity (about 20% of hemolysis at the lowest tested concentration, 1.9 µg/mL). Infrared spectroscopy of six representative extracts attested the presence of tannins, polyphenols, and flavonoids, which was confirmed by a qualitative phytochemical assay.

  19. Pneumococcal Induced T-activation with Resultant Thrombotic Microangiopathy

    J.W. Oliver

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Thrombotic microangiopathies are disorders resulting from platelet thromboses forming in the microvasculature with resultant schistocyte forms. Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS is a microangiopathic hemolytic anemia often complicated by acute renal failure in children. HUS is typically caused by bacterial infection, most commonly enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli. Neuraminidase-producing organisms, such as Streptococcus pneumoniae have also been reported as potential etiologies. The pathogenesis in these cases involves cleavage of sialic acid residues from the surfaces of erythrocytes, platelets, and glomerular capillary endothelial cells, exposing the Thomsen-Friedenreich antigen, a process known as T-activation. We describe a 2-year-old girl who presented with pneumococcal pneumonia and sepsis ultimately resulting in a thrombotic microangiopathy with acute renal failure, most consistent with HUS. The patient's direct antiglobulin test was positive. Polyagglutination was observed with human adult serum, but not with umbilical cord serum. Her red blood cells (RBCs were reactive against peanut and soybean lectins, but not Salvia sclarea or Salvia horminum lectins. These findings are consistent with T-activation. Clinicians should be cognizant of the possibility of T-activation with resultant HUS in patients infected with neuraminidase-producing bacteria. Such patients may be difficult to identify using monoclonal typing antisera, as these typically do not have anti-T antibodies. Whether such patients are at risk for transfusion-associated hemolysis is debatable.

  20. Evaluation of Hemagglutination Activity of Chitosan Nanoparticles Using Human Erythrocytes

    Jefferson Muniz de Lima

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Chitosan is a polysaccharide composed of randomly distributed chains of β-(1-4 D-glucosamine and N-acetyl-D-glucosamine. This compound is obtained by partial or total deacetylation of chitin in acidic solution. The chitosan-based hemostatic agents have been gaining much attention in the management of bleeding. The aim of this study was to evaluate in vitro hemagglutination activity of chitosan nanoparticles using human erythrocytes. The preparation of nanoparticles was achieved by ionotropic gelification technique followed by neutralization with NaOH 1 mol/L−1. The hemagglutination activity was performed on a solution of 2% erythrocytes (pH 7.4 on PBS collected from five healthy volunteers. The hemolysis determination was made by spectrophotometric analysis. Chitosan nanoparticle solutions without NaOH addition changed the reddish colour of the wells into brown, suggesting an oxidative reaction of hemoglobin and possible cell lysis. All neutralized solutions of chitosan nanoparticles presented positive haemagglutination, without any change in reaction color. Chitosan nanoparticles presented hemolytic activity ranging from 186.20 to 223.12%, while neutralized solutions ranged from 2.56 to 72.54%, comparing to distilled water. Results highlight the need for development of new routes of synthesis of chitosan nanoparticles within human physiologic pH.

  1. Composition and biological activities of the aqueous extracts of three scleractinian corals from the Mexican Caribbean: Pseudodiploria strigosa, Porites astreoides and Siderastrea siderea.

    García-Arredondo, Alejandro; Rojas-Molina, Alejandra; Ibarra-Alvarado, César; Lazcano-Pérez, Fernando; Arreguín-Espinosa, Roberto; Sánchez-Rodríguez, Judith

    2016-01-01

    Scleractinian corals (stony corals) are the most abundant reef-forming cnidarians found in coral reefs throughout the world. Despite their abundance and ecological importance, information about the diversity of their toxins and their biological activities is very scarce. In this study, the chemical composition and the biological activities of the aqueous extracts of Pseudodiploria strigosa , Porites astreoides and Siderastrea siderea , three scleractinian corals from the Mexican Caribbean, have been assessed for the first time. Toxicity of the extracts was assessed in crickets; the presence of cytolysins was detected by the hemolysis assay; the vasoconstrictor activity was determined by the isolated rat aortic ring assay; the nociceptive activity was evaluated by the formalin test. The presence of phospholipases A 2 (PLA 2 ), serine proteases, and hyaluronidases was determined by enzymatic methods. Low-molecular-weight fractions were obtained by gel filtration chromatography and ultrafiltration. Extracts from the three species were toxic to crickets, induced hemolysis in human and rat erythrocytes, produced vasoconstriction on isolated rat aortic rings, and presented phospholipase A 2 and serine-protease activity. Despite the fact that these corals are not considered to be harmless to humans, the extracts generated significant nociceptive responses. The matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry analysis of the low-molecular-weight fractions revealed the presence of peptides within a mass range of 3000 to 6000 Da. These fractions were toxic to crickets and two of them induced a transitory vasoconstrictor effect on isolated rat aortic rings. This study suggests that scleractinian corals produce low-molecular-weight peptides that are lethal to crickets and induce vasoconstriction.

  2. The apoptotic effects of Brucea javanica fruit extract against HT29 cells associated with p53 upregulation and inhibition of NF-κB translocation

    Bagheri E

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Elham Bagheri,1 Fatemeh Hajiaghaalipour,2 Shaik Nyamathulla,1 Nur’Ain Salehen3 1Department of Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia; 2Institute of Biological Science, Faculty of Science, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia; 3Department of Biomedical Science, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia Background: Brucea javanica (L. Merr. is a plant from the genus Brucea, which is used in local traditional medicine to treat various diseases. Recent studies revealed an impressive anticancer efficiency of B. javanica extract in different types of cancer cells.Purpose: In this study, we have investigated the cytotoxic effects of the B. javanica hexane, ethanolic extracts against colon cancer cells. HT29 colon cells were selected as an in vitro cancer model to evaluate the anticancer activity of B. javanica ethanolic extract (BJEE and the possible mechanisms of action that induced apoptosis.Methods: 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2, 5,-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT, lactate dehydrogenase, acridine orange/propidium iodide, and annexin-V-fluorescein isothiocyanate assays were performed to determine the antiproliferative and apoptosis validation of BJEE on cancer cells. Measurement of reactive oxygen species (ROS production, caspase activities, nucleus factor-κB activity, and gene expression experiments was done to investigate the potential mechanisms of action in the apoptotic process.Results: The results obtained from this study illustrated the significant antiproliferative effect of BJEE on colorectal cancer cells, with a concentration value that inhibits 50% of the cell growth of 25±3.1 µg/mL after 72 h of treatment. MTT assay demonstrated that the BJEE is selectively toxic to cancer cells, and BJEE induced cell apoptosis via activation of caspase-8 along with modulation of apoptosis-related proteins such as Fas, CD40, tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligands

  3. Anti-oxidation activity of different types of natural Cordyceps sinensis and cultured Cordyceps mycelia.

    Li, S P; Li, P; Dong, T T; Tsim, K W

    2001-05-01

    Cordyceps, one of the well-known traditional Chinese medicines, consists of the dried fungus Cordyceps sinensis growing on the larva of the caterpillar. It is commonly used for the replenishment of body health. One of the known pharmacological effects is its anti-oxidation activity. However, there is a great variation of the quality in different sources of Cordyceps. Here, the water extracts of various sources of natural C. sinensis and cultured Cordyceps mycelia were analyzed for their anti-oxidation activity by using three different assay methods such as the xanthine oxidase assay, the induction of hemolysis assay and the lipid peroxidation assay. The results showed that Cordyceps, in general, possesses a strong anti-oxidation activity in all assays tested. However, both natural and cultured Cordyceps showed the lowest inhibition in the lipid peroxidation when compared with the other two assay methods. The cultured Cordyceps mycelia had equally strong anti-oxidation activity as compared to the natural Cordyceps. Besides, the anti-oxidation activities were increased to 10-30 folds in the partially purified polysaccharide fractions from the cultured Cordyceps mycelia, which suggested that the activity could be derived partly from Cordyceps polysaccharides.

  4. Disease-linked mutations in factor H reveal pivotal role of cofactor activity in self-surface-selective regulation of complement activation.

    Kerr, Heather; Wong, Edwin; Makou, Elisavet; Yang, Yi; Marchbank, Kevin; Kavanagh, David; Richards, Anna; Herbert, Andrew P; Barlow, Paul N

    2017-08-11

    Spontaneous activation enables the complement system to respond very rapidly to diverse threats. This activation is efficiently suppressed by complement factor H (CFH) on self-surfaces but not on foreign surfaces. The surface selectivity of CFH, a soluble protein containing 20 complement-control protein modules (CCPs 1-20), may be compromised by disease-linked mutations. However, which of the several functions of CFH drives this self-surface selectivity remains unknown. To address this, we expressed human CFH mutants in Pichia pastoris We found that recombinant I62-CFH (protective against age-related macular degeneration) and V62-CFH functioned equivalently, matching or outperforming plasma-derived CFH, whereas R53H-CFH, linked to atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS), was defective in C3bBb decay-accelerating activity (DAA) and factor I cofactor activity (CA). The aHUS-linked CCP 19 mutant D1119G-CFH had virtually no CA on (self-like) sheep erythrocytes ( E S ) but retained DAA. The aHUS-linked CCP 20 mutant S1191L/V1197A-CFH (LA-CFH) had dramatically reduced CA on E S but was less compromised in DAA. D1119G-CFH and LA-CFH both performed poorly at preventing complement-mediated hemolysis of E S PspCN, a CFH-binding Streptococcus pneumoniae protein domain, binds CFH tightly and increases accessibility of CCPs 19 and 20. PspCN did not improve the DAA of any CFH variant on E S Conversely, PspCN boosted the CA, on E S , of I62-CFH, R53H-CFH, and LA-CFH and also enhanced hemolysis protection by I62-CFH and LA-CFH. We conclude that CCPs 19 and 20 are critical for efficient CA on self-surfaces but less important for DAA. Exposing CCPs 19 and 20 with PspCN and thus enhancing CA on self-surfaces may reverse deficiencies of some CFH variants. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  5. Antioxidant activity of flower, stem and leaf extracts of Ferula gummosa Boiss

    Mohammad Nabavi, Seyed

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The Antioxidant and antihemolytic activities of hydroalcoholic extracts of the flowers, stems and leaves of the Ferula gummosa Boiss were investigated employing different in vitro assay systems. Leaf extract showed better activity in DPPH radical scavenging. In addition it showed better activity in nitric oxide and H2O2 scavenging and Fe2+ chelating activity than the other parts. The extracts exhibited good antioxidant activity in linoleic acid system test but were not comparable with vitamin C (p2O2 induced hemolysis. Among the extracts, the flowers had higher phenolic and flavonoid contents. This plant is very promising for further biochemical experiments.La actividad antihemolítica y antioxidante de extractos hidroalcohólicos de flores, tallos y hojas de Ferula gummosa Boiss fueron investigados empleando diferentes ensayos in vitro. Los extractos de hojas mostraron una mejor actividad captadora de radicales libres. Además, mostraron una mejor actividad captadora de óxido nítrico y H2O2 y actividad quelatante de Fe2+ que las otras partes. Los extractos exhibieron una buena actividad antioxidante en el ensayo con ácido linoleico pero no comparable con la vitamina C (pF. gummosa mostraron una mejor actividad antihemolítica contra la hemolisis inducida con H2O2. Entre los extractos, las flores tienen los más altos contenidos de fenoles y flavonoides. Esta planta es muy prometedora para futuros experimentos bioquímicos.

  6. Antioxidant Activity and Acetylcholinesterase Inhibition of Grape Skin Anthocyanin (GSA

    Mehnaz Pervin

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available We aimed to investigate the antioxidant and acetylcholinesterase inhibitory activities of the anthocyanin rich extract of grape skin. Grape skin anthocyanin (GSA neutralized free radicals in different test systems, such as 2,-2'-azinobis-(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid (ABTS and 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH assays, to form complexes with Fe2+ preventing 2,2'-azobis(2-amidinopropane dihydrochloride (AAPH-induced erythrocyte hemolysis and oxidative DNA damage. Moreover, GSA decreased reactive oxygen species (ROS generation in isolated mitochondria thus inhibiting 2',-7'-dichlorofluorescin (DCFH oxidation. In an in vivo study, female BALB/c mice were administered GSA, at 12.5, 25, and 50 mg per kg per day orally for 30 consecutive days. Herein, we demonstrate that GSA administration significantly elevated the level of antioxidant enzymes in mice sera, livers, and brains. Furthermore, GSA inhibited acetylcholinesterase (AChE in the in vitro assay with an IC50 value of 363.61 µg/mL. Therefore, GSA could be an excellent source of antioxidants and its inhibition of cholinesterase is of interest with regard to neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease.

  7. The role of cytochrome c oxidase subunit Va in non-small cell lung carcinoma cells: association with migration, invasion and prediction of distant metastasis

    Chen, Wen-Liang; Kuo, Kuang-Tai; Chou, Teh-Ying; Chen, Chien-Lung; Wang, Chih-Hao; Wei, Yau-Huei; Wang, Liang-Shun

    2012-01-01

    Lung cancer is one of the most lethal malignancies worldwide, but useful biomarkers of lung cancer are still insufficient. The aim of this study is to identify some membrane-bound protein(s) associated with migration and invasion in human non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells. We classified four NSCLC cell lines into high and low migration/invasion groups by Transwell and Matrigel assays. Using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS), we identified 10 membrane-associated proteins being significantly overexpressed in the high migration/invasion group. The expression of the target protein in the four NSCLC cell lines was then confirmed by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), western blot and immunostaining. RNA interference technique was applied to observe the influence of the target protein on migration and invasion. Gelatin zymography was also performed to evaluate the activities of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and MMP-9. Expression condition of the target protein on surgical specimens was further examined by immunohistochemical staining and the clinicopathologic data were analyzed. We identified a mitochondria-bound protein cytochrome c oxidase subunit Va (COX Va) because of its abundant presence found exclusively in tumorous areas. We also demonstrated that migration and invasion of NSCLC cells decreased substantially after knocking down COX Va by siRNA. Meanwhile, we found a positive correlation between COX Va expression, Bcl-2 expression and activities of MMP-2 and MMP-9 in NSCLC cells. Immunohistochemical staining of surgically resected lung adenocarcinomas in 250 consecutive patients revealed that strong COX Va expression was found in 54.8% (137/250) of patients and correlated positively with the status of lymph node metastasis (P = 0.032). Furthermore, strong COX Va expression was associated with the presence of distant metastasis (P = 0

  8. Human Tubal-Derived Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Associated with Low Level Laser Therapy Significantly Reduces Cigarette Smoke-Induced COPD in C57BL/6 mice.

    Jean Pierre Schatzmann Peron

    Full Text Available Cigarette smoke-induced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease is a very debilitating disease, with a very high prevalence worldwide, which results in a expressive economic and social burden. Therefore, new therapeutic approaches to treat these patients are of unquestionable relevance. The use of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs is an innovative and yet accessible approach for pulmonary acute and chronic diseases, mainly due to its important immunoregulatory, anti-fibrogenic, anti-apoptotic and pro-angiogenic. Besides, the use of adjuvant therapies, whose aim is to boost or synergize with their function should be tested. Low level laser (LLL therapy is a relatively new and promising approach, with very low cost, no invasiveness and no side effects. Here, we aimed to study the effectiveness of human tube derived MSCs (htMSCs cell therapy associated with a 30mW/3J-660 nm LLL irradiation in experimental cigarette smoke-induced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Thus, C57BL/6 mice were exposed to cigarette smoke for 75 days (twice a day and all experiments were performed on day 76. Experimental groups receive htMSCS either intraperitoneally or intranasally and/or LLL irradiation either alone or in association. We show that co-therapy greatly reduces lung inflammation, lowering the cellular infiltrate and pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion (IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α and KC, which were followed by decreased mucus production, collagen accumulation and tissue damage. These findings seemed to be secondary to the reduction of both NF-κB and NF-AT activation in lung tissues with a concomitant increase in IL-10. In summary, our data suggests that the concomitant use of MSCs + LLLT may be a promising therapeutic approach for lung inflammatory diseases as COPD.

  9. Single-chain antibody-based gene therapy: Inhibition of tumor growth by in situ production of phage-derived antibodies blocking functionally active sites of cell-associated matrices

    Sanz, Laura; Kristensen, Peter; Blanco, Belén

    2002-01-01

    Experimental evidence suggests that blocking the interactions between endothelial cells and extracellular matrix (ECM) components may provide a potent and general strategy to inhibit tumor neovascularization. Based on these considerations, we have focused our efforts on laminin, component of the ...

  10. In Vitro Antioxidant, Antihemolytic, and Anticancer Activity of the Carotenoids from Halophilic Archaea.

    Hou, Jing; Cui, Heng-Lin

    2018-03-01

    Halophilic archaea represent a promising natural source of carotenoids. However, little information is available about the biological effects of carotenoids from halophilic archaea. In this study, the carotenoids produced by seven halophilic archaeal strains Halogeometricum rufum, Halogeometricum limi, Haladaptatus litoreus, Haloplanus vescus, Halopelagius inordinatus, Halogranum rubrum, and Haloferax volcanii were identified by ultraviolet/visible spectroscopy, thin-layer chromatography, and high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. The C 50 carotenoids bacterioruberin and its derivatives monoanhydrobacterioruberin and bisanhydrobacterioruberin were found to be the predominant carotenoids. The antioxidant capacities of the carotenoids from these strains were significantly higher than β-carotene as determined by 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl radical scavenging assay. The antihemolytic activities of these carotenoid extracts against H 2 O 2 -induced hemolysis in mouse erythrocytes were 3.9-6.3 times higher than β-carotene. A dose-dependent in vitro antiproliferative activity against HepG2 cells was observed for the extract from Hgm. limi, while that from Hpn. vescus exhibited a relatively high activity in a dose-independent manner. These results suggested that halophilic archaea could be considered as an alternative source of natural carotenoids with high antioxidant, antihemolytic, and anticancer activity.

  11. Membrane interactions and biological activity of antimicrobial peptides from Australian scorpion.

    Luna-Ramírez, Karen; Sani, Marc-Antoine; Silva-Sanchez, Jesus; Jiménez-Vargas, Juana María; Reyna-Flores, Fernando; Winkel, Kenneth D; Wright, Christine E; Possani, Lourival D; Separovic, Frances

    2014-09-01

    UyCT peptides are antimicrobial peptides isolated from the venom of the Australian scorpion. The activity of the UyCT peptides against Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria and red blood cells was determined. The membrane interactions of these peptides were evaluated by dye release (DR) of the fluorophore calcein from liposomes and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC); and their secondary structure was determined by circular dichroism (CD). Three different lipid systems were used to mimic red blood cells, Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus membranes. UyCT peptides exhibited broad spectrum antimicrobial activity with low MIC for S. aureus and multi-drug resistant Gram negative strains. Peptide combinations showed some synergy enhancing their potency but not hemolytic activity. The UyCT peptides adopted a helical structure in lipid environments and DR results confirmed that the mechanism of action is by disrupting the membrane. ITC data indicated that UyCT peptides preferred prokaryotic rather than eukaryotic membranes. The overall results suggest that UyCT peptides could be pharmaceutical leads for the treatment of Gram negative multiresistant bacterial infections, especially against Acinetobacter baumanni, and candidates for peptidomimetics to enhance their potency and minimize hemolysis. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Interfacially Active Peptides and Proteins. Guest Editors: William C. Wimley and Kalina Hristova. © 2013.

  12. Broad spectrum antibacterial and antifungal polymeric paint materials: synthesis, structure-activity relationship, and membrane-active mode of action.

    Hoque, Jiaul; Akkapeddi, Padma; Yadav, Vikas; Manjunath, Goutham B; Uppu, Divakara S S M; Konai, Mohini M; Yarlagadda, Venkateswarlu; Sanyal, Kaustuv; Haldar, Jayanta

    2015-01-28

    Microbial attachment and subsequent colonization onto surfaces lead to the spread of deadly community-acquired and hospital-acquired (nosocomial) infections. Noncovalent immobilization of water insoluble and organo-soluble cationic polymers onto a surface is a facile approach to prevent microbial contamination. In the present study, we described the synthesis of water insoluble and organo-soluble polymeric materials and demonstrated their structure-activity relationship against various human pathogenic bacteria including drug-resistant strains such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE), and beta lactam-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae as well as pathogenic fungi such as Candida spp. and Cryptococcus spp. The polymer coated surfaces completely inactivated both bacteria and fungi upon contact (5 log reduction with respect to control). Linear polymers were more active and found to have a higher killing rate than the branched polymers. The polymer coated surfaces also exhibited significant activity in various complex mammalian fluids such as serum, plasma, and blood and showed negligible hemolysis at an amount much higher than minimum inhibitory amounts (MIAs). These polymers were found to have excellent compatibility with other medically relevant polymers (polylactic acid, PLA) and commercial paint. The cationic hydrophobic polymer coatings disrupted the lipid membrane of both bacteria and fungi and thus showed a membrane-active mode of action. Further, bacteria did not develop resistance against these membrane-active polymers in sharp contrast to conventional antibiotics and lipopeptides, thus the polymers hold great promise to be used as coating materials for developing permanent antimicrobial paint.

  13. Functional Elucidation of Nemopilema nomurai and Cyanea nozakii Nematocyst Venoms' Lytic Activity Using Mass Spectrometry and Zymography.

    Yue, Yang; Yu, Huahua; Li, Rongfeng; Xing, Ronge; Liu, Song; Li, Kecheng; Wang, Xueqin; Chen, Xiaolin; Li, Pengcheng

    2017-01-26

    Medusozoans utilize explosively discharging penetrant nematocysts to inject venom into prey. These venoms are composed of highly complex proteins and peptides with extensive bioactivities, as observed in vitro. Diverse enzymatic toxins have been putatively identified in the venom of jellyfish, Nemopilema nomurai and Cyanea nozakii , through examination of their proteomes and transcriptomes. However, functional examination of putative enzymatic components identified in proteomic approaches to elucidate potential bioactivities is critically needed. In this study, enzymatic toxins were functionally identified using a combined approach consisting of in gel zymography and liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). The potential roles of metalloproteinases and lipases in hemolytic activity were explored using specific inhibitors. Zymography indicated that nematocyst venom possessed protease-, lipase- and hyaluronidase-class activities. Further, proteomic approaches using LC-MS/MS indicated sequence homology of proteolytic bands observed in zymography to extant zinc metalloproteinase-disintegrins and astacin metalloproteinases. Moreover, pre-incubation of the metalloproteinase inhibitor batimastat with N . nomurai nematocyst venom resulted in an approximate 62% reduction of hemolysis compared to venom exposed sheep erythrocytes, suggesting that metalloproteinases contribute to hemolytic activity. Additionally, species within the molecular mass range of 14-18 kDa exhibited both egg yolk and erythrocyte lytic activities in gel overlay assays. For the first time, our findings demonstrate the contribution of jellyfish venom metalloproteinase and suggest the involvement of lipase species to hemolytic activity. Investigations of this relationship will facilitate a better understanding of the constituents and toxicity of jellyfish venom.

  14. Antimicrobial, Antioxidant, Anti-Inflammatory, and Cytotoxic Activities of Propolis from the Stingless Bee Tetragonisca fiebrigi (Jataí

    Jaqueline Ferreira Campos

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Propolis from stingless bees Tetragonisca fiebrigi found in Brazil is used in folk medicine by their nutritional and therapeutic properties. However, there are no scientific records evidencing such properties. The present study was designed to investigate the chemical composition and the biological properties of propolis from T. fiebrigi. For this, the chemical composition of the ethanol extract of propolis (EEP was determined by GC-MS and presented phenolic compounds, alcohol, and terpenes as its major class compounds. The antimicrobial activity was accessed in gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria and in fungi, isolated from different biological fluids and reference strains. The EEP was active against all microorganisms and showed antioxidant activity by scavenging free radicals, inhibiting hemolysis and lipid peroxidation in human erythrocytes incubated with an oxidizing agent. The anti-inflammatory potential of the EEP was confirmed by inhibition of the hyaluronidase enzyme. The cytotoxic activity was concentration-dependent against K562 cells, with a predominance of death by necrosis. Taken together, these results show that propolis from T. fiebrigi has important therapeutic activities, which suggest its potential application in the pharmaceutical industry, as well as in health foods, beverages, and nutritional supplements.

  15. Activity, specificity, and titer of naturally occurring canine anti-DEA 7 antibodies.

    Spada, Eva; Proverbio, Daniela; Baggiani, Luciana; Canzi, Ilaria; Perego, Roberta

    2016-11-01

    The reported prevalence of naturally occurring anti-dog erythrocyte antigen (DEA) 7 antibodies in DEA 7-negative dogs is as high as 50%. Characterization of these antibodies may better define their importance in canine transfusion medicine. We determined in vitro activity, specificity, and titer of anti-DEA 7 antibodies in DEA 7-negative dogs. Plasma samples from 317 DEA 7-negative dogs were cross-matched with DEA 7-positive red blood cells (RBCs) using gel column technology. Agglutination occurred with DEA 7-positive RBCs but not with DEA 7-negative RBCs in 73 samples (23%), which were hence classified as containing anti-DEA 7 antibodies. These samples were evaluated for hemolytic and agglutinating activity, strength of agglutination, and antibody specificity and titers. All samples showed agglutination but none showed hemolysis. Gel agglutination was graded as 1+ for 20 samples (27%), 2+ for 49 samples (67%), 3+ for 4 samples (6%); no samples were graded 4+. The agglutination titer was DEA 7 antibodies were found in 23% of DEA 7-negative dogs. The presence of naturally occurring anti-DEA 7 antibodies suggests that cross-matching of canine blood recipients is advisable, even at first transfusion, to minimize delayed transfusion reactions. © 2016 The Author(s).

  16. Novel chimeric peptide with enhanced cell specificity and anti-inflammatory activity.

    Kim, Young-Min; Kim, Nam-Hong; Lee, Jong-Wan; Jang, Jin-Sun; Park, Yung-Hoon; Park, Seong-Cheol; Jang, Mi-Kyeong

    2015-07-31

    An antimicrobial peptide (AMP), Hn-Mc, was designed by combining the N-terminus of HPA3NT3 and the C-terminus of melittin. This chimeric AMP exhibited potent antibacterial activity with low minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs), ranging from 1 to 2 μM against four drug-susceptible bacteria and ten drug-resistant bacteria. Moreover, the hemolysis and cytotoxicity was reduced significantly compared to those of the parent peptides, highlighting its high cell selectivity. The morphological changes in the giant unilamellar vesicles and bacterial cell surfaces caused by the Hn-Mc peptide suggested that it killed the microbial cells by damaging the membrane envelope. An in vivo study also demonstrated the antibacterial activity of the Hn-Mc peptide in a mouse model infected with drug-resistant bacteria. In addition, the chimeric peptide inhibited the expression of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced cytokines in RAW 264.7 cells by preventing the interaction between LPS and Toll-like receptors. These results suggest that this chimeric peptide is an antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory candidate as a pharmaceutic agent. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Hemolytic activity of Fusobacterium necrophorum culture supernatants due to presence of phospholipase A and lysophospholipase.

    Abe, P M; Kendall, C J; Stauffer, L R; Holland, J W

    1979-01-01

    Culture supernatants of Fusobacterium necrophorum demonstrated hemolytic activity. The hemolysin(s), which was partially purified by ammonium sulfate precipitation, was temperature-dependent and heat labile. The spectrum of hemolytic activity against various erythrocytes included rabbit, human, and dog erythrocytes. Goats, sheep, and bovine erythrocytes showed only trace hemolysis. According to results of thin-layer chromatography, the hemolysin hydrolyzed rabbit erythrocyte phosphatidyl choline, phosphatidyl ethanolamine, lysophosphatidyl choline, and bovine phosphatidyl choline. Hydrolysis of egg yolk phosphatidyl choline, bovine phosphatidyl ethanolamine, cholesterol, 1,2-dipalmitin, 1,3-dipalmitin, sphingomyelin, or triolein was not detected by thin layer chromatography. A more sensitive procedure utilizing gas-liquid chromatography revealed that, of the substrates tested, the following were bein hydrolyzed: bovine and egg yolk phosphatidyl choline, lysophosphatidyl choline, alpha-palmito-beta-eleoyl-L-alpha lecithin and alpha-oleoyl-betal-palmitoyl-L-alpha lecithin. Substrates which were weakly hydrolyzed were bovine phosphatidyl ethanolamine, DL-alpha-hosphatidyl ethanolamine dipalmitoyl, 1,2-dipalmitin, 1,3-dipalmitin, and triolein.

  18. In vitro antioxidant and antiproliferative activities of selenium-containing phycocyanin from selenium-enriched Spirulina platensis.

    Chen, Tianfeng; Wong, Yum-Shing

    2008-06-25

    Both selenium and phycocyanin have been reported to show potent cancer chemopreventive activities. In this study, we investigated the in vitro antioxidant and antiproliferative activities of selenium-containing phycocyanin (Se-PC) purified from selenium-enriched Spirulina platensis. The antioxidant activity of Se-PC was evaluated by using four different free radical scavenging assays, namely, the 2,2'-azinobis-3-ethylbenzothiazolin-6-sulfonic acid (ABTS) assay, 1,1-diphenyl-2-picryhydrazyl (DPPH) assay, superoxide anion scavenging assay, and erythrocyte hemolysis assay. The results indicated that Se-PC exhibited stronger antioxidant activity than phycocyanin by scavenging ABTS, DPPH, superoxide anion, and 2,2'-azobis-(2-amidinopropane)dihydrochloride free radicals. Se-PC also showed dose-dependent protective effects on erythrocytes against H 2O 2-induced oxidative DNA damage as evaluated by the Comet assay. Moreover, Se-PC was identified as a potent antiproliferative agent against human melanoma A375 cells and human breast adenocarcinoma MCF-7 cells. Induction of apoptosis in both A375 and MCF-7 cells by Se-PC was evidenced by accumulation of sub-G1 cell populations, DNA fragmentation, and nuclear condensation. Further investigation on intracellular mechanisms indicated that depletion of mitochondrial membrane potential (DeltaPsi m) was involved in Se-PC-induced cell apoptosis. Our findings suggest that Se-PC is a promising organic Se species with potential applications in cancer chemoprevention.

  19. STUDY OF SERUM HAPTOGLOBIN LEVEL AND ITS RELATION TO ERYTHROPOIETIC ACTIVITY IN BETA THALASSEMIA CHILDREN .

    Seham Ragab

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background  :Serum haptoglobin (Hp is a reliable marker for hemolysis regardless the inflammatory state.  Objective: We investigated the possible relation between Hp depletion and hemolysis severity, hepatitis C virus (HCV infection and iron load in β-thalassemia children. Methods: Twenty  two β-thalassemia major (TM ,20 β-thalassemia  intermedia (TI children with 20 age and sex matched healthy controls were involved. Pre-transfusion hemoglobin level was considered . Serum ferritin , Hp  and transferrin receptor  levels (sTfR  (by ELISA , alanine aminotransferase (ALT and  aspartate aminotransferase (AST  (by colorimetric method were assayed. Markers of hepatitis C virus  (HCV  were done by PCR. Results:  The mean Hp levels among the studied groups were as follows; 8.02 ± 0.93 (mg/dl , 8.6 ±0.72 (mg/dl  and 122  ± 18.5(mg/dl   for TM ,TI and the controls respectively . Both patient groups had significantly lower Hp level compared to the controls (P<0.0001  with significant lower level in TM compared to TI  children ( P= 0.034  .Significant inverse correlations were  found between serum Hp and sTfR levels in thalassemia children combined and in each group (TM and TI as well as among HCV infected children. STfR   was the only significant independent predictor for  serum Hp level (t= -5.585 , P<0.0001 . Among  HCV infected patients , no significant correlation was found between serum Hp and serum transaminases  .Conclusion:  Serum Hp depletion in thalassemia had significant relation to disease severity and correlated   well with their erythropoietic activity, as assessed by the measurement of  sTfR without significant relation  HCV infection . Large sample  multicenter studies are  recommended.

  20. Antioxidant activities of the synthesized thiol-contained peptides derived from computer-aided pepsin hydrolysis of yam tuber storage protein, dioscorin.

    Han, Chuan-Hsiao; Liu, Ju-Chi; Fang, Sheng-Uei; Hou, Wen-Chi

    2013-06-01

    Our previous report showed that yam dioscorin and its peptic hydrolysates exhibit radical scavenging activities; however, the functions of these peptic hydrolases are still under investigation. In this study, the thiol-containing peptides derived from computer-aided simulation of pepsin hydrolysis of dioscorin, namely, KTCGNGME (diotide1), PPCSE (diotide2), CDDRVIRTPLT (diotide3), KTCGY (diotide4), and PPCTE (diotide5) were synthesized to compare their antioxidant activities with GSH and/or carnosine by examining hydroxyl radical scavenging activity by electron spin resonance spectrometry, anti-low-density lipoprotein peroxidation, anti-AAPH-induced hemolysis, and oxygen radical absorbance capacity activity. We found that while all the synthesized diotides showed antioxidant activity, diotide4 exhibited the highest levels. Moreover, all diotides (100 μM) showed protective effects against methylglyoxal-induced human umbilical vein endothelial cell death. These results suggest that thiol-containing diotides derived from dioscorin hydrolysis exhibit antioxidant activities and reveal the benefits of yam tuber as an antioxidant-rich food. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. EFFECT OF POLYPHENOLIC COMPOUNDS ISOLATED FROM CARTHAMUS TINCTORIUS AND CALENDULA OFFICINALIS L., ON FUNCTIONAL ACTIVITY OF IMMUNE CELLS UNDER CONDITIONS OF CYTOSTATIC IMMUNOSUPPRESSION

    N. V. Masnaya

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study – to study the effect of polyphenolic compounds extracted from the flowers of safflower oil and calendula, the functional activity of immune cells in cytotoxic immune suppression.Conventional methods determined the total number of splenocytes, relative (% and absolute (106, the number of antibody-forming cells (AFC in the spleen of mice by local hemolysis by Cunningham.Evaluated the effect of compounds of natural origin on the cellular immune response in the delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH. Phagocytic activity of peritoneal macrophages was determined by the method based on the intensity of their capture ink particles. We studied the functional activity of peritoneal macrophages by NBT test (spontaneous and stimulated. Studies were conducted on male mice Category 1 (conventional linear mouse line CBA/CaLac aged 2–2.5 months, weighing 20–22 g. After the introduction mice line CBA/CaLac of polyphenolic compounds derived from flowers of Carthamus tinctorius and flowers of Calendula officinalis L. during the 5-day course in dose 50 mg/kg was observed stimulation of the humoral immune response (total number of splenocytes, the number of antibodies in the spleen cells and the functional activity of macrophages and Immunomodulating effect on the humoral immunity and the functional activity of macrophages after a single injection of cyclophosphamide in dose 250 mg/kg. Immunotropic activity of polyphenolic compounds is higher than that those of the reference product of tincture of Echinacea purpurea.

  2. Expression of T helper cell-associated inflammatory mediator mRNAs in cells of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid samples and oxygen concentration in arterial blood samples from healthy horses exposed to hyperbaric oxygen.

    Looijen, Maty G P; New, Dallas J; Fischer, Carrie D; Dardari, Rkia; Irwin, Karyn M; Berezowski, Christopher J; Bond, Stephanie L; Léguillette, Renaud

    2016-10-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate the mRNA expression of T helper (Th)1, Th2, and Th17 cell-associated inflammatory mediators in cells of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid samples collected from healthy horses exposed to hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) and to monitor blood oxygen concentration during and following HBO therapy. ANIMALS 8 healthy horses. PROCEDURES In a randomized controlled crossover design study, each horse was exposed (beginning day 1) to 100% oxygen at a maximum of 3 atmospheres absolute (304 kPa) daily for 10 days or ambient air at atmospheric pressure in the HBO chamber for an equivalent amount of time (control). Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid samples were collected on days 0 and 10. After validation of candidate reference genes, relative mRNA expressions of various innate inflammatory, Th1 cell-derived, Th2 cell-derived (including eotaxin-2), Th17 cell-derived, and regulatory cytokines were measured by quantitative PCR assays. For 3 horses, arterial blood samples were collected for blood gas analysis during a separate HBO session. RESULTS The optimal combination of reference genes was glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, hypoxanthine ribosyltransferase, and ribosomal protein L32. Compared with day 0 findings, expression of eotaxin-2 mRNA was significantly lower (0.12-fold reduction) and the percentage of neutrophils in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid samples was significantly lower on day 10 when horses received HBO therapy. Values of Pao2 rapidly increased (> 800 mm Hg) but immediately decreased to pretreatment values when HBO sessions ended. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results indicated that HBO therapy does not increase mRNA expression of inflammatory cytokines, but reduces eotaxin-2 mRNA transcription. The Pao2 increase was transient with no cumulative effects of HBO.

  3. Comparative Studies on Bioactive Constituents in Hawk Tea Infusions with Different Maturity Degree and Their Antioxidant Activities

    Ming Yuan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Hawk tea (Litsea coreana var. lanuginose is a very popular herbal tea in the southwest of China. According to the maturity degree of raw materials, Hawk tea can usually be divided into three types: Hawk bud tea (HB, Hawk primary leaf tea (HP, and Hawk mature leaf tea (HM. In this study, some of the bioactive constituents and antioxidant properties of the three kinds of Hawk tea infusions were comparatively investigated. The results showed that the contents of total flavonoids, vitamin C, and carbohydrates in Hawk bud tea infusion (HBI were higher than those in Hawk primary leaf tea infusion (HPI and Hawk mature leaf tea infusion (HMI. HPI had higher contents of total polyphenols and exhibited better DPPH radical scavenging activity and ferric reducing activity power. HBI could provide more effective protection against erythrocyte hemolysis. As age is going from bud to mature leaf, the ability to inhibit the formation of low density lipoprotein (LDL conjugated diene and the loss of tryptophan fluorescence decreased. The bioactive constituents and antioxidant activities of Hawk tea infusions were significantly affected by the maturity degree of the raw material.

  4. Effect of producer cell line on functional activity of anti-D monoclonal antibodies destined for prevention of rhesus sensitization.

    Olovnikova, N I; Ershler, M A; Belkina, E V; Nikolaeva, T L; Miterev, G Yu

    2009-04-01

    The ability of anti-D antibodies to cause antigen-specific immunosuppression depends on their interaction with low-affinity Fcgamma-receptors. Human monoclonal antibodies to D antigen of the rhesus system were investigated by antibody-dependent cytotoxicity assay in order to estimate their ability to induce hemolysis mediated by low-affinity Fcgamma receptors. We demonstrate that affinity of monoclonal antibodies to receptors of this type does not depend on primary structure of Fc-fragment, but depends on the producer cell line which expresses the antibodies. Monoclonal IgG1 antibodies interacting with FcgammaRIIa and FcgammaRIII lost this property, if they were secreted by human-mouse heterohybridoma, but not by human B-cell line. On the opposite, monoclonal antibodies that could not activate low-affinity Fcgamma receptors were highly active after human cells fusion with rat myeloma YB2/0. Hemolytic activity of IgG3 remained unchanged after fusion of human cells with rodent cells.

  5. Antioxidant and antiglycation activities of the synthesised dipeptide, Asn-Trp, derived from computer-aided simulation of yam dioscorin hydrolysis and its analogue, Gln-Trp.

    Han, Chuan-Hsiao; Lin, Yin-Shiou; Lin, Shyr-Yi; Hou, Wen-Chi

    2014-03-15

    Previous studies have shown that the Trp residue contributes to a high oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC). Therefore, in this study, a Trp-containing dipeptide derived from a computer-aided simulation of pepsin hydrolysis of the yam tuber, dioscorin-namely, Asn-Trp (NW), and its analogue, Gln-Trp (QW)-were synthesised to compare their antioxidant and antiglycation activities with carnosine, homocarnosine, or glutathione (GSH). The antioxidant assays included hydroxyl radical-scavenging activity, anti-AAPH-induced hemolysis, and ORAC activity. NW had a significantly higher antioxidant activity than had QW and performed much better than carnosine, homocarnosine, or GSH. Using bovine serum albumin (BSA)/galactose or BSA/glucose as experimental models, NW had better antiglycation effects than had QW, as detected by an anti-N(ε)-(carboxymethyl)lysine (anti-CML) antibody. Moreover, NW and QW (50-200 μM) showed protection against methylglyoxal-induced cell deaths in human umbilical vein endothelial cells. These results suggest that NW, derived from computer-aided simulation of dioscorin hydrolysis, exhibits antioxidant and antiglycation activities, which thus shows the benefits of the yam tuber as an antioxidant-rich food. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Anticariogenic and Hemolytic Activity of Selected Seed Protein Extracts In vitro conditions.

    Kalpesh B Ishnava

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to assess the anticariogenic and hemolytic activity of crude plant seed protein extracts against tooth decaying bacteria.The proteins from seeds of 12 different plants were extracted and used for antimicrobial assay against six different organisms. The extraction was carried out in 10mM of sodium phosphate buffer (pH 7.0. Protein concentrations were determined as described by Bradford method. Anticariogenic activity was studied by agar well diffusion method and Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC was evaluated by the two-fold serial broth dilution method. Hemolytic activity, treatment of proteinase K and Kinetic study in Mimusops elengi crude seed protein extract.The anticariogenic assay demonstrated the activity of Mimusops elengi against Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pyogenes. A minor activity of Glycine wightii against Streptococcus mutans was also found. The protein content of Mimusops elengi seed protein extract was 5.84mg/ml. The MIC values for Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pyogenes against Mimusops elengi seed protein extract were 364.36μg/ml and 182.19μg/ml, respectively. Kinetic study further elucidated the mode of inhibition in the presence of the Mimusops elengi plant seed protein with respect to time. The concentration of crude extract which gave 50% hemolysis compared to Triton X-100 treatment (HC50 value was 1.58 mg/ml; which is more than five times larger than that of the MIC. Treatment with proteinase K of the Mimusops elengi seed protein resulted in absence of the inhibition zone; which clearly indicates that the activity was only due to protein.Our results showed the prominence of Mimusops elengi plant seed protein extract as an effective herbal medication against tooth decaying bacteria.

  7. Secretion and activation of the Serratia marcescens hemolysin by structurally defined ShlB mutants.

    Pramanik, Avijit; Könninger, Ulrich; Selvam, Arun; Braun, Volkmar

    2014-05-01

    The ShlA hemolysin of Serratia marcescens is secreted across the outer membrane by the ShlB protein; ShlB belongs to the two-partner secretion system (type Vb), a subfamily of the Omp85 outer membrane protein assembly and secretion superfamily. During secretion, ShlA is converted from an inactive non-hemolytic form into an active hemolytic form. The structure of ShlB is predicted to consist of the N-terminal α-helix H1, followed by the two polypeptide-transport-associated domains POTRA P1 and P2, and the β-barrel of 16 β-strands. H1 is inserted into the pore of the β-barrel in the outer membrane; P1 and P2 are located in the periplasm. To obtain insights into the secretion and activation of ShlA by ShlB, we isolated ShlB mutants impaired in secretion and/or activation. The triple H1 P1 P2 mutant did not secrete ShlA. The P1 and P2 deletion derivatives secreted reduced amounts of ShlA, of which P1 showed some hemolysis, whereas P2 was inactive. Deletion of loop 6 (L6), which is conserved among exporters of the Omp85 family, compromised activation but retained low secretion. Secretion-negative mutants generated by random mutagenesis were located in loop 6. The inactive secreted ShlA derivatives were complemented in vitro to active ShlA by an N-terminal ShlA fragment (ShlA242) secreted by ShlB. Deletion of H1 did not impair secretion of hemolytic ShlA. The study defines domains of ShlB which are important for ShlA secretion and activation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  8. Nanoencapsulation of gallic acid and evaluation of its cytotoxicity and antioxidant activity.

    de Cristo Soares Alves, Aline; Mainardes, Rubiana Mara; Khalil, Najeh Maissar

    2016-03-01

    Gallic acid is an important polyphenol compound presenting various biological activities. The objective of this study was to prepare, characterize and evaluate poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles coated or not with polysorbate 80 (PS80) containing gallic acid. Nanoparticles coated or not with PS80 were produced by emulsion solvent evaporation method and presented a mean size of around 225 nm, gallic acid encapsulation efficiency of around 26% and zeta potential of -22 mV. Nanoparticle formulations were stable during storage, except nanoparticles coated with PS80 stored at room temperature. In vitro release profile demonstrated a quite sustained gallic acid release from nanoparticles and PS80-coating decreased drug release. Cytotoxicity over red blood cells was assessed and gallic acid-loaded PLGA nanoparticles at all analyzed concentrations demonstrated lack of hemolysis, while PS80-nanoparticles containing gallic acid were cytotoxic only in higher concentrations. Antioxidant potential of nanoparticles containing gallic acid was assessed and PLGA uncoated nanoparticles presented greater efficacy than PS80-coated PLGA nanoparticles. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Proteolytic activity and cooperative hemolytic effect of dermatophytes with different species of bacteria

    Pakshir, K; Mohamadi, T; Khodadadi, H; Motamedifar, M; Zomorodian, K; Alipour, S; Motamedi, M

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Globally, dermatophytes are the most common filamentous group of fungi causing cutaneous mycoses. Dermatophytes were shown to secrete a multitude of enzymes that play a role in their pathogenesis. There is limited data on co-hemolytic (CAMP-like) effect of different bacterial species on dermatophyte species. In this study, we sought to the evaluate exoenzyme activity and co-hemolytic effect of four bacteria on clinical dermatophytes isolated from patients in Shiraz, Iran. Materials and Methods: A total of 84 clinical dermatophyte species were isolated from patients suffering dermatophytosis and identified by conventional methods. Hemolytic activity was evaluated with Columbia 5% sheep blood agar. Proteolytic activity was determined by plate clearance assay method, using gelatin 8% agar. CAMP-like factor was evaluated with four bacteria, namely, S. areus, S. saprophyticus, S. pyogenes, and S. agalactiae. Fisher's exact test was run for statistical analysis. Results: T. mentagrophytes was the most predominant agent (27 [32.1%]) followed by T. verrucosum(20 [23.8%]), T. tonsurans (10 [11.9%]), Microsporum canis (7 [8.3%]), T. rubrum (6 [7.1%]), E. floccosum (6 [7.1%]), M. gypseum (5 [6%]), and T. violaceum (3[3.6%]). The most common clinical area of dermatophytosis was the skin. All the isolates expressed the zone of incomplete alpha hemolysis. All the isolates had CAMP- positive reaction with S. aureus and the other bacteria were CAMP-negative. All the isolates expressed proteolytic activity and no significant differences were noted among diverse genera of dermatophytes and severities of proteolytic activity. Conclusion: This study indicated that hemolysin and proteolytic enzymes potentially play a role in dermatophyte pathogenesis and S. aureus could be considered as a main bacterium for creation of co-hemolytic effect in association with dermatophyte species. PMID:28959790

  10. Purification and in vitro antioxidant activities of tellurium-containing phycobiliproteins from tellurium-enriched Spirulina platensis.

    Yang, Fang; Wong, Ka-Hing; Yang, Yufeng; Li, Xiaoling; Jiang, Jie; Zheng, Wenjie; Wu, Hualian; Chen, Tianfeng

    2014-01-01

    Tellurium-containing phycocyanin (Te-PC) and allophycocyanin (Te-APC), two organic tellurium (Te) species, were purified from tellurium-enriched Spirulina platensis by a fast protein liquid chromatographic method. It was found that the incorporation of Te into the peptides enhanced the antioxidant activities of both phycobiliproteins. With fractionation by ammonium sulfate precipitation and hydroxylapatite chromatography, Te-PC and Te-APC could be effectively separated with high purity, and Te concentrations were 611.1 and 625.3 μg g(-1) protein in Te-PC and Te-APC, respectively. The subunits in the proteins were identified by using MALDI-TOF-TOF mass spectrometry. Te incorporation enhanced the antioxidant activities of both phycobiliproteins, as examined by 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulphonic acid assay. Moreover, Te-PC and Te-APC showed dose-dependent protection on erythrocytes against the water-soluble free radical initiator 2,2'-azo(2-asmidinopropane)dihydrochloride-induced hemolysis. In the hepatoprotective model, apoptotic cell death and nuclear condensation induced by tert-butyl hydroperoxide in HepG2 cells was significantly attenuated by Te-PC and Te-APC. Taken together, these results suggest that Te-PC and Te-APC are promising Te-containing proteins with application potential for treatment of diseases related to oxidative stress.

  11. HPLC-ESI-IT-MS/MS Analysis and Biological Activity of Triterpene Glycosides from the Colombian Marine Sponge Ectyoplasia ferox

    Jhonny Colorado-Ríos

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The marine sponge Ectyoplasia ferox produces antipredatory and allelopathic triterpenoid glycosides as part of its chemical defense repertoire against predators, competitors, and fouling organisms. These molecules are responsible for the pharmacological potential found in the glycosides present in this species. In order to observe the glycochemical diversity present in E. ferox, a liquid chromatography coupled to a tandem mass spectrometry approach to analyse a complex polar fraction of this marine sponge was performed. This gave valuable information for about twenty-five compounds three of which have been previously reported and another three which were found to be composed of known aglycones. Furthermore, a group of four urabosides, sharing two uncommon substitutions with carboxyl groups at C-4 on the terpenoid core, were identified by a characteristic fragmentation pattern. The oxidized aglycones present in this group of saponins can promote instability, making the purification process difficult. Cytotoxicity, cell cycle modulation, a cell cloning efficiency assay, as well as its hemolytic activity were evaluated. The cytotoxic activity was about IC50 40 µg/mL on Jurkat and CHO-k1 cell lines without exhibiting hemolysis. Discussion on this bioactivity suggests the scanning of other biological models would be worthwhile.

  12. Effects of L-arginine immobilization on the anticoagulant activity and hemolytic property of polyethylene terephthalate films

    Liu Yun; Yang Yun; Wu Feng

    2010-01-01

    Surface modification of polyethylene terephthalate (PET) films was performed with L-arginine (L-Arg) to gain an improved anticoagulant surface. The surface chemistry changes of modified films were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy. The in vitro anticoagulant activities of the surface-modified PET films were evaluated by blood clotting test, hemolytic test, and the measurement of clotting time including plasma recalcification time (PRT), activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT), and prothrombin time (PT). The data of blood coagulation index (BCI) for L-arginine modified PET films (PET-Arg) was larger than that for PET at the same blood-sample contact time. The hemolysis ratio for PET-Arg was less than that for PET and within the accepted standard for biomaterials. The PRT and APTT for PET-Arg were significantly prolonged by 189 s and 25 s, respectively, compared to those for the unmodified PET. All results suggested that the currently described modification method could be a possible candidate to create antithrombogenic PET surfaces which would be useful for further medical applications.

  13. Antitubercular activity of ZnO nanoparticles prepared by solution combustion synthesis using lemon juice as bio-fuel.

    Gopala Krishna, Prashanth; Paduvarahalli Ananthaswamy, Prashanth; Trivedi, Priyanka; Chaturvedi, Vinita; Bhangi Mutta, Nagabhushana; Sannaiah, Ananda; Erra, Amani; Yadavalli, Tejabhiram

    2017-06-01

    In this study, we report the synthesis, structural and morphological characteristics of zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles using solution combustion synthesis method where lemon juice was used as the fuel. In vitro anti-tubercular activity of the synthesized ZnO nanoparticles and their biocompatibility studies, both in vitro and in vivo were carried out. The synthesized nanoparticles showed inhibition of Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Ra strain at concentrations as low as 12.5μg/mL. In vitro cytotoxicity study performed with normal mammalian cells (L929, 3T3-L1) showed that ZnO nanoparticles are non-toxic with a Selectivity Index (SI) >10. Cytotoxicity performed on two human cancer cell lines DU-145 and Calu-6 indicated the anti-cancer activity of ZnO nanoparticles at varied concentrations. Results of blood hemolysis indicated the biocompatibility of ZnO nanoparticles. Furthermore, in vivo toxicity studies of ZnO nanoparticles conducted on Swiss albino mice (for 14days as per the OECD 423 guidelines) showed no evident toxicity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Antioxidant Activity of Ixora parviflora in a Cell/Cell-Free System and in UV-Exposed Human Fibroblasts

    Hsiu-Mei Chiang

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Polyphenols and flavonoids possess a variety of biological activities including antioxidant and anti-tumor activities. Ixora parviflora is a member of the flavonoid-rich Rubiaceae family of flowering plants and used as folk medicine in India. The aim of this study was to investigate the antioxidant activity of Ixora parviflora extract (IPE in a cell-free system and erythrocytes, and the ability of IPE to inhibit reactive oxygen species (ROS generation in human fibroblasts (Hs68 after ultraviolet (UV exposure. Various in vitro antioxidant assays were employed in this study. The extraction yield of IPE was 17.4 ± 3.9%, the total phenolic content of IPE was 26.2 μg gallic acid equivalent (GAE/mg leaves dry weight and the total flavonoids content was 54.2 ± 4.4 μg quercetin equvalent (QE/mg extract. The content of chlorogenic acid was 9.7 ± 1.2 mg/g extract. IPE at 1000 μg/mL exhibited a reducing capacity of 90.5 ± 0.6%, a 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazy (DPPH radical scavenging activity of 96.0 ± 0.4%, a ferrous chelating activity of 72.2 ± 3.5%, a hydroxyl radical scavenging activity of 96.8 ± 1.4%, and a hydrogen peroxide scavenging activity of 99.5 ± 3.3%. IPE at 500 μg/mL also possessed inhibitory activity against 2,2'-azobis (2-methylpropionamidine dihydrochloride (AAPH-induced hemolysis of erythrocytes (89.4 ± 1.8% and resulted in a 52.9% reduction in ROS generation in UV-exposed fibroblasts. According to our findings, IPE is a potent antioxidant and a potential anti-photoaging agent.

  15. Antitumor activity and systemic effects of PVM/MA-shelled selol nanocapsules in lung adenocarcinoma-bearing mice

    De Souza, Ludmilla Regina; Muehlmann, Luis Alexandre; Matos, Lívia Carneiro; Lacava, Zulmira Guerreiro Marques; Báo, Sônia Nair; Azevedo, Ricardo Bentes; Simón-Vázquez, Rosana; González-Fernández, África; De-Paula, Alfredo Maurício Batista; Mosiniewicz-Szablewska, Ewa; Suchocki, Piotr; Morais, Paulo César

    2015-01-01

    Selol is a semi-synthetic compound containing selenite that is effective against cancerous cells and safer for clinical applications in comparison with other inorganic forms of selenite. Recently, we have developed a formulation of poly(methyl vinyl ether-co-maleic anhydride)-shelled selol nanocapsules (SPN), which reduced the proliferative activity of lung adenocarcinoma cells and presented little deleterious effects on normal cells in in vitro studies. In this study, we report on the antitumor activity and systemic effects induced by this formulation in chemically induced lung adenocarcinoma-bearing mice. The in vivo antitumor activity of the SPN was verified by macroscopic quantification, immunohistochemistry and morphological analyses. Toxicity analyses were performed by evaluations of the kidney, liver, and spleen; analyses of hemogram and plasma levels of alanine aminotransferase, aspartate transaminase, urea, and creatinine; and DNA fragmentation and cell cycle activity of the bone marrow cells. Furthermore, we investigated the potential of the SPN formulation to cause hemolysis, activate the complement system, provoke an inflammatory response and change the conformation of the plasma proteins. Our results showed that the SPN reduced the area of the surface tumor nodules but not the total number of tumor nodules. The biochemical and hematological findings were suggestive of the low systemic toxicity of the SPN formulation. The surface properties of the selol nanocapsules point to characteristics that are consistent with the treatment of the tumors in vivo: low hemolytic activity, weak inflammatory reaction with no activation of the complement system, and mild or absent conformational changes of the plasma proteins. In conclusion, this report suggests that the SPN formulation investigated herein exhibits anti-tumoral effects against lung adenocarcinoma in vivo and is associated with low systemic toxicity and high biocompatibility. (paper)

  16. Recombinant production of a chimeric antimicrobial peptide in E. coli and assessment of its activity against some avian clinically isolated pathogens.

    Tanhaiean, Abass; Azghandi, Marjan; Razmyar, Jamshid; Mohammadi, Elyas; Sekhavati, Mohammad Hadi

    2018-06-08

    Over the last decades, poultry industry faced to the rapid emergence of multidrug-resistant bacteria as a global concern. Antimicrobial peptide (AMPs) known as potential antibiotic alternative and were considered as a new antimicrobial agent. Current methods of production and purification of AMPs have several limitations such as: costly, time-consuming and killing the producing host cells in recombinant form. In the present study, a chimeric peptide derived from camel lactoferrin was produced in Escherichia coli periplasmic space using a pET-based expression system and its antibacterial activity was determined on some avian pathogens in vitro. A carboxy-terminal polyhistidine tag was used for purification by Ni 2+ affinity chromatography with an average yield of 0.42 g/L. The His-tagged chimeric peptide showed different range of antimicrobial activity against clinically isolated avian pathogens with low chicken blood hemolysis activity and high serum stability. Overall, the results of this investigation showed the recombinant chimeric peptide was successfully expressed in pET-based expression system and could be considered as a proper alternative for some currently used antibiotics in poultry industry and drugs veterinary medicine. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Active Teachers - Active Students

    as an initiative from the Polytechnic in Nantes, France and the University the Los Andes in Bogota, Colombia. The objective was to start a world wide collaboration allowing teachers in engineering to learn from each other about their experiences with active learning. In this thirteenth edition, ALE joins forces...... with the International Research Symposium on Problem Based Learning (IRSPB) and the International Symposium on Project Approaches in Engineering Education (PAEE) to organise the first International Joint Conference on the Learner in Engineering Education (IJCLEE 2015) hosted by Mondragon University, in San Sebastian...

  18. Is activation analysis still active?

    Chai Zhifang

    2001-01-01

    This paper reviews some aspects of neutron activation analysis (NAA), covering instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA), k 0 method, prompt gamma-ray neutron activation analysis (PGNAA), radiochemical neutron activation analysis (RNAA) and molecular activation analysis (MAA). The comparison of neutron activation analysis with other analytical techniques are also made. (author)

  19. Electrochemical corrosion and bioactivity of Ti-Nb-Sn-hydroxyapatite composites fabricated by pulse current activated sintering.

    Xiaopeng, Wang; Fantao, Kong; Biqing, Han; Yuyong, Chen

    2017-11-01

    Ti-Nb-Sn-hydroxyapatite (HA) composites were prepared by mechanical alloying for different times (unmilled, 4, 8 and 12h), followed by pulse current activated sintering. The effects of the milling time on the electrochemical corrosion resistance and bioactivity of the sintered Ti-35Nb-2.5Sn-15HA composites were investigated. Potentiodynamic polarization test results indicated that the sintered Ti-35Nb-2.5Sn-15HA composites exhibited higher corrosion resistance with increasing milling time. The corrosion potential and current of the Ti-35Nb-2.5Sn-15HA composite sintered by 12h milled powders were - 0.261V and 0.18μA/cm 2 , respectively, and this sintered composite showed a stable and wide passivation region. The hemolysis rate of the sintered Ti-35Nb-2.5Sn-15HA composites reduced with increasing milling time and the lowest hemolytic rate of the composites was 0.87%. In addition, the in vitro cell culture results indicated that the composite sintered by 12h milled powders had good biocompatibility. These results indicate the significant potential of Ti-35Nb-2.5Sn/xHA composites for biomedical implant applications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. In Vitro Antioxidant versus Metal Ion Chelating Properties of Flavonoids: A Structure-Activity Investigation

    Cherrak, Sabri Ahmed; Mokhtari-Soulimane, Nassima; Berroukeche, Farid; Bensenane, Bachir; Cherbonnel, Angéline; Merzouk, Hafida; Elhabiri, Mourad

    2016-01-01

    Natural flavonoids such as quercetin, (+)catechin and rutin as well as four methoxylated derivatives of quercetin used as models were investigated to elucidate their impact on the oxidant and antioxidant status of human red blood cells (RBCs). The impact of these compounds against metal toxicity was studied as well as their antiradical activities with DPPH assay. Antihemolytic experiments were conducted on quercetin, (+)catechin and rutin with excess of Fe, Cu and Zn (400 μM), and the oxidant (malondialdehyde, carbonyl proteins) and antioxidant (reduced glutathione, catalase activity) markers were evaluated. The results showed that Fe and Zn have the highest prooxidant effect (37 and 33% of hemolysis, respectively). Quercetin, rutin and (+)catechin exhibited strong antioxidant properties toward Fe, but this effect was decreased with respect to Zn ions. However, the Cu showed a weak antioxidant effect at the highest flavonoid concentration (200 μM), while a prooxidant effect was observed at the lowest flavonoid concentration (100 μM). These results are in agreement with the physico-chemical and antiradical data which demonstrated that binding of the metal ions (for FeNTA: (+)Catechin, KLFeNTA = 1.6(1) × 106 M-1 > Rutin, KLFeNTA = 2.0(9) × 105 M-1 > Quercetin, KLFeNTA = 1.0(7) × 105 M-1 > Q35OH, KLFeNTA = 6.3(8.7) × 104 M-1 > Quercetin3’4’OH and Quercetin 3OH, KLFeNTA ~ 2 × 104 M-1) reflects the (anti)oxidant status of the RBCs. This study reveals that flavonoids have both prooxidant and antioxidant activity depending on the nature and concentration of the flavonoids and metal ions. PMID:27788249

  1. Anti-diabetic activity of Holothuria thomasi saponin.

    El Barky, Amira R; Hussein, Samy A; Alm-Eldeen, Abeer A; Hafez, Yehia A; Mohamed, Tarek M

    2016-12-01

    Diabetes mellitus represents a global health problem. It characterized by hyperglycemia that induces oxidative stress leading to a generation of free radicals. A wide variety of natural products in plants and other marine animals represent antioxidant activity and other health benefits like those of sea cucumber. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate the antidiabetic activity of glycosidic compound - saponin - derived from the Egyptian sea cucumber, Holothuria thomasi. Saponin has been extracted from the Egyptian sea cucumber and confirmed by hemolysis, Salkowski tests, FT/IR, UV and GC-MS analysis. Eighty white female albino rats were divided into four equal groups. The first two groups of rats; control normal and control normal saponin-treated groups. The last two groups which were made diabetic by intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin had one diabetic control and the other diabetic group that got 300mg/kg B.wt. of saponin extract after Thirty-five days after diabetes induction and lasted for six weeks. The functional group of saponin extract which established with FT/IR spectroscopy demonstrated the presence of saponin in the extracted materials as shown in the peak of the functional group in relevance to the standard one. The UV spectra revealed that λ max of saponin extract was 282nm which in accordance to the standard saponin. Also, GC-MS analysis indicated that the aglycone part of saponin was methyl esters of octadecanoic acid. Saponin extract significantly decreased serum glucose, α-amylase activity, adiponectin, IL-6, TNF-α concentrations and liver L-MDA. However, serum insulin and liver glycogen levels were significantly increased as compared with the diabetic non-treated groups. The histopathological results supported that saponin extract markedly reduced the degenerative change in β-cells. This study, therefore, depicts that the Egyptian Holothuria thomasi, sea cucumber saponin as a hypoglycemic agent with the potential to normalize

  2. One-dimensional poly(L-lysine)-block-poly(L-threonine) assemblies exhibit potent anticancer activity by enhancing membranolysis.

    Chen, Yu-Fon; Shiau, Ai-Li; Chang, Sue-Joan; Fan, Nai-Shin; Wang, Chung-Teng; Wu, Chao-Liang; Jan, Jeng-Shiung

    2017-06-01

    Herein, we report the oncolytic activity of cationic, one-dimensional (1D) fibril assemblies formed from coil-sheet poly(L-lysine)-block-poly(L-threonine) (PLL-b-PLT) block copolypeptides for cancer therapy. The 1D fibril assemblies can efficiently interact with negatively charged cellular and mitochondrial membranes via electrostatic interactions, leading to necrosis via membrane lysis and apoptosis via the mitochondria-lytic effect. The concept is analogous to that of 1D drug carriers that exhibit enhanced cell penetration. In comparison to free PLL chains, PLL-b-PLT fibril assemblies exhibit selective cytotoxicity toward cancer cells, low hemolysis activity, enhanced membranolytic activity, and a different apoptosis pathway, which may be due to differences in the peptide-membrane interactions. Antitumor studies using a metastatic LL2 lung carcinoma model indicate that the fibril assemblies significantly inhibited tumor growth, improved survival in tumor-bearing mice and suppressed lung metastasis without obvious body weight loss. An additive efficacy was also observed for treatment with both PLL-b-PLT and cisplatin. These results support the feasibility of using 1D fibril assemblies as potential apoptotic anticancer therapeutics. We report that cationic, one-dimensional (1D) fibril assemblies formed by coil-sheet poly(L-lysine)-block-poly(L-threonine) (PLL-b-PLT) block copolypeptides exhibited potent anticancer activity by enhancing membranolysis. The 1D fibril assemblies can efficiently interact with negatively charged cellular and mitochondrial membranes via electrostatic interactions, leading to necrosis via membrane lysis and apoptosis via mitochondria-lytic effect. Moreover, the fibril assemblies exhibited low hemolytic activity and selective cytotoxicity toward cancer cell, which is advantageous as compared to PLL and most antimicrobial/anticancerous peptides. This study provides a new concept of using cationic, 1D fibril assemblies for cancer therapy

  3. Functional Elucidation of Nemopilema nomurai and Cyanea nozakii Nematocyst Venoms’ Lytic Activity Using Mass Spectrometry and Zymography

    Yue, Yang; Yu, Huahua; Li, Rongfeng; Xing, Ronge; Liu, Song; Li, Kecheng; Wang, Xueqin; Chen, Xiaolin; Li, Pengcheng

    2017-01-01

    Background: Medusozoans utilize explosively discharging penetrant nematocysts to inject venom into prey. These venoms are composed of highly complex proteins and peptides with extensive bioactivities, as observed in vitro. Diverse enzymatic toxins have been putatively identified in the venom of jellyfish, Nemopilema nomurai and Cyanea nozakii, through examination of their proteomes and transcriptomes. However, functional examination of putative enzymatic components identified in proteomic approaches to elucidate potential bioactivities is critically needed. Methods: In this study, enzymatic toxins were functionally identified using a combined approach consisting of in gel zymography and liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). The potential roles of metalloproteinases and lipases in hemolytic activity were explored using specific inhibitors. Results: Zymography indicated that nematocyst venom possessed protease-, lipase- and hyaluronidase-class activities. Further, proteomic approaches using LC-MS/MS indicated sequence homology of proteolytic bands observed in zymography to extant zinc metalloproteinase-disintegrins and astacin metalloproteinases. Moreover, pre-incubation of the metalloproteinase inhibitor batimastat with N. nomurai nematocyst venom resulted in an approximate 62% reduction of hemolysis compared to venom exposed sheep erythrocytes, suggesting that metalloproteinases contribute to hemolytic activity. Additionally, species within the molecular mass range of 14–18 kDa exhibited both egg yolk and erythrocyte lytic activities in gel overlay assays. Conclusion: For the first time, our findings demonstrate the contribution of jellyfish venom metalloproteinase and suggest the involvement of lipase species to hemolytic activity. Investigations of this relationship will facilitate a better understanding of the constituents and toxicity of jellyfish venom. PMID:28134758

  4. Heme exporter FLVCR1a regulates heme synthesis and degradation and controls activity of cytochromes P450.

    Vinchi, Francesca; Ingoglia, Giada; Chiabrando, Deborah; Mercurio, Sonia; Turco, Emilia; Silengo, Lorenzo; Altruda, Fiorella; Tolosano, Emanuela

    2014-05-01

    The liver has one of the highest rates of heme synthesis of any organ. More than 50% of the heme synthesized in the liver is used for synthesis of P450 enzymes, which metabolize exogenous and endogenous compounds that include natural products, hormones, drugs, and carcinogens. Feline leukemia virus subgroup C cellular receptor 1a (FLVCR1a) is plasma membrane heme exporter that is ubiquitously expressed and controls intracellular heme content in hematopoietic lineages. We investigated the role of Flvcr1a in liver function in mice. We created mice with conditional disruption of Mfsd7b, which encodes Flvcr1a, in hepatocytes (Flvcr1a(fl/fl);alb-cre mice). Mice were analyzed under basal conditions, after phenylhydrazine-induced hemolysis, and after induction of cytochromes P450 synthesis. Livers were collected and analyzed by histologic, quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, and immunoblot analyses. Hepatic P450 enzymatic activities were measured. Flvcr1a(fl/fl);alb-cre mice accumulated heme and iron in liver despite up-regulation of heme oxygenase 1, ferroportin, and ferritins. Hepatic heme export activity of Flvcr1a was closely associated with heme biosynthesis, which is required to sustain cytochrome induction. Upon cytochromes P450 stimulation, Flvcr1a(fl/fl);alb-cre mice had reduced cytochrome activity, associated with accumulation of heme in hepatocytes. The expansion of the cytosolic heme pool in these mice was likely responsible for the early inhibition of heme synthesis and increased degradation of heme, which reduced expression and activity of cytochromes P450. In livers of mice, Flvcr1a maintains a free heme pool that regulates heme synthesis and degradation as well as cytochromes P450 expression and activity. These findings have important implications for drug metabolism. Copyright © 2014 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Heme Exporter FLVCR1a Regulates Heme Synthesis and Degradation and Controls Activity of Cytochromes P450

    Vinchi, Francesca; Ingoglia, Giada; Chiabrando, Deborah; Mercurio, Sonia; Turco, Emilia; Silengo, Lorenzo; Altruda, Fiorella; Tolosano, Emanuela

    2014-01-01

    Background & Aims The liver has one of the highest rates of heme synthesis of any organ. More than 50% of the heme synthesized in the liver is used for synthesis of P450 enzymes, which metabolize exogenous and endogenous compounds that include natural products, hormones, drugs, and carcinogens. Feline leukemia virus subgroup C cellular receptor 1a (FLVCR1a) is plasma membrane heme exporter that is ubiquitously expressed and controls intracellular heme content in hematopoietic lineages. We investigated the role of Flvcr1a in liver function in mice. Methods We created mice with conditional disruption of Mfsd7b, which encodes Flvcr1a, in hepatocytes (Flvcr1afl/fl;alb-cre mice). Mice were analyzed under basal conditions, after phenylhydrazine-induced hemolysis, and after induction of cytochromes P450 synthesis. Livers were collected and analyzed by histologic, quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, and immunoblot analyses. Hepatic P450 enzymatic activities were measured. Results Flvcr1afl/fl;alb-cre mice accumulated heme and iron in liver despite up-regulation of heme oxygenase 1, ferroportin, and ferritins. Hepatic heme export activity of Flvcr1a was closely associated with heme biosynthesis, which is required to sustain cytochrome induction. Upon cytochromes P450 stimulation, Flvcr1afl/fl;alb-cre mice had reduced cytochrome activity, associated with accumulation of heme in hepatocytes. The expansion of the cytosolic heme pool in these mice was likely responsible for the early inhibition of heme synthesis and increased degradation of heme, which reduced expression and activity of cytochromes P450. Conclusions In livers of mice, Flvcr1a maintains a free heme pool that regulates heme synthesis and degradation as well as cytochromes P450 expression and activity. These findings have important implications for drug metabolism. PMID:24486949

  6. Functional Elucidation of Nemopilema nomurai and Cyanea nozakii Nematocyst Venoms’ Lytic Activity Using Mass Spectrometry and Zymography

    Yang Yue

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Medusozoans utilize explosively discharging penetrant nematocysts to inject venom into prey. These venoms are composed of highly complex proteins and peptides with extensive bioactivities, as observed in vitro. Diverse enzymatic toxins have been putatively identified in the venom of jellyfish, Nemopilema nomurai and Cyanea nozakii, through examination of their proteomes and transcriptomes. However, functional examination of putative enzymatic components identified in proteomic approaches to elucidate potential bioactivities is critically needed. Methods: In this study, enzymatic toxins were functionally identified using a combined approach consisting of in gel zymography and liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS. The potential roles of metalloproteinases and lipases in hemolytic activity were explored using specific inhibitors. Results: Zymography indicated that nematocyst venom possessed protease-, lipase- and hyaluronidase-class activities. Further, proteomic approaches using LC-MS/MS indicated sequence homology of proteolytic bands observed in zymography to extant zinc metalloproteinase-disintegrins and astacin metalloproteinases. Moreover, pre-incubation of the metalloproteinase inhibitor batimastat with N. nomurai nematocyst venom resulted in an approximate 62% reduction of hemolysis compared to venom exposed sheep erythrocytes, suggesting that metalloproteinases contribute to hemolytic activity. Additionally, species within the molecular mass range of 14–18 kDa exhibited both egg yolk and erythrocyte lytic activities in gel overlay assays. Conclusion: For the first time, our findings demonstrate the contribution of jellyfish venom metalloproteinase and suggest the involvement of lipase species to hemolytic activity. Investigations of this relationship will facilitate a better understanding of the constituents and toxicity of jellyfish venom.

  7. Nanoparticles as Antituberculosis Drugs Carriers: Effect on Activity Against Mycobacterium tuberculosis in Human Monocyte-Derived Macrophages

    Anisimova, Y.V.; Gelperina, S.I.; Peloquin, C.A.; Heifets, L.B.

    2000-01-01

    This is the first report evaluating the nanoparticle delivery system for three antituberculosis drugs: isoniazid, rifampin, and streptomycin. The typical particle size is 250 nm. We studied accumulation of these drugs in human monocytes as well as their antimicrobial activity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis residing in human monocyte-derived macrophages. Nanoparticle encapsulation increased the intracellular accumulation (cell-association) of all three tested drugs, but it enhanced the antimicrobial activity of isoniazid and streptomycin only. On the other hand, the activity of encapsulated rifampin against intracellular bacteria was not higher than that of the free drug

  8. Antitoxin activity of aqueous extract of Cyclea peltata root against Naja naja venom.

    Sivaraman, Thulasi; Sreedevi, N S; Meenatchisundaram, S; Vadivelan, R

    2017-01-01

    Snakebites are a significant and severe global health problem. Till date, anti-snake venom serum is the only beneficial remedy existing on treating the snakebite victims. As antivenom was reported to induce early or late adverse reactions to human beings, snake venom neutralizing potential for Cyclea peltata root extract was tested for the present research by ex vivo and in vivo approaches on Naja naja toxin. Ex vivo evaluation of venom toxicity and neutralization assays was carried out. The root extracts from C. peltata were used to evaluate the Ex vivo neutralization tests such as acetylcholinesterase, protease, direct hemolysis assay, phospholipase activity, and procoagulant activity. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis from root extracts of C. peltata was done to investigate the bioactive compounds. The in vivo calculation of venom toxicity (LD 50 ) of N. naja venom remained to be 0.301 μg. C. peltata root extracts were efficiently deactivated the venom lethality, and effective dose (ED 50 ) remained to be 7.24 mg/3LD 50 of N. naja venom. C. peltata root extract was found effective in counteracting all the lethal effects of venom. GC-MS analysis of the plant extract revealed the presence of antivenom compounds such as tetradecanoic and octadecadienoic acid which have neutralizing properties on N. naja venom. The result from the ex vivo and in vivo analysis indicates that C. peltata plant root extract possesses significant compounds such as tetradecanoic acid hexadecanoic acid, heptadecanoic acid, and octadecadienoic acid which can counteract the toxins present in N. naja .

  9. The cellular responses and antibacterial activities of silver nanoparticles stabilized by different polymers

    Lin, Jiang-Jen; Lin, Wen-Chun; Dong, Rui-Xuan; Hsu, Shan-hui

    2012-02-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) are known for their excellent antibacterial activities. The possible toxicity, however, is a major concern for their applications. Three types of AgNPs were prepared in this study by chemical processes. Each was stabilized by a polymer surfactant, which was expected to reduce the exposure of cells to AgNPs and therefore their cytotoxicity. The polymer stabilizers included poly(oxyethylene)-segmented imide (POEM), poly(styrene-co-maleic anhydride)-grafting poly(oxyalkylene) (SMA) and poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA). The cytotoxicity of these chemically produced AgNPs to mouse skin fibroblasts (L929), human hepatocarcinoma cells (HepG2), and mouse monocyte macrophages (J774A1) was compared to that of physically produced AgNPs and gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) as well as the standard reference material RM8011 AuNPs. Results showed that SMA-AgNPs were the least cytotoxic among all materials, but cytotoxicity was still observed at higher silver concentrations (>30 ppm). Macrophages demonstrated the inflammatory response with cell size increase and viability decrease upon exposure to 10 ppm of the chemically produced AgNPs. SMA-AgNPs did not induce hemolysis at a silver concentration below 1.5 ppm. Regarding the antibacterial activity, POEM-AgNPs and SMA-AgNPs at 1 ppm silver content showed 99.9% and 99.3% growth inhibition against E. coli, while PVA-AgNPs at the same silver concentration displayed 79.1% inhibition. Overall, SMA-AgNPs demonstrated better safety in vitro and greater antibacterial effects than POEM-AgNPs and PVA-AgNPs. This study suggested that polymer stabilizers may play an important role in determining the toxicity of AgNPs.

  10. Metabolic activity is necessary for activation of T suppressor cells by B cells

    Elkins, K.L.; Stashak, P.W.; Baker, P.J.

    1990-01-01

    Ag-primed B cells must express cell-surface IgM, but not IgD or Ia Ag, and must remain metabolically active, in order to activate suppressor T cells (Ts) specific for type III pneumococcal polysaccharide. Ag-primed B cells that were gamma-irradiated with 1000r, or less, retained the ability to activate Ts; however, Ag-primed B cells exposed to UV light were not able to do so. gamma-Irradiated and UV-treated Ag-primed B cells both expressed comparable levels of cell-surface IgM, and both localized to the spleen after in vivo transfer; neither could proliferate in vitro in response to mitogens. By contrast, gamma-irradiated primed B cells were still able to synthesize proteins, whereas UV-treated primed B cells could not. These findings suggest that in order for Ag-primed B cells to activate Ts, they must (a) express cell-associated IgM (sIgM) antibody bearing the idiotypic determinants of antibody specific for type III pneumococcal polysaccharide, and (b) be able to synthesize protein for either the continued expression of sIgM after cell transfer, or for the elaboration of another protein molecule that is also required for the activation of Ts; this molecule does not appear to be Ia Ag

  11. Activated Charcoal

    Common charcoal is made from peat, coal, wood, coconut shell, or petroleum. “Activated charcoal” is similar to common charcoal, but is made especially for use as a medicine. To make activated charcoal, manufacturers heat common ...

  12. MATERNAL HEMOLYSIS, ELEVATED LIVER-ENZYMES AND LOW PLATELETS SYNDROME - SPECIFIC PROBLEMS IN THE NEWBORN

    EELTINK, CM; VANLINGEN, RA; AARNOUDSE, JG; DERKS, JB; OKKEN, A

    To evaluate the effects of maternal haemolysis, elevated liver enzymes and low platelets (HELLP) syndrome on the fetus and neonate we retrospectively investigated the outcome of 87 pregnancies. All women showed thrombocytopenia, elevated liver enzymes and haemolysis. None of them died. Nine infants

  13. Evidence of hemolysis in pigs infected with highly virulent African swine fever virus

    Zaven Karalyan

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The research was conducted to understand more profoundly the pathogenetic aspects of the acute form of the African swine fever (ASF. Materials and Methods: A total of 10 pigs were inoculated with ASF virus (ASFV (genotype II in the study of the red blood cells (RBCs, blood and urine biochemistry in the dynamics of disease. Results: The major hematological differences observed in ASFV infected pigs were that the mean corpuscular volume, mean corpuscular hemoglobin, and hematocrits were significantly decreased compared to controls, and the levels of erythropoietin were significantly increased. Also were detected the trends of decrease in RBC count at terminal stages of ASF. Analysis of blood biochemistry revealed that during ASF development, besides bilirubinemia significantly elevated levels of lactate dehydrogenase, and aspartate aminotransferase were detected. Analysis of urine biochemistry revealed the presence of bilirubinuria, proteinuria during ASF development. Proteinuria, especially at late stages of the disease reflects a severe kidney damage possible glomerulonefritis. Conclusion: The results of this study indicate the characteristics of developing hemolytic anemia observed in acute ASF (genotype II.

  14. Hemolysis, hemorrhage, headache, and hidden abortion: imaging findings in antiphospholipid syndrome

    Mahnken, A.H.; Brandenburg, V.M.; Haage, P.; Guenther, R.W. [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Univ. Hospital, Univ. of Technology, Aachen (Germany); Frank, R.D. [Dept. of Nephrology and Immunology, Univ. of Technology, Aachen (Germany)

    2003-12-01

    Antiphospholipid antibodies are associated with arterial and venous thromboses, recurrent pregnancy loss, and organ infarction. Any vascular region can be affected. We present a 20-year-old woman suffering from secondary antiphospholipid syndrome with a unique combination of multifocal venous thromboses, pulmonary embolism, spontaneous abortion, and splenic infarction. Diversity of clinical symptoms and diagnostic imaging modalities are discussed with emphasis on cross-sectional imaging. The syndrome should be suspected in patients with thromboses and organ infarctions of otherwise undetermined etiology. (orig.)

  15. Hemolysis, hemorrhage, headache, and hidden abortion: imaging findings in antiphospholipid syndrome

    Mahnken, A.H.; Brandenburg, V.M.; Haage, P.; Guenther, R.W.; Frank, R.D.

    2003-01-01

    Antiphospholipid antibodies are associated with arterial and venous thromboses, recurrent pregnancy loss, and organ infarction. Any vascular region can be affected. We present a 20-year-old woman suffering from secondary antiphospholipid syndrome with a unique combination of multifocal venous thromboses, pulmonary embolism, spontaneous abortion, and splenic infarction. Diversity of clinical symptoms and diagnostic imaging modalities are discussed with emphasis on cross-sectional imaging. The syndrome should be suspected in patients with thromboses and organ infarctions of otherwise undetermined etiology. (orig.)

  16. Hemolysis of the red cell : Towards improved understanding of hereditary hemolytic anemia and new diagnostics

    Huisjes, Henk Rick

    2018-01-01

    The condition in which in the oxygen-carrying capacity of RBCs or their number is insufficient to meet physiological needs is characterized as anemia. Anemia is an underestimated burden of disease and despite that the vast majority of anemia is caused by iron deficiency, a substantial number of

  17. A case of asymptomatic pancytopenia with clinical features of hemolysis as a presentation of pernicious anemia

    Venkateswara K. Kollipara

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Pernicious anemia is an autoimmune disease with a variety of clinical presentations. We describe a case of pernicious anemia presenting with pancytopenia with hemolytic features. Further workup revealed very low vitamin B12 levels and elevated methylmalonic acid. It is important for a general internist to identify pernicious anemia as one of the cause of pancytopenia and hemolytic anemia to avoid extensive workup. Pernicious anemia can present strictly with hematological abnormalities without neurological problems or vice versa as in our case.

  18. Experimental studies on hemolysis following extracorporcal blood irradiation in sheep and goat

    Heilmann, E.; Vogel, M.; Richter, K.D.; Widmer, H.W.

    1978-01-01

    In experimental studies extracorporal blood irradiation was performed in 3 sheep and 1 goat by means of a 500 Ci 137 Cs source. The sheep died of the sequelae of narcosis, with anemia being only moderately marked. In the goat a transit dosis of 466,566 rad could be applied before the animal died of the sequelae of hemolytic anemia. (author)

  19. Surface-bound capsular polysaccharide of type Ia group B Streptococcus mediates C1 binding and activation of the classic complement pathway

    Levy, N.J.; Kasper, D.L.

    1986-01-01

    The role of surface-bound type Ia group B Streptococcus (GBS) capsular polysaccharide in anti-body-independent binding of C1 and activation of the classic component pathway was investigated. In a radiolabeled bacterial-polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN) association assay, a measure of bacterial opsonization, preincubation of 3 H-type Ia GBS with purified F(ab') 2 to the organism blocked the association of the bacteria with PMN', and the inhibitory effect was dose dependent. The specificity of F(ab') 2 blocking was shown after adsorption of F(ab') 2 with type Ia polysaccharide-sensitized erythrocytes. Polysaccharide-adsorbed F(ab') 2 had a 70% decrease in ability to block the association of bacteria with PMN. Neuraminidase digestion removed 80% of the terminal sialic acid residues from the native polysaccharide. These neuraminidase-digested organisms had a 72% decrease in binding and transfer of purified C1 compared with non-enzyme-treated organisms. Type Ia capsular polysaccharide bound to sheep erythrocytes promoted classic complement pathway-mediated hemolysis of the cells. The role of C1 inhibitor (INH) in modulation of C1 activation by the organisms was investigated. The possibility existed that the C1 INH could be bound by the bacteria, allowing C1 activation to occur in the fluid phase. The inhibitor was purified from human serum, and its activity was measured before and after incubation with type Ia GBS. The organisms had no effect on C1 INH activity. Thus surface-bound capsular polysacchardie of type Ia GBS mediates C1 binding and classic pathway activation, and this does not involve the C1 INH

  20. Topical application of zinc oxide nanoparticles reduces bacterial skin infection in mice and exhibits antibacterial activity by inducing oxidative stress response and cell membrane disintegration in macrophages.

    Pati, Rashmirekha; Mehta, Ranjit Kumar; Mohanty, Soumitra; Padhi, Avinash; Sengupta, Mitali; Vaseeharan, Baskarlingam; Goswami, Chandan; Sonawane, Avinash

    2014-08-01

    Here we studied immunological and antibacterial mechanisms of zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO-NPs) against human pathogens. ZnO-NPs showed more activity against Staphylococcus aureus and least against Mycobacterium bovis-BCG. However, BCG killing was significantly increased in synergy with antituberculous-drug rifampicin. Antibacterial mechanistic studies showed that ZnO-NPs disrupt bacterial cell membrane integrity, reduce cell surface hydrophobicity and down-regulate the transcription of oxidative stress-resistance genes in bacteria. ZnO-NP treatment also augmented the intracellular bacterial killing by inducing reactive oxygen species production and co-localization with Mycobacterium smegmatis-GFP in macrophages. Moreover, ZnO-NPs disrupted biofilm formation and inhibited hemolysis by hemolysin toxin producing S. aureus. Intradermal administration of ZnO-NPs significantly reduced the skin infection, bacterial load and inflammation in mice, and also improved infected skin architecture. We envision that this study offers novel insights into antimicrobial actions of ZnO-NPs and also demonstrates ZnO-NPs as a novel class of topical anti-infective agent for the treatment of skin infections. This in-depth study demonstrates properties of ZnO nanoparticles in infection prevention and treatment in several skin infection models, dissecting the potential mechanisms of action of these nanoparticles and paving the way to human applications. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Purification and in vitro antioxidant activities of tellurium-containing phycobiliproteins from tellurium-enriched Spirulina platensis

    Yang F

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Fang Yang,1 Ka-Hing Wong,2 Yufeng Yang,3 Xiaoling Li,1 Jie Jiang,1 Wenjie Zheng,1 Hualian Wu,1 Tianfeng Chen1 1Department of Chemistry, Jinan University, Guangzhou, People’s Republic of China; 2Department of Applied Biology and Chemical Technology, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong, People’s Republic of China; 3Institute of Hydrobiology, College of Life Science and Technology, Jinan University, Guangzhou, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Tellurium-containing phycocyanin (Te-PC and allophycocyanin (Te-APC, two organic tellurium (Te species, were purified from tellurium-enriched Spirulina platensis by a fast protein liquid chromatographic method. It was found that the incorporation of Te into the peptides enhanced the antioxidant activities of both phycobiliproteins. With fractionation by ammonium sulfate precipitation and hydroxylapatite chromatography, Te-PC and Te-APC could be effectively separated with high purity, and Te concentrations were 611.1 and 625.3 µg g-1 protein in Te-PC and Te-APC, respectively. The subunits in the proteins were identified by using MALDI-TOF-TOF mass spectrometry. Te incorporation enhanced the antioxidant activities of both phycobiliproteins, as examined by 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulphonic acid assay. Moreover, Te-PC and Te-APC showed dose-dependent protection on erythrocytes against the water-soluble free radical initiator 2,2'-azo(2-asmidinopropanedihydrochloride-induced hemolysis. In the hepatoprotective model, apoptotic cell death and nuclear condensation induced by tert-butyl hydroperoxide in HepG2 cells was significantly attenuated by Te-PC and Te-APC. Taken together, these results suggest that Te-PC and Te-APC are promising Te-containing proteins with application potential for treatment of diseases related to oxidative stress. Keywords: tellurium, phycocyanin, allophycocyanin, purification, antioxidant activity

  2. Hepatitis C virus NS3/4A protease inhibits complement activation by cleaving complement component 4.

    Seiichi Mawatari

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: It has been hypothesized that persistent hepatitis C virus (HCV infection is mediated in part by viral proteins that abrogate the host immune response, including the complement system, but the precise mechanisms are not well understood. We investigated whether HCV proteins are involved in the fragmentation of complement component 4 (C4, composed of subunits C4α, C4β, and C4γ, and the role of HCV proteins in complement activation. METHODS: Human C4 was incubated with HCV nonstructural (NS 3/4A protease, core, or NS5. Samples were separated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and then subjected to peptide sequencing. The activity of the classical complement pathway was examined using an erythrocyte hemolysis assay. The cleavage pattern of C4 in NS3/4A-expressing and HCV-infected cells, respectively, was also examined. RESULTS: HCV NS3/4A protease cleaved C4γ in a concentration-dependent manner, but viral core and NS5 did not. A specific inhibitor of NS3/4A protease reduced C4γ cleavage. NS3/4A protease-mediated cleavage of C4 inhibited classical pathway activation, which was abrogated by a NS3/4A protease inhibitor. In addition, co-transfection of cells with C4 and wild-type NS3/4A, but not a catalytic-site mutant of NS3/4A, produced cleaved C4γ fragments. Such C4 processing, with a concomitant reduction in levels of full-length C4γ, was also observed in HCV-infected cells expressing C4. CONCLUSIONS: C4 is a novel cellular substrate of the HCV NS3/4A protease. Understanding disturbances in the complement system mediated by NS3/4A protease may provide new insights into the mechanisms underlying persistent HCV infection.

  3. Oral administration of amphotericin B nanoparticles: antifungal activity, bioavailability and toxicity in rats.

    Radwan, Mahasen A; AlQuadeib, Bushra T; Šiller, Lidija; Wright, Matthew C; Horrocks, Benjamin

    2017-11-01

    Amphotericin B (AMB) is used most commonly in severe systemic life-threatening fungal infections. There is currently an unmet need for an efficacious (AMB) formulation amenable to oral administration with better bioavailability and lower nephrotoxicity. Novel PEGylated polylactic-polyglycolic acid copolymer (PLGA-PEG) nanoparticles (NPs) formulations of AMB were therefore studied for their ability to kill Candida albicans (C. albicans). The antifungal activity of AMB formulations was assessed in C. albicans. Its bioavalability was investigated in nine groups of rats (n = 6). Toxicity was examined by an in vitro blood hemolysis assay, and in vivo nephrotoxicity after single and multiple dosing for a week by blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and plasma creatinine (PCr) measurements. The MIC of AMB loaded to PLGA-PEG NPs against C. albicans was reduced two to threefold compared with free AMB. Novel oral AMB delivery loaded to PLGA-PEG NPs was markedly systemically available compared to Fungizone® in rats. The addition of 2% of GA to the AMB formulation significantly (p bioavailability from 1.5 to 10.5% and the relative bioavailability was > 790% that of Fungizone®. The novel AMB formulations showed minimal toxicity and better efficacy compared to Fungizone®. No nephrotoxicity in rats was detected after a week of multiple dosing of AMB NPs based on BUN and PCr, which remained at normal levels. An oral delivery system of AMB-loaded to PLGA-PEG NPs with better efficacy and minimal toxicity was formulated. The addition of glycyrrhizic acid (GA) to AMB NPs formulation resulted in a significant oral absorption and improved bioavailability in rats.

  4. Active ageing

    Frode F. Jacobsen

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: The concept of active ageing has been gaining prominence in the Nordic countries and beyond. This has been reflected in policy papers in Norway and other Nordic nations. Aims: The aim of this article is to analyse the topic of active ageing in five Norwegian White Papers (2002 to 2015 and discuss those policy documents in context of relevant research literature. Methods: A qualitative document analyses is employed focusing on how active ageing, and ageing in general, is described and which concepts are employed. No ethical approval was needed. Findings: The general theme of ageing and the specific theme of active ageing are increasingly prominent in the Norwegian White Papers studied. In all documents, some assumptions regarding ageing and active ageing seem implicit, such as independence being more important than (interdependence. ‘Productive’ activities like participation in working life are stressed, while others, like reading, watching TV or watching children playing in the street, are ignored. Conclusions: The policy documents demonstrate that the topic of active ageing is growing in importance. The documents increasingly seem to stress ‘productive’ activities – those related to working life, voluntary work or sports and physical training. They exclude activities that are meaningful for many older people, like watching their grandchildren play or reading books. Implications for practice: Practitioners in older people’s care could consider reflecting on: Government documents dealing with their own practice The prevalent concept of active ageing The trend of active ageing as a facilitating or hindering factor for good care work How present discourse on active ageing may influence their attitude towards frail older persons How they wish to relate to active ageing in their own practice

  5. Physical Activity

    Andersen, Lars Bo; Anderssen, Sigmund Alfred; Wisløff, Ulrik

    2014-01-01

    Andersen LB, Anderssen SA, Wisløff U, Hellénius M-L, Fogelholm M, Ekelund U. (Expert Group) Nordic Nutrition Recommendations 2012. Integrating nutrition and physical activity. Chapter: Physical Activity p. 195-217.Nordic Counsil of Ministers.......Andersen LB, Anderssen SA, Wisløff U, Hellénius M-L, Fogelholm M, Ekelund U. (Expert Group) Nordic Nutrition Recommendations 2012. Integrating nutrition and physical activity. Chapter: Physical Activity p. 195-217.Nordic Counsil of Ministers....

  6. Evaluation of Costus afer Ker Gawl. in vitro anti-inflammatory activity and its chemical constituents identiifed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis

    Godswill Nduka Anyasor; Onajobi Funmilayo; Osilesi Odutola; Adebawo Olugbenga; Efere Martins Oboutor

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To evaluate the anti-inflammatory activity of a tropical African medicinal plant, Costus afer (C. afer) Ker Gawl. in vitro and identify the chemical constituents in the most active fraction. Methods:Hexane, ethyl acetate, n-butanol and aqueous fractions obtained through successive solvent partitioning of 70%methanolic leaf or stem extracts of C. afer were subjected to in vitro anti-inflammatory screening assays viz. anti-denaturation of protein, stabilization of human red blood cell (HRBC) membrane against hypotonicity-induced hemolysis and anti-proteinase activities. Diclofenac sodium was used as a standard drug. The chemical compounds in the most active fraction were determined using quantitative phytochemical and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS) analytical methods, comparing the mass spectra of the GC/MS identified compounds with those of the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) database library. Results:The hexane fraction of C. afer leaf (HFCAL) with an IC50 of 33.36μg/mL, 33μg/mL and 212.77 μg/mL exhibited the highest anti-denaturation of protein, stabilization of HRBC membrane and anti-proteinase activities respectively when compared with other test fractions. The GC/MS identified compounds in HFCAL known to possess anti-inflammatory property were terpenoids (naphthalene 1,6-dimethyl-; naphthalene 2,3-dimethyl-; phytol), phenol [phenol 2,4-bis(1,1-dimethylethyl)], coumaran [2(4H)-benzofuranone, 5,6,7,7a-tetrahydro-4, 4,7atrimethyl and fatty acids (pentadecanoic acid;hexadecanoic acid;n-hexadecanoic acid;9,12-octadecanoic acid-methyl ester;9,12,15 octadecatrienoic acid and cis-vaccenic acid)]. Conclusion: Therefore, HFCAL could be considered as a potential source of anti-inflammatory agents for herbal formulation or pharmaceutical drug production.

  7. Activity report

    1990-11-01

    The Department of Physics and Measurement Technology, Biology and Chemistry (IFM) presents every year a progress report containing a brief description of activities in research and education within the department. The report is intended as an information for colleagues and institutions. The present report contains activities for the academic year July 1989 to June 1990

  8. E2A-positive gastric MALT lymphoma has weaker plasmacytoid infiltrates and stronger expression of the memory B-cell-associated miR-223: possible correlation with stage and treatment response.

    Liu, Ting-Yun; Chen, Shee-Uan; Kuo, Sung-Hsin; Cheng, Ann-Lii; Lin, Chung-Wu

    2010-11-01

    Extranodal marginal-zone lymphoma of mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue of the stomach (gastric MALT lymphoma) is derived from memory B cells of the marginal zone. Normal memory B cells do not express markers of germinal-center B cells, such as E2A (immunoglobulin enhancer-binding factor E12/E47), B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia/lymphoma 6 (BCL6), or activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID). E2A is a transcription factor that induces somatic hypermutations and blocks plasma cell differentiation. In 50 stage-I(E)/II(E1) gastric MALT lymphomas, we confirmed that all cases were BCL6(-)/AID(-), but a subset (50%, 25/50) was E2A(+). As E2A(-) and E2A(+) gastric MALT lymphomas had similar numbers of somatic hypermutations without intraclonal variations, which implied an origin from memory B cells, the expression of E2A was best regarded as a marker of aberrant follicular differentiation. Although the status of somatic hypermutation was not affected by E2A, E2A(+) gastric MALT lymphoma showed less plasmacytoid infiltrates and higher expressions of miRNA-223, a microRNA associated with memory B cells. Clinically, E2A(+) gastric MALT lymphomas were more likely to spread to perigastric lymph nodes and were less responsive to Helicobacter eradication therapy than were E2A(-) gastric MALT lymphomas. Taken together, aberrant E2A expression is a diagnostic feature of a subtype of gastric MALT lymphoma with weaker plasmacytoid infiltrates and stronger miR-223 expression. A prospective study would be necessary to verify the association between E2A expression and a poor response to Helicobacter eradication therapy.

  9. Candida albicans orf19.3727 encodes phytase activity and is essential for human tissue damage

    Fong, Wing-Ping; Samaranayake, Lakshman Perera

    2017-01-01

    Candida albicans is a clinically important human fungal pathogen. We previously identified the presence of cell-associated phytase activity in C. albicans. Here, we reveal for the first time, that orf19.3727 contributes to phytase activity in C. albicans and ultimately to its virulence potency. Compared with its wild type counterpart, disruption of C. albicans orf19.3727 led to decreased phytase activity, reduced ability to form hyphae, attenuated in vitro adhesion, and reduced ability to penetrate human epithelium, which are the major virulence attributes of this yeast. Thus, orf19.3727 of C. albicans plays a key role in fungal pathogenesis. Further, our data uncover a putative novel strategy for anti-Candidal drug design through inhibition of phytase activity of this common pathogen. PMID:29216308

  10. Visceral perfusion abnormalities following complement activation. Clues to the mediators of organ ischemia in trauma and sepsis. First place winner: Conrad Jobst Award.

    Schirmer, W J; Schirmer, J M; Naff, G B; Fry, D E

    1988-12-01

    Complement, activated during infection and injury, has been implicated as a mediator of microvascular injury and obstruction. This study examines how two potent activators of complement, zymosan, and cobra venom factor (CVF), affect systemic and visceral perfusion. Rats were injected with either saline (1 ml/kg), zymosan (5 mg/kg) or CVF (5 units/kg) at t = 0 and 30 minutes. Thermodilution cardiac output, mean arterial pressure, heart rate, systemic vascular resistance, and hematocrit were determined at t = 2 hours. Effective hepatic and renal blood flows, by clearance of galactose and p-aminohippurate respectively, were determined over the next hour. The per cent change in total hemolytic complement from t = 0 to t = 3 hours was determined by immune hemolysis of sheep erythrocytes. There was no difference in systemic hemodynamic parameters between the three groups. Hepatic blood flow was depressed in both the zymosan (3.83 +/- 0.23 ml/min/100 g) and CVF (3.72 +/- 0.20 ml/min/100 g) groups compared with controls (4.62 +/- 0.19 ml/min/100 g, P less than 0.05). Renal blood flow in the zymosan-treated group (6.40 +/- 0.24 ml/min/100 g) increased over control (4.80 +/- 0.40 ml/min/100 g, P less than 0.05) but was unchanged in the CVF group (5.06 +/- 0.23 ml/min/100 g). The amount of complement activated correlated with the change in hepatic (r = -0.419, P less than 0.05) but not renal (r = -0.008, P = 0.917) flow. Complement activation may occupy a proximal position in the pathogenesis of hepatic ischemia associated with trauma and sepsis.

  11. [Active euthanasia].

    Folker, A P; Hvidt, N

    1995-02-20

    The growing interest in the subject of active euthanasia in connection with the debate regarding legalization of such practices in Denmark necessitates taking a definite standpoint. The difference in concept between active and passive euthanasia is stressed, and the Dutch guidelines are reviewed. The article discusses how far the patient's autonomy should go, as it regards the consideration of self-determination as being too narrow a criterion in itself. The discussion on the quality of life is included, and the consequences of the process of expulsion as a sociological concept are considered--the risk of a patient feeling guilty for being alive and therefore feeling compelled to request active euthanasia. The changed function of the physician is underlined, and it is discussed whether active euthansia will cause a breach of confidence between the physician and his patient. In connection with the debate the following tendencies in society are emphasized: lack of clarity, increasing medicalization and utilitarian priorities.

  12. Active colloids

    Aranson, Igor S

    2013-01-01

    A colloidal suspension is a heterogeneous fluid containing solid microscopic particles. Colloids play an important role in our everyday life, from food and pharmaceutical industries to medicine and nanotechnology. It is useful to distinguish two major classes of colloidal suspensions: equilibrium and active, i.e., maintained out of thermodynamic equilibrium by external electric or magnetic fields, light, chemical reactions, or hydrodynamic shear flow. While the properties of equilibrium colloidal suspensions are fairly well understood, active colloids pose a formidable challenge, and the research is in its early exploratory stage. One of the most remarkable properties of active colloids is the possibility of dynamic self-assembly, a natural tendency of simple building blocks to organize into complex functional architectures. Examples range from tunable, self-healing colloidal crystals and membranes to self-assembled microswimmers and robots. Active colloidal suspensions may exhibit material properties not present in their equilibrium counterparts, e.g., reduced viscosity and enhanced self-diffusivity, etc. This study surveys the most recent developments in the physics of active colloids, both in synthetic and living systems, with the aim of elucidation of the fundamental physical mechanisms governing self-assembly and collective behavior. (physics of our days)

  13. Microbial stasis of Leishmania enriettii in activated guinea pig macrophages

    Groocock, C.M.; Soulsby, E.J.L.

    1980-01-01

    Peritoneal exudate cells (PEC) from Leishmania-sensitized guinea pigs were cultured in vitro in the presence (activated) or absence (non-activated) of leishmanial antigen for 24 or 48 hours. These were then labelled with 51 Cr and challenged with 125 I-labelled promastigotes. The changing relationship between the macrophage and the parasite was monitored by observing changes in the ratio of the cell-associated isotopes. Highly significant differences in the ratio change developed during culture. These differences were a result of the activated cultures showing a higher release of 51 Cr and a lower release of 125 I when compared with the non-activated cells, at 12 hours the percentage release of 125 I from the parasite within the activated macrophage was fourfold less than that released by parasites within non-activated cells (9.2% versus 38.3%) and tenfold less than that released from glutaraldehyde-killed organisms phagocytosed by activated macrophages (91.6%). These studies indicate that stasis rather than killing of leishmaniae occurs in the activated macrophage in vitro. Parallel experiments evaluated by the visual counting of leishmaniae within the macrophages support these data. PEC from tuberculin-sensitized guinea pigs activated in vitro by purified protein derivative showed little or no activity against leishmaniae, indicating a specific requirement for this microbial stasis by activated macrophages. As a corollary of this, peritoneal exudate lymphocytes separated from the same preparations of PEC were shown to be specifically reactive to leishmanial antigen by transformation and incorporation of 3 H-thymidine. (author)

  14. The anti-Staphylococcus aureus activity of the phenanthrene fraction from fibrous roots of Bletilla striata.

    Guo, Jing-Jing; Dai, Bin-Ling; Chen, Ni-Pi; Jin, Li-Xia; Jiang, Fu-Sheng; Ding, Zhi-Shan; Qian, Chao-Dong

    2016-11-29

    Bletillae Rhizoma, the tuber of Bletilla striata, has been used in Chinese traditional medicine to treat infectious diseases. Chemical studies indicated that phenanthrene was one of the most important components of the herb, with a broad spectrum of antibiotic activity against Gram-positive bacteria. The objective of this study was to further characterize the antibacterial activity of the phenanthrene fraction from the fibrous root of the pseudobulb of B. striata. The phenanthrene fraction (EF60) from the ethanol extract of fibrous roots of Bletilla striata pseudobulbs was isolated using polyamide column chromatography. The antibacterial activity of the fraction was evaluated in vitro using a 96-well microtiter plate and microbroth dilution method. The cytotoxicity of EF60 against mammalian cells was tested by hemolysis and MTT assays. EF60 was obtained using alcohol extraction and polyamide column chromatography, with a yield of 14.9 g per 1 kg of the fibrous roots of B. striata. In vitro tests indicated that EF60 was active against all tested strains of Staphylococcus aureus, including clinical isolates and methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values of EF60 against these pathogens ranged from 8 to 64 μg/mL. Minimum bactericidal concentration tests demonstrated that EF60 was bactericidal against S. aureus 3304 and ATCC 29213 and was bacteriostatic against S. aureus 3211, ATCC 25923, and ATCC 43300. Consistently, the time-kill assay indicated that EF60 could completely kill S. aureus ATCC 29213 at 2× the MIC within 3 h but could kill less than two logarithmic units of ATCC 43300, even at 4× the MIC within 24 h. The postantibiotic effects (PAE) of EF60 (4× MIC) against strains 29213 and 43300 were 2.0 and 0.38 h, respectively. Further studies indicated that EF60 (160 μg/mL) showed no cytotoxicity against human erythrocytes, and was minimally toxic to Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells with an IC 50 of 75

  15. Physics activities

    1997-09-01

    As we move into the 21st Century, nuclear technology is on the verge of rejuvenation in advanced Member States and of expansion in developing Member States. The principal responsibilities of the IAEA are transferring technologies, co-ordinating scientific research, managing specialized projects and maintaining analytical quality control. The IAEA physics activities provide assistance with nuclear instrumentation, promote more effective utilization of research reactors and accelerators, and facilitate global co-operation in nuclear fusion research. These activities will help Member States improve their standards of living through the benefits of nuclear technology. This booklet presents a brief profile on the physics activities and involvement in these fields of the Physics Section, IAEA

  16. Regulatory activities

    2001-01-01

    This publication, compiled in 8 chapters, presents the regulatory system developed by the Nuclear Regulatory Authority (NRA) of the Argentine Republic. The following activities and developed topics in this document describe: the evolution of the nuclear regulatory activity in Argentina; the Argentine regulatory system; the nuclear regulatory laws and standards; the inspection and safeguards of nuclear facilities; the emergency systems; the environmental systems; the environmental monitoring; the analysis laboratories on physical and biological dosimetry, prenatal irradiation, internal irradiation, radiation measurements, detection techniques on nuclear testing, medical program on radiation protection; the institutional relations with national and international organization; the training courses and meeting; the technical information

  17. Identity Activities

    2016-08-03

    in reaction to their environment. They reflect an individual’s internal or external, conscious or subconscious , overt or covert, voluntary or...identity activities under a range of legal authorities, policy constraints, transnational threats, regional concerns and biases , and most likely...Biography. A baseline and descriptive analytic product that supports the development of the behavioral influences analysis ( BIA ) individual behavioral

  18. Active instruments

    Lim, Miguel Antonio; Ørberg, Jakob Williams

    2017-01-01

    themselves. We draw on two multi-year field studies of India and Denmark to investigate how national reforms and developments within the ranking industry interact in often surprising ways. Rankings do not always do what policy makers expect. We (1) highlight the activity of rankers in these two countries, (2...

  19. Active house

    Eriksen, Kurt Emil; Olesen, Gitte Gylling Hammershøj

    Formålet med dette abstrakt er at illustrere, at huse kan være konstrueret til at basere sig udelukkende på vedvarende energikilder og samtidig være CO2-neutrale og producere mere energi end de forbruger. Active House Visionen undersøger disse muligheder i otte demonstration huse i fem forskellige...

  20. The protease inhibitor HAI-2, but not HAI-1, regulates matriptase activation and shedding through prostasin

    Friis, Stine; Sales, Katiuchia Uzzun; Schafer, Jeffrey Martin

    2014-01-01

    cells. Whereas ablation of HAI-1 did not affect matriptase in epithelial cells of the small or large intestine, ablation of HAI-2 resulted in the loss of matriptase from both tissues. Gene silencing studies in intestinal Caco-2 cell monolayers revealed that this loss of cell-associated matriptase......The membrane-anchored serine proteases, matriptase and prostasin, and the membrane-anchored serine protease inhibitors, hepatocyte growth factor activator inhibitor (HAI)-1 and HAI-2, are critical effectors of epithelial development and postnatal epithelial homeostasis. Matriptase and prostasin...... form a reciprocal zymogen activation complex that results in the formation of active matriptase and prostasin that are targets for inhibition by HAI-1 and HAI-2. Conflicting data, however, have accumulated as to the existence of auxiliary functions for both HAI-1 and HAI-2 in regulating...

  1. Stem Cell-Associated Marker Expression in Canine Hair Follicles.

    Gerhards, Nora M; Sayar, Beyza S; Origgi, Francesco C; Galichet, Arnaud; Müller, Eliane J; Welle, Monika M; Wiener, Dominique J

    2016-03-01

    Functional hair follicle (HF) stem cells (SCs) are crucial to maintain the constant recurring growth of hair. In mice and humans, SC subpopulations with different biomarker expression profiles have been identified in discrete anatomic compartments of the HF. The rare studies investigating canine HF SCs have shown similarities in biomarker expression profiles to that of mouse and human SCs. The aim of our study was to broaden the current repertoire of SC-associated markers and their expression patterns in the dog. We combined analyses on the expression levels of CD34, K15, Sox9, CD200, Nestin, LGR5 and LGR6 in canine skin using RT-qPCR, the corresponding proteins in dog skin lysates, and their expression patterns in canine HFs using immunohistochemistry. Using validated antibodies, we were able to define the location of CD34, Sox9, Keratin15, LGR5 and Nestin in canine HFs and confirm that all tested biomarkers are expressed in canine skin. Our results show similarities between the expression profile of canine, human and mouse HF SC markers. This repertoire of biomarkers will allow us to conduct functional studies and investigate alterations in the canine SC compartment of different diseases, like alopecia or skin cancer with the possibility to extend relevant findings to human patients. © 2016 The Histochemical Society.

  2. Advanced sickle cell associated interstitial lung disease presenting ...

    Previous studies have reported abnormal pulmonary function and pulmonary hypertension among Nigerians with sickle cell disease, but there is no report of interstitial lung disease among them. We report a Nigerian sickle cell patient who presented with computed tomography proven interstitial lung disease complicated by ...

  3. Active particles

    Degond, Pierre; Tadmor, Eitan

    2017-01-01

    This volume collects ten surveys on the modeling, simulation, and applications of active particles using methods ranging from mathematical kinetic theory to nonequilibrium statistical mechanics. The contributing authors are leading experts working in this challenging field, and each of their chapters provides a review of the most recent results in their areas and looks ahead to future research directions. The approaches to studying active matter are presented here from many different perspectives, such as individual-based models, evolutionary games, Brownian motion, and continuum theories, as well as various combinations of these. Applications covered include biological network formation and network theory; opinion formation and social systems; control theory of sparse systems; theory and applications of mean field games; population learning; dynamics of flocking systems; vehicular traffic flow; and stochastic particles and mean field approximation. Mathematicians and other members of the scientific commu...

  4. Active solar information dissemination activities

    NONE

    1998-07-01

    The principal objective of the project has been the development of an information dissemination strategy for the UK active solar heating industry. The project has also aimed to prepare the industry for the implementation of such a strategy and to produce initial information materials to support the early stages of the implementation process. (author)

  5. Chocolate active

    Anon.

    1987-01-01

    There is a table of current radioactivity values for various foods and mushrooms. A special accent is on milk and chocolate. Chocolate sorts with more powdered milk are more active. Finally there is a chapter on radionucleides contained in the Chernobyl fallout, other than cesium 137, cesium 134 and strontium 90. The amounts of ruthenium 106, antimony 125, cerium 144, silver 110 m, cesium 134, strontium 90 and plutonium 239 relative to cesium 137 in soil samples in autumn 1987 are given. Special emphasis is on ruthenium 'hot particles' and on plutonium. (qui)

  6. Staying Active: Physical Activity and Exercise

    ... Events Advocacy For Patients About ACOG Staying Active: Physical Activity and Exercise Home For Patients Search FAQs Staying ... Exercise FAQ045, November 2016 PDF Format Staying Active: Physical Activity and Exercise Women's Health What are the benefits ...

  7. Nanotoxicity of silver nanoparticles to red blood cells: size dependent adsorption, uptake, and hemolytic activity.

    Chen, Li Qiang; Fang, Li; Ling, Jian; Ding, Cheng Zhi; Kang, Bin; Huang, Cheng Zhi

    2015-03-16

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) are increasingly being used as antimicrobial agents and drug carriers in biomedical fields. However, toxicological information on their effects on red blood cells (RBCs) and the mechanisms involved remain sparse. In this article, we examined the size dependent nanotoxicity of AgNPs using three different characteristic sizes of 15 nm (AgNPs15), 50 nm (AgNPs50), and 100 nm (AgNPs100) against fish RBCs. Optical microscopy and transmission electron microscopy observations showed that AgNPs exhibited a size effect on their adsorption and uptake by RBCs. The middle sized AgNPs50, compared with the smaller or bigger ones, showed the highest level of adsorption and uptake by the RBCs, suggesting an optimal size of ∼50 nm for passive uptake by RBCs. The toxic effects determined based on the hemolysis, membrane injury, lipid peroxidation, and antioxidant enzyme production were fairly size and dose dependent. In particular, the smallest sized AgNPs15 displayed a greater ability to induce hemolysis and membrane damage than AgNPs50 and AgNPs100. Such cytotoxicity induced by AgNPs should be attributed to the direct interaction of the nanoparticle with the RBCs, resulting in the production of oxidative stress, membrane injury, and subsequently hemolysis. Overall, the results suggest that particle size is a critical factor influencing the interaction between AgNPs and the RBCs.

  8. Antihemolytic Activities of Green Tea, Safflower, and Mulberry Extracts during Plasmodium berghei Infection in Mice

    Suthin Audomkasok

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Malaria-associated hemolysis is associated with mortality in adult patients. It has been speculated that oxidative stress and inflammation induced by malaria parasite are involved in its pathophysiology. Hence, we aimed to investigate the antihemolytic effect of green tea, safflower, and mulberry extracts against Plasmodium berghei infection. Aqueous crude extracts of these plants were prepared using hot water method and used for oral treatment in mice. Groups of ICR mice were infected with 6 × 106 infected red blood cells of P. berghei ANKA by intraperitoneal injection and given the extracts (500, 1500, and 3000 mg/kg twice a day for 4 consecutive days. To assess hemolysis, hematocrit levels were then evaluated. Malaria infection resulted in hemolysis. However, antihemolytic effects were observed in infected mice treated with these extracts at dose-dependent manners. In conclusion, aqueous crude extracts of green tea, safflower, and mulberry exerted antihemolysis induced by malaria infection. These plants may work as potential source in the development of variety of herbal formulations for malarial treatment.

  9. Halal Activism

    Fischer, Johan

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to further our understanding of contemporary Muslim consumer activism in Malaysia with a particular focus on halal (in Arabic, literally “permissible” or “lawful”) products and services. Muslim activists and organisations promote halal on a big scale in the interface...... zones between new forms of Islamic revivalism, the ethnicised state and Muslim consumer culture. Organisations such as the Muslim Consumers Association of Malaysia play an important role in pushing and protecting halal in Malaysia, that is, halal activists constantly call on the state to tighten halal...... in particular historical/national settings and that these issues should be explored in the interfaces between Islam, the state and market. More specifically, this article examines the above issues building on ethnography from fieldwork with three Muslim organisations in Malaysia....

  10. Type C virus activation in nontransformed mouse cells by uv-irradiated herpes simplex virus

    Hampar, B.; Hatanaka, M.; Aulakh, G.; Derge, J.G.; Lee, L.; Showalter, S.

    1977-01-01

    Infection of nontransformed mouse cells with uv-irradiated herpes simplex virus (uv-HSV) resulted in the activation of an endogenous xenotropic (x-tropic) type C virus. Synthesis of type C virus persisted for only a few days, with most of the virus remaining cell associated. The levels of type C virus activated by uv-HSV varied depending on the multiplicity of infection (m.o.i.) and the uv dose. At low uv doses, where cell killing occurred, little or no type C virus synthesis was observed. Maximum levels of type C virus synthesis were observed with the minimum uv dose which eliminated cell killing by HSV. Synthesis of type C virus, albeit at lower levels, was still observed at uv doses beyond those required to prevent cell killing

  11. Type C virus activation in nontransformed mouse cells by uv-irradiated herpes simplex virus

    Hampar, B. (National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD); Hatanaka, M.; Aulakh, G.; Derge, J.G.; Lee, L.; Showalter, S.

    1977-02-01

    Infection of nontransformed mouse cells with uv-irradiated herpes simplex virus (uv-HSV) resulted in the activation of an endogenous xenotropic (x-tropic) type C virus. Synthesis of type C virus persisted for only a few days, with most of the virus remaining cell associated. The levels of type C virus activated by uv-HSV varied depending on the multiplicity of infection (m.o.i.) and the uv dose. At low uv doses, where cell killing occurred, little or no type C virus synthesis was observed. Maximum levels of type C virus synthesis were observed with the minimum uv dose which eliminated cell killing by HSV. Synthesis of type C virus, albeit at lower levels, was still observed at uv doses beyond those required to prevent cell killing.

  12. Superoxide dismutase and catalase conjugated to polyethylene glycol increases endothelial enzyme activity and oxidant resistance

    Beckman, J.S.; Minor, R.L. Jr.; White, C.W.; Repine, J.E.; Rosen, G.M.; Freeman, B.A.

    1988-01-01

    Covalent conjugation of superoxide dismutase and catalase with polyethylene glycol (PEG) increases the circulatory half-lives of these enzymes from 125 I-PEG-catalase or 125 I-PEG-superoxide dismutase produced a linear, concentration-dependent increase in cellular enzyme activity and radioactivity. Fluorescently labeled PEG-superoxide dismutase incubated with endothelial cells showed a vesicular localization. Mechanical injury to cell monolayers, which is known to stimulate endocytosis, further increased the uptake of fluorescent PEG-superoxide dismutase. Addition of PEG and PEG-conjugated enzymes perturbed the spin-label binding environment, indicative of producing an increase in plasma membrane fluidity. Thus, PEG conjugation to superoxide dismutase and catalase enhances cell association of these enzymes in a manner which increases cellular enzyme activities and provides prolonged protection from partially reduced oxygen species

  13. An Intracellular Peptidyl-Prolyl cis/trans Isomerase Is Required for Folding and Activity of the Staphylococcus aureus Secreted Virulence Factor Nuclease.

    Wiemels, Richard E; Cech, Stephanie M; Meyer, Nikki M; Burke, Caleb A; Weiss, Andy; Parks, Anastacia R; Shaw, Lindsey N; Carroll, Ronan K

    2017-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is an important human pathogen that relies on a large repertoire of secreted and cell wall-associated proteins for pathogenesis. Consequently, the ability of the organism to cause disease is absolutely dependent on its ability to synthesize and successfully secrete these proteins. In this study, we investigate the role of peptidyl-prolyl cis/trans isomerases (PPIases) on the activity of the S. aureus secreted virulence factor nuclease (Nuc). We identify a staphylococcal cyclophilin-type PPIase (PpiB) that is required for optimal activity of Nuc. Disruption of ppiB results in decreased nuclease activity in culture supernatants; however, the levels of Nuc protein are not altered, suggesting that the decrease in activity results from misfolding of Nuc in the absence of PpiB. We go on to demonstrate that PpiB exhibits PPIase activity in vitro, is localized to the bacterial cytosol, and directly interacts with Nuc in vitro to accelerate the rate of Nuc refolding. Finally, we demonstrate an additional role for PpiB in S. aureus hemolysis and demonstrate that the S. aureus parvulin-type PPIase PrsA also plays a role in the activity of secreted virulence factors. The deletion of prsA leads to a decrease in secreted protease and phospholipase activity, similar to that observed in other Gram-positive pathogens. Together, these results demonstrate, for the first time to our knowledge, that PPIases play an important role in the secretion of virulence factors in S. aureus IMPORTANCE: Staphylococcus aureus is a highly dangerous bacterial pathogen capable of causing a variety of infections throughout the human body. The ability of S. aureus to cause disease is largely due to an extensive repertoire of secreted and cell wall-associated proteins, including adhesins, toxins, exoenzymes, and superantigens. These virulence factors, once produced, are typically transported across the cell membrane by the secretory (Sec) system in a denatured state. Consequently

  14. Active sharing

    2012-01-01

    The big news this week is, of course, the conclusions from the LHC performance workshop held in Chamonix from 6 to 10 February . The main recommendation, endorsed by CERN’s Machine Advisory Committee and adopted by the Management, is that the LHC will run at 4 TeV per beam this year. You can find all the details from Chamonix in the slides presented on Wednesday at the summary session, which leaves me free to talk about another important development coming up soon.   In ten days time, a new kind of gathering will be taking place in Geneva, bringing together two previously separate conferences, one driven by physics, the other by the medical community, but both looking to apply physics to the advancement of health. The merger of the International Conference for Translational Research in Radio-Oncology and CERN’s workshop on Physics for Health in Europe (ICTR-PHE) makes for a very eclectic mix. Presentations range from active shielding for interplanetary flight to the rather...

  15. Active Segmentation.

    Mishra, Ajay; Aloimonos, Yiannis

    2009-01-01

    The human visual system observes and understands a scene/image by making a series of fixations. Every fixation point lies inside a particular region of arbitrary shape and size in the scene which can either be an object or just a part of it. We define as a basic segmentation problem the task of segmenting that region containing the fixation point. Segmenting the region containing the fixation is equivalent to finding the enclosing contour- a connected set of boundary edge fragments in the edge map of the scene - around the fixation. This enclosing contour should be a depth boundary.We present here a novel algorithm that finds this bounding contour and achieves the segmentation of one object, given the fixation. The proposed segmentation framework combines monocular cues (color/intensity/texture) with stereo and/or motion, in a cue independent manner. The semantic robots of the immediate future will be able to use this algorithm to automatically find objects in any environment. The capability of automatically segmenting objects in their visual field can bring the visual processing to the next level. Our approach is different from current approaches. While existing work attempts to segment the whole scene at once into many areas, we segment only one image region, specifically the one containing the fixation point. Experiments with real imagery collected by our active robot and from the known databases 1 demonstrate the promise of the approach.

  16. IASS Activity

    Hojaev, Alisher S.; Ibragimova, Elvira M.

    2015-08-01

    It’s well known, astronomy in Uzbekistan has ancient roots and traditions (e.g., Mirzo Ulugh Beg, Abū al-Rayhān al-Bīrūnī, Abū ‘Abdallāh al-Khwārizmī) and astronomical heritage carefully preserved. Nowadays uzbek astronomers play a key role in scientific research but also in OAD and Decadal Plan activity in the Central Asia region. International Aerospace School (IASS) is an amazing and wonderful event held annually about 30 years. IASS is unique project in the region, and at the beginning we spent the Summer and Winter Schools. At present in the summer camp we gather about 50 teenage and undergraduate students over the country and abroad (France, Malaysia, Turkey, Azerbaijan, Pakistan, Russia, etc.). They are selected on the basis of tests of astronomy and space issues. During two weeks of IASS camp the invited scientists, cosmonauts and astronauts as well as other specialists give lectures and engage in practical exercises with IASS students in astronomy, including daily observations of the Sun and night sky observations with meniscus telescope, space research and exploration, aerospace modelling, preparation and presentation of original projects. This is important that IASS gives not theoretical grounds only but also practically train the students and the hands-on training is the major aims of IASS. Lectures and practice in the field of astronomy carried out with the direct involvement and generous assistance of Uranoscope Association (Paris, France). The current 26-th IASS is planned to held in July 2015.

  17. Structure, function and expression on blood and bone marrow cells of the urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor, uPAR

    Plesner, T; Behrendt, N; Ploug, M

    1997-01-01

    patients with the rare blood disease paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH) that fail to express glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol-anchored proteins including uPAR, show a very significantly reduced transmigration over an endothelial barrier. Cell-associated plasminogen activation by PNH......Several important functions have been assigned to the receptor for urokinase-type plasminogen activator, uPAR. As implied by the name, uPAR was first identified as a high affinity cellular receptor for urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA). It mediates the binding of the zymogen, pro......-uPA, to the plasma membrane where trace amounts of plasmin will initiate a series of events referred to as "reciprocal zymogen activation" where plasmin converts pro-uPA to the active enzyme, uPA, which in turn converts plasma membrane-associated plasminogen to plasmin. This is an efficient machinery to generate...

  18. Activation Energy

    Gadeken, Owen

    2002-01-01

    Teaming is so common in today's project management environment that most of us assume it comes naturally. We further assume that when presented with meaningful and challenging work, project teams will naturally engage in productive activity to complete their tasks. This assumption is expressed in the simple (but false) equation: Team + Work = Teamwork. Although this equation appears simple and straightforward, it is far from true for most project organizations whose reality is a complex web of institutional norms based on individual achievement and rewards. This is illustrated by the very first successful team experience from my early Air Force career. As a young lieutenant, I was sent to Squadron Officer School, which was the first in the series of Air Force professional military education courses I was required to complete during my career. We were immediately formed into teams of twelve officers. Much of the course featured competition between these teams. As the most junior member of my team, I quickly observed the tremendous pressure to show individual leadership capability. At one point early in the course, almost everyone in our group was vying to become the team leader. This conflict was so intense that it caused us to fail miserably in our first outdoor team building exercise. We spent so much time fighting over leadership that we were unable to complete any of the events on the outdoor obstacle course. This complete lack of success was so disheartening to me that I gave our team little hope for future success. What followed was a very intense period of bickering, conflict, and even shouting matches as our dysfunctional team tried to cope with our early failures and find some way to succeed. British physician and researcher Wilfred Bion (Experiences in Groups, 1961) discovered that there are powerful psychological forces inherent in all groups that divert from accomplishing their primary tasks. To overcome these restraining forces and use the potential

  19. Influence of the water molecules near surface of viral protein on virus activation process

    O, Shepelenko S; S, Salnikov A; V, Rak S; P, Goncharova E; B, Ryzhikov A, E-mail: shep@vector.nsc.r, E-mail: shep@ngs.r [Federal State Research Institution State Research Center of Virology and Biotechnology VECTOR of the Federal Service for Surveillance in Consumer Rights Protection and Human Well-being (FSRI SRC VB VECTOR) Koltsovo, Novosibirsk Region (Russian Federation)

    2009-06-01

    The infection of a cell with influenza virus comprises the stages of receptor binding to the cell membrane, endocytosis of virus particle, and fusion of the virus envelope and cell endosome membrane, which is determined by the conformational changes in hemagglutinin, a virus envelope protein, caused by pH decrease within the endosome. The pH value that induces conformation rearrangements of hemagglutinin molecule considerably varies for different influenza virus strains, first and foremost, due to the differences in amino acid structure of the corresponding proteins. The main goal of this study was to construct a model making it possible to assess the critical pH value characterizing the fusogenic activity of influenza virus hemagglutinin from the data on hemagglutinin structure and experimental verification of this model. Under this model, we assume that when the electrostatic force between interacting hemagglutinin molecules in the virus envelop exceeds a certain value, the hemagglutinin HA1 subunits are arranged so that they form a cavity sufficient for penetration of water molecules. This event leads to an irreversible hydration of the inner fragments of hemagglutinin molecule in a trimer and to the completion of conformational changes. The geometry of electrostatic field in hemagglutinin trimer was calculated taking into account the polarization effects near the interface of two dielectrics, aqueous medium and protein macromolecule. The critical pH values for the conformational changes in hemagglutinin were measured by the erythrocyte hemolysis induced by influenza virus particles when decreasing pH. The critical pH value conditionally separating the pH range into the regions with and without the conformational changes was calculated for several influenza virus H1N1 and H3N2 strains based on the data on the amino acid structure of the corresponding hemagglutinin molecules. Comparison of the theoretical and experimental values of critical pH values for

  20. Th1 cytokine-induced syndecan-4 shedding by airway smooth muscle cells is dependent on mitogen-activated protein kinases.

    Tan, Xiahui; Khalil, Najwa; Tesarik, Candice; Vanapalli, Karunasri; Yaputra, Viki; Alkhouri, Hatem; Oliver, Brian G G; Armour, Carol L; Hughes, J Margaret

    2012-04-01

    In asthma, airway smooth muscle (ASM) chemokine secretion can induce mast cell recruitment into the airways. The functions of the mast cell chemoattractant CXCL10, and other chemokines, are regulated by binding to heparan sulphates such as syndecan-4. This study is the first demonstration that airway smooth muscle cells (ASMC) from people with and without asthma express and shed syndecan-4 under basal conditions. Syndecan-4 shedding was enhanced by stimulation for 24 h with the Th1 cytokines interleukin-1β (IL-1β) or tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), but not interferon-γ (IFNγ), nor the Th2 cytokines IL-4 and IL-13. ASMC stimulation with IL-1β, TNF-α, and IFNγ (cytomix) induced the highest level of syndecan-4 shedding. Nonasthmatic and asthmatic ASM cell-associated syndecan-4 protein expression was also increased by TNF-α or cytomix at 4-8 h, with the highest levels detected in cytomix-stimulated asthmatic cells. Cell-associated syndecan-4 levels were decreased by 24 h, whereas shedding remained elevated at 24 h, consistent with newly synthesized syndecan-4 being shed. Inhibition of ASMC matrix metalloproteinase-2 did not prevent syndecan-4 shedding, whereas inhibition of ERK MAPK activation reduced shedding from cytomix-stimulated ASMC. Although ERK inhibition had no effect on syndecan-4 mRNA levels stimulated by cytomix, it did cause an increase in cell-associated syndecan-4 levels, consistent with the shedding being inhibited. In conclusion, ASMC produce and shed syndecan-4 and although this is increased by the Th1 cytokines, the MAPK ERK only regulates shedding. ASMC syndecan-4 production during Th1 inflammatory conditions may regulate chemokine activity and mast cell recruitment to the ASM in asthma.

  1. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

    Full Text Available ... Needs for Pregnant or Postpartum Women Physical Activity & Health Adding Physical Activity to Your Life Activities for ... Guide Visual Guide Worksite Physical Activity Steps to Wellness Walkability Audit Tool Sample Audit Glossary Selected References ...

  2. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

    Full Text Available ... for Older Adults Needs for Pregnant or Postpartum Women Physical Activity & Health Adding Physical Activity to Your ... Activity, 2014 Recommendations & Guidelines Fact Sheets & Infographics Social Media Tools Community Strategies BE Active: Connecting Routes + Destinations ...

  3. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

    Full Text Available ... Physical Activity Data, Trends and Maps Surveillance Systems Resources & Publications Reports Adults Need More Physical Activity MMWR ... Active: Connecting Routes + Destinations Real-World Examples Implementation Resource Guide Visual Guide Worksite Physical Activity Steps to ...

  4. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

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  5. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

    Full Text Available ... to Your Life Activities for Children Activities for Older Adults Overcoming Barriers ... required by a person to do an activity. When using relative intensity, people pay attention to how physical activity affects their ...

  6. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

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  7. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

    Full Text Available ... Adults Needs for Children What Counts Needs for Older Adults Needs for Pregnant or Postpartum Women Physical Activity & ... to Your Life Activities for Children Activities for Older Adults Overcoming Barriers Measuring Physical Activity Intensity Target Heart ...

  8. BAM! Physical Activity

    ... Smarts Links Fuel Up for Fun Power Packing Physical Activity Activity Calendar Activity Information Sheets I Heard Hurdle ... Links Sleep Game Questions Answered Under the Microscope Physical Activity Game Questions Answered Under the Microscope Lurking in ...

  9. Facts about Physical Activity

    ... Micronutrient Malnutrition State and Local Programs Facts about Physical Activity Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Some Americans ... Activity Guideline for aerobic activity than older adults. Physical activity and socioeconomic status Adults with more education are ...

  10. Physical Activity Guidelines

    ... use this site. health.gov Physical Activity Guidelines Physical Activity Physical activity is key to improving the health of the Nation. Based on the latest science, the Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans is an essential resource for ...

  11. Validation of the quantitative point-of-care CareStart biosensor for assessment of G6PD activity in venous blood.

    Germana Bancone

    Full Text Available Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD deficiency is the most common enzymopathy in the human population affecting an estimated 8% of the world population, especially those living in areas of past and present malaria endemicity. Decreased G6PD enzymatic activity is associated with drug-induced hemolysis and increased risk of severe neonatal hyperbilirubinemia leading to brain damage. The G6PD gene is on the X chromosome therefore mutations cause enzymatic deficiency in hemizygote males and homozygote females while the majority of heterozygous females have an intermediate activity (between 30-80% of normal with a large distribution into the range of deficiency and normality. Current G6PD qualitative tests are unable to diagnose G6PD intermediate activities which could hinder wide use of 8-aminoquinolines for Plasmodium vivax elimination. The aim of the study was to assess the diagnostic performances of the new Carestart G6PD quantitative biosensor.A total of 150 samples of venous blood with G6PD deficient, intermediate and normal phenotypes were collected among healthy volunteers living along the north-western Thailand-Myanmar border. Samples were analyzed by complete blood count, by gold standard spectrophotometric assay using Trinity kits and by the latest model of Carestart G6PD biosensor which analyzes both G6PD and hemoglobin.Bland-Altman comparison of the CareStart normalized G6PD values to that of the gold standard assay showed a strong bias in values resulting in poor area under-the-curve values for both 30% and 80% thresholds. Performing a receiver operator curve identified threshold values for the CareStart product equivalent to the 30% and 80% gold standard values with good sensitivity and specificity values, 100% and 92% (for 30% G6PD activity and 92% and 94% (for 80% activity respectively.The Carestart G6PD biosensor represents a significant improvement for quantitative diagnosis of G6PD deficiency over previous versions. Further

  12. Validation of the quantitative point-of-care CareStart biosensor for assessment of G6PD activity in venous blood.

    Bancone, Germana; Gornsawun, Gornpan; Chu, Cindy S; Porn, Pen; Pal, Sampa; Bansil, Pooja; Domingo, Gonzalo J; Nosten, Francois

    2018-01-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is the most common enzymopathy in the human population affecting an estimated 8% of the world population, especially those living in areas of past and present malaria endemicity. Decreased G6PD enzymatic activity is associated with drug-induced hemolysis and increased risk of severe neonatal hyperbilirubinemia leading to brain damage. The G6PD gene is on the X chromosome therefore mutations cause enzymatic deficiency in hemizygote males and homozygote females while the majority of heterozygous females have an intermediate activity (between 30-80% of normal) with a large distribution into the range of deficiency and normality. Current G6PD qualitative tests are unable to diagnose G6PD intermediate activities which could hinder wide use of 8-aminoquinolines for Plasmodium vivax elimination. The aim of the study was to assess the diagnostic performances of the new Carestart G6PD quantitative biosensor. A total of 150 samples of venous blood with G6PD deficient, intermediate and normal phenotypes were collected among healthy volunteers living along the north-western Thailand-Myanmar border. Samples were analyzed by complete blood count, by gold standard spectrophotometric assay using Trinity kits and by the latest model of Carestart G6PD biosensor which analyzes both G6PD and hemoglobin. Bland-Altman comparison of the CareStart normalized G6PD values to that of the gold standard assay showed a strong bias in values resulting in poor area under-the-curve values for both 30% and 80% thresholds. Performing a receiver operator curve identified threshold values for the CareStart product equivalent to the 30% and 80% gold standard values with good sensitivity and specificity values, 100% and 92% (for 30% G6PD activity) and 92% and 94% (for 80% activity) respectively. The Carestart G6PD biosensor represents a significant improvement for quantitative diagnosis of G6PD deficiency over previous versions. Further improvements

  13. Multiple activities of LigB potentiate virulence of Leptospira interrogans: inhibition of alternative and classical pathways of complement.

    Henry A Choy

    Full Text Available Microbial pathogens acquire the immediate imperative to avoid or counteract the formidable defense of innate immunity as soon as they overcome the initial physical barriers of the host. Many have adopted the strategy of directly disrupting the complement system through the capture of its components, using proteins on the pathogen's surface. In leptospirosis, pathogenic Leptospira spp. are resistant to complement-mediated killing, in contrast to the highly vulnerable non-pathogenic strains. Pathogenic L. interrogans uses LenA/LfhA and LcpA to respectively sequester and commandeer the function of two regulators, factor H and C4BP, which in turn bind C3b or C4b to interrupt the alternative or classical pathways of complement activation. LigB, another surface-proximal protein originally characterized as an adhesin binding multiple host proteins, has other activities suggesting its importance early in infection, including binding extracellular matrix, plasma, and cutaneous repair proteins and inhibiting hemostasis. In this study, we used a recent model of ectopic expression of LigB in the saprophyte, L. biflexa, to test the hypothesis that LigB also interacts with complement proteins C3b and C4b to promote the virulence of L. interrogans. The surface expression of LigB partially rescued the non-pathogen from killing by 5% normal human serum, showing 1.3- to 48-fold greater survival 4 to 6 d following exposure to complement than cultures of the non-expressing parental strain. Recombinant LigB7'-12 comprising the LigB-specific immunoglobulin repeats binds directly to human complement proteins, C3b and C4b, with respective K(ds of 43±26 nM and 69±18 nM. Repeats 9 to 11, previously shown to contain the binding domain for fibronectin and fibrinogen, are also important in LigB-complement interactions, which interfere with the alternative and classical pathways measured by complement-mediated hemolysis of erythrocytes. Thus, LigB is an adaptable interface

  14. Active knee joint flexibility and sports activity

    Hahn, Thomas; Foldspang, Anders; Vestergaard, E

    1999-01-01

    was significantly higher in women than in men and significantly positively associated with weekly hours of swimming and weekly hours of competitive gymnastics. Active knee flexion was significantly positively associated with participation in basketball, and significantly negatively associated with age and weekly......The aim of the study was to estimate active knee flexion and active knee extension in athletes and to investigate the potential association of each to different types of sports activity. Active knee extension and active knee flexion was measured in 339 athletes. Active knee extension...... hours of soccer, European team handball and swimming. The results point to sport-specific adaptation of active knee flexion and active knee extension. Udgivelsesdato: 1999-Apr...

  15. ABSENCE OF LECITHIN FROM THE STROMATA OF THE RED CELLS OF CERTAIN ANIMALS (RUMINANTS), AND ITS RELATION TO VENOM HEMOLYSIS

    Turner, Joseph C.

    1957-01-01

    Lipide extracts of the red cells of several animal species have been analyzed chromatographically. Genetically determined differences in phospholipide composition were found. Lecithin is absent from the cells of ox, sheep, and goat. Cells containing lecithin are susceptible to the direct hemolysin of cobra venom while cells not containing lecithin are resistant. The facts indicate that the direct hemolysin is a lecithinase. PMID:13406178

  16. Stimulation of cannabinoid receptor 2 (CB2 suppresses microglial activation

    Fernandez Francisco

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Activated microglial cells have been implicated in a number of neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer's disease (AD, multiple sclerosis (MS, and HIV dementia. It is well known that inflammatory mediators such as nitric oxide (NO, cytokines, and chemokines play an important role in microglial cell-associated neuron cell damage. Our previous studies have shown that CD40 signaling is involved in pathological activation of microglial cells. Many data reveal that cannabinoids mediate suppression of inflammation in vitro and in vivo through stimulation of cannabinoid receptor 2 (CB2. Methods In this study, we investigated the effects of a cannabinoid agonist on CD40 expression and function by cultured microglial cells activated by IFN-γ using RT-PCR, Western immunoblotting, flow cytometry, and anti-CB2 small interfering RNA (siRNA analyses. Furthermore, we examined if the stimulation of CB2 could modulate the capacity of microglial cells to phagocytise Aβ1–42 peptide using a phagocytosis assay. Results We found that the selective stimulation of cannabinoid receptor CB2 by JWH-015 suppressed IFN-γ-induced CD40 expression. In addition, this CB2 agonist markedly inhibited IFN-γ-induced phosphorylation of JAK/STAT1. Further, this stimulation was also able to suppress microglial TNF-α and nitric oxide production induced either by IFN-γ or Aβ peptide challenge in the presence of CD40 ligation. Finally, we showed that CB2 activation by JWH-015 markedly attenuated CD40-mediated inhibition of microglial phagocytosis of Aβ1–42 peptide. Taken together, these results provide mechanistic insight into beneficial effects provided by cannabinoid receptor CB2 modulation in neurodegenerative diseases, particularly AD.

  17. Activation analysis. Chapter 4

    1976-01-01

    The principle, sample and calibration standard preparation, activation by neutrons, charged particles and gamma radiation, sample transport after activation, activity measurement, and chemical sample processing are described for activation analysis. Possible applications are shown of nondestructive activation analysis. (J.P.)

  18. Active transport and heat.

    Tait, Peter W

    2011-07-01

    Increasing heat may impede peoples' ability to be active outdoors thus limiting active transport options. Co-benefits from mitigation of and adaptation to global warming should not be assumed but need to be actively designed into strategies.

  19. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

    Full Text Available ... for Older Adults Needs for Pregnant or Postpartum Women Physical Activity & Health Adding Physical Activity to Your ... Physical Activity, 2014 Recommendations & Guidelines Fact Sheets & ... Fitness Club Network Assessing Need and Interest Selecting a DFCN Promotion ...

  20. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

    Full Text Available ... About Physical Activity Data, Trends and Maps Surveillance Systems Resources & Publications Reports Adults Need More Physical Activity MMWR Data Highlights State Indicator Report on Physical Activity, 2014 Recommendations & Guidelines Fact Sheets & Infographics Social Media Tools Community ...

  1. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

    Full Text Available ... Needs for Pregnant or Postpartum Women Physical Activity & Health Adding Physical Activity to Your Life Activities for ... Obesity , National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion Email Recommend Tweet YouTube Instagram Listen Watch ...

  2. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

    Full Text Available ... gov . Physical Activity Physical Activity Basics Needs for Adults Needs for Children What Counts Needs for Older Adults Needs for Pregnant or Postpartum Women Physical Activity & ...

  3. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

    Full Text Available ... an activity. When using relative intensity, people pay attention to how physical activity affects their heart rate ... Physical Activity Overweight & Obesity Healthy Weight Breastfeeding Micronutrient Malnutrition State and Local Programs File Formats Help: How ...

  4. Physical Activity Basics

    ... Weight Breastfeeding Micronutrient Malnutrition State and Local Programs Physical Activity Basics Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir How much physical activity do you need? Regular physical activity helps improve ...

  5. Physical Activity Assessment

    Current evidence convincingly indicates that physical activity reduces the risk of colon and breast cancer. Physical activity may also reduce risk of prostate cancer. Scientists are also evaluating potential relationships between physical activity and other cancers.

  6. Guide to Physical Activity

    ... Families ( We Can! ) Health Professional Resources Guide to Physical Activity Physical activity is an important part of your ... to injury. Examples of moderate-intensity amounts of physical activity Common Chores Washing and waxing a car for ...

  7. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

    Full Text Available ... Physical Activity, 2014 Recommendations & Guidelines Fact Sheets & Infographics Social Media Tools Community Strategies BE Active: Connecting Routes + Destinations Real-World Examples ...

  8. Physical activity and obesity

    Bouchard, Claude; Katzmarzyk, Peter T

    2010-01-01

    ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 2 The Physical Activity and Exercise Continuum 7 Darren Warburton Definition of Health, Physical Activity, and Exercise . . . . . . . 7 The Continuum...

  9. Physical Activity and Cancer

    ... Cancer Genetics Services Directory Cancer Prevention Overview Research Physical Activity and Cancer On This Page What is physical activity? What is known about the relationship between physical ...

  10. Evaluation of anticonvulsant, antimicrobial and hemolytic activity of Aitchisonia rosea

    Shahid Rasool

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate the anticonvulsant, antimicrobial and hemolytic effect of Aitchisonia rosea. The anticonvulsant effect was studied at doses 400 and 800 mg/kg against pentylenetetrazole, strychnine and picrotoxin-induced seizures in albino mice. The antimicrobial assay was conducted by disc diffusion method and minimum inhibitory concentration. Hemolytic effect was analyzed by reported method. Phenolic compounds present in the n-butanol fraction of the plant were estimated by HPLC. The plant showed maximum response against drug-induced convulsions and provided protection to animals at both doses. It also showed maximum zone of inhibition and highly significant MIC against all bacterial and fungal strains. The plant protected the RBCs from hemolysis. The highest amount of phenolics found was caffeic acid (7.5 ± 0.04.

  11. Effects of diethylene glycol butyl ether and butoxyethoxyacetic acid on rat and human erythrocytes.

    Udden, M M

    2005-03-28

    The toxicity of diethylene glycol butyl ether (DGBE), and its principal metabolite, butoxyethoxyacetic acid (BEAA), were assessed in vitro for rat and human red blood cells. Rat erythrocytes showed evidence of mild hemolysis when exposed to BEAA at concentrations of 5 or 10 mM for 4 h. BEAA treated rat red blood cells also showed evidence of sub-hemolytic damage: increased spherocytosis, a shift in distribution of cell size to larger cells, a significant increase in mean cellular volume, and a decrease in cellular deformability. However, DGBE had no effect on rat red blood cell morphology, cell size, hemolysis or deformability. There was no hemolysis when human red blood cells were exposed to DGBE or BEAA at the same concentrations. No changes in mean cellular volume, distribution of cell size, or morphologic appearance of human red blood cells were observed. No evidence for decreased deformability of human red blood cells exposed to DGBE or BEAA was found. In conclusion, BEAA has weak hemolytic activity and sub-hemolytic effects in vitro on rat erythrocytes, which is consistent with the finding of mild hemolysis when the parent compound DGBE is administered to rats by gavage. The absence of hemolysis or sub-hemolytic damage when human red blood cells were exposed to BEAA or DGBE in vitro indicates that it is unlikely that hemolysis will occur as a result of human exposure to DGBE.

  12. Criminalisation of Activism

    Uldam, Julie

    Different forms of political participation involve different challenges. This paper focuses on challenges to radical activism and particularly the criminalisation of activism.......Different forms of political participation involve different challenges. This paper focuses on challenges to radical activism and particularly the criminalisation of activism....

  13. Increasing Youth Physical Activity with Activity Calendars

    Eckler, Seth

    2016-01-01

    Physical educators often struggle with ways to get their students to be active beyond the school day. One strategy to accomplish this is the use of physical activity calendars (PACs). The purpose of this article is to support the use of PACs and give practical advice for creating effective PACs.

  14. Active nematic gels as active relaxing solids

    Turzi, Stefano S.

    2017-11-01

    I propose a continuum theory for active nematic gels, defined as fluids or suspensions of orientable rodlike objects endowed with active dynamics, that is based on symmetry arguments and compatibility with thermodynamics. The starting point is our recent theory that models (passive) nematic liquid crystals as relaxing nematic elastomers. The interplay between viscoelastic response and active dynamics of the microscopic constituents is naturally taken into account. By contrast with standard theories, activity is not introduced as an additional term of the stress tensor, but it is added as an external remodeling force that competes with the passive relaxation dynamics and drags the system out of equilibrium. In a simple one-dimensional channel geometry, we show that the interaction between nonuniform nematic order and activity results in either a spontaneous flow of particles or a self-organization into subchannels flowing in opposite directions.

  15. Physical Activity During School

    Østergaard, Lars Domino

    It is important, not only on health grounds, to exercise and to be physically active. In school, physical activities have shown to improve the students’ academic behaviour resulting in improved attention and information processing as well as enhanced coping. To stimulate and motivate students...... to be even more active during school hours further enhancing their academic behaviour, it is important to know when, why and how they are active, and their attitude towards different types of physical activities. Therefore, the aim of this study was to categorize the physical activities attended by students...... during school hours and to elucidate their attitude towards the different types of activities. The data consisted of observations of lessons followed by group interviews. Analyses of the observations revealed six categories of physical activities, varying from mandatory physical activities, activities...

  16. Active regions, ch. 7

    Martres, M.J.; Bruzek, A.

    1977-01-01

    The solar Active Region is an extremely complex phenomenon comprising a large variety of features (active,region phenomena) in the photosphere, chromosphere and corona. The occurrence of the various active phenomena depends on the phase and state of evolution of the AR; their appearance depends on the radiation used for the observation. The various phenomena are described and illustrated with photographs. Several paragraphs are dedicated to magnetic classification of AR, Mt. Wilson Spot Classification, solar activity indices, and solar activity data publications

  17. Lectures Abandoned: Active Learning by Active Seminars

    Christensen, Henrik Bærbak; Corry, Aino Vonge

    2012-01-01

    Traditional lecture-based courses are widely criticised for be- ing less eective in teaching. The question is of course what should replace the lectures and various active learning tech- niques have been suggested and studied. In this paper, we report on our experiences of redesigning a software ......- tive seminars as a replacement of traditional lectures, an activity template for the contents of active seminars, an ac- count on how storytelling supported the seminars, as well as reports on our and the students' experiences....

  18. Antifeedant activity of quassinoids.

    Leskinen, V; Polonsky, J; Bhatnagar, S

    1984-10-01

    The antifeedant activity of 13 quassinoids of different structural types has been studied against the Mexican bean beetle (Epilachna varivestis Mulsant) 4th instar larvae and the southern armyworm (Spodoptera eridania Crawer) 5th instar larvae. All quassinoids tested displayed significant activity against the Mexican bean beetle and, thus, do not reveal a simple structure-activity relationship. Five quassinoids were active against the southern armyworm. Interestingly, four of these-bruceantin (I), glaucarubinone (VI), isobruceine A (VIII), and simalikalactone D (XI)-possess the required structural features for antineoplastic activity. The noncytotoxic quassin (X) is an exception; it is active against both pests.

  19. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

    Full Text Available ... What's this? Submit Button Our Division About Us Nutrition Physical Activity Overweight & Obesity Healthy Weight Breastfeeding Micronutrient ... What's this? Submit Button Our Division About Us Nutrition Physical Activity Overweight & Obesity Healthy Weight Breastfeeding Micronutrient ...

  20. Illicit Activities and Goondagardi

    The research analyzes the pathways through which exclusionary urban ... casual labour in construction or small-scale trade activities, etc) and ... PATHWAYS TO ILLICIT ACTIVITIES .... VGG Nagar had become a gambling den for some time.

  1. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

    Full Text Available ... Strategies BE Active: Connecting Routes + Destinations Real-World Examples Implementation Resource Guide Visual Guide Worksite Physical Activity ... Implementation Maintaining Interest Needs Assessment Evaluating Success CDC’s Example ... Stairwell Appearance Motivational Signs Installing Music Other ...

  2. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

    Full Text Available ... Guidelines Fact Sheets & Infographics Social Media Tools Community Strategies BE Active: Connecting Routes + Destinations Real-World Examples Implementation Resource Guide Visual Guide Worksite Physical Activity Steps ...

  3. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

    Full Text Available ... Button Our Division About Us Nutrition Physical Activity Overweight & Obesity Healthy Weight Breastfeeding Micronutrient Malnutrition State and ... Button Our Division About Us Nutrition Physical Activity Overweight & Obesity Healthy Weight Breastfeeding Micronutrient Malnutrition State and ...

  4. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

    Full Text Available ... Button Our Division About Us Nutrition Physical Activity Overweight & Obesity Healthy Weight Breastfeeding Micronutrient Malnutrition State and Local ... Button Our Division About Us Nutrition Physical Activity Overweight & Obesity Healthy Weight Breastfeeding Micronutrient Malnutrition State and Local ...

  5. Family Activities for Fitness

    Grosse, Susan J.

    2009-01-01

    This article discusses how families can increase family togetherness and improve physical fitness. The author provides easy ways to implement family friendly activities for improving and maintaining physical health. These activities include: walking, backyard games, and fitness challenges.

  6. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

    Full Text Available ... Our Division About Us Nutrition Physical Activity Overweight & Obesity Healthy Weight Breastfeeding Micronutrient Malnutrition State and Local ... Our Division About Us Nutrition Physical Activity Overweight & Obesity Healthy Weight Breastfeeding Micronutrient Malnutrition State and Local ...

  7. Major operations and activities

    Black, D.G.

    1995-06-01

    This section of the 1994 Hanford Site Environmental Report summarizes the major operations and activities on the site. These operations and activities include site management, waste management, environmental restoration and corrective actions, and research and technology development.

  8. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

    Full Text Available ... Physical Activity, 2014 Recommendations & Guidelines Fact Sheets & Infographics Social Media Tools Community Strategies BE Active: Connecting Routes + ... Obesity , National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion Email Recommend Tweet YouTube Instagram Listen Watch ...

  9. Active Marine Station Metadata

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Active Marine Station Metadata is a daily metadata report for active marine bouy and C-MAN (Coastal Marine Automated Network) platforms from the National Data...

  10. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

    Full Text Available ... Share Compartir For more help with what counts as aerobic activity, watch this video: Windows Media Player, ... The table below lists examples of activities classified as moderate-intensity or vigorous-intensity based upon the ...

  11. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

    Full Text Available ... Compartir For more help with what counts as aerobic activity, watch this video: Windows Media Player, 4: ... ways to understand and measure the intensity of aerobic activity: relative intensity and absolute intensity. Relative Intensity ...

  12. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

    Full Text Available ... Data, Trends and Maps Surveillance Systems Resources & Publications Reports Adults Need More Physical Activity MMWR Data Highlights State Indicator Report on Physical Activity, 2014 Recommendations & Guidelines Fact Sheets & ...

  13. Diabetes - keeping active

    ... ways to add more activity to your day. Introduction There are many benefits to being active. Staying ... them emails. Take the stairs instead of the elevator. Stand up and move around while making phone ...

  14. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

    Full Text Available ... Intensity The amount of energy used by the body per minute of activity. The table below lists ... upon the amount of energy used by the body while doing the activity. Top of Page Moderate ...

  15. Activities for Calculators.

    Hiatt, Arthur A.

    1987-01-01

    Ten activities that give learners in grades 5-8 a chance to explore mathematics with calculators are provided. The activity cards involve such topics as odd addends, magic squares, strange projects, and conjecturing rules. (MNS)

  16. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

    Full Text Available ... for a breath. Absolute Intensity The amount of energy used by the body per minute of activity. ... or vigorous-intensity based upon the amount of energy used by the body while doing the activity. ...

  17. Major operations and activities

    Black, D.G.

    1995-01-01

    This section of the 1994 Hanford Site Environmental Report summarizes the major operations and activities on the site. These operations and activities include site management, waste management, environmental restoration and corrective actions, and research and technology development

  18. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

    Full Text Available ... on this page will be unavailable. For more information about this message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Physical Activity Physical Activity Basics Needs for Adults Needs for Children What Counts Needs ...

  19. USAID Activity Locations

    US Agency for International Development — The USAID Activities dataset is a snapshot of activities supported by USAID including their geographical locations within countries at the time of the snapshot. The...

  20. Interpretable Active Learning

    Phillips, Richard L.; Chang, Kyu Hyun; Friedler, Sorelle A.

    2017-01-01

    Active learning has long been a topic of study in machine learning. However, as increasingly complex and opaque models have become standard practice, the process of active learning, too, has become more opaque. There has been little investigation into interpreting what specific trends and patterns an active learning strategy may be exploring. This work expands on the Local Interpretable Model-agnostic Explanations framework (LIME) to provide explanations for active learning recommendations. W...

  1. Immunizations: Active vs. Passive

    ... Issues Health Issues Health Issues Conditions Injuries & Emergencies Vaccine Preventable Diseases ... Children > Safety & Prevention > Immunizations > Immunizations: Active vs. Passive Safety & ...

  2. Activity-based design

    Andersen, Peter Bøgh

    2006-01-01

      In many types of activities communicative and material activities are so intertwined that the one cannot be understood without taking the other into account. This is true of maritime and hospital work that are used as examples in the paper. The spatial context of the activity is also important:...... and automatic machinery can replace one another in an activity. It also gives an example of how to use the framework for design....

  3. Ras activation by SOS

    Iversen, Lars; Tu, Hsiung-Lin; Lin, Wan-Chen

    2014-01-01

    Activation of the small guanosine triphosphatase H-Ras by the exchange factor Son of Sevenless (SOS) is an important hub for signal transduction. Multiple layers of regulation, through protein and membrane interactions, govern activity of SOS. We characterized the specific activity of individual ...

  4. Measurement of Physical Activity.

    Dishman, Rod K.; Washburn, Richard A.; Schoeller, Dale A.

    2001-01-01

    Valid assessment of physical activity must be unobtrusive, practical to administer, and specific about physical activity type, frequency, duration, and intensity. Assessment methods can be categorized according to whether they provide direct or indirect (e.g., self-report) observation of physical activity, body motion, physiological response…

  5. Gap43 transcription modulation in the adult brain depends on sensory activity and synaptic cooperation.

    Nicole Rosskothen-Kuhl

    Full Text Available Brain development and learning is accompanied by morphological and molecular changes in neurons. The growth associated protein 43 (Gap43, indicator of neurite elongation and synapse formation, is highly expressed during early stages of development. Upon maturation of the brain, Gap43 is down-regulated by most neurons with the exception of subdivisions such as the CA3 region of hippocampus, the lateral superior olive (LSO and the central inferior colliculus (CIC. Little is known about the regulation of this mRNA in adult brains. We found that the expression of Gap43 mRNA in specific neurons can be modulated by changing sensory activity of the adult brain. Using the central auditory system of rats as a model, Gap43 protein and mRNA levels were determined in LSO and CIC of hearing-experienced rats unilaterally or bilaterally deafened or unilaterally stimulated by a cochlear implant (CI. Our data indicate that Gap43 is a marker useful beyond monitoring neuronal growth and synaptogenesis, reflecting also specific patterns of synaptic activities on specific neurons. Thus, unilateral loss of input to an adult auditory system directly causes asymmetrical expression of Gap43 mRNA between LSOs or CICs on both sides of the brainstem. This consequence can be prevented by simple-patterned stimulation of a dysfunctional ear by way of a CI. We suggest that as a function of input balance and activity pattern, Gap43 mRNA expression changes as cells associate converging afferent signals.

  6. DAF in diabetic patients is subject to glycation/inactivation at its active site residues.

    Flückiger, Rudolf; Cocuzzi, Enzo; Nagaraj, Ram H; Shoham, Menachem; Kern, Timothy S; Medof, M Edward

    2018-01-01

    Decay accelerating factor (DAF or CD55) is a cell associated C3 and C5 convertase regulator originally described in terms of protection of self-cells from systemic complement but now known to modulate adaptive T cell responses. It is expressed on all cell types. We investigated whether nonenzymatic glycation could impair its function and potentially be relevant to complications of diabetes mellitus and other conditions that result in nonenzymatic glycation including cancer, Alzheimer's disease, and aging. Immunoblots of affinity-purified DAF from erythrocytes of patients with diabetes showed pentosidine, glyoxal-AGEs, carboxymethyllysine, and argpyrimidine. HPLC/MS analyses of glucose modified DAF localized the sites of AGE modifications to K 125 adjacent to K 126 , K 127 at the junction of CCPs2-3 and spatially near R 96 , and R 100 , all identified as being critical for DAF's function. Functional analyses of glucose or ribose treated DAF protein showed profound loss of its regulatory activity. The data argue that de-regulated activation of systemic complement and de-regulated activation of T cells and leukocytes could result from non-enzymatic glycation of DAF. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. Modeling Patterns of Activities using Activity Curves.

    Dawadi, Prafulla N; Cook, Diane J; Schmitter-Edgecombe, Maureen

    2016-06-01

    Pervasive computing offers an unprecedented opportunity to unobtrusively monitor behavior and use the large amount of collected data to perform analysis of activity-based behavioral patterns. In this paper, we introduce the notion of an activity curve , which represents an abstraction of an individual's normal daily routine based on automatically-recognized activities. We propose methods to detect changes in behavioral routines by comparing activity curves and use these changes to analyze the possibility of changes in cognitive or physical health. We demonstrate our model and evaluate our change detection approach using a longitudinal smart home sensor dataset collected from 18 smart homes with older adult residents. Finally, we demonstrate how big data-based pervasive analytics such as activity curve-based change detection can be used to perform functional health assessment. Our evaluation indicates that correlations do exist between behavior and health changes and that these changes can be automatically detected using smart homes, machine learning, and big data-based pervasive analytics.

  8. Heterogeneous Active Matter

    Kolb, Thomas; Klotsa, Daphne

    Active systems are composed of self-propelled (active) particles that locally convert energy into motion and exhibit emergent collective behaviors, such as fish schooling and bird flocking. Most works so far have focused on monodisperse, one-component active systems. However, real systems are heterogeneous, and consist of several active components. We perform molecular dynamics simulations of multi-component active matter systems and report on their emergent behavior. We discuss the phase diagram of dynamic states as well as parameters where we see mixing versus segregation.

  9. Active food packaging technologies.

    Ozdemir, Murat; Floros, John D

    2004-01-01

    Active packaging technologies offer new opportunities for the food industry, in the preservation of foods. Important active packaging systems currently known to date, including oxygen scavengers, carbon dioxide emitters/absorbers, moisture absorbers, ethylene absorbers, ethanol emitters, flavor releasing/absorbing systems, time-temperature indicators, and antimicrobial containing films, are reviewed. The principle of operation of each active system is briefly explained. Recent technological advances in active packaging are discussed, and food related applications are presented. The effects of active packaging systems on food quality and safety are cited.

  10. Accessibility, activity participation and location of activities

    Næss, Petter

    2006-01-01

    By investigating relationships between residential location and the availability of facilities, location of activities, trip distances, activity participation and trip frequencies, this paper seeks to contribute to a more detailed and nuanced understanding of the relationships between residential...... location and the amount of daily-life travel in an urban region. The empirical data are from a comprehensive study of residential location and travel in Copenhagen Metropolitan Area. Differences between inner- and outer-area residents in activity frequencies and trip frequencies are modest and partly...... outweigh each other. However, differences in trip distances due to the location of the dwelling relative to concentrations of facilities translate into substantially longer total travelling distances among suburbanites than among inner-city residents....

  11. Defense Human Resources Activity > PERSEREC

    Skip to main content (Press Enter). Toggle navigation Defense Human Resources Activity Search Search Defense Human Resources Activity: Search Search Defense Human Resources Activity: Search Defense Human Resources Activity U.S. Department of Defense Defense Human Resources Activity Overview

  12. NEA activities in 1980. 9. Activity Report

    1981-01-01

    This report describes the main features of the Agency's work during 1980 and discusses the state and prospects of the nuclear industry in OECD countries. Trends in nuclear power, radiological and environmental impacts of nuclear fuel cycle activities, nuclear safety research and licensing, nuclear law, nuclear development and fuel cycle studies technical co-operation, nuclear science organisation and administration are reviewed

  13. Marine Biology Activities. Ocean Related Curriculum Activities.

    Pauls, John

    The ocean affects all of our lives. Therefore, awareness of and information about the interconnections between humans and oceans are prerequisites to making sound decisions for the future. Project ORCA (Ocean Related Curriculum Activities) has developed interdisciplinary curriculum materials designed to meet the needs of students and teachers…

  14. Activated carbon from biomass

    Manocha, S.; Manocha, L. M.; Joshi, Parth; Patel, Bhavesh; Dangi, Gaurav; Verma, Narendra

    2013-06-01

    Activated carbon are unique and versatile adsorbents having extended surface area, micro porous structure, universal adsorption effect, high adsorption capacity and high degree of surface reactivity. Activated carbons are synthesized from variety of materials. Most commonly used on a commercial scale are cellulosic based precursors such as peat, coal, lignite wood and coconut shell. Variation occurs in precursors in terms of structure and carbon content. Coir having very low bulk density and porous structure is found to be one of the valuable raw materials for the production of highly porous activated carbon and other important factor is its high carbon content. Exploration of good low cost and non conventional adsorbent may contribute to the sustainability of the environment and offer promising benefits for the commercial purpose in future. Carbonization of biomass was carried out in a horizontal muffle furnace. Both carbonization and activation were performed in inert nitrogen atmosphere in one step to enhance the surface area and to develop interconnecting porosity. The types of biomass as well as the activation conditions determine the properties and the yield of activated carbon. Activated carbon produced from biomass is cost effective as it is easily available as a waste biomass. Activated carbon produced by combination of chemical and physical activation has higher surface area of 2442 m2/gm compared to that produced by physical activation (1365 m2/gm).

  15. Active ageing technologies

    Lassen, Aske Juul

    In the recent decade the concept of active aging has become important in the Western hemisphere. The World Health Organization and The European Union have staged active aging as a core policy area and initiated programs of physical activity, independence and prolonged working lives among...... the elderly. As part of this rearticulation of old age, many new technologies take form. This paper uses a wide concept of technologies (devices, regimes, strategies and ways of doing) and argues that technologies form active aging subjectivities, and on the other hand, that these subjectivities...... in their socio-material practices form active aging. Hence, active aging is a mutual entanglement (Callon and Rabeharisoa 2004) between technologies, practices and subjectivities. The paper is based on four months of participant observations and 17 in-depth interviews with elderly persons conducted at three...

  16. Mechanics of active surfaces

    Salbreux, Guillaume; Jülicher, Frank

    2017-09-01

    We derive a fully covariant theory of the mechanics of active surfaces. This theory provides a framework for the study of active biological or chemical processes at surfaces, such as the cell cortex, the mechanics of epithelial tissues, or reconstituted active systems on surfaces. We introduce forces and torques acting on a surface, and derive the associated force balance conditions. We show that surfaces with in-plane rotational symmetry can have broken up-down, chiral, or planar-chiral symmetry. We discuss the rate of entropy production in the surface and write linear constitutive relations that satisfy the Onsager relations. We show that the bending modulus, the spontaneous curvature, and the surface tension of a passive surface are renormalized by active terms. Finally, we identify active terms which are not found in a passive theory and discuss examples of shape instabilities that are related to active processes in the surface.

  17. Activated recombinant adenovirus proteinases

    Anderson, Carl W.; Mangel, Walter F.

    1999-08-10

    This application describes methods and expression constructs for producing activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases. Purified activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases and methods of purification are described. Activated adenovirus proteinases and methods for obtaining activated adenovirus proteinases are further included. Isolated peptide cofactors of adenovirus proteinase activity, methods of purifying and identifying said peptide cofactors are also described. Antibodies immunoreactive with adenovirus proteinases, immunospecific antibodies, and methods for preparing them are also described. Other related methods and materials are also described.

  18. Optimizing Active Cyber Defense

    Lu, Wenlian; Xu, Shouhuai; Yi, Xinlei

    2016-01-01

    Active cyber defense is one important defensive method for combating cyber attacks. Unlike traditional defensive methods such as firewall-based filtering and anti-malware tools, active cyber defense is based on spreading "white" or "benign" worms to combat against the attackers' malwares (i.e., malicious worms) that also spread over the network. In this paper, we initiate the study of {\\em optimal} active cyber defense in the setting of strategic attackers and/or strategic defenders. Specific...

  19. Contemporary physical activities

    Tainio, Matti

    2018-01-01

    The customary view of today’s recreational physical activities turns the human movement into a rational practice that is pursued for practical reasons only: for health, vitality, stamina and longevity. This prevalent point of view affects the understanding of the ends, content and quality of physical activities and it creates a bias where the biological, physiological and medical characteristics of physical activities are emphasized while the sensuous, experiential and creative aspects are su...

  20. Zinc triggers microglial activation.

    Kauppinen, Tiina M; Higashi, Youichirou; Suh, Sang Won; Escartin, Carole; Nagasawa, Kazuki; Swanson, Raymond A

    2008-05-28

    Microglia are resident immune cells of the CNS. When stimulated by infection, tissue injury, or other signals, microglia assume an activated, "ameboid" morphology and release matrix metalloproteinases, reactive oxygen species, and other proinflammatory factors. This innate immune response augments host defenses, but it can also contribute to neuronal death. Zinc is released by neurons under several conditions in which microglial activation occurs, and zinc chelators can reduce neuronal death in animal models of cerebral ischemia and neurodegenerative disorders. Here, we show that zinc directly triggers microglial activation. Microglia transfected with a nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) reporter gene showed a severalfold increase in NF-kappaB activity in response to 30 microm zinc. Cultured mouse microglia exposed to 15-30 microm zinc increased nitric oxide production, increased F4/80 expression, altered cytokine expression, and assumed the activated morphology. Zinc-induced microglial activation was blocked by inhibiting NADPH oxidase, poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1), or NF-kappaB activation. Zinc injected directly into mouse brain induced microglial activation in wild-type mice, but not in mice genetically lacking PARP-1 or NADPH oxidase activity. Endogenous zinc release, induced by cerebral ischemia-reperfusion, likewise induced a robust microglial reaction, and this reaction was suppressed by the zinc chelator CaEDTA. Together, these results suggest that extracellular zinc triggers microglial activation through the sequential activation of NADPH oxidase, PARP-1, and NF-kappaB. These findings identify a novel trigger for microglial activation and a previously unrecognized mechanism by which zinc may contribute to neurological disorders.

  1. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

    Full Text Available ... Healthy Weight Breastfeeding Micronutrient Malnutrition State and Local Programs Measuring Physical Activity Intensity Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir For more help with what ...

  2. Active Photonic Crystal Waveguides

    Ek, Sara

    This thesis deals with the fabrication and characterization of active photonic crystal waveguides, realized in III-V semiconductor material with embedded active layers. The platform offering active photonic crystal waveguides has many potential applications. One of these is a compact photonic...... due to photonic crystal dispersion. The observations are explained by the enhancement of net gain by light slow down. Another application based on active photonic crystal waveguides is micro lasers. Measurements on quantum dot micro laser cavities with different mirror configurations and photonic...

  3. CDBG Economic Development Activity

    Department of Housing and Urban Development — CDBG activity related to economic development, including commercial or industrial rehab, commercial or industrial land acquisition, commercial or industrial...

  4. Automatic NAA. Saturation activities

    Westphal, G.P.; Grass, F.; Kuhnert, M.

    2008-01-01

    A system for Automatic NAA is based on a list of specific saturation activities determined for one irradiation position at a given neutron flux and a single detector geometry. Originally compiled from measurements of standard reference materials, the list may be extended also by the calculation of saturation activities from k 0 and Q 0 factors, and f and α values of the irradiation position. A systematic improvement of the SRM approach is currently being performed by pseudo-cyclic activation analysis, to reduce counting errors. From these measurements, the list of saturation activities is recalculated in an automatic procedure. (author)

  5. Contact activation: a revision.

    Schmaier, A H

    1997-07-01

    In conclusion, a revised view of the contact system has been presented. This system has little to do with the initiation of hemostasis. Like lupus anticoagulants, deficiencies of contact proteins give prolonged APTTs but may be risk factors for thrombosis. BK from kininogens is a potent modulator of vascular biology inducing vasodilation, tissue plasminogen activator release, and prostacyclin liberation. Kininogens, themselves, are selective inhibitors of alpha-thrombin-induced platelet activation preventing alpha-thrombin from cleaving the cloned thrombin receptor after arginine41. Kininogens' alpha-thrombin inhibitory activity exists in intact kininogens, BK, and all of BK's breakdown products. HK also is the pivotal protein for contact protein assembly on endothelium. It is the receptor for prekallikrein which when bound to HK becomes activated to kallikrein by an endothelial cell enzyme system independent of activated forms of plasma factor XII. Prekallikrein activation on endothelial cells results in kinetically favorable single chain urokinase and plasminogen activation. Thus the "physiologic, negatively charged surface" for contact system activation is really the assembly of these proteins on cell membranes and activation by membrane-associated enzymes.

  6. Activated carbons and gold

    McDougall, G.J.; Hancock, R.D.

    1980-01-01

    The literature on activated carbon is reviewed so as to provide a general background with respect to the effect of source material and activation procedure on carbon properties, the structure and chemical nature of the surface of the activated carbon, and the nature of absorption processes on carbon. The various theories on the absorption of gold and silver from cyanide solutions are then reviewed, followed by a discussion of processes for the recovery of gold and silver from cyanide solutions using activated carbon, including a comparison with zinc precipitation

  7. CDBG Public Services Activity

    Department of Housing and Urban Development — CDBG activity related to public services, including senior services, legal services, youth services, employment training, health services, homebuyer counseling, food...

  8. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

    Full Text Available ... Content source: Division of Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Obesity , National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion Email Recommend Tweet YouTube Instagram ...

  9. CDBG Housing Activity

    Department of Housing and Urban Development — CDBG activity related to housing, including multifamily rehab, housing services, code enforcement, operation and repair of foreclosed property and public housing...

  10. NEA activities in 1983. 12. Activity report

    1984-01-01

    This report describes the main features of the Agency's work during 1983 and discusses the state and prospects of the nuclear industry in OECD countries. Trends in nuclear power, nuclear development and the fuel cycles nuclear safety technology and licensing, radiological and environmental impacts of nuclear fuel cycle activities, legal affairs, nuclear science, joint undertakings and other NEA joint projects, organisation and administration are reviewed

  11. Russian: An Active Introduction.

    De La Cruz, Nina

    The Active Introduction is one of the modules in an array of materials used in Russian training for beginners at the Foreign Service Institute. It is essentially a catalog of sentences relating to typical daily activities which can be combined to form different communication sequences in dialog form. Students learn to speak Russian through…

  12. Activation analysis. Detection limits

    Revel, G.

    1999-01-01

    Numerical data and limits of detection related to the four irradiation modes, often used in activation analysis (reactor neutrons, 14 MeV neutrons, photon gamma and charged particles) are presented here. The technical presentation of the activation analysis is detailed in the paper P 2565 of Techniques de l'Ingenieur. (A.L.B.)

  13. Obesity and physical activity.

    Westerterp, K.R.

    1999-01-01

    Department of Human Biology, Maastricht University, The Netherlands. k.westerterp@hb.unimaas.nl OBJECTIVES: Three aspects of obesity and physical activity are reviewed: whether the obese are inactive; how the activity level can be increased; and which are the effects of an increase in physical

  14. Rhythmic Activities for Children.

    Practical Pointers, 1977

    1977-01-01

    Focusing on the development of fundamental rhythm skills involved in music and movement activities, this teaching guide emphasizes activities that will help children express their feelings and communicate with others, develop perceptual and motor skills, and enhance sensory awareness. Suggestions for involving handicapped children and examples of…

  15. Elementary Environmental Activities.

    Larson, Robert J.

    This guide presents suggestions for field trips, out-of-doors activities, material for centers, and individualized activities in the teaching of elementary school science and particularly environmental education at the elementary level. The guide includes a section on preparation and procedures for conducting field trips, including sample…

  16. Enzyme with rhamnogalacturonase activity.

    Kofod, L.V.; Andersen, L.N.; Dalboge, H.; Kauppinen, M.S.; Christgau, S.; Heldt-Hansen, H.P.; Christophersen, C.; Nielsen, P.M.; Voragen, A.G.J.; Schols, H.A.

    1998-01-01

    An enzyme exhibiting rhamnogalacturonase activity, capable of cleaving a rhamnogalacturonan backbone in such a manner that galacturonic acids are left as the non-reducing ends, and which exhibits activity on hairy regions from a soy bean material and/or on saponified hairy regions from a sugar beet

  17. RTE activity report 2005

    2006-01-01

    The RTE (electric power transport network) is the french manger of the electric power transport. This activity report provides information on the company results for the year 2005: panorama of the year, management and organization, the place of RTE in the european market, the customers, the industrial tool, the environment the human resources, the international activity and the management report. (A.L.B.)

  18. Active and Healthy Schools

    Ball, Stephen; Kovarik, Jessica; Leidy, Heather

    2015-01-01

    The Active and Healthy School Program (AHS) can be used to alter the culture and environment of a school to help children make healthier choices. The purpose of this study was to determine the effectiveness of AHS to increase physical activity while decreasing total screen time, increase healthy food choices, and improve knowledge about physical…

  19. Measuring children's physical activity

    Schneller, Mikkel Bo; Bentsen, Peter; Nielsen, Glen

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Accelerometer-based physical activity monitoring has become the method of choice in many large-scale physical activity (PA) studies. However, there is an ongoing debate regarding the placement of the device, the determination of device wear time, and how to solve a lack of participant...

  20. Activity report 2002

    2002-01-01

    This annual report deals with the activities, the program management and the financial aspects of the ANDRA (National Agency for the radioactive wastes management) during 2002. After a presentation of the activities during the year 2002, it provides the financial accounting, data on company cash, the ANDRA missions and publications. (A.L.B.)

  1. Mental activity and culture

    Hofstede, Gert Jan

    2018-01-01

    How does culture affect mental activity? That question, applied to the design of social agents, is tackled in this chapter. Mental activity acts on the perceived outside world. It does so in three steps: perceive, interpret, select action. We see that when culture is taken into account, objective

  2. NEA activities in 1982

    1983-01-01

    This report presents an account of the activities of the Nuclear Energy Agency. It deals with current nuclear trends, nuclear development and the fuel cycle, nuclear safety research and licensing, radiological and environmental impacts of nuclear fuel cycle activities, legal affairs, nuclear science, joint undertakings, and, organization and administration

  3. Measuring Children's Physical Activity

    Schneller, Mikkel Bo; Bentsen, Peter; Nielsen, Glen

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Accelerometer-based physical activity monitoring has become the method of choice in many large-scale physical activity (PA) studies. However, there is an ongoing debate regarding the placement of the device, the determination of device wear time, and how to solve a lack of participant...

  4. Respirometry in activated sludge

    Spanjers, H.

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of the study was (1) to develop a respiration meter capable of continuously measuring, using different procedures, the oxygen uptake rate of activated sludge and (2) to expand knowledge about respiration related characteristics of wastewater and activated sludge.

    A

  5. Emotionally Intense Science Activities

    King, Donna; Ritchie, Stephen; Sandhu, Maryam; Henderson, Senka

    2015-01-01

    Science activities that evoke positive emotional responses make a difference to students' emotional experience of science. In this study, we explored 8th Grade students' discrete emotions expressed during science activities in a unit on Energy. Multiple data sources including classroom videos, interviews and emotion diaries completed at the end of…

  6. Automation of activation analysis

    Ivanov, I.N.; Ivanets, V.N.; Filippov, V.V.

    1985-01-01

    The basic data on the methods and equipment of activation analysis are presented. Recommendations on the selection of activation analysis techniques, and especially the technique envisaging the use of short-lived isotopes, are given. The equipment possibilities to increase dataway carrying capacity, using modern computers for the automation of the analysis and data processing procedure, are shown

  7. Carbon activity meter

    Roy, P.; Krankota, J.L.

    1975-01-01

    A carbon activity meter utilizing an electrochemical carbon cell with gaseous reference electrodes having particular application for measuring carbon activity in liquid sodium for the LMFBR project is described. The electrolyte container is electroplated with a thin gold film on the inside surface thereof, and a reference electrode consisting of CO/CO 2 gas is used. (U.S.)

  8. Children's recreational physical activity

    Kemperman, A.D.A.M.; Timmermans, H.J.P.

    2011-01-01

    This study explored children's participation in recreational (physical) activities and the extent to which this participation was influenced by individual and household socio-demographics and characteristics of the social and physical environment. Travel and activity diaries were used to collect

  9. The Activity of Play

    Pichlmair, Martin

    This paper presents Activity Theory as a framework for understanding the action of playing games with the intention of building a foundation for the creation of new game design tools and methods. Activity Theory, an epistemological framework rooted in Soviet psychology of the first half of the 20...

  10. Reflections on Activity Theory

    Bakhurst, David

    2009-01-01

    It is sometimes suggested that activity theory represents the most important legacy of Soviet philosophy and psychology. But what exactly "is" activity theory? The canonical account in the West is given by Engestrom, who identifies three stages in the theory's development: from Vygotsky's insights, through Leontiev's articulation of the…

  11. Activation force splines

    Engell-Nørregård, Morten Pol; Erleben, Kenny

    We present a method for simulating the active contraction of deformable models, usable for interactive animation of soft deformable objects. We present a novel physical principle as the governing equation for the coupling between the low dimensional 1D activation force model and the higher...

  12. Activity Fund Accounting.

    Cool, David W.

    1983-01-01

    Addresses the need of school districts in many states to decide on an appropriate mingling of centralization and decentralization in the operation of activity funds. Argues for analysis of activity fund operation through a breakdown into such major components as policy, the accounting system, and reporting and auditing. (JBM)

  13. Peak Longevity Physical Activity

    People who engage in three to five times the recommended minimum level of leisure-time physical activity derive the greatest benefit in terms of mortality reduction when compared with people who do not engage in leisure-time physical activity.

  14. Physical activity among adolescents

    Henriksen, P W; Ingholt, L; Rasmussen, M

    2016-01-01

    The objectives of this study were (a) to examine the association between various kinds of parental social support and adolescents' physical activity (PA) and (b) to examine whether various kinds of social support from mothers and fathers were differently associated with boys' and girls' PA. Data...... to understand why some adolescents are physically active and others are not....

  15. Human immunodeficiency virus-induced pathology favored by cellular transmission and activation

    Lewis, D.E.; Yoffe, B.; Bosworth, C.G.; Hollinger, F.B.; Rich, R.R.

    1988-01-01

    Epidemiological data suggest that transmission of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) occurs primarily by transference of virally infected cells. However, the efficiency of lytic productive infection induced by HIV after transmission of cell-associated virus vs. free virus is difficult to assess. The present studies compare the extent of depletion of CD4+ (helper/inducer) T cells after mixing uninfected cells with either free HIV or irradiated HIV-infected allogeneic or autologous cells in vitro. Rapid CD4+ cellular depletion occurred only in cultures containing allogeneic infected cells or after addition of a nonspecific T cell activation signal to cultures with autologous infected cells. These in vitro observations strongly support the epidemiological implication that interactions between infected and uninfected cells are the most efficient means of transmission and HIV-induced cytopathology in vivo. They also provide direct support for the concept that immunological stimulation by foreign cells infected with HIV dramatically increases the likelihood of transmission. These in vitro observations suggest a model for the acquisition of HIV in vivo and the role of cellular activation in dissemination of the virus to uninfected cells in an infected individual

  16. AMP (Activity Manipulation Program)

    Engle, W.W. Jr.

    1976-03-01

    AMP is a FORTRAN IV program written to handle energy-group structured activity factors such as sources, conversion factors, and response functions, as used by ANISN, DOT III, and other nuclear reactor and shielding codes. Activities may be retrieved from ANISN-type cross-section and activity sets found on cards and tapes, and from tabular-type sets on cards. They may be altered by change of group structure, multiplication by a constant, or multiplication by delta E (the group-energy interval), and then output to ANISN-type cards or tape and tabular-type cards. A full edit of input and output activities is always printed by group and activity number

  17. ANDRA, 2006 activity report

    2006-01-01

    The French national agency of radioactive waste management (ANDRA) was marked in 2006 by two outstanding events: the publication of the national inventory of radioactive wastes and valorisable materials, and the vote of the law from June 28, 2006 relative to the sustainable management of radioactive wastes and materials. This road-map law has an impact on ANDRA's activities for the coming years. This activity report presents several 2006 highlights of ANDRA's missions as well: the public service mission, the by-law about the effluents of the Aube plant for the storage of low-medium activity wastes, the building of the first 'double-cell' at the very-low activity waste storage plant of Aube, the research studies about the project of deep underground disposal of high-medium activity, long-living wastes, and the public information about ANDRA's technical and scientific know-how. The management and financial reports are attached in appendix. (J.S.)

  18. Active chiral fluids.

    Fürthauer, S; Strempel, M; Grill, S W; Jülicher, F

    2012-09-01

    Active processes in biological systems often exhibit chiral asymmetries. Examples are the chirality of cytoskeletal filaments which interact with motor proteins, the chirality of the beat of cilia and flagella as well as the helical trajectories of many biological microswimmers. Here, we derive constitutive material equations for active fluids which account for the effects of active chiral processes. We identify active contributions to the antisymmetric part of the stress as well as active angular momentum fluxes. We discuss four types of elementary chiral motors and their effects on a surrounding fluid. We show that large-scale chiral flows can result from the collective behavior of such motors even in cases where isolated motors do not create a hydrodynamic far field.

  19. Python erythrocytes are resistant to α-hemolysin from Escherichia coli.

    Larsen, Casper K; Skals, Marianne; Wang, Tobias; Cheema, Muhammad U; Leipziger, Jens; Praetorius, Helle A

    2011-12-01

    α-Hemolysin (HlyA) from Escherichia coli lyses mammalian erythrocytes by creating nonselective cation pores in the membrane. Pore insertion triggers ATP release and subsequent P2X receptor and pannexin channel activation. Blockage of either P2X receptors or pannexin channels reduces HlyA-induced hemolysis. We found that erythrocytes from Python regius and Python molurus are remarkably resistant to HlyA-induced hemolysis compared to human and Trachemys scripta erythrocytes. HlyA concentrations that induced maximal hemolysis of human erythrocytes did not affect python erythrocytes, but increasing the HlyA concentration 40-fold did induce hemolysis. Python erythrocytes were more resistant to osmotic stress than human erythrocytes, but osmotic stress tolerance per se did not confer HlyA resistance. Erythrocytes from T. scripta, which showed higher osmotic resistance than python erythrocytes, were as susceptible to HlyA as human erythrocytes. Therefore, we tested whether python erythrocytes lack the purinergic signalling known to amplify HlyA-induced hemolysis in human erythrocytes. P. regius erythrocytes increased intracellular Ca²⁺ concentration and reduced cell volume when exposed to 3 mM ATP, indicating the presence of a P2X₇-like receptor. In addition, scavenging extracellular ATP or blocking P2 receptors or pannexin channels reduced the HlyA-induced hemolysis. We tested whether the low HlyA sensitivity resulted from low affinity of HlyA to the python erythrocyte membrane. We found comparable incorporation of HlyA into human and python erythrocyte membranes. Taken together, the remarkable HlyA resistance of python erythrocytes was not explained by increased osmotic resistance, lack of purinergic hemolysis amplification, or differences in HlyA affinity.

  20. Activation neutron detector

    Ambardanishvili, T.S.; Kolomiitsev, M.A.; Zakharina, T.Y.; Dundua, V.J.; Chikhladze, N.V.

    1976-01-01

    An activation neutron detector made as a moulded and cured composition of a material capable of being neutron-activated is described. The material is selected from a group consisting of at least two chemical elements, a compound of at least two chemical elements and their mixture, each of the chemical elements and their mixture, each of the chemical elements being capable of interacting with neutrons to form radioactive isotopes having different radiation energies when disintegrating. The material capable of being neutron-activated is distributed throughout the volume of a polycondensation resin inert with respect to neutrons and capable of curing. 17 Claims, No Drawings

  1. Mnemonic activation by SPECT

    Migneco, O.; Darcourt, J.; Benoit, M; Malandain, G.; Thirion, J.P.; Robert, Ph.; Vidal, R.; Desvignes, Ph.; Benoliel, J.; Ayache, N.; Bussiere, F.

    1997-01-01

    Data of literature show that SPECT is able to detect cerebral activations induced by sensory-motor stimuli. The facts are not clearly established in what concerns the cognitive activations the amplitude of which is lower. We have studied an activation paradigm such as the Grober and Bruschke test which implies the long term explicit memory. It comprises a visual presentation of words followed by their indexed recall. By using a two-day protocol, 2 SPECTs were achieved in 4 healthy right-handed voluntaries as follows: one of activation (A) and one of control (B). The fifth subject benefited by a SPECT B and of an MRI. The injection for the examination A has been done during the indexed recall stage and for the examination B at the moment when the patient repeated several times the same 3 words. The SPECT data were collected 1 hour after the injection of 370 MBq of ECD making use of a 3-head camera equipped with UHR fan collimators and ending by a LMH on the reconstructed images of 8 mm. The MRI has been achieved by means of a Signa 1.5 Tesla magnet. The SPECT A and B of the subjects 1 to 4 were matched elastically to that of the subject 5 and that of the subject 5 was rigidly matched on its MRI. In this way the individual activation cards of the 4 subjects could be averaged and superimposed on the MRI of the 5. subject. One observes an internal temporal activation (maximal activation of left tonsil, +25% and right uncus, +23%) and a right cingulum activation (maximal activation, +25%), in agreement with the neuro-physiological data. The elastic matching makes possible the inter-subject averaging, what increases the signal-to-noise ratio of activation. The inter-modality rigid matching facilitates the anatomical localisation of the activation site. With these adapted tools, the cognitive activation is thus possible by SPECT and opens perspectives for early diagnosis of neurological troubles, namely of Alzheimer's disease

  2. Forecast of auroral activity

    Lui, A.T.Y.

    2004-01-01

    A new technique is developed to predict auroral activity based on a sample of over 9000 auroral sites identified in global auroral images obtained by an ultraviolet imager on the NASA Polar satellite during a 6-month period. Four attributes of auroral activity sites are utilized in forecasting, namely, the area, the power, and the rates of change in area and power. This new technique is quite accurate, as indicated by the high true skill scores for forecasting three different levels of auroral dissipation during the activity lifetime. The corresponding advanced warning time ranges from 22 to 79 min from low to high dissipation levels

  3. Activity report 1977

    Krishnan, L.V.; Lee, S.M.; Sahoo, D.; Sreedharan, O.M.; Srinivasan, G.

    1979-05-01

    The Research and Development (R and D) activities of the Reactor Research Centre, Kalpakkam, during the year 1977 are reported. The report is presented in the form of individual summaries of R and D activities most of which are connected with the FBTR project. These R and D activities deal with various aspects of the FBTR project such as reactor physics, reactor design, reactor engineering, fabrication, testing and quality assurance of reactor materials and components, reactor chemistry, reactor safety, reprocessing, systems analysis and instrumentation. (M.G.B.)

  4. A neutron activation detector

    Ambardanishvili, T.S.; Kolomiitsev, M.A.; Zakharina, T.Y.; Dundua, V.J.; Chikhladze, N.V.

    1973-01-01

    The present invention concerns a neutron activation detector made from a moulded and hardened composition. According to the invention, that composition contains an activable substance constituted by at least two chemical elements and/or compounds of at least two chemical elements. Each of these chemical elements is capable of reacting with the neutrons forming radio-active isotopes with vatious levels of energy during desintegration. This neutron detector is mainly suitable for measuring integral thermal neutron and fast neutron fluxes during irradiation of the sample, and also for measuring the intensities of neutron fields [fr

  5. Active Directory cookbook

    Hunter, Laura

    2008-01-01

    When you need practical hands-on support for Active Directory, the updated edition of this extremely popular Cookbook provides quick solutions to more than 300 common (and uncommon) problems you might encounter when deploying, administering, and automating Microsoft's network directory service. For the third edition, Active Directory expert Laura E. Hunter offers troubleshooting recipes based on valuable input from Windows administrators, in addition to her own experience. You'll find solutions for the Lightweight Directory Access Protocol (LDAP), ADAM (Active Directory Application Mode), m

  6. Physics of solar activity

    Sturrock, Peter A.

    1993-01-01

    The aim of the research activity was to increase our understanding of solar activity through data analysis, theoretical analysis, and computer modeling. Because the research subjects were diverse and many researchers were supported by this grant, a select few key areas of research are described in detail. Areas of research include: (1) energy storage and force-free magnetic field; (2) energy release and particle acceleration; (3) radiation by nonthermal electrons; (4) coronal loops; (5) flare classification; (6) longitude distributions of flares; (7) periodicities detected in the solar activity; (8) coronal heating and related problems; and (9) plasma processes.

  7. Creative activity and inclusion

    Shemanov A.Yu.

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the article was to analyze the inclusion potential of art creative activity, namely of theatre performance, in people with disabilities. The article provides examples of disagreements in understanding the significance of these art activities for exercising the rights of people with disabilities to contribute to culture and art and some problems arising here. The conclusion is made that theatre art performed by people with disabilities is gradually changing its function: from being a means of self-affirmation to the determination of its specific place in overall theatre process. These changes confirm the inclusion potential of theatre art activity.

  8. 1985. Activity progress report

    1986-01-01

    The research program of the Laboratory of nuclear and high energy physics (LPNHE) of the Institute of nuclear and particle physics (IN2P3) presents the research activities of its groups: principally, the Delphi group which constructs the outer detector of Delphi at LEP, the neutrino group which studies the neutrino mass, the Hera group whose work is collaboration to the construction of a detector for Hera collisioner; in parallel to these activities, other more little groups continue analysis of activities which are going to be finished: they are the CELLO group, the EHS group, the omega prime group and the nuclear emulsion group [fr

  9. Scientific activities 1979

    1981-01-01

    The scientific activities and achievements of the Nuclear Research Center Democritus for the year 1979 are presented in the form of a list of 78 projects giving title, objectives, commencement year, responsible of each project, developed activities and the pertaining lists of publications. The 15 chapters of this work cover the activities of the main Divisions of the Democritus NRC: Electronics, Biology, Physics, Chemistry, Health Physics, Reactor, Radioisotopes, Environmental Radioactivity, Soil Science, Computer Center, Uranium Exploration, Medical Service, Technological Applications and Training. (T.A.)

  10. Active Packaging Coatings

    Luis J. Bastarrachea

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Active food packaging involves the packaging of foods with materials that provide an enhanced functionality, such as antimicrobial, antioxidant or biocatalytic functions. This can be achieved through the incorporation of active compounds into the matrix of the commonly used packaging materials, or by the application of coatings with the corresponding functionality through surface modification. The latter option offers the advantage of preserving the packaging materials’ bulk properties nearly intact. Herein, different coating technologies like embedding for controlled release, immobilization, layer-by-layer deposition, and photografting are explained and their potential application for active food packaging is explored and discussed.

  11. IPSN's 2001 activity report

    2001-01-01

    This report summarizes the 2001 activities and operation of the French institute of nuclear protection and safety (IPSN) which has become the institute of radioprotection and nuclear safety (IRSN) after its merging with the office of protection against ionizing radiations (OPRI). IPSN's activities cover: the safety of nuclear facilities, the safety of nuclear wastes, the management of emergencies, the management of sensible materials, the protection of the environment and of the public health, some research activities with foreign partners (central and eastern Europe, Asia..), and a partnership with the GRS, the German homologue of IPSN. (J.S.)

  12. Inspector measurement verification activities

    George, R.S.; Crouch, R.

    e most difficult and complex activity facing a safeguards inspector involves the verification of measurements and the performance of the measurement system. Remeasurement is the key to measurement verification activities. Remeasurerements using the facility's measurement system provide the bulk of the data needed for determining the performance of the measurement system. Remeasurements by reference laboratories are also important for evaluation of the measurement system and determination of systematic errors. The use of these measurement verification activities in conjunction with accepted inventory verification practices provides a better basis for accepting or rejecting an inventory. (U.S.)

  13. Diabetes Diet, Eating, & Physical Activity

    ... Sexual, & Bladder Problems Clinical Trials Diabetes Diet, Eating, & Physical Activity Nutrition and physical activity are important parts of ... feet before, during, and after physical activity. What physical activities should I do if I have diabetes? Most ...

  14. Cryogenic Active Mirrors

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This effort seeks to develop active mirrors that can correct for thermally-induced figure deformations upon cooling from room-temperature at the time of manufacture,...

  15. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

    Full Text Available ... using relative intensity, people pay attention to how physical activity affects their heart rate and breathing. The talk test is a simple way to measure relative intensity. ...

  16. Mining activities at Neyveli

    Boopathy, P.V.; Rathinavel, R.

    1993-01-01

    Mining activities at lignite areas around Neyveli are described. Measures taken to safeguard the environment from despoliation of land, air pollution, noise pollution and effluents are described. (M.G.B.)

  17. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

    Full Text Available ... 45 David, Age 65 Harold, Age 67 Data & Statistics Facts About Physical Activity Data, Trends and Maps ... relative intensity and absolute intensity. Relative Intensity The level of effort required by a person to do ...

  18. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

    Full Text Available ... updated: June 4, 2015 Content source: Division of Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Obesity , National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion ... Services HHS/Open USA.gov Top

  19. Active Fire Mapping Program

    Active Fire Mapping Program Current Large Incidents (Home) New Large Incidents Fire Detection Maps MODIS Satellite Imagery VIIRS Satellite Imagery Fire Detection GIS Data Fire Data in Google Earth ...

  20. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

    Full Text Available ... content Start of Search Controls Search Form Controls Cancel Submit Search the CDC CDC A-Z Index ... Search Controls Search Form Controls Search The CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Physical Activity Note: Javascript ...

  1. Uranium market activities

    Patterson, J.A.

    1975-01-01

    Results are summarized from the 1974 ERDA annual survey of buyers and sellers and from a survey of uranium price data which provided information on additional domestic buying activity during the first half of 1975 through 1982

  2. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

    Full Text Available ... The amount of energy used by the body per minute of activity. The table below lists examples ... of Page Moderate Intensity Walking briskly (3 miles per hour or faster, but not race-walking) Water ...

  3. CDBG Public Improvements Activity

    Department of Housing and Urban Development — CDBG activity related to public improvements, including senior centers, youth centers, parks, street improvements, water/sewer improvements, child care centers, fire...

  4. Homebuyer Activities Report

    Department of Housing and Urban Development — This monthly report is an Excel spreadsheet. PJs can use this report to view homebuyer activities with the 2012 or 2013 program year in IDIS that are in final draw,...

  5. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

    Full Text Available ... aerobic activity, watch this video: Windows Media Player, 4:48 More videos Here are some ways to ... ePub file RIS file Page last reviewed: June 4, 2015 Page last updated: June 4, 2015 Content ...

  6. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

    Full Text Available ... For this reason, some items on this page will be unavailable. For more information about this message, ... If you're doing vigorous-intensity activity, you will not be able to say more than a ...

  7. 1996 GRAMME activity report

    1997-01-01

    This note draws a balance of the activities made at CEA-DEM within the frame of GRAMME collaboration. Results in six interest fields are presented: solidification, Mephisto program, transport phenomena, isothermal diffusion, rhenium alloys and instrumentation. (A.C.)

  8. OTI Activity Database

    US Agency for International Development — OTI's worldwide activity database is a simple and effective information system that serves as a program management, tracking, and reporting tool. In each country,...

  9. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

    Full Text Available ... level of effort required by a person to do an activity. When using relative intensity, people pay ... State and Local Programs File Formats Help: How do I view different file formats (PDF, DOC, PPT, ...

  10. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

    Full Text Available ... Older Adults Overcoming Barriers Measuring Physical Activity Intensity Target Heart Rate & Estimated Maximum Heart Rate Perceived Exertion ( ... a heavy backpack Other Methods of Measuring Intensity Target Heart Rate and Estimated Maximum Heart Rate Perceived ...

  11. Home Activities Reports

    Department of Housing and Urban Development — This monthly report is an Excel spreadsheet, broken up by state. PJs can use this report to view activities with the 2012 or 2013 program year in IDIS, including;...

  12. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

    Full Text Available ... Local Programs Measuring Physical Activity Intensity Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir For more help with what ... RSS ABOUT About CDC Jobs Funding LEGAL Policies Privacy FOIA No Fear Act OIG 1600 Clifton Road ...

  13. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

    Full Text Available ... Walkability Audit Tool Sample Audit Glossary Selected References Discount Fitness Club Network Assessing Need and Interest Selecting ... attention to how physical activity affects their heart rate and breathing. The talk test is a simple ...

  14. Physical activity: genes & health

    2002-01-01

    Carl Johan SUNDBERG is an Associate Professor in Physiology and Licenced Physician. His research focus is Molecular mechanisms involved in the adaptation of human skeletal muscle to physical activity.

  15. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

    ... 67 Data & Statistics Facts About Physical Activity Data, Trends and Maps Surveillance Systems Resources & Publications Reports Adults ... CDC’s Example StairWELL Stairwell Appearance Motivational Signs Installing Music Other Ideas to Consider Tracking Stair Usage Project ...

  16. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

    Full Text Available ... Recommendations & Guidelines Fact Sheets & Infographics Social Media Tools Community Strategies BE Active: Connecting Routes + Destinations Real-World ... Watch RSS ABOUT About CDC Jobs Funding LEGAL Policies Privacy FOIA No Fear Act OIG 1600 Clifton ...

  17. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

    Full Text Available ... 2015 Page last updated: June 4, 2015 Content source: Division of Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Obesity , National ... INFO U.S. Department of Health & Human Services HHS/Open USA.gov Top

  18. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

    Full Text Available ... 2015 Page last updated: June 4, 2015 Content source: Division of Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Obesity , National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion ... LEGAL Policies Privacy FOIA No Fear Act OIG ...

  19. Antitubercular activities of quinolones

    The paper gives a brief account of the recently introduced Szeged index. (Sz). Using this .... good correlation with antitubercular activities and yield physically meaningful regressions. ..... Parr R G and Pearson R G 1983 J. Am. Chem. Soc.

  20. Enerplan, activity report 2010

    2011-01-01

    Enerplan is the French union of solar energy professionals. Created in 1983, its social purpose is the study and defense of the rights and of the material and moral interests of its members. Enerplan structures its action through two poles representing members' activities: 'solar energy and building' where topics about heat and electricity generation in relation with buildings are treated, and 'photovoltaic energy' where topics specific to big solar power plants are considered. Thanks to the collaborative participation of its members, both poles allow Enerplan union to be source of proposals to develop solar energy in France. As an active interface between professionals and institutions, Enerplan includes in its membership: industrialists, plant makers, engineering consultants, installers, associations, energy suppliers etc, from small-medium size companies to big groups. This document presents Enerplan's activities in 2010 (public relations, lobbying, meetings and conferences, promotional activities, collaborations, projects..)