WorldWideScience

Sample records for cell wall-modifying genes

  1. Ethylene regulates Apple (Malus x domestica) fruit softening through a dose x time-dependent mechanism and through differential sensitivities and dependencies of cell wall-modifying genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ireland, Hilary S; Gunaseelan, Kularajathevan; Muddumage, Ratnasiri; Tacken, Emma J; Putterill, Jo; Johnston, Jason W; Schaffer, Robert J

    2014-05-01

    In fleshy fruit species that have a strong requirement for ethylene to ripen, ethylene is synthesized autocatalytically, producing increasing concentrations as the fruits ripen. Apple fruit with the ACC OXIDASE 1 (ACO1) gene suppressed cannot produce ethylene autocatalytically at ripening. Using these apple lines, an ethylene sensitivity dependency model was previously proposed, with traits such as softening showing a high dependency for ethylene as well as low sensitivity. In this study, it is shown that the molecular control of fruit softening is a complex process, with different cell wall-related genes being independently regulated and exhibiting differential sensitivities to and dependencies on ethylene at the transcriptional level. This regulation is controlled through a dose × time mechanism, which results in a temporal transcriptional response that would allow for progressive cell wall disassembly and thus softening. This research builds on the sensitivity dependency model and shows that ethylene-dependent traits can progress over time to the same degree with lower levels of ethylene. This suggests that a developmental clock measuring cumulative ethylene controls the fruit ripening process.

  2. Mining the secretome of root-knot nematodes for cell wall modifying proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roze, E.H.A.

    2008-01-01

    The products of parasitism genes in nematodes must be secreted to reach their targets at the nematode-plant interface. These nematode secretory proteins are therefore recognised to play an important role in the nematode-plant interaction and as a result have been subject of intense study for years.

  3. Listeria monocytogenes is resistant to lysozyme through the regulation, not the acquisition, of cell wall-modifying enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Thomas P; Loukitcheva, Anastasia; Zemansky, Jason; Wheeler, Richard; Boneca, Ivo G; Portnoy, Daniel A

    2014-11-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a Gram-positive facultative intracellular pathogen that is highly resistant to lysozyme, a ubiquitous enzyme of the innate immune system that degrades cell wall peptidoglycan. Two peptidoglycan-modifying enzymes, PgdA and OatA, confer lysozyme resistance on L. monocytogenes; however, these enzymes are also conserved among lysozyme-sensitive nonpathogens. We sought to identify additional factors responsible for lysozyme resistance in L. monocytogenes. A forward genetic screen for lysozyme-sensitive mutants led to the identification of 174 transposon insertion mutations that mapped to 13 individual genes. Four mutants were killed exclusively by lysozyme and not other cell wall-targeting molecules, including the peptidoglycan deacetylase encoded by pgdA, the putative carboxypeptidase encoded by pbpX, the orphan response regulator encoded by degU, and the highly abundant noncoding RNA encoded by rli31. Both degU and rli31 mutants had reduced expression of pbpX and pgdA, yet DegU and Rli31 did not regulate each other. Since pbpX and pgdA are also present in lysozyme-sensitive bacteria, this suggested that the acquisition of novel enzymes was not responsible for lysozyme resistance, but rather, the regulation of conserved enzymes by DegU and Rli31 conferred high lysozyme resistance. Each lysozyme-sensitive mutant exhibited attenuated virulence in mice, and a time course of infection revealed that the most lysozyme-sensitive strain was killed within 30 min of intravenous infection, a phenotype that was recapitulated in purified blood. Collectively, these data indicate that the genes required for lysozyme resistance are highly upregulated determinants of L. monocytogenes pathogenesis that are required for avoiding the enzymatic activity of lysozyme in the blood.

  4. Listeria monocytogenes Is Resistant to Lysozyme through the Regulation, Not the Acquisition, of Cell Wall-Modifying Enzymes

    OpenAIRE

    Burke, Thomas P.; Loukitcheva, Anastasia; Zemansky, Jason; Wheeler, Richard; Boneca, Ivo G.; Portnoy, Daniel A.

    2014-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a Gram-positive facultative intracellular pathogen that is highly resistant to lysozyme, a ubiquitous enzyme of the innate immune system that degrades cell wall peptidoglycan. Two peptidoglycan-modifying enzymes, PgdA and OatA, confer lysozyme resistance on L. monocytogenes; however, these enzymes are also conserved among lysozyme-sensitive nonpathogens. We sought to identify additional factors responsible for lysozyme resistance in L. monocytogenes. A forward geneti...

  5. Complex phase behavior of a fluid in slits with semipermeable walls modified with tethered chains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borówko, M; Patrykiejew, A; Rżysko, W; Sokołowski, S; Ilnytskyi, J

    2011-01-28

    We study the phase behavior of a two-component fluid in a pore with the walls modified by tethered chains. The walls are completely permeable for one component of the fluid and completely impenetrable for the second component. The fluid is perfectly mixed in a bulk phase. We have found that depending on the details of the model the fluid undergoes capillary condensation inside the pore and wetting and layering transitions at the outer walls. Moreover, we have found transitions connected with the change of symmetry of the distribution of chains and fluid inside the pore.

  6. Clock Genes in Glia Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi-Castañeda, Donají

    2016-01-01

    Circadian rhythms are periodic patterns in biological processes that allow the organisms to anticipate changes in the environment. These rhythms are driven by the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), the master circadian clock in vertebrates. At a molecular level, circadian rhythms are regulated by the so-called clock genes, which oscillate in a periodic manner. The protein products of clock genes are transcription factors that control their own and other genes’ transcription, collectively known as “clock-controlled genes.” Several brain regions other than the SCN express circadian rhythms of clock genes, including the amygdala, the olfactory bulb, the retina, and the cerebellum. Glia cells in these structures are expected to participate in rhythmicity. However, only certain types of glia cells may be called “glial clocks,” since they express PER-based circadian oscillators, which depend of the SCN for their synchronization. This contribution summarizes the current information about clock genes in glia cells, their plausible role as oscillators and their medical implications. PMID:27666286

  7. Gene sensitizes cancer cells to chemotherapy drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    NCI scientists have found that a gene, Schlafen-11 (SLFN11), sensitizes cells to substances known to cause irreparable damage to DNA.  As part of their study, the researchers used a repository of 60 cell types to identify predictors of cancer cell respons

  8. American Society of Gene & Cell Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... agencies, foundations, biotechnology and pharmaceutical companies. Mission: To advance knowledge, awareness, and education leading to the discovery and clinical application of gene and cell therapies to alleviate human disease. Vision: ASGCT will serve ...

  9. Microanalysis of gene expression in cultured cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. van der Veer (Eveliene)

    1982-01-01

    textabstractIn this thesis two aspects of gene expression in cultured cells have been studied: the heterogeneity in gene expression in relation with the development and application of microchemical techniques for the prenatal diagnosis of inborn errors of metabolism and the possibility of inducing g

  10. Stem Cell-Based Gene Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagnis; Mannoni

    1997-01-01

    Many researchers and clinicians wonder if gene therapy remains a way to treat genetic or acquired life-threatening diseases. For the last few years, many experimental, pre-clinical, and clinical data have been published showing that it is possible to transfer with relatively high efficiency new genetic information (transgene) in many cells or tissues including both hematopoietic progenitor cells and differentiated cells. Based on experimental works, addition of the normal gene to cells with deletions, mutations, or alterations of the corresponding endogenous one has been shown to reverse the phenotype and to restore (in some case) the functional defect. In spite of very attractive preliminary results, however, suggesting the feasibility and safety of this process, therapeutically efficient gene transfer and expression in targeted cells or tissues must be proven. In this review, we will focus primarily on the attempts to use gene transfer in hematopoietic stem cells as a model for more general genetic manipulations of stem cells. Hematopoietic stem cells are included in a subset of bone marrow, cord blood, or peripheral blood cells identified by the expression of the CD34 antigen on their membrane.

  11. Heat induces gene amplification in cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Bin, E-mail: yanbin@mercyhealth.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson, MS 39213 (United States); Mercy Cancer Center, Mercy Medical Center-North Iowa, Mason City, IA 50401 (United States); Ouyang, Ruoyun [Department of Respiratory Medicine, The Second Xiangya Hospital, Xinagya School of Medicine, Central South University, Changsha 410011 (China); Huang, Chenghui [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson, MS 39213 (United States); Department of Oncology, The Third Xiangya Hospital, Xinagya School of Medicine, Central South University, Changsha 410013 (China); Liu, Franklin [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710 (United States); Neill, Daniel [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson, MS 39213 (United States); Li, Chuanyuan [Dermatology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710 (United States); Dewhirst, Mark [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710 (United States)

    2012-10-26

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This study discovered that heat exposure (hyperthermia) results in gene amplification in cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hyperthermia induces DNA double strand breaks. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DNA double strand breaks are considered to be required for the initiation of gene amplification. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The underlying mechanism of heat-induced gene amplification is generation of DNA double strand breaks. -- Abstract: Background: Hyperthermia plays an important role in cancer therapy. However, as with radiation, it can cause DNA damage and therefore genetic instability. We studied whether hyperthermia can induce gene amplification in cancer cells and explored potential underlying molecular mechanisms. Materials and methods: (1) Hyperthermia: HCT116 colon cancer cells received water-submerged heating treatment at 42 or 44 Degree-Sign C for 30 min; (2) gene amplification assay using N-(phosphoacetyl)-L-aspartate (PALA) selection of cabamyl-P-synthetase, aspartate transcarbarmylase, dihydro-orotase (cad) gene amplified cells; (3) southern blotting for confirmation of increased cad gene copies in PALA-resistant cells; (4) {gamma}H2AX immunostaining to detect {gamma}H2AX foci as an indication for DNA double strand breaks. Results: (1) Heat exposure at 42 or 44 Degree-Sign C for 30 min induces gene amplification. The frequency of cad gene amplification increased by 2.8 and 6.5 folds respectively; (2) heat exposure at both 42 and 44 Degree-Sign C for 30 min induces DNA double strand breaks in HCT116 cells as shown by {gamma}H2AX immunostaining. Conclusion: This study shows that heat exposure can induce gene amplification in cancer cells, likely through the generation of DNA double strand breaks, which are believed to be required for the initiation of gene amplification. This process may be promoted by heat when cellular proteins that are responsible for checkpoints, DNA replication, DNA repair and

  12. Differential expression of cell adhesion genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stein, Wilfred D; Litman, Thomas; Fojo, Tito;

    2005-01-01

    that compare cells grown in suspension to similar cells grown attached to one another as aggregates have suggested that it is adhesion to the extracellular matrix of the basal membrane that confers resistance to apoptosis and, hence, resistance to cytotoxins. The genes whose expression correlates with poor...

  13. Gene expression profiles in irradiated cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minafra, L.; Bravatà, V.; Russo, G.; Ripamonti, M.; Gilardi, M. C.

    2013-07-01

    Knowledge of the molecular and genetic mechanisms underlying cellular response to radiation may provide new avenues to develop innovative predictive tests of radiosensitivity of tumours and normal tissues and to improve individual therapy. Nowadays very few studies describe molecular changes induced by hadrontherapy treatments, therefore this field has to be explored and clarified. High-throughput methodologies, such as DNA microarray, allow us to analyse mRNA expression of thousands of genes simultaneously in order to discover new genes and pathways as targets of response to hadrontherapy. Our aim is to elucidate the molecular networks involved in the sensitivity/resistance of cancer cell lines subjected to hadrontherapy treatments with a genomewide approach by using cDNA microarray technology to identify gene expression profiles and candidate genes responsible of differential cellular responses.

  14. Gene expression profiles in irradiated cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minafra, L.; Bravatà, V.; Russo, G.; Ripamonti, M.; Gilardi, M. C. [IBFM CNR - LATO, Cefalù, Segrate (Italy)

    2013-07-26

    Knowledge of the molecular and genetic mechanisms underlying cellular response to radiation may provide new avenues to develop innovative predictive tests of radiosensitivity of tumours and normal tissues and to improve individual therapy. Nowadays very few studies describe molecular changes induced by hadrontherapy treatments, therefore this field has to be explored and clarified. High-throughput methodologies, such as DNA microarray, allow us to analyse mRNA expression of thousands of genes simultaneously in order to discover new genes and pathways as targets of response to hadrontherapy. Our aim is to elucidate the molecular networks involved in the sensitivity/resistance of cancer cell lines subjected to hadrontherapy treatments with a genomewide approach by using cDNA microarray technology to identify gene expression profiles and candidate genes responsible of differential cellular responses.

  15. Genes involved in cell division in mycoplasmas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Alarcón

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial cell division has been studied mainly in model systems such as Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis, where it is described as a complex process with the participation of a group of proteins which assemble into a multiprotein complex called the septal ring. Mycoplasmas are cell wall-less bacteria presenting a reduced genome. Thus, it was important to compare their genomes to analyze putative genes involved in cell division processes. The division and cell wall (dcw cluster, which in E. coli and B. subtilis is composed of 16 and 17 genes, respectively, is represented by only three to four genes in mycoplasmas. Even the most conserved protein, FtsZ, is not present in all mycoplasma genomes analyzed so far. A model for the FtsZ protein from Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae and Mycoplasma synoviae has been constructed. The conserved residues, essential for GTP/GDP binding, are present in FtsZ from both species. A strong conservation of hydrophobic amino acid patterns is observed, and is probably necessary for the structural stability of the protein when active. M. synoviae FtsZ presents an extended amino acid sequence at the C-terminal portion of the protein, which may participate in interactions with other still unknown proteins crucial for the cell division process.

  16. Cell cycle gene expression under clinorotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artemenko, Olga

    2016-07-01

    Cyclins and cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) are main regulators of the cell cycle of eukaryotes. It's assumes a significant change of their level in cells under microgravity conditions and by other physical factors actions. The clinorotation use enables to determine the influence of gravity on simulated events in the cell during the cell cycle - exit from the state of quiet stage and promotion presynthetic phase (G1) and DNA synthesis phase (S) of the cell cycle. For the clinorotation effect study on cell proliferation activity is the necessary studies of molecular mechanisms of cell cycle regulation and development of plants under altered gravity condition. The activity of cyclin D, which is responsible for the events of the cell cycle in presynthetic phase can be controlled by the action of endogenous as well as exogenous factors, but clinorotation is one of the factors that influence on genes expression that regulate the cell cycle.These data can be used as a model for further research of cyclin - CDK complex for study of molecular mechanisms regulation of growth and proliferation. In this investigation we tried to summarize and analyze known literature and own data we obtained relatively the main regulators of the cell cycle in altered gravity condition.

  17. Optogenetics for gene expression in mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Konrad; Naumann, Sebastian; Weber, Wilfried; Zurbriggen, Matias D

    2015-02-01

    Molecular switches that are controlled by chemicals have evolved as central research instruments in mammalian cell biology. However, these tools are limited in terms of their spatiotemporal resolution due to freely diffusing inducers. These limitations have recently been addressed by the development of optogenetic, genetically encoded, and light-responsive tools that can be controlled with the unprecedented spatiotemporal precision of light. In this article, we first provide a brief overview of currently available optogenetic tools that have been designed to control diverse cellular processes. Then, we focus on recent developments in light-controlled gene expression technologies and provide the reader with a guideline for choosing the most suitable gene expression system.

  18. Gene Therapy: a Breakthrough for Sickle Cell Anemia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... fullstory_163849.html Gene Therapy: A Breakthrough for Sickle Cell Anemia? But treatment has only been given to ... gene therapy to treat, or even potentially cure, sickle cell anemia. The findings come from just one patient, ...

  19. Cholinergic regulation of VIP gene expression in human neuroblastoma cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Bo; Georg, Birgitte; Fahrenkrug, Jan

    1997-01-01

    Vasoactive intestinal polypeptide, muscarinic receptor, neuroblastoma cell, mRNA, gene expression, peptide processing......Vasoactive intestinal polypeptide, muscarinic receptor, neuroblastoma cell, mRNA, gene expression, peptide processing...

  20. GM-CSF GENE OR B7-1 GENE MODIFIED MURINE EL-4 CELLS VACCINE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张清媛; 李殿俊; 王志华

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To study the vaccine potency of gene-modified tumor cells. Methods: The EL-4 lymphoma was transduced with recombinant retrovirus containing the murine GM-CSF gene or B7-1 gene. The effect of gene transduction on antitumor immunity was investigated. Results: Flow cytometry analysis showed that expression of their surface marker between wild-type EL-4 cells and gene transduced tumor cells was the same except for CD80 positive in B7-1 gene transduced cells. GM-CSF gene or B7-1 gene transduced EL-4 cells resulted in remarkable loss of tumorigenicity in syngenetic mice. The systemic protective immunity was induced against the challenge with EL-4/wt cells. Therapeutic vaccine with EL-4/GM-CSF or EL/7-1 cells could retard the growth of established early-stage EL-4/wt tumor significantly, but not retard the growth of late-stage EL-4/wt tumor. Irradiated GM-CSF gene transduced EL-4 cells showed strong vaccine effect against EL-4 cell challenge, but irradiated B7-1 gene transduced EL-4 cells showed weak vaccine effect. Remarkable cooperative antitumor effect against EL-4 cell challenge was observed when both irradiated EL-4/GM-CSF and EL-4/B7-1 were inoculated together. Conclusion: GM-CSF gene or B7-1 gene transduced combination of the two kinds of vaccine may have potential application value in human cancer treatment.

  1. Gene-modified bone marrow cell therapy for prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, H; Thompson, T C

    2008-05-01

    There is a critical need to develop new and effective cancer therapies that target bone, the primary metastatic site for prostate cancer and other malignancies. Among the various therapeutic approaches being considered for this application, gene-modified cell-based therapies may have specific advantages. Gene-modified cell therapy uses gene transfer and cell-based technologies in a complementary fashion to chaperone appropriate gene expression cassettes to active sites of tumor growth. In this paper, we briefly review potential cell vehicles for this approach and discuss relevant gene therapy strategies for prostate cancer. We further discuss selected studies that led to the conceptual development and preclinical testing of IL-12 gene-modified bone marrow cell therapy for prostate cancer. Finally, we discuss future directions in the development of gene-modified cell therapy for metastatic prostate cancer, including the need to identify and test novel therapeutic genes such as GLIPR1.

  2. Direct cell lysis for single-cell gene expression profiling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David eSvec

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The interest to analyze single and few cell samples is rapidly increasing. Numerous extraction protocols to purify nucleic acids are available, but most of them compromise severely on yield to remove contaminants and are therefore not suitable for the analysis of samples containing small numbers of transcripts only. Here, we evaluate 17 direct cell lysis protocols for transcript yield and compatibility with downstream reverse transcription quantitative real-time PCR. Four endogenously expressed genes are assayed together with RNA and DNA spikes in the samples. We found bovine serum albumin (BSA to be the best lysis agent, resulting in efficient cell lysis, high RNA stability and enhanced reverse transcription efficiency. Furthermore, we found direct cell lysis with BSA superior to standard column based extraction methods, when analyzing from 1 up to 512 mammalian cells. In conclusion, direct cell lysis protocols based on BSA can be applied with most cell collection methods and are compatible with most analytical workflows to analyze single cells as well as samples composed of small numbers of cells.

  3. Gene therapy of primary T cell immunodeficiencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Alain; Hacein-Bey-Abina, Salima; Cavazzana-Calvo, Marina

    2013-08-10

    Gene therapy of severe combined immunodeficiencies has been proven to be effective to provide sustained correction of the T cell immunodeficiencies. This has been achieved for 2 forms of SCID, i.e SCID-X1 (γc deficiency) and adenosine deaminase deficiency. Occurrence of gene toxicity generated by integration of first generation retroviral vectors, as observed in the SCID-X1 trials has led to replace these vectors by self inactivated (SIN) retro(or lenti) viruses that may provide equivalent efficacy with a better safety profile. Results of ongoing clinical studies in SCID as well as in other primary immunodeficiencies, such as the Wiskott Aldrich syndrome, will be thus very informative.

  4. THE GENE EXPRESSION PROFILE OF HIGHLY METASTATIC HUMAN OVARIAN CANCER CELL LINE BY GENE CHIP

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吕桂泉; 许沈华; 牟瀚舟; 朱赤红; 羊正炎; 高永良; 楼洪坤; 刘祥麟; 杨文; 程勇

    2001-01-01

    To study the gene expression of high metastatic human ovarian carcinoma cell line (HO-8910PM) and to screen for novel metastasis- associated genes by cDNA microarray. Methods: The cDNA was retro-transcribed from equal quantity mRNA derived from tissues of highly metastatic ovarian carcinoma cell line and normal ovarian, and was labeled with Cy5 and Cy3 fluorescence as probes. The mixed probes were hybridized with BioDoor 4096 double dot human whole gene chip. The chip was scanned by scanArray 3000 laser scanner. The acquired image was analyzed by ImaGene 3.0 software. Results: By applying the cDNA microarray we found: A total of 323 genes whose expression level were 3 times higher or lower in HO-8910PM cell than normal ovarian epithelium cell were screened out, with 71 higher and 252 lower respectively. Among these 10 were new genes. 67 genes showed expression difference bigger than 6 times between HO-8910PM cell and normal ovarian epithelium cell, among these genes 12 were higher, 55 lower, and two new genes were found. Conclusion: cDNA microarray technique is effective in screening the differentially expressed genes between human ovarian cancer cell line (HO-8910PM) and normal ovarian epithelium cell. Using the cDNA microarray to analyze of human ovarian cancer cell line gene expression profile difference will help the gene diagnosis, treatment and protection.

  5. Rheumatoid factors, B cells and immunoglobulin genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jefferis, R

    1995-04-01

    The paradigm of self, non-self discrimination in the immune system is under review as autoreactive B or T cells are increasingly delineated within normal individuals. The products of autoreactive B cells are, mostly, polyspecific IgM antibodies of low affinity. These 'natural' antibodies include rheumatoid factors (RF) encoded by unmutated germline immunoglobulin genes. In rheumatoid arthritis (RA) the RF may be of the IgM, IgG or IgA isotype, show evidence of somatic mutation and have increased affinity; consistent with maturation of an antigen driven immune response. This response could be initiated or driven by an auto-immunogenic form of IgG or an exogenous cross-reactive antigen. Changes in galactosylation of IgG have been reported to be a valuable diagnostic and prognostic indicator in RA. Speculation that these changes may precipitate some of the disease processes is critically reviewed.

  6. Cell cycle-dependent gene networks relevant to cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The analysis of sophisticated interplays between cell cycle-dependent genes in a disease condition is one of the largely unexplored areas in modern tumor biology research. Many cell cycle-dependent genes are either oncogenes or suppressor genes, or are closely asso- ciated with the transition of a cell cycle. However, it is unclear how the complicated relationships between these cell cycle-dependent genes are, especially in cancers. Here, we sought to identify significant expression relationships between cell cycle-dependent genes by analyzing a HeLa microarray dataset using a local alignment algorithm and constructed a gene transcriptional network specific to the cancer by assembling these newly identified gene-gene relationships. We further characterized this global network by partitioning the whole network into several cell cycle phase-specific sub-networks. All generated networks exhibited the power-law node-degree dis- tribution, and the average clustering coefficients of these networks were remarkably higher than those of pure scale-free networks, indi- cating a property of hierarchical modularity. Based on the known protein-protein interactions and Gene Ontology annotation data, the proteins encoded by cell cycle-dependent interacting genes tended to share the same biological functions or to be involved in the same biological processes, rather than interacting by physical means. Finally, we identified the hub genes related to cancer based on the topo- logical importance that maintain the basic structure of cell cycle-dependent gene networks.

  7. Msh homeobox genes regulate cadherin-mediated cell adhesion and cell-cell sorting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lincecum, J M; Fannon, A; Song, K; Wang, Y; Sassoon, D A

    1998-07-01

    Msx-1 and Msx-2 are two closely related homeobox genes expressed in cephalic neural crest tooth buds, the optic cup endocardial cushions, and the developing limb [Hill and Davidson, 1991; Monaghan et al., 1991; Robert et al., 1991]. These sites correspond to regions of active cell segregation and proliferation under the influence of epithelial-mesenchymal cell interactions [Brown et al., 1993; Davidson et al., 1991], suggesting that Msx-1 and Msx-2 regulate cell-cell interactions. We have investigated the potential relationship between expression of the Msh homeobox genes (Msx-1 and Msx-2) and cadherin-mediated cell adhesion and cell sorting. We report that cell lines stably expressing Msx-1 or Msx-2 differentially sort on the basis of Msh gene expression. We demonstrate in vitro that initial cell aggregation involves calcium-dependent adhesion molecules (cadherins) and that Msh genes regulate cadherin-mediated adhesion. These results support the hypothesis that Msh genes play a role in the regulation of cell-cell adhesion and provide a link between the genetic phenomena of homeobox gene expression and cellular events involved in morphogenesis, including cell sorting and proliferation.

  8. Toward stable gene expression in CHO cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariati; Koh, Esther YC; Yeo, Jessna HM; Ho, Steven CL; Yang, Yuansheng

    2014-01-01

    Maintaining high gene expression level during long-term culture is critical when producing therapeutic recombinant proteins using mammalian cells. Transcriptional silencing of promoters, most likely due to epigenetic events such as DNA methylation and histone modifications, is one of the major mechanisms causing production instability. Previous studies demonstrated that the core CpG island element (IE) from the hamster adenine phosphoribosyltransferase gene is effective to prevent DNA methylation. We generated one set of modified human cytomegalovirus (hCMV) promoters by insertion of one or two copies of IE in either forward or reverse orientations into different locations of the hCMV promoter. The modified hCMV with one copy of IE inserted between the hCMV enhancer and core promoter in reverse orientation (MR1) was most effective at enhancing expression stability in CHO cells without comprising expression level when compared with the wild type hCMV. We also found that insertion of IE into a chimeric murine CMV (mCMV) enhancer and human elongation factor-1α core (hEF) promoter in reverse orientation did not enhance expression stability, indicating that the effect of IE on expression stability is possibly promoter specific. PMID:25482237

  9. HIGH EFFICIENCY RETROVIRUS-MEDIATED GENE TRANSFER TO LEUKEMIA CELLS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FU Jian-xin; CHEN Zi-xing; CEN Jian-nong; WANG Wei; RUAN Chang-geng

    1999-01-01

    Objective: To establish an efficient and safe gene transfer system mediated by retrovirus for gene marking and gene therapy of human leukemia. Method: The retroviral vector LXSN, containing the neomycin resistance (NeoR) gene, was transferred into amphotropic packaging cells GP+envAm12 by liposome transfection or by ecotropic retrovirus transduction. Amphotropic retrovirus in supernatants with higher titer was used to infect human leukemic cell lines NB4, U937, and THP-1.The efficiency of gene transfer was assayed on colonies formed by transduced K562 cells. Results: The titer of DOSPER directly transfected GP+envAm12 cells determined on NIH3T3 cells was 8.0×105 CFU/ml, while that of producer infected with retrovirus was 1.6×107CFU/ml. Integration of NeoR gene into all leukemia cells was confirmed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR).Absence of replication-competent virus was proved by both nested PCR for env gene and marker gene rescue assay. Gene transfer with the efficiency as high as 93.3 to 100% in K562 cells was verified by seminested PCR for integrated NeoR gene on colonies after 7 days' culture.Conclusion: The efficiency and safety of retrovirus mediated gene transfer system might provide an optimal system in gene therapy for leukemia or genetic diseases.

  10. Expression of recombination-activating genes and T cell receptor gene recombination in the human T cell leukemia cell line

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZOU Hong-yun; MA Li; MENG Min-jie; YAO Xin-sheng; LIN Ying; WU Zhen-qiang; HE Xiao-wei; WANG Ju-fang; WANG Xiao-ning

    2007-01-01

    Background Recent studies have suggested that mature T cells can change their specificity through reexpression of recombination-activating genes (RAG) and RAG-mediated V(D)J recombination. This process is named receptor revision and has been observed in mature peripheral T cells from transgenic mice and human donors. However, whether the receptor revision in mature T cells is a random or orientated process remains poorly understood. Here we used the Jurkat human T cell line, which represents a mature stage of T cell development, as a model to investigate the regulation of T cell receptor (TCR) gene recombination.Methods TCR Dβ-Jβ signal joint T cell receptor excision DNA circles (sjTRECs) were determined by nested and seminested PCR. Double-strand DNA breaks at recombination signal sequences (RSSs) in the TCRVβ chain locus were detected by ligation-mediated-PCR. Further analysis of the complementarity-determining region 3 (CDR3) size of the TCRVβ chain was examined by the TCR GeneScan technique.Results RAG1, RAG2, and three crucial components of the nonhomologous DNA end-joining (NHEJ) pathway were readily detected in Jurkat. Characteristics of junctional diversity of Dβ2-Jβ2 signal joints and ds RSS breaks associated with the Dβ25' and Dβ 23' sites were detected in DNA from Jurkat cells. CDR3 size and the gene sequences of the TCRVβ chain did not change during cell proliferation.Conclusions RAG1 and RAG2 and ongoing TCR gene recombination are coexpressed in Jurkat cells, but the ongoing recombination process may not play a role in modification of the TCR repertoire. However, the results suggest that Jurkat could be used as a model for studying the regulation of RAGs and V(D)J recombination and as a "special" model of the coexistence of TCR gene rearrangements and "negative" receptor revision.

  11. Alterations of FHIT Gene and P16 Gene in Nickel Transformed Human Bronchial Epithelial Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEI-DONG JI; JIA-KUN CHEN; JIA-CHUN LU; ZHONG-LIANG WU; FEI YI; SU-MEI FENG

    2006-01-01

    To study the alterations of FHIT gene and P16 gene in malignant transformed human bronchial epithelial cells induced by crystalline nickel sulfide using an immoral human bronchial epithelial cell line, and to explore the molecular mechanism of nickel carcinogenesis. Methods 16HBE cells were treated 6 times with different concentrations of NiS in vitro, and the degree of malignant transformation was determined by assaying the anchorage-independent growth and tumorigenicity. Malignant transformed cells and tumorigenic cells were examined for alterations of FHIT gene and P16 gene using RT-PCR, DNA sequencing, silver staining PCR-SSCP and Western blotting. Results NiS-treated cells exhibited overlapping growth. Compared with that of negative control cells, soft agar colony formation efficiency of NiS-treated cells showed significant increases (P<0.01) and dose-dependent effects. NiS-treated cells could form tumors in nude mice, and a squamous cell carcinoma was confirmed by histopathological examination. No mutation of exon 2 and exons 2-3, no abnormal expression in p16 gene and mutation of FHIT exons 5-8 and exons 1-4 or exons 5-9 were observed in transformed cells and tumorigenic cells. However, aberrant transcripts or loss of expression of the FHIT gene and Fhit protein was observed in transformed cells and tumorigenic cells. One of the aberrant transcripts in the FHIT gene was confirmed to have a deletion of exon 6, exon 7, exon 8, and an insertion of a 36 bp sequence replacing exon 6-8. Conclusions The FHIT gene rather than the P16 gene, plays a definite role in nickel carcinogenesis. Alterations of the FHIT gene induced by crystalline NiS may be a molecular event associated with carcinogen, chromosome fragile site instability and cell malignant transformation. FHIT may be an important target gene activated by nickel and other exotic carcinogens.

  12. Regulated genes in mesenchymal stem cells and gastriccancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shihori Tanabe; Kazuhiko Aoyagi; Hiroshi Yokozaki; Hiroki Sasaki

    2015-01-01

    AIM To investigate the genes regulated in mesenchymalstem cells (MSCs) and diffuse-type gastric cancer (GC),gene expression was analyzed.METHODS: Gene expression of MSCs and diffuse-typeGC cells were analyzed by microarray. Genes relatedto stem cells, cancer and the epithelial-mesenchymaltransition (EMT) were extracted from human genelists using Gene Ontology and reference information.Gene panels were generated, and messenger RNAgene expression in MSCs and diffuse-type GC cells wasanalyzed. Cluster analysis was performed using the NCSSsoftware.RESULTS: The gene expression of regulator of G-proteinsignaling 1 (RGS1) was up-regulated in diffuse-type GCcells compared with MSCs. A panel of stem-cell relatedgenes and genes involved in cancer or the EMT wereexamined. Stem-cell related genes, such as growtharrest-specific 6, musashi RNA-binding protein 2 andhairy and enhancer of split 1 (Drosophila), NOTCHfamily genes and Notch ligands, such as delta-like 1(Drosophila) and Jagged 2, were regulated.CONCLUSION: Expression of RGS1 is up-regulated,and genes related to stem cells and NOTCH signalingare altered in diffuse-type GC compared with MSCs.

  13. Gene expression profile of renal cell carcinoma clear cell type

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos F. Dall’Oglio

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: The determination of prognosis in patients with renal cell carcinoma (RCC is based, classically, on stage and histopathological aspects. The metastatic disease develops in one third of patients after surgery, even in localized tumors. There are few options for treating those patients, and even the new target designed drugs have shown low rates of success in controlling disease progression. Few studies used high throughput genomic analysis in renal cell carcinoma for determination of prognosis. This study is focused on the identification of gene expression signatures in tissues of low-risk, high-risk and metastatic RCC clear cell type (RCC-CCT. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We analyzed the expression of approximately 55,000 distinct transcripts using the Whole Genome microarray platform hybridized with RNA extracted from 19 patients submitted to surgery to treat RCC-CCT with different clinical outcomes. They were divided into three groups (1 low risk, characterized by pT1, Fuhrman grade 1 or 2, no microvascular invasion RCC; (2 high risk, pT2-3, Fuhrman grade 3 or 4 with, necrosis and microvascular invasion present and (3 metastatic RCC-CCT. Normal renal tissue was used as control. RESULTS: After comparison of differentially expressed genes among low-risk, high-risk and metastatic groups, we identified a group of common genes characterizing metastatic disease. Among them Interleukin-8 and Heat shock protein 70 were over-expressed in metastasis and validated by real-time polymerase chain reaction. CONCLUSION: These findings can be used as a starting point to generate molecular markers of RCC-CCT as well as a target for the development of innovative therapies.

  14. Random matrix analysis for gene interaction networks in cancer cells

    CERN Document Server

    Kikkawa, Ayumi

    2016-01-01

    Motivation: The investigation of topological modifications of the gene interaction networks in cancer cells is essential for understanding the desease. We study gene interaction networks in various human cancer cells with the random matrix theory. This study is based on the Cancer Network Galaxy (TCNG) database which is the repository of huge gene interactions inferred by Bayesian network algorithms from 256 microarray experimental data downloaded from NCBI GEO. The original GEO data are provided by the high-throughput microarray expression experiments on various human cancer cells. We apply the random matrix theory to the computationally inferred gene interaction networks in TCNG in order to detect the universality in the topology of the gene interaction networks in cancer cells. Results: We found the universal behavior in almost one half of the 256 gene interaction networks in TCNG. The distribution of nearest neighbor level spacing of the gene interaction matrix becomes the Wigner distribution when the net...

  15. Expression of zinc and cadmium responsive genes in leaves of willow (Salix caprea L.) genotypes with different accumulation characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konlechner, Cornelia; Türktaş, Mine; Langer, Ingrid; Vaculík, Marek; Wenzel, Walter W; Puschenreiter, Markus; Hauser, Marie-Theres

    2013-07-01

    Salix caprea is well suited for phytoextraction strategies. In a previous survey we showed that genetically distinct S. caprea plants isolated from metal-polluted and unpolluted sites differed in their zinc (Zn) and cadmium (Cd) tolerance and accumulation abilities. To determine the molecular basis of this difference we examined putative homologues of genes involved in heavy metal responses and identified over 200 new candidates with a suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) screen. Quantitative expression analyses of 20 genes in leaves revealed that some metallothioneins and cell wall modifying genes were induced irrespective of the genotype's origin and metal uptake capacity while a cysteine biosynthesis gene was expressed constitutively higher in the metallicolous genotype. The third and largest group of genes was only induced in the metallicolous genotype. These data demonstrate that naturally adapted woody non-model species can help to discover potential novel molecular mechanisms for metal accumulation and tolerance.

  16. Live-cell monitoring of periodic gene expression in synchronous human cells identifies Forkhead genes involved in cell cycle control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Gavin D; Gamsby, Joshua; Martyanov, Viktor; Brooks, Lionel; George, Lacy K; Mahoney, J Matthew; Loros, Jennifer J; Dunlap, Jay C; Whitfield, Michael L

    2012-08-01

    We developed a system to monitor periodic luciferase activity from cell cycle-regulated promoters in synchronous cells. Reporters were driven by a minimal human E2F1 promoter with peak expression in G1/S or a basal promoter with six Forkhead DNA-binding sites with peak expression at G2/M. After cell cycle synchronization, luciferase activity was measured in live cells at 10-min intervals across three to four synchronous cell cycles, allowing unprecedented resolution of cell cycle-regulated gene expression. We used this assay to screen Forkhead transcription factors for control of periodic gene expression. We confirmed a role for FOXM1 and identified two novel cell cycle regulators, FOXJ3 and FOXK1. Knockdown of FOXJ3 and FOXK1 eliminated cell cycle-dependent oscillations and resulted in decreased cell proliferation rates. Analysis of genes regulated by FOXJ3 and FOXK1 showed that FOXJ3 may regulate a network of zinc finger proteins and that FOXK1 binds to the promoter and regulates DHFR, TYMS, GSDMD, and the E2F binding partner TFDP1. Chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by high-throughput sequencing analysis identified 4329 genomic loci bound by FOXK1, 83% of which contained a FOXK1-binding motif. We verified that a subset of these loci are activated by wild-type FOXK1 but not by a FOXK1 (H355A) DNA-binding mutant.

  17. Gene pair signatures in cell type transcriptomes reveal lineage control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinäniemi, Merja; Nykter, Matti; Kramer, Roger; Wienecke-Baldacchino, Anke; Sinkkonen, Lasse; Zhou, Joseph Xu; Kreisberg, Richard; Kauffman, Stuart A.; Huang, Sui; Shmulevich, Ilya

    2013-01-01

    The distinct cell types of multicellular organisms arise due to constraints imposed by gene regulatory networks on the collective change of gene expression across the genome, creating self-stabilizing expression states, or attractors. We compiled a resource of curated human expression data comprising 166 cell types and 2,602 transcription regulating genes and developed a data driven method built around the concept of expression reversal defined at the level of gene pairs, such as those participating in toggle switch circuits. This approach allows us to organize the cell types into their ontogenetic lineage-relationships and to reflect regulatory relationships among genes that explain their ability to function as determinants of cell fate. We show that this method identifies genes belonging to regulatory circuits that control neuronal fate, pluripotency and blood cell differentiation, thus offering a novel large-scale perspective on lineage specification. PMID:23603899

  18. Progress in gene transfer by germ cells in mammals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Use of germ cells as vectors for transgenesis in mammals has been well developed and offers exciting prospects for experimental and applied biology, agricultural and medical sciences.Such approach is referred to as either male germ cell mediated gene transfer (MGCMGT)or female germ cell mediated gene transfer(FGCMGT)technique.Sperm-mediated gene transfer (SMGT),including its alternative method,testis-mediated gene transfer(TMGT),becomes an established and reliable method for transgenesis.They have been extensively used for producing transgenic animals.The newly developed approach of FGCMGT,ovary-mediated gene transfer(OMGT) is also a novel and useful tool for efficient transgenesis.This review highlights an overview of the recent progress in germ cell mediated gene transfer techniques,methods developed and mechanisms of nucleic acid uptake by germ cells.

  19. Isolating gene-corrected stem cells without drug selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatada, Seigo; Arnold, Larry W; Hatada, Tomoko; Cowhig, John E; Ciavatta, Dominic; Smithies, Oliver

    2005-11-08

    Progress in isolating stem cells from tissues, or generating them from adult cells by nuclear transfer, encourages attempts to use stem cells from affected individuals for gene correction and autologous therapy. Current viral vectors are efficient at introducing transgenic sequences but result in random integrations. Gene targeting, in contrast, can directly correct an affected gene, or incorporate corrective sequences into a site free from undesirable side effects, but efficiency is low. Most current targeting procedures, consequently, use positive-negative selection with drugs, often requiring >/=10 days. This drug selection causes problems with stem cells that differentiate in this time or require feeder cells, because the feeders must be drug resistant and so are not eliminated by the selection. To overcome these problems, we have developed a procedure for isolating gene-corrected stem cells free from feeder cells after 3-5 days culture without drugs. The method is still positive-negative, but the positive and negative drug-resistance genes are replaced with differently colored fluorescence genes. Gene-corrected cells are isolated by FACS. We tested the method with mouse ES cells having a mutant hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (Hprt) gene and grown on feeder cells. After 5 days in culture, gene-corrected cells were obtained free from feeder cells at a "purity" of >30%, enriched >2,000-fold and with a recovery of approximately 20%. Corrected cells were also isolated singly for clonal expansion. Our FACS-based procedure should be applicable at small or large scale to stem cells that can be cultured (with feeder cells, if necessary) for >/=3 days.

  20. Gene expression profiles of hepatic cell-type specific marker genes in progression of liver fibrosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yoshiyuki Takahara; Mitsuo Takahashi; Hiroki Wagatsuma; Fumihiko Yokoya; Qing-Wei Zhang; Mutsuyo Yamaguchi; Hiroyuki Aburatani; Norifumi Kawada

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To determine the gene expression profile data for the whole liver during development of dimethylnitrosamine (DMN)-induced hepatic fibrosis.METHODS: Marker genes were identified for different types of hepatic cells, including hepatic stellate cells (HSCs), Kupffer cells (including other inflammatory cells),and hepatocytes, using independent temporal DNA microarray data obtained from isolated hepatic cells.RESULTS: The cell-type analysis of gene expression gave several key results and led to formation of three hypotheses: (1) changes in the expression of HSCspecific marker genes during fibrosis were similar to gene expression data in in vitro cultured HSCs, suggesting a major role of the self-activating characteristics of HSCs in formation of fibrosis; (2) expression of mast cell-specific marker genes reached a peak during liver fibrosis,suggesting a possible role of mast cells in formation of fibrosis; and (3) abnormal expression of hepatocytespecific marker genes was found across several metabolic pathways during fibrosis, including sulfur-containing amino acid metabolism, fatty acid metabolism, and drug metabolism, suggesting a mechanistic relationship between these abnormalities and symptoms of liver fibrosis.CONCLUSION: Analysis of marker genes for specific hepatic cell types can identify the key aspects of fibrogenesis. Sequential activation of inflammatory cells and the self-supporting properties of HSCs play an important role in development of fibrosis.

  1. Freedom of expression: cell-type-specific gene profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otsuki, Leo; Cheetham, Seth W; Brand, Andrea H

    2014-01-01

    Cell fate and behavior are results of differential gene regulation, making techniques to profile gene expression in specific cell types highly desirable. Many methods now enable investigation at the DNA, RNA and protein level. This review introduces the most recent and popular techniques, and discusses key issues influencing the choice between these such as ease, cost and applicability of information gained. Interdisciplinary collaborations will no doubt contribute further advances, including not just in single cell type but single-cell expression profiling.

  2. Glial cell derived neurotrophic factor induces spermatogonial stem cell marker genes in chicken mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boozarpour, Sohrab; Matin, Maryam M; Momeni-Moghaddam, Madjid; Dehghani, Hesam; Mahdavi-Shahri, Naser; Sisakhtnezhad, Sajjad; Heirani-Tabasi, Asieh; Irfan-Maqsood, Muhammad; Bahrami, Ahmad Reza

    2016-06-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are known with the potential of multi-lineage differentiation. Advances in differentiation technology have also resulted in the conversion of MSCs to other kinds of stem cells. MSCs are considered as a suitable source of cells for biotechnology purposes because they are abundant, easily accessible and well characterized cells. Nowadays small molecules are introduced as novel and efficient factors to differentiate stem cells. In this work, we examined the potential of glial cell derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) for differentiating chicken MSCs toward spermatogonial stem cells. MSCs were isolated and characterized from chicken and cultured under treatment with all-trans retinoic acid (RA) or glial cell derived neurotrophic factor. Expression analysis of specific genes after 7days of RA treatment, as examined by RT-PCR, proved positive for some germ cell markers such as CVH, STRA8, PLZF and some genes involved in spermatogonial stem cell maintenance like BCL6b and c-KIT. On the other hand, GDNF could additionally induce expression of POU5F1, and NANOG as well as other genes which were induced after RA treatment. These data illustrated that GDNF is relatively more effective in diverting chicken MSCs towards Spermatogonial stem cell -like cells in chickens and suggests GDNF as a new agent to obtain transgenic poultry, nevertheless, exploitability of these cells should be verified by more experiments.

  3. Microarray gene expression profiling and analysis in renal cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadhukhan Provash

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Renal cell carcinoma (RCC is the most common cancer in adult kidney. The accuracy of current diagnosis and prognosis of the disease and the effectiveness of the treatment for the disease are limited by the poor understanding of the disease at the molecular level. To better understand the genetics and biology of RCC, we profiled the expression of 7,129 genes in both clear cell RCC tissue and cell lines using oligonucleotide arrays. Methods Total RNAs isolated from renal cell tumors, adjacent normal tissue and metastatic RCC cell lines were hybridized to affymatrix HuFL oligonucleotide arrays. Genes were categorized into different functional groups based on the description of the Gene Ontology Consortium and analyzed based on the gene expression levels. Gene expression profiles of the tissue and cell line samples were visualized and classified by singular value decomposition. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction was performed to confirm the expression alterations of selected genes in RCC. Results Selected genes were annotated based on biological processes and clustered into functional groups. The expression levels of genes in each group were also analyzed. Seventy-four commonly differentially expressed genes with more than five-fold changes in RCC tissues were identified. The expression alterations of selected genes from these seventy-four genes were further verified using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR. Detailed comparison of gene expression patterns in RCC tissue and RCC cell lines shows significant differences between the two types of samples, but many important expression patterns were preserved. Conclusions This is one of the initial studies that examine the functional ontology of a large number of genes in RCC. Extensive annotation, clustering and analysis of a large number of genes based on the gene functional ontology revealed many interesting gene expression patterns in RCC. Most

  4. T cells stimulate catabolic gene expression by the stromal cells from giant cell tumor of bone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cowan, Robert W. [Department of Pathology and Molecular Medicine, McMaster University, 1280 Main St. W., Hamilton, ON, Canada L8S 4L8 (Canada); Juravinski Cancer Centre, 699 Concession St., Hamilton, ON, Canada L8V 5C2 (Canada); Ghert, Michelle [Juravinski Cancer Centre, 699 Concession St., Hamilton, ON, Canada L8V 5C2 (Canada); Department of Surgery, McMaster University, 1280 Main St. W., Hamilton, ON, Canada L8S 4L8 (Canada); Singh, Gurmit, E-mail: gurmit.singh@jcc.hhsc.ca [Department of Pathology and Molecular Medicine, McMaster University, 1280 Main St. W., Hamilton, ON, Canada L8S 4L8 (Canada); Juravinski Cancer Centre, 699 Concession St., Hamilton, ON, Canada L8V 5C2 (Canada)

    2012-03-23

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Two T cell lines stimulate PTHrP, RANKL, MMP13 gene expression in GCT cell cultures. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CD40 expressed by stromal cells; CD40L detected in whole tumor but not cultures. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Effect of CD40L treatment on GCT cells increased PTHrP and MMP13 gene expression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PTHrP treatment increased MMP13 expression, while inhibition decreased expression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer T cells may stimulate GCT stromal cells and promote the osteolysis of the tumor. -- Abstract: The factors that promote the localized bone resorption by giant cell tumor of bone (GCT) are not fully understood. We investigated whether T cells could contribute to bone resorption by stimulating expression of genes for parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP), matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-13, and the receptor activator of nuclear-factor {kappa}B ligand (RANKL). Two cell lines, Jurkat clone E6-1 and D1.1, were co-cultured with isolated GCT stromal cells. Real-time PCR analyses demonstrated a significant increase of all three genes following 48 h incubation, and PTHrP and MMP-13 gene expression was also increased at 24 h. Further, we examined the expression of CD40 ligand (CD40L), a protein expressed by activated T cells, and its receptor, CD40, in GCT. Immunohistochemistry results revealed expression of the CD40 receptor in both the stromal cells and giant cells of the tumor. RNA collected from whole GCT tissues showed expression of CD40LG, which was absent in cultured stromal cells, and suggests that CD40L is expressed within GCT. Stimulation of GCT stromal cells with CD40L significantly increased expression of the PTHrP and MMP-13 genes. Moreover, we show that inhibition of PTHrP with neutralizing antibodies significantly decreased MMP13 expression by the stromal cells compared to IgG-matched controls, whereas stimulation with PTHrP (1-34) increased MMP-13 gene expression. These

  5. Integrative characterization of germ cell-specific genes from mouse spermatocyte UniGene library

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eddy Edward M

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The primary regulator of spermatogenesis, a highly ordered and tightly regulated developmental process, is an intrinsic genetic program involving male germ cell-specific genes. Results We analyzed the mouse spermatocyte UniGene library containing 2155 gene-oriented transcript clusters. We predict that 11% of these genes are testis-specific and systematically identified 24 authentic genes specifically and abundantly expressed in the testis via in silico and in vitro approaches. Northern blot analysis disclosed various transcript characteristics, such as expression level, size and the presence of isoform. Expression analysis revealed developmentally regulated and stage-specific expression patterns in all of the genes. We further analyzed the genes at the protein and cellular levels. Transfection assays performed using GC-2 cells provided information on the cellular characteristics of the gene products. In addition, antibodies were generated against proteins encoded by some of the genes to facilitate their identification and characterization in spermatogenic cells and sperm. Our data suggest that a number of the gene products are implicated in transcriptional regulation, nuclear integrity, sperm structure and motility, and fertilization. In particular, we found for the first time that Mm.333010, predicted to contain a trypsin-like serine protease domain, is a sperm acrosomal protein. Conclusion We identify 24 authentic genes with spermatogenic cell-specific expression, and provide comprehensive information about the genes. Our findings establish a new basis for future investigation into molecular mechanisms underlying male reproduction.

  6. Suicide genes: monitoring cells in patients with a safety switch

    OpenAIRE

    Eissenberg, Linda G.; Rettig, Michael; Dehdashti, Farrokh; Piwnica-Worms, David; John F. DiPersio

    2014-01-01

    Clinical trials increasingly incorporate suicide genes either as direct lytic agents for tumors or as safety switches in therapies based on genetically modified cells. Suicide genes can also be used as non-invasive reporters to monitor the biological consequences of administering genetically modified cells to patients and gather information relevant to patient safety. These genes can monitor therapeutic outcomes addressable by early clinical intervention. As an example, our recent clinical tr...

  7. Suicide genes: monitoring cells in patients with a safety switch

    OpenAIRE

    Linda Groppe Eissenberg; Michael eRettig; Farrokh eDehdashti; David ePiwnica-Worms; John F. DiPersio

    2014-01-01

    Clinical trials increasingly incorporate suicide genes either as direct lytic agents for tumors or as safety switches in therapies based on genetically modified cells. Suicide genes can also be used as non-invasive reporters to monitor the biological consequences of administering genetically modified cells to patients and gather information relevant to patient safety. These genes can monitor therapeutic outcomes addressable by early clinical intervention. As an example, our recent clinical t...

  8. Genes and Gene Networks Involved in Sodium Fluoride-Elicited Cell Death Accompanying Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress in Oral Epithelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshiaki Tabuchi

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Here, to understand the molecular mechanisms underlying cell death induced by sodium fluoride (NaF, we analyzed gene expression patterns in rat oral epithelial ROE2 cells exposed to NaF using global-scale microarrays and bioinformatics tools. A relatively high concentration of NaF (2 mM induced cell death concomitant with decreases in mitochondrial membrane potential, chromatin condensation and caspase-3 activation. Using 980 probe sets, we identified 432 up-regulated and 548 down-regulated genes, that were differentially expressed by >2.5-fold in the cells treated with 2 mM of NaF and categorized them into 4 groups by K-means clustering. Ingenuity® pathway analysis revealed several gene networks from gene clusters. The gene networks Up-I and Up-II included many up-regulated genes that were mainly associated with the biological function of induction or prevention of cell death, respectively, such as Atf3, Ddit3 and Fos (for Up-I and Atf4 and Hspa5 (for Up-II. Interestingly, knockdown of Ddit3 and Hspa5 significantly increased and decreased the number of viable cells, respectively. Moreover, several endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress-related genes including, Ddit3, Atf4 and Hapa5, were observed in these gene networks. These findings will provide further insight into the molecular mechanisms of NaF-induced cell death accompanying ER stress in oral epithelial cells.

  9. Wall modified photonic crystal fibre capillaries as porous layer open tubular columns for in-capillary micro-extraction and capillary chromatography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kazarian, Artaches A. [Australian Centre for Research on Separation Science, School of Physical Sciences, University of Tasmania, Private Bag 75, Hobart, Tasmania 7001 (Australia); W.M. Keck FT-ICR-MS Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC (United States); Sanz Rodriguez, Estrella; Deverell, Jeremy A. [Australian Centre for Research on Separation Science, School of Physical Sciences, University of Tasmania, Private Bag 75, Hobart, Tasmania 7001 (Australia); McCord, James; Muddiman, David C. [W.M. Keck FT-ICR-MS Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC (United States); Paull, Brett, E-mail: Brett.Paull@utas.edu.au [Australian Centre for Research on Separation Science, School of Physical Sciences, University of Tasmania, Private Bag 75, Hobart, Tasmania 7001 (Australia); ARC Centre of Excellence for Electromaterials Science, School of Physical Sciences, University of Tasmania, Private Bag 75, Hobart, Tasmania 7001 (Australia)

    2016-01-28

    Wall modified photonic crystal fibre capillary columns for in-capillary micro-extraction and liquid chromatographic separations is presented. Columns contained 126 internal parallel 4 μm channels, each containing a wall bonded porous monolithic type polystyrene-divinylbenzene layer in open tubular column format (PLOT). Modification longitudinal homogeneity was monitored using scanning contactless conductivity detection and scanning electron microscopy. The multichannel open tubular capillary column showed channel diameter and polymer layer consistency of 4.2 ± 0.1 μm and 0.26 ± 0.02 μm respectively, and modification of 100% of the parallel channels with the monolithic polymer. The modified multi-channel capillaries were applied to the in-capillary micro-extraction of water samples. 500 μL of water samples containing single μg L{sup −1} levels of polyaromatic hydrocarbons were extracted at a flow rate of 10 μL min{sup −1}, and eluted in 50 μL of acetonitrile for analysis using HPLC with fluorescence detection. HPLC LODs were 0.08, 0.02 and 0.05 μg L{sup −1} for acenaphthene, anthracene and pyrene, respectively, with extraction recoveries of between 77 and 103%. The modified capillaries were also investigated briefly for direct application to liquid chromatographic separations, with the retention and elution of a standard protein (cytochrome c) under isocratic conditions demonstrated, proving chromatographic potential of the new column format, with run-to-run retention time reproducibility of below 1%. - Highlights: • Novel PS-DVB modified photonic crystal fibres for in-capillary micro-extraction. • New method for micro-extraction of PAHs and HPLC-FL detection at sub-ppb levels. • Demonstration of PS-DVB modified photonic crystal fibres for capillary bioseparations.

  10. Wall modified photonic crystal fibre capillaries as porous layer open tubular columns for in-capillary micro-extraction and capillary chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazarian, Artaches A; Sanz Rodriguez, Estrella; Deverell, Jeremy A; McCord, James; Muddiman, David C; Paull, Brett

    2016-01-28

    Wall modified photonic crystal fibre capillary columns for in-capillary micro-extraction and liquid chromatographic separations is presented. Columns contained 126 internal parallel 4 μm channels, each containing a wall bonded porous monolithic type polystyrene-divinylbenzene layer in open tubular column format (PLOT). Modification longitudinal homogeneity was monitored using scanning contactless conductivity detection and scanning electron microscopy. The multichannel open tubular capillary column showed channel diameter and polymer layer consistency of 4.2 ± 0.1 μm and 0.26 ± 0.02 μm respectively, and modification of 100% of the parallel channels with the monolithic polymer. The modified multi-channel capillaries were applied to the in-capillary micro-extraction of water samples. 500 μL of water samples containing single μg L(-1) levels of polyaromatic hydrocarbons were extracted at a flow rate of 10 μL min(-1), and eluted in 50 μL of acetonitrile for analysis using HPLC with fluorescence detection. HPLC LODs were 0.08, 0.02 and 0.05 μg L(-1) for acenaphthene, anthracene and pyrene, respectively, with extraction recoveries of between 77 and 103%. The modified capillaries were also investigated briefly for direct application to liquid chromatographic separations, with the retention and elution of a standard protein (cytochrome c) under isocratic conditions demonstrated, proving chromatographic potential of the new column format, with run-to-run retention time reproducibility of below 1%.

  11. Gene expression profiles of human bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells and tendon cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡庆柳; 朴英杰; 邹飞

    2003-01-01

    Objective To study the gene expression profiles of human bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells and tendon cells.Methods Total RNA extracted from human bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells and tendon cells underwent reverse transcription, and the products were labeled with α-32P dCTP. The cDNA probes of total RNA were hybridized to cDNA microarray with 1176 genes, and then the signals were analyzed by AtlasImage analysis software Version 1.01a.Results Fifteen genes associated with cell proliferation and signal transduction were up-regulated, and one gene that takes part in cell-to-cell adhesion was down-regulated in tendon cells.Conclusion The 15 up-regulated and one down-regulated genes may be beneficial to the orientational differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells into tendon cells.

  12. Runx Family Genes in Tissue Stem Cell Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chelsia Qiuxia; Mok, Michelle Meng Huang; Yokomizo, Tomomasa; Tergaonkar, Vinay; Osato, Motomi

    2017-01-01

    The Runx family genes play important roles in development and cancer, largely via their regulation of tissue stem cell behavior. Their involvement in two organs, blood and skin, is well documented. This review summarizes currently known Runx functions in the stem cells of these tissues. The fundamental core mechanism(s) mediated by Runx proteins has been sought; however, it appears that there does not exist one single common machinery that governs both tissue stem cells. Instead, Runx family genes employ multiple spatiotemporal mechanisms in regulating individual tissue stem cell populations. Such specific Runx requirements have been unveiled by a series of cell type-, developmental stage- or age-specific gene targeting studies in mice. Observations from these experiments revealed that the regulation of stem cells by Runx family genes turned out to be far more complex than previously thought. For instance, although it has been reported that Runx1 is required for the endothelial-to-hematopoietic cell transition (EHT) but not thereafter, recent studies clearly demonstrated that Runx1 is also needed during the period subsequent to EHT, namely at perinatal stage. In addition, Runx1 ablation in the embryonic skin mesenchyme eventually leads to complete loss of hair follicle stem cells (HFSCs) in the adult epithelium, suggesting that Runx1 facilitates the specification of skin epithelial stem cells in a cell extrinsic manner. Further in-depth investigation into how Runx family genes are involved in stem cell regulation is warranted.

  13. Genes affecting β-cell function in type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fløyel, Tina; Kaur, Simranjeet; Pociot, Flemming

    2015-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is a multifactorial disease resulting from an immune-mediated destruction of the insulin-producing pancreatic β cells. Several environmental and genetic risk factors predispose to the disease. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified around 50 genetic regions...... that affect the risk of developing T1D, but the disease-causing variants and genes are still largely unknown. In this review, we discuss the current status of T1D susceptibility loci and candidate genes with focus on the β cell. At least 40 % of the genes in the T1D susceptibility loci are expressed in human...... islets and β cells, where they according to recent studies modulate the β-cell response to the immune system. As most of the risk variants map to noncoding regions of the genome, i.e., promoters, enhancers, intergenic regions, and noncoding genes, their possible involvement in T1D pathogenesis as gene...

  14. Suitability of endogenous reference genes for gene expression studies with human intraocular endothelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Ruoxin

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The use of quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR has become widely applied as a method to measure transcript abundance. In order to be reflective of biological processes during health and disease this method is dependent on normalisation of data against stable endogenous controls. However, these genes can vary in their stability in different cell types. The importance of reference gene validation for a particular cell type is now well recognised and is an important step in any gene expression study. Results Cultured primary human choroidal and retinal endothelial cells were treated with the immunostimulant polyinosinic: polycytidylic acid or untreated. qRT-PCR was used to quantify the expression levels of 10 commonly used endogenous control genes, TBP, HPRT1, GAPDH, GUSB, PPIA, RPLP0, B2M, 18S rRNA, PGK1 and ACTB. Three different mathematical algorithms, GeNorm, NormFinder, and BestKeeper were used to analyse gene stability to give the most representative validation. In choroidal endothelial cells the most stable genes were ranked as HPRT1 and GUSB by GeNorm and NormFinder and HPRT1 and PPIA by BestKeeper. In retinal endothelial cells the most stable genes ranked were TBP and PGK1 by GeNorm and NormFinder and HPRT1 by BestKeeper. The least stable gene for both cell types was 18S with all 3 algorithms. Conclusions We have identified the most stable endogenous control genes in intraocular endothelial cells. It is suggested future qRT-PCR studies using these cells would benefit from adopting the genes identified in this study as the most appropriate endogenous control genes.

  15. Safeguarding nonhuman primate iPS cells with suicide genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Bonan; Watts, Korashon L; Gori, Jennifer L; Wohlfahrt, Martin E; Enssle, Joerg; Adair, Jennifer E; Kiem, Hans-Peter

    2011-09-01

    The development of technology to generate induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells constitutes one of the most exciting scientific breakthroughs because of the enormous potential for regenerative medicine. However, the safety of iPS cell-related products is a major concern for clinical translation. Insertional mutagenesis, possible oncogenic transformation of iPS cells or their derivatives, or the contamination of differentiated iPS cells with undifferentiated cells, resulting in the formation of teratomas, have remained considerable obstacles. Here, we demonstrate the utility of suicide genes to safeguard iPS cells and their derivatives. We found suicide genes can control the cell fate of iPS cells in vitro and in vivo without interfering with their pluripotency and self-renewal capacity. This study will be useful to evaluate the safety of iPS cell technology in a clinically highly relevant, large animal model and further benefit the clinical use of human iPS cells.

  16. Patterns of expression of cell wall related genes in sugarcane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lima D.U.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Our search for genes related to cell wall metabolism in the sugarcane expressed sequence tag (SUCEST database (http://sucest.lbi.dcc.unicamp.br resulted in 3,283 reads (1% of the total reads which were grouped into 459 clusters (potential genes with an average of 7.1 reads per cluster. To more clearly display our correlation coefficients, we constructed surface maps which we used to investigate the relationship between cell wall genes and the sugarcane tissues libraries from which they came. The only significant correlations that we found between cell wall genes and/or their expression within particular libraries were neutral or synergetic. Genes related to cellulose biosynthesis were from the CesA family, and were found to be the most abundant cell wall related genes in the SUCEST database. We found that the highest number of CesA reads came from the root and stem libraries. The genes with the greatest number of reads were those involved in cell wall hydrolases (e.g. beta-1,3-glucanases, xyloglucan endo-beta-transglycosylase, beta-glucosidase and endo-beta-mannanase. Correlation analyses by surface mapping revealed that the expression of genes related to biosynthesis seems to be associated with the hydrolysis of hemicelluloses, pectin hydrolases being mainly associated with xyloglucan hydrolases. The patterns of cell wall related gene expression in sugarcane based on the number of reads per cluster reflected quite well the expected physiological characteristics of the tissues. This is the first work to provide a general view on plant cell wall metabolism through the expression of related genes in almost all the tissues of a plant at the same time. For example, developing flowers behaved similarly to both meristematic tissues and leaf-root transition zone tissues. Besides providing a basis for future research on the mechanisms of plant development which involve the cell wall, our findings will provide valuable tools for plant engineering in the

  17. Experimental gene therapy using p21Waf1 gene for esophageal squamous cell carcinoma by gene gun technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Yuichi; Fujii, Teruhiko; Yamana, Hideaki; Kato, Seiya; Morimatsu, Minoru; Shirouzu, Kazuo

    2004-10-01

    In our previous study, the proliferation rate of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma cell lines, which poorly expressed p21Waf1, was found to be regulated by p21Waf1 gene transfection using adenovirus vector. In the present study, in order to examine the effect of p21Waf1 gene therapy in esophageal cancer, we used gene gun technology, which proved to be a powerful method to introduce the p21Waf1 gene into esophageal cancer cells. p21Waf1 transfection to KE3 and YES2 cells (weakly expressed p21Waf1 protein cells) showed a high expression of p21Waf1 protein after applying this gene gun technique. In KE3 and YES2 cells, statistical significant growth inhibition was observed after p21Waf1 transfection compared with LacZ transfection (KE3, p=0.0009; YES2, pgun technique significantly inhibited the low basal p21Waf1 expressed esophageal cancer cell growth in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, p21Waf1 transfection strongly enhanced the effect of 5Fu suggesting that p21Waf1 may prove beneficial in chemotherapy combined with gene therapy using gene gun technology in patients with esophageal cancer who have a low level of p21Waf1 expressed tumor.

  18. The ancestral gene repertoire of animal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alié, Alexandre; Hayashi, Tetsutaro; Sugimura, Itsuro; Manuel, Michaël; Sugano, Wakana; Mano, Akira; Satoh, Nori; Agata, Kiyokazu; Funayama, Noriko

    2015-12-22

    Stem cells are pivotal for development and tissue homeostasis of multicellular animals, and the quest for a gene toolkit associated with the emergence of stem cells in a common ancestor of all metazoans remains a major challenge for evolutionary biology. We reconstructed the conserved gene repertoire of animal stem cells by transcriptomic profiling of totipotent archeocytes in the demosponge Ephydatia fluviatilis and by tracing shared molecular signatures with flatworm and Hydra stem cells. Phylostratigraphy analyses indicated that most of these stem-cell genes predate animal origin, with only few metazoan innovations, notably including several partners of the Piwi machinery known to promote genome stability. The ancestral stem-cell transcriptome is strikingly poor in transcription factors. Instead, it is rich in RNA regulatory actors, including components of the "germ-line multipotency program" and many RNA-binding proteins known as critical regulators of mammalian embryonic stem cells.

  19. The cell cycle-regulated genes of Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Oliva

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Many genes are regulated as an innate part of the eukaryotic cell cycle, and a complex transcriptional network helps enable the cyclic behavior of dividing cells. This transcriptional network has been studied in Saccharomyces cerevisiae (budding yeast and elsewhere. To provide more perspective on these regulatory mechanisms, we have used microarrays to measure gene expression through the cell cycle of Schizosaccharomyces pombe (fission yeast. The 750 genes with the most significant oscillations were identified and analyzed. There were two broad waves of cell cycle transcription, one in early/mid G2 phase, and the other near the G2/M transition. The early/mid G2 wave included many genes involved in ribosome biogenesis, possibly explaining the cell cycle oscillation in protein synthesis in S. pombe. The G2/M wave included at least three distinctly regulated clusters of genes: one large cluster including mitosis, mitotic exit, and cell separation functions, one small cluster dedicated to DNA replication, and another small cluster dedicated to cytokinesis and division. S. pombe cell cycle genes have relatively long, complex promoters containing groups of multiple DNA sequence motifs, often of two, three, or more different kinds. Many of the genes, transcription factors, and regulatory mechanisms are conserved between S. pombe and S. cerevisiae. Finally, we found preliminary evidence for a nearly genome-wide oscillation in gene expression: 2,000 or more genes undergo slight oscillations in expression as a function of the cell cycle, although whether this is adaptive, or incidental to other events in the cell, such as chromatin condensation, we do not know.

  20. Expression of HOX C homeobox genes in lymphoid cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, H J; Stage, K M; Mathews, C H; Detmer, K; Scibienski, R; MacKenzie, M; Migliaccio, E; Boncinelli, E; Largman, C

    1993-08-01

    The class I homeobox genes located in four clusters in mammalian genomes (HOX A, HOX B, HOX C, and HOX D) appear to play a major role in fetal development. Previous surveys of homeobox gene expression in human leukemic cell lines have shown that certain HOX A genes are expressed only in myeloid cell lines, whereas HOX B gene expression is largely restricted to cells with erythroid potential. We now report a survey of the expression patterns of 9 homeobox genes from the HOX C locus in a panel of 24 human and 7 murine leukemic cell lines. The most striking observation is the lymphoid-specific pattern of expression of HOX C4, located at the 3' end of the locus. A major transcript of 1.9 kilobases is observed in both T-cell and B-cell lines. HOX C4 expression is also detected in normal human marrow and peripheral blood lymphocytes, but not in mature granulocytes or monocytes. HOX C8 is also expressed in human lymphoid cells but is expressed in other blood cell types as well. However, the HOX C8 transcript pattern is lineage specific. These data, in conjunction with earlier findings, suggest that homeobox gene expression influences lineage determination during hematopoiesis.

  1. Engineering T cell immunity by TCR gene transfer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Linnemann, Carsten

    2013-01-01

    T cell responses against tumor-antigens are frequently observed for some human malignancies, in particular melanoma. However, the spontaneous development of T cell responses of a sufficient strength to eradicate human malignancies is rare. The transfer of T cell receptor (TCR) αβ genes into autologo

  2. Genome Binding and Gene Regulation by Stem Cell Transcription Factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.H. Brandsma (Johan)

    2016-01-01

    markdownabstractNearly all cells of an individual organism contain the same genome. However, each cell type transcribes a different set of genes due to the presence of different sets of cell type-specific transcription factors. Such transcription factors bind to regulatory regions such as promoters

  3. Gene-modified hematopoietic stem cells for cancer immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Sarah; De Oliveira, Satiro N

    2014-01-01

    The rapid expansion of available cancer immunotherapies has resulted in favorable early outcomes. Specifically the use of gene therapy to introduce chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) and T cell receptors (TCRs) in T cells creates new immunotherapy options for patients. While showing early success with these approaches, limitations remain that can be overcome by the use of modification of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) to express CARs and TCRs. With modern gene therapy technologies, increased safety and control of the modification of the HSCs can be achieved through the use of a suicide gene.

  4. Identification of Hematopoietic Stem Cell Engraftment Genes in Gene Therapy Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, John M; Trobridge, Grant D

    2013-09-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) therapy using replication-incompetent retroviral vectors is a promising approach to provide life-long correction for genetic defects. HSC gene therapy clinical studies have resulted in functional cures for several diseases, but in some studies clonal expansion or leukemia has occurred. This is due to the dyregulation of endogenous host gene expression from vector provirus insertional mutagenesis. Insertional mutagenesis screens using replicating retroviruses have been used extensively to identify genes that influence oncogenesis. However, retroviral mutagenesis screens can also be used to determine the role of genes in biological processes such as stem cell engraftment. The aim of this review is to describe the potential for vector insertion site data from gene therapy studies to provide novel insights into mechanisms of HSC engraftment. In HSC gene therapy studies dysregulation of host genes by replication-incompetent vector proviruses may lead to enrichment of repopulating clones with vector integrants near genes that influence engraftment. Thus, data from HSC gene therapy studies can be used to identify novel candidate engraftment genes. As HSC gene therapy use continues to expand, the vector insertion site data collected will be of great interest to help identify novel engraftment genes and may ultimately lead to new therapies to improve engraftment.

  5. Regulation of cell-to-cell variability in divergent gene expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Chao; Wu, Shuyang; Pocetti, Christopher; Bai, Lu

    2016-03-01

    Cell-to-cell variability (noise) is an important feature of gene expression that impacts cell fitness and development. The regulatory mechanism of this variability is not fully understood. Here we investigate the effect on gene expression noise in divergent gene pairs (DGPs). We generated reporters driven by divergent promoters, rearranged their gene order, and probed their expressions using time-lapse fluorescence microscopy and single-molecule fluorescence in situ hybridization (smFISH). We show that two genes in a co-regulated DGP have higher expression covariance compared with the separate, tandem and convergent configurations, and this higher covariance is caused by more synchronized firing of the divergent transcriptions. For differentially regulated DGPs, the regulatory signal of one gene can stochastically `leak' to the other, causing increased gene expression noise. We propose that the DGPs' function in limiting or promoting gene expression noise may enhance or compromise cell fitness, providing an explanation for the conservation pattern of DGPs.

  6. Gene Therapy In Squamous Cell Carcinoma – A Short Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soma Susan Varghese

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Oral cancer remains one of the leading causes of death world wide. Various means to destroy tumor cells preferentially have been developed; gene therapy is one among them with less treatment morbidity. Gene therapy involves the transfer of therapeutic or working copy of genes into a specific cell of an individual in order to repair a faulty copy of gene. The alteration can be accomplished by repairing or replacing the damaged DNA by various strategies and vectors. To date genetically altered viruses are commonly used as gene delivery vehicle (vector which has an advantage of evolutionary selection of host-virus relation. Non viral vectors which include the physical transfection of genes can be accomplished by electrophoration, microinjection, or use of ballistic particles and chemical transfection by forming liposomes.

  7. Evolution vs the number of gene copies per primitive cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, A L

    1984-01-01

    Computer simulations are presented of the rate at which an advantageous mutant would displace the prototype in a replicating system without an accurate segregation mechanism. If the number of gene copies in the system is indefinitely large, Darwinian evolution is essentially stopped because there is no coupling of phenotype with genotype, i.e., there is no growth advantage to the advantageous gene relative to the prototype and therefore no "survival of the fittest." The inhibition of evolution due to a number of gene copies less than 100 would have been not insurmountable. Although the presence of multiple copies would have allowed replacement by an advantageous mutant, it provided a way for the primitive cell to conserve less immediately useful genes that could evolve into different or more effective genes. This possibility was lost as accurate segregation mechanisms evolved and cells with few copies of each gene, such as modern procaryotes, arose.

  8. Cancer genes hypermethylated in human embryonic stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincenzo Calvanese

    Full Text Available Developmental genes are silenced in embryonic stem cells by a bivalent histone-based chromatin mark. It has been proposed that this mark also confers a predisposition to aberrant DNA promoter hypermethylation of tumor suppressor genes (TSGs in cancer. We report here that silencing of a significant proportion of these TSGs in human embryonic and adult stem cells is associated with promoter DNA hypermethylation. Our results indicate a role for DNA methylation in the control of gene expression in human stem cells and suggest that, for genes repressed by promoter hypermethylation in stem cells in vivo, the aberrant process in cancer could be understood as a defect in establishing an unmethylated promoter during differentiation, rather than as an anomalous process of de novo hypermethylation.

  9. Lab-specific gene expression signatures in pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Aaron M; Cooper, James B

    2010-08-06

    Pluripotent stem cells derived from both embryonic and reprogrammed somatic cells have significant potential for human regenerative medicine. Despite similarities in developmental potential, however, several groups have found fundamental differences between embryonic stem cell (ESC) and induced-pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) lines that may have important implications for iPSC-based medical therapies. Using an unsupervised clustering algorithm, we further studied the genetic homogeneity of iPSC and ESC lines by reanalyzing microarray gene expression data from seven different laboratories. Unexpectedly, this analysis revealed a strong correlation between gene expression signatures and specific laboratories in both ESC and iPSC lines. Nearly one-third of the genes with lab-specific expression signatures are also differentially expressed between ESCs and iPSCs. These data are consistent with the hypothesis that in vitro microenvironmental context differentially impacts the gene expression signatures of both iPSCs and ESCs.

  10. Effects of cell cycle noise on excitable gene circuits

    CERN Document Server

    Veliz-Cuba, Alan; Bennett, Matthew R; Josić, Krešimir; Ott, William

    2016-01-01

    We assess the impact of cell cycle noise on gene circuit dynamics. For bistable genetic switches and excitable circuits, we find that transitions between metastable states most likely occur just after cell division and that this concentration effect intensifies in the presence of transcriptional delay. We explain this concentration effect with a 3-states stochastic model. For genetic oscillators, we quantify the temporal correlations between daughter cells induced by cell division. Temporal correlations must be captured properly in order to accurately quantify noise sources within gene networks.

  11. Gene and stem cell therapy of the hair follicle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Robert M

    2005-01-01

    The hair follicle is a highly complex appendage of the skin containing a multiplicity of cell types. The follicle undergoes constant cycling through the life of the organism including growth and resorption with growth dependent on specific stem cells. The targeting of the follicle by genes and stem cells to change its properties, in particular, the nature of the hair shaft is discussed. Hair follicle delivery systems are described such as liposomes and viral vectors for gene therapy. The nature of the hair follicle stem cells is discussed, in particular, its pluripotency.

  12. The mechanism of gene targeting in human somatic cells.

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    Yinan Kan

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Gene targeting in human somatic cells is of importance because it can be used to either delineate the loss-of-function phenotype of a gene or correct a mutated gene back to wild-type. Both of these outcomes require a form of DNA double-strand break (DSB repair known as homologous recombination (HR. The mechanism of HR leading to gene targeting, however, is not well understood in human cells. Here, we demonstrate that a two-end, ends-out HR intermediate is valid for human gene targeting. Furthermore, the resolution step of this intermediate occurs via the classic DSB repair model of HR while synthesis-dependent strand annealing and Holliday Junction dissolution are, at best, minor pathways. Moreover, and in contrast to other systems, the positions of Holliday Junction resolution are evenly distributed along the homology arms of the targeting vector. Most unexpectedly, we demonstrate that when a meganuclease is used to introduce a chromosomal DSB to augment gene targeting, the mechanism of gene targeting is inverted to an ends-in process. Finally, we demonstrate that the anti-recombination activity of mismatch repair is a significant impediment to gene targeting. These observations significantly advance our understanding of HR and gene targeting in human cells.

  13. The mechanism of gene targeting in human somatic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kan, Yinan; Ruis, Brian; Lin, Sherry; Hendrickson, Eric A

    2014-04-01

    Gene targeting in human somatic cells is of importance because it can be used to either delineate the loss-of-function phenotype of a gene or correct a mutated gene back to wild-type. Both of these outcomes require a form of DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair known as homologous recombination (HR). The mechanism of HR leading to gene targeting, however, is not well understood in human cells. Here, we demonstrate that a two-end, ends-out HR intermediate is valid for human gene targeting. Furthermore, the resolution step of this intermediate occurs via the classic DSB repair model of HR while synthesis-dependent strand annealing and Holliday Junction dissolution are, at best, minor pathways. Moreover, and in contrast to other systems, the positions of Holliday Junction resolution are evenly distributed along the homology arms of the targeting vector. Most unexpectedly, we demonstrate that when a meganuclease is used to introduce a chromosomal DSB to augment gene targeting, the mechanism of gene targeting is inverted to an ends-in process. Finally, we demonstrate that the anti-recombination activity of mismatch repair is a significant impediment to gene targeting. These observations significantly advance our understanding of HR and gene targeting in human cells.

  14. Development of gene and stem cell therapy for ocular neurodegeneration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing-Xue; Zhang; Ning-Li; Wang; Qing-Jun; Lu

    2015-01-01

    Retinal degenerative diseases pose a serious threat to eye health, but there is currently no effective treatment available. Recent years have witnessed rapid development of several cutting-edge technologies, such as gene therapy, stem cell therapy, and tissue engineering. Due to the special features of ocular structure, some of these technologies have been translated into ophthalmological clinic practice with fruitful achievements, setting a good example for other fields. This paper reviews the development of the gene and stem cell therapies in ophthalmology.

  15. Generation of antigen-specific T cell immunity through T cell receptor gene transfer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coccoris, Miriam

    2009-01-01

    Cancer cells often escape the attack of immune cells because they originate from self-tissue. Through T cell receptor gene transfer it is possible to equip peripheral T cells with a desired specificity, and this strategy may be useful to generate tumor-specific T cells for the treatment of cancer in

  16. Stromal mesenchyme cell genes of the human prostate and bladder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pascal Laura E

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Stromal mesenchyme cells play an important role in epithelial differentiation and likely in cancer as well. Induction of epithelial differentiation is organ-specific, and the genes responsible could be identified through a comparative genomic analysis of the stromal cells from two different organs. These genes might be aberrantly expressed in cancer since cancer could be viewed as due to a defect in stromal signaling. We propose to identify the prostate stromal genes by analysis of differentially expressed genes between prostate and bladder stromal cells, and to examine their expression in prostate cancer. Methods Immunohistochemistry using antibodies to cluster designation (CD cell surface antigens was first used to characterize the stromas of the prostate and bladder. Stromal cells were prepared from either prostate or bladder tissue for cell culture. RNA was isolated from the cultured cells and analyzed by DNA microarrays. Expression of candidate genes in normal prostate and prostate cancer was examined by RT-PCR. Results The bladder stroma was phenotypically different from that of the prostate. Most notable was the presence of a layer of CD13+ cells adjacent to the urothelium. This structural feature was also seen in the mouse bladder. The prostate stroma was uniformly CD13-. A number of differentially expressed genes between prostate and bladder stromal cells were identified. One prostate gene, proenkephalin (PENK, was of interest because it encodes a hormone. Secreted proteins such as hormones and bioactive peptides are known to mediate cell-cell signaling. Prostate stromal expression of PENK was verified by an antibody raised against a PENK peptide, by RT-PCR analysis of laser-capture microdissected stromal cells, and by database analysis. Gene expression analysis showed that PENK expression was down-regulated in prostate cancer. Conclusion Our findings show that the histologically similar stromas of the prostate and

  17. Cell- and gene-based approaches to tendon regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nixon, Alan J; Watts, Ashlee E; Schnabel, Lauren V

    2012-02-01

    Repair of rotator cuff tears in experimental models has been significantly improved by the use of enhanced biologic approaches, including platelet-rich plasma, bone marrow aspirate, growth factor supplements, and cell- and gene-modified cell therapy. Despite added complexity, cell-based therapies form an important part of enhanced repair, and combinations of carrier vehicles, growth factors, and implanted cells provide the best opportunity for robust repair. Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells provide a stimulus for repair in flexor tendons, but application in rotator cuff repair has not shown universally positive results. The use of scaffolds such as platelet-rich plasma, fibrin, and synthetic vehicles and the use of gene priming for stem cell differentiation and local anabolic and anti-inflammatory impact have both provided essential components for enhanced tendon and tendon-to-bone repair in rotator cuff disruption. Application of these research techniques in human rotator cuff injury has generally been limited to autologous platelet-rich plasma, bone marrow concentrate, or bone marrow aspirates combined with scaffold materials. Cultured mesenchymal progenitor therapy and gene-enhanced function have not yet reached clinical trials in humans. Research in several animal species indicates that the concept of gene-primed stem cells, particularly embryonic stem cells, combined with effective culture conditions, transduction with long-term integrating vectors carrying anabolic growth factors, and development of cells conditioned by use of RNA interference gene therapy to resist matrix metalloproteinase degradation, may constitute potential advances in rotator cuff repair. This review summarizes cell- and gene-enhanced cell research for tendon repair and provides future directions for rotator cuff repair using biologic composites.

  18. Stem Cell Based Gene Therapy in Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae Heon Kim

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Current prostate cancer treatment, especially hormone refractory cancer, may create profound iatrogenic outcomes because of the adverse effects of cytotoxic agents. Suicide gene therapy has been investigated for the substitute modality for current chemotherapy because it enables the treatment targeting the cancer cells. However the classic suicide gene therapy has several profound side effects, including immune-compromised due to viral vector. Recently, stem cells have been regarded as a new upgraded cellular vehicle or vector because of its homing effects. Suicide gene therapy using genetically engineered mesenchymal stem cells or neural stem cells has the advantage of being safe, because prodrug administration not only eliminates tumor cells but consequently kills the more resistant therapeutic stem cells as well. The attractiveness of prodrug cancer gene therapy by stem cells targeted to tumors lies in activating the prodrug directly within the tumor mass, thus avoiding systemic toxicity. Therapeutic achievements using stem cells in prostate cancer include the cytosine deaminase/5-fluorocytosine prodrug system, herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase/ganciclovir, carboxyl esterase/CPT11, and interferon-beta. The aim of this study is to review the stem cell therapy in prostate cancer including its proven mechanisms and also limitations.

  19. Impact of methoxyacetic acid on mouse Leydig cell gene expression

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    Waxman David J

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Methoxyacetic acid (MAA is the active metabolite of the widely used industrial chemical ethylene glycol monomethyl ether, which is associated with various developmental and reproductive toxicities, including neural toxicity, blood and immune disorders, limb degeneration and testicular toxicity. Testicular toxicity is caused by degeneration of germ cells in association with changes in gene expression in both germ cells and Sertoli cells of the testis. This study investigates the impact of MAA on gene expression in testicular Leydig cells, which play a critical role in germ cell survival and male reproductive function. Methods Cultured mouse TM3 Leydig cells were treated with MAA for 3, 8, and 24 h and changes in gene expression were monitored by genome-wide transcriptional profiling. Results A total of 3,912 MAA-responsive genes were identified. Ingenuity Pathway analysis identified reproductive system disease, inflammatory disease and connective tissue disorder as the top biological functions affected by MAA. The MAA-responsive genes were classified into 1,366 early responders, 1,387 mid-responders, and 1,138 late responders, based on the time required for MAA to elicit a response. Analysis of enriched functional clusters for each subgroup identified 106 MAA early response genes involved in transcription regulation, including 32 genes associated with developmental processes. 60 DNA-binding proteins responded to MAA rapidly but transiently, and may contribute to the downstream effects of MAA seen for many mid and late response genes. Genes within the phosphatidylinositol/phospholipase C/calcium signaling pathway, whose activity is required for potentiation of nuclear receptor signaling by MAA, were also enriched in the set of early MAA response genes. In contrast, many of the genes responding to MAA at later time points encode membrane proteins that contribute to cell adhesion and membrane signaling. Conclusions These findings

  20. Engineering Synthetic Gene Circuits in Living Cells with CRISPR Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jusiak, Barbara; Cleto, Sara; Perez-Piñera, Pablo; Lu, Timothy K

    2016-07-01

    One of the goals of synthetic biology is to build regulatory circuits that control cell behavior, for both basic research purposes and biomedical applications. The ability to build transcriptional regulatory devices depends on the availability of programmable, sequence-specific, and effective synthetic transcription factors (TFs). The prokaryotic clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR) system, recently harnessed for transcriptional regulation in various heterologous host cells, offers unprecedented ease in designing synthetic TFs. We review how CRISPR can be used to build synthetic gene circuits and discuss recent advances in CRISPR-mediated gene regulation that offer the potential to build increasingly complex, programmable, and efficient gene circuits in the future.

  1. Neurohypophysial Receptor Gene Expression by Thymic T Cell Subsets and Thymic T Cell Lymphoma Cell Lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Hansenne

    2004-01-01

    transcribed in thymic epithelium, while immature T lymphocytes express functional neurohypophysial receptors. Neurohypophysial receptors belong to the G protein-linked seven-transmembrane receptor superfamily and are encoded by four distinct genes, OTR, V1R, V2R and V3R. The objective of this study was to identify the nature of neurohypophysial receptor in thymic T cell subsets purified by immunomagnetic selection, as well as in murine thymic lymphoma cell lines RL12-NP and BW5147. OTR is transcribed in all thymic T cell subsets and T cell lines, while V3R transcription is restricted to CD4+ CD8+ and CD8+ thymic cells. Neither V1R nor V2R transcripts are detected in any kind of T cells. The OTR protein was identified by immunocytochemistry on thymocytes freshly isolated from C57BL/6 mice. In murine fetal thymic organ cultures, a specific OTR antagonist does not modify the percentage of T cell subsets, but increases late T cell apoptosis further evidencing the involvement of OT/OTR signaling in the control of T cell proliferation and survival. According to these data, OTR and V3R are differentially expressed during T cell ontogeny. Moreover, the restriction of OTR transcription to T cell lines derived from thymic lymphomas may be important in the context of T cell leukemia pathogenesis and treatment.

  2. Screening for the Most Suitable Reference Genes for Gene Expression Studies in Equine Milk Somatic Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakub Cieslak

    Full Text Available Apart from the well-known role of somatic cell count as a parameter reflecting the inflammatory status of the mammary gland, the composition of cells isolated from milk is considered as a valuable material for gene expression studies in mammals. Due to its unique composition, in recent years an increasing interest in mare's milk consumption has been observed. Thus, investigating the genetic background of horse's milk variability presents and interesting study model. Relying on 39 milk samples collected from mares representing three breeds (Polish Primitive Horse, Polish Cold-blooded Horse, Polish Warmblood Horse we aimed to investigate the utility of equine milk somatic cells as a source of mRNA and to screen the best reference genes for RT-qPCR using geNorm and NormFinder algorithms. The results showed that despite relatively low somatic cell counts in mare's milk, the amount and the quality of the extracted RNA are sufficient for gene expression studies. The analysis of the utility of 7 potential reference genes for RT-qPCR experiments for the normalization of equine milk somatic cells revealed some differences between the outcomes of the applied algorithms, although in both cases the KRT8 and TOP2B genes were pointed as the most stable. Analysis by geNorm showed that the combination of 4 reference genes (ACTB, GAPDH, TOP2B and KRT8 is required for apropriate RT-qPCR experiments normalization, whereas NormFinder algorithm pointed the combination of KRT8 and RPS9 genes as the most suitable. The trial study of the relative transcript abundance of the beta-casein gene with the use of various types and numbers of internal control genes confirmed once again that the selection of proper reference gene combinations is crucial for the final results of each real-time PCR experiment.

  3. [Immunoglobulin genes in lymphoid cells and regulation of their transcription].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepchenko, A G; Urakov, D N; Luchina, N N; Deev, S M; Polianovskiĭ, O L

    1990-01-01

    The hybridoma genomes contain polyploid sets of immunoglobulin genes. We have shown, that the hybridoma PTF-02 genome contains three genes of heavy chains and two genes of light chains. The genes responsible for antibody synthesis were cloned and their structure were determined. Investigation of the kappa gene transcription and its fragments which contain regulatory sequences revealed a nuclear factor. The latter interacts with the octanucleotide localized at the promoter region of the kappa gene. The purified factor activates the transcription of the kappa gene in a heterologous cell-free system. Together with the tissue-specific factor there is also an universal factor interacting with the octanucleotide sequence. We have shown an additional factor in lymphoid cells interact with the protein which binds to the octanucleotide sequence. We have shown an additional factor in lymphoid cells interacting with the protein which binds to the octanucleotide sequence. As a result, there is a family of factors which interact with ATTTGCAT sequence. One major factor (m.w. 60 +/- 2 kDa) is an obligatory component for the initiation of immunoglobulin genes transcription.

  4. Identification of genes responsive to apoptosis in HL-60 cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei JIN; Le-feng QU; Ping MIN; Shan CHEN; Hong LI; He LU; Yong-tai HOU

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To identify genes responsive to apoptosis in HL-60 cells treated by homoharringtonine. METHODS: cDNA microarray technology was used to detect gene expression and the result of microarrays for genes (TIEG and VDUP1) was confirmed by Northern analysis. RESULTS: Seventy-five individual mRNAs whose mass changed significantly were identified. Among these genes (25 were up-regulated and 50 were down-regulated), most are known related to oncogenes and tumor suppressor. Some genes were involved in apoptosis signaling pathways.CONCLUSION: TGFβ and TNF apoptosis signaling pathways were initiated during apoptosis in HL-60 cells.TIEG and VDUP1 play important roles in mediating apoptosis.

  5. Binary gene induction and protein expression in individual cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Conolly Rory B

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Eukaryotic gene transcription is believed to occur in either a binary or a graded fashion. With binary induction, a transcription activator (TA regulates the probability with which a gene template is switched from the inactive to the active state without affecting the rate at which RNA molecules are produced from the template. With graded, also called rheostat-like, induction the gene template has continuously varying levels of transcriptional activity, and the TA regulates the rate of RNA production. Support for each of these two mechanisms arises primarily from experimental studies measuring reporter proteins in individual cells, rather than from direct measurement of induction events at the gene template. Methods and results In this paper, using a computational model of stochastic gene expression, we have studied the biological and experimental conditions under which a binary induction mode operating at the gene template can give rise to differentially expressed "phenotypes" (i.e., binary, hybrid or graded at the protein level. We have also investigated whether the choice of reporter genes plays a significant role in determining the observed protein expression patterns in individual cells, given the diverse properties of commonly-used reporter genes. Our simulation confirmed early findings that the lifetimes of active/inactive promoters and half-lives of downstream mRNA/protein products are important determinants of various protein expression patterns, but showed that the induction time and the sensitivity with which the expressed genes are detected are also important experimental variables. Using parameter conditions representative of reporter genes including green fluorescence protein (GFP and β-galactosidase, we also demonstrated that graded gene expression is more likely to be observed with GFP, a longer-lived protein with low detection sensitivity. Conclusion The choice of reporter genes may determine whether protein

  6. Gene therapy for oral squamous cell carcinoma: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraswathi, T R; Kavitha, B; Vijayashree Priyadharsini, J

    2007-01-01

    A potential approach to the treatment of genetic disorders is gene therapy. The goal of gene therapy is to introduce therapeutic genetic material into the target cell to exert the intended therapeutic effect. Gene therapy has already shown promising results for the treatment of monogenic disorders such as severe combined immunodeficiency and haemophilia. Now the procedure has been extended to the level of treating malignant conditions such as cancer of the lungs, breast, colon etc. The prevalence of tumours of the larynx and oral cavity has increased in both developed and developing countries. This increase underscores the need for a novel therapeutic modality that would decrease or completely terminate the proliferation of malignant cells. This review highlights various types of gene therapy procedures with respect to oral squamous cell carcinoma.

  7. Gene therapy for oral squamous cell carcinoma: An overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saraswathi T

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available A potential approach to the treatment of genetic disorders is gene therapy. The goal of gene therapy is to introduce therapeutic genetic material into the target cell to exert the intended therapeutic effect. Gene therapy has already shown promising results for the treatment of monogenic disorders such as severe combined immunodeficiency and haemophilia. Now the procedure has been extended to the level of treating malignant conditions such as cancer of the lungs, breast, colon etc. The prevalence of tumours of the larynx and oral cavity has increased in both developed and developing countries. This increase underscores the need for a novel therapeutic modality that would decrease or completely terminate the proliferation of malignant cells. This review highlights various types of gene therapy procedures with respect to oral squamous cell carcinoma.

  8. Transcriptional Wiring of Cell Wall-Related Genes in Arabidopsis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Marek Mutwil; Colin Ruprecht; Federico M. Giorgi; Martin Bringmann; Bj(o)rn Usadel; Staffan Persson

    2009-01-01

    Transcriptional coordination, or co-expression, of genes may signify functional relatedness of the correspond-ing proteins. For example, several genes involved in secondary cell wall cellulose biosynthesis are co-expressed with genes engaged in the synthesis of xylan, which is a major component of the secondary cell wall. To extend these types of anal-yses, we investigated the co-expression relationships of all Carbohydrate-Active enZYmes (CAZy)-related genes for Arabidopsis thaliana. Thus, the intention was to transcriptionally link different cell wall-related processes to each other, and also to other biological functions. To facilitate easy manual inspection, we have displayed these interactions as networks and matrices, and created a web-based interface (http://aranet.mpimp-golm.mpg.de/corecarb) containing downloadable files for all the transcriptional associations.

  9. Stem cell and neurogenic gene-expression profiles link prostate basal cells to aggressive prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dingxiao; Park, Daechan; Zhong, Yi; Lu, Yue; Rycaj, Kiera; Gong, Shuai; Chen, Xin; Liu, Xin; Chao, Hsueh-Ping; Whitney, Pamela; Calhoun-Davis, Tammy; Takata, Yoko; Shen, Jianjun; Iyer, Vishwanath R; Tang, Dean G

    2016-02-29

    The prostate gland mainly contains basal and luminal cells constructed as a pseudostratified epithelium. Annotation of prostate epithelial transcriptomes provides a foundation for discoveries that can impact disease understanding and treatment. Here we describe a genome-wide transcriptome analysis of human benign prostatic basal and luminal epithelial populations using deep RNA sequencing. Through molecular and biological characterizations, we show that the differential gene-expression profiles account for their distinct functional properties. Strikingly, basal cells preferentially express gene categories associated with stem cells, neurogenesis and ribosomal RNA (rRNA) biogenesis. Consistent with this profile, basal cells functionally exhibit intrinsic stem-like and neurogenic properties with enhanced rRNA transcription activity. Of clinical relevance, the basal cell gene-expression profile is enriched in advanced, anaplastic, castration-resistant and metastatic prostate cancers. Therefore, we link the cell-type-specific gene signatures to aggressive subtypes of prostate cancer and identify gene signatures associated with adverse clinical features.

  10. Pluripotent Stem Cells for Gene Therapy of Degenerative Muscle Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loperfido, Mariana; Steele-Stallard, Heather B; Tedesco, Francesco Saverio; VandenDriessche, Thierry

    2015-01-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells represent a unique source for cell-based therapies and regenerative medicine. The intrinsic features of these cells such as their easy accessibility and their capacity to be expanded indefinitely overcome some limitations of conventional adult stem cells. Furthermore, the possibility to derive patient-specific induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells in combination with the current development of gene modification methods could be used for autologous cell therapies of some genetic diseases. In particular, muscular dystrophies are considered to be a good candidate due to the lack of efficacious therapeutic treatments for patients to date, and in view of the encouraging results arising from recent preclinical studies. Some hurdles, including possible genetic instability and their efficient differentiation into muscle progenitors through vector/transgene-free methods have still to be overcome or need further optimization. Additionally, engraftment and functional contribution to muscle regeneration in pre-clinical models need to be carefully assessed before clinical translation. This review offers a summary of the advanced methods recently developed to derive muscle progenitors from pluripotent stem cells, as well as gene therapy by gene addition and gene editing methods using ZFNs, TALENs or CRISPR/Cas9. We have also discussed the main issues that need to be addressed for successful clinical translation of genetically corrected patient-specific pluripotent stem cells in autologous transplantation trials for skeletal muscle disorders.

  11. Experiments on Gene Transferring to Primary Hematopoietic Cells by Liposome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Liposomes have showed many advantages in mediating exogenous gene into many cell types in vitro and in vivo. But few data are available concerning gene transfer into hematopoietic cells. In this report, we described two-marker genes (Neo R and Lac Z) co-transferred into hematopoietic cells of human and mouse by using liposome in vitro. The efficiency of gene transfer was tested by Xgal staining and observation of colony formation. The X-gal blue staining rate of transduced cells was about (13.33±2. 68) % in human and about (16. 28±2.95) % in mouse without G418 selection. After G418 selection, the blue cell rate was (46. 06±3.47)%in human and (43. 45±4. 1) % in mouse, which were markedly higher than those before selection, suggesting that high-efficiency gene transfer and expression could be attained in primary hematopoietic cells using this easy and harmless transduction protocol. At the same time, this protocol provided experimental data for clinicians to investigate the biology of marrow reconstitution and trace the origin of relapse after autologous bone marrow transplantation for the patients with leukemia.

  12. Interdependence of cell growth and gene expression: origins and consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Matthew; Gunderson, Carl W; Mateescu, Eduard M; Zhang, Zhongge; Hwa, Terence

    2010-11-19

    In bacteria, the rate of cell proliferation and the level of gene expression are intimately intertwined. Elucidating these relations is important both for understanding the physiological functions of endogenous genetic circuits and for designing robust synthetic systems. We describe a phenomenological study that reveals intrinsic constraints governing the allocation of resources toward protein synthesis and other aspects of cell growth. A theory incorporating these constraints can accurately predict how cell proliferation and gene expression affect one another, quantitatively accounting for the effect of translation-inhibiting antibiotics on gene expression and the effect of gratuitous protein expression on cell growth. The use of such empirical relations, analogous to phenomenological laws, may facilitate our understanding and manipulation of complex biological systems before underlying regulatory circuits are elucidated.

  13. Targeted delivery of genes to endothelial cells and cell- and gene-based therapy in pulmonary vascular diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suen, Colin M; Mei, Shirley H J; Kugathasan, Lakshmi; Stewart, Duncan J

    2013-10-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a devastating disease that, despite significant advances in medical therapies over the last several decades, continues to have an extremely poor prognosis. Gene therapy is a method to deliver therapeutic genes to replace defective or mutant genes or supplement existing cellular processes to modify disease. Over the last few decades, several viral and nonviral methods of gene therapy have been developed for preclinical PAH studies with varying degrees of efficacy. However, these gene delivery methods face challenges of immunogenicity, low transduction rates, and nonspecific targeting which have limited their translation to clinical studies. More recently, the emergence of regenerative approaches using stem and progenitor cells such as endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have offered a new approach to gene therapy. Cell-based gene therapy is an approach that augments the therapeutic potential of EPCs and MSCs and may deliver on the promise of reversal of established PAH. These new regenerative approaches have shown tremendous potential in preclinical studies; however, large, rigorously designed clinical studies will be necessary to evaluate clinical efficacy and safety.

  14. Gene function in early mouse embryonic stem cell differentiation

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    Campbell Pearl A

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Little is known about the genes that drive embryonic stem cell differentiation. However, such knowledge is necessary if we are to exploit the therapeutic potential of stem cells. To uncover the genetic determinants of mouse embryonic stem cell (mESC differentiation, we have generated and analyzed 11-point time-series of DNA microarray data for three biologically equivalent but genetically distinct mESC lines (R1, J1, and V6.5 undergoing undirected differentiation into embryoid bodies (EBs over a period of two weeks. Results We identified the initial 12 hour period as reflecting the early stages of mESC differentiation and studied probe sets showing consistent changes of gene expression in that period. Gene function analysis indicated significant up-regulation of genes related to regulation of transcription and mRNA splicing, and down-regulation of genes related to intracellular signaling. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that the genes showing the largest expression changes were more likely to have originated in metazoans. The probe sets with the most consistent gene changes in the three cell lines represented 24 down-regulated and 12 up-regulated genes, all with closely related human homologues. Whereas some of these genes are known to be involved in embryonic developmental processes (e.g. Klf4, Otx2, Smn1, Socs3, Tagln, Tdgf1, our analysis points to others (such as transcription factor Phf21a, extracellular matrix related Lama1 and Cyr61, or endoplasmic reticulum related Sc4mol and Scd2 that have not been previously related to mESC function. The majority of identified functions were related to transcriptional regulation, intracellular signaling, and cytoskeleton. Genes involved in other cellular functions important in ESC differentiation such as chromatin remodeling and transmembrane receptors were not observed in this set. Conclusion Our analysis profiles for the first time gene expression at a very early stage of m

  15. Gene expression disparity in giant cell tumor of bone

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaohua PAN; Shuhua YANG; Deming XIAO; Yong DAI; Lili REN

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this paper was to study the differential gene expression of giant cell tumor of bone (GCTB) by gene chip technology. Total RNA of 8 fresh GCTB specimens (Jaffe Ⅰ:6 cases, Ⅱ: 1 case, Ⅲ: 1 case; Campanacci Ⅰ:6 cases, Ⅱ:1 case, Ⅲ:1 case; Enneking Staging G0T1-2M0, 5 cases, G1T1-2M0: 2 cases, G1T2M0: 1 case) and 4 normal bony callus specimens (the control group) were extracted and purified to get mRNA and then reverse transcribed to complementary DNA, respectively. Microarray screening with a set of 8064 human cDNA genes was conducted to analyze the difference among the samples and the control. The hybridization signals were scanned. The gene expression disparity between the GCTB samples and normal bony callus was significantly different (P<0.01), and the disparity of over 5-fold was found in 47 genes in the GCTB specimens, with 25 genes up-regulated and 22 down-regulated including the extracellular matrix and transforming-related genes, oncogene and its homolog genes, cytokine and its receptor genes. Specific gene spectrum associated with GCTB can be identified by cDNA microarray, which will be the foundation of progressive etiology elucidation, diagnosis and treatment of GCTB.

  16. Nucleus- and cell-specific gene expression in monkey thalamus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Karl D; Choudary, Prabhakara V; Jones, Edward G

    2007-02-06

    Nuclei of the mammalian thalamus are aggregations of neurons with unique architectures and input-output connections, yet the molecular determinants of their organizational specificity remain unknown. By comparing expression profiles of thalamus and cerebral cortex in adult rhesus monkeys, we identified transcripts that are unique to dorsal thalamus or to individual nuclei within it. Real-time quantitative PCR and in situ hybridization analyses confirmed the findings. Expression profiling of individual nuclei microdissected from the dorsal thalamus revealed additional subsets of nucleus-specific genes. Functional annotation using Gene Ontology (GO) vocabulary and Ingenuity Pathways Analysis revealed overrepresentation of GO categories related to development, morphogenesis, cell-cell interactions, and extracellular matrix within the thalamus- and nucleus-specific genes, many involved in the Wnt signaling pathway. Examples included the transcription factor TCF7L2, localized exclusively to excitatory neurons; a calmodulin-binding protein PCP4; the bone extracellular matrix molecules SPP1 and SPARC; and other genes involved in axon outgrowth and cell matrix interactions. Other nucleus-specific genes such as CBLN1 are involved in synaptogenesis. The genes identified likely underlie nuclear specification, cell phenotype, and connectivity during development and their maintenance in the adult thalamus.

  17. Cancer specificity of promoters of the genes controlling cell proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashkin, Kirill; Chernov, Igor; Stukacheva, Elena; Monastyrskaya, Galina; Uspenskaya, Natalya; Kopantzev, Eugene; Sverdlov, Eugene

    2015-02-01

    Violation of proliferation control is a common feature of cancer cells. We put forward the hypothesis that promoters of genes involved in the control of cell proliferation should possess intrinsic cancer specific activity. We cloned promoter regions of CDC6, POLD1, CKS1B, MCM2, and PLK1 genes into pGL3 reporter vector and studied their ability to drive heterologous gene expression in transfected cancer cells of different origin and in normal human fibroblasts. Each promoter was cloned in short (335-800 bp) and long (up to 2.3 kb) variants to cover probable location of core and whole promoter regulatory elements. Cloned promoters were significantly more active in cancer cells than in normal fibroblasts that may indicate their cancer specificity. Both versions of CDC6 promoters were shown to be most active while the activities of others were close to that of BIRC5 gene (survivin) gene promoter. Long and short variants of each cloned promoter demonstrated very similar cancer specificity with the exception of PLK1-long promoter that was substantially more specific than its short variant and other promoters under study. The data indicate that most of the important cis-regulatory transcription elements responsible for intrinsic cancer specificity are located in short variants of the promoters under study. CDC6 short promoter may serve as a promising candidate for transcription targeted cancer gene therapy.

  18. Positron emission tomography reporter genes and reporter probes: gene and cell therapy applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaghoubi, Shahriar S; Campbell, Dean O; Radu, Caius G; Czernin, Johannes

    2012-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging reporter genes (IRGs) and PET reporter probes (PRPs) are amongst the most valuable tools for gene and cell therapy. PET IRGs/PRPs can be used to non-invasively monitor all aspects of the kinetics of therapeutic transgenes and cells in all types of living mammals. This technology is generalizable and can allow long-term kinetics monitoring. In gene therapy, PET IRGs/PRPs can be used for whole-body imaging of therapeutic transgene expression, monitoring variations in the magnitude of transgene expression over time. In cell or cellular gene therapy, PET IRGs/PRPs can be used for whole-body monitoring of therapeutic cell locations, quantity at all locations, survival and proliferation over time and also possibly changes in characteristics or function over time. In this review, we have classified PET IRGs/PRPs into two groups based on the source from which they were derived: human or non-human. This classification addresses the important concern of potential immunogenicity in humans, which is important for expansion of PET IRG imaging in clinical trials. We have then discussed the application of this technology in gene/cell therapy and described its use in these fields, including a summary of using PET IRGs/PRPs in gene and cell therapy clinical trials. This review concludes with a discussion of the future direction of PET IRGs/PRPs and recommends cell and gene therapists collaborate with molecular imaging experts early in their investigations to choose a PET IRG/PRP system suitable for progression into clinical trials.

  19. Positron Emission Tomography Reporter Genes and Reporter Probes: Gene and Cell Therapy Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahriar S. Yaghoubi, Dean O. Campbell, Caius G. Radu, Johannes Czernin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Positron emission tomography (PET imaging reporter genes (IRGs and PET reporter probes (PRPs are amongst the most valuable tools for gene and cell therapy. PET IRGs/PRPs can be used to non-invasively monitor all aspects of the kinetics of therapeutic transgenes and cells in all types of living mammals. This technology is generalizable and can allow long-term kinetics monitoring. In gene therapy, PET IRGs/PRPs can be used for whole-body imaging of therapeutic transgene expression, monitoring variations in the magnitude of transgene expression over time. In cell or cellular gene therapy, PET IRGs/PRPs can be used for whole-body monitoring of therapeutic cell locations, quantity at all locations, survival and proliferation over time and also possibly changes in characteristics or function over time. In this review, we have classified PET IRGs/PRPs into two groups based on the source from which they were derived: human or non-human. This classification addresses the important concern of potential immunogenicity in humans, which is important for expansion of PET IRG imaging in clinical trials. We have then discussed the application of this technology in gene/cell therapy and described its use in these fields, including a summary of using PET IRGs/PRPs in gene and cell therapy clinical trials. This review concludes with a discussion of the future direction of PET IRGs/PRPs and recommends cell and gene therapists collaborate with molecular imaging experts early in their investigations to choose a PET IRG/PRP system suitable for progression into clinical trials.

  20. Expression and function of FERMT genes in colon carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiriyama, Kenji; Hirohashi, Yoshihiko; Torigoe, Toshihiko; Kubo, Terufumi; Tamura, Yasuaki; Kanaseki, Takayuki; Takahashi, Akari; Nakazawa, Emiri; Saka, Eri; Ragnarsson, Charlotte; Nakatsugawa, Munehide; Inoda, Satoko; Asanuma, Hiroko; Takasu, Hideo; Hasegawa, Tadashi; Yasoshima, Takahiro; Hirata, Koichi; Sato, Noriyuki

    2013-01-01

    Invasion into the matrix is one of hallmarks of malignant diseases and is the first step for tumor metastasis. Thus, analysis of the molecular mechanisms of invasion is essential to overcome tumor cell invasion. In the present study, we screened for colon carcinoma-specific genes using a cDNA microarray database of colon carcinoma tissues and normal colon tissues, and we found that fermitin family member-1 (FERMT1) is overexpressed in colon carcinoma cells. FRRMT1, FERMT2 and FERMT3 expression was investigated in colon carcinoma cells. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis revealed that only FERMT1 had cancer cell-specific expression. Protein expression of FERMT1 was confirmed by western blotting and immunohistochemical staining. To address the molecular functions of FERMT genes in colon carcinoma cells, we established FERMT1-, FERMT2- and FERMT3-overexpressing colon carcinoma cells. FERMT1-overexpressing cells exhibited greater invasive ability than did FERMT2- and FERMT3-overexpressing cells. On the other hand, FERMT1-, FERMT2- and FERMT3-overexpressing cells exhibited enhancement of cell growth. Taken together, the results of this study indicate that FERMT1 is expressed specifically in colon carcinoma cells, and has roles in matrix invasion and cell growth. These findings indicate that FERMT1 is a potential molecular target for cancer therapy.

  1. [Differentiation of functional cells from iPS cells by efficient gene transfer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawabata, Kenji; Tashiro, Katsuhisa; Mizuguchi, Hiroyuki

    2010-11-01

    Induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells, which are generated from somatic cells by transducing four genes, are expected to have broad application to regenerative medicine. Although establishment of an efficient gene transfer system for iPS cells is considered to be essential for differentiating them into functional cells, the detailed transduction characteristics of iPS cells have not been examined. By using an adenovirus (Ad) vector containing the cytomegalovirus enhancer/beta-actin (CA) promoters, we have developed an efficient transduction system for mouse mesenchymal stem cells and embryonic stem (ES) cells. Also, we applied our transduction system to mouse iPS cells and investigated whether efficient differentiation could be achieved by Ad vector-mediated transduction of a functional gene. As in the case of ES cells, the Ad vector could efficiently transduce transgenes into mouse iPS cells. We found that the CA promoter had potent transduction ability in iPS cells. Moreover, exogenous expression of a PPARγ gene or a Runx2 gene into mouse iPS cells by an optimized Ad vector enhanced adipocyte or osteoblast differentiation, respectively. These results suggest that Ad vector-mediated transient transduction is sufficient to promote cellular differentiation and that our transduction methods would be useful for therapeutic applications based on iPS cells.

  2. [Expression of rice dwarf virus outer coat protein gene(S8) in insect cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, S; Liu, H; Chen, Z; Li, Y

    2001-04-01

    Outer coat protein gene(S8) of RDV was cloned into the transfer vector pVL 1393 to construct a recombinant vector pVL1393-S8. The recombinant vector pVL1393-S8 and the linear baculovirus RP23. LacZ were cotransfected into sf9 cells to produce the recombinant virus RP23-S8. RP23-S8 infected sf9 cells were collected and analysed by SDS-PAGE and Western-blot. The results showed that the S8 gene of RDV was expressed in sf9 cells and the expression level of sf9 cells was higher between 72-96 h after infected.

  3. Gene expression profiling of chicken primordial germ cell ESTs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lim Dajeong

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Germ cells are the only cell type that can penetrate from one generation to next generation. At the early embryonic developmental stages, germ cells originally stem from primordial germ cells, and finally differentiate into functional gametes, sperm in male or oocyte in female, after sexual maturity. This study was conducted to investigate a large-scale expressed sequence tag (EST analysis in chicken PGCs and compare the expression of the PGC ESTs with that of embryonic gonad. Results We constructed 10,851 ESTs from a chicken cDNA library of a collection of highly separated embryonic PGCs. After chimeric and problematic sequences were filtered out using the chicken genomic sequences, there were 5,093 resulting unique sequences consisting of 156 contigs and 4,937 singlets. Pearson chi-square tests of gene ontology terms in the 2nd level between PGC and embryonic gonad set showed no significance. However, digital gene expression profiling using the Audic's test showed that there were 2 genes expressed significantly with higher number of transcripts in PGCs compared with the embryonic gonads set. On the other hand, 17 genes in embryonic gonads were up-regulated higher than those in the PGC set. Conclusion Our results in this study contribute to knowledge of mining novel transcripts and genes involved in germline cell proliferation and differentiation at the early embryonic stages.

  4. Suicide genes: monitoring cells in patients with a safety switch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eissenberg, Linda G; Rettig, Michael; Dehdashti, Farrokh; Piwnica-Worms, David; DiPersio, John F

    2014-01-01

    Clinical trials increasingly incorporate suicide genes either as direct lytic agents for tumors or as safety switches in therapies based on genetically modified cells. Suicide genes can also be used as non-invasive reporters to monitor the biological consequences of administering genetically modified cells to patients and gather information relevant to patient safety. These genes can monitor therapeutic outcomes addressable by early clinical intervention. As an example, our recent clinical trial used (18)F-9-(4-fluoro-3-hydroxymethylbutyl)guanine ((18)FHBG) and positron emission tomography (PET)/CT scans to follow T cells transduced with herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase after administration to patients. Guided by preclinical data we ultimately hope to discern whether a particular pattern of transduced T cell migration within patients reflects early development of graft vs. host disease. Current difficulties in terms of choice of suicide gene, biodistribution of radiolabeled tracers in humans vs. animal models, and threshold levels of genetically modified cells needed for detection by PET/CT are discussed. As alternative suicide genes are developed, additional radiolabel probes suitable for imaging in patients should be considered.

  5. Suicide genes: monitoring cells in patients with a safety switch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda Groppe Eissenberg

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Clinical trials increasingly incorporate suicide genes either as direct lytic agents for tumors or as safety switches in therapies based on genetically modified cells. Suicide genes can also be used as non-invasive reporters to monitor the biological consequences of administering genetically modified cells to patients and gather information relevant to patient safety. These genes can monitor therapeutic outcomes addressable by early clinical intervention. As an example, our recent clinical trial used 18F-9-(4-fluoro-3-hydroxymethylbutylguanine (18FHBG and PET/CT scans to follow T cells transduced with herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (TK after administration to patients. Guided by preclinical data we ultimately hope to discern whether a particular pattern of transduced T cell migration within patients reflects early development of Graft vs. Host Disease (GvHD. Current difficulties in terms of choice of suicide gene, biodistribution of radiolabeled tracers in humans versus animal models, and threshold levels of genetically modified cells needed for detection by PET/CT are discussed. As alternative suicide genes are developed, additional radiolabel probes suitable for imaging in patients should be considered.

  6. Investigation of radiosensitivity gene signatures in cancer cell lines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John S Hall

    Full Text Available Intrinsic radiosensitivity is an important factor underlying radiotherapy response, but there is no method for its routine assessment in human tumours. Gene signatures are currently being derived and some were previously generated by expression profiling the NCI-60 cell line panel. It was hypothesised that focusing on more homogeneous tumour types would be a better approach. Two cell line cohorts were used derived from cervix [n = 16] and head and neck [n = 11] cancers. Radiosensitivity was measured as surviving fraction following irradiation with 2 Gy (SF2 by clonogenic assay. Differential gene expression between radiosensitive and radioresistant cell lines (SF2 median was investigated using Affymetrix GeneChip Exon 1.0ST (cervix or U133A Plus2 (head and neck arrays. There were differences within cell line cohorts relating to tissue of origin reflected by expression of the stratified epithelial marker p63. Of 138 genes identified as being associated with SF2, only 2 (1.4% were congruent between the cervix and head and neck carcinoma cell lines (MGST1 and TFPI, and these did not partition the published NCI-60 cell lines based on SF2. There was variable success in applying three published radiosensitivity signatures to our cohorts. One gene signature, originally trained on the NCI-60 cell lines, did partially separate sensitive and resistant cell lines in all three cell line datasets. The findings do not confirm our hypothesis but suggest that a common transcriptional signature can reflect the radiosensitivity of tumours of heterogeneous origins.

  7. In search of suitable reference genes for gene expression studies of human renal cell carcinoma by real-time PCR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristiansen Glen

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Housekeeping genes are commonly used as endogenous reference genes for the relative quantification of target genes in gene expression studies. No conclusive systematic study comparing the suitability of different candidate reference genes in clear cell renal cell carcinoma has been published to date. To remedy this situation, 10 housekeeping genes for normalizing purposes of RT-PCR measurements already recommended in various studies were examined with regard to their usefulness as reference genes. Results The expression of the potential reference genes was examined in matched malignant and non-malignant tissue specimens from 25 patients with clear cell renal cell carcinoma. Quality assessment of isolated RNA performed with a 2100 Agilent Bioanalyzer showed a mean RNA integrity number of 8.7 for all samples. The between-run variations related to the crossing points of PCR reactions of a control material ranged from 0.17% to 0.38%. The expression of all genes did not depend on age, sex, and tumour stage. Except the genes TATA box binding protein (TBP and peptidylprolyl isomerase A (PPIA, all genes showed significant differences in expression between malignant and non-malignant pairs. The expression stability of the candidate reference genes was additionally controlled using the software programs geNorm and NormFinder. TBP and PPIA were validated as suitable reference genes by normalizing the target gene ADAM9 using these two most stably expressed genes in comparison with up- and down-regulated housekeeping genes of the panel. Conclusion Our study demonstrated the suitability of the two housekeeping genes PPIA and TBP as endogenous reference genes when comparing malignant tissue samples with adjacent normal tissue samples from clear cell renal cell carcinoma. Both genes are recommended as reference genes for relative gene quantification in gene profiling studies either as single gene or preferably in combination.

  8. Amygdalin inhibits genes related to cell cycle in SNU-C4 human colon cancer cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hae-Jeong Park; Sung-Vin Yim; Joo-Ho Chung; Seon-Pyo Hong; Seo-Hyun Yoon; Long-Shan Han; Long-Tai Zheng; Kyung-Hee Jung; Yoon-Kyung Uhm; Je-Hyun Lee; Ji-Seon Jeong; Woo-Sang Joo

    2005-01-01

    AIM: The genes were divided into seven categories according to biological function; apoptosis-reiated, immune response-related, signal transduction-related, cell cyclerelated, cell growth-related, stress response-related and transcription-related genes.METHODS: We compared the gene expression profiles of SNU-C4 cells between amygdalin-treated (5 mg/mL,24 h) and non-treated groups using cDNA microarray analysis. We selected genes downregulated in cDNA microarray and investigated mRNA levels of the genes by RT-PCR. RESULTS: Microarray showed that amygdalin downregulated especially genes belonging to cell cycle category: exonuclease 1 (EXO1), ATP-binding cassette, sub-family F, member 2 (ABCF2), MRE11 meiotic recombination 11 homolog A (MRE114), topoisomerase (DNA) I (TOP1), and FK506 binding protein 12-rapamycin-associated protein 1 (FRAP1). RT-PCR analysis revealed that mRNA levels of these genes were also decreased by amygdalin treatment in SNU-C4 human colon cancer cells.CONCLUSION: These results suggest that amygdalin have an anticancer effect via downregulation of cell cycle-related genes in SNU-C4 human colon cancer cells,and might be used for therapeutic anticancer drug.

  9. Embryonic stem cell-derived microvesicles induce gene expression changes in Muller cells of the retina.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Katsman

    Full Text Available Cell-derived microvesicles (MVs, recognized as important components of cell-cell communication, contain mRNAs, miRNAs, proteins and lipids and transfer their bioactive contents from parent cells to cells of other origins. We have studied the effect that MVs released from embryonic stem cells (ESMVs have on retinal progenitor Müller cells. Cultured human Müller cells were exposed to mouse ESMVs every 48 hours for a total of 9 treatments. Morphological changes were observed by light microscopy in the treated cells, which grew as individual heterogeneous cells, compared to the uniform, spindle-like adherent cellular sheets of untreated cells. ESMVs transferred to Müller cells embryonic stem cell (ESC mRNAs involved in the maintenance of pluripotency, including Oct4 and Sox2, and the miRNAs of the 290 cluster, important regulators of the ESC-specific cell cycle. Moreover, ESMV exposure induced up-regulation of the basal levels of endogenous human Oct4 mRNA in Müller cells. mRNA and miRNA microarrays of ESMV-treated vs. untreated Müller cells revealed the up-regulation of genes and miRNAs involved in the induction of pluripotency, cellular proliferation, early ocular genes and genes important for retinal protection and remodeling, as well as the down-regulation of inhibitory and scar-related genes and miRNAs involved in differentiation and cell cycle arrest. To further characterize the heterogeneous cell population of ESMV-treated Müller cells, their expression of retinal cell markers was compared to that in untreated control cells by immunocytochemistry. Markers for amacrine, ganglion and rod photoreceptors were present in treated but not in control Müller cells. Together, our findings indicate that ESMs induce de-differentiation and pluripotency in their target Müller cells, which may turn on an early retinogenic program of differentiation.

  10. Advances in Gene/Cell Therapy in Epidermolysis Bullosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murauer, Eva M; Koller, Ulrich; Pellegrini, Graziella; De Luca, Michele; Bauer, Johann W

    2015-01-01

    In the past few years, substantial preclinical and experimental advances have been made in the treatment of the severe monogenic skin blistering disease epidermolysis bullosa (EB). Promising approaches have been developed in the fields of protein and cell therapies, including allogeneic stem cell transplantation; in addition, the application of gene therapy approaches has become reality. The first ex vivo gene therapy for a junctional EB (JEB) patient was performed in Italy more than 8 years ago and was shown to be effective. We have now continued this approach for an Austrian JEB patient. Further, clinical trials for a gene therapy treatment of recessive dystrophic EB are currently under way in the United States and in Europe. In this review, we aim to point out that sustainable correction of autologous keratinocytes by stable genomic integration of a therapeutic gene represents a realistic option for patients with EB.

  11. Involvement of distinct PKC gene products in T cell functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gottfried eBaier

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available It is well established that members of the Protein kinase C(PKC family seem to have important roles in T cells. Focusing on the physiological and non-redundant PKC functions established in primary mouse T cells via germline gene-targeting approaches, our current knowledge defines two particularly critical PKC gene products, PKCθ and PKCα, as the flavor of PKC in T cells that appear to have a positive role in signaling pathways that are necessary for full antigen receptor-mediated T cell activation ex vivo and T cell-mediated immunity in vivo. Consistently, in spite of the current dogma that PKCθ inhibition might be sufficient to achieve complete immunosuppressive effects, more recent results have indicated that the pharmacological inhibition of PKCθ, and additionally, at least PKCα, appears to be needed to provide a successful approach for the prevention of allograft rejection and treatment of autoimmune diseases.

  12. Modeling of gene therapy for regenerative cells using intelligent agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adly, Aya Sedky; Aboutabl, Amal Elsayed; Ibrahim, M Shaarawy

    2011-01-01

    Gene therapy is an exciting field that has attracted much interest since the first submission of clinical trials. Preliminary results were very encouraging and prompted many investigators and researchers. However, the ability of stem cells to differentiate into specific cell types holds immense potential for therapeutic use in gene therapy. Realization of this potential depends on efficient and optimized protocols for genetic manipulation of stem cells. It is widely recognized that gain/loss of function approaches using gene therapy are essential for understanding specific genes functions, and such approaches would be particularly valuable in studies involving stem cells. A significant complexity is that the development stage of vectors and their variety are still not sufficient to be efficiently applied in stem cell therapy. The development of scalable computer systems constitutes one step toward understanding dynamics of its potential. Therefore, the primary goal of this work is to develop a computer model that will support investigations of virus' behavior and organization on regenerative tissues including genetically modified stem cells. Different simulation scenarios were implemented, and their results were encouraging compared to ex vivo experiments, where the error rate lies in the range of acceptable values in this domain of application.

  13. Gene Silencing in Insect Cells Using RNAi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hsuan-Chen; March, John C; Bentley, William E

    2016-01-01

    A technique is described for synthesizing and transfecting double stranded RNA (dsRNA) for RNA interference (RNAi) in Sf-21 cell culture. Transfection with dsRNA only requires an hour and the cells usually recover within 12 h. Suggestions for designing dsRNA are included in the methods. Furthermore, websites are provided for rapid and effective dsRNA design. Three kits are essential for using the described methods: RNAqueous®-4PCR, Megascript™ T7 kit, and the Superscript™ III kit from Life Technologies, Inc.

  14. Differential integrity of TALE nuclease genes following adenoviral and lentiviral vector gene transfer into human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holkers, Maarten; Maggio, Ignazio; Liu, Jin; Janssen, Josephine M; Miselli, Francesca; Mussolino, Claudio; Recchia, Alessandra; Cathomen, Toni; Gonçalves, Manuel A F V

    2013-03-01

    The array of genome editing strategies based on targeted double-stranded DNA break formation have recently been enriched through the introduction of transcription activator-like type III effector (TALE) nucleases (TALENs). To advance the testing of TALE-based approaches, it will be crucial to deliver these custom-designed proteins not only into transformed cell types but also into more relevant, chromosomally stable, primary cells. Viral vectors are among the most effective gene transfer vehicles. Here, we investigated the capacity of human immunodeficiency virus type 1- and adenovirus-based vectors to package and deliver functional TALEN genes into various human cell types. To this end, we attempted to assemble particles of these two vector classes, each encoding a monomer of a TALEN pair targeted to a bipartite sequence within the AAVS1 'safe harbor' locus. Vector DNA analyses revealed that adenoviral vectors transferred intact TALEN genes, whereas lentiviral vectors failed to do so, as shown by their heterogeneously sized proviruses in target cells. Importantly, adenoviral vector-mediated TALEN gene delivery resulted in site-specific double-stranded DNA break formation at the intended AAVS1 target site at similarly high levels in both transformed and non-transformed cells. In conclusion, we demonstrate that adenoviral, but not lentiviral, vectors constitute a valuable TALEN gene delivery platform.

  15. Harnessing single cell sorting to identify cell division genes and regulators in bacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Burke

    Full Text Available Cell division is an essential cellular process that requires an array of known and unknown proteins for its spatial and temporal regulation. Here we develop a novel, high-throughput screening method for the identification of bacterial cell division genes and regulators. The method combines the over-expression of a shotgun genomic expression library to perturb the cell division process with high-throughput flow cytometry sorting to screen many thousands of clones. Using this approach, we recovered clones with a filamentous morphology for the model bacterium, Escherichia coli. Genetic analysis revealed that our screen identified both known cell division genes, and genes that have not previously been identified to be involved in cell division. This novel screening strategy is applicable to a wide range of organisms, including pathogenic bacteria, where cell division genes and regulators are attractive drug targets for antibiotic development.

  16. Impact of the cell division cycle on gene circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bierbaum, Veronika; Klumpp, Stefan

    2015-12-01

    In growing cells, protein synthesis and cell growth are typically not synchronous, and, thus, protein concentrations vary over the cell division cycle. We have developed a theoretical description of genetic regulatory systems in bacteria that explicitly considers the cell division cycle to investigate its impact on gene expression. We calculate the cell-to-cell variations arising from cells being at different stages in the division cycle for unregulated genes and for basic regulatory mechanisms. These variations contribute to the extrinsic noise observed in single-cell experiments, and are most significant for proteins with short lifetimes. Negative autoregulation buffers against variation of protein concentration over the division cycle, but the effect is found to be relatively weak. Stronger buffering is achieved by an increased protein lifetime. Positive autoregulation can strongly amplify such variation if the parameters are set to values that lead to resonance-like behaviour. For cooperative positive autoregulation, the concentration variation over the division cycle diminishes the parameter region of bistability and modulates the switching times between the two stable states. The same effects are seen for a two-gene mutual-repression toggle switch. By contrast, an oscillatory circuit, the repressilator, is only weakly affected by the division cycle.

  17. Gene expression markers for Caenorhabditis elegans vulval cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Takao; Sherwood, David R; Aspöck, Gudrun; Butler, James A; Gupta, Bhagwati P; Kirouac, Martha; Wang, Minqin; Lee, Pei-Yun; Kramer, James M; Hope, Ian; Bürglin, Thomas R; Sternberg, Paul W

    2002-12-01

    The analysis of cell fate patterning during the vulval development of Caenorhabditis elegans has relied mostly on the direct observation of cell divisions and cell movements (cell lineage analysis). However, reconstruction of the developing vulva from EM serial sections has suggested seven different cell types (vulA, vulB1, vulB2, vulC, vulD, vulE, and vulF), many of which cannot be distinguished based on such observations. Here we report the vulval expression of seven genes, egl-17, cdh-3, ceh-2, zmp-1, B0034.1, T04B2.6 and F47B8.6 based on gfp, cfp and yfp (green fluorescent protein and color variants) reporter fusions. Each gene expresses in a specific subset of vulval cells, and is therefore useful as a marker for vulval cell fates. Together, expressions of markers distinguish six cell types, and reveal a strict temporal control of gene expression in the developing vulva.

  18. Optimising gene therapy of hypoparathyroidism with hematopoietic stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Yi; L(U) Bing-jie; XU Ping; SONG Chun-fang

    2005-01-01

    Background The treatment of hypoparathyroidism (HPT) is still a difficult clinical problem, which necessitates a new therapy. Gene therapy of HPT has been valuable, but how to improve the gene transfer efficiency and expression stability is a problem. This study was designed to optimize the gene therapy of HPT with hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) recombined with the parathyroid hormone (PTH) gene. Methods The human PTH gene was amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) from pcDNA3.1-PTH vectors and inserted into murine stem cell virus (MSCV) vectors with double enzyme digestion (EcoRI and XhoI). The recombinant vectors were transfected into PA317 packaging cell lines by the lipofectin method and screened by G418 selective medium. The condensed recombinant retroviruses were extracted and used to infect HSCs, which were injected into mice suffering from HPT. The change of symptoms and serum levels of PTH and calcium in each group of mice were investigated. Results The human PTH gene was inserted into MSCV vectors successfully and the titres were up to 2×107 colony forming unit (CFU)/ml in condensed retroviral solution. The secretion of PTH reached 15 ng·10-6·cell-1 per 48 hours. The wild type viruses were not detected via PCR amplification, so they were safe for use. The mice suffering from HPT recovered quickly and the serum levels of calcium and PTH remained normal for about three months after the HSCs recombined with PTH were injected into them. The therapeutic effect of this method was better than simple recombinant retroviruses injection.Conclusions The recombinant retroviral vectors MSCV-PTH and the high-titre condensed retroviral solution recombined with the PTH gene are obtained. The recombinant retroviral solution could infect HSCs at a high rate of efficiency. The infected HSCs could cure HPT in mice. This method has provided theoretical evidence for the clinical gene therapy of HPT.

  19. Role of Hox genes in stem cell differentiation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Anne Seifert; David F Werheid; Silvana M Knapp; Edda Tobiasch

    2015-01-01

    Hox genes are an evolutionary highly conserved genefamily. They determine the anterior-posterior body axisin bilateral organisms and influence the developmentalfate of cells. Embryonic stem cells are usually devoidof any Hox gene expression, but these transcriptionfactors are activated in varying spatial and temporalpatterns defining the development of various bodyregions. In the adult body, Hox genes are among othersresponsible for driving the differentiation of tissuestem cells towards their respective lineages in order torepair and maintain the correct function of tissues andorgans. Due to their involvement in the embryonic andadult body, they have been suggested to be useable forimproving stem cell differentiations in vitro and in vivo .In many studies Hox genes have been found as drivingfactors in stem cell differentiation towards adipogenesis,in lineages involved in bone and joint formation, mainlychondrogenesis and osteogenesis, in cardiovascularlineages including endothelial and smooth muscle celldifferentiations, and in neurogenesis. As life expectancyis rising, the demand for tissue reconstruction continuesto increase. Stem cells have become an increasinglypopular choice for creating therapies in regenerativemedicine due to their self-renewal and differentiationpotential. Especially mesenchymal stem cells are usedmore and more frequently due to their easy handlingand accessibility, combined with a low tumorgenicityand little ethical concerns. This review therefore intendsto summarize to date known correlations betweennatural Hox gene expression patterns in body tissuesand during the differentiation of various stem cellstowards their respective lineages with a major focus onmesenchymal stem cell differentiations. This overviewshall help to understand the complex interactions of Hoxgenes and differentiation processes all over the bodyas well as in vitro for further improvement of stem celltreatments in future regenerative medicine approaches.

  20. From single-cell to cell-pool transcriptomes: stochasticity in gene expression and RNA splicing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinov, Georgi K; Williams, Brian A; McCue, Ken; Schroth, Gary P; Gertz, Jason; Myers, Richard M; Wold, Barbara J

    2014-03-01

    Single-cell RNA-seq mammalian transcriptome studies are at an early stage in uncovering cell-to-cell variation in gene expression, transcript processing and editing, and regulatory module activity. Despite great progress recently, substantial challenges remain, including discriminating biological variation from technical noise. Here we apply the SMART-seq single-cell RNA-seq protocol to study the reference lymphoblastoid cell line GM12878. By using spike-in quantification standards, we estimate the absolute number of RNA molecules per cell for each gene and find significant variation in total mRNA content: between 50,000 and 300,000 transcripts per cell. We directly measure technical stochasticity by a pool/split design and find that there are significant differences in expression between individual cells, over and above technical variation. Specific gene coexpression modules were preferentially expressed in subsets of individual cells, including one enriched for mRNA processing and splicing factors. We assess cell-to-cell variation in alternative splicing and allelic bias and report evidence of significant differences in splice site usage that exceed splice variation in the pool/split comparison. Finally, we show that transcriptomes from small pools of 30-100 cells approach the information content and reproducibility of contemporary RNA-seq from large amounts of input material. Together, our results define an experimental and computational path forward for analyzing gene expression in rare cell types and cell states.

  1. Genome-editing Technologies for Gene and Cell Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeder, Morgan L; Gersbach, Charles A

    2016-03-01

    Gene therapy has historically been defined as the addition of new genes to human cells. However, the recent advent of genome-editing technologies has enabled a new paradigm in which the sequence of the human genome can be precisely manipulated to achieve a therapeutic effect. This includes the correction of mutations that cause disease, the addition of therapeutic genes to specific sites in the genome, and the removal of deleterious genes or genome sequences. This review presents the mechanisms of different genome-editing strategies and describes each of the common nuclease-based platforms, including zinc finger nucleases, transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs), meganucleases, and the CRISPR/Cas9 system. We then summarize the progress made in applying genome editing to various areas of gene and cell therapy, including antiviral strategies, immunotherapies, and the treatment of monogenic hereditary disorders. The current challenges and future prospects for genome editing as a transformative technology for gene and cell therapy are also discussed.

  2. Genome-editing Technologies for Gene and Cell Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeder, Morgan L; Gersbach, Charles A

    2016-01-01

    Gene therapy has historically been defined as the addition of new genes to human cells. However, the recent advent of genome-editing technologies has enabled a new paradigm in which the sequence of the human genome can be precisely manipulated to achieve a therapeutic effect. This includes the correction of mutations that cause disease, the addition of therapeutic genes to specific sites in the genome, and the removal of deleterious genes or genome sequences. This review presents the mechanisms of different genome-editing strategies and describes each of the common nuclease-based platforms, including zinc finger nucleases, transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs), meganucleases, and the CRISPR/Cas9 system. We then summarize the progress made in applying genome editing to various areas of gene and cell therapy, including antiviral strategies, immunotherapies, and the treatment of monogenic hereditary disorders. The current challenges and future prospects for genome editing as a transformative technology for gene and cell therapy are also discussed. PMID:26755333

  3. Mural granulosa cell gene expression associated with oocyte developmental competence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang Jin-Yi

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ovarian follicle development is a complex process. Paracrine interactions between somatic and germ cells are critical for normal follicular development and oocyte maturation. Studies have suggested that the health and function of the granulosa and cumulus cells may be reflective of the health status of the enclosed oocyte. The objective of the present study is to assess, using an in vivo immature rat model, gene expression profile in granulosa cells, which may be linked to the developmental competence of the oocyte. We hypothesized that expression of specific genes in granulosa cells may be correlated with the developmental competence of the oocyte. Methods Immature rats were injected with eCG and 24 h thereafter with anti-eCG antibody to induce follicular atresia or with pre-immune serum to stimulate follicle development. A high percentage (30-50%, normal developmental competence, NDC of oocytes from eCG/pre-immune serum group developed to term after embryo transfer compared to those from eCG/anti-eCG (0%, poor developmental competence, PDC. Gene expression profiles of mural granulosa cells from the above oocyte-collected follicles were assessed by Affymetrix rat whole genome array. Results The result showed that twelve genes were up-regulated, while one gene was down-regulated more than 1.5 folds in the NDC group compared with those in the PDC group. Gene ontology classification showed that the up-regulated genes included lysyl oxidase (Lox and nerve growth factor receptor associated protein 1 (Ngfrap1, which are important in the regulation of protein-lysine 6-oxidase activity, and in apoptosis induction, respectively. The down-regulated genes included glycoprotein-4-beta galactosyltransferase 2 (Ggbt2, which is involved in the regulation of extracellular matrix organization and biogenesis. Conclusions The data in the present study demonstrate a close association between specific gene expression in mural granulosa cells and

  4. Nuclear orphan receptor TLX affects gene expression, proliferation and cell apoptosis in beta cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Xiaoli; Xiong, Xiaokan; Dai, Zhe; Deng, Haohua; Sun, Li; Hu, Xuemei; Zhou, Feng; Xu, Yancheng

    Nuclear orphan receptor TLX is an essential regulator of the growth of neural stem cells. However, its exact function in pancreatic islet cells is still unknown. In the present study, gene expression profiling analysis revealed that overexpression of TLX in beta cell line MIN6 causes suppression of 176 genes and upregulation of 49 genes, including a cadre of cell cycle, cell proliferation and cell death control genes, such as Btg2, Ddit3 and Gadd45a. We next examined the effects of TLX overexpression on proliferation, apoptosis and insulin secretion in MIN6 cells. Proliferation analysis using EdU assay showed that overexpression of TLX increased percentage of EdU-positive cells. Cell cycle and apoptosis analysis revealed that overexpression of TLX in MIN6 cells resulted in higher percentage of cells exiting G1 into S-phase, and a 58.8% decrease of cell apoptosis induced by 0.5 mM palmitate. Moreover, TLX overexpression did not cause impairment of insulin secretion. Together, we conclude that TLX is among factors capable of controlling beta cell proliferation and survival, which may serve as a target for the development of novel therapies for diabetes.

  5. Adenovirus gene transfer to amelogenesis imperfecta ameloblast-like cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anton V Borovjagin

    Full Text Available To explore gene therapy strategies for amelogenesis imperfecta (AI, a human ameloblast-like cell population was established from third molars of an AI-affected patient. These cells were characterized by expression of cytokeratin 14, major enamel proteins and alkaline phosphatase staining. Suboptimal transduction of the ameloblast-like cells by an adenovirus type 5 (Ad5 vector was consistent with lower levels of the coxsackie-and-adenovirus receptor (CAR on those cells relative to CAR-positive A549 cells. To overcome CAR -deficiency, we evaluated capsid-modified Ad5 vectors with various genetic capsid modifications including "pK7" and/or "RGD" motif-containing short peptides incorporated in the capsid protein fiber as well as fiber chimera with the Ad serotype 3 (Ad3 fiber "knob" domain. All fiber modifications provided an augmented transduction of AI-ameloblasts, revealed following vector dose normalization in A549 cells with a superior effect (up to 404-fold of pK7/RGD double modification. This robust infectivity enhancement occurred through vector binding to both α(vβ3/α(vβ5 integrins and heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs highly expressed by AI-ameloblasts as revealed by gene transfer blocking experiments. This work thus not only pioneers establishment of human AI ameloblast-like cell population as a model for in vitro studies but also reveals an optimal infectivity-enhancement strategy for a potential Ad5 vector-mediated gene therapy for AI.

  6. Progesterone Upregulates Gene Expression in Normal Human Thyroid Follicular Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Paula Santin Bertoni

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Thyroid cancer and thyroid nodules are more prevalent in women than men, so female sex hormones may have an etiological role in these conditions. There are no data about direct effects of progesterone on thyroid cells, so the aim of the present study was to evaluate progesterone effects in the sodium-iodide symporter NIS, thyroglobulin TG, thyroperoxidase TPO, and KI-67 genes expression, in normal thyroid follicular cells, derived from human tissue. NIS, TG, TPO, and KI-67 mRNA expression increased significantly after TSH 20 μUI/mL, respectively: 2.08 times, P<0.0001; 2.39 times, P=0.01; 1.58 times, P=0.0003; and 1.87 times, P<0.0001. In thyroid cells treated with 20 μUI/mL TSH plus 10 nM progesterone, RNA expression of NIS, TG, and KI-67 genes increased, respectively: 1.78 times, P<0.0001; 1.75 times, P=0.037; and 1.95 times, P<0.0001, and TPO mRNA expression also increased, though not significantly (1.77 times, P=0.069. These effects were abolished by mifepristone, an antagonist of progesterone receptor, suggesting that genes involved in thyroid cell function and proliferation are upregulated by progesterone. This work provides evidence that progesterone has a direct effect on thyroid cells, upregulating genes involved in thyroid function and growth.

  7. A novel gene delivery system targeting cells expressing VEGF receptors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIJUNMIN; JINGCHULUO; 等

    1999-01-01

    Two ligand oligopeptides GV1 and GV2 were designed according to the putative binding region of VEGF to its receptors.GV1,GV2 and endosome releasing oligopeptide HA20 were conjugated with poly-L-lysine or protamine and the resulting conjugates could interact with DNA in a noncovalent bond to form a complex.Using pSV2-β-galactosidase as a reporter gene,it has been demonstrated that exogenous gene was transferred into bovine aortic arch-derived endothelial cells (ABAE) and human malignant melanoma cell lines (A375) in vitro.In vivo experiments,exogenous gene was transferred into tumor vascular endothelial cells and tumor cells of subcutaneously transplanted human colon cancer LOVO,human malignant melanoma A375 and human hepatoma graft in nude mice.This system could also target gene to intrahepatically transplanted human hepatoma injected via portal vein in nude mice.These results are correlated with the relevant receptors(flt-1,flk-1/KDR) expression on the targeted cells and tissues.

  8. Blood cell gene expression profiling in rheumatoid arthritis. Discriminative genes and effect of rheumatoid factor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bovin, Lone Frier; Rieneck, Klaus; Workman, Christopher;

    2004-01-01

    To study the pathogenic importance of the rheumatoid factor (RF) in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and to identify genes differentially expressed in patients and healthy individuals, total RNA was isolated from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from eight RF-positive and six RF-negative RA...... from all fourteen RA patients and healthy controls identified a subset of discriminative genes. These results were validated by real time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) on another group of RA patients and healthy controls. This confirmed that the following genes had...

  9. Prediction of epigenetically regulated genes in breast cancer cell lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loss, Leandro A; Sadanandam, Anguraj; Durinck, Steffen; Nautiyal, Shivani; Flaucher, Diane; Carlton, Victoria EH; Moorhead, Martin; Lu, Yontao; Gray, Joe W; Faham, Malek; Spellman, Paul; Parvin, Bahram

    2010-05-04

    Methylation of CpG islands within the DNA promoter regions is one mechanism that leads to aberrant gene expression in cancer. In particular, the abnormal methylation of CpG islands may silence associated genes. Therefore, using high-throughput microarrays to measure CpG island methylation will lead to better understanding of tumor pathobiology and progression, while revealing potentially new biomarkers. We have examined a recently developed high-throughput technology for measuring genome-wide methylation patterns called mTACL. Here, we propose a computational pipeline for integrating gene expression and CpG island methylation profles to identify epigenetically regulated genes for a panel of 45 breast cancer cell lines, which is widely used in the Integrative Cancer Biology Program (ICBP). The pipeline (i) reduces the dimensionality of the methylation data, (ii) associates the reduced methylation data with gene expression data, and (iii) ranks methylation-expression associations according to their epigenetic regulation. Dimensionality reduction is performed in two steps: (i) methylation sites are grouped across the genome to identify regions of interest, and (ii) methylation profles are clustered within each region. Associations between the clustered methylation and the gene expression data sets generate candidate matches within a fxed neighborhood around each gene. Finally, the methylation-expression associations are ranked through a logistic regression, and their significance is quantified through permutation analysis. Our two-step dimensionality reduction compressed 90% of the original data, reducing 137,688 methylation sites to 14,505 clusters. Methylation-expression associations produced 18,312 correspondences, which were used to further analyze epigenetic regulation. Logistic regression was used to identify 58 genes from these correspondences that showed a statistically signifcant negative correlation between methylation profles and gene expression in the

  10. Prediction of epigenetically regulated genes in breast cancer cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Yontao

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Methylation of CpG islands within the DNA promoter regions is one mechanism that leads to aberrant gene expression in cancer. In particular, the abnormal methylation of CpG islands may silence associated genes. Therefore, using high-throughput microarrays to measure CpG island methylation will lead to better understanding of tumor pathobiology and progression, while revealing potentially new biomarkers. We have examined a recently developed high-throughput technology for measuring genome-wide methylation patterns called mTACL. Here, we propose a computational pipeline for integrating gene expression and CpG island methylation profles to identify epigenetically regulated genes for a panel of 45 breast cancer cell lines, which is widely used in the Integrative Cancer Biology Program (ICBP. The pipeline (i reduces the dimensionality of the methylation data, (ii associates the reduced methylation data with gene expression data, and (iii ranks methylation-expression associations according to their epigenetic regulation. Dimensionality reduction is performed in two steps: (i methylation sites are grouped across the genome to identify regions of interest, and (ii methylation profles are clustered within each region. Associations between the clustered methylation and the gene expression data sets generate candidate matches within a fxed neighborhood around each gene. Finally, the methylation-expression associations are ranked through a logistic regression, and their significance is quantified through permutation analysis. Results Our two-step dimensionality reduction compressed 90% of the original data, reducing 137,688 methylation sites to 14,505 clusters. Methylation-expression associations produced 18,312 correspondences, which were used to further analyze epigenetic regulation. Logistic regression was used to identify 58 genes from these correspondences that showed a statistically signifcant negative correlation between

  11. Gene transfection in primary stem-like cells of giant cell tumor of bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Shalini; Mak, Isabella; Power, Patricia; Cunningham, Melissa; Cunnigham, Melissa; Turcotte, Robert; Ghert, Michelle

    2010-01-01

    The neoplastic stem-like stromal cell of giant cell tumor of bone (GCT) survives for multiple passages in primary culture with a stable phenotype, and exhibits multipotent characteristics. The pathophysiology of this tumor has been studied through the primary culture of these cells. However, successful gene transfer of these cells has not been reported to date. In this short report, we describe the development of the first reported technique that results in efficient gene transfection in primary stem-like cells of GCT.

  12. Gene expression analysis of cell death induction by Taurolidine in different malignant cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weyhe Dirk

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The anti-infective agent Taurolidine (TRD has been shown to have cell death inducing properties, but the mechanism of its action is largely unknown. The aim of this study was to identify potential common target genes modulated at the transcriptional level following TRD treatment in tumour cell lines originating from different cancer types. Methods Five different malignant cell lines (HT29, Chang Liver, HT1080, AsPC-1 and BxPC-3 were incubated with TRD (100 μM, 250 μM and 1000 μM. Proliferation after 8 h and cell viability after 24 h were analyzed by BrdU assay and FACS analysis, respectively. Gene expression analyses were carried out using the Agilent -microarray platform to indentify genes which displayed conjoint regulation following the addition of TRD in all cell lines. Candidate genes were subjected to Ingenuity Pathways Analysis and selected genes were validated by qRT-PCR and Western Blot. Results TRD 250 μM caused a significant inhibition of proliferation as well as apoptotic cell death in all cell lines. Among cell death associated genes with the strongest regulation in gene expression, we identified pro-apoptotic transcription factors (EGR1, ATF3 as well as genes involved in the ER stress response (PPP1R15A, in ubiquitination (TRAF6 and mitochondrial apoptotic pathways (PMAIP1. Conclusions This is the first conjoint analysis of potential target genes of TRD which was performed simultaneously in different malignant cell lines. The results indicate that TRD might be involved in different signal transduction pathways leading to apoptosis.

  13. Differential expression and alternative splicing of cell cycle genes in imatinib-treated K562 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jing; Lin, Jin; Huang, Lin-Feng; Huang, Bo; Xu, Yan-Mei; Li, Jing; Wang, Yan; Zhang, Jing; Yang, Wei-Ming; Min, Qing-Hua; Wang, Xiao-Zhong

    2015-09-01

    Cancer progression often involves the disorder of the cell cycle, and a number of effective chemotherapeutic drugs have been shown to induce cell cycle arrest. The purpose of this study was to comprehensively investigate the effects of imatinib on the expression profile of cell cycle genes in the chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) K562 cell line. In addition, we also investigated alternative splicing of the cell cycle genes affected by imatinib, since an important relationship has been shown to exist between RNA splicing and cell cycle progression. Exon array analysis was performed using total RNA purified from normal and imatinib-treated K562 cells. We identified 185 differentially expressed genes and 277 alternative splicing events between the two cell groups. A detailed analysis by reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) of key genes confirmed the experimental results of the exon array. These results suggested that treatment of K562 cells with imatinib shifts the expression and alternative splicing profiles of several cell cycle-related genes. Importantly, these findings may help improve imatinib treatment strategies in patients with CML and may be useful for imatinib resistance research and CML drug development.

  14. Gene expression analysis of in vivo fluorescent cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantin Khodosevich

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The analysis of gene expression for tissue homogenates is of limited value because of the considerable cell heterogeneity in tissues. However, several methods are available to isolate a cell type of interest from a complex tissue, the most reliable one being Laser Microdissection (LMD. Cells may be distinguished by their morphology or by specific antigens, but the obligatory staining often results in RNA degradation. Alternatively, particular cell types can be detected in vivo by expression of fluorescent proteins from cell type-specific promoters. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We developed a technique for fixing in vivo fluorescence in brain cells and isolating them by LMD followed by an optimized RNA isolation procedure. RNA isolated from these cells was of equal quality as from unfixed frozen tissue, with clear 28S and 18S rRNA bands of a mass ratio of approximately 2ratio1. We confirmed the specificity of the amplified RNA from the microdissected fluorescent cells as well as its usefulness and reproducibility for microarray hybridization and quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our technique guarantees the isolation of sufficient high quality RNA obtained from specific cell populations of the brain expressing soluble fluorescent marker, which is a critical prerequisite for subsequent gene expression studies by microarray analysis or qRT-PCR.

  15. Identification of novel Notch target genes in T cell leukaemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Warrander Fiona

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dysregulated Notch signalling is believed to play an important role in the development and maintenance of T cell leukaemia. At a cellular level, Notch signalling promotes proliferation and inhibits apoptosis of T cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (T-ALL cells. In this study we aimed to identify novel transcriptional targets of Notch signalling in the T-ALL cell line, Jurkat. Results RNA was prepared from Jurkat cells retrovirally transduced with an empty vector (GFP-alone or vectors containing constitutively active forms of Notch (N1ΔE or N3ΔE, and used for Affymetrix microarray analysis. A subset of genes found to be regulated by Notch was chosen for real-time PCR validation and in some cases, validation at the protein level, using several Notch-transduced T-ALL and non-T-ALL leukaemic cell lines. As expected, several known transcriptional target of Notch, such as HES1 and Deltex, were found to be overexpressed in Notch-transduced cells, however, many novel transcriptional targets of Notch signalling were identified using this approach. These included the T cell costimulatory molecule CD28, the anti-apoptotic protein GIMAP5, and inhibitor of DNA binding 1 (1D1. Conclusion The identification of such downstream Notch target genes provides insights into the mechanisms of Notch function in T cell leukaemia, and may help identify novel therapeutic targets in this disease.

  16. Gene expression analysis of dendritic/Langerhans cells and Langerhans cell histiocytosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rust, Renata; Kluiver, J.; Visser, Lydia; Harms, G.; Blokzijl, T.; Kamps, W.A.; Poppema, Sibrand; van den Berg, Anke

    2006-01-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is a neoplastic disorder that results in clonal proliferation of cells with a Langerhans cell (LQ phenotype. The pathogenesis of LCH is still poorly understood. In the present study, serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE) was applied to LCs generated from umbil

  17. A Review of Gene Delivery and Stem Cell Based Therapies for Regenerating Inner Ear Hair Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael S. Detamore

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Sensory neural hearing loss and vestibular dysfunction have become the most common forms of sensory defects, affecting millions of people worldwide. Developing effective therapies to restore hearing loss is challenging, owing to the limited regenerative capacity of the inner ear hair cells. With recent advances in understanding the developmental biology of mammalian and non-mammalian hair cells a variety of strategies have emerged to restore lost hair cells are being developed. Two predominant strategies have developed to restore hair cells: transfer of genes responsible for hair cell genesis and replacement of missing cells via transfer of stem cells. In this review article, we evaluate the use of several genes involved in hair cell regeneration, the advantages and disadvantages of the different viral vectors employed in inner ear gene delivery and the insights gained from the use of embryonic, adult and induced pluripotent stem cells in generating inner ear hair cells. Understanding the role of genes, vectors and stem cells in therapeutic strategies led us to explore potential solutions to overcome the limitations associated with their use in hair cell regeneration.

  18. The effect of adenovirus-mediated gene expression of FHIT in small cell lung cancer cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zandi, Roza; Xu, Kai; Poulsen, Hans S

    2011-01-01

    The candidate tumor suppressor fragile histidine traid (FHIT) is frequently inactivated in small cell lung cancer (SCLC). Mutations in the p53 gene also occur in the majority of SCLC leading to the accumulation of the mutant protein. Here we evaluated the effect of FHIT gene therapy alone...... or in combination with the mutant p53-reactivating molecule, PRIMA-1(Met)/APR-246, in SCLC. Overexpression of FHIT by recombinant adenoviral vector (Ad-FHIT)-mediated gene transfer in SCLC cells inhibited their growth by inducing apoptosis and when combined with PRIMA-1(Met)/APR-246, a synergistic cell growth...

  19. Detection of gene expression in an individual cell type within a cell mixture using microarray analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Penelope A Bryant

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A central issue in the design of microarray-based analysis of global gene expression is the choice between using cells of single type and a mixture of cells. This study quantified the proportion of lipopolysaccharide (LPS induced differentially expressed monocyte genes that could be measured in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC, and determined the extent to which gene expression in the non-monocyte cell fraction diluted or obscured fold changes that could be detected in the cell mixture. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Human PBMC were stimulated with LPS, and monocytes were then isolated by positive (Mono+ or negative (Mono- selection. The non-monocyte cell fraction (MonoD remaining after positive selection of monocytes was used to determine the effect of non-monocyte cells on overall expression. RNA from LPS-stimulated PBMC, Mono+, Mono- and MonoD samples was co-hybridised with unstimulated RNA for each cell type on oligonucleotide microarrays. There was a positive correlation in gene expression between PBMC and both Mono+ (0.77 and Mono- (0.61-0.67 samples. Analysis of individual genes that were differentially expressed in Mono+ and Mono- samples showed that the ability to detect expression of some genes was similar when analysing PBMC, but for others, differential expression was either not detected or changed in the opposite direction. As a result of the dilutional or obscuring effect of gene expression in non-monocyte cells, overall about half of the statistically significant LPS-induced changes in gene expression in monocytes were not detected in PBMC. However, 97% of genes with a four fold or greater change in expression in monocytes after LPS stimulation, and almost all (96-100% of the top 100 most differentially expressed monocyte genes were detected in PBMC. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The effect of non-responding cells in a mixture dilutes or obscures the detection of subtle changes in gene expression in an individual

  20. Gene expression profiling and gene copy-number changes in malignant mesothelioma cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanazzi, Claudia; Hersmus, Remko; Veltman, Imke M; Gillis, Ad J M; van Drunen, Ellen; Beverloo, H Berna; Hegmans, Joost P J J; Verweij, Marielle; Lambrecht, Bart N; Oosterhuis, J Wolter; Looijenga, Leendert H J

    2007-10-01

    Malignant mesothelioma (MM) is an asbestos-induced tumor that acquires aneuploid DNA content during the tumorigenic process. We used instable MM cell lines as an in vitro model to study the impact of DNA copy-number changes on gene expression profiling, in the course of their chromosomal redistribution process. Two MM cell lines, PMR-MM2 (early passages of in vitro culture) and PMR-MM7 (both early and late passages of in vitro culture), were cytogenetically characterized. Genomic gains and losses were precisely defined using microarray-based comparative genomic hybridization (array-CGH), and minimal overlapping analysis led to the identification of the common unbalanced genomic regions. Using the U133Plus 2.0 Affymetrix gene chip array, we analyzed PMR-MM7 early and late passages for genome-wide gene expression, and correlated the differentially expressed genes with copy-number changes. The presence of a high number of genetic imbalances occurring from early to late culture steps reflected the tendency of MM cells toward genomic instability. The selection of specific chromosomal abnormalities observed during subsequent cultures demonstrated the spontaneous evolution of the cancer cells in an in vitro environment. MM cell lines were characterized by copy-number changes associated with the TP53 apoptotic pathway already present at the first steps of in vitro culture. Prolonged culture led to acquisition of additional chromosomal copy-number changes associated with dysregulation of genes involved in cell adhesion, regulation of mitotic cell cycle, signal transduction, carbohydrate metabolism, motor activity, glycosaminoglycan biosynthesis, protein binding activity, lipid transport, ATP synthesis, and methyltransferase activity.

  1. Toward a stem cell gene therapy for breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, ZongYi; Liu, Ying; Tuve, Sebastian; Xun, Ye; Fan, Xiaolong; Min, Liang; Feng, Qinghua; Kiviat, Nancy; Kiem, Hans-Peter; Disis, Mary Leonora; Lieber, André

    2009-05-28

    Current approaches for treatment of late-stage breast cancer rarely result in a long-term cure. In part this is due to tumor stroma that prevents access of systemically or intratumorally applied therapeutics. We propose a stem cell gene therapy approach for controlled tumor stroma degradation that uses the pathophysiologic process of recruitment of inflammatory cells into the tumor. This approach involves genetic modification of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and their subsequent transplantation into tumor-bearing mice. We show that inducible, intratumoral expression of relaxin (Rlx) either by transplanting tumor cells that contained the Rlx gene or by transplantation of mouse HSCs transduced with an Rlx-expressing lentivirus vector delays tumor growth in a mouse model of breast cancer. The antitumor effect of Rlx was mediated through degradation of tumor stroma, which provided increased access of infiltrating antitumor immune cells to their target tumor cells. Furthermore, we have shown in a human/mouse chimeric model that genetically modified HSCs expressing a transgene can access the tumor site. Our findings are relevant for cancer gene therapy and immunotherapy.

  2. Promoter DNA hypermethylation and gene repression in undifferentiated Arabidopsis cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Berdasco

    Full Text Available Maintaining and acquiring the pluripotent cell state in plants is critical to tissue regeneration and vegetative multiplication. Histone-based epigenetic mechanisms are important for regulating this undifferentiated state. Here we report the use of genetic and pharmacological experimental approaches to show that Arabidopsis cell suspensions and calluses specifically repress some genes as a result of promoter DNA hypermethylation. We found that promoters of the MAPK12, GSTU10 and BXL1 genes become hypermethylated in callus cells and that hypermethylation also affects the TTG1, GSTF5, SUVH8, fimbrin and CCD7 genes in cell suspensions. Promoter hypermethylation in undifferentiated cells was associated with histone hypoacetylation and primarily occurred at CpG sites. Accordingly, we found that the process specifically depends on MET1 and DRM2 methyltransferases, as demonstrated with DNA methyltransferase mutants. Our results suggest that promoter DNA methylation may be another important epigenetic mechanism for the establishment and/or maintenance of the undifferentiated state in plant cells.

  3. Direct Cell Lysis for Single-Cell Gene Expression Profiling

    OpenAIRE

    David eSvec; Daniel eAndersson; Milos ePekny; Robert eSjöback; Mikael eKubista; Anders eStåhlberg

    2013-01-01

    The interest to analyze single and few cell samples is rapidly increasing. Numerous extraction protocols to purify nucleic acids are available, but most of them compromise severely on yield to remove contaminants and are therefore not suitable for the analysis of samples containing small numbers of transcripts only. Here, we evaluate 17 direct cell lysis protocols for transcript yield and compatibility with downstream reverse transcription quantitative real-time PCR. Four endogenously express...

  4. Double suicide genes selectively kill human umbilical vein endothelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Lunxu

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To construct a recombinant adenovirus containing CDglyTK double suicide genes and evaluate the killing effect of the double suicide genes driven by kinase domain insert containing receptor (KDR promoter on human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Methods Human KDR promoter, Escherichia coli (E. coli cytosine deaminase (CD gene and the herpes simplex virus-thymidine kinase (TK gene were cloned using polymerase chain reaction (PCR. Plasmid pKDR-CDglyTK was constructed with the KDR promoter and CDglyTK genes. A recombinant adenoviral plasmid AdKDR-CDglyTK was then constructed and transfected into 293 packaging cells to grow and harvest adenoviruses. KDR-expressing human umbilical vein endothelial cells (ECV304 and KDR-negative liver cancer cell line (HepG2 were infected with the recombinant adenoviruses at different multiplicity of infection (MOI. The infection rate was measured by green fluorescent protein (GFP expression. The infected cells were cultured in culture media containing different concentrations of prodrugs ganciclovir (GCV and/or 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC. The killing effects were measured using two different methods, i.e. annexin V-FITC staining and terminal transferase-mediated dUTP nick end-labeling (TUNEL staining. Results Recombinant adenoviruses AdKDR-CDglyTK were successfully constructed and they infected ECV304 and HepG2 cells efficiently. The infection rate was dependent on MOI of recombinant adenoviruses. ECV304 cells infected with AdKDR-CDglyTK were highly sensitive to GCV and 5-FC. The cell survival rate was dependent on both the concentration of the prodrugs and the MOI of recombinant adenoviruses. In contrast, there were no killing effects in the HepG2 cells. The combination of two prodrugs was much more effective in killing ECV304 cells than GCV or 5-FC alone. The growth of transgenic ECV304 cells was suppressed in the presence of prodrugs. Conclusion AdKDR-CDglyTK/double prodrog system may be a useful

  5. Specifically targeted gene therapy for small-cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, C.L.; Zandi, R.; Gjetting, T.

    2009-01-01

    Small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) is a highly malignant disease with poor prognosis. Hence, there is great demand for new therapies that can replace or supplement the current available treatment regimes. Gene therapy constitutes a promising strategy and relies on the principle of introducing exogenous....... This review describes and discusses the current status of the application of gene therapy in relation to SCLC Udgivelsesdato: 2009/4...... DNA into malignant cells causing them to die. Since SCLC is a highly disseminated malignancy, the gene therapeutic agent must be administered systemically, obligating a high level of targeting of tumor tissue and the use of delivery vehicles designed for systemic circulation of the therapeutic DNA...

  6. Gene targeting in embryonic stem cells, II: conditional technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genome modification via transgenesis has allowed researchers to link genotype and phenotype as an alternative approach to the characterization of random mutations through evolution. The synergy of technologies from the fields of embryonic stem (ES) cells, gene knockouts, and protein-mediated recombi...

  7. Adenovirus as a gene therapy vector for hematopoietic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marini, F C; Yu, Q; Wickham, T; Kovesdi, I; Andreeff, M

    2000-06-01

    Adenovirus (Adv)-mediated gene transfer has recently gained new attention as a means to deliver genes for hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) or progenitor cell gene therapy. In the past, HSCs have been regarded as poor Adv targets, mainly because they lack the specific Adv receptors required for efficient and productive Adv infection. In addition, the nonintegrating nature of Adv has prevented its application to HSC and bone marrow transduction protocols where long-term expression is required. There is even controversy as to whether Adv can infect hematopoietic cells at all. In fact, the ability of Adv to infect epithelium-based targets and its inability to effectively transfect HSCs have been used in the development of eradication schemes that use Adv to preferentially infect and "purge" tumor cell-contaminating HSC grafts. However, there are data supporting the existence of productive Adv infections into HSCs. Such protocols involve the application of cytokine mixtures, high multiplicities of infection, long incubation periods, and more recently, immunological and genetic modifications to Adv itself to enable it to efficiently transfer genes into HSCs. This is a rapidly growing field, both in terms of techniques and applications. This review examines the two sides of the Adv/CD34 controversy as well as the current developments in this field.

  8. Lentiviral hematopoietic stem cell gene therapy in inherited metabolic disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G. Wagemaker (Gerard)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractAfter more than 20 years of development, lentiviral hematopoietic stem cell gene therapy has entered the stage of initial clinical implementation for immune deficiencies and storage disorders. This brief review summarizes the development and applications, focusing on the lysosomal enzyme

  9. Differentially expressed genes in giant cell tumor of bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babeto, Erica; Conceição, André Luis Giacometti; Valsechi, Marina Curado; Peitl Junior, Paulo; de Campos Zuccari, Débora Aparecida Pires; de Lima, Luiz Guilherme Cernaglia Aureliano; Bonilha, Jane Lopes; de Freitas Calmon, Marília; Cordeiro, José Antônio; Rahal, Paula

    2011-04-01

    Giant cells tumors of bone (GCTB) are benign in nature but cause osteolytic destruction with a number of particular characteristics. These tumors can have uncertain biological behavior often contain a significant proportion of highly multinucleated cells, and may show aggressive behavior. We have studied differential gene expression in GCTB that may give a better understanding of their physiopathology, and might be helpful in prognosis and treatment. Rapid subtractive hybridization (RaSH) was used to identify and measure novel genes that appear to be differentially expressed, including KTN1, NEB, ROCK1, and ZAK using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and immunohistochemistry in the samples of GCTBs compared to normal bone tissue. Normal bone was used in the methodology RaSH for comparison with the GCTB in identification of differentially expressed genes. Functional annotation indicated that these genes are involved in cellular processes related to their tumor phenotype. The differential expression of KTN1, ROCK1, and ZAK was independently confirmed by qRT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. The expression of the KTN1 and ROCK1 genes were increased in samples by qRT-PCR and immunohistochemistry, and ZAK had reduced expression. Since ZAK have CpG islands in their promoter region and low expression in tumor tissue, their methylation pattern was analyzed by MSP-PCR. The genes identified KTN1, ROCK1, and ZAK may be responsible for loss of cellular homeostasis in GCTB since they are responsible for various functions related to tumorigenesis such as cell migration, cytoskeletal organization, apoptosis, and cell cycle control and thus may contribute at some stage in the process of formation and development of GCTB.

  10. A survey of disease connections for CD4+ T cell master genes and their directly linked genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wentian; Espinal-Enríquez, Jesús; Simpfendorfer, Kim R; Hernández-Lemus, Enrique

    2015-12-01

    Genome-wide association studies and other genetic analyses have identified a large number of genes and variants implicating a variety of disease etiological mechanisms. It is imperative for the study of human diseases to put these genetic findings into a coherent functional context. Here we use system biology tools to examine disease connections of five master genes for CD4+ T cell subtypes (TBX21, GATA3, RORC, BCL6, and FOXP3). We compiled a list of genes functionally interacting (protein-protein interaction, or by acting in the same pathway) with the master genes, then we surveyed the disease connections, either by experimental evidence or by genetic association. Embryonic lethal genes (also known as essential genes) are over-represented in master genes and their interacting genes (55% versus 40% in other genes). Transcription factors are significantly enriched among genes interacting with the master genes (63% versus 10% in other genes). Predicted haploinsufficiency is a feature of most these genes. Disease-connected genes are enriched in this list of genes: 42% of these genes have a disease connection according to Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) (versus 23% in other genes), and 74% are associated with some diseases or phenotype in a Genome Wide Association Study (GWAS) (versus 43% in other genes). Seemingly, not all of the diseases connected to genes surveyed were immune related, which may indicate pleiotropic functions of the master regulator genes and associated genes.

  11. RNA Interference Targeting Leptin Gene Effect on Hepatic Stellate Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XUE Xiulan; LIN Jusheng; SONG Yuhu; SUN Xuemei; ZHOU Hejun

    2005-01-01

    To construct the specific siRNA expression vectors and investigate their effect on leptin and collagen I in HSC, which provide a new approach to the prevent and treat hepatic fibrosis. The five siRNAs against leptin gene were transcript synthesized intracellularly by expression templates of plasmid vector psiRNA-hH1neo. The recombinant leptin siRNA plasmid vectors could express in eukaryocyte , and then to evaluate them by using enzyme cutting and sequencing. The recombinant plasmids were transfected into HSCs using Lipofectamine methods respectively. The cells were selected after growing in DMEM containing 300 μg/mL G418 for about 4 weeks. Gene expression of leptin and collagen I were showed by Western blot analysis and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Identification by enzyme cutting and sequencing showed that the leptin siRNA expression vectors were constructed successfully, and leptin siRNA could inhibit the leptin and collagen I gene expression effectively. It was concluded that RNA interference-mediated silencing of leptin gene diminished leptin and collagen I gene expression in HSCs. Furthermore, attenuated the extracellular matrix over-deposition at the same time. Leptin gene is ideal targets of gene therapy for liver fibrosis.

  12. Liver-specific gene expression in mesenchymal stem cells is induced by liver cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Claudia Lange; Philipp Bassler; Michael V. Lioznov; Helge Bruns; Dietrich Kluth; Axel R. Zander; Henning C. Fiegel

    2005-01-01

    AIM: The origin of putative liver cells from distinct bone marrow stem cells, e.g. hematopoietic stem cells or multipotent adult progenitor cells was found in recent in vitro studies. Cell culture experiments revealed a key role of growth factors for the induction of liver-specific genes in stem cell cultures. We investigated the potential of rat mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) from bone marrow to differentiate into hepatocytic cells in vitro. Furthermore,we assessed the influence of cocultured liver cells on induction of liver-specific gene expression.METHODS: Mesenchymal stem cells were marked with green fluorescent protein (GFP) by retroviral gene transduction. Clonal marked MSC were either cultured under liver stimulating conditions using fibronectin-coated culture dishes and medium supplemented with SCF, HGF,EGF, and FGF-4 alone, or in presence of freshly isolated rat liver cells. Cells in cocultures were harvested and GFP+ or GFP- cells were separated using fluorescence activated cell sorting. RT-PCR analysis for the stem cell marker Thy1 and the hepatocytic markers CK-18, albumin, CK-19,and AFP was performed in the different cell populations.RESULTS: Under the specified culture conditions, rat MSC cocultured with liver cells expressed albumin-, CK-18,CK-19, and AFP-RNA over 3 weeks, whereas MSC cultured alone did not show liver specific gene expression.CONCLUSION: The results indicate that (1) rat MSC from bone marrow can differentiate towards hepatocytic lineage in vitro, and (2) that the microenvironment plays a decisive role for the induction of hepatic differentiation of rMSC.

  13. Blood cell gene expression profiling in rheumatoid arthritis. Discriminative genes and effect of rheumatoid factor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bovin, Lone Frier; Rieneck, Klaus; Workman, Christopher;

    2004-01-01

    To study the pathogenic importance of the rheumatoid factor (RF) in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and to identify genes differentially expressed in patients and healthy individuals, total RNA was isolated from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from eight RF-positive and six RF-negative RA...

  14. Blood cell gene expression profiling in rheumatoid arthritis - Discriminative genes and effect of rheumatoid factor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bovin, L.F.; Rieneck, K.; Workman, Christopher;

    2004-01-01

    To study the pathogenic importance of the rheumatoid factor (RF) in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and to identify genes differentially expressed in patients and healthy individuals, total RNA was isolated from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from eight RF-positive and six RF-negative RA...

  15. [Selection of retroviral vector producing cell lines and gene transfer into hematopoietic cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagnis, C; Mannoni, P

    1996-04-01

    Transduction and expression of a transgene in hematopoietic stem cells with retroviral vectors still remain major challenges for gene therapy in blood disorders. Use of an easily detectable gene marker, such as the nlsLacZ, at the laboratory and clinical levels, provides a powerful approach of these two combined problems.

  16. Profiling helper T cell subset gene expression in deer mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hjelle Brian

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus are the most common mammals in North America and are reservoirs for several zoonotic agents, including Sin Nombre virus (SNV, the principal etiologic agent of hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome (HCPS in North America. Unlike human HCPS patients, SNV-infected deer mice show no overt pathological symptoms, despite the presence of virus in the lungs. A neutralizing IgG antibody response occurs, but the virus establishes a persistent infection. Limitations of detailed analysis of deer mouse immune responses to SNV are the lack of reagents and methods for evaluating such responses. Results We developed real-time PCR-based detection assays for several immune-related transcription factor and cytokine genes from deer mice that permit the profiling of CD4+ helper T cells, including markers of Th1 cells (T-bet, STAT4, IFNγ, TNF, LT, Th2 cells (GATA-3, STAT6, IL-4, IL-5 and regulatory T cells (Fox-p3, IL-10, TGFβ1. These assays compare the expression of in vitro antigen-stimulated and unstimulated T cells from individual deer mice. Conclusion We developed molecular methods for profiling immune gene expression in deer mice, including a multiplexed real-time PCR assay for assessing expression of several cytokine and transcription factor genes. These assays should be useful for characterizing the immune responses of experimentally- and naturally-infected deer mice.

  17. Expression QTL mapping in regulatory and helper T cells from the BXD family of strains reveals novel cell-specific genes, gene-gene interactions and candidate genes for auto-immune disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberts Rudi

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Regulatory T cells (Tregs play an essential role in the control of the immune response. Treg cells represent important targets for therapeutic interventions of the immune system. Therefore, it will be very important to understand in more detail which genes are specifically activated in Treg cells versus T helper (Th cells, and which gene regulatory circuits may be involved in specifying and maintaining Treg cell homeostasis. Results We isolated Treg and Th cells from a genetically diverse family of 31 BXD type recombinant inbred strains and the fully inbred parental strains of this family--C57BL/6J and DBA/2J. Subsequently genome-wide gene expression studies were performed from the isolated Treg and Th cells. A comparative analysis of the transcriptomes of these cell populations allowed us to identify many novel differentially expressed genes. Analysis of cis- and trans-expression Quantitative Trait Loci (eQTLs highlighted common and unique regulatory mechanisms that are active in the two cell types. Trans-eQTL regions were found for the Treg functional genes Nrp1, Stat3 and Ikzf4. Analyses of the respective QTL intervals suggested several candidate genes that may be involved in regulating these genes in Treg cells. Similarly, possible candidate genes were found which may regulate the expression of F2rl1, Ctla4, Klrb1f. In addition, we identified a focused group of candidate genes that may be important for the maintenance of self-tolerance and the prevention of allergy. Conclusions Variation of expression across the strains allowed us to find many novel gene-interaction networks in both T cell subsets. In addition, these two data sets enabled us to identify many differentially expressed genes and to nominate candidate genes that may have important functions for the maintenance of self-tolerance and the prevention of allergy.

  18. Identifying genes that mediate anthracyline toxicity in immune cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amber eFrick

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The role of the immune system in response to chemotherapeutic agents remains elusive. The interpatient variability observed in immune and chemotherapeutic cytotoxic responses is likely, at least in part, due to complex genetic differences. Through the use of a panel of genetically diverse mouse inbred strains, we developed a drug screening platform aimed at identifying genes underlying these chemotherapeutic cytotoxic effects on immune cells. Using genome-wide association studies (GWAS, we identified four genome-wide significant quantitative trait loci (QTL that contributed to the sensitivity of doxorubicin and idarubicin in immune cells. Of particular interest, a locus on chromosome 16 was significantly associated with cell viability following idarubicin administration (p = 5.01x10-8. Within this QTL lies App, which encodes amyloid beta precursor protein. Comparison of dose-response curves verified that T-cells in App knockout mice were more sensitive to idarubicin than those of C57BL/6J control mice (p < 0.05.In conclusion, the cellular screening approach coupled with GWAS led to the identification and subsequent validation of a gene involved in T-cell viability after idarubicin treatment. Previous studies have suggested a role for App in in vitro and in vivo cytotoxicity to anticancer agents; the overexpression of App enhances resistance, while the knockdown of this gene is deleterious to cell viability. Thus, further investigations should include performing mechanistic studies, validating additional genes from the GWAS, including Ppfia1 and Ppfibp1, and ultimately translating the findings to in vivo and human studies.

  19. Type 1 Diabetes Candidate Genes Linked to Pancreatic Islet Cell Inflammation and Beta-Cell Apoptosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Størling, Joachim; Pociot, Flemming

    2017-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is a chronic immune-mediated disease resulting from the selective destruction of the insulin-producing pancreatic islet β-cells. Susceptibility to the disease is the result of complex interactions between environmental and genetic risk factors. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified more than 50 genetic regions that affect the risk of developing T1D. Most of these susceptibility loci, however, harbor several genes, and the causal variant(s) and gene(s) for most of the loci remain to be established. A significant part of the genes located in the T1D susceptibility loci are expressed in human islets and β cells and mounting evidence suggests that some of these genes modulate the β-cell response to the immune system and viral infection and regulate apoptotic β-cell death. Here, we discuss the current status of T1D susceptibility loci and candidate genes with focus on pancreatic islet cell inflammation and β-cell apoptosis. PMID:28212332

  20. Type 1 Diabetes Candidate Genes Linked to Pancreatic Islet Cell Inflammation and Beta-Cell Apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Størling, Joachim; Pociot, Flemming

    2017-02-16

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is a chronic immune-mediated disease resulting from the selective destruction of the insulin-producing pancreatic islet β-cells. Susceptibility to the disease is the result of complex interactions between environmental and genetic risk factors. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified more than 50 genetic regions that affect the risk of developing T1D. Most of these susceptibility loci, however, harbor several genes, and the causal variant(s) and gene(s) for most of the loci remain to be established. A significant part of the genes located in the T1D susceptibility loci are expressed in human islets and β cells and mounting evidence suggests that some of these genes modulate the β-cell response to the immune system and viral infection and regulate apoptotic β-cell death. Here, we discuss the current status of T1D susceptibility loci and candidate genes with focus on pancreatic islet cell inflammation and β-cell apoptosis.

  1. T-cell suicide gene therapy prompts thymic renewal in adults after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vago, Luca; Oliveira, Giacomo; Bondanza, Attilio; Noviello, Maddalena; Soldati, Corrado; Ghio, Domenico; Brigida, Immacolata; Greco, Raffaella; Lupo Stanghellini, Maria Teresa; Peccatori, Jacopo; Fracchia, Sergio; Del Fiacco, Matteo; Traversari, Catia; Aiuti, Alessandro; Del Maschio, Alessandro; Bordignon, Claudio; Ciceri, Fabio; Bonini, Chiara

    2012-08-30

    The genetic modification of T cells with a suicide gene grants a mechanism of control of adverse reactions, allowing safe infusion after partially incompatible hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). In the TK007 clinical trial, 22 adults with hematologic malignancies experienced a rapid and sustained immune recovery after T cell-depleted HSCT and serial infusions of purified donor T cells expressing the HSV thymidine kinase suicide gene (TK+ cells). After a first wave of circulating TK+ cells, the majority of T cells supporting long-term immune reconstitution did not carry the suicide gene and displayed high numbers of naive lymphocytes, suggesting the thymus-dependent development of T cells, occurring only upon TK+ -cell engraftment. Accordingly, after the infusions, we documented an increase in circulating TCR excision circles and CD31+ recent thymic emigrants and a substantial expansion of the active thymic tissue as shown by chest tomography scans. Interestingly, a peak in the serum level of IL-7 was observed after each infusion of TK+ cells, anticipating the appearance of newly generated T cells. The results of the present study show that the infusion of genetically modified donor T cells after HSCT can drive the recovery of thymic activity in adults, leading to immune reconstitution.

  2. Identification of genes associated with cisplatin resistance in human oral squamous cell carcinoma cell line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Ping

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cisplatin is widely used for chemotherapy of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. However, details of the molecular mechanism responsible for cisplatin resistance are still unclear. The aim of this study was to identify the expression of genes related to cisplatin resistance in oral squamous cell carcinoma cells. Methods A cisplatin-resistant cell line, Tca/cisplatin, was established from a cisplatin-sensitive cell line, Tca8113, which was derived from moderately-differentiated tongue squamous cell carcinoma. Global gene expression in this resistant cell line and its sensitive parent cell line was analyzed using Affymetrix HG-U95Av2 microarrays. Candidate genes involved in DNA repair, the MAP pathway and cell cycle regulation were chosen to validate the microarray analysis results. Cell cycle distribution and apoptosis following cisplatin exposure were also investigated. Results Cisplatin resistance in Tca/cisplatin cells was stable for two years in cisplatin-free culture medium. The IC50 for cisplatin in Tca/cisplatin was 6.5-fold higher than that in Tca8113. Microarray analysis identified 38 genes that were up-regulated and 25 that were down-regulated in this cell line. Some were novel candidates, while others are involved in well-characterized mechanisms that could be relevant to cisplatin resistance, such as RECQL for DNA repair and MAP2K6 in the MAP pathway; all the genes were further validated by Real-time PCR. The cell cycle-regulated genes CCND1 and CCND3 were involved in cisplatin resistance; 24-hour exposure to 10 μM cisplatin induced a marked S phase block in Tca/cisplatin cells but not in Tca8113 cells. Conclusion The Tca8113 cell line and its stable drug-resistant variant Tca/cisplatin provided a useful model for identifying candidate genes responsible for the mechanism of cisplatin resistance in oral squamous cell carcinoma. Our data provide a useful basis for screening candidate targets for early diagnosis

  3. Early gene regulation of osteogenesis in embryonic stem cells

    KAUST Repository

    Kirkham, Glen R.

    2012-01-01

    The early gene regulatory networks (GRNs) that mediate stem cell differentiation are complex, and the underlying regulatory associations can be difficult to map accurately. In this study, the expression profiles of the genes Dlx5, Msx2 and Runx2 in mouse embryonic stem cells were monitored over a 48 hour period after exposure to the growth factors BMP2 and TGFβ1. Candidate GRNs of early osteogenesis were constructed based on published experimental findings and simulation results of Boolean and ordinary differential equation models were compared with our experimental data in order to test the validity of these models. Three gene regulatory networks were found to be consistent with the data, one of these networks exhibited sustained oscillation, a behaviour which is consistent with the general view of embryonic stem cell plasticity. The work cycle presented in this paper illustrates how mathematical modelling can be used to elucidate from gene expression profiles GRNs that are consistent with experimental data. © 2012 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  4. Planar cell polarity genes and neural tube closure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueno, Naoto; Greene, Nicholas D E

    2003-11-01

    Closure of the neural tube is essential for normal development of the brain and spinal cord. Failure of closure results in neural tube defects (NTDs), common and clinically severe congenital malformations whose molecular mechanisms remain poorly understood. On the other hand, it is increasingly well established that common molecular mechanisms are employed to regulate morphogenesis of multicellular organisms. For example, signaling triggered by polypeptide growth factors is highly conserved among species and utilized in multiple developmental processes. Recent studies have revealed that the Drosophila planar cell polarity (PCP) pathway, which directs position and direction of wing hairs on the surface of the fly wing, is well conserved, and orthologs of several genes encoding components of the pathway are also found in vertebrates. Interestingly, in vertebrates, this signaling pathway appears to be co-opted to regulate "convergent extension" cell movements during gastrulation. Disruption of vertebrate PCP genes in Xenopus laevis or zebrafish causes severe gastrulation defects or the shortening of the trunk, as well as mediolateral expansion of somites. In Xenopus, in which the neural tube closes by elevation and fusion of neural folds, inhibition of convergent extension can also prevent neural tube closure causing a "spina bifida-like" appearance. Furthermore, several of the genes involved in the PCP pathway have recently been shown to be required for neural tube closure in the mouse, since mutation of these genes causes NTDs. Therefore, understanding the mechanisms underlying the establishment of cell polarity in Drosophila may provide important clues to the molecular basis of NTDs.

  5. Recombinant cells that highly express chromosomally-integrated heterologous gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingram, Lonnie O.; Ohta, Kazuyoshi; Wood, Brent E.

    2007-03-20

    Recombinant host cells are obtained that comprise (A) a heterologous, polypeptide-encoding polynucleotide segment, stably integrated into a chromosome, which is under transcriptional control of an endogenous promoter and (B) a mutation that effects increased expression of the heterologous segment, resulting in enhanced production by the host cells of each polypeptide encoded by that segment, relative to production of each polypeptide by the host cells in the absence of the mutation. The increased expression thus achieved is retained in the absence of conditions that select for cells displaying such increased expression. When the integrated segment comprises, for example, ethanol-production genes from an efficient ethanol producer like Zymomonas mobilis, recombinant Escherichia coli and other enteric bacterial cells within the present invention are capable of converting a wide range of biomass-derived sugars efficiently to ethanol.

  6. T cells and gene regulation: the switching on and turning up of genes after T cell receptor stimulation in CD8 T cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James M Conley

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Signaling downstream of the T cell receptor (TCR is directly regulated by the dose and affinity of peptide antigen. The strength of TCR signaling drives a multitude of T cell functions from development to differentiation. CD8 T cells differentiate into a diverse pool of effector and memory cells after activation, a process that is critical for pathogen clearance and is highly regulated by TCR signal strength. T cells rapidly alter their gene expression upon activation. Multiple signaling pathways downstream of the TCR activate transcription factors, which are critical for this process. The dynamics between proximal TCR signaling, transcription factor activation, and CD8 T cell function are discussed here. We propose that Inducible T cell kinase (ITK acts as a rheostat for gene expression. This unique regulation of TCR signaling by ITK provides a possible signaling mechanism for the promotion of a diverse T cell repertoire in response to pathogen.

  7. T Cells and Gene Regulation: The Switching On and Turning Up of Genes after T Cell Receptor Stimulation in CD8 T Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conley, James M.; Gallagher, Michael P.; Berg, Leslie J.

    2016-01-01

    Signaling downstream of the T cell receptor (TCR) is directly regulated by the dose and affinity of peptide antigen. The strength of TCR signaling drives a multitude of T cell functions from development to differentiation. CD8 T cells differentiate into a diverse pool of effector and memory cells after activation, a process that is critical for pathogen clearance and is highly regulated by TCR signal strength. T cells rapidly alter their gene expression upon activation. Multiple signaling pathways downstream of the TCR activate transcription factors, which are critical for this process. The dynamics between proximal TCR signaling, transcription factor activation and CD8 T cell function are discussed here. We propose that inducible T cell kinase (ITK) acts as a rheostat for gene expression. This unique regulation of TCR signaling by ITK provides a possible signaling mechanism for the promotion of a diverse T cell repertoire in response to pathogen. PMID:26973653

  8. Effect of promoter architecture on the cell-to-cell variability in gene expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alvaro Sanchez

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available According to recent experimental evidence, promoter architecture, defined by the number, strength and regulatory role of the operators that control transcription, plays a major role in determining the level of cell-to-cell variability in gene expression. These quantitative experiments call for a corresponding modeling effort that addresses the question of how changes in promoter architecture affect variability in gene expression in a systematic rather than case-by-case fashion. In this article we make such a systematic investigation, based on a microscopic model of gene regulation that incorporates stochastic effects. In particular, we show how operator strength and operator multiplicity affect this variability. We examine different modes of transcription factor binding to complex promoters (cooperative, independent, simultaneous and how each of these affects the level of variability in transcriptional output from cell-to-cell. We propose that direct comparison between in vivo single-cell experiments and theoretical predictions for the moments of the probability distribution of mRNA number per cell can be used to test kinetic models of gene regulation. The emphasis of the discussion is on prokaryotic gene regulation, but our analysis can be extended to eukaryotic cells as well.

  9. Gene expression profile differences in high and low metastatic human ovarian cancer cell lines by gene chip

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许沈华; 牟瀚舟; 吕桂泉; 朱赤红; 羊正炎; 高永良; 楼洪坤; 刘祥麟; 程勇; 杨文

    2002-01-01

    Objectives To study the difference between gene expressions of high (H0-8910PM) and low (HO-8910) metastatic human ovarian carcinoma cell lines and screen novel associated genes by cDNA microarray. Methods cDNA retro-transcribed from equal quantities of mRNA derived from high and low metastatic tumor cells or normal ovarian tissues were labeled with Cy5 and Cy3 fluorescein as probes. The mixed probe was hybridized with two pieces of BioDoor 4096 double dot human whole gene chip and scanned with a ScanArray 3000 laser scanner. The acquired image was analyzed by ImaGene 3.0 software. Results A total of 355 genes with expression levels more than 3 times larger were found by comparing the HO-8910 cell with normal ovarian epithelial cells. A total of 323 genes with expression levels more than 3 times larger in HO-8910PM cells compared to normal ovarian epithelium cells were also detected. A total of 165 genes whose expression levels were more than two times those of HO-8910PM cells compared to their mother cell line (HO-8910) were detected. Twenty-one genes with expression levels >3 times were found from comparison of these two tumor cell lines.Conclusions cDNA microarray techniques are effective in screening differential gene expression between two human ovarian cancer cell lines (H0-8910PM; HO-8910) and normal ovarian epithelial cells. These genes may be related to the genesis and development of ovarian carcinoma. Analysis of the human ovarian cancer gene expression profile with cDNA microarray may help in gene diagnosis, treatment and prevention.

  10. Embryo quality predictive models based on cumulus cells gene expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devjak R

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Since the introduction of in vitro fertilization (IVF in clinical practice of infertility treatment, the indicators for high quality embryos were investigated. Cumulus cells (CC have a specific gene expression profile according to the developmental potential of the oocyte they are surrounding, and therefore, specific gene expression could be used as a biomarker. The aim of our study was to combine more than one biomarker to observe improvement in prediction value of embryo development. In this study, 58 CC samples from 17 IVF patients were analyzed. This study was approved by the Republic of Slovenia National Medical Ethics Committee. Gene expression analysis [quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR] for five genes, analyzed according to embryo quality level, was performed. Two prediction models were tested for embryo quality prediction: a binary logistic and a decision tree model. As the main outcome, gene expression levels for five genes were taken and the area under the curve (AUC for two prediction models were calculated. Among tested genes, AMHR2 and LIF showed significant expression difference between high quality and low quality embryos. These two genes were used for the construction of two prediction models: the binary logistic model yielded an AUC of 0.72 ± 0.08 and the decision tree model yielded an AUC of 0.73 ± 0.03. Two different prediction models yielded similar predictive power to differentiate high and low quality embryos. In terms of eventual clinical decision making, the decision tree model resulted in easy-to-interpret rules that are highly applicable in clinical practice.

  11. Discrimination of meniscal cell phenotypes using gene expression profiles

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    M Son

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The lack of quantitative and objective metrics to assess cartilage and meniscus cell phenotypes contributes to the challenges in fibrocartilage tissue engineering. Although functional assessment of the final resulting tissue is essential, initial characterization of cell sources and quantitative description of their progression towards the natural, desired cell phenotype would provide an effective tool in optimizing cell-based tissue engineering strategies. The purpose of this study was to identify quantifiable characteristics of meniscal cells and thereby find phenotypical markers that could effectively categorize cells based on their tissue of origin (cartilage, inner, middle, and outer meniscus. The combination of gene expression ratios collagen VI/collagen II, ADAMTS-5/collagen II, and collagen I/collagen II was the most effective indicator of variation among different tissue regions. We additionally demonstrate a possible application of these quantifiable metrics in evaluating the use of serially passaged chondrocytes as a possible cell source in fibrocartilage engineering. Comparing the ratios of the passaged chondrocytes and the native meniscal cells may provide direction to optimize towards the desired cell phenotype. We have thus shown that measurable markers defining the characteristics of the native meniscus can establish a standard by which different tissue engineering strategies can be objectively assessed. Such metrics could additionally be useful in exploring the different stages of meniscal degradation in osteoarthritis and provide some insight in the disease progression.

  12. The FRIABLE1 gene product affects cell adhesion in Arabidopsis.

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    Lutz Neumetzler

    Full Text Available Cell adhesion in plants is mediated predominantly by pectins, a group of complex cell wall associated polysaccharides. An Arabidopsis mutant, friable1 (frb1, was identified through a screen of T-DNA insertion lines that exhibited defective cell adhesion. Interestingly, the frb1 plants displayed both cell and organ dissociations and also ectopic defects in organ separation. The FRB1 gene encodes a Golgi-localized, plant specific protein with only weak sequence similarities to known proteins (DUF246. Unlike other cell adhesion deficient mutants, frb1 mutants do not have reduced levels of adhesion related cell wall polymers, such as pectins. Instead, FRB1 affects the abundance of galactose- and arabinose-containing oligosaccharides in the Golgi. Furthermore, frb1 mutants displayed alteration in pectin methylesterification, cell wall associated extensins and xyloglucan microstructure. We propose that abnormal FRB1 action has pleiotropic consequences on wall architecture, affecting both the extensin and pectin matrices, with consequent changes to the biomechanical properties of the wall and middle lamella, thereby influencing cell-cell adhesion.

  13. Cell Sorting and Noise-Induced Cell Plasticity Coordinate to Sharpen Boundaries between Gene Expression Domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    A fundamental question in biology is how sharp boundaries of gene expression form precisely in spite of biological variation/noise. Numerous mechanisms position gene expression domains across fields of cells (e.g. morphogens), but how these domains are refined remains unclear. In some cases, domain boundaries sharpen through differential adhesion-mediated cell sorting. However, boundaries can also sharpen through cellular plasticity, with cell fate changes driven by up- or down-regulation of gene expression. In this context, we have argued that noise in gene expression can help cells transition to the correct fate. Here we investigate the efficacy of cell sorting, gene expression plasticity, and their combination in boundary sharpening using multi-scale, stochastic models. We focus on the formation of hindbrain segments (rhombomeres) in the developing zebrafish as an example, but the mechanisms investigated apply broadly to many tissues. Our results indicate that neither sorting nor plasticity is sufficient on its own to sharpen transition regions between different rhombomeres. Rather the two have complementary strengths and weaknesses, which synergize when combined to sharpen gene expression boundaries. PMID:28135279

  14. Generation of hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase gene knockout rabbits by homologous recombination and gene trapping through somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Mingru; Jiang, Weihua; Fang, Zhenfu; Kong, Pengcheng; Xing, Fengying; Li, Yao; Chen, Xuejin; Li, Shangang

    2015-11-02

    The rabbit is a common animal model that has been employed in studies on various human disorders, and the generation of genetically modified rabbit lines is highly desirable. Female rabbits have been successfully cloned from cumulus cells, and the somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) technology is well established. The present study generated hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) gene knockout rabbits using recombinant adeno-associated virus-mediated homologous recombination and SCNT. Gene trap strategies were employed to enhance the gene targeting rates. The male and female gene knockout fibroblast cell lines were derived by different strategies. When male HPRT knockout cells were used for SCNT, no live rabbits were obtained. However, when female HPRT(+/-) cells were used for SCNT, live, healthy rabbits were generated. The cloned HPRT(+/-) rabbits were fertile at maturity. We demonstrate a new technique to produce gene-targeted rabbits. This approach may also be used in the genetic manipulation of different genes or in other species.

  15. Altered epigenetic regulation of homeobox genes in human oral squamous cell carcinoma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcinkiewicz, Katarzyna M.; Gudas, Lorraine J., E-mail: ljgudas@med.cornell.edu

    2014-01-01

    To gain insight into oral squamous cell carcinogenesis, we performed deep sequencing (RNAseq) of non-tumorigenic human OKF6-TERT1R and tumorigenic SCC-9 cells. Numerous homeobox genes are differentially expressed between OKF6-TERT1R and SCC-9 cells. Data from Oncomine, a cancer microarray database, also show that homeobox (HOX) genes are dysregulated in oral SCC patients. The activity of Polycomb repressive complexes (PRC), which causes epigenetic modifications, and retinoic acid (RA) signaling can control HOX gene transcription. HOXB7, HOXC10, HOXC13, and HOXD8 transcripts are higher in SCC-9 than in OKF6-TERT1R cells; using ChIP (chromatin immunoprecipitation) we detected PRC2 protein SUZ12 and the epigenetic H3K27me3 mark on histone H3 at these genes in OKF6-TERT1R, but not in SCC-9 cells. In contrast, IRX1, IRX4, SIX2 and TSHZ3 transcripts are lower in SCC-9 than in OKF6-TERT1R cells. We detected SUZ12 and the H3K27me3 mark at these genes in SCC-9, but not in OKF6-TERT1R cells. SUZ12 depletion increased HOXB7, HOXC10, HOXC13, and HOXD8 transcript levels and decreased the proliferation of OKF6-TERT1R cells. Transcriptional responses to RA are attenuated in SCC-9 versus OKF6-TERT1R cells. SUZ12 and H3K27me3 levels were not altered by RA at these HOX genes in SCC-9 and OKF6-TERT1R cells. We conclude that altered activity of PRC2 is associated with dysregulation of homeobox gene expression in human SCC cells, and that this dysregulation potentially plays a role in the neoplastic transformation of oral keratinocytes. - Highlights: • RNAseq elucidates differences between non-tumorigenic and tumorigenic oral keratinocytes. • Changes in HOX mRNA in SCC-9 vs. OKF6-TERT1R cells are a result of altered epigenetic regulation. • RNAseq shows that retinoic acid (RA) influences gene expression in both OKF6-TERT1R and SCC-9 cells.

  16. The effect of adenovirus-mediated gene expression of FHIT in small cell lung cancer cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zandi, Roza; Xu, Kai; Poulsen, Hans S

    2011-01-01

    or in combination with the mutant p53-reactivating molecule, PRIMA-1(Met)/APR-246, in SCLC. Overexpression of FHIT by recombinant adenoviral vector (Ad-FHIT)-mediated gene transfer in SCLC cells inhibited their growth by inducing apoptosis and when combined with PRIMA-1(Met)/APR-246, a synergistic cell growth...

  17. Effect of TNF gene-transfected LAK cells on the ascitic liver carcinoma-bearing mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guo Liang Lou; Xue Tao Cao; Bi He Min; Wei Ping Zhang; Pei Lin Meng

    2000-01-01

    AIM To investigate the therapeutic effect of TNF gene transfected LAK cells on ascitic liver carcinoma-bearing mice.METHODS TNF gene was transfected into murine LAK cells by retrovirus. Low dose TNF gene-transfectcdLAK cells and IL-2 were i.p. injected into murine model. Cytotoxicity of gene transfected LAK cells wasstudied in vitro growth and the survival time of murine model was observed.RESULTS TNF gene-transfected LAK cells secreted higher level of TNF than that of normal LAK cells orcontrol gene-transfected LAK ceils. The in vitro growth ability and cytotoxicity of TNF gene-transfectedLAK cells were markedly inhibited by anti-TNF monoclonal antibodies. Significant therapeutic effect onascitic liver carcinoma-bearing mice was achieved.CONCLUSION TNF gene-transfected LAK cells have therapeutic effect on ascitic liver carcinoma-bearingmice.

  18. Enrichment of human hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells facilitates transduction for stem cell gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Kismet; Urbinati, Fabrizia; Romero, Zulema; Campo-Fernandez, Beatriz; Kaufman, Michael L; Cooper, Aaron R; Masiuk, Katelyn; Hollis, Roger P; Kohn, Donald B

    2015-05-01

    Autologous hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) gene therapy for sickle cell disease has the potential to treat this illness without the major immunological complications associated with allogeneic transplantation. However, transduction efficiency by β-globin lentiviral vectors using CD34-enriched cell populations is suboptimal and large vector production batches may be needed for clinical trials. Transducing a cell population more enriched for HSC could greatly reduce vector needs and, potentially, increase transduction efficiency. CD34(+) /CD38(-) cells, comprising ∼1%-3% of all CD34(+) cells, were isolated from healthy cord blood CD34(+) cells by fluorescence-activated cell sorting and transduced with a lentiviral vector expressing an antisickling form of beta-globin (CCL-β(AS3) -FB). Isolated CD34(+) /CD38(-) cells were able to generate progeny over an extended period of long-term culture (LTC) compared to the CD34(+) cells and required up to 40-fold less vector for transduction compared to bulk CD34(+) preparations containing an equivalent number of CD34(+) /CD38(-) cells. Transduction of isolated CD34(+) /CD38(-) cells was comparable to CD34(+) cells measured by quantitative PCR at day 14 with reduced vector needs, and average vector copy/cell remained higher over time for LTC initiated from CD34(+) /38(-) cells. Following in vitro erythroid differentiation, HBBAS3 mRNA expression was similar in cultures derived from CD34(+) /CD38(-) cells or unfractionated CD34(+) cells. In vivo studies showed equivalent engraftment of transduced CD34(+) /CD38(-) cells when transplanted in competition with 100-fold more CD34(+) /CD38(+) cells. This work provides initial evidence for the beneficial effects from isolating human CD34(+) /CD38(-) cells to use significantly less vector and potentially improve transduction for HSC gene therapy.

  19. Gene expression pattern of functional neuronal cells derived from human bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells

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    Bron Dominique

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neuronal tissue has limited potential to self-renew or repair after neurological diseases. Cellular therapies using stem cells are promising approaches for the treatment of neurological diseases. However, the clinical use of embryonic stem cells or foetal tissues is limited by ethical considerations and other scientific problems. Thus, bone marrow mesenchymal stomal cells (BM-MSC could represent an alternative source of stem cells for cell replacement therapies. Indeed, many studies have demonstrated that MSC can give rise to neuronal cells as well as many tissue-specific cell phenotypes. Methods BM-MSC were differentiated in neuron-like cells under specific induction (NPBM + cAMP + IBMX + NGF + Insulin. By day ten, differentiated cells presented an expression profile of real neurons. Functionality of these differentiated cells was evaluated by calcium influx through glutamate receptor AMPA3. Results Using microarray analysis, we compared gene expression profile of these different samples, before and after neurogenic differentiation. Among the 1943 genes differentially expressed, genes down-regulated are involved in osteogenesis, chondrogenesis, adipogenesis, myogenesis and extracellular matrix component (tuftelin, AGC1, FADS3, tropomyosin, fibronectin, ECM2, HAPLN1, vimentin. Interestingly, genes implicated in neurogenesis are increased. Most of them are involved in the synaptic transmission and long term potentialisation as cortactin, CASK, SYNCRIP, SYNTL4 and STX1. Other genes are involved in neurite outgrowth, early neuronal cell development, neuropeptide signaling/synthesis and neuronal receptor (FK506, ARHGAP6, CDKRAP2, PMCH, GFPT2, GRIA3, MCT6, BDNF, PENK, amphiregulin, neurofilament 3, Epha4, synaptotagmin. Using real time RT-PCR, we confirmed the expression of selected neuronal genes: NEGR1, GRIA3 (AMPA3, NEF3, PENK and Epha4. Functionality of these neuron-like cells was demonstrated by Ca2+ influx through glutamate

  20. Gene editing for cell engineering: trends and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Sanjeev K; Shukla, Pratyoosh

    2016-08-18

    Gene editing with all its own advantages in molecular biology applications has made easy manipulation of various production hosts with the discovery and implementation of modern gene editing tools such as Crispr (Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats), TALENs (Transcription activator-like effector nucleases) and ZFNs (Zinc finger nucleases). With the advent of these modern tools, it is now possible to manipulate the genome of industrial production hosts such as yeast and mammalian cells which allows developing a potential and cost effective recombinant therapeutic protein. These tools also allow single editing to multiple genes for knocking-in or knocking-out of a host genome quickly in an efficient manner. A recent study on "multiplexed" gene editing revolutionized the knock-out and knock-in events of yeast and CHO, mammalian cells genome for metabolic engineering as well as high, stable, and consistent expression of a transgene encoding complex therapeutic protein such as monoclonal antibody. The gene of interest can either be integrated or deleted at single or multiple loci depending on the strategy and production requirement. This review will give a gist of all the modern tools with a brief description and advances in genetic manipulation using three major tools being implemented for the modification of such hosts with the emphasis on the use of Crispr-Cas9 for the "multiplexing gene-editing approach" for genetic manipulation of yeast and CHO mammalian hosts that ultimately leads to a fast track product development with consistent, improved product yield, quality, and thus affordability for a population at large.

  1. Method for the single step introduction of a plurality of genes in microbial cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Straat, van der L.; Graaff, de L.H.

    2015-01-01

    The invention provides a method for producing a vector for introducing a plurality of genes into a host cell, the method comprising the steps of: a) providing for each gene of the plurality of genes, a DNA fragment comprising an expression cassette for expression of the gene in the host cell, wherei

  2. Mesenchymal stem cell-based gene therapy for erectile dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, J H; Lee, H J; Song, Y S

    2016-05-01

    Despite the overwhelming success of PDE5 inhibitor (PDE5I), the demand for novel pharmacotherapeutic and surgical options for ED continues to rise owing to the increased proportion of elderly individuals in the population, in addition to the growing percentage of ED patients who do not respond to PDE5I. Surgical treatment of ED is associated with many complications, thus warranting the need for nonsurgical therapies. Moreover, none of the above-mentioned treatments essentially corrects, cures or prevents ED. Although gene therapy is a promising option, many challenges and obstacles such as local inflammatory response and random transgene expression, in addition to other safety issues, limit its use at the clinical level. The use of stem cell therapy alone also has many shortcomings. To overcome these inadequacies, many scientists and clinicians are investigating new gene and stem cell therapies.

  3. Ultrastructural localization of active genes in Allium cepa cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    By using the anti-RNA/DNA hybrid antibody as the probe, we labeled and analyzed the precise transcriptional sites of active genes in Allium cepa cells in situ. The results showed that the location of labeled signals appeared in mitochondrion was the same as that in chloroplast, generally concentrated at the central matrix space where there were no cristae and thylakoids. In the extranucleolar regions of nucleus, the labeled signals of transcriptional sites were situated at the perichromatin fibrils, which decondensed and stretched out from the chromosome territories. Our results also displayed the concentrations of labeled signals in a cer-tain region of nucleus, and this means that the gene tran-scription rich region actually existed in Allium cepa cells. In nucleolus, the synthetic sites of rRNA were localized not only to the periphery of fibrillar centers but also to the DFC near FC.

  4. EVALUATION OF CYTOKINE GENE POLYMORPHISM IN B CELL LYMPHOID MALIGNANCIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. L. Nazarova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies with some solid tumors has shown that polymorphisms of certain cytokine genes may be used as predictors of clinical outcome in the patients. It seemed important to evaluate potential correlations between production of certain pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines and co-receptor molecules, and promoter polymorphism of the cytokine genes involved into regulation of cell proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, lipid metabolism and blood clotting in the patients with hematological malignancies. The article contains our results concerning associations between of IL-1β, -2, -4, -10, -17, TNFα, and allelic polymorphisms of their genes in 62 patients with B cell lymphoid malignancies in an ethnically homogenous group (self-identified as Russians. We have shown that the GА and AA genotypes of the G-308A polymorphism in TNFα gene are significantly associated with increased production of this cytokine, being more common in aggressive non-Hodgkin lymphomas, more rare in multiple myeloma and in indolent non-Hodgkin lymphomas.

  5. [VEGF gene expression in transfected human multipotent stromal cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnikhina, S A; Lavrov, A V; Bochkov, N P

    2011-01-01

    Dynamics of VEGF gene expression in transfected multipotent stromal cells from adipose tissue was examined using electroporation and lipofection. Differences in the potency and dynamics of plasmid elimination (up to day 9) between cell cultures were observed. All cultures were divided into fast and slow plasmid-eliminating ones. Interculture differences in VEGF expression were detected. The possibility of a 5-6-fold increase of VEGF expression was shown. There were no differences in transfection potency, plasmid elimination dynamics, and VEGF expression after transfection by both nonviral methods.

  6. Methylation of Gene CHFR Promoter in Acute Leukemia Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GONG Hui; LIU Wengli; ZHOU Jianfeng; XU Huizhen

    2005-01-01

    Summary: In order to explore whether gene CHFR was inactivated by methylation in leukemia cells, the expression of CHFR was examined before and after treatment with demethylation agent in Molt-4, Jurkat and U937 leukemia cell lines by means of RT-PCR. The methylation of promoter in Molt-4, Jurkat and U937 cells as well as 41 acute leukemia patients was analyzed by MS-PCR. The results showed that methylation of CHFR promoter was inactivated and could be reversed by treatment with a demethylating agent in Molt-4, Jurkat and U937. CHFR promoter methylation was detected in 39 % of acute leukemia patients. There was no difference in incidence of CHFR promoter methylation between acute myelocytic leukemia and acute lymphocytic leukemia. In conclusion, CHFR is frequently inactivated in acute leukemia and is a good candidate for the leukemia supper gene. By affecting mitotic checkpoint function, CHFR inactivation likely plays a key role in tumorigenesis in acute leukemia. Moreover, the methylation of gene CHFR appears to be a good index with which to predict the sensitivity of acute leukemia to microtubule inhibitors.

  7. Transcriptional regulation of cathelicidin genes in chicken bone marrow cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang In; Jang, Hyun June; Jeon, Mi-hyang; Lee, Mi Ock; Kim, Jeom Sun; Jeon, Ik-Soo; Byun, Sung June

    2016-04-01

    Cathelicidins form a family of vertebrate-specific immune molecules with an evolutionarily conserved gene structure. We analyzed the expression patterns of cathelicidin genes (CAMP, CATH3, and CATHB1) in chicken bone marrow cells (BMCs) and chicken embryonic fibroblasts (CEFs). We found that CAMP and CATHB1 were significantly up-regulated in BMCs, whereas the expression of CATH3 did not differ significantly between BMCs and CEFs. To study the mechanism underlying the up-regulation of cathelicidin genes in BMCs, we predicted the transcription factors (TFs) that bind to the 5'-flanking regions of cathelicidin genes. CEBPA, EBF1, HES1, MSX1, and ZIC3 were up-regulated in BMCs compared to CEFs. Subsequently, when a siRNA-mediated knockdown assay was performed for MSX1, the expression of CAMP and CATHB1 was decreased in BMCs. We also showed that the transcriptional activity of the CAMP promoter was decreased by mutation of the MSX1-binding sites present within the 5'-flanking region of CAMP. These results increase our understanding of the regulatory mechanisms controlling cathelicidin genes in BMCs.

  8. MGMT enrichment and second gene co-expression in hematopoietic progenitor cells using separate or dual-gene lentiviral vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Justin C; Alberti, Michael O; Ismail, Mourad; Lingas, Karen T; Reese, Jane S; Gerson, Stanton L

    2015-01-22

    The DNA repair gene O(6)-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) allows efficient in vivo enrichment of transduced hematopoietic stem cells (HSC). Thus, linking this selection strategy to therapeutic gene expression offers the potential to reconstitute diseased hematopoietic tissue with gene-corrected cells. However, different dual-gene expression vector strategies are limited by poor expression of one or both transgenes. To evaluate different co-expression strategies in the context of MGMT-mediated HSC enrichment, we compared selection and expression efficacies in cells cotransduced with separate single-gene MGMT and GFP lentivectors to those obtained with dual-gene vectors employing either encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV) internal ribosome entry site (IRES) or foot and mouth disease virus (FMDV) 2A elements for co-expression strategies. Each strategy was evaluated in vitro and in vivo using equivalent multiplicities of infection (MOI) to transduce 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) or Lin(-)Sca-1(+)c-kit(+) (LSK)-enriched murine bone marrow cells (BMCs). The highest dual-gene expression (MGMT(+)GFP(+)) percentages were obtained with the FMDV-2A dual-gene vector, but half of the resulting gene products existed as fusion proteins. Following selection, dual-gene expression percentages in single-gene vector cotransduced and dual-gene vector transduced populations were similar. Equivalent MGMT expression levels were obtained with each strategy, but GFP expression levels derived from the IRES dual-gene vector were significantly lower. In mice, vector-insertion averages were similar among cells enriched after dual-gene vectors and those cotransduced with single-gene vectors. These data demonstrate the limitations and advantages of each strategy in the context of MGMT-mediated selection, and may provide insights into vector design with respect to a particular therapeutic gene or hematologic defect.

  9. In search of a suitable reference gene for normalization of gene expression in MDV-infected chicken cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marek’s disease (MD) is a contagious lymphoproliferative disease of domestic chickens caused by a highly cell-associated alpha-herpesvirus, MD virus (MDV). The choice of an appropriate housekeeping gene as an endogenous reference gene is an essential requirement for relative quantification of gene ...

  10. Differential gene expression in stromal cells of human giant cell tumor of bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuelling, M; Delling, G; Kaiser, E

    2004-12-01

    Giant cell tumor (GCT) offers a unique model for the hematopoietic-stromal cell interaction in human bone marrow. Evidence has been presented that GCT stromal cells (GCTSCs) promote accumulation, size and activity of the giant cells. Although GCTSCs are considered the neoplastic component of GCT, little is known about their genetic basis and, to date, a tumor-specific gene expression pattern has not been characterized. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been identified as the origin of the GCT neoplastic stromal cell. Using state of the art array technology, expression profiling was applied to enriched stromal cell populations from five different GCTs and two primary MSCs as controls. Of the 29 differentially expressed genes found, 25 showed an increased expression. Differential mRNA expression was verified by real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis of 10 selected genes, supporting the validity of cDNA arrays as a tool to identify tumor-related genes in GCTSCs. Increased expression of two oncogenes, JUN and NME2, was substantiated at the protein level, utilizing immunohistochemical evaluation of GCT sections and Western-blot analysis. Increased phosphorylation of JUN Ser-63 was also found.

  11. Overview of gene therapy clinical progress including cancer treatment with gene-modified T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenner, Malcolm K; Okur, Fatma V

    2009-01-01

    It is now twenty years since the first legal gene transfer studies were approved, and there has been considerable disappointment in the slow rate of progress that followed the initial studies. Gradually, however, as the limitations of available vectors are acknowledged and overcome, and with advances in our understanding of the molecular and cell biology of genetic diseases and of cancer, unequivocal successes are now being reported. In this paper we describe the remaining major roadblocks to successful gene therapy and outline approaches to overcome them. We also illustrate how genetically modified immune system cells are already being used for the effective treatment of hematological and other malignancies, and how these approaches are being modified so that they can be effective in treating a broader range of malignancies.

  12. Human respiratory epithelial cells from nasal turbinate expressed stem cell genes even after serial passaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruszymah, B H I; Izham, B A Azrul; Heikal, M Y Mohd; Khor, S F; Fauzi, M B; Aminuddin, B S

    2011-12-01

    Current development in the field of tissue engineering led to the idea of repairing and regenerating the respiratory airway through in vitro reconstruction using autologous respiratory epithelial (RE). To ensure the capability of proliferation, the stem cell property of RE cells from the nasal turbinate should be evaluated. Respiratory epithelial cells from six human nasal turbinates were harvested and cultured in vitro. The gene expression of FZD-9 and BST-1 were expressed in passage 2 (P2) and passage 4 (P4). The levels of expression were not significant between both passages. The RE cells exhibit the stem cell properties, which remains even after serial passaging.

  13. From the Cover: Design of artificial cell-cell communication using gene and metabolic networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulter, Thomas; Lee, Sun-Gu; Waichun Wong, Wilson; Fung, Eileen; Connor, Michael R.; Liao, James C.

    2004-02-01

    Artificial transcriptional networks have been used to achieve novel, nonnative behavior in bacteria. Typically, these artificial circuits are isolated from cellular metabolism and are designed to function without intercellular communication. To attain concerted biological behavior in a population, synchronization through intercellular communication is highly desirable. Here we demonstrate the design and construction of a gene-metabolic circuit that uses a common metabolite to achieve tunable artificial cell-cell communication. This circuit uses a threshold concentration of acetate to induce gene expression by acetate kinase and part of the nitrogen-regulation two-component system. As one application of the cell-cell communication circuit we created an artificial quorum sensor. Engineering of carbon metabolism in Escherichia coli made acetate secretion proportional to cell density and independent of oxygen availability. In these cells the circuit induced gene expression in response to a threshold cell density. This threshold can be tuned effectively by controlling pH over the cell membrane, which determines the partition of acetate between medium and cells. Mutagenesis of the enhancer sequence of the glnAp2 promoter produced variants of the circuit with changed sensitivity demonstrating tunability of the circuit by engineering of its components. The behavior of the circuit shows remarkable predictability based on a mathematical design model.

  14. [Experimental gene therapy using p21/WAF1 gene in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma--adenovirus infection and gene gun technology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, T; Tanaka, Y; Tanaka, T; Matono, S; Sueyoshi, S; Fujita, H; Shirouzu, K; Kato, S; Yamana, H

    2001-10-01

    p21/WAF1 (p21) inhibits the activity of the cyclin/cdk complex and controls the G1 to S cell phase transition. In the present study, we used a recombinant adenoviral approach and gene gun technology to introduce p21 into esophageal cancer cells in order to assess the effect of p21 on cell growth. Infection with the p21 adenovirus (AdV) using gene gun technology resulted in inhibition of TE9 and KE3 cell growth. The levels of involucrin, which is a marker of squamous epithelium differentiation, markedly increased at 48 h and 72 h after p21 AdV infection in TE9 cells. These results indicate that p21 plays an important role in esophageal cancer cell proliferation. Overexpression of the p21 gene can inhibit cell growth and induce differentiation in esophageal cancer cells. p21 gene therapy may prove beneficial in the treatment of esophageal cancer.

  15. Treating hearing disorders with cell and gene therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillespie, Lisa N.; Richardson, Rachael T.; Nayagam, Bryony A.; Wise, Andrew K.

    2014-12-01

    Hearing loss is an increasing problem for a substantial number of people and, with an aging population, the incidence and severity of hearing loss will become more significant over time. There are very few therapies currently available to treat hearing loss, and so the development of new therapeutic strategies for hearing impaired individuals is of paramount importance to address this unmet clinical need. Most forms of hearing loss are progressive in nature and therefore an opportunity exists to develop novel therapeutic approaches to slow or halt hearing loss progression, or even repair or replace lost hearing function. Numerous emerging technologies have potential as therapeutic options. This paper details the potential of cell- and gene-based therapies to provide therapeutic agents to protect sensory and neural cells from various insults known to cause hearing loss; explores the potential of replacing lost sensory and nerve cells using gene and stem cell therapy; and describes the considerations for clinical translation and the challenges that need to be overcome.

  16. Clusters of conserved beta cell marker genes for assessment of beta cell phenotype

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martens, Geert A; Jiang, Lei; Hellemans, Karine H;

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to establish a gene expression blueprint of pancreatic beta cells conserved from rodents to humans and to evaluate its applicability to assess shifts in the beta cell differentiated state. Genome-wide mRNA expression profiles of isolated beta cells were compared to those...... microdissected beta cells, monitor adaptations of the beta cell phenotype to fasting, and retrieve possible conserved transcriptional regulators.......The aim of this study was to establish a gene expression blueprint of pancreatic beta cells conserved from rodents to humans and to evaluate its applicability to assess shifts in the beta cell differentiated state. Genome-wide mRNA expression profiles of isolated beta cells were compared to those...... of a large panel of other tissue and cell types, and transcripts with beta cell-abundant and -selective expression were identified. Iteration of this analysis in mouse, rat and human tissues generated a panel of conserved beta cell biomarkers. This panel was then used to compare isolated versus laser capture...

  17. ET-67SUICIDE GENE THERAPY FOR GLIOMA USING MULTILINEAGE-DEFFERENTIATING STRESS ENDURING (MUSE) CELLS

    OpenAIRE

    Yamasaki, Tomohiro; Wakao, Shohei; Kawaji, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Tomo; Kamio, Yoshinobu; AMANO, SHINJI; Sameshima, Tetsuro; Sakai, Naoto; TOKUYAMA, TSUTOMU; Dezawa, Mari; Namba, Hiroki

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: We have been investigating cell-based glioma gene therapy using various kinds of stem cells transduced with the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase gene (HSVtk). In our previous study, we used SSEA3/CD105 double-positive multilineage-differentiating stress-enduring (Muse) cells transduced with HSVtk (Muse-tk cells) as the vehicle for HSVtk/ganciclovir (GCV) gene therapy. We demonstrated a potent in vitro tumoricidal bystander effect for various glioma cells. In the present stu...

  18. Clusters of conserved beta cell marker genes for assessment of beta cell phenotype

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martens, Geert A; Jiang, Lei; Hellemans, Karine H;

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to establish a gene expression blueprint of pancreatic beta cells conserved from rodents to humans and to evaluate its applicability to assess shifts in the beta cell differentiated state. Genome-wide mRNA expression profiles of isolated beta cells were compared to those...... of a large panel of other tissue and cell types, and transcripts with beta cell-abundant and -selective expression were identified. Iteration of this analysis in mouse, rat and human tissues generated a panel of conserved beta cell biomarkers. This panel was then used to compare isolated versus laser capture...... microdissected beta cells, monitor adaptations of the beta cell phenotype to fasting, and retrieve possible conserved transcriptional regulators....

  19. Heat shock genes – integrating cell survival and death

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Richa Arya; Moushami Mallik; Subhash C Lakhotia

    2007-04-01

    Heat shock induced gene expression and other cellular responses help limit the damage caused by stress and thus facilitate cellular recovery. Cellular damage also triggers apoptotic cell death through several pathways. This paper briefly reviews interactions of the major heat shock proteins with components of the apoptotic pathways. Hsp90, which acts as a chaperone for unstable signal transducers to keep them poised for activation, interacts with RIP and Akt and promotes NF-B mediated inhibition of apoptosis; in addition it also blocks some steps in the apoptotic pathways. Hsp70 is mostly anti-apoptotic and acts at several levels like inhibition of translocation of Bax into mitochondria, release of cytochrome c from mitochondria, formation of apoptosome and inhibition of activation of initiator caspases. Hsp70 also modulates JNK, NF-B and Akt signaling pathways in the apoptotic cascade. In contrast, Hsp60 has both anti- and pro-apoptotic roles. Cytosolic Hsp60 prevents translocation of the pro-apoptotic protein Bax into mitochondria and thus promotes cell survival but it also promotes maturation of procaspase-3, essential for caspase mediated cell death. Our recent in vivo studies show that RNAi for the Hsp60D in Drosophila melanogaster prevents induced apoptosis. Hsp27 exerts its anti-apoptotic influence by inhibiting cytochrome c and TNF-mediated cell death. crystallin suppresses caspase-8 and cytochrome c mediated activation of caspase-3. Studies in our laboratory also reveal that absence or reduced levels of the developmentally active as well as stress induced non-coding hsr transcripts, which are known to sequester diverse hnRNPs and related nuclear RNA-binding proteins, block induced apoptosis in Drosophila. Modulation of the apoptotic pathways by Hsps reflects their roles as ``weak links” between various ``hubs” in cellular networks. On the other hand, non-coding RNAs, by virtue of their potential to bind with multiple proteins, can act as ``hubs” in

  20. Cell Wall Proteome

    OpenAIRE

    Boudart, Georges; Minic, Zoran; Albenne, Cécile; Canut, Hervé; Jamet, Elisabeth; Pont-Lezica, Rafael F

    2007-01-01

    In this chapter, we will focus on the contribution of proteomics to the identification and determination of the structure and function of CWPs as well as discussing new perspectives in this area. The great variety of proteins found in the plant cell wall is described. Some families, such as glycoside hydrolases, proteases, lectins, and inhibitors of cell wall modifying enzymes, are discussed in detail. Examples of the use of proteomic techniques to elucidate the structure of various cell wall...

  1. Persistent donor cell gene expression among human induced pluripotent stem cells contributes to differences with human embryonic stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhumur Ghosh

    Full Text Available Human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs generated by de-differentiation of adult somatic cells offer potential solutions for the ethical issues surrounding human embryonic stem cells (hESCs, as well as their immunologic rejection after cellular transplantation. However, although hiPSCs have been described as "embryonic stem cell-like", these cells have a distinct gene expression pattern compared to hESCs, making incomplete reprogramming a potential pitfall. It is unclear to what degree the difference in tissue of origin may contribute to these gene expression differences. To answer these important questions, a careful transcriptional profiling analysis is necessary to investigate the exact reprogramming state of hiPSCs, as well as analysis of the impression, if any, of the tissue of origin on the resulting hiPSCs. In this study, we compare the gene profiles of hiPSCs derived from fetal fibroblasts, neonatal fibroblasts, adipose stem cells, and keratinocytes to their corresponding donor cells and hESCs. Our analysis elucidates the overall degree of reprogramming within each hiPSC line, as well as the "distance" between each hiPSC line and its donor cell. We further identify genes that have a similar mode of regulation in hiPSCs and their corresponding donor cells compared to hESCs, allowing us to specify core sets of donor genes that continue to be expressed in each hiPSC line. We report that residual gene expression of the donor cell type contributes significantly to the differences among hiPSCs and hESCs, and adds to the incompleteness in reprogramming. Specifically, our analysis reveals that fetal fibroblast-derived hiPSCs are closer to hESCs, followed by adipose, neonatal fibroblast, and keratinocyte-derived hiPSCs.

  2. Targeting the Gdnf Gene in peritubular myoid cells disrupts undifferentiated spermatogonial cell development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Liang-Yu; Willis, William D; Eddy, Edward M

    2016-02-16

    Spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) are a subpopulation of undifferentiated spermatogonia located in a niche at the base of the seminiferous epithelium delimited by Sertoli cells and peritubular myoid (PM) cells. SSCs self-renew or differentiate into spermatogonia that proliferate to give rise to spermatocytes and maintain spermatogenesis. Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) is essential for this process. Sertoli cells produce GDNF and other growth factors and are commonly thought to be responsible for regulating SSC development, but limited attention has been paid to the role of PM cells in this process. A conditional knockout (cKO) of the androgen receptor gene in PM cells resulted in male infertility. We found that testosterone (T) induces GDNF expression in mouse PM cells in vitro and neonatal spermatogonia (including SSCs) co-cultured with T-treated PM cells were able to colonize testes of germ cell-depleted mice after transplantation. This strongly suggested that T-regulated production of GDNF by PM cells is required for spermatogonial development, but PM cells might produce other factors in vitro that are responsible. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that production of GDNF by PM cells is essential for spermatogonial development by generating mice with a cKO of the Gdnf gene in PM cells. The cKO males sired up to two litters but became infertile due to collapse of spermatogenesis and loss of undifferentiated spermatogonia. These studies show for the first time, to our knowledge, that the production of GDNF by PM cells is essential for undifferentiated spermatogonial cell development in vivo.

  3. Induction in myeloid leukemic cells of genes that are expressed in different normal tissues

    OpenAIRE

    2005-01-01

    Using DNA microarray and cluster analysis of expressed genes in a cloned line (M1-t-p53) of myeloid leukemic cells, we have analyzed the expression of genes that are preferentially expressed in different normal tissues. Clustering of 547 highly expressed genes in these leukemic cells showed 38 genes preferentially expressed in normal hematopoietic tissues and 122 other genes preferentially expressed in different normal non-hematopoietic tissues including neuronal tissues, muscle, liver and te...

  4. Co-culture with periodontal ligament stem cells enhances osteogenic gene expression in de-differentiated fat cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tansriratanawong, Kallapat; Tamaki, Yuichi; Ishikawa, Hiroshi; Sato, Soh

    2014-10-01

    In recent decades, de-differentiated fat cells (DFAT cells) have emerged in regenerative medicine because of their trans-differentiation capability and the fact that their characteristics are similar to bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells. Even so, there is no evidence to support the osteogenic induction using DFAT cells in periodontal regeneration and also the co-culture system. Consequently, this study sought to evaluate the DFAT cells co-culture with periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs) in vitro in terms of gene expression by comparing runt-related transcription factor 2 (RUNX2) and Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma 2 (PPARγ2) genes. We isolated DFAT cells from mature adipocytes and compared proliferation with PDLSCs. After co-culture with PDLSCs, we analyzed transcriptional activity implying by DNA methylation in all adipogenic gene promoters using combined bisulfite restriction analysis. We compared gene expression in RUNX2 gene with the PPARγ2 gene using quantitative RT-PCR. After being sub-cultured, DFAT cells demonstrated morphology similar to fibroblast-like cells. At the same time, PDLSCs established all stem cell characteristics. Interestingly, the co-culture system attenuated proliferation while enhancing osteogenic gene expression in RUNX2 gene. Using the co-culture system, DFAT cells could trans-differentiate into osteogenic lineage enhancing, but conversely, their adipogenic characteristic diminished. Therefore, DFAT cells and the co-culture system might be a novel cell-based therapy for promoting osteogenic differentiation in periodontal regeneration.

  5. Gene expression in epithelial cells in response to pneumovirus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosenberg Helene F

    2001-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV and pneumonia virus of mice (PVM are viruses of the family Paramyxoviridae, subfamily pneumovirus, which cause clinically important respiratory infections in humans and rodents, respectively. The respiratory epithelial target cells respond to viral infection with specific alterations in gene expression, including production of chemoattractant cytokines, adhesion molecules, elements that are related to the apoptosis response, and others that remain incompletely understood. Here we review our current understanding of these mucosal responses and discuss several genomic approaches, including differential display reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (PCR and gene array strategies, that will permit us to unravel the nature of these responses in a more complete and systematic manner.

  6. Adenovirus-mediated gene transfer to tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cascalló, Manel; Alemany, Ramon

    2004-01-01

    Cell transduction in vitro is only the first step toward proving that a genetherapy vector can be useful to treat tumors. However, tumor targeting in vivo is now the milestone for gene therapy to succeed against disseminated cancer. Therefore, most valuable information is obtained from studies of vector biodistribution. Owing to the hepatotropism of adenoviral vectors, a particularly important parameter is the tumor/liver ratio. This ratio can be given at the level of gene expression if the amount of transgene expression is measured. To optimize the targeting, however, the levels of viral particles that reach the tumor compared to other organs must be studied. Most of this chapter deals with methods to quantify the virus fate in tumor-bearing animals. We present a radioactive labeling method that can be used to study biodistribution. After a small section dealing with tumor models, we describe methods to quantify different parameters related to adenovirus-mediated tumor targeting.

  7. A systematic study on drug-response associated genes using baseline gene expressions of the Cancer Cell Line Encyclopedia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaoming; Yang, Jiasheng; Zhang, Yi; Fang, Yun; Wang, Fayou; Wang, Jun; Zheng, Xiaoqi; Yang, Jialiang

    2016-03-01

    We have studied drug-response associated (DRA) gene expressions by applying a systems biology framework to the Cancer Cell Line Encyclopedia data. More than 4,000 genes are inferred to be DRA for at least one drug, while the number of DRA genes for each drug varies dramatically from almost 0 to 1,226. Functional enrichment analysis shows that the DRA genes are significantly enriched in genes associated with cell cycle and plasma membrane. Moreover, there might be two patterns of DRA genes between genders. There are significantly shared DRA genes between male and female for most drugs, while very little DRA genes tend to be shared between the two genders for a few drugs targeting sex-specific cancers (e.g., PD-0332991 for breast cancer and ovarian cancer). Our analyses also show substantial difference for DRA genes between young and old samples, suggesting the necessity of considering the age effects for personalized medicine in cancers. Lastly, differential module and key driver analyses confirm cell cycle related modules as top differential ones for drug sensitivity. The analyses also reveal the role of TSPO, TP53, and many other immune or cell cycle related genes as important key drivers for DRA network modules. These key drivers provide new drug targets to improve the sensitivity of cancer therapy.

  8. Analysis of Gene Expression in the K562-n High Tumorigenitic Human Leukemia Cell Line

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shuqing Lü; Xiaoping Xu; Fang Xia; JianMin Wang

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The human leukemia K562-n cell line displays much higher tumorigenic actively in nude mice compared with its parental K562 cell line. The molecular mechanism of the differences in tumorigenicity between K562-n and K562 in nude mice was examined.METHODS The differences in gene expression between K562 and K562-n cells were analyzed by using cDNA microarrays.RESULTS Among the12,800 genes examined, there was a significant difference in expression of 139 genes between K562-n and K562 cells.Eighty-five of these genes have been registered in the GeneBank and 54are unknown. The genes accessible from the GeneBank include:1)oncogenes and tumor-supressor genes; 2) genes related to transcription regulation, the cell cycle and apoptosis; 3) genes related to the cytoskeleton and cytokinetics; 4) genes related to metabolism and transport; 5) genes related to immune function. There were also some differently expressed genes with mixed functions.CONCLUSION There are many genes differentially expressed between K562-n and K562 cells .The high tumorigenicity of the human leukemia K562-n cell line in nude mice might be related to its specific geneexpression profile.

  9. Utilizing cell-matrix interactions to modulate gene transfer to stem cells inside hyaluronic acid hydrogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gojgini, Shiva; Tokatlian, Talar; Segura, Tatiana

    2011-10-01

    The effective delivery of DNA locally would increase the applicability of gene therapy in tissue regeneration, where diseased tissue is to be repaired in situ. One promising approach is to use hydrogel scaffolds to encapsulate and deliver plasmid DNA in the form of nanoparticles to the diseased tissue, so that cells infiltrating the scaffold are transfected to induce regeneration. This study focuses on the design of a DNA nanoparticle-loaded hydrogel scaffold. In particular, this study focuses on understanding how cell-matrix interactions affect gene transfer to adult stem cells cultured inside matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) degradable hyaluronic acid (HA) hydrogel scaffolds. HA was cross-linked to form a hydrogel material using a MMP degradable peptide and Michael addition chemistry. Gene transfer inside these hydrogel materials was assessed as a function of polyplex nitrogen to phosphate ratio (N/P = 5 to 12), matrix stiffness (100-1700 Pa), RGD (Arg-Gly-Asp) concentration (10-400 μM), and RGD presentation (0.2-4.7 RGDs per HA molecule). All variables were found to affect gene transfer to mouse mensenchymal stem cells culture inside the DNA loaded hydrogels. As expected, higher N/P ratios lead to higher gene transfer efficiency but also higher toxicity; softer hydrogels resulted in higher transgene expression than stiffer hydrogels, and an intermediate RGD concentration and RGD clustering resulted in higher transgene expression. We believe that the knowledge gained through this in vitro model can be utilized to design better scaffold-mediated gene delivery for local gene therapy.

  10. HBV X Gene Transfection Upregulates IL-1β and IL-6 Gene Expression and Induces Rat Glomerular Mesangial Cell Proliferation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hongzhu LU; Jianhua ZHOU

    2008-01-01

    The X gene of HBV encodes a 17-KD protein, termed HBx, which has been shown to function as a transcriptional trans-activator of a variety of viral and cellular promoter/enhancer elements. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of HBx on gene expression of interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-6, and proliferation of rat mesangial cells in vitro. The X gene of HBV was amplified by PCR assay, and inserted into the eukaryotic expression vector pCI-neo. The structure of recombinant pCI-neo-X plasmid was proved by restrict endonuclease digestion and sequencing analysis. pCI-neo-X was transfected into cultured rat mesangial cell line in vitro via liposome. HBx expression in transfected mesangial cells was detected by Western blot. The IL-1β and IL-6 mRNA expression in those cells was assayed by semiquantitative RT-PCR. Mesangial cell proliferation was tested by MTT. The results showed that HBx was obviously expressed in cultured mesangial cell line at 36th and 48th h after transfection. The expression of IL-1β and IL-6 mRNA was simultaneously increased. The cell proliferation was also obvious at the same time. It was concluded that HBx gene transfection could induce IL-1β and IL-6 gene expression and mesangial cell proliferation. HBx may play a critical role in mesangial cell proliferation through upregulation of the IL-1β and IL-6 gene expression.

  11. Retroviral transfer of the nlsLacZ gene into human CD34+ cell populations and into TF-1 cells: future prospects in gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagnis, C; Gravis, G; Imbert, A M; Herrera, D; Allario, T; Galindo, R; Lopez, M; Pavon, C; Sempere, C; Mannoni, P

    1994-11-01

    Few data are available concerning behavior of reimplanted human hematopoietic cells after autologous stem cell transplantation. This paper reports the possibility to transfer gene markers coding for beta-galactosidase (beta-Gal) activity by retroviral vectors into a human leukemic growth factor-dependent cell line, TF-1, and into human hematopoietic progenitors isolated from peripheral blood or bone marrow. Using various combinations of retroviral vectors and packaging cell lines, we demonstrated high expression of a bacterial beta-Gal activity induced by the LacZ gene, the nlsLacZ gene, or the Sh-ble/LacZ gene, in human hematopoietic cells. The expression of the nlsLacZ construct was stable until the end of the culture in infected CD34+ cell-enriched cell populations, and a slow decrease of transgene expression was observed in a transduced TF-1 cell population during a 1-year long-term culture. Data obtained with the nlsLacZ gene demonstrate that both retroviral transfer and corresponding gene expression were not found to modify the pattern of cell proliferation and differentiation. These results open interesting prospectives for the use of the nlsLacZ gene to mark and follow the fate of progenitor cells isolated from patients with cancers prior to reimplantation.

  12. Differential expression of the klf6 tumor suppressor gene upon cell damaging treatments in cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gehrau, Ricardo C.; D' Astolfo, Diego S.; Andreoli, Veronica [Centro de Investigaciones en Bioquimica Clinica e Inmunologia (CIBICI-CONICET), Departamento de Bioquimica Clinica, Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, Universidad Nacional de Cordoba, Haya de la Torre y Medina Allende, Ciudad Universitaria, 5000 Cordoba (Argentina); Bocco, Jose L., E-mail: jbocco@fcq.unc.edu.ar [Centro de Investigaciones en Bioquimica Clinica e Inmunologia (CIBICI-CONICET), Departamento de Bioquimica Clinica, Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, Universidad Nacional de Cordoba, Haya de la Torre y Medina Allende, Ciudad Universitaria, 5000 Cordoba (Argentina); Koritschoner, Nicolas P. [Centro de Investigaciones en Bioquimica Clinica e Inmunologia (CIBICI-CONICET), Departamento de Bioquimica Clinica, Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, Universidad Nacional de Cordoba, Haya de la Torre y Medina Allende, Ciudad Universitaria, 5000 Cordoba (Argentina)

    2011-02-10

    The mammalian Krueppel-like factor 6 (KLF6) is involved in critical roles such as growth-related signal transduction, cell proliferation and differentiation, development, apoptosis and angiogenesis. Also, KLF6 appears to be an emerging key factor during cancer development and progression. Its expression is thoroughly regulated by several cell-damaging stimuli. DNA damaging agents at lethal concentrations induce a p53-independent down-regulation of the klf6 gene. To investigate the impact of external stimuli on human klf6 gene expression, its mRNA level was analyzed using a cancer cell line profiling array system, consisting in an assortment of immobilized cDNAs from multiple cell lines treated with several cell-damaging agents at growth inhibitory concentrations (IC{sub 50}). Cell-damaging agents affected the klf6 expression in 62% of the cDNA samples, though the expression pattern was not dependent on the cell origin type. Interestingly, significant differences (p < 0.0001) in KLF6 mRNA levels were observed depending on the cellular p53 status upon cell damage. KLF6 expression was significantly increased in 63% of p53-deficient cells (122/195). Conversely, KLF6 mRNA level decreased nearly 4 fold in more than 70% of p53+/+ cells. In addition, klf6 gene promoter activity was down-regulated by DNA damaging agents in cells expressing the functional p53 protein whereas it was moderately increased in the absence of functional p53. Consistent results were obtained for the endogenous KLF6 protein level. Results indicate that human klf6 gene expression is responsive to external cell damage mediated by IC{sub 50} concentrations of physical and chemical stimuli in a p53-dependent manner. Most of these agents are frequently used in cancer therapy. Induction of klf6 expression in the absence of functional p53 directly correlates with cell death triggered by these compounds, whereas it is down-regulated in p53+/+ cells. Hence, klf6 expression level could represent a valuable

  13. Gene expression profiling in multipotent DFAT cells derived from mature adipocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ono, Hiromasa [Laboratory of Cell and Tissue Biology, College of Bioresource Sciences, Nihon University, 1866 Kameino, Fujisawa, Kanagawa 252-8510 (Japan); Database Center for Life Science (DBCLS), Research Organization of Information and Systems (ROIS), Faculty of Engineering Bldg.12 2-11-16 Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0032 (Japan); Oki, Yoshinao [Laboratory of Cell and Tissue Biology, College of Bioresource Sciences, Nihon University, 1866 Kameino, Fujisawa, Kanagawa 252-8510 (Japan); Bono, Hidemasa [Database Center for Life Science (DBCLS), Research Organization of Information and Systems (ROIS), Faculty of Engineering Bldg.12 2-11-16 Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0032 (Japan); Kano, Koichiro, E-mail: kkano@brs.nihon-u.ac.jp [Laboratory of Cell and Tissue Biology, College of Bioresource Sciences, Nihon University, 1866 Kameino, Fujisawa, Kanagawa 252-8510 (Japan)

    2011-04-15

    Highlights: {yields} Adipocyte dedifferentiation is evident in a significant decrease in typical genes. {yields} Cell proliferation is strongly related to adipocyte dedifferentiation. {yields} Dedifferentiated adipocytes express several lineage-specific genes. {yields} Comparative analyses using publicly available datasets boost the interpretation. -- Abstract: Cellular dedifferentiation signifies the withdrawal of cells from a specific differentiated state to a stem cell-like undifferentiated state. However, the mechanism of dedifferentiation remains obscure. Here we performed comparative transcriptome analyses during dedifferentiation in mature adipocytes (MAs) to identify the transcriptional signatures of multipotent dedifferentiated fat (DFAT) cells derived from MAs. Using microarray systems, we explored similarly expressed as well as significantly differentially expressed genes in MAs during dedifferentiation. This analysis revealed significant changes in gene expression during this process, including a significant reduction in expression of genes for lipid metabolism concomitantly with a significant increase in expression of genes for cell movement, cell migration, tissue developmental processes, cell growth, cell proliferation, cell morphogenesis, altered cell shape, and cell differentiation. Our observations indicate that the transcriptional signatures of DFAT cells derived from MAs are summarized in terms of a significant decrease in functional phenotype-related genes and a parallel increase in cell proliferation, altered cell morphology, and regulation of the differentiation of related genes. A better understanding of the mechanisms involved in dedifferentiation may enable scientists to control and possibly alter the plasticity of the differentiated state, which may lead to benefits not only in stem cell research but also in regenerative medicine.

  14. Unusual patterns of immunoglobulin gene rearrangement and expression during human B cell ontogeny: human B cells can simultaneously express cell surface kappa and lambda light chains

    OpenAIRE

    1993-01-01

    Immunoglobulin gene rearrangement during mammalian B cell development generally follows an ordered progression, beginning with heavy (H) chain genes and proceeding through kappa and lambda light (L) chain genes. To determine whether the predicted kappa-->lambda hierarchy was occurring in vitro, we generated Epstein-Barr virus-transformed cell lines from cultures undergoing human pre-B cell differentiation. A total of 143 cell lines were established. 24 expressed cell surface mu/lambda by flow...

  15. Gene expression analysis uncovers novel hedgehog interacting protein (HHIP) effects in human bronchial epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiaobo; Qiu, Weiliang; Sathirapongsasuti, J Fah; Cho, Michael H; Mancini, John D; Lao, Taotao; Thibault, Derek M; Litonjua, Augusto A; Bakke, Per S; Gulsvik, Amund; Lomas, David A; Beaty, Terri H; Hersh, Craig P; Anderson, Christopher; Geigenmuller, Ute; Raby, Benjamin A; Rennard, Stephen I; Perrella, Mark A; Choi, Augustine M K; Quackenbush, John; Silverman, Edwin K

    2013-05-01

    Hedgehog interacting protein (HHIP) was implicated in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) by genome-wide association studies (GWAS). However, it remains unclear how HHIP contributes to COPD pathogenesis. To identify genes regulated by HHIP, we performed gene expression microarray analysis in a human bronchial epithelial cell line (Beas-2B) stably infected with HHIP shRNAs. HHIP silencing led to differential expression of 296 genes; enrichment for variants nominally associated with COPD was found. Eighteen of the differentially expressed genes were validated by real-time PCR in Beas-2B cells. Seven of 11 validated genes tested in human COPD and control lung tissues demonstrated significant gene expression differences. Functional annotation indicated enrichment for extracellular matrix and cell growth genes. Network modeling demonstrated that the extracellular matrix and cell proliferation genes influenced by HHIP tended to be interconnected. Thus, we identified potential HHIP targets in human bronchial epithelial cells that may contribute to COPD pathogenesis.

  16. Musashi1 modulates cell proliferation genes in the medulloblastoma cell line Daoy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hung Jaclyn Y

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Musashi1 (Msi1 is an RNA binding protein with a central role during nervous system development and stem cell maintenance. High levels of Msi1 have been reported in several malignancies including brain tumors thereby associating Msi1 and cancer. Methods We used the human medulloblastoma cell line Daoy as model system in this study to knock down the expression of Msi1 and determine the effects upon soft agar growth and neurophere formation. Quantitative RT-PCR was conducted to evaluate the expression of cell proliferation, differentiation and survival genes in Msi1 depleted Daoy cells. Results We observed that MSI1 expression was elevated in Daoy cells cultured as neurospheres compared to those grown as monolayer. These data indicated that Msi1 might be involved in regulating proliferation in cancer cells. Here we show that shRNA mediated Msi1 depletion in Daoy cells notably impaired their ability to form colonies in soft agar and to grow as neurospheres in culture. Moreover, differential expression of a group of Notch, Hedgehog and Wnt pathway related genes including MYCN, FOS, NOTCH2, SMO, CDKN1A, CCND2, CCND1, and DKK1, was also found in the Msi1 knockdown, demonstrating that Msi1 modulated the expression of a subset of cell proliferation, differentiation and survival genes in Daoy. Conclusion Our data suggested that Msi1 may promote cancer cell proliferation and survival as its loss seems to have a detrimental effect in the maintenance of medulloblastoma cancer cells. In this regard, Msi1 might be a positive regulator of tumor progression and a potential target for therapy.

  17. Single-Cell RNA Sequencing Identifies Extracellular Matrix Gene Expression by Pancreatic Circulating Tumor Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David T. Ting

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Circulating tumor cells (CTCs are shed from primary tumors into the bloodstream, mediating the hematogenous spread of cancer to distant organs. To define their composition, we compared genome-wide expression profiles of CTCs with matched primary tumors in a mouse model of pancreatic cancer, isolating individual CTCs using epitope-independent microfluidic capture, followed by single-cell RNA sequencing. CTCs clustered separately from primary tumors and tumor-derived cell lines, showing low-proliferative signatures, enrichment for the stem-cell-associated gene Aldh1a2, biphenotypic expression of epithelial and mesenchymal markers, and expression of Igfbp5, a gene transcript enriched at the epithelial-stromal interface. Mouse as well as human pancreatic CTCs exhibit a very high expression of stromal-derived extracellular matrix (ECM proteins, including SPARC, whose knockdown in cancer cells suppresses cell migration and invasiveness. The aberrant expression by CTCs of stromal ECM genes points to their contribution of microenvironmental signals for the spread of cancer to distant organs.

  18. Inhibitory Effect of Isoflavones on Prostate Cancer Cells and PTEN Gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Objective To explore the mechanisms by which genistein and daidzein inhibit the growth of prostate cancer cells. Methods LNCaP and PC-3 cells were exposed to genistein and daidzein and cell viability was determined by MTT assay and cytotoxicity of the drugs by LDH test. Flow cytometry (FCM) was used to assess the cell cycle in LNCaP and PC-3 cells.Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was applied to examine the expression of PTEN gene (a tumor suppressor gene), estrogen receptor alpha gene (Erα), estrogen receptor beta gene (Erβ), androgen receptor gene (AR) and vascular endothelial growth factor gene (VEGF). Results The viability of PC-3 and LNCaP cells decreased with increasing concentrations and exposure time of genistein and daidzein. Genistein increased G2/M phase cells in PC-3 cells while decreased S phase cells in LNCaP cells in a dose-dependent manner. Daidzein exerted no influence on the cell cycle of LNCaP and PC-3 cells, but the apoptosis percentage of LNCaP cells was elevated significantly by daidzein. Genistein induced the expression of PTEN gene in PC-3 and LNCaP cells. Daidzein induced the expression of PTEN gene in LNCaP but not in PC-3 cells. The expression of VEGF, Erα and Erβ genes decreased and AR gene was not expressed after incubation with genistein and daidzein in PC-3 cells. In LNCaP cells, the expression of VEGF and AR gene decreased but there was no change in the expression of Erα and Erβ gene after incubation with genistein and daidzein. Conclusion Genistein and daidzein exert a time- and dose-dependent inhibitory effect on PC-3 and LNCaP cells. The down-regulation of ER gene by daidzein influences the growth of PC-3 cells directly. The inhibition of PC-3 cells by genistein and that of LNCaP cells by genistein and daidzein may be via Akt pathway that is repressed by PTEN gene, which subsequently down-regulates the expression of AR and VEGF genes. Our results suggest that the expression of PTEN gene plays a key

  19. Aristaless related homeobox gene, Arx, is implicated in mouse fetal Leydig cell differentiation possibly through expressing in the progenitor cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanako Miyabayashi

    Full Text Available Development of the testis begins with the expression of the SRY gene in pre-Sertoli cells. Soon after, testis cords containing Sertoli and germ cells are formed and fetal Leydig cells subsequently develop in the interstitial space. Studies using knockout mice have indicated that multiple genes encoding growth factors and transcription factors are implicated in fetal Leydig cell differentiation. Previously, we demonstrated that the Arx gene is implicated in this process. However, how ARX regulates Leydig cell differentiation remained unknown. In this study, we examined Arx KO testes and revealed that fetal Leydig cell numbers largely decrease throughout the fetal life. Since our study shows that fetal Leydig cells rarely proliferate, this decrease in the KO testes is thought to be due to defects of fetal Leydig progenitor cells. In sexually indifferent fetal gonads of wild type, ARX was expressed in the coelomic epithelial cells and cells underneath the epithelium as well as cells at the gonad-mesonephros border, both of which have been described to contain progenitors of fetal Leydig cells. After testis differentiation, ARX was expressed in a large population of the interstitial cells but not in fetal Leydig cells, raising the possibility that ARX-positive cells contain fetal Leydig progenitor cells. When examining marker gene expression, we observed cells as if they were differentiating into fetal Leydig cells from the progenitor cells. Based on these results, we propose that ARX acts as a positive factor for differentiation of fetal Leydig cells through functioning at the progenitor stage.

  20. Frequent mutations of genes encoding ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis pathway components in clear cell renal cell carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guo, Guangwu; Gui, Yaoting; Gao, Shengjie;

    2012-01-01

    We sequenced whole exomes of ten clear cell renal cell carcinomas (ccRCCs) and performed a screen of similar to 1,100 genes in 88 additional ccRCCs, from which we discovered 12 previously unidentified genes mutated at elevated frequencies in ccRCC. Notably, we detected frequent mutations in the u......We sequenced whole exomes of ten clear cell renal cell carcinomas (ccRCCs) and performed a screen of similar to 1,100 genes in 88 additional ccRCCs, from which we discovered 12 previously unidentified genes mutated at elevated frequencies in ccRCC. Notably, we detected frequent mutations...

  1. A novel gene delivery system for mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Brian; Duffy, Angela M; Gould Fogerite, Susan; Krause-Elsmore, Sara; Lu, Ruying; Shang, Gaofeng; Chen, Zi-Wei; Mannino, Raphael J; Bouchier-Hayes, David J; Harmey, Judith H

    2004-01-01

    Although gene therapy holds great promise for the treatment of both acquired and genetic diseases, its development has been limited by practical considerations. Non-viral efficacy of delivery remains quite poor. We are investigating the feasibility of a novel lipid-based delivery system, cochleates, to deliver transgenes to mammalian cells. Rhodamine-labelled empty cochleates were incubated with two cell-lines (4T1 adenocarcinoma and H36.12 macrophage hybridoma) and primary macrophages in vitro and in vivo. Cochleates containing green fluorescent protein (GFP) expression plasmid were incubated with 4T1 adenocarcinoma cells. Cellular uptake of labelled cochleates or transgene GFP expression were visualised with fluorescence microscopy. 4T1 and H36.12 lines showed 39% and 23.1% uptake of rhodamine-cochleates, respectively. Human monocyte-derived macrophages and mouse peritoneal macrophages had 48+/-5.38% and 51.46+/-15.6% uptake of rhodamine-cochleates in vitro. In vivo 25.69+/-0.127% of peritoneal macrophages were rhodamine-positive after intra-peritoneal injection of rhodamine-cochleates. 19.49+/-10.12% of 4T1 cells expressed GFP. Cochleates may therefore be an effective, non-toxic and non-immunogenic method to introduce transgenes in vitro and in vivo.

  2. Bach2 represses plasma cell gene regulatory network in B cells to promote antibody class switch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muto, Akihiko; Ochiai, Kyoko; Kimura, Yoshitaka; Itoh-Nakadai, Ari; Calame, Kathryn L; Ikebe, Dai; Tashiro, Satoshi; Igarashi, Kazuhiko

    2010-12-01

    Two transcription factors, Pax5 and Blimp-1, form a gene regulatory network (GRN) with a double-negative loop, which defines either B-cell (Pax5 high) or plasma cell (Blimp-1 high) status as a binary switch. However, it is unclear how this B-cell GRN registers class switch DNA recombination (CSR), an event that takes place before the terminal differentiation to plasma cells. In the absence of Bach2 encoding a transcription factor required for CSR, mouse splenic B cells more frequently and rapidly expressed Blimp-1 and differentiated to IgM plasma cells as compared with wild-type cells. Genetic loss of Blimp-1 in Bach2(-/-) B cells was sufficient to restore CSR. These data with mathematical modelling of the GRN indicate that Bach2 achieves a time delay in Blimp-1 induction, which inhibits plasma cell differentiation and promotes CSR (Delay-Driven Diversity model for CSR). Reduction in mature B-cell numbers in Bach2(-/-) mice was not rescued by Blimp-1 ablation, indicating that Bach2 regulates B-cell differentiation and function through Blimp-1-dependent and -independent GRNs.

  3. CD133-targeted gene transfer into long-term repopulating hematopoietic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brendel, Christian; Goebel, Benjamin; Daniela, Abriss; Brugman, Martijn; Kneissl, Sabrina; Schwäble, Joachim; Kaufmann, Kerstin B; Müller-Kuller, Uta; Kunkel, Hana; Chen-Wichmann, Linping; Abel, Tobias; Serve, Hubert; Bystrykh, Leonid; Buchholz, Christian J; Grez, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Gene therapy for hematological disorders relies on the genetic modification of CD34(+) cells, a heterogeneous cell population containing about 0.01% long-term repopulating cells. Here, we show that the lentiviral vector CD133-LV, which uses a surface marker on human primitive hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) as entry receptor, transfers genes preferentially into cells with high engraftment capability. Transduction of unstimulated CD34(+) cells with CD133-LV resulted in gene marking of cells with competitive proliferative advantage in vitro and in immunodeficient mice. The CD133-LV-transduced population contained significantly more cells with repopulating capacity than cells transduced with vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV)-LV, a lentiviral vector pseudotyped with the vesicular stomatitis virus G protein. Upon transfer of a barcode library, CD133-LV-transduced cells sustained gene marking in vivo for a prolonged period of time with a 6.7-fold higher recovery of barcodes compared to transduced control cells. Moreover, CD133-LV-transduced cells were capable of repopulating secondary recipients. Lastly, we show that this targeting strategy can be used for transfer of a therapeutic gene into CD34(+) cells obtained from patients suffering of X-linked chronic granulomatous disease. In conclusion, direct gene transfer into CD133(+) cells allows for sustained long-term engraftment of gene corrected cells.

  4. Inferring single-cell gene expression mechanisms using stochastic simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daigle, Bernie J.; Soltani, Mohammad; Petzold, Linda R.; Singh, Abhyudai

    2015-01-01

    Motivation: Stochastic promoter switching between transcriptionally active (ON) and inactive (OFF) states is a major source of noise in gene expression. It is often implicitly assumed that transitions between promoter states are memoryless, i.e. promoters spend an exponentially distributed time interval in each of the two states. However, increasing evidence suggests that promoter ON/OFF times can be non-exponential, hinting at more complex transcriptional regulatory architectures. Given the essential role of gene expression in all cellular functions, efficient computational techniques for characterizing promoter architectures are critically needed. Results: We have developed a novel model reduction for promoters with arbitrary numbers of ON and OFF states, allowing us to approximate complex promoter switching behavior with Weibull-distributed ON/OFF times. Using this model reduction, we created bursty Monte Carlo expectation-maximization with modified cross-entropy method (‘bursty MCEM2’), an efficient parameter estimation and model selection technique for inferring the number and configuration of promoter states from single-cell gene expression data. Application of bursty MCEM2 to data from the endogenous mouse glutaminase promoter reveals nearly deterministic promoter OFF times, consistent with a multi-step activation mechanism consisting of 10 or more inactive states. Our novel approach to modeling promoter fluctuations together with bursty MCEM2 provides powerful tools for characterizing transcriptional bursting across genes under different environmental conditions. Availability and implementation: R source code implementing bursty MCEM2 is available upon request. Contact: absingh@udel.edu Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:25573914

  5. Association Mapping of Cell Wall Synthesis Regulatory Genes and Cell Wall Quality in Switchgrass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartley, Laura [Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States). Dept. of Microbiology and Plant Biology; Wu, Y. [Oklahoma State Univ., Stillwater, OK (United States); Zhu, L. [Oklahoma State Univ., Stillwater, OK (United States); Brummer, E. C. [Noble Foundation, Ardmore, OK (United States); Saha, M. [Noble Foundation, Ardmore, OK (United States)

    2016-05-31

    Inefficient conversion of biomass to biofuels is one of the main barriers for biofuel production from such materials. Approximately half of polysaccharides in biomass remain unused by typical biochemical conversion methods. Conversion efficiency is influenced by the composition and structure of cell walls of biomass. Grasses such as wheat, maize, and rice, as well as dedicated perennial bioenergy crops, like switchgrass, make up ~55% of biomass that can be produced in the United States. Grass cell walls have a different composition and patterning compared with dicotyledonous plants, including the well-studied model plant, Arabidopsis. This project identified genetic determinants of cell wall composition in grasses using both naturally occurring genetic variation of switchgrass and gene network reconstruction and functional assays in rice. In addition, the project linked functional data in rice and other species to switchgrass improvement efforts through curation of the most abundant class of regulators in the switchgrass genome. Characterizing natural diversity of switchgrass for variation in cell wall composition and properties, also known as quality, provides an unbiased avenue for identifying biologically viable diversity in switchgrass cell walls. To characterizing natural diversity, this project generated cell wall composition and enzymatic deconstruction data for ~450 genotypes of the Switchgrass Southern Association Collection (SSAC), a diverse collection composed of 36 switchgrass accessions from the southern U.S. distribution of switchgrass. Comparing these data with other measures of cell wall quality for the same samples demonstrated the complementary nature of the diverse characterization platforms now being used for biomass characterization. Association of the composition data with ~3.2K single nucleotide variant markers identified six significant single nucleotide variant markers co-associated with digestibility and another compositional trait. These

  6. Multimodality imaging of reporter gene expression using a novel fusion vector in living cells and animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gambhir; Sanjiv , Pritha; Ray

    2009-04-28

    Novel double and triple fusion reporter gene constructs harboring distinct imageable reporter genes are provided, as well as applications for the use of such double and triple fusion constructs in living cells and in living animals using distinct imaging technologies.

  7. Analysis of target genes induced by IL-13 cytotoxin in human glioblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jing; Yang, Liming; Puri, Raj K

    2005-03-01

    IL-13 cytotoxin comprised of IL-13 and a mutated form of Pseudomonas exotoxin (fusion protein termed IL-13-PE38QQR) has been shown to inhibit protein synthesis leading to necrotic and apoptotic cell death in glioblastoma cells that express high levels of interleukin-13 receptors (IL-13R). To identify target genes of cell death and other cellular genes with IL-13 receptors in glioblastoma cells, we utilized the cDNA microarrays to analyze global gene expression profiles after IL-13 cytotoxin and IL-13 treatment. IL-13 cytotoxin mediated cytotoxicity to U251 cells in a dose-dependent manner. Hierarchical cluster analysis of differentially expressed genes in U251 glioma cells at different time points after IL-13 cytotoxin treatment showed three major groups, each representing a specific expression pattern. Randomly selected differentially expressed genes from each group were confirmed by RT-PCR analysis. Most down-regulated genes belong to cell adhesion, motility, angiogenesis, DNA repair, and metabolic pathways. While up-regulated genes belong to cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, signaling and various metabolic pathways. Unexpectedly, at early time points, both IL-13 and IL-13 cytotoxin induced several genes belonging to different pathways most notably IL-8, DIO2, END1, and ALDH1A3 indicating that these genes are early response genes and their products may be associated with IL-13R. In addition, IL-13 cytotoxin induced IL-13Ralpha2 mRNA expression during the treatment in glioma cells. Our results indicate that novel cellular genes are involved with IL-13 receptors and that IL-13 cytotoxin induced cell death involves various target genes in human glioblastoma cells. On going studies will determine the role of associated genes and their products in the IL-13R functions in glioma cells.

  8. The association of killer cell immunoglobulin like receptor gene polylmorphism with cytomegalovirus infection after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴小津

    2013-01-01

    Objective To explore the influence of the killer cell immunoglobulin like receptor(KIR)gene polymorphism on cytomegalovirus(CMV)infection and pathogenesis after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation(HSCT)

  9. Silencing of Taxol-Sensitizer Genes in Cancer Cells: Lack of Sensitization Effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Shang-Lang [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, Taoyuan 333, Taiwan (China); Chao, Chuck C.-K., E-mail: cckchao@mail.cgu.edu.tw [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, Taoyuan 333, Taiwan (China); Graduate Institute of Biomedical Sciences, College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, Taoyuan 333, Taiwan (China); Department of Medical Research and Development, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taoyuan 333, Taiwan (China)

    2015-06-16

    A previous genome-wide screening analysis identified a panel of genes that sensitize the human non-small-cell lung carcinoma cell line NCI-H1155 to taxol. However, whether the identified genes sensitize other cancer cells to taxol has not been examined. Here, we silenced the taxol-sensitizer genes identified (acrbp, atp6v0d2, fgd4, hs6st2, psma6, and tubgcp2) in nine other cancer cell types (including lung, cervical, ovarian, and hepatocellular carcinoma cell lines) that showed reduced cell viability in the presence of a sub-lethal concentration of taxol. Surprisingly, none of the genes studied increased sensitivity to taxol in the tested panel of cell lines. As observed in H1155 cells, SKOV3 cells displayed induction of five of the six genes studied in response to a cell killing dose of taxol. The other cell types were much less responsive to taxol. Notably, four of the five inducible taxol-sensitizer genes tested (acrbp, atp6v0d2, psma6, and tubgcp2) were upregulated in a taxol-resistant ovarian cancer cell line. These results indicate that the previously identified taxol-sensitizer loci are not conserved genetic targets involved in inhibiting cell proliferation in response to taxol. Our findings also suggest that regulation of taxol-sensitizer genes by taxol may be critical for acquired cell resistance to the drug.

  10. 75 FR 54351 - Cell and Gene Therapy Clinical Trials in Pediatric Populations; Public Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-07

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Cell and Gene Therapy Clinical Trials in Pediatric... public workshop entitled ``Cell and Gene Therapy Clinical Trials in Pediatric Populations.'' The purpose... therapy clinical researchers, and other stakeholders regarding best practices related to cell and...

  11. Gene set enrichment analysis and ingenuity pathway analysis of metastatic clear cell renal cell carcinoma cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Mohammed I; Dębski, Konrad J; Dabrowski, Michał; Czarnecka, Anna M; Szczylik, Cezary

    2016-08-01

    In recent years, genome-wide RNA expression analysis has become a routine tool that offers a great opportunity to study and understand the key role of genes that contribute to carcinogenesis. Various microarray platforms and statistical approaches can be used to identify genes that might serve as prognostic biomarkers and be developed as antitumor therapies in the future. Metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) is a serious, life-threatening disease, and there are few treatment options for patients. In this study, we performed one-color microarray gene expression (4×44K) analysis of the mRCC cell line Caki-1 and the healthy kidney cell line ASE-5063. A total of 1,921 genes were differentially expressed in the Caki-1 cell line (1,023 upregulated and 898 downregulated). Gene Set Enrichment Analysis (GSEA) and Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) approaches were used to analyze the differential-expression data. The objective of this research was to identify complex biological changes that occur during metastatic development using Caki-1 as a model mRCC cell line. Our data suggest that there are multiple deregulated pathways associated with metastatic clear cell renal cell carcinoma (mccRCC), including integrin-linked kinase (ILK) signaling, leukocyte extravasation signaling, IGF-I signaling, CXCR4 signaling, and phosphoinositol 3-kinase/AKT/mammalian target of rapamycin signaling. The IPA upstream analysis predicted top transcriptional regulators that are either activated or inhibited, such as estrogen receptors, TP53, KDM5B, SPDEF, and CDKN1A. The GSEA approach was used to further confirm enriched pathway data following IPA.

  12. The human desmin promoter drives robust gene expression for skeletal muscle stem cell-mediated gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonuschies, Jacqueline; Antoniou, Michael; Waddington, Simon; Boldrin, Luisa; Muntoni, Francesco; Thrasher, Adrian; Morgan, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    Lentiviral vectors (LVs) represent suitable candidates to mediate gene therapy for muscular dystrophies as they infect dividing and non-dividing cells and integrate their genetic material into the host genome, thereby theoretically mediating longterm expression. We evaluated the ability of LVs where a GFP reporter gene was under the control of five different promoters, to transduce and mediate expression in myogenic and non-myogenic cells in vitro and in skeletal muscle fibres and stem (satellite) cells in vivo. We further analysed lentivirally-transduced satellite cell-derived myoblasts following their transplantation into dystrophic, immunodeficient mouse muscles. The spleen focus-forming virus promoter mediated the highest gene expression in all cell types; the CBX3-HNRPA2B1 ubiquitously-acting chromatin opening element (UCOE) promoter was also active in all cells, whereas the human desmin promoter in isolation or fused with UCOE had lower activity in non-muscle cells. Surprisingly, the human skeletal muscle actin promoter was also active in immune cells. The human desmin promoter mediated robust, persistent reporter gene expression in myogenic cells in vitro, and satellite cells and muscle fibres in vivo. The human desmin promoter combined with UCOE did not significantly increase transgene expression. Therefore, our data indicate that the desmin promoter is suitable for the development of therapeutic purposes.

  13. Effects of navelbine and docetaxel on gene expression in lung cancer cell strains

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li CAI; Hai-ying DONG; Guang-jie SUI

    2005-01-01

    Aim: To search genes sensitivity to the anti-cancer drugs navelbine (NVB) and docetaxel (DOC) in small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) and non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell strains. Methods: The sensitivity of 4 strains of SCLC and 6 strains of NSCLC to NVB and DOC was evaluated using the MTT assay. The expression of 1291 sensitive-related genes to the anti-cancer drugs in 10 lung cancer cell strains was measured using cDNA macroarrays and the relationship was analyzed.Results: In total, there were 56 (r≥0.4) genes sensitive to NVB and DOC. For NVB: 36 genes were sensitive to NVB, 20 co-expressed genes between the SCLC+NSCLC set and the NSCLC set; 27 expressed genes and 7 specially expressed genes in the SCLC+NSCLC set; and 29 expressed genes and 9 specially expressed genes in the NSCLC set. For DOC, 50 genes were sensitive to DOC, 12co-expressed genes between the SCLC+NSCLC set and the NSCLC set; 24expressed genes and 12 specially expressed genes in the SCLC+NSCLC set; and 38 expressed genes and 26 specially expressed genes in the NSCLC set. The genes sensitive to NVB and DOC in lung-cancer cell stains were mainly divided into the following 4 categories: signal transduction molecules, cell factors, transcription factors and metabolism-related enzymes and inhibitors. Conclusions:There were obvious differences in genes related to NVB and DOC between SCLC and NSCLC cell strains, but the same as categories of function.

  14. EXPRESSION OF T CELL RECEPTOR Vα GENE FAMILIES IN INTRATHYROIDAL T CELLS OF CHINESE PATIENTS WITH GRAVES' DISEASE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Objective. Patients with Graves' disease (GD) have marked lymphocytic infiltration in their thyroid glands. We examined the gene for the variable regions of the α-chain of the Chinese T-cell receptor( Vα gene) in intrathyroidal Tcells to determine the role of T cells in the pathogenesis of GD and offer potential for the development of immunothera-peutic remedies for GD. Methods. We used the reverse transcription and polymerase chain reaction(RT-PCR) to amplify complementary DNA(cDNA) for the 18 known families of the Vα gene in intrathyroidal T cells from 5 patients with Graves' disease.The findings were compared with the results of peripheral blood T cells in the same patients as well as those in normalsubjects. Results. We found that marked restriction in the expression of T cell receptor Vα genes by T cells from the thyroidtissue of Chinese patients with GD(P < 0.001). An average of only 4.6 ± 1.52 of the 18 Vα genes were expressed insuch samples, as compared with 10.4 ± 2.30Vα genes expressed in peripheral blood T cells from the same patients.The pattem of expressed Vα genes differed from patient to patient with no clear predominance. Condusions. Expression of intrathyroidal T cell receptor Vα genes in GD is highly restricted suggesting the prima-cy of T cells in causing the disorders.

  15. An in situ hybridization-based screen for heterogeneously expressed genes in mouse ES cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Mark G; Stagg, Carole A; Falco, Geppino; Yoshikawa, Toshiyuki; Bassey, Uwem C; Aiba, Kazuhiro; Sharova, Lioudmila V; Shaik, Nabeebi; Ko, Minoru S H

    2008-02-01

    We previously reported that Zscan4 showed heterogeneous expression patterns in mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells. To identify genes that show similar expression patterns, we carried out high-throughput in situ hybridization assays on ES cell cultures for 244 genes. Most of the genes are involved in transcriptional regulation, and were selected using microarray-based comparisons of gene expression profiles in ES and embryonal carcinoma (EC) cells versus differentiated cell types. Pou5f1 (Oct4, Oct3/4) and Krt8 (EndoA) were used as controls. Hybridization signals were detected on ES cell colonies for 147 genes (60%). The majority (136 genes) of them showed relatively homogeneous expression in ES cell colonies. However, we found that two genes unequivocally showed Zscan4-like spotted expression pattern (spot-in-colony pattern; Whsc2 and Rhox9). We also found that nine genes showed relatively heterogeneous expression pattern (mosaic-in-colony pattern: Zfp42/Rex1, Rest, Atf4, Pa2g4, E2f2, Nanog, Dppa3/Pgc7/Stella, Esrrb, and Fscn1). Among these genes, Zfp42/Rex1 showed unequivocally heterogeneous expression in individual ES cells prepared by the CytoSpin. These results show the presence of different types or states of cells within ES cell cultures otherwise thought to be undifferentiated and homogeneous, suggesting a previously unappreciated complexity in ES cell cultures.

  16. Cilia-Associated Genes Play Differing Roles in Aminoglycoside-Induced Hair Cell Death in Zebrafish

    OpenAIRE

    Stawicki, Tamara M.; Hernandez, Liana; Esterberg, Robert; Linbo, Tor; Owens, Kelly N.; Shah, Arish N.; Thapa, Nihal; Roberts, Brock; Cecilia B. Moens; Rubel, Edwin W; Raible, David W.

    2016-01-01

    Hair cells possess a single primary cilium, called the kinocilium, early in development. While the kinocilium is lost in auditory hair cells of most species it is maintained in vestibular hair cells. It has generally been believed that the primary role of the kinocilium and cilia-associated genes in hair cells is in the establishment of the polarity of actin-based stereocilia, the hair cell mechanotransduction apparatus. Through genetic screening and testing of candidate genes in zebrafish (D...

  17. Identification of Suitable Reference Genes for Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cell Subset Studies in Multiple Sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oturai, D B; Søndergaard, H B; Börnsen, L;

    2016-01-01

    Quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) involves the need of a proper standard for normalizing the gene expression data. Different studies have shown the validity of reference genes to vary greatly depending on tissue, cell subsets and experimental context. This study aimed at the identification...... of suitable reference genes for qPCR studies using different peripheral blood cell subsets (whole blood (WB) cells, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and PBMC subsets (CD4(+) T cells, CD8(+) T cells, NK cells, monocytes, B cells and dendritic cells) from healthy controls (HC), patients with relapsing...... stable combination for analyses of cell subsets between HC and RRMS patients, while the combination of UBC and YWHAZ was superior for analysis of cell subsets between HC, RRMS and RRMS-IFN-β groups. GAPDH was generally unsuitable for blood cell subset studies in multiple sclerosis. In conclusion, we...

  18. Bacterial toxin-antitoxin gene system as containment control in yeast cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristoffersen, P.; Jensen, G. B.; Gerdes, K.;

    2000-01-01

    The potential of a bacterial toxin-antitoxin gene system for use in containment control in eukaryotes was explored. The Escherichia coli relE and relB genes were expressed in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Expression of the relE gene was highly toxic to yeast cells. However, expression...... of the relB gene counteracted the effect of relE to some extent, suggesting that toxin-antitoxin interaction also occurs in S. cerevisiae, Thus, bacterial toxin-antitoxin gene systems also have potential applications in the control of cell proliferation in eukaryotic cells, especially in those industrial...

  19. Circadian Clock Genes Modulate Human Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cell Differentiation, Migration and Cell Cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boucher, Helene; Vanneaux, Valerie; Domet, Thomas; Parouchev, Alexandre; Larghero, Jerome

    2016-01-01

    Many of the components that regulate the circadian clock have been identified in organisms and humans. The influence of circadian rhythm (CR) on the regulation of stem cells biology began to be evaluated. However, little is known on the role of CR on human mesenchymal stem cell (hMSCs) properties. The objective of this study was to investigate the influence of CR on the differentiation capacities of bone marrow hMSCs, as well as the regulation of cell cycle and migration capabilities. To that, we used both a chemical approach with a GSK-3β specific inhibitor (2'E,3'Z-6-bromoindirubin-3'-oxime, BIO) and a knockdown of CLOCK and PER2, two of the main genes involved in CR regulation. In these experimental conditions, a dramatic inhibition of adipocyte differentiation was observed, while osteoblastic differentiation capacities were not modified. In addition, cell migration was decreased in PER2-/- cells. Lastly, downregulation of circadian clock genes induced a modification of the hMSCs cell cycle phase distribution, which was shown to be related to a change of the cyclin expression profile. Taken together, these data showed that CR plays a role in the regulation of hMSCs differentiation and division, and likely represent key factor in maintaining hMSCs properties.

  20. Gene delivery to mice spermatogenic stem cells by EffecteneTM reagent

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈晓光; 王宁; 姚纪花; 陈浩明; 沈琦; 薛京伦

    2004-01-01

    @@ Spermatogenic (stem) cells, or spermatogonial stem cells, are the only cell type in postnatal mammals, which have the capability to self-renew and to contribute geneticinformation to the next generation. The manipulation of spermatogenic cells and the modification of their genomes have great significance for the treatment of male sterility,for gene therapy via germ cells, as well as for building transgenic animal models. 1 In this assay, we analyzed the efficiency of EffecteneTM reagent-mediated gene transfection into spermatogenic cells. The effect of transplants with different time schedules on transfection efficiency and on gene expression was also investigated.

  1. Validation of endogenous normalizing genes for expression analyses in adult human testis and germ cell neoplasms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svingen, T; Jørgensen, Anne; Rajpert-De Meyts, E

    2014-01-01

    The measurement of gene expression levels in cells and tissues typically depends on a suitable point of reference for inferring biological relevance. For quantitative (or real-time) RT-PCR assays, the method of choice is often to normalize gene expression data to an endogenous gene that is stably...... expressed across the samples analysed: a so-called normalizing or housekeeping gene. Although this is a valid strategy, the identification of stable normalizing genes has proved challenging and a gene showing stable expression across all cells or tissues is unlikely to exist. Therefore, it is necessary...

  2. Burkitt's lymphoma is a malignancy of mature B cells expressing somatically mutated V region genes.

    OpenAIRE

    Klein, U.; Klein, G.; Ehlin-Henriksson, B.; Rajewsky, K.; Küppers, R.

    1995-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The developmental stage from which stems the malignant B cell population in Burkitt's lymphoma (BL) is unclear. An approach to answering this question is provided by the sequence analysis of rear-ranged immunoglobulin (Ig) variable region (V) genes from BL for evidence of somatic mutations, together with a phenotypic characterization. As somatic hypermutation of Ig V region genes occurs in germinal center B cells, somatically mutated Ig genes are found in germinal center B cells a...

  3. Cell-Specific Promoters Enable Lipid-Based Nanoparticles to Deliver Genes to Specific Cells of the Retina In Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuhong; Rajala, Ammaji; Cao, Binrui; Ranjo-Bishop, Michelle; Agbaga, Martin-Paul; Mao, Chuanbin; Rajala, Raju V S

    2016-01-01

    Non-viral vectors, such as lipid-based nanoparticles (liposome-protamine-DNA complex [LPD]), could be used to deliver a functional gene to the retina to correct visual function and treat blindness. However, one of the limitations of LPD is the lack of cell specificity, as the retina is composed of seven types of cells. If the same gene is expressed in multiple cell types or is absent from one desired cell type, LPD-mediated gene delivery to every cell may have off-target effects. To circumvent this problem, we have tested LPD-mediated gene delivery using various generalized, modified, and retinal cell-specific promoters. We achieved retinal pigment epithelium cell specificity with vitelliform macular dystrophy (VMD2), rod cell specificity with mouse rhodopsin, cone cell specificity with red/green opsin, and ganglion cell specificity with thymocyte antigen promoters. Here we show for the first time that cell-specific promoters enable lipid-based nanoparticles to deliver genes to specific cells of the retina in vivo. This work will inspire investigators in the field of lipid nanotechnology to couple cell-specific promoters to drive expression in a cell- and tissue-specific manner.

  4. Evidence for the multicentric origin of the sickle cell hemoglobin gene in Africa.

    OpenAIRE

    Pagnier, J.; Mears, J G; Dunda-Belkhodja, O; Schaefer-Rego, K E; Beldjord, C; Nagel, R L; Labie, D

    1984-01-01

    Previous studies of the Hpa I cleavage site-sickle cell hemoglobin gene linkage in various African populations suggested that the sickle gene arose independently more than once. In the present study we have performed restriction endonuclease haplotype analysis for the beta-globin-like gene cluster from four separate geographic areas in Africa, all of which possess the sickle gene. In Benin (Central West Africa) and Algeria (Arab North Africa) all chromosomes carrying the sickle gene possess a...

  5. Effects of emodin on gene expression profile in small cell lung cancer NCI-H446 cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FU Zhong-yan; HAN Jin-xiang; HUANG Hai-yan

    2007-01-01

    Background The treatment of patients with small cell lung cancer (SCLC) is based on chemotherapy. However, the treatment is limited by the development of drug resistance. Emodin has been shown to exhibit an anti-cancer effect. But the molecular mechanism remains unclear. This study was conducted to investigate the effect of emodin on the gene expression profile changes in SCLC NCI-H446 cells.Methods NCI-H446 cells were treated with emodin and cell viability was determined by MTT assay. Cell apoptosis was determined by both flow cytometry and caspase-3 activity assay. The effect of emodin on the gene expression profile of NCI-H446 cells was analyzed using cDNA microarray. Semi-quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was used to validate the microarray results.Results Emodin suppressed viability, induced apoptosis and changed cell cycle of NCI-H446 cells. Among the 1262 genes, 10 genes were up-regulated and 8 genes were down-regulated more than 2 folds in NCI-H446 cells when compared with the control cells after treatment with emodin for 12 hours, while 12 genes were up-regulated and 24 genes were down-regulated after treatment with emodin for 24 hours. These genes were involved in metabolism, signal transduction, transcription regulation, cytoskeleton organization, immune response, transport, protein synthesis, cell cycle control, cell adhesion and RNA processing. The RT-PCR results were consistent with those obtained by the microarray.Conclusions Emodin affects the expression of genes involved in various cellular functions and plays important roles in cell apoptosis, tumor metastasis and chemotherapy-resistance, which suggests emodin might become an effective chemopreventive or chemotherapeutic agent for SCLC.

  6. Meta-analysis of differentiating mouse embryonic stem cell gene expression kinetics reveals early change of a small gene set.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clive H Glover

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Stem cell differentiation involves critical changes in gene expression. Identification of these should provide endpoints useful for optimizing stem cell propagation as well as potential clues about mechanisms governing stem cell maintenance. Here we describe the results of a new meta-analysis methodology applied to multiple gene expression datasets from three mouse embryonic stem cell (ESC lines obtained at specific time points during the course of their differentiation into various lineages. We developed methods to identify genes with expression changes that correlated with the altered frequency of functionally defined, undifferentiated ESC in culture. In each dataset, we computed a novel statistical confidence measure for every gene which captured the certainty that a particular gene exhibited an expression pattern of interest within that dataset. This permitted a joint analysis of the datasets, despite the different experimental designs. Using a ranking scheme that favored genes exhibiting patterns of interest, we focused on the top 88 genes whose expression was consistently changed when ESC were induced to differentiate. Seven of these (103728_at, 8430410A17Rik, Klf2, Nr0b1, Sox2, Tcl1, and Zfp42 showed a rapid decrease in expression concurrent with a decrease in frequency of undifferentiated cells and remained predictive when evaluated in additional maintenance and differentiating protocols. Through a novel meta-analysis, this study identifies a small set of genes whose expression is useful for identifying changes in stem cell frequencies in cultures of mouse ESC. The methods and findings have broader applicability to understanding the regulation of self-renewal of other stem cell types.

  7. Forced expression of the Oct-4 gene influences differentiation of embryonic stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    By transfecting an Oct-4 expression plasmid into embryonic stem cells (ES cells), the ES-O cell line was constructed, which sustained the expression of Oct-4 gene when induced by retinoic acid. Forced expression of Oct-4 gene could not sustain the stem property of ES-O cells without the differentiation inhibiting factor LIF, but if LIF exists,forced expression of Oct-4 gene could enhance the ability to sustain the undifferentiation state and inhibit cell differentiation induced by retinoic acid. It was indicated that Oct-4 must cooperate with LIF to sustain the undifferentiation state of ES cells. During the cell differentiation, ES-O cells tend to differentiate into neural cells, suggesting that forced expression of Oct-4 gene may be in relation with the differentiation of neuroderm.

  8. Time- and dose-dependent effects of curcumin on gene expression in human colon cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Erk Marjan J

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Curcumin is a spice and a coloring food compound with a promising role in colon cancer prevention. Curcumin protects against development of colon tumors in rats treated with a colon carcinogen, in colon cancer cells curcumin can inhibit cell proliferation and induce apoptosis, it is an anti-oxidant and it can act as an anti-inflammatory agent. The aim of this study was to elucidate mechanisms and effect of curcumin in colon cancer cells using gene expression profiling. Methods Gene expression changes in response to curcumin exposure were studied in two human colon cancer cell lines, using cDNA microarrays with four thousand human genes. HT29 cells were exposed to two different concentrations of curcumin and gene expression changes were followed in time (3, 6, 12, 24 and 48 hours. Gene expression changes after short-term exposure (3 or 6 hours to curcumin were also studied in a second cell type, Caco-2 cells. Results Gene expression changes (>1.5-fold were found at all time points. HT29 cells were more sensitive to curcumin than Caco-2 cells. Early response genes were involved in cell cycle, signal transduction, DNA repair, gene transcription, cell adhesion and xenobiotic metabolism. In HT29 cells curcumin modulated a number of cell cycle genes of which several have a role in transition through the G2/M phase. This corresponded to a cell cycle arrest in the G2/M phase as was observed by flow cytometry. Functional groups with a similar expression profile included genes involved in phase-II metabolism that were induced by curcumin after 12 and 24 hours. Expression of some cytochrome P450 genes was downregulated by curcumin in HT29 and Caco-2 cells. In addition, curcumin affected expression of metallothionein genes, tubulin genes, p53 and other genes involved in colon carcinogenesis. Conclusions This study has extended knowledge on pathways or processes already reported to be affected by curcumin (cell cycle arrest, phase

  9. Reconstruction of gene regulatory modules in cancer cell cycle by multi-source data integration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuji Zhang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Precise regulation of the cell cycle is crucial to the growth and development of all organisms. Understanding the regulatory mechanism of the cell cycle is crucial to unraveling many complicated diseases, most notably cancer. Multiple sources of biological data are available to study the dynamic interactions among many genes that are related to the cancer cell cycle. Integrating these informative and complementary data sources can help to infer a mutually consistent gene transcriptional regulatory network with strong similarity to the underlying gene regulatory relationships in cancer cells. RESULTS AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We propose an integrative framework that infers gene regulatory modules from the cell cycle of cancer cells by incorporating multiple sources of biological data, including gene expression profiles, gene ontology, and molecular interaction. Among 846 human genes with putative roles in cell cycle regulation, we identified 46 transcription factors and 39 gene ontology groups. We reconstructed regulatory modules to infer the underlying regulatory relationships. Four regulatory network motifs were identified from the interaction network. The relationship between each transcription factor and predicted target gene groups was examined by training a recurrent neural network whose topology mimics the network motif(s to which the transcription factor was assigned. Inferred network motifs related to eight well-known cell cycle genes were confirmed by gene set enrichment analysis, binding site enrichment analysis, and comparison with previously published experimental results. CONCLUSIONS: We established a robust method that can accurately infer underlying relationships between a given transcription factor and its downstream target genes by integrating different layers of biological data. Our method could also be beneficial to biologists for predicting the components of regulatory modules in which any candidate gene is involved

  10. Mesenchymal stromal cells retrovirally transduced with prodrug-converting genes are suitable vehicles for cancer gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ďuriniková, E; Kučerová, L; Matúšková, M

    2014-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSC) possess a set of several fairly unique properties which make them ideally suitable both for cellular therapies and regenerative medicine. These include: relative ease of isolation, the ability to differentiate along mesenchymal and non-mesenchymal lineages in vitro and the ability to be extensively expanded in culture without a loss of differentiative capacity. MSC are not only hypoimmunogenic, but they mediate immunosuppression upon transplantation, and possess pronounced anti-inflammatory properties. They are able to home to damaged tissues, tumors, and metastases following systemic administration. The ability of homing holds big promise for tumor-targeted delivery of therapeutic agents. Viruses are naturally evolved vehicles efficiently transferring their genes into host cells. This ability made them suitable for engineering vector systems for the delivery of genes of interest. MSC can be retrovirally transduced with genes encoding prodrug-converting genes (suicide genes), which are not toxic per se, but catalyze the formation of highly toxic metabolites following the application of a nontoxic prodrug. The homing ability of MSC holds advantages compared to virus vehicles which display many shortcomings in effective delivery of the therapeutic agents. Gene therapies mediated by viruses are limited by their restricted ability to track cancer cells infiltrating into the surrounding tissue, and by their low migratory capacity towards tumor. Thus combination of cellular therapy and gene delivery is an attractive option - it protects the vector from immune surveillance, and supports targeted delivery of a therapeutic gene/protein to the tumor site.

  11. Gene expression profiling in multipotent DFAT cells derived from mature adipocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ono, Hiromasa; Oki, Yoshinao; Bono, Hidemasa; Kano, Koichiro

    2011-04-15

    Cellular dedifferentiation signifies the withdrawal of cells from a specific differentiated state to a stem cell-like undifferentiated state. However, the mechanism of dedifferentiation remains obscure. Here we performed comparative transcriptome analyses during dedifferentiation in mature adipocytes (MAs) to identify the transcriptional signatures of multipotent dedifferentiated fat (DFAT) cells derived from MAs. Using microarray systems, we explored similarly expressed as well as significantly differentially expressed genes in MAs during dedifferentiation. This analysis revealed significant changes in gene expression during this process, including a significant reduction in expression of genes for lipid metabolism concomitantly with a significant increase in expression of genes for cell movement, cell migration, tissue developmental processes, cell growth, cell proliferation, cell morphogenesis, altered cell shape, and cell differentiation. Our observations indicate that the transcriptional signatures of DFAT cells derived from MAs are summarized in terms of a significant decrease in functional phenotype-related genes and a parallel increase in cell proliferation, altered cell morphology, and regulation of the differentiation of related genes. A better understanding of the mechanisms involved in dedifferentiation may enable scientists to control and possibly alter the plasticity of the differentiated state, which may lead to benefits not only in stem cell research but also in regenerative medicine.

  12. Identification of testosterone-/androgen receptor-regulated genes in mouse Sertoli cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qiao-Xia Zhang; Xiao-Yan Zhang; Zhen-Ming Zhang; Wei Lu; Ling Liu; Gang Li; Zhi-Ming Cai; Yao-Ting Gui; Chawnshang Chang

    2012-01-01

    Androgen and androgen receptor (AR) play important roles in male spermatogenesis and fertility,yet detailed androgenlAR signals in Sertoli cells remain unclear.To identify AR target genes in Sertoli cells,we analyzed the gene expression profiles of testis between mice lacking AR in Sertoli cells (S-AR-/y) and their littermate wild-type (WT) mice.Digital gene expression analysis identified 2276 genes downregulated and 2865 genes upregulated in the S-AR-/y mice testis compared to WT ones.To further nail down the difference within Sertoli cells,we first constructed Sertoli cell line TM4 with stably transfected AR (named as TM4/AR) and found androgens failed to transactivate AR in Sertoli TM4 and TM4/AR cells.Interestingly,additional transient transfection of AR-cDNA resulted in significant androgen responsiveness with TM4/AR cells showing 10 times more androgen sensitivity than TM4 cells.In the condition where maximal androgen response was demonstrated,we then analyzed gene expression and found the expression levels of 2313 genes were changed more than twofold by transient transfection of AR-cDNA in the presence of testosterone.Among these genes,603 androgen-/ AR-regulated genes,including 164 upregulated and 439 downregulated,were found in both S-AR-/y mice testis and TM4/AR cells.Using informatics analysis,the gene ontology was applied to analyze these androgen-/AR-regulated genes to predict the potential roles of androgen/AR in the process of spermatogenesis.Together,using gene analysis in both S-AR-/y mice testis and TM4/AR cells may help us to better understand the androgen/AR signals in Sertoli cells and their influences in spermatogenesis.

  13. PRDM1/BLIMP1: a tumor suppressor gene in B and T cell lymphomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boi, Michela; Zucca, Emanuele; Inghirami, Giorgio; Bertoni, Francesco

    2015-05-01

    The gene encoding the human BLIMP1, prdm1, is located on chromosome 6q21, a locus frequently deleted in lymphoid tumors. BLIMP1 is able to silence its target genes in a context-dependent manner through different mechanisms. BLIMP1 is expressed in both B and T cells, in which it plays important functions. In B cells, BLIMP1 acts as the master regulator of plasma cell differentiation, repressed by BCL6 and repressing both BCL6 and PAX5. In T cells, BLIMP1 is a critical factor for most terminal effector cell differentiation in both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. BLIMP1 is frequently inactivated in a variety of lymphomas, including diffuse large B cell lymphomas, Natural Killer cell lymphoma and anaplastic large T cell lymphoma. In this review, we will summarize the role of BLIMP1 in normal cells, focusing on lymphoid cells, and on its function as tumor suppressor gene in lymphomas.

  14. A rapid and efficient method to express target genes in mammalian cells by baculovirus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tong Cheng; Chen-Yu Xu; Ying-Bin Wang; Min Chen; Ting Wu; Jun Zhang; Ning-Shao Xia

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the modification of baculovirus vector and the feasibility of delivering exogenous genes into mammalian cells with the culture supernatant of Spodoptera frugiperta (Sf9) cells infected by recombinant baculoviruses.METHODS: Two recombinant baculoviruses (BacV-CMVEGFPA, BacV-CMV-EGFPB) containing CMV-EGFP expression cassette were constructed. HepG2 cells were directly incubated with the culture supernatant of Sf9 cells infected by recombinant baculoviruses, and reporter gene transfer and expression efficiencies were analyzed by flow cytometry (FCM). The optimal transduction conditions were investigated by FCM assay in HepG2 cells. Gene-transfer and expression efficiencies in HepG2 or CV1 cells by baculovirus vectors were compared with lipofectAMINE, recombinant retrovirus and vaccinia virus expression systems. Twenty different mammalian cell lines were used to investigate the feasibility of delivering exogenous genes into different mammalian cells with the culture supernatant of infected Sf9 cells.RESULTS: CMV promoter could directly express reporter genes in Sf9 cells with a relatively low efficiency. Target cells incubated with the 1:1 diluted culture supernatant (moi=50) for 12 h at 37 ℃ could achieve the highest transduction and expression efficiencies with least impairment to cell viability. Under similar conditions the baculovirus vector could achieve the highest gene-transfer and expression efficiency than lipofectAMINE, recombinant retrovirus and vaccinia virus expression systems. Most mammalian cell lines could be transduced with recombinant baculovirus. In primate adherent culture cells the recombinant baculovirus could arrive the highest infection and expression efficiencies, but it was not very satisfactory in the cell lines from mice and suspended culture cells.CONCLUSION: Mammalian cells incubated with the culture supernatant of infected Sf9 cells could serve as a very convenient way for rapid and efficient expression of foreign

  15. Global indiscriminate methylation in cell-specific gene promoters following reprogramming into human induced pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nissenbaum, Jonathan; Bar-Nur, Ori; Ben-David, Eyal; Benvenisty, Nissim

    2013-01-01

    Molecular reprogramming of somatic cells into human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) is accompanied by extensive changes in gene expression patterns and epigenetic marks. To better understand the link between gene expression and DNA methylation, we have profiled human somatic cells from different embryonic cell types (endoderm, mesoderm, and parthenogenetic germ cells) and the iPSCs generated from them. We show that reprogramming is accompanied by extensive DNA methylation in CpG-poor promoters, sparing CpG-rich promoters. Intriguingly, methylation in CpG-poor promoters occurred not only in downregulated genes, but also in genes that are not expressed in the parental somatic cells or their respective iPSCs. These genes are predominantly tissue-specific genes of other cell types from different lineages. Our results suggest a role of DNA methylation in the silencing of the somatic cell identity by global nonspecific methylation of tissue-specific genes from all lineages, regardless of their expression in the parental somatic cells.

  16. Association Mapping of Cell Wall Synthesis Regulatory Genes and Cell Wall Quality in Switchgrass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartley, Laura [Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States). Dept. of Microbiology and Plant Biology; Wu, Y. [Oklahoma State Univ., Stillwater, OK (United States); Zhu, L. [Oklahoma State Univ., Stillwater, OK (United States); Brummer, E. C. [Noble Foundation, Ardmore, OK (United States); Saha, M. [Noble Foundation, Ardmore, OK (United States)

    2016-05-31

    Inefficient conversion of biomass to biofuels is one of the main barriers for biofuel production from such materials. Approximately half of polysaccharides in biomass remain unused by typical biochemical conversion methods. Conversion efficiency is influenced by the composition and structure of cell walls of biomass. Grasses such as wheat, maize, and rice, as well as dedicated perennial bioenergy crops, like switchgrass, make up ~55% of biomass that can be produced in the United States. Grass cell walls have a different composition and patterning compared with dicotyledonous plants, including the well-studied model plant, Arabidopsis. This project identified genetic determinants of cell wall composition in grasses using both naturally occurring genetic variation of switchgrass and gene network reconstruction and functional assays in rice. In addition, the project linked functional data in rice and other species to switchgrass improvement efforts through curation of the most abundant class of regulators in the switchgrass genome. Characterizing natural diversity of switchgrass for variation in cell wall composition and properties, also known as quality, provides an unbiased avenue for identifying biologically viable diversity in switchgrass cell walls. To characterizing natural diversity, this project generated cell wall composition and enzymatic deconstruction data for ~450 genotypes of the Switchgrass Southern Association Collection (SSAC), a diverse collection composed of 36 switchgrass accessions from the southern U.S. distribution of switchgrass. Comparing these data with other measures of cell wall quality for the same samples demonstrated the complementary nature of the diverse characterization platforms now being used for biomass characterization. Association of the composition data with ~3.2K single nucleotide variant markers identified six significant single nucleotide variant markers co-associated with digestibility and another compositional trait. These

  17. Demethylation effects of elemene on the GSTP1 gene in HCC cell line QGY7703

    Science.gov (United States)

    WU, BAOQIANG; JIANG, YONG; ZHU, FENG; SUN, DONGLIN; HUANG, HONGJUN

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate elemene's effects on cell proliferation, apoptosis, and the cell cycle in the hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cell line, QYG7703, and to investigate GSTP1 gene methylation change in QGY7703 cells after being treated with elemene to explore whether elemene reversed the abnormal GSTP1 gene methylation. QGY7703 cells were treated with different elemene concentrations. Cell proliferation was measured with MTT assay, cell apoptosis and cell cycle were analyzed by flow cytometry, and GSTP1 gene methylation was analyzed by methlation-specific polymerase chain reaction. The cells' apoptotic rate increased dose-dependently with elemene concentration, and the difference was statistically significant (P<0.05). Elemene treatment arrested the cells in S phase, and thus the percentage of cells in G1 phase decreased while the cells in S phase increased dose-dependently, and the difference was statistically significant compared to the control group (P<0.05). All QGY7703 cells were identified to contain GSTP1 gene methylation before being treated with elemene and the methylation state decreased after treatment. In the present study, elemene induced cell apoptosis, inhibited the cell cycle, and reversed GSTP1 gene methylation in QGY7703 cells. PMID:27073515

  18. Nitric Oxide Prevents Mouse Embryonic Stem Cell Differentiation Through Regulation of Gene Expression, Cell Signaling, and Control of Cell Proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapia-Limonchi, Rafael; Cahuana, Gladys M; Caballano-Infantes, Estefania; Salguero-Aranda, Carmen; Beltran-Povea, Amparo; Hitos, Ana B; Hmadcha, Abdelkrim; Martin, Franz; Soria, Bernat; Bedoya, Francisco J; Tejedo, Juan R

    2016-09-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) delays mouse embryonic stem cell (mESC) differentiation by regulating genes linked to pluripotency and differentiation. Nevertheless, no profound study has been conducted on cell differentiation regulation by this molecule through signaling on essential biological functions. We sought to demonstrate that NO positively regulates the pluripotency transcriptional core, enforcing changes in the chromatin structure, in addition to regulating cell proliferation, and signaling pathways with key roles in stemness. Culturing mESCs with 2 μM of the NO donor diethylenetriamine/NO (DETA/NO) in the absence of leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) induced significant changes in the expression of 16 genes of the pluripotency transcriptional core. Furthermore, treatment with DETA/NO resulted in a high occupancy of activating H3K4me3 at the Oct4 and Nanog promoters and repressive H3K9me3 and H3k27me3 at the Brachyury promoter. Additionally, the activation of signaling pathways involved in pluripotency, such as Gsk3-β/β-catenin, was observed, in addition to activation of PI3 K/Akt, which is consistent with the protection of mESCs from cell death. Finally, a decrease in cell proliferation coincides with cell cycle arrest in G2/M. Our results provide novel insights into NO-mediated gene regulation and cell proliferation and suggest that NO is necessary but not sufficient for the maintenance of pluripotency and the prevention of cell differentiation. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 2078-2088, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Identification of differentially expressed radiation-induced genes in cervix carcinoma cells using suppression subtractive hybridization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jun Sang; Lee, Young Sook; Lee, Jeung Hoon; Lee, Woong Hee; Seo, Eun Young; Cho, Moon June [Chungnam National University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-03-15

    A number of genes and their products are induced early or late following exposure of cells to ionizing radiation. These radiation-induced genes have various effects of irradiated cells and tissues. Suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) based on PCR was used to identify the differentially expressed genes by radiation in cervix carcinoma cells. Total RNA and poly (A){sup +} mRNA were isolated from irradiated and non-irradiated HeLa cells. Forward-and reverse-subtracted cDNA libraries were constructed using SSH. Eighty-eight clones of each were used to randomly select differentially expressed genes using reverse Northern blotting (dot blot analysis). Northern blotting was used to verify the screened genes. Of the 176 clones, 10 genes in the forward-subtracted library and 9 genes in the reverse-subtracted library were identified as differentially expressed radiation-induced genes by PCR-select differential screening. Three clones from the forward-subtracted library were confirmed by Northern blotting, and showed increased expression in a dose-dependent manner, including a telomerase catalytic subunit and sodium channel-like protein gene, and an ESTs (expressed sequence tags) gene. We identified differentially expressed radiation-induced genes with low-abundance genes with SSH, but further characterization of theses genes are necessary to clarify the biological functions of them.

  20. Altered gene expression profiles of NIH3T3 cells regulated by human lung cancer associated gene CT120

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiang Huo HE; Jin Jun LI; Yi Hu XIE; Yun Tian TANG; Gen Fu YAO; Wen Xin QIN; Da Fang WAN; Jian Ren GU

    2004-01-01

    CT120, a novel membrane-associated gene implicated in lung carcinogenesis, was previously identified from chromosome 17p13.3 locus, a hot mutation spot involved in human malignancies. In the present study, we further determined that CT120 ectopic expression could promote cell proliferation activity of NIH3T3 cells using MTS assay, and monitored the downstream effects of CT120 in NIH3T3 cells with Atlas mouse cDNA expression arrays. Among 588known genes, 133 genes were found to be upregulated or downregulated by CT120. Two major signaling pathways involved in cell proliferation, cell survival and anti-apoptosis were overexpressed and activated in response to CT120:One is the Raf/MEK/Erk signal cascades and the other is the PI3K/Akt signal cascades, suggesting that CT120 might contribute, at least in part, to the constitutively activation of Erk and Akt in human lung caner cells. In addition, some tumor metastasis associated genes cathepsin B, cathepsin D, cathepsin L, MMP-2/TIMP-2 were also upregulated by CT120, upon which CT120 might be involved in tumor invasiveness and metastasis. In addition, CT120 might play an important role in tumor progression through modulating the expression of some candidate "Lung Tumor Progression"genes including B-Raf, Rab-2, BAX, BAG-1, YB-1, and Cdc42.

  1. DIFFERENTIAL EXPRESSION OF GENES INVOLVED IN METABOLISM BETWEEN TUMORIGENITIC HUMAN LEUKEMIA CELL LINES K562 AND K562-n

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吕书晴; 许小平; 夏放; 居小萍; 李瑶; 应康; 毛裕民

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To study the molecular mechanism of different tumorigenicity in nude mice of human leukemia cell lines K562-n and K562. Methods: To analyze the genes differently expressed between K562 and K562-n cells by using cDNA microarray technique. Results: Among the 12800 genes detected, some genes involved in material metabolism and material transport were differently expressed between K562-n and K562 cells. These genes include homo sapiens placenta-specific ATP-binding cassette transporter gene, dihydrodiol dehydrogenase gene, hepatic dihydrodiol dehydrogenase gene, NAD-dependent methylene tetrahydrofolate dehydrogenase cyclohydrolase, lysophosphatidic acid acyltransferase, alpha gene, argininosuccinate lyase gene, mitochondrial isocitrtate dehydrogenase, adhesion protein SQM1 gene, dimethylarginine dimethylamino-hydrolase gene, M1 subunit of ribonucleotide reductase and farnesyl pyrophosphate synthetase gene. Conclusion: The high tumorigenicity of K562-n cells is related to the different expression of some genes concerned with cell metabolism and material transpoert.

  2. Precise gene modification mediated by TALEN and single-stranded oligodeoxynucleotides in human cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoling Wang

    Full Text Available The development of human embryonic stem cells (ESCs and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs facilitates in vitro studies of human disease mechanisms, speeds up the process of drug screening, and raises the feasibility of using cell replacement therapy in clinics. However, the study of genotype-phenotype relationships in ESCs or iPSCs is hampered by the low efficiency of site-specific gene editing. Transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs spurred interest due to the ease of assembly, high efficiency and faithful gene targeting. In this study, we optimized the TALEN design to maximize its genomic cutting efficiency. We showed that using optimized TALENs in conjunction with single-strand oligodeoxynucleotide (ssODN allowed efficient gene editing in human cells. Gene mutations and gene deletions for up to 7.8 kb can be accomplished at high efficiencies. We established human tumor cell lines and H9 ESC lines with homozygous deletion of the microRNA-21 (miR-21 gene and miR-9-2 gene. These cell lines provide a robust platform to dissect the roles these genes play during cell differentiation and tumorigenesis. We also observed that the endogenous homologous chromosome can serve as a donor template for gene editing. Overall, our studies demonstrate the versatility of using ssODN and TALEN to establish genetically modified cells for research and therapeutic application.

  3. Embryonic stem cell-derived microvesicles induce gene expression changes in Müller cells of the retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsman, Diana; Stackpole, Emma J; Domin, Daniel R; Farber, Debora B

    2012-01-01

    Cell-derived microvesicles (MVs), recognized as important components of cell-cell communication, contain mRNAs, miRNAs, proteins and lipids and transfer their bioactive contents from parent cells to cells of other origins. We have studied the effect that MVs released from embryonic stem cells (ESMVs) have on retinal progenitor Müller cells. Cultured human Müller cells were exposed to mouse ESMVs every 48 hours for a total of 9 treatments. Morphological changes were observed by light microscopy in the treated cells, which grew as individual heterogeneous cells, compared to the uniform, spindle-like adherent cellular sheets of untreated cells. ESMVs transferred to Müller cells embryonic stem cell (ESC) mRNAs involved in the maintenance of pluripotency, including Oct4 and Sox2, and the miRNAs of the 290 cluster, important regulators of the ESC-specific cell cycle. Moreover, ESMV exposure induced up-regulation of the basal levels of endogenous human Oct4 mRNA in Müller cells. mRNA and miRNA microarrays of ESMV-treated vs. untreated Müller cells revealed the up-regulation of genes and miRNAs involved in the induction of pluripotency, cellular proliferation, early ocular genes and genes important for retinal protection and remodeling, as well as the down-regulation of inhibitory and scar-related genes and miRNAs involved in differentiation and cell cycle arrest. To further characterize the heterogeneous cell population of ESMV-treated Müller cells, their expression of retinal cell markers was compared to that in untreated control cells by immunocytochemistry. Markers for amacrine, ganglion and rod photoreceptors were present in treated but not in control Müller cells. Together, our findings indicate that ESMs induce de-differentiation and pluripotency in their target Müller cells, which may turn on an early retinogenic program of differentiation.

  4. Reduced rates of gene loss, gene silencing, and gene mutation in Dnmt1-deficient embryonic stem cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chan, M.F.; van Amerongen, R.; Nijjar, T.; Cuppen, E.; Jones, P.A.; Laird, P.W.

    2001-01-01

    Tumor suppressor gene inactivation is a crucial event in oncogenesis. Gene inactivation mechanisms include events resulting in loss of heterozygosity (LOH), gene mutation, and transcriptional silencing. The contribution of each of these different pathways varies among tumor suppressor genes and by c

  5. The effects of antisense PTEN gene transfection on the growth and invasion of glioma cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Hong-jie; ZHENG Zhao-cong; WANG Ru-mi; WANG Shou-sen; YANG Wei-zhong

    2006-01-01

    Objective:To study the effects of antisense PTEN gene on the growth and invasion of glioma cells. Methods:A pcDNA3. 1/Hygro (-) recombinant plasmid containing antisense PTEN gene fragment was constructed. Glioma cells of primary culture were transfected with antisense PTEN gene vector and stably transfected clones were selected. Then, the different growth and invasion abilities and the different MMP9 mRNA expressions of three kinds of cells were observed, including the transfected cells, untransfected cells and the cells transfected with empty vector. Results :The abilities of growth and invasion of the transfected cells and the expressions of MMP9 mRNA were obviously enhanced. Conclusion: Antisense PTEN gene could have a negative impact on the growth and invasion of primary culture glioma cells.

  6. Gene Delivery into Plant Cells for Recombinant Protein Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiang Chen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Recombinant proteins are primarily produced from cultures of mammalian, insect, and bacteria cells. In recent years, the development of deconstructed virus-based vectors has allowed plants to become a viable platform for recombinant protein production, with advantages in versatility, speed, cost, scalability, and safety over the current production paradigms. In this paper, we review the recent progress in the methodology of agroinfiltration, a solution to overcome the challenge of transgene delivery into plant cells for large-scale manufacturing of recombinant proteins. General gene delivery methodologies in plants are first summarized, followed by extensive discussion on the application and scalability of each agroinfiltration method. New development of a spray-based agroinfiltration and its application on field-grown plants is highlighted. The discussion of agroinfiltration vectors focuses on their applications for producing complex and heteromultimeric proteins and is updated with the development of bridge vectors. Progress on agroinfiltration in Nicotiana and non-Nicotiana plant hosts is subsequently showcased in context of their applications for producing high-value human biologics and low-cost and high-volume industrial enzymes. These new advancements in agroinfiltration greatly enhance the robustness and scalability of transgene delivery in plants, facilitating the adoption of plant transient expression systems for manufacturing recombinant proteins with a broad range of applications.

  7. Distinct gene expression signatures in human embryonic stem cells differentiated towards definitive endoderm at single-cell level

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norrman, Karin; Strömbeck, Anna; Semb, Henrik;

    2013-01-01

    of anterior definitive endoderm (DE). Here, we differentiated human embryonic stem cells towards DE using three different activin A based treatments. Differentiation efficiencies were evaluated by gene expression profiling over time at cell population level. A panel of key markers was used to study DE...... for the three activin A based protocols applied. Our data provide novel insights in DE gene expression at the cellular level of in vitro differentiated human embryonic stem cells, and illustrate the power of using single-cell gene expression profiling to study differentiation heterogeneity and to characterize......Characterization of directed differentiation of pluripotent stem cells towards therapeutically relevant cell types, including pancreatic beta-cells and hepatocytes, depends on molecular markers and assays that resolve the signature of individual cells. Pancreas and liver both have a common origin...

  8. Spontaneously immortalised bovine mammary epithelial cells exhibit a distinct gene expression pattern from the breast cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Qianqian

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Spontaneous immortalisation of cultured mammary epithelial cells (MECs is an extremely rare event, and the molecular mechanism behind spontaneous immortalisation of MECs is unclear. Here, we report the establishment of a spontaneously immortalised bovine mammary epithelial cell line (BME65Cs and the changes in gene expression associated with BME65Cs cells. Results BME65Cs cells maintain the general characteristics of normal mammary epithelial cells in morphology, karyotype and immunohistochemistry, and are accompanied by the activation of endogenous bTERT (bovine Telomerase Reverse Transcriptase and stabilisation of the telomere. Currently, BME65Cs cells have been passed for more than 220 generations, and these cells exhibit non-malignant transformation. The expression of multiple genes was investigated in BME65Cs cells, senescent BMECs (bovine MECs cells, early passage BMECs cells and MCF-7 cells (a human breast cancer cell line. In comparison with early passage BMECs cells, the expression of senescence-relevant apoptosis-related gene were significantly changed in BME65Cs cells. P16INK4a was downregulated, p53 was low expressed and Bax/Bcl-2 ratio was reversed. Moreover, a slight upregulation of the oncogene c-Myc, along with an undetectable level of breast tumor-related gene Bag-1 and TRPS-1, was observed in BME65Cs cells while these genes are all highly expressed in MCF-7. In addition, DNMT1 is upregulated in BME65Cs. These results suggest that the inhibition of both senescence and mitochondrial apoptosis signalling pathways contribute to the immortality of BME65Cs cells. The expression of p53 and p16INK4a in BME65Cs was altered in the pattern of down-regulation but not "loss", suggesting that this spontaneous immortalization is possibly initiated by other mechanism rather than gene mutation of p53 or p16INK4a. Conclusions Spontaneously immortalised BME65Cs cells maintain many characteristics of normal BMEC cells and

  9. Genes involved in cell adhesion and signaling: a new repertoire of retinoic acid receptor target genes in mouse embryonic fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Tanoury, Ziad; Piskunov, Aleksandr; Andriamoratsiresy, Dina; Gaouar, Samia; Lutzing, Régis; Ye, Tao; Jost, Bernard; Keime, Céline; Rochette-Egly, Cécile

    2014-02-01

    Nuclear retinoic acid (RA) receptors (RARα, β and γ) are ligand-dependent transcription factors that regulate the expression of a battery of genes involved in cell differentiation and proliferation. They are also phosphoproteins and we previously showed the importance of their phosphorylation in their transcriptional activity. In the study reported here, we conducted a genome-wide analysis of the genes that are regulated by RARs in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) by comparing wild-type MEFs to MEFs lacking the three RARs. We found that in the absence of RA, RARs control the expression of several gene transcripts associated with cell adhesion. Consequently the knockout MEFs are unable to adhere and to spread on substrates and they display a disrupted network of actin filaments, compared with the WT cells. In contrast, in the presence of the ligand, RARs control the expression of other genes involved in signaling and in RA metabolism. Taking advantage of rescue cell lines expressing the RARα or RARγ subtypes (either wild-type or mutated at the N-terminal phosphorylation sites) in the null background, we found that the expression of RA-target genes can be controlled either by a specific single RAR or by a combination of RAR isotypes, depending on the gene. We also selected genes that require the phosphorylation of the receptors for their regulation by RA. Our results increase the repertoire of genes that are regulated by RARs and highlight the complexity and diversity of the transcriptional programs regulated by RARs, depending on the gene.

  10. Noncoding RNA small nucleolar RNA host gene 1 promote cell proliferation in nonsmall cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J You

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC is the major cause of cancer death worldwide. Increasing evidence shows that noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs are widely involved in the development and progression of NSCLC. ncRNA small nucleolar RNA host gene 1 (SNHG1 has not been studied in cancer, especially its role in lung cancer remains unknown. Our studies were designed to investigate the expression and biological significance of SNHG1 in lung cancer. SNHG1 may be a novel ncRNA in early diagnosis in lung cancer. Methods: Noncoding RNA SNHG1 expression in 7 lung cancer cell lines was measured by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. RNA interference approaches were used to find the biological functions of SNHG1. The effect of SNHG1 on proliferation was evaluated by cell count and crystal violet stains. Results: Noncoding RNA SNHG1 expression was significantly upregulated in lung cancer cells when compared with normal bronchial epithelial cells. In addition, in vitro assays our results indicated that knockdown of SNHG1 inhibited cell proliferation. Conclusions: Our data indicated that ncRNA SNHG1 is significantly upregulated in NSCLC cell lines and may represent a new biomarker and a potential therapeutic target for NSCLC intervention.

  11. Reversing effect of exogenous WWOX gene expression on malignant phenotype of primary cultured lung carcinoma cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Yu-long; LI Yue-chuan; SHOU Feng; LIU Chang-qi; PU Yong; TANG Hua

    2010-01-01

    Background Whether WW domain containing oxidoreductase (WWOX) gene is a tumor-suppressor is still controversial. Some researchers found that the transcription of the WWOX gene was lacking not only in tumor tissues but also in non-tumorous tissues and sometimes in normal tissues. Hence it is important to explore the role of the expression of the exogenous WWOX gene in the proliferation and apoptosis of primary cultured lung carcinoma cells. Methods Lipofection technique was used to determine primary cultured lung carcinoma cells containing the highly expressed exogenous WWOX gene and primary cultured cells with vectors as controls. An animal model of lung cancer was made by subcutaneous implantation of tumor cells into nude mice. RT-PCR, Western blotting, flow cytometry, and TUN EL were used to detect the transcription, expression of the exogenous gene and the effect of the expression of targeted genes on the proliferation and apoptosis of the primary cultured lung carcinoma cells. Results The growth, clone formation rate (CFR) ((5.33±1.53)%) of the primary lung cancer cells transfected with the WWOX gene, tumor size and weight were significantly lower than those of the non-transfected lung cancer cells (CFR: (14.33±1.53)%) and the primary lung cancer cells transfected with blank plasmids (CFR: (11.00±1.73)%, P<0.05). The apoptosis level of primary lung cancer cells transfected with the WWOX gene ((40.72±5.20)%) was significantly higher than that of the non-transfected lung cancer cells ((2.76±0.02)%) and the primary lung cancer cells transfected with blank plasmids ((2.72±0.15)%, P<0.05). Conclusion The expression of the exogenous WWOX gene can significantly inhibit the proliferation of lung cancer cells and induce their apoptosis, suggesting that the WWOX gene possesses tumor-suppressing effect.

  12. GENE EXPRESSION PROFILING OF HUMAN PROMYELOCYTIC LEUKEMIA HL-60 CELL TREATED BY AJOENE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    方志俊; 黄文秀; 黄明辉; 梁润松; 崔景荣; 王夔; 杨梦苏

    2002-01-01

    Objective: Ajoene, a major compound extracted from crashed garlic, has been shown to have antitumor, antimycotic, antimicrobial, antimutagenic functions in vivo or in vitro and treated as a potential antitumor drug. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the tumor cytotoxicity of ajoene and even garlic substances are poorly defined. In the present study, we aimed to generate gene expression profiles of HL-60 cell treated by ajoene. Methods: A cDNA microarray presenting 2400 of genes amplified from human leukocyte cDNA library was constructed and the gene expression profiles of HL-60 cell induced by ajoene were generated. Results: After data analysis, 28 differentially expressed genes were identified and sequenced. These genes include 21 known genes and 7 ESTs. Most of the known genes are related to cell apoptosis, such as secretory granule (PRG1), beta-2 microglobulin (B2M), 16S ribosomal RNA gene and ribosomal protein S12. Several genes are related to cell differentiation, including the genes similar to H3 histone and ribosomal protein L31. Northern blot analysis was used to verify and quantify the expression of selected genes. Conclusion: Ajoene can induce HL-60 cell apoptosis significantly and may play a role in differentiation. cDNA microarray technology can be a valuable tool to gain insight into molecular events of pharmacological mechanism of herbal medicine.

  13. THE EXPRESSION OF CONNEXIN GENES IN NASOPHARYNGEAL CARCINOMA CELLS AND THE EFFECT OF RETINOIC ACID ON THE REGULATION OF THOSE GENES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Ning; BIN Liang-hua; TANG Xiang-na; ZHOU Ming; ZENG Zhao-yang; Li Gui-yuan

    1999-01-01

    Objective: To detect which members in the connexin gene family are expressed in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) cell line HNE1, and the mechanism by which those genes are specifically switched on and off during retinoic acid (RA) induction. Methods: Establishing the cell growth curves of NPC cells. Observing the effect of RA on connexin genes by Northern hybridization. Results: Two genes Cx46 and Cx37, belonging to the connexin gene family, were expressed in HNE, The down-regulation of Cx46 and Cx37, up-regulation of RARa and growth inhibition was observed in HNE1, after exposure to RA. The gene expression and cell growth in HNE1 cells was restored after removal of RA. Conclusion: Two members of the connexin gene family: Cx37 and Cx46 were expressed in HNE1 cells, RA can inhibit the expression of those two genes mediated by RARa, and the effects of RA on HNE1 are reversible.

  14. Inhibition of Reporter Genes by Small Interfering RNAs in Cell Culture and Living Fish

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larashati, Sekar; Schyth, Brian Dall; Lorenzen, Niels

    2011-01-01

    as it provides low background compared to other reporter genes such as green fluorescence protein (GFP). In cell culture, the luciferase can be used as reporter gene to see the effect of gene silencing. In the living fish, the bioluminescence signal detected is influenced by the melanin pigment. Timing between...

  15. Isolation and characterization of gene sequences expressed in cotton fiber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taciana de Carvalho Coutinho

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Cotton fiber are tubular cells which develop from the differentiation of ovule epidermis. In addition to being one of the most important natural fiber of the textile group, cotton fiber afford an excellent experimental system for studying the cell wall. The aim of this work was to isolate and characterise the genes expressed in cotton fiber (Gossypium hirsutum L. to be used in future work in cotton breeding. Fiber of the cotton cultivar CNPA ITA 90 II were used to extract RNA for the subsequent generation of a cDNA library. Seventeen sequences were obtained, of which 14 were already described in the NCBI database (National Centre for Biotechnology Information, such as those encoding the lipid transfer proteins (LTPs and arabinogalactans (AGP. However, other cDNAs such as the B05 clone, which displays homology with the glycosyltransferases, have still not been described for this crop. Nevertheless, results showed that several clones obtained in this study are associated with cell wall proteins, wall-modifying enzymes and lipid transfer proteins directly involved in fiber development.

  16. Selection of suitable reference genes for quantitative gene expression studies in milk somatic cells of lactating cows (Bos indicus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varshney, N; Mohanty, A K; Kumar, S; Kaushik, J K; Dang, A K; Mukesh, M; Mishra, B P; Kataria, R; Kimothi, S P; Mukhopadhyay, T K; Malakar, D; Prakash, B S; Grover, S; Batish, V K

    2012-06-01

    We assessed the suitability of 9 internal control genes (ICG) in milk somatic cells of lactating cows to find suitable reference genes for use in quantitative PCR (qPCR). Eighteen multiparous lactating Sahiwal cows were used, 6 in each of 3 lactation stages: early (25 ± 5 d in milk), mid (160 ± 15 d in milk), and late (275 ± 25 d in milk) lactation. Nine candidate reference genes [glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), protein phosphatase 1 regulatory subunit 11 (PPP1R11), β-actin (ACTB), β-2 microglobulin (B2M), 40S ribosomal protein S15a (RPS15A), ubiquitously expressed transcript (UXT), mitochondrial GTPase 1 (MTG1), 18S rRNA (RN18S1), and ubiquitin (UBC)] were evaluated. Three genes, β-casein (CSN2), lactoferrin (LTF), and cathelicidin (CAMP) were chosen as target genes. Very high amplification was observed in 7 ICG and very low level amplification was observed in 2 ICG (UXT and MTG1). Thus, UXT and MTG1 were excluded from further analysis. The qPCR data were analyzed by 2 software packages, geNorm and NormFinder, to determine suitable reference genes, based on their stability and expression. Overall, PPP1R11, ACTB, UBC, and GAPDH were stably expressed among all candidate reference genes. Therefore, these genes could be used as ICG for normalization of qPCR data in milk somatic cells through lactation.

  17. Measuring the toxic effects of high gene dosage on yeast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel, J

    1996-12-13

    A novel method, which is rapid, reliable and quantitative, is presented for measuring the toxic effects on yeast cells of high dosage of any given gene. It is based on the possibility of monitoring the presence in cells of a plasmid carrying the ADE2 gene from Saccharomyces cerevisiae by direct observation of colonies, the construction of this particular plasmid being easily made by marked homologous recombination in yeast. Four yeast regulatory genes tested were found to result in various degrees of toxicity at high dosage. Possible implications of the measurement of gene toxicity for eukaryotic cell regulatory mechanisms and for the use of novel general approaches to gene selection, such as the gene-gene interference method, are discussed.

  18. Modulation of Gene Expression Networks underlying Realgar-Induced Differentiation of Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王怀宇; 刘陕西

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To elucidate the molecular mechanism of the differentiation of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) cell line NB4 induced by realgar. Methods: The response of NB4 cell to realgar was explored with a cDNA microarray representing 1003 different human genes. Results: The analysis of gene expression profiles indicated that 8 genes were up-regulated and 33 genes were down-regulated 48 hrs after realgar treatment. Among the 8 up-regulated genes, 2 genes were involved in ubiquitin proteasome degradation pathway. Some genes related to RNA processing, protein synthesis and signal transduction were down-regulated. Conclusion: The ubiquitin-proteasome degradation pathway may play an important role in the degradation of PML/RAR α fusion protein and the differentiation of NB4 cells.

  19. Effect of syncytiotrophoblast microvillous membrane treatment on gene expression in human umbilical vein endothelial cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høgh, Mette; Tannetta, D; Sargent, I;

    2006-01-01

    directly causes the endothelial cell dysfunction of pre-eclampsia. This study investigates the effect of STBM on endothelial cell gene expression. Design Human umbilical vein endothelial cells were cultured in the presence and absence of STBM. At specified time points, total RNA was purified from...... the umbilical cords. Methods Gene expression was screened by Affymetrix GeneChips and confirmed with real-time polymerase chain reaction or enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Main outcome measures Fold changes in gene expression levels between treated and control cultures were calculated from the microarray...

  20. Analysis of the DNDI gene in men with sporadic and familial testicular germ cell tumors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Linger, Rachel; Dudakia, Darshna; Huddart, Robert; Tucker, Kathy; Friedlander, Michael; Phillips, Kelly-Anne; Hogg, David; Jewett, Michael A. S.; Lohynska, Radka; Daugaard, Gedske; Richard, Stephane; Chompret, Agnes; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Bonaiti-Pellie, Catherine; Heidenreich, Axel; Albers, Peter; Olah, Edith; Geczi, Lajos; Bodrogi, Istvan; Daly, Peter A.; Guilford, Parry; Fossi, Sophie D.; Heimdal, Ketil; Tjulandin, Sergei A.; Liubchenko, Ludmila; Stoll, Hans; Weber, Walter; Einhorn, Lawrence; McMaster, Mary; Korde, Larissa; Greene, Mark H.; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Cortessis, Victoria; Easton, Douglas F.; Bishop, D. Timothy; Stratton, Michael R.; Rapley, Elizabeth A.

    2008-01-01

    A base substitution in the mouse DndI gene resulting in a truncated Dnd protein has been shown to be responsible for germ cell loss and the development of testicular germ cell tumors (TGCT) in the 129 strain of mice. We investigated the human orthologue of this gene in 263 patients (165 with a famil

  1. [Protection of corneal endothelium from apoptosis by gene and cell therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchsluger, T A

    2016-06-01

    Protection of corneal endothelium from apoptosis using gene and cell therapy is in a translational phase. This approach offers advantages for eye banking and after transplantation. Safe vehicles for gene or cell therapeutic transduction of corneal endothelium with nucleic acids are available. This strategy will be further developed in consultation with the Paul Ehrlich Institute and European regulatory authorities.

  2. BMP2 gene delivery to bone mesenchymal stem cell by chitosan-g-PEI nonviral vector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Jianhui; Wu, Jun; Liu, Di; Zhao, Xiaoli; Lu, William W.

    2015-04-01

    Nanotechnology has made a significant impact on the development of nanomedicine. Nonviral vectors have been attracting more attention for the advantage of biosafety in gene delivery. Polyethylenimine (PEI)-conjugated chitosan (chitosan-g-PEI) emerged as a promising nonviral vector and has been demonstrated in many tumor cells. However, there is a lack of study focused on the behavior of this vector in stem cells which hold great potential in regenerative medicine. Therefore, in this study, in vitro gene delivering effect of chitosan-g-PEI was investigated in bone marrow stem cells. pIRES2-ZsGreen1-hBMP2 dual expression plasmid containing both the ZsGreen1 GFP reporter gene and the BMP2 functional gene was constructed for monitoring the transgene expression level. Chitosan-g-PEI-mediated gene transfer showed 17.2% of transfection efficiency and more than 80% of cell viability in stem cells. These values were higher than that of PEI. The expression of the delivered BMP2 gene in stem cells enhanced the osteogenic differentiation. These results demonstrated that chitosan-g-PEI is capable of applying in delivering gene to stem cells and providing potential applications in stem cell-based gene therapy.

  3. Systematic mapping of occluded genes by cell fusion reveals prevalence and stability of cis-mediated silencing in somatic cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Looney, Timothy J.; Zhang, Li; Chen, Chih-Hsin; Lee, Jae Hyun; Chari, Sheila; Mao, Frank Fuxiang; Pelizzola, Mattia; Zhang, Lu; Lister, Ryan; Baker, Samuel W.; Fernandes, Croydon J.; Gaetz, Jedidiah; Foshay, Kara M.; Clift, Kayla L.; Zhang, Zhenyu; Li, Wei-Qiang; Vallender, Eric J.; Wagner, Ulrich; Qin, Jane Yuxia; Michelini, Katelyn J.; Bugarija, Branimir; Park, Donghyun; Aryee, Emmanuel; Stricker, Thomas; Zhou, Jie; White, Kevin P.; Ren, Bing; Schroth, Gary P.; Ecker, Joseph R.; Xiang, Andy Peng; Lahn, Bruce T.

    2014-01-01

    Both diffusible factors acting in trans and chromatin components acting in cis are implicated in gene regulation, but the extent to which either process causally determines a cell's transcriptional identity is unclear. We recently used cell fusion to define a class of silent genes termed “cis-silenced” (or “occluded”) genes, which remain silent even in the presence of trans-acting transcriptional activators. We further showed that occlusion of lineage-inappropriate genes plays a critical role in maintaining the transcriptional identities of somatic cells. Here, we present, for the first time, a comprehensive map of occluded genes in somatic cells. Specifically, we mapped occluded genes in mouse fibroblasts via fusion to a dozen different rat cell types followed by whole-transcriptome profiling. We found that occluded genes are highly prevalent and stable in somatic cells, representing a sizeable fraction of silent genes. Occluded genes are also highly enriched for important developmental regulators of alternative lineages, consistent with the role of occlusion in safeguarding cell identities. Alongside this map, we also present whole-genome maps of DNA methylation and eight other chromatin marks. These maps uncover a complex relationship between chromatin state and occlusion. Furthermore, we found that DNA methylation functions as the memory of occlusion in a subset of occluded genes, while histone deacetylation contributes to the implementation but not memory of occlusion. Our data suggest that the identities of individual cell types are defined largely by the occlusion status of their genomes. The comprehensive reference maps reported here provide the foundation for future studies aimed at understanding the role of occlusion in development and disease. PMID:24310002

  4. Analysis of cell growth and gene expression of porcine adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells as nuclear donor cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Hyun Ju; Park, Jung Eun; Park, Eun Jung; Kim, Min Jung; Kim, Geon A; Rhee, Sang Ho; Lim, Sang Hyun; Kang, Sung Keun; Lee, Byeong Chun

    2014-12-01

    In several laboratory animals and humans, adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (ASC) are of considerable interest because they are easy to harvest and can generate a huge proliferation of cells from a small quantity of fat. In this study, we investigated: (i) the expression patterns of reprogramming-related genes in porcine ASC; and (ii) whether ASC can be a suitable donor cell type for generating cloned pigs. For these experiments, ASC, adult skin fibroblasts (AF) and fetal fibroblasts (FF) were derived from a 4-year-old female miniature pig. The ASC expressed cell-surface markers characteristic of stem cells, and underwent in vitro differentiation when exposed to specific differentiation-inducing conditions. Expression of DNA methyltransferase (DNMT)1 in ASC was similar to that in AF, but the highest expression of the DNMT3B gene was observed in ASC. The expression of OCT4 was significantly higher in FF and ASC than in AF (P development rate of cloned embryos derived from ASC was comparable to the development of those derived using FF. Total cell numbers of blastocysts derived using ASC and FF were significantly higher than in embryos made with AF. The results demonstrated that ASC used for SCNT have a potential comparable to those of AF and FF in terms of embryo in vitro development and blastocyst formation.

  5. 40 CFR 798.5300 - Detection of gene mutations in somatic cells in culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... cells in culture. 798.5300 Section 798.5300 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY....5300 Detection of gene mutations in somatic cells in culture. (a) Purpose. Mammalian cell culture... selected by resistance to ouabain. (2) Description. Cells in suspension or monolayer culture are exposed...

  6. CD133-targeted Gene Transfer Into Long-term Repopulating Hematopoietic Stem Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brendel, Christian; Goebel, Benjamin; Daniela, Abriss; Brugman, Martijn; Kneissl, Sabrina; Schwaeble, Joachim; Kaufmann, Kerstin B.; Mueller-Kuller, Uta; Kunkel, Hana; Chen-Wichmann, Linping; Abel, Tobias; Serve, Hubert; Bystrykh, Leonid; Buchholz, Christian J.; Grez, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Gene therapy for hematological disorders relies on the genetic modification of CD34(+) cells, a heterogeneous cell population containing about 0.01% long-term repopulating cells. Here, we show that the lentiviral vector CD133-LV, which uses a surface marker on human primitive hematopoietic stem cell

  7. Methylation patterns of immunoglobulin genes in lymphoid cells: correlation of expression and differentiation with undermethylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storb, U; Arp, B

    1983-11-01

    Different states of eukaryotic gene expression are often correlated with different levels of methylation of DNA sequences containing structural genes and their flanking regions. To assess the potential role of DNA methylation in the expression of immunoglobulin genes, which require complex rearrangements prior to expression, methylation patterns were examined in cell lines representing different stages of lymphocyte maturation. Methylation of the second cytosine in the sequence 5' C-C-G-G 3' was determined by using Hpa II/Msp I endonuclease digestion. Four CH genes (C mu, C delta, C gamma 2b, and C alpha), C kappa, V kappa, C lambda, and V lambda genes were analyzed. The results lead to the following conclusions: (i) transcribed immunoglobulin genes are undermethylated; (ii) the C gene allelic to an expressed C gene is always also undermethylated; and (iii) all immunoglobulin loci tend to become increasingly undermethylated as B cells mature.

  8. Tumor-suppressor genes, cell cycle regulatory checkpoints, and the skin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Maria Abreu Velez

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The cell cycle (or cell-division cycle is a series of events that take place in a cell, leading to its division and duplication. Cell division requires cell cycle checkpoints (CPs that are used by the cell to both monitor and regulate the progress of the cell cycle. Tumor-suppressor genes (TSGs or antioncogenes are genes that protect the cell from a single event or multiple events leading to cancer. When these genes mutate, the cell can progress to a cancerous state. We aimed to perform a narrative review, based on evaluation of the manuscripts published in MEDLINE-indexed journals using the Medical Subject Headings (MeSH terms "tumor suppressor′s genes," "skin," and "cell cycle regulatory checkpoints." We aimed to review the current concepts regarding TSGs, CPs, and their association with selected cutaneous diseases. It is important to take into account that in some cell cycle disorders, multiple genetic abnormalities may occur simultaneously. These abnormalities may include intrachromosomal insertions, unbalanced division products, recombinations, reciprocal deletions, and/or duplication of the inserted segments or genes; thus, these presentations usually involve several genes. Due to their complexity, these disorders require specialized expertise for proper diagnosis, counseling, personal and family support, and genetic studies. Alterations in the TSGs or CP regulators may occur in many benign skin proliferative disorders, neoplastic processes, and genodermatoses.

  9. Switch-like genes populate cell communication pathways and are enriched for extracellular proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tozeren Aydin

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent studies have placed gene expression in the context of distribution profiles including housekeeping, graded, and bimodal (switch-like. Single-gene studies have shown bimodal expression results from healthy cell signaling and complex diseases such as cancer, however developing a comprehensive list of human bimodal genes has remained a major challenge due to inherent noise in human microarray data. This study presents a two-component mixture analysis of mouse gene expression data for genes on the Affymetrix MG-U74Av2 array for the detection and annotation of switch-like genes. Two-component normal mixtures were fit to the data to identify bimodal genes and their potential roles in cell signaling and disease progression. Results Seventeen percent of the genes on the MG-U74Av2 array (1519 out of 9091 were identified as bimodal or switch-like. KEGG pathways significantly enriched for bimodal genes included ECM-receptor interaction, cell communication, and focal adhesion. Similarly, the GO biological process "cell adhesion" and cellular component "extracellular matrix" were significantly enriched. Switch-like genes were found to be associated with such diseases as congestive heart failure, Alzheimer's disease, arteriosclerosis, breast neoplasms, hypertension, myocardial infarction, obesity, rheumatoid arthritis, and type I and type II diabetes. In diabetes alone, over two hundred bimodal genes were in a different mode of expression compared to normal tissue. Conclusion This research identified and annotated bimodal or switch-like genes in the mouse genome using a large collection of microarray data. Genes with bimodal expression were enriched within the cell membrane and extracellular environment. Hundreds of bimodal genes demonstrated alternate modes of expression in diabetic muscle, pancreas, liver, heart, and adipose tissue. Bimodal genes comprise a candidate set of biomarkers for a large number of disease states because

  10. Inhibition of cell proliferation, cell expansion and differentiation by the Arabidopsis SUPERMAN gene in transgenic tobacco plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bereterbide, A; Hernould, M; Castera, S; Mouras, A

    2001-11-01

    Plant development depends upon the control of growth, organization and differentiation of cells derived from shoot and root meristems. Among the genes involved in flower organ determination, the cadastral gene SUPERMAN controls the boundary between whorls 3 and 4 and the growth of the adaxial outer ovule integument by down-regulating cell divisions. To determine the precise function of this gene we overexpressed ectopically the Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. SUPERMAN gene in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.). The transgenic plants exhibited a dwarf phenotype. Histologically and cytologically detailed analyses showed that dwarfism is correlated with a reduction in cell number, which is in agreement with the SUPERMAN function in Arabidopsis. Furthermore, a reduction in cell expansion and an impairment of cell differentiation were observed in tobacco organs. These traits were observed in differentiated vegetative and floral organs but not in meristem structures. A potential effect of the SUPERMAN transcription factor in the control of gibberellin biosynthesis is discussed.

  11. Nuclear transfer of goat somatic cells transgenic for human lactoferrin gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lan LI; Wei SHEN; Lingjiang MIN; Qingyu PAN; Yujiang SUN; Jixian DENG; Qingjie PAN

    2008-01-01

    Transgenic animal mammary gland bioreactors are used to produce recombinant proteins with appropri-ate post-translational modifications.The nuclear transfer of transgenic somatic cells is a powerful method to pro-duce mammary gland bioreactors.We established an effi-cient gene transfer and nuclear transfer approach in goat somatic cells.Gene targeting vector pGBC2LF was con-structed by cloning human lactoferrin (LF) gene cDNA into exon 2 of the milk goat beta-casein gene and the endogenous start codon was replaced by that of human LF gene.Goat fetal fibroblasts were transfected with lin-earized pGBC2LF and 14 cell lines were positive accord-ing to PCR and Southern blot.The transgenic cells were used as donor cells of nuclear transfer and some of recon-structed embryos could develop into blastocyst in vitro.

  12. Identification of G1-regulated genes in normally cycling human cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maroun J Beyrouthy

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Obtaining synchronous cell populations is essential for cell-cycle studies. Methods such as serum withdrawal or use of drugs which block cells at specific points in the cell cycle alter cellular events upon re-entry into the cell cycle. Regulatory events occurring in early G1 phase of a new cell cycle could have been overlooked. METHODOLOGY AND FINDINGS: We used a robotic mitotic shake-off apparatus to select cells in late mitosis for genome-wide gene expression studies. Two separate microarray experiments were conducted, one which involved isolation of RNA hourly for several hours from synchronous cell populations, and one experiment which examined gene activity every 15 minutes from late telophase of mitosis into G1 phase. To verify synchrony of the cell populations under study, we utilized methods including BrdU uptake, FACS, and microarray analyses of histone gene activity. We also examined stress response gene activity. Our analysis enabled identification of 200 early G1-regulated genes, many of which currently have unknown functions. We also confirmed the expression of a set of genes candidates (fos, atf3 and tceb by qPCR to further validate the newly identified genes. CONCLUSION AND SIGNIFICANCE: Genome-scale expression analyses of the first two hours of G1 in naturally cycling cells enabled the discovery of a unique set of G1-regulated genes, many of which currently have unknown functions, in cells progressing normally through the cell division cycle. This group of genes may contain future targets for drug development and treatment of human disease.

  13. Cilia-Associated Genes Play Differing Roles in Aminoglycoside-Induced Hair Cell Death in Zebrafish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamara M. Stawicki

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Hair cells possess a single primary cilium, called the kinocilium, early in development. While the kinocilium is lost in auditory hair cells of most species it is maintained in vestibular hair cells. It has generally been believed that the primary role of the kinocilium and cilia-associated genes in hair cells is in the establishment of the polarity of actin-based stereocilia, the hair cell mechanotransduction apparatus. Through genetic screening and testing of candidate genes in zebrafish (Danio rerio we have found that mutations in multiple cilia genes implicated in intraflagellar transport (dync2h1, wdr35, ift88, and traf3ip, and the ciliary transition zone (cc2d2a, mks1, and cep290 lead to resistance to aminoglycoside-induced hair cell death. These genes appear to have differing roles in hair cells, as mutations in intraflagellar transport genes, but not transition zone genes, lead to defects in kinocilia formation and processes dependent upon hair cell mechanotransduction activity. These mutants highlight a novel role of cilia-associated genes in hair cells, and provide powerful tools for further study.

  14. Cilia-Associated Genes Play Differing Roles in Aminoglycoside-Induced Hair Cell Death in Zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stawicki, Tamara M; Hernandez, Liana; Esterberg, Robert; Linbo, Tor; Owens, Kelly N; Shah, Arish N; Thapa, Nihal; Roberts, Brock; Moens, Cecilia B; Rubel, Edwin W; Raible, David W

    2016-01-01

    Hair cells possess a single primary cilium, called the kinocilium, early in development. While the kinocilium is lost in auditory hair cells of most species it is maintained in vestibular hair cells. It has generally been believed that the primary role of the kinocilium and cilia-associated genes in hair cells is in the establishment of the polarity of actin-based stereocilia, the hair cell mechanotransduction apparatus. Through genetic screening and testing of candidate genes in zebrafish (Danio rerio) we have found that mutations in multiple cilia genes implicated in intraflagellar transport (dync2h1, wdr35, ift88, and traf3ip), and the ciliary transition zone (cc2d2a, mks1, and cep290) lead to resistance to aminoglycoside-induced hair cell death. These genes appear to have differing roles in hair cells, as mutations in intraflagellar transport genes, but not transition zone genes, lead to defects in kinocilia formation and processes dependent upon hair cell mechanotransduction activity. These mutants highlight a novel role of cilia-associated genes in hair cells, and provide powerful tools for further study.

  15. STUDY OF ECK GENE EXON-3 FROM HUMAN NORMAL TISSUE AND BREAST CANCER CELL LINE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李瑶琛; 孔令洪; 王一理; 司履生

    2003-01-01

    Objective To establish a method cloning the exon 3 of eck gene from normal tissue and ZR-75-1 cell line (a human breast cancer cell line)and study whether these genes exist mutant. Methods Designed a pair of specific primers and amplified the exon 3 of eck gene fragment from the extracted genomic DNA derived from normal epithelial cells from skin tissue and ZR-75-1 cell line respectively by PCR technique. Transformed the E.coil. JM109 with recombinant plamids constructed by inserting the amplified fragments into medium vector pUCm-T and sequenced these amplified fragments after primary screening of endonuclease restriction digestion and PCR amplification. Results ① Obtained the genomic DNA of human normal epithelial cells and ZR-75-1 cell line respectively. ② Obtained the amplified fragments of human exon 3 of eck gene through PCR technique. ③ Obtained the cloning vectors of exon 3 of eck gene of human normal epithelial cells and ZR-75-1 cell line respectively. ④ ZR-75-1 cell line exists mutation of nucleotides. Conclusion Successfully established the method of cloning the human exon 3 of eck gene and found some mutations in the detected samples. This study lays a foundation for further studying the function of eck gene in tumorgenesis.

  16. Differential Gene Expression in Thrombomodulin (TM; CD141)+ and TM− Dendritic Cell Subsets

    OpenAIRE

    Masaaki Toda; Zhifei Shao; Yamaguchi, Ken D.; Takehiro Takagi; Corina N D'Alessandro-Gabazza; Osamu Taguchi; Hugh Salamon; Leung, Lawrence L. K.; Gabazza, Esteban C.; John Morser

    2013-01-01

    Previously we have shown in a mouse model of bronchial asthma that thrombomodulin can convert immunogenic conventional dendritic cells into tolerogenic dendritic cells while inducing its own expression on their cell surface. Thrombomodulin(+) dendritic cells are tolerogenic while thrombomodulin(-) dendritic cells are pro-inflammatory and immunogenic. Here we hypothesized that thrombomodulin treatment of dendritic cells would modulate inflammatory gene expression. Murine bone marrow-derived de...

  17. EXPRESSION OF rhBMP-7 GENE IN TRANSDUCED BONE MARROW DERIVED STROMAL CELLS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    段德宇; 杜靖远; 王洪; 刘勇; 郭晓东

    2002-01-01

    Objective. To explore the possibility of expression of exogenous gene in transduced bone marrow derived stromal cells(BMSCs). Methods. The marker gene , pbLacZ, was transferred into cultured BMSCs and the expression of transduced gene by X-gal staining was examined. Then plasmid pcDNA3-rhBMP7 was delivered to cultured BMSCs. Through immunohistochemical staining and RT-PCR assay, the expression of rhBMP7 gene was detected. Results. The exogenous gene could be expressed efficiently in transduced BMSCs. Conculsion. The present study provided a theoretical basis to gene therapy on the problems of bone and cartilage tissue.

  18. Gene expression profile changes in NB4 cells induced by realgar

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王怀宇; 刘陕西; 吕晓虹; 赵晓艾; 陈思宇; 李信民

    2003-01-01

    Objectives To compare the gene expression profiles of acute promyelocytic leukemia cell line NB4 before and after 12 hours of realgar treatment using cDNA microarray.Methods Two cDNA probes were prepared through reverse transcription from mRNA of both untreated and realgar treated NB4 cells. The probes were labeled with Cy3 and Cy5 fluorescence dyes individually, hybridized with cDNA microarray representing 1003 different human genes, and scanned for fluorescent intensity. The genes were screened through the analysis of the difference in two gene expression profiles. Results The analysis of gene expression profiles indicates that 9 genes were up-regulated and 37 genes were down-regulated. Among the 9 up-regulated genes, 2 genes were involved in a proteasome degradation pathway. Some genes related to protein synthesis, signal transduction and cell receptors were down-regulated. Conclusion PSMC2 and PSMD1 genes may play an important role in the apoptosis and partial differentiation of NB4 cells.

  19. Selenium is critical for cancer-signaling gene expression but not cell proliferation in human colon Caco-2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Huawei; Botnen, James H

    2007-01-01

    Selenium (Se) is a potential anticarcinogenic nutrient, and the essential role of Se in cell growth is well recognized but certain cancer cells appear to have acquired a survival advantage under conditions of Se-deficiency. To understand the molecular basis of Se-anticancer effects at nutritional doses (nmol/L) for cultured cells, we generated Se-deficient colon Caco-2 cells by gradually reducing serum in media because serum contains a trace amount of Se. The glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity of Se-deficient Caco-2 cells was 10.8 mU/mg protein compared to 133.6 approximately 146.3 mU/mg protein in Caco-2 cells supplemented with 500 nmol/L selenite, SeMSC or SeMet (three tested Se-chemical forms) after 7-d culture in serum free media. Interestingly, there were no detectable differences in cell growth, cell cycle progression between Se-deficient cells and cells supplemented with 500 nmol/L Se. To examine differential cancer signaling-gene expression between Se-deficient and Se-supplemented cells, we employed a cancer signal pathway-specific array assay coupled with the real time PCR analysis. Our data demonstrate that although Caco-2 cells are resistant to Se deprivation, Se may exert its anticancer property through increasing the expression of humoral defense gene (A2M) and tumor suppressor-related genes (IGFBP3, HHIP) while decreasing pro-inflammatory gene (CXC L9, HSPB2) expression.

  20. Gene Cloning of Murine α-Fetoprotein Gene and Construction of Its Eukaryotic Expression Vector and Expression in CHO Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    易继林; 田耕

    2003-01-01

    To clone the murine α-fetoprotein (AFP) gene, construct the eukaryotic expression vector of AFP and express in CHO cells, total RNA were extracted from Hepa 1-6 cells, and then the murine α-fetoprotein gene was amplified by RT-PCR and cloned into the eukaryotic expression vector pcDNA3.1. The recombinant of vector was identified by restriction enzyme analysis and sequencing. A fter transient transfection of CHO cells with the vector, Western blotting was used to detect the expression of AFP. It is concluded that the 1.8kb murine α-fetoprotein gene was successfully cloned and its eukaryotic expression vector was successfully constructed.

  1. Cell cycle networks link gene expression dysregulation, mutation, and brain maldevelopment in autistic toddlers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pramparo, Tiziano; Lombardo, Michael V; Campbell, Kathleen; Barnes, Cynthia Carter; Marinero, Steven; Solso, Stephanie; Young, Julia; Mayo, Maisi; Dale, Anders; Ahrens-Barbeau, Clelia; Murray, Sarah S; Lopez, Linda; Lewis, Nathan; Pierce, Karen; Courchesne, Eric

    2015-12-14

    Genetic mechanisms underlying abnormal early neural development in toddlers with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) remain uncertain due to the impossibility of direct brain gene expression measurement during critical periods of early development. Recent findings from a multi-tissue study demonstrated high expression of many of the same gene networks between blood and brain tissues, in particular with cell cycle functions. We explored relationships between blood gene expression and total brain volume (TBV) in 142 ASD and control male toddlers. In control toddlers, TBV variation significantly correlated with cell cycle and protein folding gene networks, potentially impacting neuron number and synapse development. In ASD toddlers, their correlations with brain size were lost as a result of considerable changes in network organization, while cell adhesion gene networks significantly correlated with TBV variation. Cell cycle networks detected in blood are highly preserved in the human brain and are upregulated during prenatal states of development. Overall, alterations were more pronounced in bigger brains. We identified 23 candidate genes for brain maldevelopment linked to 32 genes frequently mutated in ASD. The integrated network includes genes that are dysregulated in leukocyte and/or postmortem brain tissue of ASD subjects and belong to signaling pathways regulating cell cycle G1/S and G2/M phase transition. Finally, analyses of the CHD8 subnetwork and altered transcript levels from an independent study of CHD8 suppression further confirmed the central role of genes regulating neurogenesis and cell adhesion processes in ASD brain maldevelopment.

  2. Gene Concepts in Higher Education Cell and Molecular Biology Textbooks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albuquerque, Pitombo Maiana; de Almeida, Ana Maria Rocha; El-Hani, Nino Charbel

    2008-01-01

    Despite being a landmark of 20th century biology, the "classical molecular gene concept," according to which a gene is a stretch of DNA encoding a functional product, which may be a single polypeptide or RNA molecule, has been recently challenged by a series of findings (e.g., split genes, alternative splicing, overlapping and nested…

  3. Application of HSVtk suicide gene to X-SCID gene therapy: ganciclovir treatment offsets gene corrected X-SCID B cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchiyama, Toru; Kumaki, Satoru; Ishikawa, Yoshinori; Onodera, Masafumi; Sato, Miki; Du, Wei; Sasahara, Yoji; Tanaka, Nobuyuki; Sugamura, Kazuo; Tsuchiya, Shigeru

    2006-03-10

    Recently, a serious adverse effect of uncontrolled clonal T cell proliferation due to insertional mutagenesis of retroviral vector was reported in X-SCID gene therapy clinical trial. To offset the side effect, we have incorporated a suicide gene into therapeutic retroviral vector for selective elimination of transduced cells. In this study, B-cell lines from two X-SCID patients were transduced with bicistronic retroviral vector carrying human gamma c chain cDNA and Herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase gene. After confirmation of functional reconstitution of the gamma c chain, the cells were treated with ganciclovir (GCV). The gamma c chain positive cells were eliminated under low concentration without cytotoxicity on untransduced cells and have not reappeared at least for 5 months. Furthermore, the gamma c chain transduced cells were still sensitive to GCV after five months. These results demonstrated the efficacy of the suicide gene therapy although further in vivo studies are required to assess feasibility of this approach in clinical trial.

  4. Differentiation of embryonic stem cells transfected by ibeB gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHANG Deshu; FANG Wengang; CHEN Yuhua

    2005-01-01

    We have previously identified an E. coli deter- minant, ibeB gene locus contributing to invasion of human brain microvascular endothelial cells. In the present study, we established embryonic stem (ES) cell lines overexpressing IbeB and found that exogenic ibeB gene could start-up expression of a neural stem cell specific marker, nestin, and give rise to polar changes. In analysis of IbeB location, it was found that GFP-IbeB fusion protein targeted at the ES cell nucleus. These data suggests that ibeB gene may play an important role in the regulation of nestin expression.

  5. MICROARRAY ANALYSIS OF DIFFERENT GENE EXPRESSION OF HUMAN CERVICAL CANCER SUBCLONE CELL LINES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Wei; Li Xu; Wang Xiang

    2006-01-01

    Objective To examine the differentially expressed invasion-related genes in two anchorage-independent uterine cervical carcinoma cell lines derived from the same patient using a cDNA array. Methods Two human uterine cervical carcinoma subclonal cell lines CS03 and CS07 derived from a single donor line CS1213 were established by limited dilution procedure. The two cDNA samples retro-transcribed from total RNA derived from CS03 and CS07 cells were screened by a cDNA microarray carrying 234 human cell-cycle related genes and 1011 human signal transduction and membrane receptor -associated genes, scanned with a ScanArray 3000 laser scanner. Results The cDNA microarray analysis showed that 12 genes in CS03 were up-regulated compared to CS07, and 24 genes in CS07 were up-regulated. The function of a number of differentially expressed genes was consistently associated with cell-cycle, cell proliferation, migration, apoptosis, signal transduction and tumor metastasis, including p34cdc2, TSC22, plasminogen activator inhibitor I (PAI-1)and desmosome associated protein(Pinin). Conclusion Multiple genes are differentially expressed in uterine cervical carcinoma cell lines even came from the same patient. It is suggested that these genes are involved in the different phenotypic characteristics and development of cervical carcinoma.

  6. THE ROLE OF RECOMBINANT Rb GENE ADENOVIRUS VECTOR IN THE GROWTH OF LUNG ADENOCARCINOMA CELLS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Jian; Jiang Lei; Xia Yongjing; Li Hongxia; Hu Yajun; Hu Shixue; Xu Hongji

    1998-01-01

    Objective:To study the role of the most extensively studied tumor suppressor gene, retinoblastoma (Rb) gene,on the growth of lung adenocarcinoma cell line GLC-82 and explore a gene therapy approach for lung adenocarcinoma. Methods: The recombinant Rb gene adenovirus vector was constructed, the control virus which carries LacZ gene was producted by the same method. Infection effects were detected by biochemical staining of β-gal and immunohistochemical analysis of Rb protein. The Rb cDNA of infected cells were determined by PCR. The cell growth rate and cell cycle were observed by cell-counting and flow cytometry. Results: The constructed recombinant adenovirus vector could infect effectively the cells with high level expression of Rb cDNA and Rb protein. The transfection of wild-type Rb gene could suppress GLC-82 cell proliferation and decrease the cellular DNA synthesis. Conclusions: These results showed the possibility of using recombinant Rb gene adenovirus vector in the gene therapy of cancer to inhibit the growth of cancer.

  7. Amyloid precursor protein regulates migration and metalloproteinase gene expression in prostate cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyazaki, Toshiaki; Ikeda, Kazuhiro; Horie-Inoue, Kuniko [Division of Gene Regulation and Signal Transduction, Research Center for Genomic Medicine, Saitama Medical University, Saitama 350-1241 (Japan); Inoue, Satoshi, E-mail: INOUE-GER@h.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Division of Gene Regulation and Signal Transduction, Research Center for Genomic Medicine, Saitama Medical University, Saitama 350-1241 (Japan); Department of Geriatric Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-8655 (Japan); Department of Anti-Aging Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-8655 (Japan)

    2014-09-26

    Highlights: • APP knockdown reduced proliferation and migration of prostate cancer cells. • APP knockdown reduced expression of metalloproteinase and EMT-related genes. • APP overexpression promoted LNCaP cell migration. • APP overexpression increased expression of metalloproteinase and EMT-related genes. - Abstract: Amyloid precursor protein (APP) is a type I transmembrane protein, and one of its processed forms, β-amyloid, is considered to play a central role in the development of Alzheimer’s disease. We previously showed that APP is a primary androgen-responsive gene in prostate cancer and that its increased expression is correlated with poor prognosis for patients with prostate cancer. APP has also been implicated in several human malignancies. Nevertheless, the mechanism underlying the pro-proliferative effects of APP on cancers is still not well-understood. In the present study, we explored a pathophysiological role for APP in prostate cancer cells using siRNA targeting APP (siAPP). The proliferation and migration of LNCaP and DU145 prostate cancer cells were significantly suppressed by siAPP. Differentially expressed genes in siAPP-treated cells compared to control siRNA-treated cells were identified by microarray analysis. Notably, several metalloproteinase genes, such as ADAM10 and ADAM17, and epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT)-related genes, such as VIM, and SNAI2, were downregulated in siAPP-treated cells as compared to control cells. The expression of these genes was upregulated in LNCaP cells stably expressing APP when compared with control cells. APP-overexpressing LNCaP cells exhibited enhanced migration in comparison to control cells. These results suggest that APP may contribute to the proliferation and migration of prostate cancer cells by modulating the expression of metalloproteinase and EMT-related genes.

  8. MOLECULAR GENETIC DISORDERS IN THE VHL GENE AND METHYLATION OF SOME SUPPRESSOR GENES IN SPORADIC CLEAR-CELL RENAL CARCINOMAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. S. Mikhailenko

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Renal carcinoma (RC is one of ten most common malignancies in adults and an urgent problem of modern oncology. The purpose of the study was to make a molecular genetic analysis of a number of suppressor genes in RC, which was aimed at searching for and characterizing the potential markers of the disease. Two hundred and nine RC samples were examined, of them there were 192 clear-cell carcinomas. VHL gene mutations were detected by single-strand conformation polymorphism and sequence analyses while the methylation of suppressor genes was by the methylation-sensitive polymerase chain reaction. Somatic VHL mutations were determined in 35.4% of cases of clear-cell RC (CCRC. VHL gene disorders were found in 53.7% of patients with Stage 1, which counts in favor of VHL inactivation in early-stage CCRC. The methylation of the VHL, RASSF1, FHIT, and CDH1 genes was identified in 12, 56, 58.4, and 46.4% of primary tumors, respectively; that of at least one gene was in 84.1% of the samples. The hypermethylation of the RASSF1 gene was associated with late stages (p = 0.015 and the presence of metastases (p = 0.036; that of the CDH1 gene was related to the progression, invasion, and dissemination of primary tumors (p = 0.009, 0.039, and 0.002, respectively. The findings show it possible to use an analysis of abnormalities in the VHL gene and the methylation of the RASSF1 and CDH1 genes to develop a system of molecular genetic markers of RC.

  9. Multi-gene epigenetic silencing of tumor suppressor genes in T-cell lymphoma cells; delayed expression of the p16 protein upon reversal of the silencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nagasawa, T; Zhang, Q; Raghunath, P N

    2006-01-01

    To understand better T-cell lymphomagenesis, we examined promoter CpG methylation and mRNA expression of closely related genes encoding p16, p15, and p14 tumor suppressor genes in cultured malignant T-cells that were derived from cutaneous, adult type, and anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK......)-expressing T-cell lymphomas. p16 gene was epigenetically silenced in all but one of the 10 malignant T-cell lines examined, p15 gene silenced in roughly half of the lines, and p14 was the least frequently affected. Extensive methylation of the p16 promoter was seen in six out of 10 cutaneous T-cell lymphoma...... patient samples and corresponded with lack of p16 protein expression in the cases examined. Treatment of cultured T-cells with the DNA methyltransferase inhibitor, 5-aza-2-deoxy-cytidine, resulted in reversal of the p16 gene silencing. However, expression of p16 protein was delayed in relationship to p16...

  10. Identification of Cell Wall Synthesis Regulatory Genes Controlling Biomass Characteristics and Yield in Rice (Oryza Sativa)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng, Zhaohua PEng [Mississippi State University; Ronald, Palmela [UC-Davis; Wang, Guo-Liang [The Ohio State University

    2013-04-26

    This project aims to identify the regulatory genes of rice cell wall synthesis pathways using a cell wall removal and regeneration system. We completed the gene expression profiling studies following the time course from cell wall removal to cell wall regeneration in rice suspension cells. We also completed, total proteome, nuclear subproteome and histone modification studies following the course from cell wall removal and cell wall regeneration process. A large number of differentially expressed regulatory genes and proteins were identified. Meanwhile, we generated RNAi and over-expression transgenic rice for 45 genes with at least 10 independent transgenic lines for each gene. In addition, we ordered T-DNA and transposon insertion mutants for 60 genes from Korea, Japan, and France and characterized the mutants. Overall, we have mutants and transgenic lines for over 90 genes, exceeded our proposed goal of generating mutants for 50 genes. Interesting Discoveries a) Cell wall re-synthesis in protoplasts may involve a novel cell wall synthesis mechanism. The synthesis of the primary cell wall is initiated in late cytokinesis with further modification during cell expansion. Phragmoplast plays an essential role in cell wall synthesis. It services as a scaffold for building the cell plate and formation of a new cell wall. Only one phragmoplast and one new cell wall is produced for each dividing cell. When the cell wall was removed enzymatically, we found that cell wall re-synthesis started from multiple locations simultaneously, suggesting that a novel mechanism is involved in cell wall re-synthesis. This observation raised many interesting questions, such as how the starting sites of cell wall synthesis are determined, whether phragmoplast and cell plate like structures are involved in cell wall re-synthesis, and more importantly whether the same set of enzymes and apparatus are used in cell wall re-synthesis as during cytokinesis. Given that many known cell wall

  11. THE EFFECT OF TRANSFECTED CX43 GENE ON THE GJIC AND PROLIFERATION OF GLIOMA CELLS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    浦佩玉; 夏之柏; 黄强; 王春艳; 王广秀

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effect of Cx43 gene on gap junction intercellular communication (GJIC) and proliferation of glioma cells. Methods: Cx43 cDNA was transfected into TJ905 human glioblastoma cells using lipofectamine. The expression of Cx43 was identified by Northern blot analyses, in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry. MTT assay and average number of AgNORs (Argyrophlic nuclear organizer regions) were used to determine the cell proliferation. TUNEL method was used for detection of cell apoptosis, and scrape loading and dye tranfer method for examination of GJIC. Results: The Cx43 expression was greatly upregulated when Cx43 gene was transfected into TJ905 glioma cells. The cell proliferation was inhibited while the cell apoptosis was not increased and GJIC was significantly restored in the glioma cells tranfected with Cx43 gene. Conclusion: Cx43 gene has an inhibitory effect on the glioma cell proliferation, but no effect on induction of cell apoptosis. The restoration of GJIC may be the major mechanism involved in its effect. Cx43 gene can be the candidate for gene therapy of gliomas.

  12. Acceleration of Apoptosis by Transfection of Bak Gene in Multi-drug Resistant Bladder Cancer Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIUYing; ZENGFuqing

    2004-01-01

    To study the killing effects of bak gene on multi-drug resistant (MDR) bladder cancer cells and the mechanisms. Methods: Bak gene was transfected into MDR bladder cancer cells by liposome. The expression of bak and Bcl-2 mRNA was detected by in situ hybridization. The expression of bak and Bcl-2 proteins was detected by SABC immunohistochemistry. The growth rate of human bladder cancer cells was studied by constructing the growth curve, cell apoptosis was measured by flow cytometry, and the morphology of cells was observed by fluorescence stain. Results: The expression of bak mRNA was positive in EJ/bak cells (P<0.05). Bak protein expression of EJ/bak cells was positive and Bcl-2 protein expression was decreased (P<0.05). The growth of MDR bladder cancer cells was significantly inhibited after bak gene was transfected (P<0.05). Apoptosis cells were increased significantly. The apoptosis rate was 35%. Apoptotic bodies can be found in these cells by fluorescence stain. Conclusion: Bak gene could inhibit the growth of MDR bladder cancer cells effectively. Inducing cell apoptosis by down-regulating the expression of Bcl-2 gene might be one of its mechanisms.

  13. Gene expression profiles of human liver cells mediated by hepatitis B virus X protein

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei-ying ZHANG; Fu-qing XU; Chang-liang SHAN; Rong XIANG; Li-hong YE; Xiao-dong ZHANG

    2009-01-01

    Aim: To demonstrate the gene expression profiles mediated by hepatitis B virus X protein (HBx), we characterized the molecular features of pathogenesis associated with HBx in a human liver cell model.Methods: We examined gene expression profiles in L-O2-X cells, an engineered L-O2 cell line that constitutively expresses HBx, relative to L-O2 cells using an Agilent 22 K human 70-mer oligonucleotide microarray representing more than 21,329 unique, well-characterized Homo sapiens genes, Western blot analysis and RNA interference (RNAi) targeting HBx mRNA validated the overexpression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and Bcl-2 in L-O2-X cells. Meanwhile, the BrdU incorporation assay was used to test cell proliferation mediated by upregulated cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2).Results: The microarray showed that the expression levels of 152 genes were remarkably altered; 82 of the genes were upregulated and 70 genes were downregulated in L-O2-X cells. The altered genes were associated with signal transduction pathways, cell cycle, metastasis, transcriptional regulation, immune response, metabolism, and other processes. PCNA and Bcl-2 were upregulated in L-O2-X cells. Furthermore, we found that COX-2 upregulation in L-O2-X cells enhanced proliferation using the BrdU incorporation assay, whereas indomethacin (an inhibitor of COX-2) abolished the promotion.Conclusion: Our findings provide new evidence that HBx is able to regulate many genes that may be involved in the car-cinogenesis. These regulated genes mediated by HBx may serve as molecular targets for the prevention and treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma.

  14. Limited gene expression variation in human embryonic stem cell and induced pluripotent stem cell-derived endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Mark P; Rufaihah, Abdul J; Liu, Lei; Ghebremariam, Yohannes T; Ivey, Kathryn N; Cooke, John P; Srivastava, Deepak

    2013-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests human embryonic stem cell (hESC) and induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cell lines have differences in their epigenetic marks and transcriptomes, yet the impact of these differences on subsequent terminally differentiated cells is less well understood. Comparison of purified, homogeneous populations of somatic cells derived from multiple independent human iPS and ES lines will be required to address this critical question. Here, we report a differentiation protocol based on embryonic development that consistently yields large numbers of endothelial cells (ECs) derived from multiple hESCs or iPS cells. Mesoderm differentiation of embryoid bodies was maximized, and defined growth factors were used to generate KDR(+) EC progenitors. Magnetic purification of a KDR(+) progenitor subpopulation resulted in an expanding, homogeneous pool of ECs that expressed EC markers and had functional properties of ECs. Comparison of the transcriptomes revealed limited gene expression variability between multiple lines of human iPS-derived ECs or between lines of ES- and iPS-derived ECs. These results demonstrate a method to generate large numbers of pure human EC progenitors and differentiated ECs from pluripotent stem cells and suggest individual lineages derived from human iPS cells may have significantly less variance than their pluripotent founders.

  15. High-Content Analysis of CRISPR-Cas9 Gene-Edited Human Embryonic Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jared Carlson-Stevermer

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available CRISPR-Cas9 gene editing of human cells and tissues holds much promise to advance medicine and biology, but standard editing methods require weeks to months of reagent preparation and selection where much or all of the initial edited samples are destroyed during analysis. ArrayEdit, a simple approach utilizing surface-modified multiwell plates containing one-pot transcribed single-guide RNAs, separates thousands of edited cell populations for automated, live, high-content imaging and analysis. The approach lowers the time and cost of gene editing and produces edited human embryonic stem cells at high efficiencies. Edited genes can be expressed in both pluripotent stem cells and differentiated cells. This preclinical platform adds important capabilities to observe editing and selection in situ within complex structures generated by human cells, ultimately enabling optical and other molecular perturbations in the editing workflow that could refine the specificity and versatility of gene editing.

  16. High-Content Analysis of CRISPR-Cas9 Gene-Edited Human Embryonic Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson-Stevermer, Jared; Goedland, Madelyn; Steyer, Benjamin; Movaghar, Arezoo; Lou, Meng; Kohlenberg, Lucille; Prestil, Ryan; Saha, Krishanu

    2016-01-12

    CRISPR-Cas9 gene editing of human cells and tissues holds much promise to advance medicine and biology, but standard editing methods require weeks to months of reagent preparation and selection where much or all of the initial edited samples are destroyed during analysis. ArrayEdit, a simple approach utilizing surface-modified multiwell plates containing one-pot transcribed single-guide RNAs, separates thousands of edited cell populations for automated, live, high-content imaging and analysis. The approach lowers the time and cost of gene editing and produces edited human embryonic stem cells at high efficiencies. Edited genes can be expressed in both pluripotent stem cells and differentiated cells. This preclinical platform adds important capabilities to observe editing and selection in situ within complex structures generated by human cells, ultimately enabling optical and other molecular perturbations in the editing workflow that could refine the specificity and versatility of gene editing.

  17. General approach for in vivo recovery of cell type-specific effector gene sets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barsi, Julius C; Tu, Qiang; Davidson, Eric H

    2014-05-01

    Differentially expressed, cell type-specific effector gene sets hold the key to multiple important problems in biology, from theoretical aspects of developmental gene regulatory networks (GRNs) to various practical applications. Although individual cell types of interest have been recovered by various methods and analyzed, systematic recovery of multiple cell type-specific gene sets from whole developing organisms has remained problematic. Here we describe a general methodology using the sea urchin embryo, a material of choice because of the large-scale GRNs already solved for this model system. This method utilizes the regulatory states expressed by given cells of the embryo to define cell type and includes a fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS) procedure that results in no perturbation of transcript representation. We have extensively validated the method by spatial and qualitative analyses of the transcriptome expressed in isolated embryonic skeletogenic cells and as a consequence, generated a prototypical cell type-specific transcriptome database.

  18. RETROVIRAL MEDIATED EFFICIENT TRANSFER ANDEXPRESSION OF MULTIPLE DRUG RESISTANCE GENE TO HUMAN LEUKEMIC CELLS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To investigate retroviral-mediated transfer and expression of human multidrug resistance (MDR) gene MDR1 in leukemic cells. Methods: Human myeloid cells, K562 and NB4, were infected by MDR retrovirus from the producer PA317/HaMDR, and the resistant cells were selected with cytotoxic drug. The transfer and expression of MDR1 gene was analyzed by using polymerase chain reaction (PCR), flow cytometry (FCM) and semisolid colonies cultivation. Results: The resistant cells, K562/MDR and NB4/MDR, in which integration of the exogenous MDR1 gene was confirmed by PCR analysis, displayed a typical MDR phenotype. The expression of MDR1 transgene was detected on truncated as well as full-length transcripts. Moreover, the resistant cells were P-glycoprotein postiive at 78.0% to 98.7% analyzed with FCM. The transduction efficieny in K562 cells was studied on suspension cultures and single-cell colonies. The transduction was more efficient in coculture system (67.9%~ 72.5%) than in supernatant system (33.1%~ 46.8%), while growth factors may improve the efficiency. Conclusion: Retrovirus could allow a functional transfer and expression of MDR1 gene in human leukemia cells, and MDR1 might act as a dominant selectable gene for coexpression with the genes of interest in gene therapy.

  19. Inhibition of LINE-1 retrotransposon-encoded reverse transcriptase modulates the expression of cell differentiation genes in breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patnala, Radhika; Lee, Sung-Hun; Dahlstrom, Jane E; Ohms, Stephen; Chen, Long; Dheen, S Thameem; Rangasamy, Danny

    2014-01-01

    Long Interspersed Elements (L1 elements) are biologically active retrotransposons that are capable of autonomous replication using their own reverse transcriptase (RT) enzyme. Expression of the normally repressed RT has been implicated in cancer cell growth. However, at present, little is known about the expression of L1-encoded RT activity or the molecular changes that are associated with RT activity in the development of breast cancer. Here, we report that RT activity is widespread in breast cancer cells. The expression of RT protein decreased markedly in breast cancer cells after treatment with the antiretroviral drug, efavirenz. While the majority of cells showed a significant reduction in proliferation, inhibition of RT was also accompanied by cell-specific differences in morphology. MCF7 cells displayed elongated microtubule extensions that adhered tightly to their substrate, while a large fraction of the T47D cells that we studied formed long filopodia projections. These morphological changes were reversible upon cessation of RT inhibition, confirming their dependence on RT activity. We also carried out gene expression profiling with microarrays and determined the genes that were differentially expressed during the process of cellular differentiation. Genes involved in proliferation, cell migration, and invasive activity were repressed in RT-inhibited cells. Concomitantly, genes involved in cell projection, formation of vacuolar membranes, and cell-to-cell junctions were significantly upregulated in RT-inhibited cells. qRT-PCR examination of the mRNA expression of these genes in additional cell lines yielded close correlation between their differential expression and the degree of cellular differentiation. Our study demonstrates that the inhibition of L1-encoded RT can reduce the rate of proliferation and promote differentiation of breast cancer cells. Together, these results provide a direct functional link between the expression of L1 retrotransposons and

  20. Involvement of gene methylation changes in the differentiation of human amniotic epithelial cells into islet-like cell clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Lin; Wang, Jian; Lu, Guangxiu

    2014-09-01

    Insulin-dependent diabetes results from destruction of the insulin-producing β-cells of the pancreas. Islet cell transplantation is a promising cure for diabetes. Here, we induced human amniotic epithelial cells (hAECs) to differentiate into islet-like cell clusters by nicotinamide plus betacellulin in vitro, and further investigated the DNA methylation status by a Nimble MeDIP microarray before and after cell differentiation to shed light on the molecular mechanisms of this differentiation. In addition, 5-Aza-2'-deoxycytidine was used to investigate whether the differentiation of hAECs into islet-like cells occurred through demethylation. Purified hAECs (CK18(+)/E-cadherin(+)/CD29(+)/CD90(-)/CD34(-)/CD45(-)) were isolated from human amnia. After induction, hAECs were found to be insulin positive and sensitive to glucose, indicating successful induction to islet-like cells. The methylation status of cell cytoskeleton-related genes was down-regulated and that of negative regulation of cell adhesion-related genes was up-regulated. The methylation status of pancreas development-related genes such as HNF1α and DGAT1 was decreased in hAECs after induction. After brief demethylation, INS gene expression was up-regulated in islet-like cell clusters, suggesting that DNA methylation changes were associated with the differentiation of hAECs into islet-like cell clusters.

  1. Compact disk (CD)-shaped device for single cell isolation and PCR of a specific gene in the isolated cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furutani, Shunsuke; Nagai, Hidenori; Takamura, Yuzuru; Kubo, Izumi

    2010-12-01

    For immediate discrimination among isolated cells we propose a novel device and technique for isolation of cells and sequential detection of specific gene(s) within them by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). In this study, we isolated Salmonella enterica cells and detected the Salmonella-specific invA gene from isolated cells by PCR on a compact disk (CD)-shaped device. This device enabled liquid flow by centrifugal force without a micro pump, and was fabricated from silicon wafer and glass to avoid evaporation of a small amount of reagent. One device has 24 microchannels, and 313 microchambers integrated on each microchannel. One microliter of PCR mixture containing cells was separated into microchambers on the device at 5000 rpm for 30 s. Each microchamber contained approximately 1.5 nL PCR mixture. A Poisson distribution of S. enterica cells was observed for different densities of cell suspension. At 200 cells μL(-1) of S. enterica or less, isolated single cells could be determined on the device by amplification of DNA of the invA gene; at 400 cells μL(-1), chambers containing no, one, two, or three cells could be determined on the device. Selective detection of S. enterica was achieved by PCR from a mixture of S. enterica and Escherichia coli on the CD-shaped device.

  2. Parallel differentiation of embryonic stem cells into different cell types by a single gene-based differentiation system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoma, Eva C; Maurus, Katja; Wagner, Toni U; Schartl, Manfred

    2012-04-01

    The generation of defined somatic cell types from pluripotent stem cells represents a promising system for many applications for regenerative therapy or developmental studies. Certain key developmental genes have been shown to be able to influence the fate determination of differentiating stem cells suggesting an alternative differentiation strategy to conventional medium-based methods. Here, we present a system allowing controlled, directed differentiation of embryonic stem cells (ESCs) solely by ectopic expression of single genes. We demonstrate that the myogenic master regulator myoD1 is sufficient to induce formation of skeletal muscle. In contrast to previous studies, our data suggest that myoD1-induced differentiation is independent of additional differentiation-inducing or lineage-promoting signals and occurs even under pluripotency-promoting conditions. Moreover, we demonstrate that single gene-induced differentiation enables the controlled formation of two distinct cell types in parallel. By mixing ES cell lines expressing myoD1 or the neural transcription factor ngn2, respectively, we generated a mixed culture of myocytes and neurons. Our findings provide new insights in the role of key developmental genes during cell fate decisions. Furthermore, this study represents an interesting strategy to obtain mixed cultures of different cells from stem cells, suggesting a valuable tool for cellular development and cell-cell interaction studies.

  3. Creation of Mice Bearing a Partial Duplication of HPRT Gene Marked with a GFP Gene and Detection of Revertant Cells In Situ as GFP-Positive Somatic Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asao Noda

    Full Text Available It is becoming clear that apparently normal somatic cells accumulate mutations. Such accumulations or propagations of mutant cells are thought to be related to certain diseases such as cancer. To better understand the nature of somatic mutations, we developed a mouse model that enables in vivo detection of rare genetically altered cells via GFP positive cells. The mouse model carries a partial duplication of 3' portion of X-chromosomal HPRT gene and a GFP gene at the end of the last exon. In addition, although HPRT gene expression was thought ubiquitous, the expression level was found insufficient in vivo to make the revertant cells detectable by GFP positivity. To overcome the problem, we replaced the natural HPRT-gene promoter with a CAG promoter. In such animals, termed HPRT-dup-GFP mouse, losing one duplicated segment by crossover between the two sister chromatids or within a single molecule of DNA reactivates gene function, producing hybrid HPRT-GFP proteins which, in turn, cause the revertant cells to be detected as GFP-positive cells in various tissues. Frequencies of green mutant cells were measured using fixed and frozen sections (liver and pancreas, fixed whole mount (small intestine, or by means of flow cytometry (unfixed splenocytes. The results showed that the frequencies varied extensively among individuals as well as among tissues. X-ray exposure (3 Gy increased the frequency moderately (~2 times in the liver and small intestine. Further, in two animals out of 278 examined, some solid tissues showed too many GFP-positive cells to score (termed extreme jackpot mutation. Present results illustrated a complex nature of somatic mutations occurring in vivo. While the HPRT-dup-GFP mouse may have a potential for detecting tissue-specific environmental mutagens, large inter-individual variations of mutant cell frequency cause the results unstable and hence have to be reduced. This future challenge will likely involve lowering the

  4. Expression profiling of genes regulated by TGF-beta: Differential regulation in normal and tumour cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahashi Takashi

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background TGF-beta is one of the key cytokines implicated in various disease processes including cancer. TGF-beta inhibits growth and promotes apoptosis in normal epithelial cells and in contrast, acts as a pro-tumour cytokine by promoting tumour angiogenesis, immune-escape and metastasis. It is not clear if various actions of TGF-beta on normal and tumour cells are due to differential gene regulations. Hence we studied the regulation of gene expression by TGF-beta in normal and cancer cells. Results Using human 19 K cDNA microarrays, we show that 1757 genes are exclusively regulated by TGF-beta in A549 cells in contrast to 733 genes exclusively regulated in HPL1D cells. In addition, 267 genes are commonly regulated in both the cell-lines. Semi-quantitative and real-time qRT-PCR analysis of some genes agrees with the microarray data. In order to identify the signalling pathways that influence TGF-beta mediated gene regulation, we used specific inhibitors of p38 MAP kinase, ERK kinase, JNK kinase and integrin signalling pathways. The data suggest that regulation of majority of the selected genes is dependent on at least one of these pathways and this dependence is cell-type specific. Interestingly, an integrin pathway inhibitor, RGD peptide, significantly affected TGF-beta regulation of Thrombospondin 1 in A549 cells. Conclusion These data suggest major differences with respect to TGF-beta mediated gene regulation in normal and transformed cells and significant role of non-canonical TGF-beta pathways in the regulation of many genes by TGF-beta.

  5. HER4 selectively coregulates estrogen stimulated genes associated with breast tumor cell proliferation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Wen; Jones, Frank E., E-mail: fjones3@tulane.edu

    2014-01-10

    Highlights: •HER4/4ICD is an obligate coactivator for 37% of estrogen regulated genes. •HER4/4ICD coactivated genes selectively regulate estrogen stimulated proliferation. •Estrogen stimulated tumor cell migration occurs independent of HER4/4ICD. •Disrupting HER4/4ICD and ER coactivated gene expression may suppress breast cancer. -- Abstract: The EGFR-family member HER4 undergoes regulated intramembrane proteolysis (RIP) to generate an intracellular domain (4ICD) that functions as a transcriptional coactivator. Accordingly, 4ICD coactivates the estrogen receptor (ER) and associates with ER at target gene promoters in breast tumor cells. However, the extent of 4ICD coactivation of ER and the functional significance of the 4ICD/ER transcriptional complex is unclear. To identify 4ICD coactivated genes we performed a microarray gene expression analysis of β-estradiol treated cells comparing control MCF-7 breast cancer cells to MCF-7 cells where HER4 expression was stably suppressed using a shRNA. In the MCF-7 cell line, β-estradiol significantly stimulated or repressed by 2-fold or more 726 or 53 genes, respectively. Significantly, HER4/4ICD was an obligate coactivator for 277 or 38% of the β-estradiol stimulated genes. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis of β-estradiol regulated genes identified significant associations with multiple cellular functions regulating cellular growth and proliferation, cell cycle progression, cancer metastasis, decreased hypoplasia, tumor cell migration, apoptotic resistance of tumor cells, and increased transcription. Genes coactivated by 4ICD displayed functional specificity by only significantly contributing to cellular growth and proliferation, cell cycle progression, and decreased hypoplasia. In direct concordance with these in situ results we show that HER4 knockdown in MCF-7 cells results in a loss of estrogen stimulated tumor cell proliferation and cell cycle progression, whereas, estrogen stimulated tumor cell migration was

  6. INHIBITION OF APOPTOSIS BY bcr-abl FUSION GENE IN K562 CELLS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Chun-hong; SUN Bing-zhong; YUAN Yue-chuan

    1999-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effect of bcr-abl fusion gene on CML cell apoptosis. Methods: Apoptosis of exvivo cultured K562 cells were observed after exposure to synthetic 18 mer antisense oligodeoxynucleotide complementary to the bcr-abl junction (b3a2). Results: Apoptosis of K562 cells was significantly increased associated with inhibition of bcr-abl expression. Conclusion: bcr-abl fusion gene formation due to chromosome translocation may be the major mechanism of CML via inhibition of apoptosis.

  7. Insulin but Not Glucagon Gene is Silenced in Human Pancreas-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    We previously characterized human islet-derived precursor cells (hIPCs) as a specific type of mesenchymal stem cell capable of differentiating to insulin (INS)- and glucagon (GCG)-expressing cells. However, during proliferative expansion, INS transcript becomes undetectable and then cannot be induced, a phenomenon consistent with silencing of the INS gene. We explored this possibility by determining whether ectopic expression of transcription factors known to induce transcription of this gene...

  8. Burkitt's lymphoma is a malignancy of mature B cells expressing somatically mutated V region genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, U.; Klein, G.; Ehlin-Henriksson, B.; Rajewsky, K.; Küppers, R.

    1995-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The developmental stage from which stems the malignant B cell population in Burkitt's lymphoma (BL) is unclear. An approach to answering this question is provided by the sequence analysis of rear-ranged immunoglobulin (Ig) variable region (V) genes from BL for evidence of somatic mutations, together with a phenotypic characterization. As somatic hypermutation of Ig V region genes occurs in germinal center B cells, somatically mutated Ig genes are found in germinal center B cells and their descendents. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Rearranged V kappa region genes from 10 kappa-expressing sporadic and endemic BL-derived cell lines (9 IgM and 1 IgG positive) and three kappa-expressing endemic BL biopsy specimens were amplified by polymerase chain reaction and sequenced. In addition, VH region gene sequences from these cell lines were determined. RESULTS: All BL cell lines and the three biopsy specimens carried somatically mutated V region genes. The average mutation frequency of rearranged V kappa genes from eight BL cell lines established from sporadic BL was 1.8%. A higher frequency (6%) was found in five endemic cases (three biopsy specimens and two BL cell lines). CONCLUSIONS: The detection of somatic mutations in the rearranged V region genes suggests that both sporadic and endemic BL represent a B-cell malignancy originating from germinal center B cells or their descendants. Interestingly, the mutation frequency detected in sporadic BL is in a range similar to that characteristic for IgM-expressing B cells in the human peripheral blood and for mu chain-expressing germinal center B cells, whereas the mutation frequency found in endemic BL is significantly higher. PMID:8529116

  9. Differential gene expression in CD45 cells at para-aortic foci stage of chicken haematopoiesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Säynäjäkangas, R; Uchida, T; Vainio, O

    2009-09-01

    Para-aortic foci of chicken embryos at 6-7 days of development are considered to provide a microenvironment for haematopoietic stem cell proliferation and initial differentiation similar to that of fetal liver in mammals. Here, we have investigated the genes involved in this process by constructing and analysing a subtractive cDNA library from CD45(+) cells in para-aortic region. Among 394 analysed clones 99 distinct genes were identified by sequence homology search. Classification of the identified genes according to biological processes revealed that innate immunity-related genes are highly expressed at this stage. This can be explained by the presence of yolk sac-derived macrophages in the original tissue sample but also by the indiscriminate expression of multiple lineage-specific genes in haematopoietic stem cells and primitive progenitors. Differentially expressed genes related to transcription, signalling and lymphocyte functions are potential candidates involved in lineage commitment.

  10. Laser-based microdissection of single cells from tissue sections and PCR analysis of rearranged immunoglobulin genes from isolated normal and malignant human B cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Küppers, Ralf; Schneider, Markus; Hansmann, Martin-Leo

    2013-01-01

    Normal and malignant B cells carry rearranged immunoglobulin (Ig) variable region genes, which due to their practically limitless diversity represent ideal clonal markers for these cells. We describe here an approach to isolate single cells from frozen tissue sections by microdissection using a laser-based method. From the isolated cells rearranged IgH and Igκ genes are amplified in a semi-nested PCR approach, using a collection of V gene family-specific primers recognizing nearly all V gene segments together with primers for the J gene segments. By sequence analysis of V genes from distinct cells, the clonal relationship of the B lineage cells can unequivocally be determined and related to the histological distribution of the cells. The approach is also useful to determine V, D, and J gene usage. Moreover, the presence and pattern of somatic Ig V gene mutations give valuable insight into the stage of differentiation of the B cells.

  11. TNF-alpha-induced metastasis gene changes in MCF-7 cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaofeng Chen; Yongqian Shu; Wei Li; Yongmei Yin

    2008-01-01

    Objective: Studies have shown that TNF- a secreted by tumor cells and macrophages infiltrated into the tumor microenvironment might promote the metastasis of a variety of malignant cancers, including breast cancer. The present study was designed to detect global metastasis-related gene expression changes of MCF-7 cells treated by low dose TNF-a and to further explore the mechanisms by which TNF-a contributes to metastasis. Methods: MCF-7 cells were cultured and treated with low dose TNF-a (20 ng/ml), cDNA array analysis was applied to detect the metastasis related gene expressions. Results: A total of 36 gene expressions were significantly regulated by TNF-a. Functional analysis indicates that the altered genes belong to different functional group. Most of the genes changed may promote the metastasis of MCF-7 cells while the others may inhibit metastasis. The changes observed in gene expression following TNF-a were somewhat time dependent. Conclusion: TNF-a can enhance the invasive ability of MCF-7 cells, partly by regulating a series of metastasis related genes, and these genes may take part in every step of metastasis. Some of the genes deserve further study.

  12. Effects of hydrogen peroxide on mitochondrial gene expression of intestinal epithelial cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian-Ming Li; Qian Cai; Hong Zhou; Guang-Xia Xiao

    2002-01-01

    AIM: To study the effects of hydrogen peroxide on mitochondrial gene expression of intestinal epithelial cells in in vitro model of hydrogen peroxide-stimulated SW-480 cells.METHODS: RNA of hydrogen peroxide-induced SW-480 cells was isolated, and reverse-transcriptional polymerase chain reaction was performed to study gene expression of ATPase subunit 6, ATPase subunit 8, cytochrome c oxidase subunit Ⅰ (COⅠ), cytochrome coxidase subuit Ⅱ (COⅡ) and cytochrome c oxidase subunit Ⅲ (COⅢ). Mitochondria were isolated and activities of mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase and ATPase were also measured simultaneously.RESULTS: Hydrogen peroxide led to differential expression of mitochondrial genes with some genes up-regulated or down-regulated in a dose dependent manner. Differences were very obvious in expressions of mitochondrial genes of cells treated with hydrogen peroxide in a concentration of 400 μmol/L or 4 mmol/L. In general, differential expression of mitochondrial genes was characterized by up-regulation of mitochondrial genes in the concentration of 400 μmol/L and down-regulation in the concentration of 4 mmol/L. In consistence with changes in mitochondrial gene expressions, hydrogen peroxide resulted in decreased activities of cytochrome c oxidase and ATPase.CONCLUSIONS: The differential expression of mitochondrial genes encoding cytochrome c oxidase and ATPase is involved in apoptosis of intestinal epithelial cells by affecting activities of cytochorme c oxidase and ATPase.

  13. Clinicopathology, immunophenotype, T cell receptor gene rearrangement, Epstein-Barr virus status and p53 gene mutation of cutaneous extranodal NK/T-cell lymphoma, nasal-type

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Ting-ting; XU Chen; LIU Shan-ling; KAN Bei; RAN Yu-ping; LIU Wei-ping; LI Gan-di

    2013-01-01

    Background Extranodal natural killer/T-cell (NK/T cell) lymphoma,nasal-type,is a rare lymphoma.Skin is the second most common site of involvement after the nasal cavity/nasalpharynx.The aim of this study was to investigate the clinicopathologic features,immunophenotype,T cell receptor (TCR) gene rearrangement,the association with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection and p53 gene mutations of the lymphoma.Methods The clinicopathologic analysis,immunohistochemistry,in situ hybridization for EBER1/2,TCR gene rearrangement by polymerase chain reaction (PCR),mutations of p53 gene analyzed by PCR and sequence analysis were employed in this study.Results In the 19 cases,the tumor primarily involved the dermis and subcutaneous layer.Immunohistochemical staining showed that most of the cases expressed CD45RO,CD56,CD3ε,TIA-1 and GrB.Three cases were positive for CD3 and two cases were positive for CD30.Monoclonal TCRY gene rearrangement was found in 7 of 18 cases.The positive rate of EBER1/2 was 100%.No p53 gene mutation was detected on the exon 4-9 in the 18 cases.Fifteen cases showed Pro (proline)/Arg (arginine) single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) on the exon 4 at codon 72.The expression of p53 protein was 72% (13/18) immunohistochemically.Conclusions Cutaneous NK/T-cell lymphoma is a rare but highly aggressive lymphoma with poor prognosis.No p53 gene mutation was detected on the exon 4-9,and Pro/Arg SNPs on p53 codon 72 were detected in the cutaneous NK/T-cell lymphoma.The overexpression of p53 protein may not be the result of p53 gene mutation.

  14. Expression Profile of Metastasis-associated Genes in Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Pei; LING Zhiqiang; YANG Hongyan; HUANG Youtian; ZHAO Mingyao; ZHENG Zhimin; DONG Ziming

    2006-01-01

    The differentially expressed genes between esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC)with or without lymphatic metastasis were investigated by gene chip, and the lymphatic metastasisassociated genes were screened out. Expression array was used to detect the mRNA from both the primary carcinoma and the corresponding esophageal epithelium in 15 cases of human ESCC. The lymphatic metastasis-associated genes were screened by bioinformatics between ESCC with or without lymphatic metastasis. The results showed that 43 (4.85%) genes significantly differed between the ESCC with and without lymphatic metastasis (P<0.05), of which 18(2.03%)were upregulated and 25 (2.82 %) down-regulated. The up-regulated genes were involved in cell adhesion molecules and cell membrane receptors and the down-regulated genes were mostly cell cycle regulators and intracellular signaling molecules. It was suggested that lymphatic metastasis-associated genes were screened by gene chip, which was helpful to understand the molecular mechanism of ESCC lymphatic metastasis and lymphatic metastasis-associated genes might be used as diagnostic markers and therapeutic targets for lymphatic metastasis.

  15. Identification of NDRG1-regulated genes associated with invasive potential in cervical and ovarian cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Gang, E-mail: zhaog69@sjtu.edu.cn [Department of Pathology, The First People' s Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University, Shanghai (China); Department of Pathology, Tianjin Cancer Hospital, Tianjin Medical University, Tianjin (China); Chen, Jiawei, E-mail: jiaweichen2000@gmail.com [Department of Pathology, The First People' s Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University, Shanghai (China); Deng, Yanqiu [Pathophysiology Department, Tianjin Medical University, Tianjin (China); Gao, Feng [Department of Pathology, The First People' s Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University, Shanghai (China); Zhu, Jiwei [Basic Medical College, Harbin Medical University, Harbin (China); Feng, Zhenzhong; Lv, Xiuhong [Department of Pathology, The First People' s Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University, Shanghai (China); Zhao, Zheng [SAS Headquarters, S6013, 600 Research Drive, Cary, NC (United States)

    2011-04-29

    Highlights: {yields} NDRG1 was knockdown in cervical and ovarian cancer cell lines by shRNA technology. {yields} NDRG1 knockdown resulted in increased cell invasion activities. {yields} Ninety-six common deregulated genes in both cell lines were identified by cDNA microarray. {yields} Eleven common NDRG1-regulated genes might enhance cell invasive activity. {yields} Regulation of invasion by NDRG1 is an indirect and complicated process. -- Abstract: N-myc downstream regulated gene 1 (NDRG1) is an important gene regulating tumor invasion. In this study, shRNA technology was used to suppress NDRG1 expression in CaSki (a cervical cancer cell line) and HO-8910PM (an ovarian cancer cell line). In vitro assays showed that NDRG1 knockdown enhanced tumor cell adhesion, migration and invasion activities without affecting cell proliferation. cDNA microarray analysis revealed 96 deregulated genes with more than 2-fold changes in both cell lines after NDRG1 knockdown. Ten common upregulated genes (LPXN, DDR2, COL6A1, IL6, IL8, FYN, PTP4A3, PAPPA, ETV5 and CYGB) and one common downregulated gene (CLCA2) were considered to enhance tumor cell invasive activity. BisoGenet network analysis indicated that NDRG1 regulated these invasion effector genes/proteins in an indirect manner. Moreover, NDRG1 knockdown also reduced pro-invasion genes expression such as MMP7, TMPRSS4 and CTSK. These results suggest that regulation of invasion and metastasis by NDRG1 is a highly complicated process.

  16. Expression of Mesenchymal Stem Cells-Related Genes and Plasticity of Aspirated Follicular Cells Obtained from Infertile Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edo Dzafic

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available After removal of oocytes for in vitro fertilization, follicular aspirates which are rich in somatic follicular cells are discarded in daily medical practice. However, there is some evidence that less differentiated cells with stem cell characteristics are present among aspirated follicular cells (AFCs. The aim of this study was to culture AFCs in vitro and to analyze their gene expression profile. Using the RT2 Profiler PCR array, we investigated the expression profile of 84 genes related to stemness, mesenchymal stem cells (MCSs, and cell differentiation in AFCs enriched by hypoosmotic protocol from follicular aspirates of infertile women involved in assisted reproduction programme in comparison with bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs and fibroblasts. Altogether the expression of 57 genes was detected in AFCs: 16 genes (OCT4, CD49f, CD106, CD146, CD45, CD54, IL10, IL1B, TNF, VEGF, VWF, HDAC1, MITF, RUNX2, PPARG, and PCAF were upregulated and 20 genes (FGF2, CASP3, CD105, CD13, CD340, CD73, CD90, KDR, PDGFRB, BDNF, COL1A1, IL6, MMP2, NES, NUDT6, BMP6, SMURF2, BMP4, GDF5, and JAG1 were downregulated in AFCs when compared with BM-MSCs. The genes which were upregulated in AFCs were mostly related to MSCs and connected with ovarian function, and differed from those in fibroblasts. The cultured AFCs with predominating granulosa cells were successfully in vitro differentiated into adipogenic-, osteogenic-, and pancreatic-like cells. The upregulation of some MSC-specific genes and in vitro differentiation into other types of cells indicated a subpopulation of AFCs with specific stemness, which was not similar to those of BM-MSCs or fibroblasts.

  17. High expression of hTERT and stemness genes in BORIS/CTCFL positive cells isolated from embryonic cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loredana Alberti

    Full Text Available BORIS/CTCFL is a member of cancer testis antigen family normally expressed in germ cells. In tumors, it is aberrantly expressed although its functions are not completely well-defined. To better understand the functions of BORIS in cancer, we selected the embryonic cancer cells as a model. Using a molecular beacon, which specifically targets BORIS mRNA, we demonstrated that BORIS positive cells are a small subpopulation of tumor cells (3-5% of total. The BORIS-positive cells isolated using BORIS-molecular beacon, expressed higher telomerase hTERT, stem cell (NANOG, OCT4, SOX2 and cancer stem cell marker genes (CD44 and ALDH1 compared to the BORIS-negative tumor cells. In order to define the functional role of BORIS, stable BORIS-depleted embryonic cancer cells were generated. BORIS silencing strongly down-regulated the expression of hTERT, stem cell and cancer stem cell marker genes. Moreover, the BORIS knockdown increased cellular senescence in embryonic cancer cells, revealing a putative role of BORIS in the senescence biological program. Our data indicate an association of BORIS expressing cells subpopulation with the expression of stemness genes, highlighting the critical role played by BORIS in embryonic neoplastic disease.

  18. Analysis of cell-type-specific gene expression during mouse spermatogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Almstrup, Kristian; Nielsen, John E; Hansen, Martin Asser

    2004-01-01

    In rodents, changes in gene expression during spermatogenesis can be monitored by sampling testis from each day during postnatal development. However, changes in gene expression at the tissue level can reflect changes in the concentration of an mRNA in a specific cell type, changes in volume....... Combining results from these techniques allows determination of the cell-type-specific gene-expression patterns of many genes during spermatogenesis. Differential display was used to determine expression profiles with high sensitivity and independent of prior knowledge of the sequence, whereas DNA arrays...... quickly assess the expression profiles of all the genes. This identified three groups of gene-expression profiles. The major group corresponds to genes that are upregulated in spermatocytes during either the mid- or late- pachytene phase of spermatogenesis (stages VII-XI). This pachytene cluster...

  19. ADHESION INDUCES MATRIX METALLOPROTEINASE-9 GENE EXPRESSION IN OVARIAN CANCER CELLS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    田方; 颜春洪; 薛红; 肖凤君

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the expression of matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) gene in cancer cells induced by adhesion with fibronectin and the underlying mechanism of cell invasion. Methods: Following adhesion of ovarian cancer cells A2780 to fibronectin, MMP mRNA expression was assayed by using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). MMP-9 promoter was cloned from genomic DNA of HT1080 cells with PCR. The MMP-9-pGL2 reporter gene vector was constructed and then transiently transfected into A2780 cells. Results: Adhesion could induce the expression of MMP-9 gene in A2780 cells, but did not affect longer theexpression of MMP-2 or TIMP-1 gene. The induction was enhanced with longer adhesion time. When the transfected cells were allowed to adhere and spread on FN-coated surface, the promoter activity of MMP-9 gene was also enhanced dramatically. Conclusion: adhesion of cells with ECM may stimulate the expression of MMP-9 gene through stimulating the promoter activity, thereby enhancing cancer cell invasion and metastasis.

  20. Study on interleukin-18 gene transfer into human breast cancer cells to prevent tumorigenicity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩明勇; 郑树; 于金明; 彭佳萍; 郭其森; 王家林

    2004-01-01

    To study the effect of interleukin-18 gene transfection on the tumorigenesis of breast cancer cell line Bacp37, human breast cancer cell line Bcap37 were transfected with Lipofectamine and selected by G418. The biological expression of rhIL-18 was tested by RT-PCR and ELISA method; nude mice were injected with Bcap37 cell with or without the hIL-18 gene. The hIL-18 cDNA was successfully integrated into Bcap37 cell; 126.3±4.5 pg hIL-18 secreted by one million transduced cells in 24 hours. Nude mice injected with IL-18 gene engineered Bcap37 cell had no tumor growth. These findings indicated that human breast cancer cells were successfully modified by the gene of IL-18 cytokine; the IL-18 gene engineered Bcap37 cells secreted hIL-18 and lost their tumorigenicity. The Bcap37 cells transduced with IL-18 gene may be used as breast cancer vaccine.

  1. Study on interleukin-18 gene transfer into human breast cancer cells to prevent tumorigenicity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩明勇; 郑树; 于金明; 彭佳萍; 郭其森; 王家林

    2004-01-01

    To study the effect of interleukin-18 gene transfection on the tumorigenesis of breast cancer cell line Bacp37,human breast cancer cell line Bcap37 were transfected with Lipofectamine and selected by G418.The biological expression of rhIL-18 was tested by RT-PCR and ELISA method;nude mice were injected with Bcap37 cell with or without the hIL-18 gene.The hIL-18 cDNA was successfully integrated into Bcap37 cell; 126.3±4.5pg hIL-18 secreted by one million transduced cells in 24 hours. Nude mice injected with IL-18 gene engineered Bcap37 cell had no tumor growth.These findings indicated that human breast cancer cells were successfully modified by the gene of IL-18 cytokine;the IL-18 gene engineered Bcap37 cells secreted hIL-18 and lost their tumorigenicity.The Bcap37 cells transduced with IL-18 gene may be used as breast cancer vaccine.

  2. Cumulus-specific genes are transcriptionally silent following somatic cell nuclear transfer in a mouse model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    This study investigated whether four cumulus-specific genes: follicular stimulating hormone receptor (FSHr), hyaluronan synthase 2 (Has2), prostaglandin synthase 2 (Ptgs2) and steroidogenic acute regulator protein (Star), were correctly reprogrammed to be transcriptionally silent following somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) in a murine model. Cumulus cells of C57×CBA F1 female mouse were injected into enucleated oocytes, followed by activation in 10 μmol/L strontium chloride for 5 h and subsequent in vitro culture up to the blastocyst stage. Expression of cumulus-specific genes in SCNT-derived embryos at 2-cell, 4-cell and day 4.5 blastocyst stages was compared with corresponding in vivo fertilized embryos by real-time PCR. It was demonstrated that immediately after the first cell cycle, SCNT-derived 2-cell stage embryos did not express all four cumulus-specific genes, which continually remained silent at the 4-cell and blastocyst stages. It is therefore concluded that all four cumulus-specific genes were correctly reprogrammed to be silent following nuclear transfer with cumulus donor cells in the mouse model. This would imply that the poor preimplantation developmental competence of SCNT embryos derived from cumulus cells is due to incomplete reprogramming of other embryonic genes, rather than cumulus-specific genes.

  3. Different Effects of BORIS/CTCFL on Stemness Gene Expression, Sphere Formation and Cell Survival in Epithelial Cancer Stem Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loredana Alberti

    Full Text Available Cancer stem cells are cancer cells characterized by stem cell properties and represent a small population of tumor cells that drives tumor development, progression, metastasis and drug resistance. To date, the molecular mechanisms that generate and regulate cancer stem cells are not well defined. BORIS (Brother of Regulator of Imprinted Sites or CTCFL (CTCF-like is a DNA-binding protein that is expressed in normal tissues only in germ cells and is re-activated in tumors. Recent evidences have highlighted the correlation of BORIS/CTCFL expression with poor overall survival of different cancer patients. We have previously shown an association of BORIS-expressing cells with stemness gene expression in embryonic cancer cells. Here, we studied the role of BORIS in epithelial tumor cells. Using BORIS-molecular beacon that was already validated, we were able to show the presence of BORIS mRNA in cancer stem cell-enriched populations (side population and spheres of cervical, colon and breast tumor cells. BORIS silencing studies showed a decrease of sphere formation capacity in breast and colon tumor cells. Importantly, BORIS-silencing led to down-regulation of hTERT, stem cell (NANOG, OCT4, SOX2 and BMI1 and cancer stem cell markers (ABCG2, CD44 and ALDH1 genes. Conversely, BORIS-induction led to up-regulation of the same genes. These phenotypes were observed in cervical, colon and invasive breast tumor cells. However, a completely different behavior was observed in the non-invasive breast tumor cells (MCF7. Indeed, these cells acquired an epithelial mesenchymal transition phenotype after BORIS silencing. Our results demonstrate that BORIS is associated with cancer stem cell-enriched populations of several epithelial tumor cells and the different phenotypes depend on the origin of tumor cells.

  4. Combinatorial gene editing in mammalian cells using ssODNs and TALENs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strouse, Bryan; Bialk, Pawel; Niamat, Rohina A.; Rivera-Torres, Natalia; Kmiec, Eric B.

    2014-01-01

    The regulation of gene editing is being elucidated in mammalian cells and its potential as well as its limitations are becoming evident. ssODNs carry out gene editing by annealing to their complimentary sequence at the target site and acting as primers for replication fork extension. To effect a genetic change, a large amount of ssODN molecules must be introduced into cells and as such induce a Reduced Proliferation Phenotype (RPP), a phenomenon in which corrected cells do not proliferate. To overcome this limitation, we have used TAL-Effector Nucleases (TALENs) to increase the frequency, while reducing the amount of ssODN required to direct gene correction. This strategy resolves the problem and averts the serious effects of RPP. The efficiency of gene editing can be increased significantly if cells are targeted while they progress through S phase. Our studies define new reaction parameters that will help guide experimental strategies of gene editing.

  5. Rapid and Cost-Effective Gene Targeting in Rat Embryonic Stem Cells by TALENs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chang Tong; Guanyi Huang; Charles Ashton; Hongping Wu; Hexin Yan; Qi-Long Ying

    2012-01-01

    The rat is the preferred animal model in many areas of biomedical research and drug development.Genetic manipulation in rats has lagged behind that in mice due to the lack of efficient gene targeting tools.Previously,we generated a knockout rat via conventional homologous recombination in rat embryonic stem (ES) cells.Here,we show that efficient gene targeting in rat ES cells can be achieved quickly through transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN)-mediated DNA double-strand breaks.Using the Golden Gate cloning technique,we constructed a pair of TALEN targeting vectors for the gene of interest in 5 days.After gene transfection,the targeted rat ES cell colonies were isolated,screened,and confirmed by PCR without the need of drug selection.Our results suggest that TALEN-mediated gene targeting is a superior means of establishing genetically modified rat ES cell lines with high efficiency and short turnaround time.

  6. Identification of antiviralrelevant genes in the cultured fish cells induced by UV-inactivated virus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    UV-inactivated grass carp hemorrhage virus (GCHV) can induce high titer of interferon in cultured CAB (crucian carp (Carassius auratus L.) blastulae) cells, and thus defend host cells against the virus invasion. The mechanism is proposed that an antiviral state should be established in the host cells by activating expression of a set of antivi-ral-relevant genes. In this study, suppressive subtractive hy-bridization is applied to constructing a subtracted cDNA library with mRNAs isolated from UV-inactivated GCHV infected and mock-infected CAB cells. 272 differential cDNA fragments are identified by both PCR and dot blot from the subtractive cDNA library. Sequencing analysis reveals 69 genes, including 46 known gene homologues, and 23 unknown putative genes. The known genes include the genes involved in interferon signaling pathways, such as Stat1 and Jak1, the antiviral genes, such as Mx and Viperin, and a set of interferon-stimulated genes observed in mammalian cells. Most of the unknown putative genes contain AU-rich ele-ment in their sequences. Differential expressions of these genes are further confirmed by virtual Northern blot and RT-PCR. The data imply that UV-inactivated GCHV is not only able to induce production of interferon in the infected CAB cells, but also leads to the expression of a series of antiviral-relevant genes or immune-relevant genes, and therefore reveals that the signaling pathway of interferon system and antiviral mechanism in fish are similar to those in mammals.

  7. Effect of Helicobacter pylori VacA on gene expression of gastric cancer cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong-Tao Wang; Zhen-Hong Li; Jian-Ping Yuan; Wei Zhao; Xiao-Dong Shi; Shan-Qing Tong; Xiao-Kui Guo

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To determine the effect of Helicobacter pylori VacA on gene expression of gastric cancer cells.METHODS: Gene expression profile of a gastric cancer cell line, SGC7901, after challenged by VacA+ and VacA- Hpylori broth culture supernatants (BCS), was detected by the cDNA microarray technique. Cytoskeleton changes of SGC7901 and HeLa cells were observed through high-resolution laser scanning confocal microscopy.RESULTS: A total of 16 000 cDNA clones were detected.The percentage of genes with heterogeneous expression in SGC7901 cells challenged by VacA+ BCS reached 5%,compared with that challenged by Vac A- BCS. There were 865 genes/EST with 2-fold differential expression levels and 198 genes/EST with 3-fold differential expression levels.Host of these genes were involved in vital cell events including signal transduction, regulation of gene expression, cytoskeleton,apoptosis, stress response and inflammation, cell cycle and tumor development. Cells co-cultured with VacA+ BCS showed collapsed and disrupted microtubular cytoarchitecture.CONCLUSION: VacA+ BCS can disrupt cytoskeletal architecture,likely through affecting the expression of cytoskeleton-associated genes, directly induce the expression of tumor promoter-related genes and inhibit the expression of tumor suppressor genes, thus favoring the development of tumors.VacA+ BCS can also alter the expression of inflammation and stress response genes. This suggests that VacA may play an important role in the pathogenicity of H pylori.

  8. The cell specificity of gene expression in the response to heat stress in corals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traylor-Knowles, N; Rose, N H; Palumbi, S R

    2017-03-02

    Previous transcriptional studies in heat stressed corals have shown that many genes are responsive to generalized heat stress whereas the expression patterns of specific gene networks after heat stress show strong correlations with variation in bleaching outcomes. However, where these specific genes are expressed is unknown. Here we employed in situ hybridization to identify patterns of spatial gene expression of genes previously predicted to be involved in general stress response and bleaching. We found that Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptors (TNFRs), known to be strong responders to heat stress, were not expressed in gastrodermal symbiont-containing cells but were widely expressed in specific cells of the epidermal layer. The transcription factors AP-1 and FosB implicated as early signals of heat stress and were widely expressed throughout the oral gastrodermis and epidermis. By contrast, a G-protein coupled receptor gene (GPCR), and a fructose bisphosphate aldolase C gene (Aldolase), previously implicated in bleaching, was expressed in symbiont containing gastrodermal cells, and in epidermal tissue. Finally, Chordin-like/Kielin (Chordin-like) a gene highly correlated to bleaching was expressed solely in the oral gastrodermis. From this study we confirm that heat responsive genes occur widely in coral tissues outside of symbiont containing cells, and that gene expression in response to heat stress that causes bleaching does not signal by itself that a gene is expressed in the symbiotic cells where bleaching occurs. Joint information about expression patterns in response to heat and cell specificity will allow greater dissection of the regulatory pathways and specific cell reactions that lead to coral bleaching.

  9. Long non-coding RNA small nucleolar RNA host gene 12 (SNHG12) promotes cell proliferation and migration by upregulating angiomotin gene expression in human osteosarcoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruan, Wendong; Wang, Pei; Feng, Shiqing; Xue, Yuan; Li, Yulin

    2016-03-01

    The long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) small nucleolar RNA host gene 12 (SNHG12) has a role in cell proliferation and migration. Angiomotin, encoded by the AMOT gene, is a protein that regulates the migration and organization of endothelial cells. SNHG12 and AMOT have been shown to play a role in a variety of human cancers but have yet to be studied in detail in human osteosarcoma. Tissue samples from primary osteosarcoma (n = 20) and adjacent normal tissues (n = 20), the osteosarcoma cell lines, SAOS-2, MG-63, U-2 OS, and the human osteoblast cell line hFOB (OB3) were studied using Western blot for angiomotin, and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction for the expression of SNHG12 and AMOT. The expression of SNHG12 was knocked down using RNA interference. Cell migration assays were performed. Cell apoptosis was studied using flow cytometry. SNHG12 and AMOT messenger RNA (mRNA) expression was upregulated in osteosarcoma tissues and cell lines when compared with normal tissues and cells. Upregulation of AMOT mRNA was associated with upregulation of SNHG12. Knockdown of SNHG12 reduced the expression of angiomotin in osteosarcoma cells and suppressed cell proliferation and migration but did not affect cell apoptosis. This preliminary study has shown that the lncRNA SNHG12 promotes cell proliferation and migration by upregulating AMOT gene expression in osteosarcoma cells in vivo and in vitro. Further studies are recommended to investigate the role of SNHG12 and AMOT expression in tumor cell proliferation and migration and angiogenesis in osteosarcoma and a range of malignant mesenchymal tumors.

  10. The candidate tumor suppressor gene ECRG4 inhibits cancer cells migration and invasion in esophageal carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu ShihHsin

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The esophageal cancer related gene 4 (ECRG4 was initially identified and cloned in our laboratory from human normal esophageal epithelium (GenBank accession no.AF325503. ECRG4 was a new tumor suppressor gene in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC associated with prognosis. In this study, we investigated the novel tumor-suppressing function of ECRG4 in cancer cell migration, invasion, adhesion and cell cycle regulation in ESCC. Methods Transwell and Boyden chamber experiments were utilized to examined the effects of ECRG4 expression on ESCC cells migration, invasion and adhesion. And flow cytometric analysis was used to observe the impact of ECRG4 expression on cell cycle regulation. Finally, the expression levels of cell cycle regulating proteins p53 and p21 in human ESCC cells transfected with ECRG4 gene were evaluated by Western blotting. Results The restoration of ECRG4 expression in ESCC cells inhibited cancer cells migration and invasion (P P > 0.05. Furthermore, ECRG4 could cause cell cycle G1 phase arrest in ESCC (P Conclusion ECRG4 is a candidate tumor suppressor gene which suppressed tumor cells migration and invasion without affecting cell adhesion ability in ESCC. Furthermore, ECRG4 might cause cell cycle G1 phase block possibly through inducing the increased expression of p53 and p21 proteins in ESCC.

  11. Generation of hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase gene knockout rabbits by homologous recombination and gene trapping through somatic cell nuclear transfer

    OpenAIRE

    Mingru Yin; Weihua Jiang; Zhenfu Fang; Pengcheng Kong; Fengying Xing; Yao Li; Xuejin Chen; Shangang Li

    2015-01-01

    The rabbit is a common animal model that has been employed in studies on various human disorders, and the generation of genetically modified rabbit lines is highly desirable. Female rabbits have been successfully cloned from cumulus cells, and the somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) technology is well established. The present study generated hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) gene knockout rabbits using recombinant adeno-associated virus-mediated homologous recombination and SCNT....

  12. Gene expression changes in the injured spinal cord following transplantation of mesenchymal stem cells or olfactory ensheathing cells.

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    Abel Torres-Espín

    Full Text Available Transplantation of bone marrow derived mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC or olfactory ensheathing cells (OEC have demonstrated beneficial effects after spinal cord injury (SCI, providing tissue protection and improving the functional recovery. However, the changes induced by these cells after their transplantation into the injured spinal cord remain largely unknown. We analyzed the changes in the spinal cord transcriptome after a contusion injury and MSC or OEC transplantation. The cells were injected immediately or 7 days after the injury. The mRNA of the spinal cord injured segment was extracted and analyzed by microarray at 2 and 7 days after cell grafting. The gene profiles were analyzed by clustering and functional enrichment analysis based on the Gene Ontology database. We found that both MSC and OEC transplanted acutely after injury induce an early up-regulation of genes related to tissue protection and regeneration. In contrast, cells transplanted at 7 days after injury down-regulate genes related to tissue regeneration. The most important change after MSC or OEC transplant was a marked increase in expression of genes associated with foreign body response and adaptive immune response. These data suggest a regulatory effect of MSC and OEC transplantation after SCI regarding tissue repair processes, but a fast rejection response to the grafted cells. Our results provide an initial step to determine the mechanisms of action and to optimize cell therapy for SCI.

  13. δ-Catenin promotes prostate cancer cell growth and progression by altering cell cycle and survival gene profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Yan-Hua

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background δ-Catenin is a unique member of β-catenin/armadillo domain superfamily proteins and its primary expression is restricted to the brain. However, δ-catenin is upregulated in human prostatic adenocarcinomas, although the effects of δ-catenin overexpression in prostate cancer are unclear. We hypothesized that δ-catenin plays a direct role in prostate cancer progression by altering gene profiles of cell cycle regulation and cell survival. Results We employed gene transfection and small interfering RNA to demonstrate that increased δ-catenin expression promoted, whereas its knockdown suppressed prostate cancer cell viability. δ-Catenin promoted prostate cancer cell colony formation in soft agar as well as tumor xenograft growth in nude mice. Deletion of either the amino-terminal or carboxyl-terminal sequences outside the armadillo domains abolished the tumor promoting effects of δ-catenin. Quantitative RT2 Profiler™ PCR Arrays demonstrated gene alterations involved in cell cycle and survival regulation. δ-Catenin overexpression upregulated cyclin D1 and cdc34, increased phosphorylated histone-H3, and promoted the entry of mitosis. In addition, δ-catenin overexpression resulted in increased expression of cell survival genes Bcl-2 and survivin while reducing the cell cycle inhibitor p21Cip1. Conclusion Taken together, our studies suggest that at least one consequence of an increased expression of δ-catenin in human prostate cancer is the alteration of cell cycle and survival gene profiles, thereby promoting tumor progression.

  14. New approaches to gene and cell therapy for hemophilia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohmori, T; Mizukami, H; Ozawa, K; Sakata, Y; Nishimura, S

    2015-06-01

    Hemophilia is considered suitable for gene therapy because it is caused by a single gene abnormality, and therapeutic coagulation factor levels may vary across a broad range. Recent success of hemophilia B gene therapy with an adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector in a clinical trial showed the real prospect that, through gene therapy, a cure for hemophilia may become a reality. However, AAV-mediated gene therapy is not applicable to patients with hemophilia A at present, and neutralizing antibodies against AAV reduce the efficacy of AAV-mediated strategies. Because patients that benefit from AAV treatment (hemophilia B without neutralizing antibodies) are estimated to represent only 15% of total patients with hemophilia, the development of basic technologies for hemophilia A and those that result in higher therapeutic effects are critical. In this review, we present an outline of gene therapy methods for hemophilia, including the transition of technical developments thus far and our novel techniques.

  15. Gene transfer and genome-wide insertional mutagenesis by retroviral transduction in fish stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qizhi Liu

    Full Text Available Retrovirus (RV is efficient for gene transfer and integration in dividing cells of diverse organisms. RV provides a powerful tool for insertional mutagenesis (IM to identify and functionally analyze genes essential for normal and pathological processes. Here we report RV-mediated gene transfer and genome-wide IM in fish stem cells from medaka and zebrafish. Three RVs were produced for fish cell transduction: rvLegfp and rvLcherry produce green fluorescent protein (GFP and mCherry fluorescent protein respectively under control of human cytomegalovirus immediate early promoter upon any chromosomal integration, whereas rvGTgfp contains a splicing acceptor and expresses GFP only upon gene trapping (GT via intronic in-frame integration and spliced to endogenous active genes. We show that rvLegfp and rvLcherry produce a transduction efficiency of 11~23% in medaka and zebrafish stem cell lines, which is as 30~67% efficient as the positive control in NIH/3T3. Upon co-infection with rvGTgfp and rvLcherry, GFP-positive cells were much fewer than Cherry-positive cells, consistent with rareness of productive gene trapping events versus random integration. Importantly, rvGTgfp infection in the medaka haploid embryonic stem (ES cell line HX1 generated GTgfp insertion on all 24 chromosomes of the haploid genome. Similar to the mammalian haploid cells, these insertion events were presented predominantly in intergenic regions and introns but rarely in exons. RV-transduced HX1 retained the ES cell properties such as stable growth, embryoid body formation and pluripotency gene expression. Therefore, RV is proficient for gene transfer and IM in fish stem cells. Our results open new avenue for genome-wide IM in medaka haploid ES cells in culture.

  16. Global irradiation effects, stem cell genes and rare transcripts in the planarian transcriptome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galloni, Mireille

    2012-01-01

    Stem cells are the closest relatives of the totipotent primordial cell, which is able to spawn millions of daughter cells and hundreds of cell types in multicellular organisms. Stem cells are involved in tissue homeostasis and regeneration, and may play a major role in cancer development. Among animals, planarians host a model stem cell type, called the neoblast, which essentially confers immortality. Gaining insights into the global transcriptional landscape of these exceptional cells takes an unprecedented turn with the advent of Next Generation Sequencing methods. Two Digital Gene Expression transcriptomes of Schmidtea mediterranea planarians, with or without neoblasts lost through irradiation, were produced and analyzed. Twenty one bp NlaIII tags were mapped to transcripts in the Schmidtea and Dugesia taxids. Differential representation of tags in normal versus irradiated animals reflects differential gene expression. Canonical and non-canonical tags were included in the analysis, and comparative studies with human orthologs were conducted. Transcripts fell into 3 categories: invariant (including housekeeping genes), absent in irradiated animals (potential neoblast-specific genes, IRDOWN) and induced in irradiated animals (potential cellular stress response, IRUP). Different mRNA variants and gene family members were recovered. In the IR-DOWN class, almost all of the neoblast-specific genes previously described were found. In irradiated animals, a larger number of genes were induced rather than lost. A significant fraction of IRUP genes behaved as if transcript versions of different lengths were produced. Several novel potential neoblast-specific genes have been identified that varied in relative abundance, including highly conserved as well as novel proteins without predicted orthologs. Evidence for a large body of antisense transcripts, for example regulated antisense for the Smed-piwil1 gene, and evidence for RNA shortening in irradiated animals is presented

  17. High-throughput gene expression profiling of memory differentiation in primary human T cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Russell Kate

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The differentiation of naive T and B cells into memory lymphocytes is essential for immunity to pathogens. Therapeutic manipulation of this cellular differentiation program could improve vaccine efficacy and the in vitro expansion of memory cells. However, chemical screens to identify compounds that induce memory differentiation have been limited by 1 the lack of reporter-gene or functional assays that can distinguish naive and memory-phenotype T cells at high throughput and 2 a suitable cell-line representative of naive T cells. Results Here, we describe a method for gene-expression based screening that allows primary naive and memory-phenotype lymphocytes to be discriminated based on complex genes signatures corresponding to these differentiation states. We used ligation-mediated amplification and a fluorescent, bead-based detection system to quantify simultaneously 55 transcripts representing naive and memory-phenotype signatures in purified populations of human T cells. The use of a multi-gene panel allowed better resolution than any constituent single gene. The method was precise, correlated well with Affymetrix microarray data, and could be easily scaled up for high-throughput. Conclusion This method provides a generic solution for high-throughput differentiation screens in primary human T cells where no single-gene or functional assay is available. This screening platform will allow the identification of small molecules, genes or soluble factors that direct memory differentiation in naive human lymphocytes.

  18. Epigenetic Regulation of the ERβ Gene on the Estrogen Signal Transfection Pathway in Colon Cancer Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    翟荣林; 王国斌; 蔡开琳; 陶凯雄; 许飞; 张万里; 王智勇

    2010-01-01

    We studied the regulatory effects of the estragen receptorβ(ERβ)gene on the downstream estrogen signal transfection pathway in colon cancer cells and the possible mechanisms involved.A human ERβ gene recombinant expression plasmid,pEGFP-C1-ERβ,was constructed and transfected into the Caco-2 colon cancer cell line,a line with low ERβ gene expression.The expression of ERβ mRNA and protein was detected 72h after transfection.RT-PCR was used to examine the expression levels of the progesterone recepror(PR)gene ...

  19. Mouse neural stem cells cultured in vitro and expressing an exogenous gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Neural stem cells are the multipotential, self-re- newing cells in central nerve system, and play an essential role in the development and differentiation of nerve system. Neural stem cells can be used to treat the nerve system diseases, especially, the transplantation of neural stem cells to rescue the degenerated neural cells has become a very promising therapeutic way. We successfully cultured neural stem cells isolated from the brains of embryonic mice in vitro and determined their distribution in the E17 mice brains. The neural stem cells were transfected with adenoviral vector carrying GFP (green fluorescence protein) gene and then highly expressed the exogenous gene. It paves the way for gene therapy of degenerative nerve system diseases.

  20. Epigenetic regulation of pluripotent genes mediates stem cell features in human hepatocellular carcinoma and cancer cell lines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao Qi Wang

    Full Text Available Activation of the stem cell transcriptional circuitry is an important event in cancer development. Although cancer cells demonstrate a stem cell-like gene expression signature, the epigenetic regulation of pluripotency-associated genes in cancers remains poorly understood. In this study, we characterized the epigenetic regulation of the pluripotency-associated genes NANOG, OCT4, c-MYC, KLF4, and SOX2 in a variety of cancer cell lines and in primary tumor samples, and investigated the re-activation of pluripotency regulatory circuits in cancer progression. Differential patterns of DNA methylation, histone modifications, and gene expression of pluripotent genes were demonstrated in different types of cancers, which may reflect their tissue origins. NANOG promoter hypomethylation and gene upregulation were found in metastatic human liver cancer cells and human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC primary tumor tissues. The upregulation of NANOG, together with p53 depletion, was significantly associated with clinical late stage of HCC. A pro-metastatic role of NANOG in colon cancer cells was also demonstrated, using a NANOG-overexpressing orthotopic tumor implantation mouse model. Demethylation of NANOG promoter was observed in CD133+(high cancer cells. In accordance, overexpression of NANOG resulted in an increase in the population of CD133+(high cells. In addition, we demonstrated a cross-regulation between OCT4 and NANOG in cancer cells via reprogramming of promoter methylation. Taken together, epigenetic reprogramming of NANOG can lead to the acquisition of stem cell-like properties. These results underscore the restoration of pluripotency circuits in cancer cells as a potential mechanism for cancer progression.

  1. Identification of reference genes in human myelomonocytic cells for gene expression studies in altered gravity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiel, Cora S; Hauschild, Swantje; Tauber, Svantje; Paulsen, Katrin; Raig, Christiane; Raem, Arnold; Biskup, Josefine; Gutewort, Annett; Hürlimann, Eva; Unverdorben, Felix; Buttron, Isabell; Lauber, Beatrice; Philpot, Claudia; Lier, Hartwin; Engelmann, Frank; Layer, Liliana E; Ullrich, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    Gene expression studies are indispensable for investigation and elucidation of molecular mechanisms. For the process of normalization, reference genes ("housekeeping genes") are essential to verify gene expression analysis. Thus, it is assumed that these reference genes demonstrate similar expression levels over all experimental conditions. However, common recommendations about reference genes were established during 1 g conditions and therefore their applicability in studies with altered gravity has not been demonstrated yet. The microarray technology is frequently used to generate expression profiles under defined conditions and to determine the relative difference in expression levels between two or more different states. In our study, we searched for potential reference genes with stable expression during different gravitational conditions (microgravity, normogravity, and hypergravity) which are additionally not altered in different hardware systems. We were able to identify eight genes (ALB, B4GALT6, GAPDH, HMBS, YWHAZ, ABCA5, ABCA9, and ABCC1) which demonstrated no altered gene expression levels in all tested conditions and therefore represent good candidates for the standardization of gene expression studies in altered gravity.

  2. Gene expression-based biomarkers for discriminating early and late stage of clear cell renal cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhalla, Sherry; Chaudhary, Kumardeep; Kumar, Ritesh; Sehgal, Manika; Kaur, Harpreet; Sharma, Suresh; Raghava, Gajendra P. S.

    2017-01-01

    In this study, an attempt has been made to identify expression-based gene biomarkers that can discriminate early and late stage of clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) patients. We have analyzed the gene expression of 523 samples to identify genes that are differentially expressed in the early and late stage of ccRCC. First, a threshold-based method has been developed, which attained a maximum accuracy of 71.12% with ROC 0.67 using single gene NR3C2. To improve the performance of threshold-based method, we combined two or more genes and achieved maximum accuracy of 70.19% with ROC of 0.74 using eight genes on the validation dataset. These eight genes include four underexpressed (NR3C2, ENAM, DNASE1L3, FRMPD2) and four overexpressed (PLEKHA9, MAP6D1, SMPD4, C11orf73) genes in the late stage of ccRCC. Second, models were developed using state-of-art techniques and achieved maximum accuracy of 72.64% and 0.81 ROC using 64 genes on validation dataset. Similar accuracy was obtained on 38 genes selected from subset of genes, involved in cancer hallmark biological processes. Our analysis further implied a need to develop gender-specific models for stage classification. A web server, CancerCSP, has been developed to predict stage of ccRCC using gene expression data derived from RNAseq experiments. PMID:28349958

  3. Identification of target genes of synovial sarcoma-associated fusion oncoprotein using human pluripotent stem cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayakawa, Kazuo [Department of Tissue Regeneration, Institute for Frontier Medical Sciences, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Department of Cell Growth and Differentiation, Center for iPS Cell Research and Application, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Nagoya City University, Nagoya (Japan); Ikeya, Makoto [Department of Cell Growth and Differentiation, Center for iPS Cell Research and Application, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Fukuta, Makoto [Department of Tissue Regeneration, Institute for Frontier Medical Sciences, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Department of Cell Growth and Differentiation, Center for iPS Cell Research and Application, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Nagoya City University, Nagoya (Japan); Woltjen, Knut [Department of Reprogramming Sciences, Center for iPS Cell Research and Application, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Tamaki, Sakura; Takahara, Naoko; Kato, Tomohisa; Sato, Shingo [Department of Tissue Regeneration, Institute for Frontier Medical Sciences, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Otsuka, Takanobu [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Nagoya City University, Nagoya (Japan); Toguchida, Junya, E-mail: togjun@frontier.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Tissue Regeneration, Institute for Frontier Medical Sciences, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Department of Cell Growth and Differentiation, Center for iPS Cell Research and Application, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan)

    2013-03-22

    Highlights: ► We tried to identify targets of synovial sarcoma (SS)-associated SYT–SSX fusion gene. ► We established pluripotent stem cell (PSC) lines with inducible SYT–SSX gene. ► SYT–SSX responsive genes were identified by the induction of SYT–SSX in PSC. ► SS-related genes were selected from database by in silico analyses. ► 51 genes were finally identified among SS-related genes as targets of SYT–SSX in PSC. -- Abstract: Synovial sarcoma (SS) is a malignant soft tissue tumor harboring chromosomal translocation t(X; 18)(p11.2; q11.2), which produces SS-specific fusion gene, SYT–SSX. Although precise function of SYT–SSX remains to be investigated, accumulating evidences suggest its role in gene regulation via epigenetic mechanisms, and the product of SYT–SSX target genes may serve as biomarkers of SS. Lack of knowledge about the cell-of-origin of SS, however, has placed obstacle in the way of target identification. Here we report a novel approach to identify SYT–SSX2 target genes using human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) containing a doxycycline-inducible SYT–SSX2 gene. SYT–SSX2 was efficiently induced both at mRNA and protein levels within three hours after doxycycline administration, while no morphological change of hPSCs was observed until 24 h. Serial microarray analyses identified genes of which the expression level changed more than twofold within 24 h. Surprisingly, the majority (297/312, 95.2%) were up-regulated genes and a result inconsistent with the current concept of SYT–SSX as a transcriptional repressor. Comparing these genes with SS-related genes which were selected by a series of in silico analyses, 49 and 2 genes were finally identified as candidates of up- and down-regulated target of SYT–SSX, respectively. Association of these genes with SYT–SSX in SS cells was confirmed by knockdown experiments. Expression profiles of SS-related genes in hPSCs and human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) were strikingly

  4. Human antigen-specific regulatory T cells generated by T cell receptor gene transfer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Todd M Brusko

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Therapies directed at augmenting regulatory T cell (Treg activities in vivo as a systemic treatment for autoimmune disorders and transplantation may be associated with significant off-target effects, including a generalized immunosuppression that may compromise beneficial immune responses to infections and cancer cells. Adoptive cellular therapies using purified expanded Tregs represents an attractive alternative to systemic treatments, with results from animal studies noting increased therapeutic potency of antigen-specific Tregs over polyclonal populations. However, current methodologies are limited in terms of the capacity to isolate and expand a sufficient quantity of endogenous antigen-specific Tregs for therapeutic intervention. Moreover, FOXP3+ Tregs fall largely within the CD4+ T cell subset and are thus routinely MHC class II-specific, whereas class I-specific Tregs may function optimally in vivo by facilitating direct tissue recognition. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To overcome these limitations, we have developed a novel means for generating large numbers of antigen-specific Tregs involving lentiviral T cell receptor (TCR gene transfer into in vitro expanded polyclonal natural Treg populations. Tregs redirected with a high-avidity class I-specific TCR were capable of recognizing the melanoma antigen tyrosinase in the context of HLA-A*0201 and could be further enriched during the expansion process by antigen-specific reactivation with peptide loaded artificial antigen presenting cells. These in vitro expanded Tregs continued to express FOXP3 and functional TCRs, and maintained the capacity to suppress conventional T cell responses directed against tyrosinase, as well as bystander T cell responses. Using this methodology in a model tumor system, murine Tregs designed to express the tyrosinase TCR effectively blocked antigen-specific effector T cell (Teff activity as determined by tumor cell growth and luciferase reporter

  5. Effect of Interaction between Chromatin Loops on Cell-to-Cell Variability in Gene Expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuoqi Liu

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available According to recent experimental evidence, the interaction between chromatin loops, which can be characterized by three factors-connection pattern, distance between regulatory elements, and communication form, play an important role in determining the level of cell-to-cell variability in gene expression. These quantitative experiments call for a corresponding modeling effect that addresses the question of how changes in these factors affect variability at the expression level in a systematic rather than case-by-case fashion. Here we make such an effort, based on a mechanic model that maps three fundamental patterns for two interacting DNA loops into a 4-state model of stochastic transcription. We first show that in contrast to side-by-side loops, nested loops enhance mRNA expression and reduce expression noise whereas alternating loops have just opposite effects. Then, we compare effects of facilitated tracking and direct looping on gene expression. We find that the former performs better than the latter in controlling mean expression and in tuning expression noise, but this control or tuning is distance-dependent, remarkable for moderate loop lengths, and there is a limit loop length such that the difference in effect between two communication forms almost disappears. Our analysis and results justify the facilitated chromatin-looping hypothesis.

  6. Expression and Regulation of the Arabidopsis thaliana Cel1 Endo 1,4 β Glucanase Gene During Compatible Plant-Nematode Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukno, Serenella; Shimerling, Orit; McCuiston, Jamie; Tsabary, Galit; Shani, Ziv; Shoseyov, Oded; Davis, Eric L

    2006-01-01

    The root-knot nematode Meloidogyne incognita is an obligate endoparasite of plant roots and stimulates elaborate modifications of selected root vascular cells to form giant cells for feeding. An Arabidopsis thaliana endoglucanase (Atcel1) promoter is activated in giant cells that were formed in Atcel1::UidA transgenic tobacco and Arabidopsis plants. Activity of the full-length Atcel1 promoter was detected in root and shoot elongation zones and in the lateral root primordia. Different 5’ and internal deletions of regions of the 1,673 bp Atcel1 promoter were each fused to the UidA reporter gene and transformed in tobacco, and roots of the transformants were inoculated with M. incognita to assay for GUS expression in giant cells and noninfected plant tissues. Comparison of the Atcel1 promoter deletion constructs showed that the region between −1,673 and −1,171 (fragment 1) was essential for Atcel1 promoter activity in giant cells and roots. Fragment 1 alone, however, was not sufficient for Atcel1 expression in giant cells or roots, suggesting that cis-acting elements in fragment 1 may function in consort with other elements within the Atcel1 promoter. Root-knot nematodes and giant cells developed normally within roots of Arabidopsis that expressed a functional antisense construct to Atcel1, suggesting that a functional redundancy in endoglucanase activity may represent another level of regulatory control of cell wall-modifying activity within nematode feeding cells. PMID:19259541

  7. ING Genes Work as Tumor Suppressor Genes in the Carcinogenesis of Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaohan; Kikuchi, Keiji; Takano, Yasuo

    2011-01-01

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is the sixth most common cancer in the world. The evolution and progression of HNSCC are considered to result from multiple stepwise alterations of cellular and molecular pathways in squamous epithelium. Recently, inhibitor of growth gene (ING) family consisting of five genes, ING1 to ING5, was identified as a new tumor suppressor gene family that was implicated in the downregulation of cell cycle and chromatin remodeling. In contrast, it has been shown that ING1 and ING2 play an oncogenic role in some cancers, this situation being similar to TGF-β. In HNSCC, the ING family has been reported to be downregulated, and ING translocation from the nucleus to the cytoplasm may be a critical event for carcinogenesis. In this paper, we describe our recent results and briefly summarize current knowledge regarding the biologic functions of ING in HNSCC.

  8. Changes in winter depression phenotype correlate with white blood cell gene expression profiles : A combined metagene and gene ontology approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosker, Fokko J.; Terpstra, Peter; Gladkevich, Anatoliy V.; Dijck-Brouwer, D. A. Janneke; te Meerman, Gerard; Nolen, Willem A.; Schoevers, Robert A.; Meesters, Ybe

    2015-01-01

    In the present study we evaluate the feasibility of gene expression in white blood cells as a peripheral marker for winter depression. Sixteen patients with winter type seasonal affective disorder were included in the study. Blood was taken by venous puncture at three time points; in winter prior an

  9. Gene Regulatory Scenarios of Primary 1,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D3 Target Genes in a Human Myeloid Leukemia Cell Line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moray J. Campbell

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Genome- and transcriptome-wide data has significantly increased the amount of available information about primary 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25(OH2D3 target genes in cancer cell models, such as human THP-1 myelomonocytic leukemia cells. In this study, we investigated the genes G0S2, CDKN1A and MYC as master examples of primary vitamin D receptor (VDR targets being involved in the control of cellular proliferation. The chromosomal domains of G0S2 and CDKN1A are 140–170 kb in size and contain one and three VDR binding sites, respectively. This is rather compact compared to the MYC locus that is 15 times larger and accommodates four VDR binding sites. All eight VDR binding sites were studied by chromatin immunoprecipitation in THP-1 cells. Interestingly, the site closest to the transcription start site of the down-regulated MYC gene showed 1,25(OH2D3-dependent reduction of VDR binding and is not associated with open chromatin. Four of the other seven VDR binding regions contain a typical DR3-type VDR binding sequence, three of which are also occupied with VDR in macrophage-like cells. In conclusion, the three examples suggest that each VDR target gene has an individual regulatory scenario. However, some general components of these scenarios may be useful for the development of new therapy regimens.

  10. HAP1 gene expression is associated with radiosensitivity in breast cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Jing [The Fourth Clinical School of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, Jiangsu (China); Department of Radiation Oncology, Nanjing Medical University Affiliated Cancer Hospital, Cancer Institute of Jiangsu Province, Nanjing, Jiangsu (China); Zhang, Jun-ying [Research Center of Clinical Oncology, Nanjing Medical University Affiliated Cancer Hospital, Cancer Institute of Jiangsu Province, Nanjing, Jiangsu (China); Yin, Li [Department of Radiation Oncology, Nanjing Medical University Affiliated Cancer Hospital, Cancer Institute of Jiangsu Province, Nanjing, Jiangsu (China); Research Center of Clinical Oncology, Nanjing Medical University Affiliated Cancer Hospital, Cancer Institute of Jiangsu Province, Nanjing, Jiangsu (China); Wu, Jian-zhong [Research Center of Clinical Oncology, Nanjing Medical University Affiliated Cancer Hospital, Cancer Institute of Jiangsu Province, Nanjing, Jiangsu (China); Guo, Wen-jie; Wu, Jian-feng [Department of Radiation Oncology, Nanjing Medical University Affiliated Cancer Hospital, Cancer Institute of Jiangsu Province, Nanjing, Jiangsu (China); Chen, Meng; Xia, You-you [The Fourth Clinical School of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, Jiangsu (China); Department of Radiation Oncology, Nanjing Medical University Affiliated Cancer Hospital, Cancer Institute of Jiangsu Province, Nanjing, Jiangsu (China); Tang, Jin-hai [Department of General Surgery, Nanjing Medical University Affiliated Cancer Hospital, Cancer Institute of Jiangsu Province, Nanjing, Jiangsu (China); Ma, Yong-chao [Department of Hematology, First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, Jiangsu (China); He, Xia, E-mail: hexiadoctor@163.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Nanjing Medical University Affiliated Cancer Hospital, Cancer Institute of Jiangsu Province, Nanjing, Jiangsu (China)

    2015-01-02

    Highlights: • Overexpression of HAP1 gene promotes apoptosis in MCF-7 cells after irradiation. • HAP1 reduces tumor volume in nude mice xenograft models after irradiation. • HAP1 increases radiosensitivity of breast cancer cells in vitro and vivo. - Abstract: Objectives: The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between huntingtin-associated protein1 (HAP1) gene and radiation therapy of breast cancer cells. Methods: HAP1 gene was transfected into breast cancer MCF-7 cells, which was confirmed by quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis (qRT-PCR) and Western blot in vitro. The changes of cell radiosensitivity were assessed by colony formation assay. Apoptosis were examined by flow cytometry. The expressions of two radiation-induced genes were evaluated by Western blot. Tumor growth was investigated in nude mice xenograft models in vivo. Results: Our data showed that HAP1 gene expression was significantly increased in HAP1-transfected MCF-7 cells in comparison with the parental cells or negative control cells. The survival rate in MCF-7/HAP1 cells was significantly decreased after irradiation (0, 2, 4, 6, 8 Gy), compared to cells in MCF-7 and MCF-7/Pb groups in vitro. HAP1 gene increased apoptosis in MCF-7 cells after irradiation. Additionally, the tumor volume and weight in MCF-7/HAP1 + RT group were observably lower than in MCF-7/HAP1 group and MCF-7/Pb + RT group. Conclusion: The present study indicated that HAP1 gene expression was related to the radiosensitivity of breast cancer cells and may play an important role in the regulation of cellular radiosensitivity.

  11. Associations of Killer Cell Immunoglobulin-Like Receptor Genes with Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Ramírez-De los Santos

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA is an autoimmune and chronic inflammatory disease of unknown etiology. Killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors are expressed on the surface of natural killer cells and CD28null T-cells, both present in synovial membrane of RA. Therefore we evaluated the associations of KIR genes with RA.

  12. Gene Expression Music Algorithm-Based Characterization of the Ewing Sarcoma Stem Cell Signature

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Gene Expression Music Algorithm (GEMusicA) is a method for the transformation of DNA microarray data into melodies that can be used for the characterization of differentially expressed genes. Using this method we compared gene expression profiles from endothelial cells (EC), hematopoietic stem cells, neuronal stem cells, embryonic stem cells (ESC), and mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) and defined a set of genes that can discriminate between the different stem cell types. We analyzed the behavior of public microarray data sets from Ewing sarcoma (“Ewing family tumors,” EFT) cell lines and biopsies in GEMusicA after prefiltering DNA microarray data for the probe sets from the stem cell signature. Our results demonstrate that individual Ewing sarcoma cell lines have a high similarity to ESC or EC. Ewing sarcoma cell lines with inhibited Ewing sarcoma breakpoint region 1-Friend leukemia virus integration 1 (EWSR1-FLI1) oncogene retained the similarity to ESC and EC. However, correlation coefficients between GEMusicA-processed expression data between EFT and ESC decreased whereas correlation coefficients between EFT and EC as well as between EFT and MSC increased after knockdown of EWSR1-FLI1. Our data support the concept of EFT being derived from cells with features of embryonic and endothelial cells. PMID:27446218

  13. Cell wall composition and candidate biosynthesis gene expression during rice development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lin, Fan; Manisseri, Chithra; Fagerström, Alexandra

    2016-01-01

    Cell walls of grasses, including cereal crops and biofuel grasses, comprise the majority of plant biomass and intimately influence plant growth, development and physiology. However, the functions of many cell wall synthesis genes, and the relationships among and the functions of cell wall compone...

  14. Effects of leptin on glucose oxidation and glucokinase gene expression in cultured liver cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹筱佩

    1999-01-01

    Objective: To observe the effects of leptin on glucose oxidation and glueokinase gene expression in rat liver cells. Methods: Rat liver cells were incubated with leptin of different doses (ranging from 10μg/L to 200μg/L). Control liver cells were

  15. Gene Expression Music Algorithm-Based Characterization of the Ewing Sarcoma Stem Cell Signature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Sebastian Staege

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Gene Expression Music Algorithm (GEMusicA is a method for the transformation of DNA microarray data into melodies that can be used for the characterization of differentially expressed genes. Using this method we compared gene expression profiles from endothelial cells (EC, hematopoietic stem cells, neuronal stem cells, embryonic stem cells (ESC, and mesenchymal stem cells (MSC and defined a set of genes that can discriminate between the different stem cell types. We analyzed the behavior of public microarray data sets from Ewing sarcoma (“Ewing family tumors,” EFT cell lines and biopsies in GEMusicA after prefiltering DNA microarray data for the probe sets from the stem cell signature. Our results demonstrate that individual Ewing sarcoma cell lines have a high similarity to ESC or EC. Ewing sarcoma cell lines with inhibited Ewing sarcoma breakpoint region 1-Friend leukemia virus integration 1 (EWSR1-FLI1 oncogene retained the similarity to ESC and EC. However, correlation coefficients between GEMusicA-processed expression data between EFT and ESC decreased whereas correlation coefficients between EFT and EC as well as between EFT and MSC increased after knockdown of EWSR1-FLI1. Our data support the concept of EFT being derived from cells with features of embryonic and endothelial cells.

  16. [Osmotic shock induces expression of Vibrio fischeri lux genes in Escherichia coli cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavil'gel'skiĭ, G B; Kotova, V Iu

    2003-04-01

    The effect of osmotic shock on the expression of genes in the lux regulon of marine bacteria Vibrio fischeri was studied in cells of Escherichia coli. Bioluminescence of cells was shown to drastically increase, when cells were exposed to osmotic shock at the early logarithmic growth phase. The expression of lux genes induced by osmotic shock is determined by the two-component regulatory system RcsC-RcsB. A nucleotide sequence in the regulatory region of the luxR gene homologous to the RcsB-box consensus of E. coli is assumed to be a primary site for this system.

  17. Cloning of WWOX Gene and Its Growth-inhibiting Effects on Ovarian Cancer Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    熊宙芳; 胡沙; 王泽华

    2010-01-01

    The growth-inhibiting and apoptosis-inducing effects of WW domain-containing oxidoreductase(WWOX) gene on ovarian cancer cell line A2780 were investigated.The full length cDNA of human WWOX gene was amplified from normal human ovary tissues.The correct cDNA of full length WWOX was subcloned into eukaryocytic expression vector pCMV.After introduction of WWOX gene into cancer cells with liposome,the WWOX mRNA and protein level in the cancer cells were detected by reverse transcription polymerase chain reactio...

  18. Transcriptional and posttranscriptional regulation of the proliferating cell nuclear antigen gene.

    OpenAIRE

    1990-01-01

    The steady-state mRNA levels of the proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) gene are growth regulated. In a previous paper (L. Ottavio, C.-D. Chang, M. G. Rizzo, S. Travali, C. Casadevall, and R. Baserga, Mol. Cell. Biol. 10:303-309, 1990), we reported that introns (especially intron 4) participate in growth regulation of the PCNA gene. We have now investigated the role of the 5'-flanking sequence of the human PCNA gene stably transfected into BALB/c 3T3 cells. Promoters of different length...

  19. The effect of MAGE-A1 gene on NIH3T3 cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jingjun Sun; Jin Zhu; Zhenning Qiu; Yuhua Li; Guipeng Ding; Yi Zhu; Zhenqing Feng; Xiaohong Guan

    2005-01-01

    Objective: Melanoma antigen genes(MAGE) genes have been found in many kinds of tumor tissue, but not in normal tissue except testis and placentas. The Ags encoded by MAGE genes therefore are strictly tumor-specific. The most current researches associated with these genes focus on the tumor vaccination using these Ags. Few reports are concerning these genes' functions. In this study, we investigated the role of MAGE-A1 gene on NIH3T3 cells after transferring with it. Methods: Clone the MAGE-A1 into the plasmids pEGFP-C3 and pcDNA3.1, then transfer the reconstructed plasmids and primary plasmids into the NIH3T3 cells using a new transfer reagent FuGENE 6. Selecting the positively transferred cells by G418. Identified by RT-PCR, Western blot, Immunocytochemistry,Laser Scanning Confocal Microscope and Fluoroscope. The cells mobile ability was measured with Millicell-PCF. The cell cycle and apoptosis were measured with Flow Cytometry. Results: The apoptosis rate of NIH3T3 cells that transferred with control plasmid pcDNA3.1was 13.4% and the raitos that stay in S phase and G2-M phase were 5.68% and 1.04% respectively. The apoptosis rate of NIH3T3 cells that transferred with pcDNA3.1-A1 was 0.90% and the ratios that stayed in S phase and G2-M phase were 19.31% and 13.47% respectively. The apoptosis rate of the cells that transferred with control plasmid pEGFP-C3 was 1.87 %, a little higher than 1.47 % of those transferred with pEGFP-C3-A1. Conclusion: The MAGE-A1 gene may enhance the cell cycle, inhibit the apoptosis and raise the mobile ability of NIH3T3 cells.

  20. Bcl6 Is Required for Somatic Hypermutation and Gene Conversion in Chicken DT40 Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Alan M.; Maman, Yaakov; Alinikula, Jukka; Schatz, David G.

    2016-01-01

    The activation induced cytosine deaminase (AID) mediates diversification of B cell immunoglobulin genes by the three distinct yet related processes of somatic hypermutation (SHM), class switch recombination (CSR), and gene conversion (GCV). SHM occurs in germinal center B cells, and the transcription factor Bcl6 is a key regulator of the germinal center B cell gene expression program, including expression of AID. To test the hypothesis that Bcl6 function is important for the process of SHM, we compared WT chicken DT40 B cells, which constitutively perform SHM/GCV, to their Bcl6-deficient counterparts. We found that Bcl6-deficient DT40 cells were unable to perform SHM and GCV despite enforced high level expression of AID and substantial levels of AID in the nucleus of the cells. To gain mechanistic insight into the GCV/SHM dependency on Bcl6, transcriptional features of a highly expressed SHM target gene were analyzed in Bcl6-sufficient and -deficient DT40 cells. No defect was observed in the accumulation of single stranded DNA in the target gene as a result of Bcl6 deficiency. In contrast, association of Spt5, an RNA polymerase II (Pol II) and AID binding factor, was strongly reduced at the target gene body relative to the transcription start site in Bcl6-deficient cells as compared to WT cells. However, partial reconstitution of Bcl6 function substantially reconstituted Spt5 association with the target gene body but did not restore detectable SHM. Our observations suggest that in the absence of Bcl6, Spt5 fails to associate efficiently with Pol II at SHM targets, perhaps precluding robust AID action on the SHM target DNA. Our data also suggest, however, that Spt5 binding is not sufficient for SHM of a target gene even in DT40 cells with strong expression of AID. PMID:26900682

  1. Bcl6 Is Required for Somatic Hypermutation and Gene Conversion in Chicken DT40 Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan M Williams

    Full Text Available The activation induced cytosine deaminase (AID mediates diversification of B cell immunoglobulin genes by the three distinct yet related processes of somatic hypermutation (SHM, class switch recombination (CSR, and gene conversion (GCV. SHM occurs in germinal center B cells, and the transcription factor Bcl6 is a key regulator of the germinal center B cell gene expression program, including expression of AID. To test the hypothesis that Bcl6 function is important for the process of SHM, we compared WT chicken DT40 B cells, which constitutively perform SHM/GCV, to their Bcl6-deficient counterparts. We found that Bcl6-deficient DT40 cells were unable to perform SHM and GCV despite enforced high level expression of AID and substantial levels of AID in the nucleus of the cells. To gain mechanistic insight into the GCV/SHM dependency on Bcl6, transcriptional features of a highly expressed SHM target gene were analyzed in Bcl6-sufficient and -deficient DT40 cells. No defect was observed in the accumulation of single stranded DNA in the target gene as a result of Bcl6 deficiency. In contrast, association of Spt5, an RNA polymerase II (Pol II and AID binding factor, was strongly reduced at the target gene body relative to the transcription start site in Bcl6-deficient cells as compared to WT cells. However, partial reconstitution of Bcl6 function substantially reconstituted Spt5 association with the target gene body but did not restore detectable SHM. Our observations suggest that in the absence of Bcl6, Spt5 fails to associate efficiently with Pol II at SHM targets, perhaps precluding robust AID action on the SHM target DNA. Our data also suggest, however, that Spt5 binding is not sufficient for SHM of a target gene even in DT40 cells with strong expression of AID.

  2. Differential expression of 114 oxidative stressrelated genes in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of acute cerebral infarction patients A gene microarray experiment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing Yang; Fei Zhong; Mingshan Ren; Jiangming Zhao

    2010-01-01

    Previous studies have focused on the analysis of single or several function-related genes in oxidative stress;however,little information is available regarding altered expression of oxidative stress-related genes in the process of ischemia-reperfusion injury from microarray experiments.The aim of the present study was to investigate the changes in cell oxidative stress-and toxicity-related gene expression utilizing microarray screening in patients with acute cerebral infarction during cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury.Of the included 114 genes,expression was significantly upregulated in eight genes,including three heat shock protein-related genes,one oxidative and metabolic stress-related gene,one cell growth arrest/senescence related gene,two apoptosis signal-related genes,and one DNA damage and repair related gene.Expression was significantly downregulated in four genes,including one cell proliferation/cancer related gene,two oxidative and metabolic stress-related genes and one DNA damage and repair related gene.The results demonstrated that cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury in patients with acute cerebral infarction was affected by many genes including oxidative stress-,heat shock-,DNA damage and repair-,and apoptosis signal-related genes.Therefore,it could be suggested that cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury may be subjected to complex genetic regulation mechanisms.

  3. Gene Expression Profile of Multiple Myeloma Cell Line Treated by Arsenic Trioxide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Mengchang; LIU Shaanxi; LIU Pengbo

    2007-01-01

    cDNA microarray was used to compare the gone expression profiles of multiple myeloma cell line RPMI8226 24 h before and after treatment with arsenic trioxide. Two eDNA probes were prepared by mRNA reverse transcription of both arsenic trioxide-treated and untreated RPMI8226 cells. The probes were labeled with Cy3 and Cy5 fluorescence dyes separately, hybridized with cDNA microarray representing 4096 different human genes, and scanned for fluorescence intensity. The differences in gene expression were calculated on the basis of the ratios of signal intensity of treated and untreated samples. The up- and down-regulated genes were screened through the analysis of gene expression ratios. The results showed that 273 genes were differentially altered at mRNA level, 121 genes were up-regulated and 152 were down-regulated. It is concluded that the treatment with arsenic trioxide can induce a variety of gene changes in RPMI8226 cell line. Many genes may be involved in the pathogenesis of multiple myeloma. ALK-1 and TXNIP genes may play an impor- tant role in the apoptosis and partial differentiation of RPMI8226 cells.

  4. Big genes are big mutagen targets: a connection to cancerous, spherical cells?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parry, Michele L; Ramsamooj, Michael; Blanck, George

    2015-01-28

    We determined the most commonly mutated genes in five cancer genome atlas (TCGA) datasets. Many of these genes were extraordinarily large, as are many cancer fusion gene partners. And many of these genes had cytoskeletal related functions. We further determined that these genes were distributed into high and low frequency mutation groups largely according to overall rate of gene-occurrence in the high and low mutation frequency groups, as was also the case with common metastasis and tumor suppressor genes. Oncoproteins were selectively mutated in the low mutation frequency groups in colon and lung datasets. Thus, genes that have very large coding regions and may impact the cytoskeleton are more commonly mutated than are common metastasis and tumor suppressor genes in both high and low frequency mutation groups. These analyses raise questions related to cell shape: (i) Are cancer cells often spherical because cytoskeletal-related proteins are large mutagen targets? (ii) Is drug-resistance facilitated by relatively common mutant proteins that lead to round cells, with altered cell physiology or reduced surface to volume ratios that could reduce intra-cellular drug concentrations?

  5. Induction of microbial genes for pathogenesis and symbiosis by chemicals from root border cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Y; Pierson, L S; Hawes, M C

    1997-12-01

    Reporter strains of soil-borne bacteria were used to test the hypothesis that chemicals released by root border cells can influence the expression of bacterial genes required for the establishment of plant-microbe associations. Promoters from genes known to be activated by plant factors included virE, required for Agrobacterium tumefaciens pathogenesis, and common nod genes from Rhizobium leguminosarum bv viciae and Rhizobium meliloti, required for nodulation of pea (Pisum sativum) and alfalfa (Medicago sativum), respectively. Also included was phzB, an autoinducible gene encoding the biosynthesis of antibiotics by Pseudomonas aureofaciens. The virE and nod genes were activated to different degrees, depending on the source of border cells, whereas phzB activity remained unaffected. The homologous interaction between R. leguminosarum bv viciae and its host, pea, was examined in detail. Nod gene induction by border cells was dosage dependent and responsive to environmental signals. The highest levels of gene induction by pea (but not alfalfa) border cells occurred at low temperatures, when little or no bacterial growth was detected. Detached border cells cultured in distilled water exhibited increased nod gene induction (ini) in response to signals from R. leguminosarum bv viciae.

  6. Identification of Reference Genes in Human Myelomonocytic Cells for Gene Expression Studies in Altered Gravity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cora S. Thiel

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Gene expression studies are indispensable for investigation and elucidation of molecular mechanisms. For the process of normalization, reference genes (“housekeeping genes” are essential to verify gene expression analysis. Thus, it is assumed that these reference genes demonstrate similar expression levels over all experimental conditions. However, common recommendations about reference genes were established during 1 g conditions and therefore their applicability in studies with altered gravity has not been demonstrated yet. The microarray technology is frequently used to generate expression profiles under defined conditions and to determine the relative difference in expression levels between two or more different states. In our study, we searched for potential reference genes with stable expression during different gravitational conditions (microgravity, normogravity, and hypergravity which are additionally not altered in different hardware systems. We were able to identify eight genes (ALB, B4GALT6, GAPDH, HMBS, YWHAZ, ABCA5, ABCA9, and ABCC1 which demonstrated no altered gene expression levels in all tested conditions and therefore represent good candidates for the standardization of gene expression studies in altered gravity.

  7. Seamless correction of the sickle cell disease mutation of the HBB gene in human induced pluripotent stem cells using TALENs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Ning; Zhao, Huimin

    2014-05-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is the most common human genetic disease which is caused by a single mutation of human β-globin (HBB) gene. The lack of long-term treatment makes the development of reliable cell and gene therapies highly desirable. Disease-specific patient-derived human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) have great potential for developing novel cell and gene therapies. With the disease-causing mutations corrected in situ, patient-derived hiPSCs can restore normal cell functions and serve as a renewable autologous cell source for the treatment of genetic disorders. Here we successfully utilized transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs), a recently emerged novel genome editing tool, to correct the SCD mutation in patient-derived hiPSCs. The TALENs we have engineered are highly specific and generate minimal off-target effects. In combination with piggyBac transposon, TALEN-mediated gene targeting leaves no residual ectopic sequences at the site of correction and the corrected hiPSCs retain full pluripotency and a normal karyotype. Our study demonstrates an important first step of using TALENs for the treatment of genetic diseases such as SCD, which represents a significant advance toward hiPSC-based cell and gene therapies.

  8. Single-Cell and Single-Molecule Analysis of Gene Expression Regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vera, Maria; Biswas, Jeetayu; Senecal, Adrien

    2016-01-01

    Recent advancements in single-cell and single-molecule imaging technologies have resolved biological processes in time and space that are fundamental to understanding the regulation of gene expression. Observations of single-molecule events in their cellular context have revealed highly dynamic aspects of transcriptional and post-transcriptional control in eukaryotic cells. This approach can relate transcription with mRNA abundance and lifetimes. Another key aspect of single-cell analysis is the cell-to-cell variability among populations of cells. Definition of heterogeneity has revealed stochastic processes, determined characteristics of under-represented cell types or transitional states, and integrated cellular behaviors in the context of multicellular organisms. In this review, we discuss novel aspects of gene expression of eukaryotic cells and multicellular organisms revealed by the latest advances in single-cell and single-molecule imaging technology. PMID:27893965

  9. Reconstructing and analysing cellular states, space and time from gene expression profiles of many cells and single cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francesconi, Mirko; Lehner, Ben

    2015-10-01

    Genome-wide gene expression profiling is a fast, cheap and standardised analysis that provides a high dimensional measurement of the state of a biological sample. In this review we describe computational methods that can be applied to identify and interpret sources of variance in gene expression in whole organisms, organs, tissues or single cells. This allows the identification of constituent cell types and states in complex mixtures, the reconstruction of temporal trajectories of development, differentiation and progression, and the reconstruction of spatial patterning. When applied to genetically variable samples, these methods allow the efficient investigation of how genetic variation influences gene expression and biological processes in space and time.

  10. Differentially expressed gene in osteosarcoma cell lines with different metastatic potentials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xinzhi Li; Lin Meng; Anming Chen; Fengjin Guo; Zhenqiang Luo; Heng Zeng

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To study the expression of osteosarcoma metastasis associated gene using a cDNA microarray, and screen new candidate genes related'to the development, progress and osteosarcoma metastasis. Methods: Total RNA of a low metastatic osteosarcoma and a high metastatic osteosarcoma (M6 and M8 cell lines, respectively) was extracted, purified to mRNA and then reverse transcribed to cDNA. M6 was used as the experimental group and M8 as the control group, and the gene expression of cells from both of these two sublines was investigated using cDNA microarrays containig 8064 cDNA clones. The cDNA of M6 was labeled with cy3 and the cDNA of M8 was labeled with cy5. The two sublines were hybridized with the cDNA microarray. The hybridization signals were scanned with a Generation Ⅲ array scanner and analyzed by Imagequant 5.0 software. Results: There were 330 differentially expressed genes between M6 and M8. In the M6 subline,152 genes were up-regulated and 178 genes were down-regulated compared to the M8 subline. These genes could be classified according to their function. Cell growth-related genes that were down-regulated included CCNG1, CDC2, APCl0,and RPA3, while expression of the tumor suppressor genes, CDKN1A and CDKN2D, was up-regulated. Other genes that were differentially expressed included those that have been implicated in the regulation of signal transduction, metabolism and apoptosis. Conclusion: This study exploits a cDNA microarray approach to identifying genes that may be associated with metastasis. The gene expression profiles of osteosarcoma cell lines is a potentially important index in the search of new candidate genes related to tumor occurrence, development and metastasis.

  11. Identification and Regulation of c-Myb Target Genes in MCF-7 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O'Rourke John P

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The c-Myb transcription factor regulates differentiation and proliferation in hematopoietic cells, stem cells and epithelial cells. Although oncogenic versions of c-Myb were first associated with leukemias, over expression or rearrangement of the c-myb gene is common in several types of solid tumors, including breast cancers. Expression of the c-myb gene in human breast cancer cells is dependent on estrogen stimulation, but little is known about the activities of the c-Myb protein or what genes it regulates in estrogen-stimulated cells. Methods We used chromatin immunoprecipitation coupled with whole genome promoter tiling microarrays to identify endogenous c-Myb target genes in human MCF-7 breast cancer cells and characterized the activity of c-Myb at a panel of target genes during different stages of estrogen deprivation and stimulation. Results By using different antibodies and different growth conditions, the c-Myb protein was found associated with over 10,000 promoters in MCF-7 cells, including many genes that encode cell cycle regulators or transcription factors and more than 60 genes that encode microRNAs. Several previously identified c-Myb target genes were identified, including CCNB1, MYC and CXCR4 and novel targets such as JUN, KLF4, NANOG and SND1. By studying a panel of these targets to validate the results, we found that estradiol stimulation triggered the association of c-Myb with promoters and that association correlated with increased target gene expression. We studied one target gene, CXCR4, in detail, showing that c-Myb associated with the CXCR4 gene promoter and activated a CXCR4 reporter gene in transfection assays. Conclusions Our results show that c-Myb associates with a surprisingly large number of promoters in human cells. The results also suggest that estradiol stimulation leads to large-scale, genome-wide changes in c-Myb activity and subsequent changes in gene expression in human breast cancer

  12. Gene Transfer to Dendritic Cells Induced a Protective Immunity against Melanoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pat Metharom; Kay A.O. Ellem; Ming Q. Wei

    2005-01-01

    Lentiviral vectors have shown promises for efficient gene transfer to dividing as well as nondividing cells. In this study, we explored lentiviral vector-mediated, the entire mTRP-2 gene transfer and expression in dendritic cells (DCs). Adoptive transfer of DCs-expressing mTRP-2 (DC-HR'CmT2) into C57BL/6 mouse was also assessed.Dendritic cells were harvested from bone marrow and functional DCs were proved by allogeneic mixed lymphocyte reaction. Lentiviral vectors were produced by transient transfection of 293T cells. Transduction of DCs was proved by marker gene expression and PCR and RT-PCR amplification. Implantation of the transduced DCs, depletion of immune cells as well as the survival of the mice after tumour challenge were investigated. High efficiency of gene transfer into mature DCs was achieved. The high level expression of the functional antigen (TRP-2) and induction of protective immunity by adoptive transfer of TRP-2 gene modified DCs were demonstrated. In vivo study showed a complete protection of mice from further melanoma cell challenge. In comparison, only 83% of mice survived when mTRP-2 peptide-pulsed DCs were administered, suggesting the generation of specific protection. Together, these results demonstrated the usefulness of this gene transfer to DC approach for immunotherapy of cancer and indicated that using tumour associated antigens (TAAs) for gene transfer may be potentially beneficial for the therapy of melanoma.

  13. Efficient conditional gene expression following transplantation of retrovirally transduced bone marrow stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Jie-Yu; Mackay, Fabienne; Alderuccio, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Retroviral gene therapy combined with bone marrow stem cell transplantation can be used to generate mice with ectopic gene expression in the bone marrow compartment in a quick and cost effective manner when compared to generating and maintaining transgenic mouse lines. However a limitation of this procedure is the lack of cell specificity in gene expression that is associated with the use of endogenous retroviral promoters. Restricting gene expression to specific cell subsets utilising tissue-specific promoter driven retroviral vectors is a challenge. Here we describe the generation of conditional expression of retrovirally encoded genes in specific bone marrow derived cell lineages utilising a Cre-dependent retroviral vector. By utilising Lck and CD19 restricted Cre transgenic bone marrow stem cells, we generate chimeric animals with T or B lymphocyte restricted gene expression respectively. The design of the Cre-dependent retroviral vector enables expression of encoded MOG and GFP genes only in association with Cre mediated DNA inversion. Importantly this strategy does not significantly increase the size of the retroviral vector; as such we are able to generate bone marrow chimeric animals with significantly higher chimerism levels than previous studies utilising Cre-dependent retroviral vectors and Cre transgenic bone marrow stem cells. This demonstrates that the use of Cre-dependent retroviral vectors is able to yield high chimerism levels for experimental use and represent a viable alternative to generating transgenic animals.

  14. Defining suitable reference genes for RT-qPCR analysis on intestinal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirakov, Maria; Borra, Marco; Cambuli, Francesca Maria; Plateroti, Michelina

    2013-07-01

    The study of the mammalian intestinal epithelium concerns several aspects of cellular and molecular biology. In fact, most of these studies aim to define molecular components or mechanisms related with the control of stemness and the balance between cell proliferation and differentiation in physiopathological conditions. It is worth mentioning that real-time quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) approaches are commonly used, but only a few studies are available regarding suitable reference genes to normalize gene expression data. The present study was designed to validate potential reference genes in freshly isolated proliferating or differentiated epithelial cells from the mouse intestine. We also extended our analysis to the IEC6 intestinal epithelial cells, as a promising model to study intestinal physiopathology in vitro. The stability of six potential reference genes (Hprt1, Ppia, Gapdh, Rplp0, Ppib, and Vil1) has been tested both in epithelial cells isolated from the mouse intestine and in the IEC6 cell line. The software programs-geNorm and Normfinder-were used to obtain an estimation of the expression stability of each gene and, by comparing the results, to identify the most suitable genes for RT-qPCR data normalization. These multiple approaches allowed us to select different suitable reference genes for the correct quantification of mRNAs depending on the differentiated or proliferative nature of the cells.

  15. Roles of chlorophyllin in cell proliferation and the expression of apoptotic and cell cycle genes in HB4a non-tumor breast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D Epiro, Gláucia Fernanda Rocha; Semprebon, Simone Cristine; Niwa, Andressa Megumi; Marcarini, Juliana Cristina; Mantovani, Mário Sérgio

    2016-06-01

    Chlorophyllin (Chl) has attracted interest in the scientific community due to its chemopreventive and antimutagenic properties. However, the molecular mechanisms of action of Chl remain unclear. This study assesses the effects on cell proliferation and the expression of genes involved in apoptosis, and the cell cycle in HB4a cells treated with Chl. Chl was cytotoxic and induced apoptosis to HB4a cells at 400 μg/mL. Analysis of gene expression showed that there was a decrease in the mRNA level of BIRC5 and CCNA2 genes involved in apoptosis and cell cycle progression, respectively. The proapoptotic gene BAX and the antiapoptotic genes BCL-2 and BCL-XL were upregulated. The cytotoxicity of Chl has been attributed to increases in the expression of BAX and decreases in the expression of genes involved in the cell cycle, but increases in the expression of anti-apoptotic genes suggests a mechanism for protection from cell death induced by Chl. This study provides important information about mechanisms that protect against or trigger damaging processes in non-tumor cells.

  16. Expression of Wnt and Notch pathway genes in a pluripotent human embryonal carcinoma cell line and embryonic stem cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, James; Andrews, Peter W

    2003-01-01

    Embryonal carcinoma (EC) cells, the pluripotent stem cells of teratocarcinomas, show many similar-ities to embryonic stem (ES) cells. Since EC cells are malignant but their terminally differentiated derivatives are not, understanding the molecular mechanisms that regulate their differentiation maybe of value for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. We have examined the expression of multiple components of two developmentally important cell-cell signalling pathways, Wnt and Notch, in the pluripotent human EC cell line, NTERA2, and the human ES cell line, H7. Both pathways have well-documented roles in controlling neurogenesis, a process that occurs largely in response to retinoicacid (RA) treatment of NTERA2 cultures and spontaneously in H7 cultures. In NTERA2, many ofthe genes tested showed altered transcriptional regulation following treatment with RA. These include members of the frizzled gene family (FZDI, FZD3, FZD4, FZD5, FZD6), encoding receptors forWnt proteins, the Frizzled Related Protein family (SFRPI, SFRP2, FRZB, SFRP4), encoding solubleWnt antagonists and also ligands and receptors of the Notch pathway (Dlkl, Jaggedl; Notchl, Notch2, Notch3). Few differences were found in the repertoire of Wnt and Notch pathway genes expressed by NTERA2 EC cells and H7 ES cells. We present a model in which interactions between and regulation of Wnt and Notch signalling are important in maintaining EC/ES stem cells and also controlling their differentiation.

  17. Selective gene transfer to endometrial cancer cells by a polymer against matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP-2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Joo Youn; Choi, Dong Soon; Kim, Changhoon; Joo, Hyun; Min, Churl K

    2008-04-01

    A novel cancer-cell-specific gene delivery vector with high transfection efficiency was designed and tested with an in vitro coculture consisting of the human endometrial adenocarcinoma cell line, HEC-1A cells, and normal endometrial stromal cells. For the cancer-cell targeting, polyethylenimine (PEI), a cationic polymer that can be easily combined with anionic DNA to form a particulate complex, polyplex, being capable of transferring a gene into a variety of cells, was covalently conjugated with antibodies against matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP-2), a typical surface-marker protein on cancer cells known for its close correlation with angiogenesis and invasion in many types of cancer, using the heterofunctional cross-linker, n-succinimidyl 3-(2-pyridyldithio)-propionamide. Biophysical properties and transfection efficiencies of anti-MMP-2-conjugated PEI were analyzed by means of dynamic light scattering, laser Doppler anemometry, and flow cytometry. Our results reveal that (1) the PEI-anti-MMP-2 antibody conjugate maintains physical parameters, including sizes and surface charges, which appear to be favorable for gene transfer and (2) when the pEGFP-N3 plasmid complexes of the PEI-anti-MMP-2 antibody conjugate are applied to the coculture consisting of HEC-1A cells and human stromal cells, a high level of green fluorescent protein expression occurs in HEC-1A cells over stromal cells, suggesting a specific gene transfer targeting cancer cells. Therefore, targeting invading cancer cells with the PEI-anti-MMP-2 antibody conjugate could be promising in endometrial cancer treatment, and this gene delivery system deserves further optimization in the context of targeted therapeutic gene delivery.

  18. E2F Transcription Factors Control the Roller Coaster Ride of Cell Cycle Gene Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurlings, Ingrid; de Bruin, Alain

    2016-01-01

    Initially, the E2F transcription factor was discovered as a factor able to bind the adenovirus E2 promoter and activate viral genes. Afterwards it was shown that E2F also binds to promoters of nonviral genes such as C-MYC and DHFR, which were already known at that time to be important for cell growth and DNA metabolism, respectively. These findings provided the first clues that the E2F transcription factor might be an important regulator of the cell cycle. Since this initial discovery in 1987, several additional E2F family members have been identified, and more than 100 targets genes have been shown to be directly regulated by E2Fs, the majority of these are important for controlling the cell cycle. The progression of a cell through the cell cycle is accompanied with the increased expression of a specific set of genes during one phase of the cell cycle and the decrease of the same set of genes during a later phase of the cell cycle. This roller coaster ride, or oscillation, of gene expression is essential for the proper progression through the cell cycle to allow accurate DNA replication and cell division. The E2F transcription factors have been shown to be critical for the temporal expression of the oscillating cell cycle genes. This review will focus on how the oscillation of E2Fs and their targets is regulated by transcriptional, post-transcriptional and post-translational mechanism in mammals, yeast, flies, and worms. Furthermore, we will discuss the functional impact of E2Fs on the cell cycle progression and outline the consequences when E2F expression is disturbed.

  19. Comparison of gene expression profiles of T cells in porcine colostrum and peripheral blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Shohei; Okutani, Mie; Tsukahara, Takamitsu; Nakanishi, Nobuo; Kato, Yoshihiro; Fukuta, Kikuto; Romero-Pérez, Gustavo A; Ushida, Kazunari; Inoue, Ryo

    2016-09-01

    OBJECTIVE To compare gene expression patterns of T cells in porcine colostrum and peripheral blood. ANIMALS 10 multiparous sows. PROCEDURES Cytotoxic and CD4-CD8 double-positive T cells were separated from porcine colostrum and peripheral blood. Total RNA was extracted. The cDNA prepared from RNA was amplified, labeled, fragmented, and competitively hybridized to DNA microarray slides. The DNA microarray data were validated by use of a real-time reverse-transcription PCR assay, and expression of the genes FOS, NFKBI, IFNG, CXCR6, CCR5, ITGB2, CCR7, and SELL was assessed. Finally, DNA microarray data were validated at the protein level by use of flow cytometry via expression of c-Fos and integrin β-2. RESULTS Evaluation of gene expression profiles indicated that in contrast to results for peripheral blood, numerous cell-signaling pathways might be activated in colostrum. Profile analysis also revealed that FOS and NFKBI (genes of transcription factors) were involved in most cell-signaling pathways and that expression of these genes was significantly higher in colostral T cells than in peripheral blood T cells. Furthermore, CCR7 and SELL (genes of T-cell differentiation markers) in colostral T cells had expression patterns extremely similar to those found in effector or effector memory T cells. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE All or most of the T cells in colostrum had an effector-like phenotype and thus were more activated than those in peripheral blood. This gene expression profile would enable T cells to migrate to mammary glands, be secreted in colostrum, and likely contribute to passive immunity provided by sows to newborn pigs.

  20. Knockout of exogenous EGFP gene in porcine somatic cells using zinc-finger nucleases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, Masahito [Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), ERATO, Nakauchi Stem Cell and Organ Regeneration Project, 4-6-1 Shirokanedai, Minato-ku, Tokyo 108-8639 (Japan); Department of Life Sciences, School of Agriculture, Meiji University, 1-1-1 Higashimita, Tama-ku, Kawasaki, Kanagawa 214-8571 (Japan); Umeyama, Kazuhiro [Department of Life Sciences, School of Agriculture, Meiji University, 1-1-1 Higashimita, Tama-ku, Kawasaki, Kanagawa 214-8571 (Japan); International Cluster for Bio-Resource Research, Meiji University, 1-1-1 Higashimita, Tama-ku, Kawasaki, Kanagawa 214-8571 (Japan); Matsunari, Hitomi [Department of Life Sciences, School of Agriculture, Meiji University, 1-1-1 Higashimita, Tama-ku, Kawasaki, Kanagawa 214-8571 (Japan); Takayanagi, Shuko [Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), ERATO, Nakauchi Stem Cell and Organ Regeneration Project, 4-6-1 Shirokanedai, Minato-ku, Tokyo 108-8639 (Japan); Department of Life Sciences, School of Agriculture, Meiji University, 1-1-1 Higashimita, Tama-ku, Kawasaki, Kanagawa 214-8571 (Japan); Haruyama, Erika; Nakano, Kazuaki; Fujiwara, Tsukasa; Ikezawa, Yuka [Department of Life Sciences, School of Agriculture, Meiji University, 1-1-1 Higashimita, Tama-ku, Kawasaki, Kanagawa 214-8571 (Japan); Nakauchi, Hiromitsu [Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), ERATO, Nakauchi Stem Cell and Organ Regeneration Project, 4-6-1 Shirokanedai, Minato-ku, Tokyo 108-8639 (Japan); Center for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, Institute of Medical Science, Tokyo University, 4-6-1 Shirokanedai, Minato-ku, Tokyo 108-8639 (Japan); and others

    2010-11-05

    Research highlights: {yields} EGFP gene integrated in porcine somatic cells could be knocked out using the ZFN-KO system. {yields} ZFNs induced targeted mutations in porcine primary cultured cells. {yields} Complete absence of EGFP fluorescence was confirmed in ZFN-treated cells. -- Abstract: Zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs) are expected as a powerful tool for generating gene knockouts in laboratory and domestic animals. Currently, it is unclear whether this technology can be utilized for knocking-out genes in pigs. Here, we investigated whether knockout (KO) events in which ZFNs recognize and cleave a target sequence occur in porcine primary cultured somatic cells that harbor the exogenous enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) gene. ZFN-encoding mRNA designed to target the EGFP gene was introduced by electroporation into the cell. Using the Surveyor nuclease assay and flow cytometric analysis, we confirmed ZFN-induced cleavage of the target sequence and the disappearance of EGFP fluorescence expression in ZFN-treated cells. In addition, sequence analysis revealed that ZFN-induced mutations such as base substitution, deletion, or insertion were generated in the ZFN cleavage site of EGFP-expression negative cells that were cloned from ZFN-treated cells, thereby showing it was possible to disrupt (i.e., knock out) the function of the EGFP gene in porcine somatic cells. To our knowledge, this study provides the first evidence that the ZFN-KO system can be applied to pigs. These findings may open a new avenue to the creation of gene KO pigs using ZFN-treated cells and somatic cell nuclear transfer.

  1. Correlating cell morphology and stochastic gene expression using fluorescence spectroscopy and GPU-enabled image analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepherd, Douglas; Shapiro, Evan; Perillo, Evan; Werner, James

    2014-03-01

    Biological processes at the microscopic level appear stochastic, requiring precise measurement and analytical techniques to determine the nature of the underlying regulatory networks. Single-molecule, single-cell studies of gene expression have provided insights into how cells respond to external stimuli. Recent work has suggested that macroscopic cell properties, such as cell morphology, are correlated with gene expression. Here we present single-cell studies of a signal-activated gene network: Interleukin 4 (IL4) RNA production in rat basophil leukemia (RBL) cells during the allergic response. We fluorescently label individual IL4 RNA transcripts in populations of RBL cells, subject to varying external stimuli. A custom super-resolution microscope is used to measure the number of fluorescent labeled IL4 transcripts in populations of RBL cells on a cell-by-cell basis. To test the hypothesis that cell morphology is connected genotype, we analyze white light images of RBL cells and cross-reference cell morphology with IL4 RNA levels. We find that the activation of RBL cells, determined by white-light imaging, is well correlated with IL4 mRNA expression.

  2. Efficient lentiviral gene transfer to canine repopulating cells using an overnight transduction protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horn, Peter A; Keyser, Kirsten A; Peterson, Laura J; Neff, Tobias; Thomasson, Bobbie M; Thompson, Jesse; Kiem, Hans-Peter

    2004-05-15

    The use of lentiviral vectors for the transduction of hematopoietic stem cells has evoked much interest owing to their ability to stably integrate into the genome of nondividing cells. However, published large animal studies have reported highly variable gene transfer rates of typically less than 1%. Here we report the use of lentiviral vectors for the transduction of canine CD34(+) hematopoietic repopulating cells using a very short, 18-hour transduction protocol. We compared lentiviral transduction of hematopoietic repopulating cells from either stem cell factor (SCF)- and granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF)-primed marrow or mobilized peripheral blood in a competitive repopulation assay in 3 dogs. All dogs engrafted rapidly within 9 days. Transgene expression was detected in all lineages (B cells, T cells, granulocytes, and red blood cells as well as platelets) indicating multilineage engraftment of transduced cells, with overall long-term marking levels of up to 12%. Gene transfer levels in mobilized peripheral blood cells were slightly higher than in primed marrow cells. In conclusion, we show efficient lentiviral transduction of canine repopulating cells using an overnight transduction protocol. These results have important implications for the design of stem cell gene therapy protocols, especially for those diseases in which the maintenance of stem cells in culture is a major limitation.

  3. The Microarray Gene Profiling Analysis of Glioblastoma Cancer Cells Reveals Genes Affected by FAK Inhibitor Y15 and Combination of Y15 and Temozolomide

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Focal adhesion is known to be highly expressed and activated in glioma cells. Recently, we demonstrated that FAK autophosphorylation inhibitor, Y15 significantly decreased tumor growth of DBTRG and U87 cells, especially in combination with temozolomide. In the present report, we performed gene expression analysis in these cells to reveal genes affected by Y15, temozolomide and combination of Y15 and temozolomide. We tested the effect of Y15 on gene expression by Illumina Human HT12v4 microarr...

  4. Altered expression of cell proliferation-related and interferon-stimulated genes in colon cancer cells resistant to SN38.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gongora, Céline; Candeil, Laurent; Vezzio, Nadia; Copois, Virginie; Denis, Vincent; Breil, Corinne; Molina, Franck; Fraslon, Caroline; Conseiller, Emmanuel; Pau, Bernard; Martineau, Pierre; Del Rio, Maguy

    2008-06-01

    Irinotecan is a topoisomerase I inhibitor widely used as an anticancer agent in the treatment of metastatic colon cancer. However, its efficacy is often limited by the development of resistance. We have isolated a colon carcinoma cell line, HCT116-SN6, which displays a 6-fold higher resistance to SN38, the active metabolite of irinotecan. In this paper, we studied the molecular mechanisms that cause resistance to SN38 in the HCT116-SN6 cell line. First, we analyzed proliferation, cell cycle distribution, apoptosis, topoisomerase I expression and activity in SN38-resistant (HCT116-SN6) and sensitive (HCT116-s cells). We showed that the SN38-induced apoptosis and the SN38-activated cell cycle checkpoints leading to G(2)/M cell cycle arrest were similar in both cell lines. Topoisomerase I expression and catalytic activity were also unchanged. Then, we compared mRNA expression profiles in the two cell lines using the Affymetrix Human Genome GeneChip arrays U133A and B. Microarray analysis showed that among the genes, which were differentially expressed in HCT116-s and HCT116-SN6 cells, 27% were related to cell proliferation suggesting that proliferation might be the main target in the development of resistance to SN38. This result correlates with the phenotypic observation of a reduced growth rate in HCT116-SN6 resistant cells. Furthermore, 29% of the overexpressed genes were Interferon Stimulated Genes and we demonstrate that their overexpression is, at least partially, due to endogenous activation of the p38 MAP kinase pathway in SN38 resistant cells. In conclusion, a slower cell proliferation rate may be a major cause of acquired resistance to SN38 via a reduction of cell cycle progression through the S phase which is mandatory for the cytotoxic action of SN38. This lower growth rate could be due to the endogenous activation of p38.

  5. Regulation of the cell cycle via mitochondrial gene expression and energy metabolism in HeLa cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Xiong; Yang Jiao; Weiwei Huang; Mingxing Ma; Min Yu; Qinghua Cui; Deyong Tan

    2012-01-01

    Human cervical cancer HeLa cells have functional mitochondria.Recent studies have suggested that mitochondrial metabolism plays an essential role in tumor cell proliferation.Nevertheless,how cells coordinate mitochondrial dynamics and cell cycle progression remains to be clarified.To investigate the relationship between mitochondrial function and cell cycle regulation,the mitochondrial gene expression profile and cellular ATP levels were determined by cell cycle progress analysis in the present study.HeLa cells were synchronized in the G0/G1 phase by serum starvation,and re-entered cell cycle by restoring serum culture,time course experiment was performed to analyze the expression of mitochondrial transcription regulators and mitochondrial genes,mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP),cellular ATP levels,and cell cycle progression.The results showed that when arrested G0/G1 cells were stimulated in serum-containing medium,the amount of DNA and the expression levels of both mRNA and proteins in mitochondria started to increase at 2 h time point,whereas the MMP and ATP level elevated at 4 h.Furthermore,the cyclin D1 expression began to increase at 4 h after serum triggered cell cycle.ATP synthesis inhibitor-oligomycintreatment suppressed the cyclin D1 and cyclin B1 expression levels and blocked cell cycle progression.Taken together,our results suggested that increased mitochondrial gene expression levels,oxidative phosphorylation activation,and cellular ATP content increase are important events for triggering cell cycle.Finally,we demonstrated that mitochondrial gene expression levels and cellular ATP content are tightly regulated and might play a central role in regulating cell proliferation.

  6. Characterization of stem cells and cancer cells on the basis of gene expression profile stability, plasticity, and robustness: dynamical systems theory of gene expressions under cell-cell interaction explains mutational robustness of differentiated cells and suggests how cancer cells emerge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneko, Kunihiko

    2011-06-01

    Here I present and discuss a model that, among other things, appears able to describe the dynamics of cancer cell origin from the perspective of stable and unstable gene expression profiles. In identifying such aberrant gene expression profiles as lying outside the normal stable states attracted through development and normal cell differentiation, the hypothesis explains why cancer cells accumulate mutations, to which they are not robust, and why these mutations create a new stable state far from the normal gene expression profile space. Such cells are in strong contrast with normal cell types that appeared as an attractor state in the gene expression dynamical system under cell-cell interaction and achieved robustness to noise through evolution, which in turn also conferred robustness to mutation. In complex gene regulation networks, other aberrant cellular states lacking such high robustness are expected to remain, which would correspond to cancer cells.

  7. Cell- and gene-therapy approaches to inner ear repair

    OpenAIRE

    Conde de Felipe, Magnolia; Feijoo-Redondo, Ana; García-Sancho, Javier; Schimmang, Thomas; Durán, Mercedes

    2011-01-01

    Sensorineural hearing loss is the most common sensory disorder in humans. It is primarily due to the degeneration of highly specialised mechanosensory cells in the cochlea, the so-called hair cells. Hearing problems can also be caused or further aggravated by the death of auditory sensory neurons that convey the information from the hair cells to the brain stem. Despite the discovery of stem/progenitor cells in the mammalian cochlea, no regeneration of either damaged hair cells or auditory ne...

  8. Expression of an activated rasD gene changes cell fate decisions during Dictyostelium development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louis, S A; Spiegelman, G B; Weeks, G

    1997-02-01

    It has been previously demonstrated that the expression of an activated rasD gene in wild-type Dictyostelium cells results in formation of aggregates with multitips, instead of the normal single tips, and a block in further development. In an attempt to better understand the role of activated RasD development, we examined cell-type-specific gene expression in a strain stably expressing high levels of RasD[G12T]. We found that the expression of prestalk cell-specific genes ecmA and tagB was markedly enhanced, whereas the expression of the prespore cell-specific gene cotC was reduced to very low levels. When the fate of cells in the multitipped aggregate was monitored with an ecmA/lacZ fusion, it appeared that most of the cells eventually adopted prestalk gene expression characteristics. When mixtures of the [G12T]rasD cells and Ax3 cells were induced to differentiate, chimeric pseudoplasmodia were not formed. Thus, although the [G12T]rasD transformant had a marked propensity to form prestalk cells, it could not supply the prestalk cell population when mixed with wild-type cells. Both stalk and spore cell formation occurred in low cell density monolayers of the [G12T]rasD strain, suggesting that at least part of the inhibition of stalk and spore formation during multicellular development involved inhibitory cell interactions within the cell mass. Models for the possible role of rasD in development are discussed.

  9. Engineering of red cells of Arabidopsis thaliana and comparative genome-wide gene expression analysis of red cells versus wild-type cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Ming-Zhu; Xie, De-Yu

    2011-04-01

    We report metabolic engineering of Arabidopsis red cells and genome-wide gene expression analysis associated with anthocyanin biosynthesis and other metabolic pathways between red cells and wild-type (WT) cells. Red cells of A. thaliana were engineered for the first time from the leaves of production of anthocyanin pigment 1-Dominant (pap1-D). These red cells produced seven anthocyanin molecules including a new one that was characterized by LC-MS analysis. Wild-type cells established as a control did not produce anthocyanins. A genome-wide microarray analysis revealed that nearly 66 and 65% of genes in the genome were expressed in the red cells and wild-type cells, respectively. In comparison with the WT cells, 3.2% of expressed genes in the red cells were differentially expressed. The expression levels of 14 genes involved in the biosynthetic pathway of anthocyanin were significantly higher in the red cells than in the WT cells. Microarray and RT-PCR analyses demonstrated that the TTG1-GL3/TT8-PAP1 complex regulated the biosynthesis of anthocyanins. Furthermore, most of the genes with significant differential expression levels in the red cells versus the WT cells were characterized with diverse biochemical functions, many of which were mapped to different metabolic pathways (e.g., ribosomal protein biosynthesis, photosynthesis, glycolysis, glyoxylate metabolism, and plant secondary metabolisms) or organelles (e.g., chloroplast). We suggest that the difference in gene expression profiles between the two cell lines likely results from cell types, the overexpression of PAP1, and the high metabolic flux toward anthocyanins.

  10. Identification of differentially expressed genes in two new human bladder carcinoma cell lines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Objective To screen and identify differentially expressed genes in two new human urothelial carcinoma cell lines, BLS-211 and BLX. Methods Suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) was used to createa subtracted library, and clones were sequenced. Results Totally 13 over-expressed genes in BLX and 9 in BLS-211 cells were obtained, respectively. Among them, 18 were known genes and 4 were new ESTs (Expressed Sequence Tag), and were collected by GenBank dbEST database (The access number was EB390424-7). Conclusion SSH is a powerful method for the identification of differentially expressed genes. The differential expression of some BCG-associated genes in different cells may be related to the different responses to clinical BCG therapy. The identified new ESTs can be cloned for full length to further study their functions.

  11. Screening differentially expressed genes in mouse hepatocarcinoma ascites cell line with high potential of lymphatic metastasis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Nan Cui; Jian-Wu Tang; Li Hou; Bo Song; Li Li; Ji-Wei Liu

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To screen genes differentially expressed in mouse hepatocarcinoma ascites cell line with high potential of lymphatic metastasis.METHODS: A subtracted cDNA library of mouse hepatocarcinoma cell line with high potential of lymphatic metastatic Hca-F and its synogenetic cell line Hca-P with a low metastatic potential was constructed by suppression subtracted hybridization(SSH) method. The screened clones of the subtracted library were sequenced and GeneBank homology search was performed.RESULTS: Fourteen differentially expressed cDNA fragments of Hca-F were obtained with two novel genes.CONCLUSION: SSH is a useful technique to detect differentially expressioned genes and an effective method to clone novel genes.

  12. Candidate gene analysis using imputed genotypes: cell cycle single-nucleotide polymorphisms and ovarian cancer risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goode, Ellen L; Fridley, Brooke L; Vierkant, Robert A;

    2009-01-01

    Polymorphisms in genes critical to cell cycle control are outstanding candidates for association with ovarian cancer risk; numerous genes have been interrogated by multiple research groups using differing tagging single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) sets. To maximize information gleaned from...... existing genotype data, we conducted a combined analysis of five independent studies of invasive epithelial ovarian cancer. Up to 2,120 cases and 3,382 controls were genotyped in the course of two collaborations at a variety of SNPs in 11 cell cycle genes (CDKN2C, CDKN1A, CCND3, CCND1, CCND2, CDKN1B, CDK2......, and rs3212891; CDK2 rs2069391, rs2069414, and rs17528736; and CCNE1 rs3218036. These results exemplify the utility of imputation in candidate gene studies and lend evidence to a role of cell cycle genes in ovarian cancer etiology, suggest a reduced set of SNPs to target in additional cases and controls....

  13. Exogenous Gene Integration for Microalgal Cell Transformation Using a Nanowire-Incorporated Microdevice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Sunwoong; Park, Seunghye; Kim, Jung; Choi, Jong Seob; Kim, Kyung Hoon; Kwon, Donguk; Jin, EonSeon; Park, Inkyu; Kim, Do Hyun; Seo, Tae Seok

    2015-12-16

    Superior green algal cells showing high lipid production and rapid growth rate are considered as an alternative for the next generation green energy resources. To achieve the biomass based energy generation, transformed microalgae with superlative properties should be developed through genetic engineering. Contrary to the normal cells, microalgae have rigid cell walls, so that target gene delivery into cells is challengeable. In this study, we report a ZnO nanowire-incorporated microdevice for a high throughput microalgal transformation. The proposed microdevice was equipped with not only a ZnO nanowire in the microchannel for gene delivery into cells but also a pneumatic polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microvalve to modulate the cellular attachment and detachment from the nanowire. As a model, hygromycin B resistance gene cassette (Hyg3) was functionalized on the hydrothermally grown ZnO nanowires through a disulfide bond and released into green algal cells, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, by reductive cleavage. During Hyg3 gene delivery, a monolithic PDMS membrane was bent down, so that algal cells were pushed down toward ZnO nanowires. The supply of vacuum in the pneumatic line made the PDMS membrane bend up, enabling the gene delivered algal cells to be recovered from the outlet of the microchannel. We successfully confirmed Hyg3 gene integrated in microalgae by amplifying the inserted gene through polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and DNA sequencing. The efficiency of the gene delivery to algal cells using the ZnO nanowire-incorporated microdevice was 6.52 × 10(4)- and 9.66 × 10(4)-fold higher than that of a traditional glass bead beating and electroporation.

  14. TIMP-1 gene deficiency increases tumour cell sensitivity to chemotherapy-induced apoptosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davidsen, Marie Louise; Würts, S.Ø.; Rømer, Maria Unni Koefoed;

    2006-01-01

    in cancer. In this regard, several studies have demonstrated an antiapoptotic effect of TIMP-1 in a number of different cell types. Since chemotherapy works by inducing apoptosis in cancer cells, we raised the hypothesis that TIMP-1 promotes resistance against chemotherapeutic drugs. In order to investigate...... this hypothesis, we have established TIMP-1 gene-deficient and TIMP-1 wild-type fibrosarcoma cells from mouse lung tissue. We have characterised these cells with regard to TIMP-1 genotype, TIMP-1 expression, malignant transformation and sensitivity to chemotherapy-induced apoptosis. We show that TIMP-1 gene...... deficiency increases the response to chemotherapy considerably, confirming that TIMP-1 protects the cells from apoptosis. This is to our knowledge the first study investigating TIMP-1 and chemotherapy-induced apoptosis employing a powerful model system comprising TIMP-1 gene-deficient cells...

  15. MFSD2A is a novel lung tumor suppressor gene modulating cell cycle and matrix attachment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shames David S

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background MFSD2A (major facilitator superfamily domain containing 2 gene maps on chromosome 1p34 within a linkage disequilibrium block containing genetic elements associated with progression of lung cancer. Results Here we show that MFSD2A expression is strongly downregulated in non-small cell lung cancer cell lines of different histotypes and in primary lung adenocarcinomas. Experimental modulation of MFSD2A in lung cancer cells is associated with alteration of mRNA levels of genes involved in cell cycle control and interaction with the extracellular matrix. Exogenous expression of MFSD2A in lung cancer cells induced a G1 block, impaired adhesion and migration in vitro, and significantly reduced tumor colony number in vitro (4- to 27-fold, P in vivo (~3-fold, P Conclusion Together these data suggest that MFSD2A is a novel lung cancer tumor suppressor gene that regulates cell cycle progression and matrix attachment.

  16. Cloning of murine BRI3 gene and study on its function for inducing cell death

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    To understand the molecular mechanism of TNFα effects, the cDNA of murine BRI3 gene was cloned from the total RNA of murine brain endothelial cells (bEnd.3)treated with hTNFα by using the suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) and the RT-PCR method. The fusion expression vector harbouring BRI3 gene and enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP) thus obtained were designated as pEGFP/I3. Then pEGFP/I3 was transiently transfected into L929 cells and the fusion protein EGFP/I3 was localized in cytoplasm. It is found that the expression of EGFP/I3 could induce cell death in L929 cells detected by TUNEL method and flow cytometry. And the overexpression of Bci-2 in L929 cells can block cell death induced by EGFP/I3, indicating that murine BRI3 gene might related to the TNFα mediated cytotoxicity.

  17. EXPRESSION OF THE O6-METHYLGUANINE-DNA METHYLTRANSFERASE GENE IN EIGHT HUMAN TUMOR CELL LINES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈建敏; 章扬培; 吴英

    1994-01-01

    O6-methylguanine-DNA methltransferase(MGMT) gene expression in 6 Mer+(HeLa S3,SMMC-7721,SGC-7901,B-239,AGZY83-a,and Cc801)and 2Mer-(SHG-44,AND HeLa MR) haman tumor cell lines was examined.Southern blot analysis revealed no deletion,amplification,or rearrangement of the MGMT gene in these cell lines.However,-1.0kb transcripts were detected in the 6 Mer+ cell lines but not in the 2 Mer- cell lines by Northern blot analysis.Furthermore,a rough correlation between MGMT activity and mRNA level in these cell lines was observed.These results suggest that transcriptional regulation of the MGMT gene is the molecular basis of the absence of MGMT activity in Mer- cell lines.

  18. Modulation of DNA methylation and gene expression in cultured sycamore cells treated by hypomethylating base analog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngernprasirtsiri, J; Akazawa, T

    1990-12-12

    The selective suppression of photosynthetic genes in both the nuclear and plastid genomes of the nonphotosynthetic white wild-type cell line of sycamore (Acer pseudoplatanus) has been found to be inversely related to the presence of a variety of methylated bases, especially 5-methylcytosine (5-MeCyt) and N6-methyladenine (N6-MeAde), localized in regions of the plastid genome containing silent genes. We used hypomethylating base analogs to manipulate the level of cytosine and adenine methylation in the white cells of sycamore, and examined the effects of changes in methylation on gene expression. Treatment with 5-azacytidine (5-AzaCyd) and N6-benzyladenine (N6-BzlAde) decreased cytosine and adenine methylation. This was accompanied by restoration of transcriptional activity in photosynthetic genes which are usually suppressed. Both 5-MeCyt and N6-MeAde suppressed nuclear gene expression, but only 5-MeCyt suppressed plastid gene expression.

  19. NF-Y activates genes of metabolic pathways altered in cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benatti, Paolo; Chiaramonte, Maria Luisa; Lorenzo, Mariangela; Hartley, John A; Hochhauser, Daniel; Gnesutta, Nerina; Mantovani, Roberto; Imbriano, Carol; Dolfini, Diletta

    2016-01-12

    The trimeric transcription factor NF-Y binds to the CCAAT box, an element enriched in promoters of genes overexpressed in tumors. Previous studies on the NF-Y regulome identified the general term metabolism as significantly enriched. We dissect here in detail the targeting of metabolic genes by integrating analysis of NF-Y genomic binding and profilings after inactivation of NF-Y subunits in different cell types. NF-Y controls de novo biosynthetic pathways of lipids, teaming up with the master SREBPs regulators. It activates glycolytic genes, but, surprisingly, is neutral or represses mitochondrial respiratory genes. NF-Y targets the SOCG (Serine, One Carbon, Glycine) and Glutamine pathways, as well as genes involved in the biosynthesis of polyamines and purines. Specific cancer-driving nodes are generally under NF-Y control. Altogether, these data delineate a coherent strategy to promote expression of metabolic genes fuelling anaerobic energy production and other anabolic pathways commonly altered in cancer cells.

  20. Integrated analysis of gene expression, CpG island methylation, and gene copy number in breast cancer cells by deep sequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhifu Sun

    Full Text Available We used deep sequencing technology to profile the transcriptome, gene copy number, and CpG island methylation status simultaneously in eight commonly used breast cell lines to develop a model for how these genomic features are integrated in estrogen receptor positive (ER+ and negative breast cancer. Total mRNA sequence, gene copy number, and genomic CpG island methylation were carried out using the Illumina Genome Analyzer. Sequences were mapped to the human genome to obtain digitized gene expression data, DNA copy number in reference to the non-tumor cell line (MCF10A, and methylation status of 21,570 CpG islands to identify differentially expressed genes that were correlated with methylation or copy number changes. These were evaluated in a dataset from 129 primary breast tumors. Gene expression in cell lines was dominated by ER-associated genes. ER+ and ER- cell lines formed two distinct, stable clusters, and 1,873 genes were differentially expressed in the two groups. Part of chromosome 8 was deleted in all ER- cells and part of chromosome 17 amplified in all ER+ cells. These loci encoded 30 genes that were overexpressed in ER+ cells; 9 of these genes were overexpressed in ER+ tumors. We identified 149 differentially expressed genes that exhibited differential methylation of one or more CpG islands within 5 kb of the 5' end of the gene and for which mRNA abundance was inversely correlated with CpG island methylation status. In primary tumors we identified 84 genes that appear to be robust components of the methylation signature that we identified in ER+ cell lines. Our analyses reveal a global pattern of differential CpG island methylation that contributes to the transcriptome landscape of ER+ and ER- breast cancer cells and tumors. The role of gene amplification/deletion appears to more modest, although several potentially significant genes appear to be regulated by copy number aberrations.

  1. Key gene regulating cell wall biosynthesis and recalcitrance in Populus, gene Y

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Jay; Engle, Nancy; Gunter, Lee E.; Jawdy, Sara; Tschaplinski, Timothy J.; Tuskan, Gerald A.

    2015-12-08

    This disclosure provides methods and transgenic plants for improved production of renewable biofuels and other plant-derived biomaterials by altering the expression and/or activity of Gene Y, an O-acetyltransferase. This disclosure also provides expression vectors containing a nucleic acid (Gene Y) which encodes the polypeptide of SEQ ID NO: 1 and is operably linked to a heterologous promoter.

  2. Vitamin D3 modulated gene expression patterns in human primary normal and cancer prostate cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzey, Meral; Luo, Jianhua; Getzenberg, Robert H

    2004-10-01

    The vitamin D receptor (VDR) is a member of the steroid/retinoid receptor superfamily of nuclear receptors and has potential tumor-suppressive functions in prostate and other cancer types. Vitamin D3 (VD3) exerts its biological actions by binding within cells to VDR. The VDR then interacts with specific regions of the DNA in cells, and triggers changes in the activity of genes involved in cell division, cell survival, and cellular function. Using human primary cultures and the prostate cancer (PCa) cell line, ALVA-31, we examined the effects of VD3 under different culture conditions. Complete G0/G1 arrest of ALVA-31 cells and approximately 50% inhibition of tumor stromal cell growth was observed. To determine changes in gene expression patterns related to VD3 activity, microarray analysis was performed. More than approximately 20,000 genes were evaluated for twofold relative increases and decreases in expression levels. A number of the gene targets that were up- and down-regulated are related to potential mechanisms of prostatic growth regulation. These include estrogen receptor (ER), heat shock proteins: 70 and 90, Apaf1, Her-2/neu, and paxillin. Utilizing antibodies generated against these targets, we were able to confirm the changes at the protein level. These newly reported gene expression patterns provide novel information not only potential markers, but also on the genes involved in VD3 induced apoptosis in PCa.

  3. Variable allelic expression of imprinted genes in human pluripotent stem cells during differentiation into specialized cell types in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sang-Wook; Kim, Jihoon; Park, Jong-Lyul; Ko, Ji-Yun; Im, Ilkyun; Do, Hyo-Sang; Kim, Hyemin; Tran, Ngoc-Tung; Lee, Sang-Hun; Kim, Yong Sung; Cho, Yee Sook; Lee, Dong Ryul; Han, Yong-Mahn

    2014-04-01

    Genomic imprinting is an epigenetic phenomenon by which a subset of genes is asymmetrically expressed in a parent-of-origin manner. However, little is known regarding the epigenetic behaviors of imprinted genes during human development. Here, we show dynamic epigenetic changes in imprinted genes in hESCs during in vitro differentiation into specialized cell types. Out of 9 imprinted genes with single nucleotide polymorphisms, mono-allelic expression for three imprinted genes (H19, KCNQ1OT1, and IPW), and bi- or partial-allelic expression for three imprinted genes (OSBPL5, PPP1R9A, and RTL1) were stably retained in H9-hESCs throughout differentiation, representing imprinting stability. Three imprinted genes (KCNK9, ATP10A, and SLC22A3) showed a loss and a gain of imprinting in a lineage-specific manner during differentiation. Changes in allelic expression of imprinted genes were observed in another hESC line during in vitro differentiation. These findings indicate that the allelic expression of imprinted genes may be vulnerable in a lineage-specific manner in human pluripotent stem cells during differentiation.

  4. Gene therapy progress and prospects: stem cell plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashofer, K; Bonnet, D

    2005-08-01

    With the identification of stem cell plasticity several years ago, multiple reports raised hopes that tissue repair by stem cell transplantation could be within reach in the near future. Krause et al reported that a single purified hematopoietic stem cell not only repopulated the bone marrow of a host animal, but also integrated into unrelated tissues. Lagasse et al demonstrated that in a genetic model of liver disease, purified hematopoietic stem cells can give rise to hepatocytes and rescue fatal liver damage. More recent work by Jiang et al demonstrated that cultured cells can retain their stem cell potential. There are a number of possible mechanisms that could explain these phenomena, and recent experiments have raised controversy about which mechanism is prevalent. One possibility is transdifferentiation of a committed cell directly into another cell type as a response to environmental cues. Transdifferentiation has been shown mainly in vitro, but some in vivo data also support this mechanism. Direct transdifferentiation would clinically be limited by the number of cells that can be introduced into an organ without removal of resident cells. If bone marrow cells could on the other hand give rise to stem cells of another tissue, then they could in theory repopulate whole organs from a few starting cells. This model of dedifferentiation is consistent with recent data from animal models. Genetic analysis of cells of donor origin in vivo and in vitro has brought to light another possible mechanism. The fusion of host and donor cells can give rise to mature tissue cells without trans- or dedifferentiation. The resulting heterokaryons are able to cure a lethal genetic defect and do not seem to be prone to give rise to cancer. All these models will clinically face the problem of accessibility of healthy primary cells for transplantation. This underlines the importance of the recent identification of a population of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) with stem cell

  5. Effect of chemical mutagens and carcinogens on gene expression profiles in human TK6 cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lode Godderis

    Full Text Available Characterization of toxicogenomic signatures of carcinogen exposure holds significant promise for mechanistic and predictive toxicology. In vitro transcriptomic studies allow the comparison of the response to chemicals with diverse mode of actions under controlled experimental conditions. We conducted an in vitro study in TK6 cells to characterize gene expression signatures of exposure to 15 genotoxic carcinogens frequently used in European industries. We also examined the dose-responsive changes in gene expression, and perturbation of biochemical pathways in response to these carcinogens. TK6 cells were exposed at 3 dose levels for 24 h with and without S9 human metabolic mix. Since S9 had an impact on gene expression (885 genes, we analyzed the gene expression data from cells cultures incubated with S9 and without S9 independently. The ribosome pathway was affected by all chemical-dose combinations. However in general, no similar gene expression was observed among carcinogens. Further, pathways, i.e. cell cycle, DNA repair mechanisms, RNA degradation, that were common within sets of chemical-dose combination were suggested by clustergram. Linear trends in dose-response of gene expression were observed for Trichloroethylene, Benz[a]anthracene, Epichlorohydrin, Benzene, and Hydroquinone. The significantly altered genes were involved in the regulation of (anti- apoptosis, maintenance of cell survival, tumor necrosis factor-related pathways and immune response, in agreement with several other studies. Similarly in S9+ cultures, Benz[a]pyrene, Styrene and Trichloroethylene each modified over 1000 genes at high concentrations. Our findings expand our understanding of the transcriptomic response to genotoxic carcinogens, revealing the alteration of diverse sets of genes and pathways involved in cellular homeostasis and cell cycle control.

  6. Gene expression and pathway analysis of human hepatocellular carcinoma cells treated with cadmium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartularo, Laura; Laulicht, Freda; Sun, Hong; Kluz, Thomas; Freedman, Jonathan H.; Costa, Max

    2015-01-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is a toxic and carcinogenic metal naturally occurring in the earth’s crust. A common route of human exposure is via diet and cadmium accumulates in the liver. The effects of Cd exposure on gene expression in human hepatocellular carcinoma (HepG2) cells were examined in this study. HepG2 cells were acutely-treated with 0.1, 0.5, or 1.0 μM Cd for 24 hours; or chronically-treated with 0.01, 0.05, or 0.1 μM Cd for three weeks and gene expression analysis was performed using Affymetrix GeneChip® Human Gene 1.0 ST Arrays. Acute and chronic exposures significantly altered the expression of 333 and 181 genes, respectively. The genes most upregulated by acute exposure included several metallothioneins. Downregulated genes included the monooxygenase CYP3A7, involved in drug and lipid metabolism. In contrast, CYP3A7 was upregulated by chronic Cd exposure, as was DNAJB9, an anti-apoptotic J protein. Genes downregulated following chronic exposure included the transcriptional regulator early growth response protein 1. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis revealed that the top networks altered by acute exposure were lipid metabolism, small molecule biosynthesis, and cell morphology, organization, and development; while top networks altered by chronic exposure were organ morphology, cell cycle, cell signaling, and renal and urological diseases/cancer. Many of the dysregulated genes play important roles in cellular growth, proliferation, and apoptosis, and may be involved in carcinogenesis. In addition to gene expression changes, HepG2 cells treated with cadmium for 24 hours indicated a reduction in global levels of histone methylation and acetylation that persisted 72 hours post-treatment. PMID:26314618

  7. Gene probes to detect cross-culture contamination in hormone producing cell lines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matsuba, I; Lernmark, A; Madsen, Ole Dragsbæk;

    1988-01-01

    Cross-culture contamination of cell lines propagated in continuous culture is a frequent event and particularly difficult to resolve in cells expressing similar phenotypes. We demonstrate that DNA-DNA hybridization to blotted endonuclease-digested cell DNA effectively detects cross-culture...... the effective use of gene probes to control the origin of cell cultures....... contamination to monitor inter-species as well as intra-species cross contamination. An insulin-producing cell-line, Clone-16, originally cloned from a human fetal endocrine pancreatic cell line did not produce human c-peptide as anticipated. DNA from these cells showed no hybridization to the human ALU...

  8. Lineage relationship of prostate cancer cell types based on gene expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ware Carol B

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prostate tumor heterogeneity is a major factor in disease management. Heterogeneity could be due to multiple cancer cell types with distinct gene expression. Of clinical importance is the so-called cancer stem cell type. Cell type-specific transcriptomes are used to examine lineage relationship among cancer cell types and their expression similarity to normal cell types including stem/progenitor cells. Methods Transcriptomes were determined by Affymetrix DNA array analysis for the following cell types. Putative prostate progenitor cell populations were characterized and isolated by expression of the membrane transporter ABCG2. Stem cells were represented by embryonic stem and embryonal carcinoma cells. The cancer cell types were Gleason pattern 3 (glandular histomorphology and pattern 4 (aglandular sorted from primary tumors, cultured prostate cancer cell lines originally established from metastatic lesions, xenografts LuCaP 35 (adenocarcinoma phenotype and LuCaP 49 (neuroendocrine/small cell carcinoma grown in mice. No detectable gene expression differences were detected among serial passages of the LuCaP xenografts. Results Based on transcriptomes, the different cancer cell types could be clustered into a luminal-like grouping and a non-luminal-like (also not basal-like grouping. The non-luminal-like types showed expression more similar to that of stem/progenitor cells than the luminal-like types. However, none showed expression of stem cell genes known to maintain stemness. Conclusions Non-luminal-like types are all representatives of aggressive disease, and this could be attributed to the similarity in overall gene expression to stem and progenitor cell types.

  9. Transient Gene and miRNA Expression Profile Changes of Confluent Human Fibroblast Cells in Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ye; Lu, Tao; Wong, Michael; Feiveson, Alan; Stodieck, Louis; Karouia, Fathi; Wang, Xiaoyu; Wu, Honglu

    2015-01-01

    Microgravity or an altered gravity environment from the static 1 gravitational constant has been shown to influence global gene expression patterns and protein levels in cultured cells. However, most of the reported studies conducted in space or using simulated microgravity on the ground have focused on the growth or differentiation of the cells. Whether non-dividing cultured cells will sense the presence of microgravity in space has not been specifically addressed. In an experiment conducted on the International Space Station, confluent human fibroblast cells were fixed after being cultured in space for 3 and 14 days for investigations of gene and miRNA (microRNA) expression profile changes in these cells. A fibroblast is a type of cell that synthesizes the extracellular matrix and collagen, the structural framework for tissues, and plays a critical role in wound healing and other functions. Results of the experiment showed that on Day 3, both the flown and ground cells were still proliferating slowly even though they were confluent, as measured by the expression of the protein Ki-67 positive cells, and the cells in space grew slightly faster. Gene and miRNA expression data indicated activation of NF(sub kappa)B (nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells) and other growth related pathways involving HGF and VEGF in the flown cells. On Day 14 when the cells were mostly non-dividing, the gene and miRNA expression profiles between the flight and ground samples were indistinguishable. Comparison of gene and miRNA expressions in the Day 3 samples in respect to Day 14 revealed that most of the changes observed on Day 3 were related to cell growth for both the flown and ground cells. Analysis of cytoskeleton changes by immunohistochemistry staining of the cells with antibodies for alpha-tubulin showed no difference between the flight and ground samples. Results of our study suggest that in true non-dividing human fibroblast cells, microgravity in

  10. A novel erythroid differen tiation related gene EDRF2 inhibited α-globin gene expression in K562 cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    In previous studies, we found that EDRF2 was an erythroid differentiation related factor, whose expression was markedly upregulated during erythroid differentiation. It suggested that this factor played a role in erythropoiesis.By using rapid amplification of cDNA ends technology, we cloned EDRF2 gene 5 '- and 3 '-cDNA ends successfully.Transfection and Northern blot analysis demonstrated that EDRF2 inhibited mRNA expression of α-globin gene, while did not regulate γ-globin gene expression. Gel shift assay confirmed that DNA-binding activity of erythroid specific transcription factors GATA-1, NF-E2 and AP1 was not af fected by either forced overexpression or artificial down regulation of EDRF2 gene in K562 cells. However, we de tected that the negative regulator of expression of GATA-1 transcription factor was increased in EDRF2 overexpressed K562 cells. These results strongly suggested that EDRF2 was involved in α-globin gene expression and erythroid differen tiation and served as a negative regulator of PU.1 transcrip tion factor.

  11. Identification of highly methylated genes across various types of B-cell non-hodgkin lymphoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole Bethge

    Full Text Available Epigenetic alterations of gene expression are important in the development of cancer. In this study, we identified genes which are epigenetically altered in major lymphoma types. We used DNA microarray technology to assess changes in gene expression after treatment of 11 lymphoma cell lines with epigenetic drugs. We identified 233 genes with upregulated expression in treated cell lines and with downregulated expression in B-cell lymphoma patient samples (n = 480 when compared to normal B cells (n = 5. The top 30 genes were further analyzed by methylation specific PCR (MSP in 18 lymphoma cell lines. Seven of the genes were methylated in more than 70% of the cell lines and were further subjected to quantitative MSP in 37 B-cell lymphoma patient samples (diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (activated B-cell like and germinal center B-cell like subtypes, follicular lymphoma and Burkitt`s lymphoma and normal B lymphocytes from 10 healthy donors. The promoters of DSP, FZD8, KCNH2, and PPP1R14A were methylated in 28%, 67%, 22%, and 78% of the 36 tumor samples, respectively, but not in control samples. Validation using a second series of healthy donor controls (n = 42; normal B cells, peripheral blood mononuclear cells, bone marrow, tonsils and follicular hyperplasia and fresh-frozen lymphoma biopsies (n = 25, confirmed the results. The DNA methylation biomarker panel consisting of DSP, FZD8, KCNH2, and PPP1R14A was positive in 89% (54/61 of all lymphomas. Receiver operating characteristic analysis to determine the discriminative power between lymphoma and healthy control samples showed a c-statistic of 0.96, indicating a possible role for the biomarker panel in monitoring of lymphoma patients.

  12. Diagnostic value of immunoglobulin κ light chain gene rearrangement analysis in B-cell lymphomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokovic, Ira; Jezersek Novakovic, Barbara; Novakovic, Srdjan

    2015-03-01

    Analysis of the immunoglobulin κ light chain (IGK) gene is an alternative method for B-cell clonality assessment in the diagnosis of mature B-cell proliferations in which the detection of clonal immunoglobulin heavy chain (IGH) gene rearrangements fails. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the added value of standardized BIOMED-2 assay for the detection of clonal IGK gene rearrangements in the diagnostic setting of suspected B-cell lymphomas. With this purpose, 92 specimens from 80 patients with the final diagnosis of mature B-cell lymphoma (37 specimens), mature T-cell lymphoma (26 specimens) and reactive lymphoid proliferation (29 specimens) were analyzed for B-cell clonality. B-cell clonality analysis was performed using the BIOMED-2 IGH and IGK gene clonality assays. The determined sensitivity of the IGK assay was 67.6%, while the determined sensitivity of the IGH assay was 75.7%. The sensitivity of combined IGH+IGK assay was 81.1%. The determined specificity of the IGK assay was 96.2% in the group of T-cell lymphomas and 96.6% in the group of reactive lesions. The determined specificity of the IGH assay was 84.6% in the group of lymphomas and 86.2% in the group of reactive lesions. The comparison of GeneScan (GS) and heteroduplex pretreatment-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (HD-PAGE) methods for the analysis of IGK gene rearrangements showed a higher efficacy of GS analysis in a series of 27 B-cell lymphomas analyzed by both methods. In the present study, we demonstrated that by applying the combined IGH+IGK clonality assay the overall detection rate of B-cell clonality was increased by 5.4%. Thus, we confirmed the added value of the standardized BIOMED-2 IGK assay for assessment of B-cell clonality in suspected B-cell lymphomas with inconclusive clinical and cyto/histological diagnosis.

  13. Transient gene and microRNA expression profile changes of confluent human fibroblast cells in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Honglu; Story, Michael; Karouia, Fathi; Stodieck, Louis; Zhang, Ye; Lu, Tao

    2016-07-01

    Microgravity, or an altered gravity environment from the Earth1g, has been shown to influence global gene expression patterns and protein levels in cultured cells. However, most of the reported studies conducted in space or using simulated microgravity on the ground have focused on the growth or differentiation of these cells. Whether non-proliferating cultured cells will sense the presence of microgravity in space has not been specifically addressed. In an experiment conducted onboard the International Space Station (ISS), confluent human fibroblast cells were fixed after being cultured in space for 3 and 14 days, respectively, for investigations of gene and miRNA expression profile changes in these cells. Results of the experiment showed that on Day 3, both the flown and ground cells were still proliferating slowly, as measured by the percentage of Ki-67 positive cells. Gene and miRNA expression data indicated activation of NFkB and other growth related pathways involving HGF and Vegf along with down regulation of the Let-7 miRNA family. On Day 14 when the cells were mostly non-proliferating, the gene and miRNA expression profiles between the flight and ground samples were indistinguishable. Comparison of gene and miRNA expressions in the Day 3 samples with respect to Day 14 revealed that most of the changes observed on Day 3 were related to cell growth for both the flown and ground cells. Analysis of cytoskeletal changes via immunohistochemistry staining of the cells with antibodies for αa-tubulin and fibronectin showed no difference between flown and ground samples. Taken together, our study suggests that in true non-dividing human fibroblast cells in culture, microgravity experienced in space has little effect on the gene and miRNA expression profiles.

  14. Transient Gene and MicroRNA Expression Profile Changes of Confluent Human Fibroblast Cells in Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ye; Lu, Tao; Wong, Michael; Wang, Xiaoyu; Stodieck, Louis; Karouia, Fathi; Story, Michael; Wu, Honglu

    2016-01-01

    Microgravity, or an altered gravity environment from the Earth1g, has been shown to influence global gene expression patterns and protein levels in cultured cells. However, most of the reported studies conducted in space or using simulated microgravity on the ground have focused on the growth or differentiation of these cells. Whether non-proliferating cultured cells will sense the presence of microgravity in space has not been specifically addressed. In an experiment conducted onboard the International Space Station (ISS), confluent human fibroblast cells were fixed after being cultured in space for 3 and 14 days, respectively, for investigations of gene and miRNA expression profile changes in these cells. Results of the experiment showed that on Day 3, both the flown and ground cells were still proliferating slowly, as measured by the percentage of Ki-67 positive cells. Gene and miRNA expression data indicated activation of NF(kappa)B and other growth related pathways involving HGF and Vegf along with down regulation of the Let-7 miRNA family. On Day 14 when the cells were mostly non-proliferating, the gene and miRNA expression profiles between the flight and ground samples were indistinguishable. Comparison of gene and miRNA expressions in the Day 3 samples with respect to Day 14 revealed that most of the changes observed on Day 3 were related to cell growth for both the flown and ground cells. Analysis of cytoskeletal changes via immunohistochemistry staining of the cells with antibodies for alpha-tubulin and fibronectin showed no difference between flown and ground samples. Taken together, our study suggests that in true non-dividing human fibroblast cells in culture, microgravity experienced in space has little effect on the gene and miRNA expression profiles.

  15. Balancing Cell Migration with Matrix Degradation Enhances Gene Delivery to Cells Cultured Three-Dimensionally Within Hydrogels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepard, Jaclyn A.; Huang, Alyssa; Shikanova, Ariella; Shea, Lonnie D.

    2010-01-01

    In regenerative medicine, hydrogels are employed to fill defects and support the infiltration of cells that can ultimately regenerate tissue. Gene delivery within hydrogels targeting infiltrating cells has the potential to promote tissue formation, but the delivery efficiency of nonviral vectors within hydrogels is low hindering their applicability in tissue regeneration. To improve their functionality, we have conducted a mechanistic study to investigate the contribution of cell migration and matrix degradation on gene delivery. In this report, lipoplexes were entrapped within hydrogels based on poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) crosslinked with peptides containing matrix metalloproteinase degradable sequences. The mesh size of these hydrogels is substantially less than the size of the entrapped lipoplexes, which can function to retain vectors. Cell migration and transfection were simultaneously measured within hydrogels with varying density of cell adhesion sites (Arg-Gly-Asp peptides) and solids content. Increasing RGD density increased expression levels up to 100-fold, while greater solids content sustained expression levels for 16 days. Increasing RGD density and decreasing solids content increased cell migration, which indicates expression levels increase with increased cell migration. Initially exposing cells to vector resulted in transient expression that declined after 2 days, verifying the requirement of migration to sustain expression. Transfected cells were predominantly located within the population of migrating cells for hydrogels that supported cell migration. Although the small mesh size retained at least 70% of the lipoplexes in the absence of cells after 32 days, the presence of cells decreased retention to 10% after 16 days. These results indicate that vectors retained within hydrogels contact migrating cells, and that persistent cell migration can maintain elevated expression levels. Thus matrix degradation and cell migration are fundamental design

  16. IBTK Differently Modulates Gene Expression and RNA Splicing in HeLa and K562 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Fiume

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The IBTK gene encodes the major protein isoform IBTKα that was recently characterized as substrate receptor of Cul3-dependent E3 ligase, regulating ubiquitination coupled to proteasomal degradation of Pdcd4, an inhibitor of translation. Due to the presence of Ankyrin-BTB-RCC1 domains that mediate several protein-protein interactions, IBTKα could exert expanded regulatory roles, including interaction with transcription regulators. To verify the effects of IBTKα on gene expression, we analyzed HeLa and K562 cell transcriptomes by RNA-Sequencing before and after IBTK knock-down by shRNA transduction. In HeLa cells, 1285 (2.03% of 63,128 mapped transcripts were differentially expressed in IBTK-shRNA-transduced cells, as compared to cells treated with control-shRNA, with 587 upregulated (45.7% and 698 downregulated (54.3% RNAs. In K562 cells, 1959 (3.1% of 63128 mapped RNAs were differentially expressed in IBTK-shRNA-transduced cells, including 1053 upregulated (53.7% and 906 downregulated (46.3%. Only 137 transcripts (0.22% were commonly deregulated by IBTK silencing in both HeLa and K562 cells, indicating that most IBTKα effects on gene expression are cell type-specific. Based on gene ontology classification, the genes responsive to IBTK are involved in different biological processes, including in particular chromatin and nucleosomal organization, gene expression regulation, and cellular traffic and migration. In addition, IBTK RNA interference affected RNA maturation in both cell lines, as shown by the evidence of alternative 3′- and 5′-splicing, mutually exclusive exons, retained introns, and skipped exons. Altogether, these results indicate that IBTK differently modulates gene expression and RNA splicing in HeLa and K562 cells, demonstrating a novel biological role of this protein.

  17. Collagen-rich stroma in aggressive colon tumors induces mesenchymal gene expression and tumor cell invasion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vellinga, T T; den Uil, S; Rinkes, IHB; Marvin, D; Ponsioen, B; Alvarez-Varela, A; Fatrai, S; Scheele, C; Zwijnenburg, D A; Snippert, H; Vermeulen, L; Medema, J P; Stockmann, H B; Koster, J; Fijneman, R J A; de Rooij, J; Kranenburg, O

    2016-01-01

    Gene expression-based classification systems have identified an aggressive colon cancer subtype with mesenchymal features, possibly reflecting epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) of tumor cells. However, stromal fibroblasts contribute extensively to the mesenchymal phenotype of aggressive col

  18. Angiogenesis gene expression in murine endothelial cells during post-pneumonectomy lung growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konerding Moritz A

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Although blood vessel growth occurs readily in the systemic bronchial circulation, angiogenesis in the pulmonary circulation is rare. Compensatory lung growth after pneumonectomy is an experimental model with presumed alveolar capillary angiogenesis. To investigate the genes participating in murine neoalveolarization, we studied the expression of angiogenesis genes in lung endothelial cells. After left pneumonectomy, the remaining right lung was examined on days 3, 6, 14 and 21days after surgery and compared to both no surgery and sham thoracotomy controls. The lungs were enzymatically digested and CD31+ endothelial cells were isolated using flow cytometry cell sorting. The transcriptional profile of the CD31+ endothelial cells was assessed using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR arrays. Focusing on 84 angiogenesis-associated genes, we identified 22 genes with greater than 4-fold regulation and significantly enhanced transcription (p

  19. Imaging gene expression in human mesenchymal stem cells: from small to large animals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willmann, Jürgen K; Paulmurugan, Ramasamy; Rodriguez-Porcel, Martin;

    2009-01-01

    To evaluate the feasibility of reporter gene imaging in implanted human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in porcine myocardium by using clinical positron emission tomography (PET)-computed tomography (CT) scanning....

  20. Cell number regulator genes in Prunus provide candidate genes for the control of fruit size in sweet and sour cherry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Franceschi, P; Stegmeir, T; Cabrera, A; van der Knaap, E; Rosyara, U R; Sebolt, A M; Dondini, L; Dirlewanger, E; Quero-Garcia, J; Campoy, J A; Iezzoni, A F

    2013-01-01

    Striking increases in fruit size distinguish cultivated descendants from small-fruited wild progenitors for fleshy fruited species such as Solanum lycopersicum (tomato) and Prunus spp. (peach, cherry, plum, and apricot). The first fruit weight gene identified as a result of domestication and selection was the tomato FW2.2 gene. Members of the FW2.2 gene family in corn (Zea mays) have been named CNR (Cell Number Regulator) and two of them exert their effect on organ size by modulating cell number. Due to the critical roles of FW2.2/CNR genes in regulating cell number and organ size, this family provides an excellent source of candidates for fruit size genes in other domesticated species, such as those found in the Prunus genus. A total of 23 FW2.2/CNR family members were identified in the peach genome, spanning the eight Prunus chromosomes. Two of these CNRs were located within confidence intervals of major quantitative trait loci (QTL) previously discovered on linkage groups 2 and 6 in sweet cherry (Prunus avium), named PavCNR12 and PavCNR20, respectively. An analysis of haplotype, sequence, segregation and association with fruit size strongly supports a role of PavCNR12 in the sweet cherry linkage group 2 fruit size QTL, and this QTL is also likely present in sour cherry (P. cerasus). The