WorldWideScience

Sample records for cell wall regeneration

  1. Clinostation influence on regeneration of cell wall in Solanum Tuberosum L. protoplasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nedukha, Elena M.; Sidorov, V. A.; Samoylov, V. M.

    1994-08-01

    Regeneration of cell walls in protoplasts was investigated using light- and electronmicroscopic methods. The protoplasts were isolated from mesophyll of Solanum tuberosum leaves and were cultivated on the horizontal low rotating clinostat (2 rpm) and in control for 10 days. Using a fluorescent method (with Calcofluor white) it was demonstrated that changes in vector gravity results in an regeneration inhibition of cell wall. With electron-microscopical and electro-cytochemical methods (staining with alcianum blue) dynamics of the regeneration of cell walls in protoplasts was studied; carbohydrate matrix of cell walls is deposited at the earliest stages of this process. The influence of microgravity on the cell wall regeneration is discussed in higher plants.

  2. Arabidopsis Regenerating Protoplast: A Powerful Model System for Combining the Proteomics of Cell Wall Proteins and the Visualization of Cell Wall Dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Ryusuke Yokoyama; Hiroaki Kuki; Takeshi Kuroha; Kazuhiko Nishitani

    2016-01-01

    The development of a range of sub-proteomic approaches to the plant cell wall has identified many of the cell wall proteins. However, it remains difficult to elucidate the precise biological role of each protein and the cell wall dynamics driven by their actions. The plant protoplast provides an excellent means not only for characterizing cell wall proteins, but also for visualizing the dynamics of cell wall regeneration, during which cell wall proteins are secreted. It therefore offers a uni...

  3. Area Expansivity Moduli of Regenerating Plant Protoplast Cell Walls Exposed to Shear Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimura, Yuu; Iino, Masaaki; Watanabe, Ugai

    2005-05-01

    To control the elasticity of the plant cell wall, protoplasts isolated from cultured Catharanthus roseus cells were regenerated in shear flows of 115 s-1 (high shear) and 19.2 s-1 (low shear, as a control). The surface area expansivity modulus and the surface breaking strength of these regenerating protoplasts were measured by a micropipette aspiration technique. Cell wall synthesis was also measured using a cell wall-specific fluorescent dye. High shear exposure for 3 h doubled both the surface area modulus and breaking strength observed under low shear, significantly decreased cell wall synthesis, and roughly quadrupled the moduli of the cell wall. Based on the cell wall synthesis data, we estimated the three-dimensional modulus of the cell wall to be 4.1± 1.2 GPa for the high shear, and 0.35± 0.2 GPa for the low shear condition, using the surface area expansivity modulus divided by the cell wall thickness, which is identical with the Young’s modulus divided by 2(1-σ), where σ is Poisson's ratio. We concluded that high shear exposure considerably strengthens the newly synthesized cell wall.

  4. Arabidopsis Regenerating Protoplast: A Powerful Model System for Combining the Proteomics of Cell Wall Proteins and the Visualization of Cell Wall Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryusuke Yokoyama

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The development of a range of sub-proteomic approaches to the plant cell wall has identified many of the cell wall proteins. However, it remains difficult to elucidate the precise biological role of each protein and the cell wall dynamics driven by their actions. The plant protoplast provides an excellent means not only for characterizing cell wall proteins, but also for visualizing the dynamics of cell wall regeneration, during which cell wall proteins are secreted. It therefore offers a unique opportunity to investigate the de novo construction process of the cell wall. This review deals with sub-proteomic approaches to the plant cell wall through the use of protoplasts, a methodology that will provide the basis for further exploration of cell wall proteins and cell wall dynamics.

  5. Expression profile analysis of genes involved in cell wall regeneration during protoplast culture in cotton by suppression subtractive hybridization and macroarray.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiyan; Tu, Lili; Zhu, Longfu; Fu, Lili; Min, Ling; Zhang, Xianlong

    2008-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms underlying cell wall biosynthesis are poorly understood. In this study, microscopic analysis showed that protoplasts generated a new cell wall within 48 h after transfer to a wall-regeneration medium. To identify genes related to cell wall biosynthesis in cotton, suppression subtractive hybridization was used to visualize differential gene expression at seven time points within the first 48 h. In total, 412 differentially expressed sequence tags (ESTs; >3-fold) were identified, and 210 unigenes were sequenced successfully. As confirmed by reverse-transcription PCR (RT-PCR) and real-time quantitative reverse-transcription PCR (QRT-PCR) analysis, the selected genes displayed complex expression patterns during cell wall regeneration from protoplasts and included most previously published cell-wall-associated genes. ESTs similar to cell-wall-protein genes, such as proline-rich protein (PRPL), glycine-rich protein (GRP), extension (EPR1), fasciclin-like arabinogalactan protein (FLA2), and expensing-like protein (EXLA and EXLB), which might participate in primary cell wall or secondary cell wall construction and modification, were up-regulated during cell wall regeneration from protoplasts. Sucrose synthase, an important enzyme in the sugar signalling pathway, played important roles in cellulose biosynthesis. Our findings also highlighted the function of some transcription factors during cell wall regeneration from protoplasts, including the squamosa promoter binding protein-like 14 (SPL14), NAC, Gbiaa-re, MYB, WRKY, swellmap 1 (SMP1), RAD5, and zinc finger family protein, as well as the enrichment of Ca(2+)-calmodulin signal molecules. On the basis of the gene expression profiles, a model of cell wall regeneration from protoplasts derived from cotton suspension cultures is proposed.

  6. Influence of a specific xyloglucan-nonasaccharide derived from cell walls of suspension-cultured cells of Daucus carota L. on regenerating carrot protoplasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmerling, M; Seitz, H U

    1990-09-01

    A xyloglucan oligosaccharide was isolated from cell walls of Daucus carota L. suspension-cultured cells. From analytical data (gel-permeation chromatography, thin-layer chromatography, monosaccharide analysis, methylation analysis) it can be concluded that this oligosaccharide preparation consists mainly of a nonasaccharide known as XG9 (Glc4Xyl3GalFuc). This nonasaccharide showed excellent "anti-auxin" properties in the pea-stem bioassay, with 80% inhibition of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D)-induced longitudinal growth of etiolated pea stem segments at concentrations of 1-0.1 nM. Applied in nanomolar concentrations to protoplasts regenerating in a medium containing 4.52 μM 2,4-D, the nonasaccharide influenced the viability of the protoplasts and the activities of glycan synthases in vitro. The effects were similar to those achieved by the omission of 2,4-D from the regeneration medium. The composition of the regenerated cell wall was not changed significantly by the use of 2,4-D-depleted medium or the addition of XG9 to 2,4-D-containing medium.

  7. Effect of microgravity environment on cell wall regeneration, cell divisions, growth, and differentiation of plants from protoplasts (7-IML-1)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Ole

    1992-01-01

    The primary goal of this project is to investigate if microgravity has any influence on growth and differentiation of protoplasts. Formation of new cell walls on rapeseed protoplasts takes place within the first 24 hours after isolation. Cell division can be observed after 2-4 days and formation of cell aggregates after 5-7 days. Therefore, it is possible during the 7 day IML-1 Mission to investigate if cell wall formation, cell division, and cell differentiation are influenced by microgravity. Protoplasts of rapeseeds and carrot will be prepared shortly before launch and injected into 0.6 ml polyethylene bags. Eight bags are placed in an aluminum block inside the ESA Type 1 container. The containers are placed at 4 C in PTCU's and transferred to orbiter mid-deck. At 4 C all cell processes are slowed down, including cell wall formation. Latest access to the shuttle will be 12 hours before launch. In orbit the containers will be transferred from the PTC box to the 22 C Biorack incubator. The installation of a 1 g centrifuge in Biorack will make it possible to distinguish between effects of near weightlessness and effects caused by cosmic radiation and other space flight factors including vibrations. Parallel control experiments will be carried out on the ground. Other aspects of the experiment are discussed.

  8. A hemicellulose-bound form of silicon with potential to improve the mechanical properties and regeneration of the cell wall of rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Congwu; Ma, Jie; Wang, Lijun

    2015-05-01

    Silicon (Si) plays a large number of diverse roles in plants, but the structural and chemical mechanisms operating at the single-cell level remain unclear. We isolate the cell walls from suspension-cultured individual cells of rice (Oryza sativa) and fractionate them into three main fractions including cellulose (C), hemicellulose (HC) and pectin (P). We find that most of the Si is in HC as determined by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), where Si may covalently crosslink the HC polysacchrides confirmed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The HC-bound form of Si could improve both the mechanical property and regeneration of the cell walls investigated by a combination of atomic force microscopy (AFM) and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). This study provides further evidence that HC could be the major ligand bound to Si, which broadens our understanding of the chemical nature of 'anomalous' Si in plant cell walls. © 2015 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2015 New Phytologist Trust.

  9. The activity of phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C is required for vegetative growth and cell wall regeneration in Coprinopsis cinerea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Young Taek; Ahn, Chun-Seob; Lee, Kyung-Jin; Kim, Jeong-Geun; Ro, Hyeon-Su; Kim, Jae Won; Lee, Chang-Won

    2012-08-01

    Three isotypes of phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C designated CcPLC1, CcPLC2, and CcPLC3 were identified in Coprinopsis cinerea, through a search of the genome sequence database. The functional role of the PI-PLCs were studied by using U73122, which specifically inhibits the activity of PI-PLC. The specificity of the inhibitor effect was confirmed by using an inactive structural analog U73433. The inhibition of PI-PLCs activity resulted in severely retarded germination of basidiospores and oidia, reduced hyphal growth, knobbly hyphal tips with many irregular side branches, and aberrant (branch-like structure) clamp cells. Furthermore, U73122 definitely inhibited cell wall formation. Here we report that PI-PLCs play important roles in various aspects of C. cinerea biology.

  10. Muscle Cells Provide Instructions for Planarian Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica N. Witchley

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Regeneration requires both potential and instructions for tissue replacement. In planarians, pluripotent stem cells have the potential to produce all new tissue. The identities of the cells that provide regeneration instructions are unknown. Here, we report that position control genes (PCGs that control regeneration and tissue turnover are expressed in a subepidermal layer of nonneoblast cells. These subepidermal cells coexpress many PCGs. We propose that these subepidermal cells provide a system of body coordinates and positional information for regeneration, and identify them to be muscle cells of the planarian body wall. Almost all planarian muscle cells express PCGs, suggesting a dual function: contraction and control of patterning. PCG expression is dynamic in muscle cells after injury, even in the absence of neoblasts, suggesting that muscle is instructive for regeneration. We conclude that planarian regeneration involves two highly flexible systems: pluripotent neoblasts that can generate any new cell type and muscle cells that provide positional instructions for the regeneration of any body region.

  11. Muscle cells provide instructions for planarian regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witchley, Jessica N; Mayer, Mirjam; Wagner, Daniel E; Owen, Jared H; Reddien, Peter W

    2013-08-29

    Regeneration requires both potential and instructions for tissue replacement. In planarians, pluripotent stem cells have the potential to produce all new tissue. The identities of the cells that provide regeneration instructions are unknown. Here, we report that position control genes (PCGs) that control regeneration and tissue turnover are expressed in a subepidermal layer of nonneoblast cells. These subepidermal cells coexpress many PCGs. We propose that these subepidermal cells provide a system of body coordinates and positional information for regeneration, and identify them to be muscle cells of the planarian body wall. Almost all planarian muscle cells express PCGs, suggesting a dual function: contraction and control of patterning. PCG expression is dynamic in muscle cells after injury, even in the absence of neoblasts, suggesting that muscle is instructive for regeneration. We conclude that planarian regeneration involves two highly flexible systems: pluripotent neoblasts that can generate any new cell type and muscle cells that provide positional instructions for the regeneration of any body region. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Planarian Body-Wall Muscle: Regeneration and Function beyond a Simple Skeletal Support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cebrià, Francesc

    2016-01-01

    The body-wall musculature of adult planarians consists of intricately organized muscle fibers, which after amputation are regenerated rapidly and with great precision through the proliferation and differentiation of pluripotent stem cells. These traits make the planarian body-wall musculature a potentially useful model for the study of cell proliferation, differentiation, and pattern formation. Planarian body-wall muscle shows some ambiguous features common to both skeletal and smooth muscle cells. However, its skeletal nature is implied by the expression of skeletal myosin heavy-chain genes and the myogenic transcription factor myoD. Where and when planarian stem cells become committed to the myogenic lineage during regeneration, how the new muscle cells are integrated into the pre-existing muscle net, and the identity of the molecular pathway controlling the myogenic gene program are key aspects of planarian muscle regeneration that need to be addressed. Expression of the conserved transcription factor myoD has been recently demonstrated in putative myogenic progenitors. Moreover, recent studies suggest that differentiated muscle cells may provide positional information to planarian stem cells during regeneration. Here, I review the limited available knowledge on planarian muscle regeneration. PMID:26904543

  13. Planarian body-wall muscle: regeneration and function beyond a simple skeletal support

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesc eCebrià

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The body-wall musculature of adult planarians consists of intricately organized muscle fibers, which after amputation are regenerated rapidly and with great precision through the proliferation and differentiation of pluripotent stem cells. These traits make the planarian body-wall musculature a potentially useful model for the study of cell proliferation, differentiation, and pattern formation. Planarian body-wall muscle shows some ambiguous features common to both skeletal and smooth muscle cells. However, its skeletal nature is implied by the expression of skeletal myosin heavy-chain genes and the myogenic transcription factor myoD. Where and when planarian stem cells become committed to the myogenic lineage during regeneration, how the new muscle cells are integrated into the pre-existing muscle net, and the identity of the molecular pathway controlling the myogenic gene program are key aspects of planarian muscle regeneration that need to be addressed. Expression of the conserved transcription factor myoD has been recently demonstrated in putative myogenic progenitors. Moreover, recent studies suggest that differentiated muscle cells may provide positional information to planarian stem cells during regeneration. Here, I review the limited available knowledge on planarian muscle regeneration.

  14. Heptanol application to the mouse round window: a model for studying cochlear lateral wall regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Shawn M; Xing, Yazhi; Hensley, Christopher T; Zhu, Juhong; Dubno, Judy R; Lang, Hainan

    2014-04-01

    Identify cells supporting cochlear lateral wall regeneration. Prospective controlled trial. Laboratory. Human presbyacusis occurs, in part, secondary to age-related degeneration of cochlear lateral wall structures such as the stria vascularis and spiral ligament fibrocytes. This degeneration is likely linked to the diminished regenerative capacity of lateral wall cells with age. While lateral wall regeneration is known to occur after an acute insult, this process remains poorly understood and the cells capable of self-replication unidentified. We hypothesized that spiral ligament fibrocytes constitute these proliferative cells. To test the hypothesis, an acute ototoxic insult was created in 65 normal-hearing, young adult mice via cochlear exposure to heptanol. Sacrifice occurred at 1 to 60 days posttreatment. Auditory brainstem responses, 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine assay, and immunostaining were used to assess regeneration. Posttreatment hearing thresholds were elevated in nearly all treated mice. Selective fibrocyte apoptosis and strial injury were observed at the time of peak hearing loss around 1 to 7 days posttreatment. Cellular proliferation was detected in the region of type II fibrocytes during this time. Hearing thresholds plateaued at 7 days posttreatment followed by a significant recovery of both hearing and morphologic appearance. Permanent outer hair cell degeneration was observed. Heptanol application to the round window of young adult mice is a rapid, selective, and reliable technique for investigating proliferation in the cochlear lateral wall. The data indirectly showed that spiral ligament fibrocytes may be the proliferative cells of the cochlear lateral wall. Further studies of this process are needed.

  15. BrdU Pulse Labelling In Vivo to Characterise Cell Proliferation during Regeneration and Repair following Injury to the Airway Wall in Sheep

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Yahaya

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The response of S-phase cells labelled with bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU in sheep airways undergoing repair in response to endobronchial brush biopsy was investigated in this study. Separate sites within the airway tree of anaesthetised sheep were biopsied at intervals prior to pulse labelling with BrdU, which was administered one hour prior to euthanasia. Both brushed and spatially disparate unbrushed (control sites were carefully mapped, dissected, and processed to facilitate histological analysis of BrdU labelling. Our study indicated that the number and location of BrdU-labelled cells varied according to the age of the repairing injury. There was little evidence of cell proliferation in either control airway tissues or airway tissues examined six hours after injury. However, by days 1 and 3, BrdU-labelled cells were increased in number in the airway wall, both at the damaged site and in the regions flanking either side of the injury. Thereafter, cell proliferative activity largely declined by day 7 after injury, when consistent evidence of remodelling in the airway wall could be appreciated. This study successfully demonstrated the effectiveness of in vivo pulse labelling in tracking cell proliferation during repair which has a potential value in exploring the therapeutic utility of stem cell approaches in relevant lung disease models.

  16. Bone regeneration and stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arvidson, K; Abdallah, B M; Applegate, L A

    2011-01-01

    This invited review covers research areas of central importance for orthopedic and maxillofacial bone tissue repair, including normal fracture healing and healing problems, biomaterial scaffolds for tissue engineering, mesenchymal and fetal stem cells, effects of sex steroids on mesenchymal stem...... cells, use of platelet rich plasma for tissue repair, osteogenesis and its molecular markers. A variety of cells in addition to stem cells, as well as advances in materials science to meet specific requirements for bone and soft tissue regeneration by addition of bioactive molecules, are discussed....

  17. Cell wall biology: perspectives from cell wall imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kieran J D; Marcus, Susan E; Knox, J Paul

    2011-03-01

    Polysaccharide-rich plant cell walls are important biomaterials that underpin plant growth, are major repositories for photosynthetically accumulated carbon, and, in addition, impact greatly on the human use of plants. Land plant cell walls contain in the region of a dozen major polysaccharide structures that are mostly encompassed by cellulose, hemicelluloses, and pectic polysaccharides. During the evolution of land plants, polysaccharide diversification appears to have largely involved structural elaboration and diversification within these polysaccharide groups. Cell wall chemistry is well advanced and a current phase of cell wall science is aimed at placing the complex polysaccharide chemistry in cellular contexts and developing a detailed understanding of cell wall biology. Imaging cell wall glycomes is a challenging area but recent developments in the establishment of cell wall molecular probe panels and their use in high throughput procedures are leading to rapid advances in the molecular understanding of the spatial heterogeneity of individual cell walls and also cell wall differences at taxonomic levels. The challenge now is to integrate this knowledge of cell wall heterogeneity with an understanding of the molecular and physiological mechanisms that underpin cell wall properties and functions.

  18. Cell wall evolution and diversity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonatan Ulrik Fangel

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Plant cell walls display a considerable degree of diversity in their compositions and molecular architectures. In some cases the functional significance of a particular cell wall type appears to be easy to discern: secondary cells walls are often heavy reinforced with lignin that provides the required durability; the thin cell walls of pollen tubes have particular compositions that enable their tip growth; lupin seed cell walls are characteristically thickened with galactan used as a storage polysaccharide. However, more frequently the evolutionary mechanisms and selection pressures that underpin cell wall diversity and evolution are unclear. The rapidly increasing availability of transcriptome and genome data sets, development of high-throughput methods for cell wall analyses, and expansion of molecular probe sets, are providing new insights into the diversity and occurrence of cell wall polysaccharides and associated biosynthetic genes. Such research is important for refining our understanding of some of the fundamental processes that enabled plants to colonise land and subsequently radiate so comprehensively. The study of cell wall structural diversity is also an important aspect of the industrial utilization of global polysaccharide bio-resources.

  19. Bacterial cell-wall recycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Jarrod W.; Fisher, Jed F.; Mobashery, Shahriar

    2012-01-01

    Many Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria recycle a significant proportion of the peptidoglycan components of their cell walls during their growth and septation. In many—and quite possibly all—bacteria, the peptidoglycan fragments are recovered and recycled. While cell-wall recycling is beneficial for the recovery of resources, it also serves as a mechanism to detect cell-wall–targeting antibiotics and to regulate resistance mechanisms. In several Gram-negative pathogens, anhydro-MurNAc-peptide cell-wall fragments regulate AmpC β-lactamase induction. In some Gram-positive organisms, short peptides derived from the cell wall regulate the induction of both β-lactamase and β-lactam-resistant penicillin-binding proteins. The involvement of peptidoglycan recycling with resistance regulation suggests that inhibitors of the enzymes involved in the recycling might synergize with cell-wall-targeted antibiotics. Indeed, such inhibitors improve the potency of β-lactams in vitro against inducible AmpC β-lactamase-producing bacteria. We describe the key steps of cell-wall remodeling and recycling, the regulation of resistance mechanisms by cell-wall recycling, and recent advances toward the discovery of cell-wall recycling inhibitors. PMID:23163477

  20. Cell wall proteomics of crops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Setsuko eKomatsu

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Cell wall proteins play key roles in cell structure and metabolism, cell enlargement, signal transduction, responses to environmental stress, and many other physiological events. Agricultural crops are often used for investigating stress tolerance because cultivars with differing degrees of tolerance are available. Abiotic and biotic stress factors markedly influence the geographical distribution and yields of many crop species. Crop cell wall proteomics is of particular importance for improving crop productivity, particularly under unfavorable environmental conditions. To better understand the mechanisms underlying stress response in crops, cell wall proteomic analyses are being increasingly utilized. In this review, the methods of purification and purity assays of cell wall protein fractions from crops are described, and the results of protein identification using gel-based and gel-free proteomic techniques are presented. Furthermore, protein composition of the cell walls of rice, wheat, maize and soybean are compared, and the role of cell wall proteins in crops under flooding and drought stress is discussed. This review will be useful for clarifying the role of the cell wall of crops in response to environmental stresses.

  1. Regenerating reptile retinas: a comparative approach to restoring retinal ganglion cell function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, D L

    2017-02-01

    Transection or damage to the mammalian optic nerve generally results in loss of retinal ganglion cells by apoptosis. This cell death is seen less in fish or amphibians where retinal ganglion cell survival and axon regeneration leads to recovery of sight. Reptiles lie somewhere in the middle of this spectrum of nerve regeneration, and different species have been reported to have a significant variation in their retinal ganglion cell regenerative capacity. The ornate dragon lizard Ctenophoris ornatus exhibits a profound capacity for regeneration, whereas the Tenerife wall lizard Gallotia galloti has a more variable response to optic nerve damage. Some individuals regain visual activity such as the pupillomotor responses, whereas in others axons fail to regenerate sufficiently. Even in Ctenophoris, although the retinal ganglion cell axons regenerate adequately enough to synapse in the tectum, they do not make long-term topographic connections allowing recovery of complex visually motivated behaviour. The question then centres on where these intraspecies differences originate. Is it variation in the innate ability of retinal ganglion cells from different species to regenerate with functional validity? Or is it variances between different species in the substrate within which the nerves regenerate, the extracellular environment of the damaged nerve or the supporting cells surrounding the regenerating axons? Investigations of retinal ganglion cell regeneration between different species of lower vertebrates in vivo may shed light on these questions. Or perhaps more interesting are in vitro studies comparing axon regeneration of retinal ganglion cells from various species placed on differing substrates.

  2. Immuno and affinity cytochemical analysis of cell wall composition in the moss Physcomitrella patens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth A. Berry

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In contrast to homeohydric vascular plants, mosses employ a poikilohydric strategy for surviving in the dry aerial environment. A detailed understanding of the structure, composition, and development of moss cell walls can contribute to our understanding of not only the evolution of overall cell wall complexity, but also the differences that have evolved in response to selection for different survival strategies. The model moss species Physcomitrella patens has a predominantly haploid lifecycle consisting of protonemal filaments that regenerate from protoplasts and enlarge by tip growth, and leafy gametophores composed of cells that enlarge by diffuse growth and differentiate into several different types. Advantages for genetic studies include methods for efficient targeted gene modification and extensive genomic resources. Immuno and affinity cytochemical labeling were used to examine the distribution of polysaccharides and proteins in regenerated protoplasts, protonemal filaments, rhizoids, and sectioned gametophores of P. patens. The cell wall composition of regenerated protoplasts was also characterized by flow cytometry. Crystalline cellulose was abundant in the cell walls of regenerating protoplasts and protonemal cells that developed on media of high osmolarity, whereas homogalacturonan was detected in the walls of protonemal cells that developed on low osmolarity media and not in regenerating protoplasts. Mannan was the major hemicellulose detected in all tissues tested. Arabinogalactan proteins were detected in different cell types by different probes, consistent with structural heterogeneity. The results reveal developmental and cell type specific differences in cell wall composition and provide a basis for analyzing cell wall phenotypes in knockout mutants.

  3. Dental pulp regeneration via cell homing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eramo, S; Natali, A; Pinna, R; Milia, E

    2017-10-19

    The typical treatment for irreversibly inflamed/necrotic pulp tissue is root canal treatment. As an alternative approach, regenerative endodontics aims to regenerate dental pulp-like tissues using two possible strategies: cell transplantation and cell homing. The former requires exogenously transplanted stem cells, complex procedures and high costs; the latter employs the host's endogenous cells to achieve tissue repair/regeneration, which is more clinically translatable. This systematic review examines cell homing for dental pulp regeneration, selecting articles on in vitro experiments, in vivo ectopic transplantation models and in situ pulp revascularization. MEDLINE/PubMed and Scopus databases were electronically searched for articles without limits in publication date. Two reviewers independently screened and included papers according to the predefined selection criteria. The electronic searches identified 46 studies. After title, abstract and full-text examination, 10 articles met the inclusion criteria. In vitro data highlighted that multiple cytokines have the capacity to induce migration, proliferation and differentiation of dental pulp stem/progenitor cells. The majority of the in vivo studies obtained regenerated connective pulp-like tissues with neovascularization. In some cases, the samples showed new innervation and new dentine deposition. The in situ pulp revascularization regenerated intracanal pulp-like tissues with neovascularization, innervation and dentine formation. Cell homing strategies for pulp regeneration need further understanding and improvement if they are to become a reliable and effective approach in endodontics. Nevertheless, cell homing currently represents the most clinically viable pathway for dental pulp regeneration. © 2017 International Endodontic Journal. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Endothelial-regenerating cells: an expanding universe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinmetz, Martin; Nickenig, Georg; Werner, Nikos

    2010-03-01

    Atherosclerosis is the most common cause for cardiovascular diseases and is based on endothelial dysfunction. A growing body of evidence suggests the contribution of bone marrow-derived endothelial progenitor cells, monocytic cells, and mature endothelial cells to vessel formation and endothelial rejuvenation. To this day, various subsets of these endothelial-regenerating cells have been identified according to cellular origin, phenotype, and properties in vivo and in vitro. However, the definition and biology, especially of endothelial progenitor cells, is complex and under heavy debate. In this review, we focus on current definitions of endothelial progenitor cells, highlight the clinical relevance of endothelial-regenerating cells, and provide new insights into cell-cell interactions involved in endothelial cell rejuvenation.

  5. Chapter 3 Cell Wall Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roger M. Rowell; Roger Pettersen; Mandla A. Tshabalala

    2012-01-01

    Wood is best defined as a three-dimensional biopolymer composite composed of an interconnected network of cellulose, hemicelluloses and lignin with minor amounts of extractives, and inorganics. The major chemical component of a living tree is water, but on a dry weight basis, all wood cell walls consist mainly of sugar-based polymers (carbohydrates, 65-75%) that are...

  6. Cells, walls, and endless forms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monniaux, Marie; Hay, Angela

    2016-12-01

    A key question in biology is how the endless diversity of forms found in nature evolved. Understanding the cellular basis of this diversity has been aided by advances in non-model experimental systems, quantitative image analysis tools, and modeling approaches. Recent work in plants highlights the importance of cell wall and cuticle modifications for the emergence of diverse forms and functions. For example, explosive seed dispersal in Cardamine hirsuta depends on the asymmetric localization of lignified cell wall thickenings in the fruit valve. Similarly, the iridescence of Hibiscus trionum petals relies on regular striations formed by cuticular folds. Moreover, NAC transcription factors regulate the differentiation of lignified xylem vessels but also the water-conducting cells of moss that lack a lignified secondary cell wall, pointing to the origin of vascular systems. Other novel forms are associated with modified cell growth patterns, including oriented cell expansion or division, found in the long petal spurs of Aquilegia flowers, and the Sarracenia purpurea pitcher leaf, respectively. Another good example is the regulation of dissected leaf shape in C. hirsuta via local growth repression, controlled by the REDUCED COMPLEXITY HD-ZIP class I transcription factor. These studies in non-model species often reveal as much about fundamental processes of development as they do about the evolution of form. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Stem cells to regenerate the newborn brain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Velthoven, C.T.J.

    2011-01-01

    Perinatal hypoxia-ischemia (HI) is a frequent cause of perinatal morbidity and mortality with limited therapeutic options. In this thesis we investigate whether mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) regenerate the neonatal brain after HI injury. We show that transplantation of MSC after neonatal brain injury

  8. Identification of Cell Wall Synthesis Regulatory Genes Controlling Biomass Characteristics and Yield in Rice (Oryza Sativa)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng, Zhaohua PEng [Mississippi State University; Ronald, Palmela [UC-Davis; Wang, Guo-Liang [The Ohio State University

    2013-04-26

    This project aims to identify the regulatory genes of rice cell wall synthesis pathways using a cell wall removal and regeneration system. We completed the gene expression profiling studies following the time course from cell wall removal to cell wall regeneration in rice suspension cells. We also completed, total proteome, nuclear subproteome and histone modification studies following the course from cell wall removal and cell wall regeneration process. A large number of differentially expressed regulatory genes and proteins were identified. Meanwhile, we generated RNAi and over-expression transgenic rice for 45 genes with at least 10 independent transgenic lines for each gene. In addition, we ordered T-DNA and transposon insertion mutants for 60 genes from Korea, Japan, and France and characterized the mutants. Overall, we have mutants and transgenic lines for over 90 genes, exceeded our proposed goal of generating mutants for 50 genes. Interesting Discoveries a) Cell wall re-synthesis in protoplasts may involve a novel cell wall synthesis mechanism. The synthesis of the primary cell wall is initiated in late cytokinesis with further modification during cell expansion. Phragmoplast plays an essential role in cell wall synthesis. It services as a scaffold for building the cell plate and formation of a new cell wall. Only one phragmoplast and one new cell wall is produced for each dividing cell. When the cell wall was removed enzymatically, we found that cell wall re-synthesis started from multiple locations simultaneously, suggesting that a novel mechanism is involved in cell wall re-synthesis. This observation raised many interesting questions, such as how the starting sites of cell wall synthesis are determined, whether phragmoplast and cell plate like structures are involved in cell wall re-synthesis, and more importantly whether the same set of enzymes and apparatus are used in cell wall re-synthesis as during cytokinesis. Given that many known cell wall

  9. Regeneration of hair cells in the mammalian vestibular system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenyan; You, Dan; Chen, Yan; Chai, Renjie; Li, Huawei

    2016-06-01

    Hair cells regenerate throughout the lifetime of non-mammalian vertebrates, allowing these animals to recover from hearing and balance deficits. Such regeneration does not occur efficiently in humans and other mammals. Thus, balance deficits become permanent and is a common sensory disorder all over the world. Since Forge and Warchol discovered the limited spontaneous regeneration of vestibular hair cells after gentamicininduced damage in mature mammals, significant efforts have been exerted to trace the origin of the limited vestibular regeneration in mammals after hair cell loss. Moreover, recently many strategies have been developed to promote the hair cell regeneration and subsequent functional recovery of the vestibular system, including manipulating the Wnt, Notch and Atoh1. This article provides an overview of the recent advances in hair cell regeneration in mammalian vestibular epithelia. Furthermore, this review highlights the current limitations of hair cell regeneration and provides the possible solutions to regenerate functional hair cells and to partially restore vestibular function.

  10. IGFBP1 increases ??cell regeneration by promoting ?? to ??cell transdifferentiation

    OpenAIRE

    Lu, Jing; Liu, Ka?Cheuk; Schulz, Nadja; Karampelias, Christos; Charbord, J?r?mie; Hilding, Agneta; Rautio, Linn; Bertolino, Philippe; ?stenson, Claes G?ran; Brismar, Kerstin; Andersson, Olov

    2016-01-01

    Abstract There is great interest in therapeutically harnessing endogenous regenerative mechanisms to increase the number of ? cells in people with diabetes. By performing whole?genome expression profiling of zebrafish islets, we identified 11 secreted proteins that are upregulated during ??cell regeneration. We then tested the proteins' ability to potentiate ??cell regeneration in zebrafish at supraphysiological levels. One protein, insulin?like growth factor (Igf) binding?protein 1 (Igfbp1),...

  11. Physiological Maturation of Regenerating Hair Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baird, Richard A.

    2003-01-01

    The bullfrog saccule, a sensor of gravity and substrate-borne vibration, is a model system for hair cell transduction. Saccular hair cells also increase in number throughout adult life and rapidly recover after hair cell damage, making this organ an ideal system for studying hair cell development, repair, and regeneration. We have used of hair cell and supporting cell immunocytochemical markers to identify damaged hair cells and hair cell precursors in organotypic cultures of the bullfrog saccule. We then used an innovative combination of confocal, electron, and time-lapse microscopy to study the fate of damaged hair cells and the origin of new hair cells after gentamicin ototoxicity in normal and mitotically blocked saccular cultures. These studies have shown that gentamicin ototoxicity produces both lethal and sublethal hair cell damage. They have also shown that hair cell recovery in this organ takes place by both the repair of sublethally damaged hair cells and by the replacement of lost hair cells by mitotic regeneration. In parallel studies, we have used biophysical and molecular biological techniques to study the differentiation and innervation of developing, repairing, and regenerating hair cells. More specifically, we have used RT-PCR to obtain the bullfrog homologues of L-type voltage- gated calcium (L-VGCC) and large-conductance Ca(2+)-activated potassium (BK) channel genes. We have then obtained probes for these genes and, using in situ hybridization, begun to examine their expression in the bullfrog saccule and amphibian papilla. We have also used fluorescent-labeled channel toxins and channel toxin derivatives to determine the time of appearance of L-type voltage-gated calcium (L-VGCC) and Ca(2+)-activated potassium (BK) channels and to study dynamic changes in the number, distribution, and co-localization of these proteins in developing, repairing, and regenerating hair cells. Using time-lapse microscopy, we are also studying the dynamic relationship

  12. 3D printing nano conductive multi-walled carbon nanotube scaffolds for nerve regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Se-Jun; Zhu, Wei; Nowicki, Margaret; Lee, Grace; Nyoung Heo, Dong; Kim, Junghoon; Zuo, Yi Y.; Zhang, Lijie Grace

    2018-02-01

    Objective. Nanomaterials, such as carbon nanotubes (CNTs), have been introduced to modify the surface properties of scaffolds, thus enhancing the interaction between the neural cells and biomaterials. In addition to superior electrical conductivity, CNTs can provide nanoscale structures similar to those present in the natural neural environment. The primary objective of this study is to investigate the proliferative capability and differential potential of neural stem cells (NSCs) seeded on a CNT incorporated scaffold. Approach. Amine functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were incorporated with a PEGDA polymer to provide enhanced electrical properties as well as nanofeatures on the surface of the scaffold. A stereolithography 3D printer was employed to fabricate a well-dispersed MWCNT-hydrogel composite neural scaffold with a tunable porous structure. 3D printing allows easy fabrication of complex 3D scaffolds with extremely intricate microarchitectures and controlled porosity. Main results. Our results showed that MWCNT-incorporated scaffolds promoted neural stem cell proliferation and early neuronal differentiation when compared to those scaffolds without the MWCNTs. Furthermore, biphasic pulse stimulation with 500 µA current promoted neuronal maturity quantified through protein expression analysis by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Significance. Results of this study demonstrated that an electroconductive MWCNT scaffold, coupled with electrical stimulation, may have a synergistic effect on promoting neurite outgrowth for therapeutic application in nerve regeneration.

  13. Conservative Socket Regeneration with Buccal Wall Defect Using Guided Tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Juboori, Mohammed Jasim

    2016-01-01

    Progressive alveolar bone resorption after tooth extraction may lead to surgical and prosthetic-driven difficulties, especially when deciding to use a dental implant to replace the extracted tooth. This case report discusses an irreparable lower left second premolar tooth with a periodontal lesion on the buccal side. A preservative tooth extraction was performed. Then, the socket was grafted with bovine bone, a collagen membrane was placed between the buccal bone and the attached gingiva, covering the bone dehiscence buccally, and the socket without a flap was raised. After a 6-month healing period, there was minimal socket width resorption and a shallow buccal vestibule. The implant was placed with high primary stability and sufficient buccal plate thickness. In conclusion, this guided tissue regeneration technique can minimize alveolar bone resorption in a socket with buccal dehiscence, but technical difficulties and shallowing of the buccal vestibule still exist.

  14. Regeneration of peritoneal mesothelial cells after placement of hyaluronate carboxymethyl-cellulose (Seprafilm®).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osawa, Hideki; Nishimura, Junichi; Hiraki, Masayuki; Takahashi, Hidekazu; Haraguchi, Naotsugu; Hata, Taishi; Ikenaga, Masakazu; Murata, Kohei; Yamamoto, Hirofumi; Mizushima, Tsunekazu; Doki, Yuichiro; Mori, Masaki

    2017-01-01

    To examine the regeneration of mesothelium under a bioresorbable membrane. A 1 cm2 piece of peritoneum was resected from both sides of the abdominal wall of retired female mice. A piece of hyaluronate and carboxymethyl-cellulose (Seprafilm®) was placed over the wound on one side and the other side was left uncovered. We evaluated the degree of adhesion and regeneration of mesothelial cells macroscopically and histologically using immunohistochemistry at different times. Macroscopically, the degree of postoperative adhesion in the treated site was significantly less than that in the untreated site. The membrane was left in place for 7 postoperative days (PODs). By POD 5, the regenerated peritoneum mesothelial cells covered part of the area and by POD 7, they had regenerated over almost all of that area in the abdominal wall. The anti-adhesion membrane worked as a physical barrier to prevent postoperative adhesion until the mesothelial cells had regenerated completely. To our knowledge, this is the first study conducted to assess the regeneration of peritoneum mesothelial cells under a bioresorbable membrane using immunohistochemistry.

  15. Sensory hair cell development and regeneration: similarities and differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, Patrick J; Huarcaya Najarro, Elvis; Sayyid, Zahra N; Cheng, Alan G

    2015-05-01

    Sensory hair cells are mechanoreceptors of the auditory and vestibular systems and are crucial for hearing and balance. In adult mammals, auditory hair cells are unable to regenerate, and damage to these cells results in permanent hearing loss. By contrast, hair cells in the chick cochlea and the zebrafish lateral line are able to regenerate, prompting studies into the signaling pathways, morphogen gradients and transcription factors that regulate hair cell development and regeneration in various species. Here, we review these findings and discuss how various signaling pathways and factors function to modulate sensory hair cell development and regeneration. By comparing and contrasting development and regeneration, we also highlight the utility and limitations of using defined developmental cues to drive mammalian hair cell regeneration. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  16. Engaging Stem Cells for Customized Tendon Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hatim Thaker

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The need for a consistent therapeutic approach to tendon injury repair is long overdue. Patients with tendon microtears or full ruptures are eligible for a wide range of invasive and non invasive interventions, often subjectively decided by the physician. Surgery produces the best outcomes, and while studies have been conducted to optimize graft constructs and to track outcomes, the data from these studies have been inconclusive on the whole. What has been established is a clear understanding of healthy tendon architecture and the inherent process of healing. With this knowledge, tissue regeneration efforts have achieved immense progress in scaffold design, cell line selection, and, more recently, the appropriate use of cytokines and growth factors. This paper evaluates the plasticity of bone-marrow-derived stem cells and the elasticity of recently developed biomaterials towards tendon regeneration efforts. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs, hematopoietic progenitor cells, and poly(1,8-octanediol co-citrate scaffolds (POC are discussed in the context of established grafting strategies. With POC scaffolds to cradle the growth of MSCs and hematopoietic progenitor cells, developing a fibroelastic network guided by cytokines and growth factors may contribute towards consistent graft constructs, enhanced functionality, and better patient outcomes.

  17. Mammalian Cochlear Hair Cell Regeneration and Ribbon Synapse Reformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoling Lu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Hair cells (HCs are the sensory preceptor cells in the inner ear, which play an important role in hearing and balance. The HCs of organ of Corti are susceptible to noise, ototoxic drugs, and infections, thus resulting in permanent hearing loss. Recent approaches of HCs regeneration provide new directions for finding the treatment of sensor neural deafness. To have normal hearing function, the regenerated HCs must be reinnervated by nerve fibers and reform ribbon synapse with the dendrite of spiral ganglion neuron through nerve regeneration. In this review, we discuss the research progress in HC regeneration, the synaptic plasticity, and the reinnervation of new regenerated HCs in mammalian inner ear.

  18. 3D printing nano conductive multi-walled carbon nanotube scaffolds for nerve regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Se-Jun; Zhu, Wei; Nowicki, Margaret; Lee, Grace; Heo, Dong Nyoung; Kim, Junghoon; Zuo, Yi; Zhang, Lijie Grace

    2017-10-24

    In recent years, the development of tissue-engineered 3D scaffolds for various regenerative engineering applications has been widely investigated. Hydrogel polymers are extensively used as tissue engineering scaffold materials due to their unique biocompatible features. However, hydrogel based scaffolds often suffer from weak mechanical strength and a lack of functional groups to enhance cell adhesion. Hence, nanomaterials, such as carbon nanotubes (CNTs), have been introduced to modify the surface properties of scaffolds, thus enhancing the interaction between the neural cells and biomaterials. In addition to superior electrical conductivity, CNT can provide nanoscale structures similar to those present in the natural neural environment. In this study, amine functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) were incorporated with a PEGDA polymer to provide enhanced electrical properties as well as nanofeatures on the surface of the scaffold. A stereolithography 3D printer was employed to fabricate a well-dispersed MWCNT-hydrogel composite neural scaffold with a tunable porous structure. 3D printing allows easy fabrication of complex 3D scaffolds with extremely intricate microarchitectures and controlled porosity. Our results showed that MWCNT-incorporated scaffolds promoted neural stem cell proliferation and early neuronal differentiation when compared to those scaffolds without the MWCNT. Furthermore, biphasic pulse stimulation with 500 uA current promoted neuronal maturity quantified through protein expression analysis by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Results of this study demonstrated that an electroconductive MWCNT scaffold, coupled with electrical stimulation, may have a synergistic effect on promoting neurite outgrowth for therapeutic application in nerve regeneration. . © 2017 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  19. Cell Wall Remodeling Enzymes Modulate Fungal Cell Wall Elasticity and Osmotic Stress Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ene, Iuliana V; Walker, Louise A; Schiavone, Marion; Lee, Keunsook K; Martin-Yken, Hélène; Dague, Etienne; Gow, Neil A R; Munro, Carol A; Brown, Alistair J P

    2015-07-28

    The fungal cell wall confers cell morphology and protection against environmental insults. For fungal pathogens, the cell wall is a key immunological modulator and an ideal therapeutic target. Yeast cell walls possess an inner matrix of interlinked β-glucan and chitin that is thought to provide tensile strength and rigidity. Yeast cells remodel their walls over time in response to environmental change, a process controlled by evolutionarily conserved stress (Hog1) and cell integrity (Mkc1, Cek1) signaling pathways. These mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways modulate cell wall gene expression, leading to the construction of a new, modified cell wall. We show that the cell wall is not rigid but elastic, displaying rapid structural realignments that impact survival following osmotic shock. Lactate-grown Candida albicans cells are more resistant to hyperosmotic shock than glucose-grown cells. We show that this elevated resistance is not dependent on Hog1 or Mkc1 signaling and that most cell death occurs within 10 min of osmotic shock. Sudden decreases in cell volume drive rapid increases in cell wall thickness. The elevated stress resistance of lactate-grown cells correlates with reduced cell wall elasticity, reflected in slower changes in cell volume following hyperosmotic shock. The cell wall elasticity of lactate-grown cells is increased by a triple mutation that inactivates the Crh family of cell wall cross-linking enzymes, leading to increased sensitivity to hyperosmotic shock. Overexpressing Crh family members in glucose-grown cells reduces cell wall elasticity, providing partial protection against hyperosmotic shock. These changes correlate with structural realignment of the cell wall and with the ability of cells to withstand osmotic shock. The C. albicans cell wall is the first line of defense against external insults, the site of immune recognition by the host, and an attractive target for antifungal therapy. Its tensile strength is conferred by

  20. The TMI regenerable solid oxide fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cable, Thomas L.

    1995-04-01

    Energy storage and production in space requires rugged, reliable hardware which minimizes weight, volume, and maintenance while maximizing power output and usable energy storage. These systems generally consist of photovoltaic solar arrays which operate during sunlight cycles to provide system power and regenerate fuel (hydrogen) via water electrolysis; during dark cycles, hydrogen is converted by the fuel cell into system. The currently preferred configuration uses two separate systems (fuel cell and electrolyzer) in conjunction with photovoltaic cells. Fuel cell/electrolyzer system simplicity, reliability, and power-to-weight and power-to-volume ratios could be greatly improved if both power production (fuel cell) and power storage (electrolysis) functions can be integrated into a single unit. The Technology Management, Inc. (TMI), solid oxide fuel cell-based system offers the opportunity to both integrate fuel cell and electrolyzer functions into one unit and potentially simplify system requirements. Based an the TMI solid oxide fuel cell (SOPC) technology, the TMI integrated fuel cell/electrolyzer utilizes innovative gas storage and operational concepts and operates like a rechargeable 'hydrogen-oxygen battery'. Preliminary research has been completed on improved H2/H2O electrode (SOFC anode/electrolyzer cathode) materials for solid oxide, regenerative fuel cells. Improved H2/H2O electrode materials showed improved cell performance in both fuel cell and electrolysis modes in reversible cell tests. ln reversible fuel cell/electrolyzer mode, regenerative fuel cell efficiencies (ratio of power out (fuel cell mode) to power in (electrolyzer model)) improved from 50 percent (using conventional electrode materials) to over 80 percent. The new materials will allow the TMI SOFC system to operate as both the electrolyzer and fuel cell in a single unit. Preliminary system designs have also been developed which indicate the technical feasibility of using the TMI SOFC

  1. [The cell wall of Coelastrum (Chlorophycees)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reymond, O

    1975-01-01

    The cell wall of Coelastrum is usually composed of three layers. The outermost layer was studied most extensively. It consists of erect tubules which often bear long bristles whose function may be to stabilize the algae in its enviroment. The cell wall can modify its morphology according to the enviroment.

  2. Modifying crops to increase cell wall digestibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Hans-Joachim G; Samac, Deborah A; Sarath, Gautam

    2012-04-01

    Improving digestibility of roughage cell walls will improve ruminant animal performance and reduce loss of nutrients to the environment. The main digestibility impediment for dicotyledonous plants is highly lignified secondary cell walls, notably in stem secondary xylem, which become almost non-digestible. Digestibility of grasses is slowed severely by lignification of most tissues, but these cell walls remain largely digestible. Cell wall lignification creates an access barrier to potentially digestible wall material by rumen bacteria if cells have not been physically ruptured. Traditional breeding has focused on increasing total dry matter digestibility rather than cell wall digestibility, which has resulted in minimal reductions in cell wall lignification. Brown midrib mutants in some annual grasses exhibit small reductions in lignin concentration and improved cell wall digestibility. Similarly, transgenic approaches down-regulating genes in monolignol synthesis have produced plants with reduced lignin content and improved cell wall digestibility. While major reductions in lignin concentration have been associated with poor plant fitness, smaller reductions in lignin provided measurable improvements in digestibility without significantly impacting agronomic fitness. Additional targets for genetic modification to enhance digestibility and improve roughages for use as biofuel feedstocks are discussed; including manipulating cell wall polysaccharide composition, novel lignin structures, reduced lignin/polysaccharide cross-linking, smaller lignin polymers, enhanced development of non-lignified tissues, and targeting specific cell types. Greater tissue specificity of transgene expression will be needed to maximize benefits while avoiding negative impacts on plant fitness.cauliflower mosiac virus (CaMV) 35S promoter. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  3. Trophic Effects of Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Tissue Regeneration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fu, Yao; Karbaat, Lisanne; Wu, Ling; Leijten, Jeroen; Both, Sanne K.; Karperien, Marcel

    2017-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are considered to hold great therapeutic value for cell-based therapy and for tissue regeneration in particular. Recent evidence indicates that the main underlying mechanism for MSCs' beneficial effects in tissue regeneration is based on their capability to produce a

  4. Polyphosphorylated fungal cell wall glycopeptides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonetti, S.J.; Black, B.; Gander, J.E.

    1987-05-01

    Penicillium charlesii secretes a 65 kDa peptidophosphogalactomannan (pPGM) containing 10 phosphodiester residues and 10 galactofuranosyl-containing galactin chains attached to a linear mannan; the polysaccharides is attached to a 3 kDa seryl- and threonyl-rich peptide. The authors have now isolated and partially characterized a form of pPGM released from mycelia of P. charlesii treated at 50/sup 0/C for 15, 30, 60 or 120 min. Two- to 3-fold more pPGM was released by heat treatment than is secreted. Crude pPGM, released by heat, was fractionated on DE-52 and was fractionated into two major fractions on the basis of its difference in negative charge. /sup 1/H-decoupled /sup 13/C NMR spectroscopy of these two fractions provided spectra very similar to that of secreted pPGM previously reported from this laboratory. /sup 1/H-decoupled /sup 31/P NMR showed major signals at 1.47, and 0.22 ppm and minor signals at 1.32, 1.15, 1.00, 0.91 and 0.76 ppm. These signals are upfield from phosphomonoesters and are in the region observed for (6-O-phosphorylcholine)- and (6-O-phosphorylethanolamine)-..cap alpha..-D-mannopyranosyl residues which are 0.22 and 0.90 ppm, respectively. These polymers contain 30 phosphodiester residues per molecule of 70 kDa mass compared with 10 phosphodiesters in secreted pPGM. Acid phosphatase and alkaline protease were the only lytic enzymes released by heat treatment. The evidence suggests that much of the pPGM is derived from cell walls; and that the polysaccharide is highly phosphorylated.

  5. 2003 Plant Cell Walls Gordon Conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniel J. Cosgrove

    2004-09-21

    This conference will address recent progress in many aspects of cell wall biology. Molecular, genetic, and genomic approaches are yielding major advances in our understanding of the composition, synthesis, and architecture of plant cell walls and their dynamics during growth, and are identifying the genes that encode the machinery needed to make their biogenesis possible. This meeting will bring together international scientists from academia, industry and government labs to share the latest breakthroughs and perspectives on polysaccharide biosynthesis, wood formation, wall modification, expansion and interaction with other organisms, and genomic & evolutionary analyses of wall-related genes, as well as to discuss recent ''nanotechnological'' advances that take wall analysis to the level of a single cell.

  6. Complete pulp regeneration after pulpectomy by transplantation of CD105+ stem cells with stromal cell-derived factor-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iohara, Koichiro; Imabayashi, Kiyomi; Ishizaka, Ryo; Watanabe, Atsushi; Nabekura, Junichi; Ito, Masataka; Matsushita, Kenji; Nakamura, Hiroshi; Nakashima, Misako

    2011-08-01

    Loss of pulp due to caries and pulpitis leads to loss of teeth and reduced quality of life. Thus, there is an unmet need for regeneration of pulp. A promising approach is stem cell therapy. Autologous pulp stem/progenitor (CD105(+)) cells were transplanted into a root canal with stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1) after pulpectomy in mature teeth with complete apical closure in dogs. The root canal was successfully filled with regenerated pulp including nerves and vasculature by day 14, followed by new dentin formation along the dentinal wall. The newly regenerated tissue was significantly larger in the transplantation of pulp CD105(+) cells with SDF-1 compared with those of adipose CD105(+) cells with SDF-1 or unfractionated total pulp cells with SDF-1. The pulp CD105(+) cells highly expressed angiogenic/neurotrophic factors compared with other cells and localized in the vicinity of newly formed capillaries after transplantation, demonstrating its potent trophic effects on neovascularization. Two-dimensional electrophoretic analyses and real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analyses demonstrated that the qualitative and quantitative protein and mRNA expression patterns of the regenerated pulp were similar to those of normal pulp. Thus, this novel stem cell therapy is the first demonstration of complete pulp regeneration, implying novel treatment to preserve and save teeth.

  7. Cell-to-cell communication--periodontal regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosshardt, Dieter D; Stadlinger, Bernd; Terheyden, Hendrik

    2015-03-01

    Although regenerative treatment options are available, periodontal regeneration is still regarded as insufficient and unpredictable. This review article provides scientific background information on the animated 3D film Cell-to-Cell Communication - Periodontal Regeneration. Periodontal regeneration is understood as a recapitulation of embryonic mechanisms. Therefore, a thorough understanding of cellular and molecular mechanisms regulating normal tooth root development is imperative to improve existing and develop new periodontal regenerative therapies. However, compared to tooth crown and earlier stages of tooth development, much less is known about the development of the tooth root. The formation of root cementum is considered the critical element in periodontal regeneration. Therefore, much research in recent years has focused on the origin and differentiation of cementoblasts. Evidence is accumulating that the Hertwig's epithelial root sheath (HERS) has a pivotal role in root formation and cementogenesis. Traditionally, ectomesenchymal cells in the dental follicle were thought to differentiate into cementoblasts. According to an alternative theory, however, cementoblasts originate from the HERS. What happens when the periodontal attachment system is traumatically compromised? Minor mechanical insults to the periodontium may spontaneously heal, and the tissues can structurally and functionally be restored. But what happens to the periodontium in case of periodontitis, an infectious disease, after periodontal treatment? A non-regenerative treatment of periodontitis normally results in periodontal repair (i.e., the formation of a long junctional epithelium) rather than regeneration. Thus, a regenerative treatment is indicated to restore the original architecture and function of the periodontium. Guided tissue regeneration or enamel matrix proteins are such regenerative therapies, but further improvement is required. As remnants of HERS persist as epithelial cell

  8. The parasitic cell wall of Coccidioides immitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, G T; Hung, C Y

    2001-01-01

    Coccidioides immitis is a human respiratory pathogen characterized by a parasitic cycle that is unique among fungi that cause systemic mycoses. Biochemical, molecular and immunological studies of the cell wall of C. immitis have focused on three distinct events of parasitic cell differentiation: isotropic growth, segmentation and endosporulation. Current investigations of each developmental phase in vitro include the identification, expression analysis, and disruption of synthase and hydrolase genes that are suspected to have key roles in morphogenesis. Temporal expression of families of beta-glucosidase and chitinase genes are of particular interest because their products may participate in wall modification during both isotropic growth and endosporulation and, thereby, represent potential molecular targets for novel antifungal drugs. Furthermore, our immunological studies of these and other isolated parasitic cell-wall components have resulted in the identification of antigens with demonstrated impact on host response to coccidioidal infection. C. immitis has proved to be an excellent model for fungal cell-wall research.

  9. Immersion Refractometry of Isolated Bacterial Cell Walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marquis, Robert E.

    1973-01-01

    Immersion-refractometric and light-scattering measurements were adapted to determinations of average refractive indices and physical compactness of isolated bacterial cell walls. The structures were immersed in solutions containing various concentrations of polymer molecules that cannot penetrate into wall pores, and then an estimate was made of the polymer concentration or the refractive index of the polymer solution in which light scattering was reduced to zero. Because each wall preparation was heterogeneous, the refractive index of the medium for zero light scattering had to be estimated by extrapolation. Refractive indices for walls suspended in bovine serum albumin solutions ranged from 1.348 for walls of the rod form of Arthrobacter crystallopoietes to 1.382 for walls of the teichoic acid deficient, 52A5 strain of Staphylococcus aureus. These indices were used to calculate approximate values for solids content per milliliter, and the calculated values agreed closely with those estimated from a knowledge of dextran-impermeable volumes per gram, dry weight, of the walls. When large molecules such as dextrans or serum albumin were used for immersion refractometry, the refractive indices obtained were for entire walls, including both wall polymers and wall water. When smaller molecules that can penetrate wall pores to various extents were used with Micrococcus lysodeikticus walls, the average, apparent refractive index of the structures increased as the molecular size of probing molecules was decreased. It was possible to obtain an estimate of 1.45 to 1.46 for the refractive index of wall polymers, predominantly peptidoglycans in this case, by extrapolating the curve for refractive index versus molecular radius to a value of 0.2 nm, the approximate radius of a water molecule. This relatively low value for polymer refractive index was interpreted as evidence in favor of the amorphous, elastic model of peptidoglycan structure and against the crystalline, rigid

  10. MINIMALLY INVASIVE SINGLE FLAP APPROACH WITH CONNECTIVE TISSUE WALL FOR PERIODONTAL REGENERATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamen Kotsilkov

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The destructive periodontal diseases are among the most prevalent in the human population. In some cases, bony defects are formed during the disease progression, thus sustaining deep periodontal pockets. The reconstruction of these defects is usually done with the classical techniques of bone substitutes placement and guided tissue regeneration. The clinical and histological data from the recent years, however, demonstrate the relatively low regenerative potential of these techniques. The contemporary approaches for periodontal regeneration rely on minimally invasive surgical protocols, aimed at complete tissue preservation in order to achieve and maintain primary closure and at stimulating the natural regenerative potential of the periodontal tissues. AIM: This presentation demonstrates the application of a new, minimally invasive, single flap surgical technique for periodontal regeneration in a clinical case with periodontitis and a residual deep intrabony defect. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A 37 years old patient presented with chronic generalised periodontitis. The initial therapy led to good control of the periodontal infection with a single residual deep periodontal pocket medially at 11 due to a deep intrabony defect. A single flap approach with an enamel matrix derivate application and a connective tissue wall technique were performed. The proper primary closure was obtained. RESULT: One month after surgery an initial mineralisation process in the defect was detected. At the third month, a complete clinical healing was observed. The radiographic control showed finished bone mineralisation and periodontal space recreation. CONCLUSION: In the limitation of the presented case, the minimally invasive surgical approach led to complete clinical healing and new bone formation, which could be proof for periodontal regeneration.

  11. Novel application of stem cell-derived factors for periodontal regeneration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inukai, Takeharu, E-mail: t-inukai@med.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine (Japan); Katagiri, Wataru, E-mail: w-kat@med.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine (Japan); Yoshimi, Ryoko, E-mail: lianzi@med.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine (Japan); Osugi, Masashi, E-mail: masashi@med.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine (Japan); Kawai, Takamasa, E-mail: takamasa@med.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine (Japan); Hibi, Hideharu, E-mail: hibihi@med.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine (Japan); Ueda, Minoru, E-mail: mueda@med.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine (Japan)

    2013-01-11

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) secrete a variety of cytokines. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cytokines were detected in conditioned medium from cultured MSCs (MSC-CM). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MSC-CM enhanced activation of dog MSCs and periodontal ligament cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MSC-CM significantly promoted alveolar bone and cementum regeneration. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Multiple cytokines contained in MSC-CM promote periodontal regeneration. -- Abstract: The effect of conditioned medium from cultured mesenchymal stem cells (MSC-CM) on periodontal regeneration was evaluated. In vitro, MSC-CM stimulated migration and proliferation of dog MSCs (dMSCs) and dog periodontal ligament cells (dPDLCs). Cytokines such as insulin-like growth factor, vascular endothelial growth factor, transforming growth factor-{beta}1, and hepatocyte growth factor were detected in MSC-CM. In vivo, one-wall critical-size, intrabony periodontal defects were surgically created in the mandible of dogs. Dogs with these defects were divided into three groups that received MSC-CM, PBS, or no implants. Absorbable atelo-collagen sponges (TERUPLUG Registered-Sign ) were used as a scaffold material. Based on radiographic and histological observation 4 weeks after transplantation, the defect sites in the MSC-CM group displayed significantly greater alveolar bone and cementum regeneration than the other groups. These findings suggest that MSC-CM enhanced periodontal regeneration due to multiple cytokines contained in MSC-CM.

  12. Identification of Novel Cell Wall Components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michelle Momany

    2009-10-26

    Our DOE Biosciences-funded work focused on the fungal cell wall and morphogenesis. We are especially interested in how new cell wall material is targeted to appropriate areas for polar (asymmetric) growth. Polar growth is the only way that filamentous fungi explore the environment to find suitable substrates to degrade. Work funded by this grant has resulted in a total of twenty peer-reviewed publications. In work funded by this grant, we identified nine Aspergillus nidulans temperature-sensitive (ts) mutants that fail to send out a germ tube and show a swollen cell phenotype at restrictive temperature, the swo mutants. In other organisms, a swollen cell phenotype is often associated with misdirected growth or weakened cell walls. Our work shows that several of the A. nidulans swo mutants have defects in the establishment and maintenance of polarity. Cloning of several swo genes by complementation also showed that secondary modification of proteins seems is important in polarity. We also investigated cell wall biosynthesis and branching based on leads in literature from other organisms and found that branching and nuclear division are tied and that the cell wall reorganizes during development. In our most recent work we have focused on gene expression during the shift from isotropic to polar growth. Surprisingly we found that genes previously thought to be involved only in spore formation are important in early vegetative growth as well.

  13. On a model of pattern regeneration based on cell memory.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolai Bessonov

    Full Text Available We present here a new model of the cellular dynamics that enable regeneration of complex biological morphologies. Biological cell structures are considered as an ensemble of mathematical points on the plane. Each cell produces a signal which propagates in space and is received by other cells. The total signal received by each cell forms a signal distribution defined on the cell structure. This distribution characterizes the geometry of the cell structure. If a part of this structure is removed, the remaining cells have two signals. They keep the value of the signal which they had before the amputation (memory, and they receive a new signal produced after the amputation. Regeneration of the cell structure is stimulated by the difference between the old and the new signals. It is stopped when the two signals coincide. The algorithm of regeneration contains certain rules which are essential for its functioning, being the first quantitative model of cellular memory that implements regeneration of complex patterns to a specific target morphology. Correct regeneration depends on the form and the size of the cell structure, as well as on some parameters of regeneration.

  14. Applicability of tooth derived stem cells in neural regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ludovica Parisi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Within the nervous system, regeneration is limited, and this is due to the small amount of neural stem cells, the inhibitory origin of the stem cell niche and often to the development of a scar which constitutes a mechanical barrier for the regeneration. Regarding these aspects, many efforts have been done in the research of a cell component that combined with scaffolds and growth factors could be suitable for nervous regeneration in regenerative medicine approaches. Autologous mesenchymal stem cells represent nowadays the ideal candidate for this aim, thank to their multipotency and to their amount inside adult tissues. However, issues in their harvesting, through the use of invasive techniques, and problems involved in their ageing, require the research of new autologous sources. To this purpose, the recent discovery of a stem cells component in teeth, and which derive from neural crest cells, has came to the light the possibility of using dental stem cells in nervous system regeneration. In this work, in order to give guidelines on the use of dental stem cells for neural regeneration, we briefly introduce the concepts of regeneration and regenerative medicine, we then focus the attention on odontogenesis, which involves the formation and the presence of a stem component in different parts of teeth, and finally we describe some experimental approaches which are exploiting dental stem cells for neural studies.

  15. Sensory hair cell death and regeneration in fishes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerry D. Monroe

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Sensory hair cells are specialized mechanotransductive receptors required for hearing and vestibular function. Loss of hair cells in humans and other mammals is permanent and causes reduced hearing and balance. In the early 1980’s, it was shown that hair cells continue to be added to the inner ear sensory epithelia in cartilaginous and bony fishes. Soon thereafter, hair cell regeneration was documented in the chick cochlea following acoustic trauma. Since then, research using chick and other avian models has led to great insights into hair cell death and regeneration. However, with the rise of the zebrafish as a model organism for studying disease and developmental processes, there has been an increased interest in studying sensory hair cell death and regeneration in its lateral line and inner ears. Advances derived from studies in zebrafish and other fish species include understanding the effect of ototoxins on hair cells and finding otoprotectants to mitigate ototoxin damage, the role of cellular proliferation versus direct transdifferentiation during hair cell regeneration, and elucidating cellular pathways involved in the regeneration process. This review will summarize research on hair cell death and regeneration using fish models, indicate the potential strengths and weaknesses of these models, and discuss several emerging areas of future studies.

  16. Applicability of tooth derived stem cells in neural regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parisi, Ludovica; Manfredi, Edoardo

    2016-11-01

    Within the nervous system, regeneration is limited, and this is due to the small amount of neural stem cells, the inhibitory origin of the stem cell niche and often to the development of a scar which constitutes a mechanical barrier for the regeneration. Regarding these aspects, many efforts have been done in the research of a cell component that combined with scaffolds and growth factors could be suitable for nervous regeneration in regenerative medicine approaches. Autologous mesenchymal stem cells represent nowadays the ideal candidate for this aim, thank to their multipotency and to their amount inside adult tissues. However, issues in their harvesting, through the use of invasive techniques, and problems involved in their ageing, require the research of new autologous sources. To this purpose, the recent discovery of a stem cells component in teeth, and which derive from neural crest cells, has came to the light the possibility of using dental stem cells in nervous system regeneration. In this work, in order to give guidelines on the use of dental stem cells for neural regeneration, we briefly introduce the concepts of regeneration and regenerative medicine, we then focus the attention on odontogenesis, which involves the formation and the presence of a stem component in different parts of teeth, and finally we describe some experimental approaches which are exploiting dental stem cells for neural studies.

  17. Biomimetic three-dimensional nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite and magnetically synthesized single-walled carbon nanotube chitosan nanocomposite for bone regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, Owen; Li, Jian; Wang, Mian; Zhang, Lijie Grace; Keidar, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Background Many shortcomings exist in the traditional methods of treating bone defects, such as donor tissue shortages for autografts and disease transmission for allografts. The objective of this study was to design a novel three-dimensional nanostructured bone substitute based on magnetically synthesized single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT), biomimetic hydrothermally treated nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite, and a biocompatible hydrogel (chitosan). Both nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite and SWCNT have a biomimetic nanostructure, excellent osteoconductivity, and high potential to improve the load-bearing capacity of hydrogels. Methods Specifically, three-dimensional porous chitosan scaffolds with different concentrations of nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite and SWCNT were created to support the growth of human osteoblasts (bone-forming cells) using a lyophilization procedure. Two types of SWCNT were synthesized in an arc discharge with a magnetic field (B-SWCNT) and without a magnetic field (N-SWCNT) for improving bone regeneration. Results Nanocomposites containing magnetically synthesized B-SWCNT had superior cytocompatibility properties when compared with nonmagnetically synthesized N-SWCNT. B-SWCNT have much smaller diameters and are twice as long as their nonmagnetically prepared counterparts, indicating that the dimensions of carbon nanotubes can have a substantial effect on osteoblast attachment. Conclusion This study demonstrated that a chitosan nanocomposite with both B-SWCNT and 20% nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite could achieve a higher osteoblast density when compared with the other experimental groups, thus making this nanocomposite promising for further exploration for bone regeneration. PMID:22619545

  18. Synthesis of plant cell wall oligosaccharides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Mads Hartvig

    Plant cell walls are structurally complex and contain a large number of diverse carbohydrate polymers. These plant fibers are a highly valuable bio-resource and the focus of food, energy and health research. We are interested in studying the interplay of plant cell wall carbohydrates with proteins...... for characterizing protein-carbohydrate binding. The presentation will highlight chemical syntheses of plant cell wall oligosaccharides from the group and provide examples from studies of their interactions with proteins....... such as enzymes, cell surface lectins, and antibodies. However, detailed molecular level investigations of such interactions are hampered by the heterogeneity and diversity of the polymers of interest. To circumvent this, we target well-defined oligosaccharides with representative structures that can be used...

  19. Pancreatic beta cell protection/regeneration with phytotherapy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hosseini, Azar; Shafiee-Nick, Reza; Ghorbani, Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    .... Considering the physiopathology of diabetes, preventing beta cell degeneration and stimulating the endogenous regeneration of islets will be essential approaches for the treatment of insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus...

  20. Stem cells in the face: tooth regeneration and beyond

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mao, Jeremy J; Robey, Pamela G; Prockop, Darwin J

    2012-01-01

    ..., pathogenesis, and regeneration is largely obscure. This perspective article critically analyzes the current status of our understanding of orofacial stem/progenitor cells, identifies gaps in our knowledge, and highlights pathways for the development...

  1. Mechanisms of pancreatic beta-cell growth and regeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens Høiriis

    1989-01-01

    Information about the mechanism of beta-cell growth and regeneration may be obtained by studies of insulinoma cells. In the present study the growth and function of the rat insulinoma cell lines RINm5F and 5AH were evaluated by addition of serum, hormones, and growth factors. It was found...... of insulin mRNA content showed that the insulinoma cells only contained about 2% of that of normal rat beta-cells. These results are discussed in relation to the role of growth factors, oncogenes, and differentiation in the growth and regeneration of beta-cells....

  2. Plasticity of intestinal epithelial cells in regeneration and cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tetteh, Paul W.

    2015-01-01

    Cellular plasticity refers to the ability of a cell to change its fate or identity in response to external or intrinsic factors. Regeneration of the intestinal epithelium after injury is driven mainly by plasticity of crypt stem cells that can rapidly divide to replace all the lost cells. Stem cell

  3. Mechanochemical Polarization of Contiguous Cell Walls Shapes Plant Pavement Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majda, Mateusz; Grones, Peter; Sintorn, Ida-Maria; Vain, Thomas; Milani, Pascale; Krupinski, Pawel; Zagórska-Marek, Beata; Viotti, Corrado; Jönsson, Henrik; Mellerowicz, Ewa J; Hamant, Olivier; Robert, Stéphanie

    2017-11-06

    The epidermis of aerial plant organs is thought to be limiting for growth, because it acts as a continuous load-bearing layer, resisting tension. Leaf epidermis contains jigsaw puzzle piece-shaped pavement cells whose shape has been proposed to be a result of subcellular variations in expansion rate that induce local buckling events. Paradoxically, such local compressive buckling should not occur given the tensile stresses across the epidermis. Using computational modeling, we show that the simplest scenario to explain pavement cell shapes within an epidermis under tension must involve mechanical wall heterogeneities across and along the anticlinal pavement cell walls between adjacent cells. Combining genetics, atomic force microscopy, and immunolabeling, we demonstrate that contiguous cell walls indeed exhibit hybrid mechanochemical properties. Such biochemical wall heterogeneities precede wall bending. Altogether, this provides a possible mechanism for the generation of complex plant cell shapes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Enzymatic Modification of Plant Cell Wall Polysaccharides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Øbro, Jens; Hayashi, Takahisa; Mikkelsen, Jørn Dalgaard

    2011-01-01

    Plant cell walls are intricate structures with remarkable properties, widely used in almost every aspect of our life. Cell walls consist largely of complex polysaccharides and there is often a need for chemical and biochemical processing before industrial use. There is an increasing demand...... for sustainable processes that replace chemical treatments with white biotechnology. Plants can contribute significantly to this sustainable process by producing plant or microbialenzymes in planta that are necessary for plant cell wall modification or total degradation. This will give rise to superior food...... fibres, hydrocolloids, paper,textile, animal feeds or biofuels. Classical microbial-based fermentation systems could in the future face serious competition from plant-based expression systems for enzyme production. Plant expressed enzymes can either be targeted to specific cellular compartments...

  5. Stem cell-based tooth and periodontal regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, L; Liu, Y; Wang, S

    2017-06-21

    Currently regeneration of tooth and periodontal damage still remains great challenge. Stem cell-based tissue engineering raised novel therapeutic strategies for tooth and periodontal repair. Stem cells for tooth and periodontal regeneration include dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs), periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs), stem cells from the dental apical papilla (SCAPs), and stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous teeth (SHEDs), dental follicle stem cells (DFSCs), dental epithelial stem cells (DESCs), bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMMSCs), adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs), embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). To date, substantial advances have been made in stem cell-based tooth and periodontal regeneration, including dentin-pulp, whole tooth, bioroot and periodontal regeneration. Translational investigations have been performed such as dental stem cell banking and clinical trials. In this review, we present strategies for stem cell-based tissue engineering for tooth and periodontal repair, and the translational studies. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Application of dedifferentiated fat cells for periodontal tissue regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugawara, Atsunori; Sato, Soh

    2014-01-01

    Periodontal diseases result from inflammation by bacterial infection in plaques, leading to tooth loss. However, regenerative approaches with periodontal tissue regeneration by guided tissue regeneration and enamel matrix derivative are not yet well established. Tissue regeneration requires three factors: cells, scaffold, and growth factors. Dedifferentiated fat cells (DFATs) are pluripotent with the same differentiation capacities as mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Access to MSCs is limited, whereas donor cells for DFATs are abundant in adipose tissues and can be non-invasively obtained. Therefore, we tested DFATs as a new source for periodontal tissue regeneration in an experimental periodontal tissue loss model in rats by transplanting DFATs on an atelocollagen scaffold using DFATs isolated from Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP). GFP-DFAT cells were transplanted on the palatal side of the upper left first molar in SD rats and detected by H&E staining, GFP, and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) expression. DFAT differentiation was also evaluated in three-dimensional cultures. GFP positive cells were detected in the regenerated tissue by the DFATs/scaffold mixture at 4 weeks after transplantation, and PCNA-positive cells were significantly increased in the periodontal ligament along the new bone in the DFATs/scaffold group more than in the scaffold-only group, suggesting that DFATs differentiate in the same manner as MSCs and regenerate in the defective areas. Consistent with previous reports, DFATs differentiation was slower than that with stem cells. The present study demonstrates that DFATs are pluripotent and an effective new source of cells for periodontal tissue regeneration.

  7. Live-cell imaging: new avenues to investigate retinal regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuela Lahne

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Sensing and responding to our environment requires functional neurons that act in concert. Neuronal cell loss resulting from degenerative diseases cannot be replaced in humans, causing a functional impairment to integrate and/or respond to sensory cues. In contrast, zebrafish (Danio rerio possess an endogenous capacity to regenerate lost neurons. Here, we will focus on the processes that lead to neuronal regeneration in the zebrafish retina. Dying retinal neurons release a damage signal, tumor necrosis factor α, which induces the resident radial glia, the Müller glia, to reprogram and re-enter the cell cycle. The Müller glia divide asymmetrically to produce a Müller glia that exits the cell cycle and a neuronal progenitor cell. The arising neuronal progenitor cells undergo several rounds of cell divisions before they migrate to the site of damage to differentiate into the neuronal cell types that were lost. Molecular and immunohistochemical studies have predominantly provided insight into the mechanisms that regulate retinal regeneration. However, many processes during retinal regeneration are dynamic and require live-cell imaging to fully discern the underlying mechanisms. Recently, a multiphoton imaging approach of adult zebrafish retinal cultures was developed. We will discuss the use of live-cell imaging, the currently available tools and those that need to be developed to advance our knowledge on major open questions in the field of retinal regeneration.

  8. Mesenchymal stem cell-mediated functional tooth regeneration in swine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonoyama, Wataru; Liu, Yi; Fang, Dianji; Yamaza, Takayoshi; Seo, Byoung-Moo; Zhang, Chunmei; Liu, He; Gronthos, Stan; Wang, Cun-Yu; Wang, Songlin; Shi, Songtao

    2006-12-20

    Mesenchymal stem cell-mediated tissue regeneration is a promising approach for regenerative medicine for a wide range of applications. Here we report a new population of stem cells isolated from the root apical papilla of human teeth (SCAP, stem cells from apical papilla). Using a minipig model, we transplanted both human SCAP and periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs) to generate a root/periodontal complex capable of supporting a porcelain crown, resulting in normal tooth function. This work integrates a stem cell-mediated tissue regeneration strategy, engineered materials for structure, and current dental crown technologies. This hybridized tissue engineering approach led to recovery of tooth strength and appearance.

  9. Mesenchymal stem cell-mediated functional tooth regeneration in swine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wataru Sonoyama

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem cell-mediated tissue regeneration is a promising approach for regenerative medicine for a wide range of applications. Here we report a new population of stem cells isolated from the root apical papilla of human teeth (SCAP, stem cells from apical papilla. Using a minipig model, we transplanted both human SCAP and periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs to generate a root/periodontal complex capable of supporting a porcelain crown, resulting in normal tooth function. This work integrates a stem cell-mediated tissue regeneration strategy, engineered materials for structure, and current dental crown technologies. This hybridized tissue engineering approach led to recovery of tooth strength and appearance.

  10. Development and regeneration of vestibular hair cells in mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Joseph C; Stone, Jennifer S

    2017-05-01

    Vestibular sensation is essential for gaze stabilization, balance, and perception of gravity. The vestibular receptors in mammals, Type I and Type II hair cells, are located in five small organs in the inner ear. Damage to hair cells and their innervating neurons can cause crippling symptoms such as vertigo, visual field oscillation, and imbalance. In adult rodents, some Type II hair cells are regenerated and become re-innervated after damage, presenting opportunities for restoring vestibular function after hair cell damage. This article reviews features of vestibular sensory cells in mammals, including their basic properties, how they develop, and how they are replaced after damage. We discuss molecules that control vestibular hair cell regeneration and highlight areas in which our understanding of development and regeneration needs to be deepened. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. In situ tissue regeneration: chemoattractants for endogenous stem cell recruitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanden Berg-Foels, Wendy S

    2014-02-01

    Tissue engineering uses cells, signaling molecules, and/or biomaterials to regenerate injured or diseased tissues. Ex vivo expanded mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) have long been a cornerstone of regeneration therapies; however, drawbacks that include altered signaling responses and reduced homing capacity have prompted investigation of regeneration based on endogenous MSC recruitment. Recent successful proof-of-concept studies have further motivated endogenous MSC recruitment-based approaches. Stem cell migration is required for morphogenesis and organogenesis during development and for tissue maintenance and injury repair in adults. A biomimetic approach to in situ tissue regeneration by endogenous MSC requires the orchestration of three main stages: MSC recruitment, MSC differentiation, and neotissue maturation. The first stage must result in recruitment of a sufficient number of MSC, capable of effecting regeneration, to the injured or diseased tissue. One of the challenges for engineering endogenous MSC recruitment is the selection of effective chemoattractant(s). The objective of this review is to synthesize and evaluate evidence of recruitment efficacy by reported chemoattractants, including growth factors, chemokines, and other more recently appreciated MSC chemoattractants. The influence of MSC tissue sources, cell culture methods, and the in vitro and in vivo environments is discussed. This growing body of knowledge will serve as a basis for the rational design of regenerative therapies based on endogenous MSC recruitment. Successful endogenous MSC recruitment is the first step of successful tissue regeneration.

  12. Regulatory factors and cell populations involved in skeletal muscle regeneration.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broek, R.W. Ten; Grefte, S.; Hoff, J.W. von den

    2010-01-01

    Skeletal muscle regeneration is a complex process, which is not yet completely understood. Satellite cells, the skeletal muscle stem cells, become activated after trauma, proliferate, and migrate to the site of injury. Depending on the severity of the myotrauma, activated satellite cells form new

  13. Sensory hair cell regeneration in the zebrafish lateral line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lush, Mark E; Piotrowski, Tatjana

    2014-10-01

    Damage or destruction of sensory hair cells in the inner ear leads to hearing or balance deficits that can be debilitating, especially in older adults. Unfortunately, the damage is permanent, as regeneration of the inner ear sensory epithelia does not occur in mammals. Zebrafish and other non-mammalian vertebrates have the remarkable ability to regenerate sensory hair cells and understanding the molecular and cellular basis for this regenerative ability will hopefully aid us in designing therapies to induce regeneration in mammals. Zebrafish not only possess hair cells in the ear but also in the sensory lateral line system. Hair cells in both organs are functionally analogous to hair cells in the inner ear of mammals. The lateral line is a mechanosensory system found in most aquatic vertebrates that detects water motion and aids in predator avoidance, prey capture, schooling, and mating. Although hair cell regeneration occurs in both the ear and lateral line, most research to date has focused on the lateral line due to its relatively simple structure and accessibility. Here we review the recent discoveries made during the characterization of hair cell regeneration in zebrafish. Copyright © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Mangiferin Facilitates Islet Regeneration and β-Cell Proliferation through Upregulation of Cell Cycle and β-Cell Regeneration Regulators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hai-Lian Wang

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Mangiferin, a xanthonoid found in plants including mangoes and iris unguicularis, was suggested in previous studies to have anti-hyperglycemic function, though the underlying mechanisms are largely unknown. This study was designed to determine the therapeutic effect of mangiferin by the regeneration of β-cells in mice following 70% partial pancreatectomy (PPx, and to explore the mechanisms of mangiferin-induced β-cell proliferation. For this purpose, adult C57BL/6J mice after 7–14 days post-PPx, or a sham operation were subjected to mangiferin (30 and 90 mg/kg body weight or control solvent injection. Mangiferin-treated mice exhibited an improved glycemia and glucose tolerance, increased serum insulin levels, enhanced β-cell hyperplasia, elevated β-cell proliferation and reduced β-cell apoptosis. Further dissection at the molecular level showed several key regulators of cell cycle, such as cyclin D1, D2 and cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (Cdk4 were significantly up-regulated in mangiferin-treated mice. In addition, critical genes related to β-cell regeneration, such as pancreatic and duodenal homeobox 1 (PDX-1, neurogenin 3 (Ngn3, glucose transporter 2 (GLUT-2, Forkhead box protein O1 (Foxo-1, and glucokinase (GCK, were found to be promoted by mangiferin at both the mRNA and protein expression level. Thus, mangiferin administration markedly facilitates β-cell proliferation and islet regeneration, likely by regulating essential genes in the cell cycle and the process of islet regeneration. These effects therefore suggest that mangiferin bears a therapeutic potential in preventing and/or treating the diabetes.

  15. An enzymatic approach to cell wall structure

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    sterilization, was 66%. A cellulase, a-arabinosidase and xylanase were partially purified from the concentrated superna- tant of R. a/bus cultures and a purified polygalacturonase was obtained from the fungus Verticillium. Of the enzymes tested, the most effective in digesting cell walls was the polygalac- turonase.

  16. Live-cell imaging: new avenues to investigate retinal regeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Lahne, Manuela; Hyde, David R.

    2017-01-01

    Sensing and responding to our environment requires functional neurons that act in concert. Neuronal cell loss resulting from degenerative diseases cannot be replaced in humans, causing a functional impairment to integrate and/or respond to sensory cues. In contrast, zebrafish (Danio rerio) possess an endogenous capacity to regenerate lost neurons. Here, we will focus on the processes that lead to neuronal regeneration in the zebrafish retina. Dying retinal neurons release a damage signal, tum...

  17. Regenerating the heart - Stem cells and the cardiovascular system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo Alberto Redi

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available A book dealing with the heart regeneration achieved thanks to cell therapies sounds like an immense challenge considering both how the field rapidily progresses and the necessary interdisciplinarity to exhaustively cover all of the multifaced aspects of the subject. The great modesty that the two editors show up in the Introduction section while writing that they declined the offer to write a book devoted to the heart regeneration is therefore something highly appreciable.....

  18. Thidiazuron: A potent cytokinin for efficient plant regeneration in Himalayan poplar (Populus ciliata Wall. using leaf explants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaurav Aggarwal

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Populus species are important resource for certain branches of industry and have special roles for scientific study on biological and agricultural systems. The present investigation was undertaken with an objective of enhancing the frequency of plant regeneration in Himalayan poplar (Populus ciliata Wall.. The effect of Thiadizuron (TDZ alone and in combination with adenine and α-Naphthalene acetic acid (NAA were studied on the regeneration potential of leaf explants. A high efficiency of shoot regeneration was observed in leaf (80.00% explants on MS basal medium supplemented with 0.024 mg/l TDZ and 79.7 mg/l adenine. Elongation and multiplication of shoots were obtained on Murashige and Skoog (MS basal medium, containing 0.5 mg/l 6. Benzyl aminopurine (BAP + 0.2mg/l Indole 3-acetic acid (IAA + 0.3 mg/l Gibberellic acid (GA3. High frequency root regeneration from in vitro developed shoots was observed on MS basal medium supplemented with 0.10 mg/l Indole 3-butyric acid(IBA. Maximum of the in vitro rooted plantlets were well accomplished to the mixture of sand: soil (1:1 and exhibited similar morphology with the field plants. A high efficiency plant regeneration protocol has been developedfrom leaf explants in Himalayan poplar (Populus ciliata Wall..

  19. Thidiazuron: A potent cytokinin for efficient plant regeneration in Himalayan poplar (Populus ciliata Wall. using leaf explants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaurav Aggarwal

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Populus species are important resource for certain branches of industry and have special roles for scientific study on biological and agricultural systems. The present investigation was undertaken with an objective of enhancing the frequency of plant regeneration in Himalayan poplar (Populus ciliataWall.. The effect of Thiadizuron (TDZ alone and in combination with adenine and alpha-Naphthalene acetic acid (NAA were studied on the regeneration potential of leaf explants. A high efficiency of shoot regeneration was observed in leaf (80.00% explants on MS basal medium supplemented with 0.024 mg/l TDZ and 79.7 mg/l adenine. Elongation and multiplication of shoots were obtained on Murashige and Skoog (MS basal medium, containing 0.5 mg/l 6. Benzyl aminopurine (BAP + 0.2mg/l Indole 3-acetic acid (IAA + 0.3 mg/l Gibberellic acid (GA3. High frequency root regeneration from in vitro developed shoots was observed on MS basal medium supplemented with 0.10 mg/l Indole 3-butyric acid (IBA. Maximum of the in vitro rooted plantlets were well accomplished to the mixture of sand: soil (1:1 and exhibited similar morphology with the field plants. A high efficiency plant regeneration protocol has been developed from leaf explants in Himalayan poplar (Populus ciliata Wall.. 

  20. Characterization of the Sclerotinia sclerotiorum cell wall proteome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Longzhou; Free, Stephen J

    2016-08-01

    We used a proteomic analysis to identify cell wall proteins released from Sclerotinia sclerotiorum hyphal and sclerotial cell walls via a trifluoromethanesulfonic acid (TFMS) digestion. Cell walls from hyphae grown in Vogel's glucose medium (a synthetic medium lacking plant materials), from hyphae grown in potato dextrose broth and from sclerotia produced on potato dextrose agar were used in the analysis. Under the conditions used, TFMS digests the glycosidic linkages in the cell walls to release intact cell wall proteins. The analysis identified 24 glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored cell wall proteins and 30 non-GPI-anchored cell wall proteins. We found that the cell walls contained an array of cell wall biosynthetic enzymes similar to those found in the cell walls of other fungi. When comparing the proteins in hyphal cell walls grown in potato dextrose broth with those in hyphal cell walls grown in the absence of plant material, it was found that a core group of cell wall biosynthetic proteins and some proteins associated with pathogenicity (secreted cellulases, pectin lyases, glucosidases and proteases) were expressed in both types of hyphae. The hyphae grown in potato dextrose broth contained a number of additional proteins (laccases, oxalate decarboxylase, peroxidase, polysaccharide deacetylase and several proteins unique to Sclerotinia and Botrytis) that might facilitate growth on a plant host. A comparison of the proteins in the sclerotial cell wall with the proteins in the hyphal cell wall demonstrated that sclerotia formation is not marked by a major shift in the composition of cell wall protein. We found that the S. sclerotiorum cell walls contained 11 cell wall proteins that were encoded only in Sclerotinia and Botrytis genomes. © 2015 The Authors. Molecular Plant Pathology published by British Society for Plant Pathology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Hierarchical signaling transduction of the immune and muscle cell crosstalk in muscle regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wenjun; Hu, Ping

    2017-08-24

    The muscle regeneration is a complicated bioprocess that involved in many cell types, including necrotic muscle cells, satellite cells, mesenchymal cells, pericytes, immune cells, and other cell types present at the injury site. Immune cells involved in both innate and adaptive immune responses regulate the progress of muscle regeneration. In this review, we discussed the roles of different immune cells in muscle regeneration. The immune cells regulate muscle regeneration through cytokine production, cell-cell contacts, and general immune environment regulation. We also describe the current known mechanism of how immune cells regulating muscle regeneration. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. Cell wall heterogeneity in root development of Arabidopsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Somssich

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Plant cell walls provide stability and protection to plant cells. During growth and development the composition of cell walls changes, but provides enough strength to withstand the turgor of the cells. Hence, cell walls are highly flexible and diverse in nature. These characteristics are important during root growth, as plant roots consist of radial patterns of cells that have diverse functions and that are at different developmental stages along the growth axis. Young stem cell daughters undergo a series of rapid cell divisions, during which new cell walls are formed that are highly dynamic, and that support rapid anisotropic cell expansion. Once the cells have differentiated, the walls of specific cell types need to comply with and support different cell functions. For example, a newly formed root hair needs to be able to break through the surrounding soil, while endodermal cells modify their walls at distinct positions to form Casparian strips between them. Hence, the cell walls are modified and rebuilt while cells transit through different developmental stages. In addition, the cell walls of roots readjust to their environment to support growth and to maximize nutrient uptake. Many of these modifications are likely driven by different developmental and stress signalling pathways. However, our understanding of how such pathways affect cell wall modifications and what enzymes are involved remain largely unknown. In this review we aim to compile data linking cell wall content and re-modelling to developmental stages of root cells, and dissect how root cell walls respond to certain environmental changes.

  3. The role of dental stem cells in regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    MAXIM, MONICA ANGELA; SORITAU, OLGA; BACIUT, MIHAELA; BRAN, SIMION; BACIUT, GRIGORE

    2015-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are adult stem cells that have the capacity of rising multiple cell types. A rich source of mesenchymal stem cells is represented by the dental tissues: the periodontal ligament, the dental pulp, the apical papilla, the dental follicle and the deciduous teeth. The aim of this review is to characterize the main dental- derived mesenchymal stem cell population, and to show their important role in tissue regeneration based on their properties : the multi-potency, the high proliferation rate, the differentiation in multiple cell lineages, the high cell viability and the positive expression for mesenchymal cell markers. Tissue regeneration or de novo’ formation of craniofacial structures is the future of regenerative medicine, offering a solution for congenital malformations, traumas and other diseases. PMID:26733745

  4. Dentin regeneration in vitro: the pivotal role of supportive cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    About, I

    2011-07-01

    The elaboration of dentin-pulp engineering strategies requires the investigation of not only progenitor cell potentials but also their interactions with other non-progenitor "supportive" cells. Under severe caries lesions, progenitor cells may be activated by growth factors released after the acidic dissolution of carious dentin. However, dentin regeneration has also been observed after traumatic injuries without any significant dentin dissolution. This raises questions about the origin of signals involved in progenitor cell activation, migration, and differentiation. Study models such as the entire tooth culture and co-cultures of pulp and endothelial cells highlighted the role of interactions between the different pulp cell types and the pivotal role they play in dentin regeneration. Injured pulp fibroblasts secrete growth factors involved in progenitor cell activation and differentiation as well as neoangiogenesis which may pave the pathways for progenitor cell migration. This appears to be the first paper to focus on this very important field in dental pulp biology.

  5. Pancreatic beta cell protection/regeneration with phytotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azar Hosseini

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Although currently available drugs are useful in controlling early onset complications of diabetes, serious late onset complications appear in a large number of patients. Considering the physiopathology of diabetes, preventing beta cell degeneration and stimulating the endogenous regeneration of islets will be essential approaches for the treatment of insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. The current review focused on phytochemicals, the antidiabetic effect of which has been proved by pancreatic beta cell protection/regeneration. Among the hundreds of plants that have been investigated for diabetes, a small fraction has shown the regenerative property and was described in this paper. Processes of pancreatic beta cell degeneration and regeneration were described. Also, the proposed mechanisms for the protective/regenerative effects of such phytochemicals and their potential side effects were discussed.

  6. Fibrogenic Cell Plasticity Blunts Tissue Regeneration and Aggravates Muscular Dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrizia Pessina

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Preservation of cell identity is necessary for homeostasis of most adult tissues. This process is challenged every time a tissue undergoes regeneration after stress or injury. In the lethal Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD, skeletal muscle regenerative capacity declines gradually as fibrosis increases. Using genetically engineered tracing mice, we demonstrate that, in dystrophic muscle, specialized cells of muscular, endothelial, and hematopoietic origins gain plasticity toward a fibrogenic fate via a TGFβ-mediated pathway. This results in loss of cellular identity and normal function, with deleterious consequences for regeneration. Furthermore, this fibrogenic process involves acquisition of a mesenchymal progenitor multipotent status, illustrating a link between fibrogenesis and gain of progenitor cell functions. As this plasticity also was observed in DMD patients, we propose that mesenchymal transitions impair regeneration and worsen diseases with a fibrotic component.

  7. Mesenchymal Stem Cell-Mediated Functional Tooth Regeneration in Swine

    OpenAIRE

    Wataru Sonoyama; Yi Liu; Dianji Fang; Takayoshi Yamaza; Byoung-Moo Seo; Chunmei Zhang; He Liu; Stan Gronthos; Cun-Yu Wang; Songlin Wang; Songtao Shi

    2006-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cell-mediated tissue regeneration is a promising approach for regenerative medicine for a wide range of applications. Here we report a new population of stem cells isolated from the root apical papilla of human teeth (SCAP, stem cells from apical papilla). Using a minipig model, we transplanted both human SCAP and periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs) to generate a root/periodontal complex capable of supporting a porcelain crown, resulting in normal tooth function. This wo...

  8. Alfalfa stem tissues: Cell wall deposition, composition, and degradability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jung, H.G.; Engels, F.M.

    2002-01-01

    Declining cell wall degradability of alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) stems with maturation limits the nutritional value of alfalfa for ruminants. This study characterized changes in cell wall concentration, composition, and degradability by rumen microbes resulting from alfalfa stem tissue

  9. Hepatic stellate cells in liver development, regeneration, and cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Chunyue; Evason, Kimberley J.; Asahina, Kinji; Stainier, Didier Y.R.

    2013-01-01

    Hepatic stellate cells are liver-specific mesenchymal cells that play vital roles in liver physiology and fibrogenesis. They are located in the space of Disse and maintain close interactions with sinusoidal endothelial cells and hepatic epithelial cells. It is becoming increasingly clear that hepatic stellate cells have a profound impact on the differentiation, proliferation, and morphogenesis of other hepatic cell types during liver development and regeneration. In this Review, we summarize and evaluate the recent advances in our understanding of the formation and characteristics of hepatic stellate cells, as well as their function in liver development, regeneration, and cancer. We also discuss how improved knowledge of these processes offers new perspectives for the treatment of patients with liver diseases. PMID:23635788

  10. Cell wall-associated enzymes in fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rast, Dora M; Baumgartner, Daniel; Mayer, Christoph; Hollenstein, G O

    2003-09-01

    This review compiles and discusses previous reports on the identity of wall-associated enzymes (WAEs) in fungi and addresses critically the widely different terminologies used in the literature to specify the type of bonding of WAEs to other entities of the cell wall compartment, the extracellular matrix (ECM). A facile and rapid fractionation protocol for catalytically active WAEs is presented, which uses crude cell walls as the experimental material, a variety of test enzymes (including representatives of polysaccharide synthases and hydrolases, phosphatases, gamma-glutamyltransferases, pyridine-nucleotide dehydrogenases and phenol-oxidising enzymes) and a combination of simple hydrophilic and hydrophobic extractants. The protocol provides four fully operationally defined classes of WAEs, with constituent members of each class displaying the same basic type of physicochemical interaction with binding partners in situ. The routine application of the protocol to different species and cell types could yield easily accessible data useful for building-up a general objective information retrieval system of WAEs, suitable as an heuristic basis both for the unravelling of the role and for the biotechnological potentialities of WAEs. A detailed account is given of the function played in the ECM by WAEs in the metabolism of chitin (chitin synthase, chitinase and beta-N-acetylhexosaminidase) and of phenols (tyrosinase).

  11. [Regeneration of ciliated cells in the internal ear].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefèbvre, P

    2002-01-01

    Hair cells are the mechanotranducer transforming the sound into a bioelectrical signal. Hair cell and supporting cell productions are completed during early embryonic development of the mammalian cochlea. In mammalian, after an injury, no hair cell replacement is observed, as opposed to birds, where regenerative mechanisms produce new sensory cells and restore the auditory function. However, a production of hair cells occurs in the mammalian sensory epithelium. Progenitor cells, isolated from newborn rats, proliferate and differentiate in hair cells and supporting cells. Supernumerary hair cells also arise in the cultured organ of Corti. This model is used to investigate the role of cell cycle regulator molecules and cell-cell interaction. The persistence of sensory cell progenitors in adult mammalian organ of Corti and the understanding of the mechanisms leading to the production of hair cells, in the developing cochlea, open the prospect of hair cell regeneration in the mature inner ear.

  12. Association Mapping of Cell Wall Synthesis Regulatory Genes and Cell Wall Quality in Switchgrass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartley, Laura [Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States). Dept. of Microbiology and Plant Biology; Wu, Y. [Oklahoma State Univ., Stillwater, OK (United States); Zhu, L. [Oklahoma State Univ., Stillwater, OK (United States); Brummer, E. C. [Noble Foundation, Ardmore, OK (United States); Saha, M. [Noble Foundation, Ardmore, OK (United States)

    2016-05-31

    Inefficient conversion of biomass to biofuels is one of the main barriers for biofuel production from such materials. Approximately half of polysaccharides in biomass remain unused by typical biochemical conversion methods. Conversion efficiency is influenced by the composition and structure of cell walls of biomass. Grasses such as wheat, maize, and rice, as well as dedicated perennial bioenergy crops, like switchgrass, make up ~55% of biomass that can be produced in the United States. Grass cell walls have a different composition and patterning compared with dicotyledonous plants, including the well-studied model plant, Arabidopsis. This project identified genetic determinants of cell wall composition in grasses using both naturally occurring genetic variation of switchgrass and gene network reconstruction and functional assays in rice. In addition, the project linked functional data in rice and other species to switchgrass improvement efforts through curation of the most abundant class of regulators in the switchgrass genome. Characterizing natural diversity of switchgrass for variation in cell wall composition and properties, also known as quality, provides an unbiased avenue for identifying biologically viable diversity in switchgrass cell walls. To characterizing natural diversity, this project generated cell wall composition and enzymatic deconstruction data for ~450 genotypes of the Switchgrass Southern Association Collection (SSAC), a diverse collection composed of 36 switchgrass accessions from the southern U.S. distribution of switchgrass. Comparing these data with other measures of cell wall quality for the same samples demonstrated the complementary nature of the diverse characterization platforms now being used for biomass characterization. Association of the composition data with ~3.2K single nucleotide variant markers identified six significant single nucleotide variant markers co-associated with digestibility and another compositional trait. These

  13. Inexhaustible hair-cell regeneration in young and aged zebrafish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filipe Pinto-Teixeira

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Animals have evolved two general strategies to counter injury and maintain physiological function. The most prevalent is protection by isolating vital organs into body cavities. However, protection is not optimal for sensory systems because their external components need to be exposed to the environment to fulfill their receptive function. Thus, a common strategy to maintain sensory abilities against persistent environmental insult involves repair and regeneration. However, whether age or frequent injuries affect the regenerative capacity of sensory organs remains unknown. We have found that neuromasts of the zebrafish lateral line regenerate mechanosensory hair cells after recurrent severe injuries and in adulthood. Moreover, neuromasts can reverse transient imbalances of Notch signaling that result in defective organ proportions during repair. Our results reveal inextinguishable hair-cell regeneration in the lateral line, and suggest that the neuromast epithelium is formed by plastic territories that are maintained by continuous intercellular communication.

  14. Tools to Understand Structural Property Relationships for Wood Cell Walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph E. Jakes; Daniel J. Yelle; Charles R. Frihart

    2011-01-01

    Understanding structure-property relationships for wood cell walls has been hindered by the complex polymeric structures comprising these cell walls and the difficulty in assessing meaningful mechanical property measurements of individual cell walls. To help overcome these hindrances, we have developed two experimental methods: 1) two-dimensional solution state nuclear...

  15. Stem cell plasticity enables hair regeneration following Lgr5+ cell loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoeck, Joerg D; Biehs, Brian; Kurtova, Antonina V; Kljavin, Noelyn M; de Sousa E Melo, Felipe; Alicke, Bruno; Koeppen, Hartmut; Modrusan, Zora; Piskol, Robert; de Sauvage, Frederic J

    2017-06-01

    Under injury conditions, dedicated stem cell populations govern tissue regeneration. However, the molecular mechanisms that induce stem cell regeneration and enable plasticity are poorly understood. Here, we investigate stem cell recovery in the context of the hair follicle to understand how two molecularly distinct stem cell populations are integrated. Utilizing diphtheria-toxin-mediated cell ablation of Lgr5+ (leucine-rich repeat-containing G-protein-coupled receptor 5) stem cells, we show that killing of Lgr5+ cells in mice abrogates hair regeneration but this is reversible. During recovery, CD34+ (CD34 antigen) stem cells activate inflammatory response programs and start dividing. Pharmacological attenuation of inflammation inhibits CD34+ cell proliferation. Subsequently, the Wnt pathway controls the recovery of Lgr5+ cells and inhibition of Wnt signalling prevents Lgr5+ cell and hair germ recovery. Thus, our study uncovers a compensatory relationship between two stem cell populations and the underlying molecular mechanisms that enable hair follicle regeneration.

  16. Human Satellite Cell Transplantation and Regeneration from Diverse Skeletal Muscles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoti Xu

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Identification of human satellite cells that fulfill muscle stem cell criteria is an unmet need in regenerative medicine. This hurdle limits understanding how closely muscle stem cell properties are conserved among mice and humans and hampers translational efforts in muscle regeneration. Here, we report that PAX7 satellite cells exist at a consistent frequency of 2–4 cells/mm of fiber in muscles of the human trunk, limbs, and head. Xenotransplantation into mice of 50–70 fiber-associated, or 1,000–5,000 FACS-enriched CD56+/CD29+ human satellite cells led to stable engraftment and formation of human-derived myofibers. Human cells with characteristic PAX7, CD56, and CD29 expression patterns populated the satellite cell niche beneath the basal lamina on the periphery of regenerated fibers. After additional injury, transplanted satellite cells robustly regenerated to form hundreds of human-derived fibers. Together, these findings conclusively delineate a source of bona-fide endogenous human muscle stem cells that will aid development of clinical applications.

  17. Anatomically shaped tooth and periodontal regeneration by cell homing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, K; Lee, C H; Kim, B K; Mao, J J

    2010-08-01

    Tooth regeneration by cell delivery encounters translational hurdles. We hypothesized that anatomically correct teeth can regenerate in scaffolds without cell transplantation. Novel, anatomically shaped human molar scaffolds and rat incisor scaffolds were fabricated by 3D bioprinting from a hybrid of poly-epsilon-caprolactone and hydroxyapatite with 200-microm-diameter interconnecting microchannels. In each of 22 rats, an incisor scaffold was implanted orthotopically following mandibular incisor extraction, whereas a human molar scaffold was implanted ectopically into the dorsum. Stromal-derived factor-1 (SDF1) and bone morphogenetic protein-7 (BMP7) were delivered in scaffold microchannels. After 9 weeks, a putative periodontal ligament and new bone regenerated at the interface of rat incisor scaffold with native alveolar bone. SDF1 and BMP7 delivery not only recruited significantly more endogenous cells, but also elaborated greater angiogenesis than growth-factor-free control scaffolds. Regeneration of tooth-like structures and periodontal integration by cell homing provide an alternative to cell delivery, and may accelerate clinical applications.

  18. An integrated view of asteroid regeneration: tissues, cells and molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Khadra, Yousra; Sugni, Michela; Ferrario, Cinzia; Bonasoro, Francesco; Varela Coelho, Ana; Martinez, Pedro; Candia Carnevali, Maria Daniela

    2017-10-01

    The potential for repairing and replacing cells, tissues, organs and body parts is considered a primitive attribute of life shared by all the organisms, even though it may be expressed to a different extent and which is essential for the survival of both individual and whole species. The ability to regenerate is particularly evident and widespread within invertebrates. In spite of the wide availability of experimental models, regeneration has been comprehensively explored in only a few animal systems (i.e., hydrozoans, planarians, urodeles) leaving many other animal groups unexplored. The regenerative potential finds its maximum expression in echinoderms. Among echinoderm classes, asteroids offer an impressive range of experimental models in which to study arm regeneration at different levels. Many studies have been recently carried out in order to understand the regenerative mechanisms in asteroids and the overall morphological processes have been well documented in different starfish species, such as Asterias rubens, Leptasterias hexactis and Echinaster sepositus. In contrast, very little is known about the molecular mechanisms that control regeneration development and patterning in these models. The origin and the fate of cells involved in the regenerative process remain a matter of debate and clear insights will require the use of complementary molecular and proteomic approaches to study this problem. Here, we review the current knowledge regarding the cellular, proteomic and molecular aspects of asteroid regeneration.

  19. Plant cell wall proteomics: the leadership of Arabidopsis thaliana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cécile eALBENNE

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Plant cell wall proteins (CWPs progressively emerged as crucial components of cell walls although present in minor amounts. Cell wall polysaccharides such as pectins, hemicelluloses and cellulose represent more than 90% of primary cell wall mass, whereas hemicelluloses, cellulose and lignins are the main components of lignified secondary walls. All these polymers provide mechanical properties to cell walls, participate in cell shape and prevent water loss in aerial organs. However, cells walls need to be modified and customized during plant development and in response to environmental cues, thus contributing to plant adaptation. CWPs play essential roles in all these physiological processes and particularly in the dynamics of cell walls, which requires organization and rearrangements of polysaccharides as well as cell-to-cell communication. In the last ten years, plant cell wall proteomics has greatly contributed to a wider knowledge of CWPs. This update will deal with (i a survey of plant cell wall proteomics studies with a focus on Arabidopsis thaliana; (ii the main protein families identified and the still missing peptides; (iii the persistent issue of the non-canonical CWPs; (iv the present challenges to overcome technological bottlenecks; and (v the perspectives beyond cell wall proteomics to understand CWP functions.

  20. Designing the stem cell microenvironment for guided connective tissue regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogdanowicz, Danielle R; Lu, Helen H

    2017-12-01

    Adult mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are an attractive cell source for regenerative medicine because of their ability to self-renew and their capacity for multilineage differentiation and tissue regeneration. For connective tissues, such as ligaments or tendons, MSCs are vital to the modulation of the inflammatory response following acute injury while also interacting with resident fibroblasts to promote cell proliferation and matrix synthesis. To date, MSC injection for connective tissue repair has yielded mixed results in vivo, likely due to a lack of appropriate environmental cues to effectively control MSC response and promote tissue healing instead of scar formation. In healthy tissues, stem cells reside within a complex microenvironment comprising cellular, structural, and signaling cues that collectively maintain stemness and modulate tissue homeostasis. Changes to the microenvironment following injury regulate stem cell differentiation, trophic signaling, and tissue healing. Here, we focus on models of the stem cell microenvironment that are used to elucidate the mechanisms of stem cell regulation and inspire functional approaches to tissue regeneration. Recent studies in this frontier area are highlighted, focusing on how microenvironmental cues modulate MSC response following connective tissue injury and, more importantly, how this unique cell environment can be programmed for stem cell-guided tissue regeneration. © 2017 New York Academy of Sciences.

  1. Regeneration of three layers vascular wall by using BMP2-treated MSC involving HIF-1α and Id1 expressions through JAK/STAT pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belmokhtar, Karim; Bourguignon, Thierry; Worou, Morel E; Khamis, Georges; Bonnet, Pierre; Domenech, Jorge; Eder, Véronique

    2011-11-01

    Engineering living, multilayered blood vessels to form in vivo arteries is a promising alternative to peripheral artery bypass using acellular grafts restricted by thrombosis and occlusion at long term. Bone Morphogenetic Protein 2 (BMP2) is a growth factor determining in the early vascular embryonic development. The aim of the present study was evaluate the collaborative effect of recombinant human--BMP2 and Bone marrow--Mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs) seeded on vascular patch to regenerate a vascular arterial wall in a rat model. BM-MSCs expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) seeded on vascular patch were cultured in presence of recombinant human-BMP2 [100 ng/mL] during 1 week before their implantation on the abdominal aorta of Wistar rats. We observed after 2 weeks under physiological arterial flow a regeneration of a three layers adult-like arterial wall with a middle layer expressing smooth muscle proteins and a border layer expressing endothelial marker. In vitro study, using Matrigel assay and co-culture of BM-MSCs with endothelial cells demonstrated that rh-BMP2 promoted tube-like formation even at long term (90 days) allowing the organization of thick rails. We demonstrated using inhibitors and siRNAs that rh-BMP2 enhanced the expression of HIF-1α and Id1 through, at least in part, the stimulation of JAK2/STAT3/STAT5 signaling pathways. Rh-BMP2 by mimicking embryological conditions allowed vascular BM-MSCs differentiation.

  2. In vitro plant regeneration from embryogenic cell suspension culture ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-05-02

    May 2, 2008 ... In vitro plant regeneration was achieved from embryogenic cell suspension culture of Astragalus chrysochlorus. When 30-day-old aseptically ... previous study, cytotoxic activities of stem and root ex-. *Corresponding author. E-mail: ... For callus induction, 30-day-old mesocotyl parts of seedlings were used.

  3. Workshop on programming beta cell development, impairment and regeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heller, Scott; Nielsen, Jens Høiriis

    2012-01-01

    Helsingør, the city of Hamlet in Denmark, provided the site for the workshop "Programming Beta Cell Development, Impairment and Regeneration" on October 23-26th, 2011. The same location has held two EASD Islet study group meetings, while the previous three workshops were held in Helsinki, Finland...... investigation. In addition, six parallel workshops on stem cells, epigenetics, autoimmunity, β-cell imaging, β-cell identity, omics in β-cell research and a panel discussion on "to be or not to be a beta cell" were held. Here, we will review some of the newest highlights and still unanswered questions...

  4. Syzygium cumini and the regeneration of insulin positive cells from the pancreatic duct

    OpenAIRE

    Schossler, Deila Rosély C.; Mazzanti, Cinthia Melazzo; Luz, Sônia Cristina Almeida da; Filappi, Andreane; Prestes, Danívia; Silveira, Aron Ferreira da; Cecim, Marcelo

    2004-01-01

    Syzygium cumini is a plant that has been used in popular medicine for the treatment of insulin dependent diabetes mellitus (DMID). This study verified the effect of Syzygium cumini upon the regeneration of insulin producing cells in the pancreatic duct wall. The animals were divided into four groups, control (C), treated control (TC), diabetic control (DC) and treated diabetic (TD). An aqueous extract from Syzygium cumini bark was given by gavage in a daily dose of 1g/kg of body weight. After...

  5. PDLLA honeycomb-like scaffolds with a high loading of superhydrophilic graphene/multi-walled carbon nanotubes promote osteoblast in vitro functions and guided in vivo bone regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Edmundo; Vasconcellos, Luana Marotta Reis de; Rodrigues, Bruno V M; Dos Santos, Danilo Martins; Campana-Filho, Sergio P; Marciano, Fernanda Roberta; Webster, Thomas J; Lobo, Anderson Oliveira

    2017-04-01

    Herein, we developed honeycomb-like scaffolds by combining poly (d, l-lactic acid) (PDLLA) with a high amount of graphene/multi-walled carbon nanotube oxides (MWCNTO-GO, 50% w/w). From pristine multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) powders, we produced MWCNTO-GO via oxygen plasma etching (OPE), which promoted their exfoliation and oxidation. Initially, we evaluated PDLLA and PDLLA/MWCNTO-GO scaffolds for tensile strength tests, cell adhesion and cell viability (with osteoblast-like MG-63 cells), alkaline phosphatase (ALP, a marker of osteoblast differentiation) activity and mineralized nodule formation. In vivo tests were carried out using PDLLA and PDLLA/MWCNTO-GO scaffolds as fillers for critical defects in the tibia of rats. MWCNTO-GO loading was responsible for decreasing the tensile strength and elongation-at-break of PDLLA scaffolds, although the high mechanical performance observed (~600MPa) assures their application in bone tissue regeneration. In vitro results showed that the scaffolds were not cytotoxic and allowed for osteoblast-like cell interactions and the formation of mineralized matrix nodules. Furthermore, MG-63 cells grown on PDLLA/MWCNTO-GO significantly enhanced osteoblast ALP activity compared to controls (cells alone), while the PDLLA group showed similar ALP activity when compared to controls and PDLLA/MWCNTO-GO. Most impressively, in vivo tests suggested that compared to PDLLA scaffolds, PDLLA/MWCNTO-GO had a superior influence on bone cell activity, promoting greater new bone formation. In summary, the results of this study highlighted that this novel scaffold (MWCNTO-GO, 50% w/w) is a promising alternative for bone tissue regeneration and, thus, should be further studied. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Stem/Progenitor cells in vascular regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li; Xu, Qingbo

    2014-06-01

    A series of studies has been presented in the search for proof of circulating and resident vascular progenitor cells, which can differentiate into endothelial and smooth muscle cells and pericytes in animal and human studies. In terms of pluripotent stem cells, including embryonic stem cells, iPS, and partial-iPS cells, they display a great potential for vascular lineage differentiation. Development of stem cell therapy for treatment of vascular and ischemic diseases remains a major challenging research field. At the present, there is a clear expansion of research into mechanisms of stem cell differentiation into vascular lineages that are tested in animal models. Although there are several clinical trials ongoing that primarily focus on determining the benefits of stem cell transplantation in ischemic heart or peripheral ischemic tissues, intensive investigation for translational aspects of stem cell therapy would be needed. It is a hope that stem cell therapy for vascular diseases could be developed for clinic application in the future.

  7. Stem cells in tooth tissue regeneration--challenges and limitations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inanç, Bülend; Elçin, Y Murat

    2011-09-01

    The accelerated pace of research in the stem cell field in recent decades and the accumulated body of knowledge has spurred the interest in potential clinical applications of stem cells in all branches of medicine including regenerative dentistry. In humans, embryonic and adult stem cells are two major groups of cells that can serve as a donor source in tissue engineering strategies based on ex-vivo cellular expansion. It has been shown that adult stem cell populations are present in all examined living tissues of the organism, thus being a crucial source of tissue homeostasis and regeneration, and offering a target population for in situ stimulation of extensive tissue regeneration. Experimental findings indicate that in the complex structure of the tooth organ, both periodontal and endodontic tissues harbour adult stem cells with characteristics peculiar to early stages of cellular differentiation. Myriad of strategies incorporating both embryonic and adult stem cells for the regeneration of a particular tooth structure or the whole teeth were proposed; however their successful application to solve real problems encountered in the clinical practice of dentistry remains an elusive and challenging objective.

  8. Concise Review: Regeneration in Mammalian Cochlea Hair Cells: Help from Supporting Cells Transdifferentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, Bénédicte; Malgrange, Brigitte

    2017-03-01

    It is commonly assumed that mammalian cochlear cells do not regenerate. Therefore, if hair cells are lost following an injury, no recovery could occur. However, during the first postnatal week, mice harbor some progenitor cells that retain the ability to give rise to new hair cells. These progenitor cells are in fact supporting cells. Upon hair cells loss, those cells are able to generate new hair cells both by direct transdifferentiation or following cell cycle re-entry and differentiation. However, this property of supporting cells is progressively lost after birth. Here, we review the molecular mechanisms that are involved in mammalian hair cell development and regeneration. Manipulating pathways used during development constitute good candidates for inducing hair cell regeneration after injury. Despite these promising studies, there is still no evidence for a recovery following hair cells loss in adult mammals. Stem Cells 2017;35:551-556. © 2017 AlphaMed Press.

  9. A Miniature Swine Model for Stem Cell-Based De Novo Regeneration of Dental Pulp and Dentin-Like Tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiaofei; Liu, Jie; Yu, Zongdong; Chen, Chao-An; Aksel, Hacer; Azim, Adham A; Huang, George T-J

    2018-01-03

    The goal of this study was to establish mini-swine as a large animal model for stem cell-based pulp regeneration studies. Swine dental pulp stem cells (sDPSCs) were isolated from mini-swine and characterized in vitro. For in vivo studies, we first employed both ectopic and semi-orthotopic study models using severe combined immunodeficiency mice. One is hydroxyapatite-tricalcium phosphate (HA/TCP) model for pulp-dentin complex formation, and the other is tooth fragment model for complete pulp regeneration with new dentin depositing along the canal walls. We found that sDPSCs are similar to their human counterparts exhibiting mesenchymal stem cell characteristics with ability to form colony forming unit-fibroblastic and odontogenic differentiation potential. sDPSCs formed pulp-dentin complex in the HA/TCP model and showed pulp regeneration capacity in the tooth fragment model. We then tested orthotopic pulp regeneration on mini-swine including the use of multi-rooted teeth. Using autologous sDPSCs carried by hydrogel and transplanted into the mini-swine root canal space, we observed regeneration of vascularized pulp-like tissue with a layer of newly deposited dentin-like (rD) tissue or osteodentin along the canal walls. In some cases, dentin bridge-like structure was observed. Immunohistochemical analysis detected the expression of nestin, dentin sialophosphoprotein, dentin matrix protein 1, and bone sialoprotein in odontoblast-like cells lining against the produced rD. We also tested the use of allogeneic sDPSCs for the same procedures. Similar findings were observed in allogeneic transplantation. This study is the first to show an establishment of mini-swine as a suitable large animal model utilizing multi-rooted teeth for further cell-based pulp regeneration studies.

  10. (Hydroxyproline-rich glycoproteins of the plant cell wall)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varner, J.E.

    1990-01-01

    We are studying the chemistry and architecture of plant cells walls, the extracellular matrices that taken together shape the plant and provide mechanical support for the plant. Cell walls are dynamic structures that regulate, or are the site of, many physiological processes, in addition to being the cells' first line of defense against invading pathogens. In the past year we have examined the role of the cell wall enzyme ascorbic acid oxidase as related to the structure of the wall and its possible interactions with hydroxyproline-rich glycoproteins of the wall.

  11. Challenges of stem cell-based pulp and dentin regeneration: a clinical perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, George T-J; Al-Habib, Mey; Gauthier, Philippe

    2013-03-01

    There are two types of approaches to regenerate tissues: cell-based and cell-free. The former approach is to introduce exogenous cells into the host to regenerate tissues, and the latter is to use materials other than cells in an attempt to regenerate tissues. There has been a significant advancement in stem cell-based pulp and dentin regeneration research in the past few years. Studies in small and large animals have demonstrated that pulp/dentin-like tissues can be regenerated partially or completely in the root canal space with apical openings of 0.7-3.0 mm using dental pulp stem cells, including stem cells from apical papilla (SCAP) and subpopulations of pulp stem cells. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMMSCs) and adipose tissue-derived MSCs (ADMSCs) have also been shown to regenerate pulp-like tissue. In contrast, the cell-free approach has not produced convincing evidence on pulp regeneration. However, one crucial concept has not been considered nor defined in the field of pulp/dentin regeneration and that is the critical size defect of dentin and pulp. Without such consideration and definition, it is difficult to predict or anticipate the extent of cell-free pulp regeneration that would occur. By reasoning, cell-free therapy is unlikely to regenerate an organ/tissue after total loss. Similarly, after a total loss of pulp, it is unlikely to regenerate without using exogenously introduced cells. A cell homing approach may provide a limited amount of tissue regeneration. Although stem cell-based pulp/dentin regeneration has shown great promise, clinical trials are difficult to launch at present. This article will address several issues that challenge and hinder the clinical applications of pulp/dentin regeneration which need to be overcome before stem cell-based pulp/dentin regeneration can occur in the clinic.

  12. Grass Cell Walls: A Story of Cross-Linking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatfield, Ronald D; Rancour, David M; Marita, Jane M

    2016-01-01

    Cell wall matrices are complex composites mainly of polysaccharides, phenolics (monomers and polymers), and protein. We are beginning to understand the synthesis of these major wall components individually, but still have a poor understanding of how cell walls are assembled into complex matrices. Valuable insight has been gained by examining intact components to understand the individual elements that make up plant cell walls. Grasses are a prominent group within the plant kingdom, not only for their important roles in global agriculture, but also for the complexity of their cell walls. Ferulate incorporation into grass cell wall matrices (C3 and C4 types) leads to a cross-linked matrix that plays a prominent role in the structure and utilization of grass biomass compared to dicot species. Incorporation of p-coumarates as part of the lignin structure also adds to the complexity of grass cell walls. Feruoylation results in a wall with individual hemicellulosic polysaccharides (arabinoxylans) covalently linked to each other and to lignin. Evidence strongly suggests that ferulates not only cross-link arabinoxylans, but may be important factors in lignification of the cell wall. Therefore, the distribution of ferulates on arabinoxylans could provide a means of structuring regions of the matrix with the incorporation of lignin and have a significant impact upon localized cell wall organization. The role of other phenolics in cell wall formation such as p-coumarates (which can have concentrations higher than ferulates) remains unknown. It is possible that p-coumarates assist in the formation of lignin, especially syringyl rich lignin. The uniqueness of the grass cell wall compared to dicot sepcies may not be so much in the gross composition of the wall, but how the distinctive individual components are organized into a functional wall matrix. These features are discussed and working models are provided to illustrate how changing the organization of feruoylation and p

  13. MECHANISM OF ACTION OF ANTIBIOTICS WHICH INHIBIT SYNTHESIS OF BACTERIAL CELL WALL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indira Mujezinović

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial cell possess a cell wall, which is a main difference from mammalian cells. Its basic function is to provide the strength of bacteria, keeps its shape and provides an unusually high internal osmotic pressure. Synthesis of (construction of bacterial cell wall occurs in at least three phases. All of these three phases can be influence by a variety of antibiotics in way to inhibit its synthesis. The most important drugs that act in this manner are ß-lactam antibiotics (penicillins, cephalosporins, cephamycins and other ß-lactams. They interfere with the synthesis of the bacterial cell wall peptidoglycan. After attachment to penicillin binding proteins (PBP on bacteria, they inhibit the transpeptidation enzyme that cross-links the peptide chain attached to the backbone of the peptidoglycan. The final bactericidal event is the inactivation of an inhibitor of autolytic enzymes in the cell wall, wich leads to lysis of the bacteria. Vancomycin inhibits the release of the building block unit from the carrier, thus preventing its addition to the growing end of the peptidoglycan. Cycloserine, which is a structural analogue of D-alanine, prevents the addition of the two terminal alanine residue to the initial tripeptide side-chain on N-acetylmuramic acid by competitive inhibition. Bacitracin interferes with the regeneration of the lipid carrier by blocking its dephosphorylation. Key words: bacterial cell wall, paptidoglycan, antibiotics, ß-lactams

  14. Enzymes and other agents that enhance cell wall extensibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosgrove, D. J.

    1999-01-01

    Polysaccharides and proteins are secreted to the inner surface of the growing cell wall, where they assemble into a network that is mechanically strong, yet remains extensible until the cells cease growth. This review focuses on the agents that directly or indirectly enhance the extensibility properties of growing walls. The properties of expansins, endoglucanases, and xyloglucan transglycosylases are reviewed and their postulated roles in modulating wall extensibility are evaluated. A summary model for wall extension is presented, in which expansin is a primary agent of wall extension, whereas endoglucanases, xyloglucan endotransglycosylase, and other enzymes that alter wall structure act secondarily to modulate expansin action.

  15. Evaluation of a platelet lysate bilayered system for periodontal regeneration in a rat intrabony three-wall periodontal defect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babo, Pedro S; Cai, Xinjie; Plachokova, Adelina S; Reis, Rui L; Jansen, John; Gomes, Manuela E; Walboomers, X Frank

    2017-08-17

    With currently available therapies, full regeneration of lost periodontal tissues after periodontitis cannot be achieved. In this study, a combined compartmentalized system was tested, composed of (a) a platelet lysate (PL)-based construct, which was placed along the root aiming to regenerate the root cementum and periodontal ligament, and (b) a calcium phosphate cement composite incorporated with hyaluronic acid microspheres loaded with PL, aiming to promote the regeneration of alveolar bone. This bilayered system was assessed in a 3-wall periodontal defect in Wistar rats. The periodontal healing and the inflammatory response of the materials were scored for a period up to 6 weeks after implantation. Furthermore, histomorphometrical measurements were performed to assess the epithelial downgrowth, the formation of alveolar bone, and the formation of new connective tissue attachment. Our data showed that the stabilization of platelet-origin proteins on the root surface increased the overall periodontal healing score and restricted the formation of long epithelial junctions. Nevertheless, the faster degradation of the cement component with incorporated hyaluronic acid microspheres compromised the stability of the system, which hampered the periodontal regeneration. Overall, in this work, we proved the positive therapeutic effect of the immobilization of a PL-based construct over the root surface in a combined compartmentalized system to assist predictable healing of functional periodontium. Therefore, after optimization of the hard tissue analogue, the system should be further elaborated in (pre)clinical validation studies. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Anthocyanins influence tannin-cell wall interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bautista-Ortín, Ana Belén; Martínez-Hernández, Alejandro; Ruiz-García, Yolanda; Gil-Muñoz, Rocío; Gómez-Plaza, Encarna

    2016-09-01

    The rate of tannin extraction was studied in a vinification of red grapes and the results compared with another vinification made with white grapes fermented as for typical red wine, in the presence of skins and seeds. Even though the grapes presented a quite similar skin and seed tannin content, the differences in tannin concentration between both vinifications was very large, despite the fact that the only apparent difference between the phenolic composition of both wines was the anthocyanin content. This suggests that anthocyanins play an important role in tannin extractability, perhaps because they affect the extent of the tannin-cell wall interaction, a factor that largely controls the resulting quantity of tannins in wines. To confirm this observation, the effect of anthocyanins on the tannin extractability from grape seeds and skin and on the interaction between tannins and grape cell walls suspended in model solutions were studied. The results indicated that anthocyanins favored skin and seed tannin extraction and that there is a competition for the adsorption sites between anthocyanins and tannins that increases the tannin content when anthocyanins are present. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Stem cells in the face: tooth regeneration and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Jeremy J; Robey, Pamela G; Prockop, Darwin J

    2012-09-07

    The face distinguishes one person from another. Postnatal orofacial tissues harbor rare cells that exhibit stem cell properties. Despite unmet clinical needs for reconstruction of tissues lost in congenital anomalies, infections, trauma, or tumor resection, how orofacial stem/progenitor cells contribute to tissue development, pathogenesis, and regeneration is largely obscure. This perspective article critically analyzes the current status of our understanding of orofacial stem/progenitor cells, identifies gaps in our knowledge, and highlights pathways for the development of regenerative therapies. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Stem Cell Therapy in Wound Healing and Tissue Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Meiliana

    2016-08-01

    a novel approach to many diseases. SUMMARY: Wound healing therapies continue to rapidly evolve, with advances in basic science and engineering research heralding the development of new therapies, as well as ways to modify existing treatments. Stem cell-based therapy is one of the most promising therapeutic concepts for wound healing. Advances in stem cell biology have enabled researchers and clinicians alike with access to cells capable of actively modulating the healing response.  KEYWORDS: wound healing, tissue regeneration, stem cells therapy

  19. Explant-dependent receptivity to isolation and a cell-wall resynthesis in protoplast culture of recalcitrant yellow lupin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alina WISZNIEWSKA

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Cell-wall resynthesis was studied in protoplast culture of yellow lupin (Lupinus luteus L.. We optimized protoplast isolation and found that explants excised from young seedling were more suitable sources of protoplasts, in contrast to callus tissue. Incubation in 2% cellulase R-10, 1% pectinase and 0.5% macerozyme solution for 3h effectively released protoplasts from majority of tested explants. Furthermore, we determined the optimal developmental age of explants which was 4, 21, 25 and 35 days for hypocotyls, cotyledons, in-vitro leaf mesophyll and ex-vitro leaf mesophyll, respectively. Explant type, culture medium and genotype influenced both a rate and a pattern of the cell wall regeneration. After 10 days of culture, the number of regenerated cells reached 44%-59% in hypocotyl, 84%-91% in cotyledonary, and 31%-42% in mesophyll protoplasts. Our results show that the earlier wall regeneration begins, the wall surface will be more incomplete. We suggest that unbalanced and inefficient cell-wall resynthesis likely contributes to recalcitrance of yellow lupin to manipulations in protoplast technology.

  20. Stem cell sources for cardiac regeneration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roccio, M.; Goumans, M. J.; Sluijter, J. P. G.; Doevendans, P. A.

    Cell-based cardiac repair has the ambitious aim to replace the malfunctioning cardiac muscle developed after myocardial infarction, with new contractile cardiomyocytes and vessels. Different stem cell populations have been intensively studied in the last decade as a potential source of new

  1. Cell proliferation is necessary for the regeneration of oral structures in the anthozoan cnidarian Nematostella vectensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Passamaneck Yale J

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The contribution of cell proliferation to regeneration varies greatly between different metazoan models. Planarians rely on pluripotent neoblasts and amphibian limb regeneration depends upon formation of a proliferative blastema, while regeneration in Hydra can occur in the absence of cell proliferation. Recently, the cnidarian Nematostella vectensis has shown potential as a model for studies of regeneration because of the ability to conduct comparative studies of patterning during embryonic development, asexual reproduction, and regeneration. The present study investigates the pattern of cell proliferation during the regeneration of oral structures and the role of cell proliferation in this process. Results In intact polyps, cell proliferation is observed in both ectodermal and endodermal tissues throughout the entire oral-aboral axis, including in the tentacles and physa. Following bisection, there is initially little change in proliferation at the wound site of the aboral fragment, however, beginning 18 to 24 hours after amputation there is a dramatic increase in cell proliferation at the wound site in the aboral fragment. This elevated level of proliferation is maintained throughout the course or regeneration of oral structures, including the tentacles, the mouth, and the pharynx. Treatments with the cell proliferation inhibitors hydroxyurea and nocodazole demonstrate that cell proliferation is indispensable for the regeneration of oral structures. Although inhibition of regeneration by nocodazole was generally irreversible, secondary amputation reinitiates cell proliferation and regeneration. Conclusions The study has found that high levels of cell proliferation characterize the regeneration of oral structures in Nematostella, and that this cell proliferation is necessary for the proper progression of regeneration. Thus, while cell proliferation contributes to regeneration of oral structures in both Nematostella and

  2. Materializing Heart Regeneration: Biomimicry of Key Observations in Cell Transplantation Therapies and Natural Cardiac Regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Yen P.; Jongpaiboonkit, Leena

    2016-07-01

    New regenerative paradigms are needed to address the growing global problem of heart failure as existing interventions are unsatisfactory. Outcomes from the current paradigm of cell transplantation have not been stellar but the mechanistic knowledge learned from them is instructive in the development of future paradigms. An emerging biomaterial-based approach incorporating key mechanisms and additional ones scrutinized from the process of natural heart regeneration in zebrafish may become the next evolution in cardiac repair. We highlight, with examples, tested key concepts and pivotal ones that may be integrated into a successful therapy.

  3. Tubulin perturbation leads to unexpected cell wall modifications and affects stomatal behaviour in Populus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swamy, Prashant S; Hu, Hao; Pattathil, Sivakumar; Maloney, Victoria J; Xiao, Hui; Xue, Liang-Jiao; Chung, Jeng-Der; Johnson, Virgil E; Zhu, Yingying; Peter, Gary F; Hahn, Michael G; Mansfield, Shawn D; Harding, Scott A; Tsai, Chung-Jui

    2015-10-01

    Cortical microtubules are integral to plant morphogenesis, cell wall synthesis, and stomatal behaviour, presumably by governing cellulose microfibril orientation. Genetic manipulation of tubulins often leads to abnormal plant development, making it difficult to probe additional roles of cortical microtubules in cell wall biogenesis. Here, it is shown that expressing post-translational C-terminal modification mimics of α-tubulin altered cell wall characteristics and guard cell dynamics in transgenic Populus tremula x alba that otherwise appear normal. 35S promoter-driven transgene expression was high in leaves but unusually low in xylem, suggesting high levels of tubulin transgene expression were not tolerated in wood-forming tissues during regeneration of transformants. Cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin contents were unaffected in transgenic wood, but expression of cell wall-modifying enzymes, and extractability of lignin-bound pectin and xylan polysaccharides were increased in developing xylem. The results suggest that pectin and xylan polysaccharides deposited early during cell wall biogenesis are more sensitive to subtle tubulin perturbation than cellulose and matrix polysaccharides deposited later. Tubulin perturbation also affected guard cell behaviour, delaying drought-induced stomatal closure as well as light-induced stomatal opening in leaves. Pectins have been shown to confer cell wall flexibility critical for reversible stomatal movement, and results presented here are consistent with microtubule involvement in this process. Taken together, the data show the value of growth-compatible tubulin perturbations for discerning microtubule functions, and add to the growing body of evidence for microtubule involvement in non-cellulosic polysaccharide assembly during cell wall biogenesis. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  4. Plant cell wall extensibility: connecting plant cell growth with cell wall structure, mechanics, and the action of wall-modifying enzymes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cosgrove, Daniel J.

    2015-11-25

    The advent of user-friendly instruments for measuring force/deflection curves of plant surfaces at high spatial resolution has resulted in a recent outpouring of reports of the ‘Young's modulus’ of plant cell walls. The stimulus for these mechanical measurements comes from biomechanical models of morphogenesis of meristems and other tissues, as well as single cells, in which cell wall stress feeds back to regulate microtubule organization, auxin transport, cellulose deposition, and future growth directionality. In this article I review the differences between elastic modulus and wall extensibility in the context of cell growth. Some of the inherent complexities, assumptions, and potential pitfalls in the interpretation of indentation force/deflection curves are discussed. Reported values of elastic moduli from surface indentation measurements appear to be 10- to >1000-fold smaller than realistic tensile elastic moduli in the plane of plant cell walls. Potential reasons for this disparity are discussed, but further work is needed to make sense of the huge range in reported values. The significance of wall stress relaxation for growth is reviewed and connected to recent advances and remaining enigmas in our concepts of how cellulose, hemicellulose, and pectins are assembled to make an extensible cell wall. A comparison of the loosening action of α-expansin and Cel12A endoglucanase is used to illustrate two different ways in which cell walls may be made more extensible and the divergent effects on wall mechanics.

  5. Two endogenous proteins that induce cell wall extension in plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    McQueen-Mason, S.; Durachko, D. M.; Cosgrove, D. J.

    1992-01-01

    Plant cell enlargement is regulated by wall relaxation and yielding, which is thought to be catalyzed by elusive "wall-loosening" enzymes. By employing a reconstitution approach, we found that a crude protein extract from the cell walls of growing cucumber seedlings possessed the ability to induce the extension of isolated cell walls. This activity was restricted to the growing region of the stem and could induce the extension of isolated cell walls from various dicot stems and the leaves of amaryllidaceous monocots, but was less effective on grass coleoptile walls. Endogenous and reconstituted wall extension activities showed similar sensitivities to pH, metal ions, thiol reducing agents, proteases, and boiling in methanol or water. Sequential HPLC fractionation of the active wall extract revealed two proteins with molecular masses of 29 and 30 kD associated with the activity. Each protein, by itself, could induce wall extension without detectable hydrolytic breakdown of the wall. These proteins appear to mediate "acid growth" responses of isolated walls and may catalyze plant cell wall extension by a novel biochemical mechanism.

  6. Müller glia cell reprogramming and retina regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Müller glia are the major glial component of the retina. They are one of the last retinal cell types to be born during development and they function to maintain retinal homeostasis and integrity. In mammals, Müller glia respond to retinal injury in a variety of ways that can be either protective or detrimental to retinal function. Although under special circumstances these cells can be coaxed to proliferate and generate neurons, these responses are meager and insufficient for repairing a damaged retina. By contrast, in teleost fish (such as zebrafish) the response of Müller glia to retinal injury involves a reprogramming event that imparts retinal stem cell characteristics and allows them to produce a proliferating population of progenitors that can regenerate all major retinal cell types and restore vision. Recent studies have revealed a number of important mechanisms underlying Müller glia reprogramming and retina regeneration in fish that may lead to new strategies for stimulating retina regeneration in mammals. PMID:24894585

  7. Advances and Prospects in Stem Cells for Cartilage Regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mingjie; Yuan, Zhiguo; Ma, Ning; Hao, Chunxiang; Guo, Weimin; Zou, Gengyi; Zhang, Yu; Chen, Mingxue; Gao, Shuang; Wang, Aiyuan; Wang, Yu; Sui, Xiang; Xu, Wenjing; Lu, Shibi

    2017-01-01

    The histological features of cartilage call attention to the fact that cartilage has a little capacity to repair itself owing to the lack of a blood supply, nerves, or lymphangion. Stem cells have emerged as a promising option in the field of cartilage tissue engineering and regenerative medicine and could lead to cartilage repair. Much research has examined cartilage regeneration utilizing stem cells. However, both the potential and the limitations of this procedure remain controversial. This review presents a summary of emerging trends with regard to using stem cells in cartilage tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. In particular, it focuses on the characterization of cartilage stem cells, the chondrogenic differentiation of stem cells, and the various strategies and approaches involving stem cells that have been used in cartilage repair and clinical studies. Based on the research into chondrocyte and stem cell technologies, this review discusses the damage and repair of cartilage and the clinical application of stem cells, with a view to increasing our systematic understanding of the application of stem cells in cartilage regeneration; additionally, several advanced strategies for cartilage repair are discussed. PMID:28246531

  8. Advances and Prospects in Stem Cells for Cartilage Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingjie Wang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The histological features of cartilage call attention to the fact that cartilage has a little capacity to repair itself owing to the lack of a blood supply, nerves, or lymphangion. Stem cells have emerged as a promising option in the field of cartilage tissue engineering and regenerative medicine and could lead to cartilage repair. Much research has examined cartilage regeneration utilizing stem cells. However, both the potential and the limitations of this procedure remain controversial. This review presents a summary of emerging trends with regard to using stem cells in cartilage tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. In particular, it focuses on the characterization of cartilage stem cells, the chondrogenic differentiation of stem cells, and the various strategies and approaches involving stem cells that have been used in cartilage repair and clinical studies. Based on the research into chondrocyte and stem cell technologies, this review discusses the damage and repair of cartilage and the clinical application of stem cells, with a view to increasing our systematic understanding of the application of stem cells in cartilage regeneration; additionally, several advanced strategies for cartilage repair are discussed.

  9. Accelerated cell divisions drive the outgrowth of the regenerating spinal cord in axolotls

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rost, Fabian; Rodrigo Albors, Aida; Mazurov, Vladimir; Brusch, Lutz; Deutsch, Andreas; Tanaka, Elly M; Chara, Osvaldo

    2016-01-01

    .... Previously, we showed that regenerating stem cells in the axolotl spinal cord revert to a molecular state resembling embryonic neuroepithelial cells and functionally acquire rapid proliferative divisions...

  10. Stem cell-based biological tooth repair and regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volponi, Ana Angelova; Pang, Yvonne; Sharpe, Paul T

    2010-12-01

    Teeth exhibit limited repair in response to damage, and dental pulp stem cells probably provide a source of cells to replace those damaged and to facilitate repair. Stem cells in other parts of the tooth, such as the periodontal ligament and growing roots, play more dynamic roles in tooth function and development. Dental stem cells can be obtained with ease, making them an attractive source of autologous stem cells for use in restoring vital pulp tissue removed because of infection, in regeneration of periodontal ligament lost in periodontal disease, and for generation of complete or partial tooth structures to form biological implants. As dental stem cells share properties with mesenchymal stem cells, there is also considerable interest in their wider potential to treat disorders involving mesenchymal (or indeed non-mesenchymal) cell derivatives, such as in Parkinson's disease. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Signals and Cells Involved in Regulating Liver Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang-I. Kang

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Liver regeneration is a complex phenomenon aimed at maintaining a constant liver mass in the event of injury resulting in loss of hepatic parenchyma. Partial hepatectomy is followed by a series of events involving multiple signaling pathways controlled by mitogenic growth factors (HGF, EGF and their receptors (MET and EGFR. In addition multiple cytokines and other signaling molecules contribute to the orchestration of a signal which drives hepatocytes into DNA synthesis. The other cell types of the liver receive and transmit to hepatocytes complex signals so that, in the end of the regenerative process, complete hepatic tissue is assembled and regeneration is terminated at the proper time and at the right liver size. If hepatocytes fail to participate in this process, the biliary compartment is mobilized to generate populations of progenitor cells which transdifferentiate into hepatocytes and restore liver size.

  12. Mesenchymal stem cells: an alternative for bone regeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Franco-González, Lina María; Restrepo-Múnera, Luz Marina

    2014-01-01

    Mesenchymal Stem Cells (msc) are found in the bone marrow and have the capacity for self-renewal and differentiation in multiple lineages: osteogenic, condrogenic, adipogenic and thenogenic. They also serve as reservoirs involved in homeostasis, maintenance and cellular regeneration. Their application in bone alterations (traumatic defects, inflammatory and degenerative diseases) has led to the development of new osteo/conductive and/or inductive therapies. During the differentiation process ...

  13. Regeneration of Dental-Pulp-like Tissue by Chemotaxis-Induced Cell Homing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jin Y.; Xin, Xuejun; Moioli, Eduardo K.; Chung, Jenny; Lee, Chang Hun; Chen, Mo; Fu, Susan Y.; Koch, Peter D.

    2010-01-01

    Tooth infections or injuries involving dental pulp are treated routinely by root canal therapy. Endodontically treated teeth are devitalized, susceptible to re-infections, fractures, and subsequent tooth loss. Here, we report regeneration of dental-pulp-like tissue by cell homing and without cell transplantation. Upon in vivo implantation of endodontically treated real-size, native human teeth in mouse dorsum for the tested 3 weeks, delivery of basic fibroblast growth factor and/or vascular endothelial growth factor (bFGF and/or VEGF) yielded re-cellularized and revascularized connective tissue that integrated to native dentinal wall in root canals. Further, combined delivery of bFGF, VEGF, or platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) with a basal set of nerve growth factor (NGF) and bone morphogenetic protein-7 (BMP7) generated cellularized and vascularized tissues positive of VEGF antibody staining and apparent neo-dentin formation over the surface of native dentinal wall in some, but not all, endodontically treated teeth. Newly formed dental pulp tissue appeared dense with disconnected cells surrounded by extracellular matrix. Erythrocyte-filled blood vessels were present with endothelial-like cell lining. Reconstructed, multiple microscopic images showed complete fill of dental-pulp-like tissue in the entire root canal from root apex to pulp chamber with tissue integration to dentinal wall upon delivery of bFGF, VEGF, or PDGF with a basal set of NGF and BMP7. Quantitative ELISA showed that combinatory delivery of bFGF, VEGF, or PDGF with basal NGF and BMP7 elaborated von Willerbrand factor, dentin sialoprotein, and NGF. These findings represent the first demonstration of regenerated dental-pulp-like tissue in endodontically treated root canals of real-size, native human teeth. The present chemotaxis-based approach has potent cell homing effects for re-cellularization and revascularization in endodontically treated root canals in vivo, although in an ectopic model

  14. Regeneration of dental-pulp-like tissue by chemotaxis-induced cell homing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jin Y; Xin, Xuejun; Moioli, Eduardo K; Chung, Jenny; Lee, Chang Hun; Chen, Mo; Fu, Susan Y; Koch, Peter D; Mao, Jeremy J

    2010-10-01

    Tooth infections or injuries involving dental pulp are treated routinely by root canal therapy. Endodontically treated teeth are devitalized, susceptible to re-infections, fractures, and subsequent tooth loss. Here, we report regeneration of dental-pulp-like tissue by cell homing and without cell transplantation. Upon in vivo implantation of endodontically treated real-size, native human teeth in mouse dorsum for the tested 3 weeks, delivery of basic fibroblast growth factor and/or vascular endothelial growth factor (bFGF and/or VEGF) yielded re-cellularized and revascularized connective tissue that integrated to native dentinal wall in root canals. Further, combined delivery of bFGF, VEGF, or platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) with a basal set of nerve growth factor (NGF) and bone morphogenetic protein-7 (BMP7) generated cellularized and vascularized tissues positive of VEGF antibody staining and apparent neo-dentin formation over the surface of native dentinal wall in some, but not all, endodontically treated teeth. Newly formed dental pulp tissue appeared dense with disconnected cells surrounded by extracellular matrix. Erythrocyte-filled blood vessels were present with endothelial-like cell lining. Reconstructed, multiple microscopic images showed complete fill of dental-pulp-like tissue in the entire root canal from root apex to pulp chamber with tissue integration to dentinal wall upon delivery of bFGF, VEGF, or PDGF with a basal set of NGF and BMP7. Quantitative ELISA showed that combinatory delivery of bFGF, VEGF, or PDGF with basal NGF and BMP7 elaborated von Willerbrand factor, dentin sialoprotein, and NGF. These findings represent the first demonstration of regenerated dental-pulp-like tissue in endodontically treated root canals of real-size, native human teeth. The present chemotaxis-based approach has potent cell homing effects for re-cellularization and revascularization in endodontically treated root canals in vivo, although in an ectopic model

  15. Mesenchymal Stem Cells for Cartilage Regeneration of TMJ Osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dixin Cui

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Temporomandibular joint osteoarthritis (TMJ OA is a degenerative disease, characterized by progressive cartilage degradation, subchondral bone remodeling, synovitis, and chronic pain. Due to the limited self-healing capacity in condylar cartilage, traditional clinical treatments have limited symptom-modifying and structure-modifying effects to restore impaired cartilage as well as other TMJ tissues. In recent years, stem cell-based therapy has raised much attention as an alternative approach towards tissue repair and regeneration. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs, derived from the bone marrow, synovium, and even umbilical cord, play a role as seed cells for the cartilage regeneration of TMJ OA. MSCs possess multilineage differentiation potential, including chondrogenic differentiation as well as osteogenic differentiation. In addition, the trophic modulations of MSCs exert anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory effects under aberrant conditions. Furthermore, MSCs combined with appropriate scaffolds can form cartilaginous or even osseous compartments to repair damaged tissue and impaired function of TMJ. In this review, we will briefly discuss the pathogenesis of cartilage degeneration in TMJ OA and emphasize the potential sources of MSCs and novel approaches for the cartilage regeneration of TMJ OA, particularly focusing on the MSC-based therapy and tissue engineering.

  16. Cell-to-cell communication in guided bone regeneration: molecular and cellular mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruber, Reinhard; Stadlinger, Bernd; Terheyden, Hendrik

    2017-09-01

    This overview provides insights into the molecular and cellular mechanisms involved in guided bone regeneration, in particular focusing on aspects presented in the 3D movie, Cell-To-Cell Communication in Guided Bone Regeneration. The information presented here is based almost exclusively on genetic mouse models in which single genes can be deleted or overexpressed, even in a specific cell type. This information needs to be extrapolated to humans and related to aspects relevant to graft consolidation under the clinical parameters of guided bone regeneration. The overview follows the ground tenor of the Cell-To-Cell Communication series and focuses on aspects of cell-to-cell communication in bone regeneration and guided bone regeneration. Here, we discuss (1) the role of inflammation during bone regeneration, including (2) the importance of the fibrin matrix, and (3) the pleiotropic functions of macrophages. We highlight (4) the origin of bone-forming osteoblasts and bone-resorbing osteoclasts as well as (5) what causes a progenitor cell to mature into an effector cell. (6) We touch on the complex bone adaptation and maintenance after graft consolidation and (7) how osteocytes control this process. Finally, we speculate on (8) how barrier membranes and the augmentation material can modulate graft consolidation. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. A Cell Wall Proteome and Targeted Cell Wall Analyses Provide Novel Information on Hemicellulose Metabolism in Flax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chabi, Malika; Goulas, Estelle; Leclercq, Celine C; de Waele, Isabelle; Rihouey, Christophe; Cenci, Ugo; Day, Arnaud; Blervacq, Anne-Sophie; Neutelings, Godfrey; Duponchel, Ludovic; Lerouge, Patrice; Hausman, Jean-François; Renaut, Jenny; Hawkins, Simon

    2017-09-01

    Experimentally-generated (nanoLC-MS/MS) proteomic analyses of four different flax organs/tissues (inner-stem, outer-stem, leaves and roots) enriched in proteins from 3 different sub-compartments (soluble-, membrane-, and cell wall-proteins) was combined with publically available data on flax seed and whole-stem proteins to generate a flax protein database containing 2996 nonredundant total proteins. Subsequent multiple analyses (MapMan, CAZy, WallProtDB and expert curation) of this database were then used to identify a flax cell wall proteome consisting of 456 nonredundant proteins localized in the cell wall and/or associated with cell wall biosynthesis, remodeling and other cell wall related processes. Examination of the proteins present in different flax organs/tissues provided a detailed overview of cell wall metabolism and highlighted the importance of hemicellulose and pectin remodeling in stem tissues. Phylogenetic analyses of proteins in the cell wall proteome revealed an important paralogy in the class IIIA xyloglucan endo-transglycosylase/hydrolase (XTH) family associated with xyloglucan endo-hydrolase activity.Immunolocalisation, FT-IR microspectroscopy, and enzymatic fingerprinting indicated that flax fiber primary/S1 cell walls contained xyloglucans with typical substituted side chains as well as glucuronoxylans in much lower quantities. These results suggest a likely central role of xyloglucans and endotransglucosylase/hydrolase activity in flax fiber formation and cell wall remodeling processes. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  18. Fetal stem cells and skeletal muscle regeneration: a therapeutic approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michela ePozzobon

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available More than 40% of the body mass is represented by muscle tissue, which possesses the innate ability to regenerate after damage through the activation of muscle specific stem cell, namely satellite cells. Muscle diseases, in particular chronic degenerative state of skeletal muscle such as dystrophies, lead to a perturbation of the regenerative process, which causes the premature exhaustion of satellite cell reservoir due to continue cycles of degeneration/regeneration. Nowadays, the research is focused on different therapeutic approaches, ranging from gene and cell to pharmacological therapy, but still there is not a definitive cure in particular for genetic muscle disease. Taking this in mind, in this article we will give special consideration to muscle diseases and the use of fetal derived stem cells as new approach for therapy. Cells of fetal origin, from cord blood to placenta and amniotic fluid, can be easily obtained without ethical concern, expanded and differentiated in culture, and possess immunemodulatory properties. The in vivo approach in animal models can be helpful to study the mechanism underneath the operating principle of the stem cell reservoir, namely the niche, which holds great potential to understand the onset of muscle pathologies.

  19. Integrating Biomaterials and Stem Cells for Neural Regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maclean, Francesca L; Rodriguez, Alexandra L; Parish, Clare L; Williams, Richard J; Nisbet, David R

    2016-02-01

    The central nervous system has a limited capacity to regenerate, and thus, traumatic injuries or diseases often have devastating consequences. Therefore, there is a distinct need to develop alternative treatments that can achieve functional recovery without side effects currently observed with some pharmacological treatments. Combining biomaterials with pluripotent stem cells (PSCs), either embryonic or induced, has the potential to revolutionize the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases and traumatic injuries. Biomaterials can mimic the extracellular matrix and present a myriad of relevant biochemical cues through rational design or further functionalization. Biomaterials such as nanofibers and hydrogels, including self-assembling peptide (SAP) hydrogels can provide a superior cell culture environment. When these materials are then combined with PSCs, more accurate drug screening and disease modeling could be developed, and the generation of large number of cells with the appropriate phenotype can be achieved, for subsequent use in vitro. Biomaterials have also been shown to support endogenous cell growth after implantation, and, in particular, hydrogels and SAPs have effectively acted as cell delivery vehicles, increasing cell survival after transplantation. Few studies are yet to fully exploit the combination of PSCs and innovative biomaterials; however, initial studies with neural stem cells, for example, are promising, and, hence, such a combination for use in vitro and in vivo is an exciting new direction for the field of neural regeneration.

  20. Role of Fetal Stem Cells in Maternal Tissue Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang F. Zhong

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Microchimerism refers to the status of harboring cells from another individual at low levels. It is well known that cells traffic bidirectionally between fetus and mother during pregnancy. This situation resembles a naturally occurring long lasting fetal stem cell transplantation. The fetus acts as the donor and the mother acts as the recipient. To study the role of microchimerism in tissue regeneration, we constructed a murine microchimerism model with wild type C57BL/6J female mice carrying progenies which expressed green fl uorescent proteins (GFP. Our data indicated that skin injuries in the female mice during pregnancy increased microchimerism of GFP expressing cells from the GFP transgenic progenies. The GFP positive cells also appeared at the site of spinal cord where injury occurred during pregnancy. Our study suggests that the amount of fetal cells in maternal mice significantly increased if injuries occurred during pregnancy. Fetal stem cells appear to respond to maternal injury signals and may play a role in maternal tissue regeneration during pregnancy.

  1. The cell cycle as a brake for β-cell regeneration from embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Badawy, Ahmed; El-Badri, Nagwa

    2016-01-13

    The generation of insulin-producing β cells from stem cells in vitro provides a promising source of cells for cell transplantation therapy in diabetes. However, insulin-producing cells generated from human stem cells show deficiency in many functional characteristics compared with pancreatic β cells. Recent reports have shown molecular ties between the cell cycle and the differentiation mechanism of embryonic stem (ES) cells, assuming that cell fate decisions are controlled by the cell cycle machinery. Both β cells and ES cells possess unique cell cycle machinery yet with significant contrasts. In this review, we compare the cell cycle control mechanisms in both ES cells and β cells, and highlight the fundamental differences between pluripotent cells of embryonic origin and differentiated β cells. Through critical analysis of the differences of the cell cycle between these two cell types, we propose that the cell cycle of ES cells may act as a brake for β-cell regeneration. Based on these differences, we discuss the potential of modulating the cell cycle of ES cells for the large-scale generation of functionally mature β cells in vitro. Further understanding of the factors that modulate the ES cell cycle will lead to new approaches to enhance the production of functional mature insulin-producing cells, and yield a reliable system to generate bona fide β cells in vitro.

  2. Small molecule probes for plant cell wall polysaccharide imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian eWallace

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Plant cell walls are composed of interlinked polymer networks consisting of cellulose, hemicelluloses, pectins, proteins, and lignin. The ordered deposition of these components is a dynamic process that critically affects the development and differentiation of plant cells. However, our understanding of cell wall synthesis and remodeling, as well as the diverse cell wall architectures that result from these processes, has been limited by a lack of suitable chemical probes that are compatible with live-cell imaging. In this review, we summarize the currently available molecular toolbox of probes for cell wall polysaccharide imaging in plants, with particular emphasis on recent advances in small molecule-based fluorescent probes. We also discuss the potential for further development of small molecule probes for the analysis of cell wall architecture and dynamics.

  3. Application of spontaneously immortalized odontoblast cells in tooth regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arany, Szilvia; Kawagoe, Masami; Sugiyama, Toshihiro

    2009-03-27

    Here, we report on the first attempt to bioengineer tooth using a spontaneously immortalized mesenchymal cell line. To assess the odontogenic potential of this cell line, odontoblast-lineage cells (OLC) were re-associated with competent dental epithelium isolated from E14.5 mice. A novel three-dimensional organ germ culture method was applied to nurture the constructs in vitro. Additionally, recombinants were transplanted under the kidney capsule in host animals for 2 weeks. Transplants developed into tooth tissues in one-third of the cases. OLC-derived GFP-positive cells could be identified in mineralizing tooth germs by immunohistochemistry. OLCs were capable of intercellular and cell-matrix communication, thus they eventually differentiated into functional odontoblasts. In summary, we managed to utilize OLCs for dental mesenchyme substitution in tooth regeneration experiments. Therefore, our spontaneously transformed cell line proved its potential for future complex, tooth developmental and bioengineering studies.

  4. In vitro regeneration of kidney from pluripotent stem cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osafune, Kenji, E-mail: osafu@cira.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Center for iPS Cell Research and Application (CiRA), Kyoto University, 53 Kawahara-cho, Shogoin, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan); PRESTO, Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), 4-1-8 Honcho, Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan); JST Yamanaka iPS Cell Special Project, Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), 4-1-8 Honcho, Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan)

    2010-10-01

    Although renal transplantation has proved a successful treatment for the patients with end-stage renal failure, the therapy is hampered by the problem of serious shortage of donor organs. Regenerative medicine using stem cells, including cell transplantation therapy, needs to be developed to solve the problem. We previously identified the multipotent progenitor cells in the embryonic mouse kidney that can give rise to several kinds of epithelial cells found in adult kidney, such as glomerular podocytes and renal tubular epithelia. Establishing the method to generate the progenitors from human pluripotent stem cells that have the capacity to indefinitely proliferate in vitro is required for the development of kidney regeneration strategy. We review the current status of the research on the differentiation of pluripotent stem cells into renal lineages and describe cues to promote this research field.

  5. Screening and characterization of plant cell walls using carbohydrate microarrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sørensen, Iben; Willats, William G T

    2011-01-01

    Plant cells are surrounded by cell walls built largely from complex carbohydrates. The primary walls of growing plant cells consist of interdependent networks of three polysaccharide classes: cellulose, cross-linking glycans (also known as hemicelluloses), and pectins. Cellulose microfibrils are tethered together by cross-linking glycans, and this assembly forms the major load-bearing component of primary walls, which is infiltrated with pectic polymers. In the secondary walls of woody tissues, pectins are much reduced and walls are reinforced with the phenolic polymer lignin. Plant cell walls are essential for plant life and also have numerous industrial applications, ranging from wood to nutraceuticals. Enhancing our knowledge of cell wall biology and the effective use of cell wall materials is dependent to a large extent on being able to analyse their fine structures. We have developed a suite of techniques based on microarrays probed with monoclonal antibodies with specificity for cell wall components, and here we present practical protocols for this type of analysis.

  6. Autologous Bone Marrow-Derived Cells Regenerate Urethral Sphincters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imamura, Tetsuya; Ishizuka, Osamu; Nishizawa, Osamu

    2012-03-01

    Regenerative medicine based on tissue engineering and/or stem cell therapy techniques has the potential to improve irreversibly damaged tissues. Surgical injury to the lower urinary tract can occur as a result of radical prostatectomy or bladder neck surgery. Regeneration of urethral sphincters could be an effective treatment for post-surgical intrinsic sphincter deficiency (ISD)-related urinary incontinence. The replacement, enhancement, and/or recovery the urethral sphincter striated and smooth muscles could increase urethral closure pressure to help patients regain continence. Stem cells from muscle-derived satellite or adipose-derived mesenchymal cells provide temporary improvement in urethral closure pressure but do not reconstruct the muscle layer structures. Our strategy to accomplish regeneration of urethral sphincters is the utilization of autologous bone marrow-derived cells. We have developed a freeze injury model of ISD in rabbits. Freezing of the urinary sphincter causes loss of the majority of striated and smooth muscle cells, and causes a significant decrease in leak point pressure. In this review, we show that the autologous bone marrow-derived cells implanted within the freeze-injured sphincters differentiate into striated or smooth muscle cells. These cells then develop to reconstitute muscle layer structures within the sphincter. Furthermore, the leak point pressure of cell-implanted rabbits is significantly higher than that of cell-free injected controls. We conclude that implantation of autologous bone marrow-derived cells could be an effective treatment for human post-surgical ISD-related urinary incontinence. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  7. Review scaffold design and stem cells for tooth regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Zhang

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Current dental treatments for the missing teeth depend largely on dentures and implants crowned with prosthetic caps to restore some functionality of the teeth. However, these devices cannot mimic the biological teeth, do not remodel and they have poor integration with the host. The concept of tissue engineering is based on that fact that by cultivating postnatal dental stem cells (DSCs on a well-designed bioengineered three dimensional scaffold, it is possible to regenerate tooth organogenesis. To date, a range of biomaterial scaffolds with different sources of cells have been proposed to regenerate substitutes to the natural extracellular matrix (ECM analogs. The design of scaffold is critical as it should be capable of supporting cell attachment and proliferation and has the appropriate mechanical properties. Moreover, there are a number of parameters that must be examined in constructing the scaffold, including porosity, the mechanical integrity and effect of surface morphology on cell adhesion and proliferation. In this paper a brief review of literature is presented together with a discussion on the future directions and the challenges ahead in the areas of periodontal dental stem cells DSCs and the scaffold design and manufacturing techniques that are of particular significant for tooth tissue engineering.

  8. Influence of nanotopography on periodontal ligament stem cell functions and cell sheet based periodontal regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Hui; Li, Bei; Zhao, Lingzhou; Jin, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Periodontal regeneration is an important part of regenerative medicine, with great clinical significance; however, the effects of nanotopography on the functions of periodontal ligament (PDL) stem cells (PDLSCs) and on PDLSC sheet based periodontal regeneration have never been explored. Titania nanotubes (NTs) layered on titanium (Ti) provide a good platform to study this. In the current study, the influence of NTs of different tube size on the functions of PDLSCs was observed. Afterward, an ectopic implantation model using a Ti/cell sheets/hydroxyapatite (HA) complex was applied to study the effect of the NTs on cell sheet based periodontal regeneration. The NTs were able to enhance the initial PDLSC adhesion and spread, as well as collagen secretion. With the Ti/cell sheets/HA complex model, it was demonstrated that the PDLSC sheets were capable of regenerating the PDL tissue, when combined with bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell (BMSC) sheets and HA, without the need for extra soluble chemical cues. Simultaneously, the NTs improved the periodontal regeneration result of the ectopically implanted Ti/cell sheets/HA complex, giving rise to functionally aligned collagen fiber bundles. Specifically, much denser collagen fibers, with abundant blood vessels as well as cementum-like tissue on the Ti surface, which well-resembled the structure of natural PDL, were observed in the NT5 and NT10 sample groups. Our study provides the first evidence that the nanotopographical cues obviously influence the functions of PDLSCs and improve the PDLSC sheet based periodontal regeneration size dependently, which provides new insight to the periodontal regeneration. The Ti/cell sheets/HA complex may constitute a good model to predict the effect of biomaterials on periodontal regeneration.

  9. Structural Studies of Complex Carbohydrates of Plant Cell Walls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Darvill, Alan [Univ. of Georgia, Athens, GA (United States); Hahn, Michael G. [Univ. of Georgia, Athens, GA (United States); O' Neill, Malcolm A. [Univ. of Georgia, Athens, GA (United States); York, William S. [Univ. of Georgia, Athens, GA (United States)

    2015-02-17

    Most of the solar energy captured by land plants is converted into the polysaccharides (cellulose, hemicellulose, and pectin) that are the predominant components of the cell wall. These walls, which account for the bulk of plant biomass, have numerous roles in the growth and development of plants. Moreover, these walls have a major impact on human life as they are a renewable source of biomass, a source of diverse commercially useful polymers, a major component of wood, and a source of nutrition for humans and livestock. Thus, understanding the molecular mechanisms that lead to wall assembly and how cell walls and their component polysaccharides contribute to plant growth and development is essential to improve and extend the productivity and value of plant materials. The proposed research will develop and apply advanced analytical and immunological techniques to study specific changes in the structures and interactions of the hemicellulosic and pectic polysaccharides that occur during differentiation and in response to genetic modification and chemical treatments that affect wall biosynthesis. These new techniques will make it possible to accurately characterize minute amounts of cell wall polysaccharides so that subtle changes in structure that occur in individual cell types can be identified and correlated to the physiological or developmental state of the plant. Successful implementation of this research will reveal fundamental relationships between polysaccharide structure, cell wall architecture, and cell wall functions.

  10. Engineering the Oryza sativa cell wall with rice NAC transcription factors regulating secondary wall formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Kouki; Sakamoto, Shingo; Kawai, Tetsushi; Kobayashi, Yoshinori; Sato, Kazuhito; Ichinose, Yasunori; Yaoi, Katsuro; Akiyoshi-Endo, Miho; Sato, Hiroko; Takamizo, Tadashi; Ohme-Takagi, Masaru; Mitsuda, Nobutaka

    2013-01-01

    Plant tissues that require structural rigidity synthesize a thick, strong secondary cell wall of lignin, cellulose and hemicelluloses in a complicated bridged structure. Master regulators of secondary wall synthesis were identified in dicots, and orthologs of these regulators have been identified in monocots, but regulation of secondary cell wall formation in monocots has not been extensively studied. Here we demonstrate that the rice transcription factors SECONDARY WALL NAC DOMAIN PROTEINs (SWNs) can regulate secondary wall formation in rice (Oryza sativa) and are potentially useful for engineering the monocot cell wall. The OsSWN1 promoter is highly active in sclerenchymatous cells of the leaf blade and less active in xylem cells. By contrast, the OsSWN2 promoter is highly active in xylem cells and less active in sclerenchymatous cells. OsSWN2 splicing variants encode two proteins; the shorter protein (OsSWN2S) has very low transcriptional activation ability, but the longer protein (OsSWN2L) and OsSWN1 have strong transcriptional activation ability. In rice, expression of an OsSWN2S chimeric repressor, driven by the OsSWN2 promoter, resulted in stunted growth and para-wilting (leaf rolling and browning under normal water conditions) due to impaired vascular vessels. The same OsSWN2S chimeric repressor, driven by the OsSWN1 promoter, caused a reduction of cell wall thickening in sclerenchymatous cells, a drooping leaf phenotype, reduced lignin and xylose contents and increased digestibility as forage. These data suggest that OsSWNs regulate secondary wall formation in rice and manipulation of OsSWNs may enable improvements in monocotyledonous crops for forage or biofuel applications.

  11. Engineering the Oryza sativa cell wall with rice NAC transcription factors regulating secondary wall formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kouki eYoshida

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Plant tissues that require structural rigidity synthesize a thick, strong secondary cell wall of lignin, cellulose and hemicelluloses in a complicated bridged structure. Master regulators of secondary wall synthesis were identified in dicots, and orthologs of these regulators have been identified in monocots, but regulation of secondary cell wall formation in monocots has not been extensively studied. Here we demonstrate that the rice transcription factors SECONDARY WALL NAC DOMAIN PROTEINs (SWNs can regulate secondary wall formation in rice (Oryza sativa and are potentially useful for engineering the monocot cell wall. The OsSWN1 promoter is highly active in sclerenchymatous cells of the leaf blade and less active in xylem cells. By contrast, the OsSWN2 promoter is highly active in xylem cells and less active in sclerenchymatous cells. OsSWN2 splicing variants encode two proteins; the shorter protein (OsSWN2S has very low transcriptional activation ability, but the longer protein (OsSWN2L and OsSWN1 have strong transcriptional activation ability. In rice, expression of an OsSWN2S chimeric repressor, driven by the OsSWN2 promoter, resulted in stunted growth and para-wilting (leaf rolling and browning under normal water conditions due to impaired vascular vessels. The same OsSWN2S chimeric repressor, driven by the OsSWN1 promoter, caused a reduction of cell wall thickening in sclerenchymatous cells, a drooping leaf phenotype, reduced lignin and xylose contents and increased digestibility as forage. These data suggest that OsSWNs regulate secondary wall formation in rice and manipulation of OsSWNs may enable improvements in monocotyledonous crops for forage or biofuel applications.

  12. Hemicellulose biosynthesis and degradation in tobacco cell walls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Compier, M.G.M.

    2005-01-01

    Natural fibres have a wide range of technological applications, such as in paper and textile industries. The basic properties and the quality of plant fibres are determined by the composition of the plant cell wall. Characteristic for fibres are thick secondary cell walls, which consist of cellulose

  13. Endotoxins, Glucans and Other Microbial Cell Wall Agents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Basinas, Ioannis; Elholm, Grethe; Wouters, Inge M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/274156652

    2017-01-01

    During the last decades an increasing interest in microbial cell wall agents has been established, since exposure to these agents has been linked to a wide range of adverse and beneficial health effects. The term microbial cell wall agents refers to a group of molecules of different composition that

  14. Characterising the cellulose synthase complexes of cell walls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mansoori Zangir, N.

    2012-01-01

    One of the characteristics of the plant kingdom is the presence of a structural cell wall. Cellulose is a major component in both the primary and secondary cell walls of plants. In higher plants cellulose is synthesized by so called rosette protein complexes with cellulose synthases (CESAs) as the

  15. Characterizing phenolformaldehyde adhesive cure chemistry within the wood cell wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel J. Yelle; John Ralph

    2016-01-01

    Adhesive bonding of wood using phenol-formaldehyde remains the industrial standard in wood product bond durability. Not only does this adhesive infiltrate the cell wall, it also is believed to form primary bonds with wood cell wall polymers, particularly guaiacyl lignin. However, the mechanism by which phenol-formaldehyde adhesive intergrally interacts and bonds to...

  16. Conditioned Medium from Periodontal Ligament Stem Cells Enhances Periodontal Regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagata, Mizuki; Iwasaki, Kengo; Akazawa, Keiko; Komaki, Motohiro; Yokoyama, Naoki; Izumi, Yuichi; Morita, Ikuo

    2017-05-01

    Periodontal disease is one of the most common infectious diseases in adults and is characterized by the destruction of tooth-supporting tissues. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) comprise the mesoderm-originating stem cell population, which has been studied and used for cell therapy. However, because of the lower rate of cell survival after MSC transplantation in various disease models, paracrine functions of MSCs have been receiving increased attention as a regenerative mechanism. The aim of this study was to investigate the regenerative potential of transplanted conditioned medium (CM) obtained from cultured periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs), the adult stem cell population in tooth-supporting tissues, using a rat periodontal defect model. Cell-free CM was collected from PDLSCs and fibroblasts, using ultrafiltration and transplanted into surgically created periodontal defects. Protein content of CM was examined by antibody arrays. Formation of new periodontal tissues was analyzed using microcomputed tomography and histological sections. PDLSC-CM transplantation enhanced periodontal tissue regeneration in a concentration-dependent manner, whereas fibroblast-CM did not show any regenerative function. Proteomic analysis revealed that extracellular matrix proteins, enzymes, angiogenic factors, growth factors and cytokines were contained in PDLSC-CM. Furthermore, PDLSC-CM transplantation resulted in the decreased mRNA level of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) in healing periodontal tissues. In addition, we found that PDLSC-CM suppressed the mRNA level of TNF-α in the monocyte/macrophage cell line, RAW cells, stimulated with IFN-γ. Our findings suggested that PDLSC-CM enhanced periodontal regeneration by suppressing the inflammatory response through TNF-α production, and transplantation of PDLSC-CM could be a novel approach for periodontal regenerative therapy.

  17. Live imaging reveals the progenitors and cell dynamics of limb regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alwes, Frederike; Enjolras, Camille; Averof, Michalis

    2016-01-01

    Regeneration is a complex and dynamic process, mobilizing diverse cell types and remodelling tissues over long time periods. Tracking cell fate and behaviour during regeneration in active adult animals is especially challenging. Here, we establish continuous live imaging of leg regeneration at single-cell resolution in the crustacean Parhyale hawaiensis. By live recordings encompassing the first 4-5 days after amputation, we capture the cellular events that contribute to wound closure and morphogenesis of regenerating legs with unprecedented resolution and temporal detail. Using these recordings we are able to track cell lineages, to generate fate maps of the blastema and to identify the progenitors of regenerated epidermis. We find that there are no specialized stem cells for the epidermis. Most epidermal cells in the distal part of the leg stump proliferate, acquire new positional values and contribute to new segments in the regenerating leg. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.19766.001 PMID:27776632

  18. Brassinosteroid Mediated Cell Wall Remodeling in Grasses under Abiotic Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaolan Rao

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Unlike animals, plants, being sessile, cannot escape from exposure to severe abiotic stresses such as extreme temperature and water deficit. The dynamic structure of plant cell wall enables them to undergo compensatory changes, as well as maintain physical strength, with changing environments. Plant hormones known as brassinosteroids (BRs play a key role in determining cell wall expansion during stress responses. Cell wall deposition differs between grasses (Poaceae and dicots. Grass species include many important food, fiber, and biofuel crops. In this article, we focus on recent advances in BR-regulated cell wall biosynthesis and remodeling in response to stresses, comparing our understanding of the mechanisms in grass species with those in the more studied dicots. A more comprehensive understanding of BR-mediated changes in cell wall integrity in grass species will benefit the development of genetic tools to improve crop productivity, fiber quality and plant biomass recalcitrance.

  19. Transcriptional regulatory network controlling secondary cell wall ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Secondary wall is an abundant component of plant biomass and has a potential to be a renewable resource of bioenergy and biomaterials. It is important to unravel the molecular mechanism underlying secondary wall formation and how it contributes to plant biomass production. In this review, we summarized the potential ...

  20. Cell fate determination during tooth development and regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsiadis, Thimios A; Graf, Daniel

    2009-09-01

    Teeth arise from sequential and reciprocal interactions between the oral epithelium and the underlying cranial neural crest-derived mesenchyme. Their formation involves a precisely orchestrated series of molecular and morphogenetic events, and gives us the opportunity to discover and understand the nature of the signals that direct cell fates and patterning. For that reason, it is important to elucidate how signaling factors work together in a defined number of cells to generate the diverse and precise patterned structures of the mature functional teeth. Over the last decade, substantial research efforts have been directed toward elucidating the molecular mechanisms that control cell fate decisions during tooth development. These efforts have contributed toward the increased knowledge on dental stem cells, and observation of the molecular similarities that exist between tooth development and regeneration.

  1. Cell Wall Composition, Biosynthesis and Remodeling during Pollen Tube Growth

    OpenAIRE

    Jean-Claude Mollet; Christelle Leroux; Flavien Dardelle; Arnaud Lehner

    2013-01-01

    The pollen tube is a fast tip-growing cell carrying the two sperm cells to the ovule allowing the double fertilization process and seed setting. To succeed in this process, the spatial and temporal controls of pollen tube growth within the female organ are critical. It requires a massive cell wall deposition to promote fast pollen tube elongation and a tight control of the cell wall remodeling to modify the mechanical properties. In addition, during its journey, the pollen tube interacts with...

  2. Histochemical, Biochemical and Cell Biological aspects of tail regeneration in lizard, an amniote model for studies on tissue regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alibardi, Lorenzo

    2014-01-01

    The present review summarizes biochemical, histochemical and immunocytochemical aspects of the process of tissue regeneration in lizards, non-mammalian amniotes with high regenerative power. The amputated tail initially mobilizes the glycogen and lipid reserves during wound healing. In the following stage of formation of the regenerative blastema tissue remodeling produces a typical embryonic tissue, initially increasing the amount of water and glycosaminoglycans such as jaluronate, which are later replaced by sulfated glycosaminoglycans and collagen during tail elongation. In blastematic and early differentiating stages the initial anaerobic metabolism utilizes glycolysis and hexose monophosphate pathways to sustain high RNA production and lipid catabolism for energy production. This stage, after formation of blood vessels, is replaced by the energy-efficient aerobic metabolism based on the Krebs' cycle that is needed for the differentiation and growth of the new tissues of the regenerating tail. Specific proteins of the cytoskeleton, extracellular matrix, cell junctions, transcriptional and growth factors are actively produced in the embryonic environment of early stages of regeneration and allow for cell movement, signaling and differentiation. During wound healing, the production of anti-microbial peptides in granulocytes is likely involved in limiting inflammation and stimulates tissue regeneration in the tail while the lasting inflammatory reaction of the limb and spinal cord limits their potential of regeneration. Activated hemopoiesis, circulating blood, endocrine glands, liver, kidney and spleen supply the regenerating tissues with metabolites and hormones but also with phagocytes and immuno-competent cells that can inhibit tissue regeneration after repetitive amputations that elicit chronic inflammation. The latter aspect shows how successful tissue regeneration in an amniote can be turned into scarring by the alteration of the initial microenvironment

  3. Biological Evaluation (In Vitro and In Vivo) of Bilayered Collagenous Coated (Nano Electrospun and Solid Wall) Chitosan Membrane for Periodontal Guided Bone Regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotfi, Ghogha; Shokrgozar, Mohammad Ali; Mofid, Rasoul; Abbas, Fatemeh Mashhadi; Ghanavati, Farzin; Baghban, Alireza Akbarzadeh; Yavari, Seyedeh Kimia; Pajoumshariati, Seyedramin

    2016-07-01

    The application of barrier membranes in guided bone regeneration (GBR) has become a commonly used surgical technique in periodontal research. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the in vitro biocompatibility and osteogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) on two different collagenous coatings (nano electrospun fibrous vs. solid wall) of bilayered collagen/chitosan membrane and their histological evaluation on bone regeneration in rabbit calvarial defects. It was found that chitosan-nano electrospun collagen (CNC) membranes had higher proliferation/metabolic activity compared to the chitosan-collagen (CC) and pristine chitosan membranes. The qRT-PCR analysis demonstrated the CNC membranes induced significant expression of osteogenic genes (Osteocalcin, RUNX2 and Col-α1) in MSCs. Moreover, higher calcium content and alkaline phosphatase activity of MSCs were observed compared to the other groups. Histologic and histomorphometric evaluations were performed on the uncovered (negative control) as well as covered calvarial defects of ten adult white rabbits with different membranes (CNC, CC, BioGide (BG, positive control)) at 1 and 2 months after surgery. More bone formation was detected in the defects covered with CNC and BG membranes than those covered by CC and the negative control. No inflammation and residual biomaterial particles were observed on the membrane surface or in the surrounding tissues in the surgical areas. These results suggest that bilayer CNC membrane can have the potential for use as a GBR membrane material facilitating bone formation.

  4. Perspective in optimization of stem cell therapies for heart regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gapska, Paulina; Kurpisz, Maciej

    2017-12-07

    There is a variety of mechanisms(s) factor(s) that may influence stem cell therapies for heart regeneration. Among the best candidates for stem cell source are: mesenchymal stem cells (also those isolated from adipose tissue), cardiac cell progenitors (CPC) and descendants of iPSC cells. iPSC/s can be potentially beneficial although their pluripotent induction has been still in question due to: low propagation efficacy, danger of genomic integration/instability, biological risk of current vector system teratoma formation etc. which have been discussed in this review. Optimization protocols are required in order to enhance stem cells resistance to pathological conditions that they may encounter in pathological organ and to increase their retention. Combination between gene transfer and stem cell therapy is now more often used in pre-clinical studies with the prospect of subsequent clinical trials. Complementary substances have been contemplated to support stem cell viability (mainly anti-inflammatory and anti- apoptotic agents), which have been tested in animal models with promising results. Integration of nanotechnology both for efficient stem cell imaging as well as with the aim to provide cell supporting scaffolds seem to be inevitable for further development of cellular therapies. The whole organ (heart) reconstruction as well as biodegradable scaffolds and scaffold-free cell sheets have been also outlined.

  5. Perspective in optimization of stem cell therapies for heart regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulina Gapska

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available There is a variety of mechanisms(s factor(s that may influence stem cell therapies for heart regeneration. Among the best candidates for stem cell source are: mesenchymal stem cells (also those isolated from adipose tissue, cardiac cell progenitors (CPC and descendants of iPSC cells. iPSC/s can be potentially beneficial although their pluripotent induction has been still in question due to: low propagation efficacy, danger of genomic integration/instability, biological risk of current vector system teratoma formation etc. which have been discussed in this review. Optimization protocols are required in order to enhance stem cells resistance to pathological conditions that they may encounter in pathological organ and to increase their retention. Combination between gene transfer and stem cell therapy is now more often used in pre-clinical studies with the prospect of subsequent clinical trials. Complementary substances have been contemplated to support stem cell viability (mainly anti-inflammatory and anti- apoptotic agents, which have been tested in animal models with promising results. Integration of nanotechnology both for efficient stem cell imaging as well as with the aim to provide cell supporting scaffolds seem to be inevitable for further development of cellular therapies. The whole organ (heart reconstruction as well as biodegradable scaffolds and scaffold-free cell sheets have been also outlined.

  6. Localization and characterization of STRO-1 cells in the deer pedicle and regenerating antler.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans J Rolf

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available The annual regeneration of deer antlers is a unique developmental event in mammals, which as a rule possess only a very limited capacity to regenerate lost appendages. Studying antler regeneration can therefore provide a deeper insight into the mechanisms that prevent limb regeneration in humans and other mammals, and, with regard to medical treatments, may possibly even show ways how to overcome these limitations. Traditionally, antler regeneration has been characterized as a process involving the formation of a blastema from de-differentiated cells. More recently it has, however, been hypothesized that antler regeneration is a stem cell-based process. Thus far, direct evidence for the presence of stem cells in primary or regenerating antlers was lacking. Here we demonstrate the presence of cells positive for the mesenchymal stem cell marker STRO-1 in the chondrogenic growth zone and the perivascular tissue of the cartilaginous zone in primary and regenerating antlers as well as in the pedicle of fallow deer (Dama dama. In addition, cells positive for the stem cell/progenitor cell markers STRO-1, CD133 and CD271 (LNGFR were isolated from the growth zones of regenerating fallow deer antlers as well as the pedicle periosteum and cultivated for extended periods of time. We found evidence that STRO-1(+ cells isolated from the different locations are able to differentiate in vitro along the osteogenic and adipogenic lineages. Our results support the view that the annual process of antler regeneration might depend on the periodic activation of mesenchymal progenitor cells located in the pedicle periosteum. The findings of the present study indicate that not only limited tissue regeneration, but also extensive appendage regeneration in a postnatal mammal can occur as a stem cell-based process.

  7. Maize development: Cell wall changes in leaves and sheaths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Developmental changes occur in maize (Zea mays L.) as it transitions from juvenile stages to the mature plant. Changes also occur as newly formed cells mature into adult cells. Maize leaf blades, including the midribs and sheaths, undergo cell wall changes as cells transition to fully mature cell ty...

  8. Cell sheet engineering and its application for periodontal regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwata, Takanori; Washio, Kaoru; Yoshida, Toshiyuki; Ishikawa, Isao; Ando, Tomohiro; Yamato, Masayuki; Okano, Teruo

    2015-04-01

    Periodontitis is a inflammation induced by a bacterial infection that causes the destruction of the attachment apparatus of dental roots. Several materials, such as bone graft materials, barrier membranes and protein products have been developed and used to treat periodontal defects clinically; however, it is difficult to regenerate the complete periodontal tissue structure. Recently, cytotherapeutic approaches have been introduced to overcome the limitation of conventional procedures. The in vitro-expanded autologous cells derived from several kinds of tissues have already been used in several clinical trials. These cytotherapeutic treatments have been shown to be safe and effective for the treatment of periodontitis. Our strategy has been to integrate stem cell biology and cell sheet engineering, in which a temperature-responsive intelligent polymer is grafted onto the surface of cell culture dish to create a 'cell sheet', to achieve a novel treatment method for periodontitis. By simple reduction of the temperature to below 32°C, a contiguous cell sheet, which is capable of keeping extracellular matrix proteins and cell-cell interactions intact, can be harvested for transplantation without the use of scaffolds. This technology has already been employed in clinical trials, confirming the safety and efficacy of the treatment. In this review, we introduce recent progress in the engineering of cell sheets and review the potential of cell sheet technology for periodontal regenerative medicine. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Architecture and Biosynthesis of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Cell Wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlean, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The wall gives a Saccharomyces cerevisiae cell its osmotic integrity; defines cell shape during budding growth, mating, sporulation, and pseudohypha formation; and presents adhesive glycoproteins to other yeast cells. The wall consists of β1,3- and β1,6-glucans, a small amount of chitin, and many different proteins that may bear N- and O-linked glycans and a glycolipid anchor. These components become cross-linked in various ways to form higher-order complexes. Wall composition and degree of cross-linking vary during growth and development and change in response to cell wall stress. This article reviews wall biogenesis in vegetative cells, covering the structure of wall components and how they are cross-linked; the biosynthesis of N- and O-linked glycans, glycosylphosphatidylinositol membrane anchors, β1,3- and β1,6-linked glucans, and chitin; the reactions that cross-link wall components; and the possible functions of enzymatic and nonenzymatic cell wall proteins. PMID:23135325

  10. Promise of periodontal ligament stem cells in regeneration of periodontium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Hidefumi; Tomokiyo, Atsushi; Fujii, Shinsuke; Wada, Naohisa; Akamine, Akifumi

    2011-07-28

    A great number of patients around the world experience tooth loss that is attributed to irretrievable damage of the periodontium caused by deep caries, severe periodontal diseases or irreversible trauma. The periodontium is a complex tissue composed mainly of two soft tissues and two hard tissues; the former includes the periodontal ligament (PDL) tissue and gingival tissue, and the latter includes alveolar bone and cementum covering the tooth root. Tissue engineering techniques are therefore required for regeneration of these tissues. In particular, PDL is a dynamic connective tissue that is subjected to continual adaptation to maintain tissue size and width, as well as structural integrity, including ligament fibers and bone modeling. PDL tissue is central in the periodontium to retain the tooth in the bone socket, and is currently recognized to include somatic mesenchymal stem cells that could reconstruct the periodontium. However, successful treatment using these stem cells to regenerate the periodontium efficiently has not yet been developed. In the present article, we discuss the contemporary standpoints and approaches for these stem cells in the field of regenerative medicine in dentistry.

  11. Branched pectic galactan in phloem-sieve-element cell walls: implications for cell mechanics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Torode, Thomas A.; O'Neill, Rachel E.; Marcus, Susan E.

    2017-01-01

    has previously been identified in garlic bulbs in which the LM26 epitope is widespread throughout most cell walls including those of phloem cells. Garlic bulb cell wall material has been used to confirm the association of the LM26 epitope with cell wall pectic rhamnogalacturonan-I (RG...

  12. Deletion of hypothetical wall teichoic acid ligases in Staphylococcus aureus activates the cell wall stress response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dengler, Vanina; Meier, Patricia Stutzmann; Heusser, Ronald; Kupferschmied, Peter; Fazekas, Judit; Friebe, Sarah; Staufer, Sibylle Burger; Majcherczyk, Paul A; Moreillon, Philippe; Berger-Bächi, Brigitte; McCallum, Nadine

    2012-08-01

    The Staphylococcus aureus cell wall stress stimulon (CWSS) is activated by cell envelope-targeting antibiotics or depletion of essential cell wall biosynthesis enzymes. The functionally uncharacterized S. aureus LytR-CpsA-Psr (LCP) proteins, MsrR, SA0908 and SA2103, all belong to the CWSS. Although not essential, deletion of all three LCP proteins severely impairs cell division. We show here that VraSR-dependent CWSS expression was up to 250-fold higher in single, double and triple LCP mutants than in wild type S. aureus in the absence of external stress. The LCP triple mutant was virtually depleted of wall teichoic acids (WTA), which could be restored to different degrees by any of the single LCP proteins. Subinhibitory concentrations of tunicamycin, which inhibits the first WTA synthesis enzyme TarO (TagO), could partially complement the severe growth defect of the LCP triple mutant. Both of the latter findings support a role for S. aureus LCP proteins in late WTA synthesis, as in Bacillus subtilis where LCP proteins were recently proposed to transfer WTA from lipid carriers to the cell wall peptidoglycan. Intrinsic activation of the CWSS upon LCP deletion and the fact that LCP proteins were essential for WTA-loading of the cell wall, highlight their important role(s) in S. aureus cell envelope biogenesis. © 2012 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. interleukin-11 induces and maintains progenitors of different cell lineages during Xenopus tadpole tail regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsujioka, Hiroshi; Kunieda, Takekazu; Katou, Yuki; Shirahige, Katsuhiko; Fukazawa, Taro; Kubo, Takeo

    2017-09-08

    Unlike mammals, Xenopus laevis tadpoles possess high ability to regenerate their lost organs. In amphibians, the main source of regenerated tissues is lineage-restricted tissue stem cells, but the mechanisms underlying induction, maintenance and differentiation of these stem/progenitor cells in the regenerating organs are poorly understood. We previously reported that interleukin-11 (il-11) is highly expressed in the proliferating cells of regenerating Xenopus tadpole tails. Here, we show that il-11 knockdown (KD) shortens the regenerated tail length, and the phenotype is rescued by forced-il-11-expression in the KD tadpoles. Moreover, marker genes for undifferentiated notochord, muscle, and sensory neurons are downregulated in the KD tadpoles, and the forced-il-11-expression in intact tadpole tails induces expression of these marker genes. Our findings demonstrate that il-11 is necessary for organ regeneration, and suggest that IL-11 plays a key role in the induction and maintenance of undifferentiated progenitors across cell lineages during Xenopus tail regeneration. Xenopus laevis tadpoles have maintained their ability to regenerate various organs. Here, the authors show that interleukin-11 is necessary for organ regeneration, by inducing and maintaining undifferentiated progenitors across cell lineages during Xenopus tail regeneration.

  14. How cell wall complexity influences saccharification efficiency in Miscanthus sinensis

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Souza, Amanda P.; Kamei, Claire L. Alvim; Torres, Andres F.; Pattathil, Sivakumar; Hahn, Michael G.; Trindade, Luisa M.; Buckeridge, Marcos S.

    2015-01-01

    The production of bioenergy from grasses has been developing quickly during the last decade, with Miscanthus being among the most important choices for production of bioethanol. However, one of the key barriers to producing bioethanol is the lack of information about cell wall structure. Cell walls are thought to display compositional differences that lead to emergence of a very high level of complexity, resulting in great diversity in cell wall architectures. In this work, a set of different techniques was used to access the complexity of cell walls of different genotypes of Miscanthus sinensis in order to understand how they interfere with saccharification efficiency. Three genotypes of M. sinensis displaying different patterns of correlation between lignin content and saccharification efficiency were subjected to cell wall analysis by quantitative/qualitative analytical techniques such as monosaccharide composition, oligosaccharide profiling, and glycome profiling. When saccharification efficiency was correlated negatively with lignin, the structural features of arabinoxylan and xyloglucan were found to contribute positively to hydrolysis. In the absence of such correlation, different types of pectins, and some mannans contributed to saccharification efficiency. Different genotypes of M. sinensis were shown to display distinct interactions among their cell wall components, which seem to influence cell wall hydrolysis. PMID:25908240

  15. Eye Absence Does Not Regulate Planarian Stem Cells during Eye Regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LoCascio, Samuel A; Lapan, Sylvain W; Reddien, Peter W

    2017-02-27

    Dividing cells called neoblasts contain pluripotent stem cells and drive planarian flatworm regeneration from diverse injuries. A long-standing question is whether neoblasts directly sense and respond to the identity of missing tissues during regeneration. We used the eye to investigate this question. Surprisingly, eye removal was neither sufficient nor necessary for neoblasts to increase eye progenitor production. Neoblasts normally increase eye progenitor production following decapitation, facilitating regeneration. Eye removal alone, however, did not induce this response. Eye regeneration following eye-specific resection resulted from homeostatic rates of eye progenitor production and less cell death in the regenerating eye. Conversely, large head injuries that left eyes intact increased eye progenitor production. Large injuries also non-specifically increased progenitor production for multiple uninjured tissues. We propose a model for eye regeneration in which eye tissue production by planarian stem cells is not directly regulated by the absence of the eye itself. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Long-term Observation of Regenerated Periodontium Induced by FGF-2 in the Beagle Dog 2-Wall Periodontal Defect Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anzai, Jun; Nagayasu-Tanaka, Toshie; Terashima, Akio; Asano, Taiji; Yamada, Satoru; Nozaki, Takenori; Kitamura, Masahiro; Murakami, Shinya

    2016-01-01

    The long-term stability and qualitative characteristics of periodontium regenerated by FGF-2 treatment were compared with normal physiological healing tissue controls in a Beagle dog 2-wall periodontal defect model 13 months after treatment by assessing tissue histology and three-dimensional microstructure using micro-computed tomography (μCT). After FGF-2 (0.3%) or vehicle treatment at the defect sites, serial changes in the bone mineral content (BMC) were observed using periodic X-ray imaging. Tissues were harvested at 13 months, evaluated histomorphometrically, and the cortical bone volume and trabecular bone structure of the newly formed bone were analyzed using μCT. FGF-2 significantly increased the BMC of the defect area at 2 months compared with that of the control group, and this difference was unchanged through 13 months. The cortical bone volume was significantly increased by FGF-2, but there was no difference between the groups in trabecular bone structure. Bone maturation was occurring in both groups because of the lower cortical volume and denser trabecular bone than what is found in intact bone. FGF-2 also increased the area of newly formed bone as assessed histomorphometrically, but the ratios of trabecular bone in the defect area were similar between the control and FGF-2 groups. These results suggest that FGF-2 stimulates neogenesis of alveolar bone that is of similar quality to that of the control group. The lengths of the regenerated periodontal ligament and cementum, measured as the distance from the defect bottom to the apical end of the gingival epithelium, and height and area of the newly formed bone in the FGF-2 group were larger than those in the control group. The present study demonstrated that, within the limitation of artificial periodontal defect model, the periodontal tissue regenerated by FGF-2 was maintained for 13 months after treatment and was qualitatively equivalent to that generated through the physiological healing process.

  17. Long-term Observation of Regenerated Periodontium Induced by FGF-2 in the Beagle Dog 2-Wall Periodontal Defect Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Anzai

    Full Text Available The long-term stability and qualitative characteristics of periodontium regenerated by FGF-2 treatment were compared with normal physiological healing tissue controls in a Beagle dog 2-wall periodontal defect model 13 months after treatment by assessing tissue histology and three-dimensional microstructure using micro-computed tomography (μCT. After FGF-2 (0.3% or vehicle treatment at the defect sites, serial changes in the bone mineral content (BMC were observed using periodic X-ray imaging. Tissues were harvested at 13 months, evaluated histomorphometrically, and the cortical bone volume and trabecular bone structure of the newly formed bone were analyzed using μCT. FGF-2 significantly increased the BMC of the defect area at 2 months compared with that of the control group, and this difference was unchanged through 13 months. The cortical bone volume was significantly increased by FGF-2, but there was no difference between the groups in trabecular bone structure. Bone maturation was occurring in both groups because of the lower cortical volume and denser trabecular bone than what is found in intact bone. FGF-2 also increased the area of newly formed bone as assessed histomorphometrically, but the ratios of trabecular bone in the defect area were similar between the control and FGF-2 groups. These results suggest that FGF-2 stimulates neogenesis of alveolar bone that is of similar quality to that of the control group. The lengths of the regenerated periodontal ligament and cementum, measured as the distance from the defect bottom to the apical end of the gingival epithelium, and height and area of the newly formed bone in the FGF-2 group were larger than those in the control group. The present study demonstrated that, within the limitation of artificial periodontal defect model, the periodontal tissue regenerated by FGF-2 was maintained for 13 months after treatment and was qualitatively equivalent to that generated through the physiological

  18. Stem Cells for Temporomandibular Joint Repair and Regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shipin; Yap, Adrian U J; Toh, Wei Seong

    2015-10-01

    Temporomandibular Disorders (TMD) represent a heterogeneous group of musculoskeletal and neuromuscular conditions involving the temporomandibular joint (TMJ), masticatory muscles and/or associated structures. They are a major cause of non-dental orofacial pain. As a group, they are often multi-factorial in nature and have no common etiology or biological explanations. TMD can be broadly divided into masticatory muscle and TMJ disorders. TMJ disorders are characterized by intra-articular positional and/or structural abnormalities. The most common type of TMJ disorders involves displacement of the TMJ articular disc that precedes progressive degenerative changes of the joint leading to osteoarthritis (OA). In the past decade, progress made in the development of stem cell-based therapies and tissue engineering have provided alternative methods to attenuate the disease symptoms and even replace the diseased tissue in the treatment of TMJ disorders. Resident mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been isolated from the synovia of TMJ, suggesting an important role in the repair and regeneration of TMJ. The seminal discovery of pluripotent stem cells including embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) have provided promising cell sources for drug discovery, transplantation as well as for tissue engineering of TMJ condylar cartilage and disc. This review discusses the most recent advances in development of stem cell-based treatments for TMJ disorders through innovative approaches of cell-based therapeutics, tissue engineering and drug discovery.

  19. Distinct roles of neuroepithelial-like and radial glia-like progenitor cells in cerebellar regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaslin, Jan; Kroehne, Volker; Ganz, Julia; Hans, Stefan; Brand, Michael

    2017-04-15

    Zebrafish can regenerate after brain injury, and the regenerative process is driven by resident stem cells. Stem cells are heterogeneous in the vertebrate brain, but the significance of having heterogeneous stem cells in regeneration is not understood. Limited availability of specific stem cells might impair the regeneration of particular cell lineages. We studied regeneration of the adult zebrafish cerebellum, which contains two major stem and progenitor cell types: ventricular zone and neuroepithelial cells. Using conditional lineage tracing we demonstrate that cerebellar regeneration depends on the availability of specific stem cells. Radial glia-like cells are thought to be the predominant stem cell type in homeostasis and after injury. However, we find that radial glia-like cells play a minor role in adult cerebellar neurogenesis and in recovery after injury. Instead, we find that neuroepithelial cells are the predominant stem cell type supporting cerebellar regeneration after injury. Zebrafish are able to regenerate many, but not all, cell types in the cerebellum, which emphasizes the need to understand the contribution of different adult neural stem and progenitor cell subtypes in the vertebrate central nervous system. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  20. Dental follicle stem cells in bone regeneration on titanium implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucaciu, Ondine; Soriţău, Olga; Gheban, Dan; Ciuca, Dan Rus; Virtic, Oana; Vulpoi, Adriana; Dirzu, Noemi; Câmpian, Radu; Băciuţ, Grigore; Popa, Catalin; Simon, Simion; Berce, Petru; Băciuţ, Mihaela; Crisan, Bogdan

    2015-12-30

    We aimed to demonstrate that DF stem cells from impacted molars and canines can be used to improve bone regeneration on titanium implants surfaces. This study highlights the presence of stem cells in DF, their potential to adhere and differentiate into osteoblasts on different types of titanium surfaces. Isolated cells from the harvested DF tissue from impacted canine/molars, expressed stem cells markers. Differentiation into bone cells was induced in presence or absence of BMP-2 and TGFβ1. The presence of growth factors until 28 days in medium maintained the cells in an earlier stage of differentiation with a lower level of specific bone proteins and a higher expression of alkaline phosphatase (ALP). Influence of titanium implants with different bioactive coatings, hydroxyapatite (TiHA) and with silicatitanate (TiSiO2), and porous Ti6Al7Nb implants as control (TiCtrl), was studied in terms of cell adhesion and viability. Ti HA implants proved to be more favorable for adhesion and proliferation of DF stem cells in first days of cultivation. The influence of titanium coatings and osteogenic differentiation mediums with or without growth factors were evaluated. Additional BMP-2 in the medium did not allow DF stem cells to develop a more mature phenotype, leaving them in a pre-osteogenic stage. The best sustained mineralization process evaluated by immuno-cytochemical staining, scanning electron microscopy and Ca(2+) quantification was observed for TiHA implants with a higher expression of ALP, collagen and Ca(2+) deposition. Long term culturing (70 days) on titanium surfaces of DF stem cells in standard medium without soluble osteogenic inducers, indicated that HA coating is more favorable, with the acquisition of a more mature osteoblastic phenotype as shown by immunocytochemical staining. These findings demonstrated that even in absence of exogenous osteogenic factors, TiHA implants and in a lesser extent TiCtrl and TiSiO2 implants can induce and sustain

  1. Stem cell therapy for intervertebral disc regeneration: review article

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohsen Sheykhhasan

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Intervertebral disks (IVD acts as shock absorber between each of the vertebrae in the spinal column by keeping the vertebrae separated when the shock caused by the action. They also serve to protect the nerves that run down the middle of the spine and intervertebral disks. The disks are made of fibrocartilaginous material. The outside of the disk is made of a strong material called the annulus fibrosus. Inside this protective covering is a jelly-like substance known as mucoprotein gel. This interior is known as the nucleus pulposus. The nucleus pulposus consists of large vacuolated notochord cells, small chondrocyte-like cells, collagen fibrils, and aggrecan, a proteoglycan that aggregates by binding to hyaluronan. Attached to each aggrecan molecule are glycosaminoglycan (GAG chains of chondroitin sulfate and keratan sulfate. Intervertebral disks degeneration is frequently associated with low back and neck pain, which accounts as a disability. Despite the known outcomes of the Intervertebral disks degeneration cascade, the treatment of IVD degeneration is limited in that available conservative and surgical treatments do not reverse the pathology or restore the IVD tissue. Regenerative medicine for IVD degeneration, by injection of Intervertebral disks cells, chondrocytes or stem cells, has been extensively studied in the past decade in various animal models of induced IVD degeneration, and has progressed to clinical trials in the treatment of various spinal disease. Despite preliminary results showing positive effects of cell-injection strategies for IVD regeneration, detailed basic research on Intervertebral disks cells and their niche demonstrates that transplanted cells are unable to survive and adapt in the avascular niche of the IVD. For this therapeutic strategy to succeed, the indications for its use and the patients who would benefit need to be better defined. To surmount these obstacles, the solution will be identified only by focused

  2. Cell wall remodeling in mycorrhizal symbiosis: a way towards biotrophism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balestrini, Raffaella; Bonfante, Paola

    2014-01-01

    Cell walls are deeply involved in the molecular talk between partners during plant and microbe interactions, and their role in mycorrhizae, i.e., the widespread symbiotic associations established between plant roots and soil fungi, has been investigated extensively. All mycorrhizal interactions achieve full symbiotic functionality through the development of an extensive contact surface between the plant and fungal cells, where signals and nutrients are exchanged. The exchange of molecules between the fungal and the plant cytoplasm takes place both through their plasma membranes and their cell walls; a functional compartment, known as the symbiotic interface, is thus defined. Among all the symbiotic interfaces, the complex intracellular interface of arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbiosis has received a great deal of attention since its first description. Here, in fact, the host plasma membrane invaginates and proliferates around all the developing intracellular fungal structures, and cell wall material is laid down between this membrane and the fungal cell surface. By contrast, in ectomycorrhizae (ECM), where the fungus grows outside and between the root cells, plant and fungal cell walls are always in direct contact and form the interface between the two partners. The organization and composition of cell walls within the interface compartment is a topic that has attracted widespread attention, both in ecto- and endomycorrhizae. The aim of this review is to provide a general overview of the current knowledge on this topic by integrating morphological observations, which have illustrated cell wall features during mycorrhizal interactions, with the current data produced by genomic and transcriptomic approaches. PMID:24926297

  3. Advanced technologies for plant cell wall evolution and diversity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fangel, Jonatan Ulrik

    Plant cell walls consist of polysaccharides, glycoproteins and phenolic polymers interlinked together in a highly complex network. The detailed analysis of cell walls is challenging because of their inherent complexity and heterogeneity. Also, complex carbohydrates, unlike proteins and nucleotides...... probes (monoclonal antibodies mAbs and carbohydrate binding modules, CBMs) to rapidly profile polysaccharides across a sample set. During my PhD I have further developed the CoMPP technique and used it for cell wall analysis within the context of a variety of applied and fundamental projects. The data...

  4. Novel Enzymes for Targeted Hydrolysis of Algal Cell Walls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schultz-Johansen, Mikkel

    urchins are known algae-eaters and may therefore be inhabited by endosymbiotic bacteria that help in degradation of algal cell wall constituents. This thesis work investigated bacteria associated with seaweed, seagrass and sea urchins for their enzymatic activities against algal cell wall polysaccharides...... are incapable of breaking the complex polysaccharides found in seaweed cell walls. Therefore, new enzymes are needed for degradation of seaweed biomass. Bacteria that colonize the surfaces of seaweed secrete enzymes that allow them to degrade and utilize seaweed polysaccharides as energy. In addition, sea...

  5. Probing (macro)molecular transport through cell walls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilcher, Giona; Delneri, Daniela; Duckham, Craig; Tirelli, Nicola

    2008-01-01

    We here report a study on the passive permeability of hydrophobic probes through the cell wall of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In this study we have prepared a series of fluorescent probes with similar chemical composition and molecular weight ranging from a few hundreds to a few thousands of g mol(-1). Their permeation into the cell body exhibits a clear MW cut-off and the underlying mechanism is governed by the permeation of individual molecules rather than aggregates. We also show that it is possible to reversibly alter the cell wall permeation properties without compromising the essence of its structure, by modifying the polarity/dielectric constant of the wall through solvent exchange.

  6. Neural stem cells promote nerve regeneration through IL12-induced Schwann cell differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Don-Ching; Chen, Jong-Hang; Hsu, Tai-Yu; Chang, Li-Hsun; Chang, Hsu; Chi, Ya-Hui; Chiu, Ing-Ming

    2017-03-01

    Regeneration of injured peripheral nerves is a slow, complicated process that could be improved by implantation of neural stem cells (NSCs) or nerve conduit. Implantation of NSCs along with conduits promotes the regeneration of damaged nerve, likely because (i) conduit supports and guides axonal growth from one nerve stump to the other, while preventing fibrous tissue ingrowth and retaining neurotrophic factors; and (ii) implanted NSCs differentiate into Schwann cells and maintain a growth factor enriched microenvironment, which promotes nerve regeneration. In this study, we identified IL12p80 (homodimer of IL12p40) in the cell extracts of implanted nerve conduit combined with NSCs by using protein antibody array and Western blotting. Levels of IL12p80 in these conduits are 1.6-fold higher than those in conduits without NSCs. In the sciatic nerve injury mouse model, implantation of NSCs combined with nerve conduit and IL12p80 improves motor recovery and increases the diameter up to 4.5-fold, at the medial site of the regenerated nerve. In vitro study further revealed that IL12p80 stimulates the Schwann cell differentiation of mouse NSCs through the phosphorylation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (Stat3). These results suggest that IL12p80 can trigger Schwann cell differentiation of mouse NSCs through Stat3 phosphorylation and enhance the functional recovery and the diameter of regenerated nerves in a mouse sciatic nerve injury model. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Composite cell sheet for periodontal regeneration: crosstalk between different types of MSCs in cell sheet facilitates complex periodontal-like tissue regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hao; Liu, Shiyu; Zhu, Bin; Xu, Qiu; Ding, Yin; Jin, Yan

    2016-11-14

    Tissue-engineering strategies based on mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and cell sheets have been widely used for periodontal tissue regeneration. However, given the complexity in periodontal structure, the regeneration methods using a single species of MSC could not fulfill the requirement for periodontal regeneration. We researched the interaction between the periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs) and jaw bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (JBMMSCs), and constructed a composite cell sheet comprising both of the above MSCs to regenerate complex periodontium-like structures in nude mice. Our results show that by co-culturing PDLSCs and JBMMSCs, the expressions of bone and extracellular matrix (ECM)-related genes and proteins were significantly improved in both MSCs. Further investigations showed that, compared to the cell sheet using PDLSCs or JBMMSCs, the composite stem cell sheet (CSCS), which comprises these two MSCs, expressed higher levels of bone- and ECM-related genes and proteins, and generated a composite structure more similar to the native periodontal tissue physiologically in vivo. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that the crosstalk between PDLSCs and JBMMSCs in cell sheets facilitate regeneration of complex periodontium-like structures, providing a promising new strategy for physiological and functional regeneration of periodontal tissue.

  8. Cell Wall Metabolism in Response to Abiotic Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyacinthe Le Gall

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available This review focuses on the responses of the plant cell wall to several abiotic stresses including drought, flooding, heat, cold, salt, heavy metals, light, and air pollutants. The effects of stress on cell wall metabolism are discussed at the physiological (morphogenic, transcriptomic, proteomic and biochemical levels. The analysis of a large set of data shows that the plant response is highly complex. The overall effects of most abiotic stress are often dependent on the plant species, the genotype, the age of the plant, the timing of the stress application, and the intensity of this stress. This shows the difficulty of identifying a common pattern of stress response in cell wall architecture that could enable adaptation and/or resistance to abiotic stress. However, in most cases, two main mechanisms can be highlighted: (i an increased level in xyloglucan endotransglucosylase/hydrolase (XTH and expansin proteins, associated with an increase in the degree of rhamnogalacturonan I branching that maintains cell wall plasticity and (ii an increased cell wall thickening by reinforcement of the secondary wall with hemicellulose and lignin deposition. Taken together, these results show the need to undertake large-scale analyses, using multidisciplinary approaches, to unravel the consequences of stress on the cell wall. This will help identify the key components that could be targeted to improve biomass production under stress conditions.

  9. The plant cell wall: A dynamic barrier against pathogen invasion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William eUnderwood

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Prospective plant pathogens must overcome the physical barrier presented by the plant cell wall. In addition to being a preformed, passive barrier limiting access of pathogens to plant cells, the cell wall is actively remodeled and reinforced specifically at discrete sites of interaction with potentially pathogenic microbes. Active reinforcement of the cell wall through the deposition of call wall appositions, referred to as papillae, is an early response to perception of numerous categories of pathogens including fungi and bacteria. Rapid deposition of papillae is generally correlated with resistance to fungal pathogens that attempt to penetrate plant cell walls for the establishment of feeding structures. Despite the ubiquity and apparent importance of this early defense response, relatively little is known about the underlying molecular mechanisms and cellular processes involved in the targeting and assembly of papillae. This review summarizes recent advances in our understanding of call wall-associated defenses induced by pathogen perception as well as the impact of changes in cell wall polymers on interactions with pathogens and highlights significant unanswered questions driving future research in the area.

  10. 2D-immunoblotting analysis of Sporothrix schenckii cell wall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Estela Ruiz-Baca

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available We utilized two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and immunoblotting (2D-immunoblotting with anti-Sporothrix schenckii antibodies to identify antigenic proteins in cell wall preparations obtained from the mycelial and yeast-like morphologies of the fungus. Results showed that a 70-kDa glycoprotein (Gp70 was the major antigen detected in the cell wall of both morphologies and that a 60-kDa glycoprotein was present only in yeast-like cells. In addition to the Gp70, the wall from filament cells showed four proteins with molecular weights of 48, 55, 66 and 67 kDa, some of which exhibited several isoforms. To our knowledge, this is the first 2D-immunoblotting analysis of the S. schenckii cell wall.

  11. An Arabidopsis gene regulatory network for secondary cell wall synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor-Teeples, M; Lin, L; de Lucas, M; Turco, G; Toal, T W; Gaudinier, A; Young, N F; Trabucco, G M; Veling, M T; Lamothe, R; Handakumbura, P P; Xiong, G; Wang, C; Corwin, J; Tsoukalas, A; Zhang, L; Ware, D; Pauly, M; Kliebenstein, D J; Dehesh, K; Tagkopoulos, I; Breton, G; Pruneda-Paz, J L; Ahnert, S E; Kay, S A; Hazen, S P; Brady, S M

    2015-01-29

    The plant cell wall is an important factor for determining cell shape, function and response to the environment. Secondary cell walls, such as those found in xylem, are composed of cellulose, hemicelluloses and lignin and account for the bulk of plant biomass. The coordination between transcriptional regulation of synthesis for each polymer is complex and vital to cell function. A regulatory hierarchy of developmental switches has been proposed, although the full complement of regulators remains unknown. Here we present a protein-DNA network between Arabidopsis thaliana transcription factors and secondary cell wall metabolic genes with gene expression regulated by a series of feed-forward loops. This model allowed us to develop and validate new hypotheses about secondary wall gene regulation under abiotic stress. Distinct stresses are able to perturb targeted genes to potentially promote functional adaptation. These interactions will serve as a foundation for understanding the regulation of a complex, integral plant component.

  12. Investigation of Plant Cell Wall Properties: A Study of Contributions from the Nanoscale to the Macroscale Impacting Cell Wall Recalcitrance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowe, Jacob Dillon

    Biochemical conversion of lignocellulosic biomass to fuel ethanol is one of a few challenging, yet opportune technologies that can reduce the consumption of petroleum-derived transportation fuels, while providing parallel reductions in greenhouse gas emissions. Biomass recalcitrance, or resistance to deconstruction, is a major technical challenge that limits effective conversion of biomass to fermentable sugars, often requiring a costly thermochemical pretreatment step to improve biomass deconstruction. Biomass recalcitrance is imparted largely by the secondary cell wall, a complex polymeric matrix of cell wall polysaccharides and aromatic heteropolymers, that provides structural stability to cells and enables plant upright growth. Polymers within the cell wall can vary both compositionally and structurally depending upon plant species and anatomical fraction, and have varied responses to thermochemical pretreatments. Cell wall properties impacting recalcitrance are still not well understood, and as a result, the goal of this dissertation is to investigate structural features of the cell wall contributing to recalcitrance (1) in diverse anatomical fractions of a single species, (2) in response to diverse pretreatments, and (3) resulting from genetic modification. In the first study, feedstock cell wall heterogeneity was investigated in anatomical (stem, leaf sheaths, and leaf blades) and internode fractions of switchgrass at varying tissue maturities. Lignin content was observed as the key contributor to recalcitrance in maturing stem tissues only, with non-cellulosic substituted glucuronoarabinoxylans and pectic polysaccharides contributing to cell wall recalcitrance in leaf sheath and leaf blades. Hydroxycinnamate (i.e., saponifiable p-coumarate and ferulate) content along with xylan and pectin extractability decreased with tissue maturity, suggesting lignification is only one component imparting maturity specific cell wall recalcitrance. In the second study

  13. Structural analysis of cell wall polysaccharides using PACE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mortimer, Jennifer C. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Joint BioEnergy Institute

    2017-01-01

    The plant cell wall is composed of many complex polysaccharides. The composition and structure of the polysaccharides affect various cell properties including cell shape, cell function and cell adhesion. Many techniques to characterize polysaccharide structure are complicated, requiring expensive equipment and specialized operators e.g. NMR, MALDI-MS. PACE (Polysaccharide Analysis using Carbohydrate gel Electrophoresis) uses a simple, rapid technique to analyze polysaccharide quantity and structure (Goubet et al. 2002). Whilst the method here describes xylan analysis, it can be applied (by use of the appropriate glycosyl hydrolase) to any cell wall polysaccharide.

  14. On the growth of walled cells: From shells to vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudaoud, Arezki

    2003-03-01

    The growth of isolated walled cells is investigated. Examples of such cells range from bacteria to giant algae, and include cochlear hair, plant root hair, fungi and yeast cells. They are modeled as elastic shells inflated by a liquid. Cell growth is driven by fluid pressure and is similar to a plastic deformation of the wall. The requirement of mechanical equilibrium leads to two new scaling laws for cell size that are in quantitative agreement with the compiled biological data. Given these results, possible shapes for growing cells are computed by analogy with those of vesicle membranes.

  15. Growth of Walled Cells: From Shells to Vesicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudaoud, Arezki

    2003-07-01

    The growth of isolated walled cells is investigated. Examples of such cells range from bacteria to giant algae, and include cochlear hair, plant root hair, fungi, and yeast cells. They are modeled as elastic shells containing a liquid. Cell growth is driven by fluid pressure and is is similar to a plastic deformation of the wall. The requirement of mechanical equilibrium leads to two new scaling laws for cell size that are in quantitative agreement with the compiled biological data. Given these results, possible shapes for growing cells are computed by analogy with those of vesicle membranes.

  16. Cell Wall Composition, Biosynthesis and Remodeling during Pollen Tube Growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Claude Mollet

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The pollen tube is a fast tip-growing cell carrying the two sperm cells to the ovule allowing the double fertilization process and seed setting. To succeed in this process, the spatial and temporal controls of pollen tube growth within the female organ are critical. It requires a massive cell wall deposition to promote fast pollen tube elongation and a tight control of the cell wall remodeling to modify the mechanical properties. In addition, during its journey, the pollen tube interacts with the pistil, which plays key roles in pollen tube nutrition, guidance and in the rejection of the self-incompatible pollen. This review focuses on our current knowledge in the biochemistry and localization of the main cell wall polymers including pectin, hemicellulose, cellulose and callose from several pollen tube species. Moreover, based on transcriptomic data and functional genomic studies, the possible enzymes involved in the cell wall remodeling during pollen tube growth and their impact on the cell wall mechanics are also described. Finally, mutant analyses have permitted to gain insight in the function of several genes involved in the pollen tube cell wall biosynthesis and their roles in pollen tube growth are further discussed.

  17. Cell Wall Composition, Biosynthesis and Remodeling during Pollen Tube Growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mollet, Jean-Claude; Leroux, Christelle; Dardelle, Flavien; Lehner, Arnaud

    2013-03-07

    The pollen tube is a fast tip-growing cell carrying the two sperm cells to the ovule allowing the double fertilization process and seed setting. To succeed in this process, the spatial and temporal controls of pollen tube growth within the female organ are critical. It requires a massive cell wall deposition to promote fast pollen tube elongation and a tight control of the cell wall remodeling to modify the mechanical properties. In addition, during its journey, the pollen tube interacts with the pistil, which plays key roles in pollen tube nutrition, guidance and in the rejection of the self-incompatible pollen. This review focuses on our current knowledge in the biochemistry and localization of the main cell wall polymers including pectin, hemicellulose, cellulose and callose from several pollen tube species. Moreover, based on transcriptomic data and functional genomic studies, the possible enzymes involved in the cell wall remodeling during pollen tube growth and their impact on the cell wall mechanics are also described. Finally, mutant analyses have permitted to gain insight in the function of several genes involved in the pollen tube cell wall biosynthesis and their roles in pollen tube growth are further discussed.

  18. The targeting of starch binding domains from starch synthase III to the cell wall alters cell wall composition and properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grisolia, Mauricio J; Peralta, Diego A; Valdez, Hugo A; Barchiesi, Julieta; Gomez-Casati, Diego F; Busi, María V

    2017-01-01

    Starch binding domains of starch synthase III from Arabidopsis thaliana (SBD123) binds preferentially to cell wall polysaccharides rather than to starch in vitro. Transgenic plants overexpressing SBD123 in the cell wall are larger than wild type. Cell wall components are altered in transgenic plants. Transgenic plants are more susceptible to digestion than wild type and present higher released glucose content. Our results suggest that the transgenic plants have an advantage for the production of bioethanol in terms of saccharification of essential substrates. The plant cell wall, which represents a major source of biomass for biofuel production, is composed of cellulose, hemicelluloses, pectins and lignin. A potential biotechnological target for improving the production of biofuels is the modification of plant cell walls. This modification is achieved via several strategies, including, among others, altering biosynthetic pathways and modifying the associations and structures of various cell wall components. In this study, we modified the cell wall of A. thaliana by targeting the starch-binding domains of A. thaliana starch synthase III to this structure. The resulting transgenic plants (E8-SDB123) showed an increased biomass, higher levels of both fermentable sugars and hydrolyzed cellulose and altered cell wall properties such as higher laxity and degradability, which are valuable characteristics for the second-generation biofuels industry. The increased biomass and degradability phenotype of E8-SBD123 plants could be explained by the putative cell-wall loosening effect of the in tandem starch binding domains. Based on these results, our approach represents a promising biotechnological tool for reducing of biomass recalcitrance and therefore, the need for pretreatments.

  19. Pathogenicity and cell wall-degrading enzyme activities of some ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr. J. T. Ekanem

    2005-12-17

    borne pathogens most of which are fungi6,8,10,11. Many phytopathogenic fungi and bacteria have long been known to produce enzymes capable of hydrolyzing the polymeric carbohydrate constituent of higher plants cell wall.

  20. Plant cell walls: New insights from ancient species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Iben; Willats, William George Tycho

    2008-01-01

    Cell walls are a defining feature of plants and have numerous crucial roles in growth and development. They are also the largest source of terrestrial biomass and have many important industrial applications - ranging from bulk products to functional food ingredients. There is considerable interest......-D-glucan is not unique to the Poales and is an abundant component of Equisetum arvense cell walls. Plant J 2008; 54:510-21....... in the structure and functions of cell walls, and in the evolution of their remarkably complex polysaccharide structures. The grasses and cereals (order Poales), have long been regarded as being unique in that their cell walls contain an unbranched homopolymer, (1¿3)(1¿4)-ß-D-glucan, in which short blocks of (1...

  1. Modification of cell wall polysaccharides during retting of cassava roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngolong Ngea, Guillaume Legrand; Guillon, Fabienne; Essia Ngang, Jean Justin; Bonnin, Estelle; Bouchet, Brigitte; Saulnier, Luc

    2016-12-15

    Retting is an important step in traditional cassava processing that involves tissue softening of the roots to transform the cassava into flour and various food products. The tissue softening that occurs during retting was attributed to the degradation of cell wall pectins through the action of pectin-methylesterase and pectate-lyase that possibly originated from a microbial source or the cassava plant itself. Changes in cell wall composition were investigated during retting using chemical analysis, specific glycanase degradation and immuno-labelling of cell wall polysaccharides. Pectic 1,4-β-d-galactan was the main cell wall polysaccharide affected during the retting of cassava roots. This result suggested that better control of pectic galactan degradation and a better understanding of the degradation mechanism by endogenous endo-galactanase and/or exogenous microbial enzymes might contribute to improve the texture properties of cassava products. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Plant cell wall characterization using scanning probe microscopy techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarbrough, John M; Himmel, Michael E; Ding, Shi-You

    2009-01-01

    Lignocellulosic biomass is today considered a promising renewable resource for bioenergy production. A combined chemical and biological process is currently under consideration for the conversion of polysaccharides from plant cell wall materials, mainly cellulose and hemicelluloses, to simple sugars that can be fermented to biofuels. Native plant cellulose forms nanometer-scale microfibrils that are embedded in a polymeric network of hemicelluloses, pectins, and lignins; this explains, in part, the recalcitrance of biomass to deconstruction. The chemical and structural characteristics of these plant cell wall constituents remain largely unknown today. Scanning probe microscopy techniques, particularly atomic force microscopy and its application in characterizing plant cell wall structure, are reviewed here. We also further discuss future developments based on scanning probe microscopy techniques that combine linear and nonlinear optical techniques to characterize plant cell wall nanometer-scale structures, specifically apertureless near-field scanning optical microscopy and coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy. PMID:19703302

  3. Plant cell wall characterization using scanning probe microscopy techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Himmel Michael E

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Lignocellulosic biomass is today considered a promising renewable resource for bioenergy production. A combined chemical and biological process is currently under consideration for the conversion of polysaccharides from plant cell wall materials, mainly cellulose and hemicelluloses, to simple sugars that can be fermented to biofuels. Native plant cellulose forms nanometer-scale microfibrils that are embedded in a polymeric network of hemicelluloses, pectins, and lignins; this explains, in part, the recalcitrance of biomass to deconstruction. The chemical and structural characteristics of these plant cell wall constituents remain largely unknown today. Scanning probe microscopy techniques, particularly atomic force microscopy and its application in characterizing plant cell wall structure, are reviewed here. We also further discuss future developments based on scanning probe microscopy techniques that combine linear and nonlinear optical techniques to characterize plant cell wall nanometer-scale structures, specifically apertureless near-field scanning optical microscopy and coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy.

  4. Boric Acid Disturbs Cell Wall Synthesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Schmidt

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Boric acid (BA has broad antimicrobial activity that makes it a popular treatment for yeast vaginitis in complementary and alternative medicine. In the model yeast S. cerevisiae, BA disturbs the cytoskeleton at the bud neck and impairs the assembly of the septation apparatus. BA treatment causes cells to form irregular septa and leads to the synthesis of irregular cell wall protuberances that extend far into the cytoplasm. The thick, chitin-rich septa that are formed during BA exposure prevent separation of cells after abscission and cause the formation of cell chains and clumps. As a response to the BA insult, cells signal cell wall stress through the Slt2p pathway and increase chitin synthesis, presumably to repair cell wall damage.

  5. Biotechnology in the Treatment of Sensorineural Hearing Loss: Foundations and Future of Hair Cell Regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Mark A.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To provide an overview of the methodologies involved in the field of hair cell regeneration. First, the author provides a tutorial on the biotechnological foundations of this field to assist the reader in the comprehension and interpretation of the research involved in hair cell regeneration. Next, the author presents a review of stem…

  6. The effects of the stem cell on ciliary regeneration of injured rabbit sinonasal epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavuzlu, Ali; Tatar, Emel Çadallı; Karagöz, Tuğba; Pınarlı, Ferda Alpaslan; Tatar, İlkan; Bayır, Ömer; Korkmaz, Mehmet Hakan

    2017-08-01

    Defects in mucosal healing after sinonasal surgery cause infection, scar formation causing obstruction, relapse of the disease within a shorter period and revision surgery. The present study aimed to create a functional ciliated epithelium using a stem cell and stem cell sheet of adipose tissue origin and to show such regeneration ultra-structurally on experimentally injured rabbit nasal epithelium. This was an experimental animal study and basic research. A total of 18 white New Zealand rabbits were divided into three groups. The medial wall of the maxillary sinus of the subjects was peeled off bilaterally. No additional procedure was applied to the subjects in Group 1. In Group 2, adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cell was implanted on the wound edges of the subjects. In Group 3, a stem cell sheet of three layers was laid onto the defect area. All subjects were killed after 3 weeks. The presence of the stem cell stained with bromo-deoxyuridine was assessed with a light microscope, whereas cilia density, ciliated orientation and cilia structure were evaluated with a scanning electron microscope. Ciliary densities in Group 2 and Group 3 were statistically superior compared to the control group (p stem cell increased the healing of the injured maxillary sinus mucosa of the rabbits in terms of cilia presence, density and morphology regardless of the implementation technique. Level of evidence NA.

  7. IGFBP1 increases β-cell regeneration by promoting α- to β-cell transdifferentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jing; Liu, Ka-Cheuk; Schulz, Nadja; Karampelias, Christos; Charbord, Jérémie; Hilding, Agneta; Rautio, Linn; Bertolino, Philippe; Östenson, Claes-Göran; Brismar, Kerstin; Andersson, Olov

    2016-09-15

    There is great interest in therapeutically harnessing endogenous regenerative mechanisms to increase the number of β cells in people with diabetes. By performing whole-genome expression profiling of zebrafish islets, we identified 11 secreted proteins that are upregulated during β-cell regeneration. We then tested the proteins' ability to potentiate β-cell regeneration in zebrafish at supraphysiological levels. One protein, insulin-like growth factor (Igf) binding-protein 1 (Igfbp1), potently promoted β-cell regeneration by potentiating α- to β-cell transdifferentiation. Using various inhibitors and activators of the Igf pathway, we show that Igfbp1 exerts its regenerative effect, at least partly, by inhibiting Igf signaling. Igfbp1's effect on transdifferentiation appears conserved across species: Treating mouse and human islets with recombinant IGFBP1 in vitro increased the number of cells co-expressing insulin and glucagon threefold. Moreover, a prospective human study showed that having high IGFBP1 levels reduces the risk of developing type-2 diabetes by more than 85%. Thus, we identify IGFBP1 as an endogenous promoter of β-cell regeneration and highlight its clinical importance in diabetes. © 2016 The Authors. Published under the terms of the CC BY NC ND 4.0 license.

  8. Patterns of expression of cell wall related genes in sugarcane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lima D.U.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Our search for genes related to cell wall metabolism in the sugarcane expressed sequence tag (SUCEST database (http://sucest.lbi.dcc.unicamp.br resulted in 3,283 reads (1% of the total reads which were grouped into 459 clusters (potential genes with an average of 7.1 reads per cluster. To more clearly display our correlation coefficients, we constructed surface maps which we used to investigate the relationship between cell wall genes and the sugarcane tissues libraries from which they came. The only significant correlations that we found between cell wall genes and/or their expression within particular libraries were neutral or synergetic. Genes related to cellulose biosynthesis were from the CesA family, and were found to be the most abundant cell wall related genes in the SUCEST database. We found that the highest number of CesA reads came from the root and stem libraries. The genes with the greatest number of reads were those involved in cell wall hydrolases (e.g. beta-1,3-glucanases, xyloglucan endo-beta-transglycosylase, beta-glucosidase and endo-beta-mannanase. Correlation analyses by surface mapping revealed that the expression of genes related to biosynthesis seems to be associated with the hydrolysis of hemicelluloses, pectin hydrolases being mainly associated with xyloglucan hydrolases. The patterns of cell wall related gene expression in sugarcane based on the number of reads per cluster reflected quite well the expected physiological characteristics of the tissues. This is the first work to provide a general view on plant cell wall metabolism through the expression of related genes in almost all the tissues of a plant at the same time. For example, developing flowers behaved similarly to both meristematic tissues and leaf-root transition zone tissues. Besides providing a basis for future research on the mechanisms of plant development which involve the cell wall, our findings will provide valuable tools for plant engineering in the

  9. Flavonoid insertion into cell walls improves wood properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ermeydan, Mahmut A; Cabane, Etienne; Masic, Admir; Koetz, Joachim; Burgert, Ingo

    2012-11-01

    Wood has an excellent mechanical performance, but wider utilization of this renewable resource as an engineering material is limited by unfavorable properties such as low dimensional stability upon moisture changes and a low durability. However, some wood species are known to produce a wood of higher quality by inserting mainly phenolic substances in the already formed cell walls--a process so-called heartwood formation. In the present study, we used the heartwood formation in black locust (Robinia pseudoacacia) as a source of bioinspiration and transferred principles of the modification in order to improve spruce wood properties (Picea abies) by a chemical treatment with commercially available flavonoids. We were able to effectively insert hydrophobic flavonoids in the cell wall after a tosylation treatment for activation. The chemical treatment reduced the water uptake of the wood cell walls and increased the dimensional stability of the bulk spruce wood. Further analysis of the chemical interaction of the flavonoid with the structural cell wall components revealed the basic principle of this bioinspired modification. Contrary to established modification treatments, which mainly address the hydroxyl groups of the carbohydrates with hydrophilic substances, the hydrophobic flavonoids are effective by a physical bulking in the cell wall most probably stabilized by π-π interactions. A biomimetic transfer of the underlying principle may lead to alternative cell wall modification procedures and improve the performance of wood as an engineering material.

  10. Odontogenic differentiation of adipose-derived stem cells for tooth regeneration: necessity, possibility, and strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Wei; Wu, Ling; Lin, Yunfeng; Liu, Lei; Tang, Wei; Tian, Weidong

    2008-01-01

    Tooth regeneration using tissue engineering concepts is a promising biological approach to solving problems of tooth loss in elderly patients. The seeding cells, however, for tooth regeneration such as odontoblasts from dental germ, stem cells from dental pulp and deciduous teeth, and ectomesenchymal cells from the first branchial arch are difficult, even impossible to harvest in clinic. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells have odontogenic capacity, but their differentiation abilities significantly decrease with the increasing age of the donors. Therefore, the cells mentioned above are not practical in the clinical application of tooth regeneration in the old. Adipose derived stem cells have many clinical advantages over bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells, and their differentiation potential can be maintained with aging. Here we propose the hypothesis that adipose derived stem cells could be induced into odontogenic lineage and might be used as suitable seeding cells for tooth regeneration to replace the lost tooth of elderly patients.

  11. Tooth regeneration from newly established cell lines from a molar tooth germ epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komine, Akihiko; Suenaga, Momoko; Nakao, Kazuhisa; Tsuji, Takashi; Tomooka, Yasuhiro

    2007-04-13

    In order to investigate tooth development, several cell lines of the dental epithelium and ectomesenchyme have been established. However, no attempt has been reported to regenerate teeth with cell lines. Here, we have established several clonal cell lines of the dental epithelium from a p53-deficient fetal mouse. They expressed specific markers of the dental epithelium such as ameloblastin and amelogenin. A new method has been developed to bioengineer tooth germs with dental epithelial and mesenchymal cells. Reconstructed tooth germs with cell lines and fetal mesenchymal cells were implanted under kidney capsule. The germs regenerated teeth with well-calcified structures as seen in natural tooth. Germs without the cell lines developed bone. This is the first success to regenerate teeth with dental epithelial cell lines. They are useful models in vitro for investigation of mechanisms in morphogenesis and of cell lineage in differentiation, and for clinical application for tooth regeneration.

  12. How the deposition of cellulose microfibrils builds cell wall architecture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Emons, A.M.C.; Mulder, B.M.

    2000-01-01

    Cell walls, the extracytoplasmic matrices of plant cells, consist of an ordered array of cellulose microfibrils embedded in a matrix of polysaccharides and glycoproteins. This construction is reminiscent of steel rods in reinforced concrete. How a cell organizes these ordered textures around itself,

  13. Saccharomyces cerevisiae cell wall products: The effects on gut ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... no differences between treatments. From the results of this study it appears as if yeast cell wall preparations can contribute to the gastrointestinal health and performance of broiler chickens by affecting mucus secreting goblet cells in a favourable manner. Keywords: Yeast, villi width and height, growth rate, goblet cells ...

  14. Loss of the Arabidopsis Protein Kinases ANPs Affects Root Cell Wall Composition, and Triggers the Cell Wall Damage Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nora Gigli Bisceglia

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The Arabidopsis NPK1-related Protein kinases ANP1, ANP2 and ANP3 belong to the MAP kinase kinase kinase (MAPKKK superfamily and were previously described to be crucial for cytokinesis, elicitor-induced immunity and development. Here we investigate the basis of their role in development by using conditional β-estradiol-inducible triple mutants to overcome lethality. In seedlings, lack of ANPs causes root cell bulging, with the transition zone being the most sensitive region. We uncover a role of ANPs in the regulation of cell wall composition and suggest that developmental defects of the triple mutants, observed at the cellular level, might be a consequence of the alterations of the pectic and cellulosic cell wall components. Lack of ANPs also induced a typical cell wall damage syndrome (CWDS similar to that observed in plants treated with the cellulose biosynthesis inhibitor isoxaben (ISX. Moreover, anp double mutants and plants overexpressing single ANPs (ANP1 or ANP3 respectively showed increased and reduced accumulation of jasmonic acid and PDF1.2 transcripts upon ISX treatment, suggesting that ANPs are part of the pathway targeted by this inhibitor and play a role in cell wall integrity surveillance.Highlights: The loss of ANP function affects cell wall composition and leads to typical cell wall damage-induced phenotypes, such as ectopic lignification and jasmonic acid accumulation.

  15. Characterizing visible and invisible cell wall mutant phenotypes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carpita, Nicholas C.; McCann, Maureen C.

    2015-04-06

    About 10% of a plant's genome is devoted to generating the protein machinery to synthesize, remodel, and deconstruct the cell wall. High-throughput genome sequencing technologies have enabled a reasonably complete inventory of wall-related genes that can be assembled into families of common evolutionary origin. Assigning function to each gene family member has been aided immensely by identification of mutants with visible phenotypes or by chemical and spectroscopic analysis of mutants with ‘invisible’ phenotypes of modified cell wall composition and architecture that do not otherwise affect plant growth or development. This review connects the inference of gene function on the basis of deviation from the wild type in genetic functional analyses to insights provided by modern analytical techniques that have brought us ever closer to elucidating the sequence structures of the major polysaccharide components of the plant cell wall.

  16. Motion of red blood cells near microvessel walls: effects of a porous wall layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    HARIPRASAD, DANIEL S.; SECOMB, TIMOTHY W.

    2013-01-01

    A two-dimensional model is used to simulate the motion and deformation of a single mammalian red blood cell (RBC) flowing close to the wall of a microvessel, taking into account the effects of a porous endothelial surface layer (ESL) lining the vessel wall. Migration of RBCs away from the wall leads to the formation of a cell-depleted layer near the wall, which has a large effect on the resistance to blood flow in microvessels. The objective is to examine the mechanical factors causing this migration, including the effects of the ESL. The vessel is represented as a straight parallel-sided channel. The RBC is represented as a set of interconnected viscoelastic elements, suspended in plasma, a Newtonian fluid. The ESL is represented as a porous medium, and plasma flow in the layer is computed using the Brinkman approximation. It is shown that an initially circular cell positioned close to the ESL in a shear flow is deformed into an asymmetric shape. This breaking of symmetry leads to migration away from the wall. With increasing hydraulic resistivity of the layer, the rate of lateral migration increases. It is concluded that mechanical interactions of RBCs flowing in microvessels with a porous wall layer may reduce the rate of lateral migration and hence reduce the width of the cell-depleted zone external to the ESL, relative to the cell-depleted zone that would be formed if the interface between the ESL and free-flowing plasma were replaced by an impermeable boundary. PMID:23493820

  17. Immunocytochemical characterization of the cell walls of bean cell suspensions during habituation and dehabituation to dichlobenil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garcia-Angulo, P.; Willats, W. G. T.; Encina, A. E.

    2006-01-01

    in habituated cells also diminished with the increasing number of subcultures. Habituated cells also liberated less extensin into the medium. In habituated cells, a decrease in the cell wall arabinogalactan protein (AGP) labelling was observed both in cell walls and in the culture medium. The increase...

  18. Sorption of volatile phenols by yeast cell walls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nerea Jiménez-Moreno

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Nerea Jiménez-Moreno, Carmen Ancín-AzpilicuetaDepartment of Applied Chemistry, Universidad Pública de Navarra, Pamplona, SpainAbstract: Yeast walls can retain different wine compounds and so its use is interesting in order to eliminate harmful substances from the must which affect alcoholic fermentation (medium chain fatty acids or which affect wine quality in a negative way (ethyl phenols, ochratoxin A. The aim of this study was to examine the capacity of commercial yeast cell walls in eliminating volatile phenols (4-ethylphenol and 4-ethylguaiacol from a synthetic wine that contained 1 mg/L of each one of these compounds. The binding of these compounds to the wall was quite fast which would seem to indicate that the yeast wall-volatile compound union is produced in the outer surface layers of this enological additive. The cell walls used reduced the concentration of 4-ethylphenol and 4-ethylguaiacol, although it would seem that on modifying the matrix of the wine the number of free binding sites on the walls is also modified.Keywords: volatile phenols, yeast cell walls, wine, sorption

  19. Evaluation of cell wall preparations for proteomics: a new procedure for purifying cell walls from Arabidopsis hypocotyls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Canut Hervé

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ultimate goal of proteomic analysis of a cell compartment should be the exhaustive identification of resident proteins; excluding proteins from other cell compartments. Reaching such a goal closely depends on the reliability of the isolation procedure for the cell compartment of interest. Plant cell walls possess specific difficulties: (i the lack of a surrounding membrane may result in the loss of cell wall proteins (CWP during the isolation procedure, (ii polysaccharide networks of cellulose, hemicelluloses and pectins form potential traps for contaminants such as intracellular proteins. Several reported procedures to isolate cell walls for proteomic analyses led to the isolation of a high proportion (more than 50% of predicted intracellular proteins. Since isolated cell walls should hold secreted proteins, one can imagine alternative procedures to prepare cell walls containing a lower proportion of contaminant proteins. Results The rationales of several published procedures to isolate cell walls for proteomics were analyzed, with regard to the bioinformatic-predicted subcellular localization of the identified proteins. Critical steps were revealed: (i homogenization in low ionic strength acid buffer to retain CWP, (ii purification through increasing density cushions, (iii extensive washes with a low ionic strength acid buffer to retain CWP while removing as many cytosolic proteins as possible, and (iv absence of detergents. A new procedure was developed to prepare cell walls from etiolated hypocotyls of Arabidopsis thaliana. After salt extraction, a high proportion of proteins predicted to be secreted was released (73%, belonging to the same functional classes as proteins identified using previously described protocols. Finally, removal of intracellular proteins was obtained using detergents, but their amount represented less than 3% in mass of the total protein extract, based on protein quantification. Conclusion The

  20. Electron Microscopy of Staphylococcus aureus Cell Wall Lysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virgilio, R.; González, C.; Muñoz, Nubia; Mendoza, Silvia

    1966-01-01

    Virgilio, Rafael (Escuela de Química y Farmacia, Universidad de Chile, Santiago, Chile), C. González, Nubia Muñoz, and Silvia Mendoza. Electron microscopy of Staphylococcus aureus cell wall lysis. J. Bacteriol. 91:2018–2024. 1966.—A crude suspension of Staphylococcus aureus cell walls (strain Cowan III) in buffer solution was shown by electron microscopy to lyse slightly after 16 hr, probably owing to the action of autolysin. The lysis was considerably faster and more intense after the addition of lysozyme. A remarkable reduction in thickness and rigidity of the cell walls, together with the appearance of many irregular protrusions in their outlines, was observed after 2 hr; after 16 hr, there remained only a few recognizable cell wall fragments but many residual particulate remnants. When autolysin was previously inactivated by trypsin, there was a complete inhibition of the lytic action of lysozyme; on the other hand, when autolysin was inactivated by heat and lysozyme was added, a distinct decrease in the thickness of the cell walls was observed, but there was no destruction of the walls. The lytic action of lysozyme, after treatment with hot 5% trichloroacetic acid, gave rise to a marked dissolution of the structure of the cell walls, which became lost against the background, without, however, showing ostensible alteration of wall outlines. From a morphological point of view, the lytic action of autolysin plus lysozyme was quite different from that of trichloroacetic acid plus lysozyme, as shown by electron micrographs, but in both cases it was very intense. This would suggest different mechanisms of action for these agents. Images PMID:5939482

  1. Regeneration of Articular Cartilage Surface: Morphogens, Cells, and Extracellular Matrix Scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakata, Ryosuke; Iwakura, Takashi; Reddi, A Hari

    2015-10-01

    The articular cartilage is a well-organized tissue for smooth and friction-free joint movement for locomotion in animals and humans. Adult articular cartilage has a very low self-regeneration capacity due to its avascular nature. The regeneration of articular cartilage surface is critical to prevent the progression to osteoarthritis (OA). Although various joint resurfacing procedures in experimental articular cartilage defects have been developed, no standardized clinical protocol has yet been established. The three critical ingredients for tissue regeneration are morphogens and growth factors, cells, and scaffolds. The concepts based on the regeneration triad have been extensively investigated in animal models. However, these studies in animal models have demonstrated variable results and outcomes. An optimal animal model must precisely mimic and model the sequence of events in articular cartilage regeneration in human. In this article, the progress and remaining challenges in articular cartilage regeneration in animal models are reviewed. The role of individual morphogens and growth factors in cartilage regeneration has been investigated. In normal articular cartilage homeostasis, morphogens and growth factors function sequentially in tissue regeneration. Mesenchymal stem cell-based repair of articular cartilage defects, performed with or without various growth factors and scaffolds, has been widely attempted in animal models. Stem cells, including embryonic and adult stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells, have also been reported as attractive cell sources for articular cartilage surface regeneration. Several studies with regard to scaffolds have been advanced, including recent investigations based on nanomaterials, functional mechanocompatible scaffolds, multilayered scaffolds, and extracellular matrix scaffolds for articular cartilage surface regeneration. Continuous refinement of animal models in chondral and osteochondral defects provide opportunities

  2. APPLICATION OF STEM CELLS AND PRECURSOR CELLS FOR STIMULATION OF ORGAN REVASCULARIZATION AND REGENERATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. V. Eremeeva

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Different angiogenic factors induced angiogenesis stimulation in ischemic tissues stays in the focus of scientific research for long time. The key role in ischemic angiogenesis belongs to endothelial precursor cells, plenty of which are reserved in bone marrow. Resident endothelial precursor cells are also found in some tissues and in circulation. These cells are involved in neoangiogenesis as well. Theoretically, injection of exogeneous endothelial precusor cells might contribute to restoration of circulation in the ischemic organ. Various types of cells have been approved for regeneration stimulation in a number of experimental protocols. A various degree of improvement of myocardial contractive function has been obtained as a universal result of these investigations, though the mechanisms underlying observed effect remain evasive. The paper focuses on advantages and drawbacks of embryonic, hematopoetic and mesenhimal stem cells application for angiogenesis stimulation and organs and tissues regeneration

  3. Impact of cell regeneration in human respiratory tract on simultaneous viral infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinky, Lubna Jahan Rashid; Dobrovolny, Hana

    2015-03-01

    Studies have found that ~ 40% of patients hospitalized with influenza-like illness are infected with at least two different viruses. In these longer infections, we need to consider the role of cell regeneration. Several mathematical models have been used to describe cell regeneration in infection models, though the effect of model choice on the predicted time course of simultaneous viral infections is not clear. We investigate a series of mathematical models of cell regeneration during simultaneous respiratory virus infections to determine the effect of cell regeneration on infection dynamics. We perform a nonlinear stability analysis for each model. The analysis suggests that coexistence of two viral species is not possible for any form of regeneration. We find that chronic illness is possible, but with only one viral species.

  4. Proximal tubular cells contain a phenotypically distinct, scattered cell population involved in tubular regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smeets, Bart; Boor, Peter; Dijkman, Henry; Sharma, Shagun V; Jirak, Peggy; Mooren, Fieke; Berger, Katja; Bornemann, Jörg; Gelman, Irwin H; Floege, Jürgen; van der Vlag, Johan; Wetzels, Jack F M; Moeller, Marcus J

    2013-04-01

    Regeneration of injured tubular cells occurs after acute tubular necrosis primarily from intrinsic renal cells. This may occur from a pre-existing intratubular stem/progenitor cell population or from any surviving proximal tubular cell. In this study, we characterize a CD24-, CD133-, and vimentin-positive subpopulation of cells scattered throughout the proximal tubule in normal human kidney. Compared to adjacent 'normal' proximal tubular cells, these CD24-positive cells contained less cytoplasm, fewer mitochondria, and no brush border. In addition, 49 marker proteins are described that are expressed within the proximal tubules in a similar scattered pattern. For eight of these markers, we confirmed co-localization with CD24. In human biopsies of patients with acute tubular necrosis (ATN), the number of CD24-positive tubular cells was increased. In both normal human kidneys and the ATN biopsies, around 85% of proliferating cells were CD24-positive - indicating that this cell population participates in tubular regeneration. In healthy rat kidneys, the novel cell subpopulation was absent. However, upon unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO), the novel cell population was detected in significant amounts in the injured kidney. In summary, in human renal biopsies, the CD24-positive cells represent tubular cells with a deviant phenotype, characterized by a distinct morphology and marker expression. After acute tubular injury, these cells become more numerous. In healthy rat kidneys, these cells are not detectable, whereas after UUO, they appeared de novo - arguing against the notion that these cells represent a pre-existing progenitor cell population. Our data indicate rather that these cells represent transiently dedifferentiated tubular cells involved in regeneration. Copyright © 2012 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Altered cell wall disassembly during ripening of Cnr tomato fruit : implications for cell wall adhesion and fruit softening

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Orfila, C.; Huisman, M.M.H.; Willats, W.G.T.; Alebeek, van G.J.W.M.; Schols, H.A.; Seymour, G.B.; Knox, J.P.

    2002-01-01

    The Cnr (Colourless non-ripening) tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) mutant has an aberrant fruit-ripening phenotype in which fruit do not soften and have reduced cell adhesion between pericarp cells. Cell walls from Cnr fruit were analysed in order to assess the possible contribution of pectic

  6. Cotton fiber: a powerful single-cell model for cell wall and celluloseresearch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Candace Hope Haigler

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Cotton fibers are single-celled extensions of the seed epidermis. They can be isolated in pureform as they undergo staged differentiation including primary cell wall synthesis duringelongation and nearly pure cellulose synthesis during secondary wall thickening. Thiscombination of features supports clear interpretation of data about cell walls and cellulosesynthesis in the context of high throughput modern experimental technologies. Priorcontributions of cotton fiber to building fundamental knowledge about cell walls will besummarized and the dynamic changes in cell wall polymers throughout cotton fiberdifferentiation will be described. Recent successes in using stable cotton transformation to altercotton fiber cell wall properties as well as cotton fiber quality will be discussed. Future prospectsto perform experiments more rapidly through altering cotton fiber wall properties via virusinduced gene silencing will be evaluated.

  7. Planar cell polarity-mediated induction of neural stem cell expansion during axolotl spinal cord regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rost, Fabian; Nowoshilow, Sergej; Chara, Osvaldo; Tanaka, Elly M

    2015-01-01

    Axolotls are uniquely able to mobilize neural stem cells to regenerate all missing regions of the spinal cord. How a neural stem cell under homeostasis converts after injury to a highly regenerative cell remains unknown. Here, we show that during regeneration, axolotl neural stem cells repress neurogenic genes and reactivate a transcriptional program similar to embryonic neuroepithelial cells. This dedifferentiation includes the acquisition of rapid cell cycles, the switch from neurogenic to proliferative divisions, and the re-expression of planar cell polarity (PCP) pathway components. We show that PCP induction is essential to reorient mitotic spindles along the anterior-posterior axis of elongation, and orthogonal to the cell apical-basal axis. Disruption of this property results in premature neurogenesis and halts regeneration. Our findings reveal a key role for PCP in coordinating the morphogenesis of spinal cord outgrowth with the switch from a homeostatic to a regenerative stem cell that restores missing tissue. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10230.001 PMID:26568310

  8. Preliminary study on dental pulp stem cell-mediated pulp regeneration in canine immature permanent teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuanyuan; Zhao, Yuming; Jia, Weiqian; Yang, Jie; Ge, Lihong

    2013-02-01

    The health of human teeth depends on the integrity of the hard tissue and the activity of the pulp and periodontal tissues, which are responsible for nutritional supply. Without the nourishing of the pulp tissue, the possibility of tooth fracture can increase. In immature permanent teeth, root development may be influenced as well. This study explored the potential of using autologous dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) to achieve pulp regeneration in a canine pulpless model. The establishment of the pulpless animal model involved pulp extirpation and root canal preparation of young permanent incisor teeth in beagles. Autologous DPSCs were obtained from extracted first molars and expanded ex vivo to obtain a larger number of cells. The biological characteristics of canine DPSCs (cDPSCs) were analyzed both in vitro and in vivo by using the same method as used in human DPSCs. cDPSCs were transplanted into the pulpless root canal with Gelfoam as the scaffold, and root development was evaluated by radiographic and histologic analyses. cDPSCs with rapid proliferation, multiple differentiation capacity, and development potential were successfully isolated and identified both in vitro and in vivo. After they were transplanted into the pulpless root canal with Gelfoam as the scaffold, DPSCs were capable of generating pulp-like tissues containing blood vessels and dentin-like tissue. Thickening of the root canal wall was also observed. This study demonstrates the feasibility of using stem cell-mediated tissue engineering to realize pulp regeneration in immature teeth. Copyright © 2013 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Proteomic definition of the cell wall of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfe, Lisa M; Mahaffey, Spencer B; Kruh, Nicole A; Dobos, Karen M

    2010-11-05

    The cell envelope of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) is complex and diverse; composed of proteins intermingled in a matrix of peptidoglycan, mycolic acids, lipids, and carbohydrates. Proteomic studies of the Mtb cell wall have been limited; nonetheless, the characterization of resident and secreted proteins associated with the cell wall are critical to understanding bacterial survival and immune modulation in the host. In this study, the cell wall proteome was defined in order to better understand its unique biosynthetic and secretion processes. Mtb cell wall was subjected to extraction with organic solvents to remove noncovalently bound lipids and lipoglycans and remaining proteins were solubilized with either SDS, Guanidine-HCl, or TX-114. These extracts were analyzed by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass-spectrometry and resulted in the identification of 234 total proteins. The lipoproteome of Mtb, enriched in the TX-114 extract, was further resolved by multidimensional chromatography and mass spectrometry to identify an additional 294 proteins. A query of the 528 total protein identifications against Neural Network or Hidden Markov model algorithms predicted secretion signals in 87 proteins. Classification of these 528 proteins also demonstrated that 35% are involved in small molecule metabolism and 25% are involved in macromolecule synthesis and degradation building upon evidence that the Mtb cell wall is actively engaged in mycobacterial survival and remodeling.

  10. An extensive circuitry for cell wall regulation in Candida albicans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jill R Blankenship

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Protein kinases play key roles in signaling and response to changes in the external environment. The ability of Candida albicans to quickly sense and respond to changes in its environment is key to its survival in the human host. Our guiding hypothesis was that creating and screening a set of protein kinase mutant strains would reveal signaling pathways that mediate stress response in C. albicans. A library of protein kinase mutant strains was created and screened for sensitivity to a variety of stresses. For the majority of stresses tested, stress response was largely conserved between C. albicans, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and Schizosaccharomyces pombe. However, we identified eight protein kinases whose roles in cell wall regulation (CWR were not expected from functions of their orthologs in the model fungi Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Analysis of the conserved roles of these protein kinases indicates that establishment of cell polarity is critical for CWR. In addition, we found that septins, crucial to budding, are both important for surviving and are mislocalized by cell wall stress. Our study shows an expanded role for protein kinase signaling in C. albicans cell wall integrity. Our studies suggest that in some cases, this expansion represents a greater importance for certain pathways in cell wall biogenesis. In other cases, it appears that signaling pathways have been rewired for a cell wall integrity response.

  11. Stem Cells for Cardiac Regeneration by Cell Therapy and Myocardial Tissue Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jun; Zeng, Faquan; Weisel, Richard D.; Li, Ren-Ke

    Congestive heart failure, which often occurs progressively following a myocardial infarction, is characterized by impaired myocardial perfusion, ventricular dilatation, and cardiac dysfunction. Novel treatments are required to reverse these effects - especially in older patients whose endogenous regenerative responses to currently available therapies are limited by age. This review explores the current state of research for two related approaches to cardiac regeneration: cell therapy and tissue engineering. First, to evaluate cell therapy, we review the effectiveness of various cell types for their ability to limit ventricular dilatation and promote functional recovery following implantation into a damaged heart. Next, to assess tissue engineering, we discuss the characteristics of several biomaterials for their potential to physically support the infarcted myocardium and promote implanted cell survival following cardiac injury. Finally, looking ahead, we present recent findings suggesting that hybrid constructs combining a biomaterial with stem and supporting cells may be the most effective approaches to cardiac regeneration.

  12. Evaluation of cell sheet application on one wall bone defect in Macaca nemestrina through periostin expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamin, R. Y.; Soeroso, Y.; Amir, L.; Idrus, E.

    2017-08-01

    Chronic periodontitis is an oral disease in which the destruction of periodontal tissue leads to tooth loss. Regenerative therapy for attachment cannot be applied to one wall bone defects owing to the minimal existing healthy bone. Tissue engineering in the form of cell sheets has been developed to overcome this limitation. In a previous study, cell sheet application to a one wall bone defect in Macaca nemestrina showed good clinical results. To evaluate the effectiveness of cell sheet application histologically, the level of periostin expression in the gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) of M. nemestrina was determined. Periostin is a 90-kDa protein that regulates coordination and interaction for regeneration and tissue repair. A laboratory observation study was performed to see the differences in periostin levels in samples collected from M. nemestrina’s GCF, where a cell sheet was applied to the bone defect. Gel electrophoresis with SDS-PAGE was performed to detect periostin expression based on its molecular weight and to compare the expression band between the cell sheet and the control at 1, 2, and 3 weeks after treatment. The gel electrophoresis result shows different thicknesses of the protein band around the molecular weight of periostin between the cell sheet groups.

  13. Homeostatic Cell Growth Is Accomplished Mechanically through Membrane Tension Inhibition of Cell-Wall Synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas, Enrique R; Huang, Kerwyn Casey; Theriot, Julie A

    2017-11-30

    Feedback mechanisms are required to coordinate balanced synthesis of subcellular components during cell growth. However, these coordination mechanisms are not apparent at steady state. Here, we elucidate the interdependence of cell growth, membrane tension, and cell-wall synthesis by observing their rapid re-coordination after osmotic shocks in Gram-positive bacteria. Single-cell experiments and mathematical modeling demonstrate that mechanical forces dually regulate cell growth: while turgor pressure produces mechanical stress within the cell wall that promotes its expansion through wall synthesis, membrane tension induces growth arrest by inhibiting wall synthesis. Tension inhibition occurs concurrently with membrane depolarization, and depolarization arrested growth independently of shock, indicating that electrical signals implement the negative feedback characteristic of homeostasis. Thus, competing influences of membrane tension and cell-wall mechanical stress on growth allow cells to rapidly correct for mismatches between membrane and wall synthesis rates, ensuring balanced growth. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Robust regeneration of adult zebrafish lateral line hair cells reflects continued precursor pool maintenance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Ivan A; Kappedal, Ryan; Mackenzie, Scott M; Hailey, Dale W; Hoffman, Trevor L; Schilling, Thomas F; Raible, David W

    2015-06-15

    We have examined lateral line hair cell and support cell maintenance in adult zebrafish when growth is largely complete. We demonstrate that adult zebrafish not only replenish hair cells after a single instance of hair cell damage, but also maintain hair cells and support cells after multiple rounds of damage and regeneration. We find that hair cells undergo continuous turnover in adult zebrafish in the absence of damage. We identify mitotically-distinct support cell populations and show that hair cells regenerate from underlying support cells in a region-specific manner. Our results demonstrate that there are two distinct support cell populations in the lateral line, which may help explain why zebrafish hair cell regeneration is extremely robust, retained throughout life, and potentially unlimited in regenerative capacity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Chromosome and cell wall segregation in Streptococcus faecium ATCC 9790

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Higgins, M.L.; Glaser, D.; Dicker, D.T.; Zito, E.T.

    1989-01-01

    Segregation was studied by measuring the positions of autoradiographic grain clusters in chains formed from single cells containing on average less than one radiolabeled chromosome strand. The degree to which chromosomal and cell wall material cosegregated was quantified by using the methods of S. Cooper and M. Weinberger, dividing the number of chains labeled at the middle. This analysis indicated that in contrast to chromosomal segregation in Escherichia coli and, in some studies, to that in gram-positive rods, chromosomal segregation in Streptococcus faecium was slightly nonrandom and did not vary with growth rate. Results were not significantly affected by strand exchange. In contrast, labeled cell wall segregated predominantly nonrandomly.

  16. Cell wall proteome analysis of Arabidopsis thaliana mature stems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duruflé, Harold; Clemente, Hélène San; Balliau, Thierry; Zivy, Michel; Dunand, Christophe; Jamet, Elisabeth

    2017-04-01

    Plant stems carry flowers necessary for species propagation and need to be adapted to mechanical disturbance and environmental factors. The stem cell walls are different from other organs and can modify their rigidity or viscoelastic properties for the integrity and the robustness required to withstand mechanical impacts and environmental stresses. Plant cell wall is composed of complex polysaccharide networks also containing cell wall proteins (CWPs) crucial to perceive and limit the environmental effects. The CWPs are fundamental players in cell wall remodeling processes, and today, only 86 have been identified from the mature stems of the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. With a destructive method, this study has enlarged its coverage to 302 CWPs. This new proteome is mainly composed of 27.5% proteins acting on polysaccharides, 16% proteases, 11.6% oxido-reductases, 11% possibly related to lipid metabolism and 11% of proteins with interacting domains with proteins or polysaccharides. Compared to stem cell wall proteomes already available (Brachypodium distachyon, Sacharum officinarum, Linum usitatissimum, Medicago sativa), that of A. thaliana stems has a higher proportion of proteins acting on polysaccharides and of proteases, but a lower proportion of oxido-reductases. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Cell-seeded alginate hydrogel scaffolds promote directed linear axonal regeneration in the injured rat spinal cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Günther, Manuel Ingo; Weidner, Norbert; Müller, Rainer; Blesch, Armin

    2015-11-01

    Despite recent progress in enhancing axonal growth in the injured spinal cord, the guidance of regenerating axons across an extended lesion site remains a major challenge. To determine whether regenerating axons can be guided in rostrocaudal direction, we implanted 2mm long alginate-based anisotropic capillary hydrogels seeded with bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) expressing brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) or green fluorescent protein (GFP) as control into a C5 hemisection lesion of the rat spinal cord. Four weeks post-lesion, numerous BMSCs survived inside the scaffold channels, accompanied by macrophages, Schwann cells and blood vessels. Quantification of axons growing into channels demonstrated 3-4 times more axons in hydrogels seeded with BMSCs expressing BDNF (BMSC-BDNF) compared to control cells. The number of anterogradely traced axons extending through the entire length of the scaffold was also significantly higher in scaffolds with BMSC-BDNF. Increasing the channel diameters from 41μm to 64μm did not lead to significant differences in the number of regenerating axons. Lesions filled with BMSC-BDNF without hydrogels exhibited a random axon orientation, whereas axons were oriented parallel to the hydrogel channel walls. Thus, alginate-based scaffolds with an anisotropic capillary structure are able to physically guide regenerating axons. After injury, regenerating axons have to extend across the lesion site in the injured spinal cord to reestablish lost neuronal connections. While cell grafting and growth factor delivery can promote growth of injured axons, without proper guidance, axons rarely extend across the lesion site. Here, we show that alginate biomaterials with linear channels that are filled with cells expressing the growth-promoting neurotrophin BDNF promote linear axon extension throughout the channels after transplantation to the injured rat spinal cord. Animals that received the same cells but no alginate guidance structure did not

  18. Imaging collective cell migration and hair cell regeneration in the sensory lateral line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venero Galanternik, M; Navajas Acedo, J; Romero-Carvajal, A; Piotrowski, T

    2016-01-01

    The accessibility of the lateral line system and its amenability to long-term in vivo imaging transformed the developing lateral line into a powerful model system to study fundamental morphogenetic events, such as guided migration, proliferation, cell shape changes, organ formation, organ deposition, cell specification and differentiation. In addition, the lateral line is not only amenable to live imaging during migration stages but also during postembryonic events such as sensory organ tissue homeostasis and regeneration. The robust regenerative capabilities of the mature, mechanosensory lateral line hair cells, which are homologous to inner ear hair cells and the ease with which they can be imaged, have brought zebrafish into the spotlight as a model to develop tools to treat human deafness. In this chapter, we describe protocols for long-term in vivo confocal imaging of the developing and regenerating lateral line. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Inhibition of phenylpropanoid biosynthesis increases cell wall digestibility, protoplast isolation, and facilitates sustained cell division in American elm (Ulmus americana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jones A Maxwell P

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protoplast technologies offer unique opportunities for fundamental research and to develop novel germplasm through somatic hybridization, organelle transfer, protoclonal variation, and direct insertion of DNA. Applying protoplast technologies to develop Dutch elm disease resistant American elms (Ulmus americana L. was proposed over 30 years ago, but has not been achieved. A primary factor restricting protoplast technology to American elm is the resistance of the cell walls to enzymatic degradation and a long lag phase prior to cell wall re-synthesis and cell division. Results This study suggests that resistance to enzymatic degradation in American elm was due to water soluble phenylpropanoids. Incubating tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L. leaf tissue, an easily digestible species, in aqueous elm extract inhibits cell wall digestion in a dose dependent manner. This can be mimicked by p-coumaric or ferulic acid, phenylpropanoids known to re-enforce cell walls. Culturing American elm tissue in the presence of 2-aminoindane-2-phosphonic acid (AIP; 10-150 μM, an inhibitor of phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL, reduced flavonoid content, decreased tissue browning, and increased isolation rates significantly from 11.8% (±3.27 in controls to 65.3% (±4.60. Protoplasts isolated from callus grown in 100 μM AIP developed cell walls by day 2, had a division rate of 28.5% (±3.59 by day 6, and proliferated into callus by day 14. Heterokaryons were successfully produced using electrofusion and fused protoplasts remained viable when embedded in agarose. Conclusions This study describes a novel approach of modifying phenylpropanoid biosynthesis to facilitate efficient protoplast isolation which has historically been problematic for American elm. This isolation system has facilitated recovery of viable protoplasts capable of rapid cell wall re-synthesis and sustained cell division to form callus. Further, isolated protoplasts survived

  20. NGF induces adult stem Leydig cells to proliferate and differentiate during Leydig cell regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lei; Wang, Huaxi; Yang, Yan; Liu, Hui; Zhang, Qihao; Xiang, Qi; Ge, Renshan; Su, Zhijian; Huang, Yadong

    2013-06-28

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) has been reported to be involved in male reproductive physiology. However, few reports have described the activity of NGF during Leydig cell development. The objective of the present study was to examine the role of NGF during stem-Leydig-cell (SLC) regeneration. We investigated the effects of NGF on Leydig-cell (LC) regeneration by measuring mRNA levels in the adult rat testis after ethane dimethanesulfonate (EDS) treatment. Furthermore, we used the established organ culture model of rat seminiferous tubules to examine the regulation of NGF during SLC proliferation and differentiation using EdU staining, real-time PCR and western blotting. Progenitor Leydig cells (PLCs) and immature Leydig cells (ILCs) were also used to investigate the effects of NGF on LCs at different developmental stages. NGF mRNA levels changed significantly during Leydig-cell regeneration in vivo. In vitro, NGF significantly promoted the proliferation of stem Leydig cells and also induced steroidogenic enzyme gene expression and 3β-HSD protein expression. The data from PLCs and ILCs showed that NGF could increase Cyclin D1 and Hsd 17b3 mRNA levels in PLCs and Cyclin D1 mRNA levels in ILCs. These results indicate that NGF may play an important role during LC regeneration by regulating the proliferation and differentiation of LCs at different developmental stages, from SLCs to PLCs and from PLCs to ILCs. The discovery of this effect of NGF on Leydig cells will provide useful information for developing new potential therapies for PADAM (Partial Androgen Deficiency in the Aging Male). Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Stem cell sources for tooth regeneration: current status and future prospects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keishi eOtsu

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Stem cells are capable of renewing themselves through cell division and have the remarkable ability to differentiate into many different types of cells. They therefore have the potential to become a central tool in regenerative medicine. During the last decade, advances in tissue engineering and stem cell-based tooth regeneration have provided realistic and attractive means of replacing lost or damaged teeth. Investigation of embryonic and adult (tissue stem cells as potential cell sources for tooth regeneration has led to many promising results. However, technical and ethical issues have hindered the availability of these cells for clinical application. The recent discovery of induced pluripotent stem (iPS cells has provided the possibility to revolutionize the field of regenerative medicine (dentistry by offering the option of autologous transplantation. In this article, we review the current progress in the field of stem cell-based tooth regeneration and discuss the possibility of using iPS cells for this purpose.

  2. Stem cell sources for tooth regeneration: current status and future prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otsu, Keishi; Kumakami-Sakano, Mika; Fujiwara, Naoki; Kikuchi, Kazuko; Keller, Laetitia; Lesot, Hervé; Harada, Hidemitsu

    2014-01-01

    Stem cells are capable of renewing themselves through cell division and have the remarkable ability to differentiate into many different types of cells. They therefore have the potential to become a central tool in regenerative medicine. During the last decade, advances in tissue engineering and stem cell-based tooth regeneration have provided realistic and attractive means of replacing lost or damaged teeth. Investigation of embryonic and adult (tissue) stem cells as potential cell sources for tooth regeneration has led to many promising results. However, technical and ethical issues have hindered the availability of these cells for clinical application. The recent discovery of induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells has provided the possibility to revolutionize the field of regenerative medicine (dentistry) by offering the option of autologous transplantation. In this article, we review the current progress in the field of stem cell-based tooth regeneration and discuss the possibility of using iPS cells for this purpose.

  3. The Cell Wall Associated Kinases, WAKs, As Pectin Receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruce David Kohorn

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The Wall Associated Kinases, WAKs, are encoded by 5 highly similar genes clustered in a 30 kb locus in Arabidopsis. These receptor-like proteins contain a cytoplasmic serine threonine kinase, a transmembrane domain, and a less conserved region that is bound to the cell wall and contains a series of Epidermal Growth Factor (EGF repeats. Evidence is emerging that WAKs serve as pectin receptors, for both short oligogalacturonic acid fragments (OGs generated during pathogen exposure or wounding, and for longer pectins resident in native cell walls. This ability to bind and respond to several types of pectins correlates with a demonstrated role for WAKs in both the pathogen response and cell expansion during plant development.

  4. Fluorescent Probes for Exploring Plant Cell Wall Deconstruction: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Paës

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Plant biomass is a potential resource of chemicals, new materials and biofuels that could reduce our dependency on fossil carbon, thus decreasing the greenhouse effect. However, due to its chemical and structural complexity, plant biomass is recalcitrant to green biological transformation by enzymes, preventing the establishment of integrated bio-refineries. In order to gain more knowledge in the architecture of plant cell wall to facilitate their deconstruction, many fluorescent probes bearing various fluorophores have been devised and used successfully to reveal the changes in structural motifs during plant biomass deconstruction, and the molecular interactions between enzymes and plant cell wall polymers. Fluorescent probes are thus relevant tools to explore plant cell wall deconstruction.

  5. Smad4 restricts differentiation to promote expansion of satellite cell derived progenitors during skeletal muscle regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paris, Nicole D; Soroka, Andrew; Klose, Alanna; Liu, Wenxuan; Chakkalakal, Joe V

    2016-11-18

    Skeletal muscle regenerative potential declines with age, in part due to deficiencies in resident stem cells (satellite cells, SCs) and derived myogenic progenitors (MPs); however, the factors responsible for this decline remain obscure. TGFβ superfamily signaling is an inhibitor of myogenic differentiation, with elevated activity in aged skeletal muscle. Surprisingly, we find reduced expression of Smad4, the downstream cofactor for canonical TGFβ superfamily signaling, and the target Id1 in aged SCs and MPs during regeneration. Specific deletion of Smad4 in adult mouse SCs led to increased propensity for terminal myogenic commitment connected to impaired proliferative potential. Furthermore, SC-specific Smad4 disruption compromised adult skeletal muscle regeneration. Finally, loss of Smad4 in aged SCs did not promote aged skeletal muscle regeneration. Therefore, SC-specific reduction of Smad4 is a feature of aged regenerating skeletal muscle and Smad4 is a critical regulator of SC and MP amplification during skeletal muscle regeneration.

  6. The use of a polycaprolactone-tricalcium phosphate scaffold for bone regeneration of tooth socket facial wall defects and simultaneous immediate dental implant placement in Macaca fascicularis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goh, Bee Tin; Chanchareonsook, Nattharee; Tideman, Henk; Teoh, Swee Hin; Chow, James Kwok Fai; Jansen, John A

    2014-05-01

    Bone regeneration and aesthetic outcomes may be compromised when immediate implants are placed at extraction sites with dehiscence defects. The aim of this study was to compare, in a monkey model, peri-implant bone regeneration and implant stability after immediate implant placement into tooth sockets with facial wall defects in two treatment groups. In eight control monkeys, the bony defect was reconstructed with autogenous particulate bone, whereas in 10 test monkeys a polycaprolactone-tricalcium phosphate (PCL-TCP) scaffold was used. The monkeys were sacrificed after 6 months and the specimens were analyzed by histology and histomorphometry. Better maintenance of facial bone contour was noted in the test group; however, bone regeneration was seen only at areas adjacent to a bony wall of the defect. The mean bone-to-implant contact was 27.6 ± 19.1% (control group) versus 6.8 ± 7.9% (test group). The mean bone area percentage was 11.8 ± 10.1% (control group) versus 6.8 ± 6.9% (test group). Implant survival was 100% at 6 months for both the groups. It was concluded that although the use of a PCL-TCP scaffold showed better maintenance of the alveolar contour as compared to autogenous particulate bone at 6 months, there was minimal bone regeneration within the defect. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. HEXIM1 controls satellite cell expansion after injury to regulate skeletal muscle regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Peng; Chen, Kang; Huang, Bihui; Liu, Min; Cui, Miao; Rozenberg, Inna; Chaqour, Brahim; Pan, Xiaoyue; Barton, Elisabeth R.; Jiang, Xian-Cheng; Siddiqui, M.A.Q.

    2012-01-01

    The native capacity of adult skeletal muscles to regenerate is vital to the recovery from physical injuries and dystrophic diseases. Currently, the development of therapeutic interventions has been hindered by the complex regulatory network underlying the process of muscle regeneration. Using a mouse model of skeletal muscle regeneration after injury, we identified hexamethylene bisacetamide inducible 1 (HEXIM1, also referred to as CLP-1), the inhibitory component of the positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb) complex, as a pivotal regulator of skeletal muscle regeneration. Hexim1-haplodeficient muscles exhibited greater mass and preserved function compared with those of WT muscles after injury, as a result of enhanced expansion of satellite cells. Transplanted Hexim1-haplodeficient satellite cells expanded and improved muscle regeneration more effectively than WT satellite cells. Conversely, HEXIM1 overexpression restrained satellite cell proliferation and impeded muscle regeneration. Mechanistically, dissociation of HEXIM1 from P-TEFb and subsequent activation of P-TEFb are required for satellite cell proliferation and the prevention of early myogenic differentiation. These findings suggest a crucial role for the HEXIM1/P-TEFb pathway in the regulation of satellite cell–mediated muscle regeneration and identify HEXIM1 as a potential therapeutic target for degenerative muscular diseases. PMID:23023707

  8. Role of adenosine signalling and metabolism in β-cell regeneration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersson, Olov, E-mail: olov.andersson@ki.se

    2014-02-01

    Glucose homeostasis, which is controlled by the endocrine cells of the pancreas, is disrupted in both type I and type II diabetes. Deficiency in the number of insulin-producing β cells – a primary cause of type I diabetes and a secondary contributor of type II diabetes – leads to hyperglycemia and hence an increase in the need for insulin. Although diabetes can be controlled with insulin injections, a curative approach is needed. A potential approach to curing diabetes involves regenerating the β-cell mass, e.g. by increasing β-cell proliferation, survival, neogenesis or transdifferentiation. The nucleoside adenosine and its cognate nucleotide ATP have long been known to affect insulin secretion, but have more recently been shown to increase β-cell proliferation during homeostatic control and regeneration of the β-cell mass. Adenosine is also known to have anti-inflammatory properties, and agonism of adenosine receptors can promote the survival of β-cells in an inflammatory microenvironment. In this review, both intracellular and extracellular mechanisms of adenosine and ATP are discussed in terms of their established and putative effects on β-cell regeneration. - Highlights: • A potential way to cure diabetes is to regenerate the β-cell mass by promoting cell survival, proliferation or neogenesis. • Adenosine may promote β-cell regeneration through several cellular mechanisms. • Adenosine and its cognate nucleotide ATP can each promote β-cell proliferation. • Do adenosine and ATP interact in promoting β-cell proliferation?.

  9. A Review of Gene Delivery and Stem Cell Based Therapies for Regenerating Inner Ear Hair Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael S. Detamore

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Sensory neural hearing loss and vestibular dysfunction have become the most common forms of sensory defects, affecting millions of people worldwide. Developing effective therapies to restore hearing loss is challenging, owing to the limited regenerative capacity of the inner ear hair cells. With recent advances in understanding the developmental biology of mammalian and non-mammalian hair cells a variety of strategies have emerged to restore lost hair cells are being developed. Two predominant strategies have developed to restore hair cells: transfer of genes responsible for hair cell genesis and replacement of missing cells via transfer of stem cells. In this review article, we evaluate the use of several genes involved in hair cell regeneration, the advantages and disadvantages of the different viral vectors employed in inner ear gene delivery and the insights gained from the use of embryonic, adult and induced pluripotent stem cells in generating inner ear hair cells. Understanding the role of genes, vectors and stem cells in therapeutic strategies led us to explore potential solutions to overcome the limitations associated with their use in hair cell regeneration.

  10. Disruption of fungal cell wall by antifungal Echinacea extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mir-Rashed, Nadereh; Cruz, Isabel; Jessulat, Matthew; Dumontier, Michel; Chesnais, Claire; Ng, Juliana; Amiguet, Virginie Treyvaud; Golshani, Ashkan; Arnason, John T; Smith, Myron L

    2010-11-01

    In addition to widespread use in reducing the symptoms of colds and flu, Echinacea is traditionally employed to treat fungal and bacterial infections. However, to date the mechanism of antimicrobial activity of Echinacea extracts remains unclear. We utilized a set of ∼4,600 viable gene deletion mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to identify mutations that increase sensitivity to Echinacea. Thus, a set of chemical-genetic profiles for 16 different Echinacea treatments was generated, from which a consensus set of 23 Echinacea-sensitive mutants was identified. Of the 23 mutants, only 16 have a reported function. Ten of these 16 are involved in cell wall integrity/structure suggesting that a target for Echinacea is the fungal cell wall. Follow-up analyses revealed an increase in sonication-associated cell death in the yeasts S. cerevisiae and Cryptococcus neoformans after Echinacea extract treatments. Furthermore, fluorescence microscopy showed that Echinacea-treated S. cerevisiae was significantly more prone to cell wall damage than non-treated cells. This study further demonstrates the potential of gene deletion arrays to understand natural product antifungal mode of action and provides compelling evidence that the fungal cell wall is a target of Echinacea extracts and may thus explain the utility of this phytomedicine in treating mycoses.

  11. Novel Enzymes for Targeted Hydrolysis of Algal Cell Walls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schultz-Johansen, Mikkel

    urchins are known algae-eaters and may therefore be inhabited by endosymbiotic bacteria that help in degradation of algal cell wall constituents. This thesis work investigated bacteria associated with seaweed, seagrass and sea urchins for their enzymatic activities against algal cell wall polysaccharides....... These enzymes degraded fucoidan extracted from brown algae of the order Fucales, but displayed individual substrate preference and degradation pattern. This work adds substantial information to a protein family which is largely undiscovered to date. Several of the enzyme activities discovered in this thesis...

  12. Cytology, Cell Walls and septa: A Summary of Yeast Cell Biology from a Phylogenetic Perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klei, I.; Veenhuis, M.; Brul, S.; Klis, F.M.; de Groot, P.W.J.; Müller, W.H.; van Driel, K.G.A.; Boekhout, T.; Kurtzman, C. P.; Fell, J. W.; Boekhout, T.

    2011-01-01

    his chapter aims to present an overview of yeast cell biology, biochemical structure and composition of cell walls in various yeast species, septal pore ultrastructure, and other subcellular characteristics, and a phylogenetic framework to these observations. Yeast cells have ultrastructural

  13. Characterization of slow-cycling cells in the mouse cochlear lateral wall.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Li

    Full Text Available Cochlear spiral ligament fibrocytes (SLFs play essential roles in the physiology of hearing including ion recycling and the generation of endocochlear potential. In adult animals, SLFs can repopulate after damages, yet little is known about the characteristics of proliferating cells that support SLFs' self-renewal. Here we report in detail about the characteristics of cycling cells in the spiral ligament (SL. Fifteen P6 mice and six noise-exposed P28 mice were injected with 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU for 7 days and we chased BrdU retaining cells for as long as 60 days. Immunohistochemistry revealed that the BrdU positive IB4 (an endotherial marker negative cells expressed an early SLF marker Pou3f4 but negative for cleaved-Caspase 3. Marker studies revealed that type 3 SLFs displayed significantly higher percentage of BrdU+ cells compared to other subtypes. Notably, the cells retained BrdU until P72, demonstrating they were dividing slowly. In the noise-damaged mice, in contrast to the loss of the other types, the number of type 3 SLFs did not altered and the BrdU incorporating- phosphorylated Histone H3 positive type 3 cells were increased from day 1 to 14 after noise exposure. Furthermore, the cells repopulating type 1 area, where the cells diminished profoundly after damage, were positive for the type 3 SLF markers. Collectively, in the latral wall of the cochlea, type 3 SLFs have the stem cell capacity and may contribute to the endogenous regeneration of lateral wall spiral ligament. Manipulating type 3 cells may be employed for potential regenerative therapies.

  14. Interactions of Condensed Tannins with Saccharomyces cerevisiae Yeast Cells and Cell Walls: Tannin Location by Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mekoue Nguela, Julie; Vernhet, Aude; Sieczkowski, Nathalie; Brillouet, Jean-Marc

    2015-09-02

    Interactions between grape tannins/red wine polyphenols and yeast cells/cell walls was previously studied within the framework of red wine aging and the use of yeast-derived products as an alternative to aging on lees. Results evidenced a quite different behavior between whole cells (biomass grown to elaborate yeast-derived products, inactivated yeast, and yeast inactivated after autolysis) and yeast cell walls (obtained from mechanical disruption of the biomass). Briefly, whole cells exhibited a high capacity to irreversibly adsorb grape and wine tannins, whereas only weak interactions were observed for cell walls. This last point was quite unexpected considering the literature and called into question the real role of cell walls in yeasts' ability to fix tannins. In the present work, tannin location after interactions between grape and wine tannins and yeast cells and cell walls was studied by means of transmission electron microscopy, light epifluorescence, and confocal microscopy. Microscopy observations evidenced that if tannins interact with cell walls, and especially cell wall mannoproteins, they also diffuse freely through the walls of dead cells to interact with their plasma membrane and cytoplasmic components.

  15. Pea border cell maturation and release involve complex cell wall structural dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mravec, Jozef; Guo, Xiaoyuan; Hansen, Aleksander Riise

    2017-01-01

    of hydrolytic activities, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and immunolocalization of cell wall components. Using this integrated glycobiology approach, we identified multiple novel modes of cell wall structural and compositional rearrangement during root cap growth and the release of border cells. Our...

  16. Cell wall staining with Trypan blue enables quantitative analysis of morphological changes in yeast cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liesche, Johannes; Marek, Magdalena; Günther-Pomorski, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Yeast cells are protected by a cell wall that plays an important role in the exchange of substances with the environment. The cell wall structure is dynamic and can adapt to different physiological states or environmental conditions. For the investigation of morphological changes, selective...

  17. [Cell lineage tracing of regenerating cells after partial pancreatectomy using pseudo-type retrovirus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lixin; Ju, Xiaofang; Wang, Fa; Guo, Zhiwei; Piao, Shanhua; Teng, Chunbo

    2008-04-01

    Pancreas is an important mixed gland having both endocrine and exocrine functions, and has been proven regeneration after injury. To explore the cell lineage tracing methods in pancreas in vivo and the regenerate cells source, we used pseudo-type retrovirus to transfect adult mouse pancreas which had been partially pancreatectomized by rubbing the kerf using a cotton stick saturated with retrovirus suspension then injecting 100 microL retrovirus suspension into pancreas, injecting 100 microL retrovirus by caudal vein, or interperitoneally injecting retrovirus respectively. The results showed that the method of rubbing the kerf then injection of retrovirus suspension into pancreas could more effectively mark the pancreatic cells than the caudal vein injection and the intraperitoneal injection did in vivo. Furthermore, this study also found that some acinus cells could accept injury stimulus signals to regenerate through resuming mitosis after pancreatic injury. This study establishes a cell lineage tracing method in pancreas in vivo using retrovirus and offers a clue for gene therapy of pancreatic diseases using retrovirus vectors.

  18. Chondrogenically differentiated mesenchymal stromal cell pellets stimulate endochondral bone regeneration in critical-sized bone defects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. van der Stok (Johan); M.K.E. Koolen; H. Jahr (Holger); N. Kops (Nicole); J.H. Waarsing (Jan); H.H. Weinans (Harrie); O.P. van der Jagt (Olav)

    2014-01-01

    markdownabstractAbstract: Grafting bone defects or atrophic non-unions with mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs)-based grafts is not yet successful. MSC-based grafts typically use undifferentiated or osteogenically differentiated MSCs and regenerate bone through intramembranous ossification.

  19. Fgf-dependent glial cell bridges facilitate spinal cord regeneration in zebrafish

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Goldshmit, Yona; Sztal, Tamar E; Jusuf, Patricia R; Hall, Thomas E; Nguyen-Chi, Mai; Currie, Peter D

    2012-01-01

    .... The reasons for this interspecies difference in regenerative capacity remain unclear. Here we demonstrate a novel role for Fgf signaling during glial cell morphogenesis in promoting axonal regeneration after spinal cord injury...

  20. Regenerative Applications Using Tooth Derived Stem Cells in Other Than Tooth Regeneration: A Literature Review

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Park, Yun-Jong; Cha, Seunghee; Park, Young-Seok

    2016-01-01

    .... They share many commonalties but maintain differences. Considering their original function in development and the homeostasis of tooth structures, many applications of these cells in dentistry have aimed at tooth structure regeneration...

  1. The planarian flatworm: an in vivo model for stem cell biology and nervous system regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentile, Luca; Cebrià, Francesc; Bartscherer, Kerstin

    2011-01-01

    Planarian flatworms are an exception among bilaterians in that they possess a large pool of adult stem cells that enables them to promptly regenerate any part of their body, including the brain. Although known for two centuries for their remarkable regenerative capabilities, planarians have only recently emerged as an attractive model for studying regeneration and stem cell biology. This revival is due in part to the availability of a sequenced genome and the development of new technologies, such as RNA interference and next-generation sequencing, which facilitate studies of planarian regeneration at the molecular level. Here, we highlight why planarians are an exciting tool in the study of regeneration and its underlying stem cell biology in vivo, and discuss the potential promises and current limitations of this model organism for stem cell research and regenerative medicine. PMID:21135057

  2. The planarian flatworm: an in vivo model for stem cell biology and nervous system regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Gentile

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Planarian flatworms are an exception among bilaterians in that they possess a large pool of adult stem cells that enables them to promptly regenerate any part of their body, including the brain. Although known for two centuries for their remarkable regenerative capabilities, planarians have only recently emerged as an attractive model for studying regeneration and stem cell biology. This revival is due in part to the availability of a sequenced genome and the development of new technologies, such as RNA interference and next-generation sequencing, which facilitate studies of planarian regeneration at the molecular level. Here, we highlight why planarians are an exciting tool in the study of regeneration and its underlying stem cell biology in vivo, and discuss the potential promises and current limitations of this model organism for stem cell research and regenerative medicine.

  3. Bacterial Cell Wall Growth, Shape and Division

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Derouaux, A.; Terrak, M.; den Blaauwen, T.; Vollmer, W.; Remaut, H.; Fronzes, R.

    2014-01-01

    The shape of a bacterial cell is maintained by its peptidoglycan sacculus that completely surrounds the cytoplasmic membrane. During growth the sacculus is enlarged by peptidoglycan synthesis complexes that are controlled by components linked to the cytoskeleton and, in Gram-negative bacteria, by

  4. Tissue type plasminogen activator regulates myeloid-cell dependent neoangiogenesis during tissue regeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ohki, Makiko; Ohki, Yuichi; Ishihara, Makoto

    2010-01-01

    tissue regeneration is not well understood. Bone marrow (BM)-derived myeloid cells facilitate angiogenesis during tissue regeneration. Here, we report that a serpin-resistant form of tPA by activating the extracellular proteases matrix metalloproteinase-9 and plasmin expands the myeloid cell pool...... and mobilizes CD45(+)CD11b(+) proangiogenic, myeloid cells, a process dependent on vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF-A) and Kit ligand signaling. tPA improves the incorporation of CD11b(+) cells into ischemic tissues and increases expression of neoangiogenesis-related genes, including VEGF......-A. Remarkably, transplantation of BM-derived tPA-mobilized CD11b(+) cells and VEGFR-1(+) cells, but not carrier-mobilized cells or CD11b(-) cells, accelerates neovascularization and ischemic tissue regeneration. Inhibition of VEGF signaling suppresses tPA-induced neovascularization in a model of hind limb...

  5. Cell wall modification in grapevine cells in response to UV stress investigated by atomic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lesniewska, E.; Adrian, M.; Klinguer, A.; Pugin, A

    2004-08-15

    Despite cell wall reinforcement being a well-known defence mechanism of plants, it remains poorly characterized from a physical point of view. The objective of this work was to further describe this mechanism. Vitis vinifera cv Gamay cells were treated with UV-light (254 nm), a well-known elicitor of defence mechanisms in grapevines, and physical cell wall modifications were observed using the atomic force microscopy (AFM) under native conditions. The grapevine cell suspensions were continuously observed in their culture medium from 30 min to 24 h after elicitation. In the beginning, cellulose fibrils covered by a matrix surrounded the control and treated cells. After 3 h, the elicited cells displayed sprouted expansions around the cell wall that correspond to pectin chains. These expansions were not observed on untreated grapevine cells. The AFM tip was used to determine the average surface elastic modulus of cell wall that account for cell wall mechanical properties. The elasticity is diminished in UV-treated cells. In a comparative study, grapevine cells showed the same decrease in cell wall elasticity when treated with a fungal biotic elicitor of defence response. These results demonstrate cell wall strengthening by UV stress.

  6. O-acetylation of Plant Cell Wall Polysaccharides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sascha eGille

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Plant cell walls are composed of structurally diverse polymers, many of which are O-acetylated. How plants O-acetylate wall polymers and what its function is remained elusive until recently, when two protein families were identified in the model plant Arabidopsis that are involved in the O-acetylation of wall polysaccharides – the reduced wall acetylation (RWA and the trichome birefringence-like (TBL proteins. This review discusses the role of these two protein families in polysaccharide O-acetylation and outlines the differences and similarities of polymer acetylation mechanisms in plants, fungi, bacteria and mammals. Members of the TBL protein family had been shown to impact pathogen resistance, freezing tolerance, and cellulose biosynthesis. The connection of TBLs to polysaccharide O-acetylation thus gives crucial leads into the biological function of wall polymer O-acetylation.From a biotechnological point understanding the O-acetylation mechanism is important as acetyl-substituents inhibit the enzymatic degradation of wall polymers and released acetate can be a potent inhibitor in microbial fermentations, thus impacting the economic viability of e.g. lignocellulosic based biofuel production.

  7. Transplantation of dental pulp stem cells and platelet-rich plasma for pulp regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiaofei; Zhang, Chengfei; Huang, George T-J; Cheung, Gary S P; Dissanayaka, Waruna Lakmal; Zhu, Wenhao

    2012-12-01

    The loss of dental pulp may weaken teeth, rendering them susceptible to reinfection, fracture, and subsequent tooth loss. Therefore, regeneration of pulp is considered an ideal treatment to preserve teeth. The aim of this study was to explore the capacity of dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) and platelet-rich plasma (PRP) to regenerate dental pulp in canine mature permanent teeth. Pulpectomy with apical foramen enlarged to a #80 file was performed in 16 upper premolars of 4 beagle dogs. Four experimental groups were randomly established: (1) the blood clot group, (2) the autologous DPSCs group, (3) the PRP group, and (4) the DP + PRP group (a mixture of DPSCs and PRP). Four lower premolars without any further treatment after pulpectomy were used as the control group. All teeth were sealed with mineral trioxide aggregate and composite. Twelve weeks after transplantation, the teeth were subjected to radiographic and histologic examination. Twenty-four of 32 experimental root canals gained newly formed tissues. All canals with an introduction of a blood clot showed histologic evidence of vital tissue formation. Cementum-like and periodontal ligament-like tissues along the internal root canal walls were typical structures in most cases. There is no significant difference between groups with or without autologous DPSC transplantation (exact chi-square test, P pulpectomy and enlargement of the apical foramen. Histologically, transplantation of DPSCs and/or PRP into root canals showed no enhancement in new tissue formation compared with inducement of a blood clot into the root canals alone. Copyright © 2012 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Mesenchymal Stem Cell Therapy for Nerve Regeneration and Immunomodulation after Composite Tissue Allotransplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-01

    10-1-0927 TITLE: Mesenchymal Stem Cell Therapy for Nerve Regeneration and Immunomodulation after Composite Tissue Allotransplantation...immunosuppression. Bone Marrow Derived Mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs) are pluripotent cells, capable of differentiation along multiple mesenchymal lineages into...As part of implemented transition from University of Pittsburgh to Johns Hopkins University, we optimized our mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) isolation

  9. Interleukin 17-producing γδT cells promote hepatic regeneration in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Raghavendra; Graffeo, Christopher S; Gulati, Rishabh; Jamal, Mohsin; Narayan, Suchithra; Zambirinis, Constantinos P; Barilla, Rocky; Deutsch, Michael; Greco, Stephanie H; Ochi, Atsuo; Tomkötter, Lena; Blobstein, Reuven; Avanzi, Antonina; Tippens, Daniel M; Gelbstein, Yisroel; Van Heerden, Eliza; Miller, George

    2014-08-01

    Subsets of leukocytes synergize with regenerative growth factors to promote hepatic regeneration. γδT cells are early responders to inflammation-induced injury in a number of contexts. We investigated the role of γδT cells in hepatic regeneration using mice with disruptions in Tcrd (encodes the T-cell receptor δ chain) and Clec7a (encodes C-type lectin domain family 7 member a, also known as DECTIN1). We performed partial hepatectomies on wild-type C57BL/6, CD45.1, Tcrd(-/-), or Clec7a(-/-) mice. Cells were isolated from livers of patients and mice via mechanical and enzymatic digestion. γδT cells were purified by fluorescence-activated cell sorting. In mice, partial hepatectomy up-regulated expression of CCL20 and ligands of Dectin-1, which was associated with recruitment and activation of γδT cells and their increased production of interleukin (IL)-17 family cytokines. Recruited γδT cells induced production of IL-6 by antigen-presenting cells and suppressed expression of interferon gamma by natural killer T cells, promoting hepatocyte proliferation. Absence of IL-17-producing γδT cells or deletion of Dectin-1 prevented development of regenerative phenotypes in subsets of innate immune cells. This slowed liver regeneration and was associated with reduced expression of regenerative growth factors and cell cycle regulators. Conversely, exogenous administration of IL-17 family cytokines or Dectin-1 ligands promoted regeneration. More broadly, we found that γδT cells are required for inflammatory responses mediated by IL-17 and Dectin-1. γδT cells regulate hepatic regeneration by producing IL-22 and IL-17, which have direct mitogenic effects on hepatocytes and promote a regenerative phenotype in hepatic leukocytes, respectively. Dectin-1 ligation is required for γδT cells to promote hepatic regeneration. Copyright © 2014 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Microstructural study of carbonized wood after cell wall sectioning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ishimaru, Kengo; Hata, Toshimitsu; Bronsveld, Paul; Imamura, Yuji

    Wooden blocks of Japanese cedar (Cryptomeria japonica) were carbonized at 700 and 1,800 degrees C. The microstructure was analyzed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and mu-Raman spectroscopy of the inner planes of wood cell walls. The predominant structure was of a turbostratic nature and no

  11. New Model of Wood Cell Wall Microfibril and Its Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umesh P. Agarwal; Sally A. Ralph; Rick S. Reiner; Carlos Baez

    2015-01-01

    Traditionally it has been accepted that the cell walls are made up of microfibrils which are partly crystalline. However, based on the recently obtained Raman evidence that showed that the interior of the microfibril was significantly disordered and water accessible, a new model is proposed. In this model, the molecular chains of cellulose are still organized along the...

  12. The identification of cell wall degrading enzymes in Globodera rostochiensis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Popeijus, H.E.

    2002-01-01

    This thesis describes the identification of cell wall degrading enzymes of the potato cyst nematode Globodera rostochiensis . A robust method using expressed sequence tags (ESTs) was applied to identify new parasitism related enzymes. One of the ESTs revealed the first

  13. Characterisation of cell wall polysaccharides in bilberries and black currants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hilz, H.

    2007-01-01

    During berry juice production, polysaccharides are released from the cell walls and cause thickening and high viscosity when the berries are mashed. Consequences are a low juice yield and a poor colour. This can be prevented by the use of enzymes that degrade these polysaccharides. To use these

  14. The role of the cell wall in plant immunity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malinovsky, Frederikke Gro; Fangel, Jonatan Ulrik; Willats, William George Tycho

    2014-01-01

    features, others monitor physical changes caused by an infection attempt. Detection of microbes leads to activation of appropriate defense responses that then challenge the attack. Plant cell walls are formidable and dynamic barriers. They are constructed primarily of complex carbohydrates joined...... in studying these interactions, and briefly describe the analytical potential of molecular probes used in conjunction with carbohydrate microarray technology....

  15. Characterisation of cell-wall polysaccharides from mandarin segment membranes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coll-Almela, L.; Saura-Lopez, D.; Laencina-Sanchez, J.; Schols, H.A.; Voragen, A.G.J.; Ros-García, J.M.

    2015-01-01

    In an attempt to develop a process of enzymatic peeling of mandarin segments suitable for use on an industrial scale, the cell wall fraction of the segment membrane of Satsuma mandarin fruits was extracted to obtain a chelating agent-soluble pectin fraction (ChSS), a dilute sodium hydroxide-soluble

  16. Effect of nutrient calcium on the cell wall composition and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of calcium in the nutrient medium on kikuyu grass (Pennisetum clandestinum Hochst), grown in a solution culture, was investigated. Calcium had no effect on the lignin content of leaf material, but decreased the lignin content per unit stem cell wall. Calcium appeared to have no significant effect on either the ...

  17. Method for remodeling cell wall polysaccharide structures in plant

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ulvskov, P.; Schols, H.A.; Visser, R.; Borkhardt, B.; Sorensen, S.O.; Oomen, R.; Vincken, J.P.

    2001-01-01

    Methods for providing transgenic plants and parts hereof that, relative to the wild type state, is modified in a complex cell wall polysaccharide structure including pectins and hemicelluloses, the modification being in the overall glycosidic linkage pattern or the monosaccharide profile, comprising

  18. Anatomical changes in the cell-wall structure of Leucaena ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The structural changes in the cell wall and delignification pattern caused by Trametes versicolor and Trametes hirsuta in the sap wood of Leucaena leucocephala were examined by light and confocal laser scanning microscopy. The in vitro decay test was conducted for 12 weeks. Both species of Trametes used in this study ...

  19. An enzymatic approach to cell wall structure | Hungate | South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... digested to a somewhat greater extent (88%) than were the fermentable sugars of the hemicellulose fraction (62- 76%). The digestibility of the total insoluble alfalfa cell wall, including lignin but not material solubilized during heat sterilization, was 66%. A cellulase, a-arabinosidase and xylanase were partially purified from ...

  20. Analyzing the complex machinery of cell wall biosynthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmers, J.F.P.

    2009-01-01

    The plant cell wall polymers make up most of the plant biomass and provide the raw material for many economically important products including food, feed, bio-materials, chemicals, textiles, and biofuel. This broad range of functions and applications make the biosynthesis of these polysaccharides a

  1. Regeneration in Macrostomum lignano (Platyhelminthes): cellular dynamics in the neoblast stem cell system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nimeth, Katharina Theresia; Egger, Bernhard; Rieger, Reinhard; Salvenmoser, Willi; Peter, Roland; Gschwentner, Robert

    2007-03-01

    Neoblasts are potentially totipotent stem cells and the only proliferating cells in adult Platyhelminthes. We have examined the cellular dynamics of neoblasts during the posterior regeneration of Macrostomum lignano. Double-labeling of neoblasts with bromodeoxyuridine and the anti-phospho histone H3 mitosis marker has revealed a complex cellular response in the first 48 h after amputation; this response is different from that known to occur during regeneration in triclad platyhelminths and in starvation/feeding experiments in M. lignano. Mitotic activity is reduced during the first 8 h of regeneration but, at 48 h after amputation, reaches almost twice the value of control animals. The total number of S-phase cells significantly increases after 1 day of regeneration. A subpopulation of fast-cycling neoblasts surprisingly shows the same dynamics during regeneration as those in control animals. Wound healing and regeneration are accompanied by the formation of a distinct blastema. These results present new insights, at the cellular level, into the early regeneration of rhabditophoran Platyhelminthes.

  2. The cell wall of the human pathogen Candida glabrata: differential incorporation of novel adhesin-like wall proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Groot, P.W.J.; Kraneveld, E.A.; Yin, Q.Y.; Dekker, H.L.; Groß, U.; Crielaard, W.; de Koster, C.G.; Bader, O.; Klis, F.M.; Weig, M.

    2008-01-01

    The cell wall of the human pathogen Candida glabrata governs initial host-pathogen interactions that underlie the establishment of fungal infections. With the aim of identifying species-specific features that may directly relate to its virulence, we have investigated the cell wall of C. glabrata

  3. Permissive Schwann cell graft/spinal cord interfaces for axon regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Ryan R; Henao, Martha; Pearse, Damien D; Bunge, Mary Bartlett

    2015-01-01

    The transplantation of autologous Schwann cells (SCs) to repair the injured spinal cord is currently being evaluated in a clinical trial. In support, this study determined properties of spinal cord/SC bridge interfaces that enabled regenerated brainstem axons to cross them, possibly leading to improvement in rat hindlimb movement. Fluid bridges of SCs and Matrigel were placed in complete spinal cord transections. Compared to pregelled bridges of SCs and Matrigel, they improved regeneration of brainstem axons across the rostral interface. The regenerating brainstem axons formed synaptophysin(+) bouton-like terminals and contacted MAP2A(+) dendrites at the caudal interface. Brainstem axon regeneration was directly associated with glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP(+)) astrocyte processes that elongated into the SC bridge. Electron microscopy revealed that axons, SCs, and astrocytes were enclosed together within tunnels bounded by a continuous basal lamina. Neuroglycan (NG2) expression was associated with these tunnels. One week after injury, the GFAP(+) processes coexpressed nestin and brain lipid-binding protein, and the tips of GFAP(+)/NG2(+) processes extended into the bridges together with the regenerating brainstem axons. Both brainstem axon regeneration and number of GFAP(+) processes in the bridges correlated with improvement in hindlimb locomotion. Following SCI, astrocytes may enter a reactive state that prohibits axon regeneration. Elongation of astrocyte processes into SC bridges, however, and formation of NG2(+) tunnels enable brainstem axon regeneration and improvement in function. It is important for spinal cord repair to define conditions that favor elongation of astrocytes into lesions/transplants.

  4. Lgr6 marks nail stem cells and is required for digit tip regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehoczky, Jessica A; Tabin, Clifford J

    2015-10-27

    The tips of the digits of some mammals, including human infants and mice, are capable of complete regeneration after injury. This process is reliant on the presence of the overlaying nail organ and is mediated by a proliferative blastema. Epithelial Wnt/β-catenin signaling has been shown to be necessary for mouse digit tip regeneration. Here, we report on Lgr5 and Lgr6 (leucine-rich repeat-containing G protein-coupled receptor 5 and 6), two important agonists of the Wnt pathway that are known to be markers of several epithelial stem cell populations. We find that Lgr5 is expressed in a dermal population of cells adjacent to the specialized epithelia surrounding the keratinized nail plate. Moreover, Lgr5-expressing cells contribute to this dermis, but not the blastema, during digit tip regeneration. In contrast, we find that Lgr6 is expressed within cells of the nail matrix portion of the nail epithelium, as well as in a subset of cells in the bone and eccrine sweat glands. Genetic lineage analysis reveals that Lgr6-expressing cells give rise to the nail during homeostatic growth, demonstrating that Lgr6 is a marker of nail stem cells. Moreover, Lgr6-expressing cells contribute to the blastema, suggesting a potential direct role for Lgr6-expressing cells during digit tip regeneration. This role is confirmed by analysis of Lgr6-deficient mice, which have both a nail and bone regeneration defect.

  5. A review of adipocyte lineage cells and dermal papilla cells in hair follicle regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peipei Zhang

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Alopecia is an exceedingly prevalent problem effecting men and women of all ages. The standard of care for alopecia involves either transplanting existing hair follicles to bald areas or attempting to stimulate existing follicles with topical and/or oral medication. Yet, these treatment options are fraught with problems of cost, side effects, and, most importantly, inadequate long-term hair coverage. Innovative cell-based therapies have focused on the dermal papilla cell as a way to grow new hair in previously bald areas. However, despite this attention, many obstacles exist, including retention of dermal papilla inducing ability and maintenance of dermal papilla productivity after several passages of culture. The use of adipocyte lineage cells, including adipose-derived stem cells, has shown promise as a cell-based solution to regulate hair regeneration and may help in maintaining or increasing dermal papilla cells inducing hair ability. In this review, we highlight recent advances in the understanding of the cellular contribution and regulation of dermal papilla cells and summarize adipocyte lineage cells in hair regeneration.

  6. Regulation of myogenesis and skeletal muscle regeneration: effects of oxygen levels on satellite cell activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaillou, Thomas; Lanner, Johanna T

    2016-12-01

    Reduced oxygen (O 2 ) levels (hypoxia) are present during embryogenesis and exposure to altitude and in pathologic conditions. During embryogenesis, myogenic progenitor cells reside in a hypoxic microenvironment, which may regulate their activity. Satellite cells are myogenic progenitor cells localized in a local environment, suggesting that the O 2 level could affect their activity during muscle regeneration. In this review, we present the idea that O 2 levels regulate myogenesis and muscle regeneration, we elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying myogenesis and muscle regeneration in hypoxia and depict therapeutic strategies using changes in O 2 levels to promote muscle regeneration. Severe hypoxia (≤1% O 2 ) appears detrimental for myogenic differentiation in vitro, whereas a 3-6% O 2 level could promote myogenesis. Hypoxia impairs the regenerative capacity of injured muscles. Although it remains to be explored, hypoxia may contribute to the muscle damage observed in patients with pathologies associated with hypoxia (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and peripheral arterial disease). Hypoxia affects satellite cell activity and myogenesis through mechanisms dependent and independent of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α. Finally, hyperbaric oxygen therapy and transplantation of hypoxia-conditioned myoblasts are beneficial procedures to enhance muscle regeneration in animals. These therapies may be clinically relevant to treatment of patients with severe muscle damage.-Chaillou, T. Lanner, J. T. Regulation of myogenesis and skeletal muscle regeneration: effects of oxygen levels on satellite cell activity. © FASEB.

  7. Bone marrow cell extract promotes the regeneration of irradiated bone.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillaume Michel

    Full Text Available Mandibular osteoradionecrosis is a severe side effect of radiotherapy after the treatment of squamous cell carcinomas of the upper aerodigestive tract. As an alternative to its treatment by micro-anastomosed free-flaps, preclinical tissular engineering studies have been developed. Total bone marrow (TBM associated with biphasic calcium phosphate (BCP significantly enhanced bone formation in irradiated bone. One mechanism, explaining how bone marrow cells can help regenerate tissues like this, is the paracrine effect. The bone marrow cell extract (BMCE makes use of this paracrine mechanism by keeping only the soluble factors such as growth factors and cytokines. It has provided significant results in repairing various tissues, but has not yet been studied in irradiated bone reconstruction. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of BMCE via an intraosseous or intravenous delivery, with a calcium phosphate scaffold, in irradiated bone reconstruction. Twenty rats were irradiated on their hind limbs with a single 80-Gy dose. Three weeks later, surgery was performed to create osseous defects. The intraosseous group (n = 12 studied the effect of BMCE in situ, with six combinations (empty defect, BCP, TBM, BCP-TBM, lysate only, BCP-lysate. After four different combinations of implantation (empty defect, BCP, TBM, BCP-TBM, the intravenous group (n = 8 received four intravenous injections of BMCE for 2 weeks. Five weeks after implantation, samples were explanted for histological and scanning electron microscopy analysis. Lysate immunogenicity was studied with various mixed lymphocyte reactions. Intravenous injections of BMCE led to a significant new bone formation compared to the intraosseous group. The BCP-TBM mixture remained the most effective in the intraosseous group. However, intravenous injections were more effective, with TBM placed in the defect, with or without biomaterials. Histologically, highly cellularized bone marrow was

  8. Mesenchymal Stem Cells as a Potent Cell Source for Bone Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elham Zomorodian

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available While small bone defects heal spontaneously, large bone defects need surgical intervention for bone transplantation. Autologous bone grafts are the best and safest strategy for bone repair. An alternative method is to use allogenic bone graft. Both methods have limitations, particularly when bone defects are of a critical size. In these cases, bone constructs created by tissue engineering technologies are of utmost importance. Cells are one main component in the manufacture of bone construct. A few cell types, including embryonic stem cells (ESCs, adult osteoblast, and adult stem cells, can be used for this purpose. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs, as adult stem cells, possess characteristics that make them good candidate for bone repair. This paper discusses different aspects of MSCs that render them an appropriate cell type for clinical use to promote bone regeneration.

  9. Ultrastructure and composition of the Nannochloropsis gaditana cell wall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholz, Matthew J; Weiss, Taylor L; Jinkerson, Robert E; Jing, Jia; Roth, Robyn; Goodenough, Ursula; Posewitz, Matthew C; Gerken, Henri G

    2014-11-01

    Marine algae of the genus Nannochloropsis are promising producers of biofuel precursors and nutraceuticals and are also harvested commercially for aquaculture feed. We have used quick-freeze, deep-etch electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and carbohydrate analyses to characterize the architecture of the Nannochloropsis gaditana (strain CCMP 526) cell wall, whose recalcitrance presents a significant barrier to biocommodity extraction. The data indicate a bilayer structure consisting of a cellulosic inner wall (~75% of the mass balance) protected by an outer hydrophobic algaenan layer. Cellulase treatment of walls purified after cell lysis generates highly enriched algaenan preparations without using the harsh chemical treatments typically used in algaenan isolation and characterization. Nannochloropsis algaenan was determined to comprise long, straight-chain, saturated aliphatics with ether cross-links, which closely resembles the cutan of vascular plants. Chemical identification of >85% of the isolated cell wall mass is detailed, and genome analysis is used to identify candidate biosynthetic enzymes. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  10. Effect of a tunnel-structured β-tricalcium phosphate graft material on periodontal regeneration: a pilot study in a canine one-wall intrabony defect model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuura, T; Akizuki, T; Hoshi, S; Ikawa, T; Kinoshita, A; Sunaga, M; Oda, S; Kuboki, Y; Izumi, Y

    2015-06-01

    Tissue regeneration is affected by the porosity, chemical properties and geometric structure of graft materials. Regeneration of severe periodontal defects, such as one-wall intrabony defects, is difficult because of reduced tissue support, and bone grafts are commonly used in such cases. In the present study, a tunnel-structured β-tricalcium phosphate (tunnel β-TCP) graft material designed to stimulate bone formation was fabricated. The objective of this pilot study was to evaluate the effect of this graft material on periodontal regeneration in one-wall intrabony defects in dogs. Six male beagle dogs were used in this study. First, the mandibular second and third incisors were extracted. Experimental surgery was performed 12 wk after tooth extraction. Bilateral 4 × 8 mm (width × depth) one-wall intrabony defects were created in the mesial side of the mandibular canines. At the experimental sites, the defects were filled with tunnel β-TCP, whereas the control defects were left empty. Twelve weeks after surgery, qualitative and quantitative histological analyses were performed. There were no signs of clinical inflammation 12 wk after surgery. Coronal extension indicative of new bone formation was higher at the experimental sites than at the control sites, although the differences between both the sites in the newly formed cementum and connective tissue attachment were not significant. Newly formed periodontal ligament and cementum-like tissue were evident along the root surface at the experimental sites. The inner surface of the tunnels was partially resorbed and replaced with new bone. New blood vessels were observed inside the lumens of tunnel β-TCP. Tunnel β-TCP serves as a scaffold for new bone formation in one-wall intrabony defects. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Periodontal regeneration induced by porous alpha-tricalcium phosphate with immobilized basic fibroblast growth factor in a canine model of 2-wall periodontal defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuse, Kazuya; Hashimoto, Yoshiya; Kakinoki, Sachiro; Yamaoka, Tetsuji; Morita, Shosuke

    2017-10-27

    We evaluated the effect of porous alpha-tricalcium phosphate (α-TCP) with immobilized basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) on periodontal regeneration in a canine model of 2-wall periodontal defects. Identical bone defects were made in the canine mandible; six defects in each animal were filled with porous α-TCP with bFGF bound via heparin (bFGF group), and the remaining defects were filled with unmodified porous α-TCP (control group). Micro-computed tomography and histological evaluation were performed at 2, 4, and 8 weeks post-implantation. The bone mineral content of the bFGF group was higher than that of the control group at 2 and 4 weeks (p periodontal ligaments with Sharpey's fibers. At 8 weeks, continuous cortical bone with a Haversian structure covered the top of the bone defects in the bFGF group. These findings indicate that porous α-TCP with immobilized bFGF could promote periodontal regeneration at the early regeneration phase in a canine model of 2-wall periodontal defects.

  12. Cell wall staining with Trypan Blue enables quantitative analysis of morphological changes in yeast cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes eLiesche

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Yeast cells are protected by a cell wall that plays an important role in the exchange of substances with the environment. The cell wall structure is dynamic and can adapt to different physiological states or environmental conditions. For the investigation of morphological changes, selective staining with fluorescent dyes is a valuable tool. Furthermore, cell wall staining is used to facilitate sub-cellular localization experiments with fluorescently-labeled proteins and the detection of yeast cells in non-fungal host tissues. Here, we report staining of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cell wall with Trypan Blue, which emits strong red fluorescence upon binding to chitin and yeast glucan; thereby, it facilitates cell wall analysis by confocal and super-resolution microscopy. The staining pattern of Trypan Blue was similar to that of the widely used UV-excitable, blue fluorescent cell wall stain Calcofluor White. Trypan Blue staining facilitated quantification of cell size and cell wall volume when utilizing the optical sectioning capacity of a confocal microscope. This enabled the quantification of morphological changes during growth under anaerobic conditions and in the presence of chemicals, demonstrating the potential of this approach for morphological investigations or screening assays.

  13. In vivo periodontal tissue regeneration by periodontal ligament stem cells and endothelial cells in three-dimensional cell sheet constructs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panduwawala, C P; Zhan, X; Dissanayaka, W L; Samaranayake, L P; Jin, L; Zhang, C

    2017-06-01

    Chronic periodontitis causes damage to tooth-supporting tissues, resulting in tooth loss in adults. Recently, cell-sheet-based approaches have been studied to overcome the limitations of conventional cytotherapeutic procedures for periodontal regeneration. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the regenerative potential of periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs) and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) in three-dimensional (3D) cell sheet constructs for periodontal regeneration in vivo. PDLSCs, HUVECs or co-cultures of both cells were seeded onto temperature-responsive culture dishes, and intact cell sheets were fabricated. Cell sheets were wrapped around the prepared human roots in three different combinations and implanted subcutaneously into immunodeficient mice. Histological evaluation revealed that after 2, 4 and 8 wk of implantation, periodontal ligament-like tissue arrangements were observed around the implanted roots in experimental groups compared with controls. Vascular lumens were also observed in periodontal compartments of HUVEC-containing groups. Periodontal ligament regeneration, cementogenesis and osteogenesis were evident in the experimental groups at both weeks 4 and 8, as shown by immunostaining for periostin and bone sialoprotein. Human cells in the transplanted cell sheets were stained by immunohistochemistry for the presence of human mitochondria. The 3D cell sheet-based approach may be potentially beneficial and is thus encouraged for future regenerative periodontal therapy. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Regeneration and Cell Recruitment in an Improved Heterotopic Auxiliary Partial Liver Transplantation Model in the Rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ono, Yoshihiro; Pérez-Gutiérrez, Angelica; Yovchev, Mladen I; Matsubara, Kentaro; Yokota, Shinichiro; Guzman-Lepe, Jorge; Handa, Kan; Collin de l'Hortet, Alexandra; Thomson, Angus W; Geller, David A; Yagi, Hiroshi; Oertel, Michael; Soto-Gutierrez, Alejandro

    2017-01-01

    Auxiliary partial liver transplantation (APLT) in humans is a therapeutic modality used especially to treat liver failure in children or congenital metabolic disease. Animal models of APLT have helped to explore therapeutic options. Though many groups have suggested improvements, standardizing the surgical procedure has been challenging. Additionally, the question of whether graft livers are reconstituted by recipient-derived cells after transplantation has been controversial. The aim of this study was to improve experimental APLT in rats and to assess cell recruitment in the liver grafts. To inhibit recipient liver regeneration and to promote graft regeneration, we treated recipients with retrorsine and added arterial anastomosis. Using green fluorescence protein transgenic rats as recipients, we examined liver resident cell recruitment within graft livers by immunofluorescence costaining. In the improved APLT model, we achieved well-regenerated grafts that could maintain regeneration for at least 4 weeks. Regarding the cell recruitment, there was no evidence of recipient-derived hepatocyte, cholangiocyte, or hepatic stellate cell recruitment into the graft. Macrophages/monocytes, however, were consistently recruited into the graft and increased over time, which might be related to inflammatory responses. Very few endothelial cells showed colocalization of markers. We have successfully established an improved rat APLT model with arterial anastomosis as a standard technique. Using this model, we have characterized cell recruitment into the regenerating grafts.

  15. Stem cells applications in bone and tooth repair and regeneration: New insights, tools, and hopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel Meguid, Eiman; Ke, Yuehai; Ji, Junfeng; El-Hashash, Ahmed H K

    2018-03-01

    The exploration of stem and progenitor cells holds promise for advancing our understanding of the biology of tissue repair and regeneration mechanisms after injury. This will also help in the future use of stem cell therapy for the development of regenerative medicine approaches for the treatment of different tissue-species defects or disorders such as bone, cartilages, and tooth defects or disorders. Bone is a specialized connective tissue, with mineralized extracellular components that provide bones with both strength and rigidity, and thus enable bones to function in body mechanical supports and necessary locomotion process. New insights have been added to the use of different types of stem cells in bone and tooth defects over the last few years. In this concise review, we briefly describe bone structure as well as summarize recent research progress and accumulated information regarding the osteogenic differentiation of stem cells, as well as stem cell contributions to bone repair/regeneration, bone defects or disorders, and both restoration and regeneration of bones and cartilages. We also discuss advances in the osteogenic differentiation and bone regeneration of dental and periodontal stem cells as well as in stem cell contributions to dentine regeneration and tooth engineering. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Functional tooth restoration by allogeneic mesenchymal stem cell-based bio-root regeneration in swine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Fulan; Song, Tieli; Ding, Gang; Xu, Junji; Liu, Yi; Liu, Dayong; Fan, Zhipeng; Zhang, Chunmei; Shi, Songtao; Wang, Songlin

    2013-06-15

    Our previous proof-of-concept study showed the feasibility of regenerating the dental stem cell-based bioengineered tooth root (bio-root) structure in a large animal model. Here, we used allogeneic dental mesenchymal stem cells to regenerate bio-root, and then installed a crown on the bio-root to restore tooth function. A root shape hydroxyapatite tricalcium phosphate scaffold containing dental pulp stem cells was covered by a Vc-induced periodontal ligament stem cell sheet and implanted into a newly generated jaw bone implant socket. Six months after implantation, a prefabricated porcelain crown was cemented to the implant and subjected to tooth function. Clinical, radiological, histological, ultrastructural, systemic immunological evaluations and mechanical properties were analyzed for dynamic changes in the bio-root structure. The regenerated bio-root exhibited characteristics of a normal tooth after 6 months of use, including dentinal tubule-like and functional periodontal ligament-like structures. No immunological response to the bio-roots was observed. We developed a standard stem cell procedure for bio-root regeneration to restore adult tooth function. This study is the first to successfully regenerate a functional bio-root structure for artificial crown restoration by using allogeneic dental stem cells and Vc-induced cell sheet, and assess the recipient immune response in a preclinical model.

  17. Al-induced root cell wall chemical components differences of wheat ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-07-13

    Jul 13, 2011 ... Root growth is different in plants with different levels of Al-tolerance under Al stress. Cell wall chemical components of root tip cell are related to root growth. The aim of this study was to explore the relationship between root growth difference and cell wall chemical components. For this purpose, the cell wall ...

  18. Targeted and non-targeted effects in cell wall polysaccharides from transgenetically modified potato tubers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huang, J.H.

    2016-01-01

    The plant cell wall is a chemically complex network composed mainly of polysaccharides. Cell wall polysaccharides surround and protect plant cells and are responsible for the stability and rigidity of plant tissue. Pectin is a major component of primary cell wall and the middle lamella of plants.

  19. Mild and Selective Protein Release of Cell Wall Deficient Microalgae with Pulsed Electric Field

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lam, 't Gerard; Kolk, van der Jelmer A.; Chordia, Akshita; Vermuë, Marian H.; Olivieri, Giuseppe; Eppink, Michel H.M.; Wijffels, René H.

    2017-01-01

    Pulsed electric field (PEF) is considered to be a very promising technology for mild cell disruption. The application of PEF for microalgae that have a rigid cell wall, however, is hampered by the presence of that rigid outer cell wall. A cell wall free mutant of C. reinhardtii was used to mimic

  20. Al-induced root cell wall chemical components differences of wheat ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Root growth is different in plants with different levels of Al-tolerance under Al stress. Cell wall chemical components of root tip cell are related to root growth. The aim of this study was to explore the relationship between root growth difference and cell wall chemical components. For this purpose, the cell wall chemical ...

  1. Pectic arabinan side chains are essential for pollen cell wall integrity during pollen development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cankar, K.; Kortstee, A.J.; Toonen, M.A.J.; Wolters-Arts, M.; Houbein, R.; Mariani, C.; Ulvskov, P.; Jorgensen, B.; Schols, H.A.; Visser, R.G.F.; Trindade, L.M.

    2014-01-01

    Pectin is a complex polysaccharide and an integral part of the primary plant cell wall and middle lamella, contributing to cell wall mechanical strength and cell adhesion. To understand the structure–function relationships of pectin in the cell wall, a set of transgenic potato lines with altered

  2. Bone regeneration in minipigs by intrafibrillarly-mineralized collagen loaded with autologous periodontal ligament stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Ci; Yan, Boxi; Cui, Zhen; Cui, Shengjie; Zhang, Ting; Wang, Xuedong; Liu, Dawei; Yang, Ruli; Jiang, Nan; Zhou, Yanheng; Liu, Yan

    2017-01-01

    Biomimetic intrafibrillarly-mineralized collagen (IMC) is a promising scaffold for bone regeneration because of its structural and functional similarity to natural bone. The objective of this study was to evaluate the bone regeneration potential of IMC loaded with autologous periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs) in large bone defects in minipigs. A macroporous IMC with a bone-like subfibrillar nanostructure was fabricated using a biomimetic bottom-up approach. Non-healing full thickness de...

  3. Dental-derived Stem Cells and whole Tooth Regeneration: an Overview

    OpenAIRE

    Dannan, Aous

    2009-01-01

    The need for new dental tissue-replacement therapies is evident in recent reports which reveal startling statistics regarding the high incidence of tooth decay and tooth loss. Recent advances in the identification and characterization of dental stem cells, and in dental tissue-engineering strategies, suggest that bioengineering approaches may successfully be used to regenerate dental tissues and whole teeth. Interest in dental tissue-regeneration applications continues to increase as clinical...

  4. Cell Kinetics of Regenerating Liver After 70% Hepatectomy in Rats - 2-Color Flow Cytometric Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Tamura, Jun; Tanaka, Junji; Fujita, Ken-Ichi; Yoshida, Masanori; Kasamatsu, Takayuki; Arii, Shigeki; Tobe, Takayoshi

    1992-01-01

    Two-color flow cytometric (FCM) analysis using anti-bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) monoclonal antibody (MoAb) was used to investigate the cell kinetics of regenerating liver after 70% partial hepatectomy in rats. Three peaks were seen in DNA histograms of rat hepatocyte nuclei, corresponding to diploid(2c), tetraploid(4c), and octaploid(8c). These proportions changed in the course of regeneration which were clearly demonstrated by DNA histograms using flow cytometry. The proportion of d...

  5. Catechins activate muscle stem cells by Myf5 induction and stimulate muscle regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, A Rum; Kim, Kyung Min; Byun, Mi Ran; Hwang, Jun-Ha; Park, Jung Il; Oh, Ho Taek; Kim, Hyo Kyeong; Jeong, Mi Gyeong; Hwang, Eun Sook; Hong, Jeong-Ho

    2017-07-22

    Muscle weakness is one of the most common symptoms in aged individuals and increases risk of mortality. Thus, maintenance of muscle mass is important for inhibiting aging. In this study, we investigated the effect of catechins, polyphenol compounds in green tea, on muscle regeneration. We found that (-)-epicatechin gallate (ECG) and (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) activate satellite cells by induction of Myf5 transcription factors. For satellite cell activation, Akt kinase was significantly induced after ECG treatment and ECG-induced satellite cell activation was blocked in the presence of Akt inhibitor. ECG also promotes myogenic differentiation through the induction of myogenic markers, including Myogenin and Muscle creatine kinase (MCK), in satellite and C2C12 myoblast cells. Finally, EGCG administration to mice significantly increased muscle fiber size for regeneration. Taken together, the results suggest that catechins stimulate muscle stem cell activation and differentiation for muscle regeneration. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Expression of stem cell pluripotency factors during regeneration in the earthworm Eisenia foetida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Pengfei; Shao, Qiang; Diao, Xiaoping; Li, Zandong; Han, Qian

    2016-01-01

    Stem cell pluripotency factors can induce somatic cells to form induced pluripotent stem cells, which are involved in cell reprogramming and dedifferentiation. The tissue regeneration in the earthworm Eisenia foetida may involve cell dedifferentiation. There is limited information about associations between pluripotency factors and the regeneration. In this report, cDNA sequences of pluripotency factors, oct4, nanog, sox2, c-myc and lin28 genes from the earthworm E. foetida were cloned, and quantitative PCR analysis was performed for their mRNA expressions in the head, clitellum and tail. The maximum up-regulation of oct4, nanog, sox2, c-myc and lin28 occurred at 12h, 4 days, 12h, 2 days, and 24h after amputation for 110, 178, 21, 251 and 325-fold, respectively, in comparison with the controls. The results suggest that the tissues are regenerated via cellular dedifferentiation and reprogramming. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Magnetic domain wall conduits for single cell applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Donolato, Marco; Torti, A.; Kostesha, Natalie

    2011-01-01

    The ability to trap, manipulate and release single cells on a surface is important both for fundamental studies of cellular processes and for the development of novel lab-on-chip miniaturized tools for biological and medical applications. In this paper we demonstrate how magnetic domain walls...... generated in micro- and nano-structures fabricated on a chip surface can be used to handle single yeast cells labeled with magnetic beads. In detail, first we show that the proposed approach maintains the microorganism viable, as proven by monitoring the division of labeled yeast cells trapped by domain...

  8. Enhancing pancreatic Beta-cell regeneration in vivo with pioglitazone and alogliptin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Yin

    Full Text Available Pancreatic beta-cells retain limited ability to regenerate and proliferate after various physiologic triggers. Identifying therapies that are able to enhance beta-cell regeneration may therefore be useful for the treatment of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes.In this study we investigated endogenous and transplanted beta-cell regeneration by serially quantifying changes in bioluminescence from beta-cells from transgenic mice expressing firefly luciferase under the control of the mouse insulin I promoter. We tested the ability of pioglitazone and alogliptin, two drugs developed for the treatment of type 2 diabetes, to enhance beta-cell regeneration, and also defined the effect of the immunosuppression with rapamycin and tacrolimus on transplanted islet beta mass.Pioglitazone is a stimulator of nuclear receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma while alogliptin is a selective dipeptidyl peptidase IV inhibitor. Pioglitazone alone, or in combination with alogliptin, enhanced endogenous beta-cell regeneration in streptozotocin-treated mice, while alogliptin alone had modest effects. In a model of syngeneic islet transplantation, immunosuppression with rapamycin and tacrolimus induced an early loss of beta-cell mass, while treatment with insulin implants to maintain normoglycemia and pioglitazone plus alogliptin was able to partially promote beta-cell mass recovery.These data highlight the utility of bioluminescence for serially quantifying functional beta-cell mass in living mice. They also demonstrate the ability of pioglitazone, used either alone or in combination with alogliptin, to enhance regeneration of endogenous islet beta-cells as well as transplanted islets into recipients treated with rapamycin and tacrolimus.

  9. Enhancing Pancreatic Beta-Cell Regeneration In Vivo with Pioglitazone and Alogliptin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao-Jun; Misawa, Ryosuke; Grossman, Eric J.; Tao, Jing; Zhong, Rong; Witkowski, Piotr; Bell, Graeme I.; Chong, Anita S.

    2013-01-01

    Aims/Hypothesis Pancreatic beta-cells retain limited ability to regenerate and proliferate after various physiologic triggers. Identifying therapies that are able to enhance beta-cell regeneration may therefore be useful for the treatment of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Methods In this study we investigated endogenous and transplanted beta-cell regeneration by serially quantifying changes in bioluminescence from beta-cells from transgenic mice expressing firefly luciferase under the control of the mouse insulin I promoter. We tested the ability of pioglitazone and alogliptin, two drugs developed for the treatment of type 2 diabetes, to enhance beta-cell regeneration, and also defined the effect of the immunosuppression with rapamycin and tacrolimus on transplanted islet beta mass. Results Pioglitazone is a stimulator of nuclear receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma while alogliptin is a selective dipeptidyl peptidase IV inhibitor. Pioglitazone alone, or in combination with alogliptin, enhanced endogenous beta-cell regeneration in streptozotocin-treated mice, while alogliptin alone had modest effects. In a model of syngeneic islet transplantation, immunosuppression with rapamycin and tacrolimus induced an early loss of beta-cell mass, while treatment with insulin implants to maintain normoglycemia and pioglitazone plus alogliptin was able to partially promote beta-cell mass recovery. Conclusions/Interpretation These data highlight the utility of bioluminescence for serially quantifying functional beta-cell mass in living mice. They also demonstrate the ability of pioglitazone, used either alone or in combination with alogliptin, to enhance regeneration of endogenous islet beta-cells as well as transplanted islets into recipients treated with rapamycin and tacrolimus. PMID:23762423

  10. Stable corneal regeneration four years after implantation of a cell-free recombinant human collagen scaffold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagerholm, Per; Lagali, Neil S; Ong, Jeb A; Merrett, Kimberley; Jackson, W Bruce; Polarek, James W; Suuronen, Erik J; Liu, Yuwen; Brunette, Isabelle; Griffith, May

    2014-03-01

    We developed cell-free implants, comprising carbodiimide crosslinked recombinant human collagen (RHC), to enable corneal regeneration by endogenous cell recruitment, to address the worldwide shortage of donor corneas. Patients were grafted with RHC implants. Over four years, the regenerated neo-corneas were stably integrated without rejection, without the long immunosuppression regime needed by donor cornea patients. There was no recruitment of inflammatory dendritic cells into the implant area, whereas, even with immunosuppression, donor cornea recipients showed dendritic cell migration into the central cornea and a rejection episode was observed. Regeneration as evidenced by continued nerve and stromal cell repopulation occurred over the four years to approximate the micro-architecture of healthy corneas. Histopathology of a regenerated, clear cornea from a regrafted patient showed normal corneal architecture. Donor human cornea grafted eyes had abnormally tortuous nerves and stromal cell death was found. Implanted patients had a 4-year average corrected visual acuity of 20/54 and gained more than 5 Snellen lines of vision on an eye chart. The visual acuity can be improved with more robust materials for better shape retention. Nevertheless, these RHC implants can achieve stable regeneration and therefore, represent a potentially safe alternative to donor organ transplantation. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  11. Human Umbilical Cord Mesenchymal Stem Cells: A New Therapeutic Option for Tooth Regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yuanwei; Yu, Yongchun; Chen, Lin; Ye, Lanfeng; Cui, Junhui; Sun, Quan; Li, Kaide; Li, Zhiyong; Liu, Lei

    2015-01-01

    Tooth regeneration is considered to be an optimistic approach to replace current treatments for tooth loss. It is important to determine the most suitable seed cells for tooth regeneration. Recently, human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells (hUCMSCs) have been regarded as a promising candidate for tissue regeneration. However, it has not been reported whether hUCMSCs can be employed in tooth regeneration. Here, we report that hUCMSCs can be induced into odontoblast-like cells in vitro and in vivo. Induced hUCMSCs expressed dentin-related proteins including dentin sialoprotein (DSP) and dentin matrix protein-1 (DMP-1), and their gene expression levels were similar to those in native pulp tissue cells. Moreover, DSP- and DMP-1-positive calcifications were observed after implantation of hUCMSCs in vivo. These findings reveal that hUCMSCs have an odontogenic differentiation potency to differentiate to odontoblast-like cells with characteristic deposition of dentin-like matrix in vivo. This study clearly demonstrates hUCMSCs as an alternative therapeutic cell source for tooth regeneration.

  12. A multi-walled silk fibroin/silk sericin nerve conduit coated with poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) sheath for peripheral nerve regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Jianwei; Cheng, Yan; Liu, Yanxiao; Ye, Zhou; Zhan, Beilei; Quan, Daping; Xu, Yangbin

    2017-04-01

    The linearly oriented multi-walled silk fibroin/silk sericin (SF/SS) nerve conduits (NCs) can provide physical cues similar to native peripheral nerve fasciculi, but the mechanical properties of which are not excellent enough. In this study, NCs with a novel and bionic design with dual structures were developed. The important features of our NCs is that the internal skeleton (the multi-walled SF/SS conduits) has a bionic structure similar to the architecture of native peripheral nerve fasciculi, which is beneficial for nerve regeneration, and the outer sheath (the hollow poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) [PLGA] conduits) could provide strong mechanical protection for the internal skeleton. The linearly oriented multi-walled SF/SS conduit was fabricated and inserted in the hollow PLGA sheath lumen and then used for the bridge across the sciatic nerve defect in rats. The outcome of the peripheral nerve repair post implantation was evaluated. The functional and morphological parameters were examined and showed that the novel PLGA-coated SF/SS NCs could promote peripheral nerve regeneration, approaching those elicited by nerve autografts that are the first candidate for repair of peripheral nerve defects. Thus, these updated NCs have potential usefulness to enhance functional recovery after repair of peripheral nerve defect. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Germ cell regeneration-mediated, enhanced mutagenesis in the ascidian Ciona intestinalis reveals flexible germ cell formation from different somatic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Keita; Hozumi, Akiko; Treen, Nicholas; Sakuma, Tetsushi; Yamamoto, Takashi; Shirae-Kurabayashi, Maki; Sasakura, Yasunori

    2017-03-15

    The ascidian Ciona intestinalis has a high regeneration capacity that enables the regeneration of artificially removed primordial germ cells (PGCs) from somatic cells. We utilized PGC regeneration to establish efficient methods of germ line mutagenesis with transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs). When PGCs were artificially removed from animals in which a TALEN pair was expressed, somatic cells harboring mutations in the target gene were converted into germ cells, this germ cell population exhibited higher mutation rates than animals not subjected to PGC removal. PGC regeneration enables us to use TALEN expression vectors of specific somatic tissues for germ cell mutagenesis. Unexpectedly, cis elements for epidermis, neural tissue and muscle could be used for germ cell mutagenesis, indicating there are multiple sources of regenerated PGCs, suggesting a flexibility of differentiated Ciona somatic cells to regain totipotency. Sperm and eggs of a single hermaphroditic, PGC regenerated animal typically have different mutations, suggesting they arise from different cells. PGCs can be generated from somatic cells even though the maternal PGCs are not removed, suggesting that the PGC regeneration is not solely an artificial event but could have an endogenous function in Ciona. This study provides a technical innovation in the genome-editing methods, including easy establishment of mutant lines. Moreover, this study suggests cellular mechanisms and the potential evolutionary significance of PGC regeneration in Ciona. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Collagen nerve conduits promote enhanced axonal regeneration, schwann cell association, and neovascularization compared to silicone conduits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemp, Stephen W P; Syed, Shahbaz; Walsh, Walsh; Zochodne, Douglas W; Midha, Rajiv

    2009-08-01

    Peripheral nerve regeneration within guidance conduits involves a critical association between regenerating axons, Schwann cells (SCs), and neovascularization. However, it is currently unknown if there is a greater association between these factors in nonpermeable versus semipermeable nerve guide conduits. We therefore examined this collaboration in both silicone- and collagen-based nerve conduits in both 5- and 10-mm-injury gaps in rat sciatic nerves. Results indicate that collagen conduits promoted enhanced axonal and SC regeneration and association when compared to silicone conduits in the shorter 5-mm-gap model. In addition, collagen tubes displayed enhanced neovascularization over silicone conduits, suggesting that these three factors are intimately related in successful peripheral nerve regeneration. At later time points (1- and 2-month analysis) in a 10-mm-gap model, collagen tubes displayed enhanced axonal regeneration, myelination, and vascularization when compared to silicone-based conduits. Results from these studies suggest that regenerating cables within collagen-based conduits are revascularized earlier and more completely, which in turn enhances peripheral nerve regeneration through these nerve guides as compared to silicone conduits.

  15. Stem Cells for Bone Regeneration: From Cell-Based Therapies to Decellularised Engineered Extracellular Matrices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James N. Fisher

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently, autologous bone grafting represents the clinical gold standard in orthopaedic surgery. In certain cases, however, alternative techniques are required. The clinical utility of stem and stromal cells has been demonstrated for the repair and regeneration of craniomaxillofacial and long bone defects although clinical adoption of bone tissue engineering protocols has been very limited. Initial tissue engineering studies focused on the bone marrow as a source of cells for bone regeneration, and while a number of promising results continue to emerge, limitations to this technique have prompted the exploration of alternative cell sources, including adipose and muscle tissue. In this review paper we discuss the advantages and disadvantages of cell sources with a focus on adipose tissue and the bone marrow. Additionally, we highlight the relatively recent paradigm of developmental engineering, which promotes the recapitulation of naturally occurring developmental processes to allow the implant to optimally respond to endogenous cues. Finally we examine efforts to apply lessons from studies into different cell sources and developmental approaches to stimulate bone growth by use of decellularised hypertrophic cartilage templates.

  16. Gastrin treatment stimulates β-cell regeneration and improves glucose tolerance in 95% pancreatectomized rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Téllez, Noèlia; Joanny, Géraldine; Escoriza, Jéssica; Vilaseca, Marina; Montanya, Eduard

    2011-07-01

    β-Cell mass reduction is a central aspect in the development of type 1 and type 2 diabetes, and substitution or regeneration of the lost β-cells is a potentially curative treatment of diabetes. To study the effects of gastrin on β-cell mass in rats with 95% pancreatectomy (95%-Px), a model of pancreatic regeneration, rats underwent 95% Px or sham Px and were treated with [15 leu] gastrin-17 (Px+G and S+G) or vehicle (Px+V and S+V) for 15 d. In 95% Px rats, gastrin treatment reduced hyperglycemia (280 ± 52 mg vs. 436 ± 51 mg/dl, P Gastrin treatment induced β-cell regeneration by enhancing β-cell neogenesis (increased number of extraislet β-cells in Px+G: 0.42 ± 0.05 cells/mm(2) vs. Px+V: 0.27 ± 0.07 cells/mm(2), P gastrin-treated rats (Px+G: 0.07 ± 0.02%, Px+V: 0.23 ± 0.05%; P Gastrin action on β-cell regeneration and survival increased β-cell mass and improved glucose tolerance in 95% Px rats, supporting a potential role of gastrin in the treatment of diabetes.

  17. Quiescence Exit of Tert+ Stem Cells by Wnt/β-Catenin Is Indispensable for Intestinal Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han Na Suh

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Fine control of stem cell maintenance and activation is crucial for tissue homeostasis and regeneration. However, the mechanism of quiescence exit of Tert+ intestinal stem cells (ISCs remains unknown. Employing a Tert knockin (TertTCE/+ mouse model, we found that Tert+ cells are long-term label-retaining self-renewing cells, which are partially distinguished from the previously identified +4 ISCs. Tert+ cells become mitotic upon irradiation (IR injury. Conditional ablation of Tert+ cells impairs IR-induced intestinal regeneration but not intestinal homeostasis. Upon IR injury, Wnt signaling is specifically activated in Tert+ cells via the ROS-HIFs-transactivated Wnt2b signaling axis. Importantly, conditional knockout of β-catenin/Ctnnb1 in Tert+ cells undermines IR-induced quiescence exit of Tert+ cells, which subsequently impedes intestinal regeneration. Our results that Wnt-signaling-induced activation of Tert+ ISCs is indispensable for intestinal regeneration unveil the underlying mechanism for how Tert+ stem cells undergo quiescence exit upon tissue injury.

  18. Clones of ectopic stem cells in the regeneration of muscle defects in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rujing Yang

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Little is known about whether clones of ectopic, non-muscle stem cells contribute to muscle regeneration. Stem/progenitor cells that are isolated for experimental research or therapeutics are typically heterogeneous. Non-myogenic lineages in a heterogeneous population conceptually may compromise tissue repair. In this study, we discovered that clones of mononucleated stem cells of human tooth pulp fused into multinucleated myotubes that robustly expressed myosin heavy chain in vitro with or without co-culture with mouse skeletal myoblasts (C2C12 cells. Cloned cells were sustainably Oct4+, Nanog+ and Stro1+. The fusion indices of myogenic clones were approximately 16-17 folds greater than their parent, heterogeneous stem cells. Upon infusion into cardio-toxin induced tibialis anterior muscle defects, undifferentiated clonal progenies not only engrafted and colonized host muscle, but also expressed human dystrophin and myosin heavy chain more efficaciously than their parent heterogeneous stem cell populations. Strikingly, clonal progenies yielded ∼9 times more human myosin heavy chain mRNA in regenerating muscles than those infused with their parent, heterogeneous stem cells. The number of human dystrophin positive cells in regenerating muscles infused with clonal progenies was more than ∼3 times greater than muscles infused with heterogeneous stem cells from which clonal progenies were derived. These findings suggest the therapeutic potential of ectopic myogenic clones in muscle regeneration.

  19. Making sense of Wnt signaling – linking hair cell regeneration to development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lina eJansson

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Wnt signaling is a highly conserved pathway crucial for development and homeostasis of multicellular organisms. Secreted Wnt ligands bind Frizzled receptors to regulate diverse processes such as axis patterning, cell division, and cell fate specification. They also serve to govern self-renewal of somatic stem cells in several adult tissues. The complexity of the pathway can be attributed to the myriad of Wnt and Frizzled combinations as well as its diverse context-dependent functions. In the developing mouse inner ear, Wnt signaling plays diverse roles, including specification of the otic placode and patterning of the otic vesicle. At later stages, its activity governs sensory hair cell specification, cell cycle regulation, and hair cell orientation. In regenerating sensory organs from non-mammalian species, Wnt signaling can also regulate the extent of proliferative hair cell regeneration. This review describes the current knowledge of the roles of Wnt signaling and Wnt-responsive cells in hair cell development and regeneration. We also discuss possible future directions and the potential application and limitation of Wnt signaling in augmenting hair cell regeneration.

  20. Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes in Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Il; Matsuo, Yutaka; Maruyama, Shigeo

    2018-01-22

    Photovoltaics, more generally known as solar cells, are made from semiconducting materials that convert light into electricity. Solar cells have received much attention in recent years due to their promise as clean and efficient light-harvesting devices. Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) could play a crucial role in these devices and have been the subject of much research, which continues to this day. SWNTs are known to outperform multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) at low densities, because of the difference in their optical transmittance for the same current density, which is the most important parameter in comparing SWNTs and MWNTs. SWNT films show semiconducting features, which make SWNTs function as active or charge-transporting materials. This chapter, consisting of two sections, focuses on the use of SWNTs in solar cells. In the first section, we discuss SWNTs as a light harvester and charge transporter in the photoactive layer, which are reviewed chronologically to show the history of the research progress. In the second section, we discuss SWNTs as a transparent conductive layer outside of the photoactive layer, which is relatively more actively researched. This section introduces SWNT applications in silicon solar cells, organic solar cells, and perovskite solar cells each, from their prototypes to recent results. As we go along, the science and prospects of the application of solar cells will be discussed.

  1. Functional Regeneration Beyond the Glial Scar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cregg, Jared M.; DePaul, Marc A.; Filous, Angela R.; Lang, Brad T.; Tran, Amanda; Silver, Jerry

    2014-01-01

    Astrocytes react to CNS injury by building a dense wall of filamentous processes around the lesion. Stromal cells quickly take up residence in the lesion core and synthesize connective tissue elements that contribute to fibrosis. Oligodendrocyte precursor cells proliferate within the lesion and help to entrap dystrophic axon tips. Here we review evidence that this aggregate scar acts as the major barrier to regeneration of axons after injury. We also consider several exciting new interventions that allow axons to regenerate beyond the glial scar, and discuss the implications of this work for the future of regeneration biology. PMID:24424280

  2. Roles of tRNA in cell wall biosynthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dare, Kiley; Ibba, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Recent research into various aspects of bacterial metabolism such as cell wall and antibiotic synthesis, degradation pathways, cellular stress, and amino acid biosynthesis has elucidated roles of aminoacyl-transfer ribonucleic acid (aa-tRNA) outside of translation. Although the two enzyme families...... responsible for cell wall modifications, aminoacyl-phosphatidylglycerol synthases (aaPGSs) and Fem, were discovered some time ago, they have recently become of intense interest for their roles in the antimicrobial resistance of pathogenic microorganisms. The addition of positively charged amino acids...... to phosphatidylglycerol (PG) by aaPGSs neutralizes the lipid bilayer making the bacteria less susceptible to positively charged antimicrobial agents. Fem transferases utilize aa-tRNA to form peptide bridges that link strands of peptidoglycan. These bridges vary among the bacterial species in which they are present...

  3. Identifying Genes Controlling Ferulate Cross-Linking Formation in Grass Cell Walls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de O. Buanafina, Marcia Maria [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)

    2013-10-16

    This proposal focuses on cell wall feruloylation and our long term goal is to identify and isolate novel genes controlling feruloylation and to characterize the phenotype of mutants in this pathway, with a spotlight on cell wall properties.

  4. Bacterial Cell Wall Polymer-Induced Granulomatous Inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sartor; Herfarth; Van Tol EAF

    1996-04-01

    Local or systemic injection of peptidoglycan-polysaccharide polymers, which are the primary structural components of cell walls of nearly all bacteria, leads to acute inflammation, which can develop into chronic, spontaneously relapsing, granulomatous inflammation in a number of organs. Evolution into chronic granulomatous inflammation is dependent upon persistence of poorly biodegradable cell wall polymers within tissues, genetically determined host susceptibility, and generation of a T-lymphocyte-mediated immune response. Intraperitoneal injection of peptidoglycan-polysaccharide fragments from group A streptococci or selected intestinal bacteria into susceptible Lewis rats leads to chronic, spontaneously reactivating erosive arthritis and hepatic granulomas. Subserosal (intramural) injection of poorly biodegradable cell wall fragments into the distal intestine of Lewis rats induces chronic, spontaneously relapsing granulomatous enterocolitis with associated arthritis, hepatic granulomas, anemia, and leukocytosis. Chronic inflammation does not occur in T-lymphocyte-deficient rats and is prevented by cyclosporin-A therapy and degradation of peptidoglycan by the muralytic enzyme, mutanolysin. Moreover, resistant Buffalo and Fischer F344 rats, the latter sharing identical MHC antigens with Lewis rats, develop only acute inflammation with no chronic granulomatous response. Peptidoglycan-polysaccharide polymers activate almost every limb of the inflammatory response. Blockade of specific pathways suggests that interleukin-1, transforming growth factor-beta, plasma kallikrein, and T lymphocytes are dominant mediators of peptidoglycan-polysaccharide-induced arthritis, hepatic granulomas, and enterocolitis. Because of the similarity of immune mechanisms of these rat models to human disease, bacterial cell wall-induced inflammation provides unique opportunities to study pathogenic mechanisms of granuloma formation in response to ubiquitous microbial agents and to test

  5. Lignin isolated from primary walls of hybrid aspen cell cultures indicates significant differences in lignin structure between primary and secondary cell wall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christiernin, Maria; Ohlsson, Anna B; Berglund, Torkel; Henriksson, Gunnar

    2005-08-01

    Hybrid aspen (Populus tremula x tremuloides) cell cultures were grown for 7, 14 and 21 days. The cell cultures formed primary cell walls but no secondary cell wall according to carbohydrate analysis and microscopic characterization. The primary walls were lignified, increasingly with age, according to Klason lignin analysis. Presence of lignin in the primary walls, with a higher content in 21-day old cells than in 7-day old cells, was further supported by phloroglucinol/HCl reagent test and confocal microscopy after both immunolocalization and staining with acriflavin. Both laccase and peroxidase activity were found in the cultures and the activity increased during lignin formation. The lignin from the cell culture material was compared to lignin from mature aspen wood, where most of the lignin originates in the secondary cell wall, and which served as our secondary cell wall control. Lignin from the cell walls was isolated and characterized by thioacidolysis followed by gas chromatography and mass spectrometry. The lignin in the cell cultures differed from lignin of mature aspen wood in that it consisted exclusively of guaiacyl units, and had a more condensed structure. Five lignin structures were identified by mass spectrometry in the cell suspension cultures. The results indicate that the hybrid aspen cell culture used in this investigation may be a convenient experimental system for studies of primary cell wall lignin.

  6. Dynamics of cell wall elasticity pattern shapes the cell during yeast mating morphogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldenbogen, Björn; Giese, Wolfgang; Hemmen, Marie; Uhlendorf, Jannis; Herrmann, Andreas; Klipp, Edda

    2016-09-01

    The cell wall defines cell shape and maintains integrity of fungi and plants. When exposed to mating pheromone, Saccharomyces cerevisiae grows a mating projection and alters in morphology from spherical to shmoo form. Although structural and compositional alterations of the cell wall accompany shape transitions, their impact on cell wall elasticity is unknown. In a combined theoretical and experimental approach using finite-element modelling and atomic force microscopy (AFM), we investigated the influence of spatially and temporally varying material properties on mating morphogenesis. Time-resolved elasticity maps of shmooing yeast acquired with AFM in vivo revealed distinct patterns, with soft material at the emerging mating projection and stiff material at the tip. The observed cell wall softening in the protrusion region is necessary for the formation of the characteristic shmoo shape, and results in wider and longer mating projections. The approach is generally applicable to tip-growing fungi and plants cells. © 2016 The Authors.

  7. Stem cell-based growth, regeneration, and remodeling of the planarian intestine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsthoefel, David J.; Park, Amanda E.; Newmark, Phillip A.

    2011-01-01

    Although some animals are capable of regenerating organs, the mechanisms by which this is achieved are poorly understood. In planarians, pluripotent somatic stem cells called neoblasts supply new cells for growth, replenish tissues in response to cellular turnover, and regenerate tissues after injury. For most tissues and organs, however, the spatiotemporal dynamics of stem cell differentiation and the fate of tissue that existed prior to injury have not been characterized systematically. Utilizing in vivo imaging and bromodeoxyuridine pulse-chase experiments, we have analyzed growth and regeneration of the planarian intestine, the organ responsible for digestion and nutrient distribution. During growth, we observe that new gut branches are added along the entire anteroposterior axis. We find that new enterocytes differentiate throughout the intestine rather than in specific growth zones, suggesting that branching morphogenesis is achieved primarily by remodeling of differentiated intestinal tissues. During regeneration, we also demonstrate a previously unappreciated degree of intestinal remodeling, in which pre-existing posterior gut tissue contributes extensively to the newly formed anterior gut, and vice versa. By contrast to growing animals, differentiation of new intestinal cells occurs at preferential locations, including within newly generated tissue (the blastema), and along pre-existing intestinal branches undergoing remodeling. Our results indicate that growth and regeneration of the planarian intestine are achieved by coordinated differentiation of stem cells and the remodeling of pre-existing tissues. Elucidation of the mechanisms by which these processes are integrated will be critical for understanding organogenesis in a post-embryonic context. PMID:21664348

  8. Spinal cord regeneration in Xenopus tadpoles proceeds through activation of Sox2-positive cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background In contrast to mammals, amphibians, such as adult urodeles (for example, newts) and anuran larvae (for example, Xenopus) can regenerate their spinal cord after injury. However, the cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in this process are still poorly understood. Results Here, we report that tail amputation results in a global increase of Sox2 levels and proliferation of Sox2+ cells. Overexpression of a dominant negative form of Sox2 diminished proliferation of spinal cord resident cells affecting tail regeneration after amputation, suggesting that spinal cord regeneration is crucial for the whole process. After spinal cord transection, Sox2+ cells are found in the ablation gap forming aggregates. Furthermore, Sox2 levels correlated with regenerative capabilities during metamorphosis, observing a decrease in Sox2 levels at non-regenerative stages. Conclusions Sox2+ cells contribute to the regeneration of spinal cord after tail amputation and transection. Sox2 levels decreases during metamorphosis concomitantly with the lost of regenerative capabilities. Our results lead to a working hypothesis in which spinal cord damage activates proliferation and/or migration of Sox2+ cells, thus allowing regeneration of the spinal cord after tail amputation or reconstitution of the ependymal epithelium after spinal cord transection. PMID:22537391

  9. Regulation of plant cells, cell walls and development by mechanical signals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyerowitz, Elliot M. [California Inst. of Technology (CalTech), Pasadena, CA (United States)

    2016-06-14

    The overall goal of the revised scope of work for the final year of funding was to characterize cell wall biosynthesis in developing cotyledons and in the shoot apical meristem of Arabidopsis thaliana, as a way of learning about developmental control of cell wall biosynthesis in plants, and interactions between cell wall biosynthesis and the microtubule cytoskeleton. The proposed work had two parts – to look at the effect of mutation in the SPIRAL2 gene on microtubule organization and reorganization, and to thoroughly characterize the glycosyltransferase genes expressed in shoot apical meristems by RNA-seq experiments, by in situ hybridization of the RNAs expressed in the meristem, and by antibody staining of the products of the glycosyltransferases in meristems. Both parts were completed; the spiral2 mutant was found to speed microtubule reorientation after ablation of adjacent cells, supporting our hypothesis that reorganization correlates with microtubule severing, the rate of which is increased by the mutation. The glycosyltransferase characterization was completed and published as Yang et al. (2016). Among the new things learned was that primary cell wall biosynthesis is strongly controlled both by cell type, and by stage of cell cycle, implying not only that different, even adjacent, cells can have different sugar linkages in their (nonshared) walls, but also that a surprisingly large proportion of glycosyltransferases is regulated in the cell cycle, and therefore that the cell cycle regulates wall maturation to a degree previously unrecognized.

  10. Effect of Yeast Cell Morphology, Cell Wall Physical Structure and Chemical Composition on Patulin Adsorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Ying; Wang, Jianguo; Liu, Bin; Wang, Zhouli; Yuan, Yahong; Yue, Tianli

    2015-01-01

    The capability of yeast to adsorb patulin in fruit juice can aid in substantially reducing the patulin toxic effect on human health. This study aimed to investigate the capability of yeast cell morphology and cell wall internal structure and composition to adsorb patulin. To compare different yeast cell morphologies, cell wall internal structure and composition, scanning electron microscope, transmission electron microscope and ion chromatography were used. The results indicated that patulin adsorption capability of yeast was influenced by cell surface areas, volume, and cell wall thickness, as well as 1,3-β-glucan content. Among these factors, cell wall thickness and 1,3-β-glucan content serve significant functions. The investigation revealed that patulin adsorption capability was mainly affected by the three-dimensional network structure of the cell wall composed of 1,3-β-glucan. Finally, patulin adsorption in commercial kiwi fruit juice was investigated, and the results indicated that yeast cells could adsorb patulin from commercial kiwi fruit juice efficiently. This study can potentially simulate in vitro cell walls to enhance patulin adsorption capability and successfully apply to fruit juice industry.

  11. Effect of Yeast Cell Morphology, Cell Wall Physical Structure and Chemical Composition on Patulin Adsorption.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Luo

    Full Text Available The capability of yeast to adsorb patulin in fruit juice can aid in substantially reducing the patulin toxic effect on human health. This study aimed to investigate the capability of yeast cell morphology and cell wall internal structure and composition to adsorb patulin. To compare different yeast cell morphologies, cell wall internal structure and composition, scanning electron microscope, transmission electron microscope and ion chromatography were used. The results indicated that patulin adsorption capability of yeast was influenced by cell surface areas, volume, and cell wall thickness, as well as 1,3-β-glucan content. Among these factors, cell wall thickness and 1,3-β-glucan content serve significant functions. The investigation revealed that patulin adsorption capability was mainly affected by the three-dimensional network structure of the cell wall composed of 1,3-β-glucan. Finally, patulin adsorption in commercial kiwi fruit juice was investigated, and the results indicated that yeast cells could adsorb patulin from commercial kiwi fruit juice efficiently. This study can potentially simulate in vitro cell walls to enhance patulin adsorption capability and successfully apply to fruit juice industry.

  12. Re-expression of IGF-II is important for beta cell regeneration in adult mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luxian Zhou

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The key factors which support re-expansion of beta cell numbers after injury are largely unknown. Insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II plays a critical role in supporting cell division and differentiation during ontogeny but its role in the adult is not known. In this study we investigated the effect of IGF-II on beta cell regeneration. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We employed an in vivo model of 'switchable' c-Myc-induced beta cell ablation, pIns-c-MycER(TAM, in which 90% of beta cells are lost following 11 days of c-Myc (Myc activation in vivo. Importantly, such ablation is normally followed by beta cell regeneration once Myc is deactivated, enabling functional studies of beta cell regeneration in vivo. IGF-II was shown to be re-expressed in the adult pancreas of pIns-c-MycER(TAM/IGF-II(+/+ (MIG mice, following beta cell injury. As expected in the presence of IGF-II beta cell mass and numbers recover rapidly after ablation. In contrast, in pIns-c-MycER(TAM/IGF-II(+/- (MIGKO mice, which express no IGF-II, recovery of beta cell mass and numbers were delayed and impaired. Despite failure of beta cell number increase, MIGKO mice recovered from hyperglycaemia, although this was delayed. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results demonstrate that beta cell regeneration in adult mice depends on re-expression of IGF-II, and supports the utility of using such ablation-recovery models for identifying other potential factors critical for underpinning successful beta cell regeneration in vivo. The potential therapeutic benefits of manipulating the IGF-II signaling systems merit further exploration.

  13. Cell wall composition and candidate biosynthesis gene expression during rice development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lin, Fan; Manisseri, Chithra; Fagerström, Alexandra

    2016-01-01

    , we measured 15 cell wall chemical components, enzymatic digestibility and 18 cell wall polysaccharide epitopes/ligands. We also used quantitative reverse transcription-PCR to measure expression of 50 glycosyltransferases, 15 acyltransferases and eight phenylpropanoid genes, many of which had...... strong hypotheses for genes that synthesize xylans, mixed linkage glucan and pectin components. This work provides an extensive analysis of cell wall composition throughout rice development, identifies genes likely to synthesize grass cell walls, and provides a framework for development of genetically...

  14. Hypergravity Effects on Dendritic Cells and Vascular Wall Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellik, L.; Parenti, A.; Ledda, F.; Basile, V.; Romano, G.; Fusi, F.; Monici, M.

    2009-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs), the most potent antigen-presenting cells inducing specific immune responses, are involved in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. In this inflammatory disease, DCs increase in number, being particularly abundant in the shoulder regions of plaques. Since the exposure to altered gravitational conditions results in a significant impairment of the immune function, the aim of this study was to investigate the effects of hypergravity on both the function of DCs and their interactions with the vascular wall cells. Monocytes from peripheral blood mononuclear cells of healthy volunteers were sorted by CD14+ magnetic beads selection, cultured for 6 days in medium supplemented with GM-CSF and IL-4, followed by a further maturation stimulus. DC phenotype, assessed by flow cytometry, showed a high expression of the specific DC markers CD80, CD86, HLA-DR and CD83. The DCs obtained were then exposed to hypergravitational stimuli and their phenotype, cytoskeleton, ability to activate lymphocytes and interaction with vascular wall cells were investigated. The findings showed that the exposure to hypergravity conditions resulted in a significant impairment of DC cytoskeletal organization, without affecting the expression of DC markers. Moreover, an increase in DC adhesion to human vascular smooth muscle cells and in their ability to activate lymphocytes was observed.

  15. Regulation of Injury-Induced Ovarian Regeneration by Activation of Oogonial Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erler, Piril; Sweeney, Alexandra; Monaghan, James R

    2017-01-01

    Some animals have the ability to generate large numbers of oocytes throughout life. This raises the question whether persistent adult germline stem cell populations drive continuous oogenesis and whether they are capable of mounting a regenerative response after injury. Here we demonstrate the presence of adult oogonial stem cells (OSCs) in the adult axolotl salamander ovary and show that ovarian injury induces OSC activation and functional regeneration of the ovaries to reproductive capability. Cells that have morphological similarities to germ cells were identified in the developing and adult ovaries via histological analysis. Genes involved in germ cell maintenance including Vasa, Oct4, Sox2, Nanog, Bmp15, Piwil1, Piwil2, Dazl, and Lhx8 were expressed in the presumptive OSCs. Colocalization of Vasa protein with H3 mitotic marker showed that both oogonial and spermatogonial adult stem cells were mitotically active. Providing evidence of stemness and viability of adult OSCs, enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) adult OSCs grafted into white juvenile host gonads gave rise to EGFP OSCs, and oocytes. Last, the axolotl ovaries completely regenerated after partial ovariectomy injury. During regeneration, OSC activation resulted in rapid differentiation into new oocytes, which was demonstrated by Vasa+ /BrdU+ coexpression. Furthermore, follicle cell proliferation promoted follicle maturation during ovarian regeneration. Overall, these results show that adult oogenesis occurs via proliferation of endogenous OSCs in a tetrapod and mediates ovarian regeneration. This study lays the foundations to elucidate mechanisms of ovarian regeneration that will assist regenerative medicine in treating premature ovarian failure and reduced fertility. Stem Cells 2017;35:236-247. © 2016 AlphaMed Press.

  16. Differentially activated macrophages orchestrate myogenic precursor cell fate during human skeletal muscle regeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saclier, Marielle; Yacoub-Youssef, Houda; Mackey, Abigail

    2013-01-01

    , we explored both in vitro and in vivo, in human, the interactions of differentially activated MPs with myogenic precursor cells (MPCs) during adult myogenesis and skeletal muscle regeneration. We showed in vitro that through the differential secretion of cytokines and growth factors, proinflammatory...... MPs inhibited MPC fusion while anti-inflammatory MPs strongly promoted MPC differentiation by increasing their commitment into differentiated myocytes and the formation of mature myotubes. Furthermore, the in vivo time course of expression of myogenic and MP markers was studied in regenerating human...... healthy muscle after damage. We observed that regenerating areas containing proliferating MPCs were preferentially associated with MPs expressing proinflammatory markers. In the same muscle, regenerating areas containing differentiating myogenin-positive MPCs were preferentially coupled to MPs harboring...

  17. Platelet-rich plasma enhanced umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells-based bone tissue regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Yong; Gu, Weiting; Cui, Jun; Yu, Meijiao; Zhang, Yunpeng; Tang, Cuizhu; Yang, Pishan; Xu, Xin

    2014-11-01

    To evaluate the effects of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) on the proliferation and differentiation of umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells (UC-MSCs) and explore the possibility that PRP combined with UC-MSCs may be useful for bone tissue regeneration in vivo. The proliferation potential of UC-MSCs was evaluated by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. The pluripotent differentiation capacity and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) expression were further determined by ALP staining. The expression of osteoblast-associated genes was evaluated by real-time PCR. In addition, rat critical-sized calvarial defects were examined to evaluate bone regeneration in vivo. PRP enhanced UC-MSC proliferation, and 10% PRP caused the strongest ALP and Alizarin red staining. At 7 days, the expression levels of ALP, Collagen 1 (COL-1) and Runt-related transcription factor 2 (RUNX2) in the PRP group were higher than those in the FBS group. Newly regenerated bone was observed in the defect areas, and PRP combined with UC-MSCs can accelerate bone regeneration at an early stage. Our current data suggest that UC-MSCs may be utilized in alternative stem cell-based approaches for the reconstruction and regeneration of bone defects, and PRP combined with UC-MSCs can enhance bone regeneration in vivo. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Raman imaging of lignin and cellulose distribution in black spruce wood (Picea mariana) cell walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umesh P. Agarwal

    2005-01-01

    A detailed understanding of wood cell wall structure and organization is important from both fundamental and practical point of views. A state-of- the-art 633-nm laser based confocal Raman microscope was used in situ to investigate the cell wall organization of black spruce wood. Chemical information on lignin and cellulose from morphologically distinct cell wall...

  19. Cell Wall Composition and Candidate Biosynthesis Gene Expression During Rice Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Fan; Manisseri, Chithra; Fagerström, Alexandra; Peck, Matthew L.; Vega-Sánchez, Miguel E.; Williams, Brian; Chiniquy, Dawn M.; Saha, Prasenjit; Pattathil, Sivakumar; Conlin, Brian; Zhu, Lan; Hahn, Michael G.; Willats, William G. T.; Scheller, Henrik V.; Ronald, Pamela C.; Bartley, Laura E.

    2016-08-01

    Cell walls of grasses, including cereal crops and biofuel grasses, comprise the majority of plant biomass and intimately influence plant growth, development and physiology. However, the functions of many cell wall synthesis genes, and the relationships among and the functions of cell wall components remain obscure. To better understand the patterns of cell wall accumulation and identify genes that act in grass cell wall biosynthesis, we characterized 30 samples from aerial organs of rice (Oryza sativa cv. Kitaake) at 10 developmental time points, 3-100 d post-germination. Within these samples, we measured 15 cell wall chemical components, enzymatic digestibility and 18 cell wall polysaccharide epitopes/ligands. We also used quantitative reverse transcription-PCR to measure expression of 50 glycosyltransferases, 15 acyltransferases and eight phenylpropanoid genes, many of which had previously been identified as being highly expressed in rice. Most cell wall components vary significantly during development, and correlations among them support current understanding of cell walls. We identified 92 significant correlations between cell wall components and gene expression and establish nine strong hypotheses for genes that synthesize xylans, mixed linkage glucan and pectin components. This work provides an extensive analysis of cell wall composition throughout rice development, identifies genes likely to synthesize grass cell walls, and provides a framework for development of genetically improved grasses for use in lignocellulosic biofuel production and agriculture.

  20. XB130 promotes bronchioalveolar stem cell and Club cell proliferation in airway epithelial repair and regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toba, Hiroaki; Wang, Yingchun; Bai, Xiaohui; Zamel, Ricardo; Cho, Hae-Ra; Liu, Hongmei; Lira, Alonso; Keshavjee, Shaf; Liu, Mingyao

    2015-10-13

    Proliferation of bronchioalveolar stem cells (BASCs) is essential for epithelial repair. XB130 is a novel adaptor protein involved in the regulation of epithelial cell survival, proliferation and migration through the PI3K/Akt pathway. To determine the role of XB130 in airway epithelial injury repair and regeneration, a naphthalene-induced airway epithelial injury model was used with XB130 knockout (KO) mice and their wild type (WT) littermates. In XB130 KO mice, at days 7 and 14, small airway epithelium repair was significantly delayed with fewer number of Club cells (previously called Clara cells). CCSP (Club cell secreted protein) mRNA expression was also significantly lower in KO mice at day 7. At day 5, there were significantly fewer proliferative epithelial cells in the KO group, and the number of BASCs significantly increased in WT mice but not in KO mice. At day 7, phosphorylation of Akt, GSK-3β, and the p85α subunit of PI3K was observed in airway epithelial cells in WT mice, but to a much lesser extent in KO mice. Microarray data also suggest that PI3K/Akt-related signals were regulated differently in KO and WT mice. An inhibitory mechanism for cell proliferation and cell cycle progression was suggested in KO mice. XB130 is involved in bronchioalveolar stem cell and Club cell proliferation, likely through the PI3K/Akt/GSK-3β pathway.

  1. Stress analysis for wall structure in mobile hot cell design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bahrin, Muhammad Hannan, E-mail: hannan@nuclearmalaysia.gov.my; Rahman, Anwar Abdul, E-mail: anwar@nuclearmalaysia.gov.my; Hamzah, Mohd Arif, E-mail: arif@nuclearmalaysia.gov.my; Mamat, Mohd Rizal; Azman, Azraf; Hasan, Hasni [Prototype and Plant Development Centre, Technical Services Division, Malaysian Nuclear Agency (Malaysia)

    2016-01-22

    Malaysian Nuclear Agency is developing a Mobile Hot Cell (MHC) in order to handle and manage Spent High Activity Radioactive Sources (SHARS) such as teletherapy heads and irradiators. At present, there are only two units of MHC in the world, in South Africa and China. Malaysian Mobile Hot cell is developed by Malaysian Nuclear Agency with the assistance of IAEA expert, based on the design of South Africa and China, but with improved features. Stress analysis has been performed on the design in order to fulfil the safety requirement in operation of MHC. This paper discusses the loading analysis effect from the sand to the MHC wall structure.

  2. The Role of Genetically Modified Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Urinary Bladder Regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snow-Lisy, Devon C; Diaz, Edward C; Bury, Matthew I; Fuller, Natalie J; Hannick, Jessica H; Ahmad, Nida; Sharma, Arun K

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) combined with CD34+ hematopoietic/stem progenitor cells (HSPCs) can function as surrogate urinary bladder cells to synergistically promote multi-faceted bladder tissue regeneration. However, the molecular pathways governing these events are unknown. The pleiotropic effects of Wnt5a and Cyr61 are known to affect aspects of hematopoiesis, angiogenesis, and muscle and nerve regeneration. Within this study, the effects of Cyr61 and Wnt5a on bladder tissue regeneration were evaluated by grafting scaffolds containing modified human bone marrow derived MSCs. These cell lines were engineered to independently over-express Wnt5a or Cyr61, or to exhibit reduced expression of Cyr61 within the context of a nude rat bladder augmentation model. At 4 weeks post-surgery, data demonstrated increased vessel number (~250 vs ~109 vessels/mm2) and bladder smooth muscle content (~42% vs ~36%) in Cyr61OX (over-expressing) vs Cyr61KD (knock-down) groups. Muscle content decreased to ~25% at 10 weeks in Cyr61KD groups. Wnt5aOX resulted in high numbers of vessels and muscle content (~206 vessels/mm2 and ~51%, respectively) at 4 weeks. Over-expressing cell constructs resulted in peripheral nerve regeneration while Cyr61KD animals were devoid of peripheral nerve regeneration at 4 weeks. At 10 weeks post-grafting, peripheral nerve regeneration was at a minimal level for both Cyr61OX and Wnt5aOX cell lines. Blood vessel and bladder functionality were evident at both time-points in all animals. Results from this study indicate that MSC-based Cyr61OX and Wnt5aOX cell lines play pivotal roles with regards to increasing the levels of functional vasculature, influencing muscle regeneration, and the regeneration of peripheral nerves in a model of bladder augmentation. Wnt5aOX constructs closely approximated the outcomes previously observed with the co-transplantation of MSCs with CD34+ HSPCs and may be specifically targeted as an

  3. Dental stem cells in tooth regeneration and repair in the future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morsczeck, Christian; Reichert, Torsten E

    2018-02-01

    Human dental stem cells can be obtained from postnatal teeth, extracted wisdom teeth or exfoliated deciduous teeth. Due to their differentiation potential, these mesenchymal stem cells are promising for tooth repair. Therefore, the development of dental tissue regeneration represents a suitable but challenging, target for dental stem cell therapies. Areas covered: In this review, the authors provide an overview of human dental stem cells and their properties for regeneration medicine. Numerous preclinical studies have shown that dental stem cells improve bone augmentation and healing of periodontal diseases. Clinical trials are ongoing to validate the clinical feasibility of these approaches. Dental stem cells are also important for basic research. Expert opinion: Dental stem cells offer numerous advantages for tooth repair and regeneration. Data obtained from different studies are encouraging. In the next few years, investigations on dental stem cells in basic research, pre-clinical research and clinical studies will pave the way to optimizing patient-tailored treatments for repair and regeneration of dental tissues.

  4. MASTR directs MyoD-dependent satellite cell differentiation during skeletal muscle regeneration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mokalled, Mayssa H.; Johnson, Aaron N.; Creemers, Esther E.; Olson, Eric N.

    2012-01-01

    In response to skeletal muscle injury, satellite cells, which function as a myogenic stem cell population, become activated, expand through proliferation, and ultimately fuse with each other and with damaged myofibers to promote muscle regeneration. Here, we show that members of the Myocardin family

  5. Radial glial cells play a key role in echinoderm neural regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Unlike the mammalian central nervous system (CNS), the CNS of echinoderms is capable of fast and efficient regeneration following injury and constitutes one of the most promising model systems that can provide important insights into evolution of the cellular and molecular events involved in neural repair in deuterostomes. So far, the cellular mechanisms of neural regeneration in echinoderm remained obscure. In this study we show that radial glial cells are the main source of new cells in the regenerating radial nerve cord in these animals. Results We demonstrate that radial glial cells of the sea cucumber Holothuria glaberrima react to injury by dedifferentiation. Both glia and neurons undergo programmed cell death in the lesioned CNS, but it is the dedifferentiated glial subpopulation in the vicinity of the injury that accounts for the vast majority of cell divisions. Glial outgrowth leads to formation of a tubular scaffold at the growing tip, which is later populated by neural elements. Most importantly, radial glial cells themselves give rise to new neurons. At least some of the newly produced neurons survive for more than 4 months and express neuronal markers typical of the mature echinoderm CNS. Conclusions A hypothesis is formulated that CNS regeneration via activation of radial glial cells may represent a common capacity of the Deuterostomia, which is not invoked spontaneously in higher vertebrates, whose adult CNS does not retain radial glial cells. Potential implications for biomedical research aimed at finding the cure for human CNS injuries are discussed. PMID:23597108

  6. Growth factors and hepatic progenitor cells in liver regeneration : translating bench to bedside

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruitwagen, H.S.

    2017-01-01

    Upon severe acute or chronic liver injury, hepatic progenitor cells (HPCs) become activated. HPCs are adult stem cells of the liver and are considered a reserve population acting as second line of defense in liver regeneration. However, in many cases of severe liver disease this repair mechanism

  7. Regulation and plasticity of intestinal stem cells during homeostasis and regeneration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beumer, Joep; Clevers, Hans

    2016-01-01

    The intestinal epithelium is the fastest renewing tissue in mammals and has a large flexibility to adapt to different types of damage. Lgr5(+) crypt base columnar (CBC) cells act as stem cells during homeostasis and are essential during regeneration. Upon perturbation, the activity of CBCs is

  8. Fetal Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation Fails to Fully Regenerate the B-Lymphocyte Compartment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosn, Eliver Eid Bou; Waters, Jeffrey; Phillips, Megan; Yamamoto, Ryo; Long, Brian R; Yang, Yang; Gerstein, Rachel; Stoddart, Cheryl A; Nakauchi, Hiromitsu; Herzenberg, Leonore A

    2016-01-12

    B cells are key components of cellular and humoral immunity and, like all lymphocytes, are thought to originate and renew from hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). However, our recent single-HSC transfer studies demonstrate that adult bone marrow HSCs do not regenerate B-1a, a subset of tissue B cells required for protection against pneumonia, influenza, and other infections. Since B-1a are regenerated by transfers of fetal liver, the question arises as to whether B-1a derive from fetal, but not adult, HSCs. Here we show that, similar to adult HSCs, fetal HSCs selectively fail to regenerate B-1a. We also show that, in humanized mice, human fetal liver regenerates tissue B cells that are phenotypically similar to murine B-1a, raising the question of whether human HSC transplantation, the mainstay of such models, is sufficient to regenerate human B-1a. Thus, our studies overtly challenge the current paradigm that HSCs give rise to all components of the immune system. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Phenotypic Investigation of Regenerated Epithelial Cells After Gonococcal Corneal Perforation: A Clinical, Histological, and Immunohistochemical Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jongkhajornpong, Passara; Nakamura, Takahiro; Sotozono, Chie; Inatomi, Tsutomu; Kinoshita, Shigeru

    2015-11-01

    To determine the characteristics of regenerated epithelial cells after severe gonococcal infection after corneal perforation. Pathological tissue was obtained from the cornea at the time of surgery. Hematoxylin and eosin staining and immunohistochemical analysis were performed for cytoskeletal keratins (K12, K13, and K15), basement membrane and junctional markers (laminin 5, ZO-1 and Desmoplakin), and proliferative and mesenchymal markers (Ki67, α-SMA, and vimentin). A 42-year-old patient with severe gonococcal keratoconjunctivitis rapidly progressed to corneal perforation during administration of intensive topical and systemic antibiotics. After conservative treatment, the perforation healed and 5- × 3-mm corneal ectasia occurred with localized iris attachment. Complete closure of the cornea was confirmed by a negative Seidel test. After lamellar keratoplasty to improve corneal integrity and to prevent secondary glaucoma, the pathological tissue revealed a poorly organized epithelial layer at the regenerated ectatic area. The regenerated epithelial cells clearly expressed K12, ZO-1, and Desmoplakin with underlying laminin 5 (+) basement membrane. K15 and Ki67 expressions were observed predominantly at the limbal area but not in the regenerated area. α-SMA and vimentin were sporadically expressed in the underlying connective tissue. We speculate that the process of epithelial wound healing at the site of corneal perforation was responsible for migration of the surrounding epithelial cells. Although the regenerated cells expressed several cytokeratins and junctional markers, they remained disorganized and fragile.

  10. The Utilization of Plant Facilities on the International Space Station—The Composition, Growth, and Development of Plant Cell Walls under Microgravity Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ann-Iren Kittang Jost

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In the preparation for missions to Mars, basic knowledge of the mechanisms of growth and development of living plants under microgravity (micro-g conditions is essential. Focus has centered on the g-effects on rigidity, including mechanisms of signal perception, transduction, and response in gravity resistance. These components of gravity resistance are linked to the evolution and acquisition of responses to various mechanical stresses. An overview is given both on the basic effect of hypergravity as well as of micro-g conditions in the cell wall changes. The review includes plant experiments in the US Space Shuttle and the effect of short space stays (8–14 days on single cells (plant protoplasts. Regeneration of protoplasts is dependent on cortical microtubules to orient the nascent cellulose microfibrils in the cell wall. The space protoplast experiments demonstrated that the regeneration capacity of protoplasts was retarded. Two critical factors are the basis for longer space experiments: a. the effects of gravity on the molecular mechanisms for cell wall development, b. the availability of facilities and hardware for performing cell wall experiments in space and return of RNA/DNA back to the Earth. Linked to these aspects is a description of existing hardware functioning on the International Space Station.

  11. Platelet-Rich Plasma Derived Growth Factors Contribute to Stem Cell Differentiation in Musculoskeletal Regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Yun; Han, Qixin; Chen, Wei; Song, Jialin; Zhao, Xiaotian; Ouyang, Yuanming; Yuan, Weien; Fan, Cunyi

    2017-01-01

    Stem cell treatment and platelet-rich plasma (PRP) therapy are two significant issues in regenerative medicine. Stem cells such as bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells, adipose-derived stem cells and periodontal ligament stem cells can be successfully applied in the field of tissue regeneration. PRP, a natural product isolated from whole blood, can secrete multiple growth factors (GFs) for regulating physiological activities. These GFs can stimulate proliferation and differentiation of different stem cells in injury models. Therefore, combination of both agents receives wide expectations in regenerative medicine, especially in bone, cartilage and tendon repair. In this review, we thoroughly discussed the interaction and underlying mechanisms of PRP derived GFs with stem cells, and assessed their functions in cell differentiation for musculoskeletal regeneration. PMID:29164105

  12. Regenerative Applications Using Tooth Derived Stem Cells in Other Than Tooth Regeneration: A Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yun-Jong; Cha, Seunghee; Park, Young-Seok

    2016-01-01

    Tooth derived stem cells or dental stem cells are categorized according to the location from which they are isolated and represent a promising source of cells for regenerative medicine. Originally, as one kind of mesenchymal stem cells, they are considered an alternative of bone marrow stromal cells. They share many commonalties but maintain differences. Considering their original function in development and the homeostasis of tooth structures, many applications of these cells in dentistry have aimed at tooth structure regeneration; however, the application in other than tooth structures has been attempted extensively. The availability from discarded or removed teeth can be an innate benefit as a source of autologous cells. Their origin from the neural crest results in exploitation of neurological and numerous other applications. This review briefly highlights current and future perspectives of the regenerative applications of tooth derived stem cells in areas beyond tooth regeneration.

  13. Platelet-Rich Plasma Derived Growth Factors Contribute to Stem Cell Differentiation in Musculoskeletal Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun Qian

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Stem cell treatment and platelet-rich plasma (PRP therapy are two significant issues in regenerative medicine. Stem cells such as bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells, adipose-derived stem cells and periodontal ligament stem cells can be successfully applied in the field of tissue regeneration. PRP, a natural product isolated from whole blood, can secrete multiple growth factors (GFs for regulating physiological activities. These GFs can stimulate proliferation and differentiation of different stem cells in injury models. Therefore, combination of both agents receives wide expectations in regenerative medicine, especially in bone, cartilage and tendon repair. In this review, we thoroughly discussed the interaction and underlying mechanisms of PRP derived GFs with stem cells, and assessed their functions in cell differentiation for musculoskeletal regeneration.

  14. Cell Source and Mechanism of Hair Cell Regeneration in the Neonatal Mouse Cochlea

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-30

    including prestin, a protein specific to outer HCs that is necessary for the amplification of sound . Our findings demonstrate that, in contrast to common...the regeneration process ·,ve obse~ved is the ir natural response to HC death. The Atohl DTA aJld Pou4_f3DTR’· models likely induce HC death by react...cells in small intestine and colon by marker gene Lgr5. Nature 449. 1003- 1007. Belyantseva, I. A., Adler, H. J ., Curi, R., Frolenkov, G. I. and

  15. Interactions and effects of BSA-functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes on different cell lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muzi, Laura; Tardani, Franco; La Mesa, Camillo; Bonincontro, Adalberto; Bianco, Alberto; Risuleo, Gianfranco

    2016-04-01

    Functionalized carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have shown great promise in several biomedical contexts, spanning from drug delivery to tissue regeneration. Thanks to their unique size-related properties, single-walled CNTs (SWCNTs) are particularly interesting in these fields. However, their use in nanomedicine requires a clear demonstration of their safety in terms of tissue damage, toxicity and pro-inflammatory response. Thus, a better understanding of the cytotoxicity mechanisms, the cellular interactions and the effects that these materials have on cell survival and on biological membranes is an important first step for an appropriate assessment of their biocompatibility. In this study we show how bovine serum albumin (BSA) is able to generate homogeneous and stable dispersions of SWCNTs (BSA-CNTs), suggesting their possible use in the biomedical field. On the other hand, this study wishes to shed more light on the impact and the interactions of protein-stabilized SWCNTs with two different cell types exploiting multidisciplinary techniques. We show that BSA-CNTs are efficiently taken up by cells. We also attempt to describe the effect that the interaction with cells has on the dielectric characteristics of the plasma membrane and ion flux using electrorotation. We then focus on the BSA-CNTs’ acute toxicity using different cellular models. The novel aspect of this work is the evaluation of the membrane alterations that have been poorly investigated to date.

  16. Advances in Liver Regeneration: Revisiting Hepatic Stem/Progenitor Cells and Their Origin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali-Reza Sadri

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The liver has evolved to become a highly plastic organ with extraordinary regenerative capabilities. What drives liver regeneration is still being debated. Adult liver stem/progenitor cells have been characterized and used to produce functional hepatocytes and biliary cells in vitro. However, in vivo, numerous studies have questioned whether hepatic progenitor cells have a significant role in liver regeneration. Mature hepatocytes have recently been shown to be more plastic than previously believed and give rise to new hepatocytes after acute and chronic injury. In this review, we discuss current knowledge in the field of liver regeneration and the importance of the serotonin pathway as a clinical target for patients with liver dysfunction.

  17. Stem cell signaling. An integral program for tissue renewal and regeneration : Wnt signaling and stem cell control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Clevers, Hans; Loh, Kyle M; Nusse, Roel

    2014-01-01

    Stem cells fuel tissue development, renewal, and regeneration, and these activities are controlled by the local stem cell microenvironment, the "niche." Wnt signals emanating from the niche can act as self-renewal factors for stem cells in multiple mammalian tissues. Wnt proteins are lipid-modified,

  18. Structural and functional diversity in Listeria cell wall teichoic acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yang; Boulos, Samy; Sumrall, Eric; Gerber, Benjamin; Julian-Rodero, Alicia; Eugster, Marcel R; Fieseler, Lars; Nyström, Laura; Ebert, Marc-Olivier; Loessner, Martin J

    2017-10-27

    Wall teichoic acids (WTAs) are the most abundant glycopolymers found on the cell wall of many Gram-positive bacteria, whose diverse surface structures play key roles in multiple biological processes. Despite recent technological advances in glycan analysis, structural elucidation of WTAs remains challenging due to their complex nature. Here, we employed a combination of ultra-performance liquid chromatography-coupled electrospray ionization tandem-MS/MS and NMR to determine the structural complexity of WTAs from Listeria species. We unveiled more than 10 different types of WTA polymers that vary in their linkage and repeating units. Disparity in GlcNAc to ribitol connectivity, as well as variable O-acetylation and glycosylation of GlcNAc contribute to the structural diversity of WTAs. Notably, SPR analysis indicated that constitution of WTA determines the recognition by bacteriophage endolysins. Collectively, these findings provide detailed insight into Listeria cell wall-associated carbohydrates, and will guide further studies on the structure-function relationship of WTAs. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  19. In situ analysis of cell wall polymers associated with phloem fibre cells in stems of hemp, Cannabis sativa L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, Anthony W; Marcus, Susan E; Copeland, James E; Blackburn, Richard S; Knox, J Paul

    2008-06-01

    A study of stem anatomy and the sclerenchyma fibre cells associated with the phloem tissues of hemp (Cannabis sativa L.) plants is of interest for both understanding the formation of secondary cell walls and for the enhancement of fibre utility as industrial fibres and textiles. Using a range of molecular probes for cell wall polysaccharides we have surveyed the presence of cell wall components in stems of hemp in conjunction with an anatomical survey of stem and phloem fibre development. The only polysaccharide detected to occur abundantly throughout the secondary cell walls of phloem fibres was cellulose. Pectic homogalacturonan epitopes were detected in the primary cell walls/intercellular matrices between the phloem fibres although these epitopes were present at a lower level than in the surrounding parenchyma cell walls. Arabinogalactan-protein glycan epitopes displayed a diversity of occurrence in relation to fibre development and the JIM14 epitope was specific to fibre cells, binding to the inner surface of secondary cell walls, throughout development. Xylan epitopes were found to be present in the fibre cells (and xylem secondary cell walls) and absent from adjacent parenchyma cell walls. Analysis of xylan occurrence in the phloem fibre cells of hemp and flax indicated that xylan epitopes were restricted to the primary cell walls of fibre cells and were not present in the secondary cell walls of these cells.

  20. Effects of umbilical cord tissue mesenchymal stem cells (UCX®) on rat sciatic nerve regeneration after neurotmesis injuries

    OpenAIRE

    Gärtner A; Pereira T; Armada-da-Silva PAS; Amado S; Veloso AP; Amorim I; Ribeiro J.; Santos JD; Bárcia RN; Cruz P; Cruz H; Luís AL; Santos JM; Geuna S; Maurício AC

    2014-01-01

    Peripheral nerves have the intrinsic capacity of self-regeneration after traumatic injury but the extent of the regeneration is often very poor. Increasing evidence demonstrates that mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSCs) may play an important role in tissue regeneration through the secretion of soluble trophic factors that enhance and assist in repair by paracrine activation of surrounding cells. In the present study, the therapeutic value of a population of umbilical cord tissue-derived MSCs...

  1. Current Status and Future Development of Cell Transplantation Therapy for Periodontal Tissue Regeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Yoshida, Toshiyuki; Washio, Kaoru; Iwata, Takanori; Okano, Teruo; Ishikawa, Isao

    2012-01-01

    It has been shown that stem cell transplantation can regenerate periodontal tissue, and several clinical trials involving transplantation of stem cells into human patients have already begun or are in preparation. However, stem cell transplantation therapy is a new technology, and the events following transplantation are poorly understood. Several studies have reported side effects and potential risks associated with stem cell transplantation therapy. To protect patients from such risks, gove...

  2. Proliferative response of the stem cell system during regeneration of the rostrum in Macrostomum lignano (Platyhelminthes).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdoodt, Freija; Bert, Wim; Couvreur, Marjolein; De Mulder, Katrien; Willems, Maxime

    2012-02-01

    Macrostomum lignano (Platyhelminthes) possesses pluripotent stem cells, also called neoblasts, which power its extraordinary regeneration capacity. We have examined the cellular dynamics of neoblasts during regeneration of the rostrum in M. lignano. First, using live squeeze observations, the growth curve of the rostrum was determined. Second, neoblasts were labelled with 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) and an anti-phospho-histone H3 mitosis marker (anti-phos-H3) to analyze their proliferative response to amputation. During the regeneration process, both S- and M-phase cells were present anterior to the eyes, a region that is devoid of proliferating cells during homeostasis. Furthermore, BrdU pulse experiments revealed a biphasic S-phase pattern, different from the pattern known to occur during regeneration of the tail plate in M. lignano. During a first systemic phase, S-phase numbers significantly increased, both in the region adjacent to the wound (the anterior segment) and the region far from the wound (the posterior segment). During the second, spatially restricted phase, S-phase numbers in the anterior segment rose to a peak at 3 to 5 days post-amputation (p-a), while in the posterior segment, S-phase activity approached control values again. A blastema, characterized as a build-up of S- and M-phase cells, was formed 1 day p-a. Altogether, our data present new insights into the cellular response of the neoblast system upon amputation, clearly demonstrating important differences from the situation known to occur during regeneration of the tail plate. Furthermore, the presence of proliferating cells in the region anterior to the eyes shows a clear alteration in stem cell regulation during regeneration.

  3. Enzymology and molecular biology of cell wall biosynthesis. Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ray, P.M.

    1993-03-20

    In order to be able to explore the control of cell wall polysaccharide synthesis at the molecular level, which inter alia might eventually lead to means for useful modification of plant biomass polysaccharide production, the immediate goals of this project are to identify polypeptides responsible for wall polysaccharide synthase activities and to obtain clones of the genes that encode them. We are concentrating on plasma membraneassociated (1,3)-{beta}-glucan synthase (glucan synthase-II or GS-II) and Golgi-associated (1,4)-{beta}-glucan synthase (glucan synthase-I or GS-I), of growing pea stem tissue. Our progress has been much more rapid with respect to GS-II than regarding GS-I.

  4. Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma Arising from Abdominal Wall Endometriosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thouraya Achach

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Endometriosis is a frequent benign disorder. Malignancy arising in extraovarian endometriosis is a rare event. A 49-year-old woman is presented with a large painful abdominal wall mass. She underwent a myomectomy, 20 years before, for uterus leiomyoma. Computed tomography suggested that this was a desmoid tumor and she underwent surgery. Histological examination showed a clear cell adenocarcinoma associated with endometriosis foci. Pelvic ultrasound, computed tomography, and endometrial curettage did not show any malignancy or endometriosis in the uterus and ovaries. Adjuvant chemotherapy was recommended, but the patient was lost to follow up. Six months later, she returned with a recurrence of the abdominal wall mass. She was given chemotherapy and then she was reoperated.

  5. Cell wall pH and auxin transport velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasenstein, K. H.; Rayle, D.

    1984-01-01

    According to the chemiosmotic polar diffusion hypothesis, auxin pulse velocity and basal secretion should increase with decreasing cell wall pH. Experiments were designed to test this prediction. Avena coleoptile sections were preincubated in either fusicoccin (FC), cycloheximide, pH 4.0, or pH 8.0 buffer and subsequently their polar transport capacities were determined. Relative to controls, FC enhanced auxin (IAA) uptake while CHI and pH 8.0 buffer reduced IAA uptake. Nevertheless, FC reduced IAA pulse velocity while cycloheximide increased velocity. Additional experiments showed that delivery of auxin to receivers is enhanced by increased receiver pH. This phenomenon was overcome by a pretreatment of the tissue with IAA. Our data suggest that while acidic wall pH values facilitate cellular IAA uptake, they do not enhance pulse velocity or basal secretion. These findings are inconsistent with the chemiosmotic hypothesis for auxin transport.

  6. Local Nanomechanical Motion of the Cell Wall of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelling, Andrew E.; Sehati, Sadaf; Gralla, Edith B.; Valentine, Joan S.; Gimzewski, James K.

    2004-08-01

    We demonstrate that the cell wall of living Saccharomyces cerevisiae (baker's yeast) exhibits local temperature-dependent nanomechanical motion at characteristic frequencies. The periodic motions in the range of 0.8 to 1.6 kHz with amplitudes of ~3 nm were measured using the cantilever of an atomic force microscope (AFM). Exposure of the cells to a metabolic inhibitor causes the periodic motion to cease. From the strong frequency dependence on temperature, we derive an activation energy of 58 kJ/mol, which is consistent with the cell's metabolism involving molecular motors such as kinesin, dynein, and myosin. The magnitude of the forces observed (~10 nN) suggests concerted nanomechanical activity is operative in the cell.

  7. Stem cell-like properties of the endometrial side population: implication in endometrial regeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirotaka Masuda

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The human endometrium undergoes cyclical regeneration throughout a woman's reproductive life. Ectopic implantation of endometrial cells through retrograde menstruation gives rise to endometriotic lesions which affect approximately 10% of reproductive-aged women. The high regenerative capacity of the human endometrium at eutopic and ectopic sites suggests the existence of stem/progenitor cells and a unique angiogenic system. The objective of this study was to isolate and characterize putative endometrial stem/progenitor cells and to address how they might be involved in the physiology of endometrium. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We found that approximately 2% of the total cells obtained from human endometrium displayed a side population (SP phenotype, as determined by flow cytometric analysis of Hoechst-stained cells. The endometrial SP (ESP cells exhibited preferential expression of several endothelial cell markers compared to endometrial main population (EMP cells. A medium specific for endothelial cell culture enabled ESP cells to proliferate and differentiate into various types of endometrial cells, including glandular epithelial, stromal and endothelial cells in vitro, whereas in the same medium, EMP cells differentiated only into stromal cells. Furthermore, ESP cells, but not EMP cells, reconstituted organized endometrial tissue with well-delineated glandular structures when transplanted under the kidney capsule of severely immunodeficient mice. Notably, ESP cells generated endothelial cells that migrated into the mouse kidney parenchyma and formed mature blood vessels. This potential for in vivo angiogenesis and endometrial cell regeneration was more prominent in the ESP fraction than in the EMP fraction, as the latter mainly gave rise to stromal cells in vivo. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results indicate that putative endometrial stem cells are highly enriched in the ESP cells. These unique characteristics suggest that

  8. LIVER AND BONE MARROW STEM/PROGENITOR CELLS AS REGULATORS OF REPARATIVE REGENERATION OF DAMAGED LIVER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    А. V. Lundup

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In this review the modern information about effectiveness of liver insufficiency treatment by stem/ progenitor cells of liver (oval cells and bone marrow (hemopoietic cells and mesenchymal cells was presented. It is shown that medical action of these cells is referred on normalization of liver cell interaction and reorganization of processes of a reparative regeneration in damaged liver. It is believed that application of mesenchymal stromal cells from an autological bone marrow is the most perspective strategy. However, for definitive judgement about regenerative possibilities of the autological bone marrow cells it is necessary to carry out large-scale double blind clinical researches. 

  9. Gene-modified stem cells combined with rapid prototyping techniques: a novel strategy for periodontal regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Huixia; Cao, Junkai; Wang, Dongsheng; Gu, Bing; Guo, Hong; Liu, Hongchen

    2010-03-01

    Periodontal disease, a worldwide prevalent chronic disease in adults, is characterized by the destruction of the periodontal supporting tissue including the cementum, periodontal ligament and alveolar bone. The regeneration of damaged periodontal tissue is the main goal of periodontal treatment. Because conventional periodontal treatments remain insufficient to attain complete and reliable periodontal regeneration, periodontal tissue engineering has emerged as a prospective alternative method for improving the regenerative capacity of periodontal tissue. However, the potential of periodontal regeneration seems to be limited by the understanding of the cellular and molecular events in the formation of periodontal tissue and by the insufficient collaboration of multi-disciplinary research that periodontal tissue engineering involves. In this paper, we first reviewed the recent advancements in stem cells, signaling factors, and scaffolds that relate to periodontal regeneration. Then we speculate that specific genes would improve regenerative capacity of these stem cells, which could differentiate into cementoblasts, osteoblasts and fibroblasts. In addition, the 3D scaffolds that mimic the different structure and physiologic functions of natural fibro-osseous tissue could be fabricated by rapid prototyping (RP) techniques. It was therefore hypothesized that gene-modified stem cells combined with rapid prototyping techniques would be a new strategy to promote more effective and efficient periodontal regeneration.

  10. Fibroblast reticular cells engineer a blastema extracellular network during digit tip regeneration in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrero, Luis; Simkin, Jennifer; Sammarco, Mimi; Muneoka, Ken

    2017-04-01

    The regeneration blastema which forms following amputation of the mouse digit tip is composed of undifferentiated cells bound together by an organized network of fibers. A monoclonal antibody (ER-TR7) that identifies extracellular matrix (ECM) fibers produced by fibroblast reticular cells during lymphoid organogenesis was used to characterize the ECM of the digit, the blastema, and the regenerate. Digit fibroblast reticular cells produce an ER-TR7+ ECM network associated with different tissues and represent a subset of loose connective tissue fibroblasts. During blastema formation there is an upregulation of matrix production that returns to its pre-existing level and anatomical pattern in the endpoint regenerate. Co-localization studies demonstrate a strong spatial correlation between the ER-TR7 antigen and collagen type III (COL3) in histological sections. ER-TR7 and COL3 are co-induced in cultured digit fibroblasts following treatment with tumor necrosis factor alpha and a lymphotoxin beta receptor agonist. These results provide an initial characterization of the ECM during digit regeneration and identify a subpopulation of fibroblasts involved in producing the blastema provisional matrix that is remodeled during the regeneration response.

  11. Deletion of the Imprinted Gene Grb10 Promotes Hematopoietic Stem Cell Self-Renewal and Regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Xiao; Himburg, Heather A; Pohl, Katherine; Quarmyne, Mamle; Tran, Evelyn; Zhang, Yurun; Fang, Tiancheng; Kan, Jenny; Chao, Nelson J; Zhao, Liman; Doan, Phuong L; Chute, John P

    2016-11-01

    Imprinted genes are differentially expressed by adult stem cells, but their functions in regulating adult stem cell fate are incompletely understood. Here we show that growth factor receptor-bound protein 10 (Grb10), an imprinted gene, regulates hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) self-renewal and regeneration. Deletion of the maternal allele of Grb10 in mice (Grb10m/+ mice) substantially increased HSC long-term repopulating capacity, as compared to that of Grb10+/+ mice. After total body irradiation (TBI), Grb10m/+ mice demonstrated accelerated HSC regeneration and hematopoietic reconstitution, as compared to Grb10+/+ mice. Grb10-deficient HSCs displayed increased proliferation after competitive transplantation or TBI, commensurate with upregulation of CDK4 and Cyclin E. Furthermore, the enhanced HSC regeneration observed in Grb10-deficient mice was dependent on activation of the Akt/mTORC1 pathway. This study reveals a function for the imprinted gene Grb10 in regulating HSC self-renewal and regeneration and suggests that the inhibition of Grb10 can promote hematopoietic regeneration in vivo. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Investigation of the functional role of CSLD proteins in plant cell wall deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nielsen, Erik Etlar [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2017-11-21

    The overall goal of this research proposal was to characterize the molecular machinery responsible for polarized secretion of cell wall components in Arabidopsis thaliana. We have used the polarized expansion that occurs during root hair cell growth to identify membrane trafficking pathways involved in polarized secretion of cell wall components to the expanding tips of these cells, and we have recently shown that CSLD3 is preferentially targeted to the apical plasma membranes in root hair cells, where it plays essential roles during cell wall deposition in these cells. The specific aims of the project are designed to answer the following objective: Identification of the cell wall polysaccharide class that CSLD proteins synthesize.

  13. The PERK arm of the unfolded protein response regulates satellite cell-mediated skeletal muscle regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Guangyan; Hindi, Sajedah M; Mann, Aman K; Gallot, Yann S; Bohnert, Kyle R; Cavener, Douglas R; Whittemore, Scott R; Kumar, Ashok

    2017-03-23

    Regeneration of skeletal muscle in adults is mediated by satellite stem cells. Accumulation of misfolded proteins triggers endoplasmic reticulum stress that leads to unfolded protein response (UPR). The UPR is relayed to the cell through the activation of PERK, IRE1/XBP1, and ATF6. Here, we demonstrate that levels of PERK and IRE1 are increased in satellite cells upon muscle injury. Inhibition of PERK, but not the IRE1 arm of the UPR in satellite cells inhibits myofiber regeneration in adult mice. PERK is essential for the survival and differentiation of activated satellite cells into the myogenic lineage. Deletion of PERK causes hyper-activation of p38 MAPK during myogenesis. Blocking p38 MAPK activity improves the survival and differentiation of PERK-deficient satellite cells in vitro and muscle formation in vivo. Collectively, our results suggest that the PERK arm of the UPR plays a pivotal role in the regulation of satellite cell homeostasis during regenerative myogenesis.

  14. Measuring the Mechanical Properties of Plant Cell Walls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogler, Hannes; Felekis, Dimitrios; Nelson, Bradley J; Grossniklaus, Ueli

    2015-03-25

    The size, shape and stability of a plant depend on the flexibility and integrity of its cell walls, which, at the same time, need to allow cell expansion for growth, while maintaining mechanical stability. Biomechanical studies largely vanished from the focus of plant science with the rapid progress of genetics and molecular biology since the mid-twentieth century. However, the development of more sensitive measurement tools renewed the interest in plant biomechanics in recent years, not only to understand the fundamental concepts of growth and morphogenesis, but also with regard to economically important areas in agriculture, forestry and the paper industry. Recent advances have clearly demonstrated that mechanical forces play a crucial role in cell and organ morphogenesis, which ultimately define plant morphology. In this article, we will briefly review the available methods to determine the mechanical properties of cell walls, such as atomic force microscopy (AFM) and microindentation assays, and discuss their advantages and disadvantages. But we will focus on a novel methodological approach, called cellular force microscopy (CFM), and its automated successor, real-time CFM (RT-CFM).

  15. Measuring the Mechanical Properties of Plant Cell Walls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannes Vogler

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The size, shape and stability of a plant depend on the flexibility and integrity of its cell walls, which, at the same time, need to allow cell expansion for growth, while maintaining mechanical stability. Biomechanical studies largely vanished from the focus of plant science with the rapid progress of genetics and molecular biology since the mid-twentieth century. However, the development of more sensitive measurement tools renewed the interest in plant biomechanics in recent years, not only to understand the fundamental concepts of growth and morphogenesis, but also with regard to economically important areas in agriculture, forestry and the paper industry. Recent advances have clearly demonstrated that mechanical forces play a crucial role in cell and organ morphogenesis, which ultimately define plant morphology. In this article, we will briefly review the available methods to determine the mechanical properties of cell walls, such as atomic force microscopy (AFM and microindentation assays, and discuss their advantages and disadvantages. But we will focus on a novel methodological approach, called cellular force microscopy (CFM, and its automated successor, real-time CFM (RT-CFM.

  16. [Hydroxyproline: Rich glycoproteins of the plant and cell wall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varner, J.E.

    1993-01-01

    Since xylem tissue includes the main cell types which are lignified, we are interested in gene expression of glycine-rich proteins and proline-rich proteins, and other proteins which are involved in secondary cell wall thickening during xylogenesis. Since the main feature of xylogenesis is the deposition of additional wall components, study of the mechanism of xylogenesis will greatly advance our knowledge of the synthesis and assembly of wall macromolecules. We are using the in vitro xylogenesis system from isolated Zinnia mesophyll cells to isolate genes which are specifically expressed during xylogenesis. We have used subtractive hybridization methods to isolate a number of cDNA clones for differentially regulated genes from the cells after hormonal induction. So far, we have partially characterized 18 different cDNA clones from 239 positive clones. These differentially regulated genes can be divided into three sets according to the characteristics of gene expression in the induction medium and the control medium. The first set is induced in both the induction medium and the control medium without hormones. The second set is induced mainly in the induction medium and in the control medium with the addition of NAA alone. Two of thesegenes are exclusively induced by auxin. The third set of genes is induced mainly in the induction medium. Since these genes are not induced by either auxin or cytokinin alone, they may be directly involved in the process of xylogenesis. Our experiments on the localization of H[sub 2]O[sub 2] production reinforce the earlier ideas of others that H[sub 2]O[sub 2] is involved in normal lignification.

  17. mTOR is necessary for proper satellite cell activity and skeletal muscle regeneration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Pengpeng [Key Laboratory of Swine Genetics and Breeding of Agricultural Ministry & Key Laboratory of Agricultural Animal Genetics, Breeding and Reproduction of Ministry of Education, College of Animal Science and Technology, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China); Department of Animal Sciences, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Liang, Xinrong; Shan, Tizhong [Department of Animal Sciences, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Jiang, Qinyang [Department of Animal Sciences, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); College of Animal Science and Technology, Guangxi University, Nanning 530004 (China); Deng, Changyan [Key Laboratory of Swine Genetics and Breeding of Agricultural Ministry & Key Laboratory of Agricultural Animal Genetics, Breeding and Reproduction of Ministry of Education, College of Animal Science and Technology, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China); Zheng, Rong, E-mail: zhengrong@mail.hzau.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Swine Genetics and Breeding of Agricultural Ministry & Key Laboratory of Agricultural Animal Genetics, Breeding and Reproduction of Ministry of Education, College of Animal Science and Technology, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China); Kuang, Shihuan, E-mail: skuang@purdue.edu [Department of Animal Sciences, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States)

    2015-07-17

    The serine/threonine kinase mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a key regulator of protein synthesis, cell proliferation and energy metabolism. As constitutive deletion of Mtor gene results in embryonic lethality, the function of mTOR in muscle stem cells (satellite cells) and skeletal muscle regeneration remains to be determined. In this study, we established a satellite cell specific Mtor conditional knockout (cKO) mouse model by crossing Pax7{sup CreER} and Mtor{sup flox/flox} mice. Skeletal muscle regeneration after injury was severely compromised in the absence of Mtor, indicated by increased number of necrotic myofibers infiltrated by Evans blue dye, and reduced number and size of regenerated myofibers in the Mtor cKO mice compared to wild type (WT) littermates. To dissect the cellular mechanism, we analyzed satellite cell-derived primary myoblasts grown on single myofibers or adhered to culture plates. The Mtor cKO myoblasts exhibited defective proliferation and differentiation kinetics when compared to myoblasts derived from WT littermates. At the mRNA and protein levels, the Mtor cKO myoblasts expressed lower levels of key myogenic determinant genes Pax7, Myf5, Myod, Myog than did the WT myoblasts. These results suggest that mTOR is essential for satellite cell function and skeletal muscle regeneration through controlling the expression of myogenic genes. - Highlights: • Pax7{sup CreER} was used to delete Mtor gene in satellite cells. • Satellite cell specific deletion of Mtor impairs muscle regeneration. • mTOR is necessary for satellite cell proliferation and differentiation. • Deletion of Mtor leads to reduced expression of key myogenic genes.

  18. Architecture-based multiscale computational modeling of plant cell wall mechanics to examine the hydrogen-bonding hypothesis of the cell wall network structure model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Hojae; Puri, Virendra M

    2012-11-01

    A primary plant cell wall network was computationally modeled using the finite element approach to study the hypothesis of hemicellulose (HC) tethering with the cellulose microfibrils (CMFs) as one of the major load-bearing mechanisms of the growing cell wall. A computational primary cell wall network fragment (10 × 10 μm) comprising typical compositions and properties of CMFs and HC was modeled with well-aligned CMFs. The tethering of HC to CMFs is modeled in accordance with the strength of the hydrogen bonding by implementing a specific load-bearing connection (i.e. the joint element). The introduction of the CMF-HC interaction to the computational cell wall network model is a key to the quantitative examination of the mechanical consequences of cell wall structure models, including the tethering HC model. When the cell wall network models with and without joint elements were compared, the hydrogen bond exhibited a significant contribution to the overall stiffness of the cell wall network fragment. When the cell wall network model was stretched 1% in the transverse direction, the tethering of CMF-HC via hydrogen bonds was not strong enough to maintain its integrity. When the cell wall network model was stretched 1% in the longitudinal direction, the tethering provided comparable strength to maintain its integrity. This substantial anisotropy suggests that the HC tethering with hydrogen bonds alone does not manifest sufficient energy to maintain the integrity of the cell wall during its growth (i.e. other mechanisms are present to ensure the cell wall shape).

  19. Induction kinetics of the Staphylococcus aureus cell wall stress stimulon in response to different cell wall active antibiotics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Staphylococcus aureus activates a protective cell wall stress stimulon (CWSS) in response to the inhibition of cell wall synthesis or cell envelope damage caused by several structurally and functionally different antibiotics. CWSS induction is coordinated by the VraSR two-component system, which senses an unknown signal triggered by diverse cell wall active agents. Results We have constructed a highly sensitive luciferase reporter gene system, using the promoter of sas016 (S. aureus N315), which detects very subtle differences in expression as well as measuring > 4 log-fold changes in CWSS activity, to compare the concentration dependence of CWSS induction kinetics of antibiotics with different cell envelope targets. We compared the effects of subinhibitory up to suprainhibitory concentrations of fosfomycin, D-cycloserine, tunicamycin, bacitracin, flavomycin, vancomycin, teicoplanin, oxacillin, lysostaphin and daptomycin. Induction kinetics were both strongly antibiotic- and concentration-dependent. Most antibiotics triggered an immediate response with induction beginning within 10 min, except for tunicamycin, D-cycloserine and fosfomycin which showed lags of up to one generation before induction commenced. Induction characteristics, such as the rate of CWSS induction once initiated and maximal induction reached, were strongly antibiotic dependent. We observed a clear correlation between the inhibitory effects of specific antibiotic concentrations on growth and corresponding increases in CWSS induction kinetics. Inactivation of VraR increased susceptibility to the antibiotics tested from 2- to 16-fold, with the exceptions of oxacillin and D-cycloserine, where no differences were detected in the methicillin susceptible S. aureus strain background analysed. There was no apparent correlation between the induction capacity of the various antibiotics and the relative importance of the CWSS for the corresponding resistance phenotypes. Conclusion CWSS induction

  20. Induction kinetics of the Staphylococcus aureus cell wall stress stimulon in response to different cell wall active antibiotics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berger-Bächi Brigitte

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Staphylococcus aureus activates a protective cell wall stress stimulon (CWSS in response to the inhibition of cell wall synthesis or cell envelope damage caused by several structurally and functionally different antibiotics. CWSS induction is coordinated by the VraSR two-component system, which senses an unknown signal triggered by diverse cell wall active agents. Results We have constructed a highly sensitive luciferase reporter gene system, using the promoter of sas016 (S. aureus N315, which detects very subtle differences in expression as well as measuring > 4 log-fold changes in CWSS activity, to compare the concentration dependence of CWSS induction kinetics of antibiotics with different cell envelope targets. We compared the effects of subinhibitory up to suprainhibitory concentrations of fosfomycin, D-cycloserine, tunicamycin, bacitracin, flavomycin, vancomycin, teicoplanin, oxacillin, lysostaphin and daptomycin. Induction kinetics were both strongly antibiotic- and concentration-dependent. Most antibiotics triggered an immediate response with induction beginning within 10 min, except for tunicamycin, D-cycloserine and fosfomycin which showed lags of up to one generation before induction commenced. Induction characteristics, such as the rate of CWSS induction once initiated and maximal induction reached, were strongly antibiotic dependent. We observed a clear correlation between the inhibitory effects of specific antibiotic concentrations on growth and corresponding increases in CWSS induction kinetics. Inactivation of VraR increased susceptibility to the antibiotics tested from 2- to 16-fold, with the exceptions of oxacillin and D-cycloserine, where no differences were detected in the methicillin susceptible S. aureus strain background analysed. There was no apparent correlation between the induction capacity of the various antibiotics and the relative importance of the CWSS for the corresponding resistance phenotypes

  1. Effect of histone deacetylase inhibitors trichostatin A and valproic acid on hair cell regeneration in zebrafish lateral line neuromasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingzi eHe

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available In humans, auditory hair cells are not replaced when injured. Thus, cochlear hair cell loss causes progressive and permanent hearing loss. Conversely, nonmammalian vertebrates are capable of regenerating lost sensory hair cells. The zebrafish lateral line has numerous qualities that make it well suited for studying hair cell development and regeneration. Histone deacetylase (HDAC activity has been shown to have an important role in regenerative processes in vertebrates, but its function in hair cell regeneration in vivo is not fully understood. Here, we have examined the role of HDAC activity in hair cell regeneration in the zebrafish lateral line. We eliminated lateral line hair cells of 5-day post-fertilization larvae using neomycin and then treated the larvae with HDAC inhibitors. To assess hair cell regeneration, we used 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine (BrdU incorporation in zebrafish larvae to label mitotic cells after hair cell loss. We found that pharmacological inhibition of HDACs using trichostatin A (TSA or valproic acid (VPA increased histone acetylation in the regenerated neuromasts following neomycin-induced damage. We also showed that treatment with TSA or VPA decreased the number of supporting cells and regenerated hair cells in response to hair cell damage. Additionally, BrdU immunostaining and western blot analysis showed that TSA or VPA treatment caused a significant decrease in the percentage of S-phase cells and induced p21Cip1 and p27Kip1 expression, both of which are likely to explain the decrease in the amount of newly regenerated hair cells in treated embryos. Finally, we showed that HDAC inhibitors induced no observable cell death in neuromasts as measured by cleaved caspase-3 immunohistochemistry and western blot analysis. Taken together, our results demonstrate that HDAC activity has an important role in the regeneration of hair cells in the lateral line.

  2. Redirection of Human Cancer Cells upon the Interaction with the Regenerating Mouse Mammary Gland Microenvironment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia M. Rosenfield

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Tumorigenesis is often described as a result of accumulated mutations that lead to growth advantage and clonal expansion of mutated cells. There is evidence in the literature that cancer cells are influenced by the microenvironment. Our previous studies demonstrated that the mouse mammary gland is capable of redirecting mouse cells of non-mammary origins as well as Mouse Mammary Tumor Virus (MMTV-neu transformed cells toward normal mammary epithelial cell fate during gland regeneration. Interestingly, the malignant phenotype of MMTV-neu transformed cells was suppressed during serial transplantation experiments. Here, we discuss our studies that demonstrated the potential of the regenerating mouse mammary gland to redirect cancer cells of different species into a functional tumor-free mammary epithelial cell progeny. Immunochemistry for human specific CD133, mitochondria, cytokeratins as well as milk proteins and FISH for human specific probe identified human epithelial cell progeny in ducts, lobules, and secretory acini. Fluorescent In Situ Hybridization (FISH for human centromeric DNA and FACS analysis of propidium iodine staining excluded the possibility of mouse-human cell fusion. To our knowledge this is the first evidence that human cancer cells of embryonic or somatic origins respond to developmental signals generated by the mouse mammary gland microenvironment during gland regeneration in vivo.

  3. wall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irshad Kashif

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Maintaining indoor climatic conditions of buildings compatible with the occupant comfort by consuming minimum energy, especially in a tropical climate becomes a challenging problem for researchers. This paper aims to investigate this problem by evaluating the effect of different kind of Photovoltaic Trombe wall system (PV-TW on thermal comfort, energy consumption and CO2 emission. A detailed simulation model of a single room building integrated with PV-TW was modelled using TRNSYS software. Results show that 14-35% PMV index and 26-38% PPD index reduces as system shifted from SPV-TW to DGPV-TW as compared to normal buildings. Thermal comfort indexes (PMV and PPD lie in the recommended range of ASHARE for both DPV-TW and DGPV-TW except for the few months when RH%, solar radiation intensity and ambient temperature were high. Moreover PVTW system significantly reduces energy consumption and CO2 emission of the building and also 2-4.8 °C of temperature differences between indoor and outdoor climate of building was examined.

  4. Proteomic analysis of cell walls of two developmental stages of alfalfa stems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julian C Verdonk

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Cell walls are important for the growth and development of all plants. They are also valuable resources for feed and fiber, and more recently as a potential feedstock for bioenergy production. Cell wall proteins comprise only a fraction of the cell wall, but play important roles in establishing the walls and in the chemical interactions (e.g. crosslinking of cell wall components. This crosslinking provides structure, but restricts digestibility of cell wall complex carbohydrates, limiting available energy in animal and bioenergy production systems. Manipulation of cell wall proteins could be a strategy to improve digestibility. An analysis of the cell wall proteome of apical alfalfa stems (less mature, more digestible and basal alfalfa stems (more mature, less digestible was conducted using a recently developed low-salt/density gradient method for the isolation of cell walls. Walls were subsequently subjected to a modified extraction utilizing EGTA to remove pectins, followed by a LiCl extraction to isolate more tightly bound proteins. Recovered proteins were identified using shotgun proteomics. We identified 272 proteins in the alfalfa stem cell wall proteome, 153 of which had not previously been identified in cell wall proteomic analyses. Nearly 70% percent of the identified proteins were predicted to be secreted, as would be expected for most cell wall proteins, an improvement over previously published studies using traditional cell wall isolation methods. A comparison of our and several other cell wall proteomic studies indicates little overlap in identified proteins among them, which may be largely due to differences in the tissues used as well as differences in experimental approach.

  5. Immunotherapy with BCG cell wall plus irradiated tumor cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mizukuro, Tomoyuki (Kyoto Prefectural Univ. of Medicine (Japan))

    1983-04-01

    Two different fibrosarcomas (MCB-I, MCB-II) were induced by methylcholcholanthrene in syngeneic Balb/C mice were used. The tumor cells irradiated with 5,000 to 30,000 rads did not growth in mice on 30 days after inoculation. The viable tumor cells were challenged intradermally to mice on 7 days after inoculation of the tumor cells irradiated with 5,000 to 30,000 rads. The challenged tumor cells were all rejected at 30 days after inoculation. Mice were challenged with 5 x 10/sup 5/ viable tumor cells on 7 days after inoculation of 10/sup 3/ to 10/sup 8/ irradiated tumor cells. Mice pretreated with 10/sup 5/ or 10/sup 6/ irradiated tumor cells rejected the tumor cells completely. The viable tumor cells were challenged to mice on 7 days after inoculation of BCG-CW emulsion plus 10/sup 6/ irradiated tumor cells. 0, 50, 100, 200, and 400 mu g of BCG-CW emulsion were mixed in 10/sup 6/ irradiated tumor cells. Optimal dosage of BCG-CW emulsion was 50 or 100 mu g. BCG-CW emulsion plus irradiated tumor cells were injected subcutaneously to the mice after tumor cells inoculation. Three injections of the vaccine significantly suppressed the tumor outgrowth, but not one or two injections in no-treated mice. However, in the mice pretreated with BCG-CW emulsion, the tumor growth was significantly suppressed by one or two injections of the vaccine. Especially, the three injections of the vaccine significantly suppressed the tumor growth and the 25% of the mice were completely cured. The effect of the vaccine was almost the same grade by contralateral or ipsilateral treatment. The irradiated MCB-II tumor cells plus BCG-CW emulsion were not effective to the MCB-1 tumor bearing mice, suggesting the anti-tumor effect of this vaccine was immunologically specific.

  6. Cell-derived micro-environment helps dental pulp stem cells promote dental pulp regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xuexin; Li, Hui; Sun, Jingjing; Luo, Xiangyou; Yang, Hefeng; Xie, Li; Yang, Bo; Guo, Weihua; Tian, Weidong

    2017-10-01

    The function of the dental pulp is closely connected to the extracellular matrix (ECM) structure, and ECM has received significant attention due to its biological functions for regulating cells. As such, the interaction between the ECM niche and cells is worth exploring for potential clinical uses. In this study, dental pulp stem cell (DPSC)-derived ECM (DPM) was prepared through cell culture and decellularization to function as the cell niche, and changes in DPSC behaviour and histological analysis of dental pulp tissue regeneration were evaluated following the DPM culture. DPM promoted the replication of DPSCs and exhibited retention of their mineralization. Then, the DPM-based culture strategy under odontogenic culture medium was further investigated, and the mineralization-related markers showed that DPSCs were regulated towards odontogenic differentiation. Dental pulp-like tissue with well-arranged ECM was harvested after a 2-month subcutaneous implantation in nude mice with DPM application. Additionally, DPSCs cultured on the plastic culture surface showed the up-regulation of mineralization makers in vitro, but there was a disorder in matrix formation and mineralization when the cells were cultured in vivo. DPM-based cultivation could serve as a cell niche and modulate DPSC behaviour, and this method also provided an alternative to harvest tissue-specific ECM and provided a strategy for ECM-cell interaction. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Slow-cycling stem cells in hydra contribute to head regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govindasamy, Niraimathi; Murthy, Supriya; Ghanekar, Yashoda

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Adult stem cells face the challenge of maintaining tissue homeostasis by self-renewal while maintaining their proliferation potential over the lifetime of an organism. Continuous proliferation can cause genotoxic/metabolic stress that can compromise the genomic integrity of stem cells. To prevent stem cell exhaustion, highly proliferative adult tissues maintain a pool of quiescent stem cells that divide only in response to injury and thus remain protected from genotoxic stress. Hydra is a remarkable organism with highly proliferative stem cells and ability to regenerate at whole animal level. Intriguingly, hydra does not display consequences of high proliferation, such as senescence or tumour formation. In this study, we investigate if hydra harbours a pool of slow-cycling stem cells that could help prevent undesirable consequences of continuous proliferation. Hydra were pulsed with the thymidine analogue 5-ethynyl-2′-deoxyuridine (EdU) and then chased in the absence of EdU to monitor the presence of EdU-retaining cells. A significant number of undifferentiated cells of all three lineages in hydra retained EdU for about 8–10 cell cycles, indicating that these cells did not enter cell cycle. These label-retaining cells were resistant to hydroxyurea treatment and were predominantly in the G2 phase of cell cycle. Most significantly, similar to mammalian quiescent stem cells, these cells rapidly entered cell division during head regeneration. This study shows for the first time that, contrary to current beliefs, cells in hydra display heterogeneity in their cell cycle potential and the slow-cycling cells in this population enter cell cycle during head regeneration. These results suggest an early evolution of slow-cycling stem cells in multicellular animals. PMID:25432513

  8. Slow-cycling stem cells in hydra contribute to head regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niraimathi Govindasamy

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Adult stem cells face the challenge of maintaining tissue homeostasis by self-renewal while maintaining their proliferation potential over the lifetime of an organism. Continuous proliferation can cause genotoxic/metabolic stress that can compromise the genomic integrity of stem cells. To prevent stem cell exhaustion, highly proliferative adult tissues maintain a pool of quiescent stem cells that divide only in response to injury and thus remain protected from genotoxic stress. Hydra is a remarkable organism with highly proliferative stem cells and ability to regenerate at whole animal level. Intriguingly, hydra does not display consequences of high proliferation, such as senescence or tumour formation. In this study, we investigate if hydra harbours a pool of slow-cycling stem cells that could help prevent undesirable consequences of continuous proliferation. Hydra were pulsed with the thymidine analogue 5-ethynyl-2′-deoxyuridine (EdU and then chased in the absence of EdU to monitor the presence of EdU-retaining cells. A significant number of undifferentiated cells of all three lineages in hydra retained EdU for about 8–10 cell cycles, indicating that these cells did not enter cell cycle. These label-retaining cells were resistant to hydroxyurea treatment and were predominantly in the G2 phase of cell cycle. Most significantly, similar to mammalian quiescent stem cells, these cells rapidly entered cell division during head regeneration. This study shows for the first time that, contrary to current beliefs, cells in hydra display heterogeneity in their cell cycle potential and the slow-cycling cells in this population enter cell cycle during head regeneration. These results suggest an early evolution of slow-cycling stem cells in multicellular animals.

  9. JNK Controls the Onset of Mitosis in Planarian Stem Cells and Triggers Apoptotic Cell Death Required for Regeneration and Remodeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almuedo-Castillo, María; Crespo, Xenia; Seebeck, Florian; Bartscherer, Kerstin; Salò, Emili; Adell, Teresa

    2014-01-01

    Regeneration of lost tissues depends on the precise interpretation of molecular signals that control and coordinate the onset of proliferation, cellular differentiation and cell death. However, the nature of those molecular signals and the mechanisms that integrate the cellular responses remain largely unknown. The planarian flatworm is a unique model in which regeneration and tissue renewal can be comprehensively studied in vivo. The presence of a population of adult pluripotent stem cells combined with the ability to decode signaling after wounding enable planarians to regenerate a complete, correctly proportioned animal within a few days after any kind of amputation, and to adapt their size to nutritional changes without compromising functionality. Here, we demonstrate that the stress-activated c-jun–NH2–kinase (JNK) links wound-induced apoptosis to the stem cell response during planarian regeneration. We show that JNK modulates the expression of wound-related genes, triggers apoptosis and attenuates the onset of mitosis in stem cells specifically after tissue loss. Furthermore, in pre-existing body regions, JNK activity is required to establish a positive balance between cell death and stem cell proliferation to enable tissue renewal, remodeling and the maintenance of proportionality. During homeostatic degrowth, JNK RNAi blocks apoptosis, resulting in impaired organ remodeling and rescaling. Our findings indicate that JNK-dependent apoptotic cell death is crucial to coordinate tissue renewal and remodeling required to regenerate and to maintain a correctly proportioned animal. Hence, JNK might act as a hub, translating wound signals into apoptotic cell death, controlled stem cell proliferation and differentiation, all of which are required to coordinate regeneration and tissue renewal. PMID:24922054

  10. JNK controls the onset of mitosis in planarian stem cells and triggers apoptotic cell death required for regeneration and remodeling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Almuedo-Castillo

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Regeneration of lost tissues depends on the precise interpretation of molecular signals that control and coordinate the onset of proliferation, cellular differentiation and cell death. However, the nature of those molecular signals and the mechanisms that integrate the cellular responses remain largely unknown. The planarian flatworm is a unique model in which regeneration and tissue renewal can be comprehensively studied in vivo. The presence of a population of adult pluripotent stem cells combined with the ability to decode signaling after wounding enable planarians to regenerate a complete, correctly proportioned animal within a few days after any kind of amputation, and to adapt their size to nutritional changes without compromising functionality. Here, we demonstrate that the stress-activated c-jun-NH2-kinase (JNK links wound-induced apoptosis to the stem cell response during planarian regeneration. We show that JNK modulates the expression of wound-related genes, triggers apoptosis and attenuates the onset of mitosis in stem cells specifically after tissue loss. Furthermore, in pre-existing body regions, JNK activity is required to establish a positive balance between cell death and stem cell proliferation to enable tissue renewal, remodeling and the maintenance of proportionality. During homeostatic degrowth, JNK RNAi blocks apoptosis, resulting in impaired organ remodeling and rescaling. Our findings indicate that JNK-dependent apoptotic cell death is crucial to coordinate tissue renewal and remodeling required to regenerate and to maintain a correctly proportioned animal. Hence, JNK might act as a hub, translating wound signals into apoptotic cell death, controlled stem cell proliferation and differentiation, all of which are required to coordinate regeneration and tissue renewal.

  11. Direct measurement of cell wall stress-stiffening and turgor pressure in live bacterial cells

    CERN Document Server

    Deng, Yi; Shaevitz, Joshua W

    2011-01-01

    The mechanical properties of gram-negative bacteria are governed by a rigid peptidoglycan (PG) cell wall and the turgor pressure generated by the large concentration of solutes in the cytoplasm. The elasticity of the PG has been measured in bulk and in isolated sacculi and shown to be compliant compared to the overall stiffness of the cell itself. However, the stiffness of the cell wall in live cells has not been measured. In particular, the effects that pressure-induced stress might have on the stiffness of the mesh-like PG network have not been addressed even though polymeric materials often exhibit large amounts of stress-stiffening. We study bulging Escherichia coli cells using atomic force microscopy to separate the contributions of the cell wall and turgor pressure to the overall cell stiffness. We find strong evidence of power-law stress-stiffening in the E. coli cell wall, with an exponent of $1.07 \\pm 0.25$, such that the wall is significantly stiffer in live cells ($E\\sim32\\pm10$ MPa) than in unpres...

  12. Populations of latent Mycobacterium tuberculosis lack a cell wall: Isolation, visualization, and whole-genome characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Akbar Velayati

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: Here, we show cell-wall free cells of MTB bacilli in their latent state, and the biological adaptation of these cells was more phenotypic in nature than genomic. These cell-wall free cells represent a good model for understanding the nature of TB latency.

  13. Human Umbilical Cord MSCs as New Cell Sources for Promoting Periodontal Regeneration in Inflammatory Periodontal Defect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Fengqing; Liu, Shiyu; Ming, Leiguo; Tian, Rong; Jin, Fang; Ding, Yin; Zhang, Yongjie; Zhang, Hongmei; Deng, Zhihong; Jin, Yan

    2017-01-01

    Human periodontal ligament stem cells (hPDLSCs) transplantation represents a promising approach for periodontal regeneration; however, the cell source is limited due to the invasive procedure required for cell isolation. As human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells (hUCMSCs) can be harvested inexpensively and inexhaustibly, here we evaluated the regenerative potentials of hUCMSCs as compared with hPDLSCs to determine whether hUCMSCs could be used as new cell sources for periodontal regeneration. Methods The characteristics of hUCMSCs, including multi-differentiation ability and anti-inflammatory capability, were determined by comparison with hPDLSCs. We constructed cell aggregates (CA) using hUCMSCs and hPDLSCs respectively. Then hPDLSCs-CA and hUCMSCs-CA were combined with β-tricalcium phosphate bioceramic (β-TCP) respectively and their regenerative potentials were determined in a rat inflammatory periodontal defect model. Results hPDLSCs showed higher osteogenic differentiation potentials than hUCMSCs. Meanwhile, hUCMSCs showed higher extracellular matrix secretion and anti-inflammatory abilities than hPDLSCs. Similar to hPDLSCs, hUCMSCs were able to contribute to regeneration of both soft and hard periodontal tissues under inflammatory periodontitis condition. There were more newly formed bone and periodontal ligaments in hPDLSCs and hUCMSCs groups than in non-cell treated group. Moreover, no significant differences of regenerative promoting effects between hPDLSCs and hUCMSCs were found. Conclusion: hUCMSCs generated similar promoting effects on periodontal regeneration compared with hPDLSCs, and can be used as new cell sources for periodontal regeneration.

  14. Cellulose-hemicellulose interaction in wood secondary cell-wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ning; Li, Shi; Xiong, Liming; Hong, Yu; Chen, Youping

    2015-12-01

    The wood cell wall features a tough and relatively rigid fiber reinforced composite structure. It acts as a pressure vessel, offering protection against mechanical stress. Cellulose microfibrils, hemicellulose and amorphous lignin are the three major components of wood. The structure of secondary cell wall could be imagined as the same as reinforced concrete, in which cellulose microfibrils acts as reinforcing steel bar and hemicellulose-lignin matrices act as the concrete. Therefore, the interface between cellulose and hemicellulose/lignin plays a significant role in determine the mechanical behavior of wood secondary cell wall. To this end, we present a molecular dynamics (MD) simulation study attempting to quantify the strength of the interface between cellulose microfibrils and hemicellulose. Since hemicellulose binds with adjacent cellulose microfibrils in various patterns, the atomistic models of hemicellulose-cellulose composites with three typical binding modes, i.e. bridge, loop and random binding modes are constructed. The effect of the shape of hemicellulose chain on the strength of hemicellulose-cellulose composites under shear loadings is investigated. The contact area as well as hydrogen bonds between cellulose and hemicellulose, together with the covalent bonds in backbone of hemicellulose chain are found to be the controlling parameters which determine the strength of the interfaces in the composite system. For the bridge binding model, the effect of shear loading direction on the strength of the cellulose material is also studied. The obtained results suggest that the shear strength of wood-inspired engineering composites can be optimized through maximizing the formations of the contributing hydrogen bonds between cellulose and hemicellulose.

  15. Nutrient depletion modifies cell wall adsorption activity of wine yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidari, R; Caridi, A

    2016-06-01

    Yeast cell wall is a structure that helps yeasts to manage and respond to many environmental stresses. The mannosylphosphorylation is a modification in response to stress that provides the cell wall with negative charges able to bind compounds present in the environment. Phenotypes related to the cell wall modification such as the filamentous growth in Saccharomyces cerevisiae are affected by nutrient depletion. The present work aimed at describing the effect of carbon and/or nitrogen limitation on the aptitude of S. cerevisiae strains to bind coloured polyphenols. Carbon- and nitrogen-rich or deficient media supplemented with grape polyphenols were used to simulate different grape juice conditions-early, mid, 'adjusted' for nitrogen, and late fermentations. In early fermentation condition, the R+G+B values range from 106 (high adsorption, strain Sc1128) to 192 (low adsorption, strain Σ1278b), in mid-fermentation the values range from 111 (high adsorption, strain Sc1321) to 258 (low adsorption, strain Sc2306), in 'adjusted' for nitrogen conditions the values range from 105 (high adsorption, strain Sc1321) to 194 (low adsorption, strain Sc2306) while in late fermentation conditions the values range from 101 (high adsorption, strain Sc384) to 293 (low adsorption, strain Sc2306). The effect of nutrient availability is not univocal for all the strains and the different media tested modified the strains behaviour. In all the media the strains show significant differences. Results demonstrate that wine yeasts decrease/increase their parietal adsorption activity according to the nutrient availability. The wide range of strain variability observed could be useful in selecting wine starters.

  16. The sequential seeding of epithelial and mesenchymal cells for tissue-engineered tooth regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honda, Masaki J; Tsuchiya, Shuhei; Sumita, Yoshinori; Sagara, Hiroshi; Ueda, Minoru

    2007-02-01

    Progress is being made toward regenerating teeth by seeding dissociated postnatal odontogenic cells onto scaffolds and implanting them in vivo, but tooth morphology remains difficult to control. In this study, we aimed to facilitate tooth regeneration using a novel technique to sequentially seed epithelial cells and mesenchymal cells so that they formed appropriate interactions in the scaffold. Dental epithelium and mesenchyme from porcine third molar teeth were enzymatically separated and dissociated into single cells. Mesenchymal cells were seeded onto the surface of the scaffold and epithelial cells were then plated on top so that the two cell types were in direct contact. The cell-scaffold constructs were evaluated in vitro and also implanted into immunocompromised rats for in vivo analysis. Control groups included constructs where direct contact between the two cell types was prevented. In scaffolds seed using the novel technique, alkaline phosphatase activity was significantly greater than controls, the tooth morphology in vivo was developed in similar to that of natural tooth, and only one tooth structure formed in each scaffold. These results suggest that the novel cell-seeding technique could be useful for regulating the morphology of regenerated teeth.

  17. Efficacy of stem cells on periodontal regeneration: Systematic review of pre-clinical studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tassi, S A; Sergio, N Z; Misawa, M Y O; Villar, C C

    2017-10-01

    This systematic review aims to evaluate mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) periodontal regenerative potential in animal models. MEDLINE, EMBASE and LILACS databases were searched for quantitative pre-clinical controlled animal model studies that evaluated the effect of local administration of MSC on periodontal regeneration. The systematic review was conducted according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses statement guidelines. Twenty-two studies met the inclusion criteria. Periodontal defects were surgically created in all studies. In seven studies, periodontal inflammation was experimentally induced following surgical defect creation. Differences in defect morphology were identified among the studies. Autogenous, alogenous and xenogenous MSC were used to promote periodontal regeneration. These included bone marrow-derived MSC, periodontal ligament (PDL)-derived MSC, dental pulp-derived MSC, gingival margin-derived MSC, foreskin-derived induced pluripotent stem cells, adipose tissue-derived MSC, cementum-derived MSC, periapical follicular MSC and alveolar periosteal cells. Meta-analysis was not possible due to heterogeneities in study designs. In most of the studies, local MSC implantation was not associated with adverse effects. The use of bone marrow-derived MSC for periodontal regeneration yielded conflicting results. In contrast, PDL-MSC consistently promoted increased PDL and cementum regeneration. Finally, the adjunct use of MSC improved the regenerative outcomes of periodontal defects treated with membranes or bone substitutes. Despite the quality level of the existing evidence, the current data indicate that the use of MSC may provide beneficial effects on periodontal regeneration. The various degrees of success of MSC in periodontal regeneration are likely to be related to the use of heterogeneous cells. Thus, future studies need to identify phenotypic profiles of highly regenerative MSC populations. © 2017 John Wiley

  18. High-resolution solution-state NMR of unfractionated plant cell walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    John Ralph; Fachuang Lu; Hoon Kim; Dino Ress; Daniel J. Yelle; Kenneth E. Hammel; Sally A. Ralph; Bernadette Nanayakkara; Armin Wagner; Takuya Akiyama; Paul F. Schatz; Shawn D. Mansfield; Noritsugu Terashima; Wout Boerjan; Bjorn Sundberg; Mattias Hedenstrom

    2009-01-01

    Detailed structural studies on the plant cell wall have traditionally been difficult. NMR is one of the preeminent structural tools, but obtaining high-resolution solution-state spectra has typically required fractionation and isolation of components of interest. With recent methods for dissolution of, admittedly, finely divided plant cell wall material, the wall can...

  19. Plasticity and regeneration in the injured spinal cord after cell transplantation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nori, Satoshi; Nakamura, Masaya; Okano, Hideyuki

    2017-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) typically damages the long axonal tracts of the spinal cord which results in permanent disability. However, regeneration of the injured spinal cord is approaching reality according to the advances in stem cell biology. Cell transplantation therapy holds potential to lead to recovery following SCI through some positive mechanisms. Grafted cells induce plasticity and regeneration in the injured spinal cord by promoting remyelination of damaged axons, reconstruction of neural circuits by synapse formation between host neurons and graft-derived neurons, and secreting neurotrophic factors to promote axonal elongation as well as reduce retrograde axonal degeneration. In this review, we will delineate (1) the microenvironment of the injured spinal cord that influence the plasticity and regeneration capacity after SCI, (2) a number of different kinds of cell transplantation therapies for SCI that has been extensively studied by researchers, and (3) potential mechanisms of grafted cell-induced regeneration and plasticity in the injured spinal cord. © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Use of Pig as a Model for Mesenchymal Stem Cell Therapies for Bone Regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubessa, Marcello; Polkoff, Kathryn; Bionaz, Massimo; Monaco, Elisa; Milner, Derek J; Holllister, Scott J; Goldwasser, Michael S; Wheeler, Matthew B

    2017-10-02

    Bone is a plastic tissue with a large healing capability. However, extensive bone loss due to disease or trauma requires extreme therapy such as bone grafting or tissue-engineering applications. Presently, bone grafting is the gold standard for bone repair, but presents serious limitations including donor site morbidity, rejection, and limited tissue regeneration. The use of stem cells appears to be a means to overcome such limitations. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSC) have been the choice thus far for stem cell therapy for bone regeneration. However, adipose-derived stem cells (ASC) have similar immunophenotype, morphology, multilineage potential, and transcriptome compared to BMSC, and both types have demonstrated extensive osteogenic capacity both in vitro and in vivo in several species. The use of scaffolds in combination with stem cells and growth factors provides a valuable tool for guided bone regeneration, especially for complex anatomic defects. Before translation to human medicine, regenerative strategies must be developed in animal models to improve effectiveness and efficiency. The pig presents as a useful model due to similar macro- and microanatomy and favorable logistics of use. This review examines data that provides strong support for the clinical translation of the pig model for bone regeneration.

  1. Regeneration of pancreatic beta-cell mass for the treatment of diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domínguez-Bendala, Juan; Inverardi, Luca; Ricordi, Camillo

    2012-06-01

    The study of the endocrine compartment of the pancreas (the islets of Langerhans) is of great translational interest, as strategies aimed at restoring its mass could become therapies for glycemic dysregulation in type 1 and 2 diabetes mellitus, drug-related diabetes following diabetogenic therapies or hyperglycemic disturbances following the treatment of cancer and nesidioblastosis. Such strategies generally fall under one of the 'three Rs,' namely, replacement (islet transplantation and stem cell differentiation), reprogramming (chiefly from the exocrine compartment of the pancreas) and regeneration (replication and induction of endogenous stem cells). This expert opinion focuses on the latter, as islets are known to regenerate under specific circumstances of physiological (e.g., pregnancy), pathological (e.g., obesity, hyperglycemia, mutations in the glucose-sensing pathway) or experimental (e.g., partial pancreatectomy, cellophane wrapping, partial duct ligation) nature. This review presents the different models of pancreatic regeneration, which encompass the replication of existing beta-cells, reversible epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition and the reactivation of resident stem cells. Rather than a set mechanism, the pancreas appears to possess a wide range of facultative regeneration pathways. These are discussed in the context of the development of potential strategies aimed at restoring beta-cell function in insulin-dependent diabetes.

  2. Investigating Aspergillus nidulans secretome during colonisation of cork cell walls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Isabel; Garcia, Helga; Varela, Adélia; Núñez, Oscar; Planchon, Sébastien; Galceran, Maria Teresa; Renaut, Jenny; Rebelo, Luís P N; Silva Pereira, Cristina

    2014-02-26

    Cork, the outer bark of Quercus suber, shows a unique compositional structure, a set of remarkable properties, including high recalcitrance. Cork colonisation by Ascomycota remains largely overlooked. Herein, Aspergillus nidulans secretome on cork was analysed (2DE). Proteomic data were further complemented by microscopic (SEM) and spectroscopic (ATR-FTIR) evaluation of the colonised substrate and by targeted analysis of lignin degradation compounds (UPLC-HRMS). Data showed that the fungus formed an intricate network of hyphae around the cork cell walls, which enabled polysaccharides and lignin superficial degradation, but probably not of suberin. The degradation of polysaccharides was suggested by the identification of few polysaccharide degrading enzymes (β-glucosidases and endo-1,5-α-l-arabinosidase). Lignin degradation, which likely evolved throughout a Fenton-like mechanism relying on the activity of alcohol oxidases, was supported by the identification of small aromatic compounds (e.g. cinnamic acid and veratrylaldehyde) and of several putative high molecular weight lignin degradation products. In addition, cork recalcitrance was corroborated by the identification of several protein species which are associated with autolysis. Finally, stringent comparative proteomics revealed that A. nidulans colonisation of cork and wood share a common set of enzymatic mechanisms. However the higher polysaccharide accessibility in cork might explain the increase of β-glucosidase in cork secretome. Cork degradation by fungi remains largely overlook. Herein we aimed at understanding how A. nidulans colonise cork cell walls and how this relates to wood colonisation. To address this, the protein species consistently present in the secretome were analysed, as well as major alterations occurring in the substrate, including lignin degradation compounds being released. The obtained data demonstrate that this fungus has superficially attacked the cork cell walls apparently by

  3. The Mechanisms of Plant Cell Wall Deconstruction during Enzymatic Hydrolysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thygesen, Lisbeth Garbrecht; E. Thybring, Emil; Johansen, Katja Salomon

    2014-01-01

    Mechanical agitation during enzymatic hydrolysis of insoluble plant biomass at high dry matter contents is indispensable for the initial liquefaction step in biorefining. It is known that particle size reduction is an important part of liquefaction, but the mechanisms involved are poorly understood....... Here we put forward a simple model based on mechanical principles capable of capturing the result of the interaction between mechanical forces and cell wall weakening via hydrolysis of glucosidic bonds. This study illustrates that basic material science insights are relevant also within biochemistry...

  4. Conservation of root regeneration potential of cell aggregates from horseradish hairy roots used as artificial seeds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Repunte, V.; Taya, M.; Tone, S. [Osaka University, Osaka (Japan). Faculty of Engineering Science

    1996-10-20

    The effects of water content in agar gel used as a medium and oxygen level in the gas phase on the adventitious root regeneration of cell aggregates (CA) derived from horseradish hairy roots were investigated in cultures at 25{degree}C. The number of roots emerging from CA was highly dependent on water content of the agar gel and no root regeneration was observed at a gel water content of 66% during culture time of 20 days. CA root regeneration was suppressed when the CA were kept for 20 days in an atmosphere oxygen composition of 10%, but was restored upon transfer of the CA to normal atmosphere of 21% oxygen. On the basis of these findings, an artificial seed was proposed using the CA as a cell inclusion material encapsulated in alginate gels covered with coats. From the perspective of conserving the root regeneration potential of the CA by preventing the drying of alginate gel while keeping oxygen availability to the CA, different coating materials of ethylene vinyl acetate acrylic acid terpolymer, paraffin and polyorganosiloxane were tested. Paraffin was selected as a suitable coating material because of its efficient drying tolerance and adequate permeability to oxygen. A regeneration efficiency of 90% could be obtained from the CA, stored in alginate gel covered with a paraffin coating of 0.40 mm thickness at 25{degree}C for 60 days in air, when sucrose concentration in the gel was over 240 mol m{sup -3}. 25 refs., 8 figs.

  5. JNK signalling is necessary for a Wnt- and stem cell-dependent regeneration programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tejada-Romero, Belen; Carter, Jean-Michel; Mihaylova, Yuliana; Neumann, Bjoern; Aboobaker, A. Aziz

    2015-01-01

    Regeneration involves the integration of new and old tissues in the context of an adult life history. It is clear that the core conserved signalling pathways that orchestrate development also play central roles in regeneration, and further study of conserved signalling pathways is required. Here we have studied the role of the conserved JNK signalling cascade during planarian regeneration. Abrogation of JNK signalling by RNAi or pharmacological inhibition blocks posterior regeneration and animals fail to express posterior markers. While the early injury-induced expression of polarity markers is unaffected, the later stem cell-dependent phase of posterior Wnt expression is not established. This defect can be rescued by overactivation of the Hh or Wnt signalling pathway to promote posterior Wnt activity. Together, our data suggest that JNK signalling is required to establish stem cell-dependent Wnt expression after posterior injury. Given that Jun is known to be required in vertebrates for the expression of Wnt and Wnt target genes, we propose that this interaction may be conserved and is an instructive part of planarian posterior regeneration. PMID:26062938

  6. Engineering Pichia pastoris for improved NADH regeneration: A novel chassis strain for whole-cell catalysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina Geier

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Many synthetically useful reactions are catalyzed by cofactor-dependent enzymes. As cofactors represent a major cost factor, methods for efficient cofactor regeneration are required especially for large-scale synthetic applications. In order to generate a novel and efficient host chassis for bioreductions, we engineered the methanol utilization pathway of Pichia pastoris for improved NADH regeneration. By deleting the genes coding for dihydroxyacetone synthase isoform 1 and 2 (DAS1 and DAS2, NADH regeneration via methanol oxidation (dissimilation was increased significantly. The resulting Δdas1 Δdas2 strain performed better in butanediol dehydrogenase (BDH1 based whole-cell conversions. While the BDH1 catalyzed acetoin reduction stopped after 2 h reaching ~50% substrate conversion when performed in the wild type strain, full conversion after 6 h was obtained by employing the knock-out strain. These results suggest that the P. pastoris Δdas1 Δdas2 strain is capable of supplying the actual biocatalyst with the cofactor over a longer reaction period without the over-expression of an additional cofactor regeneration system. Thus, focusing the intrinsic carbon flux of this methylotrophic yeast on methanol oxidation to CO2 represents an efficient and easy-to-use strategy for NADH-dependent whole-cell conversions. At the same time methanol serves as co-solvent, inductor for catalyst and cofactor regeneration pathway expression and source of energy.

  7. Modification of antioxidant systems in cell walls of maize roots by different nitrogen sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hadži-Tašković Šukalović V; Vuletić, M.; Marković, K.; Željko, Vučinić; Kravić, N.

    2016-07-01

    Antioxidant systems of maize root cell walls grown on different nitrogen sources were evaluated. Plants were grown on a medium containing only NO3- or the mixture of NO3-+NH4+, in a 2:1 ratio. Eleven-day old plants, two days after the initiation of lateral roots, were used for the experiments. Cell walls were isolated from lateral roots and primary root segments, 2-7 cm from tip to base, representing zones of intense or decreased growth rates, respectively. Protein content and the activity of enzymes peroxidase, malate dehydrogenase and ascorbate oxidase ionically or covalently bound to the walls, as well as cell wall phenolic content and antioxidant capacity, were determined. Cell walls of plants grown on mixed N possess more developed enzymatic antioxidant systems and lower non-enzymatic antioxidant defenses than cell walls grown on NO3-. Irrespective of N treatment, the activities of all studied enzymes and protein content were higher in cell walls of lateral compared to primary roots. Phenolic content of cell walls isolated from lateral roots was higher in NO3--grown than in mixed N grown plants. No significant differences could be observed in the isozyme patterns of cell wall peroxidases isolated from plants grown on different nutrient solution. Our results indicate that different N treatments modify the antioxidant systems of root cell walls. Treatment with NO3- resulted in an increase of constitutive phenolic content, while the combination of NO3-+NH4+ elevated the redox enzyme activities in root cell walls.

  8. Tooth Movement out of the Bony Wall Using Augmented Corticotomy with Nonautogenous Graft Materials for Bone Regeneration

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lee, Kye-Bok; Lee, Dong-Yeol; Ahn, Hyo-Won; Kim, Seong-Hun; Kim, Eun-Cheol; Roitman, Igor

    2014-01-01

    ... took place only after the teeth had relapsed. However, no histologic studies have demonstrated the regeneration or reestablishment of the cortical plate [5, 6]. Corticotomy-facilitated tooth movement with alveolar bone augmentation may facilitate the retention of the periodontal ligament, thereby preventing bony dehiscence and gingival recession [7...

  9. Positional Information Is Reprogrammed in Blastema Cells of the Regenerating Limb of the Axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum)

    OpenAIRE

    McCusker, Catherine D; Gardiner, David M

    2013-01-01

    The regenerating region of an amputated salamander limb, known as the blastema, has the amazing capacity to replace exactly the missing structures. By grafting cells from different stages and regions of blastemas induced to form on donor animals expressing Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP), to non-GFP host animals, we have determined that the cells from early stage blastemas, as well as cells at the tip of late stage blastemas are developmentally labile such that their positional identity is re...

  10. Human umbilical mesenchymal stem cells conditioned medium promote primary wound healing regeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Dwi Liliek Kusindarta3; Hevi Wihadmadyatami; Yuda Heru Fibrianto; Widagdo Sri Nugroho; Heru Susetya; Dewi Kania Musana; Hery Wijayanto; Surya Agus Prihatna; Wahyuni, A. E. T. H.

    2016-01-01

    Aim: This research was conducted to clarify the capability of human umbilical mesenchymal stem cells conditioned medium (HU-MSCM) to promote regenerations of primary wound healing on the incision skin injury. Materials and Methods: In this study, two approaches in vitro and in vivo already done. On in vitro analysis, tube formation was performed using HU vein endothelial cells in the presence of HU-MSCM, in some experiments cells line was incubated prior the presence of lipopolysaccharide ...

  11. Amniotic Fluid Stem Cells and Their Application in Cell-Based Tissue Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamadreza Baghaban Eslaminejad

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Advances in stem cell biotechnology hold great promise in the field of tissue engineering andregenerative medicine. Of interest are marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs, embryonic stemcells (ESCs, and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs. In addition, amniotic fluid stem cells (AFSCshave attracted attention as a viable choice following the search for an alternative stem cellsource. Investigators are interested in these cells because they come from the amniotic fluid that isroutinely discarded after birth. There have been multiple investigations conducted worldwide in anattempt to better understand AF-SCs in terms of their potential use in regenerative medicine. In thisreview we give a brief introduction of amniotic fluid followed by a description of the cells presentwithin this fluid. Their history related to stem cell discovery in the amniotic fluid as well as themain characteristics of AF-SCs are discussed. Finally, we elaborate on the potential for these cellsto promote regeneration of various tissue defects, including fetal tissue, the nervous system, heart,lungs, kidneys, bones, and cartilage.

  12. Comparison of human dental follicle cells and human periodontal ligament cells for dentin tissue regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Ye; Bai, Ding; Guo, Weihua; Li, Jie; Zeng, Jin; Yang, Longqiang; Jiang, Zongting; Feng, Lian; Yu, Mei; Tian, Weidong

    2015-05-01

    To compare the odontogenic potential of human dental follicle cells (DFCs) and periodontal ligament cells (PDLCs). In vitro and in vivo characterization studies of DFCs and PDLCs were performed comparatively. DFCs and PDLCs were subcutaneously implanted into the dorsum of mice for 8 weeks after combined with treated dentin matrix scaffolds respectively. Proteomic analysis identified 32 differentially expressed proteins in DFCs and PDLCs. Examination of the harvested grafts showed PDLCs could form the dentin-like tissues as DFCs did. However, the structure of dentin tissues generated by DFCs was more complete. PDLCs could contribute to regenerate dentin-like tissues in the inductive microenvironment of treated dentin matrix. DFCs presented more remarkable dentinogenic capability than PDLCs did.

  13. Characterisation of dental pulp stem cells: a new horizon for tissue regeneration?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawashima, Nobuyuki

    2012-11-01

    Stem cells possess multipotent properties that allow them to differentiate into various cells, which may be potentially useful in tissue regeneration. Stem cell populations are reported to be present in various tissues of hematopoietic, neural and mesenchymal lineages, with the presence of stem cell populations in dental pulp tissue first described more than 10 years ago. The main components of dental pulp tissue are dental pulp cells, which are mesenchymal cells derived from the neural crest.(1,2) Some of these cells demonstrate high growth potential and possess multiple differentiation properties, and have been designated dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs). These cell populations are present not only in adult pulp tissue, but also in deciduous tooth pulp and apical papilla. DPSCs isolated by different methods, such as high growth potential, using various surface markers, and high efflux of a fluorescent nuclear stain (Hoechst 33342), all show multipotency, however their surface marker expression is somewhat different from each other. In vivo studies have revealed the possibility use of DPSCs in the regeneration of various tissue. DPSCs are of dental pulp origin, and dental pulp tissue is regenerated from DPSCs. Many researchers have focused on the dentine- and bone-forming properties of DPSCs, but their neuronal and muscular differentiation capacity suggests they may have a wider clinical application. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Muscle Satellite Cell Protein Teneurin-4 Regulates Differentiation During Muscle Regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Kana; Suzuki, Nobuharu; Mabuchi, Yo; Ito, Naoki; Kikura, Naomi; Fukada, So-Ichiro; Okano, Hideyuki; Takeda, Shin'ichi; Akazawa, Chihiro

    2015-10-01

    Satellite cells are maintained in an undifferentiated quiescent state, but during muscle regeneration they acquire an activated stage, and initiate to proliferate and differentiate as myoblasts. The transmembrane protein teneurin-4 (Ten-4) is specifically expressed in the quiescent satellite cells; however, its cellular and molecular functions remain unknown. We therefore aimed to elucidate the function of Ten-4 in muscle satellite cells. In the tibialis anterior (TA) muscle of Ten-4-deficient mice, the number and the size of myofibers, as well as the population of satellite cells, were reduced with/without induction of muscle regeneration. Furthermore, we found an accelerated activation of satellite cells in the regenerated Ten-4-deficient TA muscle. The cell culture analysis using primary satellite cells showed that Ten-4 suppressed the progression of myogenic differentiation. Together, our findings revealed that Ten-4 functions as a crucial player in maintaining the quiescence of muscle satellite cells. © 2015 The Authors STEM CELLS published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of AlphaMed Press.

  15. Muscle Satellite Cell Protein Teneurin‐4 Regulates Differentiation During Muscle Regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Kana; Suzuki, Nobuharu; Mabuchi, Yo; Ito, Naoki; Kikura, Naomi; Fukada, So‐ichiro; Okano, Hideyuki; Takeda, Shin'ichi

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Satellite cells are maintained in an undifferentiated quiescent state, but during muscle regeneration they acquire an activated stage, and initiate to proliferate and differentiate as myoblasts. The transmembrane protein teneurin‐4 (Ten‐4) is specifically expressed in the quiescent satellite cells; however, its cellular and molecular functions remain unknown. We therefore aimed to elucidate the function of Ten‐4 in muscle satellite cells. In the tibialis anterior (TA) muscle of Ten‐4‐deficient mice, the number and the size of myofibers, as well as the population of satellite cells, were reduced with/without induction of muscle regeneration. Furthermore, we found an accelerated activation of satellite cells in the regenerated Ten‐4‐deficient TA muscle. The cell culture analysis using primary satellite cells showed that Ten‐4 suppressed the progression of myogenic differentiation. Together, our findings revealed that Ten‐4 functions as a crucial player in maintaining the quiescence of muscle satellite cells. Stem Cells 2015;33:3017–3027 PMID:26013034

  16. Stem cells are differentially regulated during development, regeneration and homeostasis in flatworms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Mulder, Katrien; Pfister, Daniela; Kuales, Georg; Egger, Bernhard; Salvenmoser, Willi; Willems, Maxime; Steger, Jessica; Fauster, Katja; Micura, Ronald; Borgonie, Gaetan; Ladurner, Peter

    2009-10-01

    The flatworm stem cell system is exceptional within the animal kingdom, as totipotent stem cells (neoblasts) are the only dividing cells within the organism. In contrast to most organisms, piwi-like gene expression in flatworms is extended from germ cells to somatic stem cells. We describe the isolation and characterization of the piwi homologue macpiwi in the flatworm Macrostomum lignano. We use in situ hybridization, antibody staining and RNA interference to study macpiwi expression and function in adults, during postembryonic development, regeneration and upon starvation. We found novelties regarding piwi function and observed differences to current piwi functions in flatworms. First, macpiwi was essential for the maintenance of somatic stem cells in adult animals. A knock-down of macpiwi led to a complete elimination of stem cells and death of the animals. Second, the regulation of stem cells was different in adults and regenerates compared to postembryonic development. Third, sexual reproduction of M. lignano allowed to follow germline formation during postembryonic development, regeneration, and starvation. Fourth, piwi expression in hatchlings further supports an embryonic formation of the germline in M. lignano. Our findings address new questions in flatworm stem cell research and provide a basis for comparison with higher organisms.

  17. Morphological heterogeneity with normal expression but altered function of G proteins in porcine cultured regenerated coronary endothelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borg-Capra, Catherine; Fournet-Bourguignon, Marie-Pierre; Janiak, Philip; Villeneuve, Nicole; Bidouard, Jean-Pierre; Vilaine, Jean-Paul; Vanhoutte, Paul M

    1997-01-01

    Experiments were designed to investigate whether the pertussis toxin-dependent endothelial dysfunction following balloon injury is due to a reduced expression or an insufficient function of G-proteins. Endothelium-dependent responses of porcine coronary arteries were examined in vitro by use of conventional organ chambers. Morphological analysis was performed by isolating and culturing the endothelial cells from these arteries. The expression of Gi-proteins in regenerated endothelial cells was measured by Western blots and immunolabelling. The function of G-proteins was assessed by measuring the GTPase activity of cultured endothelial cells. Eight days following denudation, endothelial regrowth was confirmed by histological examination and by demonstrating the presence of endothelium-dependent relaxations to bradykinin and 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT). In primary culture, the regenerated endothelial cells displayed a ‘cobblestone' pattern as seen with native endothelial cells. Twenty eight days after denudation, the endothelium-dependent relaxations induced by 5-HT were impaired, but those to bradykinin were maintained. However, the latter were reduced when endothelium-dependent hyperpolarization was prevented. Twenty eight days after denudation, multinucleated giant cells were present in the regenerated but not in the native cultured endothelial cell populations. These regenerated endothelial cells incorporated less tritiated thymidine than native endothelial cells. The intensities of the bands on the immunoblot of the regenerated endothelial cells, when several antibodies against Giα1/α2/α3 were used, were the same as those obtained in native endothelial cells. The immunolabelling with the same antibodies was similar between the giant cells and the regenerated endothelial cells of normal size. The hydrolysis of GTP was lower in regenerated than in native endothelial cell membranes. In conclusion, endothelium-dependent relaxations mediated by Gi-proteins are

  18. Serum Proteases Potentiate BMP-Induced Cell Cycle Re-entry of Dedifferentiating Muscle Cells during Newt Limb Regeneration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wagner, Ines; Wang, Heng; Weissert, Philipp M.; Straube, Werner L.; Shevchenko, Anna; Gentzel, Marc; Brito, Goncalo; Tazaki, Akira; Oliveira, Catarina; Sugiura, Takuji; Shevchenko, Andrej; Simon, Andras; Drechsel, David N.; Tanaka, Elly M.

    2017-01-01

    Limb amputation in the newt induces myofibers to dedifferentiate and re-enter the cell cycle to generate proliferative myogenic precursors in the regeneration blastema. Here we show that bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) and mature BMPs that have been further cleaved by serum proteases induce cell

  19. The cell-wall glycoproteins of the green alga Scenedesmus obliquus. The predominant cell-wall polypeptide of Scenedesmus obliquus is related to the cell-wall glycoprotein gp3 of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voigt, Jürgen; Stolarczyk, Adam; Zych, Maria; Malec, Przemysław; Burczyk, Jan

    2014-02-01

    The green alga Scenedesmus obliquus contains a multilayered cell wall, ultrastructurally similar to that of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, although its proportion of hydroxyproline is considerably lower. Therefore, we have investigated the polypeptide composition of the insoluble and the chaotrope-soluble wall fractions of S. obliquus. The polypeptide pattern of the chaotrope-soluble wall fraction was strongly modified by chemical deglycosylation with anhydrous hydrogen fluoride (HF) in pyridine indicating that most of these polypeptides are glycosylated. Polypeptide constituents of the chaotrope-soluble cell-wall fraction with apparent molecular masses of 240, 270, 265, and 135 kDa cross-reacted with a polyclonal antibody raised against the 100 kDa deglycosylation product of the C. reinhardtii cell-wall glycoprotein GP3B. Chemical deglycosylation of the chaotrope-soluble wall fraction resulted in a 135 kDa major polypeptide and a 106 kDa minor component reacting with the same antibody. This antibody recognized specific peptide epitopes of GP3B. When the insoluble wall fraction of S. obliquus was treated with anhydrous HF/pyridine, three polypeptides with apparent molecular masses of 144, 135, and 65 kDa were solubilized, which also occured in the deglycosylated chaotrope-soluble wall fraction. These findings indicate that theses glycoproteins are cross-linked to the insoluble wall fraction via HF-sensitive bonds. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Sonic hedgehog initiates cochlear hair cell regeneration through downregulation of retinoblastoma protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Na [Otology Skull Base Surgery Department, Hearing Research Institute, Eye and ENT Hospital of Shanghai Medical School, Fudan University, Shanghai 200031 (China); Department of Otolaryngology and Program in Neuroscience, Harvard Medical School and Eaton Peabody Laboratory, Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, Boston, MA 02114 (United States); Chen, Yan [Central Laboratory, Hearing Research Institute, Eye and ENT Hospital of Shanghai Medical School, Fudan University, Shanghai 200031 (China); Wang, Zhengmin [Otology Skull Base Surgery Department, Hearing Research Institute, Eye and ENT Hospital of Shanghai Medical School, Fudan University, Shanghai 200031 (China); Institute of Biomedical Sciences, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China); Chen, Guoling [Otology Skull Base Surgery Department, Hearing Research Institute, Eye and ENT Hospital of Shanghai Medical School, Fudan University, Shanghai 200031 (China); Lin, Qin [Otology Skull Base Surgery Department, Hearing Research Institute, Eye and ENT Hospital of Shanghai Medical School, Fudan University, Shanghai 200031 (China); Department of Otolaryngology, First Affiliated Hospital of Fujian Medical University, Otolaryngology Institute of Fujian Province, Fuzhou (China); Chen, Zheng-Yi, E-mail: Zheng-yi_chen@meei.harvard.edu [Department of Otolaryngology and Program in Neuroscience, Harvard Medical School and Eaton Peabody Laboratory, Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, Boston, MA 02114 (United States); Li, Huawei, E-mail: hwli@shmu.edu.cn [Otology Skull Base Surgery Department, Hearing Research Institute, Eye and ENT Hospital of Shanghai Medical School, Fudan University, Shanghai 200031 (China); Institute of Biomedical Sciences, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China)

    2013-01-11

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Shh activation in neonatal cochleae enhances sensory cell proliferation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Proliferating supporting cells can transdifferentiate into hair cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Shh promotes proliferation by transiently modulating pRb activity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Shh inhibits pRb by inhibiting transcription and increasing phosphorylation of pRb. -- Abstract: Cell cycle re-entry by cochlear supporting cells and/or hair cells is considered one of the best approaches for restoring hearing loss as a result of hair cell damage. To identify mechanisms that can be modulated to initiate cell cycle re-entry and hair cell regeneration, we studied the effect of activating the sonic hedgehog (Shh) pathway. We show that Shh signaling in postnatal rat cochleae damaged by neomycin leads to renewed proliferation of supporting cells and hair cells. Further, proliferating supporting cells are likely to transdifferentiate into hair cells. Shh treatment leads to inhibition of retinoblastoma protein (pRb) by increasing phosphorylated pRb and reducing retinoblastoma gene transcription. This results in upregulation of cyclins B1, D2, and D3, and CDK1. These results suggest that Shh signaling induces cell cycle re-entry in cochlear sensory epithelium and the production of new hair cells, in part by attenuating pRb function. This study provides an additional route to modulate pRb function with important implications in mammalian hair cell regeneration.

  1. Future dentistry: cell therapy meets tooth and periodontal repair and regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catón, Javier; Bostanci, Nagihan; Remboutsika, Eumorphia; De Bari, Cosimo; Mitsiadis, Thimios A

    2011-05-01

    Cell-based tissue repair of the tooth and - tooth-supporting - periodontal ligament (PDL) is a new attractive approach that complements traditional restorative or surgical techniques for replacement of injured or pathologically damaged tissues. In such therapeutic approaches, stem cells and/or progenitor cells are manipulated in vitro and administered to patients as living and dynamic biological agents. In this review, we discuss the clonogenic potential of human dental and periodontal tissues such as the dental pulp and the PDL and their potential for tooth and periodontal repair and/or regeneration. We propose novel therapeutic approaches using stem cells or progenitor cells, which are targeted to regenerate the lost dental or periodontal tissue. © 2011 The Authors Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine © 2011 Foundation for Cellular and Molecular Medicine/Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  2. The expression pattern of PKCtheta in satellite cells of normal and regenerating muscle in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokugawa, Seiji; Sakuma, Kunihiro; Fujiwara, Hiroyoshi; Hirata, Miyuki; Oda, Ryo; Morisaki, Shinsuke; Yasuhara, Masahiro; Kubo, Toshikazu

    2009-06-01

    Protein kinase C (PKC) is a key enzyme in regulating a variety of cellular functions. PKCtheta is the most abundant PKC isoform expressed in skeletal muscle. However, the functional role of PKCtheta linked to muscle regeneration has not yet been identified. Using reverse transcription (RT)-PCR and immunofluorescence analysis, we investigated the expression patterns of PKCtheta in normal and regenerating tibialis anterior (TA) muscles in the rat. The amount of PKCtheta mRNA in the muscle increased from the 4th to 6th post-surgical day. Immunofluorescence revealed PKCtheta protein in quiescent satellite cells identified by c-Met. PKCtheta immunoreactivity was not observed in many proliferating satellite cells by labeling with BrdU in the regenerating muscle. At 4, 6 and 10 days postsurgery, PKCtheta immunoreactivity was observed in half the differentiating satellite cells labeling with myogenin. After 4 and 6 days, the localization of PKCtheta coincided with those of Pax7 and TGF-beta. Thus, PKCtheta may play an important role in inhibiting differentiation and maintaining the quiescent satellite cells in muscle regeneration.

  3. Intravital imaging of hair-cell development and regeneration in the zebrafish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hernan eLopez-Schier

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Direct videomicroscopic visualization of organ formation and regeneration in toto is a powerful strategy to study cellular processes that often cannot be replicated in vitro. Intravital imaging aims at quantifying changes in tissue architecture or subcellular organization over time during organ development, regeneration or degeneration. A general feature of this approach is its reliance on the optical isolation of defined cell types in the whole animals by transgenic expression of fluorescent markers. Here we describe a simple and robust method to analyze sensory hair-cell development and regeneration in the zebrafish lateral line by high-resolution intravital imaging using laser-scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM and selective plane illumination microscopy (SPIM. The main advantage of studying hair-cell regeneration in the lateral line is that it occurs throughout the life of the animal, which allows its study in the most natural context. We detail protocols to achieve continuous videomicroscopy for up to 68 hours, enabling direct observation of cellular behavior, which can provide a sensitive assay for the quantitative classification of cellular phenotypes and cell-lineage reconstruction. Modifications to this protocol should facilitate pharmacogenetic assays to identify or validate otoprotective or reparative drugs for future clinical strategies aimed at preserving aural function in humans.

  4. The Hippo pathway regulates stem cells during homeostasis and regeneration of the flatworm Macrostomum lignano

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Demircan, T.; Berezikov, E.

    2013-01-01

    The Hippo pathway orchestrates activity of stem cells during development and tissue regeneration and is crucial for controlling organ size. However, roles of the Hippo pathway in highly regenerative organisms, such as flatworms, are unknown. Here we show that knockdown of the Hippo pathway core

  5. The Hippo Pathway Regulates Stem Cells During Homeostasis and Regeneration of the Flatworm Macrostomum Lignano

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Demircan, Turan; Berezikov, Eugene

    The Hippo pathway orchestrates activity of stem cells during development and tissue regeneration and is crucial for controlling organ size. However, roles of the Hippo pathway in highly regenerative organisms, such as flatworms, are unknown. Here we show that knockdown of the Hippo pathway core

  6. Evaluation of bone regeneration potential of dental follicle stem cells for treatment of craniofacial defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezai-Rad, Maryam; Bova, Jonathan F; Orooji, Mahdi; Pepping, Jennifer; Qureshi, Ammar; Del Piero, Fabio; Hayes, Daniel; Yao, Shaomian

    2015-11-01

    Stem cell-based tissue regeneration offers potential for treatment of craniofacial bone defects. The dental follicle, a loose connective tissue surrounding the unerupted tooth, has been shown to contain progenitor/stem cells. Dental follicle stem cells (DFSCs) have strong osteogenesis capability, which makes them suitable for repairing skeletal defects. The objective of this study was to evaluate bone regeneration capability of DFSCs loaded into polycaprolactone (PCL) scaffold for treatment of craniofacial defects. DFSCs were isolated from the first mandibular molars of postnatal Sprague-Dawley rats and seeded into the PCL scaffold. Cell attachment and cell viability on the scaffold were examined with the use of scanning electron microscopy and alamar blue reduction assay. For in vivo transplantation, critical-size defects were created on the skulls of 5-month-old immunocompetent rats, and the cell-scaffold constructs were transplanted into the defects. Skulls were collected at 4 and 8 weeks after transplantation, and bone regeneration in the defects was evaluated with the use of micro-computed tomography and histological analysis. Scanning electron microscopy and Alamar blue assay demonstrated attachment and proliferation of DFSCs in the PCL scaffold. Bone regeneration was observed in the defects treated with DFSC transplantation but not in the controls without DFSC transplant. Transplanting DFSC-PCL with or without osteogenic induction before transplantation achieved approximately 50% bone regeneration at 8 weeks. Formation of woven bone was observed in the DFSC-PCL treatment group. Similar results were seen when osteogenic-induced DFSC-PCL was transplanted to the critical-size defects. This study demonstrated that transplantation of DFSCs seeded into PCL scaffolds can be used to repair craniofacial defects. Copyright © 2015 International Society for Cellular Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Identification and use of fluorescent dyes for plant cell wall imaging using high-throughput screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Charles T; Carroll, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Plant cell walls define cell shape during development and are composed of interlaced carbohydrate and protein networks. Fluorescent dyes have long been used to label plant cell walls, enabling optical microscopy-based interrogation of cell wall structure and composition. However, the specific cell wall components to which these dyes bind are often poorly defined. The availability of fluorescent compound libraries provides the potential to screen for and identify new fluorescent compounds that interact with specific plant cell wall components, enabling the study of cell wall architecture in intact, living tissues. Here, we describe a technique for screening fluorescent compound libraries for enhanced fluorescence upon interaction with plant cell walls, a secondary screening method to identify which cell wall components interact with a given dye, and a protocol for staining and observing Arabidopsis seedlings using a fluorescent cell wall-labeling dye. These methods have the potential to be applied to screening for differences in cell wall structure and composition among genetically diverse plant varieties or species.

  8. The Role of Pectin Acetylation in the Organization of Plant Cell Walls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fimognari, Lorenzo

    All plant cells are surrounded by one or more cell wall layers. The cell wall serves as a stiff mechanical support while it allows cells to expand and provide a protective barrier to invading pathogens. Cell walls are dynamic structures composed of entangled cell wall polysaccharides that must...... adopt defined 3D organization to allow their composition/interactions to be tweaked upon developmental need. Failure to build functional cell wall architecture will affect plant growth and resistance to stresses. In this PhD dissertation I explored the role of pectin acetylation in controlling...... that the loss of structural integrity in the cell wall was the underlying cause for triggering defenses response. This hypothesis was tested in Manuscript II. Through a suppressor screen of 30.000 Arabidopsis rwa2 plants and mapping of mutations by next generation sequencing, we pinpointed pectin deacetylation...

  9. Properties of lead deposits in cell walls of radish (Raphanus sativus) roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Hiroshi; Fukuoka, Daisuke; Tatai, Yuri; Kamachi, Hiroyuki; Hayatsu, Manabu; Ono, Manami; Suzuki, Suechika

    2013-01-01

    Various mechanisms are involved in detoxification of heavy metals such as lead (Pb) in plant cells. Most of the Pb taken up by plants accumulates in their roots. However, the detailed properties of Pb complexes in roots remain unclear. We have investigated the properties of Pb deposits in root cell walls of radish (Raphanus sativus L.) seedlings grown on glass beads bed containing Pb pellets, which are the source of Pb-contamination in shooting range soils. Pb deposits were tightly bound to cell walls. Cell wall fragments containing about 50,000 ppm Pb were prepared from the roots. After extracting Pb from the cell wall fragments using HCl, Pb ions were recombined with the Pb-extracted cell wall fragments in a solution containing Pb acetate. When the cell wall fragments were treated with pectinase (E.C. 3.2.1.15) and were chemically modified with 1-ethyl-3-dimethylamino-propylcarboimide, the Pb-rebinding ability of the treated cell wall fragments decreased. When acid-treated cell wall fragments were incubated in a solution containing Pb(2+) and excess amounts of a chelating agent, Pb recombined with the cell wall fragments were measured to estimate the affinity between Pb(2+) and the cell wall fragments. Our data show that Pb(2+) binds to carboxyl groups of cell walls. The source of the carboxyl groups is suggested to be pectic compounds. A stability constant of the Pb-cell wall complex was estimated to be about 10(8). The role of root cell walls in the mechanism underlying heavy metal tolerance was discussed.

  10. Chemical Profiling of the Plant Cell Wall through Raman Microspectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Ju; Singh, Seema; Sun, Lan; Simmons, Blake; Auer, Manfred; Parvin, Bahram

    2010-03-02

    This paper presents a computational framework for chemical pro.ling of the plant cell wall through the Raman spectroscopy. The system enables query of known spectral signatures and clustering of spectral data based on intrinsic properties. As a result, presence and relative concentration of speci.c chemical bonds can be quanti.ed. The primary contribution of this paper is in representation of raman pro.le in terms of .uorescence background and multiscale peak detection at each grid point (voxel). Such a representation allows ef.cient spatial segmentation based on the coupling between high-level salient properties and low-level symbolic representation at each voxel. The high-level salient properties refer to preferred peaks and their attributes for the entire image. The low-level symbolic representations are based on .uorescence background, spectral peak locations, and their attributes. We present results on a corn stover tissue section that is imaged through Raman microscopy, and the results are consistent with the literature. In addition, automatic clustering indicates several distinct layers of the cell walls with different spectral signatures.

  11. Glycemic control promotes pancreatic beta-cell regeneration in streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric J Grossman

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Pancreatic beta-cells proliferate following administration of the beta-cell toxin streptozotocin. Defining the conditions that promote beta-cell proliferation could benefit patients with diabetes. We have investigated the effect of insulin treatment on pancreatic beta-cell regeneration in streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice, and, in addition, report on a new approach to quantify beta-cell regeneration in vivo. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Streptozotocin-induced diabetic were treated with either syngeneic islets transplanted under the kidney capsule or subcutaneous insulin implants. After either 60 or 120 days of insulin treatment, the islet transplant or insulin implant were removed and blood glucose levels monitored for 30 days. The results showed that both islet transplants and insulin implants restored normoglycemia in the 60 and 120 day treated animals. However, only the 120-day islet and insulin implant groups maintained euglycemia (<200 mg/dl following discontinuation of insulin treatment. The beta-cell was significantly increased in all the 120 day insulin-treated groups (insulin implant, 0.69+/-0.23 mg; and islet transplant, 0.91+/-0.23 mg compared non-diabetic control mice (1.54+/-0.25 mg. We also show that we can use bioluminescent imaging to monitor beta-cell regeneration in living MIP-luc transgenic mice. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The results show that insulin treatment can promote beta-cell regeneration. Moreover, the extent of restoration of beta-cell function and mass depend on the length of treatment period and overall level of glycemic control with better control being associated with improved recovery. Finally, real-time bioluminescent imaging can be used to monitor beta-cell recovery in living MIP-luc transgenic mice.

  12. Systemic Delivery of Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells for In Situ Intervertebral Disc Regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Catarina R.; Almeida, Maria Inês; Silva, Andreia M.; Molinos, Maria; Lamas, Sofia; Pereira, Catarina L.; Teixeira, Graciosa Q.; Monteiro, António T.; Santos, Susana G.; Gonçalves, Raquel M.; Barbosa, Mário A.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Cell therapies for intervertebral disc (IVD) regeneration presently rely on transplantation of IVD cells or stem cells directly to the lesion site. Still, the harsh IVD environment, with low irrigation and high mechanical stress, challenges cell administration and survival. In this study, we addressed systemic transplantation of allogeneic bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) intravenously into a rat IVD lesion model, exploring tissue regeneration via cell signaling to the lesion site. MSC transplantation was performed 24 hours after injury, in parallel with dermal fibroblasts as a control; 2 weeks after transplantation, animals were killed. Disc height index and histological grading score indicated less degeneration for the MSC‐transplanted group, with no significant changes in extracellular matrix composition. Remarkably, MSC transplantation resulted in local downregulation of the hypoxia responsive GLUT‐1 and in significantly less herniation, with higher amounts of Pax5+ B lymphocytes and no alterations in CD68+ macrophages within the hernia. The systemic immune response was analyzed in the blood, draining lymph nodes, and spleen by flow cytometry and in the plasma by cytokine array. Results suggest an immunoregulatory effect in the MSC‐transplanted animals compared with control groups, with an increase in MHC class II+ and CD4+ cells, and also upregulation of the cytokines IL‐2, IL‐4, IL‐6, and IL‐10, and downregulation of the cytokines IL‐13 and TNF‐α. Overall, our results indicate a beneficial effect of systemically transplanted MSCs on in situ IVD regeneration and highlight the complex interplay between stromal cells and cells of the immune system in achieving successful tissue regeneration. Stem Cells Translational Medicine 2017;6:1029–1039 PMID:28297581

  13. Adipose stem cells for intervertebral disc regeneration: Current status and concepts for the future: Tissue Engineering Review Series

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogendoorn, R.J.W.; Lu, Z.F.; Kroeze, R.J.; Bank, R.A.; Wuisman, P.I.; Helder, M.N.

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Degenerative disc disease and emerging biological treatment approaches Stem cell sources Integration of ASC-based regenerative medicine and surgery In vitro studies Animal models Cells in disc regeneration in vivo In vivo studies Perspective Conclusions Abstract New regenerative

  14. Red microalgal cell-wall polysaccharides: biotechnological aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arad, Shoshana Malis; Levy-Ontman, Oshrat

    2010-06-01

    The area of sugars and glycosylation is not as well developed as other fields in cell biology owing to biotechnological constraints. However, the biotechnological potential of sugars, including polysaccharides, is the driving force pushing research efforts to meet the challenge. Algae produce cell-wall sulfated polysaccharides, with those of the red unicells, which dissolve into the medium, having unique characteristics-structure, composition, fluid dynamics, and extreme stability. These characteristics, combined with polysaccharide bioactivities, offer a vast range of potential applications. Research has thus been directed toward an in-depth understanding of the molecular structure, biosynthesis, and characteristics of the red microalgal sulfated polysaccharides and to the development of molecular-genetic tools, aiming at large-scale production for applications that can benefit humanity. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Murein and pseudomurein cell wall binding domains of bacteria and archaea-a comparative view

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visweswaran, Ganesh Ram R.; Dijkstra, Bauke W.; Kok, Jan

    2011-01-01

    The cell wall, a major barrier protecting cells from their environment, is an essential compartment of both bacteria and archaea. It protects the organism from internal turgor pressure and gives a defined shape to the cell. The cell wall serves also as an anchoring surface for various proteins and

  16. Novel Adult Stem Cells for Peripheral Nerve Regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    301–313 (2008). 20. Medici , D. et al. Conversion of vascular endothelial cells into multipotent stem- like cells. Nat. Med. 16, 1400–1406 (2010). 21...2006). 23. Medici , D. et al. Conversion of vascular endothelial cells into multipotent stem- like cells. Nat. Med. 17, 514 (2011). 24. Lee, G. et al

  17. Control of Cell Identity in Pancreas Development and Regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanger, Ben Z.; Hebrok, Matthias

    2013-01-01

    The endocrine and exocrine cells in the adult pancreas are not static, but can change differentiation state in response to injury or stress. This concept of cells in flux means that there may be ways to generate certain types of cells (such as insulin-producing β-cells) and prevent formation of others (such as transformed, neoplastic cells). We review different aspects of cell identity in the pancreas, discussing how cells achieve their identity during embryonic development and maturation, and how this identity remains plastic, even in the adult pancreas. PMID:23622126

  18. Myocardial infarction: stem cell transplantation for cardiac regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Edmund; Verma, Paul; Hourigan, Kerry; Banerjee, Rinti

    2015-11-01

    It is estimated that by 2030, almost 23.6 million people will perish from cardiovascular disease, according to the WHO. The review discusses advances in stem cell therapy for myocardial infarction, including cell sources, methods of differentiation, expansion selection and their route of delivery. Skeletal muscle cells, hematopoietic cells and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and embryonic stem cells (ESCs)-derived cardiomyocytes have advanced to the clinical stage, while induced pluripotent cells (iPSCs) are yet to be considered clinically. Delivery of cells to the sites of injury and their subsequent retention is a major issue. The development of supportive scaffold matrices to facilitate stem cell retention and differentiation are analyzed. The review outlines clinical translation of conjugate stem cell-based cellular therapeutics post-myocardial infarction.

  19. Brain and muscle Arnt-like 1 promotes skeletal muscle regeneration through satellite cell expansion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chatterjee, Somik [Center for Diabetes Research, Department of Medicine, Houston Methodist Research Institute, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Yin, Hongshan [Center for Diabetes Research, Department of Medicine, Houston Methodist Research Institute, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Third Affiliated Hospital, Hebei Medical University, Shijiazhuang 050051, Hebei (China); Nam, Deokhwa [Center for Diabetes Research, Department of Medicine, Houston Methodist Research Institute, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Li, Yong [Department of Pediatric Surgery, Center for Stem Cell Research and Regenerative Medicine, University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Ma, Ke, E-mail: kma@houstonmethodist.org [Center for Diabetes Research, Department of Medicine, Houston Methodist Research Institute, Houston, TX 77030 (United States)

    2015-02-01

    Circadian clock is an evolutionarily conserved timing mechanism governing diverse biological processes and the skeletal muscle possesses intrinsic functional clocks. Interestingly, although the essential clock transcription activator, Brain and muscle Arnt-like 1 (Bmal1), participates in maintenance of muscle mass, little is known regarding its role in muscle growth and repair. In this report, we investigate the in vivo function of Bmal1 in skeletal muscle regeneration using two muscle injury models. Bmal1 is highly up-regulated by cardiotoxin injury, and its genetic ablation significantly impairs regeneration with markedly suppressed new myofiber formation and attenuated myogenic induction. A similarly defective regenerative response is observed in Bmal1-null mice as compared to wild-type controls upon freeze injury. Lack of satellite cell expansion accounts for the regeneration defect, as Bmal1{sup −/−} mice display significantly lower satellite cell number with nearly abolished induction of the satellite cell marker, Pax7. Furthermore, satellite cell-derived primary myoblasts devoid of Bmal1 display reduced growth and proliferation ex vivo. Collectively, our results demonstrate, for the first time, that Bmal1 is an integral component of the pro-myogenic response that is required for muscle repair. This mechanism may underlie its role in preserving adult muscle mass and could be targeted therapeutically to prevent muscle-wasting diseases. - Highlights: • Bmal1 is highly inducible by muscle injury and myogenic stimuli. • Genetic ablation of Bmal1 significantly impairs muscle regeneration. • Bmal1 promotes satellite cell expansion during muscle regeneration. • Bmal1-deficient primary myoblasts display attenuated growth and proliferation.

  20. Investigation of microstructural and mechanical properties of cell walls of closed-cell aluminium alloy foams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Islam, M.A.; Kader, M.A.; Hazell, P.J.; Brown, A.D. [School of Engineering and Information Technology, UNSW Canberra, ACT 2610 (Australia); Saadatfar, M. [Department of Applied Mathematics, Australian National University, Canberra ACT 0200 (Australia); Quadir, M.Z [Electron Microscope Unit, Mark Wainwright Analytical Centre (MWAC), The University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW 2052 (Australia); Microscopy and Microanalysis Facility (MMF), John de Laeter Centre (JdLC), Curtin University, WA 6102 (Australia); Escobedo, J.P., E-mail: J.Escobedo-Diaz@adfa.edu.au [School of Engineering and Information Technology, UNSW Canberra, ACT 2610 (Australia)

    2016-06-01

    This study investigates the influence of microstructure on the strength properties of individual cell walls of closed-cell stabilized aluminium foams (SAFs). Optical microscopy (OM), micro-computed X-ray tomography (µ-CT), electron backscattering diffraction (EBSD), and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) analyses were conducted to examine the microstructural properties of SAF cell walls. Novel micro-tensile tests were performed to investigate the strength properties of individual cell walls. Microstructural analysis of the SAF cell walls revealed that the material consists of eutectic Al-Si and dendritic a-Al with an inhomogeneous distribution of intermetallic particles and micro-pores (void defects). These microstructural features affected the micro-mechanism fracture behaviour and tensile strength of the specimens. Laser-based extensometer and digital image correlation (DIC) analyses were employed to observe the strain fields of individual tensile specimens. The tensile failure mode of these materials has been evaluated using microstructural analysis of post-mortem specimens, revealing a brittle cleavage fracture of the cell wall materials. The micro-porosities and intermetallic particles reduced the strength under tensile loading, limiting the elongation to fracture on average to ~3.2% and an average ultimate tensile strength to ~192 MPa. Finally, interactions between crack propagation and obstructing intermetallic compounds during the tensile deformation have been elucidated.

  1. Mechanosensory organ regeneration in zebrafish depends on a population of multipotent progenitor cells kept latent by Schwann cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, Mario; Ceci, Maria Laura; Gutiérrez, Daniela; Anguita-Salinas, Consuelo; Allende, Miguel L

    2016-04-07

    Regenerating damaged tissue is a complex process, requiring progenitor cells that must be stimulated to undergo proliferation, differentiation and, often, migratory behaviors and morphological changes. Multiple cell types, both resident within the damaged tissue and recruited to the lesion site, have been shown to participate. However, the cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in the activation of progenitor cell proliferation and differentiation after injury, and their regulation by different cells types, are not fully understood. The zebrafish lateral line is a suitable system to study regeneration because most of its components are fully restored after damage. The posterior lateral line (PLL) is a mechanosensory system that develops embryonically and is initially composed of seven to eight neuromasts distributed along the trunk and tail, connected by a continuous stripe of interneuromastic cells (INCs). The INCs remain in a quiescent state owing to the presence of underlying Schwann cells. They become activated during development to form intercalary neuromasts. However, no studies have described if INCs can participate in a regenerative event, for example, after the total loss of a neuromast. We used electroablation in transgenic larvae expressing fluorescent proteins in PLL components to completely ablate single neuromasts in larvae and adult fish. This injury results in discontinuity of the INCs, Schwann cells, and the PLL nerve. In vivo imaging showed that the INCs fill the gap left after the injury and can regenerate a new neuromast in the injury zone. Further, a single INC is able to divide and form all cell types in a regenerated neuromast and, during this process, it transiently expresses the sox2 gene, a neural progenitor cell marker. We demonstrate a critical role for Schwann cells as negative regulators of INC proliferation and neuromast regeneration, and that this inhibitory property is completely dependent on active ErbB signaling. The potential

  2. Purified Human Dental Pulp Stem Cells Promote Osteogenic Regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasui, T; Mabuchi, Y; Toriumi, H; Ebine, T; Niibe, K; Houlihan, D D; Morikawa, S; Onizawa, K; Kawana, H; Akazawa, C; Suzuki, N; Nakagawa, T; Okano, H; Matsuzaki, Y

    2016-02-01

    Human dental pulp stem/progenitor cells (hDPSCs) are attractive candidates for regenerative therapy because they can be easily expanded to generate colony-forming unit-fibroblasts (CFU-Fs) on plastic and the large cell numbers required for transplantation. However, isolation based on adherence to plastic inevitably changes the surface marker expression and biological properties of the cells. Consequently, little is currently known about the original phenotypes of tissue precursor cells that give rise to plastic-adherent CFU-Fs. To better understand the in vivo functions and translational therapeutic potential of hDPSCs and other stem cells, selective cell markers must be identified in the progenitor cells. Here, we identified a dental pulp tissue-specific cell population based on the expression profiles of 2 cell-surface markers LNGFR (CD271) and THY-1 (CD90). Prospectively isolated, dental pulp-derived LNGFR(Low+)THY-1(High+) cells represent a highly enriched population of clonogenic cells--notably, the isolated cells exhibited long-term proliferation and multilineage differentiation potential in vitro. The cells also expressed known mesenchymal cell markers and promoted new bone formation to heal critical-size calvarial defects in vivo. These findings suggest that LNGFR(Low+)THY-1(High+) dental pulp-derived cells provide an excellent source of material for bone regenerative strategies. © International & American Associations for Dental Research 2015.

  3. Sdf-1 (CXCL12) induces CD9 expression in stem cells engaged in muscle regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brzoska, Edyta; Kowalski, Kamil; Markowska-Zagrajek, Agnieszka; Kowalewska, Magdalena; Archacki, Rafał; Plaskota, Izabela; Stremińska, Władysława; Jańczyk-Ilach, Katarzyna; Ciemerych, Maria A

    2015-03-24

    Understanding the mechanism of stem cell mobilization into injured skeletal muscles is a prerequisite step for the development of muscle disease therapies. Many of the currently studied stem cell types present myogenic potential; however, when introduced either into the blood stream or directly into the tissue, they are not able to efficiently engraft injured muscle. For this reason their use in therapy is still limited. Previously, we have shown that stromal-derived factor-1 (Sdf-1) caused the mobilization of endogenous (not transplanted) stem cells into injured skeletal muscle improving regeneration. Here, we demonstrate that the beneficial effect of Sdf-1 relies on the upregulation of the tetraspanin CD9 expression in stem cells. The expression pattern of adhesion proteins, including CD9, was analysed after Sdf-1 treatment during regeneration of rat skeletal muscles and mouse Pax7-/- skeletal muscles, that are characterized by the decreased number of satellite cells. Next, we examined the changes in CD9 level in satellite cells-derived myoblasts, bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells, and embryonic stem cells after Sdf-1 treatment or silencing expression of CXCR4 and CXCR7. Finally, we examined the potential of stem cells to fuse with myoblasts after Sdf-1 treatment. In vivo analyses of Pax7-/- mice strongly suggest that Sdf-1-mediates increase in CD9 levels also in mobilized stem cells. In the absence of CXCR4 receptor the effect of Sdf-1 on CD9 expression is blocked. Next, in vitro studies show that Sdf-1 increases the level of CD9 not only in satellite cell-derived myoblasts but also in bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells, as well as embryonic stem cells. Importantly, the Sdf-1 treated cells migrate and fuse with myoblasts more effectively. We suggest that Sdf-1 binding CXCR4 receptor improves skeletal muscle regeneration by upregulating expression of CD9 and thus, impacting at stem cells mobilization to the injured muscles.

  4. Dental Pulp Stem Cells as a multifaceted tool for bioengineering and the regeneration of craniomaxillofacial tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maitane eAurrekoetxea

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Dental pulp stem cells, or DPSC, are neural crest-derived cells with an outstanding capacity to differentiate along multiple cell lineages of interest for cell therapy. In particular, highly efficient osteo/dentinogenic differentiation of DPSC can be achieved using simple in vitro protocols, making these cells a very attractive and promising tool for the future treatment of dental and periodontal diseases. Among craniomaxillofacial organs, the tooth and salivary gland are two such cases in which complete regeneration by tissue engineering using DPSC appears to be possible, as research over the last decade has made substantial progress in experimental models of partial or total regeneration of both organs, by cell recombination technology. Moreover, DPSC seem to be a particularly good choice for the regeneration of nerve tissues, including injured or transected cranial nerves. In this context, the oral cavity appears to be an excellent testing ground for new regenerative therapies using DPSC. However, many issues and challenges need yet to be addressed before these cells can be employed in clinical therapy. In this review, we point out some important aspects on the biology of DPSC with regard to their use for the reconstruction of different craniomaxillofacial tissues and organs, with special emphasis on cranial bones, nerves, teeth, and salivary glands. We suggest new ideas and strategies to fully exploit the capacities of DPSC for bioengineering of the aforementioned tissues.

  5. Regenerating Heart Using a Novel Compound and Human Wharton Jelly Mesenchymal Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabbani, Shahram; Soleimani, Masoud; Imani, Mohammad; Sahebjam, Mohammad; Ghiaseddin, Ali; Nassiri, Seyed Mahdi; Majd Ardakani, Jalil; Tajik Rostami, Maryam; Jalali, Arash; Mousanassab, Bahmanshir; Kheradmandi, Mahsa; Ahmadi Tafti, Seyed Hossein

    2017-04-01

    Myocardial infarction is a major problem in health system and most conventional therapy is not led to restoration of the health. Stem cell therapy is a method to regenerate the heart but today appropriate cell source and scaffold selection as extracellular matrix to achieve the best effect is disputing. In this study a combination of human Wharton jelly mesenchymal stem cells (HWJMSCs) with a novel compound consisting polyethylene glycol (PEG), hyaluronic acid and chitosan is presented to heart regeneration. After proliferation and expansion of HWJMSCs, these cells were mixed with scaffold and injected into the infarcted rabbit myocardium. After two months cardiac function and infarcted area were evaluated. Immunohistochemistry performed for vessel count and demonstrating of differentiation ability into cardiomyocytes. To confirm this ability PCR was done. Scanning electron microscope was used to evaluate angiogenesis. Improving cardiac function was higher in cell/scaffold group than the others and it was confirmed by SPECT results which showed least defect size in the myocardium. There were a lot of neoangiogenesis in the target group and also cardiomyogenesis observed in cell/scaffold group. PCR results confirmed the presence of differentiated cardiomyocytes and SEM showed well developed vessel in this group. Comparing macroscopic and microscopic results between all groups revealed that HWJMSC in combination with this scaffold led to brilliant results regarding cardiac function, angiogenesis and cardiogenesis. It is recommended using these cells and materials for cardiac tissue engineering and regeneration therapy. Copyright © 2017 IMSS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Can stem cells really regenerate the human heart? Use your noggin, dickkopf! Lessons from developmental biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommer, Paula

    2013-06-01

    The human heart is the first organ to develop and its development is fairly well characterised. In theory, the heart has the capacity to regenerate, as its cardiomyocytes may be capable of cell division and the adult heart contains a cardiac stem cell niche, presumably capable of differentiating into cardiomyocytes and other cardiac-associated cell types. However, as with most other organs, these mechanisms are not activated upon serious injury. Several experimental options to induce regeneration of the damaged heart tissue are available: activate the endogenous cardiomyocytes to divide, coax the endogenous population of stem cells to divide and differentiate, or add exogenous cell-based therapy to replace the lost cardiac tissue. This review is a summary of the recent research into all these avenues, discussing the reasons for the limited successes of clinical trials using stem cells after cardiac injury and explaining new advances in basic science. It concludes with a reiteration that chances of successful regeneration would be improved by understanding and implementing the basics of heart development and stem cell biology.

  7. Neural Crest Stem Cells from Dental Tissues: A New Hope for Dental and Neural Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaskon Ibarretxe

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Several stem cell sources persist in the adult human body, which opens the doors to both allogeneic and autologous cell therapies. Tooth tissues have proven to be a surprisingly rich and accessible source of neural crest-derived ectomesenchymal stem cells (EMSCs, which may be employed to repair disease-affected oral tissues in advanced regenerative dentistry. Additionally, one area of medicine that demands intensive research on new sources of stem cells is nervous system regeneration, since this constitutes a therapeutic hope for patients affected by highly invalidating conditions such as spinal cord injury, stroke, or neurodegenerative diseases. However, endogenous adult sources of neural stem cells present major drawbacks, such as their scarcity and complicated obtention. In this context, EMSCs from dental tissues emerge as good alternative candidates, since they are preserved in adult human individuals, and retain both high proliferation ability and a neural-like phenotype in vitro. In this paper, we discuss some important aspects of tissue regeneration by cell therapy and point out some advantages that EMSCs provide for dental and neural regeneration. We will finally review some of the latest research featuring experimental approaches and benefits of dental stem cell therapy.

  8. Biomimetic extracellular matrix mediated somatic stem cell differentiation: applications in dental pulp tissue regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravindran, Sriram; George, Anne

    2015-01-01

    Dental caries is one of the most widely prevalent infectious diseases in the world. It affects more than half of the world's population. The current treatment for necrotic dental pulp tissue arising from dental caries is root canal therapy. This treatment results in loss of tooth sensitivity and vitality making it prone for secondary infections. Over the past decade, several tissue-engineering approaches have attempted regeneration of the dental pulp tissue. Although several studies have highlighted the potential of dental stem cells, none have transitioned into a clinical setting owing to limited availability of dental stem cells and the need for growth factor delivery systems. Our strategy is to utilize the intact ECM of pulp cells to drive lineage specific differentiation of bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells. From a clinical perspective, pulp ECM scaffolds can be generated using cell lines and patient specific somatic stem cells can be used for regeneration. Our published results have shown the feasibility of using pulp ECM scaffolds for odontogenic differentiation of non-dental mesenchymal cells. This focused review discusses the issues surrounding dental pulp tissue regeneration and the potential of our strategy to overcome these issues. PMID:25954205

  9. Role of Stem Cells Transplantation in Tissue Regeneration After Acute or Chronic Acetaminophen Induced Liver Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katselis, Charalampos; Apostolou, Konstantinos; Feretis, Themistoklis; Papanikolaou, Ioannis G; Zografos, George C; Toutouzas, Konstantinos; Papalois, Apostolos

    2016-01-01

    Acetaminophen-induced liver injury (APAP) is recognized as a frequent etiologic factor responsible for hepatic damage in the developed world. Management remains still elusive as treatment options are limited and their results are inconclusive. Consequently new strategies are explored at the experimental level. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) present a promising modality as they can promote liver regeneration (LG) and compensate acute liver injury (ALI). Our research was focused on articles related to drug-induced liver injury, mechanisms of liver regeneration (LG) after Acute Liver Injury (ALI) and recent experimental protocols of Mesenchymal Stem Cells (MSCs) transplantation after chemical insult. All these studies are cited on Pubmed and MedLine. This review has three distinct sections. First recent developments in ALI pathogenesis are presented. The second section covers cellular pathways and histological findings relevant to liver regeneration. The final chapter analyzes MSCs transplantation protocols after ALI and interrelation between liver regeneration and hepatic differentiation of MSCs. Adipose tissue stem cells (ADSCs) and (MSCs) transplantation represents a promising modality in severe ALI management although many aspects remain to be clarified.

  10. Hard tissue regeneration capacity of apical pulp derived cells (APDCs) from human tooth with immature apex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Shigehiro; Yamaguchi, Satoshi; Watanabe, Akihiko; Hamada, Keiichi; Amagasa, Teruo

    2008-06-20

    Recent studies indicate that dental pulp is a new source of adult stem cells. The human tooth with an immature apex is a developing organ, and the apical pulp of this tooth may contain a variety of progenitor/stem cells, which participate in root formation. We investigated the hard tissue regeneration potential of apical pulp derived cells (APDCs) from human tooth with an immature apex. APDCs cultured with a mineralization-promoting medium showed alkaline phosphatase activity in porous hydroxyapatite (HA) scaffolds. The composites of APDCs and HA were implanted subcutaneously in immunocompromised rats and harvested at 12 weeks after implantation. In histological analysis, the APDCs/HA composites exhibited bone- and dentine-like mineralized tissues in the pore areas of HA. This study suggests that the human tooth with an immature apex is an effective source of cells for hard tissue regeneration.

  11. RETRACTED: Recent advances in cardiac regeneration: Stem cell, biomaterial and growth factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheraghi, Mostafa; Namdari, Mehrdad; Negahdari, Babak; Eatemadi, Ali

    2017-03-01

    Myocardial infarction has been reported to be responsible for about 7.3 million deaths each year globally. Present treatments for myocardial infarction have been more palliative rather than curative. Over the past few years, stem cells have demonstrated its potency in regenerating damaged cardiac tissue, especially after myocardial infarction. However, limited short half-life of the protein and cell therapy and low transplanted cell survival rate as demonstrated via several clinical trials have lead to development of more potent and novel delivery systems like biomaterial delivery system and the use of various growth factors. In this review, we will be enumerating and discussing the recent advances in cardiac regeneration with focus on stem cell, biomaterial and growth factors. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Immunohistochemical analyses of cell cycle progression and gene expression of biliary epithelial cells during liver regeneration after partial hepatectomy of the mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, Tatsuya; Fukuchi, Tomokazu; Yagi, Shinomi; Shiojiri, Nobuyoshi

    2016-05-20

    The liver has a remarkable regeneration capacity, and, after surgical removal of its mass, the remaining tissue undergoes rapid regeneration through compensatory growth of its constituent cells. Although hepatocytes synchronously proliferate under the control of various signaling molecules from neighboring cells, there have been few detailed analyses on how biliary cells regenerate for their cell population after liver resection. The present study was undertaken to clarify how biliary cells regenerate after partial hepatectomy of mice through extensive analyses of their cell cycle progression and gene expression using immunohistochemical and RT-PCR techniques. When expression of PCNA, Ki67 antigen, topoisomerase IIα and phosphorylated histone H3, which are cell cycle markers, was immunohistochemically examined during liver regeneration, hepatocytes had a peak of the S phase and M phase at 48-72 h after resection. By contrast, biliary epithelial cells had much lower proliferative activity than that of hepatocytes, and their peak of the S phase was delayed. Mitotic figures were rarely detectable in biliary cells. RT-PCR analyses of gene expression of biliary markers such as Spp1 (osteopontin), Epcam and Hnf1b demonstrated that they were upregulated during liver regeneration. Periportal hepatocytes expressed some of biliary markers, including Spp1 mRNA and protein. Some periportal hepatocytes had downregulated expression of HNF4α and HNF1α. Gene expression of Notch signaling molecules responsible for cell fate decision of hepatoblasts to biliary cells during development was upregulated during liver regeneration. Notch signaling may be involved in biliary regeneration.

  13. Effect of Cell-seeded Hydroxyapatite Scaffolds on Rabbit Radius Bone Regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-22

    Effect of cell-seeded hydroxyapatite scaffolds on rabbit radius bone regeneration C. R. Rathbone,1 T. Guda,1,2 B. M. Singleton,2 D. S. Oh,2,3 M. R...Library (wileyonlinelibrary.com). DOI: 10.1002/jbm.a.34834 Abstract: Highly porous hydroxyapatite (HA) scaffolds were developed as bone graft substitutes...Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 102A: 1458– 1466, 2014. Key Words: hydroxyapatite , rabbit radius, mesenchymal stem cells, bone, callus

  14. The plant cell wall in the feeding sites of cyst nematodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holger eBohlmann

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Plant parasitic cyst nematodes (genera Heterodera and Globodera are serious pests for many crops. They enter the host roots as migratory second stage juveniles (J2 and migrate intracellularly towards the vascular cylinder using their stylet and a set of cell wall degrading enzymes produced in the pharyngeal glands. They select an initial syncytial cell (ISC within the vascular cylinder or inner cortex layers to induce the formation of a multicellular feeding site called a syncytium, which is the only source of nutrients for the parasite during its entire life. A syncytium can consist of more than hundred cells whose protoplasts are fused together through local cell wall dissolutions. While the nematode produces a cocktail of cell wall degrading and modifying enzymes during migration through the root, the cell wall degradations occurring during syncytium development are due to the plants own cell wall modifying and degrading proteins. The outer syncytial cell wall thickens to withstand the increasing osmotic pressure inside the syncytium. Furthermore, pronounced cell wall ingrowths can be formed on the outer syncytial wall at the interface with xylem vessels. They increase the surface of the symplast-apoplast interface, thus enhancing nutrient uptake into the syncytium. Processes of cell wall degradation, synthesis and modification in the syncytium are facilitated by a variety of plant proteins and enzymes including expansins, glucanases, pectate lyases and cellulose synthases, which are produced inside the syncytium or in cells surrounding the syncytium.

  15. The plant cell wall in the feeding sites of cyst nematodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohlmann, Holger; Sobczak, Miroslaw

    2014-01-01

    Plant parasitic cyst nematodes (genera Heterodera and Globodera) are serious pests for many crops. They enter the host roots as migratory second stage juveniles (J2) and migrate intracellularly toward the vascular cylinder using their stylet and a set of cell wall degrading enzymes produced in the pharyngeal glands. They select an initial syncytial cell (ISC) within the vascular cylinder or inner cortex layers to induce the formation of a multicellular feeding site called a syncytium, which is the only source of nutrients for the parasite during its entire life. A syncytium can consist of more than hundred cells whose protoplasts are fused together through local cell wall dissolutions. While the nematode produces a cocktail of cell wall degrading and modifying enzymes during migration through the root, the cell wall degradations occurring during syncytium development are due to the plants own cell wall modifying and degrading proteins. The outer syncytial cell wall thickens to withstand the increasing osmotic pressure inside the syncytium. Furthermore, pronounced cell wall ingrowths can be formed on the outer syncytial wall at the interface with xylem vessels. They increase the surface of the symplast-apoplast interface, thus enhancing nutrient uptake into the syncytium. Processes of cell wall degradation, synthesis and modification in the syncytium are facilitated by a variety of plant proteins and enzymes including expansins, glucanases, pectate lyases and cellulose synthases, which are produced inside the syncytium or in cells surrounding the syncytium. PMID:24678316

  16. Immunogold scanning electron microscopy can reveal the polysaccharide architecture of xylem cell walls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Qiang; Sun, Yuliang; Juzenas, Kevin

    2017-04-01

    Immunofluorescence microscopy (IFM) and immunogold transmission electron microscopy (TEM) are the two main techniques commonly used to detect polysaccharides in plant cell walls. Both are important in localizing cell wall polysaccharides, but both have major limitations, such as low resolution in IFM and restricted sample size for immunogold TEM. In this study, we have developed a robust technique that combines immunocytochemistry with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to study cell wall polysaccharide architecture in xylem cells at high resolution over large areas of sample. Using multiple cell wall monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), this immunogold SEM technique reliably localized groups of hemicellulosic and pectic polysaccharides in the cell walls of five different xylem structures (vessel elements, fibers, axial and ray parenchyma cells, and tyloses). This demonstrates its important advantages over the other two methods for studying cell wall polysaccharide composition and distribution in these structures. In addition, it can show the three-dimensional distribution of a polysaccharide group in the vessel lateral wall and the polysaccharide components in the cell wall of developing tyloses. This technique, therefore, should be valuable for understanding the cell wall polysaccharide composition, architecture and functions of diverse cell types. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  17. Circulating osteogenic cells: implications for injury, repair, and regeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pignolo, Robert J; Kassem, Moustapha

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this review is to provide a critical reading of recent literature pertaining to the presence of circulating, fluid-phase osteoblastic cells and their possible contribution to bone formation. We have termed this group of cells collectively as circulating osteogenic precursor (COP) cells...

  18. Dynamics of degeneration and regeneration in developing zebrafish peripheral axons reveals a requirement for extrinsic cell types

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Villegas Rosario

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Understanding the cellular mechanisms regulating axon degeneration and regeneration is crucial for developing treatments for nerve injury and neurodegenerative disease. In neurons, axon degeneration is distinct from cell body death and often precedes or is associated with the onset of disease symptoms. In the peripheral nervous system of both vertebrates and invertebrates, after degeneration of detached fragments, axons can often regenerate to restore function. Many studies of axonal degeneration and regeneration have used in vitro approaches, but the influence of extrinsic cell types on these processes can only be fully addressed in live animals. Because of its simplicity and superficial location, the larval zebrafish posterior lateral line (pLL nerve is an ideal model system for live studies of axon degeneration and regeneration. Results We used laser axotomy and time-lapse imaging of pLL axons to characterize the roles of leukocytes, Schwann cells and target sensory hair cells in axon degeneration and regeneration in vivo. Immune cells were essential for efficient removal of axonal debris after axotomy. Schwann cells were required for proper fasciculation and pathfinding of regenerating axons to their target cells. Intact target hair cells were not themselves required for regeneration, but chemical ablation of neuromasts caused axons to transiently deviate from their normal paths. Conclusions Macrophages, Schwann cells, and target sensory organs are required for distinct aspects of pLL axon degeneration or regeneration in the zebrafish larva. Our work introduces a powerful vertebrate model for analyzing axonal degeneration and regeneration in the living animal and elucidating the role of extrinsic cell types in these processes.

  19. Cell Sources for Bone Regeneration: The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly (But Promising)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Based on the extensive investigation of various ways to regenerate bone, bone marrow stromal cells, in conjunction with ceramic scaffolds, show great promise for application in human patients, and are already in use in a limited number of clinical trials. In preparing for clinical trials, scale-up current good manufacturing processes (cGMP) must incorporate the use of appropriate assays to ensure that the resulting cell product has maintained its biological activity. Future developments are needed to identify better scaffolds, and better ways to deliver cells with either injectable carriers, or by developing techniques to aide in their escape from the circulation and their incorporation into the pre-existing tissue. Lastly, development of methods that faithfully direct pluripotent stem cell differentiation into populations of osteogenic precursors (and ideally, containing skeletal stem cells) represents a new challenge in the field of bone regeneration, but also offer new opportunities to not only to study the biology of bone formation, but also to develop a robust cell source for bone regeneration. PMID:21797663

  20. EMT Involved in Migration of Stem/Progenitor Cells for Pituitary Development and Regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Saishu; Kato, Takako; Kato, Yukio

    2016-01-01

    Epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT) and cell migration are important processes in embryonic development of many tissues as well as oncogenesis. The pituitary gland is a master endocrine tissue and recent studies indicate that Sox2-expressing stem/progenitor cells actively migrate and develop this tissue during embryogenesis. Notably, although migration activity of stem/progenitor cells in the postnatal period seems to be reduced compared to that in the embryonic period, it is hypothesized that stem/progenitor cells in the adult pituitary re-migrate from their microenvironment niche to contribute to the regeneration system. Therefore, elucidation of EMT in the pituitary stem/progenitor cells will promote understanding of pituitary development and regeneration, as well as diseases such as pituitary adenoma. In this review, so as to gain more insights into the mechanisms of pituitary development and regeneration, we summarize the EMT in the pituitary by focusing on the migration of pituitary stem/progenitor cells during both embryonic and postnatal organogenesis. PMID:27058562

  1. Structural constraints and dynamics of bacterial cell wall architecture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Angel De Pedro

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The peptidoglycan wall (PG is a unique structure which confers physical strength and defined shape to bacteria. It consists of a net-like macromolecule of peptide interlinked glycan chains overlying the cell membrane. The structure and layout of the PG dictates that the wall has to be continuously modified as bacteria go through division, morphological differentiation and adaptive responses. The PG is poorly known in structural terms. However, to understand morphogenesis a precise knowledge of glycan strand arrangement and of local effects of the different kinds of subunits is essential. The scarcity of data led to a conception of the PG as a regular, highly ordered structure which strongly influenced growth models. Here, we review the structure of the PG to define a more realistic conceptual framework. We discuss the consequences of the plasticity of murein architecture in morphogenesis and try to define a set of minimal structural constraints that must be fulfilled by any model to be compatible with present day information.

  2. Remarkable heterogeneity displayed by oval cells in rat and mouse models of stem cell-mediated liver regeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jelnes, Peter; Santoni-Rugiu, Eric; Rasmussen, Morten

    2007-01-01

    The experimental protocols used in the investigation of stem cell-mediated liver regeneration in rodents are characterized by activation of the hepatic stem cell compartment in the canals of Hering followed by transit amplification of oval cells and their subsequent differentiation along hepatic...... the molecular phenotypes of oval cells in several of the most commonly used protocols of stem cell-mediated liver regeneration-namely, treatment with 2-acetylaminofluorene and partial (70%) hepatectomy (AAF/PHx); a choline-deficient, ethionine-supplemented (CDE) diet; a 3,5-diethoxycarbonyl-1,4-dihydro......-collidin (DDC) diet; and N-acetyl-paraaminophen (APAP). Reproducibly, oval cells showing reactivity for cytokeratins (CKs), muscle pyruvate kinase (MPK), the adenosine triphosphate-binding cassette transporter ABCG2/BCRP1 (ABCG2), alpha-fetoprotein (AFP), and delta-like protein 1/preadipocyte factor 1 (Dlk...

  3. Kidney stem cells in development, regeneration and cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dziedzic, Klaudyna; Pleniceanu, Oren; Dekel, Benjamin

    2014-12-01

    The generation of nephrons during development depends on differentiation via a mesenchymal to epithelial transition (MET) of self-renewing, tissue-specific stem cells confined to a specific anatomic niche of the nephrogenic cortex. These cells may transform to generate oncogenic stem cells and drive pediatric renal cancer. Once nephron epithelia are formed the view of post-MET tissue renal growth and maintenance by adult tissue-specific epithelial stem cells becomes controversial. Recently, genetic lineage tracing that followed clonal evolution of single kidney cells showed that the need for new cells is constantly driven by fate-restricted unipotent clonal expansions in varying kidney segments arguing against a multipotent adult stem cell model. Lineage-restriction was similarly maintained in kidney organoids grown in culture. Importantly, kidney cells in which Wnt was activated were traced to give significant clonal progeny indicating a clonogenic hierarchy. In vivo nephron epithelia may be endowed with the capacity akin to that of unipotent epithelial stem/progenitor such that under specific stimuli can clonally expand/self renew by local proliferation of mature differentiated cells. Finding ways to ex vivo preserve and expand the observed in vivo kidney-forming capacity inherent to both the fetal and adult kidneys is crucial for taking renal regenerative medicine forward. Some of the strategies used to achieve this are sorting human fetal nephron stem/progenitor cells, growing adult nephrospheres or reprogramming differentiated kidney cells toward expandable renal progenitors. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. Stem Cells in Tooth Development, Growth, Repair, and Regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Tian; Volponi, Ana Angelova; Babb, Rebecca; An, Zhengwen; Sharpe, Paul T

    2015-01-01

    Human teeth contain stem cells in all their mesenchymal-derived tissues, which include the pulp, periodontal ligament, and developing roots, in addition to the support tissues such as the alveolar bone. The precise roles of these cells remain poorly understood and most likely involve tissue repair mechanisms but their relative ease of harvesting makes teeth a valuable potential source of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) for therapeutic use. These dental MSC populations all appear to have the same developmental origins, being derived from cranial neural crest cells, a population of embryonic stem cells with multipotential properties. In rodents, the incisor teeth grow continuously throughout life, a feature that requires populations of continuously active mesenchymal and epithelial stem cells. The discrete locations of these stem cells in the incisor have rendered them amenable for study and much is being learnt about the general properties of these stem cells for the incisor as a model system. The incisor MSCs appear to be a heterogeneous population consisting of cells from different neural crest-derived tissues. The epithelial stem cells can be traced directly back in development to a Sox10(+) population present at the time of tooth initiation. In this review, we describe the basic biology of dental stem cells, their functions, and potential clinical uses. © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Dental stem cells for tooth regeneration and repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantesso, Andrea; Sharpe, Paul

    2009-09-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) resident in bone marrow are one of the most studied and clinically important populations of adult stem cells. Cells with, similar properties to these MSCs have been described in several different tooth tissues and the potential ease with which these dental MSCs could be obtained from patients has prompted great interest in these cells as a source of MSCs for cell-based therapeutics. In this review we address the current state of knowledge regarding these cells, their properties, origins, locations, functions and potential uses in tooth tissue