WorldWideScience

Sample records for cell wall degrading

  1. Alfalfa stem tissues: Cell wall deposition, composition, and degradability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jung, H.G.; Engels, F.M.

    2002-01-01

    Declining cell wall degradability of alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) stems with maturation limits the nutritional value of alfalfa for ruminants. This study characterized changes in cell wall concentration, composition, and degradability by rumen microbes resulting from alfalfa stem tissue proliferatio

  2. The identification of cell wall degrading enzymes in Globodera rostochiensis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Popeijus, H.E.

    2002-01-01

    This thesis describes the identification of cell wall degrading enzymes of the potato cyst nematode Globodera rostochiensis . A robust method using expressed sequence tags (ESTs) was applied to identify new parasitism related enzymes. One of the ESTs revealed the first pectate lyase from a metazoan

  3. Cell wall degradation in the autolysis of filamentous fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Leblic, M I; Reyes, F; Martinez, M J; Lahoz, R

    1982-12-27

    A systematic study on autolysis of the cell walls of fungi has been made on Neurospora crassa, Botrytis cinerea, Polystictus versicolor, Aspergillus nidulans, Schizophyllum commune, Aspergillus niger, and Mucor mucedo. During autolysis each fungus produces the necessary lytic enzymes for its autodegradation. From autolyzed cultures of each fungus enzymatic precipitates were obtained. The degree of lysis of the cell walls, obtained from non-autolyzed mycelia, was studied by incubating these cell walls with and without a supply of their own lytic enzymes. The degree of lysis increased with the incubation time and generally was higher with a supply of lytic enzymes. Cell walls from mycelia of different ages were obtained. A higher degree of lysis was always found, in young cell walls than in older cell walls, when exogenous lytic enzymes were present. In all the fungi studied, there is lysis of the cell walls during autolysis. This is confirmed by the change of the cell wall structure as well as by the degree of lysis reached by the cell wall and the release of substances, principally glucose and N-acetylglucosamine in the medium.

  4. Hemicellulose biosynthesis and degradation in tobacco cell walls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Compier, M.G.M.

    2005-01-01

    Natural fibres have a wide range of technological applications, such as in paper and textile industries. The basic properties and the quality of plant fibres are determined by the composition of the plant cell wall. Characteristic for fibres are thick secondary cell walls, which consist of cellulose

  5. Consolidated pretreatment and hydrolysis of plant biomass expressing cell wall degrading enzymes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raab, R. Michael; Zhang, Dongcheng; Bougri, Oleg

    2016-02-02

    Methods for consolidated pretreatment and hydrolysis of genetically engineered plants expressing cell wall degrading enzymes are provided. Expression cassettes and vectors for making transgenic plants are described. Plants engineered to express one or more cell wall degrading enzymes using expression cassettes and vectors of the invention are also provided.

  6. Cell wall degradation is required for normal starch mobilisation in barley endosperm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andriotis, Vasilios M E; Rejzek, Martin; Barclay, Elaine; Rugen, Michael D; Field, Robert A; Smith, Alison M

    2016-01-01

    Starch degradation in barley endosperm provides carbon for early seedling growth, but the control of this process is poorly understood. We investigated whether endosperm cell wall degradation is an important determinant of the rate of starch degradation. We identified iminosugar inhibitors of enzymes that degrade the cell wall component arabinoxylan. The iminosugar 1,4-dideoxy-1, 4-imino-l-arabinitol (LAB) inhibits arabinoxylan arabinofuranohydrolase (AXAH) but does not inhibit the main starch-degrading enzymes α- and β-amylase and limit dextrinase. AXAH activity in the endosperm appears soon after the onset of germination and resides in dimers putatively containing two isoforms, AXAH1 and AXAH2. Upon grain imbibition, mobilisation of arabinoxylan and starch spreads across the endosperm from the aleurone towards the crease. The front of arabinoxylan degradation precedes that of starch degradation. Incubation of grains with LAB decreases the rate of loss of both arabinoxylan and starch, and retards the spread of both degradation processes across the endosperm. We propose that starch degradation in the endosperm is dependent on cell wall degradation, which permeabilises the walls and thus permits rapid diffusion of amylolytic enzymes. AXAH may be of particular importance in this respect. These results provide new insights into the mobilization of endosperm reserves to support early seedling growth. PMID:27622597

  7. Cell wall degradation is required for normal starch mobilisation in barley endosperm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andriotis, Vasilios M. E.; Rejzek, Martin; Barclay, Elaine; Rugen, Michael D.; Field, Robert A.; Smith, Alison M.

    2016-01-01

    Starch degradation in barley endosperm provides carbon for early seedling growth, but the control of this process is poorly understood. We investigated whether endosperm cell wall degradation is an important determinant of the rate of starch degradation. We identified iminosugar inhibitors of enzymes that degrade the cell wall component arabinoxylan. The iminosugar 1,4-dideoxy-1, 4-imino-l-arabinitol (LAB) inhibits arabinoxylan arabinofuranohydrolase (AXAH) but does not inhibit the main starch-degrading enzymes α- and β-amylase and limit dextrinase. AXAH activity in the endosperm appears soon after the onset of germination and resides in dimers putatively containing two isoforms, AXAH1 and AXAH2. Upon grain imbibition, mobilisation of arabinoxylan and starch spreads across the endosperm from the aleurone towards the crease. The front of arabinoxylan degradation precedes that of starch degradation. Incubation of grains with LAB decreases the rate of loss of both arabinoxylan and starch, and retards the spread of both degradation processes across the endosperm. We propose that starch degradation in the endosperm is dependent on cell wall degradation, which permeabilises the walls and thus permits rapid diffusion of amylolytic enzymes. AXAH may be of particular importance in this respect. These results provide new insights into the mobilization of endosperm reserves to support early seedling growth. PMID:27622597

  8. Effects of X-irradiation on artificial blood vessel wall degradation by invasive tumor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Artificial vessel wall cultures, constructed by growing arterial endothelial cells on preformed layers of rat smooth muscle cells, were used to evaluate the effects of X-irradiation on tumor cell-induced tissue degradation. Bovine endothelial cells had radiation sensitivities similar to those of rat smooth muscle cells. Preirradiation of smooth muscle cells, before the addition of human fibrosarcoma (HT 1080) cells, did not increase the rate of degradation and destruction by the invasive cells. However, the degradation rate was decreased if the cultures were irradiated after the addition of HT 1080 cells. The presence of bovine endothelial cells markedly inhibited the destructive abilities of fibrosarcoma cells, but preirradiation of artificial vessel walls substantially decreased their capabilities to resist HT 1080-induced lysis. These findings suggest that the abilities of blood vessels to limit extravasation may be compromised by ionizing radiation

  9. [Degradation of cell wall polysaccharides during postharvest fruit ripening and softening of different apple varieties].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Chang-Hai; Mizuno, Masashi; Kan, Juan; Suo, Biao; Wang, Zhi-Jun; Tsuchida, Hironobu

    2006-12-01

    The cell wall material (CWM) and eight cell wall polysaccharides fractions were extracted from 'Fuji' and 'Kinsei' apples during storage at different time (0 and 42 days). The sugar composition characteristics of each fraction were determined by gas chromatography. The results showed that, during storages, the firmness of 'Kinsei' apples decreased significantly, and a significant peak of ethylene production was shown after 10 d storage, but only a little ethylene was produced in 'Fuji' apples, which had a better storability. Compare to other cell wall polysaccharide fractions, in Na(2)CO(3)-soluble pectic fractions of apple fruit, there were abundant rhamnogalacturonan I (RG-I), which branched highly in side chains due to the compositions of arabinans, galactans, arabinogalactans etc. As for cell wall polysaccharides, in 'Kinsei' apples, the decrease of pectic fractions was shown most significantly in Na(2)CO(3)-1 fraction, which was associated with a significant degradation of arabinosyl and galactosyl residues on the side chains. Further more, higher molecular mass in Na(2)CO(3)-1 pectic polysaccharides degraded and turned into ones with smaller molecular mass. From these results, the degradation of side chains in Na(2)CO(3)-1 pectic polysaccharides under the activity of enzyme was considered one of the most significant factors of apple fruit softening through modifying the network of cell wall polysaccharides.

  10. Chemical composition and cell wall polysaccharide degradability of pith and rind tissues from mature maize internodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Our study was undertaken to identify tissue-specific biochemical traits that may be targeted in breeding programs for improving forage digestibility. We compared cell wall chemical composition and 24- and 96-h in vitro degradabilities in separated pith and rind tissues from six maize inbred lines. A...

  11. Cell wall degrading enzymes in Trichoderma asperellum grown on wheat bran

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bech, Lasse; Busk, Peter Kamp; Lange, Lene

    2015-01-01

    Trichoderma asperellum is a filamentous fungus that is able to produce and secrete a wide range of extracellular hydrolytic enzymes used for plant cell wall degradation. The Trichoderma genus has attracted considerable attention from the biorefinery industry due to the production of cell wall...... Pattern Recognition enabling an efficient enzyme discovery. This was furthermore used to re-annotate CAZYmes present in five publically available Trichoderma species, hereby elucidating differences in CAZYmes on a functional level in contrary to glycoside hydrolase family level. This comparison supports...

  12. Building and degradation of secondary cell walls: are there common patterns of lamellar assembly of cellulose microfibrils and cell wall delamination?

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Micco, Veronica; Ruel, Katia; Joseleau, Jean-Paul; Aronne, Giovanna

    2010-08-01

    During cell wall formation and degradation, it is possible to detect cellulose microfibrils assembled into thicker and thinner lamellar structures, respectively, following inverse parallel patterns. The aim of this study was to analyse such patterns of microfibril aggregation and cell wall delamination. The thickness of microfibrils and lamellae was measured on digital images of both growing and degrading cell walls viewed by means of transmission electron microscopy. To objectively detect, measure and classify microfibrils and lamellae into thickness classes, a method based on the application of computerized image analysis combined with graphical and statistical methods was developed. The method allowed common classes of microfibrils and lamellae in cell walls to be identified from different origins. During both the formation and degradation of cell walls, a preferential formation of structures with specific thickness was evidenced. The results obtained with the developed method allowed objective analysis of patterns of microfibril aggregation and evidenced a trend of doubling/halving lamellar structures, during cell wall formation/degradation in materials from different origin and which have undergone different treatments. PMID:20532796

  13. Recognition and degradation of plant cell wall polysaccharides by two human gut symbionts.

    OpenAIRE

    Martens, Eric C.; Lowe, Elisabeth C.; Herbert Chiang; Nicholas A Pudlo; Meng Wu; McNulty, Nathan P.; D Wade Abbott; Bernard Henrissat; Gilbert, Harry J.; Bolam, David N.; Jeffrey I Gordon

    2011-01-01

    Symbiotic bacteria inhabiting the human gut have evolved under intense pressure to utilize complex carbohydrates, primarily plant cell wall glycans in our diets. These polysaccharides are not digested by human enzymes, but are processed to absorbable short chain fatty acids by gut bacteria. The Bacteroidetes, one of two dominant bacterial phyla in the adult gut, possess broad glycan-degrading abilities. These species use a series of membrane protein complexes, termed Sus-like systems, for cat...

  14. Recognition and degradation of plant cell wall polysaccharides by two human gut symbionts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric C Martens

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Symbiotic bacteria inhabiting the human gut have evolved under intense pressure to utilize complex carbohydrates, primarily plant cell wall glycans in our diets. These polysaccharides are not digested by human enzymes, but are processed to absorbable short chain fatty acids by gut bacteria. The Bacteroidetes, one of two dominant bacterial phyla in the adult gut, possess broad glycan-degrading abilities. These species use a series of membrane protein complexes, termed Sus-like systems, for catabolism of many complex carbohydrates. However, the role of these systems in degrading the chemically diverse repertoire of plant cell wall glycans remains unknown. Here we show that two closely related human gut Bacteroides, B. thetaiotaomicron and B. ovatus, are capable of utilizing nearly all of the major plant and host glycans, including rhamnogalacturonan II, a highly complex polymer thought to be recalcitrant to microbial degradation. Transcriptional profiling and gene inactivation experiments revealed the identity and specificity of the polysaccharide utilization loci (PULs that encode individual Sus-like systems that target various plant polysaccharides. Comparative genomic analysis indicated that B. ovatus possesses several unique PULs that enable degradation of hemicellulosic polysaccharides, a phenotype absent from B. thetaiotaomicron. In contrast, the B. thetaiotaomicron genome has been shaped by increased numbers of PULs involved in metabolism of host mucin O-glycans, a phenotype that is undetectable in B. ovatus. Binding studies of the purified sensor domains of PUL-associated hybrid two-component systems in conjunction with transcriptional analyses demonstrate that complex oligosaccharides provide the regulatory cues that induce PUL activation and that each PUL is highly specific for a defined cell wall polymer. These results provide a view of how these species have diverged into different carbohydrate niches by evolving genes that target

  15. Role of cell wall degrading enzymes in the interaction of poplar and Melampsora larici-populina Kleb.

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chengming TIAN; Peng ZHAO; Zhimin CAO

    2009-01-01

    The activity of cell wall-degrading enzymes,produced in poplar cultivars infected Melampsora larici-populina Kleb., was studied. The results show that PMG,PMTE, Cx and fl-glucosidase played roles during the infection. After inoculation, the activity of PMG in both susceptible and resistant cultivars had two peak values in 2 dpi and 5 dpi. The activities of PMTE and β-glucosidase had a peak value in 3 dpi, and Cx in 2 dpi. Among these cell wall-degrading enzymes, the activities of PMG and PMTE were higher and the activities of Cx and β-glucosidase were relatively lower. The activities of these cell wall-degrading enzymes were significantly higher in susceptible cultivars than those in resistant cultivars. All these demonstrated that these cell wall-degrading enzymes played certain roles in the infection ofM. larici-populina.

  16. Cell Wall

    OpenAIRE

    Jamet, Elisabeth; Canut, Hervé; Boudart, Georges; Albenne, Cécile; Pont-Lezica, Rafael F

    2008-01-01

    This chapter covers our present knowledge of cell wall proteomics highlighting the distinctive features of cell walls and cell wall proteins in relation to problems encountered for protein extraction, separation and identification. It provides clues to design strategies for efficient cell wall proteomic studies. It gives an overview of the kinds of proteins that have yet been identified: the expected proteins vs the identified proteins. Finally, the new vision of the cell wall proteome, and t...

  17. Effect of calcium on cell-wall degrading enzymes of Botrytis cinerea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasanuma, Izumi; Suzuki, Takuya

    2016-09-01

    Effective anti-Botrytis strategies leading to reduce pesticides on strawberries are examined to provide the protection that is harmless to humans, higher animals and plants. Calcium treatments significantly inhibited the spore germination and mycelial growth of B. cinerea. The intracellular polygalacturonase and CMCase showed low activities in B. cinerea cultivated by medium containing calcium. On the other hand, calcium-stimulated β-glucosidases production occurred. Our findings suggest that the calcium treatments keep CMCase activity low and cause low activities of cell-wall degrading enzymes of B. cinerea in the late stage of growth. PMID:26998660

  18. Divergent selection for ester-linked diferulates in maize pith stalk tissues. Effects on cell wall composition and degradability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barros-Rios, Jaime; Malvar, Rosa A; Jung, Hans-Joachim G; Bunzel, Mirko; Santiago, Rogelio

    2012-11-01

    Cross-linking of grass cell wall components through diferulates (DFAs) has a marked impact on cell wall properties. However, results of genetic selection for DFA concentration have not been reported for any grass species. We report here the results of direct selection for ester-linked DFA concentration in maize stalk pith tissues and the associated changes in cell wall composition and biodegradability. After two cycles of divergent selection, maize populations selected for higher total DFA (DFAT) content (CHs) had 16% higher DFAT concentrations than populations selected for lower DFAT content (CLs). These significant DFA concentration gains suggest that DFA deposition in maize pith parenchyma cell walls is a highly heritable trait that is genetically regulated and can be modified trough conventional breeding. Maize populations selected for higher DFAT had 13% less glucose and 10% lower total cell wall concentration than CLs, suggesting that increased cross-linking of feruloylated arabinoxylans results in repacking of the matrix and possibly in thinner and firmer cell walls. Divergent selection affected esterified DFAT and monomeric ferulate ether cross link concentrations differently, supporting the hypothesis that the biosynthesis of these cell wall components are separately regulated. As expected, a more higher DFA ester cross-coupled arabinoxylan network had an effect on rumen cell wall degradability (CLs showed 12% higher 24-h total polysaccharide degradability than CHs). Interestingly, 8-8-coupled DFAs, previously associated with cell wall strength, were the best predictors of pith cell wall degradability (negative impact). Thus, further research on the involvement of these specific DFA regioisomers in limiting cell wall biodegradability is encouraged. PMID:22938993

  19. How endogenous plant cell-wall degradation mechanisms can help achieve higher efficiency in saccharification of biomass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavares, Eveline Q P; De Souza, Amanda P; Buckeridge, Marcos S

    2015-07-01

    Cell-wall recalcitrance to hydrolysis still represents one of the major bottlenecks for second-generation bioethanol production. This occurs despite the development of pre-treatments, the prospect of new enzymes, and the production of transgenic plants with less-recalcitrant cell walls. Recalcitrance, which is the intrinsic resistance to breakdown imposed by polymer assembly, is the result of inherent limitations in its three domains. These consist of: (i) porosity, associated with a pectin matrix impairing trafficking through the wall; (ii) the glycomic code, which refers to the fine-structural emergent complexity of cell-wall polymers that are unique to cells, tissues, and species; and (iii) cellulose crystallinity, which refers to the organization in micro- and/or macrofibrils. One way to circumvent recalcitrance could be by following cell-wall hydrolysis strategies underlying plant endogenous mechanisms that are optimized to precisely modify cell walls in planta. Thus, the cell-wall degradation that occurs during fruit ripening, abscission, storage cell-wall mobilization, and aerenchyma formation are reviewed in order to highlight how plants deal with recalcitrance and which are the routes to couple prospective enzymes and cocktail designs with cell-wall features. The manipulation of key enzyme levels in planta can help achieving biologically pre-treated walls (i.e. less recalcitrant) before plants are harvested for bioethanol production. This may be helpful in decreasing the costs associated with producing bioethanol from biomass. PMID:25922489

  20. Comparative secretome analysis suggests low plant cell wall degrading capacity in Frankia symbionts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Normand Philippe

    2008-01-01

    genomes, suggesting that plant cell wall polysaccharide degradation may not be crucial to root infection, or that this degradation varies among strains. We hypothesize that the relative lack of secreted polysaccharide-degrading enzymes in Frankia reflects a strategy used by these bacteria to avoid eliciting host defense responses. The esterases, lipases, and proteases found in the core Frankia secretome might facilitate hyphal penetration through the cell wall, release carbon sources, or modify chemical signals. The core secretome also includes extracellular solute-binding proteins and Frankia-specific hypothetical proteins that may enable the actinorhizal symbiosis.

  1. Rhizobium sp. Degradation of Legume Root Hair Cell Wall at the Site of Infection Thread Origin

    OpenAIRE

    Ridge, Robert W.; Rolfe, Barry G.

    1985-01-01

    Using a new microinoculation technique, we demonstrated that penetration of Rhizobium sp. into the host root hair cell occurs at 20 to 22 h after inoculation. It did this by dissolving the cell wall maxtrix, leaving a layer of depolymerized wall microfibrils. Colony growth pressure “stretched” the weakened wall, forming a bulge into an interfacial zone between the wall and plasmalemma. At the same time vesicular bodies, similar to plasmalemmasomes, accumulated at the penetration site in a man...

  2. Heterologous Expression of Plant Cell Wall Degrading Enzymes for Effective Production of Cellulosic Biofuels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang-Kyu Jung

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A major technical challenge in the cost-effective production of cellulosic biofuel is the need to lower the cost of plant cell wall degrading enzymes (PCDE, which is required for the production of sugars from biomass. Several competitive, low-cost technologies have been developed to produce PCDE in different host organisms such as Escherichia coli, Zymomonas mobilis, and plant. Selection of an ideal host organism is very important, because each host organism has its own unique features. Synthetic biology-aided tools enable heterologous expression of PCDE in recombinant E. coli or Z. mobilis and allow successful consolidated bioprocessing (CBP in these microorganisms. In-planta expression provides an opportunity to simplify the process of enzyme production and plant biomass processing and leads to self-deconstruction of plant cell walls. Although the future of currently available technologies is difficult to predict, a complete and viable platform will most likely be available through the integration of the existing approaches with the development of breakthrough technologies.

  3. Enhancement of Palm Oil Extraction Using Cell Wall Degrading Enzyme Formulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this recent work, application of aqueous enzymatic process to enhance recovery of palm oil was studied. Experiments were carried out to investigate the structural carbohydrate composition of oil palm mesocarp (Elaeis guineensis) and to analyze the effect of different combination of enzymes on the palm oil recovery and degree of digestibility and the respective correlation. The optimum combination of enzymes comprising of Cellic CTec2 (X1), Cellic HTec2 (X2) and Pectinex Ultra SP-L (X3) for Aqueous Enzymatic Oil Extraction Process (AEOEP), were determined using Simplex Lattice mixture design under fixed parameters. Maximum oil recovery of 88 % was achieved with ratio of enzymes at 0.46: 0.34: 0.2 (X1:X2:X3), at enzyme loading of 30 mg protein/ 10 g substrate, substrate loading of 50 % w/v, pH 4.8, and 2 hours of incubation at 50 degree Celsius. The conversion of reducing sugar at corresponding condition was measured to evaluate the effectiveness of enzymes in degrading fruit cell wall releasing trapped oil. Moreover, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was utilized to indicate the increase in cell wall disintegration leading to higher release of oil with enzymatic treatment. (author)

  4. Plant Wall Degradative Compounds and Systems

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The present invention relates to cell wall degradative systems, in particular to systems containing enzymes that bind to and/or depolymerize cellulose. These...

  5. A 3-D Model of a Perennial Ryegrass Primary Cell Wall and Its Enzymatic Degradation

    OpenAIRE

    Indrakumar Vetharaniam; Kelly, William J.; Graeme T. Attwood; Harris, Philip J.

    2014-01-01

    We have developed a novel 3-D, agent-based model of cell-wall digestion to improve our understanding of ruminal cell-wall digestion. It offers a capability to study cell walls and their enzymatic modification, by providing a representation of cellulose microfibrils and non-cellulosic polysaccharides and by simulating their spatial and catalytic interactions with enzymes. One can vary cell-wall composition and the types and numbers of enzyme molecules, allowing the model to be applied to a ran...

  6. Genomic characterization of plant cell wall degrading enzymes and in silico analysis of xylanses and polygalacturonases of Fusarium virguliforme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plant cell wall degrading enzymes (PCWDEs) are important effectors for plant pathogens to invade plants. In this study, the composition of PCWDEs in Fusarium virguliforme that were grown for 5-days and 20 days in liquid medium was determined by RNA-Seq. Differential expression analysis showed more P...

  7. Coniferyl Ferulate Incorporation into Lignin Enhances the Alkaline Delignification and Enzymatic Degradation of Cell Walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Incorporating ester interunit linkages into lignin could facilitate fiber delignification and utilization. In model studies with maize cell walls, we examined how partial substitution of coniferyl alcohol (a normal monolignol) with coniferyl ferulate (an ester conjugate from lignan biosynthesis) alt...

  8. PLASMALEMMA PATCH CLAMP EXPERIMENTS IN PLANT-ROOT CELLS - PROCEDURE FOR FAST ISOLATION OF PROTOPLASTS WITH MINIMAL EXPOSURE TO CELL-WALL DEGRADING ENZYMES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VOGELZANG, SA; PRINS, HBA

    1992-01-01

    A convenient and rapid isolation procedure for root cell protoplasts suitable for patch clamp experiments. was developed for root cells of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum and Plantago species, grown on hydroculture. The procedure is based on a minimal exposure of cells to cell wall degrading enzyme

  9. Cell wall degrading isoenzyme profiles of Trichoderma biocontrol strains show correlation with rDNA species

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sanz L; Hermosa M R; González F J; Monte E

    2004-01-01

    @@ Species of the fungus Trichoderma, a genus of Hyphomycetes, are ubiquitous in the environment, but especially in soil. They have been used in a wide range of commercial applications including the production of hydrolases and in the biological control of plant diseases. A fundamental part of the Trichoderma antifungal system consists of a series of genes coding for a surprising variety of extracellular cell wall degrading enzymes (CWDE).Characterisation and identification of strains at the species level is the first step in utilizing the full potential of fungi in specific applications. One aim when isolating Trichoderma strains is to identify those which can be used in new agricultural and industrial applications. In the past it was not uncommon that biocontrol strains were defined as T. harzianum Rifai, due to the limited classification system of the genus Trichoderma. In recent years, several PCR-based molecular techniques have been used to detect and discriminate among microorganisms. Sequence analysis of the ITS regions of the ribosomal DNA and gene fragments as those corresponding to tef1 gene have been helpful in the neotypification, description and characterization of species in the genus Trichoderna.Another useful method for the identification of Trichoderma strains is the randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) technique.Isozyme polymorphisms evaluation of five putative extracellular lytic enzymes loci (β-1,3-glucanase, β-1,6-glucanase, cellulase, chitinase and protease antivities) were carried out using representative strains of defined molecular groups. CWDE groupings obtained from biocontrol strains are discussed in relation to their phylogenetic location and antifungal activities.Compiling morphological, biochemical and sequence information data into a common database would provide a useful resource that could be used to accurately name new haplotypes identified in the future and correctly place them within the genus Trichoderma.

  10. Extractability and digestibility of plant cell wall polysaccharides during hydrothermal and enzymatic degradation of wheat straw (Triticum aestivum L.)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Mads A.T.; Ahl, Louise I.; Pedersen, Henriette L.;

    2014-01-01

    and by comprehensive microarray polymer profiling (CoMPP). This way, the effects of each degradation step to the intermolecular organisation of specific polysaccharides in the cell walls were elucidated. After pretreatment, the degree of polymerisation (DP) of released xylo-oligosaccharides in both samples was up...... to about 20, but mostly around 3-8, and notably more acetylated in stems. Arabinoxylan (AX) and mixed-linkage glucan (MLG) became water-extractable while xylan, xyloglucan (XG), mannan and glucan remained only alkali-extractable. All polysaccharides became partly digestible after pretreatment however......, regardless their extractability in water or only alkali. Based on the results, AX and MLG appear to be loosely bound in the cell wall matrix while the other polysaccharides are bound more tightly and shielded from enzymatic attack by AX and MLG until pretreatment. The gradual solubilisation and digestion...

  11. Response Mechanisms of Bacterial Degraders to Environmental Contaminants on the Level of Cell Walls and Cytoplasmic Membrane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slavomíra Murínová

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial strains living in the environment must cope with the toxic compounds originating from humans production. Surface bacterial structures, cell wall and cytoplasmic membrane, surround each bacterial cell and create selective barriers between the cell interior and the outside world. They are a first site of contact between the cell and toxic compounds. Organic pollutants are able to penetrate into cytoplasmic membrane and affect membrane physiological functions. Bacteria had to evolve adaptation mechanisms to counteract the damage originated from toxic contaminants and to prevent their accumulation in cell. This review deals with various adaptation mechanisms of bacterial cell concerning primarily the changes in cytoplasmic membrane and cell wall. Cell adaptation maintains the membrane fluidity status and ratio between bilayer/nonbilayer phospholipids as well as the efflux of toxic compounds, protein repair mechanisms, and degradation of contaminants. Low energy consumption of cell adaptation is required to provide other physiological functions. Bacteria able to survive in toxic environment could help us to clean contaminated areas when they are used in bioremediation technologies.

  12. Discovery of LPMO activity on hemicelluloses shows the importance of oxidative processes in plant cell wall degradation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agger, Jane W.; Isaksen, Trine; Várnai, Anikó;

    2014-01-01

    of LPMOs, and considering the complexity and copolymeric nature of the plant cell wall, it has been speculated that some LPMOs may act on other substrates, in particular the hemicelluloses that tether to cellulose microfibrils. We demonstrate that an LPMO from Neurospora crassa, NcLPMO9C, indeed degrades...... walls. Products generated by NcLPMO9C were analyzed using high performance anion exchange chromatography and multidimensional mass spectrometry. We show that NcLPMO9C generates oxidized products from a variety of substrates and that its product profile differs from those of hydrolytic enzymes acting...... on the same substrates. The enzyme particularly acts on the glucose backbone of xyloglucan, accepting various substitutions (xylose, galactose) in almost all positions. Because the attachment of xyloglucan to cellulose hampers depolymerization of the latter, it is possible that the beneficial effect...

  13. Combining proteomics and transcriptome sequencing to identify active plant-cell-wall-degrading enzymes in a leaf beetle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirsch Roy

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The primary plant cell wall is a complex mixture of polysaccharides and proteins encasing living plant cells. Among these polysaccharides, cellulose is the most abundant and useful biopolymer present on earth. These polysaccharides also represent a rich source of energy for organisms which have evolved the ability to degrade them. A growing body of evidence suggests that phytophagous beetles, mainly species from the superfamilies Chrysomeloidea and Curculionoidea, possess endogenous genes encoding complex and diverse families of so-called plant cell wall degrading enzymes (PCWDEs. The presence of these genes in phytophagous beetles may have been a key element in their success as herbivores. Here, we combined a proteomics approach and transcriptome sequencing to identify PCWDEs present in larval gut contents of the mustard leaf beetle, Phaedon cochleariae. Results Using a two-dimensional proteomics approach, we recovered 11 protein bands, isolated using activity assays targeting cellulose-, pectin- and xylan-degrading enzymes. After mass spectrometry analyses, a total of 13 proteins putatively responsible for degrading plant cell wall polysaccharides were identified; these proteins belong to three glycoside hydrolase (GH families: GH11 (xylanases, GH28 (polygalacturonases or pectinases, and GH45 (β-1,4-glucanases or cellulases. Additionally, highly stable and proteolysis-resistant host plant-derived proteins from various pathogenesis-related protein (PRs families as well as polygalacturonase-inhibiting proteins (PGIPs were also identified from the gut contents proteome. In parallel, transcriptome sequencing revealed the presence of at least 19 putative PCWDE transcripts encoded by the P. cochleariae genome. All of these were specifically expressed in the insect gut rather than the rest of the body, and in adults as well as larvae. The discrepancy observed in the number of putative PCWDEs between transcriptome and proteome

  14. Functional and modular analyses of diverse endoglucanases from Ruminococcus albus 8, a specialist plant cell wall degrading bacterium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iakiviak, Michael; Devendran, Saravanan; Skorupski, Anna; Moon, Young Hwan; Mackie, Roderick I; Cann, Isaac

    2016-01-01

    Ruminococcus albus 8 is a specialist plant cell wall degrading ruminal bacterium capable of utilizing hemicellulose and cellulose. Cellulose degradation requires a suite of enzymes including endoglucanases, exoglucanases, and β-glucosidases. The enzymes employed by R. albus 8 in degrading cellulose are yet to be completely elucidated. Through bioinformatic analysis of a draft genome sequence of R. albus 8, seventeen putatively cellulolytic genes were identified. The genes were heterologously expressed in E. coli, and purified to near homogeneity. On biochemical analysis with cellulosic substrates, seven of the gene products (Ra0185, Ra0259, Ra0325, Ra0903, Ra1831, Ra2461, and Ra2535) were identified as endoglucanases, releasing predominantly cellobiose and cellotriose. Each of the R. albus 8 endoglucanases, except for Ra0259 and Ra0325, bound to the model crystalline cellulose Avicel, confirming functional carbohydrate binding modules (CBMs). The polypeptides for Ra1831 and Ra2535 were found to contain distantly related homologs of CBM65. Mutational analysis of residues within the CBM65 of Ra1831 identified key residues required for binding. Phylogenetic analysis of the endoglucanases revealed three distinct subfamilies of glycoside hydrolase family 5 (GH5). Our results demonstrate that this fibrolytic bacterium uses diverse GH5 catalytic domains appended with different CBMs, including novel forms of CBM65, to degrade cellulose. PMID:27439730

  15. Crystal and cryoEM structural studies of a cell wall degrading enzyme in the bacteriophage [psi]29 tail

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiang, Ye; Morais, Marc C.; Cohen, Daniel N.; Bowman, Valorie D.; Anderson, Dwight L.; Rossmann, Michael G. (Purdue); (UMM)

    2009-08-28

    The small bacteriophage {phi}29 must penetrate the {approx}250-{angstrom} thick external peptidoglycan cell wall and cell membrane of the Gram-positive Bacillus subtilis, before ejecting its dsDNA genome through its tail into the bacterial cytoplasm. The tail of bacteriophage {phi}29 is noncontractile and {approx}380 {angstrom} long. A 1.8-{angstrom} resolution crystal structure of gene product 13 (gp13) shows that this tail protein has spatially well separated N- and C-terminal domains, whose structures resemble lysozyme-like enzymes and metallo-endopeptidases, respectively. CryoEM reconstructions of the WT bacteriophage and mutant bacteriophages missing some or most of gp13 shows that this enzyme is located at the distal end of the {phi}29 tail knob. This finding suggests that gp13 functions as a tail-associated, peptidoglycan-degrading enzyme able to cleave both the polysaccharide backbone and peptide cross-links of the peptidoglycan cell wall. Comparisons of the gp13{sup -} mutants with the {phi}29 mature and emptied phage structures suggest the sequence of events that occur during the penetration of the tail through the peptidoglycan layer.

  16. Leaf-cutting ant fungi produce cell wall degrading pectinase complexes reminiscent of phytopathogenic fungi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boomsma Jacobus J

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Leaf-cutting (attine ants use their own fecal material to manure fungus gardens, which consist of leaf material overgrown by hyphal threads of the basidiomycete fungus Leucocoprinus gongylophorus that lives in symbiosis with the ants. Previous studies have suggested that the fecal droplets contain proteins that are produced by the fungal symbiont to pass unharmed through the digestive system of the ants, so they can enhance new fungus garden growth. Results We tested this hypothesis by using proteomics methods to determine the gene sequences of fecal proteins in Acromyrmex echinatior leaf-cutting ants. Seven (21% of the 33 identified proteins were pectinolytic enzymes that originated from the fungal symbiont and which were still active in the fecal droplets produced by the ants. We show that these enzymes are found in the fecal material only when the ants had access to fungus garden food, and we used quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis to show that the expression of six of these enzyme genes was substantially upregulated in the fungal gongylidia. These unique structures serve as food for the ants and are produced only by the evolutionarily advanced garden symbionts of higher attine ants, but not by the fungi reared by the basal lineages of this ant clade. Conclusions Pectinolytic enzymes produced in the gongylidia of the fungal symbiont are ingested but not digested by Acromyrmex leaf-cutting ants so that they end up in the fecal fluid and become mixed with new garden substrate. Substantial quantities of pectinolytic enzymes are typically found in pathogenic fungi that attack live plant tissue, where they are known to breach the cell walls to allow the fungal mycelium access to the cell contents. As the leaf-cutting ant symbionts are derived from fungal clades that decompose dead plant material, our results suggest that their pectinolytic enzymes represent secondarily evolved adaptations that are convergent to

  17. The snf1 gene of Ustilago maydis acts as a dual regulator of cell wall degrading enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadal, Marina; Garcia-Pedrajas, Maria D; Gold, Scott E

    2010-12-01

    Many fungal plant pathogens are known to produce extracellular enzymes that degrade cell wall elements required for host penetration and infection. Due to gene redundancy, single gene deletions generally do not address the importance of these enzymes in pathogenicity. Cell wall degrading enzymes (CWDEs) in fungi are often subject to carbon catabolite repression at the transcriptional level such that, when glucose is available, CWDE-encoding genes, along with many other genes, are repressed. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, one of the main players controlling this process is SNF1, which encodes a protein kinase. In this yeast, Snf1p is required to release glucose repression when this sugar is depleted from the growth medium. We have employed a reverse genetic approach to explore the role of the SNF1 ortholog as a potential regulator of CWDE gene expression in Ustilago maydis. We identified U. maydis snf1 and deleted it from the fungal genome. Consistent with our hypothesis, the relative expression of an endoglucanase and a pectinase was higher in the wild type than in the Δsnf1 mutant strain when glucose was depleted from the growth medium. However, when cells were grown in derepressive conditions, the relative expression of two xylanase genes was unexpectedly higher in the Δsnf1 strain than in the wild type, indicating that, in this case, snf1 negatively regulated the expression of these genes. Additionally, we found that, contrary to several other fungal species, U. maydis Snf1 was not required for utilization of alternative carbon sources. Also, unlike in ascomycete plant pathogens, deletion of snf1 did not profoundly affect virulence in U. maydis.

  18. 植物病原真菌细胞壁降解酶的研究进展%Research Progress of Fungal Cell Wall-degrading Enzyme

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    董章勇; 王振中

    2012-01-01

    The type of plant pathogenic fungal cell wall-degrading enzymes was overviewed. The role of cell wall-degrading enzymes in the plant pathogenic fungal infection was clarified. Moreover factors affecting the production of cell wall-degrading enzymes as well as the synergistic effects among the enzymes were summed up.%综述了植物病原真菌细胞壁降解酶的类型,阐明了细胞壁降解酶在植物病原真菌侵染中的作用,归纳了影响细胞壁降解酶产生的因素以及细胞壁降解酶之间的协同作用.

  19. Mycoparasitism studies of Trichoderma harzianum against Sclerotinia sclerotiorum: evaluation of antagonism and expression of cell wall-degrading enzymes genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troian, Rogério Fraga; Steindorff, Andrei Stecca; Ramada, Marcelo Henrique Soller; Arruda, Walquiria; Ulhoa, Cirano José

    2014-10-01

    Trichoderma spp. are known for their biocontrol activity against several plant pathogens. A specific isolate of Trichoderma harzianum, 303/02, has the potential to inhibit the growth of Sclerotinia sclerotiorum, an important agent involved in several crop diseases. In this study, the interaction between T. harzianum 303/02 and mycelia, sclerotia and apothecia of S. sclerotiorum was studied by scanning electron microscopy. RT-qPCR was used to examine the expression of 11 genes potentially involved in biocontrol. T. harzianum 303/02 parasitizes S. sclerotiorum by forming branches that coil around the hyphae. The fungus multiplied abundantly at the sclerotia and apothecia surface, forming a dense mycelium that penetrated the inner surface of these structures. The levels of gene expression varied according to the type of structure with which T. harzianum was interacting. The data also showed the presence of synergistic action between the cell-wall degrading enzymes. PMID:24966041

  20. Degradation of lucerne stem cell walls by five rumen bacterial species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jung, H.G.; Engels, F.M.; Weimer, P.J.

    2004-01-01

    The rumen bacterial strains Butyrivibrio fibrisolvens H17c, Fibrobacter succinogenes S85, Lachnospira multiparus 40, Ruminococcus albus 7 and R. flavefaciens FD-1 were compared individually and as a five-species mixture with a rumen inoculum for their ability to degrade lucerne (Medicago sativa L.)

  1. Diversity and strain specificity of plant cell wall degrading enzymes revealed by the draft genome of Ruminococcus flavefaciens FD-1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margret E Berg Miller

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Ruminococcus flavefaciens is a predominant cellulolytic rumen bacterium, which forms a multi-enzyme cellulosome complex that could play an integral role in the ability of this bacterium to degrade plant cell wall polysaccharides. Identifying the major enzyme types involved in plant cell wall degradation is essential for gaining a better understanding of the cellulolytic capabilities of this organism as well as highlighting potential enzymes for application in improvement of livestock nutrition and for conversion of cellulosic biomass to liquid fuels. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The R. flavefaciens FD-1 genome was sequenced to 29x-coverage, based on pulsed-field gel electrophoresis estimates (4.4 Mb, and assembled into 119 contigs providing 4,576,399 bp of unique sequence. As much as 87.1% of the genome encodes ORFs, tRNA, rRNAs, or repeats. The GC content was calculated at 45%. A total of 4,339 ORFs was detected with an average gene length of 918 bp. The cellulosome model for R. flavefaciens was further refined by sequence analysis, with at least 225 dockerin-containing ORFs, including previously characterized cohesin-containing scaffoldin molecules. These dockerin-containing ORFs encode a variety of catalytic modules including glycoside hydrolases (GHs, polysaccharide lyases, and carbohydrate esterases. Additionally, 56 ORFs encode proteins that contain carbohydrate-binding modules (CBMs. Functional microarray analysis of the genome revealed that 56 of the cellulosome-associated ORFs were up-regulated, 14 were down-regulated, 135 were unaffected, when R. flavefaciens FD-1 was grown on cellulose versus cellobiose. Three multi-modular xylanases (ORF01222, ORF03896, and ORF01315 exhibited the highest levels of up-regulation. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The genomic evidence indicates that R. flavefaciens FD-1 has the largest known number of fiber-degrading enzymes likely to be arranged in a cellulosome architecture. Functional

  2. Degradation of wheat straw cell wall by white rot fungi Phanerochaete chrysosporium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Jijiao

    The main aim of this dissertation research was to understand the natural microbial degradation process of lignocellulosic materials in order to develop a new, green and more effective pretreatment technology for bio-fuel production. The biodegradation of wheat straw by white rot fungi Phanerochaete chrysosporium was investigated. The addition of nutrients significantly improved the performance of P.chrysosporium on wheat straw degradation. The proteomic analysis indicated that this fungus produced various pepetides related to cellulose and lignin degradation while grown on the biomass. The structural analysis of lignin further showed that P.chrysosporium preferentially degraded hydroxycinnamtes in order to access cellulose. In details, the effects of carbon resource and metabolic pathway regulating compounds on manganeses peroxidase (MnP) were studied. The results indicated that MnP activity of 4.7 +/- 0.31 U mL-1 was obtained using mannose as a carbon source. The enzyme productivity further reached 7.36 +/- 0.05 U mL-1 and 8.77 +/- 0.23 U mL -1 when the mannose medium was supplemented with cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) respectively, revealing highest MnP productivity obtained by optimizing the carbon sources and supplementation with small molecules. In addition, the effects of nutrient additives for improving biological pretreatment of lignocellulosic biomass were studied. The pretreatment of wheat straw supplemented with inorganic salts (salts group) and tween 80 was examined. The extra nutrient significantly improved the ligninase expression leading to improve digestibility of lignocellulosic biomass. Among the solid state fermentation groups, salts group resulted in a substantial degradation of wheat straw within one week, along with the highest lignin loss (25 %) and ˜ 250% higher efficiency for the total sugar release through enzymatic hydrolysis. The results were correlated with pyrolysis GC-MS (Py

  3. Chitin hydrolysis assisted by cell wall degrading enzymes immobilized of Thichoderma asperellum on totally cinnamoylated D-sorbitol beads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, cell wall degrading enzymes produced by Thrichoderma asperellum (TCWDE) were immobilized on totally cinnamoylated D-sorbitol (TCNSO) beads and used for chitin hydrolysis. In order to optimize immobilization efficiency, the reaction time was varied from 2 to 12 h and reactions were conducted in the presence or absence of Na2SO4. Immobilized enzymes were analysed concerning to thermal and operational stability. Immobilization in presence of Na2SO4 was 54% more efficient than immobilization in absence of salt. After optimization, 32% of the total enzyme offered was immobilized, with 100% of bounding efficiency, measured as the relation between protein and enzyme immobilized. Free and TCNSO–TCWDE presented very similar kinetics with maximum hydrolysis reached at 90 min of reaction. Thermal stability of both free and TCNSO–TCWDE was similar, with losses in activity after 55 °C. Moreover, free and TCNSO–TCWDE retained 100% activity after 3 h incubation at 55 °C. TCNSO–TCWDE were used in a bath-wise reactor during 14 cycles, producing 1825 μg of N-acetylglucosamine (NAG) maintaining 83% of initial activity. - Highlights: • TCWDE immobilized on TCNSO, a support with highly hydrophobic character • New immobilization strategy for immobilization on a hydrophobic support • TCNSO–TCWDE were retained during washes and during incubation at 55 °C for 3 h

  4. Enhancing rice resistance to fungal pathogens by transformation with cell wall degrading enzyme genes from Trichoderma atroviride

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘梅; 孙宗修; 朱洁; 徐同; HARMANGaryE; LORITOMatteo

    2004-01-01

    Three genes encoding for fungal cell wall degrading enzymes (CWDEs), ech42, nag70 and gluc78 from the biocontrol fungus Trichoderma atroviride were inserted into the binary vector pCAMBIA1305.2 singly and in all possible combinations and transformed to rice plants. More than 1800 independently regenerated plantlets in seven different populations (for each of the three genes and each of the four gene combinations) were obtained. The ech42 gene encoding for an endochitinase increased resistance to sheath blight caused by Rhizoctonia solani, while the exochitinase-encoding gene, nag70, had lesser effect. The expression level of endochitinase but exochitinase was correlated with disease resistance. Nevertheless, exochitinase enhanced the effect of endochitinase on disease resistance when the two genes co-expressed in transgenics. Resistance to Magnaporthe grisea was found in all kinds of regenerated plants including that with single gluc78. A few lines expressing either ech42 or nag70 gene were immune to the disease. Transgenic plants are being tested to further evaluate disease resistance at field level. This is the first report of multiple of expression of genes encoding CWDEs from Trichoderma atroviride that result in resistance to blast and sheath blight in rice.

  5. Chitin hydrolysis assisted by cell wall degrading enzymes immobilized of Thichoderma asperellum on totally cinnamoylated D-sorbitol beads

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandes, Kátia F., E-mail: katia@icb.ufg.br [Departamento de Bioquímica e Biologia Molecular, Instituo de Ciências Biológicas, Universidade Federal de Goiás, Cx. Postal 131, 74001-970 Goiânia, GO (Brazil); Grupo de Química de Carbohidratos y Biotecnología de Alimentos (QCBA), Departamento de Química Orgánica, Facultad de Química, Universidad de Murcia, E-30100 Espinardo, Murcia (Spain); Cortijo-Triviño, David [Grupo de Química de Carbohidratos y Biotecnología de Alimentos (QCBA), Departamento de Química Orgánica, Facultad de Química, Universidad de Murcia, E-30100 Espinardo, Murcia (Spain); Batista, Karla A.; Ulhoa, Cirano J. [Departamento de Bioquímica e Biologia Molecular, Instituo de Ciências Biológicas, Universidade Federal de Goiás, Cx. Postal 131, 74001-970 Goiânia, GO (Brazil); García-Ruiz, Pedro A. [Grupo de Química de Carbohidratos y Biotecnología de Alimentos (QCBA), Departamento de Química Orgánica, Facultad de Química, Universidad de Murcia, E-30100 Espinardo, Murcia (Spain)

    2013-07-01

    In this study, cell wall degrading enzymes produced by Thrichoderma asperellum (TCWDE) were immobilized on totally cinnamoylated D-sorbitol (TCNSO) beads and used for chitin hydrolysis. In order to optimize immobilization efficiency, the reaction time was varied from 2 to 12 h and reactions were conducted in the presence or absence of Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}. Immobilized enzymes were analysed concerning to thermal and operational stability. Immobilization in presence of Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} was 54% more efficient than immobilization in absence of salt. After optimization, 32% of the total enzyme offered was immobilized, with 100% of bounding efficiency, measured as the relation between protein and enzyme immobilized. Free and TCNSO–TCWDE presented very similar kinetics with maximum hydrolysis reached at 90 min of reaction. Thermal stability of both free and TCNSO–TCWDE was similar, with losses in activity after 55 °C. Moreover, free and TCNSO–TCWDE retained 100% activity after 3 h incubation at 55 °C. TCNSO–TCWDE were used in a bath-wise reactor during 14 cycles, producing 1825 μg of N-acetylglucosamine (NAG) maintaining 83% of initial activity. - Highlights: • TCWDE immobilized on TCNSO, a support with highly hydrophobic character • New immobilization strategy for immobilization on a hydrophobic support • TCNSO–TCWDE were retained during washes and during incubation at 55 °C for 3 h.

  6. Chitin hydrolysis assisted by cell wall degrading enzymes immobilized of Thichoderma asperellum on totally cinnamoylated D-sorbitol beads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Kátia F; Cortijo-Triviño, David; Batista, Karla A; Ulhoa, Cirano J; García-Ruiz, Pedro A

    2013-07-01

    In this study, cell wall degrading enzymes produced by Thrichoderma asperellum (TCWDE) were immobilized on totally cinnamoylated D-sorbitol (TCNSO) beads and used for chitin hydrolysis. In order to optimize immobilization efficiency, the reaction time was varied from 2 to 12 h and reactions were conducted in the presence or absence of Na2SO4. Immobilized enzymes were analysed concerning to thermal and operational stability. Immobilization in presence of Na2SO4 was 54% more efficient than immobilization in absence of salt. After optimization, 32% of the total enzyme offered was immobilized, with 100% of bounding efficiency, measured as the relation between protein and enzyme immobilized. Free and TCNSO-TCWDE presented very similar kinetics with maximum hydrolysis reached at 90 min of reaction. Thermal stability of both free and TCNSO-TCWDE was similar, with losses in activity after 55 °C. Moreover, free and TCNSO-TCWDE retained 100% activity after 3h incubation at 55 °C. TCNSO-TCWDE were used in a bath-wise reactor during 14 cycles, producing 1825 μg of N-acetylglucosamine (NAG) maintaining 83% of initial activity.

  7. Selection of a Streptomyces strain able to produce cell wall degrading enzymes and active against Sclerotinia sclerotiorum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fróes, Adriana; Macrae, Andrew; Rosa, Juliana; Franco, Marcella; Souza, Rodrigo; Soares, Rosângela; Coelho, Rosalie

    2012-10-01

    Control of plant pathogen Sclerotinia sclerotiorum is an ongoing challenge because of its wide host range and the persistence of its sclerotia in soil. Fungicides are the most commonly used method to control this fungus but these can have ecotoxicity impacts. Chitinolytic Streptomyces strains isolated from Brazilian tropical soils were capable of inhibiting S. sclerotiorum growth in vitro, offering new possibilities for integrated pest management and biocontrol, with a new approach to dealing with an old problem. Strain Streptomyces sp. 80 was capable of irreversibly inhibiting fungal growth. Compared to other strains, its crude enzymes had the highest chitinolytic levels when measured at 25°C and strongly inhibited sclerotia from S. sclerotiorum. It produced four hydrolytic enzymes involved in fungal cell wall degradation when cultured in presence of the fungal mycelium. The best production, obtained after three days, was 0.75 U/ml for exochitinase, 0.9 U/ml for endochitinase, 0.16 U/ml for glucanase, and 1.78 U/ml for peptidase. Zymogram analysis confirmed two hydrolytic bands of chitinolytic activity with apparent molecular masses of 45.8 and 206.8 kDa. One glucanase activity with an apparent molecular mass of 55 kDa was also recorded, as well as seven bands of peptidase activity with apparent molecular masses ranging from 15.5 to 108.4 kDa. Differential interference contrast microscopy also showed alterations of hyphal morphology after co-culture. Streptomyces sp. 80 seems to be promising as a biocontrol agent against S. sclerotiorum, contributing to the development of new methods for controlling plant diseases and reducing the negative impact of using fungicides. PMID:23124748

  8. Production by Tobacco Transplastomic Plants of Recombinant Fungal and Bacterial Cell-Wall Degrading Enzymes to Be Used for Cellulosic Biomass Saccharification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Longoni

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Biofuels from renewable plant biomass are gaining momentum due to climate change related to atmospheric CO2 increase. However, the production cost of enzymes required for cellulosic biomass saccharification is a major limiting step in this process. Low-cost production of large amounts of recombinant enzymes by transgenic plants was proposed as an alternative to the conventional microbial based fermentation. A number of studies have shown that chloroplast-based gene expression offers several advantages over nuclear transformation due to efficient transcription and translation systems and high copy number of the transgene. In this study, we expressed in tobacco chloroplasts microbial genes encoding five cellulases and a polygalacturonase. Leaf extracts containing the recombinant enzymes showed the ability to degrade various cell-wall components under different conditions, singly and in combinations. In addition, our group also tested a previously described thermostable xylanase in combination with a cellulase and a polygalacturonase to study the cumulative effect on the depolymerization of a complex plant substrate. Our results demonstrate the feasibility of using transplastomic tobacco leaf extracts to convert cell-wall polysaccharides into reducing sugars, fulfilling a major prerequisite of large scale availability of a variety of cell-wall degrading enzymes for biofuel industry.

  9. Production by Tobacco Transplastomic Plants of Recombinant Fungal and Bacterial Cell-Wall Degrading Enzymes to Be Used for Cellulosic Biomass Saccharification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longoni, Paolo; Leelavathi, Sadhu; Doria, Enrico; Reddy, Vanga Siva; Cella, Rino

    2015-01-01

    Biofuels from renewable plant biomass are gaining momentum due to climate change related to atmospheric CO2 increase. However, the production cost of enzymes required for cellulosic biomass saccharification is a major limiting step in this process. Low-cost production of large amounts of recombinant enzymes by transgenic plants was proposed as an alternative to the conventional microbial based fermentation. A number of studies have shown that chloroplast-based gene expression offers several advantages over nuclear transformation due to efficient transcription and translation systems and high copy number of the transgene. In this study, we expressed in tobacco chloroplasts microbial genes encoding five cellulases and a polygalacturonase. Leaf extracts containing the recombinant enzymes showed the ability to degrade various cell-wall components under different conditions, singly and in combinations. In addition, our group also tested a previously described thermostable xylanase in combination with a cellulase and a polygalacturonase to study the cumulative effect on the depolymerization of a complex plant substrate. Our results demonstrate the feasibility of using transplastomic tobacco leaf extracts to convert cell-wall polysaccharides into reducing sugars, fulfilling a major prerequisite of large scale availability of a variety of cell-wall degrading enzymes for biofuel industry.

  10. Effect of combined cell wall degrading enzyme treatment on the total dissolved solids and sugars of soymilk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chijioke Maduka OSUJI

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Soymilk from different varieties of soybean was treated with combinations of cell wall hydrolyzing enzymes (glucanase, cellulose, arabanase, hemicellulase and xylanase. Treated samples and control were evaluated for Total Dissolved Solids (TDS and different sugars (glucose, raffinose, sucrose, fructose, xylose, maltose, lactose, stachyose, starch, galactose, cellulose using HPLC. Mean TDS of all enzyme-treated soymilk samples (235.8-268.3 ppm was significantly (p≤0.05 higher than the control (167.8 ppm, it also increased significantly (p≤0.05 after sterilization. Sugars present in the enzyme-hydrolyzed soymilk were significantly (p≤0.05 different from the control. Sucrose content was depleted after enzyme treatment. The change in content of glucose, xylose, fructose, maltose, raffinose, starchyose had high correlation with TDS. Possible chemical modification of sugars impaired their detection despite increases in TDS. Use of TDS for rapid monitoring of enzyme hydrolyses of soymilk cell-wall sugars is feasible.

  11. The Lamportian cell wall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keiliszewski, M.; Lamport, D. (Michigan State Univ. Plant Research Lab., East Lansing (United States))

    1991-05-01

    The Lamportian Warp-Weft hypothesis suggests a cellulose-extensin interpenetrating network where extensin mechanically couples the load-bearing cellulose microfibrils in a wall matrix that is best described as a microcomposite. This model is based on data gathered from the extensin-rich walls of tomato and sycamore cell suspension culture, wherein extensin precursors are insolubilized into the wall by undefined crosslinks. The authors recent work with cell walls isolated from intact tissue as well as walls from suspension cultured cells of the graminaceous monocots maize and rice, the non-graminaceous monocot asparagus, the primitive herbaceous dicot sugar beet, and the gymnosperm Douglas Fir indicate that although extensins are ubiquitous to all plant species examined, they are not the major structural protein component of most walls examined. Amino acid analyses of intact and HF-treated walls shows a major component neither an HRGP, nor directly comparable to the glycine-rich wall proteins such as those associated with seed coat walls or the 67 mole% glycine-rich proteins cloned from petunia and soybean. Clearly, structural wall protein alternatives to extensin exist and any cell wall model must take that into account. If we assume that extracellular matrices are a priori network structures, then new Hypless' structural proteins in the maize cell wall raise questions about the sort of network these proteins create: the kinds of crosslinks involved; how they are formed; and the roles played by the small amounts of HRGPs.

  12. Gibberellic-acid-induced synthesis and release of cell-wall-degrading endoxylanase by isolated aleurone layers of barley

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dashek, W.V.; Chrispeels, M.J.

    1977-01-01

    When aleurone layers of barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) are incubated with gibberellic acid (GA/sub 3/), xylose and arabinose, both as free sugars and bound to larger molecules, are released into the medium. Release begins 10 to 12 h after the start of incubation and continues for at least 60 h. At the same time there is a GA/sub 3/-induced breakdown of the cell wall resulting in a loss of /sup 2///sub 3/ of the cell-wall pentose during 60 h of incubation. GA/sub 3/ causes the appearance in the medium of an enzyme (or enzymes) which hydrolyze larchwood xylan and aleurone-layer arabinoxylan. Release of the enzyme(s) into the medium begins 28 to 32 h after the start of incubation. Enzyme activity does not accumulate to any large extent in the tissue prior to release into the medium, and is present in very low levels only in the absence of GA/sub 3/. Xylanase activity is associated with a protein (or proteins) with a molecular weight of 29,000. The hydrolysis of the xylans is largely caused by endoxylanase activity, indicating the importance of endoglycosidases in the GA/sub 3/-induced breakdown of the aleurone cell wall.

  13. Production of plant cell wall degrading enzymes by monoculture and co-culture of Aspergillus niger and Aspergillus terreus under SSF of banana peels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehman, Shazia; Aslam, Hina; Ahmad, Aqeel; Khan, Shakeel Ahmed; Sohail, Muhammad

    2014-01-01

    Filamentous fungi are considered to be the most important group of microorganisms for the production of plant cell wall degrading enzymes (CWDE), in solid state fermentations. In this study, two fungal strains Aspergillus niger MS23 and Aspergillus terreus MS105 were screened for plant CWDE such as amylase, pectinase, xylanase and cellulases (β-glucosidase, endoglucanase and filterpaperase) using a novel substrate, Banana Peels (BP) for SSF process. This is the first study, to the best of our knowledge, to use BP as SSF substrate for plant CWDE production by co-culture of fungal strains. The titers of pectinase were significantly improved in co-culture compared to mono-culture. Furthermore, the enzyme preparations obtained from monoculture and co-culture were used to study the hydrolysis of BP along with some crude and purified substrates. It was observed that the enzymatic hydrolysis of different crude and purified substrates accomplished after 26 h of incubation, where pectin was maximally hydrolyzed by the enzyme preparations of mono and co-culture. Along with purified substrates, crude materials were also proved to be efficiently degraded by the cocktail of the CWDE. These results demonstrated that banana peels may be a potential substrate in solid-state fermentation for the production of plant cell wall degrading enzymes to be used for improving various biotechnological and industrial processes.

  14. Production of plant cell wall degrading enzymes by monoculture and co-culture of Aspergillus niger and Aspergillus terreus under SSF of banana peels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shazia Rehman

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Filamentous fungi are considered to be the most important group of microorganisms for the production of plant cell wall degrading enzymes (CWDE, in solid state fermentations. In this study, two fungal strains Aspergillus niger MS23 and Aspergillus terreus MS105 were screened for plant CWDE such as amylase, pectinase, xylanase and cellulases (β-glucosidase, endoglucanase and filterpaperase using a novel substrate, Banana Peels (BP for SSF process. This is the first study, to the best of our knowledge, to use BP as SSF substrate for plant CWDE production by co-culture of fungal strains. The titers of pectinase were significantly improved in co-culture compared to mono-culture. Furthermore, the enzyme preparations obtained from monoculture and co-culture were used to study the hydrolysis of BP along with some crude and purified substrates. It was observed that the enzymatic hydrolysis of different crude and purified substrates accomplished after 26 h of incubation, where pectin was maximally hydrolyzed by the enzyme preparations of mono and co-culture. Along with purified substrates, crude materials were also proved to be efficiently degraded by the cocktail of the CWDE. These results demonstrated that banana peels may be a potential substrate in solid-state fermentation for the production of plant cell wall degrading enzymes to be used for improving various biotechnological and industrial processes.

  15. Studying the organization of genes encoding plant cell wall degrading enzymes in Chrysomela tremula provides insights into a leaf beetle genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauchet, Y; Saski, C A; Feltus, F A; Luyten, I; Quesneville, H; Heckel, D G

    2014-06-01

    The ability of herbivorous beetles from the superfamilies Chrysomeloidea and Curculionoidea to degrade plant cell wall polysaccharides has only recently begun to be appreciated. The presence of plant cell wall degrading enzymes (PCWDEs) in the beetle's digestive tract makes this degradation possible. Sequences encoding these beetle-derived PCWDEs were originally identified from transcriptomes and strikingly resemble those of saprophytic and phytopathogenic microorganisms, raising questions about their origin; e.g. are they insect- or microorganism-derived? To demonstrate unambiguously that the genes encoding PCWDEs found in beetle transcriptomes are indeed of insect origin, we generated a bacterial artificial chromosome library from the genome of the leaf beetle Chrysomela tremula, containing 18 432 clones with an average size of 143 kb. After hybridizing this library with probes derived from 12 C. tremula PCWDE-encoding genes and sequencing the positive clones, we demonstrated that the latter genes are encoded by the insect's genome and are surrounded by genes possessing orthologues in the genome of Tribolium castaneum as well as in three other beetle genomes. Our analyses showed that although the level of overall synteny between C. tremula and T. castaneum seems high, the degree of microsynteny between both species is relatively low, in contrast to the more closely related Colorado potato beetle. PMID:24456018

  16. The strawberry (Fragariaxananassa) fruit-specific rhamnogalacturonate lyase 1 (FaRGLyase1) gene encodes an enzyme involved in the degradation of cell-wall middle lamellae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina-Hidalgo, Francisco J; Franco, Antonio R; Villatoro, Carmen; Medina-Puche, Laura; Mercado, José A; Hidalgo, Miguel A; Monfort, Amparo; Caballero, José Luis; Muñoz-Blanco, Juan; Blanco-Portales, Rosario

    2013-04-01

    Pectins are essential components of primary plant cell walls and middle lamellae, and are related to the consistency of the fruit and its textural changes during ripening. In fact, strawberries become soft as the middle lamellae of cortical parenchyma cells are extensively degraded during ripening, leading to the observed short post-harvest shelf life. Using a custom-made oligonucleotide-based strawberry microarray platform, a putative rhamnogalacturonate lyase gene (FaRGlyase1) was identified. Bioinformatic analysis of the FaRGlyase1 sequence allowed the identification of a conserved rhamnogalacturonate lyase domain, which was also present in other putative RGlyase sequences deposited in the databases. Expression of FaRGlyase1 occurred mainly in the receptacle, concurrently with ripening, and it was positively regulated by abscisic acid and negatively by auxins. FaRGLyase1 gene expression was transiently silenced by injecting live Agrobacterium cells harbouring RNA interference constructs into fruit receptacles. Light and electron microscopy analyses of these transiently silenced fruits revealed that this gene is involved in the degradation of pectins present in the middle lamella region between parenchymatic cells. In addition, genetic linkage association analyses in a strawberry-segregating population showed that FaRGLyase1 is linked to a quantitative trait loci linkage group related to fruit hardness and firmness. The results showed that FaRGlyase1 could play an important role in the fruit ripening-related softening process that reduces strawberry firmness and post-harvest life.

  17. Proteomic Investigation of Rhizoctonia solani AG 4 Identifies Secretome and Mycelial Proteins with roles in Plant Cell Wall Degradation and Virulence

    KAUST Repository

    Lakshman, Dilip

    2016-03-28

    Rhizoctonia solani AG 4 is a soilborne necrotrophic fungal plant pathogen that causes economically important diseases on agronomic crops worldwide. Here we used a proteomics approach to characterize both intracellular proteins and the secretome of R. solani AG 4 isolate Rs23A under several growth conditions; the secretome being highly important in pathogenesis. From over 500 total secretome and soluble intracellular protein spots from 2-D gels, 457 protein spots were analyzed and 318 proteins positively matched with fungal proteins of known function by comparison with available R. solani genome databases specific for anastomosis groups 1-IA, 1-IB, and 3. These proteins were categorized to possible cellular locations and functional groups; and for some proteins their putative roles in plant cell wall degradation and virulence. The majority of the secreted proteins were grouped to extracellular regions and contain hydrolase activity.

  18. PEM fuel cell degradation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borup, Rodney L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mukundan, Rangachary [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    The durability of PEM fuel cells is a major barrier to the commercialization of these systems for stationary and transportation power applications. While significant progress has been made in understanding degradation mechanisms and improving materials, further improvements in durability are required to meet commercialization targets. Catalyst and electrode durability remains a primary degradation mode, with much work reported on understanding how the catalyst and electrode structure degrades. Accelerated Stress Tests (ASTs) are used to rapidly evaluate component degradation, however the results are sometimes easy, and other times difficult to correlate. Tests that were developed to accelerate degradation of single components are shown to also affect other component's degradation modes. Non-ideal examples of this include ASTs examining catalyst degradation performances losses due to catalyst degradation do not always well correlate with catalyst surface area and also lead to losses in mass transport.

  19. Plant cell wall dynamics and wall-related susceptibility in plant–pathogen interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Bellincampi, Daniela; Cervone, Felice; Lionetti, Vincenzo

    2014-01-01

    The cell wall is a dynamic structure that often determines the outcome of the interactions between plants and pathogens. It is a barrier that pathogens need to breach to colonize the plant tissue. While fungal necrotrophs extensively destroy the integrity of the cell wall through the combined action of degrading enzymes, biotrophic fungi require a more localized and controlled degradation of the cell wall in order to keep the host cells alive and utilize their feeding structures. Also bacteri...

  20. Plant cell wall dynamics and wall-related susceptibility in plant-pathogen interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Daniela eBellincampi; Felice eCervone; Vincenzo eLionetti

    2014-01-01

    The cell wall is a dynamic structure that often determines the outcome of the interactions between plants and pathogens. It is a barrier that pathogens need to breach to colonize the plant tissue. While fungal necrotrophs extensively destroy the integrity of the cell wall through the combined action of degrading enzymes, biotrophic fungi require a more localized and controlled degradation of the cell wall in order to keep the host cells alive and utilize their feeding structures. Also bacteri...

  1. Cell Wall Biology: Perspectives from Cell Wall Imaging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kieran J.D.Lee; Susan E.Marcus; J.Paul Knox

    2011-01-01

    Polysaccharide-rich plant cell walls are important biomaterials that underpin plant growth,are major repositories for photosynthetically accumulated carbon,and,in addition,impact greatly on the human use of plants. Land plant cell walls contain in the region of a dozen major polysaccharide structures that are mostly encompassed by cellulose,hemicelluloses,and pectic polysaccharides. During the evolution of land plants,polysaccharide diversification appears to have largely involved structural elaboration and diversification within these polysaccharide groups. Cell wall chemistry is well advanced and a current phase of cell wall science is aimed at placing the complex polysaccharide chemistry in cellular contexts and developing a detailed understanding of cell wall biology. Imaging cell wall glycomes is a challenging area but recent developments in the establishment of cell wall molecular probe panels and their use in high throughput procedures are leading to rapid advances in the molecular understanding of the spatial heterogeneity of individual cell walls and also cell wall differences at taxonomic levels. The challenge now is to integrate this knowledge of cell wall heterogeneity with an understanding of the molecular and physiological mechanisms that underpin cell wall properties and functions.

  2. Pectic substances from soybean cell walls distinguish themselves from other plant cell wall pectins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huisman, M.M.H.; Schols, H.A.; Voragen, A.G.J.

    2003-01-01

    The uncommon structural features of soybean cell wall pectic substances explain their resistance to degradation by enzymes generally used to degrade this kind of polymers, and indicates that a search for new enzymes is required to enable enzymatic modification of these polysaccharides

  3. Rice transformation with cell wall degrading enzyme genes from Trichoderma atroviride and its effect on plant growth and resistance to fungal pathogens

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Mei; Sun Zong-Xiu; Zhu Jie; Xu Tong; Gary E Harman; Matteo Lorito; Sheri Woo

    2004-01-01

    @@ Three genes encoding for fungal cell wall degrading enzymes (CWDE), ech42, nag70 and gluc78from the biocontrol fungus Trichoderma atroviride were inserted into the binary vector pCAMBIA1305. 2 singly and in all possible combinations. The coding sequences were placed downstream of the rice actin promoter and all vectors were used to transform rice plants. A total of more than 1,800 independently regenerated plantlets in seven different populations (for each of the three genes and each of the four gene combinations) were obtained. Expression in plant was obtained for all the fungal genes used singly or in combinations. The ech42 gene encoding for an endochitinase increased resistance to sheath blight caused by Rhizoctonia solani, while the exochitinase-encoding gene, nag70, had a lesser effect. The expression level of endochitinase but not of the exochitinase was correlated with disease resistance. Nevertheless, exochitinase enhanced the positive effect of endochitinase on disease resistance when two genes were co-expressed in transgenic rice. Improved resistance to Magnaporthe grisea was found in all types of regenerated plants, including those with the gluc78 gene alone, while a few lines expressing either ech42 or nag70 appeared to be immune to this pathogen. Transgenic plants expressing the gluc78 gene alone were stunted and only few of them survived, even though they showed resistance to M. grisea. However, combination with either one of the two other genes ( ech42, nag70 ) as included in the same T-DNA region, reduced the negative effect of gluc78 on plant growth. This is the first report of single or multiple of expression of transgens encoding CWDEs that results in resistance to blast and sheath blight in rice.

  4. Real-Time Imaging of Plant Cell Wall Structure at Nanometer Scale, with Respect to Cellulase Accessibility and Degradation Kinetics (Presentation)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, S. Y.

    2012-05-01

    Presentation on real-time imaging of plant cell wall structure at nanometer scale. Objectives are to develop tools to measure biomass at the nanometer scale; elucidate the molecular bases of biomass deconstruction; and identify factors that affect the conversion efficiency of biomass-to-biofuels.

  5. Transcriptomic events involved in melon mature-fruit abscission comprise the sequential induction of cell-wall degrading genes coupled to a stimulation of endo and exocytosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Corbacho

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mature-fruit abscission (MFA in fleshy-fruit is a genetically controlled process with mechanisms that, contrary to immature-fruit abscission, has not been fully characterized. Here, we use pyrosequencing to characterize the transcriptomes of melon abscission zone (AZ at three stages during AZ-cell separation in order to understand MFA control at an early stage of AZ-activation. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The results show that by early induction of MFA, the melon AZ exhibits major gene induction, while by late induction of MFA, melon AZ shows major gene repression. Although some genes displayed similar regulation in both early and late induction of abscission, such as EXT1-EXT4, EGase1, IAA2, ERF1, AP2D15, FLC, MADS2, ERAF17, SAP5 and SCL13 genes, the majority had different expression patterns. This implies that time-specific events occur during MFA, and emphasizes the value of characterizing multiple time-specific abscission transcriptomes. Analysis of gene-expression from these AZs reveal that a sequential induction of cell-wall-degrading genes is associated with the upregulation of genes involved in endo and exocytosis, and a shift in plant-hormone metabolism and signaling genes during MFA. This is accompanied by transcriptional activity of small-GTPases and synthaxins together with tubulins, dynamins, V-type ATPases and kinesin-like proteins potentially involved in MFA signaling. Early events are potentially controlled by down-regulation of MADS-box, AP2/ERF and Aux/IAA transcription-factors, and up-regulation of homeobox, zinc finger, bZIP, and WRKY transcription-factors, while late events may be controlled by up-regulation of MYB transcription-factors. SIGNIFICANCE: Overall, the data provide a comprehensive view on MFA in fleshy-fruit, identifying candidate genes and pathways associated with early induction of MFA. Our comprehensive gene-expression profile will be very useful for elucidating gene regulatory networks of the MFA in

  6. Cell wall integrity signaling and innate immunity in plants

    OpenAIRE

    Nühse, Thomas S.

    2012-01-01

    All plant pathogens and parasites have had to develop strategies to overcome cell walls in order to access the host’s cytoplasm. As a mechanically strong, multi-layered composite exoskeleton, the cell wall not only enables plants to grow tall but also protects them from such attacks. Many plant pathogens employ an arsenal of cell wall degrading enzymes, and it has long been thought that the detection of breaches in wall integrity contributes to the induction of defense. Cell wall fragments ar...

  7. Cell wall proteomics of crops

    OpenAIRE

    Komatsu, Setsuko; Yanagawa, Yuki

    2013-01-01

    Cell wall proteins play key roles in cell structure and metabolism, cell enlargement, signal transduction, responses to environmental stress, and many other physiological events. Agricultural crops are often used for investigating stress tolerance because cultivars with differing degrees of tolerance are available. Abiotic and biotic stress factors markedly influence the geographical distribution and yields of many crop species. Crop cell wall proteomics is of particular importance for improv...

  8. Diverse Synthetases and Fungi Degradation Enzymes for the Polysaccharides of Plant Cell Walls%植物细胞壁多糖合成酶系及真菌降解酶系

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    公维丽; 王禄山; 张怀强

    2015-01-01

    秸秆类植物细胞壁多糖高效降解转化对我国农业经济的绿色可持续发展具有重要意义,然而植物细胞壁在长期进化过程中形成了复杂结构限制了工业化酶解转化的过程。一方面从植物细胞壁多糖合成酶系的多样性、细胞壁多糖成分的复杂性、超分子结构的异质性等方面综述了形成植物细胞壁抗降解屏障的原因;另一方面从真菌降解植物细胞壁酶系的多样性、不同菌株降解酶组成差异性等分析降解转化植物细胞壁时发挥的不同作用,从而为工业转化合理复配真菌降解酶系,提高秸秆生物质的利用效率提供理论支持。%Efficient degradation and conversion of the polysaccharides in the plant cell wall of straw is of great significance for green and sustainable development of agriculture economy in China. But the enzymatic hydrolysis process of the polysaccharides was restricted by the complex structures of plant cell wallsformed in the long-term evolution process. In this paper, the diversity of plant cell wall polysaccharides synthetases, the complexity of cell wall polysaccharides, and the heterogeneity of supramolecular structures are reviewed from the perspective of the reasons causing plant cell wall recalcitrance;in addition, the variety of plant cell wall degradation enzymes of fungi, and the discrepancy among different strains in degrading different biomass were also summarized, which provide theoretical support for reasonable recompounding of fungi degradation enzymes in industrial to improve the utilization efficiency of straw biomass.

  9. Characterisation of cell wall polysaccharides in bilberries and black currants

    OpenAIRE

    Hilz, H

    2007-01-01

    During berry juice production, polysaccharides are released from the cell walls and cause thickening and high viscosity when the berries are mashed. Consequences are a low juice yield and a poor colour. This can be prevented by the use of enzymes that degrade these polysaccharides. To use these enzymes most efficiently, the structure and composition of the cell walls had to be known. This thesis describes a detailed composition of the cell walls of bilberries and black currants. The obtained ...

  10. Modification of cell wall polysaccharides during retting of cassava roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngolong Ngea, Guillaume Legrand; Guillon, Fabienne; Essia Ngang, Jean Justin; Bonnin, Estelle; Bouchet, Brigitte; Saulnier, Luc

    2016-12-15

    Retting is an important step in traditional cassava processing that involves tissue softening of the roots to transform the cassava into flour and various food products. The tissue softening that occurs during retting was attributed to the degradation of cell wall pectins through the action of pectin-methylesterase and pectate-lyase that possibly originated from a microbial source or the cassava plant itself. Changes in cell wall composition were investigated during retting using chemical analysis, specific glycanase degradation and immuno-labelling of cell wall polysaccharides. Pectic 1,4-β-d-galactan was the main cell wall polysaccharide affected during the retting of cassava roots. This result suggested that better control of pectic galactan degradation and a better understanding of the degradation mechanism by endogenous endo-galactanase and/or exogenous microbial enzymes might contribute to improve the texture properties of cassava products. PMID:27451197

  11. Immobilization of cells via activated cell walls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Markt, M.; Kas, J.; Valentova, O.; Demnerova, K.; Vodrazka, Z.

    1986-10-01

    Cell walls of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and S. uvarum were activated by periodate oxidation of vicinal diol groups in cell wall polysaccharides. The aldehyde groups thus generated allow the yeast cells to be covalently bound to modified bead cellulose or macroporous glycidyl methacrylate supports, or to enzymes such as glucose oxidase and catalase. 6 references.

  12. 热处理抑制采后龙眼果肉自溶及细胞壁物质降解%Inhibiting aril breakdown and degradation of cell wall material in pulp of harvested longan fruits by heat treatment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵云峰; 林河通; 王静; 林艺芬; 陈艺晖

    2014-01-01

    of harvested fruits and vegetables. The effects of hot-water treatment (HWT) on aril breakdown, cell wall component contents and cell wall-degrading enzyme activities in pulp of harvested longan fruits were investigated. This study aimed to determine the relationship between inhibition of longan cell wall metabolism by heat treatment and aril breakdown for achieving the control of aril breakdown and prolonging the storage period of harvested longan fruits. The harvested longan (cv. Fuyan) fruits were pre-treated with hot-water at 50℃ for 10 minutes, air dry, and then packed into sealed polyethylene bags (0.015 mm thickness) and stored at (15±1)℃for 10 days. Aril breakdown condition was observed, cell wall component contents and cell wall-degrading enzyme activities in pulp of harvested longan fruits were determined regularly during the storage. The results showed that aril breakdown index constantly rose during storage, water-soluble pectin (WSP) content first increased and then decreased, contents of ionic-soluble pectin (ISP), covalent-soluble pectin (CSP),, hemicellulose and cellulose decreased continuously. Activities of pectin pectinmethylesterase (PME) and cellulase (CX) rose at first but then declined. polygalacturonase (PG) activity reduced, andβ-galactosidase (β-Gal) activity firstly fell and then went up in the pulp of the control treatment of harvested longan fruits. Compared with the fruits in the control treatment, HWT could significantly (P<0.05) inhibited the rise of aril breakdown index, reduced the activities of the PME, PG,β-Gal and CX, delayed the increase in the content of WSP and the decline in contents of ISP, CSP, semicellulose and cellulose. From the results, it can be concluded that aril breakdown and components of cell wall metabolism in the pulp of harvested longan fruits were closely related. PME, PG and CX played an important role in the early aril breakdown, andβ-Gal and reactive oxygen may play an important role in the late

  13. Cell Wall Integrity Signaling in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    OpenAIRE

    Levin, David E.

    2005-01-01

    The yeast cell wall is a highly dynamic structure that is responsible for protecting the cell from rapid changes in external osmotic potential. The wall is also critical for cell expansion during growth and morphogenesis. This review discusses recent advances in understanding the various signal transduction pathways that allow cells to monitor the state of the cell wall and respond to environmental challenges to this structure. The cell wall integrity signaling pathway controlled by the small...

  14. Back wall solar cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandhorst, H. W., Jr. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    A solar cell is disclosed which comprises a first semiconductor material of one conductivity type with one face having the same conductivity type but more heavily doped to form a field region arranged to receive the radiant energy to be converted to electrical energy, and a layer of a second semiconductor material, preferably highly doped, of opposite conductivity type on the first semiconductor material adjacent the first semiconductor material at an interface remote from the heavily doped field region. Instead of the opposite conductivity layer, a metallic Schottky diode layer may be used, in which case no additional back contact is needed. A contact such as a gridded contact, previous to the radiant energy may be applied to the heavily doped field region of the more heavily doped, same conductivity material for its contact.

  15. Accelerating forward genetics for cell wall deconstruction

    OpenAIRE

    Vidaurre, Danielle; Bonetta, Dario

    2012-01-01

    The elucidation of the genes involved in cell wall synthesis and assembly remains one of the biggest challenges of cell wall biology. Although traditional genetic approaches, using simple yet elegant screens, have identified components of the cell wall, many unknowns remain. Exhausting the genetic toolbox by performing sensitized screens, adopting chemical genetics or combining these with improved cell wall imaging, hold the promise of new gene discovery and function. With the recent introduc...

  16. Moss cell walls: structure and biosynthesis

    OpenAIRE

    Alison W. Roberts; Eric M Roberts; Haigler, Candace H.

    2012-01-01

    The genome sequence of the moss Physcomitrella patens has stimulated new research examining the cell wall polysaccharides of mosses and the glycosyl transferases that synthesize them as a means to understand fundamental processes of cell wall biosynthesis and plant cell wall evolution. The cell walls of mosses and vascular plants are composed of the same classes of polysaccharides, but with differences in side chain composition and structure. Similarly, the genomes of P. patens and angiosperm...

  17. Unique aspects of the grass cell wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grasses are amongst the most important crops worldwide, and the composition of their cell walls is critical for uses as food, feed, and energy crops. Grass cell walls differ dramatically from dicot cell walls in terms of the major structural polysaccharides present, how those polysaccharides are lin...

  18. The cell wall of Fusarium oxysporum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoffelmeer, EAM; Klis, FM; Sietsma, JH; Cornelissen, BJC

    1999-01-01

    Sugar analysis of isolated cell walls from three formae speciales of Fusarium oxysporum showed that they contained not only glucose and (N-acetyl)-glucosamine, but also mannose, galactose, and uronic acids, presumably originating from cell wall glycoproteins. Cell wall glycoproteins accounted for 50

  19. Shape dynamics of growing cell walls

    CERN Document Server

    Banerjee, Shiladitya; Dinner, Aaron R

    2015-01-01

    We introduce a general theoretical framework to study the shape dynamics of actively growing and remodeling surfaces. Using this framework we develop a physical model for growing bacterial cell walls and study the interplay of cell shape with the dynamics of growth and constriction. The model allows us to derive constraints on cell wall mechanical energy based on the observed dynamics of cell shape. We predict that exponential growth in cell size requires a constant amount of cell wall energy to be dissipated per unit volume. We use the model to understand and contrast growth in bacteria with different shapes such as spherical, ellipsoidal, cylindrical and toroidal morphologies. Coupling growth to cell wall constriction, we predict a discontinuous shape transformation, from partial constriction to cell division, as a function of the chemical potential driving cell-wall synthesis. Our model for cell wall energy and shape dynamics relates growth kinetics with cell geometry, and provides a unified framework to d...

  20. Inhibiting aril breakdown and degradation of cell wall material in pulp of harvested longan fruits by heat treatment%热处理抑制采后龙眼果肉自溶及细胞壁物质降解

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵云峰; 林河通; 王静; 林艺芬; 陈艺晖

    2014-01-01

    of harvested fruits and vegetables. The effects of hot-water treatment (HWT) on aril breakdown, cell wall component contents and cell wall-degrading enzyme activities in pulp of harvested longan fruits were investigated. This study aimed to determine the relationship between inhibition of longan cell wall metabolism by heat treatment and aril breakdown for achieving the control of aril breakdown and prolonging the storage period of harvested longan fruits. The harvested longan (cv. Fuyan) fruits were pre-treated with hot-water at 50℃ for 10 minutes, air dry, and then packed into sealed polyethylene bags (0.015 mm thickness) and stored at (15±1)℃for 10 days. Aril breakdown condition was observed, cell wall component contents and cell wall-degrading enzyme activities in pulp of harvested longan fruits were determined regularly during the storage. The results showed that aril breakdown index constantly rose during storage, water-soluble pectin (WSP) content first increased and then decreased, contents of ionic-soluble pectin (ISP), covalent-soluble pectin (CSP),, hemicellulose and cellulose decreased continuously. Activities of pectin pectinmethylesterase (PME) and cellulase (CX) rose at first but then declined. polygalacturonase (PG) activity reduced, andβ-galactosidase (β-Gal) activity firstly fell and then went up in the pulp of the control treatment of harvested longan fruits. Compared with the fruits in the control treatment, HWT could significantly (P<0.05) inhibited the rise of aril breakdown index, reduced the activities of the PME, PG,β-Gal and CX, delayed the increase in the content of WSP and the decline in contents of ISP, CSP, semicellulose and cellulose. From the results, it can be concluded that aril breakdown and components of cell wall metabolism in the pulp of harvested longan fruits were closely related. PME, PG and CX played an important role in the early aril breakdown, andβ-Gal and reactive oxygen may play an important role in the late

  1. Soya beans and Maize : The effect of chemical and physical structure of cell wall polysaccharides on fermentation kinetics

    OpenAIRE

    Laar, van de, P.

    2000-01-01

    The analysis of the relationship between cell wall composition and fermentation of endosperm cell walls of soya beans and maize was approached from three different angles. Firstly, the fermentation (rate and extent of fermentation, the sugar degradation pattern, and volatile fatty acid production) of soya bean and maize cell walls was analysed, both in situ and in vitro. This analysis revealed that the physical structure of the cell wall (particle size and cell wall thickness) influences cell...

  2. Optical coherence tomography assessment of vessel wall degradation in thoracic aortic aneurysms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Real, Eusebio; Eguizabal, Alma; Pontón, Alejandro; Díez, Marta Calvo; Fernando Val-Bernal, José; Mayorga, Marta; Revuelta, José M.; López-Higuera, José M.; Conde, Olga M.

    2013-12-01

    Optical coherence tomography images of human thoracic aorta from aneurysms reveal elastin disorders and smooth muscle cell alterations when visualizing the media layer of the aortic wall. These disorders can be employed as indicators for wall degradation and, therefore, become a hallmark for diagnosis of risk of aneurysm under intraoperative conditions. Two approaches are followed to evaluate this risk: the analysis of the reflectivity decay along the penetration depth and the textural analysis of a two-dimensional spatial distribution of the aortic wall backscattering. Both techniques require preprocessing stages for the identification of the air-sample interface and for the segmentation of the media layer. Results show that the alterations in the media layer of the aortic wall are better highlighted when the textural approach is considered and also agree with a semiquantitative histopathological grading that assesses the degree of wall degradation. The correlation of the co-occurrence matrix attains a sensitivity of 0.906 and specificity of 0.864 when aneurysm automatic diagnosis is evaluated with a receiver operating characteristic curve.

  3. Characterisation of cell wall polysaccharides in bilberries and black currants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hilz, H.

    2007-01-01

    During berry juice production, polysaccharides are released from the cell walls and cause thickening and high viscosity when the berries are mashed. Consequences are a low juice yield and a poor colour. This can be prevented by the use of enzymes that degrade these polysaccharides. To use these enzy

  4. The Unfolded Protein Response Is Induced by the Cell Wall Integrity Mitogen-activated Protein Kinase Signaling Cascade and Is Required for Cell Wall Integrity in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    OpenAIRE

    Scrimale, Thomas; DiDone, Louis; de Mesy Bentley, Karen L.; Krysan, Damian J.

    2009-01-01

    The yeast cell wall is an extracellular structure that is dependent on secretory and membrane proteins for its construction. We investigated the role of protein quality control mechanisms in cell wall integrity and found that the unfolded protein response (UPR) and, to a lesser extent, endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-associated degradation (ERAD) pathways are required for proper cell wall construction. Null mutation of IRE1, double mutation of ERAD components (hrd1Δ and ubc7Δ) and ire1Δ, or expres...

  5. Architecture of dermatophyte cell Walls: Electron microscopic and biochemical analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nozawa, Y.; Kitajima, Y.

    1984-01-01

    A review with 83 references on the cell wall structure of dermatophytes is presented. Topics discussed include separation and preparation of cell walls; microstructure of cell walls by electron microscopy; chemical composition of cell walls; structural model of cell walls; and morphological structure of cell walls.

  6. Cell wall remodelling enzymes modulate fungal cell wall elasticity and osmotic stress resistance

    OpenAIRE

    Ene, Iuliana; Walker, Louise; Schiavone, Marion; Lee, Keunsook K.; Dague, Etienne; Gow, Neil A.R.; Munro, Carol A

    2015-01-01

    The fungal cell wall confers cell morphology and protection against environmental insults. For fungal pathogens, the cell wall is a key immunological modulator and an ideal therapeutic target. Yeast cell walls possess an inner matrix of interlinked β-glucan and chitin that is thought to provide tensile strength and rigidity. Yeast cells remodel their walls over time in response to environmental change, a process controlled by evolutionarily conserved stress (Hog1) and cell integrity (Mkc1, Ce...

  7. Regulation of Cell Wall Biogenesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: The Cell Wall Integrity Signaling Pathway

    OpenAIRE

    Levin, David E.

    2011-01-01

    The yeast cell wall is a strong, but elastic, structure that is essential not only for the maintenance of cell shape and integrity, but also for progression through the cell cycle. During growth and morphogenesis, and in response to environmental challenges, the cell wall is remodeled in a highly regulated and polarized manner, a process that is principally under the control of the cell wall integrity (CWI) signaling pathway. This pathway transmits wall stress signals from the cell surface to...

  8. A model for cell wall dissolution in mating yeast cells: polarized secretion and restricted diffusion of cell wall remodeling enzymes induces local dissolution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lori B Huberman

    Full Text Available Mating of the budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, occurs when two haploid cells of opposite mating types signal using reciprocal pheromones and receptors, grow towards each other, and fuse to form a single diploid cell. To fuse, both cells dissolve their cell walls at the point of contact. This event must be carefully controlled because the osmotic pressure differential between the cytoplasm and extracellular environment causes cells with unprotected plasma membranes to lyse. If the cell wall-degrading enzymes diffuse through the cell wall, their concentration would rise when two cells touched each other, such as when two pheromone-stimulated cells adhere to each other via mating agglutinins. At the surfaces that touch, the enzymes must diffuse laterally through the wall before they can escape into the medium, increasing the time the enzymes spend in the cell wall, and thus raising their concentration at the point of attachment and restricting cell wall dissolution to points where cells touch each other. We tested this hypothesis by studying pheromone treated cells confined between two solid, impermeable surfaces. This confinement increases the frequency of pheromone-induced cell death, and this effect is diminished by reducing the osmotic pressure difference across the cell wall or by deleting putative cell wall glucanases and other genes necessary for efficient cell wall fusion. Our results support the model that pheromone-induced cell death is the result of a contact-driven increase in the local concentration of cell wall remodeling enzymes and suggest that this process plays an important role in regulating cell wall dissolution and fusion in mating cells.

  9. A model for cell wall dissolution in mating yeast cells: polarized secretion and restricted diffusion of cell wall remodeling enzymes induces local dissolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huberman, Lori B; Murray, Andrew W

    2014-01-01

    Mating of the budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, occurs when two haploid cells of opposite mating types signal using reciprocal pheromones and receptors, grow towards each other, and fuse to form a single diploid cell. To fuse, both cells dissolve their cell walls at the point of contact. This event must be carefully controlled because the osmotic pressure differential between the cytoplasm and extracellular environment causes cells with unprotected plasma membranes to lyse. If the cell wall-degrading enzymes diffuse through the cell wall, their concentration would rise when two cells touched each other, such as when two pheromone-stimulated cells adhere to each other via mating agglutinins. At the surfaces that touch, the enzymes must diffuse laterally through the wall before they can escape into the medium, increasing the time the enzymes spend in the cell wall, and thus raising their concentration at the point of attachment and restricting cell wall dissolution to points where cells touch each other. We tested this hypothesis by studying pheromone treated cells confined between two solid, impermeable surfaces. This confinement increases the frequency of pheromone-induced cell death, and this effect is diminished by reducing the osmotic pressure difference across the cell wall or by deleting putative cell wall glucanases and other genes necessary for efficient cell wall fusion. Our results support the model that pheromone-induced cell death is the result of a contact-driven increase in the local concentration of cell wall remodeling enzymes and suggest that this process plays an important role in regulating cell wall dissolution and fusion in mating cells.

  10. Cell Wall Assembly in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    OpenAIRE

    Lesage, Guillaume; Bussey, Howard

    2006-01-01

    An extracellular matrix composed of a layered meshwork of β-glucans, chitin, and mannoproteins encapsulates cells of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This organelle determines cellular morphology and plays a critical role in maintaining cell integrity during cell growth and division, under stress conditions, upon cell fusion in mating, and in the durable ascospore cell wall. Here we assess recent progress in understanding the molecular biology and biochemistry of cell wall synthesis and it...

  11. How do plant cell walls extend?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosgrove, D. J.

    1993-01-01

    This article briefly summarizes recent work that identifies the biophysical and biochemical processes that give rise to the extension of plant cell walls. I begin with the biophysical notion of stress relaxation of the wall and follow with recent studies of wall enzymes thought to catalyze wall extension and relaxation. Readers should refer to detailed reviews for more comprehensive discussion of earlier literature (Taiz, 1984; Carpita and Gibeaut, 1993; Cosgrove, 1993).

  12. In-vitro fermentability of cell walls as influenced by lignin composition and cross-linking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    We assessed how diverse modifications in lignin composition and reductions in ferulate-lignin cross-linking influence the degradability of cell walls. Cell walls from nonlignified maize cell suspensions were artificially lignified with varying ratios of normal monolignols (coniferyl and sinapyl alco...

  13. Microanalysis of Plant Cell Wall Polysaccharides

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nicolai Obel; Veronika Erben; Tatjana Schwarz; Stefan Kühne; Andrea Fodor; Markus Pauly

    2009-01-01

    Oligosaccharide Mass Profiling (OLIMP) allows a fast and sensitive assessment of cell wall polymer structure when coupled with Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption Ionisation Time Of Flight Mass Spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). The short time required for sample preparation and analysis makes possible the study of a wide range of plant organs, revealing a high degree of heterogeneity in the substitution pattern of wall polymers such as the cross-linking glycan xyloglucan and the pectic polysaccharide homogalacturonan. The high sensitivity of MALDI-TOF allows the use of small amounts of samples, thus making it possible to investigate the wall structure of single cell types when material is collected by such methods as laser micro-dissection. As an example, the analysis of the xyloglucan structure in the leaf cell types outer epidermis layer, entire epidermis cell layer, palisade mesophyll cells, and vascular bundles were investigated. OLIMP is amenable to in situ wall analysis, where wall polymers are analyzed on unprepared plant tissue itself without first iso-lating cell walls. In addition, OLIMP enables analysis of wall polymers in Golgi-enriched fractions, the location of nascent matrix polysaccharide biosynthesis, enabling separation of the processes of wall biosynthesis versus post-deposition apo-plastic metabolism. These new tools will make possible a semi-quantitative analysis of the cell wall at an unprecedented level.

  14. Cell wall composition of chlorococcal algae

    OpenAIRE

    Blumreisinger, Maria; Meindl, Doris; Loos, Eckhard

    1983-01-01

    The cell walls of representatives of the genera Chlorella, Monoraphidium, Ankistrodesmus and Scenedesmus contained 24–74% neutral sugars, 1–24% uronic acids, 2–16% protein and 0–15% glucosamine. Two types of cell walls could be discerned containing as main sugars either rhamnose and galactose or mannose and glucose with a lack of galactose.

  15. WallProtDB, a database resource for plant cell wall proteomics

    OpenAIRE

    San Clemente, Hélène; Jamet, Elisabeth

    2015-01-01

    Background During the last fifteen years, cell wall proteomics has become a major research field with the publication of more than 50 articles describing plant cell wall proteomes. The WallProtDB database has been designed as a tool to facilitate the inventory, the interpretation of cell wall proteomics data and the comparisons between cell wall proteomes. Results WallProtDB (http://www.polebio.lrsv.ups-tlse.fr/WallProtDB/) presently contains 2170 proteins and ESTs identified experimentally i...

  16. Cell wall proteins: a new insight through proteomics

    OpenAIRE

    Jamet, Elisabeth; Canut, Hervé; Boudart, Georges; Pont-Lezica, Rafael F

    2006-01-01

    Cell wall proteins are essential constituents of plant cell walls; they are involved in modifications of cell wall components, wall structure, signaling and interactions with plasma membrane proteins at the cell surface. The application of proteomic approaches to the cell wall compartment raises important questions: are there technical problems specific to cell wall proteomics? What kinds of proteins can be found in Arabidopsis walls? Are some of them unexpected? What sort of post-translation...

  17. Accelerating forward genetics for cell wall deconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danielle eVidaurre

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available One of the biggest challenges of cell wall biology is the elucidation of the genes involved the cell wall and their function due to the recalcitrance of the cell wall. Through traditional genetic approaches, many simple yet elegant screens have been able to identify components of the cell wall and their networks. Despite progress in the identification of several genes of the cell wall, there remain many unknown players whose function has yet to be determined. Exhausting the genetic toolbox by performing secondary screens on a genetically mutated background, chemical genetics using small molecules and improved cell wall imaging hold promise for new gene discovery and function. With the recent introduction of next-generation sequencing technologies, it is now possible to quickly and efficiently map and clone genes of interest in Arabidopsis and any model organism with a completed genome sequence. The combination of a classical genetics approach and cutting edge technology will propel cell wall biology of Arabidopsis and other useful crops forward into the future.

  18. Molecular regulation of plant cell wall extensibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosgrove, D. J.

    1998-01-01

    Gravity responses in plants often involve spatial and temporal changes in cell growth, which is regulated primarily by controlling the ability of the cell wall to extend. The wall is thought to be a cellulose-hemicellulose network embedded in a hydrated matrix of complex polysaccharides and a small amount of structural protein. The wall extends by a form of polymer creep, which is mediated by expansins, a novel group of wall-loosening proteins. Expansins were discovered during a molecular dissection of the "acid growth" behavior of cell walls. Expansin alters the rheology of plant walls in profound ways, yet its molecular mechanism of action is still uncertain. It lacks detectable hydrolytic activity against the major components of the wall, but it is able to disrupt noncovalent adhesion between wall polysaccharides. The discovery of a second family of expansins (beta-expansins) sheds light on the biological role of a major group of pollen allergens and implies that expansins have evolved for diverse developmental functions. Finally, the contribution of other processes to wall extensibility is briefly summarized.

  19. Plant cell wall proteomics: the leadership of Arabidopsis thaliana

    OpenAIRE

    Albenne, Cécile; Canut, Hervé; Jamet, Elisabeth

    2013-01-01

    Plant cell wall proteins (CWPs) progressively emerged as crucial components of cell walls although present in minor amounts. Cell wall polysaccharides such as pectins, hemicelluloses, and cellulose represent more than 90% of primary cell wall mass, whereas hemicelluloses, cellulose, and lignins are the main components of lignified secondary walls. All these polymers provide mechanical properties to cell walls, participate in cell shape and prevent water loss in aerial organs. However, cell wa...

  20. 2003 Plant Cell Walls Gordon Conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniel J. Cosgrove

    2004-09-21

    This conference will address recent progress in many aspects of cell wall biology. Molecular, genetic, and genomic approaches are yielding major advances in our understanding of the composition, synthesis, and architecture of plant cell walls and their dynamics during growth, and are identifying the genes that encode the machinery needed to make their biogenesis possible. This meeting will bring together international scientists from academia, industry and government labs to share the latest breakthroughs and perspectives on polysaccharide biosynthesis, wood formation, wall modification, expansion and interaction with other organisms, and genomic & evolutionary analyses of wall-related genes, as well as to discuss recent ''nanotechnological'' advances that take wall analysis to the level of a single cell.

  1. Refractive index of plant cell walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gausman, H. W.; Allen, W. A.; Escobar, D. E.

    1974-01-01

    Air was replaced with media of higher refractive indices by vacuum infiltration in leaves of cucumber, blackeye pea, tomato, and string bean plants, and reflectance of noninfiltrated and infiltrated leaves was spectrophotometrically measured. Infiltrated leaves reflected less light than noninfiltrated leaves over the 500-2500-nm wavelength interval because cell wall-air interfaces were partly eliminated. Minimal reflectance should occur when the average refractive index of plant cell walls was matched by the infiltrating fluid. Although refractive indices that resulted in minimal reflectance differed among the four plant genera, an average value of 1.425 approximates the refractive index of plant cell walls for the four plant genera.

  2. Cell wall proteomics of the green alga Haematococcus pluvialis (Chlorophyceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Sheng-Bing; Hu, Qiang; Sommerfeld, Milton; Chen, Feng

    2004-03-01

    The green microalga Haematococcus pluvialis can synthesize and accumulate large amounts of the ketocarotenoid astaxanthin, and undergo profound changes in cell wall composition and architecture during the cell cycle and in response to environmental stresses. In this study, cell wall proteins (CWPs) of H. pluvialis were systematically analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) coupled with peptide mass fingerprinting (PMF) and sequence-database analysis. In total, 163 protein bands were analyzed, which resulted in positive identification of 81 protein orthologues. The highly complex and dynamic composition of CWPs is manifested by the fact that the majority of identified CWPs are differentially expressed at specific stages of the cell cycle along with a number of common wall-associated 'housekeeping' proteins. The detection of cellulose synthase orthologue in the vegetative cells suggested that the biosynthesis of cellulose occurred during primary wall formation, in contrast to earlier observations that cellulose was exclusively present in the secondary wall of the organism. A transient accumulation of a putative cytokinin oxidase at the early stage of encystment pointed to a possible role in cytokinin degradation while facilitating secondary wall formation and/or assisting in cell expansion. This work represents the first attempt to use a proteomic approach to investigate CWPs of microalgae. The reference protein map constructed and the specific protein markers obtained from this study provide a framework for future characterization of the expression and physiological functions of the proteins involved in the biogenesis and modifications in the cell wall of Haematococcus and related organisms. PMID:14997492

  3. Homogenization of a viscoelastic model for plant cell wall biomechanics

    OpenAIRE

    Ptashnyk, Mariya; Seguin, Brian

    2015-01-01

    The microscopic structure of a plant cell wall is given by cellulose microfibrils embedded in a cell wall matrix. In this paper we consider a microscopic model for interactions between viscoelastic deformations of a plant cell wall and chemical processes in the cell wall matrix. We consider elastic deformations of the cell wall microfibrils and viscoelastic Kelvin--Voigt type deformations of the cell wall matrix. Using homogenization techniques (two-scale convergence and periodic unfolding me...

  4. Function of laccases in cell wall biosynthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Anders; Holm, Preben Bach; Andersen, Jeppe Reitan

    2011-01-01

    substrate specificities and expression patterns. As part of the strategic research centre Bio4Bio, the present project deals with laccase functions in relation to cell wall formation in grasses based on a study of the model species Brachypodium distachyon. Thirty-one isozymes have been retrieved from......Laccases are multicopper oxidases capable of polymerizing monolignols. Histochemical assays have shown temporal and spatial correlation with secondary cell wall formation in both herbs and woody perennials. However, in plants laccases constitutes a relatively large group of isoenzymes with unique...... hybridization. Specific isozymes that show high correlation with the process of secondary cell wall formation will be further studied in a reverse genetic study in which candidates will be knocked out using RNA interference. Phenotypes of knock-out mutants are to be described in relation to cell wall...

  5. Cell wall remodeling under abiotic stress

    OpenAIRE

    Tenhaken, Raimund

    2015-01-01

    Plants exposed to abiotic stress respond to unfavorable conditions on multiple levels. One challenge under drought stress is to reduce shoot growth while maintaining root growth, a process requiring differential cell wall synthesis and remodeling. Key players in this process are the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and peroxidases, which initially cross-link phenolic compounds and glycoproteins of the cell walls causing stiffening. The function of ROS shifts after having converted a...

  6. Cell-wall dynamics in growing bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furchtgott, Leon; Wingreen, Ned; Huang, Kerwyn Casey

    2010-03-01

    Bacterial cells come in a large variety of shapes, and cell shape plays an important role in the regulation of many biological functions. Cell shape in bacterial cells is dictated by a cell wall composed of peptidoglycan, a polymer made up of long, stiff glycan strands and flexible peptide crosslinks. Although much is understood about the structural properties of peptidoglycan, little is known about the dynamics of cell wall organization in bacterial cells. In particular, during cell growth, how does the bacterial cell wall continuously expand and reorganize while maintaining cell shape? In order to investigate this question quantitatively, we model the cell wall of the Gram-negative bacterium Escherichia coli using a simple elastic model, in which glycan and peptide subunits are treated as springs with different spring constants and relaxed lengths. We consider the peptidoglycan network as a single-layered network of these springs under tension due to an internal osmotic pressure. Within this model, we simulate possible hypotheses for cell growth as different combinations of addition of new springs and breakage of old springs.

  7. Modes of deformation of walled cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumais, Jacques

    2013-11-01

    The bewildering morphological diversity found in cells is one of the starkest illustrations of life's ability to self-organize. Yet the morphogenetic mechanisms that produce the multifarious shapes of cells are still poorly understood. The shared similarities between the walled cells of prokaryotes, many protists, fungi, and plants make these groups particularly appealing to begin investigating how morphological diversity is generated at the cell level. In this review, I attempt a first classification of the different modes of surface deformation used by walled cells. Five modes of deformation were identified: inextensional bending, equi-area shear, elastic stretching, processive intussusception, and chemorheological growth. The two most restrictive modes-inextensional and equi-area deformations-are embodied in the exine of pollen grains and the wall-like pellicle of euglenoids, respectively. For these modes, it is possible to express the deformed geometry of the cell explicitly in terms of the undeformed geometry and other easily observable geometrical parameters. The greatest morphogenetic power is reached with the processive intussusception and chemorheological growth mechanisms that underlie the expansive growth of walled cells. A comparison of these two growth mechanisms suggests a possible way to tackle the complexity behind wall growth.

  8. Study on the Activity of Cell Wall Degradation Enzyme of Sweet Potato in Its Storage%甘薯在贮藏期间细胞壁降解酶活性的变化

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王炜; 李鹏霞; 胡花丽; 王毓宁

    2012-01-01

    The study was carried out to investigate the changes of pectin and cell wall degradation enzyme of pur- ple sweet potato and yellow sweet potato during their storage for 100 days. The purpose of the research was to find the variation of sweet potato. The sweet potato with Sportak dipping treatment(1 000mg/L) were placed in storage solu- tion under 7 ℃ , using the sweet patato stored at ambient-temperature as control (ck) , to detect the physical indica- tors periodically. The results showed that Sportak dipping treatment combined with storage at 7 ℃ effectively preven- ted the rapid decrease of content of protopectin and slowed down the increase of activity of polygalacturonase and cel- lulose. The Sportak dipping treatment combined with storage at 7 ℃ could keep higher content of protopectin and im- prove the storage quality of sweet potatoin in the actual production.%研究了紫心甘薯、黄心甘薯在贮藏100d期间果胶和细胞壁降解酶的变化情况,以期得出变化规律。以施保克溶液浸泡处理甘薯,置于7℃贮藏,以室温贮藏的甘薯为对照,定期进行生理指标检测。结果表明:贮藏期间,7℃贮藏结合施保克处理能防止甘薯的原果胶过快下降,延缓多聚半乳糖醛酸酶和纤维素酶活性的升高。7℃贮藏结合施保克处理可以较好保持原果胶含量,在实际生产中可以提高甘薯的贮藏品质。

  9. "Steiner trees" between cell walls of sisal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI GuanShi; YIN YaJun; LI Yan; ZHONG Zheng

    2009-01-01

    Through careful analysis on the cross-section of sisal fibers,it is found that the middle lamellae between the cell walls have clear geometric characteristics:between the cell walls of three neighboring cells,the middle lamellae form a three-way junction with 120°symmetry. If the neighboring three-way junctions are connected,a network of Steiner tree with angular symmetry and topological invariability is formed. If more and more Steiner trees are connected,a network of Steiner rings is generated. In another word,idealized cell walls and the middle lamellae are dominated by the Steiner geometry. This geometry not only depicts the geometric symmetry,the topological invariability and minimal property of the middle lamellae,but also controls the mechanics of sisal fibers.

  10. Evaluation of Chlorella (Chlorophyta) as Source of Fermentable Sugars via Cell Wall Enzymatic Hydrolysis

    OpenAIRE

    Marcoaurélio Almenara Rodrigues; Elba Pinto da Silva Bon

    2011-01-01

    The cell wall of Chlorella is composed of up to 80% carbohydrates including cellulose. In this study, Chlorella homosphaera and Chlorella zofingiensis were evaluated as source of fermentable sugars via their cell wall enzymatic degradation. The algae were cultivated in inorganic medium, collected at the stationary growth phase and centrifuged. The cell pellet was suspended in citrate buffer, pH 4.8 and subjected to 24 hours hydrolysis at 50°C using a cellulases, xylanases, and amylases ble...

  11. Roles of membrane trafficking in plant cell wall dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Ebine, Kazuo; Ueda, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    The cell wall is one of the characteristic components of plant cells. The cell wall composition differs among cell types and is modified in response to various environmental conditions. To properly generate and modify the cell wall, many proteins are transported to the plasma membrane or extracellular space through membrane trafficking, which is one of the key protein transport mechanisms in eukaryotic cells. Given the diverse composition and functions of the cell wall in plants, the transpor...

  12. Copolymerization of Sinapyl p-coumarate With Sinapyl alcohol: Impact on Syringyl Lignin Formation and Fermentability of Maize Cell Walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lignins in grass biomass and forage crops are highly acylated with p-coumarate, but the function of p-coumarate and its impact on cell wall degradability are poorly understood. In this study, cell walls from maize cell suspensions were artificially lignified with coniferyl alcohol and increasing pro...

  13. Microanalysis of Plant Cell Wall Polysaccharides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Obel, N.; Erben, V.; Schwarz, T.; Kühnel, S.; Fodor, A.; Pauly, M.

    2009-01-01

    Oligosaccharide Mass Profiling (OLIMP) allows a fast and sensitive assessment of cell wall polymer structure when coupled with Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption Ionisation Time Of Flight Mass Spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). The short time required for sample preparation and analysis makes possible the s

  14. Characterization of the Sclerotinia sclerotiorum cell wall proteome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Longzhou; Free, Stephen J

    2016-08-01

    We used a proteomic analysis to identify cell wall proteins released from Sclerotinia sclerotiorum hyphal and sclerotial cell walls via a trifluoromethanesulfonic acid (TFMS) digestion. Cell walls from hyphae grown in Vogel's glucose medium (a synthetic medium lacking plant materials), from hyphae grown in potato dextrose broth and from sclerotia produced on potato dextrose agar were used in the analysis. Under the conditions used, TFMS digests the glycosidic linkages in the cell walls to release intact cell wall proteins. The analysis identified 24 glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored cell wall proteins and 30 non-GPI-anchored cell wall proteins. We found that the cell walls contained an array of cell wall biosynthetic enzymes similar to those found in the cell walls of other fungi. When comparing the proteins in hyphal cell walls grown in potato dextrose broth with those in hyphal cell walls grown in the absence of plant material, it was found that a core group of cell wall biosynthetic proteins and some proteins associated with pathogenicity (secreted cellulases, pectin lyases, glucosidases and proteases) were expressed in both types of hyphae. The hyphae grown in potato dextrose broth contained a number of additional proteins (laccases, oxalate decarboxylase, peroxidase, polysaccharide deacetylase and several proteins unique to Sclerotinia and Botrytis) that might facilitate growth on a plant host. A comparison of the proteins in the sclerotial cell wall with the proteins in the hyphal cell wall demonstrated that sclerotia formation is not marked by a major shift in the composition of cell wall protein. We found that the S. sclerotiorum cell walls contained 11 cell wall proteins that were encoded only in Sclerotinia and Botrytis genomes. PMID:26661933

  15. Cell Wall Heterogeneity in Root Development of Arabidopsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somssich, Marc; Khan, Ghazanfar Abbas; Persson, Staffan

    2016-01-01

    Plant cell walls provide stability and protection to plant cells. During growth and development the composition of cell walls changes, but provides enough strength to withstand the turgor of the cells. Hence, cell walls are highly flexible and diverse in nature. These characteristics are important during root growth, as plant roots consist of radial patterns of cells that have diverse functions and that are at different developmental stages along the growth axis. Young stem cell daughters undergo a series of rapid cell divisions, during which new cell walls are formed that are highly dynamic, and that support rapid anisotropic cell expansion. Once the cells have differentiated, the walls of specific cell types need to comply with and support different cell functions. For example, a newly formed root hair needs to be able to break through the surrounding soil, while endodermal cells modify their walls at distinct positions to form Casparian strips between them. Hence, the cell walls are modified and rebuilt while cells transit through different developmental stages. In addition, the cell walls of roots readjust to their environment to support growth and to maximize nutrient uptake. Many of these modifications are likely driven by different developmental and stress signaling pathways. However, our understanding of how such pathways affect cell wall modifications and what enzymes are involved remain largely unknown. In this review we aim to compile data linking cell wall content and re-modeling to developmental stages of root cells, and dissect how root cell walls respond to certain environmental changes. PMID:27582757

  16. Cell Wall Heterogeneity in Root Development of Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somssich, Marc; Khan, Ghazanfar Abbas; Persson, Staffan

    2016-01-01

    Plant cell walls provide stability and protection to plant cells. During growth and development the composition of cell walls changes, but provides enough strength to withstand the turgor of the cells. Hence, cell walls are highly flexible and diverse in nature. These characteristics are important during root growth, as plant roots consist of radial patterns of cells that have diverse functions and that are at different developmental stages along the growth axis. Young stem cell daughters undergo a series of rapid cell divisions, during which new cell walls are formed that are highly dynamic, and that support rapid anisotropic cell expansion. Once the cells have differentiated, the walls of specific cell types need to comply with and support different cell functions. For example, a newly formed root hair needs to be able to break through the surrounding soil, while endodermal cells modify their walls at distinct positions to form Casparian strips between them. Hence, the cell walls are modified and rebuilt while cells transit through different developmental stages. In addition, the cell walls of roots readjust to their environment to support growth and to maximize nutrient uptake. Many of these modifications are likely driven by different developmental and stress signaling pathways. However, our understanding of how such pathways affect cell wall modifications and what enzymes are involved remain largely unknown. In this review we aim to compile data linking cell wall content and re-modeling to developmental stages of root cells, and dissect how root cell walls respond to certain environmental changes. PMID:27582757

  17. Arrangement of peptidoglycan in the cell wall of Staphylococcus spp.

    OpenAIRE

    Amako, K; Umeda, A.; Murata, K

    1982-01-01

    The arrangement of peptidoglycan in the cell wall of Staphylococcus was observed with the newly developed freeze-fracture technique, using n-octanol instead of water as the freezing medium. The replica of the trichloroacetic acid-extracted cell wall (TCA-wall) showed two areas. One of them has a concentric circular structure, a characteristic surface structure of the staphylococcal cell wall, and the other showed an irregular and rough surface. The chemical analysis of the wall revealed that ...

  18. Degradation of CIGS solar cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Theelen, M.J.

    2015-01-01

    Thin film CIGS solar cells and individual layers within these solar cells have been tested in order to assess their long term stability. Alongside with the execution of standard tests, in which elevated temperatures and humidity levels are used, the solar cells have also been exposed to a combinatio

  19. Fluorescent tags to explore cell wall structure and dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Gonneau, Martine; Höfte, Herman; Vernhettes, Samantha

    2012-01-01

    Plant cell walls are highly dynamic and heterogeneous structures, which vary between cell types, growth stages but also between microdomains within a single cell wall. In this review, we summarize the imaging techniques using fluorescent tags that are currently being used and which should in the coming years revolutionize our understanding of the dynamics of cell wall architecture and the cellular processes involved in the synthesis of cell wall components.

  20. Interconnections between cell wall polymers, wall mechanics, and cortical microtubules: Teasing out causes and consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Chaowen; Anderson, Charles T

    2016-09-01

    In plants, cell wall components including cellulose, hemicelluloses, and pectins interact with each other to form complex extracellular network structures that control cell growth and maintain cell shape. However, it is still not clear exactly how different wall polymers interact, how the conformations and interactions of cell wall polymers relate to wall mechanics, and how these factors impinge on intracellular structures such as the cortical microtubule cytoskeleton. Here, based on studies of Arabidopsis thaliana xxt1 xxt2 mutants, which lack detectable xyloglucan in their walls and display aberrant wall mechanics, altered cellulose patterning and biosynthesis, and reduced cortical microtubule stability, we discuss the potential relationships between cell wall biosynthesis, wall mechanics, and cytoskeletal dynamics in an effort to better understand their roles in controlling plant growth and morphogenesis.

  1. Interconnections between cell wall polymers, wall mechanics, and cortical microtubules: Teasing out causes and consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Chaowen; Anderson, Charles T

    2016-09-01

    In plants, cell wall components including cellulose, hemicelluloses, and pectins interact with each other to form complex extracellular network structures that control cell growth and maintain cell shape. However, it is still not clear exactly how different wall polymers interact, how the conformations and interactions of cell wall polymers relate to wall mechanics, and how these factors impinge on intracellular structures such as the cortical microtubule cytoskeleton. Here, based on studies of Arabidopsis thaliana xxt1 xxt2 mutants, which lack detectable xyloglucan in their walls and display aberrant wall mechanics, altered cellulose patterning and biosynthesis, and reduced cortical microtubule stability, we discuss the potential relationships between cell wall biosynthesis, wall mechanics, and cytoskeletal dynamics in an effort to better understand their roles in controlling plant growth and morphogenesis. PMID:27611066

  2. Plant Cell Wall Matrix Polysaccharide Biosynthesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ajay Pal S. Sandhu; Gursharn S. Randhawa; Kanwarpal S. Dhugga

    2009-01-01

    The wall of an expanding plant cell consists primarily of cellulose microfibrils embedded in a matrix of hemi-cellulosic and pectic polysaccharides along with small amounts of structural and enzymatic proteins. Matrix polysacchar-ides are synthesized in the Golgi and exported to the cell wall by exocytosis, where they intercalate among cellulose microfibrUs, which are made at the plasma membrane and directly deposited into the cell wall. Involvement of Golgi glucan synthesis in auxin-induced cell expansion has long been recognized; however, only recently have the genes corresponding to glucan synthases been identified. Biochemical purification was unsuccessful because of the labile nature and very low abundance of these enzymes. Mutational genetics also proved fruitless. Expression of candidate genes identified through gene expression profiling or comparative genomics in heterologous systems followed by functional characterization has been relatively successful. Several genes from the cellulose synthase-like (Cs/) family have been found to be involved in the synthesis of various hemicellulosic glycans. The usefulness of this approach, however, is limited to those enzymes that probably do not form complexes consisting of unrelated proteins. Nonconventional approaches will continue to incre-mentally unravel the mechanisms of Golgi polysaccharide biosynthesis.

  3. Soya beans and Maize : The effect of chemical and physical structure of cell wall polysaccharides on fermentation kinetics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laar, van H.

    2000-01-01

    The analysis of the relationship between cell wall composition and fermentation of endosperm cell walls of soya beans and maize was approached from three different angles. Firstly, the fermentation (rate and extent of fermentation, the sugar degradation pattern, and volatile fatty acid production) o

  4. Advanced technologies for plant cell wall evolution and diversity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fangel, Jonatan Ulrik

    Plant cell walls consist of polysaccharides, glycoproteins and phenolic polymers interlinked together in a highly complex network. The detailed analysis of cell walls is challenging because of their inherent complexity and heterogeneity. Also, complex carbohydrates, unlike proteins and nucleotide...

  5. Association Mapping of Cell Wall Synthesis Regulatory Genes and Cell Wall Quality in Switchgrass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartley, Laura [Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States). Dept. of Microbiology and Plant Biology; Wu, Y. [Oklahoma State Univ., Stillwater, OK (United States); Zhu, L. [Oklahoma State Univ., Stillwater, OK (United States); Brummer, E. C. [Noble Foundation, Ardmore, OK (United States); Saha, M. [Noble Foundation, Ardmore, OK (United States)

    2016-05-31

    Inefficient conversion of biomass to biofuels is one of the main barriers for biofuel production from such materials. Approximately half of polysaccharides in biomass remain unused by typical biochemical conversion methods. Conversion efficiency is influenced by the composition and structure of cell walls of biomass. Grasses such as wheat, maize, and rice, as well as dedicated perennial bioenergy crops, like switchgrass, make up ~55% of biomass that can be produced in the United States. Grass cell walls have a different composition and patterning compared with dicotyledonous plants, including the well-studied model plant, Arabidopsis. This project identified genetic determinants of cell wall composition in grasses using both naturally occurring genetic variation of switchgrass and gene network reconstruction and functional assays in rice. In addition, the project linked functional data in rice and other species to switchgrass improvement efforts through curation of the most abundant class of regulators in the switchgrass genome. Characterizing natural diversity of switchgrass for variation in cell wall composition and properties, also known as quality, provides an unbiased avenue for identifying biologically viable diversity in switchgrass cell walls. To characterizing natural diversity, this project generated cell wall composition and enzymatic deconstruction data for ~450 genotypes of the Switchgrass Southern Association Collection (SSAC), a diverse collection composed of 36 switchgrass accessions from the southern U.S. distribution of switchgrass. Comparing these data with other measures of cell wall quality for the same samples demonstrated the complementary nature of the diverse characterization platforms now being used for biomass characterization. Association of the composition data with ~3.2K single nucleotide variant markers identified six significant single nucleotide variant markers co-associated with digestibility and another compositional trait. These

  6. Fluorescent tags to explore cell wall structure and dynamics.

    OpenAIRE

    Martine eGonneau; Herman eHöfte; Samantha eVernhettes

    2012-01-01

    Plant cell walls are highly dynamic and heterogeneic structures, which vary between celltypes, growth stages but also between microdomains within a single cell wall. In this review, we summarize the imaging techniques using fluorescent tags that are currently being used and which should in the coming years revolutionize our understanding of the dynamics of cell wall architecture and the cellular processes involved in synthesis of cell wall components.

  7. Bio-based composites that mimic the plant cell wall

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Zhuo

    2009-01-01

    Nature creates high performance materials under modest conditions, i.e., neutral pH and ambient temperature and pressure. One of the most significant materials is the plant cell wall. The plant cell wall is a composite of oriented cellulose microfibrils reinforcing a lignin/hemicellulose matrix. In principle, the plant cell wall composite is designed much like a synthetic fiber-reinforced polymer composite. Unlike synthetic composites, the plant cell wall has an excellent combination of h...

  8. Association Mapping of Cell Wall Synthesis Regulatory Genes and Cell Wall Quality in Switchgrass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartley, Laura [Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States). Dept. of Microbiology and Plant Biology; Wu, Y. [Oklahoma State Univ., Stillwater, OK (United States); Zhu, L. [Oklahoma State Univ., Stillwater, OK (United States); Brummer, E. C. [Noble Foundation, Ardmore, OK (United States); Saha, M. [Noble Foundation, Ardmore, OK (United States)

    2016-05-31

    Inefficient conversion of biomass to biofuels is one of the main barriers for biofuel production from such materials. Approximately half of polysaccharides in biomass remain unused by typical biochemical conversion methods. Conversion efficiency is influenced by the composition and structure of cell walls of biomass. Grasses such as wheat, maize, and rice, as well as dedicated perennial bioenergy crops, like switchgrass, make up ~55% of biomass that can be produced in the United States. Grass cell walls have a different composition and patterning compared with dicotyledonous plants, including the well-studied model plant, Arabidopsis. This project identified genetic determinants of cell wall composition in grasses using both naturally occurring genetic variation of switchgrass and gene network reconstruction and functional assays in rice. In addition, the project linked functional data in rice and other species to switchgrass improvement efforts through curation of the most abundant class of regulators in the switchgrass genome. Characterizing natural diversity of switchgrass for variation in cell wall composition and properties, also known as quality, provides an unbiased avenue for identifying biologically viable diversity in switchgrass cell walls. To characterizing natural diversity, this project generated cell wall composition and enzymatic deconstruction data for ~450 genotypes of the Switchgrass Southern Association Collection (SSAC), a diverse collection composed of 36 switchgrass accessions from the southern U.S. distribution of switchgrass. Comparing these data with other measures of cell wall quality for the same samples demonstrated the complementary nature of the diverse characterization platforms now being used for biomass characterization. Association of the composition data with ~3.2K single nucleotide variant markers identified six significant single nucleotide variant markers co-associated with digestibility and another compositional trait. These

  9. Wall relaxation and the driving forces for cell expansive growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosgrove, D. J.

    1987-01-01

    When water uptake by growing cells is prevented, the turgor pressure and the tensile stress in the cell wall are reduced by continued wall loosening. This process, termed in vivo stress relaxation, provides a new way to study the dynamics of wall loosening and to measure the wall yield threshold and the physiological wall extensibility. Stress relaxation experiments indicate that wall stress supplies the mechanical driving force for wall yielding. Cell expansion also requires water absorption. The driving force for water uptake during growth is created by wall relaxation, which lowers the water potential of the expanding cells. New techniques for measuring this driving force show that it is smaller than believed previously; in elongating stems it is only 0.3 to 0.5 bar. This means that the hydraulic resistance of the water transport pathway is small and that rate of cell expansion is controlled primarily by wall loosening and yielding.

  10. Beyond growth: novel functions for bacterial cell wall hydrolases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyckoff, Timna J; Taylor, Jennifer A; Salama, Nina R

    2012-11-01

    The peptidoglycan cell wall maintains turgor pressure and cell shape of most bacteria. Cell wall hydrolases are essential, together with synthases, for growth and daughter cell separation. Recent work in diverse organisms has uncovered new cell wall hydrolases that act autonomously or on neighboring cells to modulate invasion of prey cells, cell shape, innate immune detection, intercellular communication, and competitor lysis. The hydrolases involved in these processes catalyze the cleavage of bonds throughout the sugar and peptide moities of peptidoglycan. Phenotypes associated with these diverse hydrolases reveal new functions of the bacterial cell wall beyond growth and division.

  11. Structure of the cell wall of mango after application of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cells of the mesocarp of mango cultivar Tommy Atkins were analyzed by Transmission Electron Microscope—TEM to evaluate the effects of doses of 0.5 and 1.0 kGy applied immediately after the fruit and after storage for twenty days at a temperature of 12 °C followed by 5 days of simulated marketing at a temperature of 21 °C. No alteration was found in the structure of the cell wall, middle lamella, and plasma membrane of fruits when analyzed immediately after application of doses. The mesocarp cell structure of the cell wall, middle lamella, and the plasma membrane did however undergo changes after storage. Fruits that received a dose of 0.5 kGy displayed slight changes in cell wall structure and slight disintegration of the middle lamella. Fruits that received a dose of 1.0 kGy displayed more severe changes in the structure of the cell wall, greater middle lamella degradation, and displacement of the plasma membrane. - Highlights: ► Mesocarp cells were analyzed by Transmission Electron Microscope—TEM. ► No change in cell wall structure, middle lamella and plasma membrane was found in fruits immediately after irradiation. ► Changes in cell wall structure, middle lamella and plasma membrane happened after storage. ► Fruits subjected to 0.5 kGy showed smaller cell wall change.

  12. Fermentation of the endosperm cell walls of monocotyledon and dicotyledon plant species: The relationship between cell wall characteristics and fermentability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laar, van H.; Tamminga, S.; Williams, B.A.; Verstegen, M.W.A.

    2000-01-01

    Cell walls from the endosperm of four monocotyledons (maize, wheat, rye, and rice) and four dicotyledons (soya bean, lupin, faba bean, and pea) seeds were studied to relate cell wall composition and structure with fermentation characteristics. Cell wall material was isolated from the endosperm of th

  13. Cell wall and enzyme changes during the graviresponse of the leaf-sheath pulvinus of oat (Avena sativa)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibeaut, David M.; Karuppiah, Nadarajah; Chang, S.-R.; Brock, Thomas G.; Vadlamudi, Babu; Kim, Donghern; Ghosheh, Najati S.; Rayle, David L.; Carpita, Nicholas C.; Kaufman, Peter B.

    1990-01-01

    The graviresponse of the leaf-sheath pulvinus of oat (Avena sativa) involves an asymmetric growth response and asymmetric processes involving degradation of starch and cell wall synthesis. Cellular and biochemical events were studied by investigation of the activities of related enzymes and changes in cell walls and their constituents. It is suggested that an osmotic potential gradient acts as the driving factor for growth, while wall extensibility is a limiting factor in pulvinus growth.

  14. 真空预冷减缓双孢菇细胞壁物质的降解%Vacuum cooling retards degradation of cell wall matter in Agaricus bisporus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陶菲; 郜海燕; 葛林梅; 穆宏磊; 陈杭君

    2013-01-01

    Vacuum cooling is a rapid cooling technique extensively used for cooling some agricultural and food products. The vacuum cooling technology is now gradually applied to the precooling treatment of agricultural products due to the advantages of quick cooling, easy operation, no constraint of packing containers, and energy savings. Consumption of Agaricus bisporus has increased substantially because of its delicacy, flavor and nutritional value. Agaricus bisporus is an excellent source of several essential amino acids, vitamins (B2, niacin, and folates), and minerals (potassium, phosphorus, zinc, and copper). Agaricus bisporus has a short shelf life of 3-4 days compared to most vegetables at ambient temperatures because it has no cuticle to protect it from physical or microbial attack or water loss. Loss of quality is caused by morphological changes due to maturation, discoloration, changes in texture and flavor, and losses of nutrients. Textural changes of fruits are accompanied by loss of neutral sugars, solubilization and depolymerization of the polysaccharides of the cell wall, and rearrangements of their associations, as the result of the combined action of several cell wall-modifying enzymes, acting in both pectic and hemicellulosic fractions. Recent studies on the structure of the plant cell wall have disclosed a large number and type of biochemical linkages between the components. Such linkages are potential targets for enzymatic action and draw attention to the putative involvement of several members of enzymes able to act and modify its structure in a developmental and coordinated way. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of vacuum cooling treatment on cell wall compositional changes and ultrastructure in fresh mushrooms during 15 d of post-harvest storage at 4℃. In this study, we investigated the change of cellulose content, cellulose activity, propectin content, WSP content, and the PG activity of Agaricus bisporus before and after

  15. Cell wall polysaccharides hydrolysis of malting barley (Hordeum vulgare L.: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamar, C.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Malting quality results from the different steps of the malting process. Malting uses internal changes of the seed occurring during germination, such as enzymes synthesis, to obtain a good hydrolysis process and the components required. Among the three main hydrolytic events observed, that are namely starch degradation, cell wall breakdown and protein hydrolysis, an efficient cell wall polysaccharides hydrolysis is an essential condition for a final product of quality. Indeed, because of the physical barrier of the cell wall, cell wall polysaccharides hydrolysis is one of the first steps expected from the process to gain access to the cell components. Moreover, viscosity problem and haze formation in malting industry are related to their presence during the process when inefficient degradation occurs, leading to increased production time and cost. Understanding the key elements in cell wall degradation is important for a better control. (1-3,1-4-β-glucans and arabinoxylans are the main constituents of cell wall. (1-3,1-4-β-glucans are unbranched chains of β-D-glucopyranose residues with β-(1,3 linkages and β-(1,4 linkages. Arabinoxylan consists in a backbone of D-xylanopyranosyl units linked by β-(1-4 bonds connected to single L-arabinofuranose by α-(1→2 or α-(1→3-linkages. Degradation of (1-3,1-4-β-glucans is processed by the (1-3,1-4-β-glucanases, the β-glucosidases and the β-glucane exohydrolases. It seems that the (1-3-β-glucanases are also involved. Arabinoxylans are mainly decomposed by (1-4-β-xylan endohydrolase, arabinofuranosidase and β-xylosidase.

  16. Degradation study of XVIII century graffiti on the walls of Chiaramonte Palace (Palermo, Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberghina, M. F.; Barraco, R.; Brai, M.; Casaletto, M. P.; Ingo, G. M.; Marrale, M.; Policarpo, D.; Schillaci, T.; Tranchina, L.

    2010-09-01

    A systematic investigation of the original materials and the degradation phenomena induced by soluble salts on the wall matrix and on the graffiti of the Inquisition jails of Chiaramonte Palace in Palermo (Italy) was carried out. Built in the XIV century, Chiaramonte Palace was used as Inquisition court during the XV-XVI centuries. The ancient graffiti, recently discovered, represent a unique historical witness of the prisoners that lived during that terrible period. In order to study the nature, the amount and the distribution of the salts in the masonry, stone materials sampled at different depth from the wall matrix and saline efflorescences were analysed. Different physical techniques were used, such as X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy, X-ray Fluorescence, Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy, X-ray Diffraction and Ionic Chromatography. Results of the chemical and physical characterisation showed that the main cause of the degradation of graffiti and wall paintings was the presence of soluble salts, such as nitrates, chlorides and sulphates. Traces of oxalates, coming from a previous conservation treatment, were also found. The results obtained by the stratigraphical characterisation of soluble salts in the wall matrix can be used to recommend a procedure based on air humidification at high relative humidity values in order to avoid salt crystallisation and to prevent the crumbling process of the graffiti.

  17. [Extracellular hydrolases of strain Bacillus sp. 739 and their involvement in the lysis of micromycete cell walls].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aktuganov, G E; Galimzianova, N F; Melent'ev, A I; Kuz'mina, L Iu

    2007-01-01

    The mycolytic bacterial strain Bacillus sp. 739 produces extracellular enzymes which degrade in vitro the cell walls of a number of phytopathogenic and saprophytic fungi. When Bacillus sp. 739 was cultivated with Bipolaris sorokiniana, a cereal root-rot pathogen, the fungus degradation process correlated with the levels of the beta-1,3-glucanase and protease activity. The comparative characteristic of Bacillus sp. 739 enzymatic preparations showed that efficient hydrolysis of the fungus cell walls was the result of the action of the complex of enzymes produced by the strain when grown on chitin-containing media. Among the enzymes of this complex, chitinases and beta-1,3-glucanases hydrolyzed most actively the disintegrated cell walls of B. sorokiniana. However, only beta-1,3-glucanases were able to degrade the cell walls of native fungal mycelium in the absence of other hydrolases, which is indicative of their key role in the mycolytic activity of Bacillus sp. 739.

  18. Enzymes and other agents that enhance cell wall extensibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosgrove, D. J.

    1999-01-01

    Polysaccharides and proteins are secreted to the inner surface of the growing cell wall, where they assemble into a network that is mechanically strong, yet remains extensible until the cells cease growth. This review focuses on the agents that directly or indirectly enhance the extensibility properties of growing walls. The properties of expansins, endoglucanases, and xyloglucan transglycosylases are reviewed and their postulated roles in modulating wall extensibility are evaluated. A summary model for wall extension is presented, in which expansin is a primary agent of wall extension, whereas endoglucanases, xyloglucan endotransglycosylase, and other enzymes that alter wall structure act secondarily to modulate expansin action.

  19. Cell Wall Microstructure Analysis Implicates Hemicellulose Polysaccharides in Cell Adhesion in Tomato Fruit Pericarp Parenchyma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jose J. Ordaz-Ortiz; Susan E. Marcus; J. Paul Knox

    2009-01-01

    Methods developed to isolate intact cells from both unripe and ripe tomato fruit pericarp parenchyma have allowed the cell biological analysis of polysaccharide epitopes at the surface of separated cells. The LM7 pectic homoga-lacturonan epitope is a marker of the junctions of adhesion planes and intercellular spaces in parenchyma systems. The LM7 epitope persistently marked the former edge of adhesion planes at the surface of cells separated from unripe and ripened tomato fruit and also from fruits with the Cnr mutation. The LM 11 xylan epitope was associated, in sections, with cell walls lining intercellular space but the epitope was not detected at the surface of isolated cells, being lost during cell isolation. The LM15 xyloglucan epitope was present at the surface of cells isolated from unripe fruit in a pattern reflecting the former edge of cell adhesion planes/intercellular space but with gaps and apparent breaks, An equivalent pattern ofLM15 epitope occurrence was revealed at the surface of cells isolated by pectate lyase action but was not present in cells isolated from ripe fruit or from Cnr fruit. In contrast to wild-type cells, the LM5 galactan and LM21 mannan epitopes oc-curred predominantly in positions reflecting intercellular space in Cnr, suggesting a concerted alteration in cell wall mi-crostructure in response to this mutation. Galactanase and mannanase, along with pectic homogalacturonan-degrading enzymes, were capable of releasing cells from unripe fruit parenchyma. These observations indicate that hemicellulose polymers are present in architectural contexts reflecting cell adhesion and that several cell wall polysaccharide classes are likely to contribute to cell adhesion/cell separation in tomato fruit pericarp parenchyma.

  20. Pectic substances in the cell wall and the intercellular cohesion of potato tuber tissue during cooking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keijbets, M.J.H.

    1974-01-01

    The influence of ions, starch, buffer strength and pH on solubilization of pectic galacturonan from potato cell wall material during boiling was studied. The ions enhanced β-eliminative degradation of galacturonan, but calcium, copper (II) and iron (II) cations slowed down the solubilization at pH 6

  1. Revealing the Differences Between Free and Complexed Enzyme Mechanisms and Factors Contributing to Cell Wall Recalcitrance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Resch, Michael G.; Donohoe, Byron; Ciesielski, Peter; Nill, Jennifer; McKinney, Kellene; Mittal, Ashutosh; Katahira, Rui; Himmel, Michael; Biddy, Mary; Beckham, Gregg; Decker, Steve

    2014-09-08

    Enzymatic depolymerization of polysaccharides is a key step in the production of fuels and chemicals from lignocellulosic biomass, and discovery of synergistic biomass-degrading enzyme paradigms will enable improved conversion processes. Historically, revealing insights into enzymatic saccharification mechanisms on plant cell walls has been hindered by uncharacterized substrates and low resolution.

  2. Anthocyanins influence tannin-cell wall interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bautista-Ortín, Ana Belén; Martínez-Hernández, Alejandro; Ruiz-García, Yolanda; Gil-Muñoz, Rocío; Gómez-Plaza, Encarna

    2016-09-01

    The rate of tannin extraction was studied in a vinification of red grapes and the results compared with another vinification made with white grapes fermented as for typical red wine, in the presence of skins and seeds. Even though the grapes presented a quite similar skin and seed tannin content, the differences in tannin concentration between both vinifications was very large, despite the fact that the only apparent difference between the phenolic composition of both wines was the anthocyanin content. This suggests that anthocyanins play an important role in tannin extractability, perhaps because they affect the extent of the tannin-cell wall interaction, a factor that largely controls the resulting quantity of tannins in wines. To confirm this observation, the effect of anthocyanins on the tannin extractability from grape seeds and skin and on the interaction between tannins and grape cell walls suspended in model solutions were studied. The results indicated that anthocyanins favored skin and seed tannin extraction and that there is a competition for the adsorption sites between anthocyanins and tannins that increases the tannin content when anthocyanins are present. PMID:27041322

  3. Peroxidase-induced degradation of single-walled carbon nanotubes: hypochlorite is a major oxidant capable of in vivo degradation of carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vlasova, I I; Vakhrusheva, T V; Sokolov, A V; Kostevich, V A [Research Institute for Physico-Chemical Medicine, FMBA, M. Pirogovskaya Str. 1a, Moscow (Russian Federation); Ragimov, A A, E-mail: irina.vlasova@yahoo.com [National Research Centre of Surgery, RAMS, Abrikosovskiy per. 2, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2011-04-01

    Due to their extraordinary properties, single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) have a tremendous potential for medical applications such as clinical diagnostics, targeted drug (or gene) delivery and cancer therapy. Hence, effects of SWNTs on living systems as well as mechanisms for biodegradation of SWTNs are of great importance and must be studied before starting to explore SWNTs for medical use. This study was undertaken to compare the potential of different peroxidases in degrading carboxylated SWNT (c-SWNT) and to elucidate the role of peroxidase-generated reactive products in this process. A detailed study showed that neither reactive intermediate products nor free radicals generated via peroxidase cycle can considerably oxidize c-SWNT. Biodegradation of c-SWNT in model system can be induced by free radicals generated as a result of heme degradation. The latter explains why hemoglobin, which is a pseudo-peroxidase possessing low peroxidase activity, is able to oxidize carbon nanotubes with a higher efficiency than horseradish peroxidase. However, c-SWNT in the presence of blood plasma (15 vol %) demonstrated no degradation even at high concentrations of hemoglobin and H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. The comparison of the ability of various peroxidases to degrade SWNTs in vitro revealed that MPO, due to its ability to produce hypochlorite, and lactoperoxidase, due to its ability to produce hypobromite, are extremely efficient in degrading carbon nanotubes. Since neutrophils are a main source of human MPO, we tested the effect of SWNTs on these cells. SWNTs were unable to stimulate neutrophils. On the other hand, they dose-dependently enhanced opsonized zymosan-induced cell stimulation as detected by measuring the amount of hypochlorite produced. This finding may be relevant to the in vivo situation, for example, at inflammatory sites. In order to imitate conditions characteristic of phagosomes and inflammatory sites, we titrated the suspension of c-SWNT in the presence of

  4. Two endogenous proteins that induce cell wall extension in plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    McQueen-Mason, S.; Durachko, D. M.; Cosgrove, D. J.

    1992-01-01

    Plant cell enlargement is regulated by wall relaxation and yielding, which is thought to be catalyzed by elusive "wall-loosening" enzymes. By employing a reconstitution approach, we found that a crude protein extract from the cell walls of growing cucumber seedlings possessed the ability to induce the extension of isolated cell walls. This activity was restricted to the growing region of the stem and could induce the extension of isolated cell walls from various dicot stems and the leaves of amaryllidaceous monocots, but was less effective on grass coleoptile walls. Endogenous and reconstituted wall extension activities showed similar sensitivities to pH, metal ions, thiol reducing agents, proteases, and boiling in methanol or water. Sequential HPLC fractionation of the active wall extract revealed two proteins with molecular masses of 29 and 30 kD associated with the activity. Each protein, by itself, could induce wall extension without detectable hydrolytic breakdown of the wall. These proteins appear to mediate "acid growth" responses of isolated walls and may catalyze plant cell wall extension by a novel biochemical mechanism.

  5. Cell Wall Growth and Modulation Dynamics in a Model Unicellular Green Alga—Penium margaritaceum: Live Cell Labeling with Monoclonal Antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David S. Domozych

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Penium margaritaceum is a unicellular charophycean green alga that possesses cell wall polymers similar to those of land plants. Several wall macromolecules of this alga are recognized by monoclonal antibodies specific for wall polymer epitopes of land plants. Immunofluorescence protocols using these antibodies may be employed to label specific cell wall constituents of live cells. Fluorescent labeling persists for several days, and this attribute allows for tracing of wall epitopes in both long- and short-term studies of cell development. Quantitative analysis of surface area covered by cell wall polymers is also easily performed. We show that significant cell expansion caused by incubation of cells in low levels of osmotically active agents like mannitol, glucose, or sucrose results from the inability of cells to undergo cytokinesis but does not result in significant changes to the amount of new cell wall. We also demonstrate that cells can be maintained for long periods of time in culture medium supplemented with specific cell wall-degrading enzymes where notable changes to wall infrastructure occur. These results demonstrate the great potential value of Penium in elucidating fundamental events during cell wall synthesis and modulation in plant cells.

  6. An arabidopsis gene regulatory network for secondary cell wall synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    The plant cell wall is an important factor for determining cell shape, function and response to the environment. Secondary cell walls, such as those found in xylem, are composed of cellulose, hemicelluloses and lignin and account for the bulk of plant biomass. The coordination between transcriptiona...

  7. Modeling Degradation in Solid Oxide Electrolysis Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manohar S. Sohal; Anil V. Virkar; Sergey N. Rashkeev; Michael V. Glazoff

    2010-09-01

    Idaho National Laboratory has an ongoing project to generate hydrogen from steam using solid oxide electrolysis cells (SOECs). To accomplish this, technical and degradation issues associated with the SOECs will need to be addressed. This report covers various approaches being pursued to model degradation issues in SOECs. An electrochemical model for degradation of SOECs is presented. The model is based on concepts in local thermodynamic equilibrium in systems otherwise in global thermodynamic no equilibrium. It is shown that electronic conduction through the electrolyte, however small, must be taken into account for determining local oxygen chemical potential, , within the electrolyte. The within the electrolyte may lie out of bounds in relation to values at the electrodes in the electrolyzer mode. Under certain conditions, high pressures can develop in the electrolyte just near the oxygen electrode/electrolyte interface, leading to oxygen electrode delamination. These predictions are in accordance with the reported literature on the subject. Development of high pressures may be avoided by introducing some electronic conduction in the electrolyte. By combining equilibrium thermodynamics, no equilibrium (diffusion) modeling, and first-principles, atomic scale calculations were performed to understand the degradation mechanisms and provide practical recommendations on how to inhibit and/or completely mitigate them.

  8. Cosegregation of cell wall and DNA in Bacillus subtilis.

    OpenAIRE

    Schlaeppi, J M; Karamata, D

    1982-01-01

    Cosegregation of cell wall and DNA of a lysis-negative mutant of Bacillus subtilis was examined by continuously labeling (i) cell wall, (ii) DNA, and (iii) both cell wall and DNA. After four to five generations of chase in liquid media it was found by light microscope autoradiography that the numbers of wall segregation units per cell are 29 and 9 in rich and minimal medium, respectively. Under the same conditions the numbers of segregation units of DNA were almost 50% lower: 15 and 5, respec...

  9. Cell wall sorting of lipoproteins in Staphylococcus aureus.

    OpenAIRE

    Navarre, W W; Daefler, S; Schneewind, O

    1996-01-01

    Many surface proteins are thought to be anchored to the cell wall of gram-positive organisms via their C termini, while the N-terminal domains of these molecules are displayed on the bacterial surface. Cell wall anchoring of surface proteins in Staphylococcus aureus requires both an N-terminal leader peptide and a C-terminal cell wall sorting signal. By fusing the cell wall sorting of protein A to the C terminus of staphylococcal beta-lactamase, we demonstrate here that lipoproteins can also ...

  10. Nanosurgery: observation of peptidoglycan strands in Lactobacillus helveticus cell walls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Firtel, Max; Henderson, Grant; Sokolov, Igor

    2004-11-15

    The internal cell wall structure of the bacterium Lactobacillus helveticus has been observed in situ in aqueous solution using an atomic force microscope (AFM). The AFM tip was used not only for imaging but presumably to remove mechanically large patches of the outer cell wall after appropriate chemical treatment, which typically leaves the bacteria alive. The surface exposed after this 'surgery' revealed {approx}26 nm thick twisted strands within the cell wall. The structure and location of the observed strands are consistent with the glycan backbone of peptidoglycan fibers that give strength to the cell wall. The structural organization of these fibers has not been observed previously.

  11. Advanced Cell Development and Degradation Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. E. O' Brien; C. M. Stoots; J. S. Herring; R. C. O' Brien; K. G. Condie; M. Sohal; G. K. Housley; J. J. Hartvigsen; D. Larsen; G. Tao; B. Yildiz; V. Sharma; P. Singh; N. Petigny; T. L. Cable

    2010-09-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has been researching the application of solid-oxide electrolysis cells for large-scale hydrogen production from steam over a temperature range of 800 to 900ºC. From 2003 – 2009, this work was sponsored by the DOE Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative (NHI). Starting in 2010, the HTE research program has been sponsored by the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) program. HTSE research priorities in FY10 are centered on understanding and reducing cell and stack performance degradation to an acceptable level to advance the technology readiness level of HTSE and to justify further large-scale demonstration activities. This report provides a summary of our FY10 experimental program, which has been focused on advanced cell and stack development and degradation studies. Advanced cell and stack development activities are under way at five technology partners: MSRI, Versa Power, Ceramatec, NASA Glenn, and St. Gobain. Performance evaluation of the advanced technology cells and stacks has been performed by the technology partners, by MIT and the University of Connecticut and at the INL HTE Laboratory. Summaries of these development activities and test results are presented.

  12. Small molecule probes for plant cell wall polysaccharide imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian eWallace

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Plant cell walls are composed of interlinked polymer networks consisting of cellulose, hemicelluloses, pectins, proteins, and lignin. The ordered deposition of these components is a dynamic process that critically affects the development and differentiation of plant cells. However, our understanding of cell wall synthesis and remodeling, as well as the diverse cell wall architectures that result from these processes, has been limited by a lack of suitable chemical probes that are compatible with live-cell imaging. In this review, we summarize the currently available molecular toolbox of probes for cell wall polysaccharide imaging in plants, with particular emphasis on recent advances in small molecule-based fluorescent probes. We also discuss the potential for further development of small molecule probes for the analysis of cell wall architecture and dynamics.

  13. Cell wall structure and biogenesis in Aspergillus species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimi, Akira; Miyazawa, Ken; Abe, Keietsu

    2016-09-01

    Aspergillus species are among the most important filamentous fungi from the viewpoints of industry, pathogenesis, and mycotoxin production. Fungal cells are exposed to a variety of environmental stimuli, including changes in osmolality, temperature, and pH, which create stresses that primarily act on fungal cell walls. In addition, fungal cell walls are the first interactions with host cells in either human or plants. Thus, understanding cell wall structure and the mechanism of their biogenesis is important for the industrial, medical, and agricultural fields. Here, we provide a systematic review of fungal cell wall structure and recent findings regarding the cell wall integrity signaling pathways in aspergilli. This accumulated knowledge will be useful for understanding and improving the use of industrial aspergilli fermentation processes as well as treatments for some fungal infections. PMID:27140698

  14. Cellulose synthesis in two secondary cell wall processes in a single cell type

    OpenAIRE

    Mendu, Venugopal; Stork, Jozsef; Harris, Darby; DeBolt, Seth

    2011-01-01

    Plant cells have a rigid cell wall that constrains internal turgor pressure yet extends in a regulated and organized manner to allow the cell to acquire shape. The primary load-bearing macromolecule of a plant cell wall is cellulose, which forms crystalline microfibrils that are organized with respect to a cell's function and shape requirements. A primary cell wall is deposited during expansion whereas secondary cell wall is synthesized post expansion during differentiation. A complex form of...

  15. Measurement of streptococcal cell wall in tissues of rats resistant or susceptible to cell wall-induced chronic erosive arthritis.

    OpenAIRE

    Anderle, S K; Allen, J B; Wilder, R L; Eisenberg, R A; Cromartie, W J; Schwab, J. H.

    1985-01-01

    The quantity of streptococcal cell wall localized in the joints of rats of strains which are either susceptible (Sprague-Dawley, LEW/N, M520/N) or resistant (Buffalo, WKY/N, F344/N) to cell wall-induced chronic erosive arthritis was measured after intraperitoneal injection of group A streptococcal cell wall fragments. Susceptibility or resistance was not associated with a difference in the amount of cell wall localized in limbs or other tissues. It is concluded that although localization of c...

  16. Cell wall composition profiling of parasitic giant dodder (Cuscuta reflexa) and its hosts: a priori differences and induced changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnsen, Hanne R; Striberny, Bernd; Olsen, Stian; Vidal-Melgosa, Silvia; Fangel, Jonatan U; Willats, William G T; Rose, Jocelyn K C; Krause, Kirsten

    2015-08-01

    Host plant penetration is the gateway to survival for holoparasitic Cuscuta and requires host cell wall degradation. Compositional differences of cell walls may explain why some hosts are amenable to such degradation while others can resist infection. Antibody-based techniques for comprehensive profiling of cell wall epitopes and cell wall-modifying enzymes were applied to several susceptible hosts and a resistant host of Cuscuta reflexa and to the parasite itself. Infected tissue of Pelargonium zonale contained high concentrations of de-esterified homogalacturonans in the cell walls, particularly adjacent to the parasite's haustoria. High pectinolytic activity in haustorial extracts and high expression levels of pectate lyase genes suggest that the parasite contributes directly to wall remodeling. Mannan and xylan concentrations were low in P. zonale and in five susceptible tomato introgression lines, but high in the resistant Solanum lycopersicum cv M82, and in C. reflexa itself. Knowledge of the composition of resistant host cell walls and the parasite's own cell walls is useful in developing strategies to prevent infection by parasitic plants. PMID:25808919

  17. Micropipette aspiration on the outer hair cell lateral wall.

    OpenAIRE

    Sit, P S; Spector, A A; Lue, A J; Popel, A S; Brownell, W.E.

    1997-01-01

    The mechanical properties of the lateral wall of the guinea pig cochlear outer hair cell were studied using the micropipette aspiration technique. A fire-polished micropipette with an inner diameter of approximately 4 microm was brought into contact with the lateral wall and negative pressure was applied. The resulting deformation of the lateral wall was recorded on videotape and subjected to morphometric analysis. The relation between the length of the aspirated portion of the cell and aspir...

  18. Assembly and enlargement of the primary cell wall in plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosgrove, D. J.

    1997-01-01

    Growing plant cells are shaped by an extensible wall that is a complex amalgam of cellulose microfibrils bonded noncovalently to a matrix of hemicelluloses, pectins, and structural proteins. Cellulose is synthesized by complexes in the plasma membrane and is extruded as a self-assembling microfibril, whereas the matrix polymers are secreted by the Golgi apparatus and become integrated into the wall network by poorly understood mechanisms. The growing wall is under high tensile stress from cell turgor and is able to enlarge by a combination of stress relaxation and polymer creep. A pH-dependent mechanism of wall loosening, known as acid growth, is characteristic of growing walls and is mediated by a group of unusual wall proteins called expansins. Expansins appear to disrupt the noncovalent bonding of matrix hemicelluloses to the microfibril, thereby allowing the wall to yield to the mechanical forces generated by cell turgor. Other wall enzymes, such as (1-->4) beta-glucanases and pectinases, may make the wall more responsive to expansin-mediated wall creep whereas pectin methylesterases and peroxidases may alter the wall so as to make it resistant to expansin-mediated creep.

  19. Structural Studies of Complex Carbohydrates of Plant Cell Walls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Darvill, Alan [Univ. of Georgia, Athens, GA (United States); Hahn, Michael G. [Univ. of Georgia, Athens, GA (United States); O' Neill, Malcolm A. [Univ. of Georgia, Athens, GA (United States); York, William S. [Univ. of Georgia, Athens, GA (United States)

    2015-02-17

    Most of the solar energy captured by land plants is converted into the polysaccharides (cellulose, hemicellulose, and pectin) that are the predominant components of the cell wall. These walls, which account for the bulk of plant biomass, have numerous roles in the growth and development of plants. Moreover, these walls have a major impact on human life as they are a renewable source of biomass, a source of diverse commercially useful polymers, a major component of wood, and a source of nutrition for humans and livestock. Thus, understanding the molecular mechanisms that lead to wall assembly and how cell walls and their component polysaccharides contribute to plant growth and development is essential to improve and extend the productivity and value of plant materials. The proposed research will develop and apply advanced analytical and immunological techniques to study specific changes in the structures and interactions of the hemicellulosic and pectic polysaccharides that occur during differentiation and in response to genetic modification and chemical treatments that affect wall biosynthesis. These new techniques will make it possible to accurately characterize minute amounts of cell wall polysaccharides so that subtle changes in structure that occur in individual cell types can be identified and correlated to the physiological or developmental state of the plant. Successful implementation of this research will reveal fundamental relationships between polysaccharide structure, cell wall architecture, and cell wall functions.

  20. Characterising the cellulose synthase complexes of cell walls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mansoori Zangir, N.

    2012-01-01

    One of the characteristics of the plant kingdom is the presence of a structural cell wall. Cellulose is a major component in both the primary and secondary cell walls of plants. In higher plants cellulose is synthesized by so called rosette protein complexes with cellulose synthases (CESAs) as the c

  1. Engineering the Oryza sativa cell wall with rice NAC transcription factors regulating secondary wall formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kouki eYoshida

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Plant tissues that require structural rigidity synthesize a thick, strong secondary cell wall of lignin, cellulose and hemicelluloses in a complicated bridged structure. Master regulators of secondary wall synthesis were identified in dicots, and orthologs of these regulators have been identified in monocots, but regulation of secondary cell wall formation in monocots has not been extensively studied. Here we demonstrate that the rice transcription factors SECONDARY WALL NAC DOMAIN PROTEINs (SWNs can regulate secondary wall formation in rice (Oryza sativa and are potentially useful for engineering the monocot cell wall. The OsSWN1 promoter is highly active in sclerenchymatous cells of the leaf blade and less active in xylem cells. By contrast, the OsSWN2 promoter is highly active in xylem cells and less active in sclerenchymatous cells. OsSWN2 splicing variants encode two proteins; the shorter protein (OsSWN2S has very low transcriptional activation ability, but the longer protein (OsSWN2L and OsSWN1 have strong transcriptional activation ability. In rice, expression of an OsSWN2S chimeric repressor, driven by the OsSWN2 promoter, resulted in stunted growth and para-wilting (leaf rolling and browning under normal water conditions due to impaired vascular vessels. The same OsSWN2S chimeric repressor, driven by the OsSWN1 promoter, caused a reduction of cell wall thickening in sclerenchymatous cells, a drooping leaf phenotype, reduced lignin and xylose contents and increased digestibility as forage. These data suggest that OsSWNs regulate secondary wall formation in rice and manipulation of OsSWNs may enable improvements in monocotyledonous crops for forage or biofuel applications.

  2. Engineering the Oryza sativa cell wall with rice NAC transcription factors regulating secondary wall formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Kouki; Sakamoto, Shingo; Kawai, Tetsushi; Kobayashi, Yoshinori; Sato, Kazuhito; Ichinose, Yasunori; Yaoi, Katsuro; Akiyoshi-Endo, Miho; Sato, Hiroko; Takamizo, Tadashi; Ohme-Takagi, Masaru; Mitsuda, Nobutaka

    2013-01-01

    Plant tissues that require structural rigidity synthesize a thick, strong secondary cell wall of lignin, cellulose and hemicelluloses in a complicated bridged structure. Master regulators of secondary wall synthesis were identified in dicots, and orthologs of these regulators have been identified in monocots, but regulation of secondary cell wall formation in monocots has not been extensively studied. Here we demonstrate that the rice transcription factors SECONDARY WALL NAC DOMAIN PROTEINs (SWNs) can regulate secondary wall formation in rice (Oryza sativa) and are potentially useful for engineering the monocot cell wall. The OsSWN1 promoter is highly active in sclerenchymatous cells of the leaf blade and less active in xylem cells. By contrast, the OsSWN2 promoter is highly active in xylem cells and less active in sclerenchymatous cells. OsSWN2 splicing variants encode two proteins; the shorter protein (OsSWN2S) has very low transcriptional activation ability, but the longer protein (OsSWN2L) and OsSWN1 have strong transcriptional activation ability. In rice, expression of an OsSWN2S chimeric repressor, driven by the OsSWN2 promoter, resulted in stunted growth and para-wilting (leaf rolling and browning under normal water conditions) due to impaired vascular vessels. The same OsSWN2S chimeric repressor, driven by the OsSWN1 promoter, caused a reduction of cell wall thickening in sclerenchymatous cells, a drooping leaf phenotype, reduced lignin and xylose contents and increased digestibility as forage. These data suggest that OsSWNs regulate secondary wall formation in rice and manipulation of OsSWNs may enable improvements in monocotyledonous crops for forage or biofuel applications. PMID:24098302

  3. A phosphorylated pseudokinase complex controls cell wall synthesis in mycobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gee, Christine L; Papavinasasundaram, Kadamba G; Blair, Sloane R; Baer, Christina E; Falick, Arnold M; King, David S; Griffin, Jennifer E; Venghatakrishnan, Harene; Zukauskas, Andrew; Wei, Jun-Rong; Dhiman, Rakesh K; Crick, Dean C; Rubin, Eric J; Sassetti, Christopher M; Alber, Tom

    2012-01-24

    Prokaryotic cell wall biosynthesis is coordinated with cell growth and division, but the mechanisms regulating this dynamic process remain obscure. Here, we describe a phosphorylation-dependent regulatory complex that controls peptidoglycan (PG) biosynthesis in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. We found that PknB, a PG-responsive Ser-Thr protein kinase (STPK), initiates complex assembly by phosphorylating a kinase-like domain in the essential PG biosynthetic protein, MviN. This domain was structurally diverged from active kinases and did not mediate phosphotransfer. Threonine phosphorylation of the pseudokinase domain recruited the FhaA protein through its forkhead-associated (FHA) domain. The crystal structure of this phosphorylated pseudokinase-FHA domain complex revealed the basis of FHA domain recognition, which included unexpected contacts distal to the phosphorylated threonine. Conditional degradation of these proteins in mycobacteria demonstrated that MviN was essential for growth and PG biosynthesis and that FhaA regulated these processes at the cell poles and septum. Controlling this spatially localized PG regulatory complex is only one of several cellular roles ascribed to PknB, suggesting that the capacity to coordinate signaling across multiple processes is an important feature conserved between eukaryotic and prokaryotic STPK networks. PMID:22275220

  4. The role of wall calcium in the extension of cell walls of soybean hypocotyls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virk, S. S.; Cleland, R. E.

    1990-01-01

    Calcium crosslinks are load-bearing bonds in soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr.) hypocotyl cell walls, but they are not the same load-bearing bonds that are broken during acid-mediated cell elongation. This conclusion is reached by studying the relationship between wall calcium, pH and the facilitated creep of frozen-thawed soybean hypocotyl sections. Supporting data include the following observations: 1) 2-[(2-bis-[carboxymethyl]amino-5-methylphenoxy)methyl]-6-methoxy-8-bis[car boxymethyl]aminoquinoline (Quin 2) and ethylene glycol-bis(2-aminoethyl ether)-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (EGTA) caused only limited facilitated creep as compared with acid, despite removal of comparable or larger amounts of wall calcium; 2) the pH-response curves for calcium removal and acid-facilitated creep were different; 3) reversible acid-extension occurred even after removal of almost all wall calcium with Quin 2; and 4) growth of abraded sections did not involve a proportional loss of wall calcium. Removal of wall calcium, however, increased the capacity of the walls to undergo acid-facilitated creep. These data indicate that breakage of calcium crosslinks is not a major mechanism of cell-wall loosening in soybean hypocotyl tissues.

  5. On-Off Switches for Secondary Cell Wall Biosynthesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huan-Zhong Wang; Richard A.Dixon

    2012-01-01

    Secondary cell walls provide plants with rigidity and strength to support their body weight and ensure water and nutrient transport.They also provide textiles,timber,and potentially second-generation biofuels for human use.Genes responsible for synthesis of the different cell wall components,namely cellulose,hemicelluloses,and lignin,are coordinately expressed and under transcriptional regulation.In the past several years,cell wall-related NAC and MYB transcription factors have been intensively investigated in different species and shown to be master switches of secondary cell wall biosynthesis.Positive and negative regulators,which function upstream of NAC master switches,have also been identified in different plant tissues.Further elucidation of the regulatory mechanisms of cell wall synthesis will facilitate the engineering of plant feedstocks suitable for biofuel production.

  6. On-off switches for secondary cell wall biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Huan-Zhong; Dixon, Richard A

    2012-03-01

    Secondary cell walls provide plants with rigidity and strength to support their body weight and ensure water and nutrient transport. They also provide textiles, timber, and potentially second-generation biofuels for human use. Genes responsible for synthesis of the different cell wall components, namely cellulose, hemicelluloses, and lignin, are coordinately expressed and under transcriptional regulation. In the past several years, cell wall-related NAC and MYB transcription factors have been intensively investigated in different species and shown to be master switches of secondary cell wall biosynthesis. Positive and negative regulators, which function upstream of NAC master switches, have also been identified in different plant tissues. Further elucidation of the regulatory mechanisms of cell wall synthesis will facilitate the engineering of plant feedstocks suitable for biofuel production. PMID:22138968

  7. High-throughput microarray mapping of cell wall polymers in roots and tubers during the viscosity reducing process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yuhong, Huang; Willats, William George Tycho; Lange, Lene;

    2015-01-01

    Viscosity reduction has a great impact on the efficiency of ethanol production when using roots and tubers as feedstock. Plant cell wall-degrading enzymes (PCWDEs) have been successfully applied to overcome the challenges posed by high viscosity. However, the changes in cell wall polymers during...... the viscosity reducing process are poorly characterized. Comprehensive microarray polymer profiling (CoMPP), which is a high-throughput microarray, was used for the first time to map changes in the cell wall polymers of sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas), cassava (Manihot esculenta) and Canna edulis Ker. (Canna...... edulis) over the entire viscosity reducing process. The results indicated that the composition of cell wall polymers among these three roots and tubers was markedly different. The gel-like matrix and glycoprotein network in the Canna edulis Ker. cell wall caused difficulty in viscosity reduction...

  8. Identifying new lignin bioengineering targets: 1. Monolignol-substitute impacts on lignin formation and cell wall fermentability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Fachuang

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent discoveries highlighting the metabolic malleability of plant lignification indicate that lignin can be engineered to dramatically alter its composition and properties. Current plant biotechnology efforts are primarily aimed at manipulating the biosynthesis of normal monolignols, but in the future apoplastic targeting of phenolics from other metabolic pathways may provide new approaches for designing lignins that are less inhibitory toward the enzymatic hydrolysis of structural polysaccharides, both with and without biomass pretreatment. To identify promising new avenues for lignin bioengineering, we artificially lignified cell walls from maize cell suspensions with various combinations of normal monolignols (coniferyl and sinapyl alcohols plus a variety of phenolic monolignol substitutes. Cell walls were then incubated in vitro with anaerobic rumen microflora to assess the potential impact of lignin modifications on the enzymatic degradability of fibrous crops used for ruminant livestock or biofuel production. Results In the absence of anatomical constraints to digestion, lignification with normal monolignols hindered both the rate and extent of cell wall hydrolysis by rumen microflora. Inclusion of methyl caffeate, caffeoylquinic acid, or feruloylquinic acid with monolignols considerably depressed lignin formation and strikingly improved the degradability of cell walls. In contrast, dihydroconiferyl alcohol, guaiacyl glycerol, epicatechin, epigallocatechin, and epigallocatechin gallate readily formed copolymer-lignins with normal monolignols; cell wall degradability was moderately enhanced by greater hydroxylation or 1,2,3-triol functionality. Mono- or diferuloyl esters with various aliphatic or polyol groups readily copolymerized with monolignols, but in some cases they accelerated inactivation of wall-bound peroxidase and reduced lignification; cell wall degradability was influenced by lignin content and the degree

  9. ENHANCED DEGRADATION OF CAPTAN BY IMMOBILIZED CELLS OF BACILLUS CIRCULANS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veena More

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The possibility of using Bacillus circulans in degrading captan was evaluated by comparing the captan degradation rate by freely suspended and immobilized cells on agar, sodium alginate (SA, polyacrylamide (PA and polyurethane-foam (PUF in batch and repeated batch degradations. Under batch degradations, 50, 60, 72, and 88% of 0.1% captan was degraded by freely suspended cells, agar-, SA-, and PA-immobilized cells, respectively in 72 h; whereas 15, 47.5, 67.7 and 75% of 0.2% captan was degraded by freely suspended cells, agar-, SA-, and PA-immobilized cells, respectively in 72 h. However, 0.1 and 0.2% captan were completely degraded by PUF-immobilized cells in 48 and 72 h, respectively. Under repeated batch degradations, PUF-immobilized cells were reused more than 40 cycles for 72 h without losing the captan degradation ability, while the cells immobilized on agar, SA, and the PA could be reused for 15, 20, and 25 cycles, respectively. A significant 0.1% captan degradation by PUF-immobilized cells was observed at pH 4.0 - 10.0 and 20 - 40 ºC ranges. In contrast, freely suspended cells only degraded captan at optimum pH of 7.0 and 30 ºC. The PUF-immobilized cells were able to significantly degrade captan for 120 days at 4 ºC without losing the captan degradation ability; whereas this ability was lost in 120 days for freely suspended cells. Since the application of captan leads to pollution and reduces soil fertility, the use of immobilized cells of Bacillus circulans can thus be a better cost-effective strategy to decontaminate captan polluted sites.

  10. 马铃薯干腐病菌侵染过程中切片组织细胞壁降解酶的变化%Changes of Cell Wall Degrading Enzymes in Potato Tuber Tissue Slices Infected by Fusarium sulphureum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨志敏; 毕阳; 李永才; 寇宗红; 包改红; 刘成琨; 王毅; 王蒂

    2012-01-01

    [目的]探讨干腐病菌(Fusarium sulphureum Schlechlendahl)侵染过程中马铃薯切片组织主要细胞壁降解酶(cell wall degrading enzymes,CWDEs)活性的动态变化.[方法]陇薯3号马铃薯块茎组织切片接种F.sulphureum后,不同培养天数取样测定并比较分析主要CWDEs活性变化.[结果]F.sulphureum侵染的组织均能产生多聚半乳糖醛酸酶(PG)、果胶甲基半乳糖醛酸酶(PMG)、纤维素酶(Cx)、β-葡萄糖苷酶、多聚半乳糖醛酸反式消除酶(PGTE)、果胶甲基反式消除酶(PMTE)、果胶甲基酯酶(PME)、果胶裂解酶(PML),但PG、PMG、Cx、β-葡萄糖苷酶活性显著高于其它酶.在侵染前期(1-3 d)PMG和Cx出现高峰,PG在后期(4-6 d)活性增高,而β-葡萄糖苷酶在整个侵染过程中活性一直呈上升趋势.[结论]CWDEs是F.sulphureum侵染和扩展过程中主要的致病因子,且各种CWDEs在致病中发挥作用的时期不同.%[Objective] The dynamic changes of main cell wall degrading enzymes (CWDEs) activities in potato tuber tissue slices infected by Fusarium sulphureum were investigated. [Method] Major CWDEs activities of potato tuber slices tissue (Longshu No.3) inoculated with F. sulphureum were detected and comparatively analyzed during different sampling period. [Result] A series of CWDEs including polygalacturonase (PG), polymethyl-galacturonase (PMG), carboxymethyl cellulose (Cx), β-glucosidase, polygalacturonic acid trans-eliminase (PGTE), pectin methyl-trans-eliminase (PMTE), pectin methylesterase (PE) and pectate lyase were detected in infected tissue. Whereas PG, PMG, Cx, and p-glucosidase showed higher activities as compared with others. The activity of PMG and Cx kept higher during early infection period (1-3 days after infection), but higher PG activity appeared during later infection period (4-6 days after inoculation), but p-glucosidase showed a rising trend during the enzyme dynamics analysis. [ Conclusion] These findings suggested that CWDEs

  11. How cell wall complexity influences saccharification efficiency in Miscanthus sinensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Souza, Amanda P; Alvim Kamei, Claire L; Torres, Andres F; Pattathil, Sivakumar; Hahn, Michael G; Trindade, Luisa M; Buckeridge, Marcos S

    2015-07-01

    The production of bioenergy from grasses has been developing quickly during the last decade, with Miscanthus being among the most important choices for production of bioethanol. However, one of the key barriers to producing bioethanol is the lack of information about cell wall structure. Cell walls are thought to display compositional differences that lead to emergence of a very high level of complexity, resulting in great diversity in cell wall architectures. In this work, a set of different techniques was used to access the complexity of cell walls of different genotypes of Miscanthus sinensis in order to understand how they interfere with saccharification efficiency. Three genotypes of M. sinensis displaying different patterns of correlation between lignin content and saccharification efficiency were subjected to cell wall analysis by quantitative/qualitative analytical techniques such as monosaccharide composition, oligosaccharide profiling, and glycome profiling. When saccharification efficiency was correlated negatively with lignin, the structural features of arabinoxylan and xyloglucan were found to contribute positively to hydrolysis. In the absence of such correlation, different types of pectins, and some mannans contributed to saccharification efficiency. Different genotypes of M. sinensis were shown to display distinct interactions among their cell wall components, which seem to influence cell wall hydrolysis. PMID:25908240

  12. Technological Implications of Modifying the Extent of Cell Wall-Proanthocyanidin Interactions Using Enzymes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Belén Bautista-Ortín

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The transference and reactivity of proanthocyanidins is an important issue that affects the technological processing of some fruits, such as grapes and apples. These processes are affected by proanthocyanidins bound to cell wall polysaccharides, which are present in high concentrations during the processing of the fruits. Therefore, the effective extraction of proanthocyanidins from fruits to their juices or derived products will depend on the ability to manage these associations, and, in this respect, enzymes that degrade these polysaccharides could play an important role. The main objective of this work was to test the role of pure hydrolytic enzymes (polygalacturonase and cellulose and a commercial enzyme containing these two activities on the extent of proanthocyanidin-cell wall interactions. The results showed that the modification promoted by enzymes reduced the amount of proanthocyanidins adsorbed to cell walls since they contributed to the degradation and release of the cell wall polysaccharides, which diffused into the model solution. Some of these released polysaccharides also presented some reactivity towards the proanthocyanidins present in a model solution.

  13. Technological Implications of Modifying the Extent of Cell Wall-Proanthocyanidin Interactions Using Enzymes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bautista-Ortín, Ana Belén; Ben Abdallah, Rim; Castro-López, Liliana del Rocío; Jiménez-Martínez, María Dolores; Gómez-Plaza, Encarna

    2016-01-01

    The transference and reactivity of proanthocyanidins is an important issue that affects the technological processing of some fruits, such as grapes and apples. These processes are affected by proanthocyanidins bound to cell wall polysaccharides, which are present in high concentrations during the processing of the fruits. Therefore, the effective extraction of proanthocyanidins from fruits to their juices or derived products will depend on the ability to manage these associations, and, in this respect, enzymes that degrade these polysaccharides could play an important role. The main objective of this work was to test the role of pure hydrolytic enzymes (polygalacturonase and cellulose) and a commercial enzyme containing these two activities on the extent of proanthocyanidin-cell wall interactions. The results showed that the modification promoted by enzymes reduced the amount of proanthocyanidins adsorbed to cell walls since they contributed to the degradation and release of the cell wall polysaccharides, which diffused into the model solution. Some of these released polysaccharides also presented some reactivity towards the proanthocyanidins present in a model solution. PMID:26797601

  14. A proteomic and genetic analysis of the Neurospora crassa conidia cell wall proteins identifies two glycosyl hydrolases involved in cell wall remodeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ao, Jie; Aldabbous, Mash'el; Notaro, Marysa J; Lojacono, Mark; Free, Stephen J

    2016-09-01

    A proteomic analysis of the conidial cell wall identified 35 cell wall proteins. A comparison with the proteome of the vegetative hyphae showed that 16 cell wall proteins were shared, and that these shared cell wall proteins were cell wall biosynthetic proteins or cell wall structural proteins. Deletion mutants for 34 of the genes were analyzed for phenotypes indicative of conidial cell wall defects. Mutants for two cell wall glycosyl hydrolases, the CGL-1 β-1,3-glucanase (NCU07523) and the NAG-1 exochitinase (NCU10852), were found to have a conidial separation phenotype. These two enzymes function in remodeling the cell wall between adjacent conidia to facilitate conidia formation and dissemination. Using promoter::RFP and promoter::GFP constructs, we demonstrated that the promoters for 15 of the conidia-specific cell wall genes, including cgl-1 and nag-1, provided for conidia-specific gene expression or for a significant increase in their expression during conidiation. PMID:27381444

  15. Mechanical properties of plant cell walls probed by relaxation spectra

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Steen Laugesen; Ray, Peter Martin; Karlsson, Anders Ola;

    2011-01-01

    type. This may be due to the plant’s ability to compensate for the wall modification or because the biophysical method that is often employed, determination of simple elastic modulus and breakstrength, lacks the resolving power necessary for detecting subtle mechanical phenotypes. Here, we apply...... a method, determination of relaxation spectra, which probes, and can separate, the viscoelastic properties of different cell wall components (i.e. those properties that depend on the elastic behavior of load-bearing wall polymers combined with viscous interactions between them). A computer program, Bayes......Relax, that deduces relaxation spectra from appropriate rheological measurements is presented and made accessible through a Web interface. BayesRelax models the cell wall as a continuum of relaxing elements, and the ability of the method to resolve small differences in cell wall mechanical properties is demonstrated...

  16. Glycosytransferases involved in arabinosylation of cell wall extensins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Bent L; Harholt, Jesper; Jørgensen, Bodil;

    2011-01-01

    Extensins are a group of ancient hydroxyproline rich cell wall glycoproteins that are found in some chlorophyte algae (such as Chlamydomonas), where they constitute the main wall building block, as well as in higher plant cell walls, where they constitute a relatively minor component of particular...... al (2007) Molecular characterization of two Arabidopsis thaliana glycosyltransferase mutants, rra-1 and -2, which have a reduced content of arabinose in a polymer tightly associated with the cellulose residue. Plant Mol. Biol. 64:439-451 Gille et al (2009) Identification of plant cell wall mutants...... importance to wall assembly. The GlycosylTransferase family 77 (GT-family-77) rra1-2 (Egelund et al. 2007) and xeg113 (Gille et al. 2009) Arabidopsis, mutants have been suggested to be arabinosyltransferases involved in arabinosylation of extensins. We have now isolated extensins from these mutants and a new...

  17. Cell Wall Metabolism in Response to Abiotic Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyacinthe Le Gall

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available This review focuses on the responses of the plant cell wall to several abiotic stresses including drought, flooding, heat, cold, salt, heavy metals, light, and air pollutants. The effects of stress on cell wall metabolism are discussed at the physiological (morphogenic, transcriptomic, proteomic and biochemical levels. The analysis of a large set of data shows that the plant response is highly complex. The overall effects of most abiotic stress are often dependent on the plant species, the genotype, the age of the plant, the timing of the stress application, and the intensity of this stress. This shows the difficulty of identifying a common pattern of stress response in cell wall architecture that could enable adaptation and/or resistance to abiotic stress. However, in most cases, two main mechanisms can be highlighted: (i an increased level in xyloglucan endotransglucosylase/hydrolase (XTH and expansin proteins, associated with an increase in the degree of rhamnogalacturonan I branching that maintains cell wall plasticity and (ii an increased cell wall thickening by reinforcement of the secondary wall with hemicellulose and lignin deposition. Taken together, these results show the need to undertake large-scale analyses, using multidisciplinary approaches, to unravel the consequences of stress on the cell wall. This will help identify the key components that could be targeted to improve biomass production under stress conditions.

  18. 2D-immunoblotting analysis of Sporothrix schenckii cell wall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Estela Ruiz-Baca

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available We utilized two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and immunoblotting (2D-immunoblotting with anti-Sporothrix schenckii antibodies to identify antigenic proteins in cell wall preparations obtained from the mycelial and yeast-like morphologies of the fungus. Results showed that a 70-kDa glycoprotein (Gp70 was the major antigen detected in the cell wall of both morphologies and that a 60-kDa glycoprotein was present only in yeast-like cells. In addition to the Gp70, the wall from filament cells showed four proteins with molecular weights of 48, 55, 66 and 67 kDa, some of which exhibited several isoforms. To our knowledge, this is the first 2D-immunoblotting analysis of the S. schenckii cell wall.

  19. Temporal sequence of cell wall disassembly events in developing fruits. 2. Analysis of blueberry (Vaccinium species).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicente, Ariel R; Ortugno, Claudia; Rosli, Hernan; Powell, Ann L T; Greve, L Carl; Labavitch, John M

    2007-05-16

    Softening and pathogen susceptibility are the major factors limiting the marketing of blueberries as fresh fruits, and these traits are associated with fruit cell wall structure. However, few studies that characterize wall modifications occurring during development and ripening have been reported for this fruit. In this study the ripening-associated modifications of blueberry fruit cell walls (composition, pectin and hemicellulose solubilization, and depolymerization) at five stages of ripeness have been analyzed. Xylose was found to be the most abundant noncellulosic neutral sugar associated with fruit walls, and the observed high Xyl/Glc ratio suggested that xylans, which are usually a minor hemicellulosic fruit wall component, are abundant in blueberry. The pectic matrix showed increased solubilization at early and intermediate stages of ripening, but no changes were detected in late ripening. Furthermore, little reduction in pectin polymer size occurred during blueberry ripening. In contrast, hemicellulose levels decreased as ripening progressed, and a clear depolymerization of these components was observed. A model for cell wall degradation in this fruit is discussed. PMID:17428068

  20. The dynamics of plant cell-wall polysaccharide decomposition in leaf-cutting ant fungus gardens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moller, Isabel Eva; de Fine Licht, Henrik Hjarvard; Harholt, Jesper;

    2011-01-01

    The degradation of live plant biomass in fungus gardens of leaf-cutting ants is poorly characterised but fundamental for understanding the mutual advantages and efficiency of this obligate nutritional symbiosis. Controversies about the extent to which the garden-symbiont Leucocoprinus gongylophorus......, to map the occurrence of cell wall polymers in consecutive sections of the fungus garden of the leaf-cutting ant Acromyrmex echinatior. We show that pectin, xyloglucan and some xylan epitopes are degraded, whereas more highly substituted xylan and cellulose epitopes remain as residuals in the waste...

  1. Up against the wall: is yeast cell wall integrity ensured by mechanosensing in plasma membrane microdomains?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kock, Christian; Dufrêne, Yves F; Heinisch, Jürgen J

    2015-02-01

    Yeast cell wall integrity (CWI) signaling serves as a model of the regulation of fungal cell wall synthesis and provides the basis for the development of antifungal drugs. A set of five membrane-spanning sensors (Wsc1 to Wsc3, Mid2, and Mtl1) detect cell surface stress and commence the signaling pathway upon perturbations of either the cell wall structure or the plasma membrane. We here summarize the latest advances in the structure/function relationship primarily of the Wsc1 sensor and critically review the evidence that it acts as a mechanosensor. The relevance and physiological significance of the information obtained for the function of the other CWI sensors, as well as expected future developments, are discussed.

  2. Effect of steam treatment on the properties of wood cell walls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Yafang; Berglund, Lars; Salmén, Lennart

    2011-01-10

    Steam treatment is a hygrothermal method of potential industrial significance for improving the dimensional stability and durability of wood materials. The steaming results in different chemical and micromechanical changes in the nanostructured biocomposite that comprise a wood cell wall. In this study, spruce wood ( Picea abies Karst.) that had been subjected to high-temperature steaming up to 180 °C was examined, using imaging Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) microscopy and nanoindentation to track changes in the chemical structure and the micromechanical properties of the secondary cell wall. Similar changes in the chemical components, due to the steam treatment, were found in earlywood and latewood. A progressive degradation of the carbonyl groups in the glucuronic acid unit of xylan and a loss of mannose units in the glucomannan backbone, that is, a degradation of glucomannan, together with a loss of the C═O group linked to the aromatic skeleton in lignin, was found. The development of the hygroscopic and micromechanical properties that occurred with an elevation in the steam temperature correlated well with this pattern of degradation in the constituents in the biocomposite matrix in the cell wall (hemicellulose and lignin).

  3. Plant cell walls: New insights from ancient species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Iben; Willats, William George Tycho

    2008-01-01

    Cell walls are a defining feature of plants and have numerous crucial roles in growth and development. They are also the largest source of terrestrial biomass and have many important industrial applications - ranging from bulk products to functional food ingredients. There is considerable interest...... in the structure and functions of cell walls, and in the evolution of their remarkably complex polysaccharide structures. The grasses and cereals (order Poales), have long been regarded as being unique in that their cell walls contain an unbranched homopolymer, (1¿3)(1¿4)-ß-D-glucan, in which short blocks of (1...... in horsetails (Equisetales order) was therefore significant and has prompted a re-evaluation of some of the current views on cell wall evolution and structural diversity. Addendum to: Sørensen I, Pettolino FA, Wilson SM, Doblin MS, Johansen B, Bacic A, Willats WGT. Mixed-linkage (1¿3),(1¿4)-ß...

  4. Immunocytochemical characterization of the cell walls of bean cell suspensions during habituation and dehabituation to dichlobenil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garcia-Angulo, P.; Willats, W. G. T.; Encina, A. E.;

    2006-01-01

    and fluorochrome labelling of resin-embedded sections, and immunodot assays (IDAs) of cell wall fractions. The cell walls from bean cell suspensions with initial levels of habituation to dichlobenil had decreased levels of cellulose, but this effect lessened with increasing numbers of subcultures. All cell walls...... in habituated cells also diminished with the increasing number of subcultures. Habituated cells also liberated less extensin into the medium. In habituated cells, a decrease in the cell wall arabinogalactan protein (AGP) labelling was observed both in cell walls and in the culture medium. The increase...... in the number of subcultures in 0.3 µM dichlobenil was accompanied by an increment in some pectic epitopes (JIM5 and LM5) and a decrease in other pectic and in protein epitopes (JIM7, PAM1, LM6, LM2 and MAC207), indicating a re-structuring of cell walls throughout the habituation procedure. Dehabituated cells...

  5. Analyzing the complex machinery of cell wall biosynthesis

    OpenAIRE

    Timmers, J.F.P.

    2009-01-01

    The plant cell wall polymers make up most of the plant biomass and provide the raw material for many economically important products including food, feed, bio-materials, chemicals, textiles, and biofuel. This broad range of functions and applications make the biosynthesis of these polysaccharides a highly interesting target of scientific research. In this thesis a protein-protein interaction strategy was used to gain insight in the cell wall biosynthesis of Arabidopsis thaliana and to identif...

  6. Patterns of expression of cell wall related genes in sugarcane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lima D.U.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Our search for genes related to cell wall metabolism in the sugarcane expressed sequence tag (SUCEST database (http://sucest.lbi.dcc.unicamp.br resulted in 3,283 reads (1% of the total reads which were grouped into 459 clusters (potential genes with an average of 7.1 reads per cluster. To more clearly display our correlation coefficients, we constructed surface maps which we used to investigate the relationship between cell wall genes and the sugarcane tissues libraries from which they came. The only significant correlations that we found between cell wall genes and/or their expression within particular libraries were neutral or synergetic. Genes related to cellulose biosynthesis were from the CesA family, and were found to be the most abundant cell wall related genes in the SUCEST database. We found that the highest number of CesA reads came from the root and stem libraries. The genes with the greatest number of reads were those involved in cell wall hydrolases (e.g. beta-1,3-glucanases, xyloglucan endo-beta-transglycosylase, beta-glucosidase and endo-beta-mannanase. Correlation analyses by surface mapping revealed that the expression of genes related to biosynthesis seems to be associated with the hydrolysis of hemicelluloses, pectin hydrolases being mainly associated with xyloglucan hydrolases. The patterns of cell wall related gene expression in sugarcane based on the number of reads per cluster reflected quite well the expected physiological characteristics of the tissues. This is the first work to provide a general view on plant cell wall metabolism through the expression of related genes in almost all the tissues of a plant at the same time. For example, developing flowers behaved similarly to both meristematic tissues and leaf-root transition zone tissues. Besides providing a basis for future research on the mechanisms of plant development which involve the cell wall, our findings will provide valuable tools for plant engineering in the

  7. Salt stress causes cell wall damage in yeast cells lacking mitochondrial DNA

    OpenAIRE

    Qiuqiang Gao; Liang-Chun Liou; Qun Ren; Xiaoming Bao; Zhaojie Zhang

    2015-01-01

    The yeast cell wall plays an important role in maintaining cell morphology, cell integrity and response to environmental stresses. Here, we report that salt stress causes cell wall damage in yeast cells lacking mitochondrial DNA (ρ0). Upon salt treatment, the cell wall is thickened, broken and becomes more sensitive to the cell wall-perturbing agent sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS). Also, SCW11 mRNA levels are elevated in ρ0 cells. Deletion of SCW11 significantly decreases the sensitivity of ρ0 c...

  8. Pectin, a versatile polysaccharide present in plant cell walls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voragen, A.G.J.; Coenen, G.J.; Verhoef, R.P.; Schols, H.A.

    2009-01-01

    Pectin or pectic substances are collective names for a group of closely associated polysaccharides present in plant cell walls where they contribute to complex physiological processes like cell growth and cell differentiation and so determine the integrity and rigidity of plant tissue. They also pla

  9. Structure of the cell wall of mango after application of ionizing radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Josenilda M.; Villar, Heldio P.; Pimentel, Rejane M. M.

    2012-11-01

    Cells of the mesocarp of mango cultivar Tommy Atkins were analyzed by Transmission Electron Microscope—TEM to evaluate the effects of doses of 0.5 and 1.0 kGy applied immediately after the fruit and after storage for twenty days at a temperature of 12 °C followed by 5 days of simulated marketing at a temperature of 21 °C. No alteration was found in the structure of the cell wall, middle lamella, and plasma membrane of fruits when analyzed immediately after application of doses. The mesocarp cell structure of the cell wall, middle lamella, and the plasma membrane did however undergo changes after storage. Fruits that received a dose of 0.5 kGy displayed slight changes in cell wall structure and slight disintegration of the middle lamella. Fruits that received a dose of 1.0 kGy displayed more severe changes in the structure of the cell wall, greater middle lamella degradation, and displacement of the plasma membrane.

  10. Bacterial glycobiology: rhamnose-containing cell wall polysaccharides in Gram-positive bacteria.

    OpenAIRE

    Mistou, Michel-Yves; Sutcliffe, Iain; van Sorge, Nina

    2016-01-01

    The composition of the Gram-positive cell wall is typically described as containing peptidoglycan, proteins and essential secondary cell wall structures called teichoic acids, which comprise approximately half of the cell wall mass. The cell walls of many species within the genera Streptococcus, Enterococcus and Lactococcus contain large amounts of the sugar rhamnose, which is incorporated in cell wall-anchored polysaccharides (CWP) that possibly function as homologues of well-studied wall te...

  11. Determining the polysaccharide composition of plant cell walls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettolino, Filomena A; Walsh, Cherie; Fincher, Geoffrey B; Bacic, Antony

    2012-09-01

    The plant cell wall is a chemically complex structure composed mostly of polysaccharides. Detailed analyses of these cell wall polysaccharides are essential for our understanding of plant development and for our use of plant biomass (largely wall material) in the food, agriculture, fabric, timber, biofuel and biocomposite industries. We present analytical techniques not only to define the fine chemical structures of individual cell wall polysaccharides but also to estimate the overall polysaccharide composition of cell wall preparations. The procedure covers the preparation of cell walls, together with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS)-based methods, for both the analysis of monosaccharides as their volatile alditol acetate derivatives and for methylation analysis to determine linkage positions between monosaccharide residues as their volatile partially methylated alditol acetate derivatives. Analysis time will vary depending on both the method used and the tissue type, and ranges from 2 d for a simple neutral sugar composition to 2 weeks for a carboxyl reduction/methylation linkage analysis. PMID:22864200

  12. Evaluation of cell wall preparations for proteomics: a new procedure for purifying cell walls from Arabidopsis hypocotyls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Canut Hervé

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ultimate goal of proteomic analysis of a cell compartment should be the exhaustive identification of resident proteins; excluding proteins from other cell compartments. Reaching such a goal closely depends on the reliability of the isolation procedure for the cell compartment of interest. Plant cell walls possess specific difficulties: (i the lack of a surrounding membrane may result in the loss of cell wall proteins (CWP during the isolation procedure, (ii polysaccharide networks of cellulose, hemicelluloses and pectins form potential traps for contaminants such as intracellular proteins. Several reported procedures to isolate cell walls for proteomic analyses led to the isolation of a high proportion (more than 50% of predicted intracellular proteins. Since isolated cell walls should hold secreted proteins, one can imagine alternative procedures to prepare cell walls containing a lower proportion of contaminant proteins. Results The rationales of several published procedures to isolate cell walls for proteomics were analyzed, with regard to the bioinformatic-predicted subcellular localization of the identified proteins. Critical steps were revealed: (i homogenization in low ionic strength acid buffer to retain CWP, (ii purification through increasing density cushions, (iii extensive washes with a low ionic strength acid buffer to retain CWP while removing as many cytosolic proteins as possible, and (iv absence of detergents. A new procedure was developed to prepare cell walls from etiolated hypocotyls of Arabidopsis thaliana. After salt extraction, a high proportion of proteins predicted to be secreted was released (73%, belonging to the same functional classes as proteins identified using previously described protocols. Finally, removal of intracellular proteins was obtained using detergents, but their amount represented less than 3% in mass of the total protein extract, based on protein quantification. Conclusion The

  13. Another brick in the cell wall: biosynthesis dependent growth model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adelin Barbacci

    Full Text Available Expansive growth of plant cell is conditioned by the cell wall ability to extend irreversibly. This process is possible if (i a tensile stress is developed in the cell wall due to the coupling effect between turgor pressure and the modulation of its mechanical properties through enzymatic and physicochemical reactions and if (ii new cell wall elements can be synthesized and assembled to the existing wall. In other words, expansive growth is the result of coupling effects between mechanical, thermal and chemical energy. To have a better understanding of this process, models must describe the interplay between physical or mechanical variable with biological events. In this paper we propose a general unified and theoretical framework to model growth in function of energy forms and their coupling. This framework is based on irreversible thermodynamics. It is then applied to model growth of the internodal cell of Chara corallina modulated by changes in pressure and temperature. The results describe accurately cell growth in term of length increment but also in term of cell pectate biosynthesis and incorporation to the expanding wall. Moreover, the classical growth model based on Lockhart's equation such as the one proposed by Ortega, appears as a particular and restrictive case of the more general growth equation developed in this paper.

  14. Analysis of bulk and inorganic degradation products of stones, mortars and wall paintings by portable Raman microprobe spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Alonso, M; Castro, K; Martinez-Arkarazo, I; Angulo, M; Olazabal, M A; Madariaga, J M

    2004-05-01

    This work reports the use of a portable Raman microprobe spectrometer for the analysis of bulk and decaying compounds in carbonaceous materials such as stones, mortars and wall paintings. The analysed stones include limestone, dolomite and carbonaceous sandstone, gypsum and calcium oxalate, both mono- and dihydrated, being the main inorganic degradation products detected. Mortars include bulk phases with pure gypsum, calcite and mixtures of both or with sand, soluble salts being the most important degradation products. The pigments detected in several wall paintings include Prussian blue, iron oxide red, iron oxide yellow, vermilion, carbon black and lead white. Three different decaying processes have been characterised in the mortars of the wall paintings: (a) a massive absorption of nitrates that reacted with calcium carbonate and promoted the unbinding of pigment grains, (b) the formation of black crusts in the vault of the presbytery and (c) the thermodecomposition of pigments due to a fire.

  15. Degradation in Solid Oxide Cells During High Temperature Electrolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manohar Sohal

    2009-05-01

    Idaho National Laboratory has an ongoing project to generate hydrogen from steam using solid oxide electrolysis cells. One goal of that project is to address the technical and degradation issues associated with solid oxide electrolysis cells. This report covers a variety of these degradation issues, which were discussed during a workshop on “Degradation in Solid Oxide Electrolysis Cells and Strategies for its Mitigation,” held in Phoenix, AZ on October 27, 2008. Three major degradation issues related to solid oxide electrolysis cells discussed at the workshop are: • Delamination of O2-electrode and bond layer on steam/O2-electrode side • Contaminants (Ni, Cr, Si, etc.) on reaction sites (triple-phase boundary) • Loss of electrical/ionic conductivity of electrolyte. This list is not all inclusive, but the workshop summary can be useful in providing a direction for future research related to the degradation of solid oxide electrolysis cells.

  16. Altered cell wall disassembly during ripening of Cnr tomato fruit : implications for cell wall adhesion and fruit softening

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Orfila, C.; Huisman, M.M.H.; Willats, W.G.T.; Alebeek, van G.J.W.M.; Schols, H.A.; Seymour, G.B.; Knox, J.P.

    2002-01-01

    The Cnr (Colourless non-ripening) tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) mutant has an aberrant fruit-ripening phenotype in which fruit do not soften and have reduced cell adhesion between pericarp cells. Cell walls from Cnr fruit were analysed in order to assess the possible contribution of pectic

  17. Pt/C Fuel Cell Catalyst Degradation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zana, Alessandro

    This thesis investigates the degradation behavior of Pt/C catalysts under simulated automotive conditions. By using the “tool box” synthesis method the Pt loading has been changed from low to high Pt loadings, therefore permitting to study the role of Pt on the degradation of high surface area (H...

  18. Pectic arabinan side chains are essential for pollen cell wall integrity during pollen development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cankar, Katarina; Kortstee, Anne; Toonen, Marcel A J; Wolters-Arts, Mieke; Houbein, Rudolf; Mariani, Celestina; Ulvskov, Peter; Jorgensen, Bodil; Schols, Henk A; Visser, Richard G F; Trindade, Luisa M

    2014-05-01

    Pectin is a complex polysaccharide and an integral part of the primary plant cell wall and middle lamella, contributing to cell wall mechanical strength and cell adhesion. To understand the structure-function relationships of pectin in the cell wall, a set of transgenic potato lines with altered pectin composition was analysed. The expression of genes encoding enzymes involved in pectin acetylation, degradation of the rhamnogalacturonan backbone and type and length of neutral side chains, arabinan and galactan in particular, has been altered. Upon crossing of different transgenic lines, some transgenes were not transmitted to the next generation when these lines were used as a pollen donor, suggesting male sterility. Viability of mature pollen was severely decreased in potato lines with reduced pectic arabinan, but not in lines with altered galactan side chains. Anthers and pollen of different developmental stages were microscopically examined to study the phenotype in more detail. Scanning electron microscopy of flowers showed collapsed pollen grains in mature anthers and in earlier stages cytoplasmic protrusions at the site of the of kin pore, eventually leading to bursting of the pollen grain and leaking of the cytoplasm. This phenomenon is only observed after the microspores are released and the tapetum starts to degenerate. Timing of the phenotype indicates a role for pectic arabinan side chains during remodelling of the cell wall when the pollen grain is maturing and dehydrating.

  19. Cell wall staining with Trypan blue enables quantitative analysis of morphological changes in yeast cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liesche, Johannes; Marek, Magdalena; Günther-Pomorski, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    staining with fluorescent dyes is a valuable tool. Furthermore, cell wall staining is used to facilitate sub-cellular localization experiments with fluorescently-labeled proteins and the detection of yeast cells in non-fungal host tissues. Here, we report staining of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cell wall......Yeast cells are protected by a cell wall that plays an important role in the exchange of substances with the environment. The cell wall structure is dynamic and can adapt to different physiological states or environmental conditions. For the investigation of morphological changes, selective...... with Trypan Blue, which emits strong red fluorescence upon binding to chitin and yeast glucan; thereby, it facilitates cell wall analysis by confocal and super-resolution microscopy. The staining pattern of Trypan Blue was similar to that of the widely used UV-excitable, blue fluorescent cell wall stain...

  20. Overexpression of the carbohydrate binding module of strawberry expansin2 in Arabidopsis thaliana modifies plant growth and cell wall metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nardi, Cristina F; Villarreal, Natalia M; Rossi, Franco R; Martínez, Santiago; Martínez, Gustavo A; Civello, Pedro M

    2015-05-01

    Several cell wall enzymes are carbohydrate active enzymes that contain a putative Carbohydrate Binding Module (CBM) in their structures. The main function of these non-catalitic modules is to facilitate the interaction between the enzyme and its substrate. Expansins are non-hydrolytic proteins present in the cell wall, and their structure includes a CBM in the C-terminal that bind to cell wall polymers such as cellulose, hemicelluloses and pectins. We studied the ability of the Expansin2 CBM (CBMFaEXP2) from strawberry (Fragaria x ananassa, Duch) to modify the cell wall of Arabidopsis thaliana. Plants overexpressing CBMFaEXP2 were characterized phenotypically and biochemically. Transgenic plants were taller than wild type, possibly owing to a faster growth of the main stem. Cell walls of CBMFaEXP2-expressing plants were thicker and contained higher amount of pectins. Lower activity of a set of enzymes involved in cell wall degradation (PG, β-Gal, β-Xyl) was found, and the expression of the corresponding genes (AtPG, Atβ-Gal, Atβ-Xyl5) was reduced also. In addition, a decrease in the expression of two A. thaliana Expansin genes (AtEXP5 and AtEXP8) was observed. Transgenic plants were more resistant to Botrytis cinerea infection than wild type, possibly as a consequence of higher cell wall integrity. Our results support the hypothesis that the overexpression of a putative CBM is able to modify plant cell wall structure leading to modulation of wall loosening and plant growth. These findings might offer a tool to controlling physiological processes where cell wall disassembly is relevant, such as fruit softening. PMID:25837738

  1. Inhibitors targeting on cell wall biosynthesis pathway of MRSA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Haihong; Cheng, Guyue; Dai, Menghong; Wu, Qinghua; Yuan, Zonghui

    2012-11-01

    Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), widely known as a type of new superbug, has aroused world-wide concern. Cell wall biosynthesis pathway is an old but good target for the development of antibacterial agents. Peptidoglycan and wall teichoic acids (WTAs) biosynthesis are two main processes of the cell wall biosynthesis pathway (CWBP). Other than penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs), some key factors (Mur enzymes, lipid I or II precursor, etc.) in CWBP are becoming attractive molecule targets for the discovery of anti-MRSA compounds. A number of new compounds, with higher affinity for PBPs or with inhibitory activity on such molecule targets in CWBP of MRSA, have been in the pipeline recently. This review concludes recent research achievements and provides a complete picture of CWBP of MRSA, including the peptidoglycan and wall teichoic acids synthesis pathway. The potential inhibitors targeting on CWBP are subsequently presented to improve development of novel therapeutic strategies for MRSA. PMID:22898792

  2. The MP65 gene is required for cell wall integrity, adherence to epithelial cells and biofilm formation in Candida albicans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Girolamo Antonietta

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The MP65 gene of Candida albicans (orf19.1779 encodes a putative β-glucanase mannoprotein of 65 kDa, which plays a main role in a host-fungus relationship, morphogenesis and pathogenicity. In this study, we performed an extensive analysis of a mp65Δ mutant to assess the role of this protein in cell wall integrity, adherence to epithelial cells and biofilm formation. Results The mp65Δ mutant showed a high sensitivity to a range of cell wall-perturbing and degrading agents, especially Congo red, which induced morphological changes such as swelling, clumping and formation of hyphae. The mp65Δ mutant showed an activation of two MAPKs (Mkc1p and Cek1p, a high level of expression of two stress-related genes (DDR48 and SOD5, and a modulated expression of β-glucan epitopes, but no gross changes in cell wall polysaccharide composition. Interestingly, the mp65Δ mutant displayed a marked reduction in adhesion to BEC and Caco-2 cells and severe defects in biofilm formation when compared to the wild type. All of the mentioned properties were totally or partially recovered in a revertant strain, demonstrating the specificity of gene deletion. Conclusions We demonstrate that the MP65 gene of Candida albicans plays a significant role in maintaining cell wall integrity, as well as in adherence to epithelia and biofilm formation, which are major virulence attributes of this fungus.

  3. Co-delivery of cell-wall-forming enzymes in the same vesicle for coordinated fungal cell wall formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuster, Martin; Martin-Urdiroz, Magdalena; Higuchi, Yujiro; Hacker, Christian; Kilaru, Sreedhar; Gurr, Sarah J; Steinberg, Gero

    2016-01-01

    Fungal cells are surrounded by an extracellular cell wall. This complex matrix of proteins and polysaccharides protects against adverse stresses and determines the shape of fungal cells. The polysaccharides of the fungal wall include 1,3-β-glucan and chitin, which are synthesized by membrane-bound synthases at the growing cell tip. A hallmark of filamentous fungi is the class V chitin synthase, which carries a myosin-motor domain. In the corn smut fungus Ustilago maydis, the myosin-chitin synthase Mcs1 moves to the plasma membrane in secretory vesicles, being delivered by kinesin-1 and myosin-5. The myosin domain of Mcs1 enhances polar secretion by tethering vesicles at the site of exocytosis. It remains elusive, however, how other cell-wall-forming enzymes are delivered and how their activity is coordinated post secretion. Here, we show that the U. maydis class VII chitin synthase and 1,3-β-glucan synthase travel in Mcs1-containing vesicles, and that their apical secretion depends on Mcs1. Once in the plasma membrane, anchorage requires enzyme activity, which suggests co-synthesis of chitin and 1,3-β-glucan polysaccharides at sites of exocytosis. Thus, delivery of cell-wall-forming enzymes in Mcs1 vesicles ensures local foci of fungal cell wall formation. PMID:27563844

  4. Simulated microgravity inhibits cell wall regeneration of Penicillium decumbens protoplasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, C.; Sun, Y.; Yi, Z. C.; Rong, L.; Zhuang, F. Y.; Fan, Y. B.

    2010-09-01

    This work compares cell wall regeneration from protoplasts of the fungus Penicillium decumbens under rotary culture (simulated microgravity) and stationary cultures. Using an optimized lytic enzyme mixture, protoplasts were successfully released with a yield of 5.3 × 10 5 cells/mL. Under simulated microgravity conditions, the protoplast regeneration efficiency was 33.8%, lower than 44.9% under stationary conditions. Laser scanning confocal microscopy gave direct evidence for reduced formation of polysaccharides under simulated conditions. Scanning electron microscopy showed the delayed process of cell wall regeneration by simulated microgravity. The delayed regeneration of P. decumbens cell wall under simulated microgravity was likely caused by the inhibition of polysaccharide synthesis. This research contributes to the understanding of how gravitational loads affect morphological and physiological processes of fungi.

  5. Magnetic domain wall conduits for single cell applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Donolato, Marco; Torti, A.; Kostesha, Natalie;

    2011-01-01

    The ability to trap, manipulate and release single cells on a surface is important both for fundamental studies of cellular processes and for the development of novel lab-on-chip miniaturized tools for biological and medical applications. In this paper we demonstrate how magnetic domain walls...... generated in micro- and nano-structures fabricated on a chip surface can be used to handle single yeast cells labeled with magnetic beads. In detail, first we show that the proposed approach maintains the microorganism viable, as proven by monitoring the division of labeled yeast cells trapped by domain...... walls over 16 hours. Moreover, we demonstrate the controlled transport and release of individual yeast cells via displacement and annihilation of individual domain walls in micro- and nano-sized magnetic structures. These results pave the way to the implementation of magnetic devices based on domain...

  6. Primary Cell Wall Structure in the Evolution of Land Plants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Investigation of the primary cell walls of lower plants improves our understanding of the cell biology of these organisms but also has the potential to improve our understanding of cell wall structure and function in angiosperms that evolved from lower plants. Cell walls were prepared from eight species, ranging from a moss to advanced gymnosperms, and subjected to sequential chemical extraction to separate the main polysaccharide fractions. The glycosyl compositions of these fractions were then determined by gas chromatography. The results were compared among the eight plants and among data from related studies reported in the existing published reports to identify structural features that have been either highly conserved or clearly modified during evolution. Among the highly conserved features are the presence of a cellulose framework, the presence of certain hemicelluloses such as xyloglucan, and the presence of rhamnogalacturonan Ⅱ, a domain in pectic polysaccharides. Among the modified features are the abundance of mannosyl-containing hemicelluloses and the presence of methylated sugars.

  7. How cell wall complexity influences saccharification efficiency in Miscanthus sinensis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Souza, De Amanda P.; Lessa Alvim Kamei, Claire; Torres Salvador, Andres Francisco; Pattathil, Sivakumar; Hahn, Michael G.; Trindade, Luisa M.; Buckeridge, Marcos S.

    2015-01-01

    The production of bioenergy from grasses has been developing quickly during the last decade, with Miscanthus being among the most important choices for production of bioethanol. However, one of the key barriers to producing bioethanol is the lack of information about cell wall structure. Cell wal

  8. Alterations in auxin homeostasis suppress defects in cell wall function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blaire J Steinwand

    Full Text Available The plant cell wall is a highly dynamic structure that changes in response to both environmental and developmental cues. It plays important roles throughout plant growth and development in determining the orientation and extent of cell expansion, providing structural support and acting as a barrier to pathogens. Despite the importance of the cell wall, the signaling pathways regulating its function are not well understood. Two partially redundant leucine-rich-repeat receptor-like kinases (LRR-RLKs, FEI1 and FEI2, regulate cell wall function in Arabidopsis thaliana roots; disruption of the FEIs results in short, swollen roots as a result of decreased cellulose synthesis. We screened for suppressors of this swollen root phenotype and identified two mutations in the putative mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase E1α homolog, IAA-Alanine Resistant 4 (IAR4. Mutations in IAR4 were shown previously to disrupt auxin homeostasis and lead to reduced auxin function. We show that mutations in IAR4 suppress a subset of the fei1 fei2 phenotypes. Consistent with the hypothesis that the suppression of fei1 fei2 by iar4 is the result of reduced auxin function, disruption of the WEI8 and TAR2 genes, which decreases auxin biosynthesis, also suppresses fei1 fei2. In addition, iar4 suppresses the root swelling and accumulation of ectopic lignin phenotypes of other cell wall mutants, including procuste and cobra. Further, iar4 mutants display decreased sensitivity to the cellulose biosynthesis inhibitor isoxaben. These results establish a role for IAR4 in the regulation of cell wall function and provide evidence of crosstalk between the cell wall and auxin during cell expansion in the root.

  9. Structure, function, and biosynthesis of plant cell walls: proceedings of the seventh annual symposium in botany

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dugger, W.M.; Bartnicki-Garcia, S. (eds.)

    1984-01-01

    Papers in the following areas were included in these symposium proceedings: (1) cell wall chemistry and biosynthesis; (2) cell wall hydrolysis and associated physiology; (3) cellular events associated with cell wall biosynthesis; and (4) interactions of plant cell walls with pathogens and related responses. Papers have been individually abstracted for the data base. (ACR)

  10. The Structure of Plant Cell Walls: II. The Hemicellulose of the Walls of Suspension-cultured Sycamore Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, W D; Talmadge, K W; Keegstra, K; Albersheim, P

    1973-01-01

    The molecular structure, chemical properties, and biological function of the xyloglucan polysaccharide isolated from cell walls of suspension-cultured sycamore (Acer pseudoplatanus) cells are described. The sycamore wall xyloglucan is compared to the extracellular xyloglucan secreted by suspension-cultured sycamore cells into their culture medium and is also compared to the seed "amyloid" xyloglucans.Xyloglucan-or fragments of xyloglucan-and acidic fragments of the pectic polysaccharides are released from endopolygalacturonase-pretreated sycamore walls by treatment of these walls with 8 m urea, endoglucanase, or 0.5 n NaOH. Some of the xyloglucan thus released is found to cochromatograph with the acidic pectic fragments on diethylaminoethyl Sephadex. The chemical or enzymic treatments required for the release of xyloglucan from the walls and the cochromatography of xyloglucan with the acidic pectic fragments indicate that xyloglucan is covalently linked to the pectic polysaccharides and is noncovalently bound to the cellulose fibrils of the sycamore cell wall.The molecular structure of sycamore xyloglucan was characterized by methylation analysis of the oligosaccharides obtained by endoglucanase treatment of the polymer. The structure of the polymer is based on a repeating heptasaccharide unit which consists of 4 residues of beta-1-4-linked glucose and 3 residues of terminal xylose. A single xylose residue is glycosidically linked to carbon 6 of 3 of the glucosyl residues.

  11. Bistable forespore engulfment in Bacillus subtilis by a zipper mechanism in absence of the cell wall.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikola Ojkic

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available To survive starvation, the bacterium Bacillus subtilis forms durable spores. The initial step of sporulation is asymmetric cell division, leading to a large mother-cell and a small forespore compartment. After division is completed and the dividing septum is thinned, the mother cell engulfs the forespore in a slow process based on cell-wall degradation and synthesis. However, recently a new cell-wall independent mechanism was shown to significantly contribute, which can even lead to fast engulfment in [Formula: see text] 60 [Formula: see text] of the cases when the cell wall is completely removed. In this backup mechanism, strong ligand-receptor binding between mother-cell protein SpoIIIAH and forespore-protein SpoIIQ leads to zipper-like engulfment, but quantitative understanding is missing. In our work, we combined fluorescence image analysis and stochastic Langevin simulations of the fluctuating membrane to investigate the origin of fast bistable engulfment in absence of the cell wall. Our cell morphologies compare favorably with experimental time-lapse microscopy, with engulfment sensitive to the number of SpoIIQ-SpoIIIAH bonds in a threshold-like manner. By systematic exploration of model parameters, we predict regions of osmotic pressure and membrane-surface tension that produce successful engulfment. Indeed, decreasing the medium osmolarity in experiments prevents engulfment in line with our predictions. Forespore engulfment may thus not only be an ideal model system to study decision-making in single cells, but its biophysical principles are likely applicable to engulfment in other cell types, e.g. during phagocytosis in eukaryotes.

  12. Destructuring plant biomass: Focus on fungal and extremophilic cell wall hydrolases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerriero, Gea; Hausman, Jean-Francois; Strauss, Joseph; Ertan, Haluk; Siddiqui, Khawar Sohail

    2016-01-01

    The use of plant biomass as feedstock for biomaterial and biofuel production is relevant in the current bio-based economy scenario of valorizing renewable resources. Fungi, which degrade complex and recalcitrant plant polymers, secrete different enzymes that hydrolyze plant cell wall polysaccharides. The present review discusses the current research trends on fungal, as well as extremophilic cell wall hydrolases that can withstand extreme physico-chemical conditions required in efficient industrial processes. Secretomes of fungi from the phyla Ascomycota, Basidiomycota, Zygomycota and Neocalli-mastigomycota are presented along with metabolic cues (nutrient sensing, coordination of carbon and nitrogen metabolism) affecting their composition. We conclude the review by suggesting further research avenues focused on the one hand on a comprehensive analysis of the physiology and epigenetics underlying cell wall degrading enzyme production in fungi and on the other hand on the analysis of proteins with unknown function and metagenomics of extremophilic consortia. The current advances in consolidated bioprocessing, altered secretory pathways and creation of designer plants are also examined. Furthermore, recent developments in enhancing the activity, stability and reusability of enzymes based on synergistic, proximity and entropic effects, fusion enzymes, structure-guided recombination between homologous enzymes and magnetic enzymes are considered with a view to improving saccharification. PMID:25804821

  13. Large-scale co-expression approach to dissect secondary cell wall formation across plant species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colin eRuprecht

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Plant cell walls are complex composites largely consisting of carbohydrate-based polymers, and are generally divided into primary and secondary walls based on content and characteristics. Cellulose microfibrils constitute a major component of both primary and secondary cell walls and are synthesized at the plasma membrane by cellulose synthase (CESA complexes. Several studies in Arabidopsis have demonstrated the power of co-expression analyses to identify new genes associated with secondary wall cellulose biosynthesis. However, across-species comparative co-expression analyses remain largely unexplored. Here, we compared co-expressed gene vicinity networks of primary and secondary wall CESAs in Arabidopsis, barley, rice, poplar, soybean, Medicago and wheat, and identified gene families that are consistently co-regulated with cellulose biosynthesis. In addition to the expected polysaccharide acting enzymes, we also found many gene families associated with cytoskeleton, signaling, transcriptional regulation, oxidation and protein degradation. Based on these analyses, we selected and biochemically analyzed T-DNA insertion lines corresponding to approximately twenty genes from gene families that re-occur in the co-expressed gene vicinity networks of secondary wall CESAs across the seven species. We developed a statistical pipeline using principal component analysis (PCA and optimal clustering based on silhouette width to analyze sugar profiles. One of the mutants, corresponding to a pinoresinol reductase gene, displayed disturbed xylem morphology and held lower levels of lignin molecules. We propose that this type of large-scale co-expression approach, coupled with statistical analysis of the cell wall contents, will be useful to facilitate rapid knowledge transfer across plant species.

  14. The Interplay between Cell Wall Mechanical Properties and the Cell Cycle in Staphylococcus aureus

    OpenAIRE

    Bailey, Richard G.; Turner, Robert D.; Mullin, Nic; Clarke, Nigel,; Foster, Simon J.; Hobbs, Jamie K.

    2014-01-01

    The nanoscale mechanical properties of live Staphylococcus aureus cells during different phases of growth were studied by atomic force microscopy. Indentation to different depths provided access to both local cell wall mechanical properties and whole-cell properties, including a component related to cell turgor pressure. Local cell wall properties were found to change in a characteristic manner throughout the division cycle. Splitting of the cell into two daughter cells followed a local softe...

  15. Changes of lipid domains in Bacillus subtilis cells with disrupted cell wall peptidoglycan

    OpenAIRE

    Muchová, Katarína; Wilkinson, Anthony J.; Barák, Imrich

    2011-01-01

    The cell wall is responsible for cell integrity and the maintenance of cell shape in bacteria. The Gram-positive bacterial cell wall consists of a thick peptidoglycan layer located on the outside of the cytoplasmic membrane. Bacterial cell membranes, like eukaryotic cell membranes, are known to contain domains of specific lipid and protein composition. Recently, using the membrane-binding fluorescent dye FM4-64, helix-like lipid structures extending along the long axis of the cell and consist...

  16. Synthesis and Application of Plant Cell Wall Oligogalactans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Mathias Christian Franch

    The plant cell walls represent almost 50% of the biomass found in plants and are therefore one of the main targets for biotechnological research. Major motivators are their potential as a renewable energy source for transport fuels, as functional foods, and as a source of raw materials to generate...... chemical building blocks for industrial processes. To achieve a sustainable development it is necessary to optimize plant production and utilization. This will require a better understanding of the cell wall structure and function at the molecular level. The cell wall is composed by an intricate network...... of the arabinogalactans series. The fragments were applied in the characterization of a glycosyl transferase, a hydrolase and to study the important cancer biomarker galectin-3. The work done during an external stay at University of Oxford is also presented. This concerns isolation and modification...

  17. Cell wall integrity signalling in human pathogenic fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dichtl, Karl; Samantaray, Sweta; Wagener, Johannes

    2016-09-01

    Fungi are surrounded by a rigid structure, the fungal cell wall. Its plasticity and composition depend on active regulation of the underlying biosynthesis and restructuring processes. This involves specialised signalling pathways that control gene expression and activities of biosynthetic enzymes. The cell wall integrity (CWI) pathway is the central signalling cascade required for the adaptation to a wide spectrum of cell wall perturbing conditions, including heat, oxidative stress and antifungals. In the recent years, great efforts were made to analyse the CWI pathway of diverse fungi. It turned out that the CWI signalling cascade is mostly conserved in the fungal kingdom. In this review, we summarise as well as compare the current knowledge on the canonical CWI pathway in the human pathogenic fungi Candida albicans, Candida glabrata, Aspergillus fumigatus and Cryptococcus neoformans. Understanding the differences and similarities in the stress responses of these organisms could become a key to improving existing or developing new antifungal therapies. PMID:27155139

  18. Fluorescent Probes for Exploring Plant Cell Wall Deconstruction: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Paës

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Plant biomass is a potential resource of chemicals, new materials and biofuels that could reduce our dependency on fossil carbon, thus decreasing the greenhouse effect. However, due to its chemical and structural complexity, plant biomass is recalcitrant to green biological transformation by enzymes, preventing the establishment of integrated bio-refineries. In order to gain more knowledge in the architecture of plant cell wall to facilitate their deconstruction, many fluorescent probes bearing various fluorophores have been devised and used successfully to reveal the changes in structural motifs during plant biomass deconstruction, and the molecular interactions between enzymes and plant cell wall polymers. Fluorescent probes are thus relevant tools to explore plant cell wall deconstruction.

  19. Transcriptional Wiring of Cell Wall-Related Genes in Arabidopsis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Marek Mutwil; Colin Ruprecht; Federico M. Giorgi; Martin Bringmann; Bj(o)rn Usadel; Staffan Persson

    2009-01-01

    Transcriptional coordination, or co-expression, of genes may signify functional relatedness of the correspond-ing proteins. For example, several genes involved in secondary cell wall cellulose biosynthesis are co-expressed with genes engaged in the synthesis of xylan, which is a major component of the secondary cell wall. To extend these types of anal-yses, we investigated the co-expression relationships of all Carbohydrate-Active enZYmes (CAZy)-related genes for Arabidopsis thaliana. Thus, the intention was to transcriptionally link different cell wall-related processes to each other, and also to other biological functions. To facilitate easy manual inspection, we have displayed these interactions as networks and matrices, and created a web-based interface (http://aranet.mpimp-golm.mpg.de/corecarb) containing downloadable files for all the transcriptional associations.

  20. The role of the cell wall in plant immunity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malinovsky, Frederikke Gro; Fangel, Jonatan Ulrik; Willats, William George Tycho

    2014-01-01

    The battle between plants and microbes is evolutionarily ancient, highly complex, and often co-dependent. A primary challenge for microbes is to breach the physical barrier of host cell walls whilst avoiding detection by the plant's immune receptors. While some receptors sense conserved microbial...... features, others monitor physical changes caused by an infection attempt. Detection of microbes leads to activation of appropriate defense responses that then challenge the attack. Plant cell walls are formidable and dynamic barriers. They are constructed primarily of complex carbohydrates joined...... by numerous distinct connection types, and are subject to extensive post-synthetic modification to suit prevailing local requirements. Multiple changes can be triggered in cell walls in response to microbial attack. Some of these are well described, but many remain obscure. The study of the myriad of subtle...

  1. Histochemical effects of γ radiation on soft fruit cell walls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irradiation effects in peaches, tomatoes, cherries and grapes on the composition of cell wall polysaccharides were investigated by histochemical techniques. Cell wall polysaccharides, separated by a modified Jensen's method were pectins, hemicellulose, non-cellulosic polysaccharides and cellulose. The extinction values of Periodic Acid Schiff stained tissues was measured by microscopical photometry. Irradiation induced highly significant changes in polysaccharide composition of mesocarp cell walls; these changes were found to be a function of time of irradiation after harvest and of the species tested. A general influence on polysaccharide molecules was not found. Variations produced by irradiation are postulated to be an interference with a regulatory system rather than a breakdown of a functional molecule (metabolic enzyme or polysaccharide. (author)

  2. Stem and progenitor cells in biostructure of blood vessel walls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krzysztof Korta

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Development of vascular and hematopoietic systems during organogenesis occurs at the same time. During vasculogenesis, a small part of cells does not undergo complete differentiation but stays on this level, “anchored” in tissue structures described as stem cell niches. The presence of blood vessels within tissue stem cell niches is typical and led to identification of niches and ensures that they are functioning. The three-layer biostructure of vessel walls for artery and vein, tunica: intima, media and adventitia, for a long time was defined as a mechanical barrier between vessel light and the local tissue environment. Recent findings from vascular biology studies indicate that vessel walls are dynamic biostructures, which are equipped with stem and progenitor cells, described as vascular wall-resident stem cells/progenitor cells (VW-SC/PC. Distinct zones for vessel wall harbor heterogeneous subpopulations of VW-SC/PC, which are described as “subendothelial or vasculogenic zones”. Recent evidence from in vitro and in vivo studies show that prenatal activity of stem and progenitor cells is not only limited to organogenesis but also exists in postnatal life, where it is responsible for vessel wall homeostasis, remodeling and regeneration. It is believed that VW-SC/PC could be engaged in progression of vascular disorders and development of neointima. We would like to summarize current knowledge about mesenchymal and progenitor stem cell phenotype with special attention to distribution and biological properties of VW-SC/PC in biostructures of intima, media and adventitia niches. It is postulated that in the near future, niches for VW-SC/PC could be a good source of stem and progenitor cells, especially in the context of vessel tissue bioengineering as a new alternative to traditional revascularization therapies.

  3. Bacterial Cell Wall-Induced Arthritis: Chemical Composition and Tissue Distribution of Four Lactobacillus Strains

    OpenAIRE

    Šimelyte, Egle; Rimpiläinen, Marja; Lehtonen, Leena; Zhang, Xiang; Toivanen, Paavo

    2000-01-01

    To study what determines the arthritogenicity of bacterial cell walls, cell wall-induced arthritis in the rat was applied, using four strains of Lactobacillus. Three of the strains used proved to induce chronic arthritis in the rat; all were Lactobacillus casei. The cell wall of Lactobacillus fermentum did not induce chronic arthritis. All arthritogenic bacterial cell walls had the same peptidoglycan structure, whereas that of L. fermentum was different. Likewise, all arthritogenic cell walls...

  4. Materials and system degradation in PEM fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fowler, D. [Waterloo Univ., ON (Canada). Dept. of Chemical Engineering, Green Energy and Fuel Cell Group

    2007-07-01

    Various degradation processes in fuel cell anodes and cathodes can cause the release of fluoride ions that thin the ionomer membrane and allow more gases to permeate the cell. This presentation provided an overview of reliability modelling techniques used to identify the failure modes of material degradation in fuel cells. A reliability model of a fuel cell stack and hydrogen power system was presented in addition to solution methods for Nafion degradation of the main polymer chain. Changes in the molecular weight of Nafion were discussed. A case study of a model was used to demonstrate that reaction slowed as the ionomer on the cathode degraded. Equations were developed for hydrogen crossover, peroxide production; peroxide destruction; F-ion production; thickness change; diffusion through the gas diffusion layer (GDL); and open circuit voltage (OCV). It was concluded that the OCV durability experiments generated a mechanism for degradation of commercial membranes. The modelling study showed that degradation was related to the permeability of hydrogen to the cathode, and oxygen to the anode. It was concluded that at lower oxygen pressures anode degradation was limited, while at higher pressures anode degradation was more significant. A power point presentation of the University of Waterloo's alternative fuel team provided details of the team's recent research activities. tabs., figs.

  5. Inhibition of phenylpropanoid biosynthesis increases cell wall digestibility, protoplast isolation, and facilitates sustained cell division in American elm (Ulmus americana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jones A Maxwell P

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protoplast technologies offer unique opportunities for fundamental research and to develop novel germplasm through somatic hybridization, organelle transfer, protoclonal variation, and direct insertion of DNA. Applying protoplast technologies to develop Dutch elm disease resistant American elms (Ulmus americana L. was proposed over 30 years ago, but has not been achieved. A primary factor restricting protoplast technology to American elm is the resistance of the cell walls to enzymatic degradation and a long lag phase prior to cell wall re-synthesis and cell division. Results This study suggests that resistance to enzymatic degradation in American elm was due to water soluble phenylpropanoids. Incubating tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L. leaf tissue, an easily digestible species, in aqueous elm extract inhibits cell wall digestion in a dose dependent manner. This can be mimicked by p-coumaric or ferulic acid, phenylpropanoids known to re-enforce cell walls. Culturing American elm tissue in the presence of 2-aminoindane-2-phosphonic acid (AIP; 10-150 μM, an inhibitor of phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL, reduced flavonoid content, decreased tissue browning, and increased isolation rates significantly from 11.8% (±3.27 in controls to 65.3% (±4.60. Protoplasts isolated from callus grown in 100 μM AIP developed cell walls by day 2, had a division rate of 28.5% (±3.59 by day 6, and proliferated into callus by day 14. Heterokaryons were successfully produced using electrofusion and fused protoplasts remained viable when embedded in agarose. Conclusions This study describes a novel approach of modifying phenylpropanoid biosynthesis to facilitate efficient protoplast isolation which has historically been problematic for American elm. This isolation system has facilitated recovery of viable protoplasts capable of rapid cell wall re-synthesis and sustained cell division to form callus. Further, isolated protoplasts survived

  6. Particle Trajectories in Rotating Wall Cell Culture Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandran N.; Downey, J. P.

    1999-01-01

    Cell cultures are extremely important to the medical community since such cultures provide an opportunity to perform research on human tissue without the concerns inherent in experiments on individual humans. Development of cells in cultures has been found to be greatly influenced by the conditions of the culture. Much work has focused on the effect of the motions of cells in the culture relative to the solution. Recently rotating wall vessels have been used with success in achieving improved cellular cultures. Speculation and limited research have focused on the low shear environment and the ability of rotating vessels to keep cells suspended in solution rather than floating or sedimenting as the primary reasons for the improved cellular cultures using these devices. It is widely believed that the cultures obtained using a rotating wall vessel simulates to some degree the effect of microgravity on cultures. It has also been speculated that the microgravity environment may provide the ideal acceleration environment for culturing of cellular tissues due to the nearly negligible levels of sedimentation and shear possible. This work predicts particle trajectories of cells in rotating wall vessels of cylindrical and annular design consistent with the estimated properties of typical cellular cultures. Estimates of the shear encountered by cells in solution and the interactions with walls are studied. Comparisons of potential experiments in ground and microgravity environments are performed.

  7. Characters of Fractal Ultrastructure in Wood Cell Wall

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Beimei; ZHAO Guangjie

    2006-01-01

    Fractal theory was introduced in order to describe the ultrastructure of wood cell wall in this paper.The cellulose chain clusters around nano-scale were viewed as a fractal object that consists of many fibrillar structural units with different scales including microfibrils.On the basis of the morphological data of wood cell wall.fractal dimensions of multi-level fibrillar structural units were calculated by fractal-geometry approach,and then the morphological and structural characteristics of fibers as well as the influences on wood properties were investigated according to the dimensions.Besides,the fractal self-nesting character of the ultrastruture was also analyzed.

  8. Phagocytic properties of lung alveolar wall cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanaka,Akisuke

    1974-04-01

    Full Text Available For the purpose to define the mechanism of heavy metal intoxication by inhalation, morphologic observations were made on rat lungs after nasal instillation of iron colloid particles of positive and negative electric charges. Histochemical observation was also made on the liver and spleen of these animals. The instilled iron colloid particles reach the alveolar cavity easily, as can be seen in the tissue sections stained by Prussian blue reaction. Alveolar macrophages do take up them avidly both of positive and negative charges, though much less the positive particles than negative ones. In contrast, the alveolar epithelial cells take up solely positive particles by phagocytosis but not negative ones. Electron microscope observation revealed that the positive particles are ingested by Type I epithelial cells by pinocytosis and by Type II cells by phagocytosis as well. Then the iron colloid particles are transferred into the basement membrane by exocytosis. Travelling through the basement membrane they are again taken up by capillary endothelial cells by phagocytosis. Some particles were found in the intercellular clefts of capillary endothelial cells but not any iron colloid particles in the intercellular spaces of epithelial cells and in the capillary lumen. However, the liver and spleen tissues of the animals given iron colloid showed a strong positive iron reaction. On the basis of these observations, the mechanism of acute intoxication by inhaling heavy metal dusts like lead fume is discussed from the view point of selective uptake of alveolar epithelial and capillary endothelial cells for the particles of the positive electric cha'rge.

  9. Cell Wall Polysaccharides of Candida albicans Induce Mast Cell Degranulation in the Gut

    OpenAIRE

    Sakurai, Atsuko; Yamaguchi, Natsu; Sonoyama, Kei

    2012-01-01

    We investigated Candida albicans-induced mast cell degranulation in vitro and in vivo. Cell wall fraction but not culture supernatant and cell membrane fraction prepared from hyphally grown C. albicans induced β-hexosaminidase release in RBL-2H3 cells. Cell wall mannan and soluble β-glucan fractions also induced β-hexosaminidase release. Histological examination of mouse forestomach showed that C. albicans gut colonization induces mast cell degranulation. However, intragastric administration ...

  10. Proteomic response of the biological control fungus Trichoderma atroviride to growth on the cell walls of Rhizoctonia solani.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grinyer, Jasmine; Hunt, Sybille; McKay, Matthew; Herbert, Ben R; Nevalainen, Helena

    2005-06-01

    Trichoderma atroviride has a natural ability to parasitise phytopathogenic fungi such as Rhizoctonia solani and Botrytis cinerea, therefore providing an environmentally sound alternative to chemical fungicides in the management of these pathogens. Two-dimensional electrophoresis was used to display cellular protein patterns of T. atroviride (T. harzianum P1) grown on media containing either glucose or R. solani cell walls. Protein profiles were compared to identify T. atroviride proteins up-regulated in the presence of the R. solani cell walls. Twenty-four protein spots were identified using matrix-assisted laser desorption ionisation mass spectrometry, liquid chromatography mass spectrometry and N-terminal sequencing. Identified up-regulated proteins include known fungal cell wall-degrading enzymes such as N-acetyl-beta-D: -glucosaminidase and 42-kDa endochitinase. Three novel proteases of T. atroviride were identified, containing sequence similarity to vacuolar serine protease, vacuolar protease A and a trypsin-like protease from known fungal proteins. Eukaryotic initiation factor 4a, superoxide dismutase and a hypothetical protein from Neurospora crassa were also up-regulated as a response to R. solani cell walls. Several cell wall-degrading enzymes were identified from the T. atroviride culture supernatant, providing further evidence that a cellular response indicative of biological control had occurred. PMID:15856359

  11. High-throughput microarray mapping of cell wall polymers in roots and tubers during the viscosity-reducing process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yuhong; Willats, William G; Lange, Lene; Jin, Yanling; Fang, Yang; Salmeán, Armando A; Pedersen, Henriette L; Busk, Peter Kamp; Zhao, Hai

    2016-03-01

    Viscosity reduction has a great impact on the efficiency of ethanol production when using roots and tubers as feedstock. Plant cell wall-degrading enzymes have been successfully applied to overcome the challenges posed by high viscosity. However, the changes in cell wall polymers during the viscosity-reducing process are poorly characterized. Comprehensive microarray polymer profiling, which is a high-throughput microarray, was used for the first time to map changes in the cell wall polymers of sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas), cassava (Manihot esculenta), and Canna edulis Ker. over the entire viscosity-reducing process. The results indicated that the composition of cell wall polymers among these three roots and tubers was markedly different. The gel-like matrix and glycoprotein network in the C. edulis Ker. cell wall caused difficulty in viscosity reduction. The obvious viscosity reduction of the sweet potato and the cassava was attributed to the degradation of homogalacturonan and the released 1,4-β-d-galactan and 1,5-α-l-arabinan. PMID:25757626

  12. Influence of N-glycans on Expression of Cell Wall Remodeling Related Genes in Paracoccidioides brasiliensis Yeast Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Fausto; Antoniêto, Amanda Cristina Campos; Pessoni, André Moreira; Monteiro, Valdirene Neves; Alegre-Maller, Ana Claudia Paiva; Pigosso, Laurine Lacerda; Pereira, Maristela; Soares, Célia Maria de Almeida; Roque-Barreira, Maria Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Paracoccidioidomycosis is the most prevalent systemic mycosis in Latin America. It is caused by the temperature-dependent dimorphic fungus Paracoccidioides brasiliensis. The P. brasiliensis cell wall is a dynamic outer structure, composed of a network of glycoproteins and polysaccharides, such as chitin, glucan and N-glycosylated proteins. These glycoproteins can interact with the host to affect infection rates, and are known to perform other functions. We inhibited N-linked glycosylation using tunicamycin (TM), and then evaluated the expression of P. brasiliensis genes related to cell wall remodeling. Our results suggest that cell wall synthesis related genes, such as β-1,3-glucanosyltransferase (PbGEL3), 1,3-β-D-glucan synthase (PbFKS1), and α-1,4-amylase (PbAMY), as well as cell wall degrading related genes, such as N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase (PbNAG1), α-1,3-glucanase (PbAGN), and β-1,3-glucanase (PbBGN1 and PbBGN2), have their expression increased by the N-glycosylation inhibition, as detected by qRT-PCR. The observed increases in gene expression levels reveal possible compensatory mechanisms for diminished enzyme activity due to the lack of glycosylation caused by TM. PMID:27226767

  13. A model of cell wall expansion based on thermodynamics of polymer networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veytsman, B. A.; Cosgrove, D. J.

    1998-01-01

    A theory of cell wall extension is proposed. It is shown that macroscopic properties of cell walls can be explained through the microscopic properties of interpenetrating networks of cellulose and hemicellulose. The qualitative conclusions of the theory agree with the existing experimental data. The dependence of the cell wall yield threshold on the secretion of the wall components is discussed.

  14. The Cellulose System in the Cell Wall of Micrasterias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim; Herth; Vuong; Chanzy

    1996-11-01

    The cellulose system of the cell wall of Micrasterias denticulata and Micrasterias rotata was analyzed by diffraction contrast transmission electron microscopy, electron diffraction, and X-ray analysis. The studies, achieved on disencrusted cell ghosts, confirmed that the cellulose microfibrils occurred in crisscrossed bands consisting of a number of parallel ribbon-like microfibrils. The individual microfibrils had thicknesses of 5 nm for a width of around 20 nm, but in some instances, two or three microfibrils merged into one another to yield larger monocrystalline domains reaching up to 60 nm in lateral size. The orientation of the cellulose of Micrasterias is very unusual, as it was found that in the cell wall, the equatorial crystallographic planes of cellulose having a d-spacing of 0.60 nm [(11;0) in the Ibeta cellulose unit cell defined by Sugiyama et al., 1991, Macromolecules 24, 4168-4175] were oriented perpendicular to the cell wall surface. Up to now, such orientation has been found only in Spirogyra, another member of the Zygnemataceae group. The unusual structure of the secondary wall cellulose of Micrasterias may be tentatively correlated with the unique organization of the terminal complexes, which in this alga occur as hexagonal arrays of rosettes. PMID:8986649

  15. The metabolic enzyme ManA reveals a link between cell wall integrity and chromosome morphology.

    OpenAIRE

    Maya Elbaz; Sigal Ben-Yehuda

    2010-01-01

    Author Summary The bacterial cell is resistant to extremes of osmotic pressure and protected against mechanical damages by the existence of a rigid outer shell defined as the cell wall. The strength of the cell wall is achieved by the presence of long glycan strands cross-linked by peptide side bridges. The cell wall is a dynamic structure continuously being synthesized and modified to allow for cell growth and division. Damaging the cell wall leads to abnormal cellular morphologies and cell ...

  16. IL-1β enhances cell adhesion to degraded fibronectin

    OpenAIRE

    Rajshankar, Dhaarmini; Downey, Gregory P.; McCulloch, Christopher A.

    2012-01-01

    IL-1β is a prominent proinflammatory cytokine that mediates degradation of extracellular matrix proteins through increased expression of matrix metalloproteinases, which involves a signaling pathway in adherent cells that is restricted by focal adhesions. Currently, the mechanism by which IL-1β affects cell adhesion to matrix proteins is not defined, and it is not known whether degraded matrix proteins affect IL-1β signaling. We examined adhesion-related IL-1β signaling in fibroblasts attachi...

  17. Electrochemical detection and degradation of ibuprofen from water on multi-walled carbon nanotubes-epoxy composite electrode

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sorina Motoc; Adriana Remes; Aniela Pop; Florica Manea; Joop Schoonman

    2013-01-01

    This work describes the electrochemical behaviour of ibuprofen on two types of multi-walled carbon nanotubes based composite electrodes,i.e.,multi-walled carbon nanotubes-epoxy (MWCNT) and silver-modified zeolite-multi-walled carbon nanotubes-epoxy (AgZMWCNT) composites electrodes.The composite electrodes were obtained using two-roll mill procedure.SEM images of surfaces of the composites revealed a homogeneous distribution of the composite components within the epoxy matrix.AgZMWCNT composite electrode exhibited the better electrical conductivity and larger electroactive surface area.The electrochemical determination of ibuprofen (IBP) was achieved using AgZMWCNT by cyclic voltammetry,differential-pulsed voltammetry,square-wave voltammetry and chronoamperometry.The IBP degradation occurred on both composite electrodes under controlled electrolysis at 1.2 and 1.75 V vs.Ag/AgCl,and IBP concentration was determined comparatively by differential-pulsed voltammetry,under optimized conditions using AgZMWCNT electrode and UV-Vis spectrophotometry methods to determine the IBP degradation performance for each electrode.AgZMWCNT electrode exhibited a dual character allowing a double application in IBP degradation process and its control.

  18. Catalysts of plant cell wall loosening [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    OpenAIRE

    Cosgrove, Daniel J.

    2016-01-01

    The growing cell wall in plants has conflicting requirements to be strong enough to withstand the high tensile forces generated by cell turgor pressure while selectively yielding to those forces to induce wall stress relaxation, leading to water uptake and polymer movements underlying cell wall expansion. In this article, I review emerging concepts of plant primary cell wall structure, the nature of wall extensibility and the action of expansins, family-9 and -12 endoglucanases, family-16 xyl...

  19. An emerging role of pectic rhamnogalacturonanII for cell wall integrity

    OpenAIRE

    Reboul, Rebecca; Tenhaken, Raimund

    2012-01-01

    The plant cell wall is a complex network of different polysaccharides and glycoproteins, showing high diversity in nature. The essential components, tethering cell wall are under debate, as novel mutants challenge established models. The mutant ugd2,3 with a reduced supply of the important wall precursor UDP-glucuronic acid reveals the critical role of the pectic compound rhamnogalacturonanII for cell wall stability. This polymer seems to be more important for cell wall integrity than the pre...

  20. Fuel Cell Testing - Degradation of Fuel Cells and its Impact on Fuel Cell Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Pfrang, Andreas

    2008-01-01

    Fuel cells are expected to play a major role in the future energy supply, especially polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells could become an integral part in future cars. Reduction of degradation of fuel cell performance while keeping fuel cell cost under control is the key for an introduction into mass markets.

  1. Environmental stability of stem cell wall traits in alfalfa

    Science.gov (United States)

    The concentration of stem cell wall constituents in alfalfa, Medicago sativa L., herbage can affect dry matter intake and energy availability in dairy and beef production systems and impact energy conversion efficiency when alfalfa is used to produce biofuels. Stem Klason lignin, glucose, xylose, an...

  2. Evidence for a Melanin Cell Wall Component in Pneumocystis carinii

    OpenAIRE

    Icenhour, Crystal R.; Kottom, Theodore J.; Limper, Andrew H.

    2003-01-01

    Fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled monoclonal antibodies specific for fungal melanin were used in this study to visualize melanin-like components of the Pneumocystis carinii cell wall. A colorimetric enzyme assay confirmed these findings. This is the first report of melanin-like pigments in Pneumocystis.

  3. Characterisation of cell-wall polysaccharides from mandarin segment membranes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coll-Almela, L.; Saura-Lopez, D.; Laencina-Sanchez, J.; Schols, H.A.; Voragen, A.G.J.; Ros-García, J.M.

    2015-01-01

    In an attempt to develop a process of enzymatic peeling of mandarin segments suitable for use on an industrial scale, the cell wall fraction of the segment membrane of Satsuma mandarin fruits was extracted to obtain a chelating agent-soluble pectin fraction (ChSS), a dilute sodium hydroxide-soluble

  4. Analyzing the complex machinery of cell wall biosynthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmers, J.F.P.

    2009-01-01

    The plant cell wall polymers make up most of the plant biomass and provide the raw material for many economically important products including food, feed, bio-materials, chemicals, textiles, and biofuel. This broad range of functions and applications make the biosynthesis of these polysaccharides a

  5. Microstructural study of carbonized wood after cell wall sectioning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ishimaru, Kengo; Hata, Toshimitsu; Bronsveld, Paul; Imamura, Yuji

    2007-01-01

    Wooden blocks of Japanese cedar (Cryptomeria japonica) were carbonized at 700 and 1,800 degrees C. The microstructure was analyzed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and mu-Raman spectroscopy of the inner planes of wood cell walls. The predominant structure was of a turbostratic nature and no

  6. Hetero-oligomeric cell wall channels (porins) of Nocardia farcinica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kläckta, Christian; Knörzer, Philipp; Riess, Franziska; Benz, Roland

    2011-06-01

    The cell wall of Nocardia farcinica contains a cation-selective cell wall channel, which may be responsible for the limited permeability of the cell wall of N. farcinica for negatively charged antibiotics. Based on partial sequencing of the protein responsible for channel formation derived from N. farcinica ATTC 3318 we were able to identify the corresponding genes (nfa15890 and nfa15900) within the known genome of N. farcinica IFM 10152. The corresponding genes of N. farcinica ATTC 3318 were separately expressed in the Escherichia coli BL21DE3Omp8 strain and the N-terminal His10-tagged proteins were purified to homogeneity using immobilized metal affinity chromatography. The pure proteins were designated NfpANHis and NfpBNHis, for N. farcinica porin A and N. farcinica porin B. The two proteins were checked separately for channel formation in lipid bilayers. Our results clearly indicate that the proteins NfpANHis and NfpBNHis expressed in E. coli could only together form a channel in lipid bilayer membranes. This means that the cell wall channel of N. farcinica is formed by a heterooligomer. NfpA and NfpB form together a channel that may structurally be related to MspA of Mycobacterium smegmatis based on amino acid comparison and renaturation procedure. PMID:21092733

  7. Polymer mobility in cell walls of cucumber hypocotyls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenwick, K. M.; Apperley, D. C.; Cosgrove, D. J.; Jarvis, M. C.

    1999-01-01

    Cell walls were prepared from the growing region of cucumber (Cucumis sativus) hypocotyls and examined by solid-state 13C NMR spectroscopy, in both enzymically active and inactivated states. The rigidity of individual polymer segments within the hydrated cell walls was assessed from the proton magnetic relaxation parameter, T2, and from the kinetics of cross-polarisation from 1H to 13C. The microfibrils, including most of the xyloglucan in the cell wall, as well as cellulose, behaved as very rigid solids. A minor xyloglucan fraction, which may correspond to cross-links between microfibrils, shared a lower level of rigidity with some of the pectic galacturonan. Other pectins, including most of the galactan side-chain residues of rhamnogalacturonan I, were much more mobile and behaved in a manner intermediate between the solid and liquid states. The only difference observed between the enzymically active and inactive cell walls, was the loss of a highly mobile, methyl-esterified galacturonan fraction, as the result of pectinesterase activity.

  8. The digestion of yeast cell wall polysaccharides in veal calves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gaillard, B.D.E.; Weerden, van E.J.

    1976-01-01

    1. The digestibility of the cell wall polysaccharides of an alkane-grown yeast in different parts of the digestive tract of two veal calves fitted with re-entrant cannulas at the end of the ileum was studied by replacing part of the skim-milk powder of their ‘normal’, milk-substitute (all-milk-prote

  9. A sycamore cell wall polysaccharide and a chemically related tomato leaf polysaccharide possess similar proteinase inhibitor-inducing activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, C A; Bishop, P; Pearce, G

    1981-09-01

    A large pectic polysaccharide, called rhamnogalacturonan I, that is solubilized by a fungal endo-alpha-1,4-polygalacturonase from the purified walls of suspension-cultured sycamore cells possesses proteinase inhibitor-inducing activity similar to that of the proteinase inhibitor-inducing factor, a pectic-like oligosaccharide fraction isolated from tomato leaves. This suggests that the proteinase inhibitor-inducing activity resides in particular polysaccharide fragments which can be released when plant cell walls are exposed to appropriate enzyme degradation as a result of either wounding or pest attack.

  10. Degradation of bulk diffusion length in CZ silicon solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reiss, J.H.; King, R.R.; Mitchell, K.W. [Siemens Solar Industries, Camarillo, CA (United States)

    1995-08-01

    Commercially-produced, unencapsulated, CZ silicon solar cells can lose 3 to 4% of their initial efficiency after exposure to light. After this initial, rapid ( < 30 min.) decrease, the cell power output remains stable. The cell performance recovers in a matter of hours in the dark at room temperature, and degrades again under light exposure. The different conditions under which CZ silicon cells degrade, and the reverse process, annealing, are characterized with the methods of spectral response and current-voltage (I-V) measurements. Iron impurities are a possible cause of this effect.

  11. A Phosphorylated Pseudokinase Complex Controls Cell Wall Synthesis in Mycobacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Gee, Christine L.; Papavinasasundaram, Kadamba G.; Blair, Sloane R.; Baer, Christina E.; Falick, Arnold M.; King, David S.; Griffin, Jennifer E.; Venghatakrishnan, Harene; Zukauskas, Andrew; Wei, Jun-Rong; Dhiman, Rakesh K.; Crick, Dean C.; Rubin, Eric J.; Sassetti, Christopher M.; Alber, Tom

    2012-01-01

    Prokaryotic cell wall biosynthesis is coordinated with cell growth and division, but the mechanisms regulating this dynamic process remain obscure. Here, we describe a phosphorylation-dependent regulatory complex that controls peptidoglycan (PG) biosynthesis in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. We found that PknB, a PG-responsive Ser-Thr protein kinase (STPK), initiates complex assembly by phosphorylating a kinase-like domain in the essential PG biosynthetic protein, MviN. This domain was structura...

  12. Structure of Plant Cell Walls: XI. GLUCURONOARABINOXYLAN, A SECOND HEMICELLULOSE IN THE PRIMARY CELL WALLS OF SUSPENSION-CULTURED SYCAMORE CELLS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darvill, J E; McNeil, M; Darvill, A G; Albersheim, P

    1980-12-01

    The isolation, purification, and partial characterization of a glucuronoarabinoxylan, a previously unobserved component of the primary cell walls of dicotyledonous plants, are described. The glucuronoarabinoxylan constitutes approximately 5% of the primary walls of suspension-cultured sycamore cells. This glucuronoarabinoxylan possesses many of the structural characteristics of analogous polysaccharides that have been isolated from the primary and secondary cell walls of monocots as well as from the secondary cell walls of dicots. The glucuronoarabinoxylan of primary dicot cell walls has a linear beta-1,4-linked d-xylopyranosyl backbone with both neutral and acidic sidechains attached at intervals along its length. The acidic sidechains are terminated with glucuronosyl or 4-O-methyl glucuronosyl residues, whereas the neutral sidechains are composed of arabinosyl and/or xylosyl residues.

  13. Crushing Strength of Aluminum Honeycomb with Thinning Cell Wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogasawara, Nagahisa; Chiba, Norimasa; Kobayashi, Eiji; Kikuchi, Yuji

    To evaluate the crash safety of automobiles, various collision tests are performed by the auto industry. In the offset frontal collision test and the side collision test, the target is an aluminum honeycomb material which has thinning cell walls. In this study, based on the analyses of the shock absorption mechanism, a new crushing strength formula is proposed. First, load-displacement curves obtained from compression tests in quasi-static condition showed an almost linear relation between a thinning rate of cell walls and a crushing strength. Second, based on Wierzbicki's theory, a new formula was proposed, which can estimate a crushing strength of a honeycomb material with thinning wall. In addition, a correcting equation which considered an elastic deformation was also proposed. Third, parametric analyses were carried out with a FE model which can simulate a delamination between cell walls. The results obtained from the theory and FEM almost corresponded to each other for a wide range of the thinning rate. Fourth, impact tests were carried out, in which the weight was dropped freely at the speed used for the automobile tests. Those results almost agreed well with the sum of the theoretical crush strength and the inside air pressure.

  14. Breeding grasses for capacity to biofuel production or silage feeding value: an updated list of genes involved in maize secondary cell wall biosynthesis and assembly

    OpenAIRE

    Courtial, Audrey; Soler, Marçal; Chateigner-Boutin, Anne Laure; Reymond, Matthieu; Mechin, Valerie; WANG Hua; Grima-Pettenati, Jacqueline

    2013-01-01

    In the near future, maize, sorghum, or switchgrass stovers and cereal straws will be a significant source of carbohydratesfor sustainable biofuel production, in addition to the current use of grass silage in cattle feeding. However, cell wall properties, including the enzymatic degradability of structural polysaccharides in industrial fermenters or animal rumen, is greatly influenced by the embedding of cell wall carbohydrates in lignin matrix, and the linkages between lignins, p-hydroxycinna...

  15. Changes of wood cell walls in response to hygro-mechanical steam treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Juan; Song, Kunlin; Salmén, Lennart; Yin, Yafang

    2015-01-22

    The effects of compression combined with steam treatment (CS-treatment), i.e. a hygro-mechanical steam treatment on Spruce wood were studied on a cell-structure level to understand the chemical and physical changes of the secondary cell wall occurring under such conditions. Specially, imaging FT-IR microscopy, nanoindentation and dynamic vapour absorption were used to track changes in the chemical structure, in micromechanical and hygroscopic properties. It was shown that CS-treatment resulted in different changes in morphological, chemical and physical properties of the cell wall, in comparison with those under pure steam treatment. After CS-treatment, the cellular structure displayed significant deformations, and the biopolymer components, e.g. hemicellulose and lignin, were degraded, resulting in decreased hygroscopicity and increased mechanical properties of the wood compared to both untreated and steam treated wood. Moreover, CS-treatment resulted in a higher degree of degradation especially in earlywood compared to a more uniform behaviour of wood treated only by steam.

  16. Assessment of dry-stone terrace wall degradation with a 3D approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djuma, Hakan; Camera, Corrado; Faka, Marina; Bruggeman, Adriana; Hermon, Sorin

    2016-04-01

    In the Mediterranean basin, terracing is a common element of agricultural lands. Terraces retained by dry-stone walls are used to conserve arable soil, delay erosion processes and retain rainfall runoff. Currently, agricultural land abandonment is widespread in the Mediterranean region leading to terrace wall failure due to lack of maintenance and consequently an increase in soil erosion. The objective of this study is to test the applicability of digital 3D documentation on mountainous agricultural areas for assessing changes in terrace wall geometry, including terrace wall failures and associated soil erosion. The study area is located at 800-1100 m above sea level, in the Ophiolite complex of the Troodos Mountains in Cyprus. Average annual precipitation is 750 mm. Two sites with dry-stone terraces were selected for this study. The first site had a sequence of three terrace walls that were surveyed. The uppermost terrace wall was collapsed at several locations; the middle at few locations; and the lowest was still intact. Three fieldwork campaigns were conducted at this site: during the dry season (initial conditions), the middle and end of the wet season. The second site had one terrace wall that was almost completely collapsed. This terrace was restored during a communal terrace rehabilitation event. Two fieldwork campaigns were conducted for this terrace: before and after the terrace wall restoration. Terrace walls were documented with a set of digital images, and transformed into a 3D point cloud (using web-based services and commercial software - Autodesk 123D catch and Menci Software uMap, respectively). A set of points, registered with the total station and geo-referenced with a GPS, enabled the scaling of the 3D model and aligning the terrace walls within the same reference system. The density (distance between each point) of the reconstructed point clouds is 0.005 m by Umap and 0.025 m by 123D Catch. On the first site, the model analysis identified wall

  17. In situ microscopic observation of chitin and fungal cells with chitinous cell walls in hydrothermal conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Shigeru Deguchi; Kaoru Tsujii; Koki Horikoshi

    2015-01-01

    Recent findings of intact chitin in fossil records suggest surprisingly high recalcitrance of this biopolymer during hydrothermal treatments. We also know in the experience of everyday life that mushroom, cells of which have chitinous cell walls, do not fall apart however long they are simmered. We used in situ optical microscopy to examine chitin and fungal cells with chitinous cell walls during hydrothermal treatments, and obtained direct evidence that they remained undegraded at temperatur...

  18. Identification of Cell Wall Synthesis Regulatory Genes Controlling Biomass Characteristics and Yield in Rice (Oryza Sativa)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng, Zhaohua PEng [Mississippi State University; Ronald, Palmela [UC-Davis; Wang, Guo-Liang [The Ohio State University

    2013-04-26

    This project aims to identify the regulatory genes of rice cell wall synthesis pathways using a cell wall removal and regeneration system. We completed the gene expression profiling studies following the time course from cell wall removal to cell wall regeneration in rice suspension cells. We also completed, total proteome, nuclear subproteome and histone modification studies following the course from cell wall removal and cell wall regeneration process. A large number of differentially expressed regulatory genes and proteins were identified. Meanwhile, we generated RNAi and over-expression transgenic rice for 45 genes with at least 10 independent transgenic lines for each gene. In addition, we ordered T-DNA and transposon insertion mutants for 60 genes from Korea, Japan, and France and characterized the mutants. Overall, we have mutants and transgenic lines for over 90 genes, exceeded our proposed goal of generating mutants for 50 genes. Interesting Discoveries a) Cell wall re-synthesis in protoplasts may involve a novel cell wall synthesis mechanism. The synthesis of the primary cell wall is initiated in late cytokinesis with further modification during cell expansion. Phragmoplast plays an essential role in cell wall synthesis. It services as a scaffold for building the cell plate and formation of a new cell wall. Only one phragmoplast and one new cell wall is produced for each dividing cell. When the cell wall was removed enzymatically, we found that cell wall re-synthesis started from multiple locations simultaneously, suggesting that a novel mechanism is involved in cell wall re-synthesis. This observation raised many interesting questions, such as how the starting sites of cell wall synthesis are determined, whether phragmoplast and cell plate like structures are involved in cell wall re-synthesis, and more importantly whether the same set of enzymes and apparatus are used in cell wall re-synthesis as during cytokinesis. Given that many known cell wall

  19. A laser microsurgical method of cell wall removal allows detection of large-conductance ion channels in the guard cell plasma membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miedema, H.; Henriksen, G. H.; Assmann, S. M.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    Application of patch clamp techniques to higher-plant cells has been subject to the limitation that the requisite contact of the patch electrode with the cell membrane necessitates prior enzymatic removal of the plant cell wall. Because the wall is an integral component of plant cells, and because cell-wall-degrading enzymes can disrupt membrane properties, such enzymatic treatments may alter ion channel behavior. We compared ion channel activity in enzymatically isolated protoplasts of Vicia faba guard cells with that found in membranes exposed by a laser microsurgical technique in which only a tiny portion of the cell wall is removed while the rest of the cell remains intact within its tissue environment. "Laser-assisted" patch clamping reveals a new category of high-conductance (130 to 361 pS) ion channels not previously reported in patch clamp studies on plant plasma membranes. These data indicate that ion channels are present in plant membranes that are not detected by conventional patch clamp techniques involving the production of individual plant protoplasts isolated from their tissue environment by enzymatic digestion of the cell wall. Given the large conductances of the channels revealed by laser-assisted patch clamping, we hypothesize that these channels play a significant role in the regulation of ion content and electrical signalling in guard cells.

  20. Characterization of PEM fuel cell degradation by polarization change curves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezmalinovic, Dario; Simic, Boris; Barbir, Frano

    2015-10-01

    Polarization change curves, defined as a difference between the polarization curve at the beginning of life and the actual polarization curve after the cell has been operational for some time, were used to analyze degradation of a PEM fuel cell exposed to voltage cycling as an accelerated stress test for electrocatalyst degradation. Degradation, i.e., loss of voltage was due to increase of activation losses and increase of resistance in the catalyst layer, both most likely due to the loss of catalyst electrochemically active area. The results of the polarization change curves analysis correspond to the findings of the periodic individual tests performed during the accelerated stress test, such as electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry and linear sweep voltammetry. Therefore, this method has potential to be used as a relatively quick and simple, yet effective, degradation diagnostic tool.

  1. Surface Analyses and Immune Reactivities of Major Cell Wall-Associated Proteins of Group A Streptococcus

    OpenAIRE

    Cole, Jason N; Ramirez, Ruben D.; Currie, Bart J.; Cordwell, Stuart J.; Djordjevic, Steven P.; Mark J Walker

    2005-01-01

    A proteomic analysis was undertaken to identify cell wall-associated proteins of Streptococcus pyogenes. Seventy-four distinct cell wall-associated proteins were identified, 66 of which were novel. Thirty-three proteins were immunoreactive with pooled S. pyogenes-reactive human antisera. Biotinylation of the GAS cell surface identified 23 cell wall-associated proteins that are surface exposed.

  2. Pectic arabinan side chains are essential for pollen cell wall integrity during pollen development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cankar, K.; Kortstee, A.J.; Toonen, M.A.J.; Wolters-Arts, M.; Houbein, R.; Mariani, C.; Ulvskov, P.; Jorgensen, B.; Schols, H.A.; Visser, R.G.F.; Trindade, L.M.

    2014-01-01

    Pectin is a complex polysaccharide and an integral part of the primary plant cell wall and middle lamella, contributing to cell wall mechanical strength and cell adhesion. To understand the structure–function relationships of pectin in the cell wall, a set of transgenic potato lines with altered pec

  3. Targeted and non-targeted effects in cell wall polysaccharides from transgenetically modified potato tubers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huang, J.H.

    2016-01-01

    The plant cell wall is a chemically complex network composed mainly of polysaccharides. Cell wall polysaccharides surround and protect plant cells and are responsible for the stability and rigidity of plant tissue. Pectin is a major component of primary cell wall and the middle lamella of plants. Ho

  4. Stability and Degradation of Organic and Polymer Solar Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Organic photovoltaics (OPV) are a new generation of solar cells with the potential to offer very short energy pay back times, mechanical flexibility and significantly lower production costs compared to traditional crystalline photovoltaic systems. A weakness of OPV is their comparative instability...... during operation and this is a critical area of research towards the successful development and commercialization of these 3rd generation solar cells. Covering both small molecule and polymer solar cells, Stability and Degradation of Organic and Polymer Solar Cells summarizes the state of the art...... understanding of stability and provides a detailed analysis of the mechanisms by which degradation occurs. Following an introductory chapter which compares different photovoltaic technologies, the book focuses on OPV degradation, discussing the origin and characterization of the instability and describing...

  5. Ectopic lignification in primary cellulose-deficient cell walls of maize cell suspension cultures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hugo Melida; Antonio Encina; Asier Largo-Gosens; Esther Novo-Uzal; Rogelio Santiago; Federico Pomar; Pedro Garca; Penelope Garca-Angulo; Jose Luis Acebes; Jesus Alvarez

    2015-01-01

    Maize (Zea mays L.) suspension-cultured cells with up to 70% less cellulose were obtained by stepwise habituation to dichlobenil (DCB), a cellulose biosynthesis inhibitor. Cellulose deficiency was accompanied by marked changes in cell wall matrix polysaccharides and phenolics as revealed by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. Cell wall compositional analysis indicated that the cellulose-deficient cell walls showed an enhancement of highly branched and cross-linked arabinoxylans, as well as an increased content in ferulic acid, diferulates and p-coumaric acid, and the presence of a polymer that stained positive for phloroglucinol. In accordance with this, cellulose-deficient cell walls showed a fivefold increase in Klason-type lignin. Thioacidolysis/GC-MS analysis of cellulose-deficient cell walls indicated the presence of a lignin-like polymer with a Syringyl/Guaiacyl ratio of 1.45, which differed from the sensu stricto stress-related lignin that arose in response to short-term DCB-treatments. Gene expression analysis of these cells indicated an overexpression of genes specific for the biosynthesis of monolignol units of lignin. A study of stress signaling pathways revealed an overexpression of some of the jasmonate signaling pathway genes, which might trigger ectopic lignification in response to cell wall integrity disruptions. In summary, the structural plasticity of primary cell walls is proven, since a lignification process is possible in response to cellulose impoverishment.

  6. Modelling cathode catalyst degradation in polymer electrolyte fuel cells

    OpenAIRE

    Rinaldo, Steven Giordano

    2013-01-01

    Nano-sized Pt particles in the cathode catalyst layer of a polymer electrolyte fuel cell afford a high initial electrochemically active surface-area. However, the gain in active surface area for desired surface reactions is offset in part by enhanced rates of degradation processes that cause losses in catalyst mass, catalyst surface-area, and electrocatalytic activity. The loss of electrochemically active surface-area of the catalyst causes severe performance degradation over relevant lifetim...

  7. Solid Oxide Electrolysis Cells: Degradation at High Current Densities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knibbe, Ruth; Traulsen, Marie Lund; Hauch, Anne;

    2010-01-01

    The degradation of Ni/yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ)-based solid oxide electrolysis cells operated at high current densities was studied. The degradation was examined at 850°C, at current densities of −1.0, −1.5, and −2.0 A/cm2, with a 50:50 (H2O:H2) gas supplied to the Ni/YSZ hydrogen electrode...

  8. IDENTIFYING GENES CONTROLLING FERULATE CROSS-LINKING FORMATION IN GRASS CELL WALLS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de O Buanafina, Marcia Maria

    2013-10-16

    expression in tall fescue under CaMV::35S resulted in 1.9 fold decrease in activity compared to activity when FAEA was driven by the rice actin promoter (Buanafina et al., 2008) and indicates that the CaMV::35S promoter might not be ideal to drive gene expression in grasses. Our results also shows that the level of cell wall esterified ferulates and diferulates did not change when BdAT8 was down regulated indicating that wall ferulates indicating this is not a feruloyl transferase candidate. We are currently preparing plant material from these selected transgenic plants to assess putative feruloyltransferase transcripts levels among different transgenic lines produced. 4. Cell Wall Characterization of Brachypodium accessions. We have also been assessing how the level of cell wall esterified ferulates and diferulates, arabinoxylan, lignification and cellulose mediated sugar release varies among different Brachypodium diploid and tetraploid lines at different stages of development. Considerable variation has been found for the different cell wall components studied. We have also found significant variation for cellulase-mediated release of sugars from leaves of different Brachypodium accession lines. This will give us a good ground to assess the mutants and will be useful for producing a mapping population. The analyses are still ongoing as plant material needs to collected from different genotypes at the flowering stage for cell wall characterization. We aim to have this study completed and published. 5. Based on our previous findings where FAE expression in planta resulted in increased cell wall degradability and the positive synergism between FAEA and xylanase, we have tested if co-expression of FAEA and XYN2 in planta could improve the digestion of polysaccharides and increase cell wall degradability and post harvest cell wall deconstruction in grasses more effectively than expression of xylanase (Buanafina et al., 2012) or FAE (Buanafina et al. 2008, 2009, 2010) alone. As

  9. Orbital wall infarction in child with sickle cell disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssens, C; Claeys, L; Maes, P; Boiy, T; Wojciechowski, M

    2015-12-01

    We present the case of a 17-year-old boy, known with homozygous sickle cell disease, who was admitted because of generalised pain. He developed bilateral periorbital oedema and proptosis, without pain or visual disturbances. In addition to hyperhydration, oxygen and analgesia IV antibiotics were started, to cover a possible osteomyelitis. Patients with sickle cell disease are at risk for vaso-occlusive crises, when the abnormally shaped red blood cells aggregate and block the capillaries. Such a crisis typically presents at a location with high bone marrow activity, as the vertebrae and long bones. At an early age, the bone marrow is still active at other sites, for example the orbital wall, and thus infarction can also occur there. Thus, in young persons with sickle cell disease, it is important to consider orbital wall infarction in the differential diagnosis, since the approach is different from osteomyelitis. If the disease is complicated by an orbital compression syndrome, corticosteroids or surgical intervention may be necessary to preserve the vision. In our patient, an MRI of the orbitae demonstrated periorbital oedema with bone anomalies in the orbital and frontal bones, confirming orbital wall infarction. Ophthalmological examination revealed no signs of pressure on the nervus opticus. The patient recovered gradually with conservative treatment.

  10. Orbital wall infarction in child with sickle cell disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssens, C; Claeys, L; Maes, P; Boiy, T; Wojciechowski, M

    2015-12-01

    We present the case of a 17-year-old boy, known with homozygous sickle cell disease, who was admitted because of generalised pain. He developed bilateral periorbital oedema and proptosis, without pain or visual disturbances. In addition to hyperhydration, oxygen and analgesia IV antibiotics were started, to cover a possible osteomyelitis. Patients with sickle cell disease are at risk for vaso-occlusive crises, when the abnormally shaped red blood cells aggregate and block the capillaries. Such a crisis typically presents at a location with high bone marrow activity, as the vertebrae and long bones. At an early age, the bone marrow is still active at other sites, for example the orbital wall, and thus infarction can also occur there. Thus, in young persons with sickle cell disease, it is important to consider orbital wall infarction in the differential diagnosis, since the approach is different from osteomyelitis. If the disease is complicated by an orbital compression syndrome, corticosteroids or surgical intervention may be necessary to preserve the vision. In our patient, an MRI of the orbitae demonstrated periorbital oedema with bone anomalies in the orbital and frontal bones, confirming orbital wall infarction. Ophthalmological examination revealed no signs of pressure on the nervus opticus. The patient recovered gradually with conservative treatment. PMID:26790559

  11. Beta-lactamase induction and cell wall metabolism in Gram-negative bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ximin eZeng

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Production of beta-lactamases, the enzymes that degrade beta-lactam antibiotics, is the most widespread and threatening mechanism of antibiotic resistance. In the past, extensive research has focused on the structure, function, and ecology of beta-lactamases while limited efforts were placed on the regulatory mechanisms of beta-lactamases. Recently, increasing evidence demonstrate a direct link between beta-lactamase induction and cell wall metabolism in Gram-negative bacteria. Specifically, expression of beta-lactamase could be induced by the liberated murein fragments, such as muropeptides. This article summarizes current knowledge on cell wall metabolism, beta-lactam, and beta lactamases. In particular, we comprehensively reviewed recent studies on the beta-lactamase induction by muropeptides via two major molecular mechanisms (the AmpG-AmpR-AmpC pathway and BlrAB-like two-component regulatory system in Gram-negative bacteria. The signaling pathways for beta-lactamase induction offer a broad array of promising targets for the discovery of new antibacterial drugs used for combination therapies. Therefore, to develop effective mitigation strategies against the widespread beta-lactam resistance, examination of the molecular basis of beta-lactamase induction by cell wall fragment is highly warranted.

  12. Antigenicity and immunogenicity of an extract from the cell wall and cell membrane of Histoplasma capsulatum yeast cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Gómez, A M; Rhodes, J C; Deepe, G S

    1991-01-01

    In order to identify T-cell antigens from Histoplasma capsulatum yeast cells, we prepared a detergent extract of the cell wall and cell membrane of yeast-phase H. capsulatum G217B and analyzed its antigenicity and immunogenicity. Mice injected with viable H. capsulatum yeast cells or with 500 or 1,000 micrograms of the extract mounted a delayed-type hypersensitivity response to solubilized cell wall and cell membrane. Vaccination with this antigenic preparation conferred a protective immune r...

  13. Chromium related degradation of solid oxide fuel cells; Chrom-bezogene Degradation von Festoxid-Brennstoffzellen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neumann, Anita

    2011-05-04

    Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFCs) offer a high potential for application as an auxiliary power unit (APU) for heavy goods vehicles as well as combined heat and power (CHP) systems. SOFCs are especially attractive due to their high efficiencies and the use of different fuel types. However, optimization in terms of long term stability and costs are still necessary. This work characterized the degradation of SOFCs with lanthanum strontium manganite (LSM) cathodes under chromium influence. Galvanostatic cell tests were carried out at 800 C with operation times from 250 - 3000 h and variation of the chromium source and current density. The current densities of j = 0 (A)/(cm{sup 2}), j = 0,3 (A)/(cm{sup 2}) and j = 0,5 (A)/(cm{sup 2}) were applied. The high temperature ferritic alloy Crofer22APU was used as a chromium source. Variation of the chromium source was realized by coating the Crofer22APU insert with the chromium retention layer Mn{sub 3}O{sub 4} and the cathode contact layer LCC10. Cell degradation was analyzed with regard to cell voltage, current density and area specific resistance (ASR). Microstructural alterations of the cathode as well as chromium content and distribution across the cell were investigated after completion of the cell tests. For cells with a chromium source present and operation with a nonzero current density, the course of cell degradation was divided into three phases: a run-in, weak linear degradation and strong linear degradation. A decrease of the chromium release rate by means of different coatings stretched the course of degradation along the timescale. Strong degradation, which is characterized by a significant increase in ASR as well as a decrease of current density at the operating point, was only observed when a chromium source in the setup was comb ined with operation of the cell with a non-zero current density. Operation of the cell with a chromium source but no current density caused a degradation of current density at the

  14. Ultrastructural effects of lysozymes on the cell wall of Caryophanon latum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trentini, W C; Murray, R G

    1975-02-01

    When Caryophanon latum was exposed to egg white lysozyme in isotonic sucrose and observed by phase-contrast microscopy, protoplasts emerged along the length of the trichomes, apparently at sites corresponding to cross septa. Electron microscopy of sections revealed that this enzyme initially attacked the core of the septal peptidoglycan and delamination of septa resulted. The inner densely staining layer of the lateral and polar wall (considered to contain peptidoglycan as the major component) remained intact except for destruction at the advancing tip of partial septa; protoplasts or cell debris could escape from the gaps formed at developing septa. Treatment of intact trichomes with pronase, a lipase - phospholipase C mixture, EDTA, glutaraldehyde, or heat, before exposure to egg white lysozyme did not alter this pattern nor did it render the remaining peptidoglycan more susceptible to attack. The wall material external to the peptidoglycan was solubilized by pronase. The peptidoglycan remaining after lysozyme treatment was not morphologically changed by treatment with pronase. Lysozyme derived from Chalaropsis hydrolyzed incomplete septa initially, while the lateral and polar wall and complete septa were degraded later. Therefore, it is most probable that the inner dense layer does contain the peptidoglycan component and that some biochemical maturation distinguishes the substrate for these enzymes in the lateral wall and septa. PMID:803400

  15. Cell wall bound anionic peroxidases from asparagus byproducts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaramillo-Carmona, Sara; López, Sergio; Vazquez-Castilla, Sara; Jimenez-Araujo, Ana; Rodriguez-Arcos, Rocio; Guillen-Bejarano, Rafael

    2014-10-01

    Asparagus byproducts are a good source of cationic soluble peroxidases (CAP) useful for the bioremediation of phenol-contaminated wastewaters. In this study, cell wall bound peroxidases (POD) from the same byproducts have been purified and characterized. The covalent forms of POD represent >90% of the total cell wall bound POD. Isoelectric focusing showed that whereas the covalent fraction is constituted primarily by anionic isoenzymes, the ionic fraction is a mixture of anionic, neutral, and cationic isoenzymes. Covalently bound peroxidases were purified by means of ion exchange chromatography and affinity chromatography. In vitro detoxification studies showed that although CAP are more effective for the removal of 4-CP and 2,4-DCP, anionic asparagus peroxidase (AAP) is a better option for the removal of hydroxytyrosol (HT), the main phenol present in olive mill wastewaters.

  16. Cytoplasmic streaming in plant cells: the role of wall slip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, K; Marenduzzo, D; Cates, M E

    2012-06-01

    We present a computer simulation study, via lattice Boltzmann simulations, of a microscopic model for cytoplasmic streaming in algal cells such as those of Chara corallina. We modelled myosin motors tracking along actin lanes as spheres undergoing directed motion along fixed lines. The sphere dimension takes into account the fact that motors drag vesicles or other organelles, and, unlike previous work, we model the boundary close to which the motors move as walls with a finite slip layer. By using realistic parameter values for actin lane and myosin density, as well as for endoplasmic and vacuole viscosity and the slip layer close to the wall, we find that this simplified view, which does not rely on any coupling between motors, cytoplasm and vacuole other than that provided by viscous Stokes flow, is enough to account for the observed magnitude of streaming velocities in intracellular fluid in living plant cells.

  17. Roles of tRNA in cell wall biosynthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dare, Kiley; Ibba, Michael

    2012-01-01

    responsible for cell wall modifications, aminoacyl-phosphatidylglycerol synthases (aaPGSs) and Fem, were discovered some time ago, they have recently become of intense interest for their roles in the antimicrobial resistance of pathogenic microorganisms. The addition of positively charged amino acids...... to phosphatidylglycerol (PG) by aaPGSs neutralizes the lipid bilayer making the bacteria less susceptible to positively charged antimicrobial agents. Fem transferases utilize aa-tRNA to form peptide bridges that link strands of peptidoglycan. These bridges vary among the bacterial species in which they are present...... and play a role in resistance to antibiotics that target the cell wall. Additionally, the formation of truncated peptides results in shorter peptide bridges and loss of branched linkages which makes bacteria more susceptible to antimicrobials. A greater understanding of the structure and substrate...

  18. Effects of spaceflight on polysaccharides of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cell wall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hong-Zhi; Wang, Qiang; Liu, Xiao-Yong; Tan, Sze-Sze

    2008-12-01

    Freeze-dried samples of four Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains, namely, FL01, FL03, 2.0016, and 2.1424, were subjected to spaceflight. After the satellite's landing on Earth, the samples were recovered and changes in yeast cell wall were analyzed. Spaceflight strains of all S. cerevisiae strains showed significant changes in cell wall thickness (P growth curve analysis showed spaceflight S. cerevisiae 2.0016 had a faster growth rate, shorter lag phase periods, higher final biomass, and higher content of beta-glucan. Genetic stability analysis showed that prolonged subculturing of spaceflight strain S. cerevisiae 2.0016 did not lead to the appearance of variants, indicating that the genetic stability of S. cerevisiae 2.0016 mutant could be sufficient for its exploitation of beta-glucan production. PMID:18797865

  19. Regulation of plant cells, cell walls and development by mechanical signals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyerowitz, Elliot M. [California Inst. of Technology (CalTech), Pasadena, CA (United States)

    2016-06-14

    The overall goal of the revised scope of work for the final year of funding was to characterize cell wall biosynthesis in developing cotyledons and in the shoot apical meristem of Arabidopsis thaliana, as a way of learning about developmental control of cell wall biosynthesis in plants, and interactions between cell wall biosynthesis and the microtubule cytoskeleton. The proposed work had two parts – to look at the effect of mutation in the SPIRAL2 gene on microtubule organization and reorganization, and to thoroughly characterize the glycosyltransferase genes expressed in shoot apical meristems by RNA-seq experiments, by in situ hybridization of the RNAs expressed in the meristem, and by antibody staining of the products of the glycosyltransferases in meristems. Both parts were completed; the spiral2 mutant was found to speed microtubule reorientation after ablation of adjacent cells, supporting our hypothesis that reorganization correlates with microtubule severing, the rate of which is increased by the mutation. The glycosyltransferase characterization was completed and published as Yang et al. (2016). Among the new things learned was that primary cell wall biosynthesis is strongly controlled both by cell type, and by stage of cell cycle, implying not only that different, even adjacent, cells can have different sugar linkages in their (nonshared) walls, but also that a surprisingly large proportion of glycosyltransferases is regulated in the cell cycle, and therefore that the cell cycle regulates wall maturation to a degree previously unrecognized.

  20. Effect of Yeast Cell Morphology, Cell Wall Physical Structure and Chemical Composition on Patulin Adsorption.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Luo

    Full Text Available The capability of yeast to adsorb patulin in fruit juice can aid in substantially reducing the patulin toxic effect on human health. This study aimed to investigate the capability of yeast cell morphology and cell wall internal structure and composition to adsorb patulin. To compare different yeast cell morphologies, cell wall internal structure and composition, scanning electron microscope, transmission electron microscope and ion chromatography were used. The results indicated that patulin adsorption capability of yeast was influenced by cell surface areas, volume, and cell wall thickness, as well as 1,3-β-glucan content. Among these factors, cell wall thickness and 1,3-β-glucan content serve significant functions. The investigation revealed that patulin adsorption capability was mainly affected by the three-dimensional network structure of the cell wall composed of 1,3-β-glucan. Finally, patulin adsorption in commercial kiwi fruit juice was investigated, and the results indicated that yeast cells could adsorb patulin from commercial kiwi fruit juice efficiently. This study can potentially simulate in vitro cell walls to enhance patulin adsorption capability and successfully apply to fruit juice industry.

  1. REGULATION OF PLANT CELLS, CELL WALLS AND DEVELOPMENT BY MECHANICAL SIGNALS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyerowitz, Elliot M [California Inst. of Technology (CalTech), Pasadena, CA (United States)

    2016-08-22

    The overall goal of the revised scope of work for the final year of funding was to characterize cell wall biosynthesis in developing cotyledons and in the shoot apical meristem of Arabidopsis thaliana, as a way of learning about developmental control of cell wall biosynthesis in plants, and interactions between cell wall biosynthesis and the microtubule cytoskeleton. The proposed work had two parts – to look at the effect of mutation in the SPIRAL2 gene on microtubule organization and reorganization, and to thoroughly characterize the glycosyltransferase genes expressed in shoot apical meristems by RNA-seq experiments, by in situ hybridization of the RNAs expressed in the meristem, and by antibody staining of the products of the glycosyltransferases in meristems. Both parts were completed; the spiral2 mutant was found to speed microtubule reorientation after ablation of adjacent cells, supporting our hypothesis that reorganization correlates with microtubule severing, the rate of which is increased by the mutation. The glycosyltransferase characterization was completed and published as Yang et al. (2016). Among the new things learned was that primary cell wall biosynthesis is strongly controlled both by cell type, and by stage of cell cycle, implying not only that different, even adjacent, cells can have different sugar linkages in their (nonshared) walls, but also that a surprisingly large proportion of glycosyltransferases is regulated in the cell cycle, and therefore that the cell cycle regulates wall maturation to a degree previously unrecognized.

  2. Influence of Magnesium Alloy Degradation on Undifferentiated Human Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Cecchinato

    Full Text Available Magnesium alloys are of particular interest in medical science since they provide compatible mechanical properties with those of the cortical bone and, depending on the alloying elements, they have the capability to tailor the degradation rate in physiological conditions, providing alternative bioresorbable materials for bone applications. The present study investigates the in vitro short-term response of human undifferentiated cells on three magnesium alloys and high-purity magnesium (Mg.The degradation parameters of magnesium-silver (Mg2Ag, magnesium-gadolinium (Mg10Gd and magnesium-rare-earth (Mg4Y3RE alloys were analysed after 1, 2, and 3 days of incubation in cell culture medium under cell culture condition. Changes in cell viability and cell adhesion were evaluated by culturing human umbilical cord perivascular cells on corroded Mg materials to examine how the degradation influences the cellular development.The pH and osmolality of the medium increased with increasing degradation rate and it was found to be most pronounced for Mg4Y3RE alloy. The biological observations showed that HUCPV exhibited a more homogeneous cell growth on Mg alloys compared to high-purity Mg, where they showed a clustered morphology. Moreover, cells exhibited a slightly higher density on Mg2Ag and Mg10Gd in comparison to Mg4Y3RE, due to the lower alkalinisation and osmolality of the incubation medium. However, cells grown on Mg10Gd and Mg4Y3RE generated more developed and healthy cellular structures that allowed them to better adhere to the surface. This can be attributable to a more stable and homogeneous degradation of the outer surface with respect to the incubation time.

  3. Cell wall perturbation sensitizes fungi to the antimalarial drug chloroquine

    OpenAIRE

    Islahudin, Farida; Khozoie, Combiz; Bates, Steven; Ting, Kang-Nee; Pleass, Richard J.; Avery, Simon V.

    2013-01-01

    Chloroquine (CQ) has been a mainstay of antimalarial drug treatment for several decades. Additional therapeutic actions of CQ have been described, including some reports of fungal inhibition. Here we investigated the action of CQ in fungi, including the yeast model Saccharomyces cerevisiae. A genomewide yeast deletion strain collection was screened against CQ, revealing that bck1Δ and slt2Δ mutants of the cell wall integrity pathway are CQ hypersensitive. This phenotype was rescued with sorbi...

  4. Life behind cell walls: paradigm lost, paradigm regained.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamport, D T

    2001-09-01

    This review of the living cell wall and its protein components is in two parts. The first is anecdotal. A personal account spanning over 40 years research may perhaps be an antidote to one stereotypical view of scientists as detached and humorless. The second part deals with the meaning of function, particularly as it applies to hydroxyproline-rich glycoproteins. Function is a difficult word to define objectively. However, with help from such luminaries as Humpty Dumpty: "A word means what I want it to mean, neither more nor less," and Wittgenstein: "Giving examples of usage ... is the only way to talk about meaning," it is possible to construct a ziggurat representing increasingly complex levels of organization from molecular structure to ecology. Forty years ago I suggested that hydroxyproline-rich structural proteins played a key role in cell wall functioning. But because the bulk of the wall is carbohydrate, there has been an understandable resistance to paradigm change. Expansins, paradoxically, contribute greatly to this resistance because their modus operandi as cell-wall-loosening proteins is based on the idea that they break hydrogen bonds between polysaccharide chains allowing slippage. However, this view is not consistent with the recent discovery [Grobe et al. (1999) Eur. J. Biochem 263: 33-40] that beta-expansins may be proteases, as it implies that the extensin network is not a straightjacket but a substrate for expansin in muro. Such a direct role for extensins in both negative and positive regulation of cell expansion and elongation may constitute a major morphogenetic mechanism operating at all levels of plant growth and development.

  5. The Mechanisms of Plant Cell Wall Deconstruction during Enzymatic Hydrolysis

    OpenAIRE

    Thygesen, Lisbeth G; Thybring, Emil E.; Johansen, Katja S.; Claus Felby

    2014-01-01

    Mechanical agitation during enzymatic hydrolysis of insoluble plant biomass at high dry matter contents is indispensable for the initial liquefaction step in biorefining. It is known that particle size reduction is an important part of liquefaction, but the mechanisms involved are poorly understood. Here we put forward a simple model based on mechanical principles capable of capturing the result of the interaction between mechanical forces and cell wall weakening via hydrolysis of glucosidic ...

  6. Antioxidant properties of cell wall polysaccharides of Stevia rebaudiana leaves

    OpenAIRE

    Mediesse Kengne Francine; Woguia Alice Louise; Fogue Souopgui Pythagore; Atogho-Tiedeu Barbara; Simo Gustave; Thaddée Boudjeko

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To examine the total phenolic and protein contents, and the antioxidant activities of cell wall polysaccharide fractions of Stevia rebaudiana leaves. Methods: Three different polysaccharide-enriched fractions, namely FPE (extract with 50 mmol/ L ethylene diamine tetra acetic acid), FPK (extract with 0.05 mol/L KOH) and FH (extract with 4 mol/L KOH) were extracted from Stevia rebaudiana leaves. The antioxidant activity of these fractions was evaluated based on thei...

  7. Enzyme Amplified Detection of Microbial Cell Wall Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wainwright, Norman R.

    2004-01-01

    This proposal is MBL's portion of NASA's Johnson Space Center's Astrobiology Center led by Principal Investigator, Dr. David McKay, entitled: 'Institute for the Study of Biomarkers in Astromaterials.' Dr. Norman Wainwright is the principal investigator at MBL and is responsible for developing methods to detect trace quantities of microbial cell wall chemicals using the enzyme amplification system of Limulus polyphemus and other related methods.

  8. Cell-wall hemicelluloses as mobile carbon stores in plants

    OpenAIRE

    Schädel, Christina

    2009-01-01

    Hemicelluloses are the second most abundant polysaccharide in nature after cellulose. So far, the chemical heterogeneity of cell-wall hemicelluloses and the relatively large sample-volume required in existing methods represent major obstacles for large-scale, cross-species analyses of this important plant compounds. Here, we apply a new micro-extraction method to analyse hemicelluloses and the ratio of ‘cellulose and lignin’ to hemicelluloses in different tissues of 28 plant species comprisin...

  9. Enhanced regeneration of degraded polymer solar cells by thermal annealing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Pankaj, E-mail: pankaj@mail.nplindia.ernet.in [CSIR-National Physical Laboratory, Dr. K. S. Krishnan Marg, New Delhi 110012 (India); Centre for Organic Electronics, Physics, University of Newcastle, Callaghan NSW-2308 (Australia); Bilen, Chhinder; Zhou, Xiaojing; Belcher, Warwick J.; Dastoor, Paul C., E-mail: Paul.Dastoor@newcastle.edu.au [Centre for Organic Electronics, Physics, University of Newcastle, Callaghan NSW-2308 (Australia); Feron, Krishna [Centre for Organic Electronics, Physics, University of Newcastle, Callaghan NSW-2308 (Australia); CSIRO Energy Technology, P. O. Box 330, Newcastle NSW 2300 (Australia)

    2014-05-12

    The degradation and thermal regeneration of poly(3-hexylethiophene) (P3HT):[6,6]-phenyl-C{sub 61}-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) and P3HT:indene-C{sub 60} bisadduct (ICBA) polymer solar cells, with Ca/Al and Ca/Ag cathodes and indium tin oxide/poly(ethylene-dioxythiophene):polystyrene sulfonate anode have been investigated. Degradation occurs via a combination of three primary pathways: (1) cathodic oxidation, (2) active layer phase segregation, and (3) anodic diffusion. Fully degraded devices were subjected to thermal annealing under inert atmosphere. Degraded solar cells possessing Ca/Ag electrodes were observed to regenerate their performance, whereas solar cells having Ca/Al electrodes exhibited no significant regeneration of device characteristics after thermal annealing. Moreover, the solar cells with a P3HT:ICBA active layer exhibited enhanced regeneration compared to P3HT:PCBM active layer devices as a result of reduced changes to the active layer morphology. Devices combining a Ca/Ag cathode and P3HT:ICBA active layer demonstrated ∼50% performance restoration over several degradation/regeneration cycles.

  10. Progress Towards the Tomato Fruit Cell Wall Proteome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliel eRuiz May

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The plant cell wall (CW compartment, or apoplast, is host to a highly dynamic proteome, comprising large numbers of both enzymatic and structural proteins. This reflects its importance as the interface between adjacent cells and the external environment, the presence of numerous extracellular metabolic and signaling pathways, and the complex nature of wall structural assembly and remodeling during cell growth and differentiation. Tomato fruit ontogeny, with its distinct phases of rapid growth and ripening, provides a valuable experimental model system for CW proteomic studies, in that it involves substantial wall assembly, remodeling and coordinated disassembly. Moreover, diverse populations of secreted proteins must be deployed to resist microbial infection and protect against abiotic stresses. Tomato fruits also provide substantial amounts of biological material, which is a significant advantage for many types of biochemical analyses, and facilitates the detection of lower abundance proteins. In this review we describe a variety of orthogonal techniques that have been applied to identify CW localized proteins from tomato fruit, including approaches that: target the proteome of the CW and the overlying cuticle; functional ‘secretome’ screens; lectin affinity chromatography; and computational analyses to predict proteins that enter the secretory pathway. Each has its merits and limitations, but collectively they are providing important insights into CW proteome composition and dynamics, as well as some potentially controversial issues, such as the prevalence of non-canonical protein secretion.

  11. Cell wall proteins in seedling cotyledons of Prosopis chilensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, J G; Cardemil, L

    1994-01-01

    Four cell wall proteins of cotyledons of Prosopis chilensis seedlings were characterized by PAGE and Western analyses using a polyclonal antibody, generated against soybean seed coat extensin. These proteins had M(r)s of 180,000, 126,000, 107,000 and 63,000, as determined by SDS-PAGE. The proteins exhibited a fluorescent positive reaction with dansylhydrazine suggesting that they are glycoproteins; they did not show peroxidase activity. The cell wall proteins were also characterized by their amino acid composition and by their amino-terminal sequence. These analyses revealed that there are two groups of related cell wall proteins in the cotyledons. The first group comprises the proteins of M(r)s 180,000, 126,000, 107,000 which are rich in glutamic acid/glutamine and aspartic acid/asparagine and they have almost identical NH2-terminal sequences. The second group comprises the M(r) 63,000 protein which is rich in proline, glycine, valine and tyrosine, with an NH2-terminal sequence which was very similar to that of soybean proline-rich proteins.

  12. Protein transport across the cell wall of monoderm Gram-positive bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Forster, Brian M.; Marquis, Hélène

    2012-01-01

    In monoderm (single membrane) Gram-positive bacteria, the majority of secreted proteins are first translocated across the cytoplasmic membrane into the inner wall zone. For a subset of these proteins, final destination is within the cell envelope either as membrane-anchored or cell wall-anchored proteins, whereas another subset of proteins is destined to be transported across the cell wall into the extracellular milieu. Although the cell wall is a porous structure, there is evidence that, for...

  13. The cell wall and endoplasmic reticulum stress responses are coordinately regulated in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    OpenAIRE

    Krysan, Damian J.

    2009-01-01

    The unfolded protein response (UPR) is an intracellular signaling pathway that regulates the cellular response to the accumulation of misfolded proteins in eukaryotes. Our group has demonstrated that cell wall stress activates UPR in yeast through signals transmitted by the cell wall integrity (CWI) mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase cascade. The UPR is required to maintain cell wall integrity; mutants lacking a functional UPR have defects in cell wall biosynthesis and are hypersensitive ...

  14. Homogenization of a system of elastic and reaction-diffusion equations modelling plant cell wall biomechanics

    OpenAIRE

    Ptashnyk, Mariya; Seguin, Brian

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we present a derivation and multiscale analysis of a mathematical model for plant cell wall biomechanics that takes into account both the microscopic structure of a cell wall coming from the cellulose microfibrils and the chemical reactions between the cell wall's constituents. Particular attention is paid to the role of pectin and the impact of calcium-pectin cross-linking chemistry on the mechanical properties of the cell wall. We prove the existence and uniqueness of the stro...

  15. Quantitative Profiling of Feruloylated Arabinoxylan Side-Chains from Graminaceous Cell Walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schendel, Rachel R.; Meyer, Marleen R.; Bunzel, Mirko

    2016-01-01

    Graminaceous arabinoxylans are distinguished by decoration with feruloylated monosaccharidic and oligosaccharidic side-chains. Although it is hypothesized that structural complexity and abundance of these feruloylated arabinoxylan side-chains may contribute, among other factors, to resistance of plant cell walls to enzymatic degradation, quantitative profiling approaches for these structural units in plant cell wall materials have not been described yet. Here we report the development and application of a rapid and robust method enabling the quantitative comparison of feruloylated side-chain profiles in cell wall materials following mildly acidic hydrolysis, C18-solid phase extraction (SPE), reduction under aprotic conditions, and liquid chromatography with diode-array detection/mass spectrometry (LC-DAD/MS) separation and detection. The method was applied to the insoluble fiber/cell wall materials isolated from 12 whole grains: wild rice (Zizania aquatica L.), long-grain brown rice (Oryza sativa L.), rye (Secale cereale L.), kamut (Triticum turanicum Jakubz.), wheat (Triticum aestivum L.), spelt (Triticum spelta L.), intermediate wheatgrass (Thinopyrum intermedium), maize (Zea mays L.), popcorn (Zea mays L. var. everta), oat (Avena sativa L.) (dehulled), barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) (dehulled), and proso millet (Panicum miliaceum L.). Between 51 and 96% of the total esterified monomeric ferulates were represented in the quantified compounds captured in the feruloylated side-chain profiles, which confirms the significance of these structures to the global arabinoxylan structure in terms of quantity. The method provided new structural insights into cereal grain arabinoxylans, in particular, that the structural moiety α-l-galactopyranosyl-(1→2)-β-d-xylopyranosyl-(1→2)-5-O-trans-feruloyl-l-arabinofuranose (FAXG), which had previously only been described in maize, is ubiquitous to cereal grains. PMID:26834763

  16. Stability and Degradation of Polymer Solar cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norrman, Kion

    The current state-of-the-art allows for roll-to-roll manufacture of polymer solar cells in high volume with stability and efficiency sufficient to grant success in low-energy applications. However, further improvement is needed for the successful application of the devices in real life applications...

  17. Plectasin, a Fungal Defensin, Targets the Bacterial Cell Wall Precursor Lipid II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schneider, Tanja; Kruse, Thomas; Wimmer, Reinhard;

    2010-01-01

    that plectasin, a fungal defensin, acts by directly binding the bacterial cell-wall precursor Lipid II. A wide range of genetic and biochemical approaches identify cell-wall biosynthesis as the pathway targeted by plectasin. In vitro assays for cell-wall synthesis identified Lipid II as the specific cellular...

  18. Staphylococcus aureus Cell Wall Stress Stimulon Gene-lacZ Fusion Strains: Potential for Use in Screening for Cell Wall-Active Antimicrobials▿

    OpenAIRE

    Steidl, Rebecca; Pearson, Stacy; Stephenson, Robert E.; Ledala, Nagender; Sitthisak, Sutthirat; Wilkinson, Brian J; Jayaswal, Radheshyam K.

    2008-01-01

    lacZ fusion strains were constructed using the promoters of five cell wall stress stimulon genes: pbp2, tcaA, vraSR, sgtB, and lytR. All fusion strains were induced only in the presence of cell wall-active antibiotics, suggesting the potential of these strains for use in high-throughput screening for new cell wall-active agents.

  19. Stress analysis for wall structure in mobile hot cell design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bahrin, Muhammad Hannan, E-mail: hannan@nuclearmalaysia.gov.my; Rahman, Anwar Abdul, E-mail: anwar@nuclearmalaysia.gov.my; Hamzah, Mohd Arif, E-mail: arif@nuclearmalaysia.gov.my; Mamat, Mohd Rizal; Azman, Azraf; Hasan, Hasni [Prototype and Plant Development Centre, Technical Services Division, Malaysian Nuclear Agency (Malaysia)

    2016-01-22

    Malaysian Nuclear Agency is developing a Mobile Hot Cell (MHC) in order to handle and manage Spent High Activity Radioactive Sources (SHARS) such as teletherapy heads and irradiators. At present, there are only two units of MHC in the world, in South Africa and China. Malaysian Mobile Hot cell is developed by Malaysian Nuclear Agency with the assistance of IAEA expert, based on the design of South Africa and China, but with improved features. Stress analysis has been performed on the design in order to fulfil the safety requirement in operation of MHC. This paper discusses the loading analysis effect from the sand to the MHC wall structure.

  20. Effect of Wall Charge on Striation in Plasma Display Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Feng; OUYANG Jiting; CAO Jing; FENG Shuo; MIAO Jinsong; WANG Jianqi

    2007-01-01

    Different configurations and driving voltages have been employed to investigate the effect of the wall charge on the striations in macroscopic plasma display panel (PDP) cells.The experimental results show that a discharge channel near the dielectric layer is indispensable to striation occurring in the anode area during a discharge,while the pre-accumulated charge on the dielectric layer and the surface state are not important.The origin of the striation is related only to the physical process in the cell.The dielectric layer acts as a charge collector during a PDP discharge.

  1. The BETA-1, 3-Glucanase of Basidiomycete QM 806: Studies on it's production and application in yeast cell wall hydrolysis

    OpenAIRE

    Ryan, Eleanor

    1986-01-01

    In this project the growth and production of JB-1,3-glucanase by Basidiomycete sp QM 806 was investigated, with a view to studying its application in B-1,3-glucan degradation and in yeast extract production. The effect of various parameters on 3-1 »3-glucanase production was examined. The optimal conditions for enzyme production in submerged shake-flask culture were chosen. Two B-1,3-glucans (laminarin and yeast cell walls) were degraded using the B-1,3-glucanase produced. The degra...

  2. Stability and degradation mechanisms in organic solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ecker, Bernhard

    2012-04-26

    This thesis deals with stability improvements and the investigation of degradation mechanisms in organic solar cells. Organic solar cells have been in the focus of extensive academic research for over almost two decades and are currently entering the market in small scale applications. For successful large scale applications, next to the improvement of the power conversion efficiency, the stability of organic solar cells has to be increased. This thesis is dedicated to the investigation of novel materials and architectures to study stability-related issues and degradation mechanisms in order to contribute to the basic understanding of the working principles of organic solar cells. Here, impedance spectroscopy, a frequency domain technique, is used to gain information about stability and degradation mechanisms in organic solar cells. In combination with systematic variations in the preparation of solar cells, impedance spectroscopy gives the possibility to differentiate between interface and bulk dominated effects. Additionally, impedance spectroscopy gives access to the dielectric properties of the device, such as capacitance. This offers among other things the opportunity to probe the charge carrier concentration and the density of states. Another powerful way of evaluation is the combination of experimentally obtained impedance spectra with equivalent circuit modelling. The thesis presents results on novel materials and solar cell architectures for efficient hole and electron extraction. This indicates the importance of knowledge over interlayers and interfaces for improving both the efficiency and stability of organic solar cells.

  3. In situ analysis of cell wall polymers associated with phloem fibre cells in stems of hemp, Cannabis sativa L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, Anthony W; Marcus, Susan E; Copeland, James E; Blackburn, Richard S; Knox, J Paul

    2008-06-01

    A study of stem anatomy and the sclerenchyma fibre cells associated with the phloem tissues of hemp (Cannabis sativa L.) plants is of interest for both understanding the formation of secondary cell walls and for the enhancement of fibre utility as industrial fibres and textiles. Using a range of molecular probes for cell wall polysaccharides we have surveyed the presence of cell wall components in stems of hemp in conjunction with an anatomical survey of stem and phloem fibre development. The only polysaccharide detected to occur abundantly throughout the secondary cell walls of phloem fibres was cellulose. Pectic homogalacturonan epitopes were detected in the primary cell walls/intercellular matrices between the phloem fibres although these epitopes were present at a lower level than in the surrounding parenchyma cell walls. Arabinogalactan-protein glycan epitopes displayed a diversity of occurrence in relation to fibre development and the JIM14 epitope was specific to fibre cells, binding to the inner surface of secondary cell walls, throughout development. Xylan epitopes were found to be present in the fibre cells (and xylem secondary cell walls) and absent from adjacent parenchyma cell walls. Analysis of xylan occurrence in the phloem fibre cells of hemp and flax indicated that xylan epitopes were restricted to the primary cell walls of fibre cells and were not present in the secondary cell walls of these cells.

  4. A Model for Cell Wall Dissolution in Mating Yeast Cells: Polarized Secretion and Restricted Diffusion of Cell Wall Remodeling Enzymes Induces Local Dissolution

    OpenAIRE

    Huberman, Lori B.; Murray, Andrew W.

    2014-01-01

    Mating of the budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, occurs when two haploid cells of opposite mating types signal using reciprocal pheromones and receptors, grow towards each other, and fuse to form a single diploid cell. To fuse, both cells dissolve their cell walls at the point of contact. This event must be carefully controlled because the osmotic pressure differential between the cytoplasm and extracellular environment causes cells with unprotected plasma membranes to lyse. If the cell...

  5. Photocatalytic Degradation of E.coli Membrane Cell in the Presence of ZnO Nanowires

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xuefei; WANG Wei; LIU Peng; WANG ping; ZHANG Lianmeng

    2011-01-01

    The photocatalytic degradation of E. coli membrane cell by ZnO nanowires was studied using field-emission scanning electron microscope(FE-SEM), fluorescence microscopy, and Attenuated total reflection fourier transform infrared(ATR-FTIR). The outer membrane of E.coli was removed completely in the presence of ZnO nanowires under UV irradiation, and the cells became twisted shapes without a mechanically strong network. After ZnO nanowires photocatalysis, the permeability of the treated cells increased to some degree that could be confirmed by quantum dots labeling technique. Structural changes in the cell wall membrane were revealed by the decay of the characteristic groups bands in ATR-FTIR spectra.

  6. Expansins are among plant cell wall modifying agents specifically expressed during development of nematode-induced syncytia

    OpenAIRE

    Fudali, Sylwia; Sobczak, Miroslaw; Janakowski, Slawomir; Griesser, Michaela; Grundler, Florian MW; Golinowski, Wladyslaw

    2008-01-01

    Cyst nematodes are economically important pests. As obligatory biotrophic endoparasites they invade host roots and induce formation of syncytia, structures that serve them as the only source of nutrients. During syncytium development, extensive cell wall modifications take place. Cell wall dissolution occurs during cell wall opening formation, cell walls expand during hypertrophy of syncytial elements and local cell wall synthesis leads to the thickening of syncytial cell wall and the formati...

  7. Pressure Dependent Wall Relaxation in Polarized $^3$He Gaseous Cells

    CERN Document Server

    Peng, C; Chu, P -H; Gao, H; Zhang, Y

    2013-01-01

    Pressure dependence of longitudinal relaxation time (T$_1$) due to the cell wall was observed previously at both room temperature and low temperature in valved Rb-coated refillable $^3$He gaseous cells in \\cite{Zheng2}. The diffusion of $^3$He from measurement cell through a capillary tube to the valve and the subsequent depolarization on the surface of the valve was proposed to possibly explain such a pressure dependence at room temperature \\cite{Saam}. In this paper, we investigate this diffusion effect through measurements of T$_1$ with newly designed Rb-coated Pyrex glass cells at 295 K as well as finite element analysis (FEA) studies. Both the experimental results and FEA studies show that the diffusion effect is insufficient to explain the observed linear pressure-dependent behavior of T$_1$.

  8. Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma Arising from Abdominal Wall Endometriosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thouraya Achach

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Endometriosis is a frequent benign disorder. Malignancy arising in extraovarian endometriosis is a rare event. A 49-year-old woman is presented with a large painful abdominal wall mass. She underwent a myomectomy, 20 years before, for uterus leiomyoma. Computed tomography suggested that this was a desmoid tumor and she underwent surgery. Histological examination showed a clear cell adenocarcinoma associated with endometriosis foci. Pelvic ultrasound, computed tomography, and endometrial curettage did not show any malignancy or endometriosis in the uterus and ovaries. Adjuvant chemotherapy was recommended, but the patient was lost to follow up. Six months later, she returned with a recurrence of the abdominal wall mass. She was given chemotherapy and then she was reoperated.

  9. Cell wall pH and auxin transport velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasenstein, K. H.; Rayle, D.

    1984-01-01

    According to the chemiosmotic polar diffusion hypothesis, auxin pulse velocity and basal secretion should increase with decreasing cell wall pH. Experiments were designed to test this prediction. Avena coleoptile sections were preincubated in either fusicoccin (FC), cycloheximide, pH 4.0, or pH 8.0 buffer and subsequently their polar transport capacities were determined. Relative to controls, FC enhanced auxin (IAA) uptake while CHI and pH 8.0 buffer reduced IAA uptake. Nevertheless, FC reduced IAA pulse velocity while cycloheximide increased velocity. Additional experiments showed that delivery of auxin to receivers is enhanced by increased receiver pH. This phenomenon was overcome by a pretreatment of the tissue with IAA. Our data suggest that while acidic wall pH values facilitate cellular IAA uptake, they do not enhance pulse velocity or basal secretion. These findings are inconsistent with the chemiosmotic hypothesis for auxin transport.

  10. Scattering properties of microalgae: the effect of cell size and cell wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svensen, Øyvind; Frette, Øyvind; Rune Erga, Svein

    2007-08-01

    The main objective of this work was to investigate how the cell size and the presence of a cell wall influence the scattering properties of the green microalgae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. The growth cycle of two strains, one with a cell wall and one without, was synchronized to be in the same growth phase. Measurements were conducted at two different phases of the growth cycle on both strains of the algae. It was found that the shape of the scattering phase function was very similar for both strains at both growth phases, but the regular strain with a cell wall scatters more strongly than the wall-less mutant. It was also found that the mutant strain has a stronger increase in scattering than the regular strain, as the algae grow, and that the scattering from the regular strain is more wavelength dependent than from the mutant strain.

  11. Penium margaritaceum: A Unicellular Model Organism for Studying Plant Cell Wall Architecture and Dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Domozych, David S

    2014-01-01

    Penium margaritaceum is a new and valuable unicellular model organism for studying plant cell wall structure and developmental dynamics. This charophyte has a cell wall composition remarkably similar to the primary cell wall of many higher plants and clearly-defined inclusive zones containing specific polymers. Penium has a simple cylindrical phenotype with a distinct region of focused wall synthesis. Specific polymers, particularly pectins, can be identified using monoclonal antibodies rais...

  12. Change in wall composition of transfer and aleurone cells during wheat grain development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert, P; Jamme, F; Barron, C; Bouchet, B; Saulnier, L; Dumas, P; Guillon, F

    2011-02-01

    In addition to the starchy endosperm, a specialized tissue accumulating storage material, the endosperm of wheat grain, comprises the aleurone layer and the transfer cells next to the crease. The transfer cells, located at the ventral region of the grain, are involved in nutrient transfer from the maternal tissues to the developing endosperm. Immunolabeling techniques, Raman spectroscopy, and synchrotron infrared micro-spectroscopy were used to study the chemistry of the transfer cell walls during wheat grain development. The kinetic depositions of the main cell wall polysaccharides of wheat grain endosperm, arabinoxylan, and (1-3)(1-4)-β-glucan in transfer cell walls were different from kinetics previously observed in the aleurone cell walls. While (1-3)(1-4)-β-glucan appeared first in the aleurone cell walls at 90°D, arabinoxylan predominated in the transfer cell walls from 90 to 445°D. Both aleurone and transfer cell walls were enriched in (1-3)(1-4)-β-glucan at the mature stage of wheat grain development. Arabinoxylan was more substituted in the transfer cell walls than in the aleurone walls. However, arabinoxylan was more feruloylated in the aleurone than in the transfer cell walls, whatever the stage of grain development. In the transfer cells, the ferulic acid was less abundant in the outer periclinal walls while para-coumarate was absent. Possible implications of such differences are discussed.

  13. [Hydroxyproline: Rich glycoproteins of the plant and cell wall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varner, J.E.

    1993-01-01

    Since xylem tissue includes the main cell types which are lignified, we are interested in gene expression of glycine-rich proteins and proline-rich proteins, and other proteins which are involved in secondary cell wall thickening during xylogenesis. Since the main feature of xylogenesis is the deposition of additional wall components, study of the mechanism of xylogenesis will greatly advance our knowledge of the synthesis and assembly of wall macromolecules. We are using the in vitro xylogenesis system from isolated Zinnia mesophyll cells to isolate genes which are specifically expressed during xylogenesis. We have used subtractive hybridization methods to isolate a number of cDNA clones for differentially regulated genes from the cells after hormonal induction. So far, we have partially characterized 18 different cDNA clones from 239 positive clones. These differentially regulated genes can be divided into three sets according to the characteristics of gene expression in the induction medium and the control medium. The first set is induced in both the induction medium and the control medium without hormones. The second set is induced mainly in the induction medium and in the control medium with the addition of NAA alone. Two of thesegenes are exclusively induced by auxin. The third set of genes is induced mainly in the induction medium. Since these genes are not induced by either auxin or cytokinin alone, they may be directly involved in the process of xylogenesis. Our experiments on the localization of H[sub 2]O[sub 2] production reinforce the earlier ideas of others that H[sub 2]O[sub 2] is involved in normal lignification.

  14. Modulation of insulin degrading enzyme activity and liver cell proliferation

    OpenAIRE

    Pivovarova, Olga; von Loeffelholz, Christian; Ilkavets, Iryna; Sticht, Carsten; Zhuk, Sergei; Murahovschi, Veronica; Lukowski, Sonja; Döcke, Stephanie; Kriebel, Jennifer; de las Heras Gala, Tonia; Malashicheva, Anna; Kostareva, Anna; Lock, Johan F; Stockmann, Martin; Grallert, Harald

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus type 2 (T2DM), insulin therapy, and hyperinsulinemia are independent risk factors of liver cancer. Recently, the use of a novel inhibitor of insulin degrading enzyme (IDE) was proposed as a new therapeutic strategy in T2DM. However, IDE inhibition might stimulate liver cell proliferation via increased intracellular insulin concentration. The aim of this study was to characterize effects of inhibition of IDE activity in HepG2 hepatoma cells and to analyze liver specific expre...

  15. Induction kinetics of the Staphylococcus aureus cell wall stress stimulon in response to different cell wall active antibiotics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berger-Bächi Brigitte

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Staphylococcus aureus activates a protective cell wall stress stimulon (CWSS in response to the inhibition of cell wall synthesis or cell envelope damage caused by several structurally and functionally different antibiotics. CWSS induction is coordinated by the VraSR two-component system, which senses an unknown signal triggered by diverse cell wall active agents. Results We have constructed a highly sensitive luciferase reporter gene system, using the promoter of sas016 (S. aureus N315, which detects very subtle differences in expression as well as measuring > 4 log-fold changes in CWSS activity, to compare the concentration dependence of CWSS induction kinetics of antibiotics with different cell envelope targets. We compared the effects of subinhibitory up to suprainhibitory concentrations of fosfomycin, D-cycloserine, tunicamycin, bacitracin, flavomycin, vancomycin, teicoplanin, oxacillin, lysostaphin and daptomycin. Induction kinetics were both strongly antibiotic- and concentration-dependent. Most antibiotics triggered an immediate response with induction beginning within 10 min, except for tunicamycin, D-cycloserine and fosfomycin which showed lags of up to one generation before induction commenced. Induction characteristics, such as the rate of CWSS induction once initiated and maximal induction reached, were strongly antibiotic dependent. We observed a clear correlation between the inhibitory effects of specific antibiotic concentrations on growth and corresponding increases in CWSS induction kinetics. Inactivation of VraR increased susceptibility to the antibiotics tested from 2- to 16-fold, with the exceptions of oxacillin and D-cycloserine, where no differences were detected in the methicillin susceptible S. aureus strain background analysed. There was no apparent correlation between the induction capacity of the various antibiotics and the relative importance of the CWSS for the corresponding resistance phenotypes

  16. Direct measurement of cell wall stress-stiffening and turgor pressure in live bacterial cells

    CERN Document Server

    Deng, Yi; Shaevitz, Joshua W

    2011-01-01

    The mechanical properties of gram-negative bacteria are governed by a rigid peptidoglycan (PG) cell wall and the turgor pressure generated by the large concentration of solutes in the cytoplasm. The elasticity of the PG has been measured in bulk and in isolated sacculi and shown to be compliant compared to the overall stiffness of the cell itself. However, the stiffness of the cell wall in live cells has not been measured. In particular, the effects that pressure-induced stress might have on the stiffness of the mesh-like PG network have not been addressed even though polymeric materials often exhibit large amounts of stress-stiffening. We study bulging Escherichia coli cells using atomic force microscopy to separate the contributions of the cell wall and turgor pressure to the overall cell stiffness. We find strong evidence of power-law stress-stiffening in the E. coli cell wall, with an exponent of $1.07 \\pm 0.25$, such that the wall is significantly stiffer in live cells ($E\\sim32\\pm10$ MPa) than in unpres...

  17. Polyacylurethanes as Novel Degradable Cell Carrier Materials for Tissue Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arend Jan Schouten

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Polycaprolactone (PCL polyester and segmented aliphatic polyester urethanes based on PCL soft segment have been thoroughly investigated as biodegradable scaffolds for tissue engineering. Although proven beneficial as long term implants, these materials degrade very slowly and are therefore not suitable in applications in which scaffold support is needed for a shorter time. A recently developed class of polyacylurethanes (PAUs is expected to fulfill such requirements. Our aim was to assess in vitro the degradation of PAUs and evaluate their suitability as temporary scaffold materials to support soft tissue repair. With both a mass loss of 2.5–3.0% and a decrease in molar mass of approx. 35% over a period of 80 days, PAUs were shown to degrade via both bulk and surface erosion mechanisms. Fourier Transform Infra Red (FTIR spectroscopy was successfully applied to study the extent of PAUs microphase separation during in vitro degradation. The microphase separated morphology of PAU1000 (molar mass of the oligocaprolactone soft segment = 1000 g/mol provided this polymer with mechano-physical characteristics that would render it a suitable material for constructs and devices. PAU1000 exhibited excellent haemocompatibility in vitro. In addition, PAU1000 supported both adhesion and proliferation of vascular endothelial cells and this could be further enhanced by pre-coating of PAU1000 with fibronectin (Fn. The contact angle of PAU1000 decreased both with in vitro degradation and by incubation in biological fluids. In endothelial cell culture medium the contact angle reached 60°, which is optimal for cell adhesion. Taken together, these results support the application of PAU1000 in the field of soft tissue repair as a temporary degradable scaffold.

  18. Chromatin and Cell Wall Staining of Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagan, Iain M

    2016-01-01

    Fission yeasts grow by tip extension, maintaining a constant width until they reach a critical size threshold and divide. Division by medial fission-which gives these yeast their name-generates a new end that arises from the site of cytokinesis. The old end, which was produced during the previous cell cycle, initiates progression of the new cell cycle, and in G2, the new end is activated in a process termed new-end takeoff (NETO). In this protocol, the fluorescent stains calcofluor and 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) are used to give a rapid and informative assessment of morphogenesis and cell-cycle progression in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe Calcofluor reveals the timing of NETO because it stains the birth scars that are generated at new ends by cytokinesis less efficiently than the rest of the cell wall. Intense calcofluor staining of the septum and measurement of cell length are also widely used to identify dividing cells and to gauge the timing of mitotic commitment. Staining nuclei with DAPI identifies mono- and binucleated cells and complements the calcofluor staining procedure to evaluate the stages of the cell cycle and identify mitotic errors. Equally simple DAPI staining procedures reveal chromatin structure in higher resolution, facilitating more accurate staging of mitotic progression and characterization of mitotic errors. PMID:27250942

  19. Profiling the Hydrolysis of Isolated Grape Berry Skin Cell Walls by Purified Enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zietsman, Anscha J J; Moore, John P; Fangel, Jonatan U; Willats, William G T; Vivier, Melané A

    2015-09-23

    The unraveling of crushed grapes by maceration enzymes during winemaking is difficult to study because of the complex and rather undefined nature of both the substrate and the enzyme preparations. In this study we simplified both the substrate, by using isolated grape skin cell walls, and the enzyme preparations, by using purified enzymes in buffered conditions, to carefully follow the impact of the individual and combined enzymes on the grape skin cell walls. By using cell wall profiling techniques we could monitor the compositional changes in the grape cell wall polymers due to enzyme activity. Extensive enzymatic hydrolysis, achieved with a preparation of pectinases or pectinases combined with cellulase or hemicellulase enzymes, completely removed or drastically reduced levels of pectin polymers, whereas less extensive hydrolysis only opened up the cell wall structure and allowed extraction of polymers from within the cell wall layers. Synergistic enzyme activity was detectable as well as indications of specific cell wall polymer associations.

  20. Members of the Hsp70 family of proteins in the cell wall of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    OpenAIRE

    López-Ribot, J L; Chaffin, W L

    1996-01-01

    Western blot (immunoblot) analysis of cell wall and cytosolic extracts obtained from parental and ssa1 and ssa2 single- and double-mutant strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae showed that the heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) products of these genes, previously thought to be restricted to the cell interior, are also present in the cell wall. A cell wall location was further confirmed by indirect immunofluorescence with intact cells and biotinylation of extracellular Hsp70. Hsp70s have been implicat...

  1. Cellulose-hemicellulose interaction in wood secondary cell-wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ning; Li, Shi; Xiong, Liming; Hong, Yu; Chen, Youping

    2015-12-01

    The wood cell wall features a tough and relatively rigid fiber reinforced composite structure. It acts as a pressure vessel, offering protection against mechanical stress. Cellulose microfibrils, hemicellulose and amorphous lignin are the three major components of wood. The structure of secondary cell wall could be imagined as the same as reinforced concrete, in which cellulose microfibrils acts as reinforcing steel bar and hemicellulose-lignin matrices act as the concrete. Therefore, the interface between cellulose and hemicellulose/lignin plays a significant role in determine the mechanical behavior of wood secondary cell wall. To this end, we present a molecular dynamics (MD) simulation study attempting to quantify the strength of the interface between cellulose microfibrils and hemicellulose. Since hemicellulose binds with adjacent cellulose microfibrils in various patterns, the atomistic models of hemicellulose-cellulose composites with three typical binding modes, i.e. bridge, loop and random binding modes are constructed. The effect of the shape of hemicellulose chain on the strength of hemicellulose-cellulose composites under shear loadings is investigated. The contact area as well as hydrogen bonds between cellulose and hemicellulose, together with the covalent bonds in backbone of hemicellulose chain are found to be the controlling parameters which determine the strength of the interfaces in the composite system. For the bridge binding model, the effect of shear loading direction on the strength of the cellulose material is also studied. The obtained results suggest that the shear strength of wood-inspired engineering composites can be optimized through maximizing the formations of the contributing hydrogen bonds between cellulose and hemicellulose.

  2. Nutrient depletion modifies cell wall adsorption activity of wine yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidari, R; Caridi, A

    2016-06-01

    Yeast cell wall is a structure that helps yeasts to manage and respond to many environmental stresses. The mannosylphosphorylation is a modification in response to stress that provides the cell wall with negative charges able to bind compounds present in the environment. Phenotypes related to the cell wall modification such as the filamentous growth in Saccharomyces cerevisiae are affected by nutrient depletion. The present work aimed at describing the effect of carbon and/or nitrogen limitation on the aptitude of S. cerevisiae strains to bind coloured polyphenols. Carbon- and nitrogen-rich or deficient media supplemented with grape polyphenols were used to simulate different grape juice conditions-early, mid, 'adjusted' for nitrogen, and late fermentations. In early fermentation condition, the R+G+B values range from 106 (high adsorption, strain Sc1128) to 192 (low adsorption, strain Σ1278b), in mid-fermentation the values range from 111 (high adsorption, strain Sc1321) to 258 (low adsorption, strain Sc2306), in 'adjusted' for nitrogen conditions the values range from 105 (high adsorption, strain Sc1321) to 194 (low adsorption, strain Sc2306) while in late fermentation conditions the values range from 101 (high adsorption, strain Sc384) to 293 (low adsorption, strain Sc2306). The effect of nutrient availability is not univocal for all the strains and the different media tested modified the strains behaviour. In all the media the strains show significant differences. Results demonstrate that wine yeasts decrease/increase their parietal adsorption activity according to the nutrient availability. The wide range of strain variability observed could be useful in selecting wine starters. PMID:27116955

  3. A radioimmunoassay for lignin in plant cell walls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lignin detection and determination in herbaceous tissue requires selective, specific assays which are not currently available. A radioimmunoassay (RIA) was developed to study lignin metabolism in these tissues. A β-aryl ether lignin model compound was synthesized, linked to keyhole limpet hemocyanin using a water-soluble carbodiimide, and injected into rabbits. The highest titer of the antiserum obtained was 34 ηg/mL of model derivatized BSA. An in vitro system was developed to characterize the RIA. The model compound was linked to amino activated polyacrylamide beads to mimic lignin in the cell walls. 125I Radiolabelled protein A was used to detect IgG antibody binding. The RIA was shown in the in vitro system to exhibit saturable binding. The amount of antibody bound decreased when the serum was diluted. Immunoelectrophoresis and competitive binding experiments confirmed that both aromatic rings of the lignin model compound had been antigenic. Chlorogenic acid, a phenolic known to be present in plant cells, did not compete for antibody binding. The RIA was used to measure lignin in milled plant samples and barley seedlings. Antiserum binding to wheat cell walls and stressed barley segments was higher than preimmune serum binding. Antibody binding to stressed barley tissue decreased following NaClO2 delignification. The RIA was found to be less sensitive than expected, so several avenues for improving the method are discussed

  4. Lignification in poplar tension wood lignified cell wall layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshinaga, Arata; Kusumoto, Hiroshi; Laurans, Françoise; Pilate, Gilles; Takabe, Keiji

    2012-09-01

    The lignification process in poplar tension wood lignified cell wall layers, specifically the S(1) and S(2) layers and the compound middle lamella (CML), was analysed using ultraviolet (UV) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Variations in the thickness of the gelatinous layer (G-layer) were also measured to clarify whether the lignified cell wall layers had completed their lignification before the deposition of G-layers, or, on the contrary, if lignification of these layers was still active during G-layer formation. Observations using UV microscopy and TEM indicated that both UV absorbance and the degree of potassium permanganate staining increased in the CML and S(1) and S(2) layers during G-layer formation, suggesting that the lignification of these lignified layers is still in progress during G-layer formation. In the context of the cell-autonomous monolignol synthesis hypothesis, our observations suggest that monolignols must go through the developing G-layer during the lignification of CML and the S(1) and S(2) layers. The alternative hypothesis of external synthesis (in the rays) does not require that monolignols go through the G-layer before being deposited in the CML, or the S(1) and S(2) layers. Interestingly, the previous observation of lignin in the poplar G-layer was not confirmed with the microscopy techniques used in the present study. PMID:22933655

  5. Absence of correlation between rates of cell wall turnover and autolysis shown by Bacillus subtilis mutants.

    OpenAIRE

    Vitković, L; Cheung, H. Y.; Freese, E

    1984-01-01

    Bacillus subtilis mutants with reduced rates of cell wall autolysis reached a constant rate of wall turnover after a longer lag than the standard strain but eventually showed the same turnover rate. In reverse, a turnover-deficient mutant autolysed at a slightly higher rate than the standard strain. Consequently, there is no correlation between the rates of cell wall turnover and autolysis.

  6. The Mechanisms of Plant Cell Wall Deconstruction during Enzymatic Hydrolysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thygesen, Lisbeth Garbrecht; E. Thybring, Emil; Johansen, Katja Salomon;

    2014-01-01

    Mechanical agitation during enzymatic hydrolysis of insoluble plant biomass at high dry matter contents is indispensable for the initial liquefaction step in biorefining. It is known that particle size reduction is an important part of liquefaction, but the mechanisms involved are poorly understood....... Here we put forward a simple model based on mechanical principles capable of capturing the result of the interaction between mechanical forces and cell wall weakening via hydrolysis of glucosidic bonds. This study illustrates that basic material science insights are relevant also within biochemistry...

  7. Chitosan Obtained from Cell Wall of Aspergillus Niger Mycelium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Hui-li; LIN Wen-luan; LIN Jian-ming

    2004-01-01

    Chitin from cell walls of Aspergillus Niger mycelium was prepared. A new method for the preparation of high deacetylation degree chitosan was studied in a dilute sodium hydroxide solution at a high pressure. The experimental results indicate that the deacetylation degree of the chitosan can reach 80% under the condition of a 5.00 mol/L sodium hydroxide solution at 0.1 MPa of pressure for 1 h. This method shows the advantages of the applications in the industry production and environment protection.

  8. Mass spectrometry for characterizing plant cell wall polysaccharides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan eBauer

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Mass spectrometry is a selective and powerful technique to obtain identification and structural information on compounds present in complex mixtures. Since it requires only small sample amount it is an excellent tool for researchers interested in detecting changes in composition of complex carbohydrates of plants. This mini-review gives an overview of common mass spectrometry techniques applied to the analysis of plant cell wall carbohydrates. It presents examples in which mass spectrometry has been used to elucidate the structure of oligosaccharides derived from hemicelluloses and pectins and illustrates how information on sequence, linkages, branching and modifications are obtained from characteristic fragmentation patterns.

  9. wall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irshad Kashif

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Maintaining indoor climatic conditions of buildings compatible with the occupant comfort by consuming minimum energy, especially in a tropical climate becomes a challenging problem for researchers. This paper aims to investigate this problem by evaluating the effect of different kind of Photovoltaic Trombe wall system (PV-TW on thermal comfort, energy consumption and CO2 emission. A detailed simulation model of a single room building integrated with PV-TW was modelled using TRNSYS software. Results show that 14-35% PMV index and 26-38% PPD index reduces as system shifted from SPV-TW to DGPV-TW as compared to normal buildings. Thermal comfort indexes (PMV and PPD lie in the recommended range of ASHARE for both DPV-TW and DGPV-TW except for the few months when RH%, solar radiation intensity and ambient temperature were high. Moreover PVTW system significantly reduces energy consumption and CO2 emission of the building and also 2-4.8 °C of temperature differences between indoor and outdoor climate of building was examined.

  10. AtPGL3 is an Arabidopsis BURP domain protein that is localized to the cell wall and promotes cell enlargement

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Jiyoung; Cui, Yong; Kang, Byung-Ho

    2015-01-01

    The BURP domain is a plant-specific domain that has been identified in secretory proteins, and some of these are involved in cell wall modification. The tomato polygalacturonase I complex involved in pectin degradation in ripening fruits has a non-catalytic subunit that has a BURP domain. This protein is called polygalacturonase 1 beta (PG1β) and the Arabidopsis genome encodes three proteins that exhibit strong amino acid similarities with PG1β? We generated Arabidopsis lines in which express...

  11. Determination of the pore size of cell walls of living plant cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carpita, N.; Sabularse, D.; Montezinos, D.; Delmer, D.P.

    1979-09-14

    The limiting diameter of pores in the walls of living plant cells through which molecules can freely pass has been determined by a solute exclusion technique to be 35 to 38 angstroms for hair cells of Raphanus sativus roots and fibers of Gossypium hirsutum, 38 to 40 angstroms for cultured cells of Acer pseudoplatanus, and 45 to 52 angstroms for isolated palisade parenchyma cells of the leaves of Xanthium strumarium and Commelina communis. These results indicate that molecules with diameters larger than these pores would be restricted in their ability to penetrate such a cell wall, and that such a wall may represent a more significant barrier to cellular communication than has been previously assumed.

  12. The cell-wall glycoproteins of the green alga Scenedesmus obliquus. The predominant cell-wall polypeptide of Scenedesmus obliquus is related to the cell-wall glycoprotein gp3 of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voigt, Jürgen; Stolarczyk, Adam; Zych, Maria; Malec, Przemysław; Burczyk, Jan

    2014-02-01

    The green alga Scenedesmus obliquus contains a multilayered cell wall, ultrastructurally similar to that of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, although its proportion of hydroxyproline is considerably lower. Therefore, we have investigated the polypeptide composition of the insoluble and the chaotrope-soluble wall fractions of S. obliquus. The polypeptide pattern of the chaotrope-soluble wall fraction was strongly modified by chemical deglycosylation with anhydrous hydrogen fluoride (HF) in pyridine indicating that most of these polypeptides are glycosylated. Polypeptide constituents of the chaotrope-soluble cell-wall fraction with apparent molecular masses of 240, 270, 265, and 135 kDa cross-reacted with a polyclonal antibody raised against the 100 kDa deglycosylation product of the C. reinhardtii cell-wall glycoprotein GP3B. Chemical deglycosylation of the chaotrope-soluble wall fraction resulted in a 135 kDa major polypeptide and a 106 kDa minor component reacting with the same antibody. This antibody recognized specific peptide epitopes of GP3B. When the insoluble wall fraction of S. obliquus was treated with anhydrous HF/pyridine, three polypeptides with apparent molecular masses of 144, 135, and 65 kDa were solubilized, which also occured in the deglycosylated chaotrope-soluble wall fraction. These findings indicate that theses glycoproteins are cross-linked to the insoluble wall fraction via HF-sensitive bonds. PMID:24388513

  13. The dynamics of plant cell-wall polysaccharide decomposition in leaf-cutting ant fungus gardens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel E Moller

    Full Text Available The degradation of live plant biomass in fungus gardens of leaf-cutting ants is poorly characterised but fundamental for understanding the mutual advantages and efficiency of this obligate nutritional symbiosis. Controversies about the extent to which the garden-symbiont Leucocoprinus gongylophorus degrades cellulose have hampered our understanding of the selection forces that induced large scale herbivory and of the ensuing ecological footprint of these ants. Here we use a recently established technique, based on polysaccharide microarrays probed with antibodies and carbohydrate binding modules, to map the occurrence of cell wall polymers in consecutive sections of the fungus garden of the leaf-cutting ant Acromyrmex echinatior. We show that pectin, xyloglucan and some xylan epitopes are degraded, whereas more highly substituted xylan and cellulose epitopes remain as residuals in the waste material that the ants remove from their fungus garden. These results demonstrate that biomass entering leaf-cutting ant fungus gardens is only partially utilized and explain why disproportionally large amounts of plant material are needed to sustain colony growth. They also explain why substantial communities of microbial and invertebrate symbionts have evolved associations with the dump material from leaf-cutting ant nests, to exploit decomposition niches that the ant garden-fungus does not utilize. Our approach thus provides detailed insight into the nutritional benefits and shortcomings associated with fungus-farming in ants.

  14. Chemical Profiling of the Plant Cell Wall through Raman Microspectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Ju; Singh, Seema; Sun, Lan; Simmons, Blake; Auer, Manfred; Parvin, Bahram

    2010-03-02

    This paper presents a computational framework for chemical pro.ling of the plant cell wall through the Raman spectroscopy. The system enables query of known spectral signatures and clustering of spectral data based on intrinsic properties. As a result, presence and relative concentration of speci.c chemical bonds can be quanti.ed. The primary contribution of this paper is in representation of raman pro.le in terms of .uorescence background and multiscale peak detection at each grid point (voxel). Such a representation allows ef.cient spatial segmentation based on the coupling between high-level salient properties and low-level symbolic representation at each voxel. The high-level salient properties refer to preferred peaks and their attributes for the entire image. The low-level symbolic representations are based on .uorescence background, spectral peak locations, and their attributes. We present results on a corn stover tissue section that is imaged through Raman microscopy, and the results are consistent with the literature. In addition, automatic clustering indicates several distinct layers of the cell walls with different spectral signatures.

  15. Murein and pseudomurein cell wall binding domains of bacteria and archaea-a comparative view

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visweswaran, Ganesh Ram R.; Dijkstra, Bauke W.; Kok, Jan

    2011-01-01

    The cell wall, a major barrier protecting cells from their environment, is an essential compartment of both bacteria and archaea. It protects the organism from internal turgor pressure and gives a defined shape to the cell. The cell wall serves also as an anchoring surface for various proteins and a

  16. PEGylated single-walled carbon nanotubes activate neutrophils to increase production of hypochlorous acid, the oxidant capable of degrading nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perspectives for the use of carbon nanotubes in biomedical applications depend largely on their ability to degrade in the body into products that can be easily cleared out. Carboxylated single-walled carbon nanotubes (c-SWCNTs) were shown to be degraded by oxidants generated by peroxidases in the presence of hydrogen peroxide. In the present study we demonstrated that conjugation of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) to c-SWCNTs does not interfere with their degradation by peroxidase/H2O2 system or by hypochlorite. Comparison of different heme-containing proteins for their ability to degrade PEG-SWCNTs has led us to conclude that the myeloperoxidase (MPO) product hypochlorous acid (HOCl) is the major oxidant that may be responsible for biodegradation of PEG-SWCNTs in vivo. MPO is secreted mainly by neutrophils upon activation. We hypothesize that SWCNTs may enhance neutrophil activation and therefore stimulate their own biodegradation due to MPO-generated HOCl. PEG-SWCNTs at concentrations similar to those commonly used in in vivo studies were found to activate isolated human neutrophils to produce HOCl. Both PEG-SWCNTs and c-SWCNTs enhanced HOCl generation from isolated neutrophils upon serum-opsonized zymosan stimulation. Both types of nanotubes were also found to activate neutrophils in whole blood samples. Intraperitoneal injection of a low dose of PEG-SWCNTs into mice induced an increase in percentage of circulating neutrophils and activation of neutrophils and macrophages in the peritoneal cavity, suggesting the evolution of an inflammatory response. Activated neutrophils can produce high local concentrations of HOCl, thereby creating the conditions favorable for degradation of the nanotubes. -- Highlights: ► Myeloperoxidase (MPO) product hypochlorous acid is able to degrade CNTs. ► PEGylated SWCNTs stimulate isolated neutrophils to produce hypochlorous acid. ► SWCNTs are capable of activating neutrophils in blood samples. ► Activation of neutrophils in

  17. Cell wall proteins of Sporothrix schenckii as immunoprotective agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alba-Fierro, Carlos A; Pérez-Torres, Armando; López-Romero, Everardo; Cuéllar-Cruz, Mayra; Ruiz-Baca, Estela

    2014-01-01

    Sporothrix schenckii is the etiological agent of sporotrichosis, an endemic subcutaneous mycosis in Latin America. Cell wall (CW) proteins located on the cell surface are inducers of cellular and humoral immune responses, potential candidates for diagnosis purposes and to generate vaccines to prevent fungal infections. This mini-review emphasizes the potential use of S. schenckii CW proteins as protective and therapeutic immune response inducers against sporotrichosis. A number of pathogenic fungi display CW components that have been characterized as inducers of protective cellular and humoral immune responses against the whole pathogen from which they were originally purified. The isolation and characterization of immunodominant protein components of the CW of S. schenckii have become relevant because of their potential in the development of protective and therapeutic immune responses against sporotrichosis. This manuscript is part of the series of works presented at the "V International Workshop: Molecular genetic approaches to the study of human pathogenic fungi" (Oaxaca, Mexico, 2012).

  18. Molecular Mechanisms for Vascular Development and Secondary Cell Wall Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jung Hyun; Wang, Huanzhong

    2016-01-01

    Vascular tissues are important for transporting water and nutrients throughout the plant and as physical support of upright growth. The primary constituents of vascular tissues, xylem, and phloem, are derived from the meristematic vascular procambium and cambium. Xylem cells develop secondary cell walls (SCWs) that form the largest part of plant lignocellulosic biomass that serve as a renewable feedstock for biofuel production. For the last decade, research on vascular development and SCW biosynthesis has seen rapid progress due to the importance of these processes to plant biology and to the biofuel industry. Plant hormones, transcriptional regulators and peptide signaling regulate procambium/cambium proliferation, vascular patterning, and xylem differentiation. Transcriptional regulatory pathways play a pivot role in SCW biosynthesis. Although most of these discoveries are derived from research in Arabidopsis, many genes have shown conserved functions in biofuel feedstock species. Here, we review the recent advances in our understanding of vascular development and SCW formation and discuss potential biotechnological uses. PMID:27047525

  19. Degradation of polysaccharide hydrogels seeded with bone marrow stromal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahromi, Shiva H; Grover, Liam M; Paxton, Jennifer Z; Smith, Alan M

    2011-10-01

    In order to produce hydrogel cell culture substrates that are fit for the purpose, it is important that the mechanical properties are well understood not only at the point of cell seeding but throughout the culture period. In this study the change in the mechanical properties of three biopolymer hydrogels alginate, low methoxy pectin and gellan gum have been assessed in cell culture conditions. Samples of the gels were prepared encapsulating rat bone marrow stromal cells which were then cultured in osteogenic media. Acellular samples were also prepared and incubated in standard cell culture media. The rheological properties of the gels were measured over a culture period of 28 days and it was found that the gels degraded at very different rates. The degradation occurred most rapidly in the order alginate > Low methoxy pectin > gellan gum. The ability of each hydrogel to support differentiation of bone marrow stromal cells to osteoblasts was also verified by evidence of mineral deposits in all three of the materials. These results highlight that the mechanical properties of biopolymer hydrogels can vary greatly during in vitro culture, and provide the potential of selecting hydrogel cell culture substrates with mechanical properties that are tissue specific.

  20. Proteomic Analysis to Identify Tightly-Bound Cell Wall Protein in Rice Calli

    OpenAIRE

    Cho, Won Kyong; Hyun, Tae Kyung; Kumar, Dhinesh; Rim, Yeonggil; Chen, Xiong Yan; Jo, Yeonhwa; Kim, Suwha; Lee, Keun Woo; Park, Zee-Yong; Lucas, William J.; Kim, Jae-Yean

    2015-01-01

    Rice is a model plant widely used for basic and applied research programs. Plant cell wall proteins play key roles in a broad range of biological processes. However, presently, knowledge on the rice cell wall proteome is rudimentary in nature. In the present study, the tightly-bound cell wall proteome of rice callus cultured cells using sequential extraction protocols was developed using mass spectrometry and bioinformatics methods, leading to the identification of 1568 candidate proteins. Ba...

  1. Cell wall and lipid composition of Isosphaera pallida, a budding eubacterium from hot springs.

    OpenAIRE

    Giovannoni, S J; Godchaux, W; Schabtach, E; Castenholz, R W

    1987-01-01

    Isosphaera pallida is an unusual gliding, budding eubacterium recently isolated from North American hot springs. Electron micrographs of ultrathin sections revealed a cell wall atypical of eubacteria: two electrondense layers separated by an electron-transparent layer, with no evident peptidoglycan layer. Growth was not inhibited by penicillin. Cell walls were isolated from sheared cells by velocity sedimentation. The rigid-layer fraction, prepared from cell walls by treatment with boiling 10...

  2. Binding of paraquat to cell walls of paraquat resistant and susceptible biotypes of Hordeum glaucum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alizadeh, H.M.; Preston, C.; Powles, S.B. [University of Adeilaide, Glen Osmond, SA (Australia). CRC for Weed Management Systems and Department of Crop Protection

    1997-12-31

    Full text: Paraquat is a widely used, non-selective, light activated contact herbicide acting as a photosystem electron acceptor. Resistance to paraquat in weed species has occurred in Australia and world-wide following extensive use of this herbicide. The mechanism of resistance to paraquat in `Hordeum glaucum` is correlated with reduced herbicide translocation and may be due to sequestration of herbicide away from its site of action by either binding to cell walls or other means. We measured paraquat binding to a cell wall fraction in resistant and susceptible biotypes of H. glaucum to determine whether differences in binding of paraquat to cell walls could explain herbicide resistance. The cell wall fraction was isolated from leaves of resistant and susceptible biotypes and incubated with {sup 14}C-labelled paraquat. Of the total paraquat - absorbed by a cell wall preparation, about 80% remains strongly bind to the cell wall and doesn`t readily exchange with solution in the absence of divalent cations. Divalent cations (Ca{sup 2+},putrescine and paraquat) can competitively exchange for paraquat tightly bound to the cell wall. From kinetic experiments it seems that there are two types of binding sites in the cell wall with different affinities for paraquat. No significant differences between cell wall, characteristics of resistant and susceptible biotypes of H. glaucum have been found in any of our experiments. Therefore, increased binding of paraquat to the cell wall appears not to be a mechanism for exclusion of paraquat in resistant biotype

  3. Light-Induced Degradation of Thin Film Silicon Solar Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamelmann, F. U.; Weicht, J. A.; Behrens, G.

    2016-02-01

    Silicon-wafer based solar cells are still domination the market for photovoltaic energy conversion. However, most of the silicon is used only for mechanical stability, while only a small percentage of the material is needed for the light absorption. Thin film silicon technology reduces the material demand to just some hundred nanometer thickness. But even in a tandem stack (amorphous and microcrystalline silicon) the efficiencies are lower, and light-induced degradation is an important issue. The established standard tests for characterisation are not precise enough to predict the performance of thin film silicon solar cells under real conditions, since many factors do have an influence on the degradation. We will show some results of laboratory and outdoor measurements that we are going to use as a base for advanced modelling and simulation methods.

  4. Hematopoietic Stem Cells Expansion in Rotating Wall Vessel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang LIU; Tian-Qing LIU; Xiu-Bo FAN; Dan GE; Zhan-Feng CUI; Xue-Hu MA

    2005-01-01

    @@ 1 Introduction Clinical trials have demonstrated that ex vivo expanded hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and progenitors offer great promise in reconstituting in vivo hematopoiesis in patients who have undergone intensive chemotherapy.It is therefore necessary to develop a clinical-scale culture system to provide the expanded HSCs and progenitors.Static culture systems such as T-flasks and gas-permeable blood bags are the most widely used culture devices for expanding hematopoietic cells. But they reveal several inherent limitations: ineffective mixing, lack of control options for dissolved oxygen and pH and difficulty in continuous feeding, which restricts the usefulness of static systems. Several advanced bioreactors have been used in the field of HSCs expansion. But hematopoietic cells are extremely sensitive to shear, so cells in bioreactors such as stirred and perfusion culture systems may suffer physical damage. This problem will be improved by applying the rotating wall vessel (RWV) bioreactor in clinic because of its low shear and unique structure. In this research, cord blood (CB) HSCs were expanded by means of a cell-dilution feeding protocol in RWV.

  5. The connection of cytoskeletal network with plasma membrane and the cell wall

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zengyu Liu; Staffan Persson; Yi Zhang

    2015-01-01

    The cell wall provides external support of the plant cells, while the cytoskeletons including the microtubules and the actin filaments constitute an internal framework. The cytoskeletons contribute to the cell wall biosynthesis by spatially and temporarily regulating the transportation and deposition of cell wall components. This tight control is achieved by the dynamic behavior of the cytoskeletons, but also through the tethering of these structures to the plasma membrane. This tethering may also extend beyond the plasma membrane and impact on the cell wall, possibly in the form of a feedback loop. In this review, we discuss the linking components between the cytoskeletons and the plasma membrane, and/or the cell wall. We also discuss the prospective roles of these components in cell wall biosyn-thesis and modifications, and aim to provide a platform for further studies in this field.

  6. Influence of Magnesium Alloy Degradation on Undifferentiated Human Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Francesca Cecchinato; Nezha Ahmad Agha; Adela Helvia Martinez-Sanchez; Berengere Julie Christine Luthringer; Frank Feyerabend; Ryo Jimbo; Regine Willumeit-Römer; Ann Wennerberg

    2015-01-01

    Background Magnesium alloys are of particular interest in medical science since they provide compatible mechanical properties with those of the cortical bone and, depending on the alloying elements, they have the capability to tailor the degradation rate in physiological conditions, providing alternative bioresorbable materials for bone applications. The present study investigates the in vitro short-term response of human undifferentiated cells on three magnesium alloys and high-purity magnes...

  7. Fuel starvation. Irreversible degradation mechanisms in PEM fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rangel, Carmen M.; Silva, R.A.; Travassos, M.A.; Paiva, T.I.; Fernandes, V.R. [LNEG, National Laboratory for Energy and Geology, Lisboa (Portugal). UPCH Fuel Cells and Hydrogen Unit

    2010-07-01

    PEM fuel cell operates under very aggressive conditions in both anode and cathode. Failure modes and mechanism in PEM fuel cells include those related to thermal, chemical or mechanical issues that may constrain stability, power and lifetime. In this work, the case of fuel starvation is examined. The anode potential may rise to levels compatible with the oxidization of water. If water is not available, oxidation of the carbon support will accelerate catalyst sintering. Diagnostics methods used for in-situ and ex-situ analysis of PEM fuel cells are selected in order to better categorize irreversible changes of the cell. Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) is found instrumental in the identification of fuel cell flooding conditions and membrane dehydration associated to mass transport limitations / reactant starvation and protonic conductivity decrease, respectively. Furthermore, it indicates that water electrolysis might happen at the anode. Cross sections of the membrane catalyst and gas diffusion layers examined by scanning electron microscopy indicate electrode thickness reduction as a result of reactions taking place during hydrogen starvation. Catalyst particles are found to migrate outwards and located on carbon backings. Membrane degradation in fuel cell environment is analyzed in terms of the mechanism for fluoride release which is considered an early predictor of membrane degradation. (orig.)

  8. Interfacial Degradation of Planar Lead Halide Perovskite Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero, Antonio; You, Jingbi; Aranda, Clara; Kang, Yong Soo; Garcia-Belmonte, Germà; Zhou, Huanping; Bisquert, Juan; Yang, Yang

    2016-01-26

    The stability of perovskite solar cells is one of the major challenges for this technology to reach commercialization, with water believed to be the major degradation source. In this work, a range of devices containing different cathode metal contacts in the configuration ITO/PEDOT:PSS/MAPbI3/PCBM/Metal are fully electrically characterized before and after degradation caused by steady illumination during 4 h that induces a dramatic reduction in power conversion efficiency from values of 12 to 1.8%. We show that a decrease in performance and generation of the S-shape is associated with chemical degradation of the metal contact. Alternatively, use of Cr2O3/Cr as the contact enhances the stability, but modification of the energetic profile during steady illumination takes place, significantly reducing the performance. Several techniques including capacitance-voltage, X-ray diffraction, and optical absorption results suggest that the properties of the bulk perovskite layer are little affected in the device degradation process. Capacitance-voltage and impedance spectroscopy results show that the electrical properties of the cathode contact are being modified by generation of a dipole at the cathode that causes a large shift of the flat-band potential that modifies the interfacial energy barrier and impedes efficient extraction of electrons. Ionic movement in the perovskite layer changes the energy profile close to the contacts, modifying the energy level stabilization at the cathode. These results provide insights into the degradation mechanisms of perovskite solar cells and highlight the importance to further study the use of protecting layers to avoid the chemical reactivity of the perovskite with the external contacts. PMID:26679510

  9. Effect of silencing the two major tomato fruit pectin methylesterase isoforms on cell wall pectin metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, B; Ström, A; Tasker, A; West, G; Tucker, G A

    2013-11-01

    Post-harvest storage is largely limited by fruit softening, a result of cell wall degradation. Pectin methylesterase (PE) (EC 3.1.1.11) is a major hydrolase responsible for pectin de-esterification in the cell wall, a response to fruit ripening. Two major PE isoforms, PE1 and PE2, have been isolated from tomato (Solanum lycopersicon) pericarp tissue and both have previously been down-regulated using antisense suppression. In this paper, PE1 and PE2 double antisense tomato plants were successfully generated through crossing the two single antisense lines. In the double antisense fruit, approximately 10% of normal PE activity remained and ripening associated pectin de-esterification was almost completely blocked. However, double antisense fruit softened normally during ripening. In tomato fruit, the PE1 isoform was found to contribute little to total PE activity and have little effect on the degree of esterification of pectin. In contrast, the other dominant fruit isoform, PE2, has a major impact on de-esterification of total pectin. PE2 appears to act on non-CDTA-soluble pectin during ripening and on CDTA-soluble pectin before the start of ripening in a potentially block-wise fashion.

  10. Cell-wall structural changes in wheat straw pretreated for bioethanol production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jørgensen Henning

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pretreatment is an essential step in the enzymatic hydrolysis of biomass and subsequent production of bioethanol. Recent results indicate that only a mild pretreatment is necessary in an industrial, economically feasible system. The Integrated Biomass Utilisation System hydrothermal pretreatment process has previously been shown to be effective in preparing wheat straw for these processes without the application of additional chemicals. In the current work, the effect of the pretreatment on the straw cell-wall matrix and its components are characterised microscopically (atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy and spectroscopically (attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy in order to understand this increase in digestibility. Results The hydrothermal pretreatment does not degrade the fibrillar structure of cellulose but causes profound lignin re-localisation. Results from the current work indicate that wax has been removed and hemicellulose has been partially removed. Similar changes were found in wheat straw pretreated by steam explosion. Conclusion Results indicate that hydrothermal pretreatment increases the digestibility by increasing the accessibility of the cellulose through a re-localisation of lignin and a partial removal of hemicellulose, rather than by disruption of the cell wall.

  11. Cell-wall structural changes in wheat straw pretreated for bioethanol production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristensen, Jan B; Thygesen, Lisbeth G; Felby, Claus; Jørgensen, Henning; Elder, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Background Pretreatment is an essential step in the enzymatic hydrolysis of biomass and subsequent production of bioethanol. Recent results indicate that only a mild pretreatment is necessary in an industrial, economically feasible system. The Integrated Biomass Utilisation System hydrothermal pretreatment process has previously been shown to be effective in preparing wheat straw for these processes without the application of additional chemicals. In the current work, the effect of the pretreatment on the straw cell-wall matrix and its components are characterised microscopically (atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy) and spectroscopically (attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy) in order to understand this increase in digestibility. Results The hydrothermal pretreatment does not degrade the fibrillar structure of cellulose but causes profound lignin re-localisation. Results from the current work indicate that wax has been removed and hemicellulose has been partially removed. Similar changes were found in wheat straw pretreated by steam explosion. Conclusion Results indicate that hydrothermal pretreatment increases the digestibility by increasing the accessibility of the cellulose through a re-localisation of lignin and a partial removal of hemicellulose, rather than by disruption of the cell wall. PMID:18471316

  12. Evaluating Kinetic Composing of Cell Wall for Low-Fiber Mutation Rice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHEN Heng-sheng; CHEN Jun-chen; ZENG Da-li; TU Jie-feng; TANG Bao-sha; TENG Sheng

    2004-01-01

    The work compared the differences of low fiber mutation rice (LF, Nendao) that selectedthrough gamma-ray (γ) with parental variety Shuangkezao (CK) on their biologicaldevelopment and cell wall composing after rice heading stage. Comparing with parentalrice, LF rice revealed an advantage on its vegetative growing by increasing the yieldsof leave blade, leave sheath and stem for 27.77, 30.19 and 37.96% respectively. And thecellulose content of LF rice straw was decreased remarkably for 23.9%, the hemicellulose,lignin and biogenic silicon contents were increased contrarily for 11.94, 8.79 and 5.60%respectively. Moreover, the crude protein content was increased by 20.71% for LF rice andwith an improvement on its solubility for 63.49% concomitantly. The results indicatedthat the Iow-fiber mutation rice exhibited its potential as a fodder-rice variety or asdual-purpose rice to improve fiber degradability of straw.

  13. A fungal cell wall integrity-associated MAP kinase cascade in Coniothyrium minitans is required for conidiation and mycoparasitism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Fanyun; Gong, Xiaoyan; Hamid, Mahammad Imran; Fu, Yanping; Jiatao, Xie; Cheng, Jiasen; Li, Guoqing; Jiang, Daohong

    2012-05-01

    Coniothyrium minitans is an important biocontrol agent against Sclerotinia diseases. Previously, a conidiation-deficient mutant ZS-1T1000 was screened out from a T-DNA insertional library of C. minitans. CmBCK1, encoding MAP kinase kinase kinase and homologous to BCK1 of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, was disrupted by T-DNA insertion in this mutant. Targeted disruption of CmBCK1 led to the mutants undergoing autolysis and displaying hypersensitivity to the cell wall-degrading enzymes. The △CmBCK1 mutants lost the ability to produce pycnidia and conidia compared to the wild-type strain ZS-1. △CmBCK1 mutants could grow on the surface of sclerotia of Sclerotinia sclerotiorum but not form conidia, which resulted in much lower ability to reduce the viability of sclerotia of S. sclerotiorum. Furthermore, CmSlt2, a homolog of Slt2 encoding cell wall integrity-related MAP kinase and up-regulated by BCK1 in S. cerevisiae, was identified and targeted disrupted. The △CmSlt2 mutants had a similar phenotype to the △CmBCK1 mutants. The △CmSlt2 mutants also had autolytic aerial hyphae, hypersensitivity to cell wall-degrading enzymes, lack of conidiation and reduction of sclerotial mycoparasitism. Taken together, our results suggest that CmBCK1 and CmSlt2 are involved in conidiation and the hyperparasitic activities of C. minitans. PMID:22426009

  14. Post-translational modifications of plant cell wall proteins and peptides: A survey from a proteomics point of view.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canut, Hervé; Albenne, Cécile; Jamet, Elisabeth

    2016-08-01

    Plant cell wall proteins (CWPs) and peptides are important players in cell walls contributing to their assembly and their remodeling during development and in response to environmental constraints. Since the rise of proteomics technologies at the beginning of the 2000's, the knowledge of CWPs has greatly increased leading to the discovery of new CWP families and to the description of the cell wall proteomes of different organs of many plants. Conversely, cell wall peptidomics data are still lacking. In addition to the identification of CWPs and peptides by mass spectrometry (MS) and bioinformatics, proteomics has allowed to describe their post-translational modifications (PTMs). At present, the best known PTMs consist in proteolytic cleavage, N-glycosylation, hydroxylation of P residues into hydroxyproline residues (O), O-glycosylation and glypiation. In this review, the methods allowing the capture of the modified proteins based on the specific properties of their PTMs as well as the MS technologies used for their characterization are briefly described. A focus is done on proteolytic cleavage leading to protein maturation or release of signaling peptides and on O-glycosylation. Some new technologies, like top-down proteomics and terminomics, are described. They aim at a finer description of proteoforms resulting from PTMs or degradation mechanisms. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Plant Proteomics- a bridge between fundamental processes and crop production, edited by Dr. Hans-Peter Mock. PMID:26945515

  15. Preparation of hydrogel hollow particles for cell encapsulation by a method of polyester core degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabanel, J-M; Hildgen, P

    2004-06-01

    Implantation of encapsulated cells in particles of less than 1 mm (micro-encapsulation) has been proposed as a cell synthesized bio-molecule delivery system. Encapsulation provides immuno-isolation, protecting foreign cells from host immune system while nutrients, oxygen and therapeutic products can diffuse freely across capsule walls. A new method is described for the synthesis of a new family of hollow microparticles for cell encapsulation. Unlike other micro-encapsulation methods, encapsulation in those devices will take place after capsule synthesis, by micro-injection. The microcapsules were prepared by a three-steps original procedure: first, synthesis of a core particle, followed by coating with a layer of epichlorohydrin cross-linked amylo-pectin gel and, finally, selective degradation of the core particle to create the cavity. Initial experiments make use of amylo-pectin cross-linked with trimetaphosphate as core particle material. However, selective degradation was difficult to achieve. In further essays, polyesters were used successfully for the preparation of core particles. Optimizations were carried out and the permeability and morphology of the hollow particles were investigated. The preliminary results show that the new method has the potential to become a standard procedure to obtain hydrogel hollow particles. Moreover, the permeability study seems to be in accordance with specifications for immuno-isolation.

  16. Electron Spin Resonance Study of Fuel Cell Polymer Membrane Degradation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Alexander Panchenko; Elena Aleksandrova; Emil Roduner

    2005-01-01

    @@ 1Introduction The long term stability of the membrane is an important factor limiting the fuel cell lifetime. During extended use the membrane degrades, probably via reaction with hydroxyl and superoxide radicals which are regular intermediates of the oxygen reduction at the cathode. Only extremely stable membranes can withstand the aggressive chemical and physical environment in an operating fuel cell. Within a given set of operating conditions, intrinsic chemical and mechanical properties of the membrane as well as its water content impact its durability dramatically.

  17. Modeling Degradation in Solid Oxide Electrolysis Cells - Volume II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manohar Motwani

    2011-09-01

    Idaho National Laboratory has an ongoing project to generate hydrogen from steam using solid oxide electrolysis cells (SOECs). To accomplish this, technical and degradation issues associated with the SOECs will need to be addressed. This report covers various approaches being pursued to model degradation issues in SOECs. An electrochemical model for degradation of SOECs is presented. The model is based on concepts in local thermodynamic equilibrium in systems otherwise in global thermodynamic non-equilibrium. It is shown that electronic conduction through the electrolyte, however small, must be taken into account for determining local oxygen chemical potential,, within the electrolyte. The within the electrolyte may lie out of bounds in relation to values at the electrodes in the electrolyzer mode. Under certain conditions, high pressures can develop in the electrolyte just near the oxygen electrode/electrolyte interface, leading to oxygen electrode delamination. These predictions are in accordance with the reported literature on the subject. Development of high pressures may be avoided by introducing some electronic conduction in the electrolyte. By combining equilibrium thermodynamics, non-equilibrium (diffusion) modeling, and first-principles, atomic scale calculations were performed to understand the degradation mechanisms and provide practical recommendations on how to inhibit and/or completely mitigate them.

  18. Sonocatalytical degradation enhancement for ibuprofen and sulfamethoxazole in the presence of glass beads and single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Hamadani, Yasir A J; Chu, Kyoung Hoon; Flora, Joseph R V; Kim, Do-Hyung; Jang, Min; Sohn, Jinsik; Joo, Wanho; Yoon, Yeomin

    2016-09-01

    Sonocatalytic degradation experiments were carried out to determine the effects of glass beads (GBs) and single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) on ibuprofen (IBP) and sulfamethoxazole (SMX) removal using low and high ultrasonic frequencies (28 and 1000kHz). In the absence of catalysts, the sonochemical degradation at pH 7, optimum power of 0.18WmL(-1), and a temperature of 15°C was higher (79% and 72%) at 1000kHz than at 28kHz (45% and 33%) for IBP and SMX, respectively. At the low frequency (28kHz) H2O2 production increased significantly, from 10μM (no GBs) to 86μM in the presence of GBs (0.1mm, 10gL(-1)); however, no enhancement was achieved at 1000kHz. In contrast, the H2O2 production increased from 10μM (no SWNTs) to 31μM at 28kHz and from 82μM (no SWNTs) to 111μM at 1000kHz in the presence of SWNTs (45mgL(-1)). Thus, maximum removals of IBP and SMX were obtained in the presence of a combination of GBs and SWNTs at the low frequency (94% and 88%) for 60min contact time; however, >99% and 97% removals were achieved for 40 and 60min contact times at the high frequency for IBP and SMX, respectively. The results indicate that both IBP and SMX degradation followed pseudo-first-order kinetics. Additionally, the enhanced removal of IBP and SMX in the presence of catalysts was because GBs and SWNTs increased the number of free OH radicals due to ultrasonic irradiation and the adsorption capacity increase with SWNT dispersion. PMID:27150790

  19. Area Expansivity Moduli of Regenerating Plant Protoplast Cell Walls Exposed to Shear Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimura, Yuu; Iino, Masaaki; Watanabe, Ugai

    2005-05-01

    To control the elasticity of the plant cell wall, protoplasts isolated from cultured Catharanthus roseus cells were regenerated in shear flows of 115 s-1 (high shear) and 19.2 s-1 (low shear, as a control). The surface area expansivity modulus and the surface breaking strength of these regenerating protoplasts were measured by a micropipette aspiration technique. Cell wall synthesis was also measured using a cell wall-specific fluorescent dye. High shear exposure for 3 h doubled both the surface area modulus and breaking strength observed under low shear, significantly decreased cell wall synthesis, and roughly quadrupled the moduli of the cell wall. Based on the cell wall synthesis data, we estimated the three-dimensional modulus of the cell wall to be 4.1± 1.2 GPa for the high shear, and 0.35± 0.2 GPa for the low shear condition, using the surface area expansivity modulus divided by the cell wall thickness, which is identical with the Young’s modulus divided by 2(1-σ), where σ is Poisson's ratio. We concluded that high shear exposure considerably strengthens the newly synthesized cell wall.

  20. Cell wall antibiotics provoke accumulation of anchored mCherry in the cross wall of Staphylococcus aureus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenqi Yu

    Full Text Available A fluorescence microscopy method to directly follow the localization of defined proteins in Staphylococcus was hampered by the unstable fluorescence of fluorescent proteins. Here, we constructed plasmid (pCX encoded red fluorescence (RF mCherry (mCh hybrids, namely mCh-cyto (no signal peptide and no sorting sequence, mCh-sec (with signal peptide, and mCh-cw (with signal peptide and cell wall sorting sequence. The S. aureus clones targeted mCh-fusion proteins into the cytosol, the supernatant and the cell envelope respectively; in all cases mCherry exhibited bright fluorescence. In staphylococci two types of signal peptides (SP can be distinguished: the +YSIRK motif SP(lip and the -YSIRK motif SP(sasF. mCh-hybrids supplied with the +YSIRK motif SP(lip were always expressed higher than those with -YSIRK motif SP(sasF. To study the location of the anchoring process and also the influence of SP type, mCh-cw was supplied on the one hand with +YSIRK motif (mCh-cw1 and the other hand with -YSIRK motif (mCh-cw2. MCh-cw1 preferentially localized at the cross wall, while mCh-cw2 preferentially localized at the peripheral wall. Interestingly, when treated with sub-lethal concentrations of penicillin or moenomycin, both mCh-cw1 and mCh-cw2 were concentrated at the cross wall. The shift from the peripheral wall to the cross wall required Sortase A (SrtA, as in the srtA mutant this effect was blunted. The effect is most likely due to antibiotic mediated increase of free anchoring sites (Lipid II at the cross wall, the substrate of SrtA, leading to a preferential incorporation of anchored proteins at the cross wall.

  1. Cell wall sorting signals in surface proteins of gram-positive bacteria.

    OpenAIRE

    Schneewind, O; Mihaylova-Petkov, D; Model, P

    1993-01-01

    Staphylococcal protein A is anchored to the cell wall, a unique cellular compartment of Gram-positive bacteria. The sorting signal sufficient for cell wall anchoring consists of an LPXTG motif, a C-terminal hydrophobic domain and a charged tail. Homologous sequences are found in many surface proteins of Gram-positive bacteria and we explored the universality of these sequences to serve as cell wall sorting signals. We show that several signals are able to anchor fusion proteins to the staphyl...

  2. In vivo cell wall loosening by hydroxyl radicals during cress seed germination and elongation growth

    OpenAIRE

    Müller, Kerstin; Linkies, Ada; Vreeburg, Robert A. M.; Fry, Stephen C; Krieger-Liszkay, Anja; Leubner-Metzger, Gerhard

    2009-01-01

    Loosening of cell walls is an important developmental process in key stages of plant life cycles, including seed germination, elongation growth and fruit ripening. Here we report direct in vivo evidence for hydroxyl radical (•OH)-mediated cell wall loosening during plant seed germination and seedling growth. We used electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR)-spectroscopy to show that •OH is generated in the cell wall during radicle elongation and weakening of the endosperm of cress (Lepidium sativ...

  3. Single Wall Carbon Nanotube-polymer Solar Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Sheila G.; Castro, Stephanie L.; Landi, Brian J.; Gennett, Thomas; Raffaelle, Ryne P.

    2005-01-01

    Investigation of single wall carbon nanotube (SWNT)-polymer solar cells has been conducted towards developing alternative lightweight, flexible devices for space power applications. Photovoltaic devices were constructed with regioregular poly(3-octylthiophene)-(P3OT) and purified, >95% w/w, laser-generated SWNTs. The P3OT composites were deposited on ITO-coated polyethylene terapthalate (PET) and I-V characterization was performed under simulated AM0 illumination. Fabricated devices for the 1.0% w/w SWNT-P3OT composites showed a photoresponse with an open-circuit voltage (V(sub oc)) of 0.98 V and a short-circuit current density (I(sub sc)) of 0.12 mA/sq cm. Optimization of carrier transport within these novel photovoltaic systems is proposed, specifically development of nanostructure-SWNT complexes to enhance exciton dissociation.

  4. Two cationic peroxidases from cell walls of Araucaria araucana seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riquelme, A; Cardemil, L

    1995-05-01

    We have previously reported the purification and partial characterization of two cationic peroxidases from the cell walls of seeds and seedlings of the South American conifer, Araucaria araucana. In this work, we have studied the amino acid composition and NH2-terminal sequences of both enzymes. We also compare the data obtained from these analyses with those reported for other plant peroxidases. The two peroxidases are similar in their amino acid compositions. Both are particularly rich in glycine, which comprises more than 30% of the amino acid residues. The content of serine is also high, ca 17%. The two enzymes are different in their content of arginine, alanine, valine, phenylalanine and threonine. Both peroxidases have identical NH2-terminal sequences, indicating that the two proteins are genetically related and probably are isoforms of the same kind of peroxidase. The amino acid composition and NH2-terminal sequence analyses showed marked differences from the cationic peroxidases from turnip and horseradish. PMID:7786490

  5. Composition and architecture of the cell walls of grasses and the mechanisms of synthesis of cell wall polysaccharides. Final report for period September 1, 1988 - April 30, 2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carpita, Nicholas C.

    2001-10-18

    This program was devoted toward complete understanding of the polysaccharide structure and architecture of the primary cell walls grasses and cereals, and the biosynthesis of the mixed-linkage beta-glucane, a cellulose interacting polymer that is synthesized uniquely by grass species and close relatives. With these studies as focal point, the support from DOE was instrumental in the development of new analytical means that enabled us to characterize carbohydrate structure, to reveal new features of cell wall dynamics during cell growth, and to apply these techniques in other model organisms. The support by DOE in these basic studies was acknowledged on numerous occasions in review articles covering current knowledge of cell wall structure, architecture, dynamics, biosynthesis, and in all genes related to cell wall biogenesis.

  6. Degradation mechanism for planar heterojunction perovskite solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Kouhei; Furumoto, Yoshikazu; Shahiduzzaman, M.; Kuwabara, Takayuki; Takahashi, Kohshin; Taima, Tetsuya

    2016-04-01

    Organic-inorganic hybrid perovskite materials have recently emerged as a promising cost- and energy-efficient light absorber material for photovoltaic applications. Unfortunately, perovskite solar cells have a problem with decreasing power conversion efficiency owing to their degradation in air. To clarify the cause of the degradation of perovskite solar cells, we exposed deposited CH3NH3PbI3 and HC(NH2)2PbI3 films to an O2 or (H2O+N2) atmosphere condition. Analysis of these films revealed that a large energy band gap was observed as a result of the influence of the H2O molecule in CH3NH3PbI3 and HC(NH2)2PbI3. Under the (H2O+N2) atmosphere condition, the existence of CH3NH3I and HC(NH2)2I molecules was found to affect the morphology and as well as the crystalline diffraction peak. The resultant perovskite crystalline structure was degraded by H2O molecules under the air exposure condition.

  7. Pectinous cell wall thickenings formation - A common defense strategy of plants to cope with Pb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krzesłowska, Magdalena; Rabęda, Irena; Basińska, Aneta; Lewandowski, Michał; Mellerowicz, Ewa J; Napieralska, Anna; Samardakiewicz, Sławomir; Woźny, Adam

    2016-07-01

    Lead, one of the most abundant and hazardous trace metals affecting living organisms, has been commonly detected in plant cell walls including some tolerant plants, mining ecotypes and hyperaccumulators. We have previously shown that in tip growing Funaria sp. protonemata cell wall is remodeled in response to lead by formation of thickenings rich in low-methylesterified pectins (pectin epitope JIM5 - JIM5-P) able to bind metal ions, which accumulate large amounts of Pb. Hence, it leads to the increase of cell wall capacity for Pb compartmentalization. Here we show that diverse plant species belonging to different phyla (Arabidopsis, hybrid aspen, star duckweed), form similar cell wall thickenings in response to Pb. These thickenings are formed in tip growing cells such as the root hairs, and in diffuse growing cells such as meristematic and root cap columella cells of root apices in hybrid aspen and Arabidopsis and in mesophyll cells in star duckweed fronds. Notably, all analyzed cell wall thickenings were abundant in JIM5-P and accumulated high amounts of Pb. In addition, the co-localization of JIM5-P and Pb commonly occurred in these cells. Hence, cell wall thickenings formed the extra compartment for Pb accumulation. In this way plant cells increased cell wall capacity for compartmentalization of this toxic metal, protecting protoplast from its toxicity. As cell wall thickenings occurred in diverse plant species and cell types differing in the type of growth we may conclude that pectinous cell wall thickenings formation is a widespread defense strategy of plants to cope with Pb. Moreover, detection of natural defense strategy, increasing plant cell walls capacity for metal accumulation, reveals a promising direction for enhancing plant efficiency in phytoremediation. PMID:27107260

  8. Pectinous cell wall thickenings formation - A common defense strategy of plants to cope with Pb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krzesłowska, Magdalena; Rabęda, Irena; Basińska, Aneta; Lewandowski, Michał; Mellerowicz, Ewa J; Napieralska, Anna; Samardakiewicz, Sławomir; Woźny, Adam

    2016-07-01

    Lead, one of the most abundant and hazardous trace metals affecting living organisms, has been commonly detected in plant cell walls including some tolerant plants, mining ecotypes and hyperaccumulators. We have previously shown that in tip growing Funaria sp. protonemata cell wall is remodeled in response to lead by formation of thickenings rich in low-methylesterified pectins (pectin epitope JIM5 - JIM5-P) able to bind metal ions, which accumulate large amounts of Pb. Hence, it leads to the increase of cell wall capacity for Pb compartmentalization. Here we show that diverse plant species belonging to different phyla (Arabidopsis, hybrid aspen, star duckweed), form similar cell wall thickenings in response to Pb. These thickenings are formed in tip growing cells such as the root hairs, and in diffuse growing cells such as meristematic and root cap columella cells of root apices in hybrid aspen and Arabidopsis and in mesophyll cells in star duckweed fronds. Notably, all analyzed cell wall thickenings were abundant in JIM5-P and accumulated high amounts of Pb. In addition, the co-localization of JIM5-P and Pb commonly occurred in these cells. Hence, cell wall thickenings formed the extra compartment for Pb accumulation. In this way plant cells increased cell wall capacity for compartmentalization of this toxic metal, protecting protoplast from its toxicity. As cell wall thickenings occurred in diverse plant species and cell types differing in the type of growth we may conclude that pectinous cell wall thickenings formation is a widespread defense strategy of plants to cope with Pb. Moreover, detection of natural defense strategy, increasing plant cell walls capacity for metal accumulation, reveals a promising direction for enhancing plant efficiency in phytoremediation.

  9. Antioxidant properties of cell wall polysaccharides of Stevia rebaudiana leaves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mediesse Kengne Francine

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To examine the total phenolic and protein contents, and the antioxidant activities of cell wall polysaccharide fractions of Stevia rebaudiana leaves. Methods: Three different polysaccharide-enriched fractions, namely FPE (extract with 50 mmol/ L ethylene diamine tetra acetic acid, FPK (extract with 0.05 mol/L KOH and FH (extract with 4 mol/L KOH were extracted from Stevia rebaudiana leaves. The antioxidant activity of these fractions was evaluated based on their ability to scavenge DPPH (1, 1-diphenyl-2-picryl hydrazyl free radical, to reduce ferric power, to chelate ferrous ion and to protect human DNA. Results: The results indicated that protein content was found to be higher in FPK polysaccharide enriched fraction (47.48 µg per mg of FPK. Furthermore, the phenolic compound analysis according to the Folin-Ciocalteu method was higher in FPK (17.71 µg ferulic acid. The DPPH maximal inhibition percentage of the three polysaccharide-enriched fractions at 400 µg/mL was 27.66%, 59.90% and 23.21% respectively for FPE, FPK and FH. All the polysaccharide fractions exhibited a ferric reducing power except the FH one. The three fractions also exhibited lipid peroxidation inhibition, and they completely reverted the DNA damage induced by H2O2/FeCl2. FPK showed the strongest scavenging activity against the DPPH radical, the best chelating ability and lipid peroxidation inhibition. Conclusions: Stevia cell wall polysaccharide fractions are potent protective agents against oxidative stress. The analysis revealed major differences in the antioxidant activity in the three polysaccharides fractions. However, the 0.05 mol/L KOH pectin fraction (FPK showed better antioxidant activity.

  10. Antioxidant properties of cell wall polysaccharides of Stevia rebaudiana leaves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mediesse Kengne Francine; Woguia Alice Louise; Fogue Souopgui Pythagore; Atogho-Tiedeu Barbara; Simo Gustave; Thadde Boudjeko

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To examine the total phenolic and protein contents, and the antioxidant activities of cell wall polysaccharide fractions of Stevia rebaudiana leaves.Methods:L ethylene diamine tetra acetic acid), FPK (extract with 0.05 mol/L KOH) and FH (extract with 4 mol/L KOH) were extracted from Stevia rebaudiana leaves. The antioxidant activity of these fractions was evaluated based on their ability to scavenge DPPH (1, 1-diphenyl-2-picryl hydrazyl) free radical, to reduce ferric power, to chelate ferrous ion and to protect human DNA. Three different polysaccharide-enriched fractions, namely FPE (extract with 50 mmol/Results: The results indicated that protein content was found to be higher in FPK polysaccharide enriched fraction (47.48 µg per mg of FPK). Furthermore, the phenolic compound analysis according to the Folin-Ciocalteu method was higher in FPK (17.71 µg ferulic acid). The DPPH maximal inhibition percentage of the three polysaccharide-enriched fractions at 400 µg/mL was 27.66%, 59.90% and 23.21% respectively for FPE, FPK and FH. All the polysaccharide fractions exhibited a ferric reducing power except the FH one. The three fractions also exhibited lipid peroxidation inhibition, and they completely reverted the DNA damage induced by H2O2/FeCl2. FPK showed the strongest scavenging activity against the DPPH radical, the best chelating ability and lipid peroxidation inhibition.Conclusions: Stevia cell wall polysaccharide fractions are potent protective agents against oxidative stress. The analysis revealed major differences in the antioxidant activity in the three polysaccharides fractions. However, the 0.05 mol/L KOH pectin fraction (FPK) showed better antioxidant activity.

  11. Plant cell walls throughout evolution: towards a molecular understanding of their design principles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarkar, Purbasha; Bosneaga, Elena; Auer, Manfred

    2009-02-16

    Throughout their life, plants typically remain in one location utilizing sunlight for the synthesis of carbohydrates, which serve as their sole source of energy as well as building blocks of a protective extracellular matrix, called the cell wall. During the course of evolution, plants have repeatedly adapted to their respective niche,which is reflected in the changes of their body plan and the specific design of cell walls. Cell walls not only changed throughout evolution but also are constantly remodelled and reconstructed during the development of an individual plant, and in response to environmental stress or pathogen attacks. Carbohydrate-rich cell walls display complex designs, which together with the presence of phenolic polymers constitutes a barrier for microbes, fungi, and animals. Throughout evolution microbes have co-evolved strategies for efficient breakdown of cell walls. Our current understanding of cell walls and their evolutionary changes are limited as our knowledge is mainly derived from biochemical and genetic studies, complemented by a few targeted yet very informative imaging studies. Comprehensive plant cell wall models will aid in the re-design of plant cell walls for the purpose of commercially viable lignocellulosic biofuel production as well as for the timber, textile, and paper industries. Such knowledge will also be of great interest in the context of agriculture and to plant biologists in general. It is expected that detailed plant cell wall models will require integrated correlative multimodal, multiscale imaging and modelling approaches, which are currently underway.

  12. Genome-Wide Association Mapping for Cell Wall Composition and Properties in Temperate Grasses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bellucci, Andrea

    -glucans. Plant cell wall biosynthesis is regulated by a large number of genes and regulatory factors but very few of these are known and characterized. This PhD project aimed to the identification of putative candidate genes involved in plant cell wall composition and properties using a genome wide (GWAS...... with a wide range of chemical bounds. At present the interest in plant cell wall is growing due to the possibility to convert ligno-cellulosic biomass (e.g. agricultural residues) into bioethanol but also for the benefits to human health of some cell wall constituents found in cereals, in particular beta...

  13. Principles of bacterial cell-size determination revealed by cell wall synthesis perturbations

    OpenAIRE

    Carolina Tropini; Timothy K. Lee; Jen Hsin; Samantha M. Desmarais; Tristan Ursell; Russell D. Monds; Kerwyn Casey Huang

    2014-01-01

    Although bacterial cell morphology is tightly controlled, the principles of size regulation remain elusive. In Escherichia coli, perturbation of cell-wall synthesis often results in similar morphologies, making it difficult to deconvolve the complex genotype-phenotype relationships underlying morphogenesis. Here we modulated cell width through heterologous expression of sequences encoding the essential enzyme PBP2 and through sublethal treatments with drugs that inhibit PBP2 and the MreB cyto...

  14. Chemical degradation mechanisms of membranes for alkaline membrane fuel cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chemical degradation mechanisms of membranes for alkaline membrane fuel cells have been investigated using density functional theory (DFT). We have elucidated that the aryl-ether moiety of membranes is one of the weakest site against attack of hydroxide ions. The results of DFT calculations for hydroxide initiated aryl-ether cleavage indicated that the aryl-ether cleavage occurred prior to degradation of cationic functional group. Such a weak nature of the aryl-ether group arises from the electron deficiency of the aryl group as well as the low bond dissociation energy. The DFT results suggests that removal of the aryl-ether group in the membrane should enhance the stability of membranes under alkaline conditions. In fact, an ether fee poly(phenylene) membrane exhibits excellent stability against the attack from hydroxide ions

  15. Chemical degradation mechanisms of membranes for alkaline membrane fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choe, Yoong-Kee [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Umezono 1-1-1, Tsukuba (Japan); Henson, Neil J.; Kim, Yu Seung [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-12-31

    Chemical degradation mechanisms of membranes for alkaline membrane fuel cells have been investigated using density functional theory (DFT). We have elucidated that the aryl-ether moiety of membranes is one of the weakest site against attack of hydroxide ions. The results of DFT calculations for hydroxide initiated aryl-ether cleavage indicated that the aryl-ether cleavage occurred prior to degradation of cationic functional group. Such a weak nature of the aryl-ether group arises from the electron deficiency of the aryl group as well as the low bond dissociation energy. The DFT results suggests that removal of the aryl-ether group in the membrane should enhance the stability of membranes under alkaline conditions. In fact, an ether fee poly(phenylene) membrane exhibits excellent stability against the attack from hydroxide ions.

  16. CELL-WALL GROWTH AND PROTEIN SECRETION IN FUNGI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SIETSMA, JH; WOSTEN, HAB; WESSELS, JGH

    1995-01-01

    Secretion of proteins is a vital process in fungi. Because hyphal walls form a diffusion barrier for proteins, a mechanism different from diffusion probably exist to transport proteins across the wall. In Schizophyllum commune, evidence has been obtained for synthesis at the hyphal apex of wall comp

  17. Analysis of Cell Wall Teichoic Acids in Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Covas, Gonçalo; Vaz, Filipa; Henriques, Gabriela; Pinho, Mariana G; Filipe, Sérgio R

    2016-01-01

    Most bacterial cells are surrounded by a surface composed mainly of peptidoglycan (PGN), a glycopolymer responsible for ensuring the bacterial shape and a telltale molecule that betrays the presence of bacteria to the host immune system. In Staphylococcus aureus, as in most gram-positive bacteria, peptidoglycan is concealed by covalently linked molecules of wall teichoic acids (WTA)-phosphate rich molecules made of glycerol and ribitol phosphates which may be tailored by different amino acids and sugars.In order to analyze and compare the composition of WTA produced by different S. aureus strains, we describe methods to: (1) quantify the total amount of WTA present at the bacterial cell surface, through the determination of the inorganic phosphate present in phosphodiester linkages of WTA; (2) identify which sugar constituents are present in the assembled WTA molecules, by detecting the monosaccharides, released by acid hydrolysis, through an high-performance anion exchange chromatography analysis coupled with pulsed amperometric detection (HPAEC-PAD) and (3) compare the polymerization degree of WTA found at the cell surface of different S. aureus strains, through their different migration in a polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE). PMID:27311674

  18. Wall extensibility: its nature, measurement and relationship to plant cell growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosgrove, D. J.

    1993-01-01

    Expansive growth of plant cells is controlled principally by processes that loosen the wall and enable it to expand irreversibly. The central role of wall relaxation for cell expansion is reviewed. The most common methods for assessing the extension properties of plant cell walls ( wall extensibility') are described, categorized and assessed critically. What emerges are three fundamentally different approaches which test growing cells for their ability (a) to enlarge at different values of turgor, (b) to induce wall relaxation, and (c) to deform elastically or plastically in response to an applied tensile force. Analogous methods with isolated walls are similarly reviewed. The results of these different assays are related to the nature of plant cell growth and pertinent biophysical theory. I argue that the extensibilities' measured by these assays are fundamentally different from one another and that some are more pertinent to growth than others.

  19. DBIO Best Thesis Award: Mechanics, Dynamics, and Organization of the Bacterial Cytoskeleton and Cell Wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Siyuan

    2012-02-01

    Bacteria come in a variety of shapes. While the peptidoglycan (PG) cell wall serves as an exoskeleton that defines the static cell shape, the internal bacterial cytoskeleton mediates cell shape by recruiting PG synthesis machinery and thus defining the pattern of cell-wall synthesis. While much is known about the chemistry and biology of the cytoskeleton and cell wall, much of their biophysics, including essential aspects of the functionality, dynamics, and organization, remain unknown. This dissertation aims to elucidate the detailed biophysical mechanisms of cytoskeleton guided wall synthesis. First, I find that the bacterial cytoskeleton MreB contributes nearly as much to the rigidity of an Escherichia coli cell as the cell wall. This conclusion implies that the cytoskeletal polymer MreB applies meaningful force to the cell wall, an idea favored by theoretical modeling of wall growth, and suggests an evolutionary origin of cytoskeleton-governed cell rigidity. Second, I observe that MreB rotates around the long axis of E. coli, and the motion depends on wall synthesis. This is the first discovery of a cell-wall assembly driven molecular motor in bacteria. Third, I prove that both cell-wall synthesis and the PG network have chiral ordering, which is established by the spatial pattern of MreB. This work links the molecular structure of the cytoskeleton and of the cell wall with organismal-scale behavior. Finally, I develop a mathematical model of cytoskeleton-cell membrane interactions, which explains the preferential orientation of different cytoskeleton components in bacteria.

  20. Partial purification of saccharifying and cell wall-hydrolyzing enzymes from malt in waste from beer fermentation broth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khattak, Waleed Ahmad; Kang, Minkyung; Ul-Islam, Mazhar; Park, Joong Kon

    2013-06-01

    A number of hydrolyzing enzymes that are secreted from malt during brewing, including cell wall-hydrolyzing, saccharide-hydrolyzing, protein-degrading, lipid-hydrolyzing, and polyphenol and thiol-hydrolyzing enzymes, are expected to exist in an active form in waste from beer fermentation broth (WBFB). In this study, the existence of these enzymes was confirmed by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, after which enzyme extract was partially purified through a series of purification steps. The hydrolyzing enzyme activity was then measured under various conditions at each purification step using carboxymethyl cellulose as a substrate. The best hydrolyzing activities of partially purified enzymes were found at pH 4.5 and 50 °C in a citrate buffer system. The enzymes showed highest thermal stability at 30 °C when exposed for prolonged time. As the temperature increased gradually from 25 to 70 °C, yeast cells in the chemically defined medium with enzyme extract lost their cell wall and viability earlier than those without enzyme extract. Cell wall degradation and the release of cell matrix into the culture media at elevated temperature (45-70 °C) in the presence of enzyme extract were monitored through microscopic pictures. Saccharification enzymes from malt were relatively more active in the original WBFB than supernatant and diluted sediments. The presence of hydrolyzing enzymes from malt in WBFB is expected to play a role in bioethanol production using simultaneous saccharification and fermentation without the need for additional enzymes, nutrients, or microbial cells via a cell-free enzyme system. PMID:23377262

  1. Reduced Wall Acetylation Proteins Play Vital and Distinct Roles in Cell Wall O-Acetylation in Arabidopsis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manabe, Yuzuki; Verhertbruggen, Yves; Gille, Sascha;

    2013-01-01

    . The quadruple rwa mutant can be completely complemented with the RWA2 protein expressed under 35S promoter, indicating the functional redundancy of the RWA proteins. Nevertheless, the degree of acetylation of xylan, (gluco) mannan, and xyloglucan as well as overall cell wall acetylation is affected differently...

  2. Reversible degradation of inverted organic solar cells by concentrated sunlight

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tromholt, Thomas; Manor, Assaf; Katz, Eugene A;

    2011-01-01

    Concentrated sunlight was used to study the performance response of inverted P3HT:PCBM organic solar cells after exposure to high intensity sunlight. Correlations of efficiency as a function of solar intensity were established in the range of 0.5–15 suns at three different stages: for a pristine....... The transient state is believed to be a result of the breakdown of the diode behaviour of the ZnO electron transport layer by O2 desorption, increasing the hole conductivity. These results imply that accelerated degradation of organic solar cells by concentrated sunlight is not a straightforward process...... cell, after 30 min exposure at 5 suns and after 30 min of rest in the dark. High intensity exposure introduced a major performance decrease for all solar intensities, followed by a partial recovery of the lost performance over time: at 1 sun only 6% of the initial performance was conserved after...

  3. Osteoprotegerin is bound, internalized, and degraded by multiple myeloma cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Standal, Therese; Seidel, Carina; Hjertner, Øyvind;

    2002-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a hematologic malignancy characterized by accumulation of plasma cells in the bone marrow (BM). Bone destruction is a complication of the disease and is usually associated with severe morbidity. The balance between receptor activator of nuclear factor-kappaB (NF......-kappaB) ligand and osteoprotegerin (OPG) is of major importance in bone homeostasis. We have recently shown that serum OPG levels are lower in patients with myeloma than in healthy individuals. Here we show that myeloma cells can bind, internalize, and degrade OPG, thereby providing a possible explanation...... for the lower levels of OPG in the BM of patients with MM. This process is dependent on interaction of OPG with heparan sulfates on the myeloma cells. The results suggest a novel biologic mechanism for the bone disease associated with MM and that treatment of the bone disease with OPG lacking the heparin...

  4. Impact of scaffold micro and macro architecture on Schwann cell proliferation under dynamic conditions in a rotating wall vessel bioreactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Over the last decade tissue engineering has emerged as a powerful alternative to regenerate lost tissues owing to trauma or tumor. Evidence shows that Schwann cell containing scaffolds have improved performance in vivo as compared to scaffolds that depend on cellularization post implantation. However, owing to limited supply of cells from the patients themselves, several approaches have been taken to enhance cell proliferation rates to produce complete and uniform cellularization of scaffolds. The most common approach is the application of a bioreactor to enhance cell proliferation rate and therefore reduce the time needed to obtain sufficiently significant number of glial cells, prior to implantation. In this study, we show the application of a rotating wall bioreactor system for studying Schwann cell proliferation on nanofibrous spiral shaped scaffolds, prepared by solvent casting and salt leaching techniques. The scaffolds were fabricated from polycaprolactone (PCL), which has ideal mechanical properties and upon degradation does not produce acidic byproducts. The spiral scaffolds were coated with aligned or random nanofibers, produced by electrospinning, to provide a substrate that mimics the native extracellular matrix and the essential contact guidance cues. At the 4 day time point, an enhanced rate of cell proliferation was observed on the open structured nanofibrous spiral scaffolds in a rotating wall bioreactor, as compared to static culture conditions. However, the cell proliferation rate on the other contemporary scaffolds architectures such as the tubular and cylindrical scaffolds show reduced cell proliferation in the bioreactor as compared to static conditions, at the same time point. Moreover, the rotating wall bioreactor does not alter the orientation or the phenotype of the Schwann cells on the aligned nanofiber containing scaffolds, wherein, the cells remain aligned along the length of the scaffolds. Therefore, these open structured spiral

  5. Impact of scaffold micro and macro architecture on Schwann cell proliferation under dynamic conditions in a rotating wall vessel bioreactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valmikinathan, Chandra M.; Hoffman, John [Department of Chemistry, Chemical Biology and Biomedical Engineering, Stevens Institute of Technology, Hoboken, NJ, 07030 (United States); Yu, Xiaojun, E-mail: xyu@stevens.edu [Department of Chemistry, Chemical Biology and Biomedical Engineering, Stevens Institute of Technology, Hoboken, NJ, 07030 (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Over the last decade tissue engineering has emerged as a powerful alternative to regenerate lost tissues owing to trauma or tumor. Evidence shows that Schwann cell containing scaffolds have improved performance in vivo as compared to scaffolds that depend on cellularization post implantation. However, owing to limited supply of cells from the patients themselves, several approaches have been taken to enhance cell proliferation rates to produce complete and uniform cellularization of scaffolds. The most common approach is the application of a bioreactor to enhance cell proliferation rate and therefore reduce the time needed to obtain sufficiently significant number of glial cells, prior to implantation. In this study, we show the application of a rotating wall bioreactor system for studying Schwann cell proliferation on nanofibrous spiral shaped scaffolds, prepared by solvent casting and salt leaching techniques. The scaffolds were fabricated from polycaprolactone (PCL), which has ideal mechanical properties and upon degradation does not produce acidic byproducts. The spiral scaffolds were coated with aligned or random nanofibers, produced by electrospinning, to provide a substrate that mimics the native extracellular matrix and the essential contact guidance cues. At the 4 day time point, an enhanced rate of cell proliferation was observed on the open structured nanofibrous spiral scaffolds in a rotating wall bioreactor, as compared to static culture conditions. However, the cell proliferation rate on the other contemporary scaffolds architectures such as the tubular and cylindrical scaffolds show reduced cell proliferation in the bioreactor as compared to static conditions, at the same time point. Moreover, the rotating wall bioreactor does not alter the orientation or the phenotype of the Schwann cells on the aligned nanofiber containing scaffolds, wherein, the cells remain aligned along the length of the scaffolds. Therefore, these open structured spiral

  6. Restrictive glycosylphosphatidylinositol anchor synthesis in cwh6/gpi3 yeast cells causes aberrant biogenesis of cell wall proteins.

    OpenAIRE

    Vossen, J.H.; Müller, W. H.; Lipke, P N; Klis, F. M.

    1997-01-01

    We previously reported that the defects in the Saccharomyces cerevisiae cwh6 Calcofluor white-hypersensitive cell wall mutant are caused by a mutation in SPT14/GPI3, a gene involved in glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchor biosynthesis. Here we describe the effect of cwh6/spt14/gpi3 on the biogenesis of cell wall proteins. It was found that the release of precursors of cell wall proteins from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) was retarded. This was accompanied by proliferation of ER structur...

  7. Investigation of Solar Cells Power Degradation Due to Electrostatic Discharge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Fayazi

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Satellites are surrounded with protons, electrons and heavy charged particles. Space radiation impact on satellite sub-systems cause several anomalies which are important problem for satellite designers. Until recently, the majority of spacecraft primary power systems used solar arrays and rechargeable batteries to supply 28 V. For low-inclination spacecraft, 28 V systems have not been observed to arc. As the power requirements for spacecraft increased, however, high-voltage solar arrays were baselined to minimize total mass and increase power production efficiency. With the advent of 100 V systems in the late 1980s, arcing began to be observed on a number of spacecraft. The mechanism proposed in this paper, described electrical and physical degradation of solar cells due to electrostatic discharge anomalies on satellites. The cell was characterized again after arcing to determine the change in efficiency. This paper details the process for designing the circuit to create the arcing, and the different setups used to degrade the cells electrically and physically. It also describes the final setups to be used in space laboratory. This model is designed using Matlab and SPENVIS. Identification and simulation this mechanism is an important step in solar array design for space application

  8. High temperature PEM fuel cells - Degradation and durability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Araya, S.S.

    2012-12-15

    This work analyses the degradation issues of a High Temperature Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell (HT-PEMFC). It is based on the assumption that given the current challenges for storage and distribution of hydrogen, it is more practical to use liquid alcohols as energy carriers for fuel cells. Among these, methanol is very attractive, as it can be obtained from a variety of renewable sources and has a relatively low reforming temperature for the production of hydrogen rich gaseous mixture. The effects on HT-PEMFC of the different constituents of this gaseous mixture, known as a reformate gas, are investigated in the current work. For this, an experimental set up, in which all these constituents can be fed to the anode side of a fuel cell for testing, is put in place. It includes mass flow controllers for the gaseous species, and a vapor delivery system for the vapor mixture of the unconverted reforming reactants. Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) is used to characterize the effects of these impurities. The effects of CO were tested up to 2% by volume along with other impurities. All the reformate impurities, including ethanol-water vapor mixture, cause loss in the performance of the fuel cell. In general, CO{sub 2} dilutes the reactants, if tested alone at high operating temperatures (180 C), but tends to exacerbate the effects of CO if they are tested together. On the other hand, CO and methanol-water vapor mixture degrade the fuel cell proportionally to the amounts in which they are tested. In this dissertation some of the mechanisms with which the impurities affect the fuel cell are discussed and interdependence among the effects is also studied. This showed that the combined effect of reformate impurities is more than the arithmetic sum of the individual effects of reformate constituents. The results of the thesis help to understand better the issues of degradation and durability in fuel cells, which can help to make them more durable and

  9. NAC-MYB-based transcriptional regulation of secondary cell wall biosynthesis in land plants

    OpenAIRE

    Nakano, Yoshimi; Yamaguchi, Masatoshi; Endo, Hitoshi; Rejab, Nur Ardiyana; Ohtani, Misato

    2015-01-01

    Plant cells biosynthesize primary cell walls (PCW) in all cells and produce secondary cell walls (SCWs) in specific cell types that conduct water and/or provide mechanical support, such as xylem vessels and fibers. The characteristic mechanical stiffness, chemical recalcitrance, and hydrophobic nature of SCWs result from the organization of SCW-specific biopolymers, i.e., highly ordered cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin. Synthesis of these SCW-specific biopolymers requires SCW-specific enz...

  10. FINITE ELEMENT ANALYSIS OF THE FATIGUE BEHAVIOR OF WOOD FIBER CELL WALLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phichit Somboon

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available The fatigue behavior of the wood fiber cell wall under mechanical treatment in refining was simulated dynamically using a finite element method. The effect of the amplitude and frequency of impacts on the mechanical breakdown of the fiber wall structure was examined. The proposed model of the fiber cell wall was constructed from elementary microfibrils in various orientations embedded in isotropic lignin. The fatigue of the cell wall was simulated under normal refiner mechanical pulping conditions. A cyclic load was applied on the model fiber through a hemispherical grit proposed to be applied on the surface on refiner segments. Changes in the elastic modulus of the cell wall were analyzed to determine the potential for cell wall breakdown. An increase in the amplitude of applied forces and frequency of impacts was found to have a significant influence on the reduction of the elastic modulus of the wall structure. A high frequency of impacts increased the stiffness of the cell wall, but resulted in faster reduction of the elastic modulus. At a lower amplitude of impacts, efficient breakdown of the cell wall using grits was achieved with a high frequency of impacts or a high rotational speed of refiners.

  11. Primary abdominal wall clear cell carcinoma arising from incisional endometriosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Burcu Gundogdu; Isin Ureyen; Gunsu Kimyon; Hakan Turan; Nurettin Boran; Gokhan Tulunay; Dilek Bulbul; Taner Turan; M Faruk Kose

    2013-01-01

    A 49 year-old patient with the complaint of a mass located in the caesarean scar was admitted. There was a fixed mass 30í30 mm in diameter with regular contour located at the right corner of the pfannenstiel incision. Computed tomography revealed a (40í50í50) mm solid mass lesion with margins that cannot be distinguished from the uterus, bladder and small intestines and a heterogeneous mass lesion (50í45í55) mm in diameter, located in the right side of the anterior abdominal wall. Cytoreductive surgery including total abdominal hysterectomy and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy was performed. Final pathology was clear cell carcinoma. Clear cell carcinoma arising from an extraovarian endometriotic focus was diagnosed and the patient received 6 cycles paclitaxel-carboplatin chemotherapy as adjuvant treatment. The patient who was lost to follow-up applied to our clinic 2 years after surgery with a recurrent mass in the left inguinal region. After 3 cycles of chemotherapy, the patient's tumoral mass in the left inguinal region was excised. The result of the pathology was carcinoma metastasis. It is decided that the following treatment of the patient should be palliative radiation therapy. The patient who underwent palliative radiation therapy died of disease after 4 months of the second operation.

  12. Arthritis by autoreactive T cell lines obtained from rats after injection of intestinal bacterial cell wall fragments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I. Klasen (Ina); J. Kool (Jeanette); M.J. Melief; I. Loeve (I.); W.B. van den Berg (Wim); A.J. Severijnen; M.P.H. Hazenberg (Maarten)

    1992-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ T cell lines (B13, B19) were isolated from the lymph nodes of Lewis rats 12 days after an arthritogenic injection of cell wall fragments of Eubacterium aerofaciens (ECW), a major resident of the human intestinal flora. These cell wall fragments consist of peptidoglycan

  13. Pectic homogalacturonan masks abundant sets of xyloglucan epitopes in plant cell walls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedersen Henriette L

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Molecular probes are required to detect cell wall polymers in-situ to aid understanding of their cell biology and several studies have shown that cell wall epitopes have restricted occurrences across sections of plant organs indicating that cell wall structure is highly developmentally regulated. Xyloglucan is the major hemicellulose or cross-linking glycan of the primary cell walls of dicotyledons although little is known of its occurrence or functions in relation to cell development and cell wall microstructure. Results Using a neoglycoprotein approach, in which a XXXG heptasaccharide of tamarind seed xyloglucan was coupled to BSA to produce an immunogen, we have generated a rat monoclonal antibody (designated LM15 to the XXXG structural motif of xyloglucans. The specificity of LM15 has been confirmed by the analysis of LM15 binding using glycan microarrays and oligosaccharide hapten inhibition of binding studies. The use of LM15 for the analysis of xyloglucan in the cell walls of tamarind and nasturtium seeds, in which xyloglucan occurs as a storage polysaccharide, indicated that the LM15 xyloglucan epitope occurs throughout the thickened cell walls of the tamarind seed and in the outer regions, adjacent to middle lamellae, of the thickened cell walls of the nasturtium seed. Immunofluorescence analysis of LM15 binding to sections of tobacco and pea stem internodes indicated that the xyloglucan epitope was restricted to a few cell types in these organs. Enzymatic removal of pectic homogalacturonan from equivalent sections resulted in the abundant detection of distinct patterns of the LM15 xyloglucan epitope across these organs and a diversity of occurrences in relation to the cell wall microstructure of a range of cell types. Conclusion These observations support ideas that xyloglucan is associated with pectin in plant cell walls. They also indicate that documented patterns of cell wall epitopes in relation to cell

  14. Impact of Cell Wall Composition on Maize Resistance to Pests and Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Malvar, Rosa A.; Rogelio Santiago; Jaime Barros-Rios

    2013-01-01

    In cereals, the primary cell wall is built of a skeleton of cellulosic microfibrils embedded in a matrix of hemicelluloses and smaller amounts of pectins, glycoproteins and hydroxycinnamates. Later, during secondary wall development, p-coumaryl, coniferyl and sinapyl alcohols are copolymerized to form mixed lignins. Several of these cell wall components show a determinative role in maize resistance to pest and diseases. However, defense mechanisms are very complex and vary among t...

  15. Immuno and affinity cytochemical analysis of cell wall composition in the moss Physcomitrella patens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth A. Berry

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In contrast to homeohydric vascular plants, mosses employ a poikilohydric strategy for surviving in the dry aerial environment. A detailed understanding of the structure, composition, and development of moss cell walls can contribute to our understanding of not only the evolution of overall cell wall complexity, but also the differences that have evolved in response to selection for different survival strategies. The model moss species Physcomitrella patens has a predominantly haploid lifecycle consisting of protonemal filaments that regenerate from protoplasts and enlarge by tip growth, and leafy gametophores composed of cells that enlarge by diffuse growth and differentiate into several different types. Advantages for genetic studies include methods for efficient targeted gene modification and extensive genomic resources. Immuno and affinity cytochemical labeling were used to examine the distribution of polysaccharides and proteins in regenerated protoplasts, protonemal filaments, rhizoids, and sectioned gametophores of P. patens. The cell wall composition of regenerated protoplasts was also characterized by flow cytometry. Crystalline cellulose was abundant in the cell walls of regenerating protoplasts and protonemal cells that developed on media of high osmolarity, whereas homogalacturonan was detected in the walls of protonemal cells that developed on low osmolarity media and not in regenerating protoplasts. Mannan was the major hemicellulose detected in all tissues tested. Arabinogalactan proteins were detected in different cell types by different probes, consistent with structural heterogeneity. The results reveal developmental and cell type specific differences in cell wall composition and provide a basis for analyzing cell wall phenotypes in knockout mutants.

  16. Immuno and Affinity Cytochemical Analysis of Cell Wall Composition in the Moss Physcomitrella patens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Elizabeth A; Tran, Mai L; Dimos, Christos S; Budziszek, Michael J; Scavuzzo-Duggan, Tess R; Roberts, Alison W

    2016-01-01

    In contrast to homeohydric vascular plants, mosses employ a poikilohydric strategy for surviving in the dry aerial environment. A detailed understanding of the structure, composition, and development of moss cell walls can contribute to our understanding of not only the evolution of overall cell wall complexity, but also the differences that have evolved in response to selection for different survival strategies. The model moss species Physcomitrella patens has a predominantly haploid lifecycle consisting of protonemal filaments that regenerate from protoplasts and enlarge by tip growth, and leafy gametophores composed of cells that enlarge by diffuse growth and differentiate into several different types. Advantages for genetic studies include methods for efficient targeted gene modification and extensive genomic resources. Immuno and affinity cytochemical labeling were used to examine the distribution of polysaccharides and proteins in regenerated protoplasts, protonemal filaments, rhizoids, and sectioned gametophores of P. patens. The cell wall composition of regenerated protoplasts was also characterized by flow cytometry. Crystalline cellulose was abundant in the cell walls of regenerating protoplasts and protonemal cells that developed on media of high osmolarity, whereas homogalactuonan was detected in the walls of protonemal cells that developed on low osmolarity media and not in regenerating protoplasts. Mannan was the major hemicellulose detected in all tissues tested. Arabinogalactan proteins were detected in different cell types by different probes, consistent with structural heterogneity. The results reveal developmental and cell type specific differences in cell wall composition and provide a basis for analyzing cell wall phenotypes in knockout mutants. PMID:27014284

  17. Immuno and Affinity Cytochemical Analysis of Cell Wall Composition in the Moss Physcomitrella patens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Elizabeth A; Tran, Mai L; Dimos, Christos S; Budziszek, Michael J; Scavuzzo-Duggan, Tess R; Roberts, Alison W

    2016-01-01

    In contrast to homeohydric vascular plants, mosses employ a poikilohydric strategy for surviving in the dry aerial environment. A detailed understanding of the structure, composition, and development of moss cell walls can contribute to our understanding of not only the evolution of overall cell wall complexity, but also the differences that have evolved in response to selection for different survival strategies. The model moss species Physcomitrella patens has a predominantly haploid lifecycle consisting of protonemal filaments that regenerate from protoplasts and enlarge by tip growth, and leafy gametophores composed of cells that enlarge by diffuse growth and differentiate into several different types. Advantages for genetic studies include methods for efficient targeted gene modification and extensive genomic resources. Immuno and affinity cytochemical labeling were used to examine the distribution of polysaccharides and proteins in regenerated protoplasts, protonemal filaments, rhizoids, and sectioned gametophores of P. patens. The cell wall composition of regenerated protoplasts was also characterized by flow cytometry. Crystalline cellulose was abundant in the cell walls of regenerating protoplasts and protonemal cells that developed on media of high osmolarity, whereas homogalactuonan was detected in the walls of protonemal cells that developed on low osmolarity media and not in regenerating protoplasts. Mannan was the major hemicellulose detected in all tissues tested. Arabinogalactan proteins were detected in different cell types by different probes, consistent with structural heterogneity. The results reveal developmental and cell type specific differences in cell wall composition and provide a basis for analyzing cell wall phenotypes in knockout mutants.

  18. Cell wall growth during elongation and division : one ring to bind them?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheffers, Dirk-Jan

    2007-01-01

    The role of the cell division protein FtsZ in bacterial cell wall (CW) synthesis is believed to be restricted to localizing proteins involved in the synthesis of the septal wall. Elsewhere, compelling evidence is provided that in Caulobacter crescentus, FtsZ plays an additional role in CW synthesis

  19. Detection of 2 immunoreactive antigens in the cell wall of Sporothrix brasiliensis and Sporothrix globosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Baca, Estela; Hernández-Mendoza, Gustavo; Cuéllar-Cruz, Mayra; Toriello, Conchita; López-Romero, Everardo; Gutiérrez-Sánchez, Gerardo

    2014-07-01

    The cell wall of members of the Sporothrix schenckii complex contains highly antigenic molecules which are potentially useful for the diagnosis and treatment of sporotrichosis. In this study, 2 immunoreactive antigens of 60 (Gp60) and 70 kDa (Gp70) were detected in the cell wall of the yeast morphotypes of Sporothrix brasiliensis and Sporothrix globosa.

  20. Cell wall composition and candidate biosynthesis gene expression during rice development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lin, Fan; Manisseri, Chithra; Fagerström, Alexandra;

    2016-01-01

    strong hypotheses for genes that synthesize xylans, mixed linkage glucan and pectin components. This work provides an extensive analysis of cell wall composition throughout rice development, identifies genes likely to synthesize grass cell walls, and provides a framework for development of genetically...

  1. CONSTITUTIVE MELANIN IN THE CELL WALL OF THE ETIOLOGIC AGENT OF LOBO'S DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TABORDA Valeria B.A.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Lobo's disease is a chronic granulomatous disease caused by the obligate pathogenic fungus, whose cell walls contain constitutive melanin. In contrast, melanin does not occur in the cell walls of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis when stained by the Fontana-Masson stain.

  2. Structure of Plant Cell Walls : XXVI. The Walls of Suspension-Cultured Sycamore Cells Contain a Family of Rhamnogalacturonan-I-Like Pectic Polysaccharides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, T; Thomas, J; Darvill, A; Albersheim, P

    1989-02-01

    Considerable information has been obtained about the primary structures of suspension-cultured sycamore (Acer pseudoplatanus) cell-wall pectic polysaccharides, i.e. rhamnogalacturonan I, rhamnogalacturonan II, and homogalacturonan. However, these polysaccharides, which are solubilized from the walls by endo-alpha-1,4-polygalacturonase, account for only about half of the pectic polysaccharides known to be present in sycamore cell walls. We now report that, after exhaustive treatment with endo-alpha-1,4-polygalacturonase, additional pectic polysaccharides were extracted from sycamore cell walls by treatment with Na(2)CO(3) at 1 and 22 degrees C. These previously uncharacterized polysaccharides accounted for approximately 4% of the cell wall. Based on the glycosyl and glycosyl-linkage compositions and the nature of the products obtained by treating the quantitatively predominant NaCO(3)-extracted polysaccharides with lithium metal dissolved in ethylenediamine, the polysaccharides were found to strongly resemble rhamnogalacturonan I. However, unlike rhamnogalacturonan I that characteristically had equal amounts of 2- and 2,4-linked rhamnosyl residues in its backbone, the polysaccharides extracted in Na(2)CO(3) at 1 degrees C had markedly disparate ratios of 2- to 2,4-linked rhamnosyl residues. We concluded that polysaccharides similar to rhamnogalacturonan I but with different degrees of branching are present in the walls of suspension-cultured sycamore cells.

  3. Probiotics promote endocytic allergen degradation in gut epithelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Knockdown of A20 compromised the epithelial barrier function. ► The fusion of endosome/lysosome was disturbed in the A20-deficient HT-29 cells. ► Antigens transported across A20-deficient HT-29 monolayers conserved antigenicity. ► Probiotic proteins increased the expression of A20 in HT-29 cells. -- Abstract: Background and aims: Epithelial barrier dysfunction plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of allergic diseases; the mechanism is to be further understood. The ubiquitin E3 ligase A20 (A20) plays a role in the endocytic protein degradation in the cells. This study aims to elucidate the role of A20 in the maintenance of gut epithelial barrier function. Methods: Gut epithelial cell line, HT-29 cell, was cultured into monolayers to evaluate the barrier function in transwells. RNA interference was employed to knock down the A20 gene in HT-29 cells to test the role of A20 in the maintenance of epithelial barrier function. Probiotic derived proteins were extracted from the culture supernatants using to enhance the expression of A20 in HT-29 cells. Results: The results showed that the knockdown of A20 compromised the epithelial barrier function in HT-29 monolayers, mainly increased the intracellular permeability. The fusion of endosome/lysosome was disturbed in the A20-deficient HT-29 cells. Allergens collected from the transwell basal chambers of A20-deficient HT-29 monolayers still conserved functional antigenicity. Treating with probiotic derived proteins increased the expression of A20 in HT-29 cells and promote the barrier function. Conclusion: A20 plays an important role in the maintenance of epithelial barrier function as shown by HT-29 monolayer. Probiotic derived protein increases the expression of A20 and promote the HT-29 monolayer barrier function.

  4. Probiotics promote endocytic allergen degradation in gut epithelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Chun-Hua [Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, College of Public Health, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou (China); Liu, Zhi-Qiang [Department of Gastroenterology, The Second Hospital, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou (China); Department of Pathology and Molecular Medicine, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON (Canada); Huang, Shelly [Department of Pathology and Molecular Medicine, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON (Canada); Zheng, Peng-Yuan, E-mail: medp7123@126.com [Department of Gastroenterology, The Second Hospital, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou (China); Yang, Ping-Chang, E-mail: yangp@mcmaster.ca [Department of Pathology and Molecular Medicine, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON (Canada)

    2012-09-14

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Knockdown of A20 compromised the epithelial barrier function. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The fusion of endosome/lysosome was disturbed in the A20-deficient HT-29 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Antigens transported across A20-deficient HT-29 monolayers conserved antigenicity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Probiotic proteins increased the expression of A20 in HT-29 cells. -- Abstract: Background and aims: Epithelial barrier dysfunction plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of allergic diseases; the mechanism is to be further understood. The ubiquitin E3 ligase A20 (A20) plays a role in the endocytic protein degradation in the cells. This study aims to elucidate the role of A20 in the maintenance of gut epithelial barrier function. Methods: Gut epithelial cell line, HT-29 cell, was cultured into monolayers to evaluate the barrier function in transwells. RNA interference was employed to knock down the A20 gene in HT-29 cells to test the role of A20 in the maintenance of epithelial barrier function. Probiotic derived proteins were extracted from the culture supernatants using to enhance the expression of A20 in HT-29 cells. Results: The results showed that the knockdown of A20 compromised the epithelial barrier function in HT-29 monolayers, mainly increased the intracellular permeability. The fusion of endosome/lysosome was disturbed in the A20-deficient HT-29 cells. Allergens collected from the transwell basal chambers of A20-deficient HT-29 monolayers still conserved functional antigenicity. Treating with probiotic derived proteins increased the expression of A20 in HT-29 cells and promote the barrier function. Conclusion: A20 plays an important role in the maintenance of epithelial barrier function as shown by HT-29 monolayer. Probiotic derived protein increases the expression of A20 and promote the HT-29 monolayer barrier function.

  5. Trans-Golgi Network-An Intersection of Trafficking Cell Wall Components

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Natasha Worden; Eunsook Park; Georgia Drakakaki

    2012-01-01

    The cell wall,a crucial cell compartment,is composed of a network of polysaccharides and proteins,providing structural support and protection from external stimuli.While the cell wall structure and biosynthesis have been extensively studied,very little is known about the transport of polysaccharides and other components into the developing cell wall.This review focuses on endomembrane trafficking pathways involved in cell wall deposition.Cellulose synthase complexes are assembled in the Golgi,and are transported in vesicles to the plasma membrane.Non-cellulosic polysaccharides are synthesized in the Golgi apparatus,whereas cellulose is produced by enzyme complexes at the plasma membrane.Polvsaccharides and enzymes that are involved in cell wall modification and assembly are transported by distinct vesicle types to their destinations; however,the precise mechanisms involved in selection,sorting and delivery remain to be identified.The endomembrane system orchestrates the delivery of Golgi-derived and possibly endocytic vesicles carrying cell wall and cell membrane components to the newly-formed cell plate.However,the nature of these vesicles,their membrane compositions,and the timing of their delivery are largely unknown.Emerging technologies such as chemical genomics and proteomics are promising avenues to gain insight into the trafficking of cell wall components.

  6. Clinostation influence on regeneration of cell wall in Solanum Tuberosum L. protoplasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nedukha, Elena M.; Sidorov, V. A.; Samoylov, V. M.

    1994-08-01

    Regeneration of cell walls in protoplasts was investigated using light- and electronmicroscopic methods. The protoplasts were isolated from mesophyll of Solanum tuberosum leaves and were cultivated on the horizontal low rotating clinostat (2 rpm) and in control for 10 days. Using a fluorescent method (with Calcofluor white) it was demonstrated that changes in vector gravity results in an regeneration inhibition of cell wall. With electron-microscopical and electro-cytochemical methods (staining with alcianum blue) dynamics of the regeneration of cell walls in protoplasts was studied; carbohydrate matrix of cell walls is deposited at the earliest stages of this process. The influence of microgravity on the cell wall regeneration is discussed in higher plants.

  7. Generation of hydroxyl radical in isolated pea root cell wall, and the role of cell wall-bound peroxidase, Mn-SOD and phenolics in their production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukavica, Biljana; Mojovic, Milos; Vuccinic, Zeljko; Maksimovic, Vuk; Takahama, Umeo; Jovanovic, Sonja Veljovic

    2009-02-01

    The hydroxyl radical produced in the apoplast has been demonstrated to facilitate cell wall loosening during cell elongation. Cell wall-bound peroxidases (PODs) have been implicated in hydroxyl radical formation. For this mechanism, the apoplast or cell walls should contain the electron donors for (i) H(2)O(2) formation from dioxygen; and (ii) the POD-catalyzed reduction of H(2)O(2) to the hydroxyl radical. The aim of the work was to identify the electron donors in these reactions. In this report, hydroxyl radical (.OH) generation in the cell wall isolated from pea roots was detected in the absence of any exogenous reductants, suggesting that the plant cell wall possesses the capacity to generate .OH in situ. Distinct POD and Mn-superoxide dismutase (Mn-SOD) isoforms different from other cellular isoforms were shown by native gel electropho-resis to be preferably bound to the cell walls. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy of cell wall isolates containing the spin-trapping reagent, 5-diethoxyphosphoryl-5-methyl-1-pyrroline-N-oxide (DEPMPO), was used for detection of and differentiation between .OH and the superoxide radical (O(2)(-).). The data obtained using POD inhibitors confirmed that tightly bound cell wall PODs are involved in DEPMPO/OH adduct formation. A decrease in DEPMPO/OH adduct formation in the presence of H(2)O(2) scavengers demonstrated that this hydroxyl radical was derived from H(2)O(2). During the generation of .OH, the concentration of quinhydrone structures (as detected by EPR spectroscopy) increased, suggesting that the H(2)O(2) required for the formation of .OH in isolated cell walls is produced during the reduction of O(2) by hydroxycinnamic acids. Cell wall isolates in which the proteins have been denaturated (including the endogenous POD and SOD) did not produce .OH. Addition of exogenous H(2)O(2) again induced the production of .OH, and these were shown to originate from the Fenton reaction with tightly bound metal ions

  8. Identification of Lignin and Polysaccharide Modifications in Populus Wood by Chemometric Analysis of 2D NMR Spectra from Dissolved Cell Walls

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mattias Hedenstrom; Susanne Wiklund-Lindstrom; Tommy (O)man; Fachuang Lu; Lorenz Gerber; Paul Schatz; Bj(o)rn Sundberg; John Ralph

    2009-01-01

    2D ~(13)C-~1H HSQC NMR spectroscopy of acetylated cell walls in solution gives a detailed fingerprint that can be used to assess the chemical composition of the complete wall without extensive degradation. We demonstrate how multivariate analysis of such spectra can be used to visualize cell wall changes between sample types as high-resolution 2D NMR loading spectra. Changes in composition and structure for both lignin and polysaccharides can subsequently be interpreted on a molecular level. The multivariate approach alleviates problems associated with peak picking of overlap-ping peaks, and it allows the deduction of the relative importance of each peak for sample discrimination. As a first proof of concept, we compare Populus tension wood to normal wood. All well established differences in cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin compositions between these wood types were readily detected, confirming the reliability of the multivariate approach. In a second example, wood from transgenic Populus modified in their degree of pectin methylesterification was compared to that of wild-type trees. We show that differences in both lignin and polysaccharide composition that are difficult to detect with traditional spectral analysis and that could not be a priori predicted were revealed by the multi-variate approach. 2D NMR of dissolved cell wall samples combined with multivariate analysis constitutes a novel approach in cell wall analysis and provides a new tool that will benefit cell wall research.

  9. [Transfer of T-DNA from agrobacteria into plant cells through cell walls and membranes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chumakov, M I

    2001-01-01

    Discusses probable routes of agrobacterial penetration through the plant integumental tissues, cell wall, and plant cell plasmodesma. Analyzes the contribution of extracellular structures of agrobacteria in penetration through barriers of a plant cell, primary contact (adhesion), and during DNA transfer from bacterial (E. coli, A. tumefaciens) to recipient (bacterial or plant) cells. Discusses the relationship between donor cell adhesion to recipient cell surface and the infectious and conjugation processes. Considers the probable role of piles in conjugative transfer of agrobacterial DNA through membranes of donor and recipient (bacterial and plant) cells. Analyzes the contribution of the plant cell cytoskeleton to T-DNA transfer. Suggests a model of transport of T-DNA-VirD2 complex and VirE2 proteins through independent channels consisting of vir-coded proteins. PMID:11236737

  10. Reversible degradation of inverted organic solar cells by concentrated sunlight

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tromholt, Thomas; Krebs, Frederik C [Risoe National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy, Technical University of Denmark, Frederiksborgvej 399, DK-4000 Roskilde (Denmark); Manor, Assaf; Katz, Eugene A, E-mail: ttro@risoe.dtu.dk [Department of Solar Energy and Environmental Physics, J Blaustein Institutes for Desert Research, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Sede Boker Campus 84990 (Israel)

    2011-06-03

    Concentrated sunlight was used to study the performance response of inverted P3HT:PCBM organic solar cells after exposure to high intensity sunlight. Correlations of efficiency as a function of solar intensity were established in the range of 0.5-15 suns at three different stages: for a pristine cell, after 30 min exposure at 5 suns and after 30 min of rest in the dark. High intensity exposure introduced a major performance decrease for all solar intensities, followed by a partial recovery of the lost performance over time: at 1 sun only 6% of the initial performance was conserved after the high intensity exposure, while after rest the performance had recovered to 60% of the initial value. The timescale of the recovery effect was studied by monitoring the cell performance at 1 sun after high intensity exposure. This showed that cell performance was almost completely restored after 180 min. The transient state is believed to be a result of the breakdown of the diode behaviour of the ZnO electron transport layer by O{sub 2} desorption, increasing the hole conductivity. These results imply that accelerated degradation of organic solar cells by concentrated sunlight is not a straightforward process, and care has to be taken to allow for a sound accelerated lifetime assessment based on concentrated sunlight.

  11. Immunoprofiling reveals unique cell-specific patterns of wall epitopes in the expanding Arabidopsis stem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Hardy C; Cheung, Jingling; Ellis, Brian E

    2013-04-01

    The Arabidopsis inflorescence stem undergoes rapid directional growth, requiring massive axial cell-wall extension in all its tissues, but, at maturity, these tissues are composed of cell types that exhibit markedly different cell-wall structures. It is not clear whether the cell-wall compositions of these cell types diverge rapidly following axial growth cessation, or whether compositional divergence occurs at earlier stages in differentiation, despite the common requirement for cell-wall extensibility. To examine this question, seven cell types were assayed for the abundance and distribution of 18 major cell-wall glycan classes at three developmental stages along the developing inflorescence stem, using a high-throughput immunolabelling strategy. These stages represent a phase of juvenile growth, a phase displaying the maximum rate of stem extension, and a phase in which extension growth is ceasing. The immunolabelling patterns detected demonstrate that the cell-wall composition of most stem tissues undergoes pronounced changes both during and after rapid extension growth. Hierarchical clustering of the immunolabelling signals identified cell-specific binding patterns for some antibodies, including a sub-group of arabinogalactan side chain-directed antibodies whose epitope targets are specifically associated with the inter-fascicular fibre region during the rapid cell expansion phase. The data reveal dynamic, cell type-specific changes in cell-wall chemistry across diverse cell types during cell-wall expansion and maturation in the Arabidopsis inflorescence stem, and highlight the paradox between this structural diversity and the uniform anisotropic cell expansion taking place across all tissues during stem growth.

  12. Decreased Polysaccharide Feruloylation Compromises Plant Cell Wall Integrity and Increases Susceptibility to Necrotrophic Fungal Pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan T Reem

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The complexity of cell wall composition and structure determines the strength, flexibility, and function of the primary cell wall in plants. However, the contribution of the various components to cell wall integrity and function remains unclear. Modifications of cell wall composition can induce plant responses known as Cell Wall Integrity control. In this study, we used transgenic expression of the fungal feruloyl esterase AnFAE to examine the effect of post-synthetic modification of Arabidopsis and Brachypodium cell walls. Transgenic Arabidopsis plants expressing AnFAE showed a significant reduction of monomeric ferulic acid, increased amounts of wall-associated extensins, and increased susceptibility to Botrytis cinerea, compared with wild type. Transgenic Brachypodium showed reductions in monomeric and dimeric ferulic acids and increased susceptibility to Bipolaris sorokiniana. Upon infection, transgenic Arabidopsis and Brachypodium plants also showed increased expression of several defense-related genes compared with wild type. These results demonstrate a role, in both monocot and dicot plants, of polysaccharide feruloylation in plant cell wall integrity, which contributes to plant resistance to necrotrophic pathogens.

  13. A new picture of cell wall protein dynamics in elongating cells of Arabidopsis thaliana: Confirmed actors and newcomers

    OpenAIRE

    Jamet Elisabeth; Pont-Lezica Rafael; Borderies Gisèle; Canut Hervé; Irshad Muhammad

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Cell elongation in plants requires addition and re-arrangements of cell wall components. Even if some protein families have been shown to play roles in these events, a global picture of proteins present in cell walls of elongating cells is still missing. A proteomic study was performed on etiolated hypocotyls of Arabidopsis used as model of cells undergoing elongation followed by growth arrest within a short time. Results Two developmental stages (active growth and after g...

  14. Single-Wall Carbon Nanotube Anodes for Lithium Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hepp, Aloysius F.; Raffaelle, Ryne; Gennett, Tom; Kumta, Prashant; Maranchi, Jeff; Heben, Mike

    2006-01-01

    In recent experiments, highly purified batches of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) have shown promise as superior alternatives to the graphitic carbon-black anode materials heretofore used in rechargeable thin-film lithium power cells. The basic idea underlying the experiments is that relative to a given mass of graphitic carbon-black anode material, an equal mass of SWCNTs can be expected to have greater lithium-storage and charge/discharge capacities. The reason for this expectation is that whereas the microstructure and nanostructure of a graphitic carbon black is such as to make most of the interior of the material inaccessible for intercalation of lithium, a batch of SWCNTs can be made to have a much more open microstructure and nanostructure, such that most of the interior of the material is accessible for intercalation of lithium. Moreover, the greater accessibility of SWCNT structures can be expected to translate to greater mobilities for ion-exchange processes and, hence, an ability to sustain greater charge and discharge current densities.

  15. Modifications of Saccharomyces pastorianus cell wall polysaccharides with brewing process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastos, Rita; Coelho, Elisabete; Coimbra, Manuel A

    2015-06-25

    The cell wall polysaccharides of brewers spent yeast Saccharomyces pastorianus (BSY) and the inoculum yeast (IY) were studied in order to understand the changes induced by the brewing process. The hot water and alkali extractions performed solubilized mainly mannoproteins, more branched for BSY than those of IY. Also, (31)P solid state NMR showed that the BSY mannoproteins were 3 times more phosphorylated. By electron microscopy it was observed that the final residues of alkali sequential extraction until 4M KOH preserved the yeast three-dimensional structure. The final residues, composed mainly by glucans (92%), showed that the BSY, when compared with IY, contained higher amount of (1→4)-linked Glc (43% for BSY and 16% for IY) and lower (1→3)-linked Glc (17% for BSY and 42% for IY). The enzymatic treatment of final residue showed that both BSY and IY had (α1→4)-linked Glc and (β1→4)-linked Glc, in a 2:1 ratio, showing that S. pastorianus increases their cellulose-like linkages with the brewing process.

  16. The cell wall-targeting antibiotic stimulon of Enterococcus faecalis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacqueline Abranches

    Full Text Available Enterococcus faecalis is an opportunistic nosocomial pathogen that is highly resistant to a variety of environmental insults, including an intrinsic tolerance to antimicrobials that target the cell wall (CW. With the goal of determining the CW-stress stimulon of E. faecalis, the global transcriptional profile of E. faecalis OG1RF exposed to ampicillin, bacitracin, cephalotin or vancomycin was obtained via microarrays. Exposure to the β-lactams ampicillin and cephalotin resulted in the fewest transcriptional changes with 50 and 192 genes differentially expressed 60 min after treatment, respectively. On the other hand, treatment with bacitracin or vancomycin for 60 min affected the expression of, respectively, 377 and 297 genes. Despite the differences in the total number of genes affected, all antibiotics induced a very similar gene expression pattern with an overrepresentation of genes encoding hypothetical proteins, followed by genes encoding proteins associated with cell envelope metabolism as well as transport and binding proteins. In particular, all drug treatments, most notably bacitracin and vancomycin, resulted in an apparent metabolic downshift based on the repression of genes involved in translation, energy metabolism, transport and binding. Only 19 genes were up-regulated by all conditions at both the 30 and 60 min time points. Among those 19 genes, 4 genes encoding hypothetical proteins (EF0026, EF0797, EF1533 and EF3245 were inactivated and the respective mutant strains characterized in relation to antibiotic tolerance and virulence in the Galleria mellonella model. The phenotypes obtained for two of these mutants, ΔEF1533 and ΔEF3245, support further characterization of these genes as potential candidates for the development of novel preventive or therapeutic approaches.

  17. Identification of the cell wall receptor for Candida nodaensis Killer toxin

    OpenAIRE

    Silva, Sónia Carina; Aguiar, Cristina; Veríssimo, P.; Pires, E.; Lucas, Cândida

    2004-01-01

    Comunicação efectuada no XIV Congresso Nacional de Bioquímica em Vilamoura (Portugal), 2004. The biological action of the K toxins involves a first step in the killing process, which correspond to the adsorption the toxin to the cell wall of sensitive cells. Here we describe the work performed towards the identification of the cell wall receptor for the zymocin under this study. For this purpose, the main cell wall components of the sensitive yeast Pichia guilliermondii were extracted. Th...

  18. Genetic modification of plant cell walls to enhance biomass yield and biofuel production in bioenergy crops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yanting; Fan, Chunfen; Hu, Huizhen; Li, Ying; Sun, Dan; Wang, Youmei; Peng, Liangcai

    2016-01-01

    Plant cell walls represent an enormous biomass resource for the generation of biofuels and chemicals. As lignocellulose property principally determines biomass recalcitrance, the genetic modification of plant cell walls has been posed as a powerful solution. Here, we review recent progress in understanding the effects of distinct cell wall polymers (cellulose, hemicelluloses, lignin, pectin, wall proteins) on the enzymatic digestibility of biomass under various physical and chemical pretreatments in herbaceous grasses, major agronomic crops and fast-growing trees. We also compare the main factors of wall polymer features, including cellulose crystallinity (CrI), hemicellulosic Xyl/Ara ratio, monolignol proportion and uronic acid level. Furthermore, the review presents the main gene candidates, such as CesA, GH9, GH10, GT61, GT43 etc., for potential genetic cell wall modification towards enhancing both biomass yield and enzymatic saccharification in genetic mutants and transgenic plants. Regarding cell wall modification, it proposes a novel groove-like cell wall model that highlights to increase amorphous regions (density and depth) of the native cellulose microfibrils, providing a general strategy for bioenergy crop breeding and biofuel processing technology. PMID:27269671

  19. Genetic modification of plant cell walls to enhance biomass yield and biofuel production in bioenergy crops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yanting; Fan, Chunfen; Hu, Huizhen; Li, Ying; Sun, Dan; Wang, Youmei; Peng, Liangcai

    2016-01-01

    Plant cell walls represent an enormous biomass resource for the generation of biofuels and chemicals. As lignocellulose property principally determines biomass recalcitrance, the genetic modification of plant cell walls has been posed as a powerful solution. Here, we review recent progress in understanding the effects of distinct cell wall polymers (cellulose, hemicelluloses, lignin, pectin, wall proteins) on the enzymatic digestibility of biomass under various physical and chemical pretreatments in herbaceous grasses, major agronomic crops and fast-growing trees. We also compare the main factors of wall polymer features, including cellulose crystallinity (CrI), hemicellulosic Xyl/Ara ratio, monolignol proportion and uronic acid level. Furthermore, the review presents the main gene candidates, such as CesA, GH9, GH10, GT61, GT43 etc., for potential genetic cell wall modification towards enhancing both biomass yield and enzymatic saccharification in genetic mutants and transgenic plants. Regarding cell wall modification, it proposes a novel groove-like cell wall model that highlights to increase amorphous regions (density and depth) of the native cellulose microfibrils, providing a general strategy for bioenergy crop breeding and biofuel processing technology.

  20. Immunogold localization of xyloglucan and rhamnogalacturonan I in the cell walls of suspension-cultured sycamore cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, P J; Darvill, A G; Albersheim, P; Staehelin, L A

    1986-11-01

    PLANT CELL WALLS SERVE SEVERAL FUNCTIONS: they impart rigidity to the plant, provide a physical and chemical barrier between the cell and its environment, and regulate the size and shape of each cell. Chemical studies have provided information on the biochemical composition of the plant cell walls as well as detailed knowledge of individual cell wall molecules. In contrast, very little is known about the distribution of specific cell wall components around individual cells and throughout tissues. To address this problem, we have produced polyclonal antibodies against two cell wall matrix components; rhamnogalacturonan I (RG-I), a pectic polysaccharide, and xyloglucan (XG), a hemicellulose. By using the antibiodies as specific markers we have been able to localize these polymers on thin sections of suspension-cultured sycamore cells (Acer pseudoplatanus). Our results reveal that each molecule has a unique distribution. XG is localized throughout the entire wall and middle lamella. RG-I is restricted to the middle lamella and is especially evident in the junctions between cells. These observations indicate that plant cell walls may have more distinct chemical (and functional?) domains than previously envisaged.

  1. Impact of Cell Wall Composition on Maize Resistance to Pests and Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santiago, Rogelio; Barros-Rios, Jaime; Malvar, Rosa A.

    2013-01-01

    In cereals, the primary cell wall is built of a skeleton of cellulosic microfibrils embedded in a matrix of hemicelluloses and smaller amounts of pectins, glycoproteins and hydroxycinnamates. Later, during secondary wall development, p-coumaryl, coniferyl and sinapyl alcohols are copolymerized to form mixed lignins. Several of these cell wall components show a determinative role in maize resistance to pest and diseases. However, defense mechanisms are very complex and vary among the same plant species, different tissues or even the same tissue at different developmental stages. Thus, it is important to highlight that the role of the cell wall components needs to be tested in diverse genotypes and specific tissues where the feeding or attacking by the pathogen takes place. Understanding the role of cell wall constituents as defense mechanisms may allow modifications of crops to withstand pests and diseases. PMID:23535334

  2. Improvement in Saccharification Yield of Mixed Rumen Enzymes by Identification of Recalcitrant Cell Wall Constituents Using Enzyme Fingerprinting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badhan, Ajay; Wang, Yu-Xi; Gruninger, Robert; Patton, Donald; Powlowski, Justin; Tsang, Adrian; McAllister, Tim A

    2015-01-01

    Identification of recalcitrant factors that limit digestion of forages and the development of enzymatic approaches that improve hydrolysis could play a key role in improving the efficiency of meat and milk production in ruminants. Enzyme fingerprinting of barley silage fed to heifers and total tract indigestible fibre residue (TIFR) collected from feces was used to identify cell wall components resistant to total tract digestion. Enzyme fingerprinting results identified acetyl xylan esterases as key to the enhanced ruminal digestion. FTIR analysis also suggested cross-link cell wall polymers as principal components of indigested fiber residues in feces. Based on structural information from enzymatic fingerprinting and FTIR, enzyme pretreatment to enhance glucose yield from barley straw and alfalfa hay upon exposure to mixed rumen-enzymes was developed. Prehydrolysis effects of recombinant fungal fibrolytic hydrolases were analyzed using microassay in combination with statistical experimental design. Recombinant hemicellulases and auxiliary enzymes initiated degradation of plant structural polysaccharides upon application and improved the in vitro saccharification of alfalfa and barley straw by mixed rumen enzymes. The validation results showed that microassay in combination with statistical experimental design can be successfully used to predict effective enzyme pretreatments that can enhance plant cell wall digestion by mixed rumen enzymes. PMID:26180803

  3. Improvement in Saccharification Yield of Mixed Rumen Enzymes by Identification of Recalcitrant Cell Wall Constituents Using Enzyme Fingerprinting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajay Badhan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Identification of recalcitrant factors that limit digestion of forages and the development of enzymatic approaches that improve hydrolysis could play a key role in improving the efficiency of meat and milk production in ruminants. Enzyme fingerprinting of barley silage fed to heifers and total tract indigestible fibre residue (TIFR collected from feces was used to identify cell wall components resistant to total tract digestion. Enzyme fingerprinting results identified acetyl xylan esterases as key to the enhanced ruminal digestion. FTIR analysis also suggested cross-link cell wall polymers as principal components of indigested fiber residues in feces. Based on structural information from enzymatic fingerprinting and FTIR, enzyme pretreatment to enhance glucose yield from barley straw and alfalfa hay upon exposure to mixed rumen-enzymes was developed. Prehydrolysis effects of recombinant fungal fibrolytic hydrolases were analyzed using microassay in combination with statistical experimental design. Recombinant hemicellulases and auxiliary enzymes initiated degradation of plant structural polysaccharides upon application and improved the in vitro saccharification of alfalfa and barley straw by mixed rumen enzymes. The validation results showed that microassay in combination with statistical experimental design can be successfully used to predict effective enzyme pretreatments that can enhance plant cell wall digestion by mixed rumen enzymes.

  4. Regulatory specialization of xyloglucan (XG) and glucuronoarabinoxylan (GAX) in pericarp cell walls during fruit ripening in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takizawa, Ayami; Hyodo, Hiromi; Wada, Kanako; Ishii, Tadashi; Satoh, Shinobu; Iwai, Hiroaki

    2014-01-01

    Disassembly of cell wall polysaccharides by various cell wall hydrolases during fruit softening causes structural changes in hemicellulose and pectin that affect the physical properties and softening of tomato fruit. In a previous study, we showed that the changes in pectin during tomato fruit ripening were unique in each fruit tissue. In this study, to clarify the changes in hemicellulose in tissues during tomato fruit ripening, we focused on glucuronoarabinoxylan (GAX) and xyloglucan (XG). GAX was detected only in the skin and inner epidermis of the pericarp using LM11 antibodies, whereas a large increase in XG was detected in all fruit tissues using LM15 antibodies. The activity of hemicellulose degradation enzymes, such as β-xylosidase and α-arabinofuranosidase, decreased gradually during fruit ripening, although the tomato fruits continued to soften. In contrast, GAX and XG biosynthesis-related genes were expressed in all tomato fruit tissues even during ripening, indicating that XG was synthesized throughout the fruit and that GAX may be synthesized only in the vascular bundles and the inner epidermis. Our results suggest that changes in the cell wall architecture and tissue-specific distribution of XG and GAX might be required for the regulation of fruit softening and the maintenance of fruit shape.

  5. Regulatory specialization of xyloglucan (XG and glucuronoarabinoxylan (GAX in pericarp cell walls during fruit ripening in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayami Takizawa

    Full Text Available Disassembly of cell wall polysaccharides by various cell wall hydrolases during fruit softening causes structural changes in hemicellulose and pectin that affect the physical properties and softening of tomato fruit. In a previous study, we showed that the changes in pectin during tomato fruit ripening were unique in each fruit tissue. In this study, to clarify the changes in hemicellulose in tissues during tomato fruit ripening, we focused on glucuronoarabinoxylan (GAX and xyloglucan (XG. GAX was detected only in the skin and inner epidermis of the pericarp using LM11 antibodies, whereas a large increase in XG was detected in all fruit tissues using LM15 antibodies. The activity of hemicellulose degradation enzymes, such as β-xylosidase and α-arabinofuranosidase, decreased gradually during fruit ripening, although the tomato fruits continued to soften. In contrast, GAX and XG biosynthesis-related genes were expressed in all tomato fruit tissues even during ripening, indicating that XG was synthesized throughout the fruit and that GAX may be synthesized only in the vascular bundles and the inner epidermis. Our results suggest that changes in the cell wall architecture and tissue-specific distribution of XG and GAX might be required for the regulation of fruit softening and the maintenance of fruit shape.

  6. Interfacial thermal degradation in inverted organic solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenbank, William; Hirsch, Lionel; Wantz, Guillaume; Chambon, Sylvain, E-mail: sylvain.chambon@ims-bordeaux.fr [University of Bordeaux, CNRS, Bordeaux INP, IMS, UMR 5218, F-33405 Talence (France)

    2015-12-28

    The efficiency of organic photovoltaic (OPV) solar cells is constantly improving; however, the lifetime of the devices still requires significant improvement if the potential of OPV is to be realised. In this study, several series of inverted OPV were fabricated and thermally aged in the dark in an inert atmosphere. It was demonstrated that all of the devices undergo short circuit current-driven degradation, which is assigned to morphology changes in the active layer. In addition, a previously unreported, open circuit voltage-driven degradation mechanism was observed that is highly material specific and interfacial in origin. This mechanism was specifically observed in devices containing MoO{sub 3} and silver as hole transporting layers and electrode materials, respectively. Devices with this combination were among the worst performing devices with respect to thermal ageing. The physical origins of this mechanism were explored by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry and atomic force microscopy and an increase in roughness with thermal ageing was observed that may be partially responsible for the ageing mechanism.

  7. A new picture of cell wall protein dynamics in elongating cells of Arabidopsis thaliana: Confirmed actors and newcomers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamet Elisabeth

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cell elongation in plants requires addition and re-arrangements of cell wall components. Even if some protein families have been shown to play roles in these events, a global picture of proteins present in cell walls of elongating cells is still missing. A proteomic study was performed on etiolated hypocotyls of Arabidopsis used as model of cells undergoing elongation followed by growth arrest within a short time. Results Two developmental stages (active growth and after growth arrest were compared. A new strategy consisting of high performance cation exchange chromatography and mono-dimensional electrophoresis was established for separation of cell wall proteins. This work allowed identification of 137 predicted secreted proteins, among which 51 had not been identified previously. Apart from expected proteins known to be involved in cell wall extension such as xyloglucan endotransglucosylase-hydrolases, expansins, polygalacturonases, pectin methylesterases and peroxidases, new proteins were identified such as proteases, proteins related to lipid metabolism and proteins of unknown function. Conclusion This work highlights the CWP dynamics that takes place between the two developmental stages. The presence of proteins known to be related to cell wall extension after growth arrest showed that these proteins may play other roles in cell walls. Finally, putative regulatory mechanisms of protein biological activity are discussed from this global view of cell wall proteins.

  8. Anhydrobiosis in yeast: cell wall mannoproteins are important for yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae resistance to dehydration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borovikova, Diana; Teparić, Renata; Mrša, Vladimir; Rapoport, Alexander

    2016-08-01

    The state of anhydrobiosis is linked with the reversible delay of metabolism as a result of strong dehydration of cells, and is widely distributed in nature. A number of factors responsible for the maintenance of organisms' viability in these conditions have been revealed. This study was directed to understanding how changes in cell wall structure may influence the resistance of yeasts to dehydration-rehydration. Mutants lacking various cell wall mannoproteins were tested to address this issue. It was revealed that mutants lacking proteins belonging to two structurally and functionally unrelated groups (proteins non-covalently attached to the cell wall, and Pir proteins) possessed significantly lower cell resistance to dehydration-rehydration than the mother wild-type strain. At the same time, the absence of the GPI-anchored cell wall protein Ccw12 unexpectedly resulted in an increase of cell resistance to this treatment; this phenomenon is explained by the compensatory synthesis of chitin. The results clearly indicate that the cell wall structure/composition relates to parameters strongly influencing yeast viability during the processes of dehydration-rehydration, and that damage to cell wall proteins during yeast desiccation can be an important factor leading to cell death. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Investigating the effect of carbon nanotube diameter and wall number in carbon nanotube/silicon heterojunction solar cells

    OpenAIRE

    Tom Grace; LePing Yu; Christopher Gibson; Daniel Tune; Huda Alturaif; Zeid Al Othman; Joseph Shapter

    2016-01-01

    Suspensions of single-walled, double-walled and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were generated in the same solvent at similar concentrations. Films were fabricated from these suspensions and used in carbon nanotube/silicon heterojunction solar cells and their properties were compared with reference to the number of walls in the nanotube samples. It was found that single-walled nanotubes generally produced more favorable results; however, the double and multi-walled nanotube films used in...

  10. Altered cell wall properties are responsible for ammonium-reduced aluminium accumulation in rice roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Zhao, Xue Qiang; Chen, Rong Fu; Dong, Xiao Ying; Lan, Ping; Ma, Jian Feng; Shen, Ren Fang

    2015-07-01

    The phytotoxicity of aluminium (Al) ions can be alleviated by ammonium (NH4(+)) in rice and this effect has been attributed to the decreased Al accumulation in the roots. Here, the effects of different nitrogen forms on cell wall properties were compared in two rice cultivars differing in Al tolerance. An in vitro Al-binding assay revealed that neither NH4(+) nor NO3(-) altered the Al-binding capacity of cell walls, which were extracted from plants not previously exposed to N sources. However, cell walls extracted from NH4(+)-supplied roots displayed lower Al-binding capacity than those from NO3(-)-supplied roots when grown in non-buffered solutions. Fourier-transform infrared microspectroscopy analysis revealed that, compared with NO3(-)-supplied roots, NH4(+)-supplied roots possessed fewer Al-binding groups (-OH and COO-) and lower contents of pectin and hemicellulose. However, when grown in pH-buffered solutions, these differences in the cell wall properties were not observed. Further analysis showed that the Al-binding capacity and properties of cell walls were also altered by pHs alone. Taken together, our results indicate that the NH4(+)-reduced Al accumulation was attributed to the altered cell wall properties triggered by pH decrease due to NH4(+) uptake rather than direct competition for the cell wall binding sites between Al(3+) and NH4(+).

  11. Xyloglucans from flaxseed kernel cell wall: Structural and conformational characterisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Huihuang H; Cui, Steve W; Goff, H Douglas; Chen, Jie; Guo, Qingbin; Wang, Qi

    2016-10-20

    The structure of ethanol precipitated fraction from 1M KOH extracted flaxseed kernel polysaccharides (KPI-EPF) was studied for better understanding the molecular structures of flaxseed kernel cell wall polysaccharides. Based on methylation/GC-MS, NMR spectroscopy, and MALDI-TOF-MS analysis, the dominate sugar residues of KPI-EPF fraction comprised of (1,4,6)-linked-β-d-glucopyranose (24.1mol%), terminal α-d-xylopyranose (16.2mol%), (1,2)-α-d-linked-xylopyranose (10.7mol%), (1,4)-β-d-linked-glucopyranose (10.7mol%), and terminal β-d-galactopyranose (8.5mol%). KPI-EPF was proposed as xyloglucans: The substitution rate of the backbone is 69.3%; R1 could be T-α-d-Xylp-(1→, or none; R2 could be T-α-d-Xylp-(1→, T-β-d-Galp-(1→2)-α-d-Xylp-(1→, or T-α-l-Araf-(1→2)-α-d-Xylp-(1→; R3 could be T-α-d-Xylp-(1→, T-β-d-Galp-(1→2)-α-d-Xylp-(1→, T-α-l-Fucp-(1→2)-β-d-Galp-(1→2)-α-d-Xylp-(1→, or none. The Mw of KPI-EPF was calculated to be 1506kDa by static light scattering (SLS). The structure-sensitive parameter (ρ) of KPI-EPF was calculated as 1.44, which confirmed the highly branched structure of extracted xyloglucans. This new findings on flaxseed kernel xyloglucans will be helpful for understanding its fermentation properties and potential applications. PMID:27474598

  12. Navigating the transcriptional roadmap regulating plant secondary cell wall deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven Grant Hussey

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The current status of lignocellulosic biomass as an invaluable resource in industry, agriculture and health has spurred increased interest in understanding the transcriptional regulation of secondary cell wall (SCW biosynthesis. The last decade of research has revealed an extensive network of NAC, MYB and other families of transcription factors regulating Arabidopsis SCW biosynthesis, and numerous studies have explored SCW-related transcription factors in other dicots and monocots. Whilst the general structure of the Arabidopsis network has been a topic of several reviews, they have not comprehensively represented the detailed protein-DNA and protein-protein interactions described in the literature, and an understanding of network dynamics and functionality has not yet been achieved for SCW formation. Furthermore the methodologies employed in studies of SCW transcriptional regulation have not received much attention, especially in the case of non-model organisms. In this review, we have reconstructed the most exhaustive literature-based network representations to date of SCW transcriptional regulation in Arabidopsis. We include a manipulable Cytoscape representation of the Arabidopsis SCW transcriptional network to aid in future studies, along with a list of supporting literature for each documented interaction. Amongst other topics, we discuss the various components of the network, its evolutionary conservation in plants, putative modules and dynamic mechanisms that may influence network function, and the approaches that have been employed in network inference. Future research should aim to better understand network function and its response to dynamic perturbations, whilst the development and application of genome-wide approaches such as ChIP-seq and systems genetics are in progress for the study of SCW transcriptional regulation in non-model organisms.

  13. Malignant transformation of ectopic pancreatic cells in the duodenal wall

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Roberto; Bini; Paolo; Voghera; Alberto; Tapparo; Raffaele; Nunziata; Andrea; Demarchi; Matteo; Capocefalo; Renzo; Leli

    2010-01-01

    Ectopic pancreas (EP) is the relatively uncommon presence of pancreatic tissue outside the normal location of the pancreas. This condition is usually asymptomatic and rarely complicated by pancreatitis and malignant transformation. A few cases of neoplastic phenomena that developed from EP into the duodenal wall are described in the literature. Herein we report a case of gastric outlet obstruction due to adenocarcinoma arising from EP of the duodenal wall. The patient underwent a Whipple's procedure and had...

  14. Degradation of solar cell electric performance due to arcing in LEO plasma environment

    OpenAIRE

    Okumura, Teppei; Hosoda, Satoshi; Kagawa, Hideshi; 奥村 哲平; 細田 聡史; Kim, Jeongho; Cho, Mengu; 香河 英史

    2005-01-01

    When we operate solar array at high voltage (greater than 100 V) in LEO environment, arcing occurs on the solar array surface. The solar cell can suffer degradation of electric performance due to only one arc with some probability. We performed degradation test of solar array coupons against arcing under simulated LEO environment in order to identify the threshold of arc energy to cause the solar cell degradation. The solar array coupons are made of silicon solar cells. The LCR circuit was at...

  15. Identification of a Streptococcus salivarius Cell Wall Component Mediating Coaggregation with Veillonella alcalescens VI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weerkamp, Anton H.; McBride, Barry C.

    1981-01-01

    Cell walls of Streptococcus salivarius HB aggregated Veillonella alcalescens V1, but cell walls of the mutant S. salivarius HB-V5 did not. We found no correlation between the presence of fimbriae on streptococcal walls and the ability to aggregate Veillonella strains. Treatment of the walls with lysozyme solubilized a fraction which possessed Veillonella-aggregating activity. Solubilized cell wall preparations of strain HB contained three major (glyco)proteins as determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and at least four antigens as determined by immunoelectrophoresis with antiserum prepared against strain HB walls. A specific antiserum, which was obtained by adsorption of anti-HB serum on strain HB-V5 cells, contained monospecific antibody that reacted with the solubilized strain HB wall preparation. Similar fractions prepared from strain HB-V5 cell walls did not possess aggregating activity and lacked one protein band (protein I) after sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and one antigen (antigen b) after immunoelectrophoresis. The same antigen was absent when lysozyme-solubilized wall preparations of strain HB were reacted with anti-HB-V5 serum. Crossed-immunoisoelectric focusing indicated that this specific (glyco)protein and this antigen were identical and had an isoelectric point of 4.60. Protein I and antigen b were specifically adsorbed when solubilized strain HB cell walls were incubated with V. alcalescens V1 but were not adsorbed by nonaggregating Veillonella parvula ATCC 10790 cells. Culture supernatants of strain HB contained V. alcalescens V1-aggregating activity. Antigen b was present in the culture supernatant, but was not found in cultures of strain HB-V5. A total of 18 S. salivarius isolates possessing the streptococcal group K antigen released aggregating activity and antigen b into the culture medium, but 11 strains which lacked the K-antigen did not. Images PMID:7251145

  16. Uncovering the cultivable microbial diversity of costa rican beetles and its ability to break down plant cell wall components.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Vargas-Asensio

    Full Text Available Coleopterans are the most diverse insect order described to date. These organisms have acquired an array of survival mechanisms through their evolution, including highly efficient digestive systems. Therefore, the coleopteran intestinal microbiota constitutes an important source of novel plant cell wall-degrading enzymes with potential biotechnological applications. We isolated and described the cultivable fungi, actinomycetes and aerobic eubacteria associated with the gut of larvae and adults from six different beetle families colonizing decomposing logs in protected Costa Rican ecosystems. We obtained 611 isolates and performed phylogenetic analyses using the ITS region (fungi and 16S rDNA (bacteria. The majority of fungal isolates belonged to the order Hypocreales (26% of 169 total, while the majority of actinomycetes belonged to the genus Streptomyces (86% of 241 total. Finally, we isolated 201 bacteria spanning 19 different families belonging into four phyla: Firmicutes, α, β and γ-proteobacteria. Subsequently, we focused on microbes isolated from Passalid beetles to test their ability to degrade plant cell wall polymers. Highest scores in these assays were achieved by a fungal isolate (Anthostomella sp., two Streptomyces and one Bacillus bacterial isolates. Our study demonstrates that Costa Rican beetles harbor several types of cultivable microbes, some of which may be involved in symbiotic relationships that enable the insect to digest complex polymers such as lignocellulose.

  17. 'Strengthening the fungal cell wall through chitin-glucan cross-links: effects on morphogenesis and cell integrity'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arroyo, Javier; Farkaš, Vladimír; Sanz, Ana Belén; Cabib, Enrico

    2016-09-01

    The cross-linking of polysaccharides to assemble new cell wall in fungi requires transglycosylation mechanisms by which preexisting glycosidic linkages are broken and new linkages are created between the polysaccharides. The molecular mechanisms for these processes, which are essential for fungal cell biology, are only now beginning to be elucidated. Recent development of in vivo and in vitro biochemical approaches has allowed characterization of important aspects about the formation of chitin-glucan covalent cell wall cross-links by cell wall transglycosylases of the CRH family and their biological function. Covalent linkages between chitin and glucan mediated by Crh proteins control morphogenesis and also play important roles in the remodeling of the fungal cell wall as part of the compensatory responses necessary to counterbalance cell wall stress. These enzymes are encoded by multigene families of redundant proteins very well conserved in fungal genomes but absent in mammalian cells. Understanding the molecular basis of fungal adaptation to cell wall stress through these and other cell wall remodeling enzymatic activities offers an opportunity to explore novel antifungal treatments and to identify potential fungal virulence factors. PMID:27185288

  18. Proteomics of loosely bound cell wall proteins of Arabidopsis thaliana cell suspension cultures: a critical analysis.

    OpenAIRE

    Borderies, Gisèle; Jamet, Elisabeth; Lafitte, Claude; Rossignol, Michel; Jauneau, Alain; Boudart, Georges; Monsarrat, Bernard; Esquerré-Tugayé, Marie-Thérèse; Boudet, Alain; Pont-Lezica, Rafael

    2003-01-01

    The complete sequencing of the Arabidopsis thaliana genome allows the use of the recently developed mass spectrometry techniques to identify the cell wall proteins (CWPs). Most proteomic approaches depend on the quality of sample preparation. Extraction of CWPs is particularly complex since the proteins may be free in the apoplast or are embedded in a polysaccharide matrix where they are retained by Van der Waals interactions, hydrogen bonds, hydrophobic or ionic interactions, or cross-linked...

  19. Comparative characterization of stromal vascular cells derived from three types of vascular wall and adipose tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Santsun; Eto, Hitomi; Kato, Harunosuke; Doi, Kentaro; Kuno, Shinichiro; Kinoshita, Kahori; Ma, Hsu; Tsai, Chi-Han; Chou, Wan-Ting; Yoshimura, Kotaro

    2013-12-01

    Multipotent stem/progenitor cells localize perivascularly in many organs and vessel walls. These tissue-resident stem/progenitor cells differentiate into vascular endothelial cells, pericytes, and other mesenchymal lineages, and participate in physiological maintenance and repair of vasculatures. In this study, we characterized stromal vascular cells obtained through the explant culture method from three different vessel walls in humans: arterial wall (ART; >500 μm in diameter), venous wall (VN; >500 μm in diameter), and small vessels in adipose tissue (SV; arterioles and venules, adipose-derived stem/stromal cells (ASCs). All stromal vascular cells of different origins presented fibroblast-like morphology and we could not visually discriminate one population from another. Flow cytometry showed that the cultured population heterogeneously expressed a variety of surface antigens associated with stem/progenitor cells, but CD105 was expressed by most cells in all groups, suggesting that the cells generally shared the characteristics of mesenchymal stem cells. Our histological and flow cytometric data suggested that the main population of vessel wall-derived stromal vascular cells were CD34(+)/CD31(-) and came from the tunica adventitia and areola tissue surrounding the adventitia. CD271 (p75NTR) was expressed by the vasa vasorum in the VN adventitia and by a limited population in the adventitia of SV. All three populations differentiated into multiple lineages as did ASCs. ART cells induced the largest quantity of calcium formation in the osteogenic medium, whereas ASCs showed the greatest adipogenic differentiation. SV and VN stromal cells had greater potency for network formation than did ART stromal cells. In conclusion, the three stromal vascular populations exhibited differential functional properties. Our results have clinical implications for vascular diseases such as arterial wall calcification and possible applications to regenerative therapies

  20. Temperature Gradients on the Cell Wall in the Critical Viscosity Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Robert F.; Moldover, Michael R.

    1993-01-01

    Because of the diverging susceptibility delta rho/delta Tau near the liquid-vapor critical point, temperature gradients must be kept small to maintain adequate sample homogeneity. In our Science Requirements Document we paid particular attention to radial density gradients caused by equilibration of the xenon sample. Axial density gradients were addressed through the requirement that the cell's copper wall have a gradient less than 22 microK/m. This report re-examines the cell wall's temperature distribution in more detail by estimating all known significant contributions to temperature differences on the cell's wall.

  1. Rice Brittleness Mutants: A Way to Open the 'Black Box' of Monocot Cell Wall Biosynthesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Baocai Zhang; Yihua Zhou

    2011-01-01

    Rice is a model organism for studying the mechanism of cell wall biosynthesis and remolding in Gramineae.Mechanical strength is an important agronomy trait of rice(Oryza sativa L.)plants that affects crop lodging and grain yield.As a prominent physical property of cell walls,mechanical strength reflects upon the structure of different wall polymers and how they interact.Studies on the mechanisms that regulate the mechanical strength therefore consequently results in uncovering the genes functioning in cell wall biosynthesis and remodeling.Our group focuses on the study of isolation of brittle culm(bc)mutants and characterization of their corresponding genes.To date,several bc mutants have been reported.The identified genes have covered several pathways of cell wall biosynthesis,revealing many secrets of monocot cell wall biosynthesis.Here,we review the progress achieved in this research field and also highlight the perspectives in expectancy.All of those lend new insights into mechanisms of cell wall formation and are helpful for harnessing the waste rice straws for biofuel production.

  2. The role of the secondary cell walls in plant resistance to pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva eMiedes

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Plant resistance to pathogens relies on a complex network of constitutive and inducible defensive barriers. The plant cell wall is one of the barriers that pathogens need to overcome to successfully colonize plant tissues. The traditional view of the plant cell wall as a passive barrier has evolved to a concept that considers the wall as a dynamic structure that regulates both constitutive and inducible defence mechanisms, and as a source of signalling molecules that trigger immune responses. The secondary cell walls of plants also represent a carbon-neutral feedstock (lignocellulosic biomass for the production of biofuels and biomaterials. Therefore, engineering plants with improved secondary cell wall characteristics is an interesting strategy to ease the processing of lignocellulosic biomass in the biorefinery. However, modification of the integrity of the cell wall by impairment of proteins required for its biosynthesis or remodelling may impact the plants resistance to pathogens. This review summarizes our understanding of the role of the plant cell wall in pathogen resistance with a focus on the contribution of lignin to this biological process.

  3. Specific labeling of peptidoglycan precursors as a tool for bacterial cell wall studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dam, V.; Olrichs, N.K.; Breukink, E.J.

    2009-01-01

    Wall chart: The predominant component of the bacterial cell wall, peptidoglycan, consists of long alternating stretches of aminosugar subunits interlinked in a large three-dimensional network and is formed from precursors through several cytosolic and membrane-bound steps. The high tolerance of the

  4. Improved methods for binding acma-type protein anchor fusions yo cell-wall material of micro-organisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leenhouts, Cornelis; Ramasamy, R.; Steen, Anton; Kok, Jan; Buist, Girbe; Kuipers, Oscar

    2002-01-01

    The invention provides a method for improving binding of a proteinaceous substance to cell-wall material of a Gram-positive bacterium, said substance comprising an AcmA cell wall binding domain or homolog or functional derivative thereof, said method comprising treating said cell-wall material with

  5. Expression of S-adenosylmethionine Hydrolase in Tissues Synthesizing Secondary Cell Walls Alters Specific Methylated Cell Wall Fractions and Improves Biomass Digestibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eudes, Aymerick; Zhao, Nanxia; Sathitsuksanoh, Noppadon; Baidoo, Edward E K; Lao, Jeemeng; Wang, George; Yogiswara, Sasha; Lee, Taek Soon; Singh, Seema; Mortimer, Jenny C; Keasling, Jay D; Simmons, Blake A; Loqué, Dominique

    2016-01-01

    Plant biomass is a large source of fermentable sugars for the synthesis of bioproducts using engineered microbes. These sugars are stored as cell wall polymers, mainly cellulose and hemicellulose, and are embedded with lignin, which makes their enzymatic hydrolysis challenging. One of the strategies to reduce cell wall recalcitrance is the modification of lignin content and composition. Lignin is a phenolic polymer of methylated aromatic alcohols and its synthesis in tissues developing secondary cell walls is a significant sink for the consumption of the methyl donor S-adenosylmethionine (AdoMet). In this study, we demonstrate in Arabidopsis stems that targeted expression of AdoMet hydrolase (AdoMetase, E.C. 3.3.1.2) in secondary cell wall synthesizing tissues reduces the AdoMet pool and impacts lignin content and composition. In particular, both NMR analysis and pyrolysis gas chromatography mass spectrometry of lignin in engineered biomass showed relative enrichment of non-methylated p-hydroxycinnamyl (H) units and a reduction of dimethylated syringyl (S) units. This indicates a lower degree of methylation compared to that in wild-type lignin. Quantification of cell wall-bound hydroxycinnamates revealed a reduction of ferulate in AdoMetase transgenic lines. Biomass from transgenic lines, in contrast to that in control plants, exhibits an enrichment of glucose content and a reduction in the degree of hemicellulose glucuronoxylan methylation. We also show that these modifications resulted in a reduction of cell wall recalcitrance, because sugar yield generated by enzymatic biomass saccharification was greater than that of wild-type plants. Considering that transgenic plants show no important diminution of biomass yields, and that heterologous expression of AdoMetase protein can be spatiotemporally optimized, this novel approach provides a valuable option for the improvement of lignocellulosic biomass feedstock. PMID:27486577

  6. Expression of S-adenosylmethionine Hydrolase in Tissues Synthesizing Secondary Cell Walls Alters Specific Methylated Cell Wall Fractions and Improves Biomass Digestibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aymerick Eudes

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Plant biomass is a large source of fermentable sugars for the synthesis of bioproducts using engineered microbes. These sugars are stored as cell wall polymers, mainly cellulose and hemicellulose, and are embedded with lignin, which makes their enzymatic hydrolysis challenging. One of the strategies to reduce cell wall recalcitrance is the modification of lignin content and composition. Lignin is a phenolic polymer of methylated aromatic alcohols and its synthesis in tissues developing secondary cell walls is a significant sink for the consumption of the methyl donor S-adenosylmethionine (AdoMet. In this study, we demonstrate in Arabidopsis stems that targeted expression of S-adenosylmethionine hydrolase (AdoMetase, E.C. 3.3.1.2 in secondary cell-wall synthesizing tissues reduces the AdoMet pool and impacts lignin content and composition. In particular, both NMR analysis and pyrolysis gas chromatography mass spectrometry of lignin in engineered biomass showed relative enrichment of non-methylated p-hydroxycinnamyl (H units and a reduction of dimethylated syringyl (S units. This indicates a lower degree of methylation compared to that in wild-type lignin. Quantification of cell wall-bound hydroxycinnamates revealed a reduction of ferulate in AdoMetase transgenic lines. Biomass from transgenic lines, in contrast to that in control plants, exhibits an enrichment of glucose content and a reduction in the degree of hemicellulose glucuronoxylan methylation. We also show that these modifications resulted in a reduction of cell wall recalcitrance, because sugar yield generated by enzymatic biomass saccharification was greater than that of wild type plants. Considering that transgenic plants show no important diminution of biomass yields, and that heterologous expression of AdoMetase protein can be spatiotemporally optimized, this novel approach provides a valuable option for the improvement of lignocellulosic biomass feedstock.

  7. Expression of S-adenosylmethionine Hydrolase in Tissues Synthesizing Secondary Cell Walls Alters Specific Methylated Cell Wall Fractions and Improves Biomass Digestibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eudes, Aymerick; Zhao, Nanxia; Sathitsuksanoh, Noppadon; Baidoo, Edward E. K.; Lao, Jeemeng; Wang, George; Yogiswara, Sasha; Lee, Taek Soon; Singh, Seema; Mortimer, Jenny C.; Keasling, Jay D.; Simmons, Blake A.; Loqué, Dominique

    2016-01-01

    Plant biomass is a large source of fermentable sugars for the synthesis of bioproducts using engineered microbes. These sugars are stored as cell wall polymers, mainly cellulose and hemicellulose, and are embedded with lignin, which makes their enzymatic hydrolysis challenging. One of the strategies to reduce cell wall recalcitrance is the modification of lignin content and composition. Lignin is a phenolic polymer of methylated aromatic alcohols and its synthesis in tissues developing secondary cell walls is a significant sink for the consumption of the methyl donor S-adenosylmethionine (AdoMet). In this study, we demonstrate in Arabidopsis stems that targeted expression of AdoMet hydrolase (AdoMetase, E.C. 3.3.1.2) in secondary cell wall synthesizing tissues reduces the AdoMet pool and impacts lignin content and composition. In particular, both NMR analysis and pyrolysis gas chromatography mass spectrometry of lignin in engineered biomass showed relative enrichment of non-methylated p-hydroxycinnamyl (H) units and a reduction of dimethylated syringyl (S) units. This indicates a lower degree of methylation compared to that in wild-type lignin. Quantification of cell wall-bound hydroxycinnamates revealed a reduction of ferulate in AdoMetase transgenic lines. Biomass from transgenic lines, in contrast to that in control plants, exhibits an enrichment of glucose content and a reduction in the degree of hemicellulose glucuronoxylan methylation. We also show that these modifications resulted in a reduction of cell wall recalcitrance, because sugar yield generated by enzymatic biomass saccharification was greater than that of wild-type plants. Considering that transgenic plants show no important diminution of biomass yields, and that heterologous expression of AdoMetase protein can be spatiotemporally optimized, this novel approach provides a valuable option for the improvement of lignocellulosic biomass feedstock. PMID:27486577

  8. Proton exchange membrane fuel cell degradation: A parametric analysis using Computational Fluid Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozden, Ender; Tari, Ilker

    2016-02-01

    A Polymer Electrolyte Membrane (PEM) fuel cell is numerically investigated both as fresh and as degraded with the help of observed degradation patterns reported in the literature. The fresh fuel cell model is validated and verified with the data from the literature. Modifying the model by varying the parameters affected by degradation, a degraded PEM fuel cell model is created. The degraded fuel cell is parametrically analyzed by using a commercial Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) software. The investigated parameters are the membrane equivalent weight, the Catalyst Layer (CL) porosity and viscous resistance, the Gas Diffusion Layer (GDL) porosity and viscous resistance, and the bipolar plate contact resistance. It is shown for the first time that PEM fuel cell overall degradation can be numerically estimated by combining experimental data from degraded individual components. By comparing the simulation results for the fresh and the degraded PEM fuel cells for two years of operation, it is concluded that the effects of overall degradation on cell potential is significant - estimated to be 17% around the operating point of the fuel cell at 0.95 V open circuit voltage and 70 °C operating temperature.

  9. Investigation on Adsorption of Lithospermum erythrorhizon onto Fungal Cell Wall Polysaccharides

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孟琴; 薛莲

    2003-01-01

    A culture of Lithosperrnum erythrorhizon adsorbed on fungal cell wall polysaccharides, a novel bioadsorbent made from fungal cell wall, has been established in this paper. Three steps were involved in this immobilization. The first step was preparation of suspended plant cells from tightly aggregated plant cell clumps. The disassembled ratio of 0.715g·g-1 (the disassembled cells over total cells) was obtained under optimum condition for the enzymatic reaction. Then, the adsorption of plant cells onto fungal cell wall polysaccharides was conducted and the saturated capacity of 12g cell per gram of carrier was obtained in adsorption immobilization. Finally, the culture of cells adsorbed on fungal cell wall polysaccharides was compared with that of cells entrapped in alginate or suspension cell culture. While exposed to in situ liquid paraffin extraction coupled with cell culture, the shikonin productivity of immobilized cells by adsorption was 10.67g·L-1, which was 1.8 times of that in suspension culture and 1.5 times of that entrapped in alginate.

  10. Cell Wall Growth and Modulation Dynamics in a Model Unicellular Green Alga—Penium margaritaceum: Live Cell Labeling with Monoclonal Antibodies

    OpenAIRE

    Domozych, David S; Hannah Brechka; Alicia Britton; Marc Toso

    2011-01-01

    Penium margaritaceum is a unicellular charophycean green alga that possesses cell wall polymers similar to those of land plants. Several wall macromolecules of this alga are recognized by monoclonal antibodies specific for wall polymer epitopes of land plants. Immunofluorescence protocols using these antibodies may be employed to label specific cell wall constituents of live cells. Fluorescent labeling persists for several days, and this attribute allows for tracing of wall epitopes in both l...

  11. Trifluoromethanesulfonic acid-based proteomic analysis of cell wall and secreted proteins of the ascomycetous fungi Neurospora crassa and Candida albicans

    OpenAIRE

    Maddi, Abhiram; Bowman, Shaun M.; Free, Stephen J.

    2009-01-01

    Cell wall proteins from purified Candida albicans and Neurospora crassa cell walls were released using trifluoromethanesulfonic acid (TFMS) which cleaves the cell wall glucan/chitin matrix and deglycosylates the proteins. The cell wall proteins were then characterized by SDS PAGE and identified by proteomic analysis. The analyses for C. albicans identified 15 cell wall proteins and 6 secreted proteins. For N. crassa, the analyses identified 26 cell wall proteins and 9 secreted proteins. Most ...

  12. Turnover of galactans and other cell wall polysaccharides during development of flax plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigated the synthesis and turnover of cell wall polysaccharides of the flax (Linum usitatissimum L.) plant during development of the phloem fibers. One-month-old flax plants were exposed to a 40-min pulse with 14CO2 followed by 8-h, 24-h, and 1-month periods of chase with ambient CO2, and radioactivity in cell wall sugars was determined in various plant parts. The relative radioactivity of glucose in noncellulosic polysaccharides was the highest compared with all other cell wall sugars immediately after the pulse and decreased substantially during the subsequent chase. The relative radioactivities of the other cell wall sugars changed with differing rates, indicating turnover of specific polysaccharides. Notably, after 1 month of chase there was a marked decrease in the proportional mass and total radioactivity in cell wall galactose, indicating a long-term turnover of the galactans enriched in the fiber-containing tissues. The ratio of radiolabeled xylose to arabinose also increased during the chase, indicating a turnover of arabinose-containing polymers and interconversion to xylose. The pattern of label redistribution differed between organs, indicating that the cell wall turnover processes are tissue- and cell-specific

  13. Size, Shape, and Arrangement of Cellulose Microfibril in Higher Plant Cell Walls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, S. Y.

    2013-01-01

    Plant cell walls from maize (Zea mays L.) are imaged using atomic force microscopy (AFM) at the sub-nanometer resolution. We found that the size and shape of fundamental cellulose elementary fibril (CEF) is essentially identical in different cell wall types, i.e., primary wall (PW), parenchyma secondary wall (pSW), and sclerenchyma secondary wall (sSW), which is consistent with previously proposed 36-chain model (Ding et al., 2006, J. Agric. Food Chem.). The arrangement of individual CEFs in these wall types exhibits two orientations. In PW, CEFs are horizontally associated through their hydrophilic faces, and the planar faces are exposed, forming ribbon-like macrofibrils. In pSW and sSW, CEFs are vertically oriented, forming layers, in which hemicelluloses are interacted with the hydrophobic faces of the CEF and serve as spacers between CEFs. Lignification occurs between CEF-hemicelluloses layers in secondary walls. Furthermore, we demonstrated quantitative analysis of plant cell wall accessibility to and digestibility by different cellulase systems at real-time using chemical imaging (e.g., stimulated Raman scattering) and fluorescence microscopy of labeled cellulases (Ding et al., 2012, Science, in press).

  14. Arabinose-rich polymers as an evolutionary strategy to plasticize resurrection plant cell walls against desiccation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moore, John P.; Nguema-Ona, Eric E.; Vicré-Gibouin, Mäite;

    2013-01-01

    A variety of Southern African resurrection plants were surveyed using high-throughput cell wall profiling tools. Species evaluated were the dicotyledons, Myrothamnus flabellifolia and Craterostigma plantagineum; the monocotyledons, Xerophyta viscosa, Xerophyta schlecterii, Xerophyta humilis...

  15. 2012 PLANT CELL WALLS GORDON RESEARCH CONFERENCE AND GORDON RESEARCH SEMINAR, AUGUST 4-10, 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rose, Jocelyn

    2012-08-10

    The sub-theme of this year’s meeting, ‘Cell Wall Research in a Post-Genome World’, will be a consideration of the dramatic technological changes that have occurred in the three years since the previous cell wall Gordon Conference in the area of DNA sequencing. New technologies are providing additional perspectives of plant cell wall biology across a rapidly growing number of species, highlighting a myriad of architectures, compositions, and functions in both "conventional" and specialized cell walls. This meeting will focus on addressing the knowledge gaps and technical challenges raised by such diversity, as well as our need to understand the underlying processes for critical applications such as crop improvement and bioenergy resource development.

  16. Study of the cell wall of Staphylococcus aureus and its sensitivity to enzybiotics

    OpenAIRE

    Čmelík, R. (Richard); Melková, K.; Kobzová, Š.; Janda, L

    2015-01-01

    The endolysin resistant and sensitive strains of Staphylococcus aureus were compared by means of LC-MS based structural analysis of peptidoglycan isolated from their cell walls. The structural explanation of the resistance was suggested.

  17. Understanding the relationship between cotton fiber properties and non-cellulosic cell wall polysaccharides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rajasundaram, Dhivyaa; Runavot, Jean-Luc; Guo, Xiaoyuan;

    2014-01-01

    A detailed knowledge of cell wall heterogeneity and complexity is crucial for understanding plant growth and development. One key challenge is to establish links between polysaccharide-rich cell walls and their phenotypic characteristics. It is of particular interest for some plant material, like...... different cotton species were studied. The glycan array was generated by sequential extraction of cell wall polysaccharides from mature cotton fibers and screening samples against eleven extensively characterized cell wall probes. Also, phenotypic characteristics of cotton fibers such as length, strength...... and phenotypic traits. In addition, the analysis also identified specific polysaccharides which may play a major role during fiber development for the final fiber characteristics. Three different regression methods identified a negative correlation between micronaire and the xyloglucan and homogalacturonan...

  18. The Paracoccidioides cell wall: past and present layers towards understanding interaction with the host

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosana ePuccia

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The cell wall of pathogenic fungi plays import roles in interaction with the host, so that its composition and structure may determine the course of infection. Here we present an overview of the current and past knowledge on the cell wall constituents of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis and P. lutzii. These are temperature-dependent dimorphic fungi that cause paracoccidioidomycosis, a systemic granulomatous and debilitating disease. Focus is given on cell wall carbohydrate and protein contents, their immune-stimulatory features, adhesion properties, drug target characteristics, and morphological phase specificity. We offer a journey towards the future understanding of the dynamic life that takes place in the cell wall and of the changes that it may suffer when living in the human host.

  19. Elevated Cell Wall Chitin in Candida albicans Confers Echinocandin Resistance In Vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, K K; MacCallum, D.M; Jacobsen, M.D.; Walker, L A; Odds, F C; Gow, N. A. R.; Munro, C.A.

    2012-01-01

    Candida albicans cells with increased cell wall chitin have reduced echinocandin susceptibility in vitro. The aim of this study was to investigate whether C. albicans cells with elevated chitin levels have reduced echinocandin susceptibility in vivo. BALB/c mice were infected with C. albicans cells with normal chitin levels and compared to mice infected with high-chitin cells. Caspofungin therapy was initiated at 24 h postinfection. Mice infected with chitin-normal cells were successfully tre...

  20. Plant Cell Wall Proteins: A Large Body of Data, but What about Runaways?

    OpenAIRE

    Cécile Albenne; Hervé Canut; Laurent Hoffmann; Elisabeth Jamet

    2014-01-01

    Plant cell wall proteomics has been a very dynamic field of research for about fifteen years. A full range of strategies has been proposed to increase the number of identified proteins and to characterize their post-translational modifications. The protocols are still improving to enlarge the coverage of cell wall proteomes. Comparisons between these proteomes have been done based on various working strategies or different physiological stages. In this review, two points are highlighted. The ...

  1. Fungal Cell Wall Dynamics and Infection Site Microenvironments: Signal Integration and Infection Outcome

    OpenAIRE

    Shepardson, Kelly M.; Cramer, Robert A.

    2013-01-01

    Upon entrance into the host, fungi encounter a myriad of host effector products and microenvironments that they sense and adapt to for survival. Alterations of the structure and composition of the cell wall is a major fungal adaptation mechanism to evade these environments. Here we discuss recent findings of host-microenvironmental induced fungal cell wall changes, including structure, composition, and protein content, and their effects on host immune responses. A take home message from these...

  2. Sucrose synthase affects carbon partitioning to increase cellulose production and altered cell wall ultrastructure

    OpenAIRE

    Coleman, Heather D.; Yan, Jimmy; Mansfield, Shawn D

    2009-01-01

    Overexpression of the Gossypium hirsutum sucrose synthase (SuSy) gene under the control of 2 promoters was examined in hybrid poplar (Populus alba × grandidentata). Analysis of RNA transcript abundance, enzyme activity, cell wall composition, and soluble carbohydrates revealed significant changes in the transgenic lines. All lines showed significantly increased SuSy enzyme activity in developing xylem. This activity manifested in altered secondary cell wall cellulose content per dry weight in...

  3. Solid-State NMR on bacterial cells: selective cell wall signal enhancement and resolution improvement using dynamic nuclear polarization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) enhanced solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) has recently emerged as a powerful technique for the study of material surfaces. In this study, we demonstrate its potential to investigate cell surface in intact cells. Using Bacillus subtilis bacterial cells as an example, it is shown that the polarizing agent 1-(TEMPO-4-oxy)-3-(TEMPO-4-amino)propan-2-ol (TOTAPOL) has a strong binding affinity to cell wall polymers (peptidoglycan). This particular interaction is thoroughly investigated with a systematic study on extracted cell wall materials, disrupted cells, and entire cells, which proved that TOTAPOL is mainly accumulating in the cell wall. This property is used on one hand to selectively enhance or suppress cell wall signals by controlling radical concentrations and on the other hand to improve spectral resolution by means of a difference spectrum. Comparing DNP-enhanced and conventional solid-state NMR, an absolute sensitivity ratio of 24 was obtained on the entire cell sample. This important increase in sensitivity together with the possibility of enhancing specifically cell wall signals and improving resolution really opens new avenues for the use of DNP-enhanced solid-state NMR as an on-cell investigation tool. (authors)

  4. On the degradation of fuel cell catalyst. From model systems to high surface area catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arenz, M. [Copenhagen Univ. (Denmark). Dept. of Chemistry

    2010-07-01

    In the presented work, as an alternative accelerated degradation tests in the form of half-cell measurements combined with identical location transmission electron microscopy (IL-TEM){sup 10,} {sup 11} are presented. It is demonstrated that for different catalysts the degradation mechanism can be scrutinized in detail. Thus this approach enables the systematic investigation of fuel cell catalyst degradation in a reduced period of time. (orig.)

  5. The cell walls of green algae: a journey through evolution and diversity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David eDomozych

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The green algae represent a large group of morphologically diverse photosynthetic eukaryotes that occupy virtually every photic habitat on the planet. The extracellular coverings of green algae including cell walls are also diverse. A recent surge of research in green algal cell walls fueled by new emerging technologies has revealed new and critical insight concerning these coverings. For example, the late divergent taxa of the Charophycean Green Algae possess cell walls containing assemblages of polymers with notable similarity to the cellulose, pectins, hemicelluloses, arabinogalactan proteins, extensin and lignin present in embryophyte walls. Ulvophycean seaweeds have cell wall components whose most abundant fibrillar constituents may change from cellulose to β-mannans to β-xylans and during different life cycle phases. Likewise, these algae produce complex sulfated polysaccharides, arabinogalactan proteins and extensin. Chlorophycean green algae produce a wide array of walls ranging from cellulose-pectin complexes to ones made of hydroxyproline-rich glycoproteins. Larger and more detailed surveys of the green algal taxa including incorporation of emerging genomic and transcriptomic data are required in order to more fully resolve evolutionary trends within the green algae and in relationship with higher plants as well as potential applications of wall components in the food and pharmaceutical industries.

  6. Structural Insight into Cell Wall Architecture of Micanthus sinensis cv. using Correlative Microscopy Approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jianfeng; Lv, Xunli; Yang, Shumin; Tian, Genlin; Liu, Xing'e

    2015-10-01

    Structural organization of the plant cell wall is a key parameter for understanding anisotropic plant growth and mechanical behavior. Four imaging platforms were used to investigate the cell wall architecture of Miscanthus sinensis cv. internode tissue. Using transmission electron microscopy with potassium permanganate, we found a great degree of inhomogeneity in the layering structure (4-9 layers) of the sclerenchymatic fiber (Sf). However, the xylem vessel showed a single layer. Atomic force microscopy images revealed that the cellulose microfibrils (Mfs) deposited in the primary wall of the protoxylem vessel (Pxv) were disordered, while the secondary wall was composed of Mfs oriented in parallel in the cross and longitudinal section. Furthermore, Raman spectroscopy images indicated no variation in the Mf orientation of Pxv and the Mfs in Pxv were oriented more perpendicular to the cell axis than that of Sfs. Based on the integrated results, we have proposed an architectural model of Pxv composed of two layers: an outermost primary wall composed of a meshwork of Mfs and inner secondary wall containing parallel Mfs. This proposed model will support future ultrastructural analysis of plant cell walls in heterogeneous tissues, an area of increasing scientific interest particularly for liquid biofuel processing. PMID:26358178

  7. Changes in inositol phosphates in wild carrot cells upon initiation of cell wall digestion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Previous studies have shown that inositol trisphosphate (IP3) stimulated 45Ca+2 efflux from fusogenic carrot protoplasts and it was suggested that IP3 may serve as a second messenger for the mobilization of intracellular Ca+2 in higher plant cells. To determine whether or not inositol phosphate metabolism changes in response to external stimuli, the cells were labeled with myo-[2-3H] inositol for 18 h and exposed to cell wall digestion enzymes, Driselase. The inositol phosphates were extracted with ice cold 10% TCA and separated by anion exchange chromatography. The radioactivity of the fraction that contained IP3 increased 2-3.8 fold and that which contained inositol bisphosphate increased 1.9-2.6 fold within 1.5 min of exposure to Driselase. After 6 min, the radioactivity of both fractions increased 6-7.7 fold and an increase in inositol monophosphate was observed. These data indicate that inositol phosphate metabolism is stimulated by Driselase and suggest polyphosphoinositide hydrolysis occurs upon initiation of cell wall digestion

  8. Evidence against the involvement of ionically bound cell wall proteins in pea epicotyl growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melan, M. A.; Cosgrove, D. J.

    1988-01-01

    Ionically bound cell wall proteins were extracted from 7 day old etiolated pea (Pisum sativum L. cv Alaska) epicotyls with 3 molar LiCl. Polyclonal antiserum was raised in rabbits against the cell wall proteins. Growth assays showed that treatment of growing region segments (5-7 millimeters) of peas with either dialyzed serum, serum globulin fraction, affinity purified immunoglobulin, or papain-cleaved antibody fragments had no effect on growth. Immunofluorescence microscopy confirmed antibody binding to cell walls and penetration of the antibodies into the tissues. Western blot analysis, immunoassay results, and affinity chromatography utilizing Sepharose-bound antibodies confirmed recognition of the protein preparation by the antibodies. Experiments employing in vitro extension as a screening measure indicated no effect upon extension by antibodies, by 50 millimolar LiCl perfusion of the apoplast or by 3 molar LiCl extraction. Addition of cell wall protein to protease pretreated segments did not restore extension nor did addition of cell wall protein to untreated segments increase extension. It is concluded that, although evidence suggests that protein is responsible for the process of extension, the class(es) of proteins which are extracted from pea cell walls with 3 molar LiCl are probably not involved in this process.

  9. Cell wall chitosaccharides are essential components and exposed patterns of the phytopathogenic oomycete Aphanomyces euteiches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badreddine, Ilham; Lafitte, Claude; Heux, Laurent; Skandalis, Nicholas; Spanou, Zacharoula; Martinez, Yves; Esquerré-Tugayé, Marie-Thérèse; Bulone, Vincent; Dumas, Bernard; Bottin, Arnaud

    2008-11-01

    Chitin is an essential component of fungal cell walls, where it forms a crystalline scaffold, and chitooligosaccharides derived from it are signaling molecules recognized by the hosts of pathogenic fungi. Oomycetes are cellulosic fungus-like microorganisms which most often lack chitin in their cell walls. Here we present the first study of the cell wall of the oomycete Aphanomyces euteiches, a major parasite of legume plants. Biochemical analyses demonstrated the presence of ca. 10% N-acetyl-D-glucosamine (GlcNAc) in the cell wall. Further characterization of the GlcNAc-containing material revealed that it corresponds to noncrystalline chitosaccharides associated with glucans, rather than to chitin per se. Two putative chitin synthase (CHS) genes were identified by data mining of an A. euteiches expressed sequence tag collection and Southern blot analysis, and full-length cDNA sequences of both genes were obtained. Phylogeny analysis indicated that oomycete CHS diversification occurred before the divergence of the major oomycete lineages. Remarkably, lectin labeling showed that the Aphanomyces euteiches chitosaccharides are exposed at the cell wall surface, and study of the effect of the CHS inhibitor nikkomycin Z demonstrated that they are involved in cell wall function. These data open new perspectives for the development of antioomycete drugs and further studies of the molecular mechanisms involved in the recognition of pathogenic oomycetes by the host plants. PMID:18806214

  10. Chemical organization of the cell wall polysaccharide core of Malassezia restricta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stalhberger, Thomas; Simenel, Catherine; Clavaud, Cécile; Eijsink, Vincent G H; Jourdain, Roland; Delepierre, Muriel; Latgé, Jean-Paul; Breton, Lionel; Fontaine, Thierry

    2014-05-01

    Malassezia species are ubiquitous residents of human skin and are associated with several diseases such as seborrheic dermatitis, tinea versicolor, folliculitis, atopic dermatitis, and scalp conditions such as dandruff. Host-Malassezia interactions and mechanisms to evade local immune responses remain largely unknown. Malassezia restricta is one of the most predominant yeasts of the healthy human skin, its cell wall has been investigated in this paper. Polysaccharides in the M. restricta cell wall are almost exclusively alkali-insoluble, showing that they play an essential role in the organization and rigidity of the M. restricta cell wall. Fractionation of cell wall polymers and carbohydrate analyses showed that the polysaccharide core of the cell wall of M. restricta contained an average of 5% chitin, 20% chitosan, 5% β-(1,3)-glucan, and 70% β-(1,6)-glucan. In contrast to other yeasts, chitin and chitosan are relatively abundant, and β-(1,3)-glucans constitute a minor cell wall component. The most abundant polymer is β-(1,6)-glucans, which are large molecules composed of a linear β-(1,6)-glucan chains with β-(1,3)-glucosyl side chain with an average of 1 branch point every 3.8 glucose unit. Both β-glucans are cross-linked, forming a huge alkali-insoluble complex with chitin and chitosan polymers. Data presented here show that M. restricta has a polysaccharide organization very different of all fungal species analyzed to date. PMID:24627479

  11. Ethanolic rhizome extract from Kaempferia parviflora Wall. ex. Baker induces apoptosis in HL-60 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banjerdpongchai, Ratana; Suwannachot, Kittiphan; Rattanapanone, Viboon; Sripanidkulchai, Bungorn

    2008-01-01

    Kaempferia parviflora Wall. ex. Baker is a Thai herb containing many flavonoids that have anti-inflammatory, anti-allergic and antioxidant activities. The objective of this study was to demonstrate apoptotic effects of Kaempferia parviflora Wall. ex. Baker rhizome ethanolic extract on HL-60 cells in vitro. The extract suppressed HL-60 cell growth and decreased cell viability in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Apoptotic cell death was demonstrated by changes in cell morphology, externalization of phosphatidylserine on the cell surface, loss in mitochondrial transmembrane potential and activation of caspase 3. Apoptosis induced by K. parviflora Wall. ex. Baker rhizome ethanolic extract was enhanced by treatment with paclitaxel or doxorubicin, and inhibitors of Akt, PI3-K and MEK. PMID:19256745

  12. Disturbance of the bacterial cell wall specifically interferes with biofilm formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucher, Tabitha; Oppenheimer-Shaanan, Yaara; Savidor, Alon; Bloom-Ackermann, Zohar; Kolodkin-Gal, Ilana

    2015-12-01

    In nature, bacteria communicate via chemical cues and establish complex communities referred to as biofilms, wherein cells are held together by an extracellular matrix. Much research is focusing on small molecules that manipulate and prevent biofilm assembly by modifying cellular signalling pathways. However, the bacterial cell envelope, presenting the interface between bacterial cells and their surroundings, is largely overlooked. In our study, we identified specific targets within the biosynthesis pathways of the different cell wall components (peptidoglycan, wall teichoic acids and teichuronic acids) hampering biofilm formation and the anchoring of the extracellular matrix with a minimal effect on planktonic growth. In addition, we provide convincing evidence that biofilm hampering by transglycosylation inhibitors and D-Leucine triggers a highly specific response without changing the overall protein levels within the biofilm cells or the overall levels of the extracellular matrix components. The presented results emphasize the central role of the Gram-positive cell wall in biofilm development, resistance and sustainment. PMID:26472159

  13. Disturbance of the bacterial cell wall specifically interferes with biofilm formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucher, Tabitha; Oppenheimer-Shaanan, Yaara; Savidor, Alon; Bloom-Ackermann, Zohar; Kolodkin-Gal, Ilana

    2015-12-01

    In nature, bacteria communicate via chemical cues and establish complex communities referred to as biofilms, wherein cells are held together by an extracellular matrix. Much research is focusing on small molecules that manipulate and prevent biofilm assembly by modifying cellular signalling pathways. However, the bacterial cell envelope, presenting the interface between bacterial cells and their surroundings, is largely overlooked. In our study, we identified specific targets within the biosynthesis pathways of the different cell wall components (peptidoglycan, wall teichoic acids and teichuronic acids) hampering biofilm formation and the anchoring of the extracellular matrix with a minimal effect on planktonic growth. In addition, we provide convincing evidence that biofilm hampering by transglycosylation inhibitors and D-Leucine triggers a highly specific response without changing the overall protein levels within the biofilm cells or the overall levels of the extracellular matrix components. The presented results emphasize the central role of the Gram-positive cell wall in biofilm development, resistance and sustainment.

  14. On-line wall-free cell for laser-induced fluorescence detection in capillary electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Chang-Zhu; He, You-Zhao; Xie, Hai-Yang; Gao, Yong; Gan, Wu-Er; Li, Jun

    2009-05-15

    A wall-free detection method based on liquid junction in a capillary gap was proposed for laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) of capillary electrophoresis (CE). The capillary gap of the wall-free cell was fabricated by etching a 10-mm x 50-microm I.D. fused-silica capillary to obtain a polyimide coating sleeve, decoating about 6mm at one end of both 50 microm I.D. separation and liquid junction capillary, inserting the treated capillary ends into the coating sleeve oppositely, fixing the capillaries with a gap distance of 140 microm by epoxy glue and removing the coating sleeve by burning. The theoretical model, experimental results and wall-free cell images indicated that the gap distance and applied voltage were main influence factors on the wall-free detection. Since the wall-free cell increased the absorption light path and avoided the stray light from the capillary wall, it improved the ratio of signal to noise and limit of detection (LOD) of CE-LIF. Three flavin compounds of riboflavin (RF), flavin mononucleotide sodium (FMN) and flavin adenine dinucleotide disodium (FAD) were used to evaluate the wall-free detection method. Compared with on-column cell, the LODs of the wall-free cell were improved 15-, 6- and 9-fold for RF, FMN and FAD, respectively. The linear calibration concentrations of the flavins ranged from 0.005 to 5.0 micromol/L. The column efficiency was in the range from 1.0 x 10(5) to 2.5 x 10(5) plates. The wall-free detection of CE-LIF was applied to the analysis of the flavins in spinach and lettuce leaves. PMID:19329123

  15. Monovalent cations enable cell wall turnover of the turnover-deficient lyt-15 mutant of Bacillus subtilis.

    OpenAIRE

    Cheung, H. Y.; Freese, E

    1985-01-01

    A lyt-15 mutant reported to be unable to turn over the cell wall exhibited the same rate of wall turnover as the standard strain if the medium contained 0.2 M NaCl, which did not affect growth. Cell wall autolysis was also optimal at 0.2 M NaCl.

  16. Functional Analysis of Cellulose and Xyloglucan in the Walls of Stomatal Guard Cells of Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rui, Yue; Anderson, Charles T

    2016-03-01

    Stomatal guard cells are pairs of specialized epidermal cells that control water and CO2 exchange between the plant and the environment. To fulfill the functions of stomatal opening and closure that are driven by changes in turgor pressure, guard cell walls must be both strong and flexible, but how the structure and dynamics of guard cell walls enable stomatal function remains poorly understood. To address this question, we applied cell biological and genetic analyses to investigate guard cell walls and their relationship to stomatal function in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Using live-cell spinning disk confocal microscopy, we measured the motility of cellulose synthase (CESA)-containing complexes labeled by green fluorescent protein (GFP)-CESA3 and observed a reduced proportion of GFP-CESA3 particles colocalizing with microtubules upon stomatal closure. Imaging cellulose organization in guard cells revealed a relatively uniform distribution of cellulose in the open state and a more fibrillar pattern in the closed state, indicating that cellulose microfibrils undergo dynamic reorganization during stomatal movements. In cesa3(je5) mutants defective in cellulose synthesis and xxt1 xxt2 mutants lacking the hemicellulose xyloglucan, stomatal apertures, changes in guard cell length, and cellulose reorganization were aberrant during fusicoccin-induced stomatal opening or abscisic acid-induced stomatal closure, indicating that sufficient cellulose and xyloglucan are required for normal guard cell dynamics. Together, these results provide new insights into how guard cell walls allow stomata to function as responsive mediators of gas exchange at the plant surface. PMID:26729799

  17. The Structure of Plant Cell Walls: I. The Macromolecular Components of the Walls of Suspension-cultured Sycamore Cells with a Detailed Analysis of the Pectic Polysaccharides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talmadge, K W; Keegstra, K; Bauer, W D; Albersheim, P

    1973-01-01

    This is the first in a series of papers dealing with the structure of cell walls isolated from suspension-cultured sycamore cells (Acer pseudoplatanus). These studies have been made possible by the availability of purified hydrolytic enzymes and by recent improvements in the techniques of methylation analysis. These techniques have permitted us to identify and quantitate the macromolecular components of sycamore cell walls. These walls are composed of 10% arabinan, 2% 3,6-linked arabinogalactan, 23% cellulose, 9% oligo-arabinosides (attached to hydroxyproline), 8% 4-linked galactan, 10% hydroxyproline-rich protein, 16% rhamnogalacturonan, and 21% xyloglucan.The structures of the pectic polymers (the neutral arabinan, the neutral galactan, and the acidic rhamnogalacturonan) were obtained, in part, by methylation analysis of fragments of these polymers which were released from the sycamore walls by the action of a highly purified endopolygalacturonase. The data suggest a branched arabinan and a linear 4-linked galactan occurring as side chains on the rhamnogalacturonan. Small amounts or pieces of a xyloglucan, the wall hemicellulose, appear to be covalently linked to some of the galactan chains. Thus, the galactan appears to serve as a bridge between the xyloglucan and rhamnogalacturonan components of the wall.The rhamnogalacturonan consists of an alpha-(1 --> 4)-linked galacturonan chain which is interspersed with 2-linked rhamnosyl residues. The rhamnosyl residues are not randomly distributed in the chain but probably occur in units of rhamnosyl- (1 --> 4)-galacturonosyl- (1 --> 2)-rhamnosyl. This sequence appears to alternate with a homogalacturonan sequence containing approximately 8 residues of 4-linked galacturonic acid. About half of the rhamnosyl residues are branched, having a substituent attached to carbon 4. This is likely to be the site of attachment of the 4-linked galactan.The hydroxyprolyl oligo-arabinosides of the hydroxyproline-rich glycoprotein

  18. Decreased Polysaccharide Feruloylation Compromises Plant Cell Wall Integrity and Increases Susceptibility to Necrotrophic Fungal Pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reem, Nathan T.; Pogorelko, Gennady; Lionetti, Vincenzo; Chambers, Lauran; Held, Michael A.; Bellincampi, Daniela; Zabotina, Olga A.

    2016-01-01

    The complexity of cell wall composition and structure determines the strength, flexibility, and function of the primary cell wall in plants. However, the contribution of the various components to cell wall integrity (CWI) and function remains unclear. Modifications of cell wall composition can induce plant responses known as CWI control. In this study, we used transgenic expression of the fungal feruloyl esterase AnFAE to examine the effect of post-synthetic modification of Arabidopsis and Brachypodium cell walls. Transgenic Arabidopsis plants expressing AnFAE showed a significant reduction of monomeric ferulic acid, decreased amounts of wall-associated extensins, and increased susceptibility to Botrytis cinerea, compared with wild type. Transgenic Brachypodium showed reductions in monomeric and dimeric ferulic acids and increased susceptibility to Bipolaris sorokiniana. Upon infection, transgenic Arabidopsis and Brachypodium plants also showed increased expression of several defense-related genes compared with wild type. These results demonstrate a role, in both monocot and dicot plants, of polysaccharide feruloylation in plant CWI, which contributes to plant resistance to necrotrophic pathogens. PMID:27242834

  19. Decreased Polysaccharide Feruloylation Compromises Plant Cell Wall Integrity and Increases Susceptibility to Necrotrophic Fungal Pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reem, Nathan T; Pogorelko, Gennady; Lionetti, Vincenzo; Chambers, Lauran; Held, Michael A; Bellincampi, Daniela; Zabotina, Olga A

    2016-01-01

    The complexity of cell wall composition and structure determines the strength, flexibility, and function of the primary cell wall in plants. However, the contribution of the various components to cell wall integrity (CWI) and function remains unclear. Modifications of cell wall composition can induce plant responses known as CWI control. In this study, we used transgenic expression of the fungal feruloyl esterase AnFAE to examine the effect of post-synthetic modification of Arabidopsis and Brachypodium cell walls. Transgenic Arabidopsis plants expressing AnFAE showed a significant reduction of monomeric ferulic acid, decreased amounts of wall-associated extensins, and increased susceptibility to Botrytis cinerea, compared with wild type. Transgenic Brachypodium showed reductions in monomeric and dimeric ferulic acids and increased susceptibility to Bipolaris sorokiniana. Upon infection, transgenic Arabidopsis and Brachypodium plants also showed increased expression of several defense-related genes compared with wild type. These results demonstrate a role, in both monocot and dicot plants, of polysaccharide feruloylation in plant CWI, which contributes to plant resistance to necrotrophic pathogens.

  20. Decreased Polysaccharide Feruloylation Compromises Plant Cell Wall Integrity and Increases Susceptibility to Necrotrophic Fungal Pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reem, Nathan T; Pogorelko, Gennady; Lionetti, Vincenzo; Chambers, Lauran; Held, Michael A; Bellincampi, Daniela; Zabotina, Olga A

    2016-01-01

    The complexity of cell wall composition and structure determines the strength, flexibility, and function of the primary cell wall in plants. However, the contribution of the various components to cell wall integrity (CWI) and function remains unclear. Modifications of cell wall composition can induce plant responses known as CWI control. In this study, we used transgenic expression of the fungal feruloyl esterase AnFAE to examine the effect of post-synthetic modification of Arabidopsis and Brachypodium cell walls. Transgenic Arabidopsis plants expressing AnFAE showed a significant reduction of monomeric ferulic acid, decreased amounts of wall-associated extensins, and increased susceptibility to Botrytis cinerea, compared with wild type. Transgenic Brachypodium showed reductions in monomeric and dimeric ferulic acids and increased susceptibility to Bipolaris sorokiniana. Upon infection, transgenic Arabidopsis and Brachypodium plants also showed increased expression of several defense-related genes compared with wild type. These results demonstrate a role, in both monocot and dicot plants, of polysaccharide feruloylation in plant CWI, which contributes to plant resistance to necrotrophic pathogens. PMID:27242834

  1. Sorption of volatile phenols by yeast cell walls

    OpenAIRE

    Nerea Jiménez-Moreno; Carmen Ancín-Azpilicueta

    2009-01-01

    Nerea Jiménez-Moreno, Carmen Ancín-AzpilicuetaDepartment of Applied Chemistry, Universidad Pública de Navarra, Pamplona, SpainAbstract: Yeast walls can retain different wine compounds and so its use is interesting in order to eliminate harmful substances from the must which affect alcoholic fermentation (medium chain fatty acids) or which affect wine quality in a negative way (ethyl phenols, ochratoxin A). The aim of this study was to examine the capacity of c...

  2. Enhancement of beta-sitosterol transformation in Mycobacterium vaccae with increased cell wall permeability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korycka-Machała, M; Rumijowska-Galewicz, A; Lisowska, K; Ziolkowskit, A; Sedlacze, L

    2001-01-01

    Mycobacterium vaccae exposed to compounds which are known to disorganise the cell wall composition and architecture (protamine, glycine) showed increased specific activity in beta-sitosterol biotransformation to androstene derivatives, intennediates in the production of most medical steroids. GC/MS analysis of free lipid fatty acids revealed higher content of unsaturated compounds, mainly C16:1 and C18:1 in protamine- and glycine-treated cells than that in control cells, which seems to change the permeability features of the cell wall barrier, facilitating hydrophobic beta-sitosterol diffusion.

  3. Bacterial Wall Components such as Lipothecoid Acid, Peptidoglycan, Liposaccharide and Lipid A Stimulate Cell Proliferation in Intestinal Epithelial Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Olaya, Jaime H.; Neopikhanov, Vadim; Söderman, Charlotte; Uribe, Andrés

    2011-01-01

    Earlier studies indicate that the microflora contains mitogens to intestinal epithelial cells. Our aim is to examine whether cell wall components of both Gram-negative and positive bacteria influence cell proliferation in small intestinal and colonic epithelial cells. A human colonic epithelial cell line from adenocarcinoma (IEC-6) and a nontransformed small intestinal cell line from germ-free rats (LS-123) were incubated with (a) lipothecoid acid from Streptococcus faecalis at 1.56–50 ...

  4. Inorganic polyphosphate occurs in the cell wall of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and accumulates during cytokinesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Freimoser Florian M

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Inorganic polyphosphate (poly P, linear chains of phosphate residues linked by energy rich phosphoanhydride bonds, is found in every cell and organelle and is abundant in algae. Depending on its localization and concentration, poly P is involved in various biological functions. It serves, for example, as a phosphate store and buffer against alkali, is involved in energy metabolism and regulates the activity of enzymes. Bacteria defective in poly P synthesis are impaired in biofilm development, motility and pathogenicity. PolyP has also been found in fungal cell walls and bacterial envelopes, but has so far not been measured directly or stained specifically in the cell wall of any plant or alga. Results Here, we demonstrate the presence of poly P in the cell wall of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii by staining with specific poly P binding proteins. The specificity of the poly P signal was verified by various competition experiments, by staining with different poly P binding proteins and by correlation with biochemical quantification. Microscopical investigation at different time-points during growth revealed fluctuations of the poly P signal synchronous with the cell cycle: The poly P staining peaked during late cytokinesis and was independent of the high intracellular poly P content, which fluctuated only slightly during the cell cycle. Conclusion The presented staining method provides a specific and sensitive tool for the study of poly P in the extracellular matrices of algae and could be used to describe the dynamic behaviour of cell wall poly P during the cell cycle. We assume that cell wall poly P and intracellular poly P are regulated by distinct mechanisms and it is suggested that cell wall bound poly P might have important protective functions against toxic compounds or pathogens during cytokinesis, when cells are more vulnerable.

  5. AtPGL3 is an Arabidopsis BURP domain protein that is localized to the cell wall and promotes cell enlargement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jiyoung; Cui, Yong; Kang, Byung-Ho

    2015-01-01

    The BURP domain is a plant-specific domain that has been identified in secretory proteins, and some of these are involved in cell wall modification. The tomato polygalacturonase I complex involved in pectin degradation in ripening fruits has a non-catalytic subunit that has a BURP domain. This protein is called polygalacturonase 1 beta (PG1β) and the Arabidopsis genome encodes three proteins that exhibit strong amino acid similarities with PG1β? We generated Arabidopsis lines in which expression levels of AtPGLs are altered in order to investigate the biological roles of the Arabidopsis PG1β-like proteins (AtPGLs). Among the three AtPGLs (AtPGL1-3), AtPGL3 exhibited the highest transcriptional activity throughout all developmental stages. AtPGL triple mutant plants have smaller rosette leaves than those of wild type plants because the leaf cells are smaller in the mutant plants. Interestingly, when we overexpressed AtPGL3 using a 35S promoter, leaf cells in transgenic plants grew larger than those of the wild type. A C-terminal GFP fusion protein of AtPGL3 complemented phenotypes of the triple mutant plants and it localized to the cell wall. A truncated AtPGL3-GFP fusion protein lacking the BURP domain failed to rescue the mutant phenotypes even though the GFP protein was targeted to the cell wall, indicating that the BURP domain is required for the protein's effect on cell expansion. Quantitative RT-PCR and immunoblot analyses indicated that the α-expansin 6 gene is up-regulated in the overexpressor plants. Taken together, these results indicate that AtPGL3 is an apoplastic BURP domain protein playing a role in cell expansion. PMID:26106400

  6. Endo-b-1,4-glucanases impact plant cell wall development by influencing cellulose crystallization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Magdalena Glass; Sarah Barkwill; Faride Unda; Shawn D. Mansfield

    2015-01-01

    Cell walls are vital to the normal growth and development of plants as they protect the protoplast and provide rigidity to the stem. Here, two poplar and Arabidopsis orthologous endoglucanases, which have been proposed to play a role in secondary cell wall development, were examined. The class B endoglucanases, PtGH9B5 and AtGH9B5, are secreted enzymes that have a predicted glycosylphosphatidylinositol anchor, while the class C endo-glucanases, PtGH9C2 and AtGH9C2, are also predicted to be secreted but instead contain a carbohydrate-binding module. The poplar endoglucanases were expressed in Arabidopsis using both a 35S promoter and the Arabidopsis secondary cell wall-specific CesA8 promoter. Additionally, Arabidopsis t-DNA insertion lines and an RNAi construct was created to downregulate AtGH9C2 in Arabidopsis. All of the plant lines were examined for changes in cell morphology and pattern-ing, growth and development, cell wall crystallinity, microfibril angle, and proportion of cell wall carbohydrates. Misregula-tion of PtGH9B5/AtGH9B5 resulted in changes in xylose content, while misregulation of PtGH9C2/AtGH9C2 resulted in changes in crystallinity, which was inversely correlated with changes in plant height and rosette diameter. Together, these results suggest that these endoglucanases affect secondary cell wall development by contributing to the cell wall crystallization process.

  7. The best time of cytotoxicity for extracted cell wall from Lactobacillus casei and paracasei in K562 cell line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riki M

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of extracted cell walls from Lactobacillus casei and Lactobacillus paracasei as probiotic bacteria (isolated from common carp intestine on K562 and the role of cell concentration on the results of MTT [3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl2,5- Diphenyl tetrazolium Bromide] test.Methods: For this purpose, bacteria were cultured in specific medium (MRS broth at anaerobic condition for 24-48 hour. After incubation period culture medium was centri-fuged, then the cells were washed twice with PBS buffer to remove additional medium. Finally, collected bacterial cell disrupted by Sonication and cell walls were separated from other components by centrifugation. After that, different concentrations of cell walls (500, 1000, 2000 and 4000 µg/ml were prepared in RPMI medium for each bacteria, separately. Then anticancer properties of the cell walls were determined in vitro at 12, 24, 48 and 72 h, also the effect of K562 concentration was assayed with MTT technique.Results: The results showed extracted cell wall from both probiotic statistically (P=0.098 have anti turmeric properties in K562 and their properties will arise in relation with concentration. As well as, we found that the number of cell had not any affect on the result of MTT assay.Conclusion: We conclude that the cytotoxicity property of extracted cell wall is related in the type of bacteria, but this anticancer property would warrant further study on the clinical application of extracted cell wall.

  8. Interactions of the cell-wall glycopolymers of lactic acid bacteria with their bacteriophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie-Pierre eChapot-Chartier

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Lactic acid bacteria (LAB are Gram positive bacteria widely used in the production of fermented food in particular cheese and yoghurts. Bacteriophage infections during fermentation processes have been for many years a major industrial concern and have stimulated numerous research efforts. Better understanding of the molecular mechanisms of bacteriophage interactions with their host bacteria is required for the development of efficient strategies to fight against infections. The bacterial cell wall plays key roles in these interactions. First, bacteriophages must adsorb at the bacterial surface through specific interactions with receptors that are cell wall components. At next step, phages must overcome the barrier constituted by cell wall peptidoglycan to inject DNA inside bacterial cell. Also at the end of the infection cycle, phages synthesize endolysins able to hydrolyze peptidoglycan and lyse bacterial cells to release phage progeny. In the last decade, concomitant development of genomics and structural analysis of cell wall components allowed considerable advances in the knowledge of their structure and function in several model LAB. Here, we describe the present knowledge on the structure of the cell wall glycopolymers of the best characterized LAB emphasizing their structural variations and we present the available data regarding their role in bacteria-phage specific interactions at the different steps of the infection cycle.

  9. Characterization of Cell Wall Proteins in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Clinical Isolates Elucidates Hsp150p in Virulence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pang-Hung Hsu

    Full Text Available The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has recently been described as an emerging opportunistic fungal pathogen. Fungal cell wall mannoproteins have been demonstrated to be involved in adhesion to inert surfaces and might be engaged in virulence. In this study, we observed four clinical isolates of S. cerevisiae with relatively hydrophobic cell surfaces. Yeast cell wall subproteome was evaluated quantitatively by liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry. We identified totally 25 cell wall proteins (CWPs from log-phase cells, within which 15 CWPs were quantified. The abundance of Scw10p, Pst1p, and Hsp150p/Pir2p were at least 2 folds higher in the clinical isolates than in S288c lab strain. Hsp150p is one of the members in Pir family conserved in pathogenic fungi Candida glabrata and Candida albicans. Overexpression of Hsp150p in lab strain increased cell wall integrity and potentially enhanced the virulence of yeast. Altogether, these results demonstrated that quantitative cell wall subproteome was analyzed in clinical isolates of S. cerevisiae, and several CWPs, especially Hsp150p, were found to be expressed at higher levels which presumably contribute to strain virulence and fungal pathogenicity.

  10. Differential actions of chlorhexidine on the cell wall of Bacillus subtilis and Escherichia coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hon-Yeung Cheung

    Full Text Available Chlorhexidine is a chlorinated phenolic disinfectant used commonly in mouthwash for its action against bacteria. However, a comparative study of the action of chlorhexidine on the cell morphology of gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria is lacking. In this study, the actions of chlorhexidine on the cell morphology were identified with the aids of electron microscopy. After exposure to chlorhexidine, numerous spots of indentation on the cell wall were found in both Bacillus subtilis and Escherichia coli. The number of indentation spots increased with time of incubation and increasing chlorhexidine concentration. Interestingly, the dented spots found in B. subtilis appeared mainly at the hemispherical caps of the cells, while in E. coli the dented spots were found all over the cells. After being exposed to chlorhexidine for a prolonged period, leakage of cellular contents and subsequent ghost cells were observed, especially from B subtilis. By using 2-D gel/MS-MS analysis, five proteins related to purine nucleoside interconversion and metabolism were preferentially induced in the cell wall of E. coli, while three proteins related to stress response and four others in amino acid biosynthesis were up-regulated in the cell wall materials of B. subtilis. The localized morphological damages together with the biochemical and protein analysis of the chlorhexidine-treated cells suggest that chlorhexidine may act on the differentially distributed lipids in the cell membranes/wall of B. subtilis and E. coli.

  11. Targeting and Regulation of Cell Wall Synthesis During Tip Growth in Plants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fangwei Gu; Erik Nielsen

    2013-01-01

    Root hairs and pollen tubes are formed through tip growth, a process requiring synthesis of new cell wall material and the precise targeting and integration of these components to a selected apical plasma membrane domain in the growing tips of these cells. Presence of a tip-focused calcium gradient, control of actin cytoskeleton dynamics, and formation and targeting of secretory vesicles are essential to tip growth. Similar to cells undergoing diffuse growth, cellulose, hemi-celluloses, and pectins are also deposited in the growing apices of tip-growing cells. However, differences in the manner in which these cell wall components are targeted and inserted in the expanding portion of tip-growing cells is reflected by the identification of elements of the plant cell wall synthesis machinery which have been shown to play unique roles in tip-growing cells. In this review, we summarize our current understanding of the tip growth process, with a particular focus on the subcellular targeting of newly synthesized cell wall components, and their roles in this form of plant cell expansion.

  12. 2009 Plant Cell Walls Gordon Research Conference-August 2-7,2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Debra Mohnen

    2009-08-07

    Plant cell walls are a complex cellular compartment essential for plant growth, development and response to biotic and abiotic stress and a major biological resource for meeting our future bioenergy and natural product needs. The goal of the 2009 Plant Cell Walls Gordon Research Conference is to summarize and critically evaluate the current level of understanding of the structure, synthesis and function of the whole plant extracellular matrix, including the polysaccharides, proteins, lignin and waxes that comprise the wall, and the enzymes and regulatory proteins that drive wall synthesis and modification. Innovative techniques to study how both primary and secondary wall polymers are formed and modified throughout plant growth will be emphasized, including rapid advances taking place in the use of anti-wall antibodies and carbohydrate binding proteins, comparative and evolutionary wall genomics, and the use of mutants and natural variants to understand and identify wall structure-function relationships. Discussions of essential research advances needed to push the field forward toward a systems biology approach will be highlighted. The meeting will include a commemorative lecture in honor of the career and accomplishments of the late Emeritus Professor Bruce A. Stone, a pioneer in wall research who contributed over 40 years of outstanding studies on plant cell wall structure, function, synthesis and remodeling including emphasis on plant cell wall beta-glucans and arabinogalactans. The dwindling supply of fossil fuels will not suffice to meet our future energy and industrial product needs. Plant biomass is the renewable resource that will fill a large part of the void left by vanishing fossil fuels. It is therefore critical that basic research scientists interact closely with industrial researchers to critically evaluate the current state of knowledge regarding how plant biomass, which is largely plant cell walls, is synthesized and utilized by the plant. A final

  13. Extracellular Vesicle-Associated Transitory Cell Wall Components and Their Impact on the Interaction of Fungi with Host Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nimrichter, Leonardo; de Souza, Marcio M; Del Poeta, Maurizio; Nosanchuk, Joshua D; Joffe, Luna; Tavares, Patricia de M; Rodrigues, Marcio L

    2016-01-01

    Classic cell wall components of fungi comprise the polysaccharides glucans and chitin, in association with glycoproteins and pigments. During the last decade, however, system biology approaches clearly demonstrated that the composition of fungal cell walls include atypical molecules historically associated with intracellular or membrane locations. Elucidation of mechanisms by which many fungal molecules are exported to the extracellular space suggested that these atypical components are transitorily located to the cell wall. The presence of extracellular vesicles (EVs) at the fungal cell wall and in culture supernatants of distinct pathogenic species suggested a highly functional mechanism of molecular export in these organisms. Thus, the passage of EVs through fungal cell walls suggests remarkable molecular diversity and, consequently, a potentially variable influence on the host antifungal response. On the basis of information derived from the proteomic characterization of fungal EVs from the yeasts Cryptoccocus neoformans and Candida albicans and the dimorphic fungi Histoplasma capsulatum and Paracoccidioides brasiliensis, our manuscript is focused on the clear view that the fungal cell wall is much more complex than previously thought. PMID:27458437

  14. Extracellular Vesicle-Associated Transitory Cell Wall Components and Their Impact on the Interaction of Fungi with Host Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nimrichter, Leonardo; de Souza, Marcio M.; Del Poeta, Maurizio; Nosanchuk, Joshua D.; Joffe, Luna; Tavares, Patricia de M.; Rodrigues, Marcio L.

    2016-01-01

    Classic cell wall components of fungi comprise the polysaccharides glucans and chitin, in association with glycoproteins and pigments. During the last decade, however, system biology approaches clearly demonstrated that the composition of fungal cell walls include atypical molecules historically associated with intracellular or membrane locations. Elucidation of mechanisms by which many fungal molecules are exported to the extracellular space suggested that these atypical components are transitorily located to the cell wall. The presence of extracellular vesicles (EVs) at the fungal cell wall and in culture supernatants of distinct pathogenic species suggested a highly functional mechanism of molecular export in these organisms. Thus, the passage of EVs through fungal cell walls suggests remarkable molecular diversity and, consequently, a potentially variable influence on the host antifungal response. On the basis of information derived from the proteomic characterization of fungal EVs from the yeasts Cryptoccocus neoformans and Candida albicans and the dimorphic fungi Histoplasma capsulatum and Paracoccidioides brasiliensis, our manuscript is focused on the clear view that the fungal cell wall is much more complex than previously thought. PMID:27458437

  15. Analytical and Experimental Studies of the Degradation in Hydrogenated Amorphous Silicon Solar Cells and Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeung, Ping Fai

    1995-01-01

    An improved understanding of a-Si:H pin solar cells stability was obtained by studying light induced degradation in a-Si:H films and in devices. The current -voltage characteristics and the quantum efficiencies of a-Si:H pin solar cells were measured as a function of intrinsic layer thickness, bias light intensity and degradation condition. Photoconductivity measurements on device quality intrinsic a-Si:H thin film materials showed that the majority carrier (electron) mutau product degraded from 3times 10^{-7}rm cm ^2/V to 2times 10^{ -7}rm cm^2/V after 6 minutes of 50-Suns light illumination. Using a dual beam technique with steady white light and modulated monochromatic light, a degradation profile was detected in the degraded materials. These results suggest that inhomogeneous degradation may be important to understanding the stability of a-Si:H pin solar cells. An analytical model was developed for degradation in a-Si:H pin solar cells based on inhomogeneous degradation, which was used to explain the 'blue-dip' effect observed in the quantum efficiencies of degraded cells. A new method was developed to investigate the minority carrier (hole) diffusion length in device quality a-Si:H films as a function of degradation. This method uses the Schottky barrier structure to establish a depletion region, which can be controlled by the applied voltage and the bias light intensity. Modulated blue light is used to generate electron hole pairs near the ohmic contacts, and the holes diffuse across the neutral region to be collected. The modulated current is related to the diffusion length of the holes due to this current limiting hole transport. Comparing the results of this new technique to that of the Photocarrier Grating method, the electron drift mobility was found to degrade from rm 2.5cm^2/Vs to rm 0.15cm^2/Vs after 6 minutes of 50-Suns degradation.

  16. On-Site Enzyme Production by Trichoderma asperellum for the Degradation of Duckweed

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bech, Lasse; Herbst, Florian-Alexander; Grell, Morten Nedergaard;

    2015-01-01

    The on-site production of cell wall degrading enzymes is an important strategy for the development of sustainable bio-refinery processes. This study concerns the optimization of production of plant cell wall-degrading enzymes produced by Trichoderma asperellum. A comparative secretome analysis...

  17. Cell wall alterations in the leaves of fusariosis-resistant and susceptible pineapple cultivars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Farias Viégas Aquije, Glória Maria; Zorzal, Poliana Belisário; Buss, David Shaun; Ventura, José Aires; Fernandes, Patricia Machado Bueno; Fernandes, Antonio Alberto Ribeiro

    2010-10-01

    Fusariosis, caused by the fungus Fusarium subglutinans f. sp. ananas (Syn. F. guttiforme), is one of the main phytosanitary threats to pineapple (Ananas comosus var. comosus). Identification of plant cell responses to pathogens is important in understanding the plant-pathogen relationship and establishing strategies to improve and select resistant cultivars. Studies of the structural properties and phenolic content of cell walls in resistant (Vitoria) and susceptible (Perola) pineapple cultivars, related to resistance to the fungus, were performed. The non-chlorophyll base of physiologically mature leaves was inoculated with a conidia suspension. Analyses were performed post-inoculation by light, atomic force, scanning and transmission electron microscopy, and measurement of cell wall-bound phenolic compounds. Non-inoculated leaves were used as controls to define the constitutive tissue characteristics. Analyses indicated that morphological differences, such as cell wall thickness, cicatrization process and lignification, were related to resistance to the pathogen. Atomic force microscopy indicated a considerable difference in the mechanical properties of the resistant and susceptible cultivars, with more structural integrity, associated with higher levels of cell wall-bound phenolics, found in the resistant cultivar. p-Coumaric and ferulic acids were shown to be the major phenolics bound to the cell walls and were found in higher amounts in the resistant cultivar. Leaves of the resistant cultivar had reduced fungal penetration and a faster and more effective cicatrization response compared to the susceptible cultivar. PMID:20607243

  18. Cell wall and lipid composition of Isosphaera pallida, a budding eubacterium from hot springs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giovannoni, S J; Godchaux, W; Schabtach, E; Castenholz, R W

    1987-06-01

    Isosphaera pallida is an unusual gliding, budding eubacterium recently isolated from North American hot springs. Electron micrographs of ultrathin sections revealed a cell wall atypical of eubacteria: two electrondense layers separated by an electron-transparent layer, with no evident peptidoglycan layer. Growth was not inhibited by penicillin. Cell walls were isolated from sheared cells by velocity sedimentation. The rigid-layer fraction, prepared from cell walls by treatment with boiling 10% sodium dodecyl sulfate, was hydrolyzed and chemically analyzed for muramic acid. This essential component of peptidoglycan was absent. Amino acid analysis demonstrated a proteinaceous wall structure. Pitlike surface structures seen in negatively stained whole cells and thin sections were correlated with periodically spaced perforations of the rigid sacculus. An analysis of the lipid composition of I. pallida revealed typical ester-linked lipids with unbranched fatty acids, in contrast to the isoprenyl ether-linked lipids of archaebacteria, which also have proteinaceous cell walls. Capnoids, unusual sulfonolipids which are present in gliding bacteria of the Cytophaga-Flexibacter group, were absent. PMID:3584067

  19. Cell wall alterations in the leaves of fusariosis-resistant and susceptible pineapple cultivars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Farias Viégas Aquije, Glória Maria; Zorzal, Poliana Belisário; Buss, David Shaun; Ventura, José Aires; Fernandes, Patricia Machado Bueno; Fernandes, Antonio Alberto Ribeiro

    2010-10-01

    Fusariosis, caused by the fungus Fusarium subglutinans f. sp. ananas (Syn. F. guttiforme), is one of the main phytosanitary threats to pineapple (Ananas comosus var. comosus). Identification of plant cell responses to pathogens is important in understanding the plant-pathogen relationship and establishing strategies to improve and select resistant cultivars. Studies of the structural properties and phenolic content of cell walls in resistant (Vitoria) and susceptible (Perola) pineapple cultivars, related to resistance to the fungus, were performed. The non-chlorophyll base of physiologically mature leaves was inoculated with a conidia suspension. Analyses were performed post-inoculation by light, atomic force, scanning and transmission electron microscopy, and measurement of cell wall-bound phenolic compounds. Non-inoculated leaves were used as controls to define the constitutive tissue characteristics. Analyses indicated that morphological differences, such as cell wall thickness, cicatrization process and lignification, were related to resistance to the pathogen. Atomic force microscopy indicated a considerable difference in the mechanical properties of the resistant and susceptible cultivars, with more structural integrity, associated with higher levels of cell wall-bound phenolics, found in the resistant cultivar. p-Coumaric and ferulic acids were shown to be the major phenolics bound to the cell walls and were found in higher amounts in the resistant cultivar. Leaves of the resistant cultivar had reduced fungal penetration and a faster and more effective cicatrization response compared to the susceptible cultivar.

  20. Photoinhibition of stem elongation by blue and red light: effects on hydraulic and cell wall properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kigel, J.; Cosgrove, D. J.

    1991-01-01

    The underlying mechanism of photoinhibition of stem elongation by blue (BL) and red light (RL) was studied in etiolated seedlings of pea (Pisum sativum L. cv Alaska). Brief BL irradiations resulted in fast transient inhibition of elongation, while a delayed (lag approximately 60 minutes) but prolonged inhibition was observed after brief RL. Possible changes in the hydraulic and wall properties of the growing cells during photoinhibition were examined. Cell sap osmotic pressure was unaffected by BL and RL, but both irradiations increased turgor pressure by approximately 0.05 megapascal (pressure-probe technique). Cell wall yielding was analyzed by in vivo stress relaxation (pressure-block technique). BL and RL reduced the initial rate of relaxation by 38 and 54%, while the final amount of relaxation was decreased by 48 and 10%, respectively. These results indicate that RL inhibits elongation mainly by lowering the wall yield coefficient, while most of the inhibitory effect of BL was due to an increase of the yield threshold. Mechanical extensibility of cell walls (Instron technique) was decreased by BL and RL, mainly due to a reduction in the plastic component of extensibility. Thus, photoinhibitions of elongation by both BL and RL are achieved through changes in cell wall properties, and are not due to effects on the hydraulic properties of the cell.