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  1. Regulatory T Cells in Chronic Hepatitis B Virus Infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.N. Stoop (Jeroen Nicolaas)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractWorldwide 400 million people suffer from chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection and approximately 1 million people die annually from HBV-related disease. To clear HBV, an effective immune response, in which several cell types and cytokines play a role, is important. It is known that p

  2. Giant cell arteritis associated with chronic active Epstein-Barr virus infection

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    A. Giardina

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Giant cell arteritis is an inflammatory vasculopathy that preferentially affects medium-sized and large arteries. A viral cause has been suspected but not confirmed in polymyalgia rheumatica and giant-cell arteritis. We report the case of a 81-year-old female who suffered from chronic active Epstein-Barr virus infection and developed giant cell temporal arteritis.

  3. Immune therapy including dendritic cell based therapy in chronic hepatitis B virus infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sk Md Fazle Akbar; Norio Horiike; Morikazu Onji

    2006-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is a global public health problem. Of the approximately 2 billion people who have been infected worldwide, more than 400 million are chronic carriers of HBV. Considerable numbers of chronic HBV carriers suffer from progressive liver diseases. In addition, all HBV carriers are permanent source of this virus. There is no curative therapy for chronic HBV carriers. Antiviral drugs are recommended for about 10% patients, however, these drugs are costly, have limited efficacy, and possess considerable side effects.Recent studies have shown that immune responses of the host to the HBV are critically involved at every stage of chronic HBV infection: (1) These influence acquisition of chronic HBV carrier state, (2) They are important in the context of liver damages, (3) Recovery from chronic HBV-related liver diseases is dependent on nature and extent of HBV-specific immune responses.However, induction of adequate levels of HBV-specific immune responses in chronic HBV carriers is difficult.During the last one decade, hepatitis B vaccine has been administered to chronic HBV carriers as a therapeutic approach (vaccine therapy). The present regimen of vaccine therapy is safe and cheap, but not so effective.A dendritic cell-based therapeutic vaccine has recently been developed for treating chronic HBV infection. In this review, we will discuss about the concept, scientific logics, strategies and techniques of development of HBV-specific immune therapies including vaccine therapy and dendritic cell-based vaccine therapy for treating chronic HBV infection.

  4. T cell immunopathogenesis and immunotherapeutic strategies for chronic hepatitis B virus infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yukihiro Shimizu

    2012-01-01

    Hepatitis B is caused by the host immune response and T cells play a major role in the immunopathogenesis.More importantly,T cells not only destroy hepatocytes infected by hepatitis B virus (HBV),but also control HBV replication or eradicate HBV in a noncytolytic manner.Therefore,analysis of T cell immune response during acute and chronic HBV infection is important to develop a strategy for successful viral control,which could lead to immunotherapy for terminating persistent HBV infection.There have been many attempts at immunotherapy for chronic HBV infection,and some have shown promising results.High viral load has been shown to suppress antiviral immune responses and immunoinhibitory signals have been recently elucidated,therefore,viral suppression by nucleos(t)ide analogs,stimulation of antiviral immune response,and suppression of the immunoinhibitory signals must be combined to achieve desirable antiviral effects.

  5. Inverse association between hepatic stellate cell apoptosis and fibrosis in chronic hepatitis C virus infection.

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    Gonzalez, S A; Fiel, M I; Sauk, J; Canchis, P W; Liu, R-C; Chiriboga, L; Yee, H T; Jacobson, I M; Talal, A H

    2009-02-01

    Perisinusoidal hepatic stellate cells (HSC) are the principal fibrogenic cells in the liver. In animal models, HSC apoptosis is the predominant clearance mechanism of activated HSC, although data evaluating whether the same processes occur in humans are limited. We conducted a cross-sectional study to evaluate the association between HSC apoptosis and fibrosis stage in subjects with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection (n = 44) and HCV-negative controls with normal liver histology (n = 9). We used immunohistochemical techniques to identify activated (alpha-smooth muscle actin+), proliferative (Ki-67+) and apoptotic (terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase [TdT]-mediated dUTP nick end-labelling+) HSC in liver biopsy specimens from all subjects. The same pathologist enumerated positive cells per high-power field (HPF, x 200) in 20 periportal/lobular areas. HSC apoptosis was decreased in HCV-positive subjects compared with controls (median 0.4, range 0.0-3.1 vs 1.1, 0.2-3.5 cells/HPF, P = 0.02). Among HCV-positive subjects, HSC apoptosis was decreased in those with moderate to advanced fibrosis (P = 0.04) compared with those with mild fibrosis. By multivariate analysis, HSC apoptosis decreased by an average of 0.14 cells/HPF (95% confidence interval 0.01-0.28 cells/HPF) per increase in fibrosis stage (P = 0.04). While the number of activated and proliferative HSC was significantly increased in HCV-infected subjects compared with that in uninfected controls, the numbers of these cells did not differ between HCV-infected subjects with mild vs moderate/advanced fibrosis. In conclusion, the number of apoptotic HSC was significantly decreased in HCV-infected subjects with advanced fibrosis. In chronic HCV infection, inhibition of HSC apoptosis may be one mechanism by which fibrosis progresses.

  6. Distribution specificity of polarized populations of T helper cells in patients with chronic hepatitis B virus infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Rong-long; FENG Xiao-rong; LU Qiao-sheng; LUO Kang-xian; FU Ning

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the roles of the polarized populations of T helper cells isolated from the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of individuals with chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. Methods: PBMCs from patients with chronic HBV infection were separated routinely, stimulated by PMA, ionomycin and monensin, and the production of IL-4, IFN-γ and TGF-β by CD4+ T cells was observed by flow cytometry(FACS). Results: The percentages of the T cells producing IFN-γ, IL-4 or TGF-β ranged from 2.3% to 18.6%, 1.1% to 8.7% and 0.7% to 7.1% respectively among CD4+ cells from non-infected individuals. The majority of CD4+ T cells in PBMCs from individuals with chronic HBV infection were Th0 cells. The proportion of Th1 cells in patients with active chronic hepatitis B was higher than that in patients at inactive stage of the disease (P<0.05), indicating a significant elevation of Thl cells with the hepatic inflammation activity. The percentage of Th2 cells in individuals with HBV infection was higher than that in controls (P<0.05),but showed no difference between different patients (P>0.05). The percentage of Th3 cells was higher in asymptomatic HBV carriers than that in patients with chronic hepatitis B and in healthy controls (P<0.05). Conclusions: Th1-type cytokines are related with hepatic inflammation activity of chronic hepatitis B, and Th2 cells may be associated with the persistence of HBV infection. Th3 cells cooperating with Th2 cells are likely to function as negative immunoregulator, and may be responsible for the immune tolerance state of chronic HBV infection.

  7. Cytomegalovirus-Driven Adaptive-Like Natural Killer Cell Expansions Are Unaffected by Concurrent Chronic Hepatitis Virus Infections

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    David F. G. Malone

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Adaptive-like expansions of natural killer (NK cell subsets are known to occur in response to human cytomegalovirus (CMV infection. These expansions are typically made up of NKG2C+ NK cells with particular killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR expression patterns. Such NK cell expansion patterns are also seen in patients with viral hepatitis infection. Yet, it is not known if the viral hepatitis infection promotes the appearance of such expansions or if effects are solely attributed to underlying CMV infection. In sizeable cohorts of CMV seropositive hepatitis B virus (HBV, hepatitis C virus (HCV, and hepatitis delta virus (HDV infected patients, we analyzed NK cells for expression of NKG2A, NKG2C, CD57, and inhibitory KIRs to assess the appearance of NK cell expansions characteristic of what has been seen in CMV seropositive healthy individuals. Adaptive-like NK cell expansions observed in viral hepatitis patients were strongly associated with CMV seropositivity. The number of subjects with these expansions did not differ between CMV seropositive viral hepatitis patients and corresponding healthy controls. Hence, we conclude that adaptive-like NK cell expansions observed in HBV, HCV, and/or HDV infected individuals are not caused by the chronic hepatitis infections per se, but rather are a consequence of underlying CMV infection.

  8. Characterization of the specific CD4+ T cell response against the F protein during chronic hepatitis C virus infection.

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    De-Yong Gao

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The hepatitis C virus (HCV Alternate Reading Frame Protein (ARFP or F protein presents a double-frame shift product of the HCV core gene. We and others have previously reported that the specific antibodies against the F protein could be raised in the sera of HCV chronically infected patients. However, the specific CD4(+ T cell responses against the F protein during HCV infection and the pathological implications remained unclear. In the current study, we screened the MHC class II-presenting epitopes of the F protein through HLA-transgenic mouse models and eventually validated the specific CD4(+ T cell responses in HCV chronically infected patients. METHODOLOGY: DNA vaccination in HLA-DR1 and-DP4 transgenic mouse models, proliferation assay to test the F protein specific T cell response, genotyping of Chronic HCV patients and testing the F-peptide stimulated T cell response in the peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC by in vitro expansion and interferon (IFN- γ intracellular staining. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: At least three peptides within HCV F protein were identified as HLA-DR or HLA-DP4 presenting epitopes by the proliferation assays in mouse models. Further study with human PBMCs evidenced the specific CD4(+ T cell responses against HCV F protein as well in patients chronically infected with HCV. CONCLUSION: The current study provided the evidence for the first time that HCV F protein could elicit specific CD4(+ T cell response, which may provide an insight into the immunopathogenesis during HCV chronic infection.

  9. Chronic hepatitis C and persistent occult hepatitis C virus infection are characterized by distinct immune cell cytokine expression profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, T N Q; Mercer, S E; Michalak, T I

    2009-08-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) replicates in immune cells in both chronic hepatitis C (CHC) and occult HCV infection, but the extent of virus replication in this compartment in these opposing infection forms varies greatly. It was unknown whether this could be linked to HCV genotype or to differences in host gene expression shaping the immune response, and whether HCV replication in immune cells is sensitive to endogenous antiviral cytokines. In this study, we uncovered that significantly greater HCV load in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), but not in plasma, coincided with HCV genotypes 2 and 3 in CHC, but with genotype 1 in residual occult infection after clinical resolution of hepatitis C. Moreover, PBMC from individuals with occult infection transcribed significantly greater levels of IFN-alpha, IFN-gamma and TNF-alpha, but less interleukin (IL)-10 than those from CHC. In CHC, PBMC with low HCV load expressed significantly more IFN-gamma but less IL-12 than did cells with high virus content. In occult infection, HCV RNA detection in PBMC was associated with much lower IFN-alpha and IL-12 expression. Further, HCV replication in T lymphocytes could be completely eliminated by activation of endogenous IFN-gamma in CHC, but of IFN-alpha in occult infection. In conclusion, CHC and persistent occult HCV infection are characterized by clearly different profiles of antiviral cytokine response in circulating immune cells which are also different from those of healthy individuals. Higher expression of IL-10, combined with lower transcription of IFN-alpha, IFN-gamma and TNF-alpha, is associated with a more robust HCV replication in immune cells.

  10. IL-35 expression in peripheral blood CD4(+) T cells from chronic hepatitis B virus-infected patients directly correlates with virus load.

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    Zhou, Yali; Zhang, Hong; Li, Yumin

    2015-05-01

    Interleukin 35 (IL-35) functions in an anti-inflammatory fashion by inhibiting T-cell proliferation, whereas CD4(+) T cells play an important role in cellular immunity. In a hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection, the viral proteins stimulate the immune system to generate antiviral molecules, which correlate to HBV DNA load. We investigated the impact of HBV DNA load on the expression of IL-35 mRNA in CD4(+) T cells, and the expression of IL-35 cytokine in serum of the patients with chronic HBV infection. Here we report that the frequency of circulating CD4(+) T cells correlates with the HBV DNA load in the serum of chronic hepatitis B (CHB) patients. An increased number of CD4(+) T cells were found in those patients with higher levels of HBV DNA. Regulatory T cells (T regs) also showed this trend, but circulating cytotoxic lymphocytes (CTLs) showed a negative correlation with serum HBV DNA load. In addition, significantly more IL-35 mRNA was found in the CD4(+) T cells of CHB patients, compared to healthy controls. Patients in the high viral load group showed increased levels of IL-35 mRNA, compared with those in the low viral load group. The level of IL-35 cytokine in the serum of CHB patients was significantly higher than in the healthy controls and in those infected with HBV, the patients with a higher viral load had more serum IL-35 cytokines, compared to those with a lower viral load. Our study suggests that increased serum IL-35 could be directly related to increased levels of IL-35 mRNA in CD4(+) T cells and HBV DNA load in CHB patients. The possible role of IL-35 as an immune regulator in chronic HBV infection should be investigated further.

  11. The expression of T-cell receptor Vβ subfamily in hepatitis B virus-related acute-on-chronic liver failure patients and its clinical significance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    施文娟

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the expression and clinical significance of T-cell receptor(TCR)Vβsubfamily in hepatitis B virus(HBV)-related acute-on-chronic liverfailure(HBV-ACLF)patients.Methods Twenty-eight patients with HBV-ACLF(HBV-ACLF group)and 32patients with chronic hepatitis B flare(CHB-F group),who were treated in The Second People’s Hospital from

  12. Chronic herpes simplex virus encephalitis in childhood.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leen, W.G.; Weemaes, C.M.R.; Verbeek, M.M.; Willemsen, M.A.A.P.; Rotteveel, J.J.

    2006-01-01

    Although herpes simplex virus is a major cause of acute encephalitis in childhood, chronic herpes simplex virus encephalitis has only rarely been reported. This report presents a case of chronic herpes simplex virus encephalitis in a 6-year-old female. Diagnosis was based on the detection of herpes

  13. Effect of bovine lactoferrin on functions of activated feline peripheral blood mononuclear cells during chronic feline immunodeficiency virus infection.

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    Kobayashi, Saori; Sato, Reeko; Aoki, Takako; Omoe, Katsuhiko; Inanami, Osamu; Hankanga, Careen; Yamada, Yuichi; Tomizawa, Nobuyuki; Yasuda, Jun; Sasaki, Juso

    2008-05-01

    Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) infection is characterized by chronic overactivation of immune and inflammatory system, resulting in anergic state and dysfunction of immune cells. Lactoferrin (LF), a glycoprotein present in exocrine secretions and neutrophils, plays an important role in host defense system. Our previous study showed that oral administration of bovine LF (bLF) suppressed oral inflammation, improved the clinical symptoms and decreased serum gamma-globulin as a marker of inflammation in FIV-infected cats with intractable stomatitis. The anti-inflammatory effect was partly involved in regulation of neutrophil function by bLF. In this study, to clarify the relationship between anti-inflammatory effects of bLF and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), we examined the effect of bLF on proliferation, cell cycle progression and cytokine expression in mitogen-activated PBMC. MTT [3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)- 2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide] assay showed that bLF inhibited the concanavalin A (ConA)-induced cell proliferation in FIV-infected cats with the asymptomatic carrier and AIDS-related complex (ARC) phase. Bovine LF restored ConA-induced cell cycle progression and resulted in suppression of the induced apoptosis in feline PBMC. Real-time RT-PCR showed that bLF suppressed ConA-induced expression of interferon-gamma and interleukin-2 in cells of the ARC group regardless of the time of its addition to the medium. These results suggest the hypothesis that therapy with bLF may have the potential to improve and protect functions of overactivated lymphocytes by modulating the cell proliferation, cell cycle and cytokines expression in cats in terminal stage of FIV infection.

  14. Intrahepatic B-cell follicles of chronically hepatitis C virus-infected individuals lack signs of an ectopic germinal center reaction.

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    Tucci, Felicia A; Broering, Ruth; Lutterbeck, Melanie; Schlaak, Joerg F; Küppers, Ralf

    2014-06-01

    Chronic infection with hepatitis C virus (HCV) often affects the B-cell compartment, leading to the occurrence of autoimmunity and B-cell lymphoproliferation, in particular mixed cryoglobulinemia and B-cell lymphomas. HCV presumably causes these lymphoproliferations by chronic antigenic stimulation and/or direct mutagenic effects on B cells. It has been speculated that the interaction of HCV with B cells and the expansion of antigen-triggered B cells happens in germinal center-like structures in the livers of HCV carriers. We studied rearranged immunoglobulin V(H) genes from seven B-cell follicles microdissected from the livers of three unselected chronic HCV patients. The follicles consisted of polyclonal naive and memory B-cell populations with only rare indication of minor clonal expansions and no evidence for active somatic hypermutation. Frequent detection of V(H) rearrangements using the VH1-69 gene segment nevertheless indicated that at least a fraction of the B cells is HCV-specific and/or autoreactive. Thus, the typical intrahepatic B-cell follicles in chronic HCV carriers do not function as ectopic germinal centers for clonal expansion and affinity maturation of B cells. Hence, autoreactive and HCV-specific B-cell clones might either develop in secondary lymphoid organs or in intrahepatic follicles only under particular, yet undefined, circumstances.

  15. Inhibition of Hepatitis C Virus-Like Particle Binding to Target Cells by Antiviral Antibodies in Acute and Chronic Hepatitis C

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    Steinmann, Daniel; Barth, Heidi; Gissler, Bettina; Schürmann, Peter; Adah, Mohammed I.; Gerlach, J. Tilman; Pape, Gerd R.; Depla, Erik; Jacobs, Dirk; Maertens, Geert; Patel, Arvind H.; Inchauspé, Geneviève; Liang, T. Jake; Blum, Hubert E.; Baumert, Thomas F.

    2004-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a leading cause of chronic viral hepatitis worldwide. The study of antibody-mediated virus neutralization has been hampered by the lack of an efficient and high-throughput cell culture system for the study of virus neutralization. The HCV structural proteins have been shown to assemble into noninfectious HCV-like particles (HCV-LPs). Similar to serum-derived virions, HCV-LPs bind and enter human hepatocytes and hepatoma cell lines. In this study, we developed an HCV-LP-based model system for a systematic functional analysis of antiviral antibodies from patients with acute or chronic hepatitis C. We demonstrate that cellular HCV-LP binding was specifically inhibited by antiviral antibodies from patients with acute or chronic hepatitis C in a dose-dependent manner. Using a library of homologous overlapping envelope peptides covering the entire HCV envelope, we identified an epitope in the N-terminal E2 region (SQKIQLVNTNGSWHI; amino acid positions 408 to 422) as one target of human antiviral antibodies inhibiting cellular particle binding. Using a large panel of serum samples from patients with acute and chronic hepatitis C, we demonstrated that the presence of antibodies with inhibition of binding activity was not associated with viral clearance. In conclusion, antibody-mediated inhibition of cellular HCV-LP binding represents a convenient system for the functional characterization of human anti-HCV antibodies, allowing the mapping of envelope neutralization epitopes targeted by naturally occurring antiviral antibodies. PMID:15308699

  16. Cytokines and Epstein Barr virus (EBV) genes expression in blood chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL) cells and their immortalised CLL cell lines.

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    Laytragoon-Lewin, Nongnit; Chen, Fu; Castro, Juan; Avila-Carino, Javier; Lewin, Freddi

    2003-01-01

    We have encountered two unique chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL) patients, PG and NN. Some blood CLL cells of these patients have been infected and carry Epstein Barr virus (EBV) in vivo. In spite of their early-activated G0/G1 stage of post germinal center (GC) memory cells, ex vivo EBV-carrying blood CLL cells of PG clone expressed LMPs and used specific QUK splice for their EBNA1 expression, similar to the EBV-carrying cells of non-B origin. Interestingly, EBV-carrying CLL cells of NN clone expressed LMP2a and used UK-splice for their EBNA1 expression, similar to the in vivo EBV-carrying high density normal B cells in the blood of healthy individuals. The CLL-derived lines but not normal lymphoblastoid cell line (LCL) used QUK- and YUK-splice for their EBNA1 expression. As expected, LCL and their permanent CLL-derived lines used Cp promoter and up-regulated their EBNA2 expression. Blood CLL cells and the CLL-derived cell lines of these patients spontaneously produced cytokines as shown by microarray assay. The types and quantities of cytokines might relate to their CLL origin and viral strain in the given CLL cells. Neither blood CLL nor their CLL-derived cell lines express any detectable apoptosis-inducer ligands, CD95L or Apo 3L. As a consequence of cell cycle progression, CLL-derived cell lines up-regulated their co-stimulator molecules CD80 and apoptosis-related receptor CD95. Since only the rare EBV-carrying CLL cells grew in vitro, the combination of viral genome and cytokines seems to be critical for the outgrowth of EBV-carrying CLL cells over their EBV-negative counterpart in vitro but not in vivo.

  17. Altered distribution of natural killer cell subsets identified by CD56, CD27 and CD70 in primary and chronic human immunodeficiency virus-1 infection

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    Titanji, Kehmia; Sammicheli, Stefano; De Milito, Angelo; Mantegani, Paola; Fortis, Claudio; Berg, Louise; Kärre, Klas; Travi, Giovanna; Tassandin, Chiara; Lopalco, Lucia; Rethi, Bence; Tambussi, Giuseppe; Chiodi, Francesca

    2008-01-01

    Human natural killer (NK) (CD3− CD56+) cells can be divided into two functionally distinct subsets, CD3− CD56dim and CD3− CD56bright. We analysed the distribution of NK cell subsets in primary and chronic human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) infection, to determine if HIV infection stage may influence the subset distribution. In primary infection, contrary to chronic infection, the CD3− CD56dim subset was expanded compared to healthy controls. We also studied the effect of antiretroviral therapy administered early in infection and found that NK cell subset distribution was partially restored after 6 months of antiretroviral therapy in primary infection, but not normalized. Recently, NK cells have been divided into CD27− and CD27+ subsets with different migratory and functional capacity and CD27-mediated NK cell activation has been described in mice. We therefore investigated whether CD27 and/or CD70 (CD27 ligand) expression on NK cells, and thus the distribution of these novel NK subsets, was altered in HIV-1-infected patients. We found up-regulated expression of both CD27 and CD70 on NK cells of patients, resulting in higher proportions of CD27high and CD70high NK cells, and this phenomenon was more pronounced in chronic infection. Experiments conducted in vitro suggest that the high interleukin-7 levels found during HIV-1 infection may participate in up-regulation of CD70 on NK cell subsets. Imbalance of NK cell subsets and up-regulated expression of CD27 and CD70 initiated early in HIV-1 infection may indicate NK cell activation and intrinsic defects initiated by HIV-1 to disarm the innate immune response to the virus. PMID:17627773

  18. Virus Discovery Using Tick Cell Lines

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    Bell-Sakyi, Lesley; Attoui, Houssam

    2016-01-01

    While ticks have been known to harbor and transmit pathogenic arboviruses for over 80 years, the application of high-throughput sequencing technologies has revealed that ticks also appear to harbor a diverse range of endogenous tick-only viruses belonging to many different families. Almost nothing is known about these viruses; indeed, it is unclear in most cases whether the identified viral sequences are derived from actual replication-competent viruses or from endogenous virus elements incorporated into the ticks’ genomes. Tick cell lines play an important role in virus discovery and isolation through the identification of novel viruses chronically infecting such cell lines and by acting as host cells to aid in determining whether or not an entire replication-competent, infective virus is present in a sample. Here, we review recent progress in tick-borne virus discovery and comment on the actual and potential applications for tick cell lines in this emerging research area. PMID:27679414

  19. Antiviral Treatment Alters the Frequency of Activating and Inhibitory Receptor-Expressing Natural Killer Cells in Chronic Hepatitis B Virus Infected Patients

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    Juan Lv

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Natural killer (NK cells play a critical role in innate antiviral immunity, but little is known about the impact of antiviral therapy on the frequency of NK cell subsets. To this aim, we performed this longitudinal study to examine the dynamic changes of the frequency of different subsets of NK cells in CHB patients after initiation of tenofovir or adefovir therapy. We found that NK cell numbers and subset distribution differ between CHB patients and normal subjects; furthermore, the association was found between ALT level and CD158b+ NK cell in HBV patients. In tenofovir group, the frequency of NK cells increased during the treatment accompanied by downregulated expression of NKG2A and KIR2DL3. In adefovir group, NK cell numbers did not differ during the treatment, but also accompanied by downregulated expression of NKG2A and KIR2DL3. Our results demonstrate that treatment with tenofovir leads to viral load reduction, and correlated with NK cell frequencies in peripheral blood of chronic hepatitis B virus infection. In addition, treatments with both tenofovir and adefovir in chronic HBV infected patients induce a decrease of the frequency of inhibitory receptor+ NK cells, which may account for the partial restoration of the function of NK cells in peripheral blood following treatment.

  20. Dissection of a circulating and intrahepatic CD4(+)Foxp3(+) T-cell subpopulation in chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection: a highly informative strategy for distinguishing chronic HBV infection states.

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    Zhang, Mengjun; Zhou, Jijun; Zhao, Tingting; Huang, Guangyu; Tan, Yulong; Tan, Shun; Fu, Xiaolan; Niu, Wei; Meng, Gang; Chen, Xiaoling; Shang, Xiaoyun; Liu, Dong; Ni, Bing; Wang, Li; Wu, Yuzhang

    2012-04-01

    The definition of CD4(+)Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs) is challenging as it relates to chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. Recently, the heterogeneity of human CD4(+)Foxp3(+) T cells has been confirmed. Three circulating CD4(+)Foxp3(+) T-cell subpopulations in chronic HBV patients were identified, and their frequencies associated with clinical parameters were analyzed. Antigen specificity of Tregs was further studied. We found that circulating and intrahepatic CD4(+)CD45RA(-)Foxp3(hi)-activated Tregs (aTregs) were selectively increased in patients with chronic active hepatitis B and acute-on-chronic liver failure (ACLF) but not in asymptomatic carriers. The aTreg frequency was strongly correlated with HBV DNA load but not liver damage. In both peripheral blood mononuclear cells and livers, ACLF patients showed a dramatically elevated frequency of interleukin 17A-secreting CD45RA(-)Foxp3(lo) nonsuppressive T cells (non-Tregs), which were shown to be associated with severe liver damage. Interestingly, an HBV core antigen (HBcAg)-derived peptide could preferentially expand CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) T cells and aTregs in HLA-DR9(+) chronic active hepatitis B patients, and these Tregs required ligand-specific reactivation for suppressor function. The delineation of a CD4(+)Foxp3(+) T-cell subpopulation is a highly informative strategy for distinguishing different chronic HBV infection states. HBcAg-derived peptides may be responsible for activation of Tregs that, in turn, specifically inhibit anti-HBV immune response but not liver inflammation.

  1. Abnormal B-cell activation associated with TALL-1 over-expression and SOCS-1 suppression during chronic hepatitis C virus infection.

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    Moorman, Jonathan; Dong, Zhi P; Ni, Lei; Zhang, Chunlan; Borthwick, Thomas; Yao, Zhi Q

    2009-10-01

    Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is associated with cirrhosis, autoimmunity and lymphoproliferative disorders. We have previously reported a differential regulation of T and B lymphocytes by HCV core protein in vitro. In this report, we employed a translational approach to characterize the activation status of peripheral B cells from individuals with chronic HCV infection and to explore potential mechanisms for B-cell dysregulation in the setting of HCV infection. In contrast to the T-cell suppression observed in HCV-infected individuals, B cells exhibit a non-specific polyclonal activation phenotype, characterized by significantly higher levels of (1) the early activation marker, CD69, (2) the costimulatory molecule, CD86, and (3) the CCR5 chemokine receptor, CD195, when compared with B cells from healthy donors in response to phytohaemagglutinin (PHA) stimulation. Importantly, tumour necrosis factor- and Apo-L-related leucocyte-expressed ligand-1 (TALL-1), also known as B-lymphocyte stimulator (BLYS), was found to be up-regulated on the surface of B cells from HCV patients in response to PHA as well as HCV core antigen stimulation. This up-regulation of TALL-1 was associated with vigorous memory B-cell responses to viral antigenic stimulation. Additionally, suppressor of cytokine signalling-1 (SOCS-1), a negative feedback immunoregulator that is inhibited in B lymphocytes by HCV core in vitro, was also inhibited in B cells from HCV patients when compared with healthy donors. These findings suggest that TALL-1 over-expression and SOCS-1 suppression are associated with aberrant B-cell activation, providing a plausible basis for the B-cell clonal expansion underlying the lymphoproliferative disorders and autoimmune phenomena observed during chronic HCV infection.

  2. Chronic hepatitis C virus infection triggers spontaneous differential expression of biosignatures associated with T cell exhaustion and apoptosis signaling in peripheral blood mononucleocytes.

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    Barathan, Muttiah; Gopal, Kaliappan; Mohamed, Rosmawati; Ellegård, Rada; Saeidi, Alireza; Vadivelu, Jamuna; Ansari, Abdul W; Rothan, Hussin A; Ravishankar Ram, M; Zandi, Keivan; Chang, Li Y; Vignesh, Ramachandran; Che, Karlhans F; Kamarulzaman, Adeeba; Velu, Vijayakumar; Larsson, Marie; Kamarul, Tunku; Shankar, Esaki M

    2015-04-01

    Persistent hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection appears to trigger the onset of immune exhaustion to potentially assist viral persistence in the host, eventually leading to hepatocellular carcinoma. The role of HCV on the spontaneous expression of markers suggestive of immune exhaustion and spontaneous apoptosis in immune cells of chronic HCV (CHC) disease largely remain elusive. We investigated the peripheral blood mononuclear cells of CHC patients to determine the spontaneous recruitment of cellular reactive oxygen species (cROS), immunoregulatory and exhaustion markers relative to healthy controls. Using a commercial QuantiGenePlex(®) 2.0 assay, we determined the spontaneous expression profile of 80 different pro- and anti-apoptotic genes in persistent HCV disease. Onset of spontaneous apoptosis significantly correlated with the up-regulation of cROS, indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO), cyclooxygenase-2/prostaglandin H synthase (COX-2/PGHS), Foxp3, Dtx1, Blimp1, Lag3 and Cd160. Besides, spontaneous differential surface protein expression suggestive of T cell inhibition viz., TRAIL, TIM-3, PD-1 and BTLA on CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, and CTLA-4 on CD4+ T cells was also evident. Increased up-regulation of Tnf, Tp73, Casp14, Tnfrsf11b, Bik and Birc8 was observed, whereas FasLG, Fas, Ripk2, Casp3, Dapk1, Tnfrsf21, and Cflar were moderately up-regulated in HCV-infected subjects. Our observation suggests the spontaneous onset of apoptosis signaling and T cell exhaustion in chronic HCV disease.

  3. Hepatitis B virus (HBV) variants fluctuate in paired plasma and peripheral blood mononuclear cells among patient cohorts during different chronic hepatitis B (CHB) disease phases.

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    Coffin, C S; Osiowy, C; Gao, S; Nishikawa, S; van der Meer, F; van Marle, G

    2015-04-01

    Hepatitis B virus is classically considered a hepatotropic virus but also infects peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Chronic hepatitis B has different disease phases modulated by host immunity. We compared HBV variability, drug resistance and immune escape mutations in the overlapping HBV polymerase/surface gene in plasma and peripheral blood mononuclear cells in different disease phases. Plasma and peripheral blood mononuclear cells were isolated from 22 treatment naïve patient cohorts (five inactive, six immune-active, nine HBeAg negative and two immune-tolerant). HBV was genotyped via line probe assay, hepatitis B surface antigen titres were determined by an in-house immunoassay, and HBV DNA was quantified by kinetic PCR. The HBV polymerase/surface region, including full genome in some, was PCR-amplified and cloned, and ~20 clones/sample were sequenced. The sequences were subjected to various mutational and phylogenetic analyses. Clonal sequencing showed that only three of 22 patients had identical HBV genotype profiles in both sites. In immune-active chronic hepatitis B, viral diversity in plasma was higher compared with peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Mutations at residues, in a minority of clones, associated with drug resistance, and/or immune escape were found in both compartments but were more common in plasma. Immune escape mutations were more often observed in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells of immune-active CHB carriers, compared with other disease phases. During all CHB disease phases, differences exist between HBV variants found in peripheral blood mononuclear cells and plasma. Moreover, these data indicate that HBV evolution occurs in a compartment and disease phase-specific fashion.

  4. Generalized Liver- and Blood-Derived CD8+ T-Cell Impairment in Response to Cytokines in Chronic Hepatitis C Virus Infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie C Burke Schinkel

    Full Text Available Generalized CD8+ T-cell impairment in chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV infection and the contribution of liver-infiltrating CD8+ T-cells to the immunopathogenesis of this infection remain poorly understood. It is hypothesized that this impairment is partially due to reduced CD8+ T-cell activity in response to cytokines such as IL-7, particularly within the liver. To investigate this, the phenotype and cytokine responsiveness of blood- and liver-derived CD8+ T-cells from healthy controls and individuals with HCV infection were compared. In blood, IL-7 receptor α (CD127 expression on bulk CD8+ T-cells in HCV infection was no different than controls yet was lower on central memory T-cells, and there were fewer naïve cells. IL-7-induced signalling through phosphorylated STAT5 was lower in HCV infection than in controls, and differed between CD8+ T-cell subsets. Production of Bcl-2 following IL-7 stimulation was also lower in HCV infection and inversely related to the degree of liver fibrosis. In liver-derived CD8+ T-cells, STAT5 activation could not be increased with cytokine stimulation and basal Bcl-2 levels of liver-derived CD8+ T-cells were lower than blood-derived counterparts in HCV infection. Therefore, generalized CD8+ T-cell impairment in HCV infection is characterized, in part, by impaired IL-7-mediated signalling and survival, independent of CD127 expression. This impairment is more pronounced in the liver and may be associated with an increased potential for apoptosis. This generalized CD8+ T-cell impairment represents an important immune dysfunction in chronic HCV infection that may alter patient health.

  5. A Mouse Model of Chronic West Nile Virus Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Jessica B.; Swarts, Jessica L.; Wilkins, Courtney; Thomas, Sunil; Green, Richard; Sekine, Aimee; Voss, Kathleen M.; Mooney, Michael; Choonoo, Gabrielle; Miller, Darla R.; Pardo Manuel de Villena, Fernando; Gale, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Infection with West Nile virus (WNV) leads to a range of disease outcomes, including chronic infection, though lack of a robust mouse model of chronic WNV infection has precluded identification of the immune events contributing to persistent infection. Using the Collaborative Cross, a population of recombinant inbred mouse strains with high levels of standing genetic variation, we have identified a mouse model of persistent WNV disease, with persistence of viral loads within the brain. Compared to lines exhibiting no disease or marked disease, the F1 cross CC(032x013)F1 displays a strong immunoregulatory signature upon infection that correlates with restraint of the WNV-directed cytolytic response. We hypothesize that this regulatory T cell response sufficiently restrains the immune response such that a chronic infection can be maintained in the CNS. Use of this new mouse model of chronic neuroinvasive virus will be critical in developing improved strategies to prevent prolonged disease in humans. PMID:27806117

  6. A Mouse Model of Chronic West Nile Virus Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica B Graham

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Infection with West Nile virus (WNV leads to a range of disease outcomes, including chronic infection, though lack of a robust mouse model of chronic WNV infection has precluded identification of the immune events contributing to persistent infection. Using the Collaborative Cross, a population of recombinant inbred mouse strains with high levels of standing genetic variation, we have identified a mouse model of persistent WNV disease, with persistence of viral loads within the brain. Compared to lines exhibiting no disease or marked disease, the F1 cross CC(032x013F1 displays a strong immunoregulatory signature upon infection that correlates with restraint of the WNV-directed cytolytic response. We hypothesize that this regulatory T cell response sufficiently restrains the immune response such that a chronic infection can be maintained in the CNS. Use of this new mouse model of chronic neuroinvasive virus will be critical in developing improved strategies to prevent prolonged disease in humans.

  7. Natural killer cells contribute to hepatic injury and help in viral persistence during progression of hepatitis B e-antigen-negative chronic hepatitis B virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, S; Nandi, M; Pal, S; Mukhopadhyay, D; Chakraborty, B C; Khatun, M; Bhowmick, D; Mondal, R K; Das, S; Das, K; Ghosh, R; Banerjee, S; Santra, A; Chatterjee, M; Chowdhury, A; Datta, S

    2016-08-01

    Hepatitis B e-antigen negative (e(-)) chronic HBV infection (CHI) encompasses a heterogeneous clinical spectrum ranging from inactive carrier (IC) state to e(-) chronic hepatitis B (CHB), cirrhosis and hepatic decompensation. In the backdrop of dysfunctional virus-specific T cells, natural killer (NK) cells are emerging as innate effectors in CHI. We characterized CD3(-) CD56(+) NK cells in clinically well-defined, treatment-naive e(-) patients in IC, e(-)CHB or decompensated liver cirrhosis (LC) phase to appraise their role in disease progression. The NK cell frequencies increased progressively with disease severity (IC 8.2%, e(-)CHB 13.2% and LC 14.4%). Higher proportion of NK cells from LC/e(-)CHB expressed CD69, NKp46, NKp44, TRAIL and perforin, the last two being prominent features of CD56(bright) and CD56(dim) NK subsets, respectively. The frequencies of CD3(-) CD56(+) NK cells together with TRAIL(+) CD56(bright) and Perforin(+) CD56(dim) NK cells correlated positively with serum alanine transaminase levels in e(-)CHB/LC. K562 cell-stimulated NK cells from e(-)CHB/LC exhibited significantly greater degranulation but diminished interferon-γ production than IC. Further, Perforin(+) NK cell frequency inversely correlated with autologous CD4(+) T-cell count in e(-) patients and ligands of NK receptors were over-expressed in CD4(+) T cells from e(-)CHB/LC relative to IC. Co-culture of sorted CD56(dim) NK cells and CD4(+) T cells from e(-)CHB showed enhanced CD4(+) T-cell apoptosis, which was reduced by perforin inhibitor, concanamycin A, suggesting a possible perforin-dependent NK cell-mediated CD4(+) T-cell depletion. Moreover, greater incidence of perforin-expressing NK cells and decline in CD4(+) T cells were noticed intrahepatically in e(-)CHB than IC. Collectively, NK cells contribute to the progression of e(-)CHI by enhanced TRAIL- and perforin-dependent cytolytic activity and by restraining anti-viral immunity through reduced interferon-γ secretion and

  8. A familial T-cell lymphoma with gamma delta phenotype and an original location. Possible role of chronic Epstein-Barr virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donadieu, J; Canioni, D; Cuenod, B; Fraitag, S; Bodemer, C; Stephan, J L; Sigaux, F; Le Deist, F; Schraub, S; Ranfraing, E; Griscelli, C; Brousse, N

    1996-04-15

    We describe a familial lymphoproliferative syndrome associated with Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) infection and the gamma delta phenotype. We reviewed clinical, pathologic, immunologic, and virologic findings in a nonconsanguineous French family, collected over a 13-year period. Specimens from the father (autopsy), son (liver, lymph nodes, and pericardial effusion), and daughter (skin, liver, and digestive tract) were studied with conventional histologic and immunohistochemical techniques. Anti-EBV latent membrane protein (LMP) antibody and T-cell receptor (TCR) gene rearrangements were also studied in the daughter. The father and daughter had similar clinical and histologic features with maxilofacial, nasal, laryngeal, skin, lung, gastrointestinal, and liver involvement by a high grade large cell angiocentric T-cell lymphoma. The gamma delta phenotype and clonal rearrangement were identified in the daughter's tumor. At the time of his death from pericarditis, the son had a 5-year history of a recurrent hemophagocytic syndrome and lymphadenopathy. Chronic EBV infection was found in each case. EBV infection of the son was diagnosed by means of serologic tests and detection of the EBV genome in circulating lymphocytes, and in the father and daughter by use of an anti-LMP antibody. Its pathologic role is discussed. This familial T-cell lymphoma syndrome associated with the gamma delta phenotype and an unusual location is an original clinical entity. Chronic EBV infection was present in each case, but its precise role remains to be determined.

  9. Chronic arthritis in chikungunya virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateo, Lourdes; Roure, Silvia

    2017-07-24

    Chikungunya virus infection causes arthralgia and arthritis in the acute phase of the disease but, in more than half of the cases, musculoskeletal manifestations can be prolonged over time and, in some cases, become chronic. Although polyarthralgia is the most frequent chronic manifestation, forms with polyarthritis, tenosynovitis and enthesopathy are also common. To analyze the clinical characteristics of patients with persistent articular manifestations after infection with the Chikungunya virus. Report of 3 cases of chronic arthritis after infection with chikungunya virus diagnosed at outpatient care in a university hospital of Catalonia, all of them imported after exposure in areas of epidemic infection between 2013-2015. All three patients had inflammatory joint pain for more than one year after acute disease (3, 2 and 1 years, respectively). In all cases, it appeared as polyarthritis with involvement of small joints of hands and feet (pseudorheumatoid arthritis-like). Laboratory tests showed a slight elevation of acute phase reactants, and analyses for immune markers were negative. Two of the patients required treatment with glucocorticoids and hydroxychloroquine. The course led to slow clinical improvement, but only one of them came to be completely asymptomatic. In the differential diagnosis of chronic polyarthritis, Chikungunya virus disease should also be considered in areas in which it is not endemic. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Reumatología y Colegio Mexicano de Reumatología. All rights reserved.

  10. Chronic Bee Paralysis Virus in Honeybee Queens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amiri, Esmaeil; Meixner, Marina; Büchler, Ralph

    2014-01-01

    Chronic bee paralysis virus (CBPV) is known as a disease of worker honey bees. To investigate pathogenesis of the CBPV on the queen, the sole reproductive individual in a colony, we conducted experiments regarding the susceptibility of queens to CBPV. Results from susceptibility experiment showed...... a similar disease progress in the queens compared to worker bees after infection. Infected queens exhibit symptoms by Day 6 post infection and virus levels reach 1011 copies per head. In a transmission experiment we showed that social interactions may affect the disease progression. Queens with forced...... contact to symptomatic worker bees acquired an overt infection with up to 1011 virus copies per head in six days. In contrast, queens in contact with symptomatic worker bees, but with a chance to receive food from healthy bees outside the cage appeared healthy. The virus loads did not exceed 107...

  11. Therapy with interferon-alpha and ribavirin for chronic hepatitis C virus infection upregulates membrane HLA-ABC, CD86, and CD28 on peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Pin-Nan; Wei, Ya-Ling; Chang, Ting-Tsung; Chen, Jiann-Shiuh; Young, Kung-Chia

    2008-06-01

    Multiple interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs) involving T-cell activation are upregulated during initial interferon-alpha-based therapy for chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. However, the long-term impact on therapeutic outcome in patients remains unknown. In this study, the effects of anti-HCV therapy on the surface expression of HLA-ABC, CD86, and CD28 were longitudinally assessed. These proteins are integral membrane receptors of antigen presentation and triggering of costimulatory signals for activating CD8+ T cells. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were collected at baseline and post-treatment for 1 day, and 2, 4, 12, and 24 weeks, respectively. This treatment led to a time-related elevation of membrane levels of HLA-ABC and CD86 on B-cells and monocytes in patients with a sustained response (n = 23), but not in those without (n = 8). Meanwhile, upregulation of CD28 on CD4+ and CD8+ T cells was comparable in both groups of sustained responders and non-responders. Steady increases in the B cells' surface and intracellular HLA-ABC were observed, thus, the surface-to-intracellular ratios did not alter over the period of treatment. Furthermore, multivariate analysis shows that increased HLA-ABC on monocytes by week 12 correlates significantly with sustained response (P = 0.033). In conclusion, differential modulation of T-cell activation ISGs, such as HLA-ABC and CD86 might correlate with the outcome of interferon-alpha-based therapy in chronic hepatitis C patients.

  12. Genetic Diversity and Tissue Compartmentalization of the Hepatitis C Virus Genome in Blood Mononuclear Cells, Liver, and Serum from Chronic Hepatitis C Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navas, Sonia; Martín, Julio; Quiroga, Juan Antonio; Castillo, Inmaculada; Carreño, Vicente

    1998-01-01

    The degree of genetic variability in the hypervariable region 1 of hepatitis C virus (HCV) was analyzed by cloning and sequencing HCV genomes obtained in paired samples of serum, liver tissue, and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from four chronic hepatitis C patients. Genetic variability in serum was higher than in liver tissue or PBMC at the level of complexity (the number of different sequences obtained from each type of tissue) as well as at the level of genetic distance between all pairs of sequences within each tissue (compared by the Student t test; P viral genomes differed among the three types of tissue, as shown by segregation of sequences according to their tissue of origin in phylogenetic analysis and by statistical analysis of mean genetic distances observed between sequences obtained from different tissues (P < 0.001), but sequences from liver tissue and PBMC were more closely related to each other than to those from serum. PMID:9445070

  13. Effects of lamivudine on the function of dendritic cells derived from patients with chronic hepatitis B virus infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peng-Yuan Zheng; Dong-Yun Zhang; Gao-Feng Lu; Ping-Chang Yang; Yuan-Ming Qi; Bai-Sheng Wang

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To investigate if the nucleoside analogue lamivudine (LAM), a potent inhibitor of HBV replication,could restore the function of dendritic cells derived from patients with chronic hepatitis B (CHB) in an Asian population.METHODS: Dendritic cells (DCs) derived from mononuclearcytes of patients with chronic HBV infection were cultured in the presence of IL-4, granulocytemacrophage colony-stimulating factors (GM-CSF) and gradient concentrations of LAM (0-2 mmol/L). Cell morphology was observed under light microscopy. Cell surface molecules, including HLA-DR, CD80, CD83,and CD1α, were analyzed with flow cytometry. The concentrations of IL-6 and IL-12 in the supernatant were assayed by ELISA. T cell proliferation was assayed by methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium (MTT).RESULTS: The expression of CD1α on DC treated with 0.5 mmol/L LAM (LAM-DC 0.5 mmol/L) was significantly higher than that of DC untreated with LAM (54.1 ± 4.21vs 33.57 ± 3.14, P < 0.05), and so was the expression of CD83 (20.24 ± 2.51 vs 12.83 ± 2.12, P < 0.05) as well as the expression of HLA-DR (74.5 ± 5.16 vs 52.8 ±2.51, P < 0.05). Compared with control group, LAM-DC group (0.5 mmol/L) secreted significantly more IL-12 (910± 91.5 vs 268 ± 34.3 pg/mL, P < 0.05), had lower levels of IL-6 in the culture supernatant (28 ± 2.6 vs 55 ± 7.36pg/mL, P < 0.05), markedly enhanced the stimulatory capacity in the allogeneic mixed leukocyte reaction (MLR)(1.87 ± 0.6 vs 1.24 ± 0.51, P < 0.05).CONCLUSION: The lower expression of phenotypic molecules and impaired allogeneic mixed lymphocyte reaction function of dendritic cells derived from patients with HBV infection could be restored in vitro by incubation with LAM.

  14. Extrahepatic manifestations in chronic hepatitis C virus carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenthal, E; Cacoub, P

    2015-04-01

    Patients with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection frequently present with extrahepatic manifestations covering a large spectrum, involving different organ systems leading to the concept of systemic HCV infection. These manifestations include autoimmune phenomena and frank autoimmune and/or rheumatic diseases and may dominate the course of chronic HCV infection. Chronic HCV infection causes liver inflammation affecting the development of hepatic diseases. HCV is also a lymphotropic virus that triggers B cells and promotes favorable conditions for B lymphocyte proliferation, including mixed cryoglobulinemia (MC) and MC vasculitis, which is the most prominent extrahepatic manifestation of chronic HCV infection. HCV may also promote a low-grade chronic systemic inflammation that may affect the development of some extrahepatic manifestations, particularly cardiovascular and cerebral vascular diseases. Recognition of extrahepatic symptoms of HCV infection could facilitate early diagnosis and treatment. The development of direct-acting antiviral agents (DDAs) has revolutionized HCV treatment. DDAs, as well as new B-cell-depleting or B-cell-modulating monoclonal antibodies, will expand the panorama of treatment options for HCV-related extrahepatic manifestations including cryoglobulinemic vasculitis. In this context, a proactive, integrated approach to HCV therapy should maximize the benefits of HCV therapy, even when liver disease is mild.

  15. Chronic Ulcerative Herpes Simplex Virus Infection of the Vulva

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly Griffith-Bauer

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Herpes simplex virus infections in HIV-infected individuals can be clinically unusual and difficult to treat due to underlying problems with cell-mediated immunity and the occurrence of antiviral resistance. Additionally, partial or incomplete restoration of immune function may result in chronic ulcerations that require rotational treatments. In this report, we describe the case of a 38-year-old HIV-positive woman who developed the ulcerative form of chronic herpes simplex infection despite highly active antiretroviral therapy and valacyclovir prophylaxis. Repeated intravenous courses of foscarnet and topical cidofovir finally controlled her erosions as her cell-mediated immunity was slowly restored. This case highlights the challenges that still exist in diagnosing and managing this rare presentation of herpes simplex virus

  16. Universal screening for chronic hepatitis C virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiffman, Mitchell L

    2016-01-01

    Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection affects an estimated 123 million persons worldwide and is the leading cause of cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma in most countries. Approximately 75% of persons with chronic HCV were born between the years 1945-1965 and screening of patients in this birth cohort is now advocated. Unfortunately, these recommendations are not readily applied and a sizable population of infected persons who could benefit from treatment fall outside the birth cohort. Universal screening for HCV would be optimal. However, the primary limitation once patients are identified is accessing treatment which remains restricted in most countries.

  17. Immune regulation in chronic hepatitis C virus infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartling, Hans Jakob; Ballegaard, Vibe Cecilie; Nielsen, Nick Schou;

    2016-01-01

    The immunological result of infection with Hepatitis C virus (HCV) depends on the delicate balance between a vigorous immune response that may clear the infection, but with a risk of unspecific inflammation and, or a less inflammatory response that leads to chronic infection. In general, exhaustion...... and impairment of cytotoxic function of HCV-specific T cells and NK cells are found in patients with chronic HCV infection. In contrast, an increase in immune regulatory functions is found primarily in form of increased IL-10 production possibly due to increased level and function of anti-inflammatory Tregs....... Thus, the major immune players during chronic HCV infection are characterized by a decrease of cytotoxic function and increase of inhibitory functions. This may be an approach to diminish intrahepatic and systemic inflammation. Finally, there has been increasing awareness of regulatory functions...

  18. [Porphyrin excretion in patients with chronic hepatitis C virus infection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armas-Merino, R; Wolff, C; Parraguez, A; Soto, J R

    1997-03-01

    The high prevalence of chronic hepatitis C virus infection in patients with porphyria cutanea tarda, specially in those without family history of the disease, suggests that this could be an acquired disease and one of the most frequent extra hepatic manifestations of hepatitis C virus infection. To study the excretion of porphyrins and its precursors in cirrhotic patients with and without hepatitis C virus infection. Eighteen patients with cirrhosis Child-Pough A, eight infected with hepatitis C virus, were studied. Urinary excretion of [symbol see text] aminolevulinic acid, porphobilinogen, coproporphyrins, uroporphyrins and fecal excretion of coproporphyrins and protoporphyrins were measured. Red blood cell protoporphyrin was also measured. There were no differences in the measured parameters between patients with or without hepatitis C virus infection. No patient had uroporphyrin excretion values over the normal range. Some patients had slight elevations in some parameters, but always below the values observed in porphyrias. In these group of patients, hepatitis C virus infection of its associated liver disease, do not cause detectable alterations in porphyrin metabolism.

  19. Type I Interferon in Chronic Virus Infection and Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snell, Laura M; McGaha, Tracy L; Brooks, David G

    2017-08-01

    Type I interferons (IFN-Is) are emerging as key drivers of inflammation and immunosuppression in chronic infection. Control of these infections requires IFN-I signaling; however, prolonged IFN-I signaling can lead to immune dysfunction. IFN-Is are also emerging as double-edged swords in cancer, providing necessary inflammatory signals, while initiating feedback suppression in both immune and cancer cells. Here, we review the proinflammatory and suppressive mechanisms potentiated by IFN-Is during chronic virus infections and discuss the similar, newly emerging dichotomy in cancer. We then discuss how this understanding is leading to new therapeutic concepts and immunotherapy combinations. We propose that, by modulating the immune response at its foundation, it may be possible to widely reshape immunity to control these chronic diseases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Dysregulation of toll-like receptor (TLR) 2 expression on monocytes and upregulation of the frequency of T cells expressing TLR2 in patients with chronic hepatitis C virus infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ronit, Andreas; Salem, Mohammad; Hartling, Hans J

    2013-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) initiate inflammatory responses that may play a role in disease progression in patients infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV). TLR2 and TLR4 surface expression were assessed on CD14(+) monocytes, CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells in treatment naïve patients with chronic HCV...... infection with fibrosis, without fibrosis, co-infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), and in healthy controls. Increased expression of TLR2 was found on monocytes in HCV-infected patients with fibrosis (p...

  1. Chronic Inflammatory Periodontal Disease in Patients with Human Immunodeficiency Virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vania López Rodríguez

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: The Chronic Inflammatory Periodontal Disease is related with multiple risk factors. Those patients with human immunodeficiency virus have higher risk of presenting this disease and it is usually more serious in these cases. Objective: To describe the prevalence of Chronic Inflammatory Periodontal Disease in patients with HIV. Methods: Descriptive, observational, cross-sectional study including patients with HIV in Sancti Spiritus province. The occurrence of the disease was determined after the Periodontics Cuban Standards, and oral hygiene was assessed through the simplified oral hygiene index. Other variables were measured, such as smoking habits, T CD4+ lymphocyte counting and virus load. The independent association of each risk factor with the disease was determined through a logistic regression model. Results: The 56, 5 % of the 154 patients presented Chronic Inflammatory Periodontal Disease; 60 (39.0% gingivitis and 27 (17,5% periodontitis. Gingivitis was associated with poor oral hygiene (OR: 3,71 and periodontitis with smoking habit (OR: 5,20. The severe forms of periodontitis occurred mainly in patients with lymphocyte counting lower than 500 cells/mm3 . Conclusions: The prevalence of Chronic Inflammatory Periodontal Disease in patients with HIV in Sancti Spiritus province is linked to known risk factors such as smoking habits and oral hygiene.

  2. Phyllanthus species for chronic hepatitis B virus infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yun, Xia; Luo, Hui; Liu, Jian Ping

    2011-01-01

    Phyllanthus species for patients with chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection have been assessed in clinical trials, but no consensus regarding their usefulness exists.......Phyllanthus species for patients with chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection have been assessed in clinical trials, but no consensus regarding their usefulness exists....

  3. Epidemic of cell phone virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Pu; González, Marta; Barabási, Albert-László.

    2008-03-01

    Standard operating systems and Bluetooth technology will be a trend for future cell phone features. These will enable cell phone viruses to spread either through SMS or by sending Bluetooth requests when cell phones are physically close enough. The difference in spreading methods gives these two types of viruses' different epidemiological characteristics. SMS viruses' spread is mainly based on people's social connections, whereas the spreading of Bluetooth viruses is affected by people's mobility patterns and population distribution. Using cell phone data recording calls, SMS and locations of more than 6 million users, we study the spread of SMS and Bluetooth viruses and characterize how the social network and the mobility of mobile phone users affect such spreading processes.

  4. Pathway analysis in blood cells of pigs infected with classical swine fever virus: comparison of pigs that develop a chronic form of infection or recover.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulst, Marcel; Loeffen, Willie; Weesendorp, Eefke

    2013-02-01

    Infection of pigs with CSFV can lead to either acute disease, resulting in death or recovery, or chronic disease. The mechanisms by which CSFV manipulates the pig's first line of defence to establish a chronic infection are poorly understood. Therefore, pigs were infected with moderately virulent CSFV, and whole blood was collected on a regular basis during a period of 18 days. Using whole-genome microarrays, time-dependent changes in gene expression were recorded in blood cells of chronically diseased pigs and pigs that recovered. Bioinformatics analysis of regulated genes indicated that different immunological pathways were regulated in chronically diseased pigs compared to recovered pigs. In recovered pigs, antiviral defence mechanisms were rapidly activated, whereas in chronically diseased pigs, several genes with the potential to inhibit NF-κB- and IRF3/7-mediated transcription of type I interferons were up-regulated. Compared to recovered pigs, chronically diseased pigs failed to activate NK or cytotoxic T-cell pathways, and they showed decreased gene activity in antigen-presenting monocytes/macrophages. Remarkably, in chronically diseased pigs, genes related to the human autoimmune disease systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) were up-regulated during the whole period of 18 days. CSFV pathology in kidney and skin resembles that of SLE. Furthermore, enzymes involved in the degradation of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 and of tryptophan to kynurenines were expressed at different levels in chronically diseased and recovered pigs. Both of these chemical processes may affect the functions of T helper/regulatory cells that are crucial for tempering the inflammatory response after a viral infection.

  5. Production of Autoantibodies in Chronic Hepatitis B Virus Infection Is Associated with the Augmented Function of Blood CXCR5+CD4+ T Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Yu; Hu, Tingting; Song, Xiaofei; Nie, Hong; Chen, Min; Chen, Weixian; Zhou, Zhi; Zhang, Dazhi; Hu, Huaidong; Hu, Peng; Ren, Hong

    2016-01-01

    T follicular helper cells (Tfh) provide help to B cells to support their activation, expansion and differentiation. However, the role of Tfh cells in chronic HBV infection is poorly defined. The aim of this research was to examine the function of Tfh cells and whether they are involved in HBV related disease. Blood CXCR5+CD4+T cells and B cells in 85 patients with chronic HBV infection (HBV patients) and health controls (HC) were examined by flow cytometry. The molecule expression in blood CXCR5+CD4+ T cells was detected by real-time PCR. Blood CXCR5+CD4+ T cells and B cells were co-cultured and the production of Ig and cytokines was detected by ELISA. Autoantibodies were detected by indirect immunofluorescence and immunospot assay. We found that blood CXCR5+CD4+ T cells in patients with chronic HBV infection (HBV patients) expressed higher level of activation related molecules and cytokines than that from health controls (HC).In HBV patients, the frequency of blood CXCR5+CD4+ T cells was significantly correlated with serum ALT and AST. We also found that blood CXCR5+CD4+ T cells from HBV patients could induce B cells to secret higher level of immunoglobulin than that from HC. Several autoantibodies, including ANA, ss-A, ss-B, Scl-70, Jo-1, ect, were indeed positive in 65% HBV patients. Among HBV patients, expression of function related molecules was significantly higher in blood CXCR5+CD4+ T cells from patients with autoantibodies than that without autoantibodies. Our research indicated that blood CXCR5+CD4+ T cells from HBV patients were over activated and show augmented capacity to help B cells for antibody secreting, which might correlated with liver inflammation and the production of autoantibodies in extrahepatic manifestations. PMID:27612199

  6. Genus Phyllanthus for chronic hepatitis B virus infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, J; Lin, Haili; McIntosh, H

    2001-01-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and safety of genus Phyllanthus for chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection we performed a systematic review of randomized clinical trials. Randomized trials comparing genus Phyllanthus vs. placebo, no intervention, general nonspecific treatment, other herbal medicine...

  7. [Molecular pato-physiology of chronic virus infections].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novitskiĭ, V V; Riazantseva, N V; Zima, A P; Zhukova, O B

    2010-01-01

    Article is based on published data and results of own original researches on development of chronic socially inportant virus infections. Special attention is paid to priority research direction--molecular-genetic markers of chronis virus infections predisposition, development of personalized therapy molecural basis and forecast of infect and man organism interrelation results.

  8. Natural killer cells in hepatitis B virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shao-fei; Wang, Wen-jing; Gao, Yue-qiu

    2015-01-01

    Natural killer cells are a unique type of lymphocytes with cytotoxic capacity, and play important roles against tumors and infections. Recently, natural killer cells have been increasingly valued in their effects in hepatitis B virus infection. Since hepatitis B virus is not cytopathic, the subsequent antiviral immune responses of the host are responsible for sustaining the liver injury, which may result in cirrhosis and even hepatocellular carcinoma. Many studies have confirmed that natural killer cells participate in anti-hepatitis B virus responses both in the early phase after infection and in the chronic phase via cytolysis, degranulation, and cytokine secretion. However, natural killer cells play dichotomic roles: they exert antiviral and immunoregulatory functions whilst contribute to the pathogenesis of liver injury. Here, we review the roles of natural killer cells in hepatitis B virus infection, introducing novel therapeutic strategies for controlling hepatitis B virus infection via the modulation of natural killer cells. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  9. Influence of the invasion of peripheral blood mononuclear cells by hepatitis B virus on immune response of the patients with chronic hepatitis B

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XING Tong-jing; ZHANG Lian; HOU Jin-lin; ZHANG Ming-xia; YANG Jie; LUO Kang-xian

    2001-01-01

    To explore the influence of HBV invasion into peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) on the immune response of patients with chronic hepatitis B. Methods: The cytokine levels in the culture supernatant of PBMC from 56 patients with chronic hepatitis B were determined by ELISA, and PCR was employed to amplify the HBV DNA. Results: The levels of IFN-γ in patients with hepatitis B was lower than thoset of the control, but the difference was not statistically significant, while the levels of IL-4 were significantly higher than those of the control (P<0.01). The serum levels of HBV DNA were negatively correlated with that of IFN-y in culture supernatants of PBMC. Thirty-five patients positive of HBV DNA in the PBMCs were identified from 56 patients with hepatitis B,and their IFN-γ level proved to be significantly different. Conclusions: Th2 cell-mediated immune response is predominant in chronic hepatitis B which is associated with the chronicity of HBV infection. HBV invasion into the PBMCs may affect Th1 and Th2 cell-mediated immune response of the patients with chronic hepatitis B.

  10. Polyfunctional type-1, -2, and -17 CD8⁺ T cell responses to apoptotic self-antigens correlate with the chronic evolution of hepatitis C virus infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debora Franceschini

    Full Text Available Caspase-dependent cleavage of antigens associated with apoptotic cells plays a prominent role in the generation of CD8⁺ T cell responses in various infectious diseases. We found that the emergence of a large population of autoreactive CD8⁺ T effector cells specific for apoptotic T cell-associated self-epitopes exceeds the antiviral responses in patients with acute hepatitis C virus infection. Importantly, they endow mixed polyfunctional type-1, type-2 and type-17 responses and correlate with the chronic progression of infection. This evolution is related to the selection of autoreactive CD8⁺ T cells with higher T cell receptor avidity, whereas those with lower avidity undergo prompt contraction in patients who clear infection. These findings demonstrate a previously undescribed strict link between the emergence of high frequencies of mixed autoreactive CD8⁺ T cells producing a broad array of cytokines (IFN-γ, IL-17, IL-4, IL-2… and the progression toward chronic disease in a human model of acute infection.

  11. High-programmed death-1 levels on hepatitis C virus-specific T cells during acute infection are associated with viral persistence and require preservation of cognate antigen during chronic infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutebemberwa, Alleluiah; Ray, Stuart C; Astemborski, Jacquie; Levine, Jordana; Liu, Lin; Dowd, Kimberly A; Clute, Shalyn; Wang, Changyu; Korman, Alan; Sette, Alessandro; Sidney, John; Pardoll, Drew M; Cox, Andrea L

    2008-12-15

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is an important human pathogen that represents a model for chronic infection given that the majority of infected individuals fail to clear the infection despite generation of virus-specific T cell responses during the period of acute infection. Although viral sequence evolution at targeted MHC class I-restricted epitopes represents one mechanism for immune escape in HCV, many targeted epitopes remain intact under circumstances of viral persistence. To explore alternative mechanisms of HCV immune evasion, we analyzed patterns of expression of a major inhibitory receptor on T cells, programmed death-1 (PD-1), from the time of initial infection and correlated these with HCV RNA levels, outcome of infection, and sequence escape within the targeted epitope. We show that the level of PD-1 expression in early HCV infection is significantly higher on HCV-specific T cells from subjects who progress to chronic HCV infection than from those who clear infection. This correlation is independent of HCV RNA levels, compatible with the notion that high PD-1 expression on HCV-specific CD8 T cells during acute infection inhibits viral clearance. Viral escape during persistent infection is associated with reduction in PD-1 levels on the surface of HCV-specific T cells, supporting the necessity of ongoing antigenic stimulation of T cells for maintenance of PD-1 expression. These results support the idea that PD-1 expression on T cells specific for nonescaped epitopes contributes to viral persistence and suggest that PD-1 blockade may alter the outcome of HCV infection.

  12. Kinetics of virus production from single cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timm, Andrea; Yin, John

    2012-03-01

    The production of virus by infected cells is an essential process for the spread and persistence of viral diseases, the effectiveness of live-viral vaccines, and the manufacture of viruses for diverse applications. Yet despite its importance, methods to precisely measure virus production from cells are lacking. Most methods test infected-cell populations, masking how individual cells behave. Here we measured the kinetics of virus production from single cells. We combined simple steps of liquid-phase infection, serial dilution, centrifugation, and harvesting, without specialized equipment, to track the production of virus particles from BHK cells infected with vesicular stomatitis virus. Remarkably, cell-to-cell differences in latent times to virus release were within a factor of two, while production rates and virus yields spanned over 300-fold, highlighting an extreme diversity in virus production for cells from the same population. These findings have fundamental and technological implications for health and disease.

  13. Therapeutic silencing of microRNA-122 in primates with chronic hepatitis C virus infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lanford, Robert E; Hildebrandt-Eriksen, Elisabeth S; Petri, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    The liver-expressed microRNA-122 (miR-122) is essential for hepatitis C virus (HCV) RNA accumulation in cultured liver cells, but its potential as a target for antiviral intervention has not been assessed. We found that treatment of chronically infected chimpanzees with a locked nucleic acid (LNA...

  14. Chronic eosinophilic dermatitis associated with persistent feline herpes virus infection in cheetahs (Acinonyx jubatus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munson, L; Wack, R; Duncan, M; Montali, R J; Boon, D; Stalis, I; Crawshaw, G J; Cameron, K N; Mortenson, J; Citino, S; Zuba, J; Junge, R E

    2004-03-01

    A chronic ulcerative and eosinophilic dermatitis occurred in 20 captive cheetahs (Acinonyx jubatus) with persistent feline herpes virus 1 (FHV1) infection. Affected animals had erythematous, ulcerated plaques primarily on the face and forelegs in sites of contact with lachrymal and salivary secretions. The dermatitis was characterized by dense infiltrates of eosinophils and plasma cells and pseudoepitheliomatous hyperplasia. Rare keratinocytes within the lesions had nuclei with marginated chromatin and small eosinophilic inclusions composed of herpes virus nucleocapsids. Virus isolated from lesions was confirmed to be FHV1. Lesions persisted and progressed unless removed by cryoexcision. The occurrence of this unusual reaction to FHV1 in approximately 5% of captive North American cheetahs suggests a species propensity for a Th2-dominant response to herpes virus infection. This atypical immune reaction may indicate a heritable trait or modulation of the immune response by other factors such as chronic stress.

  15. Hepatitis C virus host cell interactions uncovered

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gottwein, Judith; Bukh, Jens

    2007-01-01

      Insights into virus-host cell interactions as uncovered by Randall et al. (1) in a recent issue of PNAS further our understanding of the hepatitis C virus (HCV) life cycle, persistence, and pathogenesis and might lead to the identification of new therapeutic targets. HCV persistently infects 180...... million individuals worldwide, causing chronic hepatitis, liver cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. The only approved treatment, combination therapy with IFN- and ribavirin, targets cellular pathways (2); however, a sustained virologic response is achieved only in approximately half of the patients...... treated. Therefore, there is a pressing need for the identification of novel drugs against hepatitis C. Although most research focuses on the development of HCV-specific antivirals, such as protease and polymerase inhibitors (3), cellular targets could be pursued and might allow the development of broad...

  16. Hepatitis C virus host cell interactions uncovered

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gottwein, Judith; Bukh, Jens

    2007-01-01

      Insights into virus-host cell interactions as uncovered by Randall et al. (1) in a recent issue of PNAS further our understanding of the hepatitis C virus (HCV) life cycle, persistence, and pathogenesis and might lead to the identification of new therapeutic targets. HCV persistently infects 180...... million individuals worldwide, causing chronic hepatitis, liver cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. The only approved treatment, combination therapy with IFN- and ribavirin, targets cellular pathways (2); however, a sustained virologic response is achieved only in approximately half of the patients...... treated. Therefore, there is a pressing need for the identification of novel drugs against hepatitis C. Although most research focuses on the development of HCV-specific antivirals, such as protease and polymerase inhibitors (3), cellular targets could be pursued and might allow the development of broad...

  17. CD4+ T cell responses in hepatitis C virus infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nasser Semmo; Paul Klenerman

    2007-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a major cause of liver damage, with virus-induced end-stage disease such as liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma resulting in a high rate of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Evidence that CD4+ T cell responses to HCV play an important role in the outcome of acute infection has been shown in several studies. However, the mechanisms behind viral persistence and the failure of CD4+ T cell responses to contain virus are poorly understood. During chronic HCV infection, HCV-specific CD4+ T cell responses are relatively weak or absent whereas in resolved infection these responses are vigorous and multispecific. Persons with a T-helper type Ⅰ profile, which promotes cellular effector mechanisms are thought to be more likely to experience viral clearance, but the overall role of these cells in the immunopathogenesis of chronic liver disease is not known. To define this, much more data is required on the function and specificity of virus-specific CD4+ T cells,especially in the early phases of acute disease and in the liver during chronic infection. The role and possible mechanisms of action of CD4+ T cell responses in determining the outcome of acute and chronic HCV infection will be discussed in this review.

  18. Chronic West Nile virus infection in kea (Nestor notabilis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakonyi, Tamás; Gajdon, Gyula K; Schwing, Raoul; Vogl, Wolfgang; Häbich, Annett-Carolin; Thaller, Denise; Weissenböck, Herbert; Rudolf, Ivo; Hubálek, Zdenek; Nowotny, Norbert

    2016-02-01

    Six kea (Nestor notabilis) in human care, naturally infected with West Nile virus (WNV) lineage 2 in Vienna, Austria, in 2008, developed mild to fatal neurological signs. WNV RNA persisted and the virus evolved in the birds' brains, as demonstrated by (phylo)genetic analyses of the complete viral genomes detected in kea euthanized between 2009 and 2014. WNV antibodies persisted in the birds, too. Chronic WNV infection in the brain might contribute to the circulation of the virus through oral transmission to predatory birds.

  19. Chronic hepatitis E virus infection in liver transplant recipients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haagsma, Elizabeth B.; van den Berg, Arie P.; Porte, Robert J.; Benne, Cornelis A.; Vennema, Harry; Reimerink, Johan H. J.; Koopmans, Marion P. G.

    2008-01-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) infection is known to run a self-limiting course. Sporadic cases of acute hepatitis due to infection with HEV genotype 3, present in pig populations, are increasingly recognized. Zoonotic transmission seems infrequent. The entity of unexplained chronic hepatitis after liver t

  20. Therapeutic vaccination against chronic hepatitis C virus infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ip, Peng Peng; Nijman, Hans W.; Wilschut, Jan; Daemen, Toos

    2012-01-01

    Approximately 170 million people worldwide are chronic carriers of Hepatitis C virus (HCV). To date, there is no prophylactic vaccine available against HCV. The standard-of-care therapy for HCV infection involves a combination of pegylated interferon-α and ribavirin. This therapy, which is commonly

  1. Therapeutic vaccination against chronic hepatitis C virus infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ip, Peng Peng; Nijman, Hans W.; Wilschut, Jan; Daemen, Toos

    2012-01-01

    Approximately 170 million people worldwide are chronic carriers of Hepatitis C virus (HCV). To date, there is no prophylactic vaccine available against HCV. The standard-of-care therapy for HCV infection involves a combination of pegylated interferon-α and ribavirin. This therapy, which is commonly

  2. Extrahepatic immune related manifestations in chronic hepatitis C virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tampaki, Maria; Koskinas, John

    2014-09-21

    The association of chronic hepatitis C with immune related syndromes has been frequently reported. There is a great range of clinical manifestations affecting various systems and organs such as the skin, the kidneys, the central and peripheral nervous system, the musculoskeletal system and the endocrine glands. Despite the high prevalence of immune related syndromes in patients with chronic hepatitis C, the exact pathogenesis is not always clear. They have been often associated with mixed cryoglobulinemia, a common finding in chronic hepatitis C, cross reaction with viral antigens, or the direct effect of virus on the affected tissues. The aim of this review is to analyze the reported hepatitis C virus immune mediated syndromes, their prevalence and clinical manifestations and to discuss the most supported theories regarding their pathogenesis.

  3. Research advances in immune tolerance in chronic hepatitis B virus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WU Fengping

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Immune tolerance refers to the specific non-response or negative response of T and B lymphocytes to antigens. According to the period of formation, immune tolerance can be classified into central tolerance and peripheral tolerance. Immune tolerance to hepatitis B virus (HBV after HBV infection is considered a major cause of chronic HBV infection. This article briefly reviews the roles of HBeAg, functional defects of dendritic cells, low response of cytotoxic T lymphocytes, T helper cells and cytokines, variations of HBV genotype and genome, and host gene polymorphisms in the development of immune tolerance in chronic HBV infection, as well as related research advances.

  4. The seasonality of respiratory viruses in patients with chronic rhinosinusitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Jesse T; Paula, Flavia E; Proença-Modena, José L; Demarco, Ricardo C; Buzatto, Guilherme P; Saturno, Tamara H; Delcaro, Luana S; Tamashiro, Edwin; Valera, Fabiana C P; Arruda, Eurico; Anselmo-Lima, Wilma T

    2015-01-01

    Chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) is a common illness, yet little is known about its pathogenesis, including the role played by respiratory viruses. A transversal prospective study was conducted to analyze the seasonality of CRS using real-time polymerase chain reaction to detect respiratory virus genomes in secretions and tissue samples from patients with CRS with and without nasal polyps. The frequency of viral detection was 41% (31/75). The respiratory virus most frequently detected was human rhinovirus, found in 18 patients (24%), followed by human metapneumovirus, human enterovirus, human respiratory sincicial virus, human adenovirus, human bocavirus, human coronavirus, and human influenza virus, detected in 12 (16%), five (6.6%), four (5.3%), four (5.3%), two (2.6%), two (2.6%), and one (1.3%) patient(s), respectively. Although none of the patients presented symptoms when the samples were collected, there was a peak in detection of the most prevalent virus in the autumn and winter seasons of both years, similar to the pattern that occurs in acute conditions. The pattern of respiratory virus seasonality found in nasal mucosa, polyps, and paranasal sinus samples in patients with CRS reinforces the possibility of asymptomatic respiratory viral infections.

  5. Hepatitis C Virus Infection and Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayten Kadanali

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: A growing pile of evidence supports the notion that pulmonary involvement is one of the extrahepatic manifestations of chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV infection. The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of HCV infection in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD, and vice versa.Methods: Two cross-sectional studies were performed: 1. A prevalence study of HCV infection among patients with COPD; 2. A prevalence study of COPD among patients with chronic HCV infection. COPD was diagnosed according to ATS/ERS guidelines. The prevalence of HCV infection in COPD group was compared with the result of a previous study which determined the prevalence of HCV infection in general population. Prevalence of COPD in patients with chronic HCV infection was also compared to those with chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV infection.Results: The study included 108 patients with COPD, 68 patients with chronic HCV infection, and 60 patients with chronic HBV infection. HCV infection was observed in 8.3% of patients with COPD, and 1.2% of the control subjects (P= 0.000. The prevalence of COPD among patients with chronic HCV and HBV infection was 17.6%, and 5%, respectively (P=0.03. Comparing COPD-positive and -negative chronic HCV patients for risk factors for COPD revealed that only the mean age was higher in COPD-positive patients (60.8±9.1 years vs. 46.5±11.5 years, P=0.000. In multivariate analysis, age was found to be the only independent predictor of COPD in HCV group.Conclusions: Patients with COPD have increased prevalence of HCV infection, and patients with HCV infection, have increased prevalence of COPD. COPD may be an extrahepatic disease associated with HCV infection.

  6. CXCL10 and trafficking of virus-specific T cells during coronavirus-induced demyelination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiles, Linda N; Liu, Michael T; Kane, Joy A C; Lane, Thomas E

    2009-09-01

    Chronic expression of CXC chemokine ligand 10 (CXCL10) in the central nervous system (CNS) following infection with the neurotropic JHM strain of mouse hepatitis virus (JHMV) is associated with an immune-mediated demyelinating disease. Treatment of mice with anti-CXCL10 neutralizing antibody results in limited CD4+ T cell infiltration into the CNS accompanied by a reduction in white matter damage. The current study determines the antigen-specificity of the T lymphocytes present during chronic disease and evaluates how blocking CXCL10 signaling affects retention of virus-specific T cells within the CNS. CXCL10 neutralization selectively reduced accumulation and/or retention of virus-specific CD4+ T cells, yet exhibited limited effect on virus-specific CD8+ T cells. The response of CXCL10 neutralization on virus-specific T cell subsets is not due to differential expression of the CXCL10 receptor CXCR3 on T cells as there was no appreciable difference in receptor expression on virus-specific T cells during either acute or chronic disease. These findings emphasize the importance of virus-specific CD4+ T cells in amplifying demyelination in JHMV-infected mice. In addition, differential signals are required for trafficking and retention of virus-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cells during chronic demyelination in JHMV-infected mice.

  7. High prevalence of occult hepatitis C virus infection in patients with chronic hepatitis B virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, Inmaculada; Bartolomé, Javier; Quiroga, Juan Antonio; Carreño, Vicente

    2013-08-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection in the absence of detectable antibodies against HCV and of viral RNA in serum is called occult HCV infection. Its prevalence and clinical significance in chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is unknown. HCV RNA was tested for in the liver samples of 52 patients with chronic HBV infection and 21 (40 %) of them were positive for viral RNA (occult HCV infection). Liver fibrosis was found more frequently and the fibrosis score was significantly higher in patients with occult HCV than in negative ones, suggesting that occult HCV infection may have an impact on the clinical course of HBV infection.

  8. Extrahepatic manifestations of chronic hepatitis C virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cacoub, Patrice; Gragnani, Laura; Comarmond, Cloe; Zignego, Anna Linda

    2014-12-15

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infected patients are known to be at risk of developing liver complications i.e. cirrhosis and liver cancer. However, the risks of morbidity and mortality are underestimated because they do not take into account non-liver consequences of chronic hepatitis C virus infection. Numerous extrahepatic manifestations have been reported in up to 74% of patients, from perceived to disabling conditions. The majority of data concern hepatitis C virus-related autoimmune and/or lymphoproliferative disorders, from mixed cryoglobulinaemia vasculitis to frank lymphomas. More recently, other hepatitis C virus-associated disorders have been reported including cardiovascular, renal, metabolic, and central nervous system diseases. This review aims to outline most of the extrahepatic manifestations that are currently being investigated, including some of autoimmune and/or lymphoproliferative nature, and others in which the role of immune mechanisms appears less clear. Beyond the liver, hepatitis C virus chronic infection should be analyzed as a multifaceted systemic disease leading to heavy direct and indirect costs. The accurate consideration of extrahepatic consequences of such a systemic infection significantly increases the weight of its pathological burden. The need for effective viral eradication measures is underlined.

  9. Molecular identification of chronic bee paralysis virus infection in Apis mellifera colonies in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morimoto, Tomomi; Kojima, Yuriko; Yoshiyama, Mikio; Kimura, Kiyoshi; Yang, Bu; Kadowaki, Tatsuhiko

    2012-07-01

    Chronic bee paralysis virus (CBPV) infection causes chronic paralysis and loss of workers in honey bee colonies around the world. Although CBPV shows a worldwide distribution, it had not been molecularly detected in Japan. Our investigation of Apis mellifera and Apis cerana japonica colonies with RT-PCR has revealed CBPV infection in A. mellifera but not A. c. japonica colonies in Japan. The prevalence of CBPV is low compared with that of other viruses: deformed wing virus (DWV), black queen cell virus (BQCV), Israel acute paralysis virus (IAPV), and sac brood virus (SBV), previously reported in Japan. Because of its low prevalence (5.6%) in A. mellifera colonies, the incidence of colony losses by CBPV infection must be sporadic in Japan. The presence of the (-) strand RNA in dying workers suggests that CBPV infection and replication may contribute to their symptoms. Phylogenetic analysis demonstrates a geographic separation of Japanese isolates from European, Uruguayan, and mainland US isolates. The lack of major exchange of honey bees between Europe/mainland US and Japan for the recent 26 years (1985-2010) may have resulted in the geographic separation of Japanese CBPV isolates.

  10. The Impact of Negative Regulation on T cell Immunity During Chronic Hepatitis C Virus Infections: A study on immunity of liver and peripheral blood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.A.A. Claassen (Mark)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractThe hepatitis C virus (HCV) is very successful in establishing persistent infections by evading the immune system and predominantly infecting hepatocytes. HCV was known as non-A non-B hepatitis since the 1970’s and identified as a unique virus in 1989 1. HCV is a single-strand positive s

  11. The effect of lipopolysaccharide-induced obesity and its chronic inflammation on influenza virus-related pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Sun-Young; Sohn, Sung-Hwa; Lee, Sang-Yeon; Park, Hye-Lim; Park, Yong-Wook; Kim, Hun; Nam, Jae-Hwan

    2015-11-01

    Obese individuals show increased susceptibility to infection, low vaccine efficacy, and worse pathophysiology. However, it is unclear how obesity affects these events. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of obesity-triggered chronic inflammation on immune cells after influenza virus infection. Control and lipopolysaccharide mice, in which an osmotic pump continually released Tween saline or lipopolysaccharide, were prepared and 3 weeks later were infected with pandemic H1N1 2009 influenza A virus. In lipopolysaccharide mice, we found a reduction in macrophage activation markers in the steady state, and reduced production of pro-inflammatory cytokines including tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β, and interleukin-6, in restimulated peritoneal macrophages. Interestingly, lipopolysaccharide-triggered chronic inflammation exacerbated the severity of pathological symptoms in the lungs after challenge with influenza virus. Taken together, the increased severity of virus-induced symptoms in obese individuals with chronic inflammation may be, at least partially, caused by macrophage dysfunction.

  12. Molecular characteristics and stages of chronic hepatitis B virus infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ying-Hui Shi; Chang-He Shi

    2009-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is a common viral pathogen that causes a substantial health burden worldwide. Remarkable progress has been made in our understanding of the natural stages of chronic HBV infection. A dynamic balance between viral replication and host immune response is pivotal to the pathogenesis of liver disease. Knowledge of the HBV genome organization and replication cycle can unravel HBV genotypes and molecular variants, which contribute to the heterogeneity in outcome of chronic HBV infection. Most HBV infections are spontaneously resolved in immunocompetent adults, whereas they become chronic in most neonates and infants at a great risk of developing complications such as cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Those with chronic HBV infection may present in one of the four phases of infection: immune tolerance, immune clearance [hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg)-positive chronic hepatitis B (CHB)], inactive carrier state, and reactivation (HBeAg-negative CHB). Understanding the dynamic nature of chronic HBV infection is crucial in the management of HBV carriers. Long-term monitoring and optimal timing of antiviral therapy for chronic HBV infection help to prevent progression of HBV-related liver disease to its later stage, particularly in patients with higher risk markers of HCC, such as serum DNA concentration, HBeAg status, serum aminotransferase, HBV genotypes, and pre-core or core mutants.

  13. Extrahepatic manifestations of chronic hepatitis C virus infection

    OpenAIRE

    Cacoub, Patrice; Comarmond, Cloe; Domont, Fanny; Savey, Léa; Desbois, Anne claire; Saadoun, David

    2016-01-01

    International audience; During hepatitis C virus (HCV) chronic infection, extrahepatic manifestations are frequent and polymorphous. This article reports on a large cohort of patients with HCV-related autoimmune or lymphoproliferative disorders, from mixed cryoglobulinemia vasculitis to frank lymphomas. The relationship between HCV infection and such immune-related diseases has been formally demonstrated by epidemiological, clinical, immunological and pathological data, and results of therape...

  14. Chronic inflammatory cells and damaged limbal cells in pterygium

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    EB

    2013-09-03

    Sep 3, 2013 ... Background: Chronic inflammation in pterygium occurrence has not been explained. ... Methods: Chronic inflammatory changes and damaged limbal basal epithelial cells were assessed in 59 samples. ..... Acute and chronic.

  15. A case of multiple extrahepatic manifestations in a patient with untreated, chronic hepatitis C virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meillier, Andrew; McGee, Jean; Kartan, Saritha; Baskin, Stuart

    2014-02-01

    Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a complex, multi-organ disorder, not just limited to the liver. Mixed cryoglobulinemia (MC) type 2 is a common extrahepatic complication, in which immunoglobulin complexes deposit in vascular endothelium. This in turn creates a diffuse inflammatory reaction, leading to a variety of disorders involving multiple systems. We report the rare case of a patient with cryoglobulinemia, cutaneous vasculitis, membroproliferative glomerulonephritis, and B cell lymphoma with a variant t(6;10) translocation in the setting of an untreated, chronic HCV infection. This case highlights the challenge associated with diagnosing and managing such a complex presentation.

  16. A novel cause of chronic viral meningoencephalitis: Cache Valley virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Michael R; Suan, Dan; Duggins, Andrew; Schubert, Ryan D; Khan, Lillian M; Sample, Hannah A; Zorn, Kelsey C; Rodrigues Hoffman, Aline; Blick, Anna; Shingde, Meena; DeRisi, Joseph L

    2017-07-01

    Immunodeficient patients are particularly vulnerable to neuroinvasive infections that can be challenging to diagnose. Metagenomic next generation sequencing can identify unusual or novel microbes and is therefore well suited for investigating the etiology of chronic meningoencephalitis in immunodeficient patients. We present the case of a 34-year-old man with X-linked agammaglobulinemia from Australia suffering from 3 years of meningoencephalitis that defied an etiologic diagnosis despite extensive conventional testing, including a brain biopsy. Metagenomic next generation sequencing of his cerebrospinal fluid and brain biopsy tissue was performed to identify a causative pathogen. Sequences aligning to multiple Cache Valley virus genes were identified via metagenomic next generation sequencing. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemistry subsequently confirmed the presence of Cache Valley virus in the brain biopsy tissue. Cache Valley virus, a mosquito-borne orthobunyavirus, has only been identified in 3 immunocompetent North American patients with acute neuroinvasive disease. The reported severity ranges from a self-limiting meningitis to a rapidly fatal meningoencephalitis with multiorgan failure. The virus has never been known to cause a chronic systemic or neurologic infection in humans. Cache Valley virus has also never previously been detected on the Australian continent. Our research subject traveled to North and South Carolina and Michigan in the weeks prior to the onset of his illness. This report demonstrates that metagenomic next generation sequencing allows for unbiased pathogen identification, the early detection of emerging viruses as they spread to new locales, and the discovery of novel disease phenotypes. Ann Neurol 2017;82:105-114. © 2017 The Authors Annals of Neurology published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Neurological Association.

  17. Presence of Gumprecht shadows (smudge cells) in bovine leukemia virus-positive cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panei, Carlos Javier; Larsen, Alejandra; González, Ester Teresa; Echeverría, María Gabriela

    2013-11-01

    Enzootic Bovine Leukosis is a chronic disease caused by the bovine leukemia virus (BLV). Smudge cells, also known as Gumprecht shadows, are not simple artifacts of slide preparation, but ragged lymphoid cells found mainly in peripheral blood smears from human patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia. In this study, we report the presence of Gumprecht shadows in peripheral blood from BLV-positive cattle.

  18. Cell killing by avian leukosis viruses.

    OpenAIRE

    Weller, S K; Temin, H M

    1981-01-01

    Infection of chicken cells with a cytopathic avian leukosis virus resulted in the detachment of killed cells from the culture dish. The detached, dead cells contained more unintegrated viral DNA than the attached cells. These results confirm the hypothesis that cell killing after infection with a cytopathic avian leukosis virus is associated with accumulation of large amounts of unintegrated viral DNA. No accumulation of large amounts of integrated viral DNA was found in cells infected with c...

  19. Chronic hepatitis C virus infection and lymphoproliferative disorders: mixed cryoglobulinemia syndrome, monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance, and B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caviglia, Gian Paolo; Sciacca, Claudio; Abate, Maria Lorena; Olivero, Antonella; Rosso, Chiara; Touscoz, Giovanni Antonio; Ciancio, Alessia; Rizzetto, Mario; Smedile, Antonina

    2015-04-01

    Chronic hepatitis C (CHC) has been associated with lymphoproliferative disorders (LPD) such as mixed cryoglobulinemia syndrome (MCS), monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS), and B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma (B-NHL). The aim of the present study is to assess MCS, MGUS, and B-NHL prevalence in a cohort of CHC-infected patients and to evaluate the association of demographic, clinical, and virologic factors with the presence of LPDs. A total of 121 CHC patients with LPDs (50 M, 71 F; mean age 61.5 ± 11.8) and 130 CHC patients without extrahepatic manifestations (60 M, 70 F; mean age 60.4 ± 9.2) were retrospectively enrolled from a cohort of 1313 CHC patients between January 2006 and December 2013. Patients with LPDs included: 25 patients with MCS (9 M, 16 F; mean age 60.2 ± 1.4), 55 patients with MGUS (18 M, 37 F; mean age 61.3 ± 12.1), and 41 patients with B-NHL (23 M, 18F; mean age 62.5 ± 11.0) RESULTS: Patients with MCS (25/1313; 1.9%), MGUS (55/1313; 4.2%), and B-LNH (41/1313; 3.1%) did not differ in age, severity of liver disease, HCV genotype, and response to antiviral therapy. Using multivariate logistic regression analysis, a positive association was found between the presence of cirrhosis and MGUS (odds ratio [OR] = 2.8924, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.2693-6.5909; P = 0.012) and between cirrhosis and B-NHL (OR = 3.9407, 95% CI 1.7226-9.0153; P = 0.001), whereas no association with MCS diagnosis emerged. Despite the pathogenetic mechanism of HCV-associated LPDs is still unclear, cirrhosis is an additional risk factor for the development of lymphoproliferative disorders in patients with chronic HCV infection. © 2014 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  20. Respiratory viruses in acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koul, Parvaiz A; Mir, Hyder; Akram, Shabir; Potdar, Varsha; Chadha, Mandeep S

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AECOPD) cause significant morbidity, mortality, and an inexorable decline of lung function. Data from developed countries have shown viruses to be important causes of AECOPD, but data from developing countries like India are scant. We set out to determine the contribution of viruses in the causation of hospitalized patients with AECOPD. Methods: Twin nasopharyngeal/oropharyngeal swabs collected from 233 patients admitted with an acute AECOPD and tested for respiratory viruses including respiratory syncytial virus A and B, parainfluenza were (PIV) 1, 2, 3, and 4, human metapneumovirus (hMPV) A and B, influenza A and B, enterovirus, corona NL65, OC43, and 229E viruses, adenovirus 2 and 4, rhinovirus, and bocavirus, by duplex real time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) using CDC approved primers and probes. Samples positive for influenza A were subtyped for A/H1N1pdm09 and A/H3N2 whereas influenza B samples were subtyped into B/Yamagata and B/Victoria subtypes, using primers and probes recommended by CDC, USA. Results: Respiratory viruses were detected in 46 (19.7%) cases, influenza A/H3N2 and rhinoviruses being the most common viruses detected. More than one virus was isolated in four cases consisting of hMPV-B + adeno-2 + Inf-B; rhino + H3N2, PIV-1 + rhino; and PIV-1+ hMPV-B in one case each. Ancillary supportive therapeutic measures included bronchodilators, antibiotics, steroids, and ventilation (noninvasive in 42 and invasive in 4). Antiviral therapy was instituted in influenza-positive patients. Three patients with A/H3N2 infection died during hospitalization. Conclusions: We conclude that respiratory viruses are important contributors to AECOPD in India. Our data calls for prompt investigation during an exacerbation for viruses to obviate inappropriate antibiotic use and institute antiviral therapy in viral disease amenable to antiviral therapy. Appropriate

  1. Hepatitis B virus enhancer Ⅰ in chronic carriers resistant to interferon treatment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONG Jing-yu; H. W. Han

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To study the structural and preliminary functional characterization of the hepatitis B virus(HBV) enhancer Ⅰ in patients with chronic hepatitis B treated with interferon (IFN). METHODS The characteristics of the HBV enhancer Ⅰ in 12chronic carrier who were treated with alpha interferon was detected by the methods of molecular biology including PCR, cloning of PCR products, sequencing and cell culture.RESULTS Four of 6 patients cleared viral DNA; all 6 in this group also seroconverted from e antigen to antibody. Prior to therapy, the HBV enhancer Ⅰ region demonstrated many point mutations in all 6 patients who became nonresponders, compared to patients who responded to interferon. The mutated sequences, many of which were within regions of transcription factor binding, were significantly more active than the corresponding wild type sequences in reporter gene assays. CONCLUSION These results imply that the mutations found in nonresponders appear to render the virus less sensitive to interferon.

  2. Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) and Hepatitis B Virus (HBV) Can Coinfect the Same Hepatocyte in the Liver of Patients with Chronic HCV and Occult HBV Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Íñigo, E.; Bartolomé, J.; Ortiz-Movilla, N.; Platero, C.; López-Alcorocho, J. M.; Pardo, M.; Castillo, I.; Carreño, V.

    2005-01-01

    In this work, we have shown that hepatitis C virus (HCV) and hepatitis B virus (HBV) can coexist in the same hepatocyte using double fluorescent in situ hybridization in liver biopsy samples from patients with chronic HCV infection with occult HBV infection. Digital image analysis of hybridization signals showed that the HBV DNA levels in coinfected hepatocytes were lower than those in cells infected only with HBV. This finding supports the hypothesis of inhibition of HBV replication by HCV. Furthermore, HCV RNA levels were lower in coinfected cells than in cells infected only with HCV, suggesting that HBV may also inhibit HCV replication. PMID:16306629

  3. Hepatitis C virus (HCV) and hepatitis B virus (HBV) can coinfect the same hepatocyte in the liver of patients with chronic HCV and occult HBV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Iñigo, E; Bartolomé, J; Ortiz-Movilla, N; Platero, C; López-Alcorocho, J M; Pardo, M; Castillo, I; Carreño, V

    2005-12-01

    In this work, we have shown that hepatitis C virus (HCV) and hepatitis B virus (HBV) can coexist in the same hepatocyte using double fluorescent in situ hybridization in liver biopsy samples from patients with chronic HCV infection with occult HBV infection. Digital image analysis of hybridization signals showed that the HBV DNA levels in coinfected hepatocytes were lower than those in cells infected only with HBV. This finding supports the hypothesis of inhibition of HBV replication by HCV. Furthermore, HCV RNA levels were lower in coinfected cells than in cells infected only with HCV, suggesting that HBV may also inhibit HCV replication.

  4. [Susceptibility of immunocompetent cells to animal viruses].

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Guerrero, J A

    1990-06-01

    The infection of several cell lines of the immune system by animal viruses has been studied. In general, those cell lines derived either from the myeloid or from the lymphoid differentiation pathways were poorly affected by these viruses. Only Semliki Forest Virus (SFV) and poliovirus were able to replicate in most of the cell lines assayed, inhibiting the cellular protein synthesis. However, this inhibition was not accompanied by a significant expression of viral proteins. These effects were not observed with UV irradiated virus suggesting that intact viral particles were required to interfere with the host macromolecular synthesis.

  5. Influence of occult hepatitis B virus infection in chronic hepatitis C outcomes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Conrado M Fernandez-Rodriguez; Maria Luisa Gutierrez; José Luis Lledó; Maria Luisa Casas

    2011-01-01

    Persistence of hepatitis B virus-DNA in the sera, peripheral blood mononuclear cells or in the liver of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg)-negative patients with or without serological markers of previous exposure (antibodies to HBsAg and/or to HB-core antigen) defines the entity called occult hepatitis B infection (OBI). Co-infection with hepatitis B and hepatitis C viruses is frequent in highly endemic areas. While this co-infection increases the risk of liver disease progression, development of cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma and also increases the rate of therapeutic failure to interferon-based treatments than either virus alone, a potentially negative effect of OBI on clinical outcomes and of therapeutic response to current antiviral regimes of patients with chronic hepatitis C remains inconclusive.

  6. Viruses, dendritic cells and the lung

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graham Barney S

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The interaction between viruses and dendritic cells (DCs is varied and complex. DCs are key elements in the development of a host response to pathogens such as viruses, but viruses have developed survival tactics to either evade or diminish the immune system that functions to kill and eliminate these micro-organisms. In the present review we summarize current concepts regarding the function of DCs in the immune system, our understanding of how viruses alter DC function to attenuate both the virus-specific and global immune response, and how we may be able to exploit DC function to prevent or treat viral infections.

  7. Therapeutic strategies for a functional cure of chronic hepatitis B virus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinhong Chang

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Treatment of chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV infection with the viral DNA polymerase inhibitors or pegylated alpha-interferon has led to a significant retardation in HBV-related disease progression and reduction in mortality related to chronic hepatitis B associated liver decompensation and hepatocellular carcinoma. However, chronic HBV infection remains not cured. The reasons for the failure to eradicate HBV infection by long-term antiviral therapy are not completely understood. However, clinical studies suggest that the intrinsic stability of the nuclear form of viral genome, the covalently closed circular (ccc DNA, sustained low level viral replication under antiviral therapy and homeostatic proliferation of hepatocytes are the critical virological and pathophysiological factors that affect the persistence and therapeutic outcomes of HBV infection. More importantly, despite potent suppression of HBV replication in livers of the treated patients, the dysfunction of HBV-specific antiviral immunity persists. The inability of the immune system to recognize cells harboring HBV infection and to cure or eliminate cells actively producing virus is the biggest challenge to finding a cure. Unraveling the complex virus–host interactions that lead to persistent infection should facilitate the rational design of antivirals and immunotherapeutics to cure chronic HBV infection.

  8. "The evil virus cell": Students' knowledge and beliefs about viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Uwe K; Enzinger, Sonja M; Fink, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    Education about virus biology at school is of pivotal interest to raise public awareness concerning means of disease transmission and, thus, methods to prevent infection, and to reduce unnecessary antibiotic treatment due to patient pressure on physicians in case of viral diseases such as influenza. This study aimed at making visible the knowledge of Austrian high school and university students with respect to virus biology, virus structure and health-education issues. The data presented here stem from comprehensive questionnaire analyses, including the task to draw a virus, from a cross-sectional study with 133 grade 7 and 199 grade 10 high school students, and 133 first-year biology and 181 first-year non-biology university students. Analyses were performed both quantitatively and qualitatively. ANOVA revealed a highly significant group effect for total knowledge relating to virus biology and health issues (F(3, 642) = 44.17, p virus as a pro- or eukaryotic cell, or falsely naming malaria as a viral disease. Since there was no significant difference in virus-related knowledge between high schools, virus biology seems to have been taught similarly among the tested schools. However, the majority of participants stated that the virus-related knowledge they had acquired at school was not sufficient. Based on the results presented here we urgently suggest improving and intensifying teaching this topic at school, since virus-related knowledge was by far too fragmentary among many participants. Such lack of health-relevant knowledge may contribute to pressure on physicians by patients to unnecessarily prescribe antibiotics, and possibly lead to potentially dangerous neglect concerning vaccination. The effectiveness of newly developed virus-related teaching units and material could be tested with the instrument used here.

  9. Antiviral treatment for chronic hepatitis B virus infection--immune modulation or viral suppression?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.H.C.J. Buster (Erik); H.L.A. Janssen (Harry)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractThe availability of nucleoside analogues has broadened treatment options for chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV ) infection. Registered treatment for chronic hepatitis B currently consists of (pegylated) interferon, lamivudine and adefovir, while entecavir is expected to be

  10. Antiviral treatment for chronic hepatitis B virus infection--immune modulation or viral suppression?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.H.C.J. Buster (Erik); H.L.A. Janssen (Harry)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractThe availability of nucleoside analogues has broadened treatment options for chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV ) infection. Registered treatment for chronic hepatitis B currently consists of (pegylated) interferon, lamivudine and adefovir, while entecavir is expected to be

  11. Current progress in the development of therapeutic vaccines for chronic hepatitis B virus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faezeh Ghasemi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Chronic hepatitis B is still a major public health issue despite the successful prophylactic vaccination attempts. Chronicity of hepatitis B virus(HBV is mainly due to its ability to debilitate host's immune system. Therefore, major measures have been taken to stop this process and help patients with chronic hepatitis B infection recover from their illness. While satisfactory results have been achieved using preventive HBV vaccines, a reliable and effective therapeutic treatment is still in need of extensive studies. Current treatments for chronic hepatitis B include direct antiviral agents and nucleoside/nucleotide analogs, which are not always effective and are also costly. In addition, due to the fact that chronic HBV is responsible for debilitation of the immune system, studies have focused on developing therapeutic vaccines to help host's immune system recover and limit the infection. Several approaches including but not restricted to recombinant peptide-based, DNA-based, viral vector-based, and cell-based approaches are currently in use to develop therapeutic vaccines against the chronic form of HBV infection. In the current review, the authors will first discuss the role of the immune system in chronic hepatitis B infection and will then focus on latest advancements in therapeutic vaccination of HBV especially the clinical trials that have been carried out so far.

  12. Chronic cutaneous varicella zoster virus infection complicating dermatomyositis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoesly, Fridolin J; Sluzevich, Jason C

    2014-04-01

    Chronic cutaneous varicella zoster virus (VZV) infection has not been previously reported or characterized as a complication of dermatomyositis. Two patients with non-malignancy-associated dermatomyositis, treated with long-term prednisone and methotrexate, developed persistent, painless ulcers ultimately established to be secondary to chronic VZV. The absence of pain or a history suggestive of acute VZV, and the lack of characteristic histopathology, resulted in a lengthy delay in diagnosis. Polymerase chain reaction and tissue immunohistochemistry were positive for VZV, and treatment with valacyclovir resulted in complete clearance. Diagnostic testing for VZV should thus be considered in the evaluation of ulcerative lesions in patients with dermatomyositis. The increased incidence of acute VZV in combination with the nature and duration of immunosuppressive treatment in this patient population may be contributory.

  13. Clonal repertoires of virus-specific CD8+ T lymphocytes are shared in mucosal and systemic compartments during chronic simian immunodeficiency virus infection in rhesus monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sircar, Piya; Furr, Kathryn L; Dorosh, Lauren A; Letvin, Norman L

    2010-08-15

    Because it is thought that mucosal tissues play a fundamental role in early HIV/SIV infection, it is crucial to understand the virus-specific responses in mucosal tissues to facilitate devising strategies to prevent and control these infections. We have employed TCR repertoire analyses to define the clonal composition of a dominant SIV epitope-specific CD8(+) T cell population in mucosal and systemic compartments of SIV-infected rhesus monkeys during both acute and chronic infection. We show that the CD8(+) T cell repertoire in mucosal tissues of uninfected rhesus monkeys is oligoclonal, whereas the CD8(+) T cell repertoire in blood is polyclonal. Early postinfection, the SIV-specific CD8(+) T cell clonal repertoire is distinct in mucosal compartments and peripheral blood. However, we observed a narrowing of the virus-specific CD8(+) T cell clonal repertoire in all sampled anatomic compartments as infection progressed from acute to chronic, and there was comparable clonal diversity in all anatomic compartments. We showed during chronic infection that the same clonal populations of virus-specific CD8(+) T cells are present in all compartments. These data indicate that the SIV-specific CD8(+) T cells in systemic and mucosal sites have a shared clonal origin and are, therefore, capable of both responding to infection in the systemic circulation and trafficking to mucosal tissues.

  14. Immunological aspects of antiviral therapy of chronic hepatitis B virus and hepatitis C virus infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehermann, Barbara; Bertoletti, Antonio

    2015-02-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) cause a large proportion of acute and chronic liver disease worldwide. Over the past decades many immunological studies defined host immune responses that mediate spontaneous clearance of acute HBV and HCV infection. However, host immune responses are also relevant in the context of treatment-induced clearance of chronic HBV and HCV infection. First, the pretreatment level of interferon-stimulated genes as well as genetic determinants of innate immune responses, such as single nucleotide polymorphisms near the IFNL3 gene, are strong predictors of the response to interferon-alpha (IFN-α)-based therapy. Second, IFN-α, which has been a mainstay of HBV and HCV therapy over decades, and ribavirin, which has also been included in interferon-free direct antiviral therapy for HCV, modulate host immune responses. Third, both IFN-α-based and IFN-α-free treatment regimens of HBV and HCV infection alter the short-term and long-term adaptive immune response against these viruses. Finally, treatment studies have not just improved the clinical outcomes, but also provided opportunities to study virus-host interaction. This review summarizes our current knowledge on how a patient's immune response affects the treatment outcome of HBV and HCV infection and how innate and adaptive immune responses themselves are altered by the different treatment regimens.

  15. The receptors for gibbon ape leukemia virus and amphotropic murine leukemia virus are not downregulated in productively infected cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eiden Maribeth V

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Over the last several decades it has been noted, using a variety of different methods, that cells infected by a specific gammaretrovirus are resistant to infection by other retroviruses that employ the same receptor; a phenomenon termed receptor interference. Receptor masking is thought to provide an earlier means of blocking superinfection, whereas receptor down regulation is generally considered to occur in chronically infected cells. Results We used replication-competent GFP-expressing viruses containing either an amphotropic murine leukemia virus (A-MLV or the gibbon ape leukemia virus (GALV envelope. We also constructed similar viruses containing fluorescence-labeled Gag proteins for the detection of viral particles. Using this repertoire of reagents together with a wide range of antibodies, we were able to determine the presence and availability of viral receptors, and detect viral envelope proteins and particles presence on the cell surface of chronically infected cells. Conclusions A-MLV or GALV receptors remain on the surface of chronically infected cells and are detectable by respective antibodies, indicating that these receptors are not downregulated in these infected cells as previously proposed. We were also able to detect viral envelope proteins on the infected cell surface and infected cells are unable to bind soluble A-MLV or GALV envelopes indicating that receptor binding sites are masked by endogenously expressed A-MLV or GALV viral envelope. However, receptor masking does not completely prevent A-MLV or GALV superinfection.

  16. RANTES gene single nucleotide polymorphisms and expression in patients with chronic hepatitis B virus infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DUAN Zhong-ping; ZHAO Xiu-ying; HUANG De-zhuang; HE Li-xiang; CHEN Yu; ZHAO Chun-hui; ZHENG Bo-jian

    2005-01-01

    Background Regulated on activation, normal T-cell expressed and secreted (RANTES) plays a critical role in T-lymphocyte activation and proliferation. The process is involved in both acute and chronic phases of inflammation. The present study was to ascertain the possible correlations between chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection and the RANTES gene polymorphisms and their expression. Methods The study included 130 HBV negative healthy donors and 152 patients with chronic hepatitis B (CHB) virus infection. The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLPs) were used to detect RANTES gene single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). RANTES levels in the platelet depleted plasma were detected by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Results RANTES alleles -403G, -28C and In1.1T were the predominant alleles in the subjects studied. No significant correlation was found between CHB infection and the RANTES alleles, while a significant correlation was found between CHB infection and increased RANTES expression in platelet depleted plasma (P<0.05). Conclusions SNPs in RANTES gene do not affect chronic HBV infection or the outcome of interferon-α treatment in patients positive for HBV "e" antigen (HBeAg+). However, patients with CHB infection express the higher levels of plasma RANTES, which is thus associated with CHB infection.

  17. Chronic hepatitis C virus infection and lipoprotein metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aizawa, Yoshio; Seki, Nobuyoshi; Nagano, Tomohisa; Abe, Hiroshi

    2015-09-28

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a hepatotrophic virus and a major cause of chronic liver disease, including hepatocellular carcinoma, worldwide. The life cycle of HCV is closely associated with the metabolism of lipids and lipoproteins. The main function of lipoproteins is transporting lipids throughout the body. Triglycerides, free cholesterol, cholesteryl esters, and phospholipids are the major components of the transported lipids. The pathway of HCV assembly and secretion is closely linked to lipoprotein production and secretion, and the infectivity of HCV particles largely depends on the interaction of lipoproteins. Moreover, HCV entry into hepatocytes is strongly influenced by lipoproteins. The key lipoprotein molecules mediating these interactions are apolipoproteins. Apolipoproteins are amphipathic proteins on the surface of a lipoprotein particle, which help stabilize lipoprotein structure. They perform a key role in lipoprotein metabolism by serving as receptor ligands, enzyme co-factors, and lipid transport carriers. Understanding the association between the life cycle of HCV and lipoprotein metabolism is important because each step of the life cycle of HCV that is associated with lipoprotein metabolism is a potential target for anti-HCV therapy. In this article, we first concisely review the nature of lipoprotein and its metabolism to better understand the complicated interaction of HCV with lipoprotein. Then, we review the outline of the processes of HCV assembly, secretion, and entry into hepatocytes, focusing on the association with lipoproteins. Finally, we discuss the clinical aspects of disturbed lipid/lipoprotein metabolism and the significance of dyslipoproteinemia in chronic HCV infection with regard to abnormal apolipoproteins.

  18. Antiviral treatment for chronic hepatitis C in patients with human immunodeficiency virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iorio, Alfonso; Marchesini, Emanuela; Awad, Tahany;

    2010-01-01

    Antiviral treatment for chronic hepatitis C may be less effective if patients are co-infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV).......Antiviral treatment for chronic hepatitis C may be less effective if patients are co-infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)....

  19. Chronic active Epstein-Barr virus infection in an adult with no detectable immune deficiency.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boer, M. de; Mol, M.J.T.M.; Bogman, M.J.J.T.; Galama, J.M.D.; Raymakers, R.A.P.

    2003-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) establishes lifelong latent infection. In some patients the host-virus balance is disturbed, resulting in a chronic active EBV infection. The following case illustrates the difficulty in diagnosing and treating chronic EBV infection. CASE: A 30-year-old woman w

  20. Umbilical Cord-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cell Transplantation in Hepatitis B Virus Related Acute-on-Chronic Liver Failure Treated with Plasma Exchange and Entecavir: a 24-Month Prospective Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yu-Hua; Xu, Ying; Wu, Hua-Mei; Yang, Jing; Yang, Li-Hong; Yue-Meng, Wan

    2016-12-01

    Search for an effective therapy for patients with hepatitis B virus related acute-on-chronic liver failure (HBV-ACLF) remains an important issue. This study investigated the efficacy of umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stem cell (UC-MSC) transplantation in patients with HBV-ACLF. 45 consecutive entecavir-treated HBV-ACLF patients were prospectively studied. Among these patients, 11 received both plasma exchange (PE) and a single transplantation of UC-MSCs (group A), while 34 received only PE (group B). The primary endpoint was survival at 24 months. Compared with group B, levels of albumin, alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, total bilirubin, direct bilirubin, prothrombin time (PT), international normalized ratio (INR) and model for end-stage liver disease score in group A improved significantly at 4 weeks after transplantation (p < 0.05). Levels of albumin, PT and INR in group A were also markedly improved at 24 months (p < 0.05). Group A had significantly higher cumulative survival rate at 24 months (54.5 % v.s. 26.5 %, p = 0.015 by log rank test). Between the two groups, levels of creatinine, White blood cell, hemoglobin and platelet were similar. HBeAg loss and hepatocellular carcinoma incidence were similar at 24 months. Group assignment (relative risk: 2.926, 95%confidence interval: 1.043-8.203, p = 0.041) was an independent predictor for survival at 24 months. Success rate of UC-MSC transplantation was 100 % in group A. No severe adverse event was observed in any patient. UC-MSC transplantation is safe and effective for HBV-ACLF patients treated with PE and entecavir. It further improves the hepatic function and survival.

  1.  Association between hepatitis B virus and chronic kidney disease: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabrizi, Fabrizio; Donato, Francesca M; Messa, Piergiorgio

     Background. Hepatitis B virus infection and chronic kidney disease are prevalent and remain a major public health problem worldwide. It remains unclear how infection with hepatitis B virus impacts on the development and progression of chronic kidney disease.

  2. Multiple immune factors are involved in controlling acute and chronic chikungunya virus infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yee Suan Poo

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The recent epidemic of the arthritogenic alphavirus, chikungunya virus (CHIKV has prompted a quest to understand the correlates of protection against virus and disease in order to inform development of new interventions. Herein we highlight the propensity of CHIKV infections to persist long term, both as persistent, steady-state, viraemias in multiple B cell deficient mouse strains, and as persistent RNA (including negative-strand RNA in wild-type mice. The knockout mouse studies provided evidence for a role for T cells (but not NK cells in viraemia suppression, and confirmed the role of T cells in arthritis promotion, with vaccine-induced T cells also shown to be arthritogenic in the absence of antibody responses. However, MHC class II-restricted T cells were not required for production of anti-viral IgG2c responses post CHIKV infection. The anti-viral cytokines, TNF and IFNγ, were persistently elevated in persistently infected B and T cell deficient mice, with adoptive transfer of anti-CHIKV antibodies unable to clear permanently the viraemia from these, or B cell deficient, mice. The NOD background increased viraemia and promoted arthritis, with B, T and NK deficient NOD mice showing high-levels of persistent viraemia and ultimately succumbing to encephalitic disease. In wild-type mice persistent CHIKV RNA and negative strand RNA (detected for up to 100 days post infection was associated with persistence of cellular infiltrates, CHIKV antigen and stimulation of IFNα/β and T cell responses. These studies highlight that, secondary to antibodies, several factors are involved in virus control, and suggest that chronic arthritic disease is a consequence of persistent, replicating and transcriptionally active CHIKV RNA.

  3. Altered T cell costimulation during chronic hepatitis B infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barboza, Luisa; Salmen, Siham; Peterson, Darrell L; Montes, Henry; Colmenares, Melisa; Hernández, Manuel; Berrueta-Carrillo, Leidith E; Berrueta, Lisbeth

    2009-01-01

    T-cell response to hepatitis B virus (HBV) is vigorous, polyclonal and multi-specific in patients with acute hepatitis who ultimately clear the virus, whereas it is narrow and inefficient in patients with chronic disease, where inappropriate early activation events could account for viral persistence. We investigated the induction of activation receptors and cytokine production in response to HBcAg and crosslinking of CD28 molecules, in CD4+ cells from a group of chronically infected patients (CIP) and naturally immune subjects (NIS). We demonstrated that CD4+ cells from CIP did not increase levels of CD40L and CD69 following stimulation with HBcAg alone or associated to CD28 crosslinking, in contrast to subjects that resolved the infection (p<0.01). Furthermore, CD4+ cells from CIP produced elevated levels of IL-10 in response to HBcAg. These results suggest that a predominant inhibitory environment may be responsible for altered T cell costimulation, representing a pathogenic mechanism for viral persistence.

  4. Manifestations of chronic hepatitis C virus infection beyond the liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Ira M; Cacoub, Patrice; Dal Maso, Luigino; Harrison, Stephen A; Younossi, Zobair M

    2010-12-01

    In addition to its effects in the liver, chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection can have serious consequences for other organ systems. Extrahepatic manifestations include mixed cryoglobulinemia (MC) vasculitis, lymphoproliferative disorders, renal disease, insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes, sicca syndrome, rheumatoid arthritis-like polyarthritis, and autoantibody production; reductions in quality of life involve fatigue, depression, and cognitive impairment. MC vasculitis, certain types of lymphoma, insulin resistance, and cognitive function appear to respond to anti-HCV therapy. However, treatments for HCV and other biopsychosocial factors can reduce quality of life and complicate management. HCV treatment has a high overall cost that increases when extrahepatic manifestations are considered. HCV appears to have a role in the pathogenesis of MC vasculitis, certain types of lymphoma, and insulin resistance. Clinicians who treat patients with HCV infections should be aware of potential extrahepatic manifestations and how these can impact and alter management of their patients.

  5. Female hepatology: Favorable role of estrogen in chronic liver disease with hepatitis B virus infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is the most common cause of hepatic fibrosis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), mainly as a result of chronic necroinflammatory liver disease. A characteristic feature of chronic hepatitis B infection, alcoholic liver disease and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is hepatic steatosis. Hepatic steatosis leads to an increase in lipid peroxidation in hepatocytes, which, in turn, activates hepatic stellate cells (HSCs). HSCs are the primary target cells for inflammatory and oxidative stimuli, and these cells produce extracellular matrix components.Chronic hepatitis B appears to progress more rapidly in males than in females, and NAFLD, cirrhosis and HCC are predominately diseases that tend to occur in men and postmenopausal women. Premenopausal women have lower hepatic iron stores and a decreased production of proinflammatory cytokines. Hepatic steatosis has been observed in aromatase-deficient mice, and has been shown to decrease in animals after estradiol treatment. Estradiol is a potent endogenous antioxidant which suppresses hepatic fibrosis in animal models, and attenuates induction of redox sensitive transcription factors, hepatocyte apoptosis and HSC activation by inhibiting a generation of reactive oxygen species in primary cultures. Variant estrogen receptors are expressed to a greater extent in male patients with chronic liver disease than in females. These lines of evidence suggest that the greater progression of hepatic fibrosis and HCC in men and postmenopausal women may be due, at least in part, to lower production of estradiol and a reduced response to the action of estradiol. A better understanding of the basic mechanisms underlying the sex-associated differences in hepatic fibrogenesis and carciogenesis may open up new avenues for the prevention and treatment of chronic liver disease.

  6. 77 FR 30293 - Recommendations for the Identification of Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) Chronic Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-22

    ... Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) Chronic Infection AGENCY: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC...) announces draft recommendations for identification of persons with HCV chronic infection, available for public comment. The recommendations are intended to increase the proportion of persons with chronic...

  7. My treatment approach to chronic hepatitis C virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiffman, Mitchell L; Long, April G; James, Amy; Alexander, Phillip

    2014-07-01

    The treatment of chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) is evolving rapidly. In 2014, the standard of care and new backbone of HCV treatment is the polymerase inhibitor sofosbuvir (SOF). Our treatment approach in patients with HCV genotype 1 is 12 weeks of SOF, peginterferon (PEGINF), and ribavirin (RBV). In patients with cirrhosis or extrahepatic manifestations of HCV who cannot tolerate PEGINF, we use 12 weeks of SOF and simeprevir. The latter is less costly and more effective than SOF and RBV for 24 weeks. Our treatment approach in all patients with genotype 2 is SOF and RBV for 12 weeks. Hepatitis C virus genotype 3 is now the most costly and difficult to cure. Our approach to treatment-naive patients with genotype 3 is SOF and RBV for 24 weeks. In patients who have previously undergone PEGINF and RBV treatment, we use PEGINF, SOF, and RBV for 12 weeks, which is equally if not more effective and less costly than SOF and RBV for 24 weeks. Patients with cirrhosis who cannot tolerate PEGINF should be treated for 24 weeks with SOF and RBV, although the sustained virologic response is suboptimal.

  8. Pathogenesis of occult chronic hepatitis B virus infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rocio Aller de la Fuente; María L Gutiérrez; Javier Garcia-Samaniego; Conrado Fernández-Rodriguez; Jose Luis Lledó; Gregorio Castellano

    2011-01-01

    Occult hepatitis B infection (OBI) is characterized by hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA in serum in the absence of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) presenting HBsAg-negative and anti-HBc positive serological patterns. Occult HBV status is associated in some cases with mutant viruses undetectable by HBsAg assays; but more frequently it is due to a strong suppression of viral replication and gene expression. OBI is an entity with world-wide diffusion. The failure to detect HBsAg, despite the persistence of the viral DNA, is due in most cases to the strong suppression of viral replication and gene expression that characterizes this "occult" HBV infection; although the mechanisms responsible for suppression of HBV are not well understood. The majority of OBI cases are secondary to overt HBV infection and represent a residual low viremia level suppressed by a strong immune response together with histological derangements which occurred during acute or chronic HBV infection. Much evidence suggests that it can favour the progression of liver fibrosis and the development of hepatocellular carcinoma.

  9. Recent Advances in Hepatitis C Virus Cell Entry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean Dubuisson

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available More than 170 million patients worldwide are chronically infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV. Prevalence rates range from 0.5% in Northern European countries to 28% in some areas of Egypt. HCV is hepatotropic, and in many countries chronic hepatitis C is a leading cause of liver disease including fibrosis, cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. HCV persists in 50–85% of infected patients, and once chronic infection is established, spontaneous clearance is rare. HCV is a member of the Flaviviridae family, in which it forms its own genus. Many lines of evidence suggest that the HCV life cycle displays many differences to that of other Flaviviridae family members. Some of these differences may be due to the close interaction of HCV with its host’s lipid and particular triglyceride metabolism in the liver, which may explain why the virus can be found in association with lipoproteins in serum of infected patients. This review focuses on the molecular events underlying the HCV cell entry process and the respective roles of cellular co-factors that have been implied in these events. These include, among others, the lipoprotein receptors low density lipoprotein receptor and scavenger receptor BI, the tight junction factors occludin and claudin-1 as well as the tetraspanin CD81. We discuss the roles of these cellular factors in HCV cell entry and how association of HCV with lipoproteins may modulate the cell entry process.

  10. Lassa Virus Cell Entry Reveals New Aspects of Virus-Host Cell Interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torriani, Giulia; Galan-Navarro, Clara; Kunz, Stefan

    2017-02-15

    Viral entry represents the first step of every viral infection and is a determinant for the host range and disease potential of a virus. Here, we review the latest developments on cell entry of the highly pathogenic Old World arenavirus Lassa virus, providing novel insights into the complex virus-host cell interaction of this important human pathogen. We will cover new discoveries on the molecular mechanisms of receptor recognition, endocytosis, and the use of late endosomal entry factors.

  11. Cell Culture Models for the Investigation of Hepatitis B and D Virus Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eloi R. Verrier

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV and hepatitis D virus (HDV infections are major causes of liver disease and hepatocellular carcinoma worldwide. Despite the presence of an efficient preventive vaccine, more than 250 million patients are chronically infected with HBV. Current antivirals effectively control but only rarely cure chronic infection. While the molecular biology of the two viruses has been characterized in great detail, the absence of robust cell culture models for HBV and/or HDV infection has limited the investigation of virus-host interactions. Native hepatoma cell lines do not allow viral infection, and the culture of primary hepatocytes, the natural host cell for the viruses, implies a series of constraints restricting the possibilities of analyzing virus-host interactions. Recently, the discovery of the sodium taurocholate co-transporting polypeptide (NTCP as a key HBV/HDV cell entry factor has opened the door to a new era of investigation, as NTCP-overexpressing hepatoma cells acquire susceptibility to HBV and HDV infections. In this review, we summarize the major cell culture models for HBV and HDV infection, discuss their advantages and limitations and highlight perspectives for future developments.

  12. Cell Culture Models for the Investigation of Hepatitis B and D Virus Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verrier, Eloi R.; Colpitts, Che C.; Schuster, Catherine; Zeisel, Mirjam B.; Baumert, Thomas F.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis D virus (HDV) infections are major causes of liver disease and hepatocellular carcinoma worldwide. Despite the presence of an efficient preventive vaccine, more than 250 million patients are chronically infected with HBV. Current antivirals effectively control but only rarely cure chronic infection. While the molecular biology of the two viruses has been characterized in great detail, the absence of robust cell culture models for HBV and/or HDV infection has limited the investigation of virus-host interactions. Native hepatoma cell lines do not allow viral infection, and the culture of primary hepatocytes, the natural host cell for the viruses, implies a series of constraints restricting the possibilities of analyzing virus-host interactions. Recently, the discovery of the sodium taurocholate co-transporting polypeptide (NTCP) as a key HBV/HDV cell entry factor has opened the door to a new era of investigation, as NTCP-overexpressing hepatoma cells acquire susceptibility to HBV and HDV infections. In this review, we summarize the major cell culture models for HBV and HDV infection, discuss their advantages and limitations and highlight perspectives for future developments. PMID:27657111

  13. Internist diagnosis and management of chronic hepatitis B virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMahon, Brian J; Block, Joan; Haber, Barbara; London, Thomas; McHugh, James A; Perrillo, Robert; Neubauer, Richard

    2012-11-01

    Chronic infection with the hepatitis B virus can lead to hepatocellular carcinoma and cirrhosis in up to 25% of infected individuals. As many as 2 million individuals in the US may have chronic hepatitis B infection, most of whom immigrated to the US from hepatitis B-endemic regions of the world. A 2010 report from the Institute of Medicine noted that two thirds of patients with hepatitis B are unaware of their infection, and most health care providers do not screen for hepatitis B or know how to manage hepatitis B-positive patients. In 2010, the Hepatitis B Foundation convened a group of primary care providers to consider the existing evidenced-based recommendations and strategies for implementation of hepatitis B screening into routine practice. The group designed an easy-to-use algorithm for screening, initial evaluation, ongoing management, and referral to a subspecialist when appropriate. Internal medicine specialists, including primary care providers and subspecialists, need to understand the steps they can take to address this often under-recognized disorder. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Cell Transformation by RNA Viruses: An Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hung Fan

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Studies of oncogenic viruses have made seminal contributions to the molecular biology of cancer. Key discoveries include the identification of viral oncogenes and cellular proto-oncogenes, elucidation of signal transduction pathways, and identification of tumor suppressor genes. The origins of cancer virology began almost exactly one hundred years ago with the discovery of avian sarcoma and acute leukemia viruses—RNA-containing viruses of the retrovirus family. The study of animal cancer viruses accelerated beginning in the late 1960s and early 1970s, with the discovery of DNA viruses that could transform cells in culture, and the development of quantitative assays for transformation by DNA and RNA-containing tumor viruses. The discovery of reverse transcriptase in retroviruses in 1970 also greatly accelerated research on these viruses. Indeed RNA and DNA tumor viruses led the way in cancer molecular biology during this era before molecular cloning. It was possible to physically purify virus particles and generate specific hybridization probes for viral DNA and RNA at a time when it was not possible to analyze cellular genes in the same manner. [...

  15. Changes of Kupffer cells during tree shrew chronically infected with hep-atitis B virus%树鼩慢性感染乙肝病毒过程中枯否细胞变化的意义

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    阮萍; 孙雯; 李瑗; 肖健; 杨春; 苏建家; 欧超; 曹骥; 骆成漂; 唐艳萍; 秦虹

    2014-01-01

    AIM:To explore the changes and significance of Kupffer cells in the process of tree shrew chroni -cally infected with hepatitis B virus (HBV).METHODS:The animals were divided into 3 groups.Group A consists of 6 tree shrews that were identified as persistently infected with HBV;group B consists of 3 tree shrews that were suspected as persistently infected with HBV;group C consists of 4 tree shrews that were not inoculated with HBV and were applied as normal controls.Liver biopsies were collected regularly from all animals , and the Kupffer cells were isolated , purified and primarily cultured.The techniques of flow cytometry , immunohistochemistry, lysosomal fluorescent probe staining and real-time RT-PCR were applied to determine the number and function of these Kupffer cells .RESULTS: The result showed that the count and proportion of CD 163+cells in group A were significantly higher than those in group B and group C ( P<0.05).Meanwhile, the fluorescence intensity levels of lysosomal , the number of lysozyme-positive cells and the mRNA ex-pression level of TNF-αin the Kupffer cells in group A were significantly lower than those in group B and group C ( P<0.05).CONCLUSION:Kupffer cells may play a regulatory role during host’s chronic HBV infection.%目的:探索枯否细胞在树鼩感染乙肝病毒( HBV)慢性化过程中的意义。方法:树鼩分为3组:A组6只,为前期实验已确定慢性感染HBV的树鼩;B组3只,为疑似慢性感染HBV的树鼩;C组4只,为未接种HBV的正常对照树鼩。全部动物定期抽血和进行肝活检手术;对手术切取的树鼩肝组织进行枯否细胞的分离、纯化和原代培养,采用流式细胞术、细胞免疫组化、溶酶体荧光探针及实时荧光定量RT-PCR等方法检测CD163+细胞数量、溶酶体数量、溶菌酶的表达及肿瘤坏死因子α( TNF-α) mRNA表达水平。结果:(1)慢性感染HBV的树鼩肝脏枯否细胞比例及肝组织内CD163

  16. Molecular Identification of Chronic Bee Paralysis Virus Infection in Apis mellifera Colonies in Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomomi Morimoto

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Chronic bee paralysis virus (CBPV infection causes chronic paralysis and loss of workers in honey bee colonies around the world. Although CBPV shows a worldwide distribution, it had not been molecularly detected in Japan. Our investigation of Apis mellifera and Apis cerana japonica colonies with RT-PCR has revealed CBPV infection in A. mellifera but not A. c. japonica colonies in Japan. The prevalence of CBPV is low compared with that of other viruses: deformed wing virus (DWV, black queen cell virus (BQCV, Israel acute paralysis virus (IAPV, and sac brood virus (SBV, previously reported in Japan. Because of its low prevalence (5.6% in A. mellifera colonies, the incidence of colony losses by CBPV infection must be sporadic in Japan. The presence of the (− strand RNA in dying workers suggests that CBPV infection and replication may contribute to their symptoms. Phylogenetic analysis demonstrates a geographic separation of Japanese isolates from European, Uruguayan, and mainland US isolates. The lack of major exchange of honey bees between Europe/mainland US and Japan for the recent 26 years (1985–2010 may have resulted in the geographic separation of Japanese CBPV isolates.

  17. Chronic Epstein-Barr virus-related hepatitis in immunocompetent patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mihaela Petrova; Maria Muhtarova; Maria Nikolova; Svetoslav Magaev; Hristo Taskov; Diana Nikolovska; Zahariy Krastev

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To investigate reactivated Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)infection as a cause for chronic hepatitis.METHODS: Patients with occasionally established elevated serum aminotransferases were studied. HIV,HBV and HCV-infections were excluded as well as any other immunosuppressive factors, metabolic or toxic disorders.EBV viral capsid antigen (VCA) IgG and IgM, EA-R and EA-D IgG and Epstein-Barr nuclear antigen (EBNA) were measured using IFA kits. Immunophenotyping of whole blood was performed by multicolor flow cytometry.CD8+ T cell responses to EBV and PHA were determined according to the intracellular expression of IFN-γ.RESULTS: The mean alanine aminotransferase (ALT)and gamma glutamyl transpeptidase (GGTP) values exceeded twice the upper normal limit, AST/ALT ratio <1. Serology tests showed reactivated EBV infection in all patients. Absolute number and percentages of T, B and NK cells were within the reference ranges. Fine subset analysis, in comparison to EBV+ healthy carriers, revealed a significant decrease of naive T cells (P < 0.001),accompanied by increased percentage of CD45RA- (P< 0.0001), and terminally differentiated CD28-CD27-CD8+ T cells (P < 0.01). Moderately elevated numbers of CD38 molecules on CD8+ T cells (P < 0.05) proposed a low viral burden. A significantly increased percentage of CD8+ T cells expressing IFN-γ in response to EBV and PHA stimulation was registered in patients, as compared to controls (P < 0.05). Liver biopsy specimens from 5 patients revealed nonspecific features of low-grade hepatitis.CONCLUSION: Chronic hepatitis might be a manifestation of chronic EBV infection in the lack of detectable immune deficiency; the expansion of CD28-CD27 and increase of functional EBV-specific CD8+ T cells being the only surrogate markers of viral activity.

  18. Gammaherpesvirus-driven plasma cell differentiation regulates virus reactivation from latently infected B lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Xiaozhen; Collins, Christopher M; Mendel, Justin B; Iwakoshi, Neal N; Speck, Samuel H

    2009-11-01

    Gammaherpesviruses chronically infect their host and are tightly associated with the development of lymphoproliferative diseases and lymphomas, as well as several other types of cancer. Mechanisms involved in maintaining chronic gammaherpesvirus infections are poorly understood and, in particular, little is known about the mechanisms involved in controlling gammaherpesvirus reactivation from latently infected B cells in vivo. Recent evidence has linked plasma cell differentiation with reactivation of the human gammaherpesviruses EBV and KSHV through induction of the immediate-early viral transcriptional activators by the plasma cell-specific transcription factor XBP-1s. We now extend those findings to document a role for a gammaherpesvirus gene product in regulating plasma cell differentiation and thus virus reactivation. We have previously shown that the murine gammaherpesvirus 68 (MHV68) gene product M2 is dispensable for virus replication in permissive cells, but plays a critical role in virus reactivation from latently infected B cells. Here we show that in mice infected with wild type MHV68, virus infected plasma cells (ca. 8% of virus infected splenocytes at the peak of viral latency) account for the majority of reactivation observed upon explant of splenocytes. In contrast, there is an absence of virus infected plasma cells at the peak of latency in mice infected with a M2 null MHV68. Furthermore, we show that the M2 protein can drive plasma cell differentiation in a B lymphoma cell line in the absence of any other MHV68 gene products. Thus, the role of M2 in MHV68 reactivation can be attributed to its ability to manipulate plasma cell differentiation, providing a novel viral strategy to regulate gammaherpesvirus reactivation from latently infected B cells. We postulate that M2 represents a new class of herpesvirus gene products (reactivation conditioners) that do not directly participate in virus replication, but rather facilitate virus reactivation by

  19. Gammaherpesvirus-driven plasma cell differentiation regulates virus reactivation from latently infected B lymphocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaozhen Liang

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Gammaherpesviruses chronically infect their host and are tightly associated with the development of lymphoproliferative diseases and lymphomas, as well as several other types of cancer. Mechanisms involved in maintaining chronic gammaherpesvirus infections are poorly understood and, in particular, little is known about the mechanisms involved in controlling gammaherpesvirus reactivation from latently infected B cells in vivo. Recent evidence has linked plasma cell differentiation with reactivation of the human gammaherpesviruses EBV and KSHV through induction of the immediate-early viral transcriptional activators by the plasma cell-specific transcription factor XBP-1s. We now extend those findings to document a role for a gammaherpesvirus gene product in regulating plasma cell differentiation and thus virus reactivation. We have previously shown that the murine gammaherpesvirus 68 (MHV68 gene product M2 is dispensable for virus replication in permissive cells, but plays a critical role in virus reactivation from latently infected B cells. Here we show that in mice infected with wild type MHV68, virus infected plasma cells (ca. 8% of virus infected splenocytes at the peak of viral latency account for the majority of reactivation observed upon explant of splenocytes. In contrast, there is an absence of virus infected plasma cells at the peak of latency in mice infected with a M2 null MHV68. Furthermore, we show that the M2 protein can drive plasma cell differentiation in a B lymphoma cell line in the absence of any other MHV68 gene products. Thus, the role of M2 in MHV68 reactivation can be attributed to its ability to manipulate plasma cell differentiation, providing a novel viral strategy to regulate gammaherpesvirus reactivation from latently infected B cells. We postulate that M2 represents a new class of herpesvirus gene products (reactivation conditioners that do not directly participate in virus replication, but rather facilitate virus

  20. Acute hepatitis due to dengue virus in a chronic hepatitis patient

    OpenAIRE

    Souza, L J; Coelho, J.M.C. de O.; Silva,E. J.; Abukater,M.; Almeida,F.C.R.; A. S. Fonte; L.A Souza

    2008-01-01

    We present a case of acute hepatitis caused by dengue virus, with a significant increase in aspartate transferase and alanine transferase levels in a chronic hepatitis patient attended at the Cane Sugar Planters Hospital of Campos dos Goytacazes, RJ.

  1. Use of Fluoroquinolones in Patients with Chronic Hepatitis C Virus-Induced Liver Failure

    OpenAIRE

    H. Kojima; Kaita, K. D. E.; Hawkins, K; Uhanova, J; Minuk, G. Y.

    2002-01-01

    Fluroquinolone antibiotics have been reported to have antiviral properties against RNA viruses, including hepatitis C virus (HCV). In the present study, five patients with advanced liver disease secondary to chronic HCV received 500 mg daily of oral ciprofloxacin for 30 days. Serum HCV-RNA levels and liver enzyme abnormalities remained largely unchanged. Thus, the role of fluoroquinolones as antiviral agents for chronic HCV in patients with advanced liver disease appears to be limited.

  2. Hepatitis C virus viremia increases the incidence of chronic kidney disease in HIV-infected patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peters, Lars; Grint, Daniel; Lundgren, Jens

    2012-01-01

    Several studies have reported on an association between hepatitis C virus (HCV) antibody status and the development of chronic kidney disease (CKD), but the role of HCV viremia and genotype are not well defined.......Several studies have reported on an association between hepatitis C virus (HCV) antibody status and the development of chronic kidney disease (CKD), but the role of HCV viremia and genotype are not well defined....

  3. Quasispecies composition and diversity do not reveal any predictors for chronic classical swine fever virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenckel, Maria; Blome, Sandra; Beer, Martin; Höper, Dirk

    2017-03-01

    Classical swine fever (CSF) can run acute, chronic, and prenatal courses in both domestic pigs and wild boar. Although chronic infections are rare events, their epidemiological impact is very high due to the long-term shedding of virus. So far, little is known about the factors that influence disease course and outcome from either the host or virus's perspective. To elucidate the viral determinants, we analyzed the role of the viral populations for the development of chronic CSF virus (CSFV) infections. Three different animal trials that had led to both chronic and acute infections were chosen for a detailed analysis by deep sequencing. The three inocula represented sub-genogroups 2.1 and 2.3, and two viruses were wild-type CSFV, one derived from an infectious cDNA clone. These viruses and samples derived from acutely and chronically infected animals were subjected to next-generation sequencing. Subsequently, the derived full-length genomes were compared at both the consensus and the quasispecies level. At consensus level, no differences were observed between the parental viruses and the viruses obtained from chronically infected animals. Despite a considerable level of variability at the quasispecies level, no indications were found for any predictive pattern with regard to the chronicity of the CSFV infections. While there might be no direct marker for chronicity, moderate virulence of some CSFV strains in itself seems to be a crucial prerequisite for the establishment of long-term infections which does not need further genetic adaption. Thus, general host and virus factors need further investigation.

  4. Cells in Dengue Virus Infection In Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sansanee Noisakran

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Dengue has been recognized as one of the most important vector-borne emerging infectious diseases globally. Though dengue normally causes a self-limiting infection, some patients may develop a life-threatening illness, dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF/dengue shock syndrome (DSS. The reason why DHF/DSS occurs in certain individuals is unclear. Studies in the endemic regions suggest that the preexisting antibodies are a risk factor for DHF/DSS. Viremia and thrombocytopenia are the key clinical features of dengue virus infection in patients. The amounts of virus circulating in patients are highly correlated with severe dengue disease, DHF/DSS. Also, the disturbance, mainly a transient depression, of hematological cells is a critical clinical finding in acute dengue patients. However, the cells responsible for the dengue viremia are unresolved in spite of the intensive efforts been made. Dengue virus appears to replicate and proliferate in many adapted cell lines, but these in vitro properties are extremely difficult to be reproduced in primary cells or in vivo. This paper summarizes reports on the permissive cells in vitro and in vivo and suggests a hematological cell lineage for dengue virus infection in vivo, with the hope that a new focus will shed light on further understanding of the complexities of dengue disease.

  5. CD58 expression of liver tissue in patients with chronic hepatitis B virus infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Ping; QI Bao-tai; CHEN Ping; HE Lin-jing; LI Jie; JI Yu-qiang; XIE Ming

    2008-01-01

    Background Several kinds of intercellular adhesion molecules closely relate to hepatitis B.The complex of CD2 and CD58 plays an important role in enhancing the adhesion of T lymphocytes to target cells,hyperplasia and activation of T lymphocytes.In this study,we explored the relationship between the expression of CD58 in liver tissue and chronic hepatitus B infection.Methods We determined the expression of the CD58 molecule on the surface of hepatocytes by using immunohistochemistry and the levels of serum HBV DNA from patients with HBV infection and from normal controls.The biochemical parameters of hepatic function were analyzed as well.Results CD58 expression in hepatocytes significantly increased with the severity progression of chronic HBV infection.The IOD levels(1og10)of CD58 in the control,mild,moderate,and severe chronic HBV infection groups were O,(7.20±4.64)×103,(25.63±7.41)x103 and(37.47±11.17)×103 respectively(P<0.05 compared with the control group,respectively)Conclusion CD58 probably increases cell mediated immunity to eliminate hepatitis B virus and leads to damage of hepatocytes.

  6. High rates of detection of respiratory viruses in tonsillar tissues from children with chronic adenotonsillar disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proenca-Modena, Jose Luiz; Pereira Valera, Fabiana Cardoso; Jacob, Marcos Gerhardinger; Buzatto, Guilherme Pietrucci; Saturno, Tamara Honorato; Lopes, Lucia; Souza, Jamila Mendonça; Escremim Paula, Flavia; Silva, Maria Lucia; Carenzi, Lucas Rodrigues; Tamashiro, Edwin; Arruda, Eurico; Anselmo-Lima, Wilma Terezinha

    2012-01-01

    Chronic tonsillar diseases are an important health problem, leading to large numbers of surgical procedures worldwide. Little is known about pathogenesis of these diseases. In order to investigate the role of respiratory viruses in chronic adenotonsillar diseases, we developed a cross-sectional study to determine the rates of viral detections of common respiratory viruses detected by TaqMan real time PCR (qPCR) in nasopharyngeal secretions, tonsillar tissues and peripheral blood from 121 children with chronic tonsillar diseases, without symptoms of acute respiratory infections. At least one respiratory virus was detected in 97.5% of patients. The viral co-infection rate was 69.5%. The most frequently detected viruses were human adenovirus in 47.1%, human enterovirus in 40.5%, human rhinovirus in 38%, human bocavirus in 29.8%, human metapneumovirus in 17.4% and human respiratory syncytial virus in 15.7%. Results of qPCR varied widely between sample sites: human adenovirus, human bocavirus and human enterovirus were predominantly detected in tissues, while human rhinovirus was more frequently detected in secretions. Rates of virus detection were remarkably high in tonsil tissues: over 85% in adenoids and close to 70% in palatine tonsils. In addition, overall virus detection rates were higher in more hypertrophic than in smaller adenoids (p = 0.05), and in the particular case of human enteroviruses, they were detected more frequently (p = 0.05) in larger palatine tonsils than in smaller ones. While persistence/latency of DNA viruses in tonsillar tissues has been documented, such is not the case of RNA viruses. Respiratory viruses are highly prevalent in adenoids and palatine tonsils of patients with chronic tonsillar diseases, and persistence of these viruses in tonsils may stimulate chronic inflammation and play a role in the pathogenesis of these diseases.

  7. High rates of detection of respiratory viruses in tonsillar tissues from children with chronic adenotonsillar disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Luiz Proenca-Modena

    Full Text Available Chronic tonsillar diseases are an important health problem, leading to large numbers of surgical procedures worldwide. Little is known about pathogenesis of these diseases. In order to investigate the role of respiratory viruses in chronic adenotonsillar diseases, we developed a cross-sectional study to determine the rates of viral detections of common respiratory viruses detected by TaqMan real time PCR (qPCR in nasopharyngeal secretions, tonsillar tissues and peripheral blood from 121 children with chronic tonsillar diseases, without symptoms of acute respiratory infections. At least one respiratory virus was detected in 97.5% of patients. The viral co-infection rate was 69.5%. The most frequently detected viruses were human adenovirus in 47.1%, human enterovirus in 40.5%, human rhinovirus in 38%, human bocavirus in 29.8%, human metapneumovirus in 17.4% and human respiratory syncytial virus in 15.7%. Results of qPCR varied widely between sample sites: human adenovirus, human bocavirus and human enterovirus were predominantly detected in tissues, while human rhinovirus was more frequently detected in secretions. Rates of virus detection were remarkably high in tonsil tissues: over 85% in adenoids and close to 70% in palatine tonsils. In addition, overall virus detection rates were higher in more hypertrophic than in smaller adenoids (p = 0.05, and in the particular case of human enteroviruses, they were detected more frequently (p = 0.05 in larger palatine tonsils than in smaller ones. While persistence/latency of DNA viruses in tonsillar tissues has been documented, such is not the case of RNA viruses. Respiratory viruses are highly prevalent in adenoids and palatine tonsils of patients with chronic tonsillar diseases, and persistence of these viruses in tonsils may stimulate chronic inflammation and play a role in the pathogenesis of these diseases.

  8. In-cell infection: a novel pathway for Epstein-Barr virus infection mediated by cell-in-cell structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Chao; Chen, Yuhui; Zeng, Musheng; Pei, Rongjuan; Du, Yong; Tang, Linquan; Wang, Mengyi; Hu, Yazhuo; Zhu, Hanyu; He, Meifang; Wei, Xiawei; Wang, Shan; Ning, Xiangkai; Wang, Manna; Wang, Jufang; Ma, Li; Chen, Xinwen; Sun, Qiang; Tang, Hong; Wang, Ying; Wang, Xiaoning

    2015-07-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) can infect both susceptible B lymphocytes and non-susceptible epithelial cells (ECs). Viral tropism analyses have revealed two intriguing means of EBV infection, either by a receptor-mediated infection of B cells or by a cell-to-cell contact-mediated infection of non-susceptible ECs. Herein, we report a novel "in-cell infection" mechanism for EBV infection of non-susceptible ECs through the formation of cell-in-cell structures. Epithelial CNE-2 cells were invaded by EBV-infected Akata B cells to form cell-in-cell structures in vitro. Such unique cellular structures could be readily observed in the specimens of nasopharyngeal carcinoma. Importantly, the formation of cell-in-cell structures led to the autonomous activation of EBV within Akata cells and subsequent viral transmission to CNE-2 cells, as evidenced by the expression of viral genes and the presence of virion particles in CNE-2 cells. Significantly, EBV generated from in-cell infected ECs displayed altered tropism with higher infection efficacy to both B cells and ECs. In addition to CNE-2 tumor cells, cell-in-cell structure formation could also mediate EBV infection of NPEC1-Bmi1 cells, an immortalized nasopharyngeal epithelial cell line. Furthermore, efficient infection by this mechanism involved the activation of the PI3K/AKT signaling pathway. Thus, our study identified "in-cell infection" as a novel mechanism for EBV infection. Given the diversity of virus-infected cells and the prevalence of cell-in-cell structures during chronic infection, we speculate that "in-cell infection" is likely a general mechanism for EBV and other viruses to infect non-susceptible ECs.

  9. Epstein-Barr virus infection in chronically inflamed periapical granulomas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kosuke Makino

    Full Text Available Periapical granulomas are lesions around the apex of a tooth caused by a polymicrobial infection. Treatment with antibacterial agents is normally performed to eliminate bacteria from root canals; however, loss of the supporting alveolar bone is typically observed, and tooth extraction is often selected if root canal treatment does not work well. Therefore, bacteria and other microorganisms could be involved in this disease. To understand the pathogenesis of periapical granulomas more precisely, we focused on the association with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV using surgically removed periapical granulomas (n = 32. EBV DNA was detected in 25 of 32 periapical granulomas (78.1% by real-time PCR, and the median number of EBV DNA copies was approximately 8,688.01/μg total DNA. In contrast, EBV DNA was not detected in healthy gingival tissues (n = 10; the difference was statistically significant according to the Mann-Whitney U test (p = 0.0001. Paraffin sections were also analyzed by in situ hybridization to detect EBV-encoded small RNA (EBER-expressing cells. EBER was detected in the cytoplasm and nuclei of B cells and plasma cells in six of nine periapical granulomas, but not in healthy gingival tissues. In addition, immunohistochemical analysis for latent membrane protein 1 (LMP-1 of EBV using serial tissue sections showed that LMP-1-expressing cells were localized to the same areas as EBER-expressing cells. These data suggest that B cells and plasma cells in inflamed granulomas are a major source of EBV infection, and that EBV could play a pivotal role in controlling immune cell responses in periapical granulomas.

  10. Defective mutations of hepatitis D viruses in chronic hepatitis D patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jaw-Ching Wu; Sheng-Chieh Hsu; Shen-Yung Wang; Yi-Hsiang Huang; I-Jane Sheen; Hsuan-Hui Shih; Wan-Jr Syu

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To verify whether "defective" mutations existed in hepatitis D virus (HDV).METHODS: Hepatitis delta antigen (HDAg)-codingsequences were amplified using Pfu DNA polymerases with proof-reading activities from sera of five patients with chronic hepatitis D. Multiple colonies were sequenced for each patient. Pfu analyzed a total of 270 HDV clones.Three representative defective HDV clones were constructed in expression plasmids and transfected into a human hepatoma cell line. Cellular proteins were extracted and analyzed by Western blot.RESULTS: Four of five cases (80%) showed defective HDV genomes in their sera. The percentage of defective genomes was 3.7% (10/270). The majority (90%) of the defective mutations were insertions or deletions that resulted in frameshift and abnormal stop translation of the HDAg. The predicted mutated HDAg ranged from 45amino acids to >214 amino acids in length. Various domains of HDAg associated with viral replication or packaging were affected in different HDV isolates. Western blot analysis showed defected HDAg in predicted positions.CONCLUSION: "Defective" viruses do exist in chronic HDV infected patients, but represented as minor strains. The clinical significance of the "defected" HDV needs further study to evaluate.

  11. Replication of a chronic hepatitis B virus genotype F1b construct.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, Sergio; Jiménez, Gustavo; Alarcón, Valentina; Prieto, Cristian; Muñoz, Francisca; Riquelme, Constanza; Venegas, Mauricio; Brahm, Javier; Loyola, Alejandra; Villanueva, Rodrigo A

    2016-03-01

    Genotype F is one of the less-studied genotypes of human hepatitis B virus, although it is widely distributed in regions of Central and South American. Our previous studies have shown that HBV genotype F is prevalent in Chile, and phylogenetic analysis of its full-length sequence amplified from the sera of chronically infected patients identified it as HBV subgenotype F1b. We have previously reported the full-length sequence of a HBV molecular clone obtained from a patient chronically infected with genotype F1b. In this report, we established a system to study HBV replication based on hepatoma cell lines transfected with full-length monomers of the HBV genome. Culture supernatants were analyzed after transfection and found to contain both HBsAg and HBeAg viral antigens. Consistently, fractionated cell extracts revealed the presence of viral replication, with both cytoplasmic and nuclear DNA intermediates. Analysis of HBV-transfected cells by indirect immunofluorescence or immunoelectron microscopy revealed the expression of viral antigens and cytoplasmic viral particles, respectively. To test the functionality of the ongoing viral replication further at the level of chromatinized cccDNA, transfected cells were treated with a histone deacetylase inhibitor, and this resulted in increased viral replication. This correlated with changes posttranslational modifications of histones at viral promoters. Thus, the development of this viral replication system for HBV genotype F will facilitate studies on the regulation of viral replication and the identification of new antiviral drugs.

  12. Affinity (tropism) of caprine arthritis encephalitis virus for brain cells ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Affinity (tropism) of caprine arthritis encephalitis virus for brain cells. ... chain reaction (RTPCR) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM techniques). ... CAE virus infection of goat brain cells to that of HIV infection in humans thus suggesting ...

  13. Compositional changes of PBL population in patients with chronic hepatitis B virus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khabiri Alireza

    Full Text Available In this report we have analysed the peripheral blood lymphocyte of several patients with chronic hepatitis B virus infection with flow cytometry. Based on the presence and absence of the HBeAb, patients were divided into two groups. In both, all the patients were HBsAg positive with normal range of serum alanine aminotranferase (23.9 ± 17.8. We have found that the immunophenotypic profiles of patients were different from healthy donors with significant decrease in CD3+ T cells, specially CD8+ T cells and a siginificant increase in the CD19+ B cells. The differences were seen in other subset of T cells (CD4+ or NK cells (CD56+/CD16+ and HLA-DR markers were not significant. When the phenotypic profiles of both groups were compared with each other, such changes were more dominant in group II, with HBeAb positive than in group I, with HBeAb negative. Also, we have seen a correlation between the increase of CD19+ B cells and the decrease of CD3+ T cells. No such correlation was observed with other cells.

  14. Xenotropic Murine Leukemia Virus-Related Virus in Monozygotic Twins Discordant for Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerome, Keith R.; Diem, Kurt; Huang, Meei-Li; Selke, Stacy; Corey, Lawrence; Buchwald, Dedra

    2011-01-01

    A recent report suggested an association between xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus (XMRV) and chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS). If confirmed, this would suggest that antiretroviral therapy might benefit patients suffering from CFS. We validated a set of assays for XMRV, and evaluated the prevalence of XMRV in a cohort of monozygotic twins discordant for CFS. Stored PBMC were tested with 3 separate PCR assays (one of which was nested) for XMRV DNA, and serum/plasma was tested for XMRV RNA by reverse transcription (RT)-PCR. None of the PBMC samples from the twins with CFS or their unaffected co-twins were positive for XMRV, by any of the assays. One plasma sample, from an unaffected co-twin, was reproducibly positive by RT-PCR. However, serum from the same day was negative, as was a followup plasma sample obtained 2 days after the positive specimen. These data do not support an association of XMRV with CFS. PMID:21795004

  15. Chronic Hepatitis B Virus Infection: The Relation between Hepatitis B Antigen Expression, Telomere Length, Senescence, Inflammation and Fibrosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phaedra M Tachtatzis

    Full Text Available Chronic Hepatitis B virus (HBV infection can lead to the development of chronic hepatitis, cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. We hypothesized that HBV might accelerate hepatocyte ageing and investigated the effect of HBV on hepatocyte cell cycle state and biological age. We also investigated the relation between inflammation, fibrosis and cell cycle phase.Liver samples from patients with chronic HBV (n = 91, normal liver (n = 55 and regenerating liver (n = 15 were studied. Immunohistochemistry for cell cycle phase markers and HBV antigens was used to determine host cell cycle phase. Hepatocyte-specific telomere length was evaluated by quantitative fluorescent in-situ hybridization (Q-FISH in conjunction with hepatocyte nuclear area and HBV antigen expression. The effects of induced cell cycle arrest and induced cellular senescence on HBV production were assessed in vitro.13.7% hepatocytes in chronic HBV had entered cell cycle, but expression of markers for S, G2 and M phase was low compared with regenerating liver. Hepatocyte p21 expression was increased (10.9% in chronic HBV and correlated with liver fibrosis. Mean telomere length was reduced in chronic HBV compared to normal. However, within HBV-affected livers, hepatocytes expressing HBV antigens had longer telomeres. Telomere length declined and hepatocyte nuclear size increased as HBV core antigen (HBcAg expression shifted from the nucleus to cytoplasm. Nuclear co-expression of HBcAg and p21 was not observed. Cell cycle arrest induced in vitro was associated with increased HBV production, in contrast to in vitro induction of cellular senescence, which had no effect.Chronic HBV infection was associated with hepatocyte G1 cell cycle arrest and accelerated hepatocyte ageing, implying that HBV induced cellular senescence. However, HBV replication was confined to biologically younger hepatocytes. Changes in the cellular location of HBcAg may be related to the onset of cellular senescence.

  16. Therapeutic Potential of Cell Penetrating Peptides (CPPs) and Cationic Polymers for Chronic Hepatitis B

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ndeboko, Bénédicte; Lemamy, Guy Joseph; Nielsen, Peter E

    2015-01-01

    Chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection remains a major health problem worldwide. Because current anti-HBV treatments are only virostatic, there is an urgent need for development of alternative antiviral approaches. In this context, cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) and cationic polymers...... hepatitis B virus (DHBV), a reference model for human HBV infection. The in vivo administration of PNA-CPP conjugates to neonatal ducklings showed that they reached the liver and inhibited DHBV replication. Interestingly, our results indicated also that a modified CPP (CatLip) alone, in the absence of its...... against chronic hepatitis B....

  17. Chronic diseases, chromosomal abnormalities, and congenital malformations as risk factors for respiratory syncytial virus hospitalization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Kim; Hjuler, Thomas; Ravn, Henrik

    2012-01-01

    Little is known about how chronic conditions other than prematurity, heart disease, and Down syndrome affect the risk and severity of hospitalization for respiratory syncytial virus (RSV). We assess the risk and severity of RSV hospitalization in children with chronic conditions in this register...

  18. Phyllanthus species versus antiviral drugs for chronic hepatitis B virus infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yun, Xia; Luo, Hui; Liu, Jian Ping

    2013-01-01

    Phyllanthus species for patients with chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection have been assessed in clinical trials, but no consensus regarding their usefulness exists. When compared with placebo or no intervention, we were unable to identify convincing evidence that phyllanthus species...... are beneficial in patients with chronic hepatitis B. Some randomised clinical trials have compared phyllanthus species versus antiviral drugs....

  19. Epstein-Barr virus:Silent companion or causative agent of chronic liver disease?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mihaela; Petrova; Victor; Kamburov

    2010-01-01

    The Epstein-Barr virus(EBV)has an important and multifaceted role in liver pathology.As a member of the herpes virus family,EBV establishes a persistent infection in more than 90%of adults.Besides acute hepatitis during primary infection,many clinical syndromes of interest for the hepatologist are associated with EBV infection.The role of EBV in the evolution of chronic hepatitis from hepatotropic viruses is considered.Chronic EBVassociated hepatitis is suspected in immunocompetent adults with compatible se...

  20. Natural Killer Cell Function and Dysfunction in Hepatitis C Virus Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kayla A. Holder

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Viruses must continually adapt against dynamic innate and adaptive responses of the host immune system to establish chronic infection. Only a small minority (~20% of those exposed to hepatitis C virus (HCV spontaneously clear infection, leaving approximately 200 million people worldwide chronically infected with HCV. A number of recent research studies suggest that establishment and maintenance of chronic HCV infection involve natural killer (NK cell dysfunction. This relationship is illustrated in vitro by disruption of typical NK cell responses including both cell-mediated cytotoxicity and cytokine production. Expression of a number of activating NK cell receptors in vivo is also affected in chronic HCV infection. Thus, direct in vivo and in vitro evidence of compromised NK function in chronic HCV infection in conjunction with significant epidemiological associations between the outcome of HCV infection and certain combinations of NK cell regulatory receptor and class I human histocompatibility linked antigen (HLA genotypes indicate that NK cells are important in the immune response against HCV infection. In this review, we highlight evidence suggesting that selective impairment of NK cell activity is related to establishment of chronic HCV infection.

  1. Natural Killer Cell Function and Dysfunction in Hepatitis C Virus Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holder, Kayla A.; Russell, Rodney S.; Grant, Michael D.

    2014-01-01

    Viruses must continually adapt against dynamic innate and adaptive responses of the host immune system to establish chronic infection. Only a small minority (~20%) of those exposed to hepatitis C virus (HCV) spontaneously clear infection, leaving approximately 200 million people worldwide chronically infected with HCV. A number of recent research studies suggest that establishment and maintenance of chronic HCV infection involve natural killer (NK) cell dysfunction. This relationship is illustrated in vitro by disruption of typical NK cell responses including both cell-mediated cytotoxicity and cytokine production. Expression of a number of activating NK cell receptors in vivo is also affected in chronic HCV infection. Thus, direct in vivo and in vitro evidence of compromised NK function in chronic HCV infection in conjunction with significant epidemiological associations between the outcome of HCV infection and certain combinations of NK cell regulatory receptor and class I human histocompatibility linked antigen (HLA) genotypes indicate that NK cells are important in the immune response against HCV infection. In this review, we highlight evidence suggesting that selective impairment of NK cell activity is related to establishment of chronic HCV infection. PMID:25057504

  2. Licensing virus-specific T cells to secrete the neutrophil attracting chemokine CXCL-8 during hepatitis B virus infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam J Gehring

    Full Text Available T cell functional plasticity helps tailor antiviral immunity during different phases of infections. We tested whether, during different phases of HBV infection, virus-specific T cells can acquire specific proinflammatory functions that could drive granulocyte/mononuclear cell liver infiltration. Multifunctional analysis of HBV-specific T cells during acute and chronic HBV infection revealed that HBV-specific T cells had the capacity to produce the neutrophil chemokine CXCL-8 but not IL-17. CXCL-8 producing T cells were detectable in the liver of chronic HBV patients with active hepatitis; while in acute HBV patients CXCL-8 production by T cells was temporally limited to the acute phase of disease, concomitant with the peak of liver inflammation. Characterization of the conditions necessary for the development of CXCL-8 producing T cells showed a requirement for IL-7 and IL-15 during T cell expansion. These data show that functional plasticity of virus-specific T cells spontaneously occurs during HBV infection and that an environment rich IL-7 and IL-15 can license T cells with the ability to produce CXCL-8 and potentially influence liver pathology.

  3. Chronic hepatitis C virus infection: Prevalence of extrahepatic manifestations and association with cryoglobulinemia in Bulgarian patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To assess the prevalence of extrahepatic manifestations in Bulgarian patients with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection and identify the clinical and biological manifestations associated with cryoglobulinemia.METHODS: The medical records of 136 chronically infected HCV patients were reviewed to assess the prevalence of extrahepatic manifestations. Association between cryoglobulin-positivity and other manifestations were identified using χ2 and Fisher's exact test. Risk factors for the presence of extrahepatic manifestations were assessed by logistic regression analysis.RESULTS: Seventy six percent (104/136) of the patients had at least one extrahepatic manifestation.Clinical manifestations included fatigue (59.6%),kidney impairment (25.0%), type 2 diabetes (22.8%),paresthesia (19.9%), arthralgia (18.4%), palpable purpura (17.6%), lymphadenopathy (16.2%), pulmonary fibrosis (15.4%), thyroid dysfunction (14.7%), Raynaud's phenomenon (11.8%), B-cell lymphoma (8.8%),sicca syndrome (6.6%), and lichen planus (5.9%).The biological manifestations included cryoglobulin production (37.5%), thrombocytopenia (31.6%), and autoantibodies: anti-nuclear (18.4%), anti-smooth muscle (16.9%), anti-neutrophil cytoplasm (13.2%) and anti-cardiolipin (8.8%). All extrahepatic manifestations showed an association with cryoglobulin-positivity, with the exception of thyroid dysfunction, sicca syndrome,and lichen planus. Risks factors for the presence of extrahepatic manifestations (univariate analysis) were:age ≥ 60 years, female gender, virus transmission by blood transfusions, longstanding infection (≥ 20 years), and extensive liver fibrosis. The most significant risks factors (multivariate analysis) were longstanding infection and extensive liver fibrosis.CONCLUSION: We observed a high prevalence of extrahepatic manifestations in patients with chronic HCV infection. Most of these manifestations were associated with impaired lymphoproliferation and cryoglobulin production

  4. Manipulation of Regulatory Cells’ Responses to Treatments for Chronic Hepatitis B Virus Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavakolpour, Soheil; Alavian, Seyed Moayed; Sali, Shahnaz

    2016-01-01

    Background Identification of effective treatments in hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection remains a controversial topic. Although the currently approved drugs for HBV control the disease’s progression and also limit associated outcomes, these drugs may not fully eradicate HBV infection. In addition to better managing patients with chronic hepatitis B (CHB) infection, the induction of seroclearance by these drugs has been a commonly discussed topic in recent years. Objectives In this study, we focused on treating CHB infection via the manipulation of T cells’ responses to identify possible approaches to cure CHB. Materials and Methods All studies relevant to the role of cellular and humoral responses in HBV infection (especially regulatory cells) were investigated via a systematic search of different databases, including PubMed, Scopus, and Google Scholar. Considering extracted data and also our unpublished data regarding the association between regulatory cytokines and CHB, we introduced a novel approach for the induction of seroclearance. Results Considering the increased levels of regulatory cytokines and also regulatory T cells (Tregs) during CHB, it seems that these cells are deeply involved in CHB infection. The inhibition of regulatory T cells may reverse the dysfunction of effector T cells in patients with CHB infection. In order to inhibit Tregs’ responses, different types of approaches could be employed to restore the impaired function of effector T cells. The blockade of IL-10, IL-35, CTLA-4, PD-1, and TIM-3 were discussed throughout this study. Regardless of the efficacy of these methods, CHB patients may experience serious liver injuries due to the cytotoxic action of CD8+ T cells. Antiviral therapy and a decrease in HBV DNA to undetectable levels could also significantly reduce the risk of the hepatitis B flare. Conclusions The inhibition of Tregs is a novel therapeutic approach to cure chronically HBV infected patients. However, further studies are

  5. Clinical features of vascular disorders associated with chronic hepatitis virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishida, Naoshi; Kudo, Masatoshi

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis virus infections can be accompanied by extrahepatic manifestations that may be caused by the host's immune reaction to the viral infection. Vascular involvement is one of these manifestations and is occasionally associated with life-threatening conditions due to systemic organ failure. The unique profile of hepatitis-related vascular involvement is associated with infection by different types of hepatitis viruses. For example, polyarteritis nodosa is more frequently reported in patients with chronic hepatitis B than those with chronic hepatitis C. Similarly, membranous nephropathy is a notable manifestation among hepatitis B virus-positive patients. In contrast, patients infected with hepatitis C virus are at risk for cryoglobulinemia and membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis. Antiviral therapy is necessary to control these kinds of vasculitis related to hepatitis virus infections; however, immunosuppressive agents may be required to treat severe cases. New antiviral drugs for viral hepatitis could improve the prognosis of vascular and renal involvement.

  6. Monitoring virus entry into living cells using DiD-labeled dengue virus particles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ayala Nunez, Vanesa; Wilschut, Jan; Smit, Jolanda M.

    2011-01-01

    A variety of approaches can be applied to investigate the multiple steps and interactions that occur during virus entry into the host cell. Single-virus tracking is a powerful real-time imaging technique that offers the possibility to monitor virus-cell binding, internalization, intracellular traffi

  7. Monitoring virus entry into living cells using DiD-labeled dengue virus particles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ayala Nunez, Vanesa; Wilschut, Jan; Smit, Jolanda M.

    2011-01-01

    A variety of approaches can be applied to investigate the multiple steps and interactions that occur during virus entry into the host cell. Single-virus tracking is a powerful real-time imaging technique that offers the possibility to monitor virus-cell binding, internalization, intracellular traffi

  8. Monitoring virus entry into living cells using DiD-labeled dengue virus particles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ayala Nunez, Vanesa; Wilschut, Jan; Smit, Jolanda M.

    2011-01-01

    A variety of approaches can be applied to investigate the multiple steps and interactions that occur during virus entry into the host cell. Single-virus tracking is a powerful real-time imaging technique that offers the possibility to monitor virus-cell binding, internalization, intracellular

  9. [Extrahepatic manifestations in patients with chronic infections due to the hepatitis C virus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos-Casals, Manuel

    2009-01-01

    Autoimmunity and viral infections are closely related, and viruses have been proposed as possible etiologic or triggering agents of systemic autoimmune diseases (SAD). The hepatitis C virus (HCV), a linear, single-stranded RNA virus, identified in 1989, is recognized as one of the viruses most often associated with autoimmune features. The association between HCV and SAD has generated growing interest in recent years. The extrahepatic manifestations often observed in patients with chronic HCV infection (both clinical and immunological) may lead to the fulfilment of the current classification criteria for some SAD.

  10. High rates of detection of respiratory viruses in the nasal washes and mucosae of patients with chronic rhinosinusitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Gye Song; Moon, Byung-Jae; Lee, Bong-Jae; Gong, Chang-Hoon; Kim, Nam Hee; Kim, You-Sun; Kim, Hun Sik; Jang, Yong Ju

    2013-03-01

    Respiratory viral infections are often implicated as triggers of chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) flare-ups. However, there is a paucity of respiratory viral surveillance studies in CRS patients, and such studies could elucidate the potential role of viruses in promoting symptoms and aggravating mucosal inflammation. Therefore, a prospective case-control study was conducted to determine the prevalence of respiratory viruses in CRS patients and non-CRS controls. Nasal lavage fluids and turbinate epithelial cells were collected prospectively from 111 CRS patients and 50 controls. Multiplex PCR was used to identify common respiratory viruses in both sample types and the infection rate was compared between groups. Respiratory viruses were detected in 50.5% of lavage samples and in 64.0% of scraping samples from CRS patients. The overall infection rate was significantly different in CRS patients and controls (odds ratio, 2.9 in lavage and 4.1 in scraping samples). Multiple viral infections were detected more frequently in lavage samples from CRS patients than those from controls (P virus and the only virus with a significantly different infection rate in CRS patients and controls in both samples (odds ratio, 3.2 in lavage and 3.4 in scraping samples). This study detected a higher prevalence of respiratory viruses in CRS patients than controls, suggesting that there may be significant associations between inflammation of CRS and respiratory viruses, particularly rhinovirus. Further studies should investigate the exact role of highly prevalent respiratory viruses in CRS patients during symptomatic aggravation and ongoing mucosal inflammation.

  11. Relevance of feline calicivirus, feline immunodeficiency virus, feline leukemia virus, feline herpesvirus and Bartonella henselae in cats with chronic gingivostomatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belgard, Sylvia; Truyen, Uwe; Thibault, Jean-Christophe; Sauter-Louis, Carola; Hartmann, Katrin

    2010-01-01

    Despite its common occurrence, the aetiology of chronic gingivostomatitis in cats remains uncertain. Aetiology is likely multifactorial, and several infectious agents may be associated with chronic gingivostomatitis. The purpose of this study was to investigate the prevalence of feline calicivirus (FCV), feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV), feline leukemia virus (FeLV), feline herpesvirus (FHV), and Bartonella henselae (B. henselae) in cats with chronic gingivostomatitis and in an age-matched control group. In addition, other factors, e. g., environmental conditions were investigated. In 52 cats with chronic gingivostomatitis and 50 healthy age-matched control cats, the presence of FCV ribonucleic acid (RNA), and FHV deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) (polymerase chain reaction [PCR] from oropharyngeal swabs), and B. henselae DNA (PCR from oropharyngeal swabs and blood), as well as FeLV antigen (serum), and antibodies against FCV, B. henselae, and FIV (serum) were examined. FCV RNA was significantly more common in cats with chronic gingivostomatitis (53.8%, p gingivostomatitis (78.8%, p = 0.023) and controls (58.0%). Of the other infectious agents investigated, there was no significant difference in the prevalence between the cats with chronic gingivostomatitis and the controls. The results of this study allow the conclusion that FCV, but no other infectious agents, is commonly associated with chronic gingivostomatitis in cats.

  12. Occult hepatitis B infection and its possible impact on chronic hepatitis C virus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Habibollahi Peiman

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available As a well-recognized clinical phenomenon, persistent detectable viral genome in liver or sera in the absence of other serological markers for active hepatitis B virus (HBV replication is called occult HBV infection. The main mechanism through which occult infection occurs is not completely understood and several possible explanations, such as integration into human genome and maintenance in peripheral mononuclear cells, exist. Occult HBV infection has been reported in different populations, especially among patients with Hepatitis C (HCV related liver disease. The probable impact of occult HBV in patients with chronic HCV infection has been previously investigated and the evidence suggests a possible correlation with lower response to anti-viral treatment, higher grades of liver histological changes, and also developing hepatocellular carcinoma. However, in the absence of conclusive results, further studies should be conducted to absolutely assess the impact of occult HBV contamination on the HCV related liver disease.

  13. Divergent Kinetics of Proliferating T Cell Subsets in Simian Immunodeficiency Virus (SIV) Infection: SIV Eliminates the “First Responder” CD4+ T Cells in Primary Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Xiaolei; Xu, Huanbin; Pahar, Bapi; Lackner, Andrew A.; Veazey, Ronald S.

    2013-01-01

    Although increased lymphocyte turnover in chronic human immunodeficiency virus and simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) infection has been reported in blood, there is little information on cell turnover in tissues, particularly in primary SIV infection. Here we examined the levels of proliferating T cell subsets in mucosal and peripheral lymphoid tissues of adult macaques throughout SIV infection. To specifically label cells in S-phase division, all animals were inoculated with bromodeoxyuridi...

  14. Hepatitis virus infection and chronic liver disease among atomic-bomb survivors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujiwara, S.; Cologne, J.; Akahoshi, M. [Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hiroshima (Japan); Kusumi, S.; Kodama, K.; Yoshizawa, H.

    2000-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to analyze various laboratory indicators of inflammation measured in atomic bomb survivors. Subjects are 6304 survivors who underwent inflammatory tests at RERF between 1998 and 1992 and whose radiation doses (DS86) are available. Inflammatory tests include leukocyte counts, neutrophil counts, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, corrected erythrocyte sedimentation rate, alpha 1 globulin, alpha 2 globulin, and sialic acid. Adjusting for age, sex, smoking, and city of residence, regression analysis was conducted. Regression analysis, adjusted for age, sex, smoking, and city of residence showed statistically significant associations with radiation dose for leukocyte counts (71.0 /mm{sup 3}/Gy, p=0.00151), erythrocyte sedimentation rate (1.58 mm/hour/Gy, p=0.0001), corrected erythrocyte sedimentation rate (1.14 mm/hour/Gy, p=0.0001), alpha 1 globulin (0.0057 g/dl/Gy, p=0.0001), alpha 2 globulin (0.0128 g/dl/Gy, p=0.0001), and sialic acid (1.2711 mg/dl/Gy, p=0.0001), but not for neutrophil counts (29.9 /mm{sup 3}/Gy, p=0.1729). Standardized scores combining results from these seven inflammatory tests showed significant associations with radiation dose both for persons with and without inflammatory disease, and for two inflammatory conditions in particular, chronic thyroiditis and chronic liver disease. In analyses of data from 403 AHS patients, in whom both inflammation indicators and T-cell ratios were measured, increased inflammation correlates with decreases in CD4 T-cells. Since the laboratory indicators of inflammation that we studied are not specific for particular clinical diseases, the implication of their dose-response-pattern is hard to interpret. The general occurrence of infectious diseases in survivors is not related to radiation dose. Such a relationship does exist, however, for other diseases in which infection may play an etiologic role. Virologic studies in A-bomb survivors have suggested dose-response alterations in immune

  15. Chronic B-Cell Leukemias and Agent Orange

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Enter ZIP code here Enter ZIP code here Chronic B-cell Leukemias and Agent Orange Veterans who ... receive VA health care and disability compensation. About chronic B-cell leukemias Leukemia is a cancer of ...

  16. Dual Infection with Hepatitis B and Epstein-Barr Virus Presenting with Severe Jaundice, Coagulopathy, and Hepatitis B Virus Chronicity Outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Sirish C; Ashraf, Imran; Mir, Fazia; Samiullah, Sami; Ibdah, Jamal A; Tahan, Veysel

    2017-02-16

    BACKGROUND Hepatitis B virus (HBV) has been reported as a coinfection with hepatitis C virus (HCV), hepatitis D virus (HDV), cytomegalovirus (CMV), and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). CASE REPORT A 34-year-old female presented to our clinic with epigastric pain and severe acute hepatitis manifested as jaundice associated with hyperbilirubinemia, elevated transaminases, and coagulopathy. The patient was diagnosed with acute HBV with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) coinfection leading to subsequent chronic hepatitis B. CONCLUSIONS To our knowledge, this patient case is the first reported case of HBV and EBV coinfection reported in the literature. HBV and EBV coinfection may cause severe acute hepatitis with HBV chronicity.

  17. Comparison of viral Env proteins from acute and chronic infections with subtype C human immunodeficiency virus type 1 identifies differences in glycosylation and CCR5 utilization and suggests a new strategy for immunogen design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ping, Li-Hua; Joseph, Sarah B; Anderson, Jeffrey A; Abrahams, Melissa-Rose; Salazar-Gonzalez, Jesus F; Kincer, Laura P; Treurnicht, Florette K; Arney, Leslie; Ojeda, Suany; Zhang, Ming; Keys, Jessica; Potter, E Lake; Chu, Haitao; Moore, Penny; Salazar, Maria G; Iyer, Shilpa; Jabara, Cassandra; Kirchherr, Jennifer; Mapanje, Clement; Ngandu, Nobubelo; Seoighe, Cathal; Hoffman, Irving; Gao, Feng; Tang, Yuyang; Labranche, Celia; Lee, Benhur; Saville, Andrew; Vermeulen, Marion; Fiscus, Susan; Morris, Lynn; Karim, Salim Abdool; Haynes, Barton F; Shaw, George M; Korber, Bette T; Hahn, Beatrice H; Cohen, Myron S; Montefiori, David; Williamson, Carolyn; Swanstrom, Ronald

    2013-07-01

    Understanding human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) transmission is central to developing effective prevention strategies, including a vaccine. We compared phenotypic and genetic variation in HIV-1 env genes from subjects in acute/early infection and subjects with chronic infections in the context of subtype C heterosexual transmission. We found that the transmitted viruses all used CCR5 and required high levels of CD4 to infect target cells, suggesting selection for replication in T cells and not macrophages after transmission. In addition, the transmitted viruses were more likely to use a maraviroc-sensitive conformation of CCR5, perhaps identifying a feature of the target T cell. We confirmed an earlier observation that the transmitted viruses were, on average, modestly underglycosylated relative to the viruses from chronically infected subjects. This difference was most pronounced in comparing the viruses in acutely infected men to those in chronically infected women. These features of the transmitted virus point to selective pressures during the transmission event. We did not observe a consistent difference either in heterologous neutralization sensitivity or in sensitivity to soluble CD4 between the two groups, suggesting similar conformations between viruses from acute and chronic infection. However, the presence or absence of glycosylation sites had differential effects on neutralization sensitivity for different antibodies. We suggest that the occasional absence of glycosylation sites encoded in the conserved regions of env, further reduced in transmitted viruses, could expose specific surface structures on the protein as antibody targets.

  18. Influence of human t-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1 Infection on laboratory parameters of patients with chronic hepatitis C virus Influência da infecção pelo vírus linfotrópico humano tipo 1 (HTLV-1 em parâmetros laboratoriais de pacientes com hepatite C crônica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Fernandes Cardoso

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C virus (HCV and human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1 share routes of transmission and some individuals have dual infection. Although some studies point to a worse prognosis of hepatitis C virus in patients co-infected with HTLV-1, the interaction between these two infections is poorly understood. This study evaluated the influence of HTLV-1 infection on laboratory parameters in chronic HCV patients. Twelve HTLV-1/HCV-coinfected patients were compared to 23 patients infected only with HCV, in regard to demographic data, risk factors for viral acquisition, HCV genotype, presence of cirrhosis, T CD4+ and CD8+ cell counts and liver function tests. There was no difference in regard to age, gender, alcohol consumption, smoking habits, HCV genotype or presence of cirrhosis between the groups. Intravenous drug use was the most common risk factor among individuals co-infected with HTLV-1. These patients showed higher TCD8+ counts (p = 0.0159 and significantly lower median values of AST and ALT (p = 0.0437 and 0.0159, respectively. In conclusion, we have shown that HCV/HTLV-1 co-infected patients differs in laboratorial parameters involving both liver and immunological patterns. The meaning of these interactions in the natural history of these infections is a matter that deserves further studies.O vírus da hepatite C (VHC e vírus linfotrópico humano tipo 1 (HTLV-1 compartilham formas de transmissão e algumas pessoas apresentam coinfecção. Embora alguns estudos apontem para um pior prognóstico da infecção pelo VHC em pacientes coinfectados com HTLV-1, a interação entre estas infecções é mal compreendida. Este estudo avaliou a influência da infecção pelo HTLV-1 em parâmetros laboratoriais de pacientes com VHC. 12 coinfectados VHC/HTLV-1 foram comparados com 23 pacientes monoinfectados com VHC, no que diz respeito aos dados demográficos, fatores de risco para aquisição viral, genótipo do VHC, presença de cirrose

  19. Occult hepatitis B virus infection is not associated with disease progression of chronic hepatitis C virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Junhyeon; Lee, Sang Soo; Choi, Yun Suk; Jeon, Yejoo; Chung, Jung Wha; Baeg, Joo Yeong; Si, Won Keun; Jang, Eun Sun; Kim, Jin-Wook; Jeong, Sook-Hyang

    2016-11-14

    To clarify the prevalence of occult hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection (OBI) and the association between OBI and liver disease progression, defined as development of liver cirrhosis or hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), worsening of Child-Pugh class, or mortality in cases of chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. This prospective cohort study enrolled 174 patients with chronic HCV infection (chronic hepatitis, n = 83; cirrhosis, n = 47; HCC, n = 44), and evaluated disease progression during a mean follow-up of 38.7 mo. OBI was defined as HBV DNA positivity in 2 or more different viral genomic regions by nested polymerase chain reaction using 4 sets of primers in the S, C, P and X open reading frame of the HBV genome. The overall OBI prevalence in chronic HCV patients at enrollment was 18.4%, with 16.9%, 25.5% and 13.6% in the chronic hepatitis C, liver cirrhosis and HCC groups, respectively (P = 0.845). During follow-up, 52 patients showed disease progression, which was independently associated with aspartate aminotransferase > 40 IU/L, Child-Pugh score and sustained virologic response (SVR), but not with OBI positivity. In 136 patients who were not in the SVR state during the study period, OBI positivity was associated with neither disease progression, nor HCC development. The prevalence of OBI in chronic HCV patients was 18.4%, and OBI was not associated with disease progression in South Koreans.

  20. Occult hepatitis B virus infection is not associated with disease progression of chronic hepatitis C virus infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Junhyeon; Lee, Sang Soo; Choi, Yun Suk; Jeon, Yejoo; Chung, Jung Wha; Baeg, Joo Yeong; Si, Won Keun; Jang, Eun Sun; Kim, Jin-Wook; Jeong, Sook-Hyang

    2016-01-01

    AIM To clarify the prevalence of occult hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection (OBI) and the association between OBI and liver disease progression, defined as development of liver cirrhosis or hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), worsening of Child-Pugh class, or mortality in cases of chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. METHODS This prospective cohort study enrolled 174 patients with chronic HCV infection (chronic hepatitis, n = 83; cirrhosis, n = 47; HCC, n = 44), and evaluated disease progression during a mean follow-up of 38.7 mo. OBI was defined as HBV DNA positivity in 2 or more different viral genomic regions by nested polymerase chain reaction using 4 sets of primers in the S, C, P and X open reading frame of the HBV genome. RESULTS The overall OBI prevalence in chronic HCV patients at enrollment was 18.4%, with 16.9%, 25.5% and 13.6% in the chronic hepatitis C, liver cirrhosis and HCC groups, respectively (P = 0.845). During follow-up, 52 patients showed disease progression, which was independently associated with aspartate aminotransferase > 40 IU/L, Child-Pugh score and sustained virologic response (SVR), but not with OBI positivity. In 136 patients who were not in the SVR state during the study period, OBI positivity was associated with neither disease progression, nor HCC development. CONCLUSION The prevalence of OBI in chronic HCV patients was 18.4%, and OBI was not associated with disease progression in South Koreans. PMID:27895431

  1. Antiviral therapies for chronic hepatitis C virus infectionwith cirrhosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    Patients who are infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV)and also have advanced fibrosis or cirrhosis have beenrecognized as "difficult-to-treat" patients during an erawhen peginterferon and ribavirin combination therapy isthe standard of care. Recent guidelines have clearly statedthat treatment should be prioritized in this populationto prevent complications such as decompensationand hepatocellular carcinoma. Recent advances in thetreatment of chronic hepatitis C have been achievedthrough the development of direct-acting antiviral agents(DAAs). Boceprevir and telaprevir are first-generationDAAs that inhibit the HCV NS3/4A protease. Bocepreviror telaprevir, in combination with peginterferon andribavirin, improved the sustained virological responserates compared with peginterferon and ribavirin alone andwere tolerated in patients with HCV genotype 1 infectionwithout cirrhosis or compensated cirrhosis. However, theefficacy is lower especially in prior non-responders withor without cirrhosis. Furthermore, a high incidence ofadverse events was observed in patients with advancedliver disease, including cirrhosis, in real-life settings.Current guidelines in the United States and in someEuropean countries no longer recommend these regimensfor the treatment of HCV. Next-generation DAAs includesecond-generation HCV NS3/4A protease inhibitors, HCVNS5A inhibitors and HCV NS5B inhibitors, which have ahigh efficacy and a lower toxicity. These drugs are usedin interferon-free or in interferon-based regimens withor without ribavirin in combination with different classesof DAAs. Interferon-based regimens, such as simeprevirin combination with peginterferon and ribavirin, are welltolerated and are highly effective especially in treatmentna?vepatients and in patients who received treatmentbut who relapsed. The efficacy is less pronounced in nullrespondersand in patients with cirrhosis. Interferonfreeregimens in combination with ribavirin and/ortwo or more DAAs could be

  2. Ultrastructural study of Mayaro virus replication in BHK-21 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mezencio, J M; de Souza, W; Fonseca, M E; Rebello, M A

    1990-01-01

    The replication of Mayaro virus in BHK-21 cells was studied by electron microscopy. The infected cells show an intense vacuolization and proliferation of membranous structures. At 5 h post-infection, precursor virus particles were seen in the cytoplasm of infected cells. Later, mature virus particles were found outside the cells and budding from the plasma membrane. Enveloped virus particles were also observed inside the vesicles and budding across their membrane. The release of virus particles into the extracellular space by exocytosis was also observed. In a later stage of the infection, inclusion bodies were sometimes present in the cytoplasm of infected cells. We conclude that in BHK-21 cells, budding from the plasma membrane is the main process of Mayaro virus maturation, and in this kind of cell replication differs significantly from that observed in Aedes albopictus cells.

  3. Dynamics of Chikungunya Virus Cell Entry Unraveled by Single-Virus Tracking in Living Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoornweg, Tabitha E; van Duijl-Richter, Mareike K S; Ayala Nuñez, Nilda V; Albulescu, Irina C; van Hemert, Martijn J; Smit, Jolanda M

    2016-01-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is a rapidly emerging mosquito-borne human pathogen causing major outbreaks in Africa, Asia and the Americas. The cell entry pathway hijacked by CHIKV to infect a cell has been studied before using inhibitory compounds. There has been some debate on the mechanism by which C

  4. Dynamics of Chikungunya Virus Cell Entry Unraveled by Single-Virus Tracking in Living Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoornweg, Tabitha E.; van Duijl-Richter, Mareike K. S.; Nunez, Nilda V. Ayala; Albulescu, Irina C.; van Hemert, Martijn J.; Smit, Jolanda M.

    2016-01-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is a rapidly emerging mosquito-borne human pathogen causing major outbreaks in Africa, Asia, and the Americas. The cell entry pathway hijacked by CHIKV to infect a cell has been studied previously using inhibitory compounds. There has been some debate on the mechanism by wh

  5. Dynamics of Chikungunya Virus Cell Entry Unraveled by Single-Virus Tracking in Living Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoornweg, Tabitha E; van Duijl-Richter, Mareike K S; Ayala Nuñez, Nilda V; Albulescu, Irina C; van Hemert, Martijn J; Smit, Jolanda M

    2016-01-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is a rapidly emerging mosquito-borne human pathogen causing major outbreaks in Africa, Asia and the Americas. The cell entry pathway hijacked by CHIKV to infect a cell has been studied before using inhibitory compounds. There has been some debate on the mechanism by which C

  6. Role of viruses in renal cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Salehipoor

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available To determine whether viral infections are related to renal cell carcinoma (RCC, we studied 49 patients with RCC (29 patients were males with age ranging from 30 to 81 years and a mean of 57.5 years; 20 patients were females with age ranging from 36 to 70 years with a mean of 58.4 years and 16 non-neoplastic kidney patients as controls. Tissues specimens from study patients and controls were examined by nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR to determine the presence of DNA of several viruses including human papilloma virus (HPV, Epstein-Barr virus (EBV, and polyoma viruses (BKV and JCV. Our results revealed that 7 of 49 (14.29% RCC tissue specimens had HPV DNA compared with none of 16 non-cancer control subjects. Regarding the HPV types, all the positive results were high-risk HPV types (type 16 in three and 18 in four patients. The present study suggests that HPV infection, especially high-risk types, is associated with RCC. However, more studies are necessary to demonstrate the molecular oncogenic processes involved in this association.

  7. Chronic Inflammatory Periodontal Disease in Patients Diagnosed with Human Immunodeficiency Virus/AIDS in Cienfuegos

    OpenAIRE

    Nivia Gontán Quintana; Alain Soto Ugalde; Elena Idaisy Otero Salabarría

    2013-01-01

    Background: human immunodeficiency virus increases patients´ susceptibility to infections. Consequently, a high incidence of periodontal diseases is observed among them. It is often associated with other lesions of the oral mucous. Objective: to determine the evolution of chronic inflammatory periodontal disease in patients diagnosed with human immunodeficiency virus/AIDS.Methods: a case series study involving HIV-positive patients who attended the Stomatology consultation in Cienfuegos was c...

  8. Interleukin-6 (IL-6) haplotypes and the response to therapy of chronic hepatitis C virus infection

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection affects nearly 170 million individuals worldwide. Treatment of HCV with pegylated interferon-α-2a is successful in eradicating virus from only 30%–80% of those treated. Interleukin-6 (IL-6) is an important cytokine involved in the immune response to infectious agents and in vitro studies suggest that host genetic variation, particularly haplotypes, may affect IL-6 expression. We examined the contribution of haplotypes in the IL-6 gene on sustained vir...

  9. Pancreatic Stellate Cells and Chronic Alcoholic Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raffaele Pezzilli

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Chronic pancreatitis is a disease often characterized by recurrent episodes of abdominal pain accompanied by progressive pancreatic exocrine and endocrine insufficiency [1] and it sometimes requires multiple hospitalizations. Obstructive jaundice, duodenal stenosis, left-sided portal hypertension, pseudocyst and mass formation, and pancreatic carcinoma may occur as complications of chronic pancreatitis. The disease is frequently the result of chronic alcohol abuse, even if other factors such as genetic alterations, autoimmune disorders, and obstructive disease of the biliary tract and the pancreas may cause the disease [2]. Medical therapy is the treatment of choice for most patients and it is based on substitutive therapy for either exocrine or endocrine insufficiency and on analgesics for pain control. In the presence of intractable pain, surgical management is the main option [3] even if, in recent years, other therapeutic options such as endoscopic therapy [4], thoracoscopic splanchnicectomy [5], and extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy have been applied in clinical practice [6]. From a pathological point of view, chronic pancreatitis is characterized by irregular sclerosis with destruction and loss of the exocrine parenchyma, and complete replacement of acinar, ductal and endocrine tissue by fibrotic tissue. It has recently been reported that acute alcoholic pancreatitis develops in a pancreas already affected by chronic pancreatitis [7]. In 1982, Watari et al. [8] reported the presence of vitamin A-containing cells in the vitamin A-fed rat pancreas. These were later described and characterized as stellate cells in the rat and the human pancreas [9, 10]. Pancreatic stellate cells are morphologically similar to hepatic stellate cells. They bear long cytoplasmic processes and are situated close to the pancreatic acini. In the quiescent state, these cells contain lipid droplets, store vitamin A and express markers such as desmin, glial

  10. Isolation of influenza viruses in MDCK 33016PF cells and clearance of contaminating respiratory viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Bernhard; Mohr, Hannah; Enders, Martin; Garten, Wolfgang; Gregersen, Jens-Peter

    2012-01-11

    This paper summarizes results obtained by multiplex PCR screening of human clinical samples for respiratory viruses and corresponding data obtained after passaging of virus-positive samples in MDCK 33016PF cells. Using the ResPlexII v2.0 (Qiagen) multiplex PCR, 393 positive results were obtained in 468 clinical samples collected during an influenza season in Germany. The overall distribution of positive results was influenza A 42.0%, influenza B 38.7%, adenovirus 1.5%, bocavirus 0.5%, coronavirus 3.3%, enterovirus 5.6%, metapneumovirus 1.0%, parainfluenza virus 0.8%, rhinovirus 4.1%, and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) 2.5%. Double infections of influenza virus together with another virus were found for adenovirus B and E, bocavirus, coronavirus, enterovirus and for rhinovirus. These other viruses were rapidly lost upon passages in MDCK 33016PF cells and under conditions as applied to influenza virus passaging. Clinical samples, in which no influenza virus but other viruses were found, were also subject to passages in MDCK 33016PF cells. Using lower inoculum dilutions than those normally applied for preparations containing influenza virus (total dilution of the original sample of ∼10(4)), the positive results for the different viruses turned negative already after 2 or 3 passages in MDCK 33016PF cells. These results demonstrate that, under practical conditions as applied to grow influenza viruses, contaminating viruses can be effectively removed by passages in MDCK cells. In combination with their superior isolation efficiency, MDCK cells appear highly suitable to be used as an alternative to embryonated eggs to isolate and propagate influenza vaccine candidate viruses.

  11. Beneficial effects of fucoidan in patients with chronic hepatitis C virus infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Naoki Mori; Kazunori Nakasone; Koh Tomimori; Chie Ishikawa

    2012-01-01

    AIM:To evaluate the effects of fucoidan,a complex sulfated polysaccharide extract from marine seaweed,on hepatitis C virus (HCV) RNA load both in vitro and in vivo.METHODS:HCV-1b replicon-expressing cells were cultured in the presence of fucoidan obtained from Cladosiphon okamuranus Tokida cultivated in Okinawa,Japan,and quantified the level of HCV replication.In an open-label uncontrolled study,15 patients with chronic hepatitis C,and HCV-related cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma were treated with fucoidan (0.83 g/d) for 12 mo.The clinical symptoms,biochemical tests,and HCV RNA levels were assessed before,during,and after treatment.RESULTS:Fucoidan dose-dependently inhibited the expression of HCV replicon.At 8-10 mo of treatment with fucoidan,HCV RNA levels were significantly lower relative to the baseline.The same treatment also tended to lower serum alanine aminotransferase levels,and the latter correlated with HCV RNA levels.However,the improved laboratory tests did not translate into significant clinical improvement.Fucoidan had no serious adverse effects.CONCLUSION:Our findings suggest that fucoidan is safe and useful in the treatment of patients with HCV-related chronic liver diseases.Further controlled clinical trials are needed to confirm the present findings.

  12. FEATURES IMMUNOLOGIC INDICATORS OF CHRONIC TONSILLITIS ASSOCIATED WITH EPSTEIN-BARR VIRUS IN ADULTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuchma I.U

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Chronic tonsillitis are the most common diseases of the upper respiratory tract. One of the causes of tonsillitis, with severe clinical manifestations or erased is the Epstein - Barr virus (EBV. According to the literature, more than 90% of the adult population infected with EBV and are lifelong carriers of the virus. After primary infection replication of the virus in asymptomatic or in the case of a weakened immune system may develop infectious mononucleosis. Primary EBV infection in adolescence and adults is much greater than in children and often causes the formation of chronic forms. The main entrance gate is EBV oropharyngeal epithelium. In epithelial cells undergoing complete EBV replication with lysis of cells and the formation of a large number of virions. EBV infects B lymphocytes through the interaction of the surface gp320 virus with CD21 (receptor for complement component C3d. In EBV-infected B lymphocytes are two possible kinds of replication: lytic and latent process. During replication of EBV lytic expressed approximately 100 proteins are immunogenic but are 4 types of proteins, which have specific antibodies: early antigen - EA; viral capsid antigen - VCA; Epstein-Barr nuclear antigen - EBNA; latent membrane protein - LMP. LMP-1 induced bcl-2 (a blocker of apoptosis in B-cells and promotes proliferation and migration of B-lymphocytes. Thus, EBV infection is characterized by widespread, reactivation of infection from infected parts that most often manifests itself with recurrent infection with symptoms of chronic tonsillitis. Objective: what features of general and local immunological parameters inherent in chronic tonsillitis in the acute stage, caused by reactivation of EBV infection. Materials and methods. The study included 311 patients with chronic tonsillitis subcompensated in the acute stage. Microbiological testing of samples produced from the throat, determined EBV DNA in saliva, EVB-VCA-IgM, EVB-EA-IgG and EVB-NA-IgG in

  13. Chronic Hepatitis B and C Virus Infection and Risk for Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma in HIV-Infected Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Qing; De Luca, Andrea; Smith, Colette

    2017-01-01

    Background: Non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) is the most common AIDS-defining condition in the era of antiretroviral therapy (ART). Whether chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection promote NHL in HIV-infected patients is unclear. Objective: To investigate whether chronic HBV...

  14. Autologous Bone Marrow Stem Cell Infusion (AMBI therapy for Chronic Liver Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajkumar JS

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Liver Cirrhosis is the end stage of chronic liver disease which may happen due to alcoholism, viral infections due to Hepatitis B, Hepatitis C viruses and is difficult to treat. Liver transplantation is the only available definitive treatment which is marred by lack of donors, post operative complications such as rejection and high cost. Autologous bone marrow stem cells have shown a lot of promise in earlier reported animal studies and clinical trials. We have in this study administered in 22 patients with chronic liver disease, autologous bone marrow stem cell whose results are presented herewith.

  15. Antigen-induced regulatory T cells in HBV chronically infected patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barboza, Luisa; Salmen, Siham; Goncalves, Loredana; Colmenares, Melisa; Peterson, Darrell; Montes, Henry; Cartagirone, Raimondo; Gutiérrez, Maria del Carmen; Berrueta, Lisbeth

    2007-11-10

    T cell response against HBV is vigorous in patients with acute hepatitis who clear the virus, whereas it is weak and narrowly focused in patients with chronic disease. We report that following incubation with HBcAg, a population of CD4+FoxP3+ cells expressing phenotypic markers of both natural and induced Tregs, can be antigen-induced from peripheral mononuclear cells. Conversely, naive and naturally immune subjects did not increase CD4+FoxP3+ Tregs following stimulation with HBcAg, supporting the idea that natural Tregs are able to respond specifically to HBV antigen. Furthermore, increased frequencies of antigen-induced CD4+FoxP3+IL-10+ Tregs correlated with viral load, suggesting that antigen-induced Tregs could contribute to an inadequate response against the virus, leading to chronic infection and support the view that specific natural Tregs may be implicated in host immune tolerance during HBV infection.

  16. Molecular Identification of Chronic Bee Paralysis Virus Infection in Apis mellifera Colonies in Japan

    OpenAIRE

    Tomomi Morimoto; Yuriko Kojima; Mikio Yoshiyama; Kiyoshi Kimura; Bu Yang; Tatsuhiko Kadowaki

    2012-01-01

    Chronic bee paralysis virus (CBPV) infection causes chronic paralysis and loss of workers in honey bee colonies around the world. Although CBPV shows a worldwide distribution, it had not been molecularly detected in Japan. Our investigation of Apis mellifera and Apis cerana japonica colonies with RT-PCR has revealed CBPV infection in A. mellifera but not A. c. japonica colonies in Japan. The prevalence of CBPV...

  17. Altered quality of life in the early stages of chronic hepatitis C is due to the virus itself

    OpenAIRE

    Strauss, Edna; Porto-Ferreira, Francisco Augusto; de Almeida-Neto, Cesar; Dias Teixeira, Maria Cristina

    2013-01-01

    Health-related quality of life (HRQOL) is impaired in chronic viral hepatitis and a direct role of the virus, although suggested, has not been demonstrated. Our aim was to evaluate HRQOL at blood donation before knowledge of the diagnosis of both hepatitis C virus (HCV) and hepatitis B virus (HBV) so as to elucidate this matter.

  18. Evasion of T cell immunity by Epstein-Barr virus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horst, D.

    2011-01-01

    Immune evasion strategies are thought to contribute essentially to the life cycle of persistent viruses by delaying the elimination of the infected cell long enough to enable the virus to replicate. Exemplary in this context are the herpesviruses, large DNA viruses that are carried as a persistent

  19. Evasion of T cell immunity by Epstein-Barr virus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horst, D.

    2011-01-01

    Immune evasion strategies are thought to contribute essentially to the life cycle of persistent viruses by delaying the elimination of the infected cell long enough to enable the virus to replicate. Exemplary in this context are the herpesviruses, large DNA viruses that are carried as a persistent a

  20. Interaction of classical swine fever virus with dendritic cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carrasco, C.P.; Rigden, R.C.; Vincent, I.E.; Balmelli, C.; Ceppi, M.; Bauhofer, O.; Tache, V.; Hjertner, B.; McNeilly, F.; Gennip, van H.G.P.; McCullough, K.C.; Summerfield, A.

    2004-01-01

    Functional disruption of dendritic cells (DCs) is an important strategy for viral pathogens to evade host defences. Monocytotropic viruses such as classical swine fever virus (CSFV) could employ such a mechanism, since the virus can suppress immune responses and induce apoptosis without infecting ly

  1. Chronic hepatitis virus infection in patients with multiple myeloma: clinical characteristics and outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung-Jen Teng

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Cytotoxic agents and steroids are used to treat lymphoid malignancies, but these compounds may exacerbate chronic viral hepatitis. For patients with multiple myeloma, the impact of preexisting hepatitis virus infection is unclear. The aim of this study is to explore the characteristics and outcomes of myeloma patients with chronic hepatitis virus infection. METHODS: From 2003 to 2008, 155 myeloma patients were examined to determine their chronic hepatitis virus infection statuses using serologic tests for the hepatitis B (HBV and C viruses (HCV. Clinical parameters and outcome variables were retrieved via a medical chart review. RESULTS: The estimated prevalences of chronic HBV and HCV infections were 11.0% (n = 17 and 9.0% (n = 14, respectively. The characteristics of patients who were hepatitis virus carriers and those who were not were similar. However, carrier patients had a higher prevalence of conventional cytogenetic abnormalities (64.3% vs. 25.0%. The cumulative incidences of grade 3-4 elevation of the level of alanine transaminase, 30.0% vs. 12.0%, and hyperbilirubinemia, 20.0% vs. 1.6%, were higher in carriers as well. In a Kaplan-Meier analysis, carrier patients had worse overall survival (median: 16.0 vs. 42.4 months. The prognostic value of carrier status was not statistically significant in the multivariate analysis, but an age of more than 65 years old, the presence of cytogenetic abnormalities, a beta-2-microglobulin level of more than 3.5 mg/L, and a serum creatinine level of more than 2 mg/ dL were independent factors associated with poor prognosis. CONCLUSION: Myeloma patients with chronic hepatitis virus infections might be a distinct subgroup, and close monitoring of hepatic adverse events should be mandatory.

  2. Hepatitis virus infection and chronic liver disease among atomic-bomb survivors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujiwara, Saeko; Cologne, John; Akahoshi, Masazumi [Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hiroshima (Japan); Kusumi, Shizuyo [Institute of Radiation Epidemiology, Radiation Effects Association, Tokyo (Japan); Kodama, Kazunori; Yoshizawa, Hiroshi [Hiroshima University School of Medicine, Hiroshima (Japan)

    2000-05-01

    Hepatitis C and B virus (HCV, HBV) infection plays a crucial role in the etiology of chronic hepatitis, liver cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma, which have been reported to increase with radiation dose among the atomic bomb survivors. The purpose of this study is to investigate whether radiation exposure altered the prevalence of hepatitis virus infection or accelerated the progress toward chronic hepatitis after hepatitis virus infection. Levels of serum antibody to hepatitis C virus (anti-HCV), HBs antigen (HBsAg), and anti-HBs antibody (anti-HBs) were measured for 6,121 participants in the Adult Health Study of atomic bomb survivors in Hiroshima and Nagasaki. No relationship was found between anti-HCV prevalence and radiation dose, after adjusting for age, sex, city, history of blood transfusion, acupuncture, and family history, but prevalence of anti-HCV was significantly lower overall among the radiation-exposed people (relative prevalence 0.84, p=0.022) compared to people with estimated radiation dose 0 Gy. No significant interaction was found between any of the above mentioned risk factors and radiation dose. People with anti-HCV positive had 13 times higher prevalence of chronic liver disease than those without anti-HCV. However, the radiation dose response for chronic liver disease among anti-HCV positive survivors may be greater than that among anti-HCV negative survivors (slope ratio 20), but the difference was marginally significant (p=0.097). Prevalence of HBsAg increased with whole-body kerma. However, no trend with radiation dose was found in the anti-HBs prevalence. In the background, prevalence of chronic liver disease in people with HBsAg-positive was approximately three times higher that in those without HBsAg. No difference in slope of the dose was found among HBsAg positive and negative individuals (slope: HBsAg positive 0.91/Gy, HBsAg negative 0.11/Gy, difference p=0.66). In conclusion, no dose-response relationship was found between

  3. Benign and malignant hematological manifestations of chronic Hepatitis C virus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiksha Kedia

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV infection, that affects 3% of world′s population, is associated with several hematological manifestations mainly benign cytopenias, coagulopathy and lymphoproliferative diseases. Immune or non-immune-mediated thrombocytopenia is a major challenge in chronic HCV infected patients especially in the setting of an advanced liver disease, with average prevalence of nearly 24%. Although several treatment modalities such as steroids, intravenous immunoglobulin, splenectomy and immunosuppresants have been tried with some success, their efficacy is not impressive and can result in an increase in viral load or other thrombotic complications. Even though a recent phase 2 study has shown promising role of a platelet growth factor, eltrombopag, in boosting platelets counts prior to antiviral treatment, its use in pre-operative setting had unexpected complications. Unlike thrombocytopenia, anemia and neutropenia are more frequently seen in treated patients and are often the result of antiviral therapy. HCV infection also pre-disposes to lymphoproliferative diseases, mainly non-Hodking′s lymphomas, likely as a result of chronic antigenic stimulation and mutation of several genes involved in carcinogenesis. Understanding of the role of HCV infection in these conditions has therapeutic implications. Whereas antiviral therapy has shown therapeutic role in HCV-associated indolent lymphomas, monitoring of hepatic function and viral load is important in the management of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma in HCV-infected patients. Although our knowledge about the HCV infection and hematological manifestations has substantially grown in last few decades, further studies are important to advance our therapeutic approach.

  4. Autoantibodies and hepatitis C virus genotypes in chronic hepatitis C patients in Estonia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Eva Zusinaite; Kaja Metsküla; Riina Salupere

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To determine the prevalence of several autoantibodies in chronic hepatitis C patients, and to find out whether the pattern of autoantibodies was associated with hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotypes.METHODS: Sera from 90 consecutive patients with chronic hepatitis C were investigated on the presence of anti-nuclear (ANA), anti-mitochondrial (AMA), anti-smooth muscle (SMA),anti-liver-kidney microsomal type 1 (LKMA1), anti-parietal cell (PCA), anti-thyroid microsomal (TMA), and anti-reticulin (ARA) autoantibodies. The autoantibodies were identified by indirect immunofluorescence. HCV genotypes were determined by a restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of the amplified 5' noncoding genome region.RESULTS: Forty-six (51.1%) patients were positive for at least one autoantibody. Various antibodies were presented as follows: ANA in 13 (14.4%) patients, SMA in 39 (43.3%),TMA in 2 (2.2%), and ARA in 1 (1.1%) patients. In 9 cases,sera were positive for two autoantibodies (ANA and SMA).AMA, PCA and LKMA1 were not detected in the observed sera. HCV genotypes were distributed as follows: 1b in 66 (73.3%) patients, 3a in 18 (20.0%), and 2a in 6 (6.7%)patients.CONCLUSION: A high prevalence of ANA and SMA can be found in chronic hepatitis C patients. Autoantibodies are present at low titre (1: 10) in most of the cases. Distribution of the autoantibodies show no differences in the sex groups and between patients infected with different HCV genotypes.

  5. Circulating adhesion molecules in patients with virus-related chronic diseases of the liver

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cosimo Marcello Bruno; Claudio Sciacca; Danila Cilio; Gaetano Bertino; Anna Elisa Marchese; Gaetana Politi; Lucia Chinnici

    2005-01-01

    AIM: In the inflammatory state, intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and vascular cellular adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) play a key role in promoting migration of immunological cells from the circulation to target site.Aim of our study was to investigate soluble forms of these molecules in patients with virus-related chronic liver diseases, to assess their behavior in different pathologies and correlation with severity of liver damage.METHODS: Circulating ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 were assayed by EIA commercial kits (R&D System Co.,Abington, UK) in 23 patients with chronic active hepatitis (CH), 50 subjects affected by liver cirrhosis (LC) and 15 healthy controls comparable for sex and age. In patients, serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) were also detected by autoanalyzer.RESULTS: LC patients had significantly higher ICAM-1 values than CH patients (38.56±7.4 ng/mL vs 20.89±6.42 ng/mL; P<0.001) and these ones had significantly higher values than controls (12.92±1.08 ng/mL; P<0.001). In CH group, ICAM-1 levels were significantly related to inflammatory activity (P= 0.041) and ALT values (r= 0.77;P<0.05). VCAM-1 values were significantly increased only in LC patients (P<0.001) and related to severity of liver impairment.CONCLUSION: These findings suggest that the determination of serum ICAM-1 can be considered as an additional useful marker of hepatocellular necrosis and inflammatory activity in chronic hepatitis, while serum VCAM-1 is an indicator of liver fibrogenesis and severity of disease in cirrhosis.

  6. Investigation of Influenza Virus Polymerase Activity in Pig Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moncorgé, Olivier; Long, Jason S.; Cauldwell, Anna V.; Zhou, Hongbo; Lycett, Samantha J.

    2013-01-01

    Reassortant influenza viruses with combinations of avian, human, and/or swine genomic segments have been detected frequently in pigs. As a consequence, pigs have been accused of being a “mixing vessel” for influenza viruses. This implies that pig cells support transcription and replication of avian influenza viruses, in contrast to human cells, in which most avian influenza virus polymerases display limited activity. Although influenza virus polymerase activity has been studied in human and avian cells for many years by use of a minigenome assay, similar investigations in pig cells have not been reported. We developed the first minigenome assay for pig cells and compared the activities of polymerases of avian or human influenza virus origin in pig, human, and avian cells. We also investigated in pig cells the consequences of some known mammalian host range determinants that enhance influenza virus polymerase activity in human cells, such as PB2 mutations E627K, D701N, G590S/Q591R, and T271A. The two typical avian influenza virus polymerases used in this study were poorly active in pig cells, similar to what is seen in human cells, and mutations that adapt the avian influenza virus polymerase for human cells also increased activity in pig cells. In contrast, a different pattern was observed in avian cells. Finally, highly pathogenic avian influenza virus H5N1 polymerase activity was tested because this subtype has been reported to replicate only poorly in pigs. H5N1 polymerase was active in swine cells, suggesting that other barriers restrict these viruses from becoming endemic in pigs. PMID:23077313

  7. Onset of Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus During Pegylated-interferon Alfa and Ribavirin Therapy for Chronic Hepatitis C Virus Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranganathan, Raghini; Janarthanan, Krishnaveni; Rajasekaran, Senthilkumar

    2012-01-01

    A 16-year-old female was treated with pegylated-interferon (PEG-IFN) alfa (a)-2b and ribavirin combination therapy for chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. She attained rapid virological response. She presented with diabetic ketoacidosis after 41 weeks of therapy. Anti-glutamic acid decarboxylase antibodies and islet cell antibodies were negative. Her fasting serum C-peptide level was <0.1 ng/mL, and the treatment course was completed. This case underlines the importance of periodic plasma glucose monitoring in patients during and after PEG-IFN and ribavirin therapy. PMID:25755410

  8. T Cell Factor 1-Expressing Memory-like CD8(+) T Cells Sustain the Immune Response to Chronic Viral Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utzschneider, Daniel T; Charmoy, Mélanie; Chennupati, Vijaykumar; Pousse, Laurène; Ferreira, Daniela Pais; Calderon-Copete, Sandra; Danilo, Maxime; Alfei, Francesca; Hofmann, Maike; Wieland, Dominik; Pradervand, Sylvain; Thimme, Robert; Zehn, Dietmar; Held, Werner

    2016-08-16

    Chronic infections promote the terminal differentiation (or "exhaustion") of T cells and are thought to preclude the formation of memory T cells. In contrast, we discovered a small subpopulation of virus-specific CD8(+) T cells that sustained the T cell response during chronic infections. These cells were defined by, and depended on, the expression of the transcription factor Tcf1. Transcriptome analysis revealed that this population shared key characteristics of central memory cells but lacked an effector signature. Unlike conventional memory cells, Tcf1-expressing T cells displayed hallmarks of an "exhausted" phenotype, including the expression of inhibitory receptors such as PD-1 and Lag-3. This population was crucial for the T cell expansion that occurred in response to inhibitory receptor blockade during chronic infection. These findings identify a memory-like T cell population that sustains T cell responses and is a prime target for therapeutic interventions to improve the immune response in chronic infections. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Is chronic hepatitis C virus infection a risk factor for breast cancer?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dominique; Larrey; Marie-Cécile; Bozonnat; Ihab; Kain; Georges-Philippe; Pageaux; Eric; Assenat

    2010-01-01

    AIM:To evaluate the prevalence of breast tumors in adult females with chronic hepatitis C virus(HCV) infection.METHODS:Prospective,single-center study,based on female outpatients consulting in a liver unit,for 1 year.The study group included females with present and/or past history of chronic infection by HCV.Patients with spontaneous recovery were excluded.Chronic hepatitis had been proved by liver biopsy in the majority of cases and/or biological markers of inflammation and fibrosis.The control group incl...

  10. Chronically infected wild boar can transmit genotype 3 hepatitis E virus to domestic pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlosser, Josephine; Vina-Rodriguez, Ariel; Fast, Christine; Groschup, Martin H; Eiden, Martin

    2015-10-22

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) causes acute hepatitis E in humans in developing countries, but sporadic and autochthonous cases do also occur in industrialized nations. In Europe, food-borne zoonotic transmission of genotype 3 (gt3) has been associated with the consumption of raw and undercooked products from domestic pig and wild boar. As shown recently, naturally acquired HEV gt3 replicates efficiently in experimentally infected wild boar and is transmissible from a wild boar to domestic pigs. Generally, following an acute infection swine suffer from a transient febrile illness and viremia in connection with fecal virus shedding. However, little is known about sub-acute or chronic HEV infections in swine, and how and where HEV survives the immune response. In this paper, we describe the incidental finding of a chronic HEVgt3 infection in two naturally infected European wild boar which were raised and housed at FLI over years. The wild boar displayed fecal HEV RNA excretion and viremia over nearly the whole observation period of more than five months. The animal had mounted a substantial antibody response, yet without initial clearance of the virus by the immune system. Further analysis indicated a subclinical course of HEV with no evidence of chronic hepatitis. Additionally, we could demonstrate that this chronic wild boar infection was still transmissible to domestic pigs, which were housed together with this animal. Sentinel pigs developed fecal virus shedding accompanied by seroconversion. Wild boar should therefore be considered as an important reservoir for transmission of HEV gt3 in Europe.

  11. In vivo immunization in combination with peg-interferon for chronic hepatitis B virus infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sprengers, D; van der Molen, R G; Binda, R; Kusters, J G; de Man, R A; Niesters, H G M; Schalm, S W; Janssen, H L A

    2007-01-01

    Only in a minority of patients with chronic hepatitis B (CHB) will treatment with interferon (IFN)-alpha or nucleoside analogues lead to sustained virological response. In vivo immunization (IVI) following virus suppression aims to optimize conditions for an effective immune response: following rapi

  12. Liver mortality attributable to chronic hepatitis C virus infection in Denmark and Scotland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Innes, Hamish; Hutchinson, Sharon J; Obel, Niels

    2016-01-01

    UNLABELLED: Liver mortality among individuals with chronic hepatitis C (CHC) infection is common, but the relative contribution of CHC per se versus adverse health behaviors is uncertain. We explored data on spontaneous resolvers of hepatitis C virus (HCV) as a benchmark group to uncover the inde...

  13. Pattern recognition receptor responses in children with chronic hepatitis B virus infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heiberg, Ida Louise; Winther, Thilde Nordmann; Paludan, Søren Riis

    2012-01-01

    Several studies have demonstrated that hepatitis B virus (HBV) affects the expression and function of Toll like receptors (TLRs), but data on TLR function in HBV infection are mainly from adult patients. The natural history of chronic hepatitis B (CHB) infection is distinctly different in children...

  14. Autologous Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Chronic Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashu Bhasin

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cell transplantation is a ‘hype and hope’ in the current scenario. It is in the early stage of development with promises to restore function in chronic diseases. Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC transplantation in stroke patients has shown significant improvement by reducing clinical and functional deficits. They are feasible and multipotent and have homing characteristics. This study evaluates the safety, feasibility and efficacy of autologous MSC transplantation in patients with chronic stroke using clinical scores and functional imaging (blood oxygen level-dependent and diffusion tensor imaging techniques. Methods: Twelve chronic stroke patients were recruited; inclusion criteria were stroke lasting 3 months to 1 year, motor strength of hand muscles of at least 2, and NIHSS of 4–15, and patients had to be conscious and able to comprehend. Fugl Meyer (FM, modified Barthel index (mBI, MRC, Ashworth tone grade scale scores and functional imaging scans were assessed at baseline, and after 8 and 24 weeks. Bone marrow was aspirated under aseptic conditions and expansion of MSC took 3 weeks with animal serum-free media (Stem Pro SFM. Six patients were administered a mean of 50–60 × 106 cells i.v. followed by 8 weeks of physiotherapy. Six patients served as controls. This was a non-randomized experimental controlled trial. Results: Clinical and radiological scanning was normal for the stem cell group patients. There was no mortality or cell-related adverse reaction. The laboratory tests on days 1, 3, 5 and 7 were also normal in the MSC group till the last follow-up. The FM and mBI showed a modest increase in the stem cell group compared to controls. There was an increased number of cluster activation of Brodmann areas BA 4 and BA 6 after stem cell infusion compared to controls, indicating neural plasticity. Conclusion: MSC therapy aiming to restore function in stroke is safe and feasible. Further randomized controlled trials are needed

  15. Autoimmune hemolytic anemia occurred prior to evident nephropathy in a patient with chronic hepatitis C virus infection: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Endo Morito

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Renal involvement in patients with chronic hepatitis C virus infection has been suggested to be due to a variety of immunological processes. However, the precise mechanism by which the kidneys are damaged in these patients is still unclear. Case presentation A 66 year old man presented with the sudden onset of autoimmune hemolytic anemia. Concomitant with a worsening of hemolysis, his initially mild proteinuria and hemoglobinuria progressed. On admission, laboratory tests revealed that he was positive for hepatitis C virus in his blood, though his liver function tests were all normal. The patient displayed cryoglobulinemia and hypocomplementemia with cold activation, and exhibited a biological false positive of syphilic test. Renal biopsy specimens showed signs of immune complex type nephropathy with hemosiderin deposition in the tubular epithelial cells. Conclusions The renal histological findings in this case are consistent with the deposition of immune complexes and hemolytic products, which might have occurred as a result of the patient's underlying autoimmune imbalance, autoimmune hemolytic anemia, and chronic hepatitis C virus infection.

  16. Therapeutic Evaluation of Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Chronic Gut Inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    1 AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-11-1-0666 TITLE: Therapeutic Evaluation of Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Chronic Gut Inflammation PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR...4Aug2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-11-1-0666 Therapeutic Evaluation of Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Chronic Gut Inflammation 5b...in a well-characterized mouse model of chronic colonic inflammation . Hypothesis: We propose that ex vivo-generated MSCs suppress chronic gut

  17. Hepatitis B Virus Splice-Generated Protein Induces T-Cell Responses in HLA-Transgenic Mice and Hepatitis B Virus-Infected Patients▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancini-Bourgine, Maryline; Bayard, Florence; Soussan, Patrick; Deng, Qiang; Lone, Yu-Chun; Kremsdorf, Dina; Michel, Marie-Louise

    2007-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus splice-generated protein (HBSP), encoded by a spliced hepatitis B virus RNA, was recently identified in liver biopsy specimens from patients with chronic active hepatitis B. We investigated the possible generation of immunogenic peptides by the processing of this protein in vivo. We identified a panel of potential epitopes in HBSP by using predictive computational algorithms for peptide binding to HLA molecules. We used transgenic mice devoid of murine major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules and positive for human MHC class I molecules to characterize immune responses specific for HBSP. Two HLA-A2-restricted peptides and one immunodominant HLA-B7-restricted epitope were identified following the immunization of mice with DNA vectors encoding HBSP. Most importantly, a set of overlapping peptides covering the HBSP sequence induced significant HBSP-specific T-cell responses in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from patients with chronic hepatitis B. The response was multispecific, as several epitopes were recognized by CD8+ and CD4+ human T cells. This study provides the first evidence that this protein generated in vivo from an alternative reading frame of the hepatitis B virus genome activates T-cell responses in hepatitis B virus-infected patients. Given that hepatitis B is an immune response-mediated disease, the detection of T-cell responses directed against HBSP in patients with chronic hepatitis B suggests a potential role for this protein in liver disease progression. PMID:17360751

  18. Progression of experimental chronic Aleutian mink disease virus infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Trine Hammer; Chriél, Mariann; Hansen, Mette Sif

    2016-01-01

    Aleutian mink disease virus (AMDV) is found world-wide and has a major impact on mink health and welfare by decreasing reproduction and fur quality. In the majority of mink, the infection is subclinical and the diagnosis must be confirmed by serology or polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Increased ...

  19. Multiple Virus Infections and the Characteristics of Chronic Bee Paralysis Virus in Diseased Honey Bees (Apis Mellifera L. in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Yan Y.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available China has the largest number of managed honey bee colonies globally, but there is currently no data on viral infection in diseased A. mellifera L. colonies in China. In particular, there is a lack of data on chronic bee paralysis virus (CBPV in Chinese honey bee colonies. Consequently, the present study investigated the occurrence and frequency of several widespread honey bee viruses in diseased Chinese apiaries, and we used the reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR assay. Described was the relationship between the presence of CBPV and diseased colonies (with at least one of the following symptoms: depopulation, paralysis, dark body colorings and hairless, or a mass of dead bees on the ground surrounding the beehives. Phylogenetic analyses of CBPV were employed. The prevalence of multiple infections of honey bee viruses in diseased Chinese apiaries was 100%, and the prevalence of infections with even five and six viruses were higher than expected. The incidence of CBPV in diseased colonies was significantly higher than that in apparently healthy colonies in Chinese A. mellifera aparies, and CBPV isolates from China can be separated into Chinese-Japanese clade 1 and 2. The results indicate that beekeeping in China may be threatened by colony decline due to the high prevalence of multiple viruses with CBPV.

  20. Association of interferon lambda-1 with herpes simplex viruses-1 and -2, Epstein-Barr virus, and human cytomegalovirus in chronic periodontitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muzammil; Jayanthi, D; Faizuddin, Mohamed; Noor Ahamadi, H M

    2017-05-01

    Periodontal tissues facilitate the homing of herpes viruses that elicit the immune-inflammatory response releasing the interferons (IFN). IFN lambda-1 (λ1) can suppress the replication of viruses, and induces the antiviral mechanism. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the association between IFN-λ1 and periodontal herpes viruses in the immunoregulation of chronic periodontal disease. The cross-sectional study design included 30 chronic periodontitis patients with a mean age of 42.30 ± 8.63 years. Gingival crevicular fluid collected was assessed for IFN-λ1 using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and four herpes viruses were detected using multiplex polymerase chain reaction technique. IFN-λ1 levels were compared between virus-positive and -negative patients for individual and total viruses. Fifty per cent (n = 15) of patients were positive for the four herpes viruses together; 50% (n = 15), 30% (n = 9), 26.7% (n = 8), and 40% (n = 12) were positive for herpes simplex virus (HSV)-1, Epstein-Barr virus, HSV-2, and human cytomegalovirus, respectively. The mean concentrations of IFN-λ1 in virus-positive patients (14.38 ± 13.95) were lower than those of virus-negative patients (228.26 ± 215.35). INF-λ1 levels in individual virus groups were also lower in virus-positive patients compared to virus-negative patients, with P < 0.001. These results suggest that IFN-λ1 could have antiviral and therapeutic value against the viruses in the pathogenesis of chronic periodontitis. © 2015 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  1. [Occult hepatitis B virus infection in chronic hepatitis C].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Jae Young; Park, Eui Ju

    2013-09-01

    Occult HBV infection is defined as the presence of HBV DNA in the liver (with or without detectable or undetectable HBV DNA in the serum) of individuals testing negative for HBsAg. Studies on occult HBV infection in hepatitis C patients have reported highly variable prevalence, because the prevalence of occult HBV infection varies depending on the hepatitis B risk factors and methodological approaches. The most reliable diagnostic approach for detecting occult HBV detection is through examination of liver DNA extracts. HCV has been suspected to strongly suppress HBV replication up to the point where it may be directly responsible for occult HBV infection development. However, more data are needed to arrive at a definitive conclusion regarding the role of HCV in inducing occult HBV infection. Occult HBV infection in chronic hepatitis C patients is a complex biological entity with possible relevant clinical implications. Influence of occult HBV infection on the clinical outcomes of chronic hepatitis C may be considered negative. However, recent studies have shown that occult HBV infection could be associated with the development of hepatocellular carcinoma and contribute to the worsening of the course of chronic liver disease over time in chronic hepatitis C patients. Nevertheless, the possible role of occult HBV infection in chronic hepatitis C is still unresolved and no firm conclusion has been made up until now. It still remains unclear how occult HBV infection affects the treatment of chronic hepatitis C. Therefore, in order to resolve current controversies and understand the pathogenic role and clinical impacts of occult HBV infection in chronic hepatitis C patients, well-designed clinical studies are needed.

  2. Extrahepatic manifestations of chronic hepatitis C virus infection:297 cases from a tertiary medical center in Beijing, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cheng Zhaojing; Zhou Baotong; Shi Xiaochun; Zhang Yao; Zhang Lifan; Chen Limeng; Liu Xiaoqing

    2014-01-01

    Background Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection can affect multiple organ systems and cause a variety of extrahepatic manifestations (EMs).We sought to assess the constituent ratio of EMs in Chinese patients with chronic HCV infection and identify the clinical and biological factors associated with EM.Methods The medical records of 297 patients with chronic HCV infection were analyzed and demographic and epidemiological information was collected.The diagnosis of chronic HCV infection was based on positive anti-HCV combined with a positive HCV-RNA or at least two times of elevated aminotransferases attributable to HCV infection.Patients with HBV and/or HIV coinfection,autoimmune hepatitis,and history of alcohol abuse were excluded.Results Sixty-two percent (184/297) of the patients had at least one EM,including fatigue (29.4%),type 2 diabetes mellitus (28.2%),renal involvement (12.5%),lymphadenopathy (9.6%),fever (9.4%),thyroid dysfunction (8.1%),and arthralgia (7.4%).Neuropathy,sicca syndrome,B-cell lymphoma,Raynaud's phenomenon,and lichen planus were rare.The mean age of patients with EM was older compared with those without EM.Conclusions EMs were common in Chinese patients with chronic HCV infection,particularly fatigue,type 2 diabetes,renal impairment,lymphadenophy,fever,and thyroid dysfunction.Older age was associated with EMs.

  3. Anti-hepatitis A virus seroprevalence among patients with chronic viral liver disease in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Do Young; Ahn, Sang Hoon; Lee, Hyun Woong; Kim, Seung Up; Kim, Ja Kyung; Paik, Yong Han; Lee, Kwan Sik; Han, Kwang Hyub; Chon, Chae Yoon

    2007-11-01

    It is generally recommended that patients with chronic viral hepatitis should be vaccinated against hepatitis A virus (HAV) infection. We intended to evaluate the prevalence of IgG anti-HAV according to age in patients chronically infected with hepatitis B virus or hepatitis C virus in Korea. From June to October 2006, 303 patients (226 male, 77 female) with chronic hepatitis, liver cirrhosis, or hepatocellular carcinoma were recruited (mean age 50.8+/-14.4 years; range 16-84). The sera were tested for antibodies to HAV, and overall and age-specific seroprevalence of anti-HAV was assessed. Hepatitis B virus infection was the etiology of liver diseases in 267 patients (88.1%), with hepatitis C virus infection in 36 (11.9%). The distribution of clinical diagnosis was chronic hepatitis in 86 patients (28.4%), liver cirrhosis in 36 (11.9%), and hepatocellular carcinoma in 181 (57.9%). The patients were categorized by decade of age and the distribution was as follows: nine patients (2.5%) in their teens, 23 (6.2%) in their 20s, 36 (12.4%) in their 30s, 78 (25.7%) in their 40s, 72 (24.1%) in their 50s, and 85 (29%) >or=61 years. The overall seroprevalence of anti-HAV was 87.8% (266/303), and no difference was observed in sex (86.7 vs. 90.9%, P=0.42). The seroprevalence in each age group was 22.2, 26.1, 72.2, 97.4, 100 and 98.8%, respectively, showing marked increase in those over 40 years of age (P<0.001). Our study demonstrates that most Korean patients over 40 years of age with chronic liver disease have already been exposed to HAV.

  4. Genotype characterization of occult hepatitis B virus strains among Egyptian chronic hepatitis C patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishk, R; Atta, H Aboul; Ragheb, M; Kamel, M; Metwally, L; Nemr, N

    2014-03-13

    Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection combined with occult hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection has been associated with increased risk of hepatitis, cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. This study aimed to determine the prevalence of occult HBV infection among Egyptian chronic HCV patients, the genotype and occurrence of surface gene mutations of HBV and the impact of co-infection on early response to treatment. The study enrolled 162 chronic HCV patients from Ismailia Fever Hospital, Egypt, who were HBV surface antigen-negative. All patients were given clinical assessment and biochemical, histological and virological examinations. HBV-DNA was detectable in sera from 3 patients out of the 40 patients who were positive for hepatitis B core antibody. These 3 patients were responsive to combination therapy at treatment week 12; only 1 of them had discontinued therapy by week 24. HBV genotype D was the only detectable genotype in those patients, with absence of "a" determinant mutations among those isolates.

  5. "The evil virus cell": Students‘ knowledge and beliefs about viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enzinger, Sonja M.; Fink, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    Education about virus biology at school is of pivotal interest to raise public awareness concerning means of disease transmission and, thus, methods to prevent infection, and to reduce unnecessary antibiotic treatment due to patient pressure on physicians in case of viral diseases such as influenza. This study aimed at making visible the knowledge of Austrian high school and university students with respect to virus biology, virus structure and health-education issues. The data presented here stem from comprehensive questionnaire analyses, including the task to draw a virus, from a cross-sectional study with 133 grade 7 and 199 grade 10 high school students, and 133 first-year biology and 181 first-year non-biology university students. Analyses were performed both quantitatively and qualitatively. ANOVA revealed a highly significant group effect for total knowledge relating to virus biology and health issues (F(3, 642) = 44.17, p knowledge between high schools, virus biology seems to have been taught similarly among the tested schools. However, the majority of participants stated that the virus-related knowledge they had acquired at school was not sufficient. Based on the results presented here we urgently suggest improving and intensifying teaching this topic at school, since virus-related knowledge was by far too fragmentary among many participants. Such lack of health-relevant knowledge may contribute to pressure on physicians by patients to unnecessarily prescribe antibiotics, and possibly lead to potentially dangerous neglect concerning vaccination. The effectiveness of newly developed virus-related teaching units and material could be tested with the instrument used here. PMID:28350815

  6. Dissecting the Cell Entry Pathway of Dengue Virus by Single-Particle Tracking in Living Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Schaar, Hilde M.; Rust, Michael J.; Chen, Chen; van der Ende-Metselaar, Heidi; Wilschut, Jan; Zhuang, Xiaowei; Smit, Jolanda M.

    2008-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) is an enveloped RNA virus that causes the most common arthropod-borne infection worldwide. The mechanism by which DENV infects the host cell remains unclear. In this work, we used live-cell imaging and single-virus tracking to investigate the cell entry, endocytic trafficking, an

  7. Dissecting the Cell Entry Pathway of Dengue Virus by Single-Particle Tracking in Living Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Schaar, Hilde M.; Rust, Michael J.; Chen, Chen; van der Ende-Metselaar, Heidi; Wilschut, Jan; Zhuang, Xiaowei; Smit, Jolanda M.

    2008-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) is an enveloped RNA virus that causes the most common arthropod-borne infection worldwide. The mechanism by which DENV infects the host cell remains unclear. In this work, we used live-cell imaging and single-virus tracking to investigate the cell entry, endocytic trafficking,

  8. Dissecting the Cell Entry Pathway of Dengue Virus by Single-Particle Tracking in Living Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Schaar, Hilde M.; Rust, Michael J.; Chen, Chen; van der Ende-Metselaar, Heidi; Wilschut, Jan; Zhuang, Xiaowei; Smit, Jolanda M.

    2008-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) is an enveloped RNA virus that causes the most common arthropod-borne infection worldwide. The mechanism by which DENV infects the host cell remains unclear. In this work, we used live-cell imaging and single-virus tracking to investigate the cell entry, endocytic trafficking, an

  9. Persistent, triple-virus co-infections in mosquito cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malasit Prida

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is known that insects and crustaceans can carry simultaneous, active infections of two or more viruses without showing signs of disease, but it was not clear whether co-infecting viruses occupied the same cells or different cells in common target tissues. Our previous work showed that successive challenge of mosquito cell cultures followed by serial, split-passage resulted in stabilized cultures with 100% of the cells co-infected with Dengue virus (DEN and an insect parvovirus (densovirus (DNV. By addition of Japanese encephalitis virus (JE, we tested our hypothesis that stable, persistent, triple-virus co-infections could be obtained by the same process. Results Using immunocytochemistry by confocal microscopy, we found that JE super-challenge of cells dually infected with DEN and DNV resulted in stable cultures without signs of cytopathology, and with 99% of the cells producing antigens of the 3 viruses. Location of antigens for all 3 viruses in the triple co-infections was dominant in the cell nuclei. Except for DNV, this differed from the distribution in cells persistently infected with the individual viruses or co-infected with DNV and DEN. The dependence of viral antigen distribution on single infection or co-infection status suggested that host cells underwent an adaptive process to accommodate 2 or more viruses. Conclusions Individual mosquito cells can accommodate at least 3 viruses simultaneously in an adaptive manner. The phenomenon provides an opportunity for genetic exchange between diverse viruses and it may have important medical and veterinary implications for arboviruses.

  10. Susceptibility testing of fish cell lines for virus isolation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ariel, Ellen; Skall, Helle Frank; Olesen, Niels Jørgen

    2009-01-01

    compare susceptibility between cell lines and between lineages within a laboratory and between laboratories (Inter-laboratory Proficiency Test). The objective being that the most sensitive cell line and lineages are routinely selected for diagnostic purposes.In comparing cell lines, we simulated "non......-cell-culture-adapted" virus by propagating the virus in heterologous cell lines to the one tested. A stock of test virus was produced and stored at - 80 °C and tests were conducted biannually. This procedure becomes complicated when several cell lines are in use and does not account for variation among lineages. In comparing...... cell lineages, we increased the number of isolates of each virus, propagated stocks in a given cell line and tested all lineages of that line in use in the laboratory. Testing of relative cell line susceptibility between laboratories is carried out annually via the Inter-laboratory Proficiency Test...

  11. Susceptibility testing of fish cell lines for virus isolation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ariel, Ellen; Skall, Helle Frank; Olesen, Niels Jørgen

    2009-01-01

    compare susceptibility between cell lines and between lineages within a laboratory and between laboratories (Inter-laboratory Proficiency Test). The objective being that the most sensitive cell line and lineages are routinely selected for diagnostic purposes.In comparing cell lines, we simulated "non......-cell-culture-adapted" virus by propagating the virus in heterologous cell lines to the one tested. A stock of test virus was produced and stored at - 80 °C and tests were conducted biannually. This procedure becomes complicated when several cell lines are in use and does not account for variation among lineages. In comparing...... cell lineages, we increased the number of isolates of each virus, propagated stocks in a given cell line and tested all lineages of that line in use in the laboratory. Testing of relative cell line susceptibility between laboratories is carried out annually via the Inter-laboratory Proficiency Test...

  12. Construction of a chimeric hepatitis C virus replicon based on a strain isolated from a chronic hepatitis C patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Huang; Zhu, Wandi; Han, Qingxia; Pei, Rongjuan; Chen, Xinwen

    2014-02-01

    Subgenomic replicons of hepatitis C virus (HCV) have been widely used for studying HCV replication. Here, we report a new subgenomic replicon based on a strain isolated from a chronically infected patient. The coding sequence of HCV was recovered from a Chinese chronic hepatitis C patient displaying high serum HCV copy numbers. A consensus sequence designated as CCH strain was constructed based on the sequences of five clones and this was classified by sequence alignment as belonging to genotype 2a. The subgenomic replicon of CCH was replication-deficient in cell culture, due to dysfunctions in NS3 and NS5B. Various JFH1/CCH chimeric replicons were constructed, and specific mutations were introduced. The introduction of mutations could partially restore the replication of chimeric replicons. A replication-competent chimeric construct was finally obtained by the introduction of NS3 from JFH1 into the backbone of the CCH strain.

  13. Higher prevalence of Epstein-Barr virus DNA in deeper periodontal pockets of chronic periodontitis in Japanese patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayako Kato

    Full Text Available Periodontitis, a complex chronic inflammatory disease caused by subgingival infection, is among the most prevalent microbial diseases in humans. Although traditional microbiological research on periodontitis has focused on putative bacteria such as Porphyromonas gingivalis, the herpes virus is proposed to be involved in the pathogenesis of periodontitis because bacterial etiology alone does not adequately explain various clinical aspects. In this study, we established for the first time, more Epstein-Barr virus (EBV DNA is found deeper in periodontal pockets of chronic periodontitis in Japanese patients. Subgingival samples were collected from 85 patients with chronic periodontitis having two periodontal sites with probing depths (PD of ≤ 3 mm (shallow or ≥ 5 mm (deep and were subjected to a nested polymerase chain reaction. EBV DNA was more frequently detected in patients with deeper PD sites (66% than in those with shallow PD sites (48% or healthy controls (45%. Coexistence of EBV DNA and P. gingivalis was significantly higher in patients with deeper PD sites (40% than in those with shallow PD sites (14% or healthy controls (13%. Although no difference in clinical index for periodontitis, the odds ratio of EBV DNA in patients with deeper PD sites was 2.36, which was 2.07-fold higher than that in those with shallow PD sites. Interestingly, the odds of acquiring chronic periodontitis (PD ≥ 5 mm were higher in the presence of both EBV DNA and P. gingivalis compared with either EBV DNA or P. gingivalis only. In addition, we also observed that EBV-encoded small RNA (EBER in positive cells of human gingival tissues. These results would suggest that EBV DNA may serve as a pathogenic factor leading to chronic periodontitis among Japanese patients.

  14. Higher Prevalence of Epstein–Barr Virus DNA in Deeper Periodontal Pockets of Chronic Periodontitis in Japanese Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Ayako; Imai, Kenichi; Ochiai, Kuniyasu; Ogata, Yorimasa

    2013-01-01

    Periodontitis, a complex chronic inflammatory disease caused by subgingival infection, is among the most prevalent microbial diseases in humans. Although traditional microbiological research on periodontitis has focused on putative bacteria such as Porphyromonas gingivalis, the herpes virus is proposed to be involved in the pathogenesis of periodontitis because bacterial etiology alone does not adequately explain various clinical aspects. In this study, we established for the first time, more Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) DNA is found deeper in periodontal pockets of chronic periodontitis in Japanese patients. Subgingival samples were collected from 85 patients with chronic periodontitis having two periodontal sites with probing depths (PD) of ≤3 mm (shallow) or ≥5 mm (deep) and were subjected to a nested polymerase chain reaction. EBV DNA was more frequently detected in patients with deeper PD sites (66%) than in those with shallow PD sites (48%) or healthy controls (45%). Coexistence of EBV DNA and P. gingivalis was significantly higher in patients with deeper PD sites (40%) than in those with shallow PD sites (14%) or healthy controls (13%). Although no difference in clinical index for periodontitis, the odds ratio of EBV DNA in patients with deeper PD sites was 2.36, which was 2.07-fold higher than that in those with shallow PD sites. Interestingly, the odds of acquiring chronic periodontitis (PD ≥5 mm) were higher in the presence of both EBV DNA and P. gingivalis compared with either EBV DNA or P. gingivalis only. In addition, we also observed that EBV-encoded small RNA (EBER) in positive cells of human gingival tissues. These results would suggest that EBV DNA may serve as a pathogenic factor leading to chronic periodontitis among Japanese patients. PMID:23991022

  15. Higher prevalence of Epstein-Barr virus DNA in deeper periodontal pockets of chronic periodontitis in Japanese patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Ayako; Imai, Kenichi; Ochiai, Kuniyasu; Ogata, Yorimasa

    2013-01-01

    Periodontitis, a complex chronic inflammatory disease caused by subgingival infection, is among the most prevalent microbial diseases in humans. Although traditional microbiological research on periodontitis has focused on putative bacteria such as Porphyromonas gingivalis, the herpes virus is proposed to be involved in the pathogenesis of periodontitis because bacterial etiology alone does not adequately explain various clinical aspects. In this study, we established for the first time, more Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) DNA is found deeper in periodontal pockets of chronic periodontitis in Japanese patients. Subgingival samples were collected from 85 patients with chronic periodontitis having two periodontal sites with probing depths (PD) of ≤ 3 mm (shallow) or ≥ 5 mm (deep) and were subjected to a nested polymerase chain reaction. EBV DNA was more frequently detected in patients with deeper PD sites (66%) than in those with shallow PD sites (48%) or healthy controls (45%). Coexistence of EBV DNA and P. gingivalis was significantly higher in patients with deeper PD sites (40%) than in those with shallow PD sites (14%) or healthy controls (13%). Although no difference in clinical index for periodontitis, the odds ratio of EBV DNA in patients with deeper PD sites was 2.36, which was 2.07-fold higher than that in those with shallow PD sites. Interestingly, the odds of acquiring chronic periodontitis (PD ≥ 5 mm) were higher in the presence of both EBV DNA and P. gingivalis compared with either EBV DNA or P. gingivalis only. In addition, we also observed that EBV-encoded small RNA (EBER) in positive cells of human gingival tissues. These results would suggest that EBV DNA may serve as a pathogenic factor leading to chronic periodontitis among Japanese patients.

  16. Angioimmunoblastic T Cell Lymphoma Mimicking Chronic Urticaria

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    Mohleen Kang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Angioimmunoblastic T cell lymphoma (AITL is a rare but distinct type of T cell lymphoma with an aggressive course and high mortality. Most patients are diagnosed late in the disease and usually present with generalized lymphadenopathy. A minority have skin lesions at the time of diagnosis, more commonly in the form of nonspecific maculopapular rash with or without pruritus. We report a rare case of AITL presenting with chronic, recurrent angioedema and urticaria-like lesions and no palpable peripheral adenopathy. Primary Care physicians, dermatologists, and allergists must maintain a high index of suspicion for cutaneous manifestations of lymphoma, especially if the skin lesions are refractory to standard treatment. Timely diagnosis is essential to improve survival.

  17. Mutations at Nucleotide 1762, 1764 and 1766 of Hepatitis B Virus X Gene in Patients with Chronic Hepatitis B and Hepatitis B-Related Cirrhosis

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    Farzaneh Salarneia (BSc

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective: Hepatitis B virus (HBV is a DNA virus with high tendency toward hepatic tissue. There are currently about 3 million HBV-infected people and 350 to 400 million chronic carriers of this virus in the world. X protein plays a role in the over-expression of oncogenes, carcinogenicity of liver cells and overlaps with the basal core promoter of the virus. Mutations at specific nucleotides of this region increase viral replication and liver disease progression. The aim of this study was to investigate the frequency of mutations at nucleotides 1762, 1764 and 1766 of HBV X gene in patients with chronic hepatitis B and hepatitis B-related cirrhosis. Methods: In this study, 102 patients including 68 chronic hepatitis patients and 34 patients with hepatitis B-related cirrhosis were enrolled. After DNA extraction, HBV X gene was amplified and sequenced using Semi Nested-PCR. Obtained gene sequences were compared with the standard sequence of HBV virus X gene available in the gene bank (Okamoto AB033559. Then, the mutations in the gene X of HBV were identified. Results: Comparison of the standard sequence with sequences obtained from patients showed the presence of A1762T / G1764A mutation in 12 chronic (17.64% and 13 cirrhotic (38.23% patients. Also, C1766G / G1764T mutations were found in 8.23% of chronic patients and 17.64% of cirrhotic patients. Conclusion: A1762T / G1764A mutations in the overlapping region of the basal core promoter with gene X C-terminal may lead to liver disease progression from chronic hepatitis to cirrhosis, by changing the amino acid sequence of the X protein.

  18. Viruses and cells intertwined since the dawn of evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durzyńska, Julia; Goździcka-Józefiak, Anna

    2015-10-16

    Many attempts have been made to define nature of viruses and to uncover their origin. Our aim within this work was to show that there are different perceptions of viruses and many concepts to explain their emergence: the virus-first concept (also called co-evolution), the escape and the reduction theories. Moreover, a relatively new concept of polyphyletic virus origin called "three RNA cells, three DNA viruses" proposed by Forterre is described herein. In this paper, not only is each thesis supported by a body of evidence but also counter-argued in the light of various findings to give more insightful considerations to the readers. As the origin of viruses and that of living cells are most probably interdependent, we decided to reveal ideas concerning nature of cellular last universal common ancestor (LUCA). Furthermore, we discuss monophyletic ancestry of cellular domains and their relationships at the molecular level of membrane lipids and replication strategies of these three types of cells. In this review, we also present the emergence of DNA viruses requiring an evolutionary transition from RNA to DNA and recently discovered giant DNA viruses possibly involved in eukaryogenesis. In the course of evolution viruses emerged many times. They have always played a key role through horizontal gene transfer in evolutionary events and in formation of the tree of life or netlike routes of evolution providing a great deal of genetic diversity. In our opinion, future findings are crucial to better understand past relations between viruses and cells and the origin of both.

  19. Variation of helper T cell 9 /regular T cell balance in the inflammatory process of hepatitis B virus infection and its significance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘肄辉

    2014-01-01

    Objective To observe the variation of helper T cell(Th)9/regular T cell(Treg cell)balance in the inflammatory process of hepatitis B virus(HBV)infection.Methods Two hundred patients with chronic HBV infection in Zhejiang Hospital of Integrated Traditional and Western Medicine during August 2011 to June 2012 were divided into four groups according to alanine aminotransferase(ALT)levels:chronic HBV carriers,chronic hepatitis B(CHB)with mildly[upper limit of normal(ULN)

  20. Easy and Rapid Detection of Mumps Virus by Live Fluorescent Visualization of Virus-Infected Cells.

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    Tadanobu Takahashi

    Full Text Available Mumps viruses show diverse cytopathic effects (CPEs of infected cells and viral plaque formation (no CPE or no plaque formation in some cases depending on the viral strain, highlighting the difficulty in mumps laboratory studies. In our previous study, a new sialidase substrate, 2-(benzothiazol-2-yl-4-bromophenyl 5-acetamido-3,5-dideoxy-α-D-glycero-D-galacto-2-nonulopyranosidonic acid (BTP3-Neu5Ac, was developed for visualization of sialidase activity. BTP3-Neu5Ac can easily and rapidly perform histochemical fluorescent visualization of influenza viruses and virus-infected cells without an antiviral antibody and cell fixation. In the present study, the potential utility of BTP3-Neu5Ac for rapid detection of mumps virus was demonstrated. BTP3-Neu5Ac could visualize dot-blotted mumps virus, virus-infected cells, and plaques (plaques should be called focuses due to staining of infected cells in this study, even if a CPE was not observed. Furthermore, virus cultivation was possible by direct pick-up from a fluorescent focus. In conventional methods, visible appearance of the CPE and focuses often requires more than 6 days after infection, but the new method with BTP3-Neu5Ac clearly visualized infected cells after 2 days and focuses after 4 days. The BTP3-Neu5Ac assay is a precise, easy, and rapid assay for confirmation and titration of mumps virus.

  1. Respiratory viruses are continuously detected in children with chronic tonsillitis throughout the year.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proença-Módena, José Luiz; Buzatto, Guilherme P; Paula, Flávia E; Saturno, Tamara H; Delcaro, Luana S; Prates, Mirela C; Tamashiro, Edwin; Valera, Fabiana C P; Arruda, Eurico; Anselmo-Lima, Wilma T

    2014-10-01

    To evaluate the oscillations on the viral detection in adenotonsillar tissues from patients with chronic adenotonsillar diseases as an indicia of the presence of persistent viral infections or acute subclinical infections. Cross-sectional prospective study. Tertiary hospital. The fluctuations of respiratory virus detection were compared to the major climatic variables during a two-year period using adenoids and palatine tonsils from 172 children with adenotonsillar hypertrophy and clinical evidence of obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome or recurrent adenotonsillitis, without symptoms of acute respiratory infection (ARI), by TaqMan real-time PCR. The rate of detection of at least one respiratory virus in adenotonsillar tissue was 87%. The most frequently detected viruses were human adenovirus in 52.8%, human enterovirus in 47.2%, human rhinovirus in 33.8%, human bocavirus in 31.1%, human metapneumovirus in 18.3% and human respiratory syncytial virus in 17.2%. Although increased detection of human enterovirus occurred in summer/autumn months, and there were summer nadirs of human respiratory syncytial virus in both years of the study, there was no obvious viral seasonality in contrast to reports with ARI patients in many regions of the world. Respiratory viruses are continuously highly detected during whole year, and without any clinical symptomatology, indicating that viral genome of some virus can persist in lymphoepithelial tissues of the upper respiratory tract. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Spirulina platensis versus silymarin in the treatment of chronic hepatitis C virus infection. A pilot randomized, comparative clinical trial

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    Yakoot Mostafa

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Spirulina platensis, a cynobacterium used frequently as a dietary supplement had been found to exhibit many immune-stimulating and antiviral activities. It had been found to activate macrophages, NK cells, T cells, B cells, and to stimulate the production of Interferon gamma (IFN-γ and other cytokines. Natural substances isolated from Spirulina platensis had been found to be potent inhibitors against several enveloped viruses by blocking viral absorption/penetration and some replication stages of progeny viruses after penetration into cells. We aimed to study whether this dietary supplement possesses any therapeutically feasible activity worthy of further larger controlled clinical evaluation. Methods Sixty six patients with chronic hepatitis C virus infection and eligible for inclusion had been randomized to either Spirulina or Silymarin treated groups for a period of six months treatment. The two groups were followed up and blindly compared for early (after 3 months and end of 6 months treatment virological response. The effects of both treatments on each of alanine aminotransferase (ALT, Chronic Liver Disease Questionnaire scores (CLDQ, Arizona Sexual Experience Scale scores (ASEX and the occurrence of any attributable adverse events were also compared. Results Among the 30 patients who had been treated with Spirulina and completed the 6 months protocol, 4 patients (13.3% had a complete end of treatment virological response and 2 patients (6.7% had a partial end of treatment response defined as significant decrease of virus load of at least 2-logs10. Though the proportion of responders in Spirulina group was greater than in the Silymarin group, the difference was not statistically significant at the end of both 6 months (p = 0.12 and 3 months treatment (p = 0.22 by Exact test. Alanine aminotransferase as well as CLDQ and ASEX scores were found to be more significantly improved in Spirulina than in Silymarin treated group

  3. Spirulina platensis versus silymarin in the treatment of chronic hepatitis C virus infection. A pilot randomized, comparative clinical trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Spirulina platensis, a cynobacterium used frequently as a dietary supplement had been found to exhibit many immune-stimulating and antiviral activities. It had been found to activate macrophages, NK cells, T cells, B cells, and to stimulate the production of Interferon gamma (IFN-γ) and other cytokines. Natural substances isolated from Spirulina platensis had been found to be potent inhibitors against several enveloped viruses by blocking viral absorption/penetration and some replication stages of progeny viruses after penetration into cells. We aimed to study whether this dietary supplement possesses any therapeutically feasible activity worthy of further larger controlled clinical evaluation. Methods Sixty six patients with chronic hepatitis C virus infection and eligible for inclusion had been randomized to either Spirulina or Silymarin treated groups for a period of six months treatment. The two groups were followed up and blindly compared for early (after 3 months) and end of 6 months treatment virological response. The effects of both treatments on each of alanine aminotransferase (ALT), Chronic Liver Disease Questionnaire scores (CLDQ), Arizona Sexual Experience Scale scores (ASEX) and the occurrence of any attributable adverse events were also compared. Results Among the 30 patients who had been treated with Spirulina and completed the 6 months protocol, 4 patients (13.3%) had a complete end of treatment virological response and 2 patients (6.7%) had a partial end of treatment response defined as significant decrease of virus load of at least 2-logs10. Though the proportion of responders in Spirulina group was greater than in the Silymarin group, the difference was not statistically significant at the end of both 6 months (p = 0.12) and 3 months treatment (p = 0.22) by Exact test. Alanine aminotransferase as well as CLDQ and ASEX scores were found to be more significantly improved in Spirulina than in Silymarin treated group. Conclusions Our

  4. Spirulina platensis versus silymarin in the treatment of chronic hepatitis C virus infection. A pilot randomized, comparative clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakoot, Mostafa; Salem, Amel

    2012-04-12

    Spirulina platensis, a cynobacterium used frequently as a dietary supplement had been found to exhibit many immune-stimulating and antiviral activities. It had been found to activate macrophages, NK cells, T cells, B cells, and to stimulate the production of Interferon gamma (IFN-γ) and other cytokines. Natural substances isolated from Spirulina platensis had been found to be potent inhibitors against several enveloped viruses by blocking viral absorption/penetration and some replication stages of progeny viruses after penetration into cells. We aimed to study whether this dietary supplement possesses any therapeutically feasible activity worthy of further larger controlled clinical evaluation. Sixty six patients with chronic hepatitis C virus infection and eligible for inclusion had been randomized to either Spirulina or Silymarin treated groups for a period of six months treatment.The two groups were followed up and blindly compared for early (after 3 months) and end of 6 months treatment virological response. The effects of both treatments on each of alanine aminotransferase (ALT), Chronic Liver Disease Questionnaire scores (CLDQ), Arizona Sexual Experience Scale scores (ASEX) and the occurrence of any attributable adverse events were also compared. Among the 30 patients who had been treated with Spirulina and completed the 6 months protocol, 4 patients (13.3%) had a complete end of treatment virological response and 2 patients (6.7%) had a partial end of treatment response defined as significant decrease of virus load of at least 2-logs10. Though the proportion of responders in Spirulina group was greater than in the Silymarin group, the difference was not statistically significant at the end of both 6 months (p = 0.12) and 3 months treatment (p = 0.22) by Exact test. Alanine aminotransferase as well as CLDQ and ASEX scores were found to be more significantly improved in Spirulina than in Silymarin treated group. Our results could suggest a therapeutically

  5. Immune complexed (IC) hepatitis C virus (HCV) in chronically and acutely HCV-infected patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riva, E; Maggi, F; Abbruzzese, F; Bellomi, F; Giannelli, G; Picardi, A; Scagnolari, C; Folgori, A; Spada, E; Piccolella, E; Dianzani, F; Antonelli, G

    2009-02-01

    In infected individuals, hepatitis C virus (HCV) exists in various forms of circulating particles which role in virus persistence and in HCV resistance to IFN therapy is still debated. Here, the proportion of HCV bound to immunoglobulin was determined in plasma of 107 chronically infected patients harbouring different HCV genotypes and, for comparison, of six patients with acute HCV infection. The results showed that, in spite of wide individual variability, chronically HCV-infected patients exhibited an extremely high proportion of immune complexed (IC) virus regardless of plasma HCV load and infecting genotype. Moreover, no significant association was found between baseline proportion of IC HCV and response to IFN treatment. Plasma samples collected within 2 weeks of treatment from 20 patients revealed a significant decline of mean IC HCV values relative to baseline that clearly paralleled the decay of total HCV load. In acutely infected patients, circulating HCV was not IC or IC at very low levels only in patients developing chronic HCV infection. Collectively, these findings strengthen the possibility that IC virus could play a critical role in the pathogenesis of HCV infection.

  6. Chronic Inflammatory Periodontal Disease in Patients Diagnosed with Human Immunodeficiency Virus/AIDS in Cienfuegos

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    Nivia Gontán Quintana

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: human immunodeficiency virus increases patients´ susceptibility to infections. Consequently, a high incidence of periodontal diseases is observed among them. It is often associated with other lesions of the oral mucous. Objective: to determine the evolution of chronic inflammatory periodontal disease in patients diagnosed with human immunodeficiency virus/AIDS.Methods: a case series study involving HIV-positive patients who attended the Stomatology consultation in Cienfuegos was conducted. The Russell Periodontal Index and the Simplified Oral Hygiene Index were used. Patients were classified taking into account clinical and immunological categories. Statistical processing was performed through SPSS program version 15.0 and Chi-square tests were applied.Results: a high prevalence of chronic inflammatory periodontal disease was observed in patients with human immunodeficiency virus. Correlation with the oral hygiene of the patients studied was found. CD4 count showed no statistical significance in periodontal disease severity. All patients classified as A2 suffer from some stage of periodontal disease, which was the most affected clinical category in spite of presenting mild immunodeficiency.Conclusions: there is a high prevalence of chronic inflammatory periodontal disease in patients diagnosed with Human Immunodeficiency Virus in Cienfuegos and it is correlated with patient’s oral hygiene.

  7. Aquatic viruses induce host cell death pathways and its application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reshi, Latif; Wu, Jen-Leih; Wang, Hao-Ven; Hong, Jiann-Ruey

    2016-01-04

    Virus infections of mammalian and animal cells consist of a series of events. As intracellular parasites, viruses rely on the use of host cellular machinery. Through the use of cell culture and molecular approaches over the past decade, our knowledge of the biology of aquatic viruses has grown exponentially. The increase in aquaculture operations worldwide has provided new approaches for the transmission of aquatic viruses that include RNA and DNA viruses. Therefore, the struggle between the virus and the host for control of the cell's death machinery is crucial for survival. Viruses are obligatory intracellular parasites and, as such, must modulate apoptotic pathways to control the lifespan of their host to complete their replication cycle. This paper updates the discussion on the detailed mechanisms of action that various aquatic viruses use to induce cell death pathways in the host, such as Bad-mediated, mitochondria-mediated, ROS-mediated and Fas-mediated cell death circuits. Understanding how viruses exploit the apoptotic pathways of their hosts may provide great opportunities for the development of future potential therapeutic strategies and pathogenic insights into different aquatic viral diseases. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Interaction of Human Tumor Viruses with Host Cell Surface Receptors and Cell Entry

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    Georgia Schäfer

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Currently, seven viruses, namely Epstein-Barr virus (EBV, Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpes virus (KSHV, high-risk human papillomaviruses (HPVs, Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV, hepatitis B virus (HBV, hepatitis C virus (HCV and human T cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1, have been described to be consistently associated with different types of human cancer. These oncogenic viruses belong to distinct viral families, display diverse cell tropism and cause different malignancies. A key to their pathogenicity is attachment to the host cell and entry in order to replicate and complete their life cycle. Interaction with the host cell during viral entry is characterized by a sequence of events, involving viral envelope and/or capsid molecules as well as cellular entry factors that are critical in target cell recognition, thereby determining cell tropism. Most oncogenic viruses initially attach to cell surface heparan sulfate proteoglycans, followed by conformational change and transfer of the viral particle to secondary high-affinity cell- and virus-specific receptors. This review summarizes the current knowledge of the host cell surface factors and molecular mechanisms underlying oncogenic virus binding and uptake by their cognate host cell(s with the aim to provide a concise overview of potential target molecules for prevention and/or treatment of oncogenic virus infection.

  9. Enhanced Replication of Hepatitis E Virus Strain 47832c in an A549-Derived Subclonal Cell Line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schemmerer, Mathias; Apelt, Silke; Trojnar, Eva; Ulrich, Rainer G.; Wenzel, Jürgen J.; Johne, Reimar

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is a human pathogen with increasing importance. The lack of efficient cell culture systems hampers systematic studies on its replication cycle, virus neutralization and inactivation. Here, several cell lines were inoculated with the HEV genotype 3c strain 47832c, previously isolated from a chronically infected transplant patient. At 14 days after inoculation the highest HEV genome copy numbers were found in A549 cells, followed by PLC/PRF/5 cells, whereas HepG2/C3A, Huh-7 Lunet BLR and MRC-5 cells only weakly supported virus replication. Inoculation of A549-derived subclone cell lines resulted in most cases in reduced HEV replication. However, the subclone A549/D3 was susceptible to lower virus concentrations and resulted in higher virus yields as compared to parental A549 cells. Transcriptome analysis indicated a downregulation of genes for carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecules (CEACAM) 5 and 6, and an upregulation of the syndecan 2 (SDC2) gene in A549/D3 cells compared to A549 cells. However, treatment of A549/D3 cells or A549 cells with CEACAM- or syndecan 2-specific antisera did not influence HEV replication. The results show that cells supporting more efficient HEV replication can be selected from the A549 cell line. The specific mechanisms responsible for the enhanced replication remain unknown. PMID:27690085

  10. Chronic meningitis and central nervous system vasculopathy related to Epstein Barr virus

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    Anil Kumar B Patil

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic active Epstein Barr virus (EBV infection causes a wide spectrum of manifestation, due to meningeal, parenchymal and vascular involvement. An 11-year-old boy presented with chronic headache, fever and seizures of 18 months duration. His magnetic resonance imaging Brain showed fusiform aneurysmal dilatations of arteries of both the anterior and posterior cerebral circulation. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF showed persistent lymphocytic pleocytosis, raised proteins and low sugar with positive polymerase chain reaction for EBV. He later developed pancytopenia due to bone marrow aplasia, with secondary infection and expired. From clinical, imaging and CSF findings, he had chronic lymphocytic meningitis with vasculopathy, which was isolated to the central nervous system. He later had marrow aplasia probably due to X-linked lymphoproliferative disorder related to EBV infection. Vasculopathy, especially diffuse fusiform aneurysmal dilatation associated with chronic EBV infection, is rare, but has been described, similar to our case report.

  11. Changes in HIV RNA and CD4 cell count after acute HCV infection in chronically HIV-infected individuals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gras, L.; Wolf, F. de; Smit, C.; Prins, M.; Meer, J.T. van der; Vanhommerig, J.W.; Zwinderman, A.H.; Schinkel, J.; Geskus, R.B.; Warris, A.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Little is known about the impact of acute hepatitis C virus (HCV) co-infection on HIV-1 disease progression. We investigated CD4 cell count and HIV RNA concentration changes after HCV infection in individuals chronically infected with HIV-1. METHODS: We selected individuals that had the l

  12. Placental Pathology of Zika Virus: Viral Infection of the Placenta Induces Villous Stromal Macrophage (Hofbauer Cell) Proliferation and Hyperplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, Avi Z; Yu, Weiying; Hill, D Ashley; Reyes, Christine A; Schwartz, David A

    2017-01-01

    -The placenta is an important component in understanding the fetal response to intrauterine Zika virus infection, but the pathologic changes in this organ remain largely unknown. Hofbauer cells are fetal-derived macrophages normally present in the chorionic villous stroma. They have been implicated in a variety of physiological and pathologic processes, in particular involving infectious agents. -To characterize the fetal and maternal responses and viral localization in the placenta following Zika virus transmission to an 11 weeks' gestation fetus. The clinical course was notable for prolonged viremia in the mother and extensive neuronal necrosis in the fetus. The fetus was delivered at 21 weeks' gestation after pregnancy termination. -The placenta was evaluated by using immunohistochemistry for inflammatory cells (macrophages/monocytes [Hofbauer cells], B and T lymphocytes) and proliferating cells, and an RNA probe to Zika virus. The fetal brain and the placenta were previously found to be positive for Zika virus RNA by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. -The placenta demonstrated prominently enlarged, hydropic chorionic villi with hyperplasia and focal proliferation of Hofbauer cells. The degree of Hofbauer cell hyperplasia gave an exaggerated immature appearance to the villi. No acute or chronic villitis, villous necrosis, remote necroinflammatory abnormalities, chorioamnionitis, funisitis, or hemorrhages were present. An RNA probe to Zika virus was positive in villous stromal cells, presumably Hofbauer cells. -Zika virus placental infection induces proliferation and prominent hyperplasia of Hofbauer cells in the chorionic villi but does not elicit villous necrosis or a maternal or fetal lymphoplasmacellular or acute inflammatory cell reaction.

  13. Hepatitis C virus infection causes cell cycle arrest at the level of initiation of mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kannan, Rathi P; Hensley, Lucinda L; Evers, Lauren E; Lemon, Stanley M; McGivern, David R

    2011-08-01

    Chronic infection with the hepatitis C virus (HCV) is associated with increased risk for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Chronic immune-mediated inflammation is likely to be an important factor in the development of HCV-associated HCC, but direct effects of HCV infection on the host cell cycle may also play a role. Although overexpression studies have revealed multiple interactions between HCV-encoded proteins and host cell cycle regulators and tumor suppressor proteins, the relevance of these observations to HCV-associated liver disease is not clear. We determined the net effect of these interactions on regulation of the cell cycle in the context of virus infection. Flow cytometry of HCV-infected carboxyfluorescein succinimidyl ester-labeled hepatoma cells indicated a slowdown in proliferation that correlated with abundance of viral antigen. A decrease in the proportions of infected cells in G(1) and S phases with an accumulation of cells in G(2)/M phase was observed, compared to mock-infected controls. Dramatic decreases in markers of mitosis, such as phospho-histone H3, in infected cells suggested a block to mitotic entry. In common with findings described in the published literature, we observed caspase 3 activation, suggesting that cell cycle arrest is associated with apoptosis. Differences were observed in patterns of cell cycle disturbance and levels of apoptosis with different strains of HCV. However, the data suggest that cell cycle arrest at the interface of G(2) and mitosis is a common feature of HCV infection.

  14. Tumor cell marker PVRL4 (nectin 4 is an epithelial cell receptor for measles virus.

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    Ryan S Noyce

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Vaccine and laboratory adapted strains of measles virus can use CD46 as a receptor to infect many human cell lines. However, wild type isolates of measles virus cannot use CD46, and they infect activated lymphocytes, dendritic cells, and macrophages via the receptor CD150/SLAM. Wild type virus can also infect epithelial cells of the respiratory tract through an unidentified receptor. We demonstrate that wild type measles virus infects primary airway epithelial cells grown in fetal calf serum and many adenocarcinoma cell lines of the lung, breast, and colon. Transfection of non-infectable adenocarcinoma cell lines with an expression vector encoding CD150/SLAM rendered them susceptible to measles virus, indicating that they were virus replication competent, but lacked a receptor for virus attachment and entry. Microarray analysis of susceptible versus non-susceptible cell lines was performed, and comparison of membrane protein gene transcripts produced a list of 11 candidate receptors. Of these, only the human tumor cell marker PVRL4 (Nectin 4 rendered cells amenable to measles virus infections. Flow cytometry confirmed that PVRL4 is highly expressed on the surfaces of susceptible lung, breast, and colon adenocarcinoma cell lines. Measles virus preferentially infected adenocarcinoma cell lines from the apical surface, although basolateral infection was observed with reduced kinetics. Confocal immune fluorescence microscopy and surface biotinylation experiments revealed that PVRL4 was expressed on both the apical and basolateral surfaces of these cell lines. Antibodies and siRNA directed against PVRL4 were able to block measles virus infections in MCF7 and NCI-H358 cancer cells. A virus binding assay indicated that PVRL4 was a bona fide receptor that supported virus attachment to the host cell. Several strains of measles virus were also shown to use PVRL4 as a receptor. Measles virus infection reduced PVRL4 surface expression in MCF7 cells, a

  15. The woodchuck as an animal model for pathogenesis and therapy of chronic hepatitis B virus infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    This review describes the woodchuck and the woodchuck hepatitis virus (WHV) as an animal model for pathogenesis and therapy of chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection and disease in humans. The establishment of woodchuck breeding colonies, and use of laboratory-reared woodchucks infected with defined WHV inocula, have enhanced our understanding of the virology and immunology of HBV infection and disease pathogenesis, including major sequelae like chronic hepatitis and hepatocellular carcinoma. The role of persistent WHV infection and of viral load on the natural history of infection and disease progression has been firmly established along the way. More recently, the model has shed new light on the role of host immune responses in these natural processes,and on how the immune system of the chronic carrier can be manipulated therapeutically to reduce or delay serious disease sequelae through induction of the recovery phenotype. The woodchuck is an outbred species and is not well defined immunologically due to a limitation of available host markers. However, the recent development of several key host response assays for woodchucks provides experimental opportunities for further mechanistic studies of outcome predictors in neonatal- and adult-acquired infections. Understanding the virological and immunological mechanisms responsible for resolution of self-limited infection, and for the onset and maintenance of chronic infection, will greatly facilitate the development of successful strategies for the therapeutic eradication of established chronic HBV infection. Likewise, the results of drug efficacy and toxicity studies in the chronic carrier woodchucks are predictive for responses of patients chronically infected with HBV. Therefore, chronic WHV carrier woodchucks provide a well-characterized mammalian model for preclinical evaluation of the safety and efficacy of drug candidates, experimental therapeutic vaccines, and immunomodulators for the treatment and

  16. The ancient Virus World and evolution of cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dolja Valerian V

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent advances in genomics of viruses and cellular life forms have greatly stimulated interest in the origins and evolution of viruses and, for the first time, offer an opportunity for a data-driven exploration of the deepest roots of viruses. Here we briefly review the current views of virus evolution and propose a new, coherent scenario that appears to be best compatible with comparative-genomic data and is naturally linked to models of cellular evolution that, from independent considerations, seem to be the most parsimonious among the existing ones. Results Several genes coding for key proteins involved in viral replication and morphogenesis as well as the major capsid protein of icosahedral virions are shared by many groups of RNA and DNA viruses but are missing in cellular life forms. On the basis of this key observation and the data on extensive genetic exchange between diverse viruses, we propose the concept of the ancient virus world. The virus world is construed as a distinct contingent of viral genes that continuously retained its identity throughout the entire history of life. Under this concept, the principal lineages of viruses and related selfish agents emerged from the primordial pool of primitive genetic elements, the ancestors of both cellular and viral genes. Thus, notwithstanding the numerous gene exchanges and acquisitions attributed to later stages of evolution, most, if not all, modern viruses and other selfish agents are inferred to descend from elements that belonged to the primordial genetic pool. In this pool, RNA viruses would evolve first, followed by retroid elements, and DNA viruses. The Virus World concept is predicated on a model of early evolution whereby emergence of substantial genetic diversity antedates the advent of full-fledged cells, allowing for extensive gene mixing at this early stage of evolution. We outline a scenario of the origin of the main classes of viruses in conjunction

  17. Cell type mediated resistance of vesicular stomatitis virus and Sendai virus to ribavirin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Nirav R; Sunderland, Amanda; Grdzelishvili, Valery Z

    2010-06-22

    Ribavirin (RBV) is a synthetic nucleoside analog with broad spectrum antiviral activity. Although RBV is approved for the treatment of hepatitis C virus, respiratory syncytial virus, and Lassa fever virus infections, its mechanism of action and therapeutic efficacy remains highly controversial. Recent reports show that the development of cell-based resistance after continuous RBV treatment via decreased RBV uptake can greatly limit its efficacy. Here, we examined whether certain cell types are naturally resistant to RBV even without prior drug exposure. Seven different cell lines from various host species were compared for RBV antiviral activity against two nonsegmented negative-strand RNA viruses, vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV, a rhabdovirus) and Sendai virus (SeV, a paramyxovirus). Our results show striking differences between cell types in their response to RBV, ranging from virtually no antiviral effect to very effective inhibition of viral replication. Despite differences in viral replication kinetics for VSV and SeV in the seven cell lines, the observed pattern of RBV resistance was very similar for both viruses, suggesting that cellular rather than viral determinants play a major role in this resistance. While none of the tested cell lines was defective in RBV uptake, dramatic variations were observed in the long-term accumulation of RBV in different cell types, and it correlated with the antiviral efficacy of RBV. While addition of guanosine neutralized RBV only in cells already highly resistant to RBV, actinomycin D almost completely reversed the RBV effect (but not uptake) in all cell lines. Together, our data suggest that RBV may inhibit the same virus via different mechanisms in different cell types depending on the intracellular RBV metabolism. Our results strongly point out the importance of using multiple cell lines of different origin when antiviral efficacy and potency are examined for new as well as established drugs in vitro.

  18. Cell type mediated resistance of vesicular stomatitis virus and Sendai virus to ribavirin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nirav R Shah

    Full Text Available Ribavirin (RBV is a synthetic nucleoside analog with broad spectrum antiviral activity. Although RBV is approved for the treatment of hepatitis C virus, respiratory syncytial virus, and Lassa fever virus infections, its mechanism of action and therapeutic efficacy remains highly controversial. Recent reports show that the development of cell-based resistance after continuous RBV treatment via decreased RBV uptake can greatly limit its efficacy. Here, we examined whether certain cell types are naturally resistant to RBV even without prior drug exposure. Seven different cell lines from various host species were compared for RBV antiviral activity against two nonsegmented negative-strand RNA viruses, vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV, a rhabdovirus and Sendai virus (SeV, a paramyxovirus. Our results show striking differences between cell types in their response to RBV, ranging from virtually no antiviral effect to very effective inhibition of viral replication. Despite differences in viral replication kinetics for VSV and SeV in the seven cell lines, the observed pattern of RBV resistance was very similar for both viruses, suggesting that cellular rather than viral determinants play a major role in this resistance. While none of the tested cell lines was defective in RBV uptake, dramatic variations were observed in the long-term accumulation of RBV in different cell types, and it correlated with the antiviral efficacy of RBV. While addition of guanosine neutralized RBV only in cells already highly resistant to RBV, actinomycin D almost completely reversed the RBV effect (but not uptake in all cell lines. Together, our data suggest that RBV may inhibit the same virus via different mechanisms in different cell types depending on the intracellular RBV metabolism. Our results strongly point out the importance of using multiple cell lines of different origin when antiviral efficacy and potency are examined for new as well as established drugs in vitro.

  19. Role of chemokines and their receptors in viral persistence and liver damage during chronic hepatitis C virus infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Chemokines produced in the liver during hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection induce migration of activated T cells from the periphery to infected parenchyma. The milieu of chemokines secreted by infected hepatocytes is predominantly associated with the T-helper cell/Tc1 T cell (Th1/Tc1) response. These chemokines consist of CCL3 (macrophage inflammatory protein-1α; MIP-1α), CCL4 (MIP-1β), CCL5 (regulated on activation normal T cell expressed and secreted; RANTES), CXCL10 (interferon-γ-inducible protein-10; IP-10),CXCL11 (interferon-inducible T-cell α chemoattractant; I-TAC), and CXCL9 (monokine induced by interferon γ; Mig) and they recruit T cells expressing either CCR5 or CXCR3 chemokine receptors. Intrahepatic and peripheral blood levels of these chemokines are increased during chronic hepatitis C. The interaction between chemokines and their receptors is essential in recruiting HCV-specific T cells to control the infection. When the adaptive immune response fails in this task, non-specific T cells without the capacity to control the infection are also recruited to the liver, and these are ultimately responsible for the persistent hepatic damage. The modulation of chemokine receptor expression and chemokine secretion could be a viral escape mechanism to avoid specific T cell migration to the liver during the early phase of infection, and to maintain liver viability during the chronic phase, by impairing non-specific T cell migration. Some chemokines and their receptors correlate with liver damage, and CXCL10 (IP-10) and CXCR3 levels have shown a clinical utility as predictors of treatment response outcome. The regulation of chemokines and their receptors could be a future potential therapeutic target to decrease liver inflammation and to increase specific T cell migration to the infected liver.

  20. Horizontal transmission of hepatitis B virus in children with chronic hepatitis B

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tumay Doganci; Gulnar Uysal; Tayfun Kir; Arzu Bakirtas; Necdet Kuyucu; Levent Doganci

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To determine the possible routes of intrafamilial transmission pattern in pediatric cases of chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection.METHODS: In this descriptive retrospective study, 302 children with chronic HBV infection from 251 families and their parents attending the Social Security Children's Hospital and Doctor Sami Ulus Children's Hopsital in Ankara between December 1998 and May 2000, were enrolled in. Screenings and diagnosis of chronic HBV infections were established according to the Consensus 2000.RESULTS: In the studied 302 children with chronic HBV infection, mothers of 38% and fathers of 23% were HBsAg positive. The HBsAg positivity in at least two siblings of the same family was 61% when both parents were HBsAg positive.CONCLUSION: It is well known that horizontal transmission is quite common in countries where Hepatitis B Virus is moderately endemic. To our best knowledge, this is the largest series observed regarding the horizontal transmission in pediatric chronic HBV infection in Turkey. It is necessary to expand the preventive programs to target not only the newborn period but also all stages of childhood.

  1. Hepatocellular carcinoma in patients with chronic hepatitis C virus infection without cirrhosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kathryn; L; Nash; Tracy; Woodall; Ashley; SM; Brown; Susan; E; Davies; Graeme; JM; Alexander

    2010-01-01

    AIM:To investigate and characterise patients with chronic hepatitis C virus(HCV) infection presenting with hepatocellular carcinoma(HCC) in the absence of cirrhosis.METHODS:Patients with chronic hepatitis C infection without cirrhosis presenting with HCC over a 2-year period were identified.The clinical case notes,blood test results and histological specimens were reviewed to identify whether additional risk factors for the development of HCC were present.RESULTS:Six patients(five male,one female) with chro...

  2. Key role of hepatitis B virus mutation in chronic hepatitis Bdevelopment to hepatocellular carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    Chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is a major riskfactor for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The HBVmutations, which include point mutation, deletion,insertion and truncation mutation of HBV gene in 4open reading frames (S, C, P, X), are closely associatedwith HCC pathogenesis. Some mutations accumulatedduring chronic HBV infection could be regarded asa biomarker to predict the occurrence of HCC. Thedetection of the mutations in clinical practice could behelpful for defining better preventive and therapeuticstrategies and, moreover, predicting the progression ofliver disease.

  3. Varicella-zoster virus glycoprotein I is essential for growth of virus in Vero cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Cohen, J I; Nguyen, H.

    1997-01-01

    Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) encodes at least six glycoproteins. Glycoprotein I (gI), the product of open reading frame 67, is a 58- to 62-kDa glycoprotein found in VZV-infected cells. We constructed two VZV gI deletion mutants. Immunoprecipitation of VZV gE from infected cells indicated that cells infected with VZV deleted for gI expressed a gE that was larger (100 kDa) than that expressed in cells infected with the parental virus (98 kDa). Cell-associated or cell-free VZV deleted for gI gre...

  4. Sofosbuvir for the treatment of chronic hepatitis C virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temesgen, Z; Talwani, R; Rizza, S A

    2014-06-01

    Sofosbuvir is a nucleotide analogue selective inhibitor of the RNA-directed RNA polymerase (NS5B) enzyme of the hepatitis C virus (HCV) genome. It has shown potent antiviral activity across all HCV genotypes and in a variety of patient populations, including treatment-naive patients; treatment-experienced patients who had failed previous standard therapy; patients with decompensated liver disease, including cirrhosis; and HIV co-infected patients. It is administered as a single, once-daily 400-mg tablet, has no food restrictions, has low potential for drug interactions, and requires no dose adjustment in mild to moderate kidney or liver impairment. When sofosbuvir is combined with pegylated interferon and/or ribavirin, its clinical and laboratory safety profile is similar to that which is expected from pegylated interferon or ribavirin alone. Rates of treatment discontinuation and dose reduction with sofosbuvir-containing regimens were lower than those commonly observed with pegylated interferon and ribavirin.

  5. Protease inhibitors-based therapy induces acquired spherocytic-like anaemia and ineffective erythropoiesis in chronic hepatitis C virus patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupo, Francesca; Russo, Roberta; Iolascon, Achille; Ieluzzi, Donatella; Siciliano, Angela; Toniutto, Pierluigi; Matté, Alessandro; Piovesan, Sara; Raffetti, Elena; Turrini, Francesco; Dissegna, Denis; Donato, Francesco; Alberti, Alfredo; Zuliani, Valeria; Fattovich, Giovanna; De Franceschi, Lucia

    2016-01-01

    The addition of protease inhibitors, boceprevir (BOC) or telaprevir (TRV), to peg-interferon and ribavirin (PR) increases the incidence of anaemia in patients with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. Although genetic variants in inosine triphosphatase (ITPA) gene have been linked to the haemolytic anaemia induced by PR, the mechanism sustaining severe anaemia during triple therapy is still unknown. This study aims to elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying anaemia in chronic HCV patients with combined therapy. We studied 59 patients with chronic HCV genotype-1: 29 treated with TRV/PR and 30 with BOC/PR. We evaluated biochemical and haematological parameters, red cell index at baseline, 4, 12, 16 and 24 weeks of treatment; in a subgroup, we performed functional studies: osmotic fragility, red cell membrane protein separation, mass spectrometry analysis, quantification of erythroid microparticles release. IL28B and ITPA polymorphisms were also evaluated. We found early acute normochromic normocytic haemolytic anaemia (4-8 weeks) followed by a late macrocytic hypo-regenerative anaemia with inappropriate low reticulocyte count (12-24 weeks). Studies on red cells revealed: (i) presence of spherocytes; (ii) increased osmotic fragility; (iii) abnormalities in red cell membrane protein composition; (iv) reduced membrane-cytoskeleton stability; (v) increased release of erythroid microparticles. ITPA polymorphisms impacted only the early phase of anaemia. The bimodal pattern of anaemia in chronic HCV patients on triple therapy might be because of acquired spherocytic-like anaemia in the early phase, followed by hyporegenerative anaemia, most likely related to the combined effects of PR and TRV or BOC on erythropoiesis. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Dual Infection with Hepatitis B and Epstein-Barr Virus Presenting with Severe Jaundice, Coagulopathy, and Hepatitis B Virus Chronicity Outcome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Sirish C.; Ashraf, Imran; Mir, Fazia; Samiullah, Sami; Ibdah, Jamal A.; Tahan, Veysel

    2017-01-01

    Patient: Female, 34 Final Diagnosis: HBV and EBV dual infection Symptoms: Jaundice • fatigue • anorexia • subjective weight loss Medication: — Clinical Procedure: — Specialty: Gastroenterology and Hepatology Objective: Rare co-existance of disease or pathology Background: Hepatitis B virus (HBV) has been reported as a coinfection with hepatitis C virus (HCV), hepatitis D virus (HDV), cytomegalovirus (CMV), and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Case Report: A 34-year-old female presented to our clinic with epigastric pain and severe acute hepatitis manifested as jaundice associated with hyperbilirubinemia, elevated transaminases, and coagulopathy. The patient was diagnosed with acute HBV with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) coinfection leading to subsequent chronic hepatitis B. Conclusions: To our knowledge, this patient case is the first reported case of HBV and EBV coinfection reported in the literature. HBV and EBV coinfection may cause severe acute hepatitis with HBV chronicity. PMID:28202897

  7. [Extrahepatic manifestations of chronic hepatitis C virus infection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puchner, K P; Berg, T

    2009-05-01

    Current data suggest that HCV infection should be regarded as a systemic infectious disease with multiorgan involvement. More than 50 % of HCV-positive patients develop during the course of the disease at least one extrahepatic manifestation (EHM). The EHMs are often the first and only clinical signs of a chronic hepatitis C. Evidence of HCV infection should always be sought out in cases of unspecific chronic fatigue and/or rheumatic, haematological, endocrine or dermatological disorders. Key pathogenetic factors for the development of EHM are undisputably the HCV lymphotropism and cryoglobulinaemia. Nevertheless, the exact pathogenesis of many EHM still remains unclear. The therapeutic approach to EHM should concentrate on the eradication of HCV. Antiviral therapy in the form of peg-interferon and ribavirin should be regarded as the first-line therapy. Viral response leads mostly to a consecutive clinical response. However, in the case of HCV-related cytopaenias or neuropathies, antiviral therapy may trigger an aggravation of these conditions. Thus, organ-involvement, severity and course of the EHM should be always taken into account when choosing the appropriate therapeutic strategy. Immunosuppressive drugs, plasmapheresis and lately rituximab are counted among therapies that can be applied complementarly or alternatively to the antiviral therapy.

  8. Host and viral factors contributing to CD8+ T cell failure in hepatitis C virus infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Christoph Neumann-Haefelin; Hans Christian Spangenberg; Hubert E Blum; Robert Thimme

    2007-01-01

    Virus-specific CD8+ T cells are thought to be the major anti-viral effector cells in hepatitis C virus (HCV)infection. Indeed, viral clearance is associated with vigorous CD8+ T cell responses targeting multiple epitopes. In the chronic phase of infection, HCV-specific CD8+ T cell responses are usually weak, narrowly focused and display often functional defects regarding cytotoxicity, cytokine production, and proliferative capacity. In the last few years, different mechanisms which might contribute to the failure of HCV-specific CD8+ T cells in chronic infection have been identified,including insufficient CD4+ help, deficient CD8+ T cell differentiation, viral escape mutations, suppression by viral factors, inhibitory cytokines, inhibitory ligands, and regulatory T cells. In addition, host genetic factors such as the host's human leukocyte antigen (HLA) background may play an important role in the efficiency of the HCVspecific CD8+ T cell response and thus outcome of infection. The growing understanding of the mechanisms contributing to T cell failure and persistence of HCV infection will contribute to the development of successful immunotherapeutical and -prophylactical strategies.

  9. Comparative study between occult hepatitis C virus infection and chronic hepatitis C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardo, M; López-Alcorocho, J M; Rodríguez-Iñigo, E; Castillo, I; Carreño, V

    2007-01-01

    We have recently described the presence of occult hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection (HCV-RNA in liver in the absence of anti-HCV and serum HCV-RNA) in patients with persistently abnormal liver function tests of unknown aetiology. The aim of this study was to compare the characteristics of patients with occult HCV infection vs those of patients with chronic hepatitis C. We compared clinical features of 68 patients with occult HCV infection and 69 untreated chronic HCV patients (anti-HCV and serum HCV-RNA positive), matched for age, gender, duration of abnormal liver function tests and body mass index. Aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase were higher (P < 0.001) in chronic HCV, but cholesterol and triglycerides were significantly higher in patients with occult HCV infection (P < 0.001 and P = 0.002). Chronic HCV patients had higher gamma-globulin (P = 0.005), alpha-foetoprotein (P < 0.001) and iron (P < 0.001) levels. Percentage of patients with necroinflammatory activity and fibrosis was higher (P < 0.001) in chronic HCV than in occult HCV infection. Mean percentage of infected hepatocytes was higher (P = 0.001) in chronic HCV (10.1%) than in occult HCV infection (5.3%). This occult HCV infection is a milder disease than chronic HCV, and this could be related to the significantly lower number of infected hepatocytes observed in occult HCV.

  10. Sendai virus utilizes specific sialyloligosaccharides as host cell receptor determinants.

    OpenAIRE

    1980-01-01

    Purified sialyltransferases (CMP-N-acetyl-neuraminate:D-galactosyl-glycoprotein N-acetylneuraminyl-transferase, EC 2.4.99.1) in conjunction with neuraminidase (acylneuraminyl hydrolase, EC 3.2.1.18) were used to produce cell surface sialyloligosaccharides of defined sequence to investigate their role in paramyxovirus infection of host cells. Infection of Madin-Darby bovine kidney cells by Sendai virus was monitored by hemagglutination titer of the virus produced and by changes in morphologica...

  11. Chronic Inflammatory Periodontal Disease in Patients with Human Immunodeficiency Virus. Enfermedad periodontal inflamatoria crónica en pacientes infectados con el virus de inmunodeficiencia humana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iralys Benítez Guzmán

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: The Chronic Inflammatory Periodontal Disease is related with multiple risk factors. Those patients with human immunodeficiency virus have higher risk of presenting this disease and it is usually more serious in these cases. Objective: To describe the prevalence of Chronic Inflammatory Periodontal Disease in patients with HIV. Methods: Descriptive, observational, cross-sectional study including patients with HIV in Sancti Spiritus province. The occurrence of the disease was determined after the Periodontics Cuban Standards, and oral hygiene was assessed through the simplified oral hygiene index. Other variables were measured, such as smoking habits, T CD4+ lymphocyte counting and virus load. The independent association of each risk factor with the disease was determined through a logistic regression model. Results: The 56, 5 % of the 154 patients presented Chronic Inflammatory Periodontal Disease; 60 (39.0% gingivitis and 27 (17,5% periodontitis. Gingivitis was associated with poor oral hygiene (OR: 3,71 and periodontitis with smoking habit (OR: 5,20. The severe forms of periodontitis occurred mainly in patients with lymphocyte counting lower than 500 cells/mm3 . Conclusions: The prevalence of Chronic Inflammatory Periodontal Disease in patients with HIV in Sancti Spiritus province is linked to known risk factors such as smoking habits and oral hygiene.Fundamento: La enfermedad periodontal inflamatoria crónica es un trastorno relacionado con diversidad de factores de riesgo. Los pacientes infectados con el virus de inmunodeficiencia humana tienen mayor riesgo para padecerla y en ellos muchas veces se agrava.  Objetivo: Describir la prevalencia de la enfermedad periodontal inflamatoria crónica en pacientes infectados con el virus de inmunodeficiencia humana. Métodos: Estudio observacional

  12. Cell entry of Lassa virus induces tyrosine phosphorylation of dystroglycan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moraz, Marie-Laurence; Pythoud, Christelle; Turk, Rolf; Rothenberger, Sylvia; Pasquato, Antonella; Campbell, Kevin P; Kunz, Stefan

    2013-05-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) receptor dystroglycan (DG) serves as a cellular receptor for the highly pathogenic arenavirus Lassa virus (LASV) that causes a haemorrhagic fever with high mortality in human. In the host cell, DG provides a molecular link between the ECM and the actin cytoskeleton via the adapter proteins utrophin or dystrophin. Here we investigated post-translational modifications of DG in the context of LASV cell entry. Using the tyrosine kinase inhibitor genistein, we found that tyrosine kinases are required for efficient internalization of virus particles, but not virus-receptor binding. Engagement of cellular DG by LASV envelope glycoprotein (LASV GP) in human epithelial cells induced tyrosine phosphorylation of the cytoplasmic domain of DG. LASV GP binding to DG further resulted in dissociation of the adapter protein utrophin from virus-bound DG. This virus-induced dissociation of utrophin was affected by genistein treatment, suggesting a role of receptor tyrosine phosphorylation in the process.

  13. The cell biology of Tobacco mosaic virus replication and movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chengke; Nelson, Richard S

    2013-01-01

    Successful systemic infection of a plant by Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) requires three processes that repeat over time: initial establishment and accumulation in invaded cells, intercellular movement, and systemic transport. Accumulation and intercellular movement of TMV necessarily involves intracellular transport by complexes containing virus and host proteins and virus RNA during a dynamic process that can be visualized. Multiple membranes appear to assist TMV accumulation, while membranes, microfilaments and microtubules appear to assist TMV movement. Here we review cell biological studies that describe TMV-membrane, -cytoskeleton, and -other host protein interactions which influence virus accumulation and movement in leaves and callus tissue. The importance of understanding the developmental phase of the infection in relationship to the observed virus-membrane or -host protein interaction is emphasized. Utilizing the latest observations of TMV-membrane and -host protein interactions within our evolving understanding of the infection ontogeny, a model for TMV accumulation and intracellular spread in a cell biological context is provided.

  14. SPF rabbits infected with rabbit hepatitis E virus isolate experimentally showing the chronicity of hepatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jian; Lei, Yaxin; Liu, Lin; Liu, Peng; Xia, Junke; Zhang, Yulin; Zeng, Hang; Wang, Lin; Wang, Ling; Zhuang, Hui

    2014-01-01

    This study focused on investigating the pathogenesis seen in specific-pathogen-free (SPF) rabbits following infection with a homologous rabbit HEV isolate (CHN-BJ-rb14) and comparing it to that seen following infection with a heterologous swine genotype 4 HEV isolate (CHN-XJ-SW13). Three of the four animals inoculated with the homologous rabbit HEV became infected, exhibiting an intermittent viremia, obvious fluctuations of liver function biomarkers alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST), and persistent fecal virus shedding throughout the nine month study. In addition, liver histopathology showed both chronic inflammation and some degree of fibrosis. Both positive and negative-stranded HEV RNA and HEV antigen expression were detected in liver, brain, stomach, duodenum and kidney from the necropsied rabbits. Inflammation of extrahepatic tissue (duodenum and kidney) was also observed. Three of the four rabbits inoculated with the heterologous genotype 4 swine HEV also became infected, showing similar levels of anti-HEV antibody to that generated following infection with the homologous virus isolate. The duration of both viremia and fecal shedding of virus was however shorter following infection with the heterologous virus and there was no significant elevation of liver function biomarkers. These results suggest that rabbit HEV infection may cause more severe hepatitis and prolong the course of the disease, with a possible chronic trend of hepatitis in SPF rabbits.

  15. Quasispecies of Hepatitis C Virus Participate in Cell-Specific Infectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuhara, Takasuke; Yamamoto, Satomi; Ono, Chikako; Nakamura, Shota; Motooka, Daisuke; Mori, Hiroyuki; Kurihara, Takeshi; Sato, Asuka; Tamura, Tomokazu; Motomura, Takashi; Okamoto, Toru; Imamura, Michio; Ikegami, Toru; Yoshizumi, Tomoharu; Soejima, Yuji; Maehara, Yoshihiko; Chayama, Kazuaki; Matsuura, Yoshiharu

    2017-03-22

    It is well documented that a variety of viral quasispecies are found in the patients with chronic infection of hepatitis C virus (HCV). However, the significance of quasispecies in the specific infectivity to individual cell types remains unknown. In the present study, we analyzed the role of quasispecies of the genotype 2a clone, JFH1 (HCVcc), in specific infectivity to the hepatic cell lines, Huh7.5.1 and Hep3B. HCV RNA was electroporated into Huh7.5.1 cells and Hep3B/miR-122 cells expressing miR-122 at a high level. Then, we adapted the viruses to Huh7 and Hep3B/miR-122 cells by serial passages and termed the resulting viruses HCVcc/Huh7 and HCVcc/Hep3B, respectively. Interestingly, a higher viral load was obtained in the homologous combination of HCVcc/Huh7 in Huh7.5.1 cells or HCVcc/Hep3B in Hep3B/miR-122 cells compared with the heterologous combination. By using a reverse genetics system and deep sequence analysis, we identified several adaptive mutations involved in the high affinity for each cell line, suggesting that quasispecies of HCV participate in cell-specific infectivity.

  16. Poor outcomes of chronic active Epstein-Barr virus infection and hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis in non-Japanese adult patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.S. Sonke (Gabe); I. Ludwig (Inge); H. van Oosten (Hannah); J.W. Baars (Joke); E. Meijer (Ellen); A.P. Kater (Arnon); D. de Jong (Daphne)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractChronic active Epstein-Barr virus infection manifests as a combination of persistent infectious mononucleosis-like symptoms and high viral load in apparently immunocompetent patients. It is closely related to Epstein-Barr virus-associated hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis. These 2 abnor

  17. Early Events in Chikungunya Virus Infection-From Virus Cell Binding to Membrane Fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Duijl-Richter, Mareike K S; Hoornweg, Tabitha E; Rodenhuis-Zybert, Izabela A; Smit, Jolanda M

    2015-07-07

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is a rapidly emerging mosquito-borne alphavirus causing millions of infections in the tropical and subtropical regions of the world. CHIKV infection often leads to an acute self-limited febrile illness with debilitating myalgia and arthralgia. A potential long-term complication of CHIKV infection is severe joint pain, which can last for months to years. There are no vaccines or specific therapeutics available to prevent or treat infection. This review describes the critical steps in CHIKV cell entry. We summarize the latest studies on the virus-cell tropism, virus-receptor binding, internalization, membrane fusion and review the molecules and compounds that have been described to interfere with virus cell entry. The aim of the review is to give the reader a state-of-the-art overview on CHIKV cell entry and to provide an outlook on potential new avenues in CHIKV research.

  18. Early Events in Chikungunya Virus Infection—From Virus Cell Binding to Membrane Fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Duijl-Richter, Mareike K. S.; Hoornweg, Tabitha E.; Rodenhuis-Zybert, Izabela A.; Smit, Jolanda M.

    2015-01-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is a rapidly emerging mosquito-borne alphavirus causing millions of infections in the tropical and subtropical regions of the world. CHIKV infection often leads to an acute self-limited febrile illness with debilitating myalgia and arthralgia. A potential long-term complication of CHIKV infection is severe joint pain, which can last for months to years. There are no vaccines or specific therapeutics available to prevent or treat infection. This review describes the critical steps in CHIKV cell entry. We summarize the latest studies on the virus-cell tropism, virus-receptor binding, internalization, membrane fusion and review the molecules and compounds that have been described to interfere with virus cell entry. The aim of the review is to give the reader a state-of-the-art overview on CHIKV cell entry and to provide an outlook on potential new avenues in CHIKV research. PMID:26198242

  19. Early Events in Chikungunya Virus Infection—From Virus CellBinding to Membrane Fusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mareike K. S. van Duijl-Richter

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Chikungunya virus (CHIKV is a rapidly emerging mosquito-borne alphavirus causing millions of infections in the tropical and subtropical regions of the world. CHIKV infection often leads to an acute self-limited febrile illness with debilitating myalgia and arthralgia. A potential long-term complication of CHIKV infection is severe joint pain, which can last for months to years. There are no vaccines or specific therapeutics available to prevent or treat infection. This review describes the critical steps in CHIKV cell entry. We summarize the latest studies on the virus-cell tropism, virus-receptor binding, internalization, membrane fusion and review the molecules and compounds that have been described to interfere with virus cell entry. The aim of the review is to give the reader a state-of-the-art overview on CHIKV cell entry and to provide an outlook on potential new avenues in CHIKV research.

  20. Acute hepatitis C virus infection induces anti-host cell receptor antibodies with virus-neutralizing properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tawar, Rajiv G; Colpitts, Che C; Timm, Jörg; Fehm, Tanja; Roggendorf, Michael; Meisel, Helga; Meyer, Nicolas; Habersetzer, François; Cosset, François-Loïc; Berg, Thomas; Zeisel, Mirjam B; Baumert, Thomas F

    2015-09-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) causes persistent infection in the majority of infected individuals. The mechanisms of persistence and clearance are only partially understood. Antibodies (Abs) against host cell entry receptors have been shown to inhibit HCV infection in cell culture and animal models. In this study, we aimed to investigate whether anti-receptor Abs are induced during infection in humans in vivo and whether their presence is associated with outcome of infection. We established an enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay using a recombinant CD81-claudin-1 (CLDN1) fusion protein to detect and quantify Abs directed against extracellular epitopes of the HCV CD81-CLDN1 coreceptor complex. The presence of anti-receptor Abs was studied in serum of patients from a well-defined cohort of a single-source HCV outbreak of pregnant women and several control groups, including uninfected pregnant women, patients with chronic hepatitis B and D virus (HBV/HDV) infection, and healthy individuals. Virus-neutralizing activity of Abs was determined using recombinant cell culture-derived HCV (HCVcc). Our results demonstrate that HCV-infected patients have statistically significantly higher anti-CD81/CLDN1 Ab titers during the early phase of infection than controls. The titers were significantly higher in resolvers compared to persisters. Functional studies using immunoadsorption and HCV cell culture models demonstrate that HCV-neutralizing anti-receptor Abs are induced in the early phase of HCV infection, but not in control groups. The virus-neutralizing properties of these Abs suggest a role for control of viral infection in conjunction with antiviral responses. Characterization of these anti-receptor Abs opens new avenues to prevent and treat HCV infection. © 2015 by the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

  1. Influenza virus and endothelial cells: A species specific relationship

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K.R. Short (Kirsty); E.J.B. Veldhuis Kroeze (Edwin); L.A. Reperant (Leslie); M. Richard (Mathilde); T. Kuiken (Thijs)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractInfluenza A virus (IAV) infection is an important cause of respiratory disease in humans. The original reservoirs of IAV are wild waterfowl and shorebirds, where virus infection causes limited, if any, disease. Both in humans and in wild waterbirds, epithelial cells are the main target

  2. [Hepatitis B virus components and cytoplasmic virus-like corpuscles in chronic hepatitis (electron microscopic study)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendrey, G

    1977-04-01

    Author in the needle-biopsy specimen of the liver of a HBsAg positive patient previously treated with immunosupressive preparates (Corticosteroid + Imuran) in the nuclei of hepatocytes by the aid of electron microscope revealed ring-shaped particula of 20-25 nm in diameter (core), in the cytoplasma of ground-glass hepatocytes in the canals of the rough-surfaced endoplasmic reticulum filamentous formations in average of 23nm in diameter (surface antigen). In addition in a few number cytoplasmic core particula have also been revealed. Dane-particula were not seen. Further in the cytoplasma round or ring-shaped virus-like bodies of unknown origin of 80 nm in diameter were found. These particula could be easily distinguished from the Dane particula and from the B virus components (a second virus infection?). Author believe, that the immunsupressive therapy could play some role in the occurrence of the B virus components, since before the therapy with Imuran they could not be detected in the liver.

  3. Infección crónica por el VHB Chronic Hepatitis B Virus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Carretero

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Existen muchos factores implicados en la patogénesis de la infección crónica por el virus de la hepatitis B (VHB, como por ejemplo características del virus, la ingesta de etanol, la coinfección con otros virus (VHC, VIH, VHD, e intervenciones terapéuticas como el uso de fármacos citotóxicos o inmunosupresores, o agentes antivirales específicos. Las características clínicas, patológicas y serológicas de la hepatitis crónica por VHB, además, son muy heterogéneas. Se puede reconocer la infección crónica por VHB ante la persistencia del antígeno Australia (HBsAg durante más de seis meses. La presencia de HBeAg se suele asociar a la replicación viral activa y puede ser medida por la cantidad de DNA-VHB presente en el suero o bien por la expresión hepática de HBcAg. El daño hepático que se produce en la hepatitis crónica por VHB no es tanto por el efecto del virus sobre los hepatocitos sino por la reacción inmune que éste provoca en el huésped. Por ello puede verse cierta correlación inversamente proporcional entre la intensidad de la replicación viral y el grado de inflamación hepática. La presencia de hepatitis crónica activa en la biopsia inicial no se ha asociado al desarrollo de cirrosis así como tampoco el diagnóstico histológico de hepatitis crónica persistente puede asegurar que se vaya a desarrollar cirrosis en un futuro.Many factors are involved in the pathogenesis of chronic hepatitis B virus infection (HBV, such as, for example, characteristics of the virus, ethanol intake, coinfection with other viruses (HCV, HIV, HDV, and therapeutic interventions such as the use of cytotoxic drugs or immunosuppressors, or specific antiviral agents. The clinical, pathological and serological characteristics of chronic hepatitis B virus infection are besides very heterogeneous. Chronic HBV infection can be recognised facing persistence of the Australia antigen (HBsAg for more than six months. The presence of HBeAg is

  4. Hepatitis C virus infection in Argentina: Burden of chronic disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ezequiel; Ridruejo; Fernando; Bessone; Jorge; R; Daruich; Chris; Estes; Adrián; C; Gadano; Homie; Razavi; Federico; G; Villamil; Marcelo; O; Silva

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To estimate the progression of the hepatitis C virus(HCV) epidemic and measure the burden of HCVrelated morbidity and mortality. METHODS: Age- and gender-defined cohorts were used to follow the viremic population in Argentina and estimate HCV incidence, prevalence, hepatic complications, and mortality. The relative impact of two scenarios on HCV-related outcomes was assessed:(1) increased sustained virologic response(SVR); and(2) increased SVR and treatment.RESULTS: Under scenario 1, SVR raised to 85%-95% in 2016. Compared to the base case scenario, there was a 0.3% reduction in prevalent cases and liverrelated deaths by 2030. Given low treatment rates, cases of hepatocellular carcinoma and decompensated cirrhosis decreased < 1%, in contrast to the base case in 2030. Under scenario 2, the same increases in SVR were modeled, with gradual increases in the annual diagnosed and treated populations. This scenario decreased prevalent infections 45%, liver-related deaths 55%, liver cancer cases 60%, and decompensated cirrhosis 55%, as compared to the base case by 2030. CONCLUSION: In Argentina, cases of end stage liver disease and liver-related deaths due to HCV are still growing, while its prevalence is decreasing. Increasing in SVR rates is not enough, and increasing in the number of patients diagnosed and candidates for treatment is needed to reduce the HCV disease burden. Based on this scenario, strategies to increase diagnosis and treatment uptake must be developed to reduce HCV burden in Argentina.

  5. Utilization of replication-competent XMRV reporter-viruses reveals severe viral restriction in primary human cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Martina Stürzel

    Full Text Available The gammaretrovirus termed xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus (XMRV was described to be isolated from prostate cancer tissue biopsies and from blood of patients suffering from chronic fatigue syndrome. However, many studies failed to detect XMRV and to verify these disease associations. Data suggesting the contamination of specimens in particular by PCR-based methods and recent reports demonstrating XMRV generation via recombination of two murine leukemia virus precursors raised serious doubts about XMRV being a genuine human pathogen. To elucidate cell tropism of XMRV, we generated replication competent XMRV reporter viruses encoding a green fluorescent protein or a secretable luciferase as tools to analyze virus infection of human cell lines or primary human cells. Transfection of proviral DNAs into LNCaP prostate cancer cells resulted in readily detectably reporter gene expression and production of progeny virus. Inoculation of known XMRV susceptible target cells revealed that these virions were infectious and expressed the reporter gene, allowing for a fast and highly sensitive quantification of XMRV infection. Both reporter viruses were capable of establishing a spreading infection in LNCaP and Raji B cells and could be easily passaged. However, after inoculation of primary human blood cells such as CD4 T cells, macrophages or dendritic cells, infection rates were very low, and a spreading infection was never established. In line with these results we found that supernatants derived from these XMRV infected primary cell types did not contain infectious virus. Thus, although XMRV efficiently replicated in some human cell lines, all tested primary cells were largely refractory to XMRV infection and did not support viral spread. Our results provide further evidence that XMRV is not a human pathogen.

  6. ESwab challenges influenza virus propagation in cell cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trebbien, Ramona; Andersen, B; Rønn, Jesper

    2014-01-01

    Although the ESwab kit (Copan, Brescia, Italy) is intended for sampling bacteria for culture, this kit is increasingly also used for virus sampling. The effect of ESwab medium on influenza virus detection by real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) or virus propagation...... in Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cell culture was investigated. The ESwab medium was suitable for viral RNA detection but not for viral propagation due to cytotoxicity. Sampling influenza viruses with ESwab challenges influenza surveillance by strongly limiting the possibility of antigenic...

  7. ESwab challenges influenza virus propagation in cell cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trebbien, Ramona; Andersen, B; Rønn, Jesper

    2014-01-01

    in Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cell culture was investigated. The ESwab medium was suitable for viral RNA detection but not for viral propagation due to cytotoxicity. Sampling influenza viruses with ESwab challenges influenza surveillance by strongly limiting the possibility of antigenic......Although the ESwab kit (Copan, Brescia, Italy) is intended for sampling bacteria for culture, this kit is increasingly also used for virus sampling. The effect of ESwab medium on influenza virus detection by real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) or virus propagation...

  8. Susceptibility of different leukocyte cell types to Vaccinia virus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sánchez-Puig Juana M

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Vaccinia virus, the prototype member of the family Poxviridae, was used extensively in the past as the Smallpox vaccine, and is currently considered as a candidate vector for new recombinant vaccines. Vaccinia virus has a wide host range, and is known to infect cultures of a variety of cell lines of mammalian origin. However, little is known about the virus tropism in human leukocyte populations. We report here that various cell types within leukocyte populations have widely different susceptibility to infection with vaccinia virus. Results We have investigated the ability of vaccinia virus to infect human PBLs by using virus recombinants expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP, and monoclonal antibodies specific for PBL subpopulations. Flow cytometry allowed the identification of infected cells within the PBL mixture 1–5 hours after infection. Antibody labeling revealed that different cell populations had very different infection rates. Monocytes showed the highest percentage of infected cells, followed by B lymphocytes and NK cells. In contrast to those cell types, the rate of infection of T lymphocytes was low. Comparison of vaccinia virus strains WR and MVA showed that both strains infected efficiently the monocyte population, although producing different expression levels. Our results suggest that MVA was less efficient than WR in infecting NK cells and B lymphocytes. Overall, both WR and MVA consistently showed a strong preference for the infection of non-T cells. Conclusions When infecting fresh human PBL preparations, vaccinia virus showed a strong bias towards the infection of monocytes, followed by B lymphocytes and NK cells. In contrast, very poor infection of T lymphocytes was detected. These finding may have important implications both in our understanding of poxvirus pathogenesis and in the development of improved smallpox vaccines.

  9. Modelling Spread of Oncolytic Viruses in Heterogeneous Cell Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Michael; Dobrovolny, Hana

    2014-03-01

    One of the most promising areas in current cancer research and treatment is the use of viruses to attack cancer cells. A number of oncolytic viruses have been identified to date that possess the ability to destroy or neutralize cancer cells while inflicting minimal damage upon healthy cells. Formulation of predictive models that correctly describe the evolution of infected tumor systems is critical to the successful application of oncolytic virus therapy. A number of different models have been proposed for analysis of the oncolytic virus-infected tumor system, with approaches ranging from traditional coupled differential equations such as the Lotka-Volterra predator-prey models, to contemporary modeling frameworks based on neural networks and cellular automata. Existing models are focused on tumor cells and the effects of virus infection, and offer the potential for improvement by including effects upon normal cells. We have recently extended the traditional framework to a 2-cell model addressing the full cellular system including tumor cells, normal cells, and the impacts of viral infection upon both populations. Analysis of the new framework reveals complex interaction between the populations and potential inability to simultaneously eliminate the virus and tumor populations.

  10. Entecavir (Baraclude in patients with chronic hepatitis B virus (HPV infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viola Sacchi

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis B is the most common serious liver infection in the world, with about 350 million people who are infected with the hepatitis B virus (HBV and about 1 million deaths annually.Hepatitis B is characterized by an acute and a chronic phase, if the subject fails to produce adequate immune response. About 5-10% of adults infected with HBV go on to develop chronic infection and become chronic carriers (CHB; moreover, the liver damage, if not stopped, continues until cirrhosis or hepatocellular carcinoma. In the natural history of HBV infection, the most important event is HBeAg seroconversion, characterized by loss of HBeAg (a specific antigen of the virus and development of Anti-HBe antibodies (HBeAg-positive patients. If the seroconversion has occurred early (when liver damage is not yet significant and is maintained,long-term prognosis is excellent. The disease can follow a more aggressive course if active viral replication persists despite anti-HBe positivity. This state, characterized by continuing viral replication, has been termed as HBeAg-negative CHB, and is the most prevalent form in Italy. At the moment, there are 4 approved antiviral drug classes, with different antiviral efficacy, for the treatment of chronic hepatitis B: interferons, nucleoside analogues, nucleotide analogues, and cyclopents. The primary target of the treatment is a prolonged suppression of viral replication, in order to avoid long term complications and increase survival.

  11. Telbivudine (Sebivo in patients with hepatitis B virus (HBV chronic infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viola Sacchi

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis B is the most common serious liver infection in the world, with about 350 million people who are infected with the hepatitis B virus (HBV and about 1 million deaths annually.Hepatitis B is characterized by an acute and a chronic phase, if the subject fails to produce adequate immune response.About 5-10% of adults infected with HBV go on to develop chronic infection and become chronic carriers (CHB; moreover, the liver damage, if not stopped, continues until cirrhosis or hepatocellular carcinoma. In the natural history of HBV infection, the most important event is HBeAg seroconversion, characterized by loss of HBeAg (a specific antigen of the virus and development of anti-HBe antibodies (HBeAg-positive patients. If the seroconversion has occurred early (when liver damage is not already significant and is maintained, long-term prognosis is excellent. The disease can follow a more aggressive course if active viral replication persists despite anti-HBe positivity. This state, characterized by continuing viral replication, has been termed as HBeAg-negative CHB, and is the most prevalent form in Italy. At the moment, there are 4 approved antiviral drug classes, with different antiviral efficacy, for the treatment of chronic hepatitis B: interferons, nucleoside analogues, nucleotide analogues, and cyclopents.The primary target of the treatment is a prolonged suppression of viral replication, in order to avoid long term complications and increase survival.

  12. Monitoring Physiological Changes in Haloarchaeal Cell during Virus Release

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    Julija Svirskaitė

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The slow rate of adsorption and non-synchronous release of some archaeal viruses have hindered more thorough analyses of the mechanisms of archaeal virus release. To address this deficit, we utilized four viruses that infect Haloarcula hispanica that represent the four virion morphotypes currently known for halophilic euryarchaeal viruses: (1 icosahedral internal membrane-containing SH1; (2 icosahedral tailed HHTV-1; (3 spindle-shaped His1; and (4 pleomorphic His2. To discern the events occurring as the progeny viruses exit, we monitored culture turbidity, as well as viable cell and progeny virus counts of infected and uninfected cultures. In addition to these traditional metrics, we measured three parameters associated with membrane integrity: the binding of the lipophilic anion phenyldicarbaundecaborane, oxygen consumption, and both intra- and extra-cellular ATP levels.

  13. Monitoring Physiological Changes in Haloarchaeal Cell during Virus Release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svirskaitė, Julija; Oksanen, Hanna M.; Daugelavičius, Rimantas; Bamford, Dennis H.

    2016-01-01

    The slow rate of adsorption and non-synchronous release of some archaeal viruses have hindered more thorough analyses of the mechanisms of archaeal virus release. To address this deficit, we utilized four viruses that infect Haloarcula hispanica that represent the four virion morphotypes currently known for halophilic euryarchaeal viruses: (1) icosahedral internal membrane-containing SH1; (2) icosahedral tailed HHTV-1; (3) spindle-shaped His1; and (4) pleomorphic His2. To discern the events occurring as the progeny viruses exit, we monitored culture turbidity, as well as viable cell and progeny virus counts of infected and uninfected cultures. In addition to these traditional metrics, we measured three parameters associated with membrane integrity: the binding of the lipophilic anion phenyldicarbaundecaborane, oxygen consumption, and both intra- and extra-cellular ATP levels. PMID:26927156

  14. Normocaloric low cholesterol diet modulates Th17/Treg balance in patients with chronic hepatitis C virus infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta Maggio

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C virus (HCV infection is associated with hepatic and extrahepatic manifestations, including immunological disorders. Chronic Hepatitis C (CHC is often characterized by cholesterol and lipid metabolism alterations, leading to hepatic steatosis. Cholesterol metabolism, in fact, is crucial for the viral life cycle. Recent works described that a higher dietary cholesterol intake is associated with the progression of HCV-related liver disease. CHC patients have increased levels of T helper 17 (Th17-cells, a lymphocytic population involved in the pathogenesis of liver inflammation and autoimmune hepatitis. The balance between Th17 and regulatory T (Treg cells is crucial for chronic inflammation and autoimmunity. Th17-cell differentiation is deeply influenced by the activation LXRs, nuclear receptors modulating cholesterol homeostasis. Moreover, HCV may affect these nuclear receptors, and cholesterol metabolism, through both direct and indirect mechanisms. On these bases, we hypothesized that modulation of cholesterol levels through Normocaloric Low Cholesterol Diet (NLCD may represent an innovative strategy to reduce the progression of HCV infection, through the modulation of peripheral Th17/Treg balance. To this end, we performed a pilot study to investigate whether a Normocaloric Low Cholesterol Diet may be able to modulate Th17/Treg balance in patients affected by chronic HCV infection. After 30 days of NLCD CHC patients showed a significant reduction in Th17 cells frequency, which correlated with strong reduction of IL-17 and IL-22 serum levels. At the same time, we appreciated an increase in the percentage of Treg cells, thus improving Treg/Th17 balance. Moreover, we observed an increased expression of LXRs and their target genes: SREBP-1c and ABCA-1. In conclusion, NLCD finely regulates Th17/Treg balance, improving immune system response in CHC patients. This study could pave the way for new treatments of CHC patients, suggesting that

  15. Influence of delta virus infection on the virologic status in Egyptian patients with chronic hepatitis B virus genotype D.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fouad, Rabab; Abdo, Mahmoud; Eldeen, Hadeel Gamal; Sabry, Dina; Atef, Mira; Ahmed, Rasha; Zayed, Naglaa

    2016-05-01

    Hepatitis delta virus (HDV) usually have an unfavorable clinical outcome in chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) patients. In Egypt, data about epidemiology, the spectrum of disease, and impact of HDV on HBV infection are rare. To assess the prevalence, clinical and virological characteristics of HDV infection among Egyptian patients with chronic HBV. Adult patients with Hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg)-positive were evaluated for the presence of HDV using anti HDV-IgG and HDV RNA by RT-PCR. Routine laboratory investigations, genotypes and subtypes for both HBV and HDV, abdominal sonography, and transient elastography (TE) were done. Liver biopsy was performed only in whenever indicated. One hundred and twenty-one treatment-naïve chronic HBV patients were included. Wild HBV genotype-D2 was found in 98.2% and 81.9% were HBeAg negative. Prevalence of HDV was 8.3% by anti-HDV IgG and 9.9% by RT-PCR. Wild HDV genotype-IIb was reported in 83.3%. HDV infection was more common in males, 90.9% of delta patients were HBeAg negative. Compared to the mono-infected HBV, concomitant HBV/HDV infection was not associated with more derangment in ALT nor advanced stage of fibrosis. 66.7% of HDV patients had significantly lower HBV-DNA level compared to the non-delta patients (P infection was associated with negative HBeAg status, reduction of HBV replication, but neither influenced the clinical course nor increased significant liver damage risk. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Analysis of HIV-1- and CMV-specific memory CD4 T-cell responses during primary and chronic infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harari, Alexandre; Rizzardi, G Paolo; Ellefsen, Kim; Ciuffreda, Donatella; Champagne, Patrick; Bart, Pierre-Alexandre; Kaufmann, Daniel; Telenti, Amalio; Sahli, Roland; Tambussi, Giuseppe; Kaiser, Laurent; Lazzarin, Adriano; Perrin, Luc; Pantaleo, Giuseppe

    2002-08-15

    CD4 T-cell-specific memory antiviral responses to human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and cytomegalovirus (CMV) were investigated in 16 patients with documented primary HIV-1 infection (4 of the 16 subjects also had primary CMV infection) and compared with those observed in patients with chronic HIV-1 and CMV coinfection. Virus-specific memory CD4 T cells were characterized on the basis of the expression of the chemokine receptor CCR7. HIV-1- and CMV-specific interferon-gamma-secreting CD4 T cells were detected in patients with primary and chronic HIV-1 and CMV coinfection and were mostly contained in the cell population lacking expression of CCR7. The magnitude of the primary CMV-specific CD4 T-cell response was significantly greater than that of chronic CMV infection, whereas there were no differences between primary and chronic HIV-1-specific CD4 T-cell responses. A substantial proportion of CD4(+)CCR7(-) T cells were infected with HIV-1. These results advance the characterization of antiviral memory CD4 T-cell response and the delineation of the potential mechanisms that likely prevent the generation of a robust CD4 T-cell immune response during primary infection.

  17. Rare inborn errors associated with chronic hepatitis B virus infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhao, Qiang; Peng, Liang; Huang, Weijun

    2012-01-01

    Chronic hepatitis B (CHB) is a major global health issue. The role of rare genetic variants in CHB has not been elucidated. We aimed to identify rare allelic variants predisposing to CHB. We performed exome sequencing in 50 CHB patients who had no identifiable risk factors for CHB and 40 controls...... who were healthy and hepatitis B surface antibody-positive, but had never received hepatitis B vaccination. We selected six rare variant alleles and followed up their association with disease status by Sanger sequencing in a case-control study comprising 1,728 CHB patients and 1,636 healthy controls....... The latter had either not been immunized with hepatitis B vaccine or had uncertain vaccination status. Our results showed that transmembrane protein 2 p.Ser1254Asn, interferon alpha 2 p.Ala120Thr, its regulator NLR family member X1 p.Arg707Cys, and complement component 2 p.Glu318Asp were associated with CHB...

  18. A Phase I Trial of Epstein-Barr Virus Gp350 Vaccine for Children With Chronic Kidney Disease Awaiting Transplantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rees, L.; Tizard, E.J.; Morgan, A.J.; Cubitt, W.D.; Finerty, S.; Oyewole-Eletu, T.A.; Owen, K.; Royed, C.; Stevens, S.J.C.; Shroff, R.C.; Tanday, M.K.; Wilson, A.; Middeldorp, J.M.; Amlot, P.L.; Steven, N.M.

    2009-01-01

    Background. Vaccination against Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), inducing an antibody response to the envelope glycoprotein gp350, might protect EBV-negative children with chronic kidney disease from lymphoproliferative disease after transplantation. Methods. A phase I trial recruited children with chronic

  19. Factors Associated With Chronic Hepatitis in Patients With Hepatitis E Virus Infection Who Have Received Solid Organ Transplants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamar, Nassim; Garrouste, Cyril; Haagsma, Elizabeth B.; Garrigue, Valerie; Pischke, Sven; Chauvet, Cecile; Dumortier, Jerome; Cannesson, Amelie; Cassuto-Viguier, Elisabeth; Thervet, Eric; Conti, Filomena; Lebray, Pascal; Dalton, Harry R.; Santella, Robert; Kanaan, Nada; Essig, Marie; Mousson, Christiane; Radenne, Sylvie; Roque-Afonso, Anne Marie; Izopet, Jacques; Rostaing, Lionel

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: Hepatitis E virus (HEV) infection can cause chronic hepatitis in recipients of solid organ transplants. However, the factors that contribute to chronic infection and the outcomes of these patients are incompletely understood. We performed a retrospective analysis of data from 17 c

  20. Factors Associated With Chronic Hepatitis in Patients With Hepatitis E Virus Infection Who Have Received Solid Organ Transplants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamar, Nassim; Garrouste, Cyril; Haagsma, Elizabeth B.; Garrigue, Valerie; Pischke, Sven; Chauvet, Cecile; Dumortier, Jerome; Cannesson, Amelie; Cassuto-Viguier, Elisabeth; Thervet, Eric; Conti, Filomena; Lebray, Pascal; Dalton, Harry R.; Santella, Robert; Kanaan, Nada; Essig, Marie; Mousson, Christiane; Radenne, Sylvie; Roque-Afonso, Anne Marie; Izopet, Jacques; Rostaing, Lionel

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: Hepatitis E virus (HEV) infection can cause chronic hepatitis in recipients of solid organ transplants. However, the factors that contribute to chronic infection and the outcomes of these patients are incompletely understood. We performed a retrospective analysis of data from 17

  1. HMGB1-induced autophagy: a new pathway to maintain Treg function during chronic hepatitis B virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Li-Sha; Li, Jing; Liu, Yun; Wang, Fu-Ping; Wang, Si-Qi; She, Wei-Min; Wu, Sheng-di; Qi, Xiao-Long; Zhou, Yong-Ping; Jiang, Wei

    2017-03-01

    High-mobility group box-1 (HMGB1) protein, as one of the well-known damage-associated molecular pattern molecules (DAMPs), is enriched in chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection and has a context-dependent role in autophagy, a highly conserved self-digestive process in response to environmental stress. Recent mouse studies indicate that autophagy is highly active in regulatory T (Treg)-cells. In the present study, we evaluated spontaneous and induced autophagy of peripheral Treg cells from 98 patients with chronic hepatitis B (CHB), by measuring levels of lipidated form of microtubule-associated light chain 3 (LC3-II, marker for closed autophagosomes) and observing autophagic vacuoles (AV) with transmission electron microscope. No significant difference was found in spontaneous autophagy of either Treg or CD4(+) naive cells when comparing CHB patients with healthy subjects, apart from CHB-Treg showed significantly higher autophagic activity after activation by anti-CD3-CD28 beads. Besides, incubation of CHB-Treg cells with CHB-serum greatly maintained their autophagic behaviour, which could be significantly diminished by blocking HMGB1 with the neutralizing antibody. Further, we characterized time- and dose-dependent effects by recombinant HMGB1 protein on autophagy of CHB-Treg cells. We also documented a significant up-regulation of HMGB1 and its receptors [toll-like receptor (TLR4), receptor for advanced glycation end-product (RAGE)] in both peripheral and intra-hepatic microenvironments of CHB patients. Moreover, the RAGE-extracellular regulated protein kinases (ERK) axis and rapamycin-sensitive components of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathways were demonstrated in vitro to be involved in HMGB1-induced autophagy of Treg cells. Additionally, HMGB1-induced autophagy could maintain cell survival and functional stability of CHB-Treg cells. Our findings could open new perspectives in developing therapeutic strategies to activate specific anti

  2. Interferon Response in Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) Infection: Lessons from Cell Culture Systems of HCV Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Pil Soo; Shin, Eui-Cheol; Yoon, Seung Kew

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a positive-stranded RNA virus that infects approximately 130-170 million people worldwide. In 2005, the first HCV infection system in cell culture was established using clone JFH-1, which was isolated from a Japanese patient with fulminant HCV infection. JFH-1 replicates efficiently in hepatoma cells and infectious virion particles are released into the culture supernatant. The development of cell culture-derived HCV (HCVcc) systems has allowed us to understand how hosts respond to HCV infection and how HCV evades host responses. Although the mechanisms underlying the different outcomes of HCV infection are not fully understood, innate immune responses seem to have a critical impact on the outcome of HCV infection, as demonstrated by the prognostic value of IFN-λ gene polymorphisms among patients with chronic HCV infection. Herein, we review recent research on interferon response in HCV infection, particularly studies using HCVcc infection systems.

  3. Ultrastructure of Zika virus particles in cell cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debora Ferreira Barreto-Vieira

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Zika virus (ZIKV has infected thousands of Brazilian people and spread to other American countries since 2015. The introduction of ZIKV brought a strong impact to public health in Brazil. It is of utmost importance to identify a susceptible cell line that will enable the isolation and identification of the virus from patient samples, viral mass production, and testing of drug and vaccine candidates. Besides real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction diagnosis for detecting the viral genome, virus isolation in cell lines was useful in order to study the structure of the viral particle and its behaviour inside cells. Analysis of ZIKV infected cell lines was achieved using transmission electron microscopy (TEM. Blood was obtained from a Brazilian patient during the first days after presenting with signs of the disease, and ZIKV from the patient’s blood was isolated in the C6/36 mosquito cell line. Afterwards, Vero cells were inoculated with the viral suspension, fixed six days after inoculation, embedded in polymers, and ultra-thin cut. Like dengue viruses, this flavivirus showed numerous virus particles present inside cellular vesicles thereby confirming the susceptibility of the Vero cell line to ZIKV replication. TEM is a unique technique available to make the virus visible.

  4. Ultrastructure of Zika virus particles in cell cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barreto-Vieira, Debora Ferreira; Barth, Ortrud Monika; Silva, Marcos Alexandre Nunes da; Santos, Carolina Cardoso; Santos, Aline da Silva; F, Joaquim Batista; Filippis, Ana Maria Bispo de

    2016-08-01

    Zika virus (ZIKV) has infected thousands of Brazilian people and spread to other American countries since 2015. The introduction of ZIKV brought a strong impact to public health in Brazil. It is of utmost importance to identify a susceptible cell line that will enable the isolation and identification of the virus from patient samples, viral mass production, and testing of drug and vaccine candidates. Besides real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction diagnosis for detecting the viral genome, virus isolation in cell lines was useful in order to study the structure of the viral particle and its behaviour inside cells. Analysis of ZIKV infected cell lines was achieved using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Blood was obtained from a Brazilian patient during the first days after presenting with signs of the disease, and ZIKV from the patient's blood was isolated in the C6/36 mosquito cell line. Afterwards, Vero cells were inoculated with the viral suspension, fixed six days after inoculation, embedded in polymers, and ultra-thin cut. Like dengue viruses, this flavivirus showed numerous virus particles present inside cellular vesicles thereby confirming the susceptibility of the Vero cell line to ZIKV replication. TEM is a unique technique available to make the virus visible.

  5. Ultrastructure of Zika virus particles in cell cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barreto-Vieira, Debora Ferreira; Barth, Ortrud Monika; da Silva, Marcos Alexandre Nunes; Santos, Carolina Cardoso; Santos, Aline da Silva; F, Joaquim Batista; de Filippis, Ana Maria Bispo

    2016-01-01

    Zika virus (ZIKV) has infected thousands of Brazilian people and spread to other American countries since 2015. The introduction of ZIKV brought a strong impact to public health in Brazil. It is of utmost importance to identify a susceptible cell line that will enable the isolation and identification of the virus from patient samples, viral mass production, and testing of drug and vaccine candidates. Besides real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction diagnosis for detecting the viral genome, virus isolation in cell lines was useful in order to study the structure of the viral particle and its behaviour inside cells. Analysis of ZIKV infected cell lines was achieved using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Blood was obtained from a Brazilian patient during the first days after presenting with signs of the disease, and ZIKV from the patient’s blood was isolated in the C6/36 mosquito cell line. Afterwards, Vero cells were inoculated with the viral suspension, fixed six days after inoculation, embedded in polymers, and ultra-thin cut. Like dengue viruses, this flavivirus showed numerous virus particles present inside cellular vesicles thereby confirming the susceptibility of the Vero cell line to ZIKV replication. TEM is a unique technique available to make the virus visible. PMID:27581122

  6. Building and optimizing a virus-specific T cell receptor library for targeted immunotherapy in viral infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banu, Nasirah; Chia, Adeline; Ho, Zi Zong; Garcia, Alfonso Tan; Paravasivam, Komathi; Grotenbreg, Gijsbert M; Bertoletti, Antonio; Gehring, Adam J

    2014-02-25

    Restoration of antigen-specific T cell immunity has the potential to clear persistent viral infection. T cell receptor (TCR) gene therapy can reconstitute CD8 T cell immunity in chronic patients. We cloned 10 virus-specific TCRs targeting 5 different viruses, causing chronic and acute infection. All 10 TCR genetic constructs were optimized for expression using a P2A sequence, codon optimization and the addition of a non-native disulfide bond. However, maximum TCR expression was only achieved after establishing the optimal orientation of the alpha and beta chains in the expression cassette; 9/10 TCRs favored the beta-P2A-alpha orientation over alpha-P2A-beta. Optimal TCR expression was associated with a significant increase in the frequency of IFN-gamma+ T cells. In addition, activating cells for transduction in the presence of Toll-like receptor ligands further enhanced IFN-gamma production. Thus, we have built a virus-specific TCR library that has potential for therapeutic intervention in chronic viral infection or virus-related cancers.

  7. Virus-Specific Interleukin-17-Producing CD4+ T Cells Are Detectable in Early Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Infection ▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Feng Yun; Merchant, Asad; Kovacs, Colin M.; Loutfy, Mona; Persad, Desmond; Ostrowski, Mario A.

    2008-01-01

    TH-17 cells have been shown to play a role in bacterial defense, acute inflammation, and autoimmunity. We examined the role of interleukin 17 (IL-17) production in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection. Both HIV-1- and cytomegalovirus (CMV)-specific IL-17-producing CD4+ T cells were detectable in early HIV-1 infection but were reduced to nondetectable levels in chronic and nonprogressive HIV-1 infection. IL-17-producing CMV-specific cells were not detected in blood from HIV-1-uninfected normal volunteers. Virus-specific TH-17 cells could coexpress other cytokines and could express CCR4 or CXCR3. Although the etiology of these cells has yet to be established, we propose that microbial translocation may induce them. PMID:18434403

  8. Characterizing human herpes virus 6 following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perissinotti, Anthony J; Gulbis, Alison; Shpall, Elizabeth J; Howell, Joshua

    2015-04-01

    Human herpes virus 6 reactivation occurs in approximately 50% of patients following hematopoietic stem cell transplant, however, the significance of human herpes virus 6 reactivation remains uncertain. A retrospective study was conducted analyzing clinical data of patients testing positive for human herpes virus 6 by quantitative polymerase chain reaction following hematopoietic stem cell transplant from 1 January 1998 to 1 October 2011. Data retrieved were used to describe the clinical course and outcome of human herpes virus 6 positive hematopoietic stem cell transplant patients. Sixty patients were identified who tested positive for human herpes virus 6 by polymerase chain reaction following hematopoietic stem cell transplant. A high proportion of patients were identified in this cohort with acute myeloid leukemia (28.3%), active disease (65%), transplanted with a matched unrelated donor (30%), ≥ 1 antigen mismatched (28.3%) matched unrelated donor, or an umbilical cord graft (25%), and those who received antithymocyte globulin (42.4%). Thirty-eight (63.3%) patients were treated for human herpes virus 6 with foscarnet alone or in combination with intravenous immunoglobulin, whereas 18 (30%) did not require treatment survival at Day 100 was 73.3%. This study suggests human herpes virus 6 reactivation occurs shortly after hematopoietic stem cell transplant (median of 25 days (interquartile range, 20-31.75) after hematopoietic stem cell transplant). Many potential risk factors are described in this report. Treatment of human herpes virus 6 predominately consisted of foscarnet with or without intravenous immunoglobulin; however, treatment of human herpes virus 6 was not always warranted. Furthermore, the effect of treatment on patient outcomes is uncertain. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  9. Clinical and virological improvement of hepatitis B virus-related or hepatitis C virus-related chronic hepatitis with concomitant hepatitis A virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagnelli, Evangelista; Coppola, Nicola; Pisaturo, Mariantonietta; Pisapia, Raffaella; Onofrio, Mirella; Sagnelli, Caterina; Catuogno, Antonio; Scolastico, Carlo; Piccinino, Felice; Filippini, Pietro

    2006-06-01

    We evaluated the clinical and virological characteristics of hepatitis A virus infection in persons concomitantly infected with hepatitis B virus (HBV) or hepatitis C virus (HCV). We enrolled 21 patients with acute hepatitis A and chronic hepatitis with no sign of liver cirrhosis, 13 patients who were positive for hepatitis B surface antigen (case B group), 8 patients who were anti-HCV positive (case C group), and 21 patients with acute hepatitis A without a preexisting liver disease (control A group). Two control groups of patients with chronic hepatitis B (control B group) or C (control C group) were also chosen. All control groups were pair-matched by age and sex with the corresponding case group. Fulminant hepatitis A was never observed, and hepatitis A had a severe course in 1 patient in the case B group and in 1 patient in the control A group. Both patients recovered. On admission, HBV DNA was detected in 1 patient in the case B group (7.7%) and in 13 patients (50%) in the control B group; HCV RNA was found in no patient in the case C group and in 16 patients (81.2%) in the control C group. Of 9 patients in the case B group who were followed up for 6 months, 3 became negative for hepatitis B surface antigen and positive for hepatitis B surface antibody, 2 remained positive for hepatitis B surface antigen and negative for HBV DNA, and 4 became positive for HBV DNA with a low viral load [corrected] Of 6 patients in the case C group who were followed up for 6 months, 3 remained negative for HCV RNA, and 3 had persistently low viral loads. Concomitant hepatitis A was always self-limited, associated with a marked inhibition of HBV and HCV genomes, and possibly had a good prognosis for the underlying chronic hepatitis.

  10. Smarter vaccine design will circumvent regulatory T cell-mediated evasion in chronic HIV and HCV infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Searls De Groot

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Despite years of research, vaccines against HIV and HCV are not yet available, due largely to effective viral immunoevasive mechanisms. A novel escape mechanism observed in viruses that cause chronic infection is suppression of viral-specific effector CD4+ and CD8+ T cells by stimulating regulatory T cells (Tregs educated on host sequences during tolerance induction. Viral class II MHC epitopes that share a TCR-face with host epitopes may activate Tregs capable of suppressing protective responses. We designed an immunoinformatic algorithm, JanusMatrix, to identify such epitopes and discovered that among human-host viruses, chronic viruses appear more human-like than viruses that cause acute infection. Furthermore, an HCV epitope that activates Tregs in chronically infected patients, but not clearers, shares a TCR-face with numerous human sequences. To boost weak CD4+ T cell responses associated with persistent infection, vaccines for HIV and HCV must circumvent potential Treg activation that can handicap efficacy. Epitope-driven approaches to vaccine design that involve careful consideration of the T cell subsets primed during immunization will advance HIV and HCV vaccine development.

  11. Autologous epidermal cell suspension: A promising treatment for chronic wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hongliang; Chen, Yan; Zhang, Cuiping; Fu, Xiaobing

    2016-02-01

    Chronic wounds have become an increasing medical and economic problem of aging societies because they are difficult to manage. Skin grafting is an important treatment method for chronic wounds, which are refractory to conservative therapy. The technique involving epidermal cell suspensions was invented to enable the possibility of treating larger wounds with only a small piece of donor skin. Both uncultured and cultured autologous epidermal cell suspensions can be prepared and survive permanently on the wound bed. A systematic search was conducted of EMBASE, Cochrane Library, PubMed and web of science by using Boolean search terms, from the establishment of the database until May 31, 2014. The bibliographies of all retrieved articles in English were searched. The search terms were: (epithelial cell suspension OR keratinocyte suspension) and chronic and wound. From the included, 6 studies are descriptive interventions and discussed the use of autologous keratinocyte suspension to treat 61 patients' chronic wound. The various methods of preparation of epidermal cell suspension are described. The advantages and shortcomings of different carriers for epidermal cell suspensions are also summarised. Both uncultured and cultured autologous epidermal cell suspensions have been used to treat chronic wounds. Although the limitations of these studies include the small number of patient populations with chronic wounds and many important problems that remain to be solved, autologous epidermal cell suspension is a promising treatment for chronic wounds. Copyright © 2015 Tissue Viability Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Mechanisms of Virus-Induced Neural Cell Death

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-03-01

    respectively. TNFa was purchased from Invitrogen and was used at a concentration of 100 ng/ml. The cell permeable, synthetic , peptide inhibitors of caspase...Sindbis 46,47 and Dengue virus 48 is associated with the induction of apoptosis, which may increase viral spread. In still other cases, proteins encoded by...J. Cell Biol. 1998; 141: 1479-1487. 23 48. Jan JT, Chen BH, Ma SH, et al. Potential dengue virus-triggered apoptotic pathway in human neuroblastoma

  13. Hepatitis C virus cell-cell transmission and resistance to direct-acting antiviral agents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Xiao

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C virus (HCV is transmitted between hepatocytes via classical cell entry but also uses direct cell-cell transfer to infect neighboring hepatocytes. Viral cell-cell transmission has been shown to play an important role in viral persistence allowing evasion from neutralizing antibodies. In contrast, the role of HCV cell-cell transmission for antiviral resistance is unknown. Aiming to address this question we investigated the phenotype of HCV strains exhibiting resistance to direct-acting antivirals (DAAs in state-of-the-art model systems for cell-cell transmission and spread. Using HCV genotype 2 as a model virus, we show that cell-cell transmission is the main route of viral spread of DAA-resistant HCV. Cell-cell transmission of DAA-resistant viruses results in viral persistence and thus hampers viral eradication. We also show that blocking cell-cell transmission using host-targeting entry inhibitors (HTEIs was highly effective in inhibiting viral dissemination of resistant genotype 2 viruses. Combining HTEIs with DAAs prevented antiviral resistance and led to rapid elimination of the virus in cell culture model. In conclusion, our work provides evidence that cell-cell transmission plays an important role in dissemination and maintenance of resistant variants in cell culture models. Blocking virus cell-cell transmission prevents emergence of drug resistance in persistent viral infection including resistance to HCV DAAs.

  14. TT virus and hepatitis G virus infections in Korean blood donors and patients with chronic liver disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mee Juhng Jeon; Jong Hee Shin; Soon Pal Suh; Yong Chai Lim; Dong Wook Ryang

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To determine the prevalences of TTV and HGV infections among blood donors and patients with chronic liver disease in Korea, to investigate the association of TTV and HGV infections with blood transfusion, and to assess the correlation between TTV and HGV viremia and hepatic damage.METHODS: A total of 391 serum samples were examined in this study. Samples were obtained from healthy blood donors (n= 110), hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg)-positive donors (n=112), anti-hepatitis C virus (anti-HCV)-positive donors (n=69), patients with type B chronic liver disease (n=81), and patients with type C chronic liver disease (n= 19).TTV DNA was detected using the hemi-nested PCR. HGV RNA was tested using RT-PCR. A history of blood transfusion and serum levels of alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) were also determined.RESULTS: TTV DNA was detected in 8.2 % of healthy blood donors, 16.1% of HBsAg-positive donors, 20.3 % of antiHCV-positive donors, 21.0 % of patients with type B chronic liver disease, and 21.1% of patients with type C chronic liver disease. HGV RNA was detected in 1.8 % of healthy blood donors, 1.8 % of HBsAg-positive donors, 17.4 % of anti-HCV-positive donors, 13.6% of patients with type B chronic liver disease, and 10.5% of patients with type C chronic liver disease. The prevalence of TTV and HGV infections in HBV- or HCV-positive donors and patients was significantly higher than in healthy blood donors (P<0.05),except for the detection rate of HGV in HBsAg-positive donors which was the same as for healthy donors. There was a history of transfusion in 66.7% of TTV DNA-positive patients and 76.9% of HGV RNA-positive patients (P<0.05). No significant increase in serum ALT and AST was detected in the TTV- or HGV-positive donors and patients.CONCLUSION: TTV and HGV infections are more frequently found in donors and patients infected with HBV or HCV than in healthy blood donors. However, there is no significant

  15. Non-muscle myosin as target antigen for human autoantibodies in patients with hepatitis C virus-associated chronic liver diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Mühlen, C A; Chan, E K; Peebles, C L; Imai, H; Kiyosawa, K; Tan, E M

    1995-04-01

    Three patients with hepatitis C virus (HCV)-related chronic liver disease were shown to have autoantibodies strongly reacting with cytoskeletal fibres of non-muscle cells. The heavy chain of non-muscle myosin microfilament was the main target for those autoantibodies, as determined by (i) cell and tissue immunofluorescence studies showing colocalization with an anti-myosin antibody prototype; (ii) primary reactivity in immunoblotting with a 200-kD protein, using either MOLT-4 cells, human platelets, or affinity-purified non-muscle myosin as antigen extract; and (iii) immunoblotting of similar immunoreactive fragments in papain-digested MOLT-4 cell extracts, by using those human sera and antibody prototype. Autoantibodies to non-muscle myosin heavy chain were not previously reported in patients with chronic liver diseases, especially in those associated with HCV infection.

  16. Dengue Virus Infection Perturbs Lipid Homeostasis in Infected Mosquito Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perera, Rushika M.; Riley, Catherine; Isaac, Georgis; Hopf- Jannasch, Amber; Moore, Ronald J.; Weitz, Karl K.; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Metz, Thomas O.; Adamec, Jiri; Kuhn, Richard J.

    2012-03-22

    Dengue virus causes {approx}50-100 million infections per year and thus is considered one of the most aggressive arthropod-borne human pathogen worldwide. During its replication, dengue virus induces dramatic alterations in the intracellular membranes of infected cells. This phenomenon is observed both in human and vector-derived cells. Using high-resolution mass spectrometry of mosquito cells, we show that this membrane remodeling is directly linked to a unique lipid repertoire induced by dengue virus infection. Specifically, 15% of the metabolites detected were significantly different between DENV infected and uninfected cells while 85% of the metabolites detected were significantly different in isolated replication complex membranes. Furthermore, we demonstrate that intracellular lipid redistribution induced by the inhibition of fatty acid synthase, the rate-limiting enzyme in lipid biosynthesis, is sufficient for cell survival but is inhibitory to dengue virus replication. Lipids that have the capacity to destabilize and change the curvature of membranes as well as lipids that change the permeability of membranes are enriched in dengue virus infected cells. Several sphingolipids and other bioactive signaling molecules that are involved in controlling membrane fusion, fission, and trafficking as well as molecules that influence cytoskeletal reorganization are also up regulated during dengue infection. These observations shed light on the emerging role of lipids in shaping the membrane and protein environments during viral infections and suggest membrane-organizing principles that may influence virus-induced intracellular membrane architecture.

  17. Dengue virus infection perturbs lipid homeostasis in infected mosquito cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rushika Perera

    Full Text Available Dengue virus causes ∼50-100 million infections per year and thus is considered one of the most aggressive arthropod-borne human pathogen worldwide. During its replication, dengue virus induces dramatic alterations in the intracellular membranes of infected cells. This phenomenon is observed both in human and vector-derived cells. Using high-resolution mass spectrometry of mosquito cells, we show that this membrane remodeling is directly linked to a unique lipid repertoire induced by dengue virus infection. Specifically, 15% of the metabolites detected were significantly different between DENV infected and uninfected cells while 85% of the metabolites detected were significantly different in isolated replication complex membranes. Furthermore, we demonstrate that intracellular lipid redistribution induced by the inhibition of fatty acid synthase, the rate-limiting enzyme in lipid biosynthesis, is sufficient for cell survival but is inhibitory to dengue virus replication. Lipids that have the capacity to destabilize and change the curvature of membranes as well as lipids that change the permeability of membranes are enriched in dengue virus infected cells. Several sphingolipids and other bioactive signaling molecules that are involved in controlling membrane fusion, fission, and trafficking as well as molecules that influence cytoskeletal reorganization are also up regulated during dengue infection. These observations shed light on the emerging role of lipids in shaping the membrane and protein environments during viral infections and suggest membrane-organizing principles that may influence virus-induced intracellular membrane architecture.

  18. Assessment of immunological changes in Epstein-Barr virus co-infection in Egyptian chronic HCV patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sahar Shoman

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Epstein-Barr virus (EBV plays a major role in liver pathology. Similar to other members of the herpesvirus family, EBV establishes a persistent infection in more than 90% of adults. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of EBV and chronic hepatitis C co-infection (HCV on biochemical and immunological responses in patients. The study was conducted in 62 patients and 33 apparently healthy controls. Patients were divided into three groups: group I, consisting of 31 patients with chronic hepatitis C infection (CHC, group II, consisting of eight patients with EBV infection and without HCV infection and group III, consisting of 23 patients with EBV and chronic HCV. The percentage of CD3+ cells, helper CD4+ cells and CD19+ B-cells was measured by flow cytometry. Human interferon-γ (IFN-γ and interleukin (IL-15 levels were measured by an ELISA. The levels of liver alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase enzymes were higher in EBV/HCV patients compared to that in EBV and HCV mono-infected patients. EBV/HCV patients had significantly reduced percentages of CD3+ and CD4+ cells compared to EBV patients. Serum IFN-γ levels were significantly reduced in EBV/HCV patients (3.86 pg/mL compared to CHC patients (6.76 pg/mL and normal controls (4.69 pg/mL. A significant increase in serum IL-15 levels was observed in EBV/HCV patients (67.7 pg/mL compared to EBV patients (29.3 pg/mL. Taken together, these observations suggest that HCV and EBV co-infection can potentiate immune response dampening in patients.

  19. Metabolic Manifestations and Complications Associated With Chronic Hepatitis C Virus Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Robert J; Gish, Robert G

    2016-05-01

    Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is associated with many extrahepatic manifestations that contribute to morbidity and mortality. It is especially important to be aware of metabolic manifestations and serious complications that affect other organs and cancer risks. Chronic HCV infection itself contributes to de novo development of insulin resistance and hepatic steatosis, both of which increase the risk of cardiovascular diseases. Through these metabolic pathways (as well as through other hypothesized mechanisms that involve lipid metabolism, systemic inflammatory signals, and endothelial dysfunction), chronic HCV infection also contributes to significant systemic cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. While chronic HCV infection contributes to incident development of metabolic complications, the presence of concurrent metabolic diseases also contributes to disease progression, such as higher risks of hepatocellular carcinoma and progression to advanced fibrosis, among patients with chronic HCV infection. The implications of these observations are particularly important given the rising prevalence of obesity and metabolic syndrome in the United States and worldwide. Furthermore, concurrent nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, either as a result of underlying metabolic syndrome or as a direct result of HCV-induced fatty liver disease, further complicates the management of chronic HCV-infected patients. Greater awareness is needed toward the systemic manifestations of chronic HCV infection, with focused attention on the associated metabolic manifestations and complications. Successful treatment and cure of chronic HCV infection with the currently available, highly effective antiviral therapies will significantly improve long-term outcomes among these patients. It is also important to recognize and address the associated metabolic manifestations and complications to reduce cardiovascular-related morbidity and mortality.

  20. Anti-hepatitis C virus T-cell immunity in the context of multiple exposures to the virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katja Pfafferott

    Full Text Available Characterisation of Hepatitis C virus (HCV-specific CD8+ T-cell responses in the context of multiple HCV exposures is critical to identify broadly protective immune responses necessary for an effective HCV vaccine against the different HCV genotypes. However, host and viral genetic diversity complicates vaccine development. To compensate for the observed variation in circulating autologous viruses and host molecules that restrict antigen presentation (human leucocyte antigens; HLA, this study used a reverse genomics approach that identified sites of viral adaptation to HLA-restricted T-cell immune pressure to predict genotype-specific HCV CD8+ T-cell targets. Peptides representing these putative HCV CD8+ T-cell targets, and their adapted form, were used in individualised IFN-γ ELISpot assays to screen for HCV-specific T-cell responses in 133 HCV-seropositive subjects with high-risk of multiple HCV exposures. The data obtained from this study i confirmed that genetic studies of viral evolution is an effective approach to detect novel in vivo HCV T-cell targets, ii showed that HCV-specific T-cell epitopes can be recognised in their adapted form and would not have been detected using wild-type peptides and iii showed that HCV-specific T-cell (but not antibody responses against alternate genotypes in chronic HCV-infected subjects are readily found, implying clearance of previous alternate genotype infection. In summary, HCV adaptation to HLA Class I-restricted T-cell responses plays a central role in anti-HCV immunity and multiple HCV genotype exposure is highly prevalent in at-risk exposure populations, which are important considerations for future vaccine design.

  1. RNA-seq based transcriptome analysis of hepatitis E virus (HEV) and hepatitis B virus (HBV) replicon transfected Huh-7 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagya, Neetu; Varma, Satya Pavan Kumar; Thakral, Deepshi; Joshi, Prashant; Durgapal, Hemlata; Panda, Subrat Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Pathogenesis of hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis E virus (HEV) infection is as varied as they appear similar; while HBV causes an acute and/or chronic liver disease and hepatocellular carcinoma, HEV mostly causes an acute self-limiting disease. In both infections, host responses are crucial in disease establishment and/or virus clearance. In the wake of worsening prognosis described during HEV super-infection over chronic HBV hepatitis, we investigated the host responses by studying alterations in gene expression in liver cells (Huh-7 cell line) by transfection with HEV replicon only (HEV-only), HBV replicon only (HBV-only) and both HBV and HEV replicons (HBV+HEV). Virus replication was validated by strand-specific real-time RT-PCR for HEV and HBsAg ELISA of the culture supernatants for HBV. Indirect immunofluorescence for the respective viral proteins confirmed infection. Transcription profiling was carried out by RNA Sequencing (RNA-Seq) analysis of the poly-A enriched RNA from the transfected cells. Averages of 600 million bases within 5.6 million reads were sequenced in each sample and ∼15,800 genes were mapped with at least one or more reads. A total of 461 genes in HBV+HEV, 408 in HBV-only and 306 in HEV-only groups were differentially expressed as compared to mock transfection control by two folds (preplicon transfected RNA-Seq based transcriptome analysis to understand the host responses against HEV and HBV.

  2. Analyses of prognostic indices of chronic liver failure caused by hepatitis virus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Mao Li; Lin Ma; Yue-Bo Yang; Zhong-Jie Shi; Shui-Sheng Zhou

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To analyze the related indices about the prognosesof chronic liver failure caused by hepatitis virus.METHODS: Retrospectively reviewed 320 cases of chronic liver failure caused by hepatitis viruses. An improved group and an ineffective group (IG) were made to compare and analyze their clinical manifestations, laboratory examination indices and complications. Logistic regression was also carried out. RESULTS: There were significant differences (P<0.05) between the improved group and the IG upon such indices as age, bilirubin, prothrombin time, albumin, alpha fetoprotein, the size of liver and complications (P<0.05). The regression formula was as follows: P = 1/(1+e-y)(y= 1.7262-0.0948X1+2.9846X2+0.6992X3+ 1.6019X4+2.0398X5). (Note: X1-Prothrombin activity; X2-digestive tract hemorrhage; X3-hepatic encephalopathy; X4-hepatorenal syndrome; X5-pulmonary infection.).CONCLUSION: Laboratory examination such as bilirubin, prothrombin time and alpha fetoprotein can be regarded as indices of the prognoses of chronic liver failure caused by hepatitis. Moreover, the regression equation can evaluate prognoses more comprehensively and direct our treatments.

  3. Prevalence of feline calicivirus, feline leukaemia virus and antibodies to FIV in cats with chronic stomatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowles, J O; Gaskell, R M; Gaskell, C J; Harvey, C E; Lutz, H

    1989-04-01

    The prevalence of feline calicivirus (FCV), feline leukaemia virus (FeLV) and feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) antibodies were assessed in 78 British and 18 North American household cats with chronic stomatitis and in appropriate controls. In British cats, FCV was significantly (P less than 0.005) more prevalent in both hospital (92 per cent) and general practice (79 per cent) cases compared to their controls (19 per cent in both cases). A similar difference in prevalence of FCV was noted in North American cats where 50 per cent of cases were positive compared to 0 per cent of controls (P less than 0.01). FeLV prevalence was low in all chronic stomatitis populations. A significantly higher prevalence of antibody to FIV was found in British hospital cases (81 per cent) compared with time-matched controls (16 per cent) (P less than 0.001): a similar rate was found in the general practice cases (75 per cent) for which no controls were available. In the North American sample, FIV antibody status was similar in cases (54 per cent positive) and their age, sex and breed matched controls (50 per cent). The possible role of FCV and FIV in the pathogenesis of feline chronic stomatitis is discussed.

  4. Hepatitis C virus cell-cell transmission and resistance to direct-acting antiviral agents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xiao, Fei; Fofana, Isabel; Heydmann, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is transmitted between hepatocytes via classical cell entry but also uses direct cell-cell transfer to infect neighboring hepatocytes. Viral cell-cell transmission has been shown to play an important role in viral persistence allowing evasion from neutralizing antibodies......-targeting entry inhibitors (HTEIs) was highly effective in inhibiting viral dissemination of resistant genotype 2 viruses. Combining HTEIs with DAAs prevented antiviral resistance and led to rapid elimination of the virus in cell culture model. In conclusion, our work provides evidence that cell-cell transmission...... plays an important role in dissemination and maintenance of resistant variants in cell culture models. Blocking virus cell-cell transmission prevents emergence of drug resistance in persistent viral infection including resistance to HCV DAAs....

  5. EBI2 overexpression in mice leads to B1 B cell expansion and chronic lymphocytic leukemia-(CLL)-like B cell malignancies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niss Arfelt, Kristine; Barington, Line; Benned-Jensen, Tau

    2017-01-01

    Human and mouse chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) develop from CD5+ B cells that in mice and macaques are known to define the distinct B1a B cell lineage. B1a cells are characterized by lack of germinal center development and the B1a cell population is increased in mice with reduced germinal...... center formation. As a major mediator of follicular B cell migration, the G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) Epstein Barr virus-induced gene 2 (EBI2 or GPR183) directs B cell migration in the lymphoid follicles in response to its endogenous ligands, oxysterols. Thus, upregulation of EBI2 drives the B...... cells towards the extrafollicular area, whereas downregulation is essential for germinal center formation. We therefore speculated whether increased expression of EBI2 would lead to an expanded B1 cell subset and, ultimately, progression to chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Here we demonstrate that B cell...

  6. Epidemiology of viruses causing chronic hepatitis among populations from the Amazon Basin and related ecosystems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Echevarría José M.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available On the last twenty years, viral hepatitis has emerged as a serious problem in almost all the Amerindian communities studied in the Amazon Basin and in other Amazon-related ecological systems from the North and Center of South America. Studies performed on communities from Bolivia, Brazil, Colombia, Peru and Venezuela have shown a high endemicity of the hepatitis B virus (HBV infection all over the region, which is frequently associated to a high prevalence of infection by hepatitis D virus among the chronic HBV carriers. Circulation of both agents responds mainly to horizontal virus transmission during childhood through mechanisms that are not fully understood. By contrast, infection by hepatitis C virus (HCV, which is present in all the urban areas of South America, is still very uncommon among them. At the moment, there is not data enough to evaluate properly the true incidence that such endemicity may have on the health of the populations affected. Since viral transmission might be operated by mechanisms that could not be acting in other areas of the World, it seems essential to investigate such mechanisms and to prevent the introduction of HCV into these populations, which consequences for health could be very serious.

  7. Understanding and altering cell tropism of vesicular stomatitis virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hastie, Eric; Cataldi, Marcela; Marriott, Ian; Grdzelishvili, Valery Z.

    2013-01-01

    Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) is a prototypic nonsegmented negative-strand RNA virus. VSV’s broad cell tropism makes it a popular model virus for many basic research applications. In addition, a lack of preexisting human immunity against VSV, inherent oncotropism and other features make VSV a widely used platform for vaccine and oncolytic vectors. However, VSV’s neurotropism that can result in viral encephalitis in experimental animals needs to be addressed for the use of the virus as a safe vector. Therefore, it is very important to understand the determinants of VSV tropism and develop strategies to alter it. VSV glycoprotein (G) and matrix (M) protein play major roles in its cell tropism. VSV G protein is responsible for VSV broad cell tropism and is often used for pseudotyping other viruses. VSV M affects cell tropism via evasion of antiviral responses, and M mutants can be used to limit cell tropism to cell types defective in interferon signaling. In addition, other VSV proteins and host proteins may function as determinants of VSV cell tropism. Various approaches have been successfully used to alter VSV tropism to benefit basic research and clinically relevant applications. PMID:23796410

  8. Prevalence of rheumatologic manifestations of chronic hepatitis C virus infection among Egyptians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Reem Hamdy Abdellatif; ElMakhzangy, Hesham Ibrahim; Gamal, Amira; Mekky, Fatma; El Kassas, Mohammed; Mohammed, Nabil; Abdel Hamid, Mohammed; Esmat, Gamal

    2010-12-01

    Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) viremia has been known to provoke a plethora of autoimmune syndromes referred to as extrahepatic manifestations of chronic HCV infection. Aim of the current study was to assess the prevalence of rheumatologic manifestations among Egyptians with hepatitis C infection and its' association with cryoglobulin profile. The current research represents a cross-sectional study where patients with chronic HCV infection attending the outpatient clinic of the National Hepatology and Tropical Medicine Research Institute over a period of 1 year were interviewed. Patients with decompensated liver disease, on interferon therapy, having end-stage renal disease or coexisting viral infection like hepatitis B surface antibody positive patients were all excluded from the research. Laboratory investigations as well as serological assay including cryoglobulin profile, rheumatoid factor, antinuclear antibody, HCV-PCR were performed. Three hundred and six patients having chronic HCV infection were interviewed in this research. The overall estimated prevalence of rheumatologic manifestations in the current research was 16.39%, chronic fatigue syndrome 9.5%, sicca symptoms 8.8%, arthralgia 6.5%, fibromyalgia 1.9%, myalgia 1.3%, arthritis 0.7%, cryoglobulinemic vasculitis 0.7%, autoimmune hemolytic anemia 0.7%, thrombocytopenia 0.7%. Xerophthalmia was significantly present in male population (p = 0.04), whereas fibromyalgia, cryoglobulinemic vasculitis, arthritis, and autoimmune hemolytic anemia were significantly present in female population under study (p chronic HCV genotype 4 infection, the prevalence of rheumatologic manifestations was 16.3% with chronic fatigue syndrome and sicca symptoms being the most common with no significant correlation to the degree of elevation of liver disease or viral load.

  9. Effect of monensin on Mayaro virus replication in monkey kidney and Aedes albopictus cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Campos, R M; Ferreira, D F; Da Veiga, V F; Rebello, M A; Rebello, M C S

    2003-01-01

    The effect of a cationic ionophore, monensin, on the replication of Mayaro virus in monkey kidney TC7 and Aedes albopictus cells has been studied. Treatment of these cells with 1 micromol/l monensin during infection did not affect the virus protein synthesis but inhibited severely the virus replication. Electron microscopy of the cells infected with Mayaro virus and treated with monensin revealed that the morphogenesis of Mayaro virus was impaired in TC7 but not in A. albopictus cells.

  10. CHRONIC HEPATITIS B VIRUS INFECTION IN PREGNANCY: STRATEGIES OF ANTIVIRAL THERAPY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. O. Bogomolov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Treatment of chronic hepatitis B during pregnancy is an extremely complicated issue. Despite  implementation of immune prophylaxis, a significant proportion of babies born by mothers with  high viral load are infected by hepatitis B virus.  Cumulative data suggest that antiviral therapy in  the 3  trimester of pregnancy is an effective intervention in the event of unsuccessful immune prord phylaxis. To minimize fetal effects of nucleoside  and nucleotide analogues, antiviral therapy during  pregnancy should be administered to mothers with high risk of disease progression and/or uncontrolled hepatitis B virus infection. The safety  data obtained indicate that telbivudine and tenofovir can be used during pregnancy. Nevertheless,  antiviral therapy requires a  thorough assessment of the risk to benefit ratio.

  11. Comparative studies in Rous sarcoma with virus, tumor cells, and chick embryo cells transformed in vitro by virus. II. Response of normal and immunized chicks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DOUGHERTY, R M; MORGAN, H R

    1962-01-01

    Chick embryo fibroblasts infected in vitro with Rous sarcoma virus have properties similar to tumor cells when injected into virus-immune chickens. When such virus-transformed fibroblasts are injected into normal chickens, they apparently participate in the production of tumors independent of their release of virus and are thus apparently malignant in vivo.

  12. Chronic Inflammation and  T Cells

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    Nathan S Fay

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The epithelial tissues of the skin, lungs, reproductive tract, and intestines are the largest physical barriers the body has to protect against infection. Epithelial tissues are woven with a matrix of immune cells programmed to mobilize the host innate and adaptive immune responses. Included among these immune cells are  T cells that are unique in their TCR usage, location, and functions in the body. Stress reception by  T cells as a result of traumatic epithelial injury, malignancy, and/or infection induces  T cell activation. Once activated,  T cells function to repair tissue, induce inflammation, recruit leukocytes, and lyse cells. Many of these functions are mediated via the production of cytokines and growth factors upon  T cell activation. Pathogenesis of many chronic inflammatory diseases involve  T cells; some of which are exacerbated by their presence, while others are improved.  T cells require a delicate balance between their need for acute inflammatory mediators to function normally and the detrimental impact imparted by chronic inflammation. This review will focus on the recent progress made in understanding how epithelial  T cells influence the pathogenesis of chronic inflammatory diseases and how a balance between acute and chronic inflammation impacts  T cell function. Future studies will be important to understand how this balance is achieved.

  13. Hepatitis C virus infection among chronic dialysis patients in the south of France: a collaborative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dussol, B; Berthezène, P; Brunet, P; Roubicek, C; Berland, Y

    1995-03-01

    During the last quarter of 1992, 984 patients from 13 dialysis centers in the Provence-Alpes-Côte-d'Azur region in France participated in a multicenter cross-sectional study to determine the prevalence, the risk factors, and the clinical consequences of infection by the hepatitis C virus (HCV). Serum samples were tested for anti-HCV antibodies using second-generation enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). In the case of a positive result, a combination test was performed using second-generation recombinant immunoblot (RIBA) or direct detection of HCV-RNA by nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Collected data included the patient's age, gender, cause of the kidney disease, type of dialysis treatment, number of years on dialysis, weekly dialysis time, drug addiction, co-infection with hepatitis B virus and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), number of kidney transplants, number of blood transfusions, and history of acute or chronic hepatitis. Chronic HCV infection was detected in 232 (23.6%) patients, whereas only 71 (7.2%) were infected by HBV. Logistic-regression analysis showed that HCV infection was associated with dialysis over a long period, numerous blood transfusions, female gender, kidney grafts, HBV infection, hemodialysis, and acute as well as chronic hepatitis. Multiple-correspondence analysis confirmed that the contamination was both transfusional and nosocomial. These results underscore the need for a strict compliance with "universal precautions" (Centers for Disease Control [CDC], Atlanta) in dialysis units and raise the question as to whether anti-HCV-positive patients should be isolated.

  14. Cell carriers for oncolytic viruses: Fed Ex for cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willmon, Candice; Harrington, Kevin; Kottke, Timothy; Prestwich, Robin; Melcher, Alan; Vile, Richard

    2009-10-01

    Oncolytic viruses delivered directly into the circulation face many hazards that impede their localization to, and infection of, metastatic tumors. Such barriers to systemic delivery could be overcome if couriers, which confer both protection, and tumor localization, to their viral cargoes, could be found. Several preclincal studies have shown that viruses can be loaded into, or onto, different types of cells without losing the biological activity of either virus or cell carrier. Importantly, such loading can significantly protect the viruses from immune-mediated virus-neutralizing activities, including antiviral antibody. Moreover, an impressive portfolio of cellular vehicles, which have some degree of tropism for tumor cells themselves, or for the biological properties associated with the tumor stroma, is already available. Therefore, it will soon be possible to initiate clinical protocols to test the hypopthesis that cell-mediated delivery can permit efficient shipping of oncolytic viruses from the loading bay (the production laboratory) directly to the tumor in immune-competent patients with metastatic disease.

  15. Reference gene selection for quantitative real-time PCR analysis in virus infected cells: SARS corona virus, Yellow fever virus, Human Herpesvirus-6, Camelpox virus and Cytomegalovirus infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Müller Marcel A

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Ten potential reference genes were compared for their use in experiments investigating cellular mRNA expression of virus infected cells. Human cell lines were infected with Cytomegalovirus, Human Herpesvirus-6, Camelpox virus, SARS coronavirus or Yellow fever virus. The expression levels of these genes and the viral replication were determined by real-time PCR. Genes were ranked by the BestKeeper tool, the GeNorm tool and by criteria we reported previously. Ranking lists of the genes tested were tool dependent. However, over all, β-actin is an unsuitable as reference gene, whereas TATA-Box binding protein and peptidyl-prolyl-isomerase A are stable reference genes for expression studies in virus infected cells.

  16. Dendritic cells: The warriors upfront-turned defunct in chronic hepatitis C infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Meenakshi; Sachdeva; Yogesh; K; Chawla; Sunil; K; Arora

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus(HCV) infection causes tremendousmorbidity and mortality with over 170 million people infected worldwide. HCV gives rise to a sustained, chronic disease in the majority of infected individuals owing to a failure of the host immune system to clear the virus. In general, an adequate immune response is elicited by an efficient antigen presentation by dendritic cells(DCs), the cells that connect innate and adaptive immune system to generate a specific immune response against a pathogen. However, HCV seems to dysregulate the activity of DCs, making them less proficient antigen presenting cells for the optimal stimulation of virusspecific T cells, hence interfering with an optimal antiviral immune response. There are discordant reports on the functional status of DCs in chronic HCV infection(CHC), from no phenotypic or functional defects to abnormal functions of DCs. Furthermore, the molecular mechanisms behind the impairment of DC function are even so not completely elucidated during CHC. Understanding the mechanisms of immune dysfunction would help in devising strategies for better management of the disease at the immunological level and help to predict the prognosis of the disease in the patients receiving antiviral therapy. In this review, we have discussed the outcomes of the interaction of DCs with HCV and the mechanisms of DC impairment during HCV infection with its adverse effects on the immune response in the infected host.

  17. Peginterferon plus ribavirin for chronic hepatitis C in patients with human immunodeficiency virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gluud, Lise Lotte; Marchesini, Emanuela; Iorio, Alfonso

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to assess the effects of peginterferon plus ribavirin for chronic hepatitis C in patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). METHODS: Trials were identified through manual and electronic searches. Randomized trials comparing peginterferon plus ribavirin...... with interferon plus ribavirin, the proportion with a sustained virological response was 26% (109 of 423) for patients with genotype 1 or 4 and 57% (130 of 230) for genotype 2 or 3. Several adverse events occurred, including fatal lactic acidosis and liver failure, but there were no significant differences...

  18. Chronic hepatitis C virus infection and post-liver transplantation diabetes mellitus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yun Ma; Wen-Wei Yan

    2005-01-01

    Patients with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection have a significantly increased prevalence of type 2 diabetes mellitus compared to controls or HBV-infected patients.Moreover, the incidence rate of post-liver transplantation diabetes mellitus (PTDM) also appears to be higher among patients with HCV infection. PTDM is often associated with direct viral infection, autoimmune disorders, and immunosuppressive regimen. Activation of tumor necrosis factor-α may be the link between HCV infection and diabetes. In this article, we reviewed the epidemiologic association between HCV infection and PTDM, highlighting the most recent pathophysiologic insights into the mechanisms underlying this association.

  19. Structure and cell biology of archaeal virus STIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Chi-yu; Johnson, Johnson E

    2012-04-01

    Recent investigations of archaeal viruses have revealed novel features of their structures and life cycles when compared to eukaryotic and bacterial viruses, yet there are structure-based unifying themes suggesting common ancestral relationships among dsDNA viruses in the three kingdoms of life. Sulfolobus solfataricus and the infecting virus Sulfolobus turreted icosahedral virus (STIV) is one of the well-established model systems to study archaeal virus replication and viral-host interactions. Reliable laboratory conditions to propagate STIV and available genetic tools allowed structural characterization of the virus and viral components that lead to the proposal of common capsid ancestry with PRD1 (bacteriophage), Adenovirus (eukaryotic virus) and PBCV (chlorellavirus). Microarray and proteomics approaches systematically analyzed viral replication and the corresponding host responses. Cellular cryo-electron tomography and thin-section EM studies uncovered the assembly and maturation pathway of STIV and revealed dramatic cellular ultra-structure changes upon infection. The viral-induced pyramid-like protrusions on cell surfaces represent a novel viral release mechanism and previously uncharacterized functions in viral replication.

  20. B-cell clonality in the liver of hepatitis C virus-infected patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    He-Bin Fan; You-Fu Zhu; An-Shen Chen; Mu-Xiu Zhou; Fu-Ming Yan; Xiao-Ju Ma; Hao Zhou

    2009-01-01

    AIM: The association of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection with type Ⅱ mixed cryoglobulinemia is well established, but the role of HCV in B-cell lymphoma remains controversial. In patients with HCV infection, B-cell clonal expansions have been detected in peripheral blood and bone marrow, and a high been documented. Liver biopsies in chronic HCV infection frequently show portal lymphoid infiltrates with features of B follicles, whose clonality has not yet been investigated. The object of this study was to determine the frequency of liver-infiltrating monoclonal B-cells in 40 patients with HCV infection. METHODS: Eight hundred and forty-eight patients were studied prospectively, including 40 HCV-positive patients and 808 patients with chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. Immunohistochemical study for B- and T-cell markers was performed on the paraffin-embedded liver tissue sections. The clonality of lymphoid B-cells was tested using a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) approach designed to identify immunoglobulin heavy chain gene ( IgH) rearrangements. RESULTS: Liver-infiltrating monoclonal B-cells were detected in the liver for 4 (10%) of 40 HCV-positive patients but were present in only 3 (0.37%) of 808 liver biopsy specimens with chronic HBV infection. Chi-square testing showed that the monoclonal B-cells infiltration in the liver was more frequent in the HCV-infected patients ( P = 0.000). A clonal IgH rearrangement was detected in 5 (71.4%) of 7 liver biopsy specimens with monoclonal B-cells infiltration. In 2 of 5 patients with both a clonal B-cell expansion and monoclonal B-cells infiltration in the liver, a definite B-cell malignancy was finally diagnosed. CONCLUSION: Liver-infiltrating monoclonal B-cells are detected in the liver of patients with chronic HCV and HBV infection. A high percentage of patients with monoclonal B-cells infiltration and B-cell clonality in the liver were finally diagnosed as having a definite B-cell malignancy.

  1. Apoptosis in Raji cell line induced by influenza A virus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李虹; 肖丽英; 李华林; 李婉宜; 蒋中华; 张林; 李明远

    2003-01-01

    Objective To study the apoptotic effects of influenza A virus on the Raji cell line. Methods Cultured Raji cells were infected with influenza A virus at a multiplicity of infection (m.o.i) of 20 and the effects of apoptosis were detected at different time points post infection using the following methods: electron microscope, DNA agarose gel electrophoresis, PI stained flow cytometry (FCM) and Annexin-V FITC/PI stained FCM.Results Raji cells infected with influenza A virus showed changes of morphology apoptotis, DNA agarose electrophoresis also demonstrated a ladder-like pattern of DNA fragments in a time-dependent manner. PI stained FCM showed "apoptosis peak" and FITC/PI stained FCM showed apoptotic cells. Quantitative analysis indicated that the percentage of apoptotic Raji cells increased after infection, and cycloheximide (CHX), an eukaryotic transcription inhibitor, could effectively inhibit the apoptotic effects of influenza A virus in vitro.Conclusions Influenza A virus can induce apoptosis in Raji cell line suggesting that it may lead to a potential method for tumor therapy.

  2. Global Dynamics of a Virus Dynamical Model with Cell-to-Cell Transmission and Cure Rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tongqian Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The cure effect of a virus model with both cell-to-cell transmission and cell-to-virus transmission is studied. By the method of next generation matrix, the basic reproduction number is obtained. The locally asymptotic stability of the virus-free equilibrium and the endemic equilibrium is considered by investigating the characteristic equation of the model. The globally asymptotic stability of the virus-free equilibrium is proved by constructing suitable Lyapunov function, and the sufficient condition for the globally asymptotic stability of the endemic equilibrium is obtained by constructing suitable Lyapunov function and using LaSalle invariance principal.

  3. [Clinical outcomes of superinfections with primary hepatotropic viruses in patients with chronic hepatitis B or C].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bura, Maciej; Mozer-Lisewska, Iwona

    2014-02-01

    Chronic hepatitis B and C are among most important problems in contemporary hepatology. Natural history of the disease can be changed as a result of superinfection with other primary hepatotropic viruses. Clinical consequences of such events are uncommon subjects of clinical reports. Acute viral hepatitis occurring in HBV- or HCV-infected patients can result in severe exacerbation of liver disease, including acute liver failure; sometimes progression of liver disease toward liver cirrhosis is observed; HBV and/or HCV clearance is also possible. Because of potentially severe outcomes of superinfections, prevention of such events based on vaccinations and education about the risk related with additional infections should be implemented in the management of patients with chronic viral hepatitis B and C.

  4. Autoantibodies in patients with chronic hepatitis C virus infection: pitfalls for the diagnosis of rheumatic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palazzi, Carlo; Buskila, Dan; D'Angelo, Salvatore; D'Amico, Emilio; Olivieri, Ignazio

    2012-07-01

    Hepatitis C virus infection (HCV) is one of the best mimes in medicine. About 40-70% of patients suffering from this disorder develop at least one extra-hepatic disorder that can have a rheumatic nature (arthralgias, arthritis, vasculitis and sicca syndrome) and must be differentiated from the primitive rheumatic diseases. In addition, HCV infection can also alter the laboratory tests. Several alterations of first line laboratory tests can be usually found in both chronic HCV infection and chronic inflammatory rheumatic disorders. In the present review we analyze the interference of HCV in tests more specifically used in rheumatology: rheumatoid factor and other autoantibodies (ANA, anti-ENA, ANCA, anti-DNA, antiphospholipid, anti-CCP). In patients suffering from HCV infection, the diagnosis of connective tissue diseases (CTD) or rheumatoid arthritis (RA) should be made only when the detected symptoms or laboratory data are not inducible by HCV, otherwise only a diagnosis of "possible CTD" or "possible RA" should be considered.

  5. Role of viruses in oral squamous cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rashmi Metgud

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The etiology of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC is complex and involves many factors. The most clearly defined risk factors are smoking and alcohol, which substantially increase the risk of oral SCC. However, despite this clear association, a substantial proportion of patients develop OSCC without exposure to them, emphasizing the role of other risk factors such as genetic susceptibility and oncogenic viruses. Some viruses are strongly associated with OSCC while the association of others is less frequent and may depend on co-factors for their carcinogenic effects. Therefore, the exact role of viruses must be evaluated with care in order to improve the diagnosis and treatment of OSCC.

  6. Negative regulation of type I IFN expression by OASL1 permits chronic viral infection and CD8⁺ T-cell exhaustion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myeong Sup Lee

    Full Text Available The type I interferons (IFN-Is are critical not only in early viral control but also in prolonged T-cell immune responses. However, chronic viral infections such as those of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV and hepatitis C virus (HCV in humans and lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV in mice overcome this early IFN-I barrier and induce viral persistence and exhaustion of T-cell function. Although various T-cell-intrinsic and -extrinsic factors are known to contribute to induction of chronic conditions, the roles of IFN-I negative regulators in chronic viral infections have been largely unexplored. Herein, we explored whether 2'-5' oligoadenylate synthetase-like 1 (OASL1, a recently defined IFN-I negative regulator, plays a key role in the virus-specific T-cell response and viral defense against chronic LCMV. To this end, we infected Oasl1 knockout and wild-type mice with LCMV CL-13 (a chronic virus and monitored T-cell responses, serum cytokine levels, and viral titers. LCMV CL-13-infected Oasl1 KO mice displayed a sustained level of serum IFN-I, which was primarily produced by splenic plasmacytoid dendritic cells, during the very early phase of infection (2-3 days post-infection. Oasl1 deficiency also led to the accelerated elimination of viremia and induction of a functional antiviral CD8 T-cell response, which critically depended on IFN-I receptor signaling. Together, these results demonstrate that OASL1-mediated negative regulation of IFN-I production at an early phase of infection permits viral persistence and suppresses T-cell function, suggesting that IFN-I negative regulators, including OASL1, could be exciting new targets for preventing chronic viral infection.

  7. Inhibition of Bim enhances replication of varicella-zoster virus and delays plaque formation in virus-infected cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xueqiao; Cohen, Jeffrey I

    2014-01-01

    Programmed cell death (apoptosis) is an important host defense mechanism against intracellular pathogens, such as viruses. Accordingly, viruses have evolved multiple mechanisms to modulate apoptosis to enhance replication. Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) induces apoptosis in human fibroblasts and melanoma cells. We found that VZV triggered the phosphorylation of the proapoptotic proteins Bim and BAD but had little or no effect on other Bcl-2 family members. Since phosphorylation of Bim and BAD reduces their proapoptotic activity, this may prevent or delay apoptosis in VZV-infected cells. Phosphorylation of Bim but not BAD in VZV-infected cells was dependent on activation of the MEK/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathway. Cells knocked down for Bim showed delayed VZV plaque formation, resulting in longer survival of VZV-infected cells and increased replication of virus, compared with wild-type cells infected with virus. Conversely, overexpression of Bim resulted in earlier plaque formation, smaller plaques, reduced virus replication, and increased caspase 3 activity. Inhibition of caspase activity in VZV-infected cells overexpressing Bim restored levels of virus production similar to those seen with virus-infected wild-type cells. Previously we showed that VZV ORF12 activates ERK and inhibits apoptosis in virus-infected cells. Here we found that VZV ORF12 contributes to Bim and BAD phosphorylation. In summary, VZV triggers Bim phosphorylation; reduction of Bim levels results in longer survival of VZV-infected cells and increased VZV replication.

  8. Persistent Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Infection Causes Ultimate Depletion of Follicular Th Cells in AIDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Huanbin; Wang, Xiaolei; Malam, Naomi; Lackner, Andrew A; Veazey, Ronald S

    2015-11-01

    CD4(+) T follicular helper (Tfh) cells are critical for the generation of humoral immune responses to pathogenic infections, providing help for B cell development, survival, and affinity maturation of Abs. Although CD4(+) Tfh cells are reported to accumulate in HIV or SIV infection, we found that germinal center Tfh cells, defined in this study as CXCR5(+)PD-1(HIGH)CD4(+) T cells, did not consistently accumulate in chronically SIV-infected rhesus macaques compared with those infected with less pathogenic simian HIV, vaccinated and SIVmac-challenged, or SIVmac-infected Mamu-A*01(+) macaques, all of which are associated with some control of virus replication and slower disease progression. Interestingly, CXCR5(+)PD-1(HIGH) Tfh cells in lymphoid tissues were eventually depleted in macaques with AIDS compared with the other cohorts. Chronic activation and proliferation of CXCR5(+)PD-1(HIGH) Tfh were increased, but PD-L2 expression was downregulated on B cells, possibly resulting in germinal center Tfh cell apoptosis. Together, these findings suggest that changes in CXCR5(+)PD-1(HIGH) Tfh cells in lymph nodes correlate with immune control during infection, and their loss or dysregulation contribute to impairment of B cell responses and progression to AIDS.

  9. Natural Killer Cells in the Orchestration of Chronic Inflammatory Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Parisi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Inflammation, altered immune cell phenotype, and functions are key features shared by diverse chronic diseases, including cardiovascular, neurodegenerative diseases, diabetes, metabolic syndrome, and cancer. Natural killer cells are innate lymphoid cells primarily involved in the immune system response to non-self-components but their plasticity is largely influenced by the pathological microenvironment. Altered NK phenotype and function have been reported in several pathological conditions, basically related to impaired or enhanced toxicity. Here we reviewed and discussed the role of NKs in selected, different, and “distant” chronic diseases, cancer, diabetes, periodontitis, and atherosclerosis, placing NK cells as crucial orchestrator of these pathologic conditions.

  10. Natural Killer Cells in the Orchestration of Chronic Inflammatory Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassani, Barbara; Tremolati, Marco; Gini, Elisabetta; Farronato, Giampietro; Bruno, Antonino

    2017-01-01

    Inflammation, altered immune cell phenotype, and functions are key features shared by diverse chronic diseases, including cardiovascular, neurodegenerative diseases, diabetes, metabolic syndrome, and cancer. Natural killer cells are innate lymphoid cells primarily involved in the immune system response to non-self-components but their plasticity is largely influenced by the pathological microenvironment. Altered NK phenotype and function have been reported in several pathological conditions, basically related to impaired or enhanced toxicity. Here we reviewed and discussed the role of NKs in selected, different, and “distant” chronic diseases, cancer, diabetes, periodontitis, and atherosclerosis, placing NK cells as crucial orchestrator of these pathologic conditions. PMID:28428965

  11. Chikungunya virus isolation using simplified cell culture technique in Mauritius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyndiah, M N; Pursem, V; Meetoo, G; Daby, S; Ramuth, V; Bhinkah, P; Chuttoo, R; Paratian, U

    2012-03-01

    During the chikungunya outbreak of 2005 - 2006, the only laboratory facilities available in Mauritius were virus isolation in cell culture tubes and serology. The laboratory was submerged with large numbers of blood samples. Comparative isolation was made in human embryonic lung (HEL) and VERO cells grown in 96-well plate. Culture on HEL cells was found to be more sensitive and presence of cytopathic effect (CPE) was observed earlier than in VERO cells. Out of the 18 300 blood samples inoculated on HEL, 11 165 were positive. This virus isolation method was of great help for the surveillance and control of the vectors. In cases of an outbreak a cheap, rapid and simple method of isolating chikungunya virus is described.

  12. Detecting RNA viruses in living mammalian cells by fluorescence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivaraman, Divya; Biswas, Payal; Cella, Lakshmi N; Yates, Marylynn V; Chen, Wilfred

    2011-07-01

    Traditional methods that rely on viral isolation and culture techniques continue to be the gold standards used for detection of infectious viral particles. However, new techniques that rely on visualization of live cells can shed light on understanding virus-host interaction for early stage detection and potential drug discovery. Live-cell imaging techniques that incorporate fluorescent probes into viral components provide opportunities for understanding mRNA expression, interaction, and virus movement and localization. Other viral replication events inside a host cell can be exploited for non-invasive detection, such as single-virus tracking, which does not inhibit viral infectivity or cellular function. This review highlights some of the recent advances made using these novel approaches for visualization of viral entry and replication in live cells. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Cell killing by Simian virus 40: protective effect of chloroquine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norkin, L C; Einck, K H

    1978-12-01

    Treatment of CV-1 cells with chloroquine before infection by simian virus 40 resulted in the accumulation of fewer nonviable, trypan blue-stainable cells at 72 h. The drug did not affect the fraction of infected T-antigen-producing cells or the viral yields. It did diminish the apparent redistribution of lysosomal N-acetyl-beta-glucosaminidase from a particulate to a soluble cell fraction, and it caused an increase in the size and number of lysosomes.

  14. Lipoprotein lipase inhibits hepatitis C virus (HCV infection by blocking virus cell entry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Maillard

    Full Text Available A distinctive feature of HCV is that its life cycle depends on lipoprotein metabolism. Viral morphogenesis and secretion follow the very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL biogenesis pathway and, consequently, infectious HCV in the serum is associated with triglyceride-rich lipoproteins (TRL. Lipoprotein lipase (LPL hydrolyzes TRL within chylomicrons and VLDL but, independently of its catalytic activity, it has a bridging activity, mediating the hepatic uptake of chylomicrons and VLDL remnants. We previously showed that exogenously added LPL increases HCV binding to hepatoma cells by acting as a bridge between virus-associated lipoproteins and cell surface heparan sulfate, while simultaneously decreasing infection levels. We show here that LPL efficiently inhibits cell infection with two HCV strains produced in hepatoma cells or in primary human hepatocytes transplanted into uPA-SCID mice with fully functional human ApoB-lipoprotein profiles. Viruses produced in vitro or in vivo were separated on iodixanol gradients into low and higher density populations, and the infection of Huh 7.5 cells by both virus populations was inhibited by LPL. The effect of LPL depended on its enzymatic activity. However, the lipase inhibitor tetrahydrolipstatin restored only a minor part of HCV infectivity, suggesting an important role of the LPL bridging function in the inhibition of infection. We followed HCV cell entry by immunoelectron microscopy with anti-envelope and anti-core antibodies. These analyses demonstrated the internalization of virus particles into hepatoma cells and their presence in intracellular vesicles and associated with lipid droplets. In the presence of LPL, HCV was retained at the cell surface. We conclude that LPL efficiently inhibits HCV infection by acting on TRL associated with HCV particles through mechanisms involving its lipolytic function, but mostly its bridging function. These mechanisms lead to immobilization of the virus at the cell

  15. The impact of hepatitis viruses on chronic lymphoproliferative disorders; preliminary results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciufu, C; Neagu, AM; Onisai, M; Bumbea, H; Ciufu, C; Vintilescu, AM; Dobrea, C; Arama, V; Mihailescu, R; Arama, S

    2010-01-01

    ,5%) with non–aggressive type of CLD. The clinical parameters monitored were: B signs were present in 19/41 (43,34%) patients, the superficial or profound adenopathies –were found in 29/41 (70,73%) patients, hepatomegaly – in 38/41 (92,68%) patients, splenomegaly – in 21/41 (51,21%) patients, extra–nodal involvements in 10/41 (24,39%) patients and most frequent in the non–aggressive type of CLD – 6/10 (60%) patients. The hematological and biochemical parameters were: the presence of anemia and thrombocytopenia – found in a small number of patients; lymphocytosis – positive in 33/41 (80,48%) patients, most with HCV infection and non–aggressive type of disease, the presence of autoimmune hemolytic anemia – in 4/41 (9,75%) patients, cryoglobulins – 8/41 (19,51%) patients, all with HCV infection; also the liver function was monitored. Antiviral therapy was administered to 12/41 (29,26%) patients – Lamivudine to 8/41 (19,51%) patients and Ribavirine/Interferon to 4/41 (9,75%) patients. Chemotherapy was given in 32/41 (78%) patients. Monoclonal antibodies anti CD20 (Rituximab) therapy was associated in 6/41 (14,63%) patients. Conclusions. A high incidence in female sex of over 50 years old was noticed. A strong association between B–cell chronic lymphoproliferative disorders and hepatitis viral infection B, C, D was revealed, the most frequent being the C hepatitis virus, associated with the non–aggressive type of CLD, extra–nodal involvement, splenomegaly, lymphocytosis, cryoglobulins, cytolysis and colestasis. The clinical and biological disease history will be monitored during chemotherapy and antiviral treatment. PMID:20945824

  16. Stem cells and chronic wound healing: state of the art

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leavitt T

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Tripp Leavitt, Michael S Hu, Clement D Marshall, Leandra A Barnes, Michael T Longaker, H Peter Lorenz Hagey Laboratory for Pediatric Regenerative Medicine, Division of Plastic Surgery, Department of Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USA Abstract: Currently available treatments for chronic wounds are inadequate. A clearly effective therapy does not exist, and treatment is often supportive. This is largely because the cellular and molecular processes underlying failure of wound repair are still poorly understood. With an increase in comorbidities, such as diabetes and vascular disease, as well as an aging population, the incidence of these intractable wounds is expected to rise. As such, chronic wounds, which are already costly, are rapidly growing as a tremendous burden to the health-care system. Stem cells have garnered much interest as a therapy for chronic wounds due to their inherent ability to differentiate into multiple lineages and promote regeneration. Herein, we discuss the types of stem cells used for chronic wound therapy, as well as the proposed means by which they do so. In particular, we highlight mesenchymal stem cells (including adipose-derived stem cells, endothelial progenitor cells, and induced pluripotent stem cells. We include the results of recent in vitro and in vivo studies in both animal models and human clinical trials. Finally, we discuss the current studies to improve stem cell therapies and the limitations of stem cell-based therapeutics. Stem cells promise improved therapies for healing chronic wounds, but further studies that are well-designed with standardized protocols are necessary for fruition. Keywords: stem cells, chronic wounds, cell therapy, wound healing

  17. [Challenges of lopinavir/ritonavir in the chronicity of human immunodeficiency virus infection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguirrebengoa, Koldo

    2014-11-01

    Combination antiretroviral therapy (ART) has increased patient survival, which is currently similar to that of the general population in western countries. However, ART is unable to completely restore normal health, given the persistence of chronic immune activation. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection has become a chronic disease and 50% of patients will soon be older than 50 years. Currently, there is a debate on the possibility of accelerated aging in the HIV-infected population. An overlap has been observed between chronic inflammation, age-related comorbidities, lifestyle, and the long-term toxicity of ART. ART-related toxicity can encourage the development of comorbidities, especially cardiovascular and renal complications, while toxicity-especially that of thymidine analogs-can also contribute to inflammation and aging. Evidence is available on simplification strategies with boosted protease inhibitor monotherapy aiming to avoid or reduce potential or demonstrated toxicity. Currently, studies are underway of dual therapy strategies with lopinavir/ritonavir (LPV/r) with distinct antiretroviral agents. The studies with the largest samples are those with raltegravir and lamivudine. The GARDEL trial has demonstrated that dual therapy with LPV/r plus a generic drug such as lamivudine is non-inferior to triple therapy in treatment- naïve patients. All of the above indicates the response to the challenge posed to LPV/r by the chronic phase of the disease and by the need to reduce costs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  18. Isolated antibody to hepatitis B core antigen in patients with chronic hepatitis C virus infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ahmed Helmy; Mohammed Ibrahim Al-Sebayel

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the prevalence of isolated anti-HBc in patients with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection,and its relation to disease severity.METHODS: We screened all patients with chronic HCV infection referred to King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Center for hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg), antibody to hepatitis B surface antigen (antiHBs), and anti-HBc. One hundred and sixty nine patients who tested negative for both HBsAg and anti-HBs were included in this study.RESULTS: Pathologically, 59 had biopsy-proven cirrhosis and 110 had chronic active hepatitis (CAH). Of these 169 patients, 85 (50.3%) tested positive for anti-HBc.Patients with CAH had significantly higher prevalence of isolated anti-HBc than patients with cirrhosis, 71 (64.5%)and 14 (23.7%) respectively (P < 0.001). Twenty-five patients were tested for HBV DNA by qualitative PCR.The test was positive in 3 of them (12%; occult HBV infection).CONCLUSION: Isolated anti-HBc alone is common in Saudi patients with chronic HCV infection, and is significantly more common in those with CAH than those with cirrhosis. Therefore, a screening strategy that only tests for HBsAg and anti-HBs in these patients will miss a large number of individuals with isolated anti-HBc, who may be potentially infectious.

  19. Standardized Prevalence Ratios for Chronic Hepatitis C Virus Infection Among Adult Japanese Hemodialysis Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohsawa, Masaki; Kato, Karen; Itai, Kazuyoshi; Tanno, Kozo; Fujishima, Yosuke; Konda, Ryuichiro; Okayama, Akira; Abe, Koichi; Suzuki, Kazuyuki; Nakamura, Motoyuki; Onoda, Toshiyuki; Kawamura, Kazuko; Sakata, Kiyomi; Akiba, Takashi; Fujioka, Tomoaki

    2010-01-01

    Background Many studies have estimated the prevalence of anti-hepatitis C virus (HCV) antibody among hemodialysis (HD) patients; however, the prevalence of HCV core antigen—which indicates the presence of chronic HCV infection—is not known. Methods Standardized prevalence ratios (SPRs) for anti-HCV antibody and HCV core antigen among HD patients (n = 1214) were calculated on the basis of data from the general population (n = 22 472) living in the same area. Results The prevalences of anti-HCV antibody and HCV core antigen were 12.5% and 7.8%, respectively, in male hemodialysis patients, and 8.5% and 4.1% in female hemodialysis patients. The SPRs (95% confidence interval) for anti-HCV antibody and HCV core antigen were 8.39 (6.72–10.1) and 12.9 (9.66–16.1), respectively, in males, and 5.42 (3.67–7.17) and 8.77 (4.72–12.8) in females. Conclusions The prevalences of chronic HCV infection among male and female HD patients were 13-fold and 9-fold, respectively, those of the population-based controls. Further studies should therefore be conducted to determine the extent of chronic HCV infection among HD patients in other populations and to determine whether chronic HCV infection contributes to increased mortality in HD patients. PMID:19881229

  20. Cryoglobulinaemia in Egyptian Patients with Extrahepatic Cutaneous Manifestations of Chronic Hepatitis C Virus Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doaa Salah Hegab

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Hepatitis C is a global major health problem with extremely variable extrahepatic manifestations. Mixed cryoglobulinaemia (MC shows a striking association with hepatitis C virus (HCV infection, and it is sometimes asymptomatic. The skin is a frequently involved target organ in MC. Objective. To investigate the prevalence of cryoglobulinaemia in a sample of Egyptian patients with cutaneous manifestations of chronic HCV infection and to correlate its presence with clinical criteria and liver function tests. Methods. One hundred and eighteen patients with skin manifestations of chronic compensated hepatitis C were included. Venous blood was tested for liver function tests and serum cryoglobulins. Results. Twelve patients (10.169% were positive for serum cryoglobulins (2 with pruritus, 4 with vasculitic lesions, 3 with livedo reticularis, one with oral lichen, one with chronic urticaria, and another with Schamberg’s disease. Vasculitic lesions and livedo reticularis of the legs showed higher prevalence in cryoglobulin-positive than in cryoglobulin-negative patients. Presence of serum cryoglobulins did not relate to patients’ demographic or laboratory findings. Conclusions. Fortunately, MC is not markedly prevalent among Egyptians with cutaneous lesions of chronic hepatitis C, and cryopositivity was commonly, but not exclusively, detected with cutaneous vasculitis and livedo reticularis. Laboratory testing for cryoglobulins in every HCV patient is advisable for earlier MC detection and management.

  1. Cryoglobulinaemia in Egyptian Patients with Extrahepatic Cutaneous Manifestations of Chronic Hepatitis C Virus Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegab, Doaa Salah; Sweilam, Mohammed Abd El Rahman

    2015-01-01

    Background. Hepatitis C is a global major health problem with extremely variable extrahepatic manifestations. Mixed cryoglobulinaemia (MC) shows a striking association with hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, and it is sometimes asymptomatic. The skin is a frequently involved target organ in MC. Objective. To investigate the prevalence of cryoglobulinaemia in a sample of Egyptian patients with cutaneous manifestations of chronic HCV infection and to correlate its presence with clinical criteria and liver function tests. Methods. One hundred and eighteen patients with skin manifestations of chronic compensated hepatitis C were included. Venous blood was tested for liver function tests and serum cryoglobulins. Results. Twelve patients (10.169%) were positive for serum cryoglobulins (2 with pruritus, 4 with vasculitic lesions, 3 with livedo reticularis, one with oral lichen, one with chronic urticaria, and another with Schamberg's disease). Vasculitic lesions and livedo reticularis of the legs showed higher prevalence in cryoglobulin-positive than in cryoglobulin-negative patients. Presence of serum cryoglobulins did not relate to patients' demographic or laboratory findings. Conclusions. Fortunately, MC is not markedly prevalent among Egyptians with cutaneous lesions of chronic hepatitis C, and cryopositivity was commonly, but not exclusively, detected with cutaneous vasculitis and livedo reticularis. Laboratory testing for cryoglobulins in every HCV patient is advisable for earlier MC detection and management.

  2. Estimating the prevalence of chronic hepatitis B virus infection--New York City, 2008.

    Science.gov (United States)

    France, Anne Marie; Bornschlegel, Katherine; Lazaroff, Julie; Kennedy, Joseph; Balter, Sharon

    2012-04-01

    Chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is a preventable cause of liver failure, cirrhosis, and liver cancer; estimated chronic HBV infection prevalence is 0.3-0.5% in the U.S.A. Prevalence in New York City (NYC) is likely higher because foreign-born persons, who represent 36% of NYC's population versus 11% nationwide, bear a disproportionate burden of chronic HBV infection. However, because no comprehensive, population-based survey of chronic HBV infection has been conducted in NYC, a reliable prevalence estimate is unavailable. We used two approaches to estimate chronic HBV infection prevalence in NYC: (1) a census-based estimate, combining local and national prevalence data for specific populations, and (2) a surveillance-based estimate, using data from NYC's Department of Health and Mental Hygiene Hepatitis B Surveillance Registry and adjusting for out-migration and deaths. Results from both the census-based estimate and the surveillance-based estimate were similar, with an estimated prevalence of chronic HBV in NYC of 1.2%. This estimate is two to four times the estimated prevalence for the U.S.A. as a whole. According to the census-based estimate, >93% of all cases in NYC are among persons who are foreign-born, and approximately half of those are among persons born in China. These findings underscore the importance of local data for tailoring programmatic efforts to specific foreign-born populations in NYC. In particular, Chinese-language programs and health education materials are critical. Reliable estimates are important for policymakers in local jurisdictions to better understand their own population's needs and can help target primary care services, prevention materials, and education.

  3. Insulin resistance, steatosis, and fibrosis in Egyptian patients with chronic Hepatitis C virus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahlam M Ahmed

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim: Both nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD and chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV infection are common in Egypt, and their coexistence is expected. There is controversy regarding the influence of NAFLD on chronic HCV disease progression. This study evaluates the effect of NAFLD on the severity of chronic hepatitis C (CHC (necroinflammation and fibrosis and assesses the relative contribution of insulin resistance syndrome to the occurrence of NAFLD in patients with chronic HCV infection. Patients and Methods: Untreated consecutive adults with chronic HCV infection admitted for liver biopsy were included in this study. Before liver biopsy, a questionnaire for risk factors was completed prospectively, and a blood sample was obtained for laboratory analysis. Results: Our study included 92 male patients. Their mean ± SD age and aspartate aminotransferase (AST level were 42 ± 7.7 years (range 20-56 and 68 ± 41.7 U/L (range 16-214, respectively. The mean insulin level and insulin resistance index were 15.6 ± 18.3 mIU/mL (range 5.1-137.4 and 5.9 ± 15.2 (range 0.9-136.2, respectively. Fifty four percent of patients had steatosis and 65% had fibrosis. In multivariate analyses, steatosis was associated with insulin resistance and fibrosis was associated with high AST level, age ≥40 years, and steatosis. Conclusions: Steatosis is a histopathologic feature in >50% of patients with chronic HCV infection. Insulin resistance has an important role in the pathogenesis of steatosis, which represents a significant determinant of fibrosis together with high serum AST level and older age.

  4. Dengue virus inhibits immune responses in Aedes aegypti cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuzhen Sim

    Full Text Available The ability of many viruses to manipulate the host antiviral immune response often results in complex host-pathogen interactions. In order to study the interaction of dengue virus (DENV with the Aedes aegypti immune response, we have characterized the DENV infection-responsive transcriptome of the immune-competent A. aegypti cell line Aag2. As in mosquitoes, DENV infection transcriptionally activated the cell line Toll pathway and a variety of cellular physiological systems. Most notably, however, DENV infection down-regulated the expression levels of numerous immune signaling molecules and antimicrobial peptides (AMPs. Functional assays showed that transcriptional induction of AMPs from the Toll and IMD pathways in response to bacterial challenge is impaired in DENV-infected cells. In addition, Escherichia coli, a gram-negative bacteria species, grew better when co-cultured with DENV-infected cells than with uninfected cells, suggesting a decreased production of AMPs from the IMD pathway in virus-infected cells. Pre-stimulation of the cell line with gram-positive bacteria prior to DENV infection had no effect on DENV titers, while pre-stimulation with gram-negative bacteria resulted in an increase in DENV titers. These results indicate that DENV is capable of actively suppressing immune responses in the cells it infects, a phenomenon that may have important consequences for virus transmission and insect physiology.

  5. Sendai virus utilizes specific sialyloligosaccharides as host cell receptor determinants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markwell, M A; Paulson, J C

    1980-10-01

    Purified sialyltransferases (CMP-N-acetyl-neuraminate:D-galactosyl-glycoprotein N-acetylneuraminyl-transferase, EC 2.4.99.1) in conjunction with neuraminidase (acylneuraminyl hydrolase, EC 3.2.1.18) were used to produce cell surface sialyloligosaccharides of defined sequence to investigate their role in paramyxovirus infection of host cells. Infection of Madin-Darby bovine kidney cells by Sendai virus was monitored by hemagglutination titer of the virus produced and by changes in morphological characteristics. By either criterion, treatment of the cells with Vibrio cholerae neuraminidase to remove cell surface sialic acids rendered them resistant to infection by Sendai virus. Endogenous replacement of receptors by the cell occurred slowly but supported maximal levels of infection within 6 hr. In contrast, sialylation during a 20-min incubation with CMP-sialic acid and beta-galactoside alpha 2,3-sialytransferase restored full susceptibility to infection. This enzyme elaborates the NeuAc alpha 2,3Gal beta 1,3GalNAc (NeuAc, N-acetylneuraminic acid) sequence on glycoproteins and glycolipids. No restoration of infectivity was observed when neuraminidase-treated cells were sialylated by using beta-galactoside alpha 2,6-sialytransferase, which elaborates the NeuAc-alpha 2,6Gal beta 1,4GlcNAc sequence. These results suggest that sialyloligosaccharide receptor determinants of defined sequence are required for Sendai virus infection of host cells.

  6. Vaccination against feline immunodeficiency virus using fixed infected cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horzinek, M.C.; Verschoor, E.J.; Vliet, A.L.W. van; Egberink, H.F.; Hesselink, W.; Alphen, W.E. van; Joosten, I.; Boog, C.J.P.; Ronde, A. de

    1995-01-01

    Crandell feline kidney cells and feline thymocytes, either feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) infected or uninfected, were fixed with paraformaldehyde and used to vaccinate cats. The cells were mixed with a 30:70 water/mineral oil emulsion containing 250 mu g ml−1 N-acetyl-d-glucosaminyl-beta-(1 4)

  7. Hepatitis C virus infection of cholangiocarcinoma cell lines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fletcher, Nicola F.; Humphreys, Elizabeth; Jennings, Elliott; Osburn, William; Lissauer, Samantha; Wilson, Garrick K.; van Ijzendoorn, Sven C. D.; Baumert, Thomas F.; Balfe, Peter; Afford, Simon; McKeating, Jane A.

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infects the liver and hepatocytes are the major cell type supporting viral replication. Hepatocytes and cholangiocytes derive from a common hepatic progenitor cell that proliferates during inflammatory conditions, raising the possibility that cholangiocytes may support HCV re

  8. Cytopathic effect of PPR vaccine virus strains in Vero cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raveendra Hegde

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The present study describes the cytopathic effect of two different Peste des petits ruminants (PPR vaccine virus strains presently being used in the country, in vero cells. The cytopathic effect (CPE was visible from 4th day post infection in Sungri vaccine virus strain where as Arasur vaccine virus strain showed CPE, 36-48 hr post infection. With both vaccine virus strains the CPE in vero cells showed initial cell rounding, aggregation and syncytial development. The generalized CPE was noticed by 6th day in Sungri and by 96 hrs post infection in Arasur strain. However complete detachment of the cell monolayer was observed in Arasur strain by 120 hr, post infection. Infected coverslip cultures stained with H & E and May & Grunwald’s Giemsa showed cell vaculation, cytoplasmic extension and syncytia comprising of five to six nuclei. Acidophilic intracytoplasmic and intranuclear inclusion bodies were also observed. Titers, HA activity and detection by s-ELISA of both the vaccine virus strains are also compared. [Vet. World 2009; 2(3.000: 93-94

  9. IMMUNE INHIBITION OF VIRUS RELEASE FROM HUMAN AND NONHUMAN CELLS BY ANTIBODY TO VIRAL AND HOST-CELL DETERMINANTS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SHARIFF, DM; DESPERBASQUES, M; BILLSTROM, M; GEERLIGS, HJ; WELLING, GW; WELLINGWESTER, S; BUCHAN, A; SKINNER, GRB

    1991-01-01

    Immune inhibition of release of the DNA virues, herpes simplex virus types 1 and 2 and pseudorabies virus by anti-viral and anti-host cell sera occurred while two RNA viruses, influenza and encephalomyocarditis, were inhibited only by anti-viral sera (not anti-host cell sera). Simian virus 40 and su

  10. IMMUNE INHIBITION OF VIRUS RELEASE FROM HUMAN AND NONHUMAN CELLS BY ANTIBODY TO VIRAL AND HOST-CELL DETERMINANTS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SHARIFF, DM; DESPERBASQUES, M; BILLSTROM, M; GEERLIGS, HJ; WELLING, GW; WELLINGWESTER, S; BUCHAN, A; SKINNER, GRB

    1991-01-01

    Immune inhibition of release of the DNA virues, herpes simplex virus types 1 and 2 and pseudorabies virus by anti-viral and anti-host cell sera occurred while two RNA viruses, influenza and encephalomyocarditis, were inhibited only by anti-viral sera (not anti-host cell sera). Simian virus 40 and

  11. Stromal cells in chronic inflammation and tertiary lymphoid organ formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, Christopher D; Barone, Francesca; Nayar, Saba; Bénézech, Cecile; Caamaño, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation is an unstable state. It either resolves or persists. Why inflammation persists and the factors that define tissue tropism remain obscure. Increasing evidence suggests that tissue-resident stromal cells not only provide positional memory but also actively regulate the differential accumulation of inflammatory cells within inflamed tissues. Furthermore, at many sites of chronic inflammation, structures that mimic secondary lymphoid tissues are observed, suggesting that chronic inflammation and lymphoid tissue formation share common activation programs. Similarly, blood and lymphatic endothelial cells contribute to tissue homeostasis and disease persistence in chronic inflammation. This review highlights our increasing understanding of the role of stromal cells in inflammation and summarizes the novel immunological role that stromal cells exert in the persistence of inflammatory diseases.

  12. Chronic Binge Alcohol Administration Dysregulates Hippocampal Genes Involved in Immunity and Neurogenesis in Simian Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Macaques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John K. Maxi

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Alcohol use disorders (AUD exacerbate neurocognitive dysfunction in Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV+ patients. We have shown that chronic binge alcohol (CBA administration (13–14 g EtOH/kg/wk prior to and during simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV infection in rhesus macaques unmasks learning deficits in operant learning and memory tasks. The underlying mechanisms of neurocognitive alterations due to alcohol and SIV are not known. This exploratory study examined the CBA-induced differential expression of hippocampal genes in SIV-infected (CBA/SIV+; n = 2 macaques in contrast to those of sucrose administered, SIV-infected (SUC/SIV+; n = 2 macaques. Transcriptomes of hippocampal samples dissected from brains obtained at necropsy (16 months post-SIV inoculation were analyzed to determine differentially expressed genes. MetaCore from Thomson Reuters revealed enrichment of genes involved in inflammation, immune responses, and neurodevelopment. Functional relevance of these alterations was examined in vitro by exposing murine neural progenitor cells (NPCs to ethanol (EtOH and HIV trans-activator of transcription (Tat protein. EtOH impaired NPC differentiation as indicated by decreased βIII tubulin expression. These findings suggest a role for neuroinflammation and neurogenesis in CBA/SIV neuropathogenesis and warrant further investigation of their potential contribution to CBA-mediated neurobehavioral deficits.

  13. Persistent virus infection despite chronic cytotoxic T-lymphocyte activation in gamma interferon-deficient mice infected with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartholdy, C; Christensen, Jan Pravsgaard; Wodarz, D;

    2000-01-01

    ). While wild-type mice rapidly cleared the infection, IFN-gamma -/- mice became chronically infected. Virus persistence in the latter mice did not reflect failure to generate cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) effectors, as an unimpaired primary CTL response was observed. Furthermore, while ex vivo CTL activity...

  14. Oseltamivir expands quasispecies of influenza virus through cell-to-cell transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Kotaro; Murano, Kensaku; Ohniwa, Ryosuke L; Kawaguchi, Atsushi; Nagata, Kyosuke

    2015-03-16

    The population of influenza virus consists of a huge variety of variants, called quasispecies, due to error-prone replication. Previously, we reported that progeny virions of influenza virus become infected to adjacent cells via cell-to-cell transmission pathway in the presence of oseltamivir. During cell-to-cell transmission, viruses become infected to adjacent cells at high multiplicity since progeny virions are enriched on plasma membrane between infected cells and their adjacent cells. Co-infection with viral variants may rescue recessive mutations with each other. Thus, it is assumed that the cell-to-cell transmission causes expansion of virus quasispecies. Here, we have demonstrated that temperature-sensitive mutations remain in progeny viruses even at non-permissive temperature by co-infection in the presence of oseltamivir. This is possibly due to a multiplex infection through the cell-to-cell transmission by the addition of oseltamivir. Further, by the addition of oseltamivir, the number of missense mutation introduced by error-prone replication in segment 8 encoding NS1 was increased in a passage-dependent manner. The number of missense mutation in segment 5 encoding NP was not changed significantly, whereas silent mutation was increased. Taken together, we propose that oseltamivir expands influenza virus quasispecies via cell-to-cell transmission, and may facilitate the viral evolution and adaptation.

  15. Conservation of T cell epitopes between seasonal inlfuenza viruses and the novel inlfuenza A H7N9 virus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huawei Mao; Hui-Ling Yen; Yinping Liu; Yu-Lung Lau; JS Malik Peiris; Wenwei Tu

    2014-01-01

    A novel avian influenza A (H7N9) virus recently emerged in the Yangtze River delta and caused diseases, often severe, in over 130 people. This H7N9 virus appeared to infect humans with greater ease than previous avian inlfuenza virus subtypes such as H5N1 and H9N2. While there are other potential explanations for this large number of human infections with an avian influenza virus, we investigated whether a lack of conserved T-cell epitopes between endemic H1N1 and H3N2 inlfuenza viruses and the novel H7N9 virus contributes to this observation. Here we demonstrate that a number of T cell epitopes are conserved between endemic H1N1 and H3N2 viruses and H7N9 virus. Most of these conserved epitopes are from viral internal proteins. The extent of conservation between endemic human seasonal inlfuenza and avian inlfuenza H7N9 was comparable to that with the highly pathogenic avian inlfuenza H5N1. Thus, the ease of inter-species transmission of H7N9 viruses (compared with avian H5N1 viruses) cannot be attributed to the lack of conservation of such T cell epitopes. On the contrary, our ifndings predict signiifcant T-cell based cross-reactions in the human population to the novel H7N9 virus. Our findings also have implications for H7N9 virus vaccine design.

  16. CD8+ T cells of chronic HCV-infected patients express multiple negative immune checkpoints following stimulation with HCV peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barathan, Muttiah; Mohamed, Rosmawati; Vadivelu, Jamuna; Chang, Li Yen; Vignesh, Ramachandran; Krishnan, Jayalakshmi; Sigamani, Panneer; Saeidi, Alireza; Ram, M Ravishankar; Velu, Vijayakumar; Larsson, Marie; Shankar, Esaki M

    2017-03-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV)-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cells are key to successful viral clearance in HCV disease. Accumulation of exhausted HCV-specific T cells during chronic infection results in considerable loss of protective functional immune responses. The role of T-cell exhaustion in chronic HCV disease remains poorly understood. Here, we studied the frequency of HCV peptide-stimulated T cells expressing negative immune checkpoints (PD-1, CTLA-4, TRAIL, TIM-3 and BTLA) by flow cytometry, and measured the levels of Th1/Th2/Th17 cytokines secreted by T cells by a commercial Multi-Analyte ELISArray™ following in vitro stimulation of T cells using HCV peptides and phytohemagglutinin (PHA). HCV peptide-stimulated CD4+ and CD8+ T cells of chronic HCV (CHC) patients showed significant increase of CTLA-4. Furthermore, HCV peptide-stimulated CD4+ T cells of CHC patients also displayed relatively higher levels of PD-1 and TRAIL, whereas TIM-3 was up-regulated on HCV peptide-stimulated CD8+ T cells. Whereas the levels of IL-10 and TGF-β1 were significantly increased, the levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-2, TNF-α, IL-17A and IL-6 were markedly decreased in the T cell cultures of CHC patients. Chronic HCV infection results in functional exhaustion of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells likely contributing to viral persistence.

  17. 3D rotating wall vessel and 2D cell culture of four veterinary virus pathogens: A comparison of virus yields, portions of infectious particles and virus growth curves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malenovská, Hana

    2016-02-01

    Only very few comparative studies have been performed that evaluate general trends of virus growth under 3D in comparison with 2D cell culture conditions. The aim of this study was to investigate differences when four animal viruses are cultured in 2D and 3D. Suid herpesvirus 1 (SuHV-1), Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSIV), Bovine adenovirus (BAdV) and Bovine parainfluenza 3 virus (BPIV-3) were cultivated in 3D rotating wall vessels (RWVs) and conventional 2D cultures. The production of virus particles, the portion of infectious particles, and the infectious growth curves were compared. For all viruses, the production of virus particles (related to cell density), including the non-infectious ones, was lower in 3D than in 2D culture. The production of only infectious particles was significantly lower in BAdV and BPIV-3 in 3D cultures in relation to cell density. The two cultivation approaches resulted in significantly different virus particle-to-TCID50 ratios in three of the four viruses: lower in SuHV-1 and BPIV-3 and higher in BAdV in 3D culture. The infectious virus growth rates were not significantly different in all viruses. Although 3D RWV culture resulted in lower production of virus particles compared to 2D systems, the portion of infectious particles was higher for some viruses.

  18. Changes in cell adhesion molecule expression on T cells associated with systemic virus infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, E C; Christensen, Jan Pravsgaard; Marker, O

    1994-01-01

    Virus-induced changes in adhesion molecule expression on T cells were investigated to understand how antiviral effector cells migrate into infectious foci. FACS analysis revealed that after systemic infection with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus a number of cell adhesion molecules, including VLA...... analyses showed that T cells with a changed adhesion molecule profile tended to present other cell surface markers indicating a state of cellular activation, e.g., IL-2R, and included all virus-specific CTL effectors. Regarding the physiologic significance of these changes in adhesion molecule expression...

  19. Activated allogeneic NK cells preferentially kill poor prognosis B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Mutational status of TP53 together with expression of wild type (wt) IGHV represents the most widely accepted biomarkers, establishing a very poor prognosis in B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (B-CLL) patients. Adoptive cell therapy using allogeneic HLA mismatched Natural Killer (NK) cells has emerged as an effective and safe alternative in the treatment of acute myeloid and lymphoid leukemias that do not respond to traditional therapies. We have described that allogeneic activated NK cell...

  20. Characterization of RD-114 Virus Isolated from a Commercial Canine Vaccine Manufactured Using CRFK Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshikawa, Rokusuke; Sato, Eiji; Igarashi, Tatsuhiko; Miyazawa, Takayuki

    2010-01-01

    Recently, we found that several commercial pet vaccines were contaminated with an infectious endogenous retrovirus, RD-114-related virus. Here, we determined the entire nucleotide sequences of RD-114-related viruses isolated from CRFK cells and a vaccine manufactured using CRFK cells. These RD-114-related viruses were nearly identical to the authentic RD-114 virus. PMID:20631117

  1. A novel single virus infection system reveals that influenza virus preferentially infects cells in g1 phase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryuta Ueda

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Influenza virus attaches to sialic acid residues on the surface of host cells via the hemagglutinin (HA, a glycoprotein expressed on the viral envelope, and enters into the cytoplasm by receptor-mediated endocytosis. The viral genome is released and transported in to the nucleus, where transcription and replication take place. However, cellular factors affecting the influenza virus infection such as the cell cycle remain uncharacterized. METHODS/RESULTS: To resolve the influence of cell cycle on influenza virus infection, we performed a single-virus infection analysis using optical tweezers. Using this newly developed single-virus infection system, the fluorescence-labeled influenza virus was trapped on a microchip using a laser (1064 nm at 0.6 W, transported, and released onto individual H292 human lung epithelial cells. Interestingly, the influenza virus attached selectively to cells in the G1-phase. To clarify the molecular differences between cells in G1- and S/G2/M-phase, we performed several physical and chemical assays. Results indicated that: 1 the membranes of cells in G1-phase contained greater amounts of sialic acids (glycoproteins than the membranes of cells in S/G2/M-phase; 2 the membrane stiffness of cells in S/G2/M-phase is more rigid than those in G1-phase by measurement using optical tweezers; and 3 S/G2/M-phase cells contained higher content of Gb3, Gb4 and GlcCer than G1-phase cells by an assay for lipid composition. CONCLUSIONS: A novel single-virus infection system was developed to characterize the difference in influenza virus susceptibility between G1- and S/G2/M-phase cells. Differences in virus binding specificity were associated with alterations in the lipid composition, sialic acid content, and membrane stiffness. This single-virus infection system will be useful for studying the infection mechanisms of other viruses.

  2. Long-term outcome of patients with virus-negative chronic myocarditis or inflammatory cardiomyopathy after immunosuppressive therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escher, Felicitas; Kühl, Uwe; Lassner, Dirk; Poller, Wolfgang; Westermann, Dirk; Pieske, Burkert; Tschöpe, Carsten; Schultheiss, Heinz-Peter

    2016-12-01

    To analyze the long-term outcome after immunosuppressive treatment of patients with virus-negative chronic myocarditis or inflammatory cardiomyopathy (CMi). We investigated 114 patients with endomyocardial biopsy (EMB)-proven virus-negative chronic myocarditis or CMi, who were treated with prednisone and azathioprine for 6 months. Myocardial inflammation was assessed by quantitative immunohistology. We examined hemodynamic measurements after 6 months and long-term follow-up periods of up to 10 years {median 10.5 months [95 % confidence interval (CI) 11.69-59.16]}. At follow-up, the patients showed a significant improvement of left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) compared to baseline after 6-month period (LVEF rising from 44.6 ± 17.3 to 51.8 ± 15.5 %, p = 0.006) and in the long-term follow-up (LVEF 52.1 ± 15.6 %, p = 0.006). Simultaneously, EMB-analysis revealed significant reduction of quantified inflammatory infiltrates (CD3(+) cells 16.03 ± 29.09-8.2 ± 9.0/mm(2), p = 0.002; CD2(+) cells 12.62 ± 20.01 to 6.61 ± 8.47/mm(2), p = 0.001; perforin(+) cells 3.94 ± 4.65-1.03 ± 1.47/mm(2), p = 0.0001), and cell-adhesion molecule HLA-1 [9.91 ± 5.55-6.65 ± 2.81/area fraction (AF), p = 0.0001]. In a subgroup analysis, patients with initial LVEF ≤45 % (n = 53) significantly increased with LVEF at follow-up (29.3 ± 8.8-41.7 ± 13.2-42.1 ± 13.1 %, p 45-60 % (n = 25) significantly improved further or recovered completely, regarding LVEF (53.0 ± 3.6-59.0 ± 9.4-59.8 ± 10.0 %, p = 0.03, Group II). Patients with initial LVEF >60 % (n = 36) remained stable and did not deteriorate over long-term follow-up (68.8 ± 6.7-67.5 ± 10.9-68.8 ± 10.7 %, p = 0.5, Group III). Groups II and III were defined as chronic myocarditis. In patients with virus-negative chronic myocarditis or CMi, we could show the effectiveness and beneficial effects of immunosuppressive treatment. Based on the

  3. Mechanisms of virus immune evasion lead to development from chronic inflammation to cancer formation associated with human papillomavirus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masachika Senba

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Human papillomavirus (HPV has developed strategies to escape eradication by innate and adaptive immunity. Immune response evasion has been considered an important aspect of HPV persistence, which is the main contributing factor leading to HPV-related cancers. HPV-induced cancers expressing viral oncogenes E6 and E7 are potentially recognized by the immune system. The major histocompatibility complex (MHC class I molecules are patrolled by natural killer cells and CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes, respectively. This system of recognition is a main target for the strategies of immune evasion deployed by viruses. The viral immune evasion proteins constitute useful tools to block defined stages of the MHC class I presentation pathway, and in this way HPV avoids the host immune response. The long latency period from initial infection to persistence signifies that HPV evolves mechanisms to escape the immune response. It has now been established that there are oncogenic mechanisms by which E7 binds to and degrades tumor suppressor Rb, while E6 binds to and inactivates tumor suppressor p53. Therefore, interaction of p53 and pRb proteins can give rise to an increased immortalization and genomic instability. Overexpression of NF-kB in cervical and penile cancers suggests that NF-kB activation is a key modulator in driving chronic inflammation to cancer. HPV oncogene-mediated suppression of NF-kB activity contributes to HPV escape from the immune system. This review focuses on the diverse mechanisms of the virus immune evasion with HPV that leads to chronic inflammation and cancer.

  4. Characterisation of Structural Proteins from Chronic Bee Paralysis Virus (CBPV Using Mass Spectrometry

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    Aurore Chevin

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Chronic bee paralysis virus (CBPV is the etiological agent of chronic paralysis, an infectious and contagious disease in adult honeybees. CBPV is a positive single-stranded RNA virus which contains two major viral RNA fragments. RNA 1 (3674 nt and RNA 2 (2305 nt encode three and four putative open reading frames (ORFs, respectively. RNA 1 is thought to encode the viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp since the amino acid sequence derived from ORF 3 shares similarities with the RdRP of families Nodaviridae and Tombusviridae. The genomic organization of CBPV and in silico analyses have suggested that RNA 1 encodes non-structural proteins, while RNA 2 encodes structural proteins, which are probably encoded by ORFs 2 and 3. In this study, purified CBPV particles were used to characterize virion proteins by mass spectrometry. Several polypeptides corresponding to proteins encoded by ORF 2 and 3 on RNA 2 were detected. Their role in the formation of the viral capsid is discussed.

  5. Pathogenetic Mechanisms of Hepatitis C Virus-Induced B-Cell Lymphomagenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Forghieri

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C virus (HCV infection is probably the most common chronic viral infection and affects an estimated 180 million people worldwide, accounting for 3% of the global population. Although the liver is considered to be the primary target, extrahepatic manifestations are well recognized among patients with chronic HCV infection. Epidemiological studies have clearly demonstrated a correlation between chronic HCV infection and occurrence of B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphomas (B-NHL. The clinical evidence that antiviral therapy has a significant role in the treatment at least of some HCV-associated lymphoproliferative disorders, especially indolent B-NHL, further supports the existence of an etiopathogenetic link. However, the mechanisms exploited by HCV to induce B-cell lymphoproliferation have so far not completely clarified. It is conceivable that different biological mechanisms, namely, chronic antigen stimulation, high-affinity interaction between HCV-E2 protein and its cellular receptors, direct HCV infection of B-cells, and “hit and run” transforming events, may be combined themselves and cooperate in a multifactorial model of HCV-associated lymphomagenesis.

  6. Ceramics adsorbing virus and cells. Uirusu, saibo bunri ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hiraide, T. (Asahi Optical Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan))

    1993-07-01

    It has been reported that hydroxyapatite (HA), which is the main inorganic component of teeth and bones of homo sapiens and used for biomaterials such as artificial tooth roots, adsorbs viruses such as influenza viruses. In this article, the history of development up to now of HA and its adsorption mechanism of protein, virus, etc., are introduced. HA was applied for chromatography in 1956 becoming one of the separating and refining methods of protein and nucleic acid, then after the development of spherical porous HA, it has become applied for high speed liquid chromatography (HPLC). Also by means of a column filled with HA granules, T-cells have been able to be purified in a short time from lymphocyte which was separated from the blood of homo sapiens. Recently it has also been reported that HA granules can adsorb influenza viruses, Japanese encephalitis viruses, polio viruses and hepatitis B viruses, and a cold-preventative mask based upon this report is now on sale. 11 refs., 7 figs.

  7. Myxoma virus suppresses proliferation of activated T lymphocytes yet permits oncolytic virus transfer to cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villa, Nancy Y; Wasserfall, Clive H; Meacham, Amy M; Wise, Elizabeth; Chan, Winnie; Wingard, John R; McFadden, Grant; Cogle, Christopher R

    2015-06-11

    Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplant (allo-HCT) can be curative for certain hematologic malignancies, but the risk of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) is a major limitation for wider application. Ideally, strategies to improve allo-HCT would involve suppression of T lymphocytes that drive GVHD while sparing those that mediate graft-versus-malignancy (GVM). Recently, using a xenograft model, we serendipitously discovered that myxoma virus (MYXV) prevented GVHD while permitting GVM. In this study, we show that MYXV binds to resting, primary human T lymphocytes but will only proceed into active virus infection after the T cells receive activation signals. MYXV-infected T lymphocytes exhibited impaired proliferation after activation with reduced expression of interferon-γ, interleukin-2 (IL-2), and soluble IL-2Rα, but did not affect expression of IL-4 and IL-10. MYXV suppressed T-cell proliferation in 2 patterns (full vs partial) depending on the donor. In terms of GVM, we show that MYXV-infected activated human T lymphocytes effectively deliver live oncolytic virus to human multiple myeloma cells, thus augmenting GVM by transfer of active oncolytic virus to residual cancer cells. Given this dual capacity of reducing GVHD plus increasing the antineoplastic effectiveness of GVM, ex vivo virotherapy with MYXV may be a promising clinical adjunct to allo-HCT regimens.

  8. Infección crónica por el VHC Chronic Hepatitis C virus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Iñarrairaegui

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Tras la infección aguda por el virus de la hepatitis C (VHC, un porcentaje importante de pacientes no aclara el virus y desarrollan una hepatitis crónica C. Los síntomas, cuando existen, suelen ser inespecíficos. Aproximadamente un tercio de los pacientes presentan además manifestaciones extrahepáticas de la infección, debidas fundamentalmente al linfotropismo del virus C. De éstas destacan, por su clara asociación con el VHC, la crioglobulinemia mixta y la producción de autoanticuerpos (autoAc. Otras enfermedades como el linfoma no Hodgkin (LNH o la tiroiditis autoinmune no tienen una asociación claramente establecida. Aunque la mayoría de los pacientes con hepatitis crónica C tienen niveles ligeros o moderadamente elevados y fluctuantes de transaminasas, hasta un tercio de los infectados pueden presentar niveles persistentemente normales de transaminasas. El diagnóstico de la infección crónica por el VHC se basa en pruebas serológicas, que detectan la presencia de anticuerpos frente al VHC, y en pruebas virológicas que detectan RNA del VHC, que confirman la existencia de infección activa. Por último, un aspecto importante en la infección crónica por el VHC, tras el diagnóstico, es establecer el estadio de fibrosis y el grado de inflamación, ya que ambas características son muy importantes para predecir la evolución natural y la necesidad de tratamiento. Hoy en día esta información sólo puede obtenerse mediante biopsia hepática, que está indicada en pacientes con infección crónica por el VHC y transaminasas elevadas. Su indicación en pacientes con transaminasas normales permanece todavía controvertida.Following acute hepatitis C virus infection (HCV, a significant percentage of patients do not clear the virus and develop a chronic hepatitis C. The symptoms, when they exist, are usually unspecific. Besides, approximately one third of the patients present extrahepatic manifestations of the infection, basically

  9. Identification of Hepatitis B Virus Surface Antigen (HBsAg Genotypes and Variations in Chronic Carriers from Isfahan Province, Iran

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    A Khedive

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hepatitis B virus (HBV gene and protein variations are frequently been seen in chronic patients. The aims of study were to determine the genotypes as well as the patterns of variations distribution in chronically-infected patients from the central part of Iran.Methods: The surface gene was amplified, sequenced and subsequently aligned using international and national Iranian database. Results: All strains belonged to genotype D, subgenotype D1 and subtype ayw2. Of all 62 mutations occurred at 39 nucleotide positions, 31 (50% were missense (amino acid altering and 31 (50% were silent (no amino acid changing. At the amino acid level, 30 substitutions occurred, however, 3 were in positions 122 and 127, corresponded to subtypic determination. 22 (73% out of 30 amino acid mutations occurred in different immune epitopes within surface protein, of which 12 (54.54% in B cell epitopes in 10 residues; 5 (45.45% in T helper epitopes in positions; 5 (22.73% in inside CTL epitopes in 4 residues. Conclusion: The distribution of amino acid mutations as well as the ratio between silent and missense nucleotide mutations showed a narrowly focused immune pressure had already been on the surface protein in these patients, led to the emergence of escape mutants in these patients.

  10. Host cell responses to dengue virus infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diosa Toro, Mayra

    2017-01-01

    Dengue (ook wel knokkelkoorts) is de meest voorkomende virale infectieziekte dat wordt overgedragen door muggen in de wereld met naar schatting 390 miljoen infecties per jaar. Ondanks de grote klinische impact en economische schade van het dengue virus is er nog steeds geen behandeling beschikbaar.

  11. African swine fever virus uses macropinocytosis to enter host cells.

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    Elena G Sánchez

    Full Text Available African swine fever (ASF is caused by a large and highly pathogenic DNA virus, African swine fever virus (ASFV, which provokes severe economic losses and expansion threats. Presently, no specific protection or vaccine against ASF is available, despite the high hazard that the continued occurrence of the disease in sub-Saharan Africa, the recent outbreak in the Caucasus in 2007, and the potential dissemination to neighboring countries, represents. Although virus entry is a remarkable target for the development of protection tools, knowledge of the ASFV entry mechanism is still very limited. Whereas early studies have proposed that the virus enters cells through receptor-mediated endocytosis, the specific mechanism used by ASFV remains uncertain. Here we used the ASFV virulent isolate Ba71, adapted to grow in Vero cells (Ba71V, and the virulent strain E70 to demonstrate that entry and internalization of ASFV includes most of the features of macropinocytosis. By a combination of optical and electron microscopy, we show that the virus causes cytoplasm membrane perturbation, blebbing and ruffles. We have also found that internalization of the virions depends on actin reorganization, activity of Na(+/H(+ exchangers, and signaling events typical of the macropinocytic mechanism of endocytosis. The entry of virus into cells appears to directly stimulate dextran uptake, actin polarization and EGFR, PI3K-Akt, Pak1 and Rac1 activation. Inhibition of these key regulators of macropinocytosis, as well as treatment with the drug EIPA, results in a considerable decrease in ASFV entry and infection. In conclusion, this study identifies for the first time the whole pathway for ASFV entry, including the key cellular factors required for the uptake of the virus and the cell signaling involved.

  12. Neutralizing antibodies in patients with chronic hepatitis C, genotype 1, against a panel of genotype 1 culture viruses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jannie; Jensen, Tanja B; Carlsen, Thomas H R;

    2013-01-01

    patients with chronic HCV infection with and without sustained virologic response when tested against any of the included culture viruses. However, NAb50-titers varied significantly with a mean reciprocal NAb50-titer of 800 (range: 100-6400) against DH6/JFH1 compared to a mean NAb50-titer of 50 (range:......The correlation of neutralizing antibodies to treatment outcome in patients with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection has not been established. The aim of this study was to determine whether neutralizing antibodies could be used as an outcome predictor in patients with chronic HCV, genotype 1......, infection treated with pegylated interferon-α and ribavirin. Thirty-nine patients with chronic hepatitis C, genotype 1a or 1b, with either sustained virologic response (n = 23) or non-sustained virologic response (n = 16) were enrolled. Samples taken prior to treatment were tested for their ability...

  13. Hepatitis B Virus Replication in CD34+ Hematopoietic Stem Cells From Umbilical Cord Blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yanxin; Yan, Qin; Fan, Rongshan; Song, Shupeng; Ren, Hong; Li, Yongguo; Lan, Yinghua

    2016-05-18

    BACKGROUND Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is a hepatotropic virus that can infect extrahepatic tissue. Whether hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) can be infected by HBV and serve as a potential virus reservoir is still unknown. In this study, the susceptibility of CD34+ HSCs to HBV was investigated. MATERIAL AND METHODS Cord blood-derived CD34+ HSCs were exposed to HBV in vitro, and immunocytochemistry, transmission electron microscopy, and RT-PCR were used to identify viral-related proteins and specific viral genomic sequences. Then, CD34+ HSCs were challenged by different titers of HBV, and intracellular and supernatant HBV DNA, and hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) levels, were examined. In addition, CD34+ peripheral blood stem cells (PBSCs) from chronic HBV carriers were isolated and cultured, and HBV DNA levels were measured. RESULTS HBV-infected CD34+ cells showed positive signals for HBsAg by DAB staining and TRITC staining, and HBV particles were identified. RT-PCR results showed that the 403 bp PCR products corresponding to the amplified hepatitis B S gene fragment were observed in CD34+ HSCs infected by HBV. In addition, supernatant and intracellular HBV DNA increased with the proliferation of CD34+ HSCs. Similar results were obtained from intracellular HBsAg quantification tests. In addition, HBV DNA levels both in cells and in supernatants of CD34+ PBSCs increased proportionally, and the increments of HBV DNA in the supernatants paralleled those found in cells. CONCLUSIONS HBV can replicate in CD34+ HSCs in cord blood or peripheral blood of chronic HBV carriers.

  14. Gamma interferon augments Fc gamma receptor-mediated dengue virus infection of human monocytic cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Kontny, U.; Kurane, I; Ennis, F A

    1988-01-01

    It has been reported that anti-dengue antibodies at subneutralizing concentrations augment dengue virus infection of monocytic cells. This is due to the increased uptake of dengue virus in the form of virus-antibody complexes by cells via Fc gamma receptors. We analyzed the effects of recombinant human gamma interferon (rIFN-gamma) on dengue virus infection of human monocytic cells. U937 cells, a human monocytic cell line, were infected with dengue virus in the form of virus-antibody complexe...

  15. Differential sensitivity of bat cells to infection by enveloped RNA viruses: coronaviruses, paramyxoviruses, filoviruses, and influenza viruses.

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    Markus Hoffmann

    Full Text Available Bats (Chiroptera host major human pathogenic viruses including corona-, paramyxo, rhabdo- and filoviruses. We analyzed six different cell lines from either Yinpterochiroptera (including African flying foxes and a rhinolophid bat or Yangochiroptera (genera Carollia and Tadarida for susceptibility to infection by different enveloped RNA viruses. None of the cells were sensitive to infection by transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV, a porcine coronavirus, or to infection mediated by the Spike (S protein of SARS-coronavirus (SARS-CoV incorporated into pseudotypes based on vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV. The resistance to infection was overcome if cells were transfected to express the respective cellular receptor, porcine aminopeptidase N for TGEV or angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 for SARS-CoV. VSV pseudotypes containing the S proteins of two bat SARS-related CoV (Bg08 and Rp3 were unable to infect any of the six tested bat cell lines. By contrast, viral pseudotypes containing the surface protein GP of Marburg virus from the family Filoviridae infected all six cell lines though at different efficiency. Notably, all cells were sensitive to infection by two paramyxoviruses (Sendai virus and bovine respiratory syncytial virus and three influenza viruses from different subtypes. These results indicate that bat cells are more resistant to infection by coronaviruses than to infection by paramyxoviruses, filoviruses and influenza viruses. Furthermore, these results show a receptor-dependent restriction of the infection of bat cells by CoV. The implications for the isolation of coronaviruses from bats are discussed.

  16. Current treatment indications and strategies in chronic hepatitis B virus infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    George V Papatheodoridis; Spilios Manolakopoulos; Athanasios J Archimandritis

    2008-01-01

    The optimal approach to the management of several marginal cases with chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV)infection is controversial. Serum HBV DNA and aminotransferase levels, and the degree of necroinflammation and fibrosis determine the therapeutic decisions. All patients with elevated aminotransferase (>twice the upper limit of normal) and serum HBV DNA above 20000 IU/mL should be treated. Liver biopsy is important for therapeutic decisions in cases with mild aminotransferase elevations and serum HBV DNA below 20000 IU/mL. Chronic HBV patients who do not receive treatment should be followed for life. There are seven agents licensed for chronic hepatitis B: standard and pegylated interferon-alpha, lamivudine, adefovir,entecavir, telbivudine and tenofovir. One-year courses with pegylated interferon-alpha induce sustained offtherapy remission in 30%-32% of patients with HBeAgpositive chronic hepatitis B and in a smaller proportion of patients with HBeAg-negative chronic hepatitis B.Oral antivirals achieve initial on-therapy responses in the majority of patients, but are intended as long-term therapies. Viral suppression has favourable effects on patients' outcome and modifies the natural course of the disease. Viral resistance, however, is the major drawback of long-term oral antiviral therapy. Lamivudine monotherapy is associated with the highest and entecavir monotherapy with the lowest resistance rate so far. There has been no resistance to tenofovir, but after only 18 mo of treatment to date. The optimal first-line anti-HBV therapy with the best long-term cost/benefit ratio remains unclear. If oral antiviral agents are used,compliance should always be ascertained and HBV DNA levels should be regularly tested.

  17. Beet yellow stunt virus in cells of Sonchus oleraceus L. and its relation to host mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esau, K

    1979-10-15

    In Sonchus oleraceus L. (Asteraceae) infected with the beet yellow stunt virus (BYSV) the virions are found in phloem cells, including the sieve elements. In parenchymatous phloem cells, the virus is present mainly in the cytoplasm. In some parenchymatous cells, containing massive accumulations of virus, the flexuous rodlike virus particles are found partly inserted into mitochondrial cristae. The mitochondrial envelope is absent where virus is present in the cristae. A similar relation between virus and host mitochondria apparently has not been recorded for any other plant virus.

  18. Chronic Hepatitis C Virus (HCV)-associated Cryoglobulinemia and its possible impact on the skin in Egyptian Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Amin Mohamed Abd El Baki1, Mohamed A.Ezzel Arab2Nabil Abd El Mageed3

    2010-01-01

    Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection may have extremely variable clinical consequences and is more than just a liver disease; it has been associated with numerous extra-hepatic manifestations (EHM). According to various international studies Mixed Cryoglobulinemia (MC) was found to be the most common EHM, however its local prevalence in Egyptian HCV patients was not clearly studied. The aim of our study was to investigate the frequency of cryoglobulinaemia in sera of chronic HCV patients...

  19. The feline lymphoid cell line MBM and its use for feline immunodeficiency virus isolation and quantitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matteucci, D; Mazzetti, P; Baldinotti, F; Zaccaro, L; Bendinelli, M

    1995-05-01

    We report on the development of a feline T lymphoblastoid cell line obtained from the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) of a specific pathogen free cat and designated MBM. The cells are pan-T+, CD4- and CD8- and remained interleukin-2-dependent and concanavalin A-dependent throughout the period of observation. MBM cells have proved at least as sensitive as fresh blasts to infection with cell-free stocks of three feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) isolates. Upon infection, they exhibit a lytic cytopathic effect. Repeated attempts to establish a chronic infection have failed. Using a limiting cell dilution method, it has been shown that MBM cells may be more sensitive than fresh blasts as substrate for isolating FIV from the PBMC of infected cats. These studies have also shown that considerable individual variations exist in the virus loads present in the PBMC of naturally infected cats, and that load size does not appear to correlate with cat age, clinical status, CD4/CD8 ratio and titer of serum neutralizing antibody.

  20. The Arabidopsis synaptotagmin SYTA regulates the cell-to-cell movement of diverse plant viruses

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    Asako eUchiyama

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Synaptotagmins are a large gene family in animals that have been extensively characterized due to their role as calcium sensors to regulate synaptic vesicle exocytosis and endocytosis in neurons, and dense core vesicle exocytosis for hormone secretion from neuroendocrine cells. Thought to be exclusive to animals, synaptotagmins have recently been characterized in Arabidopsis thaliana, in which they comprise a five gene family. Using infectivity and leaf-based functional assays, we have shown that Arabidopsis SYTA regulates endocytosis and marks an endosomal vesicle recycling pathway to regulate movement protein-mediated trafficking of the Begomovirus Cabbage leaf curl virus (CaLCuV and the Tobamovirus Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV through plasmodesmata (Lewis and Lazarowitz, 2010. To determine whether SYTA has a central role in regulating the cell-to-cell trafficking of a wider range of diverse plant viruses, we extended our studies here to examine the role of SYTA in the cell-to-cell movement of additional plant viruses that employ different modes of movement, namely the Potyvirus Turnip mosaic virus (TuMV, the Caulimovirus Cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV and the Tobamovirus Turnip vein clearing virus (TVCV, which in contrast to TMV does efficiently infect Arabidopsis. We found that both TuMV and TVCV systemic infection, and the cell-to-cell trafficking of the their movement proteins, were delayed in the Arabidopsis Col-0 syta-1 knockdown mutant. In contrast, CaMV systemic infection was not inhibited in syta-1. Our studies show that SYTA is a key regulator of plant virus intercellular movement, being necessary for the ability of diverse cell-to-cell movement proteins encoded by Begomoviruses (CaLCuV MP, Tobamoviruses (TVCV and TMV 30K protein and Potyviruses (TuMV P3N-PIPO to alter PD and thereby mediate virus cell-to-cell spread.

  1. [Management of hepatitis B virus and hepatitis C virus infection in chronic kidney failure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallet-Pichard, Anaïs; Pol, Stanislas

    2015-11-01

    Chronic infections by hepatitis B (HBV) and C virus (HCV) result in diagnosis and therapeutic issues in dialysis and kidney recipients patients. The exposure to nosocomial, including blood transfusion, risk explains the high prevalence of HBV and HCV infection in this setting. Chronic infection reduces the survival of both patients and allografts, including a specific risk of de novo glomerulonephritis. Cirrhosis was considered as a contra-indication to renal transplantation given the high risk of decompensation and death, questionning the indication of a combined liver and kidney transplantation. Thus, it is mandatory to screen HBV and HCV markers in all dialysis patients, whether or not they are candidates to transplantation. Liver biopsy allows evaluating the severity of the liver disease since the noninvasive markers of fibrosis appear to be less accurate in "renal" patients than in the general population and to better define antiviral therapeutic indications. HCV treatment was mainly based on pegylated interferon α (and low doses of ribavirin), which is contra-indicated in kidney recipients given the risk of graft rejection; HCV treatment is now based on the use of oral direct acting antivirals, which are very potent and well tolerated. HBV replication is now easily suppressed by second-generation nucleos(t)tidic analogues (entecavir and tenofovir), which will be indicated in all the dialysis patients with significant fibrosis (F2,3 or 4 according to the Metavir scoring system) and in any candidate to renal transplantation and to any HBsAg-positive kidney recipients. The best treatment remains preventive by anti-HBV vaccination for HBV and by the respect of universal hygiene rules for HCV. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier SAS.

  2. Requirement of cell nucleus for Sindbis virus replication in cultured Aedes albopictus cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erwin, C; Brown, D T

    1983-02-01

    The ability of Sindbis virus to grow in enucleated BHK-21 (vertebrate) and Aedes albopictus (invertebrate) cells was tested to determine the dependence of this virus upon nuclear function in these two phylogenetically unrelated hosts. Although both cell types could be demonstrated to produce viable cytoplasts (enucleated cells) which produced virus-specific antigen subsequent to infection. BHK cytoplasts produced a significant number of progeny virions, whereas mosquito cytoplasts did not. The production of vesicular stomatitis virus in mosquito cells was not significantly reduced by enucleation. That such a host function was not essential for vesicular stomatitis virus growth in insect cells is supported by the observation that the production of this virus by mosquito cells is not actinomycin D sensitive. This result agrees with a previously published report in which it was shown that Sindbis virus maturation in invertebrate cells is inhibited by actinomycin D, indicating a possible requirement for host cell nuclear function (Scheefers-Borchel et al., Virology, 110:292-301, 1981).

  3. Clinical relevance of precore mutations of hepatitis B virus in chronic liver disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaloska-Ivanova Viktorija

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Hepatitis B is one of the most frequent etiological factors for chronic liver diseases worldwide. Recent studies have suggested the important role of the genetic diversity of the virus on natural course of hepatitis B. Hepatitis B e-antigen negative type of chronic hepatitis is associated with mutations in the precore region and basic core promoter of hepatitis B viral genome. Aim of study was to identify precore mutations in viral genome of patients with chronic hepatitis B and to evaluate clinical patterns of liver disease related to this type of hepatitis B. Methods: Sixty seven patients with hepatitis B were included in the study. In order to evaluate the clinical patterns of chronic liver disease related to hepatitis B viral infection, biochemical and virological investigations were done, as well as a quantification of serum viral load. All patients underwent liver biopsy and semiquantification of necroinflammation and/or fibrosis according to Knodell scoring was done. In the group of e antigen-negative patients, molecular analysis was performed in order to identify presence of mutations in precore region of the virus. Results: Study group was divided in 25 HBeAg-positive and 42 HBeAg-negative subjects. Al anin-aminotransferase activity and level of viral load were higher in HBeAg-positive (p < 0.05, but average age and histology activity index were significantly higher in the HBeAg-negative patients (p < 0.01. Precore mutants were found in 38 of 42 patients with HBeAg-negative hepatitis (90%. Fibrosis was found in 30/38 cases with mutations. Discussion: Mutations in precore region of HBV in HBeAg-negative patients were more prevalent in older age and were associated with higher rate of fibrosis in liver tissue, meaning more advanced stage of the disease. This could be a consequence of longer duration of HBV infection or more severe clinical course of the disease. Conclusion: Our results suggest that precore mutations are

  4. Infectivity of chimeric human T-cell leukemia virus type I molecular clones assessed by naked DNA inoculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, T M; Robinson, M A; Bowers, F S; Kindt, T J

    1996-06-25

    Two human T-cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-I) molecular clones, K30p and K34p were derived from HTLV-I-infected rabbit cell lines. K30p and K34p differ by 18 bp with changes in the long terminal repeats (LTRs) as well as in the gag, pol, and rex but not tax or env gene products. Cells transfected with clone K30p were infectious in vitro and injection of the K30p transfectants or naked K30p DNA into rabbits leads to chronic infection. In contrast, K34p did not mediate infection in vitro or in vivo, although the cell line from which it was derived is fully infectious and K34p transfectants produce intact virus particles. To localize differences involved in the ability of the clones to cause infection, six chimeric HTLV-I clones were constructed by shuffling corresponding fragments containing the substitutions in the LTRs, the gag/pol region and the rex region between K30p and K34p. Cells transfected with any of the six chimeras produced virus, but higher levels of virus were produced by cells transfected with those constructs containing the K30p rex region. Virus production was transient except in cells transfected with K30p or with a chimera consisting of the entire protein coding region of K30p flanked by K34p LTRs; only the transfectants showing persistent virus production mediated in vitro infection. In vivo infection in rabbits following intramuscular DNA injection was mediated by K30p as well as by a chimera of K30p containing the K34p rex gene. Comparisons revealed that virus production was greater and appeared earlier in rabbits injected with K30p. These data suggest that several defects in the K34p clone preclude infectivity and furthermore, provide systems to explore functions of HTLV-I genes.

  5. The cell biology of Tobacco mosaic virus replication and movement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chengke eLiu

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Successful systemic infection of a plant by Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV requires three processes that repeat over time: initial establishment and accumulation in invaded cells, intercellular movement and systemic transport. Accumulation and intercellular movement of TMV necessarily involves intracellular transport by complexes containing virus and host proteins and virus RNA during a dynamic process that can be visualized. Multiple membranes appear to assist TMV accumulation, while membranes, microfilaments and microtubules appear to assist TMV movement. Here we review cell biological studies that describe TMV-membrane, -cytoskeleton and -other host protein interactions which influence virus accumulation and movement in leaves and callus tissue. The importance of understanding the developmental phase of the infection in relationship to the observed virus-membrane or -host protein interaction is emphasized. Utilizing the latest observations of TMV-membrane and -host protein interactions within our evolving understanding of the infection ontogeny, a model for TMV accumulation and intracellular spread in a cell biological context is provided.

  6. Risk Factors for Hepatitis C Virus Infection in Canadian Patients with Chronic Type C Hepatitis

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    GY Minuk

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available Previous reports from the United States indicate that as many as 40% of patients with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV have no identifiable risk factor for HCV infection. To determine whether the same is true of Canadian patients with chronic HCV the records of 89 anti-HCV positive patients referred to the authors' tertiary care centre for evaluation of liver disease were reviewed. Each patient had been specifically asked about the following risk factors: previous blood transfusions; intravenous drug abuse; homosexual activity; sexual promiscuity (multiple sexual partners or a history of sexually transmitted diseases; tattoos made with nonsterile techniques; and ear piercing using nonsterile techniques. The results of the study revealed that 76 of 89 patients (85% had at least one risk factor for HCV exposure, 38 (43% had only one risk factor, 19 (21% had two, 12 (14% had three and the remaining three patients (3% had four. The most common risk factor was a history of intravenous drug abuse (30 of 89 patients, 34% followed by sexual promiscuity (28, 32%, previous blood transfusions (21, 24%, tattoos (17, 19%, homosexual contacts (seven, 8% and ear piercing (five, 6%. Contrary to a recent report identifying sexual contact as an independent risk factor for HCV infection, only four cases (5% were found where sexual promiscuity was identified as the only risk factor. In conclusion, these findings indicate that a possible source of HCV infection can be identified in a large majority of Canadians referred to an urban centre with chronic HCV infection.

  7. Fibrosis assessment in patients with chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parikh, Pathik; Ryan, John D.

    2017-01-01

    Chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is a major cause of liver morbidity and mortality worldwide. While a proportion of the 250 million individuals chronically infected with HBV will not come to significant harm or require therapy, many others risk developing complications of the end-stage liver disease such as decompensated cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), without intervention. Due to the complex natural history of HBV infection, patients require an expert assessment to interpret biochemistry, viral serology and appropriately stage the disease, and to initiate monitoring and/or therapy where indicated. The detection and quantification of liver fibrosis is a key factor for disease management and prognostication for an individual with HBV. The reliance on invasive liver biopsy to stage disease is diminishing with the advent of robust non-invasive blood- and imaging-based algorithms which can reliably stage disease in many cases. These tests are now incorporated into International guidelines for HBV management and relied upon daily to inform clinical judgement. Both blood- and imaging-based approaches have advantages over liver biopsy, including minimal risks, lower cost, better patient acceptance and speed of results, while disadvantages include lower diagnostic accuracy in intermediate disease stages and variability with co-existing hepatic inflammation or steatosis. This review outlines the methods of fibrosis assessment in chronic HBV infection and focuses on the most commonly used blood- and imaging-based non-invasive tests, reviewing their diagnostic performance and applicability to patient care. PMID:28251119

  8. New horizon for radical cure of chronic hepatitis B virus infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kazuto; Tajiri; Yukihiro; Shimizu

    2016-01-01

    About 250 to 350 million people worldwide are chronically infected with hepatitis B virus(HBV), and about 700000 patients per year die of HBV-related cirrhosis or hepatocellular carcinoma(HCC). Several anti-viral agents, such as interferon and nucleos(t)ide analogues(NAs), have been used to treat this disease. NAs especially have been shown to strongly suppress HBV replication, slowing the progression to cirrhosis and the development of HCC. However, reactivation of HBV replication often occurs after cessation of treatment, because NAs alone cannot completely remove covalentlyclosed circular DNA(ccc DNA), the template of HBV replication, from the nuclei of hepatocytes. Anti-HBV immune responses, in conjunction with interferon-γ and tumor necrosis factor-α, were found to eliminate ccc DNA, but complete eradication of ccc DNA by immune response alone is difficult, as shown in patients who recover from acute HBV infection but often show long-term persistence of small amounts of HBV-DNA in the blood. Several new drugs interfering with the life cycle of HBV in hepatocytes have been developed, with drugs targeting ccc DNA theoretically the most effective for radical cure of chronic HBV infection. However, the safety of these drugs should be extensively examined before application to patients, and combinations of several approaches may be necessary for radical cure of chronic HBV infection.

  9. Antibodies to hepatitis A virus in Italian patients with chronic liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagnelli, E; Rossi, G; Coppola, N; Scolastico, C; Onofrio, M; Filippini, P; Chiaramonte, M; Pizzigall, E; Aceti, A; Spadaro, A; Raimondo, G; Piccinino, F

    2001-10-01

    To improve our knowledge for future hepatitis A virus (HAV) vaccination strategies we carried out a multicentre study on naturally acquired immunological protection against HAV in patients with chronic hepatitis in Italy. We enrolled 830 consecutive patients with chronic hepatitis on their first observation at one of the six Italian liver units participating in the study. Six hundred and fifty-eight patients (79.3%) were positive for total anti-HAV and 172 (20.7%) were negative. The anti-HAV negative patients were younger (median age 33, range 11-78) than the anti-HAV positive (median age 56, 18-87). There was a higher prevalence of cases with circulating anti-HAV among the 508 patients residing in southern Italy than in the 322 residing in northern Italy (88.8% vs. 64%, P immunological protection against HAV infection. The data suggest that the number of patients with chronic liver disease without naturally acquired immunity against HAV is substantial in Italy, particularly in the north of the country, and that new vaccination strategies are needed.

  10. Chikungunya virus neutralization antigens and direct cell-to-cell transmission are revealed by human antibody-escape mutants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia Yin Lee

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Chikungunya virus (CHIKV is an alphavirus responsible for numerous epidemics throughout Africa and Asia, causing infectious arthritis and reportedly linked with fatal infections in newborns and elderly. Previous studies in animal models indicate that humoral immunity can protect against CHIKV infection, but despite the potential efficacy of B-cell-driven intervention strategies, there are no virus-specific vaccines or therapies currently available. In addition, CHIKV has been reported to elicit long-lasting virus-specific IgM in humans, and to establish long-term persistence in non-human primates, suggesting that the virus might evade immune defenses to establish chronic infections in man. However, the mechanisms of immune evasion potentially employed by CHIKV remain uncharacterized. We previously described two human monoclonal antibodies that potently neutralize CHIKV infection. In the current report, we have characterized CHIKV mutants that escape antibody-dependent neutralization to identify the CHIKV E2 domain B and fusion loop "groove" as the primary determinants of CHIKV interaction with these antibodies. Furthermore, for the first time, we have also demonstrated direct CHIKV cell-to-cell transmission, as a mechanism that involves the E2 domain A and that is associated with viral resistance to antibody-dependent neutralization. Identification of CHIKV sub-domains that are associated with human protective immunity, will pave the way for the development of CHIKV-specific sub-domain vaccination strategies. Moreover, the clear demonstration of CHIKV cell-to-cell transmission and its possible role in the establishment of CHIKV persistence, will also inform the development of future anti-viral interventions. These data shed new light on CHIKV-host interactions that will help to combat human CHIKV infection and inform future studies of CHIKV pathogenesis.

  11. Free-virus and cell-to-cell transmission in models of equine infectious anemia virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Linda J S; Schwartz, Elissa J

    2015-12-01

    Equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) is a lentivirus in the retrovirus family that infects horses and ponies. Two strains, referred to as the sensitive strain and the resistant strain, have been isolated from an experimentally-infected pony. The sensitive strain is vulnerable to neutralization by antibodies whereas the resistant strain is neutralization-insensitive. The sensitive strain mutates to the resistant strain. EIAV may infect healthy target cells via free virus or alternatively, directly from an infected target cell through cell-to-cell transfer. The proportion of transmission from free-virus or from cell-to-cell transmission is unknown. A system of ordinary differential equations (ODEs) is formulated for the virus-cell dynamics of EIAV. In addition, a Markov chain model and a branching process approximation near the infection-free equilibrium (IFE) are formulated. The basic reproduction number R0 is defined as the maximum of two reproduction numbers, R0s and R0r, one for the sensitive strain and one for the resistant strain. The IFE is shown to be globally asymptotically stable for the ODE model in a special case when the basic reproduction number is less than one. In addition, two endemic equilibria exist, a coexistence equilibrium and a resistant strain equilibrium. It is shown that if R0>1, the infection persists with at least one of the two strains. However, for small infectious doses, the sensitive strain and the resistant strain may not persist in the Markov chain model. Parameter values applicable to EIAV are used to illustrate the dynamics of the ODE and the Markov chain models. The examples highlight the importance of the proportion of cell-to-cell versus free-virus transmission that either leads to infection clearance or to infection persistence with either coexistence of both strains or to dominance by the resistant strain. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Identification of chikungunya virus interacting proteins in mammalian cells

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mandar S Paingankar; Vidya A Arankalle

    2014-06-01

    Identification and characterization of virus host interactions is an essential step for the development of novel antiviral strategies. Very few studies have been targeted towards identification of chikungunya virus (CHIKV) interacting host proteins. In current study, virus overlay protein binding assay (VOPBA) and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight analysis (MALDI TOF/TOF) were employed for the identification of CHIKV binding proteins in mammalian cells. HSP70 and actin were identified as virus binding proteins in HEK-293T and Vero-E6 cells, whereas STAT-2 was identified as an additional protein in Vero-E6 cells. Pre-incubation with anti-HSP70 antibody and miRNA silencing of HSP70 significantly reduced the CHIKV production in HEK-293T and Vero-E6 cells at early time points. These results suggest that CHIKV exploits the housekeeping molecules such as actin, HSP70 and STAT-2 to establish infection in the mammalian cells.

  13. Variation in RNA virus mutation rates across host cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marine Combe

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available It is well established that RNA viruses exhibit higher rates of spontaneous mutation than DNA viruses and microorganisms. However, their mutation rates vary amply, from 10(-6 to 10(-4 substitutions per nucleotide per round of copying (s/n/r and the causes of this variability remain poorly understood. In addition to differences in intrinsic fidelity or error correction capability, viral mutation rates may be dependent on host factors. Here, we assessed the effect of the cellular environment on the rate of spontaneous mutation of the vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV, which has a broad host range and cell tropism. Luria-Delbrück fluctuation tests and sequencing showed that VSV mutated similarly in baby hamster kidney, murine embryonic fibroblasts, colon cancer, and neuroblastoma cells (approx. 10(-5 s/n/r. Cell immortalization through p53 inactivation and oxygen levels (1-21% did not have a significant impact on viral replication fidelity. This shows that previously published mutation rates can be considered reliable despite being based on a narrow and artificial set of laboratory conditions. Interestingly, we also found that VSV mutated approximately four times more slowly in various insect cells compared with mammalian cells. This may contribute to explaining the relatively slow evolution of VSV and other arthropod-borne viruses in nature.

  14. The Emerging Extrahepatic Manifestations of Hepatitis C Virus Infection in Chronic Hepatitis and Mixed Cryoglobulinemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poupak Fallahi

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C virus (HCV is known to be responsible for both hepatic and extrahepatic diseases. Mixed cryoglobulinemia, Sjögren syndrome, and chronic polyarthritis are the most documented rheumatologic extrahepatic manifestations of HCV infection. The most frequent and clinically important extrahepatic endocrine manifestations of chronic HCV infection are thyroid disorders and type 2 diabetes mellitus. From a meta-analysis of the literature, a significant association between HCV infection and thyroid autoimmunity and/or hypothyroidism as well as a high prevalence of thyroid cancer have been reported. The pattern of thyroid disorders observed in HCV infected patients is characterized by the presence of elevated circulating anti-thyroid peroxidase antibodies with increased risk of hypothyroidism. Several clinical epidemiologic studies have reported that HCV infection is a risk factor for type 2 diabetes. The type of diabetes manifested by subjects with chronic HCV infection is not of the classical type 2 diabetes; in fact, HCV-related diabetic patients are leaner than the classical diabetic patients, and have a significantly lower LDL-cholesterol, and both systolic and diastolic blood pressure. Furthermore, patients with mixed cryoglobulinemia (mixed cryoglobulinemia and chronic HCV infection with type 2 diabetes have more frequently non-organ-specific-autoantibodies than non-diabetic patients with mixed cryoglobulinemia and those with chronic HCV infection. Based on the above-mentioned findings, it has been hypothesized that diabetes in HCV infection may have an immune-mediated pathogenesis. In patients with chronic HCV infection, we found an increased risk of carotid artery plaque and carotid intima-media thickening. These findings suggested a possible role for chronic hepatitis C in the pathogenesis of carotid artery remodelling. Recently, high prevalence rates of anti-HCV antibodies were shown in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy or

  15. Endogenous production of infectious Inoue-Melnick virus in a human meningioma cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishibe, Y; Inoue, Y K; Hollinshead, A C

    1987-11-01

    We investigated continuous production of Inoue-Melnick virus (IMV) in the MG-1 cell line, established from human meningioma. The infectious virus, identified as a type 1 virus, was mostly recovered extracellularly. Assay of MG-1 cells as infective centers indicated that most of the cells were capable of producing infectious virus. By immunofluorescence, more than 90% of the cells were found to have IMV-associated cytoplasmic antigen(s) (IMCA).

  16. Adaptation and Study of AIDS Viruses in Animal and Cell Culture Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-01-30

    category one, e.g , Friend Murine -6- Leukemia Virus (FMuLV), Feline Leukemia Virus (FeLV), and the Macaque Type D SAIDS retrovirus (SRV) have been...10). One other animal lentivirus, Feline Immunodeficiency Virus (FIV), has had some utility in the study of protective immunity and in screening...et al. (58) transplanted RNA mumps virus infected human HeLa cells, or RNA vesicular stomatitis virus-infected hamster BHK cells into nude mice

  17. Ebola virus. Two-pore channels control Ebola virus host cell entry and are drug targets for disease treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakurai, Yasuteru; Kolokoltsov, Andrey A; Chen, Cheng-Chang; Tidwell, Michael W; Bauta, William E; Klugbauer, Norbert; Grimm, Christian; Wahl-Schott, Christian; Biel, Martin; Davey, Robert A

    2015-02-27

    Ebola virus causes sporadic outbreaks of lethal hemorrhagic fever in humans, but there is no currently approved therapy. Cells take up Ebola virus by macropinocytosis, followed by trafficking through endosomal vesicles. However, few factors controlling endosomal virus movement are known. Here we find that Ebola virus entry into host cells requires the endosomal calcium channels called two-pore channels (TPCs). Disrupting TPC function by gene knockout, small interfering RNAs, or small-molecule inhibitors halted virus trafficking and prevented infection. Tetrandrine, the most potent small molecule that we tested, inhibited infection of human macrophages, the primary target of Ebola virus in vivo, and also showed therapeutic efficacy in mice. Therefore, TPC proteins play a key role in Ebola virus infection and may be effective targets for antiviral therapy.

  18. Effects of human respiratory syncytial virus, metapneumovirus, parainfluenza virus 3 and influenza virus on CD4+ T cell activation by dendritic cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cyril Le Nouën

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV, and to a lesser extent human metapneumovirus (HMPV and human parainfluenza virus type 3 (HPIV3, re-infect symptomatically throughout life without antigenic change, suggestive of incomplete immunity. One causative factor is thought to be viral interference with dendritic cell (DC-mediated stimulation of CD4+ T cells. METHODOLOGY, PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We infected human monocyte-derived DC with purified HRSV, HMPV, HPIV3, or influenza A virus (IAV and compared their ability to induce activation and proliferation of autologous CD4+ T cells in vitro. IAV was included because symptomatic re-infection without antigenic change is less frequent, suggesting that immune protection is more complete and durable. We examined virus-specific memory responses and superantigen-induced responses by multiparameter flow cytometry. Live virus was more stimulatory than inactivated virus in inducing DC-mediated proliferation of virus-specific memory CD4+ T cells, suggesting a lack of strong suppression by live virus. There were trends of increasing proliferation in the order: HMPVcells in response to IAV, but differences were not significant. Exposure of DC to HRSV, HPIV3, or IAV reduced CD4+ T cell proliferation in response to secondary stimulus with superantigen, but the effect was transitory and greatest for IAV. T cell cytokine production was similar, with no evidence of Th2 or Th17 skewing. CONCLUSIONS, SIGNIFICANCE: Understanding the basis for the ability of HRSV in particular to symptomatically re-infect without significant antigenic change is of considerable interest. The present results show that these common respiratory viruses are similar in their ability to induce DC to activate CD4+ T cells. Thus, the results do not support the common model in which viral suppression of CD4+ T cell activation and

  19. Frequent occurrence of chronic hepatitis B virus infection among West African HIV type-1-infected children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouet, François; Chaix, Marie-Laure; Inwoley, André; Anaky, Marie-France; Fassinou, Patricia; Kpozehouen, Alphonse; Rouzioux, Christine; Blanche, Stéphane; Msellati, Philippe

    2008-02-01

    The aim of this study, conducted in Ivory Coast, was to evaluate the prevalence and evolution of viral hepatitis in children coinfected with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). Hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) markers were retrospectively and longitudinally assessed among 280 HIV-1-infected children enrolled in the Agence Nationale de Recherches sur le SIDA et les Hépatites Virales B et C 1244/1278 cohort. Among these, 173 (61.8%) received highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), including lamivudine (3TC) for 122 children. Detection of the hepatitis B s antigen (HBsAg) was performed on specimens collected at inclusion and 6 months later. If results of both tests were positive, hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg)/hepatitis B e antibody (HBeAb) and HBV DNA levels were measured at inclusion and during follow-up. A fourth-generation HCV enzyme immunoassay was used for HCV screening at inclusion. In our pediatric cohort, no patients were infected with HCV, but the prevalence of HBsAg at inclusion was 12.1% (34 of 280; 95% confidence interval [CI], 8.6-16.6). Among the HBV-HIV-1-coinfected children, a high rate of positive HBeAg chronic hepatitis B (CHB) was noted at inclusion (82.4% [ 28 of 34]; 95% CI, 65.5%-93.2%) and after a median follow-up of 18 months (78.3%; 95% CI, 45.5%-92.7%), with no significant difference between children treated with HAART (with or without 3TC) and untreated ones. These children showed high HBV DNA levels (usually >8.0 log(10) copies/mL) and viral population consisting of nearly exclusively wild-type HBeAg-positive HBV strains, strongly suggesting that most of them were in the initial immunotolerant phase of chronic hepatitis B. In sub-Saharan Africa, children with chronic hepatitis B and who are treated with 3TC-based HAART are at risk of developing 3TC resistance. Further studies are required to guide the management of HBV-HIV-1-coinfected children.

  20. Recognition of extremophilic archaeal viruses by eukaryotic cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uldahl, Kristine Buch; Wu, Linping; Hall, Arnaldur

    2016-01-01

    followed viral uptake, intracellular trafficking and cell viability in human endothelial cells of brain (hCMEC/D3 cells) and umbilical vein (HUVEC) origin. Whereas SMV1 is efficiently internalized into both types of human cells, SSV2 differentiates between HUVECs and hCMEC/D3 cells, thus opening a path......Viruses from the third domain of life, Archaea, exhibit unusual features including extreme stability that allow their survival in harsh environments. In addition, these species have never been reported to integrate into human or any other eukaryotic genomes, and could thus serve for exploration...

  1. Assembly of the murine leukemia virus is directed towards sites of cell-cell contact.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Jin

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available We have investigated the underlying mechanism by which direct cell-cell contact enhances the efficiency of cell-to-cell transmission of retroviruses. Applying 4D imaging to a model retrovirus, the murine leukemia virus, we directly monitor and quantify sequential assembly, release, and transmission events for individual viral particles as they happen in living cells. We demonstrate that de novo assembly is highly polarized towards zones of cell-cell contact. Viruses assembled approximately 10-fold more frequently at zones of cell contact with no change in assembly kinetics. Gag proteins were drawn to adhesive zones formed by viral Env glycoprotein and its cognate receptor to promote virus assembly at cell-cell contact. This process was dependent on the cytoplasmic tail of viral Env. Env lacking the cytoplasmic tail while still allowing for contact formation, failed to direct virus assembly towards contact sites. Our data describe a novel role for the viral Env glycoprotein in establishing cell-cell adhesion and polarization of assembly prior to becoming a fusion protein to allow virus entry into cells.

  2. Studies on the replication of Mayaro virus grown in interferon treated cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebello, M C; Fonseca, M E; Marinho, J O; Rebello, M A

    1994-01-01

    Mayaro virus grown in interferon treated infected cells has been characterized with regard to its ability to replicate in vertebrate (TC7) and invertebrate (Aedes albopictus) cells. Virus purified from interferon treated TC7 cells adsorbs and penetrates to the same extent as the control virus. During infection, these virus particles caused inhibition of host protein synthesis and synthesized the same spectrum of viral proteins as normal virus. This population however, was apparently more sensitive to interferon treatment. Electron microscopy of TC7 cells showed the presence of numerous aberrant virus particles budding from the plasma membrane.

  3. Studies on the replication of Mayaro virus grown in interferon treated cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. C. S. Rebello

    1994-12-01

    Full Text Available Mayaro virus grown in interferon treated infected cells has been characterized with regard to its ability to replicate in vertebrate (TC7 and invertebrate (Aedes albopictus cells. Virus purified from interferon treated TC7 cells adsorbs and penetrates to the same extent as the control virus. During infection, these virus particles caused inhibition of host protein synthesis and synthesized the same spectrum of viral proteins as normal virus. This population however, was apparently more sensitive to interferon treatment. Electron microscopy of TC7 cells showed the presence of numerous aberrant virus particles budding from the plasma membrane.

  4. Decreased peripheral natural killer cells activity in the immune activated stage of chronic hepatitis B.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Li

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND & AIMS: The natural course of chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV infection is characterized by different immune responses, ranging from immune tolerant (IT to immune activated (IA stages. In our study, we investigated the natural killer (NK cells activity in patients at different immunological stages of chronic HBV infection. METHODS: Blood samples obtained from 57 HBeAg positive patients with chronic hepatitis B (CHB, including 15 patients in the immune tolerant (IT stage, 42 patients in the immune activated (IA stage, and 18 healthy individuals (HI. The analyses included flow cytometry to detect NK cells, the determination of cytokine levels as well as of surface receptor expression and cytotoxicity. RESULTS: NK cells in peripheral blood were significantly lower in patients in the IA stage of CHB compared to HI (p<0.05. Patients in the IA stage of CHB had lower levels of NK cells activating receptor NKp30 and NKG2D expression, cytokine interferon-γ (IFN-γ and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α production, as compared to patients in the IT stage and HI, respectively (p<0.05. Cytotoxicity of NK cells was lower in patients in the IA stage of CHB compared to patients in the IT stage and HI, respectively (p<0.05. The level of IFN-γ but not level of TNF-α and cytotoxicity of NK cells was inversely correlated with serum HBV load in patients with CHB. Peripheral NK cells activity did not correlate with ALT level. CONCLUSION: NK cells activity was lower in CHB patients, especially in those in the IA stage.

  5. Globally visualizing the microtubule-dependent transport behaviors of influenza virus in live cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shu-Lin; Zhang, Li-Juan; Wang, Zhi-Gang; Zhang, Zhi-Ling; Wu, Qiu-Mei; Sun, En-Ze; Shi, Yun-Bo; Pang, Dai-Wen

    2014-04-15

    Understanding the microtubule-dependent behaviors of viruses in live cells is very meaningful for revealing the mechanisms of virus infection and endocytosis. Herein, we used a quantum dots-based single-particle tracking technique to dynamically and globally visualize the microtubule-dependent transport behaviors of influenza virus in live cells. We found that the intersection configuration of microtubules can interfere with the transport behaviors of the virus in live cells, which lead to the changing and long-time pausing of the transport behavior of viruses. Our results revealed that most of the viruses moved along straight microtubules rapidly and unidirectionally from the cell periphery to the microtubule organizing center (MTOC) near the bottom of the cell, and the viruses were confined in the grid of microtubules near the top of the cell and at the MTOC near the bottom of the cell. These results provided deep insights into the influence of entire microtubule geometry on the virus infection.

  6. Infection of brain-derived cells with the human immunodeficiency virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiodi, F; Fuerstenberg, S; Gidlund, M; Asjö, B; Fenyö, E M

    1987-01-01

    A malignant glioma cell line was infected with the human T-lymphotropic virus type IIIB isolate of the human immunodeficiency virus. Infection appeared to be latent rather than productive. Through contact with monocytic or lymphoid cells, the virus present in the glioma cells could be transmitted and gave rise to a fully productive infection. Images PMID:3644020

  7. Identification of cell surface molecules involved in dystroglycan-independent Lassa virus cell entry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimojima, Masayuki; Ströher, Ute; Ebihara, Hideki; Feldmann, Heinz; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro

    2012-02-01

    Although O-mannosylated dystroglycan is a receptor for Lassa virus, a causative agent of Lassa fever, recent findings suggest the existence of an alternative receptor(s). Here we identified four molecules as receptors for Lassa virus: Axl and Tyro3, from the TAM family, and dendritic cell-specific intercellular adhesion molecule 3-grabbing nonintegrin (DC-SIGN) and liver and lymph node sinusoidal endothelial calcium-dependent lectin (LSECtin), from the C-type lectin family. These molecules enhanced the binding of Lassa virus to cells and mediated infection independently of dystroglycan. Axl- or Tyro3-mediated infection required intracellular signaling via the tyrosine kinase activity of Axl or Tyro3, whereas DC-SIGN- or LSECtin-mediated infection and binding were dependent on a specific carbohydrate and on ions. The identification of these four molecules as Lassa virus receptors advances our understanding of Lassa virus cell entry.

  8. Hepatitis E virus genotype three infection of human liver chimeric mice as a model for chronic HEV infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.D.B. van de Garde (Martijn); S.D. Pas (Suzan); G. van der Net (Guido); R.A. de Man (Robert); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); B.L. Haagmans (Bart); A. Boonstra (Andre); T. Vanwolleghem (Thomas)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractGenotype (gt) 3 hepatitis E virus (HEV) infections are emerging in Western countries. Immunosuppressed patients are at risk of chronic HEV infection and progressive liver damage, but no adequate model system currently mimics this disease course. Here we explore the possibilities of in vi

  9. Chronic bee paralysis virus and Nosema ceranae experimental co-infection of winter honey bee workers (Apis mellifera L.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chronic bee paralysis virus (CBPV) is an important viral disease of adult bees which induces significant losses in honey bee colonies. In this study winter worker bees were experimentally infected using three different experiments. Bees were inoculated orally or topically with CBPV to evaluate the l...

  10. The presence of Chronic Bee Paralysis Virus infection in Honey bees (Apis mellifera L.) in the U.S.

    Science.gov (United States)

    The presence of Chronic bee paralysis virus (CBPV) infection in the U.S. is reported for the first time. Using molecular methods, the evidence of infection of honey bees with CBPV has been detected in both symptomatic and asymptomatic bees. While our seven year’s survey showed that the CBPV infect...

  11. Characterization of the early events in dengue virus cell entry by biochemical assays and single-virus tracking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Schaar, Hilde M.; Rust, Michael J.; Waarts, Barry-Lee; van der Ende-Metselaarl, Heidi; Kuhn, Richard J.; Wilschut, Jan; Zhuang, Xiaowei; Smit, Jolanda M.

    2007-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the cell entry characteristics of dengue virus (DENV) type 2 strain SI on mosquito, BHK-15, and BS-C-1 cells. The concentration of virus particles measured by biochemical assays was found to be substantially higher than the number of infectious particles determined by

  12. Newcastle disease virus selectively kills human tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichard, K W; Lorence, R M; Cascino, C J; Peeples, M E; Walter, R J; Fernando, M B; Reyes, H M; Greager, J A

    1992-05-01

    Newcastle disease virus (NDV), strain 73-T, has previously been shown to be cytolytic to mouse tumor cells. In this study, we have evaluated the ability of NDV to replicate in and kill human tumor cells in culture and in athymic mice. Plaque assays were used to determine the cytolytic activity of NDV on six human tumor cell lines, fibrosarcoma (HT1080), osteosarcoma (KHOS), cervical carcinoma (KB8-5-11), bladder carcinoma (HCV29T), neuroblastoma (IMR32), and Wilm's tumor (G104), and on nine different normal human fibroblast lines. NDV formed plaques on all tumor cells tested as well as on chick embryo cells (CEC), the native host for NDV. Plaques did not form on any of the normal fibroblast lines. To detect NDV replication, virus yield assays were performed which measured virus particles in infected cell culture supernatants. Virus yield increased 10,000-fold within 24 hr in tumor and CEC supernatants. Titers remained near zero in normal fibroblast supernatants. In vivo tumoricidal activity was evaluated in athymic nude Balb-c mice by subcutaneous injection of 9 x 10(6) tumor cells followed by intralesional injection of either live or heat-killed NDV (1.0 x 10(6) plaque forming units [PFU]), or medium. After live NDV treatment, tumor regression occurred in 10 out of 11 mice bearing KB8-5-11 tumors, 8 out of 8 with HT-1080 tumors, and 6 out of 7 with IMR-32 tumors. After treatment with heat-killed NDV no regression occurred (P less than 0.01, Fisher's exact test). Nontumor-bearing mice injected with 1.0 x 10(8) PFU of NDV remained healthy. These results indicate that NDV efficiently and selectively replicates in and kills tumor cells, but not normal cells, and that intralesional NDV causes complete tumor regression in athymic mice with a high therapeutic index.

  13. Human skin Langerhans cells are targets of dengue virus infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wu, SJL; Grouard-Vogel, G; Mascola, [No Value; Brachtel, E; Putvatana, R; Louder, MK; Filgueira, L; Marovich, MA; Wong, HK; Blauvelt, A; Murphy, GS; Robb, ML; Innes, BL; Birx, DL; Hayes, CG; Frankel, SS

    2000-01-01

    Dengue virus (DV), an arthropod-borne flavivirus, causes a febrile illness for which there is no antiviral treatment and no vaccine(1,2). Macrophages are important in dengue pathogenesis; however, the initial target cell for DV infection remains unknown. As DV is introduced into human skin by mosqui

  14. Treatment of genotype 2 and 3 chronic hepatitis C virus-infected patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Perdita Wietzke-Braun; Volker Meier; Katrin Neubauer-Saile; Sabine Mihm; Giuliano Ramadori

    2005-01-01

    AIM: Before pegylated interferon alpha (IFN) was introduced for the therapy of chronic hepatitis C virus(HCV)-induced hepatitis, conventional thrice weekly IFN therapy was supplemented by ribavirin. Also, at that time,higher and more frequent doses of IFN were expected to be more effective than the standard regimen of 3 MU thrice weekly. As ribavirin significantly increases side effects and negatively influences the quality of life particularly in young patients, we started a prospective non-randomized study with a daily IFN-2a monotherapy as an initial treatment for chronic hepatitis C.METHODS: Forty-six consecutive chronic HCV-infected patients received 3 MU IFN-2a per day as an initial treatment. Patients with genotype 2 or 3 (n = 12) were treated for 24 wk, and patients with genotypes other than 2 or 3 (n = 34) for 48 wk. Treatment outcome was followed up for 48 wk after the end of treatment (EOT).Virological response was defined as the absence of detectable serum HCV-RNA. Patients without virological response at 12 wk after the start of treatment received RESULTS: During treatment, three genotype 3 patients were excluded from the study due to incompliance. The remaining patients (n = 9) infected with genotype 2 or 3showed an initial virological response rate of 100%. Six patients (66.7%) were still found to be virus-free at the end of follow-up period. In these patients, initial virological response was evident already after 2 wk of treatment. In contrast, initial virological response occurred first after 4 wk of treatment in the three patients who relapsed(33.3%). In comparison, patients infected with genotypes other than 2 or 3 (n = 34) showed an initial virological response rate of only 23.5% (n = 8), and even in combination with ribavirin a sustained virological response(SVR) rate of only 11.8% (n = 4) could be achieved.CONCLUSION: In chronic HCV-infected patients with genotype 2 or 3, a SVR can be expected after 24 wk of daily dose IFN-2a treatment

  15. Dissecting the cell entry pathway of dengue virus by single-particle tracking in living cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hilde M van der Schaar

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Dengue virus (DENV is an enveloped RNA virus that causes the most common arthropod-borne infection worldwide. The mechanism by which DENV infects the host cell remains unclear. In this work, we used live-cell imaging and single-virus tracking to investigate the cell entry, endocytic trafficking, and fusion behavior of DENV. Simultaneous tracking of DENV particles and various endocytic markers revealed that DENV enters cells exclusively via clathrin-mediated endocytosis. The virus particles move along the cell surface in a diffusive manner before being captured by a pre-existing clathrin-coated pit. Upon clathrin-mediated entry, DENV particles are transported to Rab5-positive endosomes, which subsequently mature into late endosomes through acquisition of Rab7 and loss of Rab5. Fusion of the viral membrane with the endosomal membrane was primarily detected in late endosomal compartments.

  16. TCR down-regulation controls virus-specific CD8+ T cell responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonefeld, Charlotte Menné; Haks, Mariëlle; Nielsen, Bodil

    2008-01-01

    molecule Bcl-2. This resulted in a 2-fold reduction in the clonal expansion of virus-specific CD8(+) T cells during the acute phase of vesicular stomatitis virus and lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus infections. These results identify an important role of CD3gamma-mediated TCR down-regulation in virus...

  17. Occult hepatitis B virus infection among chronic hemodialysis patients in Alexandria, Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helaly, Ghada F; El Ghazzawi, Ebtisam F; Shawky, Sherine M; Farag, Farag M

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of end-stage renal disease has increased dramatically in developing countries. Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is a global health problem that represents a significant co-morbidity event that has led to outbreaks of hepatitis B. There are inadequate data concerning occult HBV infection among Egyptian chronic hemodialysis patients. This study aimed to detect occult HBV infection among chronic hemodialysis patients in Alexandria, Egypt. A cross-sectional study was performed on 100 patients with end-stage renal disease that received maintenance hemodialysis and had tested negative for HBV surface antigen. Blood samples were collected before the initiation of hemodialysis. Sera were tested for hepatitis C virus (HCV) and hepatitis B core (HBc) antibodies using ELISA, and HBV DNA was detected by SYBR Green real-time PCR using specific primers for the s and c genes and by nested PCR using pol gene-specific primers. The serum activity of alanine and aspartate aminotransferase (ALT and AST) were also measured. Anti-HCV and anti-HBc antibodies were detected in 34% and 48% of patients, respectively, and 70.6% of anti-HCV positive patients were also positive for anti-HBc antibodies. This association was statistically significant (p=0.001). HBV DNA was detected in 32% of the hemodialysis patients. A significant association was determined between the presence of HBV DNA and anti-HCV positivity (p=0.021). Aminotransferases were elevated in 21% of the studied patients, more often in patients with positive anti-HCV profiles than in patients negative for anti-HCV (poccult infections, especially among anti-HBc-positive hemodialysis patients, to improve our understanding of their clinical, laboratory, and epidemiological characteristics.

  18. Interleukin-6 (IL-6) haplotypes and the response to therapy of chronic hepatitis C virus infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yee, Leland J.; Im, KyungAh; Borg, Brian; Yang, Huiying; Liang, T. Jake

    2009-01-01

    Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection affects nearly 170 million individuals worldwide. Treatment of HCV with pegylated interferon-α-2a is successful in eradicating virus from only 30%–80% of those treated. Interleukin-6 (IL-6) is an important cytokine involved in the immune response to infectious agents and in vitro studies suggest that host genetic variation, particularly haplotypes, may affect IL-6 expression. We examined the contribution of haplotypes in the IL-6 gene on sustained viral response (SVR) to therapy for chronic HCV infection. We observed the IL-6 T-T-G-G-G-G-C-A-G-A haplotype to be associated with a lower risk of achieving SVR among Caucasian Americans (CAs) (RR=0.80; 95%C.I.: 0.66– 0.98; p=0.0261). Using a sliding window approach, the rs1800797-(G)-rs1800796-(G)-rs1800795-(G) haplotype was associated with a reduced chance of SVR (RR=0.79; 95%C.I.: 0.66–0.94; p=0.0081), as was the rs1800796-(G)-rs1800795-(G)-rs2069830-(C) haplotype (RR=0.78; 95%C.I.: 0.66–0.94; p=0.0065) among CAs. Overall, the rs1800797-(G)-rs1800796-(G)-rs1800795-(G) haplotype was independently associated with a reduced chance of SVR (RR=0.78; 95% C.I.: 0.62–1.0; p=0.0489) after adjustment for potential confounding factors. Our findings further illustrate the complexity of IL-6 genetic regulation and the potential importance of haplotypes on IL-6 expression. Our findings provide additional support for the potential importance of genetic variation in the IL-6 gene and the response to HCV therapy. PMID:19387461

  19. Interleukin-6 haplotypes and the response to therapy of chronic hepatitis C virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yee, L J; Im, K; Borg, B; Yang, H; Liang, T J

    2009-06-01

    Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection affects nearly 170 million individuals worldwide. Treatment of HCV with pegylated interferon-alpha-2a is successful in eradicating virus from only 30 to 80% of those treated. Interleukin-6 (IL-6) is an important cytokine involved in the immune response to infectious agents and in vitro studies suggest that host genetic variation, particularly haplotypes, may affect IL-6 expression. We examined the contribution of haplotypes in the IL-6 gene on sustained viral response (SVR) to the therapy for chronic HCV infection. We observed the IL-6 T-T-G-G-G-G-C-A-G-A haplotype to be associated with a lower risk of achieving SVR among Caucasian Americans (CAs) ((relative risk) RR=0.80; 95% CI: 0.66-0.98; P=0.0261). Using a sliding window approach, the rs1800797-(G)-rs1800796-(G)-rs1800795-(G) haplotype was associated with a reduced chance of SVR (RR=0.79; 95% CI: 0.66-0.94; P=0.0081), as was the rs1800796-(G)-rs1800795-(G)-rs2069830-(C) haplotype (RR=0.78; 95% CI: 0.66-0.94; P=0.0065) among CAs. Overall, the rs1800797-(G)-rs1800796-(G)-rs1800795-(G) haplotype was independently associated with a reduced chance of SVR (RR=0.78; 95% CI: 0.62-1.0; P=0.0489) after adjustment for potential confounding factors. Our findings further illustrate the complexity of IL-6 genetic regulation and the potential importance of haplotypes on IL-6 expression. Our findings provide additional support for the potential importance of genetic variation in the IL-6 gene and the response to HCV therapy.

  20. Isolation of a new herpes virus from human CD4 sup + T cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frenkel, N.; Schirmer, E.C.; Wyatt, L.S.; Katsafanas, G.; Roffman, E.; Danovich, R.M. (National Institutes of Health, Rockville, MD (USA)); June, C.H. (Naval Medical Research Institute, Bethesda, MD (USA))

    1990-01-01

    A new human herpes virus has been isolated from CD4{sup +} T cells purified from peripheral blood mononuclear cells of a healthy individual (RK), following incubation of the cells under conditions promoting T-cell activation. The virus could not be recovered from nonactivated cells. Cultures of lymphocytes infected with the RK virus exhibited a cytopathic effect, and electron microscopic analyses revealed a characteristic herpes virus structure. RK virus DNA did not hybridize with large probes derived from herpes simplex virus, Epstein-Barr virus, varicella-zoster virus, and human cytomegalovirus. The genetic relatedness of the RK virus to the recently identified T-lymphotropic human herpes virus 6 (HHV-6) was investigated by restriction enzyme analyses using 21 different enzymes and by blot hydridization analyses using 11 probes derived from two strains of HHV-6 (Z29 and U1102). Whereas the two HHV-6 strains exhibited only limited restriction enzyme polymorphism, cleavage of the RK virus DNA yielded distinct patterns. Of the 11 HHV-6 DNA probes tested, only 6 cross-hybridized with DNA fragments derived from the RK virus. Taken together, the maximal homology amounted to 31 kilobases of the 75 kilobases tested. The authors conclude that the RK virus is distinct from previously characterized human herpesviruses. The authors propose to designate it as the prototype of a new herpes virus, the seventh human herpes virus identified to date.

  1. Impaired hepatitis C virus-specific T cell responses and recurrent hepatitis C virus in HIV coinfection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arthur Y Kim

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C virus (HCV-specific T cell responses are critical for spontaneous resolution of HCV viremia. Here we examined the effect of a lymphotropic virus, HIV-1, on the ability of coinfected patients to maintain spontaneous control of HCV infection.We measured T cell responsiveness by lymphoproliferation and interferon-gamma ELISPOT in a large cohort of HCV-infected individuals with and without HIV infection. Among 47 HCV/HIV-1-coinfected individuals, spontaneous control of HCV was associated with more frequent HCV-specific lymphoproliferative (LP responses (35% compared to coinfected persons who exhibited chronic HCV viremia (7%, p = 0.016, but less frequent compared to HCV controllers who were not HIV infected (86%, p = 0.003. Preservation of HCV-specific LP responses in coinfected individuals was associated with a higher nadir CD4 count (r(2 = 0.45, p < 0.001 and the presence and magnitude of the HCV-specific CD8(+ T cell interferon-gamma response (p = 0.0014. During long-term follow-up, recurrence of HCV viremia occurred in six of 25 coinfected individuals with prior control of HCV, but in 0 of 16 HIV-1-negative HCV controllers (p = 0.03, log rank test. In these six individuals with recurrent HCV viremia, the magnitude of HCV viremia following recurrence inversely correlated with the CD4 count at time of breakthrough (r = -0.94, p = 0.017.These results indicate that HIV infection impairs the immune response to HCV-including in persons who have cleared HCV infection-and that HIV-1-infected individuals with spontaneous control of HCV remain at significant risk for a second episode of HCV viremia. These findings highlight the need for repeat viral RNA testing of apparent controllers of HCV infection in the setting of HIV-1 coinfection and provide a possible explanation for the higher rate of HCV persistence observed in this population.

  2. Isolation of eastern equine encephalitis virus in A549 and MRC-5 cell cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotomayor, E A; Josephson, S L

    1999-07-01

    Eastern equine encephalitis (EEE) has been diagnosed either serologically or by virus isolation. Until now, the recovery of EEE virus has been delegated to reference laboratories with the expertise and resources needed to amplify the virus in a susceptible vertebrate host and/or to isolate and identify the virus in cell culture. We report a case in which EEE virus was recovered directly from a patient's cerebrospinal fluid in A549 and MRC-5 cell cultures. Many clinical virology laboratories routinely use these cells to recover adenovirus, herpes simplex virus, and enterovirus. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of isolation of EEE virus in A549 cell culture. This report demonstrates the possibility of recovery of EEE virus in cell culture without the necessity of bioamplification or maintaining unusual cell lines.

  3. Cytotoxic T lymphocytes and CD4 epitope mutations in the pre-core/core region of hepatitis B virus in chronic hepatitis B carriers in Northeast Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhand, Sareh; Tabarraei, Alijan; Nazari, Amineh; Moradi, Abdolvahab

    2017-07-25

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is vulnerable to many various mutations. Those within epitopes recognized by sensitized T cells may influence the re-emergence of the virus. This study was designed to investigate the mutation in immune epitope regions of HBV pre-core/core among chronic HBV patients of Golestan province, Northeast Iran. In 120 chronic HBV carriers, HBV DNA was extracted from blood plasma samples and PCR was done using specific primers. Direct sequencing and alignment of the pre-core/core region were applied using reference sequence from Gene Bank database (Accession Number AB033559). The study showed 27 inferred amino acid substitutions, 9 of which (33.3%) were in CD4 and 2 (7.4%) in cytotoxic T lymphocytes' (CTL) epitopes and 16 other mutations (59.2%) were observed in other regions. CTL escape mutations were not commonly observed in pre-core/core sequences of chronic HBV carriers in the locale of study. It can be concluded that most of the inferred amino acid substitutions occur in different immune epitopes other than CTL and CD4.

  4. Absence of C-type virus production in human leukemic B cell, T cell and null cell lines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ogura,Hajime

    1978-06-01

    Full Text Available Electron microscope observation of cultured human leukemic B cell, T cell and null cell lines and reverse transcriptase assay of the culture supernatants were all negative for the presence of C-type virus. Bat cell line, which propagates primate C-type viruses well, was cocultivated with the human leukemic cell lines, in the hope of amplification of virus if present. Three weeks after mixed culture, the culture supernatants were again examined for reverse transcriptase activity and the cells were tested for syncytia formation by cocultivation with rat XC, human KC and RSb cell lines. All these tests, except for the positive control using a simian sarcoma virus, were negative, suggesting that no C-type was produced from these human leukemic cell lines.

  5. Induction of cell-cell fusion by ectromelia virus is not inhibited by its fusion inhibitory complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fuchs Pinhas

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ectromelia virus, a member of the Orthopox genus, is the causative agent of the highly infectious mousepox disease. Previous studies have shown that different poxviruses induce cell-cell fusion which is manifested by the formation of multinucleated-giant cells (polykaryocytes. This phenomenon has been widely studied with vaccinia virus in conditions which require artificial acidification of the medium. Results We show that Ectromelia virus induces cell-cell fusion under neutral pH conditions and requires the presence of a sufficient amount of viral particles on the plasma membrane of infected cells. This could be achieved by infection with a replicating virus and its propagation in infected cells (fusion "from within" or by infection with a high amount of virus particles per cell (fusion "from without". Inhibition of virus maturation or inhibition of virus transport on microtubules towards the plasma membrane resulted in a complete inhibition of syncytia formation. We show that in contrast to vaccinia virus, Ectromelia virus induces cell-cell fusion irrespectively of its hemagglutination properties and cell-surface expression of the orthologs of the fusion inhibitory complex, A56 and K2. Additionally, cell-cell fusion was also detected in mice lungs following lethal respiratory infection. Conclusion Ectromelia virus induces spontaneous cell-cell fusion in-vitro and in-vivo although expressing an A56/K2 fusion inhibitory complex. This syncytia formation property cannot be attributed to the 37 amino acid deletion in ECTV A56.

  6. Establishment of a new bovine leukosis virus producing cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beier, D; Riebe, R; Blankenstein, P; Starick, E; Bondzio, A; Marquardt, O

    2004-11-01

    Due to the prevalence of different bovine leukosis virus (BLV) species in the cattle population in Europe, problems may arise in the serological diagnosis of BLV infections. In addition, earlier investigations demonstrated that contamination of the BLV antigen-producing cell culture systems by bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) may give rise to misinterpretation of serological test results after BVDV vaccination of cattle. By co-cultivation of peripheral leukocytes of a BLV-infected cow with a permanent sheep kidney cell line, a new BLV-producing cell line named PO714 was established. This line carries a BLV provirus of the Belgian species and has been tested to be free of a variety of possibly contaminating viruses and mycoplasms. Investigations of a panel of well-characterised sera by agar gel immunodiffusion (AGID) and capture ELISA (cELISA) tests using antigen prepared from this new cell line in comparison with antigen of the well-known cell line FLK/BLV yielded comparable results. False positive results caused by BVDV cross-reactions could be eliminated when tests were carried out with antigen derived from the new cell line.

  7. Progress With Developing Use of Gene Editing To Cure Chronic Infection With Hepatitis B Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ely, Abdullah; Moyo, Buhle; Arbuthnot, Patrick

    2016-04-01

    Chronic infection with hepatitis B virus (HBV) occurs in approximately 6% of the world's population. Carriers of the virus are at risk for life-threatening complications, and developing curative treatment remains a priority. The main shortcoming of licensed therapies is that they do not affect viral covalently closed circular DNA (cccDNA), a stable intermediate of replication. Harnessing gene editing to mutate cccDNA provides the means to inactivate HBV gene expression permanently. Reports have described use of engineered zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs), transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs), and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) with CRISPR-associated (Cas) nucleases. Although inhibition of viral replication has been demonstrated, reliably detecting mutations in cccDNA has been difficult. Also, the dearth of murine models that mimic cccDNA formation has hampered analysis in vivo. To reach a stage of clinical use, efficient delivery of the editors to HBV-infected hepatocytes and limiting unintended off-target effects will be important. Investigating therapeutic efficacy in combination with other treatment strategies, such as immunotherapies, may be useful to augment antiviral effects. Advancing gene editing as a mode of treating HBV infection is now at an interesting stage and significant progress is likely to be made in the immediate future.

  8. Imaging of human T-lymphotropic virus type I-associated chronic progressive myeloneuropathies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alcindor, F. (Dept. of Neurology, State Univ. of New York, Health Science Center, Brooklyn, NY (United States)); Valderrama, R. (Dept. of Neurology, State Univ. of New York, Health Science Center, Brooklyn, NY (United States)); Canavaggio, M. (Abbott Labs., North Chicago, IL (United States)); Lee, H. (Abbott Labs., North Chicago, IL (United States)); Katz, A. (Dept. of Neurology, State Univ. of New York, Health Science Center, Brooklyn, NY (United States)); Montesinos, C. (Beth Israel Medical Center, Dept. of Neurology and Clinical Electrophysiology, New York, NY (United States)); Madrid, R.E. (New York State Office of Mental Retardation and Developmental Disabilities, Inst. for Basic Research in Developmental Disabilities, NY (United States)); Merino, R.R. (Beth Israel Medical Center, Dept. of Neurology and Clinical Electrophysiology, New York, NY (United States)); Pipia, P.A. (Dept. of Neurology, State Univ. of New York, Health Science Center, Brooklyn, NY (United States))

    1992-12-01

    We studied magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the head and cervical spine and CT of the head in 46 patients (14 men, 32 women) with chronic progressive myeloneuropathy. The findings were correlated with human T-lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-I) serology, race, country of origin, and age. We found a female predominance of 2:1. Most patients were aged between 30 and 50 years, and most were Caribbean immigrants and black. There were 9 men and 17 women with blood antibody titers to HTLV-I and 7 mem and 15 women with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) titers. All patients with virus or antibodies in blood or CSF were Caribbean immigrants or black. T2-weighted cranial MRI showed scattered areas of high signal intensity in the cerebral white matter, usually in the periventricular and subcortical areas, but not in the posterior cranial fossa. Cranial CT revealed periventricular low density areas, ventricular enlargement, and atrophy MRI of the cervical spine showed atrophy of the cord. Myelography was normal in all 15 patients examined. No imaging differences were observed between the HTLV-I-positive and -negative patients. These findings, although consistent with demyelination, are not specific. (orig.)

  9. MicroRNAs may solve the mystery of chronic hepatitis B virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Ying-Feng; Cui, Guang-Ying; Ye, Ping; Chen, Jia-Ning; Diao, Hong-Yan

    2013-08-14

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is a global public health problem that causes persistent liver diseases such as chronic hepatitis, cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. A large amount of people die annually from HBV infection. However, the pathogenesises of the HBV-related diseases are ill defined and the therapeutic strategies for the diseases are less than optimum. The recently discovered microRNAs (miRNAs) are tiny noncoding RNAs that regulate gene expression primarily at the post-transcriptional level by binding to mRNAs. miRNAs contribute to a variety of physiological and pathological processes. A number of miRNAs have been found to play a pivotal role in the host-virus interaction including host-HBV interaction. Numerous studies have indicated that HBV infection could change the cellular miRNA expression patterns and different stages of HBV associated disease have displayed distinctive miRNA profiles. Furthermore, the differential expressed miRNAs have been found involved in the progression of HBV-related diseases, for instance some miRNAs are involved in liver tumorigenesis and tumor metastasis. Studies have also shown that the circulating miRNA in serum or plasma might be a very useful biomarker for the diagnosis and prognosis of HBV-related diseases. In addition, miRNA-based therapy strategies have attracted increasing attention, indicating a promising future in the treatment of HBV-related diseases.

  10. Alteration of cell cycle progression by Sindbis virus infection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yi, Ruirong; Saito, Kengo [Department of Molecular Virology, Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University Graduate School of Medicine, 1-8-1 Inohana, Chiba 260-8670 (Japan); Isegawa, Naohisa [Laboratory Animal Center, Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University Graduate School of Medicine, 1-8-1 Inohana, Chiba 260-8670 (Japan); Shirasawa, Hiroshi, E-mail: sirasawa@faculty.chiba-u.jp [Department of Molecular Virology, Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University Graduate School of Medicine, 1-8-1 Inohana, Chiba 260-8670 (Japan)

    2015-07-10

    We examined the impact of Sindbis virus (SINV) infection on cell cycle progression in a cancer cell line, HeLa, and a non-cancerous cell line, Vero. Cell cycle analyses showed that SINV infection is able to alter the cell cycle progression in both HeLa and Vero cells, but differently, especially during the early stage of infection. SINV infection affected the expression of several cell cycle regulators (CDK4, CDK6, cyclin E, p21, cyclin A and cyclin B) in HeLa cells and caused HeLa cells to accumulate in S phase during the early stage of infection. Monitoring SINV replication in HeLa and Vero cells expressing cell cycle indicators revealed that SINV which infected HeLa cells during G{sub 1} phase preferred to proliferate during S/G{sub 2} phase, and the average time interval for viral replication was significantly shorter in both HeLa and Vero cells infected during G{sub 1} phase than in cells infected during S/G{sub 2} phase. - Highlights: • SINV infection was able to alter the cell cycle progression of infected cancer cells. • SINV infection can affect the expression of cell cycle regulators. • SINV infection exhibited a preference for the timing of viral replication among the cell cycle phases.

  11. Response of TT virus to IFN plus ribavirin treatment in patients with chronic hepatitis C

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Javier Moreno; Gloria Moraleda; Rafael Barcena; Mluisa Mateos; Santos del Campo

    2004-01-01

    AIM: TT virus (FTV) is a newly described DNA virus related to postransfusion hepatitis that produces persistent viremia in the absence of clinical manifestations. PEG-IFN plus ribavirin have been useful in the treatment of chronic hepatitis C infection. This study investigated the responses of TTvirus (TTV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) to PEG-IFN plus ribavirin therapy.METHODS: Fifteen patients infected with HCV were treated with PEG-IFN(0.5 μg/body weight/week) and ribavirin (1 000 mg-1 200 mg/daily) for 48 weeks. Blood samples were drawn at the beginning and the end of the therapy. Serum TTV DNA and HCV RNA were quantified by real time PCR.RESULTS: At the beginning of treatment, TTV infection was detected in 10/15 (66.6%) of HCV-infected patients. Loss of serum TTV DNA at the end of therapy occurred in 6/10(60%) patients. Out of these 6 patients, 4 (67%) became positive for TTV DNA after 6 months of therapy. Regarding HCV viremia, 11/15 (73%) patients were negative for serum HCV RNA after 48 weeks of therapy, 7/11 (64%) of these cases also became negative for TTV DNA following the combined treatment. In the 3/4 (75%) patients who were positive for HCV RNA at the end of therapy, TTV DNA was detected as well. Sustained HCV response at 6 months after treatment was 53% (8/15).CONCLUSION: No TTV sustained response can be achievedin any patient after PEG-IFN plus ribavirin administration.

  12. The role of human T cell lymphotrophic virus type 1, hepatitis B virus and hepatitis C virus coinfections in leprosy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Roberto Lima Machado

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Leprosy spectrum and outcome is associated with the host immune response against Mycobacterium leprae. The role of coinfections in leprosy patients may be related to a depression of cellular immunity or amplification of inflammatory responses. Leprosy remains endemic in several regions where human T cell lymphotrophic virus type 1 (HTLV-1, hepatitis B virus (HBV or hepatitis C virus (HCV are also endemic. We have evaluated the evidence for the possible role of these viruses in the clinical manifestations and outcomes of leprosy. HTLV-1, HBV and HCV are associated with leprosy in some regions and institutionalization is an important risk factor for these viral coinfections. Some studies show a higher prevalence of viral coinfection in lepromatous cases. Although HBV and HCV coinfection were associated with reversal reaction in one study, there is a lack of information about the consequences of viral coinfections in leprosy. It is not known whether clinical outcomes associated with leprosy, such as development of reactions or relapses could be attributed to a specific viral coinfection. Furthermore, whether the leprosy subtype may influence the progression of the viral coinfection is unknown. All of these important and intriguing questions await prospective studies to definitively establish the actual relationship between these entities.

  13. Restriction of Rift Valley Fever Virus Virulence in Mosquito Cells

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    Sonja R. Gerrard

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Arboviruses are maintained in a natural cycle that requires blood-sucking arthropod and vertebrate hosts. Arboviruses are believed to persistently infect their arthropod host without overt pathology and cause acute infection with viremia in their vertebrate host. We have focused on elucidating how a specific arbovirus, Rift Valley fever (RVF virus, causes cytopathic effect in cells derived from vertebrates and non-cytopathic infection in cells derived from arthropods. We demonstrate that the vertebrate virulence factor, NSs, is functional in arthropod cells but is expressed at significantly lower levels in infected arthropod versus infected vertebrate cells.

  14. High virus-to-cell ratios indicate ongoing production of viruses in deep subsurface sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelhardt, Tim; Kallmeyer, Jens; Cypionka, Heribert; Engelen, Bert

    2014-07-01

    Marine sediments cover two-thirds of our planet and harbor huge numbers of living prokaryotes. Long-term survival of indigenous microorganisms within the deep subsurface is still enigmatic, as sources of organic carbon are vanishingly small. To better understand controlling factors of microbial life, we have analyzed viral abundance within a comprehensive set of globally distributed subsurface sediments. Phages were detected by electron microscopy in deep (320 m below seafloor), ancient (∼14 Ma old) and the most oligotrophic subsurface sediments of the world's oceans (South Pacific Gyre (SPG)). The numbers of viruses (10(4)-10(9) cm(-3), counted by epifluorescence microscopy) generally decreased with sediment depth, but always exceeded the total cell counts. The enormous numbers of viruses indicate their impact as a controlling factor for prokaryotic mortality in the marine deep biosphere. The virus-to-cell ratios increased in deeper and more oligotrophic layers, exhibiting values of up to 225 in the deep subsurface of the SPG. High numbers of phages might be due to absorption onto the sediment matrix and a diminished degradation by exoenzymes. However, even in the oldest sediments, microbial communities are capable of maintaining viral populations, indicating an ongoing viral production and thus, viruses provide an independent indicator for microbial life in the marine deep biosphere.

  15. Cell-specific targeting of lentiviral vectors mediated by fusion proteins derived from Sindbis virus, vesicular stomatitis virus, or avian sarcoma/leukosis virus

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    Marino Michael P

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ability to efficiently and selectively target gene delivery vectors to specific cell types in vitro and in vivo remains one of the formidable challenges in gene therapy. We pursued two different strategies to target lentiviral vector delivery to specific cell types. In one of the strategies, vector particles bearing a membrane-bound stem cell factor sequence plus a separate fusion protein based either on Sindbis virus strain TR339 glycoproteins or the vesicular stomatitis virus G glycoprotein were used to selectively transduce cells expressing the corresponding stem cell factor receptor (c-kit. An alternative approach involved soluble avian sarcoma/leukosis virus receptors fused to cell-specific ligands including stem cell factor and erythropoietin for targeting lentiviral vectors pseudotyped with avian sarcoma/leukosis virus envelope proteins to cells that express the corresponding receptors. Results The titers of unconcentrated vector particles bearing Sindbis virus strain TR339 or vesicular stomatitis virus G fusion proteins plus stem cell factor in the context of c-kit expressing cells were up to 3.2 × 105 transducing units per ml while vector particles lacking the stem cell factor ligand displayed titers that were approximately 80 fold lower. On cells that lacked the c-kit receptor, the titers of stem cell factor-containing vectors were approximately 40 times lower compared to c-kit-expressing cells. Lentiviral vectors pseudotyped with avian sarcoma/leukosis virus subgroup A or B envelope proteins and bearing bi-functional bridge proteins encoding erythropoietin or stem cell factor fused to the soluble extracellular domains of the avian sarcoma/leukosis virus subgroup A or B receptors resulted in efficient transduction of erythropoietin receptor or c-kit-expressing cells. Transduction of erythropoietin receptor-expressing cells mediated by bi-functional bridge proteins was found to be dependent on the dose, the

  16. Polyclonal immunoglobulins from a chronic hepatitis C virus patient protect human liver-chimeric mice from infection with a homologous hepatitis C virus strain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vanwolleghem, Thomas; Bukh, Jens; Meuleman, Philip

    2008-01-01

    The role of the humoral immune response in the natural course of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is widely debated. Most chronically infected patients have immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies capable of neutralizing HCV pseudoparticles (HCVpp) in vitro. It is, however, not clear whether these Ig...... were loaded with chronic phase polyclonal IgG and challenged 3 days later with a 100% infectious dose of the acute phase H77C virus, both originating from patient H. Passive immunization induced sterilizing immunity in five of eight challenged animals. In the three nonprotected animals, the HCV...... chimeric mice, the inoculum was pre-incubated in vitro at an IgG concentration normally observed in humans. Conclusion: Polyclonal IgG from a patient with a long-standing HCV infection not only displays neutralizing activity in vitro using the HCVpp system, but also conveys sterilizing immunity toward...

  17. Alvocidib in Treating Patients With B-Cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia or Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-01

    B-cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Contiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage I Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage I Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage II Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

  18. Loss of Glycosaminoglycan Receptor Binding after Mosquito Cell Passage Reduces Chikungunya Virus Infectivity.

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    Dhiraj Acharya

    Full Text Available Chikungunya virus (CHIKV is a mosquito-transmitted alphavirus that can cause fever and chronic arthritis in humans. CHIKV that is generated in mosquito or mammalian cells differs in glycosylation patterns of viral proteins, which may affect its replication and virulence. Herein, we compare replication, pathogenicity, and receptor binding of CHIKV generated in Vero cells (mammal or C6/36 cells (mosquito through a single passage. We demonstrate that mosquito cell-derived CHIKV (CHIKV mos has slower replication than mammalian cell-derived CHIKV (CHIKV vero, when tested in both human and murine cell lines. Consistent with this, CHIKV mos infection in both cell lines produce less cytopathic effects and reduced antiviral responses. In addition, infection in mice show that CHIKV mos produces a lower level of viremia and less severe footpad swelling when compared with CHIKV vero. Interestingly, CHIKV mos has impaired ability to bind to glycosaminoglycan (GAG receptors on mammalian cells. However, sequencing analysis shows that this impairment is not due to a mutation in the CHIKV E2 gene, which encodes for the viral receptor binding protein. Moreover, CHIKV mos progenies can regain GAG receptor binding capability and can replicate similarly to CHIKV vero after a single passage in mammalian cells. Furthermore, CHIKV vero and CHIKV mos no longer differ in replication when N-glycosylation of viral proteins was inhibited by growing these viruses in the presence of tunicamycin. Collectively, these results suggest that N-glycosylation of viral proteins within mosquito cells can result in loss of GAG receptor binding capability of CHIKV and reduction of its infectivity in mammalian cells.

  19. Performance characteristics of qualified cell lines for isolation and propagation of influenza viruses for vaccine manufacturing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donis, Ruben O; Davis, C Todd; Foust, Angie; Hossain, M Jaber; Johnson, Adam; Klimov, Alexander; Loughlin, Rosette; Xu, Xiyan; Tsai, Theodore; Blayer, Simone; Trusheim, Heidi; Colegate, Tony; Fox, John; Taylor, Beverly; Hussain, Althaf; Barr, Ian; Baas, Chantal; Louwerens, Jaap; Geuns, Ed; Lee, Min-Shi; Venhuizen, Odewijk; Neumeier, Elisabeth; Ziegler, Thedi

    2014-11-12

    Cell culture is now available as a method for the production of influenza vaccines in addition to eggs. In accordance with currently accepted practice, viruses recommended as candidates for vaccine manufacture are isolated and propagated exclusively in hens' eggs prior to distribution to manufacturers. Candidate vaccine viruses isolated in cell culture are not available to support vaccine manufacturing in mammalian cell bioreactors so egg-derived viruses have to be used. Recently influenza A (H3N2) viruses have been difficult to isolate directly in eggs. As mitigation against this difficulty, and the possibility of no suitable egg-isolated candidate viruses being available, it is proposed to consider using mammalian cell lines for primary isolation of influenza viruses as candidates for vaccine production in egg and cell platforms. To investigate this possibility, we tested the antigenic stability of viruses isolated and propagated in cell lines qualified for influenza vaccine manufacture and subsequently investigated antigen yields of such viruses in these cell lines at pilot-scale. Twenty influenza A and B-positive, original clinical specimens were inoculated in three MDCK cell lines. The antigenicity of recovered viruses was tested by hemagglutination inhibition using ferret sera against contemporary vaccine viruses and the amino acid sequences of the hemagglutinin and neuraminidase were determined. MDCK cell lines proved to be highly sensitive for virus isolation. Compared to the virus sequenced from the original specimen, viruses passaged three times in the MDCK lines showed up to 2 amino acid changes in the hemagglutinin. Antigenic stability was also established by hemagglutination inhibition titers comparable to those of the corresponding reference virus. Viruses isolated in any of the three MDCK lines grew reasonably well but variably in three MDCK cells and in VERO cells at pilot-scale. These results indicate that influenza viruses isolated in vaccine

  20. Genome rearrangement affects RNA virus adaptability on prostate cancer cells

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    Kendra ePesko

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Gene order is often highly conserved within taxonomic groups, such that organisms with rearranged genomes tend to be less fit than wildtype gene orders, and suggesting natural selection favors genome architectures that maximize fitness. But it is unclear whether rearranged genomes hinder adaptability: capacity to evolutionarily improve in a new environment. Negative-sense nonsegmented RNA viruses (order Mononegavirales have specific genome architecture: 3′ UTR – core protein genes – envelope protein genes – RNA-dependent RNA-polymerase gene – 5′ UTR. To test how genome architecture affects RNA virus evolution, we examined vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV variants with the nucleocapsid (N gene moved sequentially downstream in the genome. Because RNA polymerase stuttering in VSV replication causes greater mRNA production in upstream genes, N-gene translocation towards the 5’ end leads to stepwise decreases in N transcription, viral replication and progeny production, and also impacts the activation of type 1 interferon mediated antiviral responses. We evolved VSV gene-order variants in two prostate cancer cell lines: LNCap cells deficient in innate immune response to viral infection, and PC3 cells that mount an IFN stimulated anti-viral response to infection. We observed that gene order affects phenotypic adaptability (reproductive growth; viral suppression of immune function, especially on PC3 cells that strongly select against virus infection. Overall, populations derived from the least-fit ancestor (most-altered N position architecture adapted fastest, consistent with theory predicting populations with low initial fitness should improve faster in evolutionary time. Also, we observed correlated responses to selection, where viruses improved across both hosts, rather than suffer fitness trade-offs on unselected hosts. Whole genomics revealed multiple mutations in evolved variants, some of which were conserved across selective

  1. [Characterization of patients with chronic hepatitis B virus infection without indication for treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planas, Ramon

    2014-07-01

    Chronic infection by the hepatitis B virus (HBV) is a dynamic process that results from the interaction between HBV replication and the host's immune response. In accordance with the consensus document of the European Association for the Study of the Liver, treatment is not indicated for the immune tolerant and inactive carrier phases. However, there are situations in the 2 phases (which we could call gray areas of chronic HBV infection) in which the correct categorization of patients is not easy and in which the start of treatment can be proposed. In the immune tolerant phase, treatment could be indicated for health professionals whose responsibilities require their participation in invasive procedures. Treatment could also be indicated for pregnant women who are HBeAg-positive, ALT normal and have high HBV DNA values and for whom oral antiviral treatment is indicated during the last trimester of pregnancy to reduce the risk of vertical HBV transmission from mother to child. For patients in the inactive carrier phase who are HBeAg-negative with persistent normal ALT levels and HBV DNA ≥ 2000 IU/mL, the intensity of the hepatic lesion will determine the indication for treatment. If these patients already have established cirrhosis then treatment is indicated if the HBV DNA is detectable, regardless of the ALT level. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  2. Genetic diversity of hepatitis C virus quasispecies in chronic renal failure patients in Midwest Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Amorim, Regina Maria Santos; Coelho, Alexandre; Lampe, Elisabeth; Raiol, Tainá; Martins, Regina Maria Bringel

    2014-08-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) quasispecies constitute a dynamic population in a continuous process of variation and selection. To investigate effect of the immune system on the genetic variability of HCV, we compared the hypervariable region 1 (HVR1) of immunosuppressed patients with chronic renal failure (CRF group) to immunocompetent patients with HCV chronic infection (control group). The HVR1 from ten samples of each group was amplified, cloned and sequenced. The HCV quasispecies from the control group had a higher frequency of variable sites in HVR1 (83.9 % vs 59.3 %, p quasispecies of the CRF group in the phylogenetic tree also showed the limited diversity of the quasispecies in immunosuppressed patients. Moreover, a higher variability of amino acids at positions 384, 386, 391, 394, 397, 398, 400, 405 and 410 was observed in the control group than in the CRF group, which showed a greater variability only at position 388 (p < 0.05). These data corroborates the hypothesis that the major selective pressure factor is the immune system, which promotes a high degree of diversity in the viral progeny and contributes to a constant evolution of HCV.

  3. Hepatitis B Virus Core-Related Antigens as Markers for Monitoring Chronic Hepatitis B Infection▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Danny Ka-Ho; Tanaka, Yasuhito; Lai, Ching-Lung; Mizokami, Masashi; Fung, James; Yuen, Man-Fung

    2007-01-01

    A sensitive chemiluminescence enzyme immunoassay has been developed for hepatitis B virus (HBV) core-related antigen (HBcrAg) detection. We aimed to investigate the usefulness of HBcrAg measurement for monitoring chronic hepatitis B disease. HBcrAg levels were measured by a chemiluminescence enzyme immunoassay in 54 untreated patients and 39 patients treated with either entecavir or lamivudine. The HBcrAg concentration correlated positively with the levels of serum HBV DNA (r = 0.820), intrahepatic total HBV DNA (r = 0.700), and covalently closed circular DNA (cccDNA) (r = 0.664; for all, P values were HBcrAg concentration was associated with a greater proportion of hepatitis B core antigen immunostaining. Although the differences were not statistically significant, patients with higher Knodell necroinflammation and fibrosis scores tended to have higher serum HBcrAg concentration levels. In the treated patients, the logarithmic reduction in HBcrAg at week 48 correlated positively with the logarithmic reduction of serum HBV DNA, intrahepatic total HBV DNA, and cccDNA. Of the 31 patients with undetectable serum HBV DNA (HBcrAg. A greater reduction in posttreatment HBcrAg concentration was associated with histological improvement and a decrease in hepatitis B core antigen immunostaining. HBcrAg concentrations of HBcrAg levels correlated with HBV virological markers and reflected the chronic hepatitis B disease activity in the liver. PMID:17942661

  4. Hepatitis B virus core-related antigens as markers for monitoring chronic hepatitis B infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Danny Ka-Ho; Tanaka, Yasuhito; Lai, Ching-Lung; Mizokami, Masashi; Fung, James; Yuen, Man-Fung

    2007-12-01

    A sensitive chemiluminescence enzyme immunoassay has been developed for hepatitis B virus (HBV) core-related antigen (HBcrAg) detection. We aimed to investigate the usefulness of HBcrAg measurement for monitoring chronic hepatitis B disease. HBcrAg levels were measured by a chemiluminescence enzyme immunoassay in 54 untreated patients and 39 patients treated with either entecavir or lamivudine. The HBcrAg concentration correlated positively with the levels of serum HBV DNA (r = 0.820), intrahepatic total HBV DNA (r = 0.700), and covalently closed circular DNA (cccDNA) (r = 0.664; for all, P values were HBcrAg concentration was associated with a greater proportion of hepatitis B core antigen immunostaining. Although the differences were not statistically significant, patients with higher Knodell necroinflammation and fibrosis scores tended to have higher serum HBcrAg concentration levels. In the treated patients, the logarithmic reduction in HBcrAg at week 48 correlated positively with the logarithmic reduction of serum HBV DNA, intrahepatic total HBV DNA, and cccDNA. Of the 31 patients with undetectable serum HBV DNA (HBcrAg. A greater reduction in posttreatment HBcrAg concentration was associated with histological improvement and a decrease in hepatitis B core antigen immunostaining. HBcrAg concentrations of HBcrAg levels correlated with HBV virological markers and reflected the chronic hepatitis B disease activity in the liver.

  5. Tumor necrosis factor gene polymorphisms in patients with cirrhosis from chronic hepatitis C virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yee, L J; Tang, J; Herrera, J; Kaslow, R A; van Leeuwen, D J

    2000-08-01

    Pro-inflammatory cytokines including tumour necrosis factor (TNF) mediate the pathogenesis of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. The distribution of TNF gene polymorphisms was examined among cirrhotic and non-cirrhotic patients infected with HCV. Thirty Caucasians with cirrhosis due to chronic HCV infection and 114 HCV-infected patients histopathologically free of cirrhosis were genotyped for genetic variants in TNF, lymphotoxin alpha and TNF-receptor type I using PCR-based techniques. Variability in the progression of HCV-related cirrhosis was assessed in a multivariate model including genetic and non-genetic factors such as gender, estimated duration of infection, alcohol consumption, and viral genotype. Viral genotype and non-genetic host features were not independently related to the occurrence or rate of development of cirrhosis in the patient population. In contrast, the TNF promoter variants TNF2 (-238A) and TNF3 (-308A) conferred a 3.2-fold and 5.1-fold risk of cirrhosis respectively (P = 0.03 for both). Reciprocal effects were observed with several TNF alleles and haplotypes defined by the -238G/A and -308G/A dimorphic sequences. Polymorphisms in the TNF alpha promoter appear to be associated with variability in the histological severity of chronic hepatitis C infection.

  6. Acute-onset chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy in hantavirus and hepatitis B virus coinfection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Jong Youb; Lim, Young-Ho; Choi, Eun-Hi

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) is an acquired autoimmune disorder with progressive weakness. Acute-onset CIDP resembles Guillain-Barre syndrome (GBS), a rapidly progressive disorder, and follows a chronic course. To our knowledge, no case of acute-onset CIDP in hantavirus and hepatitis B virus (HBV) coinfection has been reported previously. Clinical findings: We report a case of acute-onset CIDP that was initially diagnosed as GBS. Diagnoses: A 44-year-old male logger complained of acute quadriplegia and dyspnea. Mechanical ventilation was initiated. He was an HBV carrier with mild elevation of hepatic enzyme, and positive for hantavirus antibody. He was diagnosed with GBS and immunoglobulin therapy was administered. Interventions: After 8 months, quadriplegia and hypesthesia recurred. Immunoglobulin therapy at this time had no effect, but steroid therapy had some effect. Outcomes: A diagnosis of CIDP was made. After 2 months, severe extremity pain and dyspnea developed again, and steroid pulse therapy was initiated. Conclusion: Besides GBS, acute-onset CIDP can occur with hantavirus and HBV coinfection. Patients with this coinfection in whom GBS has been initially diagnosed should be followed up for a long time, because of the possibility of relapse or deterioration, and acute-onset CIDP should always be considered. PMID:27930572

  7. Neutralizing antibodies in patients with chronic hepatitis C, genotype 1, against a panel of genotype 1 culture viruses: lack of correlation to treatment outcome.

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    Jannie Pedersen

    Full Text Available The correlation of neutralizing antibodies to treatment outcome in patients with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV infection has not been established. The aim of this study was to determine whether neutralizing antibodies could be used as an outcome predictor in patients with chronic HCV, genotype 1, infection treated with pegylated interferon-α and ribavirin. Thirty-nine patients with chronic hepatitis C, genotype 1a or 1b, with either sustained virologic response (n = 23 or non-sustained virologic response (n = 16 were enrolled. Samples taken prior to treatment were tested for their ability to neutralize 6 different HCV genotype 1 cell culture recombinants (1a: H77/JFH1, TN/JFH1, DH6/JFH1; 1b: J4/JFH1, DH1/JFH1, DH5/JFH1. The results were expressed as the highest dilution yielding 50% neutralization (NAb50-titer. We observed no genotype or subtype specific differences in NAb50-titers between patients with chronic HCV infection with and without sustained virologic response when tested against any of the included culture viruses. However, NAb50-titers varied significantly with a mean reciprocal NAb50-titer of 800 (range: 100-6400 against DH6/JFH1 compared to a mean NAb50-titer of 50 (range: <50-400 against all other included isolates. Subsequent studies demonstrated that the efficient neutralization of DH6/JFH1 could be linked to engineered adaptive mutations in the envelope-2 protein. In analysis of envelope 1 and 2 sequences of HCV, recovered from a subset of patients, we observed no apparent link between relatedness of patient sequences with culture viruses used and the corresponding neutralization results. In conclusion, pre-treatment levels of neutralizing antibodies against HCV genotype 1 isolates could not predict treatment outcome in patients with chronic HCV infection. High neutralization susceptibility of DH6/JFH1 could be correlated with adaptive envelope mutations previously highlighted as important for neutralization. Our

  8. Epidemiology of acute and chronic hepatitis B virus infection in Norway, 1992-2009

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    Blystad Hans

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Norway is classified as a low prevalence country for hepatitis B virus infection. Vaccination is only recommended for risk groups (intravenous drug users (IDUs, Men who have Sex with Men (MSM, immigrants and contacts of known carriers. We describe the epidemiology of reported cases of hepatitis B in Norway, during the years 1992-2009 in order to assess the validity of current risk groups and recommend preventive measures. Methods We used case based data from the national surveillance system on acute and chronic hepatitis B. The Norwegian Statistics Bureau provided population and migration data and the Norwegian Institute for Alcohol and Drug Research the estimated number of active IDUs between 2002-2007. Incidence rates (IR and incidence rate ratios (IRR for acute hepatitis B and notification rates (NR and notification rate ratios (NRR for chronic hepatitis B with 95% confidence intervals were calculated. Results The annual IR of acute hepatitis B ranged from 0.7/100,000 (1992 to 10.6/100,000 (1999. Transmission occurred mainly among IDUs (64% or through sexual contact (24%. The risk of acquiring acute hepatitis B was highest in people aged 20-29 (IRR = 6.6 [3.3-13.3], and in males (IRR = 2.4 [1.7-3.3]. We observed two peaks of newly reported chronic hepatitis B cases in 2003 and 2009 (NR = 17.6/100,000 and 17.4/100,000, respectively. Chronic hepatitis B was more likely to be diagnosed among immigrants than among Norwegians (NRR = 93 [71.9-120.6], and among those 20-29 compared to those 50-59 (NRR = 5.2 [3.5-7.9]. Conclusions IDUs remain the largest risk group for acute hepatitis B. The observed peaks of chronic hepatitis B are related to increased immigration from high endemic countries and screening and vaccination of these groups is important to prevent further spread of infection. Universal screening of pregnant women should be introduced. A universal vaccination strategy should be considered, given the high cost of

  9. The Distribution of Hepatitis C Virus Genotypes in Patients with Chronic Hepatitis C Infection

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    Sevin Kırdar

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Hepatitis C virus (HCV infection represents a major public health problem worldwide. HCV can cause chronic hepatitis infection which may ultimately result in cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Seven major genotypes and more than 100 subtypes of HCV are shown by sequence analysis. Genotype 1 is associated with more severity of liver disease than genotypes 2 and 3 and sustained response totreatment is known to be less. In this study, we aimed to determine the HCV genotype distribution in chronic hepatitis C patients. Materials and Methods: A total of 50 patients with chronic HCV infection who attended the Microbiology Laboratory at Adnan Menderes University Hospital between August 2007 and December 2010 found to be positive for anti-HCV and HCV-RNA were included in the study. Anti-HCV testing was performed using microparticle Enzyme-Linked immunosorbent assay test kit (Murex Anti-HCV version 4, UK with autoanalyser (Grifols Triturus, Spain. The quantification of serum HCV-RNA was carried out by a realtime polymerase chain reaction method with two different systems (Cobas TaqMan HCV, Roche Diagnostics, Germany and RotorGene 6000,Corbett Research, USA. HCV genotype analysis was performed by using a kit (HCV-TS; AB Analitica, Italy based on the reverse hybridization of 5’-untranslated region and amplified products with genotype-specific probes. Results: The mean age of the 50 chronic hepatitis C patients [27 (54% female, and 23 (46% male] was 57.1±14.3 years. Genotype 1b was found in 36 (72% subjects, genotype 1a in nine (18%, genotype 2b in one (2%, genotype 3 in one (2%, and genotype 1a/1b was found in three (6% patients. No statistically significant difference was detected in HCV-RNA quantities and anti-HCV index between HCV genotypes (p>0.05. Conclusion: Compatible with the previous data obtained in Turkey, genotype 1b was found to be the most common HCV genotype in patients with chronic hepatitis C followed in our hospital.

  10. PREVALENCE OF DIABETES MELLITUS TYPE 2 IN PATIENTS WITH CHRONIC HEPATITIS C VIRUS INFECTION

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    Ranjeet

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: There is a growing body of literature on the relationship of Hepatitis C Virus (HCV infection and diabetes mellitus type 2 as its unique extrahepatic manifestation. This association was for the first time made by Allison et al. in 1994 . [1] Since then a number of observational studies have been published on the prevalence of diabetes in HCV infection and also the link between association of cirrhosis with diabetes mellitus. AIMS : To study the prevalence of diabetes mellitus type 2 in patients diagnosed to have chronic hepatitis C virus infection. To compare it with the prevalence of diabetes mellitus type 2 in general population. SETTINGS AND DESIGN : A case control study. Participants were the subjects attending the OPD / indoor of Sri Guru Ramdas Institute of Medical Sciences and Research, Amritsar. PATIENTS AND METHODS : 50 patients older than 18 years, with chronic HCV infection confirmed by ELISA, were investigated for their blood counts, LFTs, prothrombin time , serum proteins, glycosylated hemoglobin levels and abdominal ultrasonography after applying the exclusion criteria. Detailed clinical examination was done to assess for signs of encephalopathy and ascites. An equal number of age and sex matched , HCV seronegative patients with normal liver function tests were taken as controls. The prevalence of diabetes mellitus was then determined among the two groups. A relationship between HCV and Diabetes mellitus type 2 was then established. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS USED: Data was expressed as mean + SD. For categorical variables a chi square test was applied and p value was calculated. For the comparison of continuous data, the student t – test was used. Probability levels less than 0.05 were considered significant. RESULTS : 50% ( 25 out of 50 patients with chronic hepatitis C infection were diabetic while 30% (15 out of 50 of the controls were diabetic. The difference was statistically significant ( p=0.041 . Further , of the

  11. Neuroblastoma cell lines contain pluripotent tumor initiating cells that are susceptible to a targeted oncolytic virus.

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    Yonatan Y Mahller

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Although disease remission can frequently be achieved for patients with neuroblastoma, relapse is common. The cancer stem cell theory suggests that rare tumorigenic cells, resistant to conventional therapy, are responsible for relapse. If true for neuroblastoma, improved cure rates may only be achieved via identification and therapeutic targeting of the neuroblastoma tumor initiating cell. Based on cues from normal stem cells, evidence for tumor populating progenitor cells has been found in a variety of cancers. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Four of eight human neuroblastoma cell lines formed tumorspheres in neural stem cell media, and all contained some cells that expressed neurogenic stem cell markers including CD133, ABCG2, and nestin. Three lines tested could be induced into multi-lineage differentiation. LA-N-5 spheres were further studied and showed a verapamil-sensitive side population, relative resistance to doxorubicin, and CD133+ cells showed increased sphere formation and tumorigenicity. Oncolytic viruses, engineered to be clinically safe by genetic mutation, are emerging as next generation anticancer therapeutics. Because oncolytic viruses circumvent typical drug-resistance mechanisms, they may represent an effective therapy for chemotherapy-resistant tumor initiating cells. A Nestin-targeted oncolytic herpes simplex virus efficiently replicated within and killed neuroblastoma tumor initiating cells preventing their ability to form tumors in athymic nude mice. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results suggest that human neuroblastoma contains tumor initiating cells that may be effectively targeted by an oncolytic virus.

  12. Replication of clinical hepatitis B virus isolate and its application for selecting antiviral agents for chronic hepatitis B patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yin-ping Lu; Tao Guo; Bao-Ju Wang; Ji-Hua Dong; Jian-Fang Zhu; Zhao Liu; Meng-Ji Lu; Dong-Liang Yang

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To establish a cell model harboring replicative clinical hepatitis B virus (HBV) isolates and evaluate its application in individualized selection of anti-HBV agents for chronic hepatitis B (CHB) Patients.METHODS: The full-length HBV genomic DNA from 8 CHB patients was amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). All the patients were treated with lamivudine for at least seven months and finally became resistant to lamivudine. The amplified HBV DNA fragments were inserted into pHY106 vectors by Sap digestion. The recombinant plasmids containing 1.1 copies of HBV genome were transiently transfected into Huh7 cell line, and the levels of HBsAg, HBeAg and intercellular HBV replicative intermediates were determined by ELISA and Southern blot analysis, respectively, with or without lamivudine and adefovir treatment. The antiviral treatment with adefovir was administered to the patients and analyzed in parallel.RESULTS: A total of 25 independent HBV isolates were obtained from the sera of 8 patients, each patient had at least two isolates. One isolate from each individual was selected and subcloned into pHY106 vector, including 5 isolates with YVDD mutation and 3 isolates with YIDD mutation. All recombinant plasmids harboring HBV isolates were transfected into Huh7 cells. The results indicated that HBV genome carried in HBV replicons of clinical HBV isolates could effectively replicate and express in Huh7 cells. Adefovir, but not lamivudine, inhibited HBV replication both in vitro and in vivo, and in vitro inhibition was dose-dependent.CONCLUSION: The novel method described herein enables individualized selection of anti-HBV agents in clinic and is useful in future studies of antiviral therapy for CHB.

  13. Hepatitis B virus genotypes in chronic liver disease patients from New Delhi, India

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Saket Chattopadhyay; Bhudev Chandra Das; Premashis Kar

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To study the Hepatitis B virus (HBV) genotypes and their effect on the progression and outcome in patients with chronic liver diseases from New Delhi, India.METHODS: Sera from 100 HBV-related chronic liver disease (CLDB) cases were tested for HBV genotype using Polymerase Chain Reaction-Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) and Type-specific primers-based PCR (TSP-PCR) targeting to the surface (S)gene encoding hepatitis B surface antigen.RESULTS: Only genotypes A and D were present and genotype D was dominant. Genotype D was present in all CLDB patient categories. The genotype distribution for the 100 patients with CLDB was as follows: genotype A, 16/100 (16%) (7/40- 17% chronic hepatitis B (CHB);8/47, 17%, HBV-related cirrhosis (CRB); 1/13, 7.6%,HBV-related hepatocellular carcinoma (HCCB); genotype D- 84/100 (84%) (32/40- 80% CHB; 38/47- 81%, CRB;11/13, 85%, HCCB); genotype A + D, 3/100 (3%) (1/40-3% CHB; 1/47- 2%, CRB; 1/13, 7.6%, HCCB); C, 0; B, 0;E, 0; F, 0; G 0, H 0; (P < 0.01, genotype D vs A).CONCLUSION: Only HBV genotypes A and D were present in patients with CLDB from New Delhi, India.Compared with genotype D, genotype A patients had no significant clinical or biochemical differences (P > 0.05).Mixed infection with genotype A and D were seen in 3%of the cases. Genotype D was the dominant genotype prevalent in all patient categories.

  14. Vitamin D status and serum ferritin concentration in chronic hepatitis C virus type 1 infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amanzada, Ahmad; Goralczyk, Armin D; Moriconi, Federico; van Thiel, David H; Ramadori, Giuliano; Mihm, Sabine

    2013-09-01

    The circulating 25-hydroxylated form of vitamin D(3), 25(OH)D, and serum ferritin concentrations have been described to be associated with disease progression in chronic hepatitis C. Both parameters also have been assessed with regard to treatment outcome, however, with divergent results. This study examined both the pre- and posttreatment serum concentrations of 25(OH)D and ferritin in 191 patients infected chronically with hepatitis C virus (HCV) type 1 with regard to liver inflammatory activity (grading), disease progression in terms of fibrosis (staging) and an antiviral treatment outcome. Mean pretreatment serum 25(OH)D and ferritin concentrations were 18 ± 10 ng/ml and 280 ± 225 µg/L, respectively. Multivariate analysis revealed lower pretreatment serum 25(OH)D and higher ferritin concentrations to be significantly related to both severity of inflammatory activity and of fibrotic alterations. Pretreatment serum ferritin concentration, furthermore, unlike 25(OH)D concentration, was found to be associated with a sustained virological response by uni- and multivariate analyses. A sustained virological response was featured by a significant increase in serum 25(OH)D levels (18 ± 10 ng/ml vs. 22 ± 11 ng/ml; P serum ferritin concentration (191 ± 156 µg/L vs. 103 ± 63 µg/L; P serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and γ-glutamyl-transferase (γ-GT) activities. Taken together, decreased 25(OH)D and increased ferritin serum levels indicate the severity of hepatic inflammation and fibrosis in patients infected chronically with HCV type 1. Elevated ferritin, furthermore, was found to be an independent predictor for standard IFN-based therapy responsiveness. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Association between Interleukin-12 Receptor B1 Gene Polymorphism (rs401502 C/G and Chronic Hepatitis B Virus Infection

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    M Salehi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Hepatitis B virus (HBV infection is a major health problem worldwide and may lead to serious clinical complications, including chronic hepatitis, liver cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. The host’s genetic background in immune system genes is a crucial etiologic factor in progression of HBV infection to chronic disease or clearance of the virus from the body. Interleukin 12 and its receptor (IL12 Receptor play an important role in the clearance of viral infections, especially HBV. The aim of this study is to investigate the association between interleukin 12 receptor B1 gene single nucleotide polymorphism (rs401502 C/G and chronic HBV infection. Methods: In this case control study, genomic DNA of 105 chronically HBV infected patients and 105 healthy controls was extracted. Genotype of (rs401502 C/G single nucleotide polymorphism was determined using polymerase chain reaction restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP method. Results: The frequency of (rs401502 C/G SNP for GG, GC, CC genotypes and G, C alleles was %53.3, %41, %5.7 and %73.3, %26.7 in the chronic patients and %51.4, %41, %7.6 %71.9 , and %28.1 in the control group, respectively. Statistical analysis of the results showed that there was not any significant difference between the case and control groups (p=0.851. Conclusion: In this study, no association was found between (rs401502 C/G single nucleotide polymorphism within IL12RB1 gene and chronic hepatitis B virus infection. It seems that this SNP does not play a crucial role in susceptibility to HBV chronic infection

  16. Delayed Viral Clearance after 6-Week Treatment with Peginterferon Plus Ribavirin in a Patient with Chronic Hepatitis C Virus Genotype 1b

    OpenAIRE

    Akira Sato; Toshiya Ishii; Kayo Adachi; Hideaki Takahashi; Fumiaki Sano; Nobuyuki Matsumoto

    2016-01-01

    Following interferon-based therapy for chronic hepatitis C, the negativity of hepatitis C virus RNA is essential to achieve viral clearance at the end of treatment. We report a case of clearance of chronic hepatitis C virus infection following early discontinuation (at 6 weeks) of peginterferon plus ribavirin therapy, without negativity for hepatitis C virus RNA during the treatment period. The patient was a 76-year-old Japanese male infected with hepatitis C virus genotype 1b and TT of IL28B...

  17. The effect of neurotoxin on rabies virus binding to mouse neuroblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, D J; Phillips, R M

    1991-08-01

    Mouse neuroblastoma cells were exposed to alpha bungarotoxin, a neurotoxin known to inhibit rabies virus binding to the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor located at the neuromuscular junction in muscle tissue. The total amount of 3H-CVS virus that bound to neurotoxin treated cells was separated into specific and non-specific binding using a cold competition assay. Comparison of untreated and neurotoxin treated cells demonstrated that the majority of cell-associated virus in untreated cells was of a specific nature whereas the majority of the cell-associated virus in neurotoxin treated cells was due to non-specific binding.

  18. Hepatitis C virus infection of human hepatoma cell line 7721 in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi-Qiang Song; Fei Hao; Feng Min; Qiao-Yu Ma; Guo-Dong Liu

    2001-01-01

    AIM To establish a cell culture system with long-term replication of hepatitis C virus in vitro.``METHODS Human hepatoma cell line 7721 was tested for its susceptibility to HCV by incubating with a serum from a patient with chronic hepatitis C. Cells and supernatant were harvested at various phases during the culturing periods The presence of HCV RNA, the expression of HCV antigens in cells and/or supernatant were examined by RT-PCR, in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry respectively.``RESULTS The intracellular HCV RNA was first detected on d 2 after infection and then could be intermittently detected in both cells and supernatant over a period of at least three months. The expression of HCV NS3, CP10antigens could be observed in cells. The fresh cells could be infected by supematant from cultured infected cells and the transmission of viral genome from HCV-infected 7721 cells to PBMCs was also observed.``CONCLUSION The hepatoma line 7721 is not only susceptible to HCV but also supports its long-term replication in vitro.``

  19. Infection of Mosquito Cells (C6/36) by Dengue-2 Virus Interferes with Subsequent Infection by Yellow Fever Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrao, Emiliana Pereira; da Fonseca, Benedito Antônio Lopes

    2016-02-01

    Dengue is one of the most important diseases caused by arboviruses in the world. Yellow fever is another arthropod-borne disease of great importance to public health that is endemic to tropical regions of Africa and the Americas. Both yellow fever and dengue viruses are flaviviruses transmitted by Aedes aegypti mosquitoes, and then, it is reasonable to consider that in a given moment, mosquito cells could be coinfected by both viruses. Therefore, we decided to evaluate if sequential infections of dengue and yellow fever viruses (and vice-versa) in mosquito cells could affect the virus replication patterns. Using immunofluorescence and real-time PCR-based replication assays in Aedes albopictus C6/36 cells with single or sequential infections with both viruses, we demonstrated the occurrence of viral interference, also called superinfection exclusion, between these two viruses. Our results show that this interference pattern is particularly evident when cells were first infected with dengue virus and subsequently with yellow fever virus (YFV). Reduction in dengue virus replication, although to a lower extent, was also observed when C6/36 cells were initially infected with YFV followed by dengue virus infection. Although the importance that these findings have on nature is unknown, this study provides evidence, at the cellular level, of the occurrence of replication interference between dengue and yellow fever viruses and raises the question if superinfection exclusion could be a possible explanation, at least partially, for the reported lack of urban yellow fever occurrence in regions where a high level of dengue transmission occurs.

  20. EBV infection is common in gingival epithelial cells of the periodontium and worsens during chronic periodontitis.

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    Séverine Vincent-Bugnas

    Full Text Available An amplifying role for oral epithelial cells (ECs in Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV infection has been postulated to explain oral viral shedding. However, while lytic or latent EBV infections of oro/nasopharyngeal ECs are commonly detected under pathological conditions, detection of EBV-infected ECs in healthy conditions is very rare. In this study, a simple non-surgical tissue sampling procedure was used to investigate EBV infection in the periodontal epithelium that surrounds and attaches teeth to the gingiva. Surprisingly, we observed that the gingival ECs of the periodontium (pECs are commonly infected with EBV and may serve as an important oral reservoir of latently EBV-infected cells. We also found that the basal level of epithelial EBV-infection is significantly increased in chronic periodontitis, a common inflammatory disease that undermines the integrity of tooth-supporting tissues. Moreover, the level of EBV infection was found to correlate with disease severity. In inflamed tissues, EBV-infected pECs appear to be prone to apoptosis and to produce larger amounts of CCL20, a pivotal inflammatory chemokine that controls tissue infiltration by immune cells. Our discovery that the periodontal epithelium is a major site of latent EBV infection sheds a new light on EBV persistence in healthy carriers and on the role of this ubiquitous virus in periodontitis. Moreover, the identification of this easily accessible site of latent infection may encourage new approaches to investigate and monitor other EBV-associated disorders.

  1. Combination ledipasvir-sofosbuvir for the treatment of chronic hepatitis C virus infection: a review and clinical perspective

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    Nkuize M

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Marcel Nkuize,1 Thomas Sersté,1,2 Michel Buset,1 Jean-Pierre Mulkay11Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Saint-Pierre University Hospital, 2Department of Gastroenterology, Pancreatology and Hepatology, Hôpital Academique Erasme, Université Libre de Bruxelles, Brussels, Belgium Abstract: Chronic hepatitis C treatment has continued to evolve, and interferon-free, oral treatment with direct-acting antiviral agents is the current standard of care. Recently, a new treatment, which is a combination of two direct-acting antiviral agents, ledipasvir 90 mg (anti-NS5A and sofosbuvir 400 mg (anti-NS5B, has been approved in the US and the European Union for the treatment of chronic hepatitis C viral infection. In Phase III trials among chronic hepatitis C virus genotype 1 monoinfected (treatment-naïve, treatment-experienced, and with advanced liver disease or posttransplant patients and HIV–hepatitis C virus coinfected patients, the ledipasvir-sofosbuvir fixed-dose combination is associated with a higher rate of sustained virologic response at 12 weeks after therapy has ceased. According to preliminary data, the ledipasvir-sofosbuvir combination also may be effective against hepatitis C genotype 4 virus infection. The ledipasvir-sofosbuvir combination taken orally is generally well-tolerated. Moreover, the combination treatment may suppress the effect of predictive factors of chronic hepatitis C that have historically been known to be associated with treatment failure. Thus, the fixed-dose single-tablet combination of ledipasvir-sofosbuvir offers a new era for the effective treatment of a variety of patients suffering from chronic hepatitis C virus infection.Keywords: ledipasvir, liver disease, ethnicity, DAA, HIV

  2. Prostaglandin A1 inhibits replication of Mayaro virus in Aedes albopictus cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, J A; Rebello, M A

    1995-01-01

    Prostaglandin A1 (PGA1) reduced Mayaro virus replication in Aedes albopictus (mosquito) cells in culture. The highest nontoxic dose of PGA1, 7.5 microM, decreased virus production by 90%. In Mayaro virus-infected cells, PGA1 inhibited virus-specific protein synthesis. However, in mock-infected cells the presence of PGA1 stimulated the synthesis of several proteins with molecular masses of 70, 57 and 23 kDa, respectively. The data obtained from this study show that PGA1 plays a role in the metabolic regulation of Aedes albopictus cells, blocking the synthesis of Mayaro virus and inducing the synthesis of cellular polypeptides.

  3. Epstein-Barr virus DNA load in chronic lymphocytic leukemia is an independent predictor of clinical course and survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visco, Carlo; Falisi, Erika; Young, Ken H; Pascarella, Michela; Perbellini, Omar; Carli, Giuseppe; Novella, Elisabetta; Rossi, Davide; Giaretta, Ilaria; Cavallini, Chiara; Scupoli, Maria Teresa; De Rossi, Anita; D'Amore, Emanuele Stefano Giovanni; Rassu, Mario; Gaidano, Gianluca; Pizzolo, Giovanni; Ambrosetti, Achille; Rodeghiero, Francesco

    2015-07-30

    The relation between Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) DNA load and clinical course of patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is unknown. We assessed EBV DNA load by quantitative PCR at CLL presentation in mononuclear cells (MNC) of 220 prospective patients that were enrolled and followed-up in two major Institutions. In 20 patients EBV DNA load was also assessed on plasma samples. Forty-one age-matched healthy subjects were tested for EBV DNA load on MNC. Findings were validated in an independent retrospective cohort of 112 patients with CLL. EBV DNA load was detectable in 59%, and high (≥2000 copies/µg DNA) in 19% of patients, but it was negative in plasma samples. EBV DNA load was significantly higher in CLL patients than in healthy subjects (P EBV load and clinical stage or biological variables, except for 11q deletion (P = .004), CD38 expression (P = .003), and NOTCH1 mutations (P = .05). High EBV load led to a 3.14-fold increase in the hazard ratio of death and to a shorter overall survival (OS; P = .001). Poor OS was attributable, at least in part, to shorter time-to-first-treatment (P = .0008), with no higher risk of Richter's transformation or second cancer. Multivariate analysis selected high levels of EBV load as independent predictor of OS after controlling for confounding clinical and biological variables. EBV DNA load at presentation is an independent predictor of OS in patients with CLL.

  4. A new permanent cell line derived from the bank vole (Myodes glareolus as cell culture model for zoonotic viruses

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    Herzog Sibylle

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Approximately 60% of emerging viruses are of zoonotic origin, with three-fourths derived from wild animals. Many of these zoonotic diseases are transmitted by rodents with important information about their reservoir dynamics and pathogenesis missing. One main reason for the gap in our knowledge is the lack of adequate cell culture systems as models for the investigation of rodent-borne (robo viruses in vitro. Therefore we established and characterized a new cell line, BVK168, using the kidney of a bank vole, Myodes glareolus, the most abundant member of the Arvicolinae trapped in Germany. Results BVK168 proved to be of epithelial morphology expressing tight junctions as well as adherence junction proteins. The BVK168 cells were analyzed for their infectability by several arbo- and robo-viruses: Vesicular stomatitis virus, vaccinia virus, cowpox virus, Sindbis virus, Pixuna virus, Usutu virus, Inkoo virus, Puumalavirus, and Borna disease virus (BDV. The cell line was susceptible for all tested viruses, and most interestingly also for the difficult to propagate BDV. Conclusion In conclusion, the newly established cell line from wildlife rodents seems to be an excellent tool for the isolation and characterization of new rodent-associated viruses and may be used as in vitro-model to study properties and pathogenesis of these agents.

  5. Characterization of cell lines stably transfected with rubella virus replicons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tzeng, Wen-Pin; Xu, Jie [Department of Biology, Georgia State University, P.O. Box 4010, Atlanta GA 30302-4010 (United States); Frey, Teryl K., E-mail: tfrey@gsu.edu [Department of Biology, Georgia State University, P.O. Box 4010, Atlanta GA 30302-4010 (United States)

    2012-07-20

    Rubella virus (RUBV) replicons expressing a drug resistance gene and a gene of interest were used to select cell lines uniformly harboring the replicon. Replicons expressing GFP and a virus capsid protein GFP fusion (C-GFP) were compared. Vero or BHK cells transfected with either replicon survived drug selection and grew into a monolayer. However, survival was {approx}9-fold greater following transfection with the C-GFP-replicon than with the GFP-expressing replicon and while the C-GFP-replicon cells grew similarly to non-transfected cells, the GFP-replicon cells grew slower. Neither was due to the ability of the CP to enhance RNA synthesis but survival during drug selection was correlated with the ability of CP to inhibit apoptosis. Additionally, C-GFP-replicon cells were not cured of the replicon in the absence of drug selection. Interferon-alpha suppressed replicon RNA and protein synthesis, but did not cure the cells, explaining in part the ability of RUBV to establish persistent infections.

  6. T-cell responses to dengue virus in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurane, Ichiro; Matsutani, Takaji; Suzuki, Ryuji; Takasaki, Tomohiko; Kalayanarooj, Siripen; Green, Sharone; Rothman, Alan L; Ennis, Francis A

    2011-12-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in most tropical and subtropical areas of the world. Dengue virus infection induces specific CD4+CD8- and CD8+CD4- T cells in humans. In primary infection, T-cell responses to DENV are serotype cross-reactive, but the highest response is to the serotype that caused the infection. The epitopes recognized by DENV-specific T cells are located in most of the structural and non-structural proteins, but NS3 is the protein that is most dominantly recognized. In patients with dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) caused by secondary DENV infection, T cells are highly activated in vivo. These highly activated T cells are DENV-specific and oligoclonal. Multiple kinds of lymphokines are produced by the activated T cells, and it has been hypothesized that these lymphokines are responsible for induction of plasma leakage, one of the most characteristic features of DHF. Thus, T-cells play important roles in the pathogenesis of DHF and in the recovery from DENV infection.

  7. Effect of 2-(a Hydroxybenzyl) Benzimidazole on Teschen Disease Virus, Pig Enteric Viruses, and Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus in Kidney Cell Cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dardiri, A H; Delay, P D; Bachrach, H L

    1964-07-01

    The synthetic compound, 2-((a) hydroxybenzyl) benzimidazole (HBB) partially inhibited the cytopathogenicity and multiplication of Teschen disease virus (TDV) and 6 enteric-cytopathogenic porcine orphan (ECPO) viruses in swine cells but not of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) in bovine kidney cells. For FMDV, there appeared to be a slight enhancement in virus yield and in cytopathic effect when HBB was present. The inhibition of the viral cytopathic effect and reproduction of TDV and ECPO viruses was related to the concentration of HBB. At the inhibitory level, the compound did not cause any changes in the microscopic structure of pig kidney or bovine kidney cells. The suppression of TDV multiplication was reversed when HBB was removed. The compound did not inactivate TDV or FMDV.

  8. Delayed IFN response differentiates replication of West Nile virus and Japanese encephalitis virus in human neuroblastoma and glioblastoma cells.