WorldWideScience

Sample records for cell tumors treatment

  1. Treatment Option Overview (Extragonadal Germ Cell Tumors)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... following PDQ summaries: Ovarian Germ Cell Tumors Treatment Testicular Cancer Treatment Age and gender can affect the risk ... summaries of the latest published information on cancer prevention, detection, genetics, treatment, supportive care, and complementary and ...

  2. Ovarian Germ Cell Tumors Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... c) cancer cells are found in the pelvic peritoneum. In stage I , cancer is found in one ... in the abdomen ) or in washings of the peritoneum ( tissue lining the peritoneal cavity). Stage II Enlarge ...

  3. Treatment Resistance Mechanisms of Malignant Glioma Tumor Stem Cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malignant gliomas are highly lethal because of their resistance to conventional treatments. Recent evidence suggests that a minor subpopulation of cells with stem cell properties reside within these tumors. These tumor stem cells are more resistant to radiation and chemotherapies than their counterpart differentiated tumor cells and may underlie the persistence and recurrence of tumors following treatment. The various mechanisms by which tumor stem cells avoid or repair the damaging effects of cancer therapies are discussed

  4. Treatment Resistance Mechanisms of Malignant Glioma Tumor Stem Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmalz, Philip G.R. [Surgical and Molecular Neuro-Oncology Unit, National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Howard Hughes Medical Institute, National Institutes of Health Research Scholars Program, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Shen, Michael J.; Park, John K., E-mail: parkjk@ninds.nih.gov [Surgical and Molecular Neuro-Oncology Unit, National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States)

    2011-02-10

    Malignant gliomas are highly lethal because of their resistance to conventional treatments. Recent evidence suggests that a minor subpopulation of cells with stem cell properties reside within these tumors. These tumor stem cells are more resistant to radiation and chemotherapies than their counterpart differentiated tumor cells and may underlie the persistence and recurrence of tumors following treatment. The various mechanisms by which tumor stem cells avoid or repair the damaging effects of cancer therapies are discussed.

  5. Multifunctional Nucleic Acids for Tumor Cell Treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pofahl, Monika; Wengel, Jesper; Mayer, Günter

    2014-01-01

    We report on a multifunctional nucleic acid, termed AptamiR, composed of an aptamer domain and an antimiR domain. This composition mediates cell specific delivery of antimiR molecules for silencing of endogenous micro RNA. The introduced multifunctional molecule preserves cell targeting, anti......-proliferative and antimiR function in one 37-nucleotide nucleic acid molecule. It inhibits cancer cell growth and induces gene expression that is pathologically damped by an oncomir. These findings will have a strong impact on future developments regarding aptamer- and antimiR-related applications for tumor targeting...

  6. Training stem cells for treatment of malignant brain tumors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shengwen; Calvin; Li; Mustafa; H; Kabeer; Long; T; Vu; Vic; Keschrumrus; Hong; Zhen; Yin; Brent; A; Dethlefs; Jiang; F; Zhong; John; H; Weiss; William; G; Loudon

    2014-01-01

    The treatment of malignant brain tumors remains a challenge. Stem cell technology has been applied in the treatment of brain tumors largely because of the ability of some stem cells to infiltrate into regions within the brain where tumor cells migrate as shown in preclinical studies. However, not all of these efforts can translate in the effective treatment that improves the quality of life for pa-tients. Here, we perform a literature review to identify the problems in the field. Given the lack of efficacy of most stem cell-based agents used in the treatment of malignant brain tumors, we found that stem cell distribution(i.e., only a fraction of stem cells applied capable of targeting tumors) are among the limiting factors. We provide guidelines for potential improvements in stem cell distribution. Specifically, we use an engineered tissue graft platform that replicates the in vivo microenvironment, and provide our data to validate that this culture platform is viable for producing stem cells that have better stem cell distribution than with the Petri dish culture system.

  7. Treatment Option Overview (Ovarian Germ Cell Tumors)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... c) cancer cells are found in the pelvic peritoneum. In stage I , cancer is found in one ... in the abdomen ) or in washings of the peritoneum ( tissue lining the peritoneal cavity). Stage II Enlarge ...

  8. Brain tumor stem cells as research and treatment targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is one of the most malignant forms of human cancer. Despite intensive treatment, the mean survival of GBM patients remains about 1 year. Recent cancer studies revealed that cancer tissues are pathologically heterogeneous and only a small population of cells has the specific ability to reinitiate cancer. This small cell population is called cancer stem cells (CSCs); in brain tumors these are known as brain tumor stem cells (BTSCs). The identification of BTSCs yielded new insights into chemo- and radioresistance, by which BTSCs can survive selectively and initiate recurrence. Research focused on BTSCs as treatment targets may contribute to the discovery of new therapeutic strategies. Clinical and basic research studies gradually led to improved outcomes in patients with brain tumors. Stupp et al. reported a mean survival of 14.6 months in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) patients treated with radiotherapy plus temozolomide and 12.1 months in those subjected to radiotherapy alone. Earlier cancer therapies primarily targeted rapidly dividing cells but not minor populations of slowly dividing cells that contain BTSCs. Accumulating evidence suggests that BTSCs may represent an excellent tool for discovering new strategies to treat GBM patients. In this review, we present evidence supporting the CSC model of tumor progression, and discuss difficulties encountered in CSC research and experimental and therapeutic implications. (author)

  9. Treatment Option Overview (Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors / Islet Cell Tumors)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... other parts of the body. The plan for cancer treatment depends on where the NET is found in the pancreas and whether it has spread. The process used to find out if cancer has spread within the pancreas or to other parts of the body is ...

  10. Malignant transformation and treatment of cystic mixed germ cell tumor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yapeng Zhao; Hongyu Duan; Qinghui Zhang; Bingxin Shi; Hui Liang; Yuqi Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The authors report an extremely unusual presentation and management of a children pineal mixed germ cell tumor mainly composed of immature teratoma, aiming to summarize main theraptic points by literature review. Methods: A cystic lesion located in the rear of third ventricle in a child was detected 3 years ago with no other therapy performed except for a ventriculo-peritoneal shunt. During the following 3 years, intermitted regular brain MRI demonstrated no evidence of lesion aggrandizement. However from 20 days before admission to our institute the patient began to present acutely with exacerbating clinical symptoms meanwhile brain MRI showed signs of abrupt revulsions of initial lesion without any incentive cause. Neurological examination revealed a significant rising of serum tumor marker level. Then surgical resection was performed immediately after admission which was followed by correlative two-course chemotherapy. Results: Postoperative brain MRI demonstrated totally removing of the lesion in rear of third ventricle. Serum tumor marker level decreased remarkably after surgery and declined to normal level after two-course chemotherapy. No obvious neurological deficit occurred except for short-term memory difficulty which gradually recovered within two weeks. Soon after the second course chemotherapy the patient was currently asymptomatic and returned to school. Conclusions: (1) To ensure definitive diagnosis and proper therapecutic protocols benefit from grasping clinical features of mixed germ cell tumor. (2) Overall preoperative investigation including serum tumor marker level is as critical as neurological imaging examination. (3) Surgical excision is confirmed to be the key modality of treatment. With the regarding of mixed germ cell tumor, never highlight total resection too much. (4) Postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy is recommended as further intensive treatment to improve the prognosis of mix germ cell tumor.

  11. Canine mast cell tumors: diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garrett LD

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Laura D Garrett Department of Veterinary Clinical Medicine, University of Illinois College of Veterinary Medicine, Urbana, IL, USA Abstract: Mast cell tumors (MCTs are the most common malignant skin cancer in dogs, and significant variability exists in their biological behavior. Most MCTs are cured with appropriate local therapy, but a subset shows malignant behavior with the potential to spread to lymph nodes, liver, spleen, and other areas and to thus become a systemic cancer. Because of this variable behavior, it is difficult to predict how any individual tumor is going to behave. The variability thus creates uncertainty in deciding what a particular dog's prognosis is, whether staging tests to assess for metastasis are needed, and even what treatments will be necessary for best outcome. In addition to controversies over the potential for development of systemic disease, or diffuse metastasis, controversies also exist over what treatment is needed to best attain local control of these tumors. This article will briefly discuss the diagnosis of MCTs in dogs and will summarize the literature in regards to the controversial topics surrounding the more aggressive form of this disease, with recommendations made based on published studies. Keywords: mitotic index, mastocytosis, tyrosine kinase inhibitor, histologic grade

  12. Childhood Central Nervous System Germ Cell Tumors Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the tumor responds to treatment. Newly Diagnosed CNS Teratomas Treatment of newly diagnosed mature and immature central nervous system (CNS) teratomas may include the following: Surgery to remove as ...

  13. Cell mediated therapeutics for cancer treatment: Tumor homing cells as therapeutic delivery vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balivada, Sivasai

    Many cell types were known to have migratory properties towards tumors and different research groups have shown reliable results regarding cells as delivery vehicles of therapeutics for targeted cancer treatment. Present report discusses proof of concept for 1. Cell mediated delivery of Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) and targeted Magnetic hyperthermia (MHT) as a cancer treatment by using in vivo mouse cancer models, 2. Cells surface engineering with chimeric proteins for targeted cancer treatment by using in vitro models. 1. Tumor homing cells can carry MNPs specifically to the tumor site and tumor burden will decrease after alternating magnetic field (AMF) exposure. To test this hypothesis, first we loaded Fe/Fe3O4 bi-magnetic NPs into neural progenitor cells (NPCs), which were previously shown to migrate towards melanoma tumors. We observed that NPCs loaded with MNPs travel to subcutaneous melanoma tumors. After alternating magnetic field (AMF) exposure, the targeted delivery of MNPs by the NPCs resulted in a mild decrease in tumor size (Chapter-2). Monocytes/macrophages (Mo/Ma) are known to infiltrate tumor sites, and also have phagocytic activity which can increase their uptake of MNPs. To test Mo/Ma-mediated MHT we transplanted Mo/Ma loaded with MNPs into a mouse model of pancreatic peritoneal carcinomatosis. We observed that MNP-loaded Mo/Ma infiltrated pancreatic tumors and, after AMF treatment, significantly prolonged the lives of mice bearing disseminated intraperitoneal pancreatic tumors (Chapter-3). 2. Targeted cancer treatment could be achieved by engineering tumor homing cell surfaces with tumor proteases cleavable, cancer cell specific recombinant therapeutic proteins. To test this, Urokinase and Calpain (tumor specific proteases) cleavable; prostate cancer cell (CaP) specific (CaP1 targeting peptide); apoptosis inducible (Caspase3 V266ED3)- rCasp3V266ED3 chimeric protein was designed in silico. Hypothesized membrane anchored chimeric protein (rCasp3V

  14. Local hyperthermia treatment of tumors induces CD8+ T cell-mediated resistance against distal and secondary tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Peisheng; Chen, Lei; Baird, Jason R.; Demidenko, Eugene; Turk, Mary Jo; Hoopes, P. Jack; Conejo-Garcia, Jose R.; Fiering, Steven

    2014-01-01

    Combinatorial use of iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) and an alternating magnetic filed (AMF) can induce local hyperthermia in tumors in a controlled and uniform manner. Heating B16 primary tumors at 43°C for 30 minutes activated dendritic cells (DCs) and subsequently CD8+ T cells in the draining lymph node (dLN) and conferred resistance against rechallenge with B16 (but not unrelated Lewis Lung carcinoma) given 7 days post hyperthermia on both the primary tumor side and the contralateral side in a CD8+ T cell-dependent manner. Mice with heated primary tumors also resisted rechallenge given 30 days post hyperthermia. Mice with larger heated primary tumors had greater resistance to secondary tumors. No rechallenge resistance occurred when tumors were heated at 45°C. Our results demonstrate the promising potential of local hyperthermia treatment applied to identified tumors in inducing anti-tumor immune responses that reduce the risk of recurrence and metastasis. PMID:24566274

  15. Treatment of pulmonary metastatic tumors in mice using lentiviral vector-engineered stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, X.; Zhao, P; Kennedy, C; Chen, K.; Wiegand, J; Washington, G; Marrero, L; Cui, Y.

    2007-01-01

    Active cancer immunotherapy relies on functional tumor-specific effector T lymphocytes for tumor elimination. Dendritic cells (DCs), as most potent antigen-presenting cells, have been popularly employed in clinical and experimental tumor treatments. We have previously demonstrated that lentiviral vector-mediated transgene delivery to DC progenitors, including bone marrow cells and hematopoietic stem cells, followed by transplantation supports systemic generation of great numbers of tumor anti...

  16. Tumor cure and tumor cell survival kinetics after photoradiation treatment in vivo in two experimental mouse tumor systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To study the question whether tumor destruction by photoradiation therapy (PRT) in vivo is due to direct tumor cell kill or whether it is a consequence of damage to the tumor support structures, the authors have used the EMT-6 and RIF in vivo-in vitro tumor systems, which allow colony formation survival assay of tumor cells treated with PRT in vivo. The EMT-6 tumor showed no significant reduction in tumor cell clonogenicity at the completion of PRT at doses which are curative to the tumor. However, when the tumors were allowed to remain in situ for varying lengths of time (1-24 h) after PRT, tumor cell death occurred rapidly and progressively. Very similar tumor cell survival kinetics were found in RIF tumors, although cure of these tumors by PRT is rare. The pattern of tumor cell death following PRT in vivo closely matches that of tumors deprived of oxygen, implying that one of the major factors leading to tumor destruction by PRT may be the shut-down of tumor vasculature, which has been shown to be one of the initial effects of PRT

  17. Treatment Options for Childhood Extracranial Germ Cell Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... immature teratomas , and malignant germ cell tumors: Mature Teratomas Mature teratomas are the most common type of ... that cause signs and symptoms of disease. Immature Teratomas Immature teratomas also usually occur in the sacrum ...

  18. Apoptosis by Direct Current Treatment in Tumor Cells and Tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hongbae; Sim, Sungbo; Ahn, Saeyoung

    2003-10-01

    Electric field induces cell fusion, electroporation on biological cells, including apoptosis. Apoptosis is expressed in a series of natural enzymatic reactions for the natural elimination of unhealthy, genetically damaged, or otherwise aberrant cells that are not needed or not advantageous to the well-being of the organism. Its markers involve cell shrinkage, activation of intracellular caspase proteases, externalization of phosphatidylserine at the plasma membrane, and fragmentation of DNA. Direct electric fields using direct current have been exploited recently to investigate its effects on tumor cells and tissues, but the mechanism of direct electric fields has not been exhibited clearly other than by electroosmosis or pH changes. Direct electric field induces apoptosis in tumor cells cultured and tumor tissues as indicated by cell shrinkage, DNA fragmentation and tumor suppression. In our experiment that direct electric field was applied to tumor tissues via two needle electrodes inserted into tumor tissue 5mm at distance in parallel, pH changes resulted from electrochemical reaction, exhibiting about pH 9.0, 1.83, 2.0 in the vicinity of cathodic and anodic electrode, and at their mid-point, respectively. DNA fragmentation of tumor tissues destructed by direct electric field was analyzed by Tunel assay by ApopTag technology. As a result of this analysis, it showed that apoptosis in tumor tissue destructed was increased up to 59.1normal(control) tissues, showing 41.1, 31.1cathodic tissues. In vitro cell survival was exhibited that it was decreased with enhancing electric current intensity in the same condition of electrical charge 5C having different time applied. We will show results of apoptosis analyzed by flow cytometry in vitro.

  19. Optimal treatment strategy for intracranial germ cell tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study evaluated the long-term outcome of 108 consecutive patients to establish an optimal treatment strategy for respective subgroups of the newly diagnosed intracranial germ cell tumors (GCTs). A retrospective review of medical records from the authors' department for the duration of April 1989 through March 2007 identified 108 patients with newly diagnosed intracranial GCTs. The diagnosis was germinoma in 83 patients, and nongerminomatous GCT (NGGCT) in 25 patients. Long-term quality of life (QOL) was also evaluated in patients with germinoma. Reading patients with germinoma, the 10-year overall and progression-free survival (PFS) rates at a median follow-up period of 99 months were 86 and 74%, respectively. Patients treated with chemotherapy only demonstrated a decline PFS rate, and patients treated with chemotherapy followed by reduced-dose radiation therapy to the whole ventricle, whole brain, or craniospinal axis indicated significantly improved PFS than patients treated with only radiation or reduced-dose radiation therapy to the focal fields. In the QOL study, the academic outcome for germinoma patients appeared to be better than anticipated. However, neurocognitive defunctionalization was observed at the 10-year follow-up for patients treated with whole brain irradiation. Nongerminomatous GCT patients were categorized into good, intermediate, and poor prognosis groups as proposed by the Japanese Pediatric Brain Tumor Study Group. In the good and intermediate prognosis groups, the 10-year overall survived and PFS rates were 100 and 93%, respectively. In the poor prognosis group, the 3-year overall survived and PFS rates were 56 and 29%, respectively. All patients with NGGCTs, in whom the lesions on MR imaging disappeared after combination therapies consisting of resection, radiation therapy, and chemotherapy, remained alive. Chemotherapy followed by reduced-dose radiation therapy covering the whole ventricle improves the prognosis in patients with

  20. Molecular determinants of treatment response in human germ cell tumors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F. Mayer; J.A. Stoop (Hans); G.L. Scheffer (George); R. Scheper; J.W. Oosterhuis (Wolter); L.H.J. Looijenga (Leendert); C. Bokemeyer

    2003-01-01

    textabstractPURPOSE: Germ cell tumors (GCTs) are highly sensitive to cisplatin-based chemotherapy. This feature is unexplained, as is the intrinsic chemotherapy resistance of mature teratomas and the resistant phenotype of a minority of refractory GCTs. Various cellular pathways ma

  1. Molecular properties of CD133+ glioblastoma stem cells derived from treatment-refractory recurrent brain tumors

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Qinghai; Nguyen, David H.; DONG, QINGHUA; Shitaku, Peter; Chung, Kenneth; Liu, On Ying; Jonathan L Tso; Liu, Jason Y; Konkankit, Veerauo; Cloughesy, Timothy F.; Mischel, Paul S; Lane, Timothy F.; Liau, Linda M.; Stanley F Nelson; Tso, Cho-Lea

    2009-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) remains refractory to conventional therapy. CD133+ GBM cells have been recently isolated and characterized as chemo-/radio-resistant tumor-initiating cells and are hypothesized to be responsible for post-treatment recurrence. In order to explore the molecular properties of tumorigenic CD133+ GBM cells that resist treatment, we isolated CD133+ GBM cells from tumors that are recurrent and have previously received chemo-/radio-therapy. We found that the purified CD1...

  2. Mesenchymal stem cell 1 (MSC1-based therapy attenuates tumor growth whereas MSC2-treatment promotes tumor growth and metastasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth S Waterman

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Currently, there are many promising clinical trials using mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs in cell-based therapies of numerous diseases. Increasingly, however, there is a concern over the use of MSCs because they home to tumors and can support tumor growth and metastasis. For instance, we established that MSCs in the ovarian tumor microenvironment promoted tumor growth and favored angiogenesis. In parallel studies, we also developed a new approach to induce the conventional mixed pool of MSCs into two uniform but distinct phenotypes we termed MSC1 and MSC2. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we tested the in vitro and in vivo stability of MSC1 and MSC2 phenotypes as well as their effects on tumor growth and spread. In vitro co-culture of MSC1 with various cancer cells diminished growth in colony forming units and tumor spheroid assays, while conventional MSCs or MSC2 co-culture had the opposite effect in these assays. Co-culture of MSC1 and cancer cells also distinctly affected their migration and invasion potential when compared to MSCs or MSC2 treated samples. The expression of bioactive molecules also differed dramatically among these samples. MSC1-based treatment of established tumors in an immune competent model attenuated tumor growth and metastasis in contrast to MSCs- and MSC2-treated animals in which tumor growth and spread was increased. Also, in contrast to these groups, MSC1-therapy led to less ascites accumulation, increased CD45+leukocytes, decreased collagen deposition, and mast cell degranulation. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: These observations indicate that the MSC1 and MSC2 phenotypes may be convenient tools for the discovery of critical components of the tumor stroma. The continued investigation of these cells may help ensure that cell based-therapy is used safely and effectively in human disease.

  3. Application of autologous tumor cell vaccine and NDV vaccine in treatment of tumors of digestive tract

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Liang; Hui Wang; Tie-Mie Sun; Wen-Qing Yao; Li-Li Chen; Yu Jin; Chun-Ling Li; Fan-Juan Meng

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To treat patients with stage Ⅰ-Ⅳ malignant tumors of digestive tract using autologous tumor cell vaccine and NDV (Newcastle disease virus) vaccine, and observe the survival period and curative effect.METHODS: 335 patients with malignant tumors of digestive tract were treated with autologous tumor cell vaccine and NDV vaccine. The autologous tumor cell vaccine were assigned for long-term survival observation. While these failed to obtain the autologous tumor tissue were given with NDV vaccine for a short-term observation on curative effect.RESULTS: The colorectal cancer patients treated with autologous tumor cell vaccine were divided into two groups:the controlled group (subjected to resection alone) (n=257),the vaccine group (subjected to both resection and immunotherapy) (n=310). 25 patients treated with NDV immunotherapy were all at stage Ⅳ without having resection.In postoperation adjuvant therapy patients, the 5, 6 and 7-year survival rates were 66.51%, 60.52 %, 56.50 %respectively; whereas in patients with resection alone, only 45.57 %, 44.76 % and 43.42 % respectively. The average survival period was 5.13 years (resection alone group 4.15years), the median survival period was over 7 years (resection alone group 4.46 years). There were significant differences between the two groups. The patients treated with resection plus vaccine were measured delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) reactions after vaccination, (indurative scope >5 mm).The magnitude of DTH was related to the prognosis. The 5-year survival rate was 80 % for those with indurations greater than 5 mm, compared with 30 % for those with indurations less than 5 mm. The 1-year survival rate was 96 % for 25patients treated with NDV immunotherapy. The total effective rate (CR+PR) was 24.00 % in NDV immunotherapy; complete remission (CR) in 1 case (4.00 %), partial remission (PR) in 5 cases (20.00 %), stabilizedin in 16 cases (64.00 %),progression (PD) in 1 case (4.00 %). After NDV vaccine

  4. Non-lethal heat treatment of cells results in reduction of tumor initiation and metastatic potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Non-lethal hyperthermia is used clinically as adjuvant treatment to radiation, with mixed results. Denaturation of protein during hyperthermia treatment is expected to synergize with radiation damage to cause cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. Alternatively, hyperthermia is known to cause tissue level changes in blood flow, increasing the oxygenation and radiosensitivity of often hypoxic tumors. In this study, we elucidate a third possibility, that hyperthermia alters cellular adhesion and mechanotransduction, with particular impact on the cancer stem cell population. We demonstrate that cell heating results in a robust but temporary loss of cancer cell aggressiveness and metastatic potential in mouse models. In vitro, this heating results in a temporary loss in cell mobility, adhesion, and proliferation. Our hypothesis is that the loss of cellular adhesion results in suppression of cancer stem cells and loss of tumor virulence and metastatic potential. Our study suggests that the metastatic potential of cancer is particularly reduced by the effects of heat on cellular adhesion and mechanotransduction. If true, this could help explain both the successes and failures of clinical hyperthermia, and suggest ways to target treatments to those who would most benefit. - Highlights: • Non-lethal hyperthermia treatment of cancer cells is shown to cause a reduction in rates of tumor initiation and metastasis. • Dynamic imaging of cells during heat treatment shows temporary changes in cell shape, cell migration, and cell proliferation. • Loss of adhesion may lead to the observed effect, which may disproportionately impact the tumor initiating cell fraction. • Loss or suppression of the tumor initiating cell fraction results in the observed loss of metastatic potential in vivo. • This result may lead to new approaches to synergizing hyperthermia with surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy

  5. Non-lethal heat treatment of cells results in reduction of tumor initiation and metastatic potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yoo-Shin; Lee, Tae Hoon; O' Neill, Brian E., E-mail: BEOneill@houstonmethodist.org

    2015-08-14

    Non-lethal hyperthermia is used clinically as adjuvant treatment to radiation, with mixed results. Denaturation of protein during hyperthermia treatment is expected to synergize with radiation damage to cause cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. Alternatively, hyperthermia is known to cause tissue level changes in blood flow, increasing the oxygenation and radiosensitivity of often hypoxic tumors. In this study, we elucidate a third possibility, that hyperthermia alters cellular adhesion and mechanotransduction, with particular impact on the cancer stem cell population. We demonstrate that cell heating results in a robust but temporary loss of cancer cell aggressiveness and metastatic potential in mouse models. In vitro, this heating results in a temporary loss in cell mobility, adhesion, and proliferation. Our hypothesis is that the loss of cellular adhesion results in suppression of cancer stem cells and loss of tumor virulence and metastatic potential. Our study suggests that the metastatic potential of cancer is particularly reduced by the effects of heat on cellular adhesion and mechanotransduction. If true, this could help explain both the successes and failures of clinical hyperthermia, and suggest ways to target treatments to those who would most benefit. - Highlights: • Non-lethal hyperthermia treatment of cancer cells is shown to cause a reduction in rates of tumor initiation and metastasis. • Dynamic imaging of cells during heat treatment shows temporary changes in cell shape, cell migration, and cell proliferation. • Loss of adhesion may lead to the observed effect, which may disproportionately impact the tumor initiating cell fraction. • Loss or suppression of the tumor initiating cell fraction results in the observed loss of metastatic potential in vivo. • This result may lead to new approaches to synergizing hyperthermia with surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy.

  6. Intensive chemotherapy as salvage treatment for solid tumors: focus on germ cell cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Selle, F.; Gligorov, J. [Medical Oncology and Cellular Therapy Department, Hospital Tenon, Public Assistance Hospitals of Paris, Alliance for Cancer Research (APREC), Paris (France); Pierre & Marie Curie University (UPMC Paris VI), Paris (France); Richard, S.; Khalil, A. [Medical Oncology and Cellular Therapy Department, Hospital Tenon, Public Assistance Hospitals of Paris, Alliance for Cancer Research (APREC), Paris (France); Alexandre, I. [Medical Oncology Department, Hospital Centre of Bligny, Briis-sous-Forges (France); Avenin, D.; Provent, S.; Soares, D.G. [Medical Oncology and Cellular Therapy Department, Hospital Tenon, Public Assistance Hospitals of Paris, Alliance for Cancer Research (APREC), Paris (France); Lotz, J.P. [Medical Oncology and Cellular Therapy Department, Hospital Tenon, Public Assistance Hospitals of Paris, Alliance for Cancer Research (APREC), Paris (France); Pierre & Marie Curie University (UPMC Paris VI), Paris (France)

    2014-11-04

    Germ cell tumors present contrasting biological and molecular features compared to many solid tumors, which may partially explain their unusual sensitivity to chemotherapy. Reduced DNA repair capacity and enhanced induction of apoptosis appear to be key factors in the sensitivity of germ cell tumors to cisplatin. Despite substantial cure rates, some patients relapse and subsequently die of their disease. Intensive doses of chemotherapy are used to counter mechanisms of drug resistance. So far, high-dose chemotherapy with hematopoietic stem cell support for solid tumors is used only in the setting of testicular germ cell tumors. In that indication, high-dose chemotherapy is given as the first or late salvage treatment for patients with either relapsed or progressive tumors after initial conventional salvage chemotherapy. High-dose chemotherapy is usually given as two or three sequential cycles using carboplatin and etoposide with or without ifosfamide. The administration of intensive therapy carries significant side effects and can only be efficiently and safely conducted in specialized referral centers to assure optimum patient care outcomes. In breast and ovarian cancer, most studies have demonstrated improvement in progression-free survival (PFS), but overall survival remained unchanged. Therefore, most of these approaches have been dropped. In germ cell tumors, clinical trials are currently investigating novel therapeutic combinations and active treatments. In particular, the integration of targeted therapies constitutes an important area of research for patients with a poor prognosis.

  7. Intensive chemotherapy as salvage treatment for solid tumors: focus on germ cell cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Germ cell tumors present contrasting biological and molecular features compared to many solid tumors, which may partially explain their unusual sensitivity to chemotherapy. Reduced DNA repair capacity and enhanced induction of apoptosis appear to be key factors in the sensitivity of germ cell tumors to cisplatin. Despite substantial cure rates, some patients relapse and subsequently die of their disease. Intensive doses of chemotherapy are used to counter mechanisms of drug resistance. So far, high-dose chemotherapy with hematopoietic stem cell support for solid tumors is used only in the setting of testicular germ cell tumors. In that indication, high-dose chemotherapy is given as the first or late salvage treatment for patients with either relapsed or progressive tumors after initial conventional salvage chemotherapy. High-dose chemotherapy is usually given as two or three sequential cycles using carboplatin and etoposide with or without ifosfamide. The administration of intensive therapy carries significant side effects and can only be efficiently and safely conducted in specialized referral centers to assure optimum patient care outcomes. In breast and ovarian cancer, most studies have demonstrated improvement in progression-free survival (PFS), but overall survival remained unchanged. Therefore, most of these approaches have been dropped. In germ cell tumors, clinical trials are currently investigating novel therapeutic combinations and active treatments. In particular, the integration of targeted therapies constitutes an important area of research for patients with a poor prognosis

  8. New Strategies for the Treatment of Solid Tumors with CAR-T Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hao; Ye, Zhen-long; Yuan, Zhen-gang; Luo, Zheng-qiang; Jin, Hua-jun; qian, Qi-jun

    2016-01-01

    Recent years, we have witnessed significant progresses in both basic and clinical studies regarding novel therapeutic strategies with genetically engineered T cells. Modification with chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) endows T cells with tumor specific cytotoxicity and thus induce anti-tumor immunity against malignancies. However, targeting solid tumors is more challenging than targeting B-cell malignancies with CAR-T cells because of the histopathological structure features, specific antigens shortage and strong immunosuppressive environment of solid tumors. Meanwhile, the on-target/off-tumor toxicity caused by relative expression of target on normal tissues is another issue that should be reckoned. Optimization of the design of CAR vectors, exploration of new targets, addition of safe switches and combination with other treatments bring new vitality to the CAR-T cell based immunotherapy against solid tumors. In this review, we focus on the major obstacles limiting the application of CAR-T cell therapy toward solid tumors and summarize the measures to refine this new cancer therapeutic modality. PMID:27194949

  9. Sequential Salinomycin Treatment Results in Resistance Formation through Clonal Selection of Epithelial-Like Tumor Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian Kopp

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Acquiring therapy resistance is one of the major obstacles in the treatment of patients with cancer. The discovery of the cancer stem cell (CSC–specific drug salinomycin raised hope for improved treatment options by targeting therapy-refractory CSCs and mesenchymal cancer cells. However, the occurrence of an acquired salinomycin resistance in tumor cells remains elusive. To study the formation of salinomycin resistance, mesenchymal breast cancer cells were sequentially treated with salinomycin in an in vitro cell culture assay, and the resulting differences in gene expression and salinomycin susceptibility were analyzed. We demonstrated that long-term salinomycin treatment of mesenchymal cancer cells resulted in salinomycin-resistant cells with elevated levels of epithelial markers, such as E-cadherin and miR-200c, a decreased migratory capability, and a higher susceptibility to the classic chemotherapeutic drug doxorubicin. The formation of salinomycin resistance through the acquisition of epithelial traits was further validated by inducing mesenchymal-epithelial transition through an overexpression of miR-200c. The transition from a mesenchymal to a more epithelial-like phenotype of salinomycin-treated tumor cells was moreover confirmed in vivo, using syngeneic and, for the first time, transgenic mouse tumor models. These results suggest that the acquisition of salinomycin resistance through the clonal selection of epithelial-like cancer cells could become exploited for improved cancer therapies by antagonizing the tumor-progressive effects of epithelial-mesenchymal transition.

  10. Sequential Salinomycin Treatment Results in Resistance Formation through Clonal Selection of Epithelial-Like Tumor Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopp, Florian; Hermawan, Adam; Oak, Prajakta Shirish; Ulaganathan, Vijay Kumar; Herrmann, Annika; Elnikhely, Nefertiti; Thakur, Chitra; Xiao, Zhiguang; Knyazev, Pjotr; Ataseven, Beyhan; Savai, Rajkumar; Wagner, Ernst; Roidl, Andreas

    2014-12-01

    Acquiring therapy resistance is one of the major obstacles in the treatment of patients with cancer. The discovery of the cancer stem cell (CSC)-specific drug salinomycin raised hope for improved treatment options by targeting therapy-refractory CSCs and mesenchymal cancer cells. However, the occurrence of an acquired salinomycin resistance in tumor cells remains elusive. To study the formation of salinomycin resistance, mesenchymal breast cancer cells were sequentially treated with salinomycin in an in vitro cell culture assay, and the resulting differences in gene expression and salinomycin susceptibility were analyzed. We demonstrated that long-term salinomycin treatment of mesenchymal cancer cells resulted in salinomycin-resistant cells with elevated levels of epithelial markers, such as E-cadherin and miR-200c, a decreased migratory capability, and a higher susceptibility to the classic chemotherapeutic drug doxorubicin. The formation of salinomycin resistance through the acquisition of epithelial traits was further validated by inducing mesenchymal-epithelial transition through an overexpression of miR-200c. The transition from a mesenchymal to a more epithelial-like phenotype of salinomycin-treated tumor cells was moreover confirmed in vivo, using syngeneic and, for the first time, transgenic mouse tumor models. These results suggest that the acquisition of salinomycin resistance through the clonal selection of epithelial-like cancer cells could become exploited for improved cancer therapies by antagonizing the tumor-progressive effects of epithelial-mesenchymal transition. PMID:25500079

  11. T-cell suppression mediated by regulatory T cells infiltrating hepatic tumors can be overcome by GITRL treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Pedroza-Gonzalez (Alexander); J. Kwekkeboom (Jaap); D. Sprengers (Dave)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractRecently, we reported the accumulation of CD4+FOXP3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) within the tumor mass of patients bearing liver cancer. Tumor-infiltrating Tregs (TiTreg) are active and potent suppressors of antitumor immunity. Importantly, treatment with GITR L reduced the immunosuppress

  12. KRAS genotypic changes of circulating tumor cells during treatment of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aristea Kalikaki

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Circulating tumor cells (CTCs could represent a non-invasive source of cancer cells used for longitudinal monitoring of the tumoral mutation status throughout the course of the disease. The aims of the present study were to investigate the detection of KRAS mutations in CTCs from patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC and to compare their mutation status during treatment or disease progression with that of the corresponding primary tumors. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Identification of the seven most common KRAS mutations on codons 12 and 13 was performed by Peptide Nucleic Acid (PNA-based qPCR method. The sensitivity of the assay was determined after isolation of KRAS mutant cancer cells spiked into healthy donors' blood, using the CellSearch Epithelial Cell kit. Consistent detection of KRAS mutations was achieved in samples containing at least 10 tumor cells/7.5 ml of blood. RESULTS: The clinical utility of the assay was assessed in 48 blood samples drawn from 31 patients with mCRC. All patients had PIK3CA and BRAF wild type primary tumors and 14 KRAS mutant tumors. CTCs were detected in 65% of specimens obtained from 74% of patients. KRAS mutation analysis in CTC-enriched specimens showed that 45% and 16.7% of patients with mutant and wild type primary tumors, respectively, had detectable mutations in their CTCs. Assessing KRAS mutations in serial blood samples revealed that individual patient's CTCs exhibited different mutational status of KRAS during treatment. CONCLUSIONS: The current findings support the rationale for using the CTCs as a dynamic source of tumor cells which, by re-evaluating their KRAS mutation status, could predict, perhaps more accurately, the response of mCRC patients to targeted therapy.

  13. Repeated cisplatin treatment can lead to a multiresistant tumor cell population with stem cell features and sensitivity to 3-bromopyruvate

    OpenAIRE

    Wintzell, My; Löfstedt, Lina; Johansson, Joel; Pedersen, Anne B.; Fuxe, Jonas; Shoshan, Maria

    2012-01-01

    Cisplatin is used in treatment of several types of cancer, including epithelial ovarian carcinoma (EOC). In order to mimic clinical treatment and to investigate longterm effects of cisplatin in surviving cancer cells, two EOC cell lines were repeatedly treated with low doses. In the SKOV-3 cell line originating from malignant ascites, but not in A2780 cells from a primary tumor, this led to emergence of a stable population (SKOV-3-R) which in the absence of cisplatin showed increased motility...

  14. Enhancement of chemosensitivity of quiescent cell populations in solid tumors by combined treatment with nicotinamide and low temperature hyperthermia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    C3H/He and Balb/c mice bearing SCC VII and EMT6/KU tumors, respectively, received continuous administration of 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) for 5 days using implanted mini-osmotic pumps to label all proliferating (P) cells. Nicotinamide was administered intraperitoneally before cisplatin injection and/or tumors were locally heated at 40degC for 60 minutes immediately after cisplatin injection. The tumors were then excised, minced and trypsinized. The tumor cell suspensions were incubated with cytochalasin-B (a cytokinesis-blocker), and the micronucleus (MN) frequency in cells without BrdU labeling (quiescent (Q) cells) was determined using immunofluorescence staining for BrdU. The MN frequency in total (P+Q) tumor cells was determined from tumors that were not pretreated with BrdU labeling. The sensitivity to cisplatin was evaluated in terms of the frequency of induced micronuclei in binuclear tumor cells (MN frequency). In both tumor systems, the MN frequency in Q cells was lower than that in the total cell population. Nicotinamide treatment elevated the MN frequency in total SCC VII cells. Mild heating raised the MN frequency more markedly in Q cells than total cells. The combination of nicotinamide and mild heat treatment increased the MN frequency more markedly than either treatment alone. In total SCC VII cells, nicotinamide increased 195mPt-cisplatin uptake. Mild heating elevated 195mPt-cisplatin uptake in total EMT6/KU cells. Cisplatin-sensitivity of Q cells was lower than that of total cells in both tumor systems. Nicotinamide sensitized tumor cells including a large acutely hypoxic fraction such as those of SCC VII tumors through inhibition of the fluctuations in tumor blood flow. Tumor cells including a large chronically hypoxic fraction such as Q cells were thought to be sensitized by mild heating through an increase in tumor blood flow. (author)

  15. Treatment Options By Stage (Ovarian Germ Cell Tumors)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... c) cancer cells are found in the pelvic peritoneum. In stage I , cancer is found in one ... in the abdomen ) or in washings of the peritoneum ( tissue lining the peritoneal cavity). Stage II Enlarge ...

  16. Enhancement of tumor cell susceptibility to lymphokine-activated killer cells by treatment with the streptococcal preparation OK432.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaue, H; Tanimura, H; Tsunoda, T; Iwahashi, M; Tani, M; Tamai, M; Noguchi, K; Hotta, T; Arii, K

    1992-01-01

    We investigated whether tumor cell lysis by LAK cells was augmented by treatment with OK432 in vitro. NK and LAK activity against K562 cells was not enhanced by their treatment with OK432. In contrast, the susceptibility of OK432-treated Daudi and KATO-III cells to lysis by LAK cells was enhanced. Succinate dehydrogenase activity and RNA synthesis were impaired in Daudi and KATO-III cells by treatment with OK432, and moreover the expression of HLA Class I antigen and beta 2-microglobulin was inhibited in OK432-treated KATO-III cells. Thus, it is suggested that the enhancement of the susceptibility of OK432-treated tumor cells with regard to succinate dehydrogenase activity, RNA synthesis, and HLA Class I antigen expression.

  17. Residual tumor after the salvage surgery is the major risk factors for primary treatment failure in malignant ovarian germ cell tumors: A retrospective study of single institution

    OpenAIRE

    Park Jong Sup; Ryu Ki Sung; Lee Keun Ho; Lee Sung Jong; Ki Eun Young; Park Sung Taek; Song Min Jong; Lee Chung Won; Hur Soo Young

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Malignant ovarian germ cell tumors are rare, and knowledge of their prognostic factors is limited, with little available randomized data. This study was conducted to evaluate the clinicopathologic characteristics of malignant ovarian germ cell tumors and to determine the association of their prognostic factors to primary treatment failure. Methods The medical records of 57 patients with stages I to IV malignant ovarian germ cell tumor were retrospectively reviewed, and the...

  18. Volume changes of A-Mel 3 tumor cells induced by photodynamic treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PhotoDynamic Therapy has shown promising results in treatment of super-ficial malignant T1/T2 tumors through combining systematically administered photosensitizing HematoPorhyrin-Derivative and local application of light. Mechanisms leading to tumor destruction during PDT are still not completely understood. Generation of singlet oxygen by a type II photochemical reaction is reported to be primarily responsible for the cytotoxicity induced by PDT. Besides significant effects on microcirculation damage to plasma membranes, cytoplasmic organelles and enzymes, as well as to nuclear structures and enzymes, was observed following exposure cells to PDT. A phenomenon probably proceeding these events might be cell swelling. Already Meyer-Betz showed that a time- and dose-dependent swelling and edema formation of healthy skin occurs after PDT. Direct correlation between ear swelling response of albino mice and the concentration of Photofrin II in the blood at the same time of light exposure has been reported recently. Various studies indicating tumor tissue swelling following PDT without being able to discriminate if this is due to cell swelling or interstitial fluid accumulation. Therefore the influence was studied of treatment with HPD and laser light on volume changes of tumor cells and its relation to cell viability. (author). 20 refs

  19. Cell Cycle Regulating Kinase Cdk4 as a Potential Target for Tumor Cell Treatment and Tumor Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franziska Graf

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk-cyclin D/retinoblastoma (pRb/E2F cascade, which controls the G1/S transition of cell cycle, has been found to be altered in many neoplasias. Inhibition of this pathway by using, for example, selective Cdk4 inhibitors has been suggested to be a promising approach for cancer therapy. We hypothesized that appropriately radiolabeled Cdk4 inhibitors are suitable probes for tumor imaging and may be helpful studying cell proliferation processes in vivo by positron emission tomography. Herein, we report the synthesis and biological, biochemical, and radiopharmacological characterizations of two I124-labeled small molecule Cdk4 inhibitors (8-cyclopentyl-6-iodo-5-methyl-2-(4-piperazin-1-yl-phenylamino-8H-pyrido[2,3-d]-pyrimidin-7-one (CKIA and 8-cyclopentyl-6-iodo-5-methyl-2-(5-(piperazin-1-yl-pyridin-2-yl-amino-8H-pyrido[2,3-d]pyrimidin-7-one (CKIB. Our data demonstrate a defined and specific inhibition of tumor cell proliferation through CKIA and CKIB by inhibition of the Cdk4/pRb/E2F pathway emphasizing potential therapeutic benefit of CKIA and CKIB. Furthermore, radiopharmacological properties of [I124]CKIA and [I124]CKIB observed in human tumor cells are promising prerequisites for in vivo biodistribution and imaging studies.

  20. Combination therapy targeting both cancer stem-like cells and bulk tumor cells for improved efficacy of breast cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tao; Narayanaswamy, Radhika; Ren, Huilan; Torchilin, Vladimir P

    2016-06-01

    Many types of tumors are organized in a hierarchy of heterogeneous cell populations. The cancer stem-like cells (CSCs) hypothesis suggests that tumor development and metastasis are driven by a minority population of cells, which are responsible for tumor initiation, growth and recurrences. The inability to efficiently eliminate CSCs during chemotherapy, together with CSCs being highly tumorigenic and invasive, may result in treatment failure due to cancer relapse and metastases. CSCs are emerging as a promising target for the development of translational cancer therapies. Ideal panacea for cancer would kill all malignant cells, including CSCs and bulk tumor cells. Since both chemotherapy and CSCs-specific therapy are insufficient to cure cancer, we propose combination therapy with CSCs-targeted agents and chemotherapeutics for improved breast cancer treatment. We generated in vitro mammosphere of 2 breast cancer cell lines, and demonstrated ability of mammospheres to grow and enrich cancer cells with stem-like properties, including self-renewal, multilineage differentiation and enrichment of cells expressing breast cancer stem-like cell biomarkers CD44(+)/CD24(-/low). The formation of mammospheres was significantly inhibited by salinomycin, validating its pharmacological role against the cancer stem-like cells. In contrast, paclitaxel showed a minimal effect on the proliferation and growth of breast cancer stem-like cells. While combination therapies of salinomycin with conventional chemotherapy (paclitaxel or lipodox) showed a potential to improve tumor cell killing, different subtypes of breast cancer cells showed different patterns in response to the combination therapies. While optimization of combination therapy is warranted, the design of combination therapy should consider phenotypic attributes of breast cancer types. PMID:27259361

  1. Combination therapy targeting both cancer stem-like cells and bulk tumor cells for improved efficacy of breast cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tao; Narayanaswamy, Radhika; Ren, Huilan; Torchilin, Vladimir P

    2016-06-01

    Many types of tumors are organized in a hierarchy of heterogeneous cell populations. The cancer stem-like cells (CSCs) hypothesis suggests that tumor development and metastasis are driven by a minority population of cells, which are responsible for tumor initiation, growth and recurrences. The inability to efficiently eliminate CSCs during chemotherapy, together with CSCs being highly tumorigenic and invasive, may result in treatment failure due to cancer relapse and metastases. CSCs are emerging as a promising target for the development of translational cancer therapies. Ideal panacea for cancer would kill all malignant cells, including CSCs and bulk tumor cells. Since both chemotherapy and CSCs-specific therapy are insufficient to cure cancer, we propose combination therapy with CSCs-targeted agents and chemotherapeutics for improved breast cancer treatment. We generated in vitro mammosphere of 2 breast cancer cell lines, and demonstrated ability of mammospheres to grow and enrich cancer cells with stem-like properties, including self-renewal, multilineage differentiation and enrichment of cells expressing breast cancer stem-like cell biomarkers CD44(+)/CD24(-/low). The formation of mammospheres was significantly inhibited by salinomycin, validating its pharmacological role against the cancer stem-like cells. In contrast, paclitaxel showed a minimal effect on the proliferation and growth of breast cancer stem-like cells. While combination therapies of salinomycin with conventional chemotherapy (paclitaxel or lipodox) showed a potential to improve tumor cell killing, different subtypes of breast cancer cells showed different patterns in response to the combination therapies. While optimization of combination therapy is warranted, the design of combination therapy should consider phenotypic attributes of breast cancer types.

  2. Repeated cisplatin treatment can lead to a multiresistant tumor cell population with stem cell features and sensitivity to 3-bromopyruvate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wintzell, My; Löfstedt, Lina; Johansson, Joel; Pedersen, Anne B; Fuxe, Jonas; Shoshan, Maria

    2012-12-01

    Cisplatin is used in treatment of several types of cancer, including epithelial ovarian carcinoma (EOC). In order to mimic clinical treatment and to investigate longterm effects of cisplatin in surviving cancer cells, two EOC cell lines were repeatedly treated with low doses. In the SKOV-3 cell line originating from malignant ascites, but not in A2780 cells from a primary tumor, this led to emergence of a stable population (SKOV-3-R) which in the absence of cisplatin showed increased motility, epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and expression of cancer stem cell markers CD117, CD44 and ALDH1. Accordingly, the cells formed self-renewing spheres in serum-free stem cell medium. Despite upregulation of mitochondrial mass and cytochrome c, and no upregulation of Bcl-2/Bcl-xL, SKOV-3-R were multiresistant to antineoplastic drugs. Cancer stem cells, or tumor-initiating cells (TICs) are highly chemoresistant and are believed to cause relapse into disseminated and resistant EOC. Our second aim was therefore to target resistance in these TIC-like cells. Resistance could be correlated with upregulation of hexokinase-II and VDAC, which are known to form a survival-promoting mitochondrial complex. The cells were thus sensitive to 3-bromopyruvate, which dissociates hexokinase-II from this complex, and were particularly sensitive to combination treatment with cisplatin at doses down to 0.1 x IC 50. 3-bromopyruvate might thus be of use in targeting the especially aggressive TIC populations. PMID:22954696

  3. Mouse Leydig Tumor Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo-Syong Pan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Cordycepin is a natural pure compound extracted from Cordyceps sinensis (CS. We have demonstrated that CS stimulates steroidogenesis in primary mouse Leydig cell and activates apoptosis in MA-10 mouse Leydig tumor cells. It is highly possible that cordycepin is the main component in CS modulating Leydig cell functions. Thus, our aim was to investigate the steroidogenic and apoptotic effects with potential mechanism of cordycepin on MA-10 mouse Leydig tumor cells. Results showed that cordycepin significantly stimulated progesterone production in dose- and time-dependent manners. Adenosine receptor (AR subtype agonists were further used to treat MA-10 cells, showing that A1, A 2A , A 2B , and A3, AR agonists could stimulate progesterone production. However, StAR promoter activity and protein expression remained of no difference among all cordycepin treatments, suggesting that cordycepin might activate AR, but not stimulated StAR protein to regulate MA-10 cell steroidogenesis. Meanwhile, cordycepin could also induce apoptotic cell death in MA-10 cells. Moreover, four AR subtype agonists induced cell death in a dose-dependent manner, and four AR subtype antagonists could all rescue cell death under cordycepin treatment in MA-10 cells. In conclusion, cordycepin could activate adenosine subtype receptors and simultaneously induce steroidogenesis and apoptosis in MA-10 mouse Leydig tumor cells.

  4. Sexual functioning after multimodality treatment for disseminated nonseminomatous testicular germ cell tumor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VanBasten, JP; JonkerPool, G; VanDriel, MF; Sleijfer, DT; Droste, JHJ; VandeWiel, HBM; Molenaar, WM; Hoekstra, HJ; Schraffordt Koops, H.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: We determined sexual functioning after chemotherapy for disseminated nonseminomatous testicular germ cell tumor, and evaluated the impact of resection of post-chemotherapy residual retroperitoneal tumor. Materials and Methods: A total of 155 consecutive patients treated with chemotherapy fo

  5. 5-Azacytidine treatment sensitizes tumor cells to T-cell mediated cytotoxicity and modulates NK cells in patients with myeloid malignancies

    OpenAIRE

    Gang, A O; Frøsig, T M; Brimnes, M K; Lyngaa, R; Treppendahl, M B; Grønbæk, K; Dufva, I H; Straten, P thor; Hadrup, S R

    2014-01-01

    Treatment with the demethylating agent 5-Azacytidine leads to prolonged survival for patients with myelodysplastic syndrome, and the demethylation induces upregulation of cancer-testis antigens. Cancer-testis antigens are well-known targets for immune recognition in cancer, and the immune system may have a role in this treatment regimen. We show here that 5-Azacytidine treatment leads to increased T-cell recognition of tumor cells. T-cell responses against a large panel of cancer-testis antig...

  6. Treatment of peritoneal carcinomatosis by targeted delivery of the radio-labeled tumor homing peptide bi-DTPA-[F3]2 into the nucleus of tumor cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enken Drecoll

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Alpha-particle emitting isotopes are effective novel tools in cancer therapy, but targeted delivery into tumors is a prerequisite of their application to avoid toxic side effects. Peritoneal carcinomatosis is a widespread dissemination of tumors throughout the peritoneal cavity. As peritoneal carcinomatosis is fatal in most cases, novel therapies are needed. F3 is a tumor homing peptide which is internalized into the nucleus of tumor cells upon binding to nucleolin on the cell surface. Therefore, F3 may be an appropriate carrier for alpha-particle emitting isotopes facilitating selective tumor therapies. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A dimer of the vascular tumor homing peptide F3 was chemically coupled to the alpha-emitter (213Bi ((213Bi-DTPA-[F3](2. We found (213Bi-DTPA-[F3](2 to accumulate in the nucleus of tumor cells in vitro and in intraperitoneally growing tumors in vivo. To study the anti-tumor activity of (213Bi-DTPA-[F3](2 we treated mice bearing intraperitoneally growing xenograft tumors with (213Bi-DTPA-[F3](2. In a tumor prevention study between the days 4-14 after inoculation of tumor cells 6x1.85 MBq (50 microCi of (213Bi-DTPA-[F3](2 were injected. In a tumor reduction study between the days 16-26 after inoculation of tumor cells 6x1.85 MBq of (213Bi-DTPA-[F3](2 were injected. The survival time of the animals was increased from 51 to 93.5 days in the prevention study and from 57 days to 78 days in the tumor reduction study. No toxicity of the treatment was observed. In bio-distribution studies we found (213Bi-DTPA-[F3](2 to accumulate in tumors but only low activities were found in control organs except for the kidneys, where (213Bi-DTPA-[F3](2 is found due to renal excretion. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: In conclusion we report that (213Bi-DTPA-[F3](2 is a novel tool for the targeted delivery of alpha-emitters into the nucleus of tumor cells that effectively controls peritoneal carcinomatosis in preclinical models and may also be

  7. Immunological treatment of liver tumors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Maurizio Chiriva-Internati; Fabio Grizzi; Cynthia A Jumper; Everardo Cobos; Paul L Hermonat; Eldo E Frezza

    2005-01-01

    Although multiple options for the treatment of liver tumors have often been described in the past, including liver resection, radiofrequency ablation with or without hepatic pump insertion, laparoscopic liver resection and the use of chemotherapy, the potential of immunotherapy and gene manipulation is still largely unexplored.Immunological therapy by gene manipulation is based on the interaction between virus-based gene delivery systems and dendritic cells. Using viruses as vectors, it is possible to transduce dendritic cells with genes encoding tumor-associated antigens, thus inducing strong humoral and cellular immunity against the antigens themselves.Both chemotherapy and radiation therapy have the disadvantage of destroying healthy cells, thus causing severe side-effects. We need more precisely targeted therapies capable of killing cancer cells while sparing healthy cells. Our goal is to establish a new treatment for solid liver tumors based on the concept of cytoreduction,and propose an innovative algorithm.

  8. Primary intracranial germ-cell tumors. A retrospective analysis with special reference to long-term results of treatment and the behavior of rare types of tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakai, N.; Yamada, H.; Andoh, T.; Hirata, T.; Shimizu, K.; Shinoda, J.

    1988-01-01

    Thirty cases of primary intracranial germ-cell tumors were reviewed with reference to the effect of treatment. Histologically, there were 23 pure germinomas, while the remaining tumors had more unusual histology; 3 of these were teratomas, and 4 germcell tumors with the admixture of yolk sac tumor (YST) or embryonal carcinoma (EMC). Three of these rare cases are presented. The performed surgery and radiotherapy, seemed adequate for pure germinomas, and all these cases lived tumor-free after an observation time of 13 to 139 months although 4 patients developed intellectual retardation or cerebral dullness after radiotherapy. Four cases with YST and EMC elements, indicated by the elevation of AFP and HCG values in serum, were resistant to radio- and chemotherapy and developed, despite surgically total removal of the tumor, intra- or extracranial metastases. A review of the literature is included.

  9. Persistence of disseminated tumor cells after neoadjuvant treatment for locally advanced breast cancer predicts poor survival

    OpenAIRE

    Mathiesen, Randi R.; Borgen, Elin; Renolen, Anne; Løkkevik, Erik; Nesland, Jahn M; Anker, Gun; Østenstad, Bjørn; Lundgren, Steinar; Risberg, Terje; Mjaaland, Ingvil; Kvalheim, Gunnar; Lønning, Per E.; Naume, Bjørn

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Presence of disseminated tumor cells (DTCs) in bone marrow (BM) and circulating tumor cells (CTC) in peripheral blood (PB) predicts reduced survival in early breast cancer. The aim of this study was to determine the presence of and alterations in DTC- and CTC-status in locally advanced breast cancer patients undergoing neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT) and to evaluate their prognostic impact. Methods ...

  10. Surgical Treatment and Outcome of Extracranial Germ Cell Tumors in Childhood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. de Backer (Antoine)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractGerm cell tumors (GCTs) are a heterogeneous group of very rare tumors, benign or malignant, which can occur from newborn to old age. They are thought to arise from primordial germ cells, and are found in a variety of sites. This thesis is composed of 2 major parts. In a first part, the

  11. Low dose decitabine treatment induces CD80 expression in cancer cells and stimulates tumor specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Xin Wang

    Full Text Available Lack of immunogenicity of cancer cells has been considered a major reason for their failure in induction of a tumor specific T cell response. In this paper, we present evidence that decitabine (DAC, a DNA methylation inhibitor that is currently used for the treatment of myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS, acute myeloid leukemia (AML and other malignant neoplasms, is capable of eliciting an anti-tumor cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL response in mouse EL4 tumor model. C57BL/6 mice with established EL4 tumors were treated with DAC (1.0 mg/kg body weight once daily for 5 days. We found that DAC treatment resulted in infiltration of IFN-γ producing T lymphocytes into tumors and caused tumor rejection. Depletion of CD8(+, but not CD4(+ T cells resumed tumor growth. DAC-induced CTL response appeared to be elicited by the induction of CD80 expression on tumor cells. Epigenetic evidence suggests that DAC induces CD80 expression in EL4 cells via demethylation of CpG dinucleotide sites in the promoter of CD80 gene. In addition, we also showed that a transient, low-dose DAC treatment can induce CD80 gene expression in a variety of human cancer cells. This study provides the first evidence that epigenetic modulation can induce the expression of a major T cell co-stimulatory molecule on cancer cells, which can overcome immune tolerance, and induce an efficient anti-tumor CTL response. The results have important implications in designing DAC-based cancer immunotherapy.

  12. Application of a Persistent Heparin Treatment Inhibits the Malignant Potential of Oral Squamous Carcinoma Cells Induced by Tumor Cell-Derived Exosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sento, Shinya; Sasabe, Eri; Yamamoto, Tetsuya

    2016-01-01

    Exosomes are 30-100 nm-sized membranous vesicles, secreted from a variety of cell types into their surrounding extracellular space. Various exosome components including lipids, proteins, and nucleic acids are transferred to recipient cells and affect their function and activity. Numerous studies have showed that tumor cell-derived exosomes play important roles in tumor growth and progression. However, the effect of exosomes released from oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) into the tumor microenvironment remains unclear. In the present study, we isolated exosomes from OSCC cells and investigated the influence of OSCC cell-derived exosomes on the tumor cell behavior associated with tumor development. We demonstrated that OSCC cell-derived exosomes were taken up by OSCC cells themselves and significantly promoted proliferation, migration, and invasion through the activation of the PI3K/Akt, MAPK/ERK, and JNK-1/2 pathways in vitro. These effects of OSCC cell-derived exosomes were obviously attenuated by treatment with PI3K, ERK-1/2, and JNK-1/2 pharmacological inhibitors. Furthermore, the growth rate of tumor xenografts implanted into nude mice was promoted by treatment with OSCC cell-derived exosomes. The uptake of exosomes by OSCC cells and subsequent tumor progression was abrogated in the presence of heparin. Taken together, these data suggest that OSCC cell-derived exosomes might be a novel therapeutic target and the use of heparin to inhibit the uptake of OSCC-derived exosomes by OSCC cells may be useful for treatment.

  13. δ-Tocotrienol treatment is more effective against hypoxic tumor cells than normoxic cells: potential implications for cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibata, Akira; Nakagawa, Kiyotaka; Tsuduki, Tsuyoshi; Miyazawa, Teruo

    2015-08-01

    Tocotrienols, unsaturated forms of vitamin E, inhibit the proliferation of a variety of cancer cells and suppress angiogenesis. However, the mechanisms underlying those effects on cancer cell growth remain unclear especially under hypoxic conditions. In this study, we demonstrated that δ-tocotrienol (δ-T3) could be used as a novel anticancer agent against human colorectal adenocarcinoma (DLD-1) cells under both normoxic and hypoxic conditions. δ-T3 inhibited the growth of DLD-1 cells in a dose-dependent fashion by inducing cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. This effect was more potent under hypoxic than normoxic conditions. The anticancer effect of δ-T3 was achieved by its up-regulation of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors (p21 and p27), the activation of caspases and the suppression of phosphorylation of protein kinase B (Akt) at Thr(308) and Ser(473). In in vivo studies, oral administration of rice bran tocotrienol (RBT3, mainly γ-T3) (10 mg/mouse/day) significantly inhibited tumor growth in nude mice. In tumor analyses, RBT3 activated p21, p27, caspase-3 and caspase-9 and decreased Akt phosphorylation. Furthermore, immunostaining revealed that RBT3 decreased the number of cells positive for CD31/platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 in microvessels in the tumor. Taken together, these data suggest that tocotrienols are potent antitumor agents capable of inducing apoptosis and inhibiting angiogenesis under both hypoxic and normoxic conditions. Tocotrienols could have significant therapeutic potential in the clinical treatment of tumors. PMID:25979648

  14. Everolimus in the treatment of renal cell carcinoma and neuroendocrine tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Hiu-yan; Grossman, Ashley B; Bukowski, Ronald M

    2010-08-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) and neuroendocrine tumors (NET) are uncommon malignancies, highly resistant to chemotherapy, that have emerged as attractive platforms for evaluating novel targeted regimens. Everolimus is an oral rapamycin derivative within the mammalian target of rapamycin class of agents. Preclinical series have shown that everolimus exhibits anticancer effects in RCC and NET cell lines. A phase 3 placebo-controlled study in advanced clear-cell RCC, known as RECORD-1 (for "REnal Cell cancer treatment with Oral RAD001 given Daily"), documented that everolimus stabilizes tumor progression, prolongs progression-free survival and has acceptable tolerability in patients previously treated with the multikinase inhibitors sunitinib and/or sorafenib. Everolimus has been granted regulatory approval for use in sunitinib-pretreated and/or sorafenib-pretreated advanced RCC and incorporated into clinical practice guidelines, and the RECORD-1 safety data are being used to develop recommendations for managing clinically important adverse events in everolimus-treated patients. Ongoing clinical trials are evaluating everolimus as earlier RCC therapy (first-line for advanced disease and as neoadjuvant therapy), in non-clear-cell tumors, and in combination with various other approved or investigational targeted therapies for RCC. Regarding advanced NET, recently published phase 2 data support the ability of everolimus to improve disease control in patients with advanced NET as monotherapy or in combination with somatostatin analogue therapy, octreotide long-acting release (LAR). Forthcoming data from phase 3 placebo-controlled trials of everolimus, one focused on monotherapy for pancreatic NET and the other on combination use with octreotide LAR for patients with advanced NET and a history of carcinoid syndrome, will provide insight into its future place in NET therapy. The results of a number of ongoing phase 3 evaluations of everolimus will determine its broader

  15. Systemic treatment with CAR-engineered T cells against PSCA delays subcutaneous tumor growth and prolongs survival of mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adoptive transfer of T cells genetically engineered with a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) has successfully been used to treat both chronic and acute lymphocytic leukemia as well as other hematological cancers. Experimental therapy with CAR-engineered T cells has also shown promising results on solid tumors. The prostate stem cell antigen (PSCA) is a protein expressed on the surface of prostate epithelial cells as well as in primary and metastatic prostate cancer cells and therefore a promising target for immunotherapy of prostate cancer. We developed a third-generation CAR against PSCA including the CD28, OX-40 and CD3 ζ signaling domains. T cells were transduced with a lentivirus encoding the PSCA-CAR and evaluated for cytokine production (paired Student’s t-test), proliferation (paired Student’s t-test), CD107a expression (paired Student’s t-test) and target cell killing in vitro and tumor growth and survival in vivo (Log-rank test comparing Kaplan-Meier survival curves). PSCA-CAR T cells exhibit specific interferon (IFN)-γ and interleukin (IL)-2 secretion and specific proliferation in response to PSCA-expressing target cells. Furthermore, the PSCA-CAR-engineered T cells efficiently kill PSCA-expressing tumor cells in vitro and systemic treatment with PSCA-CAR-engineered T cells significantly delays subcutaneous tumor growth and prolongs survival of mice. Our data confirms that PSCA-CAR T cells may be developed for treatment of prostate cancer

  16. The Potential Impact of Biofield Treatment on Human Brain Tumor Cells: A Time-Lapse Video Microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Trivedi, Mahendra Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Study background: Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most common subtype of primary brain tumor in adults. The aim was to evaluate the impact of biofield treatment potential on human GBM and non-GBM brain cells using two time-lapse video microscopy technique. Methods: The human brain tumor, GBM cultured cells were divided into two groups viz. GBM control and GBM treatment. Similarly, human normal brain cultured cells (non-GBM) were taken and divided into two groups viz. non- GBM control ...

  17. Liquid biopsy and therapeutic response: Circulating tumor cell cultures for evaluation of anticancer treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoo, Bee Luan; Grenci, Gianluca; Jing, Tengyang; Lim, Ying Bena; Lee, Soo Chin; Thiery, Jean Paul; Han, Jongyoon; Lim, Chwee Teck

    2016-01-01

    The lack of a robust anticancer drug screening system to monitor patients during treatment delays realization of personalized treatment. We demonstrate an efficient approach to evaluate drug response using patient-derived circulating tumor cell (CTC) cultures obtained from liquid biopsy. Custom microfabricated tapered microwells were integrated with microfluidics to allow robust formation of CTC clusters without pre-enrichment and subsequent drug screening in situ. Rapid feedback after 2 weeks promotes immediate intervention upon detection of drug resistance or tolerance. The procedure was clinically validated with blood samples (n = 73) from 55 patients with early-stage, newly diagnosed, locally advanced, or refractory metastatic breast cancer. Twenty-four of these samples were used for drug evaluation. Cluster formation potential correlated inversely with increased drug concentration and therapeutic treatment. This new and robust liquid biopsy technique can potentially evaluate patient prognosis with CTC clusters during treatment and provide a noninvasive and inexpensive assessment that can guide drug discovery development or therapeutic choices for personalized treatment.

  18. Therapeutic potential and challenges of Natural killer cells in treatment of solid tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea eGras Navarro

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Natural killer (NK cells are innate lymphoid cells that hold tremendous potential for effective immunotherapy for a broad range of cancers. Due to the mode of NK cell killing requiring one–to-one target engagement and site directed release of cytolytic granules, the therapeutic potential of NK cells has been most extensively explored in hematological malignancies. However, their ability to precisely kill antibody coated cells, cancer stem cells (CSCs and genotoxically altered cells, while maintaining tolerance to healthy cells makes them appealing therapeutic effectors for all cancer forms, including metastases. Due to their release of pro-inflammatory cytokines, NK cells may potently reverse the anti-inflammatory tumor microenvironment (TME and augment adaptive immune responses by promoting differentiation, activation and/ or recruitment of accessory immune cells to sites of malignancy. Nevertheless, integrated and coordinated mechanisms of subversion of NK cell activity against the tumor and its microenvironment exist. Although our understanding of the receptor ligand interactions that regulate NK cell functionality has evolved remarkably, the diversity of ligands and receptors is complex, as is their mechanistic foundations in regulating NK cell function. In this article, we review the literature and highlight how the TME manipulates the NK cell phenotypes, genotypes and tropism to evade tumor recognition and elimination. We discuss counter strategies that may be adopted to augment the efficacy of NK cell anti-tumor surveillance, the clinical trials that have been undertaken so far in solid malignancies, critically weighing the challenges and opportunities with this approach.

  19. Diagnosis and Treatment of a Case of Leydig Cell Tumor in Dogs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiang; Jinmei; Yin; Hongbin; Li; Wenqing; Wan; Chunyun

    2014-01-01

    Based on such diagnostic measures as clinical diagnosis and lab etiological examination,the disease was diagnosed as Leydig cell tumor in dogs. Combined with the clinical examination results of the dog,testicular tumor removal operation was conducted,and the prognosis was favorable.

  20. Differential expression of the klf6 tumor suppressor gene upon cell damaging treatments in cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gehrau, Ricardo C.; D' Astolfo, Diego S.; Andreoli, Veronica [Centro de Investigaciones en Bioquimica Clinica e Inmunologia (CIBICI-CONICET), Departamento de Bioquimica Clinica, Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, Universidad Nacional de Cordoba, Haya de la Torre y Medina Allende, Ciudad Universitaria, 5000 Cordoba (Argentina); Bocco, Jose L., E-mail: jbocco@fcq.unc.edu.ar [Centro de Investigaciones en Bioquimica Clinica e Inmunologia (CIBICI-CONICET), Departamento de Bioquimica Clinica, Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, Universidad Nacional de Cordoba, Haya de la Torre y Medina Allende, Ciudad Universitaria, 5000 Cordoba (Argentina); Koritschoner, Nicolas P. [Centro de Investigaciones en Bioquimica Clinica e Inmunologia (CIBICI-CONICET), Departamento de Bioquimica Clinica, Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, Universidad Nacional de Cordoba, Haya de la Torre y Medina Allende, Ciudad Universitaria, 5000 Cordoba (Argentina)

    2011-02-10

    marker for the efficiency of cell death upon cancer treatment.

  1. Sequential Salinomycin Treatment Results in Resistance Formation through Clonal Selection of Epithelial-Like Tumor Cells12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopp, Florian; Hermawan, Adam; Oak, Prajakta Shirish; Ulaganathan, Vijay Kumar; Herrmann, Annika; Elnikhely, Nefertiti; Thakur, Chitra; Xiao, Zhiguang; Knyazev, Pjotr; Ataseven, Beyhan; Savai, Rajkumar; Wagner, Ernst; Roidl, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Acquiring therapy resistance is one of the major obstacles in the treatment of patients with cancer. The discovery of the cancer stem cell (CSC)–specific drug salinomycin raised hope for improved treatment options by targeting therapy-refractory CSCs and mesenchymal cancer cells. However, the occurrence of an acquired salinomycin resistance in tumor cells remains elusive. To study the formation of salinomycin resistance, mesenchymal breast cancer cells were sequentially treated with salinomycin in an in vitro cell culture assay, and the resulting differences in gene expression and salinomycin susceptibility were analyzed. We demonstrated that long-term salinomycin treatment of mesenchymal cancer cells resulted in salinomycin-resistant cells with elevated levels of epithelial markers, such as E-cadherin and miR-200c, a decreased migratory capability, and a higher susceptibility to the classic chemotherapeutic drug doxorubicin. The formation of salinomycin resistance through the acquisition of epithelial traits was further validated by inducing mesenchymal-epithelial transition through an overexpression of miR-200c. The transition from a mesenchymal to a more epithelial-like phenotype of salinomycin-treated tumor cells was moreover confirmed in vivo, using syngeneic and, for the first time, transgenic mouse tumor models. These results suggest that the acquisition of salinomycin resistance through the clonal selection of epithelial-like cancer cells could become exploited for improved cancer therapies by antagonizing the tumor-progressive effects of epithelial-mesenchymal transition. PMID:25500079

  2. Residual tumor after the salvage surgery is the major risk factors for primary treatment failure in malignant ovarian germ cell tumors: A retrospective study of single institution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Park Jong Sup

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Malignant ovarian germ cell tumors are rare, and knowledge of their prognostic factors is limited, with little available randomized data. This study was conducted to evaluate the clinicopathologic characteristics of malignant ovarian germ cell tumors and to determine the association of their prognostic factors to primary treatment failure. Methods The medical records of 57 patients with stages I to IV malignant ovarian germ cell tumor were retrospectively reviewed, and their clinicopathologic and treatment-related data were collected and analyzed. Results The median age at the diagnosis was 23.3 years (range: 8-65 years, and the median follow-up period was 108 months (range: 48-205 months. The histological types of the tumors were immature teratoma (n = 24, dysgerminoma (n = 20, endodermal sinus tumor (n = 8, mixed germ cell tumor (n = 4, and choriocarcinoma (n = 1. 66.7% of the patients had stage I disease; 5.2%, stage II; 26.3%, stage III; and 1.8%, stage IV. After the initial surgery, 49 patients (86% received cisplatin-based chemotherapy. The five-year survival rate was 96.5%. There were six primary treatment failures, with two of the patients dying of the disease, and the median time to the recurrence was 8 months. The histological diagnosis (P P = 0.0052, elevation of beta-hCG (P = 0.0134, operation methods (P = 0.0006, and residual tumor after the salvage surgery (P P = 0.0011, Hazard ratio = 29.046, 95% Confidence interval 3.832-220.181. Conclusion Most malignant ovarian germ cell tumors have excellent prognoses with primary treatment, and good reproductive outcomes can be expected. Because primary treatment failure is associated with the residual disease after the salvage surgery, knowledge of the presence or absence of this risk factor may be helpful in risk stratification and individualization of adjuvant therapy in malignant ovarian germ cell tumors. Further large-scale prospective studies to confirm these results

  3. Treatment of established colon carcinoma-bearing mice by dendritic cells pulsed with lysates of heat-treated tumor cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    To investigate the therapeutic effect of dendritic cells pulsed with lysates of heat-treated CT26 colon carcinoma cells. Bone marrow-derived DCs were pulsed with lysates of heat-treated tumor cells and were used to immunize BALB/c mice with established colon carcinoma. Cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) response was detected. The therapeutic effect induced by DCs was observed by tumor weight and survival time. DCs pulsed with lysates of heat-treated tumor cells markedly induced specific cytotoxic activity of CTLs. Tumor growth in the immunized BALB/c mice was significantly inhibited and the survival time of the tumor-bearing mice was prolonged. DCs pulsed with lysates of heat-treated tumor cells have an observable therapeutic effect on established colon carcinoma-bearing mice.

  4. Treatment of established colon carcinoma-bearing mice by dendritic cells pulsed with lysates of heat-treated tumor cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YING MinGang; ZHEN QiuHong; LIU Sheng; GONG FuSheng; XIE YunQing

    2009-01-01

    To investigate the therapeutic effect of dendritic cells pulsed with lysates of heat-treated CT26 colon carcinoma cells. Bone marrow-derived DCs were pulsed with lysates of heat-treated tumor cells and were used to immunize BALB/c mice with established colon carcinoma. Cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) response was detected. The therapeutic effect induced by DCs was observed by tumor weight and survival time. DCs pulsed with lysates of heat-treated tumor cells markedly induced specific cytotoxic activity of CTLs. Tumor growth in the immunized BALB/c mice was significantly inhibited and the survival time of the tumor-bearing mice was prolonged, DCs pulsed with lysates of heat-treated tumor cells have an observable therapeutic effect on established colon carcinoma-bearing mice.

  5. Evaluating mononuclear cells as nanoparticle delivery vehicles for the treatment of breast tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murton, Jaclyn K.; Hu, Chelin; Ahmed, Mona M.; Hathaway, Helen J.; Nysus, Monique; Anderson Daniels, Tamara; Norenberg, Jeffrey P.; Adolphi, Natalie L.

    2015-08-01

    In breast cancer, certain types of circulating immune cells respond to long-range chemical signals from tumors by leaving the blood stream to actively infiltrate tumor tissue. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether immune cells could be used to deliver therapeutic nanoparticles into breast tumors in mice. Mononuclear splenocytes (MS) were harvested from donor mice, labeled with Indium-111, injected intravenously into immune-competent recipient mice (3 tumor-bearing and 3 control), and imaged longitudinally by SPECT/CT. For comparison, the biodistribution of bonemarrow derived macrophages (BMDM) in one pair of mice was also imaged. Quantitative analysis of the SPECT images demonstrates that, after 24 hours, the concentration of MS detected in mammary tumors is more than 3-fold higher than the concentration detected in normal mammary glands. The ratio of MS concentration in mammary tissue to MS concentration in non-target tissues (muscle, lung, heart, liver, spleen, and kidney) was enhanced in tumor-bearing mice (compared to controls), with statistical significance achieved for mammary/muscle (p<0.01), mammary/lung (p<0.05), and mammary/kidney (p<0.05). By contrast, BMDM did not show a different affinity for tumors relative to normal mammary tissue. MS were incubated with 100 nm red fluorescent nanoparticles, and flow cytometry demonstrated that ~35% of the MS population exhibited strong phagocytic uptake of the nanoparticles. After intravenous injection into tumor-bearing mice, fluorescence microscopy images of tumor sections show qualitatively that nanoparticle-loaded MS retain the ability to infiltrate mammary tumors. Taken together, these results suggest that MS carriers are capable of actively targeting therapeutic nanoparticles to breast tumors.

  6. Metaphyseal giant cell tumor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, L.F.; Hemais, P.M.P.G.; Aymore, I.L.; Carmo, M.C.R. do; Cunha, M.E.P.R. da; Resende, C.M.C.

    Three cases of metaphyseal giant cell tumor are presented. A review of the literature is done, demostrating the lesion is rare and that there are few articles about it. Age incidence and characteristics of the tumor are discussed.

  7. Metaphyseal giant cell tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three cases of metaphyseal giant cell tumor are presented. A review of the literature is done, demostrating the lesion is rare and that there are few articles about it. Age incidence and characteristics of the tumor are discussed. (Author)

  8. What "helps" tumors evade vascular targeting treatment?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SI Zhi-chao; LIU Jie

    2008-01-01

    Objective To throw a light on the possible factors which might induce resistance of vascular targeting treatment in tumors by reviewing the recent publications in the field of tumor angiogenesis and vascular targeting treatment.Data sources The data used in this review were mainly from Medline and PubMed for relevant English language articles published from 1971 to January 2008. The search terms were "angiogenesis", "vascular targeting treatment" and "endothelial progenitor cells".Study selection Articles involved in the possible influence factors during angiogenesis and vascular targeting treatment were selected, including angiogenic or anti-angiogenic mechanism, tumor vasculature, tumor cells, cancer stem cells and endothelial progenitor cells.Results As a promising strategy vascular targeting treatment still has experimental and clinical setbacks which may term tumor vasculature's resistance to anti-angiogenesis agents. There are several possible explanations for such a resistance that might account for clinical and preclinical failures of anti-angiogenic treatment against tumor.Proangiogenic effect of hypoxia, normal tumor vasculature, escape of tumor cells and tumor vasculogenesis are included.This review reveals some clues which might be helpful to direct future research in order to remove obstacles to vascular targeting treatment.Conclusions Generally and undoubtedly vascular targeting treatment remains a promising strategy. But we still have to realize the existence of a challenging future. Further research is required to enhance our knowledge of vascular targeting treatment strategy before it could make a more substantial success.

  9. Nonislet Cell Tumor Hypoglycemia

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson Thomas; Salini C. Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Nonislet cell tumor hypoglycemia (NICTH) is a rare cause of hypoglycemia. It is characterized by increased glucose utilization by tissues mediated by a tumor resulting in hypoglycemia. NICTH is usually seen in large mesenchymal tumors including tumors involving the GI tract. Here we will discuss a case, its pathophysiology, and recent advances in the management of NICTH. Our patient was diagnosed with poorly differentiated squamous cell carcinoma of esophagus. He continued to be hypoglycemic ...

  10. 5-Azacytidine treatment sensitizes tumor cells to T-cell mediated cytotoxicity and modulates NK cells in patients with myeloid malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gang, A O; Frøsig, T M; Brimnes, M K; Lyngaa, R; Treppendahl, M B; Grønbæk, K; Dufva, I H; Straten, P Thor; Hadrup, S R

    2014-01-01

    Treatment with the demethylating agent 5-Azacytidine leads to prolonged survival for patients with myelodysplastic syndrome, and the demethylation induces upregulation of cancer-testis antigens. Cancer-testis antigens are well-known targets for immune recognition in cancer, and the immune system may have a role in this treatment regimen. We show here that 5-Azacytidine treatment leads to increased T-cell recognition of tumor cells. T-cell responses against a large panel of cancer-testis antigens were detected before treatment, and these responses were further induced upon initiation of treatment. These characteristics point to an ideal combination of 5-Azacytidine and immune therapy to preferentially boost T-cell responses against cancer-testis antigens. To initiate such combination therapy, essential knowledge is required about the general immune modulatory effect of 5-Azacytidine. We therefore examined potential treatment effects on both immune stimulatory (CD8 and CD4 T cells and Natural Killer (NK) cells) and immune inhibitory cell subsets (myeloid-derived suppressor cells and regulatory T cells). We observed a minor decrease and modulation of NK cells, but for all other populations no effects could be detected. Together, these data support a strategy for combining 5-Azacytidine treatment with immune therapy for potential clinical benefit. PMID:24681961

  11. 5-Azacytidine treatment sensitizes tumor cells to T-cell mediated cytotoxicity and modulates NK cells in patients with myeloid malignancies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gang, A O; Frøsig, T M; Brimnes, M K; Lyngaa, R; Treppendahl, M B; Grønbæk, K; Dufva, I H; Straten, P thor; Hadrup, S R

    2014-01-01

    Treatment with the demethylating agent 5-Azacytidine leads to prolonged survival for patients with myelodysplastic syndrome, and the demethylation induces upregulation of cancer-testis antigens. Cancer-testis antigens are well-known targets for immune recognition in cancer, and the immune system may have a role in this treatment regimen. We show here that 5-Azacytidine treatment leads to increased T-cell recognition of tumor cells. T-cell responses against a large panel of cancer-testis antigens were detected before treatment, and these responses were further induced upon initiation of treatment. These characteristics point to an ideal combination of 5-Azacytidine and immune therapy to preferentially boost T-cell responses against cancer-testis antigens. To initiate such combination therapy, essential knowledge is required about the general immune modulatory effect of 5-Azacytidine. We therefore examined potential treatment effects on both immune stimulatory (CD8 and CD4 T cells and Natural Killer (NK) cells) and immune inhibitory cell subsets (myeloid-derived suppressor cells and regulatory T cells). We observed a minor decrease and modulation of NK cells, but for all other populations no effects could be detected. Together, these data support a strategy for combining 5-Azacytidine treatment with immune therapy for potential clinical benefit. PMID:24681961

  12. Tumor cell metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero-Garcia, Susana; Lopez-Gonzalez, Jose Sullivan; B´ez-Viveros, José Luis; Aguilar-Cazares, Dolores

    2011-01-01

    Cancer is a genetic disease that is caused by mutations in oncogenes, tumor suppressor genes and stability genes. The fact that the metabolism of tumor cells is altered has been known for many years. However, the mechanisms and consequences of metabolic reprogramming have just begun to be understood. In this review, an integral view of tumor cell metabolism is presented, showing how metabolic pathways are reprogrammed to satisfy tumor cell proliferation and survival requirements. In tumor cells, glycolysis is strongly enhanced to fulfill the high ATP demands of these cells; glucose carbons are the main building blocks in fatty acid and nucleotide biosynthesis. Glutaminolysis is also increased to satisfy NADPH regeneration, whereas glutamine carbons replenish the Krebs cycle, which produces metabolites that are constantly used for macromolecular biosynthesis. A characteristic feature of the tumor microenvironment is acidosis, which results from the local increase in lactic acid production by tumor cells. This phenomenon is attributed to the carbons from glutamine and glucose, which are also used for lactic acid production. Lactic acidosis also directs the metabolic reprogramming of tumor cells and serves as an additional selective pressure. Finally, we also discuss the role of mitochondria in supporting tumor cell metabolism. PMID:22057267

  13. Drug and cell encapsulation : Alternative delivery options for the treatment of malignant brain tumors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bhujbal, Swapnil V.; de Vos, Paul; Niclou, Simone P.

    2014-01-01

    Malignant brain tumors including glioblastoma are incurable cancers. Over the last years a number of promising novel treatment approaches have been investigated including the application of inhibitors of receptor tyrosine kinases and downstream targets, immune-based therapies and anti-angiogenic age

  14. Dentinogenic ghost cell tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singhaniya Shikha

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Dentinogenic ghost cell tumor (DGCT is a rare tumorous form of calcifying odontogenic cyst and only a small number of cases have been described. It is a locally invasive neoplasm that is characterized by ameloblastoma-like epithelial islands, ghost cells and dentinoid. The present report describes a case of a 21-year-old male with a tumor in the posterior region of the mandible, showing features of DGCT.

  15. Olfactory ensheathing cell tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ippili Kaushal

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs are found in the olfactory bulb and olfactory nasal mucosa. They resemble Schwann cells on light and electron microscopy, however, immunohistochemical staining can distinguish between the two. There are less than 30 cases of olfactory groove schwannomas reported in the literature while there is only one reported case of OEC tumor. We report an OEC tumor in a 42-year-old male and discuss the pathology and origin of this rare tumor.

  16. DNA demethylating agent 5-azacytidine inhibits myeloid-derived suppressor cells induced by tumor growth and cyclophosphamide treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikysková, Romana; Indrová, Marie; Vlková, Veronika; Bieblová, Jana; Símová, Jana; Paracková, Zuzana; Pajtasz-Piasecka, Elzbieta; Rossowska, Joanna; Reinis, Milan

    2014-01-01

    MDSCs represent one of the key players mediating immunosuppression. These cells accumulate in the TME, lymphoid organs, and blood during tumor growth. Their mobilization was also reported after CY therapy. DNMTi 5AC has been intensively studied as an antitumor agent. In this study, we examined, using two different murine tumor models, the modulatory effects of 5AC on TU-MDSCs and CY-MDSCs tumor growth and CY therapy. Indeed, the percentage of MDSCs in the TME and spleens of 5AC-treated mice bearing TRAMP-C2 or TC-1/A9 tumors was found decreased. The changes in the MDSC percentage were accompanied by a decrease in the Arg-1 gene expression, both in the TME and spleens. CY treatment of the tumors resulted in additional MDSC accumulation in the TME and spleens. This accumulation was subsequently inhibited by 5AC treatment. A combination of CY with 5AC led to the highest tumor growth inhibition. Furthermore, in vitro cultivation of spleen MDSCs in the presence of 5AC reduced the percentage of MDSCs. This reduction was associated with an increased percentage of CD11c(+) and CD86(+)/MHCII(+) cells. The observed modulatory effect on MDSCs correlated with a reduction of the Arg-1 gene expression, VEGF production, and loss of suppressive capacity. Similar, albeit weaker effects were observed when MDSCs from the spleens of tumor-bearing animals were cultivated with 5AC. Our findings indicate that beside the direct antitumor effect, 5AC can reduce the percentage of MDSCs accumulating in the TME and spleens during tumor growth and CY chemotherapy, which can be beneficial for the outcome of cancer therapy. PMID:24389335

  17. Treatment of tumors with vitamin E suppresses myeloid derived suppressor cells and enhances CD8+ T cell-mediated antitumor effects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tae Heung Kang

    Full Text Available Vitamin E has been shown to have strong anticarcinogenic properties, including antioxidant characteristics, making it an ideal candidate for use in combination with immunotherapies that modify the tumor microenvironment. The tumor microenvironment contains immunosuppressive components, which can be diminished, and immunogenic components, which can be augmented by immunotherapies in order to generate a productive immune response. In the current study, we employ the α-tocopherol succinate isomer of vitamin E to reduce immunosuppression by myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSCs as well as adoptive transfer of antigen-specific CD8+ T cells to generate potent antitumor effects against the HPV16 E7-expressing TC-1 tumor model. We show that vitamin E alone induces necrosis of TC-1 cells and elicits antitumor effects in TC-1 tumor-bearing mice. We further demonstrate that vitamin E reverses the suppression of T cell activation by MDSCs and that this effect is mediated in part by a nitric oxide-dependent mechanism. Additionally, treatment with vitamin E reduces the percentage of MDSCs in tumor loci, and induces a higher percentage of T cells, following T cell adoptive transfer. Finally, we demonstrate that treatment with vitamin E followed by E7-specific T cell adoptive transfer experience elicits potent antitumor effects in tumor-bearing mice. Our data provide additional evidence that vitamin E has anticancer properties and that it has promise for use as an adjuvant in combination with a variety of cancer therapies.

  18. Multiple granular cell tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, J K; Kuo, T T; Griffiths, C M; Itharat, S

    1980-10-01

    Eleven cases of granular cell tumor were reviewed. In two of the cases multiple sites of involvement were seen. The tumor occurred in the oral cavity in both of these cases and each was initially wrongly diagnosed as squamous cell carcinoma. The most common site was the subcutaneous tissue (nine patients) and the tongue was involved in three cases. In one patient the parotid gland was involved. Eight of the patients were females and three were males; seven were black and four were white. The importance of differentiating between squamous cell carcinoma and granular cell tumor is stressed, as is the need for a simple wide surgical excision. PMID:7421377

  19. Treatment Analysis in a Cancer Stem Cell Context Using a Tumor Growth Model Based on Cellular Automata.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ángel Monteagudo

    Full Text Available Cancer can be viewed as an emergent behavior in terms of complex system theory and artificial life, Cellular Automata (CA being the tool most used for studying and characterizing the emergent behavior. Different approaches with CA models were used to model cancer growth. The use of the abstract model of acquired cancer hallmarks permits the direct modeling at cellular level, where a cellular automaton defines the mitotic and apoptotic behavior of cells, and allows for an analysis of different dynamics of the cellular system depending on the presence of the different hallmarks. A CA model based on the presence of hallmarks in the cells, which includes a simulation of the behavior of Cancer Stem Cells (CSC and their implications for the resultant growth behavior of the multicellular system, was employed. This modeling of cancer growth, in the avascular phase, was employed to analyze the effect of cancer treatments in a cancer stem cell context. The model clearly explains why, after treatment against non-stem cancer cells, the regrowth capability of CSCs generates a faster regrowth of tumor behavior, and also shows that a continuous low-intensity treatment does not favor CSC proliferation and differentiation, thereby allowing an unproblematic control of future tumor regrowth. The analysis performed indicates that, contrary to the current attempts at CSC control, trying to make CSC proliferation more difficult is an important point to consider, especially in the immediate period after a standard treatment for controlling non-stem cancer cell proliferation.

  20. Percutaneous CT-Guided Cryoablation as an Alternative Treatment for an Extensive Pelvic Bone Giant Cell Tumor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panizza, Pedro Sergio Brito; Albuquerque Cavalcanti, Conrado Furtado de [Sírio Libânes Hospital, Radiology and Imaged Guided Intervention Service (Brazil); Yamaguchi, Nise Hitomi [Instituto Avanços em Medicina (Brazil); Leite, Claudia Costa; Cerri, Giovanni Guido; Menezes, Marcos Roberto de, E-mail: marcos.menezes@hc.fm.usp.br [Sírio Libânes Hospital, Radiology and Imaged Guided Intervention Service (Brazil)

    2016-02-15

    A giant cell tumor (GCT) is an intermediate grade, locally aggressive neoplasia. Despite advances in surgical and clinical treatments, cases located on the spine and pelvic bones remain a significant challenge. Failure of clinical treatment with denosumab and patient refusal of surgical procedures (hemipelvectomy) led to the use of cryoablation. We report the use of percutaneous CT-guided cryoablation as an alternative treatment, shown to be a minimally invasive, safe, and effective option for a GCT with extensive involvement of the pelvic bones and allowed structural and functional preservation of the involved bones.

  1. Percutaneous CT-Guided Cryoablation as an Alternative Treatment for an Extensive Pelvic Bone Giant Cell Tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A giant cell tumor (GCT) is an intermediate grade, locally aggressive neoplasia. Despite advances in surgical and clinical treatments, cases located on the spine and pelvic bones remain a significant challenge. Failure of clinical treatment with denosumab and patient refusal of surgical procedures (hemipelvectomy) led to the use of cryoablation. We report the use of percutaneous CT-guided cryoablation as an alternative treatment, shown to be a minimally invasive, safe, and effective option for a GCT with extensive involvement of the pelvic bones and allowed structural and functional preservation of the involved bones

  2. Treatment Outcomes, Growth Height, and Neuroendocrine Functions in Patients With Intracranial Germ Cell Tumors Treated With Chemoradiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Odagiri, Kazumasa, E-mail: t086016a@yokohama-cu.ac.jp [Department of Radiology, Yokohama City University Graduate School of Medicine, Yokohama (Japan); Department of Radiology, Kanagawa Children' s Medical Center, Yokohama (Japan); Omura, Motoko [Department of Radiology, Yokohama City University Graduate School of Medicine, Yokohama (Japan); Department of Radiology, Kanagawa Children' s Medical Center, Yokohama (Japan); Hata, Masaharu [Department of Radiology, Yokohama City University Graduate School of Medicine, Yokohama (Japan); Aida, Noriko; Niwa, Tetsu [Department of Radiology, Kanagawa Children' s Medical Center, Yokohama (Japan); Ogino, Ichiro [Department of Radiology, Yokohama City University Medical Center, Yokohama (Japan); Kigasawa, Hisato [Division of Hemato-oncology/Regeneration Medicine, Kanagawa Children' s Medical Center, Yokohama (Japan); Ito, Susumu [Department of Neurosurgery, Kanagawa Children' s Medical Center, Yokohama (Japan); Adachi, Masataka [Department of Endocrinology, Kanagawa Children' s Medical Center, Yokohama (Japan); Inoue, Tomio [Department of Radiology, Yokohama City University Graduate School of Medicine, Yokohama (Japan)

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: We carried out a retrospective review of patients receiving chemoradiation therapy (CRT) for intracranial germ cell tumor (GCT) using a lower dose than those previously reported. To identify an optimal GCT treatment strategy, we evaluated treatment outcomes, growth height, and neuroendocrine functions. Methods and Materials: Twenty-two patients with GCT, including 4 patients with nongerminomatous GCT (NGGCT) were treated with CRT. The median age at initial diagnosis was 11.5 years (range, 6-19 years). Seventeen patients initially received whole brain irradiation (median dose, 19.8 Gy), and 5 patients, including 4 with NGGCT, received craniospinal irradiation (median dose, 30.6 Gy). The median radiation doses delivered to the primary site were 36 Gy for pure germinoma and 45 Gy for NGGCT. Seventeen patients had tumors adjacent to the hypothalamic-pituitary axis (HPA), and 5 had tumors away from the HPA. Results: The median follow-up time was 72 months (range, 18-203 months). The rates of both disease-free survival and overall survival were 100%. The standard deviation scores (SDSs) of final heights recorded at the last assessment tended to be lower than those at initial diagnosis. Even in all 5 patients with tumors located away from the HPA, final height SDSs decreased (p = 0.018). In 16 patients with tumors adjacent to the HPA, 8 showed metabolic changes suggestive of hypothalamic obesity and/or growth hormone deficiency, and 13 had other pituitary hormone deficiencies. In contrast, 4 of 5 patients with tumors away from the HPA did not show any neuroendocrine dysfunctions except for a tendency to short stature. Conclusions: CRT for GCT using limited radiation doses resulted in excellent treatment outcomes. Even after limited radiation doses, insufficient growth height was often observed that was independent of tumor location. Our study suggests that close follow-up of neuroendocrine functions, including growth hormone, is essential for all patients with

  3. Treatment Outcomes, Growth Height, and Neuroendocrine Functions in Patients With Intracranial Germ Cell Tumors Treated With Chemoradiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: We carried out a retrospective review of patients receiving chemoradiation therapy (CRT) for intracranial germ cell tumor (GCT) using a lower dose than those previously reported. To identify an optimal GCT treatment strategy, we evaluated treatment outcomes, growth height, and neuroendocrine functions. Methods and Materials: Twenty-two patients with GCT, including 4 patients with nongerminomatous GCT (NGGCT) were treated with CRT. The median age at initial diagnosis was 11.5 years (range, 6–19 years). Seventeen patients initially received whole brain irradiation (median dose, 19.8 Gy), and 5 patients, including 4 with NGGCT, received craniospinal irradiation (median dose, 30.6 Gy). The median radiation doses delivered to the primary site were 36 Gy for pure germinoma and 45 Gy for NGGCT. Seventeen patients had tumors adjacent to the hypothalamic-pituitary axis (HPA), and 5 had tumors away from the HPA. Results: The median follow-up time was 72 months (range, 18–203 months). The rates of both disease-free survival and overall survival were 100%. The standard deviation scores (SDSs) of final heights recorded at the last assessment tended to be lower than those at initial diagnosis. Even in all 5 patients with tumors located away from the HPA, final height SDSs decreased (p = 0.018). In 16 patients with tumors adjacent to the HPA, 8 showed metabolic changes suggestive of hypothalamic obesity and/or growth hormone deficiency, and 13 had other pituitary hormone deficiencies. In contrast, 4 of 5 patients with tumors away from the HPA did not show any neuroendocrine dysfunctions except for a tendency to short stature. Conclusions: CRT for GCT using limited radiation doses resulted in excellent treatment outcomes. Even after limited radiation doses, insufficient growth height was often observed that was independent of tumor location. Our study suggests that close follow-up of neuroendocrine functions, including growth hormone, is essential for all patients

  4. Cell-based laboratory evaluation of coagulation activation by antineoplastic drugs for the treatment of lymphoid tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsunaka, Misae; Arai, Reina; Ohashi, Ayaka; Koyama, Takatoshi

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Combining vorinostat, L-asparaginase, and doxorubicin (Dox) led to improved response rates in the treatment of lymphoid tumors. However, deep-vein thrombosis has been noted as one of the most serious side effects with these drugs, and how these regimens cause deep-vein thrombosis is unclear. Methods: We investigated the procoagulant effects of vorinostat, L-asparaginase, and doxorubicin in lymphoid tumors, focusing on tissue factor, phosphatidylserine, and antithrombin. The human vascular endothelial cell line EAhy926 as well as the lymphoid neoplastic cell lines HUT78 (cutaneous T-cell lymphoma), Molt4 (acute T-lymphoblastic leukemia), and Ramos (Burkitt lymphoma) were employed to investigate these procoagulant effects. Results: Vorinostat, L-asparaginase, and doxorubicin induced exposure of phosphatidylserine and procoagulant activity on the surface of lymphoid tumor cells. Vorinostat and doxorubicin also induced phosphatidylserine exposure and increased procoagulant activity on EAhy926 cells. Expression of tissue factor antigen was induced by doxorubicin on the surface of each type of cells, whereas expression of tissue factor mRNA was unchanged. Secretion of antithrombin from HepG2 cells was reduced only by L-asparaginase. Conclusion: These data suggest that vorinostat and doxorubicin may induce procoagulant activity in vessels through apoptosis of tumor cells and through phosphatidylserine exposure and/or tissue factor expression on vascular endothelial cells. L-asparaginase may induce a thrombophilic state by reducing the secretion of anticoagulant proteins such as antithrombin. The laboratory methods described here could be useful to evaluate the procoagulant effects of antineoplastic drugs. PMID:27504186

  5. General Information about Extragonadal Germ Cell Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... following PDQ summaries: Ovarian Germ Cell Tumors Treatment Testicular Cancer Treatment Age and gender can affect the risk ... summaries of the latest published information on cancer prevention, detection, genetics, treatment, supportive care, and complementary and ...

  6. Autophagy sensitivity of neuroendocrine lung tumor cells

    OpenAIRE

    HONG, SEUNG-KEUN; Kim, Jin-Hwan; Starenki, Dmytro; Park, Jong-In

    2013-01-01

    Neuroendocrine (NE) phenotypes characterize a spectrum of lung tumors, including low-grade typical and intermediate-grade atypical carcinoid, high-grade large-cell NE carcinoma and small cell lung carcinoma. Currently, no effective treatments are available to cure NE lung tumors, demanding identification of biological features specific to these tumors. Here, we report that autophagy has an important role for NE lung tumor cell proliferation and survival. We found that the expression levels of...

  7. [Local treatment of liver tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pless, T.K.; Skjoldbye, Bjørn Ole

    2008-01-01

    Local treatment of non-resectable liver tumors is common. This brief review describes the local treatment techniques used in Denmark. The techniques are evaluated according to the evidence in literature. The primary local treatment is Radiofrequency Ablation of both primary liver tumors and liver...

  8. In vitro feasibility study of the use of a magnetic electrospun chitosan nanofiber composite for hyperthermia treatment of tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ta-Chun; Lin, Feng-Huei; Lin, Jui-Che

    2012-07-01

    Hyperthermia has been reported to be an effective cancer treatment modality, as tumor cells are more temperature-sensitive than their normal counterparts. Since the ambient temperature can be increased by placing magnetic nanoparticles in an alternating magnetic field it has become of interest to incorporate these magnetic nanoparticles into biodegradable nanofibers for possible endoscopic hyperthermia treatment of malignant tumors. In this preliminary investigation we have explored various characteristics of biodegradable electrospun chitosan nanofibers containing magnetic nanoparticles prepared by different methods. These methods included: (1) E-CHS-Fe(3)O(4), with electrospun chitosan nanofibers directly immersed in a magnetic nanoparticle solution; (2) E-CHS-Fe(2+), with the electrospun chitosan nanofibers initially immersed in Fe(+2)/Fe(+3) solution, followed by chemical co-precipitation of the magnetic nanoparticles. The morphology and crystalline phase of the magnetic electrospun nanofiber matrices were determined by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, selected area electron diffraction, and X-ray diffraction spectroscopy. The magnetic characteristics were measured using a superconducting quantum interference device. The heating properties of these magnetic electrospun nanofiber matrices in an alternating magnetic field were investigated at a frequency of 750 kHz and magnetic intensity of 6.4 kW. In vitro cell incubation experiments indicated that these magnetic electrospun nanofiber matrices are non-cytotoxic and can effectively reduce tumor cell proliferation upon application of a magnetic field.

  9. Porfimer-sodium (Photofrin-II) in combination with ionizing radiation inhibits tumor-initiating cell proliferation and improves glioblastoma treatment efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benayoun, Liat; Schaffer, Moshe; Bril, Rotem; Gingis-Velitski, Svetlana; Segal, Ehud; Nevelsky, Alexsander; Satchi-Fainaro, Ronit; Shaked, Yuval

    2013-01-01

    Tumor relapse and tumor cell repopulation has been explained partially by the drug-free break period between successive conventional treatments. Strategies to overcome tumor relapse have been proposed, such as the use of chemotherapeutic drugs or radiation in small, frequent fractionated doses without an extended break period between treatment intervals. Yet, tumors usually acquire resistance and eventually escape the therapy. Several mechanisms have been proposed to explain the resistance of tumors to therapy, one of which involves the cancer stem cell or tumor-initiating cell (TIC) concept. TICs are believed to resist many conventional therapies, in part due to their slow proliferation and self-renewal capacities. Therefore, emerging efforts to eradicate TICs are being undertaken. Here we show that treatment with Photofrin II, among the most frequently used photosensitizers, sensitized a TIC-enriched U-87MG human glioblastoma cell to radiation, and improve treatment outcome when used in combination with radiotherapy. A U-87MG tumor cell population enriched with radiation-resistant TICs becomes radio-sensitive, and an inhibition of cell proliferation and an increase in apoptosis are found in the presence of Photofrin II. Furthermore, U-87MG tumors implanted in mice treated with Photofrin II and radiation exhibit a significant reduction in angiogenesis and vasculogenesis, and an increased percentage of apoptotic TICs when compared with tumors grown in mice treated with radiation alone. Collectively, our results offer a new possible explanation for the therapeutic effects of radiosensitizing agents, and suggest that combinatorial treatment modalities can effectively prolong treatment outcome of glioblastoma tumors by inhibiting tumor growth mediated by TICs.

  10. Enhanced suppression of tumor growth by concomitant treatment of human lung cancer cells with suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid and arsenic trioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chien, Chia-Wen [Institute of Biomedical Sciences, Academia Sinica, Taipei 11529, Taiwan (China); Graduate Institute of Life Sciences, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei 11490, Taiwan (China); Yao, Ju-Hsien [Institute of Biomedical Sciences, Academia Sinica, Taipei 11529, Taiwan (China); Institute of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei 11221, Taiwan (China); Chang, Shih-Yu [Institute of Biomedical Sciences, Academia Sinica, Taipei 11529, Taiwan (China); Lee, Pei-Chih [Institute of Biomedical Sciences, Academia Sinica, Taipei 11529, Taiwan (China); Institute of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei 11221, Taiwan (China); Lee, Te-Chang, E-mail: bmtcl@ibms.sinica.edu.tw [Institute of Biomedical Sciences, Academia Sinica, Taipei 11529, Taiwan (China); Institute of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei 11221, Taiwan (China)

    2011-11-15

    The efficacy of arsenic trioxide (ATO) against acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) and relapsed APL has been well documented. ATO may cause DNA damage by generating reactive oxygen intermediates. Suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA), a histone deacetylase inhibitor, modulates gene and protein expression via histone-dependent or -independent pathways that may result in chromatin decondensation, cell cycle arrest, differentiation, and apoptosis. We investigated whether ATO and SAHA act synergistically to enhance the death of cancer cells. Our current findings showed that combined treatment with ATO and SAHA resulted in enhanced suppression of non-small-cell lung carcinoma in vitro in H1299 cells and in vivo in a xenograft mouse model. Flow cytometric analysis of annexin V+ cells showed that apoptotic cell death was significantly enhanced after combined treatment with ATO and SAHA. At the doses used, ATO did not interfere with cell cycle progression, but SAHA induced p21 expression and led to G1 arrest. A Comet assay demonstrated that ATO, but not SAHA, induced DNA strand breaks in H1299 cells; however, co-treatment with SAHA significantly increased ATO-induced DNA damage. Moreover, SAHA enhanced acetylation of histone H3 and sensitized genomic DNA to DNase I digestion. Our results suggest that SAHA may cause chromatin relaxation and increase cellular susceptibility to ATO-induced DNA damage. Combined administration of SAHA and ATO may be an effective approach to the treatment of lung cancer. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ATO and SAHA are therapeutic agents with different action modes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Combination of ATO and SAHA synergistically inhibits tumor cell growth. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SAHA loosens chromatin structure resulting in increased sensitivity to DNase I. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ATO-induced DNA damage and apoptosis are enhanced by co-treatment with SAHA.

  11. Complete Regression of Metastatic Cervical Cancer After Treatment With Human Papillomavirus–Targeted Tumor-Infiltrating T Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevanović, Sanja; Draper, Lindsey M.; Langhan, Michelle M.; Campbell, Tracy E.; Kwong, Mei Li; Wunderlich, John R.; Dudley, Mark E.; Yang, James C.; Sherry, Richard M.; Kammula, Udai S.; Restifo, Nicholas P.; Rosenberg, Steven A.; Hinrichs, Christian S.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Metastatic cervical cancer is a prototypical chemotherapy-refractory epithelial malignancy for which better treatments are needed. Adoptive T-cell therapy (ACT) is emerging as a promising cancer treatment, but its study in epithelial malignancies has been limited. This study was conducted to determine if ACT could mediate regression of metastatic cervical cancer. Patients and Methods Patients enrolled onto this protocol were diagnosed with metastatic cervical cancer and had previously received platinum-based chemotherapy or chemoradiotherapy. Patients were treated with a single infusion of tumor-infiltrating T cells selected when possible for human papillomavirus (HPV) E6 and E7 reactivity (HPV-TILs). Cell infusion was preceded by lymphocyte-depleting chemotherapy and was followed by administration of aldesleukin. Results Three of nine patients experienced objective tumor responses (two complete responses and one partial response). The two complete responses were ongoing 22 and 15 months after treatment, respectively. One partial response was 3 months in duration. The HPV reactivity of T cells in the infusion product (as measured by interferon gamma production, enzyme-linked immunospot, and CD137 upregulation assays) correlated positively with clinical response (P = .0238 for all three assays). In addition, the frequency of HPV-reactive T cells in peripheral blood 1 month after treatment was positively associated with clinical response (P = .0238). Conclusion Durable, complete regression of metastatic cervical cancer can occur after a single infusion of HPV-TILs. Exploratory studies suggest a correlation between HPV reactivity of the infusion product and clinical response. Continued investigation of this therapy is warranted. PMID:25823737

  12. Combinatorial treatment using targeted MEK and SRC inhibitors synergistically abrogates tumor cell growth and induces mesenchymal-epithelial transition in non-small-cell lung carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chua, Kian Ngiap; Kong, Li Ren; Sim, Wen Jing; Ng, Hsien Chun; Ong, Weijie Richard; Thiery, Jean Paul; Huynh, Hung; Goh, Boon Cher

    2015-10-01

    Oncogenesis in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is regulated by a complex signal transduction network. Single-agent targeted therapy fails frequently due to treatment insensitivity and acquired resistance. In this study, we demonstrate that co-inhibition of the MAPK and SRC pathways using a PD0325901 and Saracatinib kinase inhibitor combination can abrogate tumor growth in NSCLC. PD0325901/Saracatinib at 0.25:1 combination was screened against a panel of 28 NSCLC cell lines and 68% of cell lines were found to be sensitive (IC50 cell migration and matrigel invasion. The co-inhibition of MAPK and SRC induced strong G1/G0 cell cycle arrest in the NSCLC lines, inhibited anchorage independent growth and delayed tumor growth in H460 and H358 mouse xenografts. These data provide rationale for further investigating the combination of MAPK and SRC pathway inhibitors in advanced stage NSCLC.

  13. RNAi nanomaterials targeting immune cells as an anti-tumor therapy: the missing link in cancer treatment?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Conde

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available siRNA delivery targeting tumor cells and cancer-associated immune cells has been gaining momentum in the last few years. A combinatorial approach for silencing crucial factors essential for tumor progression in cancer-associated immune cells and in cancer cells simultaneously can effectively shift the tumor microenvironment from pro-oncogenic to anti-tumoral. Gene-therapy using RNAi nanomaterials can help shift this balance; however, fully utilizing the potential of RNAi relies on effective and specific delivery. RNAi nanomaterials can act as a Trojan horse which delivers siRNAs against immunosuppressive factors and reverses the regulatory activity of tumor immune cells residing in the tumor microenvironment. Here we review potential RNAi targets, means to activate and control the immune response, as well as ways to design delivery nanovehicles for successful RNAi immunotherapy.

  14. Palliative Local Radiotherapy in the Treatment of Tumor-stage Cutaneous T-cell Lymphoma/Mycosis Fungoides

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen-chen Xu; Tao Zhang; Tao Wang; Jie Liu; Yue-hua Liu

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine the efficacy of palliative radiotherapy in treating tumor-stage cutaneous T-cell lymphoma/mycosis fungoides (MF). Methods From January 2008 to January 2013, a total of 11 patients with tumor-stage MF were treated with local radiation therapy in Peking Union Medical College Hospital. The median age of these patients was 53.36±14.45 years. Female-male ratio was 1:1.2. The average course of disease was 10.82±3.37 years. All the patients were treated with local electronic beam irradiation with a total median dosage of 48.55±9.51 (40-74) Gy in an average of 24.55±5.57 (20-40) fractions, 5 fractions per week. Results The median follow-up time was 55.27±29.3 (13-103) months. No severe acute or chronic side effects of irradiation were observed. Complete clinical response (CR) rate of the radiated sites was 54.5%(6/11), partial response (PR) rate was 36.4%(4/11), and the overall response rate (CR+PR) was 90.9%. One patient showed no response. Conclusion Local radiotherapy with psolaren plus ultraviolet A and/or interferon maintaining treatment is an effective palliative therapy in the treatment of tumor-stage MF patients.

  15. Multiparametric classification links tumor microenvironments with tumor cell phenotype.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bojana Gligorijevic

    2014-11-01

    occurred in spatially distinct microenvironments of primary tumors. We show how machine-learning analysis can classify heterogeneous microenvironments in vivo to enable prediction of motility phenotypes and tumor cell fate. The ability to predict the locations of tumor cell behavior leading to metastasis in breast cancer models may lead towards understanding the heterogeneity of response to treatment.

  16. The use of circulating tumor cells in guiding treatment decisions for patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onstenk, Wendy; de Klaver, Willemijn; de Wit, Ronald; Lolkema, Martijn; Foekens, John; Sleijfer, Stefan

    2016-05-01

    The therapeutic landscape of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) has drastically changed over the past decade with the advent of several new anti-tumor agents. Oncologists increasingly face dilemmas concerning the best treatment sequence for individual patients since most of the novel compounds have been investigated and subsequently positioned either pre- or post-docetaxel. A currently unmet need exists for biomarkers able to guide treatment decisions and to capture treatment resistance at an early stage thereby allowing for an early change to an alternative strategy. Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) have in this context intensively been investigated over the last years. The CTC count, as determined by the CellSearch System (Janssen Diagnostics LLC, Raritan, NJ), is a strong, independent prognostic factor for overall survival in patients with mCRPC at various time points during treatment and, as an early response marker, outperforms traditional response evaluations using serum prostate specific antigen (PSA) levels, scintigraphy as well as radiography. The focus of research is now shifting toward the predictive value of CTCs and the use of the characterization of CTCs to guide the selection of treatments with the highest chance of success for individual patients. Recently, the presence of the androgen receptor splice variant 7 (AR-V7) has been shown to be a promising predictive factor. In this review, we have explored the clinical value of the enumeration and characterization of CTCs for the treatment of mCRPC and have put the results obtained from recent studies investigating the prognostic and predictive value of CTCs into clinical perspective. PMID:27107266

  17. Familial germ cell tumor

    OpenAIRE

    Sanju Cyriac; Rejeev Rajendranath; A. Robert Louis; Sagar, T. G.

    2012-01-01

    Familial testicular germ cell tumors are well known in literature. Only few cases are reported where both brother and sister of the same family suffered from germ cell malignancies. We present a family where the proband is a survivor of ovarian dysgerminoma stage IA. Her elder male sibling became acutely ill and was detected to have disseminated testicular malignancy with grossly elevated markers and vegetations in the mitral valve leaflets. Despite all measures he could not be saved. Presenc...

  18. Intracranial germ cell tumor

    OpenAIRE

    Kreutz, J; Rausin, L.; Weerts, E; Tebache, M; Born, J; Hoyoux, C

    2010-01-01

    Germ cell tumours represent about 3 to 8% of pediatric brain tumours. Occurrence of diabetes insipidus is common in the case of suprasellar germ cell tumors. The diagnosis may be advanced by MRI owing to the location and relatively univocal characteristics of the lesion signal. The existence of a bifocal mass developed in both suprasellar region and pineal zone is highly suggestive of a germinoma. The most important notion is to recognize that at the time of diabetes insipidus diagnosis in a ...

  19. Gene expression markers in circulating tumor cells may predict bone metastasis and response to hormonal treatment in breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    WANG, HAIYING; MOLINA, JULIAN; JIANG, JOHN; FERBER, MATTHEW; PRUTHI, SANDHYA; JATKOE, TIMOTHY; DERECHO, CARLO; RAJPUROHIT, YASHODA; ZHENG, JIAN; WANG, YIXIN

    2013-01-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) have recently attracted attention due to their potential as prognostic and predictive markers for the clinical management of metastatic breast cancer patients. The isolation of CTCs from patients may enable the molecular characterization of these cells, which may help establish a minimally invasive assay for the prediction of metastasis and further optimization of treatment. Molecular markers of proven clinical value may therefore be useful in predicting disease aggressiveness and response to treatment. In our earlier study, we identified a gene signature in breast cancer that appears to be significantly associated with bone metastasis. Among the genes that constitute this signature, trefoil factor 1 (TFF1) was identified as the most differentially expressed gene associated with bone metastasis. In this study, we investigated 25 candidate gene markers in the CTCs of metastatic breast cancer patients with different metastatic sites. The panel of the 25 markers was investigated in 80 baseline samples (first blood draw of CTCs) and 30 follow-up samples. In addition, 40 healthy blood donors (HBDs) were analyzed as controls. The assay was performed using quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) with RNA extracted from CTCs captured by the CellSearch system. Our study indicated that 12 of the genes were uniquely expressed in CTCs and 10 were highly expressed in the CTCs obtained from patients compared to those obtained from HBDs. Among these genes, the expression of keratin 19 was highly correlated with the CTC count. The TFF1 expression in CTCs was a strong predictor of bone metastasis and the patients with a high expression of estrogen receptor β in CTCs exhibited a better response to hormonal treatment. Molecular characterization of these genes in CTCs may provide a better understanding of the mechanism underlying tumor metastasis and identify gene markers in CTCs for predicting disease progression and

  20. Gene expression markers in circulating tumor cells may predict bone metastasis and response to hormonal treatment in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haiying; Molina, Julian; Jiang, John; Ferber, Matthew; Pruthi, Sandhya; Jatkoe, Timothy; Derecho, Carlo; Rajpurohit, Yashoda; Zheng, Jian; Wang, Yixin

    2013-11-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) have recently attracted attention due to their potential as prognostic and predictive markers for the clinical management of metastatic breast cancer patients. The isolation of CTCs from patients may enable the molecular characterization of these cells, which may help establish a minimally invasive assay for the prediction of metastasis and further optimization of treatment. Molecular markers of proven clinical value may therefore be useful in predicting disease aggressiveness and response to treatment. In our earlier study, we identified a gene signature in breast cancer that appears to be significantly associated with bone metastasis. Among the genes that constitute this signature, trefoil factor 1 (TFF1) was identified as the most differentially expressed gene associated with bone metastasis. In this study, we investigated 25 candidate gene markers in the CTCs of metastatic breast cancer patients with different metastatic sites. The panel of the 25 markers was investigated in 80 baseline samples (first blood draw of CTCs) and 30 follow-up samples. In addition, 40 healthy blood donors (HBDs) were analyzed as controls. The assay was performed using quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) with RNA extracted from CTCs captured by the CellSearch system. Our study indicated that 12 of the genes were uniquely expressed in CTCs and 10 were highly expressed in the CTCs obtained from patients compared to those obtained from HBDs. Among these genes, the expression of keratin 19 was highly correlated with the CTC count. The TFF1 expression in CTCs was a strong predictor of bone metastasis and the patients with a high expression of estrogen receptor β in CTCs exhibited a better response to hormonal treatment. Molecular characterization of these genes in CTCs may provide a better understanding of the mechanism underlying tumor metastasis and identify gene markers in CTCs for predicting disease progression and

  1. A strategy of tumor treatment in mice with doxorubicin-cyclophosphamide combination based on dendritic cell activation by human double-stranded DNA preparation

    OpenAIRE

    Alyamkina, Ekaterina A; Nikolin, Valeriy P; Popova, Nelly A.; Dolgova, Evgenia V; Proskurina, Anastasia S; Orishchenko, Konstantin E.; Efremov, Yaroslav R.; Chernykh, Elena R.; Ostanin, Alexandr A.; Sidorov, Sergey V; Ponomarenko, Dmitriy M.; Zagrebelniy, Stanislav N; Bogachev, Sergey S.; Shurdov, Mikhail A

    2010-01-01

    Background Immunization of mice with tumor homogenate after combined treatment with cyclophosphamide (CP) and double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) preparation is effective at inhibition of growth of tumor challenged after the treatment. It was assumed that this inhibition might be due to activation of the antigen-presenting cells. The purpose was to develop improved antitumor strategy using mice. We studied the combined action of cytostatics doxorubicin (Dox) plus CP with subsequent dsDNA preparation ...

  2. In vitro characterization of magnetic electrospun IDA-grafted chitosan nanofiber composite for hyperthermic tumor cell treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ta-Chun; Lin, Feng-Huei; Lin, Jui-Che

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles were the thermoseeds under an alternating magnetic field and can be used to produce highly localized hyperthermia effect on deep-seated tumor. Nevertheless, effective and precisive delivery of nanoparticles to the treatment-intended site remains a challenge. In this study, Fe3O4 nanoparticles were incorporated onto the crosslinked electrospun chitosan nanofibers using chemical co-precipitation from the Fe ions adsorbed. Such magnetic nanoparticle-nanofiber composites could be delivered to the treatment site precisely by surgical or endoscopic method. Iminodiacetic acid (IDA) functionality was grafted onto the chitosan with an aim to increase the amount of magnetic nanoparticles formed in the electrospun magnetic nanofiber composite. The morphology, crystalline phase as well as the magnetism characteristic of the magnetic electrospun nanofiber matrixes, was analyzed. Results have indicated that, with the incorporation of IDA functionality, more magnetic nanoparticles were formed in the electrospun chitosan nanofiber matrix. In addition, the magnetic IDA-grafted chitosan nanofiber composite can effectively reduced the tumor cell proliferation under the application of magnetic field. This finding suggested the magnetic electrospun chitosan nanofiber composite can be of potential for hyperthermia treatment.

  3. Extraovarian granulosa cell tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Prabir

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Extraovarian granulosa cell tumor (GCT is a very uncommon tumor, assumed to arise from the ectopic gonadal tissue along the embryonal route of the genital ridge. One such rare case of extraovarian GCT was encountered in a 58-year-old female who presented with a large intraabdominal lump. Computerized tomography revealed one large retroperitoneal mass measuring 15cm x 16cm and another mesenteric mass of 8cm x 5cm size. The patient had a history of hysterectomy with bilateral salpingooophorectomy 20 years ago for uterine leiomyoma. Ultrasonography-guided aspiration smears revealed cytological features suggestive of GCT. Histopathological examination of the excised masses showed features of adult-type GCT. Because metastatic epithelial tumors, particularly from the ovaries, may show identical morphology, immunostains for inhibin and epithelial membrane antigen (EMA were performed. The tumor showed positivity for inhibin while EMA was negative thus confirming the diagnosis of GCT. As this patient had no previous history of GCT and was oophorectomized 20 years ago, the tumor was considered as extraovarian. A diagnosis of extraovarian GCT should be carried out after excluding any previous history of GCT of the ovary. Immunostains help to differentiate GCTs from other neoplasms.

  4. The Cancer Stem Cell Fraction in Hierarchically Organized Tumors Can Be Estimated Using Mathematical Modeling and Patient-Specific Treatment Trajectories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Benjamin; Scott, Jacob G; Sottoriva, Andrea; Anderson, Alexander R A; Traulsen, Arne; Altrock, Philipp M

    2016-04-01

    Many tumors are hierarchically organized and driven by a subpopulation of tumor-initiating cells (TIC), or cancer stem cells. TICs are uniquely capable of recapitulating the tumor and are thought to be highly resistant to radio- and chemotherapy. Macroscopic patterns of tumor expansion before treatment and tumor regression during treatment are tied to the dynamics of TICs. Until now, the quantitative information about the fraction of TICs from macroscopic tumor burden trajectories could not be inferred. In this study, we generated a quantitative method based on a mathematical model that describes hierarchically organized tumor dynamics and patient-derived tumor burden information. The method identifies two characteristic equilibrium TIC regimes during expansion and regression. We show that tumor expansion and regression curves can be leveraged to infer estimates of the TIC fraction in individual patients at detection and after continued therapy. Furthermore, our method is parameter-free; it solely requires the knowledge of a patient's tumor burden over multiple time points to reveal microscopic properties of the malignancy. We demonstrate proof of concept in the case of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), wherein our model recapitulated the clinical history of the disease in two independent patient cohorts. On the basis of patient-specific treatment responses in CML, we predict that after one year of targeted treatment, the fraction of TICs increases 100-fold and continues to increase up to 1,000-fold after 5 years of treatment. Our novel framework may significantly influence the implementation of personalized treatment strategies and has the potential for rapid translation into the clinic. Cancer Res; 76(7); 1705-13. ©2016 AACR.

  5. Reductions in Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells and Lung Metastases using AZD4547 Treatment of a Metastatic Murine Breast Tumor Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Liu

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: AZD4547, a small-molecule inhibitor targeting the tyrosine kinase of Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptors (FGFRs, is currently under phase II clinical study for human subjects having breast cancer, while the underlying mechanism remains elusive. The aim of this study is to explore the potential mechanism by which AZD4547 inhibits breast tumor lung metastases at the level of the tumor microenvironment. Methods: First, through in vitro experiments, we investigated the efficacy of the FGFRs inhibitor AZD4547 on 4T1 tumor cells for their proliferation, apoptosis, migration, and invasion. Second, by in vivo animal experiments, we evaluated the effects of AZD4547 on tumor growth and lung metastases in 4T1 tumor-bearing mice. Finally, we examined the impact of AZD4547 on the infiltration of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs in lung, spleens, peripheral blood and tumor. Results: Through this study we found that AZD4547 could efficiently suppress tumor 4T1 cells through restraining their proliferation, blocking migration and invasion, and inducing apoptosis in vitro. In animal model we also demonstrated that AZD4547 was able to inhibit tumor growth and lung metastases, consistent with the decreased MDSCs accumulation in the tumor and lung tissues, respectively. Moreover, the reduced number of MDSCs in peripheral blood and spleens were also observed in the AZD4547-treated mice. Importantly, through the AZD4547 treatment, the CD4+ and CD8+ T-cells were significantly increased in tumor and spleens. Conclusion: Our studies showed that AZD4547 can inhibit breast cancer cell proliferation, induce its apoptosis and block migration and invasion in vitro and suppress tumor growth and lung metastases by modulating the tumor immunologic microenvironment in vivo.

  6. Malignant brain tumor treatments and hyperbaric oxygenation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kohshi, Kiyotaka [Univ. of Occupational and Environmental Health, Kitakyushu, Fukuoka (Japan)

    2000-09-01

    Malignant brain tumor treatment and hyperbaric oxygenation: Combined hyperbaric oxygenation (HBO) therapy and radiation therapy of malignant gliomas is reviewed. Malignant glioma tissue is hypoxic, and the efficacy of radiation therapy is increased by raising the oxygen density in glioma tissue. Residual tumor was reduced by a radiation dose of approximately 40 Gy in many cases when radiation therapy was begun within 15 minutes after HBO. In the experiment in animal models with different hypoxic fractions (HFs) of cells (SCCVII and 9L gliosarcoma), the tumor reduction effect was more significant in the SCCVII model, which has a higher HF. When the SCCVII model was irradiated within 30 minutes after HBO, the improvement effect was more significant (1.60-1.78 times) than by irradiation alone. HBO was effective in the treatment of radionecrosis of the brain. However, there were some cases in which radionecrosis progressed when the HBO treatments were discontinued, and the optimal duration of HBO treatment should be determined. It is difficult to differentiate between radionecrosis and tumor recurrence after radiosurgery of a malignant intracranial tumor. When no lesion reduction is observed in response to HBO treatment and steroid administration for about one month, the lesion is concluded to be a recurrence of the tumor, and additional irradiation should be performed. HBO treatment in combination with chemotherapy is also discussed. (K.H.)

  7. Treatment Option Overview (Adult Brain Tumors)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Unknown Primary Treatment Colon Cancer Treatment Leukemia Home Page Melanoma Treatment Nasopharyngeal Cancer Treatment Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Treatment Renal Cell Cancer Treatment Small Cell ...

  8. Familial germ cell tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanju Cyriac

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Familial testicular germ cell tumors are well known in literature. Only few cases are reported where both brother and sister of the same family suffered from germ cell malignancies. We present a family where the proband is a survivor of ovarian dysgerminoma stage IA. Her elder male sibling became acutely ill and was detected to have disseminated testicular malignancy with grossly elevated markers and vegetations in the mitral valve leaflets. Despite all measures he could not be saved. Presence of germ cell malignancies in the siblings of different sex in the same family points toward a genetic susceptibility. Literature review revealed only six similar cases. A discussion regarding the rare occurrence of familial germ cell malignancies with the affected family members may be worthwhile.

  9. Active treatment of murine tumors with a highly attenuated vaccinia virus expressing the tumor associated antigen 5T4 (TroVax) is CD4+ T cell dependent and antibody mediated.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrop, Richard; Ryan, Matthew G; Myers, Kevin A; Redchenko, Irina; Kingsman, Susan M; Carroll, Miles W

    2006-09-01

    5T4 is a tumor associated antigen that is expressed on the surface of a wide spectrum of human adenocarcinomas. The highly attenuated virus, modified vaccinia Ankara, has been engineered to express human 5T4 (h5T4). In a pre-clinical murine model, the recombinant virus (TroVax) induces protection against challenge with CT26-h5T4 (a syngeneic tumor line expressing h5T4). Anti-tumor activity is long lived, with protection still evident 6 months after the final vaccination. In a therapeutic setting, injection of mice with TroVax results in a reduction in tumor burden of >90%. Depletion of CD8+ T cells has no effect upon therapy in the active treatment model, whereas depletion of CD4+ T cells completely abrogates anti-tumor activity. In a prophylactic setting, depletion of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells after the induction of a h5T4 immune response has no deleterious effect on protection following challenge with CT26-h5T4. In light of these studies, the role of antibodies in protection against tumor challenge was investigated. 5T4 specific polyclonal serum decreased tumor burden by approximately 70%. Thus, we conclude that CD4+ T cells are essential for the induction of a protective immune response and that antibodies are the likely effector moiety in this xenogeneic murine tumor model. PMID:16311730

  10. Pericytes limit tumor cell metastasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xian, Xiaojie; Håkansson, Joakim; Ståhlberg, Anders;

    2006-01-01

    Previously we observed that neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) deficiency in beta tumor cells facilitates metastasis into distant organs and local lymph nodes. Here, we show that NCAM-deficient beta cell tumors grew leaky blood vessels with perturbed pericyte-endothelial cell-cell interactions...... and deficient perivascular deposition of ECM components. Conversely, tumor cell expression of NCAM in a fibrosarcoma model (T241) improved pericyte recruitment and increased perivascular deposition of ECM molecules. Together, these findings suggest that NCAM may limit tumor cell metastasis by stabilizing...... the microvessel wall. To directly address whether pericyte dysfunction increases the metastatic potential of solid tumors, we studied beta cell tumorigenesis in primary pericyte-deficient Pdgfb(ret/ret) mice. This resulted in beta tumor cell metastases in distant organs and local lymph nodes, demonstrating a role...

  11. Specific Targeting of Tumor Endothelial Cells by a Shiga-like Toxin-Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Fusion Protein as a Novel Treatment Strategy for Pancreatic Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birgit Hotz

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Tumor endothelial cells express vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR-2. VEGF can direct toxins to tumor vessels through VEGFR-2 for antiangiogenic therapy. This study aimed to selectively damage the VEGFR-2-overexpressing vasculature of pancreatic cancer by SLT-VEGF fusion protein comprising VEGF and the A subunit of Shiga-like toxin which inhibits protein synthesis of cells with high VEGFR-2 expression. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: Expression of VEGF and VEGF receptors was evaluated in human pancreatic cancer cells (AsPC-1, HPAF-2 and in normal human endothelial cells (HUVEC by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Cells were treated with SLT-VEGF (0.1–10 nM, and cell viability, proliferation, and endothelial tube formation were assessed. Orthotopic pancreatic cancer (AsPC-1, HPAF-2 was induced in nude mice. Animals were treated with SLT-VEGF fusion protein alone or in combination with gemcitabine. Treatment began 3 days or 6 weeks after tumor induction. Primary tumor volume and dissemination were determined after 14 weeks. Microvessel density and expression of VEGF and VEGF receptors were analyzed by immunohistochemistry. RESULTS: SLT-VEGF did not influence proliferation of pancreatic cancer cells; HUVECs (low-level VEGFR-2 reduced their proliferation rate and tube formation but not their viability. SLT-VEGF fusion protein reduced tumor growth and dissemination, increasing 14-week survival (AsPC-1, up to 75%; HPAF-2, up to 83%. Results of gemcitabine were comparable with SLT-VEGF monotherapy. Combination partly increased the therapeutic effects in comparison to the respective monotherapies. Microvessel density was reduced in all groups. Intratumoral VEGFR-2 expression was found in endothelial but not in tumor cells. CONCLUSIONS: SLT-VEGF is toxic for tumor vasculature rather than for normal endothelial or pancreatic cancer cells. SLT-VEGF treatment in combination with gemcitabine may provide a novel approach for

  12. Evaluation on the Clinical Efficacy of Dendritic Cell-Activated Cytokine-Induced Killer Cells Combined with Conventional Therapy in the Treatment of Malignant Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong WEI

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the clinical efficacy of dendritic cell-activated cytokine-induced killer (DC-CIK cells combined with conventional therapy in the treatment of malignant tumors.Methods: A total of 100 patients with malignant tumors were randomly divided into two groups. Treatment group received conventional therapy combined with DC-CIK while control group received conventional therapy alone. The short-term efficacy, adverse reactions and changes of lymphocyte subpopulation were all compared between two groups after treatment.Results: The overall response rate (ORR was higher in treatment group (86.00% than in control group (54.00%, the difference was statistically significant (P<0.05. White blood cell count (WBC reduced after treatment when compared with treatment before (P=0.001, but liver and kidney function had no obvious change in treatment group (P>0.05. WBC reduced markedly, but the level of alanine aminotransferase (ALT increased obviously after treatment in control group (P<0.001. WBC was higher, but the level of ALT was lower in treatment group than in control group (P<0.001. However, there was no difference between two groups regarding serum creatinine (Scr and blood urea nitrogen (BUN (P>0.05. In treatment group, the levels of CD3+, CD3+CD4+, CD3+CD8+, and CD3+CD56+ increased (P<0.05, but the level of CD4+/CD8+ had no significant change (P>0.05. In control group, the levels of CD3+ and CD3+CD4+ reduced (P<0.05, while the levels of CD3+CD8+, CD3+CD56+ and CD4+/CD8+ had no significant change (P>0.05. The levels of CD3+, CD3+CD4+, CD3+CD8+ and CD3+CD56+ in treatment group were higher than those in control group (P<0.01, whereas CD4+/CD8+ was lower than that in control group (P<0.01.Conclusion: DC-CIK combined with conventional therapy, safe and effective, is capable of promoting the recovery of leukocytes and liver and kidney function, and improving the cellular immune function, which may provide a new therapeutic regimen for

  13. Application of a Persistent Heparin Treatment Inhibits the Malignant Potential of Oral Squamous Carcinoma Cells Induced by Tumor Cell-Derived Exosomes

    OpenAIRE

    Sento, Shinya; Sasabe, Eri; Yamamoto, Tetsuya

    2016-01-01

    Exosomes are 30–100 nm-sized membranous vesicles, secreted from a variety of cell types into their surrounding extracellular space. Various exosome components including lipids, proteins, and nucleic acids are transferred to recipient cells and affect their function and activity. Numerous studies have showed that tumor cell-derived exosomes play important roles in tumor growth and progression. However, the effect of exosomes released from oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) into the tumor micr...

  14. Brain tumor and Gliadel wafer treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Panigrahi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma is a rapidly progressive and extremely fatal form of brain tumor with poor prognosis. It is the most common type of primary brain tumor. Even with the most aggressive conventional treatment that comprises surgery followed by radiotherapy and chemotherapy, most patients die within a year of diagnosis. Developments in molecular and cell biology have led to better understanding of tumor development, leading to novel treatment strategies including biological therapy and immunotherapy to combat the deadly disease. Targeted drug delivery strategies to circumvent the blood-brain barrier have shown efficiency in clinical trials. Gliadel wafer is a new approach to the treatment of glioblastoma, which involves controlled release delivery of carmustine from biodegradable polymer wafers. It has shown promising results and provides a silver lining for glioblastoma patients.

  15. Integral treatment of Pancoast tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: to describe the features and results of treatments intended to heal patients with diagnosis of pancoast tumor. Material and method: a prospective and descriptive study was made from 22 patients who have a diagnosis of pancoast tumor and that achieved inclusion criteria for treatment with healing purposes. Results: a combined treatment of radiotherapy before surgery and radical operation, with healing purposes were made in 22 patients with upper sulcus tumor of the lung. Nine patients had post surgical problems (3 wound sepsis; pleural effusion 2; permanent thoracic pain 2; pneumothorax 1; cardiac arrythmias 7). Three deaths occurred not related to surgical procedure. Survival at 3 to five years was 57% and 38% respectively. The combined achieved control of local regional disease but not distance disease in most of the cases. Conclusions: The combination of radiotherapy and surgery is the elective treatment to be chosen for patient with lung cancer when it appears to be pan coast tumor in stages II B and III A. (The author)

  16. DNA demethylating agent 5-azacytidine inhibits myeloid-derived suppressor cells induced by tumor growth and cyclophosphamide treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Mikyšková, R; Indrová, M. (Marie); Vlková, V. (Veronika); Bieblová, J. (Jana); Šímová, J; Paračková, Z. (Zuzana); Pajtasz-Piasecka, E.; Rossowska, J.; Reiniš, M

    2014-01-01

    MDSCs represent one of the key players mediating immunosuppression. These cells accumulate in the TME, lymphoid organs, and blood during tumor growth. Their mobilization was also reported after CY therapy. DNMTi 5AC has been intensively studied as an antitumor agent. In this study, we examined, using two different murine tumor models, the modulatory effects of 5AC on TU-MDSCs and CY-MDSCs tumor growth and CY therapy. Indeed, the percentage of MDSCs in the TME and spleens of 5AC-treated mice b...

  17. MUC1-positive circulating tumor cells and MUC1 protein predict chemotherapeutic efficacy in the treatment of metastatic breast cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian-Ping Cheng; Ying Yan; Xiang-Yi Wang; Yuan-Li Lu; Yan-Hua Yuan; Jun Jia; Jun Ren

    2011-01-01

    Chemotherapy plays an important role in the treatment of metastatic breast cancer. It is important to monitor chemotherapeutic efficacy, to find a simple and efficient tool to guide treatment, and to predict the efficacy of treatment in a timely and accurate manner. This study aimed to detect mucin-1 (MUC1) positive circulating tumor cells and MUC1 protein in the peripheral blood of patients with metastatic breast cancer and to investigate their relationship to chemotherapeutic efficacy. MUC1 mRNA was detected in the peripheral blood of 34 patients with newly diagnosed metastatic breast cancer by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. The positive rates of MUC1 mRNA were 88.2% before chemotherapy and 70.6% after chemotherapy, without a significant difference (P = 0.564); MUC1 mRNA expression before chemotherapy had no correlation with treatment effectiveness (P = 0.281). The response rate of MUC1 mRNA-negative patients after first-cycle chemotherapy was significantly higher (P = 0.009) and the progression-free survival (PFS) was clearly longer than those of MUC1 mRNA-positive patients (P = 0.095). MUC1 protein in peripheral blood plasma was detected by an ELISA competitive inhibition assay. The patients with decreased MUC1 protein after chemotherapy had a significantly longer PFS than those with elevated MUC1 protein (P = 0.044). These results indicate that the outcomes of MUC1 mRNA negative patients after chemotherapy are better than those of MUC1 mRNA-positive patients. In addition, patients with decreased expression of MUC1 protein have a better PFS.

  18. Hypoxic cell turnover in different solid tumor lines.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ljungkvist, A.; Bussink, J.; Kaanders, J.H.A.M.; Rijken, P.F.J.W.; Begg, A.C.; Raleigh, J.A.; Kogel, A.J. van der

    2005-01-01

    PURPOSE: Most solid tumors contain hypoxic cells, and the amount of tumor hypoxia has been shown to have a negative impact on the outcome of radiotherapy. The efficacy of combined modality treatments depends both on the sequence and timing of the treatments. Hypoxic cell turnover in tumors may be im

  19. Mechanisms of immunological eradication of a syngeneic guinea pig tumor. II. Effect of methotrexate treatment and T cell depletion of the recipient on adoptive immunity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The influence of methotrexate on the development of immunity to the line 10 hepatoma was studied in guinea pigs. Chronic methotrexate treatment had no apparent effect on the ability of immune guinea pigs to suppress the growth of inoculated tumor cells. In contrast, the same methotrexate regimen inhibited the development of tumor immunity if started before the 8th day after immunization with a vaccine containing viable line 10 cells admixed with Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) cell walls. Thus, methotrexate selectively inhibited the afferent limb of the immune response. In adoptive transfer experiments, methotrexate-treated recipient guinea pigs were capable of being passively sensitized with immune spleen cells, indicating that the primary cell-mediated immune response of the recipient was not required for adoptive immunity. The contribution of recipient T cells in adoptive immunity was further investigated in guinea pigs deleted of T cells by thymectomy, irradiation, and bone marrow reconstitution. Despite demonstrable deficiency in T lymphocyte reactions, B animals were fully capable of rejecting tumors after transfer of immune cells. These results suggest that the expression of adoptive immunity was independent of recipient T cell participation. In addition, sublethal irradiation of immune spleen cells prior to adoptive transfer abolished their efficacy. Proliferation of transferred immune cells in the recipient may be essential for expression of adoptive immunity

  20. Anaplastic Ependymoma in a Child With Sickle Cell Anemia: A Case Report Highlighting Treatment Challenges for Young Children With Central Nervous System Tumors and Underlying Vasculopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crotty, Erin E; Meier, Emily R; Wells, Elizabeth M; Hwang, Eugene I; Packer, Roger J

    2016-03-01

    A 3-year-old boy with sickle cell anemia (SCA) presented with progressive daily emesis and was found to have an anaplastic ependymoma. Radiation therapy and chemotherapy are usually employed after subtotal resections of anaplastic ependymomas, although the benefits from chemotherapy are unclear. To mitigate the risks of adjuvant treatment in this patient at risk for SCA-associated vasculopathy, renal impairment, and other end-organ damage, proton beam irradiation without chemotherapy was chosen. Scheduled packed red blood cell transfusions were instituted to maintain sickle hemoglobin levels less than 30%. This case highlights treatment complexities for malignant brain tumors in patients predisposed to treatment-related adverse effects.

  1. Application of Adoptive T-Cell Therapy Using Tumor Antigen-Specific T-Cell Receptor Gene Transfer for the Treatment of Human Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshiki Ochi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The last decade has seen great strides in the field of cancer immunotherapy, especially the treatment of melanoma. Beginning with the identification of cancer antigens, followed by the clinical application of anti-cancer peptide vaccination, it has now been proven that adoptive T-cell therapy (ACT using cancer antigen-specific T cells is the most effective option. Despite the apparent clinical efficacy of ACT, the timely preparation of a sufficient number of cancer antigen-specific T cells for each patient has been recognized as its biggest limitation. Currently, therefore, attention is being focused on ACT with engineered T cells produced using cancer antigen-specific T-cell receptor (TCR gene transfer. With regard to human leukemia, ACT using engineered T cells bearing the leukemia antigen-specific TCR gene still remains in its infancy. However, several reports have provided preclinical data on TCR gene transfer using Wilms' tumor gene product 1 (WT1, and also preclinical and clinical data on TCR gene transfer involving minor histocompatibility antigen, both of which have been suggested to provide additional clinical benefit. In this review, we examine the current status of anti-leukemia ACT with engineered T cells carrying the leukemia antigen-specific TCR gene, and discuss the existing barriers to progress in this area.

  2. Surgical treatment of multifocal giant cell tumor of carpal bones with preservation of wrist function: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarng, Yih-Wen; Yang, Shan-Wei; Hsu, Chien-Jen

    2009-02-01

    We report a rare case of multifocal giant cell tumor of bone involving the trapezium, trapezoid, capitate, and scaphoid with soft tissue extension. Following intralesional resection, an autogenous corticocancellous iliac crest bone graft was used to fill the resultant defect and preserve carpal height and radiocarpal motion. Successful union with no recurrence was noted at 1-year follow-up.

  3. Liquid biopsies: tumor diagnosis and treatment monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Binh Thanh Vu

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Cancer is a disease with high evolutionary, i.e., malignant, characteristics that change under selective pressure from therapy. Characterization based on molecular or primary tumor properties or clinicopathological staging does not fully reflect the state of cancer, especially when cancer cells metastasize. This is the major reason for failure of cancer treatment. Currently, there is an urgent need for new approaches that allow more effective, but less invasive, monitoring of cancer status, thereby improving the efficacy of treatments. With recent technological advances, and ldquo;liquid biopsies, and rdquo; the isolation of intact cells or analysis of components that are secreted from cells, such as nucleic acids or exosomes, could be implemented easily. This approach would facilitate real-time monitoring and accurate measurement of critical biomarkers. In this review, we summarize the recent progress in the identification of circulating tumor cells using new high-resolution approaches and discuss new circulating tumor nucleic acid- and exosome-based approaches. The information obtained through liquid biopsies could be used to gain a better understanding of cancer cell invasiveness and metastatic competence, which would then benefit translational applications such as personalized medicine. [Biomed Res Ther 2016; 3(8.000: 745-756

  4. Treatment with 5-Aza-2'-Deoxycytidine Induces Expression of NY-ESO-1 and Facilitates Cytotoxic T Lymphocyte-Mediated Tumor Cell Killing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnes S Klar

    Full Text Available NY-ESO-1 belongs to the cancer/testis antigen (CTA family and represents an attractive target for cancer immunotherapy. Its expression is induced in a variety of solid tumors via DNA demethylation of the promoter of CpG islands. However, NY-ESO-1 expression is usually very low or absent in some tumors such as breast cancer or multiple myeloma. Therefore, we established an optimized in vitro treatment protocol for up-regulation of NY-ESO-1 expression by tumor cells using the hypomethylating agent 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (DAC.We demonstrated de novo induction of NY-ESO-1 in MCF7 breast cancer cells and significantly increased expression in U266 multiple myeloma cells. This effect was time- and dose-dependent with the highest expression of NY-ESO-1 mRNA achieved by the incubation of 10 μM DAC for 72 hours. NY-ESO-1 activation was also confirmed at the protein level as shown by Western blot, flow cytometry, and immunofluorescence staining. The detection and quantification of single NY-ESO-1 peptides presented at the tumor cell surface in the context of HLA-A*0201 molecules revealed an increase of 100% and 50% for MCF7 and U266 cells, respectively. Moreover, the enhanced expression of NY-ESO-1 derived peptides at the cell surface was accompanied by an increased specific lysis of MCF7 and U266 cells by HLA-A*0201/NY-ESO-1(157-165 peptide specific chimeric antigen receptor (CAR CD8+ T cells. In addition, the killing activity of CAR T cells correlated with the secretion of higher IFN-gamma levels.These results indicate that NY-ESO-1 directed immunotherapy with specific CAR T cells might benefit from concomitant DAC treatment.

  5. Treatment with 5-Aza-2'-Deoxycytidine Induces Expression of NY-ESO-1 and Facilitates Cytotoxic T Lymphocyte-Mediated Tumor Cell Killing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klar, Agnes S.; Gopinadh, Jakka; Kleber, Sascha; Wadle, Andreas; Renner, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    Background NY-ESO-1 belongs to the cancer/testis antigen (CTA) family and represents an attractive target for cancer immunotherapy. Its expression is induced in a variety of solid tumors via DNA demethylation of the promoter of CpG islands. However, NY-ESO-1 expression is usually very low or absent in some tumors such as breast cancer or multiple myeloma. Therefore, we established an optimized in vitro treatment protocol for up-regulation of NY-ESO-1 expression by tumor cells using the hypomethylating agent 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (DAC). Methodology/Principal Findings We demonstrated de novo induction of NY-ESO-1 in MCF7 breast cancer cells and significantly increased expression in U266 multiple myeloma cells. This effect was time- and dose-dependent with the highest expression of NY-ESO-1 mRNA achieved by the incubation of 10 μM DAC for 72 hours. NY-ESO-1 activation was also confirmed at the protein level as shown by Western blot, flow cytometry, and immunofluorescence staining. The detection and quantification of single NY-ESO-1 peptides presented at the tumor cell surface in the context of HLA-A*0201 molecules revealed an increase of 100% and 50% for MCF7 and U266 cells, respectively. Moreover, the enhanced expression of NY-ESO-1 derived peptides at the cell surface was accompanied by an increased specific lysis of MCF7 and U266 cells by HLA-A*0201/NY-ESO-1(157–165) peptide specific chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) CD8+ T cells. In addition, the killing activity of CAR T cells correlated with the secretion of higher IFN-gamma levels. Conclusions/Significance These results indicate that NY-ESO-1 directed immunotherapy with specific CAR T cells might benefit from concomitant DAC treatment. PMID:26447882

  6. Diagnosis and treatment of ovarian granulosa cell tumors%卵巢粒层细胞瘤的诊治

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邓继华; 尤勇

    2013-01-01

    coffee bean appearance,the cells arranged round the acidoid which called as Call-Exner body.The positve expressed markers by immunohistochemistry stainning were CD99,inhibin,calretinin,and vimentin.The 12 adult granulosa cell tumor patients' 5 years and 10 years survival rate was 100% and 91.7% respectively,after surgery and chemotherapy.Conclusions The ovarium granulose cell tumors are low grade malignant neoplasms which occurred in middle age to senium females,abnormal menstruation or postmenopause vaginal bleeding are the main clinical symptomas,the certain diagnosis is depended on pathology.The prognosis would be good after surgery excision and then assisted with chemicotherapeutics.It has important clinical signifcance if master all the above characteristics,give appropriate treatment and long-term follow-up.

  7. FDG PET/CT imaging of desmoplastic small round cell tumor: findings at staging, during treatment and at follow-up

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ostermeier, Austin; Snyder, Scott E.; Shulkin, Barry L. [St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Department of Radiological Sciences, MS 220, Memphis, TN (United States); McCarville, M.B. [St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Department of Radiological Sciences, MS 220, Memphis, TN (United States); College of Medicine, University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Department of Radiology, Memphis, TN (United States); Navid, Fariba [St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Department of Oncology, Memphis, TN (United States); University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Department of Pediatrics, College of Medicine, Memphis, TN (United States)

    2015-08-15

    Desmoplastic small round cell tumor (DSRCT) is a very uncommon soft-tissue tumor of children and young adults. It has an aggressive course with generally poor survival. In general the assessment of tumor burden and response has relied upon CT or MRI. However these tumors are often metabolically active and can be evaluated using FDG PET/CT imaging. The purpose of this study was to determine the metabolic activity of desmoplastic small round cell tumors using FDG PET/CT imaging and the potential utility of FDG PET/CT in this disease. Eight patients (seven male, one female; ages 2-20 years, median 11 years) with confirmed DSRCT underwent 82 positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) scans. PET/CT was used for initial staging (seven patients, eight scans), monitoring response to therapy (eight patients, 37 scans) and for surveillance of DSRCT recurrence (six patients, 37 scans). Each scan performed at diagnosis showed abnormally elevated uptake in the primary tumor. Five patients had abdominal pelvic involvement, and two of those also had thoracic disease. Six patients whose scans showed no abnormal sites of uptake at the end of therapy have had progression-free survivals of 2-10 years. One patient whose scan continued to show uptake during treatment died of disease 1.3 years from diagnosis. Another patient with persistent uptake remained in treatment 3 years after initial diagnosis. One surveillance scan identified recurrent disease. FDG PET/CT identified elevated metabolic activity in each patient studied. Despite our small sample size, FDG PET/CT scans appear useful for the management of patients with DSCRT. Patients whose studies become negative during or following treatment may have a prolonged remission. (orig.)

  8. Acquired Tumor Cell Radiation Resistance at the Treatment Site Is Mediated Through Radiation-Orchestrated Intercellular Communication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aravindan, Natarajan, E-mail: naravind@ouhsc.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma (United States); Aravindan, Sheeja; Pandian, Vijayabaskar; Khan, Faizan H.; Ramraj, Satish Kumar; Natt, Praveen [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma (United States); Natarajan, Mohan [Department of Pathology, The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, Texas (United States)

    2014-03-01

    Purpose: Radiation resistance induced in cancer cells that survive after radiation therapy (RT) could be associated with increased radiation protection, limiting the therapeutic benefit of radiation. Herein we investigated the sequential mechanistic molecular orchestration involved in radiation-induced radiation protection in tumor cells. Results: Radiation, both in the low-dose irradiation (LDIR) range (10, 50, or 100 cGy) or at a higher, challenge dose IR (CDIR), 4 Gy, induced dose-dependent and sustained NFκB-DNA binding activity. However, a robust and consistent increase was seen in CDIR-induced NFκB activity, decreased DNA fragmentation, apoptosis, and cytotoxicity and attenuation of CDIR-inhibited clonal expansion when the cells were primed with LDIR prior to challenge dose. Furthermore, NFκB manipulation studies with small interfering RNA (siRNA) silencing or p50/p65 overexpression unveiled the influence of LDIR-activated NFκB in regulating CDIR-induced DNA fragmentation and apoptosis. LDIR significantly increased the transactivation/translation of the radiation-responsive factors tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-1α (IL-1α), cMYC, and SOD2. Coculture experiments exhibit LDIR-influenced radiation protection and increases in cellular expression, secretion, and activation of radiation-responsive molecules in bystander cells. Individual gene-silencing approach with siRNAs coupled with coculture studies showed the influence of LDIR-modulated TNF-α, IL-1α, cMYC, and SOD2 in induced radiation protection in bystander cells. NFκB inhibition/overexpression studies coupled with coculture experiments demonstrated that TNF-α, IL-1α, cMYC, and SOD2 are selectively regulated by LDIR-induced NFκB. Conclusions: Together, these data strongly suggest that scattered LDIR-induced NFκB-dependent TNF-α, IL-1α, cMYC, and SOD2 mediate radiation protection to the subsequent challenge dose in tumor cells.

  9. Acquired Tumor Cell Radiation Resistance at the Treatment Site Is Mediated Through Radiation-Orchestrated Intercellular Communication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Radiation resistance induced in cancer cells that survive after radiation therapy (RT) could be associated with increased radiation protection, limiting the therapeutic benefit of radiation. Herein we investigated the sequential mechanistic molecular orchestration involved in radiation-induced radiation protection in tumor cells. Results: Radiation, both in the low-dose irradiation (LDIR) range (10, 50, or 100 cGy) or at a higher, challenge dose IR (CDIR), 4 Gy, induced dose-dependent and sustained NFκB-DNA binding activity. However, a robust and consistent increase was seen in CDIR-induced NFκB activity, decreased DNA fragmentation, apoptosis, and cytotoxicity and attenuation of CDIR-inhibited clonal expansion when the cells were primed with LDIR prior to challenge dose. Furthermore, NFκB manipulation studies with small interfering RNA (siRNA) silencing or p50/p65 overexpression unveiled the influence of LDIR-activated NFκB in regulating CDIR-induced DNA fragmentation and apoptosis. LDIR significantly increased the transactivation/translation of the radiation-responsive factors tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-1α (IL-1α), cMYC, and SOD2. Coculture experiments exhibit LDIR-influenced radiation protection and increases in cellular expression, secretion, and activation of radiation-responsive molecules in bystander cells. Individual gene-silencing approach with siRNAs coupled with coculture studies showed the influence of LDIR-modulated TNF-α, IL-1α, cMYC, and SOD2 in induced radiation protection in bystander cells. NFκB inhibition/overexpression studies coupled with coculture experiments demonstrated that TNF-α, IL-1α, cMYC, and SOD2 are selectively regulated by LDIR-induced NFκB. Conclusions: Together, these data strongly suggest that scattered LDIR-induced NFκB-dependent TNF-α, IL-1α, cMYC, and SOD2 mediate radiation protection to the subsequent challenge dose in tumor cells

  10. Infantile pericardial round cell tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardiac malignancies presenting in infancy are rare. Desmoplastic small round cell tumor (DSRCT) is a rare occurrence in this age group. No case of intrapericardial DSRCT has been reported in the literature in infants

  11. [Ovarian germ cell tumors in girls].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nechushkina, I V; Karseladze, A I

    2015-01-01

    Morphological structure of tumor influences on the clinical course of the disease in children with germ cell tumors. Patients with ovarian dysgerminoma at the time of diagnosis are significantly older than patients with immature teratoma and yolk sac tumor. Immature teratoma and mixed germ cell tumors are significantly larger compared to other germ cell tumors. Yolk sac tumor and embryonal carcinoma are the most common cause of emergency surgical interventions and are accompanied by rupture of tumor capsule. PMID:26087605

  12. Improvement of internal tumor volumes of non-small cell lung cancer patients for radiation treatment planning using interpolated average CT in PET/CT.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yao-Ching Wang

    Full Text Available Respiratory motion causes uncertainties in tumor edges on either computed tomography (CT or positron emission tomography (PET images and causes misalignment when registering PET and CT images. This phenomenon may cause radiation oncologists to delineate tumor volume inaccurately in radiotherapy treatment planning. The purpose of this study was to analyze radiology applications using interpolated average CT (IACT as attenuation correction (AC to diminish the occurrence of this scenario. Thirteen non-small cell lung cancer patients were recruited for the present comparison study. Each patient had full-inspiration, full-expiration CT images and free breathing PET images by an integrated PET/CT scan. IACT for AC in PET(IACT was used to reduce the PET/CT misalignment. The standardized uptake value (SUV correction with a low radiation dose was applied, and its tumor volume delineation was compared to those from HCT/PET(HCT. The misalignment between the PET(IACT and IACT was reduced when compared to the difference between PET(HCT and HCT. The range of tumor motion was from 4 to 17 mm in the patient cohort. For HCT and PET(HCT, correction was from 72% to 91%, while for IACT and PET(IACT, correction was from 73% to 93% (*p<0.0001. The maximum and minimum differences in SUVmax were 0.18% and 27.27% for PET(HCT and PET(IACT, respectively. The largest percentage differences in the tumor volumes between HCT/PET and IACT/PET were observed in tumors located in the lowest lobe of the lung. Internal tumor volume defined by functional information using IACT/PET(IACT fusion images for lung cancer would reduce the inaccuracy of tumor delineation in radiation therapy planning.

  13. Cancer stem cell plasticity and tumor hierarchy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Marina Carla Cabrera; Robert E Hollingsworth; Elaine M Hurt

    2015-01-01

    The origins of the complex process of intratumoralheterogeneity have been highly debated and differentcellular mechanisms have been hypothesized to accountfor the diversity within a tumor. The clonal evolution andcancer stem cell (CSC) models have been proposed asdrivers of this heterogeneity. However, the concept ofcancer stem cell plasticity and bidirectional conversionbetween stem and non-stem cells has added additionalcomplexity to these highly studied paradigms and may helpexplain the tumor heterogeneity observed in solid tumors.The process of cancer stem cell plasticity in which cancercells harbor the dynamic ability of shifting from a non-CSCstate to a CSC state and vice versa may be modulated byspecific microenvironmental signals and cellular interactionsarising in the tumor niche. In addition to promoting CSCplasticity, these interactions may contribute to the cellulartransformation of tumor cells and affect response tochemotherapeutic and radiation treatments by providingCSCs protection from these agents. Herein, we review theliterature in support of this dynamic CSC state, discussthe effectors of plasticity, and examine their role in thedevelopment and treatment of cancer.

  14. Tumor de células gigantes da extremidade distal do fêmur: um desafio de tratamento Giant cell tumor of femoral distal end: a challenge in treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suraj Bajracharya

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Apresentamos aqui um caso de tumor de células gigantes na extremidade distal do fêmur direito tratado com ressecção da massa tumoral em bloco com remoção aguda da extremidade proximal e distal e fixado com hastes longas em K atravessando o joelho, do fêmur à tíbia. Após a consolidação / união completa das extremidades, foi feita a remoção da haste em K, seguida pela corticotomia juntamente com a osteogênese da distração com o auxílio do anel fixador de Ilizarov. O comprimento foi alcançado com este processo. O resultado final foi muito bom neste caso. Revisamos as opções de tratamento para tumor maligno de células gigantes na extremidade distal do fêmur e as dificuldades de tratá-lo.We present a case of malignant giant cell tumor of distal end of right femur treated with resection of the tumor mass en block with acute docking of proximal and distal end and fixed with long K-nail across knee from femur to tibia. After complete consolidation/ union of the ends, removal of K nail was done followed by corticotomy along with distraction osteogenesis with the help of Ilizarov ring fixator. The length was achieved with this process. The end result was very good in this case. We reviewed the treatment options for malignant giant cell tumor of femoral distal end and the challenges in its treatment.

  15. Assessment of EGFR mutations in circulating tumor cell preparations from NSCLC patients by next generation sequencing: toward a real-time liquid biopsy for treatment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Marchetti

    Full Text Available Assessment of EGFR mutation in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC patients is mandatory for optimization of pharmacologic treatment. In this respect, mutation analysis of circulating tumor cells (CTCs may be desirable since they may provide real-time information on patient's disease status.Blood samples were collected from 37 patients enrolled in the TRIGGER study, a prospective phase II multi-center trial of erlotinib treatment in advanced NSCLC patients with activating EGFR mutations in tumor tissue. 10 CTC preparations from breast cancer patients without EGFR mutations in their primary tumors and 12 blood samples from healthy subjects were analyzed as negative controls. CTC preparations, obtained by the Veridex CellSearch System, were subjected to ultra-deep next generation sequencing (NGS on the Roche 454 GS junior platform.CTCs fulfilling all Veridex criteria were present in 41% of the patients examined, ranging in number between 1 and 29. In addition to validated CTCs, potential neoplastic elements were seen in 33 cases. These included cells not fulfilling all Veridex criteria (also known as "suspicious objects" found in 5 (13% of 37 cases, and isolated or clustered large naked nuclei with irregular shape observed in 33 (89% cases. EGFR mutations were identified by NGS in CTC preparations of 31 (84% patients, corresponding to those present in matching tumor tissue. Twenty-five (96% of 26 deletions at exon 19 and 6 (55% of 11 mutations at exon 21 were detectable (P = 0.005. In 4 (13% cases, multiple EGFR mutations, suggesting CTC heterogeneity, were documented. No mutations were found in control samples.We report for the first time that the CellSearch System coupled with NGS is a very sensitive and specific diagnostic tool for EGFR mutation analysis in CTC preparations with potential clinical impact.

  16. Tumor marker CYFRA 21-1 in assessment of radiation treatment efficacy at local non-small-cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of radiation therapy (RT) at various fractionation modes with Etopiside and Cysplatin modification in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) are analyzed. The objective effect of accelerated RT was accompanied by statistically significant reduction of blood serum CYFRA 21-1 level (an index of proteolytic tumor degradation). It was established that the dynamics of blood serum CYFRA 21-1 expression coincided with the clinical findings and could be used for prognosis and monitoring of chemoradiation therapy efficacy in patients with NSCLC.

  17. Photodynamic Treatment of Tumor with Bacteria Expressing KillerRed.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Libo Yan

    Full Text Available Photodynamic therapy (PDT is a cancer treatment modality in which a photosensitizing dye is administered and exposed to light to kill tumor cells via the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS. A fundamental obstacle for PDT is the low specificity for staining solid tumors with dyes. Recently, a tumor targeting system guided by anaerobic bacteria was proposed for tumor imaging and treatment. Here, we explore the feasibility of the genetically encoded photosensitizer KillerRed, which is expressed in Escherichia coli, to treat tumors. Using nitroblue tetrazolium (NBT, we detected a lengthy ROS diffusion from the bodies of KillerRed-expressing bacteria in vitro, which demonstrated the feasibility of using bacteria to eradicate cells in their surroundings. In nude mice, Escherichia coli (E. coli expressing KillerRed (KR-E. coli were subcutaneously injected into xenografts comprising CNE2 cells, a human nasopharyngeal carcinoma cell line, and HeLa cells, a human cervical carcinoma cell line. KR-E. coli seemed to proliferate rapidly in the tumors as observed under an imaging system. When the intensity of fluorescence increased and the fluorescent area became as large as the tumor one day after KR-E. coli injection, the KR-E. coli-bearing tumor was irradiated with an orange light (λ = 540-580 nm. In all cases, the tumors became necrotic the next day and were completely eliminated in a few days. No necrosis was observed after the irradiation of tumors injected with a vehicle solution or a vehicle carrying the E. coli without KillerRed. In successfully treated mice, no tumor recurrence was observed for more than two months. E. coli genetically engineered for KillerRed expression are highly promising for the diagnosis and treatment of tumors when the use of bacteria in patients is cleared for infection safety.

  18. Tetrathiomolybdate inhibits head and neck cancer metastasis by decreasing tumor cell motility, invasiveness and by promoting tumor cell anoikis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Merajver Sofia D

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The metastatic spread of solid tumors is directly or indirectly responsible for most cancer-related deaths. Tumor metastasis is very complex and this process requires a tumor cell to acquire enhanced motility, invasiveness and anoikis resistance to successfully establish a tumor at a distal site. Metastatic potential of tumor cells is directly correlated with the expression levels of several angiogenic cytokines. Copper is a mandatory cofactor for the function of many of these angiogenic mediators as well as other proteins that play an important role in tumor cell motility and invasiveness. We have previously shown that tetrathiomolybdate (TM is a potent chelator of copper and it mediates its anti-tumor effects by suppressing tumor angiogenesis. However, very little is known about the effect of TM on tumor cell function and tumor metastasis. In this study, we explored the mechanisms underlying TM-mediated inhibition of tumor metastasis. Results We used two in vivo models to examine the effects of TM on tumor metastasis. Animals treated with TM showed a significant decrease in lung metastasis in both in vivo models as compared to the control group. In addition, tumor cells from the lungs of TM treated animals developed significantly smaller colonies and these colonies had significantly fewer tumor cells. TM treatment significantly decreased tumor cell motility and invasiveness by inhibiting lysyl oxidase (LOX activity, FAK activation and MMP2 levels. Furthermore, TM treatment significantly enhanced tumor cell anoikis by activating p38 MAPK cell death pathway and by downregulating XIAP survival protein expression. Conclusions Taken together, these results suggest that TM is a potent suppressor of head and neck tumor metastasis by modulating key regulators of tumor cell motility, invasiveness and anoikis resistance.

  19. Diagnosis and treatment of pancreatic endocrine tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The incidence of pancreatic endocrine tumor (PET) accounts for 1-2% of total pancreatic tumors and 0.4-1.5% of autopsy cases, reflecting the recently increasing trend. According to World Health Organization (WHO) criteria (2004), PET is classified by the type of hormone produced by the tumor and its biological behavior. Together with the classical clinical images and hormone markers, 11C-5-HTP-Positron emission tomography, OctreoScan ([111In-DTPA0] octreotide) scintigram, selective arterial calcium injection (SACI)-test and intraoperative ultrasonography (IOUS) are used for diagnosis. Surgery is the treatment of choice, if supposed to be curative and tolerable. In case of a well-differentiated endocrine tumor, with no indication of resection or interventional radiology (IVR), somatostatin analog is another therapy showing stable disease status for a long period. Systemic chemotherapy, including 5-fluorouracil (FU)+streptozotocin, and streptozotocin+doxorubicin, are used in cases of well-differentiated endocrine carcinoma, and cisplatin+etoposide are applied for poorly-differentiated endocrine carcinoma (or small cell carcinoma). Recent studies focus on molecular target therapy including small molecules and monoclonal antibody, such as tyrosine kinase inhibitor, anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) antibody and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitor. (author)

  20. Brain Metastases in Patients With Germ Cell Tumors: Prognostic Factors and Treatment Options—An Analysis From the Global Germ Cell Cancer Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, Darren R.; Lorch, Anja; Kramar, Andrew; Albany, Costantine; Einhorn, Lawrence H.; Giannatempo, Patrizia; Necchi, Andrea; Flechon, Aude; Boyle, Helen; Chung, Peter; Huddart, Robert A.; Bokemeyer, Carsten; Tryakin, Alexey; Sava, Teodoro; Winquist, Eric William; De Giorgi, Ugo; Aparicio, Jorge; Sweeney, Christopher J.; Cohn Cedermark, Gabriella; Powles, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To define characteristics, treatment response, and outcomes of men with brain metastases (BM) from germ cell tumors (GCT). Patients and Methods Data from 523 men with BM from GCT were collected retrospectively from 46 centers in 13 countries by using standardized questionnaires. Clinical features were correlated with overall survival (OS) as the primary end point. Results BM were present at initial diagnosis in 228 men (group A) and at relapse in 295 men (group B). OS at 3 years (3-year OS) was superior in group A versus group B (48% v 27%; P < .001). Multiple BM and the presence of liver or bone metastasis were independent adverse prognostic factors in both groups; primary mediastinal nonseminoma (group A) and elevations of α-fetoprotein of 100 ng/mL or greater or of human chorionic gonadotropin of 5,000 U/L or greater (group B) were additional independent adverse prognostic factors. Depending on these factors, the 3-year OS ranged from 0% to 70% in group A and from 6% to 52% in group B. In group A, 99% of patients received chemotherapy; multimodality treatment or high-dose chemotherapy was not associated with statistically improved survival in multivariable analysis. In group B, only 54% of patients received chemotherapy; multimodality treatment was associated with improved survival compared with single-modality therapy (hazard ratio, 0.51; 95% CI, 0.36 to 0.73; P < .001), as was high-dose compared with conventional-dose chemotherapy (hazard ratio, 0.41; 95% CI, 0.24 to 0.70; P = .001). Conclusion Men with BM from GCT have poor OS, particularly if additional risk factors are present. High-dose chemotherapy and multimodality treatment seemed to improve survival probabilities in men with BM at relapse. PMID:26460295

  1. Restoration of tumor suppressor gene function by gene replacement or small molecule strategies for the treatment of small cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zandi, Roza

    2011-01-01

    as potential therapeutic strategies for SCLC. However, as mutant p53 proteins tend to accumulate in SCLC cells, reintroduction of wild-type p53 may not be effective due to dominant-negative effects of the mutant protein. Therefore, a more effective approach would be to reactivate the endogenous mutant p53......Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) is a highly malignant disease with no current satisfactory treatments. Identification of new therapeutic targets and treatment strategies are therefore in great demand for the improvement or replacement of current available treatment regimes. Molecular mechanisms...... altered in SCLC include loss of tumor suppressor genes (TSGs), making restoration of normal TSG function a potential therapeutic strategy. One of the TSGs most frequently inactivated in SCLC is the transcription factor p53 (>90%). The majority of the mutations found in the p53 gene are in the DNA binding...

  2. Possible epigenetic mechanisms of tumor progression: induction of high-frequency heritable but phenotypically unstable changes in the tumorigenic and metastatic properties of tumor cell populations by 5-azacytidine treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerbel, R S; Frost, P; Liteplo, R; Carlow, D A; Elliott, B E

    1984-01-01

    Treatment of a variety of highly tumorigenic mouse lines in vitro with chemical mutagens, such as ethyl methane sulfonate (EMS) or N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG), can result in extraordinarily high frequencies (sometimes in excess of 90%) of strongly immunogenic clones unable to grow progressively in normal syngeneic hosts. These clones will, however, grow in immunosuppressed hosts and gradually regain tumorigenic ability in normal mice if maintained in long-term (several months-1 year) culture, i.e., they are often phenotypically unstable. These features--phenotypic drift and high frequency--make it unlikely that point mutations are the underlying mechanism involved in the generation of the variants. Results presented here demonstrate that these observations can be reproduced on the same tumor lines using 5-azacytidine--an analogue of cytidine which can be incorporated into DNA causing subsequent extensive hypomethylation of cytosine residues in the absence of any significant mutagenic effects. Furthermore, 5-azacytidine treatment of a nonmetastatic mouse mammary tumor led to the emergence of a small number of heritable but unstable tumor clones capable of spontaneous metastatic spread. Because it is known that DNA hypomethylation can lead to transcriptional activation of normally silent genes, that altered methylation patterns can be somatically replicated with a high but not perfect fidelity, and that mutagens can cause DNA hypomethylation, we propose that DNA hypomethylation followed by de novo methylation represents a plausible mechanism to account not only for the induction of the nontumorigenic variants but for a number of aspects of tumor progression and tumor heterogeneity, as well. In particular, we refer to heritable phenotypic alterations in tumor cell populations which occur at very high frequency but which are not necessarily stable over very long periods of time.

  3. Giant Cell Tumor: Role of Conservative Treatment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Anatolii Diedkov[1; Pavlo Kovalchuk[1; Marija Kukushkina[2; Sergey Bojchuk[1; Viktor Kostyuk[1

    2014-01-01

    Giant cell tumor is aggressive bone tumor. Surgical treatment is considered to be the only effective method of treatment ofthese tumors. The problem of inoperable patients with giant cell tumors is a challenge. A total of 8 patients had giant cell bone tumorsof pelvis and sacrum. 3 patients were treated by bisphosphonates, radiation therapy and embolization of tumor-nutrient arteries. 5patients received denosumab. The efficiency was assessed according to clinical data and CT scan control. Median follow up is 28months. All 8 patients had reduction of pain intensity. Treatment with denosumab demonstrated more than 30% tumor regression. Allof the patients are in remission.

  4. Analysis of the treatment of 9 patients with islet cell tumor%9例胰岛细胞瘤诊治分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张妲; 杜昕; 王晨蕊; 杨彩哲; 关小宏

    2015-01-01

    Objective Analysis the treatment of 9 patients with islet cell tumor.Methods Those 9 patients diagnosed as islet cell tumor, who were hospitalized in Air Force General Hospital from May 1999 to June 2014, were retrospectively analyzed in terms of clinical manifestation, pre-op diagnosis, treatment protocol and outcome, pathology feature, and immunohistochemistry. Moreover, all these patients were follow-up studied.Results Among all these patients, 5 cases were tested with blood glucose and insulin pre-operation, yet only 2 patients were investigated with other hormone level. All patients accepted imaging examination before surgery. So far no discomfort symptom emerged among 6 cases of benign islet cell tumor or islet cell hyperplasia ones during post-op period. Among the malignant islet cell tumor patients who were operated on or assisted with combination therapy after surgery, 1 patient died, while 2 cases are alive till now without recurrence sign.Conclusion The endocrinologic evaluation of islet cell tumor and screen of multiple endocrine neoplasm is still expected to be consummated.%目的 对9例胰岛细胞瘤患者的诊治情况进行分析.方法 回顾性分析1999年5月—2014年6月空军总医院收治的9例胰岛细胞瘤患者的临床表现、术前诊断、治疗方案及结局、病理特点和免疫组化并进行随访.结果 功能性胰岛细胞瘤5例患者术前进行了血糖和胰岛素水平的测定,但仅2例检测了其他内分泌激素水平.全部患者术前均进行了影像学检查及手术治疗.良性胰岛细胞瘤或胰岛细胞增生6例术后随访至今未出现不适症状.恶性胰岛细胞瘤3例经手术或辅以术后联合治疗,2例生存至今未复发,1例死亡.结论 胰岛细胞瘤的内分泌评估及多发性内分泌腺瘤病的筛查尚有待完善.

  5. Radiosensitized treatment of malignant brain tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloznelyte-Plesniene, Laima

    2003-12-01

    Around 12,000 deaths from glioblastoma occurs within the European Community annually. At present, the best available treatment for malignant brain tumors results in a median survival of patients of 15 months despite surgery, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy. The purpose of this paper is to review our results of radiosensitized treatment of malignant brain tumors.

  6. Cancer stem cells and brain tumors

    OpenAIRE

    Pérez Castillo, Ana; Aguilar Morante, Diana; Morales-García, José A.; Dorado, Jorge

    2008-01-01

    Besides the role of normal stem cells in organogenesis, cancer stem cells are thought to be crucial for tumorigenesis. Most current research on human tumors is focused on molecular and cellular analysis of the bulk tumor mass. However, evidence in leukemia and, more recently, in solid tumors suggests that the tumor cell population is heterogeneous. In recent years, several groups have described the existence of a cancer stem cell population in different brain tumors. These neural cancer stem ...

  7. Cancer stem cells, tumor dormancy, and metastasis

    OpenAIRE

    EmilyChen

    2012-01-01

    Tumor cells can persist undetectably for an extended period of time in primary tumors and in disseminated cancer cells. Very little is known about why and how these tumors persist for extended periods of time and then evolve to malignancy. The discovery of cancer stem cells (CSCs) in human tumors challenges our current understanding of tumor recurrence, drug resistance, and metastasis, and opens up new research directions on how cancer cells are capable of switching from dormancy to malignanc...

  8. Management of nonfunctioning islet cell tumors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Han Liang; Pu Wang; Xiao-Na Wang; Jia-Cang Wang; Xi-Shan Hao

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To more clearly define the clinical and pathological characteristics and appropriate diagnosis and treatment of nonfunctioning (NFICTs) islet cell tumors, and to review our institutional experience over the last 30 years.METHODS: The records of 43 patients confirmed to have nonfunctioning islet cell tumors of pancreas were retrospectively reviewed. Survival was estimated by the Kaplan-Meier methods and potential risk factors for survival were compared with the log-rank tests.RESULTS: The mean age was 31.63 years (range, 8 to 67 years). There were 7 men and 36 women. Twentyeight patients had a confirmed diagnosis of nonfunctioning islet cell carcinoma (NFICC) and benign islet cell tumors were found in 15 patients. The most common symptoms in patients with NFICTs were abdominal pain (55.8%),nausea and/or vomiting (32.6%), fatigue (25.6%) and abdominal mass (23.3%). Preoperative ultrasonic and computed tomography localized the tumors in all patients.Forty-three NFICTs were distributed throughout the pancreas, with 21 located to the right of the superior mesenteric vessels, 10 in the body of the pancreas, 6 in the tail of the pancreas, and multiple tumors were found in one patient. Thirty-nine of 43 patients (91%) underwent surgical resection. Surgical treatment was curative in 30patients (70%) and palliative in 9(21%). The resectability and curative resection rate in patients with NFICC of pancreas were 89% and 61%, respectively. The overall cumulative 5- and 10-year survival rates for patients with NFICC were 58.05% and 29.03%, respectively. Radical operation and diameter of cancer small than :10 cm were positive prognostic factors in females younger than 30years old. Multivariate Cox regression analysis indicated that radical operation was the only independent prognostic factor, P=0.007.CONCLUSION: Nonfunctioning islet cell tumors of pancreas are found mainly in young women. The long-term results for patients undergone surgery, especially curative resection are

  9. Significance of Micrometastases: Circulating Tumor Cells and Disseminated Tumor Cells in Early Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Oakman

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Adjuvant systemic therapy targets minimal residual disease. Our current clinical approach in the adjuvant setting is to presume, rather than confirm, the presence of minimal residual disease. Based on assessment of the primary tumor, we estimate an individual’s recurrence risk. Subsequent treatment decisions are based on characteristics of the primary tumor, with the presumption of consistent biology and treatment sensitivity between micrometastases and the primary lesion. An alternative approach is to identify micrometastatic disease. Detection of disseminated tumor cells (DTC in the bone marrow and circulating tumor cells (CTC from peripheral blood collection may offer quantification and biocharacterization of residual disease. This paper will review the prognostic and predictive potential of micrometastatic disease in early breast cancer.

  10. Changes in the functional characteristics of tumor and normal cells after treatment with extracts of white dead-nettle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veleva, Ralitsa; Petkova, Bela; Moskova-Doumanova, Veselina; Doumanov, Jordan; Dimitrova, Milena; Koleva, Petya; Mladenova, Kirilka; Petrova, Svetla; Yordanova, Zhenya; Kapchina-Toteva, Veneta; Topouzova-Hristova, Tanya

    2015-01-01

    Lamium album L. is a perennial herb widely used in folk medicine. It possesses a wide spectrum of therapeutic activities (anti-inflammatory, astringent, antiseptic, antibiotic, antispasmodic, antioxidant and anti-proliferative). Preservation of medicinal plant could be done by in vitro propagation to avoid depletion from their natural habitat. It is important to know whether extracts from L. album plants grown in vitro possess similar properties as extracts from plants grown in vivo. For these reasons, it is important to examine changes in the composition of secondary metabolites during in vitro cultivation of the plant and how they affect the biological activity. We used A549 human cancer cell line and normal kidney epithelial cells MDCKII (Madin–Darby canine kidney cells II) as controls in assessing the anti-cancer effect of plant extracts. To elucidate changes in some key functional characteristics, adhesion test, MTT (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2-5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide), transepithelial resistance (TER), immunofluorescence staining and trypan blue exclusion test were performed. Methanol and chloroform extracts of in vivo and in vitro propagated plants affected differently cancerous and non-cancerous cells. The most pronounced differences were observed in the morphological analysis and in the cell adhesive properties. We also detected suppressed epithelial transmembrane electrical resistance of MDCK II cells, by treatment with plant extracts, compared to non-treated MDCK II cells. A549 cells did not polarize under the same conditions. Altered organization of actin filaments in both cell types were noticed suggesting that extracts from L. album L. change TER and actin filaments, and somehow may block cell mechanisms, leading to the polarization of MDCK II cells. PMID:26019631

  11. Circulating tumor cells: utopia or reality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conteduca, Vincenza; Zamarchi, Rita; Rossi, Elisabetta; Condelli, Valentina; Troiani, Laura; Aieta, Michele

    2013-09-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) could be considered a sign of tumor aggressiveness, but highly sensitive and specific methods of CTC detection are necessary owing to the rarity and heterogeneity of CTCs in peripheral blood. This review summarizes recent studies on tumor biology, with particular attention to the metastatic cascade, and the molecular characterization and clinical significance of CTCs. Recent technological approaches to enrich and detect these cells and challenges of CTCs for individualized cancer treatment are also discussed. This review also provides an insight into the positive and negative features of the future potential applications of CTC detection, which sometimes remains still a 'utopia', but its actual utility remains among the fastest growing research fields in oncology. PMID:23980681

  12. Nearly 30 Years of Treatment for Recurrent Granulosa Cell Tumor of the Ovary: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deanna Teoh

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A 30-year-old woman was diagnosed with a stage IA granulosa cell tumor (GCT of the ovary in 1979. Following removal of the adnexal mass and complete surgical staging, she remained disease-free for 12 years. In 1991 she underwent a resection of a retroperitoneal mass, confirmed to be a recurrent GCT. Despite adjuvant radiation treatment at the time of recurrence, the patient presented five years later with abdominal pain, and was found to have a second recurrence. Over the next 10 years the patient had multiple recurrences and progressive disease despite surgical resection, cytotoxic, hormonal and targeted chemotherapy treatments. In conclusion, there is no standard management for recurrent GCT of the ovary. We review this patient’s treatment in the context of the current literature.

  13. NK cells in the tumor microenvironment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Stine K; Gao, Yanhua; Basse, Per H

    2014-01-01

    The presence of natural killer (NK) cells in the tumor microenvironment correlates with outcome in a variety of cancers. However, the role of intratumoral NK cells is unclear. Preclinical studies have shown that, while NK cells efficiently kill circulating tumor cells of almost any origin......, they seem to have very little effect against the same type of tumor cells when these have extravasated. The ability to kill extravasated tumor cells is, however, is dependent of the level of activation of the NK cells, as more recent published and unpublished studies, discussed below, have demonstrated...... that interleukin-2-activated NK cells are able to attack well-established solid tumors....

  14. The surgical treatment of the giant cell tumor around the knee joint%膝关节周围骨巨细胞瘤的外科治疗

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    苏郁; 胡扬华; 王旭; 刘寿坤; 王体惠

    2015-01-01

    Objective To explore the clinical and imaging characteristics,the corresponding operation method and clinical effect of the giant cell tumor around the knee joint,and discuss the selection of surgical options of the lesion. Methods 23 patients with giant cell tumor around the knee joint were retrospectively analyzed,10 distal femur cases and 12 proximal tibia cases and 1 case of proximal fibula tumor combined with tibia metastasis were included in the study. Surgical method was chosen according to the clinical and imaging characteristics of the pathological changes: 9 cases removal of the segmental tumor and joint prosthesis replacement;Extensively curettage and inactivation of the tumor cavity for 13 cases, then filled the cavity with bone graft or cement and using fixation (9 cases of bone graft, 4 cases of cement), amputation in 1 case. Results All cases were followed up for 8 ~ 50 months. Tumor recurred in 3 cases postoperation. 1 case recurred in the group of resection of tumor segment and tumor prosthesis replacement. 2 cases recurred in the group of extended tumor curettage and bone repair of the devitalized tumor cavity. The limb functional score of the two groups were 80% and 95% respectively. Conclusions A reasonable treatment based on the clinical and imaging characteristics of giant cell tumor should be chosen in order to obtain a good local control and limb functions.%目的:探讨膝关节周围骨巨细胞瘤的临床和影像学特点、手术方式的选择及临床疗效,讨论该病变可接受的外科治疗方式。方法23例膝关节周围骨巨细胞瘤患者(股骨远端10例,胫骨近端12例,腓骨近端复发并胫骨转移1例)根据病变的临床、影像学特点选择不同手术方式:9例行瘤段切除肿瘤假体置换术;13例行肿瘤扩大刮除瘤腔灭活骨修复和内固定术(植骨 9例,骨水泥填充4例),1例行截肢术。结果患者均获得随访,时间8~50个月。术后 3例复发,

  15. Beyond evidence-based data: scientific rationale and tumor behavior to drive sequential and personalized therapeutic strategies for the treatment of metastatic renal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Incorvaia, Lorena; Bronte, Giuseppe; Bazan, Viviana; Badalamenti, Giuseppe; Rizzo, Sergio; Pantuso, Gianni; Natoli, Clara; Russo, Antonio

    2016-04-19

    The recent advances in identification of the molecular mechanisms related to tumorigenesis and angiogenesis, along with the understanding of molecular alterations involved in renal cell carcinoma (RCC) pathogenesis, has allowed the development of several new drugs which have revolutionized the treatment of metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC).This process has resulted in clinically significant improvements in median overall survival and an increasing number of patients undergoes two or even three lines of therapy. Therefore, it is necessary a long-term perspective of the treatment: planning a sequential and personalized therapeutic strategy to improve clinical outcome, the potential to achieve long-term response, and to preserve quality of life (QOL), minimizing treatment-related toxicity and transforming mRCC into a chronically treatable condition.Because of the challenges still encountered to draw an optimal therapeutic sequence, the main focus of this article will be to propose the optimal sequencing of existing, approved, oral targeted agents for the treatment of mRCC using evidence-based data along with the knowledge available on the tumor behavior and mechanisms of resistance to anti-angiogenic treatment to provide complementary information and to help the clinicians to maximize the effectiveness of targeted agents in the treatment of mRCC.

  16. Palifosfamide in Treating Patients With Recurrent Germ Cell Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-11

    Adult Central Nervous System Germ Cell Tumor; Adult Teratoma; Malignant Extragonadal Germ Cell Tumor; Malignant Extragonadal Non-Seminomatous Germ Cell Tumor; Extragonadal Seminoma; Recurrent Malignant Testicular Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IV Extragonadal Non-Seminomatous Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IV Extragonadal Seminoma; Stage IV Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor

  17. Patient-Derived Antibody Targets Tumor Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    An NCI Cancer Currents blog on an antibody derived from patients that killed tumor cells in cell lines of several cancer types and slowed tumor growth in mouse models of brain and lung cancer without evidence of side effects.

  18. Dendritic cells are stressed out in tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maj, Tomasz; Zou, Weiping

    2015-09-01

    A recently paper published in Cell reports that dendritic cells (DCs) are dysfunctional in the tumor environment. Tumor impairs DC function through induction of endoplasmic reticulum stress response and subsequent disruption of lipid metabolic homeostasis.

  19. Tumor-derived circulating endothelial cell clusters in colorectal cancer.

    KAUST Repository

    Cima, Igor

    2016-06-29

    Clusters of tumor cells are often observed in the blood of cancer patients. These structures have been described as malignant entities for more than 50 years, although their comprehensive characterization is lacking. Contrary to current consensus, we demonstrate that a discrete population of circulating cell clusters isolated from the blood of colorectal cancer patients are not cancerous but consist of tumor-derived endothelial cells. These clusters express both epithelial and mesenchymal markers, consistent with previous reports on circulating tumor cell (CTC) phenotyping. However, unlike CTCs, they do not mirror the genetic variations of matched tumors. Transcriptomic analysis of single clusters revealed that these structures exhibit an endothelial phenotype and can be traced back to the tumor endothelium. Further results show that tumor-derived endothelial clusters do not form by coagulation or by outgrowth of single circulating endothelial cells, supporting a direct release of clusters from the tumor vasculature. The isolation and enumeration of these benign clusters distinguished healthy volunteers from treatment-naïve as well as pathological early-stage (≤IIA) colorectal cancer patients with high accuracy, suggesting that tumor-derived circulating endothelial cell clusters could be used as a means of noninvasive screening for colorectal cancer. In contrast to CTCs, tumor-derived endothelial cell clusters may also provide important information about the underlying tumor vasculature at the time of diagnosis, during treatment, and throughout the course of the disease.

  20. Diagnosis and treatment of giant cell tumor of tendinous sheath in wrist%腕部腱鞘巨细胞瘤诊治体会

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陆斌; 薛花; 崔庆元; 何仿

    2011-01-01

    目的:探讨腕部腱鞘巨细胞瘤的诊断方法及手术治疗体会.方法:2002年9月至2009年10月对8例术前MRI初步诊断为腕部腱鞘巨细胞瘤的患者进行手术治疗,其中男5例,女3例;年龄16~65岁,平均41岁;痛程10~72个月,平均31个月.结果:所有患者术后病理均证实为腱鞘巨细胞瘤,随访时间5~48个月,平均34.2个月.1例复发,3例正中神经损伤症状术后明显缓解.所有患者术后腕关节功能得到明显改善.结论:腱鞘巨细胞瘤的MRI表现特点有助于术前的鉴别诊断,术中彻底切除肿块有助于预防肿瘤复发.%Objective: To investigate diagnostic methods and surgical effect for the treatment of giant cell tumor of tendinous sheath in wrist. Methods:From September 2002 to October 2009,8 patients with preoperative diagnosis as giant cell tumor of tendinous sheath based on MRI were treated surgically. There were 5 males and 3 females,ranging in age from 16 to 65 years,with an average of 41 years. The disease course ranged from 10 to 72 months with an average of 31 months. Results:The diagnosis of all the patients was confirmed as giant cell tumor of tendinous sheath by postoperative pathology. All the patients were followed up,and the during ranged from 5 to 48 months (averaged,34.2 months). One patient recurred and 3 patients got obvious relief of symptoms of median nerve injury. All the patients had significant improvement in wrist function after surgery. Conclusion: Preoperative MRI is helpful for differential diagnosis of giant cell tumor of tendinous sheath. Thorough removal of tumor is very important in prevention of recurrence.

  1. Local treatment of a pleural mesothelioma tumor with ONCOS-102 induces a systemic antitumor CD8+ T-cell response, prominent infiltration of CD8+ lymphocytes and Th1 type polarization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranki, Tuuli; Joensuu, Timo; Jäger, Elke; Karbach, Julia; Wahle, Claudia; Kairemo, Kalevi; Alanko, Tuomo; Partanen, Kaarina; Turkki, Riku; Linder, Nina; Lundin, Johan; Ristimäki, Ari; Kankainen, Matti; Hemminki, Akseli; Backman, Charlotta; Dienel, Kasper; von Euler, Mikael; Haavisto, Elina; Hakonen, Tiina; Juhila, Juuso; Jaderberg, Magnus; Priha, Petri; Vassilev, Lotta; Vuolanto, Antti; Pesonen, Sari

    2014-01-01

    Late stage cancer is often associated with reduced immune recognition and a highly immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment. The presence of tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) and specific gene-signatures prior to treatment are linked to good prognosis, while the opposite is true for extensive immunosuppression. The use of adenoviruses as cancer vaccines is a form of active immunotherapy to initialise a tumor-specific immune response that targets the patient's unique tumor antigen repertoire. We report a case of a 68-year-old male with asbestos-related malignant pleural mesothelioma who was treated in a Phase I study with a granulocyte-macrophage colony‑stimulating factor (GM-CSF)-expressing oncolytic adenovirus, Ad5/3-D24-GMCSF (ONCOS-102). The treatment resulted in prominent infiltration of CD8+ lymphocytes to tumor, marked induction of systemic antitumor CD8+ T-cells and induction of Th1-type polarization in the tumor. These results indicate that ONCOS-102 treatment sensitizes tumors to other immunotherapies by inducing a T-cell positive phenotype to an initially T-cell negative tumor. PMID:25941579

  2. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy in tumor cell lines research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MRS can be used non-invasively to study the several trace metabolites and energy metabolism in vivo. By quantitatively analyzing the compounds changes we could detect abnormal metabolism in tumor and its surrounding tissue, and estimate tumor infiltration in vivo and vitro. In recent years, MRS has been applied in cell line research and is becoming a promising method. In this article we summarized the applications of MRS in cell lines in studying diagnosis, treatment, and tumor mechanisms. (authors)

  3. Pediatric Germ Cell Tumors; A 10-year Experience

    OpenAIRE

    Khaleghnejad-tabari, Ahmad; Mirshemirani, Alireza; Rouzrokh, Mohsen; Mohajerzadeh, Leily; Khaleghnejad-Tabari, Nasibeh; Hasas-Yeganeh, Shaghayegh

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the outcome of germ cell tumors in patients admitted to our center during a ten year period. Methods: In a retrospective descriptive study, patients with the pathological diagnosis of germ cell tumor (GCT) were included. All records were evaluated and patients followed by personal visit in clinic or phone call. Data regarding age, sex, tumor site, bio-chemical assay, pathology, treatment and outcomes were gathered. For qualitative variables we ...

  4. Cell biological mechanisms of multidrug resistance in tumors.

    OpenAIRE

    Simon, S. M.; Schindler, M

    1994-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) is a generic term for the variety of strategies tumor cells use to evade the cytotoxic effects of anticancer drugs. MDR is characterized by a decreased sensitivity of tumor cells not only to the drug employed for chemotherapy but also to a broad spectrum of drugs with neither obvious structural homology nor common targets. This pleiotropic resistance is one of the major obstacles to the successful treatment of tumors. MDR may result from structural or functional cha...

  5. Human neutrophils facilitate tumor cell transendothelial migration.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Wu, Q D

    2012-02-03

    Tumor cell extravasation plays a key role in tumor metastasis. However, the precise mechanisms by which tumor cells migrate through normal vascular endothelium remain unclear. In this study, using an in vitro transendothelial migration model, we show that human polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) assist the human breast tumor cell line MDA-MB-231 to cross the endothelial barrier. We found that tumor-conditioned medium (TCM) downregulated PMN cytocidal function, delayed PMN apoptosis, and concomitantly upregulated PMN adhesion molecule expression. These PMN treated with TCM attached to tumor cells and facilitated tumor cell migration through different endothelial monolayers. In contrast, MDA-MB-231 cells alone did not transmigrate. FACScan analysis revealed that these tumor cells expressed high levels of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) but did not express CD11a, CD11b, or CD18. Blockage of CD11b and CD18 on PMN and of ICAM-1 on MDA-MB-231 cells significantly attenuated TCM-treated, PMN-mediated tumor cell migration. These tumor cells still possessed the ability to proliferate after PMN-assisted transmigration. These results indicate that TCM-treated PMN may serve as a carrier to assist tumor cell transendothelial migration and suggest that tumor cells can exploit PMN and alter their function to facilitate their extravasation.

  6. Circulating Tumor Cells Measurements in Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franck Chiappini

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Liver cancer is the fifth most common cancer in men and the seventh in women. During the past 20 years, the incidence of HCC has tripled while the 5-year survival rate has remained below 12%. The presence of circulating tumor cells (CTC reflects the aggressiveness nature of a tumor. Many attempts have been made to develop assays that reliably detect and enumerate the CTC during the development of the HCC. In this case, the challenges are (1 there are few markers specific to the HCC (tumor cells versus nontumor cells and (2 they can be used to quantify the number of CTC in the bloodstream. Another technical challenge consists of finding few CTC mixed with million leukocytes and billion erythrocytes. CTC detection and identification can be used to estimate prognosis and may serve as an early marker to assess antitumor activity of treatment. CTC can also be used to predict progression-free survival and overall survival. CTC are an interesting source of biological information in order to understand dissemination, drug resistance, and treatment-induced cell death. Our aim is to review and analyze the different new methods existing to detect, enumerate, and characterize the CTC in the peripheral circulation of patients with HCC.

  7. Medical Treatment of Gastroenteropancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Gress

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Treatment of the clinically and prognostically heterogeneous neuroendocrine neoplasms (NEN should be based on a multidisciplinary approach, including surgical, interventional, medical and nuclear medicine-based therapeutic options. Medical therapies include somatostatin analogues, interferon-a, mTOR inhibitors, multikinase inhibitors and systemic chemotherapy. For the selection of the appropriate medical treatment the hormonal activity, primary tumor localization, tumor grading and growth behaviour as well as the extent of the disease must be considered. Somatostatin analogues are mainly indicated in hormonally active tumors for symptomatic relief, but antiproliferative effects have also been demonstrated, especially in well-differentiated intestinal NET. The efficacy of everolimus and sunitinib in patients with pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (pNET has been demonstrated in large placebo-controlled clinical trials. pNETs are also chemosensitive. Streptozocin-based chemotherapeutic regimens are regarded as current standard of care. Temozolomide in combination with capecitabine is an alternative that has shown promising results that need to be confirmed in larger trials. Currently, no comparative studies and no molecular markers are established that predict the response to medical treatment. Therefore the choice of treatment for each pNET patient is based on individual parameters taking into account the patient’s preference, expected side effects and established response criteria such as proliferation rate and tumor load. Platin-based chemotherapy is still the standard treatment for poorly differentiated neuroendocrine carcinomas. Clearly, there is an unmet need for new systemic treatment options in patients with extrapancreatic neuroendocrine tumors.

  8. Medical Treatment of Gastroenteropancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rinke, Anja, E-mail: sprengea@staff.uni-marburg.de; Michl, Patrick; Gress, Thomas [Department of Gastroenterology, University Hospital Marburg, Baldinger Strasse, Marburg D-35043 (Germany)

    2012-02-08

    Treatment of the clinically and prognostically heterogeneous neuroendocrine neoplasms (NEN) should be based on a multidisciplinary approach, including surgical, interventional, medical and nuclear medicine-based therapeutic options. Medical therapies include somatostatin analogues, interferon-α, mTOR inhibitors, multikinase inhibitors and systemic chemotherapy. For the selection of the appropriate medical treatment the hormonal activity, primary tumor localization, tumor grading and growth behaviour as well as the extent of the disease must be considered. Somatostatin analogues are mainly indicated in hormonally active tumors for symptomatic relief, but antiproliferative effects have also been demonstrated, especially in well-differentiated intestinal NET. The efficacy of everolimus and sunitinib in patients with pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (pNET) has been demonstrated in large placebo-controlled clinical trials. pNETs are also chemosensitive. Streptozocin-based chemotherapeutic regimens are regarded as current standard of care. Temozolomide in combination with capecitabine is an alternative that has shown promising results that need to be confirmed in larger trials. Currently, no comparative studies and no molecular markers are established that predict the response to medical treatment. Therefore the choice of treatment for each pNET patient is based on individual parameters taking into account the patient’s preference, expected side effects and established response criteria such as proliferation rate and tumor load. Platin-based chemotherapy is still the standard treatment for poorly differentiated neuroendocrine carcinomas. Clearly, there is an unmet need for new systemic treatment options in patients with extrapancreatic neuroendocrine tumors.

  9. Newcastle disease virus selectively kills human tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichard, K W; Lorence, R M; Cascino, C J; Peeples, M E; Walter, R J; Fernando, M B; Reyes, H M; Greager, J A

    1992-05-01

    Newcastle disease virus (NDV), strain 73-T, has previously been shown to be cytolytic to mouse tumor cells. In this study, we have evaluated the ability of NDV to replicate in and kill human tumor cells in culture and in athymic mice. Plaque assays were used to determine the cytolytic activity of NDV on six human tumor cell lines, fibrosarcoma (HT1080), osteosarcoma (KHOS), cervical carcinoma (KB8-5-11), bladder carcinoma (HCV29T), neuroblastoma (IMR32), and Wilm's tumor (G104), and on nine different normal human fibroblast lines. NDV formed plaques on all tumor cells tested as well as on chick embryo cells (CEC), the native host for NDV. Plaques did not form on any of the normal fibroblast lines. To detect NDV replication, virus yield assays were performed which measured virus particles in infected cell culture supernatants. Virus yield increased 10,000-fold within 24 hr in tumor and CEC supernatants. Titers remained near zero in normal fibroblast supernatants. In vivo tumoricidal activity was evaluated in athymic nude Balb-c mice by subcutaneous injection of 9 x 10(6) tumor cells followed by intralesional injection of either live or heat-killed NDV (1.0 x 10(6) plaque forming units [PFU]), or medium. After live NDV treatment, tumor regression occurred in 10 out of 11 mice bearing KB8-5-11 tumors, 8 out of 8 with HT-1080 tumors, and 6 out of 7 with IMR-32 tumors. After treatment with heat-killed NDV no regression occurred (P less than 0.01, Fisher's exact test). Nontumor-bearing mice injected with 1.0 x 10(8) PFU of NDV remained healthy. These results indicate that NDV efficiently and selectively replicates in and kills tumor cells, but not normal cells, and that intralesional NDV causes complete tumor regression in athymic mice with a high therapeutic index.

  10. Building bridges toward invasion: tumor promoter treatment induces a novel protein kinase C-dependent phenotype in MCF10A mammary cell acini.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristine S Klos

    Full Text Available The potent tumor promoter 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA alters many cellular processes through activation of its receptor protein kinase C (PKC, including gene expression, cell cycle, and the regulation of cell morphology, raising an important question for developing targeted methods to prevent cancer: which effects of TPA are crucial for carcinogenesis? To address this question, we studied TPA action in the 3-dimensional (3D MCF10A human breast epithelial cell system, which models important features of in vivo epithelial tissue including growth constraints, structural organization of cells, and establishment of a basement membrane. MCF10A cells, which are immortalized but nontumorigenic, form hollow, spheroid structures in 3D culture referred to as acini. The development of normal acini requires the tight spatiotemporal regulation of cellular proliferation, polarization, apoptosis, and growth arrest. Treatment of MCF10A acini with TPA caused the appearance of multi-acinar structures. Surprisingly, this phenotype did not involve an increase in cell number or major changes in cell death, and polarization. Instead, live cell and confocal microscopy revealed that TPA stimulates MCF10A acini to aggregate. TPA induces the PKC-dependent production of actin-based protrusions, which leads to the formation of cellular bridges between acini, the clustering of acini, and allows cells to move into adjacent acini. During this process, the integrity of the laminin V basement membrane is disrupted, while E-cadherin-based cell-cell contacts remain intact. Altogether, our results show that under the biochemical and structural constraints of epithelial tissue, as modeled by the 3D MCF10A system, TPA induces a novel PKC-dependent phenotype that resembles local invasion. Of the many effects caused by TPA, these studies highlight the aggressive production of actin-based cellular protrusions as a potentially important event along the pathway to

  11. Brain tumor stem cell dancing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppina Bozzuto

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background. Issues regarding cancer stem cell (CSC movement are important in neurosphere biology as cell-cell or cell-environment interactions may have significant impacts on CSC differentiation and contribute to the heterogeneity of the neurosphere. Aims. Despite the growing body of literature data on the biology of brain tumor stem cells, floating CSC-derived neurospheres have been scarcely characterized from a morphological and ultrastructural point of view. Results. Here we report a morphological and ultrastructural characterization performed by live imaging and scanning electron microscopy. Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM CSC-derived neurospheres are heterogeneous and are constituted by cells, morphologically different, capable of forming highly dynamic structures. These dynamic structures are regulated by not serendipitous cell-cell interactions, and they synchronously pulsate following a cyclic course made of "fast" and "slow" alternate phases. Autocrine/paracrine non canonical Wnt signalling appears to be correlated with the association status of neurospheres. Conclusions. The results obtained suggest that GBM CSCs can behave both as independents cells and as "social" cells, highly interactive with other members of its species, giving rise to a sort of "multicellular organism".

  12. Endoscopic treatment of orbital tumors

    OpenAIRE

    Signorelli, Francesco; Anile, Carmelo; Rigante, Mario; Paludetti, Gaetano; Pompucci, Angelo; Mangiola, Annunziato

    2015-01-01

    Different orbital and transcranial approaches are performed in order to manage orbital tumors, depending on the location and size of the lesion within the orbit. These approaches provide a satisfactory view of the superior and lateral aspects of the orbit and the optic canal but involve risks associated with their invasiveness because they require significant displacement of orbital structures. In addition, external approaches to intraconal lesions may also require deinsertion of extraocular ...

  13. Determinates of tumor response to radiation: Tumor cells, tumor stroma and permanent local control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: The causes of tumor response variation to radiation remain obscure, thus hampering the development of predictive assays and strategies to decrease resistance. The present study evaluates the impact of host tumor stromal elements and the in vivo environment on tumor cell kill, and relationship between tumor cell radiosensitivity and the tumor control dose. Material and methods: Five endpoints were evaluated and compared in a radiosensitive DNA double-strand break repair-defective (DNA-PKcs−/−) tumor line, and its DNA-PKcs repair competent transfected counterpart. In vitro colony formation assays were performed on in vitro cultured cells, on cells obtained directly from tumors, and on cells irradiated in situ. Permanent local control was assessed by the TCD50 assay. Vascular effects were evaluated by functional vascular density assays. Results: The fraction of repair competent and repair deficient tumor cells surviving radiation did not substantially differ whether irradiated in vitro, i.e., in the absence of host stromal elements and factors, from the fraction of cells killed following in vivo irradiation. Additionally, the altered tumor cell sensitivity resulted in a proportional change in the dose required to achieve permanent local control. The estimated number of tumor cells per tumor, their cloning efficiency and radiosensitivity, all assessed by in vitro assays, were used to predict successfully, the measured tumor control doses. Conclusion: The number of clonogens per tumor and their radiosensitivity govern the permanent local control dose

  14. Within tumors, interactions between T cells and tumor cells are impeded by the extracellular matrix

    OpenAIRE

    Salmon, Hélène; Donnadieu, Emmanuel

    2012-01-01

    In principle, T cells can recognize and kill cancer cells. However, tumors have the ability to escape T cell attack. By imaging the dynamic behavior of T cells in human lung tumor explants, we have recently established the importance of the extracellular matrix in limiting access of T cells to tumor cells.

  15. NMR exposure sensitizes tumor cells to apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghibelli, L; Cerella, C; Cordisco, S; Clavarino, G; Marazzi, S; De Nicola, M; Nuccitelli, S; D'Alessio, M; Magrini, A; Bergamaschi, A; Guerrisi, V; Porfiri, L M

    2006-03-01

    NMR technology has dramatically contributed to the revolution of image diagnostic. NMR apparatuses use combinations of microwaves over a homogeneous strong (1 Tesla) static magnetic field. We had previously shown that low intensity (0.3-66 mT) static magnetic fields deeply affect apoptosis in a Ca2+ dependent fashion (Fanelli et al., 1999 FASEBJ., 13;95-102). The rationale of the present study is to examine whether exposure to the static magnetic fields of NMR can affect apoptosis induced on reporter tumor cells of haematopoietic origin. The impressive result was the strong increase (1.8-2.5 fold) of damage-induced apoptosis by NMR. This potentiation is due to cytosolic Ca2+ overload consequent to NMR-promoted Ca2+ influx, since it is prevented by intracellular (BAPTA-AM) and extracellular (EGTA) Ca2+ chelation or by inhibition of plasma membrane L-type Ca2+ channels. Three-days follow up of treated cultures shows that NMR decrease long term cell survival, thus increasing the efficiency of cytocidal treatments. Importantly, mononuclear white blood cells are not sensitised to apoptosis by NMR, showing that NMR may increase the differential cytotoxicity of antitumor drugs on tumor vs normal cells. This strong, differential potentiating effect of NMR on tumor cell apoptosis may have important implications, being in fact a possible adjuvant for antitumor therapies. PMID:16528477

  16. Malignant mixed germ cell tumor of ovary: a rare case report

    OpenAIRE

    Bhawana Tiwary; Hemali Heidi Sinha; Vivek K. Pandey

    2015-01-01

    Ovarian germ cell tumors are very rare and affect mainly young girls and women. One of the most remarkable advances in oncology is in the treatment of malignant ovarian germ cell tumors. The two histological groups are: dysgerminomas and non dysgerminomatous tumors. We report a case of a 29 years old multiparous woman who presented with persistent pain abdomen and was diagnosed to have a malignant mixed germ cell tumor comprising of both dysgerminoma and yolk sac tumor (endodermal sinus tumor...

  17. Atypical extragonadal germ cell tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mainak Deb

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To review the experience with the diagnosis and management of extragonadal germ cell tumors (GCT with a subset analysis of those with atypical features. Materials and Methods: A retrospective chart review of patients of extragonadal germ cell tumors between 2000 and 2010 was carried out. Results: Fifteen children aged 7 days to 15 years (median, 1.5 years were included. Three had an antenatal diagnosis (one sacrococcygeal, one retrobulbar, one retroperitoneal tumor and were operated in the neonatal period. The locations were distributed between the retrobulbar area (1, anterior neck-thyroid gland (1, mediastinum (4, abdominothoracic extending through the esophageal hiatus (1, retroperitoneal (4 and sacrococcygeal (4. On histological examination, five harbored immature elements while two were malignant; the latter children received postexcision adjuvant chemotherapy. There was no mortality. At a median follow-up of 4.5 years (6 months to 8 years, 14/15 have had an event-free survival. One immature mediastinal teratoma that recurred locally 7.5 years after the initial operation was excised and adjuvant chemotherapy instituted. Conclusions: Extragonadal GCTs in children are uncommon and occasionally present with atypical clinical, radiological and histological features resulting in diagnostic and therapeutic dilemmas.

  18. Optical Imaging of Tumor Response to Hyperbaric Oxygen Treatment and Irradiation in an Orthotopic Mouse Model of Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.A.M. Braks (Joanna); L. Spiegelberg (Linda); S. Koljenovic (Senada); Y. Ridwan (Yanto); S. Keereweer (Stijn); R. Kanaar (Roland); E.B. Wolvius (Eppo); J. Essers (Jeroen)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractPurpose: Hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) is used in the treatment of radiation-induced tissue injury but its effect on (residual) tumor tissue is indistinct and therefore investigated in this study. Procedures: Orthotopic FaDu tumors were established in mice, and the response of the (ir

  19. Granular cell tumors of the urinary bladder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kayani Naila

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Granular cell tumors (GCTs are extremely rare lesions of the urinary bladder with only nine cases being reported in world literature of which one was malignant. Generally believed to be of neural origin based on histochemical, immunohistochemical, and ultrastructural studies; they mostly follow a clinically benign course but are commonly mistaken for malignant tumors since they are solid looking, ulcerated tumors with ill-defined margins. Materials and methods We herein report two cases of GCTs, one benign and one malignant, presenting with gross hematuria in a 14- and a 47-year-old female, respectively. Results Histopathology revealed characteristic GCTs with positive immunostaining for neural marker (S-100 and negative immunostaining for epithelial (cytokeratin, Cam 5.2, AE/A13, neuroendocrine (neuron specific enolase, chromogranin A, and synaptophysin and sarcoma (desmin, vimentin markers. The benign tumor was successfully managed conservatively with transurethral resection alone while for the malignant tumor, radical cystectomy, hysterectomy with bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy, anterior vaginectomy, plus lymph node dissection was done. Both cases show long-term disease free survival. Conclusion We recommend careful pathologic assessment for establishing the appropriate diagnosis and either a conservative or aggressive surgical treatment for benign or localized malignant GCT of the urinary bladder, respectively.

  20. Cancer stem cells: a new approach to tumor development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natália Cristina Ciufa Kobayashi

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Many theories have been proposed to explain the origins of cancer. Currently, evidences show that not every tumor cell is capable of initiating a tumor. Only a small part of the cancer cells, called cancer stem cells (CSCs, can generate a tumor identical to the original one, when removed from human tumors and transplanted into immunosuppressed mice. The name given to these cells comes from the resemblance to normal stem cells, except for the fact that their ability to divide is infinite. These cells are also affected by their microenvironment. Many of the signaling pathways, such as Wnt, Notch and Hedgehog, are altered in this tumoral subpopulation, which also contributes to abnormal proliferation. Researchers have found several markers for CSCs; however, much remains to be studied, or perhaps a universal marker does not even exist, since they vary among tumor types and even from patient to patient. It was also found that cancer stem cells are resistant to radiotherapy and chemotherapy. This may explain the re-emergence of the disease, since they are not completely eliminated and minimal amounts of CSCs can repopulate a tumor. Once the diagnosis in the early stages greatly increases the chances of curing cancer, identifying CSCs in tumors is a goal for the development of more effective treatments. The objective of this article is to discuss the origin of cancer according to the theory of stem cell cancer, as well as its markers and therapies used for treatment.

  1. Residual tumor cells that drive disease relapse after chemotherapy do not have enhanced tumor initiating capacity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ganapati V Hegde

    Full Text Available Although chemotherapy is used to treat most advanced solid tumors, recurrent disease is still the major cause of cancer-related mortality. Cancer stem cells (CSCs have been the focus of intense research in recent years because they provide a possible explanation for disease relapse. However, the precise role of CSCs in recurrent disease remains poorly understood and surprisingly little attention has been focused on studying the cells responsible for re-initiating tumor growth within the original host after chemotherapy treatment. We utilized both xenograft and genetically engineered mouse models of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC to characterize the residual tumor cells that survive chemotherapy treatment and go on to cause tumor regrowth, which we refer to as tumor re-initiating cells (TRICs. We set out to determine whether TRICs display characteristics of CSCs, and whether assays used to define CSCs also provide an accurate readout of a cell's ability to cause tumor recurrence. We did not find consistent enrichment of CSC marker positive cells or enhanced tumor initiating potential in TRICs. However, TRICs from all models do appear to be in EMT, a state that has been linked to chemoresistance in numerous types of cancer. Thus, the standard CSC assays may not accurately reflect a cell's ability to drive disease recurrence.

  2. Treatment Options by Type of Adult Brain Tumor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Unknown Primary Treatment Colon Cancer Treatment Leukemia Home Page Melanoma Treatment Nasopharyngeal Cancer Treatment Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Treatment Renal Cell Cancer Treatment Small Cell ...

  3. Granular Cell Tumor: An Uncommon Benign Neoplasm

    OpenAIRE

    Tirthankar Gayen; Anupam Das; Kaushik Shome; Debabrata Bandyopadhyay; Dipti Das; Abanti Saha

    2015-01-01

    Granular cell tumor is a distinctly rare neoplasm of neural sheath origin. It mainly presents as a solitary asymptomatic swelling in the oral cavity, skin, and rarely internal organs in the middle age. Histopathology is characteristic, showing polyhedral cells containing numerous fine eosinophilic granules with indistinct cell margins. We present a case of granular cell tumor on the back of a 48-year-old woman which was painful, mimicking an adnexal tumor.

  4. Granular cell tumor: An uncommon benign neoplasm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tirthankar Gayen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Granular cell tumor is a distinctly rare neoplasm of neural sheath origin. It mainly presents as a solitary asymptomatic swelling in the oral cavity, skin, and rarely internal organs in the middle age. Histopathology is characteristic, showing polyhedral cells containing numerous fine eosinophilic granules with indistinct cell margins. We present a case of granular cell tumor on the back of a 48-year-old woman which was painful, mimicking an adnexal tumor.

  5. ACTUALLY TREATMENT OF THE HEPATIC MALIGNANT TUMORS

    OpenAIRE

    E. Tarcoveanu

    2005-01-01

    The treatment of the hepatic malignant tumors is a challenge for every surgeon. In present days there are a lot of techniques with different indications and results. These methods and their efficacity are presented in some recent papers. Hepatic resection is the gold standard treatment for hepatic malignancies with a decreasing postoperative morbidity and mortality. But only 10 - 20% of the patients with hepatic malignancies are able to be operated. For the other patients the treatment is pal...

  6. Circulating Tumor Cell and Cell-free Circulating Tumor DNA in Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurwidya, Fariz; Zaini, Jamal; Putra, Andika Chandra; Andarini, Sita; Hudoyo, Achmad; Syahruddin, Elisna; Yunus, Faisal

    2016-09-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are tumor cells that are separated from the primary site or metastatic lesion and disseminate in blood circulation. CTCs are considered to be part of the long process of cancer metastasis. As a 'liquid biopsy', CTC molecular examination and investigation of single cancer cells create an important opportunity for providing an understanding of cancer biology and the process of metastasis. In the last decade, we have seen dramatic development in defining the role of CTCs in lung cancer in terms of diagnosis, genomic alteration determination, treatment response and, finally, prognosis prediction. The aims of this review are to understand the basic biology and to review methods of detection of CTCs that apply to the various types of solid tumor. Furthermore, we explored clinical applications, including treatment monitoring to anticipate therapy resistance as well as biomarker analysis, in the context of lung cancer. We also explored the potential use of cell-free circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) in the genomic alteration analysis of lung cancer. PMID:27689025

  7. Circulating Tumor Cell and Cell-free Circulating Tumor DNA in Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaini, Jamal; Putra, Andika Chandra; Andarini, Sita; Hudoyo, Achmad; Syahruddin, Elisna; Yunus, Faisal

    2016-01-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are tumor cells that are separated from the primary site or metastatic lesion and disseminate in blood circulation. CTCs are considered to be part of the long process of cancer metastasis. As a 'liquid biopsy', CTC molecular examination and investigation of single cancer cells create an important opportunity for providing an understanding of cancer biology and the process of metastasis. In the last decade, we have seen dramatic development in defining the role of CTCs in lung cancer in terms of diagnosis, genomic alteration determination, treatment response and, finally, prognosis prediction. The aims of this review are to understand the basic biology and to review methods of detection of CTCs that apply to the various types of solid tumor. Furthermore, we explored clinical applications, including treatment monitoring to anticipate therapy resistance as well as biomarker analysis, in the context of lung cancer. We also explored the potential use of cell-free circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) in the genomic alteration analysis of lung cancer.

  8. An Ovarian Steroid Cell Tumor Causing Virilization and Massive Ascites

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Young Tae; Kim, Sang Wun; Yoon, Bo Sung; Kim, Sung Hoon; Kim, Jae Hoon; Kim, Jae Wook; Cho, Nam Hoon

    2007-01-01

    Steroid cell tumors, not otherwise specified (NOS), are rare ovarian sex cord-stromal tumors with malignant potential. The majority of these tumors produce several steroids, particularly testosterone. Various virilizing symptoms such as hirsutism, temporal balding, and amenorrhea are common in these patients; however massive ascites is an infrequent symptom. A 52-year-old woman with the sudden onset of virilization and massive ascites presented for treatment at Severance Hospital. After clini...

  9. Systemic CD8+ T cell-mediated tumoricidal effects by intratumoral treatment of oncolytic herpes simplex virus with the agonistic monoclonal antibody for murine glucocorticoid-induced tumor necrosis factor receptor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikiya Ishihara

    Full Text Available Oncolytic virotherapy combined with immunomodulators is a novel noninvasive strategy for cancer treatment. In this study, we examined the tumoricidal effects of oncolytic HF10, a naturally occurring mutant of herpes simplex virus type-1, combined with an agonistic DTA-1 monoclonal antibody specific for the glucocorticoid-induced tumor necrosis factor receptor. Two murine tumor models were used to evaluate the therapeutic efficacies of HF10 virotherapy combined with DTA-1. The kinetics and immunological mechanisms of DTA-1 in HF10 infection were examined using flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry. Intratumoral administration of HF10 in combination with DTA-1 at a low dose resulted in a more vigorous attenuation of growth of the untreated contralateral as well as the treated tumors than treatment with either HF10 or DTA-1 alone. An accumulation of CD8(+ T cells, including tumor- and herpes simplex virus type-1-specific populations, and a decrease in the number of CD4(+ Foxp3(+ T regulatory cells were seen in both HF10- and DTA-1-treated tumors. Studies using Fc-digested DTA-1 and Fcγ receptor knockout mice demonstrated the direct participation of DTA-1 in regulatory T cell depletion by antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity primarily via macrophages. These results indicated the potential therapeutic efficacy of a glucocorticoid-induced tumor necrosis factor receptor-specific monoclonal antibody in oncolytic virotherapy at local tumor sites.

  10. Singlet oxygen treatment of tumor cells triggers extracellular singlet oxygen generation, catalase inactivation and reactivation of intercellular apoptosis-inducing signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riethmüller, Michaela; Burger, Nils; Bauer, Georg

    2015-12-01

    Intracellular singlet oxygen generation in photofrin-loaded cells caused cell death without discrimination between nonmalignant and malignant cells. In contrast, extracellular singlet oxygen generation caused apoptosis induction selectively in tumor cells through singlet oxygen-mediated inactivation of tumor cell protective catalase and subsequent reactivation of intercellular ROS-mediated apoptosis signaling through the HOCl and the NO/peroxynitrite signaling pathway. Singlet oxygen generation by extracellular photofrin alone was, however, not sufficient for optimal direct inactivation of catalase, but needed to trigger the generation of cell-derived extracellular singlet oxygen through the interaction between H2O2 and peroxynitrite. Thereby, formation of peroxynitrous acid, generation of hydroxyl radicals and formation of perhydroxyl radicals (HO2(.)) through hydroxyl radical/H2O2 interaction seemed to be required as intermediate steps. This amplificatory mechanism led to the formation of singlet oxygen at a sufficiently high concentration for optimal inactivation of membrane-associated catalase. At low initial concentrations of singlet oxygen, an additional amplification step needed to be activated. It depended on singlet oxygen-dependent activation of the FAS receptor and caspase-8, followed by caspase-8-mediated enhancement of NOX activity. The biochemical mechanisms described here might be considered as promising principle for the development of novel approaches in tumor therapy that specifically direct membrane-associated catalase of tumor cells and thus utilize tumor cell-specific apoptosis-inducing ROS signaling.

  11. Singlet oxygen treatment of tumor cells triggers extracellular singlet oxygen generation, catalase inactivation and reactivation of intercellular apoptosis-inducing signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riethmüller, Michaela; Burger, Nils; Bauer, Georg

    2015-12-01

    Intracellular singlet oxygen generation in photofrin-loaded cells caused cell death without discrimination between nonmalignant and malignant cells. In contrast, extracellular singlet oxygen generation caused apoptosis induction selectively in tumor cells through singlet oxygen-mediated inactivation of tumor cell protective catalase and subsequent reactivation of intercellular ROS-mediated apoptosis signaling through the HOCl and the NO/peroxynitrite signaling pathway. Singlet oxygen generation by extracellular photofrin alone was, however, not sufficient for optimal direct inactivation of catalase, but needed to trigger the generation of cell-derived extracellular singlet oxygen through the interaction between H2O2 and peroxynitrite. Thereby, formation of peroxynitrous acid, generation of hydroxyl radicals and formation of perhydroxyl radicals (HO2(.)) through hydroxyl radical/H2O2 interaction seemed to be required as intermediate steps. This amplificatory mechanism led to the formation of singlet oxygen at a sufficiently high concentration for optimal inactivation of membrane-associated catalase. At low initial concentrations of singlet oxygen, an additional amplification step needed to be activated. It depended on singlet oxygen-dependent activation of the FAS receptor and caspase-8, followed by caspase-8-mediated enhancement of NOX activity. The biochemical mechanisms described here might be considered as promising principle for the development of novel approaches in tumor therapy that specifically direct membrane-associated catalase of tumor cells and thus utilize tumor cell-specific apoptosis-inducing ROS signaling. PMID:26225731

  12. Molecular markers for tumor cell dissemination in female cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the fight against cancer many advances have been made in early detection and treatment of the disease during the last few decades. Nevertheless, many patients still die of cancer due to metastatic spreading of the disease. Tumor cell dissemination may occur very early and usually is not discovered at the time of initial diagnosis. In these cases, the mere excision of the primary tumor is an insufficient treatment. Microscopic tumor residues will remain in the blood, lymph nodes, or the bone marrow and will cause disease recurrence. To improve the patient's prognosis, a sensitive tool for the detection of single tumor cells supplementing conventional diagnostic procedures is required. As the blood is more easily accessible than the bone marrow or tissue biopsies, we intended to identify gene markers for the detection of circulating tumor cells in the blood of cancer patients. We focused on patients with breast, ovarian, endometrial or cervical cancer. Starting from a genome-wide gene expression analysis of tumor cells and blood cells, we found six genes higher expression levels in cancer patients compared to healthy women. These findings suggest that an increased expression of these genes in the blood indicates the presence of circulating tumor cells inducing future metastases and thus the need for adjuvant therapy assisting the primary treatment. Measuring the expression levels of these six genes in the blood may supplement conventional diagnostic tests and improve the patient's prognosis. (author)

  13. Bleomycin treatment of brain tumors: an evaluation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linnert, Mette; Gehl, Julie

    2009-01-01

    Bleomycin has been used in the treatment of brain tumors for over 30 years. Currently, we are evaluating electrochemotherapy (the use of electric pulses to enhance uptake of bleomycin) for patients with secondary brain tumors. We, therefore, reviewed the literature with specific reference...... to the tolerability and toxicity of bleomycin. Using the keywords 'brain' and 'bleomycin', a database search without date restriction was performed and over 500 articles were found. Twenty-five articles were used for this study based on relevance determined by: (i) clinical studies, (ii) use of bleomycin, and (iii......) direct injection into brain tissue or cysts. There were two main indications for the use of bleomycin directly into the brain: (i) cystic tumors in the form of craniopharyngiomas and (ii) solid brain tumors such as glioblastomas and astrocytomas. The most frequent adverse effects reported were transient...

  14. Medical Treatment of Endocrine Gastroenteropancreatic Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Tomassetti

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Neuroendocrine gastroenteropancreatic (GEP tumors are rather rare neoplasms with an incidence of 1-2 cases per 100,000 people [1, 2, 3, 4]. They originate from any of the various cell types belonging to the neuroendocrine system. A general characteristic of GEP endocrine tumors is that the vast majority produce and secrete a multitude of peptide hormones and amines. Several syndromes can be associated with GEP endocrine tumors, caused by hyperproduction of a specific hormone, and usually liver metastases are pre sent in patients because of the malignancy of the tumors [5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10]. The syndromes include: carcinoid syndrome [10], Zollinger- Ellison syndrome [6], the so-called "insulinoma syndrome" [5], "glucagonoma syndrome" [7], Verner-Morrison syndrome, which is brought about by high circulating levels of vasointestinal peptide (VIP [8], and finally the "somatostatinoma syndrome" [9].

  15. Evolution of cooperation among tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axelrod, Robert; Axelrod, David E; Pienta, Kenneth J

    2006-09-01

    The evolution of cooperation has a well established theoretical framework based on game theory. This approach has made valuable contributions to a wide variety of disciplines, including political science, economics, and evolutionary biology. Existing cancer theory suggests that individual clones of cancer cells evolve independently from one another, acquiring all of the genetic traits or hallmarks necessary to form a malignant tumor. It is also now recognized that tumors are heterotypic, with cancer cells interacting with normal stromal cells within the tissue microenvironment, including endothelial, stromal, and nerve cells. This tumor cell-stromal cell interaction in itself is a form of commensalism, because it has been demonstrated that these nonmalignant cells support and even enable tumor growth. Here, we add to this theory by regarding tumor cells as game players whose interactions help to determine their Darwinian fitness. We marshal evidence that tumor cells overcome certain host defenses by means of diffusible products. Our original contribution is to raise the possibility that two nearby cells can protect each other from a set of host defenses that neither could survive alone. Cooperation can evolve as by-product mutualism among genetically diverse tumor cells. Our hypothesis supplements, but does not supplant, the traditional view of carcinogenesis in which one clonal population of cells develops all of the necessary genetic traits independently to form a tumor. Cooperation through the sharing of diffusible products raises new questions about tumorigenesis and has implications for understanding observed phenomena, designing new experiments, and developing new therapeutic approaches.

  16. SURGICAL TREATMENT OF METASTATIC SPINAL TUMOR

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐宏光; 王以朋; 邱贵兴; 叶启彬; 张嘉

    2002-01-01

    Objectives. To evaluate the effect of surgical treatment on metastatic spinal tumor. Methods. The results of surgical intervention for metastatic spinal tumor of 31 consecutive patients since October 1985 were reviewed. Results. The average survival time was 17.6 months (range from 3 months to 9 years), and 4 patients are still alive with an average survival time of 24.6 months (range, 14~ 84 months). No postoperative complication was noted. The preoperative symptoms were partially relieved and neurological functions were improved after surgery. Conclusions. Surgical treatment for metastatic spinal tumor could improve the life quality, but should be adopted cautiously. The surgical procedures such as decompression and internal fixation should be involved only when neurological deficits occurred. The surgery with postoperative complementary therapy may not only improve the life quality , but also extend the patients' life span.

  17. SURGICAL TREATMENT OF METASTATIC SPINAL TUMOR

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐宏光; 王以朋; 等

    2002-01-01

    Objective:To evaluate the effect of surgical treatment on metastatic spinal tumor.Methods:The results of surgical intervention for metastatic spinal tumor of 31 consecutive patients since October 1985 were reviewed.Results:The average survival time was 17.6 months (range from 3 months to 9 years),and 4 patients are still alive with an average survival time of 24.6 months(range,14-84 months).No postoperative complication was noted.The preoperative symptoms were partially relieved and neurological functions were improved after surgery.Conclusions:Surgical treatment for metastatic spinal tumor could improve the life quality,but should be adopted cautiously.The surgical procedures such as decompression and internal fixation should be involved only when neurological deficits occurred.The surgery with postoperative complementary therapy may not only improve the life quality,but also extend the patients' life span.

  18.  An Uncommon Presentation of Giant Cell Tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gopal Malhotra

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available  Giant Cell Tumors commonly occur at the ends of long bones. However in rare cases, they can occur in the bones of the hands and feet. Tumors in these locations occur in younger patients; in addition, these tumors are more commonly multifocal and are associated with a higher risk for local recurrence than tumors at the ends of long bones. Since lesions in the small bones may be multifocal, a patient with a giant cell tumor of the small bones should undergo a skeletal survey to exclude similar lesions elsewhere. Primary surgical treatment ranges from curettage or excision with or without bone grafting to amputation. The success of surgical treatment depends on the completeness with which the tumor was removed. We are presenting a case report of a 34 year old female, who presented with a swelling in the right hand, following trauma. X-ray of the hand showed an osteolytic expansile lesion at the base of the 1st metacarpal bone. The lesion was initially curetted and then treated by local resection with bone grafting. Histological examination revealed a typical benign giant cell tumor composed of closely packed stromal cells with a variable admixture of giant cells. Follow up at the end of one year did not reveal any recurrence of the tumor.

  19. Platelets surrounding primary tumor cells are related to chemoresistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Satoko; Miyashita, Tomoharu; Inokuchi, Masafumi; Hayashi, Hironori; Oyama, Katsunobu; Tajima, Hidehiro; Takamura, Hironori; Ninomiya, Itasu; Ahmed, A Karim; Harman, John W; Fushida, Sachio; Ohta, Tetsuo

    2016-08-01

    Platelets are crucial components of the tumor microenvironment that function to promote tumor progression and metastasis. In the circulation, the interaction between tumor cells and platelets increases invasiveness, protects tumor cells from shear stress and immune surveillance, and facilitates tumor cell extravasation to distant sites. However, the role and presence of platelets in the primary tumor have not been fully determined. Here, we investigated the presence of platelets around breast cancer primary tumor cells and the associations between these cells. We further investigated the associations among platelets, tumor cells, chemoresistance, and epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). We retrospectively analyzed data from 74 patients with human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)‑negative breast cancer who underwent biopsies before treatment and subsequent neo-adjuvant chemotherapy. In biopsy specimens, we evaluated the expression of platelet-specific markers and EMT markers using immunohistochemistry. The associations among the expression of platelet‑specific markers in biopsy specimens, EMT, response to neo‑adjuvant chemotherapy, and survival were analyzed. The presence of platelets was observed in 44 out of 74 (59%) primary breast cancer biopsy specimens. Platelet‑positive tumor cells showed EMT‑like morphological changes and EMT marker expression. Primary tumor cells associated with platelets were less responsive to neo‑adjuvant chemotherapy (pCR rate: 10 vs. 50%, respectively; p=0.0001). Platelets were an independent predictor of the response to chemotherapy upon multivariable analysis (pbreast cancer. Platelets surrounding primary tumor cells may represent novel predictors of chemotherapeutic responses. PMID:27349611

  20. New advances on critical implications of tumor- and metastasis-initiating cells in cancer progression, treatment resistance and disease recurrence

    OpenAIRE

    Mimeault, M; Batra, Surinder K.

    2010-01-01

    Accumulating lines of experimental evidence have revealed that the malignant transformation of multipotent tissue-resident adult stem/progenitor cells into cancer stem/progenitor cells endowed with a high self-renewal capacity and aberrant multilineage differentiation potential may be at origin of the most types of human aggressive and recurrent cancers. Based on new cancer stem/progenitor cell concepts of carcinogenesis, it is suggested that a small subpopulation of highly tumorigenic and mi...

  1. Quantitative analysis of tumor shrinkage due to chemotherapy and its implication for radiation treatment planning in limited-stage small-cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The optimal timing of chemoradiotherapy in limited-stage small-cell lung cancer (LS-SCLC) hasn’t been established, although evidence from studies supported that patients can benefit from early radiation therapy. The purpose of this study was to quantify tumor shrinkage in response to induction chemotherapy (IC), evaluate the impact of tumor shrinkage on radiation dosimetric parameters and determine its implication for the timing of radiation therapy for patients with LS-SCLC. Twenty patients with LS-SCLC who were treated with IC followed by concomitant radiation therapy were investigated retrospectively. Ten patients received 1 cycle of IC, and 10 patients received 2 cycles of IC. Pre-IC CT imaging was coregistered with a simulation CT, and virtual radiation plans were created for pre- and post-IC thoracic disease in each case. The changes in the gross target volume (GTV), planning target volume (PTV) and dosimetric factors associated with the lungs, esophagus and heart were analyzed. The mean GTV and PTV for all of the patients decreased by 60.9% and 40.2%, respectively, which resulted in a significant reduction in the radiation exposure to the lungs, esophagus and heart. Changes in the PTV and radiation exposure of normal tissue were not significantly affected by the number of chemotherapy cycles delivered, although patients who received 2 cycles of IC had a greater decrease in GTV than those who received only 1 cycle of IC (69.6% vs. 52.1%, p = 0.273). Our data showed that targeting the tumor post-IC may reduce the radiation dose to normal tissue in patients with LS-SCLC. However, the benefit to the normal tissue was not increased by an additional cycle of IC. These findings suggest that the first cycle of chemotherapy is very important for tumor shrinkage and that initiating thoracic radiation therapy at the second cycle of chemotherapy may be a reasonable strategy for timing of radiation therapy in LS-SCLC treatment

  2. Expression of complement C5a receptor and the viability of 4T1 tumor cells following agonist–antagonist treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurneqman Nashreq Kosni

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: This experiment shows the presence of C5a receptor on 4T1 cell line. We believe that the antagonist peptide is eligible to be used widely in cancer immunotherapy field; but in vivo studies need to be carried out first in the future, as it will determine how these drugs affect the tumor cell growth.

  3. Cell Killing Mechanisms and Impact on Gene Expression by Gemcitabine and 212Pb-Trastuzumab Treatment in a Disseminated i.p. Tumor Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yong, Kwon Joong; Milenic, Diane E; Baidoo, Kwamena E; Brechbiel, Martin W

    2016-01-01

    In pre-clinical studies, combination therapy with gemcitabine and targeted radioimmunotherapy (RIT) using 212Pb-trastuzumab showed tremendous therapeutic potential in the LS-174T tumor xenograft model of disseminated intraperitoneal disease. To better understand the underlying molecular basis for the observed cell killing efficacy, gene expression profiling was performed after a 24 h exposure to 212Pb-trastuzumab upon gemcitabine (Gem) pre-treatment in this model. DNA damage response genes in tumors were quantified using a real time quantitative PCR array (qRT-PCR array) covering 84 genes. The combination of Gem with α-radiation resulted in the differential expression of apoptotic genes (BRCA1, CIDEA, GADD45α, GADD45γ, IP6K3, PCBP4, RAD21, and p73), cell cycle regulatory genes (BRCA1, CHK1, CHK2, FANCG, GADD45α, GTSE1, PCBP4, MAP2K6, NBN, PCBP4, and SESN1), and damaged DNA binding and repair genes (BRCA1, BTG2, DMC1, ERCC1, EXO1, FANCG, FEN1, MSH2, MSH3, NBN, NTHL1, OGG1, PRKDC, RAD18, RAD21, RAD51B, SEMA4G, p73, UNG, XPC, and XRCC2). Of these genes, the expression of CHK1, GTSE1, EXO1, FANCG, RAD18, UNG and XRCC2 were specific to Gem/212Pb-trastuzumab administration. In addition, the present study demonstrates that increased stressful growth arrest conditions induced by Gem/212Pb-trastuzumab could suppress cell proliferation possibly by up-regulating genes involved in apoptosis such as p73, by down-regulating genes involved in cell cycle check point such as CHK1, and in damaged DNA repair such as RAD51 paralogs. These events may be mediated by genes such as BRCA1/MSH2, a member of BARC (BRCA-associated genome surveillance complex). The data suggest that up-regulation of genes involved in apoptosis, perturbation of checkpoint genes, and a failure to correctly perform HR-mediated DSB repair and mismatch-mediated SSB repair may correlate with the previously observed inability to maintain the G2/M arrest, leading to cell death. PMID:27467592

  4. Cell Killing Mechanisms and Impact on Gene Expression by Gemcitabine and 212Pb-Trastuzumab Treatment in a Disseminated i.p. Tumor Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yong, Kwon Joong; Milenic, Diane E.; Baidoo, Kwamena E.; Brechbiel, Martin W.

    2016-01-01

    In pre-clinical studies, combination therapy with gemcitabine and targeted radioimmunotherapy (RIT) using 212Pb-trastuzumab showed tremendous therapeutic potential in the LS-174T tumor xenograft model of disseminated intraperitoneal disease. To better understand the underlying molecular basis for the observed cell killing efficacy, gene expression profiling was performed after a 24 h exposure to 212Pb-trastuzumab upon gemcitabine (Gem) pre-treatment in this model. DNA damage response genes in tumors were quantified using a real time quantitative PCR array (qRT-PCR array) covering 84 genes. The combination of Gem with α-radiation resulted in the differential expression of apoptotic genes (BRCA1, CIDEA, GADD45α, GADD45γ, IP6K3, PCBP4, RAD21, and p73), cell cycle regulatory genes (BRCA1, CHK1, CHK2, FANCG, GADD45α, GTSE1, PCBP4, MAP2K6, NBN, PCBP4, and SESN1), and damaged DNA binding and repair genes (BRCA1, BTG2, DMC1, ERCC1, EXO1, FANCG, FEN1, MSH2, MSH3, NBN, NTHL1, OGG1, PRKDC, RAD18, RAD21, RAD51B, SEMA4G, p73, UNG, XPC, and XRCC2). Of these genes, the expression of CHK1, GTSE1, EXO1, FANCG, RAD18, UNG and XRCC2 were specific to Gem/212Pb-trastuzumab administration. In addition, the present study demonstrates that increased stressful growth arrest conditions induced by Gem/212Pb-trastuzumab could suppress cell proliferation possibly by up-regulating genes involved in apoptosis such as p73, by down-regulating genes involved in cell cycle check point such as CHK1, and in damaged DNA repair such as RAD51 paralogs. These events may be mediated by genes such as BRCA1/MSH2, a member of BARC (BRCA-associated genome surveillance complex). The data suggest that up-regulation of genes involved in apoptosis, perturbation of checkpoint genes, and a failure to correctly perform HR-mediated DSB repair and mismatch-mediated SSB repair may correlate with the previously observed inability to maintain the G2/M arrest, leading to cell death. PMID:27467592

  5. 5-Azacytidine treatment sensitizes tumor cells to T-cell mediated cytotoxicity and modulates NK cells in patients with myeloid malignancies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gang, A O; Frøsig, T M; Brimnes, M K;

    2014-01-01

    Treatment with the demethylating agent 5-Azacytidine leads to prolonged survival for patients with myelodysplastic syndrome, and the demethylation induces upregulation of cancer-testis antigens. Cancer-testis antigens are well-known targets for immune recognition in cancer, and the immune system ...... no effects could be detected. Together, these data support a strategy for combining 5-Azacytidine treatment with immune therapy for potential clinical benefit....

  6. Circulating tumor cells in oral squamous cell carcinoma: An insight

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B V Prakruthi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Circulating tumor cells (CTCs are those cells present in the blood and have antigenic and/or genetic characteristics of a specific tumor type. CTCs can be detected in the peripheral blood of cancer patients. Various techniques are available for detection of CTCs, which provide evidence for future metastasis. CTCs may provide new insight into the biology of cancer and process of metastasis in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC. The detection of CTCs may represent a new diagnostic tool for predicting the occurrence of metastatic disease in OSCC and endow with the treatment strategies to efficiently treat and prevent cancer metastasis. This review gives an insight into the significance of CTCs and different techniques for detection of CTCs.

  7. Monocyte-derived dendritic cells are essential for CD8+ T cell activation and anti-tumor responses after local immunotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Sabine eKuhn; Jianping eYang; F eRonchese

    2015-01-01

    Tumors harbor several populations of dendritic cells with the ability to prime tumor-specific T cells. However, these T cells mostly fail to differentiate into armed effectors and are unable to control tumor growth. We have previously shown that treatment with immunostimulatory agents at the tumor site can activate anti-tumor immune responses, and is associated with the appearance of a population of monocyte-derived dendritic cells in the tumor and tumor-draining lymph node. Here we use dendr...

  8. Integrin receptors on tumor cells facilitate NK cell-mediated antibody-dependent cytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anikeeva, Nadia; Steblyanko, Maria; Fayngerts, Svetlana; Kopylova, Natalya; Marshall, Deborah J; Powers, Gordon D; Sato, Takami; Campbell, Kerry S; Sykulev, Yuri

    2014-08-01

    NK cells that mediate ADCC play an important role in tumor-specific immunity. We have examined factors limiting specific lysis of tumor cells by CD16.NK-92 cells induced by CNTO 95LF antibodies recognizing αV integrins that are overexpressed on many tumor cells. Although all tested tumor cells were killed by CD16.NK-92 effectors in the presence of the antibodies, the killing of target cells with a low level of ICAM-1 expression revealed a dramatic decrease in their specific lysis at high antibody concentration, revealing a dose limiting effect. A similar effect was also observed with primary human NK cells. The effect was erased after IFN-γ treatment of tumor cells resulting in upregulation of ICAM-1. Furthermore, killing of the same tumor cells induced by Herceptin antibody was significantly impaired in the presence of CNTO 95Ala-Ala antibody variant that blocks αV integrins but is incapable of binding to CD16. These data suggest that αV integrins on tumor cells could compensate for the loss of ICAM-1 molecules, thereby facilitating ADCC by NK cells. Thus, NK cells could exercise cytolytic activity against ICAM-1 deficient tumor cells in the absence of proinflammatory cytokines, emphasizing the importance of NK cells in tumor-specific immunity at early stages of cancer. PMID:24810893

  9. Combined treatment with vitamin B12b and ascorbic acid causes in vitro DNA degradation in tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medvedev, A I; Akatov, V S; Kreshchenko, N D; Solov'eva, M E; Leshchenko, V V; Lezhnev, E I; Yakubovskaya, R I

    2001-04-01

    Incubation of Ehrlich ascites carcinoma and HEp-2 human epidermoid laryngeal carcinoma cells with hydroxycobalamin (vitamin B12b) and ascorbic acid induced generation and accumulation of double-stranded DNA fragments (23,000 b.p. and longer) in cells. The same vitamins alone in the same concentrations produced no such effects. DNA degradation in HEp-2 cells caused by long-term (4 h) incubation with 5-25 microM hydroxycobalamin and ascorbic acid (1:10-1:40 molar ratio) at 37 degrees C was comparable with that induced by gamma-irradiation in a dose of 150 Gy at 4 degrees C.

  10. Tumor-Related Methylated Cell-Free DNA and Circulating Tumor Cells in Melanoma

    OpenAIRE

    Salvianti, Francesca; Orlando, Claudio; Massi, Daniela; DE GIORGI, VINCENZO; Grazzini, Marta; Pazzagli, Mario; Pinzani, Pamela

    2016-01-01

    Solid tumor release into the circulation cell-free DNA (cfDNA) and circulating tumor cells (CTCs) which represent promising biomarkers for cancer diagnosis. Circulating tumor DNA may be studied in plasma from cancer patients by detecting tumor specific alterations, such as genetic or epigenetic modifications. Ras association domain family 1 isoform A (RASSF1A) is a tumor suppressor gene silenced by promoter hypermethylation in a variety of human cancers including melanoma. The aim of the pres...

  11. B7-1/CD80-transduced tumor cells elicit better systemic immunity than wild-type tumor cells admixed with Corynebacterium parvum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, L; McGowan, P; Ashe, S; Johnston, J V; Hellström, I; Hellström, K E

    1994-10-15

    Tumor cells genetically modified by transduction of B7 (B7-1/CD80), a natural ligand for the T-cell costimulatory molecules CD28 and CTLA-4, can elicit potent tumor immunity, and they can be effective for treatment of established cancers in animal models. In this study, three tumor lines, the EL4 lymphoma, the P815 mastocytoma, and the MCA102 sarcoma were transduced with recombinant retrovirus containing the murine B7 gene, and their potency to induce systemic immunity protective against challenge with wild-type tumor was compared to that of the same tumor cells admixed with the commonly used adjuvant Corynebacterium parvum. While admixture of tumor cells with C. parvum resulted in complete regression of tumors in syngeneic mice, it did not induce protective immunity against a subsequent challenge of wild-type cells from any of the 3 tumors tested. In contrast, B7-transduced EL4 and P815 tumors regressed locally and induced a potent systemic immunity to wild-type tumors and a higher level of cytotoxic T-cell activity than did tumor cells admixed with C. parvum. No systemic immunity was induced by B7-transduced nonimmunogenic MCA102 sarcoma cells. Our results demonstrate that immunogenic tumor cells transduced with the B7 gene are superior to tumor cells mixed with C. parvum for the induction of systemic tumor immunity. PMID:7522958

  12. Androgen - secreting steroid cell tumor of the ovary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paras Ratilal Udhreja

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Steroid cell tumors (SCTs, not otherwise specified of the ovary are rare subgroup of sex cord tumors, which account for less than 0.1% of all ovarian tumors and also that will present at any age. The majority of these tumors produce steroids with testosterone being the most common. A case of a 28-year-old woman who presented with symptoms of virilization is reported. Although SCTs are generally benign, there is a risk for malignant transformation. Surgery is the most important and hallmark treatment.

  13. Functional significance of erythropoietin receptor on tumor cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kodetthoor B Udupa

    2006-01-01

    Erythropoietin (Epo) is the regulator of red blood cell formation. Its receptor (EpoR) is now found in many cells and tissues of the body. EpoR is also shown to occur in tumor cells and Epo enhances the proliferation of these cells through cell signaling. EpoR antagonist can reduce the growth of the tumor in vivo. In view of our current knowledge of Epo, its recombinant forms and receptor,use of Epo in cancer patients to enhance the recovery of hematocrit after chemotherapy treatment has to be carefully evaluated.

  14. Immune Cells in Blood Recognize Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    NCI scientists have developed a novel strategy for identifying immune cells circulating in the blood that recognize specific proteins on tumor cells, a finding they believe may have potential implications for immune-based therapies.

  15. NKT cells as an ideal anti-tumor immunotherapeutic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shin-ichiro eFujii

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Human NKT cells are characterized by their expression of an invariant T cell antigen receptor (TCR  chain variable region encoded by a V24J18 rearrangement. These NKT cells recognize -galactosylceramide (-GalCer in conjunction with the MHC class-I-like CD1d molecule and bridge the innate and acquired immune systems to mediate efficient and augmented immune responses. A prime example of one such function is adjuvant activity: NKT cells augment anti-tumor responses because they can rapidly produce large amounts of IFN-, which acts on NK cells to eliminate MHC negative tumors and also on CD8 cytotoxic T cells to kill MHC positive tumors. Thus, upon administration of -GalCer-pulsed DCs, both MHC negative and positive tumor cells can be effectively eliminated, resulting in complete tumor eradication without tumor recurrence. Clinical trials have been completed in a cohort of 17 patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancers and 10 cases of head and neck tumors. Sixty percent of advanced lung cancer patients with high IFN- production had significantly prolonged median survival times (MST of 29.3 Mo with only the primary treatment. In the case of head and neck tumors, 10 patients who completed the trial all had stable disease or partial responses 5 wks after the combination therapy of -GalCer-DCs and activated NKT cells.We now focus on two potential powerful treatment options for the future. One is to establish artificial adjuvant vector cells containing tumor mRNA and -GalCer/CD1d. This stimulates host NKT cells followed by DC maturation and NK cell activation but also induces tumor-specific long-term memory CD8 killer T cell responses, suppressing tumor metastasis even one year after the initial single injection. The other approach is to establish induced pluripotent stem (iPS cells that can generate unlimited numbers of NKT cells with adjuvant activity. Such iPS-derived NKT cells produce IFN- in vitro and in vivo

  16. Tumor Evasion from T Cell Surveillance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katrin Töpfer

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available An intact immune system is essential to prevent the development and progression of neoplastic cells in a process termed immune surveillance. During this process the innate and the adaptive immune systems closely cooperate and especially T cells play an important role to detect and eliminate tumor cells. Due to the mechanism of central tolerance the frequency of T cells displaying appropriate arranged tumor-peptide-specific-T-cell receptors is very low and their activation by professional antigen-presenting cells, such as dendritic cells, is frequently hampered by insufficient costimulation resulting in peripheral tolerance. In addition, inhibitory immune circuits can impair an efficient antitumoral response of reactive T cells. It also has been demonstrated that large tumor burden can promote a state of immunosuppression that in turn can facilitate neoplastic progression. Moreover, tumor cells, which mostly are genetically instable, can gain rescue mechanisms which further impair immune surveillance by T cells. Herein, we summarize the data on how tumor cells evade T-cell immune surveillance with the focus on solid tumors and describe approaches to improve anticancer capacity of T cells.

  17. [Effectiveness of high-dose polychemotherapy with autologous hemopoietic stem cell transplantation in the treatment for malignant tumors of the central nervous system in children and young adults].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gevorgyan, A G; Morozova, E V; Kazantsev, I V; Punanov, Yu A; Safonova, S A; Yukhta, T V; Andreeva, T V; Zubarovskaya, L S; Zheludkova, O G; Fanasiev, B V A

    2015-01-01

    A total of 40 patients (median age 6 years, range 1-28 years) with high-risk malignant brain tumors received a single (n = 35) or tandem (n = 5) high-dose chemotherapy (HDCT) with autologous hemopoietic stem cell transplantation (auto-HSCT). The 2-year OS and DFS are 52% and 47%, accordingly, with median follow-up of 24 (range 2-96) months. The patients without complete response at the time of auto-HSCT had worst prognosis with 53% DFS in patients with partial remission and 25% in patients with disease stabilization (p = 0.001). Patients with relapsed tumor had worse prognosis, than high-risk patients in the first remission with DFS 26% and 62%, accordingly (p=0.02). The relapse rate also correlated with patient's age (38% DFS in patients younger, than 4 years and 60% in older patients, p = 0.005) and tumor morphology (63% DFS in patients with medulloblastoma, 60% in patients with germ-cell tumors, 45% in other embryonal CNS tumors, p = 0.05). The 4th-grade transplant-related toxicity and mortality rates were observed in 13% and 18% of patients, accordingly. Therefore, HDCT with auto-HSCT in young patients with high-risk CNS tumors is characterized by acceptable toxicity and allows improving overall therapy results. PMID:26087603

  18. Radiation treatment of brain tumors: Concepts and strategies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marks, J.E. (Loyola Univ. of Chicago Stritch School of Medicine, Maywood, IL (USA))

    1989-01-01

    Ionizing radiation has demonstrated clinical value for a multitude of CNS tumors. Application of the different physical modalities available has made it possible for the radiotherapist to concentrate the radiation in the region of the tumor with relative sparing of the surrounding normal tissues. Correlation of radiation dose with effect on cranial soft tissues, normal brain, and tumor has shown increasing effect with increasing dose. By using different physical modalities to alter the distribution of radiation dose, it is possible to increase the dose to the tumor and reduce the dose to the normal tissues. Alteration of the volume irradiated and the dose delivered to cranial soft tissues, normal brain, and tumor are strategies that have been effective in improving survival and decreasing complications. The quest for therapeutic gain using hyperbaric oxygen, neutrons, radiation sensitizers, chemotherapeutic agents, and BNCT has met with limited success. Both neoplastic and normal cells are affected simultaneously by all modalities of treatment, including ionizing radiation. Consequently, one is unable to totally depopulate a tumor without irreversibly damaging the normal tissues. In the case of radiation, it is the brain that limits delivery of curative doses, and in the case of chemical additives, it is other organ systems, such as bone marrow, liver, lung, kidneys, and peripheral nerves. Thus, the major obstacle in the treatment of malignant gliomas is our inability to preferentially affect the tumor with the modalities available. Until it is possible to directly target the neoplastic cell without affecting so many of the adjacent normal cells, the quest for therapeutic gain will go unrealized.72 references.

  19. Exosomes and Their Signiifcance in Diagnosis and Treatment of Tumors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Jian; LI Chao; LI Wei

    2015-01-01

    In the research field of biological markers for tumor diagnosis, the appearance of exosomes has resolved the problem that RNA molecules can be easily degraded. Exosomes carry various RNAs and can protect them from being degraded. They are deifned as polymorphism vesicle-like corpuscles (diameter: 30-100 nm) derived from late endosome or multi-vesicular endosomes in cellular endocytosis system, which contain abundant biological information, including multiple lipids, proteins and nucleic acids, etc. Exosomes are extracellular nanoscale vesicae formed in a series of regulating process of cellular “endocytosis-fusion-excretion”, and they carry proteins and transport RNAs, thus playing an important role in the intercellular material and informational transduction. There are still large amount of mRNAs and miRNAs in exosomes. Exosomes can not only protect in-vitro RNA stability, but also transfer RNA to speciifc target cells as effective carriers so as to play their regulatory function. Exosomes realize their biological information exchanges and transition via endocrine, paracrine and autocrine, and regulate cellular biological activities through direct action on superficial signal molecules or extracellular release and membrane fusion of biological active ingredients. They can directly act on tumors to impact tumor progression, or improve tumor angiogenesis and metastasis by regulating immunological function. Additionally, they can also be used for tumor diagnosis. Therefore, this study mainly summarized the biological characteristics of exosomes and their application in the regulation, diagnosis and treatment of tumors, hoping to provide references for the application of exosomes in tumors.

  20. Pathway-specific differences between tumor cell lines and normal and tumor tissue cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tozeren Aydin

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cell lines are used in experimental investigation of cancer but their capacity to represent tumor cells has yet to be quantified. The aim of the study was to identify significant alterations in pathway usage in cell lines in comparison with normal and tumor tissue. Methods This study utilized a pathway-specific enrichment analysis of publicly accessible microarray data and quantified the gene expression differences between cell lines, tumor, and normal tissue cells for six different tissue types. KEGG pathways that are significantly different between cell lines and tumors, cell lines and normal tissues and tumor and normal tissue were identified through enrichment tests on gene lists obtained using Significance Analysis of Microarrays (SAM. Results Cellular pathways that were significantly upregulated in cell lines compared to tumor cells and normal cells of the same tissue type included ATP synthesis, cell communication, cell cycle, oxidative phosphorylation, purine, pyrimidine and pyruvate metabolism, and proteasome. Results on metabolic pathways suggested an increase in the velocity nucleotide metabolism and RNA production. Pathways that were downregulated in cell lines compared to tumor and normal tissue included cell communication, cell adhesion molecules (CAMs, and ECM-receptor interaction. Only a fraction of the significantly altered genes in tumor-to-normal comparison had similar expressions in cancer cell lines and tumor cells. These genes were tissue-specific and were distributed sparsely among multiple pathways. Conclusion Significantly altered genes in tumors compared to normal tissue were largely tissue specific. Among these genes downregulation was a major trend. In contrast, cell lines contained large sets of significantly upregulated genes that were common to multiple tissue types. Pathway upregulation in cell lines was most pronounced over metabolic pathways including cell nucleotide metabolism and oxidative

  1. Giant cell tumor of the mandible

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G V V Giri

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Giant cell tumor (GCT of bone is a distinctive neoplasm characterized by abundance of multinucleated giant cells scattered throughout the stroma of mononuclear cells. Its importance lies in recognizing and differentiating the characteristic histology, which at times may mimic several other bone tumors and endocrine disorders ranging from locally aggressive giant cell granulomas to hyperparathyroidism to malignant tumors. The jaw bones account for less than 1% of the lesion.In a literature search, we found only five cases of GCT of jaw bones based on the new criteria. We present a rare case of GCT of the mandible which occurred in a 12-year-old female.

  2. Towards treatment planning and treatment of deep-seated solid tumors by electrochemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bracko Matej

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Electrochemotherapy treats tumors by combining specific chemotherapeutic drugs with an intracellular target and electric pulses, which increases drug uptake into the tumor cells. Electrochemotherapy has been successfully used for treatment of easily accessible superficial tumor nodules. In this paper, we present the first case of deep-seated tumor electrochemotherapy based on numerical treatment planning. Methods The aim of our study was to treat a melanoma metastasis in the thigh of a patient. Treatment planning for electrode positioning and electrical pulse parameters was performed for two different electrode configurations: one with four and another with five long needle electrodes. During the procedure, the four electrode treatment plan was adopted and the patient was treated accordingly by electrochemotherapy with bleomycin. The response to treatment was clinically and radiographically evaluated. Due to a partial response of the treated tumor, the metastasis was surgically removed after 2 months and pathological analysis was performed. Results A partial response of the tumor to electrochemotherapy was obtained. Histologically, the metastasis showed partial necrosis due to electrochemotherapy, estimated to represent 40-50% of the tumor. Based on the data obtained, we re-evaluated the electrical treatment parameters in order to correlate the treatment plan with the clinical response. Electrode positions in the numerical model were updated according to the actual positions during treatment. We compared the maximum value of the measured electric current with the current predicted by the model and good agreement was obtained. Finally, tumor coverage with an electric field above the reversible threshold was recalculated and determined to be approximately 94%. Therefore, according to the calculations, a small volume of tumor cells remained viable after electrochemotherapy, and these were sufficient for tumor regrowth

  3. Radiation Treatment of Primary Orbital Lymphoid Tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suh, Hyun Suk [Inje University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1985-06-15

    Primary lymphoid tumors of orbit are rare. Sometimes they pose difficulty in differentiating malignant Non-Hodgkin lymphoma of the orbit from benign lymphoid hyperplasia or pseudotumor of the orbit by growth characteristics and histologic examination of a biopsy specimen. Consequently, systemic work-up for staging of the disease before the initiation of treatment is essential. All lymphoid tumors of the orbit are radiosensitive and the response to radiotherapy is rapid and complete. Radiation dose for permanent control varies from 2,400 to 4,500rads in 2.5-4 weeks depending on extent and location of the disease. A case of localized lymphoma of the orbit was treated with radiotherapy. For the following 15 months, the patient was clinically free of disease without any evidence of side effects of radiation treatment.

  4. Metabolism of tumors under treatment: Mapping of metabolites with quantitative bioluminescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: The metabolic switch to aerobic glycolysis (Warburg effect) and enhanced lactate production is characteristic for aggressive tumor cells and is a co-determining factor for tumor response and treatment outcome. Thus analysis of the metabolic status under treatment is important to understand and improve treatment modalities. Materials and methods: Metabolite concentrations were determined by the immersion of tumor sections in an ATP, lactate or glucose-depending luciferase-containing buffer system. Integrated light output is detected in a bioluminescent detection system. Results: Mice carrying tumor xenografts derived from A549 lung cancer cells were treated with the microtubule stabilizing agent patupilone, ionizing radiation or in combination. Lactate levels were significantly reduced and glucose levels drastically increased in comparison to untreated tumors. Interestingly, these changes were only minimal in tumors derived from patupilone-resistant but otherwise isogenic A549EpoB40 cells. ATP levels of all tumors tested did not change under any treatment. When compared with histological endpoints, basal and treatment-dependent changes of lactate levels in the different tumors mainly correlated with the proliferative activity and the tumor growth response to treatment. Conclusions: This study shows that the tumor metabolism is responsive to different treatment modalities and could eventually be used as an early surrogate marker for treatment response.

  5. Treatment Regimen, Surgical Outcome, and T-cell Differentiation Influence Prognostic Benefit of Tumor-Infiltrating Lymphocytes in High-Grade Serous Ovarian Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wouters, Maartje C. A.; Komdeur, Fenne L.; Workel, Hagma H.; Klip, Harry G.; Plat, Annechien; Kooi, Neeltje M.; Wisman, G. Bea A.; Mourits, Marian J. E.; Arts, Henriette J. G.; Oonk, Maaike H. M.; Yigit, Refika; de Jong, Steven; Melief, Cornelis J. M.; Hollema, Harry; Duiker, Evelien W.; Daemen, Toos; de Bruyn, Marco; Nijman, Hans W.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL) are associated with a better prognosis in high-grade serous ovarian cancer (HGSC). However, it is largely unknown how this prognostic benefit of TIL relates to current standard treatment of surgical resection and (neo-)adjuvant chemotherapy. To address t

  6. Vaccination with autologous dendritic cells pulsed with multiple tumor antigens for treatment of patients with malignant melanoma: results from a phase I/II trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trepiakas, Redas; Berntsen, Annika; Hadrup, Sine Reker;

    2010-01-01

    vaccination with autologous monocyte-derived mature dendritic cells (DC) pulsed with p53, survivin and telomerase-derived peptides (HLA-A2+ patients) or with autologous/allogeneic tumor lysate (HLA-A2(-) patients) in combination with low-dose interleukin (IL)-2 and interferon (IFN)-alpha2b....

  7. Assessing prognosis and optimizing treatment in patients with postchemotherapy viable nonseminomatous germ-cell tumors (NSGCT): results of the sCR2 international study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fizazi, K.; Oldenburg, J.; Dunant, A.;

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The purpose of this study was to validate a prognostic index [surgical complete response 1 (sCR1)] in patients with postchemotherapy viable nonseminomatous germ-cell tumors (NSGCT). PATIENTS AND METHODS: Data and specimens from 61 patients with normalized tumor markers and postchemoth......BACKGROUND: The purpose of this study was to validate a prognostic index [surgical complete response 1 (sCR1)] in patients with postchemotherapy viable nonseminomatous germ-cell tumors (NSGCT). PATIENTS AND METHODS: Data and specimens from 61 patients with normalized tumor markers...... malignant cells, and a good International Germ Cell Consensus Classification group at presentation. Patients were assigned to one of three risk groups defined in sCR1: no risk factor (good risk), one risk factor (intermediate risk) and two to three risk factors (poor risk group). The 5-year PFS rate was 92......%, 78%, and 42%, respectively (P = 0.002) (as compared with 90%, 76%, and 41% in the original sCR1 study). The 5-year OS rate was 90%, 86%, and 52%, respectively (P = 0.009) (as compared with 100%, 83%, and 51% in the original sCR1 study). Postoperative chemotherapy did not appear to improve OS compared...

  8. What's New in Wilms Tumor Research and Treatment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... tumor research and treatment? Previous Topic Emotional and social issues for Wilms tumor survivors and their families Next ... outlook. As researchers have learned more about the gene changes in Wilms ... Targeted therapies have already become standard treatments for some kinds ...

  9. Treatment Option Overview (Childhood Central Nervous System Embryonal Tumors)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... children. See the PDQ summary on Adult Central Nervous System Tumors Treatment for more information on the treatment of adults. There are different types of CNS embryonal tumors. Enlarge Anatomy of the inside of the brain, showing the ...

  10. CellTracks cytometer for detection of circulating tumor cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tibbe, A.G.J.; Kooi, van der A.; Groot, de M.R.; Vermes, I.

    2003-01-01

    Introduction: In patients with carcinomas, tumor cells are shed into the circulation. The number of the circulating tumor cells is low and technology is needed that has sufficient sensitivity and specificity to enumerate and characterize these cells. The CellTracks system was developed to provide an

  11. [Hormonal therapy of advanced or relapsed ovarian granulosa cell tumor].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, H; Bai, P

    2016-07-01

    Ovarian granulosa cell tumor is a rare gynecologic malignancy with hormonal activity. Surgical excision is the standard treatment for this disease. Most patients present excellent short term prognosis, however, late relapse often occurs, even after many years. Viable treatments of advanced or relapsed granulosa cell tumor are still limited, and the optimal therapy method has not been established. Compared with chemotherapy and radiotherapy, hormonal therapy is a well-tolerated treatment which can be administrated over a long period of time without serious side effects, and the combined application of hormones may achieve a better outcome. Therefore, hormonal therapy has been suggested as a potential treatment option for patients with advanced or relapsed granulosa cell tumor, and to extend the tumor-free interval and attenuate the disease progression. Future researches should be focused on the identification of the hormonal therapy which may provide the greatest clinical benefit, comparing and analyzing the effects of different combined therapeutic regimens of hormone drugs, and on the synthesis of drugs highly activating estrogen receptor β expressed in the granulosa cell tumor cells. PMID:27531259

  12. Generalized Tumor Dose for Treatment Planning Decision Support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuniga, Areli A.

    Modern radiation therapy techniques allow for improved target conformity and normal tissue sparing. These highly conformal treatment plans have allowed dose escalation techniques increasing the probability of tumor control. At the same time this conformation has introduced inhomogeneous dose distributions, making delivered dose characterizations more difficult. The concept of equivalent uniform dose (EUD) characterizes a heterogeneous dose distribution within irradiated structures as a single value and has been used in biologically based treatment planning (BBTP); however, there are no substantial validation studies on clinical outcome data supporting EUD's use and therefore has not been widely adopted as decision-making support. These highly conformal treatment plans have also introduced the need for safety margins around the target volume. These margins are designed to minimize geometrical misses, and to compensate for dosimetric and treatment delivery uncertainties. The margin's purpose is to reduce the chance of tumor recurrence. This dissertation introduces a new EUD formulation designed especially for tumor volumes, called generalized Tumor Dose (gTD). It also investigates, as a second objective, margins extensions for potential improvements in local control while maintaining or minimizing toxicity. The suitability of gTD to rank LC was assessed by means of retrospective studies in a head and neck (HN) squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cohorts. The formulation was optimized based on two datasets (one of each type) and then, model validation was assessed on independent cohorts. The second objective of this dissertation was investigated by ranking the probability of LC of the primary disease adding different margin sizes. In order to do so, an already published EUD formula was used retrospectively in a HN and a NSCLC datasets. Finally, recommendations for the viability to implement this new formulation into a routine treatment

  13. Similarity on neural stem cells and brain tumor stem cells in transgenic brain tumor mouse models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guanqun Qiao; Qingquan Li; Gang Peng; Jun Ma; Hongwei Fan; Yingbin Li

    2013-01-01

    Although it is believed that glioma is derived from brain tumor stem cells, the source and molecular signal pathways of these cells are stil unclear. In this study, we used stable doxycycline-inducible transgenic mouse brain tumor models (c-myc+/SV40Tag+/Tet-on+) to explore the malignant trans-formation potential of neural stem cells by observing the differences of neural stem cel s and brain tumor stem cells in the tumor models. Results showed that chromosome instability occurred in brain tumor stem cells. The numbers of cytolysosomes and autophagosomes in brain tumor stem cells and induced neural stem cel s were lower and the proliferative activity was obviously stronger than that in normal neural stem cells. Normal neural stem cells could differentiate into glial fibril ary acidic protein-positive and microtubule associated protein-2-positive cells, which were also negative for nestin. However, glial fibril ary acidic protein/nestin, microtubule associated protein-2/nestin, and glial fibril ary acidic protein/microtubule associated protein-2 double-positive cells were found in induced neural stem cells and brain tumor stem cel s. Results indicate that induced neural stem cells are similar to brain tumor stem cells, and are possibly the source of brain tumor stem cells.

  14. Effusion cytomorphology of small round cell tumors

    OpenAIRE

    Katsuhide Ikeda; Koji Tsuta

    2016-01-01

    Background: Small round cell tumors (SRCTs) are a group of tumors composed of small, round, and uniform cells with high nuclear/cytoplasmic (N/C) ratios. The appearance of SRCT neoplastic cells in the effusion fluid is very rare. We reported the cytomorphological findings of SRCTs in effusion cytology, and performed statistical and mathematical analyses for a purpose to distinguish SRCTs. Materials and Methods: We analyzed the cytologic findings of effusion samples from 40 SRCT cases and...

  15. Mediastinal germ cell tumors: a radiologic-pathologic review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drevelegas, A. [Dept. of Radiology, Aristoteles Univ., Thessaloniki (Greece); Palladas, P. [Dept. of Radiology, G. Papanicolaou Hospital, Thessaloniki (Greece); Scordalaki, A. [Dept. of Pathology, G. Papanicolaou Hospital, Thessaloniki (Greece)

    2001-10-01

    Germ cell tumors of the mediastinum are histologically identical to those found in the testes and ovaries. Early diagnosis and treatment improve the survival rate. Imaging studies of teratoma demonstrate a rounded, often lobulated heterogeneous mass containing soft tissue elements with fluid and fat attenuation. Calcification is present in 20-43% of cases. Seminomas are large masses of homogeneous soft tissue attenuation. Malignant nonseminomatous germ cell tumors are heterogeneous tumors with irregular borders due to invasion of adjacent structures. CT shows the location and extent of the tumors as well as intrinsic elements including soft tissue, fat, fluid, and calcification. CT is the modality of choice for the diagnostic evaluation of these tumors. MRI reveals masses of heterogeneous signal intensity, is more sensitive in depicting infiltration of the adjacent structures by fat plane obliteration, and is performed as an ancillary study. (orig.)

  16. Cancer Stem Cells, Tumor Dormancy, And Metastasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Purvi ePatel

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Tumor cells can persist undetectably for an extended period of time in primary tumors and in disseminated cancer cells. Very little is known about why and how these tumors persist for extended periods of time and then evolve to malignancy. The discovery of cancer stem cells (CSCs in human tumors challenges our current understanding of tumor recurrence, drug resistance, and metastasis, and opens up new research directions on how cancer cells are capable of switching from dormancy to malignancy. Although overlapping molecules and pathways have been reported to regulate the stem-like phenotype of CSCs and metastasis, accumulated evidence has suggested additional clonal diversity within the stem-like cancer cell subpopulation. This review will describe the current hypothesis linking CSCs and metastasis and summarize mechanisms important for metastatic CSCs to re-initiate tumors in the secondary sites. A better understanding of CSCs’ contribution to clinical tumor dormancy and metastasis will provide new therapeutic revenues to eradicate metastatic tumors and significantly reduce the mortality of cancer patients.

  17. Ascitic and solid Ehrlich tumor inhibition by Chenopodium ambrosioides L. treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nascimento, Flávia R F; Cruz, Gustavo V B; Pereira, Paulo Vitor S; Maciel, Márcia C G; Silva, Lucilene A; Azevedo, Ana Paula S; Barroqueiro, Elizabeth S B; Guerra, Rosane N M

    2006-04-25

    The leaves of Chenopodium ambrosioides L. [Chenopodiaceae] ('mastruz') have been indicated for the treatment of several diseases, among which the cancer. There are no results focusing the effect of C. ambrosioides treatment on tumor development in vivo. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of treatment with C. ambrosioides on Ehrlich tumor development. Swiss mice were treated by intraperitoneal route (i.p.) with hydroalcoholic extract from leaves of C. ambrosioides (5 mg/kg) or with PBS (control group) 48 h before or 48 h later the Ehrlich tumor implantation. The tumor cells were implanted on the left footpad (solid tumor) or in the peritoneal cavity (ascitic tumor). To determine the solid tumor growth, footpad was measured each 2 days until the fourteenth day, when the feet were weighed. Ascitic tumor development was evaluated after 8 days of tumor implantation by quantification of the ascitic fluid volume and tumor cell number. The i.p. administration of C. ambrosioides extract before or after the tumor implantation significantly inhibited the solid and ascitic Ehrlich tumor forms. This inhibition was observed in ascitic tumor cell number, in the ascitic volume, in the tumor-bearing foot size and foot weight when compared to control mice. The treatments also increased the survival of tumor-bearing mice. In conclusion, C. ambrosioides has a potent anti-tumoral effect which was evident with a small dose and even when the treatment was given two days after the tumor implantation. This effect is probably related with anti-oxidant properties of C. ambrosioides.

  18. Synergistic Effect and Molecular Mechanisms of Traditional Chinese Medicine on Regulating Tumor Microenvironment and Cancer Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Jingnan Xu; Zhuo Song; Qiujun Guo; Jie Li

    2016-01-01

    The interaction of tumor cells with the microenvironment is like a relationship between the “seeds” and “soil,” which is a hotspot in recent cancer research. Targeting at tumor microenvironment as well as tumor cells has become a new strategy for cancer treatment. Conventional cancer treatments mostly focused on single targets or single mechanism (the seeds or part of the soil); few researches intervened in the whole tumor microenvironment and achieved ideal therapeutic effect as expected. Tr...

  19. Recombinant human erythropoietin alpha improves the efficacy of radiotherapy of a human tumor xenograft, affecting tumor cells and microvessels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loevey, J. [Dept. of Radiotherapy, National Inst. of Oncology, Budapest (Hungary); Bereczky, B.; Gilly, R.; Kenessey, I.; Raso, E.; Simon, E.; Timar, J. [Dept. of Tumor Progression, National Inst. of Oncology, Budapest (Hungary); Dobos, J. [Dept. of Tumor Progression, National Inst. of Oncology, Budapest (Hungary); National Koranyi Inst. of TBC and Pulmonology, Budapest (Hungary); Vago, A. [Central Lab., National Inst. of Oncology, Budapest (Hungary); Kasler, M. [Head and Neck Surgery, National Inst. of Oncology, Budapest (Hungary); Doeme, B. [National Koranyi Inst. of TBC and Pulmonology, Budapest (Hungary); Tovari, J. [National Koranyi Inst. of TBC and Pulmonology, Budapest (Hungary); 1. Inst. of Pathology and Experimental Cancer Research, Semmelweis Univ., Budapest (Hungary)

    2008-01-15

    Background and purpose: tumor-induced anemia often occurs in cancer patients, and is corrected by recombinant human erythropoietins (rHuEPOs). Recent studies indicated that, besides erythroid progenitor cells, tumor and endothelial cells express erythropoietin receptor (EPOR) as well; therefore, rHuEPO may affect their functions. Here, the effect of rHuEPO{alpha} on irradiation in EPOR-positive human squamous cell carcinoma xenograft was tested. Material and methods: A431 tumor-bearing SCID mice were treated from the tumor implantation with rHuEPO{alpha} at human-equivalent dose. Xenografts were irradiated (5 Gy) on day 14, and the final tumor mass was measured on day 22. The systemic effects of rHuEPO{alpha} on the hemoglobin level, on tumor-associated blood vessels and on hypoxia-inducible factor-(HIF-)1{alpha} expression of the tumor xenografts were monitored. The proliferation, apoptosis and clonogenic capacity of A431 cancer cells treated with rHuEPO{alpha} and irradiation were also tested in vitro. Results: in vitro, rHuEPO{alpha} treatment alone did not modify the proliferation of EPOR-positive A431 tumor cells but enhanced the effect of irradiation on proliferation, apoptosis and clonogenic capacity. In vivo, rHuEPO{alpha} administration compensated the tumor-induced anemia in SCID mice and decreased tumoral HIF-1{alpha} expression but had no effect on tumor growth. At the same time rHuEPO{alpha} treatment significantly increased the efficacy of radiotherapy in vivo (tumor weight of 23.9 {+-} 4.7 mg and 34.9 {+-} 4.6 mg, respectively), mediated by increased tumoral blood vessel destruction. Conclusion: rHuEPO{alpha} treatment may modulate the efficacy of cancer radiotherapy not only by reducing systemic hypoxia and tumoral HIF-1{alpha} expression, but also by destroying tumoral vessels. (orig.)

  20. Cell proliferation during fractionated radiation in two experimental tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tumor cell proliferation kinetics after irradiation have been studied using the method of bromodeoxyuridine incorporation and flow cytometry. Labelling indices were obtained after single and multiple fractions of radiation in a mouse fibrosarcoma (FSa-II) and human squamous carcinoma (FADU) growing in nude mice. For 8 mm tumors mean L.I was 17.5 +- 2.6% and 21.5 + 3.2%, respectively. Both tumors showed a similar response to single dose of irradiation (10 and 20 Gy) with initial depression of labelling index and then a rapid increase after 3 days in the FSa-II tumors (mean L.I 24%) and 5 days in the FADU tumors (mean L.I 27%). During fractionated treatment, labelling index was dependent on dose per fraction (2.5-18 Gy) time interval between fractions and time of analysis. Tumors were biopsied during course of fractionated treatment to see if labelling index would act as a predictor of response. No significant difference could be determined between individual tumors that had received the same dose per fraction. However a labelling index the same or higher than control values were associated with lack of tumor control. Controlled tumors showed a significant depression of labelling index (rho<0.05)

  1. Surgical treatment of giant cell tumors of long bone combined with inserted microwave antennas induced hyperthermia%插入式微波天线阵列诱导高温治疗长骨骨巨细胞瘤

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周勇; 范清宇; 马保安; 张明华; 沈万安

    2003-01-01

    AIM:To evaluate the surgical treatment methods of giant cell tumors (GCT) of long bone in conjunction with inserted microwave antennas induced hyperthermia.METHODS:46 patients, included the surgical procedures,the oncology results,the functions of the limbs and the complications were analyzed.RESULTS:Follow up 3.5 to 9 years (mean 5.5 years).All patients were evaluated according to oncological and orthopaedic criteria.Two tumors were recurred.Orthopaedic function were perfect in 44 patients and were fair in 2.Infection was found in 2 patients.CONCLUSION:The surgical procedure to treat the giant cell tumors of long bone by inserted microwave antennas induced hyperthermia is a definitive surgical method which is safe and confident.

  2. Tumor senescence and radioresistant tumor-initiating cells (TICs): let sleeping dogs lie!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zafarana, Gaetano; Bristow, Robert G

    2010-01-01

    Preclinical data from cell lines and experimental tumors support the concept that breast cancer-derived tumor-initiating cells (TICs) are relatively resistant to ionizing radiation and chemotherapy. This could be a major determinant of tumor recurrence following treatment. Increased clonogenic survival is observed in CD24-/low/CD44+ TICs derived from mammosphere cultures and is associated with (a) reduced production of reactive oxygen species, (b) attenuated activation of γH2AX and CHK2-p53 DNA damage signaling pathways, (c) reduced propensity for ionizing radiation-induced apoptosis, and (d) altered DNA double-strand or DNA single-strand break repair. However, recent data have shed further light on TIC radioresistance as irradiated TICs are resistant to tumor cell senescence following DNA damage. Taken together, the cumulative data support a model in which DNA damage signaling and repair pathways are altered in TICs and lead to an altered mode of cell death with unique consequences for long-term clonogen survival. The study of TIC senescence lays the foundation for future experiments in isogenic models designed to directly test the capacity for senescence and local control (that is, not solely local regression) and spontaneous metastases following treatment in vivo. The study also supports the targeting of tumor cell senescence pathways to increase TIC clonogen kill if the targeting also maintains the therapeutic ratio.

  3. Similarity on neural stem cells and brain tumor stem cells in transgenic brain tumor mouse models

    OpenAIRE

    Qiao, Guanqun; Li, Qingquan; Peng, Gang; Ma, Jun; Fan, Hongwei; Li, Yingbin

    2013-01-01

    Although it is believed that glioma is derived from brain tumor stem cells, the source and molecular signal pathways of these cells are still unclear. In this study, we used stable doxycycline-inducible transgenic mouse brain tumor models (c-myc+/SV40Tag+/Tet-on+) to explore the malignant trans-formation potential of neural stem cells by observing the differences of neural stem cells and brain tumor stem cells in the tumor models. Results showed that chromosome instability occurred in brain t...

  4. Characterization of cell suspensions from solid tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pallavicini, M.

    1985-07-10

    The desirable features of cells in suspension will necessarily be dependent upon the use for which the cells were prepared. Adequate cell yield or recovery is defined by the measurement to be performed. Retention of cellular morphology is important for microscopic identification of cell types in a heterogenous cell suspension, and may be used to determine whether the cells in suspension are representative of those in the tumor in situ. Different dispersal protocols may yield cells with different degrees of clonogenicity, as well as altered biochemical features, such as loss of cellular proteins, surface antigens, nucleotide pools, etc. The quality of the cell suspension can be judged by the degree of cell clumping and level of cellular debris, both of which impact on flow cytometric measurements and studies in which the number of cells be known accurately. Finally, if the data measured on the cells in suspension are to be extrapolated to phenomena occurring in the tumor in situ, it is desirable that the cells in suspension are representative of those in the solid tumor in vivo. This report compares characteristics of tumor cell suspensions obtained by different types of selected disaggregation methods. 33 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  5. Stages of Childhood Extracranial Germ Cell Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... immature teratomas , and malignant germ cell tumors: Mature Teratomas Mature teratomas are the most common type of ... that cause signs and symptoms of disease. Immature Teratomas Immature teratomas also usually occur in the sacrum ...

  6. Genetic instability in nerve sheath cell tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rogatto, Silvia Regina; Casartelli, Cacilda; Rainho, Claudia Aparecida;

    1995-01-01

    by the presence of polyploid cells with inconsistent abnormalities, endoreduplications and telomeric associations resulting in dicentric chromosomes. It is probable that these cytogenetic abnormalities represent some kind of evolutionary advantage for the in vitro progression of nerve sheath tumors....

  7. Treatment of cutaneous tumors with topical 5% imiquimod cream

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabrina Sisto Alessi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: There are various approaches to the treatment of cutaneous tumors; one of them is treatment with imiquimod, a synthetic toll-like receptor agonist with a low molecular weight that offers a topical, noninvasive, and non-surgical therapeutic option. The main objective of our study was to provide data on 89 patients who used a 5% imiquimod cream for the treatment of cutaneous tumors at the Cutaneous Oncology Group of the Dermatology Department of Hospital das Clinicas from 2003 to 2008. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Here, we present our experience in the treatment of 123 cutaneous tumors of various types, including basal cell carcinoma (BCC, squamous cell carcinoma (SCC, Bowen's disease, erythroplasia of Queyrat, Paget's disease, and trichoepithelioma, with 5% imiquimod cream from 2003 to 2008 in the Cutaneous Oncology Group of the Dermatology Department of Hospital das Clinicas. Patients were divided into two separate groups according to their diagnosis and comorbidities; these comorbidities included epidermodysplasia verruciformis, xeroderma pigmentosum, albinism, basal cell nevus syndrome, Brooke-Spiegler syndrome, HIV, chronic lymphocytic leukemia, B-cell lymphoma, and kidney transplantation. Treatment duration, response to imiquimod, follow-up, recurrence, and local and systemic reactions associated with use of the drug were analyzed. Epidemiological data were obtained and cure rates were calculated. RESULTS: The ratio of women to men was 1.28:1, and the mean age was 63.1 years. Tumors were located mainly on the face, back, trunk, and legs. For patients with comorbidities, the overall cure rate was 38%. These specific patients demonstrated cure rates of 83.5% for superficial BCC and 50% for Bowen's disease. Aggressive BCC and superficial and nodular BCC did not present a good response to treatment. Trichoepitheliomas and nodular BCC showed a partial response, and erythroplasia of Queyrat showed a complete response. For patients without

  8. Angiostatin and endostatin: endothelial cell-specific endogenous inhibitors of angiogenesis and tumor growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sim, B K

    1998-01-01

    Angiostatin and Endostatin are potent inhibitors of angiogenesis. These proteins are endogenously produced and specifically target endothelial cells resulting in angiogenesis inhibition. Recombinant preparations of these proteins inhibit the growth of metastases and regress primary tumors to dormant microscopic lesions. A variety of murine tumors as well as human breast, prostate and colon tumors in human xenograft models regress when treated with Angiostatin or Endostatin. Regression of tumors upon systemic treatment with these proteins is in part due to increased tumor cell apoptosis. Repeated cycles of Endostatin therapy lead to prolonged tumor dormancy without further treatment and are not associated with any apparent toxicity or acquired drug resistance. PMID:14517374

  9. Active targeting of tumor cells using light emitting bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, Sung Min; Min, Jung Joon; Hong, Yeong Jin; Kim, Hyun Ju; Le, Uuenchi N.; Rhee, Joon Haeng; Song, Ho Chun; Heo, Young Jun; Bom, Hee Seung; Choy, Hyon E [School of Medicine, Chonnam National University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-07-01

    The presence of bacteria and viruses in human tumors has been recognized for more than 50 years. Today, with the discovery of bacterial strains that specifically target tumors, and aided by genomic sequencing and genetic engineering, there is new interest in the use of bacteria as tumor vectors. Here, we show that bacteria injected intravenously into live animals entered and replicated in solid tumors and metastases using the novel imaging technology of biophotonics. Bioluminescence operon (LuxCDABE) or fluorescence protein, GFP) has been cloned into pUC19 plasmid to engineer pUC19lux or pUC19gfp. Engineered plasmid was transformed into different kinds of wild type (MG1655) or mutant E. coli (DH5, ppGpp, fnr, purE, crpA, flagella, etc.) strains to construct light emitting bacteria. Xenograft tumor model has been established using CT26 colon cancer cell line. Light emitting bacteria was injected via tail vein into tumor bearing mouse. In vivo bioluminescence imaging has been done after 20 min to 14 days of bacterial injection. We observed localization of tumors by light-emitting E. coli in tumor (CT-26) bearing mice. We confirmed the presence of light-emitting bacteria under the fluorescence microscope with E. coli expressing GFP. Althoug varying mutants strain with deficient invading function has been found in tumor tissues, mutant strains of movement (flagella) couldn't show any light signal from the tumor tissue under the cooled CCD camera, indicating bacteria may actively target the tumor cells. Based on their 'tumor-finding' nature, bacteria may be designed to carry multiple genes or drugs for detection and treatment of cancer, such as prodrug-converting enzymes, toxins, angiogenesis inhibitors and cytokines.

  10. Energy and Redox Homeostasis in Tumor Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus Fernandes de Oliveira

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancer cells display abnormal morphology, chromosomes, and metabolism. This review will focus on the metabolism of tumor cells integrating the available data by way of a functional approach. The first part contains a comprehensive introduction to bioenergetics, mitochondria, and the mechanisms of production and degradation of reactive oxygen species. This will be followed by a discussion on the oxidative metabolism of tumor cells including the morphology, biogenesis, and networking of mitochondria. Tumor cells overexpress proteins that favor fission, such as GTPase dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1. The interplay between proapoptotic members of the Bcl-2 family that promotes Drp 1-dependent mitochondrial fragmentation and fusogenic antiapoptotic proteins such as Opa-1 will be presented. It will be argued that contrary to the widespread belief that in cancer cells, aerobic glycolysis completely replaces oxidative metabolism, a misrepresentation of Warburg’s original results, mitochondria of tumor cells are fully viable and functional. Cancer cells also carry out oxidative metabolism and generally conform to the orthodox model of ATP production maintaining as well an intact electron transport system. Finally, data will be presented indicating that the key to tumor cell survival in an ROS rich environment depends on the overexpression of antioxidant enzymes and high levels of the nonenzymatic antioxidant scavengers.

  11. HAMLET kills tumor cells by apoptosis: structure, cellular mechanisms, and therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustafsson, Lotta; Hallgren, Oskar; Mossberg, Ann-Kristin; Pettersson, Jenny; Fischer, Walter; Aronsson, Annika; Svanborg, Catharina

    2005-05-01

    New cancer treatments should aim to destroy tumor cells without disturbing normal tissue. HAMLET (human alpha-lactalbumin made lethal to tumor cells) offers a new molecular approach to solving this problem, because it induces apoptosis in tumor cells but leaves normal differentiated cells unaffected. After partial unfolding and binding to oleic acid, alpha-lactalbumin forms the HAMLET complex, which enters tumor cells and freezes their metabolic machinery. The cells proceed to fragment their DNA, and they disintegrate with apoptosis-like characteristics. HAMLET kills a wide range of malignant cells in vitro and maintains this activity in vivo in patients with skin papillomas. In addition, HAMLET has striking effects on human glioblastomas in a rat xenograft model. After convection-enhanced delivery, HAMLET diffuses throughout the brain, selectively killing tumor cells and controlling tumor progression without apparent tissue toxicity. HAMLET thus shows great promise as a new therapeutic with the advantage of selectivity for tumor cells and lack of toxicity.

  12. Treatment Outcome and Quality of Life in Patients With Pediatric Extra-Cranial Germ Cell Tumors Previously Treated on Clinical Trial CCLG-GC-1979-01 or CCLG-GC-1989-01

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-09

    Childhood Germ Cell Tumor; Extragonadal Germ Cell Tumor; Gastrointestinal Complications; Infertility; Long-term Effects Secondary to Cancer Therapy in Children; Neurotoxicity; Ovarian Cancer; Pulmonary Complications; Sexual Dysfunction; Urinary Complications

  13. Cell motility and ECM proteolysis regulate tumor growth and tumor relapse by altering the fraction of cancer stem cells and their spatial scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sandeep; Kulkarni, Rahul; Sen, Shamik

    2016-06-01

    Tumors consist of multiple cell sub-populations including cancer stem cells (CSCs), transiently amplifying cells and terminally differentiated cells (TDCs), with the CSC fraction dictating the aggressiveness of the tumor and drug sensitivity. In epithelial cancers, tumor growth is influenced greatly by properties of the extracellular matrix (ECM), with cancer progression associated with an increase in ECM density. However, the extent to which increased ECM confinement induced by an increase in ECM density influences tumor growth and post treatment relapse dynamics remains incompletely understood. In this study, we use a cellular automata-based discrete modeling approach to study the collective influence of ECM density, cell motility and ECM proteolysis on tumor growth, tumor heterogeneity, and tumor relapse after drug treatment. We show that while increased confinement suppresses tumor growth and the spatial scattering of CSCs, this effect can be reversed when cells become more motile and proteolytically active. Our results further suggest that, in addition to the absolute number of CSCs, their spatial positioning also plays an important role in driving tumor growth. In a nutshell, our study suggests that, in confined environments, cell motility and ECM proteolysis are two key factors that regulate tumor growth and tumor relapse dynamics by altering the number and spatial distribution of CSCs.

  14. Malignant mixed germ cell tumor of ovary: a rare case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhawana Tiwary

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Ovarian germ cell tumors are very rare and affect mainly young girls and women. One of the most remarkable advances in oncology is in the treatment of malignant ovarian germ cell tumors. The two histological groups are: dysgerminomas and non dysgerminomatous tumors. We report a case of a 29 years old multiparous woman who presented with persistent pain abdomen and was diagnosed to have a malignant mixed germ cell tumor comprising of both dysgerminoma and yolk sac tumor (endodermal sinus tumor. [Int J Reprod Contracept Obstet Gynecol 2015; 4(2.000: 511-513

  15. Therapeutic Potential of Curcumin for the Treatment of Brain Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klinger, Neil V.

    2016-01-01

    Brain malignancies currently carry a poor prognosis despite the current multimodal standard of care that includes surgical resection and adjuvant chemotherapy and radiation. As new therapies are desperately needed, naturally occurring chemical compounds have been studied for their potential chemotherapeutic benefits and low toxicity profile. Curcumin, found in the rhizome of turmeric, has extensive therapeutic promise via its antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and antiproliferative properties. Preclinical in vitro and in vivo data have shown it to be an effective treatment for brain tumors including glioblastoma multiforme. These effects are potentiated by curcumin's ability to induce G2/M cell cycle arrest, activation of apoptotic pathways, induction of autophagy, disruption of molecular signaling, inhibition of invasion, and metastasis and by increasing the efficacy of existing chemotherapeutics. Further, clinical data suggest that it has low toxicity in humans even at large doses. Curcumin is a promising nutraceutical compound that should be evaluated in clinical trials for the treatment of human brain tumors.

  16. CD8+ Tumor-Infiltrating T Cells Are Trapped in the Tumor-Dendritic Cell Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Boissonnas

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Chemotherapy enhances the antitumor adaptive immune T cell response, but the immunosuppressive tumor environment often dominates, resulting in cancer relapse. Antigen-presenting cells such as tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs and tumor dendritic cells (TuDCs are the main protagonists of tumor-infiltrating lymphocyte (TIL immuno-suppression. TAMs have been widely investigated and are associated with poor prognosis, but the immuno-suppressive activity of TuDCs is less well understood. We performed two-photon imaging of the tumor tissue to examine the spatiotemporal interactions between TILs and TuDCs after chemotherapy. In a strongly immuno-suppressive murine tumor model, cyclophosphamide-mediated chemotherapy transiently enhanced the antitumor activity of adoptively transferred ovalbumin-specific CD8+ T cell receptor transgenic T cells (OTI but barely affected TuDC compartment within the tumor. Time lapse imaging of living tumor tissue showed that TuDCs are organized as a mesh with dynamic interconnections. Once infiltrated into the tumor parenchyma, OTI T cells make antigen-specific and long-lasting contacts with TuDCs. Extensive analysis of TIL infiltration on histologic section revealed that after chemotherapy the majority of OTI T cells interact with TuDCs and that infiltration is restricted to TuDC-rich areas. We propose that the TuDC network exerts antigen-dependent unproductive retention that trap T cells and limit their antitumor effectiveness.

  17. Cell-free circulating tumor DNA in cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhen Qin; Vladimir A Ljubimov; Cuiqi Zhou; Yunguang Tong; Jimin Liang

    2016-01-01

    Cancer is a common cause of death worldwide. Despite significant advances in cancer treatments, the morbidity and mortality are still enormous. Tumor heterogeneity, especially intratumoral heterogeneity, is a significant reason under-lying difculties in tumor treatment and failure of a number of current therapeutic modalities, even of molecularly targeted therapies. The development of a virtually noninvasive“liquid biopsy”from the blood has been attempted to characterize tumor heterogeneity. This review focuses on cell-free circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) in the bloodstream as a versatile biomarker. ctDNA analysis is an evolving field with many new methods being developed and optimized to be able to successfully extract and analyze ctDNA, which has vast clinical applications. ctDNA has the potential to accurately genotype the tumor and identify personalized genetic and epigenetic alterations of the entire tumor. In addition, ctDNA has the potential to accurately monitor tumor burden and treatment response, while also being able to monitor minimal residual disease, reducing the need for harmful adjuvant chemotherapy and allowing more rapid detection of relapse. There are still many challenges that need to be overcome prior to this biomarker getting wide adoption in the clinical world, including optimization, standardization, and large multicenter trials.

  18. Cell-free circulating tumor DNA in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Zhen; Ljubimov, Vladimir A; Zhou, Cuiqi; Tong, Yunguang; Liang, Jimin

    2016-01-01

    Cancer is a common cause of death worldwide. Despite significant advances in cancer treatments, the morbidity and mortality are still enormous. Tumor heterogeneity, especially intratumoral heterogeneity, is a significant reason underlying difficulties in tumor treatment and failure of a number of current therapeutic modalities, even of molecularly targeted therapies. The development of a virtually noninvasive "liquid biopsy" from the blood has been attempted to characterize tumor heterogeneity. This review focuses on cell-free circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) in the bloodstream as a versatile biomarker. ctDNA analysis is an evolving field with many new methods being developed and optimized to be able to successfully extract and analyze ctDNA, which has vast clinical applications. ctDNA has the potential to accurately genotype the tumor and identify personalized genetic and epigenetic alterations of the entire tumor. In addition, ctDNA has the potential to accurately monitor tumor burden and treatment response, while also being able to monitor minimal residual disease, reducing the need for harmful adjuvant chemotherapy and allowing more rapid detection of relapse. There are still many challenges that need to be overcome prior to this biomarker getting wide adoption in the clinical world, including optimization, standardization, and large multicenter trials. PMID:27056366

  19. Fluctuations induced extinction and stochastic resonance effect in a model of tumor growth with periodic treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Dongxi, E-mail: lidongxi@mail.nwpu.edu.c [Department of Applied Mathematics, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi' an 710072 (China); Xu Wei; Guo, Yongfeng; Xu Yong [Department of Applied Mathematics, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi' an 710072 (China)

    2011-01-31

    We investigate a stochastic model of tumor growth derived from the catalytic Michaelis-Menten reaction with positional and environmental fluctuations under subthreshold periodic treatment. Firstly, the influences of environmental fluctuations on the treatable stage are analyzed numerically. Applying the standard theory of stochastic resonance derived from the two-state approach, we derive the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) analytically, which is used to measure the stochastic resonance phenomenon. It is found that the weak environmental fluctuations could induce the extinction of tumor cells in the subthreshold periodic treatment. The positional stability is better in favor of the treatment of the tumor cells. Besides, the appropriate and feasible treatment intensity and the treatment cycle should be highlighted considered in the treatment of tumor cells.

  20. Osteoclastic giant cell tumor of the pancreas: an immunohistochemical study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dizon, M A; Multhaupt, H A; Paskin, D L;

    1996-01-01

    A case of an osteoclastic giant cell tumor of the pancreas is presented. Immunohistochemical studies were performed, which showed keratin (CAM, AE1) and epithelial membrane antigen positivity in the tumor cells. The findings support an epithelial origin for this tumor.......A case of an osteoclastic giant cell tumor of the pancreas is presented. Immunohistochemical studies were performed, which showed keratin (CAM, AE1) and epithelial membrane antigen positivity in the tumor cells. The findings support an epithelial origin for this tumor....

  1. Evaluating Tumor Response of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Patients With {sup 18}F-Fludeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography: Potential for Treatment Individualization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toma-Dasu, Iuliana, E-mail: Iuliana.Livia.Dasu@ki.se [Medical Radiation Physics, Stockholm University and Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm (Sweden); Uhrdin, Johan [RaySearch Laboratories AB, Stockholm (Sweden); Lazzeroni, Marta [Medical Radiation Physics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm (Sweden); Carvalho, Sara; Elmpt, Wouter van; Lambin, Philippe [Department of Radiation Oncology, GROW-School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht (Netherlands); Dasu, Alexandru [Department of Radiation Physics and Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping (Sweden)

    2015-02-01

    Objective: To assess early tumor responsiveness and the corresponding effective radiosensitivity for individual patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) based on 2 successive {sup 18}F-fludeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) scans. Methods and Materials: Twenty-six NSCLC patients treated in Maastricht were included in the study. Fifteen patients underwent sequential chemoradiation therapy, and 11 patients received concomitant chemoradiation therapy. All patients were imaged with FDG before the start and during the second week of radiation therapy. The sequential images were analyzed in relation to the dose delivered until the second image. An operational quantity, effective radiosensitivity, α{sub eff}, was determined at the voxel level. Correlations were sought between the average α{sub eff} or the fraction of negative α{sub eff} values and the overall survival at 2 years. Separate analyses were performed for the primary gross target volume (GTV), the lymph node GTV, and the clinical target volumes (CTVs). Results: Patients receiving sequential treatment could be divided into responders and nonresponders, using a threshold for the average α{sub eff} of 0.003 Gy{sup −1} in the primary GTV, with a sensitivity of 75% and a specificity of 100% (P<.0001). Choosing the fraction of negative α{sub eff} as a criterion, the threshold 0.3 also had a sensitivity of 75% and a specificity of 100% (P<.0001). Good prognostic potential was maintained for patients receiving concurrent chemotherapy. For lymph node GTV, the correlation had low statistical significance. A cross-validation analysis confirmed the potential of the method. Conclusions: Evaluation of the early response in NSCLC patients showed that it is feasible to determine a threshold value for effective radiosensitivity corresponding to good response. It also showed that a threshold value for the fraction of negative α{sub eff} could also be correlated with poor response. The proposed

  2. What's New in Lung Carcinoid Tumor Research and Treatment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Research Get Involved Find Local ACS Learn About Cancer » Lung Carcinoid Tumor » Detailed Guide » What’s new in lung carcinoid tumor research and treatment? Share this Page Close Push escape to close share window. Print ...

  3. What Happens after Treatment for Lung Carcinoid Tumors?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Research Get Involved Find Local ACS Learn About Cancer » Lung Carcinoid Tumor » Detailed Guide » What happens after treatment for lung carcinoid tumors? Share this Page Close Push escape to close share window. Print ...

  4. Whole tumor antigen vaccination using dendritic cells: Comparison of RNA electroporation and pulsing with UV-irradiated tumor cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benencia Fabian

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Because of the lack of full characterization of tumor associated antigens for solid tumors, whole antigen use is a convenient approach to tumor vaccination. Tumor RNA and apoptotic tumor cells have been used as a source of whole tumor antigen to prepare dendritic cell (DC based tumor vaccines, but their efficacy has not been directly compared. Here we compare directly RNA electroporation and pulsing of DCs with whole tumor cells killed by ultraviolet (UV B radiation using a convenient tumor model expressing human papilloma virus (HPV E6 and E7 oncogenes. Although both approaches led to DCs presenting tumor antigen, electroporation with tumor cell total RNA induced a significantly higher frequency of tumor-reactive IFN-gamma secreting T cells, and E7-specific CD8+ lymphocytes compared to pulsing with UV-irradiated tumor cells. DCs electroporated with tumor cell RNA induced a larger tumor infiltration by T cells and produced a significantly stronger delay in tumor growth compared to DCs pulsed with UV-irradiated tumor cells. We conclude that electroporation with whole tumor cell RNA and pulsing with UV-irradiated tumor cells are both effective in eliciting antitumor immune response, but RNA electroporation results in more potent tumor vaccination under the examined experimental conditions.

  5. Exosomes and Their Significance in Diagnosis and Treatment of Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian WANG

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In the research field of biological markers for tumor diagnosis, the appearance of exosomes has resolved the problem that RNA molecules can be easily degraded. Exosomes carry various RNAs and can protect them from being degraded. They are defined as polymorphism vesicle-like corpuscles (diameter: 30-100 nm derived from late endosome or multi-vesicular endosomes in cellular endocytosis system, which contain abundant biological information, including multiple lipids, proteins and nucleic acids, etc. Exosomes are extracellular nanoscale vesicae formed in a series of regulating process of cellular “endocytosis-fusion-excretion”, and they carry proteins and transport RNAs, thus playing an important role in the intercellular material and informational transduction. There are still large amount of mRNAs and miRNAs in exosomes. Exosomes can not only protect in-vitro RNA stability, but also transfer RNA to specific target cells as effective carriers so as to play their regulatory function. Exosomes realize their biological information exchanges and transition via endocrine, paracrine and autocrine, and regulate cellular biological activities through direct action on superficial signal molecules or extracellular release and membrane fusion of biological active ingredients. They can directly act on tumors to impact tumor progression, or improve tumor angiogenesis and metastasis by regulating immunological function. Additionally, they can also be used for tumor diagnosis. Therefore, this study mainly summarized the biological characteristics of exosomes and their application in the regulation, diagnosis and treatment of tumors, hoping to provide references for the application of exosomes in tumors.

  6. Apoptin: specific killer of tumor cells?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavassoli, M; Guelen, L; Luxon, B A; Gäken, J

    2005-08-01

    In the early 1990s it was discovered that the VP3/Apoptin protein encoded by the Chicken Anemia virus (CAV) possesses an inherent ability to specifically kill cancer cells. Apoptin was found to be located in the cytoplasm of normal cells while in tumor cells it was localized mainly in the nucleus.(1) These differences in the localization pattern were suggested to be the main mechanism by which normal cells show resistance to Apoptin-mediated cell killing. Although the mechanism of action of Apoptin is presently unknown, it seems to function by the induction of programmed cell death (PCD) after translocation from the cytoplasm to the nucleus and arresting the cell cycle at G2/M, possibly by interfering with the cyclosome.(2) In addition, cancer specific phosphorylation of Threonine residue 108 has been suggested to be important for Apoptin's function to kill tumor cells.(3) In contrast to the large number of publications reporting that nuclear localization, induction of PCD and phosphorylation of Apoptin is restricted to cancer cells, several recent studies have shown that Apoptin has the ability to migrate to the nucleus and induce PCD in some of the normal cell lines tested. There is evidence that high protein expression levels as well as the cellular growth rate may influence Apoptin's ability to specifically kill tumor cells. Thus far both in vitro and in vivo studies indicate that Apoptin is a powerful apoptosis inducing protein with a promising prospective utility in cancer therapy. However, here we show that several recent findings contradict some of the earlier results on the tumor specificity of Apoptin, thus creating some controversy in the field. The aim of this article is to review the available data, some published and some unpublished, which either agree or contradict the reported "black and white" tumor cell specificity of Apoptin. Understanding what factors appear to influence its function should help to develop Apoptin into a potent anti

  7. Clear cell renal cell tumors: Not all that is "clear" is cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Sean R; Cheng, Liang

    2016-07-01

    Continued improvement of our understanding of the clinical, histologic, and genetic features of renal cell tumors has progressively evolved renal tumor classification, revealing an expanding array of distinct tumor types with different implications for prognosis, patient counseling, and treatment. Although clear cell renal cell carcinoma is unequivocally the most common adult renal tumor, there is growing evidence that some "clear cell" renal neoplasms, such as exemplified by multilocular cystic clear cell renal neoplasm of low malignant potential (formerly multilocular cystic renal cell carcinoma), do not have the same potential for insidious progression and metastasis, warranting reclassification as low malignant potential tumors or benign neoplasms. Still other novel tumor types such as clear cell papillary renal cell carcinoma have been more recently recognized, which similarly have shown a conspicuous absence of aggressive behavior to date, suggesting that these too may be recategorized as noncancerous or may be premalignant neoplasms. This importance for prognosis is increasingly significant in the modern era, in which renal masses are increasingly found incidentally by imaging techniques at a small tumor size, raising consideration for less aggressive management options guided by renal mass biopsy diagnosis, including imaging surveillance, tumor ablation, or partial nephrectomy. PMID:26988177

  8. Enhanced delivery of liposomes to lung tumor through targeting interleukin-4 receptor on both tumor cells and tumor endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Lianhua; Na, Moon-Hee; Jung, Hyun-Kyung; Vadevoo, Sri Murugan Poongkavithai; Kim, Cheong-Wun; Padmanaban, Guruprasath; Park, Tae-In; Park, Jae-Yong; Hwang, Ilseon; Park, Keon Uk; Liang, Frank; Lu, Maggie; Park, Jiho; Kim, In-San; Lee, Byung-Heon

    2015-07-10

    A growing body of evidence suggests that pathological lesions express tissue-specific molecular targets or biomarkers within the tissue. Interleukin-4 receptor (IL-4R) is overexpressed in many types of cancer cells, including lung cancer. Here we investigated the properties of IL-4R-binding peptide-1 (IL4RPep-1), a CRKRLDRNC peptide, and its ability to target the delivery of liposomes to lung tumor. IL4RPep-1 preferentially bound to H226 lung tumor cells which express higher levers of IL-4R compared to H460 lung tumor cells which express less IL-4R. Mutational analysis revealed that C1, R2, and R4 residues of IL4RPep-1 were the key binding determinants. IL4RPep-1-labeled liposomes containing doxorubicin were more efficiently internalized in H226 cells and effectively delivered doxorubicin into the cells compared to unlabeled liposomes. In vivo fluorescence imaging of nude mice subcutaneously xenotransplanted with H226 tumor cells indicated that IL4RPep-1-labeled liposomes accumulate more efficiently in the tumor and inhibit tumor growth more effectively compared to unlabeled liposomes. Interestingly, expression of IL-4R was high in vascular endothelial cells of tumor, while little was detected in vascular endothelial cells of control organs including the liver. IL-4R expression in cultured human vascular endothelial cells was also up-regulated when activated by a pro-inflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor-α. Moreover, the up-regulation of IL-4R expression was observed in primary human lung cancer tissues. These results indicate that IL-4R-targeting nanocarriers may be a useful strategy to enhance drug delivery through the recognition of IL-4R in both tumor cells and tumor endothelial cells. PMID:25979323

  9. Cyclophosphamide chemotherapy sensitizes tumor cells to TRAIL-dependent CD8 T cell-mediated immune attack resulting in suppression of tumor growth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robbert G van der Most

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Anti-cancer chemotherapy can be simultaneously lymphodepleting and immunostimulatory. Pre-clinical models clearly demonstrate that chemotherapy can synergize with immunotherapy, raising the question how the immune system can be mobilized to generate anti-tumor immune responses in the context of chemotherapy. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We used a mouse model of malignant mesothelioma, AB1-HA, to investigate T cell-dependent tumor resolution after chemotherapy. Established AB1-HA tumors were cured by a single dose of cyclophosphamide in a CD8 T cell- and NK cell-dependent manner. This treatment was associated with an IFN-alpha/beta response and a profound negative impact on the anti-tumor and total CD8 T cell responses. Despite this negative effect, CD8 T cells were essential for curative responses. The important effector molecules used by the anti-tumor immune response included IFN-gamma and TRAIL. The importance of TRAIL was supported by experiments in nude mice where the lack of functional T cells could be compensated by agonistic anti-TRAIL-receptor (DR5 antibodies. CONCLUSION: The data support a model in which chemotherapy sensitizes tumor cells for T cell-, and possibly NK cell-, mediated apoptosis. A key role of tumor cell sensitization to immune attack is supported by the role of TRAIL in tumor resolution and explains the paradox of successful CD8 T cell-dependent anti-tumor responses in the absence of CD8 T cell expansion.

  10. Histopathological examination of spine tumors after treatment with radiosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwagerman, Nathan T; McDowell, Michael M; Hamilton, Ronald L; Monaco, Edward A; Flickinger, John C; Gerszten, Peter C

    2016-08-01

    OBJECTIVE Increased survival time after diagnosis of neoplastic disease has resulted in a gradual increase in spine tumor incidence. Radiosurgery is frequently a viable alternative to operative management in a population with severe medical comorbidities. The authors sought to assess the histopathological consequences of radiosurgery in the subset of patients progressing to operative intervention. METHODS Eighteen patients who underwent radiosurgery for spine tumors between 2008 and 2014 subsequently progressed to surgical treatment. A histopathological examination of these cases was performed. Indications for surgery included symptomatic compression fractures, radiographic instability, and symptoms of cord or cauda equina compression. Biopsy samples were obtained from the tumor within the radiosurgical zone in all cases and were permanently fixated. Viable tumor samples were stained for Ki 67. RESULTS Fifteen patients had metastatic lesions and 3 patients had neurofibromas. The mean patient age was 57 years. The operative indication was symptomatic compression in 10 cases (67%). The most frequent metastatic lesions were breast cancer (4 cases), renal cell carcinoma (3), prostate cancer (2), and endometrial cancer (2). In 9 (60%) of the 15 metastatic cases, histological examination of the lesions showed minimal evidence of inflammation. Viable tumor at the margins of the radiosurgery was seen in 9 (60%) of the metastatic cases. Necrosis in the tumor bed was frequent, as was fibrotic bone marrow. Vascular ectasia was seen in 2 of 15 metastatic cases, but sclerosis with ectasia was frequent. No evidence of malignant conversion was seen in the periphery of the lesions in the 3 neurofibroma cases. In 1 case of neurofibroma, the lesion demonstrated some small areas of remnant tumor in the radiosurgical target zone. CONCLUSIONS This case series demonstrates important histopathological characteristics of spinal lesions treated by SRS. Regions with the highest exposure to

  11. Surgery and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Children With Extracranial Germ Cell Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-06

    Childhood Embryonal Tumor; Childhood Extracranial Germ Cell Tumor; Childhood Extragonadal Germ Cell Tumor; Childhood Malignant Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Childhood Malignant Testicular Germ Cell Tumor; Childhood Teratoma; Ovarian Embryonal Carcinoma; Ovarian Yolk Sac Tumor; Stage II Malignant Testicular Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIA Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIB Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIC Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage III Malignant Testicular Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIA Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIB Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIC Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Testicular Choriocarcinoma and Yolk Sac Tumor; Testicular Embryonal Carcinoma

  12. The Human Cell Surfaceome of Breast Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Júlia Pinheiro Chagas da Cunha

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Cell surface proteins are ideal targets for cancer therapy and diagnosis. We have identified a set of more than 3700 genes that code for transmembrane proteins believed to be at human cell surface. Methods. We used a high-throuput qPCR system for the analysis of 573 cell surface protein-coding genes in 12 primary breast tumors, 8 breast cell lines, and 21 normal human tissues including breast. To better understand the role of these genes in breast tumors, we used a series of bioinformatics strategies to integrates different type, of the datasets, such as KEGG, protein-protein interaction databases, ONCOMINE, and data from, literature. Results. We found that at least 77 genes are overexpressed in breast primary tumors while at least 2 of them have also a restricted expression pattern in normal tissues. We found common signaling pathways that may be regulated in breast tumors through the overexpression of these cell surface protein-coding genes. Furthermore, a comparison was made between the genes found in this report and other genes associated with features clinically relevant for breast tumorigenesis. Conclusions. The expression profiling generated in this study, together with an integrative bioinformatics analysis, allowed us to identify putative targets for breast tumors.

  13. Tumor Protein (TP)-p53 Members as Regulators of Autophagy in Tumor Cells upon Marine Drug Exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratovitski, Edward A

    2016-01-01

    Targeting autophagic pathways might play a critical role in designing novel chemotherapeutic approaches in the treatment of human cancers, and the prevention of tumor-derived chemoresistance. Marine compounds were found to decrease tumor cell growth in vitro and in vivo. Some of them were shown to induce autophagic flux in tumor cells. In this study, we observed that the selected marine life-derived compounds (Chromomycin A2, Psammaplin A, and Ilimaquinone) induce expression of several autophagic signaling intermediates in human squamous cell carcinoma, glioblastoma, and colorectal carcinoma cells in vitro through a transcriptional regulation by tumor protein (TP)-p53 family members. These conclusions were supported by specific qPCR expression analysis, luciferase reporter promoter assay, and chromatin immunoprecipitation of promoter sequences bound to the TP53 family proteins, and silencing of the TP53 members in tumor cells. PMID:27537898

  14. Basal cell carcinoma-treatment with cryosurgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaur S

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available Basal cell carcinoma is a common cutaneous malignancy, frequently occurring over the face in elderly individuals. Various therapeutic modalities are available to treat these tumors. We describe three patients with basal cell carcinoma successfully treated with cryosurgery and discuss the indications and the use of this treatment modality for basal cell carcinomas.

  15. Basal cell carcinoma-treatment with cryosurgery

    OpenAIRE

    Kaur S; Thami G; Kanwar A

    2003-01-01

    Basal cell carcinoma is a common cutaneous malignancy, frequently occurring over the face in elderly individuals. Various therapeutic modalities are available to treat these tumors. We describe three patients with basal cell carcinoma successfully treated with cryosurgery and discuss the indications and the use of this treatment modality for basal cell carcinomas.

  16. Circulating tumor cells in lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Rachel; Pailler, Emma; Billiot, Fanny; Drusch, Françoise; Barthelemy, Amélie; Oulhen, Marianne; Besse, Benjamin; Soria, Jean-Charles; Farace, Françoise; Vielh, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) have emerged as potential biomarkers in several cancers such as colon, prostate, and breast carcinomas, with a correlation between CTC number and patient prognosis being established by independent research groups. The detection and enumeration of CTCs, however, is still a developing field, with no universal method of detection suitable for all types of cancer. CTC detection in lung cancer in particular has proven difficult to perform, as CTCs in this type of cancer often present with nonepithelial characteristics. Moreover, as many detection methods rely on the use of epithelial markers to identify CTCs, the loss of these markers during epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition in certain metastatic cancers can render these methods ineffective. The development of personalized medicine has led to an increase in the advancement of molecular characterization of CTCs. The application of techniques such as FISH and RT-PCR to detect EGFR, HER2, and KRAS abnormalities in lung, breast, and colon cancer, for example, could be used to characterize CTCs in real time. The use of CTCs as a 'liquid biopsy' is therefore an exciting possibility providing information on patient prognosis and treatment efficacy. This review summarizes the state of CTC detection today, with particular emphasis on lung cancer, and discusses the future applications of CTCs in helping the clinician to develop new strategies in patient treatment. PMID:23207444

  17. Cell Biological Mechanisms of Multidrug Resistance in Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Sanford M.; Schindler, Melvin

    1994-04-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) is a generic term for the variety of strategies tumor cells use to evade the cytotoxic effects of anticancer drugs. MDR is characterized by a decreased sensitivity of tumor cells not only to the drug employed for chemotherapy but also to a broad spectrum of drugs with neither obvious structural homology nor common targets. This pleotropic resistance is one of the major obstacles to the successful treatment of tumors. MDR may result from structural or functional changes at the plasma membrane or within the cytoplasm, cellular compartments, or nucleus. Molecular mechanisms of MDR are discussed in terms of modifications in detoxification and DNA repair pathways, changes in cellular sites of drug sequestration, decreases in drug-target affinity, synthesis of specific drug inhibitors within cells, altered or inappropriate targeting of proteins, and accelerated removal or secretion of drugs.

  18. Desmoplastic small round cell tumor: impact of 18F-FDG PET induced treatment strategy in a patient with long-term outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessio Imperiale

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The desmoplastic small round cell tumor (DSRCT is an uncommon and highly aggressive cancer. The role of 18F-FDG PET in management of DSRCT is little reported. We report a case of metastasized abdominal DSRCT detected in a 43-year old patient whose diagnostic and therapeutic approaches were influenced by 18F-FDG PET-CT. The patient is still alive ten years after diagnosis. 18F-FDG PET-CT seems to be a useful method for assessing therapeutic efficiency and detecting early recurrences even in rare malignancies such as DSRCT.

  19. High-Dose Thiotepa Plus Peripheral Stem Cell Transplantation in Treating Patients With Refractory Solid Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-06

    Brain and Central Nervous System Tumors; Childhood Germ Cell Tumor; Extragonadal Germ Cell Tumor; Ovarian Cancer; Retinoblastoma; Testicular Germ Cell Tumor; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific; Unspecified Childhood Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  20. Ultrasound features of orbital granular cell tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayres, Bernadete; Miller, Neil R; Eberhart, Charles G; Dibernardo, Cathy W

    2009-01-01

    The authors report the echographic characteristics of a rare orbital granular cell tumor and correlate these findings with histopathology. A 56-year-old woman presented with proptosis. Complete ophthalmic and ultrasound examinations were performed. Ultrasound revealed an oval, well-outlined orbital mass in the intraconal space with low-medium reflectivity and regular internal structure. An orbitotomy with complete excision of the tumor was performed. Histopathologic evaluation showed sheets and nests of cells with abundant eosinophilic and granular cytoplasm in a uniform distribution throughout the lesion. The echographic characteristics correlated well with the morphologic surgical findings and the histologic architecture. This is the first report describing the echographic characteristics of orbital granular cell tumor.

  1. Thermal ablation for the treatment of abdominal tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brace, Christopher L; Hinshaw, J Louis; Lubner, Meghan G

    2011-03-07

    Percutaneous thermal ablation is an emerging treatment option for many tumors of the abdomen not amenable to conventional treatments. During a thermal ablation procedure, a thin applicator is guided into the target tumor under imaging guidance. Energy is then applied to the tissue until temperatures rise to cytotoxic levels (50-60 °C). Various energy sources are available to heat biological tissues, including radiofrequency (RF) electrical current, microwaves, laser light and ultrasonic waves. Of these, RF and microwave ablation are most commonly used worldwide. During RF ablation, alternating electrical current (~500 kHz) produces resistive heating around the interstitial electrode. Skin surface electrodes (ground pads) are used to complete the electrical circuit. RF ablation has been in use for nearly 20 years, with good results for local tumor control, extended survival and low complication rates. Recent studies suggest RF ablation may be a first-line treatment option for small hepatocellular carcinoma and renal-cell carcinoma. However, RF heating is hampered by local blood flow and high electrical impedance tissues (eg, lung, bone, desiccated or charred tissue). Microwaves may alleviate some of these problems by producing faster, volumetric heating. To create larger or conformal ablations, multiple microwave antennas can be used simultaneously while RF electrodes require sequential operation, which limits their efficiency. Early experiences with microwave systems suggest efficacy and safety similar to, or better than RF devices. Alternatively, cryoablation freezes the target tissues to lethal levels (-20 to -40 °C). Percutaneous cryoablation has been shown to be effective against RCC and many metastatic tumors, particularly colorectal cancer, in the liver. Cryoablation may also be associated with less post-procedure pain and faster recovery for some indications. Cryoablation is often contraindicated for primary liver cancer due to underlying coagulopathy and

  2. Risk assessment of thyroid follicular cell tumors.

    OpenAIRE

    Hill, R. N.; Crisp, T M; Hurley, P M; Rosenthal, S L; Singh, D. V.

    1998-01-01

    Thyroid follicular cell tumors arise in rodents from mutations, perturbations of thyroid and pituitary hormone status with increased stimulation of thyroid cell growth by thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), or a combination of the two. The only known human thyroid carcinogen is ionizing radiation. It is not known for certain whether chemicals that affect thyroid cell growth lead to human thyroid cancer. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency applies the following science policy positions: 1)...

  3. Direct visualization of macrophage-assisted tumor cell intravasation in mammary tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyckoff, Jeffrey B; Wang, Yarong; Lin, Elaine Y; Li, Jiu-feng; Goswami, Sumanta; Stanley, E Richard; Segall, Jeffrey E; Pollard, Jeffrey W; Condeelis, John

    2007-03-15

    Although the presence of macrophages in tumors has been correlated with poor prognosis, until now there was no direct observation of how macrophages are involved in hematogenous metastasis. In this study, we use multiphoton microscopy to show, for the first time, that tumor cell intravasation occurs in association with perivascular macrophages in mammary tumors. Furthermore, we show that perivascular macrophages of the mammary tumor are associated with tumor cell intravasation in the absence of local angiogenesis. These results show that the interaction between macrophages and tumor cells lying in close proximity defines a microenvironment that is directly involved in the intravasation of cancer cells in mammary tumors.

  4. Antiangiogenic Agent Might Upgrade tumor Cell Sensitivity to Ionizing Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The understanding of the fundamental role of angiogenesis and metastasis in cancer growth has led to tremendous interest in research regarding its regulatory mechanisms and clinical implications in the management of cancer. The present study was conducted to evaluate the influence of the angiogenic regulators modification on the tumor growth and the cell sensitivity to ionizing radiation targeting the improvement of cancer therapeutic protocols. Accordingly, the antiangiogenic activity of apigenin and selenium was tested in vitro via MTT assay. The action of Apigenin and or Selenium was examined in vivo by using a model of solid tumor carcinoma (EAC). The growth rate of solid tumor in all experimental groups was measured by Caliper. The irradiated mice were exposed to 6.5 Gy of gamma rays. Apigenin 50 mg/kg body weight and selenium 5 μg per mice were daily administrated for 14 consecutive days after tumor volume reached 1mm3. The angiogenic activators TNF-α (key cytokine) in spleen, serum MMP 2 and MMP 9, liver and tumor NO, the lipid peroxidation (LPx) and angiogenic inhibitor TIMP-1 in spleen as well as, antioxidant markers (CAT, SOD, GPX) in tumor and liver tissue and DNA fragmentation in splenocytes were estimated to monitor efficacy of Apigenin and selenium in cancer treatment strategy. All parameters were determined as a time course on days 16 and 22 after tumor volume reached 1mm3. The using of MTT assay on EAC cells shows inhibition in EAC cell proliferation after the incubation with apigenin and /or selenium. The administration of apigenin and /or selenium to mice bearing tumor and to irradiated mice bearing tumor reduce significantly the TNF-α expression, MMP 2,9 , NO , LPx level and increased the antioxidant enzymes (GPx , SOD and CAT) activities. The DNA fragmentation and the antiangiogenic factors TIMP-1 were significantly increased when compared with their values in mice bearing tumor or in irradiated mice bearing tumor. From the results obtained

  5. Tumor-associated macrophages promote tumor cell proliferation in nasopharyngeal NK/T-cell lymphoma

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Yixiong; Fan, Linni; Wang, Yingmei; Li, Peifeng; Zhu, Jin; Wang, Lu; Zhang, Weichen; Zhang, Yuehua; Huang, Gaosheng

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To explore the relationship between the number of tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) and proliferative activity of tumor cells and the relationship between two macrophage biomarkers CD68 and CD163 in nasopharyngeal NK/T-cell lymphoma. Methods: Immunohistochemistry was used to reconfirm the diagnosis of nasal NK/T-cell lymphoma and detect the numbers of TAMs and the ki-67 label index of the tumor cells in all 31 cases. In addition, 12 cases of inflammatory cases were collected as c...

  6. Clinical and Radiologic Signs of Relapsed Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor: Tissue Is the Issue

    OpenAIRE

    Homs, M Y V; Schreuder, H. W. R.; Jonges, G. N.; Witteveen, P. O.

    2013-01-01

    Malignant ovarian germ cell tumor is a rare disease, but with current treatment strategies including surgery and platinum based chemotherapy survival is excellent. After treatment, intensive followup is indicated to encounter tumor relapse at an early stage. This case describes a 22-year-old female with a history of common variable immune deficiency (CVID) who underwent a resection of a large ovarian germ cell tumor followed by 4 cycles of cisplatin and etoposide resulting in clinical complet...

  7. Inducing pluripotency and immortality in prostate tumor cells : a stem cell model of cancer progression

    OpenAIRE

    Fiñones, Rita Roces

    2009-01-01

    The progression from local prostate tumor to lethal prostate cancer is not well understood. Although current treatments cure a majority of patients, a significant minority (̃12 %) of people are diagnosed with late-stage, hormone-independent disease. As yet, the origin of the hormone-independent prostate cancer cells is unknown. In the present study, the transition to the lethal form of this disease is hypothesized to occur when a genetically- compromised tumor cell undergoes (1) an immortaliz...

  8. Biology and Treatment of Rhabdoid Tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geller, James I; Roth, Jacquelyn J; Biegel, Jaclyn A

    2015-01-01

    Rhabdoid tumor is a rare, highly aggressive malignancy that primarily affects infants and young children. These tumors typically arise in the brain and kidney, although extrarenal, non-central nervous system tumors in almost all soft-tissue sites have been described. SMARCB1 is a member of the SWI/SNF chromatin-remodeling complex and functions as a tumor suppressor in the vast majority of rhabdoid tumors. Patients with germline mutations or deletions affecting SMARCB1 are predisposed to the development of rhabdoid tumors, as well as the genetic disorder schwannomatosis. The current hypothesis is that rhabdoid tumors are driven by epigenetic dysregulation, as opposed to the alteration of a specific biologic pathway. The strategies for novel therapeutic approaches based on what is currently known about rhabdoid tumor biology are presented. PMID:26349416

  9. Overcoming Hypoxic-Resistance of Tumor Cells to TRAIL-Induced Apoptosis through Melatonin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    You-Jin Lee

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available A solid tumor is often exposed to hypoxic or anoxic conditions; thus, tumor cell responses to hypoxia are important for tumor progression as well as tumor therapy. Our previous studies indicated that tumor cells are resistant to tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL-induced cell apoptosis under hypoxic conditions. Melatonin inhibits cell proliferation in many cancer types and induces apoptosis in some particular cancer types. Here, we examined the effects of melatonin on hypoxic resistant cells against TRAIL-induced apoptosis and the possible mechanisms of melatonin in the hypoxic response. Melatonin treatment increased TRAIL-induced A549 cell death under hypoxic conditions, although hypoxia inhibited TRAIL-mediated cell apoptosis. In a mechanistic study, hypoxia inducible factor-1α and prolyl-hydroxylase 2 proteins, which increase following exposure to hypoxia, were dose-dependently down-regulated by melatonin treatment. Melatonin also blocked the hypoxic responses that reduced pro-apoptotic proteins and increased anti-apoptotic proteins including Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL. Furthermore, melatonin treatment reduced TRAIL resistance by regulating the mitochondrial transmembrane potential and Bax translocation. Our results first demonstrated that melatonin treatment induces apoptosis in TRAIL-resistant hypoxic tumor cells by diminishing the anti-apoptotic signals mediated by hypoxia and also suggest that melatonin could be a tumor therapeutic tool by combining with other apoptotic ligands including TRAIL, particularly in solid tumor cells exposed to hypoxia.

  10. Controlling T cell senescence in the tumor microenvironment for tumor immunotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Ye, Jian; Peng, Guangyong

    2015-01-01

    Understanding molecular mechanisms involved in creating and sustaining the tumor suppressive microenvironment is critical for the development of novel antitumor therapeutic strategies. We have identified the induction of T cell senescence as a novel mechanism utilized by human tumor cells to induce immune suppression, and provided a new strategy using TLR8 ligands to reverse tumor immunosuppressive effects for tumor immunotherapy.

  11. Effects of treatments with angiogenesis inhibitors on tumor stroma in animal experimental models of child cancer Neuroblastoma

    OpenAIRE

    Shiikh Dahir, Mahamed

    2013-01-01

    Neuroblastoma, a neuroendocrine tumor, is the most common cancer in infancy. 75 % of those affected are under the age of 5. The disease is heterogeneous and survival rate is low.   Current treatment of neuroblastoma consists of surgery, radiation and chemotherapy, where the targets for the treatment are the malign cells. Due to the cancer cells instable genome there is a risk for resistance development. This negatively impacts the treatments goal of hindering tumor growth and spread.  Tumor g...

  12. A novel thermal treatment modality for controlling breast tumor growth and progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Yifan; Liu, Ping; Xu, Lisa X

    2012-01-01

    The new concept of keeping primary tumor under control in situ to suppress distant foci sheds light on the novel treatment of metastatic tumor. Hyperthermia is considered as one of the means for controlling tumor growth. In this study, a novel thermal modality was built to introduce hyperthermia effect on tumor to suppress its growth and progression using 4T1 murine mammary carcinoma, a common animal model of metastatic breast cancer. A mildly raised temperature (i.e.39°C) was imposed on the skin surface of the implanted tumor using a thermal heating pad. Periodic heating (12 hours per day) was carried out for 3 days, 7 days, 14 days, and 21 days, respectively. The tumor growth rate was found significantly decreased in comparison to the control without hyperthermia. Biological evidences associated with tumor angiogenesis and metastasis were examined using histological analyses. Accordingly, the effect of mild hyperthermia on immune cell infiltration into tumors was also investigated. It was demonstrated that a delayed tumor growth and malignancy progression was achieved by mediating tumor cell apoptosis, vascular injury, degrading metastasis potential and as well as inhibiting the immunosuppressive cell myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) recruitment. Further mechanistic studies will be performed to explore the quantitative relationship between tumor progression and thermal dose in the near future. PMID:23367225

  13. Apoptin: Specific killer of tumor cells?

    OpenAIRE

    Tavassoli, M; Guelen, L.; Luxon, B. A.; Gäken, J

    2005-01-01

    In the early 1990s it was discovered that the VP3/Apoptin protein encoded by the Chicken Anemia virus (CAV) possesses an inherent ability to specifically kill cancer cells. Apoptin was found to be located in the cytoplasm of normal cells while in tumor cells it was localized mainly in the nucleus.1 These differences in the localization pattern were suggested to be the main mechanism by which normal cells show resistance to Apoptin-mediated cell killing. Although the mechanism of action of Apo...

  14. Keratocystic odontogenic tumor: Clinicopathological aspects and treatment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricio Robles

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Resumen :El tumor odontogénico queratoquístico es una neoplasia intraósea benigna que deriva de restos de la lámina dental, y que se presenta con alta frecuencia. Sus características histológicas le confieren una elevada tasa de recidiva, siendo este uno de sus principales problemas terapéuticos. Presenta además una considerable agresividad local, la cual se expresa con la expansión de corticales óseas, retardo en la erupción y desplazamiento de dientes, vasos sanguíneos y nervios. En la actualidad existen diversos tratamientos, siendo el ideal aquel que presente el menor riesgo de recidiva con una baja morbilidad para el paciente. En la presente revisión se discuten los principales aspectos histopatológicos, clínicos y terapéuticos de esta patología oral Abstract: Keratocystic odontogenic tumor is a benign intraosseous neoplasm derived from remnants of the dental lamina, and that occurs with high frequency. Histological characteristics confer a high recurrence rate, this being one of its main therapeutic problems, also present a high local aggressiveness, which is expressed in cortical expansion, delayed eruption and displacement of teeth, blood vessels and nerves. At present there are various treatments, being the ideal one that present the lowest risk of recurrence with low morbidity for the patient. In this review the main histopathological, clinical and therapeutic aspects of oral pathology are discussed.

  15. Actual and future strategies in interdisciplinary treatment of medulloblastomas, supratentorial PNET and intracranial germ cell tumors in childhood; Aktuelle und zukuenftige Strategien in der interdisziplinaeren Therapie von Medulloblastomen, supratentoriellen PNET und intrakraniellen Keimzelltumoren im Kindesalter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kortmann, R.D.; Timmermann, B.; Bamberg, M. [Tuebingen Univ. (Germany). Abt. Strahlentherapie; Kuehl, J. [Wuerzburg Univ. (Germany). Kinderklinik und Poliklinik; Calaminus, G.; Goebel, U. [Duesseldorf Univ. (Germany). Kinderklinik; Dieckmann, K. [Allgemeines Krankenhaus, Vienna (Austria). Abt. Strahlentherapie; Wurm, R. [Charite, Berlin (Germany). Abt. Strahlentherapie; Soerensen, N. [Wuerzburg Univ. (Germany). Neurochirurgische Klinik und Poliklinik; Urban, C. [Graz Univ. (Austria). Klinik fuer Kinder- und Jugendheilkunde, Abt. fuer Haematologie/Onkologie

    2001-09-01

    Methods: Systemic irradiation of neuroaxis is an essential part in the management of medulloblastoma, stPNET and intracranial germ cell tumors. The introduction of quality assurance programs in radiooncology assures a precise radiotherapy of target volumes and is a prerequisite to improve survival. Results: Hyperfractionated radiotherapy has the potential of increasing dose to tumor more safely without increasing the risk for late adverse effects. Pilot studies revealed excellent tumor control in medulloblastoma with acceptable acute toxicity and a long-term survival of up to 96%. In medulloblastoma stereotactic radiation techniques reveal an acceptable toxicity and promising results in tumor control in recurrent disease or as primary treatment. They are now part of future treatment protocols in case of persisting residual tumor. Radiotherapy alone in pure germinoma is continuously yielding high cure rates. In secreting germ cell tumors cisplatin containing chemotherapies in conjunction with radiotherapy achieve a long-term survival rate of 80% today. Especially in high risk medulloblastoma and secreting germ cell tumors chemotherapies are playing an increasingly important role in the interdisciplinary management. It can be expected that future developments of chemotherapeutic protocols and the introduction of new cytostatic substances will further improve the therapeutic outcome. (orig.) [German] Methode: Die systemische Strahlenbehandlung des gesamten Liquorraums ist unveraendert wesentlicher Therapiebestandteil bei Medulloblastom, supratentoriellen primitiv neuroektodermalen Tumoren (stPNET) und intrakraniellen Keimzelltumoren. Die Einfuehrung von Qualitaetssicherungsprogrammen in der Radioonkologie gewaehrleistet eine praezise Bestrahlung der Zielvolumina und bildet die Grundvoraussetzung fuer eine Anhebung der Ueberlebenszeiten. Ergebnisse: Hyperfraktionierte Strahlenbehandlungen bieten beim Medulloblastom und bei stPNET die Moeglichkeit, die wirksame

  16. Choice of treatment and diagnostic tactics at nonpalpable breast tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye. P. Kulikov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Results of inspection, treatment and dynamic supervision of 166 patients with nonpalpable breast tumors are presented. Distribution of tumors on BI-RADS system is given. Possibilities of a mammography and ultrasonography in diagnostics of a preclinical breast cancer are shown. Practical recommendations about a choice of an optimum way of presurgical verification of nonpalpable tumors are offered. Indications for surgical treat- ment and dynamic supervision are specified at nonpalpable breast tumors.

  17. Superficial urinary bladder tumors treatment results: A 10-year experience

    OpenAIRE

    Stanković Jablan; Dinić Ljubomir; Pavlović Svetlana

    2007-01-01

    Background/Aim. The most common urinary bladder tumors are superficial tumors. Due to their tension to relapse and progress towards deeper layers after surgical therapy, an adequate therapy significantly contributed to the improvement of the results of urinary bladder tumors treatment. Staging and gradus of the tumor, presence of the carcinoma in situ (CIS) or relapses significantly influenced the choice of the therapy. The aim of this study was to ascertain the effectiveness of the intravesi...

  18. Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Young Patients With Recurrent or Resistant Malignant Germ Cell Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-12

    Childhood Extracranial Germ Cell Tumor; Childhood Extragonadal Germ Cell Tumor; Childhood Malignant Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Childhood Malignant Testicular Germ Cell Tumor; Ovarian Choriocarcinoma; Ovarian Embryonal Carcinoma; Ovarian Yolk Sac Tumor; Recurrent Childhood Malignant Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Malignant Testicular Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Testicular Choriocarcinoma; Testicular Choriocarcinoma and Embryonal Carcinoma; Testicular Choriocarcinoma and Yolk Sac Tumor; Testicular Embryonal Carcinoma; Testicular Embryonal Carcinoma and Yolk Sac Tumor; Testicular Yolk Sac Tumor

  19. Epigenetics, Nervous System Tumors, and Cancer Stem Cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent advances have begun to elucidate how epigenetic regulatory mechanisms are responsible for establishing and maintaining cell identity during development and adult life and how the disruption of these processes is, not surprisingly, one of the hallmarks of cancer. In this review, we describe the major epigenetic mechanisms (i.e., DNA methylation, histone and chromatin modification, non-coding RNA deployment, RNA editing, and nuclear reorganization) and discuss the broad spectrum of epigenetic alterations that have been uncovered in pediatric and adult nervous system tumors. We also highlight emerging evidence that suggests epigenetic deregulation is a characteristic feature of so-called cancer stem cells (CSCs), which are thought to be present in a range of nervous system tumors and responsible for tumor maintenance, progression, treatment resistance, and recurrence. We believe that better understanding how epigenetic mechanisms operate in neural cells and identifying the etiologies and consequences of epigenetic deregulation in tumor cells and CSCs, in particular, are likely to promote the development of enhanced molecular diagnostics and more targeted and effective therapeutic agents for treating recalcitrant nervous system tumors

  20. Epigenetics, Nervous System Tumors, and Cancer Stem Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qureshi, Irfan A. [Rosyln and Leslie Goldstein Laboratory for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York, NY 10461 (United States); Institute for Brain Disorders and Neural Regeneration, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York, NY 10461 (United States); Department of Neurology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York, NY 10461 (United States); Rose F. Kennedy Center for Research on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York, NY 10461 (United States); Mehler, Mark F., E-mail: mark.mehler@einstein.yu.edu [Rosyln and Leslie Goldstein Laboratory for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York, NY 10461 (United States); Institute for Brain Disorders and Neural Regeneration, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York, NY 10461 (United States); Department of Neurology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York, NY 10461 (United States); Department of Neuroscience, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York, NY 10461 (United States); Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York, NY 10461 (United States); Rose F. Kennedy Center for Research on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York, NY 10461 (United States)

    2011-09-13

    Recent advances have begun to elucidate how epigenetic regulatory mechanisms are responsible for establishing and maintaining cell identity during development and adult life and how the disruption of these processes is, not surprisingly, one of the hallmarks of cancer. In this review, we describe the major epigenetic mechanisms (i.e., DNA methylation, histone and chromatin modification, non-coding RNA deployment, RNA editing, and nuclear reorganization) and discuss the broad spectrum of epigenetic alterations that have been uncovered in pediatric and adult nervous system tumors. We also highlight emerging evidence that suggests epigenetic deregulation is a characteristic feature of so-called cancer stem cells (CSCs), which are thought to be present in a range of nervous system tumors and responsible for tumor maintenance, progression, treatment resistance, and recurrence. We believe that better understanding how epigenetic mechanisms operate in neural cells and identifying the etiologies and consequences of epigenetic deregulation in tumor cells and CSCs, in particular, are likely to promote the development of enhanced molecular diagnostics and more targeted and effective therapeutic agents for treating recalcitrant nervous system tumors.

  1. Epigenetics, Nervous System Tumors, and Cancer Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark F. Mehler

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Recent advances have begun to elucidate how epigenetic regulatory mechanisms are responsible for establishing and maintaining cell identity during development and adult life and how the disruption of these processes is, not surprisingly, one of the hallmarks of cancer. In this review, we describe the major epigenetic mechanisms (i.e., DNA methylation, histone and chromatin modification, non-coding RNA deployment, RNA editing, and nuclear reorganization and discuss the broad spectrum of epigenetic alterations that have been uncovered in pediatric and adult nervous system tumors. We also highlight emerging evidence that suggests epigenetic deregulation is a characteristic feature of so-called cancer stem cells (CSCs, which are thought to be present in a range of nervous system tumors and responsible for tumor maintenance, progression, treatment resistance, and recurrence. We believe that better understanding how epigenetic mechanisms operate in neural cells and identifying the etiologies and consequences of epigenetic deregulation in tumor cells and CSCs, in particular, are likely to promote the development of enhanced molecular diagnostics and more targeted and effective therapeutic agents for treating recalcitrant nervous system tumors.

  2. Tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes for the treatment of metastatic cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geukes Foppen, M H; Donia, M; Svane, I M;

    2015-01-01

    promising, immunotherapeutic strategy for patients with metastatic melanoma. This review will discuss the development of TIL as a treatment option for melanoma, its mode of action and simplification over time, and the possibilities to expand this therapy to other types of cancer. Also, the future directions......Over the past few years melanoma incidence has been rising steadily, resulting in an increase in melanoma related mortality. Until recently, therapeutic options for metastatic melanoma were scarce. Chemotherapy and, in some countries, IL-2 were the only registered treatment modalities. In the last...... five years, treatment with immunotherapy (anti CTLA-4, anti PD-1, or the combination of these antibodies) has shown very promising results and was able to improve survival in patients with metastatic melanoma. Adoptive cell therapy using tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes is yet another, but highly...

  3. Treatment of ovarian endodermal sinus tumor to preserve fertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yi-Wen; Chao, Kuan-Chong; Sung, Pi-Lin; Li, Wai Hou; Wang, Peng-Hui

    2013-02-01

    Endodermal sinus tumor, also known as yolk sac tumor (YST), is a malignant germ cell tumor that most frequently occurs in the testis, the ovary, and sacrococcygeal areas in children. YSTs are highly aggressive and because of the early metastatic or invasive pattern, their prognosis has been poor. Treatment methods for YSTs are usually intensive, including multiagent chemotherapy, and have shown to improve patient survival significantly; therefore, it is important to consider the reproductive function of these patients with long-term survival. Herein, we present the case of a 31-year-old female, who was diagnosed with unilateral ovarian YST at the age of 13. The patient was treated with fertility-sparing surgery and postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy. During the subsequent long-term follow-up, she was not only free of disease, but also had a successful, naturally conceived pregnancy at 31 years of age. We, therefore, conclude that YST is a curable disease, and that fertility-preservation surgery and subsequent immediate combination chemotherapy is the treatment of choice. PMID:23351423

  4. Circulating Tumor Cells in Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Brian [Institute of Urology, University of Southern California, 1441 Eastlake Avenue, Suite 7416, Los Angeles, CA 90033 (United States); Rochefort, Holly [Department of Surgery, University of Southern California, 1520 San Pablo Street, HCT 4300, Los Angeles, CA 90033 (United States); Goldkorn, Amir, E-mail: agoldkor@usc.edu [Department of Internal Medicine and Norris Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Southern California Keck School of Medicine, 1441 Eastlake Avenue, Suite 3440, Los Angeles, CA 90033 (United States)

    2013-12-04

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) can provide a non-invasive, repeatable snapshot of an individual patient’s tumor. In prostate cancer, CTC enumeration has been extensively studied and validated as a prognostic tool and has received FDA clearance for use in monitoring advanced disease. More recently, CTC analysis has been shifting from enumeration to more sophisticated molecular characterization of captured cells, which serve as a “liquid biopsy” of the tumor, reflecting molecular changes in an individual’s malignancy over time. Here we will review the main CTC studies in advanced and localized prostate cancer, highlighting the important gains as well as the challenges posed by various approaches, and their implications for advancing prostate cancer management.

  5. Circulating Tumor Cells in Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Hu

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Circulating tumor cells (CTCs can provide a non-invasive, repeatable snapshot of an individual patient’s tumor. In prostate cancer, CTC enumeration has been extensively studied and validated as a prognostic tool and has received FDA clearance for use in monitoring advanced disease. More recently, CTC analysis has been shifting from enumeration to more sophisticated molecular characterization of captured cells, which serve as a “liquid biopsy” of the tumor, reflecting molecular changes in an individual’s malignancy over time. Here we will review the main CTC studies in advanced and localized prostate cancer, highlighting the important gains as well as the challenges posed by various approaches, and their implications for advancing prostate cancer management.

  6. Single-cell profiling approaches to probing tumor heterogeneity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoo, Bee Luan; Chaudhuri, Parthiv Kant; Ramalingam, Naveen; Tan, Daniel Shao Weng; Lim, Chwee Teck; Warkiani, Majid Ebrahimi

    2016-07-15

    Tumor heterogeneity is a major hindrance in cancer classification, diagnosis and treatment. Recent technological advances have begun to reveal the true extent of its heterogeneity. Single-cell analysis (SCA) is emerging as an important approach to detect variations in morphology, genetic or proteomic expression. In this review, we revisit the issue of inter- and intra-tumor heterogeneity, and list various modes of SCA techniques (cell-based, nucleic acid-based, protein-based, metabolite-based and lipid-based) presently used for cancer characterization. We further discuss the advantages of SCA over pooled cell analysis, as well as the limitations of conventional techniques. Emerging trends, such as high-throughput sequencing, are also mentioned as improved means for cancer profiling. Collectively, these applications have the potential for breakthroughs in cancer treatment. PMID:26789729

  7. Thoughts about cancer stem cells in solid tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Porta, Caterina Am

    2012-03-26

    Cancer chemotherapy efficacy is frequently impaired by either intrinsic or acquired tumor resistance. A fundamental problem in cancer research is identifying the cell type that is capable of sustaining neoplastic growth and its origin from normal tissue cells. In recent years, the cancer stem cell (CSC) theory has changed the classical view of tumor growth and therefore the therapeutic perspective. Overcoming intrinsic and acquired resistance of cancer stem/progenitor cells to current clinical treatments represents a major challenge in treating and curing the most aggressive and metastatic cancers. On the other hand, the identification of CSCs in vivo and in vitro relies on specific surface markers that should allow the sorting cancer cells into phenotypically distinct subpopulations. In the present review, recent papers published on CSCs in solid tumors (breast, prostate, brain and melanoma) are discussed, highlighting critical points such as the choice of markers to sort CSCs and mouse models to demonstrate that CSCs are able to replicate the original tumor. A discussion of the possible role of aldehyde dehydrogenase and CXCR6 biomarkers as signaling molecules in CSCs and normal stem cells is also discussed. The author believes that efforts have to be made to investigate the functional and biological properties of putative CSCs in cancer. Developing diagnostic/prognostic tools to follow cancer development is also a challenge. In this connection it would be useful to develop a multidisciplinary approach combining mathematics, physics and biology which merges experimental approaches and theory. Biological models alone are probably unable to resolve the problem completely.

  8. ADAM12 produced by tumor cells rather than stromal cells accelerates breast tumor progression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frohlich, Camilla; Nehammer, Camilla; Albrechtsen, Reidar;

    2011-01-01

    hypothesized, however, that the tumor-associated stroma may stimulate ADAM12 expression in tumor cells, based on the fact that TGF-ß1 stimulates ADAM12 expression and is a well-known growth factor released from tumor-associated stroma. TGF-ß1 stimulation of ADAM12-negative Lewis lung tumor cells induced ADAM12...... synthesis, and growth of these cells in vivo induced a >200-fold increase in ADAM12 expression. Our observation that ADAM12 expression is significantly higher in the terminal duct lobular units (TDLUs) adjacent to human breast carcinoma compared with TDLUs found in normal breast tissue supports our......Expression of ADAM12 is low in most normal tissues, but is markedly increased in numerous human cancers, including breast carcinomas. We have previously shown that overexpression of ADAM12 accelerates tumor progression in a mouse model of breast cancer (PyMT). In the present study, we found...

  9. Reinforcing endothelial junctions prevents microvessel permeability increase and tumor cell adhesion in microvessels in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Bingmei M.; Yang, Jinlin; Cai, Bin; Fan, Jie; Zhang, Lin; Zeng, Min

    2015-10-01

    Tumor cell adhesion to the microvessel wall is a critical step during tumor metastasis. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), a secretion of tumor cells, can increase microvessel permeability and tumor cell adhesion in the microvessel. To test the hypothesis that inhibiting permeability increase can reduce tumor cell adhesion, we used in vivo fluorescence microscopy to measure both microvessel permeability and adhesion rates of human mammary carcinoma MDA-MB-231 cells in post-capillary venules of rat mesentery under the treatment of VEGF and a cAMP analog, 8-bromo-cAMP, which can decrease microvessel permeability. By immunostaining adherens junction proteins between endothelial cells forming the microvessel wall, we further investigated the structural mechanism by which cAMP abolishes VEGF-induced increase in microvessel permeability and tumor cell adhesion. Our results demonstrate that 1) Pretreatment of microvessels with cAMP can abolish VEGF-enhanced microvessel permeability and tumor cell adhesion; 2) Tumor cells prefer to adhere to the endothelial cell junctions instead of cell bodies; 3) VEGF increases microvessel permeability and tumor cell adhesion by compromising endothelial junctions while cAMP abolishes these effects of VEGF by reinforcing the junctions. These results suggest that strengthening the microvessel wall integrity can be a potential approach to inhibiting hematogenous tumor metastasis.

  10. Redefining circulating tumor cells by image processing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ligthart, S.T.

    2012-01-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTC) in the blood of patients with metastatic carcinomas are associated with poor survival and can be used to guide therapy. However, CTC are very heterogeneous in size and shape, and are present at very low frequencies. Missing or misjudging a few events may have great cons

  11. Radiosensitising effect of electrochemotherapy with bleomycin in LPB sarcoma cells and tumors in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bleomycin is poorly permeant but potent cytotoxic and radiosensitizing drug. The aim of the study was to evaluate whether a physical drug delivery system – electroporation can increase radiosensitising effect of bleomycin in vitro and in vivo. LPB sarcoma cells and tumors were treated either with bleomycin, electroporation or ionizing radiation, and combination of these treatments. In vitro, response to different treatments was determined by colony forming assay, while in vivo, treatment effectiveness was determined by local tumor control (TCD50). Time dependence of partial oxygen pressure in LPB tumors after application of electric pulses was measured by electron paramagnetic oxyimetry. Electroporation of cells in vitro increased radiosensitising effect of bleomycin for 1.5 times, in vivo radiation response of tumors was enhanced by 1.9 fold compared to response of tumors that were irradiated only. Neither treatment of tumors with bleomycin nor application of electric pulses only, affected radiation response of tumors. Application of electric pulses to the tumors induced profound but transient reduction of tumor oxygenation. Although tumor oxygenation after electroporation partially restored at the time of irradiation, it was still reduced at the level of radiobiologically relevant hypoxia. Our study shows that application of electric pulses to cells and tumors increases radiosensitising effect of bleomycin. Furthermore, our results demonstrate that the radiobiologically relevant hypoxia induced by electroporation of tumors did not counteract the pronounced radiosensitising effect of electrochemotherapy with bleomycin

  12. Radiosensitising effect of electrochemotherapy with bleomycin in LPB sarcoma cells and tumors in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sentjurc Marjeta

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bleomycin is poorly permeant but potent cytotoxic and radiosensitizing drug. The aim of the study was to evaluate whether a physical drug delivery system – electroporation can increase radiosensitising effect of bleomycin in vitro and in vivo. Methods LPB sarcoma cells and tumors were treated either with bleomycin, electroporation or ionizing radiation, and combination of these treatments. In vitro, response to different treatments was determined by colony forming assay, while in vivo, treatment effectiveness was determined by local tumor control (TCD50. Time dependence of partial oxygen pressure in LPB tumors after application of electric pulses was measured by electron paramagnetic oxyimetry. Results Electroporation of cells in vitro increased radiosensitising effect of bleomycin for 1.5 times, in vivo radiation response of tumors was enhanced by 1.9 fold compared to response of tumors that were irradiated only. Neither treatment of tumors with bleomycin nor application of electric pulses only, affected radiation response of tumors. Application of electric pulses to the tumors induced profound but transient reduction of tumor oxygenation. Although tumor oxygenation after electroporation partially restored at the time of irradiation, it was still reduced at the level of radiobiologically relevant hypoxia. Conclusion Our study shows that application of electric pulses to cells and tumors increases radiosensitising effect of bleomycin. Furthermore, our results demonstrate that the radiobiologically relevant hypoxia induced by electroporation of tumors did not counteract the pronounced radiosensitising effect of electrochemotherapy with bleomycin.

  13. Let-7 Sensitizes KRAS Mutant Tumor Cells to Chemotherapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Dai

    Full Text Available KRAS is the most commonly mutated oncogene in human cancers and is associated with poor prognosis and drug resistance. Let-7 is a family of tumor suppressor microRNAs that are frequently suppressed in solid tumors, where KRAS mutations are highly prevalent. In this study, we investigated the potential use of let-7 as a chemosensitizer. We found that let-7b repletion selectively sensitized KRAS mutant tumor cells to the cytotoxicity of paclitaxel and gemcitabine. Transfection of let-7b mimic downregulated the expression of mutant but not wild-type KRAS. Combination of let-7b mimic with paclitaxel or gemcitabine diminished MEK/ERK and PI3K/AKT signaling concurrently, triggered the onset of apoptosis, and reverted the epithelial-mesenchymal transition in KRAS mutant tumor cells. In addition, let-7b repletion downregulated the expression of β-tubulin III and ribonucleotide reductase subunit M2, two proteins known to mediate tumor resistance to paclitaxel and gemcitabine, respectively. Let-7 may represent a new class of chemosensitizer for the treatment of KRAS mutant tumors.

  14. Treatment of Cavernous Sinus Tumors with Linear Accelerator Radiosurgery

    OpenAIRE

    Chang, Steven D; Doty, James R; Martin, David P.; Hancock, Steven L.; Adler, John R.

    1999-01-01

    Since 1989, 79 patients with benign or malignant cavernous sinus tumors, have been treated at Stanford University with linear accelerator (linac) radiosurgery. Radiosurgery has been used as (1) a planned second-stage procedure for residual tumor following surgery, (2) primary treatment for patients whose medical conditions preclude surgery, (3) palliation of malignant lesions, and (4) definitive treatment for small, well-localized, poorly accessible tumors. Mean patient age was 52 years (rang...

  15. Reduced mtDNA copy number increases the sensitivity of tumor cells to chemotherapeutic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, H; Sun, S; Bai, Y; Chen, Y; Chai, R; Li, H

    2015-04-02

    Many cancer drugs are toxic to cells by activating apoptotic pathways. Previous studies have shown that mitochondria have key roles in apoptosis in mammalian cells, but the role of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) copy number variation in the pathogenesis of tumor cell apoptosis remains largely unknown. We used the HEp-2, HNE2, and A549 tumor cell lines to explore the relationship between mtDNA copy number variation and cell apoptosis. We first induced apoptosis in three tumor cell lines and one normal adult human skin fibroblast cell line (HSF) with cisplatin (DDP) or doxorubicin (DOX) treatment and found that the mtDNA copy number significantly increased in apoptotic tumor cells, but not in HSF cells. We then downregulated the mtDNA copy number by transfection with shRNA-TFAM plasmids or treatment with ethidium bromide and found that the sensitivity of tumor cells to DDP or DOX was significantly increased. Furthermore, we observed that levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) increased significantly in tumor cells with lower mtDNA copy numbers, and this might be related to a low level of antioxidant gene expression. Finally, we rescued the increase of ROS in tumor cells with lipoic acid or N-acetyl-L-cysteine and found that the apoptosis rate decreased. Our studies suggest that the increase of mtDNA copy number is a self-protective mechanism of tumor cells to prevent apoptosis and that reduced mtDNA copy number increases ROS levels in tumor cells, increases the tumor cells' sensitivity to chemotherapeutic drugs, and increases the rate of apoptosis. This research provides evidence that mtDNA copy number variation might be a promising new therapeutic target for the clinical treatment of tumors.

  16. Gastroenteropancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors: Hormonal Treatment Updates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Khagi

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors are a heterogeneous group of carcinomas that remain difficult to treat withconventional cytotoxic regimens. The 2014 American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO Gastrointestinal CancersSymposium brought us new insights into the management of gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors. The focus ofthis review will serve to highlight specific Abstracts (#268 and #273 that help shed light on a novel, targeted means oftreating gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors.

  17. Clear-cell variant of calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor (Pindborg tumor) in the mandible

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ching-Yi Chen; Chung-Wei Wu; Wen-Chen Wang; Li-Min Lin; Yuk-Kwan Chen

    2013-01-01

    We present an uncommon case (female patient aged 59 years) of the clear-cell variant of calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor (CEOT) (also known as Pindborg tumor) in the mandible. The clinical characteristics and probable origins of the clear tumor cells of previously reported cases of clear-cell variant of intraosseous CEOT are also summarized and discussed.

  18. Tumor-Initiating Cells Are Enriched in CD44hi Population in Murine Salivary Gland Tumor

    OpenAIRE

    Shukun Shen; Wenjun Yang; Zhugang Wang; Xia Lei; Liqun Xu; Yang Wang; Lizhen Wang; Lei Huang; Zhiwei Yu; Xinhong Zhang; Jiang Li; Yan Chen; Xiaoping Zhao; Xuelai Yin; Chenping Zhang

    2011-01-01

    Tumor-initiating cells (T-ICs) discovered in various tumors have been widely reported. However, T-IC populations in salivary gland tumors have yet to be elucidated. Using the established Pleomorphic Adenoma Gene-1 (Plag1) transgenic mouse model of a salivary gland tumor, we identified CD44(high) (CD44(hi)) tumor cells, characterized by high levels of CD44 cell surface expression, as the T-ICs for pleomorphic adenomas. These CD44(hi) tumor cells incorporated 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine (BrdU), at a...

  19. Giant cells tumor of radius distal end and bone reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is the case of a black women aged 40 presenting with a tumor of distal end of right radium with histological diagnosis of low-grade malignancy giant cells tumor and proposal of limb amputation. A conservative surgery was performed with a two-steps total exeresis of lesion sparing the oncologic margin. A fibular free-graft was used and wrist arthrodesis and internal fixation of graft using AO system. There was a good graft consolidation and an active incorporation of patient to social activities. The diagnosis, treatment, follow-up, rehabilitation and case prognosis are exposed

  20. MicroRNAs in tumor stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaochen Hu; Junqiang Yang; Ruijie Yang; Ruina Yang; Xinshuai Wang; Shegan Gao

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of non-coding RNAs that are believed to have a significant role in tumori-genesis and cancer metastasis. Cancer stem cel s play a major role in tumor recurrence, metastasis, and drug resistance. Research has shown that miRNAs can promote or inhibit the stemness of cancer stem cel s and regulate the dif erentiation and self-renewal of cancer stem cel s. In this article, the phenotype and regulatory mechanisms of miRNAs in cancer stem cel s wil be described, together with an explanation of their potential role in tumor diagnosis and treatment.

  1. In Vitro Efficient Expansion of Tumor Cells Deriving from Different Types of Human Tumor Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilaria Turin

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Obtaining human tumor cell lines from fresh tumors is essential to advance our understanding of antitumor immune surveillance mechanisms and to develop new ex vivo strategies to generate an efficient anti-tumor response. The present study delineates a simple and rapid method for efficiently establishing primary cultures starting from tumor samples of different types, while maintaining the immuno-histochemical characteristics of the original tumor. We compared two different strategies to disaggregate tumor specimens. After short or long term in vitro expansion, cells analyzed for the presence of malignant cells demonstrated their neoplastic origin. Considering that tumor cells may be isolated in a closed system with high efficiency, we propose this methodology for the ex vivo expansion of tumor cells to be used to evaluate suitable new drugs or to generate tumor-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes or vaccines.

  2. Tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily member 9 is upregulated in the endothelium and tumor cells in melanoma brain metastasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick N Harter

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The cytokine receptor tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily member 9 (TNFRSF9 is mainly considered to be a co-stimulatory activation marker in hematopoietic cells. Several preclinical models have shown a dramatic beneficial effect of treatment approaches targeting TNFRSF9 with agonistic antibodies. However, preliminary clinical phase I/II studies were stopped after the occurrence of several severe deleterious side effects. In a previous study, it was demonstrated that TNFRSF9 was strongly expressed by reactive astrocytes in primary central nervous system (CNS tumors, but was largely absent from tumor or inflammatory cells. The aim of the present study was to address the cellular source of TNFRSF9 expression in the setting of human melanoma brain metastasis, a highly immunogenic tumor with a prominent tropism to the CNS. Methods: Melanoma brain metastasis was analyzed in a cohort of 78 patients by immunohistochemistry for TNFRSF9 and its expression was correlated with clinicopathological parameters including sex, age, survival, tumor size, number of tumor spots, and BRAF V600E expression status. Results: Tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily member 9 was frequently expressed independently on both melanoma and endothelial cells. In addition, TNFRSF9 was also present on smooth muscle cells of larger vessels and on a subset of lymphomonocytic tumor infiltrates. No association between TNFRSF9 expression and patient survival or other clinicopathological parameters was seen. Of note, several cases showed a gradual increase in TNFRSF9 expression on tumor cells with increasing distance from blood vessels, an observation that might be linked to hypoxia-driven TNFRSF9 expression in tumor cells. Conclusion: The findings indicate that the cellular source of TNFRSF9 in melanoma brain metastasis largely exceeds the lymphomonocytic pool, and therefore further careful (re- assessment of potential TNFRSF9 functions in cell types other than

  3. Endoscopic endonasal approach for the treatment of a large clival giant cell tumor complicated by an intraoperative internal carotid artery rupture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giant cell tumors (GCTs) are primary bone neoplasms that rarely involve the skull base. These lesions are usually locally aggressive and require complete removal, including the surrounding apparently healthy bone, to provide the best chance of cure. GCTs, as well as other lesions located in the clivus, can nowadays be treated by a minimally invasive fully endoscopic extended endonasal approach. This approach ensures a more direct route to the craniovertebral junction than other possible approaches (transfacial, extended lateral, and posterolateral approaches). The case reported is a clival GCT operated on by an extended endonasal approach that provides another contribution on how to address one of the most feared complications attributed to this approach: a massive bleed due to an internal carotid artery injury

  4. Tumor-specific CD4+ T cells maintain effector and memory tumor-specific CD8+ T cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Church, Sarah E; Jensen, Shawn M; Antony, Paul A; Restifo, Nicholas P; Fox, Bernard A

    2014-01-01

    Immunotherapies that augment antitumor T cells have had recent success for treating patients with cancer. Here we examined whether tumor-specific CD4+ T cells enhance CD8+ T-cell adoptive immunotherapy in a lymphopenic environment. Our model employed physiological doses of tyrosinase-related protein 1-specific CD4+ transgenic T cells-CD4+ T cells and pmel-CD8+ T cells that when transferred individually were subtherapeutic; however, when transferred together provided significant (p ≤ 0.001) therapeutic efficacy. Therapeutic efficacy correlated with increased numbers of effector and memory CD8+ T cells with tumor-specific cytokine expression. When combined with CD4+ T cells, transfer of total (naïve and effector) or effector CD8+ T cells were highly effective, suggesting CD4+ T cells can help mediate therapeutic effects by maintaining function of activated CD8+ T cells. In addition, CD4+ T cells had a pronounced effect in the early posttransfer period, as their elimination within the first 3 days significantly (p < 0.001) reduced therapeutic efficacy. The CD8+ T cells recovered from mice treated with both CD8+ and CD4+ T cells had decreased expression of PD-1 and PD-1-blockade enhanced the therapeutic efficacy of pmel-CD8 alone, suggesting that CD4+ T cells help reduce CD8+ T-cell exhaustion. These data support combining immunotherapies that elicit both tumor-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cells for treatment of patients with cancer. PMID:24114780

  5. Ex Vivo Behaviour of Human Bone Tumor Endothelial Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Infante, Teresa [SDN-Foundation, Institute of Diagnostic and Nuclear Development, IRCCS, 80143 Naples (Italy); Cesario, Elena [Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics, Second University of Naples, 80138 Naples (Italy); Gallo, Michele; Fazioli, Flavio [Division of Skeletal Muscles Oncology Surgery, National Cancer Institute, Pascale Foundation, 80131 Naples (Italy); De Chiara, Annarosaria [Anatomic Pathology Unit, National Cancer Institute, Pascale Foundation, 80131 Naples (Italy); Tutucci, Cristina; Apice, Gaetano [Medical Oncology of Bone and Soft Sarcoma tissues Unit, National Cancer Institute, Pascale Foundation, 80131 Naples (Italy); Nigris, Filomena de, E-mail: filomena.denigris@unina2.it [Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics, Second University of Naples, 80138 Naples (Italy)

    2013-04-11

    Cooperation between endothelial cells and bone in bone remodelling is well established. In contrast, bone microvasculature supporting the growth of primary tumors and metastasis is poorly understood. Several antiangiogenic agents have recently been undergoing trials, although an extensive body of clinical data and experimental research have proved that angiogenic pathways differ in each tumor type and stage. Here, for the first time, we characterize at the molecular and functional level tumor endothelial cells from human bone sarcomas at different stages of disease and with different histotypes. We selected a CD31{sup +} subpopulation from biopsies that displayed the capability to grow as adherent cell lines without vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Our findings show the existence in human primary bone sarcomas of highly proliferative endothelial cells expressing CD31, CD44, CD105, CD146 and CD90 markers. These cells are committed to develop capillary-like structures and colony formation units, and to produce nitric oxide. We believe that a better understanding of tumor vasculature could be a valid tool for the design of an efficacious antiangiogenic therapy as adjuvant treatment of sarcomas.

  6. The biology of circulating tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantel, K; Speicher, M R

    2016-03-10

    Metastasis is a biologically complex process consisting of numerous stochastic events which may tremendously differ across various cancer types. Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are cells that are shed from primary tumors and metastatic deposits into the blood stream. CTCs bear a tremendous potential to improve our understanding of steps involved in the metastatic cascade, starting from intravasation of tumor cells into the circulation until the formation of clinically detectable metastasis. These efforts were propelled by novel high-resolution approaches to dissect the genomes and transcriptomes of CTCs. Furthermore, capturing of viable CTCs has paved the way for innovative culturing technologies to study fundamental characteristics of CTCs such as invasiveness, their kinetics and responses to selection barriers, such as given therapies. Hence the study of CTCs is not only instrumental as a basic research tool, but also allows the serial monitoring of tumor genotypes and may therefore provide predictive and prognostic biomarkers for clinicians. Here, we review how CTCs have contributed to significant insights into the metastatic process and how they may be utilized in clinical practice.

  7. MR imaging of intracranial germ cell tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Masayuki; Takashima, Tsutomu; Akakura, Yukari (Kanazawa Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine) (and others)

    1994-04-01

    MRI of 13 patients with intracranial germ cell tumor (GCT) was performed with a 1.5 T superconductive scanner. T1-and T2-weighted images (T1WI and T2WI) and Gd-DTPA-enhanced T1-weighted images (Gd-T1WI) were obtained. On T1WI and T2WI, five germinomas and one teratoma were homogeneously isointense with gray matter. Two germinomas with cystic component exhibited markedly hypointense and hyperintense areas, respectively. Three teratomas were heterogeneous on both sequences due to cystic portion, fat, and hemorrhage. Yolk sac tumor (YST) was isointense on T1WI and heterogeneous on T2WI. On Gd-T1WI, five germinomas and YST were homogeneously enhanced. All but one of the others were heterogeneously enhanced. There were increased AFP in YST and increased HCG in malignant teratoma. Differential diagnosis of GCT may be possible with MRI. However, tumor markers should be taken into consideration. (author).

  8. NK Cells Preferentially Target Tumor Cells with a Cancer Stem Cell Phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ames, Erik; Canter, Robert J; Grossenbacher, Steven K; Mac, Stephanie; Chen, Mingyi; Smith, Rachel C; Hagino, Takeshi; Perez-Cunningham, Jessica; Sckisel, Gail D; Urayama, Shiro; Monjazeb, Arta M; Fragoso, Ruben C; Sayers, Thomas J; Murphy, William J

    2015-10-15

    Increasing evidence supports the hypothesis that cancer stem cells (CSCs) are resistant to antiproliferative therapies, able to repopulate tumor bulk, and seed metastasis. NK cells are able to target stem cells as shown by their ability to reject allogeneic hematopoietic stem cells but not solid tissue grafts. Using multiple preclinical models, including NK coculture (autologous and allogeneic) with multiple human cancer cell lines and dissociated primary cancer specimens and NK transfer in NSG mice harboring orthotopic pancreatic cancer xenografts, we assessed CSC viability, CSC frequency, expression of death receptor ligands, and tumor burden. We demonstrate that activated NK cells are capable of preferentially killing CSCs identified by multiple CSC markers (CD24(+)/CD44(+), CD133(+), and aldehyde dehydrogenase(bright)) from a wide variety of human cancer cell lines in vitro and dissociated primary cancer specimens ex vivo. We observed comparable effector function of allogeneic and autologous NK cells. We also observed preferential upregulation of NK activation ligands MICA/B, Fas, and DR5 on CSCs. Blocking studies further implicated an NKG2D-dependent mechanism for NK killing of CSCs. Treatment of orthotopic human pancreatic cancer tumor-bearing NSG mice with activated NK cells led to significant reductions in both intratumoral CSCs and tumor burden. Taken together, these data from multiple preclinical models, including a strong reliance on primary human cancer specimens, provide compelling preclinical evidence that activated NK cells preferentially target cancer cells with a CSC phenotype, highlighting the translational potential of NK immunotherapy as part of a combined modality approach for refractory solid malignancies.

  9. Diagnostic value of circulating tumor cells in cerebrospinal fluid

    OpenAIRE

    Ning Mu; Chunhua Ma; Rong Jiang; Yuan Lv; Jinduo Li; Bin Wang; Liwei Sun

    2016-01-01

    To assess circulating tumor cells in cerebrospinal fluid as a diagnostic approach to identify meningeal metastasis in patients with non-small cell lung cancer by using tumor marker immunostaining–fluorescence in situ hybridization (TM-iFISH).

  10. Tumor Regulatory T Cells Potently Abrogate Antitumor Immunity1

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Zuqiang; Kim, Jin H.; Falo, Louis D.; You, Zhaoyang

    2009-01-01

    Treg from mice bearing a breast tumor were elevated (tumor Treg). In vitro, whereas tumor Treg ability to inhibit tumor-primed CD4+ T cell activity is comparable to Treg from naïve mice (naïve Treg), only tumor Treg suppress naïve CD8+ T cell activation and DC function. Neither tumor Treg nor naïve Treg can suppress antitumor immunity at the effector phase of the immune response induced by adoptively-transferred tumor-primed CD4+ T cells. This is consistent with the observation that, in this ...

  11. Cuprous oxide nanoparticles selectively induce apoptosis of tumor cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Y

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Ye Wang,1,2,* Xiao-Yuan Zi,1,* Juan Su,1 Hong-Xia Zhang,1 Xin-Rong Zhang,3 Hai-Ying Zhu,1 Jian-Xiu Li,1 Meng Yin,3 Feng Yang,3 Yi-Ping Hu,11Department of Cell Biology, 2School of Clinical Medicine, 3Department of Pharmaceuticals, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai, People's Republic of China*Authors contributed equally.Abstract: In the rapid development of nanoscience and nanotechnology, many researchers have discovered that metal oxide nanoparticles have very useful pharmacological effects. Cuprous oxide nanoparticles (CONPs can selectively induce apoptosis and suppress the proliferation of tumor cells, showing great potential as a clinical cancer therapy. Treatment with CONPs caused a G1/G0 cell cycle arrest in tumor cells. Furthermore, CONPs enclosed in vesicles entered, or were taken up by mitochondria, which damaged their membranes, thereby inducing apoptosis. CONPs can also produce reactive oxygen species (ROS and initiate lipid peroxidation of the liposomal membrane, thereby regulating many signaling pathways and influencing the vital movements of cells. Our results demonstrate that CONPs have selective cytotoxicity towards tumor cells, and indicate that CONPs might be a potential nanomedicine for cancer therapy.Keywords: nanomedicine, selective cytotoxicity, apoptosis, cell cycle arrest, mitochondrion-targeted nanomaterials

  12. HAMLET (human alpha-lactalbumin made lethal to tumor cells) triggers autophagic tumor cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aits, Sonja; Gustafsson, Lotta; Hallgren, Oskar; Brest, Patrick; Gustafsson, Mattias; Trulsson, Maria; Mossberg, Ann-Kristin; Simon, Hans-Uwe; Mograbi, Baharia; Svanborg, Catharina

    2009-03-01

    HAMLET, a complex of partially unfolded alpha-lactalbumin and oleic acid, kills a wide range of tumor cells. Here we propose that HAMLET causes macroautophagy in tumor cells and that this contributes to their death. Cell death was accompanied by mitochondrial damage and a reduction in the level of active mTOR and HAMLET triggered extensive cytoplasmic vacuolization and the formation of double-membrane-enclosed vesicles typical of macroautophagy. In addition, HAMLET caused a change from uniform (LC3-I) to granular (LC3-II) staining in LC3-GFP-transfected cells reflecting LC3 translocation during macroautophagy, and this was blocked by the macroautophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenine. HAMLET also caused accumulation of LC3-II detected by Western blot when lysosomal degradation was inhibited suggesting that HAMLET caused an increase in autophagic flux. To determine if macroautophagy contributed to cell death, we used RNA interference against Beclin-1 and Atg5. Suppression of Beclin-1 and Atg5 improved the survival of HAMLET-treated tumor cells and inhibited the increase in granular LC3-GFP staining. The results show that HAMLET triggers macroautophagy in tumor cells and suggest that macroautophagy contributes to HAMLET-induced tumor cell death.

  13. Endothelial cell-derived interleukin-6 regulates tumor growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endothelial cells play a complex role in the pathobiology of cancer. This role is not limited to the making of blood vessels to allow for influx of oxygen and nutrients required for the high metabolic demands of tumor cells. Indeed, it has been recently shown that tumor-associated endothelial cells secrete molecules that enhance tumor cell survival and cancer stem cell self-renewal. The hypothesis underlying this work is that specific disruption of endothelial cell-initiated signaling inhibits tumor growth. Conditioned medium from primary human dermal microvascular endothelial cells (HDMEC) stably transduced with silencing RNA for IL-6 (or controls) was used to evaluate the role of endothelial-derived IL-6 on the activation of key signaling pathways in tumor cells. In addition, these endothelial cells were co-transplanted with tumor cells into immunodefficient mice to determine the impact of endothelial cell-derived IL-6 on tumor growth and angiogenesis. We observed that tumor cells adjacent to blood vessels show strong phosphorylation of STAT3, a key mediator of tumor progression. In search for a possible mechanism for the activation of the STAT3 signaling pathway, we observed that silencing interleukin (IL)-6 in tumor-associated endothelial cells inhibited STAT3 phosphorylation in tumor cells. Notably, tumors vascularized with IL-6-silenced endothelial cells showed lower intratumoral microvessel density, lower tumor cell proliferation, and slower growth than tumors vascularized with control endothelial cells. Collectively, these results demonstrate that IL-6 secreted by endothelial cells enhance tumor growth, and suggest that cancer patients might benefit from targeted approaches that block signaling events initiated by endothelial cells

  14. Tumor-derived exosomes in cancer progression and treatment failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Shaorong; Cao, Haixia; Shen, Bo; Feng, Jifeng

    2015-11-10

    Exosomes have diameter within the range of 30-100 nm and spherical to cup-shaped nanoparticles with specific surface molecular characteristics, such as CD9 and CD63. These vesicles are present in nearly all human body fluids, including blood plasma/serum, saliva, breast milk, cerebrospinal fluid, urine, semen, and particularly enriched in tumor microenvironment. Exosomes contain multiple proteins, DNA, mRNA, miRNA, long non-coding RNA, and even genetic materials of viruses/prions. These materials are biochemically and functionally distinct and can be transferred to a recipient cell where they regulate protein expression and signaling pathways. Recently, exosomes are demonstrated to have a close relationship with tumor development and metastasis. Exosomes influence therapeutic effect in cancer patients. In this review, we describe the biogenesis, composition, and function of exosomes. The mechanism on how tumor-derived exosomes contribute to cancer progression and clinical treatment failure is also described, with special focus on their potential applications in cancer therapy. PMID:26452221

  15. Tumor-derived exosomes in cancer progression and treatment failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Shaorong; Cao, Haixia; Shen, Bo; Feng, Jifeng

    2015-11-10

    Exosomes have diameter within the range of 30-100 nm and spherical to cup-shaped nanoparticles with specific surface molecular characteristics, such as CD9 and CD63. These vesicles are present in nearly all human body fluids, including blood plasma/serum, saliva, breast milk, cerebrospinal fluid, urine, semen, and particularly enriched in tumor microenvironment. Exosomes contain multiple proteins, DNA, mRNA, miRNA, long non-coding RNA, and even genetic materials of viruses/prions. These materials are biochemically and functionally distinct and can be transferred to a recipient cell where they regulate protein expression and signaling pathways. Recently, exosomes are demonstrated to have a close relationship with tumor development and metastasis. Exosomes influence therapeutic effect in cancer patients. In this review, we describe the biogenesis, composition, and function of exosomes. The mechanism on how tumor-derived exosomes contribute to cancer progression and clinical treatment failure is also described, with special focus on their potential applications in cancer therapy.

  16. Review on the Applications and Molecular Mechanisms of Xihuang Pill in Tumor Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiujun Guo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Xihuang pill (XH is a complementary and alternative medicine that has been used in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM for the treatment of tumors since the 18th century. XH has clinical effects on non-Hodgkin lymphoma, breast cancer, gastric cancer, liver cancer, and bone metastasis. XH can also inhibit the growth of tumor cells and cancer stem cells, prevent tumor invasion and angiogenesis, and regulate the tumor microenvironment. XH is composed of Ru Xiang (olibanum, Mo Yao (Commiphora myrrha, She Xiang (Moschus, and Niu Huang (Calculus bovis. Some of the compounds found in these ingredients exert multiple antitumor effects and may synergize with the other ingredients. We aimed to summarize the clinical applications and molecular mechanisms of XH and its chemical composition. This review will provide potential new strategies and alternative perspectives for tumor treatments and basic research into complementary and alternative medicine.

  17. Review on the Applications and Molecular Mechanisms of Xihuang Pill in Tumor Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Qiujun; Lin, Jinyin; Liu, Rui; Gao, Yebo; He, Shulin; Xu, Xinyao; Hua, Baojin; Li, Conghuang; Hou, Wei; Zheng, Honggang; Bao, Yanju

    2015-01-01

    Xihuang pill (XH) is a complementary and alternative medicine that has been used in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) for the treatment of tumors since the 18th century. XH has clinical effects on non-Hodgkin lymphoma, breast cancer, gastric cancer, liver cancer, and bone metastasis. XH can also inhibit the growth of tumor cells and cancer stem cells, prevent tumor invasion and angiogenesis, and regulate the tumor microenvironment. XH is composed of Ru Xiang (olibanum), Mo Yao (Commiphora myrrha), She Xiang (Moschus), and Niu Huang (Calculus bovis). Some of the compounds found in these ingredients exert multiple antitumor effects and may synergize with the other ingredients. We aimed to summarize the clinical applications and molecular mechanisms of XH and its chemical composition. This review will provide potential new strategies and alternative perspectives for tumor treatments and basic research into complementary and alternative medicine.

  18. Review on the Applications and Molecular Mechanisms of Xihuang Pill in Tumor Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Qiujun; Lin, Jinyin; Liu, Rui; Gao, Yebo; He, Shulin; Xu, Xinyao; Hua, Baojin; Li, Conghuang; Hou, Wei; Zheng, Honggang; Bao, Yanju

    2015-01-01

    Xihuang pill (XH) is a complementary and alternative medicine that has been used in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) for the treatment of tumors since the 18th century. XH has clinical effects on non-Hodgkin lymphoma, breast cancer, gastric cancer, liver cancer, and bone metastasis. XH can also inhibit the growth of tumor cells and cancer stem cells, prevent tumor invasion and angiogenesis, and regulate the tumor microenvironment. XH is composed of Ru Xiang (olibanum), Mo Yao (Commiphora myrrha), She Xiang (Moschus), and Niu Huang (Calculus bovis). Some of the compounds found in these ingredients exert multiple antitumor effects and may synergize with the other ingredients. We aimed to summarize the clinical applications and molecular mechanisms of XH and its chemical composition. This review will provide potential new strategies and alternative perspectives for tumor treatments and basic research into complementary and alternative medicine. PMID:26170886

  19. STAT3-Decoy ODN Inhibits Cytokine Autocrine of Murine Tumor Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xi Liu; Jiayi Li; Jian Zhang

    2007-01-01

    Tumor cells usually secrete soluble factors to improve their proliferation via autocrine network or to escape from immune surveillance by inhibiting antitumor immunity, among these factors IL-10 and IL-6 play more important roles. Since both cytokines' signal transductions are mediated through the STAT3 pathway, STAT3 becomes an attractive target for tumor therapy. In present study, STAT3 of murine tumor cell lines B16 and MCA-38 was constitutively activated. After treatment with STAT3-decoy ODN, the proliferation of these tumor cells was inhibited and the transcription of IL-10 or IL-6 in tumor cells was down-regulated. These results suggested that STAT3 is a good target candidate, and STAT3-decoy ODN may possibly be used as a strategy for breaking both tumor autocrine network and tumor immunotolerance.

  20. Tumor cells prevent mouse dendritic cell maturation induced by TLR ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idoyaga, Juliana; Moreno, José; Bonifaz, Laura

    2007-08-01

    Tumor cells can evade the immune system through several mechanisms, one of which is to block DC maturation. It has been suggested that signaling via Toll-like receptors (TLR) may be involved in the induction of prophylactic anti-cancer immunity and in the treatment of established tumors. In the present study we found that high numbers of tumor cells interfere with BMDC activation induced by the TLR ligands LPS and poly IC. Tumor cells blocked TLR3- and TLR4-mediated induction of MHCII and the co-stimulatory molecules CD40 and CD86, as well as the cytokines IL-12, TNF-alpha and IL-6. Importantly, tumor cells induced inhibitory molecules (B7-DC, B7-H1 and CD80) on spleen DC in vivo and on BMDC, even in the presence of TLR ligands. Moreover, after a long exposure with tumor cells, purified BMDC were unable to respond to a second challenge with TLR ligands. The failure of tumor exposed-BMDC to express co-stimulatory molecules and cytokines in the presence of TLR ligands has implications for the future development of DC-based cancer immune therapies using TLR ligands as adjuvants for the activation of DC.

  1. Gene expression in tumor cells and stroma in dsRed 4T1 tumors in eGFP-expressing mice with and without enhanced oxygenation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moen Ingrid

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The tumor microenvironment is pivotal in tumor progression. Thus, we aimed to develop a mammary tumor model to elucidate molecular characteristics in the stroma versus the tumor cell compartment by global gene expression. Secondly, since tumor hypoxia influences several aspects of tumor pathophysiology, we hypothesized that hyperoxia might have an inhibitory effect on tumor growth per se. Finally, we aimed to identify differences in gene expression and key molecular mechanisms, both in the native state and following treatment. Methods 4T1 dsRed breast cancer cells were injected into eGFP expressing NOD/SCID mice. Group 1 was exposed to 3 intermittent HBO treatments (Day 1, 4 and 7, Group 2 to 7 daily HBO treatments (both 2.5bar, 100% O2, à 90 min, whereas the controls were exposed to a normal atmosphere. Tumor growth, histology, vascularisation, cell proliferation, cell death and metastasis were assessed. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting was used to separate tumor cells from stromal cells prior to gene expression analysis. Results The purity of sorted cells was verified by fluorescence microscopy. Gene expression profiling demonstrated that highly expressed genes in the untreated tumor stroma included constituents of the extracellular matrix and matrix metalloproteinases. Tumor growth was significantly inhibited by HBO, and the MAPK pathway was found to be significantly reduced. Immunohistochemistry indicated a significantly reduced microvessel density after intermittent HBO, whereas daily HBO did not show a similar effect. The anti-angiogenic response was reflected in the expression trends of angiogenic factors. Conclusions The present in vivo mammary tumor model enabled us to separate tumor and stromal cells, and demonstrated that the two compartments are characterized by distinct gene expressions, both in the native state and following HBO treatments. Furthermore, hyperoxia induced a significant tumor growth

  2. Cell Death Characterization In Tumor Constructs Using Irreversible Electroporation

    OpenAIRE

    Prokop, Katherine Jane

    2013-01-01

    Cell Death Characterization in Tumor Constructs Using Irreversible Electroporation Katherine Jane Prokop ABSTRACT Pancreatic and prostate cancer are both prevalent cancers in the United States with pancreatic being one of the most aggressive of all cancers and prostate cancer being one of the most common, ranking as the number one cancer in men. Treatment of both cancers can be quite challenging as the anatomy of the pancreas and prostate, as well as the development and diagnos...

  3. Tumor vaccine strategies after allogeneic T-cell depleted bone marrow transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferrara James L.M.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Allogeneic bone marrow transplantation is currently restricted to hematological malignancies because of a lack of anti-tumor activity against solid cancers. We have tested a novel treatment strategy to stimulate specific anti-tumor activity against a solid tumor after transplantation by vaccination with irradiated tumor cells engineered to secrete granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor. Using the B16 melanoma model, we found that vaccination elicited potent anti-tumor activity in recipients of syngeneic bone marrow transplantation in a time dependent fashion, and that immune reconstitution was critical for the development of anti-tumor activity. Vaccination did not stimulate anti-tumor immunity after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation because of the post-transplantation immunodeficiency associated with graft-versus-host disease. Remarkably, vaccination was effective in stimulating potent and long-lasting anti-tumor activity in recipients of T cell-depleted allogeneic bone marrow. Thus T cells derived from donor stem cells were able to recognize tumor antigens even though they remained tolerant to host histocompatibility antigens. Donor leukocyte infusion from a donor immunized with the recipient-derived B16 vaccines enhanced clinical activity of tumor vaccines without exacerbating graft-versus-host disease and CD4+ T cells are essential for this enhancement. These results demonstrate that vaccination of both donors and recipients can stimulate potent anti-tumor effects without the induction of graft-versus-host disease, and this strategy has important implications for the treatment of patients with solid malignancies.

  4. Novel Treatment Shrinks Ovarian Tumors in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Researchers have developed a new approach for treating tumors that express mutant versions of the p53 protein, which are present in more than half of all cancers, including an aggressive and common subtype of ovarian cancer.

  5. Treatment Options for Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... carcinoid tumors include the following: Having a family history of multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1) syndrome or neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) syndrome . Having certain conditions that affect the stomach's ...

  6. Treatment Option Overview (Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumors)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... carcinoid tumors include the following: Having a family history of multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1) syndrome or neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) syndrome . Having certain conditions that affect the stomach's ...

  7. Endothelial cell pseudopods and angiogenesis of breast cancer tumors

    OpenAIRE

    Sun LuZhe; Short Nicholas; Cameron Ivan L; Hardman W Elaine

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Background A neoplastic tumor cannot grow beyond a millimeter or so in diameter without recruitment of endothelial cells and new blood vessels to supply nutrition and oxygen for tumor cell survival. This study was designed to investigate formation of new blood vessels within a human growing breast cancer tumor model (MDA MB231 in mammary fat pad of nude female mouse). Once the tumor grew to 35 mm3, it developed a well-vascularized capsule. Histological sections of tumors greater than...

  8. Mutational analysis of circulating tumor cells from colorectal cancer patients and correlation with primary tumor tissue.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Lyberopoulou

    Full Text Available Circulating tumor cells (CTCs provide a non-invasive accessible source of tumor material from patients with cancer. The cellular heterogeneity within CTC populations is of great clinical importance regarding the increasing number of adjuvant treatment options for patients with metastatic carcinomas, in order to eliminate residual disease. Moreover, the molecular profiling of these rare cells might lead to insight on disease progression and therapeutic strategies than simple CTCs counting. In the present study we investigated the feasibility to detect KRAS, BRAF, CD133 and Plastin3 (PLS3 mutations in an enriched CTCs cell suspension from patients with colorectal cancer, with the hypothesis that these genes` mutations are of great importance regarding the generation of CTCs subpopulations. Subsequently, we compared CTCs mutational status with that of the corresponding primary tumor, in order to access the possibility of tumor cells characterization without biopsy. CTCs were detected and isolated from blood drawn from 52 colorectal cancer (CRC patients using a quantum-dot-labelled magnetic immunoassay method. Mutations were detected by PCR-RFLP or allele-specific PCR and confirmed by direct sequencing. In 52 patients, discordance between primary tumor and CTCs was 5.77% for KRAS, 3.85% for BRAF, 11.54% for CD133 rs3130, 7.69% for CD133 rs2286455 and 11.54% for PLS3 rs6643869 mutations. Our results support that DNA mutational analysis of CTCs may enable non-invasive, specific biomarker diagnostics and expand the scope of personalized medicine for cancer patients.

  9. Treatment results in case of advanced tonsillar tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors present 99 patients irradiated for a tonsillar carcinoma. 41 patients were primarily irradiated and 52 patients postoperatively. Radiotherapy was combined with cytostatic chemotherapy in six cases. Most of the cases treated were advanced tumors: 76 patients with T3/T4 tumors. 52% out of the 23 patients with T1/T2 tumors survived five years and 45% ten years; only 26% of the patients with T3 tumors and 15% of those with T4 tumors survived five years. The prognosis was significantly influenced by the lymph node state: whereas 75% of the patients with N0 tumors survived five years, this rate is reduced to 21% in case of lymph node state N3. 22 out of the 34 recurrences were situated in the tumor region, 12 in lymph nodes. 94% of recurrences became evident during the first two years after the end of treatment. (orig.)

  10. Tumor burden talks in cancer treatment with PEGylated liposomal drugs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Yu Lin

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: PEGylated liposomes are important drug carriers that can passively target tumor by enhanced permeability and retention (EPR effect in neoplasm lesions. This study demonstrated that tumor burden determines the tumor uptake, and also the tumor response, in cancer treatment with PEGylated liposomal drugs in a C26/tk-luc colon carcinoma-bearing mouse model. METHODS: Empty PEGylated liposomes (NanoX and those encapsulated with VNB (NanoVNB were labeled with In-111 to obtain InNanoX and InVNBL in high labeling yield and radiochemical purity (all >90%. BALB/c mice bearing either small (58.4±8.0 mm(3 or large (102.4±22.0 mm(3 C26/tk-luc tumors in the right dorsal flank were intravenously administered with NanoVNB, InNanoX, InVNBL, or NanoX as a control, every 7 days for 3 times. The therapeutic efficacy was evaluated by body weight loss, tumor growth inhibition (using calipers and bioluminescence imaging and survival fraction. The scintigraphic imaging of tumor mouse was performed during and after treatment. RESULTS: The biodistribution study of InVNBL revealed a clear inverse correlation (r (2 = 0.9336 between the tumor uptake and the tumor mass ranged from 27.6 to 623.9 mg. All three liposomal drugs showed better therapeutic efficacy in small-tumor mice than in large-tumor mice. Tumor-bearing mice treated with InVNBL (a combination drug showed the highest tumor growth inhibition rate and survival fraction compared to those treated with NanoVNB (chemodrug only and InNanoX (radionuclide only. Specific tumor targeting and significantly increased tumor uptake after periodical treatment with InVNBL were evidenced by scintigraphic imaging, especially in mice bearing small tumors. CONCLUSION: The significant differences in the outcomes of cancer treatment and molecular imaging between animals bearing small and large tumors revealed that tumor burden is a critical and discriminative factor in cancer therapy using PEGylated liposomal drugs.

  11. Single-cell analyses of circulating tumor cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xi-Xi Chen; Fan Bai

    2015-01-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are a population of tumor cells mediating metastasis, which results in most of the cancer related deaths. hTe number of CTCs in the peripheral blood of patients is rare, and many platforms have been launched for detection and enrichment of CTCs. Enumeration of CTCs has already been used as a prognosis marker predicting the survival rate of cancer patients. Yet CTCs should be more potential. Studies on CTCs at single cell level may help revealing the underlying mechanism of tumorigenesis and metastasis. Though far from developed, this area of study holds much promise in providing new clinical application and deep understanding towards metastasis and cancer development.

  12. Regulatory T Cells in Tumor-Associated Tertiary Lymphoid Structures Suppress Anti-tumor T Cell Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Nikhil S; Akama-Garren, Elliot H; Lu, Yisi; Lee, Da-Yae; Chang, Gregory P; Li, Amy; DuPage, Michel; Tammela, Tuomas; Kerper, Natanya R; Farago, Anna F; Robbins, Rebecca; Crowley, Denise M; Bronson, Roderick T; Jacks, Tyler

    2015-09-15

    Infiltration of regulatory T (Treg) cells into many tumor types correlates with poor patient prognoses. However, mechanisms of intratumoral Treg cell function remain to be elucidated. We investigated Treg cell function in a genetically engineered mouse model of lung adenocarcinoma and found that Treg cells suppressed anti-tumor responses in tumor-associated tertiary lymphoid structures (TA-TLSs). TA-TLSs have been described in human lung cancers, but their function remains to be determined. TLSs in this model were spatially associated with >90% of tumors and facilitated interactions between T cells and tumor-antigen-presenting dendritic cells (DCs). Costimulatory ligand expression by DCs and T cell proliferation rates increased in TA-TLSs upon Treg cell depletion, leading to tumor destruction. Thus, we propose that Treg cells in TA-TLSs can inhibit endogenous immune responses against tumors, and targeting these cells might provide therapeutic benefit for cancer patients.

  13. Dendritic cell-tumor cell hybrids and immunotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cathelin, Dominique; Nicolas, Alexandra; Bouchot, André;

    2011-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are professional antigen-presenting cells currently being used as a cellular adjuvant in cancer immunotherapy strategies. Unfortunately, DC-based vaccines have not demonstrated spectacular clinical results. DC loading with tumor antigens and DC differentiation and activation...

  14. Therapeutic Potential of Curcumin for the Treatment of Brain Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neil V. Klinger

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Brain malignancies currently carry a poor prognosis despite the current multimodal standard of care that includes surgical resection and adjuvant chemotherapy and radiation. As new therapies are desperately needed, naturally occurring chemical compounds have been studied for their potential chemotherapeutic benefits and low toxicity profile. Curcumin, found in the rhizome of turmeric, has extensive therapeutic promise via its antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and antiproliferative properties. Preclinical in vitro and in vivo data have shown it to be an effective treatment for brain tumors including glioblastoma multiforme. These effects are potentiated by curcumin’s ability to induce G2/M cell cycle arrest, activation of apoptotic pathways, induction of autophagy, disruption of molecular signaling, inhibition of invasion, and metastasis and by increasing the efficacy of existing chemotherapeutics. Further, clinical data suggest that it has low toxicity in humans even at large doses. Curcumin is a promising nutraceutical compound that should be evaluated in clinical trials for the treatment of human brain tumors.

  15. Radiosensitizing effect of nitric oxide in tumor cells and experimental tumors irradiated with gamma rays and proton beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nitric oxide (NO) has been reported to be a radiosensitizer of mammalian cells under hypoxic conditions. In a previous study, we demonstrated an enhancement in radiation response induced by NO in mouse tumor cells under aerobic conditions, with an increasing effect as a function of malignancy. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of NO in tumor cells and in experimental tumors irradiated with γ rays and proton beams. Irradiations were performed with a 137Cs γ source and with proton beams generated by the TANDAR accelerator. Tumor cells were treated with the NO donor DETA-NO and the sensitizer enhancement ratio (SER) was calculated using the α parameter of the survival curve fitted to the linear-quadratic model. Tumor cells irradiated with protons were radio sensitized by DETA-NO only in the more malignant cells irradiated with low LET protons (2.69±0.08 keV/μm). For higher LET protons there were no radiosensitizing effect. For human tumor cells pre-treated with DETA-NO and irradiated with γ rays, a significantly greater effect was demonstrated in the malignant cells (MCF-7) as compared with the near normal cells (HBL-100). Moreover, a significant decrease in tumor growth was demonstrated in mice pre-treated with the NO donor spermine and irradiated with γ rays and low LET protons as compared with mice irradiated without pre-treatment with the NO donor. In conclusion, we demonstrated a differential effect of NO as a radiosensitizer of malignant cells, both with γ rays and low LET protons. This selectivity, coupled to the in vivo inhibition of tumor growth, is of great interest for the potential use of NO releasing agents in radiotherapy. (author)

  16. Interleukin 2 expression by tumor cells alters both the immune response and the tumor microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J; Fenton, B M; Koch, C J; Frelinger, J G; Lord, E M

    1998-04-01

    Microenvironmental conditions within solid tumors can have marked effects on the growth of the tumors and their response to therapies. The disorganized growth of tumors and their attendant vascular systems tends to result in areas of the tumors that are deficient in oxygen (hypoxic). Cells within these hypoxic areas are more resistant to conventional therapies such as radiation and chemotherapy. Here, we examine the hypoxic state of EMT6 mouse mammary tumors and the location of host cells within the different areas of the tumors to determine whether such microenvironmental conditions might also affect their ability to be recognized by the immune system. Hypoxia within tumors was quantified by flow cytometry and visualized by immunohistochemistry using a monoclonal antibody (ELK3-51) against cellular adducts of 2-(2-nitro-1H-imidazol-1-yl)-N-(2,2,3,3,3-pentafluoropropyl)acetam ide (EF5), a nitroimidazole compound that binds selectively to hypoxic cells. Thy-1+ cells, quantified using a monoclonal antibody, were found only in the well-oxygenated areas. The location of these Thy-1+ cells was also examined in EMT6 tumors that had been transfected with the gene for interleukin-2 (IL-2) because these tumors contain greatly increased numbers of host cells. Surprisingly, we found that IL-2-transfected tumors had significantly decreased hypoxia compared to parental tumors. Furthermore, using the fluorescent dye Hoechst 33342, an in vivo marker of perfused vessels, combined with immunochemical staining of PECAM-1 (CD31) as a marker of tumor vasculature, we found increased vascularization in the IL-2-transfected tumors. Thus, expression of IL-2 at the site of tumor growth may enhance tumor immunity not only by inducing the generation of tumor-reactive CTLs but also by allowing increased infiltration of activated T cells into the tumors. PMID:9537251

  17. Germ Cell Tumors in Adolescents and Young Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calaminus, Gabriele; Joffe, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Germ cell tumors (GCTs) represent a group of biologically complex malignancies that affect patients at different sites within the body and at different ages. The varying nature of these tumors reflects their cell of origin which is the primordial germ cell, which normally gives rise to ovarian and testicular egg and sperm producing cells. These cells retain an ability to give rise to all types of human tissues, and this is illustrated by the different kinds of GCTs that occur. In adolescent and young adult (AYA) patients, GCTs predominantly present as testicular, ovarian or mediastinal primary GCTs, and represent some of the most complex therapeutic challenges within any AYA practice. The varying types of GCTs, defined by primary site and/or age at presentation, can look very similar microscopically. However, there is growing evidence that they may have different molecular characteristics, different biology and different requirements for curative treatments. Whilst in adult testicular GCTs there is evidence for an environmental cause during fetal development and a genetic component, these causative factors are much less well understood in other GCTs. GCTs are some of the most curable cancers in adults, but some patients exhibit resistance to standard treatments. Because of this, today's clinical research is directed at understanding how to best utilize toxic therapies and promote healthy survivorship. This chapter explores the biology, behavior and treatment of GCTs and discusses how the AYA group of GCTs may hold some of the keys to understanding fundamental unanswered questions of biological variance and curability in GCTs. PMID:27595361

  18. Tumor and Stromal-Based Contributions to Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma Invasion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Markwell, Steven M.; Weed, Scott A., E-mail: scweed@hsc.wvu.edu [Department of Neurobiology and Anatomy, Program in Cancer Cell Biology, Mary Babb Randolph Cancer Center, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States)

    2015-02-27

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is typically diagnosed at advanced stages with evident loco-regional and/or distal metastases. The prevalence of metastatic lesions directly correlates with poor patient outcome, resulting in high patient mortality rates following metastatic development. The progression to metastatic disease requires changes not only in the carcinoma cells, but also in the surrounding stromal cells and tumor microenvironment. Within the microenvironment, acellular contributions from the surrounding extracellular matrix, along with contributions from various infiltrating immune cells, tumor associated fibroblasts, and endothelial cells facilitate the spread of tumor cells from the primary site to the rest of the body. Thus far, most attempts to limit metastatic spread through therapeutic intervention have failed to show patient benefit in clinic trails. The goal of this review is highlight the complexity of invasion-promoting interactions in the HNSCC tumor microenvironment, focusing on contributions from tumor and stromal cells in order to assist future therapeutic development and patient treatment.

  19. Giant cell tumor of the spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozaki, Toshifumi; Liljenqvist, Ulf; Halm, Henry; Hillmann, Axel; Gosheger, Georg; Winkelmann, Winfried

    2002-08-01

    Six patients with giant cell tumor of the spine had surgery between 1981 and 1995. Three lesions were located in the scrum, two lesions were in the thoracic spine, and one lesion was in the lumbar spine. Preoperatively, all patients had local pain and neurologic symptoms. Two patients had cement implanted after curettage or intralesional excision of the sacral tumor; one patient had a local relapse. After the second curettage and cement implantation, the tumor was controlled. One patient with a sacral lesion had marginal excision and spondylodesis; no relapse developed. Two patients with thoracic lesions had planned marginal excision and spondylodesis; the margins finally became intralesional, but no relapse developed. One patient with a lumbar lesion had incomplete removal of the tumor and received postoperative irradiation. At the final followup (median, 69 months), five of six patients were disease-free and one patient died of disease progression. Two of the five surviving patients had pain after standing or neurologic problems. Although some contamination occurred, planning a marginal excision of the lesion seems beneficial for vertebral lesions above the sacrum. Total sacrectomy of a sacral lesion seems to be too invasive when cement implantation can control the lesion. PMID:12151896

  20. Colon tumor cells grown in NASA Bioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    These photos compare the results of colon carcinoma cells grown in a NASA Bioreactor flown on the STS-70 Space Shuttle in 1995 flight and ground control experiments. The cells grown in microgravity (left) have aggregated to form masses that are larger and more similar to tissue found in the body than the cells cultured on the ground (right). The principal investigator is Milburn Jessup of the University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center. The NASA Bioreactor provides a low turbulence culture environment which promotes the formation of large, three-dimensional cell clusters. Due to their high level of cellular organization and specialization, samples constructed in the bioreactor more closely resemble the original tumor or tissue found in the body. NASA-sponsored bioreactor research has been instrumental in helping scientists to better understand normal and cancerous tissue development. In cooperation with the medical community, the bioreactor design is being used to prepare better models of human colon, prostate, breast and ovarian tumors. Cartilage, bone marrow, heart muscle, skeletal muscle, pancreatic islet cells, liver and kidney are just a few of the normal tissues being cultured in rotating bioreactors by investigators. Cell constructs grown in a rotating bioreactor on Earth (left) eventually become too large to stay suspended in the nutrient media. In the microgravity of orbit, the cells stay suspended. Rotation then is needed for gentle stirring to replenish the media around the cells. The work is sponsored by NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research. The bioreactor is managed by the Biotechnology Cell Science Program at NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC). Credit: NASA and University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center.

  1. Human breast tumor cells are more resistant to cardiac glycoside toxicity than non-tumorigenic breast cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca J Clifford

    Full Text Available Cardiotonic steroids (CTS, specific inhibitors of Na,K-ATPase activity, have been widely used for treating cardiac insufficiency. Recent studies suggest that low levels of endogenous CTS do not inhibit Na,K-ATPase activity but play a role in regulating blood pressure, inducing cellular kinase activity, and promoting cell viability. Higher CTS concentrations inhibit Na,K-ATPase activity and can induce reactive oxygen species, growth arrest, and cell death. CTS are being considered as potential novel therapies in cancer treatment, as they have been shown to limit tumor cell growth. However, there is a lack of information on the relative toxicity of tumor cells and comparable non-tumor cells. We have investigated the effects of CTS compounds, ouabain, digitoxin, and bufalin, on cell growth and survival in cell lines exhibiting the full spectrum of non-cancerous to malignant phenotypes. We show that CTS inhibit membrane Na,K-ATPase activity equally well in all cell lines tested regardless of metastatic potential. In contrast, the cellular responses to the drugs are different in non-tumor and tumor cells. Ouabain causes greater inhibition of proliferation and more extensive apoptosis in non-tumor breast cells compared to malignant or oncogene-transfected cells. In tumor cells, the effects of ouabain are accompanied by activation of anti-apoptotic ERK1/2. However, ERK1/2 or Src inhibition does not sensitize tumor cells to CTS cytotoxicity, suggesting that other mechanisms provide protection to the tumor cells. Reduced CTS-sensitivity in breast tumor cells compared to non-tumor cells indicates that CTS are not good candidates as cancer therapies.

  2. Exosomes released from Mycoplasma infected tumor cells activate inhibitory B cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chenjie Yang

    Full Text Available Mycoplasmas cause numerous human diseases and are common opportunistic pathogens in cancer patients and immunocompromised individuals. Mycoplasma infection elicits various host immune responses. Here we demonstrate that mycoplasma-infected tumor cells release exosomes (myco+ exosomes that specifically activate splenic B cells and induce splenocytes cytokine production. Induction of cytokines, including the proinflammatory IFN-γ and the anti-inflammatory IL-10, was largely dependent on the presence of B cells. B cells were the major IL-10 producers. In splenocytes from B cell deficient μMT mice, induction of IFN-γ+ T cells by myco+ exosomes was greatly increased compared with wild type splenocytes. In addition, anti-CD3-stimulated T cell proliferation was greatly inhibited in the presence of myco+ exosome-treated B cells. Also, anti-CD3-stimulated T cell signaling was impaired by myco+ exosome treatment. Proteomic analysis identified mycoplasma proteins in exosomes that potentially contribute to the effects. Our results demonstrate that mycoplasma-infected tumor cells release exosomes carrying mycoplasma components that preferentially activate B cells, which in turn, are able to inhibit T cell activity. These results suggest that mycoplasmas infecting tumor cells can exploit the exosome pathway to disseminate their own components and modulate the activity of immune cells, in particular, activate B cells with inhibitory activity.

  3. Hypoxia-directed and activated theranostic agent: Imaging and treatment of solid tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Rajesh; Kim, Eun-Joong; Han, Jiyou; Lee, Hyunseung; Shin, Weon Sup; Kim, Hyun Min; Bhuniya, Sankarprasad; Kim, Jong Seung; Hong, Kwan Soo

    2016-10-01

    Hypoxia, a distinguished feature of various solid tumors, has been considered as a key marker for tumor progression. Inadequate vasculature and high interstitial pressures result in relatively poor drug delivery to these tumors. Herein, we developed an antitumor theranostic agent, 4, which is activated in hypoxic conditions and can be used for the diagnosis and treatment of solid tumors. Compound 4, bearing biotin, a tumor-targeting unit, and SN38, an anticancer drug, proved to be an effective theranostic agent for solid tumors. SN38 plays a dual role: as an anticancer drug for therapy and as a fluorophore for diagnosis, thus avoids an extra fluorophore and limits cytotoxicity. Compound 4, activated in the hypoxic environment, showed high therapeutic activity in A549 and HeLa cells and spheroids. In vivo imaging of solid tumors confirmed the tumor-specific localization, deep tissue penetration and activation of compound 4, as well as the production of a strong anticancer effect through the inhibition of tumor growth in a xenograft mouse model validating it as a promising strategy for the treatment of solid tumors.

  4. GRANULAR CELL TUMOR OF BREAST (CYTOLOGICAL DIAGNOSIS CONFIRMED BY HISTOPATHOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Divvya

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Granular cell tumor is a tumor derived from Schwann cells of peripheral nerves and it can occur throughout the body. About 5% of granular cell tumors occur in breast and are mostly benign in nature. We report a case of 30 year old female who presented with a swelling in right breast which on histo pathological examination revealed features consistent with granular cell tumor. This case is highlighted to reveal the importance of histopathology in differentiating granular cell tumor from carcinoma breast which is difficult based on clinical, radiological and cytological examination alone.

  5. Granular Cell Tumor of the Toe: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico Tamborini

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Granular cell tumor is a rare tumor of unknown etiology that more commonly affects the oral cavity but can also occur at other sites. The majorities of granular cell tumors are benign and present as a singular dermal nodule. We discuss a case of granular cell tumor of the fourth toe in a 54-year-old patient that was treated with conservative surgery, instead of amputation, and reconstruction with a dermal regeneration template.

  6. Granular Cell Tumor of the Toe: A Case Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamborini, Federico; Cherubino, Mario; Scamoni, Stefano; Valdatta, Luigi A.

    2010-01-01

    Granular cell tumor is a rare tumor of unknown etiology that more commonly affects the oral cavity but can also occur at other sites. The majorities of granular cell tumors are benign and present as a singular dermal nodule. We discuss a case of granular cell tumor of the fourth toe in a 54-year-old patient that was treated with conservative surgery, instead of amputation, and reconstruction with a dermal regeneration template. PMID:20862204

  7. Astrocytes Directly Influence Tumor Cell Invasion and Metastasis In Vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Ling; Cossette, Stephanie M.; Rarick, Kevin R.; Gershan, Jill; Michael B Dwinell; Harder, David R.; Ramchandran, Ramani

    2013-01-01

    Brain metastasis is a defining component of tumor pathophysiology, and the underlying mechanisms responsible for this phenomenon are not well understood. Current dogma is that tumor cells stimulate and activate astrocytes, and this mutual relationship is critical for tumor cell sustenance in the brain. Here, we provide evidence that primary rat neonatal and adult astrocytes secrete factors that proactively induced human lung and breast tumor cell invasion and metastasis capabilities. Among wh...

  8. Biology and Molecular Markers of Malignant Gonadal Germ Cell Tumors

    OpenAIRE

    Salonen, Jonna

    2009-01-01

    Germ cell tumors occur both in the gonads of both sexes and in extra-gonadal sites during adoles-cence and early adulthood. Malignant ovarian germ cell tumors are rare neoplasms accounting for less than 5% of all cases of ovarian malignancy. In contrast, testicular cancer is the most common malignancy among young males. Most of patients survive the disease. Prognostic factors of gonadal germ cell tumors include histology, clinical stage, size of the primary tumor and residua, and levels of tu...

  9. Induction of myeloid-derived suppressor cells by tumor exosomes

    OpenAIRE

    Xiang, Xiaoyu; Poliakov, Anton; Liu, Cunren; Liu, Yuelong; Deng, Zhong-Bin; wang, Jianhua; Cheng, Ziqiang; Shah, Spandan V.; Wang, Gui-Jun; Zhang, Liming; Grizzle, William E.; Mobley, Jim; Zhang, Huang-Ge

    2009-01-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) promote tumor progression. The mechanisms of MDSC development during tumor growth remain unknown. Tumor exosomes (T-exosomes) have been implicated to play a role in immune regulation, however the role of exosomes in the induction of MDSCs is unclear. Our previous work demonstrated that exosomes isolated from tumor cells are taken up by bone marrow myeloid cells. Here, we extend those findings showing that exosomes isolated from T-exosomes switch the di...

  10. Evaluation of Circulating Tumor Cells and Related Events as Prognostic Factors and Surrogate Biomarkers in Advanced NSCLC Patients Receiving First-Line Systemic Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muinelo-Romay, Laura; Vieito, Maria; Abalo, Alicia; Nocelo, Marta Alonso; Barón, Francisco; Anido, Urbano; Brozos, Elena; Vázquez, Francisca; Aguín, Santiago; Abal, Miguel; López, Rafael López

    2014-01-01

    In the present study we investigated the prognostic value of Circulating Tumour Cells (CTC) and their utility for therapy monitoring in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). A total of 43 patients newly diagnosed with NSCLC were prospectively enrolled. Blood samples were obtained before the 1st, 2nd and 5th cycles of chemotherapy and analyzed using CellSearch technology. Both CTC and CTC-related objects (not morphological standard or broken epithelial cells) were counted. At baseline 18 (41.9%) patients were positive for intact CTC count and 10 (23.2%) of them had ≥5 CTC, while CK positive events were found in 79.1% of patients. The group of patients with CTC ³5 at baseline presented worse PFS and OS than those with <5 CTC (p = 0.034 and p = 0.008, respectively). Additionally, high levels of total CK positive events were associated with poor prognosis in the group of patients with <5 CTC. Regarding therapy monitoring, patients presenting increased levels of CTC during the treatment demonstrated lower OS and PFS rates. All these data supported the value of CTC as a prognostic biomarker and as a surrogate indicator of chemotherapy effectiveness in advanced NSCLC patients, with the additional value of analyzing other "objects" such as apoptotic CTC or CK fragments to guide the clinical management of these patients.

  11. Evaluation of Circulating Tumor Cells and Related Events as Prognostic Factors and Surrogate Biomarkers in Advanced NSCLC Patients Receiving First-Line Systemic Treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muinelo-Romay, Laura; Vieito, Maria; Abalo, Alicia; Alonso Nocelo, Marta; Barón, Francisco; Anido, Urbano; Brozos, Elena; Vázquez, Francisca; Aguín, Santiago; Abal, Miguel; López López, Rafael, E-mail: rafael.lopez.lopez@sergas.es [Translational Medical Oncology, Health Research Institute of Santiago (IDIS), Complexo Hospitalario Universitario de Santiago de Compostela (SERGAS), Trav. Choupana s/n 15706 Santiago de Compostela (Spain)

    2014-01-21

    In the present study we investigated the prognostic value of Circulating Tumour Cells (CTC) and their utility for therapy monitoring in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). A total of 43 patients newly diagnosed with NSCLC were prospectively enrolled. Blood samples were obtained before the 1st, 2nd and 5th cycles of chemotherapy and analyzed using CellSearch technology. Both CTC and CTC-related objects (not morphological standard or broken epithelial cells) were counted. At baseline 18 (41.9%) patients were positive for intact CTC count and 10 (23.2%) of them had ≥5 CTC, while CK positive events were found in 79.1% of patients. The group of patients with CTC ≥5 at baseline presented worse PFS and OS than those with <5 CTC (p = 0.034 and p = 0.008, respectively). Additionally, high levels of total CK positive events were associated with poor prognosis in the group of patients with <5 CTC. Regarding therapy monitoring, patients presenting increased levels of CTC during the treatment demonstrated lower OS and PFS rates. All these data supported the value of CTC as a prognostic biomarker and as a surrogate indicator of chemotherapy effectiveness in advanced NSCLC patients, with the additional value of analyzing other “objects” such as apoptotic CTC or CK fragments to guide the clinical management of these patients.

  12. Evaluation of Circulating Tumor Cells and Related Events as Prognostic Factors and Surrogate Biomarkers in Advanced NSCLC Patients Receiving First-Line Systemic Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Muinelo-Romay

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present study we investigated the prognostic value of Circulating Tumour Cells (CTC and their utility for therapy monitoring in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. A total of 43 patients newly diagnosed with NSCLC were prospectively enrolled. Blood samples were obtained before the 1st, 2nd and 5th cycles of chemotherapy and analyzed using CellSearch technology. Both CTC and CTC-related objects (not morphological standard or broken epithelial cells were counted. At baseline 18 (41.9% patients were positive for intact CTC count and 10 (23.2% of them had ≥5 CTC, while CK positive events were found in 79.1% of patients. The group of patients with CTC ³5 at baseline presented worse PFS and OS than those with <5 CTC (p = 0.034 and p = 0.008, respectively. Additionally, high levels of total CK positive events were associated with poor prognosis in the group of patients with <5 CTC. Regarding therapy monitoring, patients presenting increased levels of CTC during the treatment demonstrated lower OS and PFS rates. All these data supported the value of CTC as a prognostic biomarker and as a surrogate indicator of chemotherapy effectiveness in advanced NSCLC patients, with the additional value of analyzing other “objects” such as apoptotic CTC or CK fragments to guide the clinical management of these patients.

  13. The scaffolding protein NHERF1 sensitizes EGFR-dependent tumor growth, motility and invadopodia function to gefitinib treatment in breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellizzi, Antonia; Greco, Maria Raffaella; Rubino, Rosa; Paradiso, Angelo; Forciniti, Stefania; Zeeberg, Katrine; Cardone, Rosa Angela; Reshkin, Stephan Joel

    2015-03-01

    Triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) patients cannot be treated with endocrine therapy or targeted therapies due to lack of related receptors. These patients overexpress the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), but are resistant to tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) and anti-EGFR therapies. Mechanisms suggested for resistance to TKIs include EGFR independence, mutations and alterations in EGFR and in its downstream signalling pathways. Ligand-induced endocytosis and degradation of EGFR play important roles in the downregulation of the EGFR signal suggesting that its activity could be regulated by targeting its trafficking. Evidence in normal cells showing that the scaffolding protein Na+/H+ exchanger regulatory factor 1 (NHERF1) can associate with EGFR to regulate its trafficking, led us to hypothesize that NHERF1 expression levels could regulate EGFR trafficking and functional expression in TNBC cells and, in this way, modulate its role in progression and response to treatment. We investigated the subcellular localization of NHERF1 and its interaction with EGFR in a metastatic basal like TNBC cell model, MDA-MB‑231, and the role of forced NHERF1 overexpression and/or stimulation with EGF on the sensitivity to EGFR specific TKI treatment with gefitinib. Stimulation with EGF induces an interaction of NHERF1 with EGFR to regulate its localization, degradation and function. NHERF1 overexpression is sufficient to drive its interaction with EGFR in non-stimulated conditions, inhibits EGFR degradation and increases its retention time in the plasma membrane. Importantly, NHERF1 overexpression strongly sensitized the cell to the pharmacological inhibition by gefitinib of EGFR-driven growth, motility and invadopodia-dependent ECM proteolysis. The further determination of how the NHERF1‑EGFR interaction is regulated may improve our understanding of TNBC resistance to the action of existing anticancer drugs.

  14. Tumor-altered dendritic cell function: implications for anti-tumor immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristian Michael Hargadon

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells are key regulators of both innate and adaptive immunity, and the array of immunoregulatory functions exhibited by these cells is dictated by their differentiation, maturation, and activation status. Although a major role for these cells in the induction of immunity to pathogens has long been appreciated, data accumulated over the last several years has demonstrated that DC are also critical regulators of anti-tumor immune responses. However, despite the potential for stimulation of robust anti-tumor immunity by DC, tumor-altered DC function has been observed in many cancer patients and tumor-bearing animals and is often associated with tumor immune escape. Such dysfunction has significant implications for both the induction of natural anti-tumor immune responses as well as the efficacy of immunotherapeutic strategies that target endogenous DC in situ or that employ exogenous DC as part of anti-cancer immunization maneuvers. In this review, the major types of tumor-altered DC function will be described, with emphasis on recent insights into the mechanistic bases for the inhibition of DC differentiation from hematopoietic precursors, the altered programming of DC precursors to differentiate into myeloid-derived suppressor cells or tumor-associated macrophages, the suppression of DC maturation and activation, and the induction of immunoregulatory DC by tumors, tumor-derived factors, and tumor-associated cells within the milieu of the tumor microenvironment. The impact of these tumor-altered cells on the quality of the overall anti-tumor immune response will also be discussed. Finally, this review will also highlight questions concerning tumor-altered DC function that remain unanswered, and it will address factors that have limited advances in the study of this phenomenon in order to focus future research efforts in the field on identifying strategies for interfering with tumor-associated DC dysfunction and improving DC-mediated anti-tumor

  15. Standard-Dose Combination Chemotherapy or High-Dose Combination Chemotherapy and Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Germ Cell Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-26

    Germ Cell Tumor; Teratoma; Choriocarcinoma; Germinoma; Mixed Germ Cell Tumor; Yolk Sac Tumor; Childhood Teratoma; Malignant Germ Cell Neoplasm; Extragonadal Seminoma; Non-seminomatous Germ Cell Tumor; Seminoma

  16. Cardiac tumors in a tertiary care cancer hospital: clinical features, echocardiographic findings, treatment and outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Swafford

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac tumors are a rare entity, comprised of tumors with diverse histology and natural history. We report the clinical characteristics, echocardiograhic findings, therapy and outcome of 59 patients with primary and metastatic cardiac tumors. Our institutional echocardiogram data base from 1993 through 2005 was reviewed to identify patients diagnosed with intra-cardiac tumor. A total of 59 patients with cardiac tumors were identified and included in the study. The patient’s characteristics, presenting symptoms, diagnostic tests, location, histology of the tumor, treatment and one year survival rate of this population was collected from the medical records. Of the 59 cardiac tumor cases, 16 (27% were primary cardiac tumors and 43 (73% were secondary cardiac tumors. The most common primary tumor was sarcoma affecting 13 (81% of the 16 cases. Of these, 5 patients were angiosarcoma, 5 unclassified sarcoma, one myxoid sarcoma and 2 maignant fibrous histiocytoma. The mean age at presentation was 41.1 years, and the most common location was right atrium affecting 6 cases (37.5%. The most common symptom of dyspnea was present in 10 (62.5% cases. Eleven (25.6% of the 43 secondary cardiac tumors were metastasis from renal cell carcinoma. The mean age at presentation was 55.4 years. Right atrium was the most frequent location affecting 18 (42% of the 43 patients. The most common presenting symptom was dyspnea in 15 (35% cases. For both primary and secondary tumors, dyspnea was the most common symptom and right atrium was most frequently involved. Sarcoma was the most common primary cardiac tumor while metastasis from renal cell carcinoma was the most common secondary tumor.

  17. Congenital granular cell lesion: A rare tumor of new born

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajesh Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Congenital granular cell tumor (CGCT, or congenital epulis, is an uncommon benign soft tissue lesion that usually arises from the alveolar mucosa of neonates and may cause respiratory and feeding problems. The histogenesis and clinical history of the lesion remains obscure. Treatment involves surgical excision and recurrences are rare. The present report describes a case of congenital granular cell lesion (CGCL in the anterior segment of maxillary alveolar ridge of a 2-month-old female. This lesion was causing feeding problem and was excised under local anesthesia, with no recurrence even after 3 years.

  18. Circulating Tumor Cells, Enumeration and Beyond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian-Mei Hou

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The detection and enumeration of circulating tumor cells (CTCs has shown significant clinical utility with respect to prognosis in breast, colorectal and prostate cancers. Emerging studies show that CTCs can provide pharmacodynamic information to aid therapy decision making. CTCs as a ‘virtual and real-time biopsy’ have clear potential to facilitate exploration of tumor biology, and in particular, the process of metastasis. The challenge of profiling CTC molecular characteristics and generating CTC signatures using current technologies is that they enrich rather than purify CTCs from whole blood; we face the problem of looking for the proverbial ‘needle in the haystack’. This review summarizes the current methods for CTC detection and enumeration, focuses on molecular characterization of CTCs, unveils some aspects of CTC heterogeneity, describes attempts to purify CTCs and scans the horizon for approaches leading to comprehensive dissection of CTC biology.

  19. Circulating Tumor Cells, Enumeration and Beyond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The detection and enumeration of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) has shown significant clinical utility with respect to prognosis in breast, colorectal and prostate cancers. Emerging studies show that CTCs can provide pharmacodynamic information to aid therapy decision making. CTCs as a ‘virtual and real-time biopsy’ have clear potential to facilitate exploration of tumor biology, and in particular, the process of metastasis. The challenge of profiling CTC molecular characteristics and generating CTC signatures using current technologies is that they enrich rather than purify CTCs from whole blood; we face the problem of looking for the proverbial ‘needle in the haystack’. This review summarizes the current methods for CTC detection and enumeration, focuses on molecular characterization of CTCs, unveils some aspects of CTC heterogeneity, describes attempts to purify CTCs and scans the horizon for approaches leading to comprehensive dissection of CTC biology

  20. Radiation therapy for intracranial germ cell tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kato, Shingo; Hayakawa, Kazushige; Tsuchiya, Miwako; Arai, Masahiko; Kazumoto, Tomoko; Niibe, Hideo; Tamura, Masaru

    1988-04-01

    The results of radiation therapy in 31 patients with intracranial germ cell tumors have been analyzed. The five-year survival rates were 70.1 % for germinomas and 38.1 % for teratomas. Three patients with germinoma have since died of spinal seeding. The prophylactic irradiation of the spinal canal has been found effective in protecting spinal seeding, since no relapse of germinoma has been observed in cases that received entire neuraxis iradiation, whereas teratomas and marker (AFP, HCG) positive tumors did not respond favorably to radiation therapy, and the cause of death in these patients has been local failure. Long-term survivors over 3 years after radiation therapy have been determined as having a good quality of life.

  1. Treatment of epidermoid tumors with gamma knife radiosurgery: Case series

    OpenAIRE

    Javier A Jacobo Vasquez; Julio R Fonnegra; Juan C Diez; Andres Fonnegra

    2016-01-01

    Background: Epidermoid tumors (ETs) are benign lesions that are treated mainly by means of surgical resection, with overall good results. External beam radiotherapy is an alternative treatment for those recurrent tumors, in which a second surgery might not be the best choice for the patient. A little information exists about the effectiveness of gamma knife radiosurgery for the treatment of newly diagnosed and recurrent ETs. We present three cases of ETs treated with gamma knife radiosurgery....

  2. Tumor-Induced CD8+ T-Cell Dysfunction in Lung Cancer Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heriberto Prado-Garcia

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide and one of the most common types of cancers. The limited success of chemotherapy and radiotherapy regimes have highlighted the need to develop new therapies like antitumor immunotherapy. CD8+ T-cells represent a major arm of the cell-mediated anti-tumor response and a promising target for developing T-cell-based immunotherapies against lung cancer. Lung tumors, however, have been considered to possess poor immunogenicity; even so, lung tumor-specific CD8+ T-cell clones can be established that possess cytotoxicity against autologous tumor cells. This paper will focus on the alterations induced in CD8+ T-cells by lung cancer. Although memory CD8+ T-cells infiltrate lung tumors, in both tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs and malignant pleural effusions, these cells are dysfunctional and the effector subset is reduced. We propose that chronic presence of lung tumors induces dysfunctions in CD8+ T-cells and sensitizes them to activation-induced cell death, which may be associated with the poor clinical responses observed in immunotherapeutic trials. Getting a deeper knowledge of the evasion mechanisms lung cancer induce in CD8+ T-cells should lead to further understanding of lung cancer biology, overcome tumor evasion mechanisms, and design improved immunotherapeutic treatments for lung cancer.

  3. Isolation of Circulating Tumor Cells by Dielectrophoresis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gascoyne, Peter R. C., E-mail: pgascoyn@mdanderson.org [Department of Imaging Physics Research, The University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center Unit 951, 1515 Holcombe Boulevard, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Shim, Sangjo [Department of Imaging Physics Research, The University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center Unit 951, 1515 Holcombe Boulevard, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Department of Biomedical Engineering, The University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station, C0800, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Present address: Micro & Nanotechnology Laboratory, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, 208 North Wright Street, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States)

    2014-03-12

    Dielectrophoresis (DEP) is an electrokinetic method that allows intrinsic dielectric properties of suspended cells to be exploited for discrimination and separation. It has emerged as a promising method for isolating circulation tumor cells (CTCs) from blood. DEP-isolation of CTCs is independent of cell surface markers. Furthermore, isolated CTCs are viable and can be maintained in culture, suggesting that DEP methods should be more generally applicable than antibody-based approaches. The aim of this article is to review and synthesize for both oncologists and biomedical engineers interested in CTC isolation the pertinent characteristics of DEP and CTCs. The aim is to promote an understanding of the factors involved in realizing DEP-based instruments having both sufficient discrimination and throughput to allow routine analysis of CTCs in clinical practice. The article brings together: (a) the principles of DEP; (b) the biological basis for the dielectric differences between CTCs and blood cells; (c) why such differences are expected to be present for all types of tumors; and (d) instrumentation requirements to process 10 mL blood specimens in less than 1 h to enable routine clinical analysis. The force equilibrium method of dielectrophoretic field-flow fractionation (DEP-FFF) is shown to offer higher discrimination and throughput than earlier DEP trapping methods and to be applicable to clinical studies.

  4. Isolation of Circulating Tumor Cells by Dielectrophoresis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter R. C. Gascoyne

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Dielectrophoresis (DEP is an electrokinetic method that allows intrinsic dielectric properties of suspended cells to be exploited for discrimination and separation. It has emerged as a promising method for isolating circulation tumor cells (CTCs from blood. DEP-isolation of CTCs is independent of cell surface markers. Furthermore, isolated CTCs are viable and can be maintained in culture, suggesting that DEP methods should be more generally applicable than antibody-based approaches. The aim of this article is to review and synthesize for both oncologists and biomedical engineers interested in CTC isolation the pertinent characteristics of DEP and CTCs. The aim is to promote an understanding of the factors involved in realizing DEP-based instruments having both sufficient discrimination and throughput to allow routine analysis of CTCs in clinical practice. The article brings together: (a the principles of DEP; (b the biological basis for the dielectric differences between CTCs and blood cells; (c why such differences are expected to be present for all types of tumors; and (d instrumentation requirements to process 10 mL blood specimens in less than 1 h to enable routine clinical analysis. The force equilibrium method of dielectrophoretic field-flow fractionation (DEP-FFF is shown to offer higher discrimination and throughput than earlier DEP trapping methods and to be applicable to clinical studies.

  5. Intraoperative radiotherapy in the multidisciplinary treatment of pediatric tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    From September 1984 to July 1987, 33 children received intraoperative radiotherapy as part of a multidisciplinary tumor treatment. Their age ranged from 2 to 17 years. Tumors types: Ewing's sarcoma (n=11), osteosarcoma (n=8), soft tissue sarcomas (n=5), Wilms' tumor (n=3), neuroblastoma (n=3), malignant pheochromocytoma (n=1), Hodgkin's disease (n=1), and optic nerve glioma (n=1). In 25 patients the disease was localized while 8 had distant metastases. Intraoperative radiotherapy was used in 26 previously untreated patients as part of a radical treatment program and in 7 cases as an effort to rescue local failures (5 in previously irradiated areas). The intraoperative radiation field included the surgically exposed tumor or tumor bed, and the single doses ranged from 10 to 20 Gy, with 6-20 MeV electrons. Patients with osteosarcoma and recurrent tumor in a previously irradiated area did not receive postoperative external beam radiotherapy. With a median follow-up time of 10 months (1 to 31+months) 24 out of 33 patients are alive without local recurrence and 9 have died from tumor (5 with local disease progression). Intraoperative radiotherapy seems to be a feasible treatment which might promote local control in pediatric tumors. (orig.)

  6. Effects of Low Dose Radiation on Tumor Apoptosis, Cell Cycle and Apoptosis-Related Protein Bcl-2 in Tumor-Bearing Mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YUHongsheng; SONGAiqin; FEIConghe; WANGZhuomin; QIUWensheng

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To study the effects of low dose radiation (LDR) on tumor apoptosis, cell cycle progression and changes of apoptosis-related protein Bcl-2 in tumor-bearing mice. Methods: Male mice of Kunming strain were implanted subcutaneously with S180 sarcoma cells in the left inguen as an in situ experimental animal model. Seven days later, the mice were subjected to 75 mGy whole-body γ-irradiation.At 24 and 48 h after the irradiation, all mice were sacrificed. The tumor sizes were measured, and tumor cell apoptosis and cell cycle progression were analyzed by flow cytometry. The expression of apoptosisrelated protein Bcl-2 and the apoptotic rate of tumor cells were observed by immunohistochemistry and electron microscopy. Results: Tumors grew significantly slower after LDR (P<0.05). The tumor cells were arrested in G1 phrase and the expression of Bcl-2 protein decreased at 24 h. Apoptotic rate of tumor cells was increased significantly at 48 h after LDR (P<0.01). Conclusion: LDR could cause a Gl-phase arrest and increase the apoptosis of tumor cells through the low level of apoptosis-related protein bcl-2 in the tumor-bearing mice. The organized immune function and anti-tumor ability are markedly increased after LDR. Our study provides practical evidence of clinical application to cancer treatment.

  7. SURGICAL TREATMENT AND PROGNOSIS OF BRONCHIAL CARCINOID TUMOR

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张志庸; 李单青; 戈烽; 李泽坚; 孙成孚; 徐乐天; 张士农

    1996-01-01

    In order to understand the effect of surgery in the treatment of the bronchial carcinoid tumor and thefactors affecting prognosis, 18 cases of bronchial carcinoid tumor are presented, including 5 cases withCushing's syndiome. There were Iobectoray in 10, lung wedge resection in 3, excision of intraluminal tumor of bronchus in 3, exploratory thoracotomy in 2 cases.No operation death.Pathological examinstion revealed 14 cases were typical carcinoid tumor and 4 cases were atypical carcinoid tumor.By 2-13 years fol-low-up,3,5 and 10 years survival rate were 82%,78% and 70% respectively.Bronchial carcinoid tumor is often confused microscopic and immunohistochemistry studies.Those patients accompanied with ectopicACTH secretion always have Cushing''s syndrome,resection of tumor can produce good result.Proper operation method depnds on the location of the tumor and patient''s extent of cardiac and pulmonary peserve.Atypical carcinoid tumor had high malignancy and poor prognosis.The size of tumor,lymph node involve ment and adjuvant therapy seem no definite effect on the patients'' survival rate.

  8. Characteristic promoter hypermethylation signatures in male germ cell tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bosl George J

    2002-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human male germ cell tumors (GCTs arise from undifferentiated primordial germ cells (PGCs, a stage in which extensive methylation reprogramming occurs. GCTs exhibit pluripotentality and are highly sensitive to cisplatin therapy. The molecular basis of germ cell (GC transformation, differentiation, and exquisite treatment response is poorly understood. Results To assess the role and mechanism of promoter hypermethylation, we analyzed CpG islands of 21 gene promoters by methylation-specific PCR in seminomatous (SGCT and nonseminomatous (NSGCT GCTs. We found 60% of the NSGCTs demonstrating methylation in one or more gene promoters whereas SGCTs showed a near-absence of methylation, therefore identifying distinct methylation patterns in the two major histologies of GCT. DNA repair genes MGMT, RASSF1A, and BRCA1, and a transcriptional repressor gene HIC1, were frequently methylated in the NSGCTs. The promoter hypermethylation was associated with gene silencing in most methylated genes, and reactivation of gene expression occured upon treatment with 5-Aza-2' deoxycytidine in GCT cell lines. Conclusions Our results, therefore, suggest a potential role for epigenetic modification of critical tumor suppressor genes in pathways relevant to GC transformation, differentiation, and treatment response.

  9. Ovarian tumor-initiating cells display a flexible metabolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Angela S. [Department of Human Nutrition, Foods, and Exercise, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA (United States); Roberts, Paul C. [Biomedical Science and Pathobiology, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA (United States); Frisard, Madlyn I. [Department of Human Nutrition, Foods, and Exercise, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA (United States); Hulver, Matthew W., E-mail: hulvermw@vt.edu [Department of Human Nutrition, Foods, and Exercise, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA (United States); Schmelz, Eva M., E-mail: eschmelz@vt.edu [Department of Human Nutrition, Foods, and Exercise, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA (United States)

    2014-10-15

    An altered metabolism during ovarian cancer progression allows for increased macromolecular synthesis and unrestrained growth. However, the metabolic phenotype of cancer stem or tumor-initiating cells, small tumor cell populations that are able to recapitulate the original tumor, has not been well characterized. In the present study, we compared the metabolic phenotype of the stem cell enriched cell variant, MOSE-L{sub FFLv} (TIC), derived from mouse ovarian surface epithelial (MOSE) cells, to their parental (MOSE-L) and benign precursor (MOSE-E) cells. TICs exhibit a decrease in glucose and fatty acid oxidation with a concomitant increase in lactate secretion. In contrast to MOSE-L cells, TICs can increase their rate of glycolysis to overcome the inhibition of ATP synthase by oligomycin and can increase their oxygen consumption rate to maintain proton motive force when uncoupled, similar to the benign MOSE-E cells. TICs have an increased survival rate under limiting conditions as well as an increased survival rate when treated with AICAR, but exhibit a higher sensitivity to metformin than MOSE-E and MOSE-L cells. Together, our data show that TICs have a distinct metabolic profile that may render them flexible to adapt to the specific conditions of their microenvironment. By better understanding their metabolic phenotype and external environmental conditions that support their survival, treatment interventions can be designed to extend current therapy regimens to eradicate TICs. - Highlights: • Ovarian cancer TICs exhibit a decreased glucose and fatty acid oxidation. • TICs are more glycolytic and have highly active mitochondria. • TICs are more resistant to AICAR but not metformin. • A flexible metabolism allows TICs to adapt to their microenvironment. • This flexibility requires development of specific drugs targeting TIC-specific changes to prevent recurrent TIC outgrowth.

  10. Bioluminescence-Based Tumor Quantification Method for Monitoring Tumor Progression and Treatment Effects in Mouse Lymphoma Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosette, Jeremie; Ben Abdelwahed, Rym; Donnou-Triffault, Sabrina; Sautès-Fridman, Catherine; Flaud, Patrice; Fisson, Sylvain

    2016-01-01

    Although bioluminescence imaging (BLI) shows promise for monitoring tumor burden in animal models of cancer, these analyses remain mostly qualitative. Here we describe a method for bioluminescence imaging to obtain a semi-quantitative analysis of tumor burden and treatment response. This method is based on the calculation of a luminoscore, a value that allows comparisons of two animals from the same or different experiments. Current BLI instruments enable the calculation of this luminoscore, which relies mainly on the acquisition conditions (back and front acquisitions) and the drawing of the region of interest (manual markup around the mouse). Using two previously described mouse lymphoma models based on cell engraftment, we show that the luminoscore method can serve as a noninvasive way to verify successful tumor cell inoculation, monitor tumor burden, and evaluate the effects of in situ cancer treatment (CpG-DNA). Finally, we show that this method suits different experimental designs. We suggest that this method be used for early estimates of treatment response in preclinical small-animal studies. PMID:27501019

  11. Bioluminescence-Based Tumor Quantification Method for Monitoring Tumor Progression and Treatment Effects in Mouse Lymphoma Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosette, Jeremie; Ben Abdelwahed, Rym; Donnou-Triffault, Sabrina; Sautès-Fridman, Catherine; Flaud, Patrice; Fisson, Sylvain

    2016-07-07

    Although bioluminescence imaging (BLI) shows promise for monitoring tumor burden in animal models of cancer, these analyses remain mostly qualitative. Here we describe a method for bioluminescence imaging to obtain a semi-quantitative analysis of tumor burden and treatment response. This method is based on the calculation of a luminoscore, a value that allows comparisons of two animals from the same or different experiments. Current BLI instruments enable the calculation of this luminoscore, which relies mainly on the acquisition conditions (back and front acquisitions) and the drawing of the region of interest (manual markup around the mouse). Using two previously described mouse lymphoma models based on cell engraftment, we show that the luminoscore method can serve as a noninvasive way to verify successful tumor cell inoculation, monitor tumor burden, and evaluate the effects of in situ cancer treatment (CpG-DNA). Finally, we show that this method suits different experimental designs. We suggest that this method be used for early estimates of treatment response in preclinical small-animal studies.

  12. Tumor-initiating cells are enriched in CD44(hi population in murine salivary gland tumor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shukun Shen

    Full Text Available Tumor-initiating cells (T-ICs discovered in various tumors have been widely reported. However, T-IC populations in salivary gland tumors have yet to be elucidated. Using the established Pleomorphic Adenoma Gene-1 (Plag1 transgenic mouse model of a salivary gland tumor, we identified CD44(high (CD44(hi tumor cells, characterized by high levels of CD44 cell surface expression, as the T-ICs for pleomorphic adenomas. These CD44(hi tumor cells incorporated 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine (BrdU, at a lower rate than their CD44(negative (CD44(neg counterparts, and also retained BrdU for a long period of time. Cell surface maker analysis revealed that 25% of the CD44(hi tumor cells co-express other cancer stem cell markers such as CD133 and CD117. As few as 500 CD44(hi tumor cells were sufficient to initiate pleomorphic adenomas in one third of the wildtype mice, whereas more than 1×10(4 CD44(neg cells were needed for the same purpose. In NIH 3T3 cells, Plag1 was capable of activating the gene transcription of Egr1, a known upregulator for CD44. Furthermore, deletion of sequence 81-96 in the Egr1 promoter region abolished the effect of Plag1 on Egr1 upregulation. Our results establish the existence of T-ICs in murine salivary gland tumors, and suggest a potential molecular mechanism for CD44 upregulation.

  13. Increased mast cell counts in benign and malignant salivary gland tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaafari-Ashkavandi, Zohreh; Ashraf, Mohammad-Javad

    2014-01-01

    Background and aims. Mast cells are one of the characteristic factors in angiogenesis, growth, and metastatic spread of tumors. The distribution and significance of mast cells in many tumors have been demonstrated. However, few studies have evaluated mast cell infiltration in salivary gland tumors. In this study, mast cell counts were evaluated in benign and malig-nant salivary gland tumors. Materials and methods. This descriptive and cross-sectional study assessed 30 cases of pleomorphic adenoma, 13 cases of adenoid cystic carcinoma, 7 cases of mucoepidermoid carcinoma (diagnosed on the basis of 2005 WHO classifica-tion), with adequate stroma in peritumoral and intratumoral areas, and 10 cases of normal salivary glands. The samples were stained with 5% diluted Giemsa solution and the average stained cell counts were calculated in 10 random microscopic fields in peri- and intra-tumoral areas. Data were analyzed by t-test and Mann-Whitney and Krusskal-Wallis tests. Results. The average mast cell counts increased in the tumors compared to normal salivary glands. There was no signifi-cant difference between benign and malignant tumors and also between different malignant tumors. Infiltration was signifi-cantly denser in peri-tumoral stroma in both tumoral groups (P = 0.001). Minor salivary glands contained significantly more numerous mast cells. Conclusion. Although mast cell counts increased in benign and malignant salivary gland tumors, there were no signifi-cant differences between the tumoral groups. Further studies are suggested to determine the type of these cells which might be useful in the assessment of biological nature of the tumor and its future treatment modality.

  14. Desmoplastic small round cell tumor: postoperative retroperitoneal mass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Colette J; Loeb, David M; Terezakis, Stephanie A

    2016-09-01

    We describe the case of a 14-year-old boy who presented with a large, 17.6-cm retroperitoneal mass, along with multiple metastases, and was diagnosed with desmoplastic small round cell tumor. After initial chemotherapy, he underwent gross total resection with a positive margin. On postoperative radiation planning computed tomography, a 6.8-cm heterogeneous mass was noted in the surgical bed. Given the tumor's aggressive nature and positive surgical margins, there was real concern for recurrent disease. Further evaluation with magnetic resonance imaging elucidated that the mass consisted of simple fluid and fat, without contrast enhancement, suggesting a postoperative fluid collection. He was able to continue with adjuvant treatment as planned. This case example illustrates that even large postoperative heterogeneous masses may still be related to postoperative fluid collection in patients with aggressive tumor. However, it is important to rule out recurrent disease before starting adjuvant therapy given improved outcomes with gross total resection in desmoplastic small round cell tumor. PMID:27594960

  15. Resection arthrodesis for giant cell tumors around the knee

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kapoor Sudhir

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Giant cell tumors (GCTs of bone are aggressive benign tumors. Wide resection is reserved for a small subset of patients with biologically more aggressive, recurrent and extensive tumors. As the patients affected with GCT are young or middle-aged adults with a normal life expectancy, arthrodesis is an attractive option for reconstruction in these patients. Materials and Methods: Thirty-six patients of mean age 33.1 years with Campanacci Grade III giant cell tumors around the knee (20 distal femoral and 16 proximal tibial were treated with wide resection and arthrodesis from January 1996 through January 2006. Arthrodesis was performed using plating with free fibular graft (n = 18, IM nail with free fibular graft (n = 8 and IM nail combined with ring fixator using bone transport (n = 10. Results: Fusion after the first surgery was achieved in 77.7%, 75% and 90% of the patients in the three groups respectively. Local recurrence was seen in two patients and repeat surgery for nonunion/ graft fracture had to be done in four patients and two patients in the plating and nailing groups respectively. Conclusion: Wide resection and arthrodesis in aggressive GCTs around the knee is a good treatment option. IM nail combined with a ring fixator seems to be a good method of arthrodesis with high fusion rates, least shortening and early rehabilitation.

  16. Superficial urinary bladder tumors treatment results: A 10-year experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanković Jablan

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. The most common urinary bladder tumors are superficial tumors. Due to their tension to relapse and progress towards deeper layers after surgical therapy, an adequate therapy significantly contributed to the improvement of the results of urinary bladder tumors treatment. Staging and gradus of the tumor, presence of the carcinoma in situ (CIS or relapses significantly influenced the choice of the therapy. The aim of this study was to ascertain the effectiveness of the intravesicelly applied BCG (Bacille Colmette - Guerin vaccine or chemiotherapy in the prevention of the relapses and further progression of superficial urinary bladder tumors. Methods. All of the diagnosed superficial tumors of bladder were removed by transurethral resection (TUR. After receiving the patohistological finding they were subjected to adjuvant therapy, immune BCG vaccine or chemiotherapy (epirubicin, doxorubicin, mitomycin-C. The third group did not accept adjuvant therapy, but had regularly scheduled cystoscopic controls. The appearance of relapses, progression of stage and grades of the tumor, as well as possible unwanted effects of adjuvant therapy were registered. Results. The applied immunotherapy (BCG influenced decreased tumor relapses (7% and statistically important difference between patients who had taken adjuvant chemotherapy (relapses 18.4% and those without this therapy was acknowledged. Grades of tumor did not show statistically significant difference on tumor relapse. A significantly longer period of time in the appearance of tumor relapse after BCG (29.33 months, had significant importance comparing to chemio (9.44 months or non-taken adjuvant therapy (9.84 months. Very small number of unwanted effects suggested an obligatory undertaking adjuvant therapy after TUR of superficial tumors. Conclusion. A significant decrease of relapses as well as avoidance of further progression of urinary bladder tumors, has introduced adjuvant therapy in

  17. Stereotactic interstitial brachytherapy for the treatment of oligodendroglial brain tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We evaluated the treatment of oligodendroglial brain tumors with interstitial brachytherapy (IBT) using 125iodine seeds (125I) and analyzed prognostic factors. Between January 1991 and December 2010, 63 patients (median age 43.3 years, range 20.8-63.4 years) suffering from oligodendroglial brain tumors were treated with 125I IBT either as primary, adjuvantly after incomplete resection, or as salvage therapy after tumor recurrence. Possible prognostic factors influencing disease progression and survival were retrospectively investigated. The actuarial 2-, 5-, and 10-year overall and progression-free survival rates after IBT for WHO II tumors were 96.9, 96.9, 89.8 % and 96.9, 93.8, 47.3 %; for WHO III tumors 90.3, 77, 54.9 % and 80.6, 58.4, 45.9 %, respectively. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated complete remission in 2 patients, partial remission in 13 patients, stable disease in 17 patients and tumor progression in 31 patients. Median time to progression for WHO II tumors was 87.6 months and for WHO III tumors 27.8 months. Neurological status improved in 10 patients and remained stable in 20 patients, while 9 patients deteriorated. There was no treatment-related mortality. Treatment-related morbidity was transient in 11 patients. WHO II, KPS ≥ 90 %, frontal location, and tumor surface dose > 50 Gy were associated with increased overall survival (p ≤ 0.05). Oligodendroglioma and frontal location were associated with a prolonged progression-free survival (p ≤ 0.05). Our study indicates that IBT achieves local control rates comparable to surgery and radio-/chemotherapy treatment, is minimally invasive, and safe. Due to the low rate of side effects, IBT may represent an attractive option as part of a multimodal treatment schedule, being supplementary to microsurgery or as a salvage therapy after chemotherapy and conventional irradiation. (orig.)

  18. Chinese medicinal herb, Acanthopanax gracilistylus, extract induces cell cycle arrest of human tumor cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, B E; Zeki, K; Sugiura, T; Yoshida, Y; Yamashita, U

    2000-04-01

    We investigated the effect of a Chinese medicinal herb, Acanthopanax gracilistylus (AG), extract (E) on the growth of human tumor cell lines in vitro. AGE markedly inhibited the proliferation of several tumor cell lines such as MT-2, Raji, HL-60, TMK-1 and HSC-2. The activity was associated with a protein of 60 kDa, which was purified by gel-filtration chromatography. Cell viability analyses indicated that the treatment with AGE inhibits cell proliferation, but does not induce cell death. The mechanism of AGE-induced inhibition of tumor cell growth involves arrest of the cell cycle at the G(0) / G(1) stage without a direct cytotoxic effect. The cell cycle arrest induced by AGE was accompanied by a decrease of phosphorylated retinoblastoma (Rb) protein. Furthermore, cyclin-dependent kinases 2 and 4 (Cdk2 and Cdk4), which are involved in the phosphorylation of Rb, were also decreased. These results suggest that AGE inhibits tumor cell growth by affecting phosphorylated Rb proteins and Cdks. PMID:10804285

  19. Enhanced antitumor reactivity of tumor-sensitized T cells by interferon alfa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vander Woude, D.L.; Wagner, P.D.; Shu, S.; Chang, A.E. (Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor (USA))

    1991-03-01

    Tumor-draining lymph node cells from mice bearing the methylcholanthrene-induced MCA 106 tumors can be sensitized in vitro to acquire antitumor reactivity. We examined the effect of interferon alfa on the function of cells that underwent in vitro sensitization in adoptive immunotherapy. Interferon alfa increased the antitumor reactivity of in vitro sensitized cells in the treatment of MCA 106 pulmonary metastases. This effect was evident in irradiated mice, indicating that a host response to the interferon alfa was not required. Interferon alfa treatment increased class I major histocompatibility complex antigen expression on tumor cells and increased their susceptibility to lysis by in vitro sensitized cells. These results suggest that interferon alfa enhancement of adoptive immunotherapy was mediated by its effect on tumor cells. Interferon alfa may be a useful adjunct to the adoptive immunotherapy of human cancer.

  20. Appearance of Tumor Cells in Cyst Fluid of Malignant Ovarian Tumor

    OpenAIRE

    Numa, Fumitaka; Suminami, Yoshinori; Ogata, Hidenobu; Nawata, Shugo; Umayahara, Kenji; Nakamura, Yasuhiko; Sugino, Norihiro; Hiraoka, Fumiko; Ise, Etsuko; TAKAHASHI, MUTSUO; Hirabayashi, Kei; Hiratsuka, Keisuke; Kato, Hiroshi

    2000-01-01

    The significance of spillage of tumor cells into the abdominal cavity by fine needle aspiration or rupture of adnexel masses in case of malignancy is the focus. However, the appearance rate of malignant cells in cyst fluid by fine needle aspiration has been quite variable. We therefore evaluated the appearance rate of malignant cells in the cyst fluid from malignant ovarian tumors. Our study population included 29 women with malignant ovarian tumor who attended two hospitals between November...

  1. Investigation of Maxillary Preprosthetic Situations after Oral Tumor Treatment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAO Yingguang(曹颖光); SUN Guohong(孙国洪); Thomas Weischer

    2004-01-01

    In order to investigate the maxillary preprosthetic situation after oral tumor treatmentand/or reconstructive surgery, based on the review of case history and the clinical records 47 cases were analyzed after oral tumor treatment and/or reconstruction, including residual maxillary bone,intermaxillary relationships, defection of maxilla and oral situation after radiation therapy. The results showed that the residual maxillary bone was useful for implantation in the front alveolar bone and zygoma area. The maxillary preprosthetic situation after tumor treatment and/or reconstructive surgery was difficult due to maxillary resection, intermaxillary relationships, unsuitable soft and hard tissue transfer and the irradiation. It is suggested that the maxillary preprosthetic situation after oral tumor treatment is getting worse not only due to maxillary resection and/or irradiation, but surprisingly also due to mandibular resection and/or irradiation.

  2. Cancer stem cells in solid tumors: elusive or illusive?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lehrach Hans R

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract During the past years in vivo transplantation experiments and in vitro colony-forming assays indicated that tumors arise only from rare cells. These cells were shown to bear self-renewal capacities and the ability to recapitulate all cell types within an individual tumor. Due to their phenotypic resemblance to normal stem cells, the term "cancer stem cells" is used. However, some pieces of the puzzle are missing: (a a stringent definition of cancer stem cells in solid tumors (b specific markers that only target cells that meet the criteria for a cancer stem cell in a certain type of tumor. These missing parts started an ongoing debate about which is the best method to identify and characterize cancer stem cells, or even if their mere existence is just an artifact caused by the experimental procedures. Recent findings query the cancer stem cell hypothesis for solid tumors itself since it was shown in xenograft transplantation experiments that under appropriate conditions tumor-initiating cells are not rare. In this review we critically discuss the challenges and prospects of the currently used major methods to identify cancer stem cells. Further on, we reflect the present discussion about the existence of cancer stem cells in solid tumors as well as the amount and characteristics of tumor-initiating cells and finally provide new perspectives like the correlation of cancer stem cells and induced pluripotent cells.

  3. P-Selectin-Mediated Adhesion between Platelets and Tumor Cells Promotes Intestinal Tumorigenesis in Apc(Min/+) Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Cuiling; Li, Bin; Guo, Simei; Wei, Bo; Shao, Chunkui; Li, Jialin; Yang, Yang; Zhang, Qianqian; Li, Jiangchao; He, Xiaodong; Wang, Lijing; Zhang, Yajie

    2015-01-01

    Studies have indicated that platelets play an important role in tumorigenesis, and an abundance of platelets accumulate in the ovarian tumor microenvironment outside the vasculature. However, whether cancer cells recruit platelets within intestinal tumors and how they signal adherent platelets to enter intestinal tumor tissues remain unknown. Here, we unexpectedly found that large numbers of platelets were deposited within human colorectal tumor specimens using immunohistochemical staining, and these platelets were fully associated with tumor development. We further report the robust adhesion of platelet aggregates to tumor cells within intestinal tumors, which occurs via a mechanism that is dependent on P-selectin (CD62P), a cell adhesion molecule that is abundantly expressed on activated platelets. Using spontaneous intestinal tumor mouse models, we determined that the genetic deletion of P-selectin suppressed intestinal tumor growth, which was rescued by the infusion of wild-type platelets but not P-selectin(-/-) platelets. Mechanistically, platelet adhesion to tumor cells induced the secretion of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) to promote angiogenesis and accelerate intestinal tumor cell proliferation. Our results indicate that the adherence of platelets to tumor cells could promote tumor growth and metastasis. By targeting this platelet-tumor cell interaction, recombinant soluble P-selectin may have therapeutic value for the treatment of intestinal tumors. PMID:25999791

  4. P-Selectin-Mediated Adhesion between Platelets and Tumor Cells Promotes Intestinal Tumorigenesis in Apc(Min/+) Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Cuiling; Li, Bin; Guo, Simei; Wei, Bo; Shao, Chunkui; Li, Jialin; Yang, Yang; Zhang, Qianqian; Li, Jiangchao; He, Xiaodong; Wang, Lijing; Zhang, Yajie

    2015-01-01

    Studies have indicated that platelets play an important role in tumorigenesis, and an abundance of platelets accumulate in the ovarian tumor microenvironment outside the vasculature. However, whether cancer cells recruit platelets within intestinal tumors and how they signal adherent platelets to enter intestinal tumor tissues remain unknown. Here, we unexpectedly found that large numbers of platelets were deposited within human colorectal tumor specimens using immunohistochemical staining, and these platelets were fully associated with tumor development. We further report the robust adhesion of platelet aggregates to tumor cells within intestinal tumors, which occurs via a mechanism that is dependent on P-selectin (CD62P), a cell adhesion molecule that is abundantly expressed on activated platelets. Using spontaneous intestinal tumor mouse models, we determined that the genetic deletion of P-selectin suppressed intestinal tumor growth, which was rescued by the infusion of wild-type platelets but not P-selectin(-/-) platelets. Mechanistically, platelet adhesion to tumor cells induced the secretion of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) to promote angiogenesis and accelerate intestinal tumor cell proliferation. Our results indicate that the adherence of platelets to tumor cells could promote tumor growth and metastasis. By targeting this platelet-tumor cell interaction, recombinant soluble P-selectin may have therapeutic value for the treatment of intestinal tumors.

  5. Tumor cell culture on collagen–chitosan scaffolds as three-dimensional tumor model: A suitable model for tumor studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aziz Mahmoudzadeh

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Tumor cells naturally live in three-dimensional (3D microenvironments, while common laboratory tests and evaluations are done in two-dimensional (2D plates. This study examined the impact of cultured 4T1 cancer cells in a 3D collagen–chitosan scaffold compared with 2D plate cultures. Collagen–chitosan scaffolds were provided and passed confirmatory tests. 4T1 tumor cells were cultured on scaffolds and then tumor cells growth rate, resistance to X-ray radiation, and cyclophosphamide as a chemotherapy drug were analyzed. Furthermore, 4T1 cells were extracted from the scaffold model and were injected into the mice. Tumor growth rate, survival rate, and systemic immune responses were evaluated. Our results showed that 4T1 cells infiltrated the scaffolds pores and constructed a 3D microenvironment. Furthermore, 3D cultured tumor cells showed a slower proliferation rate, increased levels of survival to the X-ray irradiation, and enhanced resistance to chemotherapy drugs in comparison with 2D plate cultures. Transfer of extracted cells to the mice caused enhanced tumor volume and decreased life span. This study indicated that collagen–chitosan nanoscaffolds provide a suitable model of tumor that would be appropriate for tumor studies.

  6. Cancer Stem Cells in Brain Tumors and Their Lineage Hierarchy

    OpenAIRE

    Kong, Doo-Sik

    2012-01-01

    Despite recent advances in the development of novel targeted chemotherapies, the prognosis of malignant glioma remains dismal. The chemo-resistance of this tumor is attributed to tumor heterogeneity. To explain this unique chemo- resistance, the concept of cancer stem cells has been evoked. Cancer stem cells, a subpopulation of whole tumor cells, are now regarded as candidate therapeutic targets. Here, the author reviews and discusses the cancer stem cell concept.

  7. Cancer cell differentiation heterogeneity and aggressive behavior in solid tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jögi, Annika; Vaapil, Marica; Johansson, Martin; Påhlman, Sven

    2012-05-01

    The differentiation stage of tumors is a central aspect in the histopathological classification of solid malignancies. The differentiation stage is strongly associated with tumor behavior, and generally an immature tumor is more aggressive than the more differentiated counterpart. While this is common knowledge in surgical pathology, the contribution of differentiation-related gene expression and functions to tumor behavior is often overlooked in the experimental, tumor biological setting. The mechanisms by which tumor cell differentiation stages are perturbed or affected are poorly explored but have recently come into focus with the introduction.of the tumor stem cell concept. While developmental biologists view the differentiation as a unidirectional event, pathologists and tumor biologists have introduced the concept of dedifferentiation to explain phenotypic changes occurring in solid tumors. In this review we discuss the impact of the tumor cell differentiation stage as used in surgical pathology. We further discuss knowledge gained from exploring the molecular basis of the differentiation and dedifferentiation processes in neuroblastoma and breast cancer, two tumor forms where the tumor cell differentiation concept is used in the clinical diagnostic work and where the tumor stem cell theory has been applied.

  8. Cisplatin-induced Casepase-3 activation in different tumor cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Hua; Li, Xiao; Su, Ting; Zhang, Yu-Hai

    2008-12-01

    Apoptosis plays an essential role in normal organism development which is one of the main types of programmed cell death to help tissues maintain homeostasis. Defective apoptosis can result in cell accumulation and therefore effects on tumor pathogenesis, progression and therapy resistance. A family of proteins, known as caspases, is typically activated in the early stages of apoptosis. Therefore, studying the kinetics of activation of caspases induced by antitumor drugs can contribute to antitumor drug discovery and explanation of the molecular mechanisms. This paper detected the Caspase-3 activity induced by cisplatin in human adenoid cystic carcinoma cell line (ACC-M), human hepatocellular liver carcinoma cell line (HepG2) and human epithelial carcinoma cell line (Hela) with stably expressing ECFP-DEVDDsRed (CD3) probe, a fluorescent probe consisting of Enhanced Cyan Fluorescent Protein (ECFP), red fluorescent protein (DsRed) and a linker with a recognition site of Caspase-3, by using the capillary electrophoresis (CE) and fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) imaging system. Under the same concentration of cisplatin, ACC-M cells responded the most rapidly, and then HepG2 cells and Hela cells, respectively, in the early 30 hours. Later, HepG2 cells represented acceleration in the Caspase-3 activation speed and reached full activation the earliest comparing to other two cell types. The results demonstrated that ACC-M cell is more sensitive than the other two cell types under the treatment of cisplatin.

  9. A think tank of TINK/TANKs: tumor-infiltrating/tumor-associated natural killer cells in tumor progression and angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruno, Antonino; Ferlazzo, Guido; Albini, Adriana; Noonan, Douglas M

    2014-08-01

    Tumor-infiltrating leukocytes are often induced by the cancer microenvironment to display a protumor, proangiogenic phenotype. This "polarization" has been described for several myeloid cells, in particular macrophages. Natural killer (NK) cells represent another population of innate immune cells able to infiltrate tumors. The role of NK in tumor progression and angiogenesis has not yet been fully investigated. Several studies have shown that tumor-infiltrating NK (here referred to as "TINKs") and tumor-associated NK (altered peripheral NK cells, which here we call "TANKs") are compromised in their ability to lysew tumor cells. Recent data have suggested that they are potentially protumorigenic and can also acquire a proangiogenic phenotype. Here we review the properties of TINKs and TANKs and compare their activities to that of NK cells endowed with a physiological proangiogenic phenotype, in particular decidual NK cells. We speculate on the potential origins of TINKs and TANKs and on the immune signals involved in their differentiation and polarization. The TINK and TANK phenotype has broad implications in the immune response to tumors, ranging from a deficient control of cancer and cancer stem cells to an altered crosstalk with other relevant players of the immune response, such as dendritic cells, to induction of cancer angiogenesis. With this recently acquired knowledge that has not yet been put into perspective, we point out new potential avenues for therapeutic intervention involving NK cells as a target or an ally in oncology. PMID:25178695

  10. A think tank of TINK/TANKs: tumor-infiltrating/tumor-associated natural killer cells in tumor progression and angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruno, Antonino; Ferlazzo, Guido; Albini, Adriana; Noonan, Douglas M

    2014-08-01

    Tumor-infiltrating leukocytes are often induced by the cancer microenvironment to display a protumor, proangiogenic phenotype. This "polarization" has been described for several myeloid cells, in particular macrophages. Natural killer (NK) cells represent another population of innate immune cells able to infiltrate tumors. The role of NK in tumor progression and angiogenesis has not yet been fully investigated. Several studies have shown that tumor-infiltrating NK (here referred to as "TINKs") and tumor-associated NK (altered peripheral NK cells, which here we call "TANKs") are compromised in their ability to lysew tumor cells. Recent data have suggested that they are potentially protumorigenic and can also acquire a proangiogenic phenotype. Here we review the properties of TINKs and TANKs and compare their activities to that of NK cells endowed with a physiological proangiogenic phenotype, in particular decidual NK cells. We speculate on the potential origins of TINKs and TANKs and on the immune signals involved in their differentiation and polarization. The TINK and TANK phenotype has broad implications in the immune response to tumors, ranging from a deficient control of cancer and cancer stem cells to an altered crosstalk with other relevant players of the immune response, such as dendritic cells, to induction of cancer angiogenesis. With this recently acquired knowledge that has not yet been put into perspective, we point out new potential avenues for therapeutic intervention involving NK cells as a target or an ally in oncology.

  11. Outcome of surgical resection for brain metastases and radical treatment of the primary tumor in Chinese non–small-cell lung cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Z

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Zhenye Li,1,3,* Xiangheng Zhang,1,* Xiaobing Jiang,1 Chengcheng Guo,1 Ke Sai,1 Qunying Yang,1 Zhenqiang He,1 Yang Wang,1 Zhongping Chen,1 Wei Li,2 Yonggao Mou1 1Department of Neurosurgery, Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center, State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Collaborative Innovation Center for Cancer Medicine, Guangzhou, People’s Republic of China; 2Department of Anesthesiology, Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center, State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Collaborative Innovation Center for Cancer Medicine, Guangzhou, People’s Republic of China; 3Beijing Neurosurgical Institute, Capital Medical University, Beijing, People’s Republic of China *These authors have contributed equally to this work Purpose: Brain metastasis is the most common complication of brain cancer; nevertheless, primary lung cancer accounts for approximately 20%–40% of brain metastases cases. Surgical resection is the preferred treatment for brain metastases. However, no studies have reported the outcome of surgical resection of brain metastases from non–small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC in the People’s Republic of China. Moreover, the optimal treatment for primary NSCLC in patients with synchronous brain metastases is hitherto controversial. Patients and methods: We retrospectively analyzed the cases of NSCLC patients with brain metastases who underwent neurosurgical resection at the Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center, and assessed the efficacy of surgical resection and the necessity of aggressive treatment for primary NSCLC in synchronous brain metastases patients. Results: A total of 62 patients, including 47 men and 15 women, with brain metastases from NSCLC were enrolled in the study. The median age at the time of craniotomy was 54 years (range 29–76 years. At the final follow-up evaluation, 50 patients had died. The median OS time was 15.1 months, and the survival rates were 70% and 37% at 1 and 2 years, respectively. The median OS

  12. Studies of resistance factors against chloroethylnitrosourea drugs in malignant tumor cells

    OpenAIRE

    Egyházi, Suzanne

    1996-01-01

    Drug resistance is a major clinical problem in the chemotherapy of tumor diseases and the identification of factors that make tumor cells resistant to drug treatment is therefore of crucial importance. We have investigated a possible involvement of O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT), glutathione transferase (GST) and glutathione (GSH) in the resistance to 1,3- bis(2-chloroethyl)- 1 -nitrosourea (BCNU) in two human lung cancer cell lines. The non-small cell lung ca...

  13. A Pilot Study of Circulating Tumor Cells in Stage IV Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Max Haid

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Measurement of the number of circulating tumor cells (CTCs in the bloodstream has been shown to have prognostic significance in treating breast carcinoma. This pilot study was formulated to determine if stage IV non-small cell lung carcinomas similarly shed malignant cells into the circulation and if their presence has prognostic significance. Methods: Patients with stage IV non-small cell lung carcinomas were tested once for CTCs in 7.5 ml of their blood prior to receiving any treatments. A proprietary blood collection kit produced by Veridex LLC (Raritan, NJ, which manufactures the instrument that performs the immunomagnetic CELLSEARCH® CTC assay, was used. Tumor measurements were determined in three dimensions by the same radiologist using computerized axial tomography. The three-dimensional sum was used to represent tumor size. Survival from the date of the pretreatment CTC assay was monitored and recorded. Data were analyzed statistically using NCSS8 statistical software (NCSS LLC, Kaysville, UT. Results: Of 19 evaluable patients, 10 had no detectable CTCs. There was no relation between intrapulmonary primary tumor size and the number of CTCs, nor between tumor size and survival. Survival was not affected by gender or age at entry into the trial. The mean survival of those with no detectable CTCs was 536 ± 91.1 days versus 239 ± 96.0 days for those with 1 or more detectable CTCs, a statistically significant advantage (P=0.034 favoring those without CTCs. Conclusions: Patients with a CTC score of 0 survived significantly longer than those with a CTC score of ≥ 1. Survival was not correlated with gender, age or primary tumor size. Recovery of CTCs potentially provides a noninvasive source of tumor cells for genomic profiling, which may enable development of a custom treatment plan for the individual patient. Further investigations are warranted and needed.

  14. Assessment of anti-inflammatory tumor treatment efficacy by longitudinal monitoring employing sonographic micro morphology in a preclinical mouse model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With the development of increasingly sophisticated three-dimensional volumetric imaging methods, tumor volume can serve as a robust and reproducible measurement of drug efficacy. Since the use of molecularly targeted agents in the clinic will almost certainly involve combinations with other therapeutic modalities, the use of volumetric determination can help to identify a dosing schedule of sequential combinations of cytostatic drugs resulting in long term control of tumor growth with minimal toxicity. The aim of this study is to assess high resolution sonography imaging for the in vivo monitoring of efficacy of Infliximab in pancreatic tumor. In the first experiment, primary orthotopic pancreatic tumor growth was measured with Infliximab treatment. In the second experiment, orthotopic tumors were resected ten days after inoculation of tumor cells and tumor recurrence was measured following Infliximab treatment. Tumor progression was evaluated using 3D high resolution sonography. Sonography measurement of tumor volume in vivo showed inhibitory effect of Infliximab on primary tumor growth in both non-resected and resected models. Measurement of the dynamics of tumor growth by sonography revealed that in the primary tumor Infliximab is effective against established tumors while in the resection model, Infliximab is more effective at an early stage following tumor resection. Infliximab treatment is also effective in inhibiting tumor growth growth as a result of tumor cell contamination of the surgical field. Clinical application of Infliximab is feasible in both the neoadjuvant and adjuvant setting. Infliximab is also effective in slowing the growth of tumor growth under the peritoneum and may have application in treating peritoneal carcinomatosis. Finally the study demonstrates that high resolution sonography is a sensitive imaging modality for the measurement of pancreatic tumor growth

  15. Joint Serum Tumor Markers Serve as survival predictive model of Erlotinib in the treatment of recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lan SHAO

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective Molecular targeting therapy is the direction of individualized treatment of lung cancer, scholars has been established targeted therapy prediction models which provide more guidance for clinical individual therapy. This study investigated the relationship among pulmonary surfactant-associated protein D (SP-D, transforming growth factor α (TGF-α, matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9, tissue polypeptide specific antigen (TPS, and Krebs von den Lungen-6 (KL-6 and response as well as survival in the patients with recurrent non-small cell lung cancer, which Erlotinib was as second line treatment after failure to chemotherapy. This study also established a predictive prognostic model. Methods Serum levels of SP-D, TGF-α, MMP-9, TPS, and KL-6 in 114 patients before erlotinib treatment were detected by ELISA method. Combined with clinical factors, these levels were used to investigate the relationship with efficacy in erlotinib treatment and construct a predicted prognostic model by Kaplan-Meier curve and Cox proportional hazard model multivariate analysis. Results The objective response rate (ORR and disease control rate (DCR in the 114 patients, were 22.8% (26/114 and 72.8% (83/114, to Erlotinib treatment respectively. The median progression-free survival (PFS and one year survival rate with Erlotinib treatment were 5.13 months and 69.3%, respectively. Patients in the SP-D>110 ng/mL group exhibited more ORR (33.3% vs 13.3%, P=0.011 and DCR (83.3% vs 63.3%, P=0.017 than those in the ≤110 ng/mL group. Patients in the MMP-9≤535 ng/mL group showed more DCR (83.9% than those in the >535 ng/mL group (62.1% (P=0.009. Patients in the TPS110 ng/mL (5.95 months vs 3.25 months, P=0.009, MMP-9≤535 ng/mL (5.83 months vs 3.47 months, P=0.046, KL-6<500 U/mL (6.03 months vs 3.40 months, P=0.040, and TPS<80 U/L (6.15 months vs 2.42 months, P=0.014 groups showed better PFS. Multivariate analysis showed that current or ever-smoker, wild

  16. New cancer-treatment model of photodynamic therapy combined with a type I topoisomerase inhibitor, CPT-11, against HeLa cell tumors in nude mice used by OPO parametric tunable laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Takato O.; Matsuzawa, Eiji; Matsuo, Tetsumichi; Koide, Yukio; Terakawa, Susumu; Yokokura, Teruo; Hirano, Toru

    1995-03-01

    A new cancer-treatment model, photodynamic therapy (PDT) combined with a type I topoisomerase inhibitor, camptothecin derivative (CPT-11), against HeLa cell tumors in BALB/c nude mice has been developed using a wide-band tunable coherent light source operated on optical parametric oscillation (OPO parametric tunable laser). The Photosan-3 PDT and CPT-11 combined therapy was remarkably effective, that is the inhibition rate (I.R.) 40 - 80%, as compared to PDT only in vivo. The analysis of HpD (Photosan-3) and CPT-11 effects on cultured HeLa cells in vitro has been studied by a video-enhanced contrast differential interference contrast microscope (VEC-DIC). Photosan-3 with 600 nm light killed cells by mitochondrial damage within 50 min, but not with 700 nm light. CPT-11 with 700 - 400 nm light killed cells within 50 min after nucleolus damage appeared after around 30 min. The localization of CPT-11 in cells was observed as fluorescence images in the nucleus, particularly the nucleoral area produced clear images using an Argus 100.

  17. Tumor-associated macrophages: a novel potential target for cancer treatment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YUE Zhi-qiang; LIU Yu-ping; RUAN Jun-shan; ZHOU Liang; LU Yin

    2012-01-01

    Special emphasis about cancer metastasis was concentrated on tumor cells themselves,and we usually considered the ability of migration and invasion was the final decider.Recently,bewaring of tumor microenvironment is a fundamental determinant in metastasis has become the most outstanding breakthrough.Considerable “microbes” in the microenvironment are closely linked with tumor metastatic behaviors,and the major proportion of them is tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs).Actually,TAMs conserve immediate “cross-talk” with cancer cells throughout tumor development.It is generally accepted that TAMs have mostly pro-tumoral functions and play an important role in several stages of tumor progression.This progression involves a series of events that leads from the primary site to the metastatic site,including tumor cell growth,angiogenesis,migration,invasion,intravasation and finally extravasation at distant site where the process begins again (metastasis).Thereby,TAMs has attracted substantial attentions in recent years and could become a promising therapeutic strategy.In this review,we focus on the multi-functions of TAMs in cancer and certain drugs targeting TAMs for cancer treatment those are under experimental research procedures or have even been entered human clinical tests.

  18. Expression of Hyaluronidase by Tumor Cells Induces Angiogenesis in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dacai; Pearlman, Eric; Diaconu, Eugenia; Guo, Kun; Mori, Hiroshi; Haqqi, Tariq; Markowitz, Sanford; Willson, James; Sy, Man-Sun

    1996-07-01

    Hyaluronic acid is a proteoglycan present in the extracellular matrix and is important for the maintenance of tissue architecture. Depolymerization of hyaluronic acid may facilitate tumor invasion. In addition, oligosaccharides of hyaluronic acid have been reported to induce angiogenesis. We report here that a hyaluronidase similar to the one on human sperm is expressed by metastatic human melanoma, colon carcinoma, and glioblastoma cell lines and by tumor biopsies from patients with colorectal carcinomas, but not by tissues from normal colon. Moreover, angiogenesis is induced by hyaluronidase+ tumor cells but not hyaluronidase- tumor cells and can be blocked by an inhibitor of hyaluronidase. Tumor cells thus use hyaluronidase as one of the ``molecular saboteurs'' to depolymerize hyaluronic acid to facilitate invasion. As a consequence, breakdown products of hyaluronic acid can further promote tumor establishment by inducing angiogenesis. Hyaluronidase on tumor cells may provide a target for anti-neoplastic drugs.

  19. Cancer Stem Cells, EMT, and Developmental Pathway Activation in Pancreatic Tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hindriksen, Sanne; Bijlsma, Maarten F., E-mail: m.f.bijlsma@amc.uva.nl [Laboratory for Experimental Oncology and Radiobiology, Academic Medical Centre, Meibergdreef 9, 1105AZ Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2012-10-12

    Pancreatic cancer is a disease with remarkably poor patient survival rates. The frequent presence of metastases and profound chemoresistance pose a severe problem for the treatment of these tumors. Moreover, cross-talk between the tumor and the local micro-environment contributes to tumorigenicity, metastasis and chemoresistance. Compared to bulk tumor cells, cancer stem cells (CSC) have reduced sensitivity to chemotherapy. CSC are tumor cells with stem-like features that possess the ability to self-renew, but can also give rise to more differentiated progeny. CSC can be identified based on increased in vitro spheroid- or colony formation, enhanced in vivo tumor initiating potential, or expression of cell surface markers. Since CSC are thought to be required for the maintenance of a tumor cell population, these cells could possibly serve as a therapeutic target. There appears to be a causal relationship between CSC and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in pancreatic tumors. The occurrence of EMT in pancreatic cancer cells is often accompanied by re-activation of developmental pathways, such as the Hedgehog, WNT, NOTCH, and Nodal/Activin pathways. Therapeutics based on CSC markers, EMT, developmental pathways, or tumor micro-environment could potentially be used to target pancreatic CSC. This may lead to a reduction of tumor growth, metastatic events, and chemoresistance in pancreatic cancer.

  20. IL-12 triggers a programmatic change in dysfunctional myeloid-derived cells within mouse tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerkar, Sid P.; Goldszmid, Romina S.; Muranski, Pawel; Chinnasamy, Dhanalakshmi; Yu, Zhiya; Reger, Robert N.; Leonardi, Anthony J.; Morgan, Richard A.; Wang, Ena; Marincola, Francesco M.; Trinchieri, Giorgio; Rosenberg, Steven A.; Restifo, Nicholas P.

    2011-01-01

    Solid tumors are complex masses with a local microenvironment, or stroma, that supports tumor growth and progression. Among the diverse tumor-supporting stromal cells is a heterogeneous population of myeloid-derived cells. These cells are alternatively activated and contribute to the immunosuppressive environment of the tumor; overcoming their immunosuppressive effects may improve the efficacy of cancer immunotherapies. We recently found that engineering tumor-specific CD8+ T cells to secrete the inflammatory cytokine IL-12 improved their therapeutic efficacy in the B16 mouse model of established melanoma. Here, we report the mechanism underlying this finding. Surprisingly, direct binding of IL-12 to receptors on lymphocytes or NK cells was not required. Instead, IL-12 sensitized bone marrow–derived tumor stromal cells, including CD11b+F4/80hi macrophages, CD11b+MHCIIhiCD11chi dendritic cells, and CD11b+Gr-1hi myeloid–derived suppressor cells, causing them to enhance the effects of adoptively transferred CD8+ T cells. This reprogramming of myeloid-derived cells occurred partly through IFN-γ. Surprisingly, direct presentation of antigen to the transferred CD8+ T cells by tumor was not necessary; however, MHCI expression on host cells was essential for IL-12–mediated antitumor enhancements. These results are consistent with a model in which IL-12 enhances the ability of CD8+ T cells to collapse large vascularized tumors by triggering programmatic changes in otherwise suppressive antigen-presenting cells within tumors and support the use of IL-12 as part of immunotherapy for the treatment of solid tumors. PMID:22056381

  1. Treatment of recurrent primitive neuroectodermal tumors (PNET) in children and adolescents with high-dose chemotherapy (HDC) and stem cell support: results of the HITREZ 97 multicentre trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bode, U; Zimmermann, M; Moser, O; Rutkowski, S; Warmuth-Metz, M; Pietsch, T; Kortmann, R D; Faldum, A; Fleischhack, G

    2014-12-01

    Early studies with high-dose chemotherapy for treatment of relapsed cerebral PNET had shown modest efficacy but considerable toxicity. The HIT97 national trial tested a nonrandomized but stratified relapse protocol using either intensive chemotherapy, potentially high dose, or oral chemotherapy. 72 patients (59 disseminated) whose primary treatment had been surgery (97 %), radiotherapy (88 %), and/or chemotherapy (95 %) were enrolled in the intensive chemotherapy arm at diagnosis of relapse or resistance. As a window for this study they received two courses of a 96-hour infusion with carboplatin and etoposide. A response (complete or partial remission) was documented by MRI. Responders received two more cycles of this therapy and stem cell collection, before they received HDC (carboplatin, etoposide, thiotepa) and stem cell support. All possibilities of local therapy were to be explored and applied. After two courses of chemotherapy there was a 52 % response rate (41/72 patients). The median PFS and OS for all 72 patients were 11.6 and 21.1 months. Patients with medulloblastoma had a longer PFS and OS (12.6 and 22.6 months) than those with other PNETs (3.1 and 12.3 months). Favourable prognostic features were no new signs of clinical impairment and localised disease at relapse diagnosis. For the 27 patients who received HDC the median PFS and OS were 8.4 and 20.2 months, respectively. HDC did not benefit patients with resistant cerebral PNET and was associated with profound haematological and mucosal toxicity (90-100 % grade III, IV), infections (50 % grade III and IV) and severe ototoxicity (50 % grade III, 12.5 % grade IV). Treatment related mortality was 8 %. There was low long-term survival and only 2/72 patients are in continuous remission. Adding HDC in patients who responded to the initial courses of chemotherapy did not improve survival. Patients with relapsed cerebral PNET who respond to conventional chemotherapy do not profit from further

  2. Response of quiescent and total tumor cells in solid tumors to neutrons with various cadmium ratios

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Response of quiescent (Q) and total tumor cells in solid tumors to neutron irradiation with three different cadmium (Cd) ratios was examined. The role of Q cells in tumor control was also discussed. Methods and Materials: C3H/He mice bearing SCC VII tumors received continuous administration of 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) for 5 days using implanted mini-osmotic pumps to label all proliferating (P) cells. Thirty minutes after intraperitoneal injection of sodium borocaptate-10B (BSH), or 3 h after oral administration of dl-p-boronophenylalanine-10B (BPA), the tumors were irradiated with neutrons, or those without 10B-compounds were irradiated with gamma rays. This neutron irradiation was performed using neutrons with three different cadmium (Cd) ratios. The tumors were then excised, minced, and trypsinized. The tumor cell suspensions were incubated with cytochalasin-B (a cytokinesis-blocker), and the micronucleus (MN) frequency in cells without BrdU labeling (Q cells) was determined using immunofluorescence staining for BrdU. The MN frequency in total (P + Q) tumor cells was determined from tumors that were not pretreated with BrdU. The sensitivity to neutrons was evaluated in terms of the frequency of induced micronuclei in binuclear tumor cells (MN frequency). Results: Without 10B-compounds, the MN frequency in Q cells was lower than that in the total cell population. The sensitivity difference between total and Q cells was reduced by neutron irradiation. Relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of neutrons compared with gamma rays was larger in Q cells than in total cells, and the RBE values for low-Cd-ratio neutrons tended to be larger than those for high-Cd-ratio neutrons. With 10B-compounds, MN frequency for each cell population was increased, especially for total cells. This increase in MN frequency was marked when high-Cd-ratio neutrons were used. BPA increased the MN frequency for total tumor cells more than BSH. Nevertheless, the sensitivity of Q

  3. Nursing Research of DC-CIK Cells in the Treatment of 613 Cases of Malignant Tumor%DC-CIK细胞治疗613例恶性肿瘤的护理研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林琼芬; 李凤英

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the nursing methods for patients with malignant tumor immunotherapy for DC-CIK. Methods From 2011 December to 2014 October, 613 cases of biological treatment of patients were among 34 patients given comprehensive nursing and record adverse reactions. Results The body temperature is up to 38 DEG C, after transfusion, within 30 minutes.It gradually returned to normal. after intramuscular 25mg promethazine hydrochloride. The remaining patients successfully completed treatments, no discomfort reaction. Conclusion As Dc-CIK cell therapy is a tumor biological treatment method, with less adverse reactions. Psychological nursing and norms nursing operation play an important role. to ensure treatment . smoothly.%目的:探讨对恶性肿瘤患者行DC-CIK免疫治疗的护理方法。方法对2011年12月~2014年10月613例生物治疗患者给予全面的护理并记录不良反应。结果其中有34例患者回输后30 min后体温达38℃﹐分别给予非那根25 mg肌注后体温逐渐恢复正常。其余患者顺利完成治疗﹐无不适反应发生。结论 Dc-CIK细胞治疗作为肿瘤生物治疗方法中的一种﹐其不良反应小。心理护理和规范的护理操作对保证治疗顺利进行起着重要的作用。

  4. CADrx for GBM Brain Tumors: Predicting Treatment Response from Changes in Diffusion-Weighted MRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew S. Brown

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this study was to develop a computer-aided therapeutic response (CADrx system for early prediction of drug treatment response for glioblastoma multiforme (GBM brain tumors with diffusion weighted (DW MR images. In conventional Macdonald assessment, tumor response is assessed nine weeks or more post-treatment. However, we will investigate the ability of DW-MRI to assess response earlier, at five weeks post treatment. The apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC map, calculated from DW images, has been shown to reveal changes in the tumor’s microenvironment preceding morphologic tumor changes. ADC values in treated brain tumors could theoretically both increase due to the cell kill (and thus reduced cell density and decrease due to inhibition of edema. In this study, we investigated the effectiveness of features that quantify changes from pre- and post-treatment tumor ADC histograms to detect treatment response. There are three parts to this study: first, tumor regions were segmented on T1w contrast enhanced images by Otsu’s thresholding method, and mapped from T1w images onto ADC images by a 3D region of interest (ROI mapping tool using DICOM header information; second, ADC histograms of the tumor region were extracted from both pre- and five weeks post-treatment scans, and fitted by a two-component Gaussian mixture model (GMM. The GMM features as well as standard histogram-based features were extracted. Finally, supervised machine learning techniques were applied for classification of responders or non-responders. The approach was evaluated with a dataset of 85 patients with GBM under chemotherapy, in which 39 responded and 46 did not, based on tumor volume reduction. We compared adaBoost, random forest and support vector machine classification algorithms, using ten-fold cross validation, resulting in the best accuracy of 69.41% and the corresponding area under the curve (Az of 0.70.

  5. Tumor-Induced Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Sanctis, Francesco; Bronte, Vincenzo; Ugel, Stefano

    2016-06-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) represent a heterogeneous, immune-suppressive leukocyte population that develops systemically and infiltrates tumors. MDSCs can restrain the immune response through different mechanisms including essential metabolite consumption, reactive oxygen and nitrogen species production, as well as display of inhibitory surface molecules that alter T-cell trafficking and viability. Moreover, MDSCs play a role in tumor progression, acting directly on tumor cells and promoting cancer stemness, angiogenesis, stroma deposition, epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, and metastasis formation. Many biological and pharmaceutical drugs affect MDSC expansion and functions in preclinical tumor models and patients, often reversing host immune dysfunctions and allowing a more effective tumor immunotherapy.

  6. Analysis of the diagnosis and treatment of desmoplastic small round cell tumor%腹膜后促纤维组织增生性小圆细胞瘤的临床诊治分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    卢宝健; 张卫; 尚芝群; 孙二琳; 念学武; 高靖达; 马成泉; 韩瑞发

    2015-01-01

    Objective To explore the clinical diagnostic features and treatment of desmoplastic small round cell tumor ( DSRCT ) , and to improve the understanding and management of this tumor. Methods The clinicopathological data of nine patients treated in our hospital from October 2004 to June 2014 were retrospectively analyzed and a review of the literature was made. The clinical manifestations, pathological characteristics, diagnosis and differential diagnosis, treatment and prognosis of this tumor were summarized and analyzed. Results Nine patients with DSRCT, 5 males and 4 females, with an average age of 21 years ( range 8⁃56 years) were included in this study. Ultrasound examination revealed irregular low⁃density mass shadow in the abdominal cavity. CT examination found that 6 cases had abdominal and retroperitoneal multiple solid tumor nodules, uneven density, and visible low density fluid area. Postoperative pathological examination revealed that the tumor cells were small, mostly elliptic, gathered to form clear structure of nests with clear irregular boundaries. The central portion of large tumor nests often showed necrosis. Scattered fibroblasts and large amount of hyalinization of collagen fibers were seen in the interstitial tissue around the nests. Six patients received laparotomy surgery, however, all failed to resect the tumor completely. Three patients received postoperative chemotherapy, i.e. two cases had carboplatin and paclitaxel chemotherapy, and one case of chemotherapy regimen not specified. Two patients had radiation and chemotherapy ( no concrete plan was available) . Another case was lost to follow⁃up. Two of the three patients without surgery received chemotherapy with CAP ( cyclophosphamide + adriamycin + carboplatin) and total rectal lesions, pelvic and inguinal lymph nodes, ilium metastases radiation therapy. Another one patient received EP regimen ( DDP+VP16) which was then changed into a TP chemotherapy alone. Eight of the nine cases

  7. Astrocytes directly influence tumor cell invasion and metastasis in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling Wang

    Full Text Available Brain metastasis is a defining component of tumor pathophysiology, and the underlying mechanisms responsible for this phenomenon are not well understood. Current dogma is that tumor cells stimulate and activate astrocytes, and this mutual relationship is critical for tumor cell sustenance in the brain. Here, we provide evidence that primary rat neonatal and adult astrocytes secrete factors that proactively induced human lung and breast tumor cell invasion and metastasis capabilities. Among which, tumor invasion factors namely matrix metalloprotease-2 (MMP-2 and MMP-9 were partly responsible for the astrocyte media-induced tumor cell invasion. Inhibiting MMPs reduced the ability of tumor cell to migrate and invade in vitro. Further, injection of astrocyte media-conditioned breast cancer cells in mice showed increased invasive activity to the brain and other distant sites. More importantly, blocking the preconditioned tumor cells with broad spectrum MMP inhibitor decreased the invasion and metastasis of the tumor cells, in particular to the brain in vivo. Collectively, our data implicate astrocyte-derived MMP-2 and MMP-9 as critical players that facilitate tumor cell migration and invasion leading to brain metastasis.

  8. Recent Advances in the Molecular Characterization of Circulating Tumor Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lowes, Lori E. [London Regional Cancer Program, London Health Sciences Centre, London, ON N6A 4L6 (Canada); Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Schulich School of Medicine and Dentistry, Western University, London, ON N6A 5C1 (Canada); Department of Oncology, Schulich School of Medicine and Dentistry, Western University, London, ON N6A 4L6 (Canada); Allan, Alison L., E-mail: alison.allan@lhsc.on.ca [London Regional Cancer Program, London Health Sciences Centre, London, ON N6A 4L6 (Canada); Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Schulich School of Medicine and Dentistry, Western University, London, ON N6A 5C1 (Canada); Department of Oncology, Schulich School of Medicine and Dentistry, Western University, London, ON N6A 4L6 (Canada); Lawson Health Research Institute, London, ON N6C 2R5 (Canada)

    2014-03-13

    Although circulating tumor cells (CTCs) were first observed over a century ago, lack of sensitive methodology precluded detailed study of these cells until recently. However, technological advances have now facilitated the identification, enumeration, and characterization of CTCs using a variety of methods. The majority of evidence supporting the use of CTCs in clinical decision-making has been related to enumeration using the CellSearch{sup ®} system and correlation with prognosis. Growing evidence also suggests that CTC monitoring can provide an early indication of patient treatment response based on comparison of CTC levels before and after therapy. However, perhaps the greatest potential that CTCs hold for oncology lies at the level of molecular characterization. Clinical treatment decisions may be more effective if they are based on molecular characteristics of metastatic cells rather than on those of the primary tumor alone. Molecular characterization of CTCs (which can be repeatedly isolated in a minimally invasive fashion) provides the opportunity for a “real-time liquid biopsy” that allows assessment of genetic drift, investigation of molecular disease evolution, and identification of actionable genomic characteristics. This review focuses on recent advances in this area, including approaches involving immunophenotyping, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), multiplex RT-PCR, microarray, and genomic sequencing.

  9. Molecular Programming of Tumor-Infiltrating CD8+ T Cells and IL15 Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doedens, Andrew L; Rubinstein, Mark P; Gross, Emilie T; Best, J Adam; Craig, David H; Baker, Megan K; Cole, David J; Bui, Jack D; Goldrath, Ananda W

    2016-09-01

    Despite clinical potential and recent advances, durable immunotherapeutic ablation of solid tumors is not routinely achieved. IL15 expands natural killer cell (NK), natural killer T cell (NKT) and CD8(+) T-cell numbers and engages the cytotoxic program, and thus is under evaluation for potentiation of cancer immunotherapy. We found that short-term therapy with IL15 bound to soluble IL15 receptor α-Fc (IL15cx; a form of IL15 with increased half-life and activity) was ineffective in the treatment of autochthonous PyMT murine mammary tumors, despite abundant CD8(+) T-cell infiltration. Probing of this poor responsiveness revealed that IL15cx only weakly activated intratumoral CD8(+) T cells, even though cells in the lung and spleen were activated and dramatically expanded. Tumor-infiltrating CD8(+) T cells exhibited cell-extrinsic and cell-intrinsic resistance to IL15. Our data showed that in the case of persistent viral or tumor antigen, single-agent systemic IL15cx treatment primarily expanded antigen-irrelevant or extratumoral CD8(+) T cells. We identified exhaustion, tissue-resident memory, and tumor-specific molecules expressed in tumor-infiltrating CD8(+) T cells, which may allow therapeutic targeting or programming of specific subsets to evade loss of function and cytokine resistance, and, in turn, increase the efficacy of IL2/15 adjuvant cytokine therapy. Cancer Immunol Res; 4(9); 799-811. ©2016 AACR.

  10. [Diagnostic hysteroscopy and risk of peritoneal dissemination of tumor cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazbeck, C; Dhainaut, C; Batallan, A; Benifla, J-L; Thoury, A; Madelenat, P

    2005-04-01

    Questions have been raised about the safety of diagnostic hysteroscopy preceding surgical treatment of endometrial carcinoma. Several studies showed that the risk of a positive cytology among patients presenting endometrial adenocarcinoma was increased after diagnostic hysteroscopy, suggesting a peritoneal dissemination of tumor cells due to the exploration. We studied this hypothesis on the basis of a systematic review of the scientific data. Five studies fulfilling inclusion criteria have been selected and have been introduced into a fixed model of meta-analysis. On a total of 756 studied patients, 79 presented a positive peritoneal cytology. The diagnostic hysteroscopy did not increase significantly the risk of abdominal dissemination of tumor cells, the peritoneal cytology being positive among 38 patients in the group having undergone this intervention vs 41 patients in the control group (OR = 1,64; 95% CI: 0,96-2,80). In conclusion, no formal evidence is currently available concerning the role of diagnostic hysteroscopy on the frequency of peritoneal dissemination of tumor cells, or on the vital prognosis of the patients presenting with endometrial carcinoma. From the data available, there is not any reason to avoid diagnostic hysteroscopy in the initial workup of endometrial cancer. PMID:15894211

  11. Pharmacogenomics of Scopoletin in Tumor Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ean-Jeong Seo

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Drug resistance and the severe side effects of chemotherapy necessitate the development of novel anticancer drugs. Natural products are a valuable source for drug development. Scopoletin is a coumarin compound, which can be found in several Artemisia species and other plant genera. Microarray-based RNA expression profiling of the NCI cell line panel showed that cellular response of scopoletin did not correlate to the expression of ATP-binding cassette (ABC transporters as classical drug resistance mechanisms (ABCB1, ABCB5, ABCC1, ABCG2. This was also true for the expression of the oncogene EGFR and the mutational status of the tumor suppressor gene, TP53. However, mutations in the RAS oncogenes and the slow proliferative activity in terms of cell doubling times significantly correlated with scopoletin resistance. COMPARE and hierarchical cluster analyses of transcriptome-wide mRNA expression resulted in a set of 40 genes, which all harbored binding motifs in their promoter sequences for the transcription factor, NF-κB, which is known to be associated with drug resistance. RAS mutations, slow proliferative activity, and NF-κB may hamper its effectiveness. By in silico molecular docking studies, we found that scopoletin bound to NF-κB and its regulator IκB. Scopoletin activated NF-κB in a SEAP-driven NF-κB reporter cell line, indicating that NF-κB might be a resistance factor for scopoletin. In conclusion, scopoletin might serve as lead compound for drug development because of its favorable activity against tumor cells with ABC-transporter expression, although NF-κB activation may be considered as resistance factor for this compound. Further investigations are warranted to explore the full therapeutic potential of this natural product.

  12. Boswellia sacra essential oil induces tumor cell-specific apoptosis and suppresses tumor aggressiveness in cultured human breast cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suhail Mahmoud M

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gum resins obtained from trees of the Burseraceae family (Boswellia sp. are important ingredients in incense and perfumes. Extracts prepared from Boswellia sp. gum resins have been shown to possess anti-inflammatory and anti-neoplastic effects. Essential oil prepared by distillation of the gum resin traditionally used for aromatic therapy has also been shown to have tumor cell-specific anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic activities. The objective of this study was to optimize conditions for preparing Boswellea sacra essential oil with the highest biological activity in inducing tumor cell-specific cytotoxicity and suppressing aggressive tumor phenotypes in human breast cancer cells. Methods Boswellia sacra essential oil was prepared from Omani Hougari grade resins through hydrodistillation at 78 or 100 oC for 12 hours. Chemical compositions were identified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry; and total boswellic acids contents were quantified by high-performance liquid chromatography. Boswellia sacra essential oil-mediated cell viability and death were studied in established human breast cancer cell lines (T47D, MCF7, MDA-MB-231 and an immortalized normal human breast cell line (MCF10-2A. Apoptosis was assayed by genomic DNA fragmentation. Anti-invasive and anti-multicellular tumor properties were evaluated by cellular network and spheroid formation models, respectively. Western blot analysis was performed to study Boswellia sacra essential oil-regulated proteins involved in apoptosis, signaling pathways, and cell cycle regulation. Results More abundant high molecular weight compounds, including boswellic acids, were present in Boswellia sacra essential oil prepared at 100 oC hydrodistillation. All three human breast cancer cell lines were sensitive to essential oil treatment with reduced cell viability and elevated cell death, whereas the immortalized normal human breast cell line was more resistant to essential oil

  13. EXTRA-ABDOMINAL DESMOID TUMOR: LOCAL RECURRENCE AND TREATMENT OPTIONS

    Science.gov (United States)

    TEIXEIRA, LUIZ EDUARDO MOREIRA; ARANTES, EUGÊNIO COSTA; VILLELA, RAFAEL FREITAS; SOARES, CLAUDIO BELING GONÇALVES; COSTA, ROBERTO BITARÃES DE CARVALHO; ANDRADE, MARCO ANTÔNIO PERCOPE DE

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To evaluate the rate of local recurrence of extra-abdominal desmoid tumor and compare the outcomes of surgical treatment and conservative treatment. Methods: Twenty one patients (14 women and seven men), mean age 33.0±8.7 years old, with a diagnosis of desmoid tumor were evaluated. The mean follow-up period was 58.5±29.0 months. Fourteen cases involved the lower limbs, four cases involved the upper limbs, and three cases involved the trunk. The average tumor size was 12.7±7.5 cm. Of the 21 patients, 14 did not undergo previous treatment and seven patients relapsed before the initial evaluation. Surgical treatment was performed in 16 patients and conservative treatment was performed in five patients. Results: Recurrence occurred in seven patients (33%) and six of them relapsed within the first 18 months. No significant difference was observed between conservative and surgical treatment. However, a significant difference was observed among patients undergoing wide resection and who experienced improved local control. Conclusion: The recurrence rate of desmoid tumor was 33.3%. There was no difference in recurrence between conservative and surgical treatment. In surgical treatment, wide margins showed better results for recurrence control. Level of Evidence III. Retrospective Observational Study. PMID:27217816

  14. Squalamine treatment of human tumors in nu/nu mice enhances platinum-based chemotherapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, J I; Weitman, S; Gonzalez, C M; Jundt, C H; Marty, J; Stringer, S D; Holroyd, K J; Mclane, M P; Chen, Q; Zasloff, M; Von Hoff, D D

    2001-03-01

    Squalamine, an antiangiogenic aminosterol, is presently undergoing Phase II clinical trials in cancer patients. To broaden our understanding of the clinical potential for squalamine, this agent was evaluated in nu/nu mouse xenograft models using the chemoresistant MV-522 human non-small cell lung carcinoma and the SD human neuroblastoma lines. Squalamine was studied alone and in combination with either cisplatin or paclitaxel plus carboplatin. Squalamine alone produced a modest MV-522 tumor growth inhibition (TGI) and yielded a TGI with cisplatin that was better than cisplatin alone. Squalamine also significantly enhanced the activity of paclitaxel/carboplatin combination therapy in the MV-522 tumor model. Squalamine similarly improved the effectiveness of cisplatin in producing TGI when screened against the SD human neuroblastoma xenograft. Xenograft tumor shrinkage was seen for the MV-522 tumor in combination treatments including squalamine, whereas no tumor shrinkage was seen when squalamine was omitted from the treatment regimen. To gain a greater understanding of the mechanism by which squalamine inhibited tumor growth in the xenograft studies, in vitro experiments were carried out with vascular endothelial growth factor-stimulated human umbilical vein endothelial cells in culture exposed to squalamine. Squalamine treatment was found to retard two cellular events necessary for angiogenesis, inducing disorganization of F-actin stress fibers and causing a concomitant reduction of detectable cell the surface molecular endothelial cadherin (VE-cadherin). We propose that the augmentation by squalamine of cytotoxicity from platinum-based therapies is attributable to interference by squalamine with the ability of stimuli to promote endothelial cell movement and cell-cell communication necessary for growth of new blood vessels in xenografts after chemotherapeutic injury to the tumor. PMID:11297269

  15. Role of Acid Sphingomyelinase-Induced Signaling in Melanoma Cells for Hematogenous Tumor Metastasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Carpinteiro

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hematogenous metastasis of malignant tumor cells is a multistep process that requires release of tumor cells from the local tumor mass, interaction of the tumor cells with platelets in the blood, and adhesion of either the activated tumor cells or the complexes of platelets and tumor cells to the endothelial cells of the target organ. We have previously shown that the interaction of melanoma cells with platelets results in the release of acid sphingomyelinase (Asm from activated platelets. Secreted platelet-derived Asm acts on malignant tumor cells to cluster and activate integrins; such clustering and activation are necessary for tumor cell adhesion to endothelial cells and for metastasis. Methods: We examined the response of tumor cells to treatment with extracellular sphingomyelinase or co-incubation with wild-type and Asm-deficient platelets. We determined the phosphorylation and activation of several intracellular signaling molecules, in particular p38 kinase (p38K, phospholipase Cγ (PLCγ, ezrin, and extracellular signal-regulated kinases. Results: Incubation of B16F10 melanoma cells with Asm activates p38 MAP kinase (p38K, phospholipase Cγ (PLCγ, ezrin, and extracellular signal-regulated kinases. Co-incubation of B16F10 melanoma cells with wild-type or Asm-deficient platelets showed that the phosphorylation/activation of p38K is dependent on Asm. Pharmacological blockade of p38K prevents activation of β1 integrin and adhesion in vitro. Most importantly, inhibition of p38K activity in B16F10 melanoma cells prevents tumor cell adhesion and metastasis to the lung in vivo, a finding indicating the importance of p38K for metastasis. Conclusions: Asm, secreted from activated platelets after tumor cell-platelet contact, induces p38K phosphorylation in tumor cells. This in turn stimulates β1 integrin activation that is necessary for adhesion and subsequent metastasis of tumor cells. Thus, inhibition of p38K might be a novel

  16. Fusion with stem cell makes the hepatocellular carcinoma cells similar to liver tumor-initiating cells

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Ran; Chen, Shuxun; Li, Changxian; Ng, Kevin Tak Pan; Kong, Chi-Wing; Cheng, Jinping; Cheng, Shuk Han; Li, Ronald A.; Lo, Chung Mau; Man, Kwan; Sun, Dong

    2016-01-01

    Background Cell fusion is a fast and highly efficient technique for cells to acquire new properties. The fusion of somatic cells with stem cells can reprogram somatic cells to a pluripotent state. Our research on the fusion of stem cells and cancer cells demonstrates that the fused cells can exhibit stemness and cancer cell-like characteristics. Thus, tumor-initiating cell-like cells are generated. Methods We employed laser-induced single-cell fusion technique to fuse the hepatocellular carci...

  17. [Prevalence and clinicopathological characteristics of giant cell tumors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estrada-Villaseñor, E G; Linares-González, L M; Delgado-Cedillo, E A; González-Guzmán, R; Rico-Martínez, G

    2015-01-01

    The frequency of giant cell tumors reported in the literature is very variable. Considering that our population has its own features, which distinguish it from the Anglo-Saxon and Asian populations, we think that both the frequency and the clinical characteristics of giant cell tumors in our population are different. The major aim of this paper was to determine the frequency and clinicopathological characteristics of giant cell tumors of the bone. A cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted of the cases diagnosed at our service as giant cell tumors of the bone from January to December 2013. The electronic clinical records, radiologic records and histologic slides from each case were reviewed. Giant cell tumors represented 17% of total bone tumors and 28% of benign tumors. Patients included 13 females and 18 males. The most frequent locations of giant cell tumors were: the proximal tibia, 9 cases (29%), and the distal femur, 6 cases (19%). Forty-five percent of giant cell tumors were associated with aneurysmal bone cyst (ABC) (14 cases) and one case (3%) was malignant. The frequency of giant cell tumors in this case series was intermediate, that is, higher than the one reported in Anglo-Saxon countries (usually low), but without reaching the frequency rates reported in Asian countries (high). PMID:27403516

  18. Donor-derived brain tumor following neural stem cell transplantation in an ataxia telangiectasia patient.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ninette Amariglio

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Neural stem cells are currently being investigated as potential therapies for neurodegenerative diseases, stroke, and trauma. However, concerns have been raised over the safety of this experimental therapeutic approach, including, for example, whether there is the potential for tumors to develop from transplanted stem cells. METHODS AND FINDINGS: A boy with ataxia telangiectasia (AT was treated with intracerebellar and intrathecal injection of human fetal neural stem cells. Four years after the first treatment he was diagnosed with a multifocal brain tumor. The biopsied tumor was diagnosed as a glioneuronal neoplasm. We compared the tumor cells and the patient's peripheral blood cells by fluorescent in situ hybridization using X and Y chromosome probes, by PCR for the amelogenin gene X- and Y-specific alleles, by MassArray for the ATM patient specific mutation and for several SNPs, by PCR for polymorphic microsatellites, and by human leukocyte antigen (HLA typing. Molecular and cytogenetic studies showed that the tumor was of nonhost origin suggesting it was derived from the transplanted neural stem cells. Microsatellite and HLA analysis demonstrated that the tumor is derived from at least two donors. CONCLUSIONS: This is the first report of a human brain tumor complicating neural stem cell therapy. The findings here suggest that neuronal stem/progenitor cells may be involved in gliomagenesis and provide the first example of a donor-derived brain tumor. Further work is urgently needed to assess the safety of these therapies.

  19. T-Cell Tumor Elimination as a Result of T-Cell Receptor-Mediated Activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashwell, Jonathan D.; Longo, Dan L.; Bridges, Sandra H.

    1987-07-01

    It has recently been shown that activation of murine T-cell hybridomas with antigen inhibits their growth in vitro. The ``suicide'' of these neoplastic T cells upon stimulation with antigen suggested the possibility that activation via the antigen-specific receptor could also inhibit the growth of neoplastic T cells in vivo. To test this, mice were subcutaneously inoculated with antigen-specific T-cell hybridomas and then treated intraperitoneally with antigen. Administration of the appropriate antigen immediately after inoculation with the T-cell hybridoma abrogated tumor formation; antigen administered after tumors had become established decreased the tumor burden and, in a substantial fraction of animals, led to long-term survival. The efficacy of antigen therapy was due to both a direct inhibitory effect on tumor growth and the induction of host immunity. These studies demonstrate the utility of cellular activation as a means of inhibiting neoplastic T-cell growth in vivo and provide a rationale for studying the use of less selective reagents that can mimic the activating properties of antigen, such as monoclonal antibodies, in the treatment of T-cell neoplasms of unknown antigen specificity.

  20. Ovarian steroid cell tumor in women with polycystic ovarian syndrome: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yarandi F

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Steroid cell tumor is one of the rare ovarian tumors and forms 0.1% of all ovarian tumors, divided to three subgroups. Steroid cell tumor that are not otherwise specified (NOS are the most common type and represent 60% of steroid cell tumors. One of the most known signs of this tumor is hormonal function, especially androgenic effects of it. Primary treatment consists of eradication of tumor via surgery.Case presentation: The patient is a 29 years old female with history of poly cystic ovarian syndrome since 10 years ago, who attended to the clinic of General Women Hospital of Tehran in January 2011. In pelvic ultrasonography, there was a 6449mm mass in the right adnexa consisting of homogeneous component. She underwent laparotomy and unilateral salpingoophorectomy was done. Pathological report was steroid cell tumor of ovary.Conclusion: The aim of this study is reporting one of the rare tumors of ovary and assessment of the correct way of diagnosis and treatment of it.

  1. Tumor-infiltrating B lymphocytes as an efficient source of highly specific immunoglobulins recognizing tumor cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pelliccia Angela

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is much evidence that tumor cells elicit a humoral immune response in patients. In most cases, the presence of antibodies in peripheral blood is detected only in small proportion of patients with tumors overexpressing the corresponding antigen. In the present study, we analyzed the significance of local humoral response provided by tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes in breast cancer patients. Methods The ability of a patient's immune system to produce specific antibodies inside tumor tissue, capable of recognizing tumor cells, was explored through analysis of the oligoclonality of antibodies derived from tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes and construction of a series of recombinant antibody libraries in scFv format, derived from breast tumor-infiltrating B lymphocytes. These libraries and one from peripheral blood lymphocytes of a single breast cancer patient were panned against three purified surface tumor antigens, such as CEA, MUC1 and ED-B domain, and against intact MCF7 breast carcinoma cells. Results Application of novel display vector, pKM19, allowed isolation of a large panel of breast cancer-specific antibodies against known tumor antigens, as well as against breast carcinoma cells. Reactivity of novel scFvs was confirmed by ELISA, immunohistochemistry, fluorescence staining and flow cytometry. We demonstrated that seven of ten primary breast tumor specimens, obtained using discarded surgical material, could be exploited as an appropriate source for generation of phage display libraries, giving highly specific antitumor antibodies which recognize heterologous tumor cells. Conclusion Local humoral immune response within tumor tissue in breast cancer patients frequently has an oligoclonal character. Efficient selection of specific antitumor antibodies from recombinant antibody libraries, derived from such oligoclonal tumor-infiltrated B lymphocytes, indicates the presence of natural immune response against tumor antigens

  2. TUMOR-RELATED METHYLATED CELL-FREE DNA AND CIRCULATING TUMOR CELLS IN MELANOMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca eSalvianti

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Solid tumor release into the circulation cell-free DNA (cfDNA and circulating tumor cells (CTCs which represent promising biomarkers for cancer diagnosis. Circulating tumor DNA may be studied in plasma from cancer patients by detecting tumor specific alterations, such as genetic or epigenetic modifications. Ras association domain family 1 isoform A (RASSF1A is a tumor suppressor gene silenced by promoter hypermethylation in a variety of human cancers including melanoma.The aim of the present study was to assess the diagnostic performance of a tumor-related methylated cfDNA marker in melanoma patients and to compare this parameter with the presence of CTCs.RASSF1A promoter methylation was quantified in cfDNA by qPCR in a consecutive series of 84 melanoma patients and 68 healthy controls. In a subset of 68 cases, the presence of CTCs was assessed by a filtration method (Isolation by Size of Epithelial Tumor Cells, ISET as well as by an indirect method based on the detection of tyrosinase mRNA by RT-qPCR. The distribution of RASSF1A methylated cfDNA was investigated in cases and controls and the predictive capability of this parameter was assessed by means of the area under the ROC curve (AUC.The percentage of cases with methylated RASSF1A promoter in cfDNA was significantly higher in each class of melanoma patients (in situ, invasive and metastatic than in healthy subjects (Pearson chi-squared test, p<0.001. The concentration of RASSF1A methylated cfDNA in the subjects with a detectable quantity of methylated alleles was significantly higher in melanoma patients than in controls. The biomarker showed a good predictive capability (in terms of AUC in discriminating between melanoma patients and healthy controls. This epigenetic marker associated to cfDNA did not show a significant correlation with the presence of CTCs, but, when the two parameters are jointly considered, we obtain a higher sensitivity of the detection of positive cases in invasive

  3. Tumor-Related Methylated Cell-Free DNA and Circulating Tumor Cells in Melanoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvianti, Francesca; Orlando, Claudio; Massi, Daniela; De Giorgi, Vincenzo; Grazzini, Marta; Pazzagli, Mario; Pinzani, Pamela

    2016-01-01

    Solid tumor release into the circulation cell-free DNA (cfDNA) and circulating tumor cells (CTCs) which represent promising biomarkers for cancer diagnosis. Circulating tumor DNA may be studied in plasma from cancer patients by detecting tumor specific alterations, such as genetic or epigenetic modifications. Ras association domain family 1 isoform A (RASSF1A) is a tumor suppressor gene silenced by promoter hypermethylation in a variety of human cancers including melanoma. The aim of the present study was to assess the diagnostic performance of a tumor-related methylated cfDNA marker in melanoma patients and to compare this parameter with the presence of CTCs. RASSF1A promoter methylation was quantified in cfDNA by qPCR in a consecutive series of 84 melanoma patients and 68 healthy controls. In a subset of 68 cases, the presence of CTCs was assessed by a filtration method (Isolation by Size of Epithelial Tumor Cells, ISET) as well as by an indirect method based on the detection of tyrosinase mRNA by RT-qPCR. The distribution of RASSF1A methylated cfDNA was investigated in cases and controls and the predictive capability of this parameter was assessed by means of the area under the ROC curve (AUC). The percentage of cases with methylated RASSF1A promoter in cfDNA was significantly higher in each class of melanoma patients (in situ, invasive and metastatic) than in healthy subjects (Pearson chi-squared test, p < 0.001). The concentration of RASSF1A methylated cfDNA in the subjects with a detectable quantity of methylated alleles was significantly higher in melanoma patients than in controls. The biomarker showed a good predictive capability (in terms of AUC) in discriminating between melanoma patients and healthy controls. This epigenetic marker associated to cfDNA did not show a significant correlation with the presence of CTCs, but, when the two parameters are jointly considered, we obtain a higher sensitivity of the detection of positive cases in invasive and

  4. Application of nanoparticles in brain tumor treatment

    CERN Document Server

    Caruso, Gerardo

    2012-01-01

    Despite progress in surgery, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy, an effective treatment of gliomas does not yet exist. This new monograph in the ASME-Momentum Press series on Biomedical & Nanomedical Technologies book shows how nanotechnology could be used both to improve the treatment efficacy and to reduce the adverse side effects. It will explain how nanotechnology-based approaches to targeted delivery of drugs across the brain-blood barrier may potentially be engineered to carry out specific functions as needed.

  5. Primary, non-exophytic, optic nerve germ cell tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiLuna, Michael L; Two, Aimee M; Levy, Gillian H; Patel, Toral; Huttner, Anita J; Duncan, Charles C; Piepmeier, Joseph M

    2009-12-01

    Tumors of the optic chiasm are relatively uncommon and usually associated with phakomatoses such as neurofibromatosis. Even more rare is the presentation of a primary, non-exophytic, isolated optic chiasm germ cell tumor (GCT). These tumors have imaging characteristics nearly indistinguishable from optic chiasmatic gliomas (OCGs). Herein we describe two cases of young men who presented with similar findings of progressive, painless visual loss and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis dysfunction including diabetes insipidus. Brain imaging was non-diagnostic and suggestive of an OCG. Pathology demonstrated GCTs in each case highlighting the importance of biopsy confirmation of the diagnosis. Both patients underwent a pterional craniotomy and sub-frontal approach to the optic chiasm. The chiasm was diffusely enlarged and discolored in each case without evidence of sellar, suprasellar or perichiasmatic pathology. Pathology demonstrated a malignant mixed GCT in the first patient and a germinoma in the second. This case series highlights the importance of tissue biopsy for patients with progressive symptoms from optic chiasm tumors. Furthermore, this is the first report of a primary, non-exophytic malignant mixed GCT. As the treatment regimens differ widely between optic chiasm GCTs and chiasm gliomas, tissue diagnosis is important. PMID:19554263

  6. Effects of low dose radiation on tumor apoptosis, cell cycle progression and changes of apoptosis-related protein bcl-2 in tumor-bearing mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To study the effect of low dose radiation (LDR) on tumor apoptosis, cell cycle progression and changes of apoptosis-related protein bcl-2 in tumor-bearing mice. Methods: Kunming stain male mice were implanted with S180 sarcoma cells in the left inguen subcutaneously as an in situ experimental animal model. Seven days after implantation, the mice were given 75 mGy whole-body γ-irradiation. At 24 and 48 h after irradiation, all mice were sacrificed to measure the tumor volume, and tumor cell apoptosis, cell cycle progression were analyzed by flow cytometry. The expression of apoptosis-related protein bcl-2 and the apoptotic rate of tumor cells were observed by immunohistochemistry and electron microscopy. Results: Tumor growth was significantly slowed down after LDR (P1 phase and the expression of bcl-2 protein decreased at 24 h. Apoptotic rate of tumor cells increased significantly at 48 h after LDR. Conclusion: LDR could cause a G1-phase arrest and increase the apoptosis of tumor cells through the low level of apoptosis-related protein bcl-2 in the tumor-bearing mice. The organized immune function and anti-tumor ability are markedly increased after LDR. The study provides practical evidence of clinical application to cancer treatment

  7. Assessment of interpatient heterogeneity in tumor radiosensitivity for nonsmall cell lung cancer using tumor-volume variation data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chvetsov, Alexei V., E-mail: chvetsov2@gmail.com; Schwartz, Jeffrey L.; Mayr, Nina [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington, 1959 NE Pacific Street, Seattle, Washington 98195-6043 (United States); Yartsev, Slav [London Regional Cancer Program, London Health Sciences Centre, 790 Commissioners Road East, London, Ontario 46A 4L6 (Canada)

    2014-06-15

    in this work, when taken together with the data obtained previously for head and neck cancer, suggests that the cell surviving fractionsS{sub 2} can be reconstructed from the tumor volume variation curves measured during radiotherapy with conventional fractionation. The proposed method can be used for treatment evaluation and adaptation.

  8. Cytogenetics of a malignant ovarian germ-cell tumor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Echten, J; van Doorn, LC; van der Linden, HC; van der Veen, AY; de Jong, B

    1998-01-01

    Cytogenetic investigation of a malignant ovarian tumor diagnosed as a mixed germ-cell tumor, composed of extensive choriocarcinoma and foci of yolk-sac tumor, revealed a highly abnormal chromosomal pattern. We found a chromosome number in the hypertriploid/hypotetraploid range, and several clonal st

  9. Flow cytometric DNA ploidy analysis of ovarian granulosa cell tumors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. Chadha; C.J. Cornelisse; A. Schabert (A.)

    1990-01-01

    textabstractAbstract The nuclear DNA content of 50 ovarian tumors initially diagnosed as granulosa cell tumors was measured by flow cytometry using paraffin-embedded archival material. The follow-up period of the patients ranged from 4 months to 19 years. Thirty-eight tumors were diploid or near-dip

  10. The chemosensitivity of testicular germ cell tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voutsadakis, Ioannis A

    2014-04-01

    Although rare cancers overall, testicular germ cell tumors (TGCTs) are the most common type of cancer in young males below 40 years of age. Both subtypes of TGCTs, i.e., seminomas and non-seminomas, are highly curable and the majority of even metastatic patients may expect to be cured. These high cure rates are not due to the indolent nature of these cancers, but rather to their sensitivity to chemotherapy (and for seminomas to radiotherapy). The delineation of the cause of chemosensitivity at the molecular level is of paramount importance, because it may provide insights into the minority of TGCTs that are chemo-resistant and, thereby, provide opportunities for specific therapeutic interventions aimed at reverting them to chemosensitivity. In addition, delineation of the molecular basis of TGCT chemo-sensitivity may be informative for the cause of chemo-resistance of other more common types of cancer and, thus, may create new therapeutic leads. p53, a frequently mutated tumor suppressor in cancers in general, is not mutated in TGCTs, a fact that has implications for their chemo-sensitivity. Oct4, an embryonic transcription factor, is uniformly expressed in the seminoma and embryonic carcinoma components of non-seminomas, and its interplay with p53 may be important in the chemotherapy response of these tumors. This interplay, together with other features of TGCTs such as the gain of genetic material from the short arm of chromosome 12 and the association with disorders of testicular development, will be discussed in this paper and integrated in a unifying hypothesis that may explain their chemo-sensitivity. PMID:24692098

  11. Folate-conjugated immunoglobulin targets melanoma tumor cells for NK cell effector functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skinner, Cassandra C.; McMichael, Elizabeth L.; Jaime-Ramirez, Alena C.; Abrams, Zachary B.; Lee, Robert J.; Carson, William E.

    2016-01-01

    The folate receptor (FR) is over-expressed on the vascular side of cancerous cells including those of the breast, ovaries, testes, and cervix. We hypothesized that a folate-conjugated immunoglobulin (F-IgG) would bind to the FR that is over-expressed on melanoma tumor cells to target these cells for lysis by natural killer (NK) cells. Folate receptor expression was confirmed in the Mel-39 (human melanoma) cell line by flow cytometry and immunoblot analysis, using KB (human oral epithelial) and F01 (human melanoma) as a positive and negative control, respectively. FR-positive and negative cell lines were treated with F-IgG or control immunoglobulin G (C-IgG) in the presence or absence of cytokines in order to determine NK cell ability to lyse FR-positive cell lines. NK cell activation was significantly upregulated and lysis of Mel 39 tumor cells enhanced following treatment with F-IgG, as compared to C-IgG at all effector:target (E:T) ratios (p<0.01). This trend was further enhanced by NK cell stimulation with the activating cytokine interleukin-12 (IL-12). NK cell production of cytokines such as interferon-gamma (IFN-γ), macrophage inflammatory protein 1 alpha (MIP-1α), and regulated on activation normal T-cell expressed and secreted (RANTES) were also significantly increased in response to co-stimulation with IL-12 stimulation and F-IgG-coated Mel 39 target cells, as compared to controls (p<0.01). In contrast, F-IgG did not bind to the FR-negative cell line F01 and had no significant effect on NK cell lysis or cytokine production. This research indicates the potential use of F-IgG for its ability to induce an immune response from NK cells against FR-positive melanoma tumor cells which can be further enhanced by the addition of cytokines. PMID:27035691

  12. T cell avidity and tumor recognition: implications and therapeutic strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roszkowski Jeffrey J

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In the last two decades, great advances have been made studying the immune response to human tumors. The identification of protein antigens from cancer cells and better techniques for eliciting antigen specific T cell responses in vitro and in vivo have led to improved understanding of tumor recognition by T cells. Yet, much remains to be learned about the intricate details of T celltumor cell interactions. Though the strength of interaction between T cell and target is thought to be a key factor influencing the T cell response, investigations of T cell avidity, T cell receptor (TCR affinity for peptide-MHC complex, and the recognition of peptide on antigen presenting targets or tumor cells reveal complex relationships. Coincident with these investigations, therapeutic strategies have been developed to enhance tumor recognition using antigens with altered peptide structures and T cells modified by the introduction of new antigen binding receptor molecules. The profound effects of these strategies on T celltumor interactions and the clinical implications of these effects are of interest to both scientists and clinicians. In recent years, the focus of much of our work has been the avidity and effector characteristics of tumor reactive T cells. Here we review concepts and current results in the field, and the implications of therapeutic strategies using altered antigens and altered effector T cells.

  13. Vesicle transfer and cell fusion: Emerging concepts of cell-cell communication in the tumor microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howcroft, T Kevin; Zhang, Huang-Ge; Dhodapkar, Madhav; Mohla, Suresh

    2011-08-01

    Cell-cell fusion and vesicle-mediated transfer are fundamental biological processes that are emerging as novel mechanisms for re-programming cells in the tumor microenvironment. Both cell-cell fusion and intercellular transfer of vesicles (including microvesicles and exosomes) allow for the transfer of information among tumor cells, between tumor cells and tumor stroma, and between tumor cells and the host immune system, which could have profound implications for our understanding of tumor initiation and progression. The National Cancer Institute's Division of Cancer Biology sponsored a recent workshop (December 4-6, 2010) entitled, Vesicle Transfer and Cell Fusion: Emerging Concepts of Cell-Cell Communication in the Tumor Microenvironment to assess the current state of the science in these two scientific areas. Co-chaired by Drs. Huang-Ge Zhang (University of Louisville) and Madhav Dhodapkar (Yale University) this workshop brought together, for the first time at the NIH, leaders in the field to assess the effects of vesicle transfer and cell-cell fusion on cancer initiation, progression and metastasis. This meeting report includes brief summaries of the presentations and identifies the major questions, roadblocks, and opportunities. The meeting report is presented here to highlight research priorities and to stimulate basic and translational research efforts to better understand the contributions of cell-cell fusion and vesicle transfer to cancer. PMID:21725211

  14. Immune response against large tumors eradicated by treatment with cyclophosphamide and IL-12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsung, K; Meko, J B; Tsung, Y L; Peplinski, G R; Norton, J A

    1998-02-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated eradication of small (4-8 mm) established murine MCA207 sarcomas by treatment with systemic IL-12. Analysis of the mechanism has revealed a cellular and molecular immune response at the tumor typical of a Th1 cell-mediated, macrophage-effected, delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) response. In the current study we investigate the immune response against long term established, large MCA207 tumors induced by combined treatment with IL-12 and cyclophosphamide (Cy), an agent known to potentiate the DTH response. Our results demonstrate that s.c. large MCA207 tumors (15-20 mm) that are refractory to treatment by either IL-12 or Cy alone can be completely eradicated by the combination of Cy and IL-12. IL-12 is apparently the only cytokine capable of mediating tumor eradication, and the effect is dependent on IFN-gamma. The contribution of Cy is probably due to immunopotentiation of DTH rather than to direct cytotoxicity to the tumor. The regression of these large tumors takes >4 wk and, in many cases, is self-sustained, in that little or no additional IL-12 is needed beyond the initial week of administration. Analysis of the cellular and molecular events at the tumor site suggests that the mechanism is a Th1-mediated antitumor immune response.

  15. Dendritic-tumor fusion cells in cancer immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takakura, Kazuki; Kajihara, Mikio; Ito, Zensho; Ohkusa, Toshifumi; Gong, Jianlin; Koido, Shigeo

    2015-03-01

    A promising area of clinical investigation is the use of cancer immunotherapy to treat cancer patients. Dendritic cells (DCs) operate as professional antigen-presenting cells (APCs) and play a critical role in the induction of antitumor immune responses. Thus, DC-based cancer immunotherapy represents a powerful strategy. One DC-based cancer immunotherapy strategy that has been investigated is the administration of fusion cells generated with DCs and whole tumor cells (DC-tumor fusion cells). The DC-tumor fusion cells can process a broad array of tumor-associated antigens (TAAs), including unidentified molecules, and present them through major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I and II pathways in the context of co-stimulatory signals. Improving the therapeutic efficacy of DC-tumor fusion cell-based cancer immunotherapy requires increased immunogenicity of DCs and whole tumor cells. We discuss the potential ability of DC-tumor fusion cells to activate antigen-specific T cells and strategies to improve the immunogenicity of DC-tumor fusion cells as anticancer vaccines.

  16. Biphasic modeling of brain tumor biomechanics and response to radiation treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angeli, Stelios; Stylianopoulos, Triantafyllos

    2016-06-14

    Biomechanical forces are central in tumor progression and response to treatment. This becomes more important in brain cancers where tumors are surrounded by tissues with different mechanical properties. Existing mathematical models ignore direct mechanical interactions of the tumor with the normal brain. Here, we developed a clinically relevant model, which predicts tumor growth accounting directly for mechanical interactions. A three-dimensional model of the gray and white matter and the cerebrospinal fluid was constructed from magnetic resonance images of a normal brain. Subsequently, a biphasic tissue growth theory for an initial tumor seed was employed, incorporating the effects of radiotherapy. Additionally, three different sets of brain tissue properties taken from the literature were used to investigate their effect on tumor growth. Results show the evolution of solid stress and interstitial fluid pressure within the tumor and the normal brain. Heterogeneous distribution of the solid stress exerted on the tumor resulted in a 35% spatial variation in cancer cell proliferation. Interestingly, the model predicted that distant from the tumor, normal tissues still undergo significant deformations while it was found that intratumoral fluid pressure is elevated. Our predictions relate to clinical symptoms of brain cancers and present useful tools for therapy planning. PMID:27086116

  17. Breast cancer cell behaviors on staged tumorigenesis-mimicking matrices derived from tumor cells at various malignant stages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoshiba, Takashi [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Yamagata University, 4-3-16 Jonan, Yonezawa, Yamagata 992-8510 (Japan); International Center for Materials Nanoarchitectonics (MANA), National Institute for Materials Science, 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0044 (Japan); Tanaka, Masaru, E-mail: tanaka@yz.yamagata-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Yamagata University, 4-3-16 Jonan, Yonezawa, Yamagata 992-8510 (Japan)

    2013-09-20

    Highlights: •Models mimicking ECM in tumor with different malignancy were prepared. •Cancer cell proliferation was suppressed on benign tumor ECM. •Benign tumor cell proliferation was suppressed on cancerous ECM. •Chemoresistance of cancer cell was enhanced on cancerous ECM. -- Abstract: Extracellular matrix (ECM) has been focused to understand tumor progression in addition to the genetic mutation of cancer cells. Here, we prepared “staged tumorigenesis-mimicking matrices” which mimic in vivo ECM in tumor tissue at each malignant stage to understand the roles of ECM in tumor progression. Breast tumor cells, MDA-MB-231 (invasive), MCF-7 (non-invasive), and MCF-10A (benign) cells, were cultured to form their own ECM beneath the cells and formed ECM was prepared as staged tumorigenesis-mimicking matrices by decellularization treatment. Cells showed weak attachment on the matrices derived from MDA-MB-231 cancer cells. The proliferations of MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 was promoted on the matrices derived from MDA-MB-231 cancer cells whereas MCF-10A cell proliferation was not promoted. MCF-10A cell proliferation was promoted on the matrices derived from MCF-10A cells. Chemoresistance of MDA-MB-231 cells against 5-fluorouracil increased on only matrices derived from MDA-MB-231 cells. Our results showed that the cells showed different behaviors on staged tumorigenesis-mimicking matrices according to the malignancy of cell sources for ECM preparation. Therefore, staged tumorigenesis-mimicking matrices might be a useful in vitro ECM models to investigate the roles of ECM in tumor progression.

  18. Breast cancer tumor growth is efficiently inhibited by dendritic cell transfusion in a murine model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viet Quoc Pham

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The ability of dendritic cells to efficiently present tumor-derived antigens when primed with tumor cell lysates makes them attractive as an approach for cancer treatment. This study aimed to evaluate the effects of dendritic cell transfusion dose on breast cancer tumor growth in a murine model. Dendritic cells were produced from allogeneic bone marrow-derived mononuclear cells that were cultured in RPMI 1640 medium supplemented with 20 ng/mL GM-CSF and 20 ng/mL IL-4 for 7 days. These cells were checked for maturation before being primed with a cancer cell-derived antigen. Cancer cell antigens were produced by a rapid freeze-thaw procedure using a 4T1 cell line. Immature dendritic cells were loaded with 4T1 cellderived antigens. Dendritic cells were transfused into mice bearing tumors at three different doses, included 5.104, 105, and 106 cells/mouse with a control consisting of RPMI 1640 media alone. The results showed that dendritic cell therapy inhibited breast cancer tumors in a murine model; however, this effect depended on dendritic cell dose. After 17 days, in the treated groups, tumor size decreased by 43%, 50%, and 87.5% for the doses of 5 and times; 104, 105, and 106 dendritic cells, respectively, while tumor size in the control group decreased by 44%. This result demonstrated that dendritic cell therapy is a promising therapy for breast cancer treatment. [Biomed Res Ther 2014; 1(3.000: 85-92

  19. Individual Cell-Based Models of Tumor-Environment Interactions : Multiple Effects of CD97 on Tumor Invasion

    OpenAIRE

    Galle, Joerg; Sittig, Doreen; Hanisch, Isabelle; Wobus, Manja; Wandel, Elke; Loeffler, Markus; Aust, Gabriela

    2006-01-01

    The presence of scattered tumor cells at the invading front of several carcinomas has clinical significance. These cells differ in their protein expression from cells in central tumor regions as recently shown for the EGF-TM7 receptor CD97. To understand the impact of such heterogeneity on tumor invasion, we investigated tumor cells with modified CD97 expression in vitro and in vivo. Applying an individual cell-based computer model approach, we linked specific cell properties of these cells t...

  20. Opportunities and Challenges for Pancreatic Circulating Tumor Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagrath, Sunitha; Jack, Rhonda M; Sahai, Vaibhav; Simeone, Diane M

    2016-09-01

    Sensitive and reproducible platforms have been developed for detection, isolation, and enrichment of circulating tumor cells (CTCs)-rare cells that enter the blood from solid tumors, including those of the breast, prostate gland, lung, pancreas, and colon. These might be used as biomarkers in diagnosis or determination of prognosis. CTCs are no longer simply detected and quantified; they are now used in ex vivo studies of anticancer agents and early detection. We review what we have recently learned about CTCs from pancreatic tumors, describing advances in their isolation and analysis and challenges to their clinical utility. We summarize technologies used to isolate CTCs from blood samples of patients with pancreatic cancer, including immunoaffinity and label-free physical attribute-based capture. We explain methods of CTC analysis and how findings from these studies might be used to detect cancer at earlier stages, monitor disease progression, and determine prognosis. We review studies that have expanded CTCs for testing of anticancer agents and how these approaches might be used to personalize treatment. Advances in the detection, isolation, and analysis of CTCs have increased our understanding of the dissemination and progression of pancreatic cancer. However, standardization of methodologies and prospective studies are needed for this emerging technology to have a significant effect on clinical care. PMID:27339829

  1. Treatment Options for Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... other parts of the body. The plan for cancer treatment depends on where the NET is found in the pancreas and whether it has spread. The process used to find out if cancer has spread within the pancreas or to other parts of the body is ...

  2. The microtubule stabilizer patupilone counteracts ionizing radiation-induced matrix metalloproteinase activity and tumor cell invasion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ionizing radiation (IR) in combination with microtubule stabilizing agents (MSA) is a promising combined treatment modality. Supra-additive treatment responses might result from direct tumor cell killing and cooperative indirect, tumor cell-mediated effects on the tumor microenvironment. Here we investigated deregulation of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activity, as an important component of the tumor microenvironment, by the combined treatment modality of IR with the clinically relevant MSA patupilone. Expression, secretion and activity of MMPs and related tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs) were determined in cell extracts and conditioned media derived from human fibrosarcoma HT1080 and human glioblastoma U251 tumor cells in response to treatment with IR and the MSA patupilone. Treatment-dependent changes of the invasive capacities of these tumor cell lines were analysed using a Transwell invasion assay. Control experiments were performed using TIMP-directed siRNA and TIMP-directed inhibitory antibodies. Enzymatic activity of secreted MMPs was determined after treatment with patupilone and irradiation in the human fibrosarcoma HT1080 and the human glioblastoma U251 tumor cell line. IR enhanced the activity of secreted MMPs up to 2-fold and cellular pretreatment with low dose patupilone (0.05-0.2 nM) counteracted specifically the IR-induced MMP activity. The cell invasive capacity of HT1080 and U251 cells was increased after irradiation with 2 Gy by 30% and 50%, respectively, and patupilone treatment completely abrogated IR-induced cell invasion. Patupilone did not alter the level of MMP expression, but interestingly, the protein level of secreted TIMP-1 and TIMP-2 was lower after combined treatment than after irradiation treatment alone. Furthermore, siRNA depletion of TIMP-1 or TIMP-2 prevented IR-mediated induction of MMP activity and cell invasion. These results indicate that patupilone counteracts an IR-induced MMP activation process by the

  3. Dissecting Social Cell Biology and Tumors Using Drosophila Genetics

    OpenAIRE

    Pastor-Pareja, José Carlos; Xu, Tian

    2013-01-01

    Cancer was seen for a long time as a strictly cell-autonomous process in which oncogenes and tumor-suppressor mutations drive clonal cell expansions. Research in the past decade, however, paints a more integrative picture of communication and interplay between neighboring cells in tissues. It is increasingly clear as well that tumors, far from being homogenous lumps of cells, consist of different cell types that function together as complex tissue-level communities. The repertoire of interact...

  4. Dielectrophoretic capture and genetic analysis of single neuroblastoma tumor cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erica L Carpenter

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Our understanding of the diversity of cells that escape the primary tumor and seed micrometastases remains rudimentary, and approaches for studying circulating and disseminated tumor cells have been limited by low throughput and sensitivity, reliance on single parameter sorting, and a focus on enumeration rather than phenotypic and genetic characterization. Here we utilize a highly sensitive microfluidic and dielectrophoretic approach for the isolation and genetic analysis of individual tumor cells. We employed fluorescence labeling to isolate 208 single cells from spiking experiments conducted with 11 cell lines, including 8 neuroblastoma cell lines, and achieved a capture sensitivity of 1 tumor cell per 106 white blood cells. Sample fixation or freezing had no detectable effect on cell capture. Point mutations were accurately detected in the whole genome amplification product of captured single tumor cells but not in negative control white blood cells. We applied this approach to capture 144 single tumor cells from 10 bone marrow samples from patients suffering from neuroblastoma. In this pediatric malignancy, high-risk patients often exhibit wide-spread hematogenous metastasis, but access to primary tumor can be difficult or impossible. Here we used flow-based sorting to pre-enrich samples with tumor involvement below 0.02%. For all patients for whom a mutation in the Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase gene had already been detected in their primary tumor, the same mutation was detected in single cells from their marrow. These findings demonstrate a novel, non-invasive, and adaptable method for the capture and genetic analysis of single tumor cells from cancer patients.

  5. Surgical treatment of metastatic vertebral tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozaki,Toshifumi

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Surgical treatment of metastatic spinal cord compression is controversial. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of our current surgical treatments and the use of spinal instrumentation. In this retrospective study covering the years between 1990 and 2006, 100 patients with spinal metastases which were secondary to various cancers underwent posterior and/or anterior decompression with spinal stabilization for the purposes of reduction of pain, and/or to help correct or improve neurological deficits. The group was made up of 60 men and 40 women whose ages ranged from 16 to 83 years (average of 60 years, and the average follow-up period was 14 months. The effect of treatment upon pain relief and neural deficits was assessed, and the cumulative survival rate was calculated by the Kaplan-Meier method. The average surgical time was 185min. This was calculated based on the following times, listed here with the surgery type:178min for posterior surgery;245min for anterior surgery;465 min for combined surgery;and 475min for total en bloc spondylectomy. Average blood loss during surgery was 1,630 ml for posterior surgery, 1,760 ml for anterior surgery, 1,930 ml for combined surgery, and 3,640 ml for total en bloc spondylectomy. Preoperative pain and paralysis were improved by 88% and 53%, respectively. In regards to surgical complications, postoperative epidural hematoma was observed in 2 patients, and instrumentation-related infection was observed in 1. Only 2 patients died within 2 months of surgery. In conclusion, posterior and/or anterior decompression with spinal stabilization is a safe and effective treatment for patients with spinal metastases, and can improve their quality of life.

  6. Tumor-derived IL-35 promotes tumor growth by enhancing myeloid cell accumulation and angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhihui; Liu, Jin-Qing; Liu, Zhenzhen; Shen, Rulong; Zhang, Guoqiang; Xu, Jianping; Basu, Sujit; Feng, Youmei; Bai, Xue-Feng

    2013-03-01

    IL-35 is a member of the IL-12 family of cytokines that is comprised of an IL-12 p35 subunit and an IL-12 p40-related protein subunit, EBV-induced gene 3 (EBI3). IL-35 functions through IL-35R and has a potent immune-suppressive activity. Although IL-35 was demonstrated to be produced by regulatory T cells, gene-expression analysis revealed that it is likely to have a wider distribution, including expression in cancer cells. In this study, we demonstrated that IL-35 is produced in human cancer tissues, such as large B cell lymphoma, nasopharyngeal carcinoma, and melanoma. To determine the roles of tumor-derived IL-35 in tumorigenesis and tumor immunity, we generated IL-35-producing plasmacytoma J558 and B16 melanoma cells and observed that the expression of IL-35 in cancer cells does not affect their growth and survival in vitro, but it stimulates tumorigenesis in both immune-competent and Rag1/2-deficient mice. Tumor-derived IL-35 increases CD11b(+)Gr1(+) myeloid cell accumulation in the tumor microenvironment and, thereby, promotes tumor angiogenesis. In immune-competent mice, spontaneous CTL responses to tumors are diminished. IL-35 does not directly inhibit tumor Ag-specific CD8(+) T cell activation, differentiation, and effector functions. However, IL-35-treated cancer cells had increased expression of gp130 and reduced sensitivity to CTL destruction. Thus, our study indicates novel functions for IL-35 in promoting tumor growth via the enhancement of myeloid cell accumulation, tumor angiogenesis, and suppression of tumor immunity.

  7. Head and Neck Cancer Stem Cells: From Identification to Tumor Immune Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dionne, L K; Driver, E R; Wang, X J

    2015-11-01

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is the most common form of head and neck cancer. Annually, more than half a million individuals are diagnosed with this devastating disease, with increasing incidence in Europe and Southeast Asia. The diagnosis of HNSCC often occurs in late stages of the disease and is characterized by manifestation of a high-grade primary tumor and/or lymph node metastasis, precluding timely management of this deadly cancer. Recently, HNSCC cancer stem cells have emerged as an important factor for cancer initiation and maintenance of tumor bulk. Like normal stem cells, cancer stem cells can undergo self-renewal and differentiation. This unique trait allows for maintenance of the cancer stem cell pool and facilitates differentiation into heterogeneous neoplastic progeny when necessary. Recent studies have suggested coexistence of different cancer stem cell populations within a tumor mass, where the tumor initiation and metastasis properties of these cancer stem cells can be uncoupled. Cancer stem cells also possess resistant phenotypes that evade standard chemotherapy and radiotherapy, resulting in tumor relapse. Therefore, understanding distinctive pathways relating to cancer stem cells will provide insight into early diagnosis and treatment of HNSCC. In this review, we highlight current advances in identifying cancer stem cells, detail the interactions of these cells with the immune system within the tumor niche, and discuss the potential use of immunotherapy in managing HNSCC.

  8. Cell-free circulating tumor DNA in cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Qin, Zhen; Ljubimov, Vladimir A.; Zhou, Cuiqi; Tong, Yunguang; Liang, Jimin

    2016-01-01

    Cancer is a common cause of death worldwide. Despite significant advances in cancer treatments, the morbidity and mortality are still enormous. Tumor heterogeneity, especially intratumoral heterogeneity, is a significant reason underlying difficulties in tumor treatment and failure of a number of current therapeutic modalities, even of molecularly targeted therapies. The development of a virtually noninvasive “liquid biopsy” from the blood has been attempted to characterize tumor heterogeneit...

  9. Treatment of Extra — Abdominal Desmoid Tumors with Chemotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montgomery, Corey [Rockefeller Cancer Institute, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR 72211 (United States); Emory, Cynthia [Wake Forest School of Medicine, Medical Center Blvds, Winston-Salem, NC 27157 (United States); Adams, Sheila [Department of Orthopaedics and Rehabilitation, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Cedars Medical Center, 1400 NW 12th Avenue (R-12), Miami, FL 33136 (United States); Cohen, Jonathan [Division of Psychology, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, 1695 N.W. 9th Ave. (D-29), Miami, FL 33136 (United States); Pitcher, John David [Department of Orthopaedics and Rehabilitation, University of Miami School of Medicine, 1400 NW 12th Avenue (R-12), Miami, FL 33136 (United States); Potter, Benjamin Kyle [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Walter Reed Army Medical Center, 6900 Georgia Avenue North West, Washington, D.C., 20307 (United States); Temple, H. Thomas [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, 1600 N.W. 10th Avenue (R-12), Miami, FL 33136 (United States)

    2011-08-25

    Fibromatosis, or extra-abdominal desmoid tumor, is a benign disease which often has an aggressive clinical course that can be difficult to treat. We performed a retrospective review of 16 patients (12 females and four males) with a mean age of 34.2 years treated with methotrexate and vinblastine for newly diagnosed or recurrent extra-abdominal desmoid tumor. The mean age of our patient cohort was 34.2 years (range 11–70), and the mean tumor size was 11.5 cm (range 2.5–21.2 cm). The mean duration of therapy was 12 months with an average follow-up of 43 months (range 1–149 months). Fourteen of 16 patients demonstrated a clinical response to treatment. Eight of 14 patients demonstrated a radiologic decrease in tumor size. Only one patient progressed on therapy. Six patients developed recurrent symptoms after discontinuation of treatment. Chemotherapy-related symptoms including neutropenia, nausea, and vomiting were common and observed in most patients, however these side effects were mild and transient. Five patients developed peripheral neuropathy that prompted a change from vinblastine to vinorelbine during treatment. One potentially life-threatening complication (pneumocystis pneumonia) occurred which was diagnosed early and successfully treated. The use of methotrexate and vinblastine/vinorelbine in the management of fibromatosis appears to be an effective treatment with minimal treatment-related side effects.

  10. Treatment of Extra — Abdominal Desmoid Tumors with Chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Thomas Temple

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Fibromatosis, or extra-abdominal desmoid tumor, is a benign disease which often has an aggressive clinical course that can be difficult to treat. We performed a retrospective review of 16 patients (12 females and four males with a mean age of 34.2 years treated with methotrexate and vinblastine for newly diagnosed or recurrent extra-abdominal desmoid tumor. The mean age of our patient cohort was 34.2 years (range 11–70, and the mean tumor size was 11.5 cm (range 2.5–21.2 cm. The mean duration of therapy was 12 months with an average follow-up of 43 months (range 1–149 months. Fourteen of 16 patients demonstrated a clinical response to treatment. Eight of 14 patients demonstrated a radiologic decrease in tumor size. Only one patient progressed on therapy. Six patients developed recurrent symptoms after discontinuation of treatment. Chemotherapy-related symptoms including neutropenia, nausea, and vomiting were common and observed in most patients, however these side effects were mild and transient. Five patients developed peripheral neuropathy that prompted a change from vinblastine to vinorelbine during treatment. One potentially life-threatening complication (pneumocystis pneumon